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Sample records for active-site zinc ion

  1. Active-site zinc ligands and activated H2O of zinc enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Vallee, B L; Auld, D S

    1990-01-01

    The x-ray crystallographic structures of 12 zinc enzymes have been chosen as standards of reference to identify the ligands to the catalytic and structural zinc atoms of other members of their respective enzyme families. Universally, H2O is a ligand and critical component of the catalytically active zinc sites. In addition, three protein side chains bind to the catalytic zinc atom, whereas four protein ligands bind to the structural zinc atom. The geometry and coordination number of zinc can vary greatly to accommodate particular ligands. Zinc forms complexes with nitrogen and oxygen just as readily as with sulfur, and this is reflected in catalytic zinc sites having a binding frequency of His much greater than Glu greater than Asp = Cys, three of which bind to the metal atom. The systematic spacing between the ligands is striking. For all catalytic zinc sites except the coenzyme-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase, the first two ligands are separated by a "short-spacer" consisting of 1 to 3 amino acids. These ligands are separated from the third ligand by a "long spacer" of approximately 20 to approximately 120 amino acids. The spacer enables formation of a primary bidentate zinc complex, whereas the long spacer contributes flexibility to the coordination sphere, which can poise the zinc for catalysis as well as bring other catalytic and substrate binding groups into apposition with the active site. The H2O is activated by ionization, polarization, or poised for displacement. Collectively, the data imply that the preferred mechanistic pathway for activating the water--e.g., zinc hydroxide or Lewis acid catalysis--will be determined by the identity of the other three ligands and their spacing. Images PMID:2104979

  2. Conformational changes associated with the binding of zinc acetate at the putative active site of XcTcmJ, a cupin from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris

    PubMed Central

    Axelrod, Herbert L.; Kozbial, Piotr; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S. Sri; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Carlton, Dennis; Caruthers, Jonathan; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Grant, Joanna C.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Murphy, Kevin D.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Tien, Henry J.; Trout, Christina V.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Xu, Qingping; Zubieta, Chloe; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    In the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, the product of the tcmJ gene, XcTcmJ, encodes a protein belonging to the RmlC family of cupins. XcTcmJ was crystallized in a monoclinic space group (C2) in the presence of zinc acetate and the structure was determined to 1.6 Å resolution. Previously, the apo structure has been reported in the absence of any bound metal ion [Chin et al. (2006 ▶), Proteins, 65, 1046–1050]. The most significant difference between the apo structure and the structure of XcTcmJ described here is a reorganization of the binding site for zinc acetate, which was most likely acquired from the crystallization solution. This site is located in the conserved metal ion-binding domain at the putative active site of XcTcmJ. In addition, an acetate was also bound within coordination distance of the zinc. In order to accommodate this binding, rearrangement of a conserved histidine ligand is required as well as several nearby residues within and around the putative active site. These observations indicate that binding of zinc serves a functional role in this cupin protein. PMID:20944231

  3. Conformational changes associated with the binding of zinc acetate at the putative active site of XcTcmJ, a cupin from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Herbert L; Kozbial, Piotr; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S Sri; Miller, Mitchell D; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Carlton, Dennis; Caruthers, Jonathan; Chiu, Hsiu Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Slawomir K; Grant, Joanna C; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K; Klock, Heath E; Knuth, Mark W; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T; Murphy, Kevin D; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L; Tien, Henry J; Trout, Christina V; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Xu, Qingping; Zubieta, Chloe; Hodgson, Keith O; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc André; Deacon, Ashley M; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Wilson, Ian A

    2010-10-01

    In the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, the product of the tcmJ gene, XcTcmJ, encodes a protein belonging to the RmlC family of cupins. XcTcmJ was crystallized in a monoclinic space group (C2) in the presence of zinc acetate and the structure was determined to 1.6 Å resolution. Previously, the apo structure has been reported in the absence of any bound metal ion [Chin et al. (2006), Proteins, 65, 1046-1050]. The most significant difference between the apo structure and the structure of XcTcmJ described here is a reorganization of the binding site for zinc acetate, which was most likely acquired from the crystallization solution. This site is located in the conserved metal ion-binding domain at the putative active site of XcTcmJ. In addition, an acetate was also bound within coordination distance of the zinc. In order to accommodate this binding, rearrangement of a conserved histidine ligand is required as well as several nearby residues within and around the putative active site. These observations indicate that binding of zinc serves a functional role in this cupin protein.

  4. Ion Implantation of Zinc Sulphide Thin Films,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report considers the use of ion implantation as a means of preparing rare earth doped thin films of zinc sulphide, and presents preliminary results on the luminescence of such films doped with Tb and Er166 ions. (Author)

  5. The biological inorganic chemistry of zinc ions.

    PubMed

    Krężel, Artur; Maret, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    The solution and complexation chemistry of zinc ions is the basis for zinc biology. In living organisms, zinc is redox-inert and has only one valence state: Zn(II). Its coordination environment in proteins is limited by oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur donors from the side chains of a few amino acids. In an estimated 10% of all human proteins, zinc has a catalytic or structural function and remains bound during the lifetime of the protein. However, in other proteins zinc ions bind reversibly with dissociation and association rates commensurate with the requirements in regulation, transport, transfer, sensing, signalling, and storage. In contrast to the extensive knowledge about zinc proteins, the coordination chemistry of the "mobile" zinc ions in these processes, i.e. when not bound to proteins, is virtually unexplored and the mechanisms of ligand exchange are poorly understood. Knowledge of the biological inorganic chemistry of zinc ions is essential for understanding its cellular biology and for designing complexes that deliver zinc to proteins and chelating agents that remove zinc from proteins, for detecting zinc ion species by qualitative and quantitative analysis, and for proper planning and execution of experiments involving zinc ions and nanoparticles such as zinc oxide (ZnO). In most investigations, reference is made to zinc or Zn(2+) without full appreciation of how biological zinc ions are buffered and how the d-block cation Zn(2+) differs from s-block cations such as Ca(2+) with regard to significantly higher affinity for ligands, preference for the donor atoms of ligands, and coordination dynamics. Zinc needs to be tightly controlled. The interaction with low molecular weight ligands such as water and inorganic and organic anions is highly relevant to its biology but in contrast to its coordination in proteins has not been discussed in the biochemical literature. From the discussion in this article, it is becoming evident that zinc ion speciation is

  6. The structure of sedoheptulose-7-phosphate isomerase from Burkholderia pseudomallei reveals a zinc binding site at the heart of the active site.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Nicholas J

    2010-07-16

    Heptoses are found in the surface polysaccharides of most bacteria, contributing to structures that are essential for virulence and antibiotic resistance. Consequently, the biosynthetic enzymes for these sugars are attractive targets for novel antibiotics. The best characterized biosynthetic enzyme is GmhA, which catalyzes the conversion of sedoheptulose-7-phosphate into D-glycero-D-manno-heptopyranose-7-phosphate, the first step in the biosynthesis of heptose. Here, the structure of GmhA from Burkholderia pseudomallei is reported. This enzyme contains a zinc ion at the heart of its active site: this ion stabilizes the active, closed form of the enzyme and presents coordinating side chains as a potential acid and base to drive catalysis. A complex with the product demonstrates that the enzyme retains activity in the crystal and thus suggests that the closed conformation is catalytically relevant and is an excellent target for the development of therapeutics. A revised mechanism for the action of GmhA is postulated on the basis of this structure and the activity of B. pseudomallei GmhA mutants.

  7. Accelerating degradation rate of pure iron by zinc ion implantation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Pure iron has been considered as a promising candidate for biodegradable implant applications. However, a faster degradation rate of pure iron is needed to meet the clinical requirement. In this work, metal vapor vacuum arc technology was adopted to implant zinc ions into the surface of pure iron. Results showed that the implantation depth of zinc ions was about 60 nm. The degradation rate of pure iron was found to be accelerated after zinc ion implantation. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that the implanted zinc ions brought a slight increase on cytotoxicity of the tested cells. In terms of hemocompatibility, the hemolysis of zinc ion implanted pure iron was lower than 2%. However, zinc ions might induce more adhered and activated platelets on the surface of pure iron. Overall, zinc ion implantation can be a feasible way to accelerate the degradation rate of pure iron for biodegradable applications. PMID:27482462

  8. Accelerating degradation rate of pure iron by zinc ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-12-01

    Pure iron has been considered as a promising candidate for biodegradable implant applications. However, a faster degradation rate of pure iron is needed to meet the clinical requirement. In this work, metal vapor vacuum arc technology was adopted to implant zinc ions into the surface of pure iron. Results showed that the implantation depth of zinc ions was about 60 nm. The degradation rate of pure iron was found to be accelerated after zinc ion implantation. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that the implanted zinc ions brought a slight increase on cytotoxicity of the tested cells. In terms of hemocompatibility, the hemolysis of zinc ion implanted pure iron was lower than 2%. However, zinc ions might induce more adhered and activated platelets on the surface of pure iron. Overall, zinc ion implantation can be a feasible way to accelerate the degradation rate of pure iron for biodegradable applications.

  9. Biosorption of zinc ion: a deep comprehension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Vishal

    2014-12-01

    Massive industrialization and urbanization of civilization during the last few decades have made a thrust in heavy metal pollution in various water bodies. In past, various kinds of conventional metal ion remediation technologies, such as cementation, osmosis, reverse osmosis, ultrafiltration, etc., have been practised. However, most of these technologies are quite expensive, and lead to the generation of secondary chemical sludge. However, biosorption of heavy metal ions is significantly inexpensive and an eco-friendly technology. Among the series of heavy metals, zinc has gained the significant interest due to its toxicity and easy availability in water bodies. Biosorption of zinc in liquid phase by living, nonliving, conventional and non-conventional biosorbents has been practised extensively in the past. This literature review focuses on the recent trends practised in the field of biosorption of zinc from liquid phase. The present work provides deep insight into various aspects of biosorption of zinc by different mechanisms of biosorption, bioaccumulation, isotherm, kinetic and mechanistic modeling. An exhaustive comparison among different sorts of biomasses has also been given in the present work to enlist all the milestones of biosorption.

  10. Metals on the move: zinc ions in cellular regulation and in the coordination dynamics of zinc proteins.

    PubMed

    Maret, Wolfgang

    2011-06-01

    Homeostatic control maintains essential transition metal ions at characteristic cellular concentrations to support their physiological functions and to avoid adverse effects. Zinc is especially widely used as a catalytic or structural cofactor in about 3000 human zinc proteins. In addition, the homeostatic control of zinc in eukaryotic cells permits functions of zinc(II) ions in regulation and in paracrine and intracrine signaling. Zinc ions are released from proteins through ligand-centered reactions in zinc/thiolate coordination environments, and from stores in cellular organelles, where zinc transporters participate in zinc loading and release. Muffling reactions allow zinc ions to serve as signaling ions (second messengers) in the cytosol that is buffered to picomolar zinc ion concentrations at steady-state. Muffling includes zinc ion binding to metallothioneins, cellular translocations of metallothioneins, delivery of zinc ions to transporter proteins, and zinc ion fluxes through cellular membranes with the result of removing the additional zinc ions from the cytosol and restoring the steady-state. Targets of regulatory zinc ions are proteins with sites for transient zinc binding, such as membrane receptors, enzymes, protein-protein interactions, and sensor proteins that control gene expression. The generation, transmission, targets, and termination of zinc ion signals involve proteins that use coordination dynamics in the inner and outer ligand spheres to control metal ion association and dissociation. These new findings establish critically important functions of zinc ions and zinc metalloproteins in cellular control.

  11. Synergic Effect of Active Sites in Zinc-Modified ZSM-5 Zeolites as Revealed by High-Field Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Qi, Guodong; Wang, Qiang; Xu, Jun; Trébosc, Julien; Lafon, Olivier; Wang, Chao; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Deng, Feng

    2016-12-19

    Understanding the nature of active sites in metal-supported catalysts is of great importance towards establishing their structure-property relationships. The outstanding catalytic performance of metal-supported catalysts is frequently ascribed to the synergic effect of different active sites, which is however not well spectroscopically characterized. Herein, we report the direct detection of surface Zn species and (1) H-(67) Zn internuclear interaction between Zn(2+) ions and Brønsted acid sites on Zn-modified ZSM-5 zeolites by high-field solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The observed promotion of C-H bond activation of methane is rationalized by the enhanced Brønsted acidity generated by synergic effects arising from the spatial proximity/interaction between Zn(2+) ions and Brønsted acidic protons. The concentration of synergic active sites is determined by (1) H-(67) Zn double-resonance solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

  12. Molecular dynamics studies unravel role of conserved residues responsible for movement of ions into active site of DHBPS

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, Ranajit Nivrutti; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Singh, Balvinder

    2017-01-01

    3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase (DHBPS) catalyzes the conversion of D-ribulose 5-phosphate (Ru5P) to L-3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate in the presence of Mg2+. Although crystal structures of DHBPS in complex with Ru5P and non-catalytic metal ions have been reported, structure with Ru5P along with Mg2+ is still elusive. Therefore, mechanistic role played by Mg2+ in the structure of DHBPS is poorly understood. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations of DHBPS-Ru5P complex along with Mg2+ have shown entry of Mg2+ from bulk solvent into active site. Presence of Mg2+ in active site has constrained conformations of Ru5P and has reduced flexibility of loop-2. Formation of hydrogen bonds among Thr-108 and residues - Gly-109, Val-110, Ser-111, and Asp-114 are found to be critical for entry of Mg2+ into active site. Subsequent in silico mutations of residues, Thr-108 and Asp-114 have substantiated the importance of these interactions. Loop-4 of one monomer is being proposed to act as a “lid” covering the active site of other monomer. Further, the conserved nature of residues taking part in the transfer of Mg2+ suggests the same mechanism being present in DHBPS of other microorganisms. Thus, this study provides insights into the functioning of DHBPS that can be used for the designing of inhibitors. PMID:28079168

  13. Molecular dynamics studies unravel role of conserved residues responsible for movement of ions into active site of DHBPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Ranajit Nivrutti; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Singh, Balvinder

    2017-01-01

    3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase (DHBPS) catalyzes the conversion of D-ribulose 5-phosphate (Ru5P) to L-3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate in the presence of Mg2+. Although crystal structures of DHBPS in complex with Ru5P and non-catalytic metal ions have been reported, structure with Ru5P along with Mg2+ is still elusive. Therefore, mechanistic role played by Mg2+ in the structure of DHBPS is poorly understood. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations of DHBPS-Ru5P complex along with Mg2+ have shown entry of Mg2+ from bulk solvent into active site. Presence of Mg2+ in active site has constrained conformations of Ru5P and has reduced flexibility of loop-2. Formation of hydrogen bonds among Thr-108 and residues - Gly-109, Val-110, Ser-111, and Asp-114 are found to be critical for entry of Mg2+ into active site. Subsequent in silico mutations of residues, Thr-108 and Asp-114 have substantiated the importance of these interactions. Loop-4 of one monomer is being proposed to act as a “lid” covering the active site of other monomer. Further, the conserved nature of residues taking part in the transfer of Mg2+ suggests the same mechanism being present in DHBPS of other microorganisms. Thus, this study provides insights into the functioning of DHBPS that can be used for the designing of inhibitors.

  14. Two active site divalent ions in the crystal structure of the hammerhead ribozyme bound to a transition state analogue

    DOE PAGES

    Mir, Aamir; Golden, Barbara L.

    2015-11-09

    The crystal structure of the hammerhead ribozyme bound to the pentavalent transition state analogue vanadate reveals significant rearrangements relative to the previously determined structures. The active site contracts, bringing G10.1 closer to the cleavage site and repositioning a divalent metal ion such that it could, ultimately, interact directly with the scissile phosphate. This ion could also position a water molecule to serve as a general acid in the cleavage reaction. A second divalent ion is observed coordinated to O6 of G12. This metal ion is well-placed to help tune the pKA of G12. Finally, on the basis of this crystalmore » structure as well as a wealth of biochemical studies, in this paper we propose a mechanism in which G12 serves as the general base and a magnesium-bound water serves as a general acid.« less

  15. Two active site divalent ions in the crystal structure of the hammerhead ribozyme bound to a transition state analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Mir, Aamir; Golden, Barbara L.

    2015-11-09

    The crystal structure of the hammerhead ribozyme bound to the pentavalent transition state analogue vanadate reveals significant rearrangements relative to the previously determined structures. The active site contracts, bringing G10.1 closer to the cleavage site and repositioning a divalent metal ion such that it could, ultimately, interact directly with the scissile phosphate. This ion could also position a water molecule to serve as a general acid in the cleavage reaction. A second divalent ion is observed coordinated to O6 of G12. This metal ion is well-placed to help tune the pKA of G12. Finally, on the basis of this crystal structure as well as a wealth of biochemical studies, in this paper we propose a mechanism in which G12 serves as the general base and a magnesium-bound water serves as a general acid.

  16. Energy loss of helium ions in zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Lantschner, G.H.; Eckardt, J.C.; Lifschitz, A.F.; Arista, N.R.; Araujo, L.L.; Duarte, P.F.; Santos, J.H.R. dos; Behar, M.; Dias, J.F.; Grande, P.L.; Montanari, C.C.; Miraglia, J.E.

    2004-06-01

    The energy loss of helium ions in zinc has been measured in the energy range from 37.5 to 1750 keV/amu using the transmission technique and the Rutherford backscattering method. In addition, calculations using the extended Friedel sum rule, the unitary convolution approximation, and the local plasma approximation have been performed. The contributions of the inner-shell and valence electrons to the total energy loss are separately evaluated. The measurements and calculations are in good agreement over an extended range of energies, and both of them yield stopping values higher than those provided by SRIM 2003.

  17. Metal Ion Interactions in the DNA Cleavage/Ligation Active Site of Human Topoisomerase IIα†

    PubMed Central

    Deweese, Joseph E.; Guengerich, F. Peter; Burgin, Alex B.; Osheroff, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Human topoisomerase IIα utilizes a two-metal-ion mechanism for DNA cleavage. One of the metal ions (M12+) is believed to make a critical interaction with the 3′-bridging atom of the scissile phosphate, while the other (M22+) is believed to interact with a non-bridging oxygen of the scissile phosphate. Based on structural and mutagenesis studies of prokaryotic nucleic acid enzymes, it has been proposed that the active site divalent metal ions interact with type II topoisomerases through a series of conserved acidic amino acid residues. The homologous residues in human topoisomerase IIα are E461, D541, D543, and D545. To address the validity of these assignments and to delineate interactions between individual amino acids and M12+ and M22+, we individually mutated each of these acidic amino acid residues in topoisomerase IIα to either cysteine or alanine. Mutant enzymes displayed a marked loss of catalytic and DNA cleavage activity as well as a reduced affinity for divalent metal ions. Additional experiments determined the ability of wild-type and mutant topoisomerase IIα enzymes to cleave an oligonucleotide substrate that contained a sulfur atom in place of the 3′-bridging oxygen of the scissile phosphate in the presence of Mg2+, Mn2+, or Ca2+. Based on the results of these studies, we conclude that the four acidic amino acid residues interact with metal ions in the DNA cleavage/ligation active site of topoisomerase IIα. Furthermore, we propose that M12+ interacts with E461, D543, and D545 and M22+ interacts with E461 and D541. PMID:19697956

  18. Excess zinc ions are a competitive inhibitor for carboxypeptidase A

    SciTech Connect

    Hirose, J.; Ando, S.; Kidani, Y.

    1987-10-06

    The mechanism for inhibition of enzyme activity by excess zinc ions has been studied by kinetic and equilibrium dialysis methods at pH 8.2, I = 0.5 M. With carboxypeptidase A (bovine pancreas), peptide (carbobenzoxyglycyl-L-phenylalanine and hippuryl-L-phenylalanine) and ester (hippuryl-L-phenyl lactate) substrates were inhibited competitively by excess zinc ions. The K/sub i/ values for excess zinc ions with carboxypeptidase A at pH 8.2 are all similar. The apparent constant for dissociation of excess zinc ions from carboxypeptidase A was also obtained by equilibrium dialysis at pH 8.2 and was 2.4 x 10/sup -5/ M, very close to the K/sub i/ values above. With arsanilazotyrosine-248 carboxypeptidase A ((Azo-CPD)Zn)), hippuryl-L-phenylalanine, carbobenzoxyglycyl-L-phenylalanine, and hippuryl-L-phenyl lactate were also inhibited with a competitive pattern by excess zinc ions, and the K/sub i/ values were (3.0-3.5) x 10/sup -5/ M. The apparent constant for dissociation of excess zinc ions from arsanilazotyrosine-248 carboxypeptidase A, which was obtained from absorption changes at 510 nm, was 3.2 x 10/sup -5/ M and is similar to the K/sub i/ values for ((Azo-CPD)Zn). The apparent dissociation and inhibition constants, which were obtained by inhibition of enzyme activity and spectrophotometric and equilibrium dialysis methods with native carboxypeptidase A and arsanilazotyrosine-248 carboxypeptidase A, were almost the same. This agreement between the apparent dissociation and inhibition constants indicates that the zinc binding to the enzymes directly relates to the inhibition of enzyme activity by excess zinc ions. Excess zinc ions were competitive inhibitors for both peptide and ester substrates. This behavior is believed to arise by the excess zinc ions fixing the enzyme in a conformation to which the substrates cannot bind.

  19. An aqueous zinc-ion battery based on copper hexacyanoferrate.

    PubMed

    Trócoli, Rafael; La Mantia, Fabio

    2015-02-01

    A new zinc-ion battery based on copper hexacyanoferrate and zinc foil in a 20 mM solution of zinc sulfate, which is a nontoxic and noncorrosive electrolyte, at pH 6 is reported. The voltage of this novel battery system is as high as 1.73 V. The system shows cyclability, rate capability, and specific energy values near to those of lithium-ion organic batteries based on Li4 Ti5 O12 and LiFePO4 at 10 C. The effects of Zn(2+) intercalation and H2 evolution on the performance of the battery are discussed in detail. In particular, it has been observed that hydrogen evolution can cause a shift in pH near the surface of the zinc electrode, and favor the stabilization of zinc oxide, which decreases the performance of the battery. This mechanism is hindered when the surface of zinc becomes rougher.

  20. Abundance of zinc ions in synaptic terminals of mocha mutant mice: zinc transporter 3 immunohistochemistry and zinc sulphide autometallography.

    PubMed

    Stoltenberg, Meredin; Nejsum, Lene N; Larsen, Agnete; Danscher, Gorm

    2004-02-01

    The mocha mouse is an autosomal recessive pigment mutant on mouse chromosome 10 caused by a deletion in the gene for the delta subunit of the adaptor-like complex AP-3. Based on zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3) immunohistochemistry, zinc TSQ fluorescence and a modified Timm method, previous studies found a lack of histochemically-detectable zinc and a substantial reduction in the ZnT3 immunoreactivity. It has, therefore, been suggested that the mocha mouse could serve as a model for studies of the significance of zinc ions in zinc-enriched (ZEN) neurons. We have chosen the mocha-zinc-model in a study of the significance of ZEN neurons in hypoxia-caused damage in mouse brain. In order to establish that the model was either void of zinc ions or had a significantly decreased level of zinc ions in their ZEN terminals, we repeated the studies that had lead to the above assumption, the only methodology difference being that we used the zinc specific Neo-Timm method instead of the Timm method applied in the original study. We found that, although the ZnS autometallography (AMG) technique revealed a reduction in staining intensity as compared to the littermate controls, there were still plenty of zinc ions in the ZEN terminals, in particular visible in telencephalic structures like neocortex and hippocampus. At ultrastructural levels the zinc ions were found in a pool of vesicles of the ZEN terminals as in the control animals, but additionally zinc ions could be traced in ZEN neuronal somata in the neocortex and hippocampus. The mossy fibres in the hippocampus of mocha mice also bind with TSQ, though less than in the controls. We found ZnS AMG grains in ZEN neuronal somata, which were also immunoreactive for ZnT3. Our study confirmed the decreased ZnT3 immunoreactivity in ZEN terminals of the mocha mouse found in the original study. Based on these findings, we suggest that the mocha mouse may not be an ideal model for studies of the histochemically-detectable zinc ion pool of the

  1. Quantum chemical study on the coordination environment of the catalytic zinc ion in matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Natalia; Suarez, Dimas; Sordo, Tomás L

    2006-11-30

    X-ray analyses of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have shown that the catalytic zinc ion (Zn1) can bind to one to three water molecules in addition to three conserved histidine residues. To estimate the relative stability of the possible Zn1 coordination structures in the active site of the MMPs, we carry out computational analyses on the coordination environment of the Zn1 ion in the gelatinase A enzyme (or matrix metalloproteinase 2; MMP-2). Four-, five-, and six-coordinated complexes representative of the Zn1 site are fully characterized by means of quantum mechanical (QM) methodologies. On one hand, B3LYP/LACVP* minimizations of various cluster models of the MMP-2 active site show that the trigonal bipyramidal geometry is energetically favored in the gas phase and that continuum solvent effects stabilize preferentially the tetrahedral complexes. On the other hand, B3LYP/OPLS-AA hybrid QM/molecular mechanical calculations in the solvated catalytic domain of the MMP-2 enzyme complemented with electrostatic Poisson-Boltzmann calculations show that the mature enzyme presents most likely a Zn1 ion coordinated by three histidine residues and two water molecules, while the active site glutamic acid is negatively charged. In consonance with X-ray diffraction data, other possible Zn1 configurations, a six-coordinated structure with Zn1-water as well as four- and five-coordinated complexes with a Zn1-bound hydroxide, are predicted to be very close in energy.

  2. Ion beam sputter deposited zinc telluride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Zinc telluride is of interest as a potential electronic device material, particularly as one component in an amorphous superlattice, which is a new class of interesting and potentially useful materials. Some structural and electronic properties of ZnTe films deposited by argon ion beam sputter depoairion are described. Films (up to 3000 angstroms thick) were deposited from a ZnTe target. A beam energy of 1000 eV and a current density of 4 mA/sq. cm. resulted in deposition rates of approximately 70 angstroms/min. The optical band gap was found to be approximately 1.1 eV, indicating an amorphous structure, as compared to a literature value of 2.26 eV for crystalline material. Intrinsic stress measurements showed a thickness dependence, varying from tensile for thicknesses below 850 angstroms to compressive for larger thicknesses. Room temperature conductivity measurement also showed a thickness dependence, with values ranging from 1.86 x to to the -6/ohm. cm. for 300 angstrom film to 2.56 x 10 to the -1/ohm. cm. for a 2600 angstrom film. Measurement of the temperature dependence of the conductivity for these films showed complicated behavior which was thickness dependent. Thinner films showed at least two distinct temperature dependent conductivity mechanisms, as described by a Mott-type model. Thicker films showed only one principal conductivity mechanism, similar to what might be expected for a material with more crystalline character.

  3. Ion beam sputter deposited zinc telluride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Zinc telluride is of interest as a potential electronic device material, particularly as one component in an amorphous superlattice, which is a new class of interesting and potentially useful materials. Some structural and electronic properties of ZnTe films deposited by argon ion beam sputter deposition are described. Films (up to 3000 angstroms thick) were deposited from a ZnTe target. A beam energy of 1000 eV and a current density of 4 mA/sq cm resulted in deposition rates of approximately 70 angstroms/min. The optical band gap was found to be approximately 1.1 eV, indicating an amorphous structure, as compared to a literature value of 2.26 eV for crystalline material. Intrinsic stress measurements showed a thickness dependence, varying from tensile for thicknesses below 850 angstroms to compressive for larger thicknesses. Room temperature conductivity measurement also showed a thickness dependence, with values ranging from 1.86 x 10 to the -6th/ohm cm for 300 angstrom film to 2.56 x 10 to the -1/ohm cm for a 2600 angstrom film. Measurement of the temperature dependence of the conductivity for these films showed complicated behavior which was thickness dependent. Thinner films showed at least two distinct temperature dependent conductivity mechanisms, as described by a Mott-type model. Thicker films showed only one principal conductivity mechanism, similar to what might be expected for a material with more crystalline character.

  4. Evidence for a hydroxide ion bridging two magnesium ions at the active site of the hammerhead ribozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, T; Auffinger, P; Scott, W G; Westhof, E

    1997-01-01

    In the presence of magnesium ions, cleavage by the hammerhead ribozyme RNA at a specific residue leads to 2'3'-cyclic phosphate and 5'-OH extremities. In the cleavage reaction an activated ribose 2'-hydroxyl group attacks its attached 3'-phosphate. Molecular dynamics simulations of the crystal structure of the hammerhead ribozyme, obtained after flash-freezing of crystals under conditions where the ribozyme is active, provide evidence that a mu-bridging OH-ion is located between two Mg2+ions close to the cleavable phosphate. Constrained simulations show further that a flip from the C3'- endo to the C2'- endo conformation of the ribose at the cleavable phosphate brings the 2'-hydroxyl in proximity to both the attacked phosphorous atom and the mu-bridging OH-ion. Thus, the simulations lead to a detailed new insight into the mechanism of hammerhead ribozyme cleavage where a mu-hydroxo bridged magnesium cluster, located on the deep groove side, provides an OH-ion that is able to activate the 2'-hydroxyl nucleophile after a minor and localized conformational change in the RNA. PMID:9254698

  5. Zinc finger peptide based optic sensor for detection of zinc ions.

    PubMed

    Verma, Neelam; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2016-12-15

    In the present work, polyacrylamide gel has been used as a matrix for the immobilization of zinc finger peptide and fluorescent dye acrydine orange on the micro well plate to fabricate the fluorescence based biosensor for the detection of zinc ions in milk samples. The fluorescent dye moves in the hydrophobic groove formed after folding of the peptide in the presence of zinc ions. Under optimized conditions, linear range was observed between 0.001µg/l to 10µg/l of Zinc ions, with a lowest detection limit of 0.001µg/l and response time of 5min. Presented biosensor has shown 20% decrease in fluorescent intensity values after 5 regenerations and stable for more than one month, stored at 4°C. Interference study with other metal ions like lead, cadmium and copper showed a negligible change in fluorescence intensity in comparison to zinc ions. Developed bio sensing system was found to be novel, quick, reliable, miniaturized, stable, reproducible and repeatable and specific for zinc ion, which has been applied to various milk samples.

  6. Zinc ion availability--the determinant of efficacy in zinc lozenge treatment of common colds.

    PubMed

    Eby, G A

    1997-10-01

    This is a re-analysis of reports from 1984 to 1992 of double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trials of zinc lozenges in the treatment of common colds. This re-analysis was performed to test the hypothesis that major variations in daily zinc ion availability (ZIA) between chemically different lozenge formulations caused differing results in these clinical trials. Solution chemistry computations determined the bioavailability of Zn2+ ions at physiological pH from the lozenges used in these clinical trails. ZIA was derived from Fick's laws of diffusion in a bio-electric field. Lozenges that released Zn2+ ions at physiological pH (positive ZIAs) shortened colds. Lozenges that released negatively charged zinc species at physiological pH (negative ZIAs) lengthened colds. Lozenges having a zero ZIA had no effect on common colds. Lozenges with ZIA = 100 shortened colds by 7 days while ZIA = -55 lozenges lengthened colds by 4.4 days. A linear dose-response relationship exists between ZIAs of zinc lozenges and changes in duration of common colds. It is concluded that: prospective efficacy of zinc lozenges can be predicted based upon readily determined ZIA factors and ZIAs; chemically different zinc lozenge formulations having greatly different ZIAs resulted in greatly differing results in clinical trials; mast cell granule-derived Zn2+ ions are the foundation of the primary immune system; and high ZIA zinc acetate lozenges are beneficial for common colds.

  7. Structure of the endonuclease IV homologue from Thermotoga maritima in the presence of active-site divalent metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Hughes, Ronny C.; Ng, Joseph D.; Coates, Leighton

    2010-10-05

    The most frequent lesion in DNA is at apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites resulting from DNA-base losses. These AP-site lesions can stall DNA replication and lead to genome instability if left unrepaired. The AP endonucleases are an important class of enzymes that are involved in the repair of AP-site intermediates during damage-general DNA base-excision repair pathways. These enzymes hydrolytically cleave the 5{prime}-phosphodiester bond at an AP site to generate a free 3{prime}-hydroxyl group and a 5{prime}-terminal sugar phosphate using their AP nuclease activity. Specifically, Thermotoga maritima endonuclease IV is a member of the second conserved AP endonuclease family that includes Escherichia coli endonuclease IV, which is the archetype of the AP endonuclease superfamily. In order to more fully characterize the AP endonuclease family of enzymes, two X-ray crystal structures of the T. maritima endonuclease IV homologue were determined in the presence of divalent metal ions bound in the active-site region. These structures of the T. maritima endonuclease IV homologue further revealed the use of the TIM-barrel fold and the trinuclear metal binding site as important highly conserved structural elements that are involved in DNA-binding and AP-site repair processes in the AP endonuclease superfamily.

  8. Zinc as Allosteric Ion Channel Modulator: Ionotropic Receptors as Metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Francisco Andrés; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2016-07-02

    Zinc is an essential metal to life. This transition metal is a structural component of many proteins and is actively involved in the catalytic activity of cell enzymes. In either case, these zinc-containing proteins are metalloproteins. However, the amino acid residues that serve as ligands for metal coordination are not necessarily the same in structural proteins compared to enzymes. While crystals of structural proteins that bind zinc reveal a higher preference for cysteine sulfhydryls rather than histidine imidazole rings, catalytic enzymes reveal the opposite, i.e., a greater preference for the histidines over cysteines for catalysis, plus the influence of carboxylic acids. Based on this paradigm, we reviewed the putative ligands of zinc in ionotropic receptors, where zinc has been described as an allosteric modulator of channel receptors. Although these receptors do not strictly qualify as metalloproteins since they do not normally bind zinc in structural domains, they do transitorily bind zinc at allosteric sites, modifying transiently the receptor channel's ion permeability. The present contribution summarizes current information showing that zinc allosteric modulation of receptor channels occurs by the preferential metal coordination to imidazole rings as well as to the sulfhydryl groups of cysteine in addition to the carboxyl group of acid residues, as with enzymes and catalysis. It is remarkable that most channels, either voltage-sensitive or transmitter-gated receptor channels, are susceptible to zinc modulation either as positive or negative regulators.

  9. Zinc as Allosteric Ion Channel Modulator: Ionotropic Receptors as Metalloproteins

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Francisco Andrés; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is an essential metal to life. This transition metal is a structural component of many proteins and is actively involved in the catalytic activity of cell enzymes. In either case, these zinc-containing proteins are metalloproteins. However, the amino acid residues that serve as ligands for metal coordination are not necessarily the same in structural proteins compared to enzymes. While crystals of structural proteins that bind zinc reveal a higher preference for cysteine sulfhydryls rather than histidine imidazole rings, catalytic enzymes reveal the opposite, i.e., a greater preference for the histidines over cysteines for catalysis, plus the influence of carboxylic acids. Based on this paradigm, we reviewed the putative ligands of zinc in ionotropic receptors, where zinc has been described as an allosteric modulator of channel receptors. Although these receptors do not strictly qualify as metalloproteins since they do not normally bind zinc in structural domains, they do transitorily bind zinc at allosteric sites, modifying transiently the receptor channel’s ion permeability. The present contribution summarizes current information showing that zinc allosteric modulation of receptor channels occurs by the preferential metal coordination to imidazole rings as well as to the sulfhydryl groups of cysteine in addition to the carboxyl group of acid residues, as with enzymes and catalysis. It is remarkable that most channels, either voltage-sensitive or transmitter-gated receptor channels, are susceptible to zinc modulation either as positive or negative regulators. PMID:27384555

  10. NMR Localization of Divalent Cations at the Active Site of the Neurospora VS Ribozyme Provides Insights into RNA–Metal-Ion Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Metal cations represent key elements of RNA structure and function. In the Neurospora VS ribozyme, metal cations play diverse roles; they are important for substrate recognition, formation of the active site, and shifting the pKa’s of two key nucleobases that contribute to the general acid–base mechanism. Recently, we determined the NMR structure of the A730 loop of the VS ribozyme active site (SLVI) that contributes the general acid (A756) in the enzymatic mechanism of the cleavage reaction. Our studies showed that magnesium (Mg2+) ions are essential to stabilize the formation of the S-turn motif within the A730 loop that exposes the A756 nucleobase for catalysis. In this article, we extend these NMR investigations by precisely mapping the Mg2+-ion binding sites using manganese-induced paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and cadmium-induced chemical-shift perturbation of phosphorothioate RNAs. These experiments identify five Mg2+-ion binding sites within SLVI. Four Mg2+ ions in SLVI are associated with known RNA structural motifs, including the G–U wobble pair and the GNRA tetraloop, and our studies reveal novel insights about Mg2+ ion binding to these RNA motifs. Interestingly, one Mg2+ ion is specifically associated with the S-turn motif, confirming its structural role in the folding of the A730 loop. This Mg2+ ion is likely important for formation of the active site and may play an indirect role in catalysis. PMID:24364590

  11. Autometallographic demonstration of zinc ions in rat sperm cells.

    PubMed

    Stoltenberg, M; Sørensen, M B; Danscher, G; Juhl, S; Andreasen, A; Ernst, E

    1997-09-01

    An in-vitro technique for autometallographic (AMG) demonstration of chelatable zinc in electroejaculated sperm cells and spermatozoa from the epididymis is presented and the localization of zinc ions in rat spermatozoa is described. Sperm cells from caput epididymis showed zinc staining in all parts of the tail and a sparse, dispersed staining in the acrosome. Spermatozoa from cauda epididymis showed heavy staining in the acrosome but no staining in the tail, or post-acrosomal part of the sperm head. This distinct acrosomal AMG staining was also found in ejaculated spermatozoa, but additionally a segmentation of the tail was seen based on differences in staining intensity. The membrane penetrating chelator diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC) was found to block the AMG staining whereas calcium-EDTA, known not to pass through cell membranes, did not influence the staining, proving that the detected zinc ions are intracellularly located. Two different approaches for demonstrating the presence of a chelatable zinc pool at electron microscope levels are presented, and the ultrastructural presence of AMG grains located in the acrosome and in the mitochondria of the midpiece is demonstrated. It is postulated that an exchange of zinc ions takes place between the epididymal epithelium and the sperm cells as they pass along the epididymal duct.

  12. Zinc ions modulate protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B activity.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Elisa; Massarotti, Alberto; Hogstrand, Christer; Maret, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are key enzymes in cellular regulation. The 107 human PTPs are regulated by redox signalling, phosphorylation, dimerisation, and proteolysis. Recent findings of very strong inhibition of some PTPs by zinc ions at concentrations relevant in a cellular environment suggest yet another mechanism of regulation. One of the most extensively investigated PTPs is PTP1B (PTPN1). It regulates the insulin and leptin signalling pathway and is implicated in cancer and obesity/diabetes. The development of novel assay conditions to investigate zinc inhibition of PTP1B provides estimates of about 5.6 nM affinity for inhibitory zinc(II) ions. Analysis of three PTP1B 3D structures (PDB id: 2CM2, 3I80 and 1A5Y) identified putative zinc binding sites and supports the kinetic studies in suggesting an inhibitory zinc only in the closed and cysteinyl-phosphate intermediate forms of the enzyme. These observations gain significance with regard to recent findings of regulatory roles of zinc ions released from the endoplasmic reticulum.

  13. Polyacrylate microspheres for tunable fluorimetric zinc ions sensor.

    PubMed

    Woźnica, Emilia; Maksymiuk, Krzysztof; Michalska, Agata

    2014-01-07

    A novel concept of optical fluorimetric sensing using polymeric microspheres is explored on example of zinc ions sensors. The novel approach proposed uses the advantage of concomitant presence in a microsphere of two compounds: a receptor, fluorescently silent complexing ligand and an optical transducer, fluorescent compound. Binding of the analyte by the ligand affects its absorption spectrum, leading to decrease of the free ligand absorption and increase of complex absorption band. The decrease of free ligand absorption exposes emission of the transducer, yielding increase in fluorescence intensity on analyte concentration increase. This approach was verified experimentally using Zn(2+) as a model analyte, the fluorimetric sensor obtained uses 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) as analyte sensitive receptor and pyrene as optical transducer. In the absence of zinc ions in the sample emission of pyrene embedded in the spheres was significantly quenched, whereas increase of Zn(2+) ions concentration in the sample resulted in dependence of fluorescence intensity on logarithm of zinc ions concentration in extraordinary wide range, from 10(-7) to 0.1 M. The response mechanism was explained by surface accumulation of zinc ion-PAN complex on the microsphere/sample solution interface. It was also shown that introduction of cation-exchanging sites to the microspheres significantly alters the responses pattern leading to high sensitivity over relatively limited concentration range (3-4 orders of magnitude). In the latter case the observed responses can be tuned to occur in chosen concentration range, simply by adjusting sample pH.

  14. Histochemical tracing of zinc ions in the rat testis.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, M B; Stoltenberg, M; Henriksén, K; Ernst, E; Danscher, G; Parvinen, M

    1998-05-01

    To detect free zinc ions in the rat testes four rats were transcardially perfused with Na2S, and the seminiferous tubules from two other rats were incubated in Na2S. Sections from the two sources were autometallographically (AMG) developed, whereby zinc sulphide crystal lattices created in the tissue by the sulphide treatment were silver enhanced. Light microscopical analysis showed zinc ions in primary spermatogonia until the zygotene primary spermatocytes (stage I), in late pachytene spermatocytes (stages XII and XIII), and in late spermatids from step 15 to step 19 (stages I-VIII). The highest intensity of AMG grains was detected in the residual bodies and tails of step 19 spermatids. Grains were occasionally found in the cytoplasm of Leydig cells. Sections from animals treated with the chelator diethyldithiocarbamate prior to sulphide treatment showed a complete lack of AMG staining. At ultrastructural levels the AMG grains were found in smooth-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum of all spermatogonial stages, and in the acrosome, midpiece, and tail of late spermatids. The presence of zinc ions in preleptotene spermatocytes and cytoplasmic lobes of late spermatids suggests a specific role of free zinc at the onset of meiosis and at spermiation.

  15. Motion of the Zinc Ions in Catalysis by a di-Zinc Metallo-beta-Lactamase

    SciTech Connect

    R Breece; Z Hu; M Crowder; D Tierney

    2011-12-31

    We report rapid-freeze-quench X-ray absorption spectroscopy of a dizinc metallo-beta-lactamase (MbetaL) reaction intermediate. The Zn(II) ions in the dinuclear active site of the S. maltophilia Class B3 MbetaL move away from each other, by approximately 0.3 A after 10 ms of reaction with nitrocefin, from 3.4 to 3.7 A. Together with our previous characterization of the resting enzyme and its nitrocefin product complex, where the Zn(II) ion separation relaxes to 3.6 A, these data indicate a scissoring motion of the active site that accompanies the ring-opening step. The average Zn(II) coordination number of 4.5 in the resting enzyme appears to be maintained throughout the reaction with nitrocefin. This is the first direct structural information available on early stage dizinc metallo-beta-lactamase catalysis.

  16. Kinetics and crystal structure of a mutant Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (Asp-369-->Asn): a mechanism involving one zinc per active site.

    PubMed

    Tibbitts, T T; Xu, X; Kantrowitz, E R

    1994-11-01

    Using site-directed mutagenesis, an aspartate side chain involved in binding metal ions in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (Asp-369) was replaced, alternately, by asparagine (D369N) and by alanine (D369A). The purified mutant enzymes showed reduced turnover rates (kcat) and increased Michaelis constants (Km). The kcat for the D369A enzyme was 5,000-fold lower than the value for the wild-type enzyme. The D369N enzyme required Zn2+ in millimolar concentrations to become fully active; even under these conditions the kcat measured for hydrolysis of p-nitrophenol phosphate was 2 orders of magnitude lower than for the wild-type enzyme. Thus the kcat/Km ratios showed that catalysis is 50 times less efficient when the carboxylate side chain of Asp-369 is replaced by the corresponding amide; and activity is reduced to near nonenzymic levels when the carboxylate is replaced by a methyl group. The crystal structure of D369N, solved to 2.5 A resolution with an R-factor of 0.189, showed vacancies at 2 of the 3 metal binding sites. On the basis of the kinetic results and the refined X-ray coordinates, a reaction mechanism is proposed for phosphate ester hydrolysis by the D369N enzyme involving only 1 metal with the possible assistance of a histidine side chain.

  17. Biomimetic ion nanochannels as a highly selective sequential sensor for zinc ions followed by phosphate anions.

    PubMed

    Han, Cuiping; Su, Haiyan; Sun, Zhongyue; Wen, Long; Tian, Demei; Xu, Kai; Hu, Junfeng; Wang, Aming; Li, Haibing; Jiang, Lei

    2013-07-08

    A novel biomimetic ion-responsive multi-nanochannel system is constructed by covalently immobilizing a metal-chelating ligand, 2,2'-dipicolylamine (DPA), in polyporous nanochannels prepared in a polymeric membrane. The DPA-modified multi-nanochannels show specific recognition of zinc ions over other common metal ions, and the zinc-ion-chelated nanochannels can be used as secondary sensors for HPO4(2-) anions. The immobilized DPA molecules act as specific-receptor binding sites for zinc ions, which leads to the highly selective zinc-ion response through monitoring of ionic current signatures. The chelated zinc ions can be used as secondary recognition elements for the capture of HPO4(2-) anions, thereby fabricating a sensing nanodevice for HPO4(2-) anions. The success of the DPA immobilization and ion-responsive events is confirmed by measurement of the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle (CA), and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the systems. The proposed nanochannel sensing devices display remarkable specificity, high sensitivity, and wide dynamic range. In addition, control experiments performed in complex matrices suggest that this sensing system has great potential applications in chemical sensing, biotechnology, and many other fields.

  18. Relative Penetration of Zinc Oxide and Zinc Ions into Human Skin after Application of Different Zinc Oxide Formulations.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Amy M; Song, Zhen; Moghimi, Hamid R; Roberts, Michael S

    2016-02-23

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is frequently used in commercial sunscreen formulations to deliver their broad range of UV protection properties. Concern has been raised about the extent to which these ZnO particles (both micronized and nanoparticulate) penetrate the skin and their resultant toxicity. This work has explored the human epidermal skin penetration of zinc oxide and its labile zinc ion dissolution product that may potentially be formed after application of ZnO nanoparticles to human epidermis. Three ZnO nanoparticle formulations were used: a suspension in the oil, capric caprylic triglycerides (CCT), the base formulation commonly used in commercially available sunscreen products; an aqueous ZnO suspension at pH 6, similar to the natural skin surface pH; and an aqueous ZnO suspension at pH 9, a pH at which ZnO is stable and there is minimal pH-induced impairment of epidermal integrity. In each case, the ZnO in the formulations did not penetrate into the intact viable epidermis for any of the formulations but was associated with an enhanced increase in zinc ion fluorescence signal in both the stratum corneum and the viable epidermis. The highest labile zinc fluorescence was found for the ZnO suspension at pH 6. It is concluded that, while topically applied ZnO does not penetrate into the viable epidermis, these applications are associated with hydrolysis of ZnO on the skin surface, leading to an increase in zinc ion levels in the stratum corneum, thence in the viable epidermis and subsequently in the systemic circulation and the urine.

  19. Inhibition of beta-amylase activity by calcium, magnesium and zinc ions determined by spectrophotometry and isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Dahot, M Umar; Saboury, A A; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A

    2004-04-01

    The inhibition effect of metal ions on beta amylase activity was studied. The inhibitor-binding constant (Ki) was determined by spectrophotometric and isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) methods. The binding of calcium, magnesium and zinc ion as inhibitors at the active site of barley beta amylase was studied at pH = 4.8 (sodium acetate 16 mM) and T = 300K. The Ki and enthalpy of binding for calcium (13.4, 13.1 mM and -14.3 kJ/mol), magnesium (18.6, 17.8mM and -17.7 kJ/mol) and zinc (17.5, 17.7 mM and -20.0 kJ/mol) were found by spectrophotometric and ITC methods respectively.

  20. The study of zinc ions binding to casein.

    PubMed

    Pomastowski, P; Sprynskyy, M; Buszewski, B

    2014-08-01

    The presented research was focused on physicochemical study of casein properties and the kinetics of zinc ions binding to the protein. Moreover, a fast and simple method of casein extraction from cow's milk has been proposed. Casein isoforms, zeta potential (ζ) and particle size of the separated caseins were characterized with the use of capillary electrophoresis, zeta potential analysis and field flow fractionation (FFF) technique, respectively. The kinetics of the metal-binding process was investigated in batch adsorption experiments. Intraparticle diffusion model, first-order and zero-order kinetic models were applied to test the kinetic experimental data. Analysis of changes in infrared bands registered for casein before and after zinc binding was also performed. The obtained results showed that the kinetic process of zinc binding to casein is not homogeneous but is expressed with an initial rapid stage with about 70% of zinc ions immobilized by casein and with a much slower second step. Maximum amount of bound zinc in the experimental conditions was 30.04mgZn/g casein.

  1. Improve the flame retardancy of cellulose fibers by grafting zinc ion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, KeKe; Zong, Lu; Tan, Yeqiang; Ji, Quan; Yun, Weicai; Shi, Ran; Xia, Yanzhi

    2016-01-20

    Zinc ion as the only flame retardant of cellulose fibers was successfully grafted onto cellulose fibers. Grafting maleic anhydride onto cellulose fibers via homogeneous acylation reaction between N,N-dimethyl formamide (DMF) as the first step. Then, graft zinc ion onto the formed cellulose fibers was conducted with zinc carbonate. The resulting copolymers were characterized by FTIR. Flame retardancy and thermal degradation of zinc-ion-modified cellulose fibers (cellulose-Zn fibers) was investigated by limiting oxygen index (LOI), cone calorimeter (CONE), XRD, TG and SEM. Zinc ion could effectively improve flame retardancy and thermal degradation when its content increases up to 4.96 wt%.

  2. Analysis of cellular responses of macrophages to zinc ions and zinc oxide nanoparticles: a combined targeted and proteomic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Gerdil, Adèle; Diemer, Hélène; Proamer, Fabienne; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Habert, Aurélie; Strub, Jean-Marc; Hanau, Daniel; Herlin, Nathalie; Carrière, Marie; van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    Two different zinc oxide nanoparticles, as well as zinc ions, are used to study the cellular responses of the RAW 264 macrophage cell line. A proteomic screen is used to provide a wide view of the molecular effects of zinc, and the most prominent results are cross-validated by targeted studies. Furthermore, the alteration of important macrophage functions (e.g. phagocytosis) by zinc is also investigated. The intracellular dissolution/uptake of zinc is also studied to further characterize zinc toxicity. Zinc oxide nanoparticles dissolve readily in the cells, leading to high intracellular zinc concentrations, mostly as protein-bound zinc. The proteomic screen reveals a rather weak response in the oxidative stress response pathway, but a strong response both in the central metabolism and in the proteasomal protein degradation pathway. Targeted experiments confirm that carbohydrate catabolism and proteasome are critical determinants of sensitivity to zinc, which also induces DNA damage. Conversely, glutathione levels and phagocytosis appear unaffected at moderately toxic zinc concentrations.Two different zinc oxide nanoparticles, as well as zinc ions, are used to study the cellular responses of the RAW 264 macrophage cell line. A proteomic screen is used to provide a wide view of the molecular effects of zinc, and the most prominent results are cross-validated by targeted studies. Furthermore, the alteration of important macrophage functions (e.g. phagocytosis) by zinc is also investigated. The intracellular dissolution/uptake of zinc is also studied to further characterize zinc toxicity. Zinc oxide nanoparticles dissolve readily in the cells, leading to high intracellular zinc concentrations, mostly as protein-bound zinc. The proteomic screen reveals a rather weak response in the oxidative stress response pathway, but a strong response both in the central metabolism and in the proteasomal protein degradation pathway. Targeted experiments confirm that carbohydrate

  3. Potentiometric Zinc Ion Sensor Based on Honeycomb-Like NiO Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Mazhar Ali; Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain; Hussain, Mushtaque; Khan, Yaqoob; Khan, Azam; Nur, Omer; Willander, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    In this study honeycomb-like NiO nanostructures were grown on nickel foam by a simple hydrothermal growth method. The NiO nanostructures were characterized by field emission electron microscopy (FESEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The characterized NiO nanostructures were uniform, dense and polycrystalline in the crystal phase. In addition to this, the NiO nanostructures were used in the development of a zinc ion sensor electrode by functionalization with the highly selective zinc ion ionophore 12-crown-4. The developed zinc ion sensor electrode has shown a good linear potentiometric response for a wide range of zinc ion concentrations, ranging from 0.001 mM to 100 mM, with sensitivity of 36 mV/decade. The detection limit of the present zinc ion sensor was found to be 0.0005 mM and it also displays a fast response time of less than 10 s. The proposed zinc ion sensor electrode has also shown good reproducibility, repeatability, storage stability and selectivity. The zinc ion sensor based on the functionalized NiO nanostructures was also used as indicator electrode in potentiometric titrations and it has demonstrated an acceptable stoichiometric relationship for the determination of zinc ion in unknown samples. The NiO nanostructures-based zinc ion sensor has potential for analysing zinc ion in various industrial, clinical and other real samples. PMID:23202217

  4. Influence of lead ions on the macromorphology of electrodeposited zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuda, T.; Tobias, C.W.

    1981-09-01

    The morphology of zinc as it is electrodeposited from acid solutions demonstrates a remarkable imprint of electrolyte flow conditions. The development of macromorphology of zinc deposits has been investigated under galvanostatic conditions on a rotating plantinum disk electrode by use of photomacrography, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis and Auger microprobe analysis. Logarithmic spiral markings, which reflect the hydrodynamic flow on a rotating disk, appear in a certain region of current density well below the limiting current density. Morphological observations revealed the major influence of trace lead ions on the amplifications of surface roughness through coalescence and preferred growth of initial protrusions. Results obtained from ultra-pure electrolyte suggest preferred crystal growth towards well-mixed orientation in the concentration field caused by slight differences in crystallization overpotential. A qualitative model involving a coupling mechanism between the evolving surface roughness and instability phenomena in the boundary layer is advanced to explain the formation of spiral patterns.

  5. Transient fluctuations of intracellular zinc ions in cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Maret, Wolfgang

    2009-08-15

    Zinc is essential for cell proliferation, differentiation, and viability. When zinc becomes limited for cultured cells, DNA synthesis ceases and the cell cycle is arrested. The molecular mechanisms of actions of zinc are believed to involve changes in the availability of zinc(II) ions (Zn{sup 2+}). By employing a fluorescent Zn{sup 2+} probe, FluoZin-3 acetoxymethyl ester, intracellular Zn{sup 2+} concentrations were measured in undifferentiated and in nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Intracellular Zn{sup 2+} concentrations are pico- to nanomolar in PC12 cells and are higher in the differentiated than in the undifferentiated cells. When following cellular Zn{sup 2+} concentrations for 48 h after the removal of serum, a condition that is known to cause cell cycle arrest, Zn{sup 2+} concentrations decrease after 30 min but, remarkably, increase after 1 h, and then decrease again to about one half of the initial concentration. Cell proliferation, measured by an MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay, decreases after both serum starvation and zinc chelation. Two peaks of Zn{sup 2+} concentrations occur within one cell cycle: one early in the G1 phase and the other in the late G1/S phase. Thus, fluctuations of intracellular Zn{sup 2+} concentrations and established modulation of phosphorylation signaling, via an inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases at commensurately low Zn{sup 2+} concentrations, suggest a role for Zn{sup 2+} in the control of the cell cycle. Interventions targeted at these picomolar Zn{sup 2+} fluctuations may be a way of controlling cell growth in hyperplasia, neoplasia, and diseases associated with aberrant differentiation.

  6. The M17 leucine aminopeptidase of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum: importance of active site metal ions in the binding of substrates and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Maric, Selma; Donnelly, Sheila M; Robinson, Mark W; Skinner-Adams, Tina; Trenholme, Katharine R; Gardiner, Donald L; Dalton, John P; Stack, Colin M; Lowther, Jonathan

    2009-06-16

    The M17 leucine aminopeptidase of the intraerythrocytic stages of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (PfLAP) plays a role in releasing amino acids from host hemoglobin that are used for parasite protein synthesis, growth, and development. This enzyme represents a target at which new antimalarials could be designed since metalloaminopeptidase inhibitors prevent the growth of the parasites in vitro and in vivo. A study on the metal ion binding characteristics of recombinant P. falciparum M17 leucine aminopeptidase (rPfLAP) shows that the active site of this exopeptidase contains two metal-binding sites, a readily exchangeable site (site 1) and a tight binding site (site 2). The enzyme retains activity when the metal ion is removed from site 1, while removal of metal ions from both sites results in an inactive apoenzyme that cannot be reactivated by the addition of divalent metal cations. The metal ion at site 1 is readily exchangeable with several divalent metal ions and displays a preference in the order of preference Zn(2+) > Mn(2+) > Co(2+) > Mg(2+). While it is likely that native PfLAP contains a Zn(2+) in site 2, the metal ion located in site 1 may be dependent on the type and concentration of metal ions in the cytosolic compartment of the parasite. Importantly, the type of metal ion present at site 1 influences not only the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme for peptide substrates but also the mode of binding by bestatin, a metal-chelating inhibitor of M17 aminopeptidases with antimalarial activity.

  7. Morphology-Dependent Electrochemical Performance of Zinc Hexacyanoferrate Cathode for Zinc-Ion Battery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Leyuan; Chen, Liang; Zhou, Xufeng; Liu, Zhaoping

    2015-01-01

    Zinc hexacyanoferrate (ZnHCF) which is a dimorphic (cubic or rhombohedral) Prussian blue analogue and can be intercalated by both monovalent and divalent ions,is a promising cathode material for rechargeable aqueous metal-ion batteries.In this paper, a simple co-precipitation method is developed to tune the particle morphology of ZnHCF by adjusting the dropping speed at room temperature. Three polyhedral ZnHCF particles, with cubooctahedral, truncated octahedral or octahedral shapes, are obtained at room temperature. Structural transformation from cubic phase of as-prepared ZnHCF to rhombohedral phase is observed by further dehydration of the sample at 70 °C, whereas the dehydrated ZnHCF crystals still hold the identical polyhedral shape as that of the cubic phase particles. Then the influence of shape and facets on electrochemical performance is studied for polyhedral ZnHCF with rhombohedral structure (RZnHCF). RZnHCF sample with cubooctahedral shape possesses the best rate capability and cyclic stability comparing with RZnHCF particles having truncated octahedral or octahedral shapes. Furthermore, the structure of cuboctahedron RZnHCF particles during electrochemical cycling has been monitored with ex situ X-ray diffraction to demonstrate the reversible zinc-ion intercalation mechanism. PMID:26669272

  8. Relation of morphology of electrodeposited zinc to ion concentration profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Kautz, H. E.; Sabo, B. B.

    1977-01-01

    The morphology of electrodeposited zinc was studied with special attention to the ion concentration profile. The initial concentrations were 9M hydroxide ion and 1.21M zincate. Current densities were 6.4 to 64 mA/sq cm. Experiments were run with a horizontal cathode which was observed in situ using a microscope. The morphology of the zinc deposit was found to be a function of time as well as current density; roughly, the log of the transition time from mossy to large crystalline type deposit is inversely proportional to current density. Probe electrodes indicated that the electrolyte in the cathode chamber was mixed by self inducted convection. However, relatively large concentration gradients of the involved species existed across the boundary layer of the cathode. Analysis of the data suggests that the morphology converts from mossy to large crystalline when the hydroxide activity on the cathode surface exceeds about 12 M. Other experiments show that the pulse discharge technique had no effect on the morphology in the system where the bulk concentration of the electrolyte was kept homogeneous via self induced convection.

  9. Ion imprinted polymeric nanoparticles for selective separation and sensitive determination of zinc ions in different matrices.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Rajabi, Hamid Reza; Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Roushani, Mahmoud

    2014-01-03

    Preparation of Zn(2+) ion-imprinted polymer (Zn-IIP) nanoparticles is presented in this report. The Zn-IIP nanoparticles are prepared by dissolving stoichiometric amounts of zinc nitrate and selected chelating ligand, 3,5,7,20,40-pentahydroxyflavone, in 15 mL ethanol-acetonitrile (2:1; v/v) mixture as a porogen solvent in the presence of ethylene glycol-dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as cross-linking, methacrylic acid (MAA) as functional monomer, and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator. After polymerization, Cavities in the polymer particles corresponding to the Zn(2+) ions were created by leaching the polymer in HCl aqueous solution. The synthesized IIPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and thermal analysis techniques. Also, the pH range for rebinding of Zn(2+) ion on the IIP and equilibrium binding time were optimized, using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. In selectivity study, it was found that imprinting results increased affinity of the material toward Zn(2+) ion over other competitor metal ions with the same charge and close ionic radius. The prepared IIPs were repeatedly used and regenerated for six times without any significant decrease in polymer binding affinities. Finally, the prepared sorbent was successfully applied to the selective recognition and determination of zinc ion in different real samples.

  10. Quinolinol and Peptide Inhibitors of Zinc Protease in Botulinum Neurotoxin A: Effects of Zinc Ion and Peptides on Inhibition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    binding to a hydrophobic site in BoNT/A LC and in the peptide-BoNT/A LC complex. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Clostridium botulinum , neurotoxin, serotype A... botulinum neurotoxin A: Effects of zinc ion and peptides on inhibitionq Huiguo Lai a, Minghao Feng a, Virginia Roxas-Duncan b, Sivanesan Dakshanamurthy c...September 2009 Keywords: Zinc protease Inhibitor Quinolinol Peptide Botulinum Neurotoxin Slow binding Tight binding Molecular modeling Fluorescence

  11. Selective electrodiffusion of zinc ions in a Zrt-, Irt-like protein, ZIPB

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.; Fu, D.; Chai, J.; Love, J.

    2010-12-10

    All living cells need zinc ions to support cell growth. Zrt-, Irt-like proteins (ZIPs) represent a major route for entry of zinc ions into cells, but how ZIPs promote zinc uptake has been unclear. Here we report the molecular characterization of ZIPB from Bordetella bronchiseptica, the first ZIP homolog to be purified and functionally reconstituted into proteoliposomes. Zinc flux through ZIPB was found to be nonsaturable and electrogenic, yielding membrane potentials as predicted by the Nernst equation. Conversely, membrane potentials drove zinc fluxes with a linear voltage-flux relationship. Direct measurements of metal uptake by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy demonstrated that ZIPB is selective for two group 12 transition metal ions, Zn{sup 2+} and Cd{sup 2+}, whereas rejecting transition metal ions in groups 7 through 11. Our results provide the molecular basis for cellular zinc acquisition by a zinc-selective channel that exploits in vivo zinc concentration gradients to move zinc ions into the cytoplasm.

  12. Preferential uptake of ammonium ions by zinc ferrocyanide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braterman, P. S.; Arrhenius, G.; Hui, S.; Paplawsky, W.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The concentration of ammonia from dilute aqueous solution could have facilitated many prebiotic reactions. This may be especially true if this concentration involves incorporation into an organized medium. We have shown that (unlike iron(III) ferrocyanide) zinc ferrocyanide,Zn2Fe(CN)6 xH2O, preferentially takes up ammonium ions from 0.01 M NH4Cl to give the known material Zn3(NH4)2[Fe(CN)6]2 xH2O, even in the presence of 0.01 M KCl. KCl alone gave Zn3K2[Fe(CN)6]2 xH2O. Products were characterized by elemental (CHN) analysis and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). We attribute the remarkable specificity for the ammonium ion to the open framework of the product, which offers enough space for hydrogen-bonded ammonium ions, and infer that other inorganic materials with internal spaces rich in water may show a similar preference.

  13. Kinetic modelling for zinc (II) ions biosorption onto Luffa cylindrica

    SciTech Connect

    Oboh, I.; Aluyor, E.; Audu, T.

    2015-03-30

    The biosorption of Zinc (II) ions onto a biomaterial - Luffa cylindrica has been studied. This biomaterial was characterized by elemental analysis, surface area, pore size distribution, scanning electron microscopy, and the biomaterial before and after sorption, was characterized by Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectrometer. The kinetic nonlinear models fitted were Pseudo-first order, Pseudo-second order and Intra-particle diffusion. A comparison of non-linear regression method in selecting the kinetic model was made. Four error functions, namely coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}), hybrid fractional error function (HYBRID), average relative error (ARE), and sum of the errors squared (ERRSQ), were used to predict the parameters of the kinetic models. The strength of this study is that a biomaterial with wide distribution particularly in the tropical world and which occurs as waste material could be put into effective utilization as a biosorbent to address a crucial environmental problem.

  14. Zinc activates damage-sensing TRPA1 ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hongzhen; Bandell, Michael; Petrus, Matt J.; Zhu, Michael X.; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2009-01-01

    Zinc is an essential biological trace element. It is required for the structure or function of over 300 proteins, and is increasingly recognized for its role in cell signaling. However, high concentrations of zinc have cytotoxic effects, and overexposure to zinc can cause pain and inflammation through unknown mechanisms. Here we show that zinc excites nociceptive somatosensory neurons and causes nociception in mice through TRPA1, a cation channel previously shown to mediate the pungency of wasabi and cinnamon through cysteine-modification. Zinc activates TRPA1 through a novel mechanism that requires zinc influx through TRPA1 channels and subsequent activation via specific intracellular cysteine and histidine residues. TRPA1 is highly sensitive to intracellular zinc, as low nanomolar concentrations activate TRPA1 and modulate its sensitivity. These findings identify TRPA1 as a major target for the sensory effects of zinc, and support an emerging role for zinc as a signaling molecule that can modulate sensory transmission. PMID:19202543

  15. Highly Reversible Zinc-ion Intercalation with Chevrel Phase Mo6S8 Nanocubes and Applications for Advanced Zinc-ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yingwen; Luo, Langli; Zhong, Li; Chen, Junzheng; Li, Bin; Wang, Wei; Mao, Scott X.; Wang, Chong M.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Jun

    2016-05-16

    We demonstrate the application of the Chevrel phase Mo6S8 nanocubes as the anode material for rechargeable Zn-ion batteries. Mo6S8 can host Zn2+ ions reversibility both in aqueous and nonaqueous electrolytes with specific capacities around 90 mAh/g and exhibited remarkable intercalation kinetics as well as stability. Furthermore, we assembled full cells by integrating Mo6S8 anode with zinc-polyiodide (I-/I3-) based catholytes, and demonstrated that such fuel cells was also able to deliver outstanding rate performance and cyclic stability. This first demonstration of zinc intercalating anode could inspire the design of advanced Zn ion batteries.

  16. A comparative study of ion exchange kinetics in zinc/lead-modified zeolite-clinoptilolite systems.

    PubMed

    Trgo, M; Perić, J; Medvidović, N Vukojević

    2006-08-25

    The kinetics of zinc and lead ions removal by modified zeolite-clinoptilolite has been investigated. The rate of the ion exchange process for lead ions is faster than for zinc ions, as well as the time needed to reach the equilibrium. The ion exchange capacity of zeolite of lead ions is doubly higher than that of zinc ions. Diffusion models according to the Vermeulen's approximation, the parabolic diffusion model and the homogeneous diffusion model have been tested with the experimental data of ion exchange for zinc and lead. For both systems examined, the best fit of the models proposed with the experimental data was shown by the Vermeulen's approximation and the homogeneous diffusion model with t-->t(infinity). The diffusion coefficients are calculated from kinetic models of lead ions they are of the order of 10(-6)cm(2)/min, constant for all examined initial concentrations and not dependent on time. The diffusion coefficients in the system of zinc ions is of the order of 10(-8)cm(2)/min, also independent of initial concentrations, but decreasing with time from the beginning of ion exchange to the equilibrium.

  17. Probing the Protonation State and the Redox-Active Sites of Pendant Base Iron(II) and Zinc(II) Pyridinediimine Complexes.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Mayra; Sommer, Samantha K; Swanson, Seth P; Berger, Robert F; Seda, Takele; Zakharov, Lev N; Gilbertson, John D

    2015-08-03

    Utilizing the pyridinediimine ligand [(2,6-(i)PrC6H3)N═CMe)(N((i)Pr)2C2H4)N═CMe)C5H3N] (didpa), the zinc(II) and iron(II) complexes Zn(didpa)Cl2 (1), Fe(didpa)Cl2 (2), [Zn(Hdidpa)Cl2][PF6] (3), [Fe(Hdidpa)Cl2][PF6] (4), Zn(didpa)Br2 (5), and [Zn(Hdidpa)Br2][PF6] (6), Fe(didpa)(CO)2 (7), and [Fe(Hdidpa)(CO)2][PF6] (8) were synthesized and characterized. These complexes allowed for the study of the secondary coordination sphere pendant base and the redox-activity of the didpa ligand scaffold. The protonated didpa ligand is capable of forming metal halogen hydrogen bonds (MHHBs) in complexes 3, 4, and 6. The solution behavior of the MHHBs was probed via pKa measurements and (1)H NMR titrations of 3 and 6 with solvents of varying H-bond accepting strength. The H-bond strength in 3 and 6 was calculated in silico to be 5.9 and 4.9 kcal/mol, respectively. The relationship between the protonation state and the ligand-based redox activity was probed utilizing 7 and 8, where the reduction potential of the didpa scaffold was found to shift by 105 mV upon protonation of the reduced ligand in Fe(didpa)(CO)2.

  18. The Crystal Structure of a Quercetin 2,3-Dioxygenase from Bacillus subtilis Suggests Modulation of Enzyme Activity by a Change in the Metal Ion at the Active Site(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, B.; Madan, Lalima L.; Betz, Stephen F.; Kossiakoff, Anthony A.

    2010-11-10

    Common structural motifs, such as the cupin domains, are found in enzymes performing different biochemical functions while retaining a similar active site configuration and structural scaffold. The soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis has 20 cupin genes (0.5% of the total genome) with up to 14% of its genes in the form of doublets, thus making it an attractive system for studying the effects of gene duplication. There are four bicupins in B. subtilis encoded by the genes yvrK, yoaN, yxaG, and ywfC. The gene products of yvrK and yoaN function as oxalate decarboxylases with a manganese ion at the active site(s), whereas YwfC is a bacitracin synthetase. Here we present the crystal structure of YxaG, a novel iron-containing quercetin 2,3-dioxygenase with one active site in each cupin domain. Yxag is a dimer, both in solution and in the crystal. The crystal structure shows that the coordination geometry of the Fe ion is different in the two active sites of YxaG. Replacement of the iron at the active site with other metal ions suggests modulation of enzymatic activity in accordance with the Irving-Williams observation on the stability of metal ion complexes. This observation, along with a comparison with the crystal structure of YvrK determined recently, has allowed for a detailed structure-function analysis of the active site, providing clues to the diversification of function in the bicupin family of proteins.

  19. Loss of in vitro metal ion binding specificity in mutant copper-zinc superoxide dismutases associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Goto, J J; Zhu, H; Sanchez, R J; Nersissian, A; Gralla, E B; Valentine, J S; Cabelli, D E

    2000-01-14

    The presence of the copper ion at the active site of human wild type copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) is essential to its ability to catalyze the disproportionation of superoxide into dioxygen and hydrogen peroxide. Wild type CuZnSOD and several of the mutants associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) (Ala(4) --> Val, Gly(93) --> Ala, and Leu(38) --> Val) were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Purified metal-free (apoproteins) and various remetallated derivatives were analyzed by metal titrations monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy, histidine modification studies using diethylpyrocarbonate, and enzymatic activity measurements using pulse radiolysis. From these studies it was concluded that the FALS mutant CuZnSOD apoproteins, in direct contrast to the human wild type apoprotein, have lost their ability to partition and bind copper and zinc ions in their proper locations in vitro. Similar studies of the wild type and FALS mutant CuZnSOD holoenzymes in the "as isolated" metallation state showed abnormally low copper-to-zinc ratios, although all of the copper acquired was located at the native copper binding sites. Thus, the copper ions are properly directed to their native binding sites in vivo, presumably as a result of the action of the yeast copper chaperone Lys7p (yeast CCS). The loss of metal ion binding specificity of FALS mutant CuZnSODs in vitro may be related to their role in ALS.

  20. Characterization of lymphocyte transformation induced by zinc ions.

    PubMed

    Berger, N A; Skinner, A M

    1974-04-01

    Lymphocyte cultures from all normal human adults are stimulated by zinc ions to increase DNA and RNA synthesis and undergo blast transformation. Optimal stimulation occurs at 0.1 mM Zn(++). Examination of the effects of other divalent cations reveals that 0.01 mM Hg(++) also stimulates lymphocyte DNA synthesis. Ca(++) and Mg(++) do not affect DNA synthesis in this culture system, while Mn(++), Co(++), Cd(++), Cu(++), and Ni(++) at concentrations of 10(-7)-10(-3) M are inhibitory. DNA and RNA synthesis and blast transformation begin to increase after cultures are incubated for 2-3 days with Zn(++) and these processes reach a maximum rate after 6 days. The increase in Zn(++)-stimulated lymphocyte DNA synthesis is prevented by rendering cells incapable of DNA-dependent RNA synthesis with actinomycin D or by blocking protein synthesis with cycloheximide or puromycin. Zn(++)-stimulated DNA synthesis is also partially inhibited by 5'-AMP and chloramphenicol. Zn(++) must be present for the entire 6-day culture period to produce maximum stimulation of DNA synthesis. In contrast to its ability to independently stimulate DNA synthesis, 0.1 mM Zn(++) inhibits DNA synthesis in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes and L1210 lymphoblasts.

  1. Zinc ions as cytochrome C oxidase inhibitors: two sites of action.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, S S; Azarkina, N V; Vygodina, T V; Siletsky, S A; Konstantinov, A A

    2005-02-01

    Zinc ions are shown to be an efficient inhibitor of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity, both in the solubilized and the liposome-reconstituted enzyme. The effect of zinc is biphasic. First there occurs rapid interaction of zinc with the enzyme at a site exposed to the aqueous phase corresponding to the mitochondrial matrix. This interaction is fully reversed by EDTA and results in a partial inhibition of the enzyme activity (50-90%, depending on preparation) with an effective K(i) of approximately 10 microM. The rapid effect of zinc is observed with the solubilized enzyme, it vanishes upon incorporation of cytochrome oxidase in liposomes, and it re-appears when proteoliposomes are supplied with alamethicin that makes the membrane permeable to low molecular weight substances. Zinc presumably blocks the entrance of the D-protonic channel opening into the inner aqueous phase. Second, zinc interacts slowly (tens of minutes, hours) with a site of cytochrome oxidase accessible from the outer aqueous phase bringing about complete inhibition of the enzymatic activity. The slow phase is characterized by high affinity of the inhibitor for the enzyme: full inhibition can be achieved upon incubation of the solubilized oxidase for 24 h with zinc concentration as low as 2 microM. The rate of zinc inhibitory action in the slow phase is proportional to Zn(2+) concentration. The slow interaction of zinc with the outer surface of liposome-reconstituted cytochrome oxidase is observed only with the enzyme turning over or in the presence of weak reductants, whereas incubation of zinc with the fully oxidized proteoliposomes does not induce the inhibition. It is shown that zinc ions added to cytochrome oxidase proteoliposomes from the outside inhibit specifically the slow electrogenic phase of proton transfer, coupled to a transition of cytochrome oxidase from the oxo-ferryl to the oxidized state (the F --> O step corresponding to transfer of the 4th electron in the catalytic

  2. Visible and near-infrared planar waveguide structure of polycrystalline zinc sulfide from C ions implantation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Lian; Zhou, Yu-Fan; Yu, Xiao-Fei; Zhao, Jin-Hua; Wang, Xue-Lin

    2013-02-25

    We report the fabrication of a planar waveguide in polycrystalline zinc sulfide by 6.0 MeV C ions implantation with a fluence of 5 × 10¹⁴ ion/cm² at room temperature. The near-field light intensity profiles in the visible and near-infrared bands are measured by the end-face coupling method with different laser sources. Investigation of the Raman spectra demonstrates that the microstructure of the polycrystalline zinc sulfide has no significant change after C ion implantation. The absorption spectra show that the implantation processes have no influence on the visible and infrared bands.

  3. Zinc.

    PubMed

    Barceloux, D G

    1999-01-01

    The use of zinc in metal alloys and medicinal lotions dates back before the time of Christ. Currently, most of the commercial production of zinc involves the galvanizing of iron and the manufacture of brass. Some studies support the use of zinc gluconate lozenges to treat the common cold, but there are insufficient data at this time to recommend the routine use of these lozenges. Zinc is an essential co-factor in a variety of cellular processes including DNA synthesis, behavioral responses, reproduction, bone formation, growth, and wound healing. Zinc is a relatively common metal with an average concentration of 50 mg/kg soil and a range of 10-300 mg/kg soil. Meat, seafood, dairy products, nuts, legumes, and whole grains contain relatively high concentrations of zinc. The mobility of zinc in anaerobic environments is poor and therefore severe zinc contamination occurs primarily near points sources of zinc release. The recommended daily allowance for adults is 15 mg zinc. The ingestion of 1-2 g zinc sulfate produces emesis. Zinc compounds can produce irritation and corrosion of the gastrointestinal tract, along with acute renal tubular necrosis and interstitial nephritis. Inhalation of high concentrations of zinc chloride from smoke bombs detonated in closed spaces may cause chemical pneumonitis and adult respiratory distress syndrome. In the occupational setting inhalation of fumes from zinc oxide is the most common cause of metal fume fever (fatigue, chills, fever, myalgias, cough, dyspnea, leukocytosis, thirst, metallic taste, salivation). Zinc compounds are not suspected carcinogens. Treatment of zinc toxicity is supportive. Calcium disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate (CaNa2EDTA) is the chelator of choice based on case reports that demonstrate normalization of zinc concentrations, but there are few clinical data to confirm the efficacy of this agent.

  4. Removal of lead and zinc ions from water by low cost adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Mishra, P C; Patel, R K

    2009-08-30

    In this study, activated carbon, kaolin, bentonite, blast furnace slag and fly ash were used as adsorbent with a particle size between 100 mesh and 200 mesh to remove the lead and zinc ions from water. The concentration of the solutions prepared was in the range of 50-100 mg/L for lead and zinc for single and binary systems which are diluted as required for batch experiments. The effect of contact time, pH and adsorbent dosage on removal of lead and zinc by adsorption was investigated. The equilibrium time was found to be 30 min for activated carbon and 3h for kaolin, bentonite, blast furnace slag and fly ash. The most effective pH value for lead and zinc removal was 6 for activated carbon. pH value did not effect lead and zinc removal significantly for other adsorbents. Adsorbent doses were varied from 5 g/L to 20 g/L for both lead and zinc solutions. An increase in adsorbent doses increases the percent removal of lead and zinc. A series of isotherm studies was undertaken and the data evaluated for compliance was found to match with the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. To investigate the adsorption mechanism, the kinetic models were tested, and it follows second order kinetics. Kinetic studies reveals that blast furnace slag was not effective for lead and zinc removal. The bentonite and fly ash were effective for lead and zinc removal.

  5. Correlated structural kinetics and retarded solvent dynamics at the metalloprotease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Moran; Born, Benjamin; Heyden, Matthias; Tworowski, Dmitry; Fields, Gregg B.; Sagi, Irit; Havenith, Martina

    2011-09-18

    Solvent dynamics can play a major role in enzyme activity, but obtaining an accurate, quantitative picture of solvent activity during catalysis is quite challenging. Here, we combine terahertz spectroscopy and X-ray absorption analyses to measure changes in the coupled water-protein motions during peptide hydrolysis by a zinc-dependent human metalloprotease. These changes were tightly correlated with rearrangements at the active site during the formation of productive enzyme-substrate intermediates and were different from those in an enzyme–inhibitor complex. Molecular dynamics simulations showed a steep gradient of fast-to-slow coupled protein-water motions around the protein, active site and substrate. Our results show that water retardation occurs before formation of the functional Michaelis complex. We propose that the observed gradient of coupled protein-water motions may assist enzyme-substrate interactions through water-polarizing mechanisms that are remotely mediated by the catalytic metal ion and the enzyme active site.

  6. Zinc

    MedlinePlus

    ... pill" to help remove excess water from the body. Another effect of amiloride (Midamor) is that it can increase the amount of zinc in the body. Taking zinc supplements with amiloride (Midamor) might cause ...

  7. Fluorescent zinc sensor with minimized proton-induced interferences: photophysical mechanism for fluorescence turn-on response and detection of endogenous free zinc ions.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ji Eon; Lee, Sumin; You, Youngmin; Baek, Kyung-Hwa; Ohkubo, Kei; Cho, Jaeheung; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Shin, Injae; Park, Soo Young; Nam, Wonwoo

    2012-08-20

    A new fluorescent zinc sensor (HNBO-DPA) consisting of 2-(2'-hydroxy-3'-naphthyl)benzoxazole (HNBO) chromophore and a di(2-picolyl)amine (DPA) metal chelator has been prepared and examined for zinc bioimaging. The probe exhibits zinc-induced fluorescence turn-on without any spectral shifts. Its crystal structure reveals that HNBO-DPA binds a zinc ion in a pentacoordinative fashion through the DPA and HNBO moieties. Steady-state photophysical studies establish zinc-induced deprotonation of the HNBO group. Nanosecond and femtosecond laser flash photolysis and electrochemical measurements provide evidence for zinc-induced modulation of photoinduced electron transfer (PeT) from DPA to HNBO. Thus, the zinc-responsive fluorescence turn-on is attributed to suppression of PeT exerted by deprotonation of HNBO and occupation of the electron pair of DPA, a conclusion that is further supported by density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory (DFT/TD-DFT) calculations. Under physiological conditions (pH 7.0), the probe displays a 44-fold fluorescence turn-on in response to zinc ions with a K(d) value of 12 pM. The fluorescent response of the probe to zinc ions is conserved over a broad pH range with its excellent selectivity for zinc ions among biologically relevant metal ions. In particular, its sensing ability is not altered by divalent transition metal ions such as Fe(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II). Cell experiments using HNBO-DPA show its suitability for monitoring intracellular zinc ions. We have also demonstrated applicability of the probe to visualize intact zinc ions released from cells that undergo apoptosis. More interestingly, zinc-rich pools in zebrafish embryos are traced with HNBO-DPA during early developmental stages. The results obtained from the in vitro and in vivo imaging studies demonstrate the practical usefulness of the probe to detect zinc ions.

  8. Opposite effects of electroporation of red blood cell membranes under the influence of zinc ions.

    PubMed

    Kozlova, Elena; Chernysh, Alexander; Moroz, Victor; Sergunova, Victoria; Gudkova, Olga; Fedorova, Mayya; Kuzovlev, Artem

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the study was to investigate the effects of zinc ions of various concentrations on the nanostructure of membrane of red blood cells in in vitro experiment. The suspension of red blood cells extracted from whole human blood was used. The calibrated electroporation and the atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to analyse damage to membrane nanostructure. We studied the haemolysis after the electroporation at different zinc concentrations. A low concentration of zinc (0.15-0.5 mM) increased significantly the rate of haemolysis and reduced the residual level of non-haemolyzed cells. At high concentrations of zinc ions (0.5-10 mM), the rate constant was sharply reduced, at the same time the residual level increased. The relationship between haemoglobin coagulants and the zinc concentration was examined. High concentration of zinc caused haemoglobin aggregation. It was shown by AFM that the membrane nanostructure was essentially changed. It was experimentally established that there existed a special point of zinc concentration C = 0.5±0.1 mM at which the course of the conjugate processes on the membranes of red blood cells was changed.

  9. Solution NMR characterization of Sgf73(1-104) indicates that Zn ion is required to stabilize zinc finger motif

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Chaohua; Wu, Minhao; Li, Pan; Shi, Chaowei; Tian, Changlin; Zang, Jianye

    2010-07-02

    Zinc finger motif contains a zinc ion coordinated by several conserved amino acid residues. Yeast Sgf73 protein was identified as a component of SAGA (Spt/Ada/Gcn5 acetyltransferase) multi-subunit complex and Sgf73 protein was known to contain two zinc finger motifs. Sgf73(1-104), containing the first zinc finger motif, was necessary to modulate the deubiquitinase activity of SAGA complex. Here, Sgf73(1-104) was over-expressed using bacterial expression system and purified for solution NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) structural studies. Secondary structure and site-specific relaxation analysis of Sgf73(1-104) were achieved after solution NMR backbone assignment. Solution NMR and circular dichroism analysis of Sgf73(1-104) after zinc ion removal using chelation reagent EDTA (ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic acid) demonstrated that zinc ion was required to maintain stable conformation of the zinc finger motif.

  10. Potential interaction between zinc ions and a cyclodextrin-based diclofenac formulation.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Imad I; El-Sabawi, Dina; Abdel Jalil, Mariam

    2016-01-01

    Complexes of diclofenac sodium (DF-Na) with hydroxypropyl betacyclodextrin (HPβCD) were prepared by co-evaporation in a 1:1 ratio and characterized in light of previously reported data. Phase solubility diagrams were obtained for DF-Na with HPβCD in the presence and absence of zinc ions. Dissolution profiles were obtained for DF-Na and its HPβCD complex at acidic (pH 1.2) as well as in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8), in the presence and absence of zinc. HPβCD, as expected, was shown to improve the dissolution of DF-Na in acidic medium but not in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8). The presence of zinc ions decreased the in vitro dissolution of DF-HPβCD complex in acidic medium (pH 1.2) but not in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8). It was confirmed that the precipitate that was formed by zinc ions in the presence of HPβCD and DF-Na contained no cyclodextrin and most likely it was a mixture of the complexes: DF2-Zn and DF-Zn with some molecules of water. In vivo experiments on rats have shown that HPβCD has no statistically significant effect on absorption or bioavailability of DF-Na in spite of the observed improvement of its in vitro dissolution by HPβCD. Moreover, zinc ions were shown to decrease the absorption rate of DF-Na in rats model but did neither significantly alter the absorption nor bioavailability of DF-HPβCD complex. The zinc induced precipitates of DF were shown to have significantly different crystalline properties when HPβCD was present. Therefore, the pharmaceutical details of a DF-Na preparation should be considered when designing the formulation and predicting possible interaction between DF-Na (or other potential NSAIDs) and zinc metal.

  11. Potential interaction between zinc ions and a cyclodextrin-based diclofenac formulation.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Imad I; El-Sabawi, Dina; Abdel Jalil, Mariam

    2016-03-01

    Complexes of diclofenac sodium (DF-Na) with hydroxypropyl betacyclodextrin (HPβCD) were prepared by co-evaporation in a 1:1 ratio and characterized in light of previously reported data. Phase solubility diagrams were obtained for DF-Na with HPβCD in the presence and absence of zinc ions. Dissolution profiles were obtained for DF-Na and its HPβCD complex at acidic (pH 1.2) as well as in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8), in the presence and absence of zinc. HPβCD, as expected, was shown to improve the dissolution of DF-Na in acidic medium but not in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8). The presence of zinc ions decreased the in vitro dissolution of DF-HPβCD complex in acidic medium (pH 1.2) but not in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8). It was confirmed that the precipitate that was formed by zinc ions in the presence of HPβCD and DF-Na contained no cyclodextrin and most likely it was a mixture of the complexes: DF2-Zn and DF-Zn with some molecules of water. In vivo experiments on rats have shown that HPβCD has no statistically significant effect on absorption or bioavailability of DF-Na in spite of the observed improvement of its in vitro dissolution by HPβCD. Moreover, zinc ions were shown to decrease the absorption rate of DF-Na in rats model but did neither significantly alter the absorption nor bioavailability of DF-HPβCD complex. The zinc induced precipitates of DF were shown to have significantly different crystalline properties when HPβCD was present. Therefore, the pharmaceutical details of a DF-Na preparation should be considered when designing the formulation and predicting possible interaction between DF-Na (or other potential NSAIDs) and zinc metal.

  12. Free zinc ions outside a narrow concentration range are toxic to a variety of cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bozym, Rebecca A; Chimienti, Fabrice; Giblin, Leonard J; Gross, Gunter W; Korichneva, Irina; Li, Yuan; Libert, Sarah; Maret, Wolfgang; Parviz, Maryam; Frederickson, Christopher J; Thompson, Richard B

    2010-06-01

    The zinc(II) ion has recently been implicated in a number of novel functions and pathologies in loci as diverse as the brain, retina, small intestine, prostate, heart, pancreas, and immune system. Zinc ions are a required nutrient but elevated concentrations are known to kill cells in vitro. Paradoxical observations regarding zinc's effects have appeared frequently in the literature, and often their physiological relevance is unclear. We found that for PC-12, HeLa and HT-29 cell lines as well as primary cultures of cardiac myocytes and neurons in vitro in differing media, approximately 5 nmol/L free zinc (pZn = 8.3, where pZn is defined as--log(10) [free Zn(2+)]) produced apparently healthy cells, but 20-fold higher or (in one case) lower concentrations were usually harmful as judged by multiple criteria. These results indicate that (1) the free zinc ion levels of media should be controlled with a metal ion buffer; (2) adding zinc or strong zinc ligands to an insufficiently buffered medium may lead to unpredictably low or high free zinc levels that are often harmful to cells; and (3) it is generally desirable to measure free zinc ion levels due to the presence of contaminating zinc in many biochemicals and unknown buffering capacity of many media.

  13. Removal of Zinc Form Carbonic Anhydrase: A Kinetics Experiment for Upper-Level Chemistry Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kathryn R.; Adhyaru, Bhavin

    2004-01-01

    An experiment on kinetics of deactivation of carbonic anhydrase by removal of zinc is demonstrated. Carbonic anhydrase, the enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion of carbon dioxide and bicarbonate, requires on Zn(II) ion in its active site, and removal of the zinc cofactor by complexion to another ligand leaves the apoenzyme, which is totally…

  14. Persistent ion beam induced conductivity in zinc oxide nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Johannes, Andreas; Niepelt, Raphael; Gnauck, Martin; Ronning, Carsten

    2011-12-19

    We report persistently increased conduction in ZnO nanowires irradiated by ion beam with various ion energies and species. This effect is shown to be related to the already known persistent photo conduction in ZnO and dubbed persistent ion beam induced conduction. Both effects show similar excitation efficiency, decay rates, and chemical sensitivity. Persistent ion beam induced conduction will potentially allow countable (i.e., single dopant) implantation in ZnO nanostructures and other materials showing persistent photo conduction.

  15. Persistent ion beam induced conductivity in zinc oxide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannes, Andreas; Niepelt, Raphael; Gnauck, Martin; Ronning, Carsten

    2011-12-01

    We report persistently increased conduction in ZnO nanowires irradiated by ion beam with various ion energies and species. This effect is shown to be related to the already known persistent photo conduction in ZnO and dubbed persistent ion beam induced conduction. Both effects show similar excitation efficiency, decay rates, and chemical sensitivity. Persistent ion beam induced conduction will potentially allow countable (i.e., single dopant) implantation in ZnO nanostructures and other materials showing persistent photo conduction.

  16. VO2+ ions in zinc lead borate glasses studied by EPR and optical absorption techniques.

    PubMed

    Prakash, P Giri; Rao, J Lakshmana

    2005-09-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optical absorption spectra of vanadyl ions in zinc lead borate (ZnO-PbO-B2O3) glass system have been studied. EPR spectra of all the glass samples exhibit resonance signals characteristic of VO2+ ions. The values of spin-Hamiltonian parameters indicate that the VO2+ ions in zinc lead borate glasses were present in octahedral sites with tetragonal compression and belong to C4V symmetry. The spin-Hamiltonian parameters g and A are found to be independent of V2O5 content and temperature but changing with ZnO content. The decrease in Deltag( parallel)/Deltag( perpendicular) value with increase in ZnO content indicates that the symmetry around VO2+ ions is more octahedral. The decrease in intensity of EPR signal above 10 mol% of V2O5 is attributed to a fall in the ratio of the number of V4+ ions (N4) to the number of V5+ ions (N5). The number of spins (N) participating in resonance was calculated as a function of temperature for VO2+ doped zinc lead borate glass sample and the activation energy was calculated. From the EPR data, the paramagnetic susceptibility was calculated at various temperatures and the Curie constant was evaluated from the 1/chi-T graph. The optical absorption spectra show single absorption band due to VO2+ ions in tetragonally distorted octahedral sites.

  17. Characterization of the Large Picornaviral Polypeptides Produced in the Presence of Zinc Ion

    PubMed Central

    Butterworth, Byron E.; Korant, Bruce D.

    1974-01-01

    Zinc ion inhibits the posttranslational cleavages of human rhinovirus-1A, encephalomyocarditis virus, and poliovirus polypeptides. Each virus displayed a different susceptibility to zinc. However, in each case the cleavages of the capsid precursor and the cleavages analogous to the C → D → E conversion in encephalomyocarditis virus were most sensitive to zinc. Higher concentrations of zinc resulted in the buildup of even larger precursor polypeptides of a size between 106,000 and 214,000 daltons. The sizes of these polypeptides and the relative position of their gene loci on the viral RNA were determined. These data were used to place these polypeptides in the over-all scheme of viral protein processing. PMID:4367904

  18. Zinc

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc was recognized as an essential trace metal for humans during the studies of Iranian adolescent dwarfs in the early 1960s. Zinc metal existing as Zn2+ is a strong electron acceptor in biological systems without risks of oxidant damage to cells. Zn2+ functions in the structure of proteins and is ...

  19. Synthesis and application of ion-imprinted polymer nanoparticles for the extraction and preconcentration of zinc ions.

    PubMed

    Roushani, Mahmoud; Abbasi, Shahryar; Khani, Hossein; Sahraei, Reza

    2015-04-15

    A new Zinc (II) ion-imprinted polymer (IIPs) nanoparticles was synthesised for the separation and recovery of trace Zn (II) ion from food and water sample. Zn (II) IIP was prepared by copolymerisation of methyl methacrylate (monomer) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (cross-linker) in the presence of Zn (II)-N,N'-o-phenylene bis (salicylideneimine) ternary complex wherein Zn (II) ion is the imprint ion and is used to form the imprinted polymer. Moreover, control polymer (NIP) particles were similarly prepared without the zinc (II) ions. The unleached and leached IIP particles were characterised by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The preconcentration of Zn(2+) from aqueous solution was studied during rebinding with the leached IIP particles as a function of pH, the weight of the polymer material, the uptake and desorption times, the aqueous phase and the desorption volumes. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry was employed for determination of zinc in aqueous solution.

  20. In vitro prominent bone regeneration by release zinc ion from Zn-modified implant

    SciTech Connect

    Yusa, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Osamu; Fukuda, Masayuki; Koyota, Souichi; Koizumi, Yukio; Sugiyama, Toshihiro

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} We isolated the Zn{sup 2+} ions (eluted Zn{sup 2+} ion; EZ) from zinc-incorporated titanium implant. {yields} The EZ promoted the cell viability in hBMCs. {yields} The EZ stimulated preosteoblast and osteoblast marker gene expression in hBMCs. {yields} The hBMCs supplemented with EZ showed typically cell morphology when osteoblast maturing. {yields} It is revealed that the EZ also stimulates the calcium deposition of hBMCs. -- Abstract: Zinc is one of the trace elements which induce the proliferation and the differentiation of the osteoblast. In the previous study, we found that zinc ions (Zn{sup 2+} ion)-releasing titanium implants had excellent bone fixation using a rabbit femurs model. In this study, we isolated the Zn{sup 2+} ions (eluted Zn{sup 2+} ion; EZ) released from the implant surface, and evaluated the effect of EZ on the osteogenesis of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells (hBMCs). In the result, it was found that the EZ stimulated cell viability, osteoblast marker gene (type I collagen, osteocalcin (OC), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone sialoprotein (BSP)) expressions and calcium deposition in hBMCs.

  1. Heteroaromatic donors in donor-acceptor-donor based fluorophores facilitate zinc ion sensing and cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, Sivaramapanicker; Divya, Kizhumuri P; Jayamurthy, Purushothaman; Mathew, Jomon; Anupama, V N; Philips, Divya Susan; Anees, Palappuravan; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai

    2012-11-01

    The excited state intra molecular charge transfer (ICT) property of fluorophores has been extensively used for the design of fluorescent chemosensors. Herein, we report the synthesis and properties of three donor–π-acceptor–π-donor (D–π-A–π-D) based molecular probes BP, BT and BA. Two heteroaromatic rings, pyrrole (BP), and thiophene (BT) and a non-heteroaromatic ring N-alkoxy aniline (BA) were selected as donor moieties which were linked to a bipyridine binding site through a vinylic linkage. The heteroaromatic systems BP and BT perform selective and ratiometric emission signalling for zinc ions whereas the non-heteroaromatic probe BA does not. The advantages of the D–π-A–π-D design strategy in the design of ICT based probes for the selective fluorescent ratiometric signalling of zinc ions in biological media is discussed. Further, the use of BP, BT and BA for imaging Zn(2+) ions from MCF-7 cell lines is demonstrated.

  2. Light-Controlled Release and Uptake of Zinc Ions in Solution by a Photochromic Terthiazole-Based Ligand.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Juliette; Léaustic, Anne; Berthet, Jérôme; Métivier, Rémi; Guillot, Régis; Delbaere, Stéphanie; Nakatani, Keitaro; Yu, Pei

    2017-03-22

    We have synthesized and fully characterized a photochromic zinc complex with a terphenylthiazole-based ligand with a salen-like cavity. The solution stability of the complex was found to be greatly dependent on the state of the photochromic ligand and an interesting photo-triggered release and uptake of zinc ions was found as well as monitored by its fluorescence. The contrasting stability difference of the zinc complex between its two isomeric states was rationalized by DFT calculations.

  3. A spectrophotometric method for the determination of zinc, copper, and cobalt ions in metalloproteins using Zincon.

    PubMed

    Säbel, Crystal E; Neureuther, Joseph M; Siemann, Stefan

    2010-02-15

    Zincon (2-carboxy-2'-hydroxy-5'-sulfoformazylbenzene) has long been known as an excellent colorimetric reagent for the detection of zinc and copper ions in aqueous solution. To extend the chelator's versatility to the quantification of metal ions in metalloproteins, the spectral properties of Zincon and its complexes with Zn(2+), Cu(2+), and Co(2+) were investigated in the presence of guanidine hydrochloride and urea, two common denaturants used to labilize metal ions in proteins. These studies revealed the detection of metals to be generally more sensitive with urea. In addition, pH profiles recorded for these metals indicated the optimal pH for complex formation and stability to be 9.0. As a consequence, an optimized method that allows the facile determination of Zn(2+), Cu(2+), and Co(2+) with detection limits in the high nanomolar range is presented. Furthermore, a simple two-step procedure for the quantification of both Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) within the same sample is described. Using the prototypical Cu(2+)/Zn(2+)-protein superoxide dismutase as an example, the effectiveness of this method of dual metal quantification in metalloproteins is demonstrated. Thus, the spectrophotometric determination of metal ions with Zincon can be exploited as a rapid and inexpensive means of assessing the metal contents of zinc-, copper-, cobalt-, and zinc/copper-containing proteins.

  4. Ion-beam synthesis of zinc-based nanoparticles in SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnacka, Karolina; Makhavikou, Maksim A.; Komarov, Fadei F.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper production process of Zn nanocrystals in SiO2 by using an implantation of high dose zinc ions with energy of 130 keV and annealing process in 700°C were described. Using electron microscopy was established that annealing causes extension of admixtures distribution on depth and zinc nanoparticles size increasing from approx. 1 - 6 nm to 12 - 18 nm. For prepared material AC conductivity measurements were made in temperatures range from liquid nitride temperature (LNT) to 373 K and at frequencies range from 50 Hz to 5 MHz. Strong frequency dependence on conductivity proves that in this nanocomposite Zn-SiO2 conduction takes place by electron hopping exchange (tunneling) between metallic phase nanoparticles. It was established that three activation energies of conductivity occurs in temperatures range of LNT - 373 K - in low temperatures ΔE1≍0.001 eV, in medium temperatures ΔE2≍0.025 eV and in higher temperatures area ΔE3≍0.096 eV. This is due to the presence of at least two types of nanoparticles. First there are zinc nanoparticles with zinc oxide coating, second there are nanoparticles without the coating. The highest activation energy occurs during electrons tunneling between nanoparticles with zinc oxide coating. Intermediate activation energy corresponds to tunneling from nanoparticle with coating to nanoparticle without coating or conversely. The lowest activation energy corresponds to electrons hopping between nanoparticles without coatings.

  5. Free zinc ion and dissolved orthophosphate effects on phytoplankton from Coeur d'Alene Lake, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuwabara, J.S.; Topping, B.R.; Woods, P.F.; Carter, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Coeur d'Alene Lake in northern Idaho is fed by two major rivers: the Coeur d'Alene River from the east and the St. Joe River from the south, with the Spokane River as its outlet to the north. This phosphorus-limited lake has been subjected to decades of mining (primarily for zinc and silver) and other anthropogenic inputs. A 32 full-factorial experimental design was used to examine the interactive effects of free (uncomplexed) zinc ion and dissolved-orthophosphate concentrations on phytoplankton that were isolated from two sites along a longitudinal zinc-concentration gradient in Coeur d'Alene Lake. The two sites displayed different dominant taxa. Chlorella minutissima, a dominant species near the southern St. Joe River inlet, exhibited greater sensitivity to free Zn ions than Asterionella formosa, collected nearer the Coeur d'Alene River mouth with elevated dissolved-zinc concentrations. Empirical phytoplankton-response models were generated to describe phytoplankton growth in response to remediation strategies in the surrounding watershed. If dissolved Zn can be reduced in the water column from >500 nM (i.e., current concentrations near and down stream of the Coeur d'Alene River plume) to <3 nM (i.e., concentrations near the southern St. Joe River inlet) such that the lake is truly phosphorus limited, management of phosphorus inputs by surrounding communities will ultimately determine the limnologic state of the lake.

  6. The Phylogeny and Active Site Design of Eukaryotic Copper-only Superoxide Dismutases

    DOE PAGES

    Peterson, Ryan L.; Galaleldeen, Ahmad; Villarreal, Johanna; ...

    2016-08-17

    In eukaryotes the bimetallic Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes play important roles in the biology of reactive oxygen species by disproportionating superoxide anion. We reported that the fungal pathogen Candida albicans expresses a novel copper-only SOD, known as SOD5, that lacks the zinc cofactor and electrostatic loop (ESL) domain of Cu/Zn-SODs for substrate guidance. In spite of these abnormalities, C. albicans SOD5 can disproportionate superoxide at rates limited only by diffusion. Here we demonstrate that this curious copper-only SOD occurs throughout the fungal kingdom as well as in phylogenetically distant oomycetes or “pseudofungi” species. It is the only form ofmore » extracellular SOD in fungi and oomycetes, in stark contrast to the extracellular Cu/Zn-SODs of plants and animals. Through structural biology and biochemical approaches we demonstrate that these copper-only SODs have evolved with a specialized active site consisting of two highly conserved residues equivalent to SOD5 Glu-110 and Asp-113. The equivalent positions are zinc binding ligands in Cu/Zn-SODs and have evolved in copper-only SODs to control catalysis and copper binding in lieu of zinc and the ESL. Similar to the zinc ion in Cu/Zn-SODs, SOD5 Glu-110 helps orient a key copper-coordinating histidine and extends the pH range of enzyme catalysis. Furthermore, SOD5 Asp-113 connects to the active site in a manner similar to that of the ESL in Cu/Zn-SODs and assists in copper cofactor binding. Copper-only SODs are virulence factors for certain fungal pathogens; thus this unique active site may be a target for future anti-fungal strategies.« less

  7. The Phylogeny and Active Site Design of Eukaryotic Copper-only Superoxide Dismutases

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Ryan L.; Galaleldeen, Ahmad; Villarreal, Johanna; Taylor, Alexander B.; Cabelli, Diane E.; Hart, P. John; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2016-08-17

    In eukaryotes the bimetallic Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes play important roles in the biology of reactive oxygen species by disproportionating superoxide anion. We reported that the fungal pathogen Candida albicans expresses a novel copper-only SOD, known as SOD5, that lacks the zinc cofactor and electrostatic loop (ESL) domain of Cu/Zn-SODs for substrate guidance. In spite of these abnormalities, C. albicans SOD5 can disproportionate superoxide at rates limited only by diffusion. Here we demonstrate that this curious copper-only SOD occurs throughout the fungal kingdom as well as in phylogenetically distant oomycetes or “pseudofungi” species. It is the only form of extracellular SOD in fungi and oomycetes, in stark contrast to the extracellular Cu/Zn-SODs of plants and animals. Through structural biology and biochemical approaches we demonstrate that these copper-only SODs have evolved with a specialized active site consisting of two highly conserved residues equivalent to SOD5 Glu-110 and Asp-113. The equivalent positions are zinc binding ligands in Cu/Zn-SODs and have evolved in copper-only SODs to control catalysis and copper binding in lieu of zinc and the ESL. Similar to the zinc ion in Cu/Zn-SODs, SOD5 Glu-110 helps orient a key copper-coordinating histidine and extends the pH range of enzyme catalysis. Furthermore, SOD5 Asp-113 connects to the active site in a manner similar to that of the ESL in Cu/Zn-SODs and assists in copper cofactor binding. Copper-only SODs are virulence factors for certain fungal pathogens; thus this unique active site may be a target for future anti-fungal strategies.

  8. Aqueous Rechargeable Zinc/Aluminum Ion Battery with Good Cycling Performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Faxing; Yu, Feng; Wang, Xiaowei; Chang, Zheng; Fu, Lijun; Zhu, Yusong; Wen, Zubiao; Wu, Yuping; Huang, Wei

    2016-04-13

    Developing rechargeable batteries with low cost is critically needed for the application in large-scale stationary energy storage systems. Here, an aqueous rechargeable zinc//aluminum ion battery is reported on the basis of zinc as the negative electrode and ultrathin graphite nanosheets as the positive electrode in an aqueous Al2(SO4)3/Zn(CHCOO)2 electrolyte. The positive electrode material was prepared through a simple electrochemically expanded method in aqueous solution. The cost for the aqueous electrolyte together with the Zn negative electrode is low, and their raw materials are abundant. The average working voltage of this aqueous rechargeable battery is 1.0 V, which is higher than those of most rechargeable Al ion batteries in an ionic liquid electrolyte. It could also be rapidly charged within 2 min while maintaining a high capacity. Moreover, its cycling behavior is also very good, with capacity retention of nearly 94% after 200 cycles.

  9. Defect induced modification of structural, topographical and magnetic properties of zinc ferrite thin films by swift heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, Lisha; Joy, P. A.; Vijaykumar, B. Varma; Ramanujan, R. V.; Anantharaman, M. R.

    2017-04-01

    Swift heavy ion irradiation provides unique ways to modify physical and chemical properties of materials. In ferrites, the magnetic properties can change significantly as a result of swift heavy ion irradiation. Zinc ferrite is an antiferromagnet with a Neel temperature of 10 K and exhibits anomalous magnetic properties in the nano regime. Ion irradiation can cause amorphisation of zinc ferrite thin films; thus the role of crystallinity on magnetic properties can be examined. The influence of surface topography in these thin films can also be studied. Zinc ferrite thin films, of thickness 320 nm, prepared by RF sputtering were irradiated with 100 MeV Ag ions. Structural characterization showed amorphisation and subsequent reduction in particle size. The change in magnetic properties due to irradiation was correlated with structural and topographical effects of ion irradiation. A rough estimation of ion track radius is done from the magnetic studies.

  10. Transient receptor potential melastatin 1 (TRPM1) is an ion-conducting plasma membrane channel inhibited by zinc ions.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Sachar; Drews, Anna; Rizun, Oleksandr; Wagner, Thomas F J; Lis, Annette; Mannebach, Stefanie; Plant, Sandra; Portz, Melanie; Meissner, Marcel; Philipp, Stephan E; Oberwinkler, Johannes

    2011-04-08

    TRPM1 is the founding member of the melastatin subgroup of transient receptor potential (TRP) proteins, but it has not yet been firmly established that TRPM1 proteins form ion channels. Consequently, the biophysical and pharmacological properties of these proteins are largely unknown. Here we show that heterologous expression of TRPM1 proteins induces ionic conductances that can be activated by extracellular steroid application. However the current amplitudes observed were too small to enable a reliable biophysical characterization. We overcame this limitation by modifying TRPM1 channels in several independent ways that increased the similarity to the closely related TRPM3 channels. The resulting constructs produced considerably larger currents after overexpression. We also demonstrate that unmodified TRPM1 and TRPM3 proteins form functional heteromultimeric channels. With these approaches, we measured the divalent permeability profile and found that channels containing the pore of TRPM1 are inhibited by extracellular zinc ions at physiological concentrations, in contrast to channels containing only the pore of TRPM3. Applying these findings to pancreatic β cells, we found that TRPM1 proteins do not play a major role in steroid-activated currents of these cells. The inhibition of TRPM1 by zinc ions is primarily due to a short stretch of seven amino acids present only in the pore region of TRPM1 but not of TRPM3. Combined, our data demonstrate that TRPM1 proteins are bona fide ion-conducting plasma membrane channels. Their distinct biophysical properties allow a reliable identification of endogenous TRPM1-mediated currents.

  11. Surface nanostructuring by ion-induced localized plasma expansion in zinc oxide

    SciTech Connect

    El-Said, A. S. E-mail: a.s.el-said@hzdr.de; Moslem, W. M.; Djebli, M.

    2014-06-09

    Creation of hillock-like nanostructures on the surface of zinc oxide single crystals by irradiation with slow highly charged ions is reported. At constant kinetic energy, the nanostructures were only observed after irradiation with ions of potential energies above a threshold between 19.1 keV and 23.3 keV. The size of the nanostructures increases as a function of potential energy. A plasma expansion approach is used to explain the nanostructures creation. The calculations showed that the surface nanostructures became taller with the increase of ionic temperature. The influence of charged cluster formation and the relevance of their polarity are discussed.

  12. Effect of Swift Heavy Ion Irradiation on Lithium Zinc Silicate Glasses: A Photoluminescence Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jogad, M. S.; Jogad, R. M.; Sudarsan, V.; Krishna, P. S. R.; Kothiyal, G. P.

    2011-07-01

    Lithium zinc silicate glasses with and without copper were prepared by melt-quench method and their luminescence characteristics after swift heavy ion irradiation has been investigated. Based on these studies it is established that both these glasses contain colour centres and the luminescence from such centres get significantly quenched once these samples get irradiated with 100 MeV swift heavy Ag+ ions with a fluence of 1013ions/cm2 at room temperature. Trapping of the charge carriers by the increased defect concentration brought about by irradiation is responsible for the decrease in the luminescence intensity from the irradiated samples. Copper in these glasses mainly exists as Cu+ ions as revealed by the broad emission around 500 nm.

  13. Influence of zinc ions on protein secretion in a heavy metal tolerant strain of the ericoid mycorrhizal fungus Oidiodendron maius.

    PubMed

    Martino, Elena; Franco, Barbara; Piccoli, Giovanni; Stocchi, Vilberto; Perotto, Silvia

    2002-02-01

    A heavy metal tolerant strain of the ericoid mycorrhizal species Oidiodendron maius, isolated from soil heavily contaminated with zinc, was previously shown to tolerate high concentrations of zinc and cadmium ions in the growth medium. We have investigated some of the specific molecular responses of this fungal strain to the presence of increasing concentrations of zinc ions in the growth medium. In particular, we show that zinc ions induce a general change in the array of secreted proteins, with a shift towards the production of more basic, low molecular weight polypeptides. Some of these proteins were microsequenced and identified through homology search in databases. Among them are hydrolytic enzymes (nuclease, proteinase, lysozyme) and two superoxide dismutase isoforms. The latter are antioxidant enzymes known to play a role in heavy metal response in plants, animals and microorganisms.

  14. The crystal structure of the Rv0301-Rv0300 VapBC-3 toxin-antitoxin complex from M. tuberculosis reveals a Mg2+ ion in the active site and a putative RNA-binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Andrew B; Miallau, Linda; Sawaya, Michael R; Habel, Jeff; Cascio, Duilio; Eisenberg, David

    2013-01-10

    VapBC pairs account for 45 out of 88 identified toxin-antitoxin (TA) pairs in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) H37Rv genome. A working model suggests that under times of stress, antitoxin molecules are degraded, releasing the toxins to slow the metabolism of the cell, which in the case of VapC toxins is via their RNase activity. Otherwise the TA pairs remain bound to their promoters, autoinhibiting transcription. The crystal structure of Rv0301-Rv0300, an Mtb VapBC TA complex determined at 1.49 Å resolution, suggests a mechanism for these three functions: RNase activity, its inhibition by antitoxin, and its ability to bind promoter DNA. The Rv0301 toxin consists of a core of five parallel beta strands flanked by alpha helices. Three proximal aspartates coordinate a Mg2+ ion forming the putative RNase active site. The Rv0300 antitoxin monomer is extended in structure, consisting of an N-terminal beta strand followed by four helices. The last two helices wrap around the toxin and terminate near the putative RNase active site, but with different conformations. In one conformation, the C-terminal arginine interferes with Mg2+ ion coordination, suggesting a mechanism by which the antitoxin can inhibit toxin activity. At the N-terminus of the antitoxin, two pairs of Ribbon-Helix-Helix (RHH) motifs are related by crystallographic twofold symmetry. The resulting hetero-octameric complex is similar to the FitAB system, but the two RHH motifs are about 30 Å closer together in the Rv0301-Rv0300 complex, suggesting either a different span of the DNA recognition sequence or a conformational change.

  15. Spectroscopic investigation of zinc tellurite glasses doped with Yb3 + and Er3 + ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilir, Gökhan; Kaya, Ayfer; Cinkaya, Hatun; Eryürek, Gönül

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a detailed spectroscopic investigation of zinc tellurite glasses with the compositions (0.80 - x - y) TeO2 + (0.20) ZnO + xEr2O3 + yYb2O3 (x = 0, y = 0; x = 0.004, y = 0; x = 0, y = 0.05 and x = 0.004, y = 0.05 per moles). The samples were synthesized by the conventional melt quenching method. The optical absorption and emission measurements were conducted at room temperature to determine the spectral properties of lanthanides doped zinc tellurite glasses and, to study the energy transfer processes between dopant lanthanide ions. The band gap energies for both direct and indirect possible transitions and the Urbach energies were measured from the absorption spectra. The absorption spectra of the samples were analyzed by using the Judd-Ofelt approach. The effect of the ytterbium ions on the emission properties of erbium ions was investigated and the energy transfer processes between dopant ions were studied by measuring the up-conversion emission properties of the materials. The color quality parameters of obtained visible up-conversion emission were also determined as well as possibility of using the Er3 + glasses as erbium doped fiber amplifiers at 1.55 μm in infrared emission region.

  16. Development of a quinazoline-based chelating ligand for zinc ion and its application to validation of a zinc-ion-coordinated compound.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Shirai, Akina; Kato, Keisuke; Kimura, Junko; Ichiba, Hideaki; Yajima, Takehiko; Fukushima, Takeshi

    2010-06-01

    A novel fluorescent chelating ligand, 2,4-[bis-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)]-dihydrazinoquinazoline (HBQZ), was synthesized, and the fluorescence characteristics of its complex with metal ions were investigated. Among the 36 different metal ions tested in this study, it was found that HBQZ emits intense fluorescence at 506 nm with an excitation wavelength of 414 nm in the presence of Zn2+. The fluorescence intensity was almost constant in the pH range 3.5-10.5. Complexes of other metal ions with HBQZ did not show fluorescence, and the detection limit of Zn2+ was approximately 250 nM (16 ppb). The proposed method was applied to the validation test of a bioactive compound containing Zn2+ in its structure--an antibacterial and antifungal reagent, zinc pyrithione (ZnPT). In order to effectively release Zn2+ from ZnPT, a pretreatment procedure involving heating with H3PO4 at 100 degrees C for 60 min was adopted. Under these conditions, a linear calibration curve was obtained in the ZnPT concentration range of 0.79-15.7 microM (0.25-5.0 ppm); the correlation coefficient and the relative standard deviation were 0.996 and within 3.1% (n=5), respectively.

  17. Development of near-infrared fluorescent probes for nitric oxide and zinc ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Hirotatsu; Kiyose, Kazuki; Sasaki, Eita; Nishimatsu, Hiroaki; Hirata, Yasunobu; Nagano, Tetsuo

    2007-02-01

    In fluorescence imaging studies of biological mechanisms, cyanine dyes have been employed as fluorescent labels. In particular, tricarbocyanines have the advantage that light at their emission and absorption maxima in the near-infrared (NIR) region around 650-900 nm can penetrate deeply into tissues. We successfully developed two types of cyanine dyes whose fluorescence properties change upon specific reaction with nitric oxide (NO) or zinc ion. The mechanism of fluorescence modulation of the NO probes involves photoinduced electron transfer, and the fluorescent intensity can change at the same wavelengths. We synthesized a series of amine-substituted tricarbocyanines in order to examine the correlation between the electron-donating ability of the amine and the fluorescence peak wavelength. We found that changing the electron-donating ability of the amine substituent altered the absorption and emission wavelengths. Then, we synthesized dipicolylcyanine (DIPCY), consisting of tricarbocyanine as a fluorophore and dipicolylethylenediamine as a heavy metal chelator, and investigated its response to various heavy metal ions. DIPCY can work as a ratiometric fluorescent sensor for zinc ion. This fluorescence modulation of amine-substituted tricarbocyanines should be applicable to dual-wavelength measurement of various biomolecules or enzyme activities. Thus, we have established two mechanisms for modulating the fluorescence properties of cyanines.

  18. Optical studies of Sm³⁺ ions doped zinc alumino bismuth borate glasses.

    PubMed

    Swapna, K; Mahamuda, Sk; Srinivasa Rao, A; Shakya, S; Sasikala, T; Haranath, D; Vijaya Prakash, G

    2014-05-05

    Zinc Alumino Bismuth Borate (ZnAlBiB) glasses doped with different concentrations of samarium (Sm(3+)) ions were prepared by using melt quenching technique and characterized for their lasing potentialities in visible region by using the techniques such as optical absorption, emission and emission decay measurements. Radiative properties for various fluorescent levels of Sm(3+) ions were estimated from absorption spectral information using Judd-Ofelt (JO) analysis. The emission spectra and con-focal photoluminescence images obtained by 410 nm laser excitation demonstrates very distinct and intense orange-red emission for all the doped glasses. The suitable concentration of Sm(3+) ions in these glasses to act as an efficient lasing material has been discussed by measuring the emission cross-section and branching ratios for the emission transitions. The quantum efficiencies were also been estimated from emission decay measurements recorded for the (4)G5/2 level of Sm(3+) ions. From the measured emission cross-sections, branching ratios, strong photoluminescence features and CIE chromaticity coordinates, it was found that 1 mol% of Sm(3+) ions doped ZnAlBiB glasses are most suitable for the development of visible orange-red lasers.

  19. A theoretical and experimental study of calcium, iron, zinc, cadmium, and sodium ions absorption by aspartame.

    PubMed

    Mahnam, Karim; Raisi, Fatame

    2017-03-01

    Aspartame (L-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) is a sweet dipeptide used in some foods and beverages. Experimental studies show that aspartame causes osteoporosis and some illnesses, which are similar to those of copper and calcium deficiency. This raises the issue that aspartame in food may interact with cations and excrete them from the body. This study aimed to study aspartame interaction with calcium, zinc, iron, sodium, and cadmium ions via molecular dynamics simulation (MD) and spectroscopy. Following a 480-ns molecular dynamics simulation, it became clear that the aspartame is able to sequester Fe(2+), Ca(2+), Cd(2+), and Zn(2+) ions for a long time. Complexation led to increasing UV-Vis absorption spectra and emission spectra of the complexes. This study suggests a potential risk of cationic absorption of aspartame. This study suggests that purification of cadmium-polluted water by aspartame needs a more general risk assessment.

  20. Study of structural and spectroscopic behavior of Sm3+ ions in lead-zinc borate glasses containing alkali metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasi Kumar, M. V.; Babu, S.; Rajeswara Reddy, B.; Ratnakaram, Y. C.

    2017-02-01

    High luminescence behavior of rare earth inorganic glasses have a variety of uses in the industry. In the past few decades, rare earth ions with characteristic photonics applications are being hosted by heavy metal oxide glasses. Among the rare earth ions Sm3+ ion has features which make it apt for high density optical storage. The authors of the paper have experimented to synthesize Sm3+ doped glasses. In this regard a new series of borate glasses doped with 1 mol% Sm3+ ion are developed by using melt-quenching technique. XRD, FTIR, optical absorption, luminescence techniques are used to study the various characteristics of Sm3+ ion in the present glass matrices. The XRD spectra confirms the amorphous nature of glasses. Further, the researchers have used differential thermal analysis to study the glass transition temperature. The structural groups in the prepared glasses are studied using Fourier transform infrared spectra. From the measurement of its optical absorption, three phenomenological Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters (Ω2, Ω4 and Ω6) have been computed. Based on these Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters, radiative properties such as radiative probabilities (Arad), branching ratios (β), and radiative life time (τR) are calculated. The excitation spectra of Sm3+ doped lithium heavy metal borate glass matrix is recorded under the emission wavelength of 600 nm. The emission spectra are recorded under 404 nm excitation wavelength. From various emission transitions, 4G5/2 → 6H7/2 and 4G5/2 → 6H9/2 bands could be of interest for various applications. The decay profiles of 4G5/2 level exhibit single exponential nature in all the prepared glass matrices. The potassium glass matrix exhibits higher quantum efficiency than the other glass matrices. Finally, by going through these several spectroscopic characterizations, it is concluded that the prepared Sm3+ doped lead-zinc borate glasses might be useful for visible light applications.

  1. Pure zinc sulfide quantum dot as highly selective luminescent probe for determination of hazardous cyanide ion.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Rajabi, Hamid Reza

    2014-03-01

    A rapid and simple fluorescence method is presented for selective and sensitive determination of hazardous cyanide ion in aqueous solution based on functionalized zinc sulfide (ZnS) quantum dot (QD) as luminescent prob. The ultra-small ZnS QDs were synthesized using a chemical co-precipitation method in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol (ME) as an efficient capping agent. The prepared pure ZnS QDs was applied as an optical sensor for determination of cyanide ions in aqueous solutions. ZnS nanoparticles have exhibited a strong fluorescent emission at about 424 nm. The fluorescence intensity of QDs is linearly proportional to the cyanide ion concentration in the range 2.44×10(-6) to 2.59×10(-5)M with a detection limit of 1.70×10(-7)M at pH11. The designed fluorescent sensor possesses remarkable selectivity for cyanide ion over other anions such as Cl(-), Br(-), F(-), I(-), IO3(-), ClO4(-), BrO3(-), CO3(2-), NO2(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-), S2O4(2-), C2O4(2-), SCN(-), N3(-), citrate and tartarate with negligible influences on the cyanide detection by fluorescence spectroscopy.

  2. Determination of model parameters for zinc (II) ion biosorption onto powdered waste sludge (PWS) in a fed-batch system.

    PubMed

    Kargi, Fikret; Cikla, Sinem

    2007-12-01

    Biosorption of zinc (II) ions onto pre-treated powdered waste sludge (PWS) was investigated using a completely mixed tank operating in fed-batch mode instead of an adsorption column. Experiments with variable feed flow rate (0.05-0.5 L h(-1)), feed Zn(II) ion concentrations (37.5-275 mg L(-1)) and amount of adsorbent (1-6 g PWS) were performed using fed-batch operation at pH 5 and room temperature (20-25 degrees C). Break-through curves describing variations of aqueous (effluent) zinc ion concentrations with time were determined for different operating conditions. Percent zinc removal from the aqueous phase decreased, but the biosorbed (solid phase) zinc ion concentration increased with increasing feed flow rate and zinc concentration. A modified Bohart-Adams equation was used to determine the biosorption capacity of PWS (q'(s)) and the rate constant (K) for zinc ion biosorption. Biosorption capacity (q'(s)=57.7 g Zn kg(-1) PWS) of PWS in fed-batch operation was found to be comparable with powdered activated carbon (PAC) in column operations. However, the adsorption rate constant (K=9.17 m(3) kg(-1) h(-1)) in fed-batch operation was an order of magnitude larger than those obtained in adsorption columns because of elimination of mass transfer limitations encountered in the column operations. Therefore, a completely mixed tank operated in fed-batch mode was proven to be more advantageous as compared to adsorption columns due to better contact between the phases yielding faster adsorption rates.

  3. Zinc naphthalenedicarboxylate coordination complex: A promising anode material for lithium and sodium-ion batteries with good cycling stability.

    PubMed

    Fei, Hailong; Feng, Wenjing; Xu, Tan

    2017-02-15

    It is important to discover new, cheap and environmental friendly electrode materials with high capacity and good cycling stability for lithium and sodium-ion batteries. Zinc 1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylate was firstly found to be stable anode materials for lithium and sodium-ion batteries. The discharge capacity can be up to 468.9mAhg(-1) after 100 cycles at a current density of 100mAg(-1) for lithium-ion batteries, while the second discharge capacity of 320.7mAhg(-1) was achieved as anode materials for sodium-ion batteries. A possible electrochemical reaction mechanism was discussed.

  4. Modeling batch kinetics and thermodynamics of zinc and cadmium ions removal from waste solutions using synthetic zeolite A.

    PubMed

    El-Kamash, A M; Zaki, A A; El Geleel, M Abed

    2005-12-09

    The sorptive removal of zinc and cadmium ions from aqueous solutions using synthetic zeolite A was investigated. Experiments were carried out as a function of solute concentration and temperature (298-333 K). Several kinetic models were used to test the experimental rate data and to examine the controlling mechanism of the sorption process. Various parameters such as effective diffusion coefficient, activation energy and entropy of activation were evaluated. Equilibrium sorption data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. Of the model tested, both Freundlich and D-R isotherm expressions were found to give better fit to the experimental equilibrium data compared to Langmuir model. The mean free energy is in all cases in the range corresponding to the ion exchange type of sorption. The results indicated that synthetic zeolite A can be used as an efficient ion exchange material for the removal of zinc and cadmium ions from industrial and radioactive wastewaters.

  5. An atomic absorption spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace amounts of zinc in canned juices after ion exchange separation.

    PubMed

    Aziz-Alrahman, A M

    1984-01-01

    An atomic absorption spectrophotometric method is described for the determination of microgram quantities of zinc in canned juices. After sample digestion in concentrated nitric acid, the solution is evaporated till near dryness, and then a solution of 2 M HCl is added to form tetrachlorozincate (II) ion. This acid solution, containing the zinc complex is passed through an ion-exchange column (anion exchange resin, chloride form, which is preconditioned by passing 1 M HCl solution). Zinc is eluted from the column with 0.01 M HCl solution. After evaporation to dryness, the residue is dissolved in 1% (v/v) HNO3, and then atomized into an air-acetylene flame. The limit of detection of the method is 0.15 micrograms ml-1 Zn. The analytical aspects of the proposed method, including the standard addition technique are discussed.

  6. Visualization of calcium and zinc ions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells treated with PEFs (pulse electric fields) by laser confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Urszula, Pankiewicz; Jerzy, Jamroz; Sujka, Monika; Kowalski, Radosław

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present work was to visualize the areas of increased concentration of calcium and zinc ions inside Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells with the use of confocal microscopy and to make an attempt to asses semi-quantitatively their concentration within the limits of the cells. Semi-quantitative analysis revealed that fluorescence inside cells from control samples was three-times lower than that observed for cells from the sample enriched with calcium. Differences in distribution of fluorescence intensity between cells originated from the samples enriched with zinc and control samples were also observed. On the basis of the optical sections, the 3D reconstructions of ion-rich areas distribution in the cell were made. The obtained results showed that confocal microscopy is a useful technique for visualization of the areas in S. cerevisiae cells which contain higher amount of calcium and zinc and it may be also used for semi-quantitative analysis.

  7. Organic electrolyte-based rechargeable zinc-ion batteries using potassium nickel hexacyanoferrate as a cathode material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Munseok S.; Heo, Jongwook W.; Kwak, Hunho H.; Lee, Hochun; Hong, Seung-Tae

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrates an organic electrolyte-based rechargeable zinc-ion battery (ZIB) using Prussian blue (PB) analogue potassium nickel hexacyanoferrate K0.86Ni[Fe(CN)6]0.954(H2O)0.766 (KNF-086) as the cathode material. KNF-086 is prepared via electrochemical extraction of potassium ions from K1.51Ni[Fe(CN)6]0.954(H2O)0.766 (KNF-151). The cell is composed of a KNF-086 cathode, a zinc metal anode, and a 0.5 M Zn(ClO4)2 acetonitrile electrolyte. This cell shows a reversible discharge capacity of 55.6 mAh g-1 at 0.2 C rate with the discharge voltage at 1.19 V (vs. Zn2+/Zn). As evidenced by Fourier electron density analysis with powder XRD data, the zinc-inserted phase is confirmed as Zn0.32K0.86Ni[Fe(CN)6]0.954(H2O)0.766 (ZKNF-086), and the position of the zinc ion in ZKNF-086 is revealed as the center of the large interstitial cavities of the cubic PB. Compared to KNF-086, ZKNF-086 exhibits a decreased unit cell parameter (0.9%) and volume (2.8%) while the interatomic distance of d(Fe-C) increased (from 1.84 to 1.98 Å), and the oxidation state of iron decreases from 3 to 2.23. The organic electrolyte system provides higher zinc cycling efficiency (>99.9%) than the aqueous system (ca. 80%). This result demonstrates an organic electrolyte-based ZIB, and offers a crucial basis for understanding the electrochemical intercalation chemistry of zinc ions in organic electrolytes.

  8. Bioabsorbable zinc ion induced biphasic cellular responses in vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Bioabsorbable metal zinc (Zn) is a promising new generation of implantable scaffold for cardiovascular and orthopedic applications. In cardiovascular stent applications, zinc ion (Zn2+) will be gradually released into the surrounding vascular tissues from such Zn-containing scaffolds after implantation. However, the interactions between vascular cells and Zn2+ are still largely unknown. We explored the short-term effects of extracellular Zn2+ on human smooth muscle cells (SMCs) up to 24 h, and an interesting biphasic effect of Zn2+ was observed. Lower concentrations (<80 μM) of Zn2+ had no adverse effects on cell viability but promoted cell adhesion, cell spreading, cell proliferation, cell migration, and enhanced the expression of F-actin and vinculin. Cells treated with such lower concentrations of Zn2+ displayed an elongated shape compared to controls without any treatment. In contrast, cells treated with higher Zn2+ concentrations (80–120 μM) had opposite cellular responses and behaviors. Gene expression profiles revealed that the most affected functional genes were related to angiogenesis, inflammation, cell adhesion, vessel tone, and platelet aggregation. Results indicated that Zn has interesting concentration-dependent biphasic effects on SMCs with low concentrations being beneficial to cellular functions. PMID:27248371

  9. Zinc-ion implanted and deposited titanium surfaces reduce adhesion of Streptococccus mutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Juan; Ding, Gang; Li, Jinlu; Yang, Shenhui; Fang, Bisong; Sun, Hongchen; Zhou, Yanmin

    2010-10-01

    While titanium (Ti) is a commonly used dental implant material with advantageous biocompatible and mechanical properties, native Ti surfaces do not have the ability to prevent bacterial colonization. The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition and bacterial adhesive properties of zinc (Zn) ion implanted and deposited Ti surfaces (Zn-PIIID-Ti) as potential dental implant materials. Surfaces of pure Ti (cp-Ti) were modified with increasing concentrations of Zn using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID), and elemental surface compositions were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). To evaluate bacterial responses, Streptococcus mutans were seeded onto the modifiedTi surfaces for 48 h and subsequently observed by scanning electron microscopy. Relative numbers of bacteria on each surface were assessed by collecting the adhered bacteria, reculturing and counting colony forming units after 48 h on bacterial grade plates. Ti, oxygen and carbon elements were detected on all surfaces by XPS. Increased Zn signals were detected on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces, correlating with an increase of Zn-deposition time. Substantial numbers of S. mutans adhered to cp-Ti samples, whereas bacterial adhesion on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces signficantly decreased as the Zn concentration increased ( p < 0.01). In conclusion, PIIID can successfully introduce Zn onto a Ti surface, forming a modified surface layer bearing Zn ions that consequently deter adhesion of S. mutans, a common bacterium in the oral environment.

  10. [Research on removal of copper, manganese and zinc ions using cation exchange membrane based on Donnan dialysis].

    PubMed

    Xie, De-Hua; Shi, Zhou; Chen, Shi-Yang; Xie, Peng; Song, Yong

    2010-09-01

    Based on Donnan dialysis technique, the mechanism that influences the exchange capacity of the membrane and the interaction mechanism between two co-existing ions are investigated in this paper, where the cation exchange membrane is applied to remove the heavy metal ions such as copper, manganese, zinc. The following results were obtained: It is applicable to use the cation exchange membrane to remove copper, manganese and zinc ions and 75%-85% of removal efficiency can be obtained; when the concentration and charge number are the same, the smaller the radius of hydrated heavy metal, the quicker the ion diffuse and consequently the higher removal efficiency the membrane can achieve, which is the main factor; when the radius of the hydrated heavy metals are approximately same, the membrane will have higher removal efficiency to the ion with lower atomic number; when the ions with same charge number and concentration co-exist, both of them are removed but with different removal speeds for existing of disturbance between them and there exist diffusion competition, i.e. those who are more prone to be exchanged will be more competitive and more likely to low the removal rate of the other ion seriously; if the total concentration of the ions is far lower than the exchange capacity of the membrane, the removal efficiency when the ions coexist is not lower too much than that of the case when they exist lonely.

  11. QM/MM X-ray Refinement of Zinc Metalloenzymes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Hayik, Seth A.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    Zinc metalloenzymes play an important role in biology. However, due to the limitation of molecular force field energy restraints used in X-ray refinement at medium or low resolutions, the precise geometry of the zinc coordination environment can be difficult to distinguish from ambiguous electron density maps. Due to the difficulties involved in defining accurate force fields for metal ions, the QM/MM (Quantum-Mechanical /Molecular-Mechanical) method provides an attractive and more general alternative for the study and refinement of metalloprotein active sites. Herein we present three examples that indicate that QM/MM based refinement yields a superior description of the crystal structure based on R and Rfree values and on the inspection of the zinc coordination environment. It is concluded that QM/MM refinement is a useful general tool for the improvement of the metal coordination sphere in metalloenzyme active sites. PMID:20116858

  12. Zinc ion implantation-deposition technique improves the osteoblast biocompatibility of titanium surfaces

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, YONGQIANG; XU, JUAN; CHEN, JING; QI, MENGCHUN; XIE, XUEHONG; HU, MIN

    2015-01-01

    The plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID) technique was used to implant zinc (Zn) ions into smooth surfaces of pure titanium (Ti) disks for investigation of tooth implant surface modification. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the surface structure and chemical composition of a modified Ti surface following Zn ion implantation and deposition and to examine the effect of such modification on osteoblast biocompatibility. Using the PIIID technique, Zn ions were deposited onto the smooth surface of pure Ti disks. The physical structure and chemical composition of the modified surface layers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. In vitro culture assays using the MG-63 bone cell line were performed to determine the effects of Zn-modified Ti surfaces following PIIID on cellular function. Acridine orange staining was used to detect cell attachment to the surfaces and cell cycle analysis was performed using flow cytometry. SEM revealed a rough ‘honeycomb’ structure on the Zn-modified Ti surfaces following PIIID processing and XPS data indicated that Zn and oxygen concentrations in the modified Ti surfaces increased with PIIID processing time. SEM also revealed significantly greater MG-63 cell growth on Zn-modified Ti surfaces than on pure Ti surfaces (P<0.05). Flow cytometric analysis revealed increasing percentages of MG-63 cells in S phase with increasing Zn implantation and deposition, suggesting that MG-63 apoptosis was inhibited and MG-63 proliferation was promoted on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces. The present results suggest that modification with Zn-PIIID may be used to improve the osteoblast biocompatibility of Ti implant surfaces. PMID:25673139

  13. Hedgehog Pathway Antagonist 5E1 Binds Hedgehog at the Pseudo-active Site

    PubMed Central

    Maun, Henry R.; Wen, Xiaohui; Lingel, Andreas; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Lazarus, Robert A.; Scales, Suzie J.; Hymowitz, Sarah G.

    2010-01-01

    Proper hedgehog (Hh) signaling is crucial for embryogenesis and tissue regeneration. Dysregulation of this pathway is associated with several types of cancer. The monoclonal antibody 5E1 is a Hh pathway inhibitor that has been extensively used to elucidate vertebrate Hh biology due to its ability to block binding of the three mammalian Hh homologs to the receptor, Patched1 (Ptc1). Here, we engineered a murine:human chimeric 5E1 (ch5E1) with similar Hh-binding properties to the original murine antibody. Using biochemical, biophysical, and x-ray crystallographic studies, we show that, like the regulatory receptors Cdon and Hedgehog-interacting protein (Hhip), ch5E1 binding to Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is enhanced by calcium ions. In the presence of calcium and zinc ions, the ch5E1 binding affinity increases 10–20-fold to tighter than 1 nm primarily because of a decrease in the dissociation rate. The co-crystal structure of Shh bound to the Fab fragment of ch5E1 reveals that 5E1 binds at the pseudo-active site groove of Shh with an epitope that largely overlaps with the binding site of its natural receptor antagonist Hhip. Unlike Hhip, the side chains of 5E1 do not directly coordinate the Zn2+ cation in the pseudo-active site, despite the modest zinc-dependent increase in 5E1 affinity for Shh. Furthermore, to our knowledge, the ch5E1 Fab-Shh complex represents the first structure of an inhibitor antibody bound to a metalloprotease fold. PMID:20504762

  14. Optical properties of zinc borotellurite glass doped with trivalent dysprosium ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ami Hazlin, M. N.; Halimah, M. K.; Muhammad, F. D.; Faznny, M. F.

    2017-04-01

    The zinc borotellurite doped with dysprosium oxide glass samples with chemical formula {[(TeO2) 0 . 7(B2O3) 0 . 3 ] 0 . 7(ZnO) 0 . 3 } 1 - x(Dy2O3)x (where x=0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04 and 0.05 M fraction) were prepared by using conventional melt quenching technique. The structural and optical properties of the proposed glass systems were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and UV-VIS spectroscopy. The amorphous nature of the glass systems is confirmed by using XRD technique. The infrared spectra of the glass systems indicate three obvious absorption bands which are assigned to BO3 and TeO4 vibrational groups. Based on the absorption spectra obtained, the direct and indirect optical band gaps, as well as the Urbach energy were calculated. It is observed that both the direct and indirect optical band gaps increase with the concentration of Dy3+ ions. On the other hand, the Urbach energy is observed to decrease as the concentration of Dy3+ ions increases.

  15. Metal active site elasticity linked to activation of homocysteine in methionine synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Pejchal, Robert; Bomer, Theresa M.; Matthews, Rowena G.; Smith, Janet L.; Ludwig, Martha L.

    2008-04-02

    Enzymes possessing catalytic zinc centers perform a variety of fundamental processes in nature, including methyl transfer to thiols. Cobalamin-independent (MetE) and cobalamin-dependent (MetH) methionine synthases are two such enzyme families. Although they perform the same net reaction, transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine (Hcy) to form methionine, they display markedly different catalytic strategies, modular organization, and active site zinc centers. Here we report crystal structures of zinc-replete MetE and MetH, both in the presence and absence of Hcy. Structural investigation of the catalytic zinc sites of these two methyltransferases reveals an unexpected inversion of zinc geometry upon binding of Hcy and displacement of an endogenous ligand in both enzymes. In both cases a significant movement of the zinc relative to the protein scaffold accompanies inversion. These structures provide new information on the activation of thiols by zinc-containing enzymes and have led us to propose a paradigm for the mechanism of action of the catalytic zinc sites in these and related methyltransferases. Specifically, zinc is mobile in the active sites of MetE and MetH, and its dynamic nature helps facilitate the active site conformational changes necessary for thiol activation and methyl transfer.

  16. A conveniently prepared and hypersensitized small molecular fluorescent probe: Rapidly detecting free zinc ion in HepG2 cells and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xiaoping; Sun, Ping; Li, Hong; Tian, Xiaohe; Zhang, Baowei; Wu, Jieying; Tian, Yupeng; Zhou, Hongping

    2016-12-15

    In this paper, we reported a conveniently prepared fluorescent probe for zinc ions detection, which constructed by the condensation reaction between p-(benzothiazolyl)aniline with 4, 4- diethylaminesalicylaldehyde. The sensing ability of the probe toward zinc ions in vitro was tested by a series of UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy studies, which showed that the probe possessed high sensitivity with a detection limit of 5.8nM and a rapid response time of 10s. We also carried out fluorescent bio-imaging of the probe for zinc ions in human liver hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2), which showed that the probe could be utilized to detect the intracellular endogenous zinc ions visually without introducing external zinc sources. Meanwhile, co-staining experiment with organelle selective trackers was performed to illustrate that the probe could locate at endoplasmic reticulum. Finally, we successfully used it as a zinc ion developer in plant tissue, which clearly demonstrated the distribution of zinc ions in the growth stage of plant tissue.

  17. PTEN-inhibition by zinc ions augments interleukin-2-mediated Akt phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Plum, Laura Marie; Brieger, Anne; Engelhardt, Gabriela; Hebel, Silke; Nessel, Andreas; Arlt, Marcus; Kaltenberg, Jennifer; Schwaneberg, Ulrich; Huber, Michael; Rink, Lothar; Haase, Hajo

    2014-07-01

    Free zinc ions (Zn(2+)) participate in several signaling pathways. The aim of the present study was to investigate a potential involvement of Zn(2+) in the PI3K/Akt pathway of interleukin (IL)-2 signaling in T-cells. The IL-2 receptor triggers three major pathways, ERK1/2, JAK/STAT5, and PI3K/Akt. We have previously shown that an IL-2-mediated release of lysosomal Zn(2+) into the cytoplasm activates ERK1/2, but not STAT5. In the present study, Akt phosphorylation in response to IL-2 was abrogated by the Zn(2+) chelator N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-2(pyridyl-methyl)ethylenediamine, and was induced by treatment with Zn(2+) and the ionophore pyrithione. The latter were ineffective in cells that were treated with siRNA against the phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), a phosphatase that degrades the lipid second messenger PI(3,4,5)P3, which is produced by PI3K and leads to activation of Akt. Inhibition of recombinant PTEN by Zn(2+)in vitro yielded an IC50 of 0.59 nM. Considering a resting free cytoplasmic Zn(2+) level of 0.2 nM in the T-cell line CTLL-2, this seems ideally suited for dynamic regulation by cellular Zn(2+). Oxidation with H2O2 and supplementation with Zn(2+) led to similar changes in the CD spectrum of PTEN. Moreover, Zn(2+) partially prevented the oxidation of cysteines 71 and 124. Hence, we hypothesize that zinc signals affect the IL-2-dependent PI3K/Akt pathway by inhibiting the negative regulator PTEN through binding with a sub-nanomolar affinity to cysteine residues that are essential for its catalytic activity.

  18. Modification of optical and electrical properties of zinc oxide-coated porous silicon nanostructures induced by swift heavy ion

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Morphological and optical characteristics of radio frequency-sputtered zinc aluminum oxide over porous silicon (PS) substrates were studied before and after irradiating composite films with 130 MeV of nickel ions at different fluences varying from 1 × 1012 to 3 × 1013 ions/cm2. The effect of irradiation on the composite structure was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL), and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. Current–voltage characteristics of ZnO-PS heterojunctions were also measured. As compared to the granular crystallites of zinc oxide layer, Al-doped zinc oxide (ZnO) layer showed a flaky structure. The PL spectrum of the pristine composite structure consists of the emission from the ZnO layer as well as the near-infrared emission from the PS substrate. Due to an increase in the number of deep-level defects, possibly oxygen vacancies after swift ion irradiation, PS-Al-doped ZnO nanocomposites formed with high-porosity PS are shown to demonstrate a broadening in the PL emission band, leading to the white light emission. The broadening effect is found to increase with an increase in the ion fluence and porosity. XRD study revealed the relative resistance of the film against the irradiation, i.e., the irradiation of the structure failed to completely amorphize the structure, suggesting its possible application in optoelectronics and sensing applications under harsh radiation conditions. PMID:22748164

  19. Enhancing the Photostability of Arylvinylenebipyridyl Compounds as Fluorescent Indicators for Intracellular Zinc(II) Ions

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhao; Younes, Ali H.; Allen, John R.; Davidson, Michael W.; Zhu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Arylvinylenebipyridyl (AVB) ligands are bright, zinc(II)-sensitive fluoroionophores. The applicability of AVBs as fluorescent indicators for imaging cellular zinc(II), however, is limited by low photostability, partially attributable to the photoisomerization of the vinylene functionality. Two configurationally immobilized (i.e., “locked”) AVB analogues are prepared in this work. The zinc(II)-sensitive photophysical properties and zinc(II) affinities of both AVBs and their locked analogues are characterized in organic and aqueous media. The zinc(II) sensitivity of the emission is attributed to the zinc(II)-dependent energies of the charge transfer excited states of these compounds. The configurationally locked ligands have improved photostability, while maintaining the brightness and zinc(II) sensibility of their AVB progenitors. The feasibility of the “locked” AVB analogues with improved photostability for imaging intracellular Zn(II) of eukaryotic cells using laser confocal fluorescence microscopy is demonstrated. PMID:25942357

  20. Fabrication of Amorphous Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide Thin Film Transistor by using Focused Ion Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wencong

    Compared with other transparent semiconductors, amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) has both good uniformity and high electron mobility, which make it as a good candidate for displays or large-scale transparent circuit. The goal of this research is to fabricate alpha-IGZO thin film transistor (TFT) with channel milled by focused ion beam (FIB). TFTs with different channel geometries can be achieved by applying different milling strategies, which facilitate modifying complex circuit. Technology Computer-Aided Design (TCAD) was also introduced to understand the effect of trapped charges on the device performance. The investigation of the trapped charge at IGZO/SiO2 interface was performed on the IGZO TFT on p-Silicon substrate with thermally grown SiO2 as dielectric. The subgap density-of-state model was used for the simulation, which includes conduction band-tail trap states and donor-like state in the subgap. The result shows that the de-trapping and donor-state ionization determine the interface trapped charge density at various gate biases. Simulation of IGZO TFT with FIB defined channel on the same substrate was also applied. The drain and source were connected intentionally during metal deposition and separated by FIB milling. Based on the simulation, the Ga ions in SiO2 introduced by the ion beam was drifted by gate bias and affects the saturation drain current. Both side channel and direct channel transparent IGZO TFTs were fabricated on the glass substrate with coated ITO. Higher ion energy (30 keV) was used to etch through the substrate between drain and source and form side channels at the corner of milled trench. Lower ion energy (16 keV) was applied to stop the milling inside IGZO thin film and direct channel between drain and source was created. Annealing after FIB milling removed the residual Ga ions and the devices show switch feature. Direct channel shows higher saturation drain current (~10-6 A) compared with side channel (~10-7 A) because

  1. Structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtr1 reveals an active site for an atypical phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Irani, Seema; Yogesha, S D; Mayfield, Joshua; Zhang, Mengmeng; Zhang, Yong; Matthews, Wendy L; Nie, Grace; Prescott, Nicholas A; Zhang, Yan Jessie

    2016-03-01

    Changes in the phosphorylation status of the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) correlate with the process of eukaryotic transcription. The yeast protein regulator of transcription 1 (Rtr1) and the human homolog RNAPII-associated protein 2 (RPAP2) may function as CTD phosphatases; however, crystal structures of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1 lack a consensus active site. We identified a phosphoryl transfer domain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtr1 by obtaining and characterizing a 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure. We identified a putative substrate-binding pocket in a deep groove between the zinc finger domain and a pair of helices that contained a trapped sulfate ion. Because sulfate mimics the chemistry of a phosphate group, this structural data suggested that this groove represents the phosphoryl transfer active site. Mutagenesis of the residues lining this groove disrupted catalytic activity of the enzyme assayed in vitro with a fluorescent chemical substrate, and expression of the mutated Rtr1 failed to rescue growth of yeast lacking Rtr1. Characterization of the phosphatase activity of RPAP2 and a mutant of the conserved putative catalytic site in the same chemical assay indicated a conserved reaction mechanism. Our data indicated that the structure of the phosphoryl transfer domain and reaction mechanism for the phosphoryl transfer activity of Rtr1 is distinct from those of other phosphatase families.

  2. Crystallographic snapshots of active site metal shift in E. coli fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Huyen-Thi; Lee, Seon-Hwa; Ho, Thien-Hoang; Hong, Seung-Hye; Huynh, Kim-Hung; Ahn, Yeh-Jin; Oh, Deok-Kun; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FBA) is important for both glycolysis and gluconeogenesis in life. Class II (zinc dependent) FBA is an attractive target for the development of antibiotics against protozoa, bacteria, and fungi, and is also widely used to produce various high-value stereoisomers in the chemical and pharmaceutical industry. In this study, the crystal structures of class II Escherichia coli FBA (EcFBA) were determined from four different crystals, with resolutions between 1.8 Å and 2.0 Å. Native EcFBA structures showed two separate sites of Zn1 (interior position) and Zn2 (active site surface position) for Zn2+ ion. Citrate and TRIS bound EcFBA structures showed Zn2+ position exclusively at Zn2. Crystallographic snapshots of EcFBA structures with and without ligand binding proposed the rationale of metal shift at the active site, which might be a hidden mechanism to keep the trace metal cofactor Zn2+ within EcFBA without losing it. PMID:27733232

  3. Structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtr1 reveals an active site for an atypical phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Mayfield, Joshua; Zhang, Mengmeng; Zhang, Yong; Matthews, Wendy L.; Nie, Grace; Prescott, Nicholas A.; Zhang, Yan Jessie

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the phosphorylation status of the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) correlate with the process of eukaryotic transcription. The yeast protein regulator of transcription 1 (Rtr1) and the human homolog RNAPII-associated protein 2 (RPAP2) may function as CTD phosphatases; however, crystal structures of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1 lack a consensus active site. We identified a phosphoryl transfer domain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtr1 by obtaining and characterizing a 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure. We identified a putative substrate-binding pocket in a deep groove between the zinc finger domain and a pair of helices that contained a trapped sulfate ion. Because sulfate mimics the chemistry of a phosphate group, this structural data suggested that this groove represents the phosphoryl transfer active site. Mutagenesis of the residues lining this groove disrupted catalytic activity of the enzyme assayed in vitro with a fluorescent chemical substrate, and expression of the mutated Rtr1 failed to rescue growth of yeast lacking Rtr1. Characterization of the phosphatase activity of RPAP2 and a mutant of the conserved putative catalytic site in the same chemical assay indicated a conserved reaction mechanism. Our data indicated that the structure of the phosphoryl transfer domain and reaction mechanism for the phosphoryl transfer activity of Rtr1 is distinct from those of other phosphatase families. PMID:26933063

  4. Enhanced nucleophilicity and depressed electrophilicity of peroxide by zinc(II), aluminum(III) and lanthanum(III) ions.

    PubMed

    Nishino, S; Kobayashi, T; Matsushima, H; Tokii, T; Nishida, Y

    2001-01-01

    The binuclear zinc(II) complex, [Zn2(HPTP)(CH3COO)]2+ was found highly active to cleave DNA (double-strand super-coiled DNA, pBR322 and phix174) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. However, no TBARS (2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substance) formation was detected in a solution containing 2-deoxyribose (or 2'-deoxyguanosine, etc); where (HPTP) represents N,N,N'-N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,3-diamino-2-propanol. These facts imply that DNA cleavage reaction by the binuclear Zn(II)/H2O2 system should be due to a hydrolytic mechanism, which may be attributed to the enhanced nucleophilicity but depressed electrophilicity of the peroxide ion coordinated to the zinc(II) ion. DFT (density-functional theory) calculations on the peroxide adduct of monomeric zinc(II) have supported the above consideration. Similar DFT calculations on the peroxide adducts of the Al(III) and La(III) compounds have revealed that electrophilicity of the peroxide ion in these compounds is strongly reduced. This gives an important information to elucidate the fact that La3+ can enhance the growth of plants under certain conditions.

  5. Optical characterization of Eu3+ and Tb3+ ions doped zinc lead borate glasses.

    PubMed

    Thulasiramudu, A; Buddhudu, S

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports on the spectral analysis of Eu3+ or Tb3+ ions (0.5 mol%) doped heavy metal oxide (HMO) based zinc lead borate glasses from the measurement of their absorption, emission spectra and also different physical properties. From the XRD, DSC profiles, the glass nature and glass thermal properties have been studied. The measured emission spectrum of Eu3+ glass has revealed five transitions (5D0-->7F0, 7F1, 7F2, 7F3 and 7F4) at 578, 591, 613, 654 and 702 nm, respectively, with lambdaexci=392 nm (7F0-->5L6). In the case of Tb3+:ZLB glass, four emission transitions such as (5D4-->7F6, 7F5, 7F4 and 7F3) that are located at 489, 542, 585 and 622 nm, respectively, have been measured with lambdaexci=374 nm. For all these emission bands decay curves have been plotted to evaluate their lifetimes and the emission processes that arise in the glasses have been explained in terms of energy level schemes.

  6. Zinc oxide nanolevel surface transformation for liquid crystal orientation by ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Byeong-Yun; Lee, Won-Kyu; Kim, Young-Hwan; Seo, Dae-Shik

    2009-03-01

    This paper introduces the characteristics of the zinc oxide (ZnO) inorganic film deposited by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering as an alternative alignment layer for liquid crystal display (LCD) applications. The crystalline structure related to the texture formation of ZnO (1013) was observed with a tilt angle of approximately 28.1 deg. to the ZnO (0001) plane, leading to a smooth surface and high-density structure. Ion beam (IB) bombardment at various incident angles was used to induce liquid crystal (LC) alignment and cause the measured pretilt angle on ZnO films to assume a triangular contour. The orientation order of liquid crystal molecules was due to the van der Waals force for the vertical alignment of LCs with selective breaking of O-Zn bonds by IB bombardment. The contact angle contour as a function of the IB incident angle resembled the behavior of the pretilt angle. The pretilt angle is controllable by adjusting the surface features on ZnO films with IB bombardment. The electro-optic characteristics of vertically aligned (VA)-LCD based on ZnO film were comparable to those of VA-LCD based on polyimide, showing good potential of ZnO film as a LC alignment layer.

  7. Role of zinc and copper ions in the pathogenetic mechanisms of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

    PubMed

    Stelmashook, E V; Isaev, N K; Genrikhs, E E; Amelkina, G A; Khaspekov, L G; Skrebitsky, V G; Illarioshkin, S N

    2014-05-01

    Disbalance of zinc (Zn2+) and copper (Cu2+) ions in the central nervous system is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous neurodegenerative disorders such as multisystem atrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Wilson-Konovalov disease, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. Among these, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are the most frequent age-related neurodegenerative pathologies with disorders in Zn2+ and Cu2+ homeostasis playing a pivotal role in the mechanisms of pathogenesis. In this review we generalized and systematized current literature data concerning this problem. The interactions of Zn2+ and Cu2+ with amyloid precursor protein (APP), β-amyloid (Abeta), tau-protein, metallothioneins, and GSK3β are considered, as well as the role of these interactions in the generation of free radicals in AD and PD. Analysis of the literature suggests that the main factors of AD and PD pathogenesis (oxidative stress, structural disorders and aggregation of proteins, mitochondrial dysfunction, energy deficiency) that initiate a cascade of events resulting finally in the dysfunction of neuronal networks are mediated by the disbalance of Zn2+ and Cu2+.

  8. A ratiometric fluorescent sensor for zinc ions based on covalently immobilized derivative of benzoxazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qiu-Juan; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Zhao, Xu-Hua; Gong, Yi-Jun; Tang, Jian; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2009-08-01

    In the present paper, we describe the fabrication and analytical characteristics of fluorescence-based zinc ion-sensing glass slides. To construct the sensor, a benzoxazole derivative 4-benzoxazol-2'-yl-3-hydroxyphenyl allyl ether (1) with a terminal double bond was synthesized and copolymerized with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) on the activated surface of glass slides by UV irradiation. In the absence of Zn 2+ at pH 7.24, the resulting optical sensor emitted fluorescence at 450 nm via excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Upon binding with Zn 2+, the ESIPT process was inhibited resulting in a 46 nm blue-shift of fluorescence emission. Thus, the proposed sensor can behave as a ratiometric fluorescent sensor for the selective detection of Zn 2+. In addition, the sensor shows nice selectivity, good reproducibility and fast response time. Cd 2+ did not interfere with Zn 2+ sensing. The sensing membrane demonstrates a good stability with a lifetime of at least 3 months. The linear response range covers a concentration range of Zn 2+ from 8.0 × 10 -5 to 4.0 × 10 -3 mol/L and the detection limit is 4.0 × 10 -5 mol/L. The determination of Zn 2+ in both tap and river water samples shows satisfactory results.

  9. Normal Modes Expose Active Sites in Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Glantz-Gashai, Yitav; Samson, Abraham O.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of active sites is an important tool in bioinformatics. Here we present an improved structure based technique to expose active sites that is based on large changes of solvent accessibility accompanying normal mode dynamics. The technique which detects EXPOsure of active SITes through normal modEs is named EXPOSITE. The technique is trained using a small 133 enzyme dataset and tested using a large 845 enzyme dataset, both with known active site residues. EXPOSITE is also tested in a benchmark protein ligand dataset (PLD) comprising 48 proteins with and without bound ligands. EXPOSITE is shown to successfully locate the active site in most instances, and is found to be more accurate than other structure-based techniques. Interestingly, in several instances, the active site does not correspond to the largest pocket. EXPOSITE is advantageous due to its high precision and paves the way for structure based prediction of active site in enzymes. PMID:28002427

  10. Studies on the interactions of copper and zinc ions with β-amyloid peptides by a surface plasmon resonance biosensor.

    PubMed

    Yao, Fujun; Zhang, Ruiping; Tian, He; Li, Xiangjun

    2012-01-01

    The aggregation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) into fibrils plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Metal ions including copper and zinc are closely connected to the precipitation and toxicity of Aβ. In this study, a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor was constructed to investigate the interactions between Aβ and metal ions. Aβ peptide was immobilized on the SPR chip surface through a preformed alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM). Our observations indicate that the immobilized Aβ undergoes a conformational change upon exposure to the metal ions. A difference in metal binding affinity between Aβ(1-28) and Aβ(1-42) was also detected. The results suggest that SPR is an effective method to characterize the interactions between Aβ and metal ions.

  11. Promotive Effect of Zinc Ions on the Vitality, Migration, and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Cells.

    PubMed

    An, Shaofeng; Gong, Qimei; Huang, Yihua

    2017-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element for proper cellular function and bone formation. However, its exact role in the osteogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) has not been fully clarified before. Here, we speculated that zinc may be effective to regulate their growth and osteogenic differentiation properties. To test this hypothesis, different concentrations (1 × 10(-5), 4 × 10(-5), and 8 × 10(-5) M) of zinc ions (Zn(2+)) were added to the basic growth culture medium and osteogenic inductive medium. Cell viability and migration were measured by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) and transwell migration assay in the basic growth culture medium, respectively. The reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to detect the gene expression levels of selective osteogenic differentiation markers and zinc transporters. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity analysis and alizarin red S staining were used to investigate the mineralization of hDPCs. Exposure of hDPCs to Zn(2+) stimulated their viability and migration capacity in a dose- and time-dependent manner. RT-qPCR assay revealed elevated expression levels of osteogenic differentiation-related genes and zinc transporters genes in various degrees. ALP activity was also increased with elevated Zn(2+) concentrations and extended culture periods, but enhanced matrix nodules formation were observed only in 4 × 10(-5) and 8 × 10(-5) M Zn(2+) groups. These findings suggest that specific concentrations of Zn(2+) could potentiate the vitality, migration, and osteogenic differentiation of hDPCs. We may combine optimum zinc element into pulp capping materials to improve their biological performance.

  12. Binding of iron, zinc, and lead ions from aqueous solution by shea butter (Butyrospermun Parkii) seed husks

    SciTech Connect

    Eromosele, I.C.; Otitolaye, O.O. )

    1994-08-01

    Several workers have reported on the potential use of agricultural products as substrates for the removal of metal ions from aqueous solutions. These studies demonstrated that considerable amounts of metal ions can be removed from aqueous solutions by cellulosic materials. The merit in the use of the latter is their relative abundance and cheapness compared to conventional materials for the removal of toxic metal ions from waste-waters. In some of the studies, chemical modification of cellulosic materials significantly enhanced their ion-binding properties, providing greater flexibility in their applications to a wide range of heavy metal ions. Shea butter plant (Butyrospermun Parkii) normally grows in the wild within the guinea-savana zone of Nigeria. The seeds are a rich source of edible oils and the husks are usually discarded. The husk is thus available in abundance and, hence, there is reason to examine its ion-binding properties for its possible application in the removal of toxic metal ions from industrial waste-waters. This paper reports on preliminary studies of the sorption of iron, zinc and lead ions from aqueous solution by modified and unmodified shea butter seed husks. 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. An optical fiber-based sensor array for the monitoring of zinc and copper ions in aqueous environments.

    PubMed

    Kopitzke, Steven; Geissinger, Peter

    2014-02-17

    Copper and zinc are elements commonly used in industrial applications as aqueous solutions. Before the solutions can be discharged into civil or native waterways, waste treatment processes must be undertaken to ensure compliance with government guidelines restricting the concentration of ions discharged in solution. While currently there are methods of analysis available to monitor these solutions, each method has disadvantages, be it high costs, inaccuracy, and/or being time-consuming. In this work, a new optical fiber-based platform capable of providing fast and accurate results when performing solution analysis for these metals is described. Fluorescent compounds that exhibit a high sensitivity and selectivity for either zinc or copper have been employed for fabricating the sensors. These sensors demonstrated sub-part-per-million detection limits, 30-second response times, and the ability to analyze samples with an average error of under 10%. The inclusion of a fluorescent compound as a reference material to compensate for fluctuations from pulsed excitation sources has further increased the reliability and accuracy of each sensor. Finally, after developing sensors capable of monitoring zinc and copper individually, these sensors are combined to form a single optical fiber sensor array capable of simultaneously monitoring concentration changes in zinc and copper in aqueous environments.

  14. Comparison on the molecular response profiles between nano zinc oxide (ZnO) particles and free zinc ion using a genome-wide toxicogenomics approach.

    PubMed

    Su, Guanyong; Zhang, Xiaowei; Giesy, John P; Musarrat, Javed; Saquib, Quaiser; Alkhedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Yu, Hongxia

    2015-11-01

    Increasing production and applications of nano zinc oxide particles (nano-ZnO) enhances the probability of its exposure in occupational and environmental settings, but toxicity studies are still limited. Taking the free Zn ion (Zn(2+)) as a control, cytotoxicity of a commercially available nano-ZnO was assessed with a 6-h exposure in Escherichia coli (E. coli). The fitted dose-cytotoxicity curve for ZnCl2 was significantly sharper than that from nano-ZnO. Then, a genome-wide gene expression profile following exposure to nano-ZnO was conducted by use of a live cell reporter assay system with library of 1820 modified green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing promoter reporter vectors constructed from E. coli K12 strains, which resulted in 387 significantly altered genes in bacterial (p < 0.001). These altered genes were enriched into ten biological processing and two cell components (p < 0.05) terms through statistical hypergeometric testing, strongly suggesting that exposure to nano-ZnO would result a great disturbance on the functional gene product synthesis processing, such as translation, gene expression, RNA modification, and structural constituent of ribosome. The pattern of expression of 37 genes altered by nano-ZnO (fold change>2) was different from the profile following exposure to 6 mg/L of free zinc ion. The result indicates that these two Zn forms might cause toxicity to bacterial in different modes of action. Our results underscore the importance of understanding the adverse effects elicited by nano-ZnO after entering aquatic environment.

  15. Can zinc(II) ions be doped into the crystal structure of L-proline cadmium chloride monohydrate?

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R

    2013-12-01

    The bivalent metals Cd(II) and Zn(II) exhibit different stereochemical requirements for the set of chloride and L-proline ligands, which precludes the doping of Zn(II) ions into the crystal structure of dichloro(l-proline)cadmium(II) hydrate also referred to as L-proline cadmium chloride monohydrate (L-PCCM). Hence, the reported claim of growth of zinc doped L-PCCM crystals namely Zn(0.4 mol):LPCCM and Zn(0.2 mol):LPCCM by Vetrivel et al. (S. Vetrivel, P. Anandan, K. Kanagasabapathy, S. Bhattacharya, S. Gopinath, R. Rajasekaran, Effect of zinc chloride on the growth and characterization of l-proline cadmium chloride monohydrate semiorganic NLO single crystals, Spectrochim. Acta 110A (2013) 317-323), is untenable.

  16. A facile synthesis of zinc oxide/multiwalled carbon nanotube nanocomposite lithium ion battery anodes by sol-gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köse, Hilal; Karaal, Şeyma; Aydın, Ali Osman; Akbulut, Hatem

    2015-11-01

    Free standing zinc oxide (ZnO) and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) nanocomposite materials are prepared by a sol gel technique giving a new high capacity anode material for lithium ion batteries. Free-standing ZnO/MWCNT nanocomposite anodes with two different chelating agent additives, triethanolamine (TEA) and glycerin (GLY), yield different electrochemical performances. Field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses reveal the produced anode electrodes exhibit a unique structure of ZnO coating on the MWCNT surfaces. Li-ion cell assembly using a ZnO/MWCNT/GLY free-standing anode and Li metal cathode possesses the best discharge capacity, remaining as high as 460 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles. This core-shell structured anode can offer increased energy storage and performance over conventional anodes in Li-ion batteries.

  17. The Influence of Doping with Transition Metal Ions on the Structure and Magnetic Properties of Zinc Oxide Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Zn1−xNixO (x = 0.03 ÷ 0.10) and Zn1−xFexO (x = 0.03 ÷ 0.15) thin films were synthesized by sol-gel method. The structure and the surface morphology of zinc oxide thin films doped with transition metal (TM) ions have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The magnetic studies were done using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) at room temperature. Experimental results revealed that the substitution of Ni ions in ZnO wurtzite lattice for the contents x = 0.03 ÷ 0.10 (Ni2+) leads to weak ferromagnetism of thin films. For Zn1−xFexO with x = 0.03 ÷ 0.05, the Fe3+ ions are magnetic coupling by superexchange interaction via oxygen ions in wurtzite structure. For x = 0.10 ÷ 0.15 (Fe3+) one can observe the increasing of secondary phase of ZnFe2O4 spinel. The Zn0.9Fe0.1O film shows a superparamagnetic behavior due to small crystallite sizes and the net spin magnetic moments arisen from the interaction between the iron ions through an oxygen ion in the spinel structure. PMID:24683324

  18. Evaluation of layered zinc hydroxide nitrate and zinc/nickel double hydroxide salts in the removal of chromate ions from solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Henrique Bortolaz; Wypych, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    Layered zinc hydroxide nitrate (ZnHN) and Zn/Ni layered double hydroxide salts were synthesized and used to remove chromate ions from solutions at pH 8.0. The materials were characterized by many instrumental techniques before and after chromate ion removal. ZnHN decomposed after contact with the chromate solution, whereas the layered structure of Zn/Ni hydroxide nitrate (Zn/NiHN) and Zn/Ni hydroxide acetate (Zn/NiHA) remained their layers intact after the topotactic anionic exchange reaction, only changing the basal distances. ZnHN, Zn/NiHN, and Zn/NiHA removed 210.1, 144.8, and 170.1 mg of CrO42-/g of material, respectively. Although the removal values obtained for Zn/NiHN and Zn/NiHA were smaller than the values predicted for the ideal formulas of the solids (194.3 and 192.4 mg of CrO42-/g of material, respectively), the measured capacities were higher than the values achieved with many materials reported in the literature. Kinetic experiments showed the removal reaction was fast. To facilitate the solid/liquid separation process after chromium removal, Zn/Ni layered double hydroxide salts with magnetic supports were also synthesized, and their ability to remove chromate was evaluated.

  19. Ion Exchange Conceptual Design for Treating Seven Technical Area Sumps with Elevated Levels of Copper and Zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.N.

    1999-02-17

    Recently a meeting was held to discuss technical support for developing a conceptual design and estimate for installing and operating an in-line ion exchange system to treat seven Technical Area Sumps with elevated levels (high ppb - low ppm) of copper and potentially zinc (copper level is above the outfall limits). These sump waters are currently routed to the A01 outfall, which is permitted by the State of South Carolina. a study of potential treatment options and followup laboratory work done in the summer of 1997 by Larry Oji and John Hage identified two commercially available ion exchange resins, Duolit GT-73 and Chelex 100, for treating waters at these metals concentrations.

  20. Serotype-Selective, Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Zinc Endopeptidase of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    domain lacks a deep pocket at the interface of its complex .5,9 Third, the four-ligand coordination of the zinc ion embedded in the active site of the... complex with a substrate has been reported.25 In addition to the use of the active site of the endopeptidase as a target described above, the X- ray...simulations were carried out for each of the eight com- puter-identified compounds in complex with the endo- peptidase. Each of these simulations was

  1. Amino Acid Derivatives as New Zinc Binding Groups for the Design of Selective Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Giustiniano, Mariateresa; Agamennone, Mariangela; Rossello, Armando; Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel; Novellino, Ettore; Campiglia, Pietro; Vernieri, Ermelinda; Bertamino, Alessia; Carotenuto, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    A number of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are important medicinal targets for conditions ranging from rheumatoid arthritis to cardiomyopathy, periodontal disease, liver cirrhosis, multiple sclerosis, and cancer invasion and metastasis, where they showed to have a dual role, inhibiting or promoting important processes involved in the pathology. MMPs contain a zinc (II) ion in the protein active site. Small-molecule inhibitors of these metalloproteins are designed to bind directly to the active site metal ions. In an effort to devise new approaches to selective inhibitors, in this paper, we describe the synthesis and preliminary biological evaluation of amino acid derivatives as new zinc binding groups (ZBGs). The incorporation of selected metal-binding functions in more complex biphenyl sulfonamide moieties allowed the identification of one compound able to interact selectively with different MMP enzymatic isoforms. PMID:23555050

  2. Toxicity of zinc to fungi, bacteria, and coliphages: influence of chloride ions.

    PubMed Central

    Babich, H; Stotzky, G

    1978-01-01

    A 10 mM concentration of Zn2+ decreased the survival of Escherichia coli; enhanced the survival of Bacillus cereus; did not significantly affect the survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Norcardia corallina, and T1, T7, P1, and phi80 coliphages; completely inhibited mycelial growth of Rhizoctonia solani; and reduced mycelial growth of Fusarium solani, Cunninghamella echinulata, Aspergillus niger, and Trichoderma viride. The toxicity of zinc to the fungi, bacteria, and coliphages was unaffected, lessened, or increased by the addition of high concentrations of NaCl. The increased toxicity of zinc in the presence of high concentrations of NaCl was not a result of a synergistic interaction between Zn2+ and elevated osmotic pressures but of the formation of complex anionic ZnCl species that exerted greater toxicities than did cationic Zn2+. Conversely, the decrease in zinc toxicity with increasing concentrations of NaCl probably reflected the decrease in the levels of Zn2+ due to the formation of Zn-Cl species, which was less inhibitory to these microbes than was Zn2+. A. niger tolerated higher concentrations of zinc in the presence of NaCl at 37 than at 25 degrees C. PMID:736544

  3. Validated ligand mapping of ACE active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, Daniel J.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2005-08-01

    Crystal structures of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) complexed with three inhibitors (lisinopril, captopril, enalapril) provided experimental data for testing the validity of a prior active site model predicting the bound conformation of the inhibitors. The ACE active site model - predicted over 18 years ago using a series of potent ACE inhibitors of diverse chemical structure - was recreated using published data and commercial software. Comparison between the predicted structures of the three inhibitors bound to the active site of ACE and those determined experimentally yielded root mean square deviation (RMSD) values of 0.43-0.81 Å, among the distances defining the active site map. The bound conformations of the chemically relevant atoms were accurately deduced from the geometry of ligands, applying the assumption that the geometry of the active site groups responsible for binding and catalysis of amide hydrolysis was constrained. The mapping of bound inhibitors at the ACE active site was validated for known experimental compounds, so that the constrained conformational search methodology may be applied with confidence when no experimentally determined structure of the enzyme yet exists, but potent, diverse inhibitors are available.

  4. The requirement of zinc and calcium ions for functional MMP activity in demineralized dentin matrices

    PubMed Central

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Agee, Kelli A.; Hoshika, Tomohiro; Carrilho, Marcela; Breschi, Lorenzo; Tjäderhane, Leo; Nishitani, Yoshihiro; Carvalho, Ricardo M.; Looney, Stephen; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2010-01-01

    The progressive degradation of resin-dentin bonds is due, in part, to the slow degradation of collagen fibrils in the hybrid layer by endogenous matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) of the dentin matrix. In in vitro durability studies, the storage medium composition might be important because the optimum activity of MMPs requires both zinc and calcium. Objective This study evaluated the effect of different storage media on changes in matrix stiffness, loss of dry weight or solubilization of collagen from demineralized dentin beams incubated in vitro for up to 60 days. Methods Dentin beams (1×2×6mm) were completely demineralized in 10% phosphoric acid. After baseline measurements of dry mass and elastic modulus (E) (3-point bending, 15% strain) the beams were divided into 5 groups (n=11/group) and incubated at 37°C in either media containing both zinc and calcium designated as complete medium(CM), calcium-free medium, zinc-free medium, a doubled-zinc medium or water. Beams were retested at 3, 7, 14, 30, and 60 days of incubation. The incubation media was hydrolyzed with HCl for the quantitation of hydroxyproline (HOP) as an index of solubilization of collagen by MMPs. Data were analyzed using repeated measures of ANOVA. Results Both the storage medium and storage time showed significant effects on E, mass loss and HOP release (p<0.05). The incubation in CM resulted in relatively rapid and significant (p<0.05) decreases in stiffness, and increasing amounts of mass loss. The HOP content of the experimental media also increased with incubation time but was significantly lower (p<0.05) than in the control CM medium, the recommended storage medium. Conclusions The storage solutions used to age resin-dentin bonds should be buffered solutions that contain both calcium and zinc. The common use of water as an aging medium may underestimate the hydrolytic activity of endogenous dentin MMPs. PMID:20688380

  5. Experimental phasing using zinc anomalous scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Sun-Shin; An, Young Jun; Jeong, Chang-Sook; Kim, Min-Kyu; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Lee, Kwang-Hoon; Oh, Byung-Ha

    2012-09-01

    The surface of proteins can be charged with zinc ions and the anomalous signals from these zinc ions can be used for structure determination of proteins. Zinc is a suitable metal for anomalous dispersion phasing methods in protein crystallography. Structure determination using zinc anomalous scattering has been almost exclusively limited to proteins with intrinsically bound zinc(s). Here, it is reported that multiple zinc ions can easily be charged onto the surface of proteins with no intrinsic zinc-binding site by using zinc-containing solutions. Zn derivatization of protein surfaces appears to be a largely unnoticed but promising method of protein structure determination.

  6. Selective Ion Transporting Polymerized Ionic Liquid Membrane Separator for Enhancing Cycle Stability and Durability in Secondary Zinc-Air Battery Systems.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ho Jung; Chi, Won Seok; Kwon, Ohchan; Lee, Jin Goo; Kim, Jong Hak; Shul, Yong-Gun

    2016-10-05

    Rechargeable secondary zinc-air batteries with superior cyclic stability were developed using commercial polypropylene (PP) membrane coated with polymerized ionic liquid as separators. The anionic exchange polymer was synthesized copolymerizing 1-[(4-ethenylphenyl)methyl]-3-butylimidazolium hydroxide (EBIH) and butyl methacrylate (BMA) monomers by free radical polymerization for both functionality and structural integrity. The ionic liquid induced copolymer was coated on a commercially available PP membrane (Celguard 5550). The coat allows anionic transfer through the separator and minimizes the migration of zincate ions to the cathode compartment, which reduces electrolyte conductivity and may deteriorate catalytic activity by the formation of zinc oxide on the surface of the catalyst layer. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) data revealed the copolymer-coated separator showed less zinc element in the cathode, indicating lower zinc crossover through the membrane. Ion coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) analysis confirmed over 96% of zincate ion crossover was reduced. In our charge/discharge setup, the constructed cell with the ionic liquid induced copolymer casted separator exhibited drastically improved durability as the battery life increased more than 281% compared to the pure commercial PP membrane. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) during the cycle process elucidated the premature failure of cells due to the zinc crossover for the untreated cell and revealed a substantial importance must be placed in zincate control.

  7. Rechargeable zinc halogen battery

    SciTech Connect

    Spaziante, P.M.; Nidola, A.

    1980-01-01

    A rechargeable zinc halogen battery has an aqueous electrolyte containing ions of zinc and halogen and an amount of polysaccharide and/or sorbitol sufficient to prevent zinc dendrite formation during recharging. The electrolyte may also contain trace amounts of metals such as tungsten, molybdenum, and lead. 7 tables.

  8. 3,3'-Dihydroxyisorenieratene prevents UV-induced formation of reactive oxygen species and the release of protein-bound zinc ions in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lutter, Kaya; De Spirt, Silke; Kock, Sebastian; Kröncke, Klaus-Dietrich; Martin, Hans-Dieter; Wagener, Tanja; Stahl, Wilhelm

    2010-02-01

    3,3'-Dihydroxyisorenieratene (DHIR) is a structurally unusual carotenoid exhibiting bifunctional antioxidant properties. It is synthesized by Brevibacterium linens, used in dairy industry for the production of red smear cheeses. The compound protects cellular structures against photo-oxidative damage and inhibits the UV-dependent formation of thymidine dimers. Here we show that DHIR prevents a UV-induced intracellular release of zinc ions from proteins in human dermal fibroblasts. The effect is correlated with a decreased formation of intracellular reactive oxygen species. In contrast, zinc release from cellular proteins induced by hyperthermia is not affected by pretreatment of cells with the antioxidant DHIR. It is suggested that the intracellular zinc release upon UV irradiation is due to oxidative modifications of the zinc ligands in proteins (e.g. cysteine) and that protection by DHIR is due to intracellular scavenging of reactive oxygen species generated in photo-oxidation.

  9. Zinc ion coordination as a modulating factor of the ZnuA histidine-rich loop flexibility: A molecular modeling and fluorescence spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Castelli, Silvia; Stella, Lorenzo; Petrarca, Patrizia; Battistoni, Andrea; Desideri, Alessandro; Falconi, Mattia

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescence data indicate that the His-loop of ZnuA interacts with Zn{sup +2} ions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ZnuA structural model proposed validates these spectroscopic findings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is proposed that a zinc loaded His-loop may facilitate the ZnuA-ZnuB recognition. -- Abstract: ZnuA is the soluble component of the high-affinity ZnuABC zinc transporter belonging to the ATP-binding cassette-type periplasmic Zn-binding proteins. The zinc transporter ZnuABC is composed by three proteins: ZnuB, the membrane permease, ZnuC, the ATPase component and ZnuA, the soluble periplasmic metal-binding protein which captures Zn and delivers it to ZnuB. The ZnuA protein contains a charged flexible loop, rich in histidines and acidic residues, showing significant species-specific differences. Various studies have established that this loop contributes to the formation of a secondary zinc binding site, which has been proposed to be important in the acquisition of periplasmic Zn for its delivery to ZnuB or for regulation of zinc uptake. Due to its high mobility the structure of the histidine-rich loop has never been solved by X-ray diffraction studies. In this paper, through a combined use of molecular modeling, mutagenesis and fluorescence spectroscopy, we confirm the presence of two zinc binding sites characterized by different affinities for the metal ion and show that the flexibility of the loop is modulated by the binding of the zinc ions to the protein. The data obtained by fluorescence spectroscopy have then be used to validate a 3D model including the unsolved histidine-rich loop.

  10. I. Effects of Perturbations on Ion Motion in Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry. I. First Principles Investigation of Hyperfine Properties in Zinc Chalcogenides and Spinels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Dale Wesley

    I. Many FT-ICR systems are approximately described by the so-called quadrupole approximation; the dynamics of a single ion in a constant magnetic field and a quadratic electrostatic potential. The quadrupole approximation is considered the unperturbed problem while all other forces are treated as perturbations to this motion. Averaging methods are employed to study the effects of electrostatic and excitation field inhomogeneities on ion motion in a cubic ICR cell. A theory of ion motion based on averaging methods in a cubic ICR cell is presented for differential sinusoidal excitation that explains the observed stability, orders of magnitude and resonance positions for excitation frequencies away from the cyclotron frequency. FT-ICR double resonance experiments are used to test the theoretical predictions. For excitation frequencies near the cyclotron frequency, a previously unknown and simple expression is derived for the phase synchronization process in ICR which relates how the cyclotron radius and phase depend on the initial conditions. Finally, Lie transform perturbation theory and averaging methods are used to derive frequency shifts and mode amplitudes to all three fundamental ICR modes for the true electrostatic cubic cell potential. These analytical results give good agreement with numerical results. II. All electron Hartree-Fock cluster calculations are carried out to derive electron densities, electric field gradients and electronic structures in zinc chalcogenides, zinc fluoride and oxide spinels in order to theoretically interpret the available hyperfine interactions data. The theoretical densities at the zinc nucleus are combined with experimental isomer shifts to estimate a value for the mean square nuclear charge radius for the Mossbauer transition in ^{67}Zn of Delta< r^2 > = {+(13.9} +/- 1.4)times10 ^{-3} fm^2. For ZnO (wurtzite) and ZnF_2, the electric field gradient tensors are calculated at all nuclei and compared with the available data

  11. Effects of copper and zinc ions on the germicidal properties of two popular pharmaceutical antiseptic agents cetylpyridinium chloride and povidone-iodine.

    PubMed

    Zeelie, J J; McCarthy, T J

    1998-03-01

    The effects of copper and zinc ions on the rate of killing of Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus and fungal yeast Candida albicans by antiseptic agents cetylpyridinium chloride and povidone-iodine (Betadine) were investigated. In the 48 test cases copper and zinc ions clearly potentiated the antiseptic agents in 28 (58.3%) cases and exhibited an improved (not clear potentiation) activity in 15 (31.3%) cases. In five (10.4%) cases there was no change in the antiseptics' antimicrobial activity. In general zinc potentiated the antiseptic agents more than copper. If an 'improved activity' was the only criterion for this study, then a more rapid antimicrobial effect was observed in 43 out of the 48 test cases, i.e., 90%.

  12. Sulfide binding is mediated by zinc ions discovered in the crystal structure of a hydrothermal vent tubeworm hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Flores, Jason F; Fisher, Charles R; Carney, Susan L; Green, Brian N; Freytag, John K; Schaeffer, Stephen W; Royer, William E

    2005-02-22

    Key to the remarkable ability of vestimentiferan tubeworms to thrive in the harsh conditions of hydrothermal vents are hemoglobins that permit the sequestration and delivery of hydrogen sulfide and oxygen to chemoautotrophic bacteria. Here, we demonstrate that zinc ions, not free cysteine residues, bind sulfide in vestimentiferan hemoglobins. The crystal structure of the C1 hemoglobin from the hydrothermal vent tubeworm Riftia pachyptila has been determined to 3.15 A and revealed the unexpected presence of 12 tightly bound Zn(2+) ions near the threefold axes of this D(3) symmetric hollow sphere. Chelation experiments on R. pachyptila whole-coelomic fluid and purified hemoglobins reveal a role for Zn(2+) ions in sulfide binding. Free cysteine residues, previously proposed as sulfide-binding sites in vestimentiferan hemoglobins, are found buried in surprisingly hydrophobic pockets below the surface of the R. pachyptila C1 molecule, suggesting that access of these residues to environmental sulfide is restricted. Attempts to reduce the sulfide-binding capacities of R. pachyptila hemoglobins by addition of a thiol inhibitor were also unsuccessful. These findings challenge the currently accepted paradigm of annelid hemoglobin evolution and adaptation to reducing environments.

  13. The electrical properties of 60 keV zinc ions implanted into semi-insulating gallium arsenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littlejohn, M. A.; Anikara, R.

    1972-01-01

    The electrical behavior of zinc ions implanted into chromium-doped semiinsulating gallium arsenide was investigated by measurements of the sheet resistivity and Hall effect. Room temperature implantations were performed using fluence values from 10 to the 12th to 10 to the 15th power/sq cm at 60 keV. The samples were annealed for 30 minutes in a nitrogen atmosphere up to 800 C in steps of 200 C and the effect of this annealing on the Hall effect and sheet resistivity was studied at room temperature using the Van der Pauw technique. The temperature dependence of sheet resistivity and mobility was measured from liquid nitrogen temperature to room temperature. Finally, a measurement of the implanted profile was obtained using a layer removal technique combined with the Hall effect and sheet resistivity measurements.

  14. Second order nonlinear optical properties of zinc oxide films deposited by low temperature dual ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Larciprete, M.C.; Passeri, D.; Michelotti, F.; Paoloni, S.; Sibilia, C.; Bertolotti, M.; Belardini, A.; Sarto, F.; Somma, F.; Lo Mastro, S.

    2005-01-15

    We investigated second order optical nonlinearity of zinc oxide thin films, grown on glass substrates by the dual ion beam sputtering technique under different deposition conditions. Linear optical characterization of the films was carried out by spectrophotometric optical transmittance and reflectance measurements, giving the complex refractive index dispersion. Resistivity of the films was determined using the four-point probe sheet resistance method. Second harmonic generation measurements were performed by means of the Maker fringes technique where the fundamental beam was originated by nanosecond laser at {lambda}=1064 nm. We found a relatively high nonlinear optical response, and evidence of a dependence of the nonlinear coefficient on the deposition parameters for each sample. Moreover, the crystalline properties of the films were investigated by x-ray diffraction measurements and correlation with second order nonlinearity were analyzed. Finally, we investigated the influence of the oxygen flow rate during the deposition process on both the second order nonlinearity and the structural properties of the samples.

  15. Metal-ion mutagenesis: conversion of a purple acid phosphatase from sweet potato to a neutral phosphatase with the formation of an unprecedented catalytically competent Mn(II)Mn(II) active site.

    PubMed

    Mitić, Natasa; Noble, Christopher J; Gahan, Lawrence R; Hanson, Graeme R; Schenk, Gerhard

    2009-06-17

    The currently accepted paradigm is that the purple acid phosphatases (PAPs) require a heterovalent, dinuclear metal-ion center for catalysis. It is believed that this is an essential feature for these enzymes in order for them to operate under acidic conditions. A PAP from sweet potato is unusual in that it appears to have a specific requirement for manganese, forming a unique Fe(III)-mu-(O)-Mn(II) center under catalytically optimal conditions (Schenk et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2005, 102, 273). Herein, we demonstrate, with detailed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic and kinetic studies, that in this enzyme the chromophoric Fe(III) can be replaced by Mn(II), forming a catalytically active, unprecedented antiferromagnetically coupled homodivalent Mn(II)-mu-(H)OH-mu-carboxylato-Mn(II) center in a PAP. However, although the enzyme is still active, it no longer functions as an acid phosphatase, having optimal activity at neutral pH. Thus, PAPs may have evolved from distantly related divalent dinuclear metallohydrolases that operate under pH neutral conditions by stabilization of a trivalent-divalent metal-ion core. The present Mn(II)-Mn(II) system models these distant relatives, and the results herein make a significant contribution to our understanding of the role of the chromophoric metal ion as an activator of the nucleophile. In addition, the detailed analysis of strain broadened EPR spectra from exchange-coupled dinuclear Mn(II)-Mn(II) centers described herein provides the basis for the full interpretation of the EPR spectra from other dinuclear Mn metalloenzymes.

  16. Structural and optical characteristics of Eu3+ ions in sodium-lead-zinc-lithium-borate glass system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagukguk, J.; Kaewkhao, J.; Djamal, M.; Hidayat, R.; Suprijadi; Ruangtaweep, Y.

    2016-10-01

    Structural and optical properties of Eu3+-doped sodium-lead-zinc-lithium-borate glasses (65-x)B2O3sbnd 15Na2Osbnd 10PbOsbnd 5ZnOsbnd 5Li2Osbnd xEu2O3 (where x = 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0) have been measured and analyzed by varying the Eu3+ ion concentrations. The physical parameters such as polaron radius, field strength and inter nuclear distance have been determined from measurements of densities and refractive indices. The structural properties of the prepared borate glasses were analyzed based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR instruments. The diffraction spectra show no characteristic peaks in these glasses, which indicates the amorphous nature of the glasses. The infrared spectrum of the Eu3+-doped sodium-lead-zinc-lithium-borate glass systems show three disparate regions for active absorption band around 830-860 cm-1, 1020-1040 cm-1 and 1170-1180 cm-1. The electronic transitions in the UV-vis and NIR regions are assigned to the 7F0 → 5D4, 7F0 → 5G2, 7F0 → 5L6, 7F0 → 5D3, 7F0 → 5D2, 7F0 → 5D1, 7F0 → 5D07F1 → 5D07F0 → 7F6 and 7F1 → 7F6 levels centered at 362 nm, 380 nm, 395 nm, 414 nm, 465 nm, 533 nm, 583 nm, 590 nm 2092 nm and 2202 nm respectively. Five transition bands of luminescence spectra have been observed by using an excited wavelength of 395 nm. The luminescence intensity ratio (R) of 5D0 → 7F2 (electric dipole) transition to 5D0 → 7F1 (magnetic dipole) transition has been determined to obtain the strength of the covalent/ionic bond between the Eu3+ ions and the surrounding ligands. Radiative life time and emission color of the glasses were estimated and compared with other literature data by varying Eu3+ concentrations. The experimental lifetime of the 5D0 level was found to increase with increasing Eu3+ ion content, suggesting higher non-radiative energy transfer among Eu3+ ions in the glasses.

  17. 5-Arylvinyl-2,2′-bipyridyls: Bright “push–pull” dyes as components in fluorescent indicators for zinc ions

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lei; Younes, Ali H.; Yuan, Zhao; Clark, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the zinc(II)-dependent photophysical properties of arylvinylbipyridines (AVBs), a class of fluoroionophores in which 2,2′-bipyridyl and an aryl moiety are electronically conjugated. Zinc(II) binding of an AVB may lead to an emission bathochromic shift of the fluoroionophore without diminishing its fluorescence quantum yield. This observation can be explained using the excited state model of electron donor–π bridge–electron acceptor “push–pull” fluorophores, in which the bipy moiety acts as an electron acceptor, and zinc(II)-coordination strengthens its electron affinity. The spectral sensitivity of bipy-containing fluoroionophores, such as AVBs, to zinc(II) can be exploited to prepare fluorescent indicators for this ion. In several cases, AVB moieties are incorporated in fluorescent heteroditopic ligands, so that the variation of zinc(II) concentration over a relatively large range can be correlated to fluorescence changes in either intensity or color. AVB fluoroionophores are also used to introduce an intramolecular Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) strategy for creating zinc(II) indicators with high photostability and a narrow emission band, two desired characteristics of dyes used in fluorescence microscopy. PMID:26190906

  18. Adsorption characteristics of copper, lead, zinc and cadmium ions by tourmaline.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kan; Sun, Tie-heng; Sun, Li-na; Li, Hai-bo

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption characteristics of heavy metals: Cu(II), Pb(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) ions on tourmaline were studied. Adsorption equilibrium was established. The adsorption isotherms of all the four metal ions followed well Langmuir equation. Tourmaline was found to remove heavy metal ions efficiently from aqueous solution with selectivity in the order of Pb(II)>Cu(II)>Cd(II)>Zn(II). The adsorption of metal ions by tourmaline increased with the initial concentration of metal ions increasing in the medium. Tourmaline could also increase pH value of metal solution. -The maximum heavy metal ions adsorbed by tourmaline was found to be 78.86, 154.08, 67.25, and 66.67 mg/g for Cu(II), Pb(II), Zn(II) and Cd(R), respectively. The temperature (25-55 degrees C) had a small effect on the adsorption capacity of tourmaline. Competitive adsorption of Cu(II), Pb(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) ions was also studied. The adsorption capacity of tourmaline for single metal decreased in the order of Pb>Cu>Zn >Cd and inhibition dominance observed in two metal systems was Pb>Cu, Pb>Zn, Pb>Cd, Cu>Zn, Cu>Cd, and Cd>Zn.

  19. Amphipathic Benzoic Acid Derivativies: Synthesis and Binding in the Hydrophobic Tunnel of the Zinc Deacetylase LpxC

    SciTech Connect

    Shin,H.; Gennadios, H.; Whittington, D.; Christianson, D.

    2007-01-01

    The first committed step in lipid A biosynthesis is catalyzed by uridine diphosphate-(3-O-(R-3-hydroxymyristoyl))-N-acetylglucosamine deacetylase (LpxC), a zinc-dependent deacetylase, and inhibitors of LpxC may be useful in the development of antibacterial agents targeting a broad spectrum of Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we report the design of amphipathic benzoic acid derivatives that bind in the hydrophobic tunnel in the active site of LpxC. The hydrophobic tunnel accounts for the specificity of LpxC toward substrates and substrate analogues bearing a 3-O-myristoyl substituent. Simple benzoic acid derivatives bearing an aliphatic 'tail' bind in the hydrophobic tunnel with micromolar affinity despite the lack of a glucosamine ring like that of the substrate. However, although these benzoic acid derivatives each contain a negatively charged carboxylate 'warhead' intended to coordinate to the active site zinc ion, the 2.25 {angstrom} resolution X-ray crystal structure of LpxC complexed with 3-(heptyloxy)benzoate reveals 'backward' binding in the hydrophobic tunnel, such that the benzoate moiety does not coordinate to zinc. Instead, it binds at the outer end of the hydrophobic tunnel. Interestingly, these ligands bind with affinities comparable to those measured for more complicated substrate analogue inhibitors containing glucosamine ring analogues and hydroxamate 'warheads' that coordinate to the active site zinc ion. We conclude that the intermolecular interactions in the hydrophobic tunnel dominate enzyme affinity in this series of benzoic acid derivatives.

  20. Exploring zinc coordination in novel zinc battery electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Kar, Mega; Winther-Jensen, Bjorn; Forsyth, Maria; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2014-06-14

    The coordination of zinc ions by tetraglyme has been investigated here to support the development of novel electrolytes for rechargeable zinc batteries. Zn(2+) reduction is electrochemically reversible from tetraglyme. The spectroscopic data, molar conductivity and thermal behavior as a function of zinc composition, between mole ratios [80 : 20] and [50 : 50] [tetraglyme : zinc chloride], all suggest that strong interactions take place between chloro-zinc complexes and tetraglyme. Varying the concentration of zinc chloride produces a range of zinc-chloro species (ZnClx)(2-x) in solution, which hinder full interaction between the zinc ion and tetraglyme. Both the [70 : 30] and [50 : 50] mixtures are promising electrolyte candidates for reversible zinc batteries, such as the zinc-air device.

  1. Potential Interactions of Calcium-Sensitive Reagents with Zinc Ion in Different Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fujikawa, Koichi; Fukumori, Ryo; Nakamura, Saki; Kutsukake, Takaya; Takarada, Takeshi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Background Several chemicals have been widely used to evaluate the involvement of free Ca2+ in mechanisms underlying a variety of biological responses for decades. Here, we report high reactivity to zinc of well-known Ca2+-sensitive reagents in diverse cultured cells. Methodology/Principal Findings In rat astrocytic C6 glioma cells loaded with the fluorescent Ca2+ dye Fluo-3, the addition of ZnCl2 gradually increased the fluorescence intensity in a manner sensitive to the Ca2+ chelator EGTA irrespective of added CaCl2. The addition of the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 drastically increased Fluo-3 fluorescence in the absence of ZnCl2, while the addition of the Zn2+ ionophore pyrithione rapidly and additionally increased the fluorescence in the presence of ZnCl2, but not in its absence. In cells loaded with the zinc dye FluoZin-3 along with Fluo-3, a similarly gradual increase was seen in the fluorescence of Fluo-3, but not of FluoZin-3, in the presence of both CaCl2 and ZnCl2. Further addition of pyrithione drastically increased the fluorescence intensity of both dyes, while the addition of the Zn2+ chelator N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine (TPEN) rapidly and drastically decreased FluoZin-3 fluorescence. In cells loaded with FluoZin-3 alone, the addition of ZnCl2 induced a gradual increase in the fluorescence in a fashion independent of added CaCl2 but sensitive to EGTA. Significant inhibition was found in the vitality to reduce 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide in a manner sensitive to TPEN, EDTA and BAPTA in C6 glioma cells exposed to ZnCl2, with pyrithione accelerating the inhibition. Similar inhibition occurred in an EGTA-sensitive fashion after brief exposure to ZnCl2 in pluripotent P19 cells, neuronal Neuro2A cells and microglial BV2 cells, which all expressed mRNA for particular zinc transporters. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, comprehensive analysis is absolutely required for the demonstration of a

  2. Calcium ion gradients modulate the zinc affinity and antibacterial activity of human calprotectin.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Megan Brunjes; Hayden, Joshua A; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2012-10-31

    Calprotectin (CP) is an antimicrobial protein produced and released by neutrophils that inhibits the growth of pathogenic microorganisms by sequestering essential metal nutrients in the extracellular space. In this work, spectroscopic and thermodynamic metal-binding studies are presented to delineate the zinc-binding properties of CP. Unique optical absorption and EPR spectroscopic signatures for the interfacial His(3)Asp and His(4) sites of human calprotectin are identified by using Co(II) as a spectroscopic probe. Zinc competition titrations employing chromophoric Zn(II) indicators provide a 2:1 Zn(II):CP stoichiometry, confirm that the His(3)Asp and His(4) sites of CP coordinate Zn(II), and reveal that the Zn(II) affinity of both sites is calcium-dependent. The calcium-insensitive Zn(II) competitor ZP4 affords dissociation constants of K(d1) = 133 ± 58 pM and K(d2) = 185 ± 219 nM for CP in the absence of Ca(II). These values decrease to K(d1) ≤ 10 pM and K(d2) ≤ 240 pM in the presence of excess Ca(II). The K(d1) and K(d2) values are assigned to the His(3)Asp and His(4) sites, respectively. In vitro antibacterial activity assays indicate that the metal-binding sites and Ca(II)-replete conditions are required for CP to inhibit the growth of both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria. Taken together, these data provide a working model whereby calprotectin responds to physiological Ca(II) gradients to become a potent Zn(II) chelator in the extracellular space.

  3. Application of alkaline phosphatases from different sources in pharmaceutical and clinical analysis for the determination of their cofactors; zinc and magnesium ions.

    PubMed

    Muginova, Svetlana V; Zhavoronkova, Anna M; Polyakov, Alexei E; Shekhovtsova, Tatyana N

    2007-03-01

    Prospects of using different alkaline phosphatases bearing zinc and magnesium ions in their catalytic and allosteric sites, respectively, in pharmaceutical and clinical analysis were demonstrated. Also their application for the determination of zinc in insulin to control injection quality and magnesium in human urine for the diagnosis and treatment of magnesium deficiency was shown. The reaction of p-nitrophenyl phosphate hydrolysis was chosen as an indicator. The choice of appropriate alkaline phosphatase was substantiated, the influence of the nature of buffer solutions on the behavior of the enzyme-metal systems was studied, and the conditions of the indicator reaction proceeding in the presence of sample matrixes were optimized. Simple, rapid, sensitive, and selective enzymatic procedures for determining zinc and magnesium based on their inhibiting and activating effects on the catalytic activity of alkaline phosphatases from seal and chicken intestine, respectively, were developed.

  4. Microstructured Optical Fiber-based Biosensors: Reversible and Nanoliter-Scale Measurement of Zinc Ions.

    PubMed

    Heng, Sabrina; McDevitt, Christopher A; Kostecki, Roman; Morey, Jacqueline R; Eijkelkamp, Bart A; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Monro, Tanya M; Abell, Andrew D

    2016-05-25

    Sensing platforms that allow rapid and efficient detection of metal ions would have applications in disease diagnosis and study, as well as environmental sensing. Here, we report the first microstructured optical fiber-based biosensor for the reversible and nanoliter-scale measurement of metal ions. Specifically, a photoswitchable spiropyran Zn(2+) sensor is incorporated within the microenvironment of a liposome attached to microstructured optical fibers (exposed-core and suspended-core microstructured optical fibers). Both fiber-based platforms retains high selectivity of ion binding associated with a small molecule sensor, while also allowing nanoliter volume sampling and on/off switching. We have demonstrated that multiple measurements can be made on a single sample without the need to change the sensor. The ability of the new sensing platform to sense Zn(2+) in pleural lavage and nasopharynx of mice was compared to that of established ion sensing methodologies such as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and a commercially available fluorophore (Fluozin-3), where the optical-fiber-based sensor provides a significant advantage in that it allows the use of nanoliter (nL) sampling when compared to ICP-MS (mL) and FluoZin-3 (μL). This work paves the way to a generic approach for developing surface-based ion sensors using a range of sensor molecules, which can be attached to a surface without the need for its chemical modification and presents an opportunity for the development of new and highly specific ion sensors for real time sensing applications.

  5. Shaping and compositional modification of zinc oxide nanowires under energetic manganese ion irradiation.

    PubMed

    Möller, Wolfhard; Johannes, Andreas; Ronning, Carsten

    2016-04-29

    For ZnO nanowires of 150 to 200 nm diameter standing on a flat substrate, the development of the surface contour/morphology and the local elemental composition under 175 keV Mn irradiation has been investigated both experimentally and by means of three-dimensional dynamic Monte Carlo computer simulation. The simulation results reveal a complex interplay of sputter erosion, implant incorporation, resputtering and atomic mixing, which is discussed in detail. The sputter-induced thinning of the wire is in good quantitative agreement with the experimental results obtained from pre- and post-irradiation scanning electron microscopy. The experiments also confirm the predicted sharpening of the tip, neck formation at the bottom interface, and ultimately the detachment of the nanowires from the substrate at high ion fluence. Additional good agreement with experimental results from nano-x-ray fluorescence is also obtained for the continuously increasing Mn/Zn atomic ratio within the nanowires as a function of ion fluence. The simulation yields a great deal of additional information that has not been accessible in the experiments. From this, preferential sputtering of O compared with Zn is deduced. A significant contamination of the wires with substrate material arises from ion mixing at the wire/substrate interface, rather than from redeposition of sputtered substrate atoms. Surprising hollow profiles are observed. Their formation is attributed to a special mechanism of collisional transport which is characteristic of the irradiation of nanowires at a suitable combination of wire diameter and ion energy.

  6. Effect of F ions on physical and optical properties of fluorine substituted zinc arsenic tellurite glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kareem Ahmmad, Shaik; kondaul, Edu; Rahman, Syed

    2015-02-01

    The effect of substitution of fluoride ions for oxide ions on the physical and optical properties of glass system (20-x) ZnO-xZnF2-40As2O3-40TeO2 where x = 0, 4, 8,12,16,20 mole % were investigated. The samples prepared by melt quenching method under controlled condition. The amorphous nature of these glasses was checked by X-ray diffraction technique. The density was measured according to Archimedes principle. The room temperature absorption spectra of all glass samples were determined using UV-Vis-NIR spectrometer. The thermal behaviour, glass transition temperature and stability of glass samples were studied by a differential scanning calorimetric (DSC). The density reduction of present glasses with ZnF2 concentrations may be due to the low density of ZnF2 compared with that of ZnO. Breaking the oxide network, the cross linking degree of the glass former could be reduced which results in decrease of both Tg and Tx. In the present glass system when F ions replaced by oxygen ions UV-Vis absorption cut-off wavelength decreases. This resulted form the conversion of structural unit in the glass from TeO4 to Te(O,F)4 and then to Te(O, F)3.

  7. Shaping and compositional modification of zinc oxide nanowires under energetic manganese ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Wolfhard; Johannes, Andreas; Ronning, Carsten

    2016-04-01

    For ZnO nanowires of 150 to 200 nm diameter standing on a flat substrate, the development of the surface contour/morphology and the local elemental composition under 175 keV Mn irradiation has been investigated both experimentally and by means of three-dimensional dynamic Monte Carlo computer simulation. The simulation results reveal a complex interplay of sputter erosion, implant incorporation, resputtering and atomic mixing, which is discussed in detail. The sputter-induced thinning of the wire is in good quantitative agreement with the experimental results obtained from pre- and post-irradiation scanning electron microscopy. The experiments also confirm the predicted sharpening of the tip, neck formation at the bottom interface, and ultimately the detachment of the nanowires from the substrate at high ion fluence. Additional good agreement with experimental results from nano-x-ray fluorescence is also obtained for the continuously increasing Mn/Zn atomic ratio within the nanowires as a function of ion fluence. The simulation yields a great deal of additional information that has not been accessible in the experiments. From this, preferential sputtering of O compared with Zn is deduced. A significant contamination of the wires with substrate material arises from ion mixing at the wire/substrate interface, rather than from redeposition of sputtered substrate atoms. Surprising hollow profiles are observed. Their formation is attributed to a special mechanism of collisional transport which is characteristic of the irradiation of nanowires at a suitable combination of wire diameter and ion energy.

  8. Controlling the Photocorrosion of Zinc Sulfide Nanoparticles in Water by Doping with Chloride and Cobalt Ions.

    PubMed

    Weide, Philipp; Schulz, Katharina; Kaluza, Stefan; Rohe, Markus; Beranek, Radim; Muhler, Martin

    2016-12-06

    Photodegradation under UV light irradiation is a major drawback in photocatalytic applications of sulfide semiconductors. ZnS nanoparticles were doped with very low amounts of chloride or cobalt ions in the ppm range and codoped with chloride and cobalt ions during their synthesis by precipitation in aqueous solution followed by calcination. The high-temperature wurtzite phase annealed at 800 °C had a high susceptibility to UV irradiation in water, while the low-temperature zincblende phase annealed at 400 °C was found to be stable. Chlorine doping increased the rate of photocorrosion in water, whereas cobalt doping led to a stabilization of the ZnS nanoparticles. Based on photochemical and spectroscopic investigations applying UV/vis, X-ray photoelectron, and photoluminescence spectroscopy, the increased susceptibility of Cl-doped ZnS is ascribed to a higher number of surface point defects, whereas the stabilization by Co(2+) is caused by additional recombination pathways for the charge carriers in the bulk, thus avoiding photocorrosion processes at the surface. Additional doping of Cl-doped ZnS with cobalt ions was found to counteract the detrimental effect of the chloride ions efficiently.

  9. Using fluorescence measurement of zinc ions liberated from ZnS nanoparticle labels in bioassay for Escherichia coli O157:H7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowles, Chad L.; Zhu, Xiaoshan; Pai, Chi-Yun

    2011-10-01

    In this study, an alternative approach using ZnS nanoparticle biolabels as fluorescence signal transducers is reported for the immunoassay of E. coli O157:H7 in tap water samples. Instead of measuring the fluorescence of ZnS nanoparticles in the assay, the fluorescence signal is generated through the binding of zinc ions released from nanoparticle labels with zinc-ion sensitive fluorescence indicator Fluozin-3. In the assay, ZnS nanoparticles around 50 nm in diameter were synthesized, bioconjugated, and applied for the detection of E. coli O157:H7. The assay shows a detection range over two orders of magnitude and a detection limit around 1000 colony-forming units (cfu) of E. coli O157:H7.

  10. Fluorescence properties of Eu3+ ions doped borate and fluoroborate glasses containing lithium, zinc and lead.

    PubMed

    Venkatramu, V; Babu, P; Jayasankar, C K

    2006-02-01

    The influence of glass composition on the fluorescence properties of Eu3+ ions doped borate and fluoroborate glasses modified with Li+, Zn2+ and Pb2+ cations have been investigated. The magnitude of splittings of 7F1 levels are analyzed using crystal-field (CF) analysis. The relative intensities of 5D0 --> 7F2 to 5D0 --> 7F1 transitions, crystal-field strength parameters and decay times of the 5D0 level have been determined and are found to be lower for Pb based glasses than those of Zn/Li based glasses. The lifetimes of 5D0 level are found to increase when borate glasses are modified with pure fluorides than with oxides and oxyfluorides. The fluorescence decay of 5D0 level fits perfect single exponential in the Eu3+:glass systems studied which indicates the absence of energy transfer between Eu3+ ions in these glasses.

  11. RETRACTED: Effect of F- ions on spectroscopic properties of Yb3+-doped zinc tellurite glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guonian; Zhang, Junjie; Dai, Shixun; Yang, Jianhu; Jiang, Zhonghong

    2005-06-01

    This article has been retracted at the request of the Editors, after a reader brought the following to their attention. Reason: The article substantially reproduces parts of articles published by the same authors in the Journal of Luminescence (“Effect of F- ions on physical and spectroscopic properties of Yb3+-doped TeO2 glasses”, Volume 113, Issues 1-2, Pages 27-32) and the Journal of Alloys and Compounds (“Fluorescence lifetime increase by introduction of F- ions in ytterbium-doped TeO2-based glasses”, Volume 393, Issues 1-2, Pages 279-282). There was also a failure to cite either of these articles. These other articles have also been retracted. This action has been agreed by the Editors of the three journals.

  12. Role of the diamagnetic zinc(II) ion in determining the electronic structure of lanthanide single-ion magnets.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Maheswaran; Upadhyay, Apoorva; Das, Chinmoy; Vaidya, Shefali; Singh, Sourabh Kumar; Gupta, Tulika; Mondal, Ranajit; Langley, Stuart; Murray, Keith; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2017-02-08

    Four complexes containing Dy(III) and Pr(III) ions and their Ln(III)-Zn(II) analogs were isolated and its structure solved as as [DyIII(HL)2(NO3)3] (1), [PrIII(HL)2(NO3)3] (2), [ZnDy(L)2(NO3)2(CH3COO)] (3) and [Zn2Pr(L)2(CH3COO)4 (NO3)] (4). Dc and ac magnetic data were collected for all the four complexes. 1 and 3 shows out-of-phase susceptibility signals which is a characteristic signature for a single-molecule magnet . Fivefold increase in the anisotropic barrier (Ueff) is observed for 3 (83 cm-1), compared to 1 (16 cm-1) experimentally and the role of the dipolar interaction in the magnetization relaxation dynamics of 3, ac measurements were performed in solution. The ueff found to be 89.2 cm-1 compared to the solid state sample. The observed Ueff difference between 1 and 3 is rationalized by detailed ab intio calculations. The charge density on the bridging atoms and dihedral angle found to be the key parameters to the observed magnetization relaxation behaviour in 1 and 3.

  13. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: L spectra of zinc ions in the wavelength region 0.65-1.18 nm observed in a plasma heated by a Nd laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, J.; Pikuz, S. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu; Faenov, A. Ya; Khakhalin, S. Ya; Khabibulaev, B. K.; Érmatov, Sh A.

    1993-12-01

    A study has been made of the x-ray emission spectra of zinc ions (λ ~0.65-1.18 nm) excited in a plasma produced by the beam from a Nd laser. The wavelengths were measured within ±0.3 pm. The observed spectra have been identified. Detailed calculations have made it possible to identify, for the first time, some spectra lines due to the radiative decal of autoionizing states of Na-like zinc ions.

  14. [Unification of methods for determining the trace quantities of lead, zinc, sodium and potassium ions in the assessment of drinking water adn transfusion fluid quality].

    PubMed

    Popkov, V A; Golovina, N V; Evgrafov, A A

    2001-01-01

    The results of long-term studies made by the Department of General Chemistry, I. M. Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy, that deals with unification of methods for determining some ions of metals (lead, zinc, sodium, and potassium) in the assessment of the quality of drinking water and transfusion fluids are summarized. A procedure was developed to determine the trace impurities of zinc, lead, and silver by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) by using sorption concentration. C-80-2-aminothiazole, a new sorbent synthesized at the Research Institute of Polymers, was used to detect these ions in the drinking water. With regards to the chosen optimal conditions, drinking water samples were analyzed via their direct spraying in the air-acetylene flame. The prior sorption concentration determined drinking water zinc and lead ions in the concentrations equal to or less than their permissible dose concentrations. The studies indicated that the used methods to determine the trace quantities of metals in the drinking water and aqueous solutions show a high sensitivity, rapidity, simplicity of sample preparation.

  15. Copper and Zinc Ions Specifically Promote Nonamyloid Aggregation of the Highly Stable Human γ-D Crystallin.

    PubMed

    Quintanar, Liliana; Domínguez-Calva, José A; Serebryany, Eugene; Rivillas-Acevedo, Lina; Haase-Pettingell, Cameron; Amero, Carlos; King, Jonathan A

    2016-01-15

    Cataract is the leading cause of blindness in the world. It results from aggregation of eye lens proteins into high-molecular-weight complexes, causing light scattering and lens opacity. Copper and zinc concentrations in cataractous lens are increased significantly relative to a healthy lens, and a variety of experimental and epidemiological studies implicate metals as potential etiological agents for cataract. The natively monomeric, β-sheet rich human γD (HγD) crystallin is one of the more abundant proteins in the core of the lens. It is also one of the most thermodynamically stable proteins in the human body. Surprisingly, we found that both Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions induced rapid, nonamyloid aggregation of HγD, forming high-molecular-weight light-scattering aggregates. Unlike Zn(II), Cu(II) also substantially decreased the thermal stability of HγD and promoted the formation of disulfide-bridged dimers, suggesting distinct aggregation mechanisms. In both cases, however, metal-induced aggregation depended strongly on temperature and was suppressed by the human lens chaperone αB-crystallin (HαB), implicating partially folded intermediates in the aggregation process. Consistently, distinct site-specific interactions of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions with the protein and conformational changes in specific hinge regions were identified by nuclear magnetic resonance. This study provides insights into the mechanisms of metal-induced aggregation of one of the more stable proteins in the human body, and it reveals a novel and unexplored bioinorganic facet of cataract disease.

  16. Zinc(II) Thiosemicarbazone Complex As a Ligand Towards Some Transition Metal Ions: Synthesis, Spectroscopic and Antimicrobial Studies.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Saied M E; Shebl, Magdy; Al-Gohani, Faizah S

    2010-09-01

    Heterobinuclear complexes have been synthesized by stepwise reactions using the mononuclear complex, [Zn(Tsc)2] • H2O, as a complex ligand towards the metal ions, vanadyl(IV), manganese(II), iron(III), cobalt(II), nickel(II) and copper(II). The complex ligand was synthesized by the reaction of zinc acetate dihydrate with salicylaldehyde followed by the condensation with thiosemicarbazide. The structures of the complex ligand and the prepared complexes were elucidated by elemental analyses, IR, electronic, mass, 1H and 13C NMR spectra as well as molar conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. All the complexes exhibited octahedral geometrical arrangements formulated as [Zn(Tsc)2VO(SO4)(H2O)], [Zn(Tsc)2MCl2(H2O)2] (M = Mn, Fe and Co) and [Zn(Tsc)2Fe(ox)Cl2] except the nickel(II) and copper(II) complexes, [Zn(Tsc)2CuCl(H2O)], [Zn(Tsc)2NiCl2], which have square planar geometries. The complex ligand and some of its heterobinuclear complexes showed antibacterial activity against the sensitive organisms Staphylococcus aureus as Gram-positive bacteria, Escherichia coli as Gram-negative bacteria and antifungal activity against the fungi Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus.

  17. Use of zinc ions to study thylakoid protein phosphorylation and the state 1-state 2 transition in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Markwell, J.P.; Baker, N.R.; Bradbury, M.; Thornber, J.P.

    1984-02-01

    At ATP concentrations less than 0.2 millimolar, zinc ions cause a marked stimulation of endogenous protein phosphorylation in thylakoid membranes isolated from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Turkish Samsun), pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Feltham First) and spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv Northland). The greatest stimulatory effect was observed at Zn/sup 2 +/ concentrations of 1 to 2 millimolar; higher concentrations were inhibitory. The stimulatory effect of Zn/sup 2 +/ was independent of Mg/sup 2 +/ concentration from 1 to 5 millimolar and thus does not appear to be due to the formation of a Zn/sup 2 +/-ATP complex. Phosphorylation of the histones IIA, an exogenous protein substrate, was inhibited by 2 millimolar Zn/sup 2 +/. At low levels of ATP, Zn/sup 2 +/ not only stimulates general endogenous protein phosphorylation, but also the phosphorylation of the apoproteins of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein complex. However, under these conditions Zn/sup 2 +/ inhibits the ATP-induced quenching of photosystem II fluorescence and the increase in the ratio of photosystem I to photosystemII fluorescence which are both characteristic of the State 1-State 2 transition. These results suggest that phosphorylation of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein complex may not directly bring about the State 1-State 1 transition.

  18. Binding of transition metal ions [cobalt, copper, nickel and zinc] with furanyl-, thiophenyl-, pyrrolyl-, salicylyl- and pyridyl-derived cephalexins as potent antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Chohan, Zahid H; Pervez, Humayun; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Rauf, A; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2004-02-01

    A method is described for the preparation of novel cephalexin-derived furanyl-, thiophenyl-, pyrrolyl-, salicylyl- and pyridyl-containing compounds showing potent antibacterial activity. The binding of these newly synthesized antibacterial agents with metal ions such as cobalt(II), copper(II), nickel(II) and zinc(II) has been studied and their inhibitory properties against various bacterial species such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae are also reported. These results suggest that metal ions to possess an important role in the designing of metal-based antibacterials and that such complexes are more effective against infectious diseases compared to the uncomplexed drugs.

  19. Pathways of H2 toward the Active Site of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Vitor H.; Baptista, António M.; Soares, Cláudio M.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen (H2), but little is known about the diffusion of H2 toward the active site. Here we analyze pathways for H2 permeation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit solvent. Various MD simulation replicates were done, to improve the sampling of the system states. H2 easily permeates hydrogenase in every simulation and it moves preferentially in channels. All H2 molecules that reach the active site made their approach from the side of the Ni ion. H2 is able to reach distances of <4 Å from the active site, although after 6 Å permeation is difficult. In this region we mutated Val-67 into alanine and perform new MD simulations. These simulations show an increase of H2 inside the protein and at lower distances from the active site. This valine can be a control point in the H2 access to the active center. PMID:16731562

  20. Brain-Delivery of Zinc-Ions as Potential Treatment for Neurological Diseases: Mini Review

    PubMed Central

    Grabrucker, Andreas M.; Rowan, Magali; Garner, Craig C.

    2011-01-01

    Homeostasis of metal ions such as Zn2+ is essential for proper brain function. Moreover, the list of psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders involving a dysregulation of brain Zn2+-levels is long and steadily growing, including Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease as well as schizophrenia, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, depression, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Down's syndrome, multiple sclerosis, Wilson’s disease and Pick’s disease. Furthermore, alterations in Zn2+-levels are seen in transient forebrain ischemia, seizures, traumatic brain injury and alcoholism. Thus, the possibility of altering Zn2+-levels within the brain is emerging as a new target for the prevention and treatment of psychiatric and neurological diseases. Although the role of Zn2+ in the brain has been extensively studied over the past decades, methods for controlled regulation and manipulation of Zn2+ concentrations within the brain are still in their infancy. Since the use of dietary Zn2+ supplementation and restriction has major limitations, new methods and alternative approaches are currently under investigation, such as the use of intracranial infusion of Zn2+ chelators or nanoparticle technologies to elevate or decrease intracellular Zn2+ levels. Therefore, this review briefly summarizes the role of Zn2+ in psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases and highlights key findings and impediments of brain Zn2+-level manipulation. Furthermore, some methods and compounds, such as metal ion chelation, redistribution and supplementation that are used to control brain Zn2+-levels in order to treat brain disorders are evaluated. PMID:22102982

  1. First Principles Computational Study of the Active Site of Arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Ivaylo; Klien, Micheal

    2004-01-14

    Ab initio density functional theory (DFT) methods were used to investigate the structural features of the active site of the binuclear enzyme rat liver arginase. Special emphasis was placed on the crucial role of the second shell ligand interactions. These interactions were systematically studied by performing calculations on models of varying size. It was determined that a water molecule, and not hydroxide, is the bridging exogenous ligand. The carboxylate ligands facilitate the close approach of the Mn (II) ions by attenuating the metal-metal electrostatic repulsion. Of the two metals, MnA was shown to carry a larger positive charge. Analysis of the electronic properties of the active site revealed that orbitals involving the terminal Asp234 residue, as well as the flexible -1,1 bridging Asp232, lie at high energies, suggesting weaker coordination. This is reflected in certain structural variability present in our models and is also consistent with recent experimental findings. Finally, implications of our findings for the biological function of the enzyme are delineated.

  2. Conformational Analysis on structural perturbations of the zinc finger NEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godwin, Ryan; Salsbury, Freddie; Salsbury Group Team

    2014-03-01

    The NEMO (NF-kB Essential Modulator) Zinc Finger protein (2jvx) is a functional Ubiquitin-binding domain, and plays a role in signaling pathways for immune/inflammatory responses, apoptosis, and oncogenesis [Cordier et al., 2008]. Characterized by 3 cysteines and 1 histidine residue at the active site, the biologically occurring, bound zinc configuration is a stable structural motif. Perturbations of the zinc binding residues suggest conformational changes in the 423-atom protein characterized via analysis of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Structural perturbations include simulations with and without a zinc ion and with and without de-protonated cysteines, resulting in four distinct configurations. Simulations of various time scales show consistent results, yet the longest, GPU driven, microsecond runs show more drastic structural and dynamic fluctuations when compared to shorter duration time-scales. The last cysteine residue (26 of 28) and the helix on which it resides exhibit a secondary, locally unfolded conformation in addition to its normal bound conformation. Combined analytics elucidate how the presence of zinc and/or protonated cysteines impact the dynamics and energetic fluctuations of NEMO. Comprehensive Cancer Center of Wake Forest University Computational Biosciences shared resource supported by NCI CCSG P30CA012197.

  3. Carboxylated dithiafulvenes and tetrathiafulvalene vinylogues: synthesis, electronic properties, and complexation with zinc ions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunfei

    2015-01-01

    Summary A class of carboxyl and carboxylate ester-substituted dithiafulvene (DTF) derivatives and tetrathiafulvalene vinylogues (TTFVs) has been synthesized and their electronic and electrochemical redox properties were characterized by UV–vis spectroscopic and cyclic voltammetric analyses. The carboxyl-TTFV was applied as a redox-active ligand to complex with Zn(II) ions, forming a stable Zn-TTFV coordination polymer. The structural, electrochemical, and thermal properties of the coordination polymer were investigated by infrared spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, powder X-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetric analyses. Furthermore, the microscopic porosity and surface area of the Zn-TTFV coordination polymer were measured by nitrogen gas adsorption analysis, showing a BET surface of 148.2 m2 g−1 and an average pore diameter of 10.2 nm. PMID:26124898

  4. EPR Study of Vanadium Ion in Zinc-Boro-Vanadate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Renuka, C.; Gowda, V. C. Veeranna; Chakradhar, R. P. S.; Reddy, C. Narayana

    2011-07-15

    This paper describes EPR studies on x V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-(40-x)ZnO-60B{sub 2}O{sub 3}(where x 5, 10, 15 and 20 mol %) glass system. These studies indicate a strong compositional dependent trend and existence of characteristic boro-vanadate groups in these glasses. The EPR spectra show a distinct hyperfine structure of {sup 51}V. Spectral analysis shows that the vanadium is present in the glass as vanadyl ion [VO]{sup 2+} at tetragonally distorted octahedral site. The decrease of A{sub ||} and A{sub perpendicular} with increase of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} concentration suggests an increase in the covalence between the central atom and the surrounding oxygen ligands.

  5. Iron sulfide attenuates the methanogenic toxicity of elemental copper and zinc oxide nanoparticles and their soluble metal ion analogs.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Gallagher, Sara; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-04-01

    Elemental copper (Cu(0)) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle (NP) toxicity to methanogens has been attributed to the release of soluble metal ions. Iron sulfide (FeS) partially controls the soluble concentration of heavy metals and their toxicity in aquatic environments. Heavy metals displace the Fe from FeS forming poorly soluble metal sulfides in the FeS matrix. Therefore, FeS may be expected to attenuate the NP toxicity. This work assessed FeS as an attenuator of the methanogenic toxicity of Cu(0) and ZnO NPs and their soluble salt analogs. The toxicity attenuation capacity of fine (25-75μm) and coarse (500 to 1200μm) preparations of FeS (FeS-f and FeS-c respectively) was tested in the presence of highly inhibitory concentrations of CuCl2, ZnCl2 Cu(0) and ZnO NPs. FeS-f attenuated methanogenic toxicity better than FeS-c. The results revealed that 2.5× less FeS-f than FeS-c was required to recover the methanogenic activity to 50% (activity normalized to uninhibited controls). The results also indicated that a molar FeS-f/Cu(0) NP, FeS-f/ZnO NP, FeS-f/ZnCl2, and FeS-f/CuCl2 ratio of 2.14, 2.14, 4.28, and 8.56 respectively, was necessary to recover the methanogenic activity to >75%. Displacement experiments demonstrated that CuCl2 and ZnCl2 partially displaced Fe from FeS. As a whole, the results indicate that not all the sulfide in FeS was readily available to react with the soluble Cu and Zn ions which may explain the need for a large stoichiometric excess of FeS to highly attenuate Cu and Zn toxicity. Overall, this study provides evidence that FeS attenuates the toxicity caused by Cu(0) and ZnO NPs and their soluble ion analogs to methanogens.

  6. Iron Sulfide Attenuates the Methanogenic Toxicity of Elemental Copper and Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles and their Soluble Metal Ion Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Gallagher, Sara; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A.

    2016-01-01

    Elemental copper (Cu0) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle (NP) toxicity to methanogens has been attributed to the release of soluble metal ions. Iron sulfide (FeS) partially controls the soluble concentration of heavy metals and their toxicity in aquatic environments. Heavy metals displace the Fe from FeS forming poorly soluble metal sulfides in the FeS matrix. Therefore, FeS may be expected to attenuate the NP toxicity. This work assessed FeS as an attenuator of the methanogenic toxicity of Cu0 and ZnO NPs and their soluble salt analogs. The toxicity attenuation capacity of fine (25–75 µm) and coarse (500 to 1200 µm) preparations of FeS (FeS-f and FeS-c respectively) was tested in the presence of highly inhibitory concentrations of CuCl2, ZnCl2 Cu0 and ZnO NPs. FeS-f attenuated methanogenic toxicity better than FeS-c. The results revealed that 2.5× less FeS-f than FeS-c was required to recover the methanogenic activity to 50% (activity normalized to uninhibited controls). The results also indicated that a molar FeS-f/Cu0 NP, FeS-f/ZnO NP, FeS-f/ZnCl2, and FeS-f/CuCl2 ratio of 2.14, 2.14, 4.28, and 8.56 respectively, was necessary to recover the methanogenic activity to >75%. Displacement experiments demonstrated that CuCl2 and ZnCl2 partially displaced Fe from FeS. As a whole, the results indicate that not all the sulfide in FeS was readily available to react with the soluble Cu and Zn ions which may explain the need for a large stoichiometric excesses of FeS to highly attenuate Cu and Zn toxicity. Overall, this study provides evidence that FeS attenuates the toxicity caused by Cu0 and ZnO NPs and their soluble ion analogs to methanogens. PMID:26803736

  7. Improving the porosity and catalytic capacity of a zinc paddlewheel metal-organic framework (MOF) through metal-ion metathesis in a single-crystal-to-single-crystal fashion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Wang, Xiaoqing; Dai, Fangna; Zhang, Liangliang; Wang, Rongming; Sun, Daofeng

    2014-10-06

    Zinc paddlewheel metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) frequently exhibit low stability or complete collapse upon the removal of axial ligands. Hence, there are very few reports on gas adsorption of zinc paddlewheel MOFs. In this work, the N2 and H2 adsorption measurements were carried out for a zinc MOF (namely, SDU-1) based on two types of paddlewheel secondary building units (SBUs): [Zn2(COO)3] and [Zn2(COO)4]. Because of the existence of inherent surface instability upon removal of solvates in zinc paddlewheel SBU, SDU-1 possesses a very low surface area. Through metal-ion metathesis in a single-crystal-to-single-crystal fashion, the Zn(2+) ions in SDU-1 were exchanged by Cu(2+) ions to generate Cu-SDU-1. Through the measurements of gas adsorption and catalytic test, the porosity and catalytic capacity of Cu-SDU-1 have been improved significantly, compared to SDU-1.

  8. Prominent spectral features of Sm3+ ion in disordered zinc tellurite glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanko, Y. A.; Sahar, M. R.; Ghoshal, S. K.

    Trivalent rare earth doped glasses with modified spectroscopic features are essential for solid state lasers and diverse photonic applications. Glass composition optimisation may fulfil such demand. Stimulating the spectral properties of samarium (Sm3+) ions in tellurite glass host with desired enhancement is the key issue. Glasses with composition (80 - x)TeO2-20ZnO-(x)Sm2O3, where 0 ⩽ x ⩽ 1.5 mol% are prepared using melt quenching method. The role of varying Sm3+ contents to improving the absorption and emission properties of the prepared glasses are determined. XRD pattern verifies amorphous nature of synthesised glasses. FTIR spectroscopy has been used to observe the structural modification of (TeO4) trigonal bipyramid structural units. DTA traces display prominent transition peaks for glass transition, crystallisation and melting temperature. Samples are discerned to be stable with desired Hruby parameter and superior glass forming ability. The UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectra reveals nine peaks centred at 470, 548, 947, 1085, 1238, 1385, 1492, 1550 and 1589 nm. These bands arise due to 6H5/2 → 4I11/2, 4G5/2, 6F11/2, 6F9/2, 6F7/2, 6F5/2, 6F3/2, 6H15/2 and 6F1/2 transitions, respectively. The direct, indirect band gap and Urbach energy calculated from the absorption edge of UV-Vis-NIR spectra are found to appear within (2.75-3.18) eV, (3.22-3.40) eV, and (0.20-0.31) eV, respectively. The observed increase in refractive index from 2.45 to 2.47 is ascribed to the generation of non-bridging oxygen atoms via the conversion of TeO4 into TeO3 units. Conversely the decrease in refractive index to 2.39 is attributed to the lower ionic radii (1.079 Å) of Sm3+. PL spectra under the excitation of 452 nm display four emission bands centred at 563, 600, 644 and 705 nm corresponding to 4G5/2 → 6H5/2, 6H7/2, 6H9/2 and 6H11/2 transitions of samarium ions. Excellent features of the results nominate these compositions towards prospective applications.

  9. Effective removal of zinc ions from aqueous solutions using crab carapace biosorbent.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuguang; Gibb, Stuart W; Cochrane, Emma

    2007-10-01

    The carapace of the crab (Cancer pagurus), a waste material disposed of by the seafood industry, has recently been shown to have potential as a biosorbent for the removal of metals from aqueous media. Crab carapace in the particle size ranges 0.25-0.8mm and 0.8-1.5mm were used to investigate the effects of agitation speed, contact time, metal concentration and initial pH on the removal of Zn(2+). In sequential-batch process Zn(2+) uptakes of 105.6 and 67.6 mg/g were recorded for 0.25-0.8 mm and 0.8-1.5 mm particles, respectively, while values of 141.3 and 76.9 mg/g were recorded in fixed-bed column studies. Binary-metal studies showed that the presence of Cu(2+) or Pb(2+) significantly suppressed Zn(2+) uptake. This study confirms that crab carapace may be considered a viable and cost-effective alternative to commercial activated carbon or ion-exchange resins for the removal of metals from aqueous media.

  10. A turn-on fluorescent sensor for zinc and cadmium ions based on perylene tetracarboxylic diimide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangjun; Zhang, Nan; Zhou, Jin; Chang, Tianjun; Fang, Canliang; Shangguan, Dihua

    2013-02-21

    In this paper, we describe a turn-on fluorescent probe for Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) ion detection and discrimination. This probe, N'-bis-(N,N-di-(2-pyridylmethyl)-ethane-1,2-diamine)-perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic-diimide (PDI-DIDPA), exhibits very low fluorescence at pH above 6.0 due to the photo-induced electron transfer (PET) process from 2-pyridylmethyl-amine (DPA) to perylene tetracarboxylic diimide (PDI). Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) can chelate PDI-DIDPA to form a stable complex at pH 6.0-7.0 and 9.0 respectively, and inhibit the PET process, which result in the fluorescence recovery of PDI-DIDPA. This fluorescence turn-on behavior allows the detection of Zn(2+) in the range of 0.1-4.0 μM and Cd(2+) in the range of 0.1-5.0 μM. The limit of detection for Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) is as low as 32 nM and 48 nM. The high selectivity, high sensitivity and easy operation make this probe suitable for the rapid detection of Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) respectively. The different response of PDI-DIDPA to Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) at different pH makes it possible to discriminate Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) by simply adjusting the pH of the working solution.

  11. Elaboration and characterization of solid materials of types zeolite NaA and faujasite NaY exchanged by zinc metallic ions Zn2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nibou, D.; Amokrane, S.; Mekatel, H.; Lebaili, N.

    2009-11-01

    The present work deals with the elaborated of NaA and faujasite NaY solid materials according to a hydrothermal crystallization of amorphous gels composed of solutions of silicon, aluminum and sodium. The process elaboration has been achieved in autoclaves made of steel lined in Teflon under different operating conditions of temperature of heating, time of contact and stirring. After crystallization, the samples were characterized by different techniques such as X ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, and chemical analysis. Pure solid materials NaA and NaY zeolites were obtained and were impregnated by (Zn2+) ions by ion exchange process. The effects of various parameters such as initial metal concentration, pH, solid-liquid ratio (R) and temperature on the exchange percentage are studied. The equilibrium isotherms of zinc ions sorption are also evaluated using Langmuir and Freundlich models. Thermodynamic parameters, i.e. enthalpy of adsorption ΔHads∘, entropy change ΔSads∘ and Gibbs free energy ΔGads∘ for the sorption of zinc ions on NaA and NaY zeolites were examined.

  12. Endogenous Zinc in Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The use of zinc in medicinal skin cream was mentioned in Egyptian papyri from 2000 BC (for example, the Smith Papyrus), and zinc has apparently been used fairly steadily throughout Roman and modern times (for example, as the American lotion named for its zinc ore, 'Calamine'). It is, therefore, somewhat ironic that zinc is a relatively late addition to the pantheon of signal ions in biology and medicine. However, the number of biological functions, health implications and pharmacological targets that are emerging for zinc indicate that it might turn out to be 'the calcium of the twenty-first century'. Here neurobiological roles of endogenous zinc is summarized. PMID:20396459

  13. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Silicate Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolles, Tobias; Burkart, Julia; Häusler, Thomas; Pummer, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth's crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts [1-3]. Nevertheless, among those structures K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. In this study, the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars were investigated in closer details. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. We give a potential explanation of the increased ice nucleation activity of K-feldspar. The ice nucleating sites are very much dependent on the alkali ion present by altering the water structure and the feldspar surface. The higher activity of K-feldspar can be attributed to the presence of potassium ions on the surface and surface bilayer. The alkali-ions have different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar. Chaotropic behavior of Calcium and Sodium ions are lowering the ice nucleation potential of the other feldspars, while kosmotropic Potassium has a neutral or even positive effect. Furthermore we investigated the influence of milling onto the ice nucleation of quartz particles. The ice nucleation activity can be increased by mechanical milling, by introducing more molecular, nucleation active defects to the particle surface. This effect is larger than expected by plane surface increase. [1] Atkinson et al. The Importance of Feldspar for Ice Nucleation by Mineral Dust in Mixed-Phase Clouds. Nature 2013, 498, 355-358. [2] Yakobi-Hancock et al.. Feldspar Minerals as Efficient Deposition Ice Nuclei. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2013, 13, 11175-11185. [3] Zolles et al. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015 accepted.

  14. The use of ion mobility mass spectrometry to assist protein design: a case study on zinc finger fold versus coiled coil interactions.

    PubMed

    Berezovskaya, Yana; Porrini, Massimiliano; Nortcliffe, Chris; Barran, Perdita E

    2015-04-21

    The dramatic conformational change in zinc fingers on binding metal ions for DNA recognition makes their structure-function behaviour an attractive target to mimic in de novo designed peptides. Mass spectrometry, with its high throughput and low sample consumption provides insight into how primary amino acid sequence can encode stable tertiary fold. We present here the use of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) coupled with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations as a rapid analytical platform to inform de novo design efforts for peptide-metal and peptide-peptide interactions. A dual peptide-based synthetic system, ZiCop based on a zinc finger peptide motif, and a coiled coil partner peptide Pp, have been investigated. Titration mass spectrometry determines the relative binding affinities of different divalent metal ions as Zn(2+) > Co(2+) ≫ Ca(2+). With collision induced dissociation (CID), we probe complex stability, and establish that peptide-metal interactions are stronger and more 'specific' than those of peptide-peptide complexes, and the anticipated hetero-dimeric complex is more stable than the two homo-dimers. Collision cross-sections (CCS) measurements by IM-MS reveal increased stability with respect to unfolding of the metal-bound peptide over its apo-form, and further, larger collision cross sections for the hetero-dimeric forms suggest that dimeric species formed in the absence of metal are coiled coil like. MD supports these structural assignments, backed up by data from visible light absorbance measurements.

  15. Leaching of zinc sulfide by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: Bacterial oxidation of the sulfur product layer increases the rate of zinc sulfide dissolution at high concentrations of ferrous ions

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T.A.; Crundwell, F.K.

    1999-12-01

    This paper reports the results of leaching experiments conducted with and without Thiobacillus ferroxidans at the same conditions in solution. The extent of leaching of ZnS with Bacteria is significantly higher than that without bacteria at high concentrations of ferrous ions. A porous layer of elemental sulfur is present on the surfaces of the chemically leached particles, which no sulfur is present on the surfaces of the bacterially leached particles. The analysis of the data using the shrinking-core model shows that the chemical leaching of ZnS is limited by the diffusion of ferrous ions through the sulfur product layer at high concentrations of ferrous ions. The analysis of the data shows that diffusion through the product layer does not limit the rate of dissolution when bacteria are present. This suggests that the action of T.ferroxidans in oxidizing the sulfur formed on the particle surface is to remove the barrier to diffusion by ferrous ions.

  16. Leaching of Zinc Sulfide by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: Bacterial Oxidation of the Sulfur Product Layer Increases the Rate of Zinc Sulfide Dissolution at High Concentrations of Ferrous Ions

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, T. A.; Crundwell, F. K.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports the results of leaching experiments conducted with and without Thiobacillus ferrooxidans at the same conditions in solution. The extent of leaching of ZnS with bacteria is significantly higher than that without bacteria at high concentrations of ferrous ions. A porous layer of elemental sulfur is present on the surfaces of the chemically leached particles, while no sulfur is present on the surfaces of the bacterially leached particles. The analysis of the data using the shrinking-core model shows that the chemical leaching of ZnS is limited by the diffusion of ferrous ions through the sulfur product layer at high concentrations of ferrous ions. The analysis of the data shows that diffusion through the product layer does not limit the rate of dissolution when bacteria are present. This suggests that the action of T. ferrooxidans in oxidizing the sulfur formed on the particle surface is to remove the barrier to diffusion by ferrous ions. PMID:10583978

  17. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  18. Collective ion dynamics in liquid zinc: evidence for complex dynamics in a non-free-electron liquid metal.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, M; Sacchetti, F; Guarini, E; Orecchini, A; Paciaroni, A; Sani, L; Petrillo, C

    2015-05-08

    A detailed inelastic neutron scattering investigation of the THz dynamics of liquid zinc is presented. The observed Q dependence clearly reveals the existence of a complex dynamics made up of two distinct excitations. The highest energy mode is the prolongation of the longitudinal acoustic density fluctuations whereas the comparison with the phonon dynamics of crystalline hcp zinc suggests a transverse acousticlike nature for the second one. This mode seems related to peculiar anisotropic interactions, possibly connected to the behavior of the crystalline phase.

  19. Finding a Needle in the Haystack: Computational Modeling of Mg2+ Binding in the Active Site of Protein Farnesyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yue; Chakravorty, Dhruva K.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    Studies aimed at elucidating the unknown Mg2+ binding site in protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) are reported. FTase catalyzes the transfer of a farnesyl group to a conserved cysteine residue (Cys1p) on a target protein, an important step for proteins in the signal transduction pathways (e.g. Ras). Mg2+ ions accelerate the protein farnesylation reaction by up to 700-fold. The exact function of Mg2+ in catalysis and the structural characteristics of its binding remain unresolved to date. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations addressing the role of magnesium ions in FTase are presented, and relevant octahedral binding motifs for Mg2+ in wild type (WT) FTase and Dβ352A mutant are explored. Our simulations suggest that the addition of Mg2+ ions causes a conformational changes to occur in the FTase active site, breaking interactions known to keep FPP in its inactive conformation. Two relevant Mg2+ ion binding motifs were determined in WT FTase. In the first binding motif, WT1, the Mg2+ ion is coordinated to D352β, zinc-bound D297β, two water molecules, and one oxygen atoms from the α- and β-phosphates of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP). The second binding motif, WT2, is identical with the exception of the zinc-bound D297β being replaced by a water molecule in the Mg2+ coordination complex. In the Dβ352A mutant Mg2+ binding motif, D297β, three water molecules and one oxygen atom from the α- and β-phosphates of FPP complete the octahedral coordination sphere of Mg2+. Simulations of WT FTase, in which Mg2+ was replaced by water in the active site, re-created the salt bridges and hydrogen bonding patterns around FPP, validating these simulations. In all Mg2+ binding motifs, a key hydrogen bond was identified between a magnesium bound water and Cys1p, bridging the two metallic binding sites, and thereby, reducing the equilibrium distance between the reacting atoms of FPP Cys1p. The free energy profiles calculated for these systems provide a qualitative understanding of

  20. Determination of Zinc(II) Ions Released into Artificial Digestive Juices from Culinary-Medicinal Button Mushroom, Agaricus bisporus (Agaricomycetidae), Biomass of In Vitro Cultures Using an Anodic Stripping Voltammetry Method.

    PubMed

    Kala, Katarzyna; Muszynska, Bozena; Zajac, Magdalena; Krezalek, Remigiusz; Opoka, Wlodzimierz

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is one of those microelements that are essential for the proper functioning of the human body and must be supplemented in our food at a daily dose of 15 mg. It is well known that mushrooms accumulate elements; thus, in order to determine the extent of accumulation and the level of zinc released from mushrooms, in vitro cultures of Agaricus bisporus were established. The cultures were run on a modified Oddoux medium (a control culture) as well as on the same medium with the addition of zinc hydroaspartate (100 and 200 mg/L) and zinc sulfate (87.23 and 174.47 mg/L). These compounds were chosen to help estimate which form, organic or inorganic, results in a better assimilation of zinc(II) ions by biomass. As the next step, the level of zinc(II) ions released from the lyophilized biomass of in vitro cultures to the digestive juices, under thermal conditions of the human body (37°C), was determined. For this purpose, artificial digestive juices, imitating the composition of human digestive juices, were used. For determination of zinc(II) ions in the digestive tract, an anodic stripping voltammetry method was employed. The amount of zinc released into artificial saliva over 1 minute varied from 0.15 mg/100 g d.w. in the control culture to 2.35 mg/100 g d.w. in the biomass in the medium to which 200 mg/L zinc hydroaspartate had been added. Values were higher in gastric juice and depended on incubation time (2.66 to 30.63 mg/100 g d.w.). In intestinal juice, the highest value of the released zinc grew to 24.20 mg/100 g d.w. (biomass of A. bisporus in vitro cultures in medium with the addition of 200 mg/L zinc hydroaspartate). Total average amount of zinc released into artificial digestive juices was the highest (56.26 mg/100 g d.w.) from A. bisporus biomass of in vitro cultures in the medium to which 200 mg/L zinc hydroaspartate had been added.

  1. Evolution of anatase surface active sites probed by in situ sum-frequency phonon spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yue; Chen, Shiyou; Li, Yadong; Gao, Yi; Yang, Deheng; Shen, Yuen Ron; Liu, Wei-Tao

    2016-09-01

    Surface active sites of crystals often govern their relevant surface chemistry, yet to monitor them in situ in real atmosphere remains a challenge. Using surface-specific sum-frequency spectroscopy, we identified the surface phonon mode associated with the active sites of undercoordinated titanium ions and conjoint oxygen vacancies, and used it to monitor them on anatase (TiO2) (101) under ambient conditions. In conjunction with theory, we determined related surface structure around the active sites and tracked the evolution of oxygen vacancies under ultraviolet irradiation. We further found that unlike in vacuum, the surface oxygen vacancies, which dominate the surface reactivity, are strongly regulated by ambient gas molecules, including methanol and water, as well as weakly associated species, such as nitrogen and hydrogen. The result revealed a rich interplay between prevailing ambient species and surface reactivity, which can be omnipresent in environmental and catalytic applications of titanium dioxides.

  2. Evolution of anatase surface active sites probed by in situ sum-frequency phonon spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yue; Chen, Shiyou; Li, Yadong; Gao, Yi; Yang, Deheng; Shen, Yuen Ron; Liu, Wei-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Surface active sites of crystals often govern their relevant surface chemistry, yet to monitor them in situ in real atmosphere remains a challenge. Using surface-specific sum-frequency spectroscopy, we identified the surface phonon mode associated with the active sites of undercoordinated titanium ions and conjoint oxygen vacancies, and used it to monitor them on anatase (TiO2) (101) under ambient conditions. In conjunction with theory, we determined related surface structure around the active sites and tracked the evolution of oxygen vacancies under ultraviolet irradiation. We further found that unlike in vacuum, the surface oxygen vacancies, which dominate the surface reactivity, are strongly regulated by ambient gas molecules, including methanol and water, as well as weakly associated species, such as nitrogen and hydrogen. The result revealed a rich interplay between prevailing ambient species and surface reactivity, which can be omnipresent in environmental and catalytic applications of titanium dioxides. PMID:27704049

  3. Selective sorption of lead, cadmium and zinc ions by a polymeric cation exchanger containing nano-Zr(HPO3S)2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingrui; Pan, Bingcai; Pan, Bingjun; Zhang, Weiming; Jia, Kun; Zhang, Quanxing

    2008-06-01

    A novel polymeric hybrid sorbent, namely ZrPS-001, was fabricated for enhanced sorption of heavy metal ions by impregnating Zr(HPO3S)2 (i.e., ZrPS) nanoparticles within a porous polymeric cation exchanger D-001. The immobilized negatively charged groups bound to the polymeric matrix D-001 would result in preconcentration and permeation enhancement of target metal ions prior to sequestration, and ZrPS nanoparticles are expected to sequester heavy metals selectively through an ion-exchange process. Highly effective sequestration of lead, cadmium, and zinc ions from aqueous solution can be achieved by ZrPS-001 even in the presence of competing calcium ion at concentration several orders of magnitude greater than the target species. The exhausted ZrPS-001 beads are amenable to regeneration with 6 M HCI solution for repeated use without any significant capacity loss. Fixed-bed column treatment of simulated waters containing heavy metals at high or trace levels was also performed. The content of heavy metals in treated effluent approached or met the WHO drinking water standard.

  4. Structural determination of zinc dithiophosphates in lubricating oils by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with electron impact and electron-capture negative ion chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Becchi, M; Perret, F; Carraze, B; Beziau, J F; Michel, J P

    2001-01-05

    Pentafluorobenzyl ester derivatives were used to identify zinc dialkyldithiophosphates and diaryldithiophosphates antiwear engine oil additives by GC-electron impact ionization (EI) MS and GC-electron-capture negative ion chemical ionization (ECNCI) MS analysis. GC-EI-MS of the dialkyldithiophosphate-pentafluorobenzyl derivatives afforded characteristic fragment ions corresponding to the cleavage of one and two alkyl radicals. In most cases, information was only obtained on one alkyl chain. Additional and complete information was obtained with retention time indices using synthetic derivatives and with GC-ECNCI-MS analysis. ECNCI afforded characteristic dithiophosphate anions which allowed the determination of the total number of carbon atoms in the alkyl radicals. The diastereoisomer mixtures of 2-hydroxy-sec.-alkyl radicals were completely separated on GC analysis.

  5. A 1.3Å Structure of Zinc-bound N-terminal Domain of Calmodulin Elucidates Potential Early Ion-binding Step

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Julia T.; Guo, Qing; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2007-01-01

    Summary Calmodulin (CaM) is a 16.8 kDa calcium binding protein involved in calcium-signal transduction. It is the canonical member of the EF-hand family of proteins, which are characterized by a helix-loop-helix calcium-binding motif. CaM is comprised of N- and C-terminal globular domains (N-CaM and C-CaM), and within each domain there are two EF-hand motifs. Upon binding calcium, CaM undergoes a significant, global conformational change involving reorientation of the four helix bundles in each of its two domains. This conformational change upon ion binding is a key component of the signal transduction and regulatory roles of CaM, yet the precise nature of this transition is still unclear. Here, we present a 1.3Å structure of zinc-bound N-terminal calmodulin (N-CaM) solved by single wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) phasing of a selenomethionyl-N-CaM. Our zinc-bound N-CaM structure differs from previously reported CaM structures and resembles calcium-free apo-CaM despite the zinc binding to both EF-hand motifs. Structural comparison with calcium-free apo-CaM, calcium-loaded CaM, and a crosslinked calcium-loaded CaM suggests that our zinc-bound N-CaM reveals an intermediate step in the initiation of metal ion binding at the first EF-hand motif. Our data also suggests that metal ion coordination by two key residues in the first metal-binding site represents an initial step in the conformational transition induced by metal binding. This is followed by reordering of the N-terminal region of the helix exiting from this first binding loop. This conformational switch should be incorporated into models of either step-wise conformational transition or flexible, dynamic energetic state-sampling based transition. PMID:17942116

  6. Zinc Enzymes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertini, I.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the role of zinc in various enzymes concerned with hydration, hydrolysis, and redox reactions. The binding of zinc to protein residues, properties of noncatalytic zinc(II) and catalytic zinc, and the reactions catalyzed by zinc are among the topics considered. (JN)

  7. Studies on Zinc and Copper Ion in Relation to Wound Healing in Male and Female West African Dwarf Goats.

    PubMed

    Olaifa, A K; Fadason, S T

    2017-03-06

    Wound healing remains a challenging clinical problem for which precise and efficient management is essential in order to curtail morbidity and mortality. Wound healing has been shown to depend upon the availability of appropriate trace elements like copper and zinc which serve as enzyme cofactors and structural components in tissue repair. This study aims at evaluating the distribution of zinc and copper found in the hair as well as skin during epidermal wound healing. Adult and healthy West African dwarf (WAD) goats of both sexes fed with concentrate, grass, cassava peel and water ad libitum were used. The animals were housed for three weeks before commencement of the experiments. Epidermal wounds were created on the trunks of all the goats using cardboard template of 1cm². Progressive changes in wound contraction were monitored grossly by placing clean and sterile venier calliper on the wound margin. Hair and skin elemental (copper and zinc) analyses were done using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Significant increases in Cu level were observed in the female hair compared with that of males. There were significant increases in the Zn levels of the females' hair compared with the males. The wound healed faster in female goat compared with the males. The ratio of copper to zinc is clinically more important than the concentration of either of these trace metals. The pattern of distribution between zinc and copper concentration in the skin and hair of the male and female goats observed in this study could be added factor responsible for early wound healing in female. Therefore, our findings suggest that the distribution in the Cu and Zinc level in skin and hair of both male and female goats could also be a factor for wound healing in the animals.

  8. Zinc-mediated amino acid discrimination in cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Mei; Christian, Thomas; Newberry, Kate J; Perona, John J; Hou, Ya-Ming

    2003-04-11

    Escherichia coli cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase (CysRS) achieves a high level of amino acid specificity without an editing reaction. The crystal structure of CysRS bound to substrate cysteine suggested that direct thiol coordination to a tightly bound zinc ion at the base of the active site is the primary determinant of selectivity against non-cognate amino acids. This hypothesis has now been supported by spectroscopic studies of cobalt-substituted CysRS. Binding of cysteine, but not non-cognate amino acids, induces high absorption in the ligand-to-metal charge transfer region, providing evidence for formation of a metal-thiolate bond. In addition, mutations in the zinc ligands alter the absorption spectrum without reducing the discrimination against non-cognate amino acids. These results argue strongly for a major role for the zinc ion in amino acid discrimination by CysRS, where the tight zinc-thiolate interaction and the strict structural geometry of the metal ion are sufficient to reject serine by more than 20,000-fold at the binding step.

  9. Active-Site Monovalent Cations Revealed in a 1.55 Å Resolution Hammerhead Ribozyme Structure

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Michael; Schultz, Eric P.; Martick, Monika; Scott, William G.

    2013-01-01

    We have obtained a 1.55 Å crystal structure of a hammerhead ribozyme derived from Schistosoma mansoni in conditions that permit detailed observations of Na+ ion binding in the ribozyme's active site. At least two such Na+ ions are observed. The first Na+ ion binds to the N7 of G10.1 and the adjacent A9 phosphate in a manner identical to that previously observed for divalent cations. A second Na+ ion binds to the Hoogsteen face of G12, the general base in the hammerhead cleavage reaction, thereby potentially dissipating the negative charge of the catalytically active enolate form of the nucleotide base. A potential but more ambiguous third site bridges the A9 and scissile phosphates in a manner consistent with previous predictions. Hammerhead ribozymes have been observed to be active in the presence of high concentrations of monovalent cations, including Na+, but the mechanism by which monovalent cations substitute for divalent cations in hammerhead catalysis remains unclear. Our results enable us to suggest that Na+ directly and specifically substitutes for divalent cations in the hammerhead active site. The detailed geometry of the pre-catalytic active site complex is also revealed with a new level of precision, thanks to the quality of the electron density maps obtained from what is currently the highest resolution ribozyme structure in the protein data bank. PMID:23711504

  10. Zinc poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... other materials to make industrial items such as paint, dyes, and more. These combination substances can be ... Compounds used to make paint, rubber, dyes, wood preservatives, and ... Zinc chloride Zinc oxide (relatively nonharmful) Zinc ...

  11. Lethal Factor Active-Site Mutations Affect Catalytic Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S. E.; Hanna, P. C.

    1998-01-01

    The lethal factor (LF) protein of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin contains the thermolysin-like active-site and zinc-binding consensus motif HEXXH (K. R. Klimpel, N. Arora, and S. H. Leppla, Mol. Microbiol. 13:1093–1100, 1994). LF is hypothesized to act as a Zn2+ metalloprotease in the cytoplasm of macrophages, but no proteolytic activities have been previously shown on any target substrate. Here, synthetic peptides are hydrolyzed by LF in vitro. Mass spectroscopy and peptide sequencing of isolated cleavage products separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography indicate that LF seems to prefer proline-containing substrates. Substitution mutations within the consensus active-site residues completely abolish all in vitro catalytic functions, as does addition of 1,10-phenanthroline, EDTA, and certain amino acid hydroxamates, including the novel zinc metalloprotease inhibitor ZINCOV. In contrast, the protease inhibitors bestatin and lysine CMK, previously shown to block LF activity on macrophages, did not block LF activity in vitro. These data provide the first direct evidence that LF may act as an endopeptidase. PMID:9573135

  12. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.

    1997-02-18

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate {alpha}-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal. 33 figs.

  13. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1997-01-01

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

  14. Controlled Orientation of Active Sites in a Nanostructured Multienzyme Complex

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung In; Yang, Byungseop; Jung, Younghan; Cha, Jaehyun; Cho, Jinhwan; Choi, Eun-Sil; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2016-01-01

    Multistep cascade reactions in nature maximize reaction efficiency by co-assembling related enzymes. Such organization facilitates the processing of intermediates by downstream enzymes. Previously, the studies on multienzyme nanocomplexes assembled on DNA scaffolds demonstrated that closer interenzyme distance enhances the overall reaction efficiency. However, it remains unknown how the active site orientation controlled at nanoscale can have an effect on multienzyme reaction. Here, we show that controlled alignment of active sites promotes the multienzyme reaction efficiency. By genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid and two compatible bioorthogonal chemistries, we conjugated mannitol dehydrogenase to formate dehydrogenase with the defined active site arrangement with the residue-level accuracy. The study revealed that the multienzyme complex with the active sites directed towards each other exhibits four-fold higher relative efficiency enhancement in the cascade reaction and produces 60% more D-mannitol than the other complex with active sites directed away from each other. PMID:28004799

  15. Tuning the Redox Properties of a Nonheme Iron(III)-Peroxo Complex Binding Redox-Inactive Zinc Ions by Water Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yong-Min; Bang, Suhee; Yoon, Heejung; Bae, Seong Hee; Hong, Seungwoo; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-06-19

    Here we report redox-inactive metal ions play important roles in tuning chemical properties of metal–oxygen intermediates. We describe the effect of water molecules on the redox properties of a nonheme iron(III)–peroxo complex binding redox-inactive metal ions. The coordination of two water molecules to a Zn2+ ion in (TMC)FeIII-(O2)-Zn(CF3SO3)2 (1-Zn2+) decreases the Lewis acidity of the Zn2+ ion, resulting in the decrease of the one-electron oxidation and reduction potentials of 1-Zn2+. This further changes the reactivities of 1-Zn2+ in oxidation and reduction reactions; no reaction occurred upon addition of an oxidant (e.g., cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN)) to 1-Zn2+, whereas 1-Zn2+ coordinating two water molecules, (TMC)FeIII-(O2)-Zn(CF3SO3)2-(OH2)2 [1-Zn2+-(OH2)2], releases the O2 unit in the oxidation reaction. In the reduction reactions, 1-Zn2+ was converted to its corresponding iron(IV)–oxo species upon addition of a reductant (e.g., a ferrocene derivative), whereas such a reaction occurred at a much slower rate in the case of 1-Zn2+-(OH2)2. Finally, the present results provide the first biomimetic example showing that water molecules at the active sites of metalloenzymes may participate in tuning the redox properties of metal–oxygen intermediates.

  16. Tuning the Redox Properties of a Nonheme Iron(III)-Peroxo Complex Binding Redox-Inactive Zinc Ions by Water Molecules

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Yong-Min; Bang, Suhee; Yoon, Heejung; ...

    2015-06-19

    Here we report redox-inactive metal ions play important roles in tuning chemical properties of metal–oxygen intermediates. We describe the effect of water molecules on the redox properties of a nonheme iron(III)–peroxo complex binding redox-inactive metal ions. The coordination of two water molecules to a Zn2+ ion in (TMC)FeIII-(O2)-Zn(CF3SO3)2 (1-Zn2+) decreases the Lewis acidity of the Zn2+ ion, resulting in the decrease of the one-electron oxidation and reduction potentials of 1-Zn2+. This further changes the reactivities of 1-Zn2+ in oxidation and reduction reactions; no reaction occurred upon addition of an oxidant (e.g., cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN)) to 1-Zn2+, whereas 1-Zn2+ coordinatingmore » two water molecules, (TMC)FeIII-(O2)-Zn(CF3SO3)2-(OH2)2 [1-Zn2+-(OH2)2], releases the O2 unit in the oxidation reaction. In the reduction reactions, 1-Zn2+ was converted to its corresponding iron(IV)–oxo species upon addition of a reductant (e.g., a ferrocene derivative), whereas such a reaction occurred at a much slower rate in the case of 1-Zn2+-(OH2)2. Finally, the present results provide the first biomimetic example showing that water molecules at the active sites of metalloenzymes may participate in tuning the redox properties of metal–oxygen intermediates.« less

  17. Application of micro-segmented flow for two-dimensional characterization of the combinatorial effect of zinc and copper ions on metal-tolerant Streptomyces strains.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jialan; Kürsten, Dana; Krause, Katrin; Kothe, Erika; Martin, Karin; Roth, Martin; Köhler, J Michael

    2013-10-01

    The cultivation and growth behavior of metal-tolerant strains of Streptomyce acidiscabies E13 and Streptomyces sp. F4 were studied under droplet-based microfluidics conditions. It was shown that the technique of micro segmented flow is well suited for the investigation of dependence of bacterial growth on different concentrations of either single metal ions or combinations of them. This study confirms higher tolerance to Zn than to Cu by our test organism. The highly resolved dose-response curves reflect two transitions between the different growth behaviors, separating initial responses to Cu concentration ranges into those with (a) intense growth, (b) moderate growth, and (c) growth inhibition. For Streptomyces sp. F4, an initial stimulation was shown in the sublethal range of zinc sulfate. Two-dimensional screenings using computer-controlled fluid actuation and in situ micro flow-through fluorimetry reflected a strong growth stimulation of strain F4 by zinc sulfate in the presence of sublethal Cu concentrations. This stimulatory effect on binary mixtures may be useful in providing optimal growth conditions in bioremediation procedures.

  18. Synthesis, spectroscopic, cyclic voltammetry properties and molecular structure of the thiocyanato-N meso-tetratolylporphyrinato zinc(II) ion complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denden, Zouhour; Harhouri, Wafa; Ben Haj Hassen, Leila; Rousselin, Yoann; Saint-Aman, Eric; Nasri, Habib

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of the (thiocyanato-N)(meso-tetratolylporphyrinato)zinc(II) chlorobenzene monosolvate complex with the formula [K(2,2,2-crypt)][Zn(TTP)(NCS)]·C6H5Cl (I) using the cryptand-222 to solubilize potassium thiocyanate in chlorobenzene solvent. Complex (I) has been characterized by elementary analysis, IR, UV-vis, 1H NMR and MS, and the structure of this new zinc(II) metalloporphyrin been examined crystallographically. A cyclic voltammetry investigation was also carried out on this species. The title compound crystallizes in the triclinic, space group P-1, with a = 11.5151(7) Å, b = 15.212(10) Å, c = 20.1093(12) Å, α = 80.428(4)°, β = 74.926(4)°, γ = 84.704(4)°, V = 3364.7(4) Å3, Z = 2 and Dcal = 1.303 g cm-3. The porphyrin macrocycle of (I) exhibits moderate ruffling and saddle distortions. In the crystal, the [Zn(TTP)(NCS)]- ion complexes, the [K(2,2,2-crypt)]+ counterions and the chlorobenzene solvent molecules are involved in a number of weak C__H⋯S and C-H⋯π intermolecular interactions forming a three-dimensional framework.

  19. Insights into the Effects of Zinc Doping on Structural Phase Transition of P2-Type Sodium Nickel Manganese Oxide Cathodes for High-Energy Sodium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuehang; Xu, Gui-Liang; Zhong, Guiming; Gong, Zhengliang; McDonald, Matthew J; Zheng, Shiyao; Fu, Riqiang; Chen, Zonghai; Amine, Khalil; Yang, Yong

    2016-08-31

    P2-type sodium nickel manganese oxide-based cathode materials with higher energy densities are prime candidates for applications in rechargeable sodium ion batteries. A systematic study combining in situ high energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD), ex situ X-ray absorption fine spectroscopy (XAFS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SS-NMR) techniques was carried out to gain a deep insight into the structural evolution of P2-Na0.66Ni0.33-xZnxMn0.67O2 (x = 0, 0.07) during cycling. In situ HEXRD and ex situ TEM measurements indicate that an irreversible phase transition occurs upon sodium insertion-extraction of Na0.66Ni0.33Mn0.67O2. Zinc doping of this system results in a high structural reversibility. XAFS measurements indicate that both materials are almost completely dependent on the Ni(4+)/Ni(3+)/Ni(2+) redox couple to provide charge/discharge capacity. SS-NMR measurements indicate that both reversible and irreversible migration of transition metal ions into the sodium layer occurs in the material at the fully charged state. The irreversible migration of transition metal ions triggers a structural distortion, leading to the observed capacity and voltage fading. Our results allow a new understanding of the importance of improving the stability of transition metal layers.

  20. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Crystal structure of an avian influenza polymerase PA[subscript N] reveals an endonuclease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Puwei; Bartlam, Mark; Lou, Zhiyong; Chen, Shoudeng; Zhou, Jie; He, Xiaojing; Lv, Zongyang; Ge, Ruowen; Li, Xuemei; Deng, Tao; Fodor, Ervin; Rao, Zihe; Liu, Yingfang

    2009-11-10

    The heterotrimeric influenza virus polymerase, containing the PA, PB1 and PB2 proteins, catalyses viral RNA replication and transcription in the nucleus of infected cells. PB1 holds the polymerase active site and reportedly harbours endonuclease activity, whereas PB2 is responsible for cap binding. The PA amino terminus is understood to be the major functional part of the PA protein and has been implicated in several roles, including endonuclease and protease activities as well as viral RNA/complementary RNA promoter binding. Here we report the 2.2 angstrom (A) crystal structure of the N-terminal 197 residues of PA, termed PA(N), from an avian influenza H5N1 virus. The PA(N) structure has an alpha/beta architecture and reveals a bound magnesium ion coordinated by a motif similar to the (P)DX(N)(D/E)XK motif characteristic of many endonucleases. Structural comparisons and mutagenesis analysis of the motif identified in PA(N) provide further evidence that PA(N) holds an endonuclease active site. Furthermore, functional analysis with in vivo ribonucleoprotein reconstitution and direct in vitro endonuclease assays strongly suggest that PA(N) holds the endonuclease active site and has critical roles in endonuclease activity of the influenza virus polymerase, rather than PB1. The high conservation of this endonuclease active site among influenza strains indicates that PA(N) is an important target for the design of new anti-influenza therapeutics.

  2. Diffusional correlations among multiple active sites in a single enzyme.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Carlos; Kapral, Raymond

    2014-04-07

    Simulations of the enzymatic dynamics of a model enzyme containing multiple substrate binding sites indicate the existence of diffusional correlations in the chemical reactivity of the active sites. A coarse-grain, particle-based, mesoscopic description of the system, comprising the enzyme, the substrate, the product and solvent, is constructed to study these effects. The reactive and non-reactive dynamics is followed using a hybrid scheme that combines molecular dynamics for the enzyme, substrate and product molecules with multiparticle collision dynamics for the solvent. It is found that the reactivity of an individual active site in the multiple-active-site enzyme is reduced substantially, and this effect is analyzed and attributed to diffusive competition for the substrate among the different active sites in the enzyme.

  3. Differential Assembly of Catalytic Interactions within the Conserved Active Sites of Two Ribozymes

    PubMed Central

    Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Molecular recognition is central to biology and a critical aspect of RNA function. Yet structured RNAs typically lack the preorganization needed for strong binding and precise positioning. A striking example is the group I ribozyme from Tetrahymena, which binds its guanosine substrate (G) orders of magnitude slower than diffusion. Binding of G is also thermodynamically coupled to binding of the oligonucleotide substrate (S) and further work has shown that the transition from E•G to E•S•G accompanies a conformational change that allows G to make the active site interactions required for catalysis. The group I ribozyme from Azoarcus has a similarly slow association rate but lacks the coupled binding observed for the Tetrahymena ribozyme. Here we test, using G analogs and metal ion rescue experiments, whether this absence of coupling arises from a higher degree of preorganization within the Azoarcus active site. Our results suggest that the Azoarcus ribozyme forms cognate catalytic metal ion interactions with G in the E•G complex, interactions that are absent in the Tetrahymena E•G complex. Thus, RNAs that share highly similar active site architectures and catalyze the same reactions can differ in the assembly of transition state interactions. More generally, an ability to readily access distinct local conformational states may have facilitated the evolutionary exploration needed to attain RNA machines that carry out complex, multi-step processes. PMID:27501145

  4. A Relaxed Active Site After Exon Ligation by the Group I Intron

    SciTech Connect

    Lipchock,S.; Strobel, S.

    2008-01-01

    During RNA maturation, the group I intron promotes two sequential phosphorotransfer reactions resulting in exon ligation and intron release. Here, we report the crystal structure of the intron in complex with spliced exons and two additional structures that examine the role of active-site metal ions during the second step of RNA splicing. These structures reveal a relaxed active site, in which direct metal coordination by the exons is lost after ligation, while other tertiary interactions are retained between the exon and the intron. Consistent with these structural observations, kinetic and thermodynamic measurements show that the scissile phosphate makes direct contact with metals in the ground state before exon ligation and in the transition state, but not after exon ligation. Despite no direct exonic interactions and even in the absence of the scissile phosphate, two metal ions remain bound within the active site. Together, these data suggest that release of the ligated exons from the intron is preceded by a change in substrate-metal coordination before tertiary hydrogen bonding contacts to the exons are broken.

  5. Active site structure and catalytic mechanism of phosphodiesterase for degradation of intracellular second messengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2002-03-01

    Phosphodiesterases are clinical targets for a variety of biological disorders, because this superfamily of enzymes regulate intracellular concentration of cyclic nucleotides that serve as the second messengers playing a critical role in a variety of physiological processes. Understanding structure and mechanism of a phosphodiesterase will provide a solid basis for rational design of the more efficient therapeutics. Although a three-dimensional X-ray crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human phosphodiesterase 4B2B was recently reported, it was uncertain whether a critical bridging ligand in the active site is a water molecule or a hydroxide ion. The identity of this bridging ligand has been determined by performing first-principles quantum chemical calculations on models of the active site. All the results obtained indicate that this critical bridging ligand in the active site of the reported X-ray crystal structure is a hydroxide ion, rather than a water molecule, expected to serve as the nucleophile to initialize the catalytic degradation of the intracellular second messengers.

  6. Two-Photon Ratiometric Fluorescence Probe with Enhanced Absorption Cross Section for Imaging and Biosensing of Zinc Ions in Hippocampal Tissue and Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanying; Fang, Bingqing; Jin, Ming; Tian, Yang

    2017-02-21

    Zinc ion (Zn(2+)) not only plays an important function in the structural, catalytic, transcription, and regulatory of proteins, but is also an essential ionic signal to regulate brain neurotransmitters pass process. In this work, we designed and synthesized an intramolecular charge transfer-based ratiometric two-photon fluorescence probe, P-Zn, for imaging and biosensing of Zn(2+) in live cell, hippocampal tissue, and zebrafish. The developed probe demonstrated high two-photon absorption cross section (δ) of 516 ± 77 GM, which increased to 958 ± 144 GM after the probe was coordinated with Zn(2+). Furthermore, this P-Zn probe quickly recognized Zn(2+) with high selectivity, over other metal ions, amino acids, and reactive oxygen species. More interestingly, the initial emission peak of the present probe at 465 nm decreased with a new peak increased at 550 nm, leading to the ratiometric determination of Zn(2+) with high accuracy. Finally, this two-photon fluorescence probe with high temporal resolution and remarkable analytical performance, as well as low-cytotoxicity, was successfully applied in imaging of live cells, hippocampal tissues, and zebrafishes. The present P-Zn probe combined with FLIM provided accurate mapping of Zn(2+) distribution at single-cell level. More interestingly, the two-photon spectroscopic results demonstrated that the level of Zn(2+) in hippocampal tissue of mouse with AD was higher than that in normal mouse brain.

  7. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air–liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B.; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Szymanski, Craig J.; Tolic, Ana; Klein, Jessica A.; Smith, Jordan N.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Orr, Galya

    2013-12-02

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn2+) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn2+, together with organelle-specific fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn2+ in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn2+ values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submersed cultures, intracellular Zn2+ values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn2+ values that were nearly 3 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submersed cultures, and 8 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn2+. At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ following exposures to ZnSO4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. In conclusion, together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn2+ have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes

  8. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air–liquid interface

    DOE PAGES

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B.; Xie, Yumei; ...

    2013-12-02

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn2+) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn2+, together with organelle-specificmore » fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn2+ in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn2+ values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submersed cultures, intracellular Zn2+ values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn2+ values that were nearly 3 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submersed cultures, and 8 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn2+. At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ following exposures to ZnSO4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. In conclusion, together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn2+ have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes underlying the potent toxicity of airborne ZnO NPs.« less

  9. Similarities in the HIV-1 and ASV Integrease Active Site Upon Metal Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Lins, Roberto D.; Straatsma, TP; Briggs, J. M.

    2000-04-05

    The HIV-1 integrase, which is essential for viral replication, catalyzes the insertion of viral DNA into the host chromosome thereby recruiting host cell machinery into making viral proteins. It represents the third main HIV enzyme target for inhibitor design, the first two being the reverse transcriptase and the protease. We report here a fully hydrated 2 ns molecular dynamics simulation performed using parallel NWChem3.2.1 with the AMBER95 force field. The HIV-1 integrase catalytic domain previously determined by crystallography (1B9D) and modeling including two Mg2+ ions placed into the active site based on an alignment against an ASV integrase structure containing two divalent metals (1VSH), was used as the starting structure. The simulation reveals a high degree of flexibility in the region of residues 140-149 even in the presence of a second divalent metal ion and a dramatic conformational change of the side chain of E152 when the second metal ion is present. This study shows similarities in the behavior of the catalytic residues in the HIV-1 and ASV integrases upon metal binding. The present simulation also provides support to the hypothesis that the second metal ion is likely to be carried into the HIV-1 integrase active site by the substrate, a strand of DNA.

  10. A highly sensitive fluorescent chemosensor for selective detection of zinc (II) ion based on the oxadiazole derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lu; Wang, Dan; Chen, Si-Hong; Wang, Dun-Jia; Yin, Guo-Dong

    2017-03-01

    A novel fluorescent chemosensor based on the oxadiazole, 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-5-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole, was designed and synthesized. The interaction of the oxadiazole with different metal ions had been investigated through UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectra in 9:1 (v/v) ethanol-water (pH = 7.0) solution. The oxadiazole showed a pronounced fluorescence enhancement at 430 nm upon addition of Zn2 + in aqueous solution, whereas it had no apparent interference from other metal ions. The results indicated that the oxadiazole possessed high selectivity and sensitivity to Zn2 + ion. The stoichiometric ratio between the oxadiazole and Zn2 + ion was calculated to be 2:1 by Job plot experiment, meanwhile their binding modes was confirmed by 1H NMR and mass spectrometry. Their association constant was determined to be 1.95 × 105 M- 1 and the detection limit for Zn2 + ion was 6.14 × 10- 7 mol/L.

  11. Zinc ions upregulate the hormone gastrin via an E-box motif in the proximal gastrin promoter.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lin; Kovac, Suzana; Chang, Mike; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S; Patel, Oneel

    2014-02-01

    Gastrin and its precursors act as growth factors for the normal and neoplastic gastrointestinal mucosa. As the hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride upregulates the gastrin gene, the effect of other metal ions on gastrin promoter activity was investigated. Gastrin mRNA was measured by real-time PCR, gastrin peptides by RIA, and gastrin promoter activity by dual-luciferase reporter assay. Exposure to Zn(2)(+) ions increased gastrin mRNA concentrations in the human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line AGS in a dose-dependent manner, with a maximum stimulation of 55 ± 14-fold at 100 μM (P<0.05). Significant stimulation was also observed with Cd(2)(+) and Cu(2)(+), but not with Ca(2)(+), Mg(2)(+), Ni(2)(+), or Fe(3)(+) ions. Activation of MAPK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways is necessary but not sufficient for gastrin induction by Zn(2)(+). Deletional mutation of the gastrin promoter identified an 11 bp DNA sequence, which contained an E-box motif, as necessary for Zn(2)(+)-dependent gastrin induction. The fact that E-box binding transcription factors play a crucial role in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), together with our observation that Zn(2)(+) ions upregulate the gastrin gene in AGS cells by an E-box-dependent mechanism, suggests that Zn(2)(+) ions may induce an EMT, and that gastrin may be involved in the transition.

  12. 175 MeV Au{sup +13} ion irradiation induced structural and morphological modifications in zinc oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Devendra; Sharma, Aditya; Varshney, Mayora; Verma, K. D.; Kumar, Shalendra

    2013-02-05

    Thin films of ZnO were deposited, on Si substrates, using the RF-sputtering technique and irradiated by the 175 MeV Au{sup +13} beams. The structural changes were investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. The particle size found to increase with the increasing ion fluence up to 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} ion/cm{sup 2}. At highest irradiation fluence of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} ion/cm{sup 2} the average particle size decreases. The Raman spectroscopy measurements were performed to understand the local phonon mode of the samples. The surface morphology of the as-deposited and irradiated thin films is measured by the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM).

  13. Insights into the Effects of Zinc Doping on Structural Phase Transition of P2-Type Sodium Nickel Manganese Oxide Cathodes for High-Energy Sodium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xuehang; Xu, Gui-Liang; Zhong, Guiming; Gong, Zhengliang; McDonald, Matthew J.; Zheng, Shiyao; Fu, Riqiang; Chen, Zonghai; Amine, Khalil; Yang, Yong

    2016-08-31

    P2-type sodium nickel manganese oxide-based cathode materials with higher energy densities are prime candidates for applications in rechargeable sodium ion batteries. A systematic study combining in situ high energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD), ex situ Xray absorption fine spectroscopy (XAFS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) techniques was carried out to gain a deep insight into the structural evolution of P2-Na0.66Ni0.33-xZnxMn0.67O2 (x = 0, 0.07) during cycling. In situ HEXRD and ex situ TEM measurements indicate that an irreversible phase transition occurs upon sodium insertion-extraction of Na0.66Ni0.33Mn0.67O2. Zinc doping of this system results in a high structural reversibility. XAFS measurements indicate that both materials are almost completely dependent on the Ni4+/Ni3+/ Ni2+ redox couple to provide charge/discharge capacity. SS-NMR measurements indicate that both reversible and irreversible migration of transition metal ions into the sodium layer occurs in the material at the fully charged state. The irreversible migration of transition metal ions triggers a structural distortion, leading to the observed capacity and voltage fading. Our results allow a new understanding of the importance of improving the stability of transition metal layers.

  14. Effect of zinc ions on differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to male germ cells and some germ cell-specific gene expression in rams.

    PubMed

    Ghasemzadeh-Hasankolai, Mohammad; Batavani, Roozali; Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza Baghaban; Sedighi-Gilani, Mohammadali

    2012-12-01

    This is the first report to describe the effects of zinc (Zn) ions on the expression of germ cell (GC) genes from bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs). Zn plays an important role in germinal epithelium maintenance, testosterone secretion, differentiation of GCs, and spermatogenesis. In addition, several studies have suggested that MSCs have the potential for differentiation into numerous cells types, including male GCs. In this study, we have treated passage-3 ram BM-MSCs with 0.14 μg/ml Zn sulfate (ZnSO₄) for a period of 21 days with the intent to determine whether Zn treatment can stimulate MSCs to differentiate into male GCs in vitro. We also sought to determine the type of changes seen in MSCs by Zn treatment. Differentiation into male GCs was evaluated by the assessment of expressions of the following GC-specific markers: VASA, PIWIL2, OCT4, beta1 INTEGRIN (ITG b1), DAZL (by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantitative RT-PCR), and PGP 9.5 (by immunocytochemistry). Also studied were morphological characteristics and changes in alkaline phosphatase activity. Interestingly, Zn upregulated the expressions of VASA and ITG b1 but downregulated PIWIL2 and OCT4. DAZL and PGP 9.5 were not expressed in the treatment group. According to our results, Zn ions did not stimulate BM-MSCs to transdifferentiate into male GCs; however, it changed the expression of GC genes in BM-MSCs. It can be concluded that a possible mechanism by which Zn ions can increase male fertility is by regulation of the expression of testis GC-specific genes in the differentiation process and spermatogenesis.

  15. Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development (BOND)-Zinc Review.

    PubMed

    King, Janet C; Brown, Kenneth H; Gibson, Rosalind S; Krebs, Nancy F; Lowe, Nicola M; Siekmann, Jonathan H; Raiten, Daniel J

    2016-03-09

    Zinc is required for multiple metabolic processes as a structural, regulatory, or catalytic ion. Cellular, tissue, and whole-body zinc homeostasis is tightly controlled to sustain metabolic functions over a wide range of zinc intakes, making it difficult to assess zinc insufficiency or excess. The BOND (Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development) Zinc Expert Panel recommends 3 measurements for estimating zinc status: dietary zinc intake, plasma zinc concentration (PZC), and height-for-age of growing infants and children. The amount of dietary zinc potentially available for absorption, which requires an estimate of dietary zinc and phytate, can be used to identify individuals and populations at risk of zinc deficiency. PZCs respond to severe dietary zinc restriction and to zinc supplementation; they also change with shifts in whole-body zinc balance and clinical signs of zinc deficiency. PZC cutoffs are available to identify individuals and populations at risk of zinc deficiency. However, there are limitations in using the PZC to assess zinc status. PZCs respond less to additional zinc provided in food than to a supplement administered between meals, there is considerable interindividual variability in PZCs with changes in dietary zinc, and PZCs are influenced by recent meal consumption, the time of day, inflammation, and certain drugs and hormones. Insufficient data are available on hair, urinary, nail, and blood cell zinc responses to changes in dietary zinc to recommend these biomarkers for assessing zinc status. Of the potential functional indicators of zinc, growth is the only one that is recommended. Because pharmacologic zinc doses are unlikely to enhance growth, a growth response to supplemental zinc is interpreted as indicating pre-existing zinc deficiency. Other functional indicators reviewed but not recommended for assessing zinc nutrition in clinical or field settings because of insufficient information are the activity or amounts of zinc-dependent enzymes

  16. The yeast regulator of transcription protein Rtr1 lacks an active site and phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kehui; Manley, James L; Tong, Liang

    2012-07-10

    The activity of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is controlled in part by the phosphorylation state of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of its largest subunit. Recent reports have suggested that yeast regulator of transcription protein, Rtr1, and its human homologue RPAP2, possess Pol II CTD Ser5 phosphatase activity. Here we report the crystal structure of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1, which reveals a new type of zinc finger protein and does not have any close structural homologues. Importantly, the structure does not show evidence of an active site, and extensive experiments to demonstrate its CTD phosphatase activity have been unsuccessful, suggesting that Rtr1 has a non-catalytic role in CTD dephosphorylation.

  17. Zinc, magnesium, and calcium ion supplementation confers tolerance to acetic acid stress in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae utilizing xylose.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ku Syahidah Ku; Sakamoto, Takatoshi; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Zhao, Xin-Qing; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-12-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a potential substrate for ethanol production. However, pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials produces inhibitory compounds such as acetic acid, which negatively affect ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Supplementation of the medium with three metal ions (Zn(2+) , Mg(2+) , and Ca(2+) ) increased the tolerance of S. cerevisiae toward acetic acid compared to the absence of the ions. Ethanol production from xylose was most improved (by 34%) when the medium was supplemented with 2 mM Ca(2+) , followed by supplementation with 3.5 mM Mg(2+) (29% improvement), and 180 μM Zn(2+) (26% improvement). Higher ethanol production was linked to high cell viability in the presence of metal ions. Comparative transcriptomics between the supplemented cultures and the control suggested that improved cell viability resulted from the induction of genes controlling the cell wall and membrane. Only one gene, FIT2, was found to be up-regulated in common between the three metal ions. Also up-regulation of HXT1 and TKL1 might enhance xylose consumption in the presence of acetic acid. Thus, the addition of ionic nutrients is a simple and cost-effective method to improve the acetic acid tolerance of S. cerevisiae.

  18. Molecular Recognition of the Catalytic Zinc(II) Ion in MMP-13: Structure-Based Evolution of an Allosteric Inhibitor to Dual Binding Mode Inhibitors with Improved Lipophilic Ligand Efficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Thomas; Riedl, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a class of zinc dependent endopeptidases which play a crucial role in a multitude of severe diseases such as cancer and osteoarthritis. We employed MMP-13 as the target enzyme for the structure-based design and synthesis of inhibitors able to recognize the catalytic zinc ion in addition to an allosteric binding site in order to increase the affinity of the ligand. Guided by molecular modeling, we optimized an initial allosteric inhibitor by addition of linker fragments and weak zinc binders for recognition of the catalytic center. Furthermore we improved the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) of the initial inhibitor by adding appropriate zinc binding fragments to lower the clogP values of the inhibitors, while maintaining their potency. All synthesized inhibitors showed elevated affinity compared to the initial hit, also most of the novel inhibitors displayed better LLE. Derivatives with carboxylic acids as the zinc binding fragments turned out to be the most potent inhibitors (compound 3 (ZHAWOC5077): IC50 = 134 nM) whereas acyl sulfonamides showed the best lipophilic ligand efficiencies (compound 18 (ZHAWOC5135): LLE = 2.91). PMID:26938528

  19. Molecular Recognition of the Catalytic Zinc(II) Ion in MMP-13: Structure-Based Evolution of an Allosteric Inhibitor to Dual Binding Mode Inhibitors with Improved Lipophilic Ligand Efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Thomas; Riedl, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a class of zinc dependent endopeptidases which play a crucial role in a multitude of severe diseases such as cancer and osteoarthritis. We employed MMP-13 as the target enzyme for the structure-based design and synthesis of inhibitors able to recognize the catalytic zinc ion in addition to an allosteric binding site in order to increase the affinity of the ligand. Guided by molecular modeling, we optimized an initial allosteric inhibitor by addition of linker fragments and weak zinc binders for recognition of the catalytic center. Furthermore we improved the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) of the initial inhibitor by adding appropriate zinc binding fragments to lower the clogP values of the inhibitors, while maintaining their potency. All synthesized inhibitors showed elevated affinity compared to the initial hit, also most of the novel inhibitors displayed better LLE. Derivatives with carboxylic acids as the zinc binding fragments turned out to be the most potent inhibitors (compound 3 (ZHAWOC5077): IC50 = 134 nM) whereas acyl sulfonamides showed the best lipophilic ligand efficiencies (compound 18 (ZHAWOC5135): LLE = 2.91).

  20. Perspective: On the active site model in computational catalyst screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Karsten; Plaisance, Craig P.; Oberhofer, Harald; Andersen, Mie

    2017-01-01

    First-principles screening approaches exploiting energy trends in surface adsorption represent an unparalleled success story in recent computational catalysis research. Here we argue that our still limited understanding of the structure of active sites is one of the major bottlenecks towards an ever extended and reliable use of such computational screening for catalyst discovery. For low-index transition metal surfaces, the prevalently chosen high-symmetry (terrace and step) sites offered by the nominal bulk-truncated crystal lattice might be justified. For more complex surfaces and composite catalyst materials, computational screening studies will need to actively embrace a considerable uncertainty with respect to what truly are the active sites. By systematically exploring the space of possible active site motifs, such studies might eventually contribute towards a targeted design of optimized sites in future catalysts.

  1. Structures of E. coli peptide deformylase bound to formate: insight into the preference for Fe2+ over Zn2+ as the active site metal.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rinku; Hao, Bing; Liu, Ren-Peng; Chan, Michael K

    2005-04-06

    E. coli peptide deformylase (PDF) catalyzes the deformylation of nascent polypeptides generated during protein synthesis. While PDF was originally thought to be a zinc enzyme, subsequent studies revealed that the active site metal is iron. In an attempt to understand this unusual metal preference, high-resolution structures of Fe-, Co-, and Zn-PDF were determined in complex with its deformylation product, formate. In all three structures, the formate ion binds the metal and forms hydrogen-bonding interactions with the backbone nitrogen of Leu91, the amide side chain of Gln50, and the carboxylate side chain of Glu133. One key difference, however, is how the formate binds the metal. In Fe-PDF and Co-PDF, formate binds in a bidentate fashion, while in Zn-PDF, it binds in a monodentate fashion. Importantly, these structural results provide the first clues into the origins of PDF's metal-dependent activity differences. On the basis of these structures, we propose that the basis for the higher activity of Fe-PDF stems from the better ability of iron to bind and activate the tetrahedral transition state required for cleavage of the N-terminal formyl group.

  2. The effect of metal ions on the activity and thermostability of the extracellular proteinase from a thermophilic Bacillus, strain EA.1.

    PubMed Central

    Coolbear, T; Whittaker, J M; Daniel, R M

    1992-01-01

    The proteinase from the extremely thermophilic Bacillus strain EA.1 exhibits maximum stability at a pH of approx. 6.5. In the presence of calcium ions the half-life at 95 degrees C of the enzyme at this pH was 17 min, and loss of activity followed first-order decay kinetics. The role of metal ions in the activity and stability of the enzyme was studied using the holoenzyme, the metal-depleted apoenzyme, and a zinc-enriched apoenzyme preparation. Zinc and calcium ions were the preferred bivalent cations for the active site and stabilization site(s) respectively. Stabilization by metal ions was not in itself a highly stringent process, but ions other than calcium which stabilized the enzyme generally had a concomitant inhibitory effect on activity. Inhibition and stabilization of the enzyme by cations were concentration-dependent effects and certain ions activated the apoenzyme but not the holoenzyme. Manganese(II) ions conferred some stability and also activated the enzyme, but in the latter case were not as effective as zinc ions. The results are discussed with reference to the ionic radii, co-ordination number and preferred ligand donors of the ions. Mercury(II) ions severely compromised enzyme activity and stability, and the effects of thiol-reactive agents suggest that thiol groups also have a role in enzyme integrity. PMID:1445196

  3. On the active site of mononuclear B1 metallo β-lactamases: a computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgrignani, Jacopo; Magistrato, Alessandra; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Vila, Alejandro J.; Carloni, Paolo; Pierattelli, Roberta

    2012-04-01

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MβLs) are Zn(II)-based bacterial enzymes that hydrolyze β-lactam antibiotics, hampering their beneficial effects. In the most relevant subclass (B1), X-ray crystallography studies on the enzyme from Bacillus Cereus point to either two zinc ions in two metal sites (the so-called `3H' and `DCH' sites) or a single Zn(II) ion in the 3H site, where the ion is coordinated by Asp120, Cys221 and His263 residues. However, spectroscopic studies on the B1 enzyme from B. Cereus in the mono-zinc form suggested the presence of the Zn(II) ion also in the DCH site, where it is bound to an aspartate, a cysteine, a histidine and a water molecule. A structural model of this enzyme in its DCH mononuclear form, so far lacking, is therefore required for inhibitor design and mechanistic studies. By using force field based and mixed quantum-classical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the protein in aqueous solution we constructed such structural model. The geometry and the H-bond network at the catalytic site of this model, in the free form and in complex with two common β-lactam drugs, is compared with experimental and theoretical findings of CphA and the recently solved crystal structure of new B2 MβL from Serratia fonticola (Sfh-I). These are MβLs from the B2 subclass, which features an experimentally well established mono-zinc form, in which the Zn(II) is located in the DCH site. From our simulations the ɛɛδ and δɛδ protomers emerge as possible DCH mono-zinc reactive species, giving a novel contribution to the discussion on the MβL reactivity and to the drug design process.

  4. Deep Sequencing of Random Mutant Libraries Reveals the Active Site of the Narrow Specificity CphA Metallo-β-Lactamase is Fragile to Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhizeng; Mehta, Shrenik C.; Adamski, Carolyn J.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Palzkill, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    CphA is a Zn2+-dependent metallo-β-lactamase that efficiently hydrolyzes only carbapenem antibiotics. To understand the sequence requirements for CphA function, single codon random mutant libraries were constructed for residues in and near the active site and mutants were selected for E. coli growth on increasing concentrations of imipenem, a carbapenem antibiotic. At high concentrations of imipenem that select for phenotypically wild-type mutants, the active-site residues exhibit stringent sequence requirements in that nearly all residues in positions that contact zinc, the substrate, or the catalytic water do not tolerate amino acid substitutions. In addition, at high imipenem concentrations a number of residues that do not directly contact zinc or substrate are also essential and do not tolerate substitutions. Biochemical analysis confirmed that amino acid substitutions at essential positions decreased the stability or catalytic activity of the CphA enzyme. Therefore, the CphA active - site is fragile to substitutions, suggesting active-site residues are optimized for imipenem hydrolysis. These results also suggest that resistance to inhibitors targeted to the CphA active site would be slow to develop because of the strong sequence constraints on function. PMID:27616327

  5. New dinuclear copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes for the investigation of sugar-metal ion interactions.

    PubMed

    Bera, Manindranath; Patra, Ayan

    2011-10-18

    We have studied the binding interactions of biologically important carbohydrates (D-glucose, D-xylose and D-mannose) with the newly synthesized five-coordinate dinuclear copper(II) complex, [Cu(2)(hpnbpda)(μ-OAc)] (1) and zinc(II) complex, [Zn(2)(hpnbpda)(μ-OAc)] (2) [H(3)hpnbpda=N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-2-hydroxy-1,3-propanediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid] in aqueous alkaline solution. The complexes 1 and 2 are fully characterized both in solid and solution using different analytical techniques. A geometrical optimization was made of the ligand H(3)hpnbpda and the complexes 1 and 2 by molecular mechanics (MM+) method in order to establish the stable conformations. All carbohydrates bind to the metal complexes in a 1:1 molar ratio. The binding events have been investigated by a combined approach of FTIR, UV-vis and (13)C NMR spectroscopic techniques. UV-vis spectra indicate a significant blue shift of the absorption maximum of complex 1 during carbohydrate coordination highlighting the sugar binding ability of complex 1. The apparent binding constants of the substrate-bound copper(II) complexes have been determined from the UV-vis titration experiments. The binding ability and mode of binding of these sugar substrates with complex 2 are indicated by their characteristic coordination induced shift (CIS) values in (13)C NMR spectra for carbon atoms C1, C2, and C3 of sugar substrates.

  6. 46 CFR 148.330 - Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings... Materials § 148.330 Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings. (a) The shipper must inform the cognizant Coast Guard Captain of the Port in advance of any cargo transfer operations involving zinc...

  7. 46 CFR 148.330 - Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings... Materials § 148.330 Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings. (a) The shipper must inform the cognizant Coast Guard Captain of the Port in advance of any cargo transfer operations involving zinc...

  8. 46 CFR 148.330 - Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings... Materials § 148.330 Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings. (a) The shipper must inform the cognizant Coast Guard Captain of the Port in advance of any cargo transfer operations involving zinc...

  9. 46 CFR 148.330 - Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings... Materials § 148.330 Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings. (a) The shipper must inform the cognizant Coast Guard Captain of the Port in advance of any cargo transfer operations involving zinc...

  10. Modification of algae with zinc, copper and silver ions for usage as natural composite for antibacterial applications.

    PubMed

    Mahltig, B; Soltmann, U; Haase, H

    2013-03-01

    Nanometer sized metal particles are used in many applications as antimicrobial materials. However in public discussion nanoparticular materials are a matter of concern due to potential health risks. Hence there is a certain demand for alternative antimicrobial acting materials. For this, the aim of this work is to realize an antimicrobial active material based on the release of metal ions from a natural depot. By this, the use of elemental metal particles or metal oxide particles in nanometer or micrometer scale is avoided. As natural depot four different algae materials (gained from Ascophyllum nodosum, Fucus vesicolosus, Spirulina platensis and Nannochloropsis) are used and loaded by bioabsorption with metal ions Ag(+), Cu(2+) and Zn(2+). The amount of metal bound by biosorption differs strongly in the range of 0.8 to 5.4 mg/g and depends on type of investigated algae material and type of metal ion. For most samples a smaller release of biosorbed Ag(+) and Cu(2+) is observed compared to a strong release of Zn(2+). The antibacterial activity of the prepared composites is investigated with Escherichia coli. Algae material without biosorbed metal has only a small effect on E. coli. Also by modification of algae with Zn(2+) only a small antibacterial property can be observed. Only with biosorption of Ag(+), the algae materials gain a strong bactericidal effect, even in case of a small amount of released silver ions. These silver modified algae materials can be used as highly effective bactericidal composites which may be used in future applications for the production of antimicrobial textiles, papers or polymer materials.

  11. Farnesyltransferase—New Insights into the Zinc-Coordination Sphere Paradigm: Evidence for a Carboxylate-Shift Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Sérgio F.; Fernandes, Pedro A.; Ramos, Maria João

    2005-01-01

    Despite the enormous interest that has been devoted to the study of farnesyltransferase, many questions concerning its catalytic mechanism remain unanswered. In particular, several doubts exist on the structure of the active-site zinc coordination sphere, more precisely on the nature of the fourth ligand, which is displaced during the catalytic reaction by a peptide thiolate. From available crystallographic structures, and mainly from x-ray absorption fine structure data, two possible alternatives emerge: a tightly zinc-bound water molecule or an almost symmetrical bidentate aspartate residue (Asp-297β). In this study, high-level theoretical calculations, with different-sized active site models, were used to elucidate this aspect. Our results demonstrate that both coordination alternatives lie in a notably close energetic proximity, even though the bidentate hypothesis has a somewhat lower energy. The Gibbs reaction and activation energies for the mono-bidentate conversion, as well as the structure for the corresponding transition state, were also determined. Globally, these results indicate that at room temperature the mono-bidentate conversion is reversible and very fast, and that probably both states exist in equilibrium, which suggests that a carboxylate-shift mechanism may have a key role in the farnesylation process by assisting the coordination/displacement of ligands to the zinc ion, thereby controlling the enzyme activity. Based on this equilibrium hypothesis, an explanation for the existing contradictions between the crystallographic and x-ray absorption fine structure results is proposed. PMID:15501930

  12. High dose zinc supplementation induces hippocampal zinc deficiency and memory impairment with inhibition of BDNF signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Jing, Xiao-Peng; Zhang, Shou-Peng; Gu, Run-Xia; Tang, Fang-Xu; Wang, Xiu-Lian; Xiong, Yan; Qiu, Mei; Sun, Xu-Ying; Ke, Dan; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Zinc ions highly concentrate in hippocampus and play a key role in modulating spatial learning and memory. At a time when dietary fortification and supplementation of zinc have increased the zinc consuming level especially in the youth, the toxicity of zinc overdose on brain function was underestimated. In the present study, weaning ICR mice were given water supplemented with 15 ppm Zn (low dose), 60 ppm Zn (high dose) or normal lab water for 3 months, the behavior and brain zinc homeostasis were tested. Mice fed high dose of zinc showed hippocampus-dependent memory impairment. Unexpectedly, zinc deficiency, but not zinc overload was observed in hippocampus, especially in the mossy fiber-CA3 pyramid synapse. The expression levels of learning and memory related receptors and synaptic proteins such as NMDA-NR2A, NR2B, AMPA-GluR1, PSD-93 and PSD-95 were significantly decreased in hippocampus, with significant loss of dendritic spines. In keeping with these findings, high dose intake of zinc resulted in decreased hippocampal BDNF level and TrkB neurotrophic signaling. At last, increasing the brain zinc level directly by brain zinc injection induced BDNF expression, which was reversed by zinc chelating in vivo. These results indicate that zinc plays an important role in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory and BDNF expression, high dose supplementation of zinc induces specific zinc deficiency in hippocampus, which further impair learning and memory due to decreased availability of synaptic zinc and BDNF deficit.

  13. Selective targeting of the conserved active site cysteine of Mycobacterium tuberculosis methionine aminopeptidase with electrophilic reagents.

    PubMed

    Reddi, Ravikumar; Arya, Tarun; Kishor, Chandan; Gumpena, Rajesh; Ganji, Roopa J; Bhukya, Supriya; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    Methionine aminopeptidases (MetAPs) cleave initiator methionine from ~ 70% of the newly synthesized proteins in every living cell, and specific inhibition or knockdown of this function is detrimental. MetAPs are metalloenzymes, and are broadly classified into two subtypes, type I and type II. Bacteria contain only type I MetAPs, and the active site of these enzymes contains a conserved cysteine. By contrast, in type II enzymes the analogous position is occupied by a conserved glycine. Here, we report the reactivity of the active site cysteine in a type I MetAP, MetAP1c, of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtMetAP1c) towards highly selective cysteine-specific reagents. The authenticity of selective modification of Cys105 of MtMetAP1c was established by using site-directed mutagenesis and crystal structure determination of covalent and noncovalent complexes. On the basis of these observations, we propose that metal ions in the active site assist in the covalent modification of Cys105 by orienting the reagents appropriately for a successful reaction. These studies establish, for the first time, that the conserved cysteine of type I MetAPs can be targeted for selective inhibition, and we believe that this chemistry can be exploited for further drug discovery efforts regarding microbial MetAPs.

  14. Effect of Jahn-Teller ion in zinc sodium sulphate hexahydrate: a case of low hyperfine coupling constant for Cu(II) ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidu, K. C.; Shiyamala, C.; Mithira, S.; Natarajan, B.; Venkatesan, R.; Rao, P. S.

    2005-06-01

    Single crystal electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of Cu(II) doped zinc sodium sulphate hexahydrate are carried out from room temperature (RT) to 123 K. The RT spectra show unresolved hyperfine lines and hence angular variation studies are also carried out at 123 K to obtain spin Hamiltonian parameters. The spin Hamiltonian parameters calculated from the 123 K spectra are: g(11)=2.039, g(22)=2.232, g(33)=2.394, A(11)=5.64 mT, A(22)=4.20 mT, and A(33)=7.94 mT. The g-matrix values at RT and 123 K have matched fairly well with each other. The low hyperfine value (A(33)), obtained at 123 K, has been explained by considering considerable admixture of d(x 2-y 2) ground state with d(z 2) excited state and the delocalization of the unpaired spin density onto the ligands. The admixture coefficients of ground state wave function are: a=0.346, b=0.935, c=0.055, d=0.040, e=-0.040, where a and b correspond to admixture coefficients for d(z 2) and d(x 2-y 2), respectively. Angular variation of Cu(II) resonances in the three orthogonal axes shows that the impurity has entered a substitutional site in the host lattice in place of Zn(II). Bonding parameters, kappa=0.295, P=245.4x10(-4), alpha(2)=0.709, alpha=0.8421 and alpha'=0.6034, have also been calculated to fully characterize the EPR.

  15. Rational Design Synthesis and Evaluation of New Selective Inhibitors of Microbial Class II (Zinc Dependent) Fructose Bis-phosphate Aldolases

    SciTech Connect

    R Daher; M Coincon; M Fonvielle; P Gest; M Guerin; M Jackson; J Sygusch; M Therisod

    2011-12-31

    We report the synthesis and biochemical evaluation of several selective inhibitors of class II (zinc dependent) fructose bis-phosphate aldolases (Fba). The products were designed as transition-state analogues of the catalyzed reaction, structurally related to the substrate fructose bis-phosphate (or sedoheptulose bis-phosphate) and based on an N-substituted hydroxamic acid, as a chelator of the zinc ion present in active site. The compounds synthesized were tested on class II Fbas from various pathogenic microorganisms and, by comparison, on a mammalian class I Fba. The best inhibitor shows Ki against class II Fbas from various pathogens in the nM range, with very high selectivity (up to 105). Structural analyses of inhibitors in complex with aldolases rationalize and corroborate the enzymatic kinetics results. These inhibitors represent lead compounds for the preparation of new synthetic antibiotics, notably for tuberculosis prophylaxis.

  16. The modulatory effect of zinc ions on voltage-gated potassium currents in cultured rat hippocampal neurons is not related to Kv1.3 channels.

    PubMed

    Teisseyre, A; Mercik, K; Mozrzymas, J W

    2007-12-01

    We applied the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to study the influence of zinc ions (Zn(2+)) and extracellular protons at acidic pH (pH(o)) on voltage-gated potassium currents in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. The first goal of the study was to estimate whether Kv1.3 currents significantly contributed to voltage-gated potassium currents in examined cells. Then, the influence of both ions on the activity of other voltage-gated potassium currents in the neurons was examined. We examined both the total current and the delayed - rectifier component. Results obtained in both cases were not significantly different from each other. Available data argued against any significant contribution of Kv1.3 currents to the recorded currents. Nevertheless, application of Zn(2+) in the concentration range from 100 microM to 5 mM reversibly modulated the recorded currents. The activation midpoint was shifted by about 40 mV (total current) and 30 mV (delayed-rectifier current) towards positive membrane potentials and the activation kinetics were slowed significantly (2 - 3 fold) upon application of Zn(2+). The inactivation midpoint was also shifted towards positive membrane potentials, but less significantly (about 14 mV). The current amplitudes were reduced in a concentration-dependent manner to about 0.5 of the control value. The effects of Zn(2+) were saturated at the concentration of 1 mM. Raising extracellular proton concentration by lowering the pH(o) from 7.35 to 6.4 did not affect significantly the currents. Possible mechanisms underlying the observed phenomena and their possible physiological significance are discussed.

  17. Chemical Modification of Papain and Subtilisin: An Active Site Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Vincent, Mireille; Dickman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using methyle methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) and phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride (PMSF) to specifically modify the cysteine and serine residues in the active sites of papain and subtilism respectively is demonstrated. The covalent modification of these enzymes and subsequent rescue of papain shows the beginning biochemist that proteins…

  18. Energy transfer at the active sites of heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dlott, D.D.; Hill, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments using a picosecond pump-probe apparatus at the Picosecond Free-electron Laser Center at Stanford University, were performed to investigate the relaxation of carbon monoxide bound to the active sites of heme proteins. The significance of these experiments is two-fold: (1) they provide detailed information about molecular dynamics occurring at the active sites of proteins; and (2) they provide insight into the nature of vibrational relaxation processes in condensed matter. Molecular engineering is used to construct various molecular systems which are studied with the FEL. We have studied native proteins, mainly myoglobin obtained from different species, mutant proteins produced by genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques, and a variety of model systems which mimic the structures of the active sites of native proteins, which are produced using molecular synthesis. Use of these different systems permits us to investigate how specific molecular structural changes affect dynamical processes occurring at the active sites. This research provides insight into the problems of how different species needs are fulfilled by heme proteins which have greatly different functionality, which is induced by rather small structural changes.

  19. Ultrasensitive detection of lead ion sensor based on gold nanodendrites modified electrode and electrochemiluminescent quenching of quantum dots by electrocatalytic silver/zinc oxide coupled structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Kong, Qingkun; Bian, Zhaoquan; Ma, Chao; Ge, Shenguang; Zhang, Yan; Yu, Jinghua; Yan, Mei

    2015-03-15

    A signal-off electrochemiluminescence (ECL) DNA sensor based on gold nanodendrites (Au NDs) modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode for the detection of lead ion (Pb(2+)) was developed. Well-defined Au NDs were prepared on ITO electrode using low-potential synthesis, assisted by ethylenediamine. Based on Pb(2+)-specific deoxyribozyme, the silver/zinc oxide (Ag/ZnO) with coupled structure, prepared by one-pot method, was close to the surface of the electrode to catalyze the reduction of part of H2O2, the coreactant for cathodic ECL emission, leading to a decrease of ECL intensity. In addition, taking advantage of the larger surface area to capture a large amount of capture probe as well as excellent conductivity of Au NDs, the sensor could detect Pb(2+) quantitatively in a wider range, and performed excellent selectivity. Furthermore, such simple and sensitive DNA sensor was successfully applied for the detection of Pb(2+) in lake water and human serum samples, respectively.

  20. Lead-free piezoelectrics: V3+ to V5+ ion conversion promoting the performances of V-doped Zinc Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurenti, M.; Castellino, M.; Perrone, D.; Asvarov, A.; Canavese, G.; Chiolerio, A.

    2017-02-01

    Vanadium doped ZnO (VZO) thin films were grown by RF magnetron sputtering, starting from a ZnO:V ceramic target. The crystal structure, chemical composition, electric and piezoelectric properties of the films were investigated either on the as-grown thin films or after a post-deposition rapid thermal annealing (RTA) treatment performed at 600 °C for different lengths of time (1 and 5 min) in an oxygen atmosphere. Substitutional doping of Zn2+ with V3+ and V5+ ions strongly deteriorated the hexagonal wurtzite ZnO structure of the as-grown thin films due to lattice distortion. The resulting slight amorphization led to a poor piezoelectric response and higher resistivity. After the RTA treatment, strong c-axis oriented VZO thin films were obtained, together with a partial conversion of the starting V3+ ions into V5+. The improvement of the crystal structure and the stronger polarity of both V3+ – O and V5+ – O chemical bonds, together with the corresponding easier rotation under the application of an external electric field, positively affected the piezoelectric response and increased conductivity. This was confirmed by closed-loop butterfly piezoelectric curves, by a maximum d33 piezoelectric coefficient of 85 pm·V‑1, and also by ferroelectric switching domains with a well-defined polarization hysteresis curve, featuring a residual polarization of 12.5 μC•cm‑2.

  1. Lead-free piezoelectrics: V3+ to V5+ ion conversion promoting the performances of V-doped Zinc Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Laurenti, M.; Castellino, M.; Perrone, D.; Asvarov, A.; Canavese, G.; Chiolerio, A.

    2017-01-01

    Vanadium doped ZnO (VZO) thin films were grown by RF magnetron sputtering, starting from a ZnO:V ceramic target. The crystal structure, chemical composition, electric and piezoelectric properties of the films were investigated either on the as-grown thin films or after a post-deposition rapid thermal annealing (RTA) treatment performed at 600 °C for different lengths of time (1 and 5 min) in an oxygen atmosphere. Substitutional doping of Zn2+ with V3+ and V5+ ions strongly deteriorated the hexagonal wurtzite ZnO structure of the as-grown thin films due to lattice distortion. The resulting slight amorphization led to a poor piezoelectric response and higher resistivity. After the RTA treatment, strong c-axis oriented VZO thin films were obtained, together with a partial conversion of the starting V3+ ions into V5+. The improvement of the crystal structure and the stronger polarity of both V3+ – O and V5+ – O chemical bonds, together with the corresponding easier rotation under the application of an external electric field, positively affected the piezoelectric response and increased conductivity. This was confirmed by closed-loop butterfly piezoelectric curves, by a maximum d33 piezoelectric coefficient of 85 pm·V−1, and also by ferroelectric switching domains with a well-defined polarization hysteresis curve, featuring a residual polarization of 12.5 μC∙cm−2. PMID:28165040

  2. Lead-free piezoelectrics: V(3+) to V(5+) ion conversion promoting the performances of V-doped Zinc Oxide.

    PubMed

    Laurenti, M; Castellino, M; Perrone, D; Asvarov, A; Canavese, G; Chiolerio, A

    2017-02-06

    Vanadium doped ZnO (VZO) thin films were grown by RF magnetron sputtering, starting from a ZnO:V ceramic target. The crystal structure, chemical composition, electric and piezoelectric properties of the films were investigated either on the as-grown thin films or after a post-deposition rapid thermal annealing (RTA) treatment performed at 600 °C for different lengths of time (1 and 5 min) in an oxygen atmosphere. Substitutional doping of Zn(2+) with V(3+) and V(5+) ions strongly deteriorated the hexagonal wurtzite ZnO structure of the as-grown thin films due to lattice distortion. The resulting slight amorphization led to a poor piezoelectric response and higher resistivity. After the RTA treatment, strong c-axis oriented VZO thin films were obtained, together with a partial conversion of the starting V(3+) ions into V(5+). The improvement of the crystal structure and the stronger polarity of both V(3+) - O and V(5+) - O chemical bonds, together with the corresponding easier rotation under the application of an external electric field, positively affected the piezoelectric response and increased conductivity. This was confirmed by closed-loop butterfly piezoelectric curves, by a maximum d33 piezoelectric coefficient of 85 pm·V(-1), and also by ferroelectric switching domains with a well-defined polarization hysteresis curve, featuring a residual polarization of 12.5 μC∙cm(-2).

  3. Expression of zinc transporter ZnT7 in mouse superior cervical ganglion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons contain a considerable amount of zinc ions, but little is known about zinc homeostasis in the SCG. It is known that zinc transporter 7 (ZnT7, Slc30a7), a member of the Slc30 ZnT family, is involved in mobilizing zinc ions from the cytoplasm into the Golgi...

  4. Study on the interaction of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase with aluminum ions by electrochemical and fluorescent method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Junwei; Yao, Kaian; Han, Weiying; Bi, Shuping

    2006-11-01

    The interaction of superoxide dismutase (SOD) with aluminum (Al) ions was investigated by cyclic voltammetry, fluorescence spectroscopy and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. The electrochemical activity of the SOD enzyme electrode was inhibited irreversibly by the addition of Al. Meanwhile, the static fluorescence quenching mechanism further revealed the existing of molecular complex of SOD with Al 3+. The association constant was obtained from Lineweaver-Burk plot. The experimental results of voltammetry and fluorescence spectroscopy indicated that the conformation of SOD molecule was altered by the formation of Al-SOD complex. It may influence the activity of SOD enzyme since the optimum action of SOD depends upon a particular configuration of electrostatic charges in the enzyme molecule.

  5. Interaction of aspartic acid-104 and proline-287 with the active site of m-calpain.

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, J S; Elce, J S

    1996-01-01

    In an ongoing study of the mechanisms of calpain catalysis and Ca(2+)-induced activation, the effects of Asp-104-->Ser and Pro-287-->Ser large subunit mutations on m-calpain activity, the pH-activity profile, Ca(2+)-sensitivity, and autolysis were measured. The importance of these positions was suggested by sequence comparisons between the calpain and papain families of cysteine proteinases. Asp-104 is adjacent to the active-site Cys-105, and Pro-287 is adjacent to the active-site Asn-286 and probably to the active-site His-262; both Asp-104 and Pro-287 are absolutely conserved in the known calpains, but are replaced by highly conserved serine residues in the papains. The single mutants had approx. 10-15% of wild-type activity, due mainly to a decrease in kcat, since Km was only slightly increased. The Pro-287-->Ser mutation appeared to cause a local perturbation of the catalytic Cys-105/His-262 catalytic ion pair, reducing its efficiency without major effect on the conformation and stability of the enzyme. The Asp-104-->Ser mutation caused a marked narrowing of the pH-activity curve, a 9-fold increase in Ca2+ requirement, and an acceleration of autolysis, when compared with the wild-type enzyme. The results indicated that Asp-104 alters the nature of its interaction with the catalytic ion pair during Ca(2+)-induced conformational change in calpain. This interaction may be direct or indirect, but is important in activation of the enzyme. PMID:8912692

  6. Binding of Mn-deoxyribonucleoside Triphosphates to the Active Site of the DNA Polymerase of Bacteriophage T7

    SciTech Connect

    B Akabayov; C Richardson

    2011-12-31

    Divalent metal ions are crucial as cofactors for a variety of intracellular enzymatic activities. Mg{sup 2+}, as an example, mediates binding of deoxyribonucleoside 5'-triphosphates followed by their hydrolysis in the active site of DNA polymerase. It is difficult to study the binding of Mg{sup 2+} to an active site because Mg{sup 2+} is spectroscopically silent and Mg{sup 2+} binds with low affinity to the active site of an enzyme. Therefore, we substituted Mg{sup 2+} with Mn{sup 2+}:Mn{sup 2+} that is not only visible spectroscopically but also provides full activity of the DNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7. In order to demonstrate that the majority of Mn{sup 2+} is bound to the enzyme, we have applied site-directed titration analysis of T7 DNA polymerase using X-ray near edge spectroscopy. Here we show how X-ray near edge spectroscopy can be used to distinguish between signal originating from Mn{sup 2+} that is free in solution and Mn{sup 2+} bound to the active site of T7 DNA polymerase. This method can be applied to other enzymes that use divalent metal ions as a cofactor.

  7. The homing endonuclease I-CreI uses three metals, one of which is shared between the two active sites.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, B S; Monnat, R J; Stoddard, B L

    2001-04-01

    Homing endonucleases, like restriction enzymes, cleave double-stranded DNA at specific target sites. The cleavage mechanism(s) utilized by LAGLIDADG endonucleases have been difficult to elucidate; their active sites are divergent, and only one low resolution cocrystal structure has been determined. Here we report two high resolution structures of the dimeric I-CreI homing endonuclease bound to DNA: a substrate complex with calcium and a product complex with magnesium. The bound metals in both complexes are verified by manganese anomalous difference maps. The active sites are positioned close together to facilitate cleavage across the DNA minor groove; each contains one metal ion bound between a conserved aspartate (Asp 20) and a single scissile phosphate. A third metal ion bridges the two active sites. This divalent cation is bound between aspartate residues from the active site of each subunit and is in simultaneous contact with the scissile phosphates of both DNA strands. A metal-bound water molecule acts as the nucleophile and is part of an extensive network of ordered water molecules that are positioned by enzyme side chains. These structures illustrate a unique variant of a two-metal endonuclease mechanism is employed by the highly divergent LAGLIDADG enzyme family.

  8. Cellular Active N-Hydroxyurea FEN1 Inhibitors Block Substrate Entry to the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Exell, Jack C.; Thompson, Mark J.; Finger, L. David; Shaw, Steven J.; Debreczeni, Judit; Ward, Thomas A.; McWhirter, Claire; Siöberg, Catrine L. B.; Martinez Molina, Daniel; Mark Abbott, W.; Jones, Clifford D.; Nissink, J. Willem M.; Durant, Stephen T.; Grasby, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    The structure-specific nuclease human flap endonuclease-1 (hFEN1) plays a key role in DNA replication and repair and may be of interest as an oncology target. We present the first crystal structure of inhibitor-bound hFEN1 and show a cyclic N-hydroxyurea bound in the active site coordinated to two magnesium ions. Three such compounds had similar IC50 values but differed subtly in mode of action. One had comparable affinity for protein and protein–substrate complex and prevented reaction by binding to active site catalytic metal ions, blocking the unpairing of substrate DNA necessary for reaction. Other compounds were more competitive with substrate. Cellular thermal shift data showed engagement of both inhibitor types with hFEN1 in cells with activation of the DNA damage response evident upon treatment. However, cellular EC50s were significantly higher than in vitro inhibition constants and the implications of this for exploitation of hFEN1 as a drug target are discussed. PMID:27526030

  9. Synthesis and characterization of three-dimensional transition metal ions doped zinc oxide based dilute magnetic semiconductor thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Kousik

    Dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS), especially 3d-transition metal (TM) doped ZnO based DMS materials are the most promising candidates for optoelectronics and spintronics applications; e.g. in spin light emitting diode (SLED), spin transistors, and spin field effect transistors (SFET), etc. In the present dissertation, thin films of Zn1-xTMxO (TM = Co2+, Cu2+, and Mn2+) were grown on (0001) oriented Al2O3 substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. The films were highly c-axis oriented, nearly single crystalline, and defects free for a limited concentration of the dilution of transition metal ions. In particular, we have obtained single crystalline phases of Zn1-xTMxO thin films for up to 10, 3, and 5 stoichiometric percentages of Co2+, Cu2+, and Mn2+ respectively. Raman micro-probe system was used to understand the structural and lattice dynamical properties at different physical conditions. The confinement of optical phonons in the disorder lattice was explained by alloy potential fluctuation (APF) using a spatial correlation (SC) model. The detailed analysis of the optical phonon behavior in disorder lattice confirmed the substitution of the transition metal ions in Zn 2+ site of the ZnO host lattice. The secondary phases of ZnCo 2O4, CuO, and ZnMn2O4 were detected in higher Co, Cu, and Mn doped ZnO thin films respectively; where as, XRD did not detect these secondary phases in the same samples. Room temperature ferromagnetism was observed in Co2+ and Cu2+ ions doped ZnO thin films with maximum saturation magnetization (Ms) of 1.0 and 0.76 muB respectively. The origin of the observed ferromagnetism in Zn1-xCoxO thin films was tested by the controlled introduction of shallow donors (Al) in Zn0.9-x Co0.1O:Alx (x = 0.005 and 0.01) thin films. The saturation magnetization for the 10% Co-doped ZnO (1.0 muB /Co) at 300K reduced (˜0.25 muB/Co) due to Al doping. The observed ferromagnetism and the reduction due to Al doping can be explained by the Bound

  10. Active sites in char gasification: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.D.; Perkins, M.T.; Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1987-09-01

    Among the key variables in the design of gasifiers and combustors is the reactivity of the chars which must be gasified or combusted. Significant loss of unburned char is unacceptable in virtually any process; the provision of sufficient residence time for complete conversion is essential. A very wide range of reactivities are observed, depending upon the nature of the char in a process. The current work focuses on furthering the understanding of gasification reactivities of chars. It has been well established that the reactivity of char to gasification generally depends upon three principal factors: (1) the concentration of ''active sites'' in the char; (2) mass transfer within the char; and (3) the type and concentration of catalytic impurities in the char. The present study primarily addresses the first factor. The subject of this research is the origin, nature, and fate of active sites in chars derived from parent hydrocarbons with coal-like structure. The nature and number of the active sites and their reactivity towards oxygen are examined in ''model'' chars derived from phenol-formaldehyde type resins. How the active sites are lost by the process of thermal annealing during heat treatment of chars are studied, and actual rate for the annealing process is derived. Since intrinsic char reactivities are of primary interest in the present study, a fair amount of attention was given to the model char synthesis and handling so that the effect of catalytic impurities and oxygen-containing functional groups in the chemical structure of the material were minimized, if not completely eliminated. The project would not be considered complete without comparing characteristic features of synthetic chars with kinetic behavior exhibited by natural chars, including coal chars.

  11. Bis-tridentate Chelates of an Asymmetric Ligand: X-ray Structures and Solution NMR Characterization of Divalent Zinc Triad Metal Ion Complexes of N-(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-(2-(methylthio)ethyl)amine.

    PubMed

    Bebout, Deborah C; Lai, Wei; Stamps, Sarah M; Berry, Steven M; Butcher, Raymond J

    2008-04-25

    Divalent zinc triad metal ion complexes of type M(L)(2)(ClO(4))(2) (L = N-(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-(2-(methylthio)ethyl)amine) with N(4)S(2) metal coordination spheres were isolated and characterized by X-ray crystallography and variable temperature proton NMR. Although bis-tridentate chelates have nine geometric isomers, the crystallographically characterized complexes of all three metal ions had trans facial octahedral coordination geometry with C(i) symmetry. Despite the low coordination number and geometric preferences of d(10) metal ions, which facilitate inter- and intramolecular exchange processes, dilute solutions of these bis-tridentate chelates exhibited slow geometric isomerization. Symmetry, sterics and shielding arguments supported specific isomeric assignments for the major and minor chemical shift environments observed at low temperature. At elevated temperature, rapid intramolecular exchange occurred for all three complexes but slow intermolecular exchange on the coupling constant time scale was evidenced through detection of J(HgH) interactions for Hg(L)(2) (2+). These unusual observations are discussed in the context of the zinc triad metal ion coordination chemistry of related bis-tridentate chelates.

  12. Active site amino acid sequence of human factor D.

    PubMed

    Davis, A E

    1980-08-01

    Factor D was isolated from human plasma by chromatography on CM-Sephadex C50, Sephadex G-75, and hydroxylapatite. Digestion of reduced, S-carboxymethylated factor D with cyanogen bromide resulted in three peptides which were isolated by chromatography on Sephadex G-75 (superfine) equilibrated in 20% formic acid. NH2-Terminal sequences were determined by automated Edman degradation with a Beckman 890C sequencer using a 0.1 M Quadrol program. The smallest peptide (CNBr III) consisted of the NH2-terminal 14 amino acids. The other two peptides had molecular weights of 17,000 (CNBr I) and 7000 (CNBr II). Overlap of the NH2-terminal sequence of factor D with the NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr I established the order of the peptides. The NH2-terminal 53 residues of factor D are somewhat more homologous with the group-specific protease of rat intestine than with other serine proteases. The NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr II revealed the active site serine of factor D. The typical serine protease active site sequence (Gly-Asp-Ser-Gly-Gly-Pro was found at residues 12-17. The region surrounding the active site serine does not appear to be more highly homologous with any one of the other serine proteases. The structural data obtained point out the similarities between factor D and the other proteases. However, complete definition of the degree of relationship between factor D and other proteases will require determination of the remainder of the primary structure.

  13. Identification of putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes.

    PubMed

    Das, Akash; Davis, Matthew A; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2008-08-01

    In this report, we sought to determine the putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes. For experimental purposes, a particular region of the C-terminal end of the ACAT protein was selected as the putative active site domain due to its high degree of sequence conservation from yeast to humans. Because ACAT enzymes have an intrinsic thioesterase activity, we hypothesized that by analogy with the thioesterase domain of fatty acid synthase, the active site of ACAT enzymes may comprise a catalytic triad of ser-his-asp (S-H-D) amino acid residues. Mutagenesis studies revealed that in ACAT1, S456, H460, and D400 were essential for activity. In ACAT2, H438 was required for enzymatic activity. However, mutation of D378 destabilized the enzyme. Surprisingly, we were unable to identify any S mutations of ACAT2 that abolished catalytic activity. Moreover, ACAT2 was insensitive to serine-modifying reagents, whereas ACAT1 was not. Further studies indicated that tyrosine residues may be important for ACAT activity. Mutational analysis showed that the tyrosine residue of the highly conserved FYXDWWN motif was important for ACAT activity. Furthermore, Y518 was necessary for ACAT1 activity, whereas the analogous residue in ACAT2, Y496, was not. The available data suggest that the amino acid requirement for ACAT activity may be different for the two ACAT isozymes.

  14. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  15. The Role of an Active Site Mg2+ in HDV Ribozyme Self-Cleavage: Insights from QM/MM Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Mlýnský, Vojtěch; Šponer, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme is a catalytic RNA motif embedded in the human pathogenic HDV RNA. It catalyzes self-cleavage of its sugar-phosphate backbone with direct participation of the active site cytosine C75. Biochemical and structural data support a general acid role of C75. Here, we used hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations to probe the reaction mechanism and changes in Gibbs energy along the ribozyme's reaction pathway with an N3-protonated C75H+ in the active site, which acts as the general acid, and a partially hydrated Mg2+ ion with one deprotonated, inner-shell coordinated water molecule that acts as the general base. We followed eight reaction paths with distinct position and coordination of the catalytically important active site Mg2+ ion. For six of them, we observed feasible activation barriers ranging from 14.2 to 21.9 kcal/mol, indicating that the specific position of the Mg2+ ion in the active site is predicted to strongly affect the kinetics of self-cleavage. The deprotonation of the U-1(2′-OH) nucleophile and the nucleophilic attack of the resulting U-1(2′-O−) on the scissile phosphodiester are found to be separate steps, as deprotonation precedes the nucleophilic attack. This sequential mechanism of the HDV ribozyme differs from the concerted nucleophilic activation and attack suggested for the hairpin ribozyme. We estimated the pKa of the U-1(2′-OH) group to range from 8.8 to 11.2, suggesting that the pKa is lowered by several units from that of a free ribose, comparable to and most likely smaller than the pKa of the solvated active site Mg2+ ion. Our results thus support the notion that the structure of the HDV ribozyme, and particularly the positioning of the active site Mg2+ ion, facilitates deprotonation and activation of the 2′-OH nucleophile. PMID:25412464

  16. Batch sorption dynamics and equilibrium for the removal of lead ions from aqueous phase using activated carbon developed from coffee residue activated with zinc chloride.

    PubMed

    Boudrahem, F; Aissani-Benissad, F; Aït-Amar, H

    2009-07-01

    Lignocellulosic materials are good precursors for the production of activated carbon. In this work, coffee residue has been used as raw material in the preparation of powder activated carbon by the method of chemical activation with zinc chloride for the sorption of Pb(II) from dilute aqueous solutions. The influence of impregnation ratio (ZnCl2/coffee residue) on the physical and chemical properties of the prepared carbons was studied in order to optimize this parameter. The optimum experimental condition for preparing predominantly microporous activated carbons with high pore surface area (890 m2/g) and micropore volume (0.772 cm3/g) is an impregnation ratio of 100%. The developed activated carbon shows substantial capability to sorb lead(II) ions from aqueous solutions and for relative impregnation ratios of 75 and 100%, the maximum uptake is practically the same. Thus, 75% represents the optimal impregnation ratio. Batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of the main parameters such as contact time, initial concentration of Pb(II), solution pH, ionic strength and temperature. The maximum uptake of lead(II) at 25 degrees C was about 63 mg/g of adsorbent at pH 5.8, initial Pb(II) concentration of 10 mg/L, agitation speed of 200 rpm and ionic strength of 0.005 M. The kinetic data were fitted to the models of pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order, and follow closely the pseudo-second order model. Equilibrium sorption isotherms of Pb(II) were analyzed by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models. The Freundlich model gives a better fit than the others. Results from this study suggest that activated carbon produced from coffee residue is an effective adsorbent for the removal of lead from aqueous solutions and that ZnCl2 is a suitable activating agent for the preparation of high-porosity carbons.

  17. Sol-Gel Synthesis of High-Purity Actinide Oxide ThO2 and Its Solid Solutions with Technologically Important Tin and Zinc Ions.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Vikash Kumar; Nagarajan, Rajamani

    2016-12-19

    The applicability of epoxide-based sol-gel synthesis for actinide oxide (thoria) starting from air-stable salt, Th(NO3)4, has been examined. The homogeneous gel formed from Th(NO3)4 when calcined at 400 °C yielded nanostructured thoria, and with increasing tempeartures (600, 700, and 800 °C), the average crystallite size increased. Successful Rietveld refinement of the powder X-ray diffraction pattern of ThO2 in Fm3̅m space group was carried out with a = 5.6030(35) Å. The fingerprint vibrational mode of the fluorite structure of ThO2 was noticed as a sharp band in the Raman spectrum at 457 cm(-1). In the SEM image, a near spherical morphology of thoria was noticed. Samples showed blue emission on exciting with λ = 380 nm in the photoluminescence spectrum indicative of the presence of defects. Following this approach, 50 mol % of Sn(4+) could be substituted for Th(4+), retaining the fluorite structure as evidenced by the PXRD, Raman spectroscopy, electron microscopy, EDAX, and XPS measurements. Randomization of the lattice was observed for the tin-substituted samples. A significant blue shift in the absorption threshold along with a persistent blue emission in the photoluminesence spectra were evident for the tin-substituted samples. The concentration of Zn(2+) ion in thoria was limited to 15 mol % as revealed by PXRD and XPS measurements. The Raman peak shifted to higher values for Zn(2+)-substituted samples. A change in the optical absorbance characteristics was observed for the zinc-substituted thoria. A 50 mol % Sn(4+)-substituted thoria degraded aqueous Rhodamine 6G dye solutions in the presence of UV-vis radiation following pseudo-first-order kinetics.

  18. Structure of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase with the Inhibitor β-thujaplicinol Bound at the RNase H Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Himmel, Daniel M.; Maegley, Karen A.; Pauly, Tom A.; Bauman, Joseph D.; Das, Kalyan; Dharia, Chhaya; Clark, Arthur D.; Ryan, Kevin; Hickey, Michael J.; Love, Robert A.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Bergqvist, Simon; Arnold, Eddy

    2012-01-01

    Summary Novel inhibitors are needed to counteract the rapid emergence of drug-resistant HIV variants. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) has both DNA polymerase and RNase H (RNH) enzymatic activities, but approved drugs that inhibit RT target the polymerase. Inhibitors that act against new targets, like RNH, would be effective against all of the current drug-resistant variants. Here, we present 2.80 Å and 2.04 Å resolution crystal structures of an RNH inhibitor, β-thujaplicinol, bound at the RNH active site of both HIV-1 RT and an isolated RNH domain. β-thujaplicinol chelates two divalent metal ions at the RNH active site. We provide biochemical evidence that β-thujaplicinol is a slow-binding RNH inhibitor with non-competitive kinetics and suggest that it forms a tropylium ion that interacts favorably with RT and the RNA:DNA substrate. PMID:20004166

  19. Role of vanadium ions, oxygen vacancies, and interstitial zinc in room temperature ferromagnetism on ZnO-V2O5 nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we present the role of vanadium ions (V+5 and V+3), oxygen vacancies (VO), and interstitial zinc (Zni) to the contribution of specific magnetization for a mixture of ZnO-V2O5 nanoparticles (NPs). Samples were obtained by mechanical milling of dry powders and ethanol-assisted milling for 1 h with a fixed atomic ratio V/Zn?=?5% at. For comparison, pure ZnO samples were also prepared. All samples exhibit a room temperature magnetization ranging from 1.18?×?10−3 to 3.5?×?10−3 emu/gr. Pure ZnO powders (1.34?×?10−3 emu/gr) milled with ethanol exhibit slight increase in magnetization attributed to formation of Zni, while dry milled ZnO powders exhibit a decrease of magnetization due to a reduction of VO concentration. For the ZnO-V2O5 system, dry milled and thermally treated samples under reducing atmosphere exhibit a large paramagnetic component associated to the formation of V2O3 and secondary phases containing V+3 ions; at the same time, an increase of VO is observed with an abrupt fall of magnetization to σ?~?0.7?×?10−3 emu/gr due to segregation of V oxides and formation of secondary phases. As mechanical milling is an aggressive synthesis method, high disorder is induced at the surface of the ZnO NPs, including VO and Zni depending on the chemical environment. Thermal treatment restores partially structural order at the surface of the NPs, thus reducing the amount of Zni at the same time that V2O5 NPs segregate reducing the direct contact with the surface of ZnO NPs. Additional samples were milled for longer time up to 24 h to study the effect of milling on the magnetization; 1-h milled samples have the highest magnetizations. Structural characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Identification of VO and Zni was carried out with Raman spectra, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was used to verify that V did not diffuse into ZnO NPs as well to quantify O/Zn ratios. PMID:24708614

  20. Role of vanadium ions, oxygen vacancies, and interstitial zinc in room temperature ferromagnetism on ZnO-V2O5 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Olive-Méndez, Sion F; Santillán-Rodríguez, Carlos R; González-Valenzuela, Ricardo A; Espinosa-Magaña, Francisco; Matutes-Aquino, José A

    2014-04-07

    In this work, we present the role of vanadium ions (V+5 and V+3), oxygen vacancies (VO), and interstitial zinc (Zni) to the contribution of specific magnetization for a mixture of ZnO-V2O5 nanoparticles (NPs). Samples were obtained by mechanical milling of dry powders and ethanol-assisted milling for 1 h with a fixed atomic ratio V/Zn?=?5% at. For comparison, pure ZnO samples were also prepared. All samples exhibit a room temperature magnetization ranging from 1.18?×?10-3 to 3.5?×?10-3 emu/gr. Pure ZnO powders (1.34?×?10-3 emu/gr) milled with ethanol exhibit slight increase in magnetization attributed to formation of Zni, while dry milled ZnO powders exhibit a decrease of magnetization due to a reduction of VO concentration. For the ZnO-V2O5 system, dry milled and thermally treated samples under reducing atmosphere exhibit a large paramagnetic component associated to the formation of V2O3 and secondary phases containing V+3 ions; at the same time, an increase of VO is observed with an abrupt fall of magnetization to σ?~?0.7?×?10-3 emu/gr due to segregation of V oxides and formation of secondary phases. As mechanical milling is an aggressive synthesis method, high disorder is induced at the surface of the ZnO NPs, including VO and Zni depending on the chemical environment. Thermal treatment restores partially structural order at the surface of the NPs, thus reducing the amount of Zni at the same time that V2O5 NPs segregate reducing the direct contact with the surface of ZnO NPs. Additional samples were milled for longer time up to 24 h to study the effect of milling on the magnetization; 1-h milled samples have the highest magnetizations. Structural characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Identification of VO and Zni was carried out with Raman spectra, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was used to verify that V did not diffuse into ZnO NPs as well to quantify O/Zn ratios.

  1. Probing the promiscuous active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase using synthetic substrates, homology modeling, and active site modification.

    PubMed

    Daniellou, Richard; Zheng, Hongyan; Langill, David M; Sanders, David A R; Palmer, David R J

    2007-06-26

    The active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase (IDH, EC 1.1.1.18) from Bacillus subtilis recognizes a variety of mono- and disaccharides, as well as 1l-4-O-substituted inositol derivatives. It catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of the axial alcohol of these substrates with comparable kinetic constants. We have found that 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol does not act as a substrate for IDH, in contrast to structurally similar compounds such as those bearing substituted benzyl substituents in the same position. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol and 4-O-(2-naphthyl)methyl-myo-inositol, which is a substrate for IDH, shows a distinct difference in the preferred conformation of the aryl substituent. Conformational analysis of known substrates of IDH suggests that this conformational difference may account for the difference in reactivity of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol in the presence of IDH. A sequence alignment of IDH with the homologous glucose-fructose oxidoreductase allowed the construction of an homology model of inositol dehydrogenase, to which NADH and 4-O-benzyl-scyllo-inosose were docked and the active site energy minimized. The active site model is consistent with all experimental results and suggests that a conserved tyrosine-glycine-tyrosine motif forms the hydrophobic pocket adjoining the site of inositol recognition. Y233F and Y235F retain activity, while Y233R and Y235R do not. A histidine-aspartate pair, H176 and D172, are proposed to act as a dyad in which H176 is the active site acid/base. The enzyme is inactivated by diethyl pyrocarbonate, and the mutants H176A and D172N show a marked loss of activity. Kinetic isotope effect experiments with D172N indicate that chemistry is rate-determining for this mutant.

  2. The presence of zinc-binding proteins in brain.

    PubMed

    Itoh, M; Ebadi, M; Swanson, S

    1983-09-01

    Zinc is one of the most abundant divalent metal ions in the brain, its concentration being greater than those of copper and manganese. Since free zinc ion is a potent inhibitor of sulfhydryl enzymes, we postulated that zinc in the brain most probably exists bound to macromolecules. As zinc-binding proteins in brain have not been characterized, we attempted to discover the occurrence and properties of these proteins. By using Sephadex G-75 column chromatography calibrated with proteins of known molecular weights, and by other techniques, we detected separate zinc-binding proteins, with apparent estimated molecular weights ranging from 15,000 to 210,000. Unlike the hepatic or renal zinc thioneins, the zinc-binding proteins in brain are not inducible following administration of zinc. Our interpretation of the results is that the major portion of the existing zinc in the brain is bound, and does not exist in free form.

  3. Mapping intermolecular interactions and active site conformations: from human MMP-1 crystal structure to molecular dynamics free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Nash, Anthony; Birch, Helen L; de Leeuw, Nora H

    2017-02-01

    The zinc-dependent Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) found within the extracellular matrix (ECM) of vertebrates are linked to pathological processes such as arthritis, skin ulceration and cancer. Although a general backbone proteolytic mechanism is understood, crystallographic data continue to suggest an active site that is too narrow to encompass the respective substrate. We present a fully parameterised Molecular Dynamics (MD) study of the structural properties of an MMP-1-collagen crystallographic structure (Protein Data Bank - 4AUO), followed by an exploration of the free energy surface of a collagen polypeptide chain entering the active site, using a combined meta-dynamics and umbrella sampling (MDUS) approach. We conclude that the interactions between MMP-1 and the collagen substrate are in good agreement with a number of experimental studies. As such, our unrestrained MD simulations and our MDUS results, which indicate an energetic barrier for a local uncoiling and insertion event, can inform future investigations of the collagen-peptide non-bonded association steps with the active site prior to proteolytic mechanisms. The elucidation of such free energy barriers provides a better understanding of the role of the enzyme in the ECM and is important in the design of future MMP inhibitors.

  4. Arsenic doped zinc oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Volbers, N.; Lautenschlaeger, S.; Leichtweiss, T.; Laufer, A.; Graubner, S.; Meyer, B. K.; Potzger, K.; Zhou Shengqiang

    2008-06-15

    As-doping of zinc oxide has been approached by ion implantation and chemical vapor deposition. The effect of thermal annealing on the implanted samples has been investigated by using secondary ion mass spectrometry and Rutherford backscattering/channeling geometry. The crystal damage, the distribution of the arsenic, the diffusion of impurities, and the formation of secondary phases is discussed. For the thin films grown by vapor deposition, the composition has been determined with regard to the growth parameters. The bonding state of arsenic was investigated for both series of samples using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  5. Uniform colloidal zinc compounds of various morphologies

    SciTech Connect

    Castellano, M.; Matijevic, E. )

    1989-02-01

    The preparation of finely dispersed zinc compounds consisting of uniform particles is described. Aging at elevated temperatures ({approx} 90{degree}C) of aqueous solutions of zinc nitrate or zinc chloride in the presence of urea resulted in precipitation of uniform rodlike basic zinc carbonate particles. These solids show x-ray characteristics of crystalline hydrozincite. In the presence of sulfate ions amorphous spherical particles of narrow size distribution of the same chemical composition are generated. On calcination both kinds of solids change to zinc oxide yet retain the original shape. In the presence of NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and urea, aqueous zinc salt solutions on aging yield rather uniform amorphous spherical zinc basic phosphate particles, which on calcination lose water.

  6. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  7. Active-Site Structure of Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase and Transphyletic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, D.T.; Robinson, H.; Kim, S.-K.; Reddy, P. T.

    2011-01-21

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) belonging to three nonhomologous classes (II, III, and IV) have been structurally characterized, enabling a comparison of the mechanisms of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate biosynthesis. We report the crystal structures of three active-site complexes for Yersinia pestis class IV AC (AC-IV)-two with substrate analogs and one with product. Mn{sup 2+} binds to all three phosphates, and to Glu12 and Glu136. Electropositive residues Lys14, Arg63, Lys76, Lys111, and Arg113 also form hydrogen bonds to phosphates. The conformation of the analogs is suitable for in-line nucleophilic attack by the ribose O3' on {alpha}-phosphate (distance {approx} 4 {angstrom}). In the product complex, a second Mn ion is observed to be coordinated to both ribose 2' oxygen and ribose 3' oxygen. Observation of both metal sites, together with kinetic measurements, provides strong support for a two-cation mechanism. Eleven active-site mutants were also made and kinetically characterized. These findings and comparisons with class II and class III enzymes enable a detailed transphyletic analysis of the AC mechanism. Consistent with its lack of coordination to purine, Y. pestis AC-IV cyclizes both ATP and GTP. As in other classes of AC, the ribose is loosely bound, and as in class III, no base appears to ionize the O3' nucleophile. Different syn/anti conformations suggest that the mechanism involves a conformational transition, and further evidence suggests a role for ribosyl pseudorotation. With resolutions of 1.6-1.7 {angstrom}, these are the most detailed active-site ligand complexes for any class of this ubiquitous signaling enzyme.

  8. Active-Site Structure of Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase and Transphyletic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    D Gallagher; S Kim; H Robinson; P Reddy

    2011-12-31

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) belonging to three nonhomologous classes (II, III, and IV) have been structurally characterized, enabling a comparison of the mechanisms of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate biosynthesis. We report the crystal structures of three active-site complexes for Yersinia pestis class IV AC (AC-IV) - two with substrate analogs and one with product. Mn{sup 2+} binds to all three phosphates, and to Glu12 and Glu136. Electropositive residues Lys14, Arg63, Lys76, Lys111, and Arg113 also form hydrogen bonds to phosphates. The conformation of the analogs is suitable for in-line nucleophilic attack by the ribose O3' on {alpha}-phosphate (distance {approx} 4 {angstrom}). In the product complex, a second Mn ion is observed to be coordinated to both ribose 2' oxygen and ribose 3' oxygen. Observation of both metal sites, together with kinetic measurements, provides strong support for a two-cation mechanism. Eleven active-site mutants were also made and kinetically characterized. These findings and comparisons with class II and class III enzymes enable a detailed transphyletic analysis of the AC mechanism. Consistent with its lack of coordination to purine, Y. pestis AC-IV cyclizes both ATP and GTP. As in other classes of AC, the ribose is loosely bound, and as in class III, no base appears to ionize the O3' nucleophile. Different syn/anti conformations suggest that the mechanism involves a conformational transition, and further evidence suggests a role for ribosyl pseudorotation. With resolutions of 1.6-1.7 {angstrom}, these are the most detailed active-site ligand complexes for any class of this ubiquitous signaling enzyme.

  9. Spectroscopic studies of the active site of galactose oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, P.F.; Brown, R.D. III; Koenig, S.H.

    1995-07-19

    X-ray absorption and EPR spectroscopy have been used to probe the copper site structure in galactose oxidase at pH 4.5 and 7.0. the results suggest that there are no major differences in the structure of the tetragonal Cu(II) site at these pH values. Analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicates that four N,O scatterers are present at approximately 2 {Angstrom}; these are presumably the equatorial ligands. In addition, the EXAFS data establish that oxidative activation to produce the active-site tyrosine radical does not cause major changes in the copper coordination environment. Therefore results obtained on the one-electron reduced enzyme, containing Cu(II) but not the tyrosine radical, probably also apply to the catalytically active Cu(II)/tyrosine radical state. Solvent water exchange, inhibitor binding, and substrate binding have been probed via nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) measurements. The NMRD profile of galactose oxidase is quantitatively consistent with the rapid exchange of a single, equatorial water ligand with a Cu(II)-O separation of about 2.4 {Angstrom}. Azide and cyanide displace this coordinated water. The binding of azide and the substrate dihydroxyacetone produce very similar effects on the NMRD profile of galactose oxidase, indicating that substrates also bind to the active site Cu(II) in an equatorial position.

  10. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-04

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases.

  11. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases. PMID:22020126

  12. Distance between two active-site lysines of ribulosebis-phosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.H.; Hartman, F.C.

    1986-05-01

    Previous affinity labeling studies and comparative sequence analyses have identified two different lysines at the active site of the title enzyme (Lys-166 and Lys-329 in the Rhodospirillum rubrum enzyme and Lys-175 and Lys-334 in the spinach enzyme). Because the two lysines are mutually exclusive to various reagents, they appear to be in proximity. To challenge this postulate, the authors have explored the reactions of the R. rubrum enzyme (a homodimer) with chemical cross-linking agents. 4,4'-Diisothiocyano-2,2'-disulfonate stilbene, which spans 12 A, rapidly inactivates the enzyme with protection afforded by the competitive inhibitor 2-carboxyribitol-1,5-bisphosphate. The inactivated enzyme was subjected to gel filtration in the presence of urea to remove material arising from intersubunit or intermolecular cross-linking. The monomeric fraction was digested with trypsin; inspection of the digest by HPLC revealed that over-half of the incorporated reagent was associated with a single peptide. This peptide was purified by successive ion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The amino acid composition and sequence of the purified peptide demonstrated that it is comprised of two chains, encompassing position 149-168 and 314-337 of the original protein subunit and connected by a cross-link between Lys-166 and Lys-329. Thus, the two active-site lysines can be juxtaposed only 12 A apart.

  13. The Active Site of Oligogalacturonate Lyase Provides Unique Insights into Cytoplasmic Oligogalacturonate β-Elimination*

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, D. Wade; Gilbert, Harry J.; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2010-01-01

    Oligogalacturonate lyases (OGLs; now also classified as pectate lyase family 22) are cytoplasmic enzymes found in pectinolytic members of Enterobacteriaceae, such as the enteropathogen Yersinia enterocolitica. OGLs utilize a β-elimination mechanism to preferentially catalyze the conversion of saturated and unsaturated digalacturonate into monogalacturonate and the 4,5-unsaturated monogalacturonate-like molecule, 5-keto-4-deoxyuronate. To provide mechanistic insights into the specificity of this enzyme activity, we have characterized the OGL from Y. enterocolitica, YeOGL, on oligogalacturonides and determined its three-dimensional x-ray structure to 1.65 Å. The model contains a Mn2+ atom in the active site, which is coordinated by three histidines, one glutamine, and an acetate ion. The acetate mimics the binding of the uronate group of galactourono-configured substrates. These findings, in combination with enzyme kinetics and metal supplementation assays, provide a framework for modeling the active site architecture of OGL. This enzyme appears to contain a histidine for the abstraction of the α-proton in the −1 subsite, a residue that is highly conserved throughout the OGL family and represents a unique catalytic base among pectic active lyases. In addition, we present a hypothesis for an emerging relationship observed between the cellular distribution of pectate lyase folding and the distinct metal coordination chemistries of pectate lyases. PMID:20851883

  14. Zinc and cadmium removal by biosorption on Undaria pinnatifida in batch and continuous processes.

    PubMed

    Plaza Cazón, J; Viera, M; Donati, E; Guibal, E

    2013-11-15

    Zn(II) and Cd(II) removal by biosorption using Undaria pinnatifida was studied in batch and dynamic systems. The kinetic uptake follows a pseudo second order rate equation indicating that the rate limiting step is a chemical reaction. The equilibrium data are described by the Langmuir isotherm in mono-component solutions. In binary solutions, the Jain and Snowyink model shows that most of the active sites are exclusively accessible to cadmium ions without competition with the zinc ions. The dynamic studies show that the biosorbent has higher retention and affinity for Cd(II) than for Zn(II) in both mono- and bi-component systems. SEM-EDX analysis indicates that the active sites are heterogeneously distributed on the cell wall surface. FT-IR spectrometry characterization shows that carboxylic groups and chemical groups containing N and S contribute to Zn(II) and Cd(II) uptake by U. pinnatifida. According to these results calcium-treated U. pinnatifida is a suitable adsorbent for Zn(II) and Cd(II) pollutants.

  15. An active site rearrangement within the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme releases nonproductive interactions and allows formation of catalytic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Raghuvir N.; Van Schie, Sabine N.S.; Giambaşu, George; Dai, Qing; Yesselman, Joseph D.; York, Darrin; Piccirilli, Joseph A.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Biological catalysis hinges on the precise structural integrity of an active site that binds and transforms its substrates and meeting this requirement presents a unique challenge for RNA enzymes. Functional RNAs, including ribozymes, fold into their active conformations within rugged energy landscapes that often contain misfolded conformers. Here we uncover and characterize one such “off-pathway” species within an active site after overall folding of the ribozyme is complete. The Tetrahymena group I ribozyme (E) catalyzes cleavage of an oligonucleotide substrate (S) by an exogenous guanosine (G) cofactor. We tested whether specific catalytic interactions with G are present in the preceding E•S•G and E•G ground-state complexes. We monitored interactions with G via the effects of 2′- and 3′-deoxy (–H) and −amino (–NH2) substitutions on G binding. These and prior results reveal that G is bound in an inactive configuration within E•G, with the nucleophilic 3′-OH making a nonproductive interaction with an active site metal ion termed MA and with the adjacent 2′-OH making no interaction. Upon S binding, a rearrangement occurs that allows both –OH groups to contact a different active site metal ion, termed MC, to make what are likely to be their catalytic interactions. The reactive phosphoryl group on S promotes this change, presumably by repositioning the metal ions with respect to G. This conformational transition demonstrates local rearrangements within an otherwise folded RNA, underscoring RNA's difficulty in specifying a unique conformation and highlighting Nature's potential to use local transitions of RNA in complex function. PMID:26567314

  16. Catalysis by a de novo zinc-mediated protein interface: implications for natural enzyme evolution and rational enzyme engineering.

    PubMed

    Der, Bryan S; Edwards, David R; Kuhlman, Brian

    2012-05-08

    Here we show that a recent computationally designed zinc-mediated protein interface is serendipitously capable of catalyzing carboxyester and phosphoester hydrolysis. Although the original motivation was to design a de novo zinc-mediated protein-protein interaction (called MID1-zinc), we observed in the homodimer crystal structure a small cleft and open zinc coordination site. We investigated if the cleft and zinc site at the designed interface were sufficient for formation of a primitive active site that can perform hydrolysis. MID1-zinc hydrolyzes 4-nitrophenyl acetate with a rate acceleration of 10(5) and a k(cat)/K(M) of 630 M(-1) s(-1) and 4-nitrophenyl phosphate with a rate acceleration of 10(4) and a k(cat)/K(M) of 14 M(-1) s(-1). These rate accelerations by an unoptimized active site highlight the catalytic power of zinc and suggest that the clefts formed by protein-protein interactions are well-suited for creating enzyme active sites. This discovery has implications for protein evolution and engineering: from an evolutionary perspective, three-coordinated zinc at a homodimer interface cleft represents a simple evolutionary path to nascent enzymatic activity; from a protein engineering perspective, future efforts in de novo design of enzyme active sites may benefit from exploring clefts at protein interfaces for active site placement.

  17. Biological methane oxidation: regulation, biochemistry, and active site structure of particulate methane monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Raquel L; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2004-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is a three-subunit integral membrane enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of methane to methanol. Although pMMO is the predominant methane oxidation catalyst in nature, it has proved difficult to isolate, and most questions regarding its molecular structure, active site composition, chemical mechanism, and genetic regulation remain unanswered. Copper ions are believed to play a key role in both pMMO regulation and catalysis, and there is some evidence that the enzyme contains iron as well. A number of research groups have solubilized and purified or partially purified pMMO. These preparations have been characterized by biochemical and biophysical methods. In addition, aspects of methane monooxygenase gene regulation and copper accumulation in methanotrophs have been studied. This review summarizes for the first time the often controversial pMMO literature, focusing on recent progress and highlighting unresolved issues.

  18. Threshold occupancy and specific cation binding modes in the hammerhead ribozyme active site are required for active conformation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tai-Sung; Giambaşu, George M.; Sosa, Carlos P.; Martick, Monika; Scott, William G.; York, Darrin M.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between formation of active in-line attack conformations and monovalent (Na+) and divalent (Mg2+) metal ion binding in the hammerhead ribozyme has been explored with molecular dynamics simulations. To stabilize repulsions between negatively charged groups, different requirements of threshold occupancy of metal ions were observed in the reactant and activated precursor states both in the presence or absence of a Mg2+ in the active site. Specific bridging coordination patterns of the ions are correlated with the formation of active in-line attack conformations and can be accommodated in both cases. Furthermore, simulation results suggest that the hammerhead ribozyme folds to form an electronegative recruiting pocket that attracts high local concentrations of positive charge. The present simulations help to reconcile experiments that probe the metal ion sensitivity of hammerhead ribozyme catalysis and support the supposition that Mg2+, in addition to stabilizing active conformations, plays a specific chemical role in catalysis. PMID:19265710

  19. The Neurophysiology and Pathology of Brain Zinc

    PubMed Central

    Sensi, Stefano L.; Paoletti, Pierre; Koh, Jae-Young; Aizenman, Elias; Bush, Ashley I.; Hershfinkel, Michal

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the roles played by zinc in the physiological and pathological functioning of the brain is rapidly expanding. The increased availability of genetically modified animal models, selective zinc-sensitive fluorescent probes, and novel chelators is producing a remarkable body of exciting new data that clearly establishes this metal ion as a key modulator of intracellular and intercellular neuronal signaling. In this Mini-Symposium, we will review and discuss the most recent findings that link zinc to synaptic function as well as the injurious effects of zinc dyshomeostasis within the context of neuronal death associated with major human neurological disorders, including stroke, epilepsy, and Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:22072659

  20. Vitamin K epoxide reductase: homology, active site and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodstadt, Leo; Ponting, Chris P

    2004-06-01

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) recycles reduced vitamin K, which is used subsequently as a co-factor in the gamma-carboxylation of glutamic acid residues in blood coagulation enzymes. VKORC1, a subunit of the VKOR complex, has recently been shown to possess this activity. Here, we show that VKORC1 is a member of a large family of predicted enzymes that are present in vertebrates, Drosophila, plants, bacteria and archaea. Four cysteine residues and one residue, which is either serine or threonine, are identified as likely active-site residues. In some plant and bacterial homologues the VKORC1 homologous domain is fused with domains of the thioredoxin family of oxidoreductases. These might reduce disulfide bonds of VKORC1-like enzymes as a prerequisite for their catalytic activities.

  1. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  2. Cytotoxicity of zinc in vitro.

    PubMed

    Borovanský, J; Riley, P A

    1989-01-01

    The effect of zinc ions on B16 mouse melanoma lines, HeLa cells and I-221 epithelial cells was investigated in vitro in order to ascertain whether sensitivity to Zn2+ is a general feature of cells in vitro and in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism(s) of zinc cytotoxicity. The proliferation of B16, HeLa and I-221 cell lines was inhibited by 1.25 x 10(-4), 1.50 x 10(-4) and 1.50 x 10(-4) mol/l Zn2+, respectively. The free radical scavengers, methimazole and ethanol, did not suppress the toxicity of Zn2+, neither did superoxide dismutase or catalase. The addition of the chelating agent EDTA reduced the zinc cytotoxicity. It was possible to suppress the cytotoxicity of zinc by increasing the concentration of either Fe2+ or Ca2+ but not Mg2+, which suggests that a prerequisite for the toxic action of zinc is entry into cells using channels that are shared with iron or calcium. This view was supported by experiments in which transferrin intensified the cytotoxic action of zinc in serum-free medium. Another agent facilitating zinc transport, prostaglandin E2, inhibited the proliferation of the B16 melanoma cell line. There were no conspicuous differences in zinc toxicity to pigmented and unpigmented cells. The toxic effect of zinc in the cell systems studied exceeded that of iron, copper, manganese and cobalt in the same concentration range. In vitro, Zn2+ should be regarded as a dangerous cation.

  3. Biochemical and structural characterization of Salmonella typhimurium glyoxalase II: new insights into metal ion selectivity.

    PubMed

    Campos-Bermudez, Valeria A; Leite, Ney Ribeiro; Krog, Renata; Costa-Filho, Antonio J; Soncini, Fernando C; Oliva, Glaucius; Vila, Alejandro J

    2007-10-02

    Glyoxalase II is a hydrolytic enzyme part of the glyoxalase system, responsible for detoxifying several cytotoxic compounds employing glutathione. Glyoxalase II belongs to the superfamily of metallo-beta-lactamases, with a conserved motif able to bind up to two metal ions in their active sites, generally zinc. Instead, several eukaryotic glyoxalases II have been characterized with different ratios of iron, zinc, and manganese ions. We have expressed a gene coding for a putative member of this enzyme superfamily from Salmonella typhimurium that we demonstrate, on the basis of its activity, to be a glyoxalase II, named GloB. Recombinant GloB expressed in Escherichia coli was purified with variable amounts of iron, zinc, and manganese. All forms display similar activities, as can be shown from protein expression in minimal medium supplemented with specific metal ions. The crystal structure of GloB solved at 1.4 A shows a protein fold and active site similar to those of its eukaryotic homologues. NMR and EPR experiments also reveal a conserved electronic structure at the metal site. GloB is therefore able to accommodate these different metal ions and to carry out the hydrolytic reaction with similar efficiencies in all cases. The metal promiscuity of this enzyme (in contrast to other members of the same superfamily) can be accounted for by the presence of a conserved Asp residue acting as a second-shell ligand that is expected to increase the hardness of the metal binding site, therefore favoring iron uptake in glyoxalases II.

  4. Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development (BOND)—Zinc Review12345

    PubMed Central

    King, Janet C; Brown, Kenneth H; Gibson, Rosalind S; Krebs, Nancy F; Lowe, Nicola M; Siekmann, Jonathan H; Raiten, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is required for multiple metabolic processes as a structural, regulatory, or catalytic ion. Cellular, tissue, and whole-body zinc homeostasis is tightly controlled to sustain metabolic functions over a wide range of zinc intakes, making it difficult to assess zinc insufficiency or excess. The BOND (Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development) Zinc Expert Panel recommends 3 measurements for estimating zinc status: dietary zinc intake, plasma zinc concentration (PZC), and height-for-age of growing infants and children. The amount of dietary zinc potentially available for absorption, which requires an estimate of dietary zinc and phytate, can be used to identify individuals and populations at risk of zinc deficiency. PZCs respond to severe dietary zinc restriction and to zinc supplementation; they also change with shifts in whole-body zinc balance and clinical signs of zinc deficiency. PZC cutoffs are available to identify individuals and populations at risk of zinc deficiency. However, there are limitations in using the PZC to assess zinc status. PZCs respond less to additional zinc provided in food than to a supplement administered between meals, there is considerable interindividual variability in PZCs with changes in dietary zinc, and PZCs are influenced by recent meal consumption, the time of day, inflammation, and certain drugs and hormones. Insufficient data are available on hair, urinary, nail, and blood cell zinc responses to changes in dietary zinc to recommend these biomarkers for assessing zinc status. Of the potential functional indicators of zinc, growth is the only one that is recommended. Because pharmacologic zinc doses are unlikely to enhance growth, a growth response to supplemental zinc is interpreted as indicating pre-existing zinc deficiency. Other functional indicators reviewed but not recommended for assessing zinc nutrition in clinical or field settings because of insufficient information are the activity or amounts of zinc-dependent enzymes

  5. Zinc: an underappreciated modulatory factor of brain function.

    PubMed

    Marger, L; Schubert, C R; Bertrand, D

    2014-10-15

    The divalent cation, zinc is the second most abundant metal in the human body and is indispensable for life. Zinc concentrations must however, be tightly regulated as deficiencies are associated with multiple pathological conditions while an excess can be toxic. Zinc plays an important role as a cofactor in protein folding and function, e.g. catalytic interactions, DNA recognition by zinc finger proteins and modulation ion channel activity. There are 24 mammalian proteins specific for zinc transport that are subdivided in two groups with opposing functions: ZnT proteins reduce cytosolic zinc concentration while ZIP proteins increase it. The mammalian brain contains a significant amount of zinc, with 5-15% concentrated in synaptic vesicles of glutamatergic neurons alone. Accumulated in these vesicles by the ZnT3 transporter, zinc is released into the synaptic cleft at concentrations from nanomolar at rest to high micromolar during active neurotransmission. Low concentrations of zinc modulate the activity of a multitude of voltage- or ligand-gated ion channels, indicating that this divalent cation must be taken into account in the analysis of the pathophysiology of CNS disorders including epilepsy, schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. In the context of the latest findings, we review the role of zinc in the central nervous system and discuss the relevance of the most recent association between the zinc transporter, ZIP8 and schizophrenia. An enhanced understanding of zinc transporters in the context of ion channel modulation may offer new avenues in identifying novel therapeutic entities that target neurological disorders.

  6. Zinc phosphide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Zinc phoshide ; CASRN 1314 - 84 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  7. Zinc interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most common and probably the most harmful micronutrient deficiency of commercial pecan enterprises is zinc deficiency. A review is presented of how orchard nutrient element management practices potentially influence tree Zn nutrition. Findings provide background information on how to reduce th...

  8. Zinc cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Zinc cyanide ; CASRN 557 - 21 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effe

  9. Characterization of Active Site Residues of Nitroalkane Oxidase†

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Michael P.; Fenny, Nana S.; Ali, Shah R.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of primary and secondary nitrolkanes to the corresponding aldehydes and ketones plus nitrite. The structure of the enzyme shows that Serl71 forms a hydrogen bond to the flavin N5, suggesting that it plays a role in catalysis. Cys397 and Tyr398 were previously identified by chemical modification as potential active site residues. To more directly probe the roles of these residues, the S171A, S171V, S171T, C397S, and Y398F enzymes have been characterized with nitroethane as substrate. The C397S and Y398 enzymes were less stable than the wild-type enzyme, and the C397S enzyme routinely contained a substoichiometric amount of FAD. Analysis of the steady-state kinetic parameters for the mutant enzymes, including deuterium isotope effects, establishes that all of the mutations result in decreases in the rate constants for removal of the substrate proton by ~5-fold and decreases in the rate constant for product release of ~2-fold. Only the S171V and S171T mutations alter the rate constant for flavin oxidation. These results establish that these residues are not involved in catalysis, but rather are required for maintaining the protein structure. PMID:20056514

  10. Evidence for segmental mobility in the active site of pepsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, J.; Strop, P.; Senn, H.; Foundling, S.; Kostka, V.

    1986-05-01

    The low hydrolytic activity (k/sub cat/ < 0.001 s/sup -1/) of chicken pepsin (CP) towards tri- and tetrapeptides is enhanced at least 100 times by modification of its single sulfhydryl group of Cys-115, with little effect on K/sub m/-values. Modification thus simulates the effect of secondary substrate binding on pepsin catalysis. The rate of Cys-115 modification is substantially decreased in the presence of some competitive inhibitors, suggesting its active site location. Experiments with CP alkylated at Cys-115 with Acrylodan as a fluorescent probe or with N-iodoacetyl-(4-fluoro)-aniline as a /sup 19/F-nmr probe suggest conformation change around Cys-115 to occur on substrate or substrate analog binding. The difference /sup 1/H-nmr spectra (500 MHz) of unmodified free and inhibitor-complexed CP reveal chemical shifts almost exclusively in the aromatic region. The effects of Cu/sup + +/ on /sup 19/F- and /sup 1/H-nmr spectra have been studied. Examination of a computer graphics model of CP based on E. parasitica pepsin-inhibitor complex X-ray coordinates suggests that Cys-115 is located near the S/sub 3//S/sub 5/ binding site. The results are interpreted in favor of segmental mobility of this region important for pepsin substrate binding and catalysis.

  11. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  12. The active site structure and mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    Arginine specific reagents showed irreversible inhibition of avian liver mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Potent protection against modification was elicited by CO{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} in the presence of other substrates. Labeling of enzyme with (7-{sup 14}C) phenylglyoxal showed that 1 or 2 arginines are involved in CO{sub 2} binding and activation. Peptide map studies showed this active site arginine residues is located at position 289. Histidine specific reagents showed pseudo first order inhibition of avian mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity. The best protection against modification was elicited by IDP or IDP and Mn{sup +2}. One histidine residue is at or near the phosphoenolpyruvate binding site as demonstrated in the increased absorbance at 240 nm and proton relaxation rate studies. Circular dichroism studies reveal that enzyme structure was perturbed by diethylpyrocarbonate modification. Metal binding studies suggest that this enzyme has only one metal binding site. The putative binding sites from several GTP and phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes are observed in P-enolpyruvate carboxykinase from different species.

  13. Resonant active sites in catalytic ammonia synthesis: A structural model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholach, Alexander R.; Bryliakova, Anna A.; Matveev, Andrey V.; Bulgakov, Nikolai N.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption sites Mn consisted of n adjacent atoms M, each bound to the adsorbed species, are considered within a realistic model. The sum of bonds Σ lost by atoms in a site in comparison with the bulk atoms was used for evaluation of the local surface imperfection, while the reaction enthalpy at that site was used as a measure of activity. The comparative study of Mn sites (n = 1-5) at basal planes of Pt, Rh, Ir, Fe, Re and Ru with respect to heat of N2 dissociative adsorption QN and heat of Nad + Had → NHad reaction QNH was performed using semi-empirical calculations. Linear QN(Σ) increase and QNH(Σ) decrease allowed to specify the resonant Σ for each surface in catalytic ammonia synthesis at equilibrium Nad coverage. Optimal Σ are realizable for Ru2, Re2 and Ir4 only, whereas other centers meet steric inhibition or unreal crystal structure. Relative activity of the most active sites in proportion 5.0 × 10- 5: 4.5 × 10- 3: 1: 2.5: 3.0: 1080: 2270 for a sequence of Pt4, Rh4, Fe4(fcc), Ir4, Fe2-5(bcc), Ru2, Re2, respectively, is in agreement with relevant experimental data. Similar approach can be applied to other adsorption or catalytic processes exhibiting structure sensitivity.

  14. DNA inhibits catalysis by the carboxyltransferase subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase: implications for active site communication.

    PubMed

    Benson, Brian K; Meades, Glen; Grove, Anne; Waldrop, Grover L

    2008-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) catalyzes the first committed step in the synthesis of long-chain fatty acids. The crystal structure of the Escherichia coli carboxyltransferase component of ACC revealed an alpha(2)beta(2) subunit composition with two active sites and, most importantly, a unique zinc domain in each alphabeta pair that is absent in the eukaryotic enzyme. We show here that carboxyltransferase binds DNA. Half-maximal saturation of different single-stranded or double-stranded DNA constructs is seen at 0.5-1.0 muM, and binding is cooperative and nonspecific. The substrates (malonyl-CoA and biocytin) inhibit DNA:carboxyltransferase complex formation. More significantly, single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA, and heparin inhibit the reaction catalyzed by carboxyltransferase, with single-stranded DNA and heparin acting as competitive inhibitors. However, double-inhibition experiments revealed that both DNA and heparin can bind the enzyme in the presence of a bisubstrate analog (BiSA), and the binding of BiSA has a very weak synergistic effect on the binding of the second inhibitor (DNA or heparin) and vice versa. In contrast, DNA and heparin can also bind to the enzyme simultaneously, but the binding of either molecule has a strong synergistic effect on binding of the other. An important mechanistic implication of these observations is that the dual active sites of ACC are functionally connected.

  15. Active site conformational changes of prostasin provide a new mechanism of protease regulation by divalent cations

    SciTech Connect

    Spraggon, Glen; Hornsby, Michael; Shipway, Aaron; Tully, David C.; Bursulaya, Badry; Danahay, Henry; Harris, Jennifer L.; Lesley, Scott A.

    2010-01-12

    Prostasin or human channel-activating protease 1 has been reported to play a critical role in the regulation of extracellular sodium ion transport via its activation of the epithelial cell sodium channel. Here, the structure of the extracellular portion of the membrane associated serine protease has been solved to high resolution in complex with a nonselective d-FFR chloromethyl ketone inhibitor, in an apo form, in a form where the apo crystal has been soaked with the covalent inhibitor camostat and in complex with the protein inhibitor aprotinin. It was also crystallized in the presence of the divalent cation Ca{sup +2}. Comparison of the structures with each other and with other members of the trypsin-like serine protease family reveals unique structural features of prostasin and a large degree of conformational variation within specificity determining loops. Of particular interest is the S1 subsite loop which opens and closes in response to basic residues or divalent ions, directly binding Ca{sup +2} cations. This induced fit active site provides a new possible mode of regulation of trypsin-like proteases adapted in particular to extracellular regions with variable ionic concentrations such as the outer membrane layer of the epithelial cell.

  16. Structural analysis of the active site geometry of N5-carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Thoden, James B; Holden, Hazel M; Firestine, Steven M

    2008-12-16

    N(5)-Carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase (N(5)-CAIR synthetase) converts 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR), MgATP, and bicarbonate into N(5)-CAIR, MgADP, and P(i). The enzyme is required for de novo purine biosynthesis in microbes yet is not found in humans suggesting that it represents an ideal and unexplored target for antimicrobial drug design. Here we report the X-ray structures of N(5)-CAIR synthetase from Escherichia coli with either MgATP or MgADP/P(i) bound in the active site cleft. These structures, determined to 1.6-A resolution, provide detailed information regarding the active site geometry before and after ATP hydrolysis. In both structures, two magnesium ions are observed. Each of these is octahedrally coordinated, and the carboxylate side chain of Glu238 bridges them. For the structure of the MgADP/P(i) complex, crystals were grown in the presence of AIR and MgATP. No electron density was observed for AIR, and the electron density corresponding to the nucleotide clearly revealed the presence of ADP and P(i) rather than ATP. The bound P(i) shifts by approximately 3 A relative to the gamma-phosphoryl group of ATP and forms electrostatic interactions with the side chains of Arg242 and His244. Since the reaction mechanism of N(5)-CAIR synthetase is believed to proceed via a carboxyphosphate intermediate, we propose that the location of the inorganic phosphate represents the binding site for stabilization of this reactive species. Using the information derived from the two structures reported here, coupled with molecular modeling, we propose a catalytic mechanism for N(5)-CAIR synthetase.

  17. Structure of PEP carboxykinase from the succinate-producing Actinobacillus succinogenes: a new conserved active-site motif.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Yvonne A; Prasad, Lata; Laivenieks, Maris; Zeikus, J Gregory; Delbaere, Louis T J

    2005-07-01

    Actinobacillus succinogenes can produce, via fermentation, high concentrations of succinate, an important industrial commodity. A key enzyme in this pathway is phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK), which catalyzes the production of oxaloacetate from phosphoenolpyruvate and carbon dioxide, with the concomitant conversion of adenosine 5'-diphosphate to adenosine 5'-triphosphate. 1.85 and 1.70 A resolution structures of the native and a pyruvate/Mn(2+)/phosphate complex have been solved, respectively. The structure of the complex contains sulfhydryl reducing agents covalently bound to three cysteine residues via disulfide bonds. One of these cysteine residues (Cys285) is located in the active-site cleft and may be analogous to the putative reactive cysteine of PCK from Trypanosoma cruzi. Cys285 is also part of a previously unreported conserved motif comprising residues 280-287 and containing the pattern NXEXGXY(/F)A(/G); this new motif appears to have a structural role in stabilizing and positioning side chains that bind substrates and metal ions. The first few residues of this motif connect the two domains of the enzyme and a fulcrum point appears to be located near Asn280. In addition, an active-site Asp residue forms two coordinate bonds with the Mn(2+) ion present in the structure of the complex in a symmetrical bidentate manner, unlike in other PCK structures that contain a manganese ion.

  18. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  19. Experimental and computational active site mapping as a starting point to fragment-based lead discovery.

    PubMed

    Behnen, Jürgen; Köster, Helene; Neudert, Gerd; Craan, Tobias; Heine, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard

    2012-02-06

    Small highly soluble probe molecules such as aniline, urea, N-methylurea, 2-bromoacetate, 1,2-propanediol, nitrous oxide, benzamidine, and phenol were soaked into crystals of various proteins to map their binding pockets and to detect hot spots of binding with respect to hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties. The selected probe molecules were first tested at the zinc protease thermolysin. They were then applied to a wider range of proteins such as protein kinase A, D-xylose isomerase, 4-diphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-D-erythritol synthase, endothiapepsin, and secreted aspartic protease 2. The crystal structures obtained clearly show that the probe molecules populate the protein binding pockets in an ordered fashion. The thus characterized, experimentally observed hot spots of binding were subjected to computational active site mapping using HotspotsX. This approach uses knowledge-based pair potentials to detect favorable binding positions for various atom types. Good agreement between the in silico hot spot predictions and the experimentally observed positions of the polar hydrogen bond forming functional groups and hydrophobic portions was obtained. Finally, we compared the observed poses of the small-molecule probes with those of much larger structurally related ligands. They coincide remarkably well with the larger ligands, considering their spatial orientation and the experienced interaction patterns. This observation confirms the fundamental hypothesis of fragment-based lead discovery: that binding poses, even of very small molecular probes, do not significantly deviate or move once a ligand is grown further into the binding site. This underscores the fact that these probes populate given hot spots and can be regarded as relevant seeds for further design.

  20. Antimicrobial properties of zeolite-X and zeolite-A ion-exchanged with silver, copper, and zinc against a broad range of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Selami; Ustaoğlu, Zeynep; Yılmazer, Gonca Altın; Sahin, Fikrettin; Baç, Nurcan

    2014-02-01

    Zeolites are nanoporous alumina silicates composed of silicon, aluminum, and oxygen in a framework with cations, water within pores. Their cation contents can be exchanged with monovalent or divalent ions. In the present study, the antimicrobial (antibacterial, anticandidal, and antifungal) properties of zeolite type X and A, with different Al/Si ratio, ion exchanged with Ag(+), Zn(2+), and Cu(2+) ions were investigated individually. The study presents the synthesis and manufacture of four different zeolite types characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The ion loading capacity of the zeolites was examined and compared with the antimicrobial characteristics against a broad range of microorganisms including bacteria, yeast, and mold. It was observed that Ag(+) ion-loaded zeolites exhibited more antibacterial activity with respect to other metal ion-embedded zeolite samples. The results clearly support that various synthetic zeolites can be ion exchanged with Ag(+), Zn(2+), and Cu(2+) ions to acquire antimicrobial properties or ion-releasing characteristics to provide prolonged or stronger activity. The current study suggested that zeolite formulations could be combined with various materials used in manufacturing medical devices, surfaces, textiles, or household items where antimicrobial properties are required.

  1. Analyzing the catalytic role of active site residues in the Fe-type nitrile hydratase from Comamonas testosteroni Ni1.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Salette; Wu, Rui; Krzywda, Karoline; Opalka, Veronika; Chan, Hei; Liu, Dali; Holz, Richard C

    2015-07-01

    A strictly conserved active site arginine residue (αR157) and two histidine residues (αH80 and αH81) located near the active site of the Fe-type nitrile hydratase from Comamonas testosteroni Ni1 (CtNHase), were mutated. These mutant enzymes were examined for their ability to bind iron and hydrate acrylonitrile. For the αR157A mutant, the residual activity (k cat = 10 ± 2 s(-1)) accounts for less than 1% of the wild-type activity (k cat = 1100 ± 30 s(-1)) while the K m value is nearly unchanged at 205 ± 10 mM. On the other hand, mutation of the active site pocket αH80 and αH81 residues to alanine resulted in enzymes with k cat values of 220 ± 40 and 77 ± 13 s(-1), respectively, and K m values of 187 ± 11 and 179 ± 18 mM. The double mutant (αH80A/αH81A) was also prepared and provided an enzyme with a k cat value of 132 ± 3 s(-1) and a K m value of 213 ± 61 mM. These data indicate that all three residues are catalytically important, but not essential. X-ray crystal structures of the αH80A/αH81A, αH80W/αH81W, and αR157A mutant CtNHase enzymes were solved to 2.0, 2.8, and 2.5 Å resolutions, respectively. In each mutant enzyme, hydrogen-bonding interactions crucial for the catalytic function of the αCys(104)-SOH ligand are disrupted. Disruption of these hydrogen bonding interactions likely alters the nucleophilicity of the sulfenic acid oxygen and the Lewis acidity of the active site Fe(III) ion.

  2. Effects of Zinc on Particulate Methane Monooxygenase Activity and Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Sirajuddin, Sarah; Barupala, Dulmini; Helling, Stefan; Marcus, Katrin; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is a membrane-bound metalloenzyme that oxidizes methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. Zinc is a known inhibitor of pMMO, but the details of zinc binding and the mechanism of inhibition are not understood. Metal binding and activity assays on membrane-bound pMMO from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) reveal that zinc inhibits pMMO at two sites that are distinct from the copper active site. The 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure of Methylocystis species strain Rockwell pMMO reveals two previously undetected bound lipids, and metal soaking experiments identify likely locations for the two zinc inhibition sites. The first is the crystallographic zinc site in the pmoC subunit, and zinc binding here leads to the ordering of 10 previously unobserved residues. A second zinc site is present on the cytoplasmic side of the pmoC subunit. Parallels between these results and zinc inhibition studies of several respiratory complexes suggest that zinc might inhibit proton transfer in pMMO. PMID:24942740

  3. Studies of removal of platinum(IV) ion microquantities from the model solutions of aluminium, copper, iron, nickel and zinc chloride macroquantities on the anion exchanger Duolite S 37.

    PubMed

    Hubicki, Z; Wójcik, G

    2006-08-25

    Platinum has been widely applied in catalytic industry and the recovery of noble metals from industrial wastes becomes an economic issue. The laboratory studies of platinum(IV) microquantities removal from 1M aluminium, copper, iron, nickel and zinc chloride solutions in 0.1M hydrochloric acid solutions on the anion exchanger Duolite S 37 of the functional secondary and tertiary amine groups were carried out. For this anion exchanger the fraction extracted values (%E, Pt(IV)) as well as the sorption isotherms were determined depending on the kind of aqueous phase and phase contact time. Moreover, the bed and weight distribution coefficients as well as working and total ion-exchange capacities were calculated from the platinum(IV) breakthrough curves. Kinetic parameters were determined.

  4. Characterization of the active site of ADP-ribosyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Munshi, C; Thiel, D J; Mathews, I I; Aarhus, R; Walseth, T F; Lee, H C

    1999-10-22

    ADP-ribosyl cyclase synthesizes two Ca(2+) messengers by cyclizing NAD to produce cyclic ADP-ribose and exchanging nicotinic acid with the nicotinamide group of NADP to produce nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Recombinant Aplysia cyclase was expressed in yeast and co-crystallized with a substrate, nicotinamide. x-ray crystallography showed that the nicotinamide was bound in a pocket formed in part by a conserved segment and was near the central cleft of the cyclase. Glu(98), Asn(107) and Trp(140) were within 3.5 A of the bound nicotinamide and appeared to coordinate it. Substituting Glu(98) with either Gln, Gly, Leu, or Asn reduced the cyclase activity by 16-222-fold, depending on the substitution. The mutant N107G exhibited only a 2-fold decrease in activity, while the activity of W140G was essentially eliminated. The base exchange activity of all mutants followed a similar pattern of reduction, suggesting that both reactions occur at the same active site. In addition to NAD, the wild-type cyclase also cyclizes nicotinamide guanine dinucleotide to cyclic GDP-ribose. All mutant enzymes had at least half of the GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity of the wild type, some even 2-3-fold higher, indicating that the three coordinating amino acids are responsible for positioning of the substrate but not absolutely critical for catalysis. To search for the catalytic residues, other amino acids in the binding pocket were mutagenized. E179G was totally devoid of GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity, and both its ADP-ribosyl cyclase and the base exchange activities were reduced by 10,000- and 18,000-fold, respectively. Substituting Glu(179) with either Asn, Leu, Asp, or Gln produced similar inactive enzymes, and so was the conversion of Trp(77) to Gly. However, both E179G and the double mutant E179G/W77G retained NAD-binding ability as shown by photoaffinity labeling with [(32)P]8-azido-NAD. These results indicate that both Glu(179) and Trp(77) are crucial for catalysis and

  5. A bio-mimetic zinc/tau protein as an artificial catalase.

    PubMed

    Asadollahi, Kazem; Jasemi, Neda Sadat Kazemein; Riazi, Gholam Hossein; Katuli, Fatemeh Hedayati; Yazdani, Fahimeh; Sartipnia, Nasrin; Moosavi, Mohammad Amin; Rahimi, Arash; Falahati, Mojtaba

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the catalase-like activity of monomeric tau protein was reported in the presence of of zinc (Zn(II)) ions at low pH value. Monomeric tau protein contains two SH groups that are a target of disulfide bond formation. However these SH groups are able to interact with Zn(II) ion at pH 7.2 which creates a thiol bond as a mimetic model of chloroperoxidase active site which performs catalase like activity at low pH. Zn(II)/tau protein complex decomposed H2O2 with a high rate (Vm) as well as an efficient turn oven number (kcat) at pH 3. This remarkable catalase like activity is may be attributed to the conformational reorientation of protein at low pH. Circular dichroism (CD) studies did not demonstrate any secondary structural changes of tau protein after addition of Zn(II) ions at pH 7.2. In addition, tau protein shows identical CD bands at pH 7.2 and 3. Moreover, fluorescence quenching of tau by Zn(II) at pH 7.2 was initiated by complex formation rather than by dynamic collision. A significant red shift (6nm) was observed in the emission maximum of the fluorescence spectra when the protein was dissolved at pH 3 compared to pH 7.2. This conformational change can provide information regarding the rearrangements of the protein structure and exposure of Cys-Zn(II) group to the solvent which induces easy access of active site to H2O2 molecules and corresponding enhanced catalytic activity of Zn(II)/tau protein complex. This study introduces tau protein as a bio-inspired high performing scaffold for transition metal encapsulation and introducing an engineered apoprotein-induced biomimetic enzyme.

  6. Recent advances in zinc-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanguang; Dai, Hongjie

    2014-08-07

    Zinc-air is a century-old battery technology but has attracted revived interest recently. With larger storage capacity at a fraction of the cost compared to lithium-ion, zinc-air batteries clearly represent one of the most viable future options to powering electric vehicles. However, some technical problems associated with them have yet to be resolved. In this review, we present the fundamentals, challenges and latest exciting advances related to zinc-air research. Detailed discussion will be organized around the individual components of the system - from zinc electrodes, electrolytes, and separators to air electrodes and oxygen electrocatalysts in sequential order for both primary and electrically/mechanically rechargeable types. The detrimental effect of CO2 on battery performance is also emphasized, and possible solutions summarized. Finally, other metal-air batteries are briefly overviewed and compared in favor of zinc-air.

  7. Zinc and growth.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Y

    1996-08-01

    Zinc is an essential nutrients and plays an important role in growth and sexual function. Zinc deficiency has been known to cause growth retardation and hypogonadism. Several mechanisms of growth retardation and hypogonadism due to zinc deficiency have been suggested. Zinc affects growth hormone (GH) metabolism. Conversely, GH affects zinc metabolism. Zinc deficiency may result in reduced GH production and/or insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Zinc deficiency may also affect bone metabolism and gonadal function. The interrelationships among zinc, growth, gonadal function, and GH-IGF-I axis appears to be complex.

  8. Interaction of potassium cyanide with the [Ni-4Fe-5S] active site cluster of CO dehydrogenase from Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans.

    PubMed

    Ha, Seung-Wook; Korbas, Malgorzata; Klepsch, Mirjam; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Meyer, Ortwin; Svetlitchnyi, Vitali

    2007-04-06

    The Ni-Fe carbon monoxide (CO) dehydrogenase II (CODHII(Ch)) from the anaerobic CO-utilizing hydrogenogenic bacterium Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans catalyzes the oxidation of CO, presumably at the Ni-(micro(2)S)-Fe1 subsite of the [Ni-4S-5S] cluster in the active site. The CO oxidation mechanism proposed on the basis of several CODHII(Ch) crystal structures involved the apical binding of CO at the nickel ion and the activation of water at the Fe1 ion of the cluster. To understand how CO interacts with the active site, we have studied the reactivity of the cluster with potassium cyanide and analyzed the resulting type of nickel coordination by x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Cyanide acts as a competitive inhibitor of reduced CODHII(Ch) with respect to the substrate CO and is therefore expected to mimic the substrate. It inhibits the enzyme reversibly, forming a nickel cyanide. In this reaction, one of the four square-planar sulfur ligands of nickel is replaced by the carbon atom of cyanide, suggesting removal of the micro(2)S from the Ni-(micro(2)S)-Fe1 subsite. Upon reactivation of the inhibited enzyme, cyanide is released, and the square-planar coordination of nickel by 4S ligands is recovered, which includes the reformation of the Ni-(micro(2)S)-Fe1 bridge. The results are summarized in a model of the CO oxidation mechanism at the [Ni-4Fe-5S] active site cluster of CODHII(Ch) from C. hydrogenoformans.

  9. Application of mechanosynthesized azine-decorated zinc(II) metal-organic frameworks for highly efficient removal and extraction of some heavy-metal ions from aqueous samples: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Tahmasebi, Elham; Masoomi, Mohammad Yaser; Yamini, Yadollah; Morsali, Ali

    2015-01-20

    The three zinc(II) metal-organic frameworks [Zn2(oba)2(4-bpdb)]·(DMF)x (TMU-4), [Zn(oba)(4-bpdh)0.5]n·(DMF)y (TMU-5), and [Zn(oba)(4-bpmb)0.5]n·(DMF)z (TMU-6) [DMF = dimethylformamide, H2oba = 4,4'-oxybisbenzoic acid, 4-bpdb = 1,4-bis(4-pyridyl)-2,3-diaza-1,3-butadiene, 4-bpdh = 2,5-bis(4-pyridyl)-3,4-diaza-2,4-hexadiene, and 4-bpmb = N(1),N(4)-bis((pyridin-4-yl)methylene)benzene-1,4-diamine], which contain azine-functionalized pores, have been successfully synthesized by mechanosynthesis as a convenient, rapid, low-cost, solventless, and green process. These MOFs were studied for the removal and extraction of some heavy-metal ions from aqueous samples, and the effects of the basicity and void space of these MOFs on adsorption efficiency were evaluated. The results showed that, for trace amounts of metal ions, the basicity of the N-donor ligands in the MOFs determines the adsorption efficiency of the MOFs for the metal ions. In contrast, at high concentrations of metal ions, the void space of the MOFs plays a main role in the adsorption process. The studies conducted revealed that, among the three MOFs, TMU-6 had a lower adsorption efficiency for metal ions than the other two MOFs. This result can be attributed to the greater basicity of the azine groups on the TMU-4 and TMU-5 pore walls as compared to the imine groups on the N-donor ligands on the TMU-6 pore walls. Subsequently, TMU-5 was chosen as an efficient sorbent for the extraction and preconcentration of trace amounts of some heavy-metal ions including Cd(II), Co(II), Cr(III), Cu(II), and Pb(II), followed by their determination by flow injection inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Several variables affecting the extraction efficiency of the analytes were investigated and optimized. The optimized methodology exhibits a good linearity between 0.05 and 100 μg L(-1) (R(2) > 0.9935) and detection limits in the range of 0.01-1.0 μg L(-1). The method has enhancement factors between 42

  10. The LZT proteins; the LIV-1 subfamily of zinc transporters.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kathryn M; Nicholson, Robert I

    2003-04-01

    Zinc is an essential ion for cells with a vital role to play in controlling the cellular processes of the cell, such as growth, development and differentiation. Specialist proteins called zinc transporters control the level of intracellular zinc in cells. In mammals, the ZIP family of zinc transporters has a pivotal role in maintaining the correct level of intracellular zinc by their ability to transport zinc into cells from outside, although they may also transport metal ions other than zinc. There are now recognised to be four subfamilies of the ZIP transporters, including the recently discovered LIV-1 subfamily which has similarity to the oestrogen-regulated gene LIV-1, previously implicated in metastatic breast cancer. We call this new subfamily LZT, for LIV-1 subfamily of ZIP zinc Transporters. Here we document current knowledge of this previously uncharacterised group of proteins, which includes the KE4 proteins. LZT proteins are similar to ZIP transporters in secondary structure and ability to transport metal ions across the plasma membrane or intracellular membranes. However, LZT proteins have a unique motif (HEXPHEXGD) with conserved proline and glutamic acid residues, unprecedented in other zinc transporters. The localisation of LZT proteins to lamellipodiae mirrors cellular location of the membrane-type matrix metalloproteases. These differences to other zinc transporters may be consistent with an alternative role for LZT proteins in cells, particularly in diseases such as cancer.

  11. The pH-dependence of the Escherichia coli RNase HII-catalysed reaction suggests that an active site carboxylate group participates directly in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Bastock, James A; Webb, Michelle; Grasby, Jane A

    2007-04-27

    RNase HII specifically catalyses the hydrolysis of phosphate diester linkages contained within the RNA portion of DNA/RNA hybrids. The catalytic parameters of the enzyme derived from Escherichia coli BL21 have been measured using 5'-fluorescent oligodeoxynucleotide substrates containing embedded ribonucleotides. The products of the reaction and the chemistry of phosphate diester hydrolysis were assigned unequivocally using mass spectrometry. The pH-dependence of the catalytic parameters was measured under conditions of optimal magnesium ion concentration. The logarithm of the turnover number of the enzyme increases steeply with pH until a pH-independent region is reached close to neutrality. The slope of the pH-dependent region is 2, indicating that the catalytically proficient form of RNase HII is di-anionic. The pH-dependence of log 1/K(M) is a sigmoidal curve reaching a maximal value at higher pH, suggesting deprotonation of a residue stabilises substrate binding. Possible mechanisms for the RNase HII-catalysed reaction consistent with the pH-dependent behaviour of the enzyme are discussed. The active sites of RNase H enzymes contain a cluster of four strictly conserved carboxylate groups. Together, the data suggest a requirement for ionisation of an active site carboxylic acid for metal ion binding or correct positioning of metal ion(s) in the enzyme-substrate complex and a role for a second active site carboxylate in general base catalysis.

  12. [Design, synthesis, and biological activities of histone deacetylase inhibitors with diketo ester as zinc binding group].

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Su, Hong; Yang, Bo; You, Qi-Dong

    2011-03-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) inhibition causes hyperacetylation of histones leading to growth arrest, differentiation and apoptosis of tumor cells, representing a new strategy in cancer therapy. Many of previously reported HDACs inhibitors are hydroxamic acid derivatives, which could chelate the zinc ion in the active site in a bidentate fashion. However, hydroxamic acids occasionally have produced problems such as poor pharmacokinetics, severe toxicity and low selectivity. Herein we describe the identification of a new series of non-hydroxamate HDACs inhibitors bearing diketo ester moieties as zinc binding group. HDACs inhibition assay and antiproliferation assays in vitro against multiple cancer cell lines were used for evaluation. These compounds displayed low antiproliferative activity against solid tumor cells, while good antiproliferative activity against human leukemic monocyte lymphoma cell line U937. Compound CPUYS707 is the best with GI50 value of 0.31 micromol x L(-1) against U937 cells, which is more potent than SAHA and MS-275. HDACs inhibition activity of these compounds is lower than that expected, further evaluation is needed.

  13. Structure of protein O-mannose kinase reveals a unique active site architecture

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qinyu; Venzke, David; Walimbe, Ameya S; Anderson, Mary E; Fu, Qiuyu; Kinch, Lisa N; Wang, Wei; Chen, Xing; Grishin, Nick V; Huang, Niu; Yu, Liping; Dixon, Jack E; Campbell, Kevin P; Xiao, Junyu

    2016-01-01

    The ‘pseudokinase’ SgK196 is a protein O-mannose kinase (POMK) that catalyzes an essential phosphorylation step during biosynthesis of the laminin-binding glycan on α-dystroglycan. However, the catalytic mechanism underlying this activity remains elusive. Here we present the crystal structure of Danio rerio POMK in complex with Mg2+ ions, ADP, aluminum fluoride, and the GalNAc-β3-GlcNAc-β4-Man trisaccharide substrate, thereby providing a snapshot of the catalytic transition state of this unusual kinase. The active site of POMK is established by residues located in non-canonical positions and is stabilized by a disulfide bridge. GalNAc-β3-GlcNAc-β4-Man is recognized by a surface groove, and the GalNAc-β3-GlcNAc moiety mediates the majority of interactions with POMK. Expression of various POMK mutants in POMK knockout cells further validated the functional requirements of critical residues. Our results provide important insights into the ability of POMK to function specifically as a glycan kinase, and highlight the structural diversity of the human kinome. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22238.001 PMID:27879205

  14. Structural mechanism of RuBisCO activation by carbamylation of the active site lysine.

    PubMed

    Stec, Boguslaw

    2012-11-13

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is a crucial enzyme in carbon fixation and the most abundant protein on earth. It has been studied extensively by biochemical and structural methods; however, the most essential activation step has not yet been described. Here, we describe the mechanistic details of Lys carbamylation that leads to RuBisCO activation by atmospheric CO(2). We report two crystal structures of nitrosylated RuBisCO from the red algae Galdieria sulphuraria with O(2) and CO(2) bound at the active site. G. sulphuraria RuBisCO is inhibited by cysteine nitrosylation that results in trapping of these gaseous ligands. The structure with CO(2) defines an elusive, preactivation complex that contains a metal cation Mg(2+) surrounded by three H(2)O/OH molecules. Both structures suggest the mechanism for discriminating gaseous ligands by their quadrupole electric moments. We describe conformational changes that allow for intermittent binding of the metal ion required for activation. On the basis of these structures we propose the individual steps of the activation mechanism. Knowledge of all these elements is indispensable for engineering RuBisCO into a more efficient enzyme for crop enhancement or as a remedy to global warming.

  15. Dynamic formation of single-atom catalytic active sites on ceria-supported gold nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yanggang; Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; ...

    2015-03-04

    Ab initio Molecular Dynamics simulations and static Density Functional Theory calculations have been performed to investigate the reaction mechanism of CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst. It is found that under reaction condition CO adsorption significantly labializes the surface atoms of the Au cluster and leads to the formation of isolated Au+-CO species that resides on the support in the vicinity of the Au particle. In this context, we identified a dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism at the interfacial area for CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst, which is a lower energy pathway than that of CO oxidation at the interface with themore » metal particle. This results from the ability of the single atom site to strongly couple with the redox properties of the support in a synergistic manner thereby lowering the barrier for redox reactions. We find that the single Au+ ion, which only exists under reaction conditions, breaks away from the Au cluster to catalyze CO oxidation and returns to the Au cluster after the catalytic cycle is completed. Generally, our study highlights the importance of the dynamic creation of active sites under reaction conditions and their essential role in a catalytic process.« less

  16. Dynamic formation of single-atom catalytic active sites on ceria-supported gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanggang; Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Li, Jun; Rousseau, Roger J.

    2015-03-04

    Ab initio Molecular Dynamics simulations and static Density Functional Theory calculations have been performed to investigate the reaction mechanism of CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst. It is found that under reaction condition CO adsorption significantly labializes the surface atoms of the Au cluster and leads to the formation of isolated Au+-CO species that resides on the support in the vicinity of the Au particle. In this context, we identified a dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism at the interfacial area for CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst, which is a lower energy pathway than that of CO oxidation at the interface with the metal particle. This results from the ability of the single atom site to strongly couple with the redox properties of the support in a synergistic manner thereby lowering the barrier for redox reactions. We find that the single Au+ ion, which only exists under reaction conditions, breaks away from the Au cluster to catalyze CO oxidation and returns to the Au cluster after the catalytic cycle is completed. Generally, our study highlights the importance of the dynamic creation of active sites under reaction conditions and their essential role in a catalytic process.

  17. Molecular mechanisms of the epithelial transport of toxic metal ions, particularly mercury, cadmium, lead, arsenic, zinc and copper. Progress report, January 1, 1980-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, R H

    1980-01-01

    Investigations were continued to elucidate the mode of transepithelial transport of toxic metal ions across the gastrointestinal tract, as well as their interactions with biological processes and other metal ions. All experimental details that are either published, submitted for publication or in press during this report period are included in the Appendix. Primary attention for this report has been given to the intestinal absorption of lead and its interaction with other biological moieties.

  18. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth’s crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts. Here we investigated in closer detail the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. Finally, we give a potential explanation of this effect, finding alkali-metal ions having different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar surfaces. PMID:25584435

  19. Design and synthesis of a new terbium complex-based luminescent probe for time-resolved luminescence sensing of zinc ions.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhiqiang; Xiao, Yunna; Song, Bo; Yuan, Jingli

    2014-09-01

    Luminescent probes/chemosensors based on lanthanide complexes have shown great potentials in various bioassays due to their unique long-lived luminescence property for eliminating short-lived autofluorescence with time-resolved detection mode. In this work, we designed and synthesized a new dual-chelating ligand {4'-[N,N-bis(2-picolyl)amino]methylene-2,2':6',2'-terpyridine-6,6'-diyl} bis(methylenenitrilo) tetrakis(acetic acid) (BPTTA), and investigated the performance of its Tb(3+) complex (BPTTA-Tb(3+)) for the time-resolved luminescence sensing of Zn(2+) ions in aqueous media. Weakly luminescent BPTTA-Tb(3+) can rapidly react with Zn(2+) ions to display remarkable luminescence enhancement with high sensitivity and selectivity, and such luminescence response can be realized repeatedly. Laudably, the dose-dependent luminescence enhancement shows a good linear response to the concentration of Zn(2+) ions with a detection limit of 4.1 nM. To examine the utility of the new probe for detecting intracellular Zn(2+) ions, the performance of BPTTA-Tb(3+) in the time-resolved luminescence imaging of Zn(2+) ions in living HeLa cells was investigated. The results demonstrated the applicability of BPTTA-Tb(3+) as a probe for the time-resolved luminescence sensing of intracellular Zn(2+) ions.

  20. Cationic Zinc-Cadmium Alloy Clusters in Zeolite A

    SciTech Connect

    Readman,J.; Gameson, I.; Hriljac, J.; Anderson, P.

    2007-01-01

    Rietveld analysis of synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data obtained from the product of the reaction of cadmium vapor with dehydrated zinc-exchanged zeolite A (LTA structure type) indicates the formation of cationic zinc-cadmium alloy clusters. The clusters are located in approximately 40% of the sodalite cages; the remaining 60% of the cages contain divalent zinc ions coordinated both to the oxygen atoms of the zeolite framework and to residual extra framework oxygen.

  1. Steady state fluorescence studies of wild type recombinant cinnamoyl CoA reductase (Ll-CCRH1) and its active site mutants.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant; Vishwakarma, Rishi Kishore; Singh, Somesh; Gaikwad, Sushama; Khan, Bashir M

    2014-05-01

    Fluorescence quenching and time resolved fluorescence studies of wild type recombinant cinnamoyl CoA reductase (Ll-CCRH1), a multitryptophan protein from Leucaena leucocephala and 10 different active site mutants were carried out to investigate tryptophan environment. The enzyme showed highest affinity for feruloyl CoA (K(a)  = 3.72 × 10(5) M(-1)) over other CoA esters and cinnamaldehydes, as determined by fluorescence spectroscopy. Quenching of the fluorescence by acrylamide for wild type and active site mutants was collisional with almost 100% of the tryptophan fluorescence accessible under native condition and remained same after denaturation of protein with 6 M GdnHCl. In wild type Ll-CCRH1, the extent of quenching achieved with iodide (f(a) = 1.0) was significantly higher than cesium ions (f(a) = 0.33) suggesting more density of positive charge around surface of trp conformers under native conditions. Denaturation of wild type protein with 6 M GdnHCl led to significant increase in the quenching with cesium (f(a) = 0.54), whereas quenching with iodide ion was decreased (f(a) = 0.78), indicating reorientation of charge density around trp from positive to negative and heterogeneity in trp environment. The Stern-Volmer plots for wild type and mutants Ll-CCRH1 under native and denatured conditions, with cesium ion yielded biphasic quenching profiles. The extent of quenching for cesium and iodide ions under native and denatured conditions observed in active site mutants was significantly different from wild type Ll-CCRH1 under the same conditions. Thus, single substitution type mutations of active site residues showed heterogeneity in tryptophan microenvironment and differential degree of conformation of protein under native or denatured conditions.

  2. Production of zinc pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.F.

    1996-11-26

    Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries. 6 figs.

  3. Production of zinc pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, John F.

    1996-01-01

    Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries.

  4. 2,2‧-[Benzene-1,2-diylbis(iminomethanediyl)]diphenol derivative bearing two amine and hydroxyl groups as fluorescent receptor for Zinc(II) ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayade, Kundan; Sahoo, Suban K.; Patil, Rahul; Singh, Narinder; Attarde, Sanjay; Kuwar, Anil

    A new non-natural receptor 2,2‧-[benzene-1,2-diylbis(iminomethanediyl)]diphenol (4) was synthesized, and it is fluorogenic behaviour toward various metal ions were investigated. Receptor 4 exhibited pronounced fluorescence enhancement in the presence of Zn2+, which can visually be discernible by an orchid fluorescence in compared to other metal ions. The receptor 4 shows high sensitivity and selectivity for Zn2+ through changes in the fluorescence intensity based on chelation-enhanced fluorescence (CHEF). The binding modes of the complexes were investigated by Job’s plot and density functional theory (DFT).

  5. Zinc coordination spheres in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Laitaoja, Mikko; Valjakka, Jarkko; Jänis, Janne

    2013-10-07

    Zinc metalloproteins are one of the most abundant and structurally diverse proteins in nature. In these proteins, the Zn(II) ion possesses a multifunctional role as it stabilizes the fold of small zinc fingers, catalyzes essential reactions in enzymes of all six classes, or assists in the formation of biological oligomers. Previously, a number of database surveys have been conducted on zinc proteins to gain broader insights into their rich coordination chemistry. However, many of these surveys suffer from severe flaws and misinterpretations or are otherwise limited. To provide a more comprehensive, up-to-date picture on zinc coordination environments in proteins, zinc containing protein structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) were analyzed in detail. A statistical analysis in terms of zinc coordinating amino acids, metal-to-ligand bond lengths, coordination number, and structural classification was performed, revealing coordination spheres from classical tetrahedral cysteine/histidine binding sites to more complex binuclear sites with carboxylated lysine residues. According to the results, coordination spheres of hundreds of crystal structures in the PDB could be misinterpreted due to symmetry-related molecules or missing electron densities for ligands. The analysis also revealed increasing average metal-to-ligand bond length as a function of crystallographic resolution, which should be taken into account when interrogating metal ion binding sites. Moreover, one-third of the zinc ions present in crystal structures are artifacts, merely aiding crystal formation and packing with no biological significance. Our analysis provides solid evidence that a minimal stable zinc coordination sphere is made up by four ligands and adopts a tetrahedral coordination geometry.

  6. Kinetic analysis of zinc metabolism and its regulation in normal humans

    SciTech Connect

    Wastney, M.E.; Aamodt, R.L.; Rumble, W.F.; Henkin, R.I.

    1986-08-01

    Zinc metabolism was studied in 32 normal volunteers after oral or intravenous administration of WVZn. Data were collected from the blood, urine, feces, whole body, and over the liver and thigh regions for 9 mo while the subjects consumed their regular diets (containing 10 mg Zn ion/day) and for an additional 9 mo while the subjects received an exogenous oral supplement of 100 mg Zn ion/day. Data from each subject were fitted by a compartmental model for zinc metabolism that was developed previously for patients with taste and smell dysfunction. These data from normal subjects were used to determine the absorption, distribution, and excretion of zinc and the mass of zinc in erythrocytes, liver, thigh, and whole body. By use of additional data obtained from the present study, the model was refined further such that a large compartment, which was previously determined to contain 90% of the body zinc, was subdivided into two compartments to represent zinc in muscle and bone. When oral zinc intake was increased 11-fold three new sites of regulation of zinc metabolism were identified in addition to the two sites previously defined in patients with taste and smell dysfunction (absorption of zinc from gut and excretion of zinc in urine). The three new sites are exchange of zinc with erythrocytes, release of zinc by muscle, and secretion of zinc into gut. Regulation at these five sites appears to maintain some tissue concentrations of zinc when dietary zinc increases.

  7. Dynamics of an Active-Site Flap Contributes to Catalysis in a JAMM Family Metallo Deubiquitinase.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Amy N; Shrestha, Rashmi K; Ronau, Judith A; Babar, Aditya; Sheedlo, Michael J; Fuchs, Julian E; Paul, Lake N; Das, Chittaranjan

    2015-10-06

    The endosome-associated deubiquitinase (DUB) AMSH is a member of the JAMM family of zinc-dependent metallo isopeptidases with high selectivity for Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains, which play a key role in endosomal-lysosomal sorting of activated cell surface receptors. The catalytic domain of the enzyme features a flexible flap near the active site that opens and closes during its catalytic cycle. Structural analysis of its homologues, AMSH-LP (AMSH-like protein) and the fission yeast counterpart, Sst2, suggests that a conserved Phe residue in the flap may be critical for substrate binding and/or catalysis. To gain insight into the contribution of this flap in substrate recognition and catalysis, we generated mutants of Sst2 and characterized them using a combination of enzyme kinetics, X-ray crystallography, molecular dynamics simulations, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Our analysis shows that the Phe residue in the flap contributes key interactions during the rate-limiting step but not to substrate binding, since mutants of Phe403 exhibit a defect only in kcat but not in KM. Moreover, ITC studies show Phe403 mutants have similar KD for ubiquitin compared to the wild-type enzyme. The X-ray structures of both Phe403Ala and the Phe403Trp, in both the free and ubiquitin bound form, reveal no appreciable structural change that might impair substrate or alter product binding. We observed that the side chain of the Trp residue is oriented identically with respect to the isopeptide moiety of the substrate as the Phe residue in the wild-type enzyme, so the loss of activity seen in this mutant cannot be explained by the absence of a group with the ability to provide van der Waals interactions that facilitate the hyrdolysis of the Lys63-linked diubiquitin. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the flap in the Trp mutant is quite flexible, allowing almost free rotation of the indole side chain. Therefore, it is possible that these different dynamic

  8. Structural Evidence of a Productive Active Site Architecture for an Evolved Quorum-quenching GKL Lactonase †

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Bo; Chow, Jeng Yeong; Baldansuren, Amgalanbaatar; Yap, Lai Lai; Gan, Yunn Hwen; Dikanov, Sergei A.; Robinson, Robert C.; Yew, Wen Shan

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro evolution and engineering of quorum-quenching lactonases with enhanced reactivities was achieved using a thermostable GKL enzyme as template, yielding the E101G/R230C GKL mutant with increased catalytic activity and broadened substrate range [Chow, J. Y., Xue, B., Lee, K. H., Tung, A., Wu, L., Robinson, R. C., and Yew, W. S. (2010) J Biol Chem 285, 40911-40920]. This enzyme possesses the (β/α)8-barrel fold and is a member of the PLL (Phosphotriesterase-Like Lactonase)-group of enzymes within the amidohydrolase superfamily that hydrolyze N-acyl-homoserine lactones, which mediate the quorum-sensing pathways of bacteria. The structure of the evolved N-butyryl-L-homoserine lactone (substrate)-bound E101G/R230C GKL enzyme was solved, in the presence of the inactivating D266N mutation, to a resolution of 2.2 Å to provide an explanation for the observed rate enhancements; in addition, the substrate-bound structure of the catalytically-inactive E101N/D266N mutant of the manganese-reconstituted enzyme was obtained to a resolution of 2.1 Å; the ligand-free, manganese-reconstituted E101N mutant to a resolution of 2.6 Å; and the structures of ligand-free zinc-reconstituted wild-type, E101N, R230D, and E101G/R230C mutants of GKL to a resolution of 2.1 Å, 2.1 Å, 1.9 Å, and 2.0 Å, respectively. In particular, the structure of the evolved E101G/R230C mutant of GKL provides evidence for a catalytically productive active site architecture that contributes to the observed enhancement in catalysis. At high concentrations, wild-type and mutant GKL enzymes are differentially colored, with absorbance maximums in the range of 512 nm to 553 nm. The structures of the wild-type and mutant GKL provide a tractable link between the origins of the coloration and the charge-transfer complex between the α-cation and Tyr99 within the enzyme active site. Taken together, this study provides evidence for the modulability of enzymatic catalysis through subtle changes in enzyme

  9. Active-Site Hydration and Water Diffusion in Cytochrome P450cam: A Highly Dynamic Process

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome Y

    2011-01-01

    Long-timescale molecular dynamics simulations (300 ns) are performed on both the apo- (i.e., camphor-free) and camphor-bound cytochrome P450cam (CYP101). Water diffusion into and out of the protein active site is observed without biased sampling methods. During the course of the molecular dynamics simulation, an average of 6.4 water molecules is observed in the camphor-binding site of the apo form, compared to zero water molecules in the binding site of the substrate-bound form, in agreement with the number of water molecules observed in crystal structures of the same species. However, as many as 12 water molecules can be present at a given time in the camphor-binding region of the active site in the case of apo-P450cam, revealing a highly dynamic process for hydration of the protein active site, with water molecules exchanging rapidly with the bulk solvent. Water molecules are also found to exchange locations frequently inside the active site, preferentially clustering in regions surrounding the water molecules observed in the crystal structure. Potential-of-mean-force calculations identify thermodynamically favored trans-protein pathways for the diffusion of water molecules between the protein active site and the bulk solvent. Binding of camphor in the active site modifies the free-energy landscape of P450cam channels toward favoring the diffusion of water molecules out of the protein active site.

  10. Influence of divalent copper, manganese and zinc ions on fibril nucleation and elongation of the amyloid-like yeast prion determinant Sup35p-NM.

    PubMed

    Suhre, Michael H; Hess, Simone; Golser, Adrian V; Scheibel, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    There is a large body of evidence that divalent metal ions, particularly copper, might play a role in several protein folding pathologies like Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease or the prion diseases. However, contribution of metal ions on pathogenesis and their molecular influence on the formation of amyloid structures is not clear. Therefore, the general influence of metals on the formation of amyloids is still controversially discussed. We have utilized the well established system of yeast Sup35p-NM to investigate the role of three different metal ions, Cu(2+), Mn(2+) and Zn(2+), on amyloidogenesis. Recently, it has been shown that the prion determining region NM of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae prion protein Sup35p, which is responsible for the yeast prion phenotype [PSI(+)], specifically binds Cu(2+) ions. We further characterized the affinity of NM for Cu(2+), which were found to be comparable to that of other amyloidogenic proteins like the mammalian prion protein PrP. The specific binding sites could be located in the aminoterminal N-region which is known to initiate formation of amyloidogenic nuclei. In the presence of Cu(2+), fibril nucleation was significantly delayed, probably due to influences of copper on the oligomeric ensemble of soluble Sup35p-NM, since Cu(2+) altered the tertiary structure of soluble Sup35p-NM, while no influences on fibril elongation could be detected. The secondary structure of soluble or fibrous protein and the morphology of the fibrils were apparently not altered when assembled in presence of Cu(2+). In contrast, Mn(2+) and Zn(2+) did not bind to Sup35p-NM and did not exhibit significant effects on the formation of NM amyloid fibrils.

  11. TRPM3 channels provide a regulated influx pathway for zinc in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Thomas F J; Drews, Anna; Loch, Sabine; Mohr, Florian; Philipp, Stephan E; Lambert, Sachar; Oberwinkler, Johannes

    2010-09-01

    Zinc is stored in insulin-containing dense core vesicles of pancreatic beta-cells where it forms crystals together with insulin and calcium ions. Zinc ions are therefore released together with insulin upon exocytosis of these vesicles. Consequently, pancreatic beta-cells need to take up large amounts of zinc from the extracellular space across their plasma membrane. The pathways for zinc uptake are only partially understood. TRPM3 channels are present in pancreatic beta-cells and can be activated by the endogenous steroid pregnenolone sulfate. We demonstrate here that recombinant TRPM3 channels are highly permeable for many divalent cations, in particular also for zinc ions. Importantly, TRPM3 channels endogenously expressed in pancreatic beta-cells are also highly permeable for zinc ions. Using FluoZin3 to image changes of the intracellular zinc concentration, we show that pancreatic beta-cells take up zinc through TRPM3 channels even when extracellular zinc concentrations are low and physiological levels of calcium and magnesium are present. Activation of TRPM3 channels also leads to depolarization of beta-cells and to additional zinc influx through voltage-gated calcium channels. Our data establish that TRPM3 channels constitute a regulated entry pathway for zinc ions in pancreatic beta-cells.

  12. Signal Amplification of Bioassay Using Zinc Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowles, Chad L.

    bioassay signal tranducers. To overcome the limitations associated with zinc-based nanomaterials, a novel signal transduction approach was developed that relies on zinc ion release from nanoparticle labels during an immunoassay. The development of an innovative method for zinc ion detection and the description of a previously undescribed zinc-based nanomaterial are also described in this work. There are three major contributions to science in this work: (1) The development of an original and innovative signal transduction approach for immunoassays that adopts fluorescence detection of zinc ions released from ZnS nanoparticle labels; (2) The discovery and development of dual signal amplification for immunoassay signal transduction using ion release and subsequent activation of a zinc dependent metallozyme; (3) The synthesis and characterization of a novel zinc-based nanomaterial and its biosensing application using both single and dual signal amplification strategies.

  13. Zinc signals promote IL-2-dependent proliferation of T cells.

    PubMed

    Kaltenberg, Jennifer; Plum, Laura M; Ober-Blöbaum, Julia L; Hönscheid, Andrea; Rink, Lothar; Haase, Hajo

    2010-05-01

    Zinc signals, i.e. a change of the intracellular concentration of free zinc ions in response to receptor stimulation, are involved in signal transduction in several immune cells. Here, the role of zinc signals in T-cell activation by IL-2 was investigated in the murine cytotoxic T-cell line CTLL-2 and in primary human T cells. Measurements with the fluorescent dyes FluoZin-3 and Zinquin showed that zinc is released from lysosomes into the cytosol in response to stimulation of the IL-2-receptor. Activation of the ERK-pathway was blocked by chelation of free zinc with N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-2(pyridyl-methyl)ethylenediamine, whereas zinc was not required for STAT5 phosphorylation. In addition, the key signaling molecules MEK and ERK were activated in response to elevated free intracellular zinc, induced by incubation with zinc and the ionophore pyrithione. Downstream of ERK activation, ERK-specific gene expression of c-fos and IL-2-induced proliferation was found to depend on zinc. Further experiments indicated that inhibition of MEK and ERK-dephosphorylating protein phosphatases is the molecular mechanism for the influence of zinc on this pathway. In conclusion, an increase of cytoplasmic free zinc is required for IL-2-induced ERK signaling and proliferation of T cells.

  14. The roles of active site residues in the catalytic mechanism of methylaspartate ammonia-lyase.

    PubMed

    Raj, Hans; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2013-01-01

    Methylaspartate ammonia-lyase (MAL; EC 4.3.1.2) catalyzes the reversible addition of ammonia to mesaconate to yield l-threo-(2S,3S)-3-methylaspartate and l-erythro-(2S,3R)-3-methylaspartate as products. In the proposed minimal mechanism for MAL of Clostridium tetanomorphum, Lys-331 acts as the (S)-specific base catalyst and abstracts the 3S-proton from l-threo-3-methylaspartate, resulting in an enolate anion intermediate. This enolic intermediate is stabilized by coordination to the essential active site Mg(2+) ion and hydrogen bonding to the Gln-329 residue. Collapse of this intermediate results in the release of ammonia and the formation of mesaconate. His-194 likely acts as the (R)-specific base catalyst and abstracts the 3R-proton from the l-erythro isomer of 3-methylaspartate, yielding the enolic intermediate. In the present study, we have investigated the importance of the residues Gln-73, Phe-170, Gln-172, Tyr-356, Thr-360, Cys-361 and Leu-384 for the catalytic activity of C. tetanomorphum MAL. These residues, which are part of the enzyme surface lining the substrate binding pocket, were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis and the mutant enzymes were characterized for their structural integrity, ability to catalyze the amination of mesaconate, and regio- and diastereoselectivity. Based on the observed properties of the mutant enzymes, combined with previous structural studies and protein engineering work, we propose a detailed catalytic mechanism for the MAL-catalyzed reaction, in which the side chains of Gln-73, Gln-172, Tyr-356, Thr-360, and Leu-384 provide favorable interactions with the substrate, which are important for substrate binding and activation. This detailed knowledge of the catalytic mechanism of MAL can serve as a guide for future protein engineering experiments.

  15. Binding of free and protein-associated zinc to rat spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Sansone, G; Martino, M; Abrescia, P

    1991-01-01

    1. The zinc content of rat spermatozoa increases, upon ejaculation, from 0.035 to 1.055 micrograms/10(6) cells. 2. The rat seminal plasma holds zinc both as free ion and as protein-bound forms. 3. Zinc-free ions bind in vitro to rat epididymal spermatozoa. 4. Zinc-protein complexes can be isolated, by a chromatographic procedure, from the dorsolateral lobe of rat prostate. 5. The isolated zinc-protein complexes bind in vitro to rat epididymal spermatozoa.

  16. Complexation of divalent metal ions with diols in the presence of anion auxiliary ligands: zinc-induced oxidation of ethylene glycol to glycolaldehyde by consecutive hydride ion and proton shifts.

    PubMed

    Ruttink, Paul J A; Dekker, Lennard J M; Luider, Theo M; Burgers, Peter C

    2012-07-01

    Ternary complexes of the type AH•••M(2+)•••L(-) (AH = diol, including diethylene and triethylene glycol, M = Ca, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn and auxiliary anion ligand L(-)  = CH(3)COO(-), HCOO(-) and Cl(-)) have been generated in the gas phase by MALDI and ESI, and their dissociation characteristics have been obtained. Use of the auxiliary ligands enables the complexation of AH with the divalent metal ion without AH becoming deprotonated, although A(-)•••M(2+) is often also generated in the ion source or after MS/MS. For M = Ca, dissociation occurs to AH + M(2+)•••L(-) and/or to A(-)•••M(2+) + LH, the latter being produced from the H-shifted isomer A(-) •••M(2+)•••LH. For a given ligand L(-), the intensity ratio of these processes can be interpreted (barring reverse energy barriers) in terms of the quantity PA(A(-)) - Ca(aff) (A(-)), where PA is the proton affinity and Ca(aff) is the calcium ion affinity. Deuterium labeling shows that the complex ion HOCH(2)CH(2) OH•••Zn(2+)•••(-)OOCCH(3), in addition to losing acetic acid (60 Da), also eliminates glycolaldehyde (HOCH(2)CH=O, also 60 Da); it is proposed that these reactions commence with a hydride ion shift to produce the ion-dipole complex HOCH(2)CHOH(+)••• HZnOOCCH(3), which then undergoes proton transfer and dissociation to HOCH(2)CH=O + HZn(+)•••O = C(OH)CH(3). In this reaction, ethylene glycol is oxidized by consecutive hydride ion and proton shifts. A minor process leads to loss of the isomeric species HOCH=CHOH.

  17. Spectroscopic insights into the nature of active sites in iron–nitrogen–carbon electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction in acid

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Qingying; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Tylus, Urszula; Strickland, Kara; Li, Jingkun; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Anibal, Jacob; Gumeci, Cenk; Barton, Scott Calabrese; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frederic; Halevi, Barr; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2016-11-01

    of the site-blocking effect. Moreover, a highly active MOF-based catalyst without Fe–N moieties was developed, and the active sites were identified as nitrogen-doped carbon fibers with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. The high ORR activity and durability of catalysts involving this second site, as demonstrated in fuel cell, are attributed to the high density of active sites and the elimination or reduction of Fenton-type processes. The latter are initiated by hydrogen peroxide but are known to be accelerated by iron ions exposed to the surface, resulting in the formation of damaging free-radicals.

  18. Enhanced in vitro regeneration and change in photosynthetic pigments, biomass and proline content in Withania somnifera L. (Dunal) induced by copper and zinc ions.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Nigar; Ahmad, Naseem; Anis, Mohammad

    2011-12-01

    In the present study the effect of inorganic nutrients (CuSO₄ & ZnSO₄) on morphogenic and biochemical responses from nodal explants in Withania somnifera L. was investigated. Incorporation of either Copper sulphate (25-200 μM) or Zinc sulphate (50-500 μM) in the optimized Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium highly influenced the shoot bud formation and subsequent elongation, which induced maximum percentage (95%) regeneration, number (61.7 ± 0.25) of shoots with shoot length (5.46 ± 0.16 cm) on CuSO₄ (100 μM) and maximum percentage regeneration (100%), number of shoots (66.1 ± 0.96) with shoot length (6.24 ± 0.21 cm) on ZnSO₄ (300 μM) after 12 weeks of culture. Healthy growing in vitro microshoots rooted efficiently on ½ MS medium supplemented with NAA (0.5 μM), which induced (16.2 ± 0.12) roots with root length (3.30 ± 0.12 cm) after 4 weeks. Pigment content increased with increasing concentration of Cu and Zn and the maximum Chl. a (0.47), (0.41); Chl. b (0.52), (0.42); total Chl. (0.99), (0.83) and Carotenoid (0.16), (0.16) mg/g FW contents in regenerants were found on CuSO₄ (100 μM) and ZnSO₄ (300 μM), respectively. Maximum proline content (0.17), (0.16) μg/g FW was observed on high concentrations of CuSO₄ (200 μM) and ZnSO₄ (500 μM) respectively, in the basal medium. Regenerated plantlets were acclimatized successfully in soilrite with a survival rate of 95%. No morphological variations were detected among the micropropagated plants when compared with seedling raised plants of the same age.

  19. Electrochemical synthesis and characterization of zinc carbonate and zinc oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Marashianpour, Zahra; Karimi, Meisam Sadeghpour; Mohammad-Zadeh, Mohammad

    2015-11-01

    Zinc oxide and its precursor i.e., zinc carbonate is widely utilized in various fields of industry, especially in solar energy conversion, optical, and inorganic pigments. In this work, a facile and clean electrodeposition method was utilized for the synthesis of zinc carbonate nanoparticles. Also, zinc oxide nanoparticles were produced by calcination of the prepared zinc carbonate powder. Zinc carbonate nanoparticles with different sizes were electrodeposited by electrolysis of a zinc plate as anode in the solution of sodium carbonate. It was found that the particle size of zinc carbonate might be tuned by process parameters, i.e., electrolysis voltage, carbonate ion concentration, solvent composition and stirring rate of the electrolyte solution. An orthogonal array design was utilized to identify the optimum experimental conditions. The experimental results showed that the minimum size of the electrodeposited ZnCO3 particles is about 24 nm whereas the maximum particle size is around 40 nm. The TG-DSC studies of the nanoparticles indicated that the main thermal degradation of ZnCO3 occurs in two steps over the temperature ranges of 150-250 and 350-400 °C. The electrosynthesized ZnCO3 nanoparticles were calcined at the temperature of 600 °C to prepare ZnO nanoparticles. The prepared ZnCO3 and ZnO nanoparticles were characterized by SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and FT-IR techniques.

  20. Proteome-wide analysis of nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations in active sites of human proteins.

    PubMed

    Dingerdissen, Hayley; Motwani, Mona; Karagiannis, Konstantinos; Simonyan, Vahan; Mazumder, Raja

    2013-03-01

    An enzyme's active site is essential to normal protein activity such that any disruptions at this site may lead to dysfunction and disease. Nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations (nsSNVs), which alter the amino acid sequence, are one type of disruption that can alter the active site. When this occurs, it is assumed that enzyme activity will vary because of the criticality of the site to normal protein function. We integrate nsSNV data and active site annotations from curated resources to identify all active-site-impacting nsSNVs in the human genome and search for all pathways observed to be associated with this data set to assess the likely consequences. We find that there are 934 unique nsSNVs that occur at the active sites of 559 proteins. Analysis of the nsSNV data shows an over-representation of arginine and an under-representation of cysteine, phenylalanine and tyrosine when comparing the list of nsSNV-impacted active site residues with the list of all possible proteomic active site residues, implying a potential bias for or against variation of these residues at the active site. Clustering analysis shows an abundance of hydrolases and transferases. Pathway and functional analysis shows several pathways over- or under-represented in the data set, with the most significantly affected pathways involved in carbohydrate metabolism. We provide a table of 32 variation-substrate/product pairs that can be used in targeted metabolomics experiments to assay the effects of specific variations. In addition, we report the significant prevalence of aspartic acid to histidine variation in eight proteins associated with nine diseases including glycogen storage diseases, lacrimo-auriculo-dento-digital syndrome, Parkinson's disease and several cancers.

  1. A unique geometry of the active site of angiotensin-converting enzyme consistent with structure-activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Dorica; Naylor, Christopher B.; Motoc, Ioan; Marshall, Garland R.

    1987-04-01

    Previous structure-activity studies of captopril and related active angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have led to the conclusion that the basic structural requirements for inhibition of ACE involve (a) a terminal carboxyl group; (b) an amido carbonyl group; and (c) different types of effective zinc (Zn) ligand functional groups. Such structural requirements common to a set of compounds acting at the same receptor have been used to define a pharmacophoric pattern of atoms or groups of atoms mutually oriented in space that is necessary for ACE inhibition from a stereochemical point of view. A unique pharmacophore model (within the resolution of approximately 0.15 Å) was observed using a method for systematic search of the conformational hyperspace available to the 28 structurally different molecules under study. The method does not assume a common molecular framework, and, therefore, allows comparison of different compounds that is independent of their absolute orientation. Consequently, by placing the carboxyl binding group, the binding site for amido carbonyl, and the Zn atom site in positions determined by ideal binding geometry with the inhibitors' functional groups, it was possible to clearly specify a geometry for the active site of ACE.

  2. Active sites in Cu-SSZ-13 deNOx catalyst under reaction conditions: a XAS/XES perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomachenko, Kirill A.; Borfecchia, Elisa; Bordiga, Silvia; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Beato, Pablo; Lamberti, Carlo

    2016-05-01

    Cu-SSZ-13 is a highly active catalyst for the NH3-assisted selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of the harmful nitrogen oxides (NOx, x=1, 2). Since the catalytically active sites for this reaction are mainly represented by isolated Cu ions incorporated into the zeolitic framework, element-selective studies of Cu local environment are crucial to fully understand the enhanced catalytic properties of this material. Herein, we highlight the recent advances in the characterization of the most abundant Cu-sites in Cu-SSZ-13 upon different reaction-relevant conditions made employing XAS and XES spectroscopies, complemented by computational analysis. A concise review of the most relevant literature is also presented.

  3. Prevention of cell death by the zinc ion chelating agent TPEN in cultured PC12 cells exposed to Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation (OGD).

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhao; Huang, Yue-yang; Wang, Yu-xiang; Wang, Hong-gang; Deng, Fei; Heng, Bin; Xie, Lai-hua; Liu, Yan-qiang

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the role of Zn(2+)-associated glutamate signaling pathway and voltage-dependent outward potassium ion currents in neuronal death induced by hypoxia-ischemia, PC12 cells were exposed to Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation (OGD) solution mimicking the hypoxic-ischemic condition in neuron, and the effect of N,N,N',N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN), a specific Zn(2+) chelating agent on OGD-induced neuronal death was assessed in the present study. The cell survival rate, apoptosis status, potassium channel currents, intracellular free glutamate concentration and GluR2 expression in PC12 cells exposed to OGD in the absence or presence of TPEN for different time were investigated. The results showed that OGD exposure increased apoptosis, reduced the cell viability (P < 0.01 at 3h, 6h and 24h, respectively compared to control), changed the voltage-dependent outward potassium ion current (increase at 1h, but decrease at 3h) and decreased the concentration of intracellular glutamate (P < 0.05 at 3h and 6h, P < 0.01 at 24h respectively compared to control) and GluR2 expression (P < 0.05 at 3h, 6h and 24h, respectively compared to control) in PC12 cells. TPEN partially reversed the influence resulted from OGD. These results suggest that OGD-induced cell apoptosis and/or death is mediated by the alteration in glutamate signaling pathway and the voltage-dependent outward potassium ion currents, while TPEN effectively prevent cell apoptosis and/or death under hypoxic-ischemic condition.

  4. L-Shell X-Ray Production Cross Sections for Calcium, Iron, Nickel, Copper, Zinc, Gallium, and Germanium by Hydrogen, Helium, and Lithium Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeir, Michael Ridge

    1992-01-01

    L-shell x-ray production cross sections are presented for Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, and Ge by 0.5- to 5.0-MeV protons and by 0.5- to 8.0-MeV helium ions and Ca, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Ge by 0.75- to 4.5-MeV lithium ions. These measurements are compared to the first Born theory and the perturbed -stationary-state theory with energy-loss, Coulomb deflection, and relativistic corrections (ECPSSR). The results are also compared to previous experimental investigations. The high precision x-ray measurements were performed with a windowless Si(Li) detector. The efficiency of the detector was determined by the use of thin target atomic -field bremsstrahlung produced by 66.5 keV electrons. The measured bremsstrahlung spectra were compared to theoretical bremsstrahlung distributions in order to obtain an efficiency versus energy curve. The targets for the measurement were manufactured by the vacuum evaporation of the target element onto thin foils of carbon. Impurities in the carbon caused interferences in the L-shell x-ray peaks. Special cleansing procedures were developed that reduced the impurity concentrations in the carbon foil, making the use of less than 5 mug/cm^2 targets possible. The first Born theory is seen to greatly overpredict the data at low ion energies. The ECPSSR theory matches the data very well at the high energy region. At low energies, while fitting the data much more closely than the first Born theory, the ECPSSR theory does not accurately predict the trend of the data. This is probably due to the onset of molecular-orbital effects, a mechanism not accounted for in the ECPSSR theory.

  5. Redox kinetic measurements of glutathione at the mercury electrode by means of square-wave voltammetry. The role of copper, cadmium and zinc ions.

    PubMed

    Mladenov, Mitko; Mirceski, Valentin; Gjorgoski, Icko; Jordanoski, Blagoja

    2004-12-01

    The electrode reaction of glutathione (GSH) at the hanging mercury drop electrode is studied by means of square-wave voltammetry (SWV). At potentials more positive than -0.350 V (vs. Ag/AgCl (3 mol/l KCl)) the oxidation of the mercury electrode in the presence of GSH leads to creation of a sparingly soluble mercury-GSH complex that deposits onto the electrode surface. Under cathodic potential scan, the deposited complex acts as a reducible reactant, giving raise to a well-defined cathodic stripping reversible SW voltammetric response. The electrode reaction can be described by the scheme: Hg(SG)(2(s))+e(-)+2H((aq))(+) = Hg((l))+2GSH((aq)). Thus, the electrode reaction provides information on both thermodynamics and kinetics of the chemical interactions of GSH with mercury. An experimental methodology for measuring the kinetics of the electrode reactions, based on the property known as "quasireversible maximum", is developed. The standard redox rate constant is 5.09, 5.75 and 5.22 cm s(-1) in a phosphate buffer at pH 5.6, 7.0 and 8.5, respectively, with a precision of +/-10%. The high rate of the electrode reaction reflects the strong affinity of GSH towards chemical interaction with mercury. The electrode reaction is particularly sensitive to the presence of heavy metal ions such as Cu(2+), Cd(2+), and Zn(2+.) The rate of the electrode reaction decreases significantly in the presence of these ions due to simultaneous interactions of GSH with the respective ion and mercury.

  6. A Processive Carbohydrate Polymerase That Mediates Bifunctional Catalysis Using a Single Active Site

    PubMed Central

    May, John F.; Levengood, Matthew R.; Splain, Rebecca A.; Brown, Christopher D.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2012-01-01

    Even in the absence of a template, glycosyltransferases can catalyze the synthesis of carbohydrate polymers of specific sequence. The paradigm has been that one enzyme catalyzes the formation of one type of glycosidic linkage, yet certain glycosyltransferases generate polysaccharide sequences composed of two distinct linkage types. In principle, bifunctional glycosyltransferases can possess separate active sites for each catalytic activity or one active site with dual activities. We encountered the fundamental question of one or two distinct active sites in our investigation of the galactosyltransferase GlfT2. GlfT2 catalyzes the formation of mycobacterial galactan, a critical cell-wall polymer composed of galactofuranose residues connected with alternating, regioisomeric linkages. We found that GlfT2 mediates galactan polymerization using only one active site that manifests dual regioselectivity. Structural modeling of the bifunctional glycosyltransferases hyaluronan synthase and cellulose synthase suggests that these enzymes also generate multiple glycosidic linkages using a single active site. These results highlight the versatility of glycosyltransferases for generating polysaccharides of specific sequence. We postulate that a hallmark of processive elongation of a carbohydrate polymer by a bifunctional enzyme is that one active site can give rise to two separate types of glycosidic bonds. PMID:22217153

  7. Zinc-sensitive MRI contrast agent detects differential release of Zn(II) ions from the healthy vs. malignant mouse prostate

    PubMed Central

    Clavijo Jordan, M. Veronica; Lo, Su-Tang; Chen, Shiuhwei; Preihs, Christian; Chirayil, Sara; Zhang, Shanrong; Kapur, Payal; Li, Wen-Hong; De Leon-Rodriguez, Luis M.; Lubag, Angelo J. M.; Rofsky, Neil M.; Sherry, A. Dean

    2016-01-01

    Many secretory tissues release Zn(II) ions along with other molecules in response to external stimuli. Here we demonstrate that secretion of Zn(II) ions from normal, healthy prostate tissue is stimulated by glucose in fasted mice and that release of Zn(II) can be monitored by MRI. An ∼50% increase in water proton signal enhancement is observed in T1-weighted images of the healthy mouse prostate after infusion of a Gd-based Zn(II) sensor and an i.p. bolus of glucose. Release of Zn(II) from intracellular stores was validated in human epithelial prostate cells in vitro and in surgically exposed prostate tissue in vivo using a Zn(II)-sensitive fluorescent probe known to bind to the extracellular surface of cells. Given the known differences in intracellular Zn(II) stores in healthy versus malignant prostate tissues, the Zn(II) sensor was then evaluated in a transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model in vivo. The agent proved successful in detecting small malignant lesions as early as 11 wk of age, making this noninvasive MR imaging method potentially useful for identifying prostate cancer in situations where it may be difficult to detect using current multiparametric MRI protocols. PMID:27562169

  8. Zinc-sensitive MRI contrast agent detects differential release of Zn(II) ions from the healthy vs. malignant mouse prostate.

    PubMed

    Clavijo Jordan, M Veronica; Lo, Su-Tang; Chen, Shiuhwei; Preihs, Christian; Chirayil, Sara; Zhang, Shanrong; Kapur, Payal; Li, Wen-Hong; De Leon-Rodriguez, Luis M; Lubag, Angelo J M; Rofsky, Neil M; Sherry, A Dean

    2016-09-13

    Many secretory tissues release Zn(II) ions along with other molecules in response to external stimuli. Here we demonstrate that secretion of Zn(II) ions from normal, healthy prostate tissue is stimulated by glucose in fasted mice and that release of Zn(II) can be monitored by MRI. An ∼50% increase in water proton signal enhancement is observed in T1-weighted images of the healthy mouse prostate after infusion of a Gd-based Zn(II) sensor and an i.p. bolus of glucose. Release of Zn(II) from intracellular stores was validated in human epithelial prostate cells in vitro and in surgically exposed prostate tissue in vivo using a Zn(II)-sensitive fluorescent probe known to bind to the extracellular surface of cells. Given the known differences in intracellular Zn(II) stores in healthy versus malignant prostate tissues, the Zn(II) sensor was then evaluated in a transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model in vivo. The agent proved successful in detecting small malignant lesions as early as 11 wk of age, making this noninvasive MR imaging method potentially useful for identifying prostate cancer in situations where it may be difficult to detect using current multiparametric MRI protocols.

  9. Zinc oxide overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Zinc oxide is an ingredient in many products. Some of these are certain creams and ointments used ... prevent or treat minor skin burns and irritation. Zinc oxide overdose occurs when someone eats one of ...

  10. Bacitracin zinc overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... sprays such as Polysporin Spray and Neosporin Prescription antibiotic eye drops and ointments such as Neosporin Ophthalmic Bacitracin zinc may also be added to animal food. Other products may also contain bacitracin zinc.

  11. Zinc in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduce your risk of becoming sick with the common cold. Starting to take zinc supplements within 24 hours ... 26. Singh M, Das RR. Zinc for the common cold. Cochrane Database Syst Rev . Jun18;6:CD001364. PMID: ...

  12. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase CDK1 by oxindolimine ligands and corresponding copper and zinc complexes.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Rodrigo Bernardi; Petersen, Philippe Alexandre Divina; Gonzales-Zubiate, Fernando A; Oliveira, Carla Columbano; Kumar, Naresh; do Nascimento, Rafael Rodrigues; Petrilli, Helena Maria; da Costa Ferreira, Ana Maria

    2015-10-01

    Oxindolimine-copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes that previously have shown to induce apoptosis, with DNA and mitochondria as main targets, exhibit here significant inhibition of kinase CDK1/cyclin B protein. Copper species are more active than the corresponding zinc, and the free ligand shows to be less active, indicating a major influence of coordination in the process, and a further modulation by the coordinated ligand. Molecular docking and classical molecular dynamics provide a better understanding of the effectiveness and kinase inhibition mechanism by these compounds, showing that the metal complex provides a stronger interaction than the free ligand with the ATP-binding site. The metal ion introduces charge in the oxindole species, giving it a more rigid conformation that then becomes more effective in its interactions with the protein active site. Analogous experiments resulted in no significant effect regarding phosphatase inhibition. These results can explain the cytotoxicity of these metal complexes towards different tumor cells, in addition to its capability of binding to DNA, and decreasing membrane potential of mitochondria.

  13. Zinc and gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Skrovanek, Sonja; DiGuilio, Katherine; Bailey, Robert; Huntington, William; Urbas, Ryan; Mayilvaganan, Barani; Mercogliano, Giancarlo; Mullin, James M

    2014-01-01

    This review is a current summary of the role that both zinc deficiency and zinc supplementation can play in the etiology and therapy of a wide range of gastrointestinal diseases. The recent literature describing zinc action on gastrointestinal epithelial tight junctions and epithelial barrier function is described. Zinc enhancement of gastrointestinal epithelial barrier function may figure prominently in its potential therapeutic action in several gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:25400994

  14. Localization of zinc after in vitro mineralization in osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Kanno, S; Anuradha, C D; Hirano, S

    2001-10-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the incorporation of zinc (Zn) into cultured UMR-106 osteoblasts in response to mineralization caused by the addition of beta-glycerophosphate. As a result of the induced mineralization, the contents of calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), and Zn in the monolayer increased, whereas the magnesium (Mg) content did not change. The activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) also increased during the process. The zinc distribution in the cell monolayer was studied using Zinquin, a fluorescent zinc ion chelator. The double fluorescent labeling with Zinquin and calcein revealed that zinc was localized both as intracellular vesicles and extracellular clusters, whereas calcium was colocalized with extracellular zinc. These results suggest that zinc is involved in the mineralization process of UMR-106 cells.

  15. Calcium-manganese oxides as structural and functional models for active site in oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II: lessons from simple models.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi

    2011-01-01

    The oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II which induces the oxidation of water to dioxygen in plants, algae and certain bacteria contains a cluster of one calcium and four manganese ions. It serves as a model to split water by sunlight. Reports on the mechanism and structure of photosystem II provide a more detailed architecture of the oxygen evolving complex and the surrounding amino acids. One challenge in this field is the development of artificial model compounds to study oxygen evolution reaction outside the complicated environment of the enzyme. Calcium-manganese oxides as structural and functional models for the active site of photosystem II are explained and reviewed in this paper. Because of related structures of these calcium-manganese oxides and the catalytic centers of active site of the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II, the study may help to understand more about mechanism of oxygen evolution by the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II.

  16. 2,6-Bis(2-Benzimidazolyl)Pyridine Fluorescent Red-Shifted Sensor for Recognition of Zinc(II) and a Calorimetric Sensor for Iron Ions.

    PubMed

    Vosough Razavi, Bita; Badiei, Alireza; Lashgari, Negar; Mohammadi Ziarani, Ghodsi

    2016-09-01

    The ability of 2,6-bis(2-benzimidazolyl)pyridine (bbp) as an optical sensor was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, colorimetric and UV-visible techniques. The fluorescence spectra of bbp demonstrated a red-shifted upon addition of Zn(2+) ion, whereas rest of the cations did not induce any shift. Selectivity of the sensor was examined toward Zn(2+) in the presence of a wide range of cations, as interfering agents, that showed no disruption in its function. In addition, the pH effect was tested on the fluorescence response of bbp; which showed the efficiency of the sensor in a wide pH range. The limit of detection for Zn(2+) was estimated as 2.1 μM. Furthermore, the colorimetric studies were carried out and the observations showed a color change from colorless to purple by the addition of Fe(2+) ion and from colorless to yellow by the addition of Fe(3+). The UV-visible studies were carried out to confirm the colorimetric observations. The color changes occurred when Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) were added to the sensors solution, respectively. The detection limits were calculated as 2.8 × 10(-7) M and 3.5 × 10(-6) M for Fe(2+) and Fe(3+), respectively. Hence, bbp can be used as a dual mode optical sensor for detection of Zn(2+) by fluorescence and discriminately detection of Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) visually.

  17. Tetrahydroindazolone substituted 2-aminobenzamides as fluorescent probes: switching metal ion selectivity from zinc to cadmium by interchanging the amino and carbamoyl groups on the fluorophore.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jia; Xu, Qin-Chao; Li, Ri-chen; Tang, Xi; He, Ying-Fang; Zhang, Meng-Yu; Zhang, Yuan; Xing, Guo-Wen

    2012-08-21

    Three fluorescent probes CdABA', CdABA and ZnABA', which are structural isomers of ZnABA, have been designed with N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (BPEA) as chelator and 2-aminobenzamide as fluorophore. These probes can be divided into two groups: CdABA, CdABA' for Cd(2+) and ZnABA, ZnABA' for Zn(2+). Although there is little difference in their chemical structures, the two groups of probes exhibit totally different fluorescence properties for preference of Zn(2+) or Cd(2+). In the group of Zn(2+) probes, ZnABA/ZnABA' distinguish Zn(2+) from Cd(2+) with F(Zn)(2+)-F(Cd)(2+) = 1.87-2.00. Upon interchanging the BPEA and carbamoyl groups on the aromatic ring of the fluorophore, the structures of ZnABA/ZnABA' are converted into CdABA/CdABA'. Interestingly, the metal ions selectivity of CdABA/CdABA' was switched to discriminate Cd(2+) from Zn(2+) with F(Cd)(2+)-F(Zn)(2+) = 2.27-2.36, indicating that a small structural modification could lead to a remarkable change of the metal ion selectivity. (1)H NMR titration and ESI mass experiments demonstrated that these fluorescent probers exhibited different coordination modes for Zn(2+) and Cd(2+). With CdABA' as an example, generally, upon addition of Cd(2+), the fluorescence response possesses PET pathway to display no obvious shift of maximum λ(em) in the absence or presence of Cd(2+). However, an ICT pathway could be employed after adding Zn(2+) into the CdABA' solution, resulting in a distinct red-shift of maximal λ(em).

  18. Trace elements in human physiology and pathology: zinc and metallothioneins.

    PubMed

    Tapiero, Haim; Tew, Kenneth D

    2003-11-01

    Zinc is one of the most abundant nutritionally essential elements in the human body. It is found in all body tissues with 85% of the whole body zinc in muscle and bone, 11% in the skin and the liver and the remaining in all the other tissues. In multicellular organisms, virtually all zinc is intracellular, 30-40% is located in the nucleus, 50% in the cytoplasm, organelles and specialized vesicles (for digestive enzymes or hormone storage) and the remainder in the cell membrane. Zinc intake ranges from 107 to 231 micromol/d depending on the source, and human zinc requirement is estimated at 15 mg/d. Zinc has been shown to be essential to the structure and function of a large number of macromolecules and for over 300 enzymic reactions. It has both catalytic and structural roles in enzymes, while in zinc finger motifs, it provides a scaffold that organizes protein sub-domains for the interaction with either DNA or other proteins. It is critical for the function of a number of metalloproteins, inducing members of oxido-reductase, hydrolase ligase, lyase family and has co-activating functions with copper in superoxide dismutase or phospholipase C. The zinc ion (Zn(++)) does not participate in redox reactions, which makes it a stable ion in a biological medium whose potential is in constant flux. Zinc ions are hydrophilic and do not cross cell membranes by passive diffusion. In general, transport has been described as having both saturable and non-saturable components, depending on the Zn(II) concentrations involved. Zinc ions exist primarily in the form of complexes with proteins and nucleic acids and participate in all aspects of intermediary metabolism, transmission and regulation of the expression of genetic information, storage, synthesis and action of peptide hormones and structural maintenance of chromatin and biomembranes.

  19. Copper and zinc binding properties of the N-terminal histidine-rich sequence of Haemophilus ducreyi Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Paksi, Zoltán; Jancsó, Attila; Pacello, Francesca; Nagy, Nóra; Battistoni, Andrea; Gajda, Tamás

    2008-09-01

    The Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu,ZnSOD) isolated from Haemophilus ducreyi possesses a His-rich N-terminal metal binding domain, which has been previously proposed to play a copper(II) chaperoning role. To analyze the metal binding ability and selectivity of the histidine-rich domain we have carried out thermodynamic and solution structural analysis of the copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes of a peptide corresponding to the first 11 amino acids of the enzyme (H(2)N-HGDHMHNHDTK-OH, L). This peptide has highly versatile metal binding ability and provides one and three high affinity binding sites for zinc(II) and copper(II), respectively. In equimolar solutions the MHL complexes are dominant in the neutral pH-range with protonated lysine epsilon-amino group. As a consequence of its multidentate nature, L binds zinc and copper with extraordinary high affinity (K(D,Zn)=1.6x10(-9)M and K(D,Cu)=5.0x10(-12)M at pH 7.4) and appears as the strongest zinc(II) and copper(II) chelator between the His-rich peptides so far investigated. These K(D) values support the already proposed role of the N-terminal His-rich region of H. ducreyi Cu,ZnSOD in copper recruitment under metal starvation, and indicate a similar function in the zinc(II) uptake, too. The kinetics of copper(II) transfer from L to the active site of Cu-free N-deleted H. ducreyi Cu,ZnSOD showed significant pH and copper-to-peptide ratio dependence, indicating specific structural requirements during the metal ion transfer to the active site. Interestingly, the complex CuHL has significant superoxide dismutase like activity, which may suggest multifunctional role of the copper(II)-bound N-terminal His-rich domain of H. ducreyi Cu,ZnSOD.

  20. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  1. HEPARIN-BINDING EGF CLEAVAGE MEDIATES ZINC-INDUCED EGF RECEPTOR PHOSPHORYLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that exposure to zinc ions can activate epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) signaling in murine fibroblasts and A431 cells through a mechanism involving Src kinase. While studying the effects of zinc ions in normal human bronchial epithelial cel...

  2. Gamma Radiation-Induced Damage in the Zinc Finger of the Transcription Factor IIIA

    PubMed Central

    Miao, YuJi; Hu, XiaoDan; Min, Rui; Liu, PeiDang; Zhang, HaiQian

    2016-01-01

    A zinc finger motif is an element of proteins that can specifically recognize and bind to DNA. Because they contain multiple cysteine residues, zinc finger motifs possess redox properties. Ionizing radiation generates a variety of free radicals in organisms. Zinc finger motifs, therefore, may be a target of ionizing radiation. The effect of gamma radiation on the zinc finger motifs in transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA), a zinc finger protein, was investigated. TFIIIA was exposed to different gamma doses from 60Co sources. The dose rates were 0.20 Gy/min and 800 Gy/h, respectively. The binding capacity of zinc finger motifs in TFIIIA was determined using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. We found that 1000 Gy of gamma radiation impaired the function of the zinc finger motifs in TFIIIA. The sites of radiation-induced damage in the zinc finger were the thiol groups of cysteine residues and zinc (II) ions. The thiol groups were oxidized to form disulfide bonds and the zinc (II) ions were indicated to be reduced to zinc atoms. These results indicate that the zinc finger motif is a target domain for gamma radiation, which may decrease 5S rRNA expression via impairment of the zinc finger motifs in TFIIIA. PMID:27803644

  3. Differential pro-inflammatory effects of metal oxide nanoparticles and their soluble ions in vitro and in vivo; zinc and copper nanoparticles, but not their ions, recruit eosinophils to the lungs.

    PubMed

    Cho, Wan-Seob; Duffin, Rodger; Poland, Craig A; Duschl, Albert; Oostingh, Gertie Janneke; Macnee, William; Bradley, Mark; Megson, Ian L; Donaldson, Ken

    2012-02-01

    Abstract Nickel, zinc, and copper oxide nanoparticles (NiONP, ZnONP, and CuONP) and their aqueous extracts (AEs) were applied to A549 lung epithelial cells to determine the cytotoxicity, IL-8 production, and activation of transcription factors. Nanoparticles (NPs) and their AEs were also instilled into rat lungs to evaluate acute and chronic inflammatory effects. In vitro AEs had specific effects; for example NiOAE had no effect and ZnOAE affected all parameters measured. NPs themselves all had cytotoxic effects but only ZnONP and CuONP impacted pro-inflammatory endpoints. The inflammatory cells in the BAL were also different from AEs and NPs with ZnONP and CuONP recruiting eosinophils and neutrophils whilst ZnOAE and CuOAE elicited only mild neutrophilic inflammation that had resolved by four weeks. NiONP recruited neutrophils only whilst NiOAE did not cause any inflammation. Understanding differences in the toxic role of the ionic components of metal oxide NPs will contribute to full hazard identification and characterisation.

  4. Zinc oxyfluoride transparent conductor

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Roy G.

    1991-02-05

    Transparent, electrically conductive and infrared-reflective films of zinc oxyfluoride are produced by chemical vapor deposition from vapor mixtures of zinc, oxygen and fluorine-containing compounds. The substitution of fluorine for some of the oxygen in zinc oxide results in dramatic increases in the electrical conductivity. For example, diethyl zinc, ethyl alcohol and hexafluoropropene vapors are reacted over a glass surface at 400.degree. C. to form a visibly transparent, electrically conductive, infrared reflective and ultraviolet absorptive film of zinc oxyfluoride. Such films are useful in liquid crystal display devices, solar cells, electrochromic absorbers and reflectors, energy-conserving heat mirrors, and antistatic coatings.

  5. Molecular dynamics explorations of active site structure in designed and evolved enzymes.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Sílvia; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Noey, Elizabeth L; Houk, K N

    2015-04-21

    This Account describes the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reveal how mutations alter the structure and organization of enzyme active sites. As proposed by Pauling about 70 years ago and elaborated by many others since then, biocatalysis is efficient when functional groups in the active site of an enzyme are in optimal positions for transition state stabilization. Changes in mechanism and covalent interactions are often critical parts of enzyme catalysis. We describe our explorations of the dynamical preorganization of active sites using MD, studying the fluctuations between active and inactive conformations normally concealed to static crystallography. MD shows how the various arrangements of active site residues influence the free energy of the transition state and relates the populations of the catalytic conformational ensemble to the enzyme activity. This Account is organized around three case studies from our laboratory. We first describe the importance of dynamics in evaluating a series of computationally designed and experimentally evolved enzymes for the Kemp elimination, a popular subject in the enzyme design field. We find that the dynamics of the active site is influenced not only by the original sequence design and subsequent mutations but also by the nature of the ligand present in the active site. In the second example, we show how microsecond MD has been used to uncover the role of remote mutations in the active site dynamics and catalysis of a transesterase, LovD. This enzyme was evolved by Tang at UCLA and Codexis, Inc., and is a useful commercial catalyst for the production of the drug simvastatin. X-ray analysis of inactive and active mutants did not reveal differences in the active sites, but relatively long time scale MD in solution showed that the active site of the wild-type enzyme preorganizes only upon binding of the acyl carrier protein (ACP) that delivers the natural acyl group to the active site. In the absence of bound ACP

  6. The zinc dyshomeostasis hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Craddock, Travis J A; Tuszynski, Jack A; Chopra, Deepak; Casey, Noel; Goldstein, Lee E; Hameroff, Stuart R; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly. Hallmark AD neuropathology includes extracellular amyloid plaques composed largely of the amyloid-β protein (Aβ), intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) composed of hyper-phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau (MAP-tau), and microtubule destabilization. Early-onset autosomal dominant AD genes are associated with excessive Aβ accumulation, however cognitive impairment best correlates with NFTs and disrupted microtubules. The mechanisms linking Aβ and NFT pathologies in AD are unknown. Here, we propose that sequestration of zinc by Aβ-amyloid deposits (Aβ oligomers and plaques) not only drives Aβ aggregation, but also disrupts zinc homeostasis in zinc-enriched brain regions important for memory and vulnerable to AD pathology, resulting in intra-neuronal zinc levels, which are either too low, or excessively high. To evaluate this hypothesis, we 1) used molecular modeling of zinc binding to the microtubule component protein tubulin, identifying specific, high-affinity zinc binding sites that influence side-to-side tubulin interaction, the sensitive link in microtubule polymerization and stability. We also 2) performed kinetic modeling showing zinc distribution in extra-neuronal Aβ deposits can reduce intra-neuronal zinc binding to microtubules, destabilizing microtubules. Finally, we 3) used metallomic imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) to show anatomically-localized and age-dependent zinc dyshomeostasis in specific brain regions of Tg2576 transgenic, mice, a model for AD. We found excess zinc in brain regions associated with memory processing and NFT pathology. Overall, we present a theoretical framework and support for a new theory of AD linking extra-neuronal Aβ amyloid to intra-neuronal NFTs and cognitive dysfunction. The connection, we propose, is based on β-amyloid-induced alterations in zinc ion concentration inside neurons affecting stability of polymerized

  7. Monocopper active site for partial methane oxidation in Cu-exchanged 8MR zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Ambarish R.; Zhao, Zhi -Jian; Siahrostami, Samira; Nørskov, Jens K.; Studt, Felix

    2016-08-17

    Direct conversion of methane to methanol using oxygen is experiencing renewed interest owing to the availability of new natural gas resources. Copper-exchanged zeolites such as mordenite and ZSM-5 have shown encouraging results, and di- and tri-copper species have been suggested as active sites. Recently, small eight-membered ring (8MR) zeolites including SSZ-13, -16, and -39 have been shown to be active for methane oxidation, but the active sites and reaction mechanisms in these 8MR zeolites are not known. In this work, we use density functional theory (DFT) calculations to systematically evaluate monocopper species as active sites for the partial methane oxidation reaction in Cu-exchanged SSZ-13. On the basis of kinetic and thermodynamic arguments, we suggest that [CuIIOH]+ species in the 8MR are responsible for the experimentally observed activity. Furthermore, our results successfully explain the available spectroscopic data and experimental observations including (i) the necessity of water for methanol extraction and (ii) the effect of Si/Al ratio on the catalyst activity. Monocopper species have not yet been suggested as an active site for the partial methane oxidation reaction, and our results suggest that [CuIIOH]+ active site may provide complementary routes for methane activation in zeolites in addition to the known [Cu–O–Cu]2+ and Cu3O3 motifs.

  8. Monocopper active site for partial methane oxidation in Cu-exchanged 8MR zeolites

    DOE PAGES

    Kulkarni, Ambarish R.; Zhao, Zhi -Jian; Siahrostami, Samira; ...

    2016-08-17

    Direct conversion of methane to methanol using oxygen is experiencing renewed interest owing to the availability of new natural gas resources. Copper-exchanged zeolites such as mordenite and ZSM-5 have shown encouraging results, and di- and tri-copper species have been suggested as active sites. Recently, small eight-membered ring (8MR) zeolites including SSZ-13, -16, and -39 have been shown to be active for methane oxidation, but the active sites and reaction mechanisms in these 8MR zeolites are not known. In this work, we use density functional theory (DFT) calculations to systematically evaluate monocopper species as active sites for the partial methane oxidationmore » reaction in Cu-exchanged SSZ-13. On the basis of kinetic and thermodynamic arguments, we suggest that [CuIIOH]+ species in the 8MR are responsible for the experimentally observed activity. Furthermore, our results successfully explain the available spectroscopic data and experimental observations including (i) the necessity of water for methanol extraction and (ii) the effect of Si/Al ratio on the catalyst activity. Monocopper species have not yet been suggested as an active site for the partial methane oxidation reaction, and our results suggest that [CuIIOH]+ active site may provide complementary routes for methane activation in zeolites in addition to the known [Cu–O–Cu]2+ and Cu3O3 motifs.« less

  9. Simultaneous Automatic Electrochemical Detection of Zinc, Cadmium, Copper and Lead Ions in Environmental Samples Using a Thin-Film Mercury Electrode and an Artificial Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Kudr, Jiri; Nguyen, Hoai Viet; Gumulec, Jaromir; Nejdl, Lukas; Blazkova, Iva; Ruttkay-Nedecky, Branislav; Hynek, David; Kynicky, Jindrich; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    In this study a device for automatic electrochemical analysis was designed. A three electrodes detection system was attached to a positioning device, which enabled us to move the electrode system from one well to another of a microtitre plate. Disposable carbon tip electrodes were used for Cd(II), Cu(II) and Pb(II) ion quantification, while Zn(II) did not give signal in this electrode configuration. In order to detect all mentioned heavy metals simultaneously, thin-film mercury electrodes (TFME) were fabricated by electrodeposition of mercury on the surface of carbon tips. In comparison with bare electrodes the TMFEs had lower detection limits and better sensitivity. In addition to pure aqueous heavy metal solutions, the assay was also performed on mineralized rock samples, artificial blood plasma samples and samples of chicken embryo organs treated with cadmium. An artificial neural network was created to evaluate the concentrations of the mentioned heavy metals correctly in mixture samples and an excellent fit was observed (R2 = 0.9933). PMID:25558996

  10. Simultaneous automatic electrochemical detection of zinc, cadmium, copper and lead ions in environmental samples using a thin-film mercury electrode and an artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Kudr, Jiri; Nguyen, Hoai Viet; Gumulec, Jaromir; Nejdl, Lukas; Blazkova, Iva; Ruttkay-Nedecky, Branislav; Hynek, David; Kynicky, Jindrich; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2014-12-30

    In this study a device for automatic electrochemical analysis was designed. A three electrodes detection system was attached to a positioning device, which enabled us to move the electrode system from one well to another of a microtitre plate. Disposable carbon tip electrodes were used for Cd(II), Cu(II) and Pb(II) ion quantification, while Zn(II) did not give signal in this electrode configuration. In order to detect all mentioned heavy metals simultaneously, thin-film mercury electrodes (TFME) were fabricated by electrodeposition of mercury on the surface of carbon tips. In comparison with bare electrodes the TMFEs had lower detection limits and better sensitivity. In addition to pure aqueous heavy metal solutions, the assay was also performed on mineralized rock samples, artificial blood plasma samples and samples of chicken embryo organs treated with cadmium. An artificial neural network was created to evaluate the concentrations of the mentioned heavy metals correctly in mixture samples and an excellent fit was observed (R2 = 0.9933).

  11. Sol-Gel Derived Mg-Based Ceramic Scaffolds Doped with Zinc or Copper Ions: Preliminary Results on Their Synthesis, Characterization, and Biocompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Theodorou, Georgios S.; Kontonasaki, Eleana; Theocharidou, Anna; Bakopoulou, Athina; Bousnaki, Maria; Hadjichristou, Christina; Papachristou, Eleni; Papadopoulou, Lambrini; Kantiranis, Nikolaos A.; Chrissafis, Konstantinos; Paraskevopoulos, Konstantinos M.; Koidis, Petros T.

    2016-01-01

    Glass-ceramic scaffolds containing Mg have shown recently the potential to enhance the proliferation, differentiation, and biomineralization of stem cells in vitro, property that makes them promising candidates for dental tissue regeneration. An additional property of a scaffold aimed at dental tissue regeneration is to protect the regeneration process against oral bacteria penetration. In this respect, novel bioactive scaffolds containing Mg2+ and Cu2+ or Zn2+, ions known for their antimicrobial properties, were synthesized by the foam replica technique and tested regarding their bioactive response in SBF, mechanical properties, degradation, and porosity. Finally their ability to support the attachment and long-term proliferation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells (DPSCs) was also evaluated. The results showed that conversely to their bioactive response in SBF solution, Zn-doped scaffolds proved to respond adequately regarding their mechanical strength and to be efficient regarding their biological response, in comparison to Cu-doped scaffolds, which makes them promising candidates for targeted dental stem cell odontogenic differentiation and calcified dental tissue engineering. PMID:26981124

  12. Preparation and formation mechanism of porous carbon nanosheets by thermal decomposition of polyvinyl alcohol films impregnated with zinc (II) and nitrate ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Kojima, Rikio; Sagisaka, Kento; Umeda, Motoki; Tanaka, Toshihisa; Kondo, Atsushi; Iiyama, Taku; Kimura, Mutsumi; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Touhara, Hidekazu

    2017-03-01

    Porous carbon nanosheets (PCNS) with high surface areas were prepared by thermal decomposition of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) films impregnated with Zn2+ and NO3-. Through this simple preparation method that required no additional activation processes, curved carbon nanosheets (<30 nm thick) were assembled into novel carbon materials. Detailed thermogravimetry-differential thermal analyses of the PVA films impregnated with Zn2+ and NO3- indicated that the sheet-like structures originated from exothermic pyrolysis of NO3- associated with the thermal decomposition of PVA. According to the nitrogen adsorption isotherm analyses at 77 K, the PCNS had a high specific surface area (>1600 m2 g-1) and bimodal pore structure consisting of micropores and mesopores. Because of their unique structural properties, the PCNS are attractive for use as electrode materials. The electrode performance of the PCNS was investigated in 1-M tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate ((C2H5)4NBF4) in propylene carbonate. The PCNS electrodes displayed high specific capacitance (86 F g-1 for cations and 115 F g-1 for anions). They also showed exceptionally high rate performance with ∼90% capacitance retention at current densities up to 2 A g-1 because their nanosheet structure allowed the rapid diffusion of ions inside the electrode.

  13. Cadmium and zinc relationships.

    PubMed

    Elinder, C G; Piscator, M

    1978-08-01

    Cadmium and zinc concentrations in kidney and liver have been measured under different exposure situations in different species including man. The results show that zinc increases almost equimolarly with cadmium in kidney after long-term low-level exposure to cadmium, e.g., in man, horse, pig, and lamb. In contrast, the increase of zinc follows that of cadmium to only a limited extent, e.g., in guinea pig, rabbit, rat, mouse, and chicks. In liver, the cadmium--zinc relationship seems to be reversed in such a way that zinc increases with cadmium more markedly in laboratory animals than in higher mammals. These differences between cadmium and zinc relationships in humans and large farm animals and those in commonly used laboratory animals must be considered carefully before experimental data on cadmium and zinc relationships in laboratory animals can be extrapolated to humans.

  14. Memo is homologous to nonheme iron dioxygenases and binds an ErbB2-derived phosphopeptide in its vestigial active site.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chen; Lienhard, Susanne; Hynes, Nancy E; Badache, Ali; Leahy, Daniel J

    2008-02-01

    Memo (mediator of ErbB2-driven cell motility) is a 297-amino-acid protein recently shown to co-precipitate with the C terminus of ErbB2 and be required for ErbB2-driven cell motility. Memo is not homologous to any known signaling proteins, and how it mediates ErbB2 signals is not known. To provide a molecular basis for understanding Memo function, we have determined and report here the 2.1A crystal structure of human Memo and show it be homologous to class III nonheme iron-dependent dioxygenases, a structural class that now includes a zinc-binding protein of unknown function. No metal binding or enzymatic activity can be detected for Memo, but Memo does bind directly to a specific ErbB2-derived phosphopeptide encompassing Tyr-1227 using its vestigial enzymatic active site. Memo thus represents a new class of phosphotyrosine-binding protein.

  15. Memo is Homologous to Nonheme Iron Dioxygenases and Binds an ErbB2-Derived Phosphopeptide in its Vestigial Active Site

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu,C.; Lienhard, S.; Hynes, N.; Badache, A.; Leahy, D.

    2008-01-01

    Memo (mediator of ErbB2-driven cell motility) is a 297-amino-acid protein recently shown to co-precipitate with the C terminus of ErbB2 and be required for ErbB2-driven cell motility. Memo is not homologous to any known signaling proteins, and how it mediates ErbB2 signals is not known. To provide a molecular basis for understanding Memo function, we have determined and report here the 2.1A crystal structure of human Memo and show it be homologous to class III nonheme iron-dependent dioxygenases, a structural class that now includes a zinc-binding protein of unknown function. No metal binding or enzymatic activity can be detected for Memo, but Memo does bind directly to a specific ErbB2-derived phosphopeptide encompassing Tyr-1227 using its vestigial enzymatic active site. Memo thus represents a new class of phosphotyrosine-binding protein.

  16. Conserved active site residues limit inhibition of a copper-containing nitrite reductase by small molecules.

    PubMed

    Tocheva, Elitza I; Eltis, Lindsay D; Murphy, Michael E P

    2008-04-15

    The interaction of copper-containing dissimilatory nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6 ( AfNiR) with each of five small molecules was studied using crystallography and steady-state kinetics. Structural studies revealed that each small molecule interacted with the oxidized catalytic type 2 copper of AfNiR. Three small molecules (formate, acetate and nitrate) mimic the substrate by having at least two oxygen atoms for bidentate coordination to the type 2 copper atom. These three anions bound to the copper ion in the same asymmetric, bidentate manner as nitrite. Consistent with their weak inhibition of the enzyme ( K i >50 mM), the Cu-O distances in these AfNiR-inhibitor complexes were approximately 0.15 A longer than that observed in the AfNiR-nitrite complex. The binding mode of each inhibitor is determined in part by steric interactions with the side chain of active site residue Ile257. Moreover, the side chain of Asp98, a conserved residue that hydrogen bonds to type 2 copper-bound nitrite and nitric oxide, was either disordered or pointed away from the inhibitors. Acetate and formate inhibited AfNiR in a mixed fashion, consistent with the occurrence of second acetate binding site in the AfNiR-acetate complex that occludes access to the type 2 copper. A fourth small molecule, nitrous oxide, bound to the oxidized metal in a side-on fashion reminiscent of nitric oxide to the reduced copper. Nevertheless, nitrous oxide bound at a farther distance from the metal. The fifth small molecule, azide, inhibited the reduction of nitrite by AfNiR most strongly ( K ic = 2.0 +/- 0.1 mM). This ligand bound to the type 2 copper center end-on with a Cu-N c distance of approximately 2 A, and was the only inhibitor to form a hydrogen bond with Asp98. Overall, the data substantiate the roles of Asp98 and Ile257 in discriminating substrate from other small anions.

  17. Conserved Active Site Residues Limit Inhibition of a Copper-Containing Nitrite By Small Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Tocheva, E.I.; Eltis, L.D.; Murphy, M.E.P.

    2009-05-26

    The interaction of copper-containing dissimilatory nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6 ( AfNiR) with each of five small molecules was studied using crystallography and steady-state kinetics. Structural studies revealed that each small molecule interacted with the oxidized catalytic type 2 copper of AfNiR. Three small molecules (formate, acetate and nitrate) mimic the substrate by having at least two oxygen atoms for bidentate coordination to the type 2 copper atom. These three anions bound to the copper ion in the same asymmetric, bidentate manner as nitrite. Consistent with their weak inhibition of the enzyme ( K i >50 mM), the Cu-O distances in these AfNiR-inhibitor complexes were approximately 0.15 A longer than that observed in the AfNiR-nitrite complex. The binding mode of each inhibitor is determined in part by steric interactions with the side chain of active site residue Ile257. Moreover, the side chain of Asp98, a conserved residue that hydrogen bonds to type 2 copper-bound nitrite and nitric oxide, was either disordered or pointed away from the inhibitors. Acetate and formate inhibited AfNiR in a mixed fashion, consistent with the occurrence of second acetate binding site in the AfNiR-acetate complex that occludes access to the type 2 copper. A fourth small molecule, nitrous oxide, bound to the oxidized metal in a side-on fashion reminiscent of nitric oxide to the reduced copper. Nevertheless, nitrous oxide bound at a farther distance from the metal. The fifth small molecule, azide, inhibited the reduction of nitrite by AfNiR most strongly ( K ic = 2.0 +/- 0.1 mM). This ligand bound to the type 2 copper center end-on with a Cu-N c distance of approximately 2 A, and was the only inhibitor to form a hydrogen bond with Asp98. Overall, the data substantiate the roles of Asp98 and Ile257 in discriminating substrate from other small anions.

  18. Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of heterodinuclear complexes modeling active sites in purple acid phospatases.

    PubMed

    Jarenmark, Martin; Haukka, Matti; Demeshko, Serhiy; Tuczek, Felix; Zuppiroli, Luca; Meyer, Franc; Nordlander, Ebbe

    2011-05-02

    To model the heterodinuclear active sites in plant purple acid phosphatases, a mononuclear synthon, [Fe(III)(H(2)IPCPMP)(Cl(2))][PF(6)] (1), has been generated in situ from the ligand 2-(N-isopropyl-N-((2-pyridyl)methyl)aminomethyl)-6-(N-(carboxylmethyl)-N-((2-pyridyl)methyl)amino methyl)-4-methylphenol (IPCPMP) and used to synthesize heterodinuclear complexes of the formulas [Fe(III)M(II)(IPCPMP)(OAc)(2)(CH(3)OH)][PF(6)] (M = Zn (2), Co (3), Ni (4), Mn (5)), [Fe(III)Zn(II)(IPCPMP)(mpdp)][PF(6)] (6) (mpdp = meta-phenylene-dipropionate), and [Fe(III)Cu(II)(IPCPMP) (OAc)}(2)(μ-O)][PF(6)] (7). Complexes 2-4, 6, and 7 have been crystallographically characterized. The structure of 6 is a solid state coordination polymer with heterodinuclear monomeric units, and 7 is a tetranuclear complex consisting of two heterodinuclear phenolate-bridged Fe(III)Cu(II) units bridged through a μ-oxido group between the two Fe(III) ions. Mössbauer spectra confirm the presence of high spin Fe(III) in an octahedral environment for 1, 3, and 5 while 2 and 4 display relaxation effects. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate weak antiferromagnetic coupling for 3, 4, and 5 and confirm the assignment of the metal centers in 2-5 as high spin Fe(III)-M(II) (M = Zn, Co (high spin), Ni (high spin), Mn (high spin)). Complexes 2-5 are intact in acetonitrile solution as indicated by IR spectroscopy (for 2-4) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) but partly dissociate to hydroxide species and a mononuclear complex in water/acetonitrile solutions. UV-vis spectroscopy reveal pH-dependent behavior, and species that form upon increasing the pH have been assigned to μ-hydroxido-bridged Fe(III)M(II) complexes for 2-5 although 2 and 3 is further transformed into what is propsed to be a μ-oxido-bridged tetranuclear complex similar to 7. Complexes 2-5 enhance phosphodiester cleavage of 2-hydroxy-propyl-p-nitrophenyl phosphate (HPNP) and bis(2,4-dinitrophenyl)phosphate (BDNPP), but

  19. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  20. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  1. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Mehta, Angad P.; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh H.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2015-03-27

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active site metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.

  2. Kinetics of nucleotide entry into RNA polymerase active site provides mechanism for efficiency and fidelity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Beibei; Sexton, Rachel E; Feig, Michael

    2017-04-01

    During transcription, RNA polymerase II elongates RNA by adding nucleotide triphosphates (NTPs) complementary to a DNA template. Structural studies have suggested that NTPs enter and exit the active site via the narrow secondary pore but details have remained unclear. A kinetic model is presented that integrates molecular dynamics simulations with experimental data. Previous simulations of trigger loop dynamics and the dynamics of matched and mismatched NTPs in and near the active site were combined with new simulations describing NTP exit from the active site via the secondary pore. Markov state analysis was applied to identify major states and estimate kinetic rates for transitions between those states. The kinetic model predicts elongation and misincorporation rates in close agreement with experiment and provides mechanistic hypotheses for how NTP entry and exit via the secondary pore is feasible and a key feature for achieving high elongation and low misincorporation rates during RNA elongation.

  3. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, Abhinav; Venkatachalam, Avanthika; Gideon, Daniel Andrew; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Cyanide (CN) is a well-studied toxic principle, known to inhibit heme-enzymes. • Inhibition is supposed to result from CN binding at the active site as a ligand. • Diverse heme enzymes’ CN inhibition profiles challenge prevailing mechanism. • Poor binding efficiency of CN at low enzyme concentrations and ligand pressures. • CN-based diffusible radicals cause ‘non-productive electron transfers’ (inhibition). - Abstract: The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins’ active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes.

  4. Fragment-based identification of determinants of conformational and spectroscopic change at the ricin active site

    SciTech Connect

    Carra,J.; McHugh, C.; Mulligan, S.; Machiesky, L.; Soares, A.; Millard, C.

    2007-01-01

    We found that amide ligands can bind weakly but specifically to the ricin active site, producing significant shifts in positions of the critical active site residues Arg180 and Tyr80. These results indicate that fragment-based drug discovery methods are capable of identifying minimal bonding determinants of active-site side-chain rearrangements and the mechanistic origins of spectroscopic shifts. Our results suggest that tryptophan fluorescence provides a sensitive probe for the geometric relationship of arginine-tryptophan pairs, which often have significant roles in protein function. Using the unusual characteristics of the RTA system, we measured the still controversial thermodynamic changes of site-specific urea binding to a protein, results that are relevant to understanding the physical mechanisms of protein denaturation.

  5. Denaturation studies of active-site labeled papain using electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Z A; Butterfiel, D A

    1991-01-01

    A spin-labeled p-chloromercuribenzoate (SL-PMB) and a fluorescence probe, 6-acryloyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (Acrylodan), both of which bind to the single SH group located in the active site of papain, were used to investigate the interaction of papain (EC 3.4.22.2) with two protein denaturants. It was found that the active site of papain was highly stable in urea solution, but underwent a large conformational change in guanidine hydrochloride solution. Electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence results were in agreement and both paralleled enzymatic activity of papain with respect to both the variation in pH and denaturation. These results strongly suggest that SL-PMB and Acrylodan labels can be used to characterize the physical state of the active site of the enzyme. PMID:1657229

  6. Crystal structures of human 3-hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-dioxygenase with native and non-native metals bound in the active site.

    PubMed

    Pidugu, Lakshmi Swarna Mukhi; Neu, Heather; Wong, Tin Lok; Pozharski, Edwin; Molloy, John L; Michel, Sarah L J; Toth, Eric A

    2017-04-01

    3-Hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-dioxygenase (3HAO) is an enzyme in the microglial branch of the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation. 3HAO is a non-heme iron-containing, ring-cleaving extradiol dioxygenase that catalyzes the addition of both atoms of O2 to the kynurenine pathway metabolite 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (3-HANA) to form quinolinic acid (QUIN). QUIN is a highly potent excitotoxin that has been implicated in a number of neurodegenerative conditions, making 3HAO a target for pharmacological downregulation. Here, the first crystal structure of human 3HAO with the native iron bound in its active site is presented, together with an additional structure with zinc (a known inhibitor of human 3HAO) bound in the active site. The metal-binding environment is examined both structurally and via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR). The studies identified Met35 as the source of potential new interactions with substrates and inhibitors, which may prove useful in future therapeutic efforts.

  7. Functional biomimetic models for the active site in the respiratory enzyme cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Collman, James P; Decréau, Richard A

    2008-11-07

    A functional analog of the active site in the respiratory enzyme, cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) reproduces every feature in CcO's active site: a myoglobin-like heme (heme a3), a distal tridentate imidazole copper complex (Cu(B)), a phenol (Tyr244), and a proximal imidazole. When covalently attached to a liquid-crystalline SAM film on an Au electrode, this functional model continuously catalyzes the selective four-electron reduction of dioxygen at physiological potential and pH, under rate-limiting electron flux (as occurs in CcO).

  8. Thermodynamics of binding of calcium, magnesium, and zinc to the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor ion channel peptidic inhibitors, conantokin-G and conantokin-T.

    PubMed

    Prorok, M; Castellino, F J

    1998-07-31

    The binding isotherms of the divalent metal cations, Ca2+, Mg2+, and Zn2+, to the synthetic gamma-carboxyglutamic acid-containing neuroactive peptides, conantokin-G (con-G) and conantokin-T (con-T), have been determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) at 25 degreesC and pH 6.5. We have previously shown by potentiometric measurements that con-G contains 2-3 equivalent Ca2+ sites with an average Kd value of 2800 microM. With Mg2+ as the ligand, two separate exothermic sites are obtained by ITC, one of Kd = 46 microM and another of Kd = 311 microM. Much tighter binding of Zn2+ is observed for these latter two sites (Kd values = 0.2 microM and 1.1 microM), and a third considerably weaker binding site is observed, characterized by a Kd value of 286 microM and an endothermic enthalpy of binding. con-T possesses a single exothermic tight binding site for Ca2+, Mg2+, and Zn2+, with Kd values of 428 microM, 10.2 microM, and 0.5 microM, respectively. Again, in the case of con-T, a weak (Kd = 410 microM) endothermic binding site is observed for Zn2+. The binding of these cations to con-G and con-T result in an increase in the alpha-helical content of the peptides. However, this helix is somewhat destabilized in both cases by binding of Zn2+ to its weakest site. Since the differences observed in binding affinities of these three cations to the peptides are substantially greater than their comparative Kd values to malonate, we conclude that the structure of the peptide and, most likely, the steric and geometric properties imposed on the cation site as a result of peptide folding greatly influence the strength of the interaction of cations with con-G and con-T. Further, since the Zn2+ concentrations released in the synaptic cleft during excitatory synaptic activity are sufficiently high relative to the Kd of Zn2+ for con-G and con-T, this cation along with Mg2+, are most likely the most significant metal ion ligands of these peptides in neuronal cells.

  9. The metzincins--topological and sequential relations between the astacins, adamalysins, serralysins, and matrixins (collagenases) define a superfamily of zinc-peptidases.

    PubMed Central

    Stöcker, W.; Grams, F.; Baumann, U.; Reinemer, P.; Gomis-Rüth, F. X.; McKay, D. B.; Bode, W.

    1995-01-01

    The three-dimensional structures of the zinc endopeptidases human neutrophil collagenase, adamalysin II from rattle snake venom, alkaline proteinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and astacin from crayfish are topologically similar, with respect to a five-stranded beta-sheet and three alpha-helices arranged in typical sequential order. The four proteins exhibit the characteristic consensus motif HEXXHXXGXXH, whose three histidine residues are involved in binding of the catalytically essential zinc ion. Moreover, they all share a conserved methionine residue beneath the active site metal as part of a superimposable "Met-turn." This structural relationship is supported by a sequence alignment performed on the basis of topological equivalence showing faint but distinct sequential similarity. The alkaline proteinase is about equally distant (26% sequence identity) to both human neutrophil collagenase and astacin and a little further away from adamalysin II (17% identity). The pairs astacin/adamalysin II, astacin/human neutrophil collagenase, and adamalysin II/human neutrophil collagenase exhibit sequence identities of 16%, 14%, and 13%, respectively. Therefore, the corresponding four distinct families of zinc peptidases, the astacins, the matrix metalloproteinases (matrixins, collagenases), the adamalysins/reprolysins (snake venom proteinases/reproductive tract proteins), and the serralysins (large bacterial proteases from Serratia, Erwinia, and Pseudomonas) appear to have originated by divergent evolution from a common ancestor and form a superfamily of proteolytic enzymes for which the designation "metzincins" has been proposed. There is also a faint but significant structural relationship of the metzincins to the thermolysin-like enzymes, which share the truncated zinc-binding motif HEXXH and, moreover, similar topologies in their N-terminal domains. PMID:7663339

  10. Zinc and prostatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Ho, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Aim to understand the connection between zinc and prostatic cancer, and to summarize the recent findings about the functions of zinc in the maintenance of prostate health. Recent findings Contradictory findings have been reported by epidemiologic studies examining the association between zinc intake and the risk of prostate cancer. However, a growing body of experimental evidence support that high zinc levels are essential for prostate health. The possible mechanisms include the effects of zinc on the inhibition of terminal oxidation, induction of mitochondrial apoptogenesis, and suppression of NFκB activity. The most recent finding is the effects of zinc in the maintenance of DNA integrity in normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) by modulating the expression and activity of DNA repair and damage response proteins, especially p53. Zinc depletion in PrEC increased p53 expression but compromised p53 DNA binding activity resulting an impaired DNA repair function. Moreover, recent findings support the role of zinc transporters as tumor suppressors in the prostate. Summary Future studies need to discover sensitive and specific zinc biomarkers and perform more in vivo studies on the effects of zinc on prostate functions in normal animals or prostate cancer models. PMID:19684515

  11. Angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2): comparative modeling of the active site, specificity requirements, and chloride dependence.

    PubMed

    Guy, Jodie L; Jackson, Richard M; Acharya, K Ravi; Sturrock, Edward D; Hooper, Nigel M; Turner, Anthony J

    2003-11-18

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a homologue of ACE, represents a new and potentially important target in cardio-renal disease. A model of the active site of ACE2, based on the crystal structure of testicular ACE, has been developed and indicates that the catalytic mechanism of ACE2 resembles that of ACE. Structural differences exist between the active site of ACE (dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase) and ACE2 (carboxypeptidase) that are responsible for the differences in specificity. The main differences occur in the ligand-binding pockets, particularly at the S2' subsite and in the binding of the peptide carboxy-terminus. The model explains why the classical ACE inhibitor lisinopril is unable to bind to ACE2. On the basis of the ability of ACE2 to cleave a variety of biologically active peptides, a consensus sequence of Pro-X-Pro-hydrophobic/basic for the protease specificity of ACE2 has been defined that is supported by the ACE2 model. The dipeptide, Pro-Phe, completely inhibits ACE2 activity at 180 microM with angiotensin II as the substrate. As with ACE, the chloride dependence of ACE2 is substrate-specific such that the hydrolysis of angiotensin I and the synthetic peptide substrate, Mca-APK(Dnp), are activated in the presence of chloride ions, whereas the cleavage of angiotensin II is inhibited. The ACE2 model is also suggestive of a possible mechanism for chloride activation. The structural insights provided by these analyses for the differences in inhibition pattern and substrate specificity among ACE and its homologue ACE2 and for the chloride dependence of ACE/ACE2 activity are valuable in understanding the function and regulation of ACE2.

  12. An enlarged, adaptable active site in CYP164 family P450 enzymes, the sole P450 in Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Agnew, Christopher R J; Warrilow, Andrew G S; Burton, Nicholas M; Lamb, David C; Kelly, Steven L; Brady, R Leo

    2012-01-01

    CYP164 family P450 enzymes are found in only a subset of mycobacteria and include CYP164A1, which is the sole P450 found in Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy. This has previously led to interest in this enzyme as a potential drug target. Here we describe the first crystal structure of a CYP164 enzyme, CYP164A2 from Mycobacterium smegmatis. CYP164A2 has a distinctive, enlarged hydrophobic active site that extends above the porphyrin ring toward the access channels. Unusually, we find that CYP164A2 can simultaneously bind two econazole molecules in different regions of the enlarged active site and is accompanied by the rearrangement and ordering of the BC loop. The primary location is through a classic interaction of the azole group with the porphyrin iron. The second econazole molecule is bound to a unique site and is linked to a tetracoordinated metal ion complexed to one of the heme carboxylates and to the side chains of His 105 and His 364. All of these features are preserved in the closely homologous M. leprae CYP164A1. The computational docking of azole compounds to a homology model of CYP164A1 suggests that these compounds will form effective inhibitors and is supported by the correlation of parallel docking with experimental binding studies of CYP164A2. The binding of econazole to CYP164A2 occurs primarily through the high-spin "open" conformation of the enzyme (K(d) [dissociation constant] of 0.1 μM), with binding to the low-spin "closed" form being significantly hindered (K(d) of 338 μM). These studies support previous suggestions that azole derivatives may provide an effective strategy to improve the treatment of leprosy.

  13. Structural Analysis of the Active Site Geometry of N[superscript 5]-Carboxyaminoimidazole Ribonucleotide Synthetase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Thoden, James B.; Holden, Hazel M.; Firestine, Steven M.

    2009-09-11

    N{sub 5}-Carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase (N{sub 5}-CAIR synthetase) converts 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR), MgATP, and bicarbonate into N{sub 5}-CAIR, MgADP, and P{sub i}. The enzyme is required for de novo purine biosynthesis in microbes yet is not found in humans suggesting that it represents an ideal and unexplored target for antimicrobial drug design. Here we report the X-ray structures of N{sub 5}-CAIR synthetase from Escherichia coli with either MgATP or MgADP/P{sub i} bound in the active site cleft. These structures, determined to 1.6-{angstrom} resolution, provide detailed information regarding the active site geometry before and after ATP hydrolysis. In both structures, two magnesium ions are observed. Each of these is octahedrally coordinated, and the carboxylate side chain of Glu238 bridges them. For the structure of the MgADP/P{sub i} complex, crystals were grown in the presence of AIR and MgATP. No electron density was observed for AIR, and the electron density corresponding to the nucleotide clearly revealed the presence of ADP and P{sub i} rather than ATP. The bound P{sub i} shifts by approximately 3 {angstrom} relative to the {gamma}-phosphoryl group of ATP and forms electrostatic interactions with the side chains of Arg242 and His244. Since the reaction mechanism of N{sub 5}-CAIR synthetase is believed to proceed via a carboxyphosphate intermediate, we propose that the location of the inorganic phosphate represents the binding site for stabilization of this reactive species. Using the information derived from the two structures reported here, coupled with molecular modeling, we propose a catalytic mechanism for N{sub 5}-CAIR synthetase.

  14. Probing the catalytic mechanism of bovine CD38/NAD+ glycohydrolase by site directed mutagenesis of key active site residues.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Isabelle; Kellenberger, Esther; Cakir-Kiefer, Céline; Muller-Steffner, Hélène; Schuber, Francis

    2014-07-01

    Bovine CD38/NAD(+) glycohydrolase catalyzes the hydrolysis of NAD(+) to nicotinamide and ADP-ribose and the formation of cyclic ADP-ribose via a stepwise reaction mechanism. Our recent crystallographic study of its Michaelis complex and covalently-trapped intermediates provided insights into the modalities of substrate binding and the molecular mechanism of bCD38. The aim of the present work was to determine the precise role of key conserved active site residues (Trp118, Glu138, Asp147, Trp181 and Glu218) by focusing mainly on the cleavage of the nicotinamide-ribosyl bond. We analyzed the kinetic parameters of mutants of these residues which reside within the bCD38 subdomain in the vicinity of the scissile bond of bound NAD(+). To address the reaction mechanism we also performed chemical rescue experiments with neutral (methanol) and ionic (azide, formate) nucleophiles. The crucial role of Glu218, which orients the substrate for cleavage by interacting with the N-ribosyl 2'-OH group of NAD(+), was highlighted. This contribution to catalysis accounts for almost half of the reaction energy barrier. Other contributions can be ascribed notably to Glu138 and Asp147 via ground-state destabilization and desolvation in the vicinity of the scissile bond. Key interactions with Trp118 and Trp181 were also proven to stabilize the ribooxocarbenium ion-like transition state. Altogether we propose that, as an alternative to a covalent acylal reaction intermediate with Glu218, catalysis by bCD38 proceeds through the formation of a discrete and transient ribooxocarbenium intermediate which is stabilized within the active site mostly by electrostatic interactions.

  15. [Zinc and type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Fukunaka, Ayako; Fujitani, Yoshio

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatic β cells contain the highest amount of zinc among cells within the human body, and hence, the relationship between zinc and diabetes has been a topic of great interest. While many studies demonstrating possible involvement of zinc deficiency in diabetes have been reported, precise mechanisms how zinc regulates glucose metabolism are still far from understood. Recent studies revealed that zinc can transmit signals that are driven by a variety of zinc transporters in a tissue and cell-type specific manner and deficiency in some zinc transporters may cause human diseases. Here, we review the role of zinc in metabolism particularly focusing on the emerging role of zinc transporters in diabetes.

  16. Zinc in Pancreatic Islet Biology, Insulin Sensitivity, and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Maret, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    About 20 chemical elements are nutritionally essential for humans with defined molecular functions. Several essential and nonessential biometals are either functional nutrients with antidiabetic actions or can be diabetogenic. A key question remains whether changes in the metabolism of biometals and biominerals are a consequence of diabetes or are involved in its etiology. Exploration of the roles of zinc (Zn) in this regard is most revealing because 80 years of scientific discoveries link zinc and diabetes. In pancreatic β- and α-cells, zinc has specific functions in the biochemistry of insulin and glucagon. When zinc ions are secreted during vesicular exocytosis, they have autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine roles. The membrane protein ZnT8 transports zinc ions into the insulin and glucagon granules. ZnT8 has a risk allele that predisposes the majority of humans to developing diabetes. In target tissues, increased availability of zinc enhances the insulin response by inhibiting protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, which controls the phosphorylation state of the insulin receptor and hence downstream signalling. Inherited diseases of zinc metabolism, environmental exposures that interfere with the control of cellular zinc homeostasis, and nutritional or conditioned zinc deficiency influence the patho-biochemistry of diabetes. Accepting the view that zinc is one of the many factors in multiple gene-environment interactions that cause the functional demise of β-cells generates an immense potential for treating and perhaps preventing diabetes. Personalized nutrition, bioactive food, and pharmaceuticals targeting the control of cellular zinc in precision medicine are among the possible interventions.

  17. Dynamics of the Active Sites of Dimeric Seryl tRNA Synthetase from Methanopyrus kandleri.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Saheb; Nandi, Nilashis

    2015-08-27

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) carry out the first step of protein biosynthesis. Several aaRSs are multimeric, and coordination between the dynamics of active sites present in each monomer is a prerequisite for the fast and accurate aminoacylation. However, important lacunae of understanding exist concerning the conformational dynamics of multimeric aaRSs. Questions remained unanswered pertaining to the dynamics of the active site. Little is known concerning the conformational dynamics of the active sites in response to the substrate binding, reorganization of the catalytic residues around reactants, time-dependent changes at the reaction center, which are essential for facilitating the nucleophilic attack, and interactions at the interface of neighboring monomers. In the present work, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of dimeric (mk)SerRS from Methanopyrus kandleri bound with tRNA using an explicit solvent system. Two dimeric states of seryl tRNA synthetase (open, substrate bound, and adenylate bound) and two monomeric states (open and substrate bound) are simulated with bound tRNA. The aim is to understand the conformational dynamics of (mk)SerRS during its reaction cycle. While the present results provide a clear dynamical perspective of the active sites of (mk)SerRS, they corroborate with the results from the time-averaged experimental data such as crystallographic and mutation analysis of methanogenic SerRS from M. kandleri and M. barkeri. It is observed from the present simulation that the motif 2 loop gates the active site and its Glu351 and Arg360 stabilizes ATP in a bent state favorable for nucleophilic attack. The flexibility of the walls of the active site gradually reduces near reaction center, which is a more organized region compared to the lid region. The motif 2 loop anchors Ser and ATP using Arg349 in a hydrogen bonded geometry crucial for nucleophilic attack and favorably influences the electrostatic potential at the

  18. The Molybdenum Active Site of Formate Dehydrogenase Is Capable of Catalyzing C-H Bond Cleavage and Oxygen Atom Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Tobias; Schrapers, Peer; Utesch, Tillmann; Nimtz, Manfred; Rippers, Yvonne; Dau, Holger; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Haumann, Michael; Leimkühler, Silke

    2016-04-26

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are capable of performing the reversible oxidation of formate and are enzymes of great interest for fuel cell applications and for the production of reduced carbon compounds as energy sources from CO2. Metal-containing FDHs in general contain a highly conserved active site, comprising a molybdenum (or tungsten) center coordinated by two molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide molecules, a sulfido and a (seleno-)cysteine ligand, in addition to a histidine and arginine residue in the second coordination sphere. So far, the role of these amino acids in catalysis has not been studied in detail, because of the lack of suitable expression systems and the lability or oxygen sensitivity of the enzymes. Here, the roles of these active site residues is revealed using the Mo-containing FDH from Rhodobacter capsulatus. Our results show that the cysteine ligand at the Mo ion is displaced by the formate substrate during the reaction, the arginine has a direct role in substrate binding and stabilization, and the histidine elevates the pKa of the active site cysteine. We further found that in addition to reversible formate oxidation, the enzyme is further capable of reducing nitrate to nitrite. We propose a mechanistic scheme that combines both functionalities and provides important insights into the distinct mechanisms of C-H bond cleavage and oxygen atom transfer catalyzed by formate dehydrogenase.

  19. Improved zinc electrode and rechargeable zinc-air battery

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, P.N. Jr.

    1988-06-21

    The invention comprises an improved rechargeable zinc-air cell/battery having recirculating alkaline electrolyte and a zinc electrode comprising a porous foam support material which carries the active zinc electrode material. 5 figs.

  20. Zinc Modulates Nanosilver-Induced Toxicity in Primary Neuronal Cultures.

    PubMed

    Ziemińska, Elżbieta; Strużyńska, Lidia

    2016-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles (NAg) have recently become one of the most commonly used nanomaterials. Since the ability of nanosilver to enter the brain has been confirmed, there has been a need to investigate mechanisms of its neurotoxicity. We previously showed that primary neuronal cultures treated with nanosilver undergo destabilization of calcium homeostasis via a mechanism involving glutamatergic NMDA receptors. Considering the fact that zinc interacts with these receptors, the aim of the present study was to examine the role of zinc in mechanisms of neuronal cell death in primary cultures. In cells treated with nanosilver, we noted an imbalance between extracellular and intracellular zinc levels. Thus, the influence of zinc deficiency and supplementation on nanosilver-evoked cytotoxicity was investigated by treatment with TPEN (a chelator of zinc ions), or ZnCl(2), respectively. Elimination of zinc leads to complete death of nanosilver-treated CGCs. In contrast, supplementation with ZnCl(2) increases viability of CGCs in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of zinc provided protection against the extra/intracellular calcium imbalance in a manner similar to MK-801, an antagonist of NMDA receptors. Zinc chelation by TPEN decreases the mitochondrial potential and dramatically increases the rate of production of reactive oxygen species. Our results indicate that zinc supplementation positively influences nanosilver-evoked changes in CGCs. This is presumed to be due to an inhibitory effect on NMDA-sensitive calcium channels.

  1. Zinc electrode and rechargeable zinc-air battery

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, P.N. Jr.

    1989-06-27

    This patent describes an improved zinc electrode for a rechargeable zinc-air battery comprising an outer frame and a porous foam electrode support within the frame which is treated prior to the deposition of zinc thereon to inhibit the formation of zinc dendrites on the external surface thereof. The outer frame is provided with passageways for circulating an alkaline electrolyte through the treated zinc-coated porous foam. A novel rechargeable zinc-air battery system is also disclosed.

  2. Zinc in Entamoeba invadens.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, R. S.; Sattilaro, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectroscopy, electron microprobe analysis, and dithizone staining of trophozoites and cysts of Entamoeba invadens demonstrate that these cells have a high concentration of zinc (approximately one picogram per cell or 1% of their dry weight). In the cysts of this organism, the zinc is confined to the chromatoid bodies, which previous work has shown to contain crystals of ribosomes. The chemical state and function of this zinc are unknown.

  3. Structural and Kinetic Analyses of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Active Site Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Crichlow, G.; Lubetsky, J; Leng, L; Bucala, R; Lolis, E

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a secreted protein expressed in numerous cell types that counters the antiinflammatory effects of glucocorticoids and has been implicated in sepsis, cancer, and certain autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the structure of MIF contains a catalytic site resembling the tautomerase/isomerase sites of microbial enzymes. While bona fide physiological substrates remain unknown, model substrates have been identified. Selected compounds that bind in the tautomerase active site also inhibit biological functions of MIF. It had previously been shown that the acetaminophen metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), covalently binds to the active site of MIF. In this study, kinetic data indicate that NAPQI inhibits MIF both covalently and noncovalently. The structure of MIF cocrystallized with NAPQI reveals that the NAPQI has undergone a chemical alteration forming an acetaminophen dimer (bi-APAP) and binds noncovalently to MIF at the mouth of the active site. We also find that the commonly used protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), forms a covalent complex with MIF and inhibits the tautomerase activity. Crystallographic analysis reveals the formation of a stable, novel covalent bond for PMSF between the catalytic nitrogen of the N-terminal proline and the sulfur of PMSF with complete, well-defined electron density in all three active sites of the MIF homotrimer. Conclusions are drawn from the structures of these two MIF-inhibitor complexes regarding the design of novel compounds that may provide more potent reversible and irreversible inhibition of MIF.

  4. Substrate shuttling between active sites of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase is not required to generate coproporphyrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, John D.; Warby, Christy A.; Whitby, Frank G.; Kushner, James P.; Hill, Christopher P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase (URO-D; EC 4.1.1.37), the fifth enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, is required for the production of heme, vitamin B12, siroheme, and chlorophyll precursors. URO-D catalyzes the sequential decarboxylation of the four acetate side chains on the pyrrole groups of uroporphyrinogen to produce coproporphyrinogen. URO-D is a stable homodimer with the active site clefts of the two subunits adjacent to each other. It has been hypothesized that the two catalytic centers interact functionally, perhaps by shuttling of reaction intermediates between subunits. We tested this hypothesis by construction of a single chain protein (scURO-D) in which the two subunits were connected by a flexible linker. The crystal structure of this protein was shown to be superimposible with wild-type activity and have comparable catalytic activity. Mutations that impaired one or the other of the two active sites of scURO-D resulted in approximately half of wild-type activity. The distribution of reaction intermediates was the same for mutant and wild-type sequences, and was unaltered in a competition experiment using the I and III isomer substrates. These observations indicate that communication between active sites is not required for enzyme function, and suggest that the dimeric structure of URO-D is required to achieve conformational stability and create a large active site cleft. PMID:19362562

  5. Substrate Shuttling Between Active Sites of Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase in Not Required to Generate Coproporphyrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.; Warby, C; Whitby, F; Kushner, J; Hill, C

    2009-01-01

    Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D; EC 4.1.1.37), the fifth enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, is required for the production of heme, vitamin B12, siroheme, and chlorophyll precursors. URO-D catalyzes the sequential decarboxylation of four acetate side chains in the pyrrole groups of uroporphyrinogen to produce coproporphyrinogen. URO-D is a stable homodimer, with the active-site clefts of the two subunits adjacent to each other. It has been hypothesized that the two catalytic centers interact functionally, perhaps by shuttling of reaction intermediates between subunits. We tested this hypothesis by construction of a single-chain protein (single-chain URO-D) in which the two subunits were connected by a flexible linker. The crystal structure of this protein was shown to be superimposable with wild-type activity and to have comparable catalytic activity. Mutations that impaired one or the other of the two active sites of single-chain URO-D resulted in approximately half of wild-type activity. The distributions of reaction intermediates were the same for mutant and wild-type sequences and were unaltered in a competition experiment using I and III isomer substrates. These observations indicate that communication between active sites is not required for enzyme function and suggest that the dimeric structure of URO-D is required to achieve conformational stability and to create a large active-site cleft.

  6. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  7. In silico analysis of Pycnoporus cinnabarinus laccase active site with toxic industrial dyes.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Nirmal K; Vindal, Vaibhav; Narayana, Siva Lakshmi; Ramakrishna, V; Kunal, Swaraj Priyaranjan; Srinivas, M

    2012-05-01

    Laccases belong to multicopper oxidases, a widespread class of enzymes implicated in many oxidative functions in various industrial oxidative processes like production of fine chemicals to bioremediation of contaminated soil and water. In order to understand the mechanisms of substrate binding and interaction between substrates and Pycnoporus cinnabarinus laccase, a homology model was generated. The resulted model was further validated and used for docking studies with toxic industrial dyes- acid blue 74, reactive black 5 and reactive blue 19. Interactions of chemical mediators with the laccase was also examined. The docking analysis showed that the active site always cannot accommodate the dye molecules, due to constricted nature of the active site pocket and steric hindrance of the residues whereas mediators are relatively small and can easily be accommodated into the active site pocket, which, thereafter leads to the productive binding. The binding properties of these compounds along with identification of critical active site residues can be used for further site-directed mutagenesis experiments in order to identify their role in activity and substrate specificity, ultimately leading to improved mutants for degradation of these toxic compounds.

  8. The active site of cytochrome P-450 nifedipine oxidase: a model-building study.

    PubMed

    Ferenczy, G G; Morris, G M

    1989-12-01

    A model of the active site of cytochrome P-450 nifedipine oxidase is built on the basis of sequence homology with cytochrome P-450CAM. Substrates are docked into the binding pocket, and molecular mechanical energy minimization is performed to analyze the forces between the substrates and the enzyme.

  9. Zinc and Chlamydia trachomatis

    SciTech Connect

    Sugarman, B.; Epps, L.R.

    1985-07-01

    Zinc was noted to have significant effects upon the infection of McCoy cells by each of two strains of Chlamydia trachomatis. With a high or low Chlamydia inoculant, the number of infected cells increased up to 200% utilizing supplemental zinc (up to 1 x 10/sup -4/ M) in the inoculation media compared with standard Chlamydia cultivation media (8 x 10/sup -6/ M zinc). Ferric chloride and calcium chloride did not effect any such changes. Higher concentrations of zinc, after 2 hr of incubation with Chlamydia, significantly decreased the number of inclusions. This direct effect of zinc on the Chlamydia remained constant after further repassage of the Chlamydia without supplemental zinc, suggesting a lethal effect of the zinc. Supplemental zinc (up to 10/sup -4/ M) may prove to be a useful addition to inoculation media to increase the yield of culturing for Chlamydia trachomatis. Similarly, topical or oral zinc preparations used by people may alter their susceptibility to Chamydia trachomatis infections.

  10. Zinc: An Essential Micronutrient

    PubMed Central

    SAPER, ROBERT B.; RASH, REBECCA

    2009-01-01

    Zinc is an essential micronutrient for human metabolism that catalyzes more than 100 enzymes, facilitates protein folding, and helps regulate gene expression. Patients with malnutrition, alcoholism, inflammatory bowel disease, and malabsorption syndromes are at an increased risk of zinc deficiency. Symptoms of zinc deficiency are nonspecific, including growth retardation, diarrhea, alopecia, glossitis, nail dystrophy, decreased immunity, and hypogonadism in males. In developing countries, zinc supplementation may be effective for the prevention of upper respiratory infection and diarrhea, and as an adjunct treatment for diarrhea in malnourished children. Zinc in combination with antioxidants may be modestly effective in slowing the progression of intermediate and advanced age-related macular degeneration. Zinc is an effective treatment for Wilson disease. Current data do not support zinc supplementation as effective for upper respiratory infection, wound healing, or human immunodeficiency virus. Zinc is well tolerated at recommended dosages. Adverse effects of long-term high-dose zinc use include suppressed immunity, decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, anemia, copper deficiency, and possible genitourinary complications. PMID:20141096

  11. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of RNase H Activity of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase by RNase H Active Site-Directed Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hua-Poo; Yan, Youwei; Prasad, G. Sridhar; Smith, Robert F.; Daniels, Christopher L.; Abeywickrema, Pravien D.; Reid, John C.; Loughran, H. Marie; Kornienko, Maria; Sharma, Sujata; Grobler, Jay A.; Xu, Bei; Sardana, Vinod; Allison, Timothy J.; Williams, Peter D.; Darke, Paul L.; Hazuda, Daria J.; Munshi, Sanjeev

    2010-09-02

    HIV/AIDS continues to be a menace to public health. Several drugs currently on the market have successfully improved the ability to manage the viral burden in infected patients. However, new drugs are needed to combat the rapid emergence of mutated forms of the virus that are resistant to existing therapies. Currently, approved drugs target three of the four major enzyme activities encoded by the virus that are critical to the HIV life cycle. Although a number of inhibitors of HIV RNase H activity have been reported, few inhibit by directly engaging the RNase H active site. Here, we describe structures of naphthyridinone-containing inhibitors bound to the RNase H active site. This class of compounds binds to the active site via two metal ions that are coordinated by catalytic site residues, D443, E478, D498, and D549. The directionality of the naphthyridinone pharmacophore is restricted by the ordering of D549 and H539 in the RNase H domain. In addition, one of the naphthyridinone-based compounds was found to bind at a second site close to the polymerase active site and non-nucleoside/nucleotide inhibitor sites in a metal-independent manner. Further characterization, using fluorescence-based thermal denaturation and a crystal structure of the isolated RNase H domain reveals that this compound can also bind the RNase H site and retains the metal-dependent binding mode of this class of molecules. These structures provide a means for structurally guided design of novel RNase H inhibitors.

  12. A Variable Active Site Residue Influences the Kinetics of Response Regulator Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Immormino, Robert M; Silversmith, Ruth E; Bourret, Robert B

    2016-10-04

    Two-component regulatory systems, minimally composed of a sensor kinase and a response regulator protein, are common mediators of signal transduction in microorganisms. All response regulators contain a receiver domain with conserved active site residues that catalyze the signal activating and deactivating phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions. We explored the impact of variable active site position T+1 (one residue C-terminal to the conserved Thr/Ser) on reaction kinetics and signaling fidelity, using wild type and mutant Escherichia coli CheY, CheB, and NarL to represent the three major sequence classes observed across response regulators: Ala/Gly, Ser/Thr, and Val/Ile/Met, respectively, at T+1. Biochemical and structural data together suggested that different amino acids at T+1 impacted reaction kinetics by altering access to the active site while not perturbing overall protein structure. A given amino acid at position T+1 had similar effects on autodephosphorylation in each protein background tested, likely by modulating access of the attacking water molecule to the active site. Similarly, rate constants for CheY autophosphorylation with three different small molecule phosphodonors were consistent with the steric constraints on access to the phosphorylation site arising from combination of specific phosphodonors with particular amino acids at T+1. Because other variable active site residues also influence response regulator phosphorylation biochemistry, we began to explore how context (here, the amino acid at T+2) affected the influence of position T+1 on CheY autocatalytic reactions. Finally, position T+1 affected the fidelity and kinetics of phosphotransfer between sensor kinases and response regulators but was not a primary determinant of their interaction.

  13. Wobble Pairs of the HDV Ribozyme Play Specific Roles in Stabilization of Active Site Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sripathi, Kamali N.; Banáš, Pavel; Reblova, Kamila; Šponer, Jiři; Otyepka, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is the only known human pathogen whose genome contains a catalytic RNA motif (ribozyme). The overall architecture of the HDV ribozyme is that of a double-nested pseudoknot, with two GU pairs flanking the active site. Although extensive studies have shown that mutation of either wobble results in decreased catalytic activity, little work has focused on linking these mutations to specific structural effects on catalytic fitness. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations based on an activated structure to probe the active site dynamics as a result of wobble pair mutations. In both wild-type and mutant ribozymes, the in-line fitness of the active site (as a measure of catalytic proficiency) strongly depends on the presence of a C75(N3H3+)N1(O5′) hydrogen bond, which positions C75 as the general acid for the reaction. Our mutational analyses show that each GU wobble supports catalytically fit conformations in distinct ways; the reverse G25U20 wobble promotes high in-line fitness, high occupancy of the C75(N3H3+)G1(O5′) general-acid hydrogen bond and stabilization of the G1U37 wobble, while the G1U37 wobble acts more locally by stabilizing high in-line fitness and the C75(N3H3+)G1(O5′) hydrogen bond. We also find that stable type I A-minor and P1.1 hydrogen bonding above and below the active site, respectively, prevent local structural disorder from spreading and disrupting global conformation. Taken together, our results define specific, often redundant architectural roles for several structural motifs of the HDV ribozyme active site, expanding the known roles of these motifs within all HDV-like ribozymes and other structured RNAs. PMID:25631765

  14. Chelating ionic liquids for reversible zinc electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Kar, Mega; Winther-Jensen, Bjorn; Forsyth, Maria; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2013-05-21

    Advanced, high energy-density, metal-air rechargeable batteries, such as zinc-air, are of intense international interest due to their important role in energy storage applications such as electric and hybrid vehicles, and to their ability to deal with the intermittency of renewable energy sources such as solar and wind. Ionic liquids offer a number of ideal thermal and physical properties as potential electrolytes in such large-scale energy storage applications. We describe here the synthesis and characterisation of a family of novel "chelating" ILs designed to chelate and solubilize the zinc ions to create electrolytes for this type of battery. These are based on quaternary alkoxy alkyl ammonium cations of varying oligo-ether side chains and anions such as p-toluene sulfonate, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide and dicyanoamides. This work shows that increasing the ether chain length in the cation from two to four oxygens can increase the ionic conductivity and reduce the melting point from 67 °C to 15 °C for the tosylate system. Changing the anion also plays a significant role in the nature of the zinc deposition electrochemistry. We show that zinc can be reversibly deposited from [N(222(20201))][NTf2] and [N(222(202020201))][NTf2] beginning at -1.4 V and -1.7 V vs. SHE, respectively, but not in the case of tosylate based ILs. This indicates that the [NTf2] is a weaker coordinating anion with the zinc cation, compared to the tosylate anion, allowing the coordination of the ether chain to dominate the behavior of the deposition and stripping of zinc ions.

  15. Parametrization of DFTB3/3OB for Magnesium and Zinc for Chemical and Biological Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the parametrization of the approximate density functional theory, DFTB3, for magnesium and zinc for chemical and biological applications. The parametrization strategy follows that established in previous work that parametrized several key main group elements (O, N, C, H, P, and S). This 3OB set of parameters can thus be used to study many chemical and biochemical systems. The parameters are benchmarked using both gas-phase and condensed-phase systems. The gas-phase results are compared to DFT (mostly B3LYP), ab initio (MP2 and G3B3), and PM6, as well as to a previous DFTB parametrization (MIO). The results indicate that DFTB3/3OB is particularly successful at predicting structures, including rather complex dinuclear metalloenzyme active sites, while being semiquantitative (with a typical mean absolute deviation (MAD) of ∼3–5 kcal/mol) for energetics. Single-point calculations with high-level quantum mechanics (QM) methods generally lead to very satisfying (a typical MAD of ∼1 kcal/mol) energetic properties. DFTB3/MM simulations for solution and two enzyme systems also lead to encouraging structural and energetic properties in comparison to available experimental data. The remaining limitations of DFTB3, such as the treatment of interaction between metal ions and highly charged/polarizable ligands, are also discussed. PMID:25178644

  16. [Zinc and chronic enteropathies].

    PubMed

    Giorgi, P L; Catassi, C; Guerrieri, A

    1984-01-01

    In recent years the nutritional importance of zinc has been well established; its deficiency and its symptoms have also been recognized in humans. Furthermore, Acrodermatitis Enteropathica has been isolated, a rare but severe disease, of which skin lesions, chronic diarrhoea and recurring infections are the main symptoms. The disease is related to the malfunctioning of intestinal absorption of zinc and can be treated by administering pharmacological doses of zinc orally. Good dietary sources of zinc are meat, fish and, to a less extent, human milk. The amount of zinc absorbed in the small intestine is influenced by other nutrients: some compounds inhibit this process (dietary fiber, phytate) while others (picolinic acid, citric acid), referred to as Zn-binding ligands (ZnBL) facilitate it. Citric acid is thought to be the ligand which accounts for the high level of bioavailability of zinc in human milk. zinc absorption occurs throughout the small intestine, not only in the prossimal tract (duodenum and jejunum) but also in the distal tract (ileum). Diarrhoea is one of the clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency, thus many illnesses distinguished by chronic diarrhoea entail a bad absorption of zinc. In fact, in some cases of chronic enteropathies in infants, like coeliac disease and seldom cystic fibrosis, a deficiency of zinc has been isolated. Some of the symptoms of Crohn's disease, like retarded growth and hypogonadism, have been related to hypozinchemia which is present in this illness. Finally, it is possible that some of the dietary treatments frequently used for persistent post-enteritis diarrhoea (i.e. cow's milk exclusion, abuse and misuse of dietary fiber like carrot and carub powder, use of soy formula) can constitute a scarce supply of zinc and therefore could promote the persistency of diarrhoea itself.

  17. Zinc pyrithione impairs zinc homeostasis and upregulates stress response gene expression in reconstructed human epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Lamore, Sarah D.

    2014-01-01

    Zinc ion homeostasis plays an important role in human cutaneous biology where it is involved in epidermal differentiation and barrier function, inflammatory and antimicrobial regulation, and wound healing. Zinc-based compounds designed for topical delivery therefore represent an important class of cutaneous therapeutics. Zinc pyrithione (ZnPT) is an FDA-approved microbicidal agent used worldwide in over-the-counter topical antimicrobials, and has also been examined as an investigational therapeutic targeting psoriasis and UVB-induced epidermal hyperplasia. Recently, we have demonstrated that cultured primary human skin keratinocytes display an exquisite sensitivity to nanomolar ZnPT concentrations causing induction of heat shock response gene expression and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-dependent cell death (Cell Stress Chaperones 15:309–322, 2010). Here we demonstrate that ZnPT causes rapid accumulation of intracellular zinc in primary keratinocytes as observed by quantitative fluorescence microscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and that PARP activation, energy crisis, and genomic impairment are all antagonized by zinc chelation. In epidermal reconstructs (EpiDerm™) exposed to topical ZnPT (0.1–2% in Vanicream™), ICP-MS demonstrated rapid zinc accumulation, and expression array analysis demonstrated upregulation of stress response genes encoding metallothionein-2A (MT2A), heat shock proteins (HSPA6, HSPA1A, HSPB5, HSPA1L, DNAJA1, HSPH1, HSPD1, HSPE1), antioxidants (SOD2, GSTM3, HMOX1), and the cell cycle inhibitor p21 (CDKN1A). IHC analysis of ZnPT-treated EpiDerm™ confirmed upregulation of Hsp70 and TUNEL-positivity. Taken together our data demonstrate that ZnPT impairs zinc ion homeostasis and upregulates stress response gene expression in primary keratinocytes and reconstructed human epidermis, activities that may underlie therapeutic and toxicological effects of this topical drug. PMID:21424779

  18. Zinc pyrithione impairs zinc homeostasis and upregulates stress response gene expression in reconstructed human epidermis.

    PubMed

    Lamore, Sarah D; Wondrak, Georg T

    2011-10-01

    Zinc ion homeostasis plays an important role in human cutaneous biology where it is involved in epidermal differentiation and barrier function, inflammatory and antimicrobial regulation, and wound healing. Zinc-based compounds designed for topical delivery therefore represent an important class of cutaneous therapeutics. Zinc pyrithione (ZnPT) is an FDA-approved microbicidal agent used worldwide in over-the-counter topical antimicrobials, and has also been examined as an investigational therapeutic targeting psoriasis and UVB-induced epidermal hyperplasia. Recently, we have demonstrated that cultured primary human skin keratinocytes display an exquisite sensitivity to nanomolar ZnPT concentrations causing induction of heat shock response gene expression and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-dependent cell death (Cell Stress Chaperones 15:309-322, 2010). Here we demonstrate that ZnPT causes rapid accumulation of intracellular zinc in primary keratinocytes as observed by quantitative fluorescence microscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and that PARP activation, energy crisis, and genomic impairment are all antagonized by zinc chelation. In epidermal reconstructs (EpiDerm™) exposed to topical ZnPT (0.1-2% in Vanicream™), ICP-MS demonstrated rapid zinc accumulation, and expression array analysis demonstrated upregulation of stress response genes encoding metallothionein-2A (MT2A), heat shock proteins (HSPA6, HSPA1A, HSPB5, HSPA1L, DNAJA1, HSPH1, HSPD1, HSPE1), antioxidants (SOD2, GSTM3, HMOX1), and the cell cycle inhibitor p21 (CDKN1A). IHC analysis of ZnPT-treated EpiDerm™ confirmed upregulation of Hsp70 and TUNEL-positivity. Taken together our data demonstrate that ZnPT impairs zinc ion homeostasis and upregulates stress response gene expression in primary keratinocytes and reconstructed human epidermis, activities that may underlie therapeutic and toxicological effects of this topical drug.

  19. Crystallographic Analysis of Active Site Contributions to Regiospecificity in the Diiron Enzyme Toluene 4-Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Lucas J.; Acheson, Justin F.; McCoy, Jason G.; Elsen, Nathaniel L.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Fox, Brian G.

    2014-10-02

    Crystal structures of toluene 4-monooxygenase hydroxylase in complex with reaction products and effector protein reveal active site interactions leading to regiospecificity. Complexes with phenolic products yield an asymmetric {mu}-phenoxo-bridged diiron center and a shift of diiron ligand E231 into a hydrogen bonding position with conserved T201. In contrast, complexes with inhibitors p-NH{sub 2}-benzoate and p-Br-benzoate showed a {mu}-1,1 coordination of carboxylate oxygen between the iron atoms and only a partial shift in the position of E231. Among active site residues, F176 trapped the aromatic ring of products against a surface of the active site cavity formed by G103, E104 and A107, while F196 positioned the aromatic ring against this surface via a {pi}-stacking interaction. The proximity of G103 and F176 to the para substituent of the substrate aromatic ring and the structure of G103L T4moHD suggest how changes in regiospecificity arise from mutations at G103. Although effector protein binding produced significant shifts in the positions of residues along the outer portion of the active site (T201, N202, and Q228) and in some iron ligands (E231 and E197), surprisingly minor shifts (<1 {angstrom}) were produced in F176, F196, and other interior residues of the active site. Likewise, products bound to the diiron center in either the presence or absence of effector protein did not significantly shift the position of the interior residues, suggesting that positioning of the cognate substrates will not be strongly influenced by effector protein binding. Thus, changes in product distributions in the absence of the effector protein are proposed to arise from differences in rates of chemical steps of the reaction relative to motion of substrates within the active site channel of the uncomplexed, less efficient enzyme, while structural changes in diiron ligand geometry associated with cycling between diferrous and diferric states are discussed for their potential

  20. New active site oriented glyoxyl-agarose derivatives of Escherichia coli penicillin G acylase

    PubMed Central

    Cecchini, Davide A; Serra, Immacolata; Ubiali, Daniela; Terreni, Marco; Albertini, Alessandra M

    2007-01-01

    Background Immobilized Penicillin G Acylase (PGA) derivatives are biocatalysts that are industrially used for the hydrolysis of Penicillin G by fermentation and for the kinetically controlled synthesis of semi-synthetic β-lactam antibiotics. One of the most used supports for immobilization is glyoxyl-activated agarose, which binds the protein by reacting through its superficial Lys residues. Since in E. coli PGA Lys are also present near the active site, an immobilization that occurs through these residues may negatively affect the performance of the biocatalyst due to the difficult diffusion of the substrate into the active site. A preferential orientation of the enzyme with the active site far from the support surface would be desirable to avoid this problem. Results Here we report how it is possible to induce a preferential orientation of the protein during the binding process on aldehyde activated supports. A superficial region of PGA, which is located on the opposite side of the active site, is enriched in its Lys content. The binding of the enzyme onto the support is consequently forced through the Lys rich region, thus leaving the active site fully accessible to the substrate. Different mutants with an increasing number of Lys have been designed and, when active, immobilized onto glyoxyl agarose. The synthetic performances of these new catalysts were compared with those of the immobilized wild-type (wt) PGA. Our results show that, while the synthetic performance of the wt PGA sensitively decreases after immobilization, the Lys enriched mutants have similar performances to the free enzyme even after immobilization. We also report the observations made with other mutants which were unable to undergo a successful maturation process for the production of active enzymes or which resulted toxic for the host cell. Conclusion The desired orientation of immobilized PGA with the active site freely accessible can be obtained by increasing the density of Lys residues

  1. LiZIP3 is a cellular zinc transporter that mediates the tightly regulated import of zinc in Leishmania infantum parasites

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Sandra; da Silva, Rosa Barreira; Shawki, Ali; Castro, Helena; Lamy, Márcia; Eide, David; Costa, Vítor; Mackenzie, Bryan; Tomás, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cellular zinc homeostasis ensures that the intracellular concentration of this element is kept within limits that enable its participation in critical physiological processes without exerting toxic effects. We report here the identification and characterization of the first mediator of zinc homeostasis in Leishmania infantum, LiZIP3, a member of the ZIP family of divalent metal-ion transporters. The zinc transporter activity of LiZIP3 was first disclosed by its capacity to rescue the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains deficient in zinc acquisition. Subsequent expression of LiZIP3 in Xenopus laevis oocytes was shown to stimulate the uptake of a broad range of metal ions, among which Zn2+ was the preferred LiZIP3 substrate (K0.5 ≈ 0.1 μM). Evidence that LiZIP3 functions as a zinc importer in L. infantum came from the observations that the protein locates to the cell membrane and that its overexpression leads to augmented zinc internalization. Importantly, expression and cell-surface location of LiZIP3 are lost when parasites face high zinc bioavailability. LiZIP3 decline in response to zinc is regulated at the mRNA level in a process involving (a) short-lived protein(s). Collectively, our data reveal that LiZIP3 enables L. infantum to acquire zinc in a highly regulated manner, hence contributing to zinc homeostasis. PMID:25644708

  2. Preparation of zinc orthotitanate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, D. W.; Gilligan, J. E.; Harada, Y.; Logan, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    Use of decomposable precursors to enhance zinc oxide-titanium dioxide reaction and rapid fixing results in rapid preparation of zinc orthotitanate powder pigment. Preparation process allows production under less stringent conditions. Elimination of powder grinding results in purer that is less susceptible to color degradation.

  3. Reversible zinc-induced injuries to erythrocyte membrane nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Chernysh, A M; Kozlova, E K; Moroz, V V; Sergunova, V A; Gudkova, O Ye; Fedorova, M S

    2012-11-01

    Zinc-induced injuries to red blood cell membrane nanostructures at different zinc concentrations were studied by atomic force microscopy. In order to distinguish the intrinsic characteristics of membrane nanostructures, the membrane surfaces were represented by three orders using 3D Fourier transform. Increasing the concentrations of zinc ions modified the pattern of induced injuries: their depths and diameters and their number on the membrane surface test area increased. The injuries and their distribution for each order of membrane surface were analyzed. Albumin restored membrane nanosurface.

  4. Bioavailability of zinc in runoff water from roofing materials.

    PubMed

    Heijerick, D G; Janssen, C R; Karlèn, C; Wallinder, I Odnevall; Leygraf, C

    2002-06-01

    Corrosion and runoff from zinc-coated materials and outdoor structures is an important source for the dispersion of zinc in the environment. Being part of a large inter-disciplinary research project, this study presents the bioavailability of zinc in runoff water immediately after release from the surface of 15 different commercially available zinc-based materials exposed to the urban environment of Stockholm, Sweden. Runoff water was analysed chemically and evaluated for its possible environmental impact, using both a biosensor test with the bacteria Alcaligenes eutrophus (Biomet) and the conventional 72 h growth inhibition test with the green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata. Chemical speciation modelling revealed that most zinc (94.3-99.9%) was present as the free Zn ion, the most bioavailable speciation form. These findings were confirmed by the results of the biosensor test (Biomet) which indicated that all zinc was indeed bioavailable. Analysis of the ecotoxicity data also suggested that the observed toxic effects were due to the presence of Zn2+ ions. Finally, regression analysis showed that, for this type of runoff samples, the rapid screening biosensor was capable of predicting (a) the total amount of zinc present in the runoff samples (R2 of 0.93-0.98; p < 0.05) and (b) the observed 72 h-EbC50s (R2 of 0.69-0.97; p < 0.05).

  5. Specific potassium ion interactions facilitate homocysteine binding to betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Mládková, Jana; Hladílková, Jana; Diamond, Carrie E; Tryon, Katherine; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Garrow, Timothy A; Jungwirth, Pavel; Koutmos, Markos; Jiráček, Jiří

    2014-10-01

    Betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) is a zinc-dependent methyltransferase that uses betaine as the methyl donor for the remethylation of homocysteine to form methionine. This reaction supports S-adenosylmethionine biosynthesis, which is required for hundreds of methylation reactions in humans. Herein we report that BHMT is activated by potassium ions with an apparent K(M) for K⁺ of about 100 µM. The presence of potassium ions lowers the apparent K(M) of the enzyme for homocysteine, but it does not affect the apparent K(M) for betaine or the apparent k(cat) for either substrate. We employed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to theoretically predict and protein crystallography to experimentally localize the binding site(s) for potassium ion(s). Simulations predicted that K⁺ ion would interact with residues Asp26 and/or Glu159. Our crystal structure of BHMT bound to homocysteine confirms these sites of interaction and reveals further contacts between K⁺ ion and BHMT residues Gly27, Gln72, Gln247, and Gly298. The potassium binding residues in BHMT partially overlap with the previously identified DGG (Asp26-Gly27-Gly28) fingerprint in the Pfam 02574 group of methyltransferases. Subsequent biochemical characterization of several site-specific BHMT mutants confirmed the results obtained by the MD simulations and crystallographic data. Together, the data herein indicate that the role of potassium ions in BHMT is structural and that potassium ion facilitates the specific binding of homocysteine to the active site of the enzyme.

  6. Protective role of intracellular zinc in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion is associated with preservation of protein kinase C isoforms.

    PubMed

    Karagulova, Gulnura; Yue, Yuankun; Moreyra, Abel; Boutjdir, Mohamed; Korichneva, Irina

    2007-05-01

    The recent discovery of zinc signals and their essential role in the redox signaling network implies that zinc homeostasis and the function of zinc-containing proteins are probably altered as a result of oxidative stress, suggesting new targets for pharmacological intervention. We hypothesized that the level of intracellular labile zinc is changed in hearts subjected to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and investigated whether the maintenance of myocardial zinc status protected heart functions. Using fluorescent imaging, we demonstrated decreased levels of labile zinc in the I/R hearts. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a known trigger of zinc release, liberated zinc ions in control hearts but failed to produce any increase in zinc levels in the I/R rat hearts. Adding the zinc ionophore pyrithione at reperfusion improved myocardial recovery up to 100% and reduced the incidence of arrhythmias more than 2-fold. This effect was dose-dependent, and high concentrations of zinc were toxic. Adding membrane-impermeable zinc chloride was ineffective. Hearts from rats receiving zinc pyrithione supplements in their diet fully recovered from I/R. The recovery was associated with the prevention of degradation of the two protein kinase C isoforms, delta and epsilon, during I/R. In conclusion, our results suggest a protective role of intracellular zinc in myocardial recovery from oxidative stress imposed by I/R. The data support the potential clinical use of zinc ionophores in the settings of acute redox stress in the heart.

  7. Radioisotopic studies concerning the efficacy of standard washing procedures for the cleansing of hair before zinc analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, R.A.; Dreosti, I.E.

    1984-10-01

    Various standard procedures were investigated in relation to the removal of exogenously applied 65Zn from human hair and endogenously incorporated 65Zn from rat hair. Human hair was found to adsorb zinc and a variety of other metal ions from aqueous solutions in a manner which suggested some ion-exchange capacity. Uptake of zinc varied considerably between human hair samples, but in most cases accumulation of zinc occurred rapidly and often resulted in hair zinc levels several-fold higher than found in control samples. Extraction of zinc and other metal ions was greatest after treatment with disodium EDTA and sodium lauryl sulfate than after washing with water or aqueous Triton X-100. However, no procedure effectively removed all exogenous zinc, while all treatments extracted varying proportions of the endogenous zinc component. Because of the inability of standard washing procedures to remove exogenous zinc without reducing endogenous or indicator zinc levels, use of hair zinc analyses to indicate nutritional zinc status are inadvisable if hair zinc contamination is likely to have occurred.

  8. Zinc Chloride and Zinc Acetate Injected into the Neostriatum Produce Opposite Effect on Locomotor Behavior of Rats.

    PubMed

    Yakimovskii, A F; Kryzhanovskaya, S Yu

    2015-12-01

    Zinc chloride and zinc acetate solutions injected in a dose of 1 μg into the rostral neostriatum produced opposite effect on locomotor behavior of rats. Zink chloride disturbed conditioned avoidance and reduced spontaneous motor activity. Zink acetate virtually did not modify avoidance behavior and stimulated motor activity with elements of motor stereotypy. It was hypothesized that important factors here were the relationship between the effect and the level of metal released after salt dissociation and different reactivity of the synaptic substrate of the neostriatum to the presence of zinc ions.

  9. Synthesis of supported bimetallic nanoparticles with controlled size and composition distributions for active site elucidation

    SciTech Connect

    Hakim, Sikander H.; Sener, Canan; Alba Rubio, Ana C.; Gostanian, Thomas M.; O'neill, Brandon J; Ribeiro, Fabio H.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Dumesic, James A

    2015-08-01

    Elucidation of active sites in supported bimetallic catalysts is complicated by the high level of dispersity in the nanoparticle size and composition that is inherent in conventional methods of catalyst preparation. We present a synthesis strategy that leads to highly dispersed, bimetallic nanoparticles with uniform particle size and composition by means of controlled surface reactions. We demonstrate the synthesis of three systems, RhMo, PtMo, and RhRe, consisting of a highly reducible metal with an oxophilic promoter. These catalysts are characterized by FTIR, CO chemisorption, STEM/EDS, TPR, and XAS analysis. The catalytic properties of these bimetallic nanoparticles were probed for the selective CO hydrogenolysis of (hydroxymethyl)tetrahydropyran to produce 1,6 hexanediol. Based on the characterization results and reactivity trends, the active sites in the hydrogenolysis reaction are identified to be small ensembles of the more noble metal (Rh, Pt) adjacent to highly reduced moieties of the more oxophilic metal (Mo, Re).

  10. Mutations inducing an active-site aperture in Rhizobium sp. sucrose isomerase confer hydrolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Lipski, Alexandra; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Ravaud, Stéphanie; Robert, Xavier; Rhimi, Moez; Haser, Richard; Mattes, Ralf; Aghajari, Nushin

    2013-02-01

    Sucrose isomerase is an enzyme that catalyzes the production of sucrose isomers of high biotechnological and pharmaceutical interest. Owing to the complexity of the chemical synthesis of these isomers, isomaltulose and trehalulose, enzymatic conversion remains the preferred method for obtaining these products. Depending on the microbial source, the ratio of the sucrose-isomer products varies significantly. In studies aimed at understanding and explaining the underlying molecular mechanisms of these reactions, mutations obtained using a random-mutagenesis approach displayed a major hydrolytic activity. Two of these variants, R284C and F164L, of sucrose isomerase from Rhizobium sp. were therefore crystallized and their crystal structures were determined. The three-dimensional structures of these mutants allowed the identification of the molecular determinants that favour hydrolytic activity compared with transferase activity. Substantial conformational changes resulting in an active-site opening were observed, as were changes in the pattern of water molecules bordering the active-site region.

  11. Dynamics and Mechanism of Efficient DNA Repair Reviewed by Active-Site Mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chuang; Liu, Zheyun; Li, Jiang; Guo, Xunmin; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2010-06-01

    Photolyases repair the UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in damage DNA via a photoreaction which includes a series of light-driven electron transfers between the two-electron-reduced flavin cofactor FADH^- and the dimer. We report here our systematic studies of the repair dynamics in E. coli photolyase with mutation of several active-site residues. With femtosecond resolution, we observed the significant change in the forward electron transfer from the excited FADH^- to the dimer and the back electron transfer from the repaired thymines by mutation of E274A, R226A, R342A, N378S and N378C. We also found that the mutation of E274A accelerates the bond-breaking of the thymine dimer. The dynamics changes are consistent with the quantum yield study of these mutants. These results suggest that the active-site residues play a significant role, structurally and chemically, in the DNA repair photocycle.

  12. Docking and molecular dynamics studies at trypanothione reductase and glutathione reductase active sites.

    PubMed

    Iribarne, Federico; Paulino, Margot; Aguilera, Sara; Murphy, Miguel; Tapia, Orlando

    2002-05-01

    A theoretical docking study on the active sites of trypanothione reductase (TR) and glutathione reductase (GR) with the corresponding natural substrates, trypanothione disulfide (T[S]2) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), is reported. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in order to check the robustness of the docking results. The energetic results are in agreement with previous experimental findings and show the crossed complexes have lower stabilization energies than the natural ones. To test DOCK3.5, four nitro furanic compounds, previously designed as potentially active anti-chagasic molecules, were docked at the GR and TR active sites with the DOCK3.5 procedure. A good correlation was found between differential inhibitory activity and relative interaction energy (affinity). The results provide a validation test for the use of DOCK3.5 in connection with the design of anti-chagasic drugs.

  13. Extreme electric fields power catalysis in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase.

    PubMed

    Fried, Stephen D; Bagchi, Sayan; Boxer, Steven G

    2014-12-19

    Enzymes use protein architecture to impose specific electrostatic fields onto their bound substrates, but the magnitude and catalytic effect of these electric fields have proven difficult to quantify with standard experimental approaches. Using vibrational Stark effect spectroscopy, we found that the active site of the enzyme ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) exerts an extremely large electric field onto the C=O chemical bond that undergoes a charge rearrangement in KSI's rate-determining step. Moreover, we found that the magnitude of the electric field exerted by the active site strongly correlates with the enzyme's catalytic rate enhancement, enabling us to quantify the fraction of the catalytic effect that is electrostatic in origin. The measurements described here may help explain the role of electrostatics in many other enzymes and biomolecular systems.

  14. An Active Site Water Network in the Plasminogen Activator Pla from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-08-13

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 {angstrom}. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  15. 13C-Methyl isocyanide as an NMR probe for cytochrome P450 active sites

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Christopher R.; Pullela, Phani Kumar; Im, Sang-Choul; Waskell, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    The cytochromes P450 (CYPs) play a central role in many biologically important oxidation reactions, including the metabolism of drugs and other xenobiotic compounds. Because they are often assayed as both drug targets and anti-targets, any tools that provide: (a) confirmation of active site binding and (b) structural data, would be of great utility, especially if data could be obtained in reasonably high throughput. To this end, we have developed an analog of the promiscuous heme ligand, cyanide, with a 13CH3-reporter attached. This 13C-methyl isocyanide ligand binds to bacterial (P450cam) and membrane-bound mammalian (CYP2B4) CYPs. It can be used in a rapid 1D experiment to identify binders, and provides a qualitative measure of structural changes in the active site. PMID:19199046

  16. An active site water network in the plasminogen activator pla from Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-07-14

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 A. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  17. Computation of Rate Constants for Diffusion of Small Ligands to and from Buried Protein Active Sites.

    PubMed

    Wang, P-H; De Sancho, D; Best, R B; Blumberger, J

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of ligands to actives sites of proteins is essential to enzyme catalysis and many cellular signaling processes. In this contribution we review our recently developed methodology for calculation of rate constants for diffusion and binding of small molecules to buried protein active sites. The diffusive dynamics of the ligand obtained from molecular dynamics simulation is coarse grained and described by a Markov state model. Diffusion and binding rate constants are then obtained either from the reactive flux formalism or by fitting the time-dependent population of the Markov state model to a phenomenological rate law. The method is illustrated by applications to diffusion of substrate and inhibitors in [NiFe] hydrogenase, CO-dehydrogenase, and myoglobin. We also discuss a recently developed sensitivity analysis that allows one to identify hot spots in proteins, where mutations are expected to have the strongest effects on ligand diffusion rates.

  18. A split active site couples cap recognition by Dcp2 to activation

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N.; Jones, Brittnee N.; Hernandez, Gail A.; Gross, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Decapping by Dcp2 is an essential step in 5′-3′ mRNA decay. In yeast, decapping requires an open-to-closed transition in Dcp2, though the link between closure and catalysis remains elusive. Here we show using NMR that cap binds conserved residues on both the catalytic and regulatory domains of Dcp2. Lesions in the cap-binding site on the regulatory domain reduce the catalytic step two orders of magnitude and block formation of the closed state whereas Dcp1 enhances the catalytic step by a factor of ten and promotes closure. We conclude that closure occurs during the rate-limiting catalytic step of decapping, juxtaposing the cap-binding region of each domain to form a composite active site. This work suggests a model for regulation of decapping, where coactivators trigger decapping by stabilizing a labile composite active site. PMID:20711189

  19. Controlling activation site density by low-energy far-field stimulation in cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Hörning, Marcel; Takagi, Seiji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2012-06-01

    Tachycardia and fibrillation are potentially fatal arrhythmias associated with the formation of rotating spiral waves in the heart. Presently, the termination of these types of arrhythmia is achieved by use of antitachycardia pacing or cardioversion. However, these techniques have serious drawbacks, in that they either have limited application or produce undesirable side effects. Low-energy far-field stimulation has recently been proposed as a superior therapy. This proposed therapeutic method would exploit the phenomenon in which the application of low-energy far-field shocks induces a large number of activation sites ("virtual electrodes") in tissue. It has been found that the formation of such sites can lead to the termination of undesired states in the heart and the restoration of normal beating. In this study we investigate a particular aspect of this method. Here we seek to determine how the activation site density depends on the applied electric field through in vitro experiments carried out on neonatal rat cardiac tissue cultures. The results indicate that the activation site density increases exponentially as a function of the intracellular conductivity and the level of cell isotropy. Additionally, we report numerical results obtained from bidomain simulations of the Beeler-Reuter model that are quantitatively consistent with our experimental results. Also, we derive an intuitive analytical framework that describes the activation site density and provides useful information for determining the ratio of longitudinal to transverse conductivity in a cardiac tissue culture. The results obtained here should be useful in the development of an actual therapeutic method based on low-energy far-field pacing. In addition, they provide a deeper understanding of the intrinsic properties of cardiac cells.

  20. Human 15-LOX-1 active site mutations alter inhibitor binding and decrease potency.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Michelle; van Hoorebeke, Christopher; Horn, Thomas; Deschamps, Joshua; Freedman, J Cody; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Jacobson, Matthew P; Holman, Theodore

    2016-11-01

    Human 15-lipoxygenase-1 (h15-LOX-1 or h12/15-LOX) reacts with polyunsaturated fatty acids and produces bioactive lipid derivatives that are implicated in many important human diseases. One such disease is stroke, which is the fifth leading cause of death and the first leading cause of disability in America. The discovery of h15-LOX-1 inhibitors could potentially lead to novel therapeutics in the treatment of stroke, however, little is known about the inhibitor/active site interaction. This study utilizes site-directed mutagenesis, guided in part by molecular modeling, to gain a better structural understanding of inhibitor interactions within the active site. We have generated eight mutants (R402L, R404L, F414I, F414W, E356Q, Q547L, L407A, I417A) of h15-LOX-1 to determine whether these active site residues interact with two h15-LOX-1 inhibitors, ML351 and an ML094 derivative, compound 18. IC50 values and steady-state inhibition kinetics were determined for the eight mutants, with four of the mutants affecting inhibitor potency relative to wild type h15-LOX-1 (F414I, F414W, E356Q and L407A). The data indicate that ML351 and compound 18, bind in a similar manner in the active site to an aromatic pocket close to F414 but have subtle differences in their specific binding modes. This information establishes the binding mode for ML094 and ML351 and will be leveraged to develop next-generation inhibitors.

  1. Controlling activation site density by low-energy far-field stimulation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörning, Marcel; Takagi, Seiji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2012-06-01

    Tachycardia and fibrillation are potentially fatal arrhythmias associated with the formation of rotating spiral waves in the heart. Presently, the termination of these types of arrhythmia is achieved by use of antitachycardia pacing or cardioversion. However, these techniques have serious drawbacks, in that they either have limited application or produce undesirable side effects. Low-energy far-field stimulation has recently been proposed as a superior therapy. This proposed therapeutic method would exploit the phenomenon in which the application of low-energy far-field shocks induces a large number of activation sites (“virtual electrodes”) in tissue. It has been found that the formation of such sites can lead to the termination of undesired states in the heart and the restoration of normal beating. In this study we investigate a particular aspect of this method. Here we seek to determine how the activation site density depends on the applied electric field through in vitro experiments carried out on neonatal rat cardiac tissue cultures. The results indicate that the activation site density increases exponentially as a function of the intracellular conductivity and the level of cell isotropy. Additionally, we report numerical results obtained from bidomain simulations of the Beeler-Reuter model that are quantitatively consistent with our experimental results. Also, we derive an intuitive analytical framework that describes the activation site density and provides useful information for determining the ratio of longitudinal to transverse conductivity in a cardiac tissue culture. The results obtained here should be useful in the development of an actual therapeutic method based on low-energy far-field pacing. In addition, they provide a deeper understanding of the intrinsic properties of cardiac cells.

  2. BIOPHYSICS. Comment on "Extreme electric fields power catalysis in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase".

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Aditya; Yabukarski, Filip; Lamba, Vandana; Schwans, Jason P; Sunden, Fanny; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-08-28

    Fried et al. (Reports, 19 December 2014, p. 1510) demonstrated a strong correlation between reaction rate and the carbonyl stretching frequency of a product analog bound to ketosteroid isomerase oxyanion hole mutants and concluded that the active-site electric field provides 70% of catalysis. Alternative comparisons suggest a smaller contribution, relative to the corresponding solution reaction, and highlight the importance of atomic-level descriptions.

  3. Systematic mutagenesis of the active site omega loop of TEM-1 beta-lactamase.

    PubMed Central

    Petrosino, J F; Palzkill, T

    1996-01-01

    Beta-Lactamase is a bacterial protein that provides resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics. TEM-1 beta-lactamase is the most prevalent plasmid-mediated beta-lactamase in gram-negative bacteria. Normally, this enzyme has high levels of hydrolytic activity for penicillins, but mutant beta-lactamases have evolved with activity toward a variety of beta-lactam antibiotics. It has been shown that active site substitutions are responsible for changes in the substrate specificity. Since mutant beta-lactamases pose a serious threat to antimicrobial therapy, the mechanisms by which mutations can alter the substrate specificity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase are of interest. Previously, screens of random libraries encompassing 31 of 55 active site amino acid positions enabled the identification of the residues responsible for maintaining the substrate specificity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase. In addition to substitutions found in clinical isolates, many other specificity-altering mutations were also identified. Interestingly, many nonspecific substitutions in the N-terminal half of the active site omega loop were found to increase ceftazidime hydrolytic activity and decrease ampicillin hydrolytic activity. To complete the active sight study, eight additional random libraries were constructed and screened for specificity-altering mutations. All additional substitutions found to alter the substrate specificity were located in the C-terminal half of the active site loop. These mutants, much like the N-terminal omega loop mutants, appear to be less stable than the wild-type enzyme. Further analysis of a 165-YYG-167 triple mutant, selected for high levels of ceftazidime hydrolytic activity, provides an example of the correlation which exists between enzyme instability and increased ceftazidime hydrolytic activity in the ceftazidime-selected omega loop mutants. PMID:8606154

  4. The surface chemistry of heterogeneous catalysis: mechanisms, selectivity, and active sites.

    PubMed

    Zaera, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    The role of chemical kinetics in defining the requirements for the active sites of heterogeneous catalysts is discussed. A personal view is presented, with specific examples from our laboratory to illustrate the role of the chemical composition, structure, and electronic properties of specific surface sites in determining reaction activity and selectivity. Manipulation of catalytic behavior via the addition of chemical modifiers and by tuning of the reaction conditions is also introduced.

  5. Analysis of Hydrogen Tunneling in an Enzyme Active Site using von Neumann Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, Isaiah; Iyengar, Srinivasan S.

    2010-01-01

    We build on our earlier quantum wavepacket study of hydrogen transfer in the biological enzyme, soybean lipoxygenase-1, by using von Neumann quantum measurement theory to gain qualitative insights into the transfer event. We treat the enzyme active site as a measurement device which acts on the tunneling hydrogen nucleus via the potential it exerts at each configuration. A series of changing active site geometries during the tunneling process effects a sequential projection of the initial, reactant state onto the final, product state. We study this process using several different kinds of von Neumann measurements and show how a discrete sequence of such measurements not only progressively increases the projection of the hydrogen nuclear wavepacket onto the product side but also favors proton over deuteron transfer. Several qualitative features of the hydrogen tunneling problem found in wavepacket dynamics studies are also recovered here. These include the shift in the “transition state” towards the reactant as a result of nuclear quantization, greater participation of excited states in the case of deuterium, and presence of critical points along the reaction coordinate that facilitate hydrogen and deuterium transfer and coincide with surface crossings. To further “tailor” the dynamics, we construct a perturbation to the sequence of measurements, that is a perturbation to the dynamical sequence of active site geometry evolution, which leads us to insight on the existence of sensitive regions of the reaction profile where subtle changes to the dynamics of the active site can have an effect on the hydrogen and deuterium transfer process. PMID:22933858

  6. Effect of chromium oxide as active site over TiO2-PILC for selective catalytic oxidation of NO.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingxin; Zhang, Shule; Cai, Wei; Zhong, Qin

    2013-12-01

    This study introduced TiO2-pillared clays (TiO2-PILC) as a support for the catalytic oxidation of NO and analyzed the performance of chromium oxides as the active site of the oxidation process. Cr-based catalysts were prepared by a wet impregnation method. It was found that the 10 wt.% chromium doping on the support achieved the best catalytic activity. At 350 degrees C, the NO conversion was 61% under conditions of GHSV = 23600 hr(-1). The BET data showed that the support particles had a mesoporous structure. H2-TPR showed that Cr(10)TiP (10 wt.% Cr doping on TiO2-PILC) clearly exhibited a smooth single peak. EPR and XPS were used to elucidate the oxidation process. During the NO + O2 adsorption, the intensity of evolution of superoxide ions (O2(-)) increased. The content of Cr3+ on the surface of the used catalyst was 40.37%, but when the used catalyst continued adsorbing NO, the Cr3+ increased to 50.28%. Additionally, O(alpha)/O(beta) increased markedly through the oxidation process. The NO conversion decreased when SO2 was added into the system, but when the SO2 was removed, the catalytic activity recovered almost up to the initial level. FT-IR spectra did not show a distinct characteristic peak of SO4(2-).

  7. Evidence for the Role of Active Site Residues in the Hairpin Ribozyme from Molecular Simulations along the Reaction Path

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The hairpin ribozyme accelerates a phosphoryl transfer reaction without catalytic participation of divalent metal ions. Residues A38 and G8 have been implicated as playing roles in general acid and base catalysis, respectively. Here we explore the structure and dynamics of key active site residues using more than 1 μs of molecular dynamics simulations of the hairpin ribozyme at different stages along the catalytic pathway. Analysis of results indicates hydrogen bond interactions between the nucleophile and proR nonbridging oxygen are correlated with active inline attack conformations. Further, the simulation results suggest a possible alternative role for G8 to promote inline fitness and facilitate activation of the nucleophile by hydrogen bonding, although this does not necessarily exclude an additional role as a general base. Finally, we suggest that substitution of G8 with N7- or N3-deazaguanosine which have elevated pKa values, both with and without thio modifications at the 5′ leaving group position, would provide valuable insight into the specific role of G8 in catalysis. PMID:24842535

  8. Redesigning the active site of transaldolase TalB from Escherichia coli: new variants with improved affinity towards nonphosphorylated substrates.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Sarah; Gutiérrez, Mariana; Sandalova, Tatyana; Schneider, Gunter; Clapés, Pere; Sprenger, Georg A; Samland, Anne K

    2010-03-22

    Recently, we reported on a transaldolase B variant (TalB F178Y) that is able to use dihydroxyacetone (DHA) as donor in aldol reactions. In a second round of protein engineering, we aimed at improving the affinity of this variant towards nonphosphorylated acceptor aldehydes, that is, glyceraldehyde (GA). The anion binding site was identified in the X-ray structure of TalB F178Y where a sulfate ion from the buffer was bound in the active site. Therefore, we performed site-directed saturation mutagenesis at three residues forming the putative phosphate binding site, Arg181, Ser226 and Arg228. The focused libraries were screened for the formation of D-fructose from DHA and d,l-GA by using an adjusted colour assay. The best results with respect to the synthesis of D-fructose were achieved with the TalB F178Y/R181E variant, which exhibited an at least fivefold increase in affinity towards d,l-GA (K(M)=24 mM). We demonstrated that this double mutant can use D-GA, glycolaldehyde and the L-isomer, L-GA, as acceptor substrates. This resulted in preparative synthesis of D-fructose, D-xylulose and L-sorbose when DHA was used as donor. Hence, we engineered a DHA-dependent aldolase that can synthesise the formation of polyhydroxylated compounds from simple and cheap substrates at preparative scale.

  9. Structural role of the active-site metal in the conformation of Trypanosoma brucei phosphoglycerate mutase.

    PubMed

    Mercaldi, Gustavo F; Pereira, Humberto M; Cordeiro, Artur T; Michels, Paul A M; Thiemann, Otavio H

    2012-06-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutases (PGAMs) participate in both the glycolytic and the gluconeogenic pathways in reversible isomerization of 3-phosphoglycerate and 2-phosphoglycerate. PGAMs are members of two distinct protein families: enzymes that are dependent on or independent of the 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate cofactor. We determined the X-ray structure of the monomeric Trypanosoma brucei independent PGAM (TbiPGAM) in its apoenzyme form, and confirmed this observation by small angle X-ray scattering data. Comparing the TbiPGAM structure with the Leishmania mexicana independent PGAM structure, previously reported with a phosphoglycerate molecule bound to the active site, revealed the domain movement resulting from active site occupation. The structure reported here shows the interaction between Asp319 and the metal bound to the active site, and its contribution to the domain movement. Substitution of the metal-binding residue Asp319 by Ala resulted in complete loss of independent PGAM activity, and showed for the first time its involvement in the enzyme's function. As TbiPGAM is an attractive molecular target for drug development, the apoenzyme conformation described here provides opportunities for its use in structure-based drug design approaches. Database Structural data for the Trypanosoma brucei 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate-independent phosphoglycerate mutase (iPGAM) has been deposited with the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB) Protein Data Bank under code 3NVL.

  10. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Mehta, Angad P.; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh H.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2015-03-01

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5‧-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active site metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.

  11. Substrate conformational transitions in the active site of chorismate mutase: their role in the catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Guo, H; Cui, Q; Lipscomb, W N; Karplus, M

    2001-07-31

    Chorismate mutase acts at the first branch-point of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis and catalyzes the conversion of chorismate to prephenate. The results of molecular dynamics simulations of the substrate in solution and in the active site of chorismate mutase are reported. Two nonreactive conformers of chorismate are found to be more stable than the reactive pseudodiaxial chair conformer in solution. It is shown by QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations, which take into account the motions of the enzyme, that when these inactive conformers are bound to the active site, they are rapidly converted to the reactive chair conformer. This result suggests that one contribution of the enzyme is to bind the more prevalent nonreactive conformers and transform them into the active form in a step before the chemical reaction. The motion of the reactive chair conformer in the active site calculated by using the QM/MM potential generates transient structures that are closer to the transition state than is the stable CHAIR conformer.

  12. Substrate-binding specificity of chitinase and chitosanase as revealed by active-site architecture analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shijia; Shao, Shangjin; Li, Linlin; Cheng, Zhi; Tian, Li; Gao, Peiji; Wang, Lushan

    2015-12-11

    Chitinases and chitosanases, referred to as chitinolytic enzymes, are two important categories of glycoside hydrolases (GH) that play a key role in degrading chitin and chitosan, two naturally abundant polysaccharides. Here, we investigate the active site architecture of the major chitosanase (GH8, GH46) and chitinase families (GH18, GH19). Both charged (Glu, His, Arg, Asp) and aromatic amino acids (Tyr, Trp, Phe) are observed with higher frequency within chitinolytic active sites as compared to elsewhere in the enzyme structure, indicating significant roles related to enzyme function. Hydrogen bonds between chitinolytic enzymes and the substrate C2 functional groups, i.e. amino groups and N-acetyl groups, drive substrate recognition, while non-specific CH-π interactions between aromatic residues and substrate mainly contribute to tighter binding and enhanced pr