Science.gov

Sample records for active-duty military personnel

  1. 2011 Health Related Behaviors Survey of Active Duty Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    with about 1.4% reporting illicit drug, synthetic cannabis , or inhalant use in the past 12 months.1  About one-quarter (24.9%) of active duty personnel...drug use began by asking about the use of a variety of illicit drugs such as marijuana, cocaine, and heroin. Two substances, synthetic cannabis and...of any “illicit” drug use. Since survey administration in 2011, many of the compounds found in synthetic cannabis have been classified by the military

  2. Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors Among Active Duty Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    Assessment Program (DLAP), which incorporates the active duty health behaviors study and expands the scope to include the National Guard and Reserves, as...well as other special studies . Findings from the program provide information on the fitness of the force, including estimates of alcohol, drug, and...first to include Coast Guard personnel. The study has three broad aims for active duty military personnel: continue to assess the nature, extent, and

  3. Prospective post-traumatic stress disorder symptom trajectories in active duty and separated military personnel.

    PubMed

    Porter, Ben; Bonanno, George A; Frasco, Melissa A; Dursa, Erin K; Boyko, Edward J

    2017-06-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a serious mental illness that affects current and former military service members at a disproportionately higher rate than the civilian population. Prior studies have shown that PTSD symptoms follow multiple trajectories in civilians and military personnel. The current study examines whether the trajectories of PTSD symptoms of veterans separated from the military are similar to continuously serving military personnel. The Millennium Cohort Study is a population-based study of military service members that commenced in 2001 with follow-up assessments occurring approximately every 3 years thereafter. PTSD symptoms were assessed at each time point using the PTSD Checklist. Latent growth mixture modeling was used to compare PTSD symptom trajectories between personnel who separated (veterans; n = 5292) and personnel who remained in military service (active duty; n = 16,788). Four distinct classes (resilient, delayed-onset, improving, and elevated-recovering) described PTSD symptoms trajectories in both veterans and active duty personnel. Trajectory shapes were qualitatively similar between active duty and veterans. However, within the resilient, improving, and elevated recovering classes, the shapes were statistically different. Although the low-symptom class was the most common in both groups (veterans: 82%; active duty: 87%), veterans were more likely to be classified in the other three classes (in all cases, p < 0.01). The shape of each trajectory was highly similar between the two groups despite differences in military and civilian life.

  4. Spice: A New Legal Herbal Mixture Abused by Young Active Duty Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Spice: A New “Legal” Herbal Mixture Abused by Young Active Duty Military Personnel Vikhyat S. Bebarta, MD Sasha Ramirez, DO Shawn M. Varney, MD...ABSTRACT. Spice is an herbal mixture smoked for euphoria and mixed with synthetic cannabinoids that are undetected on urine drug screens. Spice use has...drug paraphernalia. Spice is a new herbal mixture that is increasingly used in the military. Expected effects are similar to cannabis, but may include

  5. Dental utilization by spouses of active duty U.S. military personnel.

    PubMed

    Chisick, M C; Poindexter, F R; York, A K

    1998-03-01

    This study explores dental utilization and access barriers to dental care for spouses of active duty U.S. military personnel as reported by their military sponsor. It also compares dental utilization of spouses and civilians. The data, collected using self-administered questionnaires between April 1994 and January 1995, are from 5,732 Army, Air Force, Navy, and Marine personnel with nonmilitary spouses. Comparative civilian data are from the most recent (1985-1986) U.S. oral health survey of working adults. Results show that dental utilization of military spouses parallels that of civilians. Cost was the most commonly cited barrier to dental care for spouses. Logistic regression results show that the likelihood of a spouse having seen a dentist within the past year is influenced by insurance status, sex, branch of service of sponsor, and rank of sponsor. Insurance status is the strongest predictor of dental utilization for spouses.

  6. Gender differences in the expression of PTSD symptoms among active duty military personnel.

    PubMed

    Hourani, Laurel; Williams, Jason; Bray, Robert; Kandel, Denise

    2015-01-01

    This study examined gender differences in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and symptom factors in the total U.S. active duty force. Data were drawn from the 2008 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors among Active Duty Military Personnel including 17,939 men and 6751 women from all services. The results indicated that women expressed more distress than men across almost all the symptoms on the PTSD Checklist except for hypervigilance. Women also scored significantly higher on all four factors examined: Re-experiencing, Avoidance, Emotionally Numb, Hyperarousal. More women than men were distressed by combat experiences that involved some type of violence, such as being wounded, witnessing or engaging in acts of cruelty, engaging in hand-to-hand combat, and, to a lesser extent, handling dead bodies. Men who had been sexually abused had a greater number of symptoms and were consistently more distressed than women on individual symptoms and symptom factors.

  7. Effects of combat deployment on risky and self-destructive behavior among active duty military personnel.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Cynthia J; Stander, Valerie A; McWhorter, Stephanie K; Rabenhorst, Mandy M; Milner, Joel S

    2011-10-01

    Although research has documented negative effects of combat deployment on mental health, few studies have examined whether deployment increases risky or self-destructive behavior. The present study addressed this issue. In addition, we examined whether deployment effects on risky behavior varied depending on history of pre-deployment risky behavior, and assessed whether psychiatric conditions mediated effects of deployment on risky behavior. In an anonymous survey, active duty members of the U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Navy (N = 2116) described their deployment experiences and their participation in risky recreational activities, unprotected sex, illegal drug use, self-injurious behavior, and suicide attempts during three time frames (civilian, military pre-deployment, and military post-deployment). Respondents also reported whether they had problems with depression, anxiety, or PTSD during the same three time frames. Results revealed that risky behavior was much more common in civilian than in military life, with personnel who had not deployed, compared to those who had deployed, reporting more risky behavior and more psychiatric problems as civilians. For the current time period, in contrast, personnel who had deployed (versus never deployed) were significantly more likely to report both risky behavior and psychiatric problems. Importantly, deployment was associated with increases in risky behavior only for personnel with a pre-deployment history of engaging in risky behavior. Although psychiatric conditions were associated with higher levels of risky behavior, psychiatric problems did not mediate associations between deployment and risky behavior. Implications for understanding effects of combat deployment on active duty personnel and directions for future research are discussed.

  8. Prevalence of Perceived Stress and Mental Health Indicators Among Reserve-Component and Active-Duty Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Marian E.; Hourani, Laurel L.; Bray, Robert M.; Williams, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We examined stress levels and other indicators of mental health in reservists and active-duty military personnel by deployment status. Methods. We used data from the Department of Defense Health-Related Behaviors surveys, which collect comprehensive, population-based data for reserve and active-duty forces. Data were collected from 18 342 reservists and 16 146 active-duty personnel. Results. Overall, with adjustment for sociodemographic and service differences, reservists reported similar or less work and family stress, depression, and anxiety symptoms than did active-duty personnel. However, reservists who had been deployed reported higher rates of suicidal ideation and attempts than did active-duty personnel who had been deployed and higher rates of post-traumatic stress disorder symptomatology than did any active-duty personnel and reservists who had not been deployed. The highest rates of suicidal ideation and attempts were among reservists who had served in theaters other than Iraq and Afghanistan. Conclusions. Our results suggest that deployment has a greater impact on reservists than on active-duty members, thus highlighting the urgent need for services addressing reservists’ unique postdeployment mental health issues. Also, deployment to any theater, not only Iraq or Afghanistan, represents unique threats to all service members’ mental well-being. PMID:22571709

  9. Incidence of Norovirus-Associated Medical Encounters among Active Duty United States Military Personnel and Their Dependents

    PubMed Central

    Rha, Brian; Lopman, Benjamin A.; Alcala, Ashley N.; Riddle, Mark S.; Porter, Chad K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Norovirus is a leading cause of gastroenteritis episodes and outbreaks in US military deployments, but estimates of endemic disease burden among military personnel in garrison are lacking. Methods Diagnostic codes from gastroenteritis-associated medical encounters of active duty military personnel and their beneficiaries from July 1998–June 2011 were obtained from the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center. Using time-series regression models, cause-unspecified encounters were modeled as a function of encounters for specific enteropathogens. Model residuals (representing unexplained encounters) were used to estimate norovirus-attributable medical encounters. Incidence rates were calculated using population data for both active duty and beneficiary populations. Results The estimated annual mean rate of norovirus-associated medically-attended visits among active duty personnel and their beneficiaries was 292 (95% CI: 258 to 326) and 93 (95% CI: 80 to 105) encounters per 10,000 persons, respectively. Rates were highest among beneficiaries <5 years of age with a median annual rate of 435 (range: 318 to 646) encounters per 10,000 children. Norovirus was estimated to cause 31% and 27% of all-cause gastroenteritis encounters in the active duty and beneficiary populations, respectively, with over 60% occurring between November and April. There was no evidence of any lag effect where norovirus disease occurred in one population before the other, or in one beneficiary age group before the others. Conclusions Norovirus is a major cause of medically-attended gastroenteritis among non-deployed US military active duty members as well as in their beneficiaries. PMID:27115602

  10. Association among functional-movement ability, fatigue, sedentary time, and fitness in 40 years and older active duty military personnel.

    PubMed

    Kennedy-Armbruster, Carol; Evans, Ellen M; Sexauer, Lisa; Peterson, James; Wyatt, William

    2013-12-01

    Identifying potential modifiable determinants of functional movement ability and fatigue may inform efforts to maintain constant physical readiness, especially in active duty military over 40 years of age, who are largely sedentary throughout their work day. The primary aim of this study was to determine the associations among conventional fitness measures (body composition, flexibility, and strength), sedentary behavior (sitting time), functional movement ability, and fatigue in military personnel. Volunteer active duty personnel 40 years of age and older (n = 569 males; n = 121 females; mean ± SD for total sample = 44.5 ± 4.1 years) were assessed for adiposity (%Fat), strength, flexibility, self-reported sitting time, perceived fatigue using the fatigue severity scale, and functional movement ability using the functional movement screening criteria. Greater flexibility was associated with better functional movement screening scores (r = 0.34, p < 0.05), and waist circumference and %Fat were inversely related to function (r = -0.26 and -0.21, p < 0.05). Furthermore, less sitting time (p < 0.001) was associated with less fatigue. Our data suggest that exercise training, reductions in daily sitting time, and weight management may be viable intervention targets to enhance functional movement ability and reduce fatigue in 40+ year old active duty military personnel.

  11. Stress, mental health, and job performance among active duty military personnel: findings from the 2002 Department of Defense Health-Related Behaviors Survey.

    PubMed

    Hourani, Laurel L; Williams, Thomas V; Kress, Amii M

    2006-09-01

    This study examined the extent to which high levels of occupational and family stress were associated with mental health problems and productivity loss among active duty military personnel. We analyzed data from the 2002 Department of Defense Survey of Health-Related Behaviors among Military Personnel, which provided extensive population-based information on 12,756 active duty personnel in all branches of the military worldwide. Military personnel reported higher levels of stress at work than in their family life. The personnel reporting the highest levels of occupational stress were those 25 or younger, those who were married with spouses not present, and women. Personnel with high levels of stress had significantly higher rates of mental health problems and productivity loss than those with less stress. We recommend that prevention and intervention efforts geared toward personnel reporting the highest levels of stress be given priority for resources in this population.

  12. Pilot Study to determine interest of adult civilian dependants of active duty military personnel in participation in a weight control program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adult civilian dependents of active duty military personnel (ADMP) may play a central role in influencing the home food environment and the risk of overweight and obesity in American Warfighters and military families. However, there is no information on whether this group would be receptive to weigh...

  13. Spice: a new "legal" herbal mixture abused by young active duty military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Ramirez, Sasha; Varney, Shawn M

    2012-01-01

    Spice is an herbal mixture smoked for euphoria and mixed with synthetic cannabinoids that are undetected on urine drug screens. Spice use has increased in the military because it is considered legal and is not detected on urine drug screen. The authors describe 3 cases of Spice use in military members. Case 1: 19-year-old male presented with paranoia, agitation, and visual hallucinations after smoking the "Space" brand of Spice. Urine thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were negative. Case 2: 19-year-old female presented with sedation, amnesia, and agitation. She smoked the "Space" brand. She was alert within 3 hours of arrival. Urine GC-MS detected levorphanol. Case 3: 23-year-old male presented with delusions and paranoia. He complained of "monsters on his back." His symptoms improved in the emergency department (ED). His urine TLC and GC-MS were negative. All cases were admitted and evaluated by a toxicologist; all 3 had their history corroborated by family or friends, or with drug paraphernalia. Spice is a new herbal mixture that is increasingly used in the military. Expected effects are similar to cannabis, but may include more paranoia and hallucinations, and may differ for each brand.

  14. Effects of Combat Deployment on Risky and Self-Destructive Behavior Among Active Duty Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    risky behavior in an attempt to create an “ adrenaline rush” similar to those that they experienced in combat (Vaughan, 2006). Increases in risky...mediators, including habituation to pain and fear (Joiner’s, 2005; Killgore et al., 2008) aswell as desire to recapture the excitement or “ adrenaline ...in risk-taking are meaningfully influenced by the number or duration of deployments experienced. Because the present findings indicated that personnel

  15. New Sources of Active Duty Military Personnel: The Prior Service Accessions Pool.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    reverse aide it necessry a"d identify by block nmrber) See Reverse Side DO I J’AN75, 1473 EDITION OF INOV 48 1SOSOLETE UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY...nurse 926 91E 91 Dental Dental hygienist 081 Specialist 94B 94 Food Service Cook, cafeteria 912 Specialist Food service worker 916 95B 95 Military police...houising, subs idized food prices, etc. ). It t heit ad ’justs the new f igure for di fferences in the tax treatment o~f m ili tary an~d cmvilIian

  16. Assessment of Chiropractic Treatment for Low Back Pain, Military Readiness and Smoking Cessation in Military Active Duty Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    protocol changes. The amendments were routed through all 5 IRBs (RAND, Palmer, NHP, NMCSD, and WRNMMC) prior to site implementation. Samueli ...Chiropractic care on reaction and response times. CONTACT INFORMATION: Ian Coulter, PhD ACT Principal Investigator RAND Corp Samueli Chair in...Chiropractic Research Ph: (563)885-5150 Email: christine.goertz@palmer.edu Joan Walter, JD, PA ACT Co-Investigator Samueli Institute/VP, Military

  17. The Role of Natural Support Systems in the Post-deployment Adjustment of Active Duty Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Janet A; Olson, Jonathan; Perkins, Daniel F; Travis, Wendy J; Ormsby, LaJuana

    2015-09-01

    This study examined the relations among three different types of naturally occurring social support (from romantic partners, friends and neighbors, and unit leaders) and three indices of service member well-being (self reports of depressive symptoms, satisfaction with military life, and perceptions of unit readiness) for service members who did and did not report negative experiences associated with military deployment. Data were drawn from the 2011 Community Assessment completed anonymously by more than 63,000 USAF personnel. Regression analyses revealed that higher levels of social support was associated with better outcomes regardless of negative deployment experiences. Evidence of moderation was also noted, with all forms of social support moderating the impact of negative deployment experiences on depressive symptoms and support from unit leaders moderating the impact of negative deployment experience on satisfaction with military life. No moderation was found for perceptions of unit readiness. Subgroup analyses revealed slightly different patterns for male and female service members, with support providing fewer moderation effects for women. These findings may have value for military leaders and mental health professionals working to harness the power of naturally occurring relationships to maximize the positive adjustment of service members and their families. Implications for practices related to re-integration of post-deployment military personnel are discussed.

  18. The relationship between heavy alcohol use and work productivity loss in active duty military personnel: a secondary analysis of the 1995 Department of Defense Worldwide Survey.

    PubMed

    Fisher, C A; Hoffman, K J; Austin-Lane, J; Kao, T C

    2000-05-01

    This cross-sectional study examines the association between heavy alcohol use among active duty military personnel and five work productivity loss events that may have an adverse effect on military performance and readiness. Data for light (N = 3,147) and heavy (N = 2,242) drinkers, categorized by gender and pay grade, were obtained from the 1995 Department of Defense Worldwide Survey. Drinking classification was predefined using a standard algorithm that factored quantity and frequency of wine, beer, and liquor consumed. The relative risks of experiencing a productivity loss event at a particular level and 95% confidence intervals were calculated by applying the Mantel-Haenszel method after adjusting for age. The relative risks for increased self-reported lateness, leaving early, low performance, and on-the-job injury were all higher for heavy drinkers than for light drinkers. This association between the heavy-drinking population and four of five work productivity loss events indicates that prevention programs should target all personnel.

  19. Pilot study to determine interest of adult civilian dependents of active duty military personnel in participation in a weight control program.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, Asma; Roberts, Susan B; Young, Andrew J; McGraw, Susan; Dallal, Gerard E; Das, Sai Krupa

    2014-03-01

    Adult civilian dependents of active duty military personnel (ADMP) may play a central role in influencing the home food environment and the risk of overweight and obesity in American Warfighters and military families. However, there is no information on whether this group would be receptive to weight control programs. We conducted a survey to determine the level of interest of adult civilian dependents of ADMP in participating in a group weight control program. Subjects were a convenience sample of 191 adult civilian dependents of ADMP (94% women, 6% men) based in Massachusetts and aged 33.8 ± 8.4 years, body mass index 25.5 ± 5.5 kg/m(2). Overall, there was a significant effect of body mass index on interest in program participation (p = 0.004). Eighty five percent of overweight participants and 100% of obese participants reported being Moderately Likely or Very Likely to participate in a provided weight control program. In overweight and obese survey respondents there was no significant effect of ADMP rank on interest in program participation (p = 0.34). These findings suggest that overweight and obese adult civilian dependents of ADMP may be very receptive targets for programs to control overweight and obesity in military families.

  20. Military Personnel: DOD Needs More Complete Data on Active-Duty Servicemembers Use of Food Assistance Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    programs. GAO reviewed information on government and charitable food assistance programs and policies . GAO also interviewed DOD and service officials at...quality-of-life matters.7 USD (P&R) is the Secretary’s senior policy advisor on recruitment, career development, and pay and benefits for military...Manpower Data Center, Military Community and Family Policy , and others. USD (P&R) responsibilities include, but are not limited to, developing policies

  1. Past Childhood Abuse and Present Alcohol Use as Risk Factors for Suicidal Ideation and Suicide Attempt in United States Military Active Duty Personnel, 2008

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    Abuse and Alcoholism, Research Findings on Underage Drinking and the Minimum Legal Drinking Age, 28 Aug 2008, URL: http://www.niaaa.nih.gov/AboutNIAAA...a notable rate of current heavy drinking among members. Prior studies in the general population demonstrated associations between childhood abuse...of active duty military revealed a high prevalence of members with past childhood abuse and a notable rate of current heavy drinking among members

  2. 1999 Survey of Active Duty Personnel: Statistical Methodology Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    6218 Ask for report by ADA 386 288 DMDC Report No. 2000-010 September 2000 1999 SURVEY OF ACTIVE DUTY PERSONNEL: STATISTICAL METHODOLOGY REPORT...STATISTICAL METHODOLOGY REPORT Executive Summary This report describes the sampling design, sample selection, estimation procedures, and the missing data

  3. Trends in the incidence of physician-diagnosed mild traumatic brain injury among active duty U.S. military personnel between 1997 and 2007.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Kenneth L; Marshall, Stephen W; Sturdivant, Rodney X; Lincoln, Andrew E

    2012-05-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) has been described as the most common form of traumatic brain injury within military populations; however, few epidemiologic studies have examined incidence rates for mTBI in this population. The objective of this study was to examine trends in the incidence of mTBI among active-duty U.S. service members between 1997 and 2007. Specifically, we were interested in evaluating trends in the incidence rates in relation to the initiation of combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. A retrospective cohort study was conducted utilizing data extracted from the Defense Medical Surveillance System to identify all incident cases of mTBI within the study population. The primary outcome of interest was the incidence rate of mTBI per 1000 person-years. Multivariable Poisson regression was used to analyze the data. There were 98,012 mTBI cases and 14,956,955 person-years of follow-up, for an overall incidence rate of 6.55 (95% CI 6.51,6.59) per 1000 person-years. There was a steady increase in the mTBI rate over time. The average change in the mTBI rate was 8.5% (95% CI 8.2%,8.8%) per year; however, the rate rose dramatically in the last 2 years of the study period. Overall, for 2006-2007 versus 1997-2005, the rate ratio was 1.61 (95% CI 1.58,1.65). The greatest increase in the rate of mTBI was observed among those serving in Iraq, who experienced a 38.4% (95% CI 35.4%,41.1%) annual increase in new cases. The observed increase in the incidence of mTBI in this population has significant policy implications in terms of allocating appropriate health care resources.

  4. Health promotion in active-duty military women with children.

    PubMed

    Agazio, Janice G; Ephraim, Paula M; Flaherty, Norma B; Gurney, Cynthia A

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which selected demographic characteristics, definition of health, perceived health status, perceived self-efficacy, and resources are related to the health promoting behaviors of active-duty women with children and to describe qualitatively the experience of being an active-duty mother. Grounded in Pender's (1996) Health Promotion Model, this study used methodological triangulation to test a hypothesized model. A sample of 141 active-duty women with children using military health services participated. Resource availability and commitment were key components of being successful at balancing home and work demands.

  5. Chronic pain management in the active-duty military

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamison, David; Cohen, Steven P.

    2012-06-01

    As in the general population, chronic pain is a prevalent and burdensome affliction in active-duty military personnel. Painful conditions in military members can be categorized broadly in terms of whether they arise directly from combat injuries (gunshot, fragmentation wound, blast impact) or whether they result from non-combat injuries (sprains, herniated discs, motor vehicle accidents). Both combat-related and non-combat-related causes of pain can further be classified as either acute or chronic. Here we discuss the state of pain management as it relates to the military population in both deployed and non-deployed settings. The term non-battle injury (NBI) is commonly used to refer to those conditions not directly associated with the combat actions of war. In the history of warfare, NBI have far outstripped battle-related injuries in terms not only of morbidity, but also mortality. It was not until improvements in health care and field medicine were applied in World War I that battle-related deaths finally outnumbered those attributed to disease and pestilence. However, NBI have been the leading cause of morbidity and hospital admission in every major conflict since the Korean War. Pain remains a leading cause of presentation to military medical facilities, both in and out of theater. The absence of pain services is associated with a low return-to-duty rate among the deployed population. The most common pain complaints involve the low-back and neck, and studies have suggested that earlier treatment is associated with more significant improvement and a higher return to duty rate. It is recognized that military medicine is often at the forefront of medical innovation, and that many fields of medicine have reaped benefit from the conduct of war.

  6. 7 CFR 1400.213 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Military personnel. 1400.213 Section 1400.213... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.213 Military personnel. If a person is called to active duty in the military before a determination is made that the person...

  7. 7 CFR 1400.213 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Military personnel. 1400.213 Section 1400.213... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.213 Military personnel. If a person is called to active duty in the military before a determination is made that the person...

  8. 7 CFR 1400.213 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Military personnel. 1400.213 Section 1400.213... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.213 Military personnel. If a person is called to active duty in the military before a determination is made that the person...

  9. 7 CFR 1400.213 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Military personnel. 1400.213 Section 1400.213... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.213 Military personnel. If a person is called to active duty in the military before a determination is made that the person...

  10. 7 CFR 1400.213 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Military personnel. 1400.213 Section 1400.213... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.213 Military personnel. If a person is called to active duty in the military before a determination is made that the person...

  11. Intimate partner violence among military veterans and active duty servicemen.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Amy D; Panuzio, Jillian; Taft, Casey T

    2005-11-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious public health problem that has received increased attention in the military. We review existing literature regarding prevalence, consequences, correlates, and treatment of IPV perpetration among military veterans and active duty servicemen. Rates of IPV across these military populations range from 13.5% to 58%, with considerably lower rates obtained among samples not selected on the basis of psychopathology. For both military veterans and active duty servicemen, IPV results in significant victim injury and negative child outcomes, and problematic substance use, depression, and antisocial characteristics represent psychiatric correlates of IPV perpetration. For veterans, posttraumatic stress disorder also is an important correlate that largely accounts for the relationship between combat exposure and IPV perpetration. Additional correlates include military service factors, relationship adjustment, childhood trauma, and demographic factors. The only experimentally controlled IPV treatment study indicates that standard treatments are ineffective for active duty servicemen. Further research is needed to advance the development of etiological models of IPV among military populations, to determine whether such models necessarily differ from those developed among civilians, and to rigorously test IPV interventions tailored to the specific characteristics of these individuals.

  12. Impact of childhood maltreatment on physical health-related quality of life in U.S. active duty military personnel and combat veterans.

    PubMed

    Aversa, Laura H; Lemmer, Jennifer; Nunnink, Sarah; McLay, Robert N; Baker, Dewleen G

    2014-08-01

    Previous studies have found an association between childhood maltreatment (CM) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and to a lesser extent have considered whether psychiatric symptoms may explain the relationship. This study aimed to further our understanding of the link between CM and HRQoL by testing whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or depressive symptoms mediate the relationship between childhood maltreatment and physical HRQoL. Mediation models were examined in a sample of male Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) active duty and combat veterans (n=249). PTSD and depressive symptoms mediated the relationship between CM and overall physical HRQoL, as well as participation in daily activities due to physical health, bodily pain, and social functioning. Mediation of the relationship between childhood maltreatment and physical and social functioning by depression and PTSD symptoms may lend support to neurobiological hypotheses that childhood maltreatment sensitizes the nervous system and after repeated trauma may lead to the development of psychiatric symptoms, which have a major impact on morbidity and mortality.

  13. Associations between sleep difficulties and risk factors for cardiovascular disease in veterans and active duty military personnel of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts.

    PubMed

    Ulmer, Christi S; Bosworth, Hayden B; Germain, Anne; Lindquist, Jennifer; Olsen, Maren; Brancu, Mira; Beckham, Jean C

    2015-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests that sleep disturbance may play an important role in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Despite the prevalence of sleep complaints among service members of recent military conflicts, few studies have examined associations between sleep and risk factors for CVD in this population. Symptom checklist items regarding distress about "trouble falling asleep" and "restless/disturbed sleep" were used as proxies for sleep onset and maintenance difficulties to examine these associations in US military service members of recent conflicts. Veterans having both sleep onset and maintenance difficulties had greater odds of being a current smoker and having psychiatric symptoms and diagnoses. Increased odds of a self-reported hypertension diagnosis and elevated systolic blood pressure were also found in certain subsets of this sample. Findings highlight the need for greater recognition of sleep difficulties as a CVD risk factor in a population known to be at increased risk for this condition.

  14. Perceived deprivation in active duty military nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Julie A; Fallacaro, Michael D; Pellegrini, Joseph E

    2009-02-01

    There is a shortage of military Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs). Relative deprivation is a perception of unfairness due to discrepancies between what one has and what one could or should have that is dependent on feelings (subjective data) and facts (objective data). Feelings of relative deprivation could contribute to the military CRNA shortage. The purposes of this study were to measure relative deprivation in active-duty military CRNAs and explore variables that correlate with relative deprivation. The descriptive, correlational study was conducted using a self-administered survey sent to 435 active-duty Army, Navy, and Air Force CRNAs. Surveys were distributed to subjects by mail and could be answered by mail or by secured website. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Analysis of the data revealed a calculated response rate of 57.7%. There was no significant correlation (P < .05) between years as a CRNA, military pay, promotion opportunity, or scope of practice/autonomy and relative deprivation. Correlations of the psychological factors "wanting" and "deserving" with relative deprivation were significant (P < .001). Further research is indicated to identify definitive factors that can be modified to improve feelings of deprivation as they relate to retention and recruitment of military CRNAs.

  15. 42 CFR 31.14 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, AND FORMER LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE Provisions Applicable to Personnel of Former Lighthouse Service § 31.14 Application for treatment; active duty personnel. An applicant for medical...

  16. 42 CFR 31.14 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, AND FORMER LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE Provisions Applicable to Personnel of Former Lighthouse Service § 31.14 Application for treatment; active duty personnel. An applicant for medical...

  17. 42 CFR 31.14 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, AND FORMER LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE Provisions Applicable to Personnel of Former Lighthouse Service § 31.14 Application for treatment; active duty personnel. An applicant for medical...

  18. 42 CFR 31.14 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, AND FORMER LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE Provisions Applicable to Personnel of Former Lighthouse Service § 31.14 Application for treatment; active duty personnel. An applicant for medical...

  19. 42 CFR 31.14 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, AND FORMER LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE Provisions Applicable to Personnel of Former Lighthouse Service § 31.14 Application for treatment; active duty personnel. An applicant for medical...

  20. Deployment stressors and posttraumatic stress symptomatology: comparing active duty and National Guard/Reserve personnel from Gulf War I.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Dawne S; Samper, Rita E; King, Daniel W; King, Lynda A; Martin, James A

    2008-02-01

    The increased use of National Guard and Reserve (NG/R) military personnel in current conflicts raises the question of whether deployment experiences and their associations with posttraumatic stress symptomatology differ for active duty and NG/R military personnel. To date, very few studies are available on this topic. Moreover, it is unclear whether the impact of military status differs for women and men. We addressed these research issues in a sample of 311 female and male Gulf War I veterans. Several differences were observed in deployment stressor exposures and results based on differential associations generally suggested more negative impacts of deployment experiences for active duty women and NG/R men. The potential role of unit cohesion in explaining these findings is discussed.

  1. Caffeine Use among Active Duty Navy and Marine Corps Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Knapik, Joseph J.; Trone, Daniel W.; McGraw, Susan; Steelman, Ryan A.; Austin, Krista G.; Lieberman, Harris R.

    2016-01-01

    Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) indicate 89% of Americans regularly consume caffeine, but these data do not include military personnel. This cross-sectional study examined caffeine use in Navy and Marine Corps personnel, including prevalence, amount of daily consumption, and factors associated with use. A random sample of Navy and Marine Corps personnel was contacted and asked to complete a detailed questionnaire describing their use of caffeine-containing substances, in addition to their demographic, military, and lifestyle characteristics. A total of 1708 service members (SMs) completed the questionnaire. Overall, 87% reported using caffeinated beverages ≥1 time/week, with caffeine users consuming a mean ± standard error of 226 ± 5 mg/day (242 ± 7 mg/day for men, 183 ± 8 mg/day for women). The most commonly consumed caffeinated beverages (% users) were coffee (65%), colas (54%), teas (40%), and energy drinks (28%). Multivariable logistic regression modeling indicated that characteristics independently associated with caffeine use (≥1 time/week) included older age, white race/ethnicity, higher alcohol consumption, and participating in less resistance training. Prevalence of caffeine use in these SMs was similar to that reported in civilian investigations, but daily consumption (mg/day) was higher. PMID:27735834

  2. Caffeine Use among Active Duty Navy and Marine Corps Personnel.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Joseph J; Trone, Daniel W; McGraw, Susan; Steelman, Ryan A; Austin, Krista G; Lieberman, Harris R

    2016-10-09

    Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) indicate 89% of Americans regularly consume caffeine, but these data do not include military personnel. This cross-sectional study examined caffeine use in Navy and Marine Corps personnel, including prevalence, amount of daily consumption, and factors associated with use. A random sample of Navy and Marine Corps personnel was contacted and asked to complete a detailed questionnaire describing their use of caffeine-containing substances, in addition to their demographic, military, and lifestyle characteristics. A total of 1708 service members (SMs) completed the questionnaire. Overall, 87% reported using caffeinated beverages ≥1 time/week, with caffeine users consuming a mean ± standard error of 226 ± 5 mg/day (242 ± 7 mg/day for men, 183 ± 8 mg/day for women). The most commonly consumed caffeinated beverages (% users) were coffee (65%), colas (54%), teas (40%), and energy drinks (28%). Multivariable logistic regression modeling indicated that characteristics independently associated with caffeine use (≥1 time/week) included older age, white race/ethnicity, higher alcohol consumption, and participating in less resistance training. Prevalence of caffeine use in these SMs was similar to that reported in civilian investigations, but daily consumption (mg/day) was higher.

  3. Efficacy of a Tobacco Quitline in Active Duty Military and TRICARE Beneficiaries: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Klesges, Robert C; Ebbert, Jon O; Talcott, G Wayne; Thomas, Fridtjof; Richey, Phyllis A; Womack, Catherine; Hryshko-Mullen, Ann; Oh, John

    2015-08-01

    A higher proportion of military personnel than civilians smoke cigarettes. Few randomized trials of tobacco use interventions have been conducted in the U.S. military. We evaluated the efficacy of a tobacco quitline (QL) in 1298 active duty military personnel, their dependents, reservists, and retirees who smoke cigarettes. Participants were randomized to either a proactive (counselor-initiated) or reactive (participant-initiated) QL intervention for 8 weeks. The proactive condition included up to an 8-week supply of free nicotine replacement therapy, and the reactive condition included a 2-week supply. The primary outcome was 12-month smoking abstinence. The enrolled population was predominantly affiliated with the Air Force and Army. At the end of treatment, proactive treatment was associated with a greater odds of both prolonged (44.22% vs. 24.96%; odds ratio [OR] = 2.4, P < 0.0001) and 7-day point prevalence (49.92% vs. 28.20%; OR = 2.5, P < 0.0001) smoking abstinence, a difference that was maintained for prolonged smoking abstinence at 12 months (22.03% vs. 13.41%; OR = 1.8, P < 0.0001). Our findings provide evidence that a proactive QL with nicotine replacement therapy is highly efficacious among Air Force and Army active duty and TRICARE beneficiaries and would provide an effective telephonic treatment option for this population of smokers.

  4. Validity of the Virtual Reality Stroop Task (VRST) in active duty military.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Christina M; Reger, Greg M; Edwards, Joseph; Rizzo, Albert A; Courtney, Christopher G; Parsons, Thomas D

    2013-01-01

    Virtual environments provide the ability to systematically deliver test stimuli in simulated contexts relevant to real world behavior. The current study evaluated the validity of the Virtual Reality Stroop Task (VRST), which presents test stimuli during a virtual reality military convoy with simulated combat threats. Active duty Army personnel (N = 49) took the VRST, a customized version of the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM)-Fourth Edition TBI Battery (2007) that included the addition of the ANAM Stroop and Tower tests, and traditional neuropsychological measures, including the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System version of the Color-Word Interference Test. Preliminary convergent and discriminant validity was established, and performance on the VRST was significantly associated with computerized and traditional tests of attention and executive functioning. Valid virtual reality cognitive assessments open new lines of inquiry into the impact of environmental stimuli on performance and offer promise for the future of neuropsychological assessments used with military personnel.

  5. Barriers and Facilitators of Breastfeeding for Primiparous Active Duty Military Mothers: A Qualitative Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-05-11

    allowing more rapid involution of the uterus and decreased postpartum bleeding. Amenorrhea caused by breastfeeding results in less menstrual blood loss in...BARRIERS AND FACILITATORS OF BREASTFEEDING FOR PRIMIPAROUS ACTIVE DUTY MILITARY MOTHERS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY Kristine Markley Bristow APPROVED... BREASTFEEDING FOR PRIMIPAROUS ACTIVE DUTY MILITARY MOTHERS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY” beyond brief excerpts is with the permission of the copyright owner, and

  6. Barriers and Facilitators of Breasteeding for Primiparous Active Duty Military Mothers: A Qualitative Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-05-01

    Breastfeeding increases oxytocin levels, allowing more rapid involution of the uterus and decreased postpartum bleeding. Amenorrhea caused by breastfeeding ...BARRIERS AND FACILITATORS OF BREASTFEEDING FOR PRIMIPAROUS ACTIVE DUTY MILITARY MOTHERS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY Kristine Markley Bristow APPROVED...FACILITATORS OF BREASTFEEDING FOR PRIMIPAROUS ACTIVE DUTY MILITARY MOTHERS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  7. Motor vehicle crashes among active duty U.S. Army personnel, 1999 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Rossen, Lauren M; Pollack, Keshia M; Canham-Chervak, Michelle; Canada, Sara; Baker, Susan P

    2011-09-01

    In the U.S. Army, motor vehicle crashes (MVCs), both privately owned and military, are a leading cause of injury and death. Few studies have described the distribution and trends of MVCs among Army personnel, which may have been impacted by current military missions. This descriptive study of risk factors and select outcomes is from safety report data maintained by the U.S. Army Combat Readiness/Safety Center on 11,469 active duty Army personnel involved in MVCs, 1999-2006. The majority (66%) of Soldiers in MVCs were in military vehicles within the continental United States (68%). The average age of individuals involved in MVCs was 27.7 years old. Males had a consistently higher MVC rate than females. The average cost per MVC related to property damage and injuries was $36,039 and $24,038, respectively. Results suggest a need for additional exploration of MVCs involving Army vehicles, which were the most common and among the most costly.

  8. Suicides in Active-Duty Enlisted Navy Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawahara, Yoshito; Palinkas, Lawrence A.

    1991-01-01

    Compared completed suicides among U.S. Navy enlisted personnel from 1974-85 to suicides in U.S. general population and in U.S. Army. Navy suicide rate, lowest of three groups, increased between 1976 and 1983, in contrast to national and Army rates. Young white males in apprentice/recruit and blue-collar occupations had highest rates of suicide in…

  9. Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military: Top-Line Estimates for Active-Duty Service Members from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    SEXUAL ASSAULT AND SEXUAL HARASSMENT IN THE U.S. MILITARY Top-Line Estimates for Active -Duty Service Members from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace...SUBTITLE Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military: Top-Line Estimates for Active -Duty Service Members from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace...and Tables Figures 1. Estimated Percentage of Active -Duty Service Men and Women Who Experienced Unwanted Sexual Contact in the Past Year, as

  10. Active Duty Female Military’s Experience of Fear, Embarrassment, and Distress During Pelvic Examinations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    1 1. Sexual Violence While on Active Duty...............................................2 2. Sexual Violence Prior to Military...Service .........................................3 3. History of Sexual Violence Associated With Physical and Mental Health Issues...experience of one or more of the following: (1) verbal and/or physical sexual harassment; (2) attempted sexual assault, or the attempt to force sexual

  11. Satisfaction with Military Dental Care by Active Duty Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    problem and may contribute to reducing the morale similar score in Table II would indicate a satisfaction level be- of soldiers as well . As Marine Corps...ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) In fall 1992, a random, worldwide sample of 5,474 enlisted personnel and 4,036 officers was surveyed on satisfaction with twenty...composite overall satisfaction score using factor analysis. Composite scores were regressed on demographics, dental utilization, and access .barriers

  12. Tabulations of Responses from the 2000 Survey of Reserve Component Personnel: Volume 5. Civilian Work, Economic Issues, Full-Time Active Duty National Guard/Reserve, and Military Life

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-01

    data to create the single measure of program used in Tables 43/45/165.1-3. (The same measure of program is also one of five variables by which most...Achieving Training Objectives -- Quality of Personnel in Lower-Grade Drill Positions: By Reserve Component...46m.2 Problem for Unit/Organization in Achieving Training Objectives -- Quality of Personnel in Lower-Grade Drill

  13. They Self-Ignited: Adult Student Journeys to an Associate's Degree While Active Duty Military or Military Spouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bibus, Lindsay Pohl

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study was undertaken in order to gain an understanding of the lived experiences of adult students and how they made meaning of their journey. To that end, through in-depth interviews with twenty participants, the study inquired into the journeys to an associate's degree of adult students who were also active duty military service…

  14. Health-related impact of deployment extensions on spouses of active duty army personnel.

    PubMed

    SteelFisher, Gillian K; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Blendon, Robert J

    2008-03-01

    This study examined problems pertaining to the health and well-being of Army spouses during deployment, comparing those whose experienced extensions of their partners' deployments with those whose partners returned home on time or early. It used data from a 2004 survey of 798 spouses of active duty personnel. Controlling for demographic and deployment characteristics, spouses who experienced extensions fared worse on an array of measures, including mental well-being (e.g., feelings of depression), household strains (e.g., problems with household and car maintenance), and some areas of their jobs (having to stop work or to work fewer hours). There were no statistically significant differences regarding problems pertaining to their overall health, marriage, other work issues, finances, relationships with Army families, or safety. However, spouses who experienced extensions were more likely to perceive the Army negatively during deployment. These findings suggest that deployment extensions may exacerbate certain problems and frustrations for Army spouses.

  15. Overweight and obesity in military personnel: sociodemographic predictors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tracey J; Marriott, Bernadette P; Dotson, Laura; Bathalon, Gaston P; Funderburk, Leslee; White, Alan; Hadden, Louise; Young, Andrew J

    2012-07-01

    In the United States, nationally representative civilian studies have shown that BMI is associated with select sociodemographic characteristics. Active-duty military personnel are not included in these surveys and the persistence of these associations in military personnel is unknown. Data from the worldwide, representative 2002 and 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Surveys of Health-Related Behaviors Among Active Duty Military Personnel were used to assess the prevalence of overweight and obesity and, the association of BMI with sociodemographic characteristics. The final response bases included 12,756 (2002) and 16,146 (2005) personnel. Results indicated that the combined prevalence of overweight and obesity in military personnel increased to an all-time high in 2005 (60.5%) with higher prevalence of obesity in 2005 compared to 2002 (12.9% vs. 8.7, respectively, P ≤ 0.01). Holding other variables constant, regression analysis indicated that women were significantly less likely than men to be overweight or obese in both survey years (P ≤ 0.0001), which is contrary to civilian data. Similar to civilian data, the prevalence of obesity was significantly associated with increased age, black or Hispanic/Latino race/ethnicity, and being married (P ≤ 0.01). US military personnel are not immune to the US obesity epidemic. Demographic characteristics associated with being overweight should be considered when developing military-sponsored weight management programs.

  16. Military Deployments and Mental Health Utilization Among Spouses of Active Duty Service Members.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Todd C; Kum, Hye-Chung; Dabney, Alan; Wells, Rebecca

    2016-10-01

    Since the onset of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan attention has increased on the importance of mental health with military service members. An integral component, although far less studied, are the ties between mental health and military spouses. Military deployments place considerable stress on military families. This study analyzed the mental health utilization of military spouses of active duty service members assigned to an aircraft carrier between 2011 and 2014. A negative binomial generalized estimating equation was used to examine the rate of change in mental health utilization over time against various deployment phases. Associations emerged between select deployment phases (i.e., deployment 1, between deployments, deployment 2) with increases in mental health utilization ranging between 12% and 20% for military spouses. This study demonstrated, for military spouses, the in between deployment phase has associations with mental health utilization rates similar to actual deployed periods. As a result, military leaders should continue to monitor the well-being of their service members' families throughout all deployment phases.

  17. PTSD among military personnel.

    PubMed

    Creamer, Mark; Wade, Darryl; Fletcher, Susan; Forbes, David

    2011-04-01

    Although symptoms characteristic of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been noted in military personnel for many centuries, it was not until 1980 that the disorder was formally recognized and became the focus of legitimate study. This paper reviews our current state of knowledge regarding the prevalence and course of this complex condition in past and present members of the defence forces. Although rates vary across conflicts and countries, there is no doubt that PTSD affects substantial numbers of personnel and results in considerable impairment in functioning and quality of life. The paper goes on to discuss recent attempts to build resilience and to promote adjustment following deployment, noting that there is little evidence at this stage upon which to draw firm conclusions. Finally, effective treatment for PTSD is reviewed, with particular reference to the challenges posed by this population in a treatment setting.

  18. Dental utilization of active duty/previous active duty US military: a cross-sectional analysis of the 2010 Behavior and Risk Surveillance Survey

    PubMed Central

    Sambamoorthi, Usha; Jurevic, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study is to understand dental utilization of 1) individuals serving/having served in active duty in the U.S. military as compared with the general public and 2) individuals who are currently serving as compared with individuals who are no longer active duty, but have been in active duty within the previous year. Methods The Behavior and Risk Surveillance Survey, 2010, was used in cross-sectional analyses to determine the comparisons. Chi square and multivariable logistic regression analyses were applied. Results 70.7% of participants who had served/currently serving had a dental visit within the previous 12 months; 69.9% of the general public reported a dental visit (p = 0.0265). 69.8% of participants who had served/currently serving had a dental hygiene visit within the previous 12 months and 68.1% of the general public reported a dental hygiene visit (p <0.0001). The adjusted odds ratio (AOR) for participants who had served/currently serving vs. the general public was 1.10 (95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.05, 1.16; p<0.0001) for dental visits and 1.11 (95%CI 1.05, 1.17; p<0.0001) for dental hygiene visits. Conclusion Participants who are serving or have served were more likely to have any dental visit and dental hygiene visit than the general public; but the results were not substantively important. PMID:26086028

  19. [Morbidity in draft military personnel].

    PubMed

    Mukhametzhanov, A M; Smagulov, N K

    2015-01-01

    Military service activity appeared to influence health state of military personnel. Body strain at initial stages of the service, connected with stress situation, affects general body resistance and manifests in higher general morbidity level with transitory disablement that decreases with adaptation. Based on normalized intensity parameters, the equation enables to ease a procedure of evaluation and forecast of transitory disablement morbidity in draft military personnel.

  20. Test-retest reliability of four computerized neurocognitive assessment tools in an active duty military population.

    PubMed

    Cole, Wesley R; Arrieux, Jacques P; Schwab, Karen; Ivins, Brian J; Qashu, Felicia M; Lewis, Steven C

    2013-11-01

    Computerized neurocognitive assessment tools (NCATs) are increasingly used for baseline and post-concussion assessments. To date, NCATs have not demonstrated strong test-retest reliabilities. Most studies have used non-military populations and different methodologies, complicating the determination of the utility of NCATs in military populations. The test-retest reliability of four NCATs (Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics 4 [ANAM4], CNS-Vital Signs, CogState, and Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Test [ImPACT]) was investigated in a healthy active duty military sample. Four hundred and nineteen Service Members were randomly assigned to take one NCAT and 215 returned after approximately 30 days for retest. Participants deemed to have inadequate effort during one or both testing sessions, according to the NCATs scoring algorithms, were removed from analyses. Each NCAT had at least one reliability score (intraclass correlation) in the "adequate" range (.70-.79), only ImPACT had one score considered "high" (.80-.89), and no scores met "very high" criteria (.90-.99). However, overall test-retest reliabilities in four NCATs in a military sample are consistent with reliabilities reported in the literature and are lower than desired for clinical decision-making.

  1. Precipitating circumstances of suicide among active duty U.S. Army personnel versus U.S. civilians, 2005-2010.

    PubMed

    Logan, Joseph E; Skopp, Nancy A; Reger, Mark A; Gladden, Matt; Smolenski, Derek J; Floyd, C Faye; Gahm, Gregory A

    2015-02-01

    To help understand suicide among soldiers, we compared suicide events between active duty U.S. Army versus civilian decedents to identify differences and inform military prevention efforts. We linked 141 Army suicide records from 2005 to 2010 to National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) data. We described the decedents' military background and compared their precipitators of death captured in NVDRS to those of demographically matched civilian suicide decedents. Both groups commonly had mental health and intimate partner precipitating circumstances, but soldier decedents less commonly disclosed suicide intent.

  2. Precipitating Circumstances of Suicide among Active Duty U.S. Army Personnel Versus U.S. Civilians, 2005–2010

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Joseph E; Skopp, Nancy A; Reger, Mark A; Gladden, Matt; Smolenski, Derek J; Floyd, C Faye; Gahm, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    To help understand suicide among soldiers, we compared suicide events between active duty U.S. Army versus civilian decedents to identify differences and inform military prevention efforts. We linked 141 Army suicide records from 2005 to 2010 to National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) data. We described the decedents’ military background and compared their precipitators of death captured in NVDRS to those of demographically matched civilian suicide decedents. Both groups commonly had mental health and intimate partner precipitating circumstances, but soldier decedents less commonly disclosed suicide intent. PMID:25093259

  3. Reference values for performance on the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics V3.0 in an active duty military sample.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Dennis L; Bleiberg, Joseph; Roebuck-Spencer, Tresa; Cernich, Alison N; Schwab, Karen; Ivins, Brian; Salazar, Andres M; Harvey, Sally C; Brown, Fred H; Warden, Deborah

    2006-10-01

    The Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM) is a computerized measure of processing speed, cognitive efficiency, and memory. This study describes performance and psychometric properties of ANAM in an active duty, healthy military sample (N = 2,371) composed primarily of young (18-46 years) adult males. Rarely have neuropsychological reference values for use with individuals in the military been derived from a large, active duty military population, and this is the first computerized neuropsychological test battery with military-specific reference values. Although these results do not provide demographically corrected, formal normative data, they provide reference points for neuropsychologists and other health care providers who are using ANAM data in research or clinical settings, with patients of comparable demographics to the present sample.

  4. Protein supplementation in U.S. military personnel.

    PubMed

    Pasiakos, Stefan M; Montain, Scott J; Young, Andrew J

    2013-11-01

    Protein supplements (PSs) are, after multivitamins, the most frequently consumed dietary supplement by U.S. military personnel. Warfighters believe that PSs will improve health, promote muscle strength, and enhance physical performance. The estimated prevalence of regular PS use by military personnel is nearly 20% or more in active-duty personnel, which is comparable to collegiate athletes and recreationally active adults, but higher than that for average U.S. civilians. Although the acute metabolic effects of PS ingestion are well described, little is known regarding the benefits of PS use by warfighters in response to the metabolic demands of military operations. When dietary protein intake approaches 1.5 g · kg(-1) · d(-1), and energy intake matches energy expenditure, the use of PSs by most physically active military personnel may not be necessary. However, dismounted infantry often perform operations consisting of long periods of strenuous physical activity coupled with inadequate dietary energy and protein intake. In these situations, the use of PSs may have efficacy for preserving fat-free mass. This article reviews the available literature regarding the prevalence of PS use among military personnel. Furthermore, it highlights the unique metabolic stressors affecting U.S. military personnel and discusses potential conditions during which protein supplementation might be beneficial.

  5. Rationale for Spiritually Oriented Cognitive Processing Therapy for Moral Injury in Active Duty Military and Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Harold G; Boucher, Nathan A; Oliver, Rev John P; Youssef, Nagy; Mooney, Scott R; Currier, Joseph M; Pearce, Michelle

    2017-02-01

    Wartime experiences have long been known to cause ethical conflict, guilt, self-condemnation, difficulty forgiving, loss of trust, lack of meaning and purpose, and spiritual struggles. "Moral injury" (MI) (also sometimes called "inner conflict") is the term used to capture this emotional, cognitive, and behavioral state. In this article, we provide rationale for developing and testing Spiritually Oriented Cognitive Processing Therapy, a version of standard cognitive processing therapy for the treatment of MI in active duty and veteran service members (SMs) with posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms who are spiritual or religious (S/R). Many SMs have S/R beliefs that could increase vulnerability to MI. Because the injury is to deeply held moral standards and ethical values and often adversely affects spiritual beliefs and worldview, we believe that those who are S/R will respond more favorably to a therapy that directly targets this injury from a spiritually oriented perspective. An evidence-based treatment for MI in posttraumatic stress disorder that not only respects but also utilizes SMs' spiritual beliefs/behaviors may open the door to treatment for many S/R military personnel.

  6. Repeat infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae among active duty U.S. Army personnel: a population-based case-series study.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Christian T; Wurapa, Eyako K; Sateren, Warren B; Morris, Sara M; Hollingsworth, Bruce P; Sanchez, Jose L

    2016-11-24

    Little information is known on the rate of repeat gonorrhea infection among U.S. military personnel. We analyzed all gonorrhea cases reported to the Defense Medical Surveillance System during 2006-2012 to determine the rate of repeat infection. During the seven-year study period, 17,602 active duty U.S. Army personnel with a first incident gonorrhea infection were reported. Among the 4987 women with a first gonorrhea infection, 14.4% had at least one repeat infection. Among the 12,615 men with a first gonorrhea infection, 13.7% had at least one repeat infection. Overall, the rate of repeat gonorrhea infection was 44.5 and 48.9 per 1000 person-years for women and men, respectively. Service members aged 17-19 years (hazard ratio [HR] for women = 1.51; HR for men = 1.71), African-American personnel (HR for women = 1.26; HR for men = 2.17), junior enlisted personnel (HR for women = 2.64; HR for men = 1.37), and those with one year or less of service (HR for women = 1.23; HR for men = 1.37) were at higher risk of repeat infection. The findings from this study highlight the need to develop targeted prevention initiatives including education, counseling, and retesting to prevent gonorrhea reinfections among U.S. Army personnel.

  7. Active-duty military service members’ visual representations of PTSD and TBI in masks

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Melissa S.; Kaimal, Girija; Gonzaga, Adele M. L.; Myers-Coffman, Katherine A.; DeGraba, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Active-duty military service members have a significant risk of sustaining physical and psychological trauma resulting in traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Within an interdisciplinary treatment approach at the National Intrepid Center of Excellence, service members participated in mask making during art therapy sessions. This study presents an analysis of the mask-making experiences of service members (n = 370) with persistent symptoms from combat- and mission-related TBI, PTSD, and other concurrent mood issues. Data sources included mask images and therapist notes collected over a five-year period. The data were coded and analyzed using grounded theory methods. Findings indicated that mask making offered visual representations of the self related to individual personhood, relationships, community, and society. Imagery themes referenced the injury, relational supports/losses, identity transitions/questions, cultural metaphors, existential reflections, and conflicted sense of self. These visual insights provided an increased understanding of the experiences of service members, facilitating their recovery.

  8. Development of a multilevel prevention program for improved relationship functioning in active duty military members.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Richard E; Smith Slep, Amy M; Sabathne, C; Eckardt Erlanger, Ann C; Hsu, Teresa T; Snyder, Douglas K; Balderrama-Durbin, Christina; Cigrang, Jeffrey A; Talcott, Gerald W; Tatum, JoLyn; Baker, Monty T; Cassidy, Daniel; Sonnek, Scott M

    2015-06-01

    The relationships and families of active duty (AD) service members have been tremendously strained by deployments and high operations' tempo. This study involves the first steps in developing a multilevel approach to preventing relationship problems that integrates universal, selective, and indicated prevention/intervention. Such an approach has tremendous empirical support for parenting problems, but no similar program exists for couple problems. We conducted two studies with U.S. Air Force Security Forces members. Study 1 elicited the target population's topics of highest interest. For almost all topics, 70% to 95% of participants who desired information reported being underserved by current prevention offerings (i.e., not receiving needed information). Using the top topics generated in Study 1, we developed prevention information/action planning sheets on 18 relationship issues. In Study 2, we had AD members who gave feedback on the form and content of the sheets. Overall, AD members believed that the sheets were moderately to very useful and were presented well, had pithy but comprehensive information and conveyed the content well. Results imply that a multilevel approach may be a useful complement to formal services in meeting underserved military members' needs and that further research and development of this dissemination vector for evidence-based information is warranted.

  9. Contact dermatitis in military personnel.

    PubMed

    Dever, Tara T; Walters, Michelle; Jacob, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Military personnel encounter the same allergens and irritants as their civilian counterparts and are just as likely to develop contact dermatitis from common exposures encountered in everyday life. In addition, they face some unique exposures that can be difficult to avoid owing to their occupational duties. Contact dermatitis can be detrimental to a military member's career if he or she is unable to perform core duties or avoid the inciting substances. An uncontrolled contact dermatitis can result in the member's being placed on limited-duty (ie, nondeployable) status, needing a job or rate change, or separation from military service. We present some common causes of contact dermatitis in military personnel worldwide and some novel sources of contact dermatitis in this population that may not be intuitive.

  10. Understanding diet and modeling changes in the omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid composition of U.S. garrison foods for active duty personnel.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Bernadette P; Yu, Karina; Majchrzak-Hong, Sharon; Johnson, Jeremiah; Hibbeln, Joseph R

    2014-11-01

    Research indicates that dietary omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are important in reducing the risk of mental illness. We used the DoD Survey of Health Related Behaviors among Active Duty Military Personnel (HRBS) to assess current military dietary patterns and meal locations. We used the Lands Equation to model PUFAs in a sample Garrison diet and the nutritional impact of substitution of foods higher in omega-3 PUFAs and lower in omega-6 PUFAs on tissue composition. The military diet was very poor quality compared to 2010 Healthy People Guidelines. A representative Garrison diet does not meet our estimated healthy n-3 HUFA intake at 3.5 g/d, corresponding with a tissue composition of 60% n-3 in HUFA (i.e., 40% n-6 in HUFA). Substitution of n-3 rich eggs, poultry, pork and other food commodities, combined with use on low linoleic acid oils, may contribute significantly to attaining healthier n-6/n-3 proportions in the tissue.

  11. Military Personnel Exhibit a Lower Presence of Obesity than the General U.S. Adult Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    307 Rankinen T & Bouchard C (2004) Fitness alters the associations of BMI and 308 waist circumference with total and abdominal fat. Obesity...either group. 152 Active duty military personnel are not included in the U.S. CDC national surveys 153 [e.g., NHANES, Behavioral Risk Factor

  12. Motivating Treatment Seeking and Behavior Change by Untreated Military Personnel Abusing Alcohol or Drugs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    ABSTRACT Conducting the efficacy trial to evaluate the utility of a Motivational Enhancement Therapy intervention to attract untreated active duty...SUBJECT TERMS Alcohol abuse, substance abuse, early intervention , motivational enhancement therapy 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...enhancement intervention (MET) for substance abusing military personnel who are not currently in substance abuse treatment . The intervention is

  13. 42 CFR 31.5 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR CERTAIN PERSONNEL OF THE COAST GUARD, NATIONAL OCEAN SURVEY, PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, AND FORMER LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE Provisions Applicable to Coast Guard, National Ocean... the case of National Ocean Survey personnel, shall be signed by an officer of the National...

  14. 42 CFR 31.5 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR CERTAIN PERSONNEL OF THE COAST GUARD, NATIONAL OCEAN SURVEY, PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, AND FORMER LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE Provisions Applicable to Coast Guard, National Ocean... the case of National Ocean Survey personnel, shall be signed by an officer of the National...

  15. 42 CFR 31.5 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR CERTAIN PERSONNEL OF THE COAST GUARD, NATIONAL OCEAN SURVEY, PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, AND FORMER LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE Provisions Applicable to Coast Guard, National Ocean... the case of National Ocean Survey personnel, shall be signed by an officer of the National...

  16. 42 CFR 31.5 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR CERTAIN PERSONNEL OF THE COAST GUARD, NATIONAL OCEAN SURVEY, PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, AND FORMER LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE Provisions Applicable to Coast Guard, National Ocean... the case of National Ocean Survey personnel, shall be signed by an officer of the National...

  17. 42 CFR 31.5 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR CERTAIN PERSONNEL OF THE COAST GUARD, NATIONAL OCEAN SURVEY, PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, AND FORMER LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE Provisions Applicable to Coast Guard, National Ocean... the case of National Ocean Survey personnel, shall be signed by an officer of the National...

  18. Pathways of Risk and Resilience: Impact of a Family Resilience Program on Active-Duty Military Parents.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, William R; Lester, Patricia; Milburn, Norweeta; Woodward, Kirsten; Stein, Judith

    2016-12-01

    Over the past decade, studies into the impact of wartime deployment and related adversities on service members and their families have offered empirical support for systemic models of family functioning and a more nuanced understanding of the mechanisms by which stress and trauma reverberate across family and partner relationships. They have also advanced our understanding of the ways in which families may contribute to the resilience of children and parents contending with the stressors of serial deployments and parental physical and psychological injuries. This study is the latest in a series designed to further clarify the systemic functioning of military families and to explicate the role of resilient family processes in reducing symptoms of distress and poor adaptation among family members. Drawing upon the implementation of the Families Overcoming Under Stress (FOCUS) Family Resilience Program at 14 active-duty military installations across the United States, structural equation modeling was conducted with data from 434 marine and navy active-duty families who participated in the FOCUS program. The goal was to better understand the ways in which parental distress reverberates across military family systems and, through longitudinal path analytic modeling, determine the pathways of program impact on parental distress. The findings indicated significant cross-influence of distress between the military and civilian parents within families, families with more distressed military parents were more likely to sustain participation in the program, and reductions in distress among both military and civilian parents were significantly mediated by improvements in resilient family processes. These results are consistent with family systemic and resilient models that support preventive interventions designed to enhance family resilient processes as an important part of comprehensive services for distressed military families.

  19. 14 CFR 13.21 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Military personnel. 13.21 Section 13.21... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.21 Military personnel. If a report made... civilian employee of the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10...

  20. 49 CFR 1503.407 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Military personnel. 1503.407 Section 1503.407... Assessment of Civil Penalties by TSA § 1503.407 Military personnel. If a report made under this part... the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. chapter...

  1. 14 CFR 13.21 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Military personnel. 13.21 Section 13.21... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.21 Military personnel. If a report made... civilian employee of the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10...

  2. 49 CFR 1503.407 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Military personnel. 1503.407 Section 1503.407... Assessment of Civil Penalties by TSA § 1503.407 Military personnel. If a report made under this part... the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. chapter...

  3. 49 CFR 1503.407 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Military personnel. 1503.407 Section 1503.407... Assessment of Civil Penalties by TSA § 1503.407 Military personnel. If a report made under this part... the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. chapter...

  4. 49 CFR 1503.407 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Military personnel. 1503.407 Section 1503.407... Assessment of Civil Penalties by TSA § 1503.407 Military personnel. If a report made under this part... the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. chapter...

  5. 49 CFR 1503.407 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Military personnel. 1503.407 Section 1503.407... Assessment of Civil Penalties by TSA § 1503.407 Military personnel. If a report made under this part... the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. chapter...

  6. 14 CFR 13.21 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Military personnel. 13.21 Section 13.21... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.21 Military personnel. If a report made... civilian employee of the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10...

  7. 14 CFR 13.21 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Military personnel. 13.21 Section 13.21... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.21 Military personnel. If a report made... civilian employee of the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10...

  8. 14 CFR 13.21 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Military personnel. 13.21 Section 13.21... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.21 Military personnel. If a report made... civilian employee of the Department of Defense who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10...

  9. The Effect of Career Assessments and Follow-Up Counseling on Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy (CDMSE) among Active-Duty Coast Guard Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    This study (a) examined career decision-making self-efficacy (CDMSE) differences across gender, age, military grade, level of education, previous career assessments, previous career counseling, and currently attending college, and (b) examined the effect of career assessments with follow-up counseling on CDMSE among active-duty Coast Guard…

  10. [Hip replacement in military personnel].

    PubMed

    Maksimov, I B; Paniushin, K A; Brizhan', L K; Buriachenko, B P; Varfolomeev, D I; Mimanchev, O V

    2014-01-01

    Hip joint diseases and injuries are common for orthopedic pathology among military personnel. Hip replacement is one of the most frequent operations. Authors evaluated hip replacement in 136 servicemen treated at the center of traumatology and orthopedics of Burdenko General Military Clinical Hospital of the Ministry of Defense of Russia in 2010-2013. On the basis of the conducted analysis the main disease groups were revealed, peculiarities of pathology among this category of patients. Authors proposed surgical doctrine for the treatment of this contingent. Effective surgical treatment, in particular, hip replacement surgery, conducted with the use of the proposed principles, as a rule, fully functionally cured patients and contributes to return them in the system that contributes to the strengthening of defensibility of the country.

  11. Military unit support, postdeployment social support, and PTSD symptoms among active duty and National Guard soldiers deployed to Iraq.

    PubMed

    Han, Sohyun C; Castro, Frank; Lee, Lewina O; Charney, Meredith E; Marx, Brian P; Brailey, Kevin; Proctor, Susan P; Vasterling, Jennifer J

    2014-06-01

    Research suggests that military unit support and community postdeployment social support are associated with fewer PTSD symptoms following military deployment. This study extended prior research by examining the associations among predeployment unit support and PTSD symptoms before Iraq deployment as well as unit support, PTSD symptoms, and postdeployment social support after deployment among 835 U.S. Army and 173 National Guard soldiers. Multiple regression analyses indicated that predeployment unit support was not significantly associated with postdeployment PTSD severity in either group of soldiers, whereas higher unit support during deployment was significantly associated with lower postdeployment PTSD severity among active duty soldiers only. Among both groups, higher levels of postdeployment social support were associated with lower levels of postdeployment PTSD symptom severity. These findings suggest that postdeployment social support is a particularly strong buffer against postdeployment PTSD symptoms among both groups of soldiers whereas the effects of unit support may be limited.

  12. Military Personnel: DOD Needs to Take Further Actions to Prevent Sexual Assault During Initial Military Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    sexual assaults within the military still go unreported. Based on the results of a DOD 2012 survey of active duty servicemembers, DOD estimated that...about 26,000 active duty 2Department of Defense, Department of Defense Annual Report on Sexual Assault in the Military: Fiscal Year 2013 (Apr. 22...to estimate the past year prevalence of unwanted sexual contact among active duty servicemembers. Although the survey term “unwanted sexual contact

  13. Occupational Impact of Multilevel Cervical Disease Treated With Hybrid Cervical Disc Arthroplasty in Active Duty Military Population.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Andrew; Herzog, Josh; Caram, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    This article evaluates the techniques, results, and complications of hybrid cervical disc arthroplasty in a high-demand military population. Emphasis is on the occupational impact and return to duty outcomes. This article is a case series with prospective follow-up of 30 hybrid cervical disc arthroplasty patients from the authors' institution. Average follow-up was 16.1 months. Average patient age was 39.7 years. Noncommissioned officer was the most common military rank. Cervical disc arthroplasty at C5/6 with fusion at C6/7 was the most common procedure (21/30). All classifications of military occupational specialty were represented. A total of 24/30 (80%) patients returned to duty (RTD) and 24/24 (100%) of RTD patients reported relief (postoperative improvement) compared with 4/6 (66.7%) medical evaluation board patients. Average RTD time was 15.6 weeks. All RTD patients maintained their preoperative military occupational specialty. Hybrid cervical disc arthroplasty has the potential to provide relief and return military patients to preoperative active duty status.

  14. An Exploratory Study of Educational Participation Issues Confronting Active Duty Air Force Personnel Assigned to McConnell Air Force Base

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Terry L., Sr.

    2012-01-01

    Serving in the military today is a very specialized and intense experience, with the use of technology requiring dedicated training and education. The military provides much of this specialized training, but also recognizes the value of higher education for its personnel. Our military personnel are supporting our country daily and their increased…

  15. Obesity classification in military personnel: A comparison of body fat, waist circumference, and body mass index measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate obesity classifications from body fat percentage (BF%), body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference (WC). A total of 451 overweight/obese active duty military personnel completed all three assessments. Most were obese (men, 81%; women, 98%) using National...

  16. Posttraumatic stress disorder in veterans and military personnel: epidemiology, screening, and case recognition.

    PubMed

    Gates, Margaret A; Holowka, Darren W; Vasterling, Jennifer J; Keane, Terence M; Marx, Brian P; Rosen, Raymond C

    2012-11-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a psychiatric disorder that affects 7-8% of the general U.S. population at some point during their lifetime; however, the prevalence is much higher among certain subgroups, including active duty military personnel and veterans. In this article, we review the empirical literature on the epidemiology and screening of PTSD in military and veteran populations, including the availability of sensitive and reliable screening tools. Although estimates vary across studies, evidence suggests that the prevalence of PTSD in deployed U.S. military personnel may be as high as 14-16%. Prior studies have identified trauma characteristics and pre- and posttrauma factors that increase risk of PTSD among veterans and military personnel. This information may help to inform prevention and screening efforts, as screening programs could be targeted to high-risk populations. Large-scale screening efforts have recently been implemented by the U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs. Given the prevalence and potential consequences of PTSD among veterans and active duty military personnel, development and continued evaluation of effective screening methods is an important public health need.

  17. Suicide Deaths of Active-Duty U.S. Military and Omega-3 Fatty-Acid Status: A Case-Control Comparison

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Deaths e1J Clin Psychiatry Suicide Deaths of Active-Duty US Military and Omega -3 Fatty - Acid Status: A Case-Control Comparison Michael D. Lewis, MD...factors. Objective: To determine whether deficiencies of neuroactive, highly unsaturated omega -3 essential fatty acids (n-3 HUFAs), in particular...U.S. Military And Omega -3 Fatty - Acid Status: A Case-Control Comparison 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  18. Risk Factors for Lower Extremity Tendinopathies in Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Brett D.; Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis; Seelig, Amber D.; Jacobson, Isabel G.; Boyko, Edward J.; Smith, Besa; Ryan, Margaret A.K.; Gackstetter, Gary D.; Smith, Tyler C.; Bagnell, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Background: Overuse injuries have a significant impact on United States military service members, but research to date has been limited in its ability to assess occupational and behavioral risk factors. Hypothesis/Purpose: To prospectively identify risk factors for the development of lower extremity tendinopathy and plantar fasciitis in United States military personnel. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Baseline data from the Millennium Cohort Study, a long-term observational cohort of military personnel, were utilized. Service members were enrolled in the cohort in 2001, 2004, and 2007. A total of 80,106 active-duty personnel were followed over 1 year for the development of patellar tendinopathy, Achilles tendinopathy, and plantar fasciitis. Regression analyses were used to estimate significant associations between each tendinopathy, plantar fasciitis, and demographic, behavioral, and occupational characteristics. Results: Using medical records, 450 cases of Achilles tendinitis, 584 cases of patellar tendinopathy, and 1228 cases of plantar fasciitis were identified. Recent deployment was associated with an increased risk for developing plantar fasciitis (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-1.56). Moderate weekly alcohol consumption was marginally associated with an increased risk for Achilles tendinopathy (AOR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.00-1.76). Overweight or obese individuals were more likely to develop Achilles tendinopathy and plantar fasciitis. Conclusion: Lower extremity tendinopathies and plantar fasciitis are common among military service members, and this study identified several modifiable risk factors for their occurrence. These potential risk factors could serve as the focus for future preventive and intervention studies. PMID:26535232

  19. 78 FR 43796 - Indebtedness of Military Personnel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 513 Indebtedness of Military Personnel AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Final rule; removal. SUMMARY: This action removes regulations concerning indebtedness of military.... Program responsibility has been transferred to the Defense Finance and Accounting Services (DFAS),...

  20. Optimal Compensating Wages for Military Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrell, Scott E.; West, James E.

    2005-01-01

    The current U.S. military pay structure offers inequitable and inefficient wages across locations. Military personnel are paid less competitive wages in high-cost and/or low-amenity locations compared to low-cost and/or high-amenity locations. This pay system results in unequal reenlistment rates across locations, which leads to production…

  1. Factors influencing a health promoting lifestyle in spouses of active duty military.

    PubMed

    Padden, Diane L; Connors, Rebecca A; Posey, Sheena M; Ricciardi, Richard; Agazio, Janice G

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the factors influencing the health promoting behaviors (HPBs) of military spouses. Pender's Health Promotion Model provided the theoretical framework guiding this study. One hundred twelve female spouses were surveyed regarding their perceived health status, perceived stress, self-efficacy, social support, and participation in HPBs. Perceived health status, self-efficacy, social support, and HPBs were positively related, whereas perceived stress was negatively related. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed perceived stress and social support to be predictive of an overall health promoting lifestyle (HPLPII), with the full model explaining 49.7% of the variance.

  2. Agency is associated with decreased emotional distress and suicidal ideation in military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Craig J; Andreski, Sarah Rae; McNaughton-Cassill, Mary; Osman, Augustine

    2014-01-01

    Suicides in the U.S. military continue to rise at a rapid rate. Identification of protective factors that reduce risk for suicidal thoughts and behaviors among military personnel are therefore needed. Agency--the sense that one is competent, effective, and in control of one's life--has shown to reduce the effects of hopelessness and emotional distress on suicidal thoughts and attempts in non-military populations. The current study explores the association of agency with suicidal ideation in a sample (n = 273) of active duty Air Force Security Forces personnel. Results of generalized regression modeling suggest that agency is directly associated with decreased emotional distress and severity of suicidal ideation, but does not moderate the effect of emotional distress on suicidal ideation.

  3. The Full Cost of Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    Direct costs are clearly linked to the compensation of individuals  Indirect costs cover overhead expenses not tracked to individuals  Current vs...service  In the Defense Department budget vs. in the budget of other government departments 1 Current Direct Costs of Military Personnel Basic...I N S T I T U T E F O R D E F E N S E A N A L Y S E S The Full Cost of Military Personnel Stanley A. Horowitz INSTITUTE FOR DEFENSE ANALYSES

  4. Lateral Entry of Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    completion is accounted for in the training costs used here.) There is evidence that people with post -secondary education, the most likely lateral entrants...between worker and ocupation . Untrained entrants typically sign on for a specialty with little or no experience. -, 18 x, .. The military bears the risk

  5. Military Personnel: DOD Needs to Establish a Strategy and Improve Transparency over Reserve and National Guard Compensation to Manage Significant Growth in Cost

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Comments and Our Evaluation 37 Appendix I Updated Active Duty Compensation Costs 40 Appendix II Scope and Methodology 43 Appendix III Pay and...Integrated Military Human Resources System, to consolidate their personnel and pay systems. This consolidation may improve transparency by...Establish a Strategy and Improve Transparency over Reserve and National Guard Compensation to Manage Significant Growth in Cost June 2007

  6. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14... CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel commercial activity. Commercial activities performed exclusively by military personnel not subject to deployment in...

  7. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14... CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel commercial activity. Commercial activities performed exclusively by military personnel not subject to deployment in...

  8. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14... CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel commercial activity. Commercial activities performed exclusively by military personnel not subject to deployment in...

  9. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14... CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel commercial activity. Commercial activities performed exclusively by military personnel not subject to deployment in...

  10. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14... CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel commercial activity. Commercial activities performed exclusively by military personnel not subject to deployment in...

  11. Tropical skin diseases in British military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Mark S

    2013-09-01

    Skin complaints are common in travellers to foreign countries and are responsible for up to 25% of medical consultations by military personnel during deployments in the tropics. They also have relatively high rates of field hospital admission, medical evacuation and referral to UK Role 4 healthcare facilities. Non-infectious tropical skin diseases include sunburn, heat rash, arthropod bites, venomous bites, contact dermatitis and phytophotodermatitis. During tropical deployments skin infections that commonly occur in military personnel may become more frequent, severe and difficult to treat. Several systemic tropical infections have cutaneous features that can be useful in making early diagnoses. Tropical skin infections such as cutaneous larva migrans, cutaneous myiasis, cutaneous leishmaniasis and leprosy do occur in British troops and require specialist clinical management. This illustrated review focuses on the most significant tropical skin diseases that have occurred in British military personnel in recent years. Clinical management of these conditions on deployments would be improved and medical evacuations could be reduced if a military dermatology 'reach-back' service (including a telemedicine facility) was available.

  12. A Feasibility Study of Female Active Duty Military Personnel and Exposure to Jet Fuel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-07-01

    exposure. Fundam Appl Toxicol. 10:224-232, 1988. 12. Murray FJ, John JA, Rampy LW, et al: Embryotoxicity of inhaled benzene in mice and rabbits. Am Ind...Hyg Assoc J. 40:993-998, 1979. 13. Ungvary G and Tatrai E: On the embryotoxic effects of benzene and its salkyl derivatives in mice, rats and rabbits...Arch Toxicol Suppl 8:425-430, 1985. 14. Kuna RA and Kapp RW: Embryotoxic /teratogenic potential of benzene vapor in rats. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 57:1

  13. Demographic, Psychological, and Weight-Related Correlates of Weight Control Behaviors Among Active Duty Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Anorexia Nervosa (AN), 1-3% for Bulimia Nervosa (BN), and 0.7-4.0% for Binge Eating Disorder (BED; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). The gender...the female to male ratio for bulimia nervosa and anorexia nervosa is 10:1, the female to male ratio for binge eating disorder is only 2.5:1 (Jacobi...association between bulimia scores and selected peers increased over time, whereas there was no association between 1) bulimia scores and unselected

  14. Evaluation of Sound Therapy Tinnitus Treatments with Concurrent Counseling in Active Duty Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-04

    Tinnitus Retraining Therapy (TRT). Identifying the course of treatment or intervention is multifactorial. This decision is often driven by factors such...levels (F = 16.71, p = .003). For this treatment group, pre- and post- intervention measures of both disturbance levels and BBNMML measures failed to...failed to reveal a statistically significant effect of time (i.e. use of treatment at pre- and post- intervention ) for either device used

  15. 2005 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors among Active Duty Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    0.6 (0.1) Females 0.5 (0.5) 0.6 (0.3) 0.3 (0.2) 0.9 (0.3) 0.6 (0.2) Total 1.4 (0.8) 0.7 (0.1) 0.4 (0.2) 0.4 (0.1) 0.6 (0.1) Hypnosis Males...indicate how much you have been bothered by each problem in the past month. (Place an "X" on each line) Repeated, disturbing memories , thoughts or...American Healing, curanderismo) Biofeedback Hypnosis (self or led by practitioner) Art/music therapy

  16. Tibial stress fractures in an active duty population: long-term outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kilcoyne, Kelly G; Dickens, Jonathan F; Rue, John-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Tibial stress fractures are a common overuse injury among military recruits. The purpose of this study was to determine what, if any, long-term effects that tibial stress fractures have on military personnel with respect to physical activity level, completion of military training, recurrence of symptoms, and active duty service. Twenty-six military recruits included in a previous tibial stress fracture study were contacted 10 years after initial injury and asked a series of questions related to any long-term consequences of their tibial stress fracture. Of the 13 patients available for contact, no patients reported any necessary limited duty while on active duty, and no patient reported being separated or discharged from the military as a result of stress fracture. Tibial stress fractures in military recruits are most often an isolated injury and do not affect ability to complete military training or reflect a long-term need for decreased physical activity.

  17. The psychometric properties of the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES) in a clinical sample of active duty military service members.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Damon; Francis, Joseph P; Tafrate, Raymond Chip

    2005-11-01

    The increasing prominence of the construct of readiness to change in the field of substance abuse treatment has led to the development of instruments designed to assess the construct. We examined the psychometric properties of one such instrument, the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES), in a sample of treatment-seeking, active duty, U.S. military service members diagnosed with alcohol and/or drug dependence. A principal components analysis of the items was consistent with the tridimensional structure of the SOCRATES found among treatment-seeking civilians but resulted in a 14-item scale, as opposed to the 19-item version found for civilians. Normative data, in the form of means and decile rankings for the SOCRATES subscales, for substance-dependent military patients are provided to complement those available for civilian patients. Future research should examine the concurrent and predictive validity of the scale.

  18. Atrial and ventricular tachyarrhythmias in military personnel.

    PubMed

    Posselt, Bonnie N; Cox, A T; D'Arcy, J; Rooms, M; Saba, M

    2015-09-01

    Although rare, sudden cardiac death does occur in British military personnel. In the majority of cases, the cause is considered to be a malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmia, which can be precipitated by a number of underlying pathologies. Conversely, a tachyarrhythmia may have a more benign and treatable cause, yet the initial clinical symptoms may be similar, making differentiation difficult. This is an overview of the mechanisms underlying the initiation and propagation of arrhythmias and the various pathological conditions that predispose to arrhythmia genesis, classified according to which parts of the heart are involved: atrial tachyarrhythmias, atrial and ventricular, as well as those affecting the ventricles alone. It encompasses atrial tachycardia, atrial flutter, supraventricular tachycardias and ventricular tachycardias, including the more commonly encountered inherited primary electrical diseases, also known as the channelopathies. The clinical features, investigation and management strategies are outlined. The occupational impact-in serving military personnel and potential recruits-is described, with explanations relating to the different conditions and their specific implication on continued military service.

  19. Prevalence of contraindications to mefloquine use among USA military personnel deployed to Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Nevin, Remington L; Pietrusiak, Paul P; Caci, Jennifer B

    2008-01-01

    Background Mefloquine has historically been considered safe and well-tolerated for long-term malaria chemoprophylaxis, but its prescribing requires careful attention to rule out contraindications to its use, including a history of certain psychiatric and neurological disorders. The prevalence of these disorders has not been defined in cohorts of U.S. military personnel deployed to areas where long-term malaria chemoprophylaxis is indicated. Methods Military medical surveillance and pharmacosurveillance databases were utilized to identify contraindications to mefloquine use among a cohort of 11,725 active duty U.S. military personnel recently deployed to Afghanistan. Results A total of 9.6% of the cohort had evidence of a contraindication. Females were more than twice as likely as males to have a contraindication (OR = 2.48, P < 0.001). Conclusion These findings underscore the importance of proper systematic screening prior to prescribing and dispensing mefloquine, and the need to provide alternatives to mefloquine suitable for long-term administration among deployed U.S. military personnel. PMID:18267019

  20. Descriptive epidemiology and natural history of idiopathic venous thromboembolism in U.S. active duty enlisted personnel, 1998-2007.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Randall J; Li, Yuanzhang; Niebuhr, David W

    2011-05-01

    The estimated incidence of idiopathic venous thromboembolism (IVTE) cases in the United States ranges from 24,000 to 282,000/year. This analysis explores the incidence and prevalence of IVTE in the military and if cases experience increased attrition. The Defense Medical Surveillance System was searched for incident IVTE cases from 1998 through 2007. Enlisted cases were each matched to 3 controls. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard modeling were performed. We matched 463 cases to 1,389 controls. Outpatient IVTE rates have increased markedly from 1998 through 2007. Cases of all-cause attrition risk (0.56 [95% CI = 0.44, 0.72]) and rates were significantly less than controls (p < 0.0001), and cases of medical attrition risk (1.64 [95% CI = 1.13, 2.37]) and rates were significantly higher (p < 0.01). Increasing rates with lower attrition suggests increasing case prevalence. Health care providers must maintain a high index of suspicion for venous thromboembolism to minimize adverse sequelae affecting health, unit readiness, and medical costs.

  1. 19 CFR 148.90 - Foreign military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Foreign military personnel. 148.90 Section 148.90... International Organizations and Special Treatment for Returning Individuals § 148.90 Foreign military personnel... country, and of their immediate families under subheading 9806.00.20, Harmonized Tariff Schedule of...

  2. [Characteristics of urinary tract infections in military personnel in military service in Far North].

    PubMed

    Sergienko, H F; Vasil'chenko, M I; Plekhanov, V N

    2010-12-01

    For the purpose of improvement of the effectiveness of the treatment of urinary tract infections in military personnel in condition of High North were studied 505 clinical records of military personnel took the treatment from 1998 till 2009. It is established that the part of urinary tract infections from the urologic pathology in contract military personnel is higher than in draft military personnel. Among urinary tract infections prevails pyelonephritis associated with urolithiasis and abnormal development of kidneys. The main type of contamination under the acute pyelonephritis in military personnel is ascending. For this type dysuria, leukocyturia and bacteriuria are characteristic. For the hematogenous contamination pain in lumbar region, imperceptible leukocyturia, proteinuria are characteristic. Kidney carbuncles are higher in 2.5 times in draft military personnel. The main pathogen is aurococcus. "Gates" of this infection are furunculuses of different localization.

  3. The Wellbeing of Army Personnel in Dual-Military Marriages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Military Marriages PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ann H. Huffman CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Northern Arizona University Flagstaff, AZ 86011...May 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Wellbeing of Army Personnel in Dual-Military Marriages 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12...military marriage wellbeing. The central hypothesis of the proposed research is that individuals in dual-military marriages are exposed to unique stressors

  4. [Current state and prospects of military personnel health monitoring].

    PubMed

    Rezvantsev, M V; Kuznetsov, S M; Ivanov, V V; Zakurdaev, V V

    2014-01-01

    The current article is dedicated to some features of the Russian Federation Armed Forces military personnel health monitoring such as legal and informational provision, methodological basis of functioning, historical aspect of formation and development of the social and hygienic monitoring in the Russian Federation Armed Forces. The term "military personnel health monitoring" is defined as an analytical system of constant and long-term observation, analysis, assessment, studying of factors determined the military personnel health, these factors correlations, health risk factors management in order to minimize them. The current state of the military personnel health monitoring allows coming to the conclusion that the military health system does have forces and resources for state policy of establishing the population health monitoring system implementation. The following directions of the militarily personnel health monitoring improvement are proposed: the Russian Federation Armed Forces medical service record and report system reorganization bringing it closer to the civilian one, implementation of the integrated approach to the medical service informatisation, namely, military personnel health status and medical service resources monitoring. The leading means in this direction are development and introduction of a military serviceman individual health status monitoring system on the basis of a serviceman electronic medical record card. Also it is proposed the current Russian Federation Armed Forces social and hygienic monitoring improvement at the expense of informational interaction between the two subsystems on the basis of unified military medical service space.

  5. Supporting School Success for Homeless Children of Veterans and Active Duty Military Members. Best Practices in Interagency Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This brief is designed for local staff of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), state McKinney-Vento coordinators and school district McKinney-Vento liaisons, educators, and other providers of services to active members of the military and veterans, and their children. It provides basic information to assist homeless children of veterans or…

  6. Assessment of Chiropractic Treatment for Low Back Pain, Military Readiness and Smoking Cessation in Military Active Duty Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    System; Wayne B. Jonas, M.D. of Samueli Institute; Anthony J. Lisi, DC of Veterans Health Administration; Dennis Marchiori, DC, Ph.D. of Palmer...received official signatures from: WRNMMC, Samueli Institute, Palmer College of Chiropractic and RAND Corporation and San Diego Commanding Admiral, who...review. Once an IT Impact Statement is obtained from WRNMMC the amendment will be sent for legal review. Samueli Institute is in the process of

  7. Assessment of Chiropractic Treatment for Low Back Pain, Military Readiness and Smoking Cessation in Military Active Duty Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    IA ; † Physical Medicine and Integrative Care Services, Fort Bliss, TX ; ‡ Samueli Institute, Alexandria, VA ; § Palmer College of Chiropractic...drug(s). Samueli Institute grant funds were received to support this work. Some of this work was conducted in a facility constructed with support

  8. Assessment of Chiropractic Treatment for Low Back Pain, Military Readiness and Smoking Cessation in Military Active Duty Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Johnson, DC of VAGLA Healthcare System; Wayne B. Jonas, M.D. of Samueli Institute; Anthony J. Lisi, DC of Veterans Health Annual Report, W81XWH-11-2...concerns are minimal. After the first of the year, COL Helwig and Dr. Mona Bingham ( Samueli Institute) will begin working on the necessary documentation to...RAND’s marketing department, Samueli Institute’s marketing department, Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research employees and chiropractors working in

  9. Missed opportunity to screen and diagnose PTSD and depression among deploying shipboard US military personnel

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Braden R.; Michael, Nelson L.; Scott, Paul T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are significant risks for suicide and other adverse events among US military personnel, but prevalence data among ship-assigned personnel at the onset of deployment are unknown. Aims To determine the prevalence of shipboard personnel who screen positive for PTSD and/or major depressive disorder (MDD) at the onset of deployment, and also those who reported these diagnoses made by a physician or healthcare professional in the year prior to deployment. Method Active-duty ship-assigned personnel (N = 2078) completed anonymous assessments at the beginning of deployment. Depression was measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D; score of ≥22), and PTSD was assessed using the PTSD Checklist–Civilian Version (PCL-C; both score and symptom criteria were used). Results In total, 7.3% (n = 151 of 2076) screened positive for PTSD and 22% (n = 461 of 2078) for MDD at deployment onset. Only 6% and 15% of those who screened positive for PTSD or MDD, respectively, had been diagnosed by a healthcare professional in the past year. Conclusions Missed opportunities for mental healthcare among screen-positive shipboard personnel reduce the benefits associated with early identification and linkage to care. Improved methods of mental health screening that promote early recognition and referral to care may mitigate psychiatric events in theatre. Declaration of interest This work was performed as part of the official duties of the authors as military service members or employees of the US Government. Copyright and usage This work was prepared by military service members or employees of the US Government as part of their official duties. As such, copyright protection is not available for this work (Title 17, USC, §105). PMID:27713833

  10. Jet Fuel Exposure and Neurological Health in Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    study to examine predicted dose - response relationships. The field study is being carried out with military (Air Force) personnel. Working groups have been convened and, currently, the Tier I phase is being planned.

  11. Group Counseling for Military Personnel Who Battered Their Wives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldo, Michael

    1986-01-01

    Describes counseling with military personnel who have battered their wives and includes referral procedures, assessment, and a group intervention. Associates group participation with increases in relationship skills and curtailed battering. (Author)

  12. Impact of Transcendental Meditation on Psychotropic Medication Use Among Active Duty Military Service Members With Anxiety and PTSD.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Vernon A; Monto, Andrea; Williams, Jennifer J; Rigg, John L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether the regular practice of Transcendental Meditation (TM) decreased the need for psychotropic medications required for anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) management and increased psychological wellbeing. The sample included 74 military Service Members with documented PTSD or anxiety disorder not otherwise specified (ADNOS), 37 that practiced TM and 37 that did not. At 1 month, 83.7% of the TM group stabilized, decreased, or ceased medications and 10.8% increased medication dosage; compared with 59.4% of controls that showed stabilizations, decreases, or cessations; and 40.5% that increased medications (p < 0.03). A similar pattern was observed after 2 (p < 0.27), 3 (p < 0.002), and 6 months (p < 0.34). Notably, there was a 20.5% difference between groups in severity of psychological symptoms after 6 months, that is, the control group experienced an increase in symptom severity compared with the group practicing TM. These findings provide insight into the benefits of TM as a viable treatment modality in military treatment facilities for reducing PTSD and ADNOS psychological symptoms and associated medication use.

  13. 19 CFR 148.90 - Foreign military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Foreign military personnel. 148.90 Section 148.90 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE... International Organizations and Special Treatment for Returning Individuals § 148.90 Foreign military...

  14. 19 CFR 148.90 - Foreign military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Foreign military personnel. 148.90 Section 148.90 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE... International Organizations and Special Treatment for Returning Individuals § 148.90 Foreign military...

  15. 19 CFR 148.90 - Foreign military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Foreign military personnel. 148.90 Section 148.90 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE... International Organizations and Special Treatment for Returning Individuals § 148.90 Foreign military...

  16. 19 CFR 148.90 - Foreign military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Foreign military personnel. 148.90 Section 148.90 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE... International Organizations and Special Treatment for Returning Individuals § 148.90 Foreign military...

  17. Individual and environmental contingencies associated with multiple suicide attempts among U.S. military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Craig J; Rudd, M David; Wertenberger, Evelyn

    2016-08-30

    Suicidal behavior among U.S. military personnel persists as a significant public health issue. Previous research indicates the primary motive for suicide attempts among military personnel is the desire to reduce or alleviate emotional distress, a finding that converges with studies in nonmilitary samples. Much less is understood about the consequences of a first suicide attempt that could influence the occurrence of additional suicide attempts. In order to identify these contingencies, 134 active duty Soldiers who had attempted suicide (n=69 first-time attempters, n=65 multiple attempters) participated in structured interviews focused on their experiences immediately following their first attempt. Soldiers were more likely to have made multiple suicide attempts if they were younger at the time of their first attempt, were not admitted to a hospital or treatment program after their first attempt, or experienced emotional and psychological relief immediately afterwards. Results suggest that Soldiers who experience emotional and/or psychological relief immediately after their first suicide attempt or do not receive treatment are more likely to make additional suicide attempts.

  18. Epidemiology of Sexually Transmitted Infections among Human Immunodeficiency Virus Positive United States Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Jeff S; Clark, Leslie L; Garges, Eric C; Otto, Jean Lin

    2013-01-01

    Background. Minimal data exist that describe the epidemiology of sexually transmitted infections (STI) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive populations across the pre- and post-diagnosis periods for HIV. Purpose. The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the epidemiology of gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis, herpes simplex virus, and human papillomavirus in an HIV-positive population. Methods. All 1,961 HIV seropositive United States active duty military personnel from 2000-2010 were identified. STI diagnoses relative to HIV diagnosis from 1995, which was the earliest electronic medical record available, to 2010 were examined. Results. The incidence diagnosis rates of STI generally increased during the period leading up to eventual HIV diagnosis. The rates of STI during the post-HIV diagnosis period fluctuated, but remained elevated compared to pre-HIV diagnosis period. Approximately 45%-69% with an STI in the HIV seropositive military population were diagnosed with their first STI greater than one year after their HIV diagnosis. Of those who were diagnosed with an STI in the post-HIV diagnosis period, 70.6% had one STI diagnosis, 23.5% had two STI diagnoses, and 5.8% had three or more STI diagnoses. Conclusions. Despite aggressive counseling, high-risk sexual behavior continues to occur in the HIV-positive military population.

  19. Health-related quality of life in Gulf War era military personnel.

    PubMed

    Voelker, Margaret D; Saag, Kenneth G; Schwartz, David A; Chrischilles, Elizabeth; Clarke, William R; Woolson, Robert F; Doebbeling, Bradley N

    2002-05-15

    The Gulf War's impact on veterans' health-related quality of life (HRQL) remains unclear. The authors examined the HRQL of military personnel deployed to the Gulf War Theater compared with those not deployed. In 1995-1996, a structured, population-based telephone survey was conducted 5 years postconflict among a cohort originally from Iowa on active duty during the conflict. The sample included 4,886 eligible subjects stratified by deployment and military status and proportionately distributed within five substrata. The Medical Outcome Study Short Form-36 (SF-36) assessed HRQL, and multivariable linear regression identified pre- and perideployment risk factors. A total of 3,695 respondents (76%) participated. Nondeployed participants reported excellent health more often than deployed participants (31% vs. 21%, p < 0.01). SF-36 scores for deployed participants were poorer than those for nondeployed controls across all health domains. Modifiable factors such as smoking and military preparedness, and other factors such as predeployment physical and mental health morbidity, were independent risk factors for poorer HRQL after deployment. Deployed veterans reported slightly poorer HRQL even after the authors adjusted for other risk factors. Further investigation of factors influencing postdeployment HRQL is needed. Routine collection of health information by using standardized instruments pre- and perideployment should be implemented.

  20. Outbreak of hepatitis A in Korean military personnel.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Seop; Lee, Ju-Hyung; Kwon, Keun-Sang

    2008-05-01

    This report describes a hepatitis A outbreak among Korean military personnel. Each case of hepatitis A in this outbreak was defined as a person who had symptoms compatible with acute viral hepatitis A and had positive HAV IgM between May 2 and August 14, 2007 in Inje district, Gangwon, Korea. We tested 70 cases with symptoms for HAV IgM, and 67 cases showed positive results. They included 4 sergeants, 1 officer and 62 privates. A positive result for HAV IgG among asymptomatic military personnel was seen in 11.8% of cases. This epidemic occurred after a heavy rainfall in the military compound area where drinking water was supplied by the stream water. After the outbreak, the supply of drinking water was switched to a public water system. All of 178 military personnel who had no HAV IgG were vaccinated on July 26, 2007. The outbreak was resolved after the control measures were implemented.

  1. Operation United Assistance: infectious disease threats to deployed military personnel.

    PubMed

    Murray, Clinton K; Yun, Heather C; Markelz, Ana Elizabeth; Okulicz, Jason F; Vento, Todd J; Burgess, Timothy H; Cardile, Anthony P; Miller, R Scott

    2015-06-01

    As part of the international response to control the recent Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the Department of Defense has deployed military personnel to train Liberians to manage the disease and build treatment units and a hospital for health care volunteers. These steps have assisted in providing a robust medical system and augment Ebola diagnostic capability within the affected nations. In order to prepare for the deployment of U.S. military personnel, the infectious disease risks of the regions must be determined. This evaluation allows for the establishment of appropriate force health protection posture for personnel while deployed, as well as management plans for illnesses presenting after redeployment. Our objective was to detail the epidemiology and infectious disease risks for military personnel in West Africa, particularly for Liberia, along with lessons learned from prior deployments.

  2. FY2010 National Defense Authorization Act: Selected Military Personnel Policy Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-10

    Members of the Retired Reserve Who Are Not Yet Age 60 ........... 13 Chiropractic Health Care for Members on Active Duty...Personnel Policy Issues Congressional Research Service 14 Chiropractic Health Care for Members on Active Duty Background: Chiropractic is a health care ...Section 702 of the Floyd D. Spence National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001 (P.L. 106-398) established the Chiropractic Care Program

  3. Managing the Reduction in Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    second, and possibly third reenlistments; and selection of some personnel for early retirement . A Sustaining Level of Accessions. The long-term size...Air Force might be selected for involuntary early retirement in 1991. This number would represent about 5 percent of personnel eligible for retirement

  4. A guide to treating military personnel in a civilian mental health facility.

    PubMed

    Levitt, Gwen A

    2014-11-01

    As the number of troops returning home from the Middle East continues to rise, so does the need for psychiatric treatment. More and more often, civilian mental health facilities will be faced with treating active duty service members. Because the patients are active duty status, civilian providers need to become familiar with the unique intricacies and challenges of interacting with military command and mental health clinics. Concepts such as confidentiality and consent have a slightly different meaning in the military that affects care in the civilian realm. Diagnoses, medication choices, and treatment planning can also have an impact on a service member's career in the military that civilian providers may not recognize. This guide serves as a "beginner's" manual for working with active duty service members.

  5. Body contouring surgery for military personnel following massive weight loss.

    PubMed

    Chong, S J; Kok, Y O; Foo, C L

    2011-12-01

    The burgeoning global obesity epidemic extends to the military service, where 6-53% of military personnel are overweight. Obese military personnel who adhere to a strict training and diet regime may potentially achieve and maintain significant weight loss. They may however face physical problems such as excess skin folds causing discomfort, difficulty in uniform fitting, personal hygiene, interference with full physical activities and psychological issues such as body image dissatisfaction, low self esteem and difficulty in social acceptance. We present a case report of a highly motivated military conscript who achieved and maintained significant weight loss but had physical defects following Massive Weight Loss. Body contouring surgery was successfully utilised to correct his physical defects and allowed him to return to full physical duties.

  6. Population Health Trial for Smokeless Tobacco Cessation with Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Military Personnel under the direction of Jane Bowers, Community Dental Health Hygienist , Fort Drum, New York z conducted at USA DENTAL ACTIVITY, FORT...to me by Jane Bowers, or her designee, Community Dental Health Hygienist , Fort Drum, New York, phone 315-772-7841JS7, CCd I have been given an...Accomplishments include visits for orientation and training at dental clinics at 14 additional military installations: 6 AF sites were added for enrollment purposes

  7. Detection of Early Lung Cancer Among Military Personnel (DECAMP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-2-0161 TITLE: Detection of Early lung Cancer Among...September 2012-29 September 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0161 Detection of Early lung Cancer Among Military Personnel... lung cancer in Military Treatment Facilities and Veteran’s Administration Hospitals. Over the course of the second year of this award, we have

  8. Success of Job Corps Personnel Entering the Military.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    unlimited Success of Job Corps Personnel Entering the Military by Guy Joseph Carrier Lieutenant, United States Navy B.S., United States Naval Academy, 1972...military service of the United States during the period 1968-1978. The intent of this introductory chapter is twofold. First, a short description of...8Congressional Budget Office, Congress of the United States , CETA Reauthorization Issues, August, 1978. 9Benefits and Responsibilities, portion of DOD/DOL

  9. Medical Aspects of Sickle Hemoglobin in Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Brodine, C. E.; Uddin, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DOD) will soon issue a directive to test all incoming military personnel for the presence of hemoglobin S. The military testing program for hemoglobin S is an occupational medicine program. This report includes a discussion of armed services physical standards, a description of the Navy effort to evaluate an automated system for detection of hemoglobin S, and the proposed DOD directive. PMID:833894

  10. 32 CFR 705.15 - Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... periodical or service, radio or TV station or network, or may work part-time for such an organization. The...) Military personnel on active duty and Navy civilians may not serve on the staff of a “civilian...

  11. 32 CFR 705.15 - Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... periodical or service, radio or TV station or network, or may work part-time for such an organization. The...) Military personnel on active duty and Navy civilians may not serve on the staff of a “civilian...

  12. 32 CFR 705.15 - Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... periodical or service, radio or TV station or network, or may work part-time for such an organization. The...) Military personnel on active duty and Navy civilians may not serve on the staff of a “civilian...

  13. [New approaches to assessment of military personnel health status].

    PubMed

    Sivashchenko, P P; Ivanov, V V; Grigor'ev, S G; Baranovskiĭ, A M

    2013-05-01

    For the first time were suggested some indices such as the index of ratio of one unit's (higher/highest formation) hospitalization, lost worktime, discharge and mortality to the primary morbidity for one military unit and the same index of ratio to the same criteria for the group of military unit. The mentioned peculiarities are intended for impartial and comprehensive estimation of Armed Forces of the Russian Federation military personnel health status and medical units (establishments) activity. These indices include as criteria of diseases prevalence, morbidity, hospitalization, discharge and mortality characteristics. Employment of the new tools provides the possibility of the military health care system analysis by means of such health status components as military labor character peculiarities of medical support, as well as medical service forces and resources availability in the Army, Navy and Air Force.

  14. Military personnel recognition system using texture, colour, and SURF features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irhebhude, Martins E.; Edirisinghe, Eran A.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents an automatic, machine vision based, military personnel identification and classification system. Classification is done using a Support Vector Machine (SVM) on sets of Army, Air Force and Navy camouflage uniform personnel datasets. In the proposed system, the arm of service of personnel is recognised by the camouflage of a persons uniform, type of cap and the type of badge/logo. The detailed analysis done include; camouflage cap and plain cap differentiation using gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) texture feature; classification on Army, Air Force and Navy camouflaged uniforms using GLCM texture and colour histogram bin features; plain cap badge classification into Army, Air Force and Navy using Speed Up Robust Feature (SURF). The proposed method recognised camouflage personnel arm of service on sets of data retrieved from google images and selected military websites. Correlation-based Feature Selection (CFS) was used to improve recognition and reduce dimensionality, thereby speeding the classification process. With this method success rates recorded during the analysis include 93.8% for camouflage appearance category, 100%, 90% and 100% rates of plain cap and camouflage cap categories for Army, Air Force and Navy categories, respectively. Accurate recognition was recorded using SURF for the plain cap badge category. Substantial analysis has been carried out and results prove that the proposed method can correctly classify military personnel into various arms of service. We show that the proposed method can be integrated into a face recognition system, which will recognise personnel in addition to determining the arm of service which the personnel belong. Such a system can be used to enhance the security of a military base or facility.

  15. [Personal e-cards for military personnel and military-medical information system].

    PubMed

    Kalachev, O V; Stolyar, V P; Kuandykov, M G; Papkov, A Yu

    2015-08-01

    The article presents main directions of activities of the medical service, dealing with implementation of personal electronic cards for military personnel, organizing the process of automation of medical service management, military and medical organizations and health care departments. The given article, reveals the on-going activity, concerning creation of the military-medical information system, which will unite all medical units, organizations, and governments into one information space.

  16. Job Attitudes of Military Airlift Command Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    nutbers of available youth. John haisbitt, author of Megatrends, predicts that labor short.ges are beginning to occur and will continue throughout the...available resources (e.g., personnel and material). 81. Your work group’s performance in compariscn to similar work groups is very high. ORGANIZATION CLIMA "E

  17. Dengue Virus Exposures among Deployed U.S. Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Elisabeth M; Martinez, Luis J; Jarman, Richard G; Lyons, Arthur G; Eckels, Kenneth H; De La Barrera, Rafael A; Thomas, Stephen J

    2017-02-13

    Dengue virus infections have adversely impacted U.S. military operations since the Spanish-American War. The erosion of mission capabilities and lost duty days are underestimated. Appreciating the incidence and prevalence of dengue infections in U.S. military personnel is important to inform disease prevention strategies. Banked pre- and post-deployment serum samples from 1,000 U.S. military personnel with a single deployment to a dengue-endemic region were tested using a screening microneutralization assay to detect anti-dengue-virus-neutralizing antibodies. A total of 76 (7.6%) post-deployment samples were positive and 15 of the pre-deployment samples were negative. These figures represent an infection incidence of 1.5% and total of 17.6 seroconversions per 10,000 deployment months. These data represent a deploying military population with a relatively high background rate of dengue seropositivity, a low level of infection during deployment compared with background infection rates in the local populations, and the potential for worsening clinical attack rates with increased frequency of deployment. Additional studies are required to more clearly elucidate the dengue infection and disease risk in U.S. military personnel.

  18. Mental Health Among Military Personnel and Veterans.

    PubMed

    Pickett, Treven; Rothman, David; Crawford, Eric F; Brancu, Mira; Fairbank, John A; Kudler, Harold S

    2015-01-01

    This commentary describes the prevalence of mental health problems affecting military service members and veterans in North Carolina and the rest of the nation, with a special emphasis on those who served in the recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Approximately 1.9 million of these veterans have become eligible for Veterans Affairs health care since 2002, and an estimated 1.16 million veterans have registered for this care.

  19. Declining hepatitis A antibody seroprevalence in the Korean military personnel.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Seop; Kwon, Keun-Sang; Koh, Dai-Ha; Youm, Jung-Ho; Gwack, Jin; Lee, Ju-Hyung

    2010-05-01

    We retrospectively analyzed serological test results for anti-hepatitis A virus immunoglobulin G (anti-HAV IgG) of sera collected from 779 military personnel during January 2001 to May 2008. The overall seroprevalence of anti-HAV IgG of the subjects was 17.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 14.8-20.1%). When adjusted to the age-specific distribution of the army population, the age-adjusted seroprevalence was 14.6% (95% CI, 13.0-16.3%). All subjects who were 40 years and over had anti-HAV IgG. Meanwhile, the seroprevalence of anti-HAV IgG for those 24 years and younger was 4.7%. This low prevalence rate among young military personnel calls for stricter adherence to vaccination policies and stronger requirements for military HAV vaccination programs.

  20. Active Duty Military Deployments: A Respite from Job Stressors and Burnout for Air Force Acquisition Support Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-23

    Inventory ( Maslach & Jackson , 1986). The Emotional Exhaustion scale measures an individual’s feeling of being depleted of energy and an overall...drained sensation resulting from excessive psychological demands ( Maslach & Jackson , 1986). Sample items include “I feel emotionally drained from my...3), 392-401. Maslach , C., & Jackson , S. E. (1986). Maslach Burnout Inventory Manual (2nd Ed. ed.). Palo Alto: Consulting Psychologists Press

  1. The Health Status of Women in the Military. An Epidemiological Study of Active Duty Navy and Marine Corps Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-08-24

    adjustment reactions, and other symptoms/ syndromes (e.g., eating and sleep disorders) among women (26). Two- to four-fold differences in...PID) Gonorrhea ("clap") Syphilis Chlamydia Herpes or genital warts Sterility/infertility . Arthritis Neuralgia Anorexia or bulimia (eating...my life had been a failure. j. I felt fearful. k. My sleep was restless . I. I was happy. m. I talked less than usual. n. I felt lonely. o. People

  2. The Health Status of Women in the Military: An Epidemiological Study of Active Duty Navy And Marine Corps Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-03-01

    ships found significantly higher rates of personality disorder, stress, and adjustment reactions, and other symptoms/ syndromes (e.g., eating and sleep...0 0 0 - hh. Gon orrhea ("clap") 0 0 0 - i i . Syphil is 0 0 0 - jj. Chlamydia 0 0 0 - kk. Herpes or genital warts 0 0 0 - I I. Steril ity...felt hopeful about the future. 0 i. I thought my life had been a fai lure. 0 j. I felt fearful . 0 k. My sleep was restless . 0 I. I was happy . . 0

  3. An Assessment of Health Literacy Rates in a Sample of Active-Duty Military Personnel at a Major Medical Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    aeute care setting. Similarly, the concept of malpractice has been used to influence the theory and practice of risk management and along with it...failure to apply risk management techniques could adversely affect the clinical setting. In using the concept of malpractice, Roy (1996) was able to...demonstrate how nurses could identify risk management issues use this knowledge to further the use of risk management techniques in their own

  4. Bibliography of Military and Non-Military Personnel Turnover Literature.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    satisfaction and productivity. The authors wish to express their appreciation to SRA Gerald P. Yates and Ms. Kathleen Donahue for their assistance in...Chicago, IL: St. Clair Press, 1974. Karp , H. B., & Nickson, J. W., Jr. Motivator-hygiene deprivation as a predictor of job turnover. Personnel

  5. Behavioral health care of isolated military personnel by videoconference.

    PubMed

    Hill, Jeffrey V; Brown, Mark C; Diebold, Carroll J; Borders, Michael A; Staudenmeier, James; Detwiler, Howard F; Francis, Dave B

    2004-01-01

    The changing role of the military presents a unique challenge for military behavioral health organizations in dealing with the geographic isolation of personnel. Telemedical solutions should help to meet this challenge. In the behavioral health arena, there are many uses for videoconferencing and other communications technology in maintaining continuity when patients or clinicians travel or deploy; assisting isolated behavioral health-care providers and general practitioners; evaluating and treating isolated military personnel; and addressing family issues. Family interventions by videoconference and other communications technology may be particularly useful in treating military personnel and in promoting morale of the fighting force. Although much remains to be researched and proven empirically, anecdotal experience supports the utility of using communications technology to enhance behavioral health interventions. This article describes the clinical videoconference experience within the Department of Psychiatry at Tripler Army Medical Center (TAMC), during a Multinational force deployment to the Sinai, and during training at the Joint Readiness Training Center, Fort Polk, Louisiana. A brief discussion of potential legal issues involving videoconferencing in behavioral health is also included.

  6. Electrocution fatalities in military personnel in Ankara, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Tugcu, Harun; Ozsoy, Sait; Balandiz, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate various cases of death caused by electrical injuries among Turkish military personnel. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed fatality cases of military personnel between 1994 and 2013 at the Department of Forensic Medicine, Gulhane Military Medical Academy, School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey, the only forensic medicine center for the Turkish Armed Forces. Medical records and autopsy reports of cases of electrical fatalities were reviewed and analyzed in terms of age and gender-specific incidence, voltage, contact details, body region distribution, location, and season of incident, site, and severity of injuries sustained, and histopathological and toxicological findings. Results: Sixteen (3.5%) out of the 450 autopsy cases involved electrocution. All deaths were accidental and most frequently occurred outdoors (75%). Eight (50%) died due to high voltage while 6 (37.5%) died due to low voltage. The entry and exit lesions were determined most frequently in cases with high voltage injury. The low voltage deaths commonly occurred at the scene of the event (66.6%), while almost all high voltage deaths occurred in the hospital (87.5%, p=0.03). Electrical burns were most commonly detected in the upper extremities (32.6%, n=14). Conclusion: The present study shows that deaths due to high voltage electrocution are more frequent than low voltage electrocution among military personnel. PMID:25630009

  7. The Associations of Physical and Sexual Assault with Suicide Risk in Nonclinical Military and Undergraduate Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Craig J.; McNaugton-Cassill, Mary; Osman, Augustine; Hernandez, Ann Marie

    2013-01-01

    The associations of various forms of sexual and physical assault with a history of suicide attempts and recent suicide ideation were studied in two distinct samples: active duty military and undergraduate students. A total of 273 active duty Air Force personnel and 309 undergraduate students anonymously completed self-report surveys of assault…

  8. The Effect of Deployment on the Rate of Major Depression and Substance Abuse in Active Duty Military from 2001-2006

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Major Depression , Rates of Substance Abuse, Deployment Effects, OEF, OIF, Comorbidity, Mental Health Illness 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY...health illness . This thesis evaluates the effects of deployment history on major depression and substance abuse in the active duty population from...trend in mental health illness , depression , and substance abuse being the top two diagnoses. Mental health illness affects readiness, and the cost of

  9. FY2014 National Defense Authorization Act: Selected Military Personnel Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-19

    a review of the investigative practices of military law enforcement agencies, including a review of the extent to which such agencies recommend...content. This will allow personnel to evaluate the extent to which their training correlates with the skills and training required for various...Department of Defense tries to provide some access at these locations through the Cheetah Program, which uses Humvee mounted satellite units and laptops

  10. Protecting military personnel from high risk dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Deuster, Patricia A; Lieberman, Harris R

    2016-01-01

    It is legal tomarketmost naturally occurring substances as dietary supplements in the USA without manufacturers demonstrating they are safe or effective, and an endless variety of ingredients, from esoteric botanicals to unapproved pharmaceuticals, can be found in dietary supplements. Use of certain supplements can pose a risk, but since a robust reporting systemdoes not exist in the USA it is difficult to know which are problematic and the number of adverse events (AE) resulting from their use. Certain populations, includingmilitary personnel, aremore likely to use dietary supplements than the general population. Approximately 70% of military personnel take dietary supplements while about 50% of civilians do. Service members prefer supplements purported to enhance physical performance such as supposedly natural stimulants, protein and amino acids, and combination products. Since some of thesemay be problematic, Servicemembers are probably at higher risk of injury than the general population. Ten percent of military populations appear to be taking potentially risky supplements, and the US Department of Defense (DoD) has taken variousmeasures to protect uniformed personnel including education, policy changes, and restricting sales. Actions taken include launching Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS), introducing a High Risk Supplement list, educating health care professionals on reporting AE thatmight be associated with dietary supplements, recommending policy for reporting AE, and developing an online AE reporting system. OPSS is a DoD-wide effort to educate service members, leaders, health care providers, military families, and retirees on how to safely select supplements

  11. Investigating the respiratory health of deployed military personnel.

    PubMed

    Morris, Michael J; Zacher, Lisa L; Jackson, David A

    2011-10-01

    Recent news media articles have implied a direct relationship between environmental exposures such as burn pits during current deployments and the development of serious and debilitating chronic pulmonary disease. These articles suggest that the military is superficially investigating evidence that establishes a link between deployment and development of chronic lung disease. Anecdotal cases of military personnel with lung disease are detailed to suggest a systemic problem with undiagnosed and untreated pulmonary disease in deployed service members. Despite these contentions, the U.S. Army Medical Department and other agencies have been actively pursuing numerous scientific investigations into deployment-related lung disease to define the severity and prevalence of the issue. This article will review relevant research efforts by the U.S. military in the existing medical literature and address the current efforts planned by the services to systematically investigate the possibility of deployment-related pulmonary disease.

  12. 77 FR 23667 - Defense Advisory Committee on Military Personnel Testing; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... of the Secretary Defense Advisory Committee on Military Personnel Testing; Notice of Meeting AGENCY... Military Personnel Testing will take place. DATES: Tuesday, May 22, 2012, from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and...- pencil tests for military enlistment. Agenda: The agenda includes an overview of current enlistment...

  13. 32 CFR 644.550 - Sale to employees or military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Sale to employees or military personnel. 644.550... PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Sale Procedure § 644.550 Sale to employees or military personnel. The sale of Government real property will not be made to civilian employees or military members of...

  14. 78 FR 21349 - Defense Advisory Committee on Military Personnel Testing; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... of the Secretary Defense Advisory Committee on Military Personnel Testing; Notice of Federal Advisory... Defense Advisory Committee on Military Personnel Testing will take place. DATES: Thursday, May 9, 2013... progress in developing computerized tests for military enlistment. Agenda: The agenda includes an...

  15. A longitudinal pilot study of resilience in Canadian military personnel.

    PubMed

    Sudom, Kerry A; Lee, Jennifer E C; Zamorski, Mark A

    2014-12-01

    Research on psychological resilience is important for occupations involving routine exposure to trauma or critical events. Such research can allow for the identification of factors to target in training, education and intervention programs, as well as groups that may be at higher risk for mental health problems. Although efforts have been made to determine the individual characteristics that contribute to positive outcomes under stress, little is known about whether such characteristics are stable over time or how stressful events can impact psychological resilience in high-risk occupations such as military service. Following a review of the evidence on variations in resilience over time, results of a pilot study of Canadian Armed Forces personnel are presented in which differences in resilience characteristics were examined from military recruitment to several years after enrollment. While there was little change in resilience characteristics over time on average, there was considerable individual variation, with some individuals showing marked improvement and others showing marked deterioration in resilience characteristics. At both time points, individuals who had been deployed showed greater resilience characteristics than those who had never been deployed. Implications for the promotion of psychological resilience in military populations and personnel employed in other high-risk occupations are discussed.

  16. Toxoplasmosis in military personnel involved in jungle operations.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Marín, Jorge Enrique; de-la-Torre, Alejandra; Barrios, Patricia; Cardona, Nestor; Álvarez, Catalina; Herrera, Claudia

    2012-04-01

    Tropical diseases, mainly leishmaniasis and malaria, increased among Colombian military personnel due to intensive operations in the jungle in the last ten years; as a result the Colombian army developed important preventive strategies for malaria and leishmaniasis. However, no knowledge exists about toxoplasmosis, an emergent disease in military personnel. We compared the prevalence of IgG anti-Toxoplasma antibodies by ELISA and of parasitaemia by a real time PCR assay, in 500 professional soldiers that operated in the jungle with a group of 501 soldiers working in an urban zone (Bogotá). We found that the prevalence was significantly different between both groups of soldiers (80% in soldiers operating in jungle vs. 45% in urban soldiers, adjusted OR 11.4; CI 95%: 3.8-34; p<0.0001). All soldiers operating in the jungle drink unboiled and chlorine untreated lake or river water. In urban soldiers, these risk factors along with eating wild animal meat or eating tigrillo (little spotted cat) were significantly associated with a higher prevalence. Characteristic toxoplasmic choriorretinal lesions were found in 4 soldiers that operated in the jungle (0.8%) and in one urban soldier (0.19%). All soldiers before being deployed in jungle operations should be tested for Toxoplasma antibodies and to receive adequate health information about the routine use of personnel filters to purify their water for consumption.

  17. Mortality of first world war military personnel: comparison of two military cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Christine; Summers, Jennifer A; Bannister, John; Harper, Glyn

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify the impact of the first world war on the lifespan of participating military personnel (including in veterans who survived the war). Design Comparison of two cohorts of military personnel, followed to death. Setting Military personnel leaving New Zealand to participate in the first world war. Participants From a dataset of the New Zealand Expeditionary Forces, we randomly selected participants who embarked on troopships in 1914 and a comparison non-combat cohort who departed on troopships in late 1918 (350 in each group). Main outcome measures Lifespan based on dates of birth and death from a range of sources (such as individual military files and an official database of birth and death records). Results A quarter of the 1914 cohort died during the war, with deaths from injury predominating (94%) over deaths from disease (6%). This cohort had a significantly shorter lifespan than the late 1918 “non-combat” cohort, with median ages of death being 65.9 versus 74.2, respectively (a difference of 8.3 years shown also in Kaplan-Meier survival curves, log rank P<0.001). The difference for the lifespan of veterans in the postwar period was more modest, with median ages of death being 72.6 versus 74.3, respectively (a difference of 1.7 years, log rank P=0.043). There was no evidence for differences between the cohorts in terms of occupational class, based on occupation at enlistment. Conclusions Military personnel going to the first world war in 1914 from New Zealand lost around eight years of life (relative to a comparable military cohort). In the postwar period they continued to have an increased risk of premature death. PMID:25516379

  18. Military Personnel: Enhanced Collaboration and Process Improvements Needed for Determining Military Treatment Facility Medical Personnel Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    dentists, medical service corps, and veterinarians , to name a few, at the work center level across Army fixed military treatment facilities. The model uses...1072 - 896 903 Hematology /Oncology 41 40 43 - 12 17 - 18 14 Infectious Disease 63 59 62 - 29 34 - 16 17 Internal Medicine 315 e 254 e 277 e

  19. A comparison of the postdeployment hospitalization experience of U.S. military personnel following service in the 1991 Gulf War, Southwest Asia after the Gulf War, and Bosnia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Besa; Smith, Tyler C; Ryan, Margaret A K; Gray, Gregory C

    2006-12-01

    Much attention has been given to the impact of deployment on the health of veterans from the 1991 Gulf War. Whereas increases in self-reported symptoms have been common, no specific exposures have been implicated. Some have suggested that stress from deployment is the chief cause for multisymptom conditions among Gulf War veterans, but comparisons with the health of other recent deployers have not been made. We sought to examine the impact of several large military deployments on hospitalization experience. Hospitalization records were examined for all active duty personnel deployed exclusively to the Gulf War, Southwest Asia after the Gulf War, or Bosnia. Cox's hazard modeling was used to assess time until first post-deployment hospitalization, separation from active duty, or December 31, 2000, whichever occurred first, while controlling for influential covariates and temporal changes. Personnel deployed to Southwest Asia after the 1991 Gulf War were at a slight increased risk for any-cause hospitalization and for 3 of the 14 major diagnostic categories when compared with veterans of the 1991 Gulf War. Personnel deployed to Bosnia were at a decreased risk for any-cause hospitalization and 12 of the 14 major diagnostic categories when compared with Gulf War veterans. These findings do not fully explain the complexity of postdeployment health experiences. Although the risk for hospitalization may be associated with regional deployment, it is unlikely that Gulf War veterans are at greater risk of hospitalization due to a specific exposure-related disease.

  20. Exploring the Role of Social Connectedness among Military Youth: Perceptions from Youth, Parents, and School Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mmari, Kristin N.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Sudhinaraset, May; Blum, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The increased stress on military families during wartime can be particularly difficult for adolescents. The current study employed 11 focus groups with military youth, parents, and school personnel working with military youth to better understand how youth and their families cope with stressors faced as result of living in a military family. An…

  1. HIV among military personnel in the Niger Delta of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Azuonwu, O; Erhabor, O; Obire, O

    2012-02-01

    The military community is considered a high-risk environment for HIV transmission. In this study, a total of One hundred and fifty military personnel aged between 20 and 55 years attending the Nigerian army Hospital, Air Force Clinic and Police Clinic in the Niger Delta of Nigeria were randomly recruited for the study. Samples were tested for HIV using an immunochromatographic assay. The CD4 cell count was estimated using the Partec Cyflow Counter (Partec, Germany). Results of the study showed an overall HIV prevalence rate of 14.67%. The prevalence of HIV was significantly higher among subjects in the ≥40 years age group (P = 0.03). The HIV prevalence was higher among female subjects compared to male military personnel (P = 0.05). Also, there was a significant negative correlation between the CD4 count and HIV positivity (r = -0.443, P<0.01). Out of the 22 subjects positive for HIV, 9.1% were severely immune compromised with CD4 count below<200 cells/μL while 72.7 and 18.2% had CD4 count of 200-350 and 350-500 cells/μL respectively. There is need for the development of a strategic plan that integrates HIV/AIDS and other STIs programs into existing systems and structures to foster behavior change through information dissemination. Policies should be instituted to make condoms regularly available and freely distributed, with the goal of achieving a 100%-condom-use rate. There is the need for an effective voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) and sentinel surveillance survey in the Nigerian military. Also critical is the establishment of a fully integrated and comprehensive care and support system including universal access of antiretroviral treatment for infected people.

  2. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Balazs, George C; Grimm, Patrick D; Donohue, Michael A; Keblish, David J; Rue, John-Paul

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to report the clinical and functional outcomes of revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in a young, active duty military population. Patients undergoing revision ACL reconstruction were enrolled in an institutional clinical database and followed prospectively. The primary outcomes were patients' scores on a timed run, as compared with recorded scores before reinjury. Secondary outcomes included scores on the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), the International Knee Documentation Committee subjective (IKDC subjective), the Short Form - 36 health survey (SF-36) version 2, the Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE), and the Tegner activity scale. A total of 13 patients were identified who met the inclusion criteria and had complete follow-up. The mean age at revision ACL reconstruction was 20.5 years (range, 19-22 years), and mean follow-up was 40.2 months (range, 13-66 months). All patients underwent a single stage revision ACL reconstruction with ipsilateral bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft, ipsilateral hamstring autograft, or bone-tendon-bone allograft. Mean physical readiness test (PRT) score at final follow-up was not statistically different than documented preinjury PRT score (77.9 vs. 85.5, p > 0.05), nor was the mean run time (7:12 vs. 6:43/mile, p > 0.05). Significant improvements exceeding published minimal clinically important differences were seen in SANE score, SF-36 physical component summary score, KOOS sports and recreation, KOOS quality of life, WOMAC pain score, and WOMAC function score. Patients undergoing revision ACL reconstruction at our facility show good recovery of baseline physical performance as measured by the semiannual PRT and timed run test, and significant improvements in patient-reported outcome scores. Level of Evidence Level IV, case series.

  3. 2012 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members: Nonresponse Bias Analysis Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    the extent of nonresponse bias for the estimated rate of unwanted sexual contact (USC rate) in the active duty military. The level of nonresponse...of this research was to assess the extent of nonresponse bias for the estimated rate of unwanted sexual contact (USC rate)1 in the active duty...DMDC estimated that overall 1.9% (±0.45) of active duty military members had experienced unwanted sexual contact (USC) in the last 12 months. DMDC

  4. An outbreak of Paederus dermatitis in Thai military personnel.

    PubMed

    Suwannahitatorn, Picha; Jatapai, Anchalee; Rangsin, Ram

    2014-02-01

    An outbreak of Paederus dermatitis in Thai military personnel in 2007 was reported. Approximately ninety-one percent ofmilitary personnel who worked in a battalion located in Bangkok experienced Paederus dermatitis in April-May 2007. The most common clinical manifestations were blisters and erythematous rash. The most affected areas were head, neck, back and groin. "Kissing lesions" were seen in 17.3% of cases and 23.5% had multiple lesions. Compared with other reports, we found a high incidence of lesions in unexposed body parts. This disease should be recognized as a differential diagnosis especially in tropical countries. Awareness of the condition and its clinical features will aid early diagnosis and prompt treatment.

  5. State Policymakers: Supporting Military Families with Children. Policy Briefing Series. Issue 15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Melissa; Lettieri, Chelsea

    2008-01-01

    Managing work and family responsibilities is particularly difficult for military families with children. While military life has always been demanding, in recent years an increasing number of military personnel in both the Active Duty Force and Selected Reserves have had to confront the additional demands of parenthood. Providing resources to…

  6. Deployment-related insomnia in military personnel and veterans.

    PubMed

    Bramoweth, Adam D; Germain, Anne

    2013-10-01

    Insomnia is a prevalent disorder that greatly impacts military personnel, especially those deployed in support of combat efforts. Deployment-related stressors like combat exposure, mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) irregular sleep-wake schedules, and adjustment to the return home all contribute to insomnia. However, insomnia can also exacerbate the deployment experience and is a risk factor for traumatic stress reactions such as PTSD, depression, and suicide. Military personnel with mTBI are significantly impacted by insomnia; the majority experience sleep disruption and this can impede recovery and rehabilitation. As more service members return home from deployment, treatment is vital to reduce the impact of insomnia. Preliminary outcome data, showing positive results for reduction of sleep disruption, has been found with treatments such as combined cognitive behavioral treatment of insomnia (CBTI) and imagery rehearsal therapy (IRT), preference-based interventions, as well as efforts to broadly disseminate CBTI. The recent literature on the impact and treatment of deployment-related insomnia is reviewed.

  7. Deployment-Related Insomnia in Military Personnel and Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Bramoweth, Adam D.

    2013-01-01

    Insomnia is a prevalent disorder that greatly impacts military personnel, especially those deployed in support of combat efforts. Deployment-related stressors like combat exposure, mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) irregular sleep-wake schedules, and adjustment to the return home all contribute to insomnia. However, insomnia can also exacerbate the deployment experience and is a risk factor for traumatic stress reactions such as PTSD, depression, and suicide. Military personnel with mTBI are significantly impacted by insomnia; the majority experience sleep disruption and this can impede recovery and rehabilitation. As more service members return home from deployment, treatment is vital to reduce the impact of insomnia. Preliminary outcome data, showing positive results for reduction of sleep disruption, has been found with treatments such as combined cognitive behavioral treatment of insomnia (CBTI) and imagery rehearsal therapy (IRT), preference-based interventions, as well as efforts to broadly disseminate CBTI. The recent literature on the impact and treatment of deployment-related insomnia is reviewed. PMID:24005883

  8. The Potential Effects of the Defense Business Board Military Compensation Task Group’s 2011 Recommendations on Active-Duty Service Member Retirement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    Plan 5 The military did not begin participating in the TSP until 2001. Although this is the case , the TSP has been in existence since 1986 when...Human Resource Strategy did not recommend cuts in military compensation due to the unfairness of the MRRA. Taking the lead from the DSB, Congress...per year (Henning, 2011). The task group drew three main conclusions from their study. First, the system is unfair because, due to the 20-year

  9. Unintended Pregnancy and Contraception Among Active Duty Servicewomen and Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Vinita; Borrero, Sonya; Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla

    2012-01-01

    The number of women of childbearing age who are active duty service members or veterans of the U.S. military is increasing. These women may seek reproductive health care at medical facilities operated by the military, in the civilian sector or through the Department of Veterans Affairs. This article reviews the current data on unintended pregnancy and prevalence of and barriers to contraceptive use among active duty and veteran women. Active duty servicewomen have high rates of unintended pregnancy and low contraceptive use which may be due to official prohibition of sexual activity in the military, logistic difficulties faced by deployed women and limited patient and provider knowledge of available contraceptives. In comparison, little is known about rates of unintended pregnancy and contraceptive use among women veterans. Based on this review, research recommendations to address these issues are provided. PMID:22200252

  10. 75 FR 22751 - Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Advisory Committee on Military Personnel Testing; Charter...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... members, who are eminent authorities in the fields of educational and psychological testing. Committee... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Advisory Committee on Military Personnel Testing... notice that it is renewing the charter for the Defense Advisory Committee on Military Personnel...

  11. Plasmodium vivax Malaria among military personnel, French Guiana, 1998-2008.

    PubMed

    Queyriaux, Benjamin; Texier, Gaetan; Ollivier, Lenaick; Galoisy-Guibal, Laurent; Michel, Remy; Meynard, Jean-Baptiste; Decam, Christophe; Verret, Catherine; Pommier de Santi, Vincent; Spiegel, Andre; Boutin, Jean-Paul; Migliani, Rene; Deparis, Xavier

    2011-07-01

    We obtained health surveillance epidemiologic data on malaria among French military personnel deployed to French Guiana during 1998-2008. Incidence of Plasmodium vivax malaria increased and that of P. falciparum remained stable. This new epidemiologic situation has led to modification of malaria treatment for deployed military personnel.

  12. 75 FR 37410 - Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Advisory Committee on Military Personnel Testing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Advisory Committee on Military Personnel...D announces that the Defense Advisory Committee on Military Personnel Testing will meet on July...

  13. 75 FR 63823 - Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Advisory Committee on Military Personnel Testing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Advisory Committee on Military Personnel Testing... Defense announces that the Defense Advisory Committee on Military Personnel Testing will meet November...

  14. Motivating Treatment Seeking and Behavior Change by Untreated Military Personnel Abusing Alcohol or Drugs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    intervention , motivational enhancement therapy 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: U 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF...military personnel who are not currently in substance abuse treatment . The intervention is designed to prompt: (a) a willingness to participate voluntarily...Motivating Treatment Seeking and Behavior Change by Untreated Military Personnel Abusing Alcohol or Drugs PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Denise

  15. Worldwide Survey of Alcohol and Nonmedical Drug Use Among Military Personnel: 1985

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    Substance Abuse Prevention Programs ....... 147 1. A Prevention Perspective ....... ................ 147 2. Perceptions of the Acceptability and Risk of...and to beliefs about the harmful effects of drugs. vii The psychological belief variables (harmful effects of drugs, drug prevention efforts...military personnel. 1. The Context of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Programs Most military personnel feel that drinking and drug use are not

  16. Motivating Treatment Seeking and Behavior Change by Untreated Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    marijuana,  cannabis , stimulants).    Counselor Training: The study team created a training manual for both conditions that will be  available for...effect = ‐2.19 [95% CI: ‐5.29, ‐.23]  pg. 8    Synthetic  Cannabis  (SC):  The use of synthetic marijuana was found to be high among  participating...Kaysen, D., & Roffman, R. (2014). Spicing up  the military: Use and effects of synthetic  cannabis  in substance abusing army personnel. Addict  Behav, 39(7

  17. Replacing Military Personnel in Some Support Positions With Federal Civilians

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-03

    data  from and includes other information published in CBO’s Replacing Military Personnel in  Support Positions With Civilian Employees, www.cbo.gov...include: • Meeting readiness objectives • Achieving workforce  management  goals • Complying with laws, executive orders,  treaties, or international...Force Marine Corps 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Needed for Workforce Management Objectives Needed for Readiness Required by Law, Executive Order, Treaty, or

  18. Tobacco Promotion to Military Personnel: “The Plums Are Here to Be Plucked”

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Elizabeth A.; Malone, Ruth E.

    2009-01-01

    Smoking rates among military personnel are high, damaging health, decreasing short- and long-term troop readiness, and costing the Department of Defense (DOD). The military is an important market for the tobacco industry, which long targeted the military with cigarette promotions. Internal tobacco industry documents were examined to explore tobacco sponsorship of events targeted to military personnel. Evidence was found of more than 1,400 events held between 1980 and 1997. In 1986, the DOD issued a directive forbidding such special promotions; however, with the frequently eager cooperation of military personnel, they continued for more than a decade, apparently ceasing only because of the restrictions of the Master Settlement Agreement. The U.S. military collaborated with the tobacco industry for decades, creating a military culture of smoking. Reversing that process will require strong policy establishing tobacco use as unmilitary. PMID:19743733

  19. Mental Health and Substance Use Factors Associated with Unwanted Sexual Contact among U.S. Active Duty Service Women

    PubMed Central

    Stahlman, Shauna; Javanbakht, Marjan; Cochran, Susan; Hamilton, Alison B.; Shoptaw, Steven; Gorbach, Pamina M.

    2015-01-01

    Many U.S. military women are exposed to unwanted sexual contact during military service, which can have important implications for mental health. Using data from the 2008 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors, we employed multiple logistic regression methods to examine whether unwanted sexual contact was associated with stress, screening positive for mental disorders, or substance use, among active duty service women. The sample included 7,415 female military personnel, of whom 13.4% reported unwanted sexual contact (including any touching of genitals) since entering the military. After adjusting for potentially confounding variables, factors independently associated with unwanted sexual contact included military-related stress (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 2.44), family/personal life-related stress (AOR = 1.78), and gender-related stress (AOR = 1.98) in the past 12 months. In addition, screening positive for depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, psychological distress, and suicidal ideation or attempt were associated with unwanted sexual contact (AOR = 1.57–2.11). For drug/alcohol use, only misuse of tranquilizers/muscle relaxers (past 12 months) was associated with report of unwanted sexual contact (AOR = 1.35). Given the prevalence of unwanted sexual contact and corresponding adverse health outcomes in this sample of active duty women, strategies to create military structural/cultural changes and reduce gender-related stress and sexism are needed. PMID:25976935

  20. Prevalence of Hypertension Among Active Duty Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-13

    coronary heart disease , and renal disease , which account for a large proportion of adult deaths in the United States. The purpose of this study was to...cardiovascular diseases --stroke, rheumatic heart disease , coronary heart disease , and hypertension--hypertension is the most prevalent, afflicting approximately 30...factor, in conjunction with the fact that hypertension is one of the most modifiable risk factors for heart disease and stroke (Alderman,

  1. Meta-analysis of average symptom change in inpatient treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder in veteran and active duty U.S. military samples.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Justin S; Loeffler, George H; Pulos, Steven; Campbell, Annie W

    2016-11-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that inpatient/residential treatment for PTSD associated with military duty should result in significantly lower PTSD symptoms at patient discharge compared to patient intake. Meta-analysis of effects comparing intake and discharge PTSD symptoms from 26 samples, reported in 16 studies, supported this hypothesis (d = -.73; p < .00001). Moderator analysis indicated between-study variation in PTSD symptom changes was predominantly due to the type of measure used, with the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale producing the largest effect (d = -1.60). Larger effects were also observed for more recently published studies and studies with larger percentages of females. These findings support the efficacy of inpatient treatment for military PTSD, although a causal factor for effectiveness could not be identified. Further, the results indicate between-program comparisons of symptom reduction require the same measure of PTSD. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Lowering the Retirement Age for Military Reservists

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-11

    not bring them to the same level, or equal pay , but it would provide a slightly more equitable treatment than the current age 60 rule. By drawing...receive retirement pay once they have reached the age of 60. For some military reservists this could mean waiting an additional 22 years before...receiving retirement pay after completing 20 years of active military service. By contrast, retired active duty military personnel can start receiving

  3. [Influence of chronic diseases of reserve military personnel of Ukraine army on their capability to do their duty according military speciality].

    PubMed

    Ivashchenko, S N

    2008-01-01

    The author presents in the article the way of distribution of reserve military personnel of Ukraine army on special groups depending on presence of chronical diseases or pathological conditions. The author analyzed more than 800 personal files of military personnel and other materials related to assessment of functional state of this personnel and efficiency of performing their duty. Data received from Kiev commissariats and other Ukraine military Institutions have been analyzed. The proposed way of military personnel distribution allows optimizing their operating mode by creating a special mode where resource of military personnel's professional health is preserved.

  4. The impact of deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan on partners and wives of military personnel.

    PubMed

    de Burgh, H Thomas; White, Claire J; Fear, Nicola T; Iversen, Amy C

    2011-04-01

    Deployment has well documented psychological consequences for military personnel. To fully understand the human cost of war, the psychosocial impact of separation and homecoming of military personnel on their families must also be considered. Recent arduous conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan make understanding the impact of war on spouses topical and pertinent. Widespread psychological morbidity and social dysfunction have been reported in spouses of military personnel who have been deployed to combat zones such as Vietnam, with difficulties most acute for spouses of military personnel with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A review of the literature published between 2001 and 2010 assessing the impact of deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan on spouses of military personnel was conducted. A total of 14 US-based studies were identified which examined psychological morbidity, help seeking, marital dysfunction and stress in spouses. Longer deployments, deployment extensions and PTSD in military personnel were found to be associated with psychological problems for the spouse. Methodological differences in the studies limit direct comparisons. Recommendations for future research are outlined. The needs of spouses of military personnel remain an important issue with implications for service provision and occupational capability of both partners.

  5. [Peculiarities of mental disorders and evaluation of life quality in military personnel wounded in local military conflicts].

    PubMed

    Iudin, V E; Liamin, M V; Iaroshenko, V P

    2011-02-01

    The goal of research is the study of the peculiarities of clinico- psychopathologic varients of development of mental disorders and life quality in military personnel, wounded in local military conflicts in conditions of multidisciplinary military hospital. 317 patients aged 19-45 with mine-explosive wounds got in the Chechen Republic and Dagestan were examined. Analysis performed in early and secondary post stress period showed the predominance of border-line psychopathologic disorders and detected some peculiarities.

  6. Why do UK military personnel refuse the anthrax vaccination?

    PubMed

    Murphy, Dominic; Marteau, Theresa; Hotopf, Matthew; Rona, Roberto J; Wessely, Simon

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the reasons why some UK military personnel refused the anthrax vaccination. Data were collected from 5,302 members of the UK Armed Forces who had been deployed to Iraq since 2003 and had been offered the anthrax vaccination. As part of a larger questionnaire, information was collected on acceptance or refusal of the vaccination. Twenty-eight percent of participants refused the anthrax vaccination; of these 51% indicated that they refused vaccination because of concern that it was being offered voluntarily. Reasons differed between those deployed during the war-fighting phase in Iraq, who were concerned about being supplied with insufficient or unclear information (75% vs. 66%), and those involved on subsequent deployments, who felt that there was no longer a risk that biological weapons would be used against them (61% vs. 43%). Thus, refusal rates were related to perception of the threat. In addition, our results indicated the importance of providing individuals with relevant information to aid them in making decisions to receive the anthrax vaccination or not. The findings provide evidence that for some people, the policy to increase confidence in the anthrax vaccination program may have led to a decrease in levels of trust.

  7. [Smoking among military personnel of young age: bad habit and risk factor].

    PubMed

    Moroz, H Z; Hrytsenko, O O; Piteĭ, M V

    2006-01-01

    Anonymous questioning was done among military personnel to study their attitude to healthy way of living and smoking. 80 military persons aged from 18 till 30 participated in the study (40 officers and 40 soldiers). Obtained results showed that 72,5% of soldiers and 42,5% of officers smoked it in connection with compromised heredity may lead to the development of chronic non-infectious disease. Military personnel realize their own responsibility in relation to their health and have all necessary knowledge of healthy way of living but apply their knowledge not in full extent to maintain and strengthen their health. Revealed discrepancy shows that military personnel underestimate bad effect of smoking on health. It necessitates enhancing sanitary and educational measures and individual responsibility of military personal toward their health and providing influence on motivation to lead healthy way of living.

  8. Auricular Therapy for Treatment of Musculoskeletal Pain in the Setting of Military Personnel: A Randomized Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-2-0163 TITLE: Auricular Therapy for Treatment of Musculoskeletal Pain in the Setting of Military Personnel: A Randomized...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-10-2-0163 Auricular Therapy for Treatment of Musculoskeletal Pain in the Setting of Military Personnel: A...SUBJET TERMS Auricular Therapy; Musculoskeletal Pain 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF

  9. Enzyme Mini-Test for Field Identification of Leishmania isolates from U.S. Military Personnel.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-15

    TEST FOR FIELD IDENTIFICATION OF LEISHMANIA ISOLATES FROM U. S. MILITARY PERSONNEL Annual Report RICHARD D. KREUTZER 15 AUGUST 1983 Supported by U. S... LEISHMANIA ISOLATES FROM U. S. MILITARY PERSONNEL 1. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(&) Richard D. Kreutzer DAMD1...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES N/A 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side If noceawaetnd Identify by block number) Leishmania ; electrophoresis; identification

  10. Respiratory diseases among U.S. military personnel: countering emerging threats.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, G. C.; Callahan, J. D.; Hawksworth, A. W.; Fisher, C. A.; Gaydos, J. C.

    1999-01-01

    Emerging respiratory disease agents, increased antibiotic resistance, and the loss of effective vaccines threaten to increase the incidence of respiratory disease in military personnel. We examine six respiratory pathogens (adenoviruses, influenza viruses, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Bordetella pertussis) and review the impact of the diseases they cause, past efforts to control these diseases in U.S. military personnel, as well as current treatment and surveillance strategies, limitations in diagnostic testing, and vaccine needs. PMID:10341174

  11. [Influence of work factors on health state in personnel servicing military nuclear technical objects].

    PubMed

    Poluboiarinov, V N; Iusov, I G; Ivanchenko, A V; Turlakov, Iu S

    2014-01-01

    Complex of occupational studies and medical, statistical research helped to reveal climate, geographic and other factors influencing health state of personnel servicing military nuclear technical objects. Considering peculiarities of occupational activities in various specialists, the authors specified measures to improve medical service for nuclear technical military officers directly working with nuclear ammunition. Practical application of the measures helped to gain 1.5-1.7 times improvement in morbidity parameters among nuclear technical military officers.

  12. Introduction to the special issue: drugs, wars, military personnel, and veterans.

    PubMed

    Golub, Andrew; S Bennett, Alexander

    2013-07-01

    This special issue examines major structural, sociocultural, and behavioral issues surrounding substance use and misuse among U.S. military personnel and veterans who served in recent military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. This introduction provides a brief historical review of the US's experiences of the linkages between war and substance use, misuse, and abuse. It then describes how the various topics covered in this issue span the military-veteran life course and explains the significance of each contribution.

  13. Suicidal or Self-Harming Ideation in Military Personnel Transitioning to Civilian Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansfield, Alyssa J.; Bender, Randall H.; Hourani, Laurel L.; Larson, Gerald E.

    2011-01-01

    Suicides have markedly increased among military personnel in recent years. We used path analysis to examine factors associated with suicidal/self-harming ideation among male Navy and Marine Corps personnel transitioning to civilian life. Roughly 7% of men (Sailors = 5.3%, Marines = 9.0%) reported ideation during the previous 30 days. Results…

  14. Research on Role Sets and Emotional Relationships in Military Personnel Marriage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murtazina, Elmira I.; Minullina, Aida F.

    2016-01-01

    An urgent demand of society to conduct effective work with the family substantiates the relevance of the research. The article provides the investigation of role sets and emotional relationships in marriage through the study of military personnel and nonmilitary personnel families. Practical implementation of psychological ideas represents one of…

  15. Protein and microRNA biomarkers from lavage, urine, and serum in military personnel evaluated for dyspnea

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Joseph N.; Brewer, Heather M.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Weitz, Karl K.; Morris, Michael J.; Skabelund, Andrew J.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.; Cho, Ji -Hoon; Gelinas, Richard

    2014-10-05

    Background: We have identified candidate protein and microRNA (miRNA) biomarkers for dyspnea by studying serum, lavage fluid, and urine from military personnel who reported serious respiratory symptoms after they were deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan. Methods: Forty-seven soldiers with the complaint of dyspnea who enrolled in the STudy of Active Duty Military Personnel for Environmental Dust Exposure (STAMPEDE) underwent comprehensive pulmonary evaluations at the San Antonio Military Medical Center. The evaluation included fiber-optic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage. The clinical findings from the STAMPEDE subjects pointed to seven general underlying diagnoses or findings including airway hyperreactivity, asthma, low diffusivity of carbon monoxide, and abnormal cell counts. The largest category was undiagnosed. As an exploratory study, not a classification study, we profiled proteins or miRNAs in lavage fluid, serum, or urine in this group to look for any underlying molecular patterns that might lead to biomarkers. Proteins in lavage fluid and urine were identified by accurate mass tag (database-driven) proteomics methods while miRNAs were profiled by a hybridization assay applied to serum, urine, and lavage fluid. Results: Over seventy differentially expressed proteins were reliably identified both from lavage and from urine in forty-eight dyspnea subjects compared to fifteen controls with no known lung disorder. Six of these proteins were detected both in urine and lavage. One group of subjects was distinguished from controls by expressing a characteristic group of proteins. A related group of dyspnea subjects expressed a unique group of miRNAs that included one miRNA that was differentially overexpressed in all three fluids studied. The levels of several miRNAs also showed modest but direct associations with several standard clinical measures of lung health such as forced vital capacity or gas exchange efficiency. Conclusions: Candidate proteins and mi

  16. Protein and microRNA biomarkers from lavage, urine, and serum in military personnel evaluated for dyspnea

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Joseph N.; Brewer, Heather M.; Nicora, Carrie D.; ...

    2014-10-05

    Background: We have identified candidate protein and microRNA (miRNA) biomarkers for dyspnea by studying serum, lavage fluid, and urine from military personnel who reported serious respiratory symptoms after they were deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan. Methods: Forty-seven soldiers with the complaint of dyspnea who enrolled in the STudy of Active Duty Military Personnel for Environmental Dust Exposure (STAMPEDE) underwent comprehensive pulmonary evaluations at the San Antonio Military Medical Center. The evaluation included fiber-optic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage. The clinical findings from the STAMPEDE subjects pointed to seven general underlying diagnoses or findings including airway hyperreactivity, asthma, low diffusivity of carbonmore » monoxide, and abnormal cell counts. The largest category was undiagnosed. As an exploratory study, not a classification study, we profiled proteins or miRNAs in lavage fluid, serum, or urine in this group to look for any underlying molecular patterns that might lead to biomarkers. Proteins in lavage fluid and urine were identified by accurate mass tag (database-driven) proteomics methods while miRNAs were profiled by a hybridization assay applied to serum, urine, and lavage fluid. Results: Over seventy differentially expressed proteins were reliably identified both from lavage and from urine in forty-eight dyspnea subjects compared to fifteen controls with no known lung disorder. Six of these proteins were detected both in urine and lavage. One group of subjects was distinguished from controls by expressing a characteristic group of proteins. A related group of dyspnea subjects expressed a unique group of miRNAs that included one miRNA that was differentially overexpressed in all three fluids studied. The levels of several miRNAs also showed modest but direct associations with several standard clinical measures of lung health such as forced vital capacity or gas exchange efficiency. Conclusions: Candidate proteins

  17. Seroconversion for Infectious Pathogens among UK Military Personnel Deployed to Afghanistan, 2008–2011

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Penelope; Bridge, Hannah; Wright, Deborah; Jameson, Lisa; Bosworth, Andrew; Hatch, Rebecca; Hayward-Karlsson, Jenny; Osborne, Jane; Bailey, Mark S.; Green, Andrew; Ross, David; Brooks, Tim; Hewson, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Military personnel are at high risk of contracting vector-borne and zoonotic infections, particularly during overseas deployments, when they may be exposed to endemic or emerging infections not prevalent in their native countries. We conducted seroprevalence testing of 467 UK military personnel deployed to Helmand Province, Afghanistan, during 2008–2011 and found that up to 3.1% showed seroconversion for infection with Rickettsia spp., Coxiella burnetii, sandfly fever virus, or hantavirus; none showed seroconversion for infection with Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus. Most seroconversions occurred in personnel who did not report illness, except for those with hantavirus (70% symptomatic). These results indicate that many exposures to infectious pathogens, and potentially infections resulting from those exposures, may go unreported. Our findings reinforce the need for continued surveillance of military personnel and for education of health care providers to help recognize and prevent illnesses and transmission of pathogens during and after overseas deployments. PMID:25418685

  18. Seroconversion for infectious pathogens among UK military personnel deployed to Afghanistan, 2008-2011.

    PubMed

    Newman, Edmund N C; Johnstone, Penelope; Bridge, Hannah; Wright, Deborah; Jameson, Lisa; Bosworth, Andrew; Hatch, Rebecca; Hayward-Karlsson, Jenny; Osborne, Jane; Bailey, Mark S; Green, Andrew; Ross, David; Brooks, Tim; Hewson, Roger

    2014-12-01

    Military personnel are at high risk of contracting vector-borne and zoonotic infections, particularly during overseas deployments, when they may be exposed to endemic or emerging infections not prevalent in their native countries. We conducted seroprevalence testing of 467 UK military personnel deployed to Helmand Province, Afghanistan, during 2008-2011 and found that up to 3.1% showed seroconversion for infection with Rickettsia spp., Coxiella burnetii, sandfly fever virus, or hantavirus; none showed seroconversion for infection with Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus. Most seroconversions occurred in personnel who did not report illness, except for those with hantavirus (70% symptomatic). These results indicate that many exposures to infectious pathogens, and potentially infections resulting from those exposures, may go unreported. Our findings reinforce the need for continued surveillance of military personnel and for education of health care providers to help recognize and prevent illnesses and transmission of pathogens during and after overseas deployments.

  19. The Wellbeing of Army Personnel in Dual-Military Marriages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    management . We have successfully administered surveys and interviews (focus groups) to six different military bases (Fort Bragg, Fort Campbell, Fort Bliss... management . Although both dual-career and dual-military couples experience role conflict, the effects on job performance (but not family...attributed to the management of stress (Bellman, Forster, Still, & Cooper, 2003). If women in dual-military marriages are not offered support, they are

  20. A review of cardiovascular risk factors in US military personnel.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Leigh K; Turner, Barbara S; Stotts, Nancy A; Dracup, Kathleen A

    2008-01-01

    As the civilian population exhibits increasing trends in major cardiovascular (CV) risk factors in younger age groups, the US military is observing similar trends. These worrisome developments are seen even in young adulthood. Despite the need for a fit, combat-ready force, increases in CV risk are increasingly evident in the military population. This review provides an overview of coronary artery disease in the young and the prevalence of risk factors in the military population. With increases in current military operations in an acutely stressful environment, the role of stress and the manifestation of CV disease are also examined.

  1. Military Personnel: Additional Steps Are Needed to Strengthen DOD’s Oversight of Ethics and Professionalism Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    MILITARY PERSONNEL Additional Steps Are Needed to Strengthen DOD’s Oversight of Ethics and Professionalism Issues...DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military Personnel: Additional Steps Are Needed to Strengthen DOD’s Oversight of Ethics ...MILITARY PERSONNEL Additional Steps Are Needed to Strengthen DOD’s Oversight of Ethics and Professionalism Issues Why GAO Did This Study

  2. Effect of Food, Diet and Nutrition on Military Readiness and Preparedness of Army Personnel and Dependents in a Peacetime Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-15

    3) Diet, Neurotransmitters and Behavior, Chandan Prasad, Ph.D., Principal Investigator, 4) Cardiovascular Helth Promotion for Military Personnel and...findings apply directly to Army personnel and their health maintenance in peace and under crisis situations. Extensive demographic, anthropometric

  3. [Problems and prospects of infectious diseases and HIV-infected military personnel register organization].

    PubMed

    Bolekhan, V N; Zagorodnikov, G G; Gorichnyĭ, V A; Orlova, E S; Nikolaev, P G

    2014-08-01

    An analysis of regulatory documents of the Ministry of Healthcare and the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation related to HIV/AIDS prevention was carried out. The current system of HIV/AIDS detection and registration among military and civil personnel was assessed. Problems and prospects of scientific-and-research laboratory (the register of infectious disease pathology and HIV-infected military personnel) of Scientific-and-research centre at the Kirov Military medical academy were discussed. It is proposed that the main direction of the laboratory activity will be the restoration of up-to-date records of military personnel with HIV/AIDS. This activity will provide the necessary information to responsible specialists of the Main state sanitary and epidemiological surveillance centre and the Main military medical department of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation for the sanitary and epidemiological surveillance for purposeful and economically feasible management decisions in the field of military personnel infection diseases prevention.

  4. Diagnosis and management of chronic lung disease in deployed military personnel.

    PubMed

    Morris, Michael J; Lucero, Pedro F; Zanders, Thomas B; Zacher, Lisa L

    2013-08-01

    Military personnel are a unique group of individuals referred to the pulmonary physician for evaluation. Despite accession standards that limit entrance into the military for individuals with various pre-existing lung diseases, the most common disorders found in the general population such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease remain frequently diagnosed. Military personnel generally tend to be a more physically fit population who are required to exercise on a regular basis and as such may have earlier presentations of disease than their civilian counterparts. Exertional dyspnea is a common complaint; establishing a diagnosis may be challenging given the subtle nature of symptoms and lack of specificity with pulmonary function testing. The conflicts over the past 10 years in Iraq and Afghanistan have also given rise to new challenges for deployed military. Various respiratory hazards in the deployed environment include suspended geologic dusts, burn pits, vehicle exhaust emissions, industrial air pollution, and isolated exposure incidents and may give rise to both acute respiratory symptoms and chronic lung disease. In the evaluation of deployed military personnel, establishing the presence of actual pulmonary disease and the relationship of existing disease to deployment is an ongoing issue to both military and civilian physicians. This paper reviews the current evidence for chronic lung disease in the deployed military population and addresses any differences in diagnosis and management.

  5. Pathways to Military Service for College Men and Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manpower and Reserve Affairs (DOD), Washington, DC.

    The handbook provides college students and graduates with summary information about military service opportunities. All officer and enlisted personnel programs are described, along with entrance qualifications and active duty obligations. Officer programs fall into four categories: (1) training programs for undergraduates, which include military…

  6. Virtual reality exposure therapy for active duty soldiers.

    PubMed

    Reger, Greg M; Gahm, Gregory A

    2008-08-01

    Virtual reality exposure (VRE) therapy is a promising treatment for a variety of anxiety disorders and has recently been extended to the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this article, the authors briefly review the rationale for VRE and its key processes. They illustrate the treatment with an active-duty Army soldier diagnosed with combat-related PTSD. Six sessions of VRE were provided using an immersive simulation of a military convoy in Iraq. Self-reported PTSD symptoms and psychological distress were reduced at posttreatment relative to pretreatment reports, as assessed by the PTSD Checklist-Military Version and the Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale-24. The case outcomes parallel those reported in the research with other disorders and suggest the applicability of VRE in treating active duty soldiers with combat-related PTSD.

  7. Population Health Trial for Smokeless Tobacco Cessation With Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    attention within the military, the use of smokeless tobacco (chewing tobacco and snuff ) has not been a focus of medical services or research...INTRODUCTION While smoking cessation has received considerable attention within the military, the use of smokeless tobacco (chewing tobacco and snuff ) has...tobacco juice while using snuff or chew. Table 3. Current Tobacco Use of DoD Smokeless Tobacco Participants – Indicators of Dependence Current

  8. Narrative transformation among military personnel on an adventurous training and sport course.

    PubMed

    Carless, David

    2014-10-01

    In the wake of recent wars, some military personnel face considerable physical and mental health problems. In this article I explore the effects of an adapted sport and inclusive adventurous training course for military personnel who have experienced physical injury and/or psychological trauma. Using a dialogical narrative approach, I analyzed stories shared by six soldiers during the course to explore the effects of involvement. Participation in the course seemed to facilitate a narrative transformation or opening corresponding to a broadening identity and sense of self. Story plots progressed from a failing monological narrative, through a chaos narrative, toward a dialogical quest narrative prioritizing immersion in an intense present, a developing self, and a relational orientation. On the basis of narrative theory, I suggest this transformation holds positive consequences for the health and well-being of military personnel who have experienced injury and/or trauma.

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome knowledge and risk factors in Ethiopian military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bakhireva, Ludmila N; Abebe, Yegeremu; Brodine, Stephanie K; Kraft, Heidi S; Shaffer, Richard A; Boyer, Cherrie B

    2004-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS)-related knowledge and behaviors were assessed in face-to-face structured interviews with 314 Ethiopian military personnel. A significant finding of this research was the association between HIV/AIDS knowledge and risky sexual behavior. That is, military personnel who had inaccurate knowledge about HIV/AIDS transmission and prevention were 3.4 times as likely to engage in combined sexual risk behaviors compared with personnel with accurate knowledge, after controlling for age, military rank, and marital status (odds ratio, 3.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.86-6.22). This finding highlights the potential value of educational programs in slowing the spread of HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa.

  10. Military Personnel: Army Needs a Requirement for Capturing Data and Clear Guidance on Use of Military for Civilian or Contractor Positions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    establish a requirement and guidance for monitoring the use of borrowed military personnel and improve oversight of cost reporting. DOD concurred with...outside of their Military Occupational Specialty including as lifeguards, grounds maintenance personnel, and gym attendants because the Army did not...8GAO, Human Capital: DOD Needs Complete Assessments to Improve Future Strategic

  11. [Organization of prophylaxis and treatment of respiratory diseases in military personnel].

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Iu V; Azarov, I I; Kuvshinov, K É; Ogarkov, P I; Zhdanov, K V; Zaĭtsev, A A; Afonaskov, O V

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory diseases for many years in the Armed Forces of the Russian occupy the leading position in the structure of the pathology of internal organs. Preventive measures to prevention of the emergence and spread of acute respiratory infections among soldiers can help to reduce the incidence of community-acquired pneumonia in the armed forces. Particular attention is drawn to the control of the conditions of accommodation, food and combat training of military personnel, as well as the implementation of the commanders of their duties. Shows typical action plans for the prevention of outbreaks of infectious diseases of the respiratory tract in military units and algorithms for the treatment of respiratory infections in military personnel in military units and hospitals.

  12. Facilitating reintegration for military service personnel, veterans, and their families: An introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Elnitsky, Christine A; Kilmer, Ryan P

    2017-01-01

    As service members return from active duty and, in some cases, exit the military, they face a process of reintegration (also referred to as community reintegration) as they seek to resume participation in their life roles as civilians. Facilitating this dynamic process of reintegration for service members, veterans, and their families-including outlining potential strategies for supporting this return to civilian life and its demands, roles, and responsibilities-is the focus of this Special Issue. Reintegration has been framed as a national priority (U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, 2015) and has been a point of emphasis of efforts at federal, state, and local levels. As the articles in this issue suggest, multiple public, private, and voluntary systems and the communities to which service members, veterans, and their families return can help influence their health outcomes and, ultimately, their reintegration. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Spontaneous and Deliberate Dissociative States in Military Personnel: Relationships to Objective Performance Under Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Disorders , Ed 4. Washington, DC, APA, 1994. 2. Eisen ML, Lynn SJ: Dissociation , memory and suggestibility in adults and children. Appl Cogn Psychol 2001; 15...Pacella ML, Irish L, Ostrowski SA, et al: Avoidant coping as a mediator between peritraumatic dissociation and posttraumatic stress disorder . J Trauma...BRIEF REPORTS MILITARY MEDICINE, 179, 9:955, 2014 Spontaneous and Deliberate Dissociative States in Military Personnel: Relationships to Objective

  14. Military Presence: U.S. Personnel in NATO Europe.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-06

    Industrial Funds, and other accounts supporting the NATO presence ’Figures represent estimated civilian personnel pay costs for seven Navy commands...enma rk, ( ieria ny, Greenland, and Tu rkey. It o)perates and Comman mantins theillist fi issile earls’ w arning systeill andi sat ell ite t rack- in...many, France, and the I nited Kingdom. These personnel are students at selected civilian institutions, agencies, and industries in NXAT) European

  15. A Methodology for Modeling the Flow of Military Personnel Across Air Force Active and Reserve Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    C O R P O R A T I O N Research Report A Methodology for Modeling the Flow of Military Personnel Across Air Force Active and Reserve Components...Lisa M. Harrington, James H . Bigelow, Alexander Rothenberg, James Pita, Paul D. Emslie Limited Print and Electronic Distribution Rights This document...of a particular component—whether active , guard, or reserve. As a result, when personnel policies are implemented in one component, little is known

  16. Perceptions of stigma and barriers to care among UK military personnel deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq.

    PubMed

    Osório, Carlos; Jones, Norman; Fertout, Mohammed; Greenberg, Neil

    2013-09-01

    Perceived stigma and organizational barriers to care (stigma/BTC) can influence the decision to seek help for military personnel when they are suffering from mental health problems. We examined the relationship between stigmatizing beliefs, perceived BTC, and probable post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in 23,101 UK military personnel deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq both during and after deployment; and in a smaller group some six months later. Overall, our results suggest that stigma/BTC perceptions were significantly, and substantially higher during deployment than when personnel are returning home; however, within the smaller follow-up group, the rates climbed significantly over the first six-months post-deployment although they still remained lower than during-deployment levels. Male personnel, those who reported higher levels of PTSD symptoms and/or greater combat exposure were significantly more likely to endorse more stigma/BTC at both sampling points. Rates of stigma/BTC on deployment are substantially higher than rates measured when personnel are in less threatening environments. We suggest that the considerable efforts that military forces make to encourage effective help seeking should take account of the fluctuating levels of stigma/BTC. Commanders should be aware that encouraging help seeking may be more difficult in operational environments than when personnel have returned home.

  17. FY2017 National Defense Authorization Act: Selected Military Personnel Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-29

    in an armed force, a component, a branch, a grade, or any other category of the armed forces.” 10 U.S.C. §101( b )(11). As such, end- strengths are...Benefits for Former Spouses: Legislation and Policy Issues, by David F . Burrelli. CRS Point of Contact: Kristy N. Kamarck, x7-7783. *Survivor...and CRS Report RL31664, The Military Survivor Benefit Plan: A Description of Its Provisions, by David F . Burrelli. 23 CRS Report RL31664, The Military

  18. Melanoma Incidence Rates in Active Duty Military Personnel Compared With a Population-Based Registry in the United States, 2000-2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    for Research on Cancer Working Group on artifi- cial ultraviolet ( UV ) light and skin cancer: The association of use of sunbeds with cutaneous...later in life, especially among those with fair skin pigmentation, light eye and hair color, and propensity to freckle.’*"^ Studies comparing melanoma...occupations, " aircrew survival equipmentman" and "engineman," were found to have at least a two-fold risk of melanoma compared with general population rates

  19. Frequent Binge Drinking After Combat-Acquired Traumatic Brain Injury Among Active Duty Military Personnel With a Past Year Combat Deployment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    in 2008 reported drinking at or above hazardous drinking levels, including 5% who met screening cri- teria for possible alcohol dependence. 10 These...stop 035, Waltham, MA 02454 (radams@brandeis.edu). DOI: 10.1097/ HTR .0b013e318268db94 Copyright © 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Unauthorized...ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10 . SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S

  20. Substance Use and Mental Health Trends among U.S. Military Active Duty Personnel: Key Findings from the 2008 DoD Health Behavior Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    marijuana or hashish, cocaine. LSD, PCP. MDMA , other hallucino- gens, methamphetamine, heroin, GHB/GBL, and inhalants. Prescription drugs included...dayB. Any Illinit Dmg LJsp inRluning Prèsf.nptinn Drug K îsiLsa = »sa nt manjuana cocaine (including crackl, hallucinogens (PCP WDA MDMA and othet...S. bartnlurates/sedaiivas. orpain wlievers Illiril nn [Isp. F^i:lnili = use o( marijuana, cocaine ¡including Crack), hallucinpgens (PCP. MDA, MDMA

  1. The Health Status of Women in the Military: An Epidemiologic Study of Active-Duty Navy and Marine Corps Personnel, Part 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    Swan, S.H. (1992). Moderate maternal and paternal alcohol consumption and the risk of spontaneous abortion. Epidemiology, 3, 364-370. Windham, G.C...produce a viable embryo or fetus. Maternal factors affecting the length of pregnancy include exposure to organic solvents (Lindbohm, Taskinen, Sallmen...version of the DIS, the Quick DIS is a self-contained computer program and is considerably shorter than the parent version. Thus, training was greatly

  2. A Theory of Military Compensation and Personnel Policy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    82 The Pension Formula .......................... 84 Early - Retirement Provisions ..................... 86 Chapter Six ORGANIZATIONAL...Date and ( Early ) Retirement Benefits ......................... 104 Chapter Seven A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF THE CURRENT MILITARY PAY AND RETIREMENT...plans, such as the benefit formula, vesting provisions, and provisions for early retirement , the "normal" age of retirement, cost-of-living adjust- ments

  3. Soldiering with Substance: Substance and Steroid Use among Military Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucher, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    The military provides a unique social environment given the organization and culture of the institution. Understanding substance use by those inside this institution provides insight into both the population as well as substance use in general. Using data collected from in-depth interviews, this article explores the nature and extent of substance…

  4. Chemical means of protecting US military personnel from mosquito bites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 1942, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has examined over 30,000 repellents and insecticides for the U.S. military. The repellent research has focused on discovery of repellents that work on clothing, skin, and at a distance (spatial repellents). Borne out of this research is...

  5. Group Treatment for Wife-Battering Military Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldo, Michael

    Isolation from extended family, frequent geographic relocation, living in foreign countries, prolonged separation of spouses, occupational stress, prevalent cross-cultural marriages, financial problems and dependence of the civilian spouse on the military member have been cited as pressures which could contribute to wife-battering by military…

  6. All Around the World, U. of Maryland Offers Classes to U.S. Military Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Amy Magaro

    1997-01-01

    The University of Maryland University College is providing degree and continuing education to 20,000 military personnel with 1,000 faculty at 100 locations in Asia, Australia, Europe, the Middle East, Russia, and South America. Distance education is offered in Antarctica and Hong Kong. Almost every subject taught domestically is offered overseas.…

  7. Problems Faced by Military Personnel in Pursuing Higher Education Programs: A Study with Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, David W.; And Others

    This document contains five reports from a study that collected survey data on the practices and state trends affecting military personnel attending proprietary, private, and public postsecondary education institutions in 11 states and on the practices related to student transcript evaluation. The contents include "Introduction, State and…

  8. Factors associated with substance use among Spanish military personnel involved in "Bosnia-Herzegovina".

    PubMed

    Vargas Pecino, Cristina; Castellano, Enrique; Trujillo, Humberto

    2017-01-12

    The use of both legal and illegal drugs has rarely been investigated among the Spanish military population involved in multinational military operations. The aim of the current study was to examine the consumption of drugs by Spanish military personnel in Bosnia-Herzegovina, and the variables associated with such substance use. A total of 605 military personnel participated in the cross-sectional study. The participants' mean age was 25.9 years (SD = 5.9), and 93.9% of the sample was male. The majority of the participants were enlisted personnel (83.5%). The most widely used drugs were tobacco (54.2%), and alcohol (39.9%). With respect to illegal drugs, the results showed that the drug with the highest prevalence of "use at some point during a lifetime" was cannabis (36.2%), followed by cocaine (14.9%) and amphetamines (12.1%). The most important variable associated with a decrease in the consumption of illegal drugs was social support. Conversely, participants with friends who have used illegal drugs had an increased likelihood of drug consumption. Given that the use of drugs can adversely affect soldiers' performance, preventive measures should be applied in multinational military operations.

  9. Personnel Security during Joint Operations with Foreign Military Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    century society into the twenty-first century encounters a number of obstacles. Illiteracy and innumeracy rates are high, and repressive social values are...Operations with Foreign Military Forces Feature quickly degraded into executions for social infractions like blasphemy. Repression soon followed, and the...is functionally illiterate, how do we expect to close this gap without a massive education program to support it? Miscommunication is the breeding

  10. The Wellbeing of Army Personnel in Dual Military Marriages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    being in a dual-military marriage. The initial findings were presented at the American Psychological Association (VanPuyvelde, Stover, Dunbar... structural equation modeling (AMOS 21; Arbuckle, 2012) to assess the indirect affect of work-family conflict on wellbeing. The proposed model...perceptions of fairness and cohesion) mediated the relationship between work-family conflict and psychological distress. Work-family conflict   6

  11. Major Cost Drivers of Motor Vehicle Crashes Involving Air Force Military Personnel and the Influence of the Military Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    crashes ( MVCs ) involving USAF military personnel when off duty/off base are a critical concern for the Department of Defense (DoD), due to potential...impact on mission readiness. In addition, the cost of MVCs places excessive financial burden on the USAF budget, apart from productivity loss and...leading to MVCs is crucial to establishing effective preventive measures to mitigate the negative consequences of MVCs . This thesis applied

  12. Developments in Decontamination Technologies of Military Personnel and Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sata, Utkarsh R.; Ramkumar, Seshadri S.

    Individual protection is important for warfighters, first responders and civilians to meet the current threat of toxic chemicals and chemical warfare (CW) agents. Within the realm of individual protection, decontamination of warfare agents is not only required on the battlefield but also in laboratory, pilot plants, production and agent destruction sites. It is of high importance to evaluate various decontaminants and decontamination techniques for implementing the best practices in varying scenarios such as decontamination of personnel, sites and sensitive equipment.

  13. Correlates of pain symptoms among Iraq and Afghanistan military personnel following combat-related blast exposure.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Kelcey J; Hawn, Sage E; Amstadter, Ananda B; Cifu, David X; Walker, William C

    2014-01-01

    Pain complaints are highly prevalent among military servicemembers and Veterans of the recent combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. The high comorbidity of pain with conditions such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) underscores the importance of a greater understanding of factors associated with complex polytraumatic injuries among military personnel. The present study aimed to identify correlates of current pain among 201 U.S. military personnel who reported at least one blast experience during combat deployment (age [mean +/– standard deviation]: 27.20 +/– 7.58 yr). Theoretically derived subsets of variables were analyzed in successive hierarchical regression models to determine correlates of self-reported pain symptoms. Preliminary models evaluated demographic features, medical and injury characteristics (e.g., TBI classification), psychosocial history (e.g., trauma exposure), and psychiatric variables. A final model was then derived, in which older age, possible or probable mild TBI, depression symptoms, and PTSD re-experiencing symptoms emerged as significant correlates of pain. The findings further the understanding of polytrauma symptoms among military personnel by identifying specific patient characteristics and comorbidity patterns related to pain complaints. Increased awareness of demographic, psychiatric, or medical factors implicated in pain will enhance comprehensive clinical assessment and intervention efforts.

  14. Connections, Partnerships, Opportunities, and Programs to Enhance Success for Military Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Deborah; Northrup, Pamela; Wiley, Lusharon

    2009-01-01

    Active-duty personnel, reservists, veterans, and their spouses or dependents represent 30% of the 10,000 students at the University of West Florida (UWF). With base realignment activities, a rise in the number of troops returning from deployments, and an increase in military-affiliated students on campus, the needs of veterans and their families…

  15. Preventing Injuries in the U.S. Military: The Process, Priorities, and Epidemiologic Evidence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    prevention. (2) METHODS. Active Duty military personnel, who sought inpatient or outpatient treatment for one or more oral-maxillofacial...just mortality measures but also morbidity measures such as disabilities, hospital discharges, and visits for emergency and other outpatient treatment ...RJ, Fulco CD, and Liverman, CT, editors. 1999. Reducing the burden of injury: advancing prevention and treatment . Washington, DC: National

  16. A Dynamic Model of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder for Military Personnel and Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffarzadegan, Navid; Ebrahimvandi, Alireza; Jalali, Mohammad S.

    2016-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) stands out as a major mental illness; however, little is known about effective policies for mitigating the problem. The importance and complexity of PTSD raise critical questions: What are the trends in the population of PTSD patients among military personnel and veterans in the postwar era? What policies can help mitigate PTSD? To address these questions, we developed a system dynamics simulation model of the population of military personnel and veterans affected by PTSD. The model includes both military personnel and veterans in a “system of systems.” This is a novel aspect of our model, since many policies implemented at the military level will potentially influence (and may have side effects on) veterans and the Department of Veterans Affairs. The model is first validated by replicating the historical data on PTSD prevalence among military personnel and veterans from 2000 to 2014 (datasets from the Department of Defense, the Institute of Medicine, the Department of Veterans Affairs, and other sources). The model is then used for health policy analysis. Our results show that, in an optimistic scenario based on the status quo of deployment to intense/combat zones, estimated PTSD prevalence among veterans will be at least 10% during the next decade. The model postulates that during wars, resiliency-related policies are the most effective for decreasing PTSD. In a postwar period, current health policy interventions (e.g., screening and treatment) have marginal effects on mitigating the problem of PTSD, that is, the current screening and treatment policies must be revolutionized to have any noticeable effect. Furthermore, the simulation results show that it takes a long time, on the order of 40 years, to mitigate the psychiatric consequences of a war. Policy and financial implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:27716776

  17. A Dynamic Model of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder for Military Personnel and Veterans.

    PubMed

    Ghaffarzadegan, Navid; Ebrahimvandi, Alireza; Jalali, Mohammad S

    2016-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) stands out as a major mental illness; however, little is known about effective policies for mitigating the problem. The importance and complexity of PTSD raise critical questions: What are the trends in the population of PTSD patients among military personnel and veterans in the postwar era? What policies can help mitigate PTSD? To address these questions, we developed a system dynamics simulation model of the population of military personnel and veterans affected by PTSD. The model includes both military personnel and veterans in a "system of systems." This is a novel aspect of our model, since many policies implemented at the military level will potentially influence (and may have side effects on) veterans and the Department of Veterans Affairs. The model is first validated by replicating the historical data on PTSD prevalence among military personnel and veterans from 2000 to 2014 (datasets from the Department of Defense, the Institute of Medicine, the Department of Veterans Affairs, and other sources). The model is then used for health policy analysis. Our results show that, in an optimistic scenario based on the status quo of deployment to intense/combat zones, estimated PTSD prevalence among veterans will be at least 10% during the next decade. The model postulates that during wars, resiliency-related policies are the most effective for decreasing PTSD. In a postwar period, current health policy interventions (e.g., screening and treatment) have marginal effects on mitigating the problem of PTSD, that is, the current screening and treatment policies must be revolutionized to have any noticeable effect. Furthermore, the simulation results show that it takes a long time, on the order of 40 years, to mitigate the psychiatric consequences of a war. Policy and financial implications of the findings are discussed.

  18. Pilot Trial of Inpatient Cognitive Therapy for the Prevention of Suicide in Military Personnel with Acute Stress Disorder or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    Military Operational Medicine Research Program to prepare a grant application to conduct a larger scale multi-site study to definitively determine the...Ghahramanlou, M. (1999, April). A correlation between the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF...mental and physical health of postpartum active duty military women. (USUHS Doctoral Dissertation, Clinical Psychology) 34 Curriculum Vitae

  19. A systematic review of suicide prevention programs for military or veterans.

    PubMed

    Bagley, Steven C; Munjas, Brett; Shekelle, Paul

    2010-06-01

    Military personnel and veterans have important suicide risk factors. After a systematic review of the literature on suicide prevention, seven (five in the U.S.) studies of military personnel were identified containing interventions that may reduce the risk of suicide. The effectiveness of the individual components was not assessed, and problems in methodology or reporting of data were common. Overall, multifaceted interventions for active duty military personnel are supported by consistent evidence, although of very mixed quality, and in some cases during intervals of declines in suicide rates in the general population. There were insufficient studies of U.S. Veterans to reach conclusions.

  20. Relationship between general nutrition knowledge and diet quality in Australian military personnel.

    PubMed

    Kullen, Charina J; Farrugia, Jamie-Lee; Prvan, Tania; O'Connor, Helen T

    2016-04-01

    A balanced diet informed by sound nutrition knowledge is key for operational readiness and the health of military personnel. Unfortunately, research suggests that military personnel have inadequate dietary intakes. This study assessed general nutrition knowledge, diet quality and their association in Australian military personnel. A convenience sample of male military personnel (n 211) including Army soldiers and officers completed a validated general nutrition knowledge questionnaire (GNKQ) and FFQ. The GNKQ assessed knowledge of dietary guidelines (Section A), sources of nutrients (Section B), choosing everyday foods (Section C) and diet-disease relationships (Section D). The Australian Recommended Food Score (ARFS) was used to assess diet quality from FFQ data. Statistical analyses included the χ 2 test, Spearman's correlation test, t test, median test, ANCOVA and ordinal logistic regression. The mean total GNKQ score was 52·7 %. Participants performed best on Section A (58·5 %) followed by Sections B (57·3 %) and C (57·0 %) and worst on Section D (31·0 %). Overall, officers scored significantly higher than soldiers (58·7 v. 51·9 %, P=0·001). Age was weakly but positively correlated with GNKQ total scores (r 0·307; P<0·0005), with no significant effects seen for level of education (P=0·463) or living arrangement (P=0·167). Overall ARFS was 37·6 (sd 7·7) (50·8 %) with officers scoring significantly higher than soldiers (54·7 v. 50·3 %, P=0·040). No demographic variables influenced total ARFS. The total GNKQ score had a significant, positive but weak relationship with total ARFS (r 0·179; P=0·009). Given the importance of nutrition to personnel health and operational readiness, initiatives to improve nutrition knowledge and diet quality are recommended in this population, especially in soldiers.

  1. Operational Stress and Correlates of Mental Health Among Joint Task Force Guantanamo Bay Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Webb-Murphy, Jennifer A; De La Rosa, Gabriel M; Schmitz, Kimberly J; Vishnyak, Elizabeth J; Raducha, Stephanie C; Roesch, Scott C; Johnston, Scott L

    2015-12-01

    Military personnel deployed to Joint Task Force Guantanamo Bay (JTF-GTMO) faced numerous occupational stressors. As part of a program evaluation, personnel working at JTF-GTMO completed several validated self-report measures. Personnel were at the beginning, middle, or end of their deployment phase. This study presents data regarding symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, alcohol abuse, depression, and resilience among 498 U.S. military personnel deployed to JTF-GTMO in 2009. We also investigated individual and organizational correlates of mental health among these personnel. Findings indicated that tenure at JTF-GTMO was positively related to adverse mental health outcomes. Regression models including these variables had R2 values ranging from .02 to .11. Occupation at JTF-GTMO also related to mental health such that guards reported poorer mental health than medical staff. Reluctance to seek out mental health care was also related to mental health outcomes. Those who reported being most reluctant to seek out care tended to report poorer mental health than those who were more willing to seek out care. Results suggested that the JTF-GTMO deployment was associated with significant psychological stress, and that both job-related and attitude-related variables were important to understanding mental health symptoms in this sample.

  2. Compliance with antimalarial chemoprophylaxis recommendations for wounded United States military personnel admitted to a military treatment facility.

    PubMed

    Rini, Elizabeth A; Weintrob, Amy C; Tribble, David R; Lloyd, Bradley A; Warkentien, Tyler E; Shaikh, Faraz; Li, Ping; Aggarwal, Deepak; Carson, M Leigh; Murray, Clinton K

    2014-06-01

    Malaria chemoprophylaxis is used as a preventive measure in military personnel deployed to malaria-endemic countries. However, limited information is available on compliance with chemoprophylaxis among trauma patients during hospitalization and after discharge. Therefore, we assessed antimalarial primary chemoprophylaxis and presumptive antirelapse therapy (primaquine) compliance among wounded United States military personnel after medical evacuation from Afghanistan (June 2009-August 2011) to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Landstuhl, Germany, and then to three U.S. military hospitals. Among admissions at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, 74% of 2,540 patients were prescribed primary chemoprophylaxis and < 1% were prescribed primaquine. After transfer of 1,331 patients to U.S. hospitals, 93% received primary chemoprophylaxis and 33% received primaquine. Of 751 trauma patients with available post-admission data, 42% received primary chemoprophylaxis for four weeks, 33% received primaquine for 14 days, and 17% received both. These antimalarial chemoprophylaxis prescription rates suggest that improved protocols to continue malaria chemoprophylaxis in accordance with force protection guidelines are needed.

  3. Compliance with Antimalarial Chemoprophylaxis Recommendations for Wounded United States Military Personnel Admitted to a Military Treatment Facility

    PubMed Central

    Rini, Elizabeth A.; Weintrob, Amy C.; Tribble, David R.; Lloyd, Bradley A.; Warkentien, Tyler E.; Shaikh, Faraz; Li, Ping; Aggarwal, Deepak; Carson, M. Leigh; Murray, Clinton K.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria chemoprophylaxis is used as a preventive measure in military personnel deployed to malaria-endemic countries. However, limited information is available on compliance with chemoprophylaxis among trauma patients during hospitalization and after discharge. Therefore, we assessed antimalarial primary chemoprophylaxis and presumptive antirelapse therapy (primaquine) compliance among wounded United States military personnel after medical evacuation from Afghanistan (June 2009–August 2011) to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Landstuhl, Germany, and then to three U.S. military hospitals. Among admissions at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, 74% of 2,540 patients were prescribed primary chemoprophylaxis and < 1% were prescribed primaquine. After transfer of 1,331 patients to U.S. hospitals, 93% received primary chemoprophylaxis and 33% received primaquine. Of 751 trauma patients with available post-admission data, 42% received primary chemoprophylaxis for four weeks, 33% received primaquine for 14 days, and 17% received both. These antimalarial chemoprophylaxis prescription rates suggest that improved protocols to continue malaria chemoprophylaxis in accordance with force protection guidelines are needed. PMID:24732457

  4. Suicidal or self-harming ideation in military personnel transitioning to civilian life.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Alyssa J; Bender, Randall H; Hourani, Laurel L; Larson, Gerald E

    2011-08-01

    Suicides have markedly increased among military personnel in recent years. We used path analysis to examine factors associated with suicidal/self-harming ideation among male Navy and Marine Corps personnel transitioning to civilian life. Roughly 7% of men (Sailors = 5.3%, Marines = 9.0%) reported ideation during the previous 30 days. Results suggest that combat exposure, substance abuse, and resilience are associated with suicidal ideation/self-harming thoughts through the mediation of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and/or depression symptoms. Substance abuse plays a moderating role. Resilience had a direct effect only among the Marines. Implications for improving the transition to civilian life are discussed.

  5. [The state of health of the US Armed Forces military personnel in 2012].

    PubMed

    Golota, A S; Krassiĭ, A B; Nagibovich, O A; Sivashchenko, P P

    2013-08-01

    The current article is dedicated to the state of health of the US Armed Forces military active component personnel in 2012 according to the report published by the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center in April 2013 issue of Center's Medical Surveillance Monthly Report. Sequentially, the key characteristics of ambulatory visits and hospitalization for the leading disease chapters and certain disease groups have been presented. The data have been given for the total personnel as well as for male and female separately. The general hospitalization has also been presented for the US Armed Forces components.

  6. Prevalence of Tuberculosis among Veterans, Military Personnel and their Families in East Azerbaijan Province Violators of the last 15 Years.

    PubMed

    Azad Aminjan, Maboud; Moaddab, Seyyed Reza; Hosseini Ravandi, Mohammad; Kazemi Haki, Behzad

    2015-10-01

    Nowadays in the world, tuberculosis is the second largest killer of adults after HIV. Due to the location of presidios that is mostly located in hazardous zones soldiers and army personnel are considered high risk, therefore we decided to determine the prevalence of tuberculosis status in this group of people. This was a cross-sectional descriptive research that studied the prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis in soldiers and military personnel in the last 15 years in tuberculosis and lung disease research center at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. The statistical population consisted of all the soldiers and military personnel. The detection method in this study was based on microscopic examination following Ziehl-Neelsen Stain and in Leuven Stein Johnson culturing. Descriptive statistics was used for statistical analysis and statistical values less than 0.05 were considered significant. By review information in this center since the 1988-2013 with 72 military personnel suffering from tuberculosis, it was revealed that among them 30 women, 42 men, 14 soldiers, 29 family members, and 29 military personnel are pointed. A significant correlation was found between TB rates among military personnel and their families. Although in recent years, the national statistics indicate a decline of tuberculosis, but the results of our study showed that TB is still a serious disease that must comply with the first symptoms of tuberculosis in military personnel and their families that should be diagnosed as soon as possible.

  7. Malaria in British military personnel deployed to Sierra Leone: a case series.

    PubMed

    Quantick, Oliver; Howlett-Shipley, R; Roughton, S; Ross, D

    2017-02-01

    From December 2014 to April 2015, seven cases of malaria were seen in 1530 military personnel deployed to Sierra Leone on Operation GRITROCK in response to the West African Ebola outbreak, despite predeployment briefings, prescription of chemoprophylactic agents and bite prevention measures. The cases have prompted discussion regarding the efficacy of current measures and how to prevent future cases in deployed military personnel or more widely, those working in malaria-risk environments. All of the cases have made a full recovery and returned to work. We discuss what can be learnt concerning the choice of chemoprophylactic agent and whether anything further be added to standard operating procedures regarding bite prevention and treatment of cases.

  8. Health surveillance of deployed military personnel occasionally leads to unexpected findings.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, Alexander C

    2012-10-24

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can be caused by life threatening illness, such as cancer and coronary events. The study by Forbes et al. made the unexpected finding that military personnel evacuation with medical illness have similar rates of PTSD to those evacuated with combat injuries. It may be that the illness acts as a nonspecific stressor that interacts with combat exposures to increase the risk of PTSD. Conversely, the inflammatory consequence of systemic illness may augment the effects to traumatic stress and facilitate the immunological abnormalities that are now being associated with PTSD and depression. The impact of the stress on cytokine systems and their role in the onset of PTSD demands further investigation. Military personnel evacuated due to physical illness require similar screening and monitoring for the risk of PTSD to those injured who are already known to be at high risk.

  9. The Analysis of Social Insurance Benefits Provided for the Indonesian Military Personnel.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    RD-RI52 *15 THE ANALYSIS OF SOCIAL INSURANCE BENEFITS PROVIDED FOR in1 THE INDONESIAN MILITARY PERSONNEL(U) NAYAL POSTGRADUATE UNCLSSIIEDSCHOOL...PERIOD COVERED The Analvsis of Social Insurance "aster’s Thesis Benefits Provided for the Indonesian June 1053L 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT...It noctomrv and Ienettv by block numbe,) Actuarial Calculation, Benefits , Burial Compensation, rareer Pattern, Contributions, Tndonesian Militarv

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Arivett, Brock A; Ream, Dave C; Fiester, Steven E; Kidane, Destaalem; Actis, Luis A

    2016-08-11

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes severe hospital-acquired infections, is grouped as an ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogen because of its extensive drug resistance phenotypes and effects on human health worldwide. Five multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated in this work.

  11. Draft Genome Sequences of Escherichia coli Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Arivett, Brock A; Ream, Dave C; Fiester, Steven E; Kidane, Destaalem; Actis, Luis A

    2016-08-11

    Members of the Escherichia coli bacterial family have been grouped as ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogens because of their extensive drug resistance phenotypes and increasing threat to human health. The genomes of six extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated.

  12. Draft Genome Sequences of Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Arivett, Brock A; Ream, Dave C; Fiester, Steven E; Kidane, Destaalem; Actis, Luis A

    2016-08-25

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative bacterium capable of causing hospital-acquired infections that has been grouped with Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species as ESKAPE pathogens because of their extensive drug resistance phenotypes and increasing risk to human health. Twenty-four multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated.

  13. Army ’New Standards’ Personnel: Effect of Remedial Literacy Training on Performance in Military Service

    DTIC Science & Technology

    placed in remedial training programs (Army Preparatory Training, APT), designed to upgrade their literacy status to a fifth-grade level or higher. The...research sought to determine whether success in remedial literacy training was associated with superior military performance. Another objective was...to develop an equation for predicting terminal literacy scores. Analysis for 9,000 Army personnel was carried out on data extracted from the

  14. Repeated Concussion Among U.S. Military Personnel During Operation Iraqi Freedom

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Dougherty Rosemary H. Morrison Kimberly H. Quinn Michael R. Galarneau Report No. 10 -33 The views expressed in this article are those of the...JRRD Volume 48, Number 10 , 2011Pages 1269–1278 Journal of Rehabil itation Research & DevelopmentRepeated concussion among U.S. military personnel...amber.dougherty@med.navy.mil DOI:10.1682/JRRD.2011.01.00131269 1270 JRRD, Volume 48, Number 10 , 2011concussions [9–13]. Evidence exists that some aspects of

  15. Sexual Orientation and U.S. Military Personnel Policy: Options and Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    from that of the general civilian population. Many military personnel are in their late teens and early twenties, and this age group has the highest STD...touching, leering. las- s’ylimilter,.Ies attouchements.Iles regards concupis-* civous remarks and the display of porno - cents, les remarques lascives et...Gail L. Zellman, "A Health Beliefs Field Experiment: Teen Talk," in B. C. Miller, J. J. Card, R. L. Paikoff, and J. L. Peterson (eds.), Preventing

  16. Distress, support, and relationship satisfaction during military-induced separations: a longitudinal study among spouses of Dutch deployed military personnel.

    PubMed

    Andres, Manon

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine (a) how life stress, work-family conflict, social support, psychological distress, and relationship satisfaction develop over the course of military-induced separations; (b) what best predicts relationship satisfaction after being separated for several months; and (c) whether the effects were mediated by spousal interaction. Longitudinal data were collected among 153 spouses of Dutch military personnel before, during, and after military-induced separations. Analyses demonstrated a significant decrease in relationship satisfaction, psychological distress, and social support over time. Controlling for predeployment levels of relationship satisfaction, work-family conflict, social support, psychological distress, and spousal interaction made significant contributions to the explanation of relationship satisfaction after military-induced separations. However, the effects on relationships varied for each stage of the work-related spousal separation. Hence, clinical implications for psychological service delivery suggested by these findings are impacted by the stage of the work-related spousal separation. Specifically, before the separation, services might focus upon balancing work and family demands; during the separation, services that facilitate building networks are important; and finally, communication remains the key service focus upon reunion.

  17. HIV infection among U.S. Army and Air Force military personnel: sociodemographic and genotyping analysis.

    PubMed

    Singer, Darrell E; Bautista, Christian T; O'Connell, Robert J; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Agan, Brian K; Kijak, Gustavo H; Hakre, Shilpa; Sanchez, Jose L; Sateren, Warren B; McCutchan, Francine E; Michael, Nelson L; Scott, Paul T

    2010-08-01

    Since 1985, the U.S. Department of Defense has periodically screened all military personnel for HIV allowing for the monitoring of the infection in this dynamic cohort population. A nested case-control study was performed to study sociodemographics, overseas assignment, and molecular analysis of HIV. Cases were newly identified HIV infections among U.S. Army and Air Force military personnel from 2000 to 2004. Controls were frequency matched to cases by gender and date of case first positive HIV screening test. Genotyping analysis was performed using high-throughput screening assays and partial genome sequencing. HIV was significantly associated with black race [odds ratio (OR) = 6.65], single marital status (OR = 4.45), and age (OR per year = 1.07). Ninety-seven percent were subtype B and 3% were non-B subtypes (A3, CRF01_AE, A/C recombinant, G, CRF02_AG). Among cases, overseas assignment in the period at risk prior to their first HIV-positive test was associated with non-B HIV subtype infection (OR = 8.44). Black and single military personnel remain disproportionately affected by HIV infection. Most non-B HIV subtypes were associated with overseas assignment. Given the increased frequency and length of assignments, and the expanding HIV genetic diversity observed in this population, there is a need for active HIV genotyping surveillance and a need to reinforce primary HIV prevention efforts.

  18. [Biostatistical study on health surveillance of Military Navy personnel in Sicilia and Calabria regions].

    PubMed

    Gaudioso, F; Anastasio, G; Truglio, O; Managò, A; Fuda, P; Degano, F; Toscano, A; Iermano, P

    2007-01-01

    The Maritime Military Health submit to periodic medical examination civilian employees exposed to health risks and all military personnel. The latest, because of particular use in operational duties, as well as the characteristic of seafarers employed, undergoes an extensive medical protocol. In 2006 there were around 3200 access to the Service of Medicine Labor Navy Hospital in Augusta (SR). We wanted then to make a collection of data with purpose to highlight the diseases that most often affect the area of military jurisdiction. The illnesses were divided into two main groups: those who did not produce any result on the job because of insignificant impact functional, and those for which they have been taken to unfitness, temporary or permanent. From a statistical evaluation of the acquired data, it results that most affected systems are the skeletical, hematologic, psychic, ENT, heart, the Body Mass Index.

  19. Cognitive changes and dementia risk after traumatic brain injury: implications for aging military personnel.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Andrea S; Roebuck-Spencer, Tresa M; Cernich, Alison

    2014-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is recognized as an important risk factor for the long-term cognitive health of military personnel, particularly in light of growing evidence that TBI increases risk for Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. In this article, we review the neurocognitive and neuropathologic changes after TBI with particular focus on the potential risk for cognitive decline across the life span in military service members. Implications for monitoring and surveillance of cognition in the aging military population are discussed. Additional studies are needed to clarify the factors that increase risk for later life cognitive decline, define the mechanistic link between these factors and dementia, and provide empirically supported interventions to mitigate the impact of TBI on cognition across the life span.

  20. Neurocognitive performance and prior injury among U.S. Department of Defense military personnel.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Susan P; Nieto, Kenneth; Heaton, Kristin J; Dillon, Caitlin C; Schlegel, Robert E; Russell, Michael L; Vincent, Andrea S

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the neurocognitive performance of U.S. military personnel completing the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (version 4) TBI Military (ANAM4 TBI-MIL) battery as part of the Department of Defense Neurocognitive Functional Assessment Program. Descriptive analyses utilizing the ANAM4TBI Military Performance Database were performed. We examined ANAM Composite Score (ACS) differences between five injury subgroups (no injury, brain injury with current symptoms, brain injury without current symptoms, nonbrain injury with current symptoms, and nonbrain injury without current symptoms) using general linear mixed modeling. Almost 11% (70,472/641,285) reported brain injury in the 4 years before assessment. The ACS differed significantly by injury group (p < 0.0001). In comparison to the no injury group, those reporting brain injury with current symptoms (d = -0.44) and nonbrain injury with current symptoms (d = -0.24) demonstrated significantly reduced ACS scores (p < 0.0001) indicative of reduced neurocognitive proficiency. In this population-based study of U.S. military personnel, neurocognitive performance was significantly associated with reported injury within the past 4 years among those experiencing current symptoms. Occupational programs focusing on prospective brain health of injured population groups are warranted.

  1. Mental Health Concerns: Veterans & Active Duty

    MedlinePlus

    ... through My Health e Vet , the VA’s online personal health record. This site for veterans, active duty ... their families provides access to health records, a personal health journal, online VA prescription refill information and ...

  2. The prevalence and treatment of dental caries among Israeli permanent force military personnel.

    PubMed

    Sgan-Cohen, H D; Horev, T; Zusman, S P; Katz, J; Eldad, A

    1999-08-01

    A survey was conducted to determine dental caries prevalence and treatment among 1,095 25- to 44-year-old permanent force Israeli military personnel. Caries experience, by decayed, missing, and filled permanent teeth (DMFT), was 11.66, with an average of 1.37 untreated caries, 2.40 extracted teeth, and 7.90 treated teeth. Caries was positively associated with age (p < 0.001). Females demonstrated statistically higher DMFT levels than males (p = 0.009). Negative associations were detected for education levels and untreated and extracted components (p < 0.001), and a positive association was detected for the treated caries component (p < 0.001). Permanent military personnel treated by private dentists exhibited 17.6% untreated caries, compared with 9.4% among personnel treated in the army. Officers had lower levels of untreated caries (8.6%) than others (13.3%). Among the present population, 77% had attended a dental clinic in the preceding 2 years. Permanent force personnel are offered free, comprehensive, and accessible dental treatment. The data emphasize a need for further dental health education.

  3. Description of Officers and Enlisted Personnel in the U.S. Armed Forces. A Reference for Military Manpower Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doering, Zahava D.; And Others

    As part of a project to improve the quality of survey data and to link survey data to policy formulation and research needs in the military, a study was made of more than 54,000 men and women military officers and enlisted personnel in 1978-79. The survey sought information about their personal preferences and attitudes, past behavior, and career…

  4. Job Satisfaction and the Perceived Organizational Culture of U.S. Military and Military Affiliated Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diffenauer, Deborah A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between demographic characteristics, level of job satisfaction, and current/preferred organizational culture in a sample of 139 off-campus military degree program participants. Responses were received from undergraduate students in the fields of engineering, applied sciences and arts, and education. "The Job…

  5. 32 CFR 884.6 - Requests by Federal authorities for military personnel stationed within the United States and its...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY PERSONNEL DELIVERY OF PERSONNEL TO... delivery of service members, the Air Force will normally deliver service members when the request is... properly identified Federal officer represents that such a warrant has been issued. (b) A U.S....

  6. 32 CFR 884.6 - Requests by Federal authorities for military personnel stationed within the United States and its...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY PERSONNEL DELIVERY OF PERSONNEL TO... delivery of service members, the Air Force will normally deliver service members when the request is... properly identified Federal officer represents that such a warrant has been issued. (b) A U.S....

  7. 32 CFR 724.405 - Commandant of the Marine Corps or the Commander, Naval Military Personnel Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Commandant of the Marine Corps or the Commander... Department Discharge Review System § 724.405 Commandant of the Marine Corps or the Commander, Naval Military Personnel Command. Personnel managers of the Marine Corps and the Navy; responsible for providing...

  8. Understanding and Reducing Off-Duty Vehicle Crashes Among Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Ecola, Liisa; Collins, Rebecca L.; Eiseman, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The authors review traffic safety in the United States, with specific reference to military personnel, focusing on safety interventions and attempts to change driver behavior and decisions. Overall, driving has become safer over the last 20 years: A variety of factors seem to have contributed to this increased safety—better vehicle safety features, better road safety features, decreases in teenage drunk driving, more seat belt use, and at least recently, fewer vehicle miles traveled. In contrast, motorcycle riding, a topic of particular interest to the military, is becoming more dangerous. The main difference between the military and civilian population is the proportion of military crash fatalities on motorcycles—the U.S. rate is currently about 15 percent of fatalities, while in some military branches the rate is on average 35–40 percent. This review shows that the following safety interventions tend to help in the reduction of vehicle crashes and that some in particular may be useful in the military setting: (1) better enforcement of underage drinking laws and continuation of alcohol deglamorization campaigns (Department of Defense regulations exist, but underage drinking seems to be relatively common); (2) high-visibility enforcement techniques for sobriety checkpoints; (3) high-visibility enforcement techniques for seat belt use; (4) adoption of a lower blood alcohol concentration level (such as 0.05) for motorcyclists, since the evidence shows that motorcyclists' ability to drive safely begins declining at lower levels than those for car drivers; (5) screening—perhaps as part of military medical assessment—and brief intervention with a trained counselor for at-risk drinkers, since they are at higher risk for drinking and driving; (6) media campaigns that are paired with community activities that also emphasize driver safety, such as workshops or fairs and with enforcement of driving regulations, and targeted at the drivers at highest risk

  9. Military Occupational Outcomes in Canadian Armed Forces Personnel with and without Deployment-Related Mental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zamorski, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Mental disorders are common in military organizations, and these frequently lead to functional impairments that can interfere with duties and lead to costly attrition. In Canada, the military mental health system has received heavy investment to improve occupational outcomes. We investigated military occupational outcomes of diagnosed mental disorders in a cohort of 30,513 personnel who deployed on the Afghanistan mission. Methods: Cohort members were military personnel who deployed on the Afghanistan mission from 2001 to 2008. Mental disorder diagnoses and their attribution to the Afghanistan mission were ascertained via medical records in a stratified random sample (n = 2014). Career-limiting medical conditions (that is, condition-associated restrictions that reliably lead to medically related attrition) were determined using administrative data. Outcomes were assessed from first Afghanistan-related deployment return. Results: At 5 years of follow-up, the Kaplan-Meier estimated cumulative fraction with career-limiting medical conditions was 40.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 35.5 to 46.4) among individuals with Afghanistan service–related mental disorders (ARMD), 23.6% (CI 15.5 to 31.8) with other mental disorders, and 11.1% (CI 8.9 to 13.3) without mental disorders. The adjusted Cox regression hazard ratios for career-limiting medical condition risk were 4.89 (CI 3.85 to 6.23) among individuals with ARMD and 2.31 (CI 1.48 to 3.60) with other mental disorders, relative to those without mental disorders. Conclusions: Notwithstanding the Canadian military’s mental health system investments, mental disorders (particularly ARMD) still led to a high risk of adverse military occupational outcomes. Such investments have intrinsic value but may not translate into reduced medically related attrition without improvements in prevention and treatment effectiveness. PMID:27254844

  10. Prevalence of DSM-IV Major Depression Among U.S. Military Personnel: Meta-Analysis and Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    Angermeyer MC, Konig HH, Riedel-Heller SG: Cost-of- illness studies of depression : a systematic review. J Affect Disord 2007; 98(1–2): 29–43. 2. Kessler RC...the U.S. All rights reserved. MILITARY MEDICINE, 177, 8:47, 2012 Prevalence of DSM-IV Major Depression Among U.S. Military Personnel: Meta-Analysis...estimated the prevalence of recent Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV (DSM-IV) major depression (MD) among U.S. military personnel

  11. Occupational exposure of personnel operating military radio equipment: measurements and simulation.

    PubMed

    Paljanos, Annamaria; Miclaus, Simona; Munteanu, Calin

    2015-09-01

    Technical literature provides numerous studies concerning radiofrequency exposure measurements for various radio communication devices, but there are few studies related to exposure of personnel operating military radio equipment. In order to evaluate exposure and identify cases when safety requirements are not entirely met, both measurements and simulations are needed for accurate results. Moreover, given the technical characteristics of the radio devices used in the military, personnel mainly operate in the near-field region so both measurements and simulation becomes more complex. Measurements were made in situ using a broadband personal exposimeter equipped with two isotropic probes for both electric and magnetic components of the field. The experiment was designed for three different operating frequencies of the same radio equipment, while simulations were made in FEKO software using hybrid numerical methods to solve complex electromagnetic field problems. The paper aims to discuss the comparative results of the measurements and simulation, as well as comparing them to reference levels specified in military or civilian radiofrequency exposure standards.

  12. Seroprevalence of sandfly fever virus infection in military personnel on the western border of Iran.

    PubMed

    Shiraly, Ramin; Khosravi, Afra; Farahangiz, Saman

    Military troops deployed to endemic areas are at risk of contracting sandfly fever, an arthropod-borne viral infection. Although typically a self-limited disease, sandfly fever can cause significant morbidity and loss of function among soldiers. We conducted this study to determine the extent of past SFV infection in a group of healthy Iranian military personnel in Ilam province on the western border of Iran. A total of 201 serum samples were tested by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) to detect four common sandfly fever virus serotypes. Demographic data were also collected. Overall, 37 samples (18.4%) were positive for specific IgG antibodies to sandfly viruses. Sandfly fever Sicilian virus (SFSV) and sandfly fever Naples virus (SFNV) were the most common serotypes. A positive test was inversely related to nativity (P<0.01) but was not associated with age (P=0.163), duration of presence in the border region (P=0.08) or employment status (P=0.179). Our findings indicate that past SFV infection is common among military personnel in the western border region of Iran, a Leishmania-endemic region. Therefore, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of troops presenting with acute febrile illness in similar settings.

  13. A malaria vaccine for travelers and military personnel: Requirements and top candidates.

    PubMed

    Teneza-Mora, Nimfa; Lumsden, Joanne; Villasante, Eileen

    2015-12-22

    Malaria remains an important health threat to non-immune travelers with the explosive growth of global travel. Populations at high risk of acquiring malaria infections include once semi-immune travelers who visit friends and relatives, military forces, business travelers and international tourists with destinations to sub-Saharan Africa, where malaria transmission intensity is high. Most malaria cases have been associated with poor compliance with existing preventive measures, including chemoprophylaxis. High risk groups would benefit immensely from an efficacious vaccine to protect them against malaria infection and together make up a sizable market for such a vaccine. The attributes of an ideal malaria vaccine for non-immune travelers and military personnel include a protective efficacy of 80% or greater, durability for at least 6 months, an acceptable safety profile and compatibility with existing preventive measures. It is very likely that a malaria vaccine designed to effectively prevent infection and clinical disease in the non-immune traveler and military personnel will also protect semi-immune residents of malaria-endemic areas and contribute to malaria elimination by reducing or blocking malaria transmission. The RTS,S vaccine (GlaxoSmithKline) and the PfSPZ Vaccine (Sanaria Inc) are the leading products that would make excellent vaccine candidates for these vulnerable populations.

  14. The relationship between life adjustment and parental bonding in military personnel with adjustment disorder in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    For-Wey, Lung; Fei-Yin, Lee; Bih-Ching, Shu

    2002-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the characteristics of military personnel with adjustment disorder to give them more appropriate treatment. The participants were 36 military personnel who met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, criteria of adjustment disorder as diagnosed by a psychiatrist at a teaching hospital in southern Taiwan. Another 24 persons were recruited as an age-matched control group. Each individual completed the clinical interview and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised and then completed the questionnaires which included demographic information, the Parental Bonding Instrument, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, and the Chinese Health Questionnaire. We found statistically significant differences between the case and control groups in personality and parental bonding attitudes. Soldiers with higher neuroticism, lower extraversion, and maternal overprotection had an increased risk of suffering from adjustment disorder. The inclusion of family function and the military environment and such other factors as cultural variables is recommended for future study. The statistical approach of structural equation modeling also should be considered in future studies to determine competing risk factors and mediating effects.

  15. PREDICTORS OF POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER IN MILITARY PERSONNEL DEPLOYED TO PEACEKEEPING MISSIONS.

    PubMed

    Sikharulidze, G; Oniani, T; Gugushvili, N

    2016-04-01

    As the empirical evidence suggests PTSD, depression and anxiety represent prevalent and severe problem in armed forces. High co morbidity of these disorders with each other further complicates clinical picture. Georgian military personnel regularly take part in different peacekeeping missions, however there is no existing data regarding associations of mental health problems in Georgian armed forces. Data was collected between 2014 and 2015, after 6 month deployment. Participants were 2810 Georgian military personnel who took part in peacekeeping missions. All participants were male, average age: M=31,2 (SD=6,3). All instruments used in the study were self-report scales. PTSD was measured by PCL-5; Depression and anxiety was measured by PHQ (Patient Health Questionnaire). Both variables - Severity of Anxiety symptoms and severity of depression symptoms independently predicted PTSD, but after being placed together in the same regression model, only depression symptom severity accounted for significant portion of variance. Due to the fact that the participants of our study (n=69) were young (M=29,68 ; SD=5,8) male personnel, our findings cannot be generalized. Also it should be considered, that for PTSD screening we used self-report questionnaires, which reduces liability of participants' answers and increases the tendency of self-biased responses. It is advisable for clinical practitioners and therapists to consider depression symptoms in patients with PTSD and screen for depression additionally, in order to exclude or include co morbidity factors in treatment course.

  16. Brief interventions to reduce harmful alcohol use among military personnel: lessons learned from the civilian experience.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, William G; Hartman, Roger; Olshaker, Jonathan

    2006-06-01

    Unhealthy alcohol use is among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Among military personnel, service members between the ages 18 and 25 had a 27.3% prevalence of heavy drinking in the previous 30 days, compared to 15.3% among civilians in the same age group. In the civilian world, > 100 million patients are treated in U.S. emergency departments (ED) annually; 7.9% of these visits are alcohol related. Alcohol is associated with a broad range of health consequences that may ultimately present in the ED setting: traumatic injuries (e.g., motor vehicle crashes, intentional violence, falls); environmental injuries (e.g., frostbite); cardiovascular problems (e.g., hypertension, dilated cardiomyopathy); gastrointestinal disorders (e.g., hepatitis, pancreatitis, gastrointestinal bleeding); neurological problems (e.g., encephalopathy, alcohol withdrawal, withdrawal seizures), as well as psychological problems (e.g., depression, suicide). Seminal work has been done to create behavioral interventions for at-risk drinkers. These motivational interventions have been found to be successful in encouraging clients to change their risky behaviors. We present such a technique, called the Brief Negotiated Interview as performed in a civilian ED setting, in hopes of adapting it for use in the military context. Military health care providers could easily adapt this technique to help reduce risky levels of alcohol consumption among service members, retirees, or military dependents.

  17. The Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Different Obesity Phenotype in Iranian Male Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Payab, Moloud; Hasani-Ranjbar, Shirin; Merati, Yaser; Esteghamati, Alireza; Qorbani, Mostafa; Hematabadi, Mahboobeh; Rashidian, Hoda; Shirzad, Nooshin

    2017-03-01

    Obesity, especially when concentrated in the abdominal area, is often associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. Stress, particularly occupational stress, is one of the most important factors contributing to the increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome components among different populations. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of overweight and obesity as well as the criteria for metabolic syndrome and its risk factors and different obesity phenotype in a population of military personnel aged 20 to 65 years. This study is a retrospective cross-sectional study in which data are extracted from the database of a military hospital (2,200 participants). The records of participants contained information such as age, marital status, educational level, weight, height, body mass index, blood pressure, waist circumference, history of drug use and smoking, as well as the results of tests including lipid profile and fasting blood glucose. The Adult Treatment Panel III criteria as well as two national criteria were used to identify metabolic syndrome among participants. Data analysis was p1erformed using SPSS version 16. The average age of participants was 33.37 (7.75) years. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome according to Iranian cutoff was 26.6% for the waist circumference >90 cm (585 persons) and 19.6% for the waist circumference >95 cm (432 persons). The rate of metabolic syndrome was identified as 11.1% (432 cases) according to Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results of the current study identified that the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among military individuals is less than other populations, but the prevalence of the syndrome is higher than other military personnel in other countries.

  18. [Legal regulation of the personnel issues of military medicine during the reign of Paul I].

    PubMed

    Iskhakov, E R

    2015-08-01

    The article describes laws and regulations concerning the Russian army and navy, and accordingly its medical services accepted during the reign of Paul I. During this period different decrees aimed to improve medical personnel training in order to admit students to medical and surgical schools, reorganization of educational medical institutions, improving of professional skills of medical workers. Other decrees, aimed to improvement of recruitment of medical personnel of troops: the best students of had to be sent to troops instead physician assistant, medical staff increase and additional funding, countering the reduce of physicians' social welfare due to the inhumane attitude of the authorities, to regulate of the military medical service rotation order as well as assessment of their professional, moral, and psychological qualities.

  19. Natural History of HTLV III Infection in USAF Personnel: Clinical Evaluation, Laboratory Evaluation, Assessment of In Vivo and In Vitro Immunologic Status, and Data Storage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    A a Y.TIC FILE CO Y NATURAL HISTORY OF HTLV III INFECTION IN USAF PERSONNEL: CLINICAL EVALUATION, LABORATORY EVALUATION, ASSESSMENT OF IN VIVO AND IN...Security Classification) Natural History of HTLV III Infection in USAF Personnel: Clinical Evaluation, Laboratory Evaluation, Assessment of In Vivo and In...4defifby- bkwk-numbhr) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP HTLV III/HIV natural history, HIV disease progression, USAF 06 03 active duty military HIV, HIV

  20. Effects of personal and occupational stress on injuries in a young, physically active population: a survey of military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bedno, Sheryl; Hauret, Keith; Loringer, Kelly; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Mallon, Timothy; Jones, Bruce

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to document risk factors for any injury and sports- and exercise-related injuries, including personal and occupational stress among active duty service members (SMs) in the Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy. A total of 10,692 SMs completed the April 2008 Status of Forces Survey of Active Duty Members. The survey asked about demographics, personal stress and occupational stress, injuries from any cause, and participation in sports- and exercise- related activities in the past year. The survey used a complex sampling procedure to create a representative sample of SMs. Logistic regression was used to examine the associations of injury outcomes with potential risk factors. 49% of SMs sought medical care for an injury in the past year and 25% sustained a sports- and exercise-related activities injury. Odds of injury were higher for the Army and Marine Corps than for the Air Force or Navy. This survey showed that higher personal and occupational stress was associated with higher risks of injury. SMs who experienced higher levels of personal or occupational stress reported higher risks of injuries. The effects of stress reduction programs on injury risks should be evaluated in military and other young physically active populations.

  1. Military Psychology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MILITARY FORCES(FOREIGN), *MILITARY PSYCHOLOGY , *TEXTBOOKS, USSR, ORGANIZATIONS, COMBAT READINESS, PSYCHOMOTOR FUNCTION, REASONING, SURVEYS...TRANSLATIONS, MILITARY TRAINING, OFFICER PERSONNEL, PERCEPTION( PSYCHOLOGY ), PERSONALITY, COMMUNISM, INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS, EMOTIONS.

  2. Military Education: Additional DOD Guidance Is Needed to Enhance Oversight of the Service Academies and Their Preparatory Schools

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-27

    Military Personnel: The DOD and Coast Guard Academies Have Taken Steps to Address Incidents of Sexual Harassment and Assault , but Greater Federal Oversight...military training activities and mandatory athletic activities. In return for their free education, the graduates must serve on active duty for 5...Academies: Academic Review Processes. GAO/NSIAD-95-57. Washington, D.C.: April 5, 1995. DOD Service Academies: Update on Extent of Sexual Harassment

  3. Epidemiologic and behavioral characterization of knowledge of condom use and modeling among military personnel.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Laurens; Ogungbade, Gbadebo; Ward, Doriel D; Ross, Michael W; Ekong, Ernest; Essien, Ekere James

    2008-08-01

    How accurately condoms are being used vary across populations and knowledge of the factors determining its proper use remains unclear. Knowledge of such differentials and determinants would aid in evaluating the contributions of condom use to HIV epidemic reduction. Baseline data from the Situationally Focused Individual HIV/AIDS intervention to promote HIV protective behavior among 2,213 Nigerian Military Personnel were analyzed. Educational status as a predictor variable was assessed using univariable and multivariable logistic regression model. Compared to those with less than high school education, those with high school and some college education were two times more likely to demonstrate knowledge of condom use and modeling, prevalence odds ratio (POR), 2.32, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.60-3.37. After adjustment for the relevant covariates, higher education attainment was associated with nonsignificant 62% increase in knowledge and modeling, POR, 1.62, 95% CI = 0.78-3.38. This study is indicative of low knowledge of condom use and modeling among the Nigerian military personnel; as well as a direct correlation between education attainment and knowledge of condom use and modeling.

  4. Willingness to receive a hypothetical avian influenza vaccine among US military personnel in mid-deployment.

    PubMed

    Porter, Chad K; Fitamaurice, Gina; Tribble, David R; Armstrong, Adam W; Mostafa, Manal; Riddle, Mark S

    2013-12-01

    Though no avian influenza vaccine currently exists, development efforts have increased. Given recent reports of suboptimal vaccination rates among US military personnel, we sought to assess factors associated with a willingness to receive a hypothetical avian influenza vaccine. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by US military personnel during mid-deployment to Iraq, Afghanistan, and surrounding regions. Respondents were predominately male (86.2%), Army (72.1%), and enlisted (86.3%) with a mean age of 29.6 y. The majority (77.1%) agreed to receive an avian influenza vaccine if available. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) identified two factors, vaccine importance and disease risk, that best described the individual perceptions and both were associated with an increased willingness to receive the hypothetical vaccine (OR: 8.2 and 1.6, respectively). Importantly, after controlling for these factors differences in the willingness to receive this hypothetical vaccine were observed across gender and branch of service. These results indicated that targeted education on vaccine safety and efficacy as well as disease risk may modify vaccination patterns in this population.

  5. Risk of viral hepatitis among military personnel assigned to US Navy ships.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, R E; Malone, J D; Cloninger, L A; Rozmajzl, P J; Lewis, D; Butler, J; Cross, E; Gray, S; Hyams, K C

    1992-04-01

    A prevalence study of 2072 male US shipboard military personnel scheduled for deployment to South America/West Africa and the Mediterranean was conducted to determine whether serologic evidence of prior hepatitis A, B, or C infection is associated with exposure in foreign countries. There were 210 subjects (10.1%) who had antibodies to hepatitis A virus (anti-HAV), 76 (3.7%) to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc), and 9 (0.4%) to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV). By multivariate analysis, anti-HAV seropositivity was independently associated with age, non-white racial/ethnic groups, birth outside of the United States, and prior Caribbean deployment for less than 1 year. Anti-HBc seropositivity was independently associated with black and Filipino race/ethnicity, foreign birth, a history of a sexually transmitted disease, South Pacific/Indian Ocean deployment (less than 12 months), and South Pacific or Mediterranean duty for (greater than 1 year). No geographic risk factors were associated with anti-HCV positivity. These data indicate that military personnel deployed outside the United States are at increased risk of viral hepatitis infection and should be considered for vaccination.

  6. Validity and reliability of the 20 meter shuttle run test in military personnel.

    PubMed

    Aandstad, Anders; Holme, Ingar; Berntsen, Sveinung; Anderssen, Sigmund A

    2011-05-01

    is regularly monitored in military personnel, as occupational demands require a certain level of fitness. Distance run (eg, 2 mile) is typically carried out to measure aerobic fitness, but an alternative test could be the 20 meter shuttle run test (20 m SRT). The present study aimed to evaluate validity and reliability of this test in military personnel. An equation for predicting maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) was developed on 38 Home Guard soldiers and cross validated in 28 Air Force cadets. Reliability of the 20 m SRT, expressed as mean difference in estimated VO2max-- 95% limits of agreement, was -0.8 +/- 3.1 mL x kg(-1) min(-1). Mean difference +/- limits of agreement between estimated and measured VO2max was -0.4 +/- 6.2 mL.kg(-1)x min-'. The 20 m SRT seems to be a reliable test, although validity is less certain, as relatively high variability was observed between measured and estimated VO2max from the 20 m SRT.

  7. [Current situation and future perspectives for malaria prophylaxis among travellers and military personnel].

    PubMed

    Touze, Jean-Etienne; Debonne, Jean-Marc; Boutin, Jean-Paul

    2007-10-01

    Malaria remains a major public health problem, both for travellers and for the 40,000 French soldiers deployed each year to endemic areas. Epidemiological data show that imported malaria (IM) is on the increase, and that migrants account for more than 60% of malaria cases notified each year in France. The increase in IM among French military personnel is explained by prematurely terminated chemoprophylaxis on return, repeated short missions, and more cases of P. vivax and P. ovale infection. The choice of chemoprophylaxis depends mainly on the level of chloroquine resistance in the country visited. The atovaquone-proguanil combination is well tolerated and only requires 7 days of intake on return from the endemic area. Doxycycline monohydrate is cheaper and better-tolerated than mefloquine, and is thus preferred for French military personnel. However, its short half-life necessitates very good compliance. Chemoprophylaxis should be combined with vector control measures and with personal protection (impregnated bednets, protective clothing, repellents, and indoor insecticide spraying). The need for these measures should be clearly explained before departure, during the stay, and after return.

  8. Outbreak of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Peruvian Military Personnel Undertaking Training Activities in the Amazon Basin, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Oré, Marianela; Sáenz, Eliana; Cabrera, Rufino; Sanchez, Juan F.; De Los Santos, Maxy B.; Lucas, Carmen M.; Núñez, Jorge H.; Edgel, Kimberly A.; Sopan, Justino; Fernández, Jorge; Carnero, Andres M.; Baldeviano, G. Christian; Arrasco, Juan C.; Graf, Paul C. F.; Lescano, Andres G.

    2015-01-01

    Military personnel deployed to the Amazon Basin are at high risk for cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). We responded to an outbreak among Peruvian Army personnel returning from short-term training in the Amazon, conducting active case detection, lesion sample collection, and risk factor assessment. The attack rate was 25% (76/303); the incubation period was 2–36 weeks (median = 8). Most cases had one lesion (66%), primarily ulcerative (49%), and in the legs (57%). Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identified Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis (59/61 = 97%) and L. (V.) guyanensis (2/61 = 3%). Being male (risk ratio [RR] = 4.01; P = 0.034), not wearing long-sleeve clothes (RR = 1.71; P = 0.005), and sleeping in open rooms (RR = 1.80; P = 0.009) were associated with CL. Sodium stibogluconate therapy had a 41% cure rate, less than previously reported in Peru (∼ 70%; P < 0.001). After emphasizing pre-deployment education and other basic prevention measures, trainees in the following year had lower incidence (1/278 = 0.4%; P < 0.001). Basic prevention can reduce CL risk in deployed militaries. PMID:26078320

  9. Correlates of HIV knowledge and Sexual risk behaviors among Female Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Essien, E. James; Monjok, Emmanuel; Chen, Hua; Abughosh, Susan; Ekong, Ernest; Peters, Ronald J.; Holmes, Laurens; Holstad, Marcia M.; Mgbere, Osaro

    2010-01-01

    Objective Uniformed services personnel are at an increased risk of HIV infection. We examined the HIV/AIDS knowledge and sexual risk behaviors among female military personnel to determine the correlates of HIV risk behaviors in this population. Method The study used a cross-sectional design to examine HIV/AIDS knowledge and sexual risk behaviors in a sample of 346 females drawn from two military cantonments in Southwestern Nigeria. Data was collected between 2006 and 2008. Using bivariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression, HIV/AIDS knowledge and sexual behaviors were described in relation to socio-demographic characteristics of the participants. Results Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that level of education and knowing someone with HIV/AIDS were significant (p<0.05) predictors of HIV knowledge in this sample. HIV prevention self-efficacy was significantly (P<0.05) predicted by annual income and race/ethnicity. Condom use attitudes were also significantly (P<0.05) associated with number of children, annual income, and number of sexual partners. Conclusion Data indicates the importance of incorporating these predictor variables into intervention designs. PMID:20387111

  10. Outbreak of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Peruvian Military Personnel Undertaking Training Activities in the Amazon Basin, 2010.

    PubMed

    Oré, Marianela; Sáenz, Eliana; Cabrera, Rufino; Sanchez, Juan F; De Los Santos, Maxy B; Lucas, Carmen M; Núñez, Jorge H; Edgel, Kimberly A; Sopan, Justino; Fernández, Jorge; Carnero, Andres M; Baldeviano, G Christian; Arrasco, Juan C; Graf, Paul C F; Lescano, Andres G

    2015-08-01

    Military personnel deployed to the Amazon Basin are at high risk for cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). We responded to an outbreak among Peruvian Army personnel returning from short-term training in the Amazon, conducting active case detection, lesion sample collection, and risk factor assessment. The attack rate was 25% (76/303); the incubation period was 2-36 weeks (median = 8). Most cases had one lesion (66%), primarily ulcerative (49%), and in the legs (57%). Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identified Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis (59/61 = 97%) and L. (V.) guyanensis (2/61 = 3%). Being male (risk ratio [RR] = 4.01; P = 0.034), not wearing long-sleeve clothes (RR = 1.71; P = 0.005), and sleeping in open rooms (RR = 1.80; P = 0.009) were associated with CL. Sodium stibogluconate therapy had a 41% cure rate, less than previously reported in Peru (~70%; P < 0.001). After emphasizing pre-deployment education and other basic prevention measures, trainees in the following year had lower incidence (1/278 = 0.4%; P < 0.001). Basic prevention can reduce CL risk in deployed militaries.

  11. Rank, job stress, psychological distress and physical activity among military personnel

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical fitness is one of the most important qualities in armed forces personnel. However, little is known about the association between the military environment and the occupational and leisure-time dimensions of the physical activity practiced there. This study assessed the association of rank, job stress and psychological distress with physical activity levels (overall and by dimensions). Methods This a cross-sectional study among 506 military service personnel of the Brazilian Army examined the association of rank, job stress and psychological distress with physical activity through multiple linear regression using a generalized linear model. Results The adjusted models showed that the rank of lieutenant was associated with most occupational physical activity (β = 0.324; CI 95% 0.167; 0.481); “high effort and low reward” was associated with more occupational physical activity (β = 0.224; CI 95% 0.098; 0.351) and with less physical activity in sports/physical exercise in leisure (β = −0.198; CI 95% −0.384; −0.011); and psychological distress was associated with less physical activity in sports/exercise in leisure (β = −0.184; CI 95% −0.321; −0.046). Conclusions The results of this study show that job stress and rank were associated with higher levels of occupational physical activity. Moreover job stress and psychological distress were associated with lower levels of physical activity in sports/exercises. In the military context, given the importance of physical activity and the psychosocial environment, both of which are related to health, these findings may offer input to institutional policies directed to identifying psychological distress early and improving work relationships, and to creating an environment more favorable to increasing the practice of leisure-time physical activity. PMID:23914802

  12. Total knee arthroplasty for posttraumatic osteoarthritis in military personnel under age 50.

    PubMed

    Murtha, Andrew S; Johnson, Anthony E; Buckwalter, Joseph A; Rivera, Jessica C

    2016-05-13

    United States military personnel frequently suffer knee injuries. The resulting progressive post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) causes significant disability in these young high-demand patients for which total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the only effective treatment of their pain and impairment. Yet the use of this option for treatment of PTOA has not been studied. This retrospective review identified 74 knees in 64 U.S. military personnel who underwent TKA at ≤ 50 years-of-age during an eight year period at a tertiary-care, academic, military medical center. Fifty-five knees (74.3%) experienced one or more prior ligamentous, meniscal, or chondral injuries prior to arthroplasty. Only one subject had a history of osteochondral intra-articular fracture. The average at injury was 29.2 years (95% CI of ± 2.50) with an average age at arthroplasty of 44.3 years (± 1.11). The most common injury was anterior cruciate ligament rupture (n = 19) with a mean time to TKA of 23.1 years (± 10.54) and 18.8 years (± 7.01) when concomitant meniscal pathology was noted. Nineteen patients were noted to have radiographic and symptomatic end-stage osteoarthritis without a specified etiology at 41.4 years (± 1.47) and underwent subsequent TKA. This is the first study to evaluate treatment of end-stage PT OA in young people treated with TKA, finding that the incidence of PTOA as an indication for arthroplasty is significantly higher than among civilians. In this otherwise healthy, high-demand patient population, the rate of OA progression following knee injury is accelerated and the long term implications can be career and life-altering. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. The prevalence of mental health disorders in (ex-)military personnel with a physical impairment: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Stevelink, S A M; Malcolm, E M; Mason, C; Jenkins, S; Sundin, J; Fear, N T

    2015-01-01

    Background Having a visual, hearing or physical impairment (defined as problems in body function or structure) may adversely influence the mental well-being of military personnel. This paper reviews the existing literature regarding the prevalence of mental health problems among (ex-)military personnel who have a permanent, predominantly, physical impairment. Method Multiple electronic literature databases were searched for relevant studies (EMBASE (1980–January 2014), MEDLINE (1946–January 2014), PsycINFO (2002–January 2014), Web of Science (1975–January 2014)). Results 25 papers were included in the review, representing 17 studies. Studies conducted among US military personnel (n=8) were most represented. A range of mental health disorders were investigated; predominately post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but also depression, anxiety disorder (excluding PTSD), psychological distress and alcohol misuse. The findings indicate that mental health disorders including PTSD (range 2–59%), anxiety (range 16.1–35.5%), depression (range 9.7–46.4%) and psychological distress (range 13.4–36%) are frequently found whereby alcohol misuse was least common (range 2.2–26.2%). Conclusions Common mental health disorders were frequently identified among (ex-)military personnel with a physical impairment. Adequate care and support is necessary during the impairment adaptation process to facilitate the psychosocial challenges (ex-)military personnel with an impairment face. Future research should be directed into factors impacting on the mental well-being of (ex-)military personnel with an impairment, how prevalence rates vary across impairment types and to identify and act on specific needs for care and support. PMID:25227569

  14. Laboratory impulsivity and depression in blast-exposed military personnel with post-concussion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bjork, James M; Burroughs, Thomas K; Franke, Laura M; Pickett, Treven C; Johns, Sade E; Moeller, F Gerard; Walker, William C

    2016-12-30

    In military populations, traumatic brain injury (TBI) also holds potential to increase impulsivity and impair mood regulation due to blast injury effects on ventral frontal cortex - to put military personnel at risk for suicide or substance abuse. We assessed a linkage between depression and impaired behavioral inhibition in 117 blast-exposed service members (SM) and veterans with post-concussion syndrome (PCS), where PCS was defined using a Rivermead Postconcussive Symptom Questionnaire (RPQ) modified to clarify whether each symptom worsened compared to pre-blast. Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D) scores, PTSD Checklist 5 (PCL-5) scores, and RPQ raw subscale scores correlated positively with commission and perseverative errors on the continuous performance test II (CPT-II). In contrast, the number of RPQ symptoms ostensibly worsened post-blast did not correlate with impulsive errors on the CPT-II. These data replicate earlier findings that link increased affective symptomatology to impaired behavior inhibition in military TBI populations, but where additional effects on impulsivity from the blast itself remain equivocal.

  15. Experiences of military CRNAs with service personnel who are emerging from general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Wilson, John Tyler; Pokorny, Marie E

    2012-08-01

    We conducted this qualitative study to understand the experiences of military Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) working with service personnel who have traumatic brain injury (TBI) and/or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and are emerging from general anesthesia. This study is important because there are no studies in the literature that describe the experiences of anesthetists working with patients with these specific problems. The leading questions were: "Out of all the anesthesia cases both abroad and stateside (post 9/11/2001), have you noticed service members wake from general anesthesia (not utilizing total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA), in a state of delirium? If so, can you tell me your experiences and thought processes as to why it was occurring?" Five themes emerged: (1) Emergence delirium (ED) exists and to a much higher degree in the military than in the general population. (2) ED was much more prevalent in the younger military population. (3) TIVA was a superior anesthetic for patients thought to have TBI and/or PTSD. (4) Talking to all patients suspected of having TBI and/or PTSD before surgery and on emergence was vital for a smooth emergence. (5) There is something profound happening in regard to ketamine and PTSD and TBI.

  16. Risk assessments for exposure of deployed military personnel to insecticides and personal protective measures used for disease-vector management.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Paula A; Peterson, Robert K D; Davis, Ryan S

    2007-10-01

    Infectious diseases are problematic for deployed military forces throughout the world, and, historically, more military service days have been lost to insect-vectored diseases than to combat. Because of the limitations in efficacy and availability of both vaccines and therapeutic drugs, vector management often is the best tool that military personnel have against most vector-borne pathogens. However, the use of insecticides may raise concerns about the safety of their effects on the health of the military personnel exposed to them. Therefore, our objective was to use risk assessment methodologies to evaluate health risks to deployed U.S. military personnel from vector management tactics. Our conservative tier-1, quantitative risk assessment focused on acute, subchronic, and chronic exposures and cancer risks to military personnel after insecticide application and use of personal protective measures in different scenarios. Exposures were estimated for every scenario, chemical, and pathway. Acute, subchronic, and chronic risks were assessed using a margin of exposure (MOE) approach. Our MOE was the ratio of a no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) to an estimated exposure. MOEs were greater than the levels of concern (LOCs) for all surface residual and indoor space spraying exposures, except acute dermal exposure to lambda-cyhalothrin. MOEs were greater than the LOCs for all chemicals in the truck-mounted ultra-low-volume (ULV) exposure scenario. The aggregate cancer risk for permethrin exceeded 1 x 10(-6), but more realistic exposure refinements would reduce the cancer risk below that value. Overall, results indicate that health risks from exposures to insecticides and personal protective measures used by military personnel are low.

  17. Repeated concussion among U.S. military personnel during Operation Iraqi Freedom.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, Andrew J; Dougherty, Amber L; Morrison, Rosemary H; Quinn, Kimberly H; Galarneau, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Concussions are a predominant injury of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. The aims of this study were to describe repeated concussive events among U.S. military personnel injured in Operation Iraqi Freedom and examine subsequent healthcare utilization. We reviewed clinical records from the Expeditionary Medical Encounter Database to identify service members with repeat concussions. We abstracted demographic and injury-specific variables, calculated time between events, and identified healthcare utilization from electronic medical databases. Overall, 113 personnel experienced more than one concussion between 2004 and 2008. A majority of these incidents were blast related. The median time between events was 40 days, with 20% experiencing a second event within 2 weeks of the first and 87% within 3 months. Time between events was not associated with severity of the second event. Greater severity of the second concussive event was associated with higher postinjury utilization of mental health and neurology services. This study is one of the first to describe repeated concussions in a combat setting. We found that repeated concussions occur within a short interval among deployed personnel, although the effects of the first event are unclear. Further research is needed to define the effect of repeated concussions on the health of combat veterans.

  18. Military Personnel: DOD Addressing Challenges in Iraq and Afghanistan but Opportunities Exist to Enhance the Planning Process for Army Medical Personnel Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    dental corps, and nurse anesthetists are to be deployed in theater for no longer than 90 days at a time unless the individual volunteers for a longer...dentists, and nurse anesthetists . To determine the extent to which the Army’s reserve component medical units deployed their authorized medical...refer to U.S. military health care officers including physicians, dentists, nurses , and others, as well as enlisted personnel such as medics, hospital

  19. 1999 Survey of Active Duty Personnel: Administration, Datasets, and Codebook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-12-01

    with the survey’s lithocode to ensure quality . Any mismatched pairs initiated further investigation of the matching process. This procedure ensured...Introduction to variance estimation. New York: Springer-Verlag. Woodruff, R. (1952). Confidence intervals for medians and other positional measures ...characteristics of your current residence and community at your permanent duty station? a. Cost of residence b. Quality and condition of residence c. Amount of

  20. Use of Alternative Therapies by Active Duty Air Force Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-13

    are led by lay people. Table I Healing Matrix Orthodox Marginal Alternative Physical Surgery Chiropractic Rolfing Cranial-sacral Manipulation...and. finally chiropractic therapy (9) . Commercial weight loss programs and self-help groups were also used by the respondents. Symptoms for which...mainstream of conventional medicine. These unconventional or alternative therapies include treatments by chiropractors, acupuncturists, herbal therapists , and

  1. Preparing MSW Students to Provide Mental and Behavioral Health Services to Military Personnel, Veterans, and Their Families in Rural Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rishel, Carrie W.; Hartnett, Helen P.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of mental health disorders constitutes a nationwide public health crisis. Estimates suggest that more than 90 million people live in areas designated mental health professional shortage areas, with almost 6,000 additional practitioners needed to meet the service needs in these areas. Military personnel and veterans have greater…

  2. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 372 - Overseas Military Personnel Charter Operator's Surety Bond Under Part 372 of the Special...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Overseas Military Personnel Charter... CFR Part 372) A Appendix A to Part 372 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF... (X-57), Office of Aviation Analysis, U.S. Department of Transportation, Washington, DC 20590,...

  3. A Prosthesis to Train the Proprioceptive Capabilities of the Residual Limb of Military Personnel Recovering from Lower Limb Amputation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    10-1-0573 TITLE: A prosthesis to train the proprioceptive capabilities of the residual limb of military personnel recovering from lower limb...To) 1September2011-31August2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Prosthesis to Train the Proprioceptive Capabilities of the 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  4. 14 CFR 249.21 - Preservation of records by public charter operators and overseas military personnel charter...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preservation of records by public charter operators and overseas military personnel charter operators. 249.21 Section 249.21 Aeronautics and Space... of an authorized representative of the DOT. (a) All receipts and statements of travel agents and...

  5. Protein supplementation for military personnel: a review of the mechanisms and performance outcomes.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Tom M

    2013-11-01

    Protein supplement use is common among athletes, active adults, and military personnel. This review provides a summary of the evidence base that either supports or refutes the ergogenic effects associated with different mechanisms that have been proposed to support protein supplementation. It was clear that if carbohydrate delivery was optimal either during or after an acute bout of exercise that additional protein will not increase exercise capacity. Evidence was also weak to substantiate use of protein supplements to slow the increase in brain serotonin and onset of central fatigue. It was also evident that additional research is warranted to test whether the benefits of protein supplements for enhancing recovery of fluid balance after exercise will affect subsequent work in the heat. In contrast, with repeated exercise, use of protein supplementation was associated with reductions in muscle soreness and often a faster recovery of muscle function due to reductions in protein degradation. There was also good supportive evidence for long-term benefits of protein supplementation for gains in muscle mass and strength through accelerated rates of protein synthesis, as long as the training stimulus was of sufficient intensity, frequency, and duration. However, studies have not examined the impact of protein supplements under the combined stress of a military environment that includes repeated bouts of exercise with little opportunity for feeding and recovery, lack of sleep, and exposure to extreme environments. Both additional laboratory and field research is warranted to help provide evidence-based guidance for the choice of protein supplements to enhance soldier performance.

  6. Cerebellar white matter abnormalities following primary blast injury in US military personnel.

    PubMed

    Mac Donald, Christine; Johnson, Ann; Cooper, Dana; Malone, Thomas; Sorrell, James; Shimony, Joshua; Parsons, Matthew; Snyder, Abraham; Raichle, Marcus; Fang, Raymond; Flaherty, Stephen; Russell, Michael; Brody, David L

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of blast exposure on the human brain in the absence of head impact. Clinical reports, experimental animal studies, and computational modeling of blast exposure have suggested effects on the cerebellum and brainstem. In US military personnel with isolated, primary blast-related 'mild' traumatic brain injury and no other known insult, we found diffusion tensor MRI abnormalities consistent with cerebellar white matter injury in 3 of 4 subjects. No abnormalities in other brain regions were detected. These findings add to the evidence supporting the hypothesis that primary blast exposure contributes to brain injury in the absence of head impact and that the cerebellum may be particularly vulnerable. However, the clinical effects of these abnormalities cannot be determined with certainty; none of the subjects had ataxia or other detected evidence of cerebellar dysfunction. The details of the blast events themselves cannot be disclosed at this time, thus additional animal and computational modeling will be required to dissect the mechanisms underlying primary blast-related traumatic brain injury. Furthermore, the effects of possible subconcussive impacts and other military-related exposures cannot be determined from the data presented. Thus many aspects of topic will require further investigation.

  7. Diarrheal illness among deployed U.S. military personnel during Operation Bright Star 2001--Egypt.

    PubMed

    Sanders, John W; Putnam, Shannon D; Gould, Philip; Kolisnyk, John; Merced, Norma; Barthel, Vincent; Rozmajzl, Patrick J; Shaheen, Hind; Fouad, Salwa; Frenck, Robert W

    2005-06-01

    In the fall of 2001, approximately 15,000 U.S. military personnel participated in a military exercise in the northwestern Egyptian desert. To assess the prevalence and impact of diarrhea and enteropathogen distribution, we conducted a post-deployment survey and a case series study. A departure convenience sampling (n = 3725) was used in the post-deployment survey. Overall, 9.3% reported diarrhea, 2.6% sought medical care, and 2.8% stopped or decreased their work for at least a day. Among those reporting diarrhea, 41.7% had symptoms for less than 2 days, 43.5% had symptoms from 2-5 days, and 14.8% had symptoms for more than 5 days. In the case series study, pathogens were identified in 53.6% of the 129 cases enrolled. Pathogens identified included enterotoxigenic E. coli (n = 53), enteroaggregative E. coli (n = 13), Cryptosporidium (n = 9), Campylobacter jejuni (n = 7), noroviruses (n = 7), Shigella flexneri (n = 2), rotavirus (n = 2), and Entamoeba histolytica (n = 2). Among those seeking care for diarrhea, two thirds reported a decreased ability or inability to perform their jobs for at least one day, but overall, diarrhea was much less prevalent than in past surveys in this region, with minimal impact on the mission.

  8. Stigma as a barrier to seeking health care among military personnel with mental health problems.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Marie-Louise; Fear, Nicola T; Rona, Roberto J; Wessely, Simon; Greenberg, Neil; Jones, Norman; Goodwin, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 60% of military personnel who experience mental health problems do not seek help, yet many of them could benefit from professional treatment. Across military studies, one of the most frequently reported barriers to help-seeking for mental health problems is concerns about stigma. It is, however, less clear how stigma influences mental health service utilization. This review will synthesize existing research on stigma, focusing on those in the military with mental health problems. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies between 2001 and 2014 to examine the prevalence of stigma for seeking help for a mental health problem and its association with help-seeking intentions/mental health service utilization. Twenty papers met the search criteria. Weighted prevalence estimates for the 2 most endorsed stigma concerns were 44.2% (95% confidence interval: 37.1, 51.4) for "My unit leadership might treat me differently" and 42.9% (95% confidence interval: 36.8, 49.0) for "I would be seen as weak." Nine studies found no association between anticipated stigma and help-seeking intentions/mental health service use and 4 studies found a positive association. One study found a negative association between self-stigma and intentions to seek help. Counterintuitively, those that endorsed high anticipated stigma still utilized mental health services or were interested in seeking help. We propose that these findings may be related to intention-behavior gaps or methodological issues in the measurement of stigma. Positive associations may be influenced by modified labeling theory. Additionally, other factors such as self-stigma and negative attitudes toward mental health care may be worth further attention in future investigation.

  9. Co-occurrence of alcohol, smokeless tobacco, cigarette, and illicit drug use by lower ranking military personnel.

    PubMed

    Kao, T C; Schneider, S J; Hoffman, K J

    2000-01-01

    The Worldwide Survey of Health Related Behaviors is administered periodically to a probability sample of military personnel. Earlier reports of these surveys suggested that illicit drug use was highest among the lowest ranking personnel. This paper reports a secondary analysis of the 1992 and 1995 surveys of the lowest ranking personnel. The results suggested that in general illicit drug users tended also to use alcohol, smokeless tobacco, and cigarettes. Heavy drinkers were more likely than light drinkers to use illicit drugs. No such relationship was observed between illicit drug use and the level of use of cigarettes or smokeless tobacco. Moreover, among the heavy drinkers, illicit drug users were especially likely to use cigarettes and among males, smokeless tobacco. The relevance of these results to military policies toward illicit drug use is discussed.

  10. Regional methamphetamine use among U.S. Army personnel stationed in the continental United States and Hawaii: a six-year retrospective study (2000-2005).

    PubMed

    Lacy, Benjamin W; Ditzler, Thomas F; Wilson, Raymond S; Martin, Thomas M; Ochikubo, Jon T; Roussel, Robert R; Pizarro-Matos, Jose M; Vazquez, Raymond

    2008-04-01

    Substance use disorders constitute a serious and persistent threat to military readiness and to the health and safety of military personnel and their families. Methamphetamine is among the most addictive and damaging of commonly abused drugs; this is of great concern for military health providers in Hawaii due to the unusually high prevalence in the local community. The effect of regional drug use on active duty subpopulations has not been previously studied. This study includes a 6-year retrospective sample of laboratory-confirmed methamphetamine-, cocaine-, and marijuana-positive drug tests among Army soldiers stationed in Hawaii and western and eastern continental U.S. installations. The findings suggest that active duty members are significantly affected by the local drug climate. However, current military drug policies also deter use as evidenced by low absolute drug-positive rates even in regions of high civilian prevalence.

  11. Cross-sectional prevalence survey of intimate partner violence perpetration and victimization in Canadian military personnel

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intimate partner violence (IPV) is prevalent and is associated with a broad range of adverse consequences. In military organizations, IPV may have special implications, such as the potential of service-related mental disorders to trigger IPV. However, the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) have limited data to guide their prevention and control efforts. Methods Self-reported IPV perpetration, victimization, and their correlates were assessed on a cross-sectional survey of a stratified random sample of currently-serving Canadian Regular Forces personnel (N = 2157). The four primary outcomes were perpetration or victimization of any physical and/or sexual or emotional and/or financial IPV over the lifespan of the current relationship. Results Among the 81% of the population in a current relationship, perpetration of any physical and/or sexual IPV was reported in 9%; victimization was reported in 15%. Any emotional and/or financial abuse was reported by 19% (perpetration) and 22% (victimization). Less physically injurious forms of abuse predominated. Logistic regression modelling showed that relationship dissatisfaction was independently associated with all four outcomes (OR range = 2.3 to 3.7). Probable depression was associated with all outcomes except physical and/or sexual IPV victimization (OR range = 2.5 – 2.7). PTSD symptoms were only associated with physical and/or sexual IPV perpetration (OR = 3.2, CI = 1.4 to 7.9). High-risk drinking was associated with emotional and/or financial abuse. Risk of IPV was lowest in those who had recent deployment experience; remote deployment experience (vs. never having deployed) was an independent risk factor for all IPV outcomes (OR range = 2.0 – 3.4). Conclusions IPV affects an important minority of military families; less severe cases predominate. Mental disorders, high-risk drinking, relationship dissatisfaction, and remote deployment were independently associated with abuse outcomes. The

  12. [Malaria in military personnel: the case of the Ivory Coast in 2002-2003].

    PubMed

    Migliani, R; Josse, R; Hovette, P; Keundjian, A; Pages, F; Meynard, J-B; Ollivier, L; Sbai Idrissi, K; Tifratene, K; Orlandi, E; Rogier, C; Boutin, J-P

    2003-01-01

    French troops were sent to the Ivory Coast on September 22, 2002 within the framework of Operation Unicorn in response to the political unrest. From September 22 to October 20, a total of 37 cases of malaria were reported, i.e., 35.7 cases per 1000 man-months. As of October 11, the central headquarters of the Armed Services Health Corps decided to use doxycycline as the exclusive agent for drug prophylaxis in military personnel on duty in the Ivory Coast and to enhance vector control measures. The incidence of malaria decreased to 2 cases per 1000 man-months at the sixth month. A recrudescence of malaria to 15 cases per 1000 man-months was observed with the rainy season in April. During this period one person presenting severe malaria with coma required emergency evacuation to France. In May 2003, several studies were undertaken to determine the factors that caused this recrudescence. These studies included surveys to evaluate awareness concerning malaria and monitor compliance with drug prophylaxis and tolerance of doxycycline, a case-control study to identify factors related to malarious episodes and an entomological study. Awareness of malaria was high with 75% of the 477 respondents stating that malaria could be transmitted by single mosquito bite. The case-control study showed a correlation between occurrence of malarious bouts and non-compliance with drug prophylaxis (p < 10(-5)). The odds-ratio was 3.05 (95% confidence interval, 1.52-6.14) for subjects claiming zero to one incident of non-compliance per week and 7.51 (IC95%, 3.24-17.40) for those claiming more than one incident of non-compliance per week. Tolerance of doxycyline was good since 72% of respondents reported no adverse effects. The main vector was Anopheles gambiae. The number of bites per man per night ranged from 25 to 2 and the number of infected bites ranged from 2 to 3 per week. Treatment was initiated promptly using quinine at a total dose of 25 mg/kg in 3 daily doses for 7 days by the

  13. Examining the relationship between coping strategies and suicidal desire in a sample of United States military personnel.

    PubMed

    Khazem, Lauren R; Law, Keyne C; Green, Bradley A; Anestis, Michael D

    2015-02-01

    Suicidal desire in the military has been previously examined through the lens of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide (IPTS). However, no research has examined the impact of specific coping strategies on perceived burdensomeness, thwarted belongingness, and suicidal ideation in a large population of individuals serving in the US military. Furthermore, the factor structure of previously utilized coping clusters did not apply to our sample of military personnel. Therefore, we found a three-factor solution to be tested in this sample. We hypothesized that specific types of coping behavior clusters (Adaptive and Maladaptive) would predict both IPTS constructs and suicidal ideation. Results indicated that Adaptive and Maladaptive coping clusters predicted the IPTS constructs in the hypothesized directions. However, only the Maladaptive cluster predicted suicidal ideation. These findings implicate the need for further research and suicide prevention efforts focusing on coping strategies, specifically those that are maladaptive in nature, in relation to suicidal ideation in military members.

  14. Active duty service members who sustain a traumatic brain injury have chronically elevated peripheral concentrations of Aβ40 and lower ratios of Aβ42/40

    PubMed Central

    Lejbman, Natasha; Olivera, Anlys; Heinzelmann, Morgan; Feng, Rebekah; Yun, Sijung; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Gill, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary objective: Excessive accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) and tau have been observed in older individuals with chronic neurological symptoms related to a traumatic brain injury (TBI), yet little is known about the possible role of Aβ in younger active duty service members following a TBI. The purpose of the study was to determine if Aβ 40 or 42 related to sustaining a TBI or to chronic neurological symptoms in a young cohort of military personnel. Research design: This was a cross-sectional study of active duty service members who reported sustaining a TBI and provided self-report of neurological and psychological symptoms and provided blood. Methods and procedures: An ultrasensitive single-molecule enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to compare concentrations of Aβ in active duty service members with (TBI+; n = 53) and without (TBI–; n = 18) a history of TBI. Self-report and medical history were used to measure TBI occurrence and approximate the number of total TBIs and the severity of TBIs sustained during deployment. Main outcomes and results: This study reports that TBI is associated with higher concentrations of Aβ40 (F 1,68 = 6.948, p = 0.009) and a lower ratio of Aβ42/Aβ40 (F 1,62 = 5.671, p = 0.020). These differences remained significant after controlling for co-morbid symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. Conclusions: These findings suggest that alterations in Aβ relate to TBIs and may contribute to chronic neurological symptoms. PMID:27834544

  15. Neighborhood and home food environment and children's diet and obesity: Evidence from military personnel's installation assignment.

    PubMed

    Shier, Victoria; Nicosia, Nancy; Datar, Ashlesha

    2016-06-01

    Research and policy initiatives are increasingly focused on the role of neighborhood food environment in children's diet and obesity. However, existing evidence relies on observational data that is limited by neighborhood selection bias. The Military Teenagers' Environments, Exercise, and Nutrition Study (M-TEENS) leverages the quasi-random variation in neighborhood environment generated by military personnel's assignment to installations to examine whether neighborhood food environments are associated with children's dietary behaviors and BMI. Our results suggest that neither the actual nor the perceived availability of particular food outlets in the neighborhood is associated with children's diet or BMI. The availability of supermarkets and convenience stores in the neighborhood was not associated with where families shop for food or children's dietary behaviors. Further, the type of store that families shop at was not associated with the healthiness of food available at home. Similarly, availability of fast food and restaurants was unrelated to children's dietary behaviors or how often children eat fast food or restaurant meals. However, the healthiness of food available at home was associated with healthy dietary behaviors while eating at fast food outlets and restaurants were associated with unhealthy dietary behaviors in children. Further, parental supervision, including limits on snack foods and meals eaten as a family, was associated with dietary behaviors. These findings suggest that focusing only on the neighborhood food environment may ignore important factors that influence children's outcomes. Future research should also consider how families make decisions about what foods to purchase, where to shop for foods and eating out, how closely to monitor their children's food intake, and, ultimately how these decisions collectively impact children's outcomes.

  16. Disaster Preparedness Among Active Duty Navy, Retirees, Veterans, and Dependents

    PubMed Central

    Annis, Heather; Jacoby, Irving; DeMers, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Background With the increase in natural and manmade disasters, preparedness remains a vital area of concern. Despite attempts by government and non-government agencies to stress the importance of preparedness, national levels of preparedness remain unacceptably low. A goal of commands and installations is to ensure that US Navy beneficiaries are well prepared for disasters. This is especially critical in active service members to meet mission readiness requirements in crisis settings. Objective To evaluate active duty personnel, dependents, veterans, and retirees regarding disaster preparedness status. Methods The authors conducted an anonymous 29-question survey for US Navy active duty, dependents, veterans and retirees of the Greater San Diego Region evaluating actual basic disaster readiness as determined by FEMA standards of 3-day minimum supply of emergency stores and equipment. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis were used to analyze data. Results 1150 surveys were returned and analyzed. 983 were sufficiently complete for logistic regression analysis with 394 responding “Yes” to having a 72-hour disaster kit (40.1%) while 589 had “No” as a response (59.9%). Conclusion The surveyed population is no more prepared than the general public though surveyed beneficiaries overall are at upper range of preparedness. Lower income and levels of education were associated with lack of preparedness, whereas training in disaster preparedness or having been affected by disasters increased the likelihood of being adequately prepared. Unlike results seen in the general public, those with chronic healthcare needs in our surveyed population were more, rather than less likely to be prepared and those with minor children were less likely, rather than more likely to be prepared. Duty status was assessed and only veterans were significantly more likely than most to be prepared. PMID:26903142

  17. Characteristics of Adenovirus Pneumonia in Korean Military Personnel, 2012–2016

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hee; Yoo, Hongseok; Park, Sung Bum

    2017-01-01

    Adenovirus (AdV) can cause severe pneumonia in non-immunocompromised host, but limited data exist on the distinctive characteristics of AdV pneumonia in non-immunocompromised patients. We evaluated distinctive clinico-laboratory and radiological characteristics and outcomes of AdV pneumonia (n = 179), compared with non-AdV pneumonia (n = 188) in Korean military personnel between 2012 and 2016. AdV pneumonia patients had a higher rate of consolidation with ground-glass opacity (101/152) in lobar distribution (89/152) on computed tomography (CT) (P < 0.001). Laboratory findings showed a higher incidence of unusual blood profiles such as leukopenia (55/179, P < 0.001) or thrombocytopenia (100/179, P < 0.001). The patients had more systemic symptoms such as myalgia (82/179, P = 0.001) or diarrhea (23/179, P < 0.001), compared with non-AdV pneumonia patients. Bacterial co-infection was identified in 28.5% of AdV pneumonia. Most of the AdV isolates typed (69/72, 95.8%) were AdV-55. Patients with a pneumonia severity index ≥ class III were more commonly observed in AdV pneumonia patients compared with non-AdV pneumonia patients (11.2% vs. 2.1%, P < 0.001), and time to clinical stabilization from admission was longer in the AdV pneumonia patients compared with the non-AdV pneumonia patients (3.8 vs. 2.6 days, P < 0.001). Mechanical ventilation (n = 6) was only required in AdV pneumonia patients, one of whom died due to AdV-55. Our data showed that AdV pneumonia in non-immunocompromised patients had distinct characteristics and most of the isolates typed in our study were AdV-55. It is suggested that AdV-55 is an important pathogen of pneumonia in Korean military personnel. PMID:28049240

  18. Characteristics of Adenovirus Pneumonia in Korean Military Personnel, 2012-2016.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hee; Jhun, Byung Woo; Kim, Hojoong; Yoo, Hongseok; Park, Sung Bum

    2017-02-01

    Adenovirus (AdV) can cause severe pneumonia in non-immunocompromised host, but limited data exist on the distinctive characteristics of AdV pneumonia in non-immunocompromised patients. We evaluated distinctive clinico-laboratory and radiological characteristics and outcomes of AdV pneumonia (n = 179), compared with non-AdV pneumonia (n = 188) in Korean military personnel between 2012 and 2016. AdV pneumonia patients had a higher rate of consolidation with ground-glass opacity (101/152) in lobar distribution (89/152) on computed tomography (CT) (P < 0.001). Laboratory findings showed a higher incidence of unusual blood profiles such as leukopenia (55/179, P < 0.001) or thrombocytopenia (100/179, P < 0.001). The patients had more systemic symptoms such as myalgia (82/179, P = 0.001) or diarrhea (23/179, P < 0.001), compared with non-AdV pneumonia patients. Bacterial co-infection was identified in 28.5% of AdV pneumonia. Most of the AdV isolates typed (69/72, 95.8%) were AdV-55. Patients with a pneumonia severity index ≥ class III were more commonly observed in AdV pneumonia patients compared with non-AdV pneumonia patients (11.2% vs. 2.1%, P < 0.001), and time to clinical stabilization from admission was longer in the AdV pneumonia patients compared with the non-AdV pneumonia patients (3.8 vs. 2.6 days, P < 0.001). Mechanical ventilation (n = 6) was only required in AdV pneumonia patients, one of whom died due to AdV-55. Our data showed that AdV pneumonia in non-immunocompromised patients had distinct characteristics and most of the isolates typed in our study were AdV-55. It is suggested that AdV-55 is an important pathogen of pneumonia in Korean military personnel.

  19. Military Personnel: Actions Needed to Address Sexual Assaults of Male Servicemembers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    it would need to address the “unofficial” culture that is defined by exaggerated characteristics of stereotypical masculinity, among other things...Respondents’ Unit Have both Men and Women Assigned, by Rank Group 65 Table 8: Situations Presented to Respondent on Separate Cards for Question 6...DOD. At the same time, officials found that for fiscal year 2010, of those active-duty women estimated to have experienced unwanted sexual contact

  20. [The reform of military medical education and the tasks of the Military Medical Academy in improving personnel training].

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, Iu L

    1994-08-01

    The Military Medical Academy is a military educational institution which carries out the primary profile training of physicians for the Armed Services and all types of post-graduation training and advanced training of the scientific-pedagogical and medical specialists. Internship as a first stage of the post-graduation training is intended to improve practical medical training of the graduates of the Russian Military Medical Academy and other medico-military educational institutions by means of their primary specialization in one of the clinical or profile branches of medicine. The reforming of the post-graduation training rest system in the Military Medical Academy aims at its further development and putting specialists' training system into accordance with the Armed Forces reorganizations. This will make it possible to ensure high professional qualification of military doctors at the level of national and international standards.

  1. A Multisite, Randomized Clinical Trial of Virtual Reality and Prolonged Exposure Therapy for Active Duty Soldiers with PTSD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Therapy (PE) Post - Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) BODY: Overview This study was a randomized, waitlist...therapy (PE) with a waitlist (WL) group in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in active duty (AD) Soldiers with combat-related...subjects randomized. 15. SUBJECT TERMS exposure therapy, posttraumatic stress disorder , virtual reality, military, prolonged exposure 16

  2. Outpatient Mental Healthcare of Military Personnel at a Remote U.S. Air Base in Northern Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    Military Personnel       No Diagnosis                   9 (8%)  Nicotine  Dependence             26 (22%)  Anxiety Disorder (including acute stress and PTSD...engaging  in  the use of  alcohol or illegal substances (e.g., marijuana, amphetamines,  cocaine ) while deployed in Iraq.      In general, airmen and...indicate that 26 (22%) military personnel who sought outpatient mental  healthcare  also  sought  treatment  for  nicotine   dependence,  which  was

  3. Two cases of visceral leishmaniasis in U.S. military personnel--Afghanistan, 2002-2004.

    PubMed

    2004-04-02

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), a sand fly-borne parasitic disease also known as kala-azar (Hindi, for black sickness or fever), is a risk for persons who travel to or live in areas of the tropics, subtropics, and southern Europe where the disease is endemic. The World Health Organization estimates that approximately 500,000 new cases of this potentially fatal disease occur each year, >90% of which are acquired in parts of the Indian subcontinent, Sudan, and Brazil. A total of 21 cases of VL acquired in Afghanistan, all in the 1980s, have been reported previously. This report provides preliminary data about two cases of VL that have been diagnosed in U.S. military personnel deployed to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, which began in 2001. U.S. health-care providers should consider VL in persons who were deployed to Southwest/Central Asia (or were in other areas where VL is endemic) who have persistent febrile illnesses, especially if associated with other clinical manifestations suggestive of VL (e.g., splenomegaly and pancytopenia).

  4. Bodybuilding, Energy, and Weight-Loss Supplements are Associated with Deployment and Physical Activity in U.S. Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    the herbal weight-loss supplement hydroxycut. Ann Intern Med. 2005;142:477–478. 22. Baum M, Weiss M. The influence of a taurine containing drink on...Naval Health Research Center Bodybuilding, Energy, and Weight-Loss Supplements Are Associated With Deployment and Physical Activity in U.S...Weight-Loss Supplements Are Associated With Deployment and Physical Activity in U.S. Military Personnel ISABEL G. JACOBSON, MPH, JAIME L. HORTON, BS

  5. Case series study of traveler's diarrhea in U.S. military personnel at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Porter, C K; El Mohammady, H; Baqar, S; Rockabrand, D M; Putnam, S D; Tribble, D R; Riddle, M S; Frenck, R W; Rozmajzl, P; Kilbane, E; Fox, A; Ruck, R; Lim, M; Johnston, Y J; Murphy, E; Sanders, J W

    2008-12-01

    Military personnel with traveler's diarrhea (n=202) while deployed to Incirlik Air Base, Turkey, from June to September 2002 were evaluated for pathogen-specific immune responses. Serologic and fecal immunoglobulin A (IgA) titers to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli antigens (CS6, CS3, and LT) were quite low. In contrast, subjects with Campylobacter infections had high serologic and fecal IgA responses.

  6. Military Compensation: DOD Needs More Complete and Consistent Data to Assess the Costs and Policies of Relocating Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    MILITARY COMPENSATION DOD Needs More Complete and Consistent Data to Assess the Costs and Policies of Relocating...failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE SEP 2015 2. REPORT TYPE ...the Costs and Policies of Relocating Personnel 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  7. Military Personnel: DOD Should Develop a Plan to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Its Career Intermission Pilot Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    MILITARY PERSONNEL DOD Should Develop a Plan to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Its Career Intermission Pilot... Career Intermission Pilot Program 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER...the Effectiveness of Its Career Intermission Pilot Program Why GAO Did This Study Congress authorized CIPP in 2009 to provide greater

  8. The Belgian Concept of Social-Psychological Support of Families of Military Personnel Deployed in Crisis Response Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    e.g.: midlife crisis , retirement) • Social difficulties after the breakdown of a relationship or an illness, death, unexpected event (e.g...RTO-MP-HFM-134 37 - 1 The Belgian Concept of Social-Psychological Support of Families of Military Personnel Deployed in Crisis Response...Brussels BELGIUM Philippe.Manigart@rma.ac.be, Jean-Francois.Fils@rma.ac.be ABSTRACT With the multiplication of crisis response operations carried out

  9. [Typhus fever morbidity among the military personnel and civilians in the regions around Volga river during World War I].

    PubMed

    Raĭkova, S V; Zav'ialov, A I

    2013-07-01

    The article is concerned to the materials about epidemiologic situation of typhus fever in the regions around Volga river (Saratovsky, Samarsky and others) during World War I (1914-1918) among the military personnel of the Russian army and among the civilians. The main reasons for spread of infection, ways of the transmission, and also measures for decreasing of level of morbidity on the different stages of evacuation of patients with typhus fever in the safer hospitals are shown. The most important methods of fighting against epidemic of typhus fever were: isolation of patients in separate special hospitals, desincection and disinfection measures in the foci of infection and organization appropriate sanitary conditions for military man in the army and among civilians. Acquired valuable experience of territorial and military doctors during the period of epidemic of typhus fever allowed receiving complex effective antiepidemic measures of fighting and prevention from this disease.

  10. Prevalence of common skin diseases and their associated factors among military personnel in Korea: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jung Min; Ha, Beomman; Lee, Hongsun; Park, Chang Keun; Kim, Hyun Joon; Park, Young Min

    2012-10-01

    This study was conducted to clarify the prevalence of common skin diseases and their associated factors among military personnel in Korea. Four dermatologists visited adjacent military units and examined soldiers. A structured questionnaire that included questions about known skin diseases, demographic information, and questions for the Perceived Stress Index was completed for each participant. The soldiers that had been diagnosed with a skin disease answered one additional questionnaire (Skindex-29) which assess the influence of an individual's skin disease on daily life. Of 1,321 soldiers examined, 798 (60.4%) had one or more skin diseases. The three most common skin problems were acne (35.6%), tinea pedis (15.2%) and atopic dermatitis (5.1%). The diseases closely related to the period of military service were acne, tinea pedis, viral warts and corns. The diseases related to the amount of stress were atopic dermatitis, seborrheic dermatitis, and acne. The most troublesome skin diseases were atopic dermatitis, tinea cruris, and seborrheic dermatitis. These results demonstrated that the prevalence of skin disease among military personnel in Korea is very high, and that some of the skin disorders may have a significant influence on their daily lives.

  11. Post Admission Cognitive Therapy (PACT) for the Inpatient Treatment of Military Personnel with Suicidal Behaviors: A Multi-Site Randomized Controlled Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    depression, trauma, sleep , suicide ideation), repeat number of psychiatric hospitalization(s), hope for one’s future, and acceptability of treatment (as...0106 TITLE: Post Admission Cognitive Therapy (PACT) for the Inpatient Treatment of Military Personnel with Suicidal Behaviors: A Multi- Site...Inpatient Treatment of Military Personnel with Suicidal Behaviors: A Multi-Site Randomized Controlled Trial Service Members and Veterans 5a

  12. Family stress and posttraumatic stress: the impact of military operations on military health care providers.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Susanne W; Barnett, Scott D; Hickling, Edward J

    2012-08-01

    This study uses data from the 2005 Department of Defense Survey of Health-Related Behaviors Among Military Personnel to examine relationships between family stress and posttraumatic stress symptoms across 4 subgroups of Operation Iraqi Freedom-deployed (i.e., war in Iraq) or Operation Enduring Freedom-deployed (i.e., war in Afghanistan) active-duty military service members. Results suggest the following: (a) the greatest positive correlation of family stressors with posttraumatic stress symptoms was found within the military health care officer group, and (b) these military health care officers differed in family stressors mediating posttraumatic stress with divorce and financial problems accounting for significant and unique portions of the variance. Implications for care of service members and their families are discussed.

  13. Persistence of serogroup C antibody responses following quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccination in United States military personnel.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manisha; Romero-Steiner, Sandra; Broderick, Michael P; Thomas, Cynthia G; Plikaytis, Brian D; Schmidt, Daniel S; Johnson, Scott E; Milton, Andrea S; Carlone, George M; Clark, Thomas A; Messonnier, Nancy E; Cohn, Amanda C; Faix, Dennis J

    2014-06-24

    Serogroup C meningococcal (MenC) disease accounts for one-third of all meningococcal cases and causes meningococcal outbreaks in the U.S. Quadrivalent meningococcal vaccine conjugated to diphtheria toxoid (MenACYWD) was recommended in 2005 for adolescents and high risk groups such as military recruits. We evaluated anti-MenC antibody persistence in U.S. military personnel vaccinated with either MenACYWD or meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine (MPSV4). Twelve hundred subjects vaccinated with MenACYWD from 2006 to 2008 or MPSV4 from 2002 to 2004 were randomly selected from the Defense Medical Surveillance System. Baseline serologic responses to MenC were assessed in all subjects; 100 subjects per vaccine group were tested during one of the following six post-vaccination time-points: 5-7, 11-13, 17-19, 23-25, 29-31, or 35-37 months. Anti-MenC geometric mean titers (GMT) were measured by rabbit complement serum bactericidal assay (rSBA) and geometric mean concentrations (GMC) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Continuous variables were compared using the Wilcoxon rank sum test and the proportion of subjects with an rSBA titer ≥ 8 by chi-square. Pre-vaccination rSBA GMT was <8 for the MenACWYD group. rSBA GMT increased to 703 at 5-7 months post-vaccination and decreased by 94% to 43 at 3 years post-vaccination. GMT was significantly lower in the MenACWYD group at 5-7 months post-vaccination compared to the MPSV4 group. The percentage of MenACWYD recipients achieving an rSBA titer of ≥ 8 decreased from 87% at 5-7 months to 54% at 3 years. There were no significant differences between vaccine groups in the proportion of subjects with a titer of ≥ 8 at any time-point. GMC for the MenACWYD group was 0.14 μg/mL at baseline, 1.07 μg/mL at 5-7 months, and 0.66 μg/mL at 3 years, and significantly lower than the MPSV4 group at all time-points. Anti-MenC responses wane following vaccination with MenACYWD; a booster dose is needed to maintain protective levels

  14. FY2013 National Defense Authorization Act: Selected Military Personnel Policy Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-16

    Retirement System, or CSRS , a military retiree who becomes a federal employee can waive their military retired pay and have their military time credited to...survivor benefits under CSRS . CSRS is a closed retirement system however, and retirees who now enter the civil service are covered by the Federal Employees... CSRS and FERS retirees. Reference(s): CRS Report RL31664, The Military Survivor Benefit Plan: A Description of Its Provisions, by David F. Burrelli

  15. Eliminating Major Gaps in DoD Data on the Fully-Burdened and Life-Cycle Cost of Military Personnel: Cost Elements Should be Mandated by Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-07

    Budget $ Billions O&M (less DODEA & DeCA ) $169.8 Military Personnel $135.1 Procurement $98.8 RDTE & Other $74.7 Defense Health Program $32.5...Military Construction $8.7 DoD Dependent Education (DODEA) $2.7 Family Housing (Construction & Ops) $1.7 Defense Commissary Agency ( DeCA ) $1.4

  16. Military Personnel: Joint Officer Development Has Improved, But a Strategic Approach Is Needed. Report to the Subcommittee on Military Personnel, Committee on Armed Services, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    In response to the need of military leaders to be better prepared to plan, support, and conduct joint (multi-service and multi-national) operations, Congress enacted the Goldwater- Nichols Department of Defense Reorganization Act of 1986. Positive steps were taken to implement provisions in the Act that address the education, assignment, and…

  17. A Meta-Analysis of Risk Factors for Combat-Related PTSD among Military Personnel and Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Kang, Peng; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Lulu

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a complex and chronic disorder caused by exposure to a traumatic event, is a common psychological result of current military operations. It causes substantial distress and interferes with personal and social functioning. Consequently, identifying the risk factors that make military personnel and veterans more likely to experience PTSD is of academic, clinical, and social importance. Four electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and PsycINFO) were used to search for observational studies (cross-sectional, retrospective, and cohort studies) about PTSD after deployment to combat areas. The literature search, study selection, and data extraction were conducted by two of the authors independently. Thirty-two articles were included in this study. Summary estimates were obtained using random-effects models. Subgroup analyses, sensitivity analyses, and publication bias tests were performed. The prevalence of combat-related PTSD ranged from 1.09% to 34.84%. A total of 18 significant predictors of PTSD among military personnel and veterans were found. Risk factors stemming from before the trauma include female gender, ethnic minority status, low education, non-officer ranks, army service, combat specialization, high numbers of deployments, longer cumulative length of deployments, more adverse life events, prior trauma exposure, and prior psychological problems. Various aspects of the trauma period also constituted risk factors. These include increased combat exposure, discharging a weapon, witnessing someone being wounded or killed, severe trauma, and deployment-related stressors. Lastly, lack of post-deployment support during the post-trauma period also increased the risk of PTSD. The current analysis provides evidence of risk factors for combat-related PTSD in military personnel and veterans. More research is needed to determine how these variables interact and how to best protect against susceptibility to PTSD. PMID

  18. A meta-analysis of risk factors for combat-related PTSD among military personnel and veterans.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chen; Ge, Yang; Tang, Bihan; Liu, Yuan; Kang, Peng; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Lulu

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a complex and chronic disorder caused by exposure to a traumatic event, is a common psychological result of current military operations. It causes substantial distress and interferes with personal and social functioning. Consequently, identifying the risk factors that make military personnel and veterans more likely to experience PTSD is of academic, clinical, and social importance. Four electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and PsycINFO) were used to search for observational studies (cross-sectional, retrospective, and cohort studies) about PTSD after deployment to combat areas. The literature search, study selection, and data extraction were conducted by two of the authors independently. Thirty-two articles were included in this study. Summary estimates were obtained using random-effects models. Subgroup analyses, sensitivity analyses, and publication bias tests were performed. The prevalence of combat-related PTSD ranged from 1.09% to 34.84%. A total of 18 significant predictors of PTSD among military personnel and veterans were found. Risk factors stemming from before the trauma include female gender, ethnic minority status, low education, non-officer ranks, army service, combat specialization, high numbers of deployments, longer cumulative length of deployments, more adverse life events, prior trauma exposure, and prior psychological problems. Various aspects of the trauma period also constituted risk factors. These include increased combat exposure, discharging a weapon, witnessing someone being wounded or killed, severe trauma, and deployment-related stressors. Lastly, lack of post-deployment support during the post-trauma period also increased the risk of PTSD. The current analysis provides evidence of risk factors for combat-related PTSD in military personnel and veterans. More research is needed to determine how these variables interact and how to best protect against susceptibility to PTSD.

  19. Military Personnel. Military and Civilian Pay Comparisons Present Challenges and Are One of Many Tools in Assessing Compensation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    than 400 military dental treatment facilities on a space available basis. Eligible family members may enroll in the TRICARE Dental Program, which...perspectives on compensation. That is, we focused on cash compensation and the value of benefits to servicemembers versus the cost to the government of... Costs Military compensation includes a mix of cash, noncash benefits, and deferred compensation, and has been one of the primary tools used by DOD to

  20. Depression, anxiety, and stress in partners of Australian combat veterans and military personnel: a comparison with Australian population norms

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Partners of Australian combat veterans are at an increased risk of experiencing mental health problems. The present study provides a comparative analysis of the mental health of partners of veterans with that of the Australian normative data. To compare different types of groups of partners, the study samples comprised: (a) partners of Australian combat veterans (Sample 1: n = 282, age M = 60.79, SD = 5.05), (b) a sub-sample of partners of Australian combat veterans from the previous sample (Sample 2: n = 50; M = 60.06, SD = 4.80), (c) partners of Special Air Services Regiment (SASR) personnel (Sample 3: n = 40, age M = 34.39SD = 7.01), and (d) partners of current serving military (non-SASR) personnel (Sample 4: n = 38, age M = 32.37, SD = 6.20). Respondents completed measures assessing their reported levels of depression, anxiety, and stress. Samples 1 and 2 comprised partners of Australian military veterans who reported significantly greater symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress than the comparative population norms. The sample of SASR personnel partners (Sample 3) reported significantly lower levels of depression and anxiety, whereas the sample with non-SASR personnel partners (Sample 4) reported a significantly greater stress symptomatology than the comparative norms. Number of deployments was found to be associated with depression, anxiety, and stress in partners of non-SASR veterans (Sample 4). Lessons and protective factors can be learnt from groups within the current military as to what may assist partners and families to maintain a better level of psychosocial health. PMID:27635339

  1. Depression, anxiety, and stress in partners of Australian combat veterans and military personnel: a comparison with Australian population norms.

    PubMed

    MacDonell, Gail V; Bhullar, Navjot; Thorsteinsson, Einar B

    2016-01-01

    Partners of Australian combat veterans are at an increased risk of experiencing mental health problems. The present study provides a comparative analysis of the mental health of partners of veterans with that of the Australian normative data. To compare different types of groups of partners, the study samples comprised: (a) partners of Australian combat veterans (Sample 1: n = 282, age M = 60.79, SD = 5.05), (b) a sub-sample of partners of Australian combat veterans from the previous sample (Sample 2: n = 50; M = 60.06, SD = 4.80), (c) partners of Special Air Services Regiment (SASR) personnel (Sample 3: n = 40, age M = 34.39SD = 7.01), and (d) partners of current serving military (non-SASR) personnel (Sample 4: n = 38, age M = 32.37, SD = 6.20). Respondents completed measures assessing their reported levels of depression, anxiety, and stress. Samples 1 and 2 comprised partners of Australian military veterans who reported significantly greater symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress than the comparative population norms. The sample of SASR personnel partners (Sample 3) reported significantly lower levels of depression and anxiety, whereas the sample with non-SASR personnel partners (Sample 4) reported a significantly greater stress symptomatology than the comparative norms. Number of deployments was found to be associated with depression, anxiety, and stress in partners of non-SASR veterans (Sample 4). Lessons and protective factors can be learnt from groups within the current military as to what may assist partners and families to maintain a better level of psychosocial health.

  2. Incidence and Duration of Breastfeedings in Active Duty Military Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    mothers who breastfeed their babies to 75% in the early postpartum period and increase the number of mothers who nurse for up to six months to fifty...n=429,840) of the 720,000 women sampled were breastfeeding in the hospital (Ryan, 1997). At 6 months postpartum , 21.6% (n=155,520) of the women...responses to a postpartum questionnaire sent to mothers. Comparing rates of breastfeeding in 1989 to the rates in 1995, breast-feeding initiation increased

  3. Biomarkers for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in Active Duty Military (BALSAM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    testing and serial testing scenarios. If the biomarkers are viewed as indicators of disease process, a serial testing approach will improve our...disease, we would wish to minimize false negatives. A parallel testing approach to the biomarkers will allow us to maximize sensitivity and rule-out...Cincinnati, all remaining samples at the end of the study will we be decontaminated by bleaching followed by autoclave sterilization then discarded

  4. 22 CFR 19.11-6 - Death during active duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Death during active duty. 19.11-6 Section 19.11... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.11-6 Death during active duty. (a...-2 computed as if the participant had retired on the date of death unless a court order or...

  5. 22 CFR 19.11-6 - Death during active duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Death during active duty. 19.11-6 Section 19.11... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.11-6 Death during active duty. (a...-2 computed as if the participant had retired on the date of death unless a court order or...

  6. 22 CFR 19.11-6 - Death during active duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Death during active duty. 19.11-6 Section 19.11... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.11-6 Death during active duty. (a...-2 computed as if the participant had retired on the date of death unless a court order or...

  7. 22 CFR 19.11-6 - Death during active duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Death during active duty. 19.11-6 Section 19.11... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.11-6 Death during active duty. (a...-2 computed as if the participant had retired on the date of death unless a court order or...

  8. 22 CFR 19.11-6 - Death during active duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Death during active duty. 19.11-6 Section 19.11... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.11-6 Death during active duty. (a...-2 computed as if the participant had retired on the date of death unless a court order or...

  9. 12 CFR 1022.121 - Active duty alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Active duty alerts. 1022.121 Section 1022.121 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION FAIR CREDIT REPORTING (REGULATION V) Duties of Consumer Reporting Agencies Regarding Identity Theft § 1022.121 Active duty alerts. (a) Duration....

  10. 12 CFR 1022.121 - Active duty alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Active duty alerts. 1022.121 Section 1022.121 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION FAIR CREDIT REPORTING (REGULATION V) Duties of Consumer Reporting Agencies Regarding Identity Theft § 1022.121 Active duty alerts. (a) Duration....

  11. 12 CFR 1022.121 - Active duty alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Active duty alerts. 1022.121 Section 1022.121 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION FAIR CREDIT REPORTING (REGULATION V) Duties of Consumer Reporting Agencies Regarding Identity Theft § 1022.121 Active duty alerts. (a) Duration....

  12. Women in the Military. Hearings before the Military Personnel and Compensation Subcommitee of the Committee on Armed Services, House of Representatives. One Hundredth Congress, First and Second Sessions (October 1, November 19, 1987 and February 4, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Armed Services.

    Within this document is the testimony delivered by 15 individuals at congressional hearings. Among the issues spoken to are: the combat exclusion law and its effect on the careers of women in the military; the kinds of jobs open to female armed services personnel; special problems that women in the military face; their promotion and retention…

  13. Design and methodology of a randomized clinical trial of home-based telemental health treatment for U.S. military personnel and veterans with depression.

    PubMed

    Luxton, David D; Pruitt, Larry D; O'Brien, Karen; Stanfill, Katherine; Jenkins-Guarnieri, Michael A; Johnson, Kristine; Wagner, Amy; Thomas, Elissa; Gahm, Gregory A

    2014-05-01

    Home-based telemental health (TMH) treatments have the potential to address current and future health needs of military service members, veterans, and their families, especially for those who live in rural or underserved areas. The use of home-based TMH treatments to address the behavioral health care needs of U.S. military healthcare beneficiaries is not presently considered standard of care in the Military Health System. The feasibility, safety, and clinical efficacy of home-based TMH treatments must be established before broad dissemination of home-based treatment programs can be implemented. This paper describes the design, methodology, and protocol of a clinical trial that compares in-office to home-based Behavioral Activation for Depression (BATD) treatment delivered via web-based video technology for service members and veterans with depression. This grant funded three-year randomized clinical trial is being conducted at the National Center for Telehealth and Technology at Joint-base Lewis-McChord and at the Portland VA Medical Center. Best practice recommendations regarding the implementation of in-home telehealth in the military setting as well as the cultural and contextual factors of providing in-home care to active duty and veteran military populations are also discussed.

  14. Military Personnel: Prior GAO Work on DOD’s Actions to Prevent and Respond to Sexual Assault in the Military

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-30

    rape case evidence is held for a minimum of 50 years. Restricted cases: Forensic examination kits are stored for 12 months, then destroyed if...intimidation, abuse of authority, or when the victim does not or cannot consent. Sexual assault includes rape , forcible sodomy (oral or anal sex...and mental health providers, criminal investigative personnel, law enforcement personnel, and chaplains. 2Department of Defense Directive 6495.01

  15. Providing care to military personnel and their families: how we can all contribute.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Todd D; Hemmer, Paul A

    2014-09-01

    Providing medical care to members of the military and their families remains a societal duty carried out not only by military physicians but also, and in large part, by civilian providers. As many military families are geographically dispersed, it is probable that all physicians at some point in their training or careers will care for this unique patient population. Understanding the military culture can help physicians provide the best care possible to our military families, and inclusion of military cultural competency curricula in all medical schools is a first step in advancing this understanding. The authors review the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that all health professionals should acquire to be able to care for those who serve and offer recommendations for developing these among all students and trainees.

  16. The clinical utility of a brief measure of perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness for the detection of suicidal military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Craig J

    2011-10-01

    Perceived burdensomeness (PB) and thwarted belongingness (TB) are important indicators of suicide risk; however, limited research has investigated applicability to military populations, and no efforts have been initiated to translate these constructs into easily implemented clinical tools. The current study examined the structure and validity of a brief self-report survey of PB and TB, the 10-item Interpersonal Needs Questionnaire (INQ-10), among a sample of 219 deployed military personnel. Factor analysis confirmed that PB and TB are distinct, and are correlated with psychiatric symptomatology. Receiver operating characteristic analyses indicated the most useful cutoff scores were PB=1 and TB=3.2. Both scales significantly improved the ability to rule-in and rule-out current suicide ideation among deployed service members.

  17. Effectiveness comparison between Thai traditional massage and Chinese acupuncture for myofascial back pain in Thai military personnel: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Kumnerddee, Wipoo

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this randomized comparative study was to provide preliminary data of comparative effectiveness of Thai traditional massage (TTM) and Chinese acupuncture for the treatment of myofascial back pain in young military personnel. Eighteen Thai military personnel, aged ranging from 20-40 years were randomly divided into TTM and acupuncture groups. Each group received 5 sessions of massage or acupuncture during a 10-day period. The Thai version McGill Pain Questionnaire, 100-mm, visual analog scale (VAS) and summation of pain threshold in each trigger point measured by pressure algometer were assessed at day 0, 3, 8 and 10. At the end of treatment protocols, McGill scores decreased significantly in TTM and acupuncture groups (p = 0.024 and 0.002, respectively). VAS also decreased significantly (p = 0.029 and 0.003, respectively). However, the pain pressure threshold increased significantly in the acupuncture group but not in the TTM group (p = 0.006 and 0.08, respectively). When outcomes were compared between the two groups, no significant difference was found in the VAS (p = 0.115) and pain pressure threshold (p = 0.116), whereas the acupuncture group showed significantly lower McGill scores than the TTM group (p = 0.039). In conclusion, five sessions of Thai traditional massage and Chinese acupuncture were effective for the treatment of myofascial back pain in young Thai military personnel. Significant effects in both groups begin after the first session. Acupuncture is more effective than Thai traditional massage when affective aspect is also evaluated.

  18. Effectiveness of a video-based motivational skills-building HIV risk-reduction intervention for female military personnel.

    PubMed

    Essien, E James; Mgbere, Osaro; Monjok, Emmanuel; Ekong, Ernest; Holstad, Marcia M; Kalichman, Seth C

    2011-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that the HIV/AIDS prevalence rates in several African armed forces are high, with gender inequality rendering female military personnel more vulnerable to the disease. The objective of this study was to replicate a successful videotape-based HIV prevention intervention among Nigerian female military personnel in an effort to establish the cross-cultural stability, feasibility and cost-effectiveness of this approach in resource-limited countries. Enlisted women (N346) were recruited from two cantonments in Southwestern Nigeria and randomly assigned to either (a) a 5-session video-based, small group, cognitive-behavioral, HIV prevention intervention, or (b) a 5-session, video-based, contact-matched, HIV education control condition. Participants provided self-report of their HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and sexual behaviors at baseline, 3 and 6 months after completing the intervention. The results indicate that the motivational skills-building intervention did not improve participants' knowledge of HIV/AIDS any better than did the HIV education control condition at each assessment period, but it significantly increased condom use among women in this group by 53.6% at 3-month follow-up. HIV preventive behaviors among women in the motivational skills-building intervention group improved significantly, being 2 and 3 times more, compared to women in the HIV education control group at 3-month and 6-month follow-up assessments. The intervention also significantly improved behavioral intentions of participants as well as reduced alcohol use before sex by 25%, after 3 months; and number of sexual partners by 12% after 6 months. Women in the intervention group were five times more likely than women in HIV education control group to suggest that their new male partners use condom. These findings indicate that a videotape-based, HIV prevention intervention is a feasible and effective approach to HIV prevention among female military personnel from sub

  19. Cross-sectional study of alteration of phantom limb pain with visceral stimulation in military personnel with amputation.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Michael; Bennett Britton, Thomas M; Drew, Benjamin T; Phillip, Rhodri D

    2015-01-01

    While phantom limb pain is a well-recognized phenomenon, clinical experience has suggested that the augmentation of phantom limb pain with visceral stimulation is an issue for many military personnel with amputation (visceral stimulation being the sensation of the bowel or bladder either filling or evacuating). However, the prevalence of this phenomenon is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of the alteration in phantom limb pain and the effect that visceral stimulation has on phantom limb pain intensity. A cross-sectional study of 75 military personnel who have lost one or both lower limbs completed a questionnaire to assess the prevalence of the alteration of phantom limb pain with visceral stimulation. Included in the questionnaire was a pain visual analog scale (VAS) graded from 0 to 10. Patients recorded the presence and intensity of phantom limb pain. They also recorded whether and how this pain altered with a need to micturate or micturition, and/or a need to defecate or defecation, again using a pain VAS. Time since amputation, level of amputation, and medications were also recorded. Patients reported a phantom limb pain prevalence of 85% with a mean VAS of 3.6. In all, 56% of patients reported a change in the severity of phantom limb pain with visceral stimuli. The mean increase in VAS for visceral stimulation was 2.5 +/- 1.6 for bladder stimulation and 2.9 +/- 2.0 for bowel stimulation. Of the patients questioned, 65% reported an improvement in symptoms over time. VAS scores were highest in the subgroup less than 6 mo postamputation. An increase in phantom limb pain with visceral stimulation is a common problem for military personnel with amputation.

  20. If we ask, what they might tell: clinical assessment lessons from LGBT military personnel post-DADT.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Maria Heliana; Rogers, Stephen Joseph; Johnson, Harriet Lee; Banks, Jon; Seay, Wanda Penny; Tinsley, Billy Lee; Grant, Andrew Warren

    2013-01-01

    Following repeal of the Don't Ask Don't Tell Policy, nearly one million lesbian, gay, and bisexual veterans and service members may increasingly seek access to Veterans Affairs services (G. Gates, 2004; G. J. Gates, 2010). Limited data exist regarding lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) military personnel posing a unique challenge to clinicians and healthcare systems serving veterans with evidence-based and culturally relevant practice. In an effort to fill this information void, participatory program evaluation is used to inform recommendations for LGBT-affirmative health care systems change in a post-DADT world.

  1. 78 FR 69392 - Defense Advisory Committee on Military Personnel Testing; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... the meeting is to review planned changes and progress in developing computerized tests for military..., 2013, from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ADDRESSES: The Embassy Suites Hotel O'Hare-Rosemont, 555 North River... progress in developing computerized tests for military enlistment screening. Agenda: The agenda includes...

  2. Attracting the Best. How the Military Competes for Information Technology Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    71 CHAPTER SIX Modeling the Supply of IT Personnel...73 Dynamic Retention Model with Enlistment ......................................................74 Model Structure...79 Adding Breaching Costs and Calibrating the Model

  3. Stress and mental disorders in female military personnel: comparisons between the sexes in a male dominated profession.

    PubMed

    Mota, Natalie P; Medved, Maria; Wang, Jianli; Asmundson, Gordon J G; Whitney, Debbie; Sareen, Jitender

    2012-02-01

    The proportion of women in militaries is growing; however, many studies in the area of military mental health have been conducted with majority male samples. The present study examined sex differences in trauma exposure, work stress, and mental disorders in the Canadian Community Health Survey - Canadian Forces Supplement, a representative sample of 5155 regular force personnel and 3286 reservists ages 16-54. Past-year DSM-IV mental disorders (depression, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social phobia, PTSD, and alcohol dependence), lifetime exposure to 28 traumatic events, and work stress were assessed. Regular and reserve female personnel were less likely than males to experience deployment-related traumas, accidents, and several events involving violence (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] range 0.10-0.62). Women were more likely to endorse sexual trauma, partner abuse, and being stalked (AOR range 3.60-13.63). For work stress, regular force women reported higher levels of job demand and stress around social support than men, whereas regular and reserve force women reported less physical exertion. After adjusting for a range of covariates, regular female personnel were more likely than males to have PTSD (AOR 1.88, 99% CI 1.01-3.50), while reservist women were more likely than men to have depression, panic disorder, and any mood or anxiety disorder (AOR range 1.87-6.98). Both regular and reservist women had lower rates of alcohol dependence (AOR range 0.30-0.34). Clinicians working with female personnel should screen for trauma/stressors and mental disorders that are particularly common in this population.

  4. [New approaches to the diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of military personnel, military pensioners and their family members with arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Potekhin, N P; Sarkisov, K A; Starovoitova, I M; Orlov, F A; Fursov, A N; Karakozov, A G; Klopotskii, S A; Alatortseva, L A

    2015-08-01

    The article considers new approaches to diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of patients with arterial hypertension (AH) applied to the Ministry of Defence contingent. For the medical service of the Armed Forces the problem is relevant because of the significant labor losses, high level of dismission, morbidity and mortality of this disease. In the assessment of the patients limitation of life should be considered a variant AH, the stage, availability and seventy of the organ damage, severity and reversibility of complications, the incidence and severity of hypertensive crises, the effectiveness of treatment, comorbidity, education, occupation, the presence of contra-types and conditions of military service or labor. Military medical expertise of soldiers with AH uses the classification of degrees of arterial hypertension of 2010 and a three-stage-classification hypertonic disease created by the World Health Organization, 1996.

  5. A Diagnosis of Insomnia Is Associated With Differential Expression of Sleep-Regulating Genes in Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Gill, Jessica M; Lee, Hyunhwa; Baxter, Tristin; Reddy, Swarnalatha Y; Barr, Taura; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Wang, Dan; Mysliwiec, Vincent

    2015-07-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common and disturbing symptom in military personnel, with many individuals progressing to the development of insomnia, which is characterized by increased arousals, wakefulness after sleep onset, and distorted sleep architecture. The molecular mechanisms underlying insomnia remain elusive, limiting future therapeutic development to address this critical issue. We examined whole gene expression profiles associated with insomnia. We compared subjects with insomnia (n = 25) to controls (n = 13) without insomnia using microarray gene expression profiles obtained from peripheral samples of whole blood obtained from military personnel. Compared to controls, participants with insomnia had differential expression of 44 transcripts from 43 identified genes. Among the identified genes, urotensin 2 was downregulated by more than 6 times in insomnia participants, and the fold-change remained significant after controlling for depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and medication use. Urotensin 2 is involved in regulation of orexin A and B activity and rapid eye movement during sleep. These findings suggest that differential expression of these sleep-regulating genes contributes to symptoms of insomnia and, specifically, that switching between rapid eye movement and nonrapid eye movement sleep stages underlies insomnia symptoms. Future work to identify therapeutic agents that are able to regulate these pathways may provide novel treatments for insomnia.

  6. Trajectories of suicide ideation, nonsuicidal self-injury, and suicide attempts in a nonclinical sample of military personnel and veterans.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Craig J; Bryan, AnnaBelle O; May, Alexis M; Klonsky, E David

    2015-06-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a risk factor for suicide attempts, but little is known about NSSI among military personnel and veterans, or about the temporal sequencing of NSSI relative to suicide ideation and attempts. This study evaluates trajectories of suicide ideation, NSSI, and suicide attempts in a sample of 422 military personnel and veterans. Of those with a history of NSSI, 77% also experienced suicide ideation. Suicide ideation emerged before NSSI (67%) more often than the reverse (17%). Of those with a history of suicide attempt, 41% also engaged in NSSI. NSSI emerged prior to the first suicide attempt (91%) more often than the reverse (9%). The length of time from suicide ideation to suicide attempt was longer for those who first engaged in NSSI (median = 3.5 years) compared with those who did not engage in NSSI (median = 0.0 years), Wald χ(2)(1) = 11.985, p = .002. Age of onset was earlier for participants reporting NSSI only compared with those reporting both NSSI and suicide attempts (16.71 vs. 22.08 years), F(1, 45) = 4.149, p = .048. NSSI may serve as a "stepping stone" from suicide ideation to attempts for 41% of those who attempt suicide.

  7. Meningococcal Disease in US Military Personnel Before and after Adoption of Conjugate Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    after Adoption of Conjugate Vaccine Michael P. Broderick, Christopher Phillips, Dennis Faix Author affiliation: Naval Health Research Center, San Diego... vaccines , the first of which was developed by the US Army (1–5). In 1985, the quadrivalent polysaccharide vaccine (MPSV-4) was implemented as the...military standard. It was replaced during 2006–2008 by the quadrivalent conjugate vaccine (MCV-4). Every person en- tering US military service is required

  8. Assessment of Military Personnel for Complex Environment using Human Performance Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    HBR (Human Behaviour Representation)-theory´s aim to create a computer program that simulates typical military or military related scenarios (i.e... HBR -assessment decision support system consists mainly of two different computer programs: 1) Assessment-Demonstrator: a 3D-simulation of realistic...BEHAVIOR REPRESENTATION ( HBR ) Human behaviour is highly complex in its structure. It is influenced by physical, emotional, cognitive and social factors

  9. Determinants of Burnout in Acute and Critical Care Military Nursing Personnel: A Cross-Sectional Study from Peru

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Elizabeth; Carnero, Andrés M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence on the prevalence and determinants of burnout among military acute and critical care nursing personnel from developing countries is minimal, precluding the development of effective preventive measures for this high-risk occupational group. In this context, we aimed to examine the association between the dimensions of burnout and selected socio-demographic and occupational factors in military acute/critical care nursing personnel from Lima, Peru. Methods and Findings We conducted a cross-sectional study in 93 nurses/nurse assistants from the acute and critical care departments of a large, national reference, military hospital in Lima, Peru, using a socio-demographic/occupational questionnaire and a validated Spanish translation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Total scores for each of the burnout dimensions were calculated for each participant. Higher emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation scores, and lower personal achievement scores, implied a higher degree of burnout. We used linear regression to evaluate the association between each of the burnout dimensions and selected socio-demographic and occupational characteristics, after adjusting for potential confounders. The associations of the burnout dimensions were heterogeneous for the different socio-demographic and occupational factors. Higher emotional exhaustion scores were independently associated with having children (p<0.05) and inversely associated with the time working in the current department (p<0.05). Higher depersonalization scores were independently associated with being single compared with being divorced, separated or widowed (p<0.01), working in the emergency room/intensive care unit compared with the recovery room (p<0.01), and inversely associated with age (p<0.05). Finally, higher personal achievement scores were independently associated with having children (p<0.05). Conclusion Among Peruvian military acute and critical care nursing personnel, potential screening and

  10. A systematic review and meta-analysis on the prevalence of dietary supplement use by military personnel

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although a number of studies have been conducted on the prevalence of dietary supplement (DS) use in military personnel, these investigations have not been previously summarized. This article provides a systematic literature review of this topic. Methods Literature databases, reference lists, and other sources were searched to find studies that quantitatively examined the prevalence of DS use in uniformed military groups. Prevalence data were summarized by gender and military service. Where there were at least two investigations, meta-analysis was performed using a random model and homogeneity of the prevalence values was assessed. Results The prevalence of any DS use for Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps men was 55%, 60%, 60%, and 61%, respectively; for women corresponding values were 65%, 71%, 76%, and 71%, respectively. Prevalence of multivitamin and/or multimineral (MVM) use for Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps men was 32%, 46%, 47%, and 41%, respectively; for women corresponding values were 40%, 55%, 63%, and 53%, respectively. Use prevalence of any individual vitamin or mineral supplement for Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps men was 18%, 27%, 25%, and 24%, respectively; for women corresponding values were 29%, 36%, 40%, and 33%, respectively. Men in elite military groups (Navy Special Operations, Army Rangers, and Army Special Forces) had a use prevalence of 76% for any DS and 37% for MVM, although individual studies were not homogenous. Among Army men, Army women, and elite military men, use prevalence of Vitamin C was 15% for all three groups; for Vitamin E, use prevalence was 8%, 7%, and 9%, respectively; for sport drinks, use prevalence was 22%, 25% and 39%, respectively. Use prevalence of herbal supplements was generally low compared to vitamins, minerals, and sport drinks, ≤5% in most investigations. Conclusions Compared to men, military women had a higher use prevalence of any DS and MVM. Army men and women tended to

  11. Physical and functional outcomes following multidisciplinary residential rehabilitation for prearthritic hip pain among young active UK military personnel

    PubMed Central

    Coppack, Russell J; Bilzon, James L; Wills, Andrew K; McCurdie, Ian M; Partridge, Laura K; Nicol, Alastair M; Bennett, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    Background There are no studies describing the clinical outcomes of a residential, multidisciplinary team (MDT) rehabilitation intervention for patients with prearthritic hip pain. The aim of this cohort study was to describe the functional and physical outcomes of multidisciplinary residential rehabilitation for UK military personnel with prearthritic hip pain. Methods Participants (N=40) with a mean age of 33 years referred to a specialist residential rehabilitation centre completed a comprehensive multidisciplinary residential intervention. The main outcome measures were mean pain, physical function (modified shuttle test (MST) and Y-balance test), hip range of motion (HROM) and a patient-reported outcome measure (The Copenhagen Hip and Groin Outcome Score, HAGOS). All scores for symptomatic hips were taken at baseline and post-treatment. Results There were improvements in the Y-balance test and HROM following rehabilitation. There were significant improvements in mean difference (T1-to-T2) for Y-balance scores (15.8 cm, 95% CI 10.7 to 20.9, p<0.001), HROM (6.5° increase in hip flexion, 95% CI 4.6 to 9.4, p<0.001) and hip internal rotation (4.6°, 95% CI 2.7 to 6.6, p<0.001). Scores for HAGOS, pain, MST and functional activity assessment showed no improvement. Conclusions Among UK military personnel with prearthritic hip pain, MDT residential rehabilitation resulted in improvements in a functional Y-balance test, hip flexion and internal rotation. The study suggests short-term benefits across some outcomes for the current UK military approach to MDT residential rehabilitation. PMID:27900174

  12. Lower health related quality of life in U.S. military personnel is associated with service-related disorders and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gill, Jessica; Lee, Hyunhwa; Barr, Taura; Baxter, Tristin; Heinzelmann, Morgan; Rak, Hannah; Mysliwiec, Vincent

    2014-04-30

    Military personnel who have combat exposures are at increased risk for the service-related disorders of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, sleep disturbances and decreased health related quality of life (HRQOL). Those with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) are at even greater risk. Inflammation is associated with these disorders and may underlie the risk for health declines. We evaluated 110 recently deployed, military personnel presenting with sleep disturbances for service-related disorders (TBI, PTSD, and depression) as well as HRQOL. ANOVA models were used to examine differences among military personnel with two or more service-related disorders (high comorbid group), or one or no disorders (low comorbid group). Logistic regression models were used to determine associations among interleukin-6 (IL-6) to HRQOL and service-related disorders. Approximately one-third of the sample had two or more service-related disorders. HRQOL was lower and IL-6 concentrations were higher in military personnel with PTSD or depression, with the most profound differences in those with more service-related disorders, regardless of sleep disorder. Having symptoms of depression and PTSD resulted in a 3.5-fold risk to be in the lower quartile of HRQOL and the highest quartile of IL-6. In a linear regression model, 41% of the relationship between HRQOL and IL-6 concentrations was mediated by PTSD and depression. Military personnel with PTSD and depression are at high risk for lower HRQOL, and higher IL-6 concentrations. Comprehensive treatment is required to address co-occurring service-related disorders in military personnel to promote health and well-being.

  13. "It's what we're here for:" nurses caring for military personnel during the Persian Gulf Wars.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Patricia; Scott, Jared E; Callister, Lynn Clark

    2008-01-01

    Military nursing service during wartime represents significant contributions to a unique type of health care. The purposes of this study were to: (1) generate themes that elucidate combat nursing experiences, (2) honor nurses who served by sharing their stories, and (3) permanently archive accounts of nursing personnel who served during the Persian Gulf Wars during the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Eleven military nurses who provided health care to American troops in the Persian Gulf participated in a historical study as part of the ongoing Nurses at War oral history project documenting the experiences of nurses during times of armed conflict. The overriding theme, "It's what we're here for," demonstrates the commitment of nurses: a commitment to care and to sacrifice. Other themes drawn from the study included lessons learned from their wartime nursing experiences, sacrifices made, and chronicles of caring. During armed conflict in the Persian Gulf Wars, military nurses' personal stories demonstrated the importance of being engaged in making meaningful professional and historical contributions. These nurses displayed professional commitment and hardiness in the face of difficult life circumstances, saying, "We did what we had to do."

  14. Energy drink and energy shot use in the military.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Mark B; Attipoe, Selasi; Jones, Donnamaria; Ledford, Christy J W; Deuster, Patricia A

    2014-10-01

    Use of energy drinks and energy shots among military personnel is controversial. High amounts of caffeine (the primary active ingredient in these products) may impact performance of military duties. The impact of caffeine overconsumption and potential subsequent side effects that might be experienced by service members with unique roles and responsibilities is a concern. Reported here are the prevalence of use, reasons for use, and side effects associated with consumption of energy drinks and energy shots among several populations of active duty personnel in the US military. A snowball survey was sent to over 10,000 active duty personnel. A total of 586 (∼6% response rate) individuals completed a 30-item electronic survey. Over half of respondents (53%) reported consuming an energy drink at least once in the past 30 days. One in five (19%) reported energy shot consumption in the prior 30 days. One in five (19%) also reported consuming an energy drink in combination with an alcoholic beverage. Age and gender were significantly associated with energy drink consumption. Young male respondents (18-29 years) reported the highest use of both energy drinks and energy shots. Among those reporting energy drink and energy shot use, the most common reasons for consumption were to improve mental alertness (61%) and to improve mental (29%) and physical (20%) endurance. Nearly two-thirds (65%) of users self-reported at least one side effect. The most commonly reported side effects included increased pulse rate/palpitations, restlessness, and difficulty sleeping. Use of energy products among military personnel is common and has the potential to impact warrior health and military readiness.

  15. Tabulations of Responses from the 2000 Survey of Reserve Component Personnel: Vol. 1. Military Background

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-01

    data to create the single measure of program used in Tables 43/45/165.1-3. (The same measure of program is also one of five variables by which most...Achieving Training Objectives -- Quality of Personnel in Lower-Grade Drill Positions: By Reserve Component...46m.2 Problem for Unit/Organization in Achieving Training Objectives -- Quality of Personnel in Lower-Grade Drill Positions

  16. Aggressive and violent behavior among military personnel deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan: prevalence and link with deployment and combat exposure.

    PubMed

    MacManus, Deirdre; Rona, Roberto; Dickson, Hannah; Somaini, Greta; Fear, Nicola; Wessely, Simon

    2015-01-01

    A systematic review and meta-analyses were conducted on studies of the prevalence of aggressive and violent behavior, as well as of violent offenses and convictions, among military personnel following deployment to Iraq and/or Afghanistan; the relationship with deployment and combat exposure; and the role that mental health problems, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), have on the pathway between deployment and combat to violence. Seventeen studies published between January 1, 2001, and February 12, 2014, in the United States and the United Kingdom met the inclusion criteria. Despite methodological differences across studies, aggressive behavior was found to be prevalent among serving and formerly serving personnel, with pooled estimates of 10% (95% confidence interval (CI): 1, 20) for physical assault and 29% (95% CI: 25, 36) for all types of physical aggression in the last month, and worthy of further exploration. In both countries, rates were increased among combat-exposed, formerly serving personnel. The majority of studies suggested a small-to-moderate association between combat exposure and postdeployment physical aggression and violence, with a pooled estimate of the weighted odds ratio = 3.24 (95% CI: 2.75, 3.82), with several studies finding that violence increased with intensity and frequency of exposure to combat traumas. The review's findings support the mediating role of PTSD between combat and postdeployment violence and the importance of alcohol, especially if comorbid with PTSD.

  17. A systematic review of the impact of foreign postings on accompanying spouses of military personnel.

    PubMed

    Blakely, Gillian; Hennessy, Catherine; Chung, Man Cheung; Skirton, Heather

    2012-03-01

    Military spouses frequently cope with separation, but limited research reviewing the impact of an overseas relocation when a spouse accompanies their serving husband/wife has been conducted. A search for studies reviewing the impact of foreign postings on these accompanying spouses was undertaken utilizing 12 databases and other resources. Ultimately, 12 studies were analyzed and four key themes produced: functioning of a military family on an international posting, loss, wellbeing and support. Overall, additional stressors are associated with an overseas posting and experiences are specific to an individual and their circumstances. Further research is required to examine the potential relationship between a spouse's experiences overseas and the impact on their health and wellbeing. This would help to identify possible areas of health care provision and support necessary to maximize a military spouse's experience.

  18. [The role of the vaccine prophylaxis of cervical cancer among female military personnel].

    PubMed

    Shmidt, A A; Alieva, M T; Ivanova, L V; Molchanov, O V

    2015-06-01

    The authors presented results of the study concerning human papillomavirus infecting of military students of higher military educational institutions of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation. In the Center for Obstetrics and Gynaecology of the Kirov Military-Medical Academy was performed a dynamic examination of 478 female cadets aged 17-25. The high level of high-risk HPV viruses was revealed during the examination what proves the necessity of prophylaxis enhancing with the aim to prevent gynecological diseases and reproductive health promotion. The main ways of cervical cancer prophylaxis are health education, in-depth medical examination of women with the aim to reveal and treat gynecological diseases (this medical examination should be carried out twice a year), primary prevention of cervical cancer by vaccination.

  19. [Prospects of computer-assisted assessment of functional health status of military personnel].

    PubMed

    Blaginin, A A; Ganapolskii, V P; Goncharenko, A Yu; Emelyanov, Yu A; Zhiltsova, I I; Sinelnikov, S N; Yusupov, V V

    2015-08-01

    The article is devoted to the development of:an integrated system for remote assessment of the functional state of the military serivcemen. A review of domestic and foreign literature concerning this problem is presented and proposed a new look and approach to monitoring the combat capability of the military servicemen. The authors carried out analysis of the possibility of using accumulated experience and the use of high-tech means to solve an assigned task at the level and gave a concrete way to solve this task at the current stage to improve the quality of health care and the efficiency of professional activity of servicemen.

  20. Military Personnel Dilemmas: Perspectives on Gender-Related Issues. A Selected List of Resource Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    women do not seek careers or respon- sible jobs were refuted. Beans, Harry C. "Sex Discrimination In The Military." MILITARY LAW REVIEW. Winter 1975. p...Their Changing Role In The Army)." SOLDIERS. March 1978. pp. 6-12. Harris , Brayton. "flow Will We Man The Fleets?" U. S. NAVAL INSTITUTE PROCEEDINGS...Earnings Differences By Sex." MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW. January l9l. pp. 49-53. Sangerran, Harry . "A Look At The F(lual Pay Act In Practice." LABOR LAW JOURNAL

  1. Impact of Physical Activity on Participation and Quality of Life in Individuals who use Prostheses and other Assistive Technology/Lower Extremity Prostheses versus Wheelchair for Functional Performance and Participation of Military and Veteran Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Performance and Participation of Military and Veteran Personnel. PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Shirley G. Fitzgerald, Ph.D. CONTRACTING...Participation of Military and Veteran Personnel. 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Shirley G. Fitzgerald, Ph.D. Cooper RA...participating in these organized events, positive psychosocial benefits may result to veterans with disabilities. Participation in adaptive sports

  2. [Experience of medical backup of military parade on Red Square. Authors showed data about medical backup of military personnel taking part in the parade on Red Square dedicating to anniversary of victory in the Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Malykh, A B; Iakovlev, S V; Valevskiĭ, V V

    2014-03-01

    Authors showed data about medical backup of military personnel taking part in the parade on Red Square dedicating to anniversary of Victory in the Great Patriotic War. Experience of running such events allowed to work out an algorithm for medical service: preparatory stage, training stage, running of parade, stage of move out to permanent base. During the parade on Red Square for medical care asked 18 people (participants of parade and civilians). Authors came to conclusion that as a result of medical backup of military personnel taking part in the parade no infectious and group diseases were registered.

  3. Genetics and Other Risk Factors for Past Concussions in Active-Duty Soldiers.

    PubMed

    Dretsch, Michael N; Silverberg, Noah; Gardner, Andrew J; Panenka, William J; Emmerich, Tanja; Crynen, Gogce; Ait-Ghezala, Ghania; Chaytow, Helena; Mathura, Venkat; Crawford, Fiona C; Iverson, Grant L

    2017-02-15

    Risk factors for concussion in active-duty military service members are poorly understood. The present study examined the association between self-reported concussion history and genetics (apolipoprotein E [APOE], brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], and D2 dopamine receptor genes [DRD2]), trait personality measures (impulsive-sensation seeking and trait aggression-hostility), and current alcohol use. The sample included 458 soldiers who were preparing to deploy for Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom. For those with the BDNF Met/Met genotype, 57.9% (11/19) had a history of one or more prior concussions, compared with 35.6% (154/432) of those with other BDNF genotypes (p = 0.049, odds ratio [OR] = 2.48). APOE and DRD2 genotypes were not associated with risk for past concussions. Those with the BDNF Met/Met genotype also reported greater aggression and hostility personality characteristics. When combined in a predictive model, prior military deployments, being male, and having the BDNF Met/Met genotype were independently associated with increased lifetime history of concussions in active-duty soldiers. Replication in larger independent samples is necessary to have more confidence in both the positive and negative genetic associations reported in this study.

  4. Combat Experiences and their Relationship to Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Clusters in UK Military Personnel Deployed to Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Osório, Carlos; Jones, Norman; Jones, Edgar; Robbins, Ian; Wessely, Simon; Greenberg, Neil

    2017-03-10

    The association of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom clusters with combat and other operational experiences among United Kingdom Armed Forces (UK AF) personnel who deployed to Afghanistan in 2009 were examined. Previous studies suggest that the risk of developing PTSD rises as combat exposure levels increase. To date, no UK research has investigated how specific classes of combat and operational experiences relate to PTSD symptom clusters. The current study was a secondary analysis of data derived from a two-arm cluster, randomized-controlled trial of a postdeployment operational stress-reduction intervention in deployed UK AF personnel. 2510 UK AF personnel provided combat exposure data and completed the PTSD checklist (civilian version) immediately post-deployment while 1635 of the original cohort completed further followed-up measures four to six months later. A 14-item combat experience scale was explored using principle component analysis, which yielded three main categories of experience: (1) violent combat, (2) proximity to wounding or death and (3) encountering explosive devices. The association of combat experience classes to PTSD 5-factor "dysphoric arousal" model (re-experiencing, avoidance, numbing, dysphoric-arousal and anxious-arousal symptoms) was assessed. Greater exposure to violent combat was predictive of re-experiencing and numbing symptoms, while proximity to wounding or death experiences were predictive of re-experiencing and anxious-arousal symptoms. Explosive device exposure was predictive of anxious-arousal symptoms. The present study suggests that categories of combat experience differentially impact on PTSD symptom clusters and may have relevance for clinicians treating military personnel following deployment.

  5. Total and cause-specific mortality of Finnish military personnel following service in international peacekeeping operations 1990–2010: a comprehensive register-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Laukkala, T; Parkkola, K; Henriksson, M; Pirkola, S; Kaikkonen, N; Pukkala, E; Jousilahti, P

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To estimate total and cause-specific mortality after international peacekeeping deployments among the Finnish military peacekeeping personnel in comparison to the general population of similar age and sex. Design A register-based study of a cohort of military peacekeeping personnel in 1990–2010 followed for mortality until the end of 2013. Causes of death were obtained from the national Causes of Death Register. The standardised mortality ratio (SMR) for total and cause-specific mortality was calculated as the ratio of observed and expected number of deaths. Setting Finland (peacekeeping operations in different countries in Africa, Asia and in an area of former Yugoslavia in Europe). Participants 14 584 men and 418 women who had participated in international military peacekeeping operations ending between 1990 and 2010. Interventions Participation in military peacekeeping operations. Main outcome Total and cause-specific mortality. Results 209 men and 3 women died after their peacekeeping service. The SMR for all-cause mortality was 0.55 (95% CI 0.48 to 0.62). For the male peacekeeping personnel, the SMR for all diseases was 0.44 (95% CI 0.35 to 0.53) and for accidental and violent deaths 0.69 (95% CI 0.57 to 0.82). The SMR for suicides was 0.71 (95% CI 0.53 to 0.92). Conclusions Even though military peacekeeping personnel are working in unique and often stressful conditions, their mortality after their service is lower compared with the general population. Military peacekeeping personnel appear to be a selected population group with low general mortality and no excess risk of any cause of death after peacekeeping service. PMID:27799241

  6. Characteristics of Living and Deceased Suicidal Military Personnel Based on Single Versus Multiple Suicide Attempt Status

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-27

    Suicide Prevention and Significance of Tertiary Prevention Efforts There are three stages of prevention in regard to illness and injury (Green...Finally, tertiary prevention is treatment to prevent the recurrence of illness or injury (Green & MILITARY SINGLE VERSUS MULTIPLE SUICIDE ATTEMPTS 3...Kreuter, 2005). Tertiary prevention is the aim of the present study as its purpose is to investigate the factors that are

  7. An Investigation of the Health Practices, Attitudes, and Perceptions of USAF Military and Civilian Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    breakfast is eaten. This indicates en- listed military are more prone to skip breakfast than compa- rable civilians. 64 TABLE 4.20 Number of Times per...Eating Breakfast .. *....0... ..* . 64 Consumption of Alcoholic Re Beverages ....................... 67 Research Question Two .............. 74 Research...Weight ........................ 94 Hours of Sleep ............ . .......... 95 Eating Breakfast ..................... 95 Alcohol Consumption

  8. A Randomized Control Trial Of A community Mental Health Intervention For Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    findings for this study for this reporting period. Mental health literacy , Mental Health First Aid (MHFA), curriculum adaptation 6 DMohatt@wiche.edu 3...collection instruments to assess impact of mental health literacy program in the military setting. REPORTABLE OUTCOMES: None at this time

  9. Longitudinal Investigation of Smoking Initiation and Relapse Among Younger and Older US Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Trone, Daniel W.; Peterson, Arthur V.; Jacobson, Isabel G.; Littman, Alyson J.; Maynard, Charles; Seelig, Amber D.; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F.; Bricker, Jonathan B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined whether military service, including deployment and combat experience, were related to smoking initiation and relapse. Methods. We included older (panel 1) and younger (panel 2) participants in the Millennium Cohort Study. Never smokers were followed for 3 to 6 years for smoking initiation, and former smokers were followed for relapse. Complementary log-log regression models estimated the relative risk (RR) of initiation and relapse by military exposure while adjusting for demographic, health, and lifestyle factors. Results. Deployment with combat experience predicted higher initiation rate (panel 1: RR = 1.44; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.28, 1.62; panel 2: RR = 1.26; 95% CI = 1.04, 1.54) and relapse rate (panel 1 only: RR = 1.48; 95% CI = 1.36, 1.62). Depending on the panel, previous mental health disorders, life stressors, and other military and nonmilitary characteristics independently predicted initiation and relapse. Conclusions. Deployment with combat experience and previous mental disorder may identify military service members in need of intervention to prevent smoking initiation and relapse. PMID:25880953

  10. Seroepidemiologic Survey for Coxiella burnetii Among US Military Personnel Deployed to Southwest and Central Asia in 2005

    PubMed Central

    Royal, Joseph; Riddle, Mark S.; Mohareb, Emad; Monteville, Marshall R.; Porter, Chad K.; Faix, Dennis J.

    2013-01-01

    We used a seroepidemiologic study to estimate Q fever (Coxiella burnetii) seroprevalence, seroincidence, and risk factors for seroconversion in two deployed military populations in 2005. The first study group resided in an area with a known Q fever outbreak history (Al Asad, Iraq). Of this population, 7.2% seroconverted for an incidence rate of 10.6 seroconversions per 1,000 person-months. The second population included personnel transiting through Qatar on mid-deployment leave from southwest/central Asia. In this group, we found 2.1% prevalence with 0.92 seroconversions per 1,000 person-months. However, no significant risk factors for Q fever seroconversion were found in either population. PMID:24043692

  11. Reforming the American Military Officer Personnel System: Addendum: Thoughts on Contractors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-24

    the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI)], [the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)], [the Department of Justice ], [the Department...hiring process, as noted:11 • Eliminate the use of personnel ceilings at any organizational level as a means to control cost. The contracting for

  12. Endophenotypes of Dementia Associated with Traumatic Brain Injury in Retired Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    neuropsychological results, is in preparation. The results of this study show that older veterans with past TBI have a specific clinical and... neuropsychological phenotype, which has relevance for future treatment. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Traumatic brain injury (TBI), dementia, chronic traumatic...Kramer trained all study personnel on the administration of the neuropsychological tests; Dr. Kramer traveled to HJF and select HJF study staff

  13. Heart rate variabilty changes during first week of acclimatization to 3500 m altitude in Indian military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bhaumik, G; Dass, D; Bhattacharyya, D; Sharma, Y K; Singh, S B

    2013-01-01

    Acute exposure to hypobaric hypoxia induces the changes in autonomic control of heart rate. Due to emergencies or war like conditions, rapid deployment of Indian military personnel into high altitude frequently occurs. Rapid deployment to high altitude soldiers are at risk of developing high altitude sickness. The present study was conducted to evaluate the acute exposure to high altitude hypobaric hypoxia (3500 m altitude) on the autonomic nervous control of heart rate in Indian military personnel during first week of acclimatization Indices of heart rate variability (viz; R-R interval, total power, low frequency, high frequency, ratio of low to high frequency) and pulse arterial oxygen saturation were measured at sea level and 3500m altitude. Power spectrum of heart rate variability was quantified by low frequency (LF: 0.04-0.15 Hz) and high frequency (HF: 0.15-0.5 Hz) widths. The ratio of LF to HF was also assessed as an index of the sympathovagal balance. Mean R-R interval decreased significantly on day 2 on induction to altitude which tended to increase on day 5. Total power (TP) decreased high altitude and tended to recover within a week. Both HF and LF power showed decrement at 3500m in comparison to sea level. The ratio of LF to HF (LF/HF) at 3500m was significantly higher at 3500m. SpO2 values decreased significantly (P < 0.05) at high altitude on day-2 which increased on day-5. We conclude that autonomic control of the heart rate measured by heart rate variability was altered on acute induction to 3500m which showed a significant decrease in parasympathetic tone and increase in sympathetic tone, then acclimatization seems to be characterized by progressive shift toward a higher parasympathetic tone.

  14. Evaluation of insecticides and repellents for the control of the sand fly Phlebotomus papatasi to protect deployed U.S. Military personnel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phlebotomine sand flies, including Phlebotomus papatasi, are important blood feeders and vectors that transmit the disease agents (Leishmania) that cause Leishmaniasis. Deployed U.S. Military Personnel in Iraq and Afghanistan suffered from sand fly bites and the disease they transmit. A USDA-DoD joi...

  15. Innovative technologies targeting vector populations to mitigate the risk of exposure to leishmaniasis and protect deployed U.S. Military personnel in the Middle East

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phlebotomine sand flies, including Phlebotomus papatasi, are blood feeders and vectors of significant public health importance because they transmit Leishmania spp., which cause leishmaniasis. Deployed U.S. Military personnel in the Middle East suffer from sand fly bites and are at risk of contract...

  16. Innovative technologies targeting vector populations to mitigate the risk of exposure to leishmaniasis and protect deployed U.S. Military personnel in the Middle East

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phlebotomine sand flies, including Phlebotomus papatasi, are blood feeders and vectors of significant public health importance because they transmit Leishmania spp., which cause leishmaniasis. Deployed U.S. Military personnel in the Middle East suffer from sand fly bites and are at risk of contracti...

  17. Environmental factors, immune changes and respiratory diseases in troops during military activities.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Chciałowski, Andrzej; Korsak, Jolanta

    2013-06-01

    Combat operations in contemporary theaters of war, as well as combat training, are carried out in all parts of the world, typically in a harsh environment. Specific environmental conditions, such as heat, cold, high-altitudes, desert climates, as well as chemical and biological pollution of both the atmosphere and soil, together with over-exertion, food restrictions, sleep deprivation, and psychological stress can all result in changes in the immune system and the occurrence of associated diseases. Respiratory diseases are one of the most common health problems among military personnel participating in combat training or deployed to operations in areas characterized by difficult climatic and sanitary conditions. They are, therefore, one of the main reasons for military personnel requiring ambulant and hospital treatment. The aim of the study was to discuss the influence of environmental factors and the conditions in which active duty is performed on changes in the immune system and the occurrence of respiratory tract diseases in a military environment.

  18. Severe Neuropsychiatric Reaction in a Deployed Military Member after Prophylactic Mefloquine

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Alan L.; Seegmiller, Robert A.; Schindler, Libby S.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies of military personnel who have deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan have reported a number of combat-related psychiatric disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and traumatic brain injury. This case report involves a 27-year-old male active-duty US military service member who developed severe depression, psychotic hallucinations, and neuropsychological sequelae following the prophylactic use of the antimalarial medication mefloquine hydrochloride. The patient had a recent history of depression and was taking antidepressant medications at the time of his deployment to the Middle East. Psychiatrists and other health care providers should be aware of the possible neuropsychiatric side effects of mefloquine in deployed military personnel and should consider the use of other medications for malaria prophylaxis in those individuals who may be at increased risk for side effects. PMID:22937403

  19. Military Service, Race, and the Transition to Marriage and Cohabitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teachman, Jay

    2009-01-01

    Using data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Study of Youth, the author investigates the relationship between military service and the transition to the first intimate union. The author argues that active-duty military service promotes marriage over cohabitation. The results are consistent with this argument, showing that active-duty members of…

  20. Sickle Cell Trait Complicated by Acute Rhabdomyolysis in Military Personnel: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Joshua M; Wuerdeman, Marc F

    2015-08-01

    Sickle cell trait, a trait known to be protective against falciparum malaria, is prevalent in the African American community. Unlike true sickle cell disease, sickle cell trait is currently not a disqualifying condition for military service. In the case below, we describe an occurrence, from Logar Provence, Afghanistan (2,072 m above mean sea level), of exertional acute rhabdomyolysis in an American service member known to be a sickle cell trait carrier. The case serves to educate Military Medical providers and Commanders alike, to the increased risk certain training and work environments have on sickle cell trait Service members; it raises the question of what duty limitations, if any, sickle cell carriers should have.

  1. The Role of Sleep in the Health and Resiliency of Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    Health and Well-Being across the Military Spectrum (Bien-être et santé mentale dans le milieu militaire). RTO-MP-HFM-205 14. ABSTRACT Sleep is a...than 85%, and 42% took longer than 30 minutes to fall asleep (Peterson et al., 2008). The Mental Health Advisory Team (MHAT) Reports V (OTSMNC-I...gender, lower reported general health , and reported mental health symptoms. Findings from a study of 130 injured service members with extremity trauma

  2. Risk Factors for Sexually-Transmitted Diseases Among Deployed U.S. Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    blank) 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 1993J Journal article 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Risk factors for sexually ...Bethesda, Maryland 20889-5606 11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Reprinted from: Sexually Transmitted Diseases 1993 Sept-Oct Vol.20 No.5 pp.294-2 9 8 12a...15. NUMBER OF PAGES 5 sexually transmitted diseases, epidemiologic survey, risk profiles, 16. PRICE CODE military medicine 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

  3. FY2010 National Defense Authorization Act: Selected Military Personnel Policy Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-17

    treatment approaches, they primarily perform adjustments to the spine or other parts of the body with the goal of correcting alignment problems and...supporting the body’s natural ability to heal itself. Research to expand the scientific understanding of chiropractic treatment is ongoing. Section 702...at designated military treatment facilities. A service member’s primary care manager determines if chiropractic care is appropriate. Family members

  4. FY2010 National Defense Authorization Act: Selected Military Personnel Policy Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-27

    focuses on the relationship between the body’s structure—mainly the spine—and its functioning. Although practitioners may use a variety of treatment ...the body’s natural ability to heal itself. Research to expand the scientific understanding of chiropractic treatment is ongoing. Section 702 of the...at designated military treatment facilities. A service member’s primary care manager determines if chiropractic care is appropriate. Family members

  5. Nutritional Needs in Hot Environments-Applications for Military Personnel in Field Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    list,, the nutrient standards but includes definitions of terminology . guide- lines for healthful diets. and clarification of the use of the MR[DA, for...Congress Catalog Card No. 93-83118 International Standard Book Number 0-309-04840-0 Additional copies of this report are available from: National...approaches for studying the relationship of diet to physical and mental performance; and to review and advise on standards for military feeding systems

  6. FY2011 National Defense Authorization Act: Selected Military Personnel Policy Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-09

    combat theaters, have all increased. What has also increased is the number of single military parents with custody of a child or children . Some...for Parents who are Members of the Armed Forces Deployed in Support of a Contingency Operation...passed Conference Committee Section 601 supports a 1.9% (0.5% above the President’s Budget) across-the-board pay raise that would be effective

  7. Options for Using Military Waiver Information in Personnel Security Clearance Investigations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    3000 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI td. Z39.18 PREFACE v PREFACE Military enlistment applicants and service members who...Allan, personal communication, January 18, 2005). 15 Current Waiver Chief is Master Sergeant John T . Allan...Headquarters level. DFC Law violations of adjudicated felony offense(s) as a juvenile; waiver granted by the US Marine Corps Regional Command level

  8. Enhancing Interoperability Among Enlisted Medical Personnel. A Case Study of Military Surgical Technologists

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    defense Intelligence Community under Contract W74V8H-06-C-0002. iii Preface As medical staff are becoming more integrated in forward-deployed medical...the Navy, the Marine Corps, the defense agencies, and the defense Intelligence Community . The principal investigators are Sheila Nataraj Kirby and...students and become aware of potentially immediate job opportunities within the military. However, greater exposure to the civilian labor market might

  9. Extreme health sensing: the challenges, technologies, and strategies for active health sustainment of military personnel during training and combat missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buller, Mark; Welles, Alexander; Chadwicke Jenkins, Odest; Hoyt, Reed

    2010-04-01

    Military personnel are often asked to accomplish rigorous missions in extremes of climate, terrain, and terrestrial altitude. Personal protective clothing and individual equipment such as body armor or chemical biological suits and excessive equipment loads, exacerbate the physiological strain. Health, over even short mission durations, can easily be compromised. Measuring and acting upon health information can provide a means to dynamically manage both health and mission goals. However, the measurement of health state in austere military environments is challenging; (1) body worn sensors must be of minimal weight and size, consume little power, and be comfortable and unobtrusive enough for prolonged wear; (2) health states are not directly measureable and must be estimated; (3) sensor measurements are prone to noise, artifact, and failure. Given these constraints we examine current successful ambulatory physiological status monitoring technologies, review maturing sensors that may provide key health state insights in the future, and discuss unconventional analytical techniques that optimize health, mission goals, and doctrine from the perspective of thermal work strain assessment and management.

  10. In vitro characterization of multivalent adhesion molecule 7-based inhibition of multidrug-resistant bacteria isolated from wounded military personnel.

    PubMed

    Krachler, Anne Marie; Mende, Katrin; Murray, Clinton; Orth, Kim

    2012-07-01

    Treatment of wounded military personnel at military medical centers is often complicated by colonization and infection of wounds with pathogenic bacteria. These include nosocomially transmitted, often multidrug-resistant pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. We analyzed the efficacy of multivalent adhesion molecule (MAM) 7-based anti-adhesion treatment of host cells against aforementioned pathogens in a tissue culture infection model. Herein, we observed that a correlation between two important hallmarks of virulence, attachment and cytotoxicity, could serve as a useful predictor for the success of MAM7-based inhibition against bacterial infections. Initially, we characterized 20 patient isolates (five from each pathogen mentioned above) in terms of genotypic diversity, antimicrobial susceptibility and important hallmarks of pathogenicity (biofilm formation, attachment to and cytotoxicity toward cultured host cells). All isolates displayed a high degree of genotypic diversity, which was also reflected by large strain-to-strain variability in terms of biofilm formation, attachment and cytotoxicity within each group of pathogen. Using non-pathogenic bacteria expressing MAM7 or latex beads coated with recombinant MAM7 for anti-adhesion treatment, we showed a decrease in cytotoxicity, indicating that MAM7 has potential as a prophylactic agent to attenuate infection by multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens.

  11. Herpes simplex virus type 2 and HIV infection among US military personnel: implications for health prevention programmes.

    PubMed

    Bautista, C T; Singer, D E; O'Connell, R J; Crum-Cianflone, N; Agan, B K; Malia, J A; Sanchez, J L; Peel, S A; Michael, N L; Scott, P T

    2009-09-01

    US military personnel are routinely screened for HIV infection. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is a risk factor for HIV acquisition. To determine the association between HSV-2 and HIV, a matched case-control study was conducted among US Army and Air Force service members with incident HIV infections (cases) randomly matched with two HIV-uninfected service members (controls) between 2000 and 2004. HSV-2 prevalence was significantly higher among cases (30.3%, 138/456) than among controls (9.7%, 88/912, P < 0.001). HSV-2 was strongly associated with HIV in univariate (odds ratio [OR] = 4.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.1-5.8) and multiple analyses (adjusted [OR] = 3.9, 95% CI = 2.8-5.6). The population attributable risk percentage of HIV infection due to HSV-2 was 23%. Identifying HSV-2 infections may afford the opportunity to provide targeted behavioural interventions that could decrease the incidence of HIV infections in the US military population; further studies are needed.

  12. 78 FR 22252 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; FFEL/Direct Loan/Perkins Military...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; FFEL/ Direct Loan/Perkins Military Service.../Perkins Military Service Deferment/Post-Active Duty Student Deferment Request & SCRA Request. OMB Control... Number of Annual Burden Hours: 9,177. Abstract: The Military Service/Post-Active Duty Student...

  13. Post-traumatic headaches in civilians and military personnel: a comparative, clinical review.

    PubMed

    Theeler, Brett; Lucas, Sylvia; Riechers, Ronald G; Ruff, Robert L

    2013-06-01

    Post-traumatic headache (PTH) is the most frequent symptom after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We review the epidemiology and characterization of PTH in military and civilian settings. PTH appears to be more likely to develop following mild TBI (concussion) compared with moderate or severe TBI. PTH often clinically resembles primary headache disorders, usually migraine. For migraine-like PTH, individuals who had the most severe headache pain had the highest headache frequencies. Based on studies to date in both civilian and military settings, we recommend changes to the current definition of PTH. Anxiety disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are frequently associated with TBI, especially in military populations and in combat settings. PTSD can complicate treatment of PTH as a comorbid condition of post-concussion syndrome. PTH should not be treated as an isolated condition. Comorbid conditions such as PTSD and sleep disturbances also need to be treated. Double-blind placebo-controlled trials in PTH population are necessary to see whether similar phenotypes in the primary headache disorders and PTH will respond similarly to treatment. Until blinded treatment trials are completed, we suggest that, when possible, PTH be treated as one would treat the primary headache disorder(s) that the PTH most closely resembles.

  14. Prevalence of allergic diseases and risk factors of wheezing in Korean military personnel.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Min; Ahn, Jong Seong; Noh, Chang Suk; Lee, Sei Won

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis, as well as the risk factors of wheezing among young adults in the Korean military. Young military conscripts in five areas completed a modified International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire. For subjects with current wheeze in one sample area, baseline spirometry and bronchodilator response were measured. For subjects without a significant response to bronchodilator (improvement in FEV1 of more than 200 mL and 12%), methacholine challenge tests (MCT) were also performed. Of 3,359 subjects that completed the questionnaire, 354 (10.5%) had current wheeze, 471 (14.0%) had current allergic rhinitis, and 326 (9.7%) had current eczema. Current wheeze was associated with family history of allergic disease, overweight, current smoking, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis. Of 36 subjects with current wheeze who underwent PFT with or without MCT in the Anyang area, 24 (66.7%) were confirmed to have current asthma. In conclusion, the prevalence of allergic disease in young adults of Korean military is not low, and the risk factors of wheezing include family history of allergic disease, overweight, current smoking, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis.

  15. Viral gastroenteritis associated with genogroup II norovirus among U.S. military personnel in Turkey, 2009.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Salwa F; Klena, John D; Mostafa, Manal; Dogantemur, Jessica; Middleton, Tracy; Hanson, James; Sebeny, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    The present study demonstrates that multiple NoV genotypes belonging to genogroup II contributed to an acute gastroenteritis outbreak at a US military facility in Turkey that was associated with significant negative operational impact. Norovirus (NoV) is an important pathogen associated with acute gastroenteritis among military populations. We describe the genotypes of NoV outbreak occurred at a United States military facility in Turkey. Stool samples were collected from 37 out of 97 patients presenting to the clinic on base with acute gastroenteritis and evaluated for bacterial and viral pathogens. NoV genogroup II (GII) was identified by RT-PCR in 43% (16/37) stool samples. Phylogenetic analysis of a 260 base pair fragment of the NoV capsid gene from ten stool samples indicated the circulation of multiple and rare genotypes of GII NoV during the outbreak. We detected four GII.8 isolates, three GII.15, two GII.9 and a sole GII.10 NoV. Viral sequences could be grouped into four clusters, three of which have not been previously reported in Turkey. The fact that current NoV outbreak was caused by rare genotypes highlights the importance of norovirus strain typing. While NoV genogroup II is recognized as causative agent of outbreak, circulation of current genotypes has been rarely observed in large number of outbreaks.

  16. Increased vitamin plasma levels in Swedish military personnel treated with nutrients prior to automatic weapon training

    PubMed Central

    Le Prell, C. G.; Johnson, A.-C.; Lindblad, A.-C.; Skjönsberg, Å.; Ulfendahl, M.; Guire, K.; Green, G. E.; Campbell, K. C. M.; Miller, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a significant clinical, social, and economic issue. The development of novel therapeutic agents to reduce NIHL will potentially benefit multiple very large noise-exposed populations. Oxidative stress has been identified as a significant contributor to noise-induced sensory cell death and noise-induced hearing loss, and several antioxidant strategies have now been suggested for potential translation to human subjects. One such strategy is a combination of beta-carotene, vitamins C and E, and magnesium, which has shown promise for protection against NIHL in rodent models, and is being evaluated in a series of international human clinical trials using temporary (military gunfire, audio player use) and permanent (stamping factory, military airbase) threshold shift models (NCT00808470). The noise exposures used in the recently completed Swedish military gunfire study described in this report did not, on average, result in measurable changes in auditory function using conventional pure-tone thresholds and distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) amplitudes as metrics. However, analysis of the plasma samples confirmed significant elevations in the bloodstream 2 hours after oral consumption of active clinical supplies, indicating the dose is realistic. The plasma outcomes are encouraging, but clinical acceptance of any novel therapeutic critically depends on demonstration that the agent reduces noise-induced threshold shift in randomized, placebo-controlled, prospective human clinical trials. Although this noise insult did not induce hearing loss, the trial design and study protocol can be applied to other populations exposed to different noise insults. PMID:22122960

  17. Characterization of complete HIV type 1 genomes from non-B subtype infections in U.S. military personnel.

    PubMed

    Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Brodine, Stephanie K; Mascola, John R; Sankale, Jean-Louis; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Kim, Bohye; Birx, Deborah L; McCutchan, Francine E

    2005-05-01

    Infections with non-B HIV-1 subtypes are rare in the United States, but comprise a significant percentage of infections among U.S. military personnel. Risk behavior while on overseas deployment correlates with non-B infection in this population. Extensive genetic characterization will be required to define HIV-1 diversity, and to effectively evaluate requirements for HIV-1 vaccines and other prevention strategies in this group. From 1997 to 2000, 520 recent seroconverters, identified through routine HIV-1 testing in the U.S. active military force, volunteered for a prospective study. V3 loop serology or partial genome sequencing identified 28 non- B subtype infections; 14 were studied by full genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Five strains were CRF01_AE. Four of these clustered with CM240 from Thailand, and one clustered with African CRF01_AE. Four strains were CRF02_AG, prevalent in West and West Central Africa. Two strains were subtype C. One strain was a unique recombinant between CRF01_AE and subtype B, and another was a complex unique recombinant between subtype A and D. The final strain was a member of a complex circulating recombinant first identified in Senegal, CRF09_cpx, incorporating subtypes A, F, G, and an unclassified genome. This diversity of non-B subtype HIV-1 strains, encompassing three globally prevalent non-B strains and including rare or even possibly unique strains, illustrates the breadth of U.S. military exposure while deployed and sets the bar higher for breadth of cross-subtype protection to be afforded by an HIV-1 vaccine.

  18. Military Personnel. Preliminary Observations on DOD’s and the Coast Guard’s Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-31

    sexual assault; and (3) exercise oversight over reports of sexual assault. This statement draws on GAO’s preliminary observations from an ongoing...would enable servicemembers to confidentially disclose an incident of sexual assault. Since 2005, active duty servicemembers have had two options...incidents involving servicemembers; • have visibility over reports of sexual assault involving servicemembers; and • exercise oversight over

  19. Worldwide Survey of Nonmedical Drug Use and Alcohol Use among Military Personnel: 1980.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-14

    divorced , separated and never married categories) and "high school graduate or less" and "more than high school train- ing or education" were defined for...the installation absent without leave assigned a permanent change of station • separated from the Service Absences for any other reason were designated...personnel in Europe, the lowest in rJc3tions. -, Iency of Drinking During Past 30 Days present findings separately on quantity and .3s. for each of the

  20. Deployment-Related Injury and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in US Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    population. Findings of the Epidemiologic Catchment Area survey. New England Journal of Medicine 1987;317:1630–4. 18. Koren D, Norman D, Cohen A...to dead bodies, discharged his or her weapon, or had a perceived threat to life. The specific questions are shown in Table 1. For analyses including...responses. For analyses including only personnel with BI, those who endorsed zero or one combat exposures were combined due to small numbers. In order

  1. Motivating Treatment Seeking and Behavior Change by Untreated Military Personnel Abusing Alcohol or Drugs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    cannabis in substance abusing army personnel. 9. Abstract: Attracting substance abusing soldiers to voluntarily take stock of their use: Preliminary...marijuana, cannabis , stimulants). Counselor Training: The study team created a training manual for both conditions that will be available for...for drinking at 3-months, indirect effect = -2.19 [95% CI: - 5.29, -.23] Synthetic Cannabis (SC): The use of synthetic marijuana was found to be

  2. Manual of Military Decorations and Awards: DoD-Wide Performance and Valor Awards; Foreign Awards; Military Awards to Foreign Personnel and U.S. Public Health Service Officers; and Miscellaneous Information

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-23

    17 DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS ( DFC ) ..........................................................................17 Introduction...Military Personnel. See Appendix 2 to Enclosure 3 of this Manual. 3. DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS ( DFC ) a. Introduction. The DFC is governed by...1) Eligibility Criteria (a) The DFC may be awarded to any persons who, after April 6, 1917, while serving in any capacity with the U.S

  3. Students Help a Teacher Called to Active Duty: What a Great Feeling to Have a Group of Students Who Are Excited and Want to Help a Teacher in Need so Many Miles from Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuill, Ron

    2005-01-01

    The author shares how his technology education students at Tecumseh Middle School help his former student from a Purdue class, Ryan Smith, who was called to active military duty. Ryan was teaching technology education at Lafayette Jefferson High School when he was called by the military in the fall of 2004 to report to active duty. Before…

  4. Tabulations of Responses from the 2000 Survey of Reserve Component Personnel: Volume 2. Military Plans, Military Training,and Military Unit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-01

    these questions (43, 45, and 165) were combined with administrative data to create the single measure of program used in Tables 43/45/165.1-3. (The same... measure of program is also one of five variables by which most items are crosstabulated; see the Subgroups section.) Estimation Procedures The 2000...46m.1 Problem for Unit/Organization in Achieving Training Objectives -- Quality of Personnel in Lower-Grade Drill Positions

  5. Alzheimer's Disease prevalence, costs, and prevention for military personnel and veterans.

    PubMed

    Sibener, Leslie; Zaganjor, Ibrahim; Snyder, Heather M; Bain, Lisa J; Egge, Robert; Carrillo, Maria C

    2014-06-01

    By 2050, more than 13 million Americans of all ages are estimated to be living with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and the aggregate costs of care will swell to approximately $1.2 trillion. The rapidly climbing number of those affected with AD includes a growing population of aging military veterans affected who may have an added risk for the disease as a consequence of traumatic brain injury, posttraumatic stress disorder, and/or service-related injuries. The increasing number of individuals, the long duration of disability, and the rising cost of care for AD and other dementia to our society are important public health challenges facing many older adults. These challenges are further compounded by a burgeoning military veteran population that is much younger, with an increased risk of AD and other dementia, and who may experience decades-long periods of disability and care. This outlook underscores the critical need for investments in research at the federal and international levels to accelerate the pace of progress in developing breakthrough discoveries that will change the trajectory of AD and related dementia.

  6. Comparison of Whole-Body Cooling Techniques for Athletes and Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Nye, Emma A; Eberman, Lindsey E; Games, Kenneth E; Carriker, Colin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate cooling rates of The Polar Life Pod(®), a military protocol and cold water immersion. A randomized, repeated measures design was used to compare three treatment options. Participants exercised in an environmental chamber, where they followed a military march protocol on a treadmill, followed by the application of one of three treatments: Cold water immersion tub (5 - 10 °C), Polar Life Pod® (5 - 10 °C), Ice sheets at onset (5 - 10 °C). Mean cooling rate for CWI was 0.072 ºC/min, 0.046ºC/min for ice sheets, and 0.040ºC/min for The Polar Life Pod(®). There was a significant difference between conditions (F2,26=13.564, p=0.001, ES=0.511, 1-β=0.969). There was a significant difference in cooling rate among The Polar Life Pod(®) and CWI (p = 0.006), and no significant difference among The Polar Life Pod(®) and Ice Sheets (p = 0.103). There was a significant difference of time to cool among the three conditions F2,26 = 13.564, p = 0.001, ES = 0.401, 1-β = 0.950. Our results support multiple organizations that deem CWI as the only acceptable treatment, when compared to the cooling rates of The Polar Life Pod(®) and ice sheets.

  7. Aerobic Power and Coronary Risk Factors in 40 and over Aged Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-18

    ergometer ), the results ate not directly comparable. fIowever, if one takes into account the lower values obtained using the cycle ergometer , it can be...30.0 Present Study 40 -53 260 TM 38.1 *CE = Cycle Ergometer ; TM = Treadmill TABLE 3. Selected risk f ators of subijects dWring the pretraining period...Canadian forces personnel aged 40-55 reported a mean value of 32.4 m/kg- min using a subrnaximal predictive cycle ergometer test. If these dbta are

  8. Medical Malpractice Claims Against Military and Civilian Personnel of the Armed Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-24

    Civilian Personnel of the Armed Forces References: (a) Public Law 94-464, & l(a), 90 Stat. 1985, Title 10, United States Code, SectionD TI 1089 (f)ELECTE (b...OF AUTHORITY 1. The authority vested in the Secretary of Defense by I, ’I Title 10, U.S. C., section 1089 (f) (reference (a)) to hold harm- /’i...Title 10, U.S. C., section 1089 (f) (reference (a)). D. PROCEDURES 1. In all cases under Title 10, U.S.C., section 1089 , medical per- sonnel shall be

  9. Changes in Career Intent during Initial Tour of Active Duty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shenk, Faye

    The study was designed to determine the predictability of an Air Force officer's career decision and to evaluate relationships between career decision and various demographic, environmental, and attitudinal factors. Information on this group was compiled for the period before commissioning and through five years of active duty. The report presents…

  10. Considerations for incorporating eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic omega-3 fatty acids into the military food supply chain.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Adam; Rice, Harry B

    2014-11-01

    The U.S. military may consider exploring the inclusion of the long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), in the diets of active duty military personnel. To be successful, certain challenges must be overcome including determining appropriate dosage, ensuring cost efficiency, and optimizing stability. To increase EPA and DHA intake, the military should consider using one of three strategies, including mandates or recommendations on omega-3 supplement usage, contracts to purchase commercially available foods for distribution in the food supply chain, or direct addition of EPA and DHA into currently consumed foods. This review presents the challenges and strategies and provides potential suggestions to the military to increase the likelihood of success.

  11. [Studies on prenosological diagnostics of health of armed forces personnel on compulsory military service].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Federal budget scientific institution "Nizhny Novgorod research institute for hygiene and occupational pathology", Federal service of supervision in sphere of protection of the rights of consumers and wellbeing of the person. The authors have evaluated physical development of contract military persons divided in following age groups (under 30, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, over 50 years old), according to morphofunctional indices, index of functional measurement in human organism, pathological affection. Obtained data give evidence about presence of health risk factors in all observed groups. Preventive measures are the most necessary in 1 and 2 groups. The highest health risk group is age group of 35-39 years old.

  12. Military Health Behaviors: Promotion of Healthy Weight and Fitness in Career Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    Accessions Research Consortium in Fort  Jackson , SC. • Allen et al. (2005) presented a poster at NAASO’s 2005  Annual Scientific Meeting: “Military...PA: Lippincott  Williams  & Wilkins.  Bathalon, G. (2004, January).  Abdominal girth and health  readiness standards: Proposed changes to AR 600­9.  Oral...presentation given at the Accessions Research Consortium,  Fort  Jackson , SC.  Bathalon, G. (2005, January). Weight Status as Recruits:  Impact on

  13. Comparison of Whole-Body Cooling Techniques for Athletes and Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    NYE, EMMA A.; EBERMAN, LINDSEY E.; GAMES, KENNETH E.; CARRIKER, COLIN

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate cooling rates of The Polar Life Pod®, a military protocol and cold water immersion. A randomized, repeated measures design was used to compare three treatment options. Participants exercised in an environmental chamber, where they followed a military march protocol on a treadmill, followed by the application of one of three treatments: Cold water immersion tub (5 – 10 °C), Polar Life Pod® (5 – 10 °C), Ice sheets at onset (5 – 10 °C). Mean cooling rate for CWI was 0.072 ºC/min, 0.046ºC/min for ice sheets, and 0.040ºC/min for The Polar Life Pod®. There was a significant difference between conditions (F2,26=13.564, p=0.001, ES=0.511, 1-β=0.969). There was a significant difference in cooling rate among The Polar Life Pod® and CWI (p = 0.006), and no significant difference among The Polar Life Pod® and Ice Sheets (p = 0.103). There was a significant difference of time to cool among the three conditions F2,26 = 13.564, p = 0.001, ES = 0.401, 1-β = 0.950. Our results support multiple organizations that deem CWI as the only acceptable treatment, when compared to the cooling rates of The Polar Life Pod® and ice sheets. PMID:28344741

  14. Functional status after blast-plus-impact complex concussive traumatic brain injury in evacuated United States military personnel.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Christine L; Johnson, Ann M; Nelson, Elliot C; Werner, Nicole J; Fang, Raymond; Flaherty, Stephen F; Brody, David L

    2014-05-15

    Fundamental questions remain unanswered about the longitudinal impact of blast-plus-impact complex traumatic brain injuries (TBI) from wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. This prospective, observational study investigated measures of clinical outcome in US military personnel evacuated to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center (LRMC) in Germany after such "blast-plus" concussive TBIs. Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended assessments completed 6-12 months after injury indicated a moderate overall disability in 41/47 (87%) blast-plus TBI subjects and a substantial but smaller number (11/18, 61%, p=0.018) of demographically similar US military controls without TBI evacuated for other medical reasons. Cognitive function assessed with a neuropsychological test battery was not different between blast-plus TBI subjects and controls; performance of both groups was generally in the normal range. No subject was found to have focal neurological deficits. However, 29/47 (57%) of blast-plus subjects with TBI met all criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) versus 5/18 (28%) of controls (p=0.014). PTSD was highly associated with overall disability; 31/34 patients with PTSD versus 19/31 patients who did not meet full PTSD criteria had moderate to severe disability (p=0.0003). Symptoms of depression were also more severe in the TBI group (p=0.05), and highly correlated with PTSD severity (r=0.86, p<0.0001). Thus, in summary, high rates of PTSD and depression but not cognitive impairment or focal neurological deficits were observed 6-12 months after concussive blast-plus-impact complex TBI. Overall disability was substantially greater than typically reported in civilian non-blast concussive ("mild") patients with TBI, even with polytrauma. The relationship between these clinical outcomes and specific blast-related aspects of brain injuries versus other combat-related factors remains unknown.

  15. Birth Outcomes Among Military Personnel Following Exposure to Documented Open-Air Burn Pits Before and During Pregnancy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    by the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program.17,19 Preterm birth was assessed using an infant’s estimated gestational age (EGA) at birth...Atlanta Congenital Defects Program: 35 years of birth defects surveillance at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Birth Defects Res A...Registry and the Defense Manpower Data Center were used to examine the prevalence of birth defects and preterm birth among infants of active-duty women and

  16. Occupational cocaine exposure of crime laboratory personnel preparing training aids for a military working dog program.

    PubMed

    Gehlhausen, Jay M; Klette, Kevin L; Stout, Peter R; Given, JoAnn

    2003-10-01

    The potential for passive cocaine exposure was evaluated in crime laboratory employees preparing training aids for a military working dog program (MWD). The primary goal of the study was to elucidate the routes of exposure and implement procedural changes that would minimize this risk. Several work environments and laboratory procedures were examined by monitoring personal breathing zones (PBZ), ambient airborne cocaine levels in the laboratory spaces, and urinary levels of the primary cocaine metabolite, benzoylecgonine. The study was performed initially using current laboratory procedures to establish a baseline and to identify potential sources of exposure. A subsequent study was performed to determine the effectiveness of the follow-up procedure in reducing exposure. As a result of the changes, the 8-h time weighted averages (TWAs) were 40 to 80% lower in the follow-up study as compared to the baseline assessment. Dermal absorption and PBZ inhalation of cocaine during manufacture were likely the most significant source of cocaine exposure. Ambient airborne cocaine may have also contributed to the total exposure, but for most observations, the concentrations were significantly less than those determined from PBZ monitoring. The maximum ambient cocaine concentration was 0.0144 mg/m(3) compared to a maximum of 0.4004 mg/m(3) observed during PBZ monitoring. Occupational exposure decreased in the follow-up study because of the proper use of personal protective equipment and improvements in engineering controls.

  17. Evaluating a prototype device designed to alleviate night vision goggle induced neck strain among military personnel.

    PubMed

    Dibblee, Jenna; Worthy, Portia; Farrell, Philip; Hetzler, Markus; Reid, Susan; Stevenson, Joan; Fischer, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was verify the design of a novel Helmet System Support Device (HSSD) that can be used by military aircrew to help intervene on and reduce the high prevalence of neck trouble. Twelve healthy participants repeated simulated helicopter aircrew tasks on 3 separate days. On each day they wore a different helmet configuration, where measures of performance, perceived demand/preference and muscular demand were recorded. The results showed that vigilance tasks were performed over 10% faster with the HSSD configuration compared to wearing the normal helmet configuration. Participants were able to maintain static (endurance) postures for 28% longer, and use of the HSSD helped to prevent neck muscle fatigue in the most demanding task. The results of this design verification study indicate that the HSSD may be a realistic, feasible near-term solution to intervene on the high prevalence of neck trouble among rotary-wing aircrew. Practitioner Summary: This paper verifies the effectiveness of the Helmet System Support Device (HSSD) as an on-body personal protective device to help control exposures associated with aircrew neck trouble. The HSSD reduced perceived demand, reduced cumulative muscle activity in select muscles and provided improved fatigue resistance, meeting its desired design objectives.

  18. Secondary and tertiary transfer of vaccinia virus among U.S. military personnel--United States and worldwide, 2002-2004.

    PubMed

    2004-02-13

    In December 2002, the Department of Defense (DoD) began vaccinating military personnel as part of the pre-event vaccination program. Because vaccinia virus is present on the skin at the site of vaccination, it can spread to other parts of the body (i.e., autoinoculation) or to contacts of vaccinees (i.e., contact transfer). To prevent autoinoculation and contact transfer, DoD gave vaccinees printed information that focused on hand washing, covering the vaccination site, and limiting contact with infants (1,2). This report describes cases of contact transfer of vaccinia virus among vaccinated military personnel since December 2002; findings indicate that contact transfer of vaccinia virus is rare. Continued efforts are needed to educate vaccinees about the importance of proper vaccination-site care in preventing contact transmission, especially in household settings.

  19. Bacterial species diversity in cigarettes linked to an investigation of severe pneumonitis in U.S. Military personnel deployed in operation iraqi freedom.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Alejandro P; Swezey, James L; Wicklow, Donald T; McAtee, Matthew J

    2005-07-01

    This report presents results from a study on the bacterial diversity of cigarette brands collected from military personnel during the U.S. Army's investigation of a series of cases of acute eosinophilic pneumonitis in military personnel deployed in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Eight species of Bacillus, including five new species, and one new species of Kurthia were isolated from the cigarettes. Some of these species have been identified elsewhere as causes of hypersensitivity pneumonitis and other respiratory syndromes. All of the isolates were facultative anaerobes, and many displayed mucoid growth under anaerobic conditions. In addition, many isolates also displayed the ability to form surface biofilms under liquid culture. Although biofilm formation and mucoid growth were not correlated, the former was found to be much more pronounced under anaerobic conditions as opposed to aerobic ones. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  20. Incidence of cancer among Swedish military and civil personnel involved in UN missions in the Balkans 1989-99.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, P; Talbäck, M; Lundin, A; Lagercrantz, B; Gyllestad, P-E; Fornell, L

    2004-02-01

    Leukaemia cases among European UN soldiers in the Balkans have been related hypothetically to exposure to depleted uranium. This study was performed to investigate the risk of cancer among Swedish personnel (8750 men and 438 women) involved in UN missions in the Balkans 1989-99. The overall incidence of cancer was slightly higher than expected; 34 cancers were observed and 28.1 were expected based on national cancer rates. Among military men, there were eight cases of testicular cancer versus 4.6 expected. There was one case of chronic myeloid leukaemia, and no cases of acute leukaemia. The overall risk of cancer was increased in a subgroup of 648 men taking part in convoy operations, based on only five cancers at four different sites. The study gives no support for the hypothesis that UN service in the Balkans could lead to haematolymphatic malignancies after short latency. However, no exposure assessment was performed, and future follow up is necessary for evaluation of long term risks.

  1. Influence of educational status and other variables on human immunodeficiency virus risk perception among military personnel: a large cohort finding.

    PubMed

    Essien, E James; Ogungbade, Gbadebo O; Ward, Doriel; Ekong, Ernest; Ross, Michael W; Meshack, Angela; Holmes, Laurens

    2007-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk perception remains an effective determinant of HIV transmission. Although higher educational attainment has been associated with increased HIV risk perception, this predictor remains to be assessed among Nigerian military personnel (NMP). In a prospective cohort of 2,213 NMP, the effects of education and other factors on HIV risk perception were assessed at baseline by using the X2 statistic and unconditional logistic regression. There was an inverse correlation between higher educational attainment and HIV risk perception in the univariate model (prevalence odds ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.52-0.79). This association persisted after adjustment for relevant covariates in the multivariate model (prevalence odds ratio, 0.70; 95% confidence interval, 0.56-0.88). Similarly, there was a direct correlation between use of alcohol and marijuana and HIV risk perception (p < 0.05). In contrast, casual sex and gender were not statistically significantly associated with HIV risk perception (p > 0.05). This study indicates an inverse correlation between educational attainment and HIV risk perception, as well as a direct correlation between alcohol and marijuana use and HIV risk perception, among NMP. Therefore, HIV prevention interventions targeted at NMP need to include multiple factors that may affect risk perception regardless of the educational status of the participants.

  2. Alcohol use and substance use disorders in Gulf War, Afghanistan, and Iraq War veterans compared with nondeployed military personnel.

    PubMed

    Kelsall, Helen Louise; Wijesinghe, Millawage Supun Dilara; Creamer, Mark Christopher; McKenzie, Dean Philip; Forbes, Andrew Benjamin; Page, Matthew James; Sim, Malcolm Ross

    2015-01-01

    Although recent veterans have been found to be at increased risk of psychiatric disorders, limited research has focused on alcohol or substance use disorders. This systematic review and meta-analysis examined whether alcohol or substance use disorders were more common in Gulf War, Afghanistan, and Iraq War veterans compared with military comparison groups nondeployed to the corresponding conflict, including never deployed personnel. Literature was searched (1990-2014) in multiple electronic databases. Studies were assessed for eligibility and quality, including risk of bias. Eighteen studies (1997-2014) met inclusion criteria. Pooled analysis based on a random-effects model yielded a summary odds ratio of 1.33 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.22, 1.46) for alcohol (7 studies) and 2.13 (95% CI: 0.96, 4.72) for substance use (3 studies) disorders among Gulf War veterans, as well as 1.36 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.66) for alcohol (7 studies) and 1.14 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.25) for substance use (4 studies) disorders among Iraq/Afghanistan veterans; meta-regressions found no statistically significant association between theater of war and alcohol use or substance use disorders. Our findings indicate that Gulf and Iraq/Afghanistan war veterans are at higher alcohol use disorder risk than nondeployed veterans, but further studies with increased power are needed to assess substance use disorder risk in Gulf War veteran populations.

  3. Association between bovine casein antibody and new onset schizophrenia among US military personnel.

    PubMed

    Niebuhr, David W; Li, Yuanzhang; Cowan, David N; Weber, Natalya S; Fisher, Jared A; Ford, Glen M; Yolken, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Schizophrenia is a pervasive neuropsychiatric disorder of uncertain etiology. Multiple studies have documented immune activation in individuals with schizophrenia. One antigen capable of inducing a prolonged immune response is bovine casein derived from ingested milk products. Increased levels of casein antibodies have been found in individuals with schizophrenia after diagnosis. This study was directed at determining the potential association between schizophrenia and pre-illness onset levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to bovine casein. Parallel analyses for casein antibody levels with bipolar disorder were included as comparison. Cases were service members who received medical discharges from the military with a schizophrenia diagnosis from 1992 to 2005. Serum specimens were selected for 855 cases and 1165 matched healthy controls. IgG antibodies to bovine whole-casein were measured by solid phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated to examine the associations of casein IgG level with risk of schizophrenia by time to diagnosis and by subjects' initial level. Increasing casein IgG antibody levels among those with a high initial level, drawn before diagnosis, was associated with an 18% increase in the hazard risk of schizophrenia per unit increase (value of low-positive standard) in IgG antibody levels (HR=1.18; 95% CI 1.04, 1.34). This is the first report to identify an association between the risk of schizophrenia and elevated antibodies to bovine casein prior to disease onset. Additional research is required to elucidate the complex genetic environmental interactions involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and to identify potentially modifiable risk factors.

  4. Mild traumatic brain injury and suicide risk among a clinical sample of deployed military personnel: Evidence for a serial mediation model of anger and depression.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Ian H; Joiner, Thomas E; Bryan, Craig J

    2017-01-01

    Research has demonstrated a robust link between traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) and suicide risk. Yet, few studies have investigated factors that account for this link. Utilizing a clinical sample of deployed military personnel, this study aimed to examine a serial meditation model of anger and depression in the association of mild TBI and suicide risk. A total of 149 military service members referred for evaluation/treatment of a suspected head injury at a military hospital participated in the present study (92.6% male; Mage = 27.9y). Self-report measures included the Suicidal Behaviors Questionnaire-Revised (SBQ-R), Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM) anger and depression subscales, and Behavioral Health Measure-20 depression subscale. A current mild TBI diagnosis was confirmed by a licensed clinical psychologist/physician. Overall, 84.6% (126/149) of participants met diagnostic criteria for a current mild TBI. Bootstrapped serial mediation analyses indicated that the association of mild TBI and suicide risk is serially mediated by anger and depression symptoms (bias-corrected 95% confidence interval [CI] for the indirect effect = 0.044, 0.576). An alternate serial mediation model in which depression symptoms precede anger was not statistically significant (bias-corrected 95% CI for the indirect effect = -0.405, 0.050). Among a clinical sample of military personnel, increased anger and depression statistically mediated the association of mild TBI and suicide risk, and anger appears to precede depression in this pathway. Findings suggest that therapeutically targeting anger may serve to thwart the trajectory to suicide risk among military personnel who experience a mild TBI. Future research should investigate this conjecture within a prospective design to establish temporality.

  5. House Divided: The Splitting of Active Duty Civil Affairs Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    training of Active Duty Civil Affairs. This will allow the reader to become familiar with the Active branch as a whole and show the different...readers are extremely familiar with the large-scale environment given the nightly news coverage, but the small-scale environment is decidedly different...apparatus and are familiar with operating in conjunction with embassies and country teams. While conventional forces also have their own intelligence

  6. Seroprevalence for Coxiella burnetii, Francisella tularensis, Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis in Austrian adults: a cross-sectional survey among military personnel and civilians.

    PubMed

    Tobudic, Selma; Nedomansky, Klara; Poeppl, Wolfgang; Müller, Maria; Faas, Angelus; Mooseder, Gerhard; Allerberger, Franz; Stanek, Gerold; Burgmann, Heinz

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of Coxiella burnetii, Francisella tularensis, Brucella abortus, and Brucella melitensis infections in Austria and the exposure risk of military personnel were assessed in an exploratory nationwide cross-sectional seroprevalence survey in 526 healthy adult individuals, 222 of which were soldiers and 304 were civilians. Screening for IgA/IgG antibodies to C. burnetii (Phase I) and IgG/IgM antibodies to C. burnetii (Phase II), and to F. tularensis was done with commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. To detect antibodies against B. abortus and B. melitensis, an in-house complement fixation test was used. Overall, 11 individuals (2.0%) showed antibodies to C. burnetii, 3 individuals (0.5%) were seropositive for F. tularensis, and one (0.3%) individual was borderline positive. All individuals positive or borderline for F. tularensis tested negative for antibodies against C. burnetii. All individuals tested negative for antibodies against B. melitensis/B. abortus. There were no significant differences between the seroprevalence of C. burnetii and F. tularensis among military personnel and civilians. Our data demonstrate serological evidence of a low rate of exposure to C. burnetii and F. tularensis among the Austrian adult population and military personnel.

  7. Validation of a Tablet Application for Assessing Dietary Intakes Compared with the Measured Food Intake/Food Waste Method in Military Personnel Consuming Field Rations

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mavra; Mandic, Iva; Lou, Wendy; Goodman, Len; Jacobs, Ira; L’Abbé, Mary R.

    2017-01-01

    The collection of accurate dietary intakes using traditional dietary assessment methods (e.g., food records) from military personnel is challenging due to the demanding physiological and psychological conditions of training or operations. In addition, these methods are burdensome, time consuming, and prone to measurement errors. Adopting smart-phone/tablet technology could overcome some of these barriers. The objective was to assess the validity of a tablet app, modified to contain detailed nutritional composition data, in comparison to a measured food intake/waste method. A sample of Canadian Armed Forces personnel, randomized to either a tablet app (n = 9) or a weighed food record (wFR) (n = 9), recorded the consumption of standard military rations for a total of 8 days. Compared to the gold standard measured food intake/waste method, the difference in mean energy intake was small (−73 kcal/day for tablet app and −108 kcal/day for wFR) (p > 0.05). Repeated Measures Bland-Altman plots indicated good agreement for both methods (tablet app and wFR) with the measured food intake/waste method. These findings demonstrate that the tablet app, with added nutritional composition data, is comparable to the traditional dietary assessment method (wFR) and performs satisfactorily in relation to the measured food intake/waste method to assess energy, macronutrient, and selected micronutrient intakes in a sample of military personnel. PMID:28264428

  8. Alcohol Misuse and Psychological Resilience among U.S. Iraq and Afghanistan Era Veteran Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Green, Kimberly T.; Beckham, Jean C.; Youssef, Nagy; Elbogen, Eric B.

    2013-01-01

    evolves over time. Moreover, our results underscore the importance of assessing resilience as part of alcohol use screening for preventing alcohol misuse in Iraq and Afghanistan era military veterans. PMID:24090625

  9. Occupational needs and intervention strategies for military personnel with mild traumatic brain injury and persistent post-concussion symptoms: a review.

    PubMed

    Cogan, Alison M

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), also known as concussion, has been labeled the "signature injury" of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. A subset of military personnel with mTBI experience ongoing symptoms well beyond the normal recovery window. While much research has been dedicated to understanding the etiology and severity of the symptoms, very little has assessed how long-term symptoms impact participation in daily life. A scoping study of the occupational science and occupational therapy literature was conducted to ascertain the current state of research on the impact of mTBI on participation in daily life activities, as well as occupational therapy interventions for mTBI. Although the emphasis in this article is on military personnel with mTBI, studies on civilians with mTBI were included in the review as research with military populations is extremely limited. Based on the literature reviewed, the author suggests a role for occupational science research and occupational therapy practice in meeting the occupational needs of military service members with persistent symptoms after mTBI.

  10. Monitoring Exposure to Ebola and Health of U.S. Military Personnel Deployed in Support of Ebola Control Efforts - Liberia, October 25, 2014-February 27, 2015.

    PubMed

    Cardile, Anthony P; Murray, Clinton K; Littell, Christopher T; Shah, Neel J; Fandre, Matthew N; Drinkwater, Dennis C; Markelz, Brian P; Vento, Todd J

    2015-07-03

    In response to the unprecedented Ebola virus disease (Ebola) outbreak in West Africa, the U.S. government deployed approximately 2,500 military personnel to support the government of Liberia. Their primary missions were to construct Ebola treatment units (ETUs), train health care workers to staff ETUs, and provide laboratory testing capacity for Ebola. Service members were explicitly prohibited from engaging in activities that could result in close contact with an Ebola-infected patient or coming in contact with the remains of persons who had died from unknown causes. Military units performed twice-daily monitoring of temperature and review of exposures and symptoms ("unit monitoring") on all persons throughout deployment, exit screening at the time of departure from Liberia, and post-deployment monitoring for 21 days at segregated, controlled monitoring areas on U.S. military installations. A total of 32 persons developed a fever during deployment from October 25, 2014, through February 27, 2015; none had a known Ebola exposure or developed Ebola infection. Monitoring of all deployed service members revealed no Ebola exposures or infections. Given their activity restrictions and comprehensive monitoring while deployed to Liberia, U.S. military personnel constitute a unique population with a lower risk for Ebola exposure compared with those working in the country without such measures.

  11. War, its aftermath, and U.S. health policy: toward a comprehensive health program for America's military personnel, veterans, and their families.

    PubMed

    Jackonis, Michael J; Deyton, Lawrence; Hess, William J

    2008-01-01

    This essay discusses the challenges faced by veterans returning to society in light of the current organization and structure of the military, veterans', and overall U.S. health care systems. It also addresses the need for an integrated health care financing and delivery system to ensure a continuum of care for service members, veterans, dependents, and other family members. The health care systems of both the Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs execute their responsibilities to active duty service members, while their families and retirees/veterans are under separate legal authorities. Although they perform their mandates with extraordinary commitment and demonstrably high quality, both systems need to explore improved communication, coordination, and sharing, as well as increased collaboration with the Department of Health and Human Services programs serving the same populations, far beyond current efforts. The health care-related missions and the locus of health care delivery of each agency are admittedly unique, but their distinctions must not be permitted to impede system integration and coordination of a continuum of care provided to the men and women who serve the nation, and their families.

  12. Prevalence of Intimate Partner Violence, Stalking, and Sexual Violence Among Active Duty Women and Wives of Active Duty Men - Comparisons with Women in the U.S. General Population, 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Prevalence of Intimate Partner Violence, Stalking, and Sexual Violence Among Active Duty Women and Wives of Active Duty Men—Comparisons with Women...Technical Report Prevalence of Intimate Partner Violence, Sexual Violence, and Stalking among Active Duty Women and Wives of Active Duty Men— Comparisons...the General U.S. Population, Active Duty Women, and Wives of Active Duty Men by Type of Perpetrator — NISVS 2010 Table 3 Prevalence of Contact Sexual

  13. Creating healing environments in support of the U.S. Military: a commitment to quality through the built environment.

    PubMed

    Casscells, S Ward; Kurmel, Colonel Thom; Ponatoski, Ed

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Military Health System (MHS) provides care to 9.2 million beneficiaries with approximately 130 thousand military and civilian staff in 70 military hospitals, 411 primary care clinics, and 417 dental clinics around the world. In anticipation of nearly $11 billion of new medical construction planned for the next 5 years, this paper describes the commitment of the MHS leadership and its approach to creating healing physical environments across the system, employing a set of principles, projected outcomes, and design features to achieve world-class facilities for service members and the military "family." The results of a survey of active duty personnel and spouses indicated a desire for MHS facilities to provide space for family members to be able to spend the night, to control environmental features such as lighting and temperature, and to communicate more effectively with family and friends outside the facility via e-mail and telephone.

  14. Tobacco Research in the Military: Reflections on 20 Years of Research in the United States Air Force.

    PubMed

    Talcott, G Wayne; Ebbert, Jon O; Klesges, Robert C; Linde, Brittany D; Seals, Robert W; Krukowski, Rebecca A; Grieser, Emily A; Oh, John Y; Martin-Zona, Denise M

    2015-08-01

    The U.S. military is one of the world's largest employers. Approximately 30% of active duty military personnel smoke cigarettes and more than 14% use smokeless tobacco. The military has historically supported tobacco use and more recently is attempting to combat its use. Through 20 years of collaborative research with the United States Air Force, we have learned that smoking bans are effective, recruits who have never previously smoked cigarettes initiate tobacco use, smokeless tobacco serves as a gateway for smoking initiation, smoking is associated with discharge, smoking adds significant proximal training costs, tobacco use increases during deployment, and tobacco quitline counseling with a provision of medication is effective. Our findings may provide groundwork for future tobacco control efforts in the U.S. military.

  15. 2010 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members. Overview Report on Sexual Harassment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    2010 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members Overview Report on Sexual Harassment Additional copies of this report may...SURVEY OF ACTIVE DUTY MEMBERS: OVERVIEW REPORT ON SEXUAL HARASSMENT Lindsay M. Rock and Rachel N. Lipari Defense Manpower... ACTIVE DUTY MEMBERS: OVERVIEW REPORT ON SEXUAL HARASSMENT Executive Summary Background This report presents the results on issues related to

  16. The associations of physical and sexual assault with suicide risk in nonclinical military and undergraduate samples.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Craig J; McNaugton-Cassill, Mary; Osman, Augustine; Hernandez, Ann Marie

    2013-04-01

    The associations of various forms of sexual and physical assault with a history of suicide attempts and recent suicide ideation were studied in two distinct samples: active duty military and undergraduate students. A total of 273 active duty Air Force personnel and 309 undergraduate students anonymously completed self-report surveys of assault victimization, emotional distress, belongingness, recent suicide ideation, and previous suicide attempts. Among military personnel, rape, robbery, or violent assault was associated with a nonsignificant trend toward increased risk for suicide attempts, whereas physical abuse or battering as an adult was significantly associated with recent suicide ideation. Among undergraduates, unwanted sexual experiences as an adult and physical or sexual abuse as a child were significantly associated with increased risk for suicide attempt, but only unwanted experiences as an adult was significantly associated with increased risk for suicide ideation. Experiencing multiple forms of assault increased risk for suicide attempts and ideation in both groups. Results suggest that different types of assault contribute differentially to suicide risk in military versus undergraduate populations, but experiencing multiple types of assault is associated with increased risk in both groups.

  17. Life as a military spouse.

    PubMed

    Eubanks, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    Military spouses live a capricious life. They often move away from everything familiar to support their active duty spouse. Honor, courage, and commitment are values military spouses need to assist them in being strong and resilient. Effective coping skills aid in the various roles these spouses assume, which may cause personal sacrifices to be made in support of the service member.

  18. Chapter 5 mantram repetition: an evidence-based complementary practice for military personnel and veterans in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Bormann, Jill E; Weinrich, Sally; Allard, Carolyn B; Beck, Danielle; Johnson, Brian D; Holt, Lindsay Cosco

    2014-01-01

    Today in the digital age, with our advances in modern technology and communication, there are additional stressors for our military personnel and Veterans. Constant dangers exist both on and off the battlefield, unlike prior wars that had clearly-defined war zones. In addition, medical advances have assisted in saving the lives of many more gravely injured troops than ever previously possible. As the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan come to an end, large numbers of service men and women are returning home with multiple injuries. This group of Veterans has significantly higher rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury than ever before reported. Although existing PTSD therapies have been found to be highly effective for many Veterans, there is a substantial minority unsatisfactorily treated. Mantram repetition, an innovative, complementary, evidence-based treatment, is proving to be successful for these new Veterans. When used regularly it helps with "road rage, impatience, anger, frustration, and being out of control." A mantram is a brief, sacred word or phrase that embodies divine power or the greatest positive energy one can imagine (Easwaran, 2008a). Mantram repetition is a simple, quick, personal, portable, and private complementary practice that may be used as an adjunct to current treatments for PTSD. Growing research evidence supports mantram repetition's value for dissemination and adoption in the 21st century. This chapter summarizes Mantram Program research conducted from 2003 to 2014. It describes the health-related benefits of the Mantram Program in various populations. The current research focuses on benefits for managing psychological distress and promoting quality of life in Veterans. Future areas for research are suggested.

  19. Factors influencing injury severity score regarding Thai military personnel injured in mass casualty incident April 10, 2010: lessons learned from armed conflict casualties: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Political conflicts in Bangkok, Thailand have caused mass casualties, especially the latest event April 10, 2010, in which many military personnel were injured. Most of them were transferred to Phramongkutklao Hospital, the largest military hospital in Thailand. The current study aimed to assess factors influencing Injury Severity Score (ISS) regarding Thai military personnel injured in the mass casualty incident (MCI) April 10, 2010. Methods A total of 728 injured soldiers transferred to Phramongkutklao Hospital were reviewed. Descriptive statistics was used to display characteristics of the injuries, relationship between mechanism of injury and injured body regions. Multiple logistic regressions were used to calculate the adjusted odds ratio (adjusted OR) of ISS comparing injured body region categories. Results In all, 153 subjects defined as major data category were enrolled in this study. Blast injury was the most common mechanism of injury (90.2%). These victims displayed 276 injured body regions. The most common injured body region was the extremities (48.5%). A total of 18 patients (11.7%) had an ISS revealing more than 16 points. Three victims who died were expected to die due to high Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS). However, one with high TRISS survived. Factors influencing ISS were age (p = 0.04), abdomen injury (adjusted OR = 29.9; 95% CI, 5.8-153.5; P < 0.01), head & neck injury (adjusted OR = 13.8; 95% CI, 2.4-80.4; P < 0.01) and chest injury (adjusted OR = 9.9; 95% CI, 2.1-47.3; P < 0.01). Conclusions Blast injury was the most common mechanism of injury among Thai military personnel injured in the MCI April 10, 2010. Age and injured body region such as head & neck, chest and abdomen significantly influenced ISS. These factors should be investigated for effective medical treatment and preparing protective equipment to prevent such injuries in the future. PMID:22214518

  20. Chapter 6 impact of deployment on military families.

    PubMed

    Agazio, Janice; Goodman, Petra; Padden, Diane L

    2014-01-01

    To date, approximately 300,000 families including 700,000 children have been affected by the increased and repeated number of deployments in support of the Global War on Terror in Iraq and Afghanistan since 2001. The purpose of this review is to discuss the impact of these deployments on family members of active duty and reserve/guard personnel. A search of literature across the years of military conflicts reveals waves of studies emerging after World War II, the Vietnam conflict, Desert Storm/Shield, and now the most recent wars. Study designs most frequently include qualitative exploratory, survey methods, and program evaluations. The field is limited by small scale projects, service- and facility-specific samples, and knowledge extracted from related topics. More research is needed to achieve a more comprehensive understanding across the trajectory of the deployment experience for both service personnel and family members as well as long-term outcomes.

  1. Radiation exposure of U.S. military individuals.

    PubMed

    Blake, Paul K; Komp, Gregory R

    2014-02-01

    The U.S. military consists of five armed services: the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard. It directly employs 1.4 million active duty military, 1.3 million National Guard and reserve military, and 700,000 civilian individuals. This paper describes the military guidance used to preserve and maintain the health of military personnel while they accomplish necessary and purposeful work in areas where they are exposed to radiation. It also discusses military exposure cohorts and associated radiogenic disease compensation programs administered by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, the U.S. Department of Justice, and the U.S. Department of Labor. With a few exceptions, the U.S. military has effectively employed ionizing radiation since it was first introduced during the Spanish-American War in 1898. The U.S military annually monitors 70,000 individuals for occupational radiation exposure: ~2% of its workforce. In recent years, the Departments of the Navy (including the Marine Corps), the Army, and the Air Force all have a low collective dose that remains close to 1 person-Sv annually. Only a few Coast Guard individuals are now routinely monitored for radiation exposure. As with the nuclear industry as a whole, the Naval Reactors program has a higher collective dose than the remainder of the U.S. military. The U.S. military maintains occupational radiation exposure records on over two million individuals from 1945 through the present. These records are controlled in accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974 but are available to affected individuals or their designees and other groups performing sanctioned epidemiology studies.Introduction of Radiation Exposure of U.S. Military Individuals (Video 2:19, http://links.lww.com/HP/A30).

  2. Refractive Surgery: New Techniques and Usability for Military Personnel (La chirurgie refractive: Nouvelles techniques et leur application pour le personnel militaire)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    adaptées à un environnement opérationnel hostile ni à certains matériels ou activités militaires. Par conséquent, le recours à la chirurgie réfractive...evaluated individually. MILITARY CRS POLICY RTO-TR-HFM-191 3 - 3 The Danish Armed Forces have no internal ophthalmological clinic or capability. Thus

  3. Mood symptoms contribute to working memory decrement in active-duty soldiers being treated for posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Dretsch, Michael N; Thiel, Kenneth J; Athy, Jeremy R; Irvin, Clinton R; Sirmon-Fjordbak, Bess; Salvatore, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    A significant proportion of military veterans of operations in Afghanistan and Iraq have been diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Growing evidence suggests that neuropsychological deficits are a symptom of PTSD. The current study investigated neurocognitive functioning among soldiers diagnosed with PTSD. Specifically, active-duty soldiers with and without a diagnosis of PTSD were assessed for performance on tests of attention and working memory. In addition, factors such as combat experience, depression, anxiety, PTSD symptom severity, and alcohol consumption were explored as possible mediators of group differences in neurocognitive functioning. Twenty-three active-duty soldiers diagnosed with PTSD were matched with 23 healthy Soldier controls; all were administered the Attention Network Task (ANT), Backward Digit Span (BDS) task, Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, PTSD Checklist—Military Version, Combat Exposure Scale, and Modified Drinking Behavior Questionnaire. Soldiers diagnosed with PTSD performed significantly worse on the working memory task (BDS) than healthy controls, and reported greater levels of PTSD symptoms, combat exposure, depression, and anxiety. However, after controlling for depression and anxiety symptoms, the relationship between PTSD and working memory was no longer present. The results indicate that PTSD is accompanied by deficits in working memory, which appear to be partially attributed to anxiety and depression symptoms. PMID:22950039

  4. US military service members vaccinated against smallpox in 2003 and 2004 experience a slightly higher risk of hospitalization postvaccination.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Isabel G; Smith, Tyler C; Smith, Besa; Wells, Timothy S; Reed, Robert J; Ryan, Margaret A K

    2008-07-29

    This study explores adverse events severe enough to warrant hospitalization that may have been associated with receiving the smallpox vaccine in conjunction with military service. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to identify the risk of hospitalization among US active-duty military personnel during a 1-year period following receipt of the smallpox vaccine. The reference group consisted of active-duty military personnel who also received the smallpox vaccine after the conclusion of their health care observation period, allowing for comparison to a temporally and demographically similar population. The risk of hospitalization was slightly elevated among the postvaccine group for any-cause hospitalization and for hospitalization in several broad diagnostic categories. Hospitalizations for asthma, autoimmune diseases, and myopericarditis, were more likely in the postvaccine group. The increased risk of hospitalization for varied outcomes does not necessarily imply a cause-effect relationship, but it does offer areas for more focused study, using longitudinal data to explore the long-term impact of smallpox vaccination on the health of young adults.

  5. Military Personnel Law Deskbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    not a “taking” for which damages accrue. Ainsworth v. Barn Ballroom Co., 157 F.2d 97 (4th Cir. 1946). Standard of review is whether the action was...MCO 1700.27A, paras. 1402, 1405. A. Lotterie B. Pull-tab C. Sale of t bo D. Topless or nude dancing . AR 215-1, para. 8-13. E. Awarding alcohol as

  6. Military Personnel Assignments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-09

    of Defense, Organization of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Defense Agencies," > f , February 4, 1970 (hereby canceled) (d) DoD Directive 1315.14...34DoD Components"). 2. Does not apply to service members in non-DoD activities covered by DoD Directive 1000.17 (reference ( f )). C. DEFINITIONS Terms...possible, shall be allowed to extend any assignment voluntarily beyond the prescribed tour. f . Through the grades of 0-5 for officers and E-8 for enlisted

  7. Acute Health Effects Among Military Personnel Participating in the Cleanup of the Hebei Spirit Oil Spill, 2007, in Taean County, Korea

    PubMed Central

    Gwack, Jin; Lee, Ju Hyung; Kang, Young Ah; Chang, Kyu-jin; Lee, Moo Sik; Hong, Jee Young

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to investigate acute health effects and its related factors among military personnel participating in the cleanup of the 2007 Hebei Spirit oil spill accident in Taean county, Korea. Methods We collected data on acute symptoms during the cleanup and their predictors using a self-administered questionnaire to 2624 military personnel. Selfreported symptoms included six neurologic symptoms, five respiratory symptoms, two dermatologic symptoms, three ophthalmic symptoms, and three general symptoms. Independent variables were demographic factors (gender, age, education level, and rank), health behavioral factors (smoking history and usage of the personal protective equipment such as masks and gloves), and occupational history such as where and for how long individuals participated in cleanup. Results The duration of work days was significantly associated with 17 acute symptoms except for itchiness and red skin.Working in Taean county also increased the risk of most acute symptoms except headache and back pain. In regard to personal protective equipment, wearing masks was mainly related to the development of respiratory symptoms such as sore throat and wearing other protective equipment was related to the development of sore throat, back pain, headache, and cough. Military personnel younger than 25 years reported 4.66 times more hot flushing and 5.39 times more itchiness than those older than 25 years. Conclusion It should be emphasized that for early-stage cleanup the number of workers should be minimized, sufficient personal protective equipment with approved quality for blocking noxious gas should be supplied, and systematic health care for the workers should be provided. Health effects could be diminished by providing adequate education regarding the appropriate use of protective equipment, especially to nonprofessionals such as residents and volunteers. To make disaster response expeditious, a national and regional preparedness

  8. "I Serve 2": Meeting the needs of military children in civilian practice.

    PubMed

    Rossiter, Alicia Gill; Dumas, Mary Anne; Wilmoth, Margaret C; Patrician, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    The American Academy of Nursing launched the "Have You Ever Served in the Military?" campaign in 2013 in conjunction with the Joining Forces campaign spearheaded by First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden. The "Have You Ever Served in the Military?" campaign provides guidance and resources for nurses outside the Military Health System and Veterans Health Administration where upwards of 80% of veterans receive care. However, most military personnel do not serve alone. More than half of the 2.2 million active duty, National Guard, and Reserve service members currently serving in the armed forces have families and many military children experience stress and anxiety secondary to parental military service. Although strides have been made to improve identification and treatment of the visible and invisible wounds of war for service members, little to no information exists regarding the impact parental service has on the physical, psychological, and behavioral health of military children. In addition, there is no mechanism in place to identify military children in civilian practice nor resources providing evidence-based best practices when caring for these children.

  9. Sexual Harassment and Assault as Predictors of PTSD Symptomatology among U.S. Female Persian Gulf Military Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Jessica; Sharkansky, Erica J.; Read, Jennifer P.; Dawson, Ree; Ouimette, Paige Crosby; Martin, James A.

    1998-01-01

    Examines sexual harassment and assault of women in a wartime military example. Explores the impacts of these stressors and combat exposure on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomatology. Harassment and assault were higher than in civilian and peacetime military samples. The number of postwar stressful life events mediated the relationship…

  10. Immune Responses in U.S. Military Personnel Who Received Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine (MenACWY) Concomitantly with Other Vaccines Were Higher than in Personnel Who Received MenACWY Alone.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Michael P; Romero-Steiner, Sandra; Rajam, Gowrisankar; Johnson, Scott E; Milton, Andrea; Kim, Ellie; Choi, Lisa J; Radin, Jennifer M; Schmidt, Daniel S; Carlone, George M; Messonnier, Nancy; Faix, Dennis J

    2016-08-01

    Immunological responses to vaccination can differ depending on whether the vaccine is given alone or with other vaccines. This study was a retrospective evaluation of the immunogenicity of a tetravalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine for serogroups A, C, W, and Y (MenACWY) administered alone (n = 41) or concomitantly with other vaccines (n = 279) to U.S. military personnel (mean age, 21.6 years) entering the military between 2006 and 2008. Concomitant vaccines included tetanus/diphtheria (Td), inactivated polio vaccine (IPV), hepatitis vaccines, and various influenza vaccines, among others; two vaccine groups excluded Tdap and IPV. Immune responses were evaluated in baseline and postvaccination sera for Neisseria meningitidis serogroups C and Y 1 to 12 months (mean, 4.96 months) following vaccination. Functional antibodies were measured by using a serum bactericidal antibody assay with rabbit complement (rSBA) and by measurement of serogroup-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies. The percentage of vaccinees reaching threshold levels (IgG concentration in serum, ≥2 μg/ml; rSBA titer, ≥8) corresponding to an immunologic response was higher postvaccination than at baseline (P < 0.001). Administration of MenACWY along with other vaccines was associated with higher geometric means of IgG concentrations and rSBA titers than those measured 4.60 months after a single dose of MenACWY. In addition, higher percentages of vaccinees reached the immunological threshold (range of odds ratios [ORs], 1.5 to 21.7) and more of them seroconverted (OR range, 1.8 to 4.8) when MenACWY was administered with any other vaccine than when administered alone. Additional prospective randomized clinical trials are needed to confirm the observed differences among groups in the immune response to MenACWY when given concomitantly with other vaccines to U.S. military personnel.

  11. Immune Responses in U.S. Military Personnel Who Received Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine (MenACWY) Concomitantly with Other Vaccines Were Higher than in Personnel Who Received MenACWY Alone

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Steiner, Sandra; Rajam, Gowrisankar; Johnson, Scott E.; Milton, Andrea; Kim, Ellie; Choi, Lisa J.; Radin, Jennifer M.; Schmidt, Daniel S.; Carlone, George M.; Messonnier, Nancy; Faix, Dennis J.

    2016-01-01

    Immunological responses to vaccination can differ depending on whether the vaccine is given alone or with other vaccines. This study was a retrospective evaluation of the immunogenicity of a tetravalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine for serogroups A, C, W, and Y (MenACWY) administered alone (n = 41) or concomitantly with other vaccines (n = 279) to U.S. military personnel (mean age, 21.6 years) entering the military between 2006 and 2008. Concomitant vaccines included tetanus/diphtheria (Td), inactivated polio vaccine (IPV), hepatitis vaccines, and various influenza vaccines, among others; two vaccine groups excluded Tdap and IPV. Immune responses were evaluated in baseline and postvaccination sera for Neisseria meningitidis serogroups C and Y 1 to 12 months (mean, 4.96 months) following vaccination. Functional antibodies were measured by using a serum bactericidal antibody assay with rabbit complement (rSBA) and by measurement of serogroup-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies. The percentage of vaccinees reaching threshold levels (IgG concentration in serum, ≥2 μg/ml; rSBA titer, ≥8) corresponding to an immunologic response was higher postvaccination than at baseline (P < 0.001). Administration of MenACWY along with other vaccines was associated with higher geometric means of IgG concentrations and rSBA titers than those measured 4.60 months after a single dose of MenACWY. In addition, higher percentages of vaccinees reached the immunological threshold (range of odds ratios [ORs], 1.5 to 21.7) and more of them seroconverted (OR range, 1.8 to 4.8) when MenACWY was administered with any other vaccine than when administered alone. Additional prospective randomized clinical trials are needed to confirm the observed differences among groups in the immune response to MenACWY when given concomitantly with other vaccines to U.S. military personnel. PMID:27280619

  12. Voxel-wise resting-state MEG source magnitude imaging study reveals neurocircuitry abnormality in active-duty service members and veterans with PTSD

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ming-Xiong; Yurgil, Kate A.; Robb, Ashley; Angeles, Annemarie; Diwakar, Mithun; Risbrough, Victoria B.; Nichols, Sharon L.; McLay, Robert; Theilmann, Rebecca J.; Song, Tao; Huang, Charles W.; Lee, Roland R.; Baker, Dewleen G.

    2014-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a leading cause of sustained impairment, distress, and poor quality of life in military personnel, veterans, and civilians. Indirect functional neuroimaging studies using PET or fMRI with fear-related stimuli support a PTSD neurocircuitry model that includes amygdala, hippocampus, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). However, it is not clear if this model can fully account for PTSD abnormalities detected directly by electromagnetic-based source imaging techniques in resting-state. The present study examined resting-state magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals in 25 active-duty service members and veterans with PTSD and 30 healthy volunteers. In contrast to the healthy volunteers, individuals with PTSD showed: 1) hyperactivity from amygdala, hippocampus, posterolateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC), and insular cortex in high-frequency (i.e., beta, gamma, and high-gamma) bands; 2) hypoactivity from vmPFC, Frontal Pole (FP), and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) in high-frequency bands; 3) extensive hypoactivity from dlPFC, FP, anterior temporal lobes, precuneous cortex, and sensorimotor cortex in alpha and low-frequency bands; and 4) in individuals with PTSD, MEG activity in the left amygdala and posterolateral OFC correlated positively with PTSD symptom scores, whereas MEG activity in vmPFC and precuneous correlated negatively with symptom score. The present study showed that MEG source imaging technique revealed new abnormalities in the resting-state electromagnetic signals from the PTSD neurocircuitry. Particularly, posterolateral OFC and precuneous may play important roles in the PTSD neurocircuitry model. PMID:25180160

  13. Committee on Military Nutrition Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    MILITARY RESEARCH, * NUTRITION , MILITARY PERSONNEL, PERFORMANCE(HUMAN), METABOLISM, NUTRIENTS, HIGH ENERGY, MEDICAL RESEARCH, FOOD, DIET, MENTAL ABILITY, WORKSHOPS, BIOMEDICINE, CAFFEINE, SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE.

  14. 2012 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members. Survey Note and Briefing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-15

    Exercises /Alerts Percent of Active Duty Members Who Experienced Unwanted Sexual Contact, by Gender WGRA 2012 Q35 Margins of error range from ±4% to ±12...harassment in the active duty force. This survey note and accompanying briefing (Appendix) provide information on the prevalence rates of sexual ...ELATIONS SURVEYSH R 2012 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members 2 Unwanted Sexual Contact 2006 2010 2012 Women: 6.8% Men

  15. 2012 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members: Administration, Datasets and Codebook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-04

    ABSTRACT This report documents the administration of the 2012 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Sexual ... Active Duty Members Information Gathered on the Survey G-2 HOMESAFE To what extent do/would you feel safe from being sexually assaulted on your...of Active Duty Members Information Gathered on the Survey G-26 In an effort to prevent sexual assault, please indicate how well your unit

  16. Suicide risk among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender military personnel and veterans: what does the literature tell us?

    PubMed

    Matarazzo, Bridget B; Barnes, Sean M; Pease, James L; Russell, Leah M; Hanson, Jetta E; Soberay, Kelly A; Gutierrez, Peter M

    2014-04-01

    Research suggests that both the military and veteran and the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) populations may be at increased risk for suicide. A literature review was conducted to identify research related to suicide risk in the LGBT military and veteran populations. Despite the paucity of research directly addressing this issue, themes are discussed evident in the literature on LGBT identity and suicide risk as well as LGBT military service members and veterans. Factors such as social support and victimization appear to be particularly relevant. Suggestions are made with respect to future research that is needed on this very important and timely topic.

  17. Pre-existing cross-reactive antibodies to avian influenza H5N1 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 in US military personnel.

    PubMed

    Pichyangkul, Sathit; Krasaesub, Somporn; Jongkaewwattana, Anan; Thitithanyanont, Arunee; Wiboon-Ut, Suwimon; Yongvanitchit, Kosol; Limsalakpetch, Amporn; Kum-Arb, Utaiwan; Mongkolsirichaikul, Duangrat; Khemnu, Nuanpan; Mahanonda, Rangsini; Garcia, Jean-Michel; Mason, Carl J; Walsh, Douglas S; Saunders, David L

    2014-01-01

    We studied cross-reactive antibodies against avian influenza H5N1 and 2009 pandemic (p) H1N1 in 200 serum samples from US military personnel collected before the H1N1 pandemic. Assays used to measure antibodies against viral proteins involved in protection included a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay and a neuraminidase inhibition (NI) assay. Viral neutralization by antibodies against avian influenza H5N1 and 2009 pH1N1 was assessed by influenza (H5) pseudotyped lentiviral particle-based and H1N1 microneutralization assays. Some US military personnel had cross-neutralizing antibodies against H5N1 (14%) and 2009 pH1N1 (16.5%). The odds of having cross-neutralizing antibodies against 2009 pH1N1 were 4.4 times higher in subjects receiving more than five inactivated whole influenza virus vaccinations than those subjects with no record of vaccination. Although unclear if the result of prior vaccination or disease exposure, these pre-existing antibodies may prevent or reduce disease severity.

  18. Consortium for Health and Military Performance and American College of Sports Medicine consensus paper on extreme conditioning programs in military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Michael F; Nindl, Bradley C; Deuster, Patricia A; Baumgartner, Neal; Kane, Shawn F; Kraemer, William J; Sexauer, Lisa R; Thompson, Walter R; O'Connor, Francis G

    2011-01-01

    A potential emerging problem associated with increasingly popularized extreme conditioning programs (ECPs) has been identified by the military and civilian communities. That is, there is an apparent disproportionate musculoskeletal injury risk from these demanding programs, particularly for novice participants, resulting in lost duty time, medical treatment, and extensive rehabilitation. This is a significant and costly concern for the military with regard to effectively maintaining operational readiness of the Force. While there are certain recognized positive aspects of ECPs that address a perceived and/or actual unfulfilled conditioning need for many individuals and military units, these programs have limitations and should be considered carefully. Moreover, certain distinctive characteristics of ECPs appear to violate recognized accepted standards for safely and appropriately developing muscular fitness and are not uniformly aligned with established and accepted training doctrine. Accordingly, practical solutions to improve ECP prescription and implementation and reduce injury risk are of paramount importance.

  19. Military Personnel: DOD Is Expanding Combat Service Opportunities for Women, but Should Monitor Long-Term Integration Progress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    cohesion, women’s health , and facilities. As of May 2015, the Secretary of the Navy was the only military department Secretary to recommend an...requirements. First, the military services have established general physical fitness standards to promote overall health and physical fitness among...these challenges in areas such as unit cohesion, women’s health , equipment, facilities (e.g., separate restrooms and sleeping quarters), women’s

  20. U.S. Department of Defense Experiences with Substituting Government Civilian Employees for Military Personnel: Executive Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    Manpower Data Center (DMDC) data • discussions with human resource , manpower, and budget experts across DoD who have experience with military-to...research- ers discussed this question with human resource , manpower, and budget experts across DoD who have had experience with military-to-civilian...the Forces and Resources Policy Center director. We received constructive reviews of the larger report from Stanley Horowitz of the Institute for