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Sample records for active-site cysteine residues

  1. The amino acid sequence around the active-site cysteine and histidine residues, and the buried cysteine residue in ficin.

    PubMed

    Husain, S S; Lowe, G

    1970-04-01

    Ficin that had been prepared from the latex of Ficus glabrata by salt fractionation and chromatography on carboxymethylcellulose was completely and irreversibly inhibited with 1,3-dibromo[2-(14)C]acetone and then treated with N-(4-dimethylamino-3,5-dinitrophenyl)maleimide in 6m-guanidinium chloride. After reduction and carboxymethylation of the labelled protein, it was digested with trypsin and alpha-chymotrypsin. Two radioactive peptides and two coloured peptides were isolated chromatographically and their sequences determined. The radioactive peptides revealed the amino acid sequences around the active-site cysteine and histidine residues and showed a high degree of homology with the omino acid sequence around the active-site cysteine and histidine residues in papain. The coloured peptides allowed the amino acid sequence around the buried cysteine residue in ficin to be determined.

  2. Identification of an active site cysteine residue in Escherichia coli pyruvate oxidase.

    PubMed

    Koland, J G; Gennis, R B

    1982-06-10

    The cysteine-directed reagent N-ethylmaleimide rapidly and completely inactivates pyruvate oxidase. This inactivation is correlated with the reaction of one cysteine residue per enzyme monomer. In the presence of the cofactor, thiamin pyrophosphate, the enzyme is not inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide. Furthermore, the N-ethylmaleimide-inactivated enzyme exhibits a very low affinity for the cofactor as determined by a fluorescence quenching technique. The presence of a reactive cysteine residue at the thiamin pyrophosphate binding site is therefore indicated. Although N-ethylmaleimide completely inactivates the enzyme, a second sulfhydryl reagent methylmethanethiosulfonate is only partially inhibitory. It is shown that methylmethanethiosulfonate and N-ethylmaleimide react with the same cysteine residue. Thus, the N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive residue is probably not directly involved in catalysis.

  3. Role of a cysteine residue in the active site of ERK and the MAPKK family

    SciTech Connect

    Ohori, Makoto; Kinoshita, Takayoshi; Yoshimura, Seiji; Warizaya, Masaichi; Nakajima, Hidenori . E-mail: hidenori.nakajima@jp.astellas.com; Miyake, Hiroshi

    2007-02-16

    Kinases of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, including extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), represent likely targets for pharmacological intervention in proliferative diseases. Here, we report that FR148083 inhibits ERK2 enzyme activity and TGF{beta}-induced AP-1-dependent luciferase expression with respective IC{sub 50} values of 0.08 and 0.05 {mu}M. FR265083 (1'-2' dihydro form) and FR263574 (1'-2' and 7'-8' tetrahydro form) exhibited 5.5-fold less and no activity, respectively, indicating that both the {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated ketone and the conformation of the lactone ring contribute to this inhibitory activity. The X-ray crystal structure of the ERK2/FR148083 complex revealed that the compound binds to the ATP binding site of ERK2, involving a covalent bond to S{gamma} of ERK2 Cys166, hydrogen bonds with the backbone NH of Met108, N{zeta} of Lys114, backbone C=O of Ser153, N{delta}2 of Asn154, and hydrophobic interactions with the side chains of Ile31, Val39, Ala52, and Leu156. The covalent bond motif in the ERK2/FR148083 complex assures that the inhibitor has high activity for ERK2 and no activity for other MAPKs such as JNK1 and p38MAPK{alpha}/{beta}/{gamma}/{delta} which have leucine residues at the site corresponding to Cys166 in ERK2. On the other hand, MEK1 and MKK7, kinases of the MAPKK family which also can be inhibited by FR148083, contain a cysteine residue corresponding to Cys166 of ERK2. The covalent binding to the common cysteine residue in the ATP-binding site is therefore likely to play a crucial role in the inhibitory activity for these MAP kinases. These findings on the molecular recognition mechanisms of FR148083 for kinases with Cys166 should provide a novel strategy for the pharmacological intervention of MAPK cascades.

  4. Thiol-beta-lactamase: replacement of the active-site serine of RTEM beta-lactamase by a cysteine residue.

    PubMed

    Sigal, I S; Harwood, B G; Arentzen, R

    1982-12-01

    We describe a procedure by which the codon (AGC) for the active-site serine-70 of pBR322 beta-lactamase (penicillinase, penicillin amido-beta-lactamhydrolase, EC 3.5.2.6) is altered to that for cysteine (TGC). The pertinent nucleotide bases, A-G-C-A, positions 410-413, of pBR322 are excised by treating a limited HgiAI digest of pBR322 with the 3' leads to 5' exonuclease of T4 DNA polymerase. The new sequence, T-G-C-A, is inserted in two steps. First, the Kpn I molecular linker d(T-G-G-T-A-C-C-A) is ligated into the gap described above. The internal sequence G-T-A-C is then excised enzymatically with Kpn I and T4 DNA polymerase and the molecule is recircularized. This mutant gene, which codes for a thiol-beta-lactamase, confers on Escherichia coli K-12 hosts an ampicillin resistance that is reduced compared with that given by pBR322 yet is greater than that of E. coli lacking any intact beta-lactamase gene. Cell-free extracts of E. coli strains hosting the thiol-beta-lactamase gene possess a p-chloromercuribenzoate-sensitive beta-lactamase activity.

  5. Chikungunya virus infectivity, RNA replication and non-structural polyprotein processing depend on the nsP2 protease's active site cysteine residue.

    PubMed

    Rausalu, Kai; Utt, Age; Quirin, Tania; Varghese, Finny S; Žusinaite, Eva; Das, Pratyush Kumar; Ahola, Tero; Merits, Andres

    2016-11-15

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae, has a positive-stand RNA genome approximately 12 kb in length. In infected cells, the genome is translated into non-structural polyprotein P1234, an inactive precursor of the viral replicase, which is activated by cleavages carried out by the non-structural protease, nsP2. We have characterized CHIKV nsP2 using both cell-free and cell-based assays. First, we show that Cys478 residue in the active site of CHIKV nsP2 is indispensable for P1234 processing. Second, the substrate requirements of CHIKV nsP2 are quite similar to those of nsP2 of related Semliki Forest virus (SFV). Third, substitution of Ser482 residue, recently reported to contribute to the protease activity of nsP2, with Ala has almost no negative effect on the protease activity of CHIKV nsP2. Fourth, Cys478 to Ala as well as Trp479 to Ala mutations in nsP2 completely abolished RNA replication in CHIKV and SFV trans-replication systems. In contrast, trans-replicases with Ser482 to Ala mutation were similar to wild type counterparts. Fifth, Cys478 to Ala as well as Trp479 to Ala mutations in nsP2 abolished the rescue of infectious virus from CHIKV RNA transcripts while Ser482 to Ala mutation had no effect. Thus, CHIKV nsP2 is a cysteine protease.

  6. Chikungunya virus infectivity, RNA replication and non-structural polyprotein processing depend on the nsP2 protease’s active site cysteine residue

    PubMed Central

    Rausalu, Kai; Utt, Age; Quirin, Tania; Varghese, Finny S.; Žusinaite, Eva; Das, Pratyush Kumar; Ahola, Tero; Merits, Andres

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae, has a positive-stand RNA genome approximately 12 kb in length. In infected cells, the genome is translated into non-structural polyprotein P1234, an inactive precursor of the viral replicase, which is activated by cleavages carried out by the non-structural protease, nsP2. We have characterized CHIKV nsP2 using both cell-free and cell-based assays. First, we show that Cys478 residue in the active site of CHIKV nsP2 is indispensable for P1234 processing. Second, the substrate requirements of CHIKV nsP2 are quite similar to those of nsP2 of related Semliki Forest virus (SFV). Third, substitution of Ser482 residue, recently reported to contribute to the protease activity of nsP2, with Ala has almost no negative effect on the protease activity of CHIKV nsP2. Fourth, Cys478 to Ala as well as Trp479 to Ala mutations in nsP2 completely abolished RNA replication in CHIKV and SFV trans-replication systems. In contrast, trans-replicases with Ser482 to Ala mutation were similar to wild type counterparts. Fifth, Cys478 to Ala as well as Trp479 to Ala mutations in nsP2 abolished the rescue of infectious virus from CHIKV RNA transcripts while Ser482 to Ala mutation had no effect. Thus, CHIKV nsP2 is a cysteine protease. PMID:27845418

  7. Identification of putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes.

    PubMed

    Das, Akash; Davis, Matthew A; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2008-08-01

    In this report, we sought to determine the putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes. For experimental purposes, a particular region of the C-terminal end of the ACAT protein was selected as the putative active site domain due to its high degree of sequence conservation from yeast to humans. Because ACAT enzymes have an intrinsic thioesterase activity, we hypothesized that by analogy with the thioesterase domain of fatty acid synthase, the active site of ACAT enzymes may comprise a catalytic triad of ser-his-asp (S-H-D) amino acid residues. Mutagenesis studies revealed that in ACAT1, S456, H460, and D400 were essential for activity. In ACAT2, H438 was required for enzymatic activity. However, mutation of D378 destabilized the enzyme. Surprisingly, we were unable to identify any S mutations of ACAT2 that abolished catalytic activity. Moreover, ACAT2 was insensitive to serine-modifying reagents, whereas ACAT1 was not. Further studies indicated that tyrosine residues may be important for ACAT activity. Mutational analysis showed that the tyrosine residue of the highly conserved FYXDWWN motif was important for ACAT activity. Furthermore, Y518 was necessary for ACAT1 activity, whereas the analogous residue in ACAT2, Y496, was not. The available data suggest that the amino acid requirement for ACAT activity may be different for the two ACAT isozymes.

  8. Selective targeting of the conserved active site cysteine of Mycobacterium tuberculosis methionine aminopeptidase with electrophilic reagents.

    PubMed

    Reddi, Ravikumar; Arya, Tarun; Kishor, Chandan; Gumpena, Rajesh; Ganji, Roopa J; Bhukya, Supriya; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    Methionine aminopeptidases (MetAPs) cleave initiator methionine from ~ 70% of the newly synthesized proteins in every living cell, and specific inhibition or knockdown of this function is detrimental. MetAPs are metalloenzymes, and are broadly classified into two subtypes, type I and type II. Bacteria contain only type I MetAPs, and the active site of these enzymes contains a conserved cysteine. By contrast, in type II enzymes the analogous position is occupied by a conserved glycine. Here, we report the reactivity of the active site cysteine in a type I MetAP, MetAP1c, of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtMetAP1c) towards highly selective cysteine-specific reagents. The authenticity of selective modification of Cys105 of MtMetAP1c was established by using site-directed mutagenesis and crystal structure determination of covalent and noncovalent complexes. On the basis of these observations, we propose that metal ions in the active site assist in the covalent modification of Cys105 by orienting the reagents appropriately for a successful reaction. These studies establish, for the first time, that the conserved cysteine of type I MetAPs can be targeted for selective inhibition, and we believe that this chemistry can be exploited for further drug discovery efforts regarding microbial MetAPs.

  9. Affinity alkylation of the active site of C21 steroid side-chain cleavage cytochrome P-450 from neonatal porcine testis: a unique cysteine residue alkylated by 17-(bromoacetoxy)progesterone.

    PubMed

    Onoda, M; Haniu, M; Yanagibashi, K; Sweet, F; Shively, J E; Hall, P F

    1987-01-27

    The affinity alkylating progesterone analogue 17-(bromoacetoxy)progesterone has been used to label the active site of a microsomal cytochrome P-450 enzyme from neonatal pig testis. The enzyme causes removal of the C20 and C21 side chains from the substrates progesterone and pregnenolone by catalyzing both 17-hydroxylase and C17,20-lyase reactions, which produce the corresponding C19 steroidal precursors of testosterone. The progesterone analogue causes simultaneous inactivation of the two catalytic activities of the enzyme by a first-order kinetic process that obeys saturation kinetics. Progesterone and 17-hydroxyprogesterone each protect the enzyme against inactivation. The progesterone and analogue is a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme with Ki values of 8.4 microM and 7.8 microM for progesterone and 17-hydroxyprogesterone, respectively. The enzyme inactivation and kinetic data are consistent with a theory proposing that the analogue and the two substrates compete for the same active site. The radioactive analogue 17-[( 14C]bromoacetoxy)progesterone causes inactivation of the enzyme with incorporation of 1.5-2.2 mol of the analogue per mole of inactivated enzyme. When this experiment is carried out in the presence of a substrate, then 0.9-1.2 mol of radioactive analogue is incorporated per mole of inactivated enzyme. The data suggest that the analogue can bind to two different sites, one of which is related to the catalytic site. Radiolabeled enzyme samples, from reactions of the 14C-labeled analogue with the enzyme alone or with enzyme in the presence of a substrate, were subjected to amino acid analysis and also to tryptic digestion and peptide mapping.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Affinity alkylation of the active site of C/sub 21/ steroid side-chain cleavage cytochrome P-450 from neonatal porcine testis: a unique cysteine residue alkylated by 17-(bromoacetoxy)progesterone

    SciTech Connect

    Onoda, M.; Haniu, M.; Yanagibashi, K.; Sweet, F.; Shively, J.E.; Hall, P.F.

    1987-01-27

    The affinity alkylating progesterone analogue 17-(bromoacetoxy)progesterone has been used to label the active site of a microsomal cytochrome P-450 enzyme from neonatal pig testis. The enzyme causes removal of the C/sub 20/ and C/sub 21/ side chains from the substrates progesterone and pregnenolone by catalyzing both 17-hydroxylase and C/sub 17,20/-lyase reactions, which produce the corresponding C/sub 1//sup 9/ steroidal precursors of testosterone. The progesterone analogue causes simultaneous inactivation of the two catalytic activities of the enzyme by a first-order kinetic process that obeys saturation kinetics. Progesterone and 17-hydroxyprogesterone each protect the enzyme against inactivation. The progesterone analogue is a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme with K/sub i/ values of 8.4 ..mu..M and 7.8 ..mu..M for progesterone and 17-hydroxyprogesterone, respectively. The enzyme inactivation and kinetic data are consistent with a theory proposing that the analogue and the two substrates compete for the same active site. The radioactive analogue 17-((/sup 14/C)bromoacetoxy)progesterone causes inactivation of the enzyme with incorporation of 1.5-2.2 mol of the analogue per mole of inactivated enzyme. When this experiment is carried out in the presence of a substrate, then 0.9-1.2 mol of radioactive analogue is incorporated per mole of inactivated enzyme. The data suggest that the analogue can bind to two different sites, one of which is related to the catalytic site. Radiolabeled enzyme samples, from reactions of the /sup 14/C-labeled analogue with the enzyme alone or with enzyme in the presence of a substrate, were subjected to amino acid analysis and also in tryptic digestion and peptide mapping.

  11. Characterization of Active Site Residues of Nitroalkane Oxidase†

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Michael P.; Fenny, Nana S.; Ali, Shah R.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of primary and secondary nitrolkanes to the corresponding aldehydes and ketones plus nitrite. The structure of the enzyme shows that Serl71 forms a hydrogen bond to the flavin N5, suggesting that it plays a role in catalysis. Cys397 and Tyr398 were previously identified by chemical modification as potential active site residues. To more directly probe the roles of these residues, the S171A, S171V, S171T, C397S, and Y398F enzymes have been characterized with nitroethane as substrate. The C397S and Y398 enzymes were less stable than the wild-type enzyme, and the C397S enzyme routinely contained a substoichiometric amount of FAD. Analysis of the steady-state kinetic parameters for the mutant enzymes, including deuterium isotope effects, establishes that all of the mutations result in decreases in the rate constants for removal of the substrate proton by ~5-fold and decreases in the rate constant for product release of ~2-fold. Only the S171V and S171T mutations alter the rate constant for flavin oxidation. These results establish that these residues are not involved in catalysis, but rather are required for maintaining the protein structure. PMID:20056514

  12. Flexibility of active-site gorge aromatic residues and non-gorge aromatic residues in acetylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Ghattyvenkatakrishna, Pavan K; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    The presence of an unusually large number of aromatic residues in the active site gorge of acetylcholinesterase has been a topic of great interest. Flexibility of these residues has been suspected to be a key player in controlling ligand traversal in the gorge. This raises the question of whether the over representation of aromatic residues in the gorge implies higher than normal flexibility of those residues. The current study suggests that it does not. Large changes in the hydrophobic cross sectional area due to dihedral oscillations are probably the reason behind their presence in the gorge.

  13. Mutational analysis of the three cysteines and active-site aspartic acid 103 of ketosteroid isomerase from Pseudomonas putida biotype B.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S W; Joo, S; Choi, G; Cho, H S; Oh, B H; Choi, K Y

    1997-01-01

    In order to clarify the roles of three cysteines in ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) from Pseudomonas putida biotype B, each of the cysteine residues has been changed to a serine residue (C69S, C81S, and C97S) by site-directed mutagenesis. All cysteine mutations caused only a slight decrease in the k(cat) value, with no significant change of Km for the substrate. Even modification of the sulfhydryl group with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) has almost no effect on enzyme activity. These results demonstrate that none of the cysteines in the KSI from P. putida is critical for catalytic activity, contrary to the previous identification of a cysteine in an active-site-directed photoinactivation study of KSI. Based on the three-dimensional structures of KSIs with and without dienolate intermediate analog equilenin, as determined by X-ray crystallography at high resolution, Asp-103 was found to be located within the range of the hydrogen bond to the equilenin. To assess the role of Asp-103 in catalysis, Asp-103 has been replaced with either asparagine (D103N) or alanine (D103A) by site-directed mutagenesis. For D103A mutant KSI there was a significant decrease in the k(cat) value: the k(cat) of the mutant was 85-fold lower than that of the wild-type enzyme; however, for the D103N mutant, which retained some hydrogen bonding capability, there was a minor decrease in the k(cat) value. These findings support the idea that aspartic acid 103 in the active site is an essential catalytic residue involved in catalysis by hydrogen bonding to the dienolate intermediate. PMID:9401033

  14. Mutagenesis and crystallographic studies of the catalytic residues of the papain family protease bleomycin hydrolase: new insights into active-site structure

    PubMed Central

    O'Farrell, Paul A.; Joshua-Tor, Leemor

    2006-01-01

    Bleomycin hydrolase (BH) is a hexameric papain family cysteine protease which is involved in preparing peptides for antigen presentation and has been implicated in tumour cell resistance to bleomycin chemotherapy. Structures of active-site mutants of yeast BH yielded unexpected results. Replacement of the active-site asparagine with alanine, valine or leucine results in the destabilization of the histidine side chain, demonstrating unambiguously the role of the asparagine residue in correctly positioning the histidine for catalysis. Replacement of the histidine with alanine or leucine destabilizes the asparagine position, indicating a delicate arrangement of the active-site residues. In all of the mutants, the C-terminus of the protein, which lies in the active site, protrudes further into the active site. All mutants were compromised in their catalytic activity. The structures also revealed the importance of a tightly bound water molecule which stabilizes a loop near the active site and which is conserved throughout the papain family. It is displaced in a number of the mutants, causing destabilization of this loop and a nearby loop, resulting in a large movement of the active-site cysteine. The results imply that this water molecule plays a key structural role in this family of enzymes. PMID:17007609

  15. Inactivation of the RTEM-1 cysteine beta-lactamase by iodoacetate. The nature of active-site functional groups and comparisons with the native enzyme.

    PubMed

    Knap, A K; Pratt, R F

    1991-01-01

    The pH-rate profile for inactivation of the RTEM-1 cysteine beta-lactamase by iodoacetate supports previous evidence [Knap & Pratt (1989) Proteins Struct. Funct. Genet. 6, 316-323] for the activation of the active-site thiol group by adjacent functional groups. The enhanced reactivity of iodoacetate, with respect to that of iodoacetamide, suggests the influence of a positive charge in the active site. The reactivity of iodoacetate is not affected by dissociation of an active-site functional group of pKa 6.7, which increases the reactivity of neutral reagents, probably because of a compensation phenomenon; it is, however, lost on dissociation of an acid of pKa 8.1. It is concluded that the active cysteine beta-lactamase has four functional groups at the active site, one nucleophilic thiolate of Cys-70, one neutral acid (most probably the carboxy group of Glu-166, from the crystal structures) and two cationic residues (most probably Lys-73 and Lys-234). A comparison of these results with the pH-dependence of reactivity of the native RTEM-2 beta-lactamase suggests that the active form of the latter enzyme is also monocationic, although the nucleophile (Ser-70) is likely to be neutral in this case and the carboxylic acid dissociated. A mechanism of class A beta-lactamase catalysis is discussed where the Glu-166 carboxylate acts as a general base/acid catalyst and Lys-73 is principally required for electrostatic stabilization of the anionic tetrahedral intermediate.

  16. Metacaspase activity of Arabidopsis thaliana is regulated by S-nitrosylation of a critical cysteine residue.

    PubMed

    Belenghi, Beatrice; Romero-Puertas, Maria C; Vercammen, Dominique; Brackenier, Anouk; Inzé, Dirk; Delledonne, Massimo; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2007-01-12

    Nitric oxide (NO) regulates a number of signaling functions in both animals and plants under several physiological and pathophysiological conditions. S-Nitrosylation linking a nitrosothiol on cysteine residues mediates NO signaling functions of a broad spectrum of mammalian proteins, including caspases, the main effectors of apoptosis. Metacaspases are suggested to be the ancestors of metazoan caspases, and plant metacaspases have previously been shown to be genuine cysteine proteases that autoprocess in a manner similar to that of caspases. We show that S-nitrosylation plays a central role in the regulation of the proteolytic activity of Arabidopsis thaliana metacaspase 9 (AtMC9) and hypothesize that this S-nitrosylation affects the cellular processes in which metacaspases are involved. We found that AtMC9 zymogens are S-nitrosylated at their active site cysteines in vivo and that this posttranslational modification suppresses both AtMC9 autoprocessing and proteolytic activity. However, the mature processed form is not prone to NO inhibition due to the presence of a second S-nitrosylation-insensitive cysteine that can replace the S-nitrosylated cysteine residue within the catalytic center of the processed AtMC9. This cysteine is absent in caspases and paracaspases but is conserved in all reported metacaspases.

  17. Effect of exchange of the cysteine molybdenum ligand with selenocysteine on the structure and function of the active site in human sulfite oxidase.

    PubMed

    Reschke, Stefan; Niks, Dimitri; Wilson, Heather; Sigfridsson, Kajsa G V; Haumann, Michael; Rajagopalan, K V; Hille, Russ; Leimkühler, Silke

    2013-11-19

    Sulfite oxidase (SO) is an essential molybdoenzyme for humans, catalyzing the final step in the degradation of sulfur-containing amino acids and lipids, which is the oxidation of sulfite to sulfate. The catalytic site of SO consists of a molybdenum ion bound to the dithiolene sulfurs of one molybdopterin (MPT) molecule, carrying two oxygen ligands, and is further coordinated by the thiol sulfur of a conserved cysteine residue. We have exchanged four non-active site cysteines in the molybdenum cofactor (Moco) binding domain of human SO (SOMD) with serine using site-directed mutagenesis. This facilitated the specific replacement of the active site Cys207 with selenocysteine during protein expression in Escherichia coli. The sulfite oxidizing activity (kcat/KM) of SeSOMD4Ser was increased at least 1.5-fold, and the pH optimum was shifted to a more acidic value compared to those of SOMD4Ser and SOMD4Cys(wt). X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed a Mo(VI)-Se bond length of 2.51 Å, likely caused by the specific binding of Sec207 to the molybdenum, and otherwise rather similar square-pyramidal S/Se(Cys)O2Mo(VI)S2(MPT) site structures in the three constructs. The low-pH form of the Mo(V) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal of SeSOMD4Ser was altered compared to those of SOMD4Ser and SOMD4Cys(wt), with g1 in particular shifted to a lower magnetic field, due to the Se ligation at the molybdenum. In contrast, the Mo(V) EPR signal of the high-pH form was unchanged. The substantially stronger effect of substituting selenocysteine for cysteine at low pH as compared to high pH is most likely due to the decreased covalency of the Mo-Se bond.

  18. Discovery and Mechanistic Characterization of Selective Inhibitors of H2S-producing Enzyme: 3-Mercaptopyruvate Sulfurtransferase (3MST) Targeting Active-site Cysteine Persulfide

    PubMed Central

    Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Sasakura, Kiyoshi; Suwanai, Yusuke; Toma-Fukai, Sachiko; Shimamoto, Kazuhito; Takano, Yoko; Shibuya, Norihiro; Terai, Takuya; Komatsu, Toru; Ueno, Tasuku; Ogasawara, Yuki; Tsuchiya, Yukihiro; Watanabe, Yasuo; Kimura, Hideo; Wang, Chao; Uchiyama, Masanobu; Kojima, Hirotatsu; Okabe, Takayoshi; Urano, Yasuteru; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Nagano, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Very recent studies indicate that sulfur atoms with oxidation state 0 or −1, called sulfane sulfurs, are the actual mediators of some physiological processes previously considered to be regulated by hydrogen sulfide (H2S). 3-Mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST), one of three H2S-producing enzymes, was also recently shown to produce sulfane sulfur (H2Sn). Here, we report the discovery of several potent 3MST inhibitors by means of high-throughput screening (HTS) of a large chemical library (174,118 compounds) with our H2S-selective fluorescent probe, HSip-1. Most of the identified inhibitors had similar aromatic ring-carbonyl-S-pyrimidone structures. Among them, compound 3 showed very high selectivity for 3MST over other H2S/sulfane sulfur-producing enzymes and rhodanese. The X-ray crystal structures of 3MST complexes with two of the inhibitors revealed that their target is a persulfurated cysteine residue located in the active site of 3MST. Precise theoretical calculations indicated the presence of a strong long-range electrostatic interaction between the persulfur anion of the persulfurated cysteine residue and the positively charged carbonyl carbon of the pyrimidone moiety of the inhibitor. Our results also provide the experimental support for the idea that the 3MST-catalyzed reaction with 3-mercaptopyruvate proceeds via a ping-pong mechanism. PMID:28079151

  19. Involvement of the Cys-Tyr cofactor on iron binding in the active site of human cysteine dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Arjune, Sita; Schwarz, Guenter; Belaidi, Abdel A

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur metabolism has gained increasing medical interest over the last years. In particular, cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) has been recognized as a potential marker in oncology due to its altered gene expression in various cancer types. Human CDO is a non-heme iron-dependent enzyme, which catalyzes the irreversible oxidation of cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid, which is further metabolized to taurine or pyruvate and sulfate. Several studies have reported a unique post-translational modification of human CDO consisting of a cross-link between cysteine 93 and tyrosine 157 (Cys-Tyr), which increases catalytic efficiency in a substrate-dependent manner. However, the reaction mechanism by which the Cys-Tyr cofactor increases catalytic efficiency remains unclear. In this study, steady-state kinetics were determined for wild type CDO and two different variants being either impaired or saturated with the Cys-Tyr cofactor. Cofactor formation in CDO resulted in an approximately fivefold increase in k cat and tenfold increase in k cat/K m over the cofactor-free CDO variant. Furthermore, iron titration experiments revealed an 18-fold decrease in K d of iron upon cross-link formation. This finding suggests a structural role of the Cys-Tyr cofactor in coordinating the ferrous iron in the active site of CDO in accordance with the previously postulated reaction mechanism of human CDO. Finally, we identified product-based inhibition and α-ketoglutarate and glutarate as CDO inhibitors using a simplified well plate-based activity assay. This assay can be used for high-throughput identification of additional inhibitors, which may contribute to understand the functional importance of CDO in sulfur amino acid metabolism and related diseases.

  20. IDENTIFYING CRITICAL CYSTEINE RESIDUES IN ARSENIC (+3 OXIDATION STATE) METHYLTRANSFERASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) catalyzes methylation of inorganic arsenic to mono, di, and trimethylated arsenicals. Orthologous AS3MT genes in genomes ranging from simple echinoderm to human predict a protein with five conserved cysteine (C) residues. In ...

  1. A Variable Active Site Residue Influences the Kinetics of Response Regulator Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Immormino, Robert M; Silversmith, Ruth E; Bourret, Robert B

    2016-10-04

    Two-component regulatory systems, minimally composed of a sensor kinase and a response regulator protein, are common mediators of signal transduction in microorganisms. All response regulators contain a receiver domain with conserved active site residues that catalyze the signal activating and deactivating phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions. We explored the impact of variable active site position T+1 (one residue C-terminal to the conserved Thr/Ser) on reaction kinetics and signaling fidelity, using wild type and mutant Escherichia coli CheY, CheB, and NarL to represent the three major sequence classes observed across response regulators: Ala/Gly, Ser/Thr, and Val/Ile/Met, respectively, at T+1. Biochemical and structural data together suggested that different amino acids at T+1 impacted reaction kinetics by altering access to the active site while not perturbing overall protein structure. A given amino acid at position T+1 had similar effects on autodephosphorylation in each protein background tested, likely by modulating access of the attacking water molecule to the active site. Similarly, rate constants for CheY autophosphorylation with three different small molecule phosphodonors were consistent with the steric constraints on access to the phosphorylation site arising from combination of specific phosphodonors with particular amino acids at T+1. Because other variable active site residues also influence response regulator phosphorylation biochemistry, we began to explore how context (here, the amino acid at T+2) affected the influence of position T+1 on CheY autocatalytic reactions. Finally, position T+1 affected the fidelity and kinetics of phosphotransfer between sensor kinases and response regulators but was not a primary determinant of their interaction.

  2. Mitochondrial thiol oxidase Erv1: both shuttle cysteine residues are required for its function with distinct roles.

    PubMed

    Ang, Swee Kim; Zhang, Mengqi; Lodi, Tiziana; Lu, Hui

    2014-06-01

    Erv1 (essential for respiration and viability 1), is an essential component of the MIA (mitochondrial import and assembly) pathway, playing an important role in the oxidative folding of mitochondrial intermembrane space proteins. In the MIA pathway, Mia40, a thiol oxidoreductase with a CPC motif at its active site, oxidizes newly imported substrate proteins. Erv1 a FAD-dependent thiol oxidase, in turn reoxidizes Mia40 via its N-terminal Cys30-Cys33 shuttle disulfide. However, it is unclear how the two shuttle cysteine residues of Erv1 relay electrons from the Mia40 CPC motif to the Erv1 active-site Cys130-Cys133 disulfide. In the present study, using yeast genetic approaches we showed that both shuttle cysteine residues of Erv1 are required for cell growth. In organelle and in vitro studies confirmed that both shuttle cysteine residues were indeed required for import of MIA pathway substrates and Erv1 enzyme function to oxidize Mia40. Furthermore, our results revealed that the two shuttle cysteine residues of Erv1 are functionally distinct. Although Cys33 is essential for forming the intermediate disulfide Cys33-Cys130' and transferring electrons to the redox active-site directly, Cys30 plays two important roles: (i) dominantly interacts and receives electrons from the Mia40 CPC motif; and (ii) resolves the Erv1 Cys33-Cys130 intermediate disulfide. Taken together, we conclude that both shuttle cysteine residues are required for Erv1 function, and play complementary, but distinct, roles to ensure rapid turnover of active Erv1.

  3. Identification of active site residues of Fenugreek β-amylase: chemical modification and in silico approach.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Garima; Singh, Vinay K; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2014-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of Fenugreek β-amylase is not available in protein data bank. Therefore, an attempt has been made to identify the catalytic amino acid residues of enzyme by employing studies of pH dependence of enzyme catalysis, chemical modification and bioinformatics. Treatment of purified Fenugreek β-amylase with EDAC in presence of glycine methyl ester and sulfhydryl group specific reagents (IAA, NEM and p-CMB), followed a pseudo first-order kinetics and resulted in effective inactivation of enzyme. The reaction with EDAC in presence of NTEE (3-nitro-l-tyrosine ethylester) resulted into modification of two carboxyl groups per molecule of enzyme and presence of one accessible sulfhydryl group at the active site, per molecule of enzyme was ascertained by titration with DTNB. The above results were supported by the prevention of inactivation of enzyme in presence of substrate. Based on MALDI-TOF analysis of purified Fenugreek β-amylase and MASCOT search, β-amylase of Medicago sativa was found to be the best match. To further confirm the amino acid involved in catalysis, homology modelling of β-amylase of M. sativa was performed. The sequence alignment, superimposition of template and target models, along with study of interactions involved in docking of sucrose and maltose at the active site, led to identification of Glu187, Glu381 and Cys344 as active site residues.

  4. Active site cysteine-null glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) rescues nitric oxide-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takeya; Nakajima, Hidemitsu; Nakatsuji, Masatoshi; Itakura, Masanori; Kaneshige, Akihiro; Azuma, Yasu-Taka; Inui, Takashi; Takeuchi, Tadayoshi

    2016-02-29

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a homotetrameric enzyme involved in a key step of glycolysis, also has a role in mediating cell death under nitrosative stress. Our previous reports suggest that nitric oxide-induced intramolecular disulfide-bonding GAPDH aggregation, which occurs through oxidation of the active site cysteine (Cys-152), participates in a mechanism to account for nitric oxide-induced death signaling in some neurodegenerative/neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we demonstrate a rescue strategy for nitric oxide-induced cell death accompanied by GAPDH aggregation in a mutant with a substitution of Cys-152 to alanine (C152A-GAPDH). Pre-incubation of purified wild-type GAPDH with C152A-GAPDH under exposure to nitric oxide inhibited wild-type GAPDH aggregation in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro. Several lines of structural analysis revealed that C152A-GAPDH extensively interfered with nitric oxide-induced GAPDH-amyloidogenesis. Overexpression of doxycycline-inducible C152A-GAPDH in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma significantly rescued nitric oxide-induced death, concomitant with the decreased formation of GAPDH aggregates. Further, both co-immunoprecipitation assays and simulation models revealed a heterotetramer composed of one dimer each of wild-type GAPDH and C152A-GAPDH. These results suggest that the C152A-GAPDH mutant acts as a dominant-negative molecule against GAPDH aggregation via the formation of this GAPDH heterotetramer. This study may contribute to a new therapeutic approach utilizing C152A-GAPDH against brain damage in nitrosative stress-related disorders.

  5. Hydroxynonenal inactivates cathepsin B by forming Michael adducts with active site residues.

    PubMed

    Crabb, John W; O'Neil, June; Miyagi, Masaru; West, Karen; Hoff, Henry F

    2002-04-01

    Oxidation of plasma low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) generates the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2 nonenal (HNE) and also reduces proteolytic degradation of oxLDL and other proteins internalized by mouse peritoneal macrophages in culture. This leads to accumulation of undegraded material in lysosomes and formation of ceroid, a component of foam cells in atherosclerotic lesions. To explore the possibility that HNE contributes directly to the inactivation of proteases, structure-function studies of the lysosomal protease cathepsin B have been pursued. We found that treatment of mouse macrophages with HNE reduces degradation of internalized maleyl bovine serine albumin and cathepsin B activity. Purified bovine cathepsin B treated briefly with 15 microM HNE lost approximately 76% of its protease activity and also developed immunoreactivity with antibodies to HNE adducts in Western blot analysis. After stabilization of the potential Michael adducts by sodium borohydride reduction, modified amino acids were localized within the bovine cathepsin B protein structure by mass spectrometric analysis of tryptic peptides. Michael adducts were identified by tandem mass spectrometry at cathepsin B active site residues Cys 29 (mature A chain) and His 150 (mature B chain). Thus, covalent interaction between HNE and critical active site residues inactivates cathepsin B. These results support the hypothesis that the accumulation of undegraded macromolecules in lysosomes after oxidative damage are caused in part by direct protease inactivation by adduct formation with lipid peroxidation products such as HNE.

  6. The Ribotoxin Restrictocin Recognizes Its RNA Substrate by Selective Engagement of Active Site Residues

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Restrictocin and related fungal endoribonucleases from the α-sarcin family site-specifically cleave the sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) on the ribosome to inhibit translation and ultimately trigger cell death. Previous studies showed that the SRL folds into a bulged-G motif and tetraloop, with restrictocin achieving a specificity of ∼1000-fold by recognizing both motifs only after the initial binding step. Here, we identify contacts within the protein−RNA interface and determine the extent to which each one contributes to enzyme specificity by examining the effect of protein mutations on the cleavage of the SRL substrate compared to a variety of other RNA substrates. As with other biomolecular interfaces, only a subset of contacts contributes to specificity. One contact of this subset is critical, with the H49A mutation resulting in quantitative loss of specificity. Maximum catalytic activity occurs when both motifs of the SRL are present, with the major contribution involving the bulged-G motif recognized by three lysine residues located adjacent to the active site: K110, K111, and K113. Our findings support a kinetic proofreading mechanism in which the active site residues H49 and, to a lesser extent, Y47 make greater catalytic contributions to SRL cleavage than to suboptimal substrates. This systematic and quantitative analysis begins to elucidate the principles governing RNA recognition by a site-specific endonuclease and may thus serve as a mechanistic model for investigating other RNA modifying enzymes. PMID:21417210

  7. Metal-catalyzed oxidation of phenylalanine-sensitive 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase from Escherichia coli: inactivation and destabilization by oxidation of active-site cysteines.

    PubMed

    Park, O K; Bauerle, R

    1999-03-01

    The in vitro instability of the phenylalanine-sensitive 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase [DAHPS(Phe)] from Escherichia coli has been found to be due to a metal-catalyzed oxidation mechanism. DAHPS(Phe) is one of three differentially feedback-regulated isoforms of the enzyme which catalyzes the first step of aromatic biosynthesis, the formation of DAHP from phosphoenolpyruvate and D-erythrose-4-phosphate. The activity of the apoenzyme decayed exponentially, with a half-life of about 1 day at room temperature, and the heterotetramer slowly dissociated to the monomeric state. The enzyme was stabilized by the presence of phosphoenolpyruvate or EDTA, indicating that in the absence of substrate, a trace metal(s) was the inactivating agent. Cu2+ and Fe2+, but none of the other divalent metals that activate the enzyme, greatly accelerated the rate of inactivation and subunit dissociation. Both anaerobiosis and the addition of catalase significantly reduced Cu2+-catalyzed inactivation. In the spontaneously inactivated enzyme, there was a net loss of two of the seven thiols per subunit; this value increased with increasing concentrations of added Cu2+. Dithiothreitol completely restored the enzymatic activity and the two lost thiols in the spontaneously inactivated enzyme but was only partially effective in reactivation of the Cu2+-inactivated enzyme. Mutant enzymes with conservative replacements at either of the two active-site cysteines, Cys61 or Cys328, were insensitive to the metal attack. Peptide mapping of the Cu2+-inactivated enzyme revealed a disulfide linkage between these two cysteine residues. All results indicate that DAHPS(Phe) is a metal-catalyzed oxidation system wherein bound substrate protects active-site residues from oxidative attack catalyzed by bound redox metal cofactor. A mechanism of inactivation of DAHPS is proposed that features a metal redox cycle that requires the sequential oxidation of its two active-site cysteines.

  8. Control of Substrate Specificity by Active-Site Residues in Nitrobenzene Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Kou-San; Parales, Rebecca E.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrobenzene 1,2-dioxygenase from Comamonas sp. strain JS765 catalyzes the initial reaction in nitrobenzene degradation, forming catechol and nitrite. The enzyme also oxidizes the aromatic rings of mono- and dinitrotoluenes at the nitro-substituted carbon, but the basis for this specificity is not understood. In this study, site-directed mutagenesis was used to modify the active site of nitrobenzene dioxygenase, and the contribution of specific residues in controlling substrate specificity and enzyme performance was evaluated. The activities of six mutant enzymes indicated that the residues at positions 258, 293, and 350 in the α subunit are important for determining regiospecificity with nitroarene substrates and enantiospecificity with naphthalene. The results provide an explanation for the characteristic specificity with nitroarene substrates. Based on the structure of nitrobenzene dioxygenase, substitution of valine for the asparagine at position 258 should eliminate a hydrogen bond between the substrate nitro group and the amino group of asparagine. Up to 99% of the mononitrotoluene oxidation products formed by the N258V mutant were nitrobenzyl alcohols rather than catechols, supporting the importance of this hydrogen bond in positioning substrates in the active site for ring oxidation. Similar results were obtained with an I350F mutant, where the formation of the hydrogen bond appeared to be prevented by steric interference. The specificity of enzymes with substitutions at position 293 varied depending on the residue present. Compared to the wild type, the F293Q mutant was 2.5 times faster at oxidizing 2,6-dinitrotoluene while retaining a similar Km for the substrate based on product formation rates and whole-cell kinetics. PMID:16517627

  9. The pepsin residue glycine-76 contributes to active-site loop flexibility and participates in catalysis.

    PubMed Central

    Okoniewska, M; Tanaka, T; Yada, R Y

    2000-01-01

    Glycine residues are known to contribute to conformational flexibility of polypeptide chains, and have been found to contribute to flexibility of some loops associated with enzymic catalysis. A comparison of porcine pepsin in zymogen, mature and inhibited forms revealed that a loop (a flap), consisting of residues 71--80, located near the active site changed its position upon substrate binding. The loop residue, glycine-76, has been implicated in the catalytic process and thought to participate in a hydrogen-bond network aligning the substrate. This study investigated the role of glycine-76 using site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutants, G76A, G76V and G76S, were constructed to increase conformational restriction of a polypeptide chain. In addition, the serine mutant introduced a hydrogen-bonding potential at position 76 similar to that observed in human renin. All the mutants, regardless of amino acid size and polarity, had lower catalytic efficiency and activated more slowly than the wild-type enzyme. The slower activation process was associated directly with altered proteolytic activity. Consequently, it was proposed that a proteolytic cleavage represents a limiting step of the activation process. Lower catalytic efficiency of the mutants was explained as a decrease in the flap flexibility and, therefore, a different pattern of hydrogen bonds responsible for substrate alignment and flap conformation. The results demonstrated that flap flexibility is essential for efficient catalytic and activation processes. PMID:10861225

  10. Probing catalysis by Escherichia coli dTDP-glucose-4,6-dehydratase: identification and preliminary characterization of functional amino acid residues at the active site.

    PubMed

    Hegeman, A D; Gross, J W; Frey, P A

    2001-06-05

    A model of the Escherichia coli dTDP-glucose-4,6-dehydratase (4,6-dehydratase) active site has been generated by combining amino acid sequence alignment information with the 3-dimensional structure of UDP-galactose-4-epimerase. The active site configuration is consistent with the partially refined 3-dimensional structure of 4,6-dehydratase, which lacks substrate-nucleotide but contains NAD(+) (PDB file ). From the model, two groups of active site residues were identified. The first group consists of Asp135(DEH), Glu136(DEH), Glu198(DEH), Lys199(DEH), and Tyr301(DEH). These residues are near the substrate-pyranose binding pocket in the model, they are completely conserved in 4,6-dehydratase, and they differ from the corresponding equally well-conserved residues in 4-epimerase. The second group of residues is Cys187(DEH), Asn190(DEH), and His232(DEH), which form a motif on the re face of the cofactor nicotinamide binding pocket that resembles the catalytic triad of cysteine-proteases. The importance of both groups of residues was tested by mutagenesis and steady-state kinetic analysis. In all but one case, a decrease in catalytic efficiency of approximately 2 orders of magnitude below wild-type activity was observed. Mutagenesis of each of these residues, with the exception of Cys187(DEH), which showed near-wild-type activity, clearly has important negative consequences for catalysis. The allocation of specific functions to these residues and the absolute magnitude of these effects are obscured by the complex chemistry in this multistep mechanism. Tools will be needed to characterize each chemical step individually in order to assign loss of catalytic efficiency to specific residue functions. To this end, the effects of each of these variants on the initial dehydrogenation step were evaluated using a the substrate analogue dTDP-xylose. Additional steady-state techniques were employed in an attempt to further limit the assignment of rate limitation. The results are

  11. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  12. Fasting, but Not Aging, Dramatically Alters the Redox Status of Cysteine Residues on Proteins in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Menger, Katja E; James, Andrew M; Cochemé, Helena M; Harbour, Michael E; Chouchani, Edward T; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Partridge, Linda; Murphy, Michael P

    2015-06-30

    Altering the redox state of cysteine residues on protein surfaces is an important response to environmental challenges. Although aging and fasting alter many redox processes, the role of cysteine residues is uncertain. To address this, we used a redox proteomic technique, oxidative isotope-coded affinity tags (OxICAT), to assess cysteine-residue redox changes in Drosophila melanogaster during aging and fasting. This approach enabled us to simultaneously identify and quantify the redox state of several hundred cysteine residues in vivo. Cysteine residues within young flies had a bimodal distribution with peaks at ∼10% and ∼85% reversibly oxidized. Surprisingly, these cysteine residues did not become more oxidized with age. In contrast, 24 hr of fasting dramatically oxidized cysteine residues that were reduced under fed conditions while also reducing cysteine residues that were initially oxidized. We conclude that fasting, but not aging, dramatically alters cysteine-residue redox status in D. melanogaster.

  13. The roles of active site residues in the catalytic mechanism of methylaspartate ammonia-lyase.

    PubMed

    Raj, Hans; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2013-01-01

    Methylaspartate ammonia-lyase (MAL; EC 4.3.1.2) catalyzes the reversible addition of ammonia to mesaconate to yield l-threo-(2S,3S)-3-methylaspartate and l-erythro-(2S,3R)-3-methylaspartate as products. In the proposed minimal mechanism for MAL of Clostridium tetanomorphum, Lys-331 acts as the (S)-specific base catalyst and abstracts the 3S-proton from l-threo-3-methylaspartate, resulting in an enolate anion intermediate. This enolic intermediate is stabilized by coordination to the essential active site Mg(2+) ion and hydrogen bonding to the Gln-329 residue. Collapse of this intermediate results in the release of ammonia and the formation of mesaconate. His-194 likely acts as the (R)-specific base catalyst and abstracts the 3R-proton from the l-erythro isomer of 3-methylaspartate, yielding the enolic intermediate. In the present study, we have investigated the importance of the residues Gln-73, Phe-170, Gln-172, Tyr-356, Thr-360, Cys-361 and Leu-384 for the catalytic activity of C. tetanomorphum MAL. These residues, which are part of the enzyme surface lining the substrate binding pocket, were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis and the mutant enzymes were characterized for their structural integrity, ability to catalyze the amination of mesaconate, and regio- and diastereoselectivity. Based on the observed properties of the mutant enzymes, combined with previous structural studies and protein engineering work, we propose a detailed catalytic mechanism for the MAL-catalyzed reaction, in which the side chains of Gln-73, Gln-172, Tyr-356, Thr-360, and Leu-384 provide favorable interactions with the substrate, which are important for substrate binding and activation. This detailed knowledge of the catalytic mechanism of MAL can serve as a guide for future protein engineering experiments.

  14. A Mutational Analysis of the Active Site Loop Residues in cis-3-Chloroacrylic Acid Dehalogenase

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Gottfried K.; Huddleston, Jamison P.; Johnson, William H.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    cis -3-Chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (cis-CaaD) from Pseudomonas pavonaceae 170 and a homologue from Corynebacterium glutamicum designated Cg10062 share 34% sequence identity (54% similarity). The former catalyzes a key step in a bacterial catabolic pathway for the nematocide 1,3-dichloropropene, whereas the latter has no known biological activity. Although Cg10062 has the six active site residues (Pro-1, His-28, Arg-70, Arg-73, Tyr-103, Glu-114) that are critical for cis-CaaD activity, it shows only a low level cis-CaaD activity and lacks the specificity of cis-CaaD: Cg10062 processes both isomers of 3-chloroacrylate with a preference for the cis-isomer. Although the basis for these differences is unknown, a comparison of the crystal structures of the enzymes covalently modified by an adduct resulting from their incubation with the same inhibitor offers a possible explanation. A 6-residue active site loop in cis-CaaD shows a strikingly different conformation from that observed in Cg10062: the loop closes down on the active site of cis-CaaD, but not on that of Cg10062. In order to examine what this loop might contribute to cis-CaaD catalysis and specificity, the residues were changed individually to those found in Cg10062. Subsequent kinetic and mechanistic analysis suggests that the T34A mutant of cis-CaaD is more Cg10062-like. The mutant enzyme shows a 4-fold increase in Km (using cis-3-bromoacrylate), but not to the degree observed for Cg10062 (687-fold). The mutation also causes a 4-fold decrease in the burst rate (compared to the wild type cis-CaaD), whereas Cg10062 shows no burst rate. More telling is the reaction of the T34A mutant of cis-CaaD with the alternate substrate, 2,3-butadienoate. In the presence of NaBH4 and the allene, cis-CaaD is completely inactivated after one turnover due to the covalent modification of Pro-1. The same experiment with Cg10062 does not result in the covalent modification of Pro-1. The different outcomes are attributed to

  15. Multiple active site residues are important for photochemical efficiency in the light-activated enzyme protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR).

    PubMed

    Menon, Binuraj R K; Hardman, Samantha J O; Scrutton, Nigel S; Heyes, Derren J

    2016-08-01

    Protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) catalyzes the light-driven reduction of protochlorophyllide (Pchlide), an essential, regulatory step in chlorophyll biosynthesis. The unique requirement of the enzyme for light has provided the opportunity to investigate how light energy can be harnessed to power biological catalysis and enzyme dynamics. Excited state interactions between the Pchlide molecule and the protein are known to drive the subsequent reaction chemistry. However, the structural features of POR and active site residues that are important for photochemistry and catalysis are currently unknown, because there is no crystal structure for POR. Here, we have used static and time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of a number of active site variants to study the role of a number of residues, which are located in the proposed NADPH/Pchlide binding site based on previous homology models, in the reaction mechanism of POR. Our findings, which are interpreted in the context of a new improved structural model, have identified several residues that are predicted to interact with the coenzyme or substrate. Several of the POR variants have a profound effect on the photochemistry, suggesting that multiple residues are important in stabilizing the excited state required for catalysis. Our work offers insight into how the POR active site geometry is finely tuned by multiple active site residues to support enzyme-mediated photochemistry and reduction of Pchlide, both of which are crucial to the existence of life on Earth.

  16. Roles of key active-site residues in flavocytochrome P450 BM3.

    PubMed Central

    Noble, M A; Miles, C S; Chapman, S K; Lysek, D A; MacKay, A C; Reid, G A; Hanzlik, R P; Munro, A W

    1999-01-01

    The effects of mutation of key active-site residues (Arg-47, Tyr-51, Phe-42 and Phe-87) in Bacillus megaterium flavocytochrome P450 BM3 were investigated. Kinetic studies on the oxidation of laurate and arachidonate showed that the side chain of Arg-47 contributes more significantly to stabilization of the fatty acid carboxylate than does that of Tyr-51 (kinetic parameters for oxidation of laurate: R47A mutant, Km 859 microM, kcat 3960 min-1; Y51F mutant, Km 432 microM, kcat 6140 min-1; wild-type, Km 288 microM, kcat 5140 min-1). A slightly increased kcat for the Y51F-catalysed oxidation of laurate is probably due to decreased activation energy (DeltaG) resulting from a smaller DeltaG of substrate binding. The side chain of Phe-42 acts as a phenyl 'cap' over the mouth of the substrate-binding channel. With mutant F42A, Km is massively increased and kcat is decreased for oxidation of both laurate (Km 2. 08 mM, kcat 2450 min-1) and arachidonate (Km 34.9 microM, kcat 14620 min-1; compared with values of 4.7 microM and 17100 min-1 respectively for wild-type). Amino acid Phe-87 is critical for efficient catalysis. Mutants F87G and F87Y not only exhibit increased Km and decreased kcat values for fatty acid oxidation, but also undergo an irreversible conversion process from a 'fast' to a 'slow' rate of substrate turnover [for F87G (F87Y)-catalysed laurate oxidation: kcat 'fast', 760 (1620) min-1; kcat 'slow', 48.0 (44.6) min-1; kconv (rate of conversion from fast to slow form), 4.9 (23.8) min-1]. All mutants showed less than 10% uncoupling of NADPH oxidation from fatty acid oxidation. The rate of FMN-to-haem electron transfer was shown to become rate-limiting in all mutants analysed. For wild-type P450 BM3, the rate of FMN-to-haem electron transfer (8340 min-1) is twice the steady-state rate of oxidation (4100 min-1), indicating that other steps contribute to rate limitation. Active-site structures of the mutants were probed with the inhibitors 12-(imidazolyl

  17. Targeting Non-Catalytic Cysteine Residues Through Structure-Guided Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Hallenbeck, Kenneth K.; Turner, David M.; Renslo, Adam R.; Arkin, Michelle R.

    2017-01-01

    The targeting of non-catalytic cysteine residues with small molecules is drawing increased attention from drug discovery scientists and chemical biologists. From a biological perspective, genomic and proteomic studies have revealed the presence of cysteine mutations in several oncogenic proteins, suggesting both a functional role for these residues and also a strategy for targeting them in an ‘allele specific’ manner. For the medicinal chemist, the structure-guided design of cysteine-reactive molecules is an appealing strategy to realize improved selectivity and pharmacodynamic properties in drug leads. Finally, for chemical biologists, the modification of cysteine residues provides a unique means to probe protein structure and allosteric regulation. Here, we review three applications of cysteine-modifying small molecules: 1) the optimization of existing drug leads, 2) the discovery of new lead compounds, and 3) the use of cysteine-reactive molecules as probes of protein dynamics. In each case, structure-guided design plays a key role in determining which cysteine residue(s) to target and in designing compounds with the proper geometry to enable both covalent interaction with the targeted cysteine and productive non-covalent interactions with nearby protein residues. PMID:27449257

  18. Conserved active site residues limit inhibition of a copper-containing nitrite reductase by small molecules.

    PubMed

    Tocheva, Elitza I; Eltis, Lindsay D; Murphy, Michael E P

    2008-04-15

    The interaction of copper-containing dissimilatory nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6 ( AfNiR) with each of five small molecules was studied using crystallography and steady-state kinetics. Structural studies revealed that each small molecule interacted with the oxidized catalytic type 2 copper of AfNiR. Three small molecules (formate, acetate and nitrate) mimic the substrate by having at least two oxygen atoms for bidentate coordination to the type 2 copper atom. These three anions bound to the copper ion in the same asymmetric, bidentate manner as nitrite. Consistent with their weak inhibition of the enzyme ( K i >50 mM), the Cu-O distances in these AfNiR-inhibitor complexes were approximately 0.15 A longer than that observed in the AfNiR-nitrite complex. The binding mode of each inhibitor is determined in part by steric interactions with the side chain of active site residue Ile257. Moreover, the side chain of Asp98, a conserved residue that hydrogen bonds to type 2 copper-bound nitrite and nitric oxide, was either disordered or pointed away from the inhibitors. Acetate and formate inhibited AfNiR in a mixed fashion, consistent with the occurrence of second acetate binding site in the AfNiR-acetate complex that occludes access to the type 2 copper. A fourth small molecule, nitrous oxide, bound to the oxidized metal in a side-on fashion reminiscent of nitric oxide to the reduced copper. Nevertheless, nitrous oxide bound at a farther distance from the metal. The fifth small molecule, azide, inhibited the reduction of nitrite by AfNiR most strongly ( K ic = 2.0 +/- 0.1 mM). This ligand bound to the type 2 copper center end-on with a Cu-N c distance of approximately 2 A, and was the only inhibitor to form a hydrogen bond with Asp98. Overall, the data substantiate the roles of Asp98 and Ile257 in discriminating substrate from other small anions.

  19. Conserved Active Site Residues Limit Inhibition of a Copper-Containing Nitrite By Small Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Tocheva, E.I.; Eltis, L.D.; Murphy, M.E.P.

    2009-05-26

    The interaction of copper-containing dissimilatory nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6 ( AfNiR) with each of five small molecules was studied using crystallography and steady-state kinetics. Structural studies revealed that each small molecule interacted with the oxidized catalytic type 2 copper of AfNiR. Three small molecules (formate, acetate and nitrate) mimic the substrate by having at least two oxygen atoms for bidentate coordination to the type 2 copper atom. These three anions bound to the copper ion in the same asymmetric, bidentate manner as nitrite. Consistent with their weak inhibition of the enzyme ( K i >50 mM), the Cu-O distances in these AfNiR-inhibitor complexes were approximately 0.15 A longer than that observed in the AfNiR-nitrite complex. The binding mode of each inhibitor is determined in part by steric interactions with the side chain of active site residue Ile257. Moreover, the side chain of Asp98, a conserved residue that hydrogen bonds to type 2 copper-bound nitrite and nitric oxide, was either disordered or pointed away from the inhibitors. Acetate and formate inhibited AfNiR in a mixed fashion, consistent with the occurrence of second acetate binding site in the AfNiR-acetate complex that occludes access to the type 2 copper. A fourth small molecule, nitrous oxide, bound to the oxidized metal in a side-on fashion reminiscent of nitric oxide to the reduced copper. Nevertheless, nitrous oxide bound at a farther distance from the metal. The fifth small molecule, azide, inhibited the reduction of nitrite by AfNiR most strongly ( K ic = 2.0 +/- 0.1 mM). This ligand bound to the type 2 copper center end-on with a Cu-N c distance of approximately 2 A, and was the only inhibitor to form a hydrogen bond with Asp98. Overall, the data substantiate the roles of Asp98 and Ile257 in discriminating substrate from other small anions.

  20. SufE D74R Substitution Alters Active Site Loop Dynamics To Further Enhance SufE Interaction with the SufS Cysteine Desulfurase

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yuyuan; Kim, Dokyong; Dong, Guangchao; Busenlehner, Laura S.; Frantom, Patrick A.; Outten, F. Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Many essential metalloproteins require iron–sulfur (Fe–S) cluster cofactors for their function. In vivo persulfide formation from L-cysteine is a key step in the biogenesis of Fe–S clusters in most organisms. In Escherichia coli, the SufS cysteine desulfurase mobilizes persulfide from L-cysteine via a PLP-dependent ping-pong reaction. SufS requires the SufE partner protein to transfer the persulfide to the SufB Fe–S cluster scaffold. Without SufE, the SufS enzyme fails to efficiently turn over and remains locked in the persulfide-bound state. Coordinated protein–protein interactions mediate sulfur transfer from SufS to SufE. Multiple studies have suggested that SufE must undergo a conformational change to extend its active site Cys loop during sulfur transfer from SufS. To test this putative model, we mutated SufE Asp74 to Arg (D74R) to increase the dynamics of the SufE Cys51 loop. Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) analysis of SufE D74R revealed an increase in solvent accessibility and dynamics in the loop containing the active site Cys51 used to accept persulfide from SufS. Our results indicate that the mutant protein has a stronger binding affinity for SufS than that of wild-type SufE. In addition, SufE D74R can still enhance SufS desulfurase activity and did not show saturation at higher SufE D74R concentrations, unlike wild-type SufE. These results show that dynamic changes may shift SufE to a sulfur-acceptor state that interacts more strongly with SufS. PMID:26171726

  1. Molecular dynamics studies unravel role of conserved residues responsible for movement of ions into active site of DHBPS

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, Ranajit Nivrutti; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Singh, Balvinder

    2017-01-01

    3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase (DHBPS) catalyzes the conversion of D-ribulose 5-phosphate (Ru5P) to L-3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate in the presence of Mg2+. Although crystal structures of DHBPS in complex with Ru5P and non-catalytic metal ions have been reported, structure with Ru5P along with Mg2+ is still elusive. Therefore, mechanistic role played by Mg2+ in the structure of DHBPS is poorly understood. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations of DHBPS-Ru5P complex along with Mg2+ have shown entry of Mg2+ from bulk solvent into active site. Presence of Mg2+ in active site has constrained conformations of Ru5P and has reduced flexibility of loop-2. Formation of hydrogen bonds among Thr-108 and residues - Gly-109, Val-110, Ser-111, and Asp-114 are found to be critical for entry of Mg2+ into active site. Subsequent in silico mutations of residues, Thr-108 and Asp-114 have substantiated the importance of these interactions. Loop-4 of one monomer is being proposed to act as a “lid” covering the active site of other monomer. Further, the conserved nature of residues taking part in the transfer of Mg2+ suggests the same mechanism being present in DHBPS of other microorganisms. Thus, this study provides insights into the functioning of DHBPS that can be used for the designing of inhibitors. PMID:28079168

  2. Molecular dynamics studies unravel role of conserved residues responsible for movement of ions into active site of DHBPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Ranajit Nivrutti; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Singh, Balvinder

    2017-01-01

    3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase (DHBPS) catalyzes the conversion of D-ribulose 5-phosphate (Ru5P) to L-3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate in the presence of Mg2+. Although crystal structures of DHBPS in complex with Ru5P and non-catalytic metal ions have been reported, structure with Ru5P along with Mg2+ is still elusive. Therefore, mechanistic role played by Mg2+ in the structure of DHBPS is poorly understood. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations of DHBPS-Ru5P complex along with Mg2+ have shown entry of Mg2+ from bulk solvent into active site. Presence of Mg2+ in active site has constrained conformations of Ru5P and has reduced flexibility of loop-2. Formation of hydrogen bonds among Thr-108 and residues - Gly-109, Val-110, Ser-111, and Asp-114 are found to be critical for entry of Mg2+ into active site. Subsequent in silico mutations of residues, Thr-108 and Asp-114 have substantiated the importance of these interactions. Loop-4 of one monomer is being proposed to act as a “lid” covering the active site of other monomer. Further, the conserved nature of residues taking part in the transfer of Mg2+ suggests the same mechanism being present in DHBPS of other microorganisms. Thus, this study provides insights into the functioning of DHBPS that can be used for the designing of inhibitors.

  3. Targeting Non-Catalytic Cysteine Residues Through Structure-Guided Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Hallenbeck, Kenneth K; Turner, David M; Renslo, Adam R; Arkin, Michelle R

    2017-01-01

    The targeting of non-catalytic cysteine residues with small molecules is drawing increased attention from drug discovery scientists and chemical biologists. From a biological perspective, genomic and proteomic studies have revealed the presence of cysteine mutations in several oncogenic proteins, suggesting both a functional role for these residues and also a strategy for targeting them in an 'allele specific' manner. For the medicinal chemist, the structure-guided design of cysteine- reactive molecules is an appealing strategy to realize improved selectivity and pharmacodynamic properties in drug leads. Finally, for chemical biologists, the modification of cysteine residues provides a unique means to probe protein structure and allosteric regulation. Here, we review three applications of cysteinemodifying small molecules: 1) the optimization of existing drug leads, 2) the discovery of new lead compounds, and 3) the use of cysteine-reactive molecules as probes of protein dynamics. In each case, structure-guided design plays a key role in determining which cysteine residue(s) to target and in designing compounds with the proper geometry to enable both covalent interaction with the targeted cysteine and productive non-covalent interactions with nearby protein residues.

  4. Mutational and structural analyses of Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus Man5B reveal novel active site residues for family 5 glycoside hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Takuji; Schmitz, George E; Dodd, Dylan; Han, Yejun; Burnett, Alanna; Nagasawa, Naoko; Mackie, Roderick I; Nakamura, Haruki; Morikawa, Kosuke; Cann, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    CpMan5B is a glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 5 enzyme exhibiting both β-1,4-mannosidic and β-1,4-glucosidic cleavage activities. To provide insight into the amino acid residues that contribute to catalysis and substrate specificity, we solved the structure of CpMan5B at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure revealed several active site residues (Y12, N92 and R196) in CpMan5B that are not present in the active sites of other structurally resolved GH5 enzymes. Residue R196 in GH5 enzymes is thought to be strictly conserved as a histidine that participates in an electron relay network with the catalytic glutamates, but we show that an arginine fulfills a functionally equivalent role and is found at this position in every enzyme in subfamily GH5_36, which includes CpMan5B. Residue N92 is required for full enzymatic activity and forms a novel bridge over the active site that is absent in other family 5 structures. Our data also reveal a role of Y12 in establishing the substrate preference for CpMan5B. Using these molecular determinants as a probe allowed us to identify Man5D from Caldicellulosiruptor bescii as a mannanase with minor endo-glucanase activity.

  5. Mutational and Structural Analyses of Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus Man5B Reveal Novel Active Site Residues for Family 5 Glycoside Hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yejun; Burnett, Alanna; Nagasawa, Naoko; Mackie, Roderick I.; Nakamura, Haruki; Morikawa, Kosuke; Cann, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    CpMan5B is a glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 5 enzyme exhibiting both β-1,4-mannosidic and β-1,4-glucosidic cleavage activities. To provide insight into the amino acid residues that contribute to catalysis and substrate specificity, we solved the structure of CpMan5B at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure revealed several active site residues (Y12, N92 and R196) in CpMan5B that are not present in the active sites of other structurally resolved GH5 enzymes. Residue R196 in GH5 enzymes is thought to be strictly conserved as a histidine that participates in an electron relay network with the catalytic glutamates, but we show that an arginine fulfills a functionally equivalent role and is found at this position in every enzyme in subfamily GH5_36, which includes CpMan5B. Residue N92 is required for full enzymatic activity and forms a novel bridge over the active site that is absent in other family 5 structures. Our data also reveal a role of Y12 in establishing the substrate preference for CpMan5B. Using these molecular determinants as a probe allowed us to identify Man5D from Caldicellulosiruptor bescii as a mannanase with minor endo-glucanase activity. PMID:24278284

  6. Analyzing the catalytic role of active site residues in the Fe-type nitrile hydratase from Comamonas testosteroni Ni1.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Salette; Wu, Rui; Krzywda, Karoline; Opalka, Veronika; Chan, Hei; Liu, Dali; Holz, Richard C

    2015-07-01

    A strictly conserved active site arginine residue (αR157) and two histidine residues (αH80 and αH81) located near the active site of the Fe-type nitrile hydratase from Comamonas testosteroni Ni1 (CtNHase), were mutated. These mutant enzymes were examined for their ability to bind iron and hydrate acrylonitrile. For the αR157A mutant, the residual activity (k cat = 10 ± 2 s(-1)) accounts for less than 1% of the wild-type activity (k cat = 1100 ± 30 s(-1)) while the K m value is nearly unchanged at 205 ± 10 mM. On the other hand, mutation of the active site pocket αH80 and αH81 residues to alanine resulted in enzymes with k cat values of 220 ± 40 and 77 ± 13 s(-1), respectively, and K m values of 187 ± 11 and 179 ± 18 mM. The double mutant (αH80A/αH81A) was also prepared and provided an enzyme with a k cat value of 132 ± 3 s(-1) and a K m value of 213 ± 61 mM. These data indicate that all three residues are catalytically important, but not essential. X-ray crystal structures of the αH80A/αH81A, αH80W/αH81W, and αR157A mutant CtNHase enzymes were solved to 2.0, 2.8, and 2.5 Å resolutions, respectively. In each mutant enzyme, hydrogen-bonding interactions crucial for the catalytic function of the αCys(104)-SOH ligand are disrupted. Disruption of these hydrogen bonding interactions likely alters the nucleophilicity of the sulfenic acid oxygen and the Lewis acidity of the active site Fe(III) ion.

  7. Mutagenesis of conserved active site residues of dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase enhances the accumulation of α-ketoglutarate in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongwei; Madzak, Catherine; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen

    2016-01-01

    α-Ketoglutarate (α-KG) is an important intermediate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and has broad applications. The mitochondrial ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDH) complex catalyzes the oxidation of α-KG to succinyl-CoA. Disruption of KGDH, which may enhance the accumulation of α-KG theoretically, was found to be lethal to obligate aerobic cells. In this study, individual overexpression of dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase (DLST), which serves as the inner core of KGDH, decreased overall activity of the enzyme complex. Furthermore, two conserved active site residues of DLST, His419, and Asp423 were identified. In order to determine whether these residues are engaged in enzyme reaction or not, these two conserved residues were individually mutated. Analysis of the kinetic parameters of the enzyme variants provided evidence that the catalytic reaction of DLST depended on residues His419 and Asp423. Overexpression of mutated DLST not only impaired balanced assembly of KGDH, but also disrupted the catalytic integrity of the enzyme complex. Replacement of the Asp423 residue by glutamate increased extracellular α-KG by 40 % to 50 g L(-1) in mutant strain. These observations uncovered catalytic roles of two conserved active site residues of DLST and provided clues for effective metabolic strategies for rational carbon flux control for the enhanced production of α-KG and related bioproducts.

  8. Conservation of cysteine residues in fungal histidine acid phytases.

    PubMed

    Mullaney, Edward J; Ullah, Abul H J

    2005-03-11

    Amino acid sequence analysis of fungal histidine acid phosphatases displaying phytase activity has revealed a conserved eight-cysteine motif. These conserved amino acids are not directly associated with catalytic function; rather they appear to be essential in the formation of disulfide bridges. Their role is seen as being similar to another eight-cysteine motif recently reported in the amino acid sequence of nearly 500 plant polypeptides. An additional disulfide bridge formed by two cysteines at the N-terminus of all the filamentous ascomycete phytases was also observed. Disulfide bridges are known to increase both stability and heat tolerance in proteins. It is therefore plausible that this extra disulfide bridge contributes to the higher stability found in phytase from some Aspergillus species. To engineer an enhanced phytase for the feed industry, it is imperative that the role of disulfide bridges be taken into cognizance and possibly be increased in number to further elevate stability in this enzyme.

  9. Crystal structure of a papain-fold protein without the catalytic residue: a novel member in the cysteine proteinase family.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Wei, Zhiyi; Chang, Shaojie; Teng, Maikun; Gong, Weimin

    2006-04-21

    A 31kDa cysteine protease, SPE31, was isolated from the seeds of a legume plant, Pachyrizhus erosus. The protein was purified, crystallized and the 3D structure solved using molecular replacement. The cDNA was obtained by RT PCR followed by amplification using mRNA isolated from the seeds of the legume plant as a template. Analysis of the cDNA sequence and the 3D structure indicated the protein to belong to the papain family. Detailed analysis of the structure revealed an unusual replacement of the conserved catalytic Cys with Gly. Replacement of another conserved residue Ala/Gly by a Phe sterically blocks the access of the substrate to the active site. A polyethyleneglycol molecule and a natural peptide fragment were bound to the surface of the active site. Asn159 was found to be glycosylated. The SPE31 cDNA sequence shares several features with P34, a protein found in soybeans, that is implicated in plant defense mechanisms as an elicitor receptor binding to syringolide. P34 has also been shown to interact with vegetative storage proteins and NADH-dependent hydroxypyruvate reductase. These roles suggest that SPE31 and P34 form a unique subfamily within the papain family. The crystal structure of SPE31 complexed with a natural peptide ligand reveals a unique active site architecture. In addition, the clear evidence of glycosylated Asn159 provides useful information towards understanding the functional mechanism of SPE31/P34.

  10. Selective Loss of Cysteine Residues and Disulphide Bonds in a Potato Proteinase Inhibitor II Family

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiu-Qing; Zhang, Tieling; Donnelly, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    Disulphide bonds between cysteine residues in proteins play a key role in protein folding, stability, and function. Loss of a disulphide bond is often associated with functional differentiation of the protein. The evolution of disulphide bonds is still actively debated; analysis of naturally occurring variants can promote understanding of the protein evolutionary process. One of the disulphide bond-containing protein families is the potato proteinase inhibitor II (PI-II, or Pin2, for short) superfamily, which is found in most solanaceous plants and participates in plant development, stress response, and defence. Each PI-II domain contains eight cysteine residues (8C), and two similar PI-II domains form a functional protein that has eight disulphide bonds and two non-identical reaction centres. It is still unclear which patterns and processes affect cysteine residue loss in PI-II. Through cDNA sequencing and data mining, we found six natural variants missing cysteine residues involved in one or two disulphide bonds at the first reaction centre. We named these variants Pi7C and Pi6C for the proteins missing one or two pairs of cysteine residues, respectively. This PI-II-7C/6C family was found exclusively in potato. The missing cysteine residues were in bonding pairs but distant from one another at the nucleotide/protein sequence level. The non-synonymous/synonymous substitution (Ka/Ks) ratio analysis suggested a positive evolutionary gene selection for Pi6C and various Pi7C. The selective deletion of the first reaction centre cysteine residues that are structure-level-paired but sequence-level-distant in PI-II illustrates the flexibility of PI-II domains and suggests the functionality of their transient gene versions during evolution. PMID:21494600

  11. Subsite-specific contributions of different aromatic residues in the active site architecture of glycoside hydrolase family 12

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Wang, Shuai; Wu, Xiuyun; Liu, Shijia; Li, Dandan; Xu, Hao; Gao, Peiji; Chen, Guanjun; Wang, Lushan

    2015-01-01

    The active site architecture of glycoside hydrolase (GH) is a contiguous subregion of the enzyme constituted by residues clustered in the three-dimensional space, recognizing the monomeric unit of ligand through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. Mutations of the key residues in the active site architecture of the GH12 family exerted different impacts on catalytic efficiency. Binding affinities between the aromatic amino acids and carbohydrate rings were quantitatively determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and the quantum mechanical (QM) method, showing that the binding capacity order of Tyr>Trp>His (and Phe) was determined by their side-chain properties. The results also revealed that the binding constant of a certain residue remained unchanged when altering its location, while the catalytic efficiency changed dramatically. Increased binding affinity at a relatively distant subsite, such as the mutant of W7Y at the −4 subsite, resulted in a marked increase in the intermediate product of cellotetraose and enhanced the reactivity of endoglucanase by 144%; while tighter binding near the catalytic center, i.e. W22Y at the −2 subsite, enabled the enzyme to bind and hydrolyze smaller oligosaccharides. Clarification of the specific roles of the aromatics at different subsites may pave the way for a more rational design of GHs. PMID:26670009

  12. Substrate specificity engineering of beta-mannosidase and beta-glucosidase from Pyrococcus by exchange of unique active site residues.

    PubMed

    Kaper, Thijs; van Heusden, Hester H; van Loo, Bert; Vasella, Andrea; van der Oost, John; de Vos, Willem M

    2002-03-26

    A beta-mannosidase gene (PH0501) was identified in the Pyrococcus horikoshii genome and cloned and expressed in E. coli. The purified enzyme (BglB) was most specific for the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-mannopyranoside (pNP-Man) (Km: 0.44 mM) with a low turnover rate (kcat: 4.3 s(-1)). The beta-mannosidase has been classified as a member of family 1 of glycoside hydrolases. Sequence alignments and homology modeling showed an apparent conservation of its active site region with, remarkably, two unique active site residues, Gln77 and Asp206. These residues are an arginine and asparagine residue in all other known family 1 enzymes, which interact with the catalytic nucleophile and equatorial C2-hydroxyl group of substrates, respectively. The unique residues of P. horikoshii BglB were introduced in the highly active beta-glucosidase CelB of Pyrococcus furiosus and vice versa, yielding two single and one double mutant for each enzyme. In CelB, both substitutions R77Q and N206D increased the specificity for mannosides and reduced hydrolysis rates 10-fold. In contrast, BglB D206N showed 10-fold increased hydrolysis rates and 35-fold increased affinity for the hydrolysis of glucosides. In combination with inhibitor studies, it was concluded that the substituted residues participate in the ground-state binding of substrates with an equatorial C2-hydroxyl group, but contribute most to transition-state stabilization. The unique activity profile of BglB seems to be caused by an altered interaction between the enzyme and C2-hydroxyl of the substrate and a specifically increased affinity for mannose that results from Asp206.

  13. Partial order optimum likelihood (POOL): maximum likelihood prediction of protein active site residues using 3D Structure and sequence properties.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wenxu; Wei, Ying; Murga, Leonel F; Ondrechen, Mary Jo; Williams, Ronald J

    2009-01-01

    A new monotonicity-constrained maximum likelihood approach, called Partial Order Optimum Likelihood (POOL), is presented and applied to the problem of functional site prediction in protein 3D structures, an important current challenge in genomics. The input consists of electrostatic and geometric properties derived from the 3D structure of the query protein alone. Sequence-based conservation information, where available, may also be incorporated. Electrostatics features from THEMATICS are combined with multidimensional isotonic regression to form maximum likelihood estimates of probabilities that specific residues belong to an active site. This allows likelihood ranking of all ionizable residues in a given protein based on THEMATICS features. The corresponding ROC curves and statistical significance tests demonstrate that this method outperforms prior THEMATICS-based methods, which in turn have been shown previously to outperform other 3D-structure-based methods for identifying active site residues. Then it is shown that the addition of one simple geometric property, the size rank of the cleft in which a given residue is contained, yields improved performance. Extension of the method to include predictions of non-ionizable residues is achieved through the introduction of environment variables. This extension results in even better performance than THEMATICS alone and constitutes to date the best functional site predictor based on 3D structure only, achieving nearly the same level of performance as methods that use both 3D structure and sequence alignment data. Finally, the method also easily incorporates such sequence alignment data, and when this information is included, the resulting method is shown to outperform the best current methods using any combination of sequence alignments and 3D structures. Included is an analysis demonstrating that when THEMATICS features, cleft size rank, and alignment-based conservation scores are used individually or in combination

  14. Mutation of active site residues in synthetic T4-lysozyme gene and their effect on lytic activity.

    PubMed

    Anand, N N; Stephen, E R; Narang, S A

    1988-06-16

    The active site amino acids (Glu11 and Asp20) in T4-lysozyme have been mutated to their isosteric residues Gln or Asn and/or acidic residues such as Glu----Asp or Asp----Glu by the oligonucleotide-replacement method. Out of eight mutants so generated the mutant T4-lysozyme obtained from pTLY.Asp11 retains maximum amount of activity (approximately 16%), pTLY.Asn20 the least (0.9%) whereas pTLY.Gln11 lost completely. A systematic study of the active and inactive mutants thus generated supports the important role of Glu11 and Asp20 in T4-lysozyme activity as predicted in earlier studies.

  15. Rational Design of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Inhibitors that Act by Covalently Bonding to Two Active Site Residues

    PubMed Central

    Otrubova, Katerina; Brown, Monica; McCormick, Michael S.; Han, Gye W.; O’Neal, Scott T.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Lichtman, Aron H.; Boger, Dale L.

    2013-01-01

    The design and characterization of α-ketoheterocycle fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors are disclosed that additionally and irreversibly target a cysteine (Cys269) found in the enzyme cytosolic port while maintaining the reversible covalent Ser241 attachment responsible for their rapid and initially reversible enzyme inhibition. Two α-ketooxazoles (3 and 4) containing strategically placed electrophiles at the C5 position of the pyridyl substituent of 2 (OL-135) were prepared and examined as inhibitors of FAAH. Consistent with the observed time-dependent non-competitive inhibition, the co-crystal X-ray structure of 3 bound to a humanized variant of rat FAAH revealed that 3 was not only covalently bound to the active site catalytic nucleophile Ser241 as a deprotonated hemiketal, but also to Cys269 through the pyridyl C5-substituent, thus providing an inhibitor with dual covalent attachment in the enzyme active site. In vivo characterization of the prototypical inhibitors in mice demonstrate that they raise endogenous brain levels of FAAH substrates to a greater extent and for a much longer duration (>6 h) than the reversible inhibitor 2, indicating that the inhibitors accumulate and persist in the brain to completely inhibit FAAH for a prolonged period. Consistent with this behavior and the targeted irreversible enzyme inhibition, 3 reversed cold allodynia in the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain in mice for a sustained period (>6 h) beyond that observed with the reversible inhibitor 2, providing effects that were unchanged over the 1–6 h time course monitored. PMID:23581831

  16. Mutational analysis of the active site residues of a D: -psicose 3-epimerase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Jung; Yeom, Soo-Jin; Kim, Kwangsoo; Rhee, Sangkee; Kim, Dooil; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2010-02-01

    D-Psicose 3-epimerase from Agrobacterium tumefacience catalyzes the conversion of D: -fructose to D-psicose. According to mutational analysis, the ring at position 112, the negative charge at position 156, and the positive charge at position 215 were essential components for enzyme activity and for binding fructose and psicose. The surface contact area and distance to the bound substrate by molecular modeling suggest that the positive charge of Arg215 was involved in stabilization of cis-endiol intermediate. The distances between the catalytic residues (Glu150 and Glu244) and Mn(2+) are critical to the catalysis, and the negative charges of the metal-binding residues are important for interaction with metal ion. The kinetic parameters of the D183E and H209A mutants for metal-binding residues with substrate and the near-UV circular dichroism spectra indicate that the metal ion bound to Asp183 and His209 is involved not only in catalysis but also in substrate binding.

  17. Do cysteine residues regulate transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel protein expression?

    PubMed

    Thilo, Florian; Liu, Ying; Krueger, Katharina; Förste, Nora; Wittstock, Antje; Scholze, Alexandra; Tepel, Martin

    2012-03-01

    The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 (TRPC6) channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine (HC) or acetylcysteine (ACC) affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed that patients with chronic renal failure had significantly elevated HC levels and TRPC6 mRNA expression levels in monocytes compared with control subjects. We further observed that administration of HC or ACC significantly increased TRPC6 channel protein expression compared with control conditions. We, therefore, hypothesize that cysteine residues increase TRPC6 channel protein expression in humans.

  18. The identification of free cysteine residues within antibodies and a potential role for free cysteine residues in covalent aggregation because of agitation stress.

    PubMed

    Huh, Joon H; White, April J; Brych, Stephen R; Franey, Heather; Matsumura, Masazumi

    2013-06-01

    Human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) and immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) antibodies contain multiple disulfide bonds, which are an integral part of the structure and stability of the protein. Open disulfide bonds have been detected in a number of therapeutic and serum derived antibodies. This report details a method that fluorescently labels free cysteine residues, quantifies, and identifies the proteolytic fragments by liquid chromatography coupled to online mass spectrometry. The majority of the open disulfide bonds in recombinant and serum derived IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies were in the constant domains. This method was applied to the identification of cysteines in an IgG2 antibody that are involved in the formation of covalent intermolecular bonds because of the application of a severe agitation stress. The free cysteine in the CH 1 domain of the IgG2 decreased upon application of the stress and implicates open disulfide bonds in this domain as the likely source of free cysteines involved in the formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds. The presence of comparable levels of open disulfide bonds in recombinant and endogenous antibodies suggests that open disulfide bonds are an inherent feature of antibodies and that the susceptibility of intermolecular disulfide bond formation is similar for recombinant and serum-derived IgG antibodies.

  19. Sweet potato beta-amylase. Primary structure and identification of the active-site glutamyl residue.

    PubMed

    Toda, H; Nitta, Y; Asanami, S; Kim, J P; Sakiyama, F

    1993-08-15

    The complete amino acid sequence of a subunit of sweet potato beta-amylase, a homotetramer, was established by sequence analysis of peptides obtained by digestions with Achromobacter protease I and Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease and by cyanogen bromide cleavage of the S-carboxymethylated subunit. The subunit of the enzyme is a single polypeptide consisting of 498 amino acid residues. It showed 50-60% identity in the amino acid sequence with those of beta-amylases from soybean and barley, while it about 25% with those of three bacterial beta-amylases deduced from the cDNA sequences. Sweet potato beta-amylase was completely inactivated with 2,3-epoxypropyl alpha-D-[U-14C]glucopyranoside. Sequence analysis of the inactivated enzyme revealed that Glu187 was specifically esterified by the affinity labeling with the above reagent, proposing that Glu187 is a potent candidate involved directly in the catalysis with this plant beta-amylase.

  20. A Cysteine-Rich Protein Kinase Associates with a Membrane Immune Complex and the Cysteine Residues Are Required for Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Yadeta, Koste A; Elmore, James M; Creer, Athena Y; Feng, Baomin; Franco, Jessica Y; Rufian, Jose Sebastian; He, Ping; Phinney, Brett; Coaker, Gitta

    2017-01-01

    Membrane-localized proteins perceive and respond to biotic and abiotic stresses. We performed quantitative proteomics on plasma membrane-enriched samples from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) treated with bacterial flagellin. We identified multiple receptor-like protein kinases changing in abundance, including cysteine (Cys)-rich receptor-like kinases (CRKs) that are up-regulated upon the perception of flagellin. CRKs possess extracellular Cys-rich domains and constitute a gene family consisting of 46 members in Arabidopsis. The single transfer DNA insertion lines CRK28 and CRK29, two CRKs induced in response to flagellin perception, did not exhibit robust alterations in immune responses. In contrast, silencing of multiple bacterial flagellin-induced CRKs resulted in enhanced susceptibility to pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae, indicating functional redundancy in this large gene family. Enhanced expression of CRK28 in Arabidopsis increased disease resistance to P. syringae Expression of CRK28 in Nicotiana benthamiana induced cell death, which required intact extracellular Cys residues and a conserved kinase active site. CRK28-mediated cell death required the common receptor-like protein kinase coreceptor BAK1. CRK28 associated with BAK1 as well as the activated FLAGELLIN-SENSING2 (FLS2) immune receptor complex. CRK28 self-associated as well as associated with the closely related CRK29. These data support a model where Arabidopsis CRKs are synthesized upon pathogen perception, associate with the FLS2 complex, and coordinately act to enhance plant immune responses.

  1. A Cysteine-Rich Protein Kinase Associates with a Membrane Immune Complex and the Cysteine Residues Are Required for Cell Death1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, James M.; Creer, Athena Y.; Feng, Baomin; Franco, Jessica Y.; He, Ping; Phinney, Brett

    2017-01-01

    Membrane-localized proteins perceive and respond to biotic and abiotic stresses. We performed quantitative proteomics on plasma membrane-enriched samples from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) treated with bacterial flagellin. We identified multiple receptor-like protein kinases changing in abundance, including cysteine (Cys)-rich receptor-like kinases (CRKs) that are up-regulated upon the perception of flagellin. CRKs possess extracellular Cys-rich domains and constitute a gene family consisting of 46 members in Arabidopsis. The single transfer DNA insertion lines CRK28 and CRK29, two CRKs induced in response to flagellin perception, did not exhibit robust alterations in immune responses. In contrast, silencing of multiple bacterial flagellin-induced CRKs resulted in enhanced susceptibility to pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae, indicating functional redundancy in this large gene family. Enhanced expression of CRK28 in Arabidopsis increased disease resistance to P. syringae. Expression of CRK28 in Nicotiana benthamiana induced cell death, which required intact extracellular Cys residues and a conserved kinase active site. CRK28-mediated cell death required the common receptor-like protein kinase coreceptor BAK1. CRK28 associated with BAK1 as well as the activated FLAGELLIN-SENSING2 (FLS2) immune receptor complex. CRK28 self-associated as well as associated with the closely related CRK29. These data support a model where Arabidopsis CRKs are synthesized upon pathogen perception, associate with the FLS2 complex, and coordinately act to enhance plant immune responses. PMID:27852951

  2. Oxidation and inactivation of SERCA by selective reaction of cysteine residues with amino acid peroxides.

    PubMed

    Dremina, Elena S; Sharov, Victor S; Davies, Michael J; Schöneich, Christian

    2007-10-01

    The oxidative modification of proteins plays an important role in a wide range of pathological processes and aging. Proteins are modified by numerous biologic oxidants including hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, singlet oxygen, and oxygen- and nitrogen-centered radicals. More recently, an additional class of physiologically important oxidants has been identified, peptide and protein peroxides. The latter react quite rapidly and selectively with protein cysteine residues. The sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA) is reversibly regulated through NO-dependent S-glutathiolation of specific cysteine residues. The irreversible oxidation of these cysteine residues could, therefore, impair NO-dependent muscle relaxation. Here, we show that specific protein-derived (amino acid) peroxides react selectively with a subset of the 22 reduced cysteine residues of SERCA1, including a peptide-containing Cys674 and Cys675, where Cys674 (in SERCA2) represents one of the targets for NO-dependent S-glutathiolation. Out of 11 tested amino acid, peptide, and protein peroxides, those derived from free tryptophan and free tyrosine showed the highest reactivity towards SERCA, while no oxidation under similar experimental conditions was detected through hydrogen peroxide. Among the peroxides from tryptophan, those of free tryptophan showed a significantly higher reactivity as compared to those from N- and C-terminally blocked tryptophan. Quantitative HPLC-MS/MS analysis demonstrated that the highest reactivity of the tryptophan-derived peroxides was observed for Cys774 and Cys938, cysteine residues, which are embedded within the transmembrane domains of SERCA1. This unusual reactivity of transmembrane domains cannot be solely rationalized by the hydrophobicity of the oxidant, as the peroxide from dl-tryptophan shows considerable higher reactivity as compared to the one derived from N-acetyl-tryptophan methyl ester. Our data demonstrate a potential role of peptide- and protein

  3. Mutational analysis of active site contact residues in anti-fluorescein monoclonal antibody 4-4-20.

    PubMed

    Denzin, L K; Gulliver, G A; Voss, E W

    1993-10-01

    The contribution to high affinity Fl binding by each crystallographically defined Mab 4-4-20 (Ka = 1.7 x 10(10) M-1; Qmax = 90%) ligand contact residue (L27dHis, L32Tyr, L34Arg, L91Ser, L96Trp and H33Trp) has been determined by site-specific mutagenesis studies. All six antigen contact residues were changed to Ala in the single-chain derivative of Mab 4-4-20 and following expression in E. coli, denaturation, refolding and purification, each SCA mutant was characterized in terms of Fl binding affinity, Qmax, lambda max and idiotype. Results demonstrated that Ala substitutions at each ligand contact residue reduced the binding affinities and quenching maxima for all residues except L27d which retained wild type characteristics. The SCA TyrL32Ala, SerL91Ala and TrpH33Ala mutants exhibited binding affinities that were approximately 1000-fold lower than the wild type value and greatly reduced Qmax values. Additionally, other amino acid substitutions were performed at three of the six antigen contact residues (L91Ser, L96Trp and H33Trp) to further evaluate the role of each in Fl binding. Therefore, the following mutations were constructed and characterized: SerL91Asn, TrpL96Tyr, TrpL96Phe, TrpL96Leu, TrpH33Tyr and TrpH33Phe. Results of site-specific mutagenesis studies are discussed in terms of Mab active site structure and suggest that L32Tyr, L91Ser and H33Trp are important for high affinity Fl binding and efficient Fl quenching.

  4. HIGH-THROUGHPUT IDENTIFICATION OF CATALYTIC REDOX-ACTIVE CYSTEINE RESIDUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cysteine (Cys) residues often play critical roles in proteins; however, identification of their specific functions has been limited to case-by-case experimental approaches. We developed a procedure for high-throughput identification of catalytic redox-active Cys in proteins by se...

  5. Chemical Modification of Papain and Subtilisin: An Active Site Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Vincent, Mireille; Dickman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using methyle methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) and phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride (PMSF) to specifically modify the cysteine and serine residues in the active sites of papain and subtilism respectively is demonstrated. The covalent modification of these enzymes and subsequent rescue of papain shows the beginning biochemist that proteins…

  6. Probing the catalytic mechanism of bovine CD38/NAD+ glycohydrolase by site directed mutagenesis of key active site residues.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Isabelle; Kellenberger, Esther; Cakir-Kiefer, Céline; Muller-Steffner, Hélène; Schuber, Francis

    2014-07-01

    Bovine CD38/NAD(+) glycohydrolase catalyzes the hydrolysis of NAD(+) to nicotinamide and ADP-ribose and the formation of cyclic ADP-ribose via a stepwise reaction mechanism. Our recent crystallographic study of its Michaelis complex and covalently-trapped intermediates provided insights into the modalities of substrate binding and the molecular mechanism of bCD38. The aim of the present work was to determine the precise role of key conserved active site residues (Trp118, Glu138, Asp147, Trp181 and Glu218) by focusing mainly on the cleavage of the nicotinamide-ribosyl bond. We analyzed the kinetic parameters of mutants of these residues which reside within the bCD38 subdomain in the vicinity of the scissile bond of bound NAD(+). To address the reaction mechanism we also performed chemical rescue experiments with neutral (methanol) and ionic (azide, formate) nucleophiles. The crucial role of Glu218, which orients the substrate for cleavage by interacting with the N-ribosyl 2'-OH group of NAD(+), was highlighted. This contribution to catalysis accounts for almost half of the reaction energy barrier. Other contributions can be ascribed notably to Glu138 and Asp147 via ground-state destabilization and desolvation in the vicinity of the scissile bond. Key interactions with Trp118 and Trp181 were also proven to stabilize the ribooxocarbenium ion-like transition state. Altogether we propose that, as an alternative to a covalent acylal reaction intermediate with Glu218, catalysis by bCD38 proceeds through the formation of a discrete and transient ribooxocarbenium intermediate which is stabilized within the active site mostly by electrostatic interactions.

  7. Density functional theory calculations on the active site of biotin synthase: mechanism of S transfer from the Fe(2)S(2) cluster and the role of 1st and 2nd sphere residues.

    PubMed

    Rana, Atanu; Dey, Subal; Agrawal, Amita; Dey, Abhishek

    2015-10-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed on the active site of biotin synthase (BS) to investigate the sulfur transfer from the Fe(2)S(2) cluster to dethiobiotin (DTB). The active site is modeled to include both the 1st and 2nd sphere residues. Molecular orbital theory considerations and calculation on smaller models indicate that only an S atom (not S²⁻) transfer from an oxidized Fe(2)S(2) cluster leads to the formation of biotin from the DTB using two adenosyl radicals generated from S-adenosyl-L-methionine. The calculations on larger protein active site model indicate that a 9-monothiobiotin bound reduced cluster should be an intermediate during the S atom insertion from the Fe(2)S(2) cluster consistent with experimental data. The Arg260 bound to Fe1, being a weaker donor than cysteine bound to Fe(2), determines the geometry and the electronic structure of this intermediate. The formation of this intermediate containing the C9-S bond is estimated to have a ΔG(≠) of 17.1 kcal/mol while its decay by the formation of the 2nd C6-S bond is calculated to have a ΔG(≠) of 29.8 kcal/mol, i.e. the 2nd C-S bond formation is calculated to be the rate determining step in the cycle and it leads to the decay of the Fe(2)S(2) cluster. Significant configuration interaction (CI), present in these transition states, helps lower the barrier of these reactions by ~30-25 kcal/mol relative to a hypothetical outer-sphere reaction. The conserved Phe285 residue near the Fe(2)S(2) active site determines the stereo selectivity at the C6 center of this radical coupling reaction. Reaction mechanism of BS investigated using DFT calculations. Strong CI and the Phe285 residue control the kinetic rate and stereochemistry of the product.

  8. Novel residues lining the CFTR chloride channel pore identified by functional modification of introduced cysteines.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Mohammad; Linsdell, Paul

    2009-04-01

    Substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis (SCAM) has been used widely to identify pore-lining amino acid side chains in ion channel proteins. However, functional effects on permeation and gating can be difficult to separate, leading to uncertainty concerning the location of reactive cysteine side chains. We have combined SCAM with investigation of the charge-dependent effects of methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents on the functional permeation properties of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channels. We find that cysteines substituted for seven out of 21 continuous amino acids in the eleventh and twelfth transmembrane (TM) regions can be modified by external application of positively charged [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] MTS bromide (MTSET) and negatively charged sodium [2-sulfonatoethyl] MTS (MTSES). Modification of these cysteines leads to changes in the open channel current-voltage relationship at both the macroscopic and single-channel current levels that reflect specific, charge-dependent effects on the rate of Cl(-) permeation through the channel from the external solution. This approach therefore identifies amino acid side chains that lie within the permeation pathway. Cysteine mutagenesis of pore-lining residues also affects intrapore anion binding and anion selectivity, giving more information regarding the roles of these residues. Our results demonstrate a straightforward method of screening for pore-lining amino acids in ion channels. We suggest that TM11 contributes to the CFTR pore and that the extracellular loop between TMs 11 and 12 lies close to the outer mouth of the pore.

  9. Evidence for the Role of Active Site Residues in the Hairpin Ribozyme from Molecular Simulations along the Reaction Path

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The hairpin ribozyme accelerates a phosphoryl transfer reaction without catalytic participation of divalent metal ions. Residues A38 and G8 have been implicated as playing roles in general acid and base catalysis, respectively. Here we explore the structure and dynamics of key active site residues using more than 1 μs of molecular dynamics simulations of the hairpin ribozyme at different stages along the catalytic pathway. Analysis of results indicates hydrogen bond interactions between the nucleophile and proR nonbridging oxygen are correlated with active inline attack conformations. Further, the simulation results suggest a possible alternative role for G8 to promote inline fitness and facilitate activation of the nucleophile by hydrogen bonding, although this does not necessarily exclude an additional role as a general base. Finally, we suggest that substitution of G8 with N7- or N3-deazaguanosine which have elevated pKa values, both with and without thio modifications at the 5′ leaving group position, would provide valuable insight into the specific role of G8 in catalysis. PMID:24842535

  10. Active site hydrophobic residues impact hydrogen tunneling differently in a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase at optimal versus nonoptimal temperatures.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Zachary D; Meadows, Corey W; Dong, Ming; Bahnson, Brian J; Klinman, Judith P

    2012-05-22

    A growing body of data suggests that protein motion plays an important role in enzyme catalysis. Two highly conserved hydrophobic active site residues in the cofactor-binding pocket of ht-ADH (Leu176 and V260) have been mutated to a series of hydrophobic side chains of smaller size, as well as one deletion mutant, L176Δ. Mutations decrease k(cat) and increase K(M)(NAD(+)). Most of the observed decreases in effects on k(cat) at pH 7.0 are due to an upward shift in the optimal pH for catalysis; a simple electrostatic model is invoked that relates the change in pK(a) to the distance between the positively charged nicotinamide ring and bound substrate. Structural modeling of the L176Δ and V260A variants indicates the development of a cavity behind the nicotinamide ring without any significant perturbation of the secondary structure of the enzyme relative to that of the wild type. Primary kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) are modestly increased for all mutants. Above the dynamical transition at 30 °C for ht-ADH [Kohen, A., et al. (1999) Nature 399, 496], the temperature dependence of the KIE is seen to increase with a decrease in side chain volume at positions 176 and 260. Additionally, the relative trends in the temperature dependence of the KIE above and below 30 °C appear to be reversed for the cofactor-binding pocket mutants in relation to wild-type protein. The aggregate results are interpreted in the context of a full tunneling model of enzymatic hydride transfer that incorporates both protein conformational sampling (preorganization) and active site optimization of tunneling (reorganization). The reduced temperature dependence of the KIE in the mutants below 30 °C indicates that at low temperatures, the enzyme adopts conformations refractory to donor-acceptor distance sampling.

  11. Effects of active site cleft residues on oligosaccharide binding, hydrolysis, and glycosynthase activities of rice BGlu1 and its mutants.

    PubMed

    Pengthaisong, Salila; Ketudat Cairns, James R

    2014-12-01

    Rice BGlu1 (Os3BGlu7) is a glycoside hydrolase family 1 β-glucosidase that hydrolyzes cellooligosaccharides with increasing efficiency as the degree of polymerization (DP) increases from 2 to 6, indicating six subsites for glucosyl residue binding. Five subsites have been identified in X-ray crystal structures of cellooligosaccharide complexes with its E176Q acid-base and E386G nucleophile mutants. X-ray crystal structures indicate that cellotetraose binds in a similar mode in BGlu1 E176Q and E386G, but in a different mode in the BGlu1 E386G/Y341A variant, in which glucosyl residue 4 (Glc4) interacts with Q187 instead of the eliminated phenolic group of Y341. Here, we found that the Q187A mutation has little effect on BGlu1 cellooligosaccharide hydrolysis activity or oligosaccharide binding in BGlu1 E176Q, and only slight effects on BGlu1 E386G glycosynthase activity. X-ray crystal structures showed that cellotetraose binds in a different position in BGlu1 E176Q/Y341A, in which it interacts directly with R178 and W337, and the Q187A mutation had little effect on cellotetraose binding. Mutations of R178 and W337 to A had significant and nonadditive effects on oligosaccharide hydrolysis by BGlu1, pNPGlc cleavage and cellooligosaccharide inhibition of BGlu1 E176Q and BGlu1 E386G glycosynthase activity. Hydrolysis activity was partially rescued by Y341 for longer substrates, suggesting stacking of Glc4 on Y341 stabilizes binding of cellooligosaccharides in the optimal position for hydrolysis. This analysis indicates that complex interactions between active site cleft residues modulate substrate binding and hydrolysis.

  12. Comparative residue interaction analysis (CoRIA): a 3D-QSAR approach to explore the binding contributions of active site residues with ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datar, Prasanna A.; Khedkar, Santosh A.; Malde, Alpeshkumar K.; Coutinho, Evans C.

    2006-06-01

    A novel approach termed comparative residue-interaction analysis (CoRIA), emphasizing the trends and principles of QSAR in a ligand-receptor environment has been developed to analyze and predict the binding affinity of enzyme inhibitors. To test this new approach, a training set of 36 COX-2 inhibitors belonging to nine families was selected. The putative binding (bioactive) conformations of inhibitors in the COX-2 active site were searched using the program DOCK. The docked configurations were further refined by a combination of Monte Carlo and simulated annealing methods with the Affinity program. The non-bonded interaction energies of the inhibitors with the individual amino acid residues in the active site were then computed. These interaction energies, plus specific terms describing the thermodynamics of ligand-enzyme binding, were correlated to the biological activity with G/PLS. The various QSAR models obtained were validated internally by cross validation and boot strapping, and externally using a test set of 13 molecules. The QSAR models developed on the CoRIA formalism were robust with good r 2, q 2 and r pred 2 values. The major highlights of the method are: adaptation of the QSAR formalism in a receptor setting to answer both the type (qualitative) and the extent (quantitative) of ligand-receptor binding, and use of descriptors that account for the complete thermodynamics of the ligand-receptor binding. The CoRIA approach can be used to identify crucial interactions of inhibitors with the enzyme at the residue level, which can be gainfully exploited in optimizing the inhibitory activity of ligands. Furthermore, it can be used with advantage to guide point mutation studies. As regards the COX-2 dataset, the CoRIA approach shows that improving Coulombic interaction with Pro528 and reducing van der Waals interaction with Tyr385 will improve the binding affinity of inhibitors.

  13. Conformational preferences and pKa value of cysteine residue.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Yun; Byun, Byung Jin; Kang, Young Kee

    2008-09-11

    The conformational preferences of the Cys dipeptides with thiol and thiolate groups (Ac-Cys-NHMe and Ac-Cys (-)-NHMe, respectively) and the apparent (i.e., macroscopic) p K a value of the Cys dipeptide have been studied at the hybrid density functional B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-31+G(d) level with the conductor-like polarizable continuum model in the gas phase and in water. The hydrogen bonds and/or favorable interactions between the backbone and the thiol group of the side chain resulted in the different conformational preferences of the Cys and Cys (-) dipeptides from those of the Ala dipeptide in the gas phase and in water, although the preferred conformations of the Cys dipeptide are in part similar to those of the Ala dipeptide. In particular, the interactions between the thiolate group and the backbone amide groups appear to play a role in stabilizing the alpha- or 3 10-helical conformations for the Cys (-) dipeptide in the gas phase and in water. The p K a value of the Cys residue is estimated to be 8.58 at 25 degrees C using the statistically weighted free energies of all feasible conformations for the Cys and Cys (-) dipeptides in the gas phase and solvation free energies, which is consistent with the observed values of 8.3 and 8.22 +/- 0.16.

  14. Comprehensive cysteine-scanning mutagenesis reveals Claudin-2 pore-lining residues with different intrapore locations.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiahua; Zhuo, Min; Pei, Lei; Rajagopal, Madhumitha; Yu, Alan S L

    2014-03-07

    The first extracellular loop (ECL1) of claudins forms paracellular pores in the tight junction that determine ion permselectivity. We aimed to map the pore-lining residues of claudin-2 by comprehensive cysteine-scanning mutagenesis of ECL1. We screened 45 cysteine mutations within the ECL1 by expression in polyclonal Madin-Darby canine kidney II Tet-Off cells and found nine mutants that displayed a significant decrease of conductance after treatment with the thiol-reactive reagent 2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl methanethiosulfonate, indicating the location of candidate pore-lining residues. Next, we stably expressed these candidates in monoclonal Madin-Darby canine kidney I Tet-Off cells and exposed them to thiol-reactive reagents. The maximum degree of inhibition of conductance, size selectivity of degree of inhibition, and size dependence of the kinetics of reaction were used to deduce the location of residues within the pore. Our data support the following sequence of pore-lining residues located from the narrowest to the widest part of the pore: Ser(68), Ser(47), Thr(62)/Ile(66), Thr(56), Thr(32)/Gly(45), and Met(52). The paracellular pore appears to primarily be lined by polar side chains, as expected for a predominantly aqueous environment. Furthermore, our results strongly suggest the existence of a continuous sequence of residues in the ECL1 centered around Asp(65)-Ser(68) that form a major part of the lining of the pore.

  15. Human xylosyltransferase I: functional and biochemical characterization of cysteine residues required for enzymic activity.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sandra; Schöttler, Manuela; Schön, Sylvia; Prante, Christian; Brinkmann, Thomas; Kuhn, Joachim; Götting, Christian; Kleesiek, Knut

    2005-03-01

    XT-I (xylosyltransferase I) is the initial enzyme in the post-translational biosynthesis of glycosaminoglycan chains in proteoglycans. To gain insight into the structure-function relationship of the enzyme, a soluble active form of human XT-I was expressed in High Five insect cells with an apparent molecular mass of 90 kDa. Analysis of the electrophoretic mobility of the protein under non-reducing and reducing conditions indicated that soluble XT-I does not form homodimers through disulphide bridges. In addition, the role of the cysteine residues was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis combined with chemical modifications of XT-I by N-phenylmaleimide. Replacement of Cys471 or Cys574 with alanine led to a complete loss of catalytic activity, indicating the necessity of these residues for maintaining an active conformation of soluble recombinant XT-I by forming disulphide bonds. On the other hand, N-phenylmaleimide treatment showed no effect on wild-type XT-I but strongly inactivated the cysteine mutants in a dose-dependant manner, indicating that seven intramolecular disulphide bridges are formed in wild-type XT-I. The inhibitory effect of UDP on the XT-I activity of C561A (Cys561-->Ala) mutant enzyme was significantly reduced compared with all other tested cysteine mutants. In addition, we tested for binding to UDP-agarose beads. The inactive mutants revealed no significantly different nucleotide-binding properties. Our study demonstrates that recombinant XT-I is organized as a monomer with no free thiol groups and strongly suggests that the catalytic activity does not depend on the presence of free thiol groups, furthermore, we identified five cysteine residues which are critical for enzyme activity.

  16. Solution oxygen-17 NMR application for observing a peroxidized cysteine residue in oxidized human SOD1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Noriko; Yoshihara, Daisaku; Sakiyama, Haruhiko; Eguchi, Hironobu; Suzuki, Keiichiro

    2016-12-01

    NMR active nuclei, 1H, 13C and 15N, are usually used for determination of protein structure. However, solution 17O-NMR application to proteins is extremely limited although oxygen is an essential element in biomolecules. Proteins are oxidized through cysteine residues by two types of oxidation. One is reversible oxidation such as disulphide bonding (Cys-S-S-Cys) and the other is irreversible oxidation to cysteine sulfinic acid (Cys-SO 2H) and cysteine sulfonic acid (Cys-SO 3H). Copper,Zinc-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is a key enzyme in the protection of cells from the superoxide anion radical. The SH group at Cys 111 residue in human SOD1 is selectively oxidized to -SO 2H and -SO 3H with atmospheric oxygen, and this oxidized human SOD1 is also suggested to play an important role in the pathophysiology of various neurodegenerative diseases, probably mainly via protein aggregation. Therefore, information on the structural and the dynamics of the oxidized cysteine residue would be crucial for the understanding of protein aggregation mechanism. Although the -SO 3H group on proteins cannot be directly detected by conventional NMR techniques, we successfully performed the site-specific 17O-labeling of Cys 111 in SOD1 using ^{17}it {O}2 gas and the 17O-NMR analysis for the first time. We observed clear 17O signal derived from a protein molecule and show that 17O-NMR is a sensitive probe for studying the structure and dynamics of the 17O-labeled protein molecule. This novel and unique strategy can have great impact on many research fields in biology and chemistry.

  17. Expression and mutational analysis of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus HCF-1: functional requirements for cysteine residues.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joyce A; Forney, Scott D; Ricci, Alessondra M; Allen, Emily G; Hefferon, Kathleen L; Miller, Lois K

    2005-11-01

    The host cell-specific factor 1 gene (hcf-1) of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus is required for efficient virus growth in TN368 cells but is dispensable for virus replication in SF21 cells. However, the mechanism of action of hcf-1 is unknown. To begin to understand its function in virus replication we have investigated the expression and localization pattern of HCF-1 in infected cells. Analysis of virus-infected TN368 cells showed that hcf-1 is expressed at an early time in the virus life cycle, between 2 and 12 h postinfection, and localized the protein to punctate nuclear foci. Through coprecipitation experiments we have confirmed that HCF-1 self-associates into dimers or higher-order structures. We also found that overexpression of HCF-1 repressed expression from the hcf-1 promoter in transient reporter assays. Mutagenesis of cysteine residues within a putative RING finger domain in the amino acid sequence of HCF-1 abolished self-association activity and suggests that the RING domain may be involved in this protein-protein interaction. A different but overlapping set of cysteine residues were required for efficient gene repression activity. Functional analysis of HCF-1 mutants showed that the cysteine amino acids required for both self-association and gene repression activities of HCF-1 were also required for efficient late-gene expression and occlusion body formation in TN368 cells. Mutational analysis also identified essential charged and hydrophobic amino acids located between two of the essential cysteine residues. We propose that HCF-1 is a RING finger-containing protein whose activity requires HCF-1 self-association and gene repression activity.

  18. Signal transduction in light-oxygen-voltage receptors lacking the adduct-forming cysteine residue.

    PubMed

    Yee, Estella F; Diensthuber, Ralph P; Vaidya, Anand T; Borbat, Peter P; Engelhard, Christopher; Freed, Jack H; Bittl, Robert; Möglich, Andreas; Crane, Brian R

    2015-12-09

    Light-oxygen-voltage (LOV) receptors sense blue light through the photochemical generation of a covalent adduct between a flavin-nucleotide chromophore and a strictly conserved cysteine residue. Here we show that, after cysteine removal, the circadian-clock LOV-protein Vivid still undergoes light-induced dimerization and signalling because of flavin photoreduction to the neutral semiquinone (NSQ). Similarly, photoreduction of the engineered LOV histidine kinase YF1 to the NSQ modulates activity and downstream effects on gene expression. Signal transduction in both proteins hence hinges on flavin protonation, which is common to both the cysteinyl adduct and the NSQ. This general mechanism is also conserved by natural cysteine-less, LOV-like regulators that respond to chemical or photoreduction of their flavin cofactors. As LOV proteins can react to light even when devoid of the adduct-forming cysteine, modern LOV photoreceptors may have arisen from ancestral redox-active flavoproteins. The ability to tune LOV reactivity through photoreduction may have important implications for LOV mechanism and optogenetic applications.

  19. Signal transduction in light–oxygen–voltage receptors lacking the adduct-forming cysteine residue

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Estella F.; Diensthuber, Ralph P.; Vaidya, Anand T.; Borbat, Peter P.; Engelhard, Christopher; Freed, Jack H.; Bittl, Robert; Möglich, Andreas; Crane, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Light–oxygen–voltage (LOV) receptors sense blue light through the photochemical generation of a covalent adduct between a flavin-nucleotide chromophore and a strictly conserved cysteine residue. Here we show that, after cysteine removal, the circadian-clock LOV-protein Vivid still undergoes light-induced dimerization and signalling because of flavin photoreduction to the neutral semiquinone (NSQ). Similarly, photoreduction of the engineered LOV histidine kinase YF1 to the NSQ modulates activity and downstream effects on gene expression. Signal transduction in both proteins hence hinges on flavin protonation, which is common to both the cysteinyl adduct and the NSQ. This general mechanism is also conserved by natural cysteine-less, LOV-like regulators that respond to chemical or photoreduction of their flavin cofactors. As LOV proteins can react to light even when devoid of the adduct-forming cysteine, modern LOV photoreceptors may have arisen from ancestral redox-active flavoproteins. The ability to tune LOV reactivity through photoreduction may have important implications for LOV mechanism and optogenetic applications. PMID:26648256

  20. A Conserved Active Site Tyrosine Residue of Proline Dehydrogenase Helps Enforce the Preference for Proline over Hydroxyproline as the Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrander, E.L.; Larson, J.D.; Schuermann, J.P.; Tanner, J.J.

    2009-03-02

    Proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) catalyzes the oxidation of L-proline to {Delta}-1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate. PRODHs exhibit a pronounced preference for proline over hydroxyproline (trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline) as the substrate, but the basis for specificity is unknown. The goal of this study, therefore, is to gain insight into the structural determinants of substrate specificity of this class of enzyme, with a focus on understanding how PRODHs discriminate between the two closely related molecules, proline and hydroxyproline. Two site-directed mutants of the PRODH domain of Escherichia coli PutA were created: Y540A and Y540S. Kinetics measurements were performed with both mutants. Crystal structures of Y540S complexed with hydroxyproline, proline, and the proline analogue L-tetrahydro-2-furoic acid were determined at resolutions of 1.75, 1.90, and 1.85 {angstrom}, respectively. Mutation of Tyr540 increases the catalytic efficiency for hydroxyproline 3-fold and decreases the specificity for proline by factors of 20 (Y540S) and 50 (Y540A). The structures show that removal of the large phenol side chain increases the volume of the substrate-binding pocket, allowing sufficient room for the 4-hydroxyl of hydroxyproline. Furthermore, the introduced serine residue participates in recognition of hydroxyproline by forming a hydrogen bond with the 4-hydroxyl. This result has implications for understanding the substrate specificity of the related enzyme human hydroxyproline dehydrogenase, which has serine in place of tyrosine at this key active site position. The kinetic and structural results suggest that Tyr540 is an important determinant of specificity. Structurally, it serves as a negative filter for hydroxyproline by clashing with the 4-hydroxyl group of this potential substrate.

  1. Redox Biology: Computational Approaches to the Investigation of Functional Cysteine Residues

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Stefano M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Cysteine (Cys) residues serve many functions, such as catalysis, stabilization of protein structure through disulfides, metal binding, and regulation of protein function. Cys residues are also subject to numerous post-translational modifications. In recent years, various computational tools aiming at classifying and predicting different functional categories of Cys have been developed, particularly for structural and catalytic Cys. On the other hand, given complexity of the subject, bioinformatics approaches have been less successful for the investigation of regulatory Cys sites. In this review, we introduce different functional categories of Cys residues. For each category, an overview of state-of-the-art bioinformatics methods and tools is provided, along with examples of successful applications and potential limitations associated with each approach. Finally, we discuss Cys-based redox switches, which modify the view of distinct functional categories of Cys in proteins. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 135–146. PMID:20812876

  2. cDNA cloning of porcine brain prolyl endopeptidase and identification of the active-site seryl residue

    SciTech Connect

    Rennex, D.; Hemmings, B.A.; Hofsteenge, J.; Stone, S.R. )

    1991-02-26

    Prolyl endopeptidase is a cytoplasmic serine protease. The enzyme was purified from porcine kidney, and oligonucleotides based on peptide sequences from this protein were used to isolate a cDNA clone from a porcine brain library. This clone contained the complete coding sequence of prolyl endopeptidase and encoded a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 80751 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence of prolyl endopeptidase showed no sequence homology with other known serine proteases. ({sup 3}H)Diisopropyl fluorophosphate was used to identify the active-site serine of prolyl endopeptidase. One labeled peptide was isolated and sequenced. The sequence surrounding the active-site serine was Asn-Gly-Gly-Ser-Asn-Gly-Gly. This sequence is different from the active-site sequences of other known serine proteases. This difference and the lack of overall homology with the known families of serine proteases suggest that prolyl endopeptidase represents a new type of serine protease.

  3. Role of cysteine residues and disulfide bonds in the activity of a legume root nodule-specific, cysteine-rich peptide.

    PubMed

    Haag, Andreas F; Kerscher, Bernhard; Dall'Angelo, Sergio; Sani, Monica; Longhi, Renato; Baloban, Mikhail; Wilson, Heather M; Mergaert, Peter; Zanda, Matteo; Ferguson, Gail P

    2012-03-30

    The root nodules of certain legumes including Medicago truncatula produce >300 different nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides. Medicago NCR antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) mediate the differentiation of the bacterium, Sinorhizobium meliloti into a nitrogen-fixing bacteroid within the legume root nodules. In vitro, NCR AMPs such as NCR247 induced bacteroid features and exhibited antimicrobial activity against S. meliloti. The bacterial BacA protein is critical to prevent S. meliloti from being hypersensitive toward NCR AMPs. NCR AMPs are cationic and have conserved cysteine residues, which form disulfide (S-S) bridges. However, the natural configuration of NCR AMP S-S bridges and the role of these in the activity of the peptide are unknown. In this study, we found that either cysteine replacements or S-S bond modifications influenced the activity of NCR247 against S. meliloti. Specifically, either substitution of cysteines for serines, changing the S-S bridges from cysteines 1-2, 3-4 to 1-3, 2-4 or oxidation of NCR247 lowered its activity against S. meliloti. We also determined that BacA specifically protected S. meliloti against oxidized NCR247. Due to the large number of different NCRs synthesized by legume root nodules and the importance of bacterial BacA proteins for prolonged host infections, these findings have important implications for analyzing the function of these novel peptides and the protective role of BacA in the bacterial response toward these peptides.

  4. Cysteine residues of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus ORF5a protein are not essential for virus viability.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lichang; Zhou, Yan; Liu, Runxia; Li, Yanhua; Gao, Fei; Wang, Xiaomin; Fan, Hongjie; Yuan, Shishan; Wei, Zuzhang; Tong, Guangzhi

    2015-02-02

    ORF5a protein was recently identified as a novel structural protein in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). The ORF5a protein possesses two cysteines at positions 29 and 30 that are highly conserved among type 2 PRRSV. In this study, the significance of the ORF5a protein cysteine residues on virus replication was determined based on a type 2 PRRSV cDNA clone (pAJXM). Each cysteine was substituted by serine or glycine and the mutations were introduced into pAJXM. We found that the replacement of cysteine to glycine at position 30 was lethal for virus viability, but all serine mutant clones produced infectious progeny viruses. This data indicated that cysteine residues in the ORF5a protein were not essential for replication of type 2 PRRSV. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assay were used to study ORF5a protein interacted with other enveloped proteins. These results showed that ORF5a protein interacted non-covalently with itself and interacted with GP4 and 2b protein. The replacement of cysteine to glycine at position 30 affected the ORF5a protein interacted non-covalently with itself, which may account for the lethal phenotype of mutants carrying substitution of cysteine to glycine at position 30.

  5. New insights into the catalytic mechanism of histidine phosphatases revealed by a functionally essential arginine residue within the active site of the Sts phosphatases.

    PubMed

    San Luis, Boris; Nassar, Nicolas; Carpino, Nick

    2013-07-01

    Sts (suppressor of T-cell receptor signalling)-1 and Sts-2 are HPs (histidine phosphatases) that negatively regulate TCR (T-cell receptor) signalling pathways, including those involved in cytokine production. HPs play key roles in such varied biological processes as metabolism, development and intracellular signalling. They differ considerably in their primary sequence and substrate specificity, but possess a catalytic core formed by an invariant quartet of active-site residues. Two histidine and two arginine residues cluster together within the HP active site and are thought to participate in a two-step dephosphorylation reaction. To date there has been little insight into any additional residues that might play an important functional role. In the present study, we identify and characterize an additional residue within the Sts phosphatases (Sts-1 Arg383 or Sts-2 Arg369) that is critical for catalytic activity and intracellular function. Mutation of Sts-1 Arg383 to an alanine residue compromises the enzyme's activity and renders Sts-1 unable to suppress TCR-induced cytokine induction. Of the multiple amino acids substituted for Arg383, only lysine partially rescues the catalytic activity of Sts-1. Although Sts-1 Arg383 is conserved in all Sts homologues, it is only conserved in one of the two sub-branches of HPs. The results of the present study highlight an essential role for Sts-1 phosphatase activity in regulating T-cell activation and add a new dimension of complexity to our understanding of HP catalytic activity.

  6. Importance of cysteine residues in the thyroid hormone transporter MCT8.

    PubMed

    Lima de Souza, Elaine C; Groeneweg, Stefan; Visser, W Edward; Peeters, Robin P; Visser, Theo J

    2013-05-01

    The thyroid hormone (TH) transporter monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) is crucial for brain development as demonstrated by the severe psychomotor retardation in patients with MCT8 mutations. MCT8 contains 10 residues of the reactive amino acid cysteine (Cys) whose functional roles were studied using the Cys-specific reagent p-chloromercurybenzenesulfonate (pCMBS) and by site-directed mutagenesis. Pretreatment of JEG3 cells with pCMBS resulted in a dose- and time-dependent decrease of subsequent T3 uptake. Pretreatment with dithiothreitol did not affect TH transport or its inhibition by pCMBS. However, pCMBS inhibition of MCT8 was reversed by dithiothreitol. Inhibition of MCT8 by pCMBS was prevented in the presence of T3. The single and double mutation of C481A and C497A did not affect T3 transport, but the single mutants were less sensitive and the double mutant was completely insensitive to pCMBS. Similar effects on MCT8 were obtained using HgCl2 instead of pCMBS. In conclusion, we have identified Cys481 and Cys497 in MCT8 as the residues modified by pCMBS or HgCl2. These residues are probably located at or near the substrate-recognition site in MCT8. It remains to be investigated whether MCT8 function is regulated by modification of these Cys residues under pathophysiological conditions.

  7. Modification of cysteine residues by cyclopentenone prostaglandins: interplay with redox regulation of protein function.

    PubMed

    Oeste, Clara L; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Cyclopentenone prostaglandins (cyPG) are endogenous lipid mediators involved in the resolution of inflammation and the regulation of cell proliferation and cellular redox status. Upon exogenous administration they have shown beneficial effects in models of inflammation and tissue injury, as well as potential antitumoral actions, which have raised a considerable interest in their study for the development of therapeutic tools. Due to their electrophilic nature, the best-known mechanism of action of these mediators is the covalent modification of proteins at cysteine residues through Michael addition. Identification of cyPG targets through proteomic approaches, including MS/MS analysis to pinpoint the modified residues, is proving critical to characterize their mechanisms of action. Among the targets of cyPG are proinflammatory transcription factors, proteins involved in cell defense, such as the regulator of the antioxidant response Keap1 and detoxifying enzymes like GST, and key signaling proteins like Ras proteins. Moreover, cyPG may interact with redox-active small molecules, such as glutathione and hydrogen sulfide. Much has been learned about cyPG in the past few years and this knowledge has also contributed to clarify both pharmacological actions and signaling mechanisms of these and other electrophilic lipids. Given the fact that many cyPG targets are involved in or are targets for redox regulation, there is a complex interplay with redox-induced modifications. Here we address the modification of protein cysteine residues by cyPG elucidated by proteomic studies, paying special attention to the interplay with redox signaling.

  8. Mechanism of phosphoryl transfer by nucleoside diphosphate kinase pH dependence and role of the active site Lys16 and Tyr56 residues.

    PubMed

    Schneider, B; Babolat, M; Xu, Y W; Janin, J; Véron, M; Deville-Bonne, D

    2001-04-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase phosphorylates nucleoside diphosphates with little specificity for the base and the sugar. Although nucleotide analogues used in antiviral therapies are also metabolized to their triphosphate form by NDP kinase, their lack of the 3'-hydroxyl of the ribose, which allows them to be DNA chain terminators, severely impairs the catalytic efficiency of NDP kinase. We have analyzed the kinetics parameters of several mutant NDP kinases modified on residues (Lys16, Tyr56, Asn119) interacting with the gamma-phosphate and/or the 3'-OH of the Mg2+-ATP substrate. We compared the relative contributions of the active-site residues and the substrate 3'-OH for point mutations on Lys16, Tyr56 and Asn119. Analysis of additional data from pH profiles identify the ionization state of these residues in the enzyme active form. X-ray structure of K16A mutant NDP kinase shows no detectable rearrangement of the residues of the active site.

  9. Dissection of the EntF condensation domain boundary and active site residues in nonribosomal peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Roche, Eric D; Walsh, Christopher T

    2003-02-11

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) make many natural products of clinical importance, but a deeper understanding of the protein domains that compose NRPS assembly lines is required before these megasynthetases can be effectively engineered to produce novel drugs. The N-terminal amide bond-forming condensation (C) domain of the enterobactin NRPS EntF was excised from the multidomain synthetase using endpoints determined from sequence alignments and secondary structure predictions. The isolated domain was well-folded when compared by circular dichroism to the vibriobactin NRPS VibH, a naturally free-standing C domain. The EntF domain was also fully functional in an assay based on a synthetic small-molecule substrate, seryl N-acetylcysteamine. Active site mutants of the EntF C domain were surprisingly inactive in vitro as compared to their VibH counterparts, yet maintained the overall domain structure. An in vivo assay was developed in the context of the full-length EntF protein to more sensitively probe the activity level of the C domain mutants, and this supported strong effects for the active site mutations. The crucial role of histidine-138 was confirmed by assay of the full-length protein in vitro. These results suggest a strong resemblance of catalysis by the EntF C domain to chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, including an active site organized by an arginine-aspartate salt bridge, a key histidine acting as a general base, and an asparagine instead of a serine stabilizing the proposed tetrahedral intermediate by hydrogen bonding. The precise definition of a functional C domain excised from a NRPS should aid efforts at swapping NRPS domains between assembly lines.

  10. The Role of Cysteine Residues in Catalysis of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Machová, Iva; Hubálek, Martin; Lepšík, Martin; Bednárová, Lucie; Pazderková, Markéta; Kopecký, Vladimír; Snášel, Jan; Dostál, Jiří; Pichová, Iva

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb), the causative agent of tuberculosis, can persist in macrophages for decades, maintaining its basic metabolic activities. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pck; EC 4.1.1.32) is a key player in central carbon metabolism regulation. In replicating MTb, Pck is associated with gluconeogenesis, but in non-replicating MTb, it also catalyzes the reverse anaplerotic reaction. Here, we explored the role of selected cysteine residues in function of MTb Pck under different redox conditions. Using mass spectrometry analysis we confirmed formation of S–S bridge between cysteines C391 and C397 localized in the C-terminal subdomain. Molecular dynamics simulations of C391-C397 bridged model indicated local conformation changes needed for formation of the disulfide. Further, we used circular dichroism and Raman spectroscopy to analyze the influence of C391 and C397 mutations on Pck secondary and tertiary structures, and on enzyme activity and specificity. We demonstrate the regulatory role of C391 and C397 that form the S–S bridge and in the reduced form stabilize Pck tertiary structure and conformation for gluconeogenic and anaplerotic reactions. PMID:28135343

  11. Arginine residues on the opposite side of the active site stimulate the catalysis of ribosome depurination by ricin A chain by interacting with the P-protein stalk.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Ping; Kahn, Peter C; Kahn, Jennifer Nielsen; Grela, Przemyslaw; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2013-10-18

    Ricin inhibits protein synthesis by depurinating the α-sarcin/ricin loop (SRL). Ricin holotoxin does not inhibit translation unless the disulfide bond between the A (RTA) and B (RTB) subunits is reduced. Ricin holotoxin did not bind ribosomes or depurinate them but could depurinate free RNA. When RTA is separated from RTB, arginine residues located at the interface are exposed to the solvent. Because this positively charged region, but not the active site, is blocked by RTB, we mutated arginine residues at or near the interface of RTB to determine if they are critical for ribosome binding. These variants were structurally similar to wild type RTA but could not bind ribosomes. Their K(m) values and catalytic rates (k(cat)) for an SRL mimic RNA were similar to those of wild type, indicating that their activity was not altered. However, they showed an up to 5-fold increase in K(m) and up to 38-fold decrease in kcat toward ribosomes. These results suggest that the stalk binding stimulates the catalysis of ribosome depurination by RTA. The mutated arginines have side chains behind the active site cleft, indicating that the ribosome binding surface of RTA is on the opposite side of the surface that interacts with the SRL. We propose that stalk binding stimulates the catalysis of ribosome depurination by orienting the active site of RTA toward the SRL and thereby allows docking of the target adenine into the active site. This model may apply to the translation factors that interact with the stalk.

  12. Improved identification of wheat gluten proteins through alkylation of cysteine residues and peptide-based mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rombouts, Ine; Lagrain, Bert; Brunnbauer, Markus; Delcour, Jan A.; Koehler, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The concentration and composition of wheat gluten proteins and the presence, concentration and location of cysteine residues therein are important for wheat flour quality. However, it is difficult to identify gluten proteins, as they are an extremely polymorphic mixture of prolamins. We here present methods for cysteine labeling of wheat prolamins with 4-vinylpyridine (4-VP) and iodoacetamide (IDAM) which, as compared to label-free analysis, substantially improve identification of cysteine-containing peptides in enzymic prolamin digests by electrospray ionization - tandem mass spectrometry. Both chymotrypsin and thermolysin yielded cysteine-containing peptides from different gluten proteins, but more proteins could be identified after chymotryptic digestion. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, we were the first to label prolamins with isotope coded affinity tags (ICAT), which are commonly used for quantitative proteomics. However, more peptides were detected after labeling gluten proteins with 4-VP and IDAM than with ICAT. PMID:23880742

  13. Two Conserved Cysteine Residues Are Required for the Masculinizing Activity of the Silkworm Masc Protein.

    PubMed

    Katsuma, Susumu; Sugano, Yudai; Kiuchi, Takashi; Shimada, Toru

    2015-10-23

    We have recently discovered that the Masculinizer (Masc) gene encodes a CCCH tandem zinc finger protein, which controls both masculinization and dosage compensation in the silkworm Bombyx mori. In this study, we attempted to identify functional regions or residues that are required for the masculinizing activity of the Masc protein. We constructed a series of plasmids that expressed the Masc derivatives and transfected them into a B. mori ovary-derived cell line, BmN-4. To assess the masculinizing activity of the Masc derivatives, we investigated the splicing patterns of B. mori doublesex (Bmdsx) and the expression levels of B. mori IGF-II mRNA-binding protein, a splicing regulator of Bmdsx, in Masc cDNA-transfected BmN-4 cells. We found that two zinc finger domains are not required for the masculinizing activity. We also identified that the C-terminal 288 amino acid residues are sufficient for the masculinizing activity of the Masc protein. Further detailed analyses revealed that two cysteine residues, Cys-301 and Cys-304, in the highly conserved region among lepidopteran Masc proteins are essential for the masculinizing activity in BmN-4 cells. Finally, we showed that Masc is a nuclear protein, but its nuclear localization is not tightly associated with the masculinizing activity.

  14. Alanine substitutions of noncysteine residues in the cysteine-stabilized αβ motif

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying-Fang; Cheng, Kuo-Chang; Tsai, Ping-Hsing; Liu, Chung-Cheng; Lee, Tian-Ren; Ping-Chiang Lyu

    2009-01-01

    The protein scaffold is a peptide framework with a high tolerance of residue modifications. The cysteine-stabilized αβ motif (CSαβ) consists of an α-helix and an antiparallel triple-stranded β-sheet connected by two disulfide bridges. Proteins containing this motif share low sequence identity but high structural similarity and has been suggested as a good scaffold for protein engineering. The Vigna radiate defensin 1 (VrD1), a plant defensin, serves here as a model protein to probe the amino acid tolerance of CSαβ motif. A systematic alanine substitution is performed on the VrD1. The key residues governing the inhibitory function and structure stability are monitored. Thirty-two of 46 residue positions of VrD1 are altered by site-directed mutagenesis techniques. The circular dichroism spectrum, intrinsic fluorescence spectrum, and chemical denaturation are used to analyze the conformation and structural stability of proteins. The secondary structures were highly tolerant to the amino acid substitutions; however, the protein stabilities were varied for each mutant. Many mutants, although they maintained their conformations, altered their inhibitory function significantly. In this study, we reported the first alanine scan on the plant defensin containing the CSαβ motif. The information is valuable to the scaffold with the CSαβ motif and protein engineering. PMID:19533758

  15. Mutational analysis of extracellular cysteine residues of rat secretin receptor shows that disulfide bridges are essential for receptor function.

    PubMed

    Vilardaga, J P; Di Paolo, E; Bialek, C; De Neef, P; Waelbroeck, M; Bollen, A; Robberecht, P

    1997-05-15

    We attempted to express point-mutant secretin receptors where each of the 10 extracellular Cys residues was replaced by a Ser residue, in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Six of the point-mutant receptors (C24-->S, C44-->S, C53-->S, C67-->S, C85-->S and C101-->S) could not be detected by binding or functional studies: the mutations resulted in functional inactivation of the receptor. In contrast, the four other point-mutant receptors (C11-->S, C186-->S, C193-->S and C263-->S) were able to bind poorly 125I-secretin, and to activate adenylate cyclase with high secretin EC50 values. These results suggest that cysteine residues 24, 44, 53, 67, 85 and 101 are necessary for receptor function, and that the two putative disulfide bridges formed by cysteine residues 11, 186, 193 and 263 are functionally relevant, but not essential for receptor expression. Secretin activated the adenylate cyclase through the quadruple mutant (C11,186,193,263-->S), the four triple mutants, and through double mutants C186,193-->S and C186,263-->S with a very high (microM) EC50 value, suggesting that, in the wild-type receptor, disulfide bridges are formed between C11-C186, and between C193-C263. Prior treatment with dithiothreitol resulted in a marked EC50 increase of the wild-type receptor and of those receptors with at least the two cysteine residues in positions 11 and 186, suggesting that the C11-C186 (but not the C193-C263) disulfide bridge was accessible to this reducing agent. Several results nevertheless indicated that, in mutant receptors, alternative disulfide bridges can be formed between cysteine 186 and cysteine 193 or 263, suggesting that these three residues are in close spatial proximity in the wild-type receptor.

  16. Identification and clarification of the role of key active site residues in bacterial glutathione S-transferase zeta/maleylpyruvate isomerase

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Ti; Li, De-Feng; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Application of site-directed mutagenesis to probe the active site residues of glutathione-dependent maleylpyruvate isomerase. {yields} Two conserved residues, Arg8 and Arg176, in zeta class glutathione S-transferases are critical for maleylpyruvate orientation and enolization. {yields} Arg109, found exclusively in NagL, participates in k{sub cat} regulation. {yields} The T11A mutant exhibited a significantly decreased K{sub m} value for glutathione with little impact on maleylpyruvate kinetics. {yields} The Thr11 residue appears to have significance in the evolution of glutathione S-transferase classes. -- Abstract: The maleylpyruvate isomerase NagL from Ralstonia sp. strain U2, which has been structurally characterized previously, catalyzes the isomerization of maleylpyruvate to fumarylpyruvate. It belongs to the class zeta glutathione S-transferases (GSTZs), part of the cytosolic GST family (cGSTs). In this study, site-directed mutagenesis was conducted to probe the functions of 13 putative active site residues. Steady-state kinetic information for mutants in the reduced glutathione (GSH) binding site, suggested that (a) Gln64 and Asp102 interact directly with the glutamyl moiety of glutathione, (b) Gln49 and Gln64 are involved in a potential electron-sharing network that influences the ionization of the GSH thiol. The information also suggests that (c) His38, Asn108 and Arg109 interact with the GSH glycine moiety, (d) His104 has a role in the ionization of the GSH sulfur and the stabilization of the maleyl terminal carboxyl group in the reaction intermediate and (e) Arg110 influences the electron distribution in the active site and therefore the ionization of the GSH thiolate. Kinetic data for mutants altered in the substrate-binding site imply that (a) Arg8 and Arg176 are critical for maleylpyruvate orientation and enolization, and (b) Arg109 (exclusive to NagL) participates in k{sub cat} regulation. Surprisingly, the T11A mutant had a

  17. Identification of highly reactive cysteine residues at less exposed positions in the Fab constant region for site-specific conjugation.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Yasuhisa; Muramoto, Takashige; Nagatomo, Kazutaka; Shinmi, Daisuke; Honma, Emiko; Masuda, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Motoo

    2015-06-17

    Engineered cysteine residues are currently used for the site-specific conjugation of antibody-drug conjugates (ADC). In general, positions on the protein surface have been selected for substituting a cysteine as a conjugation site; however, less exposed positions (with less than 20% of accessible surface area [ASA]) have not yet been evaluated. In this study, we engineered original cysteine positional variants of a Fab fragment, with less than 20% of ASA, and evaluated their thiol reactivities through conjugation with various kinds of payloads. As a result, we have identified three original cysteine positional variants (heavy chain: Hc-A140C, light chain: Lc-Q124C and Lc-L201C), which exhibited similar monomer content, thermal stability, and antigen binding affinity in comparison to the wild-type Fab. In addition, the presence of cysteine in these positions made it possible for the Fab variants to react with variable-sized molecules with high efficiency. The favorable physical properties of the cysteine positional variants selected in our study suggest that less exposed positions, with less than 20% of ASA, provide an alternative for creating conjugation sites.

  18. Mechanism of Flavoprotein l-6-Hydroxynicotine Oxidase: pH and Solvent Isotope Effects and Identification of Key Active Site Residues.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F; Chadegani, Fatemeh; Zhang, Shengnan; Dougherty, Vi

    2017-02-14

    The flavoenzyme l-6-hydroxynicotine oxidase is a member of the monoamine oxidase family that catalyzes the oxidation of (S)-6-hydroxynicotine to 6-hydroxypseudooxynicotine during microbial catabolism of nicotine. While the enzyme has long been understood to catalyze oxidation of the carbon-carbon bond, it has recently been shown to catalyze oxidation of a carbon-nitrogen bond [Fitzpatrick, P. F., et al. (2016) Biochemistry 55, 697-703]. The effects of pH and mutagenesis of active site residues have now been utilized to study the mechanism and roles of active site residues. Asn166 and Tyr311 bind the substrate, while Lys287 forms a water-mediated hydrogen bond with flavin N5. The N166A and Y311F mutations result in ∼30- and ∼4-fold decreases in kcat/Km and kred for (S)-6-hydroxynicotine, respectively, with larger effects on the kcat/Km value for (S)-6-hydroxynornicotine. The K287M mutation results in ∼10-fold decreases in these parameters and a 6000-fold decrease in the kcat/Km value for oxygen. The shapes of the pH profiles are not altered by the N166A and Y311F mutations. There is no solvent isotope effect on the kcat/Km value for amines. The results are consistent with a model in which both the charged and neutral forms of the amine can bind, with the former rapidly losing a proton to a hydrogen bond network of water and amino acids in the active site prior to the transfer of hydride to the flavin.

  19. Identification of key functional residues in the active site of human {beta}1,4-galactosyltransferase 7: a major enzyme in the glycosaminoglycan synthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Talhaoui, Ibtissam; Bui, Catherine; Oriol, Rafael; Mulliert, Guillermo; Gulberti, Sandrine; Netter, Patrick; Coughtrie, Michael W H; Ouzzine, Mohamed; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie

    2010-11-26

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) play a central role in many pathophysiological events, and exogenous xyloside substrates of β1,4-galactosyltransferase 7 (β4GalT7), a major enzyme of GAG biosynthesis, have interesting biomedical applications. To predict functional peptide regions important for substrate binding and activity of human β4GalT7, we conducted a phylogenetic analysis of the β1,4-galactosyltransferase family and generated a molecular model using the x-ray structure of Drosophila β4GalT7-UDP as template. Two evolutionary conserved motifs, (163)DVD(165) and (221)FWGWGREDDE(230), are central in the organization of the enzyme active site. This model was challenged by systematic engineering of point mutations, combined with in vitro and ex vivo functional assays. Investigation of the kinetic properties of purified recombinant wild-type β4GalT7 and selected mutants identified Trp(224) as a key residue governing both donor and acceptor substrate binding. Our results also suggested the involvement of the canonical carboxylate residue Asp(228) acting as general base in the reaction catalyzed by human β4GalT7. Importantly, ex vivo functional tests demonstrated that regulation of GAG synthesis is highly responsive to modification of these key active site amino acids. Interestingly, engineering mutants at position 224 allowed us to modify the affinity and to modulate the specificity of human β4GalT7 toward UDP-sugars and xyloside acceptors. Furthermore, the W224H mutant was able to sustain decorin GAG chain substitution but not GAG synthesis from exogenously added xyloside. Altogether, this study provides novel insight into human β4GalT7 active site functional domains, allowing manipulation of this enzyme critical for the regulation of GAG synthesis. A better understanding of the mechanism underlying GAG assembly paves the way toward GAG-based therapeutics.

  20. Catalytic efficiency of HAP phytases is determined by a key residue in close proximity to the active site.

    PubMed

    Fu, Dawei; Li, Zhongyuan; Huang, Huoqing; Yuan, Tiezheng; Shi, Pengjun; Luo, Huiying; Meng, Kun; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin

    2011-05-01

    The maximum activity of Yersinia enterocolitica phytase (YeAPPA) occurs at pH 5.0 and 45 °C, and notably, its specific activity (3.28 ± 0.24 U mg(-1)) is 800-fold less than that of its Yersinia kristeensenii homolog (YkAPPA; 88% amino acid sequence identity). Sequence alignment and molecular modeling show that the arginine at position 79 (Arg79) in YeAPPA corresponding to Gly in YkAPPA as well as other histidine acid phosphatase (HAP) phytases is the only non-conserved residue near the catalytic site. To characterize the effects of the corresponding residue on the specific activities of HAP phytases, Escherichia coli EcAPPA, a well-characterized phytase with a known crystal structure, was selected for mutagenesis-its Gly73 was replaced with Arg, Asp, Glu, Ser, Thr, Leu, or Tyr. The results show that the specific activities of all of the corresponding EcAPPA mutants (17-2,400 U mg(-1)) were less than that of the wild-type phytase (3,524 U mg(-1)), and the activity levels were approximately proportional to the molecular volumes of the substituted residues' side chains. Site-directed replacement of Arg79 in YeAPPA (corresponding to Gly73 of EcAPPA) with Ser, Leu, and Gly largely increased the specific activity, which further verified the key role of the residue at position 79 for determining phytase activity. Thus, a new determinant that influences the catalytic efficiency of HAP phytases has been identified.

  1. Characterization of a novel y-type HMW-GS with eight cysteine residues from Triticum monococcum ssp. monococcum.

    PubMed

    Li, Zenglin; Li, Hongyu; Chen, Gang; Kou, Chunlan; Ning, Shunzong; Yuan, Zhongwei; Jiang, Qi; Zheng, Youliang; Liu, Dengcai; Zhang, Lianquan

    2015-11-15

    The composition and number of high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GSs) play important roles in determining the grain-processing quality of common wheat. The Glu-1Ay allele is silent in common wheat. In this study, an active y-type HMW-GS allele termed 1Ay8.2 (GenBank No. KP137569) was identified from Triticum monococcum L. ssp. monococcum (AmAm, 2n=2x=14), a species with a genome related to the A-genome of common wheat. Compared with previously reported active 1Ay subunits, this novel subunit contained an extra cysteine residue at position 103 of the amino acid sequence in the N-terminal region, in addition to the six cysteines in the N- and C-terminal regions found in most active 1Ay subunits and the one in the repetitive region that appears in only a few 1Ay alleles. This subunit was expressed in an amphiploid (AAAmAmBB, 2n=6x=42) between Triticum turgidum L. ssp. dicoccon and T. monococcum ssp. monococcum. This amphiploid could be used as a bridge to transfer 1Ay8.2 into common wheat cultivars. Replacing the silenced 1Ay in common wheat with the active 1Ay8.2 allele harboring an extra cysteine residue is expected to improve the quality by increasing the number of HMW-GSs and promoting the formation of covalent interactions through disulfide bonds with the extra cysteine residue.

  2. Cyst(e)ine residues of bovine white-matter proteolipid proteins. Role of disulphides in proteolipid conformation.

    PubMed Central

    Oteiza, P I; Adamo, A M; Aloise, P A; Paladini, A C; Paladini, A A; Soto, E F

    1987-01-01

    Cyst(e)ine residues of bovine white-matter proteolipid proteins were characterized in a highly purified preparation. From a total of 10.6 cyst(e)ine residues/molecule of protein, as determined by performic acid oxidation, 2.5-3 thiol groups were freely accessible to iodoacetamide, iodoacetic acid and 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB), when the proteins were solubilized in chloroform/methanol (C/M) (2:1, v/v). The presence of lipids had no effect on thiol-group exposure. One thiol group available to DTNB in C/M could not be detected when proteolipids were solubilized in the more polar solvent n-butanol. In a C/M solution of purified proteolipid proteins, SDS did not increase the number of reactive thiol groups, but the cleavage of one disulphide bridge made it possible to alkylate six more groups. C.d. and fluorescence studies showed that rupture of this disulphide bond changed the protein conformation, which was reflected in partial loss of helical structure and in a greater exposure to the solvent of at least one tryptophan residue. Cyst(e)ine residues were also characterized in the different components [PLP (principal proteolipid protein), DM20 and LMW (low-Mr proteins)] of the proteolipid preparation. Although the numbers of cyst(e)ine residues in PLP and DM20 were similar, in LMW fewer residues were alkylated under four different experimental conditions. The differences, however, are not simply related to differences in Mr. PMID:3663175

  3. Chemical modification of cysteine and tyrosine residues in formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase from Clostridium thermoaceticum

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.I.; Ljungdahl, L.G.

    1982-04-01

    The chemical modification of cysteine and tyrosine residues in formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase from Clostridium thermoaceticum has been examined relative to enzymatic activity and reactivity of these groups in the native protein. 4,4'-Dipyridyl disulfide, dansylaziridine, and fluorescein mercuric acetate all reacted with just one of six sulfhydryls per enzyme subunit, resulting in activities of 100, 95 and 70%, respectively. The K/sub m/ values for MgATP, formate, and tetrahydrofolate were unaltered in the modified enzymes. ATP did produce a 2.5-fold reduction in the rate of reaction between the enzyme and 4,4'-dipyridyl disulfide. Tetranitromethane reacted most rapidly with a single sulfhydryl group per subunit to produce a 20 to 30% loss in activity. Subsequent additions of tetranitromethane modified 2.2 tyrosines per subunit which was proportional to the loss of the remaining enzymatic activity. Folic acid, a competitive inhibitor, protected against modification of the tyrosines and the associated activity losses; however, the oxidation of the single sulfhydryl group and the initial 20 to 30% activity loss were unaffected. In the presence of folic acid, higher concentrations of tetranitromethane produced a loss of the remaining activity proportional to the modification of 1.2 tyrosines per subunit. It is proposed that at least 1 tyrosine critical for enzymatic activity is located at or near the folic acid/tetrahydrofolate binding site.

  4. Direct determination of the redox status of cysteine residues in proteins in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Satoshi; Tatenaka, Yuki; Ohuchi, Yuya; Hisabori, Toru

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • A new DNA-maleimide which is cleaved by UV irradiation, DNA-PCMal, was developed. • DNA-PCMal can be used like DNA-Mal to analyze the redox state of cysteine residues. • It is useful for detecting the thiol redox status of a protein in vivo by Western blotting method. • Thus, DNA-PCMal can be a powerful tool for redox proteomics analysis. - Abstract: The redox states of proteins in cells are key factors in many cellular processes. To determine the redox status of cysteinyl thiol groups in proteins in vivo, we developed a new maleimide reagent, a photocleavable maleimide-conjugated single stranded DNA (DNA-PCMal). The DNA moiety of DNA-PCMal is easily removed by UV-irradiation, allowing DNA-PCMal to be used in Western blotting applications. Thereby the state of thiol groups in intracellular proteins can be directly evaluated. This new maleimide compound can provide information concerning redox proteins in vivo, which is important for our understanding of redox networks in the cell.

  5. L-delta-(alpha-Aminoadipoyl)-L-cysteine-D-valine synthetase: production of dipeptides containing valine residue at its C-terminus.

    PubMed

    Shiau, Chia-Yang; Liu, Yu-Tien

    2002-04-12

    L-delta-(alpha-Aminoadipoyl)-L-cysteine-D-valine synthetase (ACVS) has been recently studied as a model enzyme for peptide synthetases. It was found that in the absence of alpha-aminoadipic acid but in the presence of several cysteine analogues it was incorporated into several analogue dipeptides upon incubation of the potential cysteine analogues with ACVS. [(14)C]Cysteine was incorporated into the[(14)C]cysteinyl-valine analogue dipeptides. Notably, [(14)C]valine incorporation in the presence of N-acylated cysteine analogues was observed. The alpha-aminoadipic acid activation site is influential, inhibitory or promotive, on the production of these putative dipeptide products. The production of dipeptide analogues, containing valine or analogues at the C-terminus, leads to the speculation that the biosynthetic direction of ACV could be from the C-terminus to the N-terminus.

  6. Proximity of reactive cysteine residue and flavin in Escherichia coli pyruvate oxidase as estimated by fluorescence energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Koland, J G; Gennis, R B

    1982-08-31

    Pyruvate oxidase of Escherichia coli possesses a reactive cysteine residue believed to be associated with the thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) binding site. This residue is not reactive in the presence of TPP. Exposure of the enzyme to cysteine-directed fluorescent reagents results in the formation of fluorescent protein conjugates. Although these reagents do not react solely with the TPP-protectable cysteine residue, the fluorescence emission spectrum of a probe attached to this residue can be obtained by a difference technique. It was determined that the fluorescence emission of probes at the TPP-protectable site is very low due to energy transfer to the FAD coenzyme and that this fluorescence is greatly enhanced upon reduction or extraction of the flavin. Application of fluorescence energy transfer theory enabled the determination of an upper limit for the distance between the probes at the TPP-protectable site and the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) (roughly 20 A). Thus, the TPP binding site and the FAD coenzyme are likely in close proximity.

  7. Predicting the redox state and secondary structure of cysteine residues using multi-dimensional classification analysis of NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Cheng; Lai, Wen-Chung; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2016-09-01

    A tool for predicting the redox state and secondary structure of cysteine residues using multi-dimensional analyses of different combinations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts has been developed. A data set of cysteine [Formula: see text], (13)C(α), (13)C(β), (1)H(α), (1)H(N), and (15)N(H) chemical shifts was created, classified according to redox state and secondary structure, using a library of 540 re-referenced BioMagResBank (BMRB) entries. Multi-dimensional analyses of three, four, five, and six chemical shifts were used to derive rules for predicting the structural states of cysteine residues. The results from 60 BMRB entries containing 122 cysteines showed that four-dimensional analysis of the C(α), C(β), H(α), and N(H) chemical shifts had the highest prediction accuracy of 100 and 95.9 % for the redox state and secondary structure, respectively. The prediction of secondary structure using 3D, 5D, and 6D analyses had the accuracy of ~90 %, suggesting that H(N) and [Formula: see text] chemical shifts may be noisy and made the discrimination worse. A web server (6DCSi) was established to enable users to submit NMR chemical shifts, either in BMRB or key-in formats, for prediction. 6DCSi displays predictions using sets of 3, 4, 5, and 6 chemical shifts, which shows their consistency and allows users to draw their own conclusions. This web-based tool can be used to rapidly obtain structural information regarding cysteine residues directly from experimental NMR data.

  8. Trypanosoma evansi: identification and characterization of a variant surface glycoprotein lacking cysteine residues in its C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yonggen; Zhao, Xinxin; Zou, Jingru; Suo, Xun

    2011-01-01

    African trypanosomes are flagellated unicellular parasites which proliferate extracellularly in the mammalian host blood-stream and tissue spaces. They evade the hosts' antibody-mediated lyses by sequentially changing their variant surface glycoprotein (VSG). VSG tightly coats the entire parasite body, serving as a physical barrier. In Trypanosoma brucei and the closely related species Trypanosoma evansi, Trypanosoma equiperdum, each VSG polypeptide can be divided into N- and C-terminal domains, based on cysteine distribution and sequence homology. N-terminal domain, the basis of antigenic variation, is hypervariable and contains all the exposed epitopes; C-terminal domain is relatively conserved and a full set of four or eight cysteines were generally observed. We cloned two genes from two distinct variants of T. evansi, utilizing RT-PCR with VSG-specific primers. One contained a VSG type A N-terminal domain followed a C-terminal domain lacking cysteine residues. To confirm that this gene is expressed as a functional VSG, the expression and localization of the corresponding gene product were characterized using Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining of living trypanosomes. Expression analysis showed that this protein was highly expressed, variant-specific, and had a ubiquitous cellular surface localization. All these results indicated that it was expressed as a functional VSG. Our finding showed that cysteine residues in VSG C-terminal domain were not essential; the conserved C-terminal domain generally in T. brucei like VSGs would possibly evolve for regulating the VSG expression.

  9. Probing the location and function of the conserved histidine residue of phosphoglucose isomerase by using an active site directed inhibitor N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Meng, M.; Chane, T. L.; Sun, Y. J.; Hsiao, C. D.

    1999-01-01

    Phosphoglucose isomerase (EC 5.3.1.9) catalyzes the interconversion of D-glucopyranose-6-phosphate and D-fructofuranose-6-phosphate by promoting an intrahydrogen transfer between C1 and C2. A conserved histidine exists throughout all phosphoglucose isomerases and was hypothesized to be the base catalyzing the isomerization reaction. In the present study, this conserved histidine, His311, of the enzyme from Bacillus stearothermophilus was subjected to mutational analysis, and the mutational effect on the inactivation kinetics by N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate was investigated. The substitution of His311 with alanine, asparagine, or glutamine resulted in the decrease of activity, in k(cat)/K(M), by a factor of 10(3), indicating the importance of this residue. N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate inactivated irreversibly the activity of wild-type phosphoglucose isomerase; however, His311 --> Ala became resistant to this inhibitor, indicating that His311 is located in the active site and is responsible for the inactivation of the enzyme by this active site-directed inhibitor. The pKa of His311 was estimated to be 6.31 according to the pH dependence of the inactivation. The proximity of this value with the pKa value of 6.35, determined from the pH dependence of k(cat)/K(M), supports a role of His311 as a general base in the catalysis. PMID:10595547

  10. The inhibition of human farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase by nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates. Elucidating the role of active site threonine 201 and tyrosine 204 residues using enzyme mutants☆

    PubMed Central

    Tsoumpra, Maria K.; Muniz, Joao R.; Barnett, Bobby L.; Kwaasi, Aaron A.; Pilka, Ewa S.; Kavanagh, Kathryn L.; Evdokimov, Artem; Walter, Richard L.; Von Delft, Frank; Ebetino, Frank H.; Oppermann, Udo; Russell, R. Graham G.; Dunford, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (FPPS) is the major molecular target of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (N-BPs), used clinically as bone resorption inhibitors. We investigated the role of threonine 201 (Thr201) and tyrosine 204 (Tyr204) residues in substrate binding, catalysis and inhibition by N-BPs, employing kinetic and crystallographic studies of mutated FPPS proteins. Mutants of Thr201 illustrated the importance of the methyl group in aiding the formation of the Isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) binding site, while Tyr204 mutations revealed the unknown role of this residue in both catalysis and IPP binding. The interaction between Thr201 and the side chain nitrogen of N-BP was shown to be important for tight binding inhibition by zoledronate (ZOL) and risedronate (RIS), although RIS was also still capable of interacting with the main-chain carbonyl of Lys200. The interaction of RIS with the phenyl ring of Tyr204 proved essential for the maintenance of the isomerized enzyme-inhibitor complex. Studies with conformationally restricted analogues of RIS reaffirmed the importance of Thr201 in the formation of hydrogen bonds with N-BPs. In conclusion we have identified new features of FPPS inhibition by N-BPs and revealed unknown roles of the active site residues in catalysis and substrate binding. PMID:26318908

  11. FK506-binding protein mutational analysis: defining the active-site residue contributions to catalysis and the stability of ligand complexes.

    PubMed

    DeCenzo, M T; Park, S T; Jarrett, B P; Aldape, R A; Futer, O; Murcko, M A; Livingston, D J

    1996-02-01

    The 12 kDa FK506-binding protein FKBP12 is a cis-trans peptidyl-prolyl isomerase that binds the macrolides FK506 and rapamycin. We have examined the role of the binding pocket residues of FKBP12 in protein-ligand interactions by making conservative substitutions of 12 of these residues by site-directed mutagenesis. For each mutant FKBP12, we measured the affinity for FK506 and rapamycin and the catalytic efficiency in the cis-frans peptidyl-prolyl isomerase reaction. The mutation of Trp59 or Phe99 generates an FKBP12 with a significantly lower affinity for FK506 than wild-type protein. Tyr26 and Tyr82 mutants are enzymatically active, demonstrating that hydrogen bonding by these residues is not required for catalysis of the cis-trans peptidyl-prolyl isomerase reaction, although these mutations alter the substrate specificity of the enzyme. We conclude that hydrophobic interactions in the active site dominate in the stabilization of FKBP12 binding to macrolide ligands and to the twisted-amide peptidyl-prolyl substrate intermediate.

  12. Role of active-site residues Tyr55 and Tyr114 in catalysis and substrate specificity of Corynebacterium diphtheriae C-S lyase.

    PubMed

    Astegno, Alessandra; Allegrini, Alessandra; Piccoli, Stefano; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Dominici, Paola

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increased interest in bacterial methionine biosynthesis enzymes as antimicrobial targets because of their pivotal role in cell metabolism. C-S lyase from Corynebacterium diphtheriae is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzyme in the transsulfuration pathway that catalyzes the α,β-elimination of sulfur-containing amino acids, such as L-cystathionine, to generate ammonia, pyruvate, and homocysteine, the immediate precursor of L-methionine. In order to gain deeper insight into the functional and dynamic properties of the enzyme, mutants of two highly conserved active-site residues, Y55F and Y114F, were characterized by UV-visible absorbance, fluorescence, and CD spectroscopy in the absence and presence of substrates and substrate analogs, as well as by steady-state kinetic studies. Substitution of Tyr55 with Phe apparently causes a 130-fold decrease in K(d)(PLP) at pH 8.5 providing evidence that Tyr55 plays a role in cofactor binding. Moreover, spectral data show that the mutant accumulates the external aldimine intermediate suggesting that the absence of interaction between the hydroxyl moiety and PLP-binding residue Lys222 causes a decrease in the rate of substrate deprotonation. Mutation of Tyr114 with Phe slightly influences hydrolysis of L-cystathionine, and causes a change in substrate specificity towards L-serine and O-acetyl-L-serine compared to the wild type enzyme. These findings, together with computational data, provide useful insights in the substrate specificity of C-S lyase, which seems to be regulated by active-site architecture and by the specific conformation in which substrates are bound, and will aid in development of inhibitors.

  13. Antioxidant activity of cysteine, tryptophan, and methionine residues in continuous phase beta-lactoglobulin in oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Elias, Ryan J; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2005-12-28

    Proteins dispersed in the continuous phase of oil-in-water emulsions are capable of inhibiting lipid oxidation reactions. The antioxidant activity of these proteins is thought to encompass both free radical scavenging by amino acid residues and chelation of prooxidative transition metals; however, the precise mechanism by which this occurs remains unclear. In this study, the oxidative stability of cysteine, tryptophan, and methionine residues in continuous phase beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg) in a Brij-stabilized menhaden oil-in-water emulsion was determined. The presence of low concentrations of continuous phase beta-Lg (250 and 750 microg/mL) significantly inhibited lipid oxidation as determined by lipid hydroperoxides and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances analysis. It was observed that cysteine oxidized before tryptophan in beta-Lg, and both residues oxidized before lipid oxidation could be detected. No oxidation of the methionine residues of beta-Lg was observed despite its reported high oxidative susceptibility. It is conceivable that surface exposure of amino acid residues greatly affects their oxidation kinetics, which may explain why some residues are preferentially oxidized relative to others. Further elucidation of the mechanisms governing free radical scavenging of amino acids could lead to more effective applications of proteins as antioxidants within oil-in-water food emulsions.

  14. Neisseria meningitidis Translation Elongation Factor P and Its Active-Site Arginine Residue Are Essential for Cell Viability

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, Tatsuo; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Takehiro; Masuda, Akiko; Dohmae, Naoshi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    Translation elongation factor P (EF-P), a ubiquitous protein over the entire range of bacterial species, rescues ribosomal stalling at consecutive prolines in proteins. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica, the post-translational β-lysyl modification of Lys34 of EF-P is important for the EF-P activity. The β-lysyl EF-P modification pathway is conserved among only 26–28% of bacteria. Recently, it was found that the Shewanella oneidensis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa EF-P proteins, containing an Arg residue at position 32, are modified with rhamnose, which is a novel post-translational modification. In these bacteria, EF-P and its Arg modification are both dispensable for cell viability, similar to the E. coli and S. enterica EF-P proteins and their Lys34 modification. However, in the present study, we found that EF-P and Arg32 are essential for the viability of the human pathogen, Neisseria meningitidis. We therefore analyzed the modification of Arg32 in the N. meningitidis EF-P protein, and identified the same rhamnosyl modification as in the S. oneidensis and P. aeruginosa EF-P proteins. N. meningitidis also has the orthologue of the rhamnosyl modification enzyme (EarP) from S. oneidensis and P. aeruginosa. Therefore, EarP should be a promising target for antibacterial drug development specifically against N. meningitidis. The pair of genes encoding N. meningitidis EF-P and EarP suppressed the slow-growth phenotype of the EF-P-deficient mutant of E. coli, indicating that the activity of N. meningitidis rhamnosyl–EF-P for rescuing the stalled ribosomes at proline stretches is similar to that of E. coli β-lysyl–EF-P. The possible reasons for the unique requirement of rhamnosyl–EF-P for N. meningitidis cells are that more proline stretch-containing proteins are essential and/or the basal ribosomal activity to synthesize proline stretch-containing proteins in the absence of EF-P is lower in this bacterium than in others. PMID:26840407

  15. Functional site profiling and electrostatic analysis of cysteines modifiable to cysteine sulfenic acid.

    PubMed

    Salsbury, Freddie R; Knutson, Stacy T; Poole, Leslie B; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S

    2008-02-01

    Cysteine sulfenic acid (Cys-SOH), a reversible modification, is a catalytic intermediate at enzyme active sites, a sensor for oxidative stress, a regulator of some transcription factors, and a redox-signaling intermediate. This post-translational modification is not random: specific features near the cysteine control its reactivity. To identify features responsible for the propensity of cysteines to be modified to sulfenic acid, a list of 47 proteins (containing 49 known Cys-SOH sites) was compiled. Modifiable cysteines are found in proteins from most structural classes and many functional classes, but have no propensity for any one type of protein secondary structure. To identify features affecting cysteine reactivity, these sites were analyzed using both functional site profiling and electrostatic analysis. Overall, the solvent exposure of modifiable cysteines is not different from the average cysteine. The combined sequence, structure, and electrostatic approaches reveal mechanistic determinants not obvious from overall sequence comparison, including: (1) pKaS of some modifiable cysteines are affected by backbone features only; (2) charged residues are underrepresented in the structure near modifiable sites; (3) threonine and other polar residues can exert a large influence on the cysteine pKa; and (4) hydrogen bonding patterns are suggested to be important. This compilation of Cys-SOH modification sites and their features provides a quantitative assessment of previous observations and a basis for further analysis and prediction of these sites. Agreement with known experimental data indicates the utility of this combined approach for identifying mechanistic determinants at protein functional sites.

  16. Identification of Two Reactive Cysteine Residues in the Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 Using Top-Down FTICR Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotcher, Jenna; Clarke, David J.; Weidt, Stefan K.; Mackay, C. Logan; Hupp, Ted R.; Sadler, Peter J.; Langridge-Smith, Pat R. R.

    2011-05-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a redox-regulated transcription factor involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and senescence in response to multiple forms of stress, as well as many other cellular processes such as DNA repair, glycolysis, autophagy, oxidative stress and differentiation. The discovery of cysteine-targeting compounds that cause re-activation of mutant p53 and the death of tumor cells in vivo has emphasized the functional importance of p53 thiols. Using a combination of top-down and middle-down FTICR mass spectrometry, we show that of the 10 Cys residues in the core domain of wild-type p53, Cys182 and Cys277 exhibit a remarkable preference for modification by the alkylating reagent N-ethylmaleimide. The assignment of Cys182 and Cys277 as the two reactive Cys residues was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. Further alkylation of p53 beyond Cys182 and Cys277 was found to trigger co-operative modification of the remaining seven Cys residues and protein unfolding. This study highlights the power of top-down FTICR mass spectrometry for analysis of the cysteine reactivity and redox chemistry in multiple cysteine-containing proteins.

  17. Positioning of cysteine residues within the N-terminal portion of the BST-2/tetherin ectodomain is important for functional dimerization of BST-2.

    PubMed

    Welbourn, Sarah; Kao, Sandra; Du Pont, Kelly E; Andrew, Amy J; Berndsen, Christopher E; Strebel, Klaus

    2015-02-06

    BST-2/tetherin is a cellular host factor capable of restricting the release of a variety of enveloped viruses, including HIV-1. Structurally, BST-2 consists of an N-terminal cytoplasmic domain, a transmembrane domain, an ectodomain, and a C-terminal membrane anchor. The BST-2 ectodomain encodes three cysteine residues in its N-terminal half, each of which can contribute to the formation of cysteine-linked dimers. We previously reported that any one of the three cysteine residues is sufficient to produce functional BST-2 dimers. Here we investigated the importance of cysteine positioning on the ectodomain for functional dimerization of BST-2. Starting with a cysteine-free monomeric form of BST-2, individual cysteine residues were reintroduced at various locations throughout the ectodomain. The resulting BST-2 variants were tested for expression, dimerization, surface presentation, and inhibition of HIV-1 virus release. We found significant flexibility in the positioning of cysteine residues, although the propensity to form cysteine-linked dimers generally decreased with increasing distance from the N terminus. Interestingly, all BST-2 variants, including the one lacking all three ectodomain cysteines, retained the ability to form non-covalent dimers, and all of the BST-2 variants were efficiently expressed at the cell surface. Importantly, not all BST-2 variants capable of forming cysteine-linked dimers were functional, suggesting that cysteine-linked dimerization of BST-2 is necessary but not sufficient for inhibiting virus release. Our results expose new structural constraints governing the functional dimerization of BST-2, a property essential to its role as a restriction factor tethering viruses to the host cell.

  18. Contributions of the substrate-binding arginine residues to maleate-induced closure of the active site of Escherichia coli aspartate aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Matharu, A; Hayashi, H; Kagamiyama, H; Maras, B; John, R A

    2001-03-01

    Crystallography shows that aspartate aminotransferase binds dicarboxylate substrate analogues by bonds to Arg292 and Arg386, respectively [Jager, J, Moser, M. Sauder, U. & Jansonius, J. N. (1994) J. Mol. Biol., 239, 285-305]. The contribution of each interaction to the conformational change that the enzyme undergoes when it binds ligands via these residues, is assessed by probing mutant forms of the enzyme lacking either or both arginines. The probes used are NaH(3)BCN which reduces the cofactor imine, the reactive substrate analogue, cysteine sulfinate and proteolysis by trypsin. The unreactive substrate analogue, maleate, is used to induce closure. Each single mutant reacted only 2.5-fold more slowly with NaH(3)BCN than the wild-type indicating that charge repulsion by the arginines contributes little to maintaining the open conformation. Maleate lowered the rate of reduction of the wild-type enzyme more than 300-fold but had little effect on the reaction of the mutant enzymes indicating that the ability of this dicarboxylate analogue to bridge the arginines precisely makes the major contribution to closure. The R292L mutant reacted 20 times more rapidly with cysteine sulfinate than R386L but 5 x 10(4) times more slowly than the wild-type enzyme, consistent with the proposal that enzyme's catalytic abilities are not developed unless closure is induced by bridging of the arginines. Proteolysis of the mutants with trypsin showed that, in the wild-type enzyme, the bonds most susceptible to trypsin are those contributed by Arg292 and Arg386. Proteolysis of the next most susceptible bond, at Arg25 in the double mutant, was protected by maleate demonstrating the presence of an additional site on the enzyme for binding dicarboxylates.

  19. A replacement of the active-site aspartic acid residue 293 in mouse cathepsin D affects its intracellular stability, processing and transport in HEK-293 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Partanen, Sanna; Storch, Stephan; Löffler, Hans-Gerhard; Hasilik, Andrej; Tyynelä, Jaana; Braulke, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    The substitution of an active-site aspartic acid residue by asparagine in the lysosomal protease cathepsin D (CTSD) results in a loss of enzyme activity and severe cerebrocortical atrophy in a novel form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in sheep [Tyynelä, Sohar, Sleat, Gin, Donnelly, Baumann, Haltia and Lobel (2000) EMBO J. 19, 2786-2792]. In the present study we have introduced the corresponding mutation by replacing aspartic acid residue 293 with asparagine (D293N) into the mouse CTSD cDNA to analyse its effect on synthesis, transport and stability in transfected HEK-293 cells. The complete inactivation of mutant D293N mouse CTSD was confirmed by a newly developed fluorimetric quantification system. Moreover, in the heterologous overexpression systems used, mutant D293N mouse CTSD was apparently unstable and proteolytically modified during early steps of the secretory pathway, resulting in a loss of mass by about 1 kDa. In the affected sheep, the endogenous mutant enzyme was stable but also showed the shift in its molecular mass. In HEK-293 cells, the transport of the mutant D293N mouse CTSD to the lysosome was delayed and associated with a low secretion rate compared with wild-type CTSD. These data suggest that the mutation may result in a conformational change which affects stability, processing and transport of the enzyme. PMID:12350228

  20. Evidence for a Proton Transfer Network and a Required Persulfide-Bond-Forming Cysteine Residue in Ni-Containing Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Eun Jin Kim; Jian Feng; Matthew R. Bramlett; Paul A. Lindahl

    2004-05-18

    OAK-B135 Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Moorella thermoacetica catalyzes the reversible oxidation of CO to CO2 at a nickel-iron-sulfur active-site called the C-cluster. Mutants of a proposed proton transfer pathway and of a cysteine residue recently found to form a persulfide bond with the C-cluster were characterized. Four semi-conserved histidine residues were individually mutated to alanine. His116 and His122 were essential to catalysis, while His113 and His119 attenuated catalysis but were not essential. Significant activity was ''rescued'' by a double mutant where His116 was replaced by Ala and His was also introduced at position 115. Activity was also rescued in double mutants where His122 was replaced by Ala and His was simultaneously introduced at either position 121 or 123. Activity was also ''rescued'' by replacing His with Cys at position 116. Mutation of conserved Lys587 near the C-cluster attenuated activity but did not eliminate it. Activity was virtually abolished in a double mutant where Lys587 and His113 were both changed to Ala. Mutations of conserved Asn284 also attenuated activity. These effects suggest the presence of a network of amino acid residues responsible for proton transfer rather than a single linear pathway. The Ser mutant of the persulfide-forming Cys316 was essentially inactive and displayed no EPR signals originating from the C-cluster. Electronic absorption and metal analysis suggests that the C-cluster is absent in this mutant. The persulfide bond appears to be essential for either the assembly or stability of the C-cluster, and/or for eliciting the redox chemistry of the C-cluster required for catalytic activity.

  1. Vitamin K epoxide reductase: homology, active site and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodstadt, Leo; Ponting, Chris P

    2004-06-01

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) recycles reduced vitamin K, which is used subsequently as a co-factor in the gamma-carboxylation of glutamic acid residues in blood coagulation enzymes. VKORC1, a subunit of the VKOR complex, has recently been shown to possess this activity. Here, we show that VKORC1 is a member of a large family of predicted enzymes that are present in vertebrates, Drosophila, plants, bacteria and archaea. Four cysteine residues and one residue, which is either serine or threonine, are identified as likely active-site residues. In some plant and bacterial homologues the VKORC1 homologous domain is fused with domains of the thioredoxin family of oxidoreductases. These might reduce disulfide bonds of VKORC1-like enzymes as a prerequisite for their catalytic activities.

  2. Exhaustive mutagenesis of six secondary active-site residues in Escherichia coli chorismate mutase shows the importance of hydrophobic side chains and a helix N-capping position for stability and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Jonathan Kyle; Keeffe, Jennifer R; Kast, Peter; Mayo, Stephen L

    2007-06-12

    Secondary active-site residues in enzymes, including hydrophobic amino acids, may contribute to catalysis through critical interactions that position the reacting molecule, organize hydrogen-bonding residues, and define the electrostatic environment of the active site. To ascertain the tolerance of an important model enzyme to mutation of active-site residues that do not directly hydrogen bond with the reacting molecule, all 19 possible amino acid substitutions were investigated in six positions of the engineered chorismate mutase domain of the Escherichia coli chorismate mutase-prephenate dehydratase. The six secondary active-site residues were selected to clarify results of a previous test of computational enzyme design procedures. Five of the positions encode hydrophobic side chains in the wild-type enzyme, and one forms a helix N-capping interaction as well as a salt bridge with a catalytically essential residue. Each mutant was evaluated for its ability to complement an auxotrophic chorismate mutase deletion strain. Kinetic parameters and thermal stabilities were measured for variants with in vivo activity. Altogether, we find that the enzyme tolerated 34% of the 114 possible substitutions, with a few mutations leading to increases in the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. The results show the importance of secondary amino acid residues in determining enzymatic activity, and they point to strengths and weaknesses in current computational enzyme design procedures.

  3. The metalloid arsenite induces nuclear export of Id3 possibly via binding to the N-terminal cysteine residues

    SciTech Connect

    Kurooka, Hisanori; Sugai, Manabu; Mori, Kentaro; Yokota, Yoshifumi

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Sodium arsenite induces cytoplasmic accumulation of Id3. •Arsenite binds to closely spaced N-terminal cysteine residues of Id3. •N-terminal cysteines are essential for arsenite-induced nuclear export of Id3. •Nuclear export of Id3 counteracts its transcriptional repression activity. -- Abstract: Ids are versatile transcriptional repressors that regulate cell proliferation and differentiation, and appropriate subcellular localization of the Id proteins is important for their functions. We previously identified distinct functional nuclear export signals (NESs) in Id1 and Id2, but no active NES has been reported in Id3. In this study, we found that treatment with the stress-inducing metalloid arsenite led to the accumulation of GFP-tagged Id3 in the cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic accumulation was impaired by a mutation in the Id3 NES-like sequence resembling the Id1 NES, located at the end of the HLH domain. It was also blocked by co-treatment with the CRM1-specific nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B (LMB), but not with the inhibitors for mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Importantly, we showed that the closely spaced N-terminal cysteine residues of Id3 interacted with the arsenic derivative phenylarsine oxide (PAO) and were essential for the arsenite-induced cytoplasmic accumulation, suggesting that arsenite induces the CRM1-dependent nuclear export of Id3 via binding to the N-terminal cysteines. Finally, we demonstrated that Id3 significantly repressed arsenite-stimulated transcription of the immediate-early gene Egr-1 and that this repression activity was inversely correlated with the arsenite-induced nuclear export. Our results imply that Id3 may be involved in the biological action of arsenite.

  4. Conversion of citrate synthase into citryl-CoA lyase as a result of mutation of the active-site aspartic acid residue to glutamic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Man, W J; Li, Y; O'Connor, C D; Wilton, D C

    1991-01-01

    The active-site aspartic acid residue, Asp-362, of Escherichia coli citrate synthase was changed by site-directed mutagenesis to Glu-362, Asn-362 or Gly-362. Only very low catalytic activity could be detected with the Asp----Asn and Asp----Gly mutations. The Asp----Glu mutation produced an enzyme that expressed about 0.8% of the overall catalytic rate, and the hydrolysis step in the reaction, monitored as citryl-CoA hydrolysis, was inhibited to a similar extent. However, the condensation reaction, measured in the reverse direction as citryl-CoA cleavage to oxaloacetate and acetyl-CoA, was not affected by the mutation, and this citryl-CoA lyase activity was the major catalytic activity of the mutant enzyme. This high condensation activity in an enzyme in which the subsequent hydrolysis step was about 98% inhibited permitted considerable exchange of the methyl protons of acetyl-CoA during catalysis by the mutant enzyme. The Km for oxaloacetate was not significantly altered in the D362E mutant enzyme, whereas the Km for acetyl-CoA was about 5 times lower. A mechanism is proposed in which Asp-362 is involved in the hydrolysis reaction of this enzyme, and not as a base in the deprotonation of acetyl-CoA as recently suggested by others. [Karpusas, Branchaud & Remington (1990) Biochemistry 29, 2213-2219; Alter, Casazza, Zhi, Nemeth, Srere & Evans, (1990) Biochemistry 29, 7557-7563]. PMID:1684105

  5. Structures of Arg- and Gln-type bacterial cysteine dioxygenase homologs.

    PubMed

    Driggers, Camden M; Hartman, Steven J; Karplus, P Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In some bacteria, cysteine is converted to cysteine sulfinic acid by cysteine dioxygenases (CDO) that are only ∼15-30% identical in sequence to mammalian CDOs. Among bacterial proteins having this range of sequence similarity to mammalian CDO are some that conserve an active site Arg residue ("Arg-type" enzymes) and some having a Gln substituted for this Arg ("Gln-type" enzymes). Here, we describe a structure from each of these enzyme types by analyzing structures originally solved by structural genomics groups but not published: a Bacillus subtilis "Arg-type" enzyme that has cysteine dioxygenase activity (BsCDO), and a Ralstonia eutropha "Gln-type" CDO homolog of uncharacterized activity (ReCDOhom). The BsCDO active site is well conserved with mammalian CDO, and a cysteine complex captured in the active site confirms that the cysteine binding mode is also similar. The ReCDOhom structure reveals a new active site Arg residue that is hydrogen bonding to an iron-bound diatomic molecule we have interpreted as dioxygen. Notably, the Arg position is not compatible with the mode of Cys binding seen in both rat CDO and BsCDO. As sequence alignments show that this newly discovered active site Arg is well conserved among "Gln-type" CDO enzymes, we conclude that the "Gln-type" CDO homologs are not authentic CDOs but will have substrate specificity more similar to 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases.

  6. Structures of Arg- and Gln-type bacterial cysteine dioxygenase homologs

    PubMed Central

    Driggers, Camden M; Hartman, Steven J; Karplus, P Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In some bacteria, cysteine is converted to cysteine sulfinic acid by cysteine dioxygenases (CDO) that are only ∼15–30% identical in sequence to mammalian CDOs. Among bacterial proteins having this range of sequence similarity to mammalian CDO are some that conserve an active site Arg residue (“Arg-type” enzymes) and some having a Gln substituted for this Arg (“Gln-type” enzymes). Here, we describe a structure from each of these enzyme types by analyzing structures originally solved by structural genomics groups but not published: a Bacillus subtilis “Arg-type” enzyme that has cysteine dioxygenase activity (BsCDO), and a Ralstonia eutropha “Gln-type” CDO homolog of uncharacterized activity (ReCDOhom). The BsCDO active site is well conserved with mammalian CDO, and a cysteine complex captured in the active site confirms that the cysteine binding mode is also similar. The ReCDOhom structure reveals a new active site Arg residue that is hydrogen bonding to an iron-bound diatomic molecule we have interpreted as dioxygen. Notably, the Arg position is not compatible with the mode of Cys binding seen in both rat CDO and BsCDO. As sequence alignments show that this newly discovered active site Arg is well conserved among “Gln-type” CDO enzymes, we conclude that the “Gln-type” CDO homologs are not authentic CDOs but will have substrate specificity more similar to 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases. PMID:25307852

  7. Critical active-site residues identified by site-directed mutagenesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase, a new member of the haloacid dehalogenases hydrolase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Beassoni, Paola R; Otero, Lisandro H; Massimelli, Maria J; Lisa, Angela T; Domenech, Carlos E

    2006-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase (PChP), the product of the PA5292 gene, is synthesized when the bacteria are grown with choline, betaine, dimethylglycine, or carnitine. In the presence of Mg(2+), PChP catalyzes the hydrolysis of both phosphorylcholine (PCh) and p-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP). PCh saturation curve analysis of the enzyme with or without the signal peptide indicated that the peptide was the fundamental factor responsible for decreasing the affinity of the second site of PChP for PCh, either at pH 5.0 or pH 7.4. PChP contained three conserved motifs characteristic of the haloacid dehalogenases superfamily. In the PChP without the signal peptide, motifs I, II, and III correspond to the residues (31)DMDNT(35), (166)SAA(168), and K(242)/(261)GDTPDSD(267), respectively. To determine the catalytic importance of the D31, D33, T35, S166, K242, D262, D265, and D267 on the enzyme activity, site-directed mutagenesis was performed. D31, D33, D262, and D267 were identified as the more important residues for catalysis. D265 and D267 may be involved in the stabilization of motif III, or might contribute to substrate specificity. The substitution of T35 by S35 resulted in an enzyme with a low PChP activity, but conserves the catalytic sites involved in the hydrolysis of PCh (K(m1) 0.03 mM: , K(m2) 0.5 mM: ) or p-NPP (K(m) 2.1 mM: ). Mutating either S166 or K242 revealed that these residues are also important to catalyze the hydrolysis of both substrates. The substitution of lysine by arginine or by glutamine revealed the importance of the positive charged group, either from the amino or guanidinium groups, because K242Q was inactive, whereas K242R was a functional enzyme.

  8. The roles of active-site residues in the catalytic mechanism of trans-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase: a kinetic, NMR, and mutational analysis.

    PubMed

    Azurmendi, Hugo F; Wang, Susan C; Massiah, Michael A; Poelarends, Gerrit J; Whitman, Christian P; Mildvan, Albert S

    2004-04-13

    trans-3-Chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (CaaD) converts trans-3-chloroacrylic acid to malonate semialdehyde by the addition of H(2)O to the C-2, C-3 double bond, followed by the loss of HCl from the C-3 position. Sequence similarity between CaaD, an (alphabeta)(3) heterohexamer (molecular weight 47,547), and 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), an (alpha)(6) homohexamer, distinguishes CaaD from those hydrolytic dehalogenases that form alkyl-enzyme intermediates. The recently solved X-ray structure of CaaD demonstrates that betaPro-1 (i.e., Pro-1 of the beta subunit), alphaArg-8, alphaArg-11, and alphaGlu-52 are at or near the active site, and the >or=10(3.4)-fold decreases in k(cat) on mutating these residues implicate them as mechanistically important. The effect of pH on k(cat)/K(m) indicates a catalytic base with a pK(a) of 7.6 and an acid with a pK(a) of 9.2. NMR titration of (15)N-labeled wild-type CaaD yielded pK(a) values of 9.3 and 11.1 for the N-terminal prolines, while the fully active but unstable alphaP1A mutant showed a pK(a) of 9.7 (for the betaPro-1), implicating betaPro-1 as the acid catalyst, which may protonate C-2 of the substrate. These results provide the first evidence for an amino-terminal proline, conserved in all known tautomerase superfamily members, functioning as a general acid, rather than as a general base as in 4-OT. Hence, a reasonable candidate for the general base in CaaD is the active site residue alphaGlu-52. CaaD has 10 arginine residues, six in the alpha-subunit (Arg-8, Arg-11, Arg-17, Arg-25, Arg-35, and Arg-43), and four in the beta-subunit (Arg-15, Arg-21, Arg-55, and Arg-65). (1)H-(15)N-heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) spectra of CaaD showed seven to nine Arg-NepsilonH resonances (denoted R(A) to R(I)) depending on the protein concentration and pH. One of these signals (R(D)) disappeared in the spectrum of the largely inactive alphaR11A mutant (deltaH = 7.11 ppm, deltaN = 89.5 ppm), and another one (R

  9. The Role of Cysteine Residues in Redox Regulation and Protein Stability of Arabidopsis thaliana Starch Synthase 1

    PubMed Central

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna; Cuesta-Seijo, Jose A.; Nielsen, Morten M.; Marri, Lucia; Mellor, Silas B.; Glaring, Mikkel A.; Jensen, Poul E.; Palcic, Monica M.; Blennow, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Starch biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is strictly regulated. In leaf extracts, starch synthase 1 (AtSS1) responds to the redox potential within a physiologically relevant range. This study presents data testing two main hypotheses: 1) that specific thiol-disulfide exchange in AtSS1 influences its catalytic function 2) that each conserved Cys residue has an impact on AtSS1 catalysis. Recombinant AtSS1 versions carrying combinations of cysteine-to-serine substitutions were generated and characterized in vitro. The results demonstrate that AtSS1 is activated and deactivated by the physiological redox transmitters thioredoxin f1 (Trxf1), thioredoxin m4 (Trxm4) and the bifunctional NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC). AtSS1 displayed an activity change within the physiologically relevant redox range, with a midpoint potential equal to -306 mV, suggesting that AtSS1 is in the reduced and active form during the day with active photosynthesis. Cys164 and Cys545 were the key cysteine residues involved in regulatory disulfide formation upon oxidation. A C164S_C545S double mutant had considerably decreased redox sensitivity as compared to wild type AtSS1 (30% vs 77%). Michaelis-Menten kinetics and molecular modeling suggest that both cysteines play important roles in enzyme catalysis, namely, Cys545 is involved in ADP-glucose binding and Cys164 is involved in acceptor binding. All the other single mutants had essentially complete redox sensitivity (98–99%). In addition of being part of a redox directed activity “light switch”, reactivation tests and low heterologous expression levels indicate that specific cysteine residues might play additional roles. Specifically, Cys265 in combination with Cys164 can be involved in proper protein folding or/and stabilization of translated protein prior to its transport into the plastid. Cys442 can play an important role in enzyme stability upon oxidation. The physiological and phylogenetic relevance of these findings

  10. Contribution of cysteine residues to the structure and function of herpes simplex virus gH/gL

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, Tina M. . E-mail: tmcairns@biochem.dental.upenn.edu; Landsburg, Daniel J. . E-mail: dlandsbu@temple.edu; Charles Whitbeck, J. . E-mail: whitbeck@biochem.dental.upenn.edu; Eisenberg, Roselyn J. . E-mail: roselyn@biochem.dental.upenn.edu; Cohen, Gary H. . E-mail: cohen@biochem.dental.upenn.edu

    2005-02-20

    In HSV types 1 and 2, gH forms a noncovalent heterodimer with gL. Previous studies demonstrated that the first 323 amino acids of gH1 and the first 161 amino acids of gL1 are sufficient for gH/gL binding. For gL1, substitution of any of its four cysteine (C) residues (all located within the gH/gL binding region) destroyed gH binding and function. Although gH1 contains 8 cysteines in its ectodomain, gH 2 contains 7 (C3 of gH1 is replaced by arginine in gH2). We found that mutation of any of the four C-terminal cysteines led to a reduction or loss of gH/gL function. Mutation of C5 or C6 in gH1 or gH2 rendered the proteins non-functional. However, substitution of C7 and/or C8 in gH1 has a definite negative impact on cell-cell fusion, although these mutations had less effect on complementation. Remarkably, all four gH1 N-terminal cysteines could be mutated simultaneously with little effect on fusion or complementation. As gH2 already lacks C3, we constructed a triple mutant (gH2-C1/2/4) which exhibited a similar phenotype. Since gH1 is known to bind gL2 and vice versa, we wondered whether binding of gH2 to the heterologous gL1 would enhance the fusion defect seen with the gH2-C2 mutant. The combination of mutant gH2-C2 with wild-type gL1 was nonfunctional in a cell-cell fusion assay. Interestingly, the reciprocal was not true, as gH1-C2 could utilize both gL1 and gL2. These findings suggest that there is a structural difference in the gH2 N-terminus as compared to gH1. We also present genetic evidence for at least one disulfide bond within gH2, between cysteines 2 and 4.

  11. Kinetic and site-directed mutagenesis studies of the cysteine residues of bovine low molecular weight phosphotyrosyl protein phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Davis, J P; Zhou, M M; Van Etten, R L

    1994-03-25

    The roles of the 8 conserved cysteines and 1 arginine in the low molecular weight phosphotyrosyl protein phosphatases were investigated using site-directed mutagenesis of the recombinant bovine heart enzyme. Single mutants of cysteine to serine were studied for each cysteine; alanine replacements were also made for Cys-12, Cys-17, and Arg-18. The CD spectra of the purified proteins were effectively superimposable, consistent with the conclusion that no major structural alterations had occurred, but 1H NMR spectroscopy did reveal some spectral shifts in the aromatic region. Kinetic analysis of the mutant proteins demonstrated that only Cys-12, Cys-17, and Arg-18 had significantly altered catalytic activity toward the substrate p-nitrophenyl phosphate at pH 5. The Cys-12 and Arg-18 mutants were effectively inactive. Thus, it is concluded that Cys-12 is the catalytic nucleophile, and Arg-18 presumably serves an essential function in substrate binding. The C17S mutant had 6% residual activity compared with wild type protein, whereas the C17A mutant had 37% activity. Consistent with the observed activity of the Cys-17 mutant, a covalent phosphocysteine intermediate was trapped and identified by 31P NMR. Further kinetic analysis of C17A using several aryl phosphate monoester substrates with different leaving group pK alpha values indicated that no change in the rate-determining step of the catalytic mechanism had occurred, that is, dephosphorylation of the covalent phosphoenzyme intermediate remains rate-limiting. The C17A mutant had a 4-fold higher phosphate Ki and slightly higher Km values for p-nitrophenyl phosphate suggesting that Cys-17 may be important for optimal positioning of the substrate phosphate moiety.

  12. The role of individual cysteine residues in the processing, structure, and function of human macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Deng, P; Wang, Y L; Pattengale, P K; Rettenmier, C W

    1996-11-12

    The shortest form of human macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF alpha, CSF-1(256) is expressed on the cell surface as a homodimeric type I transmembrane glycoprotein. The seven cysteine residues in CSF-1(256) form three intrachain disulfide bonds (Cys7-Cys90, Cys48-Cys139, and Cys 102-Cys146), and one interchain disulfide bond (Cys31-Cys31). To examine the role of the seven cysteine residues in CSF-1(256), we replaced each half-cystine by a serine using site-directed mutagenesis, and stably expressed the mutated genes in mouse NIH 3T3 cells. We showed that each of the seven cysteines of CSF-1(256) is essential for its biological activity. Our data further show that substitution of Cys48 or Cys139 totally blocked dimer formation and cell surface expression of CSF-1(256), and that substitution of Cys102 and Cys146 severely impaired CSF-1 dimer formation and cell surface expression. In contrast, substitution of Cys7 or Cys90 affected CSF-1 dimer formation to a lesser degree but did not significantly affect cell surface expression of CSF-1. Furthermore, disruption of the interchain disulfide bond led to efficient cell surface expression of monomeric CSF-1. All of the cell surface expressed mutant CSF-1 proteins, either dimeric or monomeric, still underwent efficient ectodomain cleavage. The electrophoretic mobilities of the cleaved dimeric ectodomains of these mutant CSF-1 proteins on SDS-PAGE exhibited distinctly different patterns as compared with the wild type. Substitution of either Cys7 or Cys90 produced the same shift, while substitution of either Cys102 or Cys146 resulted in a shift distinct from that caused by substitution of Cys7 or Cys90. These data suggest that replacement of either of a pair of intrachain half-cystine residues results in similar conformational changes, and may provide a novel method for mapping intrachain disulfide bonds in dimeric proteins.

  13. Structures of Arg- and Gln-type bacterial cysteine dioxygenase homologs: Arg- and Gln-type Bacterial CDO Homologs

    DOE PAGES

    Driggers, Camden M.; Hartman, Steven J.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In some bacteria, cysteine is converted to cysteine sulfinic acid by cysteine dioxygenases (CDO) that are only ~15–30% identical in sequence to mammalian CDOs. Among bacterial proteins having this range of sequence similarity to mammalian CDO are some that conserve an active site Arg residue (“Arg-type” enzymes) and some having a Gln substituted for this Arg (“Gln-type” enzymes). Here, we describe a structure from each of these enzyme types by analyzing structures originally solved by structural genomics groups but not published: a Bacillus subtilis “Arg-type” enzyme that has cysteine dioxygenase activity (BsCDO), and a Ralstonia eutropha “Gln-type” CDO homolog ofmore » uncharacterized activity (ReCDOhom). The BsCDO active site is well conserved with mammalian CDO, and a cysteine complex captured in the active site confirms that the cysteine binding mode is also similar. The ReCDOhom structure reveals a new active site Arg residue that is hydrogen bonding to an iron-bound diatomic molecule we have interpreted as dioxygen. Notably, the Arg position is not compatible with the mode of Cys binding seen in both rat CDO and BsCDO. As sequence alignments show that this newly discovered active site Arg is well conserved among “Gln-type” CDO enzymes, we conclude that the “Gln-type” CDO homologs are not authentic CDOs but will have substrate specificity more similar to 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases.« less

  14. Structures of Arg- and Gln-type bacterial cysteine dioxygenase homologs: Arg- and Gln-type Bacterial CDO Homologs

    SciTech Connect

    Driggers, Camden M.; Hartman, Steven J.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In some bacteria, cysteine is converted to cysteine sulfinic acid by cysteine dioxygenases (CDO) that are only ~15–30% identical in sequence to mammalian CDOs. Among bacterial proteins having this range of sequence similarity to mammalian CDO are some that conserve an active site Arg residue (“Arg-type” enzymes) and some having a Gln substituted for this Arg (“Gln-type” enzymes). Here, we describe a structure from each of these enzyme types by analyzing structures originally solved by structural genomics groups but not published: a Bacillus subtilis “Arg-type” enzyme that has cysteine dioxygenase activity (BsCDO), and a Ralstonia eutropha “Gln-type” CDO homolog of uncharacterized activity (ReCDOhom). The BsCDO active site is well conserved with mammalian CDO, and a cysteine complex captured in the active site confirms that the cysteine binding mode is also similar. The ReCDOhom structure reveals a new active site Arg residue that is hydrogen bonding to an iron-bound diatomic molecule we have interpreted as dioxygen. Notably, the Arg position is not compatible with the mode of Cys binding seen in both rat CDO and BsCDO. As sequence alignments show that this newly discovered active site Arg is well conserved among “Gln-type” CDO enzymes, we conclude that the “Gln-type” CDO homologs are not authentic CDOs but will have substrate specificity more similar to 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases.

  15. Looking at enzymes from the inside out: the proximity of catalytic residues to the molecular centroid can be used for detection of active sites and enzyme-ligand interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shimon, Avraham; Eisenstein, Miriam

    2005-08-12

    Analysis of the distances of the exposed residues in 175 enzymes from the centroids of the molecules indicates that catalytic residues are very often found among the 5% of residues closest to the enzyme centroid. This property of catalytic residues is implemented in a new prediction algorithm (named EnSite) for locating the active sites of enzymes and in a new scheme for re-ranking enzyme-ligand docking solutions. EnSite examines only 5% of the molecular surface (represented by surface dots) that is closest to the centroid, identifying continuous surface segments and ranking them by their area size. EnSite ranks the correct prediction 1-4 in 97% of the cases in a dataset of 65 monomeric enzymes (rank 1 for 89% of the cases) and in 86% of the cases in a dataset of 176 monomeric and multimeric enzymes from all six top-level enzyme classifications (rank 1 in 74% of the cases). Importantly, identification of buried or flat active sites is straightforward because EnSite "looks" at the molecular surface from the inside out. Detailed examination of the results indicates that the proximity of the catalytic residues to the centroid is a property of the functional unit, defined as the assembly of domains or chains that form the active site (in most cases the functional unit corresponds to a single whole polypeptide chain). Using the functional unit in the prediction further improves the results. The new property of active sites is also used for re-evaluating enzyme-inhibitor unbound docking results. Sorting the docking solutions by the distance of the interface to the centroid of the enzyme improves remarkably the ranks of nearly correct solutions compared to ranks based on geometric-electrostatic-hydrophobic complementarity scores.

  16. Substitution of conserved cysteine residues in Wheat streak mosaic virus HC-Pro abolishes virus transmission by the wheat curl mite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Substitutions in the amino-terminal region of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) HC-Pro were evaluated for effects on transmission by the wheat curl mite (Aceria tosichella Keifer). Alanine substitution at cysteine residues 16, 46 and 49 abolished vector transmission. Although alanine substitution a...

  17. Normal Modes Expose Active Sites in Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Glantz-Gashai, Yitav; Samson, Abraham O.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of active sites is an important tool in bioinformatics. Here we present an improved structure based technique to expose active sites that is based on large changes of solvent accessibility accompanying normal mode dynamics. The technique which detects EXPOsure of active SITes through normal modEs is named EXPOSITE. The technique is trained using a small 133 enzyme dataset and tested using a large 845 enzyme dataset, both with known active site residues. EXPOSITE is also tested in a benchmark protein ligand dataset (PLD) comprising 48 proteins with and without bound ligands. EXPOSITE is shown to successfully locate the active site in most instances, and is found to be more accurate than other structure-based techniques. Interestingly, in several instances, the active site does not correspond to the largest pocket. EXPOSITE is advantageous due to its high precision and paves the way for structure based prediction of active site in enzymes. PMID:28002427

  18. Proteome-wide analysis of nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations in active sites of human proteins.

    PubMed

    Dingerdissen, Hayley; Motwani, Mona; Karagiannis, Konstantinos; Simonyan, Vahan; Mazumder, Raja

    2013-03-01

    An enzyme's active site is essential to normal protein activity such that any disruptions at this site may lead to dysfunction and disease. Nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations (nsSNVs), which alter the amino acid sequence, are one type of disruption that can alter the active site. When this occurs, it is assumed that enzyme activity will vary because of the criticality of the site to normal protein function. We integrate nsSNV data and active site annotations from curated resources to identify all active-site-impacting nsSNVs in the human genome and search for all pathways observed to be associated with this data set to assess the likely consequences. We find that there are 934 unique nsSNVs that occur at the active sites of 559 proteins. Analysis of the nsSNV data shows an over-representation of arginine and an under-representation of cysteine, phenylalanine and tyrosine when comparing the list of nsSNV-impacted active site residues with the list of all possible proteomic active site residues, implying a potential bias for or against variation of these residues at the active site. Clustering analysis shows an abundance of hydrolases and transferases. Pathway and functional analysis shows several pathways over- or under-represented in the data set, with the most significantly affected pathways involved in carbohydrate metabolism. We provide a table of 32 variation-substrate/product pairs that can be used in targeted metabolomics experiments to assay the effects of specific variations. In addition, we report the significant prevalence of aspartic acid to histidine variation in eight proteins associated with nine diseases including glycogen storage diseases, lacrimo-auriculo-dento-digital syndrome, Parkinson's disease and several cancers.

  19. Covalent targeting of remote cysteine residues to develop CDK12 and 13 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tinghu; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Olson, Calla M; Dixon-Clarke, Sarah E; Abraham, Brian J; Greifenberg, Ann K; Ficarro, Scott B; Elkins, Jonathan M; Liang, Yanke; Hannett, Nancy M; Manz, Theresa; Hao, Mingfeng; Bartkowiak, Bartlomiej; Greenleaf, Arno L; Marto, Jarrod A; Geyer, Matthias; Bullock, Alex N; Young, Richard A; Gray, Nathanael S

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases 12 and 13 (CDK12 and 13) play critical roles in the regulation of gene transcription. However, the absence of CDK12 and 13 inhibitors has hindered the ability to investigate the consequences of their inhibition in healthy cells and cancer cells. Here we describe the rational design of a first-in-class CDK12 and 13 covalent inhibitor, THZ531. Co-crystallization with CDK12-cyclin K indicates that THZ531 irreversibly targets a cysteine located outside the kinase domain. THZ531 causes a loss of gene expression with concurrent loss of elongating and hyperphosphorylated RNA polymerase II. In particular, THZ531 substantially decreases the expression of DNA damage response genes and key super–enhancer–associated transcription factor genes. Coincident with transcriptional perturbation, THZ531 dramatically induced apoptotic cell death. Small molecules capable of specifically targeting CDK12 and 13 may thus help identify cancer subtypes that are particularly dependent on their kinase activities. PMID:27571479

  20. Characterization of high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits from Eremopyrum bonaepartis and identification of a novel variant with unusual high molecular weight and altered cysteine residues.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qian-Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Ma, Jian; Wei, Long; Zhao, Shan; Zhao, Quan-Zhi; Qi, Peng-Fei; Lu, Zhen-Xiang; Zheng, You-Liang; Wei, Yu-Ming

    2014-04-01

    We characterized two high-molecular-weight glutenin subunit (HMW-GS) variants from Eremopyrum bonaepartis, determined their complete open reading frames, and further expressed them in a bacterial system. The variants have many novel structural features compared with typical subunits encoded by Glu-1 loci: 1Fx3.7 and 1Fy1.5 exhibit hybrid properties of x- and y-type subunits. In addition, unusual molecular mass and altered number and distribution of cysteine residues were unique features of HMW-GSs encoded by Glu-F1 from E. bonaepartis. The mature 1Fx3.7 subunit has a full length of 1,223 amino acid residues, making it the largest subunit found thus far, while 1Fy1.5 is just 496 residues. In addition, the mutated PGQQ repeat motif was found in the repetitive region of 1Fx3.7. Although it has a similar molecular mass to that previously reported for 1Dx2.2, 1Dx2.2* and 1S(sh)x2.9 subunits, 1Fx3.7 appears to have had a different evolutionary history. The N-terminal and repetitive regions have a total of four additional cysteine residues, giving 1Fx3.7 a total of eight cysteines, while 1Fy1.5 has only six cysteines because the GHCPTSPQQ nonapeptide at the end of the repetitive region is deleted. With its extra cysteine residues and the longest repetitive region, features that are relevant to good wheat quality, the 1Fx3.7 subunit gene could be an excellent candidate for applications in wheat quality improvement.

  1. 4-Oxalocrotonate tautomerase, a 41-kDa homohexamer: backbone and side-chain resonance assignments, solution secondary structure, and location of active site residues by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Stivers, J. T.; Abeygunawardana, C.; Whitman, C. P.; Mildvan, A. S.

    1996-01-01

    4-Oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), a homohexamer consisting of 62 residues per subunit, catalyzes the isomerization of unsaturated alpha-keto acids using Pro-1 as a general base (Stivers et al., 1996a, 1996b). We report the backbone and side-chain 1H, 15N, and 13C NMR assignments and the solution secondary structure for 4-OT using 2D and 3D homonuclear and heteronuclear NMR methods. The subunit secondary structure consists of an alpha-helix (residues 13-30), two beta-strands (beta 1, residues 2-8; beta 2, residues 39-45), a beta-hairpin (residues 50-57), two loops (I, residues 9-12; II, 34-38), and two turns (I, residues 30-33; II, 47-50). The remaining residues form coils. The beta 1 strand is parallel to the beta 2 strand of the same subunit on the basis of cross stand NH(i)-NH(j) NOEs in a 2D 15N-edited 1H-NOESY spectrum of hexameric 4-OT containing two 15N-labeled subunits/hexamer. The beta 1 strand is also antiparallel to another beta 1 strand from an adjacent subunit forming a subunit interface. Because only three such pairwise interactions are possible, the hexamer is a trimer of dimers. The diffusion constant, determined by dynamic light scattering, and the rotational correlation time (14.5 ns) estimated from 15N T1/T2 measurements, are consistent with the hexameric molecular weight of 41 kDa. Residue Phe-50 is in the active site on the basis of transferred NOEs to the bound partial substrate 2-oxo-1,6-hexanedioate. Modification of the general base, Pro-1, with the active site-directed irreversible inhibitor, 3-bromopyruvate, significantly alters the amide 15N and NH chemical shifts of residues in the beta-hairpin and in loop II, providing evidence that these regions change conformation when the active site is occupied. PMID:8845763

  2. Amino-terminal cysteine residues differentially influence RGS4 protein plasma membrane targeting, intracellular trafficking, and function.

    PubMed

    Bastin, Guillaume; Singh, Kevin; Dissanayake, Kaveesh; Mighiu, Alexandra S; Nurmohamed, Aliya; Heximer, Scott P

    2012-08-17

    Regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins are potent inhibitors of heterotrimeric G-protein signaling. RGS4 attenuates G-protein activity in several tissues. Previous work demonstrated that cysteine palmitoylation on residues in the amino-terminal (Cys-2 and Cys-12) and core domains (Cys-95) of RGS4 is important for protein stability, plasma membrane targeting, and GTPase activating function. To date Cys-2 has been the priority target for RGS4 regulation by palmitoylation based on its putative role in stabilizing the RGS4 protein. Here, we investigate differences in the contribution of Cys-2 and Cys-12 to the intracellular localization and function of RGS4. Inhibition of RGS4 palmitoylation with 2-bromopalmitate dramatically reduced its localization to the plasma membrane. Similarly, mutation of the RGS4 amphipathic helix (L23D) prevented membrane localization and its G(q) inhibitory function. Together, these data suggest that both RGS4 palmitoylation and the amphipathic helix domain are required for optimal plasma membrane targeting and function of RGS4. Mutation of Cys-12 decreased RGS4 membrane targeting to a similar extent as 2-bromopalmitate, resulting in complete loss of its G(q) inhibitory function. Mutation of Cys-2 did not impair plasma membrane targeting but did partially impair its function as a G(q) inhibitor. Comparison of the endosomal distribution pattern of wild type and mutant RGS4 proteins with TGN38 indicated that palmitoylation of these two cysteines contributes differentially to the intracellular trafficking of RGS4. These data show for the first time that Cys-2 and Cys-12 play markedly different roles in the regulation of RGS4 membrane localization, intracellular trafficking, and G(q) inhibitory function via mechanisms that are unrelated to RGS4 protein stabilization.

  3. Two tyrosine residues outside the editing active site in Giardia lamblia leucyl-tRNA synthetase are essential for the post-transfer editing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Long; Wang, En-Duo

    2009-08-28

    Leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) is responsible for the Leu-tRNA(Leu) synthesis. The connective peptide 1 (CP1) domain inserted into the Rossmann nucleotide binding fold possesses editing active site to hydrolyze the mischarged tRNA(Leu) with noncognate amino acid, then to ensure high fidelity of protein synthesis. A few co-crystal structures of LeuRS with tRNA(Leu) in different conformations revealed that tRNA(Leu) 3' end shuttled between synthetic and editing active sites dynamically with direct and specific interaction with the CP1 domain. Here, we reported that Y515 and Y520 outside the editing active site of CP1 domain of Giardia lamblia LeuRS (GlLeuRS) are crucial for post-transfer editing by influencing the binding affinity with mischarged tRNA(Leu). Mutations on Y515 and Y520 also decreased tRNA(Leu) charging activity to various extents but had no effect on leucine activation. Our results gave some biochemical knowledge about interaction of tRNA(Leu) 3' end with the CP1 domain in archaeal/eukaryotic LeuRS.

  4. Structure of PEP carboxykinase from the succinate-producing Actinobacillus succinogenes: a new conserved active-site motif.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Yvonne A; Prasad, Lata; Laivenieks, Maris; Zeikus, J Gregory; Delbaere, Louis T J

    2005-07-01

    Actinobacillus succinogenes can produce, via fermentation, high concentrations of succinate, an important industrial commodity. A key enzyme in this pathway is phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK), which catalyzes the production of oxaloacetate from phosphoenolpyruvate and carbon dioxide, with the concomitant conversion of adenosine 5'-diphosphate to adenosine 5'-triphosphate. 1.85 and 1.70 A resolution structures of the native and a pyruvate/Mn(2+)/phosphate complex have been solved, respectively. The structure of the complex contains sulfhydryl reducing agents covalently bound to three cysteine residues via disulfide bonds. One of these cysteine residues (Cys285) is located in the active-site cleft and may be analogous to the putative reactive cysteine of PCK from Trypanosoma cruzi. Cys285 is also part of a previously unreported conserved motif comprising residues 280-287 and containing the pattern NXEXGXY(/F)A(/G); this new motif appears to have a structural role in stabilizing and positioning side chains that bind substrates and metal ions. The first few residues of this motif connect the two domains of the enzyme and a fulcrum point appears to be located near Asn280. In addition, an active-site Asp residue forms two coordinate bonds with the Mn(2+) ion present in the structure of the complex in a symmetrical bidentate manner, unlike in other PCK structures that contain a manganese ion.

  5. Influences of Proline and Cysteine Residues on Fragment Yield in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization In-Source Decay Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, Daiki; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Quinton, Loïc; De Pauw, Edwin

    2014-06-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay produces highly informative fragments for the sequencing of peptides/proteins. Among amino acids, cysteine and proline residues were found to specifically influence the fragment yield. As they are both frequently found in small peptide structures for which de novo sequencing is mandatory, the understanding of their specific behaviors would allow useful fragmentation rules to be established. In the case of cysteine, a c•/ w fragment pair originating from Xxx-Cys is formed by side-chain loss from the cysteine residue. The presence of a proline residue contributes to an increased yield of ISD fragments originating from N-Cα bond cleavage at Xxx1-Xxx2Pro, which is attributable to the cyclic structure of the proline residue. Our results suggest that the aminoketyl radical formed by MALDI-ISD generally induces the homolytic N-Cα bond cleavage located on the C-terminal side of the radical site. In contrast, N-Cα bond cleavage at Xxx-Pro produces no fragments and the N-Cα bond at the Xxx1-Xxx2Pro bond is alternatively cleaved via a heterolytic cleavage pathway.

  6. An exposed cysteine residue of human angiostatic mini tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Wakasugi, Keisuke

    2010-04-13

    Human tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) catalyzes the aminoacylation of tRNA(Trp). Human TrpRS exists in two forms: a major form that is the full-length protein and a truncated form (mini TrpRS) in which most of the N-terminal extension is absent. Human mini, but not full-length, TrpRS has angiostatic activity. Because the full-length protein, which lacks angiostatic activity, has all of the amino acid determinants of the mini form, which has activity, I searched for conformational differences between the two proteins. Using a disulfide cross-linking assay, I showed that the molecular environment around Cys62 is significantly different between the two proteins. This difference can be explained by inspection of the three-dimensional structure of the full-length protein. These results give a clear demonstration of a significant difference, around a specific residue (Cys62), between a potent angiostatic and nonangiostatic version of human TrpRS.

  7. Investigation by site-directed mutagenesis of the role of cytochrome P450 2B4 non-active site residues in protein-ligand interactions based on crystal structures of the ligand-bound enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Wilderman, P. Ross; Gay, Sean C.; Jang, Hyun-Hee; Zhang, Qinghai; Stout, C. David; Halpert, James R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Residues located outside of the active site of cytochromes P450 2B have exhibited importance in ligand binding, structural stability, and drug metabolism. However, contributions of non-active site residues to the plasticity of these enzymes are not known. Thus, a systematic investigation was undertaken of unique residue-residue interactions found in crystal structures of P450 2B4 in complex with 4-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazole (4-CPI), a closed conformation, or in complex with bifonazole, an expanded conformation. Nineteen mutants distributed over eleven sites were constructed, expressed in E. coli, and purified. Most mutants showed significantly decreased expression, especially in the case of interactions found in the 4-CPI structure. Six mutants (H172A, H172F, H172Q, L437A, E474D, and E474Q) were chosen for detailed functional analysis. Among these, the Ks of H172F for bifonazole was ~20-times higher than wild type 2B4, and the Ks of L437A for 4-CPI was ~50-times higher than wild type, leading to significantly altered inhibitor selectivity. Enzyme function was tested with the substrates 7-ethoxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin (7-EFC), 7-methoxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin (7-MFC), and 7-benzyloxyresorufin (7-BR). H172F was inactive with all three substrates, and L437A did not turn over 7-BR. Furthermore, H172A, H172Q, E474D and E474Q showed large changes in kcat/KM for each of the three substrates, in some cases up to 50-fold. Concurrent molecular dynamics simulations yield distances between some of the residues in these putative interaction pairs that are not consistent with contact. The results indicate that small changes in the protein scaffold lead to large differences in solution behavior and enzyme function. PMID:22051155

  8. Glycosyltransfer in mutants of putative catalytic residue Glu303 of the human ABO(H) A and B blood group glycosyltransferases GTA and GTB proceeds through a labile active site.

    PubMed

    Blackler, Ryan J; Gagnon, Susannah M L; Polakowski, Robert; Rose, Natisha L; Zheng, Ruixiang B; Letts, James A; Johal, Asha R; Schuman, Brock; Borisova, Svetlana N; Palcic, Monica M; Evans, Stephen V

    2016-11-22

    The homologous glycosyltransferases α-1,3-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (GTA) and α-1,3-galactosyltransferase (GTB) carry out the final synthetic step of the closely related human ABO(H) blood group A and B antigens. The catalytic mechanism of these model retaining enzymes remains under debate, where Glu303 has been suggested to act as a putative nucleophile in a double displacement mechanism, a local dipole stabilizing the intermediate in an orthogonal associative mechanism or a general base to stabilize the reactive oxocarbenium ion-like intermediate in an S N i-like mechanism. Kinetic analysis of GTA and GTB point mutants E303C, E303D, E303Q and E303A shows that despite the enzymes having nearly identical sequences, the corresponding mutants of GTA/GTB have up to a 13-fold difference in their residual activities relative to wild type. High-resolution single crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal, surprisingly, that the mutated Cys, Asp and Gln functional groups are no more than 0.8 Å further from the anomeric carbon of donor substrate compared to wild type. However, complicating the analysis is the observation that Glu303 itself plays a critical role in maintaining the stability of a strained "double-turn" in the active site through several hydrogen bonds, and any mutation other than E303Q leads to significantly higher thermal motion or even disorder in the substrate recognition pockets. Thus, there is a remarkable juxtaposition of the mutants E303C and E303D, which retain significant activity despite disrupted active site architecture, with GTB/E303Q, which maintains active site architecture but exhibits zero activity. These findings indicate that nucleophilicity at position 303 is more catalytically valuable than active site stability and highlight the mechanistic elasticity of these enzymes.

  9. The number of cysteine residues per mole in apolipoprotein E affects systematically synchronous neural interactions in women's healthy brains.

    PubMed

    Leuthold, Arthur C; Mahan, Margaret Y; Stanwyck, John J; Georgopoulos, Angeliki; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P

    2013-05-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is involved in lipid metabolism in the brain, but its effects on brain function are not understood. Three apoE isoforms (E4, E3, and E2) are the result of cysteine-arginine interchanges at two sites: there are zero interchanges in E4, one interchange in E3, and two interchanges in E2. The resulting six apoE genotypes (E4/4, E4/3, E4/2, E3/3, E3/2, E2/2) yield five groups with respect to the number of cysteine residues per mole (CysR/mole), as follows. ApoE4/4 has zero cysteine residues per mole (0-CysR/mole), E4/3 has one (1-CysR/mole), E4/2 and E3/3 each has two (2-CysR/mole), E3/2 has three (3-CysR/mole), and E2/2 has four (4-CysR/mole). The use of the number of CysR/mole to characterize the apoE molecule converts the categorical apoE genotype scale, consisting of 6 distinct genotypes above, to a 5-point continuous scale (0-4 CysR/mole). This allows the use of statistical analyses suitable for continuous variables (e.g. regression) to quantify the relations between various variables and apoE. Using such analyses, here, we show for the first time that apoE affects in a graded and orderly manner neural communication, as assessed by analyzing the relation between the number of CysR/mole and synchronous neural interactions (SNI) measured by magnetoencephalography (MEG) in 130 cognitively healthy women. At the one end of the CysR/mole range, the 4-CysR/mole (E2/2) SNI distribution had the highest mean, lowest variance, lowest range, and lowest coefficient of variation, whereas at the other end, 0-CysR/mole (E4/4) SNI distribution had the lowest mean, highest variance, highest range, and highest coefficient of variation. The special status of the 4-CysR/mole distribution was reinforced by the results of a hierarchical tree analysis where the 4-CysR/mole (E2/2) SNI distribution occupied a separate branch by itself and the remaining CysR/mole SNI distributions were placed at increasing distances from the 4-CysR/mole distribution, according to

  10. Palmitoylation of the Cysteine Residue in the DHHC Motif of a Palmitoyl Transferase Mediates Ca2+ Homeostasis in Aspergillus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanwei; Zheng, Qingqing; Sun, Congcong; Song, Jinxing; Gao, Lina; Zhang, Shizhu; Muñoz, Alberto; Read, Nick D.; Lu, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Finely tuned changes in cytosolic free calcium ([Ca2+]c) mediate numerous intracellular functions resulting in the activation or inactivation of a series of target proteins. Palmitoylation is a reversible post-translational modification involved in membrane protein trafficking between membranes and in their functional modulation. However, studies on the relationship between palmitoylation and calcium signaling have been limited. Here, we demonstrate that the yeast palmitoyl transferase ScAkr1p homolog, AkrA in Aspergillus nidulans, regulates [Ca2+]c homeostasis. Deletion of akrA showed marked defects in hyphal growth and conidiation under low calcium conditions which were similar to the effects of deleting components of the high-affinity calcium uptake system (HACS). The [Ca2+]c dynamics in living cells expressing the calcium reporter aequorin in different akrA mutant backgrounds were defective in their [Ca2+]c responses to high extracellular Ca2+ stress or drugs that cause ER or plasma membrane stress. All of these effects on the [Ca2+]c responses mediated by AkrA were closely associated with the cysteine residue of the AkrA DHHC motif, which is required for palmitoylation by AkrA. Using the acyl-biotin exchange chemistry assay combined with proteomic mass spectrometry, we identified protein substrates palmitoylated by AkrA including two new putative P-type ATPases (Pmc1 and Spf1 homologs), a putative proton V-type proton ATPase (Vma5 homolog) and three putative proteins in A. nidulans, the transcripts of which have previously been shown to be induced by extracellular calcium stress in a CrzA-dependent manner. Thus, our findings provide strong evidence that the AkrA protein regulates [Ca2+]c homeostasis by palmitoylating these protein candidates and give new insights the role of palmitoylation in the regulation of calcium-mediated responses to extracellular, ER or plasma membrane stress. PMID:27058039

  11. Cysteine residue 911 in C-terminal tail of human BK(Ca)α channel subunit is crucial for its activation by carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Telezhkin, Vsevolod; Brazier, Stephen P; Mears, Ruth; Müller, Carsten T; Riccardi, Daniela; Kemp, Paul J

    2011-06-01

    The large conductance, voltage- and calcium-activated potassium channel, BK(Ca), is a known target for the gasotransmitter, carbon monoxide (CO). Activation of BK(Ca) by CO modulates cellular excitability and contributes to the physiology of a diverse array of processes, including vascular tone and oxygen-sensing. Currently, there is no consensus regarding the molecular mechanisms underpinning reception of CO by the BK(Ca). Here, employing voltage-clamped, inside-out patches from HEK293 cells expressing single, double and triple cysteine mutations in the BK(Ca) α-subunit, we test the hypothesis that CO regulation is conferred upon the channel by interactions with cysteine residues within the RCK2 domain. In physiological [Ca(2+)](i), all mutants carrying a cysteine substitution at position 911 (C911G) demonstrated significantly reduced CO sensitivity; the C911G mutant did not express altered Ca(2+)-sensitivity. In contrast, histidine residues in RCK1 domain, previously shown to ablate CO activation in low [Ca(2+)](i), actually increased CO sensitivity when [Ca(2+)](i) was in the physiological range. Importantly, cyanide, employed here as a substituent for CO at potential metal centres, occluded activation by CO; this effect was freely reversible. Taken together, these data suggest that a specific cysteine residue in the C-terminal domain, which is close to the Ca(2+) bowl but which is not involved in Ca(2+) activation, confers significant CO sensitivity to BK(Ca) channels. The rapid reversibility of CO and cyanide binding, coupled to information garnered from other CO-binding proteins, suggests that C911 may be involved in formation of a transition metal cluster which can bind and, thereafter, activate BK(Ca).

  12. Conserved Cysteine Residue in the DNA-Binding Domain of the Bovine Papillomavirus Type 1 E2 Protein Confers Redox Regulation of the DNA- Binding Activity in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Alison A.; Klausner, Richard D.; Howley, Peter M.

    1992-08-01

    The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 open reading frame encodes three proteins involved in viral DNA replication and transcriptional regulation. These polypeptides share a carboxyl-terminal domain with a specific DNA-binding activity; through this domain the E2 polypeptides form dimers. In this study, we demonstrate the inhibition of E2 DNA binding in vitro by reagents that oxidize or otherwise chemically modify the free sulfydryl groups of reactive cysteine residues. However, these reagents had no effect on DNA-binding activity when the E2 polypeptide was first bound to DNA, suggesting that the free sulfydryl group(s) may be protected by DNA binding. Sensitivity to sulfydryl modification was mapped to a cysteine residue at position 340 in the E2 DNA-binding domain, an amino acid that is highly conserved among the E2 proteins of different papillomaviruses. Replacement of this residue with other amino acids abrogated the sensitivity to oxidation-reduction changes but did not affect the DNA-binding property of the E2 protein. These results suggest that papillomavirus DNA replication and transcriptional regulation could be modulated through the E2 proteins by changes in the intracellular redox environment. Furthermore, a motif consisting of a reactive cysteine residue carboxyl-terminal to a lysine residue in a basic region of the DNA-binding domain is a feature common to a number of transcriptional regulatory proteins that, like E2, are subject to redox regulation. Thus, posttranslational regulation of the activity of these proteins by the intracellular redox environment may be a general phenomenon.

  13. A mutational analysis of the active site of human type II inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Futer, Olga; Sintchak, Michael D; Caron, Paul R; Nimmesgern, Elmar; DeCenzo, Maureen T; Livingston, David J; Raybuck, Scott A

    2002-01-31

    The oxidation of IMP to XMP is the rate-limiting step in the de novo synthesis of guanine ribonucleotides. This NAD-dependent reaction is catalyzed by the enzyme inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). Based upon the recent structural determination of IMPDH complexed to oxidized IMP (XMP*) and the potent uncompetitive inhibitor mycophenolic acid (MPA), we have selected active site residues and prepared mutants of human type II IMPDH. The catalytic parameters of these mutants were determined. Mutations G326A, D364A, and the active site nucleophile C331A all abolish enzyme activity to less than 0.1% of wild type. These residues line the IMP binding pocket and are necessary for correct positioning of the substrate, Asp364 serving to anchor the ribose ring of the nucleotide. In the MPA/NAD binding site, significant loss of activity was seen by mutation of any residue of the triad Arg322, Asn303, Asp274 which form a hydrogen bonding network lining one side of this pocket. From a model of NAD bound to the active site consistent with the mutational data, we propose that these resides are important in binding the ribose ring of the nicotinamide substrate. Additionally, mutations in the pair Thr333, Gln441, which lies close to the xanthine ring, cause a significant drop in the catalytic activity of IMPDH. It is proposed that these residues serve to deliver the catalytic water molecule required for hydrolysis of the cysteine-bound XMP* intermediate formed after oxidation by NAD.

  14. Loss of a histidine residue at the active site of S-locus ribonuclease is associated with self-compatibility in Lycopersicon peruvianum.

    PubMed Central

    Royo, J; Kunz, C; Kowyama, Y; Anderson, M; Clarke, A E; Newbigin, E

    1994-01-01

    Gametophytic self-incompatibility in the Solanaceae is controlled by a single, multiallelic locus, the S locus. We have recently described an allele of the S locus of Lycopersicon peruvianum that caused this normally self-incompatible plant to become self-compatible. We have now characterized two glycoproteins present in the styles of self-compatible and self-incompatible accessions of L. peruvianum: one is a ribonuclease that cosegregates with a functional self-incompatibility allele (S6 allele); the other cosegregates with the self-compatible allele (Sc allele) but has no ribonuclease activity. The derived amino acid sequences of the cDNAs encoding the S6 and Sc glycoproteins resemble sequences of other ribonucleases encoded by the S locus. The derived sequence for the Sc glycoprotein differs from the others by lacking one of the histidine residues found in all other S-locus ribonucleases. These findings demonstrate the essential role of ribonuclease activity in self-incompatibility and lend further weight to evidence that this histidine residue is involved in the catalytic site of the enzyme. Images PMID:8022814

  15. Substitution of cysteine for glycine at residue 415 of one allele of the alpha 1(I) chain of type I procollagen in type III/IV osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, A C; Oliver, J; Renouf, D V; Keston, M; Pope, F M

    1991-01-01

    We have examined the type I collagen in a patient with type III/IV osteogenesis imperfecta. Two forms of alpha 1(I) chain were produced, one normal and the other containing a cysteine residue within the triple helical domain of the molecule. Cysteine is not normally present in this domain of type I collagen. Peptide mapping experiments localised the mutation to peptide alpha 1(I)CB3 which spans residues 403 to 551 of the triple helix. Subsequent PCR amplification of cDNA covering this region followed by sequencing showed a G to T single base change in the GGC codon for glycine 415 generating TGC, the codon for cysteine. The effect of the mutation on the protein is to delay secretion from the cell, reduce the thermal stability of the molecule by 2 degrees C, and cause excessive post-translational modification of all chains in molecules containing one or more mutant alpha 1(I) chains. The clinical phenotype observed in this patient and the position of the mutation conform to the recent prediction of Starman et al that Gly----Cys mutations in the alpha 1(I) chain have a gradient of severity decreasing from the C-terminus to the N-terminus. Images PMID:1770532

  16. Subtype-selective regulation of IP(3) receptors by thimerosal via cysteine residues within the IP(3)-binding core and suppressor domain.

    PubMed

    Khan, Samir A; Rossi, Ana M; Riley, Andrew M; Potter, Barry V L; Taylor, Colin W

    2013-04-15

    IP(3)R (IP(3) [inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate] receptors) and ryanodine receptors are the most widely expressed intracellular Ca(2+) channels and both are regulated by thiol reagents. In DT40 cells stably expressing single subtypes of mammalian IP(3)R, low concentrations of thimerosal (also known as thiomersal), which oxidizes thiols to form a thiomercurylethyl complex, increased the sensitivity of IP(3)-evoked Ca(2+) release via IP(3)R1 and IP(3)R2, but inhibited IP(3)R3. Activation of IP(3)R is initiated by IP(3) binding to the IBC (IP(3)-binding core; residues 224-604) and proceeds via re-arrangement of an interface between the IBC and SD (suppressor domain; residues 1-223). Thimerosal (100 μM) stimulated IP(3) binding to the isolated NT (N-terminal; residues 1-604) of IP(3)R1 and IP(3)R2, but not to that of IP(3)R3. Binding of a competitive antagonist (heparin) or partial agonist (dimeric-IP(3)) to NT1 was unaffected by thiomersal, suggesting that the effect of thimerosal is specifically related to IP(3)R activation. IP(3) binding to NT1 in which all cysteine residues were replaced by alanine was insensitive to thimerosal, so too were NT1 in which cysteine residues were replaced in either the SD or IBC. This demonstrates that thimerosal interacts directly with cysteine in both the SD and IBC. Chimaeric proteins in which the SD of the IP(3)R was replaced by the structurally related A domain of a ryanodine receptor were functional, but thimerosal inhibited both IP(3) binding to the chimaeric NT and IP(3)-evoked Ca(2+) release from the chimaeric IP(3)R. This is the first systematic analysis of the effects of a thiol reagent on each IP(3)R subtype. We conclude that thimerosal selectively sensitizes IP(3)R1 and IP(3)R2 to IP(3) by modifying cysteine residues within both the SD and IBC and thereby stabilizing an active conformation of the receptor.

  17. A highly conserved interaction involving the middle residue of the SXN active-site motif is crucial for function of class B penicillin-binding proteins: mutational and computational analysis of PBP 2 from N. gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Tomberg, Joshua; Temple, Brenda; Fedarovich, Alena; Davies, Christopher; Nicholas, Robert A

    2012-04-03

    Insertion of an aspartate residue at position 345a in penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP 2), which lowers the rate of penicillin acylation by ~6-fold, is commonly observed in penicillin-resistant strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Here, we show that insertions of other amino acids also lower the penicillin acylation rate of PBP 2, but none supported growth of N. gonorrhoeae, indicating loss of essential transpeptidase activity. The Asp345a mutation likely acts by altering the interaction between its adjacent residue, Asp346, in the β2a-β2d hairpin loop and Ser363, the middle residue of the SXN active site motif. Because the adjacent aspartate creates ambiguity in the position of the insertion, we also examined if insertions at position 346a could confer decreased susceptibility to penicillin. However, only aspartate insertions were identified, indicating that only an Asp-Asp couple can confer resistance and retain transpeptidase function. The importance of the Asp346-Ser363 interaction was assessed by mutation of each residue to Ala. Although both mutants lowered the acylation rate of penicillin G by 5-fold, neither could support growth of N. gonorrhoeae, again indicating loss of transpeptidase function. Interaction between a residue in the equivalent of the β2a-β2d hairpin loop and the middle residue of the SXN motif is observed in crystal structures of other Class B PBPs, and its importance is also supported by multisequence alignments. Overall, these results suggest that this conserved interaction can be manipulated (e.g., by insertion) to lower the acylation rate by β-lactam antibiotics and increase resistance, but only if essential transpeptidase activity is preserved.

  18. Substrate-assisted cysteine deprotonation in the mechanism of dimethylargininase (DDAH) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Stone, Everett M; Costello, Alison L; Tierney, David L; Fast, Walter

    2006-05-02

    The enzyme dimethylargininase (also known as dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase or DDAH; EC 3.5.3.18) catalyzes the hydrolysis of endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, N(omega)-methyl-l-arginine and N(omega),N(omega)-dimethyl-l-arginine. Understanding the mechanism and regulation of DDAH activity is important for developing ways to control nitric oxide production during angiogenesis and in many cases of vascular endothelial pathobiology. Several possible physiological regulation mechanisms of DDAH depend upon the presence of an active-site cysteine residue, Cys249 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) DDAH, which is proposed to serve as a nucleophile in the catalytic mechanism. Through the use of pH-dependent ultraviolet and visible (UV-vis) difference spectroscopy and inactivation kinetics, the pK(a) of the active-site Cys249 in the resting enzyme was found to be unperturbed from pK(a) values of typical noncatalytic cysteine residues. In contrast, the pH dependence of k(cat) values indicates a much lower apparent pK(a) value. UV-vis difference spectroscopy between wild-type and C249S DDAH shows absorbance changes consistent with Cys249 deprotonation to the anionic thiolate upon binding positively charged ligands. The proton from Cys249 is lost either to the solvent or to an unidentified general base. A mutation of the active-site histidine residue, H162G, does not eliminate cysteine nucleophilicity, further arguing against a pre-formed ion pair with Cys249. Finally, UV-vis and X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that inhibitory metal ions can bind at these two active-site residues, Cys249 and His162, and also stabilize the anionic form of Cys249. These results support a proposed substrate-assisted mechanism for Pa DDAH in which ligand binding modulates the reactivity of the active-site cysteine.

  19. Direct NMR resonance assignments of the active site histidine residue in Escherichia coli thioesterase I/protease I/lysophospholipase L1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Jin; Tyukhtenko, Sergiy I; Huang, Tai-Huang

    2006-11-01

    Owing to the hydrogen-bond interaction and rapid exchange rate with the bulk water, the transverse relaxation time for the N(delta1)-H proton of the catalytic histidine in Escherichia coli thioesterase I/protease I/lysophospholipase L1 (TEP-I) is rather short. Because of its catalytic importance, it is desirable to detect and assign this proton resonance. In this paper, we report the first direct NMR correlation between the short-lived N(delta1)-H proton and its covalently attached N(delta1)-nitrogen of the catalytic His157 residue in E. coli thioesterase/protease I. We have used gradient-enhanced jump-return spin-echo HMQC (GE-JR SE HMQC) to obtain a direct correlation between the short-lived N(delta1)-H proton and its covalently attached N(delta1)-nitrogen. The sensitivity of detection for the short-lived N(delta1)-H proton was enhanced substantially by improved water suppression, in particular, the suppression of radiation damping via pulsed field gradients.

  20. Purification and properties of thiol beta-lactamase. A mutant of pBR322 beta-lactamase in which the active site serine has been replaced with cysteine.

    PubMed

    Sigal, I S; DeGrado, W F; Thomas, B J; Petteway, S R

    1984-04-25

    The specifically mutated enzyme thiol beta-lactamase has been expressed in Escherichia coli by means of the trp promoter and purified to homogeneity. The gene for this enzyme results from a single base change N410 A----T in the gene of pBR322 RTEM beta-lactamase (EC 3.5.2.6, penicillinase, penicillin amido-beta-lactamhydrolase) which alters the codon for the active site Ser 70 to that for Cys. Precursor thiol beta-lactamase is processed to give the same NH2-terminal sequence as that for wild type enzyme. In contrast to the wild type enzyme, thiol beta-lactamase contains one free titratable thiol group/molecule. Thiol beta-lactamase catalyzes the hydrolysis of beta-lactams with a substrate specificity that is distinct from that of wild type enzyme. For benzyl-penicillin and ampicillin, the Km values are similar to wild type values although the kcat values are 1-2% that of wild type enzyme. For the cephalosporin nitrocefin, the Km is greater than 10-fold that of the wild type and the kcat is at least as large as the kcat for the wild type enzyme. Thiol beta-lactamase is different from wild type beta-lactamase in that it is not competitively inhibited by boric acid although a small degree of noncompetitive inhibition does occur. Whereas the circular dichroism spectra of both enzymes are nearly identical, thiol beta-lactamase at 40 degrees C is 3-fold more resistant to trypsin than is the wild type enzyme.

  1. Extended amino acid sequences around the active-site lysine residue of class-I fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases from rabbit muscle, sturgeon muscle, trout muscle and ox liver.

    PubMed Central

    Benfield, P A; Forcina, B G; Gibbons, I; Perham, R N

    1979-01-01

    1. Amino acid sequences covering the region between residues 173 and 248 [adopting the numbering system proposed by Lai, Nakai & Chang (1974) Science 183, 1204-1206] were derived for trout (Salmo trutta) muscle aldolase and for ox liver aldolase. A comparable sequence was derived for residues 180-248 of sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) muscle aldolase. The close homology with the rabbit muscle enzyme was used to align the peptides of the other aldolases from which the sequences were derived. The results also allowed a partial sequence for the N-terminal 39 residues for the ox liver enzyme to be deduced. 2. In the light of the strong homology evinced for these enzymes, a re-investigation of the amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle aldolase between residues 181 and 185 was undertaken. This indicated the presence of a hitherto unsuspected -Ile-Val-sequence between residues 181 and 182 and the need to invert the sequence -Glu-Val- to -Val-Glx- at positions 184 and 185. 3. Comparison of the available amino acid sequences of these enzymes suggested an early evolutionary divergence of the genes for muscle and liver aldolases. It was also consistent with other evidence that the central region of the primary structure of these enzymes (which includes the active-site lysine-227) forms part of a conserved folding domain in the protein subunit. 4. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequences proposed has been deposited as Suy Lending Division, Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1978) 169, 5. PMID:534504

  2. Characterization of the DNA-binding domain and identification of the active site residue in the 'Gyr A' half of Leishmania donovani topoisomerase II.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Tanushri; Mukherjee, Mandira; Das, Rakhee; Das, Aditi; Majumder, Hemanta K

    2005-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase II is a multidomain homodimeric enzyme that changes DNA topology by coupling ATP hydrolysis to the transport of one DNA helix through a transient double-stranded break in another. To investigate the biochemical properties of the individual domains of Leishmania donovani topoisomerase II, four truncation mutants were generated. Deletion of 178 aminoacids from the C-terminus (core and LdDeltaC1058) had no apparent effect on the DNA-binding or cleavage activities of the enzymes. However, when 429 aminoacids from the N-terminus and 451 aminoacids from the C-terminus were removed (LdDeltaNDeltaC), the enzyme was no longer active. Moreover, the removal of 429 aminoacids from the N-terminus (LdDeltaNDeltaC, core and LdDeltaN429) render the mutant proteins incapable of performing ATP hydrolysis. The mutant proteins show cleavage activities at wide range of KCl concentrations (25-350 mM). In addition, the mutant proteins, excepting LdDeltaNDeltaC, can also act on kDNA and linearize the minicircles. Surprisingly, the mutant proteins fail to show the formation of the enhanced cleavable complex in the presence of etoposide. Our findings suggest that the conformation required for interaction with the drug is absent in the mutant proteins. Here, we have also identified Tyr(775) through direct sequencing of the DNA linked peptide as the catalytic residue implicated in DNA-breakage and rejoining. Taken together, our results demonstrate that topoisomerase II are functionally and mechanistically conserved enzymes and the variations in activity seem to reflect functional optimization for its physiological role during parasite genome replication.

  3. Characterization of the DNA-binding domain and identification of the active site residue in the ‘Gyr A’ half of Leishmania donovani topoisomerase II

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Tanushri; Mukherjee, Mandira; Das, Rakhee; Das, Aditi; Majumder, Hemanta K.

    2005-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase II is a multidomain homodimeric enzyme that changes DNA topology by coupling ATP hydrolysis to the transport of one DNA helix through a transient double-stranded break in another. To investigate the biochemical properties of the individual domains of Leishmania donovani topoisomerase II, four truncation mutants were generated. Deletion of 178 aminoacids from the C-terminus (core and LdΔC1058) had no apparent effect on the DNA-binding or cleavage activities of the enzymes. However, when 429 aminoacids from the N-terminus and 451 aminoacids from the C-terminus were removed (LdΔNΔC), the enzyme was no longer active. Moreover, the removal of 429 aminoacids from the N-terminus (LdΔNΔC, core and LdΔN429) render the mutant proteins incapable of performing ATP hydrolysis. The mutant proteins show cleavage activities at wide range of KCl concentrations (25–350 mM). In addition, the mutant proteins, excepting LdΔNΔC, can also act on kDNA and linearize the minicircles. Surprisingly, the mutant proteins fail to show the formation of the enhanced cleavable complex in the presence of etoposide. Our findings suggest that the conformation required for interaction with the drug is absent in the mutant proteins. Here, we have also identified Tyr775 through direct sequencing of the DNA linked peptide as the catalytic residue implicated in DNA-breakage and rejoining. Taken together, our results demonstrate that topoisomerase II are functionally and mechanistically conserved enzymes and the variations in activity seem to reflect functional optimization for its physiological role during parasite genome replication. PMID:15860773

  4. SARS-coronavirus spike S2 domain flanked by cysteine residues C822 and C833 is important for activation of membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Madu, Ikenna G.; Belouzard, Sandrine; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2009-10-25

    The S2 domain of the coronavirus spike (S) protein is known to be responsible for mediating membrane fusion. In addition to a well-recognized cleavage site at the S1-S2 boundary, a second proteolytic cleavage site has been identified in the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) S2 domain (R797). C-terminal to this S2 cleavage site is a conserved region flanked by cysteine residues C822 and C833. Here, we investigated the importance of this well conserved region for SARS-CoV S-mediated fusion activation. We show that the residues between C822-C833 are well conserved across all coronaviruses. Mutagenic analysis of SARS-CoV S, combined with cell-cell fusion and pseudotyped virion infectivity assays, showed a critical role for the core-conserved residues C822, D830, L831, and C833. Based on available predictive models, we propose that the conserved domain flanked by cysteines 822 and 833 forms a loop structure that interacts with components of the SARS-CoV S trimer to control the activation of membrane fusion.

  5. Isotope-coded, iodoacetamide-based reagent to determine individual cysteine pKa values by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Kimberly J.; Day, Amanda E.; Zeng, Bubing B.; King, S. Bruce; Poole, Leslie B.

    2008-01-01

    Cysteine reactivity in enzymes is imparted to a large extent by the stabilization of the deprotonated form of the reduced cysteine (i.e. the thiolate) within the active site. While this is likely to be an important chemical attribute of many thiol-based enzymes including cysteine-dependent peroxidases (peroxiredoxins) and proteases, only relatively few pKa values have been determined experimentally. Presented here is a new technique for determining the pKa value of cysteine residues through quantitative mass spectrometry following chemical modification with an iodoacetamide-based reagent over a range of pH buffers. This isotope-coded reagent, N-phenyl iodoacetamide (iodoacetanilide), is readily prepared in deuterated (d5) and protiated (d0) versions and is more reactive toward free cysteine than is iodoacetamide. Using this approach, the pKa values for the two cysteine residues in Escherichia coli thioredoxin were determined to be 6.5 and > 10, in good agreement with previous reports using chemical modification approaches. This technique allows the pKa of specific cysteine residues to be determined in a clear, fast, and simple manner and, because cysteine residues on separate tryptic peptides are measured separately, is not complicated by the presence of multiple cysteines within the protein of interest. PMID:18162165

  6. Exploring the role of putative active site amino acids and pro-region motif of recombinant falcipain-2: a principal hemoglobinase of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Dasaradhi, P V N; Chauhan, Virander S; Malhotra, Pawan

    2004-04-23

    Falcipain-2 is one of the principal hemoglobinases of Plasmodium falciparum, a human malaria parasite. It has a typical papain family cysteine protease structural organization, a large pro-domain, a mature domain with conserved active site amino acids. Pro-domain of falcipain-2 also contains two important conserved motifs, "GNFD" and "ERFNIN." The "GNFD" motif has been shown to be responsible for correct folding and stability in case of many papain family proteases. In the present study, we carried out site-directed mutagenesis to assess the roles of active site residues and pro-domain residues for the activity of falcipain-2. Our results showed that substitutions of putative active site residues; Q36, C42, H174, and N204 resulted in complete loss of falcipain-2 activity, while W206 and D155 mutants retained partial/complete activity in comparison to the wild type falcipain-2. Homology modeling data also corroborate the results of mutagenesis; Q36, C42, H174, N204, and W206 residues form the active site loop of the enzyme and D155 lie outside the active pocket. Substitutions in the pro-region did not affect the activity of falcipain-2. This implies that falcipain-2 shares active site residues with other members of papain family, however pro-region of falcipain-2 does not play any role in the activity of enzyme.

  7. Role of Cysteine Residues in the Carboxyl-Terminus of the Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor in Intracellular Traffic and Postendocytic Processing

    PubMed Central

    Melo-Nava, Brenda; Casas-González, Patricia; Pérez-Solís, Marco A.; Castillo-Badillo, Jean; Maravillas-Montero, José L.; Jardón-Valadez, Eduardo; Zariñán, Teresa; Aguilar-Rojas, Arturo; Gallay, Nathalie; Reiter, Eric; Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications occurring during the biosynthesis of G protein-coupled receptors include glycosylation and palmitoylation at conserved cysteine residues located in the carboxyl-terminus of the receptor. In a number of these receptors, these modifications play an important role in receptor function and particularly, in intracellular trafficking. In the present study, the three cysteine residues present in the carboxyl-terminus of the human FSHR were replaced with glycine by site-directed mutagenesis. Wild-type and mutant (Cys627/629/655Gly) FSHRs were then transiently expressed in HEK-293 cells and analyzed for cell-surface plasma membrane expression, agonist-stimulated signaling and internalization, and postendocytic processing in the absence and presence of lysosome and/or proteasome inhibitors. Compared with the wild-type FSHR, the triple mutant FSHR exhibited ~70% reduction in plasma membrane expression as well as a profound attenuation in agonist-stimulated cAMP production and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Incubation of HEK-293 cells expressing the wild-type FSHR with 2-bromopalmitate (palmitoylation inhibitor) for 6 h, decreased plasma membrane expression of the receptor by ~30%. The internalization kinetics and β-arrestin 1 and 2 recruitment were similar between the wild-type and triple mutant FSHR as disclosed by assays performed in non-equilibrium binding conditions and by confocal microscopy. Cells expressing the mutant FSHR recycled the internalized FSHR back to the plasma membrane less efficiently than those expressing the wild-type FSHR, an effect that was counteracted by proteasome but not by lysosome inhibition. These results indicate that replacement of the cysteine residues present in the carboxyl-terminus of the FSHR, impairs receptor trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane and its recycling from endosomes back to the cell surface following agonist-induced internalization. Since in the FSHR these

  8. Ubiquitin vinyl methyl ester binding orients the misaligned active site of the ubiquitin hydrolase UCHL1 into productive conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreaux, David A.; Maiti, Tushar K.; Davies, Christopher W.; Das, Chittaranjan

    2010-07-06

    Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) is a Parkinson disease-associated, putative cysteine protease found abundantly and selectively expressed in neurons. The crystal structure of apo UCHL1 showed that the active-site residues are not aligned in a canonical form, with the nucleophilic cysteine being 7.7 {angstrom} from the general base histidine, an arrangement consistent with an inactive form of the enzyme. Here we report the crystal structures of the wild type and two Parkinson disease-associated variants of the enzyme, S18Y and I93M, bound to a ubiquitin-based suicide substrate, ubiquitin vinyl methyl ester. These structures reveal that ubiquitin vinyl methyl ester binds primarily at two sites on the enzyme, with its carboxy terminus at the active site and with its amino-terminal {beta}-hairpin at the distal site - a surface-exposed hydrophobic crevice 17 {angstrom} away from the active site. Binding at the distal site initiates a cascade of side-chain movements in the enzyme that starts at a highly conserved, surface-exposed phenylalanine and is relayed to the active site resulting in the reorientation and proximal placement of the general base within 4 {angstrom} of the catalytic cysteine, an arrangement found in productive cysteine proteases. Mutation of the distal-site, surface-exposed phenylalanine to alanine reduces ubiquitin binding and severely impairs the catalytic activity of the enzyme. These results suggest that the activity of UCHL1 may be regulated by its own substrate.

  9. Methylene Blue Inhibits Caspases by Oxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine.

    PubMed

    Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Sharma, Gyanesh; Kaushal, Vikas; Foveau, Bénédicte; LeBlanc, Andrea C

    2015-09-24

    Methylene blue, currently in phase 3 clinical trials against Alzheimer Disease, disaggregates the Tau protein of neurofibrillary tangles by oxidizing specific cysteine residues. Here, we investigated if methylene blue can inhibit caspases via the oxidation of their active site cysteine. Methylene blue, and derivatives, azure A and azure B competitively inhibited recombinant Caspase-6 (Casp6), and inhibited Casp6 activity in transfected human colon carcinoma cells and in serum-deprived primary human neuron cultures. Methylene blue also inhibited recombinant Casp1 and Casp3. Furthermore, methylene blue inhibited Casp3 activity in an acute mouse model of liver toxicity. Mass spectrometry confirmed methylene blue and azure B oxidation of the catalytic Cys163 cysteine of Casp6. Together, these results show a novel inhibitory mechanism of caspases via sulfenation of the active site cysteine. These results indicate that methylene blue or its derivatives could (1) have an additional effect against Alzheimer Disease by inhibiting brain caspase activity, (2) be used as a drug to prevent caspase activation in other conditions, and (3) predispose chronically treated individuals to cancer via the inhibition of caspases.

  10. TRPA1 is activated by direct addition of cysteine residues to the N-hydroxysuccinyl esters of acrylic and cinnamic acids.

    PubMed

    Sadofsky, Laura R; Boa, Andrew N; Maher, Sarah A; Birrell, Mark A; Belvisi, Maria G; Morice, Alyn H

    2011-01-01

    The nociceptor TRPA1 is thought to be activated through covalent modification of specific cysteine residues on the N terminal of the channel. The precise mechanism of covalent modification with unsaturated carbonyl-containing compounds is unclear, therefore by examining a range of compounds which can undergo both conjugate and/or direct addition reactions we sought to further elucidate the mechanism(s) whereby TRPA1 can be activated by covalent modification. Calcium signalling was used to determine the mechanism of activation of TRPA1 expressed in HEK293 cells with a series of related compounds which were capable of either direct and/or conjugate addition processes. These results were confirmed using physiological recordings with isolated vagus nerve preparations. We found negligible channel activation with chemicals which could only react with cysteine residues via conjugate addition such as acrylamide, acrylic acid, and cinnamic acid. Compounds able to react via either conjugate or direct addition, such as acrolein, methyl vinyl ketone, mesityl oxide, acrylic acid NHS ester, cinnamaldehyde and cinnamic acid NHS ester, activated TRPA1 in a concentration dependent manner as did compounds only capable of direct addition, namely propionic acid NHS ester and hydrocinnamic acid NHS ester. These compounds failed to activate TRPV1 expressed in HEK293 cells or mock transfected HEK293 cells. For molecules capable of direct or conjugate additions, the results suggest for the first time that TRPA1 may be activated preferentially by direct addition of the thiol group of TRPA1 cysteines to the agonist carbonyl carbon of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl-containing compounds.

  11. The anti/syn conformation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine is modulated by Bacillus subtilis PolX active site residues His255 and Asn263. Efficient processing of damaged 3'-ends.

    PubMed

    Zafra, Olga; Pérez de Ayala, Lucía; de Vega, Miguel

    2017-04-01

    8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8oxodG) is a major lesion resulting from oxidative stress and found in both DNA and dNTP pools. Such a lesion is usually removed from DNA by the Base Excision Repair (BER), a universally conserved DNA repair pathway. 8oxodG usually adopts the favored and promutagenic syn-conformation at the active site of DNA polymerases, allowing the base to hydrogen bonding with adenine during DNA synthesis. Here, we study the structural determinants that affect the glycosidic torsion-angle of 8oxodGTP at the catalytic active site of the family X DNA polymerase from Bacillus subtilis (PolXBs). We show that, unlike most DNA polymerases, PolXBs exhibits a similar efficiency to stabilize the anti and syn conformation of 8oxodGTP at the catalytic site. Kinetic analyses indicate that at least two conserved residues of the nucleotide binding pocket play opposite roles in the anti/syn conformation selectivity, Asn263 and His255 that favor incorporation of 8oxodGMP opposite dA and dC, respectively. In addition, the presence in PolXBs of Mn(2+)-dependent 3'-phosphatase and 3'-phosphodiesterase activities is also shown. Those activities rely on the catalytic center of the C-terminal Polymerase and Histidinol Phosphatase (PHP) domain of PolXBs and, together with its 3'-5' exonuclease activity allows the enzyme to resume gap-filling after processing of damaged 3' termini.

  12. Cysteine residues in the major capsid protein, Vp1, of the JC virus are important for protein stability and oligomer formation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shintaro; Suzuki, Tadaki; Igarashi, Manabu; Orba, Yasuko; Ohtake, Noriko; Nagakawa, Keita; Niikura, Kenichi; Kimura, Takashi; Kasamatsu, Harumi; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    The capsid of the human polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) consists of 72 pentameric capsomeres of a major structural protein, Vp1. The cysteine residues of the related Vp1 of SV40 are known to contribute to Vp1 folding, pentamer formation, pentamer-pentamer contacts, and capsid stabilization. In light of the presence of a slight structural difference between JCV Vp1 and SV40 counterpart, the way the former folds could be either different from or similar to the latter. We found a difference: an important contribution of Vp1 cysteines to the formation of infectious virions, unique in JCV and absent in SV40. Having introduced amino acid substitution at each of six cysteines (C42, C80, C97, C200, C247, and C260) in JCV Vp1, we found that, when expressed in HeLa cells, the Vp1 level was decreased in C80A and C247A mutants, and remained normal in the other mutants. Additionally, the C80A and C247A Vp1-expressing cell extracts did not show the hemagglutination activity characteristic of JCV particles. The C80A and C247A mutant Vp1s were found to be less stable than the wild-type Vp1 in HeLa cells. When produced in a reconstituted in vitro protein translation system, these two mutant proteins were stable, suggesting that some cellular factors were responsible for their degradation. As determined by their sucrose gradient sedimentation profiles, in vitro translated C247A Vp1 formed pentamers, but in vitro translated C80A Vp1 was entirely monomeric. When individually incorporated into the JCV genome, the C80A and C247A mutants, but not the other Vp1 cysteine residues mutants, interfered with JCV infectivity. Furthermore, the C80A, but not the C247A, mutation prevented the nuclear localization of Vp1 in JCV genome transfected cells. These findings suggest that C80 of JCV Vp1 is required for Vp1 stability and pentamer formation, and C247 is involved in capsid assembly in the nucleus.

  13. The Molybdenum Active Site of Formate Dehydrogenase Is Capable of Catalyzing C-H Bond Cleavage and Oxygen Atom Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Tobias; Schrapers, Peer; Utesch, Tillmann; Nimtz, Manfred; Rippers, Yvonne; Dau, Holger; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Haumann, Michael; Leimkühler, Silke

    2016-04-26

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are capable of performing the reversible oxidation of formate and are enzymes of great interest for fuel cell applications and for the production of reduced carbon compounds as energy sources from CO2. Metal-containing FDHs in general contain a highly conserved active site, comprising a molybdenum (or tungsten) center coordinated by two molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide molecules, a sulfido and a (seleno-)cysteine ligand, in addition to a histidine and arginine residue in the second coordination sphere. So far, the role of these amino acids in catalysis has not been studied in detail, because of the lack of suitable expression systems and the lability or oxygen sensitivity of the enzymes. Here, the roles of these active site residues is revealed using the Mo-containing FDH from Rhodobacter capsulatus. Our results show that the cysteine ligand at the Mo ion is displaced by the formate substrate during the reaction, the arginine has a direct role in substrate binding and stabilization, and the histidine elevates the pKa of the active site cysteine. We further found that in addition to reversible formate oxidation, the enzyme is further capable of reducing nitrate to nitrite. We propose a mechanistic scheme that combines both functionalities and provides important insights into the distinct mechanisms of C-H bond cleavage and oxygen atom transfer catalyzed by formate dehydrogenase.

  14. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Influence of Protein – Micelle Ratios and Cysteine Residues on the Kinetic Stability and Unfolding Rates of Human Mitochondrial VDAC-2

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Svetlana Rajkumar; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Delineating the kinetic and thermodynamic factors which contribute to the stability of transmembrane β-barrels is critical to gain an in-depth understanding of membrane protein behavior. Human mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channel isoform 2 (hVDAC-2), one of the key anti-apoptotic eukaryotic β-barrel proteins, is of paramount importance, owing to its indispensable role in cell survival. We demonstrate here that the stability of hVDAC-2 bears a strong kinetic contribution that is dependent on the absolute micellar concentration used for barrel folding. The refolding efficiency and ensuing stability is sensitive to the lipid-to-protein (LPR) ratio, and displays a non-linear relationship, with both low and high micellar amounts being detrimental to hVDAC-2 structure. Unfolding and aggregation process are sequential events and show strong temperature dependence. We demonstrate that an optimal lipid-to-protein ratio of 2600∶1 – 13000∶1 offers the highest protection against thermal denaturation. Activation energies derived only for lower LPRs are ∼17 kcal mol−1 for full-length hVDAC-2 and ∼23 kcal mol−1 for the Cys-less mutant, suggesting that the nine cysteine residues of hVDAC-2 impart additional malleability to the barrel scaffold. Our studies reveal that cysteine residues play a key role in the kinetic stability of the protein, determine barrel rigidity and thereby give rise to strong micellar association of hVDAC-2. Non-linearity of the Arrhenius plot at high LPRs coupled with observation of protein aggregation upon thermal denaturation indicates that contributions from both kinetic and thermodynamic components stabilize the 19-stranded β-barrel. Lipid-protein interaction and the linked kinetic contribution to free energy of the folded protein are together expected to play a key role in hVDAC-2 recycling and the functional switch at the onset of apoptosis. PMID:24494036

  16. Oxidation of structural cysteine residues in thioredoxin 1 by aromatic arsenicals enhances cancer cell cytotoxicity caused by the inhibition of thioredoxin reductase 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Lu, Jun; Ren, Xiaoyuan; Du, Yatao; Zheng, Yujuan; Ioannou, Panayiotis V; Holmgren, Arne

    2015-12-01

    Thioredoxin systems, composed of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), thioredoxin (Trx) and NADPH, play important roles in maintaining cellular redox homeostasis and redox signaling. Recently the cytosolic Trx1 system has been shown to be a cellular target of arsenic containing compounds. To elucidate the relationship of the structure of arsenic compounds with their ability of inhibiting TrxR1 and Trx1, and cytotoxicity, we have investigated the reaction of Trx1 system with seven arsenic trithiolates: As(Cys)3, As(GS)3, As(Penicillamine)3, As(Mercaptoethanesulfonate)3, As(Mercaptopurine)3, As(2-mercaptopyridine)3 and As(2-mercaptopyridine N-oxide)3. The cytotoxicity of these arsenicals was consistent with their ability to inhibit TrxR1 in vitro and in cells. Unlike other arsenicals, As(Mercaptopurine)3 which did not show inhibitory effects on TrxR1 had very weak cytotoxicity, indicating that TrxR1 is a reliable drug target for arsenicals. Moreover, the two aromatic compounds As(2-mercaptopyridine)3 and As(2-mercaptopyridine N-oxide)3 showed stronger cytotoxicity than the others. As(2-mercaptopyridine)3 which selectively oxidized two structural cysteines (Cys62 and Cys69) in Trx1 showed mild improvement in cytotoxicity. As(2-mercaptopyridine N-oxide)3 oxidized all the Cys residues in Trx1, exhibiting the strongest cytotoxicity. Oxidation of Trx1 by As(2-mercaptopyridine)3 and As(2-mercaptopyridine N-oxide)3 affected electron transfer from NADPH and TrxR1 to peroxiredoxin 1 (Prx1), which could result in the reactive oxygen species elevation and trigger cell death process. These results suggest that oxidation of structural cysteine residues in Trx1 by aromatic group in TrxR1-targeting drugs may sensitize tumor cells to cell death, providing a novel approach to regulate cellular redox signaling and also a basis for rational design of new anticancer agents.

  17. Oxidation of a Cysteine Residue in Elongation Factor EF-Tu Reversibly Inhibits Translation in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Yutthanasirikul, Rayakorn; Nagano, Takanori; Jimbo, Haruhiko; Hihara, Yukako; Kanamori, Takashi; Ueda, Takuya; Haruyama, Takamitsu; Konno, Hiroki; Yoshida, Keisuke; Hisabori, Toru; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka

    2016-03-11

    Translational elongation is susceptible to inactivation by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and elongation factor G has been identified as a target of oxidation by ROS. In the present study we examined the sensitivity to oxidation by ROS of another elongation factor, EF-Tu. The structure of EF-Tu changes dramatically depending on the bound nucleotide. Therefore, we investigated the sensitivity to oxidation in vitro of GTP- and GDP-bound EF-Tu as well as that of nucleotide-free EF-Tu. Assays of translational activity with a reconstituted translation system from Escherichia coli revealed that GTP-bound and nucleotide-free EF-Tu were sensitive to oxidation by H2O2, whereas GDP-bound EF-Tu was resistant to H2O2. The inactivation of EF-Tu was the result of oxidation of Cys-82, a single cysteine residue, and subsequent formation of both an intermolecular disulfide bond and sulfenic acid. Replacement of Cys-82 with serine rendered EF-Tu resistant to inactivation by H2O2, confirming that Cys-82 was a target of oxidation. Furthermore, oxidized EF-Tu was reduced and reactivated by thioredoxin. Gel-filtration chromatography revealed that some of the oxidized nucleotide-free EF-Tu formed large complexes of >30 molecules. Atomic force microscopy revealed that such large complexes dissociated into several smaller aggregates upon the addition of dithiothreitol. Immunological analysis of the redox state of EF-Tu in vivo showed that levels of oxidized EF-Tu increased under strong light. Thus, resembling elongation factor G, EF-Tu appears to be sensitive to ROS via oxidation of a cysteine residue, and its inactivation might be reversed in a redox-dependent manner.

  18. Interaction of 5'-P-sulfonylbenzoyl adenosine with cysteine residues of rat liver 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    El-Maghrabi, M.R.; Lively, M.O.; Pilkis, S.J.

    1987-05-01

    The kinase and bisphosphatase reactions of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase appear to be catalyzed at separate active sites. The kinase site contains 3 cysteinyl residues that are important for sugar phosphate binding but not for ATP binding. These groups are readily alkylated with iodoacetamide which decreases by 15-fold the affinity for Fru 6-P but also increases the maximal velocity of the reaction by the same extent. Incubation of the enzyme with 5'-p-fluorosulfonylbenzoyl adenosine (FSBA), an ATP analog, has no effect on the bisphosphatase activity but inactivates the kinase. The addition of dithiothreitol completely reactivates the kinase, suggesting that the reagent affected sulfhydryl groups critical for sugar phosphate binding and not the ATP site of the enzyme. Similarly, 8-Azido-ATP/UV-photoinactivated enzyme is also reactivated by dithiothreitol and involves the same sulfhydryl groups, since alkylation of the latter with iodoacetamide protects the enzyme from inactivation by FSBA and from 8-azido ATP. Cyanogen bromide cleavage of enzyme that had been alkylated with iodo(I-/sup 14/C)acetamide yielded a 20,000 dalton peptide which contained the three cysteinyl residues. It is concluded that the site of action of ATP analogs to inactivate the kinase are these cysteinyl residues rather than the ATP binding site per se.

  19. Analysis of the solvent accessibility of cysteine residues on maize rayado fino virus virus-like particles produced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants and cross-linking of peptides to VLPs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A method to analyze the solvent accessibility of the thiol group of cysteine residues of Maize rayado fino virus-virus-like particles (VLPs) followed by a peptide cross-linking reaction is described. The method takes advantage of the availability of several chemical groups on the surface of the VLPs...

  20. Evidence for the participation of Cys sub 558 and Cys sub 559 at the active site of mercuric reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.M.; Moore, M.J.; Massey, V.; Williams, C.H. Jr.; Distefano, M.D.; Ballou, D.P.; Walsh, C.T. )

    1989-02-07

    Mercuric reductase, with FAD and a reducible disulfide at the active site, catalyzes the two-electron reduction of Hg(II) by NADPH. Addition of reducing equivalents rapidly produces a spectrally distinct EH{sub 2} form of the enzyme containing oxidized FAD and reduced active site thiols. Formation of EH{sub 2} has previously been reported to require only 2 electrons for reduction of the active site disulfide. The authors present results of anaerobic titrations of mercuric reductase with NADPH and dithionite showing that the equilibrium conversion of oxidized enzyme to EH{sub 2} actually requires 2 equiv of reducing agent or 4 electrons. Kinetic studies conducted both at 4{degree}C and at 25{degree}C indicate that reduction of the active site occurs rapidly, as previously reported; this is followed by a slower reduction of another redox group via reaction with the active site. ({sup 14}C)Iodoacetamide labeling experiments demonstrate that the C-terminal residues, Cys{sub 558} and Cys{sub 559}, are involved in this disulfide. The fluorescence, but not the absorbance, of the enzyme-bound FAD was found to be highly dependent on the redox state of the C-terminal thiols. Thus, E{sub ox} with Cys{sub 558} and Cys{sub 559} as thiols exhibits less than 50% of the fluorescence of E{sub ox} where these residues are present as a disulfide, indicating that the thiols remain intimately associated with the active site. Initial velocity measurements show that the auxiliary disulfide must be reduced before catalytic Hg(II) reduction can occur, consistent with the report of a preactivation phenomenon with NADPH or cysteine. A modified minimal catalytic mechanism is proposed as well as several chemical mechanisms for the Hg(II) reduction step.

  1. Crystal structures of cyanide- and triiodide-bound forms of Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase at different pH values. Perturbations of active site residues and their implication in enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, K; Kunishima, N; Amada, F; Kubota, T; Matsubara, H

    1995-09-15

    The structures of the cyanide and triiodide complexes of Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase (ARP) at different pH values were investigated by x-ray crystallography in order to examine the behavior of the invariant residues of arginine (Arg-52) and distal histidine (His-56) during the enzyme reaction as well as to provide the structural basis of the active site of peroxidase. The models of the cyanide complexes at pH 7.5, 5.0, and 4.0, respectively, were refined to the R-factors of 17.8, 17.8, and 18.5% using 7.0-1.6-A resolution data, and those of the triiodide complexes at pH 6.5 and 5.0 refined to 16.9 and 16.8% using 7.0-1.9-A resolution data. The structures of the cyanide complexes at pH 7.5, 5.0, and 4.0 are identical within experimental error. Cyanide ion bound to the heme in the bent conformation rather than in the tilt conformation. Upon cyanide ion binding, the N epsilon atom of His-56 moved toward the ion by rotation of the imidazole ring around the C beta-C gamma bond, but there was little conformational change in the remaining residues. The distance between the N epsilon atom of His-56 and the nitrogen atom of the cyanide suggests the presence of a hydrogen bond between them in the pH range investigated. In the triiodide complexes, one of the two triiodides bound to ARP was located at the distal side of the heme. When triiodide bound to ARP, unlike the rearrangement of the distal arginine of cytochrome c peroxidase that occurs on formation of the fluoride complex or compound I, the side chain of Arg-52 moved little. The conformation of the side chain of His-56, however, changed markedly. Conformational flexibility of His-56 appears to be a requisite for proton translocation from one oxygen atom to the other of HOO- by acid-base catalysis to produce compound I. The iron atom in each cyanide complex (low-spin ferric) is located in the heme plane, whereas in each triiodide complex (high-spin ferric) the iron atom is displaced from the plane about 0.2 A toward

  2. Protein Topology Determines Cysteine Oxidation Fate: The Case of Sulfenyl Amide Formation among Protein Families

    PubMed Central

    Defelipe, Lucas A.; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Gauto, Diego; Marti, Marcelo A.; Turjanski, Adrián G.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine residues have a rich chemistry and play a critical role in the catalytic activity of a plethora of enzymes. However, cysteines are susceptible to oxidation by Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species, leading to a loss of their catalytic function. Therefore, cysteine oxidation is emerging as a relevant physiological regulatory mechanism. Formation of a cyclic sulfenyl amide residue at the active site of redox-regulated proteins has been proposed as a protection mechanism against irreversible oxidation as the sulfenyl amide intermediate has been identified in several proteins. However, how and why only some specific cysteine residues in particular proteins react to form this intermediate is still unknown. In the present work using in-silico based tools, we have identified a constrained conformation that accelerates sulfenyl amide formation. By means of combined MD and QM/MM calculation we show that this conformation positions the NH backbone towards the sulfenic acid and promotes the reaction to yield the sulfenyl amide intermediate, in one step with the concomitant release of a water molecule. Moreover, in a large subset of the proteins we found a conserved beta sheet-loop-helix motif, which is present across different protein folds, that is key for sulfenyl amide production as it promotes the previous formation of sulfenic acid. For catalytic activity, in several cases, proteins need the Cysteine to be in the cysteinate form, i.e. a low pKa Cys. We found that the conserved motif stabilizes the cysteinate by hydrogen bonding to several NH backbone moieties. As cysteinate is also more reactive toward ROS we propose that the sheet-loop-helix motif and the constraint conformation have been selected by evolution for proteins that need a reactive Cys protected from irreversible oxidation. Our results also highlight how fold conservation can be correlated to redox chemistry regulation of protein function. PMID:25741692

  3. Determination of ceftiofur metabolite desfuroylceftiofur cysteine disulfide in bovine tissues using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry as a surrogate marker residue for ceftiofur.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shixia; Chiesa, Oscar A; Kijak, Philip; Chattopadhaya, Chaitali; Lancaster, Vicki; Smith, Elizabeth A; Girard, Lauren; Sklenka, Sara; Li, Hui

    2014-06-04

    Ceftiofur is a widely used cephalosporin β-lactam antibiotic with frequently reported residue violations. This paper reports a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for determining a ceftiofur metabolite, desfuroylceftiofur cysteine disulfide (DCCD), in bovine kidney, liver, and muscle tissues. Incurred tissue samples were obtained from dosed animals and analyzed to evaluate the utility of the method. For kidney, the target tissue, the method utilized a simple extraction with phosphate buffer followed by solid phase extraction (SPE) cleanup. For liver and muscle, acetonitrile and hexane were used to remove most proteins and fat from the initial buffer extract before the SPE cleanup. Method accuracy was between 97 and 107%, and the coefficient of variation was between 3.4 and 11.0% for all three types of tissues. The relationship between the new and regulatory methods for bovine kidney was established. It was concluded that DCCD is a suitable surrogate marker residue for ceftiofur in bovine kidney.

  4. Dynamic evolution of selenocysteine utilization in bacteria: a balance between selenoprotein loss and evolution of selenocysteine from redox active cysteine residues

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Romero, Hector; Salinas, Gustavo; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2006-01-01

    Background Selenocysteine (Sec) is co-translationally inserted into protein in response to UGA codons. It occurs in oxidoreductase active sites and often is catalytically superior to cysteine (Cys). However, Sec is used very selectively in proteins and organisms. The wide distribution of Sec and its restricted use have not been explained. Results We conducted comparative genomics and phylogenetic analyses to examine dynamics of Sec decoding in bacteria at both selenium utilization trait and selenoproteome levels. These searches revealed that 21.5% of sequenced bacteria utilize Sec, their selenoproteomes have 1 to 31 selenoproteins, and selenoprotein-rich organisms are mostly Deltaproteobacteria or Firmicutes/Clostridia. Evolutionary histories of selenoproteins suggest that Cys-to-Sec replacement is a general trend for most selenoproteins. In contrast, only a small number of Sec-to-Cys replacements were detected, and these were mostly restricted to formate dehydrogenase and selenophosphate synthetase families. In addition, specific selenoprotein gene losses were observed in many sister genomes. Thus, the Sec/Cys replacements were mostly unidirectional, and increased utilization of Sec by existing protein families was counterbalanced by loss of selenoprotein genes or entire selenoproteomes. Lateral transfers of the Sec trait were an additional factor, and we describe the first example of selenoprotein gene transfer between archaea and bacteria. Finally, oxygen requirement and optimal growth temperature were identified as environmental factors that correlate with changes in Sec utilization. Conclusion Our data reveal a dynamic balance between selenoprotein origin and loss, and may account for the discrepancy between catalytic advantages provided by Sec and the observed low number of selenoprotein families and Sec-utilizing organisms. PMID:17054778

  5. Genetic encoding of caged cysteine and caged homocysteine in bacterial and mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Uprety, Rajendra; Luo, Ji; Liu, Jihe; Naro, Yuta; Samanta, Subhas; Deiters, Alexander

    2014-08-18

    We report the genetic incorporation of caged cysteine and caged homocysteine into proteins in bacterial and mammalian cells. The genetic code of these cells was expanded with an engineered pyrrolysine tRNA/tRNA synthetase pair that accepts both light-activatable amino acids as substrates. Incorporation was validated by reporter assays, western blots, and mass spectrometry, and differences in incorporation efficiency were explained by molecular modeling of synthetase-amino acid interactions. As a proof-of-principle application, the genetic replacement of an active-site cysteine residue with a caged cysteine residue in Renilla luciferase led to a complete loss of enzyme activity; however, upon brief exposure to UV light, a >150-fold increase in enzymatic activity was observed, thus showcasing the applicability of the caged cysteine in live human cells. A simultaneously conducted genetic replacement with homocysteine yielded an enzyme with greatly reduced activity, thereby demonstrating the precise probing of a protein active site. These discoveries provide a new tool for the optochemical control of protein function in mammalian cells and expand the set of genetically encoded unnatural amino acids.

  6. Replacement of the catalytic nucleophile cysteine-296 by serine in class II polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa-mediated synthesis of a new polyester: identification of catalytic residues.

    PubMed Central

    Amara, Amro A; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2003-01-01

    The class II PHA (polyhydroxyalkanoate) synthases [PHA(MCL) synthases (medium-chain-length PHA synthases)] are mainly found in pseudomonads and catalyse synthesis of PHA(MCL)s using CoA thioesters of medium-chain-length 3-hydroxy fatty acids (C6-C14) as a substrate. Only recently PHA(MCL) synthases from Pseudomonas oleovorans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were purified and in vitro activity was achieved. A threading model of the P. aeruginosa PHA(MCL) synthase PhaC1 was developed based on the homology to the epoxide hydrolase (1ek1) from mouse which belongs to the alpha/beta-hydrolase superfamily. The putative catalytic residues Cys-296, Asp-452, His-453 and His-480 were replaced by site-specific mutagenesis. In contrast to class I and III PHA synthases, the replacement of His-480, which aligns with the conserved base catalyst of the alpha/beta-hydrolases, with Gln did not affect in vivo enzyme activity and only slightly in vitro enzyme activity. The second conserved histidine His-453 was then replaced by Gln, and the modified enzyme showed only 24% of wild-type in vivo activity, which indicated that His-453 might functionally replace His-480 in class II PHA synthases. Replacement of the postulated catalytic nucleophile Cys-296 by Ser only reduced in vivo enzyme activity to 30% of wild-type enzyme activity and drastically changed substrate specificity. Moreover, the C296S mutation turned the enzyme sensitive towards PMSF inhibition. The replacement of Asp-452 by Asn, which is supposed to be required as general base catalyst for elongation reaction, did abolish enzyme activity as was found for the respective amino acid residue of class I and III enzymes. In the threading model residues Cys-296, Asp-452, His-453 and His-480 reside in the core structure with the putative catalytic nucleophile Cys-296 localized at the highly conserved gamma-turns of the alpha/beta-hydrolases. Inhibitor studies indicated that catalytic histidines reside in the active site. The conserved

  7. Tryptophan and cystein residues of the acetylcholine receptors of Torpedo species. Relationship to binding of cholinergic ligands.

    PubMed

    Eldefrawi, M E; Eldefrawi, A T; Wilson, D B

    1975-09-23

    Several methods were used to analyze for tryptophan in the acetylcholine (ACh) receptors purified from the electric organs of the electric rays, Torpedo californica and Torpedo marmorata. The best value of tryptophan was 2.4 mol %. When excited at 290 nm, both receptors fluoresced with a maximum at 336, but there was no change in the fluorescence emission spectra upon binding of carbamylcholine, d-tubocurarine, ACh, or decamethonium. The free SH content of the Torpedo receptors varied in different preparations, and was highest in that purified from fresh T. californica using deaerated solutions and dialysis under nitrogen, and lowest in that prepared from the aged lyophilized membranes of T. marmorata. The maximum free SH content was 20 nmol/mg of protein or 0.22 mol %, equal to at most 18% of the total cysteic acid residues. Reaction of either 33% or of all the SH residues with p-chloromercuribenzoate reduced maximum ACh binding to the pure receptor prepared from fresh T. californica by only 23%.

  8. Role of Cysteine Residues in the Structure, Stability, and Alkane Producing Activity of Cyanobacterial Aldehyde Deformylating Oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yuuki; Yasugi, Fumitaka; Arai, Munehito

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (AD) is a key enzyme for alkane biosynthesis in cyanobacteria, and it can be used as a catalyst for alkane production in vitro and in vivo. However, three free Cys residues in AD may impair its catalytic activity by undesired disulfide bond formation and oxidation. To develop Cys-deficient mutants of AD, we examined the roles of the Cys residues in the structure, stability, and alkane producing activity of AD from Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 by systematic Cys-to-Ala/Ser mutagenesis. The C71A/S mutations reduced the hydrocarbon producing activity of AD and facilitated the formation of a dimer, indicating that the conserved Cys71, which is located in close proximity to the substrate-binding site, plays crucial roles in maintaining the activity, structure, and stability of AD. On the other hand, mutations at Cys107 and Cys117 did not affect the hydrocarbon producing activity of AD. Therefore, we propose that the C107A/C117A double mutant is preferable to wild type AD for alkane production and that the double mutant may be used as a pseudo-wild type protein for further improvement of the alkane producing activity of AD. PMID:25837679

  9. Effects of Ca/sup 2 +/ and subunit interactions on surface accessibility of cysteine residues in cardiac troponin

    SciTech Connect

    Ingraham, R.H.; Hodges, R.S.

    1988-08-09

    Rabbit and bovine cardiac troponin (Tn) subunits and complexes were labeled with iodo(/sup 14/C)acetamide in the presence and absence of Ca/sup 2 +/ to determine the effects of tertiary and quaternary structure on exposure of Cys SH groups. This procedure serves both to map region of subunit interaction and the effects of Ca/sup 2 +/-induced conformational change and to indicate which Cys residues should be useful attachment sites for spectroscopic or cross-linking probes. After being labeled, Tn subunits were purified by using reversed-phase HPLC and subjected to tryptic cleavage with or without prior citraconylation. Cys-containing fragments were isolated by RP-HPLC, and the percent labeling was determined. Cys-75 and -92 of TnI were completely accessible to iodoacetamide both when TnI was labeled alone or when in the TnC-TnI complex. Both residues were largely inaccessible when Tn or the TnI-TnT complex was labeled, suggesting burial in the TnI-TnT interface. In contrast, the Cys from the N-terminal region of bovine TnT was stoichiometrically labeled when TnT was labeled alone, in native Tn or in a troponin-tropomyosin complex. Cys-35 and -84 of TnC are located in the nonfunctional Ca/sup 2 +/ binding loop I of cardiac TnC and helix D, respectively. For TnC alone, the percent labelings of Cys-35 and -84 were 11% and 26%, respectively (minus Ca/sup 2 +/), and 16% and 63%, respectively (plus Ca/sup 2 +/). For TnC labeled within Tn, the percent labelings of Cys-35 and -84 were 20% and 52%, respectively (minus Ca/sup 2 +/), and 20% and 78%, respectively (plus Ca/sup 2 +/). The Ca/sup 2 +/-induced exposure of these residues, especially Cys-84, supports the Ca/sup 2 +/-activated model of turkey skeletal TnC derived from crystallographic data.

  10. Site-specific mutagenesis and functional analysis of active sites of sulfur oxygenase reductase from Gram-positive moderate thermophile Sulfobacillus acidophilus TPY.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huijun; Guo, Wenbin; Xu, Changan; Zhou, Hongbo; Chen, Xinhua

    2013-12-14

    Sequence alignments revealed that the conserved motifs of SORSa which formed an independent branch between archaea and Gram-negative bacteria SORs according to the phylogenetic relationship were similar with the archaea and Gram-negative bacteria SORs. In order to investigate the active sites of SORSa, cysteines 31, 101 and 104 (C31, C101, C104), histidines 86 and 90 (H86 and H90) and glutamate 114 (E114) of SORSa were chosen as the target amino acid residues for site-specific mutagenesis. The wild type and six mutant SORs were expressed in E. coli BL21, purified and confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis. Enzyme activity determination revealed that the active sites of SORSa were identical with the archaea and Gram-negative bacteria SORs reported. Replacement of any cysteine residues reduced SOR activity by 53-100%, while the mutants of H86A, H90A and E114A lost their enzyme activities largely, only remaining 20%, 19% and 32% activity of the wild type SOR respectively. This study will enrich our awareness for active sites of SOR in a Gram-positive bacterium.

  11. Roles of Copper and a Conserved Aspartic Acid in the Autocatalytic Hydroxylation of a Specific Tryptophan Residue during Cysteine Tryptophylquinone Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Heather R; Sehanobish, Esha; Shiller, Alan M; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio; Davidson, Victor L

    2017-02-21

    The first posttranslational modification step in the biosynthesis of the tryptophan-derived quinone cofactors is the autocatalytic hydroxylation of a specific Trp residue at position C-7 on the indole side chain. Subsequent modifications are catalyzed by modifying enzymes, but the mechanism by which this first step occurs is unknown. LodA possesses a cysteine tryptophylquinone (CTQ) cofactor. Metal analysis as well as spectroscopic and kinetic studies of the mature and precursor forms of a D512A LodA variant provides evidence that copper is required for the initial hydroxylation of the precursor protein and that if alternative metals are bound, the modification does not occur and the precursor is unstable. It is shown that the mature native LodA also contains loosely bound copper, which affects the visible absorbance spectrum and quenches the fluorescence spectrum that is attributed to the mature CTQ cofactor. When copper is removed, the fluorescence appears, and when it is added back to the protein, the fluorescence is quenched, indicating that copper reversibly binds in the proximity of CTQ. Removal of copper does not diminish the enzymatic activity of LodA. This distinguishes LodA from enzymes with protein-derived tyrosylquinone cofactors in which copper is present near the cofactor and is absolutely required for activity. Mechanisms are proposed for the role of copper in the hydroxylation of the unactivated Trp side chain. These results demonstrate that the reason that the highly conserved Asp512 is critical for LodA, and possibly all tryptophylquinone enzymes, is not because it is required for catalysis but because it is necessary for CTQ biosynthesis, more specifically to facilitate the initial copper-dependent hydroxylation of a specific Trp residue.

  12. Improving the Stability of the EC1 Domain of E-cadherin by Thiol Alkylation of the Cysteine Residue

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Maulik; Laurence, Jennifer S.; Williams, Todd D.; Middaugh, C. Russell; Siahaan, Teruna J.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to improve chemical and physical stability of the EC1 protein derived from the extracellular domain of E-cadherin. In solution, the EC1 protein has been shown to form a covalent dimer via a disulfide bond formation followed by physical aggregation and precipitation. To improve solution stability of the EC1 protein, the thiol group of the Cys13 residue in EC1 was alkylated with iodoacetate, iodoacetamide, and maleimide-PEG-5000 to produce thioether derivatives called EC1-IA, EC1-IN, and EC1-PEG. The physical and chemical stabilities of the EC1 derivatives and the parent EC1 were evaluated at various pHs (3.0, 7.0, and 9.0) and temperatures (0, 3, 70 °C). The structural characteristics of each molecule were analyzed by circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy and the derivatives have similar secondary structure as the parent EC1 protein at pH 7.0. Both EC1-IN and EC1-PEG derivatives showed better chemical and physical stability profiles than did the parent EC1 at pH 7.0. EC1-PEG had the best stability profile compared to EC1-IN and EC1 in solution under various conditions. PMID:22531851

  13. Chemical modification of serine at the active site of penicillin acylase from Kluyvera citrophila.

    PubMed Central

    Martín, J; Slade, A; Aitken, A; Arche, R; Virden, R

    1991-01-01

    The site of reaction of penicillin acylase from Kluyvera citrophila with the potent inhibitor phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride was investigated by incubating the inactivated enzyme with thioacetic acid to convert the side chain of the putative active-site serine residue to that of cysteine. The protein product contained one thiol group, which was reactive towards 2,2'-dipyridyl disulphide and iodoacetic acid. Carboxymethylcysteine was identified as the N-terminal residue of the beta-subunit of the carboxy[3H]methylthiol-protein. No significant changes in tertiary structure were detected in the modified penicillin acylase using near-u.v. c.d. spectroscopy. However, the catalytic activity (kcat) with either an anilide or an ester substrate was decreased in the thiol-protein by a factor of more than 10(4). A comparison of sequences of apparently related acylases shows no other extensive regions of conserved sequence containing an invariant serine residue. The side chain of this residue is proposed as a candidate nucleophile in the formation of an acyl-enzyme during catalysis. PMID:1764029

  14. Controlled Orientation of Active Sites in a Nanostructured Multienzyme Complex

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung In; Yang, Byungseop; Jung, Younghan; Cha, Jaehyun; Cho, Jinhwan; Choi, Eun-Sil; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2016-01-01

    Multistep cascade reactions in nature maximize reaction efficiency by co-assembling related enzymes. Such organization facilitates the processing of intermediates by downstream enzymes. Previously, the studies on multienzyme nanocomplexes assembled on DNA scaffolds demonstrated that closer interenzyme distance enhances the overall reaction efficiency. However, it remains unknown how the active site orientation controlled at nanoscale can have an effect on multienzyme reaction. Here, we show that controlled alignment of active sites promotes the multienzyme reaction efficiency. By genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid and two compatible bioorthogonal chemistries, we conjugated mannitol dehydrogenase to formate dehydrogenase with the defined active site arrangement with the residue-level accuracy. The study revealed that the multienzyme complex with the active sites directed towards each other exhibits four-fold higher relative efficiency enhancement in the cascade reaction and produces 60% more D-mannitol than the other complex with active sites directed away from each other. PMID:28004799

  15. Active sites of thioredoxin reductases: why selenoproteins?

    PubMed

    Gromer, Stephan; Johansson, Linda; Bauer, Holger; Arscott, L David; Rauch, Susanne; Ballou, David P; Williams, Charles H; Schirmer, R Heiner; Arnér, Elias S J

    2003-10-28

    Selenium, an essential trace element for mammals, is incorporated into a selected class of selenoproteins as selenocysteine. All known isoenzymes of mammalian thioredoxin (Trx) reductases (TrxRs) employ selenium in the C-terminal redox center -Gly-Cys-Sec-Gly-COOH for reduction of Trx and other substrates, whereas the corresponding sequence in Drosophila melanogaster TrxR is -Ser-Cys-Cys-Ser-COOH. Surprisingly, the catalytic competence of these orthologous enzymes is similar, whereas direct Sec-to-Cys substitution of mammalian TrxR, or other selenoenzymes, yields almost inactive enzyme. TrxRs are therefore ideal for studying the biology of selenocysteine by comparative enzymology. Here we show that the serine residues flanking the C-terminal Cys residues of Drosophila TrxRs are responsible for activating the cysteines to match the catalytic efficiency of a selenocysteine-cysteine pair as in mammalian TrxR, obviating the need for selenium. This finding suggests that the occurrence of selenoenzymes, which implies that the organism is selenium-dependent, is not necessarily associated with improved enzyme efficiency. Our data suggest that the selective advantage of selenoenzymes is a broader range of substrates and a broader range of microenvironmental conditions in which enzyme activity is possible.

  16. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA encoding a mammalian cathepsin L-like cysteine proteinase from Acanthamoeba healyi

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yeon-Chul; Hwang, Mi-Yul; Yun, Ho-Cheol; Yu, Hak-Sun; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Yong, Tai-Soon

    2002-01-01

    We have cloned a cDNA encoding a cysteine proteinase of the Acanthamoeba healyi OC-3A strain isolated from the brain of a granulomatous amoebic encephalitis patient. A DNA probe for an A. healyi cDNA library screening was amplified by PCR using degenerate oligonucleotide primers designed on the basis of conserved amino acids franking the active sites of cysteine and asparagine residues that are conserved in the eukaryotic cysteine proteinases. Cysteine proteinase gene of A. healyi (AhCP1) was composed of 330 amino acids with signal sequence, a proposed pro-domain and a predicted active site made up of the catalytic residues, Cys25, His159, and Asn175. Deduced amino acid sequence analysis indicates that AhCP1 belong to ERFNIN subfamily of C1 peptidases. By Northern blot analysis, no direct correlation was observed between AhCP1 mRNA expression and virulence of Acanthamoeba, but the gene was expressed at higher level in amoebae isolated from soil than amoeba from clinical samples. These findings raise the possibility that Ahcp1 protein may play a role in protein metabolism and digestion of phagocytosed bacteria or host tissue debris rather than in invasion of amoebae into host tissue. PMID:11949209

  17. Functional consequences of sulfhydryl modification of the γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 at a single solvent-exposed cysteine residue.

    PubMed

    Omoto, Jaison J; Maestas, Matthew J; Rahnama-Vaghef, Ali; Choi, Ye E; Salto, Gerardo; Sanchez, Rachel V; Anderson, Cynthia M; Eskandari, Sepehr

    2012-12-01

    The aims of this study were to optimize the experimental conditions for labeling extracellularly oriented, solvent-exposed cysteine residues of γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 (GAT1) with the membrane-impermeant sulfhydryl reagent [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl]methanethiosulfonate (MTSET) and to characterize the functional and pharmacological consequences of labeling on transporter steady-state and presteady-state kinetic properties. We expressed human GAT1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes and used radiotracer and electrophysiological methods to assay transporter function before and after sulfhydryl modification with MTSET. In the presence of NaCl, transporter exposure to MTSET (1-2.5 mM for 5-20 min) led to partial inhibition of GAT1-mediated transport, and this loss of function was completely reversed by the reducing reagent dithiothreitol. MTSET treatment had no functional effect on the mutant GAT1 C74A, whereas the membrane-permeant reagents N-ethylmaleimide and tetramethylrhodamine-6-maleimide inhibited GABA transport mediated by GAT1 C74A. Ion replacement experiments indicated that MTSET labeling of GAT1 could be driven to completion when valproate replaced chloride in the labeling buffer, suggesting that valproate induces a GAT1 conformation that significantly increases C74 accessibility to the extracellular fluid. Following partial inhibition by MTSET, there was a proportional reduction in both the presteady-state and steady-state macroscopic signals, and the functional and pharmacological properties of the remaining signals were indistinguishable from those of unlabeled GAT1. Therefore, covalent modification of GAT1 at C74 results in completely nonfunctional as well as electrically silent transporters.

  18. The secondary structure of apolipoproteins in human HDL3 particles after chemical modification of their tyrosine, lysine, cysteine or arginine residues. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Herzyk, E; Owen, J S; Chapman, D

    1988-09-02

    Fourier transform infrared spectra of apolipoprotein E-depleted human HDL3 have been obtained in H2O and 2H2O buffers. The absorption bands in the protein amide I and amide II regions (1700-1500 cm-1) were assigned to alpha-helical, disordered and beta-strand/beta-turn structures of apolipoproteins A-I and A-II (apoA-I and apoA-II), the apolipoprotein constituents of HDL3. Modification of HDL3 by tetranitromethane (TNM) treatment, acetylation, reduction plus alkylation and 1,2-cyclohexanedione treatment derivatised tyrosine, lysine, cysteine and arginine residues, respectively, and caused alteration of the secondary structure of the HDL3 apolipoproteins to different extents. Each of the chemical modifications caused changes in the frequency of bands associated with beta-strands/beta-turns, but only TNM treatment of HDL3, as judged by the second- and fourth-derivative spectra, resulted in a shift of the band assigned to the alpha-helical structure of the proteins. In agreement with other workers, only TNM treatment of HDL3 particles was found to inhibit their binding by high-affinity cell membrane receptors. It is proposed, therefore, that receptor recognition of HDL3 particles is dependent on conservation of the alpha-helix structures within apoA-I and apoA-II, and that beta-strand/beta-turn structures are not involved. This conclusion is consistent with the predominance of amphipathic alpha-helical structures in both apolipoproteins and with the relaxed specificity of the receptors which are thought to recognise both apoA-I and apoA-II.

  19. Optimal expression of a Fab-effector fusion protein in Escherichia coli by removing the cysteine residues responsible for an interchain disulfide bond of a Fab molecule.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyeon-Ju; Kim, Hye-Jin; Jung, Mun-Sik; Han, Jae-Kyu; Cha, Sang-Hoon

    2017-04-01

    Development of novel bi-functional or even tri-functional Fab-effector fusion proteins would have a great potential in the biomedical sciences. However, the expression of Fab-effector fusion proteins in Escherichia coli is problematic especially when a eukaryotic effector moiety is genetically linked to a Fab due to the lack of proper chaperone proteins and an inappropriate physicochemical environment intrinsic to the microbial hosts. We previously reported that a human Fab molecule, referred to as SL335, reactive to human serum albumin has a prolonged in vivo serum half-life in rats. We, herein, tested six discrete SL335-human growth hormone (hGH) fusion constructs as a model system to define an optimal Fab-effector fusion format for E. coli expression. We found that one variant, referred to as HserG/Lser, outperformed the others in terms of a soluble expression yield and functionality in that HserG/Lser has a functional hGH bioactivity and possesses an serum albumin-binding affinity comparable to SL335. Our results clearly demonstrated that the genetic linkage of an effector domain to the C-terminus of Fd (VH+CH1) and the removal of cysteine (Cys) residues responsible for an interchain disulfide bond (IDB) ina Fab molecule optimize the periplasmic expression of a Fab-effector fusion protein in E. coli. We believe that our approach can contribute the development of diverse bi-functional Fab-effector fusion proteins by providing a simple strategy that enables the reliable expression of a functional fusion proteins in E. coli.

  20. Structure of a Berberine Bridge Enzyme-Like Enzyme with an Active Site Specific to the Plant Family Brassicaceae

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Bastian; Wallner, Silvia; Steiner, Barbara; Oberdorfer, Gustav; Kumar, Prashant; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas; Sensen, Christoph W.; Gruber, Karl; Macheroux, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Berberine bridge enzyme-like (BBE-like) proteins form a multigene family (pfam 08031), which is present in plants, fungi and bacteria. They adopt the vanillyl alcohol-oxidase fold and predominantly show bi-covalent tethering of the FAD cofactor to a cysteine and histidine residue, respectively. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome was recently shown to contain genes coding for 28 BBE-like proteins, while featuring four distinct active site compositions. We determined the structure of a member of the AtBBE-like protein family (termed AtBBE-like 28), which has an active site composition that has not been structurally and biochemically characterized thus far. The most salient and distinguishing features of the active site found in AtBBE-like 28 are a mono-covalent linkage of a histidine to the 8α-position of the flavin-isoalloxazine ring and the lack of a second covalent linkage to the 6-position, owing to the replacement of a cysteine with a histidine. In addition, the structure reveals the interaction of a glutamic acid (Glu426) with an aspartic acid (Asp369) at the active site, which appear to share a proton. This arrangement leads to the delocalization of a negative charge at the active site that may be exploited for catalysis. The structure also indicates a shift of the position of the isoalloxazine ring in comparison to other members of the BBE-like family. The dioxygen surrogate chloride was found near the C(4a) position of the isoalloxazine ring in the oxygen pocket, pointing to a rapid reoxidation of reduced enzyme by dioxygen. A T-DNA insertional mutant line for AtBBE-like 28 results in a phenotype, that is characterized by reduced biomass and lower salt stress tolerance. Multiple sequence analysis showed that the active site composition found in AtBBE-like 28 is only present in the Brassicaceae, suggesting that it plays a specific role in the metabolism of this plant family. PMID:27276217

  1. Substitution of cysteine 192 in a highly conserved Streptococcus pyogenes extracellular cysteine protease (interleukin 1beta convertase) alters proteolytic activity and ablates zymogen processing.

    PubMed Central

    Musser, J M; Stockbauer, K; Kapur, V; Rudgers, G W

    1996-01-01

    Virtually all strains of the human pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes express a highly conserved extracellular cysteine protease. The protein is made as an inactive zymogen of 40,000 Da and undergoes autocatalytic truncation to result in a 28,000-Da active protease. Numerous independent lines of investigation suggest that this enzyme participates in one or more phases of host-parasite interaction, such as inflammation and soft tissue invasion. Replacement of the single cysteine residue (C-192) with serine (C192S mutation) resulted in loss of detectable proteolytic activity against bovine casein, human fibronectin, and the low-molecular-weight synthetic substrate 7-amino-4-trifluoromethyl coumarin. The C192S mutant molecule does not undergo autocatalytic processing of zymogen to mature form. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that C-192 participates in active-site formation and enzyme catalysis. PMID:8675287

  2. Substitution of cysteine 192 in a highly conserved Streptococcus pyogenes extracellular cysteine protease (interleukin 1beta convertase) alters proteolytic activity and ablates zymogen processing.

    PubMed

    Musser, J M; Stockbauer, K; Kapur, V; Rudgers, G W

    1996-06-01

    Virtually all strains of the human pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes express a highly conserved extracellular cysteine protease. The protein is made as an inactive zymogen of 40,000 Da and undergoes autocatalytic truncation to result in a 28,000-Da active protease. Numerous independent lines of investigation suggest that this enzyme participates in one or more phases of host-parasite interaction, such as inflammation and soft tissue invasion. Replacement of the single cysteine residue (C-192) with serine (C192S mutation) resulted in loss of detectable proteolytic activity against bovine casein, human fibronectin, and the low-molecular-weight synthetic substrate 7-amino-4-trifluoromethyl coumarin. The C192S mutant molecule does not undergo autocatalytic processing of zymogen to mature form. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that C-192 participates in active-site formation and enzyme catalysis.

  3. Interaction of aspartic acid-104 and proline-287 with the active site of m-calpain.

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, J S; Elce, J S

    1996-01-01

    In an ongoing study of the mechanisms of calpain catalysis and Ca(2+)-induced activation, the effects of Asp-104-->Ser and Pro-287-->Ser large subunit mutations on m-calpain activity, the pH-activity profile, Ca(2+)-sensitivity, and autolysis were measured. The importance of these positions was suggested by sequence comparisons between the calpain and papain families of cysteine proteinases. Asp-104 is adjacent to the active-site Cys-105, and Pro-287 is adjacent to the active-site Asn-286 and probably to the active-site His-262; both Asp-104 and Pro-287 are absolutely conserved in the known calpains, but are replaced by highly conserved serine residues in the papains. The single mutants had approx. 10-15% of wild-type activity, due mainly to a decrease in kcat, since Km was only slightly increased. The Pro-287-->Ser mutation appeared to cause a local perturbation of the catalytic Cys-105/His-262 catalytic ion pair, reducing its efficiency without major effect on the conformation and stability of the enzyme. The Asp-104-->Ser mutation caused a marked narrowing of the pH-activity curve, a 9-fold increase in Ca2+ requirement, and an acceleration of autolysis, when compared with the wild-type enzyme. The results indicated that Asp-104 alters the nature of its interaction with the catalytic ion pair during Ca(2+)-induced conformational change in calpain. This interaction may be direct or indirect, but is important in activation of the enzyme. PMID:8912692

  4. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of a Copper-Binding Mutant of the Organomercurial Lyase MerB: Insight into the Key Role of the Active Site Aspartic Acid in Hg-Carbon Bond Cleavage and Metal Binding Specificity.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Haytham M; Lecoq, Lauriane; Stevenson, Michael; Mansour, Ahmed; Cappadocia, Laurent; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Wilkinson, Kevin J; Sygusch, Jurgen; Wilcox, Dean E; Omichinski, James G

    2016-02-23

    In bacterial resistance to mercury, the organomercurial lyase (MerB) plays a key role in the detoxification pathway through its ability to cleave Hg-carbon bonds. Two cysteines (C96 and C159; Escherichia coli MerB numbering) and an aspartic acid (D99) have been identified as the key catalytic residues, and these three residues are conserved in all but four known MerB variants, where the aspartic acid is replaced with a serine. To understand the role of the active site serine, we characterized the structure and metal binding properties of an E. coli MerB mutant with a serine substituted for D99 (MerB D99S) as well as one of the native MerB variants containing a serine residue in the active site (Bacillus megaterium MerB2). Surprisingly, the MerB D99S protein copurified with a bound metal that was determined to be Cu(II) from UV-vis absorption, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, and electron paramagnetic resonance studies. X-ray structural studies revealed that the Cu(II) is bound to the active site cysteine residues of MerB D99S, but that it is displaced following the addition of either an organomercurial substrate or an ionic mercury product. In contrast, the B. megaterium MerB2 protein does not copurify with copper, but the structure of the B. megaterium MerB2-Hg complex is highly similar to the structure of the MerB D99S-Hg complexes. These results demonstrate that the active site aspartic acid is crucial for both the enzymatic activity and metal binding specificity of MerB proteins and suggest a possible functional relationship between MerB and its only known structural homologue, the copper-binding protein NosL.

  5. The co-crystal structure of unliganded bovine alpha-thrombin and prethrombin-2: movement of the Tyr-Pro-Pro-Trp segment and active site residues upon ligand binding.

    PubMed Central

    Malkowski, M. G.; Martin, P. D.; Guzik, J. C.; Edwards, B. F.

    1997-01-01

    Unliganded bovine alpha-thrombin and prethrombin-2 have been co-crystallized, in space group P21212, using either ammonium sulfate or polyethylene glycol 2000 (PEG2K), and their structures determined at 2.2 A and 2.3 A, respectively. Initial phases were determined by molecular replacement and refined using XPLOR to final R factors of 0.187 (Rfree = 0.255) and 0.190 (Rfree = 0.282) for the salt and PEG2K models, respectively. The apo-enzyme form of bovine alpha-thrombin shows dramatic shifts in placement for the Tyr-Pro-Pro-Trp segment, for Glu-192, and for the catalytic residues His-57 and Ser-195, when compared to 4 thrombin complexes representing different states of catalysis, namely (1) the Michaelis complex (residues 7-19 of fibrinogen A alpha with a non-cleavable scissile bond), (2) enzyme-inhibitor complex (D-Phe-Pro-Arg chloromethylketone), (3) enzyme product complex (residues 7-16 of fibrinopeptide A), and (4) the exosite complex (residues 53-64 of hirudin). The structures of bovine and human prethrombin-2 are generally similar to one another (RMS deviation of 0.68 A) but differ significantly in the Arg-15/Ile-16 cleavage region and in the three activation domains, which are disordered in bovine prethrombin-2, analogous to that seen for trypsinogen. PMID:9232645

  6. The Crystal Structure of the Fifth Scavenger Receptor Cysteine-Rich Domain of Porcine CD163 Reveals an Important Residue Involved in Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongfang; Jiang, Longguang; Qiao, Songlin; Zhi, Yubao; Chen, Xin-Xin; Yang, Yanyan; Huang, Xiaojing; Huang, Mingdong; Li, Rui; Zhang, Gai-Ping

    2017-02-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has become an economically critical factor in swine industry since its worldwide spread in the 1990s. Infection by its causative agent, PRRS virus (PRRSV), was proven to be mediated by an indispensable receptor, porcine CD163 (pCD163), and the fifth scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain (SRCR5) is essential for virus infection. However, the structural details and specific residues of pCD163 SRCR5 involved in infection have not been defined yet. In this study, we prepared recombinant pCD163 SRCR5 in Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) cells and determined its crystal structure at a high resolution of 2.0 Å. This structure includes a markedly long loop region and shows a special electrostatic potential, and these are significantly different from those of other members of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily (SRCR-SF). Subsequently, we carried out structure-based mutational studies to identify that the arginine residue at position 561 (Arg561) in the long loop region is important for PRRSV infection. Further, we showed Arg561 probably takes effect on the binding of pCD163 to PRRSV during virus invasion. Altogether the current work provides the first view of the CD163 SRCR domain, expands our knowledge of the invasion mechanism of PRRSV, and supports a molecular basis for prevention and control of the virus.

  7. Metal Ion Interactions in the DNA Cleavage/Ligation Active Site of Human Topoisomerase IIα†

    PubMed Central

    Deweese, Joseph E.; Guengerich, F. Peter; Burgin, Alex B.; Osheroff, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Human topoisomerase IIα utilizes a two-metal-ion mechanism for DNA cleavage. One of the metal ions (M12+) is believed to make a critical interaction with the 3′-bridging atom of the scissile phosphate, while the other (M22+) is believed to interact with a non-bridging oxygen of the scissile phosphate. Based on structural and mutagenesis studies of prokaryotic nucleic acid enzymes, it has been proposed that the active site divalent metal ions interact with type II topoisomerases through a series of conserved acidic amino acid residues. The homologous residues in human topoisomerase IIα are E461, D541, D543, and D545. To address the validity of these assignments and to delineate interactions between individual amino acids and M12+ and M22+, we individually mutated each of these acidic amino acid residues in topoisomerase IIα to either cysteine or alanine. Mutant enzymes displayed a marked loss of catalytic and DNA cleavage activity as well as a reduced affinity for divalent metal ions. Additional experiments determined the ability of wild-type and mutant topoisomerase IIα enzymes to cleave an oligonucleotide substrate that contained a sulfur atom in place of the 3′-bridging oxygen of the scissile phosphate in the presence of Mg2+, Mn2+, or Ca2+. Based on the results of these studies, we conclude that the four acidic amino acid residues interact with metal ions in the DNA cleavage/ligation active site of topoisomerase IIα. Furthermore, we propose that M12+ interacts with E461, D543, and D545 and M22+ interacts with E461 and D541. PMID:19697956

  8. Structure of the Autocatalytic Cysteine Protease Domain of Potyvirus Helper-component Proteinase*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Bihong; Lin, Jinzhong; Ye, Keqiong

    2011-01-01

    The helper-component proteinase (HC-Pro) of potyvirus is involved in polyprotein processing, aphid transmission, and suppression of antiviral RNA silencing. There is no high resolution structure reported for any part of HC-Pro, hindering mechanistic understanding of its multiple functions. We have determined the crystal structure of the cysteine protease domain of HC-Pro from turnip mosaic virus at 2.0 Å resolution. As a protease, HC-Pro only cleaves a Gly-Gly dipeptide at its own C terminus. The structure represents a postcleavage state in which the cleaved C terminus remains tightly bound at the active site cleft to prevent trans activity. The structure adopts a compact α/β-fold, which differs from papain-like cysteine proteases and shows weak similarity to nsP2 protease from Venezuelan equine encephalitis alphavirus. Nevertheless, the catalytic cysteine and histidine residues constitute an active site that is highly similar to these in papain-like and nsP2 proteases. HC-Pro recognizes a consensus sequence YXVGG around the cleavage site between the two glycine residues. The structure delineates the sequence specificity at sites P1–P4. Structural modeling and covariation analysis across the Potyviridae family suggest a tryptophan residue accounting for the glycine specificity at site P1′. Moreover, a surface of the protease domain is conserved in potyvirus but not in other genera of the Potyviridae family, likely due to extra functional constrain. The structure provides insight into the catalysis mechanism, cis-acting mode, cleavage site specificity, and other functions of the HC-Pro protease domain. PMID:21543324

  9. A Quantitative Mass-Spectrometry Platform to Monitor Changes in Cysteine Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yu; Weerapana, Eranthie

    2017-01-01

    Summary Cysteine residues on proteins serve diverse functional roles in catalysis and regulation and are susceptible to numerous posttranslational modifications. Methods to monitor the reactivity of cysteines within the context of a complex proteome have facilitated the identification and functional characterization of cysteine residues on disparate proteins. Here, we describe the use of a cysteine-reactive iodoacetamide probe coupled to isotopically labeled, cleavable linkers to identify and quantify cysteine-reactivity changes from two biological samples. PMID:27778278

  10. Use of the parallax-quench method to determine the position of the active-site loop of cholesterol oxidase in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Wolfgang, D E; Sampson, N S

    2000-11-07

    To elucidate the cholesterol oxidase-membrane bilayer interaction, a cysteine was introduced into the active site lid at position-81 using the Brevibacterium enzyme. To eliminate the possibility of labeling native cysteine, the single cysteine in the wild-type enzyme was mutated to a serine without any change in activity. The loop-cysteine mutant was then labeled with acrylodan, an environment-sensitive fluorescence probe. The fluorescence increased and blue-shifted upon binding to lipid vesicles, consistent with a change into a more hydrophobic, i.e., lipid, environment. This acrylodan-labeled cholesterol oxidase was used to explore the pH, ionic strength, and headgroup dependence of binding. Between pH 6 and 10, there was no significant change in binding affinity. Incorporation of anionic lipids (phosphatidylserine) into the vesicles did not increase the binding affinity nor did altering the ionic strength. These experiments suggested that the interactions are primarily driven by hydrophobic effects not ionic effects. Using vesicles doped with either 5-doxyl phosphatidylcholine, 10-doxyl phosphatidylcholine, or phosphatidyl-tempocholine, quenching of acrylodan fluorescence was observed upon binding. Using the parallax method of London [Chattopadhyay, A., and London, E. (1987) Biochemistry 26, 39-45], the acrylodan ring is calculated to be 8.1 +/- 2.5 A from the center of the lipid bilayer. Modeling the acrylodan-cysteine residue as an extended chain suggests that the backbone of the loop does not penetrate into the lipid bilayer but interacts with the headgroups, i.e., the choline. These results demonstrate that cholesterol oxidase interacts directly with the lipid bilayer and sits on the surface of the membrane.

  11. Defining critical residues for substrate binding to 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase: Active site substitutions stabilize the pre-decarboxylation intermediate C2α-lactylthiamin diphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Kakalis, Lazaros; Jordan, Frank; Meyers, Caren L. Freel

    2014-01-01

    1-Deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) synthase catalyzes formation of DXP from pyruvate and d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (d-GAP) in a thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent manner, and is the first step in the essential pathway to isoprenoids in human pathogens. Understanding the mechanism of this unique enzyme is critical for developing new anti-infective agents that selectively target isoprenoid biosynthesis. The present study uses mutagenesis and a combination of protein fluorescence, circular dichroism and kinetics experiments to investigate the roles of Arg-420, Arg-478 and Tyr-392 in substrate binding and catalysis. The results support a random sequential, preferred order mechanism and predict Arg-420 and Arg-478 are involved in binding of the acceptor substrate, d-GAP. d-Glyceraldehyde, an alternative acceptor substrate lacking the phosphoryl group predicted to interact with Arg-420 and Arg-478, also accelerates decarboxylation of the pre-decarboxylation intermediate C2α-lactylthiamin diphosphate (LThDP) on DXP synthase, indicating this binding interaction is not absolutely required, and the hydroxyaldehyde sufficiently triggers decarboxylation. Unexpectedly, Tyr-392 contributes to d-GAP affinity and is not required for LThDP formation or its d-GAP-promoted decarboxylation. Time-resolved CD spectroscopy and NMR experiments indicate LThDP is significantly stabilized on R420A and Y392F variants compared to wild type DXP synthase in the absence of acceptor substrate, yet these substitutions do not appear to impact the rate of d-GAP-promoted LThDP decarboxylation in the presence of high d-GAP, and LThDP formation remains the rate-limiting step. These results suggest a role of these residues to promote d-GAP binding which in turn facilitates decarboxylation, and further highlight interesting differences between DXP synthase and other ThDP-dependent enzymes. PMID:24767541

  12. Reaction of Cysteine(s) with Phenyldichloroarsine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    acetyl -L- cysteine reacted like the two Cys-l 3 residucs are spatially not In close L-Cys teine- a nd Iformed a 1:1 adduct when the ratio proximity...were obtained when L- cysteine methyl ester and N- acetyl -L- cysteine 0.0 were used in our studies. For the N- acetyl -L- cysteine , the sample decomposed...the N- acetyl derivatives of L- cysteine .... ... .. , also formed 1:1 adducts, Another possibility is that solvent plays a role in the adducts fornmd

  13. Homology modeling, molecular docking and MD simulation studies to investigate role of cysteine protease from Xanthomonas campestris in degradation of Aβ peptide.

    PubMed

    Dhanavade, Maruti J; Jalkute, Chidambar B; Barage, Sagar H; Sonawane, Kailas D

    2013-12-01

    Cysteine protease is known to degrade amyloid beta peptide which is a causative agent of Alzheimer's disease. This cleavage mechanism has not been studied in detail at the atomic level. Hence, a three-dimensional structure of cysteine protease from Xanthomonas campestris was constructed by homology modeling using Geno3D, SWISS-MODEL, and MODELLER 9v7. All the predicted models were analyzed by PROCHECK and PROSA. Three-dimensional model of cysteine protease built by MODELLER 9v7 shows similarity with human cathepsin B crystal structure. This model was then used further for docking and simulation studies. The molecular docking study revealed that Cys17, His87, and Gln88 residues of cysteine protease form an active site pocket similar to human cathepsin B. Then the docked complex was refined by molecular dynamic simulation to confirm its stable behavior over the entire simulation period. The molecular docking and MD simulation studies showed that the sulfhydryl hydrogen atom of Cys17 of cysteine protease interacts with carboxylic oxygen of Lys16 of Aβ peptide indicating the cleavage site. Thus, the cysteine protease model from X. campestris having similarity with human cathepsin B crystal structure may be used as an alternate approach to cleave Aβ peptide a causative agent of Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Chemical Protein Modification through Cysteine.

    PubMed

    Gunnoo, Smita B; Madder, Annemieke

    2016-04-01

    The modification of proteins with non-protein entities is important for a wealth of applications, and methods for chemically modifying proteins attract considerable attention. Generally, modification is desired at a single site to maintain homogeneity and to minimise loss of function. Though protein modification can be achieved by targeting some natural amino acid side chains, this often leads to ill-defined and randomly modified proteins. Amongst the natural amino acids, cysteine combines advantageous properties contributing to its suitability for site-selective modification, including a unique nucleophilicity, and a low natural abundance--both allowing chemo- and regioselectivity. Native cysteine residues can be targeted, or Cys can be introduced at a desired site in a protein by means of reliable genetic engineering techniques. This review on chemical protein modification through cysteine should appeal to those interested in modifying proteins for a range of applications.

  15. Systematic mutational analysis of the active-site threonine of HIV-1 proteinase: rethinking the "fireman's grip" hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Strisovsky, K.; Tessmer, U.; Langner, J.; Konvalinka, J.; Kräusslich, H. G.

    2000-01-01

    Aspartic proteinases share a conserved network of hydrogen bonds (termed "fireman's grip"), which involves the hydroxyl groups of two threonine residues in the active site Asp-Thr-Gly triplets (Thr26 in the case of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) PR). In the case of retroviral proteinases (PRs), which are active as symmetrical homodimers, these interactions occur at the dimer interface. For a systematic analysis of the "fireman's grip," Thr26 of HIV-1 PR was changed to either Ser, Cys, or Ala. The variant enzymes were tested for cleavage of HIV-1 derived peptide and polyprotein substrates. PR(T26S) and PR(T26C) showed similar or slightly reduced activity compared to wild-type HIV-1 PR, indicating that the sulfhydryl group of cysteine can substitute for the hydroxyl of the conserved threonine in this position. PR(T26A), which lacks the "fireman's grip" interaction, was virtually inactive and was monomeric in solution at conditions where wild-type PR exhibited a monomer-dimer equilibrium. All three mutations had little effect when introduced into only one chain of a linked dimer of HIV-1 PR. In this case, even changing both Thr residues to Ala yielded residual activity suggesting that the "fireman's grip" is not essential for activity but contributes significantly to dimer formation. Taken together, these results indicate that the "fireman's grip" is crucial for stabilization of the retroviral PR dimer and for overall stability of the enzyme. PMID:11045610

  16. Peptide-formation on cysteine-containing peptide scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, B. C.; Orgel, L. E.

    1999-01-01

    Monomeric cysteine residues attached to cysteine-containing peptides by disulfide bonds can be activated by carbonyldiimidazole. If two monomeric cysteine residues, attached to a 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Glyn-Cys-Glu10, (n = 0, 1, 2, 3) are activated, they react to form the dipeptide Cys-Cys. in 25-65% yield. Similarly, the activation of a cysteine residue attached to the 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Gly-Glu10 in the presence of Arg5 leads to the formation of Cys-Arg5 in 50% yield. The significance of these results for prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  17. Modulation of Active Site Electronic Structure by the Protein Matrix to Control [NiFe] Hydrogenase Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle MA; Raugei, Simone; Squier, Thomas C.

    2014-09-30

    Control of the reactivity of the nickel center of the [NiFe] hydrogenase and other metalloproteins commonly involves outer coordination sphere ligands that act to modify the geometry and physical properties of the active site metal centers. We carried out a combined set of classical molecular dynamics and quantum/classical mechanics calculations to provide quantitative estimates of how dynamic fluctuations of the active site within the protein matrix modulate the electronic structure at the catalytic center. Specifically we focused on the dynamics of the inner and outer coordination spheres of the cysteinate-bound Ni–Fe cluster in the catalytically active Ni-C state. There are correlated movements of the cysteinate ligands and the surrounding hydrogen-bonding network, which modulate the electron affinity at the active site and the proton affinity of a terminal cysteinate. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesize a coupling between protein dynamics and electron and proton transfer reactions critical to dihydrogen production.

  18. Reconstruction of Cysteine Biosynthesis Using Engineered Cysteine-Free and Methionine-Free Enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Kendrick; Fujishima, Kosuke; Abe, Nozomi; Nakahigashi, Kenji; Endy, Drew; Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    Ten of the proteinogenic amino acids can be generated abiotically while the remaining thirteen require biology for their synthesis. Paradoxically, the biosynthesis pathways observed in nature require enzymes that are made with the amino acids they produce. For example, Escherichia coli produces cysteine from serine via two enzymes that contain cysteine. Here, we substituted alternate amino acids for cysteine and also methionine, which is biosynthesized from cysteine, in serine acetyl transferase (CysE) and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (CysM). CysE function was rescued by cysteine-and-methionine-free enzymes and CysM function was rescued by cysteine-free enzymes. Structural modeling suggests that methionine stabilizes CysM and is present in the active site of CysM. Cysteine is not conserved among CysE and CysM protein orthologs, suggesting that cysteine is not functionally important for its own synthesis. Engineering biosynthetic enzymes that lack the amino acids being synthesized provides insights into the evolution of amino acid biosynthesis and pathways for bioengineering.

  19. Natural cysteine protease inhibitors in protozoa: Fifteen years of the chagasin family.

    PubMed

    Costa, Tatiana F R; Lima, Ana Paula C A

    2016-03-01

    Chagasin-type inhibitors comprise natural inhibitors of papain-like cysteine proteases that are distributed among Protist, Bacteria and Archaea. Chagasin was identified in the pathogenic protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi as an approximately 11 kDa protein that is a tight-binding and highly thermostable inhibitor of papain, cysteine cathepsins and endogenous parasite cysteine proteases. It displays an Imunoglobulin-like fold with three exposed loops to one side of the molecule, where amino acid residues present in conserved motifs at the tips of each loop contact target proteases. Differently from cystatins, the loop 2 of chagasin enters the active-site cleft, making direct contact with the catalytic residues, while loops 4 and 6 embrace the enzyme from the sides. Orthologues of chagasin are named Inhibitors of Cysteine Peptidases (ICP), and share conserved overall tri-dimensional structure and mode of binding to proteases. ICPs are tentatively distributed in three families: in family I42 are grouped chagasin-type inhibitors that share conserved residues at the exposed loops; family I71 contains Plasmodium ICPs, which are large proteins having a chagasin-like domain at the C-terminus, with lower similarity to chagasin in the conserved motif at loop 2; family I81 contains Toxoplasma ICP. Recombinant ICPs tested so far can inactivate protozoa cathepsin-like proteases and their mammalian counterparts. Studies on their biological roles were carried out in a few species, mainly using transgenic protozoa, and the conclusions vary. However, in all cases, alterations in the levels of expression of chagasin/ICPs led to substantial changes in one or more steps of parasite biology, with higher incidence in influencing their interaction with the hosts. We will cover most of the findings on chagasin/ICP structural and functional properties and overview the current knowledge on their roles in protozoa.

  20. Parkinsonism-associated Protein DJ-1/Park7 Is a Major Protein Deglycase That Repairs Methylglyoxal- and Glyoxal-glycated Cysteine, Arginine, and Lysine Residues

    PubMed Central

    Richarme, Gilbert; Mihoub, Mouadh; Dairou, Julien; Bui, Linh Chi; Leger, Thibaut; Lamouri, Aazdine

    2015-01-01

    Glycation is an inevitable nonenzymatic covalent reaction between proteins and endogenous reducing sugars or dicarbonyls (methylglyoxal, glyoxal) that results in protein inactivation. DJ-1 was reported to be a multifunctional oxidative stress response protein with poorly defined function. Here, we show that human DJ-1 is a protein deglycase that repairs methylglyoxal- and glyoxal-glycated amino acids and proteins by acting on early glycation intermediates and releases repaired proteins and lactate or glycolate, respectively. DJ-1 deglycates cysteines, arginines, and lysines (the three major glycated amino acids) of serum albumin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase, and aspartate aminotransferase and thus reactivates these proteins. DJ-1 prevented protein glycation in an Escherichia coli mutant deficient in the DJ-1 homolog YajL and restored cell viability in glucose-containing media. These results suggest that DJ-1-associated Parkinsonism results from excessive protein glycation and establishes DJ-1 as a major anti-glycation and anti-aging protein. PMID:25416785

  1. The "Lid" in the Streptococcus pneumoniae SrtC1 Sortase Adopts a Rigid Structure that Regulates Substrate Access to the Active Site.

    PubMed

    Jacobitz, Alex W; Naziga, Emmanuel B; Yi, Sung Wook; McConnell, Scott A; Peterson, Robert; Jung, Michael E; Clubb, Robert T; Wereszczynski, Jeff

    2016-08-25

    Many species of Gram-positive bacteria use sortase enzymes to assemble long, proteinaceous pili structures that project from the cell surface to mediate microbial adhesion. Sortases construct highly stable structures by catalyzing a transpeptidation reaction that covalently links pilin subunits together via isopeptide bonds. Most Gram-positive pili are assembled by class C sortases that contain a "lid", a structurally unique N-terminal extension that occludes the active site. It has been hypothesized that the "lid" in many sortases is mobile and thus capable of readily being displaced from the enzyme to facilitate substrate binding. Here, we show using NMR dynamics measurements, in vitro assays, and molecular dynamics simulations that the lid in the class C sortase from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SrtC1) adopts a rigid conformation in solution that is devoid of large magnitude conformational excursions that occur on mechanistically relevant time scales. Additionally, we show that point mutations in the lid induce dynamic behavior that correlates with increased hydrolytic activity and sorting signal substrate access to the active site cysteine residue. These results suggest that the lid of the S. pneumoniae SrtC1 enzyme has a negative regulatory function and imply that a significant energetic barrier must be surmounted by currently unidentified factors to dislodge it from the active site to initiate pilus biogenesis.

  2. Mutagenesis of varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein I (gI) identifies a cysteine residue critical for gE/gI heterodimer formation, gI structure, and virulence in skin cells.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Stefan L; Sommer, Marvin H; Reichelt, Mike; Rajamani, Jaya; Vlaycheva-Beisheim, Leonssia; Stamatis, Shaye; Cheng, Jason; Jones, Carol; Zehnder, James; Arvin, Ann M

    2011-05-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is the alphaherpesvirus that causes chicken pox (varicella) and shingles (zoster). The two VZV glycoproteins gE and gI form a heterodimer that mediates efficient cell-to-cell spread. Deletion of gI yields a small-plaque-phenotype virus, ΔgI virus, which is avirulent in human skin using the xenograft model of VZV pathogenesis. In the present study, 10 mutant viruses were generated to determine which residues were required for the typical function of gI. Three phosphorylation sites in the cytoplasmic domain of gI were not required for VZV virulence in vivo. Two deletion mutants mapped a gE binding region in gI to residues 105 to 125. A glycosylation site, N116, in this region did not affect virulence. Substitution of four cysteine residues highly conserved in the Alphaherpesvirinae established that C95 is required for gE/gI heterodimer formation. The C95A and Δ105-125 (with residues 105 to 125 deleted) viruses had small-plaque phenotypes with reduced replication kinetics in vitro similar to those of the ΔgI virus. The Δ105-125 virus was avirulent for human skin in vivo. In contrast, the C95A mutant replicated in vivo but with significantly reduced kinetics compared to those of the wild-type virus. In addition to abolished gE/gI heterodimer formation, gI from the C95A or the Δ105-125 mutant was not recognized by monoclonal antibodies that detect the canonical conformation of gI, demonstrating structural disruption of gI in these viruses. This alteration prevented gI incorporation into virus particles. Thus, residues C95 and 105 to 125 are critical for gI structure required for gE/gI heterodimer formation, virion incorporation, and ultimately, effective viral spread in human skin.

  3. ROSics: chemistry and proteomics of cysteine modifications in redox biology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jung; Ha, Sura; Lee, Hee Yoon; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) occurring in proteins determine their functions and regulations. Proteomic tools are available to identify PTMs and have proved invaluable to expanding the inventory of these tools of nature that hold the keys to biological processes. Cysteine (Cys), the least abundant (1-2%) of amino acid residues, are unique in that they play key roles in maintaining stability of protein structure, participating in active sites of enzymes, regulating protein function and binding to metals, among others. Cys residues are major targets of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are important mediators and modulators of various biological processes. It is therefore necessary to identify the Cys-containing ROS target proteins, as well as the sites and species of their PTMs. Cutting edge proteomic tools which have helped identify the PTMs at reactive Cys residues, have also revealed that Cys residues are modified in numerous ways. These modifications include formation of disulfide, thiosulfinate and thiosulfonate, oxidation to sulfenic, sulfinic, sulfonic acids and thiosulfonic acid, transformation to dehydroalanine (DHA) and serine, palmitoylation and farnesylation, formation of chemical adducts with glutathione, 4-hydroxynonenal and 15-deoxy PGJ2, and various other chemicals. We present here, a review of relevant ROS biology, possible chemical reactions of Cys residues and details of the proteomic strategies employed for rapid, efficient and sensitive identification of diverse and novel PTMs involving reactive Cys residues of redox-sensitive proteins. We propose a new name, "ROSics," for the science which describes the principles of mode of action of ROS at molecular levels.

  4. The cysteine proteinases of the pineapple plant.

    PubMed

    Rowan, A D; Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1990-03-15

    The pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) was shown to contain at least four distinct cysteine proteinases, which were purified by a procedure involving active-site-directed affinity chromatography. The major proteinase present in extracts of plant stem was stem bromelain, whilst fruit bromelain was the major proteinase in the fruit. Two additional cysteine proteinases were detected only in the stem: these were ananain and a previously undescribed enzyme that we have called comosain. Stem bromelain, fruit bromelain and ananain were shown to be immunologically distinct. Enzymic characterization revealed differences in both substrate-specificities and inhibition profiles. A study of the cysteine proteinase derived from the related bromeliad Bromelia pinguin (pinguinain) indicated that in many respects it was similar to fruit bromelain, although it was found to be immunologically distinct.

  5. The cysteine proteinases of the pineapple plant.

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, A D; Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1990-01-01

    The pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) was shown to contain at least four distinct cysteine proteinases, which were purified by a procedure involving active-site-directed affinity chromatography. The major proteinase present in extracts of plant stem was stem bromelain, whilst fruit bromelain was the major proteinase in the fruit. Two additional cysteine proteinases were detected only in the stem: these were ananain and a previously undescribed enzyme that we have called comosain. Stem bromelain, fruit bromelain and ananain were shown to be immunologically distinct. Enzymic characterization revealed differences in both substrate-specificities and inhibition profiles. A study of the cysteine proteinase derived from the related bromeliad Bromelia pinguin (pinguinain) indicated that in many respects it was similar to fruit bromelain, although it was found to be immunologically distinct. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2327970

  6. Active site amino acid sequence of human factor D.

    PubMed

    Davis, A E

    1980-08-01

    Factor D was isolated from human plasma by chromatography on CM-Sephadex C50, Sephadex G-75, and hydroxylapatite. Digestion of reduced, S-carboxymethylated factor D with cyanogen bromide resulted in three peptides which were isolated by chromatography on Sephadex G-75 (superfine) equilibrated in 20% formic acid. NH2-Terminal sequences were determined by automated Edman degradation with a Beckman 890C sequencer using a 0.1 M Quadrol program. The smallest peptide (CNBr III) consisted of the NH2-terminal 14 amino acids. The other two peptides had molecular weights of 17,000 (CNBr I) and 7000 (CNBr II). Overlap of the NH2-terminal sequence of factor D with the NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr I established the order of the peptides. The NH2-terminal 53 residues of factor D are somewhat more homologous with the group-specific protease of rat intestine than with other serine proteases. The NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr II revealed the active site serine of factor D. The typical serine protease active site sequence (Gly-Asp-Ser-Gly-Gly-Pro was found at residues 12-17. The region surrounding the active site serine does not appear to be more highly homologous with any one of the other serine proteases. The structural data obtained point out the similarities between factor D and the other proteases. However, complete definition of the degree of relationship between factor D and other proteases will require determination of the remainder of the primary structure.

  7. Novel aggregate formation of a frame-shift mutant protein of tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase is ascribed to three cysteine residues in the C-terminal extension. Retarded secretion and proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Komaru, Keiichi; Ishida, Yoko; Amaya, Yoshihiro; Goseki-Sone, Masae; Orimo, Hideo; Oda, Kimimitsu

    2005-04-01

    In the majority of hypophosphatasia patients, reductions in the serum levels of alkaline phosphatase activity are caused by various missense mutations in the tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP) gene. A unique frame-shift mutation due to a deletion of T at cDNA number 1559 [TNSALP (1559delT)] has been reported only in Japanese patients with high allele frequency. In this study, we examined the molecular phenotype of TNSALP (1559delT) using in vitro translation/translocation system and COS-1 cells transiently expressing this mutant protein. We showed that the mutant protein not only has a larger molecular size than the wild type enzyme by approximately 12 kDa, reflecting an 80 amino acid-long extension at its C-terminus, but that it also lacks a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. In support of this, alkaline phosphatase activity of the cells expressing TNSALP (1559delT) was localized at the juxtanucleus position, but not on the cell surface. However, only a limited amount of the newly synthesized protein was released into the medium and the rest was polyubiquitinated, followed by degradation in the proteasome. SDS/PAGE and analysis by sucrose-density-gradient analysis indicated that TNSALP (1559delT) forms a disulfide-bonded high-molecular-mass aggregate. Interestingly, the aggregate form of TNSALP (1559delT) exhibited a significant enzyme activity. When all three cysteines at positions of 506, 521 and 577 of TNSALP (1559delT) were replaced with serines, the aggregation disappeared and instead this modified mutant protein formed a noncovalently associated dimer, strongly indicating that these cysteine residues in the C-terminal region are solely responsible for aggregate formation by cross-linking the catalytically active dimers. Thus, complete absence of TNSALP on cell surfaces provides a plausible explanation for a severe lethal phenotype of a homozygote hypophosphatasia patient carrying TNSALP (1559delT).

  8. Production of Human Cu,Zn SOD with Higher Activity and Lower Toxicity in E. coli via Mutation of Free Cysteine Residues

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Although, as an antioxidant enzyme, human Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (hSOD1) can mitigate damage to cell components caused by free radicals generated by aerobic metabolism, large-scale manufacturing and clinical use of hSOD1 are still limited by the challenge of rapid and inexpensive production of high-quality eukaryotic hSOD1 in recombinant forms. We have demonstrated previously that it is a promising strategy to increase the expression levels of soluble hSOD1 so as to increase hSOD1 yields in E. coli. In this study, a wild-type hSOD1 (wtSOD1) and three mutant SOD1s (mhSOD1s), in which free cysteines were substituted with serine, were constructed and their expression in soluble form was measured. Results show that the substitution of Cys111 (mhSOD1/C111S) increased the expression of soluble hSOD1 in E. coli whereas substitution of the internal Cys6 (mhSOD1/C6S) decreased it. Besides, raised levels of soluble expression led to an increase in hSOD1 yields. In addition, mhSOD1/C111S expressed at a higher soluble level showed lower toxicity and stronger whitening and antiradiation activities than those of wtSOD1. Taken together, our data demonstrate that C111S mutation in hSOD1 is an effective strategy to develop new SOD1-associated reagents and that mhSOD1/C111S is a satisfactory candidate for large-scale production. PMID:28299326

  9. Crucial role of conserved cysteine residues in the assembly of two iron-sulfur clusters on the CIA protein Nar1.

    PubMed

    Urzica, Eugen; Pierik, Antonio J; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich; Lill, Roland

    2009-06-09

    Iron-sulfur (Fe/S) protein maturation in the eukaryotic cytosol and nucleus requires conserved components of the essential CIA machinery. The CIA protein Nar1 performs a specific function in transferring an Fe/S cluster that is assembled de novo on the Cfd1-Nbp35 scaffold to apoproteins. Here, we used systematic site-directed mutagenesis and a combination of in vitro and in vivo studies to show that Nar1 holds two Fe/S clusters at conserved N- and C-terminal cysteine motifs. A wealth of biochemical studies suggests that the assembly of these Fe/S clusters on Nar1 cannot be studied in Escherichia coli, as the recombinant protein does not contain the native Fe/S clusters. We therefore followed Fe/S cluster incorporation directly in yeast by a (55)Fe radiolabeling method in vivo, and we measured the functional consequences of Nar1 mutations in the assembly of cytosolic Fe/S proteins. We find that both Fe/S clusters are essential for Nar1 function and cell viability. Molecular modeling using a structurally but not functionally related bacterial iron-only hydrogenase as a template provided compelling structural explanations for our mutational data. The C-terminal Fe/S cluster is stably buried within Nar1, whereas the N-terminal one is exposed at the protein surface and hence may be more easily lost. Insertion of an Fe/S cluster into the C-terminal location depends on the N-terminal motif, suggesting the participation of the latter motif in the assembly process of the C-terminal cluster. The vicinity of the two Fe/S centers suggests a close functional cooperation during cytosolic Fe/S protein maturation.

  10. Validated ligand mapping of ACE active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, Daniel J.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2005-08-01

    Crystal structures of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) complexed with three inhibitors (lisinopril, captopril, enalapril) provided experimental data for testing the validity of a prior active site model predicting the bound conformation of the inhibitors. The ACE active site model - predicted over 18 years ago using a series of potent ACE inhibitors of diverse chemical structure - was recreated using published data and commercial software. Comparison between the predicted structures of the three inhibitors bound to the active site of ACE and those determined experimentally yielded root mean square deviation (RMSD) values of 0.43-0.81 Å, among the distances defining the active site map. The bound conformations of the chemically relevant atoms were accurately deduced from the geometry of ligands, applying the assumption that the geometry of the active site groups responsible for binding and catalysis of amide hydrolysis was constrained. The mapping of bound inhibitors at the ACE active site was validated for known experimental compounds, so that the constrained conformational search methodology may be applied with confidence when no experimentally determined structure of the enzyme yet exists, but potent, diverse inhibitors are available.

  11. Discovery of Potent Cysteine-Containing Dipeptide Inhibitors against Tyrosinase: A Comprehensive Investigation of 20 × 20 Dipeptides in Inhibiting Dopachrome Formation.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Tien-Sheng; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chen, Wang-Chuan; Wang, Yeng-Tseng; Lee, Yu-Ching; Lu, Chung-Kuang; Don, Ming-Jaw; Chang, Chang-Yu; Lee, Ching-Hsiao; Lin, Hui-Hsiung; Hsu, Hung-Ju; Hsiao, Nai-Wan

    2015-07-15

    Tyrosinase is an essential copper-containing enzyme required for melanin synthesis. The overproduction and abnormal accumulation of melanin cause hyperpigmentation and neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, tyrosinase is promising for use in medicine and cosmetics. Our previous study identified a natural product, A5, resembling the structure of the dipeptide WY and apparently inhibiting tyrosinase. Here, we comprehensively estimated the inhibitory capability of 20 × 20 dipeptides against mushroom tyrosinase. We found that cysteine-containing dipeptides, directly blocking the active site of tyrosinase, are highly potent in inhibition; in particular, N-terminal cysteine-containing dipeptides markedly outperform the C-terminal-containing ones. The cysteine-containing dipeptides, CE, CS, CY, and CW, show comparative bioactivities, and tyrosine-containing dipeptides are substrate-like inhibitors. The dipeptide PD attenuates 16.5% melanin content without any significant cytotoxicity. This study reveals the functional role of cysteine residue positional preference and the selectivity of specific amino acids in cysteine-containing dipeptides against tyrosinase, aiding in developing skin-whitening products.

  12. Evolution of New Enzymatic Function by Structural Modulation of Cysteine Reactivity in Pseudomonas fluorescens Isocyanide Hydratase

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Madzelan, Peter; Nan, Ruth; Milkovic, Nicole M.; Wilson, Mark A.

    2010-09-13

    Isocyanide (formerly isonitrile) hydratase (EC 4.2.1.103) is an enzyme of the DJ-1 superfamily that hydrates isocyanides to yield the corresponding N-formamide. In order to understand the structural basis for isocyanide hydratase (ICH) catalysis, we determined the crystal structures of wild-type and several site-directed mutants of Pseudomonas fluorescens ICH at resolutions ranging from 1.0 to 1.9 {angstrom}. We also developed a simple UV-visible spectrophotometric assay for ICH activity using 2-naphthyl isocyanide as a substrate. ICH contains a highly conserved cysteine residue (Cys101) that is required for catalysis and interacts with Asp17, Thr102, and an ordered water molecule in the active site. Asp17 has carboxylic acid bond lengths that are consistent with protonation, and we propose that it activates the ordered water molecule to hydrate organic isocyanides. In contrast to Cys101 and Asp17, Thr102 is tolerant of mutagenesis, and the T102V mutation results in a substrate-inhibited enzyme. Although ICH is similar to human DJ-1 (1.6 {angstrom} C-{alpha} root mean square deviation), structural differences in the vicinity of Cys101 disfavor the facile oxidation of this residue that is functionally important in human DJ-1 but would be detrimental to ICH activity. The ICH active site region also exhibits surprising conformational plasticity and samples two distinct conformations in the crystal. ICH represents a previously uncharacterized clade of the DJ-1 superfamily that possesses a novel enzymatic activity, demonstrating that the DJ-1 core fold can evolve diverse functions by subtle modulation of the environment of a conserved, reactive cysteine residue.

  13. Trimeric gp120-specific bovine monoclonal antibodies require cysteine and aromatic residues in CDRH3 for high affinity binding to HIV Env.

    PubMed

    Heydarchi, Behnaz; Center, Rob J; Bebbington, Jonathan; Cuthbertson, Jack; Gonelli, Christopher; Khoury, Georges; Mackenzie, Charlene; Lichtfuss, Marit; Rawlin, Grant; Muller, Brian; Purcell, Damian

    2017-04-01

    We isolated HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-specific memory B cells from a cow that had developed high titer polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) with broad neutralizing activity after a long duration vaccination with HIV-1AD8 Env gp140 trimers. We cloned the bovine IgG matched heavy (H) and light (L) chain variable (V) genes from these memory B cells and constructed IgG monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with either a human constant (C)-region/bovine V-region chimeric or fully bovine C and V regions. Among 42 selected Ig+ memory B cells, two mAbs (6A and 8C) showed high affinity binding to gp140 Env. Characterization of both the fully bovine and human chimeric isoforms of these two mAbs revealed them as highly type-specific and capable of binding only to soluble AD8 uncleaved gp140 trimers and covalently stabilized AD8 SOSIP gp140 cleaved trimers, but not monomeric gp120. Genomic sequence analysis of the V genes showed the third heavy complementarity-determining region (CDRH3) of 6A mAb was 21 amino acids in length while 8C CDRH3 was 14 amino acids long. The entire V heavy (VH) region was 27% and 25% diverged for 6A and 8C, respectively, from the best matched germline V genes available, and the CDRH3 regions of 6A and 8C were 47.62% and 78.57% somatically mutated, respectively, suggesting a high level of somatic hypermutation compared with CDRH3 of other species. Alanine mutagenesis of the VH genes of 6A and 8C, showed that CDRH3 cysteine and tryptophan amino acids were crucial for antigen binding. Therefore, these bovine vaccine-induced anti-HIV antibodies shared some of the notable structural features of elite human broadly neutralizing antibodies, such as CDRH3 size and somatic mutation during affinity-maturation. However, while the 6A and 8C mAbs inhibited soluble CD4 binding to gp140 Env, they did not recapitulate the neutralizing activity of the polyclonal antibodies against HIV infection.

  14. Trimeric gp120-specific bovine monoclonal antibodies require cysteine and aromatic residues in CDRH3 for high affinity binding to HIV Env

    PubMed Central

    Center, Rob J.; Bebbington, Jonathan; Cuthbertson, Jack; Khoury, Georges; Lichtfuss, Marit; Rawlin, Grant; Purcell, Damian

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We isolated HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-specific memory B cells from a cow that had developed high titer polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) with broad neutralizing activity after a long duration vaccination with HIV-1AD8 Env gp140 trimers. We cloned the bovine IgG matched heavy (H) and light (L) chain variable (V) genes from these memory B cells and constructed IgG monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with either a human constant (C)-region/bovine V-region chimeric or fully bovine C and V regions. Among 42 selected Ig+ memory B cells, two mAbs (6A and 8C) showed high affinity binding to gp140 Env. Characterization of both the fully bovine and human chimeric isoforms of these two mAbs revealed them as highly type-specific and capable of binding only to soluble AD8 uncleaved gp140 trimers and covalently stabilized AD8 SOSIP gp140 cleaved trimers, but not monomeric gp120. Genomic sequence analysis of the V genes showed the third heavy complementarity-determining region (CDRH3) of 6A mAb was 21 amino acids in length while 8C CDRH3 was 14 amino acids long. The entire V heavy (VH) region was 27% and 25% diverged for 6A and 8C, respectively, from the best matched germline V genes available, and the CDRH3 regions of 6A and 8C were 47.62% and 78.57% somatically mutated, respectively, suggesting a high level of somatic hypermutation compared with CDRH3 of other species. Alanine mutagenesis of the VH genes of 6A and 8C, showed that CDRH3 cysteine and tryptophan amino acids were crucial for antigen binding. Therefore, these bovine vaccine-induced anti-HIV antibodies shared some of the notable structural features of elite human broadly neutralizing antibodies, such as CDRH3 size and somatic mutation during affinity-maturation. However, while the 6A and 8C mAbs inhibited soluble CD4 binding to gp140 Env, they did not recapitulate the neutralizing activity of the polyclonal antibodies against HIV infection. PMID:27996375

  15. Probes of the Catalytic Site of Cysteine Dioxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Chai,S.; Bruyere, J.; Maroney, M.

    2006-01-01

    The first major step of cysteine catabolism, the oxidation of cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid, is catalyzed by cysteine dioxygenase (CDO). In the present work, we utilize recombinant rat liver CDO and cysteine derivatives to elucidate structural parameters involved in substrate recognition and x-ray absorption spectroscopy to probe the interaction of the active site iron center with cysteine. Kinetic studies using cysteine structural analogs show that most are inhibitors and that a terminal functional group bearing a negative charge (e.g. a carboxylate) is required for binding. The substrate-binding site has no stringent restrictions with respect to the size of the amino acid. Lack of the amino or carboxyl groups at the a-carbon does not prevent the molecules from interacting with the active site. In fact, cysteamine is shown to be a potent activator of the enzyme without being a substrate. CDO was also rendered inactive upon complexation with the metal-binding inhibitors azide and cyanide. Unlike many non-heme iron dioxygenases that employ a-keto acids as cofactors, CDO was shown to be the only dioxygenase known to be inhibited by {alpha}-ketoglutarate.

  16. New iodo-acetamido cyanines for labeling cysteine thiol residues. A strategy for evaluating plasma proteins and their oxido-redox status.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Grilli, Stefano; Candiano, Giovanni; Fabbroni, Serena; Della Ciana, Leopoldo; Petretto, Andrea; Santucci, Laura; Urbani, Andrea; Gusmano, Rosanna; Scolari, Francesco; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2009-01-01

    Two new iodoacetamide-substituted cyanines, C3NIASO3 and C5NIASO3, were synthesized starting from hemicyanine and were utilized for labeling plasma proteins. Specificity, sensitivity and feasibility for SH residues was tested utilizing an equimolar mixture of standard proteins and with normal plasma. Oxidized plasma proteins following H(2)O(2 )exposure and plasma from patients with focal glomerulosclerosis were analyzed as models of altered protein oxido-redox status. Following optimization of the assay (dye/protein ratio, pH), C3NIASO3 and C5NIASO3 gave a sensitivity slightly better than N-hydroxysuccinimidyl dyes for plasma proteins and were successfully employed for differential display electrophoresis (DIGE). Twenty-nine proteins were detected in normal plasma after 2-DE while less proteins were detected in plasma of patients with glomerulosclerosis. Following massive 'in vitro' oxidation with H(2)O(2), C3NIASO3 and C5NIASO3 failed to detect any residual SH, implicating massive oxidation. In conclusion, this study describes the synthesis of two new iodoacetamide cyanines that can be utilized for the analysis of plasma proteins with 2-DE and DIGE. They are also indicated for the definition of the oxido-redox status of proteins and were successfully utilized to extend the analysis of oxidation damage in patients with glomerulosclerosis.

  17. Active-site mutants of beta-lactamase: use of an inactive double mutant to study requirements for catalysis.

    PubMed

    Dalbadie-McFarland, G; Neitzel, J J; Richards, J H

    1986-01-28

    We have studied the catalytic activity and some other properties of mutants of Escherichia coli plasmid-encoded RTEM beta-lactamase (EC 3.5.2.6) with all combinations of serine and threonine residues at the active-site positions 70 and 71. (All natural beta-lactamases have conserved serine-70 and threonine-71.) From the inactive double mutant Ser-70----Thr, Thr-71----Ser [Dalbadie-McFarland, G., Cohen, L. W., Riggs, A. D., Morin, C., Itakura, K., & Richards, J. H. (1982) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 79, 6409-6413], an active revertant, Thr-71----Ser (i.e., residue 70 in the double mutant had changed from threonine to the serine conserved at position 70 in the wild-type enzyme), was isolated by an approach that allows identification of active revertants in the absence of a background of wild-type enzyme. This mutant (Thr-71----Ser) has about 15% of the catalytic activity of wild-type beta-lactamase. The other possible mutant involving serine and threonine residues at positions 70 and 71 (Ser-70----Thr) shows no catalytic activity. The primary nucleophiles of a serine or a cysteine residue [Sigal, I. S., Harwood, B. G., & Arentzen, R. (1982) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 79, 7157-7160] at position 70 thus seem essential for enzymatic activity. Compared to wild-type enzyme, all three mutants show significantly reduced resistance to proteolysis; for the active revertant (Thr-71----Ser), we have also observed reduced thermal stability and reduced resistance to denaturation by urea.

  18. Protein modification by acrolein: Formation and stability of cysteine adducts

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jian; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Pierce, William M.

    2010-01-01

    The toxicity of the ubiquitous pollutant and endogenous metabolite, acrolein, is due in part to covalent protein modifications. Acrolein reacts readily with protein nucleophiles via Michael addition and Schiff base formation. Potential acrolein targets in protein include the nucleophilic side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues as well as the free amino terminus of proteins. Although cysteine is the most acrolein-reactive residue, cysteine-acrolein adducts are difficult to identify in vitro and in vivo. In this study, model peptides with cysteine, lysine, and histidine residues were used to examine the reactivity of acrolein. Results from these experiments show that acrolein reacts rapidly with cysteine residues through Michael addition to form M+56 Da adducts. These M+56 adducts are, however, not stable, even though spontaneous dissociation of the adduct is slow. Further studies demonstrated that when acrolein and model peptides are incubated at physiological pH and temperature, the M+56 adducts decreased gradually accompanied by the increase of M+38 adducts, which are formed from intra-molecular Schiff base formation. Adduct formation with the side chains of other amino acid residues (lysine and histidine) was much slower than cysteine and required higher acrolein concentration. When cysteine residues were blocked by reaction with iodoacetamide and higher concentrations of acrolein were used, adducts of the N-terminal amino group or histidyl residues were formed but lysine adducts were not detected. Collectively, these data demonstrate that acrolein reacts avidly with protein cysteine residues and that the apparent loss of protein-acrolein Michael adducts over time may be related to the appearance of a novel (M+38) adduct. These findings may be important in identification of in vivo adducts of acrolein with protein cysteine residues. PMID:19231900

  19. The Structures of the C185S and C185A Mutants of Sulfite Oxidase Reveal Rearrangement of the Active Site

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, James A.; Wilson, Heather L.; Pushie, M. Jake; Kisker, Caroline; George, Graham N.; Rajagopalan, K.V.

    2010-11-03

    Sulfite oxidase (SO) catalyzes the physiologically critical conversion of sulfite to sulfate. Enzymatic activity is dependent on the presence of the metal molybdenum complexed with a pyranopterin-dithiolene cofactor termed molybdopterin. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of SOs from a variety of sources has identified a single conserved Cys residue essential for catalytic activity. The crystal structure of chicken liver sulfite oxidase indicated that this residue, Cys185 in chicken SO, coordinates the Mo atom in the active site. To improve our understanding of the role of this residue in the catalytic mechanism of sulfite oxidase, serine and alanine variants at position 185 of recombinant chicken SO were generated. Spectroscopic and kinetic studies indicate that neither variant is capable of sulfite oxidation. The crystal structure of the C185S variant was determined to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution and to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution in the presence of sulfite, and the C185A variant to 2.8 {angstrom} resolution. The structures of the C185S and C185A variants revealed that neither the Ser or Ala side chains appeared to closely interact with the Mo atom and that a third oxo group replaced the usual cysteine sulfur ligand at the Mo center, confirming earlier extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) work on the human C207S mutant. An unexpected result was that in the C185S variant, in the absence of sulfite, the active site residue Tyr322 became disordered as did the loop region flanking it. In the C185S variant crystallized in the presence of sulfite, the Tyr322 residue relocalized to the active site. The C185A variant structure also indicated the presence of a third oxygen ligand; however, Tyr322 remained in the active site. EXAFS studies of the Mo coordination environment indicate the Mo atom is in the oxidized Mo{sup VI} state in both the C185S and C185A variants of chicken SO and show the expected trioxodithiolene active site. Density

  20. A novel allosteric mechanism in the cysteine peptidase cathepsin K discovered by computational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novinec, Marko; Korenč, Matevž; Caflisch, Amedeo; Ranganathan, Rama; Lenarčič, Brigita; Baici, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    Allosteric modifiers have the potential to fine-tune enzyme activity. Therefore, targeting allosteric sites is gaining increasing recognition as a strategy in drug design. Here we report the use of computational methods for the discovery of the first small-molecule allosteric inhibitor of the collagenolytic cysteine peptidase cathepsin K, a major target for the treatment of osteoporosis. The molecule NSC13345 is identified by high-throughput docking of compound libraries to surface sites on the peptidase that are connected to the active site by an evolutionarily conserved network of residues (protein sector). The crystal structure of the complex shows that NSC13345 binds to a novel allosteric site on cathepsin K. The compound acts as a hyperbolic mixed modifier in the presence of a synthetic substrate, it completely inhibits collagen degradation and has good selectivity for cathepsin K over related enzymes. Altogether, these properties qualify our methodology and NSC13345 as promising candidates for allosteric drug design.

  1. Histidine 407, a phantom residue in the E1 subunit of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, activates reductive acetylation of lipoamide on the E2 subunit. An explanation for conservation of active sites between the E1 subunit and transketolase.

    PubMed

    Nemeria, Natalia; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Brunskill, Andrew; Sheibani, Farzad; Wei, Wen; Yan, Yan; Zhang, Sheng; Jordan, Frank; Furey, William

    2002-12-31

    Least squares alignment of the E. coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex E1 subunit and yeast transketolase crystal structures indicates a general structural similarity between the two enzymes and provides a plausible location for a short-loop region in the E1 structure that was unobserved due to disorder. The residue H407, located in this region, is shown to be able to penetrate the active site. Suggested by this comparison, the H407A E1 variant was created, and H407 was shown to participate in the reductive acetylation of both an independently expressed lipoyl domain and the intact 1-lipoyl E2 subunit. While the H407A substitution only modestly affected the reaction through pyruvate decarboxylation (ca. 14% activity compared to parental E1), the overall complex has a much impaired activity, at most 0.15% compared to parental E1. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements show that the binding of the lipoyl domain to the H407A E1 variant is much weaker than that to parental E1. At the same time, mass spectrometric measurements clearly demonstrate much impaired reductive acetylation of the independently expressed lipoyl domain and of the intact 1-lipoyl E2 by the H407A variant compared to the parental E1. A proposal is presented to explain the remarkable conservation of the three-dimensional structure at the active centers of the E. coli E1 subunit and transketolase on the basis of the parallels in the ligation-type reactions carried out and the need to protonate a very weak acid, a dithiolane sulfur atom in the former, and a carbonyl oxygen atom in the latter.

  2. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-04

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases.

  3. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases. PMID:22020126

  4. Characterization of the Cysteine Content in Proteins Utilizing Cysteine Selenylation with 266 nm Ultraviolet Photodissociation (UVPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, W. Ryan; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2016-08-01

    Characterization of the cysteine content of proteins is a key aspect of proteomics. By defining both the total number of cysteines and their bound/unbound state, the number of candidate proteins considered in database searches is significantly constrained. Herein we present a methodology that utilizes 266 nm UVPD to count the number of free and bound cysteines in intact proteins. In order to attain this goal, proteins were derivatized with N-(phenylseleno)phthalimide (NPSP) to install a selectively cleavable Se-S bond upon 266 UVPD. The number of Se-S bonds cleaved upon UVPD, a process that releases SePh moieties, corresponds to the number of cysteine residues per protein.

  5. First Principles Computational Study of the Active Site of Arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Ivaylo; Klien, Micheal

    2004-01-14

    Ab initio density functional theory (DFT) methods were used to investigate the structural features of the active site of the binuclear enzyme rat liver arginase. Special emphasis was placed on the crucial role of the second shell ligand interactions. These interactions were systematically studied by performing calculations on models of varying size. It was determined that a water molecule, and not hydroxide, is the bridging exogenous ligand. The carboxylate ligands facilitate the close approach of the Mn (II) ions by attenuating the metal-metal electrostatic repulsion. Of the two metals, MnA was shown to carry a larger positive charge. Analysis of the electronic properties of the active site revealed that orbitals involving the terminal Asp234 residue, as well as the flexible -1,1 bridging Asp232, lie at high energies, suggesting weaker coordination. This is reflected in certain structural variability present in our models and is also consistent with recent experimental findings. Finally, implications of our findings for the biological function of the enzyme are delineated.

  6. Review stapling peptides using cysteine crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Fairlie, David P; Dantas de Araujo, Aline

    2016-11-01

    Stapled peptides are an emerging class of cyclic peptide molecules with enhanced biophysical properties such as conformational and proteolytic stability, cellular uptake and elevated binding affinity and specificity for their biological targets. Among the limited number of chemistries available for their synthesis, the cysteine-based stapling strategy has received considerable development in the last few years driven by facile access from cysteine-functionalized peptide precursors. Here we present some recent advances in peptide and protein stapling where the side-chains of cysteine residues are covalently connected with a range of different crosslinkers affording bisthioether macrocyclic peptides of varying topology and biophysical properties. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 843-852, 2016.

  7. Mapping inhibitor binding modes on an active cysteine protease via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gregory M; Balouch, Eaman; Goetz, David H; Lazic, Ana; McKerrow, James H; Craik, Charles S

    2012-12-18

    Cruzain is a member of the papain/cathepsin L family of cysteine proteases, and the major cysteine protease of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. We report an autoinduction methodology that provides soluble cruzain in high yields (>30 mg/L in minimal medium). These increased yields provide sufficient quantities of active enzyme for use in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based ligand mapping. Using circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopy, we also examined the solution-state structural dynamics of the enzyme in complex with a covalently bound vinyl sulfone inhibitor (K777). We report the backbone amide and side chain carbon chemical shift assignments of cruzain in complex with K777. These resonance assignments were used to identify and map residues located in the substrate binding pocket, including the catalytic Cys25 and His162. Selective [(15)N]Cys, [(15)N]His, and [(13)C]Met labeling was performed to quickly assess cruzain-ligand interactions for a set of eight low-molecular weight compounds exhibiting micromolar binding or inhibition. Chemical shift perturbation mapping verified that six of the eight compounds bind to cruzain at the active site. Three different binding modes were delineated for the compounds, namely, covalent, noncovalent, and noninteracting. These results provide examples of how NMR spectroscopy can be used to screen compounds for fast evaluation of enzyme-inhibitor interactions to facilitate lead compound identification and subsequent structural studies.

  8. Cysteine protease inhibition by nitrile-based inhibitors: a computational study

    PubMed Central

    Quesne, Matthew G.; Ward, Richard A.; de Visser, Sam P.

    2013-01-01

    Cysteine protease enzymes are important for human physiology and catalyze key protein degradation pathways. These enzymes react via a nucleophilic reaction mechanism that involves a cysteine residue and the proton of a proximal histidine. Particularly efficient inhibitors of these enzymes are nitrile-based, however, the details of the catalytic reaction mechanism currently are poorly understood. To gain further insight into the inhibition of these molecules, we have performed a combined density functional theory and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study on the reaction of a nitrile-based inhibitor with the enzyme active site amino acids. We show here that small perturbations to the inhibitor structure can have dramatic effects on the catalysis and inhibition processes. Thus, we investigated a range of inhibitor templates and show that specific structural changes reduce the inhibitory efficiency by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, as the reaction takes place on a polar surface, we find strong differences between the DFT and QM/MM calculated energetics. In particular, the DFT model led to dramatic distortions from the starting structure and the convergence to a structure that would not fit the enzyme active site. In the subsequent QM/MM study we investigated the use of mechanical vs. electronic embedding on the kinetics, thermodynamics and geometries along the reaction mechanism. We find minor effects on the kinetics of the reaction but large geometric and thermodynamics differences as a result of inclusion of electronic embedding corrections. The work here highlights the importance of model choice in the investigation of this biochemical reaction mechanism. PMID:24790966

  9. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis LipB enzyme functions as a cysteine/lysine dyad acyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingjun; Zhao, Xin; Nasser Eddine, Ali; Geerlof, Arie; Li, Xinping; Cronan, John E; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2006-06-06

    Lipoic acid is essential for the activation of a number of protein complexes involved in key metabolic processes. Growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis relies on a pathway in which the lipoate attachment group is synthesized from an endogenously produced octanoic acid moiety. In patients with multiple-drug-resistant M. tuberculosis, expression of one gene from this pathway, lipB, encoding for octanoyl-[acyl carrier protein]-protein acyltransferase is considerably up-regulated, thus making it a potential target in the search for novel antiinfectives against tuberculosis. Here we present the crystal structure of the M. tuberculosis LipB protein at atomic resolution, showing an unexpected thioether-linked active-site complex with decanoic acid. We provide evidence that the transferase functions as a cysteine/lysine dyad acyltransferase, in which two invariant residues (Lys-142 and Cys-176) are likely to function as acid/base catalysts. Analysis by MS reveals that the LipB catalytic reaction proceeds by means of an internal thioesteracyl intermediate. Structural comparison of LipB with lipoate protein ligase A indicates that, despite conserved structural and sequence active-site features in the two enzymes, 4'-phosphopantetheine-bound octanoic acid recognition is a specific property of LipB.

  10. Π-Clamp-mediated cysteine conjugation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Welborn, Matthew; Zhu, Tianyu; Yang, Nicole J; Santos, Michael S; Van Voorhis, Troy; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-02-01

    Site-selective functionalization of complex molecules is one of the most significant challenges in chemistry. Typically, protecting groups or catalysts must be used to enable the selective modification of one site among many that are similarly reactive, and general strategies that selectively tune the local chemical environment around a target site are rare. Here, we show a four-amino-acid sequence (Phe-Cys-Pro-Phe), which we call the 'π-clamp', that tunes the reactivity of its cysteine thiol for site-selective conjugation with perfluoroaromatic reagents. We use the π-clamp to selectively modify one cysteine site in proteins containing multiple endogenous cysteine residues. These examples include antibodies and cysteine-based enzymes that would be difficult to modify selectively using standard cysteine-based methods. Antibodies modified using the π-clamp retained binding affinity to their targets, enabling the synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates for selective killing of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The π-clamp is an unexpected approach to mediate site-selective chemistry and provides new avenues to modify biomolecules for research and therapeutics.

  11. π-Clamp Mediated Cysteine Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Welborn, Matthew; Zhu, Tianyu; Yang, Nicole J.; Santos, Michael S.; Van Voorhis, Troy; Pentelute, Bradley L.

    2016-01-01

    Site-selective functionalization of complex molecules is a grand challenge in chemistry. Protecting groups or catalysts must be used to selectively modify one site among many that are similarly reactive. General strategies are rare such the local chemical environment around the target site is tuned for selective transformation. Here we show a four amino acid sequence (Phe-Cys-Pro-Phe), which we call the “π-clamp”, tunes the reactivity of its cysteine thiol for the site-selective conjugation with perfluoroaromatic reagents. We used the π-clamp to selectively modify one cysteine site in proteins containing multiple endogenous cysteine residues (e.g. antibodies and cysteine-based enzymes), which was impossible with prior cysteine modification methods. The modified π-clamp antibodies retained binding affinity to their targets, enabling the synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) for selective killing of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The π-clamp is an unexpected approach for site-selective chemistry and provides opportunities to modify biomolecules for research and therapeutics. PMID:26791894

  12. π-Clamp-mediated cysteine conjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Welborn, Matthew; Zhu, Tianyu; Yang, Nicole J.; Santos, Michael S.; van Voorhis, Troy; Pentelute, Bradley L.

    2016-02-01

    Site-selective functionalization of complex molecules is one of the most significant challenges in chemistry. Typically, protecting groups or catalysts must be used to enable the selective modification of one site among many that are similarly reactive, and general strategies that selectively tune the local chemical environment around a target site are rare. Here, we show a four-amino-acid sequence (Phe-Cys-Pro-Phe), which we call the ‘π-clamp’, that tunes the reactivity of its cysteine thiol for site-selective conjugation with perfluoroaromatic reagents. We use the π-clamp to selectively modify one cysteine site in proteins containing multiple endogenous cysteine residues. These examples include antibodies and cysteine-based enzymes that would be difficult to modify selectively using standard cysteine-based methods. Antibodies modified using the π-clamp retained binding affinity to their targets, enabling the synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates for selective killing of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The π-clamp is an unexpected approach to mediate site-selective chemistry and provides new avenues to modify biomolecules for research and therapeutics.

  13. Cysteine Modifications in the Pathogenesis of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Cristiana; Carrì, Maria Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Several proteins are found misfolded and aggregated in sporadic and genetic forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). These include superoxide dismutase (SOD1), transactive response DNA-binding protein (TDP-43), fused in sarcoma/translocated in liposarcoma protein (FUS/TLS), p62, vasolin-containing protein (VCP), Ubiquilin-2 and dipeptide repeats produced by unconventional RAN-translation of the GGGGCC expansion in C9ORF72. Up to date, functional studies have not yet revealed a common mechanism for the formation of such diverse protein inclusions. Consolidated studies have demonstrated a fundamental role of cysteine residues in the aggregation process of SOD1 and TDP43, but disturbance of protein thiols homeostatic factors such as protein disulfide isomerases (PDI), glutathione, cysteine oxidation or palmitoylation might contribute to a general aberration of cysteine residues proteostasis in ALS. In this article we review the evidence that cysteine modifications may have a central role in many, if not all, forms of this disease. PMID:28167899

  14. Solution NMR structure of the NlpC/P60 domain of lipoprotein Spr from Escherichia coli: structural evidence for a novel cysteine peptidase catalytic triad.

    PubMed

    Aramini, James M; Rossi, Paolo; Huang, Yuanpeng J; Zhao, Li; Jiang, Mei; Maglaqui, Melissa; Xiao, Rong; Locke, Jessica; Nair, Rajesh; Rost, Burkhard; Acton, Thomas B; Inouye, Masayori; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2008-09-16

    Escherichia coli Spr is a membrane-anchored cell wall hydrolase. The solution NMR structure of the C-terminal NlpC/P60 domain of E. coli Spr described here reveals that the protein adopts a papain-like alpha+beta fold and identifies a substrate-binding cleft featuring several highly conserved residues. The active site features a novel Cys-His-His catalytic triad that appears to be a unique structural signature of this cysteine peptidase family. Moreover, the relative orientation of these catalytic residues is similar to that observed in the analogous Ser-His-His triad, a variant of the classic Ser-His-Asp charge relay system, suggesting the convergent evolution of a catalytic mechanism in quite distinct peptidase families.

  15. Chicken scFvs with an Artificial Cysteine for Site-Directed Conjugation.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Aerin; Shin, Jung Won; Kim, Soohyun; Kim, Hyori; Chung, Junho

    2016-01-01

    For the site-directed conjugation of chemicals and radioisotopes to the chicken-derived single-chain variable fragment (scFv), we investigated amino acid residues replaceable with cysteine. By replacing each amino acid of the 157 chicken variable region framework residues (FR, 82 residues on VH and 75 on VL) with cysteine, 157 artificial cysteine mutants were generated and characterized. At least 27 residues on VL and 37 on VH could be replaced with cysteine while retaining the binding activity of the original scFv. We prepared three VL (L5, L6 and L7) and two VH (H13 and H16) mutants as scFv-Ckappa fusion proteins and showed that PEG-conjugation to the sulfhydryl group of the artificial cysteine was achievable in all five mutants. Because the charge around the cysteine residue affects the in vivo stability of thiol-maleimide conjugation, we prepared 16 charge-variant artificial cysteine mutants by replacing the flanking residues of H13 with charged amino acids and determined that the binding activity was not affected in any of the mutants except one. We prepared four charge-variant H13 artificial cysteine mutants (RCK, DCE, ECD and ECE) as scFv-Ckappa fusion proteins and confirmed that the reactivity of the sulfhydryl group on cysteine is active and their binding activity is retained after the conjugation process.

  16. A Processive Carbohydrate Polymerase That Mediates Bifunctional Catalysis Using a Single Active Site

    PubMed Central

    May, John F.; Levengood, Matthew R.; Splain, Rebecca A.; Brown, Christopher D.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2012-01-01

    Even in the absence of a template, glycosyltransferases can catalyze the synthesis of carbohydrate polymers of specific sequence. The paradigm has been that one enzyme catalyzes the formation of one type of glycosidic linkage, yet certain glycosyltransferases generate polysaccharide sequences composed of two distinct linkage types. In principle, bifunctional glycosyltransferases can possess separate active sites for each catalytic activity or one active site with dual activities. We encountered the fundamental question of one or two distinct active sites in our investigation of the galactosyltransferase GlfT2. GlfT2 catalyzes the formation of mycobacterial galactan, a critical cell-wall polymer composed of galactofuranose residues connected with alternating, regioisomeric linkages. We found that GlfT2 mediates galactan polymerization using only one active site that manifests dual regioselectivity. Structural modeling of the bifunctional glycosyltransferases hyaluronan synthase and cellulose synthase suggests that these enzymes also generate multiple glycosidic linkages using a single active site. These results highlight the versatility of glycosyltransferases for generating polysaccharides of specific sequence. We postulate that a hallmark of processive elongation of a carbohydrate polymer by a bifunctional enzyme is that one active site can give rise to two separate types of glycosidic bonds. PMID:22217153

  17. Structural Insights into the Protease-like Antigen Plasmodium falciparum SERA5 and Its Noncanonical Active-Site Serine

    SciTech Connect

    Hodder, Anthony N.; Malby, Robyn L.; Clarke, Oliver B.; Fairlie, W. Douglas; Colman, Peter M.; Crabb, Brendan S.; Smith, Brian J.

    2009-08-28

    The sera genes of the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium encode a family of unique proteins that are maximally expressed at the time of egress of parasites from infected red blood cells. These multi-domain proteins are unique, containing a central papain-like cysteine-protease fragment enclosed between the disulfide-linked N- and C-terminal domains. However, the central fragment of several members of this family, including serine repeat antigen 5 (SERA5), contains a serine (S596) in place of the active-site cysteine. Here we report the crystal structure of the central protease-like domain of Plasmodium falciparum SERA5, revealing a number of anomalies in addition to the putative nucleophilic serine: (1) the structure of the putative active site is not conducive to binding substrate in the canonical cysteine-protease manner; (2) the side chain of D594 restricts access of substrate to the putative active site; and (3) the S{sub 2} specificity pocket is occupied by the side chain of Y735, reducing this site to a small depression on the protein surface. Attempts to determine the structure in complex with known inhibitors were not successful. Thus, despite having revealed its structure, the function of the catalytic domain of SERA5 remains an enigma.

  18. The active site structure and mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    Arginine specific reagents showed irreversible inhibition of avian liver mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Potent protection against modification was elicited by CO{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} in the presence of other substrates. Labeling of enzyme with (7-{sup 14}C) phenylglyoxal showed that 1 or 2 arginines are involved in CO{sub 2} binding and activation. Peptide map studies showed this active site arginine residues is located at position 289. Histidine specific reagents showed pseudo first order inhibition of avian mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity. The best protection against modification was elicited by IDP or IDP and Mn{sup +2}. One histidine residue is at or near the phosphoenolpyruvate binding site as demonstrated in the increased absorbance at 240 nm and proton relaxation rate studies. Circular dichroism studies reveal that enzyme structure was perturbed by diethylpyrocarbonate modification. Metal binding studies suggest that this enzyme has only one metal binding site. The putative binding sites from several GTP and phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes are observed in P-enolpyruvate carboxykinase from different species.

  19. Kinetic, Mutational, and Structural Studies of the Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Nonstructural Protein 2 Cysteine Protease

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xin; Compton, Jaimee R.; Leary, Dagmar H.; Olson, Mark A.; Lee, Michael S.; Cheung, Jonah; Ye, Wenjuan; Ferrer, Mark; Southall, Noel; Jadhav, Ajit; Glass, Pamela J.; Marugan, Juan; Legler, Patricia M.

    2017-01-01

    The Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) nonstructural protein 2 (nsP2) cysteine protease (EC 3.4.22.-) is essential for viral replication and is involved in the cytopathic effects (CPE) of the virus. The VEEV nsP2 protease is a member of MEROPS Clan CN and characteristically contains a papain-like protease linked to an S-adenosyl-L-methionine dependent RNA methyltransferase (SAM MTase) domain. The protease contains an alternative active site motif, 475NVCWAK480, which differs from papain’s (CGS25CWAFS), and the enzyme lacks a transition state (TS) stabilizing residue homologous to Q19 in papain. To understand the roles of conserved residues in catalysis we determined the structure of the free enzyme, and the first structure of an inhibitor-bound alphaviral protease. The peptide-like E64d inhibitor was found to bind beneath a β-hairpin at the interface of the SAM MTase and protease domains. His-546 adopted a conformation that differed from that found in the free enzyme, each conformer may assist in leaving group departure of either the amine or Cys thiolate during the catalytic cycle. Interestingly, E64c (200 μM), the carboxylic acid form of the E64d ester, did not inhibit the nsP2 protease. To identify key residues involved in substrate binding, a number of mutants were analyzed. Mutation of the motif residue, N475A, led to a 24-fold reduction in kcat/Km, and the conformation of this residue did not change after inhibition. N475 forms a hydrogen bond with R662 in the SAM MTase domain, and the R662A and R662K mutations both led to 16-fold reductions in kcat/Km. N475 forms the base of the P1 binding site and likely orients the substrate for nucleophilic attack or plays a role in product release. An Asn homologous to N475 is similarly found in coronaviral papain-like proteases (PLpro) of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) virus and Middle Eastern Respiratory virus (MERS). Mutation of another motif residue, K480A, led to a 9-fold decrease in kcat

  20. Crystal Structure of a Hidden Protein, YcaC, a Putative Cysteine Hydrolase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, with and without an Acrylamide Adduct.

    PubMed

    Grøftehauge, Morten K; Truan, Daphne; Vasil, Adriana; Denny, Paul W; Vasil, Michael L; Pohl, Ehmke

    2015-07-14

    As part of the ongoing effort to functionally and structurally characterize virulence factors in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we determined the crystal structure of YcaC co-purified with the target protein at resolutions of 2.34 and 2.56 Å without a priori knowledge of the protein identity or experimental phases. The three-dimensional structure of YcaC adopts a well-known cysteine hydrolase fold with the putative active site residues conserved. The active site cysteine is covalently bound to propionamide in one crystal form, whereas the second form contains an S-mercaptocysteine. The precise biological function of YcaC is unknown; however, related prokaryotic proteins have functions in antibacterial resistance, siderophore production and NADH biosynthesis. Here, we show that YcaC is exceptionally well conserved across both bacterial and fungal species despite being non-ubiquitous. This suggests that whilst YcaC may not be part of an integral pathway, the function could confer a significant evolutionary advantage to microbial life.

  1. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  2. A novel cysteine desulfurase influencing organosulfur compounds in Lentinula edodes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Lei, Xiao-Yu; Chen, Lian-Fu; Bian, Yin-Bing; Yang, Hong; Ibrahim, Salam A.; Huang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Organosulfur compounds are the basis for the unique aroma of Lentinula edodes, and cysteine sulfoxide lyase (C-S lyase) is the key enzyme in this trait. The enzyme from Alliium sativum has been crystallized and well-characterized; however, there have been no reports of the characterization of fungi C-S lyase at the molecular level. We identified a L. edodes C-S lyase (Lecsl), cloned a gene of Csl encoded Lecsl and then combined modeling, simulations, and experiments to understand the molecular basis of the function of Lecsl. Our analysis revealed Lecsl to be a novel cysteine desulfurase and not a type of cysteine sulfoxide lyase. The pyridoxal-5-phosphate (PLP) molecule bonded tightly to Lecsl to form a Lecsl-PLP complex. Moreover, the Lecsl had one active center that served to bind two kinds of substrates, S-methyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide and L-cysteine, and had both cysteine sulfoxide lyase and cysteine desulfurase activity. We found that the amino acid residue Asn393 was essential for the catalytic activity of Lecsl and that the gene Csl encoded a novel cysteine desulfurase to influence organosulfur compounds in L. edodes. Our results provide a new insight into understanding the formation of the unique aroma of L. edodes. PMID:26054293

  3. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  4. Fragment-based identification of determinants of conformational and spectroscopic change at the ricin active site

    SciTech Connect

    Carra,J.; McHugh, C.; Mulligan, S.; Machiesky, L.; Soares, A.; Millard, C.

    2007-01-01

    We found that amide ligands can bind weakly but specifically to the ricin active site, producing significant shifts in positions of the critical active site residues Arg180 and Tyr80. These results indicate that fragment-based drug discovery methods are capable of identifying minimal bonding determinants of active-site side-chain rearrangements and the mechanistic origins of spectroscopic shifts. Our results suggest that tryptophan fluorescence provides a sensitive probe for the geometric relationship of arginine-tryptophan pairs, which often have significant roles in protein function. Using the unusual characteristics of the RTA system, we measured the still controversial thermodynamic changes of site-specific urea binding to a protein, results that are relevant to understanding the physical mechanisms of protein denaturation.

  5. Contribution of active-site glutamine to rate enhancement in ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Boudreaux, David; Chaney, Joseph; Maiti, Tushar K.; Das, Chittaranjan

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolases (UCHs) are cysteine proteases featuring a classical cysteine-histidine-aspartate catalytic triad, also a highly conserved glutamine thought to be a part of the oxyanion hole. However, the contribution of this side chain to the catalysis by UCH enzymes is not known. Herein, we demonstrate that the glutamine side chain contributes to rate enhancement in UCHL1, UCHL3 and UCHL5. Mutation of the glutamine to alanine in these enzymes impairs the catalytic efficiency mainly due to a 16 to 30-fold reduction in kcat, which is consistent with a loss of approximately 2 kcal/mol in transition-state stabilization. However, the contribution to transition-state stabilization observed here is rather modest for the side chain’s role in oxyanion stabilization. Interestingly, we discovered that the carbonyl oxygen of this side chain is engaged in a C—H•••O hydrogen-bonding contact with the CεH group of the catalytic histidine. Upon further analysis, we found that this interaction is a common active-site structural feature in most cysteine proteases, including papain, belonging to families with the QCH(N/D) type of active-site configuration. It is possible that removal of the glutamine side chain might have abolished the C—H•••O interaction, which typically accounts for 2 kcal/mol of stabilization, leading to the effect on catalysis observed here. Additional studies performed on UCHL3 by mutating the glutamine to glutamate (strong C—H•••O acceptor but oxyanion destabilizer) and to lysine (strong oxyanion stabilizer but lacking C—H•••O hydrogen-bonding property) suggest that the C—H•••O hydrogen bond could contribute to catalysis. PMID:22284438

  6. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of cysteine-free coprisin nonapeptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaeho; Lee, Daeun; Choi, Hyemin; Kim, Ha Hyung; Kim, Ho; Hwang, Jae Sam; Lee, Dong Gun; Kim, Jae Il

    2014-01-10

    Coprisin is a 43-mer defensin-like peptide from the dung beetle, Copris tripartitus. CopA3 (LLCIALRKK-NH₂), a 9-mer peptide containing a single free cysteine residue at position 3 of its sequence, was derived from the α-helical region of coprisin and exhibits potent antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities. The single cysteine implies a tendency for dimerization; however, it remains unknown whether this cysteine residue is indispensible for CopA3's antimicrobial activity. To address this issue, in the present study we synthesized eight cysteine-substituted monomeric CopA3 analogs and two dimeric analogs, CopA3 (Dimer) and CopIK (Dimer), and evaluated their antimicrobial effects against bacteria and fungi, as well as their hemolytic activity toward human erythrocytes. Under physiological conditions, CopA3 (Mono) exhibits a 6/4 (monomer/dimer) molar ratio in HPLC area percent, indicating that its effects on bacterial strains likely reflect a CopA3 (Mono)/CopA3 (Dimer) mixture. We also report the identification of CopW, a new cysteine-free nonapeptide derived from CopA3 that has potent antimicrobial activity with virtually no hemolytic activity. Apparently, the cysteine residue in CopA3 is not essential for its antimicrobial function. Notably, CopW also exhibited significant synergistic activity with ampicillin and showed more potent antifungal activity than either wild-type coprisin or melittin.

  7. Crystal Structure of a Sulfur Carrier Protein Complex Found in the Cysteine Biosynthetic Pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Jurgenson, Christopher T.; Burns, Kristin E.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2008-10-02

    The structure of the protein complex CysM-CysO from a new cysteine biosynthetic pathway found in the H37Rv strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been determined at 1.53 {angstrom} resolution. CysM (Rv1336) is a PLP-containing {beta}-replacement enzyme and CysO (Rv1335) is a sulfur carrier protein with a ubiquitin-like fold. CysM catalyzes the replacement of the acetyl group of O-acetylserine by CysO thiocarboxylate to generate a protein-bound cysteine that is released in a subsequent proteolysis reaction. The protein complex in the crystal structure is asymmetric with one CysO protomer binding to one end of a CysM dimer. Additionally, the structures of CysM and CysO were determined individually at 2.8 and 2.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Sequence alignments with homologues and structural comparisons with CysK, a cysteine synthase that does not utilize a sulfur carrier protein, revealed high conservation of active site residues; however, residues in CysM responsible for CysO binding are not conserved. Comparison of the CysM-CysO binding interface with other sulfur carrier protein complexes revealed a similarity in secondary structural elements that contribute to complex formation in the ThiF-ThiS and MoeB-MoaD systems, despite major differences in overall folds. Comparison of CysM with and without bound CysO revealed conformational changes associated with CysO binding.

  8. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of Cathepsin B and L cysteine proteases from rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus).

    PubMed

    Whang, Ilson; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Nikapitiya, Chamilani; Lee, Youngdeuk; Kim, Yucheol; Lee, Sukkyoung; Oh, Chulhong; Jung, Sung-Ju; Oh, Myung-Joo; Choi, Cheol Young; Yeo, Sang-Yeob; Kim, Bong-Seok; Kim, Se-Jae; Lee, Jehee

    2011-03-01

    Cathepsins are lysosomal cysteine proteases of the papain family that play an important role in intracellular protein degradation and turn over within the lysosomal system. In the present study, full-length sequences of cathepsin B (RbCathepsin B) and L (RbCathepsin L) were identified after transcriptome sequencing of rock bream Oplegnathus fasciatus mixed tissue cDNA. Cathepsin B was composed of 330 amino acid residues with 36 kDa predicted molecular mass. RbCathepsin L contained 336 amino acid residues encoding for a 38 kDa predicted molecular mass protein. The sequencing analysis results showed that both cathepsin B and L contain the characteristic papain family cysteine protease signature and active sites for the eukaryotic thiol proteases of cysteine, asparagine and histidine. In addition, RbCathepsin L contained EF hand Ca(2+) binding and cathepsin propeptide inhibitor domains. The rock bream cathepsin B and L showed the highest amino acid identity of 90 and 95% to Lutjanus argentimaculatus cathepsin B and Lates calcarifer cathepsin L, respectively. By phylogenetic analysis, cathepsin B and L exhibited a high degree of evolutionary relationship to respective cathepsin family members of the papain superfamily. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis results confirmed that the expression of cathepsin B and L genes was constitutive in all examined tissues isolated from un-induced rock bream. Moreover, activation of RbCathepsin B and L mRNA was observed in both lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Edwardsiella tarda challenged liver and blood cells, indicating a role of immune response in rock bream.

  9. Mapping sequence differences between thimet oligopeptidase and neurolysin implicates key residues in substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Ray, Kallol; Hines, Christina S; Rodgers, David W

    2002-09-01

    The highly homologous endopeptidases thimet oligopeptidase and neurolysin are both restricted to short peptide substrates and share many of the same cleavage sites on bioactive and synthetic peptides. They sometimes target different sites on the same peptide, however, and defining the determinants of differential recognition will help us to understand how both enzymes specifically target a wide variety of cleavage site sequences. We have mapped the positions of the 224 surface residues that differ in sequence between the two enzymes onto the surface of the neurolysin crystal structure. Although the deep active site channel accounts for about one quarter of the total surface area, only 11% of the residue differences map to this region. Four isolated sequence changes (R470/E469, R491/M490, N496/H495, and T499/R498; neurolysin residues given first) are well positioned to affect recognition of substrate peptides, and differences in cleavage site specificity can be largely rationalized on the basis of these changes. We also mapped the positions of three cysteine residues believed to be responsible for multimerization of thimet oligopeptidase, a process that inactivates the enzyme. These residues are clustered on the outside of one channel wall, where multimerization via disulfide formation is unlikely to block the substrate-binding site. Finally, we mapped the regulatory phosphorylation site in thimet oligopeptidase to a location on the outside of the molecule well away from the active site, which indicates this modification has an indirect effect on activity.

  10. Misincorporation proton-alkyl exchange (MPAX): engineering cysteine probes into proteins.

    PubMed

    Burguete, Alondra Schweizer; Harbury, Pehr B; Pfeffer, Suzanne R

    2005-12-01

    This unit describes a rapid and efficient method to screen a polypeptide for amino acid residues that contribute to protein-protein interaction interfaces. Cysteine residues are introduced as positional probes in a protein at random by co-expression in bacteria with specific cysteine misincorporator tRNAs. The protein is then purified as an ensemble of polypeptides containing cysteine at low frequency, at different positions in each molecule. The ability of the native protein structure to protect different cysteine residues from chemical modification by iodoacetamide is determined to obtain a protein surface map that reveals candidate surface residues that are likely to be important for protein-protein interaction. Cysteine mutants with altered ligand binding can also be selected simultaneously by affinity chromatography.

  11. Expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic studies of different redox states of the active site of thioredoxin 1 from the whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Acevedo, Adam A.; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D.; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R.; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a 12 kDa cellular redox protein that belongs to a family of small redox proteins which undergo reversible oxidation to produce a cystine disulfide bond through the transfer of reducing equivalents from the catalytic site cysteine residues (Cys32 and Cys35) to a disulfide substrate. In this study, crystals of thioredoxin 1 from the Pacific whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (LvTrx) were successfully obtained. One data set was collected from each of four crystals at 100 K and the three-dimensional structures of the catalytic cysteines in different redox states were determined: reduced and oxidized forms at 2.00 Å resolution using data collected at a synchrotron-radiation source and two partially reduced structures at 1.54 and 1.88 Å resolution using data collected using an in-house source. All of the crystals belonged to space group P3212, with unit-cell parameters a = 57.5 (4), b = 57.5 (4), c = 118.1 (8) Å. The asymmetric unit contains two subunits of LvTrx, with a Matthews coefficient (V M) of 2.31 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 46%. Initial phases were determined by molecular replacement using the crystallographic model of Trx from Drosophila melanogaster as a template. In the present work, LvTrx was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Structural analysis of the different redox states at the Trx active site highlights its reactivity and corroborates the existence of a dimer in the crystal. In the crystallographic structures the dimer is stabilized by several interactions, including a disulfide bridge between Cys73 of each LvTrx monomer, a hydrogen bond between the side chain of Asp60 of each monomer and several hydrophobic interactions, with a noncrystallographic twofold axis. PMID:23695560

  12. Expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic studies of different redox states of the active site of thioredoxin 1 from the whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Campos-Acevedo, Adam A; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique

    2013-05-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a 12 kDa cellular redox protein that belongs to a family of small redox proteins which undergo reversible oxidation to produce a cystine disulfide bond through the transfer of reducing equivalents from the catalytic site cysteine residues (Cys32 and Cys35) to a disulfide substrate. In this study, crystals of thioredoxin 1 from the Pacific whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (LvTrx) were successfully obtained. One data set was collected from each of four crystals at 100 K and the three-dimensional structures of the catalytic cysteines in different redox states were determined: reduced and oxidized forms at 2.00 Å resolution using data collected at a synchrotron-radiation source and two partially reduced structures at 1.54 and 1.88 Å resolution using data collected using an in-house source. All of the crystals belonged to space group P3212, with unit-cell parameters a = 57.5 (4), b = 57.5 (4), c = 118.1 (8) Å. The asymmetric unit contains two subunits of LvTrx, with a Matthews coefficient (VM) of 2.31 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 46%. Initial phases were determined by molecular replacement using the crystallographic model of Trx from Drosophila melanogaster as a template. In the present work, LvTrx was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Structural analysis of the different redox states at the Trx active site highlights its reactivity and corroborates the existence of a dimer in the crystal. In the crystallographic structures the dimer is stabilized by several interactions, including a disulfide bridge between Cys73 of each LvTrx monomer, a hydrogen bond between the side chain of Asp60 of each monomer and several hydrophobic interactions, with a noncrystallographic twofold axis.

  13. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  14. Analysis of structural changes in active site of luciferase adsorbed on nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface by molecular-dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko; Hoshino, Tadatsugu

    2007-05-21

    Interactions between luciferase and a nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface were explored by molecular-dynamics simulations. The structural changes in the active-site residues, the residues affecting the luciferin binding, and the residues affecting the bioluminescence color were smaller on the nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface than on both a hydrophobic Si surface and a hydrophilic Si surface. The nanofabrication and wet-treatment techniques are expected to prevent the decrease in activity of luciferase on the Si surface.

  15. Modification of bovine heart succinate dehydrogenase with ethoxyformic anhydride and rose bengal: evidence for essential histidyl residues protectable by substrates.

    PubMed

    Hederstedt, L; Hatefi, Y

    1986-06-01

    Purified and membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) from bovine heart mitochondria was inhibited by the histidine-modifying reagents ethoxyformic anhydride (EFA) and Rose Bengal in the presence of light. Succinate and competitive inhibitors protected against inhibition, and decreased the number of histidyl residues modified by EFA. The essential residue modified by EFA was not the essential thiol of SDH, but modification of the essential thiol abolished the protective effect of malonate against inhibition of SDH by EFA. The EFA inhibition was reversed by hydroxylamine nearly completely when the inhibition was less than or equal to 35%, and only partially when the inhibition was more extensive. The uv spectrum of EFA-modified SDH before and after hydroxylamine treatment suggested that extensive inhibition of SDH with EFA may result in ethoxyformylation at both imidazole nitrogens of histidyl residues. Such a modification is not reversed by hydroxylamine. Succinate dehydrogenases and fumarate reductases from several different sources have similar compositions, and the two enzymes from Escherichia coli have considerable homology in the amino acid composition of their respective flavoprotein and iron-sulfur protein subunits. In the former, there is a short stretch containing conserved histidine, cysteine, and arginine residues. These residues, if also conserved in the bovine enzyme, may be the essential active site residues suggested by this work (histidine) and previously (cysteine, arginine).

  16. Sulfur K-Edge XAS and DFT Calculations on NitrileHydratase: Geometric and Electronic Structure of the Non-heme Iron Active Site

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Abhishek; Chow, Marina; Taniguchi, Kayoko; Lugo-Mas, Priscilla; Davin, Steven; Maeda, Mizuo; Kovacs, Julie A.; Odaka, Masafumi; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-09-28

    The geometric and electronic structure of the active site of the non-heme iron enzyme nitrile hydratase (NHase) is studied using sulfur K-edge XAS and DFT calculations. Using thiolate (RS{sup -})-, sulfenate (RSO{sup -})-, and sulfinate (RSO{sub 2}{sup -})-ligated model complexes to provide benchmark spectral parameters, the results show that the S K-edge XAS is sensitive to the oxidation state of S-containing ligands and that the spectrum of the RSO- species changes upon protonation as the S-O bond is elongated (by {approx}0.1 {angstrom}). These signature features are used to identify the three cysteine residues coordinated to the low-spin Fe{sup III} in the active site of NHase as CysS{sup -}, CysSOH, and CysSO{sub 2}{sup -} both in the NO-bound inactive form and in the photolyzed active form. These results are correlated to geometry-optimized DFT calculations. The pre-edge region of the X-ray absorption spectrum is sensitive to the Z{sub eff} of the Fe and reveals that the Fe in [FeNO]{sup 6} NHase species has a Z{sub eff} very similar to that of its photolyzed Fe{sup III} counterpart. DFT calculations reveal that this results from the strong {pi} back-bonding into the {pi}* antibonding orbital of NO, which shifts significant charge from the formally t{sub 2}{sup 6} low-spin metal to the coordinated NO.

  17. The structure of the cysteine protease and lectin-like domains of Cwp84, a surface layer-associated protein from Clostridium difficile

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, William J.; Kirby, Jonathan M.; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Chambers, Christopher J.; Davies, Abigail H.; Roberts, April K.; Shone, Clifford C.; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2014-07-01

    The crystal structure of Cwp84, an S-layer protein from Clostridium difficile is presented for the first time. The cathepsin L-like fold of cysteine protease domain, a newly observed ‘lectin-like’ domain and several other features are described. Clostridium difficile is a major problem as an aetiological agent for antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. The mechanism by which the bacterium colonizes the gut during infection is poorly understood, but undoubtedly involves a myriad of components present on the bacterial surface. The mechanism of C. difficile surface-layer (S-layer) biogenesis is also largely unknown but involves the post-translational cleavage of a single polypeptide (surface-layer protein A; SlpA) into low- and high-molecular-weight subunits by Cwp84, a surface-located cysteine protease. Here, the first crystal structure of the surface protein Cwp84 is described at 1.4 Å resolution and the key structural components are identified. The truncated Cwp84 active-site mutant (amino-acid residues 33–497; C116A) exhibits three regions: a cleavable propeptide and a cysteine protease domain which exhibits a cathepsin L-like fold followed by a newly identified putative carbohydrate-binding domain with a bound calcium ion, which is referred to here as a lectin-like domain. This study thus provides the first structural insights into Cwp84 and a strong base to elucidate its role in the C. difficile S-layer maturation mechanism.

  18. The cardiac L-type calcium channel alpha subunit is a target for direct redox modification during oxidative stress - the role of cysteine residues in the alpha interacting domain.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Padmapriya; Cserne Szappanos, Henrietta; Ingley, Evan; Hool, Livia C

    2017-03-17

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the Western world. The incidence of cardiovascular disease is predicted to further rise with the increase in obesity and diabetes and with the ageing population. Even though the survival rate from ischemic heart disease has improved over the past 30 years, many patients progress to a chronic pathological condition, known as cardiac hypertrophy that is associated with an increase in morbidity and mortality. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and calcium play an essential role in mediating cardiac hypertrophy. The L-type calcium channel is the main route for calcium influx into cardiac myocytes. There is now good evidence for a direct role for the L-type calcium channel in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Cysteines on the channel are targets for redox modification and glutathionylation of the channel can modulate the function of the channel protein leading to the onset of pathology. The cysteine responsible for modification of L-type calcium channel function has now been identified. Detailed understanding of the role of cysteines as possible targets during oxidative stress may assist in designing therapy to prevent the development of hypertrophy and heart failure. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. In silico analysis of Pycnoporus cinnabarinus laccase active site with toxic industrial dyes.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Nirmal K; Vindal, Vaibhav; Narayana, Siva Lakshmi; Ramakrishna, V; Kunal, Swaraj Priyaranjan; Srinivas, M

    2012-05-01

    Laccases belong to multicopper oxidases, a widespread class of enzymes implicated in many oxidative functions in various industrial oxidative processes like production of fine chemicals to bioremediation of contaminated soil and water. In order to understand the mechanisms of substrate binding and interaction between substrates and Pycnoporus cinnabarinus laccase, a homology model was generated. The resulted model was further validated and used for docking studies with toxic industrial dyes- acid blue 74, reactive black 5 and reactive blue 19. Interactions of chemical mediators with the laccase was also examined. The docking analysis showed that the active site always cannot accommodate the dye molecules, due to constricted nature of the active site pocket and steric hindrance of the residues whereas mediators are relatively small and can easily be accommodated into the active site pocket, which, thereafter leads to the productive binding. The binding properties of these compounds along with identification of critical active site residues can be used for further site-directed mutagenesis experiments in order to identify their role in activity and substrate specificity, ultimately leading to improved mutants for degradation of these toxic compounds.

  20. Dynamics of the Active Sites of Dimeric Seryl tRNA Synthetase from Methanopyrus kandleri.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Saheb; Nandi, Nilashis

    2015-08-27

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) carry out the first step of protein biosynthesis. Several aaRSs are multimeric, and coordination between the dynamics of active sites present in each monomer is a prerequisite for the fast and accurate aminoacylation. However, important lacunae of understanding exist concerning the conformational dynamics of multimeric aaRSs. Questions remained unanswered pertaining to the dynamics of the active site. Little is known concerning the conformational dynamics of the active sites in response to the substrate binding, reorganization of the catalytic residues around reactants, time-dependent changes at the reaction center, which are essential for facilitating the nucleophilic attack, and interactions at the interface of neighboring monomers. In the present work, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of dimeric (mk)SerRS from Methanopyrus kandleri bound with tRNA using an explicit solvent system. Two dimeric states of seryl tRNA synthetase (open, substrate bound, and adenylate bound) and two monomeric states (open and substrate bound) are simulated with bound tRNA. The aim is to understand the conformational dynamics of (mk)SerRS during its reaction cycle. While the present results provide a clear dynamical perspective of the active sites of (mk)SerRS, they corroborate with the results from the time-averaged experimental data such as crystallographic and mutation analysis of methanogenic SerRS from M. kandleri and M. barkeri. It is observed from the present simulation that the motif 2 loop gates the active site and its Glu351 and Arg360 stabilizes ATP in a bent state favorable for nucleophilic attack. The flexibility of the walls of the active site gradually reduces near reaction center, which is a more organized region compared to the lid region. The motif 2 loop anchors Ser and ATP using Arg349 in a hydrogen bonded geometry crucial for nucleophilic attack and favorably influences the electrostatic potential at the

  1. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Siklos, Marton; BenAissa, Manel; Thatcher, Gregory R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a) inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b) obtaining selectivity within families of cysteine proteases and their isozymes is problematic. This review provides a general update on strategies for cysteine protease inhibitor design and a focus on cathepsin B and calpain 1 as drug targets for neurodegenerative disorders; the latter focus providing an interesting query for the contemporary assumptions that irreversible, covalent protein modification and low selectivity are anathema to therapeutic safety and efficacy. PMID:26713267

  2. Dynamics and Mechanism of Efficient DNA Repair Reviewed by Active-Site Mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chuang; Liu, Zheyun; Li, Jiang; Guo, Xunmin; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2010-06-01

    Photolyases repair the UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in damage DNA via a photoreaction which includes a series of light-driven electron transfers between the two-electron-reduced flavin cofactor FADH^- and the dimer. We report here our systematic studies of the repair dynamics in E. coli photolyase with mutation of several active-site residues. With femtosecond resolution, we observed the significant change in the forward electron transfer from the excited FADH^- to the dimer and the back electron transfer from the repaired thymines by mutation of E274A, R226A, R342A, N378S and N378C. We also found that the mutation of E274A accelerates the bond-breaking of the thymine dimer. The dynamics changes are consistent with the quantum yield study of these mutants. These results suggest that the active-site residues play a significant role, structurally and chemically, in the DNA repair photocycle.

  3. An Active Site Water Network in the Plasminogen Activator Pla from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-08-13

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 {angstrom}. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  4. An active site water network in the plasminogen activator pla from Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-07-14

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 A. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  5. Noncovalent intermolecular interactions between dehydroepiandrosterone and the active site of human dehydroepiandrosterone sulphotransferase: A density functional theory based treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astani, Elahe; Heshmati, Emran; Chen, Chun-Jung; Hadipour, Nasser L.; Shekarsaraei, Setareh

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical study was performed to characterize noncovalent intermolecular interactions, especially hydrogen bond (HB), in the active site of enzyme human dehydroepiandrosterone sulphotransferase (SULT2A1/DHEA) using the local (M06-L) and hybrid (M06, M06-2X) meta-GGA functionals of density functional theory (DFT). Results revealed that DHEA is able to form HBs with residues His99, Tyr231, Met137 and Met16 in the active site of the SULT2A1/DHEA. It was found that DHEA interacts with the other residues through electrostatic and Van der Waals interactions.

  6. Density functional theory and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study of cysteine protease inhibition by nitrile-based inhibitors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Visser, Sam; Quesne, Matthew; Ward, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Cysteine protease enzymes are important for human physiology and catalyze key protein degradation pathways. These enzymes react via a nucleophilic reaction mechanism that involves a cysteine residue and the proton of a proximal histidine. Particularly efficient inhibitors of these enzymes are nitrile-based, however, the details of the catalytic reaction mechanism currently are poorly understood. To gain further insight into the inhibition of these molecules, we have performed a combined density functional theory and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study on the reaction of a nitrile-based inhibitor with the enzyme active site amino acids. We show here that small perturbations to the inhibitor structure can have dramatic effects on the catalysis and inhibition processes. Thus, we investigated a range of inhibitor templates and show that specific structural changes reduce the inhibitory efficiency by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, as the reaction takes place on a polar surface, we find strong differences between the DFT and QM/MM calculated energetics. In particular, the DFT model led to dramatic distortions from the starting structure and the convergence to a structure that would not fit the enzyme active site. In the subsequent QM/MM study we investigated the use of mechanical versus electronic embedding on the kinetics, thermodynamics and geometries along the reaction mechanism. We find minor effects on the kinetics of the reaction but large geometric and thermodynamics differences as a result of inclusion of electronic embedding corrections. The work here highlights the importance of model choice in the investigation of this biochemical reaction mechanism.

  7. Crystallographic Analysis of Active Site Contributions to Regiospecificity in the Diiron Enzyme Toluene 4-Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Lucas J.; Acheson, Justin F.; McCoy, Jason G.; Elsen, Nathaniel L.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Fox, Brian G.

    2014-10-02

    Crystal structures of toluene 4-monooxygenase hydroxylase in complex with reaction products and effector protein reveal active site interactions leading to regiospecificity. Complexes with phenolic products yield an asymmetric {mu}-phenoxo-bridged diiron center and a shift of diiron ligand E231 into a hydrogen bonding position with conserved T201. In contrast, complexes with inhibitors p-NH{sub 2}-benzoate and p-Br-benzoate showed a {mu}-1,1 coordination of carboxylate oxygen between the iron atoms and only a partial shift in the position of E231. Among active site residues, F176 trapped the aromatic ring of products against a surface of the active site cavity formed by G103, E104 and A107, while F196 positioned the aromatic ring against this surface via a {pi}-stacking interaction. The proximity of G103 and F176 to the para substituent of the substrate aromatic ring and the structure of G103L T4moHD suggest how changes in regiospecificity arise from mutations at G103. Although effector protein binding produced significant shifts in the positions of residues along the outer portion of the active site (T201, N202, and Q228) and in some iron ligands (E231 and E197), surprisingly minor shifts (<1 {angstrom}) were produced in F176, F196, and other interior residues of the active site. Likewise, products bound to the diiron center in either the presence or absence of effector protein did not significantly shift the position of the interior residues, suggesting that positioning of the cognate substrates will not be strongly influenced by effector protein binding. Thus, changes in product distributions in the absence of the effector protein are proposed to arise from differences in rates of chemical steps of the reaction relative to motion of substrates within the active site channel of the uncomplexed, less efficient enzyme, while structural changes in diiron ligand geometry associated with cycling between diferrous and diferric states are discussed for their potential

  8. Structure of Leishmania major cysteine synthase

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, Paul K.; Westrop, Gareth D.; Ramos, Tania; Müller, Sylke; Coombs, Graham H.; Hunter, William N.

    2012-01-01

    Cysteine biosynthesis is a potential target for drug development against parasitic Leishmania species; these protozoa are responsible for a range of serious diseases. To improve understanding of this aspect of Leishmania biology, a crystallographic and biochemical study of L. major cysteine synthase has been undertaken, seeking to understand its structure, enzyme activity and modes of inhibition. Active enzyme was purified, assayed and crystallized in an orthorhombic form with a dimer in the asymmetric unit. Diffraction data extending to 1.8 Å resolution were measured and the structure was solved by molecular replacement. A fragment of γ-poly-d-glutamic acid, a constituent of the crystallization mixture, was bound in the enzyme active site. Although a d-­glutamate tetrapeptide had insignificant inhibitory activity, the enzyme was competitively inhibited (K i = 4 µM) by DYVI, a peptide based on the C-­terminus of the partner serine acetyltransferase with which the enzyme forms a complex. The structure surprisingly revealed that the cofactor pyridoxal phosphate had been lost during crystallization. PMID:22750854

  9. Replication of murine coronavirus requires multiple cysteines in the endodomain of spike protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jinhua; Lv, Jun; Wang, Yuyan; Gao, Shuang; Yao, Qianqian; Qu, Di; Ye, Rong

    2012-06-05

    A conserved cysteine-rich motif located between the transmembrane domain and the endodomain is essential for membrane fusion and assembly of coronavirus spike (S) protein. Here, we proved that three cysteines within the motif, but not dependent on position, are minimally required for the survival of the recombinant mouse hepatitis virus. When the carboxy termini with these mutated motifs of S proteins were respectively introduced into a heterogeneous protein, both incorporation into lipid rafts and S-palmitoylation of these recombinant proteins showed a similar quantity requirement to cysteine residues. Meanwhile, the redistribution of these proteins on cellular surface indicated that the absence of the positively charged rather than cysteine residues in the motif might lead the dramatic reduction in syncytial formation of some mutants with the deleted motifs. These results suggest that multiple cysteine as well as charged residues concurrently improves the membrane-associated functions of S protein in viral replication and cytopathogenesis.

  10. Cysteines under ROS attack in plants: a proteomics view.

    PubMed

    Akter, Salma; Huang, Jingjing; Waszczak, Cezary; Jacques, Silke; Gevaert, Kris; Van Breusegem, Frank; Messens, Joris

    2015-05-01

    Plants generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as part of their metabolism and in response to various external stress factors, potentially causing significant damage to biomolecules and cell structures. During the course of evolution, plants have adapted to ROS toxicity, and use ROS as signalling messengers that activate defence responses. Cysteine (Cys) residues in proteins are one of the most sensitive targets for ROS-mediated post-translational modifications, and they have become key residues for ROS signalling studies. The reactivity of Cys residues towards ROS, and their ability to react to different oxidation states, allow them to appear at the crossroads of highly dynamic oxidative events. As such, a redox-active cysteine can be present as S-glutathionylated (-SSG), disulfide bonded (S-S), sulfenylated (-SOH), sulfinylated (-SO2H), and sulfonylated (-SO3H). The sulfenic acid (-SOH) form has been considered as part of ROS-sensing pathways, as it leads to further modifications which affect protein structure and function. Redox proteomic studies are required to understand how and why cysteines undergo oxidative post-translational modifications and to identify the ROS-sensor proteins. Here, we update current knowledge of cysteine reactivity with ROS. Further, we give an overview of proteomic techniques that have been applied to identify different redox-modified cysteines in plants. There is a particular focus on the identification of sulfenylated proteins, which have the potential to be involved in plant signal transduction.

  11. Formylglycine, a Post-Translationally Generated Residue with Unique Catalytic Capabilities and Biotechnology Applications

    PubMed Central

    Appel, Mason J.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2015-01-01

    Formylglycine (fGly) is a catalytically essential residue found almost exclusively in the active sites of type I sulfatases. Formed by post-translational oxidation of cysteine or serine side chains, this aldehyde-functionalized residue participates in a unique and highly efficient catalytic mechanism for sulfate ester hydrolysis. The enzymes that produce fGly, formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE) and anaerobic sulfatase-maturating enzyme (anSME), are as unique and specialized as fGly itself. FGE especially is structurally and mechanistically distinct, and serves the sole function of activating type I sulfatase targets. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding the mechanism by which fGly contributes to sulfate ester hydrolysis, the molecular details of fGly biogenesis by FGE and anSME, and finally, recent biotechnology applications of fGly beyond its natural catalytic function. PMID:25514000

  12. Molecular dynamics explorations of active site structure in designed and evolved enzymes.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Sílvia; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Noey, Elizabeth L; Houk, K N

    2015-04-21

    This Account describes the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reveal how mutations alter the structure and organization of enzyme active sites. As proposed by Pauling about 70 years ago and elaborated by many others since then, biocatalysis is efficient when functional groups in the active site of an enzyme are in optimal positions for transition state stabilization. Changes in mechanism and covalent interactions are often critical parts of enzyme catalysis. We describe our explorations of the dynamical preorganization of active sites using MD, studying the fluctuations between active and inactive conformations normally concealed to static crystallography. MD shows how the various arrangements of active site residues influence the free energy of the transition state and relates the populations of the catalytic conformational ensemble to the enzyme activity. This Account is organized around three case studies from our laboratory. We first describe the importance of dynamics in evaluating a series of computationally designed and experimentally evolved enzymes for the Kemp elimination, a popular subject in the enzyme design field. We find that the dynamics of the active site is influenced not only by the original sequence design and subsequent mutations but also by the nature of the ligand present in the active site. In the second example, we show how microsecond MD has been used to uncover the role of remote mutations in the active site dynamics and catalysis of a transesterase, LovD. This enzyme was evolved by Tang at UCLA and Codexis, Inc., and is a useful commercial catalyst for the production of the drug simvastatin. X-ray analysis of inactive and active mutants did not reveal differences in the active sites, but relatively long time scale MD in solution showed that the active site of the wild-type enzyme preorganizes only upon binding of the acyl carrier protein (ACP) that delivers the natural acyl group to the active site. In the absence of bound ACP

  13. Structural Characterization of Human 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase Variants Bearing Active Site Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Radom,C.; Banerjee, A.; Verdine, G.

    2007-01-01

    The human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) protein is responsible for initiating base excision DNA repair of the endogenous mutagen 8-oxoguanine. Like nearly all DNA glycosylases, hOGG1 extrudes its substrate from the DNA helix and inserts it into an extrahelical enzyme active site pocket lined with residues that participate in lesion recognition and catalysis. Structural analysis has been performed on mutant versions of hOGG1 having changes in catalytic residues but not on variants having altered 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (oxoG) contact residues. Here we report high resolution structural analysis of such recognition variants. We found that Ala substitution at residues that contact the phosphate 5 to the lesion (H270A mutation) and its Watson-Crick face (Q315A mutation) simply removed key functionality from the contact interface but otherwise had no effect on structure. Ala substitution at the only residue making an oxoG-specific contact (G42A mutation) introduced torsional stress into the DNA contact surface of hOGG1, but this was overcome by local interactions within the folded protein, indicating that this oxoG recognition motif is 'hardwired'. Introduction of a side chain intended to sterically obstruct the active site pocket (Q315F mutation) led to two different structures, one of which (Q315F{sup *149}) has the oxoG lesion in an exosite flanking the active site and the other of which (Q315F{sup *292}) has the oxoG inserted nearly completely into the lesion recognition pocket. The latter structure offers a view of the latest stage in the base extrusion pathway yet observed, and its lack of catalytic activity demonstrates that the transition state for displacement of the lesion base is geometrically demanding.

  14. A simple isotopic labeling method to study cysteine oxidation in Alzheimer's disease: oxidized cysteine-selective dimethylation (OxcysDML).

    PubMed

    Gu, Liqing; Robinson, Renã A S

    2016-04-01

    Cysteine is widely involved in redox signaling pathways through a number of reversible and irreversible modifications. Reversible modifications (e.g., S-glutathionylation, S-nitrosylation, disulfide bonds, and sulfenic acid) are used to protect proteins from oxidative attack and maintain cellular homeostasis, while irreversible oxidations (e.g., sulfinic acid and sulfonic acid) serve as hallmarks of oxidative stress. Proteomic analysis of cysteine-enriched peptides coupled with reduction of oxidized thiols can be used to measure the oxidation states of cysteine, which is helpful for elucidating the role that oxidative stress plays in biology and disease. As an extension of our previously reported cysDML method, we have developed oxidized cysteine-selective dimethylation (OxcysDML), to investigate the site-specific total oxidation of cysteine residues in biologically relevant samples. OxcysDML employs (1) blocking of free thiols by a cysteine-reactive reagent, (2) enrichment of peptides containing reversibly oxidized cysteine by a solid phase resin, and (3) isotopic labeling of peptide amino groups to quantify cysteine modifications arising from different biological conditions. On-resin enrichment and labeling minimizes sample handing time and improves efficiency in comparison with other redox proteomic methods. OxcysDML is also inexpensive and flexible, as it can accommodate the exploration of various cysteine modifications. Here, we applied the method to liver tissues from a late-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse model and wild-type (WT) controls. Because we have previously characterized this proteome using the cysDML approach, we are able here to probe deeper into the redox status of cysteine in AD. OxcysDML identified 1129 cysteine sites (from 527 proteins), among which 828 cysteine sites underwent oxidative modifications. Nineteen oxidized cysteine sites had significant alteration levels in AD and represent proteins involved in metabolic processes. Overall

  15. Crystal structure of an avian influenza polymerase PA[subscript N] reveals an endonuclease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Puwei; Bartlam, Mark; Lou, Zhiyong; Chen, Shoudeng; Zhou, Jie; He, Xiaojing; Lv, Zongyang; Ge, Ruowen; Li, Xuemei; Deng, Tao; Fodor, Ervin; Rao, Zihe; Liu, Yingfang

    2009-11-10

    The heterotrimeric influenza virus polymerase, containing the PA, PB1 and PB2 proteins, catalyses viral RNA replication and transcription in the nucleus of infected cells. PB1 holds the polymerase active site and reportedly harbours endonuclease activity, whereas PB2 is responsible for cap binding. The PA amino terminus is understood to be the major functional part of the PA protein and has been implicated in several roles, including endonuclease and protease activities as well as viral RNA/complementary RNA promoter binding. Here we report the 2.2 angstrom (A) crystal structure of the N-terminal 197 residues of PA, termed PA(N), from an avian influenza H5N1 virus. The PA(N) structure has an alpha/beta architecture and reveals a bound magnesium ion coordinated by a motif similar to the (P)DX(N)(D/E)XK motif characteristic of many endonucleases. Structural comparisons and mutagenesis analysis of the motif identified in PA(N) provide further evidence that PA(N) holds an endonuclease active site. Furthermore, functional analysis with in vivo ribonucleoprotein reconstitution and direct in vitro endonuclease assays strongly suggest that PA(N) holds the endonuclease active site and has critical roles in endonuclease activity of the influenza virus polymerase, rather than PB1. The high conservation of this endonuclease active site among influenza strains indicates that PA(N) is an important target for the design of new anti-influenza therapeutics.

  16. New active site oriented glyoxyl-agarose derivatives of Escherichia coli penicillin G acylase

    PubMed Central

    Cecchini, Davide A; Serra, Immacolata; Ubiali, Daniela; Terreni, Marco; Albertini, Alessandra M

    2007-01-01

    Background Immobilized Penicillin G Acylase (PGA) derivatives are biocatalysts that are industrially used for the hydrolysis of Penicillin G by fermentation and for the kinetically controlled synthesis of semi-synthetic β-lactam antibiotics. One of the most used supports for immobilization is glyoxyl-activated agarose, which binds the protein by reacting through its superficial Lys residues. Since in E. coli PGA Lys are also present near the active site, an immobilization that occurs through these residues may negatively affect the performance of the biocatalyst due to the difficult diffusion of the substrate into the active site. A preferential orientation of the enzyme with the active site far from the support surface would be desirable to avoid this problem. Results Here we report how it is possible to induce a preferential orientation of the protein during the binding process on aldehyde activated supports. A superficial region of PGA, which is located on the opposite side of the active site, is enriched in its Lys content. The binding of the enzyme onto the support is consequently forced through the Lys rich region, thus leaving the active site fully accessible to the substrate. Different mutants with an increasing number of Lys have been designed and, when active, immobilized onto glyoxyl agarose. The synthetic performances of these new catalysts were compared with those of the immobilized wild-type (wt) PGA. Our results show that, while the synthetic performance of the wt PGA sensitively decreases after immobilization, the Lys enriched mutants have similar performances to the free enzyme even after immobilization. We also report the observations made with other mutants which were unable to undergo a successful maturation process for the production of active enzymes or which resulted toxic for the host cell. Conclusion The desired orientation of immobilized PGA with the active site freely accessible can be obtained by increasing the density of Lys residues

  17. Programmed cell death in Ricinus and Arabidopsis: the function of KDEL cysteine peptidases in development.

    PubMed

    Hierl, Georg; Vothknecht, Ute; Gietl, Christine

    2012-05-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) in plants is a prerequisite for development as well as seed and fruit production. It also plays a significant role in pathogen defense. A unique group of papain-type cysteine endopeptidases, characterized by a C-terminal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal (KDEL CysEP), is involved in plant PCD. Genes for these endopeptidases have been sequenced and analyzed from 25 angiosperms and gymnosperms. They have no structural relationship to caspases involved in mammalian PCD and homologs to this group of plant cysteine endopeptidases have not been found in mammals or yeast. In castor beans (Ricinus communis), the CysEP is synthesized as pre-pro-enzyme. The pro-enzyme is transported to the cytosol of cells undergoing PCD in ER-derived vesicles called ricinosomes. These vesicles release the mature CysEP in the final stages of organelle disintegration triggered by acidification of the cytoplasm resulting from the disruption of the vacuole. Mature CysEP digests the hydroxyproline (Hyp)-rich proteins (extensins) that form the basic scaffold of the plant cell wall. The KDEL CysEPs accept a wide variety of amino acids at the active site, including the glycosylated Hyp residues of the extensins. In Arabidopsis, three KDEL CysEPs (AtCEP1, AtCEP2 and AtCEP3) are expressed in tissues undergoing PCD. In transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing β-glucuronidase under the control of the promoters for these three genes, cell- and tissue-specific activities were mapped during seedling, flower and seed development. KDEL CysEPs participate in the collapse of tissues in the final stage of PCD and in tissue re-modeling such as lateral root formation.

  18. Characterization of the active site of ADP-ribosyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Munshi, C; Thiel, D J; Mathews, I I; Aarhus, R; Walseth, T F; Lee, H C

    1999-10-22

    ADP-ribosyl cyclase synthesizes two Ca(2+) messengers by cyclizing NAD to produce cyclic ADP-ribose and exchanging nicotinic acid with the nicotinamide group of NADP to produce nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Recombinant Aplysia cyclase was expressed in yeast and co-crystallized with a substrate, nicotinamide. x-ray crystallography showed that the nicotinamide was bound in a pocket formed in part by a conserved segment and was near the central cleft of the cyclase. Glu(98), Asn(107) and Trp(140) were within 3.5 A of the bound nicotinamide and appeared to coordinate it. Substituting Glu(98) with either Gln, Gly, Leu, or Asn reduced the cyclase activity by 16-222-fold, depending on the substitution. The mutant N107G exhibited only a 2-fold decrease in activity, while the activity of W140G was essentially eliminated. The base exchange activity of all mutants followed a similar pattern of reduction, suggesting that both reactions occur at the same active site. In addition to NAD, the wild-type cyclase also cyclizes nicotinamide guanine dinucleotide to cyclic GDP-ribose. All mutant enzymes had at least half of the GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity of the wild type, some even 2-3-fold higher, indicating that the three coordinating amino acids are responsible for positioning of the substrate but not absolutely critical for catalysis. To search for the catalytic residues, other amino acids in the binding pocket were mutagenized. E179G was totally devoid of GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity, and both its ADP-ribosyl cyclase and the base exchange activities were reduced by 10,000- and 18,000-fold, respectively. Substituting Glu(179) with either Asn, Leu, Asp, or Gln produced similar inactive enzymes, and so was the conversion of Trp(77) to Gly. However, both E179G and the double mutant E179G/W77G retained NAD-binding ability as shown by photoaffinity labeling with [(32)P]8-azido-NAD. These results indicate that both Glu(179) and Trp(77) are crucial for catalysis and

  19. Catalytic roles of flexible regions at the active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco)

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Harpel, M.R.; Chen, Yuh-Ru; Larson, E.M.; Larimer, F.W.

    1995-12-31

    Chemical and mutagenesis studies of Rubisco have identified Lys329 and Glu48 as active-site residues that are located in distinct, interacting domains from adjacent subunits. Crystallographic analyses have shown that Lys329 is the apical residue in a 12-residue flexible loop (loop 6) of the {Beta},{alpha}-barrel domain of the active site and that Glu48 resides at the end of helix B of the N-terminal domain of the active site. When phosphorylated ligands are bound by the enzyme, loop 6 adopts a closed conformation and, in concert with repositioning of helix B, thereby occludes the active site from the external environment. In this closed conformation, the {gamma}-carboxylate of Glu48 and the {epsilon}-amino group of Lys329 engage in intersubunit electrostatic interaction. By use of appropriate site-directed mutants of Rhodospirillum rubrum Rubisco, we are addressing several issues: the catalytic roles of Lys329 and Glu48, the functional significance of the intersubunit salt bridge comprised of these two residues, and the roles of loop 6 and helix B in stabilizing labile reaction intermediates. Characterization of novel products derived from misprocessing of D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) by the mutant proteins have illuminated the structure of the key intermediate in the normal oxygenase pathway.

  20. Cysteine Methylation Controls Radical Generation in the Cfr Radical AdoMet rRNA Methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Challand, Martin R.; Salvadori, Enrico; Driesener, Rebecca C.; Kay, Christopher W. M.; Roach, Peter L.; Spencer, James

    2013-01-01

    The ‘radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet)’ enzyme Cfr methylates adenosine 2503 of the 23S rRNA in the peptidyltransferase centre (P-site) of the bacterial ribosome. This modification protects host bacteria, notably methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), from numerous antibiotics, including agents (e.g. linezolid, retapamulin) that were developed to treat such organisms. Cfr contains a single [4Fe-4S] cluster that binds two separate molecules of AdoMet during the reaction cycle. These are used sequentially to first methylate a cysteine residue, Cys338; and subsequently generate an oxidative radical intermediate that facilitates methyl transfer to the unreactive C8 (and/or C2) carbon centres of adenosine 2503. How the Cfr active site, with its single [4Fe-4S] cluster, catalyses these two distinct activities that each utilise AdoMet as a substrate remains to be established. Here, we use absorbance and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to investigate the interactions of AdoMet with the [4Fe-4S] clusters of wild-type Cfr and a Cys338 Ala mutant, which is unable to accept a methyl group. Cfr binds AdoMet with high (∼ 10 µM) affinity notwithstanding the absence of the RNA cosubstrate. In wild-type Cfr, where Cys338 is methylated, AdoMet binding leads to rapid oxidation of the [4Fe-4S] cluster and production of 5'-deoxyadenosine (DOA). In contrast, while Cys338 Ala Cfr binds AdoMet with equivalent affinity, oxidation of the [4Fe-4S] cluster is not observed. Our results indicate that the presence of a methyl group on Cfr Cys338 is a key determinant of the activity of the enzyme towards AdoMet, thus enabling a single active site to support two distinct modes of AdoMet cleavage. PMID:23861844

  1. Tricyclic covalent inhibitors selectively target Jak3 through an active site thiol.

    PubMed

    Goedken, Eric R; Argiriadi, Maria A; Banach, David L; Fiamengo, Bryan A; Foley, Sage E; Frank, Kristine E; George, Jonathan S; Harris, Christopher M; Hobson, Adrian D; Ihle, David C; Marcotte, Douglas; Merta, Philip J; Michalak, Mark E; Murdock, Sara E; Tomlinson, Medha J; Voss, Jeffrey W

    2015-02-20

    The action of Janus kinases (JAKs) is required for multiple cytokine signaling pathways, and as such, JAK inhibitors hold promise for treatment of autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis. However, due to high similarity in the active sites of the four members (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2), developing selective inhibitors within this family is challenging. We have designed and characterized substituted, tricyclic Jak3 inhibitors that selectively avoid inhibition of the other JAKs. This is accomplished through a covalent interaction between an inhibitor containing a terminal electrophile and an active site cysteine (Cys-909). We found that these ATP competitive compounds are irreversible inhibitors of Jak3 enzyme activity in vitro. They possess high selectivity against other kinases and can potently (IC50 < 100 nm) inhibit Jak3 activity in cell-based assays. These results suggest irreversible inhibitors of this class may be useful selective agents, both as tools to probe Jak3 biology and potentially as therapies for autoimmune diseases.

  2. Tricyclic Covalent Inhibitors Selectively Target Jak3 through an Active Site Thiol*

    PubMed Central

    Goedken, Eric R.; Argiriadi, Maria A.; Banach, David L.; Fiamengo, Bryan A.; Foley, Sage E.; Frank, Kristine E.; George, Jonathan S.; Harris, Christopher M.; Hobson, Adrian D.; Ihle, David C.; Marcotte, Douglas; Merta, Philip J.; Michalak, Mark E.; Murdock, Sara E.; Tomlinson, Medha J.; Voss, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    The action of Janus kinases (JAKs) is required for multiple cytokine signaling pathways, and as such, JAK inhibitors hold promise for treatment of autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis. However, due to high similarity in the active sites of the four members (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2), developing selective inhibitors within this family is challenging. We have designed and characterized substituted, tricyclic Jak3 inhibitors that selectively avoid inhibition of the other JAKs. This is accomplished through a covalent interaction between an inhibitor containing a terminal electrophile and an active site cysteine (Cys-909). We found that these ATP competitive compounds are irreversible inhibitors of Jak3 enzyme activity in vitro. They possess high selectivity against other kinases and can potently (IC50 < 100 nm) inhibit Jak3 activity in cell-based assays. These results suggest irreversible inhibitors of this class may be useful selective agents, both as tools to probe Jak3 biology and potentially as therapies for autoimmune diseases. PMID:25552479

  3. A split active site couples cap recognition by Dcp2 to activation

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N.; Jones, Brittnee N.; Hernandez, Gail A.; Gross, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Decapping by Dcp2 is an essential step in 5′-3′ mRNA decay. In yeast, decapping requires an open-to-closed transition in Dcp2, though the link between closure and catalysis remains elusive. Here we show using NMR that cap binds conserved residues on both the catalytic and regulatory domains of Dcp2. Lesions in the cap-binding site on the regulatory domain reduce the catalytic step two orders of magnitude and block formation of the closed state whereas Dcp1 enhances the catalytic step by a factor of ten and promotes closure. We conclude that closure occurs during the rate-limiting catalytic step of decapping, juxtaposing the cap-binding region of each domain to form a composite active site. This work suggests a model for regulation of decapping, where coactivators trigger decapping by stabilizing a labile composite active site. PMID:20711189

  4. Mechanisms of mitochondrial holocytochrome c synthase and the key roles played by cysteines and histidine of the heme attachment site, Cys-XX-Cys-His.

    PubMed

    Babbitt, Shalon E; San Francisco, Brian; Mendez, Deanna L; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S; Rodgers, Kenton R; Bretsnyder, Eric C; Kranz, Robert G

    2014-10-17

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c assembly requires the covalent attachment of heme by thioether bonds between heme vinyl groups and a conserved CXXCH motif of cytochrome c/c1. The enzyme holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS) binds heme and apocytochrome c substrate to catalyze this attachment, subsequently releasing holocytochrome c for proper folding to its native structure. We address mechanisms of assembly using a functional Escherichia coli recombinant system expressing human HCCS. Human cytochrome c variants with individual cysteine, histidine, double cysteine, and triple cysteine/histidine substitutions (of CXXCH) were co-purified with HCCS. Single and double mutants form a complex with HCCS but not the triple mutant. Resonance Raman and UV-visible spectroscopy support the proposal that heme puckering induced by both thioether bonds facilitate release of holocytochrome c from the complex. His-19 (of CXXCH) supplies the second axial ligand to heme in the complex, the first axial ligand was previously shown to be from HCCS residue His-154. Substitutions of His-19 in cytochrome c to seven other residues (Gly, Ala, Met, Arg, Lys, Cys, and Tyr) were used with various approaches to establish other roles played by His-19. Three roles for His-19 in HCCS-mediated assembly are suggested: (i) to provide the second axial ligand to the heme iron in preparation for covalent attachment; (ii) to spatially position the two cysteinyl sulfurs adjacent to the two heme vinyl groups for thioether formation; and (iii) to aid in release of the holocytochrome c from the HCCS active site. Only H19M is able to carry out these three roles, albeit at lower efficiencies than the natural His-19.

  5. Mechanisms of Mitochondrial Holocytochrome c Synthase and the Key Roles Played by Cysteines and Histidine of the Heme Attachment Site, Cys-XX-Cys-His*

    PubMed Central

    Babbitt, Shalon E.; San Francisco, Brian; Mendez, Deanna L.; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S.; Rodgers, Kenton R.; Bretsnyder, Eric C.; Kranz, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c assembly requires the covalent attachment of heme by thioether bonds between heme vinyl groups and a conserved CXXCH motif of cytochrome c/c1. The enzyme holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS) binds heme and apocytochrome c substrate to catalyze this attachment, subsequently releasing holocytochrome c for proper folding to its native structure. We address mechanisms of assembly using a functional Escherichia coli recombinant system expressing human HCCS. Human cytochrome c variants with individual cysteine, histidine, double cysteine, and triple cysteine/histidine substitutions (of CXXCH) were co-purified with HCCS. Single and double mutants form a complex with HCCS but not the triple mutant. Resonance Raman and UV-visible spectroscopy support the proposal that heme puckering induced by both thioether bonds facilitate release of holocytochrome c from the complex. His-19 (of CXXCH) supplies the second axial ligand to heme in the complex, the first axial ligand was previously shown to be from HCCS residue His-154. Substitutions of His-19 in cytochrome c to seven other residues (Gly, Ala, Met, Arg, Lys, Cys, and Tyr) were used with various approaches to establish other roles played by His-19. Three roles for His-19 in HCCS-mediated assembly are suggested: (i) to provide the second axial ligand to the heme iron in preparation for covalent attachment; (ii) to spatially position the two cysteinyl sulfurs adjacent to the two heme vinyl groups for thioether formation; and (iii) to aid in release of the holocytochrome c from the HCCS active site. Only H19M is able to carry out these three roles, albeit at lower efficiencies than the natural His-19. PMID:25170082

  6. Diffusional correlations among multiple active sites in a single enzyme.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Carlos; Kapral, Raymond

    2014-04-07

    Simulations of the enzymatic dynamics of a model enzyme containing multiple substrate binding sites indicate the existence of diffusional correlations in the chemical reactivity of the active sites. A coarse-grain, particle-based, mesoscopic description of the system, comprising the enzyme, the substrate, the product and solvent, is constructed to study these effects. The reactive and non-reactive dynamics is followed using a hybrid scheme that combines molecular dynamics for the enzyme, substrate and product molecules with multiparticle collision dynamics for the solvent. It is found that the reactivity of an individual active site in the multiple-active-site enzyme is reduced substantially, and this effect is analyzed and attributed to diffusive competition for the substrate among the different active sites in the enzyme.

  7. Structure and mechanism leading to formation of the cysteine sulfinate product complex of a biomimetic cysteine dioxygenase model.

    PubMed

    Sallmann, Madleen; Kumar, Suresh; Chernev, Petko; Nehrkorn, Joscha; Schnegg, Alexander; Kumar, Devesh; Dau, Holger; Limberg, Christian; de Visser, Sam P

    2015-05-11

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a unique nonheme iron enzyme that is involved in the metabolism of cysteine in the body. It contains an iron active site with an unusual 3-His ligation to the protein, which contrasts with the structural features of common nonheme iron dioxygenases. Recently, some of us reported a truly biomimetic model for this enzyme, namely a trispyrazolylborato iron(II) cysteinato complex, which not only has a structure very similar to the enzyme-substrate complex but also represents a functional model: Treatment of the model with dioxygen leads to cysteine dioxygenation, as shown by isolating the cysteine part of the product in the course of the work-up. However, little is known on the conversion mechanism and, so far, not even the structure of the actual product complex had been characterised, which is also unknown in case of the enzyme. In a multidisciplinary approach including density functional theory calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we have now determined the structure of the actual sulfinato complex for the first time. The Cys-SO2 (-) functional group was found to be bound in an η(2) -O,O-coordination mode, which, based on the excellent resemblance between model and enzyme, also provides the first support for a corresponding binding mode within the enzymatic product complex. Indeed, this is again confirmed by theory, which had predicted a η(2) -O,O-binding mode for synthetic as well as the natural enzyme.

  8. Mechanistic pathways of mercury removal from the organomercurial lyase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial populations present in Hg-rich environments have evolved biological mechanisms to detoxify methylmercury and other organometallic mercury compounds. The most common resistance mechanism relies on the H+-assisted cleavage of the Hg–C bond of methylmercury by the organomercurial lyase MerB. Although the initial reaction steps which lead to the loss of methane from methylmercury have already been studied experimentally and computationally, the reaction steps leading to the removal of Hg2+ from MerB and regeneration of the active site for a new round of catalysis have not yet been elucidated. In this paper, we have studied the final steps of the reaction catalyzed by MerB through quantum chemical computations at the combined MP2/CBS//B3PW91/6-31G(d) level of theory. While conceptually simple, these reaction steps occur in a complex potential energy surface where several distinct pathways are accessible and may operate concurrently. The only pathway which clearly emerges as forbidden in our analysis is the one arising from the sequential addition of two thiolates to the metal atom, due to the accumulation of negative charges in the active site. The addition of two thiols, in contrast, leads to two feasible mechanistic possibilities. The most straightforward pathway proceeds through proton transfer from the attacking thiol to Cys159 , leading to its removal from the mercury coordination sphere, followed by a slower attack of a second thiol, which removes Cys96. The other pathway involves Asp99 in an accessory role similar to the one observed earlier for the initial stages of the reaction and affords a lower activation enthalpy, around 14 kcal mol−1, determined solely by the cysteine removal step rather than by the thiol ligation step. Addition of one thiolate to the intermediates arising from either thiol attack occurs without a barrier and produces an intermediate bound to one active site cysteine and from which Hg(SCH3)2 may be removed only after

  9. Chikungunya nsP2 protease is not a papain-like cysteine protease and the catalytic dyad cysteine is interchangeable with a proximal serine.

    PubMed

    Saisawang, Chonticha; Saitornuang, Sawanan; Sillapee, Pornpan; Ubol, Sukathida; Smith, Duncan R; Ketterman, Albert J

    2015-11-24

    Chikungunya virus is the pathogenic alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever in humans. In the last decade millions of cases have been reported around the world from Africa to Asia to the Americas. The alphavirus nsP2 protein is multifunctional and is considered to be pivotal to viral replication, as the nsP2 protease activity is critical for proteolytic processing of the viral polyprotein during replication. Classically the alphavirus nsP2 protease is thought to be papain-like with the enzyme reaction proceeding through a cysteine/histidine catalytic dyad. We performed structure-function studies on the chikungunya nsP2 protease and show that the enzyme is not papain-like. Characterization of the catalytic dyad cysteine residue enabled us to identify a nearby serine that is catalytically interchangeable with the dyad cysteine residue. The enzyme retains activity upon alanine replacement of either residue but a replacement of both cysteine and serine residues results in no detectable activity. Protein dynamics appears to allow the use of either the cysteine or the serine residue in catalysis. This switchable dyad residue has not been previously reported for alphavirus nsP2 proteases and would have a major impact on the nsP2 protease as an anti-viral target.

  10. Chikungunya nsP2 protease is not a papain-like cysteine protease and the catalytic dyad cysteine is interchangeable with a proximal serine

    PubMed Central

    Saisawang, Chonticha; Saitornuang, Sawanan; Sillapee, Pornpan; Ubol, Sukathida; Smith, Duncan R.; Ketterman, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus is the pathogenic alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever in humans. In the last decade millions of cases have been reported around the world from Africa to Asia to the Americas. The alphavirus nsP2 protein is multifunctional and is considered to be pivotal to viral replication, as the nsP2 protease activity is critical for proteolytic processing of the viral polyprotein during replication. Classically the alphavirus nsP2 protease is thought to be papain-like with the enzyme reaction proceeding through a cysteine/histidine catalytic dyad. We performed structure-function studies on the chikungunya nsP2 protease and show that the enzyme is not papain-like. Characterization of the catalytic dyad cysteine residue enabled us to identify a nearby serine that is catalytically interchangeable with the dyad cysteine residue. The enzyme retains activity upon alanine replacement of either residue but a replacement of both cysteine and serine residues results in no detectable activity. Protein dynamics appears to allow the use of either the cysteine or the serine residue in catalysis. This switchable dyad residue has not been previously reported for alphavirus nsP2 proteases and would have a major impact on the nsP2 protease as an anti-viral target. PMID:26597768

  11. The cysteine-cluster motif of c-Yes, Lyn and FAK as a suppressive module for the kinases.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Aminur; Senga, Takeshi; Oo, Myat Lin; Hasegawa, Hitoki; Biswas, Md Helal Uddin; Mon, Naing Naing; Huang, Pengyu; Ito, Satoko; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Hamaguchi, Michinari

    2008-04-01

    The Src family of non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases plays a critical role in the progression of human cancers so that the development of its specific inhibitors is important as a therapeutic tool. We previously reported that cysteine residues in the cysteine-cluster (CC) motif of v-Src were critical for the kinase inactivation by the SH-alkylating agents such as N-(9-acridinyl) maleimide (NAM), whereas other cysteine residues were dispensable. We found similar CC-motifs in other Src-family kinases and a non-Src-family kinase, FAK. In this study, we explored the function of the CC-motif in Yes, Lyn and FAK. While Src has four cysteines in the CC-motif, c-Yes and Lyn have three and two of the four cysteines, respectively. Two conserved cysteines of the Src family kinases, corresponding to Cys487 and Cys498 of Src, were essential for the resistance to the inactivation of the kinase activity by NAM, whereas the first cysteine of c-Yes, which is absent in Lyn, was less important. FAK has similar CC-motifs with two cysteines and both cysteines were again essential for the resistance to the inactivation of the kinase activity by NAM. Taken together, modification of cysteine residues of the CC-motif causes a repressor effect on the catalytic activity of the Src family kinases and FAK.

  12. A Hydrophobic Pocket in the Active Site of Glycolytic Aldolase Mediates Interactions with Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein

    SciTech Connect

    St-Jean,M.; Izard, T.; Sygusch, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aldolase plays essential catalytic roles in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. However, aldolase is a highly abundant protein that is remarkably promiscuous in its interactions with other cellular proteins. In particular, aldolase binds to highly acidic amino acid sequences, including the C-terminus of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor. Here we report the crystal structure of tetrameric rabbit muscle aldolase in complex with a C-terminal peptide of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein. Aldolase recognizes a short, 4-residue DEWD motif (residues 498-501), which adopts a loose hairpin turn that folds about the central aromatic residue, enabling its tryptophan side chain to fit into a hydrophobic pocket in the active site of aldolase. The flanking acidic residues in this binding motif provide further interactions with conserved aldolase active site residues, Arg-42 and Arg-303, aligning their side chains and forming the sides of the hydrophobic pocket. The binding of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein to aldolase precludes intramolecular interactions of its C-terminus with its active site, and is competitive with substrate as well as with binding by actin and cortactin. Finally, based on this structure a novel naphthol phosphate-based inhibitor of aldolase was identified and its structure in complex with aldolase demonstrated mimicry of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-aldolase interaction. The data support a model whereby aldolase exists in distinct forms that regulate glycolysis or actin dynamics.

  13. Probing the active site tryptophan of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin with an analog

    PubMed Central

    Englert, Markus; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Wang, Yane-Shih; Eiler, Daniel; Söll, Dieter; Guo, Li-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded non-canonical amino acids are powerful tools of protein research and engineering; in particular they allow substitution of individual chemical groups or atoms in a protein of interest. One such amino acid is the tryptophan (Trp) analog 3-benzothienyl-l-alanine (Bta) with an imino-to-sulfur substitution in the five-membered ring. Unlike Trp, Bta is not capable of forming a hydrogen bond, but preserves other properties of a Trp residue. Here we present a pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase-derived, engineered enzyme BtaRS that enables efficient and site-specific Bta incorporation into proteins of interest in vivo. Furthermore, we report a 2.1 Å-resolution crystal structure of a BtaRS•Bta complex to show how BtaRS discriminates Bta from canonical amino acids, including Trp. To show utility in protein mutagenesis, we used BtaRS to introduce Bta to replace the Trp28 residue in the active site of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin. This experiment showed that not the hydrogen bond between residues Trp28 and Asp58, but the bulky aromatic side chain of Trp28 is important for active site maintenance. Collectively, our study provides a new and robust tool for checking the function of Trp in proteins. PMID:26582921

  14. The intrinsic cysteine and histidine residues of the anti-Salmonella antibody Se155-4: a model for the introduction of new functions into antibody-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Young, N Martin; Watson, David C; Cunningham, Anna M; MacKenzie, C Roger

    2014-10-01

    New functions can be incorporated into anti-hapten or anti-protein antibodies by mutating selected residues in the binding-site region either to Cys, to allow alkylation with reagents bearing the desired functional groups, or to His, to create metal-binding sites or to make antigen binding pH-sensitive. However, choosing suitable sites for these mutations has been hampered by the lack of antibodies with these features, to serve as models. Remarkably, the anti-carbohydrate antibody Se155-4, specific for the Salmonella group B lipopolysaccharide, already has a Cys and two pairs of His residues close to the antigen-binding pocket in its structure, and shows pH-dependent antigen binding. We therefore investigated modification of its Cys94L in an scFv version of the antibody with the aims of creating a 'reagentless' fluorescent sensor and attaching a metal-binding group that might confer lyase activity. These groups were successfully introduced, as judged by mass spectrometry, and had only slightly reduced antigen binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The fluorescent product was sensitive to addition of antigen in a solution format, unlike a modification of a more distant Cys introduced into the VH CDR4 loop. Two other routes to modulate antigen binding were also explored, metal binding by the His pair alongside the antigen-binding pocket and insertions into CDR4 to extend the antigen-contact area. His residues adjacent to the antigen-binding pocket bound copper, causing a 5-fold decrease in antigen binding. In CDR4 of the VH domain, the preferred insert length was four residues, which gave stable antigen-binding products but did not improve overall antigen affinity.

  15. The Cysteine Dioxygenase Homologue from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is a 3-Mercaptopropionate Dioxygenase*

    PubMed Central

    Tchesnokov, Egor P.; Fellner, Matthias; Siakkou, Eleni; Kleffmann, Torsten; Martin, Lois W.; Aloi, Sekotilani; Lamont, Iain L.; Wilbanks, Sigurd M.; Jameson, Guy N. L.

    2015-01-01

    Thiol dioxygenation is the initial oxidation step that commits a thiol to important catabolic or biosynthetic pathways. The reaction is catalyzed by a family of specific non-heme mononuclear iron proteins each of which is reported to react efficiently with only one substrate. This family of enzymes includes cysteine dioxygenase, cysteamine dioxygenase, mercaptosuccinate dioxygenase, and 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenase. Using sequence alignment to infer cysteine dioxygenase activity, a cysteine dioxygenase homologue from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (p3MDO) has been identified. Mass spectrometry of P. aeruginosa under standard growth conditions showed that p3MDO is expressed in low levels, suggesting that this metabolic pathway is available to the organism. Purified recombinant p3MDO is able to oxidize both cysteine and 3-mercaptopropionic acid in vitro, with a marked preference for 3-mercaptopropionic acid. We therefore describe this enzyme as a 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenase. Mössbauer spectroscopy suggests that substrate binding to the ferrous iron is through the thiol but indicates that each substrate could adopt different coordination geometries. Crystallographic comparison with mammalian cysteine dioxygenase shows that the overall active site geometry is conserved but suggests that the different substrate specificity can be related to replacement of an arginine by a glutamine in the active site. PMID:26272617

  16. Characterizations of Three Major Cysteine Sensors of Keap1 in Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Saito, Ryota; Suzuki, Takafumi; Hiramoto, Keiichiro; Asami, Soichiro; Naganuma, Eriko; Suda, Hiromi; Iso, Tatsuro; Yamamoto, Hirotaka; Morita, Masanobu; Baird, Liam; Furusawa, Yuki; Negishi, Takaaki; Ichinose, Masakazu; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2015-11-02

    The Keap1-Nrf2 system plays a central role in cytoprotection against electrophilic/oxidative stresses. Although Cys151, Cys273, and Cys288 of Keap1 are major sensor cysteine residues for detecting these stresses, it has not been technically feasible to evaluate the functionality of Cys273 or Cys288, since Keap1 mutants that harbor substitutions in these residues and maintain the ability to repress Nrf2 accumulation do not exist. To overcome this problem, we systematically introduced amino acid substitutions into Cys273/Cys288 and finally identified Cys273Trp and Cys288Glu mutations that do not affect Keap1's ability to repress Nrf2 accumulation. Utilizing these Keap1 mutants, we generated stable murine embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cell lines and knock-in mouse lines. Our analyses with the MEFs and peritoneal macrophages from the knock-in mice revealed that three major cysteine residues, Cys151, Cys273, and Cys288, individually and/or redundantly act as sensors. Based on the functional necessity of these three cysteine residues, we categorized chemical inducers of Nrf2 into four classes. Class I and II utilizes Cys151 and Cys288, respectively, while class III requires all three residues (Cys151/Cys273/Cys288), while class IV inducers function independently of all three of these cysteine residues. This study thus demonstrates that Keap1 utilizes multiple cysteine residues specifically and/or collaboratively as sensors for the detection of a wide range of environmental stresses.

  17. The spectrum character of photoreaction of Hypocrellin A and cysteine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jucheng; Liu, Wei; Li, Ying; Zhang, Pei; Yi, Zhongzhou; Min, Yong; Huang, Zhaolong; Yao, Lihua; Lu, Haiju

    2008-12-01

    In the current work, Hypocrellin A (HA) is one of the nature photosensitizer was recognized by researchers, and it used as a probe to research the molecular recognition and interaction with protein, the work suggested the HA can as the medicine to treat some disease. This paper study the spectrum character of photoreaction of Hypocrellin A and cysteine in different pH value, the spectrum show an isosbestic point at 495nm, and the absorption peak at 478nm was red-shifted to about 500nm. The result suggested the HA can react with cysteine in this condition, and farther illuminated the cysteine residue may is one of the target of the interaction of HA or HB with protein.

  18. The Cysteine Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Chandler, Joshua D.; Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    The cysteine (Cys) proteome is a major component of the adaptive interface between the genome and the exposome. The thiol moiety of Cys undergoes a range of biologic modifications enabling biological switching of structure and reactivity. These biological modifications include sulfenylation and disulfide formation, formation of higher oxidation states, S-nitrosylation, persulfidation, metallation, and other modifications. Extensive knowledge about these systems and their compartmentalization now provides a foundation to develop advanced integrative models of Cys proteome regulation. In particular, detailed understanding of redox signaling pathways and sensing networks is becoming available to discriminate network structures. This research focuses attention on the need for atlases of Cys modifications to develop systems biology models. Such atlases will be especially useful for integrative studies linking the Cys proteome to imaging and other omics platforms, providing a basis for improved redox-based therapeutics. Thus, a framework is emerging to place the Cys proteome as a complement to the quantitative proteome in the omics continuum connecting the genome to the exposome. PMID:25843657

  19. Structural role of the active-site metal in the conformation of Trypanosoma brucei phosphoglycerate mutase.

    PubMed

    Mercaldi, Gustavo F; Pereira, Humberto M; Cordeiro, Artur T; Michels, Paul A M; Thiemann, Otavio H

    2012-06-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutases (PGAMs) participate in both the glycolytic and the gluconeogenic pathways in reversible isomerization of 3-phosphoglycerate and 2-phosphoglycerate. PGAMs are members of two distinct protein families: enzymes that are dependent on or independent of the 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate cofactor. We determined the X-ray structure of the monomeric Trypanosoma brucei independent PGAM (TbiPGAM) in its apoenzyme form, and confirmed this observation by small angle X-ray scattering data. Comparing the TbiPGAM structure with the Leishmania mexicana independent PGAM structure, previously reported with a phosphoglycerate molecule bound to the active site, revealed the domain movement resulting from active site occupation. The structure reported here shows the interaction between Asp319 and the metal bound to the active site, and its contribution to the domain movement. Substitution of the metal-binding residue Asp319 by Ala resulted in complete loss of independent PGAM activity, and showed for the first time its involvement in the enzyme's function. As TbiPGAM is an attractive molecular target for drug development, the apoenzyme conformation described here provides opportunities for its use in structure-based drug design approaches. Database Structural data for the Trypanosoma brucei 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate-independent phosphoglycerate mutase (iPGAM) has been deposited with the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB) Protein Data Bank under code 3NVL.

  20. Substrate-binding specificity of chitinase and chitosanase as revealed by active-site architecture analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shijia; Shao, Shangjin; Li, Linlin; Cheng, Zhi; Tian, Li; Gao, Peiji; Wang, Lushan

    2015-12-11

    Chitinases and chitosanases, referred to as chitinolytic enzymes, are two important categories of glycoside hydrolases (GH) that play a key role in degrading chitin and chitosan, two naturally abundant polysaccharides. Here, we investigate the active site architecture of the major chitosanase (GH8, GH46) and chitinase families (GH18, GH19). Both charged (Glu, His, Arg, Asp) and aromatic amino acids (Tyr, Trp, Phe) are observed with higher frequency within chitinolytic active sites as compared to elsewhere in the enzyme structure, indicating significant roles related to enzyme function. Hydrogen bonds between chitinolytic enzymes and the substrate C2 functional groups, i.e. amino groups and N-acetyl groups, drive substrate recognition, while non-specific CH-π interactions between aromatic residues and substrate mainly contribute to tighter binding and enhanced processivity evident in GH8 and GH18 enzymes. For different families of chitinolytic enzymes, the number, type, and position of substrate atoms bound in the active site vary, resulting in different substrate-binding specificities. The data presented here explain the synergistic action of multiple enzyme families at a molecular level and provide a more reasonable method for functional annotation, which can be further applied toward the practical engineering of chitinases and chitosanases.

  1. Deep Sequencing of Random Mutant Libraries Reveals the Active Site of the Narrow Specificity CphA Metallo-β-Lactamase is Fragile to Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhizeng; Mehta, Shrenik C.; Adamski, Carolyn J.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Palzkill, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    CphA is a Zn2+-dependent metallo-β-lactamase that efficiently hydrolyzes only carbapenem antibiotics. To understand the sequence requirements for CphA function, single codon random mutant libraries were constructed for residues in and near the active site and mutants were selected for E. coli growth on increasing concentrations of imipenem, a carbapenem antibiotic. At high concentrations of imipenem that select for phenotypically wild-type mutants, the active-site residues exhibit stringent sequence requirements in that nearly all residues in positions that contact zinc, the substrate, or the catalytic water do not tolerate amino acid substitutions. In addition, at high imipenem concentrations a number of residues that do not directly contact zinc or substrate are also essential and do not tolerate substitutions. Biochemical analysis confirmed that amino acid substitutions at essential positions decreased the stability or catalytic activity of the CphA enzyme. Therefore, the CphA active - site is fragile to substitutions, suggesting active-site residues are optimized for imipenem hydrolysis. These results also suggest that resistance to inhibitors targeted to the CphA active site would be slow to develop because of the strong sequence constraints on function. PMID:27616327

  2. Perspective: On the active site model in computational catalyst screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Karsten; Plaisance, Craig P.; Oberhofer, Harald; Andersen, Mie

    2017-01-01

    First-principles screening approaches exploiting energy trends in surface adsorption represent an unparalleled success story in recent computational catalysis research. Here we argue that our still limited understanding of the structure of active sites is one of the major bottlenecks towards an ever extended and reliable use of such computational screening for catalyst discovery. For low-index transition metal surfaces, the prevalently chosen high-symmetry (terrace and step) sites offered by the nominal bulk-truncated crystal lattice might be justified. For more complex surfaces and composite catalyst materials, computational screening studies will need to actively embrace a considerable uncertainty with respect to what truly are the active sites. By systematically exploring the space of possible active site motifs, such studies might eventually contribute towards a targeted design of optimized sites in future catalysts.

  3. Purification and sequencing of the active site tryptic peptide from penicillin-binding protein 1b of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, R.A.; Suzuki, H.; Hirota, Y.; Strominger, J.L.

    1985-07-02

    This paper reports the sequence of the active site peptide of penicillin-binding protein 1b from Escherichia coli. Purified penicillin-binding protein 1b was labeled with (/sup 14/C)penicillin G, digested with trypsin, and partially purified by gel filtration. Upon further purification by high-pressure liquid chromatography, two radioactive peaks were observed, and the major peak, representing over 75% of the applied radioactivity, was submitted to amino acid analysis and sequencing. The sequence Ser-Ile-Gly-Ser-Leu-Ala-Lys was obtained. The active site nucleophile was identified by digesting the purified peptide with aminopeptidase M and separating the radioactive products on high-pressure liquid chromatography. Amino acid analysis confirmed that the serine residue in the middle of the sequence was covalently bonded to the (/sup 14/C)penicilloyl moiety. A comparison of this sequence to active site sequences of other penicillin-binding proteins and beta-lactamases is presented.

  4. The crystal structure of the cysteine protease Xylellain from Xylella fastidiosa reveals an intriguing activation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Leite, Ney Ribeiro; Faro, Aline Regis; Dotta, Maria Amélia Oliva; Faim, Livia Maria; Gianotti, Andreia; Silva, Flavio Henrique; Oliva, Glaucius; Thiemann, Otavio Henrique

    2013-02-14

    Xylella fastidiosa is responsible for a wide range of economically important plant diseases. We report here the crystal structure and kinetic data of Xylellain, the first cysteine protease characterized from the genome of the pathogenic X. fastidiosa strain 9a5c. Xylellain has a papain-family fold, and part of the N-terminal sequence blocks the enzyme active site, thereby mediating protein activity. One novel feature identified in the structure is the presence of a ribonucleotide bound outside the active site. We show that this ribonucleotide plays an important regulatory role in Xylellain enzyme kinetics, possibly functioning as a physiological mediator.

  5. Protein engineering of the quaternary sulfiredoxin.peroxiredoxin enzyme.substrate complex reveals the molecular basis for cysteine sulfinic acid phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Thomas J; Johnson, Lynnette C; Lowther, W Todd

    2009-11-27

    Oxidative stress can damage the active site cysteine of the antioxidant enzyme peroxiredoxin (Prx) to the sulfinic acid form, Prx-SO(2)(-). This modification leads to inactivation. Sulfiredoxin (Srx) utilizes a unique ATP-Mg(2+)-dependent mechanism to repair the Prx molecule. Using selective protein engineering that involves disulfide bond formation and site-directed mutagenesis, a mimic of the enzyme.substrate complex has been trapped. Here, we present the 2.1 A crystal structure of human Srx in complex with PrxI, ATP, and Mg(2+). The Cys(52) sulfinic acid moiety was substituted by mutating this residue to Asp, leading to a replacement of the sulfur atom with a carbon atom. Because the Srx reaction cannot occur, the structural changes in the Prx active site that lead to the attack on ATP may be visualized. The local unfolding of the helix containing C52D resulted in the packing of Phe(50) in PrxI within a hydrophobic pocket of Srx. Importantly, this structural rearrangement positioned one of the oxygen atoms of Asp(52) within 4.3 A of the gamma-phosphate of ATP bound to Srx. These observations support a mechanism where phosphorylation of Prx-SO(2)(-) is the first chemical step.

  6. Finding a Needle in the Haystack: Computational Modeling of Mg2+ Binding in the Active Site of Protein Farnesyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yue; Chakravorty, Dhruva K.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    Studies aimed at elucidating the unknown Mg2+ binding site in protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) are reported. FTase catalyzes the transfer of a farnesyl group to a conserved cysteine residue (Cys1p) on a target protein, an important step for proteins in the signal transduction pathways (e.g. Ras). Mg2+ ions accelerate the protein farnesylation reaction by up to 700-fold. The exact function of Mg2+ in catalysis and the structural characteristics of its binding remain unresolved to date. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations addressing the role of magnesium ions in FTase are presented, and relevant octahedral binding motifs for Mg2+ in wild type (WT) FTase and Dβ352A mutant are explored. Our simulations suggest that the addition of Mg2+ ions causes a conformational changes to occur in the FTase active site, breaking interactions known to keep FPP in its inactive conformation. Two relevant Mg2+ ion binding motifs were determined in WT FTase. In the first binding motif, WT1, the Mg2+ ion is coordinated to D352β, zinc-bound D297β, two water molecules, and one oxygen atoms from the α- and β-phosphates of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP). The second binding motif, WT2, is identical with the exception of the zinc-bound D297β being replaced by a water molecule in the Mg2+ coordination complex. In the Dβ352A mutant Mg2+ binding motif, D297β, three water molecules and one oxygen atom from the α- and β-phosphates of FPP complete the octahedral coordination sphere of Mg2+. Simulations of WT FTase, in which Mg2+ was replaced by water in the active site, re-created the salt bridges and hydrogen bonding patterns around FPP, validating these simulations. In all Mg2+ binding motifs, a key hydrogen bond was identified between a magnesium bound water and Cys1p, bridging the two metallic binding sites, and thereby, reducing the equilibrium distance between the reacting atoms of FPP Cys1p. The free energy profiles calculated for these systems provide a qualitative understanding of

  7. Artemisolide is a typical inhibitor of I{kappa}B kinase {beta} targeting cysteine-179 residue and down-regulates NF-{kappa}B-dependent TNF-{alpha} expression in LPS-activated macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Byung Hak; Lee, Jun-Young; Seo, Jee Hee; Lee, Hwa Young; Ryu, Shi Yong; Ahn, Byung Woo; Lee, Chong-Kil; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Han, Sang-Bae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2007-09-28

    Nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B regulates a central common signaling for immunity and cell survival. Artemisolide (ATM) was previously isolated as a NF-{kappa}B inhibitor from a plant of Artemisia asiatica. However, molecular basis of ATM on NF-{kappa}B activation remains to be defined. Here, we demonstrate that ATM is a typical inhibitor of I{kappa}B kinase {beta} (IKK{beta}), resulting in inhibition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NF-{kappa}B activation in RAW 264.7 macrophages. ATM inhibited the kinase activity of highly purified IKK{beta} and also LPS-induced IKK activity in the cells. Moreover, the effect of ATM on IKK{beta} activity was completely abolished by substitution of Cys-179 residue of IKK{beta} to Ala residue, indicating direct targeting site of ATM. ATM could inhibit I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation in LPS-activated RAW 264.7 cells and subsequently prevent NF-{kappa}B activation. Further, we demonstrate that ATM down-regulates NF-{kappa}B-dependent TNF-{alpha} expression. Taken together, this study provides a pharmacological potential of ATM in NF-{kappa}B-dependent inflammatory disorders.

  8. Human 15-LOX-1 active site mutations alter inhibitor binding and decrease potency.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Michelle; van Hoorebeke, Christopher; Horn, Thomas; Deschamps, Joshua; Freedman, J Cody; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Jacobson, Matthew P; Holman, Theodore

    2016-11-01

    Human 15-lipoxygenase-1 (h15-LOX-1 or h12/15-LOX) reacts with polyunsaturated fatty acids and produces bioactive lipid derivatives that are implicated in many important human diseases. One such disease is stroke, which is the fifth leading cause of death and the first leading cause of disability in America. The discovery of h15-LOX-1 inhibitors could potentially lead to novel therapeutics in the treatment of stroke, however, little is known about the inhibitor/active site interaction. This study utilizes site-directed mutagenesis, guided in part by molecular modeling, to gain a better structural understanding of inhibitor interactions within the active site. We have generated eight mutants (R402L, R404L, F414I, F414W, E356Q, Q547L, L407A, I417A) of h15-LOX-1 to determine whether these active site residues interact with two h15-LOX-1 inhibitors, ML351 and an ML094 derivative, compound 18. IC50 values and steady-state inhibition kinetics were determined for the eight mutants, with four of the mutants affecting inhibitor potency relative to wild type h15-LOX-1 (F414I, F414W, E356Q and L407A). The data indicate that ML351 and compound 18, bind in a similar manner in the active site to an aromatic pocket close to F414 but have subtle differences in their specific binding modes. This information establishes the binding mode for ML094 and ML351 and will be leveraged to develop next-generation inhibitors.

  9. Systematic mutagenesis of the active site omega loop of TEM-1 beta-lactamase.

    PubMed Central

    Petrosino, J F; Palzkill, T

    1996-01-01

    Beta-Lactamase is a bacterial protein that provides resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics. TEM-1 beta-lactamase is the most prevalent plasmid-mediated beta-lactamase in gram-negative bacteria. Normally, this enzyme has high levels of hydrolytic activity for penicillins, but mutant beta-lactamases have evolved with activity toward a variety of beta-lactam antibiotics. It has been shown that active site substitutions are responsible for changes in the substrate specificity. Since mutant beta-lactamases pose a serious threat to antimicrobial therapy, the mechanisms by which mutations can alter the substrate specificity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase are of interest. Previously, screens of random libraries encompassing 31 of 55 active site amino acid positions enabled the identification of the residues responsible for maintaining the substrate specificity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase. In addition to substitutions found in clinical isolates, many other specificity-altering mutations were also identified. Interestingly, many nonspecific substitutions in the N-terminal half of the active site omega loop were found to increase ceftazidime hydrolytic activity and decrease ampicillin hydrolytic activity. To complete the active sight study, eight additional random libraries were constructed and screened for specificity-altering mutations. All additional substitutions found to alter the substrate specificity were located in the C-terminal half of the active site loop. These mutants, much like the N-terminal omega loop mutants, appear to be less stable than the wild-type enzyme. Further analysis of a 165-YYG-167 triple mutant, selected for high levels of ceftazidime hydrolytic activity, provides an example of the correlation which exists between enzyme instability and increased ceftazidime hydrolytic activity in the ceftazidime-selected omega loop mutants. PMID:8606154

  10. Active Site Hydrophobicity and the Convergent Evolution of Paraoxonase Activity in Structurally Divergent Enzymes: The Case of Serum Paraoxonase 1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a native lactonase capable of promiscuously hydrolyzing a broad range of substrates, including organophosphates, esters, and carbonates. Structurally, PON1 is a six-bladed β-propeller with a flexible loop (residues 70–81) covering the active site. This loop contains a functionally critical Tyr at position 71. We have performed detailed experimental and computational analyses of the role of selected Y71 variants in the active site stability and catalytic activity in order to probe the role of Y71 in PON1’s lactonase and organophosphatase activities. We demonstrate that the impact of Y71 substitutions on PON1’s lactonase activity is minimal, whereas the kcat for the paraoxonase activity is negatively perturbed by up to 100-fold, suggesting greater mutational robustness of the native activity. Additionally, while these substitutions modulate PON1’s active site shape, volume, and loop flexibility, their largest effect is in altering the solvent accessibility of the active site by expanding the active site volume, allowing additional water molecules to enter. This effect is markedly more pronounced in the organophosphatase activity than the lactonase activity. Finally, a detailed comparison of PON1 to other organophosphatases demonstrates that either a similar “gating loop” or a highly buried solvent-excluding active site is a common feature of these enzymes. We therefore posit that modulating the active site hydrophobicity is a key element in facilitating the evolution of organophosphatase activity. This provides a concrete feature that can be utilized in the rational design of next-generation organophosphate hydrolases that are capable of selecting a specific reaction from a pool of viable substrates. PMID:28026940

  11. L-Cysteine and L-AP4 microinjections in the rat caudal ventrolateral medulla decrease arterial blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Yumi

    2014-12-01

    The thiol amino acid L-cysteine increases arterial blood pressure (ABP) when injected into the cerebrospinal fluid space in conscious rats, indicating a pressor response to centrally acting L-cysteine. A prior synaptic membrane binding assay suggests that L-cysteine has a strong affinity for the L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4) binding site. The central action of L-cysteine may be vial-AP4 sensitive receptors. The present study investigated cardiovascular responses to L-cysteine and L-ap4 microinjected into the autonomic area of the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM) where inhibitory neurons regulate ABP via pre-sympathetic vasomotor neurons. Both the injection of L-cysteine and L-AP4 in the CVLM sites identified with L-glutamate produced the same depressor and bradycardic responses in urethane-anesthetized rats. Neither a prior antagonist microinjection of MK801 for the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor nor CNQX for the non-NMDA receptor attenuated the responses to L-cysteine, but the combination of the two receptor blocking with an additional prior injection abolished the response. In contrast, either receptor blockade alone abolished the response to L-AP4, indicating distinct mechanisms between responses to L-cysteine and L-AP4 in the CVLM. The results indicate that the CVLM is a central active site for L-cysteine's cardiovascular response. Central L-cysteine's action could be independent of the L-AP4 sensitive receptors. Cardiovascular regulation may involve endogenous L-cysteine in the CVLM. Further multidisciplinary examinations are required to elaborate on L-cysteine's functional roles in the CVLM.

  12. Rat glutathione S-transferase M4-4: an isoenzyme with unique structural features including a redox-reactive cysteine-115 residue that forms mixed disulphides with glutathione.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, H; Tchaikovskaya, T; Tu, Y S; Chapman, J; Qian, B; Ching, W M; Tien, M; Rowe, J D; Patskovsky, Y V; Listowsky, I; Tu, C P

    2001-01-01

    Although the existence of the rat glutathione S-transferase (GST) M4 (rGSTM4) gene has been known for some time, the corresponding protein has not as yet been purified from tissue. A recombinant rGSTM4-4 was thus expressed in Escherichia coli from a chemically synthesized rGSTM4 gene. The catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) of rGSTM4-4 for the 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) conjugation reaction was 50-180-fold less than that of the well-characterized homologous rGSTM1-1, and the pH optimum for the same reaction was 8.5 for rGSTM4-4 as opposed to 6.5 for rGSTM1-1. Molecular-modelling studies predict that key substitutions in the helix alpha4 region of rGSTM4-4 account for this pK(a) difference. A notable structural feature of rGSTM4-4 is the Cys-115 residue in place of the Tyr-115 of other Mu-class GSTs. The thiol group of Cys-115 is redox-reactive and readily forms a mixed disulphide even with GSH; the S-glutathiolated form of the enzyme is catalytically active. A mutated rGSTM4-4 (C115Y) had 6-10-fold greater catalytic efficiency than the wild-type rGSTM4-4. Trp-45, a conserved residue among Mu-class GSTs, is essential in rGSTM4-4 for both enzyme activity and binding to glutathione affinity matrices. Antibodies directed against either the unique C-terminal undecapeptide or tridecapeptide of rGSTM4 reacted with rat and mouse liver GSTs to reveal an orthologous mouse GSTM4-4 present at low basal levels but which is inducible in mouse liver. This subclass of rodent Mu GSTs with redox-active Cys-115 residues could have specialized physiological functions in response to oxidative stress. PMID:11368767

  13. Pressure-induced perturbation on the active site of beta-amylase monitored from the sulfhydryl reaction.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, N; Mitani, D; Kunugi, S

    2001-05-22

    We investigated the pressure effect on the conformation of beta-amylase by monitoring the chemical reaction of the unpaired cysteine. Sweet potato beta-amylase is composed of four identical subunits, each of which contains six cysteine residues. These residues are inert to 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) in the native state due to steric hindrance. With the increase of the pressure from 0.1 to 400 MPa, the reactivity of one cysteine out of six residues was enhanced. We have identified that the reacted cysteine residue was Cys345 by the chemical cleavage at the reacted site. The reaction kinetics of Cys345 were pseudo-first-order, and the apparent rate constant was increased from 0.001 to 0.05 min(-)(1) with the increase of pressure from 100 to 400 MPa. The activation volume of the reaction rate was calculated as -24 +/- 2 mL/mol from the slope of the logarithmic plot of the pressure dependence of the rate constant. Hysteresis was not evident in the change of intrinsic fluorescence during the cycle of compression and decompression between 0.1 and 400 MPa, indicating that the tetramer does not dissociate under high pressure. This indicates that the enhancement of the reactivity of Cys345 was caused by the perturbation of local conformation under high pressure. The reaction of Cys345 was also enhanced by low concentrations of GuHCl, suggesting the significant role of hydration-driven fluctuation in the pressure-induced enhancement of the reactivity.

  14. Identification by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of an active-site hydrogen-bond network in human monoacylglycerol lipase (hMGL): implications for hMGL dynamics, pharmacological inhibition, and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Karageorgos, Ioannis; Tyukhtenko, Sergiy; Zvonok, Nikolai; Janero, David R; Sallum, Christine; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2010-08-01

    Intramolecular hydrogen bonding is an important determinant of enzyme structure, catalysis, and inhibitor action. Monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL) modulates cannabinergic signaling as the main enzyme responsible for deactivating 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), a primary endocannabinoid lipid messenger. By enhancing tissue-protective 2-AG tone, targeted MGL inhibitors hold therapeutic promise for managing pain and treating inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. We report study of purified, solubilized human MGL (hMGL) to explore the details of hMGL catalysis by using two known covalent hMGL inhibitors, the carbamoyl tetrazole AM6701 and N-arachidonoylmaleimide (NAM), that act through distinct mechanisms. Using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) with purified wild-type and mutant hMGLs, we have directly observed a strong hydrogen-bond network involving Asp239 and His269 of the catalytic triad and neighboring Leu241 and Cys242 residues. hMGL inhibition by AM6701 alters this hydrogen-bonding pattern through subtle active-site structural rearrangements without influencing hydrogen-bond occupancies. Rapid carbamoylation of hMGL Ser122 by AM6701 and elimination of the leaving group is followed by a slow hydrolysis of the carbamate group, ultimately regenerating catalytically competent hMGL. In contrast, hMGL titration with NAM, which leads to cysteine alkylation, stoichiometrically decreases the population of the active-site hydrogen bonds. NAM prevents reformation of this network, and in this manner inhibits hMGL irreversibly. These data provide detailed molecular insight into the distinctive mechanisms of two covalent hMGL inhibitors and implicate a hydrogen-bond network as a structural feature of hMGL catalytic function.

  15. Backbone 1H, 13C and 15N assignments of YibK and avariant containing a unique cysteine residue at C-terminus in 8 M urea-denatured states [corrected].

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Shu-Ju Micky; Mallam, Anna L; Jackson, Sophie E; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny

    2014-10-01

    YibK is a tRNA methyltransferase from Haemophilus influenzae, which forms a stable homodimer in solution and contains a deep trefoil 31 knot encompassing the C-terminal helix that threads through a long loop. It has been a model system for investigating knotted protein folding pathways. Recent data have shown that the polypeptide chain of YibK remains loosely knotted under highly denaturing conditions. Here, we report (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shift assignments for YibK and its variant in the presence of 8 M urea. This work forms the basis for further analysis using NMR techniques such as paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, residual dipolar couplings and spin-relaxation dynamics analysis.

  16. Probing the active site of cinnamoyl CoA reductase 1 (Ll-CCRH1) from Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant; Patel, Krunal; Vishwakarma, Rishi Kishore; Srivastava, Sameer; Singh, Somesh; Gaikwad, Sushama; Khan, Bashir M

    2013-09-01

    Lack of three dimensional crystal structure of cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) limits its detailed active site characterization studies. Putative active site residues involved in the substrate/NADPH binding and catalysis for Leucaena leucocephala CCR (Ll-CCRH1; GenBank: DQ986907) were identified by amino acid sequence alignment and homology modeling. Putative active site residues and proximal H215 were subjected for site directed mutagenesis, and mutated enzymes were expressed, purified and assayed to confirm their functional roles. Mutagenesis of S136, Y170 and K174 showed complete loss of activity, indicating their pivotal roles in catalysis. Mutant S212G exhibited the catalytic efficiencies less than 10% of wild type, showing its indirect involvement in substrate binding or catalysis. R51G, D77G, F30V and I31N double mutants showed significant changes in Km values, specifying their roles in substrate binding. Finally, chemical modification and substrate protection studies corroborated the presence Ser, Tyr, Lys, Arg and carboxylate group at the active site of Ll-CCRH1.

  17. Energy transfer at the active sites of heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dlott, D.D.; Hill, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments using a picosecond pump-probe apparatus at the Picosecond Free-electron Laser Center at Stanford University, were performed to investigate the relaxation of carbon monoxide bound to the active sites of heme proteins. The significance of these experiments is two-fold: (1) they provide detailed information about molecular dynamics occurring at the active sites of proteins; and (2) they provide insight into the nature of vibrational relaxation processes in condensed matter. Molecular engineering is used to construct various molecular systems which are studied with the FEL. We have studied native proteins, mainly myoglobin obtained from different species, mutant proteins produced by genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques, and a variety of model systems which mimic the structures of the active sites of native proteins, which are produced using molecular synthesis. Use of these different systems permits us to investigate how specific molecular structural changes affect dynamical processes occurring at the active sites. This research provides insight into the problems of how different species needs are fulfilled by heme proteins which have greatly different functionality, which is induced by rather small structural changes.

  18. Quantum mechanics study of the hydroxyethylamines-BACE-1 active site interaction energies.

    PubMed

    Gueto-Tettay, Carlos; Drosos, Juan Carlos; Vivas-Reyes, Ricardo

    2011-06-01

    The identification of BACE-1, a key enzyme in the production of Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides, generated by the proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein, was a major advance in the field of Alzheimer's disease as this pathology is characterized by the presence of extracellular senile plaques, mainly comprised of Aβ peptides. Hydroxyethylamines have demonstrated a remarkable potential, like candidate drugs, for this disease using BACE-1 as target. Density Functional Theory calculations were employed to estimate interaction energies for the complexes formed between the hydroxyethylamine derivated inhibitors and 24 residues in the BACE-1 active site. The collected data offered not only a general but a particular quantitative description that gives a deep insight of the interactions in the active site, showing at the same time how ligand structural variations affect them. Polar interactions are the major energetic contributors for complex stabilization and those ones with charged aspartate residues are highlighted, as they contribute over 90% of the total attractive interaction energy. Ligand-ARG296 residue interaction reports the most repulsive value and decreasing of the magnitude of this repulsion can be a key feature for the design of novel and more potent BACE-1 inhibitors. Also it was explained why sultam derivated BACE-1 inhibitors are better ones than lactam based. Hydrophobic interactions concentrated at S1 zone and other relevant repulsions and attractions were also evaluated. The comparison of two different theory levels (X3LYP and M062X) allowed to confirm the relevance of the detected interactions as each theory level has its own strength to depict the forces involved, as is the case of M062X which is better describing the hydrophobic interactions. Those facts were also evaluated and confirmed by comparing the quantitative trend, of selected ligand-residue interactions, with MP2 theory level as reference standard method for electrostatic plus

  19. Quantum mechanics study of the hydroxyethylamines-BACE-1 active site interaction energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueto-Tettay, Carlos; Drosos, Juan Carlos; Vivas-Reyes, Ricardo

    2011-06-01

    The identification of BACE-1, a key enzyme in the production of Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides, generated by the proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein, was a major advance in the field of Alzheimer's disease as this pathology is characterized by the presence of extracellular senile plaques, mainly comprised of Aβ peptides. Hydroxyethylamines have demonstrated a remarkable potential, like candidate drugs, for this disease using BACE-1 as target. Density Functional Theory calculations were employed to estimate interaction energies for the complexes formed between the hydroxyethylamine derivated inhibitors and 24 residues in the BACE-1 active site. The collected data offered not only a general but a particular quantitative description that gives a deep insight of the interactions in the active site, showing at the same time how ligand structural variations affect them. Polar interactions are the major energetic contributors for complex stabilization and those ones with charged aspartate residues are highlighted, as they contribute over 90% of the total attractive interaction energy. Ligand-ARG296 residue interaction reports the most repulsive value and decreasing of the magnitude of this repulsion can be a key feature for the design of novel and more potent BACE-1 inhibitors. Also it was explained why sultam derivated BACE-1 inhibitors are better ones than lactam based. Hydrophobic interactions concentrated at S1 zone and other relevant repulsions and attractions were also evaluated. The comparison of two different theory levels (X3LYP and M062X) allowed to confirm the relevance of the detected interactions as each theory level has its own strength to depict the forces involved, as is the case of M062X which is better describing the hydrophobic interactions. Those facts were also evaluated and confirmed by comparing the quantitative trend, of selected ligand-residue interactions, with MP2 theory level as reference standard method for electrostatic plus

  20. Catalytic and Structural Role of a Conserved Active Site Histidine in Berberine Bridge Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Berberine bridge enzyme (BBE) is a paradigm for the class of bicovalently flavinylated oxidases, which catalyzes the oxidative cyclization of (S)-reticuline to (S)-scoulerine. His174 was identified as an important active site residue because of its role in the stabilization of the reduced state of the flavin cofactor. It is also strictly conserved in the family of BBE-like oxidases. Here, we present a detailed biochemical and structural characterization of a His174Ala variant supporting its importance during catalysis and for the structural organization of the active site. Substantial changes in all kinetic parameters and a decrease in midpoint potential were observed for the BBE His174Ala variant protein. Moreover, the crystal structure of the BBE His174Ala variant showed significant structural rearrangements compared to wild-type enzyme. On the basis of our findings, we propose that His174 is part of a hydrogen bonding network that stabilizes the negative charge at the N1–C2=O locus via interaction with the hydroxyl group at C2′ of the ribityl side chain of the flavin cofactor. Hence, replacement of this residue with alanine reduces the stabilizing effect for the transiently formed negative charge and results in drastically decreased kinetic parameters as well as a lower midpoint redox potential. PMID:22757961

  1. Multiple, Ligand-Dependent Routes from the Active Site of Cytochrome P450 2C9

    SciTech Connect

    Cojocaru, Vlad; Winn, Peter J.; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2012-02-13

    The active site of liver-specific, drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenases is deeply buried in the protein and is connected to the protein surface through multiple tunnels, many of which were found open in different CYP crystal structures. It has been shown that different tunnels could serve as ligand passage routes in different CYPs. However, it is not understood whether one CYP uses multiple routes for substrate access and product release and whether these routes depend on ligand properties. From 300 ns of molecular dynamics simulations of CYP2C9, the second most abundant CYP in the human liver we found four main ligand exit routes, the occurrence of each depending on the ligand type and the conformation of the F-G loop, which is likely to be affected by the CYP-membrane interaction. A non-helical F-G loop favored exit towards the putative membrane-embedded region. Important protein features that direct ligand exit include aromatic residues that divide the active site and whose motions control access to two pathways. The ligands interacted with positively charged residues on the protein surface through hydrogen bonds that appear to select for acidic substrates. The observation of multiple, ligand-dependent routes in a CYP aids understanding of how CYP mutations affect drug metabolism and provides new possibilities for CYP inhibition.

  2. Similarities in the HIV-1 and ASV Integrease Active Site Upon Metal Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Lins, Roberto D.; Straatsma, TP; Briggs, J. M.

    2000-04-05

    The HIV-1 integrase, which is essential for viral replication, catalyzes the insertion of viral DNA into the host chromosome thereby recruiting host cell machinery into making viral proteins. It represents the third main HIV enzyme target for inhibitor design, the first two being the reverse transcriptase and the protease. We report here a fully hydrated 2 ns molecular dynamics simulation performed using parallel NWChem3.2.1 with the AMBER95 force field. The HIV-1 integrase catalytic domain previously determined by crystallography (1B9D) and modeling including two Mg2+ ions placed into the active site based on an alignment against an ASV integrase structure containing two divalent metals (1VSH), was used as the starting structure. The simulation reveals a high degree of flexibility in the region of residues 140-149 even in the presence of a second divalent metal ion and a dramatic conformational change of the side chain of E152 when the second metal ion is present. This study shows similarities in the behavior of the catalytic residues in the HIV-1 and ASV integrases upon metal binding. The present simulation also provides support to the hypothesis that the second metal ion is likely to be carried into the HIV-1 integrase active site by the substrate, a strand of DNA.

  3. Structural analysis of a penicillin V acylase from Pectobacterium atrosepticum confirms the importance of two Trp residues for activity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Avinash, Vellore Sunder; Panigrahi, Priyabrata; Chand, Deepak; Pundle, Archana; Suresh, Cheravakattu Gopalan; Ramasamy, Sureshkumar

    2016-02-01

    Penicillin V acylases (PVA) catalyze the deacylation of the beta-lactam antibiotic phenoxymethylpenicillin (Pen V). They are members of the Ntn hydrolase family and possess an N-terminal cysteine as the main catalytic nucleophile residue. They form the evolutionarily related cholylglycine hydrolase (CGH) group which includes bile salt hydrolases (BSH) responsible for bile deconjugation. Even though a few PVA and BSH structures have been reported, no structure of a functional PVA from Gram-negative bacteria is available. Here, we report the crystal structure of a highly active PVA from Gram-negative Pectobacterium atrosepticum (PaPVA) at 2.5Å resolution. Structural comparison with PVAs from Gram-positive bacteria revealed that PaPVA had a distinctive tetrameric structure and active site organization. In addition, mutagenesis of key active site residues and biochemical characterization of the resultant variants elucidated the role of these residues in substrate binding and catalysis. The importance of residue Trp23 and Trp87 side chains in binding and correct positioning of Pen V by PVAs was confirmed using mutagenesis and substrate docking with a 15ns molecular dynamics simulation. These results establish the unique nature of Gram-negative CGHs and necessitate further research about their substrate spectrum.

  4. Dipeptide-derived nitriles containing additional electrophilic sites: potentially irreversible inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Löser, Reik; Gütschow, Michael

    2009-12-01

    Heterocyclic and open-chain dipeptide-derived nitriles have been synthesized, containing an additional electrophilic center enabling the subsequent covalent modification of the thioimidate nitrogen formed in situ at the active site of the enzyme. The inhibitory potential of these nitriles against the cysteine proteases papain and cathepsins L, S, and K was determined. The open-chain dipeptide nitriles 8 and 10 acted as moderate reversible inhibitors, but no evidence for an irreversible inhibition of these enzymes was discernable.

  5. Identification of active sites in amidase: Evolutionary relationship between amide bond- and peptide bond-cleaving enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Michihiko; Fujiwara, Yoshie; Goda, Masahiko; Komeda, Hidenobu; Shimizu, Sakayu

    1997-01-01

    Mainly based on various inhibitor studies previously performed, amidases came to be regarded as sulfhydryl enzymes. Not completely satisfied with this generally accepted interpretation, we performed a series of site-directed mutagenesis studies on one particular amidase of Rhodococcus rhodochrous J1 that was involved in its nitrile metabolism. For these experiments, the recombinant amidase was produced as the inclusion body in Escherichia coli to greatly facilitate its recovery and subsequent purification. With regard to the presumptive active site residue Cys203, a Cys203 → Ala mutant enzyme still retained 11.5% of the original specific activity. In sharp contrast, substitutions in certain other positions in the neighborhood of Cys203 had a far more dramatic effect on the amidase. Glutamic acid substitution of Asp191 reduced the specific activity of the mutant enzyme to 1.33% of the wild-type activity. Furthermore, Asp191 → Asn substitution as well as Ser195 → Ala substitution completely abolished the specific activity. It would thus appear that, among various conserved residues residing within the so-called signature sequence common to all amidases, the real active site residues are Asp191 and Ser195 rather than Cys203. Inasmuch as an amide bond (CO-NH2) in the amide substrate is not too far structurally removed from a peptide bond (CO-NH-), the signature sequences of various amidases were compared with the active site sequences of various types of proteases. It was found that aspartic acid and serine residues corresponding to Asp191 and Ser195 of the Rhodococcus amidase are present within the active site sequences of aspartic proteinases, thus suggesting the evolutionary relationship between the two. PMID:9342349

  6. Identification of Arg-12 in the active site of Escherichia coli K1 CMP-sialic acid synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Stoughton, D M; Zapata, G; Picone, R; Vann, W F

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli K1 CMP-sialic acid synthetase catalyses the synthesis of CMP-sialic acid from CTP and sialic acid. The active site of the 418 amino acid E. coli enzyme was localized to its N-terminal half. The bacterial CMP-sialic acid synthetase enzymes have a conserved motif, IAIIPARXXSKGLXXKN, at their N-termini. Several basic residues have been identified at or near the active site of the E. coli enzyme by chemical modification and site-directed mutagenesis. Only one of the lysines in the N-terminal motif, Lys-21, appears to be essential for activity. Mutation of Lys-21 in the N-terminal motif results in an inactive enzyme. Furthermore, Arg-12 of the N-terminal motif appears to be an active-site residue, based on the following evidence. Substituting Arg-12 with glycine or alanine resulted in inactive enzymes, indicating that this residue is required for enzymic activity. The Arg-12-->Lys mutant was partially active, demonstrating that a positive charge is required at this site. Steady-state kinetic analysis reveals changes in k(cat), K(m) and K(s) for CTP, which implicates Arg-12 in catalysis and substrate binding. PMID:10510306

  7. Prediction of the disulfide-bonding state of cysteines in proteins at 88% accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, Pier Luigi; Fariselli, Piero; Malaguti, Luca; Casadio, Rita

    2002-01-01

    The task of predicting the cysteine-bonding state in proteins starting from the residue chain is addressed by implementing a new hybrid system that combines a neural network and a hidden Markov model (hidden neural network). Training is performed using 4136 cysteine-containing segments extracted from 969 nonhomologous proteins of well-resolved three-dimensional structure. After a 20-fold cross-validation procedure, the efficiency of the prediction scores as high as 88% and 84%, when measured on cysteine and protein basis, respectively. These results outperform previously described methods for the same task. PMID:12381855

  8. Structural mechanism of RuBisCO activation by carbamylation of the active site lysine.

    PubMed

    Stec, Boguslaw

    2012-11-13

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is a crucial enzyme in carbon fixation and the most abundant protein on earth. It has been studied extensively by biochemical and structural methods; however, the most essential activation step has not yet been described. Here, we describe the mechanistic details of Lys carbamylation that leads to RuBisCO activation by atmospheric CO(2). We report two crystal structures of nitrosylated RuBisCO from the red algae Galdieria sulphuraria with O(2) and CO(2) bound at the active site. G. sulphuraria RuBisCO is inhibited by cysteine nitrosylation that results in trapping of these gaseous ligands. The structure with CO(2) defines an elusive, preactivation complex that contains a metal cation Mg(2+) surrounded by three H(2)O/OH molecules. Both structures suggest the mechanism for discriminating gaseous ligands by their quadrupole electric moments. We describe conformational changes that allow for intermittent binding of the metal ion required for activation. On the basis of these structures we propose the individual steps of the activation mechanism. Knowledge of all these elements is indispensable for engineering RuBisCO into a more efficient enzyme for crop enhancement or as a remedy to global warming.

  9. Active Site Mapping of Human Cathepsin F with Dipeptide Nitrile Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Janina; Furtmann, Norbert; Ponert, Moritz; Frizler, Maxim; Löser, Reik; Bartz, Ulrike; Bajorath, Jürgen; Gütschow, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Cleavage of the invariant chain is the key event in the trafficking pathway of major histocompatibility complex class II. Cathepsin S is the major processing enzyme of the invariant chain, but cathepsin F acts in macrophages as its functional synergist which is as potent as cathepsin S in invariant chain cleavage. Dedicated low-molecular-weight inhibitors for cathepsin F have not yet been developed. An active site mapping with 52 dipeptide nitriles, reacting as covalent-reversible inhibitors, was performed to draw structure-activity relationships for the non-primed binding region of human cathepsin F. In a stepwise process, new compounds with optimized fragment combinations were designed and synthesized. These dipeptide nitriles were evaluated on human cysteine cathepsins F, B, L, K and S. Compounds 10 (N-(4-phenylbenzoyl)-leucylglycine nitrile) and 12 (N-(4-phenylbenzoyl)leucylmethionine nitrile) were found to be potent inhibitors of human cathepsin F, with Ki values <10 nM. With all dipeptide nitriles from our study, a 3D activity landscape was generated to visualize structure-activity relationships for this series of cathepsin F inhibitors.

  10. Active sites in char gasification: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.D.; Perkins, M.T.; Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1987-09-01

    Among the key variables in the design of gasifiers and combustors is the reactivity of the chars which must be gasified or combusted. Significant loss of unburned char is unacceptable in virtually any process; the provision of sufficient residence time for complete conversion is essential. A very wide range of reactivities are observed, depending upon the nature of the char in a process. The current work focuses on furthering the understanding of gasification reactivities of chars. It has been well established that the reactivity of char to gasification generally depends upon three principal factors: (1) the concentration of ''active sites'' in the char; (2) mass transfer within the char; and (3) the type and concentration of catalytic impurities in the char. The present study primarily addresses the first factor. The subject of this research is the origin, nature, and fate of active sites in chars derived from parent hydrocarbons with coal-like structure. The nature and number of the active sites and their reactivity towards oxygen are examined in ''model'' chars derived from phenol-formaldehyde type resins. How the active sites are lost by the process of thermal annealing during heat treatment of chars are studied, and actual rate for the annealing process is derived. Since intrinsic char reactivities are of primary interest in the present study, a fair amount of attention was given to the model char synthesis and handling so that the effect of catalytic impurities and oxygen-containing functional groups in the chemical structure of the material were minimized, if not completely eliminated. The project would not be considered complete without comparing characteristic features of synthetic chars with kinetic behavior exhibited by natural chars, including coal chars.

  11. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  12. Analysis of Active-Site Amino-Acid Residues of Human Serum Paraoxonase Using Competitive Substrates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    inhibitor Paraoxonase activity was determined using 0.26-2.6 mM of paraoxon hydrolysis by H115W, competitive inhi- paraoxon (diethyl p- nitrophenyl phosphate ...simultaneously,Tel: +1 410 436 1338 E-mail: douglas.cerasoli@us.army.mil phenyl acetate competitively inhibits paraoxon hydrolysis by HI 15W. Con- versely...has no effect on the ability of F222Y to catalyze the doi:10.1 111/i.1742-4658.2005.04646.x hydrolysis of phenyl acetate, suggesting that the F222Y

  13. Structural effects of nucleobase variations at key active site residue Ade38 in the hairpin ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    MacElrevey, Celeste; Salter, Jason D.; Krucinska, Jolanta; Wedekind, Joseph E.

    2008-01-01

    The hairpin ribozyme requires functional groups from Ade38 to achieve efficient bond cleavage or ligation. To identify molecular features that contribute to catalysis, structures of position 38 base variants 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP), 2-aminopurine (AP), cytosine (Cyt), and guanine (Gua) were determined between 2.2 and 2.8 Å resolution. For each variant, two substrate modifications were compared: (1) a 2′-O-methyl-substituent at Ade-1 was used in lieu of the nucleophile to mimic the precatalytic state, and (2) a 3′-deoxy-2′,5′-phosphodiester linkage between Ade-1 and Gua+1 was used to mimic a reaction-intermediate conformation. While the global fold of each variant remained intact, the results revealed the importance of Ade38 N1 and N6 groups. Absence of N6 resulting from AP38 coincided with failure to localize the precatalytic scissile phosphate. Cyt38 severely impaired catalysis in a prior study, and its structures here indicated an anti base conformation that sequesters the imino moiety from the scissile bond. Gua38 was shown to be even more deleterious to activity. Although the precatalytic structure was nominally affected, the reaction-intermediate conformation indicated a severe electrostatic clash between the Gua38 keto oxygen and the pro-Rp oxygen of the scissile bond. Overall, position 38 modifications solved in the presence of 2′-OMe Ade-1 deviated from in-line geometry, whereas variants with a 2′,5′ linkage exhibited S-turn destabilization, as well as base conformational changes from syn to anti. These findings demonstrate the importance of the Ade38 Watson–Crick face in attaining a reaction-intermediate state and the sensitivity of the RNA fold to restructuring when electrostatic and shape features fail to complement. PMID:18596253

  14. Mutational analysis of the active site flap (20s loop) of mandelate racemase.

    PubMed

    Bourque, Jennifer R; Bearne, Stephen L

    2008-01-15

    Mandelate racemase from Pseudomonas putida catalyzes the Mg2+-dependent 1,1-proton transfer that interconverts the enantiomers of mandelate. Residues of the 20s and 50s loops determine, in part, the topology and polarity of the active site and hence the substrate specificity. Previously, we proposed that, during racemization, the phenyl ring of mandelate moves between an S-pocket comprised of residues from the 50s loop and an R-pocket comprised of residues from the 20s loop [Siddiqi, F., Bourque, J. R., Jiang, H., Gardner, M., St. Maurice, M., Blouin, C., and Bearne, S. L. (2005) Biochemistry 44, 9013-9021]. The 20s loop constitutes a mobile beta-meander flap that covers the active site cavity shielding it from solvent and controlling entry and egress of ligands. To understand the role of the 20s loop in catalysis and substrate specificity, we constructed a series of mutants (V22A, V22I, V22F, T24S, A25V, V26A, V26L, V26F, V29A, V29L, V29F, V26A/V29L, and V22I/V29L) in which the sizes of hydrophobic side chains of the loop residues were varied. Catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) for all mutants were reduced between 6- and 40-fold with the exception of those of V22I, V26A, V29L, and V22I/V29L which had near wild-type efficiencies with mandelate. Thr 24 and Ala 25, located at the tip of the 20s loop, were particularly sensitive to minor alterations in the size of their hydrophobic side chains; however, most mutations were tolerated quite well, suggesting that flap mobility could compensate for increases in the steric bulk of hydrophobic side chains. With the exception of V29L, with mandelate as the substrate, and V22F and V26A/V29L, with 2-naphthylglycolate (2-NG) as the substrate, the values of kcat and Km were not altered in a manner consistent with steric obstruction of the R-pocket, perhaps due to flap mobility compensating for the increased size of the hydrophobic side chains. Surprisingly, V22I and V29L catalyzed the racemization of the bulkier substrate 2-NG

  15. Probing the promiscuous active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase using synthetic substrates, homology modeling, and active site modification.

    PubMed

    Daniellou, Richard; Zheng, Hongyan; Langill, David M; Sanders, David A R; Palmer, David R J

    2007-06-26

    The active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase (IDH, EC 1.1.1.18) from Bacillus subtilis recognizes a variety of mono- and disaccharides, as well as 1l-4-O-substituted inositol derivatives. It catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of the axial alcohol of these substrates with comparable kinetic constants. We have found that 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol does not act as a substrate for IDH, in contrast to structurally similar compounds such as those bearing substituted benzyl substituents in the same position. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol and 4-O-(2-naphthyl)methyl-myo-inositol, which is a substrate for IDH, shows a distinct difference in the preferred conformation of the aryl substituent. Conformational analysis of known substrates of IDH suggests that this conformational difference may account for the difference in reactivity of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol in the presence of IDH. A sequence alignment of IDH with the homologous glucose-fructose oxidoreductase allowed the construction of an homology model of inositol dehydrogenase, to which NADH and 4-O-benzyl-scyllo-inosose were docked and the active site energy minimized. The active site model is consistent with all experimental results and suggests that a conserved tyrosine-glycine-tyrosine motif forms the hydrophobic pocket adjoining the site of inositol recognition. Y233F and Y235F retain activity, while Y233R and Y235R do not. A histidine-aspartate pair, H176 and D172, are proposed to act as a dyad in which H176 is the active site acid/base. The enzyme is inactivated by diethyl pyrocarbonate, and the mutants H176A and D172N show a marked loss of activity. Kinetic isotope effect experiments with D172N indicate that chemistry is rate-determining for this mutant.

  16. Probing Oxygen Activation Sites in Two Flavoprotein Oxidases Using Chloride as an Oxygen Surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Kommoju, Phaneeswara-Rao; Chen, Zhi-wei; Bruckner, Robert C.; Mathews, F. Scott; Jorns, Marilyn Schuman

    2011-08-16

    A single basic residue above the si-face of the flavin ring is the site of oxygen activation in glucose oxidase (GOX) (His516) and monomeric sarcosine oxidase (MSOX) (Lys265). Crystal structures of both flavoenzymes exhibit a small pocket at the oxygen activation site that might provide a preorganized binding site for superoxide anion, an obligatory intermediate in the two-electron reduction of oxygen. Chloride binds at these polar oxygen activation sites, as judged by solution and structural studies. First, chloride forms spectrally detectable complexes with GOX and MSOX. The protonated form of His516 is required for tight binding of chloride to oxidized GOX and for rapid reaction of reduced GOX with oxygen. Formation of a binary MSOX-chloride complex requires Lys265 and is not observed with Lys265Met. Binding of chloride to MSOX does not affect the binding of a sarcosine analogue (MTA, methylthioactetate) above the re-face of the flavin ring. Definitive evidence is provided by crystal structures determined for a binary MSOX-chloride complex and a ternary MSOX-chloride-MTA complex. Chloride binds in the small pocket at a position otherwise occupied by a water molecule and forms hydrogen bonds to four ligands that are arranged in approximate tetrahedral geometry: Lys265:NZ, Arg49:NH1, and two water molecules, one of which is hydrogen bonded to FAD:N5. The results show that chloride (i) acts as an oxygen surrogate, (ii) is an effective probe of polar oxygen activation sites, and (iii) provides a valuable complementary tool to the xenon gas method that is used to map nonpolar oxygen-binding cavities.

  17. The Phylogeny and Active Site Design of Eukaryotic Copper-only Superoxide Dismutases

    DOE PAGES

    Peterson, Ryan L.; Galaleldeen, Ahmad; Villarreal, Johanna; ...

    2016-08-17

    In eukaryotes the bimetallic Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes play important roles in the biology of reactive oxygen species by disproportionating superoxide anion. We reported that the fungal pathogen Candida albicans expresses a novel copper-only SOD, known as SOD5, that lacks the zinc cofactor and electrostatic loop (ESL) domain of Cu/Zn-SODs for substrate guidance. In spite of these abnormalities, C. albicans SOD5 can disproportionate superoxide at rates limited only by diffusion. Here we demonstrate that this curious copper-only SOD occurs throughout the fungal kingdom as well as in phylogenetically distant oomycetes or “pseudofungi” species. It is the only form ofmore » extracellular SOD in fungi and oomycetes, in stark contrast to the extracellular Cu/Zn-SODs of plants and animals. Through structural biology and biochemical approaches we demonstrate that these copper-only SODs have evolved with a specialized active site consisting of two highly conserved residues equivalent to SOD5 Glu-110 and Asp-113. The equivalent positions are zinc binding ligands in Cu/Zn-SODs and have evolved in copper-only SODs to control catalysis and copper binding in lieu of zinc and the ESL. Similar to the zinc ion in Cu/Zn-SODs, SOD5 Glu-110 helps orient a key copper-coordinating histidine and extends the pH range of enzyme catalysis. Furthermore, SOD5 Asp-113 connects to the active site in a manner similar to that of the ESL in Cu/Zn-SODs and assists in copper cofactor binding. Copper-only SODs are virulence factors for certain fungal pathogens; thus this unique active site may be a target for future anti-fungal strategies.« less

  18. Active-Site Structure of Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase and Transphyletic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, D.T.; Robinson, H.; Kim, S.-K.; Reddy, P. T.

    2011-01-21

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) belonging to three nonhomologous classes (II, III, and IV) have been structurally characterized, enabling a comparison of the mechanisms of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate biosynthesis. We report the crystal structures of three active-site complexes for Yersinia pestis class IV AC (AC-IV)-two with substrate analogs and one with product. Mn{sup 2+} binds to all three phosphates, and to Glu12 and Glu136. Electropositive residues Lys14, Arg63, Lys76, Lys111, and Arg113 also form hydrogen bonds to phosphates. The conformation of the analogs is suitable for in-line nucleophilic attack by the ribose O3' on {alpha}-phosphate (distance {approx} 4 {angstrom}). In the product complex, a second Mn ion is observed to be coordinated to both ribose 2' oxygen and ribose 3' oxygen. Observation of both metal sites, together with kinetic measurements, provides strong support for a two-cation mechanism. Eleven active-site mutants were also made and kinetically characterized. These findings and comparisons with class II and class III enzymes enable a detailed transphyletic analysis of the AC mechanism. Consistent with its lack of coordination to purine, Y. pestis AC-IV cyclizes both ATP and GTP. As in other classes of AC, the ribose is loosely bound, and as in class III, no base appears to ionize the O3' nucleophile. Different syn/anti conformations suggest that the mechanism involves a conformational transition, and further evidence suggests a role for ribosyl pseudorotation. With resolutions of 1.6-1.7 {angstrom}, these are the most detailed active-site ligand complexes for any class of this ubiquitous signaling enzyme.

  19. Active-Site Structure of Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase and Transphyletic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    D Gallagher; S Kim; H Robinson; P Reddy

    2011-12-31

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) belonging to three nonhomologous classes (II, III, and IV) have been structurally characterized, enabling a comparison of the mechanisms of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate biosynthesis. We report the crystal structures of three active-site complexes for Yersinia pestis class IV AC (AC-IV) - two with substrate analogs and one with product. Mn{sup 2+} binds to all three phosphates, and to Glu12 and Glu136. Electropositive residues Lys14, Arg63, Lys76, Lys111, and Arg113 also form hydrogen bonds to phosphates. The conformation of the analogs is suitable for in-line nucleophilic attack by the ribose O3' on {alpha}-phosphate (distance {approx} 4 {angstrom}). In the product complex, a second Mn ion is observed to be coordinated to both ribose 2' oxygen and ribose 3' oxygen. Observation of both metal sites, together with kinetic measurements, provides strong support for a two-cation mechanism. Eleven active-site mutants were also made and kinetically characterized. These findings and comparisons with class II and class III enzymes enable a detailed transphyletic analysis of the AC mechanism. Consistent with its lack of coordination to purine, Y. pestis AC-IV cyclizes both ATP and GTP. As in other classes of AC, the ribose is loosely bound, and as in class III, no base appears to ionize the O3' nucleophile. Different syn/anti conformations suggest that the mechanism involves a conformational transition, and further evidence suggests a role for ribosyl pseudorotation. With resolutions of 1.6-1.7 {angstrom}, these are the most detailed active-site ligand complexes for any class of this ubiquitous signaling enzyme.

  20. The Phylogeny and Active Site Design of Eukaryotic Copper-only Superoxide Dismutases

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Ryan L.; Galaleldeen, Ahmad; Villarreal, Johanna; Taylor, Alexander B.; Cabelli, Diane E.; Hart, P. John; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2016-08-17

    In eukaryotes the bimetallic Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes play important roles in the biology of reactive oxygen species by disproportionating superoxide anion. We reported that the fungal pathogen Candida albicans expresses a novel copper-only SOD, known as SOD5, that lacks the zinc cofactor and electrostatic loop (ESL) domain of Cu/Zn-SODs for substrate guidance. In spite of these abnormalities, C. albicans SOD5 can disproportionate superoxide at rates limited only by diffusion. Here we demonstrate that this curious copper-only SOD occurs throughout the fungal kingdom as well as in phylogenetically distant oomycetes or “pseudofungi” species. It is the only form of extracellular SOD in fungi and oomycetes, in stark contrast to the extracellular Cu/Zn-SODs of plants and animals. Through structural biology and biochemical approaches we demonstrate that these copper-only SODs have evolved with a specialized active site consisting of two highly conserved residues equivalent to SOD5 Glu-110 and Asp-113. The equivalent positions are zinc binding ligands in Cu/Zn-SODs and have evolved in copper-only SODs to control catalysis and copper binding in lieu of zinc and the ESL. Similar to the zinc ion in Cu/Zn-SODs, SOD5 Glu-110 helps orient a key copper-coordinating histidine and extends the pH range of enzyme catalysis. Furthermore, SOD5 Asp-113 connects to the active site in a manner similar to that of the ESL in Cu/Zn-SODs and assists in copper cofactor binding. Copper-only SODs are virulence factors for certain fungal pathogens; thus this unique active site may be a target for future anti-fungal strategies.

  1. Phosphorylation of serine 264 impedes active site accessibility in the E1 component of the human pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Franziska; Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov; Golbik, Ralph; Spinka, Michael; Dominiak, Paulina; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Brauer, Johanna; Patel, Mulchand S; Tittmann, Kai

    2007-05-29

    At the junction of glycolysis and the Krebs cycle in cellular metabolism, the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (PDHc) catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. In mammals, PDHc is tightly regulated by phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of three serine residues in the thiamin-dependent pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) component. In vivo, inactivation of human PDHc correlates mostly with phosphorylation of serine 264, which is located at the entrance of the substrate channel leading to the active site of E1. Despite intense investigations, the molecular mechanism of this inactivation has remained enigmatic. Here, a detailed analysis of microscopic steps of catalysis in human wild-type PDHc-E1 and pseudophosphorylation variant Ser264Glu elucidates how phosphorylation of Ser264 affects catalysis. Whereas the intrinsic reactivity of the active site in catalysis of pyruvate decarboxylation remains nearly unaltered, the preceding binding of substrate to the enzyme's active site via the substrate channel and the subsequent reductive acetylation of the E2 component are severely slowed in the phosphorylation variant. The structure of pseudophosphorylation variant Ser264Glu determined by X-ray crystallography reveals no differences in the three-dimensional architecture of the phosphorylation loop or of the active site, when compared to those of the wild-type enzyme. However, the channel leading to the active site is partially obstructed by the side chain of residue 264 in the variant. By analogy, a similar obstruction of the substrate channel can be anticipated to result from a phosphorylation of Ser264. The kinetic and thermodynamic results in conjunction with the structure of Ser264Glu suggest that phosphorylation blocks access to the active site by imposing a steric and electrostatic barrier for substrate binding and active site coupling with the E2 component. As a Ser264Gln variant, which carries no charge at position 264, is also selectively

  2. Probing cathepsin K activity with a selective substrate spanning its active site.

    PubMed Central

    Lecaille, Fabien; Weidauer, Enrico; Juliano, Maria A; Brömme, Dieter; Lalmanach, Gilles

    2003-01-01

    The limited availability of highly selective cathepsin substrates seriously impairs studies designed to monitor individual cathepsin activities in biological samples. Among mammalian cysteine proteases, cathepsin K has a unique preference for a proline residue at P2, the primary determinant of its substrate specificity. Interestingly, congopain from Trypanosoma congolense also accommodates a proline residue in its S2 subsite. Analysis of a congopain model showed that amino acids forming its S2 subsite are identical with those of cathepsin K, except Leu67 which is replaced by a tyrosine residue in cathepsin K. Furthermore, amino acid residues of the congopain S2' binding pocket, which accepts a proline residue, are strictly identical with those of cathepsin K. Abz-HPGGPQ-EDN2ph [where Abz represents o-aminobenzoic acid and EDN2ph (=EDDnp) represents N -(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-ethylenediamine], a substrate initially developed for trypanosomal enzymes, was efficiently cleaved at the Gly-Gly bond by cathepsin K (kcat/ K(m)=426000 M(-1) x s(-1)). On the other hand, Abz-HPGGPQ-EDN2ph was resistant to hydrolysis by cathepsins B, F, H, L, S and V (20 nM enzyme concentration) and the Y67L (Tyr67-->Leu)/L205A cathepsin K mutant (20 nM), but still acted as a competitive inhibitor. Taken together, the selectivity of Abz-HPGGPQ-EDN2ph to cathepsin K primarily depends on the S2 and S2' subsite specificities of cathepsin K and the ionization state of histidine at P3. Whereas Abz-HPGGPQ-EDN2ph was hydrolysed by wild-type mouse fibroblast lysates, its hydrolysis was completely abolished in the cathepsin K-deficient samples, indicating that Abz-HPGGPQ-EDN2ph can be used to monitor selectively cathepsin K activity in physiological fluids and cell lysates. PMID:12837132

  3. The homing endonuclease I-CreI uses three metals, one of which is shared between the two active sites.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, B S; Monnat, R J; Stoddard, B L

    2001-04-01

    Homing endonucleases, like restriction enzymes, cleave double-stranded DNA at specific target sites. The cleavage mechanism(s) utilized by LAGLIDADG endonucleases have been difficult to elucidate; their active sites are divergent, and only one low resolution cocrystal structure has been determined. Here we report two high resolution structures of the dimeric I-CreI homing endonuclease bound to DNA: a substrate complex with calcium and a product complex with magnesium. The bound metals in both complexes are verified by manganese anomalous difference maps. The active sites are positioned close together to facilitate cleavage across the DNA minor groove; each contains one metal ion bound between a conserved aspartate (Asp 20) and a single scissile phosphate. A third metal ion bridges the two active sites. This divalent cation is bound between aspartate residues from the active site of each subunit and is in simultaneous contact with the scissile phosphates of both DNA strands. A metal-bound water molecule acts as the nucleophile and is part of an extensive network of ordered water molecules that are positioned by enzyme side chains. These structures illustrate a unique variant of a two-metal endonuclease mechanism is employed by the highly divergent LAGLIDADG enzyme family.

  4. Minimized natural versions of fungal ribotoxins show improved active site plasticity.

    PubMed

    Maestro-López, Moisés; Olombrada, Miriam; García-Ortega, Lucía; Serrano-González, Daniel; Lacadena, Javier; Oñaderra, Mercedes; Gavilanes, José G; Martínez-Del-Pozo, Álvaro

    2017-04-01

    Fungal ribotoxins are highly specific extracellular RNases which cleave a single phosphodiester bond at the ribosomal sarcin-ricin loop, inhibiting protein biosynthesis by interfering with elongation factors. Most ribotoxins show high degree of conservation, with similar sizes and amino acid sequence identities above 85%. Only two exceptions are known: hirsutellin A and anisoplin, produced by the entomopathogenic fungi Hirsutella thompsonii and Metarhizium anisopliae, respectively. Both proteins are similar but smaller than the other known ribotoxins (130 vs 150 amino acids), displaying only about 25% sequence identity with them. They can be considered minimized natural versions of their larger counterparts, best represented by α-sarcin. The conserved α-sarcin active site residue Tyr48 has been replaced by the geometrically equivalent Asp, present in the minimized ribotoxins, to produce and characterize the corresponding mutant. As a control, the inverse anisoplin mutant (D43Y) has been also studied. The results show how the smaller versions of ribotoxins represent an optimum compromise among conformational freedom, stability, specificity, and active-site plasticity which allow these toxic proteins to accommodate the characteristic abilities of ribotoxins into a shorter amino acid sequence and more stable structure of intermediate size between that of other nontoxic fungal RNases and previously known larger ribotoxins.

  5. QM/MM Analysis of Cellulase Active Sites and Actions of the Enzymes on Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Saharay, Moumita; Guo, Hao-Bo; Smith, Jeremy C; Guo, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradation of cellulosic biomass requires the actions of three types of secreted enzymes; endoglucanase (EC 3.2.1.4), cellobiohydrolase or exoglucanase (EC 3.2.1.91), and -glucosidase (EC 4.2.1.21). These enzymes act synergistically to hydrolyse the -1,4 bonds of cellulose and converts it into simple sugar. Hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond can occur either by net retention or by inversion of anomeric configuration at the anomeric center. QM/MM simulations are useful tools to study the energetics of the reactions and analyze the active-site structures at different states of the catalysis, including the formation of unstable transition states. Here, a brief description of previous work on glycoside hydrolases is first given. The results of the QM/MM potential energy and free energy simulations corresponding to glycosylation and deglycosylation processes are then provided for two retaining endoglucanases, Cel12A and Cel5A. The active-site structural features are analyzed based on the QM/MM results. The role of different residues and hydrogen bonding interactions during the catalysis and the importance of the sugar ring distortion are discussed for these two enzymes.

  6. Structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtr1 reveals an active site for an atypical phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Irani, Seema; Yogesha, S D; Mayfield, Joshua; Zhang, Mengmeng; Zhang, Yong; Matthews, Wendy L; Nie, Grace; Prescott, Nicholas A; Zhang, Yan Jessie

    2016-03-01

    Changes in the phosphorylation status of the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) correlate with the process of eukaryotic transcription. The yeast protein regulator of transcription 1 (Rtr1) and the human homolog RNAPII-associated protein 2 (RPAP2) may function as CTD phosphatases; however, crystal structures of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1 lack a consensus active site. We identified a phosphoryl transfer domain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtr1 by obtaining and characterizing a 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure. We identified a putative substrate-binding pocket in a deep groove between the zinc finger domain and a pair of helices that contained a trapped sulfate ion. Because sulfate mimics the chemistry of a phosphate group, this structural data suggested that this groove represents the phosphoryl transfer active site. Mutagenesis of the residues lining this groove disrupted catalytic activity of the enzyme assayed in vitro with a fluorescent chemical substrate, and expression of the mutated Rtr1 failed to rescue growth of yeast lacking Rtr1. Characterization of the phosphatase activity of RPAP2 and a mutant of the conserved putative catalytic site in the same chemical assay indicated a conserved reaction mechanism. Our data indicated that the structure of the phosphoryl transfer domain and reaction mechanism for the phosphoryl transfer activity of Rtr1 is distinct from those of other phosphatase families.

  7. The effect of methyl-donated hydrogen bonding on active site conformations of hyaluronate lyase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migues, Angela N.; Vergenz, Robert A.; Moore, Kevin B.

    2010-03-01

    Geometric evidence shows a val-A252 methyl-donated (MD) hydrogen bond (HB) in hyaluronate lyase (Streptococcus pneumoniae) interacts with nearby NH--O and OH--O HBs, distorting active-site helical structure. Results for model fragment A248-254 are based on experimental heavy atom positions with ab initio hydrogen atoms. The MDHB, with (H-O distance, donor-H-O angle) = (2.3å; 174^o), exhibits more favorable geometry than thr-A253 OH--O HB (1.8å; 170^o) to the same ala-249 C=O. Consequently, thr-253 N-H--O interaction is forced closer to lys-250 C=O than ala-249 C=O(2.6 versus 2.7å). A novel method has been developed to quantify the effects of atomic diplacements on motions of neighboring helices. A coordinate system was established to track the movement of specific residues and to ascertain the effect of such motions on active site conformations.

  8. Structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtr1 reveals an active site for an atypical phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Mayfield, Joshua; Zhang, Mengmeng; Zhang, Yong; Matthews, Wendy L.; Nie, Grace; Prescott, Nicholas A.; Zhang, Yan Jessie

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the phosphorylation status of the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) correlate with the process of eukaryotic transcription. The yeast protein regulator of transcription 1 (Rtr1) and the human homolog RNAPII-associated protein 2 (RPAP2) may function as CTD phosphatases; however, crystal structures of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1 lack a consensus active site. We identified a phosphoryl transfer domain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtr1 by obtaining and characterizing a 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure. We identified a putative substrate-binding pocket in a deep groove between the zinc finger domain and a pair of helices that contained a trapped sulfate ion. Because sulfate mimics the chemistry of a phosphate group, this structural data suggested that this groove represents the phosphoryl transfer active site. Mutagenesis of the residues lining this groove disrupted catalytic activity of the enzyme assayed in vitro with a fluorescent chemical substrate, and expression of the mutated Rtr1 failed to rescue growth of yeast lacking Rtr1. Characterization of the phosphatase activity of RPAP2 and a mutant of the conserved putative catalytic site in the same chemical assay indicated a conserved reaction mechanism. Our data indicated that the structure of the phosphoryl transfer domain and reaction mechanism for the phosphoryl transfer activity of Rtr1 is distinct from those of other phosphatase families. PMID:26933063

  9. Automated docking of maltose, 2-deoxymaltose, and maltotetraose into the soybean beta-amylase active site.

    PubMed

    Laederach, A; Dowd, M K; Coutinho, P M; Reilly, P J

    1999-11-01

    In this study, products and substrates were docked into the active site of beta-amylase using the simulated annealing algorithm AutoDock. Lowest-energy conformers reproduced known crystallographic atom positions within 0.4 to 0.8 A rmsd. Docking studies were carried out with both open and closed configurations of the beta-amylase mobile flap, a loop comprising residues 96 to 103. Ligands with two rings docked within the cleft near the active site when the flap was open, but those with four rings did not. The flap must be closed for alpha-maltotetraose to adopt a conformation allowing it to dock near the crystallographically determined subsites. The closed flap is necessary for productive but not for nonproductive binding, and therefore it plays a essential role in catalysis. The gain in total binding energy upon closing of the flap for alpha-maltose docked to subsites -2, -1 and +1, +2 is about 22 kcal/mol, indicating more favorable interactions are possible with the flap closed. Larger intermolecular interaction energies are observed for two alpha-maltose molecules docked to subsites -2, -1 and +1, +2 than for one alpha-maltotetraose molecule docked from subsites -2 to +2, suggesting that it is only upon cleavage of the alpha-1,4 linkage that optimal closed-flap binding can occur with the crytallographically determined enzyme structure.

  10. Molecular mimicry of substrate oxygen atoms by water molecules in the beta-amylase active site.

    PubMed

    Pujadas, G; Palau, J

    2001-08-01

    Soybean beta-amylase (EC 3.2.1.2) has been crystallized both free and complexed with a variety of ligands. Four water molecules in the free-enzyme catalytic cleft form a multihydrogen-bond network with eight strategic residues involved in enzyme-ligand hydrogen bonds. We show here that the positions of these four water molecules are coincident with the positions of four potential oxygen atoms of the ligands within the complex. Some of these waters are displaced from the active site when the ligands bind to the enzyme. How many are displaced depends on the shape of the ligand. This means that when one of the four positions is not occupied by a ligand oxygen atom, the corresponding water remains. We studied the functional/structural role of these four waters and conclude that their presence means that the conformation of the eight side chains is fixed in all situations (free or complexed enzyme) and preserved from unwanted or forbidden conformational changes that could hamper the catalytic mechanism. The water structure at the active pocket of beta-amylase is therefore essential for providing the ligand recognition process with plasticity. It does not affect the protein active-site geometry and preserves the overall hydrogen-bonding network, irrespective of which ligand is bound to the enzyme. We also investigated whether other enzymes showed a similar role for water. Finally, we discuss the potential use of these results for predicting whether water molecules can mimic ligand atoms in the active center.

  11. The Active Site of Oligogalacturonate Lyase Provides Unique Insights into Cytoplasmic Oligogalacturonate β-Elimination*

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, D. Wade; Gilbert, Harry J.; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2010-01-01

    Oligogalacturonate lyases (OGLs; now also classified as pectate lyase family 22) are cytoplasmic enzymes found in pectinolytic members of Enterobacteriaceae, such as the enteropathogen Yersinia enterocolitica. OGLs utilize a β-elimination mechanism to preferentially catalyze the conversion of saturated and unsaturated digalacturonate into monogalacturonate and the 4,5-unsaturated monogalacturonate-like molecule, 5-keto-4-deoxyuronate. To provide mechanistic insights into the specificity of this enzyme activity, we have characterized the OGL from Y. enterocolitica, YeOGL, on oligogalacturonides and determined its three-dimensional x-ray structure to 1.65 Å. The model contains a Mn2+ atom in the active site, which is coordinated by three histidines, one glutamine, and an acetate ion. The acetate mimics the binding of the uronate group of galactourono-configured substrates. These findings, in combination with enzyme kinetics and metal supplementation assays, provide a framework for modeling the active site architecture of OGL. This enzyme appears to contain a histidine for the abstraction of the α-proton in the −1 subsite, a residue that is highly conserved throughout the OGL family and represents a unique catalytic base among pectic active lyases. In addition, we present a hypothesis for an emerging relationship observed between the cellular distribution of pectate lyase folding and the distinct metal coordination chemistries of pectate lyases. PMID:20851883

  12. Lethal Factor Active-Site Mutations Affect Catalytic Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S. E.; Hanna, P. C.

    1998-01-01

    The lethal factor (LF) protein of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin contains the thermolysin-like active-site and zinc-binding consensus motif HEXXH (K. R. Klimpel, N. Arora, and S. H. Leppla, Mol. Microbiol. 13:1093–1100, 1994). LF is hypothesized to act as a Zn2+ metalloprotease in the cytoplasm of macrophages, but no proteolytic activities have been previously shown on any target substrate. Here, synthetic peptides are hydrolyzed by LF in vitro. Mass spectroscopy and peptide sequencing of isolated cleavage products separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography indicate that LF seems to prefer proline-containing substrates. Substitution mutations within the consensus active-site residues completely abolish all in vitro catalytic functions, as does addition of 1,10-phenanthroline, EDTA, and certain amino acid hydroxamates, including the novel zinc metalloprotease inhibitor ZINCOV. In contrast, the protease inhibitors bestatin and lysine CMK, previously shown to block LF activity on macrophages, did not block LF activity in vitro. These data provide the first direct evidence that LF may act as an endopeptidase. PMID:9573135

  13. Differences and similarities in binding of pyruvate and L-lactate in the active site of M4 and H4 isoforms of human lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Swiderek, Katarzyna; Paneth, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    We present QM/MM calculations that show differences in geometries of active sites of M(4) and H(4) isoforms of human LDH ligated with oxamate, pyruvate or L-lactate. As the consequence of these differences, binding isotope effects of the methyl hydrogen atoms of pyruvate and l-lactate may be used to experimentally distinguish these isoforms. Based on the FEP calculations we argue that L-lactate is a better candidate for the experimental studies. Our calculations of energies of interactions of ligands with the active site residues provide explanation for the observed experimentally sensitivity to inhibition of the M(4) isoenzyme isoform and pinpoint the differences to interactions of the ligand with the histidine residue. We conclude that pyruvate interacts much stronger in the active site of H(4) than M(4) isoform and that the latter interactions are weaker than with water molecules in the aqueous solution.

  14. A type IV translocated Legionella cysteine phytase counteracts intracellular growth restriction by phytate.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stephen; Stirnimann, Christian U; Wieser, Mara; Frey, Daniel; Meier, Roger; Engelhardt, Sabrina; Li, Xiaodan; Capitani, Guido; Kammerer, Richard A; Hilbi, Hubert

    2014-12-05

    The causative agent of Legionnaires' pneumonia, Legionella pneumophila, colonizes diverse environmental niches, including biofilms, plant material, and protozoa. In these habitats, myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (phytate) is prevalent and used as a phosphate storage compound or as a siderophore. L. pneumophila replicates in protozoa and mammalian phagocytes within a unique "Legionella-containing vacuole." The bacteria govern host cell interactions through the Icm/Dot type IV secretion system (T4SS) and ∼300 different "effector" proteins. Here we characterize a hitherto unrecognized Icm/Dot substrate, LppA, as a phytate phosphatase (phytase). Phytase activity of recombinant LppA required catalytically essential cysteine (Cys(231)) and arginine (Arg(237)) residues. The structure of LppA at 1.4 Å resolution revealed a mainly α-helical globular protein stabilized by four antiparallel β-sheets that binds two phosphate moieties. The phosphates localize to a P-loop active site characteristic of dual specificity phosphatases or to a non-catalytic site, respectively. Phytate reversibly abolished growth of L. pneumophila in broth, and growth inhibition was relieved by overproduction of LppA or by metal ion titration. L. pneumophila lacking lppA replicated less efficiently in phytate-loaded Acanthamoeba castellanii or Dictyostelium discoideum, and the intracellular growth defect was complemented by the phytase gene. These findings identify the chelator phytate as an intracellular bacteriostatic component of cell-autonomous host immunity and reveal a T4SS-translocated L. pneumophila phytase that counteracts intracellular bacterial growth restriction by phytate. Thus, bacterial phytases might represent therapeutic targets to combat intracellular pathogens.

  15. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site

    PubMed Central

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called ‘catalytic residues’ are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06181.001 PMID:25902402

  16. Development of Novel Sugar Isomerases by Optimization of Active Sites in Phosphosugar Isomerases for Monosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Soo-Jin; Kim, Yeong-Su

    2013-01-01

    Phosphosugar isomerases can catalyze the isomerization of not only phosphosugar but also of monosaccharides, suggesting that the phosphosugar isomerases can be used as sugar isomerases that do not exist in nature. Determination of active-site residues of phosphosugar isomerases, including ribose-5-phosphate isomerase from Clostridium difficile (CDRPI), mannose-6-phosphate isomerase from Bacillus subtilis (BSMPI), and glucose-6-phosphate isomerase from Pyrococcus furiosus (PFGPI), was accomplished by docking of monosaccharides onto the structure models of the isomerases. The determinant residues, including Arg133 of CDRPI, Arg192 of BSMPI, and Thr85 of PFGPI, were subjected to alanine substitutions and found to act as phosphate-binding sites. R133D of CDRPI, R192 of BSMPI, and T85Q of PFGPI displayed the highest catalytic efficiencies for monosaccharides at each position. These residues exhibited 1.8-, 3.5-, and 4.9-fold higher catalytic efficiencies, respectively, for the monosaccharides than the wild-type enzyme. However, the activities of these 3 variant enzymes for phosphosugars as the original substrates disappeared. Thus, R133D of CDRPI, R192 of BSMPI, and T85Q of PFGPI are no longer phosphosugar isomerases; instead, they are changed to a d-ribose isomerase, an l-ribose isomerase, and an l-talose isomerase, respectively. In this study, we used substrate-tailored optimization to develop novel sugar isomerases which are not found in nature based on phosphosugar isomerases. PMID:23204422

  17. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  18. The crystal structure of Pseudomonas putida azoreductase - the active site revisited.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Ana Maria D; Mendes, Sónia; de Sanctis, Daniele; Martins, Lígia O; Bento, Isabel

    2013-12-01

    The enzymatic degradation of azo dyes begins with the reduction of the azo bond. In this article, we report the crystal structures of the native azoreductase from Pseudomonas putida MET94 (PpAzoR) (1.60 Å), of PpAzoR in complex with anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (1.50 Å), and of PpAzoR in complex with Reactive Black 5 dye (1.90 Å). These structures reveal the residues and subtle changes that accompany substrate binding and release. Such changes highlight the fine control of access to the catalytic site that is required by the ping-pong mechanism, and in turn the specificity offered by the enzyme towards different substrates. The topology surrounding the active site shows novel features of substrate recognition and binding that help to explain and differentiate the substrate specificity observed among different bacterial azoreductases.

  19. The narrow active-site cleft of O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase from Leishmania donovani allows complex formation with serine acetyltransferases with a range of C-terminal sequences.

    PubMed

    Raj, Isha; Kumar, Sudhir; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2012-08-01

    Cysteine is a crucial substrate for the synthesis of glutathione and trypanothione, which in turn maintain intracellular redox homeostasis and defend against oxidative stress in the pathogen Leishmania donovani. Here, the identification, sequencing, characterization and crystal structure at 1.79 Å resolution of O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS), a cysteine-biosynthetic pathway enzyme from L. donovani (LdOASS), are reported. It shows binding to the serine acetyltransferase (SAT) C-terminal peptide, indicating that OASS and SAT interact with each other to form a cysteine synthase complex, further confirmed by the structure of LdOASS in complex with SAT C-terminal octapeptide at 1.68 Å resolution. Docking and fluorescence binding studies show that almost all SAT C-terminus mimicking tetrapeptides can bind to LdOASS. Some peptides had a higher binding affinity than the native peptide, indicating that SAT-OASS interactions are not sequence-specific. The structure of LdOASS with a designed peptide (DWSI) revealed that LdOASS makes more interactions with the designed peptide than with the native peptide. In almost all known SAT-OASS interactions the SAT C-terminal sequence was shown to contain amino acids with large side chains. Structural comparison with other OASSs revealed that LdOASS has a relatively less open active-site cleft, which may be responsible for its interaction with the smaller-amino-acid-containing C-terminal LdSAT peptide. Biochemical studies confirmed that LdOASS interacts with SATs from Entamoeba histolytica and Brucella abortus, further displaying its sequence-independent and versatile mode of interaction with SATs. This implicates a critical role of the size of the active-site cleft opening in OASS for SAT-OASS interaction and thus cysteine synthase complex formation.

  20. Ligand-binding specificity and promiscuity of the main lignocellulolytic enzyme families as revealed by active-site architecture analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Li; Liu, Shijia; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Lushan

    2016-01-01

    Biomass can be converted into sugars by a series of lignocellulolytic enzymes, which belong to the glycoside hydrolase (GH) families summarized in CAZy databases. Here, using a structural bioinformatics method, we analyzed the active site architecture of the main lignocellulolytic enzyme families. The aromatic amino acids Trp/Tyr and polar amino acids Glu/Asp/Asn/Gln/Arg occurred at higher frequencies in the active site architecture than in the whole enzyme structure. And the number of potential subsites was significantly different among different families. In the cellulase and xylanase families, the conserved amino acids in the active site architecture were mostly found at the −2 to +1 subsites, while in β-glucosidase they were mainly concentrated at the −1 subsite. Families with more conserved binding amino acid residues displayed strong selectivity for their ligands, while those with fewer conserved binding amino acid residues often exhibited promiscuity when recognizing ligands. Enzymes with different activities also tended to bind different hydroxyl oxygen atoms on the ligand. These results may help us to better understand the common and unique structural bases of enzyme-ligand recognition from different families and provide a theoretical basis for the functional evolution and rational design of major lignocellulolytic enzymes. PMID:27009476

  1. Single active-site histidine in D-xylose isomerase from Streptomyces violaceoruber. Identification by chemical derivatization and peptide mapping.

    PubMed

    Vangrysperre, W; Ampe, C; Kersters-Hilderson, H; Tempst, P

    1989-10-01

    Group-specific chemical modifications of D-xylose isomerase from Streptomyces violaceruber indicated that complete loss of activity is fully correlated with the acylation of a single histidine. Active-site protection, by the ligand combination of xylitol plus Mg2+, completely blocked diethyl pyrocarbonate derivatization of this particular residue [Vangrysperre, Callens, Kersters-Hilderson & De Bruyne (1988) Biochem. J. 250, 153-160]. Differential peptide mapping between D-xylose isomerase, which has previously been treated with diethyl pyrocarbonate in the presence or absence of xylitol plus Mg2+, allowed specific isolation and sequencing of a peptide containing this active-site histidine. For this purpose we used two essentially new techniques: first, a highly reproducible peptide cleavage protocol for protease-resistant, carbethoxylated proteins with guanidinium hydrochloride as denaturing agent and subtilisin for proteolysis; and second, reverse-phase liquid chromatography with dual-wavelength detection at 214 and 238 nm, and calculation of absorbance ratios. It allowed us to locate the single active-site histidine at position 54 in the primary structure of Streptomyces violaceoruber D-xylose isomerase. The sequence around this residue is conserved in D-xylose isomerases from a diversity of micro-organisms, suggesting that this is a structurally and/or functionally essential part of the molecule.

  2. The anti-angiogenic agent fumagillin covalently modifies a conserved active-site histidine in the Escherichia coli methionine aminopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Lowther, W. Todd; McMillen, Debra A.; Orville, Allen M.; Matthews, Brian W.

    1998-01-01

    Methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP) exists in two forms (type I and type II), both of which remove the N-terminal methionine from proteins. It previously has been shown that the type II enzyme is the molecular target of fumagillin and ovalicin, two epoxide-containing natural products that inhibit angiogenesis and suppress tumor growth. By using mass spectrometry, N-terminal sequence analysis, and electronic absorption spectroscopy we show that fumagillin and ovalicin covalently modify a conserved histidine residue in the active site of the MetAP from Escherichia coli, a type I enzyme. Because all of the key active site residues are conserved, it is likely that a similar modification occurs in the type II enzymes. This modification, by occluding the active site, may prevent the action of MetAP on proteins or peptides involved in angiogenesis. In addition, the results suggest that these compounds may be effective pharmacological agents against pathogenic and resistant forms of E. coli and other microorganisms. PMID:9770455

  3. A single mutation in the hepta-peptide active site of Aspergillus niger PhyA phytase leads to myriad of biochemical changes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The active site motif of proteins belonging to ‘Histidine Acid Phosphatase’ (HAP) contains a hepta-peptide region, RHGXRXP. A close comparison among fungal and yeast HAPs has revealed the fourth residue of the hepta-peptide to be E instead of A, which is the case with A. niger phyA phytase. However,...

  4. Ligand-dependent dynamics of the active-site lid in bacterial dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Masooma; Richter, Christine; Chisty, Liisa T; Kirkpatrick, John; Blackledge, Martin; Webb, Martin R; Driscoll, Paul C

    2014-02-18

    The dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) enzyme family has been the subject of substantial investigation as a potential therapeutic target for the regulation of vascular tension. DDAH enzymes catalyze the conversion of asymmetric N(η),N(η)-dimethylarginine (ADMA) to l-citrulline. Here the influence of substrate and product binding on the dynamic flexibility of DDAH from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PaDDAH) has been assessed. A combination of heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy, static and time-resolved fluorescence measurements, and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations was employed. A monodisperse monomeric variant of the wild-type enzyme binds the reaction product l-citrulline with a low millimolar dissociation constant. A second variant, engineered to be catalytically inactive by substitution of the nucleophilic Cys249 residue with serine, can still convert the substrate ADMA to products very slowly. This PaDDAH variant also binds l-citrulline, but with a low micromolar dissociation constant. NMR and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the active site "lid", formed by residues Gly17-Asp27, exhibits a high degree of internal motion on the picosecond-to-nanosecond time scale. This suggests that the lid is open in the apo state and allows substrate access to the active site that is otherwise buried. l-Citrulline binding to both protein variants is accompanied by an ordering of the lid. Modification of PaDDAH with a coumarin fluorescence reporter allowed measurement of the kinetic mechanism of the PaDDAH reaction. A combination of NMR and kinetic data shows that the catalytic turnover of the enzyme is not limited by release of the l-citrulline product. The potential to develop the coumarin-PaDDAH adduct as an l-citrulline sensor is discussed.

  5. In silico designing of a new cysteine analogue of hirudin variant 3 for site specific PEGylation

    PubMed Central

    Sajjadi, Seyed Mehdi; Rahimi, Hamzeh; Mohammadi, Saeed; Faranoush, Mohammad; Mirzahoseini, Hasan; Toogeh, Gholamreza

    2017-01-01

    Hirudin is an anticoagulant agent of the salivary glands of the medicinal leech. Recombinant hirudin (r-Hir) displays certain drawbacks including bleeding and immunogenicity. To solve these problems, cysteine-specific PEGylation has been proposed as a successful technique. However, proper selection of the appropriate cysteine residue for substitution is a critical step. This study has, for the first time, used a computational approach aimed at identifying a single potential PEGylation site for replacement by cysteine residue in the hirudin variant 3 (HV3). Homology modeling (HM) was performed using MODELLER. All non-cysteine residues of the HV3 were replaced with the cysteine. The best model was selected based on the results of discrete optimized protein energy score, PROCHECK software, and Verify3D. The receptor binding was investigated using protein-protein docking by ClusPro web tool which was then visualized using LigPlot+ software and PyMOL. Finally, multiple sequence alignment (MSA) using ClustalW software and disulfide bond prediction were performed. According to the results of HM and docking, Q33C, which was located on the surface of the protein, was the best site for PEGylation. Furthermore, MSA showed that Q33 was not a conserved residue and LigPlot+ software showed that it is not involved in the hirudin-thrombin binding pocket. Moreover, prediction softwares established that it is not involved in disulfide bond formation. In this study, for the first time, the utility of the in silico approach for creating a cysteine analogue of HV3 was introduced. Our study demonstrated that the substitution of Q33 by cysteine probably has no effect on the biological activity of the HV3. However, experimental analyses are required to confirm the results. PMID:28255315

  6. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C.

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress, and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a prodomain (regulatory) and a mature domain (catalytic). The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein–protein interactions (PPIs) and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing) of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases. PMID:27199750

  7. Spectroscopic studies of the active site of galactose oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, P.F.; Brown, R.D. III; Koenig, S.H.

    1995-07-19

    X-ray absorption and EPR spectroscopy have been used to probe the copper site structure in galactose oxidase at pH 4.5 and 7.0. the results suggest that there are no major differences in the structure of the tetragonal Cu(II) site at these pH values. Analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicates that four N,O scatterers are present at approximately 2 {Angstrom}; these are presumably the equatorial ligands. In addition, the EXAFS data establish that oxidative activation to produce the active-site tyrosine radical does not cause major changes in the copper coordination environment. Therefore results obtained on the one-electron reduced enzyme, containing Cu(II) but not the tyrosine radical, probably also apply to the catalytically active Cu(II)/tyrosine radical state. Solvent water exchange, inhibitor binding, and substrate binding have been probed via nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) measurements. The NMRD profile of galactose oxidase is quantitatively consistent with the rapid exchange of a single, equatorial water ligand with a Cu(II)-O separation of about 2.4 {Angstrom}. Azide and cyanide displace this coordinated water. The binding of azide and the substrate dihydroxyacetone produce very similar effects on the NMRD profile of galactose oxidase, indicating that substrates also bind to the active site Cu(II) in an equatorial position.

  8. Structural role of a conserved active site cis proline in the Thermotoga maritima acetyl esterase from the carbohydrate esterase family 7.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mrityunjay K; Manoj, Narayanan

    2017-04-01

    A conserved cis proline residue located in the active site of Thermotoga maritima acetyl esterase (TmAcE) from the carbohydrate esterase family 7 (CE7) has been substituted by alanine. The residue was known to play a crucial role in determining the catalytic properties of the enzyme. To elucidate the structural role of the residue, the crystal structure of the Pro228Ala variant (TmAcEP228A ) was determined at 2.1 Å resolution. The replacement does not affect the overall secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures and moderately decreases the thermal stability. However, the wild type cis conformation of the 227-228 peptide bond adopts a trans conformation in the variant. Other conformational changes in the tertiary structure are restricted to residues 222-226, preceding this peptide bond and are located away from the active site. Overall, the results suggest that the conserved proline residue is responsible for the cis conformation of the peptide and shapes the geometry of the active site. Elimination of the pyrrolidine ring results in the loss of van der Waals and hydrophobic interactions with both the alcohol and acyl moeities of the ester substrate, leading to significant impairment of the activity and perturbation of substrate specificity. Furthermore, a cis-to-trans conformational change arising out of residue changes at this position may be associated with the evolution of divergent activity, specificity, and stability properties of members constituting the CE7 family. Proteins 2017; 85:694-708. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Expression and purification of cysteine introduced recombinant saporin.

    PubMed

    Günhan, Emine; Swe, Mimi; Palazoglu, Mine; Voss, John C; Chalupa, Leo M

    2008-04-01

    Saporin, a ribosome inactivating protein is widely used for immunotoxin construction. Here we describe a mutation of saporin (sap)-3 DNA by introducing a cysteine residue, followed by protein expression and purification by ion exchange chromatography. The purified Cys255sap-3, sap-3 isomer and commercially purchased saporin, were tested for toxicity using assays measuring inhibition for protein synthesis. The IC(50) values showed that the toxicity of the Cys255sap-3 is equivalent to the sap-3 isomer and commercial saporin. Reactivity of Cys255sap-3 was confirmed by labeling with a thio-specific fluorescent probe as well as conjugation with a nonspecific mouse IgG. We have found that a single cysteine within saporin provides a method for antibody conjugation that ensures a uniform and reproducible modification of a saporin variant retaining high activity.

  10. Non-empirical analysis of the nature of the inhibitor active-site interactions in leucine aminopeptidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grembecka, J.; K ȩdzierski, P.; Sokalski, W. A.

    1999-11-01

    Non-empirical analysis of the physical nature of the intermolecular interactions between several leucine aminopeptidase inhibitors and various constituents of the enzyme active site has been performed using a direct version of the hybrid variation-perturbation decomposition of SCF and MP2 interaction energies. The interaction energy terms obtained at different theory levels have been correlated with experimentally measured activities of the inhibitors, indicating that the more advanced the quantum-chemical method and, the larger the active-site model, the better is the correlation between calculated and measured binding energies. The electrostatic multipole term constitutes the dominant contribution in the total interaction energy, whereas Zn 2+488 and Lys +262 enzyme residues play the crucial role in the binding of these inhibitors by leucine aminopeptidase.

  11. S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Steve C; Steventon, Glyn B

    2012-05-01

    S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine, the side-chain carboxymethyl derivative of the sulfur-containing amino acid, cysteine, has been known and available for almost 80 years. During this time, it has been put to a variety of uses, but it is within the field of respiratory medicine that, presently, it has found a clinical niche. Early studies indicated that this compound underwent a rather simplistic, predictable pattern of metabolism, whereas later investigations alluded to more subtle interactions with the pathways of intermediary metabolism, as may be expected for an amino acid derivative. In addition, suggestions of polymorphic influences and circadian rhythms within metabolic profiles have emerged. These latter factors may underlie the conflicting reports regarding the therapeutic efficacy of this compound: that it appears to work well in some patients, but has no measurable effects in others. The relevant literature pertaining to the fate of this compound within living systems has been reviewed and a comprehensive précis advanced. Hopefully, this article will serve as a vade mecum for those interested in S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine and as a catalyst for future research.

  12. Degenerate cysteine patterns mediate two redox sensing mechanisms in the papillomavirus E7 oncoprotein.

    PubMed

    Camporeale, Gabriela; Lorenzo, Juan R; Thomas, Maria G; Salvatierra, Edgardo; Borkosky, Silvia S; Risso, Marikena G; Sánchez, Ignacio E; de Prat Gay, Gonzalo; Alonso, Leonardo G

    2017-04-01

    Infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus induces deregulation of cellular redox homeostasis. Virus replication and papillomavirus-induced cell transformation require persistent expression of viral oncoproteins E7 and E6 that must retain their functionality in a persistent oxidative environment. Here, we dissected the molecular mechanisms by which E7 oncoprotein can sense and manage the potentially harmful oxidative environment of the papillomavirus-infected cell. The carboxy terminal domain of E7 protein from most of the 79 papillomavirus viral types of alpha genus, which encloses all the tumorigenic viral types, is a cysteine rich domain that contains two classes of cysteines: strictly conserved low reactive Zn(+2) binding and degenerate reactive cysteine residues that can sense reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based on experimental data obtained from E7 proteins from the prototypical viral types 16, 18 and 11, we identified a couple of low pKa nucleophilic cysteines that can form a disulfide bridge upon the exposure to ROS and regulate the cytoplasm to nucleus transport. From sequence analysis and phylogenetic reconstruction of redox sensing states we propose that reactive cysteine acquisition through evolution leads to three separate E7s protein families that differ in the ROS sensing mechanism: non ROS-sensitive E7s; ROS-sensitive E7s using only a single or multiple reactive cysteine sensing mechanisms and ROS-sensitive E7s using a reactive-resolutive cysteine couple sensing mechanism.

  13. Using Unnatural Amino Acids to Probe the Energetics of Oxyanion Hole Hydrogen Bonds in the Ketosteroid Isomerase Active Site

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds are ubiquitous in enzyme active sites, providing binding interactions and stabilizing charge rearrangements on substrate groups over the course of a reaction. But understanding the origin and magnitude of their catalytic contributions relative to hydrogen bonds made in aqueous solution remains difficult, in part because of complexities encountered in energetic interpretation of traditional site-directed mutagenesis experiments. It has been proposed for ketosteroid isomerase and other enzymes that active site hydrogen bonding groups provide energetic stabilization via “short, strong” or “low-barrier” hydrogen bonds that are formed due to matching of their pKa or proton affinity to that of the transition state. It has also been proposed that the ketosteroid isomerase and other enzyme active sites provide electrostatic environments that result in larger energetic responses (i.e., greater “sensitivity”) to ground-state to transition-state charge rearrangement, relative to aqueous solution, thereby providing catalysis relative to the corresponding reaction in water. To test these models, we substituted tyrosine with fluorotyrosines (F-Tyr’s) in the ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) oxyanion hole to systematically vary the proton affinity of an active site hydrogen bond donor while minimizing steric or structural effects. We found that a 40-fold increase in intrinsic F-Tyr acidity caused no significant change in activity for reactions with three different substrates. F-Tyr substitution did not change the solvent or primary kinetic isotope effect for proton abstraction, consistent with no change in mechanism arising from these substitutions. The observed shallow dependence of activity on the pKa of the substituted Tyr residues suggests that the KSI oxyanion hole does not provide catalysis by forming an energetically exceptional pKa-matched hydrogen bond. In addition, the shallow dependence provides no indication of an active site electrostatic

  14. Probing the Catalytic Potential of the Hamster Arylamine N-Acetyltransferase 2 Catalytic Triad by Site-directed Mutagenesis of the Proximal Conserved Residue, Tyrosine 190

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Naixia; Liu, Li; Walters, Kylie J.; Hanna, Patrick E.; Wagner, Carston R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) play an important role in both detoxification of arylamine and hydrazine drugs and activation of arylamine carcinogens. Since the catalytic triad, Cys-His-Asp, of mammalian NATs has been shown to be essential for maintaining protein stability, rendering it impossible to assess alterations of the triad on catalysis, we explored the impact of the highly conserved proximal residue, Tyr-190, which forms a direct hydrogen bond interaction with one of the triad residues, Asp-122, as well as a potential pi-pi stacking interaction with the active site His-107. Replacement of Hamster NAT2 Tyr-190 by either phenylalanine, isoleucine, or alanine was well tolerated and did not result in significant alterations in the overall fold of the protein. Nevertheless, stopped-flow and steady-state kinetic analysis revealed that Tyr-190 was critical for maximizing the acetylation rate of NAT2 and the transacetylation rate of p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) when compared to wild type. Tyr-190 was also shown to play an important role in determining the pKa of the active site cysteine during acetylation, as well as the pH versus rate profile for transacetylation. We hypothesized that the pH-dependence was associated with global changes in the active site structure, which was revealed by the superposition of [1H, 15N] HSQC spectra for wild type and Y190A. These results suggest that NAT2 catalytic efficiency is partially governed by the ability of Tyr-190 to mediate the collective impact of multiple side chains on the electrostatic potential and local conformation of active site. PMID:19860825

  15. Reprogramming the Chemodiversity of Terpenoid Cyclization by Remolding the Active Site Contour of epi-Isozizaene Synthase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The class I terpenoid cyclase epi-isozizaene synthase (EIZS) utilizes the universal achiral isoprenoid substrate, farnesyl diphosphate, to generate epi-isozizaene as the predominant sesquiterpene cyclization product and at least five minor sesquiterpene products, making EIZS an ideal platform for the exploration of fidelity and promiscuity in a terpenoid cyclization reaction. The hydrophobic active site contour of EIZS serves as a template that enforces a single substrate conformation, and chaperones subsequently formed carbocation intermediates through a well-defined mechanistic sequence. Here, we have used the crystal structure of EIZS as a guide to systematically remold the hydrophobic active site contour in a library of 26 site-specific mutants. Remolded cyclization templates reprogram the reaction cascade not only by reproportioning products generated by the wild-type enzyme but also by generating completely new products of diverse structure. Specifically, we have tripled the overall number of characterized products generated by EIZS. Moreover, we have converted EIZS into six different sesquiterpene synthases: F96A EIZS is an (E)-β-farnesene synthase, F96W EIZS is a zizaene synthase, F95H EIZS is a β-curcumene synthase, F95M EIZS is a β-acoradiene synthase, F198L EIZS is a β-cedrene synthase, and F96V EIZS and W203F EIZS are (Z)-γ-bisabolene synthases. Active site aromatic residues appear to be hot spots for reprogramming the cyclization cascade by manipulating the stability and conformation of critical carbocation intermediates. A majority of mutant enzymes exhibit only relatively modest 2–100-fold losses of catalytic activity, suggesting that residues responsible for triggering substrate ionization readily tolerate mutations deeper in the active site cavity. PMID:24517311

  16. Detection of local polarity and conformational changes at the active site of rabbit muscle creatine kinase with a new arginine-specific fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujuan; Wang, Xiaochun; Shi, Wen; Wang, Ke; Ma, Huimin

    2008-02-01

    A new polarity-sensitive fluorescent probe, 3-(4-chloro-6-p-glyoxal-phenoxy-1,3,5-triazinylamino)-7-(dimethylamino)-2-methylphenazine (CGTDP), is synthesized for selective labeling of active-site arginine residues. The probe comprises a neutral red moiety as a polarity-sensitive fluorophore and a phenylglyoxal unit as an arginine-specific labeling group. The probe exhibits a sensitive response of shift of fluorescence maximum emission wavelength to solvent polarity only instead of pH or temperature, which leads to the use of the probe in detecting the local polarity and conformational changes of the active site of rabbit muscle creatine kinase (CK) denatured by pH or temperature. The polarity of the active site domain has been first found to correspond to a dielectric constant of about 44, and the conformational change of the active site directly revealed by CGTDP occurs far before that of CK as a whole disclosed by the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence during acid or thermal denaturation. The present strategy may provide a useful method to detect the local polarity and conformational changes of the active sites of many enzymes that employ arginine residues as anion recognition sites under different denaturation conditions.

  17. Structural analysis of peroxide-soaked MnSOD crystals reveals side-on binding of peroxide to active-site manganese.

    PubMed

    Porta, Jason; Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Borgstahl, Gloria E O

    2010-06-11

    The superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes are important antioxidant agents that protect cells from reactive oxygen species. The SOD family is responsible for catalyzing the disproportionation of superoxide radical to oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. Manganese- and iron-containing SOD exhibit product inhibition whereas Cu/ZnSOD does not. Here, we report the crystal structure of Escherichia coli MnSOD with hydrogen peroxide cryotrapped in the active site. Crystallographic refinement to 1.55 A and close inspection revealed electron density for hydrogen peroxide in three of the four active sites in the asymmetric unit. The hydrogen peroxide molecules are in the position opposite His26 that is normally assumed by water in the trigonal bipyramidal resting state of the enzyme. Hydrogen peroxide is present in active sites B, C, and D and is side-on coordinated to the active-site manganese. In chains B and D, the peroxide is oriented in the plane formed by manganese and ligands Asp167 and His26. In chain C, the peroxide is bound, making a 70 degrees angle to the plane. Comparison of the peroxide-bound active site with the hydroxide-bound octahedral form shows a shifting of residue Tyr34 towards the active site when peroxide is bound. Comparison with peroxide-soaked Cu/ZnSOD indicates end-on binding of peroxide when the SOD does not exhibit inhibition by peroxide and side-on binding of peroxide in the product-inhibited state of MnSOD.

  18. Paired natural cysteine mutation mapping: aid to constraining models of protein tertiary structure.

    PubMed Central

    Kreisberg, R.; Buchner, V.; Arad, D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the benefit of mapping paired cysteine mutation patterns as a guide to identifying the positions of protein disulfide bonds. This information can facilitate the computer modeling of protein tertiary structure. First, a simple, paired natural-cysteine-mutation map is presented that identifies the positions of putative disulfide bonds in protein families. The method is based on the observation that if, during the process of evolution, a disulfide-bonded cysteine residue is not conserved, then it is likely that its counterpart will also be mutated. For each target protein, protein databases were searched for the primary amino acid sequences of all known members of distinct protein families. Primary sequence alignment was carried out using PileUp algorithms in the GCG package. To search for correlated mutations, we listed only the positions where cysteine residues were highly conserved and emphasized the mutated residues. In proteins of known three-dimensional structure, a striking pattern of paired cysteine mutations correlated with the positions of known disulfide bridges. For proteins of unknown architecture, the mutation maps showed several positions where disulfide bridging might occur. PMID:8563638

  19. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  20. Comparison of topological clustering within protein networks using edge metrics that evaluate full sequence, full structure, and active site microenvironment similarity

    PubMed Central

    Leuthaeuser, Janelle B; Knutson, Stacy T; Kumar, Kiran; Babbitt, Patricia C; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S

    2015-01-01

    The development of accurate protein function annotation methods has emerged as a major unsolved biological problem. Protein similarity networks, one approach to function annotation via annotation transfer, group proteins into similarity-based clusters. An underlying assumption is that the edge metric used to identify such clusters correlates with functional information. In this contribution, this assumption is evaluated by observing topologies in similarity networks using three different edge metrics: sequence (BLAST), structure (TM-Align), and active site similarity (active site profiling, implemented in DASP). Network topologies for four well-studied protein superfamilies (enolase, peroxiredoxin (Prx), glutathione transferase (GST), and crotonase) were compared with curated functional hierarchies and structure. As expected, network topology differs, depending on edge metric; comparison of topologies provides valuable information on structure/function relationships. Subnetworks based on active site similarity correlate with known functional hierarchies at a single edge threshold more often than sequence- or structure-based networks. Sequence- and structure-based networks are useful for identifying sequence and domain similarities and differences; therefore, it is important to consider the clustering goal before deciding appropriate edge metric. Further, conserved active site residues identified in enolase and GST active site subnetworks correspond with published functionally important residues. Extension of this analysis yields predictions of functionally determinant residues for GST subgroups. These results support the hypothesis that active site similarity-based networks reveal clusters that share functional details and lay the foundation for capturing functionally relevant hierarchies using an approach that is both automatable and can deliver greater precision in function annotation than current similarity-based methods. PMID:26073648

  1. Replacement of the proximal heme thiolate ligand in chloroperoxidase with a histidine residue

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xianwen; Mroczko, Mark; Manoj, Kelath M.; Wang, Xiaotang; Hager, Lowell P.

    1999-01-01

    Chloroperoxidase is a versatile heme enzyme which can cross over the catalytic boundaries of other oxidative hemoproteins and perform multiple functions. Chloroperoxidase, in addition to catalyzing classical peroxidative reactions, also acts as a P450 cytochrome and a potent catalase. The multiple functions of chloroperoxidase must be derived from its unique active site structure. Chloroperoxidase possesses a proximal cysteine thiolate heme iron ligand analogous to the P450 cytochromes; however, unlike the P450 enzymes, chloroperoxidase possesses a very polar environment distal to its heme prosthetic group and contains a glutamic acid residue in close proximity to the heme iron. The presence of a thiolate ligand in chloroperoxidase has long been thought to play an essential role in its chlorination and epoxidation activities; however, the research reported in this paper proves that hypothesis to be invalid. To explore the role of Cys-29, the amino acid residue supplying the thiolate ligand in chloroperoxidase, Cys-29 has been replaced with a histidine residue. Mutant clones of the chloroperoxidase genome have been expressed in a Caldariomyces fumago expression system by using gene replacement rather than gene insertion technology. C. fumago produces wild-type chloroperoxidase, thus requiring gene replacement of the wild type by the mutant gene. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that gene replacement has been reported for this type of fungus. The recombinant histidine mutants retain most of their chlorination, peroxidation, epoxidation, and catalase activities. These results downplay the importance of a thiolate ligand in chloroperoxidase and suggest that the distal environment of the heme active site plays the major role in maintaining the diverse activities of this enzyme. PMID:10535936

  2. Benzoquinone reveals a cysteine-dependent desensitization mechanism of TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, Yessenia; Blair, Nathaniel T

    2013-05-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) nonselective cation channel has a conserved function as a noxious chemical sensor throughout much of Metazoa. Electrophilic chemicals activate both insect and vertebrate TRPA1 via covalent modification of cysteine residues in the amino-terminal region. Although naturally occurring electrophilic plant compounds, such as mustard oil and cinnamaldehyde, are TRPA1 agonists, it is unknown whether arthropod-produced electrophiles activate mammalian TRPA1. We characterized the effects of the electrophilic arthropod defensive compound para-benzoquinone (pBQN) on the human TRPA1 channel. We used whole-cell recordings of human embryonic kidney cells heterologously expressing either wild-type TRPA1 or TRPA1 with three serine-substituted cysteines crucial for electrophile activation (C621S, C641S, C665S). We found that pBQN activates TRPA1 starting at 10 nM and peaking at 300 nM; higher concentrations caused rapid activation followed by a fast decline. Activation by pBQN required reactivity with cysteine residues, but ones that are distinct from those previously reported to be the key targets of electrophiles. The current reduction we found at higher pBQN concentrations was a cysteine-dependent desensitization of TRPA1, and did not require prior activation. The cysteines required for desensitization are not accessible to all electrophiles as iodoacetamide and internally applied 2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl methanesulfonate failed to cause desensitization (despite large activation). Interestingly, following pBQN desensitization, wild-type TRPA1 had dramatically reduced response to the nonelectrophile agonist carvacrol, whereas the triple cysteine mutant TRPA1 retained its full response. Our results suggest that modification of multiple cysteine residues by electrophilic compounds can generate both activation and desensitization of the TRPA1 channel.

  3. Cwp84, a Clostridium difficile cysteine protease, exhibits conformational flexibility in the absence of its propeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, William J.; Roberts, April K.; Shone, Clifford C.; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2015-02-19

    Two structures of Cwp84, a cysteine protease from the S-layer of C. difficile, are presented after propeptide cleavage. They reveal the movement of three loops, two in the active-site groove and one on the surface of the lectin-like domain, exposing a hydrophobic pocket. In recent decades, the global healthcare problems caused by Clostridium difficile have increased at an alarming rate. A greater understanding of this antibiotic-resistant bacterium, particularly with respect to how it interacts with the host, is required for the development of novel strategies for fighting C. difficile infections. The surface layer (S-layer) of C. difficile is likely to be of significant importance to host–pathogen interactions. The mature S-layer is formed by a proteinaceous array consisting of multiple copies of a high-molecular-weight and a low-molecular-weight S-layer protein. These components result from the cleavage of SlpA by Cwp84, a cysteine protease. The structure of a truncated Cwp84 active-site mutant has recently been reported and the key features have been identified, providing the first structural insights into the role of Cwp84 in the formation of the S-layer. Here, two structures of Cwp84 after propeptide cleavage are presented and the three conformational changes that are observed are discussed. These changes result in a reconfiguration of the active site and exposure of the hydrophobic pocket.

  4. Direct photoaffinity labeling of gizzard myosin with ( sup 3 H)uridine diphosphate places Glu185 of the heavy chain at the active site

    SciTech Connect

    Garabedian, T.E.; Yount, R.G. )

    1990-12-25

    The active site of chicken gizzard myosin was labeled by direct photoaffinity labeling with ({sup 3}H)UDP. ({sup 3}H) UDP was stably trapped at the active site by addition of vanadate (Vi) and Co{sup 2+}. The extraordinary stability of the myosin.Co2+.(3H)UDP.Vi complex (t1/2 greater than 5 days at 0{degrees}C) allowed it to be purified free of extraneous ({sup 3}H)UDP before irradiation began. Upon UV irradiation, greater than 60% of the trapped ({sup 3}H)UDP was photoincorporated into the active site. Only the 200-kDa heavy chain was labeled, confirming earlier results using ({sup 3}H)UTP. Extensive tryptic digestion of photolabeled myosin subfragment 1 followed by high performance liquid chromatography separations and removal of nucleotide phosphates by treatment with alkaline phosphatase allowed two labeled peptides to be isolated. Sequencing of the labeled peptides and radioactive counting showed that Glu185 was the residue labeled. Since UDP is a zero-length cross-linker, Glu185 is located at the purine-binding pocket of the active site of smooth myosin and adjacent to the glycine-rich loop which binds the polyphosphate portion of ATP. This Glu residue is conserved in smooth and nonmuscle myosins and is the same residue identified previously by ({sup 3}H)UTP photolabeling in Acanthamoeba myosin II.

  5. Sulfide-Binding Hemoglobins: Effects of Mutations on Active-Site Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Alberti, S.; Bacelo, D. E.; Binning, R. C.; Echave, J.; Chergui, M.; Lopez-Garriga, J.

    2006-01-01

    The dynamics of Hemoglobin I (HbI) from the clam Lucina pectinata, from wild-type sperm whale (SW) myoglobin, and from the L29F/H64Q/V68F triple mutant of SW, both unligated and bound to hydrogen sulfide (H2S), have been studied in molecular dynamics simulations. Features that account for differences in H2S affinity among the three have been examined. Our results verify the existence of an unusual heme rocking motion in unligated HbI that can promote the entrance of large ligands such as H2S. The FQF-mutant partially reproduces the amplitude and relative orientation of the motion of HbI's heme group. Therefore, besides introducing favorable electrostatic interactions with H2S, the three mutations in the distal pocket change the dynamic properties of the heme group. The active-site residues Gln-64(E7), Phe-43(CD1), and His-93(F8) are also shown to be more flexible in unligated HbI than in FQF-mutant and SW. Further contributions to H2S affinity come from differences in hydrogen bonding between the heme propionate groups and nearby amino acid residues. PMID:16782787

  6. Structure of protein O-mannose kinase reveals a unique active site architecture

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qinyu; Venzke, David; Walimbe, Ameya S; Anderson, Mary E; Fu, Qiuyu; Kinch, Lisa N; Wang, Wei; Chen, Xing; Grishin, Nick V; Huang, Niu; Yu, Liping; Dixon, Jack E; Campbell, Kevin P; Xiao, Junyu

    2016-01-01

    The ‘pseudokinase’ SgK196 is a protein O-mannose kinase (POMK) that catalyzes an essential phosphorylation step during biosynthesis of the laminin-binding glycan on α-dystroglycan. However, the catalytic mechanism underlying this activity remains elusive. Here we present the crystal structure of Danio rerio POMK in complex with Mg2+ ions, ADP, aluminum fluoride, and the GalNAc-β3-GlcNAc-β4-Man trisaccharide substrate, thereby providing a snapshot of the catalytic transition state of this unusual kinase. The active site of POMK is established by residues located in non-canonical positions and is stabilized by a disulfide bridge. GalNAc-β3-GlcNAc-β4-Man is recognized by a surface groove, and the GalNAc-β3-GlcNAc moiety mediates the majority of interactions with POMK. Expression of various POMK mutants in POMK knockout cells further validated the functional requirements of critical residues. Our results provide important insights into the ability of POMK to function specifically as a glycan kinase, and highlight the structural diversity of the human kinome. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22238.001 PMID:27879205

  7. Conformational plasticity surrounding the active site of NADH oxidase from Thermus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Miletti, Teresa; Di Trani, Justin; Jr Levros, Louis-Charles; Mittermaier, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Biotechnological applications of enzymes can involve the use of these molecules under nonphysiological conditions. Thus, it is of interest to understand how environmental variables affect protein structure and dynamics and how this ultimately modulates enzyme function. NADH oxidase (NOX) from Thermus thermophilus exemplifies how enzyme activity can be tuned by reaction conditions, such as temperature, cofactor substitution, and the addition of cosolutes. This enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of reduced NAD(P)H to NAD(P)+ with the concurrent reduction of O2 to H2O2, with relevance to biosensing applications. It is thermophilic, with an optimum temperature of approximately 65°C and sevenfold lower activity at 25°C. Moderate concentrations (≈1M) of urea and other chaotropes increase NOX activity by up to a factor of 2.5 at room temperature. Furthermore, it is a flavoprotein that accepts either FMN or the much larger FAD as cofactor. We have used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) titration and 15N spin relaxation experiments together with isothermal titration calorimetry to study how NOX structure and dynamics are affected by changes in temperature, the addition of urea and the substitution of the FMN cofactor with FAD. The majority of signals from NOX are quite insensitive to changes in temperature, cosolute addition, and cofactor substitution. However, a small cluster of residues surrounding the active site shows significant changes. These residues are implicated in coupling changes in the solution conditions of the enzyme to changes in catalytic activity. PMID:25970557

  8. Active site histidine in spinach ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase modified by diethyl pyrocarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Y.; McFadden, B.A.; el-Gul, T.

    1985-07-16

    (TH) Diethyl pyrocarbonate was synthesized from (TH) ethanol prepared by the reduction of acetaldehyde by NaB3H4. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) from spinach was inactivated with this reagent at pH 7.0 the presence of 20 mM MgS , and tryptic peptides that contained modified histidine residues were isolated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Labeling of the enzyme was conducted in the presence and absence of the competitive inhibitor sedoheptulose 1,7-bisphosphate. The amount of one peptide that was heavily labeled in the absence of this compound was reduced 10-fold in its presence. The labeled residue was histidine-298. This result, in combination with earlier experiments, suggests that His-298 in spinach RuBisCO is located in the active site domain and is essential to enzyme activity. This region of the primary structure is strongly conserved in seven other ribulosebisphosphate carboxylases from divergent sources.

  9. 2-(4-Bromoacetamido)anilino-2-deoxypentitol 1,5-bisphosphate, a new affinity label for ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Rhodospirillum rubrum. Determination of reaction parameters and characterization of an active site peptide.

    PubMed

    Herndon, C S; Hartman, F C

    1984-03-10

    of the enzyme. The lack of reactivity with the spinach enzyme is explained by the deletion of the histidyl residue and the replacement of cysteine by tryptophan in the eukaryotic species. Although the nonconservation of the modified residues argues against a functional role other than maintenance of structural integrity, the extensive homology in this region among seven different species of carboxylase is compatible with the region comprising a portion of the active site.

  10. Part I. Cobalt thiolate complexes modeling the active site of cobalt nitrile hydratase. Part II. Formation of inorganic nanoparticles on protein scaffolding in Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Irene Yuk Man

    Part I. A series of novel cobalt dithiolate complexes with mixed imine/amine ligand systems is presented here as electronic and structural models for the active site in the bacterial enzyme class, nitrile hydratase (NHase). Pentadentate cobalt(II) complexes with S2N 3 ligand environments are first studied as precursors to the more relevant cobalt(III) complexes. Adjustment of the backbone length by removal of a methylene group increases the reactivity of the system; whereas reduction of the two backbone imine bonds to allow free rotation about those bonds may decrease reactivity. Reactivity change due to the replacement of the backbone amine proton with a more sterically challenging methyl group is not yet clear. Upon oxidation, the monocationic pentadentate cobalt(III) complex, 1b, shows promising reactivity similar to that of NHase. The metal's open coordination site allows reversible binding of the endogenous, monoanionic ligands, N 3- and NCS-. Oxygenation of the thiolate sulfur atoms by exposure to O2 and H2O 2 produces sulfenate and sulfinate ligands in complex 8, which resembles the crystal structure of "deactivated" Fe NHase. However, its lack of reactivity argues against the oxygenated enzyme structure as the active form. Six-coordinate cobalt(III) complexes with S2N4 amine/amine ligand systems are also presented as analogues of previously reported iron(III) compounds, which mimic the spectroscopic properties of Fe NHase. The cobalt complexes do not seem to similarly model Co NHase. However, the S = 0 cobalt(III) center can be spectroscopically silent and difficult to detect, making comparison with synthetic models using common techniques hard. Part II. Dodecameric Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase mutant, E165C, stacks along its six-fold axis to produce tubular nanostructures in the presence of some divalent metal ions, as does the wild type enzyme. The centrally located, engineered Cys-165 residues appear to bind to various species and may serve as

  11. Synthesis of macrocyclic trypanosomal cysteine protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen Ting; Lira, Ricardo; Hansell, Elizabeth; McKerrow, James H; Roush, William R

    2008-11-15

    The importance of cysteine proteases in parasites, compounded with the lack of redundancy compared to their mammalian hosts makes proteases attractive targets for the development of new therapeutic agents. The binding mode of K11002 to cruzain, the major cysteine protease of Trypanosoma cruzi was used in the design of conformationally constrained inhibitors. Vinyl sulfone-containing macrocycles were synthesized via olefin ring-closing metathesis and evaluated against cruzain and the closely related cysteine protease, rhodesain.

  12. The active site of hen egg-white lysozyme: flexibility and chemical bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Held, Jeanette Smaalen, Sander van

    2014-04-01

    Chemical bonding at the active site of lysozyme is analyzed on the basis of a multipole model employing transferable multipole parameters from a database. Large B factors at low temperatures reflect frozen-in disorder, but therefore prevent a meaningful free refinement of multipole parameters. Chemical bonding at the active site of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) is analyzed on the basis of Bader’s quantum theory of atoms in molecules [QTAIM; Bader (1994 ▶), Atoms in Molecules: A Quantum Theory. Oxford University Press] applied to electron-density maps derived from a multipole model. The observation is made that the atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) of HEWL at a temperature of 100 K are larger than ADPs in crystals of small biological molecules at 298 K. This feature shows that the ADPs in the cold crystals of HEWL reflect frozen-in disorder rather than thermal vibrations of the atoms. Directly generalizing the results of multipole studies on small-molecule crystals, the important consequence for electron-density analysis of protein crystals is that multipole parameters cannot be independently varied in a meaningful way in structure refinements. Instead, a multipole model for HEWL has been developed by refinement of atomic coordinates and ADPs against the X-ray diffraction data of Wang and coworkers [Wang et al. (2007), Acta Cryst. D63, 1254–1268], while multipole parameters were fixed to the values for transferable multipole parameters from the ELMAM2 database [Domagala et al. (2012), Acta Cryst. A68, 337–351] . Static and dynamic electron densities based on this multipole model are presented. Analysis of their topological properties according to the QTAIM shows that the covalent bonds possess similar properties to the covalent bonds of small molecules. Hydrogen bonds of intermediate strength are identified for the Glu35 and Asp52 residues, which are considered to be essential parts of the active site of HEWL. Furthermore, a series of weak C

  13. Localization of the active site of an enzyme, bacterial luciferase, using two-quantum affinity modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benimetskaya, L. Z.; Gitelzon, I. I.; Kozionov, Andrew L.; Novozhilov, S. Y.; Petushkov, V. N.; Rodionova, N. S.; Stockman, Mark I.

    1991-11-01

    For the first time the method of two-quantum affinity modification has been employed to probe the structure of an enzyme, bacterial luciferase. Position of the flavin-binding site of this enzyme, which was previously unknown, has been established. The obtained data indicate that the flavin site is positioned on the (alpha) -subunit. The closest contact of the protein chain of the enzyme with the chromophoric group of the flavin takes place near 80 +/- 10 and 120 +/- 10 amino acid residues; the regions 50 +/- 10 and 215 +/- 10 are also close to the flavin. The established localization does not contradict suggestions on positions of the flavin and phosphate sites of the bacterial luciferase, which had earlier been made from the data on evolutionary stability of various luciferases. The present method can, in principle, be applied to a great number of enzymes, including all flavin-dependent enzymes. Enzymatic catalysis has high speed and specificity. Creation of a method of determination of the elements of the primary structure of a protein, making up the active site (in which substratum conversion occurs), could be a significant advance in clearing up mechanisms of enzymatic catalysis. It was proposed to localize active sites of the enzymes, whose substrata are chromophores, using this method of two-quantum affinity modification. An enzyme- substratum complex is irradiated with laser light of sufficiently long wavelength ((lambda) 300 nm) which is not directly absorbed by the enzyme. Two-quantum quasiresonant excitation of the substratum activates it to the state with energy 5-7 eV, which is then radiativelessly transferred to neighboring protein groups. This energy exceeds the energy of activation of peptide bond breakage. Therefore, the enzyme will be disrupted in the vicinity of its active site. In the present paper the above approach has been implemented for the first time. Information has been obtained about the position of the flavin-binding site of bacterial

  14. The Salmonella Effector SpvD Is a Cysteine Hydrolase with a Serovar-specific Polymorphism Influencing Catalytic Activity, Suppression of Immune Responses, and Bacterial Virulence*

    PubMed Central

    Grabe, Grzegorz J.; Zhang, Yue; Przydacz, Michal; Rolhion, Nathalie; Yang, Yi; Pruneda, Jonathan N.; Komander, David; Holden, David W.; Hare, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens secrete virulence (effector) proteins that interfere with immune signaling in their host. SpvD is a Salmonella enterica effector protein that we previously demonstrated to negatively regulate the NF-κB signaling pathway and promote virulence of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium in mice. To shed light on the mechanistic basis for these observations, we determined the crystal structure of SpvD and show that it adopts a papain-like fold with a characteristic cysteine-histidine-aspartate catalytic triad comprising Cys-73, His-162, and Asp-182. SpvD possessed an in vitro deconjugative activity on aminoluciferin-linked peptide and protein substrates in vitro. A C73A mutation abolished SpvD activity, demonstrating that an intact catalytic triad is required for its function. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that SpvD is a cysteine protease. The amino acid sequence of SpvD is highly conserved across different S. enterica serovars, but residue 161, located close to the catalytic triad, is variable, with serovar Typhimurium SpvD having an arginine and serovar Enteritidis a glycine at this position. This variation affected hydrolytic activity of the enzyme on artificial substrates and can be explained by substrate accessibility to the active site. Interestingly, the SpvDG161 variant more potently inhibited NF-κB-mediated immune responses in cells in vitro and increased virulence of serovar Typhimurium in mice. In summary, our results explain the biochemical basis for the effect of virulence protein SpvD and demonstrate that a single amino acid polymorphism can affect the overall virulence of a bacterial pathogen in its host. PMID:27789710

  15. Crystal structure, exogenous ligand binding, and redox properties of an engineered diiron active site in a bacterial hemerythrin.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yasunori; Onoda, Akira; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Takano, Yu; Hirota, Shun; Kurtz, Donald M; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Hayashi, Takashi

    2013-11-18

    A nonheme diiron active site in a 13 kDa hemerythrin-like domain of the bacterial chemotaxis protein DcrH-Hr contains an oxo bridge, two bridging carboxylate groups from Glu and Asp residues, and five terminally ligated His residues. We created a unique diiron coordination sphere containing five His and three Glu/Asp residues by replacing an Ile residue with Glu in DcrH-Hr. Direct coordination of the carboxylate group of E119 to Fe2 of the diiron site in the I119E variant was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. The substituted Glu is adjacent to an exogenous ligand-accessible tunnel. UV-vis absorption spectra indicate that the additional coordination of E119 inhibits the binding of the exogenous ligands azide and phenol to the diiron site. The extent of azide binding to the diiron site increases at pH ≤ 6, which is ascribed to protonation of the carboxylate ligand of E119. The diferrous state (deoxy form) of the engineered diiron site with the extra Glu residue is found to react more slowly than wild type with O2 to yield the diferric state (met form). The additional coordination of E119 to the diiron site also slows the rate of reduction from the met form. All these processes were found to be pH-dependent, which can be attributed to protonation state and coordination status of the E119 carboxylate. These results demonstrate that modifications of the endogenous coordination sphere can produce significant changes in the ligand binding and redox properties in a prototypical nonheme diiron-carboxylate protein active site.

  16. Mechanical and chemical properties of cysteine-modified kinesin molecules.

    PubMed

    Iwatani, S; Iwane, A H; Higuchi, H; Ishii, Y; Yanagida, T

    1999-08-10

    To probe the structural changes within kinesin molecules, we made the mutants of motor domains of two-headed kinesin (4-411 aa) in which either all the five cysteines or all except Cys45 were mutated. A residual cysteine (Cys45) of the kinesin mutant was labeled with an environment-sensitive fluorescent probe, acrylodan. ATPase activity, mechanical properties, and fluorescence intensity of the mutants were measured. Upon acrylodan-labeled kinesin binding to microtubules in the presence of 1 mM AMPPNP, the peak intensity was enhanced by 3.4-fold, indicating the structural change of the kinesin head by the binding. Substitution of cysteines decreased both the maximum microtubule-activated ATPase and the sliding velocity to the same extent. However, the maximum force and the step size were not affected; the force produced by a single molecule was 6-6.5 pN, and a step size due to the hydrolysis of one ATP molecule by kinesin molecules was about 10 nm for all kinesins. This step size was close to a unitary step size of 8 nm. Thus, the mechanical events of kinesin are tightly coupled with the chemical events.

  17. Automated docking of {alpha}-(1,4)- and {alpha}-(1,6)-linked glucosyl trisaccharides in the glucoamylase active site

    SciTech Connect

    Countinho, P.M.; Reilly, P.J.; Dowd, M.K.

    1998-06-01

    Low-energy conformers of five {alpha}-(1,4)- and {alpha}-(1,6)-linked glucosyl trisaccharides were flexibly docked into the glucoamylase active site using AutoDock 2.2. To ensure that all significant conformational space was searched, the starting trisaccharide conformers for docking were all possible combinations of the corresponding disaccharide low-energy conformers. All docked trisaccharides occupied subsites {minus}1 and +1 in very similar modes to those of corresponding nonreducing-end disaccharides. For linear substrates, full binding at subsite +2 occurred only when the substrate reducing end was {alpha}-(1,4)-linked, with hydrogen-bonding with the hydroxy-methyl group being the only polar interaction there. Given the absence of other important interactions at this subsite, multiple substrate conformations are allowed. For the one docked branched substrate, steric hindrance in the {alpha}-(1,6)-glycosidic oxygen suggests that the active-site residues have to change position for hydrolysis to occur. Subsite +1 of the glucoamylase active site allows flexibility in binding but, at least in Aspergillus glucoamylases, subsite +2 selectively binds substrates {alpha}-(1,4)-linked between subsites +1 and +2. Enzyme engineering to limit substrate flexibility at subsite +2 could improve glucoamylase industrial properties.

  18. Ligand uptake in Mycobacterium tuberculosis truncated hemoglobins is controlled by both internal tunnels and active site water molecules

    PubMed Central

    Davidge, Kelly S; Singh, Sandip; Bowman, Lesley AH; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; Carballal, Sebastián; Radi, Rafael; Poole, Robert K; Dikshit, Kanak; Estrin, Dario A; Marti, Marcelo A; Boechi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human tuberculosis, has two proteins belonging to the truncated hemoglobin (trHb) family. Mt-trHbN presents well-defined internal hydrophobic tunnels that allow O 2 and •NO to migrate easily from the solvent to the active site, whereas Mt-trHbO possesses tunnels that are partially blocked by a few bulky residues, particularly a tryptophan at position G8. Differential ligand migration rates allow Mt-trHbN to detoxify •NO, a crucial step for pathogen survival once under attack by the immune system, much more efficiently than Mt-trHbO. In order to investigate the differences between these proteins, we performed experimental kinetic measurements, •NO decomposition, as well as molecular dynamics simulations of the wild type Mt-trHbN and two mutants, VG8F and VG8W. These mutations introduce modifications in both tunnel topologies and affect the incoming ligand capacity to displace retained water molecules at the active site. We found that a single mutation allows Mt-trHbN to acquire ligand migration rates comparable to those observed for Mt-trHbO, confirming that ligand migration is regulated by the internal tunnel architecture as well as by water molecules stabilized in the active site. PMID:26478812

  19. Mechanistic Insights into the Bifunctional Non-Heme Iron Oxygenase Carbapenem Synthase by Active Site Saturation Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Ryan M.; Townsend, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    The carbapenem class of β-lactam antibiotics is known for its remarkable potency, antibacterial spectrum and resistance to β-lactamase-mediated inactivation. While the biosynthesis of structurally “complex” carbapenems, such as thienamycin, share initial biochemical steps with carbapenem-3-carboxylate (“simple” carbapenem), the requisite inversion at C5 and formation of the characteristic α,β-unsaturated carboxylate are different in origin between the two groups. Here we consider carbapenem synthase, a mechanistically distinct bifunctional non-heme iron α-ketoglutarate-dependent enzyme responsible for the terminal reactions, C5 epimerization and desaturation, in simple carbapenem production. Interestingly, this enzyme accepts two stereoisomeric substrates and transforms each to a common active antibiotic. Owing both to enzyme and product instability, resort to saturation mutagenesis of active site and selected second-sphere residues gave clearly differing profiles of CarC tolerance to structural modification. Guided by a crystal structure and the mutational data, in silico docking was used to suggest the positioning of each disastereomeric substrate in the active site. The two orientations relative to the reactive iron-oxo center are manifest in the two distinct reactions, C5-epimerization and C2/3-desaturation. These observations favor a two-step reaction scheme involving two complete oxidative cycles as opposed to a single catalytic cycle in which an active site tyrosine, Tyr67, after hydrogen donation to achieve bicyclic ring inversion, is further hypothesized to serve as a radical carrier. PMID:23611403

  20. Composite active site of chondroitin lyase ABC accepting both epimers of uronic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Shaya, D.; Hahn, Bum-Soo; Bjerkan, Tonje Marita; Kim, Wan Seok; Park, Nam Young; Sim, Joon-Soo; Kim, Yeong-Shik; Cygler, M.

    2008-03-19

    Enzymes have evolved as catalysts with high degrees of stereospecificity. When both enantiomers are biologically important, enzymes with two different folds usually catalyze reactions with the individual enantiomers. In rare cases a single enzyme can process both enantiomers efficiently, but no molecular basis for such catalysis has been established. The family of bacterial chondroitin lyases ABC comprises such enzymes. They can degrade both chondroitin sulfate (CS) and dermatan sulfate (DS) glycosaminoglycans at the nonreducing end of either glucuronic acid (CS) or its epimer iduronic acid (DS) by a {beta}-elimination mechanism, which commences with the removal of the C-5 proton from the uronic acid. Two other structural folds evolved to perform these reactions in an epimer-specific fashion: ({alpha}/{alpha}){sub 5} for CS (chondroitin lyases AC) and {beta}-helix for DS (chondroitin lyases B); their catalytic mechanisms have been established at the molecular level. The structure of chondroitinase ABC from Proteus vulgaris showed surprising similarity to chondroitinase AC, including the presence of a Tyr-His-Glu-Arg catalytic tetrad, which provided a possible mechanism for CS degradation but not for DS degradation. We determined the structure of a distantly related Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron chondroitinase ABC to identify additional structurally conserved residues potentially involved in catalysis. We found a conserved cluster located {approx}12 {angstrom} from the catalytic tetrad. We demonstrate that a histidine in this cluster is essential for catalysis of DS but not CS. The enzyme utilizes a single substrate-binding site while having two partially overlapping active sites catalyzing the respective reactions. The spatial separation of the two sets of residues suggests a substrate-induced conformational change that brings all catalytically essential residues close together.

  1. Kinetic and Spectroscopic Studies of Bicupin Oxalate Oxidase and Putative Active Site Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Moomaw, Ellen W.; Hoffer, Eric; Moussatche, Patricia; Salerno, John C.; Grant, Morgan; Immelman, Bridget; Uberto, Richard; Ozarowski, Andrew; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Ceriporiopsis subvermispora oxalate oxidase (CsOxOx) is the first bicupin enzyme identified that catalyzes manganese-dependent oxidation of oxalate. In previous work, we have shown that the dominant contribution to catalysis comes from the monoprotonated form of oxalate binding to a form of the enzyme in which an active site carboxylic acid residue must be unprotonated. CsOxOx shares greatest sequence homology with bicupin microbial oxalate decarboxylases (OxDC) and the 241-244DASN region of the N-terminal Mn binding domain of CsOxOx is analogous to the lid region of OxDC that has been shown to determine reaction specificity. We have prepared a series of CsOxOx mutants to probe this region and to identify the carboxylate residue implicated in catalysis. The pH profile of the D241A CsOxOx mutant suggests that the protonation state of aspartic acid 241 is mechanistically significant and that catalysis takes place at the N-terminal Mn binding site. The observation that the D241S CsOxOx mutation eliminates Mn binding to both the N- and C- terminal Mn binding sites suggests that both sites must be intact for Mn incorporation into either site. The introduction of a proton donor into the N-terminal Mn binding site (CsOxOx A242E mutant) does not affect reaction specificity. Mutation of conserved arginine residues further support that catalysis takes place at the N-terminal Mn binding site and that both sites must be intact for Mn incorporation into either site. PMID:23469254

  2. Evidence for segmental mobility in the active site of pepsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, J.; Strop, P.; Senn, H.; Foundling, S.; Kostka, V.

    1986-05-01

    The low hydrolytic activity (k/sub cat/ < 0.001 s/sup -1/) of chicken pepsin (CP) towards tri- and tetrapeptides is enhanced at least 100 times by modification of its single sulfhydryl group of Cys-115, with little effect on K/sub m/-values. Modification thus simulates the effect of secondary substrate binding on pepsin catalysis. The rate of Cys-115 modification is substantially decreased in the presence of some competitive inhibitors, suggesting its active site location. Experiments with CP alkylated at Cys-115 with Acrylodan as a fluorescent probe or with N-iodoacetyl-(4-fluoro)-aniline as a /sup 19/F-nmr probe suggest conformation change around Cys-115 to occur on substrate or substrate analog binding. The difference /sup 1/H-nmr spectra (500 MHz) of unmodified free and inhibitor-complexed CP reveal chemical shifts almost exclusively in the aromatic region. The effects of Cu/sup + +/ on /sup 19/F- and /sup 1/H-nmr spectra have been studied. Examination of a computer graphics model of CP based on E. parasitica pepsin-inhibitor complex X-ray coordinates suggests that Cys-115 is located near the S/sub 3//S/sub 5/ binding site. The results are interpreted in favor of segmental mobility of this region important for pepsin substrate binding and catalysis.

  3. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  4. Resonant active sites in catalytic ammonia synthesis: A structural model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholach, Alexander R.; Bryliakova, Anna A.; Matveev, Andrey V.; Bulgakov, Nikolai N.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption sites Mn consisted of n adjacent atoms M, each bound to the adsorbed species, are considered within a realistic model. The sum of bonds Σ lost by atoms in a site in comparison with the bulk atoms was used for evaluation of the local surface imperfection, while the reaction enthalpy at that site was used as a measure of activity. The comparative study of Mn sites (n = 1-5) at basal planes of Pt, Rh, Ir, Fe, Re and Ru with respect to heat of N2 dissociative adsorption QN and heat of Nad + Had → NHad reaction QNH was performed using semi-empirical calculations. Linear QN(Σ) increase and QNH(Σ) decrease allowed to specify the resonant Σ for each surface in catalytic ammonia synthesis at equilibrium Nad coverage. Optimal Σ are realizable for Ru2, Re2 and Ir4 only, whereas other centers meet steric inhibition or unreal crystal structure. Relative activity of the most active sites in proportion 5.0 × 10- 5: 4.5 × 10- 3: 1: 2.5: 3.0: 1080: 2270 for a sequence of Pt4, Rh4, Fe4(fcc), Ir4, Fe2-5(bcc), Ru2, Re2, respectively, is in agreement with relevant experimental data. Similar approach can be applied to other adsorption or catalytic processes exhibiting structure sensitivity.

  5. Mapping protein cysteine sulfonic acid modifications with specific enrichment and mass spectrometry: an integrated approach to explore the cysteine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuan-Chang; Huang, Chien-Ning; Lin, Chia-Hung; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Wu, Chih-Che

    2010-08-01

    Oxidation of thiol proteins, which results in conversion of cysteine residues to cysteine sulfenic, sulfinic or sulfonic acids, is an important posttranslational control of protein function in cells. To facilitate the analysis of this process with MALDI-MS, we have developed a method for selective enrichment and identification of peptides containing cysteine sulfonic acid (sulfopeptides) in tryptic digests of proteins based on ionic affinity capture using polyarginine-coated nanodiamonds as high-affinity probes. The method was applied to selectively concentrate sulfopeptides from either a highly dilute solution or a complex peptide mixture in which the abundance of the sulfonated analyte is as low as 0.02%. The polyarginine-coated probes exhibit a higher affinity for peptides containing multiple sulfonic acids than peptides containing single sulfonic acid. The limit of the detection is in the femtomole range, with the MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer operating in the negative ion mode. The results show that the new approach has good specificity even in the presence of phosphopeptides. An application of this method for selective enrichment and structural identification of sulfopeptides is demonstrated with the tryptic digests of performic-acid-oxidized BSA.

  6. Shifting redox states of the iron center partitions CDO between crosslink formation or cysteine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Njeri, Catherine W; Ellis, Holly R

    2014-09-15

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) is a mononuclear iron-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of L-cysteine to L-cysteine sulfinic acid. The mammalian CDO enzymes contain a thioether crosslink between Cys93 and Tyr157, and purified recombinant CDO exists as a mixture of the crosslinked and non crosslinked isoforms. The current study presents a method of expressing homogenously non crosslinked CDO using a cell permeative metal chelator in order to provide a comprehensive investigation of the non crosslinked and crosslinked isoforms. Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis of purified non crosslinked CDO revealed that the iron was in the EPR silent Fe(II) form. Activity of non crosslinked CDO monitoring dioxygen utilization showed a distinct lag phase, which correlated with crosslink formation. Generation of homogenously crosslinked CDO resulted in an ∼5-fold higher kcat/Km value compared to the enzyme with a heterogenous mixture of crosslinked and non crosslinked CDO isoforms. EPR analysis of homogenously crosslinked CDO revealed that this isoform exists in the Fe(III) form. These studies present a new perspective on the redox properties of the active site iron and demonstrate that a redox switch commits CDO towards either formation of the Cys93-Tyr157 crosslink or oxidation of the cysteine substrate.

  7. Allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a using Quercetin 3-O-rutinoside and its combination.

    PubMed

    Rani, Nidhi; Vijayakumar, Saravanan; P T V, Lakshmi; Arunachalam, Annamalai

    2016-08-01

    Recent crystallographic study revealed the involvement of allosteric site in active site inhibition of penicillin binding protein (PBP2a), where one molecule of Ceftaroline (Cef) binds to the allosteric site of PBP2a and paved way for the other molecule (Cef) to bind at the active site. Though Cef has the potency to inhibit the PBP2a, its adverse side effects are of major concern. Previous studies have reported the antibacterial property of Quercetin derivatives, a group of natural compounds. Hence, the present study aims to evaluate the effect of Quercetin 3-o-rutinoside (Rut) in allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a. The molecular docking studies between allosteric site and ligands (Rut, Que, and Cef) revealed a better binding efficiency (G-score) of Rut (-7.790318) and Cef (-6.194946) with respect to Que (-5.079284). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies showed significant changes at the active site in the presence of ligands (Rut and Cef) at allosteric site. Four different combinations of Rut and Cef were docked and their G-scores ranged between -6.320 and -8.623. MD studies revealed the stability of the key residue (Ser403) with Rut being at both sites, compared to other complexes. Morphological analysis through electron microscopy confirmed that combination of Rut and Cefixime was able to disturb the bacterial cell membrane in a similar fashion to that of Rut and Cefixime alone. The results of this study indicate that the affinity of Rut at both sites were equally good, with further validations Rut could be considered as an alternative for inhibiting MRSA growth.

  8. Tryptophanase from Proteus vulgaris: the conformational rearrangement in the active site, induced by the mutation of Tyrosine 72 to phenylalanine, and its mechanistic consequences.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, Vitalia V; Zakomirdina, Ludmila N; Dementieva, Irene S; Phillips, Robert S; Gollnick, Paul D; Demidkina, Tatyana V; Faleev, Nicolai G

    2006-04-01

    Tyr72 is located at the active site of tryptophanase (Trpase) from Proteus vulgaris. For the wild-type Trpase Tyr72 might be considered as the general acid catalyst at the stage of elimination of the leaving groups. The replacement of Tyr72 by Phe leads to a decrease in activity for L-tryptophan by 50,000-fold and to a considerable rearrangement of the active site of Trpase. This rearrangement leads to an increase of room around the alpha-C atom of any bound amino acid, such that covalent binding of alpha-methyl-substituted amino acids becomes possible (which cannot be realized in wild-type Trpase). The changes in reactivities of S-alkyl-L-cysteines provide evidence for an increase of congestion in the proximity of their side groups in the mutant enzyme as compared to wild-type enzyme. The observed alteration of catalytic properties in a large degree originates from a conformational change in the active site. The Y72F Trpase retains significant activity for L-serine, which allowed us to conclude that in the mutant enzyme, some functional group is present which fulfills the role of the general acid catalyst in reactions associated with elimination of small leaving groups.

  9. Structure of the sodium channel pore revealed by serial cysteine mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-García, M T; Chiamvimonvat, N; Marban, E; Tomaselli, G F

    1996-01-01

    The pores of voltage-gated cation channels are formed by four intramembrane segments that impart selectivity and conductance. Remarkably little is known about the higher order structure of these critical pore-lining or P segments. Serial