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Sample records for actively bleeding peptic

  1. Endoscopic Management of Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min

    2015-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods. PMID:25844337

  2. Endoscopic management of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min; Kim, Byung-Wook

    2015-03-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods.

  3. Endoscopic management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yidan; Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the indications, technical aspects, and comparative effectiveness of the endoscopic treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by peptic ulcer. Pre-endoscopic considerations, such as the use of prokinetics and timing of endoscopy, are reviewed. In addition, this article examines aspects of postendoscopic care such as the effectiveness, dosing, and duration of postendoscopic proton-pump inhibitors, Helicobacter pylori testing, and benefits of treatment in terms of preventing rebleeding; and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet agents, and oral anticoagulants, including direct thrombin and Xa inhibitors, following acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

  4. Photocoagulation in the treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Wlodzimierz; Paczkowski, Pawel M.

    1996-03-01

    The authors present their experience in the endoscopic laser photocoagulation of bleeding peptic ulcer. From 1991 to June 1995, 203 patients admitted for UGI bleeding from peptic ulcer have been treated by this method. The source of bleeding was confirmed by endoscopy. The patients were divided into two groups: actively bleeding peptic ulcer (group IA and IB according to Forrest's classification) and ulcer with stigmata of recent bleeding (group IIA/IIB). The former group consisted of 106 patients, among whom over 40 percent (45 patients) presented signs of hypovolemic shock on admission. Nd:YAG laser (Surgical Laser Technologies) was used in a continuous mode with a contact (8 - 20 watts) or non-contact (over 50 watts) method of coagulation. In actively bleeding patients photocoagulation resulted in stopping the hemorrhage in 95 (90%). Recurrent bleeding occurred in 16 cases; in 9 of them it was stopped by repeated photocoagulation. In this group 18 patients required surgical intervention. The mortality was of 10.3% (11 patients). In 97 patients with recent bleeding stigmata photocoagulation provoked heavy hemorrhage in 3 (in 2 cases stopped by prolonged coagulation). In 9 of the remaining 94 patients recurrent bleeding occurred. Nine patients required surgical intervention. Mortality in this group was of 6%.

  5. Endoscopic Obliteration for Bleeding Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Zawadzki, J.J. J.; Gajda, A.G. G.; Kamiński, P. Ł.; Lembas, L.; Bielecki, K.

    1997-01-01

    A group of 133 patients treated for bleeding peptic ulcer in our Department, is reviewed. Within several hours of admission, all patients underwent upper gastrointestinal tract gastroscopy and obliteration of the bleeding ulcer. Bleeding gastric ulcers were found in 41 patients, and duodenal ulcers in 92 patients. Patients were classified according to the Forrest scale: IA – 11 patients, IB – 49 patients, IIA – 35 patients, lIB – 40 patients. In 126 (94.7%) patients the bleeding was stopped, and 7 required urgent surgery: 3 patients with gastric ulcer underwent gastrectomy, and 4 with duodenal ulcer – truncal vagotomy with pyloroplasty and had the bleeding site underpinned. Fifty-five patients underwent elective surgery: gastrectomy and vagotomy (18 patients with gastric ulcer), highly selective vagotomy (25 patients with duodenal ulcer) and truncal vagotomy and pyloroplasty (12 patients with duodenal ulcer). None of the patients was observed to have recurrent bleeding. PMID:18493453

  6. [Bleeding peptic ulcers--how can recurrent bleeding be prevented?].

    PubMed

    Labenz, J; Tillenburg, B; Peitz, U; Stolte, M; Börsch, G

    1995-01-01

    Bleeding is the most frequent complication of peptic ulcer disease. Patients with a previous ulcer hemorrhage have a high risk for future bleeding episodes. Therefore, treatment aiming at ulcer prophylaxis is mandatory. Helicobacter pylori infection, acid/pepsin and intake of Aspirin or NSAIDs are the main causal factors involved in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease. Ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can be cured by gastric acid suppression (e.g. omeprazole) and prevented by withdrawal of the ulcerogenic substances or co-medication with omeprazole or misoprostol. Acid and Helicobacter pylori are necessary, albeit by themselves not sufficient factors in the causal web of the formerly idiopathic, gastritis-associated peptic ulcer disease of the stomach and the duodenum. Maintenance therapy with antisecretory drugs results in a marked decrease of ulcer recurrences and probably further ulcer complications after an index bleeding, but a definite cure of the ulcer disease is not feasible in the majority of patients. The proportion of patients remaining in remission is dependent on the degree of gastric acid suppression. Therefore, potent antisecretory drugs such as the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole should be used if a physician decides to initiate a long-term maintenance therapy. Several studies have demonstrated beyond doubt that cure of Helicobacter pylori eradication resulted in a stable remission of gastric and duodenal ulcer disease. In addition, a true reinfection after apparent eradication of the bacteria has been rarely observed in adults.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Recent Developments in the Endoscopic Treatment of Patients with Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jae-Young

    2016-01-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is an internal medical emergency. Endoscopic hemostasis has been shown to improve the survival rate of patients with peptic ulcer bleeding. Although the established hemostatic modalities, including injection, thermal therapy, and mechanical therapy, are effective in controlling peptic ulcer bleeding, hemostasis can be difficult to achieve in some cases. As a result, recent, new endoscopic hemostatic modalities, including over-the-scope clips, topical hemostatic sprays, and endoscopic ultrasonography-guided angiotherapy, have been developed. PMID:27744666

  8. Prophylactic aspirin and risk of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Weil, J.; Colin-Jones, D.; Langman, M.; Lawson, D.; Logan, R.; Murphy, M.; Rawlins, M.; Vessey, M.; Wainwright, P.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the risks of hospitalisation for bleeding peptic ulcer with the current prophylactic aspirin regimens of 300 mg daily or less. DESIGN--A case-control study with hospital and community controls. SETTING--Hospitals in Glasgow, Newcastle, Nottingham, Oxford, and Portsmouth. SUBJECTS--1121 patients with gastric or duodenal ulcer bleeding matched with hospital and community controls. RESULTS--144 (12.8%) cases had been regular users of aspirin (taken at least five days a week for at least the previous month) compared with 101 (9.0%) hospital and 77 (7.8%) community controls. Odds ratios were raised for all doses of aspirin taken, whether compared with hospital or community controls (compared with combined controls: 75 mg, 2.3 (95% confidence interval 1.2 to 4.4); 150 mg, 3.2 (1.7 to 6.5); 300 mg, 3.9 (2.5 to 6.3)). Results were not explained by confounding influences of age, sex, prior ulcer history or dyspepsia, or concurrent non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use. Risks seemed particularly high in patients who took non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs concurrently. CONCLUSION--No conventionally used prophylactic aspirin regimen seems free of the risk of peptic ulcer complications. PMID:7711618

  9. Peptic ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    ... I. bleed - peptic ulcer; H. pylori - peptic ulcer; Helicobacter pylori - peptic ulcer ... is infection of the stomach by bacteria called Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori ). Most people with peptic ulcers have ...

  10. Diagnosis, treatment, and outcome in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers and Helicobacter pylori infections.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ting-Chun; Lee, Chia-Long

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding is the most frequently encountered complication of peptic ulcer disease. Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) administration are two independent risk factors for UGI bleeding. Therefore, testing for and diagnosing Hp infection are essential for every patient with UGI hemorrhage. The presence of the infection is usually underestimated in cases of bleeding peptic ulcers. A rapid urease test (RUT), with or without histology, is usually the first test performed during endoscopy. If the initial diagnostic test is negative, a delayed (13)C-urea breath test (UBT) or serology should be performed. Once an infection is diagnosed, antibiotic treatment is advocated. Sufficient evidence supports the concept that Hp infection eradication can heal the ulcer and reduce the likelihood of rebleeding. With increased awareness of the effects of Hp infection, the etiologies of bleeding peptic ulcers have shifted to NSAID use, old age, and disease comorbidity.

  11. Peptic activity and gastroduodenal mucosal damage.

    PubMed Central

    Raufman, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    This contribution reviews briefly the history of the discovery and characterization of peptic activity; secretory models and current concepts regarding the regulation of pepsinogen secretion; and evidence that pepsin is a necessary co-factor for gastroduodenal mucosal injury. Several animal studies indicate that peptic activity is required for acid- and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastroduodenal ulceration. A more vigorous approach to the development of anti-peptic drugs for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease is encouraged. Images Figure 1 PMID:9041694

  12. Intramural hematoma of duodenum: An unusual complication after endoscopic therapy for a bleeding peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ramesh; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Bhatia, Vikram; Garg, Hitendra Kumar; Sundar, Shyam

    2011-01-01

    Intramural hematoma of duodenum (IDH) is a relatively unusual complication associated with endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer. This unusual condition is usually seen in children following blunt trauma to the abdomen. We describe here a case of IDH occurring following endoscopic therapy for bleeding duodenal ulcer in an adult patient with end-stage renal disease. The hematomas appeared on the second day of endoscopic intervention, caused transient duodenal obstruction and resolved spontaneously with conservative treatment in a week. PMID:21814382

  13. Small bowel ulcerative lesions are common in elderly NSAIDs users with peptic ulcer bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tsibouris, Panagiotis; Kalantzis, Chissostomos; Apostolopoulos, Periklis; Zalonis, Antonios; Isaacs, Peter Edward Thomas; Hendrickse, Mark; Alexandrakis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency of small bowel ulcerative lesions in patients with peptic ulcer and define the significance of those lesions. METHODS: In our prospective study, 60 consecutive elderly patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding from a peptic ulceration (cases) and 60 matched patients with a non-bleeding peptic ulcer (controls) underwent small bowel capsule endoscopy, after a negative colonoscopy (compulsory in our institution). Controls were evaluated for non-bleeding indications. Known or suspected chronic inflammatory conditions and medication that could harm the gut were excluded. During capsule endoscopy, small bowel ulcerative lesions were counted thoroughly and classified according to Graham classification. Other small bowel lesions were also recorded. Peptic ulcer bleeding was controlled endoscopically, when adequate, proton pump inhibitors were started in both cases and controls, and Helicobacter pylori eradicated whenever present. Both cases and controls were followed up for a year. In case of bleeding recurrence upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was repeated and whenever it remained unexplained it was followed by repeat colonoscopy and capsule endoscopy. RESULTS: Forty (67%) cases and 18 (30%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P = 0.0001), while 22 (37%) cases and 4 (8%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Among non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) consumers, 39 (95%) cases and 17 (33%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P < 0.0001), while 22 (55%) cases and 4 (10%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Small bowel ulcerative lesions were infrequent among patients not consuming NSAIDs. Mean entry hemoglobin was 9.3 (SD = 1.4) g/dL in cases with small bowel ulcerative lesions and 10.5 (SD = 1.3) g/dL in those without (P = 0.002). Cases with small bowel ulcers necessitate more units of packed red blood cells. During their hospitalization, 6 (27%) cases with small bowel ulcers presented

  14. Are higher doses of proton pump inhibitors better in acute peptic bleeding?

    PubMed

    Villalón, Alejandro; Olmos, Roberto; Rada, Gabriel

    2016-06-24

    Although there is broad consensus about the benefits of proton pump inhibitors in acute upper peptic bleeding, there is still controversy over their optimal dosing. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews including 27 randomized trials addressing this question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded high-dose proton pump inhibitors probably result in little or no difference in re-bleeding rate or mortality. The risk/benefit and cost/benefit balance probably favor use of low-doses.

  15. Are higher doses of proton pump inhibitors better in acute peptic bleeding?

    PubMed

    Villalón, Alejandro; Olmos, Roberto; Rada, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Although there is broad consensus about the benefits of proton pump inhibitors in acute upper peptic bleeding, there is still controversy over their optimal dosing. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews including 27 randomized trials addressing this question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded high-dose proton pump inhibitors probably result in little or no difference in re-bleeding rate or mortality. The risk/benefit and cost/benefit balance probably favor use of low-doses. PMID:27390875

  16. Validity of peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding diagnoses in administrative databases: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Montedori, Alessandro; Abraha, Iosief; Chiatti, Carlos; Cozzolino, Francesco; Orso, Massimiliano; Luchetta, Maria Laura; Rimland, Joseph M; Ambrosio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Administrative healthcare databases are useful to investigate the epidemiology, health outcomes, quality indicators and healthcare utilisation concerning peptic ulcers and gastrointestinal bleeding, but the databases need to be validated in order to be a reliable source for research. The aim of this protocol is to perform the first systematic review of studies reporting the validation of International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision and 10th version (ICD-9 and ICD-10) codes for peptic ulcer and upper gastrointestinal bleeding diagnoses. Methods and analysis MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library databases will be searched, using appropriate search strategies. We will include validation studies that used administrative data to identify peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding diagnoses or studies that evaluated the validity of peptic ulcer and upper gastrointestinal bleeding codes in administrative data. The following inclusion criteria will be used: (a) the presence of a reference standard case definition for the diseases of interest; (b) the presence of at least one test measure (eg, sensitivity, etc) and (c) the use of an administrative database as a source of data. Pairs of reviewers will independently abstract data using standardised forms and will evaluate quality using the checklist of the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) criteria. This systematic review protocol has been produced in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis Protocol (PRISMA-P) 2015 statement. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval is not required given that this is a protocol for a systematic review. We will submit results of this study to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. The results will serve as a guide for researchers validating administrative healthcare databases to determine appropriate case definitions for peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal

  17. Marshall and Warren Lecture 2009: peptic ulcer bleeding: an expedition of 20 years from 1989-2009.

    PubMed

    Sung, Joseph J Y

    2010-02-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is one of the most common medical emergencies leading to substantial mortality and morbidity. The last two decades has witnessed some important advances in the management of this condition, and some of these are results from clinical trials conducted in the Asia Pacific region. The optimal use of combined endoscopic hemostasis and the use of pharmacologic control of acid secretion in the stomach have significantly improved clinical outcome. The role of surgery has been redefined. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection and prophylactic treatment in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and anti-platelet users have made progress in preventing recurrence of peptic ulcer and bleeding. Instead of merely focusing on safety in the gastrointestinal tract, striking a balance between risk and benefit of continuing anti-platelet agents should be a top agenda.

  18. [Peptic activity of gastric juice in chronic gastritis. Morpho-functional aspects].

    PubMed

    Perasso, A; Testino, G; Cornaggia, M; Melloni, E

    1993-02-01

    The aim of this study has been to evaluate peptic activity in gastric juice and gastric peptic cell mass in chronic gastritis. As regard peptic activity, there is a close correlation between it and the peptic gastric cell mass considered globally and expressed as Peptic Gastric Index (PGI), resulting from the individual average between fundic peptic index (chief cells + fundic muco-peptic cells) and antral peptic index (antral muco-peptic cells), both obtained by multiplying the number of peptic cells per mm2 by the thickness of respectively fundic and antral gland layer). In particular fundic and antral superficiale gastritis does not involve changes in peptic activity in gastric juice. On the contrary, in case of fundic pre-atrophic or atrophic there is a significant drop of peptic activity in gastric juice, regardless of the histological condition of the antrum. The lowest value of peptic activity may be noticed in case of atrophic pan-gastritis. Pre-atrophic and atrophic gastritis limited to the antrum--with superficial fundic gastritis--does not involve significant decreases of peptic activity in gastric juice. In this experiences Helicobacter pylori seem to influence peptic secretion: in fact, there is an increases of peptic activity in gastric juice in case of chronic pre-atrophic gastritis HP+.

  19. Absence of Helicobacter pylori is not protective against peptic ulcer bleeding in elderly on offending agents: lessons from an exceptionally low prevalence population.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeong Yeh; Noridah, Nordin; Syed Hassan, Syed Abdul Aziz; Menon, Jayaram

    2014-01-01

    Aim. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is exceptionally rare in population from the north-eastern region of Peninsular Malaysia. This provides us an opportunity to contemplate the future without H. pylori in acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Methods. All cases in the GI registry with GI bleeding between 2003 and 2006 were reviewed. Cases with confirmed non-variceal aetiology were analysed. Rockall score > 5 was considered high risk for bleeding and primary outcomes studied were in-hospital mortality, recurrent bleeding and need for surgery. Results. The incidence of non-variceal upper GI bleeding was 2.2/100,000 person-years. Peptic ulcer bleeding was the most common aetiology (1.8/100,000 person-years). In-hospital mortality (3.6%), recurrent bleeding (9.6%) and need for surgery (4.0%) were uncommon in this population with a largely low risk score (85.2% with score ≤5). Elderly were at greater risk for bleeding (mean 68.5 years, P = 0.01) especially in the presence of duodenal ulcers (P = 0.04) despite gastric ulcers being more common. NSAIDs, aspirin and co-morbidities were the main risk factors. Conclusions. The absence of H. pylori infection may not reduce the risk of peptic ulcer bleeding in the presence of risk factors especially offending drugs in the elderly.

  20. Bleeding peptic ulcer caused by ectopic gastric mucosa in a duplicated segment of jejunum

    SciTech Connect

    Newmark, H.; Ching, G.; Halls, J.; Levy, I.J.

    1981-02-01

    The authors present a case in which a patient suffered a bleeding jejunal ulcer caused by heterotopic gastric mucosa in a congenital duplication of a segment of jejunum. This is the first case diagnosed preoperatively by two different radiographic means. These lesions were shown by both pertechnetate flow and barium small bowel studies. The rarity of these entities and the modalities used for diagnosis are described.

  1. Risk factors influencing the outcome of peptic ulcer bleeding in chronic kidney disease after initial endoscopic hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chih-Ming; Hsu, Chien-Ning; Tai, Wei-Chen; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shih, Chih-Wei; Ku, Ming-Kun; Yuan, Lan-Ting; Wang, Jiunn-Wei; Tseng, Kuo-Lun; Sun, Wei-Chih; Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Nguang, Seng-Howe; Hsu, Pin-I; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who had peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) may have more adverse outcomes. This population-based cohort study aimed to identify risk factors that may influence the outcomes of patients with CKD and PUB after initial endoscopic hemostasis. Data from 1997 to 2008 were extracted from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We included a cohort dataset of 1 million randomly selected individuals and a dataset of patients with CKD who were alive in 2008. A total of 18,646 patients with PUB were screened, and 1229 patients admitted for PUB after endoscopic hemostasis were recruited. The subjects were divided into non-CKD (n = 1045) and CKD groups (n = 184). We analyzed the risks of peptic ulcer rebleeding, sepsis events, and mortality among in-hospital patients, and after discharge. Results showed that the rebleeding rates associated with repeat endoscopic therapy (11.96% vs 6.32%, P = 0.0062), death rates (8.7%, vs 2.3%, P < 0.0001), hospitalization cost (US$ 5595±7200 vs US$2408 ± 4703, P < 0.0001), and length of hospital stay (19.6 ± 18.3 vs 11.2 ± 13.1, P < 0.0001) in the CKD group were higher than those in the non-CKD group. The death rate in the CKD group was also higher than that in the non-CKD group after discharge. The independent risk factor for rebleeding during hospitalization was age (odds ratio [OR], 1.02; P = 0.0063), whereas risk factors for death were CKD (OR, 2.37; P = 0.0222), shock (OR, 2.99; P = 0.0098), and endotracheal intubation (OR, 5.31; P < 0.0001). The hazard ratio of rebleeding risk for aspirin users after discharge over a 10-year follow-up period was 0.68 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.45–0.95, P = 0.0223). On the other hand, old age (P < 0.0001), CKD (P = 0.0090), diabetes (P = 0.0470), and congestive heart failure (P = 0.0013) were the independent risk factors for death after discharge. In-hospital patients with CKD and PUB after

  2. Improvement of Short-Term Outcomes for High-Risk Bleeding Peptic Ulcers With Addition of Argon Plasma Coagulation Following Endoscopic Injection Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huay-Min; Tsai, Wei-Lun; Yu, Hsien-Chung; Chan, Hoi-Hung; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lin, Kung-Hung; Tsai, Tzung-Jiun; Kao, Sung-Shuo; Sun, Wei-Chih; Hsu, Ping-I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A second endoscopic method together with injection therapy is recommended to treat high-risk bleeding peptic ulcers. This study investigated whether additional argon plasma coagulation (APC) treatment could influence hemostatic efficacy following endoscopic injection therapy to treat high-risk bleeding ulcers. From October 2010 to January 2012, eligible patients with high-risk bleeding ulcers were admitted to our hospital. They prospectively randomly underwent either APC therapy along with distilled water injection or distilled water injection alone. Episodes of rebleeding were retreated with endoscopic combination therapy. Patients in whom retreatment was ineffective underwent emergency surgery or transarterial embolization (TAE). A total of 116 enrolled patients were analyzed. The hemostatic efficacy in 58 patients treated with APC along with distilled water injection was compared with that in 58 patients treated with distilled water injection alone. The 2 treatment groups were similar with respect to all baseline characteristics. Initial hemostasis was accomplished in 56 patients treated with combined therapy, and 55 patients treated with distilled water injection therapy (97% vs 95%, P = 0.648). Bleeding recurred in 2 patients treated with combined therapy, and 9 patients treated with distilled water injection (3.6% vs 16%, P = 0.029). Treatment method was the only independent prognostic factor for recurrent bleeding (odds ratio 0.17; 95% confidence interval 0.03–0.84; P = 0.029). The 2 groups did not differ significantly in hospital stay, TAE, surgery, and mortality. Endoscopic therapy with APC following distilled water injection is more effective than distilled water injection alone for preventing rebleeding of peptic ulcer. PMID:26266385

  3. Risk factors determining the need for second-look endoscopy for peptic ulcer bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis and proton pump inhibitor infusion

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Wu, Chung-Tai; Chen, Wei-Ying; Yang, Er-Hsiang; Chen, Po-Jun; Sheu, Bor-Shyang

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: The need for routine second-look endoscopy in cases of peptic ulcer bleeding remains uncertain. We investigated risk factors related to the need for second-look endoscopy after endoscopic hemostasis and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) infusion. Patients and methods: We prospectively enrolled 316 patients with peptic ulcer bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis. Second-look endoscopy was scheduled after 72-hour PPI infusion (Day-3 subgroup) or one day early (Day-2 subgroup). If early rebleeding developed within 3 days, emergent second-look endoscopy was conducted. Risk factors for early rebleeding (use of E2nd score to predict the need for early second-look endoscopy) and persistent major stigmata in the Day-3 subgroup (use of R2nd score to predict the need for routine second-look endoscopy) were analyzed using univariable and multivariable regression. Results: Excluding 10 of 316 patients with early rebleeding, the rate of persistent major stigmata was lower in the Day-3 subgroup than in the Day-2 subgroup (4.8 % vs. 15.4 %, P  = 0.002). Endoscopic epinephrine-injection monotherapy and hypoalbuminemia < 3.0 g/dL were two independent risk factors for early rebleeding (P  ≤ 0.05). The Forrest Ia-Ib type and hypoalbuminemia < 3.5 g/dL were two independent risk factors for persistent major stigmata on the day-3 second-look endoscopy (P  < 0.05). The E2nd score was highly accurate for prediction of early rebleeding (AUROC 0.86; 95 % CI, 0.73~0.99), and the R2nd score could predict persistent major stigmata at second-look endoscopy (AUROC 0.84; 95 % CI, 0.69~0.99). Conclusions: For patients with peptic ulcer bleeding, E2nd and R2nd scores can indicate the need for early and routine second-look endoscopy, respectively (Trial registration identifier: NCT02197039). PMID:27004241

  4. Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    Blood loss; Open injury bleeding ... be spread if infected blood gets into an open wound, even a small one. Although puncture wounds ... have symptoms such as: Blood coming from an open wound Bruising Bleeding can also cause shock, which ...

  5. Risk factors influencing the outcome of peptic ulcer bleeding in chronic kidney disease after initial endoscopic hemostasis: A nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chih-Ming; Hsu, Chien-Ning; Tai, Wei-Chen; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shih, Chih-Wei; Ku, Ming-Kun; Yuan, Lan-Ting; Wang, Jiunn-Wei; Tseng, Kuo-Lun; Sun, Wei-Chih; Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Nguang, Seng-Howe; Hsu, Pin-I; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-09-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who had peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) may have more adverse outcomes. This population-based cohort study aimed to identify risk factors that may influence the outcomes of patients with CKD and PUB after initial endoscopic hemostasis. Data from 1997 to 2008 were extracted from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We included a cohort dataset of 1 million randomly selected individuals and a dataset of patients with CKD who were alive in 2008. A total of 18,646 patients with PUB were screened, and 1229 patients admitted for PUB after endoscopic hemostasis were recruited. The subjects were divided into non-CKD (n = 1045) and CKD groups (n = 184). We analyzed the risks of peptic ulcer rebleeding, sepsis events, and mortality among in-hospital patients, and after discharge. Results showed that the rebleeding rates associated with repeat endoscopic therapy (11.96% vs 6.32%, P = 0.0062), death rates (8.7%, vs 2.3%, P < 0.0001), hospitalization cost (US$ 5595±7200 vs US$2408 ± 4703, P < 0.0001), and length of hospital stay (19.6 ± 18.3 vs 11.2 ± 13.1, P < 0.0001) in the CKD group were higher than those in the non-CKD group. The death rate in the CKD group was also higher than that in the non-CKD group after discharge. The independent risk factor for rebleeding during hospitalization was age (odds ratio [OR], 1.02; P = 0.0063), whereas risk factors for death were CKD (OR, 2.37; P = 0.0222), shock (OR, 2.99; P = 0.0098), and endotracheal intubation (OR, 5.31; P < 0.0001). The hazard ratio of rebleeding risk for aspirin users after discharge over a 10-year follow-up period was 0.68 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.45-0.95, P = 0.0223). On the other hand, old age (P < 0.0001), CKD (P = 0.0090), diabetes (P = 0.0470), and congestive heart failure (P = 0.0013) were the independent risk factors for death after discharge. In-hospital patients with CKD and PUB after endoscopic therapy

  6. Division and repair of the sphincteric mechanism at the gastric outlet in emergency operations for bleeding peptic ulcer. A new technique for use in combination with suture ligation of the bleeding point and highly selective vagotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, D

    1977-01-01

    In three of 26 patients who were treated by highly selective vagotomy (HSV) plus suture of the bleeding point for massive hemorrhage from peptic ulceration, access to the ulcer could not be obtained by means of a duodenotomy or gastrotomy which spared the pylorus. Instead, a wide gastroduodenotomy was performed, the artery in the base of the ulcer underrun and HSV performed. The gastroduodenotomy incision was closed longitudinally, rather than as a pyloroplasty. In this way, the integrity of the antral mill and of the pyloric sphincter was restored. The patients were followed up for six months, one year and three years respectively, and were found to be in good health, without clinical or radiological evidence of gastric retention or of recurrent ulceration. Thus the sphincteric mechanism at the exit of the stomach can, like the anal sphincter, be divided and subsequently repaired with good restoration of function. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:341823

  7. Does COX1 gene polymorphism (A842G/C50T) influence peptic ulcer bleeding in Indian patients?.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, S; Simon, Ebby George; Joseph, A J; Dutta, Amit Kumar; Chowdhury, Sudipta Dhar; Kurien, Reuben Thomas; Chacko, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    This is a pilot study to test the hypothesis that polymorphisms that may be linked to cyclooxygenase production may affect the likelihood and the nature of bleeding in patients with ulcer disease. Of the two polymorphism that have previously been studied for links we chose the A842G polymorphims. Of the 50 patients with ulcer bleeding who were studied, 8 had a heterozygous polymorphisms and 42 had the normal configuration. On comparing these two groups. there were no significant differences in clinical presentation except that there was a tendency to have less gastric ulcers among those with the A842G/C50T polymorphism. Based on these studies we need to undertake a larger studies comparing these groups with those with ulcers without GI bleeding and those without ulcers PMID:27522738

  8. Peptic Ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    A peptic ulcer is a sore in the lining of your stomach or your duodenum, the first part of your ... Comes and goes for several days or weeks Peptic ulcers happen when the acids that help you digest ...

  9. Randomised comparison between adrenaline injection alone and adrenaline injection plus heat probe treatment for actively bleeding ulcers.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, S. S.; Lau, J. Y.; Sung, J. J.; Chan, A. C.; Lai, C. W.; Ng, E. K.; Chan, F. K.; Yung, M. Y.; Li, A. K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare endoscopic adrenaline injection alone and adrenaline injection plus heat probe for the treatment of actively bleeding peptic ulcers. DESIGN: Randomised prospective study of patients admitted with actively bleeding peptic ulcers. SETTING: One university hospital. SUBJECTS: 276 patients with actively bleeding ulcers detected by endoscopy within 24 hours of admission: 136 patients were randomised to endoscopic adrenaline injection alone and 140 to adrenaline injection plus heat probe treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Initial endoscopic haemostasis; clinical rebleeding; requirement for operation; requirement for blood transfusion; hospital stay, ulcer healing at four weeks; and mortality in hospital. RESULTS: Initial haemostasis was achieved in 131/134 patients (98%) who received adrenaline injection alone and 135/136 patients (99%) who received additional heat probe treatment (P = 0.33). Outcome as measured by clinical rebleeding (12 v 5), requirement for emergency operation (14 v 8), blood transfusion (2 v 3 units), hospital stay (4 v 4 days), ulcer healing at four weeks (79.1% v 74%), and in hospital mortality (7 v 8) were not significantly different in the two groups. In the subgroup of patients with spurting haemorrhage 8/27 (29.6%; 14.5% to 50.3%) patients from the adrenaline injection alone group and 2/31 (6.5%; 1.1% to 22.9%) patients from the dual treatment group required operative intervention. The relative risk of this was lower in the dual treatment group (0.17; 0.03 to 0.87). Hospital stay was significantly shorter in the dual treatment group than the adrenaline injection alone group (4 v 6 days, P = 0.01). CONCLUSION: The addition of heat probe treatment after endoscopic adrenaline injection confers an advantage in ulcers with spurting haemorrhage. PMID:9158465

  10. Early lactate clearance for predicting active bleeding in critically ill patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Wada, Tomoki; Hagiwara, Akiyoshi; Uemura, Tatsuki; Yahagi, Naoki; Kimura, Akio

    2016-08-01

    Not all patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) require emergency endoscopy. Lactate clearance has been suggested as a parameter for predicting patient outcomes in various critical care settings. This study investigates whether lactate clearance can predict active bleeding in critically ill patients with UGIB. This single-center, retrospective, observational study included critically ill patients with UGIB who met all of the following criteria: admission to the emergency department (ED) from April 2011 to August 2014; had blood samples for lactate evaluation at least twice during the ED stay; and had emergency endoscopy within 6 h of ED presentation. The main outcome was active bleeding detected with emergency endoscopy. Classification and regression tree (CART) analyses were performed using variables associated with active bleeding to derive a prediction rule for active bleeding in critically ill UGIB patients. A total of 154 patients with UGIB were analyzed, and 31.2 % (48/154) had active bleeding. In the univariate analysis, lactate clearance was significantly lower in patients with active bleeding than in those without active bleeding (13 vs. 29 %, P < 0.001). Using the CART analysis, a prediction rule for active bleeding is derived, and includes three variables: lactate clearance; platelet count; and systolic blood pressure at ED presentation. The rule has 97.9 % (95 % CI 90.2-99.6 %) sensitivity with 32.1 % (28.6-32.9 %) specificity. Lactate clearance may be associated with active bleeding in critically ill patients with UGIB, and may be clinically useful as a component of a prediction rule for active bleeding.

  11. Peptic Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a good alternative to NSAIDs for most childhood conditions. Signs and Symptoms Although peptic ulcers are rare in kids, if your child has any of these signs and symptoms, call your doctor: burning pain in the abdomen between the breastbone and the belly button (the ...

  12. [Total peptic activity in gastric juice in patients with duodenal ulcer. Variations in relation to age and role of Helicobacter pylori].

    PubMed

    Testino, G; Bastardini, R; Sumberaz, A

    1994-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate total peptic activity in gastric juice in duodenal ulcer patients in relation to age and Helicobacter pylori infection. In duodenal ulcer patients peptic activity increases significantly in comparison to normal subjects. In relation to age there is no variation. Therefore, gastric secretion has an autonomous behaviour independently of any physiological variation in healthy subjects. Helicobacter pylori infection is present in 89.4% of duodenal ulcer patients. The bacterium infection does not imply a significant increase of peptic activity in gastric juice. Its lesive action is therefore not attributable to a modification of peptic activity, but it is due to its direct action on gastric metaplasia in the duodenum.

  13. Peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Kalyanakrishnan; Salinas, Robert C

    2007-10-01

    Peptic ulcer disease usually occurs in the stomach and proximal duodenum. The predominant causes in the United States are infection with Helicobacter pylori and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Symptoms of peptic ulcer disease include epigastric discomfort (specifically, pain relieved by food intake or antacids and pain that causes awakening at night or that occurs between meals), loss of appetite, and weight loss. Older patients and patients with alarm symptoms indicating a complication or malignancy should have prompt endoscopy. Patients taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should discontinue their use. For younger patients with no alarm symptoms, a test-and-treat strategy based on the results of H. pylori testing is recommended. If H. pylori infection is diagnosed, the infection should be eradicated and antisecretory therapy (preferably with a proton pump inhibitor) given for four weeks. Patients with persistent symptoms should be referred for endoscopy. Surgery is indicated if complications develop or if the ulcer is unresponsive to medications. Bleeding is the most common indication for surgery. Administration of proton pump inhibitors and endoscopic therapy control most bleeds. Perforation and gastric outlet obstruction are rare but serious complications. Peritonitis is a surgical emergency requiring patient resuscitation; laparotomy and peritoneal toilet; omental patch placement; and, in selected patients, surgery for ulcer control.

  14. Intravenous non-high-dose pantoprazole is equally effective as high-dose pantoprazole in preventing rebleeding among low risk patients with a bleeding peptic ulcer after initial endoscopic hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many studies have shown that high-dose proton-pumps inhibitors (PPI) do not further reduce the rate of rebleeding compared to non-high-dose PPIs but we do not know whether intravenous non-high-dose PPIs reduce rebleeding rates among patients at low risk (Rockall score < 6) or among those at high risk, both compared to high-dose PPIs. This retrospective case-controlled study aimed to identify the subgroups of these patients that might benefit from treatment with non-high-dose PPIs. Methods Subjects who received high dose and non-high-dose pantoprazole for confirmed acute PU bleeding at a tertiary referral hospital were enrolled (n = 413). They were divided into sustained hemostasis (n = 324) and rebleeding groups (n = 89). The greedy method was applied to allow treatment-control random matching (1:1). Patients were randomly selected from the non-high-dose and high-dose PPI groups who had a high risk peptic ulcer bleeding (n = 104 in each group), and these were then subdivided to two subgroups (Rockall score ≥ 6 vs. < 6, n = 77 vs. 27). Results An initial low hemoglobin level, serum creatinine level, and Rockall score were independent factors associated with rebleeding. After case-control matching, the significant variables between the non-high-dose and high-dose PPI groups for a Rockall score ≥ 6 were the rebleeding rate, and the amount of blood transfused. Case-controlled matching for the subgroup with a Rockall score < 6 showed that the rebleeding rate was similar for both groups (11.1% in each group). Conclusion Intravenous non-high-dose pantoprazole is equally effective as high-dose pantoprazole when treating low risk patients with a Rockall sore were < 6 who have bleeding ulcers and high-risk stigmata after endoscopic hemostasis. PMID:22455511

  15. Active Bleeding after Cardiac Surgery: A Prospective Observational Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Fellahi, Jean-Luc; Bertet, Héléna; Faucanie, Marie; Amour, Julien; Blanloeil, Yvonnick; Lanquetot, Hervé; Ouattara, Alexandre; Picot, Marie Christine

    2016-01-01

    Main Objectives To estimate the incidence of active bleeding after cardiac surgery (AB) based on a definition directly related on blood flow from chest drainage; to describe the AB characteristics and its management; to identify factors of postoperative complications. Methods AB was defined as a blood loss > 1.5 ml/kg/h for 6 consecutive hours within the first 24 hours or in case of reoperation for hemostasis during the first 12 postoperative hours. The definition was applied in a prospective longitudinal observational study involving 29 French centers; all adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass were included over a 3-month period. Perioperative data (including blood product administration) were collected. To study possible variation in clinical practice among centers, patients were classified into two groups according to the AB incidence of the center compared to the overall incidence: “Low incidence” if incidence is lower and “High incidence” if incidence is equal or greater than overall incidence. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors of postoperative complications. Results Among 4,904 patients, 129 experienced AB (2.6%), among them 52 reoperation. Postoperative bleeding loss was 1,000 [820;1,375] ml and 1,680 [1,280;2,300] ml at 6 and 24 hours respectively. Incidence of AB varied between centers (0 to 16%) but was independent of in-centre cardiac surgical experience. Comparisons between groups according to AB incidence showed differences in postoperative management. Body surface area, preoperative creatinine, emergency surgery, postoperative acidosis and red blood cell transfusion were risk factors of postoperative complication. Conclusions A blood loss > 1.5 ml/kg/h for 6 consecutive hours within the first 24 hours or early reoperation for hemostasis seems a relevant definition of AB. This definition, independent of transfusion, adjusted to body weight, may assess real time bleeding occurring

  16. Duodenoportal fistula caused by peptic ulcer after extended right hepatectomy for hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Takifuji, Katsunari; Nakatani, Yoshihiro; Tani, Masaji; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2006-01-01

    Background A fistula between the duodenum and the main portal vein near a peptic ulcer is extremely rare, and only two cases of duodenal ulcers have been reported in the past. Case presentation We report a 68-year-old man with a diagnosis of anemia who had a history of extended right hepatectomy for hilar cholangiocarcinoma 20 months previously. The first endoscopic examination revealed a giant peptic ulcer with active bleeding at the posterior wall of the duodenal bulbs, and hemostasis was performed. Endoscopic treatment and transarterial embolization were performed repeatedly because of uncontrollable bleeding from the duodenal ulcer. Nevertheless, he died of sudden massive hematemesis on the 20th hospital day. At autopsy, communication with the main portal vein and duodenal ulcer was observed. Conclusion It should be borne in mind that the main portal vein is exposed at the front of the hepatoduodenal ligament in cases with previous extrahepatic bile duct resection. PMID:17123451

  17. Complications of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Milosavljevic, Tomica; Kostić-Milosavljević, Mirjana; Jovanović, Ivan; Krstić, Miodrag

    2011-01-01

    There are four major complications of peptic ulcer disease (PUD): bleeding, perforation, penetration, and obstruction. Complications can occur in patients with peptic ulcer of any etiology. Despite improvements in the medical management and the lower overall incidence of PUD, there are conflicting data about the incidence of potentially life-threatening ulcer complications. There are important time trends embedded within this stable overall rate of complications: the dramatic decline in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (comparing the cohort born from 1900 to 1920 to cohorts born after 1940); an increased use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and an increased rate of ulcer complications related to such drug use, especially in the elderly. As a result of these trends, ulcer complications are on the rise in older patients but on the decline in younger individuals. Hemorrhage is the most frequent PUD complication and its incidence is increasing in comparison to perforation and stenosis. Therapeutic endoscopy is considered the treatment of choice for bleeding ulcers, reducing the need for emergent surgical procedures to 10-20% of the cases. In recent years, besides the success of angiographic embolization, the containment of massive hemorrhage must also be taken into account. Transcatheter arterial embolization is also an effective and safe treatment in patients with duodenal ulcers re-bleeding after therapeutic endoscopy or surgery.

  18. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in Kuala Lumpur Hospital, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lakhwani, M N; Ismail, A R; Barras, C D; Tan, W J

    2000-12-01

    Despite advancements in endoscopy and pharmacology in the treatment of peptic ulcer disease the overall mortality has remained constant at 10% for the past four decades. The aim of this study was to determine the age, gender, racial distribution, incidence and causes of endoscopically diagnosed cases of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding to summarise treatments undertaken and to report their outcome. A prospective study of UGI bleeding in 128 patients was performed in two surgical wards of Kuala Lumpur Hospital, involving both elective and emergency admissions. The study group comprised of 113 (88.2%) males and 15 (11.7%) females. The mean age was 51.9 years (range 14 to 85 years) and 37.5% (48 of 128 patients) were older than 60 years. The Indian race was over-represented in all disease categories. Smoking (50.1%), alcohol consumption (37.5%), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (17.2%), traditional remedies (5.5%), anti-coagulants (2.3%) and steroids (0.8%) were among the risk factors reported. Common presenting symptoms and signs included malaena (68.8%), haematemesis (59.4%) and fresh per rectal bleeding (33.6%). The commonest causes of UGI bleeding were duodenal ulcer (32%), gastric ulcer (29.7%), erosions (duodenal and gastric) (21.9%), oesophageal varices (10.9%) and malignancy (3.9%). UGI bleeding was treated non-surgically in 90.6% of cases. Blood transfusions were required in 62.6% (67/107) of peptic ulcer disease patients. Surgical intervention for bleeding peptic ulcer occurred in around 10% of cases and involved under-running of the bleeding vessel in most high risk duodenal and gastric ulcer patients. The overall mortality from bleeding peptic ulcer disease was 4.7%. Six patients died from torrential UGI haemorrhage soon after presentation, without the establishment of a cause. Active resuscitative protocols, early endoscopy, more aggressive interventional therapy, early surgery by more senior surgeons, increasing intensive care unit

  19. Evaluation of Anti-Secretory and Anti-Ulcerogenic Activities of Avipattikar Churna on The Peptic Ulcers in Experimental Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gyawali, Sudesh; Khan, Gulam Muhammad; Lamichane, Shreekrishna; Gautam, Jaya; Ghimire, Saurav; Adhikari, Rashmi; Lamsal, Reshma

    2013-01-01

    Background: Avipattikar churna, a poly-herbal formulation, is one of the popular ayurvedic formulations which is used for peptic ulcer diseases but the scientific documentation with regards to its effect for the indication is lacking. Aims: This study was carried out to evaluate the anti-secretory and the anti-ulcerogenic activities of the churna and to compare its activity with that of ranitidine in a pyloric ligated model of rats. Material and methods: Four groups of rats with 6 animals in each served as the ulcer controls, churna low dose (500 mg/kg), churna high dose (750mg/kg) and ranitidine (25mg/kg). The control group rats received only vehicle (2% (v/v) gum acacia), while the rats of the other groups received the respective dose of the churna or ranitidine which was suspended in the vehicle. The treatments were given twice a day, orally, for two days. After 1 hour of the last dose, pyloric ligations were performed and the rats were sacrificed for evaluation after four hours of the ligations. The gastric contents were collected and its volume, pH and acidity were measured. The numbers of ulcers and their lengths were measured which were used to calculate the gastric irritancy index and the curative ratio. The histological examinations of the gastric tissues were also performed. Results: The churna, in both doses, significantly decreased the volumes of the gastric contents, the ulcer score, the length of the ulcer, the gastric irritancy index and pH increased as compared to those in the control group. The effects of the churna were comparable to that of ranitidine. The histopathological evaluation of the gastric tissue also supported the results. Conclusion: Avipattikar churna has anti-secretory and anti-ulcerogenic effects which are comparable to those of ranitidine in peptic ulcer diseases. PMID:23905120

  20. Computed tomography angiography in patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Reis, Fatima Regina Silva; Cardia, Patricia Prando; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency, with considerable morbidity and mortality rates, and a prompt diagnosis is essential for a better prognosis. In such a context, endoscopy is the main diagnostic tool; however, in cases where the gastrointestinal hemorrhage is massive, the exact bleeding site might go undetected. In addition, a trained professional is not always present to perform the procedure. In an emergency setting, optical colonoscopy presents limitations connected with the absence of bowel preparation, so most of the small bowel cannot be assessed. Scintigraphy cannot accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of the bleeding and is not available at emergency settings. The use of capsule endoscopy is inappropriate in the acute setting, particularly in the emergency department at night, and is a highly expensive method. Digital angiography, despite its high sensitivity, is invasive, presents catheterization-related risks, in addition to its low availability at emergency settings. On the other hand, computed tomography angiography is fast, widely available and minimally invasive, emerging as a promising method in the diagnostic algorithm of these patients, being capable of determining the location and cause of bleeding with high accuracy. Based on a critical literature review and on their own experience, the authors propose a computed tomography angiography protocol to assess the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding.

  1. Electrodermal screening of biologically active points for upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ying-Jung; Hu, Wen-Long; Hung, I-Ling; Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Hung, Yu-Chiang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this case-control study was to investigate the relationship between the electrical resistance of the skin at biologically active points (BAPs) on the main meridians and upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). Electrical resistance to direct current at 20 BAPs on the fingers and toes of 100 patients with (38 men, 12 women; mean age [range], 58.20 ± 19.62 [18-83] years) and without (27 men, 23 women; 49.54 ± 12.12 [22-74] years) UGIB was measured through electrodermal screening (EDS), based on the theory of electroacupuncture according to Voll (EAV). Data were compared through analysis of variance (ANOVA), receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, and logistic regression. The initial readings were lower in the UGIB group, indicating blood and energy deficiency due to UGIB. Significant differences in indicator drop values were observed at nine BAPs (p < 0.05) on the bilateral small intestine, bilateral stomach, bilateral circulation, bilateral fibroid degeneration, and right lymph meridians. The area under the ROC curve values of the BAPs on the bilateral small intestine and stomach meridians were larger than 0.5, suggesting the diagnostic accuracy of EDS for UGIB on the basis of the indicator drop of these BAPs. Logistic regression revealed that when the indicator drop of the BAP on the left stomach meridian increased by one score, the risk of UGIB increased by about 1.545-3.523 times. In conclusion, the change in the electrical resistance of the skin measured by EDS at the BAPs on the bilateral small intestine and stomach meridians provides specific information on UGIB.

  2. Secondary aortoenteric fistula: active bleeding detected with multi-detector-row CT.

    PubMed

    Roos, Justus E; Willmann, Jürgen K; Hilfiker, Paul R

    2002-12-01

    We report a case of active bleeding of a secondary aortoenteric fistula (SAEF), in which CT angiography with multi-detector-row CT (MDCT) was finally diagnostic after negative catheter angiography and unsatisfactory endoscopy. The MDCT angiography clearly demonstrated the fistulous tract between the abdominal aortic graft and the duodenum. The dynamic process of bleeding was confirmed as a net increase of contrast agent accumulation in the duodenum through different phases. The MDCT angiography with its excellent 3D image quality is therefore a valuable method in the assessment of active SAEF bleeding. PMID:12522640

  3. Vagotomy and double pyloroplasty for peptic ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Hines, J R; Geurkink, R E; Kornmesser, T A; Wikholm, L; Davis, R P

    1975-01-01

    Seventy patients with peptic ulcers (55 duodenal and 15 gastric) were treated by truncal vagotomy and doulbe pyloroplasty during the past four years. Clinical and experimental data as presented lead us to believe that transecting the pylorus twice produces an incontinent pyloric sphincter and a larger gastric outlet than is found in other methods of pyloroplasty. This decreases gastric stasis and has led to a lower ulcer recurrence rate (1.5%). In addition the untoward postoperative sequelae are minimal. The 70 patients treated (for the most pare consecutive cases) exhibited the usual complications of peptic ulcer disease. Thirty-three had intractable pain, 23 bleeding (15 massive), 13 obstruction, and one acute perforation. There were no operative or postoperative deaths and the only serious postoperative complication was unrelated to the double pyloroplasty. During the followup period four patients have died of unrelated diseases. Of the remaining 66 patients one developed a probable recurrent peptic ulcer which has responded to medical management. Four patients have intermittent dumping, three have mild diarrhea and one has failed to gain weight, Constipation and weight gain are more common complaints. It would appear that vagotomy with double pyloroplasty is a safe and effective operation for peptic ulcers and that further clinical trials are warranted. PMID:1119866

  4. [Treatment of a subcapsular renal bleeding after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy with recombinant, activated factor VII].

    PubMed

    Langer, H; Strohmaier, W L; Probst, S

    2002-11-01

    We report on a patient who suffered a large subcapsular and perirenal haematoma after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. Despite surgical intervention the bleeding did not stop for 6 days and 10 units of packed red blood cells were transfused. With the treatment of recombinant, activated factor VIII (NovoSeven((R))) an immediate haemostasis could be reached, so that impending nephrectomy could be avoided. This is the first case where FVIIa has been successfully used to stop a trauma-related bleeding in a patient without any obvious accompanying coagulation disorder.

  5. PEPTIC ULCER DISEASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is an ulcerative condition of the stomach or duodenum that may be accompanied by mucosal inflammation. PUD is classified as primary when it occurs in healthy children and as secondary when underlying disorders associated with injury, illness, or drug therapy co-exists. Pri...

  6. Peptic ulcer in hospital

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, H. Daintree

    1962-01-01

    This study corresponds to an estimated 142,250 admissions for peptic ulcer to the wards of National Health Service hospitals in England and Wales during the two years 1956 and 1957. It presents a picture of the incidence and mortality of complications and surgical treatment throughout England and Wales. PMID:14036965

  7. Control of Pitching Airfoil Aerodynamics by Vorticity Flux Modification using Active Bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2014-11-01

    Distributed active bleed driven by pressure differences across a pitching airfoil is used to regulate the vorticity flux over the airfoil's surface and thereby to control aerodynamic loads in wind tunnel experiments. The range of pitch angles is varied beyond the static stall margin of the 2-D VR-7 airfoil at reduced pitching rates up to k = 0.42. Bleed is regulated dynamically using piezoelectric louvers between the model's pressure side near the trailing edge and the suction surface near the leading edge. The time-dependent evolution of vorticity concentrations over the airfoil and in the wake during the pitch cycle is investigated using high-speed PIV and the aerodynamic forces and moments are measured using integrated load cells. The timing of the dynamic stall vorticity flux into the near wake and its effect on the flow field are analyzed in the presence and absence of bleed using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). It is shown that bleed actuation alters the production, accumulation, and advection of vorticity concentrations near the surface with significant effects on the evolution, and, in particular, the timing of dynamic stall vortices. These changes are manifested by alteration of the lift hysteresis and improvement of pitch stability during the cycle, while maintaining cycle-averaged lift to within 5% of the base flow level with significant implications for improvement of the stability of flexible wings and rotor blades. This work is supported by the Rotorcraft Center (VLRCOE) at Georgia Tech.

  8. Gastrointestinal bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... amounts of bleeding that occur over a long period of time can lead to problems such as anemia or low blood counts. Once a bleeding site is found, many therapies are available to stop the bleeding or treat the cause.

  9. Optimal management of peptic ulcer disease in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Pilotto, Alberto; Franceschi, Marilisa; Maggi, Stefania; Addante, Filomena; Sancarlo, Daniele

    2010-07-01

    Recent data report that the incidence of peptic ulcer is decreasing in the general population; conversely, the rates of gastric and duodenal ulcer hospitalization and mortality remain very high in older patients. Two major factors that might explain this epidemiological feature in the elderly population are the high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and the increasing prescriptions of gastroduodenal damaging drugs, including NSAIDs and/or aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid). The main goals for treating peptic ulcer disease in old age are to reduce recurrence of the disease and to prevent complications, especially bleeding and perforation. The available treatments for peptic ulcer are essentially based on gastric acid suppression with antisecretory drugs and the eradication of H. pylori infection. The aim of this article is to report the available data on clinical efficacy and tolerability of peptic ulcer treatments in elderly patients and provide recommendations for their optimal use in this special population. Proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-based triple therapies for 7 days are highly effective for the cure of H. pylori-positive peptic ulcers as well as for reducing ulcer recurrence. Antisecretory drugs are also the treatment of choice for NSAID- or aspirin-related peptic ulcers and are useful as preventive therapy in chronic users of NSAIDs and low-dose aspirin as antiplatelet therapy. Antisecretory PPI therapy has a favourable tolerability profile in geriatric patients; however, monitoring is suggested in older patients with frequent pulmonary infections, gastrointestinal malabsorption, unexplained chronic diarrhoea, osteoporosis or those taking concomitant cytochrome P450 2C19-metabolized medications. The overall approach to the geriatric patient should include a comprehensive geriatric assessment that ensures multidimensional evaluation of the patient in order to better define the clinical risk of adverse outcomes in the older patient with peptic ulcer and

  10. [Peptic ulcer disease and stress].

    PubMed

    Herszényi, László; Juhász, Márk; Mihály, Emese; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2015-08-30

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of peptic ulcer disease revolutionised our views on the etiology and treatment of the disease. This discovery has tempted many experts to conclude that psychological factors and, specifically, stress are unimportant. However, Helicobacter pylori infection alone does not explain fully the incidence and prevalence of peptic ulcer disease. It has been demonstrated that stress can cause peptic ulcer disease even in the absence of Helicobacter pylori infection, supporting a multicausal model of peptic ulcer etiology. Psychological stress among other risk factors can function as a cofactor with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  11. Perforated peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Søreide, Kjetil; Thorsen, Kenneth; Harrison, Ewen M; Bingener, Juliane; Møller, Morten H; Ohene-Yeboah, Michael; Søreide, Jon Arne

    2015-09-26

    Perforated peptic ulcer is a common emergency condition worldwide, with associated mortality rates of up to 30%. A scarcity of high-quality studies about the condition limits the knowledge base for clinical decision making, but a few published randomised trials are available. Although Helicobacter pylori and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are common causes, demographic differences in age, sex, perforation location, and underlying causes exist between countries, and mortality rates also vary. Clinical prediction rules are used, but accuracy varies with study population. Early surgery, either by laparoscopic or open repair, and proper sepsis management are essential for good outcome. Selected patients can be managed non-operatively or with novel endoscopic approaches, but validation of such methods in trials is needed. Quality of care, sepsis care bundles, and postoperative monitoring need further assessment. Adequate trials with low risk of bias are urgently needed to provide better evidence. We summarise the evidence for perforated peptic ulcer management and identify directions for future clinical research.

  12. Comparison of low- and high-dose recombinant activated factor VII for postcardiac surgical bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Aly Makram

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the Study: A retrospective observational study to compare safety and efficacy of high and low doses of recombinant activated factor VIIa (rFVIIa) in severe postcardiac surgical bleeding. Patients and Methods: From 2004 to 2014, all patients who received rFVIIa for bleeding after cardiac surgery were included and arranged in two groups; Group 1: Low dose (40–50 mcg/kg) (n = 98) and Group 2: High dose (90–120 mcg/kg) (n = 156). Results: There was no significant difference in demographic and surgical characteristics of both groups on admission to Cardiac Surgical Intensive Care Unit (CSICU). There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding the reduction in chest tube bleeding in the first 6 h or the transfusion requirement in the 24 h after admission to CSICU. A total of 15 patients (5.9%) had thromboembolic adverse events. (Seven (7.1%) patients in Group 1 compared to 8 (5.1%) patients in Group 2, P = 0.58). There were no significant differences in all-cause mortality at 30 days (2% in Group 1 vs. 3.2% in Group 2, P = 0.6) and at hospital discharge between the two study groups (6.1% in Group 1 vs. 8.3% in Group 2, P = 0.5), respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding the need for re-exploration, days on mechanical ventilation, CSICU, or hospital stay. Conclusion: In this report, Low-dose rFVIIa showed equivalent efficacy and safety to high-dose rFVIIa. Further prospective randomized studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:27688624

  13. Bleeding Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... known as clotting factors. If you have a bleeding disorder, you either do not have enough platelets or ... they don't work the way they should. Bleeding disorders can be the result of other diseases, such ...

  14. Evidence supporting the use of recombinant activated factor VII in congenital bleeding disorders

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Pär I; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2010-01-01

    Background: Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa, NovoSeven®) was introduced in 1996 for the treatment of hemophilic patients with antibodies against coagulation factor VIII or IX. Objective: To review the evidence supporting the use of rFVIIa for the treatment of patients with congenital bleeding disorders. Patients and methods: English-language databases were searched in September 2009 for reports of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the ability of rFVIIa to restore hemostasis in patients with congenital bleeding disorders. Results: Eight RCTs involving 256 hemophilic patients with antibodies against coagulation factors, also known as inhibitors, were identified. The evidence supporting the use of rFVIIa in these patients was weak with regard to dose, clinical setting, mode of administration, efficacy, and adverse events, given the limited sample size of each RCT and the heterogeneity of the studies. Conclusion: The authors suggest that rFVIIa therapy in hemophilic patients with inhibitors should be based on the individual’s ability to generate thrombin and form a clot, and not on the patient’s weight alone. Therefore, assays for thrombin generation, such as whole-blood thromboelastography, have the potential to significantly improve the treatment of these patients. PMID:20689697

  15. Use of recombinant activated factor VII for acute bleeding episodes in acquired hemophilia: final analysis from the Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society Registry acquired hemophilia study

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Alice D.; Kessler, Craig M.; Al-Mondhiry, Hamid A.B.; Gut, Robert Z.; Cooper, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society Registry was used to monitor the postapproval use and safety of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa). The objective of this article is to evaluate the data from the Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society Registry related to rFVIIa-treated bleeding episodes in patients with acquired hemophilia. For each rFVIIa-treated bleeding episode, the initial dose, total dose, average infused dose, number of doses, and treatment duration were calculated. Efficacy was assessed on a three-point scale. Out of the 166 registered patients with acquired hemophilia, 110 patients were treated for 237 bleeding episodes (139 rFVIIa treated); the majority (70%) were in patients older than 60 years. The most frequently reported bleeding locations were subcutaneous (40%) and mucosal (32%). Subcutaneous bleeding episodes were more commonly reported in women (55% vs. 40% men) and white patients (44 vs. 27% black). Of the 139 rFVIIa-treated bleeding episodes, rFVIIa was used as first-line treatment in 127 bleeding episodes. The median initial dose was 90 μg/kg; the median total dose per episode was 333.5 μg/kg. Physician-rated efficacy of rFVIIa for each bleeding episode was reported as ‘bleeding stopped’ in 85% of bleeding episodes, ‘bleeding slowed’ in 11% of bleeding episodes, ‘no improvement’ in 4% of bleeding episodes, and was not documented in 1 bleeding episode. One thromboembolic event was reported; transient neurologic symptoms were reported in a 31-year-old postpartum patient after 110 doses of rFVIIa. Adequate hemostasis was provided for most rFVIIa-treated bleeding episodes at doses largely conforming to the package insert. No major safety concerns were reported. PMID:26761583

  16. Perforated peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Søreide, Kjetil; Thorsen, Kenneth; Harrison, Ewen M.; Bingener, Juliane; Møller, Morten H.; Ohene-Yeboah, Michael; Søreide, Jon Arne

    2015-01-01

    Summary Perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) is a frequent emergency condition worldwide with associated mortality up to 30%. A paucity of studies on PPU limits the knowledge base for clinical decision-making, but a few randomised trials are available. While Helicobacter pylori and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are frequent causes of PPU, demographic differences in age, gender, perforation location and aetiology exist between countries, as do mortality rates. Clinical prediction rules are used, but accuracy varies with study population. Early surgery, either by laparoscopic or open repair, and proper sepsis management are essential for good outcome. Selected patients can perhaps be managed non-operatively or with novel endoscopic approaches, but validation in trials is needed. Quality of care, sepsis care-bundles and postoperative monitoring need further evaluation. Adequate trials with low risk of bias are urgently needed for better evidence. Here we summarize the evidence for PPU management and identify directions for future clinical research. PMID:26460663

  17. Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Peptic Ulcer URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  18. Circumventing furin enhances factor VIII biological activity and ameliorates bleeding phenotypes in hemophilia models

    PubMed Central

    Siner, Joshua I.; Samelson-Jones, Benjamin J.; Crudele, Julie M.; French, Robert A.; Lee, Benjamin J.; Zhou, Shanzhen; Merricks, Elizabeth; Raymer, Robin; Camire, Rodney M.; Arruda, Valder R.

    2016-01-01

    Processing by the proprotein convertase furin is believed to be critical for the biological activity of multiple proteins involved in hemostasis, including coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). This belief prompted the retention of the furin recognition motif (amino acids 1645–1648) in the design of B-domain–deleted FVIII (FVIII-BDD) products in current clinical use and in the drug development pipeline, as well as in experimental FVIII gene therapy strategies. Here, we report that processing by furin is in fact deleterious to FVIII-BDD secretion and procoagulant activity. Inhibition of furin increases the secretion and decreases the intracellular retention of FVIII-BDD protein in mammalian cells. Our new variant (FVIII-ΔF), in which this recognition motif is removed, efficiently circumvents furin. FVIII-ΔF demonstrates increased recombinant protein yields, enhanced clotting activity, and higher circulating FVIII levels after adeno-associated viral vector–based liver gene therapy in a murine model of severe hemophilia A (HA) compared with FVIII-BDD. Moreover, we observed an amelioration of the bleeding phenotype in severe HA dogs with sustained therapeutic FVIII levels after FVIII-ΔF gene therapy at a lower vector dose than previously employed in this model. The immunogenicity of FVIII-ΔF did not differ from that of FVIII-BDD as a protein or a gene therapeutic. Thus, contrary to previous suppositions, FVIII variants that can avoid furin processing are likely to have enhanced translational potential for HA therapy. PMID:27734034

  19. Nutritional care in peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    VOMERO, Nathália Dalcin; COLPO, Elisângela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer is a lesion of the mucosal lining of the upper gastrointestinal tract characterized by an imbalance between aggressive and protective factors of the mucosa, having H. pylori as the main etiologic factor. Dietotherapy is important in the prevention and treatment of this disease. Aim To update nutritional therapy in adults' peptic ulcer. Methods Exploratory review without restrictions with primary sources indexed in Scielo, PubMed, Medline, ISI, and Scopus databases. Results Dietotherapy, as well as caloric distribution, should be adjusted to the patient's needs aiming to normalize the nutritional status and promote healing. Recommended nutrients can be different in the acute phase and in the recovery phase, and there is a greater need of protein and some micronutrients, such as vitamin A, zinc, selenium, and vitamin C in the recovery phase. In addition, some studies have shown that vitamin C has a beneficial effect in eradication of H. pylori. Fibers and probiotics also play a important role in the treatment of peptic ulcer, because they reduce the side effects of antibiotics and help reduce treatment time. Conclusion A balanced diet is vital in the treatment of peptic ulcer, once food can prevent, treat or even alleviate the symptoms involving this pathology. However, there are few papers that innovate dietotherapy; so additional studies addressing more specifically the dietotherapy for treatment of peptic ulcer are necessary. PMID:25626944

  20. Bleeding gums

    MedlinePlus

    ... line. This will lead to a condition called gingivitis , or inflamed gums. Plaque that is not removed ... Livingstone; 2009:chap 60. Read More Bleeding disorders Gingivitis Periodontitis Update Date 2/25/2014 Updated by: ...

  1. Bleeding Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause bleeding, such as endometriosis (EN-doh-MEE-tree-OH-suhss) Large bruises from a minor bump ... 8573 National Hemophilia Foundation Phone: 800-424-2634 World Federation of Hemophilia Phone: 514-875-7944 Return ...

  2. Bleeding time

    MedlinePlus

    A blood pressure cuff is inflated around your upper arm. While the cuff is on your arm, the health care provider makes two ... a tiny amount of bleeding. The blood pressure cuff is immediately deflated. Blotting paper is touched to ...

  3. [Gastroprotective action of the nettle extract in experimental peptic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Burkova, V N; Boev, S G; Vengerovskiĭ, A I; Iudina, N V; Arbuzov, A G

    2011-01-01

    Nettle extract produced from leaves crushed to 40-70 nm fragments protects the stomach mucous membrane, and does it better than the extract derived from same leaves crushed to 1 mm fragments, on the models of peptic ulcers caused by acetylsalicylic acid, histamine, prednisolone, and immobilized stress. The antiulcer activity of the nettle extract from 40-70 nm fragments is comparable with the effect of buckthorn oil. Nettle extracts also hinder the excess acid secretion and diminish the acidity of stomach juice in experimental peptic ulcer caused by pylorus ligation. PMID:21476271

  4. The use of recombinant activated factor VII for controlling life-threatening bleeding in Dengue Shock Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chuansumrit, Ampaiwan; Tangnararatchakit, Kanchana; Lektakul, Yujinda; Pongthanapisith, Viroj; Nimjaroenniyom, Nuntaporn; Thanarattanakorn, Pattra; Wongchanchailert, Malai; Komwilaisak, Patcharee

    2004-06-01

    To report the use of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in controlling life-threatening bleeding episodes in patients with grades III and IV Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF), also known as Dengue Shock Syndrome. Fifteen patients (seven boys, eight girls), whose median age was 8 years, were enrolled in the study. They were divided into two groups. Group 1 included nine patients, mainly grade III, waiting for platelet concentrate, and group 2 included six patients, mainly grade IV, who had already received platelet concentrate with unresponsiveness. A single dose or repeated doses of 100 microg/kg rFVIIa was/were given at intervals of 4 h according to the bleeding symptoms. The median times from the onset of bleeding to rFVIIa initiation were 6.5 and 29.8 h in groups 1 and 2, respectively. Each patient received one to three doses. An effective response was found in eight patients (53.3%), including six patients in group 1 and two patients in group 2. They had complete cessation of bleeding without recurrence for 48 h. An ineffective response was found in seven patients (46.7%) including three patients in group 1 and four patients in group 2 for which the bleeding recurred (n = 2), temporarily slowed down (n = 3), continued (n = 1) or occurred at a new site (n = 1). These included three patients in profound shock 24-48 h before referral to comprehensive treatment centers, two patients receiving ibuprofen before hospitalization, one patient with extensive volume overloading, and one patient requiring surgical intervention to ligate the torn intercostal artery and vein. The platelet concentrate was promptly transfused to stop bleeding in patients with ineffective responses. The results revealed that the earlier initiation of rFVIIa in the mainly grade III DHF in group 1 yielded a higher effective response (66.7%) than the delayed initiation in the mainly grade IV DHF in group 2 (33.3%). Moreover, patients previously receiving ibuprofen or volume expander of low

  5. Circuit life versus bleeding risk: the impact of achieved activated partial thromboplastin time versus achieved filtration fraction.

    PubMed

    MacEwen, Clare; Watkinson, Peter; Winearls, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    Whilst prolonging hemofilter (circuit) life, heparin increases bleeding risk. The impact of achieved activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) on circuit life and bleeding risk has not been assessed in a modern critically ill cohort. Lowering filtration fraction may be an alternative means of prolonging circuit life, but is often overlooked in critical care. An observational study of 309 consecutive circuits in a general intensive care unit was conducted using a wide target APTT range. Multilevel modeling was used to predict circuit life and bleeding according to achieved APTT and filtration fraction. Independent predictors of circuit failure (i.e. unplanned ending of treatment) included filtration fraction (P<0.001, HR 1.07 per 1% increase), peak APTT (P<0.001, HR 0.8 per 10 s increase or 0.3 APTR increase) and baseline PT (P=0.014, HR 0.91 for every 50% increase). The only significant predictor of bleeding was peak APTT (P=0.017, OR 1.05 per 10 s increase). Every 10 s APTT increase was associated with a 20% reduction in circuit failure, but a 5% increase in hemorrhage. A 3% reduction in filtration fraction was associated with the same improvement in circuit life as a 10 s increase in APTT. Increasing APTT prolongs circuit life but carries a substantial risk of bleeding even in modern practice. Filtration fraction has a large impact on circuit life in the critically ill: a 3% reduction in filtration fraction, e.g. by increasing blood flow or delivering some of the clearance via dialysis, would be expected to reduce circuit failure as much as a 10 s increase in APTT.

  6. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers. PMID:1801957

  7. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers.

  8. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C J; Kuo, C H; Chen, P C; Changcheng, C S

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-six virologically and serologically confirmed Dengue patients with signs of upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding (13.1%) were studied during the 1987 outbreak in southern Taiwan. Within a 1-yr period from 1987 to 1988 in Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, there were 198 patients with Dengue fever confirmed. Viral isolation and serological studies indicated that type I Dengue was the cause. There was no evidence of sequential secondary infection among them. The 26 patients were evaluated gastroduodenoscopically. Most of the Dengue patients who developed upper gastrointestinal bleeding had gastric ulcers or duodenal ulcers; superficial and hemorrhagic gastritis are the other relevant endoscopic findings. Thirteen patients (50%) had a past history of peptic ulcer symptoms, whereas the other 13 did not. Dengue infection is a precipitating factor in inducing peptic ulcer bleeding because of hemostatic derangements. Supportive therapy and blood transfusions alone were adequate treatment, except for one patient who required surgery due to massive bleeding of a duodenal ulcer. No mortality was observed in this study.

  9. Titrating haemophilia B phenotypes using siRNA strategy: evidence that antithrombotic activity is separated from bleeding liability.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Joseph M; Tadin-Strapps, Marija; Thankappan, Anil; Strapps, Walter R; DiPietro, Marti; Leander, Karen; Zhang, Zuo; Shin, Myung K; Levorse, John; Desai, Kunal; Xu, Yiming; Lai, KehDih; Wu, Weizhen; Chen, Zhu; Cai, Tian-Quan; Jochnowitz, Nina; Bentley, Ross; Hoos, Lizbeth; Zhou, Yuchen; Sepp-Lorenzino, Laura; Seiffert, Dietmar; Andre, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    Haemophilia A and B are characterised by a life-long bleeding predisposition, and several lines of evidence suggest that risks of atherothrombotic events may also be reduced. Establishing a direct correlation between coagulation factor levels, thrombotic risks and bleeding propensity has long been hampered by an inability to selectively and specifically inhibit coagulation factor levels. Here, the exquisite selectivity of gene silencing combined with a gene knockout (KO) approach was used to define the relative contribution of factor IX (fIX) to thrombosis and primary haemostasis in the rat. Using a lipid nanoparticle (LNP) formulation, we successfully delivered fIX siRNAs to the liver by intravenous administration. The knockdown (KD) of target gene mRNA was achieved rapidly (within 24 hour post-siRNA dosing), sustained (maintained for at least 7 days post dosing) and not associated with changes in mRNA expression levels of other coagulation factors. We found that intermediate levels of liver fIX mRNA silencing (60-95 %) translating into a 50-99 % reduction of plasma fIX activity provided protection from thrombosis without prolonging the cuticle bleeding time. Over 99 % inhibition of fIX activity was required to observe increase in bleeding, a phenotype confirmed in fIX KO rats. These data provide substantial evidence of a participation of fIX in the mechanisms regulating thrombosis prior to those regulating primary haemostasis, therefore highlighting the potential of fIX as a therapeutic target. In addition, hepatic mRNA silencing using LNP-encapsulated siRNAs may represent a promising novel approach for the chronic treatment and prevention of coagulation-dependent thrombotic disorders in humans.

  10. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems for therapeutic management of peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Garg, Tarun; Kumar, Animesh; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    A peptic ulcer, stomach ulcer, or gastric ulcer, also known as peptic ulcer disease (PUD), is a very common chronic disorder of the stomach which is mainly caused by damage or impairment of the stomach lining. Various factors such as pepsin, gastric acid, H. pylori, NSAIDs, prostaglandins, mucus, bicarbonate, and blood flow to mucosa play an important role in causing peptic ulcers. In this review article, our main focus is on some important gastroretentive drug delivery systems (GRDDS) (floating, bioadhesive, high density, swellable, raft forming, superporous hydrogel, and magnetic systems) which will be helpful in gastroretention of different dosage forms for treatment of peptic ulcer. GRDDS provides a mean for controlled release of compounds that are absorbed by active transport in the upper intestine. It also enables controlled delivery for paracellularly absorbed drugs without a decrease in bioavailability. The above approaches are specific for targeting and leading to a marked improvement in the quality of life for a large number of patients. In the future, it is expected that they will become of growing significance, finally leading to improved efficiencies of various types of pharmacotherapies.

  11. Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding - review the effectiveness of endoscopic hemostasis methods

    PubMed Central

    Szura, Mirosław; Pasternak, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding is a condition that requires immediate medical intervention and has a high associated mortality rate (exceeding 10%). The vast majority of upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases are due to peptic ulcers. Helicobacter pylori infection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin are the main risk factors for peptic ulcer disease. Endoscopic therapy has generally been recommended as the first-line treatment for upper gastrointestinal bleeding as it has been shown to reduce recurrent bleeding, the need for surgery and mortality. Early endoscopy (within 24 h of hospital admission) has a greater impact than delayed endoscopy on the length of hospital stay and requirement for blood transfusion. This paper aims to review and compare the efficacy of the types of endoscopic hemostasis most commonly used to control non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding by pooling data from the literature. PMID:26421105

  12. Role of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Roja

    2015-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a multifactorial and complex disease involving gastric and duodenal ulcers. Despite medical advances, the management of peptic ulcer and its complications remains a challenge, with high morbidity and death rates for the disease. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that, among a broad reach of natural molecules, dietary polyphenols with multiple biological mechanisms of action play a pivotal part in the management of gastric and duodenal ulcers. The current review confirmed that dietary polyphenols possess protective and therapeutic potential in peptic ulcer mediated by: improving cytoprotection, re-epithelialization, neovascularization, and angiogenesis; up-regulating tissue growth factors and prostaglandins; down-regulating anti-angiogenic factors; enhancing endothelial nitric oxide synthase-derived NO; suppressing oxidative mucosal damage; amplifying antioxidant performance, antacid, and anti-secretory activity; increasing endogenous mucosal defensive agents; and blocking Helicobacter pylori colonization associated gastric morphological changes and gastroduodenal inflammation and ulceration. In addition, anti-inflammatory activity due to down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and cellular and intercellular adhesion agents, suppressing leukocyte-endothelium interaction, inhibiting nuclear signaling pathways of inflammatory process, and modulating intracellular transduction and transcription pathways have key roles in the anti-ulcer action of dietary polyphenols. In conclusion, administration of a significant amount of dietary polyphenols in the human diet or as part of dietary supplementation along with conventional treatment can result in perfect security and treatment of peptic ulcer. Further well-designed preclinical and clinical tests are recommended in order to recognize higher levels of evidence for the confirmation of bioefficacy and safety of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer. PMID:26074689

  13. Role of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Roja

    2015-06-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a multifactorial and complex disease involving gastric and duodenal ulcers. Despite medical advances, the management of peptic ulcer and its complications remains a challenge, with high morbidity and death rates for the disease. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that, among a broad reach of natural molecules, dietary polyphenols with multiple biological mechanisms of action play a pivotal part in the management of gastric and duodenal ulcers. The current review confirmed that dietary polyphenols possess protective and therapeutic potential in peptic ulcer mediated by: improving cytoprotection, re-epithelialization, neovascularization, and angiogenesis; up-regulating tissue growth factors and prostaglandins; down-regulating anti-angiogenic factors; enhancing endothelial nitric oxide synthase-derived NO; suppressing oxidative mucosal damage; amplifying antioxidant performance, antacid, and anti-secretory activity; increasing endogenous mucosal defensive agents; and blocking Helicobacter pylori colonization associated gastric morphological changes and gastroduodenal inflammation and ulceration. In addition, anti-inflammatory activity due to down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and cellular and intercellular adhesion agents, suppressing leukocyte-endothelium interaction, inhibiting nuclear signaling pathways of inflammatory process, and modulating intracellular transduction and transcription pathways have key roles in the anti-ulcer action of dietary polyphenols. In conclusion, administration of a significant amount of dietary polyphenols in the human diet or as part of dietary supplementation along with conventional treatment can result in perfect security and treatment of peptic ulcer. Further well-designed preclinical and clinical tests are recommended in order to recognize higher levels of evidence for the confirmation of bioefficacy and safety of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer.

  14. Computed tomographic findings in penetrating peptic ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Madrazo, B.L.; Halpert, R.D.; Sandler, M.A.; Pearlberg, J.L.

    1984-12-01

    Four cases of peptic ulcer penetrating the head of the pancreas were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT). Findings common to 3 cases included (a) an ulcer crater, (b) a sinus tract, and (c) enlargement of the head of the pancreas. Unlike other modalities, the inherent spatial resolution of CT allows a convenient diagnosis of this important complication of peptic ulcer disease.

  15. Successful Control of Massive Bleeding in a Child with Burkitt's Lymphoma via a Biosimilar Recombinant Activated Factor VII (AryoSeven™)

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi Pour, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a 4-year-old girl with Burkitt's lymphoma, who suffered from a massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage 3 days after chemotherapy. In spite of applying the common practice in correction of coagulopathy, thrombocytopenia persisted and bleeding became life-threatening. In the present case report, we report a successful control of bleeding with a single-dose administration of a biosimilar recombinant activated human factor VII (AryoSeven). PMID:27478659

  16. Triple gastric peptic ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Radojkovic, Milan; Mihajlovic, Suncica; Stojanovic, Miroslav; Stanojevic, Goran; Damnjanovic, Zoran

    2016-03-01

    Patients with advanced or metastatic cancer have compromised nutritional, metabolic, and immune conditions. Nevertheless, little is known about gastroduodenal perforation in cancer patients. Described in the present report is the case of a 41-year old woman with stage IV recurrent laryngeal cancer, who used homeopathic anticancer therapy and who had triple peptic ulcer perforation (PUP) that required surgical repair. Triple gastric PUP is a rare complication. Self-administration of homeopathic anticancer medication should be strongly discouraged when evidence-based data regarding efficacy and toxicity is lacking.

  17. Endovascular Treatment of Active Splenic Bleeding After Colonoscopy: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Corcillo, Antonella; Aellen, Steve Zingg, Tobias; Bize, Pierre; Demartines, Nicolas; Denys, Alban

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Colonoscopy is reported to be a safe procedure that is routinely performed for the diagnosis and treatment of colorectal diseases. Splenic rupture is considered to be a rare complication with high mortality and morbidity that requires immediate diagnosis and management. Nonoperative management (NOM), surgical treatment (ST), and, more recently, proximal splenic artery embolization (PSAE) have been proposed as treatment options. The goal of this study was to assess whether PSAE is safe even in high-grade ruptures. Methods: We report two rare cases of post colonoscopy splenic rupture. A systematic review of the literature from 2002 to 2010 (first reported case of PSAE) was performed and the three types of treatment compared. Results: All patients reviewed (77 of 77) presented with intraperitoneal hemorrhage due to isolated splenic trauma. Splenic rupture was high-grade in most patients when grading was possible. Six of 77 patients (7.8 %) were treated with PSAE, including the 2 cases reported herein. Fifty-seven patients (74 %) underwent ST. NOM was attempted first in 25 patients with a high failure rate (11 of 25 [44 %]) and requiring a salvage procedure, such as PSAE or ST. Previous surgery (31 of 59 patients), adhesions (10 of 13), diagnostic colonoscopies (49 of 71), previous biopsies or polypectomies (31 of 57) and female sex (56 of 77) were identified as risk factors. In contrast, splenomegaly (0 of 77 patients), medications that increase the risk of bleeding (13 of 30) and difficult colonoscopies (16 of 51) were not identified as risk factors. PSAE was safe and effective even in elderly patients with comorbidities and those taking medications that increase the risk of bleeding, and the length of the hospital stay was similar to that after ST. Conclusion: We propose a treatment algorithm based on clinical and radiological criteria. Because of the high failure rate after NOM, PSAE should be the treatment of choice to manage grade I through IV splenic

  18. Evaluation of Aryoseven Safety (Recombinant Activated Factor VII) in Patients with Bleeding Disorders (An Observational Post-Marketing Surveillance Study)

    PubMed Central

    Toogeh, Gholamreza; Abolghasemi, Hassan; Eshghi, Peyman; Managhchi, Mohammadreza; Shaverdi-niasari, Mohammadreza; Karimi, Katayoon; Roostaei, Samin; Emran, Neda; Abdollahi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recombinant activated factor VII induces hemostasis in patients with coagulopathy disorders. AryoSeven™ as a safe Iranian Recombinant activated factor VII has been available on our market. This study was performed to establish the safety of AryoSeven on patients with coagulopathy disorder. Methods: This single-center, descriptive, cross sectional study was carried out in Thrombus and Homeostasis Research Center ValiAsr Hospital during 2013-2014. Fifty one patients with bleeding disorders who received at least one dose of Aryoseven were enrolled. Patients’ demographic data and adverse effect of drug and reaction related to Aryoseven or previous usage of Recombinant activated FVII were recorded in questionnaires. Finally data were analyzed to compare side effects of Aryoseven and other Recombinant activated FVII brands. Results: Aryoseven was prescribed for 51 Patients. Of all participants with mean age 57.18+21.38 yr, 31 cases were male and 26 subjects had past history of recombinant activated FVII usage. Glanzman was the most frequent disorder followed by congenital FVII deficiency, hemophilia with inhibitors, factor 5 deficiency, acquired hemophilia, hemophilia A with inhibitor, and hemophilia A or B with inhibitor. The majority of bleeding episodes had occurred in joints. Three patients (5.9%) complained about adverse effects of Aryoseven vs. 11.5 % about adverse effects of other brands. However this difference was not significant, statistically. Conclusion: Based on monitor patients closely for any adverse events, we concluded that Aryoseven administration under careful weighing of benefit versus potential harm may comparable with other counterpart drugs. PMID:27799968

  19. Laparoscopic Peptic Ulcer Perforation Closure: the Preferred Choice.

    PubMed

    Shah, Franal H; Mehta, Sudhir G; Gandhi, Mona D; Saraj

    2015-12-01

    Peptic ulcer perforation is a common life-threatening emergency needing immediate intervention. Laparoscopic closure of perforation is now widely practiced over conventional open closure. This study aimed to compare laparoscopic peptic ulcer perforation closure with conventional open closure in terms of operative time, postoperative analgesia, complications, hospital stay, and return to routine activities. This unicentric, nonblinded, prospective, randomized study was carried out in 50 patients with peptic ulcer perforation who were randomly allocated to undergo either laparoscopic closure or open closure surgery with 25 patients in each group. The mean operative time (60 vs 90 min) was less in the laparoscopic group (p < 0.05). Postoperative analgesia requirements (1 vs 6 days) were also less in laparoscopic patients (p < 0.05). Complications (nil vs 6; p < 0.05) and hospital stay (3 vs 8 days) were less in laparoscopic patients (p < 0.05). Patients return to normal activities (5 vs 10 days; p < 0.05) earlier in laparoscopic perforation closure than in open closure. Our study has shown better outcomes and lesser morbidities with laparoscopic approach in terms of shorter operative time, shorter hospital stay, less analgesic requirements, and less wound infections. Patients also return to routine activities earlier with the laparoscopic approach. It is a safe alternative to open surgery and should be a preferred choice when there are no contraindications to laparoscopy.

  20. [Peptic ulcer and Helicobacter pylori. Comments on the authors' cases].

    PubMed

    Dallera, F; Gendarini, A; Scanzi, G

    1993-01-01

    The presence of Helicobacter was tested on a group with antral or duodenal ulcer with or without gastritis, versus a group without gastric or duodenal pathology. Furthermore an open trial was performed between omeprazole and colloidal bismuth subcitrate (CBS) on patients similarly affected by peptic disease. Although CBS did eliminate Helicobacter in more than a half of patients, what was not obtained by omeprazole, this result did not mean a better control of peptic disease: in fact the omeprazole was remarkably more active in our series on clinical and endoscopic ground, whether the Helicobacter was present or not, and further studies are required to assess the real significance of Helicobacter pylori in the above conditions.

  1. Prostaglandins, H2-receptor antagonists and peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Bright-Asare, P; Habte, T; Yirgou, B; Benjamin, J

    1988-01-01

    Peptic ulcer develops when offensive factors overwhelm defensive processes in the gastroduodenal mucosa. Offensive factors include NSAIDs, hydrochloric acid-peptic activity, bile reflux, and some products of the lipoxygenase pathway such as leukotriene B4; whereas defensive processes are largely mediated by prostaglandins through poorly understood mechanisms uniformly termed cytoprotection. Cytoprotection, a physiological process working through the products of arachidonic acid metabolism, may result from the net effect of the protective actions of prostaglandins versus the damaging actions of leukotrienes. Some prostaglandins also have antisecretory effects. Therefore the peptic ulcer healing effects of prostaglandin analogues, all of which have significant antisecretory activity, may be more due to their antisecretory effects than primarily to their effects on mucosal defences. Certain drug-induced gastroduodenal lesions, e.g. NSAID-induced ulcers, which are often unresponsive to H2-receptor antagonists, have been healed and their recurrence prevented by the use of PGE1 and PGE2 analogues. All the prostaglandin analogues investigated to date in humans have the potential for inducing abortion, an important side effect which may limit their worldwide use. The optimal prostaglandin analogue for ulcer healing should not induce abortion and should be potently cytoprotective. The predominant damaging agent in the development of peptic ulcer disease is gastric hydrochloric acid. Thus, the worldwide established efficacy and safety of H2-receptor antagonists such as cimetidine, ranitidine, famotidine and most recently of roxatidine acetate suggest that these agents have become the standard by which other forms of anti-ulcer therapy should be judged. PMID:2905237

  2. An endoscopic laser Doppler flowmetry of a gastroduodenal mucosa at bleeding ulcer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapkin, U. G.; Kapralov, C. V.; Gogolev, A. A.; Lychagov, V. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2006-08-01

    One of the important problems of a bleeding gastroduodenal ulcer surgery is a prognosis of the recurrent hemorrhage and appraisal of endoscopic hemostasis quality. Endoscopic Laser Doppler Flowmetry of a mucous coat of stomach and a duodenum was made on 34 patients for the purpose of investigation of features of microcirculation. Analogous researches are made on 30 patients with a peptic ulcer and on 28 practically healthy people. Analysis of LDF-grams has shown certain differences in regional microcirculations in stomach and duodenal at normal and at a pathology. Increase of regional perfusion in periulcerose zone with its pathology disbalance can serve as a criterion for activities of an alteration processes in gastroduodenal ulcer defining the risk of possible hemorrhage.

  3. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal uterine bleeding is any bleeding from the uterus (through your vagina) other than your normal monthly ... or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, ...

  4. Bleeding esophageal varices

    MedlinePlus

    ... air. This produces pressure against the bleeding veins (balloon tamponade). Once the bleeding is stopped, other varices can be treated with medicines and medical procedures to prevent future bleeding, including: Drugs called ...

  5. Young onset peptic ulcer disease and non-ulcer dyspepsia are separate entities.

    PubMed

    Cederberg, A; Varis, K; Salmi, H A; Sipponen, P; Härkönen, M; Sarna, S

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of peptic ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia in young men were studied in 202 consecutive conscripts who attended Central Military Hospital in Helsinki because of long-standing upper abdominal complaints. Active peptic ulceration (APU) was found in 48 patients, inactive peptic ulcer disease (IPU) was diagnosed in 77 patients, non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) was diagnosed in 52 patients. In 25 cases the reason for symptoms was another disease, and these patients were excluded from the study. A control series (CON) consisted of 30 symptomless healthy young male volunteers. The likelihood of discriminating between peptic ulcer disease and non-ulcer dyspepsia in a young male patient with dyspepsia are indicated by odds ratios (OR) and its 95% confidence limits (CL 95). Active peptic ulcer disease differs from NUD, e.g., by 1) presence of antrum gastritis, OR 41.5 (CL 95: 10.1-171), 2) Helicobacter pylori in the gastric mucosa, OR 31.0 (7.4-130), 3) Lewisa+ phenotype, OR 8.9 (1.7-45.4), 4) serum pepsinogen I (S-PGI) greater than 100 micrograms/l, OR 4.6 (1.7-12.4), 5) non-secretor status, OR 4.3 (1.6-11.6), and 6) O-blood group, OR 3.0 (1.2-7.7). In conclusion, the status of gastroduodenal mucosa, gastric secretion pattern and distribution of some genetic markers in patient series indicate that young onset peptic ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia are two separate entities. Helicobacter-positive antrum gastritis is the best determinant of ulcer risk, but also high S-PGI, Lewisa+ phenotype, non-secretor status and O-blood group are signs of increased risk of peptic ulcer.

  6. [Peptic ulcer surgery in the aged].

    PubMed

    Michel, D

    1981-04-01

    Particular problems are discussed in 257 patients over 75 years of age, who were treated for peptic ulcer disease between 1960 and 1979. In elderly patients the peptic ulcer is complicated, often requiring emergency surgery. A special problem in the aged is simultaneous appearance of various sicknesses, which produces further complications. The chosen method of surgery is described and the post-operative period and its general and surgical problems are discussed. The result is a concept of indication for surgery, particularly for the elective operation of chronic ulcers not responding to therapy, before the ulcer becomes complicated. PMID:7227008

  7. [Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug and Aspirin-induced Peptic Ulcer Disease].

    PubMed

    Shim, Young Kwang; Kim, Nayoung

    2016-06-25

    Despite decreasing Helicobacter pylori prevalence, the prevalence of peptic ulcer disease is increasing in the aged population, mainly due to increasing use of NSAIDs to manage pain and inflammation. In addition, low dose aspirin is employed as an anti-coagulant for those who have suffered or are at high risk of ischemic stroke and cardiovascular disease. However, NSAIDs and aspirin are injurious to mucosa of stomach and duodenum. NSAID-induced inhibition of mucosal prostaglandin synthesis is thought to be a major mechanism of gastrointestinal mucosal injury. The proportion of elderly has increased rapidly in Korea, with the proportion over 65 years old expected to be 24.3% in 2030. In this higher-risk population, the strategy to reduce the incidence of NSAID-related peptic ulcers and complications such as bleeding, obstruction and perforation is very important. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor can be used for reducing the risk of NSAID-related ulcers and upper gastrointestinal (GI) complications. However, continuous use of PPI has several problems. In addition, NSAID-related problems in the lower GI tract have increased, in contrast to the decrease of NSAID-related upper GI disease. The aim of this review is to provide an evidence-based knowledge regarding the mechanism, complications of treatment, and prevention strategies for NSAID- or aspirin-related peptic ulcer disease in Korea.

  8. Effect of High-Dose-Rate {sup 192}Ir Source Activity on Late Rectal Bleeding After Intracavitary Radiation Therapy for Uterine Cervix Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Osamu Yoshioka, Yasuo; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Morimoto, Masahiro; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Kawaguchi, Yoshifumi; Konishi, Koji; Nakamura, Satoaki; Shiomi, Hiroya; Inoue, Takehiro

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: This retrospective study analyzed the effect of the activity of high-dose-rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir source on late rectal bleeding after HDR intracavitary radiotherapy (ICRT) in patients with uterine cervix cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred thirty-two patients who underwent HDR-ICRT and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) were analyzed. The rectal point dose in ICRT was calculated by inserting a lead wire into the rectal lumen and summed with the whole-pelvic EBRT dose. The rectal biologic effective dose (BED) was calculated. The relationship between averaged source activity or the BED and late rectal bleeding were analyzed. Results: Three-year actuarial rectal bleeding probabilities were 46% ({>=}100 Gy{sub 3}) and 18% ({<=} 100 Gy{sub 3}), respectively (p < 0.005). When patients were divided into four groups according to rectal BED ({>=} or {<=}100 Gy{sub 3}) and source activity ({>=} or {<=}2.4 cGy.m{sup 2}.h{sup -1}), the group with both a high BED and high activity showed significantly greater probability (58% at 3 years; p < 0.005). It was noted that the probability of the group with BED of 100 Gy{sub 3} or greater was high, but that was not the case with 2.4 cGy.m{sup 2}.h{sup -1} or less. Conclusion: This is the first clinical report concerning the source activity effect of HDR {sup 192}Ir on late rectal bleeding in patients undergoing HDR-ICRT. This suggests that when source activity is higher than 2.4 cGy.m{sup 2}.h{sup -1}, ICRT should be performed with more caution not to exceed 100 Gy{sub 3} in total.

  9. Vaginal bleeding - hormonal

    MedlinePlus

    ... in heavy menstrual bleeding: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Obstet Gynecol . 2009;113:1104-16. PMID: ... Mirena) for heavy menstrual bleeding: systematic review and meta-analysis of data from individual patients. BMJ . 2010 ...

  10. Symptoms and Causes of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ulcer Disease Next: Diagnosis of Peptic Ulcer Disease Digestive Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients and medical professionals. View the full list of Digestive Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ NIH...Turning Discovery ...

  11. Definition and Facts for Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next: Symptoms and Causes of Peptic Ulcer Disease Digestive Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients and medical professionals. View the full list of Digestive Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ NIH...Turning Discovery ...

  12. Acid peptic diseases: pharmacological approach to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Alex; Kraft, Walter K

    2011-01-01

    Acid peptic disorders are the result of distinctive, but overlapping pathogenic mechanisms leading to either excessive acid secretion or diminished mucosal defense. They are common entities present in daily clinical practice that, owing to their chronicity, represent a significant cost to healthcare. Key elements in the success of controlling these entities have been the development of potent and safe drugs based on physiological targets. The histamine-2 receptor antagonists revolutionized the treatment of acid peptic disorders owing to their safety and efficacy profile. The proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) represent a further therapeutic advance due to more potent inhibition of acid secretion. Ample data from clinical trials and observational experience have confirmed the utility of these agents in the treatment of acid peptic diseases, with differential efficacy and safety characteristics between and within drug classes. Paradigms in their speed and duration of action have underscored the need for new chemical entities that, from a single dose, would provide reliable duration of acid control, particularly at night. Moreover, PPIs reduce, but do not eliminate, the risk of ulcers in patients taking NSAIDs, reflecting untargeted physiopathologic pathways and a breach in the ability to sustain an intragastric pH of more than 4. This review provides an assessment of the current understanding of the physiology of acid production, a discussion of medications targeting gastric acid production and a review of efficacy in specific acid peptic diseases, as well as current challenges and future directions in the treatment of acid-mediated diseases. PMID:21822447

  13. Perforated peptic ulcer: how to improve outcome?

    PubMed

    Møller, Morten Hylander; Adamsen, Sven; Wøjdemann, Morten; Møller, Ann Merete

    2009-01-01

    Despite the introduction of histamine H2-receptor antagonists, proton-pump inhibitors and the discovery of Helicobacter pylori, both the incidence of emergency surgery for perforated peptic ulcer and the mortality rate for patients undergoing surgery for peptic ulcer perforation have increased. This increase has occurred despite improvements in perioperative treatment and monitoring. To improve the outcome of these patients, it is necessary to investigate the reasons behind this high mortality rate. In this review we evaluate the existing evidence in order to identify significant risk factors with an emphasis on risks that are preventable. A systematic review including randomized studies was carried out. There are a limited number of studies of patients with peptic ulcer perforation. Most of these studies are of low evident status. Only a few randomized, controlled trials have been published. The mortality rate and the extent of postoperative complications are fairly high but the reasons for this have not been thoroughly explained, even though a number of risk factors have been identified. Some of these risk factors can be explained by the septic state of the patient on admission. In order to improve the outcome of patients with peptic ulcer perforation, sepsis needs to be factored into the existing knowledge and treatment.

  14. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Biecker, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions, erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application (oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased. PMID:26558151

  15. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Biecker, Erwin

    2015-11-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions, erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application (oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased. PMID:26558151

  16. Results of the WIRK prospective, non-interventional observational study of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in patients with congenital haemophilia with inhibitors and other bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Birschmann, I; Klamroth, R; Eichler, H; Schenk, J; Kirchmaier, C M; Halimeh, S

    2013-09-01

    Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) has been available for the treatment of acute bleeding and for prevention of bleeding during surgery and invasive procedures in patients with congenital haemophilia with inhibitors (CHwI) and acquired haemophilia since 1996. The study objective was to assess the efficacy and safety of rFVIIa in patients with CHwI, acquired haemophilia, congenital FVII deficiency and Glanzmann's thrombasthenia, in a real-life clinical setting. There were no specific inclusion or exclusion criteria; participation was offered to all German haemophilia centres known to use rFVIIa to treat patients with the above indications. Data on rFVIIa use and efficacy for the treatment of acute bleeding episodes and invasive procedures were recorded. Adverse drug reactions and recurrent bleeding episodes were also monitored. In total, 64 patients (50.0% women) received rFVIIa treatment. Patients experienced 281 evaluable bleeding episodes and underwent 44 invasive procedures. In 252 of 281 (89.7%) bleeding episodes, a stop (66.5%) or a significant reduction (23.1%) in bleeding was observed. No bleeding complications were reported for 42 of 44 (95.5%) invasive procedures covered with rFVIIa. A clear positive association was observed between early initiation of rFVIIa treatment for acute bleeding and efficacy. The total cumulative dose and number of injections were 468.3 ± 545.8 μg kg(-1) and 3.6 ± 4.6 respectively. No drug-related adverse events were reported. rFVIIa use in Germany provided effective haemostatic cover without associated adverse events in the management of acute bleeds and invasive procedures across a range of bleeding disorders.

  17. Effect of Ramadan fasting on acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Amine, El Mekkaoui; Kaoutar, Saâda; Ihssane, Mellouki; Adil, Ibrahimi; Dafr-Allah, Benajah

    2013-01-01

    Background: Prolonged fasting may precipitate or exacerbate gastrointestinal complaints. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation between Ramadan fasting and acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB), and to assess characteristics of those occurred in the holly month. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis was conducted for all patients, who underwent endoscopy for AUGIB in Ramadan (R) and the month before Ramadan (BR). Epidemiological, clinical and etiological characteristics and outcome of patients having AUGIB were compared between the two periods from 2001 to 2010. Results: Two hundred and ninety-one patients had endoscopy for AUGIB during the two periods study. There was an increasing trend in the overall number of patients in Ramadan period (n = 132, 45.4% versus n = 159, 54.6%), especially with duodenal ulcer (n = 48, 37.2% versus n = 81, 62.8%). The most frequent etiology was peptic ulcer but it was more observed in group R than in group BR (46.2% versus 57.9%, P = 0.04), especially duodenal ulcer (36.4% versus 50.3%, P = 0.01); this finding persisted in multivariable modeling (adjusted odds ratio: 1.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-2.69, P = 0.03). In contrast, there was a decreasing trend in rate of variceal bleeding from BR period (26.5%) to R period (18.9%; P = 0.11). Regarding the outcome, there were no significant differences between the two periods of the study: Recurrent bleeding (10.6% versus 7.5%, P = 0.36) and mortality rate (5.3% versus 4.4%, P = 0.7). Conclusion: The most frequent etiology of AUGIB was peptic ulcer during Ramadan. However, Ramadan fasting did not influence the outcome of the patients. Prophylactic measures should be taken for people with risk factors for peptic ulcer disease. PMID:23930121

  18. The use of hemospray in portal hypertensive bleeding; a case series.

    PubMed

    Smith, L A; Morris, A J; Stanley, A J

    2014-02-01

    Hemospray is a haemostatic agent licensed for endoscopic haemostasis of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) in Europe and Canada. Hemospray has been shown to be safe and effective in achieving haemostasis in bleeding peptic ulcers in a prospective clinical study and several further case series have described the use of hemospray in other non-variceal causes of gastrointestinal bleeding. Portal hypertensive gastropathy and colopathy are common in patients with portal hypertension. As hemospray is an easy to apply, non-contact method, which can cover large areas of mucosa, it may be of benefit in acute non-variceal portal hypertensive bleeding. We present data from the first four consecutive patients presenting to our institution with acute haemorrhage secondary to non-variceal diffuse portal hypertensive bleeding treated with hemospray.

  19. [Direct oral anticoagulant associated bleeding].

    PubMed

    Godier, A; Martin, A-C; Rosencher, N; Susen, S

    2016-07-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) are recommended for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. However, they are associated with hemorrhagic complications. Management of DOAC-induced bleeding remains challenging. Activated or non-activated prothrombin concentrates are proposed, although their efficacy to reverse DOAC is uncertain. Therapeutic options also include antidotes: idarucizumab, antidote for dabigatran, has been approved for use whereas andexanet alpha, antidote for anti-Xa agents, and aripazine, antidote for all DOAC, are under development. Other options include hemodialysis for the treatment of dabigatran-associated bleeding and administration of oral charcoal if recent DOAC ingestion. DOAC plasma concentration measurement is necessary to guide DOAC reversal. We propose an update on DOAC-associated bleeding, integrating the availability of dabigatran antidote and the critical place of DOAC concentration measurements. PMID:27297642

  20. [Direct oral anticoagulant associated bleeding].

    PubMed

    Godier, A; Martin, A-C; Rosencher, N; Susen, S

    2016-07-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) are recommended for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. However, they are associated with hemorrhagic complications. Management of DOAC-induced bleeding remains challenging. Activated or non-activated prothrombin concentrates are proposed, although their efficacy to reverse DOAC is uncertain. Therapeutic options also include antidotes: idarucizumab, antidote for dabigatran, has been approved for use whereas andexanet alpha, antidote for anti-Xa agents, and aripazine, antidote for all DOAC, are under development. Other options include hemodialysis for the treatment of dabigatran-associated bleeding and administration of oral charcoal if recent DOAC ingestion. DOAC plasma concentration measurement is necessary to guide DOAC reversal. We propose an update on DOAC-associated bleeding, integrating the availability of dabigatran antidote and the critical place of DOAC concentration measurements.

  1. Characterization of multiple platelet activation pathways in patients with bleeding as a high-throughput screening option: use of 96-well Optimul assay

    PubMed Central

    Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C.; Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Chan, Melissa V.; Lundberg, Martina H.; Morgan, Neil V.; Bem, Danai; Nisar, Shaista P.; Leo, Vincenzo C.; Jones, Matthew L.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Daly, Martina E.; Mumford, Andrew D.; Warner, Timothy D.; Watson, Steve P.; Watson, Steve P.; Mumford, Andrew D.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Gissen, Paul; Daly, Martina E.; Lester, Will; Clark, Justin; Williams, Mike; Motwani, Jayashree; Marshall, Dianne; Nyatanga, Priscilla; Mann, Pat; Kirwan, Julie; Wilde, Jonathan; Dunkley, Tracey; Greenway, April; Makris, Michael; Pavord, Sue; Dattani, Rashesh; Grimley, Gerry Dolan Charlotte; Stokley, Simone; Astwood, Emma; Chang, Cherry; Foros, Merri; Trower, Linda; Thachil, Jecko; Hay, Charlie; Pike, Gill; Will, Andrew; Grainger, John; Foulkes, Matt; Fareh, Mona; Talks, Kate; Biss, Tina; Kesteven, Patrick; Hanley, John; Vowles, Julie; Basey, Lesley; Barnes, Michelle; Collins, Peter; Rayment, Rachel; Alikhan, Raza; Morris, Ana Guerrero Rebecca; Mansell, Dianne; Toh, Cheng Hock; Martlew, Vanessa; Murphy, Elaine; Lachmann, Robin; Rose, Peter; Chapman, Oliver; Lokare, Anand; Marshall, Kathryn; Khan, Naseem; Keeling, David; Giangrande, Paul; Austin, Steve; Bevan, David; Alamelu, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Up to 1% of the population have mild bleeding disorders, but these remain poorly characterized, particularly with regard to the roles of platelets. We have compared the usefulness of Optimul, a 96-well plate-based assay of 7 distinct pathways of platelet activation to characterize inherited platelet defects in comparison with light transmission aggregometry (LTA). Using Optimul and LTA, concentration-response curves were generated for arachidonic acid, ADP, collagen, epinephrine, Thrombin receptor activating-peptide, U46619, and ristocetin in samples from (1) healthy volunteers (n = 50), (2) healthy volunteers treated with antiplatelet agents in vitro (n = 10), and (3) patients with bleeding of unknown origin (n = 65). The assays gave concordant results in 82% of cases (κ = 0.62, P < .0001). Normal platelet function results were particularly predictive (sensitivity, 94%; negative predictive value, 91%), whereas a positive result was not always substantiated by LTA (specificity, 67%; positive predictive value, 77%). The Optimul assay was significantly more sensitive at characterizing defects in the thromboxane pathway, which presented with normal responses with LTA. The Optimul assay is sensitive to mild platelet defects, could be used as a rapid screening assay in patients presenting with bleeding symptoms, and detects changes in platelet function more readily than LTA. This trial was registered at www.isrctn.org as #ISRCTN 77951167. PMID:24408324

  2. [Aggressive factors in the physiopathology of peptic ulcer. Recent findings].

    PubMed

    Testino, G

    1996-06-01

    The peptic ulcer (PU) is characterized by definite gastric cyto-secretory profiles. In case of duodenal ulcer (DU) and pre-pyloric gastric ulcer (PPGU), there is a prevalence of hyperparietalism with hyperchloridria, while in ulcer with body-fundic localization (BFGU) normo-hypoparietalism with normo-hypochloridria prevails. As well, the total peptic activity follows a superimposable course: it increases in cases of DU and PPGU, while it remains in the normal range in case of BFGU. With reference to the qualitative variations of pepsin, in course of PU the amount of pepsin 1 increases significantly. Such pepsin has a powerful proteolytic action even at high pH: which explains the possible onset of PU even in hypochloridria conditions. Helicobacter pylori (HP) has revolutionized the pathogenetic approach towards the gastric pathology: in 75% of cases there are alterations of the mucosae superficial profile, micropapillary changes, erosions, vacuolations with cellular degeneration. In 90% of cases is present chronic active inflammation in correspondence of the glandular neck of the gastric epithelium. In 70% of cases of BFGU there are qualitative alterations of the superficial epithelium. The gastric anatomic-functional behaviour, however, has an autonomous course and it is not influenced by the presence of infection. It results, therefore, that the bacterium is an important cofactor in PU pathogenesis by means of a direct cytotoxic-enzymatic action, without influencing a secretory behaviour which, in PU, is substantially conditioned by the genetic characteristics of the patient.

  3. The missense Thr211Pro mutation in the factor X activation peptide of a bleeding patient causes molecular defect in the clotting cascade.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qiulan; Shen, Yiping; Yang, Likui; Wang, Xuefeng; Rezaie, Alireza R

    2013-07-01

    Factor X (FX) is a vitamin K-dependent coagulation zymogen, which upon activation to factor Xa assembles into the prothrombinase complex to activate prothrombin to thrombin. FX can be activated by either factor VIIa-tissue factor or factor IXa-factor VIIIa in extrinsic and intrinsic pathways, respectively. In this study, we identified a bleeding patient with moderate FX deficiency who exhibits a clotting defect only in the intrinsic pathway. Exome sequencing revealed that the patient carries a novel homozygous missense mutation that results in substitution of Thr211 with Pro in the activation peptide of FX. Thr211 is the site of an O-linked glycosylation in the activation peptide of FX. We postulated that the lack of this post-translational modification specifically impacts the activation of FX by intrinsic Xase, thereby impairing thrombin generation in the subject. To test this hypothesis, we expressed both wild-type FX and FX containing this mutation in mammalian cells and following the purification of the zymogens to homogeneity characterized their properties in both purified and plasma-based assay systems. Analysis of the results suggests that Thr211 to Pro substitution renders the FX mutant a poor substrate for both physiological activators, however, at physiological concentration of the substrate, the clotting defect manifest itself only in the intrinsic pathway, thus explaining the bleeding phenotype for the patient carrying this mutation. PMID:23677006

  4. Computed tomographic staging of traumatic epidural bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.

    1982-09-01

    The computed tomographic findings in 45 patients with post-traumatic epidural hemotomas are subdivided into three categories (acute, subacute, and chronic) and correlated with the severity of bleeding, clot formation, and clot resorption. Active epidural bleeding may be identified in acute cases.

  5. Bleeding diathesis and hemophilias.

    PubMed

    Amin, Chirag; Sharathkumar, Anjali; Griest, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Patients with hemophilia and other congenital bleeding disorders are at risk for development of central nervous system (CNS) hemorrhage and can present with acute or chronic neurologic symptoms. These disorders are generally caused by qualitative or quantitative deficiency of components of hemostasis such as coagulation proteins, von Willebrand factor, or platelets. Rapid diagnosis and specific medical management such as coagulation factor replacement therapy are mandatory to minimize the morbidity and mortality of CNS bleeding. Therefore, the objective of this chapter is to introduce neurologists to the physiology of hemostasis and to provide an overview of the clinical presentation, and management of inherited bleeding disorders that can potentially present with CNS bleeding. Since hemophilia is the most common bleeding disorder encountered in clinical practice, more emphasis is placed on management of hemophilia. Additionally, neurologic manifestations related to the bleeding diathesis in patients with hemophilia are elaborated. PMID:24365370

  6. Bleeding and cupping.

    PubMed Central

    Turk, J. L.; Allen, E.

    1983-01-01

    Bleeding and cupping have been used in medicine since ancient times in the treatment of fevers and local inflammatory disorders. Local bleeding, by 'wet cupping', was effected by a scarificator or by leeches. John Hunter recommended venesection in moderation but preferred leeches for local bleeding. Bleeding as an accepted therapeutic practice went out of vogue in the middle of the nineteenth century as a result of the introduction of modern scientific methods. Dry cupping and the use of leeches, as counter irritants, persisted until the middle of this century. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6338802

  7. [The pewter bleeding bowls].

    PubMed

    Renner, Claude

    2004-01-01

    In the late seventeenth century, then along the eighteen and nineteenth centuries the amount of the bloodlettings was measured by means of three pewter bleeding bowls that held three ounces of blood, about 300 millilitres. In the middle of the nineteenth century new and large bleeding bowls with metric graduations were manufactured only by the Parisian potters.

  8. [The pewter bleeding bowls].

    PubMed

    Renner, Claude

    2004-01-01

    In the late seventeenth century, then along the eighteen and nineteenth centuries the amount of the bloodlettings was measured by means of three pewter bleeding bowls that held three ounces of blood, about 300 millilitres. In the middle of the nineteenth century new and large bleeding bowls with metric graduations were manufactured only by the Parisian potters. PMID:15359483

  9. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the scope and importance of gastrointestinal bleeding in runners and other athletes, discussing causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related bleeding. Practical tips to mitigate the problem, potentially more troublesome in women because of lower iron stores, are presented (e.g., gradual conditioning and avoidance of prerace…

  10. Surgical bleeding in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. R.; Billica, R. D.; Johnston, S. L. 3rd

    1993-01-01

    A surgical procedure performed during space flight would occur in a unique microgravity environment. Several experiments performed during weightlessness in parabolic flight were reviewed to ascertain the behavior of surgical bleeding in microgravity. Simulations of bleeding using dyed fluid and citrated bovine blood, as well as actual arterial and venous bleeding in rabbits, were examined. The high surface tension property of blood promotes the formation of large fluid domes, which have a tendency to adhere to the wound. The use of sponges and suction will be adequate to prevent cabin atmosphere contamination with all bleeding, with the exception of temporary arterial droplet streams. The control of the bleeding with standard surgical techniques should not be difficult.

  11. Acquired bleeding disorders in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kruse-Jarres, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    The hemostatic balance changes with advancing age which may be due to factors such as platelet activation, increase of certain clotting factor proteins, slowing of the fibrinolytic system, and modification of the endothelium and blood flow. Generally, this predisposes the elderly to thrombosis rather than bleeding. It often necessitates antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy, which can cause significant bleeding problems in an aging population. Additionally, changing renal function, modification in immune regulation, and a multitude of other disease processes, can give rise to acquired bleeding disorders. Bleeding can prove difficult to treat in a dynamic environment and in a population that may have underlying thrombotic risk factors.This article discusses some specific challenges of acquired bleeding arising in the elderly. The use of anticoagulation and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications is prevalent in the treatment of the elderly and predisposes them to increased bleeding risk as their physiology changes. When prescribing and monitoring these therapies, it is exceedingly important to weigh thrombotic versus bleeding risks. There are additional rare acquired bleeding disorders that predominantly affect the elderly. One of them is acquired hemophilia, which is an autoimmune disorder arising from antibodies against factor VIII. The treatment challenge rests in the use of hemostatic agents in a population that is already at increased risk for thrombotic complications. Another rare disorder of intensifying interest, acquired von Willebrand syndrome, has a multitude of etiologic mechanisms. Understanding the underlying pathophysiology is essential in making a treatment decision for this disorder.

  12. Upper GI Bleeding in Children

    MedlinePlus

    Upper GI Bleeding in Children What is upper GI Bleeding? Irritation and ulcers of the lining of the esophagus, stomach or duodenum can result in upper GI bleeding. When this occurs the child may vomit ...

  13. Endoscopic hemostasis by injection therapy and electro-hydro-coagulation in high-risk patients with active gastroduodenal bleeding ulcer.

    PubMed

    Boix, J; Planas, R; Humbert, P; Fabrega, C; Villagrasa, M

    1987-11-01

    For the purpose of arresting hemorrhage from bleeding gastric or duodenal ulcers we developed, in 28 high-risk patients, a new method of endoscopic local injection of epinephrine (1:10,000) followed by electro-hydro monopolar coagulation and injection of Polidocanol (1%). Nine patients had signs of shock at the time of admission. The average blood requirements were 3.9 units in the first 24 hours. All patients had important factors militating against surgery, namely age and serious primary disease. In 26 out of 28 patients (92.8%) hemostasis was accomplished during endoscopy. Three patients (10.7%) rebled within the first 36 hours, requiring emergency surgery. Thus definitive hemostasis was achieved in 23 patients (82.1%). There were no complications as a result of endoscopic treatment.

  14. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Jennings, J C

    1995-11-01

    Physicians who care for female patients cannot avoid the frequent complaint of abnormal uterine bleeding. Knowledge of the disorders that cause this problem can prevent serious consequences in many patients and improve the quality of life for many others. The availability of noninvasive and minimally invasive diagnostic studies and minimally invasive surgical treatment has revolutionized management of abnormal uterine bleeding. Similar to any other disorder, the extent to which a physician manages abnormal uterine bleeding depends on his or her own level of comfort. When limitations of either diagnostic or therapeutic capability are encountered, consultation and referral should be used to the best interest of patients.

  15. Effect of the oral intake of probiotic Pediococcus acidilactici BA28 on Helicobacter pylori causing peptic ulcer in C57BL/6 mice models.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Baljinder; Garg, Neena; Sachdev, Atul; Kumar, Balvir

    2014-01-01

    Probiotic lactic acid bacteria are being proposed to cure peptic ulcers by reducing colonization of Helicobacter pylori within the stomach mucosa and by eradicating already established infection. In lieu of that, in vitro inhibitory activity of pediocin-producing probiotic Pediococcus acidilactici BA28 was evaluated against H. pylori by growth inhibition assays. Further, chronic gastritis was first induced in two groups of C57BL/6 mice by orogastric inoculation with H. pylori with polyethylene catheter, and probiotic P. acidilactici BA28 was orally administered to study the eradication and cure of peptic ulcer disease. H. pylori and P. acidilactici BA28 were detected in gastric biopsy and fecal samples of mice, respectively. A probiotic treatment with P. acidilactici BA28, which is able to eliminate H. pylori infection and could reverse peptic ulcer disease, is being suggested as a co-adjustment with conventional antibiotic treatment. The study provided an evidence of controlling peptic ulcer disease, by diet mod

  16. Vaginal bleeding in pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 9 , bleeding may be a sign of: The placenta separating from the inner wall of the uterus ... the baby is born ( abruptio placentae ) Miscarriage The placenta is covering all or part of the opening ...

  17. Understanding Minor Rectal Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... fever or significant rectal bleeding. Laser or infrared coagulation and sclerotherapy (injection of medicine directly into the ... or if symptoms persist despite rubber band ligation, coagulation or sclerotherapy. What are anal fissures? Tears that ...

  18. GI bleeding - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100162.htm GI bleeding - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... colon, and finally, the rectum and anus. The GI tract is a long, hollow, muscular tube through ...

  19. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  20. Peptic ulcer in childhood. Psychological factors.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, G N; Gargoulas, A; Papaloukas, A; Marinopoulou, A; Rabavilas, A D

    1979-01-01

    Thirty children (20 girls and 10 boys, aged 6-16 years) with primary peptic ulcers, matched in paris for age, sex and socio-economic standard to a group of 30 ulcer-free controls, were submitted to a structured psychiatric interview, a structured 'present psychiatric state' examination and to personality and intelligence tests. With one exception all patients suffered from duodenal ulcer; 3 male patients had personalities with psychopathic elements, 7 patients had nicknames, 5 suffered from psychiatric disorders, 3 had attempted suicide in the past, and 3 had had homosexual experiences. These parameters were negative in all controls. The patients had lower mean IQ, worse scholastic adaptation, more anxious and overprotective parents, higher frequency of faddiness in food and lower frequency of nail-biting than the controls. Psychotraumatic events had preceded the onset of ulcer symptomatology in 11 cases. The findings are discussed and the contribution of psychological factors in the pathogenesis of childhood peptic ulcer is stressed. PMID:550183

  1. [Non-Helicobacter pylori, Non-nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Peptic Ulcer Disease].

    PubMed

    Chang, Young Woon

    2016-06-25

    Non-Helicobacter pylori, non-NSAID peptic ulcer disease (PUD), termed idiopathic PUD, is increasing in Korea. Diagnosis is based on exclusion of common causes such as H. pylori infection, infection with other pathogens, surreptitious ulcerogenic drugs, malignancy, and uncommon systemic diseases with upper gastrointestinal manifestations. The clinical course of idiopathic PUD is delayed ulcer healing, higher recurrence, higher re-bleeding after initial ulcer healing, and higher mortality than the other types of PUD. Genetic predisposition, older age, chronic mesenteric ischemia, cigarette smoking, concomitant systemic diseases, and psychological stress are considered risk factors for idiopathic PUD. Diagnosis of idiopathic PUD should systematically explore all possible causes. Management of this disease is to treat underlying disease followed by regular endoscopic surveillance to confirm ulcer healing. Continuous proton pump inhibitor therapy is an option for patients who respond poorly to the standard ulcer regimen.

  2. [Non-Helicobacter pylori, Non-nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Peptic Ulcer Disease].

    PubMed

    Chang, Young Woon

    2016-06-25

    Non-Helicobacter pylori, non-NSAID peptic ulcer disease (PUD), termed idiopathic PUD, is increasing in Korea. Diagnosis is based on exclusion of common causes such as H. pylori infection, infection with other pathogens, surreptitious ulcerogenic drugs, malignancy, and uncommon systemic diseases with upper gastrointestinal manifestations. The clinical course of idiopathic PUD is delayed ulcer healing, higher recurrence, higher re-bleeding after initial ulcer healing, and higher mortality than the other types of PUD. Genetic predisposition, older age, chronic mesenteric ischemia, cigarette smoking, concomitant systemic diseases, and psychological stress are considered risk factors for idiopathic PUD. Diagnosis of idiopathic PUD should systematically explore all possible causes. Management of this disease is to treat underlying disease followed by regular endoscopic surveillance to confirm ulcer healing. Continuous proton pump inhibitor therapy is an option for patients who respond poorly to the standard ulcer regimen. PMID:27312831

  3. A Challenging Case of a Large Gastroduodenal Artery Pseudoaneurysm after Surgery of a Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Rancaño, Rocio; Antona, Esteban Martín; Montero, José Vicente Méndez

    2015-01-01

    We report a 48-year-old man in whom a chronic postbulbar duodenal ulcer destroyed much of the back wall of the duodenum and gastroduodenal artery causing pseudoaneurysm. The lesion was found and evaluated by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (that revealed a large pseudoaneurysm of 83 mm × 75 mm in diameter) and by angiography and then treated with transcatheter embolization leading to a complete resolution of the lesion. The case is rare and important for several reasons. First, we demonstrate that pseudoaneurysm of the gastroduodenal artery caused by a duodenal ulcer can occur and present a diagnostic challenge (as far as we know, only three cases have been reported previously in the literature). Second, this case report focuses on the importance of ligation of the gastroduodenal artery when bleeding of peptic ulcers occurs. Additionally, we present an overview of the relevant literature. PMID:25648587

  4. Evaluation and management of congenital bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Rahul; Cabey, Whitney

    2014-08-01

    Patients presenting to the emergency department with acute bleeding and a history of clotting or platelet disorder present a unique challenge to the emergency physician. The severity of bleeding presentation is based on mechanism as well as factor levels: patients with factor levels greater than 5% can respond to most minor hemostatic challenges, whereas those with factor levels less than 1% bleed with minor trauma or even spontaneously. Treatment should be initiated in consultation with the patient's hematologist using medications and specific factor replacement, except in rare, life-threatening, resource-poor situations, when cryoprecipitate or activated prothrombin complex may be considerations.

  5. Rectal bleeding induced by Dipyridamole.

    PubMed

    Bayer, I; Kyzer, S; Creter, D; Lewinski, U H

    1986-02-01

    Nineteen patients treated continuously with Dipyridamole were evaluated for rectal bleeding. Thirteen suffered from overt rectal bleeding and six served as controls. Hemorrhoids were found in all patients. Contact bleeding was found in 16. The bleeding continued despite rubber band ligation, and stopped only on withdrawal of the drug. PMID:3484697

  6. Multiple bleeds in haemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Aronstam, A; Painter, M J; Eddey, J V

    1979-01-01

    One hundred and eighty-one bleeding episodes involving two sites simultaneously were noted during a survey of 4935 bleeding episodes, an incidence of 3.7%. Elbows, knees and ankles were the commonest sites involved in double bleeds, while the thigh, upper arm and elbow were the commonest sites involved in the double bleeds needing most transfusions. The overall transfusion requirements were less than for single bleeds. The frequency of multiple bleeds correlated significantly with the overall bleeding frequency, but not with the number of days under observation.

  7. Endoscopic findings and management of dengue patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yi-Chun; Wu, Keng-Liang; Kuo, Chung-Huang; Hu, Tsung-Hui; Chou, Yeh-Pin; Chuah, Seng-Kee; Kuo, Chung-Mou; Kee, Kwong-Ming; Changchien, Chi-Sin; Liu, Jien-Wei; Chiu, King-Wah

    2005-08-01

    There are 100 million cases of dengue infection, 500,000 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever, and 25,000 deaths annually due to dengue worldwide. Gastrointestinal bleeding is the most common type of severe hemorrhage in dengue fever. However, there are no reports about the clinical applications of endoscopic therapy for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGI) in dengue patients. From June 17, 2002 to January 30, 2003, 1,156 patients with confirmed dengue virus infection were treated at Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital in Taiwan. We analyzed those patients who had received endoscopic therapy for UGI. The characteristic endoscopic findings, therapeutic courses, and amount of blood component transfused were collected from their charts for statistical analysis. Among the 1,156 dengue patients, 97 (8.4%) had complications of UGI bleeding during hospitalization. The endoscopic findings included hemorrhagic (and/or erosive) gastritis in 67% of the patients, gastric ulcer in 57.7%, duodenal ulcer in 26.8%, and esophageal ulcer in 3.1%. Of the 73 patients with peptic ulcer, 42 (57.5%) met the endoscopic criteria (recent hemorrhage) for endoscopic hemostasis therapy. Peptic ulcer patients with recent hemorrhage required more transfusions with packed red blood cells (P = 0.002) and fresh frozen plasma (P = 0.05) than those without recent hemorrhage. Among these 42 patients with recent hemorrhage, endoscopic injection therapy was conducted in 15 patients (group A). The other 27 patients (group B) did not receive endoscopic therapy. After endoscopy, patients in group A required more transfusions with packed red blood cells (P = 0.03) and fresh frozen plasma (P = 0.014) than did patients in group B. There were no significant differences between groups A and B in duration of hospital stay and amounts of transfused platelet concentrate after endoscopy. Medical treatment with blood transfusion is the mainstay of management of UGI bleeding in dengue patients. Patients having

  8. Volcano-like intermittent bleeding activity for seven years from an arterio-enteric fistula on a kidney graft site after pancreas-kidney transplantation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction We report the first case of a patient who underwent simultaneous kidney and pancreas transplantation and who then suffered from repeated episodes of severe gastrointestinal bleeding over a period of seven years. Locating the site of gastrointestinal bleeding is a challenging task. This case illustrates that detection of an arterio-enteric fistula can be very difficult, especially in technically-challenging situations such as cases of severe intra-abdominal adhesions. It is important to consider the possibility of arterio-enteric fistulas in cases of intermittent bleeding episodes, especially in transplant patients. Case presentation A 40-year-old Caucasian man received a combined pancreas-kidney transplantation as a result of complications from diabetes mellitus type I. Thereafter, he suffered from intermittent clinically-relevant episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding. Repeat endoscopic, surgical, scintigraphic, and angiographic investigations during his episodes of acute bleeding could not locate the bleeding site. He finally died in hemorrhagic shock due to arterio-enteric bleeding at the kidney graft site, which was diagnosed post-mortem. Conclusions In accordance with the literature, we suggest considering the removal of any rejected transplant organs in situations where arterio-enteric fistulas seem likely but cannot be excluded by repeat conventional or computed tomography-angiographic methods. Arterio-enteric fistulas may intermittently bleed over many years. PMID:21059222

  9. Long-term efficacy and safety of rabeprazole in patients taking low-dose aspirin with a history of peptic ulcers: a phase 2/3, randomized, parallel-group, multicenter, extension clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Kato, Mototsugu; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Watanabe, Toshio; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Sugisaki, Nobuyuki; Okada, Yasushi; Ogawa, Hisao; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Fujimoto, Kazuma

    2015-01-01

    A 24-week, double-blind, clinical trial of rabeprazole for the prevention of recurrent peptic ulcers caused by low-dose aspirin (LDA) has been reported, but trials for longer than 24 weeks have not been reported. The aim of this study is to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of rabeprazole for preventing peptic ulcer recurrence on LDA therapy. Eligible patients had a history of peptic ulcers on long-term LDA (81 or 100 mg/day) therapy. Patients with no recurrence of peptic ulcers at the end of the 24-week double-blind phase with rabeprazole (10- or 5-mg once daily) or teprenone (50 mg three times daily) entered the extension phase. Rabeprazole doses were maintained for a maximum of 76 weeks, including the double-blind 24-week period and the extension phase period (long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups). Teprenone was randomly switched to rabeprazole 10 or 5 mg for a maximum of 52 weeks in the extension phase (newly-initiated rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups). The full analysis set consisted of 151 and 150 subjects in the long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups, respectively, and the cumulative recurrence rates of peptic ulcers were 2.2 and 3.7%, respectively. Recurrent peptic ulcers were not observed in the newly-initiated rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups. No bleeding ulcers were reported. No clinically significant safety findings, including cardiovascular events, emerged. The use of long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg once daily prevents the recurrence of peptic ulcers in subjects on low-dose aspirin therapy, and both were well-tolerated. PMID:26060354

  10. Endoscopic laser Doppler flowmetry in the experiment and in the bleeding gastric and duodenal ulcer clinic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapralov, S. V.; Shapkin, Y. G.; Lychagov, V. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2007-05-01

    One of the most complex problems of emergency surgery is the choice of surgical tactics to deal with bleeding peptic ulcer. Endoscopic hemostasis is prescribed to patients with continuing bleedings and prerelapse syndrome. But till nowdays the objective verification of the prerelapse condition had not been worked out. What is more there are no objective criteria to judge the effectiveness of the carried endohemostasis. The aim of the study was to work out a new objective diagnostic method of pre-recurrence syndrome that can be able to make prognosis for possible gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding recurrence more precise. Laser Doppler flowmetry was the method of studies the regional perfusion. The device used in this work was made at the Optics and Biophysics Department of Saratov State University.

  11. Endoscopic hemostasis state of the art - Nonvariceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Goelder, Stefan Karl; Brueckner, Juliane; Messmann, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    New endoscopic techniques for hemostasis in nonvariceal bleeding were introduced and known methods further improved. Hemospray and Endoclot are two new compounds for topical treatment of bleeding. Initial studies in this area have shown a good hemostatic effect, especially in active large scale oozing bleeding, e.g., tumor bleedings. For further evaluation larger prospective studies comparing the substanced with other methods of endoscopic hemostasis are needed. For localized active arterial bleeding primary injection therapy in the area of ​​bleeding as well as in the four adjacent quadrants offers a good method to reduce bleeding activity. The injection is technically easy to learn and practicable. After bleeding activity is reduced the bleeding source can be localized more clearly for clip application. Today many different through-the-scope (TTS) clips are available. The ability to close and reopen a clip can aid towards good positioning at the bleeding site. Even more important is the rotatability of a clip before application. Often multiple TTS clips are required for secure closure of a bleeding vessel. One model has the ability to use three clips in series without changing the applicator. Severe arterial bleeding from vessels larger than 2 mm is often unmanageable with these conventional methods. Here is the over-the-scope-clip system another newly available method. It is similar to the ligation of esophageal varices and involves aspiration of tissue into a transparent cap before closure of the clip. Thus a greater vascular occlusion pressure can be achieved and larger vessels can be treated endoscopically. Patients with severe arterial bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract have a very high rate of recurrence after initial endoscopic treatment. These patients should always be managed in an interdisciplinary team of interventional radiologist and surgeons. PMID:26962402

  12. Rare Jejunal Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Christman, Emily; Hassell, Lewis A.; Kastens, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Severe gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) secondary to jejunal diverticulosis (JD) is very rare. Delay in establishing a diagnosis is common and GIB from JD is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We report an illustrative case diagnosed by push enteroscopy and managed with surgery. PMID:27800518

  13. Management of patients with ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Laine, Loren; Jensen, Dennis M

    2012-03-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the step-wise management of patients with overt upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Hemodynamic status is first assessed, and resuscitation initiated as needed. Patients are risk-stratified based on features such as hemodynamic status, comorbidities, age, and laboratory tests. Pre-endoscopic erythromycin is considered to increase diagnostic yield at first endoscopy. Pre-endoscopic proton pump inhibitor (PPI) may be considered to decrease the need for endoscopic therapy but does not improve clinical outcomes. Upper endoscopy is generally performed within 24h. The endoscopic features of ulcers direct further management. Patients with active bleeding or non-bleeding visible vessels receive endoscopic therapy (e.g., bipolar electrocoagulation, heater probe, sclerosant, clips) and those with an adherent clot may receive endoscopic therapy; these patients then receive intravenous PPI with a bolus followed by continuous infusion. Patients with flat spots or clean-based ulcers do not require endoscopic therapy or intensive PPI therapy. Recurrent bleeding after endoscopic therapy is treated with a second endoscopic treatment; if bleeding persists or recurs, treatment with surgery or interventional radiology is undertaken. Prevention of recurrent bleeding is based on the etiology of the bleeding ulcer. H. pylori is eradicated and after cure is documented anti-ulcer therapy is generally not given. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are stopped; if they must be resumed low-dose COX-2-selective NSAID plus PPI is used. Patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin should start PPI and generally re-institute aspirin soon after bleeding ceases (within 7 days and ideally 1-3 days). Patients with idiopathic ulcers receive long-term anti-ulcer therapy. PMID:22310222

  14. Management of patients with ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Laine, Loren; Jensen, Dennis M

    2012-03-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the step-wise management of patients with overt upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Hemodynamic status is first assessed, and resuscitation initiated as needed. Patients are risk-stratified based on features such as hemodynamic status, comorbidities, age, and laboratory tests. Pre-endoscopic erythromycin is considered to increase diagnostic yield at first endoscopy. Pre-endoscopic proton pump inhibitor (PPI) may be considered to decrease the need for endoscopic therapy but does not improve clinical outcomes. Upper endoscopy is generally performed within 24h. The endoscopic features of ulcers direct further management. Patients with active bleeding or non-bleeding visible vessels receive endoscopic therapy (e.g., bipolar electrocoagulation, heater probe, sclerosant, clips) and those with an adherent clot may receive endoscopic therapy; these patients then receive intravenous PPI with a bolus followed by continuous infusion. Patients with flat spots or clean-based ulcers do not require endoscopic therapy or intensive PPI therapy. Recurrent bleeding after endoscopic therapy is treated with a second endoscopic treatment; if bleeding persists or recurs, treatment with surgery or interventional radiology is undertaken. Prevention of recurrent bleeding is based on the etiology of the bleeding ulcer. H. pylori is eradicated and after cure is documented anti-ulcer therapy is generally not given. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are stopped; if they must be resumed low-dose COX-2-selective NSAID plus PPI is used. Patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin should start PPI and generally re-institute aspirin soon after bleeding ceases (within 7 days and ideally 1-3 days). Patients with idiopathic ulcers receive long-term anti-ulcer therapy.

  15. Pathogenicity island cag, vacA and IS605 genotypes in Mexican strains of Helicobacter pylori associated with peptic ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. Two major virulence factors of H. pylori have been described: the pathogenicity island cag (cag PAI) and the vacuolating cytotoxin gene (vacA). Virtually all strains have a copy of vacA, but its genotype varies. The cag PAI is a region of 32 genes in which the insertion of IS605 elements in its middle region has been associated with partial or total deletions of it that have generated strains with varying virulence. Accordingly, the aim of this work was to determine the cag PAI integrity, vacA genotype and IS605 status in groups of isolates from Mexican patients with non-peptic ulcers (NPU), non-bleeding peptic ulcers (NBPU), and bleeding peptic ulcers (BPU). Methods The cag PAI integrity was performed by detection of eleven targeted genes along this locus using dot blot hybridization and PCR assays. The vacA allelic, cag PAI genotype 1 and IS605 status were determined by PCR analysis. Results Groups of 16-17 isolates (n = 50) from two patients with NPU, NBPU, and BPU, respectively, were studied. 90% (45/50) of the isolates harbored a complete cag PAI. Three BPU isolates lacked the cag PAI, and two of the NBPU had an incomplete cag PAI: the first isolate was negative for three of its genes, including deletion of the cagA gene, whereas the second did not have the cagM gene. Most of the strains (76%) had the vacA s1b/m1 genotype; meanwhile the IS605 was not present within the cag PAI of any strain but was detected elsewhere in the genome of 8% (4/50). Conclusion The patients had highly virulent strains since the most of them possessed a complete cag PAI and had a vacA s1b/m1 genotype. All the isolates presented the cag PAI without any IS605 insertion (genotype 1). Combined vacA genotypes showed that 1 NPU, 2 NBPU, and 1 BPU patients (66.6%) had a mixed infection; coexistence of H. pylori strains with different cag PAI status was observed in 1 NBPU and 2 BPU (50

  16. [The acute bleeding rectal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Hansen, H

    1985-06-14

    An acute bleeding rectal ulcer was the solitary condition in four patients. The cause of such an ulcer, which always results in heavy arterial bleeding, remains unknown. The source of bleeding is demonstrated by rectoscopy which may at times be difficult because of the large amount of blood in the rectum and the hidden position of the small ulcer. Sclerosing or circumferential suturing of the ulcer provides immediate cessation of bleeding and cure.

  17. ACG Clinical Guideline: Diagnosis and Management of Small Bowel Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Gerson, Lauren B; Fidler, Jeff L; Cave, David R; Leighton, Jonathan A

    2015-09-01

    Bleeding from the small intestine remains a relatively uncommon event, accounting for ~5-10% of all patients presenting with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Given advances in small bowel imaging with video capsule endoscopy (VCE), deep enteroscopy, and radiographic imaging, the cause of bleeding in the small bowel can now be identified in most patients. The term small bowel bleeding is therefore proposed as a replacement for the previous classification of obscure GI bleeding (OGIB). We recommend that the term OGIB should be reserved for patients in whom a source of bleeding cannot be identified anywhere in the GI tract. A source of small bowel bleeding should be considered in patients with GI bleeding after performance of a normal upper and lower endoscopic examination. Second-look examinations using upper endoscopy, push enteroscopy, and/or colonoscopy can be performed if indicated before small bowel evaluation. VCE should be considered a first-line procedure for small bowel investigation. Any method of deep enteroscopy can be used when endoscopic evaluation and therapy are required. VCE should be performed before deep enteroscopy if there is no contraindication. Computed tomographic enterography should be performed in patients with suspected obstruction before VCE or after negative VCE examinations. When there is acute overt hemorrhage in the unstable patient, angiography should be performed emergently. In patients with occult hemorrhage or stable patients with active overt bleeding, multiphasic computed tomography should be performed after VCE or CTE to identify the source of bleeding and to guide further management. If a source of bleeding is identified in the small bowel that is associated with significant ongoing anemia and/or active bleeding, the patient should be managed with endoscopic therapy. Conservative management is recommended for patients without a source found after small bowel investigation, whereas repeat diagnostic investigations are recommended

  18. Cefoperazone Induced Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Katukuri, Goutham Reddy; Maddala, Raja Naga Mahesh; Ramamoorthi, Kusugodlu; Hande, Manjunatha

    2016-08-01

    Cefoperazone is a beta-lactam antibiotic which is frequently used in treating a variety of gram positive and gram negative infections. The chemical structure of cefoperazone contains a side chain of N-methylthiotetrazole which can inhibit vitamin K metabolism resulting in hypoprothombinemia. We report a case of cefoperazone induced coagulopathy manifesting as gastrointestinal bleeding. A Naranjo assessment score of 5 was obtained, indicating a probable relationship between the patient's coagulation function disorder and her use of the suspect drug. PMID:27656491

  19. Increased Risk of Peptic Ulcers Following a Cholecystectomy for Gallstones.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Huang, Chung-Chien; Kao, Li-Ting; Lin, Herng-Ching; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective cohort study examined the relationship between a cholecystectomy and the subsequent risk of peptic ulcers using a population-based database. Data for this study were retrieved from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. This study included 5209 patients who had undergone a cholecystectomy for gallstones and 15,627 sex- and age-matched comparison patients. We individually tracked each patient for a 5-year period to identify those who subsequently received a diagnosis of peptic ulcers. We found that of the 20,836 sampled patients, 2033 patients (9.76%) received a diagnosis of peptic ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period: 674 from the study group (12.94% of the patients who underwent a cholecystectomy) and 1359 from the comparison group (8.70% of the comparison patients). The stratified Cox proportional hazard regressions showed that the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for peptic ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period was 1.48 (95% CI = 1.34~1.64) for patients who underwent a cholecystectomy than comparison patients. Furthermore, the adjusted HRs of gastric ulcers and duodenal ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period were 1.70 and 1.71, respectively, for patients who underwent a cholecystectomy compared to comparison patients. This study demonstrated a relationship between a cholecystectomy and a subsequent diagnosis of peptic ulcers. PMID:27469240

  20. Increased Risk of Peptic Ulcers Following a Cholecystectomy for Gallstones

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Huang, Chung-Chien; Kao, Li-Ting; Lin, Herng-Ching; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective cohort study examined the relationship between a cholecystectomy and the subsequent risk of peptic ulcers using a population-based database. Data for this study were retrieved from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. This study included 5209 patients who had undergone a cholecystectomy for gallstones and 15,627 sex- and age-matched comparison patients. We individually tracked each patient for a 5-year period to identify those who subsequently received a diagnosis of peptic ulcers. We found that of the 20,836 sampled patients, 2033 patients (9.76%) received a diagnosis of peptic ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period: 674 from the study group (12.94% of the patients who underwent a cholecystectomy) and 1359 from the comparison group (8.70% of the comparison patients). The stratified Cox proportional hazard regressions showed that the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for peptic ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period was 1.48 (95% CI = 1.34~1.64) for patients who underwent a cholecystectomy than comparison patients. Furthermore, the adjusted HRs of gastric ulcers and duodenal ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period were 1.70 and 1.71, respectively, for patients who underwent a cholecystectomy compared to comparison patients. This study demonstrated a relationship between a cholecystectomy and a subsequent diagnosis of peptic ulcers. PMID:27469240

  1. Diagnostic and Treatment Approaches for Refractory Peptic Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Refractory peptic ulcers are defined as ulcers that do not heal completely after 8 to 12 weeks of standard anti-secretory drug treatment. The most common causes of refractory ulcers are persistent Helicobacter pylori infection and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Simultaneous use of two or more H. pylori diagnostic methods are recommended for increased sensitivity. Serologic tests may be useful for patients currently taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) or for suspected false negative results, as they are not affected by PPI use. NSAID use should be discontinued when possible. Platelet cyclooxygenase activity tests can confirm surreptitious use of NSAIDs or aspirin. Cigarette smoking can delay ulcer healing. Therefore, patients who smoke should be encouraged to quit. Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) is a rare but important cause of refractory gastroduodenal ulcers. Fasting plasma gastrin levels should be checked if ZES is suspected. If an ulcer is refractory despite a full course of standard PPI treatment, the dose should be doubled and administration of another type of PPI considered. PMID:26240800

  2. Central nervous system bleeding in patients with rare bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Siboni, S M; Zanon, E; Sottilotta, G; Consonni, D; Castaman, G; Mikovic, D; Biondo, F; Tagliaferri, A; Iorio, A; Mannucci, P M; Peyvandi, F

    2012-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) bleeding is one of the most severe and debilitating manifestations occurring in patients with rare bleeding disorders (RBDs). The aim of this study was to retrospectively collect data on patients affected with RBDs who had CNS bleeding, to establish incidence of recurrence, death rate, neurological sequences, most frequent location, type of bleeding and efficacy of treatments. Results pertained to 36 CNS bleeding episodes in 24 patients with severe deficiency except one with moderate factor VII (FVII) deficiency. Six patients (25%) experienced a recurrence and two had more than one recurrence. Seven patients (29%) had an early onset of CNS bleeding before the first 2 years of life, others (71%) later in life. In 76% of cases, CNS bleeding was spontaneous. CNS bleeding was intracerebral in 19 cases (53%), extracerebral in 10 (28%) and both intracerebral and extracerebral in two cases (6%). Neurosurgery was performed in 11 cases, in association with replacement therapy in seven cases. Seizures were noted in four patients. Residual psychomotor abnormalities were seen in two patients. No death was recorded. To prevent recurrence, 17/24 patients (71%) were put on secondary prophylaxis. In conclusion, recurrence of CNS bleeding was confirmed to be relatively frequent in patients with severe FV, FX, FVII and FXIII deficiencies. Most patients were managed with replacement therapy alone, surgery being reserved for those with worsening neurological conditions. Our results indicate that some RBDs require early prophylactic treatment to prevent CNS bleeding. Optimal dosage and frequency of treatment need further evaluation.

  3. Surgical perspectives in peptic ulcer disease and gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Lipof, Tamar; Shapiro, David; Kozol, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    For much of the twentieth century, surgery was frequently the solution for peptic ulcer disease. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of ulcers paralleled the development of potent pharmaceutical therapy. As the surgical world developed parietal cell vagotomy which would minimize the complications of surgery, patients failing medical therapy became rare. Emergent surgery for complicated peptic ulcers has not declined however. The development of proton pump inhibitors and the full understanding of the impact of H pylori has led to a trend towards minimalism in surgical therapy for complicated peptic ulcer disease. In addition to the changes in patient care, these developments have had an impact on the training of surgeons. This article outlines these trends and developments. PMID:16718847

  4. Psychosocial factors in peptic ulcer and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Levenstein, Susan

    2002-06-01

    Over the past decade, while gastroenterologists' interest in mind-body interactions in organic disorders dwindled, stronger evidence has linked psychosocial factors with the incidence and recurrence of peptic ulcer and with the course of inflammatory bowel disease. Psychological-behavioral approaches to treatment continue to be disappointing. Psychosocial factors may affect ulcer by increasing duodenal acid load, altering local circulation or motility, intensifying Helicobacter pylori infection, stimulating corticosteroid secretion, and affecting health risk behaviors; possible mechanisms for inflammatory bowel disease include immune deregulation, gut permeability changes, and poor medication adherence. Both belong to the growing category of diseases thought to have an infectious component: for peptic ulcer the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, for inflammatory bowel disease an exaggerated immune response to gut bacteria. Peptic ulcer and inflammatory bowel disease, which present unique interactions among psychological, immunologic, endocrine, infectious, and behavioral factors, are splendid paradigms of the biopsychosocial model.

  5. Persistent Bleeding Following a Stapled Hemorrhoidopexy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung Taek; Lee, Jae-Bum; Kim, Mi Jung; Lee, Doo-Seok; Youk, Eui-Gon; Kim, Do-Sun; Lee, Doo-Han

    2016-01-01

    A stapled hemorrhoidopexy (SH) is widely used for treatment of patients with grades III and IV hemorrhoids. The SH is easy to perform, is associated with less pain and allows early return to normal activities. However, complications, whether severe or not, have been reported. Here, we present the case of a female patient with persistent bleeding after a SH. The bleeding was caused by the formation of granulation tissue at the stapler line, diagnosed with sigmoidoscopy, and successfully treated via transanal excision (TAE) under spinal anesthesia. The biopsy showed inflammatory granulation tissue. After the TAE, her symptom was completely gone. PMID:27437395

  6. Erythrocyte 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and erythropoietic activity in rabbits with severe bleeding anaemia superimposed in the early post-natal fall in haemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Holter, P H; Refsum, H E

    1985-08-01

    Erythrocyte 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG), whole blood haemoglobin (Hb), haematocrit (Hct), mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) and reticulocyte percentage (Rt) were determined before and after bleeding in two groups of suckling chinchilla rabbits. One group was subjected to severe bleeding on the 12th, 15th, 18th and 21st day after birth and studied for 3 weeks, while the other was studied during the first 24 h after one severe bleeding on the 18th day. In the first group Hb and Hct fell to 2.7 g . dl-1 and 11.5%, respectively, on the 25th day. The fall was accompanied by a marked rise in Rt and decline in MCHC, reaching maximum and minimum on the 29th day, and a simultaneous, temporary decline in 2,3-DPG. In the other group the acute bleeding was accompanied by a marked fall in Hb and Hct, but no change in Rt and MCHC. 2,3-DPG was unchanged 8 h after the bleeding, but showed a rise during the following 16 h, definitely beyond the normal rise at this age. It is concluded that severe bleeding anaemia induces a rise in erythrocyte 2,3-DPG synthesis. However, the effect of the acute rise in 2,3-DPG is far from sufficient to maintain the O2 delivery capacity of the blood, and is completely offset by the influence of a subsequent change in the erythrocyte population towards younger cells with low 2,3-DPG. PMID:4050480

  7. Clinical picture of peptic ulceration diagnosed endoscopically.

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, M C; Holmes, G K; Cockel, R

    1977-01-01

    Clinical features and laboratory data are presented for 100 patients with benign gastric ulceration and 150 patients with duodenal ulceration confirmed endoscopically in a district general hospital unit. Abdominal pain was the commonest indication for endoscopy, but one third of examinations were performed for acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Although the patients were selected by referral for endoscopy their clinical presentation, age, and sex distribution were similar to those reported in previous general surveys. There were no clinical features which clearly distinguished gastric from duodenal ulceration. However, of those with gastric ulceration younger patients more often had distal ulcers and presented with pain, while elderly subjects tended to have high lesser curve involvement and presented with haemorrhage. Moreover, all females presenting with haemorrhage were aged over 50 years, while 6% of males bleeding from gastric ulceration and 40% of males bleeding from duodenal ulceration were under this age. Anaemia when present, except in two premenopausal females, indicated either a recent acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage or a coexistent second diagnosis. PMID:873333

  8. [Diagnosis and Treatment of Peptic Ulcer Disease: Present and Future Perspective].

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Wook

    2016-06-25

    Peptic ulcer disease is one of the most commonly encountered diseases in gastroenterology clinics. After the discovery of Helicobacter pylori by Warren and Marshall, it has been identified as the most important cause of peptic ulcer. Eradication of H. pylori markedly reduces the post-treatment recurrence rate of peptic ulcer. However, as human populations age, the incidence of cardiovascular and musculoskeletal diseases increases and consequent use of aspirin and non-steroidal anti-in-flammatory drugs increases. Thus causes and presenting patterns of peptic ulcer have changed. In this review, I describe new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for peptic ulcer disease and explore future perspectives.

  9. Rare bleeding disorders in children: identification and primary care management.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Suchitra S

    2013-11-01

    Bleeding symptoms are common in healthy children but occasionally may indicate an underlying congenital or acquired bleeding diathesis. The rare bleeding disorders (RBDs) comprise inherited deficiencies of coagulation factors I (congenital fibrinogen deficiencies), II, V, VII, X, XI, and XIII and combined factor deficiencies, most notably of factors V and VIII and of vitamin K-dependent factors. These disorders often manifest during childhood and may present with recurrent or even serious or life-threatening bleeding episodes, particularly during the neonatal period. Accordingly, primary care and other nonhematologist pediatric providers should be familiar with the clinical presentation and initial evaluation of these rare disorders. Bleeding manifestations generally vary within the same RBD and may be indistinguishable from 1 RBD to another or from other more common bleeding disorders. Serious bleeding events such as intracranial hemorrhage may be heralded by less serious bleeding symptoms. The results of initial coagulation studies, especially prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time, are often helpful in narrowing down the potential factor deficiency, with factor XIII deficiency being an exception. Consultation with a hematologist is advised to facilitate accurate diagnosis and to ensure proper management and follow-up. The approach to bleeding episodes and invasive procedures is individualized and depends on the severity, frequency, and, in the case of procedures, likelihood of bleeding. Prophylaxis may be appropriate in children with recurrent serious bleeding and specifically after life-threatening bleeding episodes. When available, specific purified plasma-derived or recombinant factor concentrates, rather than fresh frozen plasma or cryoprecipitate, are the treatment of choice.

  10. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Lucy; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a common and debilitating condition with high direct and indirect costs. AUB frequently co-exists with fibroids, but the relationship between the two remains incompletely understood and in many women the identification of fibroids may be incidental to a menstrual bleeding complaint. A structured approach for establishing the cause using the Fédération International de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique (FIGO) PALM-COEIN (Polyp, Adenomyosis, Leiomyoma, Malignancy (and hyperplasia), Coagulopathy, Ovulatory disorders, Endometrial, Iatrogenic and Not otherwise classified) classification system will facilitate accurate diagnosis and inform treatment options. Office hysteroscopy and increasing sophisticated imaging will assist provision of robust evidence for the underlying cause. Increased availability of medical options has expanded the choice for women and many will no longer need to recourse to potentially complicated surgery. Treatment must remain individualised and encompass the impact of pressure symptoms, desire for retention of fertility and contraceptive needs, as well as address the management of AUB in order to achieve improved quality of life. PMID:26803558

  11. Sarcomas arising after radiotherapy for peptic ulcer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lieber, M.R.; Winans, C.S.; Griem, M.L.; Moossa, R.; Elner, V.M.; Franklin, W.A.

    1985-06-01

    Therapeutic gastric irradiation has been used to reduce peptic juice secretion in patients with peptic ulcer disease. Between 1937 and 1968 a total of 2049 patients received such therapy at the University of Chicago. Three of these patients are known to have developed sarcomas in the field of radiation. Two gastric leiomyosarcomas of the stomach were diagnosed 26 and 14 years after treatment and a malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the anterior chest wall was removed six years after gastric irradiation. Of 743 peptic ulcer patients treated without irradiation and constituted as a control group for the study of therapeutic gastric radiation, none is known to have developed sarcoma. As the incidence of sarcoma in these patient groups is known only from the tumor registry of the University of Chicago, other cases of sarcoma may exist in the groups. While an increased incidence of sarcoma has not been proven to occur in patients who received therapeutic gastric irradiation for peptic ulcer disease, the possibility of such a risk should be borne in mind by physicians caring for such patients.

  12. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for peptic ulcer disease 2015.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Kiichi; Yoshino, Junji; Akamatsu, Taiji; Itoh, Toshiyuki; Kato, Mototsugu; Kamada, Tomoari; Takagi, Atsushi; Chiba, Toshimi; Nomura, Sachiyo; Mizokami, Yuji; Murakami, Kazunari; Sakamoto, Choitsu; Hiraishi, Hideyuki; Ichinose, Masao; Uemura, Naomi; Goto, Hidemi; Joh, Takashi; Miwa, Hiroto; Sugano, Kentaro; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-03-01

    The Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSGE) revised the evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for peptic ulcer disease in 2014 and has created an English version. The revised guidelines consist of seven items: bleeding gastric and duodenal ulcers, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy, non-eradication therapy, drug-induced ulcer, non-H. pylori, non-nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ulcer, surgical treatment, and conservative therapy for perforation and stenosis. Ninety clinical questions (CQs) were developed, and a literature search was performed for the CQs using the Medline, Cochrane, and Igaku Chuo Zasshi databases between 1983 and June 2012. The guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. Therapy is initially provided for ulcer complications. Perforation or stenosis is treated with surgery or conservatively. Ulcer bleeding is first treated by endoscopic hemostasis. If it fails, surgery or interventional radiology is chosen. Second, medical therapy is provided. In cases of NSAID-related ulcers, use of NSAIDs is stopped, and anti-ulcer therapy is provided. If NSAID use must continue, the ulcer is treated with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) or prostaglandin analog. In cases with no NSAID use, H. pylori-positive patients receive eradication and anti-ulcer therapy. If first-line eradication therapy fails, second-line therapy is given. In cases of non-H. pylori, non-NSAID ulcers or H. pylori-positive patients with no indication for eradication therapy, non-eradication therapy is provided. The first choice is PPI therapy, and the second choice is histamine 2-receptor antagonist therapy. After initial therapy, maintenance therapy is provided to prevent ulcer relapse.

  13. Helicobacter pylori is not the predominant etiology for peptic ulcers requiring operation.

    PubMed

    Zelickson, Marc S; Bronder, Cathy M; Johnson, Brent L; Camunas, Joseph A; Smith, Dane E; Rawlinson, Dustin; Von, Stephen; Stone, H Harlan; Taylor, Spence M

    2011-08-01

    As the number of patients requiring operation for peptic ulcer disease (PUD) declines, presumed contemporary ulcer etiology has largely been derived from medically treated patients not subjected to surgery. The purpose of this study was to examine the specific causes of PUD in patients requiring surgery. Our Acute Care Surgical Service registry was reviewed for patients operated on for complications of PUD from 2004 to 2009. Emphasis was placed on individual etiologic factors for PUD. There were 128 patients (52% male, 81% white) who underwent emergency operation including: simple patch closure (n = 61, 48%); gastric resection (n = 22, 17%); gastric resection with vagotomy (n = 21, 16%); vagotomy and pyloroplasty (n = 18, 14%); or other procedures (n = 6, 5%). Complications necessitating operation were perforation (n = 79, 62%); bleeding (n = 29, 23%); obstruction (n = 12, 9%); and intractability (n = 8, 6%). Perioperative mortality was 12.5 per cent. Risk factors for PUD included tobacco use (50%), alcohol abuse (34%), and steroids (21%). Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory use was confirmed in 68 (53%) patients. Of the 128 patients, 82 (64%) were tested for Helicobacter pylori, 33 (40%) of which were positive and 49 (60%) negative. Helicobacter pylori, thus, was the confirmed ulcer etiology in only 26 per cent of cases. Unlike contemporary series of medically treated PUD, Helicobacter pylori may not be the predominant etiologic factor in patients who experience complications requiring surgery. A "traditional" surgical approach with liberal use of vagotomy, not antibiotic triple therapy, may well be the preferred treatment consideration in such cases. PMID:21944523

  14. Diagnosis and Treatment of Peptic Ulcer Disease and H. pylori Infection.

    PubMed

    Fashner, Julia; Gitu, Alfred C

    2015-02-15

    The most common causes of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) are Helicobacter pylori infection and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The test-and-treat strategy for detecting H. pylori is appropriate in situations where the risk of gastric cancer is low based on age younger than 55 years and the absence of alarm symptoms. Most other patients should undergo upper endoscopy to rule out malignancy and other serious causes of dyspepsia. Urea breath tests and stool antigen tests are most accurate for identifying H. pylori infection and can be used to confirm cure; serologic tests are a convenient but less accurate alternative and cannot be used to confirm cure. Treatment choices include standard triple therapy, sequential therapy, quadruple therapy, and levofloxacin-based triple therapy. Standard triple therapy is only recommended when resistance to clarithromycin is low. Chronic use of NSAIDs in patients with H. pylori infection increases the risk of PUD. Recommended therapies for preventing PUD in these patients include misoprostol and proton pump inhibitors. Complications of PUD include bleeding, perforation, gastric outlet obstruction, and gastric cancer. Older persons are at higher risk of PUD because of high-risk medication use, including antiplatelet drugs, warfarin, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and bisphosphonates.

  15. Proximal gastric vagotomy: does it have a place in the future management of peptic ulcer?

    PubMed

    Johnson, A G

    2000-03-01

    Proximal gastric vagotomy (PGV) is a modification of truncal vagotomy, which was introduced by Dragstedt for the treatment of duodenal ulcer (DU) in 1943. It is a technically demanding operation; but when performed by an experienced surgeon, it is safe and gives a cure rate for DU of more than 90%, with minimal side effects. The operation permanently alters the natural history of the disease and may be used for gastric ulcer (GU), with ulcer excision; but it is not as effective. Further adaptations, such as posterior truncal vagotomy with anterior seromyotomy, were introduced to simplify and shorten the operation, but they did not receive wide acceptance. Recently, with the identification of Helicobacter, it was found that DU can also be cured by eliminating the infection. PGV is therefore used electively in patients with persistent DU that is not Helicobacter-positive or in the few in whom Helicobacter cannot be eliminated. In patients with bleeding or perforated DUs, PGV may be used in conjunction with underrunning the vessel or patching the perforation. However, few surgeons doing emergency peptic ulcer surgery have experience with PGV, so simple suture followed by medical treatment is the safest option. Because elective PGV is now a rare procedure, patients should be referred to a center with special expertise. If Helicobacter becomes resistant to antibiotics in the future, surgery may be needed regularly again, but the technical nuances would have to be learned.

  16. Hemosuccus Pancreaticus: A Mysterious Cause of Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Mandaliya, Rohan; Krevsky, Benjamin; Sankineni, Abhinav; Walp, Kiley; Chen, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Hemosuccus pancreaticus (bleeding from the pancreatic duct into the gastrointestinal tract via the ampulla of Vater) is a rare, potentially life-threatening and obscure cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. It is caused by rupture of the psuedoaneurysm of a peripancreatic vessel into pancreatic duct or pancreatic psuedocyst in the context of pancreatitis or pancreatic tumors. It can pose a significant diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma due to its anatomical location and that bleeding into the duodenum is intermittent and cannot be easily diagnosed by endoscopy. A 61-year-old female with HIV and alcoholism presented with 3 weeks of intermittent abdominal pain and melena. Examination revealed hypotension with pallor and mild epigastric tenderness. She was found to have severe anemia and a high serum lipase. It was decided to perform a contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan that demonstrated a hemorrhagic pancreatic pseudocyst with possible active bleeding into the cyst. An emergent angiogram showed a large pseudoaneurysm of the pancreaticoduodenal artery that was successfully embolized. Subsequent endoscopy showed blood near ampulla of Vater confirming the diagnosis of hemosuccus pancreaticus. Thus the bleeding pseudocyst was communicating with pancreatic duct. The patient had no further episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding. Hemosuccus pancreaticus should be considered in patients with intermittent crescendo-decrescendo abdominal pain, gastrointestinal bleeding and a high serum lipase. Contrast-enhanced CT scan can be an excellent initial diagnostic modality and can lead to prompt angiography for embolization of the bleeding pseudoaneurysm and can eliminate the need for surgery.

  17. [Rare bleeding disorders and invasive procedures].

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, F; Schved, J-F; Giansily-Blaizot, M; Samama, C-M; de Moerloose, P

    2013-03-01

    Rare inherited bleeding disorders include fibrinogen disorders, and deficiencies of factors II (prothrombin), V, VII, X, XI, XIII, and combined V+VIII, and combined vitamin K-dependent factors, with general population prevalence rates between 1/500,000 and 1/2,000,000. These inherited disorders, transmitted as autosomal recessive traits, are characterized by a heterogeneous clinical presentation (asymptomatic, mild, moderate or severe bleeding tendency); this variability is more important for deficiencies with factor levels ranging from 5 to 50%. Individual bleeding risk assessment before an invasive procedure or during peri-partum period remains difficult, although an essential step to decide whether a substitution with clotting factor is necessary or not. Because there is a poor correlation between factor activity levels and the severity of bleeding symptoms, factor correction before an invasive procedure should not be based on factor level only, but physicians must also take into account the patient phenotype as well as the haemorrhagic risk of the procedure.

  18. Corticosteroids and risk of gastrointestinal bleeding: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Narum, Sigrid; Westergren, Tone; Klemp, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess whether corticosteroids are associated with increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding or perforation. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised, double-blind, controlled trials comparing a corticosteroid to placebo for any medical condition or in healthy participants. Studies with steroids given either locally, as a single dose, or in crossover studies were excluded. Data sources Literature search using MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews between 1983 and 22 May 2013. Outcome measure Outcome measures were the occurrence of gastrointestinal bleeding or perforation. Predefined subgroup analyses were carried out for disease severity, use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or gastroprotective drugs, and history of peptic ulcer. Results 159 studies (N=33 253) were included. In total, 804 (2.4%) patients had a gastrointestinal bleeding or perforation (2.9% and 2.0% for corticosteroids and placebo). Corticosteroids increased the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding or perforation by 40% (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.66). The risk was increased for hospitalised patients (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.66). For patients in ambulatory care, the increased risk was not statistically significant (OR 1.63, 95% CI 0.42 to 6.34). Only 11 gastrointestinal bleeds or perforations occurred among 8651 patients in ambulatory care (0.13%). Increased risk was still present in subgroup analyses (studies with NSAID use excluded; OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.20 to 1.71, peptic ulcer as an exclusion criterion excluded; OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.21 to 1.78, and use of gastroprotective drugs excluded; OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.21 to 1.67). Conclusions Corticosteroid use was associated with increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation. The increased risk was statistically significant for hospitalised patients only. For patients in ambulatory care, the total occurrence of bleeding or perforation was very low, and the increased risk was not

  19. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Approach to abnormal uterine bleeding in nonpregnant reproductive-age women Differential diagnosis of genital tract bleeding in women Postmenopausal uterine bleeding The following organizations also provide reliable health information. ● National Library of Medicine ( www.nlm.nih.gov/ ...

  20. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn

    MedlinePlus

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn (VKDB) is a bleeding disorder in babies. It most often ... A lack of vitamin K may cause severe bleeding in newborn babies. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Babies often ...

  1. Historical impact to drive research in peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Banić, M; Malfertheiner, P; Babić, Z; Ostojić, R; Kujundzic, M; Fatović-Ferenčić, S; Plesko, S; Petričušić, L

    2011-01-01

    The story of gastric acid secretion began with early ideas on gastric secretion (Spallanzani and de Réaumur, 17th century) and with first descriptions of food digestion (Dupuytren and Bichat, Beaumont, early 18th century), followed by proof that gastric juice contained acid (Prout, early 18th century). The research continued with first descriptions of gastric glands as the source of gastric acid and its changes upon digestive stimulus (Purkinje and Golgi, mid and late 19th century). The theory of 'nervism' - the neuro-reflex stimulation of gastric secretion by vagal nerve (Pavlov, early 20th century) was contrasted by a histamine-mediated concept of gastric secretion (Popielski and Code, mid 20th century). Thus, gastric acid and pepsin (Schwann, early 19th century) were found to be essential for food digestion and studies also pointed to histamine, being the most potent final common chemostimulator of oxyntic cells. The discoveries in etiopathogenesis of mucosal injury were marked by the famous dictum: 'No acid, no ulcer' ('Ohne saueren Magensaft kein peptisches Geschwür', Schwarz, 1910) that later induced the term of 'mucosal defense' and the notion that the breaking of 'gastric mucosal barrier' represents the initial step in the process of mucosal injury (Davenport, Code and Scholer, mid 20th century). The prostaglandins were shown to influence all major components of gastric mucosal barrier, described with the term 'cytoprotection' (Vane, Robert and Jacobson, 1970s). Beginning in the latter half of 19th century, the studies on gastric bacteriology that followed enabled the discovery of association between Campylobacter (Helicobacter) pylori and peptic ulcers (Warren and Marshall, 1980s) that led to worldwide major interventions in treating peptic ulcer disease. The surgical approach to peptic ulcer had been outlined by resection procedures (Billroth, Pean, Moynihan, late 19 century) and vagotomy, with or without drainage procedures (Jaboulay, Latarjet

  2. Molecular hydrogen in human breath: a new strategy for selectively diagnosing peptic ulcer disease, non-ulcerous dyspepsia and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Maity, Abhijit; Pal, Mithun; Maithani, Sanchi; Ghosh, Barnali; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Pradhan, Manik

    2016-07-22

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilizes molecular hydrogen (H2) as a respiratory substrate during colonization in the gastric mucosa. However, the link between molecular H2 and the pathogenesis of peptic-ulcer disease (PUD) and non-ulcerous dyspepsia (NUD) by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori still remains mostly unknown. Here we provide evidence that breath H2 excretion profiles are distinctly altered by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori for individuals with NUD and PUD. We subsequently unravelled the potential molecular mechanisms responsible for the alteration of H2 in exhaled breath in association with peptic ulcers, encompassing both gastric and duodenal ulcers, along with NUD. We also established that carbon-isotopic fractionations in the acid-mediated bacterial environment regulated by bacterial urease activity cannot discriminate the actual disease state i.e. whether it is peptic ulcer or NUD. However, our findings illuminate the unusual molecular H2 in breath that can track the precise evolution of PUD and NUD, even after the eradication of H. pylori infection. This deepens our understanding of the pathophysiology of PUD and NUD, reveals non-invasively the actual disease state in real-time and thus offers a novel and robust new-generation strategy for treating peptic-ulcer disease together with non-ulcer related complications even when the existing (13)C-urea breath test ((13)C-UBT) fails to diagnose.

  3. Molecular hydrogen in human breath: a new strategy for selectively diagnosing peptic ulcer disease, non-ulcerous dyspepsia and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Maity, Abhijit; Pal, Mithun; Maithani, Sanchi; Ghosh, Barnali; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Pradhan, Manik

    2016-01-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilizes molecular hydrogen (H2) as a respiratory substrate during colonization in the gastric mucosa. However, the link between molecular H2 and the pathogenesis of peptic-ulcer disease (PUD) and non-ulcerous dyspepsia (NUD) by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori still remains mostly unknown. Here we provide evidence that breath H2 excretion profiles are distinctly altered by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori for individuals with NUD and PUD. We subsequently unravelled the potential molecular mechanisms responsible for the alteration of H2 in exhaled breath in association with peptic ulcers, encompassing both gastric and duodenal ulcers, along with NUD. We also established that carbon-isotopic fractionations in the acid-mediated bacterial environment regulated by bacterial urease activity cannot discriminate the actual disease state i.e. whether it is peptic ulcer or NUD. However, our findings illuminate the unusual molecular H2 in breath that can track the precise evolution of PUD and NUD, even after the eradication of H. pylori infection. This deepens our understanding of the pathophysiology of PUD and NUD, reveals non-invasively the actual disease state in real-time and thus offers a novel and robust new-generation strategy for treating peptic-ulcer disease together with non-ulcer related complications even when the existing (13)C-urea breath test ((13)C-UBT) fails to diagnose. PMID:27448107

  4. Bleeding Characteristics of Geothermal Wells

    SciTech Connect

    James, Russell; Gould, Tom

    1987-01-20

    Discharging small flows (order of 1 t/h) from wells is known as bleeding and is to relieve the build-up of gas pressure at the wellhead and to arrest corrosion in the bore. First tests over a range of bleeding flows indicate it as a fruitful subject for study in that temperature and pressure measurements at the wellhead can indicate the well enthalpy and the non-condensible gas content of the production system. Because of environmental restrictions on testing with large discharges in the future, bleeding may soon be the only valid alternative for proving a well’s potential. 1 tab., 4 figs., 6 refs.

  5. Periprocedural Bleeding Complications of Brain AVM Embolization with Onyx

    PubMed Central

    Liu, L.; Jiang, C.; He, H.; Li, Y.; Wu, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The advent of Onyx has provided a new method for neurointerventional therapists to treat brain AVMs. Although some retrospective studies have reported complications for AVM embolization with Onyx, periprocedural bleeding complications with Onyx embolization have not yet been described in detail. The aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the factors of Onyx-related bleeding complications and to find a way to avoid and manage these complications. From January 2003, patients with AVMs recruited in our institution started to be treated by Onyx embolization. From January 2007 to July 2009, 143 consecutive interventions were performed in 126 patients using flow-independent microcatheters and Onyx as embolic agents. Seven patients encountered bleeding complications (5.4% per patients and 4.7% per procedures) during or after the endovascular procedures. Among them, five bleeding episodes occurred during procedures, the other two after procedures. Details of the seven patients' clinical presentations, imaging presentations, speculative reasons and management of these complications were recorded. Follow-up data, including postoperative course, clinical symptoms and duration of follow-up were documented. The five active bleedings discovered in procedures were managed in time, and the patients recovered without any new neurological symptoms compared with preoperation. However, of the two bleeding episodes that occurred after interventional procedures, one was detected half an hour later: the patient was remained comatose two months later after resection of right occipital hematoma; the other who encountered intraventricular and midbrain hemorrhage was treated conservatively and suffered Parinaud syndrome and hemianesthesia. Conclusion: Periprocedural bleeding of AVMs embolization is considered a severe and devastating complication. The clinical course and prognosis of bleeding mostly depends on prompt detection and management. Interventional embolization is an

  6. Predictors for frequent esophageal dilations of benign peptic strictures.

    PubMed

    Agnew, S R; Pandya, S P; Reynolds, R P; Preiksaitis, H G

    1996-05-01

    Recurrence of esophageal peptic stricture necessitating repeated dilation treatments remains a problem for many patients despite optimal acid suppressive therapy. The factors associated with frequent relapses are poorly understood. We studied retrospectively a population of 58 patients with benign peptic strictures and dysphagia treated by esophageal dilation and followed for 66.5 +/- 6.7 months. Data was collected for age, sex, heartburn, weight loss, esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus, number of dilation treatments during the first year of follow-up, frequency and number of subsequent dilation treatments, type of dilator used, and history of other concurrent treatments. Patients who lacked heartburn (P = 0.007) or who reported a history of weight loss (P = 0.006) at the time of their initial presentation required more frequent dilations during the first year of follow-up. The mean number of dilations in year 1 was 6.2 +/- 0.9 for patients lacking heartburn versus 3.2 +/- 0.5 for patients with heartburn (P = 0.004), and 9.0 +/- 1.8 for patients who reported weight loss versus 4.1 +/- 0.5 (P = 0.006) for those who did not. The patients requiring frequent treatment during their first year also required frequent subsequent dilations because of stricture recurrence (P < 0.0001). We did not demonstrate any relationship between the other factors studied and treatment frequency. These observations suggest that patients who require frequent retreatment for recurrent peptic stricture are more likely to provide a history of weight loss and less likely to complain of heartburn at initial presentation. The pattern of frequent repeat dilation for recurrent peptic strictures is established during the first year of follow-up.

  7. ABCG2 in peptic ulcer: gene expression and mutation analysis.

    PubMed

    Salagacka-Kubiak, Aleksandra; Żebrowska, Marta; Wosiak, Agnieszka; Balcerczak, Mariusz; Mirowski, Marek; Balcerczak, Ewa

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the participation of polymorphism at position C421A and mRNA expression of the ABCG2 gene in the development of peptic ulcers, which is a very common and severe disease. ABCG2, encoded by the ABCG2 gene, has been found inter alia in the gastrointestinal tract, where it plays a protective role eliminating xenobiotics from cells into the extracellular environment. The materials for the study were biopsies of gastric mucosa taken during a routine endoscopy. For genotyping by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) at position C421A, DNA was isolated from 201 samples, while for the mRNA expression level by real-time PCR, RNA was isolated from 60 patients. The control group of healthy individuals consisted of 97 blood donors. The dominant genotype in the group of peptic ulcer patients and healthy individuals was homozygous CC. No statistically significant differences between healthy individuals and the whole group of peptic ulcer patients and, likewise, between the subgroups of peptic ulcer patients (infected and uninfected with Helicobacter pylori) were found. ABCG2 expression relative to GAPDH expression was found in 38 of the 60 gastric mucosa samples. The expression level of the gene varies greatly among cases. The statistically significant differences between the intensity (p = 0.0375) of H. pylori infection and ABCG2 gene expression have been shown. It was observed that the more intense the infection, the higher the level of ABCG2 expression.

  8. Effect of danazol on coagulation parameters and bleeding in hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Garewal, H S; Corrigan, J J; Durie, B G; Jeter, M A; Damiano, M L

    1985-02-22

    Danazol was given orally at a dose of 600 mg/day to six hemophiliacs for eight to 14 weeks. All patients showed a significant decrease in activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) beginning with the first measurement (two weeks) and persisting until use of the drug was discontinued. However, a corresponding increase in the deficient factor activity could not be consistently demonstrated. Despite the shortened APTT, bleeding episodes continued in the severe hemophiliacs and the patient with Christmas disease. In four patients, bleeding appeared to increase in severity or change in pattern, and in two cases the bleeding manifestations did not respond to usual factor infusions but responded to discontinuation of the drug therapy and further factor replacement. Euglobulin lysis times were measured in five patients (one hemophiliac and four with nonhemophilic conditions) who were receiving danazol. The lysis times were markedly shortened. Increased fibrinolytic activity may be responsible for the increased bleeding manifestations in danazol-treated hemophiliacs.

  9. Vaginal or uterine bleeding - overview

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal bleeding normally occurs during a woman's menstrual cycle, when she gets her period. Every woman's period is different. Most women have cycles between 24 and 34 days apart. It usually lasts ...

  10. MedlinePlus: Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... looks like coffee grounds Black or tarry stool Dark blood mixed with stool Signs of bleeding in ... lower digestive tract include Black or tarry stool Dark blood mixed with stool Stool mixed or coated ...

  11. Perforated peptic ulcer following gastric bypass for obesity.

    PubMed

    Macgregor, A M; Pickens, N E; Thoburn, E K

    1999-03-01

    Peptic ulcer in the excluded segment of a gastric bypass performed in the management of morbid obesity has only rarely been reported in the literature. The purpose of this study is to review our experience with the condition in a series of 4300 patients who underwent gastric-restrictive surgery between 1978 and 1997. Eleven patients presented with acute perforation of a peptic ulcer in the excluded gastric segment. Nine ulcers were duodenal, one was gastric, and one patient had both gastric and duodenal perforations. The time between primary gastric-restrictive surgery and ulcer perforation varied from 20 days to 12 years. All patients presented with upper abdominal pain. The classical radiological sign of perforated peptic ulcer, free air under the diaphragm, did not occur in any patient. Nine patients were initially treated by primary closure of the perforation with subsequent definitive ulcer therapy by vagotomy, pyloroplasty, or gastrectomy. One case, initially treated elsewhere, was managed by placement of a Malecot catheter through the duodenal perforation, gastrostomy, and peritoneal drainage. One recent case remains symptom-free on H2 blockers after simple closure. There was no mortality. Six cases were previously reported in the literature with a 33 per cent mortality rate.

  12. [Drug therapy of peptic ulcer. What is coming up?].

    PubMed

    Müller, P; Dammann, H G; Simon, B; Kommerell, B

    1987-02-01

    Prostaglandin-E analogues inhibit gastric acid secretion after oral administration. Therefore, these drugs are tested in clinical trials and one of them--Misoprostol--has recently been registered. With regard to healing rate of peptic ulcers and improvement of clinical signs and symptoms the prostaglandin analogues are superior to placebo but only equally effective or even slightly inferior to H2-receptor blockers. Side effects such as diarrhea or uterotropic actions will probably limit their broad application. The exact therapeutic effectiveness of prostaglandin analogues in treatment of peptic ulcer remains to be evaluated in greater detail. The substituted benzimidazole omeprazole is the first drug which exerts a long lasting and almost complete suppressive effect on gastric acid secretion in humans. This unique inhibition leads to a significant and more rapid healing rate of duodenal ulcers compared to treatment with H2-blockers. Additionally, peptic ulcers resistant to H2-blocker therapy can be treated effectively with omeprazole. In spite of these promising results the exact therapeutic effectiveness of this drug requires further evaluation.

  13. [Peptic ulcer: late complications of the surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Pinatel Lopasso, F

    1995-01-01

    The incidence of surgical treatment of peptic ulcer decreased in the last two decades. The majority of procedures for surgical management of peptic disease impairs the ability of the stomach to receive and to store food. The intake of high protein-caloric content diets can improve some nutritional deficits expressed by loss of body weight and anemia. The mechanism responsible for diarrhea is unknown, but truncal vagotomy has the highest incidence. It is usually episodic, lessens over the first year after operation and rarely remains a severe problem. The decreasing levels of colecistokinin response after meal in gastrectomy and the division of hepatic branch of anterior vagus can cause gallbladder sludge and stone formation. Alkaline reflux explains gastritis and esophagitis after partial gastric resection. Surgical duodenal diversion, like a Roux-en-Y limb, have been successful in its control. The mechanism that leads to the dumping syndrome are loss of gastric reservoir function and rapid emptying of hyperosmolar meals into small intestine. Somatostatin analogues improve the symptoms caused by abnormal release of neurohormonal agents responsible of the behaviour of the gastrointestinal tract after meals. Cancer of gastric remanent may be due to increased bacterial overgrowth and nitrosation formation. The endoscopic follow-up is essential for early diagnosis of the stump cancer. In spite of all complications, the surgeon cannot have hesitations by carrying out radical approach meanly during catastrophic emergencies of peptic disease i.e. in elderly aged patients. Nowadays, the control of chronic sequelas is easy with conservative therapeutic.

  14. Distinctive aspects of peptic ulcer disease, Dieulafoy's lesion, and Mallory-Weiss syndrome in patients with advanced alcoholic liver disease or cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Nojkov, Borko; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To systematically review the data on distinctive aspects of peptic ulcer disease (PUD), Dieulafoy’s lesion (DL), and Mallory-Weiss syndrome (MWS) in patients with advanced alcoholic liver disease (aALD), including alcoholic hepatitis or alcoholic cirrhosis. METHODS: Computerized literature search performed via PubMed using the following medical subject heading terms and keywords: “alcoholic liver disease”, “alcoholic hepatitis”,“ alcoholic cirrhosis”, “cirrhosis”, “liver disease”, “upper gastrointestinal bleeding”, “non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding”, “PUD”, ‘‘DL’’, ‘‘Mallory-Weiss tear”, and “MWS’’. RESULTS: While the majority of acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding with aALD is related to portal hypertension, about 30%-40% of acute GI bleeding in patients with aALD is unrelated to portal hypertension. Such bleeding constitutes an important complication of aALD because of its frequency, severity, and associated mortality. Patients with cirrhosis have a markedly increased risk of PUD, which further increases with the progression of cirrhosis. Patients with cirrhosis or aALD and peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) have worse clinical outcomes than other patients with PUB, including uncontrolled bleeding, rebleeding, and mortality. Alcohol consumption, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, and portal hypertension may have a pathogenic role in the development of PUD in patients with aALD. Limited data suggest that Helicobacter pylori does not play a significant role in the pathogenesis of PUD in most cirrhotic patients. The frequency of bleeding from DL appears to be increased in patients with aALD. DL may be associated with an especially high mortality in these patients. MWS is strongly associated with heavy alcohol consumption from binge drinking or chronic alcoholism, and is associated with aALD. Patients with aALD have more severe MWS bleeding and are more likely to rebleed when compared to non

  15. Bleeding varices: 1. Emergency management.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, S S; Warren, W D; Galambos, J T; Millikan, W J

    1981-01-01

    The aim of the emergency management of bleeding varices is to stop the hemorrhage nonoperatively if possible, avoiding emergency shunt surgery, an operation that has a higher mortality than elective shunt surgery. Patients with an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage should undergo endoscopy immediately to verify the diagnosis of bleeding varices. They can then be categorized according to whether they stop bleeding spontaneously (group 1), continue to bleed slowly (group 2) or continue to bleed rapidly (group 3). Group 1 patients are discussed in the second part of this two-part series. Group 2 patients are initially treated with vasopressin given intravenously; those who fail to respond should undergo emergency angiography and receive vasopressin intra-arterially. If this fails, patients at low surgical risk should undergo urgent shunt surgery; those at high risk do better with endoscopic sclerotherapy. Group 3 patients are also given an intravenous infusion of vasopressin. Patients at low surgical risk who continue to bleed then receive tamponade with a Sengstaken--Blakemore tube. If this fails, they undergo emergency creation of an H-shaped mesocaval shunt. Patients at high surgical risk who fail to respond to vasopressin given intravenously are next treated intra-arterially. If this fails they are given either endoscopic or transhepatic sclerotherapy. PMID:7006779

  16. Short-term low-dose secondary prophylaxis for severe/moderate haemophilia A children is beneficial to reduce bleed and improve daily activity, but there are obstacle in its execution: a multi-centre pilot study in China.

    PubMed

    Tang, L; Wu, R; Sun, J; Zhang, X; Feng, X; Zhang, X; Luke, K-H; Poon, M-C

    2013-01-01

    We recently showed in a single centre trial that low-dose secondary prophylaxis in severe/moderate haemophilia patients with arthropathy is feasible and beneficial. However, this regimen has not been validated in a multicentre setting and what obstacles are there to prophylaxis remain unclear. (i) Benefit study: to confirm the benefits of similar prophylaxis protocol in severe/moderate haemophilia A (HA) in a multicentre setting in China. (ii) Follow-up obstacle study: to investigate obstacles in compliance to prophylaxis treatment. (i) Benefit study: severe/moderate HA children with arthropathy from 15 centres were enrolled to undergo an 8-week on-demand treatment, followed by 6 to 12-week low-dose secondary prophylaxis. Outcomes compared in the two periods include joint and severe bleeding, daily activities and factor consumption. (ii) Obstacle study: questionnaires to investigators to collect data on patient and centre factors contributing to inability to comply with prophylaxis. We enrolled 191 patients from 15 centres. Sixty-six (34.6%) from three centres completed the prophylaxis protocol, and they had significantly decreased bleeding (78.8% haemarthrosis and 68.9% severe bleedings) and improved daily activities with no increase in factor consumption over that in the on-demand therapy period. The remaining 125 patients from 12 centres were not compliant to the prophylaxis protocol; questionnaire data indicated that the major obstacles were inability of patients/parents to accept (41.7%) or to adhere (33.3%) to the prophylaxis protocol, mostly because of failure to understand the benefits and to accept the frequent injections. Non-availability of a centre comprehensive care team was another important determinant. Short-term low-dose secondary prophylactic therapy is beneficial without increasing factors consumption for severe/moderate HA with arthropathy in a multi-centre setting in China. Obstacles to overcome must include improvement in comprehensive care

  17. Acquired coagulation inhibitor-associated bleeding disorders: an update.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2005-12-01

    Acquired blood coagulation inhibitors are circulating immunoglobulins that neutralize the activity of a specific coagulation protein or accelerate its clearance from the plasma, thus causing a bleeding tendency. In this review, we focus on the nonhemophilic inhibitors of coagulation, i.e. the autoantibodies occurring in individuals without a pre-existent coagulation defect, reporting the most recent advances in the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of these rare acquired bleeding disorders.

  18. Occurrence of thrombosis in rare bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Saez, Arlette

    2013-09-01

    Paradoxically, there are reports of thrombotic events for some rare bleeding disorders associated with significant bleeding tendency. Afibrinogenemia, factor (F) VII, or FXI deficiencies are those most commonly associated with venous or arterial thrombosis. Pathogenesis is multifactorial and the main conditions associated with this complication relate to the coexistence of inherited or acquired thrombotic risk factors linked to certain specific characteristics of the underlying defect. Patients with afibrinogenemia can develop severe, spontaneous, or recurrent thromboembolic disease. Up to 20% of congenital dysfibrinogenemia patients show predisposition to thrombosis. Thrombotic episodes, particularly deep vein thrombosis, have been reported in 3 to 4% FVII deficient patients, even those who were severely affected. These events have been reported either after infusion of plasma derived FXI concentrate or recombinant activated FVII in FXI deficient patients. So, in addition to factor level, replacement therapy must be individualized and should take into account past personal or family history of bleeding and thrombosis, and other prothrombotic risk factors. Treatment of thrombosis represents a challenge. For mild factor deficiencies, antithrombotic prophylaxis must be considered with or without concomitant use of replacement therapy. For all patients, it is also recommended to control known cardiovascular disease risk factors.

  19. Endoscopic management of diverticular bleeding.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; McCarty, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    Diverticular hemorrhage is the most common reason for lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) with substantial cost of hospitalization and a median length of hospital stay of 3 days. Bleeding usually is self-limited in 70-80% of cases but early rebleeding is not an uncommon problem that can be reduced with proper endoscopic therapies. Colonoscopy is recommended as first-line diagnostic and therapeutic approach. In the vast majority of patients diverticular hemorrhage can be readily managed by interventional endotherapy including injection, heat cautery, clip placement, and ligation to achieve endoscopic hemostasis. This review will serve to highlight the various interventions available to endoscopists with specific emphasis on superior modalities in the endoscopic management of diverticular bleeding.

  20. Endoscopic Management of Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Tarun; McCarty, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Diverticular hemorrhage is the most common reason for lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) with substantial cost of hospitalization and a median length of hospital stay of 3 days. Bleeding usually is self-limited in 70–80% of cases but early rebleeding is not an uncommon problem that can be reduced with proper endoscopic therapies. Colonoscopy is recommended as first-line diagnostic and therapeutic approach. In the vast majority of patients diverticular hemorrhage can be readily managed by interventional endotherapy including injection, heat cautery, clip placement, and ligation to achieve endoscopic hemostasis. This review will serve to highlight the various interventions available to endoscopists with specific emphasis on superior modalities in the endoscopic management of diverticular bleeding. PMID:25548554

  1. A fourfold increase of oesophageal variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients with a history of oesophageal variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Tseng, Chih-Wei; Tsai, Chih-Chun; Lay, Chorng-Jang; Tsai, Chen-Chi

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Large, recent population-based data for evaluating the predictors of oesophageal variceal bleeding (OVB) among cirrhotic patients is still lacking. This study aimed to determine the cumulative incidence of OVB among cirrhotic patients and identify the predictors of OVB occurrence. METHODS Patient information on 38,172 cirrhotic patients without a history of OVB, who were discharged between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2007, was obtained from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database for this study. All patients were followed up for three years. Death was the competing risk when calculating the cumulative incidences and hazard ratios (HRs) of OVB. RESULTS OVB was present in 2,609 patients (OVB group) and absent in 35,563 patients (non-OVB group) at hospitalisation. During the three-year follow-up period, the cumulative incidence of OVB was 44.5% and 11.3% in the OVB and non-OVB group, respectively (p < 0.001). Modified Cox regression analysis showed that the HR of OVB history was 4.42 for OVB occurrence (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.13–4.74). Other predictors for OVB occurrence included hepatocellular carcinoma (HR 1.16, 95% CI 1.09–1.24), young age (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.98–0.98), ascites (HR 1.46, 95% CI 1.37–1.56), alcohol-related disorders (HR 1.20, 95% CI 1.12–1.28), peptic ulcer bleeding (HR 1.26, 95% CI 1.13–1.41) and diabetes mellitus (HR 1.14, 95% CI 1.06–1.23). CONCLUSION Cirrhotic patients have a fourfold increased risk of future OVB following the first incidence of OVB. PMID:26768323

  2. Perforated peptic ulcer in Tikur Anbessa Hospital: a review of 74 cases.

    PubMed

    Ersumo, Tessema; W/Meskel, Yidnekachew; Kotisso, Berhanu

    2005-01-01

    Little is known on the pattern of perforated peptic ulcer in Ethiopia. To evaluate the early, outcome of management, a five-year retrospective analysis of 74 operated cases of perforated peptic ulcer was undertaken. Perforated peptic ulcer accounted for 3.4% of the adult emergency surgical procedures. The mean age was 32.6 years, with a male to female ratio of 7.2 to 1.0. Fifty-six percent of the cases were unmarried. In nearly 22.0% of the patients, no previous history of peptic ulcer disease was documented. Delay in diagnosis was noted in 95% of the cases. Most patients had duodenal ulcer perforation, and about 78% had purulent peritonitis at laparotomy. Fourteen died in hospital. Early presentation of patients to surgical care facilities may reduce morbidity and mortality in cases of peptic ulcer perforation.

  3. Efficacy of ankaferd blood stopper application on non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Gungor, Gokhan; Goktepe, M Hakan; Biyik, Murat; Polat, Ilker; Tuna, Tuncer; Ataseven, Huseyin; Demir, Ali

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively assess the hemostatic efficacy of the endoscopic topical use of ankaferd blood stopper (ABS) in active non-variceal upper gastrointestinal system (GIS) bleeding. METHODS: Endoscopy was performed on 220 patients under suspiciency of GIS bleeding. Patients with active non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) with a spurting or oozing type were included. Firstly, 8-10 cc of isotonic saline was sprayed to bleeding lesions. Then, 8 cc of ABS was applied on lesions in which bleeding continued after isotonic saline application. The other endoscopic therapeutic methods were applied on the lesions in which the bleeding did not stop after ABS. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients had an active NVUGIB with a spurting or oozing type and 193 patients were excluded from the study since they did not have non-variceal active bleeding. 8 cc of ABS was sprayed on to the lesions of 26 patients whose bleeding continued after isotonic saline and in 19 of them, bleeding stopped after ABS. Other endoscopic treatment methods were applied to the remaining patients and the bleeding was stopped with these interventions in 6 of 7 patients. CONCLUSION: ABS is an effective method on NVUGIB, particularly on young patients with no coagulopathy. ABS may be considered as part of a combination treatment with other endoscopic methods. PMID:23293725

  4. Peptic ulcer disease in endogenous hypercortisolism: myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Hatipoglu, Esra; Caglar, Asli Sezgin; Caglar, Erkan; Ugurlu, Serdal; Tuncer, Murat; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2015-11-01

    Many clinicians believe hypercortisolism is ulcerogenic. However, data from clinical studies show that prophylaxis for peptic ulcer disease is no longer recommended in patients receiving corticosteroid treatment. This has not yet been verified in endogenous hypercortisolism by controlled clinical studies. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the relationship between endogenous Cushing's syndrome (CS) and peptic ulcer disease and Helicobacter pylori infection. The study group contained 20 cases with CS resulting from ACTH-dependent endogenous hypercortisolism. The control groups consisted of 14 age- and gender-matched cases receiving exogenous corticosteroid therapy and 100 cases of dyspepsia with non-cushingoid features. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed on all cases. Biopsies were taken from five different points: two samples from the antrum, two samples from the corpus, and one sample from the fundus. A histological diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection was also obtained from evaluation of biopsy specimens. The frequency of stomach and duodenal ulcers did not vary between the groups (p = 0.5 and p = 0.7). Antral gastritis was less frequent and pangastritis was more common in cases with CS compared to the healthy controls (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001). The incidence of Candida esophagitis was more frequent in cases with CS compared to cases with corticosteroid treatment and healthy controls (p = 0.03). Histopathological findings and frequency of Helicobacter pylori based on pathology results did not vary between the three groups. It is possible that neither exogenous nor endogenous corticosteroid excess directly causes peptic ulcer or Helicobacter pylori infection. Prophylactic use of proton pump inhibitors is not compulsory for hypercortisolism of any type.

  5. A Case of an Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Ruptured Dissection of a Right Aortic Arch

    SciTech Connect

    Born, Christine; Forster, Andreas; Rock, Clemens; Pfeifer, Klaus-Juergen; Rieger, Johannes; Reiser, Maximilian

    2003-09-15

    We report a case of severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a rare underlying cause. The patient was unconscious when he was admitted to the hospital. No chest radiogram was performed. Routine diagnostic measures, including endoscopy, failed to reveal the origin of the bleeding, which was believed to originate from the esophagus secondary to a peptic ulcer or varices. Exploratory laparotomy added no further information, but contrast-enhanced multislice computed tomography (MSCT) of the chest showed dextroposition of the widened aortic arch with a ruptured type-B dissection and a consecutive aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF). The patient died on the day of admission. Noninvasive MSCT angiography gives rapid diagnostic information on patients with occult upper gastrointestinal bleeding and should be considered before more invasive conventional angiography or surgery.

  6. [Peptic Ulcer Disease Associated with Helicobacter pylori Infection].

    PubMed

    Yeo, Se-Hwan; Yang, Chang-Hun

    2016-06-25

    Although the global prevalence of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is decreasing, PUD is still one of the most common upper gastrointestinal diseases in the world due to Helicobacter pylori infection and increased use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In Korea, the prevalence of H. pylori infection is also declining, but it is still the major cause of PUD. The outcomes of H. pylori infection are caused by imbalances between bacterial virulence factors, host factors, and environmental influences. In this review, we describe the prevalence trends of H. pylori infection in Korea, the mechanism of H. pylori infection-related PUD, and treatment strategies.

  7. [Prevalence of erosive esophagitis and peptic esophageal strictures].

    PubMed

    Vasilevskiĭ, D I; Skurikhin, S S; Luft, A V; Mednikov, S N; Silant'ev, D S; Kulagin, V I; Dvoretskiĭ, S Iu; Bagnenko, S F

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a widespread among population in economically developed countries including Russia. It was analyzed the results of 34 903 endoscopic examinations of upper gastrointestinal tract in ethnically and socially homogeneous population of Leningrad region with symptoms of gastric dispepsia. Procedures were performed for the period 2007-2013. Prevalence of erosive esophagitis was 4.9%. Peptic esophageal strictures due to chronic reflux-associated inflammation were revealed in 0.2% of examined patients (3.7% of patients with erosive esophagitis). Obtained data allow to considergastroesophageal reflux disease as a socially significant problem in Russia requiring close attention and further study.

  8. Lessons for atherosclerosis research from tuberculosis and peptic ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, M C

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the causes of a disease is essential to the effective alteration of factors affecting the disease's incidence. The history of the medical understanding of tuberculosis and peptic ulcer shows that we may neglect to consider the contribution of microorganisms to long-term or recurring diseases. The author presents evidence that we may similarly be overlooking the role of microorganisms in atherosclerosis. A collaborative, comprehensive investigation of the role of microorganisms in atherosclerosis is needed to understand the cause of this disease. PMID:7882229

  9. Risk Factors Associated with Uncomplicated Peptic Ulcer and Changes in Medication Use after Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    González-Pérez, Antonio; Sáez, María E.; Johansson, Saga; Nagy, Péter; García Rodríguez, Luis A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Few epidemiologic studies have investigated predictors of uncomplicated peptic ulcer disease (PUD) separately from predictors of complicated PUD. Objective To analyze risk factors associated with uncomplicated PUD and medication use after diagnosis. Methods Patients diagnosed with uncomplicated PUD (n = 3,914) were identified from The Health Improvement Network database among individuals aged 40–84 years during 1997–2005, with no previous history of PUD. Prescription records for the year after the date of diagnosis were reviewed and a nested case–control analysis was performed to calculate the odds ratios for the association of potential risk factors with PUD. Results Medications associated with developing uncomplicated PUD included current use of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), paracetamol, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, antidepressants, antihypertensives or acid suppressants. Uncomplicated PUD was significantly associated with being a current or former smoker and having had a score of at least 3 on the Townsend deprivation index. Approximately 50% of patients who were users of ASA (19% of patients) or chronic users of NSAIDs (7% of patients) at diagnosis did not receive another prescription of the medication in the 60 days after diagnosis, and 30% were not represcribed therapy within a year. Among patients who were current users of ASA or chronic NSAIDs at the time of the PUD diagnosis and received a subsequent prescription for their ASA or NSAID during the following year, the vast majority (80–90%) also received a proton pump inhibitor coprescription. Conclusions Our results indicate that several risk factors for upper gastrointestinal bleeding are also predictors of uncomplicated PUD, and that some patients do not restart therapy with ASA or NSAIDs after a diagnosis of uncomplicated PUD. Further investigation is needed regarding the consequences for these patients in terms of increased

  10. Delayed positive gastrointestinal bleeding studies with technetium-99m-red blood cells: Utility of a second injection

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, A.F. )

    1991-02-01

    Two patients studied with technetium-99m-labeled red blood cells (RBCs) for gastrointestinal bleeding had positive findings only on 24-hr delayed images, at which time the site of bleeding could not be ascertained. In each instance, when additional delayed images suggested that active bleeding was occurring, a second aliquot of RBCs was labeled and injected. Sites of active hemorrhage were identified following further imaging in both patients. When delayed GI bleeding images are positive, further views should be obtained to ascertain if the pattern of intraluminal activity changes. If renewed active hemorrhage is suspected, reinjection with a second dose of labeled RBCs may identify the bleeding site.

  11. Anti-hemorrhagic activity of Punica granatum L. flower (Persian Golnar) against heavy menstrual bleeding of endometrial origin: a double-blind, randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Goshtasebi, Azita; Mazari, Ziba; Behboudi Gandevani, Samira; Naseri, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Heavy menstrual bleeding of endometrial origin (HMB) is a major healthcare problem in premenopausal women and affects several aspects of women’s health and quality of life (QoL). The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of Persian Golnar (PG) and tranexamic acid (TA) on heavy menstrual bleeding of endometrial origin (HMB) and patients’ QoL. Methods: A double-blind randomized controlled trial with parallel design and block randomization technique was conducted. A total of 94 women with HMB were randomly assigned to take either PG or TA for 5 days from day 1 of menses for three consecutive menstrual cycles. Blood loss was measured by the pictorial blood loss assessment chart (PBAC). Hematological assessments were made before the intervention and after treatment. QoL as a secondary outcome was evaluated using SF-36 and the menorrhagia questionnaire (MQ). Statistical analysis was performed using t-test, paired ttest, χ2 test, Mann–Whitney test, and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: In each group, 38 women (80.8%) completed the 3-month follow-up. Both PG and TA reduced blood loss. PBAC mean (SD) score was reduced from 304.92 (176.17) and 304.44 (192.72) to 164.60 (100.24) and 143.13 (96.07) after the third treatment cycle, respectively (p< 0.001). Furthermore, mean hemoglobin, Hb (SD) concentrations in the PG and TA groups increased significantly from 12.06 (0.86) and 11.53 (0.86)mg/dl to 13.02 (0.82) and 12.72 (0.88) mg/dl (p< 0.001). QoL was significantly improved in both groups (p< 0.001). However, there were no significant differences between the groups after the intervention. Conclusion: The results of the present study demonstrate the efficacy of PG in treating HMB in terms of clinical and QoL indicators. PMID:26157717

  12. Tannins, Peptic Ulcers and Related Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Neyres Zinia Taveira; de Souza Falcão, Heloina; Gomes, Isis Fernandes; de Almeida Leite, Thiago Jose; de Morais Lima, Gedson Rodrigues; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria; Tavares, Josean Fechine; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; de Athayde-Filho, Petrônio Filgueiras; Batista, Leonia Maria

    2012-01-01

    This review of the current literature aims to study correlations between the chemical structure and gastric anti-ulcer activity of tannins. Tannins are used in medicine primarily because of their astringent properties. These properties are due to the fact that tannins react with the tissue proteins with which they come into contact. In gastric ulcers, this tannin-protein complex layer protects the stomach by promoting greater resistance to chemical and mechanical injury or irritation. Moreover, in several experimental models of gastric ulcer, tannins have been shown to present antioxidant activity, promote tissue repair, exhibit anti Helicobacter pylori effects, and they are involved in gastrointestinal tract anti-inflammatory processes. The presence of tannins explains the anti-ulcer effects of many natural products. PMID:22489149

  13. Thrombosis in rare bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sáez, Arlette

    2012-04-01

    Inherited deficiencies of blood coagulation factors are usually associated with lifelong bleeding tendency. In addition to Haemophilias A and B and von Willebrand disease, congenital deficiencies of such factors as fibrinogen, prothrombin (FII)), FV, FVII, FX, FXI, FXIII, and combined deficiencies occur and can lead to a diversity of clinical conditions. Paradoxically, for some of these disorders associated with significant bleeding tendency there are reports of thrombotic events, both arterial and venous. Thrombosis in hemophilia patients has a multifactorial pathogenesis and the main conditions associated with this complication are the use of long-term central venous catheters, intensive replacement therapy usually in the setting of surgical procedures, the use of bypassing agents or the coexistence of acquired or inherited prothrombotic risk factors. Regarding other rare bleeding disorders, thrombotic phenomena has been described particularly in patients with afibrinogenemia, FXI and FVII deficiency and the events can occur even in young patients, in the presence of concomitant risk factors or spontaneously. Replacement therapy must be individualized and should take into account past history of haemostatic challenges, family history of bleeding and thrombosis, just like the level of factor. For mild deficiencies when patients are asymptomatic the use of antithrombotic prophylaxis must be considered with or without concomitant use of replacement therapy. In patients with history of thrombosis it may be helpful to perform a thrombophilia screening to exclude coexisting prothrombotic defects and for all patients it is recommended to control known cardiovascular disease risk factors.

  14. Association of endothelial progenitor cells and peptic ulcer treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    NIE, ZHIHONG; XU, LIMIN; LI, CHUANYUAN; TIAN, TAO; XIE, PINGPING; CHEN, XIA; LI, BOJING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the association between endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and peptic ulcers in patients with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), in association with the efficiency of peptic ulcer treatment. The study recruited healthy subjects and peptic ulcer patients with or without T2DM. All the ulcer patients, including those with and without T2DM, were administered omeprazole for 8 weeks. Peptic ulcer patients with T2DM were additionally treated with glipizide and novolin. Blood samples were then obtained from the three groups following ulcer treatment. CD133+ cells were isolated from the blood samples using magnetic bead selection, and cultured in complete medium 199. Morphological and quantity changes in EPCs were observed by light and fluorescence microscopy. In addition, flow cytometric analysis was used to quantify the number of vascular endothelial cells. The treatment was partially effective in 7 of the 32 peptic ulcer patients without T2DM and 12 of the 32 peptic ulcer patients with T2DM. However, this treatment was ineffective in 20 of the 32 peptic ulcer patients with T2DM. Notably, 25 peptic ulcer patients without T2DM were defined as completely recovered following treatment. In addition, the number of circulating EPCs as well as their colony forming ability was significantly reduced (P<0.05) in the peptic ulcer patients with T2DM following ulcer treatment, compared with the other groups. Circulating EPC counts were significantly increased in peptic ulcer patients without T2DM, as compared with the healthy controls. With regards to colony formation, peptic ulcer patients without T2DM did not exhibit improved colony formation ability. In conclusion, the number of circulating EPCs and their colony-forming ability was significantly reduced in peptic ulcer patients with T2DM following ulcer treatment when compared with the other groups. This suggests that the poor curative effect of peptic ulcer treatment in these

  15. [Study on the efficacy of famotidine (Quamatel) in the complex treatment of erosive gastroduodenitis, stress stomach ulcer and peptic duodenal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Korukov, B; Ognianov, S; Kostadinova, R; Gerzilov, P; Ivanov, A; Iarŭmov, N

    2004-01-01

    The haemorrhage of upper gastrointestinal tract is one of the serious problem in urgent surgery. Clinical effect of treatment with Quamatel purposely research was holded comparison of results in two groups patients. In group A with general medical treatment was included Quamatel--2 x 20 mg i.v. a day. In group B the patients was treated without H2 blocker. In cases of erosive gastritis was reported favorable effect in 76.47% at second day. The patients with stress stomach ulcer same effect was observed in third day--83.3%. In cases with peptic duodenal ulcer in I B--Forest group the bleeding was taken possession of 61.9%, in group II--79.31% and III--90.91% of patients.

  16. Technetium-99m labeled RBC imaging in gastrointestinal bleeding from gastric leiomyoma

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, U.A.; Jhingran, S.G.

    1988-01-01

    Tc-99m labeled RBC imaging is becoming increasingly useful in detecting gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding sites. A patient is presented who had massive GI bleeding from an unsuspected gastric leiomyoma in whom a Tc-99m sulfur colloid GI bleed image was negative. The Tc-99m labeled RBC imaging done on the day after sulfur colloid imaging revealed increased gastric activity due to active bleeding from an intragastric leiomyoma. Tc-99m labeled RBC imaging helped in early detection of the bleeding site resulting in its successful treatment. This experience also reinforces the assertion that Tc-99m labeled RBC imaging may be more helpful than Tc-99m sulfur colloid imaging in patients with upper GI or intermittent bleeding.

  17. Bleeding in renal failure: is von Willebrand factor implicated?

    PubMed Central

    Remuzzi, G; Livio, M; Roncaglioni, M C; Mecca, G; Donati, M B; de Gaetano, G

    1977-01-01

    Normal or increased concentrations of factor VIII procoagulant activity (VIIIC), factor VIII-related antigen (VIIIRA), and factor VIII-von Willebrand activity (VIIIVWF) were found in the predialysis plasma of 10 out of 11 patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). All patients had a bleeding time longer than 15 minutes and platelet retention to glass beads lower than 40%. The only patient who had reduced concentrations of all three factor VIII complex components was subsequently shown to have von Willebrand's disease. In four patients with CRF, very low platelet retention, and slightly prolonged bleeding time none of the three factor VIII COMPLEX COMPONENTS WERE SELECTIVely modified in predialysis samples. These findings suggest that the bleeding tendency common in CRF is not necessarily linked to defective plasma factor VIII-related activities. PMID:302134

  18. Bioengineering factor Xa to treat bleeding.

    PubMed

    Camire, Rodney M

    2016-05-01

    There is a clinical need to develop safe and rapid therapeutic strategies to control bleeding arising from a host of emergent situations. Over the past several years our laboratory has developed novel zymogen-like FXa variants and tested their safety and efficacy using hemophilia as a model system. The variants have a spectrum of properties resulting from an amino acid change at the N-terminus of the heavy chain that alters a critical conformational change. These properties, which include resistance to plasma protease inhibitors, low activity in the absence of FVa, and rescue of low activity upon incorporation in prothrombinase, yield remarkably effective pro-hemostatic agents. The FVa-dependent restoration of activity is a key aspect to their efficacy and also contributes to localizing the variants to the site of vascular injury. While pre-clinical data support their use in the setting of hemophilia, they have the potential to act as rapid pro-hemostatic agents for the treatment of a range of bleeding conditions. This review will discuss the biochemical properties of these FXa zymogen-like variants and their in vivo characterization. PMID:27207419

  19. Predictors of re-bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mu-Hsien; Tsou, Yung-Kuan; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Lee, Ching-Song; Liu, Nai-Jen; Sung, Kai-Feng; Cheng, Hao-Tsai

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To predict the re-bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) bleeding. METHODS: Over a 15-year period, data from 161 patients with delayed post-ES bleeding were retrospectively collected from a single medical center. To identify risk factors for re-bleeding after initial successful endoscopic hemostasis, parameters before, during and after the procedure of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography were analyzed. These included age, gender, blood biochemistry, co-morbidities, endoscopic diagnosis, presence of peri-ampullary diverticulum, occurrence of immediate post-ES bleeding, use of needle knife precut sphincterotomy, severity of delayed bleeding, endoscopic features on delayed bleeding, and type of endoscopic therapy. RESULTS: A total of 35 patients (21.7%) had re-bleeding after initial successful endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-ES bleeding. Univariate analysis revealed that malignant biliary stricture, serum bilirubin level of greater than 10 mg/dL, initial bleeding severity, and bleeding diathesis were significant predictors of re-bleeding. By multivariate analysis, serum bilirubin level of greater than 10 mg/dL and initial bleeding severity remained significant predictors. Re-bleeding was controlled by endoscopic therapy in a single (n = 23) or multiple (range, 2-7; n = 6) sessions in 29 of the 35 patients (82.9%). Four patients required transarterial embolization and one went for surgery. These five patients had severe bleeding when delayed post-ES bleeding occurred. One patient with decompensated liver cirrhosis died from re-bleeding. CONCLUSION: Re-bleeding occurs in approximately one-fifth of patients after initial successful endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-ES bleeding. Severity of initial bleeding and serum bilirubin level of greater than 10 mg/dL are predictors of re-bleeding. PMID:27003996

  20. [Potentialities of transabdominal ultrasound study in the diagnosis of gastric peptic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Gorshkov, A N

    2002-01-01

    The results of examination in 44 patients with gastric peptic ulcer were used to consider the potentialities of a transabdominal ultrasound study in the diagnosis and monitoring of gastric ulcerations. The ultrasound semiotics of gastric ulcers is described in the paper. A role of transabdominal ultrasound study in the algorithm of radiation and instrumental studies of gastric ulcer is defined. The inclusion of this study into the algorithm of diagnosis and monitoring of gastric peptic ulcer will make it possible not only to diagnose gastric ulcerations better, but to follow up their cicatrization. It is expedient to include a transabdominal ultrasound study as one of the diagnostic techniques for gastric peptic ulcer.

  1. CXC chemokine CXCL12 tissue expression and circulating levels in peptic ulcer patients with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Vahid; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein; Mirzaee, Vahid; Khorramdelazad, Hossein

    2016-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is among the most prevalent human infections. CXCL12 is a well-known CXC chemokine involved in inflammation and play major roles in angiogenesis. There is currently very limited data on the role of CXCL12 in peptic ulcer disease. Hence, we aimed to explore whether CXCL12 is involved in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer induced by H. pylori. In this study, we enrolled 102 H. pylori-infected patients, including 51 with active ulcer (GA) and 51 with healing ulcer (GH). We also recruited 50 healthy subjects as control, which did not show any sign or symptoms of chronic inflammatory diseases, infection, or immune-related disorders. Endoscopy was performed to determine the stage of the disease. ELISA was used for detection of H. pylori infection and CXCL12 measurement. We also employed western blotting to detect CXCL12 in ulcerative lesions of H. pylori. Demographic data were also collected by questionnaire. Our results demonstrated that CXCL12 serum levels in GA group (151.8±18.31pg/mL) were significantly higher than those in GH (36.89±6.78pg/mL) and control groups (33.77±9.12pg/mL) (P<0.0001). However, we did not observe a significant difference between GH and control groups. Moreover, overexpression of CXCL12 in gastric lesions of patients in GA group was confirmed by Western blot analysis. According to the result of the present study, it could be concluded that CXCL12 is involved in the pathogenesis and healing of H. pylori-induced peptic ulcer. CXCL12 serum levels may also be used to distinguish between GA and GH phases of the disease.

  2. Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Calciphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nancy; Haq, Khwaja F.; Mahajan, Sugandhi; Nagpal, Prashant; Doshi, Bijal

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 66 Final Diagnosis: Calciphylaxis Symptoms: Gastrointesinal haemorrhage Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Hemodialysis • blood transfusions Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Calciphylaxis is associated with a high mortality that approaches 80%. The diagnosis is usually made when obvious skin lesions (painful violaceous mottling of the skin) are present. However, visceral involvement is rare. We present a case of calciphylaxis leading to lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and rectal ulceration of the GI mucosa. Case Report: A 66-year-old woman with past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), recently diagnosed ovarian cancer, and on hemodialysis (HD) presented with painful black necrotic eschar on both legs. The radiograph of the legs demonstrated extensive calcification of the lower extremity arteries. The hospital course was complicated with lower GI bleeding. A CT scan of the abdomen revealed severe circumferential calcification of the abdominal aorta, celiac artery, and superior and inferior mesenteric arteries and their branches. Colonoscopy revealed severe rectal necrosis. She was deemed to be a poor surgical candidate due to comorbidities and presence of extensive vascular calcifications. Recurrent episodes of profuse GI bleeding were managed conservatively with blood transfusion as needed. Following her diagnosis of calciphylaxis, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium containing phosphate binders was stopped. She was started on daily hemodialysis with low calcium dialysate bath as well as intravenous sodium thiosulphate. The clinical condition of the patient deteriorated. The patient died secondary to multiorgan failure. Conclusions: Calciphylaxis leading to intestinal ischemia/perforation should be considered in the differential diagnosis in ESRD on HD presenting with abdominal pain or GI bleeding. PMID:26572938

  3. Research on Supersonic Inlet Bleed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, David O.; Vyas, Manan A.; Slater, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Phase I data results of the Fundamental Inlet Bleed Experiments project at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) are presented which include flow coefficient results for two single-hole boundary-layer bleed configurations. The bleed configurations tested are round holes at inclination angles of 90deg and 20deg both having length-to-diameter ratios of 2.0. Results were obtained at freestream Mach numbers of 1.33, 1.62, 1.98, 2.46, and 2.92 and unit Reynolds numbers of 0.984, 1.89, and 2.46 10(exp 7)/m. Approach boundary-layer data are presented for each flow condition and the flow coefficient results are compared to existing multi-hole data obtained under similar conditions. For the 90deg hole, the single and multi-hole distributions agree fairly well with the exception that under supercritical operation, the multi-hole data chokes at higher flow coefficient levels. This behavior is also observed for the 20deg hole but to a lesser extent. The 20deg hole also shows a markedly different characteristic at subcritical operation. Also presented are preliminary results of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of both configurations at the Mach 1.33 and a unit Reynolds number of 2.46 10(exp 7)/m. Comparison of the results shows the agreement to be very good.

  4. Management of dabigatran-induced bleeding with continuous venovenous hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Paul, Suman; Hamouda, Danae; Prashar, Rohini; Mbaso, Chiamaka; Khan, Abdur; Ali, Abdulmonam; Shah, Sarthi; Assaly, Ragheb

    2015-06-01

    Dabigatran, a direct thrombin inhibitor, is increasingly used for stroke prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Dabigatran has a stable pharmacokinetic profile with minimum drug interactions, and requires no routine laboratory evaluation to measure level of anticoagulation. This provides a huge advantage over warfarin, and has the potential to improve patient compliance. The disadvantages of dabigatran are the lack of a reversal agent to counter dabigatran-related bleeding and the absence of a widely available laboratory test that can quantify the extent of coagulopathy in dabigatran overdose. Hemodialysis can rapidly lower dabigatran levels and assist in controlling bleeding secondary to dabigatran overdose. However, in cases in which hemodynamic instability precludes the use of hemodialysis, alternative methods have to be utilized to control dabigatran-associated bleeding. Here we document a case of massive gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to dabigatran use that was successfully managed by continuous venovenous hemodialysis (CVVHD), along with supportive care with blood product transfusions. CVVHD reduces thrombin time and activated partial thrombin time, and causes a parallel decrease in amount of active bleeding. Finally, we show that compared to the rapid lowering of elevated thrombin time observed in hemodialysis, CVVHD requires several days to reduce thrombin time to normal range.

  5. Assessment of some Herbal Drugs for Prophylaxis of Peptic Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Gohar, Ahmed A; Zaki, Ahmed A

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous (hydrophilic) and chloroform (Lipophilic) extracts of nine medicinal plants currently used in Egyptian traditional medicine to treat some gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorders were tested for their gastro-protective effect against the incidence of peptic ulcer. Indomethacin-induced ulcer in a rat model was used for this testing. Mentha microphylla, Brassica oleracea Capitata (Cabbage), B. oleracea Botrytis (cauliflower) aqueous fraction, Portolaca oleracea polysaccharide fraction, Oreganum marjoranum, Matricaria recutita, Solanum nigrum hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions, in addition to the chloroform fraction of Portolaca oleracea and Cicorium intybus afforded high protection against the incidence of gastric ulcer (~95%). O. syriacum hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions and gum arabic afforded moderate prophylactic effect. L. sicerarea, C. intybus hydrophilic fractions and M. microphylla lipophilic fraction were inactive. Herbs represent excellent resources for cost-effective and readily available gastro-protective remedies without side effects. PMID:25276211

  6. Assessment of some Herbal Drugs for Prophylaxis of Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Gohar, Ahmed A; Zaki, Ahmed A

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous (hydrophilic) and chloroform (Lipophilic) extracts of nine medicinal plants currently used in Egyptian traditional medicine to treat some gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorders were tested for their gastro-protective effect against the incidence of peptic ulcer. Indomethacin-induced ulcer in a rat model was used for this testing. Mentha microphylla, Brassica oleracea Capitata (Cabbage), B. oleracea Botrytis (cauliflower) aqueous fraction, Portolaca oleracea polysaccharide fraction, Oreganum marjoranum, Matricaria recutita, Solanum nigrum hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions, in addition to the chloroform fraction of Portolaca oleracea and Cicorium intybus afforded high protection against the incidence of gastric ulcer (~95%). O. syriacum hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions and gum arabic afforded moderate prophylactic effect. L. sicerarea, C. intybus hydrophilic fractions and M. microphylla lipophilic fraction were inactive. Herbs represent excellent resources for cost-effective and readily available gastro-protective remedies without side effects. PMID:25276211

  7. Severe gastric variceal bleeding successfully treated by emergency splenic artery embolization.

    PubMed

    Sankararaman, Senthilkumar; Velayuthan, Sujithra; Vea, Romulo; Herbst, John

    2013-06-01

    Bleeding from gastric varices due to splenic vein obstruction is extremely rare in children, but it can be catastrophic. Reported herein is the case of a teenager with splenic vein thrombosis and chronic decompensated liver disease from autoimmune hepatitis who presented with massive gastric variceal bleeding. Standard medical management did not control the bleeding. Due to decompensated liver disease and continuous active bleeding, emergency partial splenic artery embolization was preferred over splenectomy or a shunt procedure. Bleeding was successfully controlled by partial splenic artery embolization by decreasing the inflow of blood into the portal system. It is concluded that emergency partial splenic artery embolization is a safer alternative life-saving procedure to manage severe gastric variceal bleeding due to splenic vein obstruction in a patient with high surgical risk. To our knowledge, only one other patient with similar management has been reported in the pediatric age group.

  8. An approach to outreach patients with von Willebrand disease in Egypt by targeting women with heavy menstrual bleeding and/or bleeding symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sherif, N; Goubran, H; Hassan, A; Burnouf, T; El-Ekiaby, M

    2014-03-01

    von Willebrand disease (VWD) is frequently ignored as a cause of menorrhagia. We investigated Egyptian women complaining of heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) and/or other bleeding symptoms to detect potential VWD cases. Seventy-five female patients complaining of HMB and/or bleeding symptoms and 38 age-matched healthy female controls went through a family history questionnaire, a physical examination and were evaluated for bleeding score, pictorial blood assessment chart (PBAC), complete blood count, serum ferritin, blood group, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, factor VIII (FVIII) activity, von Willebrand factor (VWF) ristocetin cofactor (RCo) activity, antigen (Ag), and RCo/Ag ratio. Sixty-eight of 75 patients presented with HMB, out of which 46 had no organic pathology and 7 presented other bleeding symptoms. Six patients were diagnosed with VWD, three with HMB, two with other bleeding symptoms and one with family history of VWD. Two related VWD patients were diagnosed in the control group. There were significant differences in bleeding and PBAC scores, ferritin level, FVIII activity, VWF:RCo and VWF:Ag between VWD patients and controls. This study indicated a high prevalence of VWD among patients with HMB without organic pathology (6.5%) and demonstrated the sensitivity of diagnostic parameters of VWD patients in an outreach campaign. The inexpensive bleeding and PBAC scoring systems are valuable to exclude cases without objective bleeding symptoms. Raising gynaecologists awareness about hereditary bleeding disorders is important to ensure a proper diagnosis and possible referral of these patients. Management of these patients with comprehensive medical care services under a multidisciplinary team would be ideal.

  9. Peptic ulcer disease and other complications in patients receiving dexamethasone palliation for brain metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Penzner, R.D.; Lipsett, J.A.

    1982-11-01

    A retrospective analysis was done of 106 patients who received radiation therapy for brain metastasis. Dexamethasone therapy was instituted in 97 patients. Peptic ulcer disease developed in 5 of 89 patients (5.6 percent) who received a dosage of at least 12 mg a day, but did not occur in patients who received a lower dose or in those who did not receive steroids. The interval between institution of dexamethasone therapy and the development of peptic ulcer disease ranged from three to nine weeks. Two patients had perforated ulcers, one of whom required surgical resection. Peptic ulcer disease contributed to the general deterioration and death of three of the five patients. Overall, in 14 of the 89 patients (15.7 percent) a complication of steroid therapy developed in the form of peptic ulcer disease, steroid myopathy or diabetes mellitus (or a combination of these).

  10. Italian survey on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and gastrointestinal bleeding in children

    PubMed Central

    Cardile, Sabrina; Martinelli, Massimo; Barabino, Arrigo; Gandullia, Paolo; Oliva, Salvatore; Di Nardo, Giovanni; Dall'Oglio, Luigi; Rea, Francesca; de' Angelis, Gian Luigi; Bizzarri, Barbara; Guariso, Graziella; Masci, Enzo; Staiano, Annamaria; Miele, Erasmo; Romano, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate gastrointestinal complications associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs) use in children. METHODS: A retrospective, multicenter study was conducted between January 2005 and January 2013, with the participation of 8 Italian pediatric gastroenterology centers. We collected all the cases of patients who refer to emergency room for suspected gastrointestinal bleeding following NSAIDs consumption, and underwent endoscopic evaluation. Previous medical history, associated risk factors, symptoms and signs at presentation, diagnostic procedures, severity of bleeding and management of gastrointestinal bleeding were collected. In addition, data regarding type of drug used, indication, dose, duration of treatment and prescriber (physician or self-medication) were examined. RESULTS: Fifty-one patients, including 34 males, were enrolled (median age: 7.8 years). Ibuprofen was the most used NSAID [35/51 patients (68.6%)]. Pain was the most frequent indication for NSAIDs use [29/51 patients (56.9%)]. Seven patients had positive family history of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection or peptic ulcer, and 12 had associated comorbidities. Twenty-four (47%) out of 51 patients used medication inappropriately. Hematemesis was the most frequent symptom (33.3%). Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastric lesions in 32/51 (62%) patients, duodenal lesions in 17 (33%) and esophageal lesions in 8 (15%). In 10/51 (19.6%) patients, a diagnosis of H. pylori gastritis was made. Forty-eight (94%) patients underwent medical therapy, with spontaneous bleeding resolution, while in 3/51 (6%) patients, an endoscopic hemostasis was needed. CONCLUSION: The data collected in this study confirms that adverse events with the involvement of the gastrointestinal tract secondary to NSAID use are also common in children PMID:26855547

  11. Management of recurrent peptic ulcer perforation: problem-focused or definitive surgery?

    PubMed

    Yazici, Pinar; Kaya, Cemal

    2014-01-01

    The combination of modern antisecretory drugs and eradication of Helicobacter pylori has changed the treatment options for peptic ulcer patients in favour of conservative therapy. Surgical approach which is used to be main treatment option has become now exceptional for uncomplicated gastroduodenal ulcers. However, it includes fixing the problem leaving the origin of the problem. We presented a peptic ulcer patient with recurrent attacks of ulcer perforation and discussed the surgical approach to these complicated cases.

  12. Xanthogranulomatous pseudotumor of stomach induced by perforated peptic ulcer mimicking a stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Chen, Chi-Kuan; Chen, Yung-Fang; Ho, Yung-Jen; Yang, Mei-Due; Shen, Wu-Chung

    2006-10-01

    Perforation is a serious complication of peptic ulcer disease occurring in 5% of such patients. Occasionally, the perforation may be sealed off by the omentum or the adjacent organs. Sealed perforated ulcer with pseudotumor formation is very rarely encountered. Here we present a case of gastric pseudotumor induced by perforation of a peptic ulcer. The imaging features in a barium sulfate study and computed tomography mimic an intramural tumor of the stomach.

  13. Bleeding issues in neonates and infants - update 2015.

    PubMed

    Nowak-Göttl, Ulrike; Limperger, Verena; Bauer, Alexander; Kowalski, Dorothee; Kenet, Gili

    2015-02-01

    The presentation of a neonate with clinical bleeding symptoms commonly causes considerable anxiety to parents and treating physicians. Since inherited coagulation disorders are rare many children with persistently abnormal coagulation screens will have an underlying bleeding disorder. Apart from emergency cases a family history including a bleeding questionnaire is mandatory asking for the onset and/or severity symptoms of hemorrhage prior to laboratory assessment. The absolute values of reference ranges for coagulation assays in neonates and children vary with analyzer and reagent systems, but confirm the concept of developmental hemostasis, showing that physiologic concentrations of coagulation proteins gradually increase and are lower in premature infants as compared to full-term babies or healthy children. The evaluation should include global screening tests and a full blood cell count to rule out thrombocytopenia. As in adults a prolonged PT in neonates reflects decreased plasma concentrations of vitamin-K-dependent factors, whereas the prolonged PTT stems from decreased plasma levels of contact factors. When initial laboratory test results reveal abnormalities, as compared to age-related values, a stepwise diagnostic approach should be followed. In the bleeding neonate or infant that has no laboratory abnormality, FXIII and alpha2-antiplasmin activity should be assessed, and when primary hemostatic defects are suspected, platelet function should be further evaluated. Treatment options of a bleeding neonate vary according to the underlying medical condition.

  14. Platelet function tests, independent of platelet count, are associated with bleeding severity in ITP.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, Andrew L; Grace, Rachael F; Gerrits, Anja J; Berny-Lang, Michelle A; Brown, Travis; Carmichael, Sabrina L; Neufeld, Ellis J; Michelson, Alan D

    2015-08-13

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients with similarly low platelet counts differ in their tendency to bleed. To determine if differences in platelet function in ITP patients account for this variation in bleeding tendency, we conducted a single-center, cross-sectional study of pediatric patients with ITP. Bleeding severity (assessed by standardized bleeding score) and platelet function (assessed by whole blood flow cytometry) with and without agonist stimulation was evaluated in 57 ITP patients (median age, 9.9 years). After adjustment for platelet count, higher levels of thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP)-stimulated percent P-selectin- and activated glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa-positive platelets were significantly associated with a lower bleeding score, whereas higher levels of immature platelet fraction (IPF), TRAP-stimulated platelet surface CD42b, unstimulated platelet surface P-selectin, and platelet forward light scatter (FSC) were associated with a higher bleeding score. Thus, platelet function tests related to platelet age (IPF, FSC) and activation through the protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) thrombin receptor (TRAP-stimulated P-selectin, activated GPIIb-IIIa, and CD42b), independent of platelet count, are associated with concurrent bleeding severity in ITP. These tests may be useful markers of future bleeding risk in ITP.

  15. Platelet function tests, independent of platelet count, are associated with bleeding severity in ITP

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Rachael F.; Gerrits, Anja J.; Berny-Lang, Michelle A.; Brown, Travis; Carmichael, Sabrina L.; Neufeld, Ellis J.; Michelson, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients with similarly low platelet counts differ in their tendency to bleed. To determine if differences in platelet function in ITP patients account for this variation in bleeding tendency, we conducted a single-center, cross-sectional study of pediatric patients with ITP. Bleeding severity (assessed by standardized bleeding score) and platelet function (assessed by whole blood flow cytometry) with and without agonist stimulation was evaluated in 57 ITP patients (median age, 9.9 years). After adjustment for platelet count, higher levels of thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP)-stimulated percent P-selectin- and activated glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa–positive platelets were significantly associated with a lower bleeding score, whereas higher levels of immature platelet fraction (IPF), TRAP-stimulated platelet surface CD42b, unstimulated platelet surface P-selectin, and platelet forward light scatter (FSC) were associated with a higher bleeding score. Thus, platelet function tests related to platelet age (IPF, FSC) and activation through the protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) thrombin receptor (TRAP-stimulated P-selectin, activated GPIIb-IIIa, and CD42b), independent of platelet count, are associated with concurrent bleeding severity in ITP. These tests may be useful markers of future bleeding risk in ITP. PMID:26138687

  16. [Anatlysis of HSPA1B A1267G gene polymorphism in peptic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, M J; Salehi, Z; Sabet, E E; Ejtehadi, F

    2014-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a common illness, affecting a considerable number of people worldwide, and its occurrence can be influenced by environmental and genetic factors. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) function mostly as molecular chaperones, and are induced by various stresses. The A to G transition at position 1267 of the HSPA1B gene was shown to correlate with changes in the level of HSPA mRNA expression. Here, the relation between A1267G polymorphism of the HSPAIB gene and risk of peptic ulcer in the Iranian population was evaluated. One hundred subjects, who underwent gastroscopy, took part in the study. DNA samples extracted from the biopsy tissues were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). After gastroscopy, peptic ulcer was diagnosed for 50 patients; among them the distribution of AA/AB/BB genotypes was 10, 88 and 2%, respectively. As for the other 50 subjects (without peptic ulcer) included in the control group, the AA/AB/BB genotypes were identified as 40, 52 and 8%, respectively. A significant association was found between the HSPA1B genotype and peptic ulcer (6.76 OR; 95% CI, 2.26-20.2; p = 0.0006). Thus, the HSPA1B A1267G polymorphism may be a marker of susceptibility to peptic ulcer.

  17. Acute Appendicitis Is Associated with Peptic Ulcers: A Population-based Study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Kao, Li-Ting; Lin, Herng-Ching; Chung, Shiu-Dong; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2015-12-08

    Despite some studies having indicated a possible association between appendicitis and duodenal ulcers, this association was mainly based on regional samples or limited clinician experiences, and as such, did not permit unequivocal conclusions. In this case-control study, we examined the association of acute appendicitis with peptic ulcers using a population-based database. We included 3574 patients with acute appendicitis as cases and 3574 sex- and age-matched controls. A Chi-squared test showed that there was a significant difference in the prevalences of prior peptic ulcers between cases and controls (21.7% vs. 16.8%, p < 0.001). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of prior peptic ulcers for cases was 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24~1.54, p < 0.001) compared to controls. The results further revealed that younger groups demonstrated higher ORs for prior peptic ulcers among cases than controls. In particular, the adjusted OR for cases < 30 years old was as high as 1.65 (95% CI = 1.25~2.19; p < 0.001) compared to controls. However, we failed to observe an association of acute appendicitis with peptic ulcers in the ≥ 60-year age group (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 0.93~1.52). We concluded that there is an association between acute appendicitis and a previous diagnosis of peptic ulcers.

  18. Massive Bleeding and Massive Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Meißner, Andreas; Schlenke, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Massive bleeding in trauma patients is a serious challenge for all clinicians, and an interdisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic approach is warranted within a limited time frame. Massive transfusion usually is defined as the transfusion of more than 10 units of packed red blood cells (RBCs) within 24 h or a corresponding blood loss of more than 1- to 1.5-fold of the body's entire blood volume. Especially male trauma patients experience this life-threatening condition within their productive years of life. An important parameter for clinical outcome is to succeed in stopping the bleeding preferentially within the first 12 h of hospital admission. Additional coagulopathy in the initial phase is induced by trauma itself and aggravated by consumption and dilution of clotting factors. Although different aspects have to be taken into consideration when viewing at bleedings induced by trauma compared to those caused by major surgery, the basic strategy is similar. Here, we will focus on trauma-induced massive hemorrhage. Currently there are no definite, worldwide accepted algorithms for blood transfusion and strategies for optimal coagulation management. There is increasing evidence that a higher ratio of plasma and RBCs (e.g. 1:1) endorsed by platelet transfusion might result in a superior survival of patients at risk for trauma-induced coagulopathy. Several strategies have been evolved in the military environment, although not all strategies should be transferred unproven to civilian practice, e.g. the transfusion of whole blood. Several agents have been proposed to support the restoration of coagulation. Some have been used for years without any doubt on their benefit-to-risk profile, whereas great enthusiasm of other products has been discouraged by inefficacy in terms of blood transfusion requirements and mortality or significant severe side effects. This review surveys current literature on fluid resuscitation, blood transfusion, and hemostatic agents currently

  19. Bleeding and clotting disorders in pediatric liver disease.

    PubMed

    Wicklund, Brian M

    2011-01-01

    The coagulopathy of liver disease in pediatric patients presents an unusual set of challenges. Little pediatric data have been published, so this review is based largely on adult studies. There is a precarious balance between deficiencies of clotting factors and anticoagulation factors in liver disease that result in abnormal prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) tests that would suggest a bleeding tendency, yet the patients can form a clot and are at risk of thromboembolic disease. Attention has centered on thromboelastography and thrombin-generation assays to clarify the patient's ability to control bleeding, but these tests are not routinely available to many treating physicians.

  20. Thromboprophylaxis and bleeding diathesis in minimally invasive stone surgery.

    PubMed

    Bourdoumis, Andreas; Stasinou, Theodora; Kachrilas, Stefanos; Papatsoris, Athanasios G; Buchholz, Noor; Masood, Junaid

    2014-01-01

    With populations ageing and active treatment of urinary stones increasingly in demand, more patients with stones are presenting with an underlying bleeding disorder or need for regular thromboprophylaxis, by means of antiplatelet and other medication. A practical guide to thromboprophylaxis in the treatment of urinary tract lithiasis has not yet been established. Patients can be stratified according to levels of risk of arterial and venous thromboembolism, which influence the requirements for antiplatelet and anticoagulant medications, respectively. Patients should also be stratified according to their risk of bleeding. Consideration of the combined risks of bleeding and thromboembolism should determine the perioperative thromboprophylactic strategy. The choice of shockwave lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy or ureteroscopy with laser lithotripsy for treatment of lithiasis should be determined with regard to these risks. Although ureteroscopy is the preferred method in high-risk patients, shockwave lithotripsy and percutaneous nephrolithotomy can be chosen when indicated, if appropriate guidelines are strictly followed.

  1. Non-equilibrium Air Plasma for Wound Bleeding Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Spencer P.; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Lin, Chuan-Shun; Chiang, Shu-Hsing

    A low temperature non-equilibrium air plasma spray is tested as a blood coagulator. Emission spectroscopy of the plasma effluent indicates that it carries abundant reactive atomic oxygen (RAO), which can activate erythrocyte - platelet interactions to enhance blood coagulation for plug formation. Tests of the device for wound bleeding control were performed on pigs. Four types of wounds, straight cut and cross cut in the ham area, a hole in an ear saphenous vein, and a cut to an ear artery, were examined. The results showed that this plasma spray could effectively stop the bleeding and reduced the bleeding time considerably. Post-Operative observation of straight cut and cross cut wound healing was carried out. It was found that the plasma treatment had a positive impact on wound healing, in particular, of the cross cut wound; its healing time was shortened by a half.

  2. Acquired antiprothrombin antibodies: an unusual cause of bleeding.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Cristiana; Viveiro, Carolina; Maia, Paulo; Rezende, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Acquired inhibitors of coagulation causing bleeding manifestations are rare in children. They emerge, normally in the context of autoimmune diseases or drug ingestion, but transient and self-limiting cases can occur after viral infection. We describe, an otherwise healthy, 7-year-old girl who had gingival bleeding after a tooth extraction. The prothrombin time (PT) and the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were both prolonged with evidence of an immediate acting inhibitor (lupic anticoagulant). Further coagulation studies demonstrated prothrombin (FII) deficiency and prothrombin directed (FII) antibodies. The serological tests to detect an underlying autoimmune disease were all negative. The coagulation studies normalised alongside the disappearance of the antibody. This article presents lupus anticoagulant hypoprothrombinaemia syndrome (LAHS) as a rare case of acquired bleeding diathesis in childhood. PMID:23299692

  3. Ulcerative colitis and a bleeding polyp detected on Tc-99m-pertechnetate abdominal scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Howman-Giles, R.

    1981-10-01

    Two children with rectal bleeding were diagnosed as having ulcerative colitis and a bleeding colonic polyp respectively using abdominal scanning with Tc-99m pertechnetate. Early flow studies are recommended with careful attention paid to the amount of time abnormal areas of activity are seen on the abdominal scan.

  4. Inherited bleeding syndromes in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-Mondhiry, H A

    1977-06-30

    This paper presents data on the occurence and pattern of inherited bleeding syndromes (IBS) in Iraq, a hitherto unexplored problem. During the first fourteen months of a prospective on-going study at a major university center, 116 patients from 62 families were diagnosed as having IBS. All patients were referred because of moderate to severe bleeding diatheses. They included 62 haemophiliacs 32 patients with von Willebrand's disease (VWD), 9 with Christmas disease (CD), 6 with afibrinogenemia, 1 with prothrombin deficiency, and 6 were thought to have platelet dysfunction. 32 other bleeders (16 hemophiliacs, 14 VWD, and 2 CD) were also recognized among the pedigrees studied but were not available for full investigations. The clinical and laboratory features of the patients observed in Iraq do not seem to be significantly different from those of patients in Western Europe or North America. Although the absolute incidence and relative distribution of these disorders in the entire population cannot yet be determined, the rate of occurence per segment population is likely to be high, most likely due to the high rate of consanguinity and large number of births per family, phenomena still prevalent in this country.

  5. Problems in family practice. Rectal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Graham, J

    1978-07-01

    The diagnosis and management of rectal bleeding problems varies with the urgency of the situation, the age of the patient, and the applicability of available diagnostic methods. Every instance of rectal bleeding is a problem that demands investigation by endoscopic, radiographic, and laboratory means. A physician can be misled by the patient's understatement or underobservance of bleeding. A good history obtained as quickly as possible in urgent circumstances and in great detail under more relaxed circumstances is of immeasurable diagnostic value.

  6. Acute Upper Gastro-Intestinal Bleeding in Morocco: What Have Changed?

    PubMed Central

    Timraz, A.; Khannoussi, W.; Ajana, F. Z.; Essamri, W.; Benelbarhdadi, I.; Afifi, R.; Benazzouz, M.; Essaid, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. In the present study, we aimed to investigate epidemiological, clinical, and etiological characteristics of acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study was conducted between January 2003 and December 2008. It concerned all cases of acute upper gastroduodenal bleeding benefited from an urgent gastro-intestinal endoscopy in our department in Morocco. Characteristics of patients were evaluated in terms of age, gender, medical history, presenting symptoms, results of rectal and clinical examinations, and endoscopy findings. Results. 1389 cases were registered. As 66% of the patients were male, 34% were female. Mean age was 49. 12% of patients had a history of previous hemorrhage, and 26% had a history of NSAID and aspirin use. Endoscopy was performed in 96%. The gastroduodenal ulcer was the main etiology in 38%, followed by gastritis and duodenitis in 32.5%. Conclusion. AUGIB is still a frequent pathology, threatening patients' life. NSAID and aspirin are still the major risk factors. Their impact due to peptic ulcer remains stable in our country. PMID:21991509

  7. Evaluation of technetium-99m DTPA for localization of site of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Mahajan, K.K.; Ericsson, S.; Nawaz, K.; Owunwanne, A.; Kouris, K.; Higazy, E.; Awdeh, M.

    1986-11-01

    Intravenous Tc-99m DTPA was evaluated in 34 patients with active upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Active bleeding was detected in 25 patients: nine in the stomach, 12 in the duodenum, and four from esophageal varices. No active bleeding was seen in nine patients (two gastric ulcers and seven duodenal ulcers). Results were correlated with endoscopic and/or surgical findings. All completely correlated except: 1) one case of esophageal varices in which there was disagreement on the site, 2) three cases of duodenal ulcers that were not bleeding on endoscopy but showed mild oozing on delayed images and 3) one case of gastric ulcer, in which no bleeding was detected in the Tc-99m DTPA study, but was found to be bleeding at surgery 24 hours later. The Tc-99m DTPA study is a reliable method for localization of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with an agreement ratio of 85%. This method also can be used safely for follow-up of patients with intermittent bleeding. It is less invasive than endoscopy, is easily repeatable, and has the same accuracy.

  8. Serendipity in scintigraphic gastrointestinal bleeding studies

    SciTech Connect

    Goergen, T.G.

    1983-09-01

    A retrospective review of 80 scintigraphic bleeding studies performed with Tc-99m sulfur colloid or Tc-99m labeled red blood cells showed five cases where there were abnormal findings not related to bleeding. In some cases, the abnormalities were initially confused with bleeding or could obscure an area of bleeding, while in other cases, the abnormalities represented additional clinical information. These included bone marrow replacement related to tumor and radiation therapy, hyperemia related to a uterine leiomyoma and a diverticular abscess, and a dilated abdominal aorta (aneurysm). Recognition of such abnormalities should prevent an erroneous diagnosis and the additional information may be of clinical value.

  9. Measures of Adiposity Are Associated with Increased Risk of Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, Matthew R.; Khalili, Hamed; Huang, Edward S.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Obesity is associated with systemic inflammation, alterations in the intestinal microbiome, and decreased epithelial integrity. The association between obesity and peptic ulcer has not been thoroughly investigated. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of 47,120 men enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (mean age of 54 years at baseline). Biennially, we updated information on body mass index (BMI), physical activity, smoking, and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) or aspirin. Self-reported waist and hip measurements were validated among a subsample of participants. Self-reported cases of gastric and duodenal ulcers were confirmed by medical record review. Helicobacter pylori status was determined from endoscopic biopsies, serum antibody measurements, and/or stool antigen assays documented in the medical record. We used Cox proportional hazards modeling to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results We documented 272 gastric and 320 duodenal ulcers over 24 years of follow up. The multivariate-adjusted HR for gastric ulcer was 1.83 (95% CI, 1.20–2.78; Ptrend<.01) for obese men (BMI ≥30.0 kg/m2), compared to men with BMIs of 23.0–24.9 kg/m2, and 1.88 (95% CI, 1.06–3.33; Ptrend=.04) for men with waist-to-hip ratios (WHR) ≥1.00, compared to men with WHR of 0.85–0.89. Risk of duodenal ulcer was not associated with BMI (Ptrend=.24) or WHR (Ptrend=.68). In secondary analyses, increased BMI and WHR were each associated with increased risk of H pylori-negative, but not H pylori-positive, ulcers. The effect of BMI on ulcer risk did not change with use of aspirin or NSAID, alcohol consumption, physical activity, or smoking. Conclusions In a large prospective cohort of male health professionals, central and total obesity were associated with increased risk of peptic ulcer—particularly gastric and H pylori-negative ulcers. PMID:24681076

  10. Swallowable fluorometric capsule for wireless triage of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Nemiroski, A; Ryou, M; Thompson, C C; Westervelt, R M

    2015-12-01

    Real-time detection of gastrointestinal bleeding remains a major challenge because there does not yet exist a minimally invasive technology that can both i) monitor for blood from an active hemorrhage and ii) uniquely distinguish it from blood left over from an inactive hemorrhage. Such a device would be an important tool for clinical triage. One promising solution, which we have proposed previously, is to inject a fluorescent dye into the blood stream and to use it as a distinctive marker of active bleeding by monitoring leakage into the gastrointestinal tract with a wireless fluorometer. This paper reports, for the first time to our knowledge, the development of a swallowable, wireless capsule with a built-in fluorometer capable of detecting fluorescein in blood, and intended for monitoring gastrointestinal bleeding in the stomach. The embedded, compact fluorometer uses pinholes to define a microliter sensing volume and to eliminate bulky optical components. The proof-of-concept capsule integrates optics, low-noise analog sensing electronics, a microcontroller, battery, and low power Zigbee radio, all into a cylindrical package measuring 11 mm × 27 mm and weighing 10 g. Bench-top experiments demonstrate wireless fluorometry with a limit-of-detection of 20 nM aqueous fluorescein. This device represents a major step towards a technology that would enable simple, rapid detection of active gastrointestinal bleeding, a capability that would save precious time and resources and, ultimately, reduce complications in patients. PMID:26490455

  11. Platelet Function Tests in Bleeding Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Riitta

    2016-04-01

    Functional disorders of platelets can involve any aspect of platelet physiology, with many different effects or outcomes. These include platelet numbers (thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia); changes in platelet production or destruction, or capture to the liver (Ashwell receptor); altered adhesion to vascular injury sites and/or influence on hemostasis and wound healing; and altered activation or receptor functions, shape change, spreading and release reactions, procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activity. Procoagulant membrane alterations, and generation of thrombin and fibrin, also affect platelet aggregation. The above parameters can all be studied, but standardization and quality control of assay methods have been limited despite several efforts. Only after a comprehensive clinical bleeding assessment, including family history, information on drug use affecting platelets, and exclusion of coagulation factor, and tissue deficits, should platelet function testing be undertaken to confirm an abnormality. Current diagnostic tools include blood cell counts, platelet characteristics according to the cell counter parameters, peripheral blood smear, exclusion of pseudothrombocytopenia, whole blood aggregometry (WBA) or light transmission aggregometry (LTA) in platelet-rich plasma, luminescence, platelet function analysis (PFA-100) for platelet adhesion and deposition to collagen cartridges under blood flow, and finally transmission electron microscopy to exclude rare structural defects leading to functional deficits. The most validated test panels are included in WBA, LTA, and PFA. Because platelets are isolated from their natural environment, many simplifications occur, as circulating blood and interaction with vascular wall are omitted in these assays. The target to reach a highly specific platelet disorder diagnosis in routine clinical management can be exhaustive, unless needed for genetic counseling. The elective overall assessment of platelet function disorder

  12. Factors Associated With Major Bleeding Events

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Shaun G.; Wojdyla, Daniel M.; Piccini, Jonathan P.; White, Harvey D.; Paolini, John F.; Nessel, Christopher C.; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Patel, Manesh R.; Sherwood, Matthew W.; Becker, Richard C.; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Hacke, Werner; Singer, Daniel E.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Breithardt, Gunter; Fox, Keith A. A.; Califf, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to report additional safety results from the ROCKET AF (Rivaroxaban Once-daily oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared with Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation). Background The ROCKET AF trial demonstrated similar risks of stroke/systemic embolism and major/nonmajor clinically relevant bleeding (principal safety endpoint) with rivaroxaban and warfarin. Methods The risk of the principal safety and component bleeding endpoints with rivaroxaban versus warfarin were compared, and factors associated with major bleeding were examined in a multivariable model. Results The principal safety endpoint was similar in the rivaroxaban and warfarin groups (14.9 vs. 14.5 events/100 patient-years; hazard ratio: 1.03; 95% confidence interval: 0.96 to 1.11). Major bleeding risk increased with age, but there were no differences between treatments in each age category (<65, 65 to 74, ≥75 years; pinteraction = 0.59). Compared with those without (n = 13,455), patients with a major bleed (n = 781) were more likely to be older, current/prior smokers, have prior gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, mild anemia, and a lower calculated creatinine clearance and less likely to be female or have a prior stroke/transient ischemic attack. Increasing age, baseline diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥90 mm Hg, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or GI bleeding, prior acetylsalicylic acid use, and anemia were independently associated with major bleeding risk; female sex and DBP <90 mm Hg were associated with a decreased risk. Conclusions Rivaroxaban and warfarin had similar risk for major/nonmajor clinically relevant bleeding. Age, sex, DBP, prior GI bleeding, prior acetylsalicylic acid use, and anemia were associated with the risk of major bleeding. (An Efficacy and Safety Study of Rivaroxaban With Warfarin for the Prevention of Stroke and Non-Central Nervous System Systemic Embolism in Patients With Non

  13. Epstein-Barr virus association with peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Mondragón, María G; Torres, Javier; Flores-Luna, Lourdes; Carreón-Talavera, Ricardo; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M

    2015-01-01

    Background. Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) use are considered the main risk to develop peptic ulcer disease (PUD). However, PUD also occurs in the absence of HP infection and/or NSAID use. Recently, we have found evidence that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation increases the risk to develop premalignant and malignant gastric lesions. Objective. To study a possible association between EBV and PUD. Methods. Antibodies against an EBV reactivation antigen, HP, and the HP virulence factor CagA were measured in sera from 207 Mexican subjects, controls (healthy individuals, n = 129), and PUD patients (n = 78, 58 duodenal and 20 gastric ulcers). Statistical associations were estimated. Results. Duodenal PUD was significantly associated with high anti-EBV IgG titers (p = 0.022, OR = 2.5), while anti-EBV IgA was positively associated with gastric PUD (p = 0.002, OR = 10.1). Conclusions. Our study suggests that EBV reactivation in gastric and duodenal epithelium increases the risk to develop PUD.

  14. Cisapride for gastro-oesophageal reflux and peptic oesophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Cucchiara, S; Staiano, A; Capozzi, C; Di Lorenzo, C; Boccieri, A; Auricchio, S

    1987-01-01

    Twenty children (age range 75 days-47 months) with reflux oesophagitis entered a random double blind trial in which they received either Cisapride (Janssen Pharmaceutical Ltd), a new prokinetic agent, or an identical placebo syrup. Diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux was made by measurement of intraluminal oesophageal pH combined with manometry. Oesophagitis was assessed in all patients by histological examination of mucosal specimens taken during oesophagogastroduodenoscopy. Manometry, pH test, and endoscopy with biopsy examination were repeated at the end of the treatment period. Seventeen patients completed the trial, eight of whom were taking the drug and nine the placebo. Mean total clinical score and post-prandial reflux time (% of reflux) significantly improved in patients in the group given Cisapride but not in the group given placebo. Furthermore, there was a significant improvement of the histological oesophagitis score only in the children in the group given Cisapride, whereas placebo was ineffective. It is concluded that Cisapride is a useful agent both for the relief of symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux and for the healing of peptic oesophagitis in infancy. PMID:3300570

  15. Stimuli of pepsinogen secretion from frog isolated peptic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, H.; Komiyama, K.; Shirakawa, T.; Heldman, A.; Anderson, W.; Hirschowitz, B.I.

    1986-03-05

    The authors have previously studied pepsinogen (Pg) secretion from isolated intact esophageal mucosa of the bullfrog R. catesbeiana. By stimulus-response studies using agonists and antagonists they characterized specific stimulation of cholinergic, adrenergic and peptidergic receptors and interaction of cAMP and Ca/sup 2 +/ dependent pathways. To understand cell mechanisms more definitively and to relate these to morphology it was necessary to isolate peptic cells. Esophageal mucosa was digested with 0.1% collagenase for 80-100 min and sieved through teflon mesh. One esophagus yielded approximately 10/sup 7/ cells, 70% pure and 89 +/- 5% viable. Basal secretion was 3% of Pg content/hr. The cells responded to graded concentrations of bombesin, bethanechol, IBMX, 8Br-cAMP, forskolin, TPA (12-0-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13 acetate) and A23187. The response to (TPA + A23187) was double the additive single output values; (TPA + A23187 + forskolin) stimulated secretion of more than double the sum of the 3 component stimuli. In calcium and magnesium-free medium, the A23187 response and the synergistic response of combinations were both lost. They have identified 3 messengers for Pg cell stimulation - cAMP, Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization and protein kinase C - each of which can be separately stimulated, and when combined are strongly synergistic.

  16. A longitudinal prospective study of bleeding diathesis in Egyptian pediatric patients: single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Mokhtar, Galila M; Tantawy, Azza A G; Adly, Amira A M; Telbany, Manal A S; El Arab, Sahar Ezz; Ismail, Mona

    2012-07-01

    Keeping an updated registry of bleeding disorders is crucial for planning care and documenting prevalence. We aimed to assess the prevalence of various bleeding disorders including rare inherited coagulation and platelet disorders concerning their clinico-epidemiological, diagnostic data and bleeding manifestations severity. Patients suffering from manifestations of bleeding or coagulation disorders presented to Hematology Clinic during 16 years were included and prospectively followed up. Demographics, clinical characteristics, complete blood count, bleeding, prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times, platelet aggregation tests and bone marrow aspiration were recorded. Overall 687 patients with bleeding disorders from total 2949 patients were identified. Inherited coagulation defects were found in 27.2%; hemophilia A (70.6%), hemophilia B (13.9%), factor I deficiency (2.3%), factor V deficiency (1.6%), factor X deficiency (4.2%), factor VII deficiency (2.6%), factor XIII deficiency (1.1%), combined factor deficiency (2.1%) and unclassified coagulation disorders in 1.6% of studied patients. Overall 72.7% had diagnosed with platelet disorders; immune thrombocytopenia was the commonest (74.8%), and inherited conditions represent (25.2%) in the following order: Glanzman's thrombasthenia (11.2%), von Willebrand disease (6.6%), Bernard-Soulier syndrome (1%) and Chediak Higashi in 0.4% and unclassified in 6%. Median age of diagnosis of coagulation and platelet disorders were 33 and 72 months. Presenting symptoms of coagulation disorders were: 25.1% post circumcision bleeding, 22.5% ecchymosis, 20.9% hemoarthrosis and 15% epistaxis. Symptoms of rare coagulation disorders were postcircumcision bleeding (20%), bleeding umbilical stump (20%), epistaxis (12%), hemoarthrosis (8%) and hematomas (4%). Presenting symptoms in rare inherited platelet disorders were purpura, ecchymosis, epistaxis and bleeding gums, respectively. Analysis of the clinico

  17. Bleeding symptoms and laboratory correlation in patients with severe von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Metjian, A D; Wang, C; Sood, S L; Cuker, A; Peterson, S M; Soucie, J M; Konkle, B A

    2009-07-01

    Type 3 von Willebrand disease (VWD) is a rare bleeding disorder with markedly decreased or absent von Willebrand factor (VWF) protein, accompanied by a parallel decrease in VWF function and factor VIII (FVIII) activity. The goal of this study was to describe the population of patients enrolled in the USA Centers for Disease Control Universal Data Collection (UDC) study with type 3 VWD, defined as a VWF:Ag of <10%, and to correlate bleeding symptoms with VWF and FVIII levels. Data on 150 patients were analysed. Almost all patients experienced bleeding episodes (98%) and required blood and/or factor product treatment (92%). While oral mucosal bleeding (the site of first bleed in 54%) was most common, subsequent muscle and joint bleeds were also seen (28%, 45%, respectively), and intracranial haemorrhage occurred in 8% of individuals. Mean age of first bleed was lower in those with either a FVIII < or =5% or a VWF:Ag <1%. Univariate marginal model analysis showed lower levels of FVIII and VWF:Ag both predicted a higher risk of joint bleeding. Longitudinal multivariate analysis found a lower FVIII level (P = 0.03), increasing age (P < 0.0001), history of joint bleeding (P = 0.001), higher body mass index (BMI) (P < 0.0001), and use of home infusion (P = 0.02) were all negatively associated with joint mobility. Low levels of VWF:Ag (P = 0.003) and male sex (P = 0.007) were also negatively associated with joint function. This study documents the strong bleeding phenotype in severe VWD and provides data to help target therapy, including prophylaxis, for patients most at risk of bleeding complications.

  18. Recurrent Midgut Bleeding due to Jejunal Angioleiomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Mityushin, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Angioleiomyoma being a type of true smooth muscle gastrointestinal tumors can lead to serious life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding. We report a case of 21-year-old male patient with recurrent midgut bleeding. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed highly vascular small bowel neoplasm. The patient underwent laparotomy with bowel resection and recovered uneventfully. Histopathology revealed jejunal angioleiomyoma. PMID:27668116

  19. Recurrent Midgut Bleeding due to Jejunal Angioleiomyoma.

    PubMed

    Gachabayov, Mahir; Mityushin, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Angioleiomyoma being a type of true smooth muscle gastrointestinal tumors can lead to serious life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding. We report a case of 21-year-old male patient with recurrent midgut bleeding. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed highly vascular small bowel neoplasm. The patient underwent laparotomy with bowel resection and recovered uneventfully. Histopathology revealed jejunal angioleiomyoma. PMID:27668116

  20. Recurrent Midgut Bleeding due to Jejunal Angioleiomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Mityushin, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Angioleiomyoma being a type of true smooth muscle gastrointestinal tumors can lead to serious life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding. We report a case of 21-year-old male patient with recurrent midgut bleeding. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed highly vascular small bowel neoplasm. The patient underwent laparotomy with bowel resection and recovered uneventfully. Histopathology revealed jejunal angioleiomyoma.

  1. Obstetric management of adolescents with bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    James, Andra H

    2010-12-01

    Adolescents with bleeding disorders who become pregnant must contend with the dual challenges of their bleeding disorder and their pregnancy. Adolescents are more likely to terminate a pregnancy than adult women, and when they do carry a pregnancy, they are more likely to deliver prematurely. Otherwise, they are at risk for the same complications that adult women with bleeding disorders experience, particularly bleeding complications postpartum. Since one half to two thirds of adolescent pregnancies are unplanned, issues related to reproduction should be addressed during routine visits with the pediatrician, hematologist or gynecologist. Girls who are at risk of being carriers for hemophilia A and B, severe von Willebrand disease, and other severe bleeding disorders should have their bleeding disorder status determined before they become pregnant. During pregnancy, a plan should be established to ensure that both mother and fetus deliver safely. Young women at risk for severe bleeding or at risk of having a severely affected infant should be referred for prenatal care and delivery to a center where, in addition to specialists in high-risk obstetrics, there is a hemophilia treatment center or a hematologist with expertise in hemostasis. Prior to delivery or any invasive procedures, young women at risk for severe bleeding should receive prophylaxis. Since administration of desmopressin may result in hyponatremia, whenever available, virally inactivated or recombinant clotting factor concentrates should be used for replacement as opposed to fresh frozen plasma or cryoprecipitate.

  2. Comparison of Bypassing Agents in Bleeding Reduction in Treatment of Bleeding Episodes in Patients With Haemophilia and Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Golestani, Mina; Eshghi, Peyman; Rasekh, Hamid Reza; Cheraghali, Abdol Majid; Salamzadeh, Jamshid; Imani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Context: Mild-to-moderate bleeding disorders in haemophilia are primarily treated via recombinant activated factor VII a (rFVIIa) or activated prothrombin complex concentrate (aPCC). However, the efficacy of each bypassing agents may vary and none of them is universally effective. Evidence Acquisition: After reviewing the databases of PubMed, Scopus, MD Consult, Ovid, Trip database, Google Scholar, ProQuest and the Cochrane Library, finally, 17 papers published from 2000 to 2013 were extracted. We used as a random effect model in meta-analysis. Comprehensive meta-analysis (CMA) software was used for calculating and estimating the mean of bleeding reduction and performing meta-analysis. Results: The mean of bleeding reduction in aPCC and rFVIIa were 71.2% with CI 95% (lower limit 86.8% and upper limit 82%) and 72.3% with CI 95% (lower limit 57.6% and upper limit 83.4%), respectively. Conclusions: Although differences between the two products were very close to each other, they reported similar effects on joint bleeds. Further clinical studies should be performed by incorporating a standardized measurement in comparative efficacy of aPCC and rFVIIa. PMID:25763245

  3. Tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke: calculation of dose based on estimated patient weight can increase the risk of cerebral bleeding.

    PubMed

    García-Pastor, Andrés; Díaz-Otero, Fernando; Funes-Molina, Carmen; Benito-Conde, Beatriz; Grandes-Velasco, Sandra; Sobrino-García, Pilar; Vázquez-Alén, Pilar; Fernández-Bullido, Yolanda; Villanueva-Osorio, Jose Antonio; Gil-Núñez, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    A dose of 0.9 mg/kg of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) has proven to be beneficial in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Dosing of t-PA based on estimated patient weight (PW) increases the likelihood of errors. Our objectives were to evaluate the accuracy of estimated PW and assess the effectiveness and safety of the actual applied dose (AAD) of t-PA. We performed a prospective single-center study of AIS patients treated with t-PA from May 2010 to December 2011. Dose was calculated according to estimated PW. Patients were weighed during the 24 h following treatment with t-PA. Estimation errors and AAD were calculated. Actual PW was measured in 97 of the 108 included patients. PW estimation errors were recorded in 22.7 % and were more frequent when weight was estimated by stroke unit staff (44 %). Only 11 % of patients misreported their own weight. Mean AAD was significantly higher in patients who had intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) after t-PA than in patients who did not (0.96 vs. 0.92 mg/kg; p = 0.02). Multivariate analysis showed an increased risk of ICH for each 10 % increase in t-PA dose above the optimal dose of 0.90 mg/kg (OR 3.10; 95 % CI 1.14-8.39; p = 0.026). No effects of t-PA misdosing were observed on symptomatic ICH, functional outcome or mortality. Estimated PW is frequently inaccurate and leads to t-PA dosing errors. Increasing doses of t-PA above 0.90 mg/kg may increase the risk of ICH. Standardized weighing methods before t-PA is administered should be considered.

  4. The use of carprofen, a non-steroidal antiinflammatory agent, in peptic ulcer diseases.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Kwiecień, N; Obtulowicz, W; Zmuda, A; Polański, M; Kopp, B; Sito, E; Oleksy, J

    1983-12-01

    The effects of carprofen (Roche), a nonsteroid antiinflammatory agent, on gastric secretion, serum gastrin level, electropotential difference (PD), gastric microbleeding, DNA loss, and the generation of mucosal prostaglandins (PGs) were examined in 20 duodenal ulcer patients with active ulcer (15 patients) or in remission (5 patients). Carprofen administered for one-week period at a therapeutic dose (300 mg/day) was well tolerated by all ulcer patients and no adverse effects were observed during or after treatment. Endoscopy performed after carprofen treatment showed complete ulcer healing in 9 out of 15 patients and no exacerbations were observed in the rest of patients. No significant changes were observed in basal or pentagastrin-induced secretion, PD, gastric microbleeding and DNA loss. The generation of PGE2, 6-keto-PGF1 alpha and thromboxane B2 was not affected by the treatment with carprofen. This study indicates that carprofen shows excellent gastrointestinal tolerance in ulcer patients, and it might be useful in the treatment of arthritic patients with peptic ulcer disease.

  5. Protective effects of ginger and marshmallow extracts on indomethacin-induced peptic ulcer in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zaghlool, Sameh S.; Shehata, Basim A.; Abo-Seif, Ali A.; Abd El-Latif, Hekma A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gastric ulcer is one of the most serious diseases. Most classic treatment lines produce adverse drug reactions. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the protective effects of two natural extracts, namely ginger and marshmallow extracts, on indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer in rats. Materials and Methods: Animals were divided into five groups; a normal control group, an ulcer control group, and three treatment groups receiving famotidine (20 mg/kg), ginger (100 mg/kg), and marshmallow (100 mg/kg). Treatments were given orally on a daily basis for 14 days prior to a single intra-peritoneal administration of indomethacin (20 mg/kg). Results: Indomethacin administration resulted in significant ulcerogenic effect evidenced by significant elevations in ulcer number, ulcer index, and blood superoxide dismutase activity accompanied by significant decreases in gastric mucosal nitric oxide and glutathione levels. In addition, elevations in gastric mucosal lipid peroxides and histamine content were observed. Alternatively, pretreatment with famotidine, ginger or marshmallow significantly corrected macroscopic and biochemical findings, supported microscopically by results of histopathological study. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that administration of either ginger or marshmallow extract could protect against indomethacin-induced peptic ulcer in rats presumably via their antioxidant properties and inhibition of histamine release. PMID:26283843

  6. Scintigraphic diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding with /sup 99/. mu. Tc-labeled blood-pool agents

    SciTech Connect

    Miskowiak, J.; Nielsen, S.; Munck, O.

    1981-11-01

    Abdominal scintigraphy with /sup 99/..mu..Tc-labeled albumin or red blood cells was used in 68 patients to localize gastrointestinal bleeding or confirm that it had stopped. Acute, active bleeding was identified in 33 patients; characteristic patterns of bleeding from the stomach, biliary passages, small intestine, and colon are shown. Sensitivity was 0.86 (95% confidence limits, 0.57-0.98) and specificity was 1.0 (95% confidence limits, 0.82-1.0) in 33 patients who had scintigraphy and endoscopy performed in succession. Abdominal scintigraphy appears to be a valuable supplement to conventional diagnostic methods. In upper gastrointestinal bleeding, scintigraphy should be considered when endoscopy fails. In lower intestinal bleeding, scintigraphy should be the method of choice.

  7. The predictability of bleeding by prothrombin times sensitive or insensitive to PIVKA during intensive oral anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Arnesen, H; Smith, P

    1991-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of PIVKA (Proteins Induced by Vitamin K Absence or Antagonism) on the bleeding tendency during oral anticoagulation, we studied consecutive patients intensively treated with warfarin (INR greater than 4.8). The level of anticoagulation was measured with the PIVKA-insensitive Normotest (NT) as well as with the PIVKA-sensitive Thrombotest (TT), and the results are expressed as per cent coagulant activity. The NT/TT ratio was determined. Twenty patients with bleeding episodes had a mean NT/TT ratio of 2.06 as compared to 2.20 in 143 patients without bleeding episodes (p = 0.08). As the NT/TT ratio was not higher in patients with bleedings, we conclude that PIVKA are of no importance for bleeding during anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists.

  8. Improving care and treatment options for women and girls with bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Roshni

    2015-12-01

    Women and girls may experience increased bleeding symptoms as carriers of haemophilia. They can also be affected by other hereditary bleeding diatheses such as von Willebrand disease, platelet dysfunction defects or deficiencies of coagulation factors (F) such as FI, FII, FV, FVII, FX, FXI and FXIII. In addition to general bleeding symptoms, such disorders pose unique problems for women due to their impact on reproductive health. Women and adolescent girls with undiagnosed bleeding disorders frequently experience heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB; menorrhagia), leading to impairment of daily activities. Other gynaecological and obstetric manifestations, for example miscarriage, bleeding during pregnancy and postpartum haemorrhage (PPH), can occur. Treatment for HMB should consider patient wishes relating to preservation of fertility, and management options include hormonal measures, desmopressin, antifibrinolytics, platelet concentrate transfusions and clotting factor therapy. During pregnancy, monitoring clotting factor levels informs the need for prophylactic therapy; subsequent haemostatic cover can minimise PPH. Under-recognition of bleeding disorders in females may lead to inappropriate, or lack of, treatment. This may be avoided by increased disease awareness, prompt and accurate diagnosis, and a multidisciplinary approach to patient care. This review considers the range of hereditary bleeding disorders that may affect women and adolescent girls, and their evaluation and management.

  9. Massive posttraumatic bleeding: epidemiology, causes, clinical features, and therapeutic management.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2013-02-01

    Bleeding typically results as a consequence of derangements of primary hemostasis, secondary hemostasis, or both, and can be dramatically amplified by the presence of other predisposing conditions, especially inherited bleeding disorders. Life-threatening hemorrhages are, however, almost exclusively caused by penetrating wounds, blunt traumas of chest and abdomen, suicide attempts, amputations, bone fractures with concomitant injury to internal organs and blood vessels, and shearing forces from sudden rotation, violent flexion, extension, or deceleration injuries. The pathogenesis of posttraumatic bleeding is complex and multifaceted. The most dramatic phenomenon that always accompanies major hemorrhages is the abrupt and considerable loss of intravascular volume, that further leads to hypovolemic shock, also known as hemorrhagic shock, culminating with peripheral ischemia, especially in those tissues where oxygen delivery is more critical (i.e., central nervous system and myocardium). The mortality rate of severe posttraumatic bleeding can be as high as 50%, especially when an appropriate treatment is not established in a timely manner. The damage control sequence basically entails a four-step approach including damage control surgery, damage control resuscitation with fluid restoration, and hemocomponents administration, as well as correction of the coagulopathy with platelets, antifibrinolytic (e.g., tranexamic acid), and/or procoagulant agents such as fresh frozen plasma, prothrombin complex concentrate, or recombinant-activated Factor VII.

  10. Perforation of the Peptic Ulcer Localized in the Proximal Jejunum - Case Report.

    PubMed

    Żyluk, Andrzej Ż; Szlosser, Zbigniew

    2016-09-01

    Non-traumatic perforation of the digestive tract occurs most often in the duodenum and stomach (peptic ulcer), as well as the colon (diverticulitis, cancer or ischemic lesions). Perforation of the small bowel is very rare. The Authors of the study presented a case of proximal jejunum perforation, which occurred in a patient with a history of duodenal peptic ulcer disease. Diagnosis posed no difficulties, and treatment included the excision of the ulceration and suturing of the bowel. The patient recovered without complications and the histological examination failed to reveal the nature of the ulcer. However, based on the medical history, one may suppose that it might be of peptic etiology, which makes this case exceptional. PMID:27648623

  11. Perforation of the Peptic Ulcer Localized in the Proximal Jejunum - Case Report.

    PubMed

    Żyluk, Andrzej Ż; Szlosser, Zbigniew

    2016-09-01

    Non-traumatic perforation of the digestive tract occurs most often in the duodenum and stomach (peptic ulcer), as well as the colon (diverticulitis, cancer or ischemic lesions). Perforation of the small bowel is very rare. The Authors of the study presented a case of proximal jejunum perforation, which occurred in a patient with a history of duodenal peptic ulcer disease. Diagnosis posed no difficulties, and treatment included the excision of the ulceration and suturing of the bowel. The patient recovered without complications and the histological examination failed to reveal the nature of the ulcer. However, based on the medical history, one may suppose that it might be of peptic etiology, which makes this case exceptional.

  12. A systematic approach for the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic peptic ulcers.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chen-Shuan; Chiang, Tsung-Hsien; Lee, Yi-Chia

    2015-09-01

    An idiopathic peptic ulcer is defined as an ulcer with unknown cause or an ulcer that appears to arise spontaneously. The first step in treatment is to exclude common possible causes, including Helicobacter pylori infection, infection with other pathogens, ulcerogenic drugs, and uncommon diseases with upper gastrointestinal manifestations. When all known causes are excluded, a diagnosis of idiopathic peptic ulcer can be made. A patient whose peptic ulcer is idiopathic may have a higher risk for complicated ulcer disease, a poorer response to gastric acid suppressants, and a higher recurrence rate after treatment. Risk factors associated with this disease may include genetic predisposition, older age, chronic mesenteric ischemia, smoking, concomitant diseases, a higher American Society of Anesthesiologists score, and higher stress. Therefore, the diagnosis and management of emerging disease should systematically explore all known causes and treat underlying disease, while including regular endoscopic surveillance to confirm ulcer healing and the use of proton-pump inhibitors on a case-by-case basis.

  13. Increased Risk of Osteoporosis in Patients With Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Tung, Yi-Ching; Chai, Chee-Yin; Lu, Ying-Yi; Su, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Tai-Hsin; Kuo, Keng-Liang; Lin, Chih-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate osteoporosis risk in patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD) using a nationwide population-based dataset. This Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) analysis included 27,132 patients aged 18 years and older who had been diagnosed with PUD (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] codes 531–534) during 1996 to 2010. The control group consisted of 27,132 randomly selected (age- and gender)-matched patients without PUD. The association between PUD and the risk of developing osteoporosis was estimated using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. During the follow-up period, osteoporosis was diagnosed in 2538 (9.35 %) patients in the PUD group and in 2259 (8.33 %) participants in the non-PUD group. After adjusting for covariates, osteoporosis risk was 1.85 times greater in the PUD group compared to the non-PUD group (13.99 vs 5.80 per 1000 person-years, respectively). Osteoporosis developed 1 year after PUD diagnosis. The 1-year follow-up period exhibited the highest significance between the 2 groups (hazard ratio [HR] = 63.44, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 28.19–142.74, P < 0.001). Osteoporosis risk was significantly higher in PUD patients with proton-pump-inhibitors (PPIs) use (HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.03–1.34) compared to PUD patients without PPIs use. This study revealed a significant association between PUD and subsequent risk of osteoporosis. Therefore, PUD patients, especially those treated with PPIs, should be evaluated for subsequent risk of osteoporosis to minimize the occurrence of adverse events. PMID:27100415

  14. The Association Between Peptic Ulcer Disease and Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tain-Junn; Guo, How-Ran; Chang, Chia-Yu; Weng, Shih-Feng; Li, Pi-I; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Wu, Wen-Shiann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stroke is a common cause of death worldwide, but about 30% of ischemic stroke (IS) patients have no identifiable contributing risk factors. Because peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and vascular events share some common risk factors, we conducted a population-based study to evaluate the association between PUD and IS. We followed up a representative sample of 1 million residents of Taiwan using the National Health Insurance Research Database from 1997 to 2011. We defined patients who received medications for PUD and had related diagnosis codes as the PUD group, and a reference group matched by age and sex was sampled from those who did not have PUD. We also collected data on medical history and monthly income. The events of IS occurred after enrollment were compared between the 2 groups. The data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazard models at the 2-tailed significant level of 0.05. The PUD group had higher income and prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), heart disease, and hyperlipidemia. They also had a higher risk of developing IS with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.31 (95% confidence interval: 1.20–1.41). Other independent risk factors included male sex, older age, lower income, and co-morbidity of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), and heart disease. PUD is a risk factor for IS, independent of conventional risk factors such as male sex, older age, lower income, and co-morbidity of hypertension, DM, and heart disease. Prevention strategies taking into account PUD should be developed and evaluated. PMID:27258514

  15. Peptic ulcer as a risk factor for postherpetic neuralgia in adult patients with herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jen-Yin; Lan, Kuo-Mao; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Tseng, Su-Feng; Weng, Shih-Feng; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2015-02-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia is the most common complication of herpes zoster. Identifying predictors for postherpetic neuralgia may help physicians screen herpes zoster patients at risk of postherpetic neuralgia and undertake preventive strategies. Peptic ulcer has been linked to immunological dysfunctions and malnutrition, both of which are predictors of postherpetic neuralgia. The aim of this retrospective case-control study was to determine whether adult herpes zoster patients with peptic ulcer were at greater risk of postherpetic neuralgia. Adult zoster patients without postherpetic neuralgia and postherpetic neuralgia patients were automatically selected from a medical center's electronic database using herpes zoster/postherpetic neuralgia ICD-9 codes supported with inclusion and exclusion criteria. Consequently, medical record review was performed to validate the diagnostic codes and all pertaining data including peptic ulcer, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and ulcerogenic medications. Because no standard pain intensity measurement exists, opioid usage was used as a proxy measurement for moderate to severe pain. In total, 410 zoster patients without postherpetic neuralgia and 115 postherpetic neuralgia patients were included. Multivariate logistic regressions identified 60 years of age and older, peptic ulcer and greater acute herpetic pain as independent predictors for postherpetic neuralgia. Among etiologies of peptic ulcer, H. pylori infection and usage of non-selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were significantly associated with the increased risk of postherpetic neuralgia; conversely, other etiologies were not significantly associated with the postherpetic neuralgia risk. In conclusion, 60 years of age and older, peptic ulcer and greater acute herpetic pain are independent predictors for postherpetic neuralgia in adult herpes zoster patients.

  16. Historic changes of occupational work load and mortality from peptic ulcer in Germany.

    PubMed

    Sonnenberg, A; Sonnenberg, G S; Wirths, W

    1987-09-01

    The occurrence of peptic ulcer disease appears to be associated with the amount of occupational work load. Worldwide the number of hospital admissions, surgical operations, and death rates from gastric and duodenal ulcer have declined during recent decades. This communication examines the probability of a correlation between the time trends of gastric and duodenal ulcer mortality in Germany and changes in the occupational work load between 1870 and 1984. Lifetime cumulative hours of work declined for all consecutive cohorts of the population born between 1840 and 1955. The fall occurred similarly in all age groups. However, lifetime cumulative energy expenditure originating from industrial blue collar work showed a peak for the cohorts born during the last quarter of the 19th century. A marked decline occurred in all cohorts born after 1905. A similar birth-cohort pattern was found for mortality from peptic ulcer disease, with those born at the turn of the century showing a higher risk of dying from peptic ulcer disease than any previous or subsequent generation. The coincidence of the birth-cohort patterns of both mortality from peptic ulcer and occupational energy expenditure suggests that birth-cohort pattern of peptic ulcer may be related to the trends of occupational work load that occurred during the industrial revolution. The amount of work hours appears to be a less sensitive measure for the occupational work load. The superimposition of two counteracting historic changes, namely the increased industrial work force and the decreased occupational work load due to legislative regulations, industrial automation, and mechanization may have shaped the rise and fall in the occurrence of peptic ulcer disease.

  17. Comparison of thrombin generation assay with conventional coagulation tests in evaluation of bleeding risk in patients with rare bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Zekavat, Omid R; Haghpanah, Sezaneh; Dehghani, Javad; Afrasiabi, Abdolreza; Peyvandi, Flora; Karimi, Mehran

    2014-09-01

    Based on the premise that the capacity of plasma to generate thrombin in vitro is a comprehensive and precise functional test of the clotting system, we designed a cross-sectional, single-center study involving 83 patients with rare bleeding disorders (RBDs) to compare the usefulness of the thrombin generation (TG) assay versus conventional tests including prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) in predicting bleeding risk in patients with RBD in southern Iran. The TG parameters consisted of endogenous thrombin potential, lag time, peak, time to peak (ttPeak), and start tail. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve showed statistically significant associations between bleeding risk and lag time, ttPeak, and start tail. We determined cutoff values for these 3 TG parameters and obtained a negative predictive value of 86% to 90% in patients with RBD who had a bleeding score (BS) ≤13. The ROC curves for the association of PT and aPTT with BS did not indicate any significant association. Correlation analysis supported the results of ROC curve analysis, only lag time, ttPeak, and start tail showed significant positive correlations with BS (P < .05). Disease severity based on plasma factor activity was significantly associated with prolonged lag time and ttPeak and with prolonged PT (P <.05). We suggest that TG assay is a potentially more useful tool for predicting the bleeding risk in patients with RBD. However, the small sample size in different RBD subgroups precluded subgroup analysis. Prospective multicenter studies with larger numbers of patients are therefore advisable.

  18. [Hyperhomocysteinemia and cardiovascular risk profile in ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease comorbidity patients].

    PubMed

    Zharkova, A V; Orlovs'kyĭ, V F

    2014-01-01

    Present article is devoted to the study of the clinic features of ischemic heart desease associated with acid peptic disease. It was shown the more evident increase of myocardial infarction risk in associated pathology patients. Such results have to be caused by the special risk factor. As such factor we desided to study the hyperhomosysteinemia. During research there were discovered that the lowest vitamin B12 serum level and the highest homocysteine serum level have been registrated in associated pathology (ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease according to long-term proton pump inhibitor use) patients. It was shown evident correlation between that changes and dyslipidemia. PMID:24908957

  19. Assessment of Risk Factors of Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mhaskar, Rahul S; Ricardo, Izurieta; Azliyati, Azizan; Laxminarayan, Rajaram; Amol, Bapaye; Santosh, Walujkar; Boo, Kwa

    2013-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a risk factor for peptic ulcer. There have been no studies addressing environmental and dietary risk factors in western India. We conducted a case control study enrolling peptic ulcer patients in Pune, India. Materials and Methods: Risk factors for peptic ulcer and H. pylori infection were assessed in a participant interview. H. pylori status was assessed from stool by monoclonal antigen detection. Results: We enrolled 190 peptic ulcer, 35 stomach cancer patients, and 125 controls. Fifty-one percent (180/350) of the participants were infected with H. pylori. Lower socioeconomic status (SES) [odds ratio (OR): 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02–1.39], meat consumption (OR: 2.35, 95% CI: 1.30–4.23), smoking (OR: 2.23, 95% CI: 1.24–4.02), eating restaurant food (OR: 3.77, 95% CI: 1.39–10.23), and drinking nonfiltered or nonboiled water (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01–1.23) were risk factors for H. pylori infection. H. pylori infection (OR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.03–2.89), meat (OR: 1.10, 95% CI: 1.02-1.75), fish (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.02–1.89) consumption, and a family history of ulcer (OR: 1.20, 95% CI: 1.08–1.60) were risk factors for peptic ulcer. Consumption of chili peppers (OR: 0.20, 95% CI: 0.10–0.37) and parasite infestation (OR: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.24–0.80) were protective against H. pylori infection. Conclusion: H. pylori infection is associated with peptic ulcer. Lower SES, consumption of restaurant food, meat, nonfiltered water, and smoking are risk factors for H. pylori. Consumption of meat, fish, and a family history of peptic ulcer are risk factors for peptic ulcer. Consumption of chili peppers and concurrent parasite infestation appear to be protective against H. pylori. PMID:23853433

  20. [Hyperhomocysteinemia and cardiovascular risk profile in ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease comorbidity patients].

    PubMed

    Zharkova, A V; Orlovs'kyĭ, V F

    2014-01-01

    Present article is devoted to the study of the clinic features of ischemic heart desease associated with acid peptic disease. It was shown the more evident increase of myocardial infarction risk in associated pathology patients. Such results have to be caused by the special risk factor. As such factor we desided to study the hyperhomosysteinemia. During research there were discovered that the lowest vitamin B12 serum level and the highest homocysteine serum level have been registrated in associated pathology (ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease according to long-term proton pump inhibitor use) patients. It was shown evident correlation between that changes and dyslipidemia.

  1. Congenital and acquired bleeding disorders in infancy.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Sally Elizabeth; Bolton-Maggs, Paula H B

    2015-11-01

    The diagnosis of congenital and acquired bleeding disorders in infants requires an understanding of developmental haemostasis and the effect on laboratory testing. A systematic approach to bleeding in neonates will aid clinicians in the diagnosis and treatment, which may be caused by a wide variety of diseases. The clinical setting will help to direct the diagnostic pathway. This review will focus on the presentation and diagnosis of congenital and acquired bleeding disorders, including platelet disorders. Current research in this field is ongoing, including investigation into neonatal platelets and their different functionalities, platelet transfusion thresholds and how changes in coagulation factors may be linked to other homeostatic mechanisms.

  2. Compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system

    DOEpatents

    Donahoo, Eric E; Ross, Christopher W

    2014-11-25

    A compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine airfoil cooling system to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system may enable cooling fluids to be exhausted from a compressor exhaust plenum through a downstream compressor bleed collection chamber and into the turbine airfoil cooling system. As such, the suction created in the compressor exhaust plenum mitigates boundary layer growth along the inner surface while providing flow of cooling fluids to the turbine airfoils.

  3. Direct Percutaneous Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, Sailen G.; Castle, Erik P.; Kriegshauser, J. Scott; Huettl, Eric A.

    2010-02-15

    Stomal variceal bleeding can develop in patients with underlying cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Most patients are best treated with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation because this addresses the underlying problem of portal hypertension. However, some patients are not good candidates for TIPS creation because they have end-stage liver disease or encephalopathy. We describe such a patient who presented with recurrent bleeding stomal varices, which was successfully treated with percutaneous coil embolization. The patient had bleeding-free survival for 1 month before death from unrelated causes.

  4. Resuscitation of Polytrauma Patients: The Management of Massive Skeletal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Guerado, Enrique; Bertrand, Maria Luisa; Valdes, Luis; Cruz, Encarnacion; Cano, Juan Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The term ‘severely injured patient’ is often synonymous of polytrauma patient, multiply-injured patient or, in some settings, polyfractured patient. Together with brain trauma, copious bleeding is the most severe complication of polytrauma. Consequently hypotension develop. Then, the perfusion of organs may be compromised, with the risk of organ failure. Treatment of chest bleeding after trauma is essential and is mainly addressed via surgical manoeuvres. As in the case of lesions to the pelvis, abdomen or extremities, this approach demonstrates the application of damage control (DC). The introduction of sonography has dramatically changed the diagnosis and prognosis of abdominal bleeding. In stable patients, a contrast CT-scan should be performed before any x-ray projection, because, in an emergency situation, spinal or pelvic fractures be missed by conventional radiological studies. Fractures or dislocation of the pelvis causing enlargement of the pelvic cavity, provoked by an anteroposterior trauma, and in particular cases presenting vertical instability, are the most severe types and require fast stabilisation by closing the pelvic ring diameter to normal dimensions and by stabilising the vertical shear. Controversy still exists about whether angiography or packing should be used as the first choice to address active bleeding after pelvic ring closure. Pelvic angiography plays a significant complementary role to pelvic packing for final haemorrhage control. Apart from pelvic trauma, fracture of the femur is the only fracture provoking acute life-threatening bleeding. If possible, femur fractures should be immobilised immediately, either by external fixation or by a sheet wrap around both extremities. PMID:26312112

  5. Genetic analysis of bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Edison, E; Konkle, B A; Goodeve, A C

    2016-07-01

    Molecular genetic analysis of inherited bleeding disorders has been practised for over 30 years. Technological changes have enabled advances, from analyses using extragenic linked markers to next-generation DNA sequencing and microarray analysis. Two approaches for genetic analysis are described, each suiting their environment. The Christian Medical Centre in Vellore, India, uses conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis mutation screening of multiplexed PCR products to identify candidate mutations, followed by Sanger sequencing confirmation of variants identified. Specific analyses for F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions are also undertaken. The MyLifeOurFuture US project between the American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network, the National Hemophilia Foundation, Bloodworks Northwest and Biogen uses molecular inversion probes (MIP) to capture target exons, splice sites plus 5' and 3' sequences and to detect F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions. This allows screening for all F8 and F9 variants in one sequencing run of multiple samples (196 or 392). Sequence variants identified are subsequently confirmed by a diagnostic laboratory. After having identified variants in genes of interest through these processes, a systematic procedure determining their likely pathogenicity should be applied. Several scientific societies have prepared guidelines. Systematic analysis of the available evidence facilitates reproducible scoring of likely pathogenicity. Documentation of frequency in population databases of variant prevalence and in locus-specific mutation databases can provide initial information on likely pathogenicity. Whereas null mutations are often pathogenic, missense and splice site variants often require in silico analyses to predict likely pathogenicity and using an accepted suite of tools can help standardize their documentation.

  6. Genetic analysis of bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Edison, E; Konkle, B A; Goodeve, A C

    2016-07-01

    Molecular genetic analysis of inherited bleeding disorders has been practised for over 30 years. Technological changes have enabled advances, from analyses using extragenic linked markers to next-generation DNA sequencing and microarray analysis. Two approaches for genetic analysis are described, each suiting their environment. The Christian Medical Centre in Vellore, India, uses conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis mutation screening of multiplexed PCR products to identify candidate mutations, followed by Sanger sequencing confirmation of variants identified. Specific analyses for F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions are also undertaken. The MyLifeOurFuture US project between the American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network, the National Hemophilia Foundation, Bloodworks Northwest and Biogen uses molecular inversion probes (MIP) to capture target exons, splice sites plus 5' and 3' sequences and to detect F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions. This allows screening for all F8 and F9 variants in one sequencing run of multiple samples (196 or 392). Sequence variants identified are subsequently confirmed by a diagnostic laboratory. After having identified variants in genes of interest through these processes, a systematic procedure determining their likely pathogenicity should be applied. Several scientific societies have prepared guidelines. Systematic analysis of the available evidence facilitates reproducible scoring of likely pathogenicity. Documentation of frequency in population databases of variant prevalence and in locus-specific mutation databases can provide initial information on likely pathogenicity. Whereas null mutations are often pathogenic, missense and splice site variants often require in silico analyses to predict likely pathogenicity and using an accepted suite of tools can help standardize their documentation. PMID:27405681

  7. Intradural chordoma presenting with intratumoral bleeding.

    PubMed

    Vellutini, Eduardo de Arnaldo Silva; de Oliveira, Matheus Fernandes

    2016-03-01

    Intradural clival chordomas are very rare, and only 29 cases have been reported to our knowledge. They arise purely intradurally without bone or dural involvement and may differ from classic clival chordomas in physiopathology and management. We present a 28-year-old woman who presented with intradural clival chordoma and tumoral bleeding. After initial gross macroscopic surgical resection, she presented with tumor recurrence after 2 years, again with intratumoral bleeding. Although usually considered to have a more favorable prognosis in comparison to typical chordomas, intradural chordomas appear to behave as typical chordomas. Intratumoral bleeding may be a sign of an aggressive lesion and risk of recurrence. We highlight the differential diagnosis of intrinsic posterior fossa bleeding, especially in young patients. Intradural chordomas may be underdiagnosed and incorrectly treated as other types of parenchymal hemorrhage.

  8. CLSM bleed water reduction test results

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.; Rajendran, N.

    1997-04-21

    Previous testing by BSRI/SRTC/Raytheon indicated that the CLSM specified for the Tank 20 closure generates about 6 gallons (23 liters) of bleed water per cubic yard of material (0.76 m3).1 This amount to about 10 percent of the total mixing water. HLWE requested that the CLSM mix be optimized to reduce bleed water while maintaining flow. Elimination of bleed water from the CLSM mix specified for High-Level Waste Tank Closure will result in waste minimization, time savings and cost savings. Over thirty mixes were formulated and evaluated at the on-site Raytheon Test Laboratory. Improved low bleed water CLSM mixes were identified. Results are documented in this report.

  9. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding (DUB) (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop AUB. Some illnesses (like thyroid disease or polycystic ovary syndrome ) can mess with the body's hormones. Problems like ... sex. Doctors ask these questions because conditions like polycystic ovary syndrome and some STDs can cause abnormal bleeding. If ...

  10. Engine bleed air reduction in DC-10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, W. H.; Viele, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    An 0.8 percent fuel savings was achieved by a reduction in engine bleed air through the use of cabin air recirculation. The recirculation system was evaluated in revenue service on a DC-10. The cabin remained comfortable with reductions in cabin fresh air (engine bleed air) as much as 50 percent. Flight test verified the predicted fuel saving of 0.8 percent.

  11. Cough-induced Tracheobronchial Mucosal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hira, Harmanjit Singh

    2011-01-01

    A 56-year-old man presented with moderate hemoptysis. It was preceded by a severe bout of cough. Flexible bronchoscopy showed diffuse tracheobronchial mucosal petechiae and bleeding. The patient was not suffering with any coagulopathies. He did not receive antiplatelet drugs. Hemoptysis resolved with cough suppressant. Subsequent bronchoscopy revealed the complete resolution of petechiae. The mechanism of bleeding after the bout of coughing is discussed. PMID:23169019

  12. Evaluation of combined famotidine with quercetin for the treatment of peptic ulcer: in vivo animal study.

    PubMed

    Abourehab, Mohammed A S; Khaled, Khaled A; Sarhan, Hatem A A; Ahmed, Osama A A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare a combined drug dosage form of famotidine (FAM) and quercetin (QRT) to augment treatment of gastric ulcer. FAM was prepared as freeze-dried floating alginate beads using ion gelation method and then coated with Eudragit RL100 to sustain FAM release. QRT was prepared as solid dispersion with polyvinyl pyrrolidone K30 to improve its solubility. Photo images and scanning electron microscope images of the prepared beads were carried out to detect floating behavior and to reveal surface and core shape of the prepared beads. Anti-ulcerogenic effect and histopathological examination of gastric tissues were carried out to investigate the effect of the combined drug formulation compared with commercial FAM tablets and FAM beads. Gastric glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase, catalase, tissue myeloperoxidase, and lipid peroxidation enzyme activities and levels in rat stomach tissues were also determined. Results revealed that spherical beads were formed with an average diameter of 1.64±0.33 mm. They floated immediately with no lag time before floating, and remained buoyant throughout the test period. Treatment with a combination of FAM beads plus QRT showed the absence of any signs of inflammation or hemorrhage, and significantly prevented the indomethacin-induced decrease in GSH levels (P<0.05) with regain of normal GSH gastric tissue levels. Also, there was a significant difference in the decrease of malondialdehyde level compared to FAM commercial tablets or beads alone (P<0.05). The combined formula significantly improved the myeloperoxidase level compared to both the disease control group and commercial FAM tablet-treated group (P<0.05). Formulation of FAM as floating beads in combination with solid dispersion of QRT improved the anti-ulcer activity compared to commercially available tablets, which reveals a promising application for treatment of peptic ulcer. PMID:25926722

  13. Risk factors influencing morbidity and mortality in perforated peptic ulcer disease

    PubMed Central

    Taş, İlhan; Ülger, Burak Veli; Önder, Akın; Kapan, Murat; Bozdağ, Zübeyir

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Peptic ulcer perforation continues to be a major surgical problem. In this study, risk factors that influence morbidity and mortality in perforated peptic ulcer disease were examined. Material and Methods: Files of 148 patients who were included in the study due to peptic ulcer perforation between January 2006 and December 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. Data regarding age, gender, complaints, time elapsed between onset of symptoms and hospital admission, physical examination findings, co-morbid diseases, laboratory and imaging findings, length of hospital stay, morbidity and mortality were recorded. Results: The study group included 129 (87.2%) male and 19 (12.8%) female patients. The mean age was 51.7±20 (15-88) years. Forty five patients (30.4%) had at least one co-morbid disease. In the postoperative period, 30 patients (20.3%) had complications. The most common complication was wound infection. Mortality was observed in 27 patients (18.2%). The most common cause of mortality was sepsis. Multivariate analysis revealed age over 60 years, presence of co-morbidities and Mannheim peritonitis index as independent risk factors for morbidity. Age over 60 years, time to admission and Mannheim peritonitis index were detected as independent risk factors for mortality. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and proper treatment are important in patients presenting with peptic ulcer perforation. PMID:25931940

  14. Perforation of a gastric tube peptic ulcer into the thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Katsoulis, I E; Veloudis, G; Exarchos, D; Yannopoulos, P

    2001-01-01

    We present a case of a 52-year-old male patient who died from massive hematemesis as a result of perforation of a benign peptic ulcer into the descending thoracic aorta, 1 year after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer and gastric tube interposition. We also review the literature for mechanisms of ulceration in intrathoracic gastric grafts and for complications of such ulcers.

  15. Prognostic factors in peptic ulcer perforations: a retrospective 14-year study.

    PubMed

    Unver, Mutlu; Fırat, Özgür; Ünalp, Ömer Vedat; Uğuz, Alper; Gümüş, Tufan; Sezer, Taylan Özgür; Öztürk, Şafak; Yoldaş, Tayfun; Ersin, Sinan; Güler, Adem

    2015-05-01

    Regarding the complications of peptic ulcer, a perforation remains the most important fatal complication. The aim of our retrospective study was to determine relations between postoperative morbidity and comorbid disease or perioperative risk factors in perforated peptic ulcer. In total, 239 patients who underwent emergency surgery for perforated peptic ulcer in Ege University General Surgery Department, between June 1999 and May 2013 were included in this study. The clinical data concerning the patient characteristics, operative methods, and complications were collected retrospectively. One hundred seventy-five of the 239 patients were male (73.2%) and 64 were female (26.8%). Mean American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score was 1 in the patients without morbidity, but mean ASA score was 3 in the morbidity and mortality groups. Primary suture and omentoplasty was the selected procedure in 228 of the patients. Eleven patients underwent resection. In total, 105 patients (43.9%) had comorbidities. Thirty-seven patients (67.3%) in the morbidity group had comorbid diseases. Thirteen (92.9%) patients in the mortality group had comorbid diseases. Perforation as a complication of peptic ulcer disease still remains among the frequent indications of urgent abdominal surgery. Among the analyzed parameters, age, ASA score, and having comorbid disease were found to have an effect on both mortality and morbidity. The controversial subject in the present study is regarding the duration of symptoms. The duration of symptoms had no effect on mortality nor morbidity in our study.

  16. Prognostic Factors in Peptic Ulcer Perforations: A Retrospective 14-Year Study

    PubMed Central

    Unver, Mutlu; Fırat, Özgür; Ünalp, Ömer Vedat; Uğuz, Alper; Gümüş, Tufan; Sezer, Taylan Özgür; Öztürk, Şafak; Yoldaş, Tayfun; Ersin, Sinan; Güler, Adem

    2015-01-01

    Regarding the complications of peptic ulcer, a perforation remains the most important fatal complication. The aim of our retrospective study was to determine relations between postoperative morbidity and comorbid disease or perioperative risk factors in perforated peptic ulcer. In total, 239 patients who underwent emergency surgery for perforated peptic ulcer in Ege University General Surgery Department, between June 1999 and May 2013 were included in this study. The clinical data concerning the patient characteristics, operative methods, and complications were collected retrospectively. One hundred seventy-five of the 239 patients were male (73.2%) and 64 were female (26.8%). Mean American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score was 1 in the patients without morbidity, but mean ASA score was 3 in the morbidity and mortality groups. Primary suture and omentoplasty was the selected procedure in 228 of the patients. Eleven patients underwent resection. In total, 105 patients (43.9%) had comorbidities. Thirty-seven patients (67.3%) in the morbidity group had comorbid diseases. Thirteen (92.9%) patients in the mortality group had comorbid diseases. Perforation as a complication of peptic ulcer disease still remains among the frequent indications of urgent abdominal surgery. Among the analyzed parameters, age, ASA score, and having comorbid disease were found to have an effect on both mortality and morbidity. The controversial subject in the present study is regarding the duration of symptoms. The duration of symptoms had no effect on mortality nor morbidity in our study. PMID:26011220

  17. The bleeding score predicts clinical outcomes and replacement therapy in adults with von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Federici, Augusto B; Bucciarelli, Paolo; Castaman, Giancarlo; Mazzucconi, Maria G; Morfini, Massimo; Rocino, Angiola; Schiavoni, Mario; Peyvandi, Flora; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2014-06-26

    Analyses of the bleeding tendency by means of the bleeding score (BS) have been proposed until now to confirm diagnosis but not to predict clinical outcomes in patients with inherited von Willebrand disease (VWD). We prospectively followed up, for 1 year, 796 Italian patients with different types of VWD to determine whether the previous BS of European VWD1 is useful to predict the occurrence of spontaneous bleeds severe enough to require replacement therapy with desmopressin (DDAVP) and/or von Willebrand factor (VWF)/factor VIII concentrates. Among the 796 patients included, 75 (9.4%) needed treatment of 232 spontaneous bleeding events. BS >10 and VWF:ristocetin cofactor activity <10 U/dL were associated with the risk of bleeding, but only a BS >10 remained highly associated in a multivariable Cox proportional hazard model (adjusted hazard ratio: 7.27 [95% confidence interval, 3.83-13.83]). Although the bleeding event-free survival was different in VWD types, only a BS >10 could predict for each type which patient had bleeding events severe enough to require treatment with DDAVP and/or concentrates. Therefore, BS can be considered a simple predictor of clinical outcomes of VWD and may identify patients needing intensive therapeutic regimens.

  18. Approaches to investigating common bleeding disorders: an evaluation of North American coagulation laboratory practices.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Catherine P M; Moffat, Karen A; Plumhoff, Elizabeth; Van Cott, Elizabeth M

    2012-05-01

    Bleeding disorders commonly result from deficiencies or defects in von Willebrand factor (VWF), platelets, coagulation factors, or fibrinolytic proteins. The primary goal of our study was to assess current North American coagulation laboratory practices for diagnosing bleeding disorders, using an on-line patterns-of-practice survey of diagnostic laboratory members of the North American Specialized Coagulation Laboratory Association. The survey examined laboratory approaches to evaluating bleeding disorders, with specific questions about the tests and test panels offered and compliance to recent guideline recommendations on diagnosing von Willebrand disease (VWD) and platelet function disorders. All laboratories responding to the survey performed a prothrombin time/international normalized ratio, an activated partial thromboplastin time, and coagulation factor assays, and many tested for VWD and platelet disorders. However, few laboratories had test panels that evaluated the more common bleeding disorders and few performed some assays, including VWF multimer assessments and assays for fibrinolytic disorders. Additionally, the cutoffs used by laboratories to diagnose type 1 VWD varied considerably, with only a minority following the National Heart Lung Blood Institute recommendations. In contrast, laboratories that tested for platelet function disorders mostly complied with aggregation testing recommendations, as published in the recent North American guidelines. Our results indicate that there are some gaps in the strategies used by laboratories to diagnose bleeding disorders that might be addressed by development of further guidelines and test algorithms that emphasize evaluations for common bleeding disorders. Laboratories may also benefit from guidelines on test interpretation, and external evaluation of their bleeding disorder testing strategies.

  19. Telemetric real-time sensor for the detection of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Schostek, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Melanie; Keller, Jan; Fode, Mario; Melbert, Michael; Schurr, Marc O; Gottwald, Thomas; Prosst, Ruediger L

    2016-04-15

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleedings from ulcers or esophago-gastric varices are life threatening medical conditions which require immediate endoscopic therapy. Despite successful endoscopic hemostasis, there is a significant risk of rebleeding often requiring close surveillance of these patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Any time delay to recognize bleeding may lead to a high blood loss and increases the risk of death. A novel telemetric real-time bleeding sensor can help indicate blood in the stomach: the sensor is swallowed to detect active bleeding or is anchored endoscopically on the gastrointestinal wall close to the potential bleeding source. By telemetric communication with an extra-corporeal receiver, information about the bleeding status is displayed. In this study the novel sensor, which measures characteristic optical properties of blood, has been evaluated in an ex-vivo setting to assess its clinical applicability and usability. Human venous blood of different concentrations, various fluids, and liquid food were tested. The LED-based sensor was able to reliably distinguish between concentrated blood and other liquids, especially red-colored fluids. In addition, the spectrometric quality of the small sensor (size: 6.5mm in diameter, 25.5mm in length) was comparable to a much larger and technically more complex laboratory spectrophotometer. The experimental data confirm the capability of a miniaturized sensor to identify concentrated blood, which could help in the very near future the detection of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and to survey high-risk patients for rebleeding.

  20. Periesophageal Pseudoaneurysms: Rare Cause of Refractory Bleeding Treated with Transarterial Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rachit D.; Komorowski, Daniel J.; Smallfield, George B.

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old female with history of systemic lupus erythematosus, prior cytomegalovirus esophagitis treated with ganciclovir, and long segment Barrett's esophagus (Prague class C8 M9) with high grade dysplasia treated with radiofrequency ablation presented to the hospital with hematemesis. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed multiple esophageal ulcers with active arterial spurting which could not be controlled with endoscopic interventions including placement of hemostatic clips. An emergent angiogram demonstrated actively bleeding saccular dilations (pseudoaneurysms) in the esophageal branches of the lower thoracic aorta as well as left gastric artery for which gelfoam and coil embolization was initially successful. Due to recurrence of massive bleeding, she subsequently underwent emergent esophagectomy and bipolar exclusion. Pathology demonstrated submucosal hemorrhage, esophagitis with dysplastic Barrett's mucosa, and an ulcer containing cytomegaloviral inclusions. We report the first case of arterial bleeding from periesophageal pseudoaneurysms as well as use of angiographic embolization for arterial bleeding in the esophagus. PMID:27812392

  1. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding: gallstone-induced auto-sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kalipershad, Sujala; Chung, Kin Tong; Jehangir, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    A 67-year-old gentleman with no significant medical history of note presented with sudden onset of epigastric pain, coffee ground vomiting and passing black tarry stool. A series of investigations including blood tests, ultrasound scan, CT abdomen and pelvis with contrast and endoscopy failed to reveal any site of active bleeding. The mystery remained and the patient continued to have upper gastrointestinal bleeding. A second CT abdomen and pelvis with contrast was carried out and showed evidence of contrast extravasation into the duodenum (figure 3). An exploratory laparotomy showed no obvious site of haemorrhage and a loop jejunostomy was performed. The diagnosis of gallstone-induced auto-sphincterotomy was only made, using gastroscope via jejunostomy, when a big gallstone was found in the third part of the duodenum and the papilla was ruptured (figure 5). PMID:22914239

  2. Changing prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and peptic ulcer among dyspeptic Sardinian patients.

    PubMed

    Dore, Maria Pina; Marras, Giuseppina; Rocchi, Chiara; Soro, Sara; Loria, Maria Francesca; Bassotti, Gabrio; Graham, David Y; Malaty, Hoda M; Pes, Giovanni M

    2015-10-01

    Over the past 50 years, the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection has fallen as standards of living improved. The changes in the prevalence of infection and its manifestations (peptic ulcer disease and gastric mucosal lesions) were investigated in a large cohort of Sardinians undergoing upper endoscopy for dyspepsia. A retrospective observational study was conducted involving patients undergoing endoscopy for dyspepsia from 1995 to 2013. H. pylori status was assessed by histology plus the rapid urease test or 13C-UBT. Gastric mucosal lesions were evaluated histologically. Data including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) use and the presence of peptic ulcers were collected. The prevalence of H. pylori was calculated for each quartile and for each birth cohort from 1910 to 2000. 11,202 records were retrieved for the analysis (62.9% women). The overall prevalence of H. pylori infection was 43.8% (M: 46.6% vs. F: 42.0%; P = 0.0001). A dramatic decrease in the prevalence of infection occurred over the 19-year observation period. The birth cohort effect was evident in each category (quartile) reflecting the continuous decline in H. pylori acquisition. Over time, the prevalence of peptic ulcers also declined, resulting in an increase in the proportion of H. pylori negative/NSAID positive and H. pylori negative/NSAID negative peptic ulcers. The prevalence of gastric mucosal changes also declined despite aging. The decline in H. pylori prevalence over time likely reflects the improvement in socioeconomic conditions in Sardinia such that H. pylori infection and its clinical outcomes including peptic ulcer are becoming less frequent even among dyspeptic patients.

  3. Similar bleeding phenotype in young children with haemophilia A or B: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Clausen, N; Petrini, P; Claeyssens-Donadel, S; Gouw, S C; Liesner, R

    2014-11-01

    The bleeding phenotype has been suggested to differ between haemophilia A and B. More knowledge on the bleeding phenotype at initiation of treatment is important to optimize patient care. The aim of this study was to investigate the severity of the bleeding phenotype and the variation in bleeding in children with severe or moderate haemophilia A and B. Consecutive, previously untreated patients with severe or moderate haemophilia A and B (factor VIII or IX activity <0.01 or 0.01-0.05 IU mL(-1) respectively) born between January 1st 2000 and January 1st 2010 were included. Primary outcome was severity of bleeding tendency. Secondary outcome was variation in bleeding pattern. A total of 582 patients with severe haemophilia A and 76 with severe haemophilia B did not differ in age at first exposure to clotting factor (0.81 vs. 0.88 years, P = 0.20), age at first bleed (0.82 vs. 0.88 years, P = 0.36), and age at first joint bleed (1.18 vs. 1.20 years, P = 0.59). Patients with moderate haemophilia were older compared to patients with severe haemophilia. In patients with moderate haemophilia there were no clear differences between haemophilia A and B. Severity and variation in bleeding phenotype are similar during the early stage of treatment in patients with severe and moderate haemophilia A and B respectively. The findings imply that children with haemophilia B should be observed and treated as vigilantly as those with haemophilia A.

  4. BLEED-Myocardial Infarction Score: Predicting mid-term post-discharge bleeding events

    PubMed Central

    Barra, Sérgio; Providência, Rui; Caetano, Francisca; Almeida, Inês; Paiva, Luís; Dinis, Paulo; Leitão Marques, António

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To derive and validate a score for the prediction of mid-term bleeding events following discharge for myocardial infarction (MI). METHODS: One thousand and fifty patients admitted for MI and followed for 19.9 ± 6.7 mo were assigned to a derivation cohort. A new risk model, called BLEED-MI, was developed for predicting clinically significant bleeding events during follow-up (primary endpoint) and a composite endpoint of significant hemorrhage plus all-cause mortality (secondary endpoint), incorporating the following variables: age, diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, smoking habits, blood urea nitrogen, glomerular filtration rate and hemoglobin at admission, history of stroke, bleeding during hospitalization or previous major bleeding, heart failure during hospitalization and anti-thrombotic therapies prescribed at discharge. The BLEED-MI model was tested for calibration, accuracy and discrimination in the derivation sample and in a new, independent, validation cohort comprising 852 patients admitted at a later date. RESULTS: The BLEED-MI score showed good calibration in both derivation and validation samples (Hosmer-Lemeshow test P value 0.371 and 0.444, respectively) and high accuracy within each individual patient (Brier score 0.061 and 0.067, respectively). Its discriminative performance in predicting the primary outcome was relatively high (c-statistic of 0.753 ± 0.032 in the derivation cohort and 0.718 ± 0.033 in the validation sample). Incidence of primary/secondary endpoints increased progressively with increasing BLEED-MI scores. In the validation sample, a BLEED-MI score below 2 had a negative predictive value of 98.7% (152/154) for the occurrence of a clinically significant hemorrhagic episode during follow-up and for the composite endpoint of post-discharge hemorrhage plus all-cause mortality. An accurate prediction of bleeding events was shown independently of mortality, as BLEED-MI predicted bleeding with similar efficacy in patients who

  5. An Unsusual Case of Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Guru, Pramod Kumar; Iyer, Vivek N.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 81 Final Diagnosis: Gastrointestinal amyloidosis Symptoms: Gastrointesinal haemorrhage • hypotension Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Endoscopy Specialty: Criitcal Care Medicine Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Amyloidosis is a multisystem disease, and can present with multitude of nonspecific symptoms. Gastrointestinal amyloidosis is common, and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in these patients has a wide differential diagnosis. The present case features the distinctive endoscopic finding of submucosal hematoma as a clue to immunoglobin light chain (AL) amyloid involvement of the gastrointestinal tract. Case Report: An 81-year-old woman with AL amyloidosis was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU) for evaluation of GI bleeding. Prior to the bleeding episode, the patient had undergone paracentesis for management of her ascites related to restrictive cardiomyopathy. Initial evaluation was negative for any intra-abdominal catastrophe related to her recent paracentesis. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was negative for any source of bleeding. However, colonoscopy showed a ruptured submucosal hematoma, which is a rare but classical finding in patients with amyloidosis. The patient was managed conservatively and did not have any further episodes of bleeding in the hospital. She unfortunately died due to her primary illness 6 weeks after discharge from the hospital. Conclusions: The finding of submucosal hematoma on endoscopy is a rare but sentinel sign for amyloidosis involvement in the GI tract. PMID:26979633

  6. Bleeding and clotting in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Dittus, Christopher; Streiff, Michael; Ansell, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a relatively common inherited vascular disorder that was first described in 1864, and is notable for epistaxis, telangiectasia, and arterial venous malformations. While genetic tests are available, the diagnosis remains clinical, and is based on the Curacao criteria. Patients with HHT are at increased risk for both bleeding and clotting events. Because of these competing complications, hematologists are often faced with difficult clinical decisions. While the majority of management decisions revolve around bleeding complications, it is not infrequent for these patients to require anticoagulation for thrombosis. Any anticoagulation recommendations must take into account the bleeding risks associated with HHT. Recent reviews have found that HHT patients can be safely anticoagulated, with the most frequent complication being worsened epistaxis. Large clinical trials have shown that factor IIa and Xa inhibitors have less intracranial bleeding than warfarin, and basic coagulation research has provided a possible mechanism. This article describes the anticoagulation dilemma posed when a 62-year-old female patient with a history of bleeding events associated with HHT was diagnosed with a pulmonary embolism. The subsequent discussion focuses on the approach to anticoagulation in the HHT patient, and addresses the role of the new oral anticoagulants. PMID:25879004

  7. [Spontaneous renal bleeding in haemodialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Groeneveld, J H M; van Buren, M; van Overhagen, H

    2008-08-01

    In three women on chronic haemodialysis because of end-stage renal disease who were 40, 59, and 73 years of age respectively, spontaneous renal bleeding was diagnosed. The first two patients presented with acute flank pain and signs of sudden blood loss, the third one had chronic abdominal pain and anaemia. A CT scan demonstrated perirenal bleeding in all three patients and expansion into the retroperitoneal space in the first and third patient. In the latter two patients, acquired renal cysts had been visible during earlier abdominal ultrasound. None of the patients had severe hypertension, but all of them had received medication enhancing bleeding tendency, such as nadroparin, which was administered during haemodialysis. The first and the last patient were treated conservatively and survived. The second patient was haemodynamically unstable and underwent embolisation to stop the bleeding. She died in hospital after fifteen days due to the complications of a cardiac arrest. Abdominal CT or ultrasound is the technique of choice to evaluate patients with end-stage renal disease with loin pain or bleeding. Most of the time, conservative treatment suffices.

  8. Management of orthopaedic surgery in rare bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Siboni, S M; Biguzzi, E; Pasta, G; Mannucci, P M; Mistretta, C; Fantini, N N; Solimeno, L P; Peyvandi, F

    2014-09-01

    Knowledge regarding the management of orthopaedic surgery in patients with rare bleeding disorders (RBDs) is limited. Retrospective data collection and analysis of 35 orthopaedic procedures (6 minor and 29 major) carried out in 22 patients with RBD between 1982 and 2013. These surgeries were performed using heterogeneous regimens of hemostatic therapy, except for seven procedures performed with no hemostatic treatment in four patients with mild factor deficiency. Of the 28 procedures carried out with hemostatic treatment, nine (32%) were performed using replacement therapy with dosages of concentrates of the deficient factor aimed to achieve perioperative plasma levels judged to be compatible with hemostasis; three (11%) using factor replacement therapy associated with fresh frozen plasma (FFP); four (14%) using recombinant activated factor VII; four (14%) using virus inactivated plasma alone; three (11%) using virus inactivated plasma associated with desmopressin; one (4%) using FFP alone; and four (14%) procedures using tranexamic acid alone. Bleeding complications occurred in 7 of 35 procedures (20%) involving five patients. Prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism was performed only in one case with no excessive bleeding, but two patients not on thromboprophylaxis developed superficial thrombophlebitis. A satisfactory control of hemostasis was achieved in most patients. In some of those characterized by mild factor deficiency (FVII, FXI) hemostatic treatment could be avoided in some instances. The control of hemostasis combined with an adequate surgical technique is needed for the successful outcome of orthopaedic surgery in RBDs that requires the involvement of specialized haemophilia centres.

  9. Massive rectal bleeding distant from a blunt car trauma.

    PubMed

    Gruden, E; Ragot, E; Arienzo, R; Revaux, A; Magri, M; Grossin, M; Leroy, C; Msika, S; Kianmanesh, R

    2010-09-01

    Mesenteric trauma is one of the possible injuries caused by the use of seat belts in case of motor vehicle crash. We report here a rare case of rectal bleeding by rupture of a mesosigmoid haematoma. An emergent laparotomy revealed a mesosigmoid haematoma with a centimetric rectal perforation. The wearing of safety belts added some specific blunt abdominal trauma, which directly depends on lap-and-sash belts. Mesenteric injuries are found out up to 5% of blunt abdominal traumas. "Seat belt mark" leads the surgical team to strongly suspect an intra-abdominal trauma. When "seat belt mark" sign is found, in patients with mild to severe blunt car injuries, CT-scan has to be realised to eliminate intra-abdominal complications, including mesenteric and mesosigmoid ones. In case of proved mesenteric haematoma associated to intestinal bleeding, a surgical treatment must be considered as first choice. Conservative approach remains possible in stable patients but surgical exploration remains necessary in unstable patients with active bleeding. PMID:20638207

  10. Aerodynamic Control of a Pitching Airfoil by Distributed Bleed Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2013-11-01

    The aerodynamic forces and moments on a dynamically pitching 2-D airfoil model are controlled in wind tunnel experiments using distributed active bleed. Bleed flow on the suction surface downstream of the leading edge is driven by pressure differences across the airfoil and is regulated by low-power louver actuators. The bleed interacts with cross flows to effect time-dependent variations of the vorticity flux and thereby alters the local flow attachment, resulting in significant changes in pre- and post-stall lift and pitching moment (over 50% increase in baseline post-stall lift). The flow field over the airfoil is measured using high-speed (2000 fps) PIV, resolving the dynamics and characteristic time-scales of production and advection of vorticity concentrations that are associated with transient variations in the aerodynamic forces and moments. In particular, it is shown that the actuation improves the lift hysteresis and pitch stability during the oscillatory pitching by altering the evolution of the dynamic stall vortex and the ensuing flow attachment during the downstroke. Supported by the Rotorcraft Center (VLRCOE) at Georgia Tech.

  11. Novel Therapeutic Strategies in the Management of Non-Variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Garber, Ari; Jang, Sunguk

    2016-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, the most common etiology of which is peptic ulcer disease, remains a persistent challenge despite a reduction in both its incidence and mortality. Both pharmacologic and endoscopic techniques have been developed to achieve hemostasis, with varying degrees of success. Among the pharmacologic therapies, proton pump inhibitors remain the mainstay of treatment, as they reduce the risk of rebleeding and requirement for recurrent endoscopic evaluation. Tranexamic acid, a derivative of the amino acid lysine, is an antifibrinolytic agent whose role requires further investigation before application. Endoscopically delivered pharmacotherapy, including Hemospray (Cook Medical), EndoClot (EndoClot Plus Inc.), and Ankaferd Blood Stopper (Ankaferd Health Products), in addition to standard epinephrine, show promise in this regard, although their mechanisms of action require further investigation. Non-pharmacologic endoscopic techniques use one of the following two methods to achieve hemostasis: ablation or mechanical tamponade, which may involve using endoscopic clips, cautery, argon plasma coagulation, over-the-scope clipping devices, radiofrequency ablation, and cryotherapy. This review aimed to highlight these novel and fundamental hemostatic strategies and the research supporting their efficacy. PMID:27744662

  12. Bleeding Risk, Management and Outcome in Patients Receiving Non-VKA Oral Anticoagulants (NOACs).

    PubMed

    Werth, Sebastian; Breslin, Tomás; NiAinle, Fionnuala; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Modern direct-acting anticoagulants are rapidly replacing vitamin K antagonists (VKA) in the management of millions of patients worldwide who require anticoagulation. These drugs include agents that inhibit activated factor X (FXa) (such as apixaban and rivaroxaban) or thrombin (such as dabigatran), and are collectively known today as non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs). Since bleeding is the most common and most dangerous side effect of long-term anticoagulation, and because NOACs have very different mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetics compared with VKA, physicians are naturally concerned about the lack of experience regarding frequency, management and outcome of NOAC-associated bleeding in daily care. This review appraises trial and registry (or "real-world") data pertaining to bleeding complications in patients taking NOACs and VKA and provides practical recommendations for the management of acute bleeding situations. PMID:25940651

  13. Diagnosis of Bleeding Meckel's Diverticulum in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sung Noh; Jang, Hyun Joo; Ye, Byong Duk; Jeon, Seong Ran; Im, Jong Pil; Cha, Jae Myung; Kim, Seong-Eun; Park, Soo Jung; Kim, Eun Ran; Chang, Dong Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Various modalities have been used to diagnose Meckel's diverticulum (MD) in practice, but with their diagnostic accuracy deemed to be unsatisfactory for clinical practice. Moreover, the usefulness of these modalities has not been evaluated for the diagnosis of bleeding MD in adults, due to the relative rarity of this condition. Therefore, the aim of our multicenter study was to determine the most accurate modality for the preoperative diagnosis of bleeding MD in adults. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of the diagnostic accuracy for small bowel bleeding associated with MD of different modalities in patients ≥18 years old who underwent assessment for MD, with confirmation at the time of explorative surgery. Diagnostic accuracy of the different modalities was evaluated against the diagnosis obtained using technetium-99m pertechnetate scintigraphy (also known as Meckel's scan), considered to be the gold standard for the diagnosis of bleeding MD in pediatrics. Results Thirty-five adults were identified with bleeding in MD over the study period, between 2005 and 2012. Among these patients, only 24 (68.6%) were diagnosed with MD preoperatively. The mean (95% confidence interval) diagnostic accuracy of selected modalities was as follows: Meckel’s scan, 21.4% (5.7%-51.2%); capsule endoscopy, 35.7% (14.0%-64.4%); balloon-assisted enteroscopy (BAE), 85.0% (61.1%-96.0%); angiography, 0.0% (0.0%-80.2%); computed tomography, 31.8% (14.7%-54.9%); and small-bowel follow-through, 62.5% (25.9%-90.0%). The diagnostic accuracy was significantly higher for BAE than for Meckel’s scan (P = 0.001). Conclusions Among available diagnostic modalities, BAE provides the highest accuracy for the diagnosis of bleeding MD in adults and, therefore, should be considered as the preferred modality for preoperative diagnosis. PMID:27626641

  14. Acute bleeding varices: a five-year prospective evaluation of tamponade and sclerotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Terblanche, J; Yakoob, H I; Bornman, P C; Stiegmann, G V; Bane, R; Jonker, M; Wright, J; Kirsch, R

    1981-01-01

    In a five-year study of massive upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, 143 patients had esophageal varices diagnosed on emergency endoscopic examination. Seventy-one patients had active bleeding from varices and required Sengstaken tube tamponade during at least one hospital admission. The remaining patients included 33 with variceal bleeding which had stopped and 39 who were bleeding from another source. Sixty-six of the former group of 71 patients were referred for emergency injection sclerotherapy. These 66 patients were followed prospectively to August 1980, and had 137 episodes of endoscopically proven variceal bleeding requiring Sengstaken tube control followed by injection sclerotherapy during 93 separate hospital admissions. Definitive control of hemorrhage was achieved in 95% the patients admitted to the hospital (single injection 70%; two or three injections 22%). The death rate per hospital admission was 28%. No patient died of continued variceal bleeding, and exsanguinating variceal hemorrhage no longer poses a major problem at our hospital. The combined use of initial Sengstaken tube tamponade followed by injection sclerotherapy has simplified emergency treatment in the group of patients who continue to bleed actively from esophageal varices, despite initial conservative treatment. Images Fig. 1. PMID:7025770

  15. Role of hemostatic powders in the endoscopic management of gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante-Balén, Marco; Plumé, Gema

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding (AGIB) is a prevalent condition with significant influence on healthcare costs. Endoscopy is essential for the management of AGIB with a pivotal role in diagnosis, risk stratification and management. Recently, hemostatic powders have been added to our endoscopic armamentarium to treat gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. These substances are intended to control active bleeding by delivering a powdered product over the bleeding site that forms a solid matrix with a tamponade function. Local activation of platelet aggregation and coagulation cascade may be also boosted. There are currently three powders commercially available: hemostatic agent TC-325 (Hemospray®), EndoClot™ polysaccharide hemostatic system, and Ankaferd Bloodstopper®. Although the available evidence is based on short series of cases and there is no randomized controlled trial yet, these powders seem to be effective in controlling GI bleeding from a variety of origins with a very favorable side effects profile. They can be used either as a primary therapy or a second-line treatment, and they seem to be especially indicated in cases of cancer-related bleeding and lesions with difficult access. In this review, we will comment on the mechanism of action, efficacy, safety and technical challenges of the use of powders in several clinical scenarios and we will try to define the main current indications of use and propose new lines of research in this area. PMID:25133029

  16. Successful Management of Neobladder Variceal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Dinesh; Chatterjee, Kshitij; Osborne, Scott; Kakkera, Krishna; Deas, Steven; Li, Ruizong; Erbland, Marcia

    2016-10-01

    Hematuria from a neobladder can occur due to a variety of pathologies including tumors, stones, and fistulas. Variceal bleeding in a neobladder is a very rare condition with only one case reported in literature. We present a case of a patient with cirrhosis and portal hypertension and an ileocolic orthotopic neobladder presenting with hematuria. Computed tomographic angiography showed dilated varices around the neobladder which were successfully embolized. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report case of variceal bleeding in a neobladder successfully managed with the combination of TIPS (transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt) procedure and embolization.

  17. The Approach to Occult Gastrointestinal Bleed.

    PubMed

    Naut, Edgar R

    2016-09-01

    Occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not visible and may present with a positive fecal occult blood test or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure bleeding can be overt or occult, with no source identified despite an appropriate diagnostic workup. A stepwise approach to this evaluation after negative upper and lower endoscopy has been shown to be cost effective. This includes repeat endoscopies if warranted, followed by video capsule endoscopy (VCE) if no obstruction is present. If the VCE is positive then specific endoscopic intervention may be possible. If negative, patients may undergo either repeat testing or watchful waiting with iron supplements.

  18. [Epidemiology of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in Gabon].

    PubMed

    Gaudong Mbethe, G L; Mounguengui, D; Ondounda, M; Magne, C; Bignoumbra, R; Ntsoumou, S; Moussavou Kombila, J-B; Nzenze, J R

    2014-01-01

    The department of internal medicine of the military hospital of Gabon managed 92 cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding from April 2009 to November 2011. The frequency of these hemorrhages in the department was 8.2%; they occurred most often in adults aged 30-40 years and 50-60 years, and mainly men (74%). Erosive-ulcerative lesions (65.2%) were the leading causes of hemorrhage, followed by esophageal varices (15.2%). These results underline the importance of preventive measures for the control of this bleeding.

  19. Mild bleeding disorders: review of 120 patients.

    PubMed

    Bolton-Maggs, P; Wilkinson, L S

    1984-01-01

    Of 120 patients presenting with mild bleeding disorders, 63 were found to have a definite coagulopathy. The commonest disorders were haemophilia, Christmas disease and von Willebrand's disease (vWd), the latter being predominant. Diagnosis led to prophylactic treatment prior to surgery in 18 patients with prevention of excessive haemorrhage. Three patients who had received blood products developed hepatitis. DDAVP (desamino-cys-1-8-D-arginine vasopressin) is the treatment of choice in suitable mildly affected patients with haemophilia A and vWd. Examination of blood group distribution suggests an excess of group O among patients with bleeding disorders, especially those with vWd.

  20. [The characteristics of treating gastric and duodenal peptic ulcer in workers in an oil-refining enterprise].

    PubMed

    Murzanov, M M; Iskakov, M N

    1995-01-01

    The article covers a topical problem--study of transitory disablement in oil-processing workers suffering from peptic ulcer. The authors demonstrate data on increased occurrence of peptic ulcer among those workers engaged mostly into the main industrial process and stress the great economic detriment caused by the disease. Application of endoscopy treatment and therapy within the local prophylactic department appeared to dramatically decrease the transitory disablement. The article could be interesting for gastroenterologists, industrial medicine officers.

  1. Evaluation for bleeding disorders in suspected child abuse.

    PubMed

    Anderst, James D; Carpenter, Shannon L; Abshire, Thomas C

    2013-04-01

    Bruising or bleeding in a child can raise the concern for child abuse. Assessing whether the findings are the result of trauma and/or whether the child has a bleeding disorder is critical. Many bleeding disorders are rare, and not every child with bruising/bleeding concerning for abuse requires an evaluation for bleeding disorders. In some instances, however, bleeding disorders can present in a manner similar to child abuse. The history and clinical evaluation can be used to determine the necessity of an evaluation for a possible bleeding disorder, and prevalence and known clinical presentations of individual bleeding disorders can be used to guide the extent of the laboratory testing. This clinical report provides guidance to pediatricians and other clinicians regarding the evaluation for bleeding disorders when child abuse is suspected.

  2. Evaluation for bleeding disorders in suspected child abuse.

    PubMed

    Anderst, James D; Carpenter, Shannon L; Abshire, Thomas C

    2013-04-01

    Bruising or bleeding in a child can raise the concern for child abuse. Assessing whether the findings are the result of trauma and/or whether the child has a bleeding disorder is critical. Many bleeding disorders are rare, and not every child with bruising/bleeding concerning for abuse requires an evaluation for bleeding disorders. In some instances, however, bleeding disorders can present in a manner similar to child abuse. The history and clinical evaluation can be used to determine the necessity of an evaluation for a possible bleeding disorder, and prevalence and known clinical presentations of individual bleeding disorders can be used to guide the extent of the laboratory testing. This clinical report provides guidance to pediatricians and other clinicians regarding the evaluation for bleeding disorders when child abuse is suspected. PMID:23530182

  3. Diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding: A practical guide for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bong Sik Matthew; Li, Bob T; Engel, Alexander; Samra, Jaswinder S; Clarke, Stephen; Norton, Ian D; Li, Angela E

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common problem encountered in the emergency department and in the primary care setting. Acute or overt gastrointestinal bleeding is visible in the form of hematemesis, melena or hematochezia. Chronic or occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not apparent to the patient and usually presents as positive fecal occult blood or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is recurrent bleeding when the source remains unidentified after upper endoscopy and colonoscopic evaluation and is usually from the small intestine. Accurate clinical diagnosis is crucial and guides definitive investigations and interventions. This review summarizes the overall diagnostic approach to gastrointestinal bleeding and provides a practical guide for clinicians. PMID:25400991

  4. Arterial hypertension: A neglected risk for bleeding.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Birgit; Mehran, Roxana

    2016-08-01

    The impact of arterial hypertension, one of the most common comorbidities in CAD patients, on bleeding risk after PCI must not be underestimated. More rigorous control of blood pressure during PCI procedure, radial artery access and alternative anticoagulant strategy may be considered in these patients. Further investigation in a more contemporary setting of PCI procedure is warranted. PMID:27530190

  5. Is there any role of acid reducing gastric surgery in peptic ulcer perforation?

    PubMed

    Nivatvongs, Supanit

    2005-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is known to be the prime factor of peptic ulcer disease as well as NSAID usage. Although medical treatment of the bacteria can eliminate the problem for more than 90% of the infected people but the cost of treatment is high then acid reducing gastric surgery still has a definite role. The prevalence of H. pylori in peptic ulcer perferation is still unknown also whether vagotomy and gastrectomy could eradicate H. pylori. Now laparoscopic surgery especially the simple repair of the perforation has became routinely used in many part of the world. So acid reducing gastric surgery is a good choice in chronic user of NSAID and also an option for people who have H. pylori infection.

  6. Surveillance of female patients with inherited bleeding disorders in United States Haemophilia Treatment Centres

    PubMed Central

    Byams, V. R.; Kouides, P. A.; Kulkarni, R.; Baker, J. R.; Brown, D. L.; Gill, J. C.; GRANT, A. M.; James, A. H.; Konkle, B. A.; Maahs, J.; Dumas, M. M.; McAlister, S.; Nance, D.; Nugent, D.; Philipp, C. S.; Soucie, J. M.; Stang, E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Inherited bleeding disorders are especially problematic for affected girls and women due to the monthly occurrence of menstrual periods and the effects on reproductive health. Although heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) is the most common manifestation, females with inherited bleeding disorders (FBD) experience other bleeding symptoms throughout the lifespan that can lead to increased morbidity and impairment of daily activities. The purpose of this article is to describe the utility of a female-focused surveillance effort [female Universal Data Collection (UDC) project] in the United States Haemophilia Treatment Centres (HTCs) and to describe the baseline frequency and spectrum of diagnoses and outcomes. All FBD aged 2 years and older receiving care at selected HTCs were eligible for enrolment. Demographic data, diagnoses and historical data regarding bleeding symptoms, treatments, gynaecological abnormalities and obstetrical outcomes were analysed. Analyses represent data collected from 2009 to 2010. The most frequent diagnoses were type 1 von Willebrand’s disease (VWD) (195/319; 61.1%), VWD type unknown (49/319; 15.4%) and factor VIII deficiency (40/319; 12.5%). HMB was the most common bleeding symptom (198/253; 78.3%); however, 157 (49.2%) participants reported greater than four symptoms. Oral contraceptives were used most frequently to treat HMB (90/165; 54.5%), followed by desmopressin [1–8 deamino-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP)] (56/165; 33.9%). Various pregnancy and childbirth complications were reported, including bleeding during miscarriage (33/43; 76.7%) and postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) (41/109; 37.6%). FBD experience multiple bleeding symptoms and obstetrical-gynaecological morbidity. The female UDC is the first prospective, longitudinal surveillance in the US focusing on FBD and has the potential to further identify complications and reduce adverse outcomes in this population. PMID:21692922

  7. Laparoscopic Repair of Perforated Peptic Ulcer: Outcome and Associated Morbidity and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Alemrajabi, Mahdi; Safari, Saeed; Tizmaghz, Adnan; Alemrajabi, Fatemeh; Shabestanipour, Ghazaal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The mainstay of treatment for perforated peptic ulcer is Omental patch closure. With the advent of laparoscopic surgery, this approach is being used for the treatment of perforated peptic ulcer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of laparoscopy in Firoozgar general hospital over a period of 18 months. The outcome of the laparoscopic approach and the associated morbidity and mortality, operation time, conversion rate and hospital stay were assessed. Methods A prospective analysis of 29 consecutive patients (mean age 37.5 years; 23 men) with perforated peptic ulcers and who had undergone laparoscopic surgery was carried over a period of 18 months from March 2014 until September 2015. Pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative clinical data were collectively analyzed by SPSS 19 for Windows. Results Seventeen patients had a history of cigarette smoking, 11 patients had a history of opium consumption, 19 were chronic NSAID users, 26 had Helicobacter pylori infections, and six had a co-morbid condition. Previous surgical history included laparotomy for pancreatic cancer in two patients, for sigmoid colon cancer in one patient, and for acute appendicitis in four patients. The average operating time for all cases was 47.5 + 20 min. The mean lag time between onset of symptoms and surgery was 20.4 hours. All patients underwent laparoscopic closure of the perforation with Omental patch closure. No morbidity was observed, and none of the patients needed conversion to open surgery. One patient died after 11 months of follow-up due to the progression of underlying pancreatic cancer. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 4.2 days. Conclusions The results of the laparoscopic approach for perforated peptic ulcer were promising, with no conversion to open surgery, no morbidity, and mortality. PMID:27504170

  8. [A study on the pattern of pain expression of peptic ulcer patients].

    PubMed

    Kim, J S; Choi, Y H

    1991-08-01

    Pain is a subjective and multidimensional concept. Therefore the patient's expression of pain have been referred to the best believable indicator of pain condition but the support data obtained from the patient considered cultural difference is a deficient condition in determined on the precise nursing diagnosis. The purpose of this research was to understand multiple pain responses in cultural difference and sensitivity, to encourage communication between medical teams, and to provide the foundation data of on data of precise nursing assessment for the patient in pain. The research problem was to grasp pain express pattern of Korean peptic ulcer patients. The subjects were 20 peptic ulcer patients in medical unit or OPD of twp university hospitals in Seoul. Data were collected from September 7th to 22nd, 1990 by intensive interviews. Interviews were done by the researcher and all were tape-recorded. The Data analysis was done by Phenomenological method from Van Kaam. Validity assured by confirmation of the internal consistency of the statements and category by nursing colleague in educational and clinicians in medical care. From the emic data, 96 descriptive statements were organized in 18 theme cluster. The results of study were summarized as follows. 1. Pain Express Pattern cluster of Peptic Ulcer Patients were "pain as clogging", "shallow pain", "pain as pressing", "nauseateing pain", "pain as smarting", "pain as pulling", "pain as pricking", "pain as bursting", "wrenching pain", "excising pain", "uncontrollable pain for mind and body", "awakening pain", "pain as hollowing" and the other cluster. As above mentioned, Pain Express Pattern of Peptic Ulcer Patient appeared diversely in verbal and they were propered to Korean culture. Therefore they will provide for the foundation data of precise nursing assessment.

  9. Endovascular Management of Acute Bleeding Arterioenteric Fistulas

    SciTech Connect

    Leonhardt, Henrik Mellander, Stefan; Snygg, Johan; Loenn, Lars

    2008-05-15

    The objective of this study was to review the outcome of endovascular transcatheter repair of emergent arterioenteric fistulas. Cases of abdominal arterioenteric fistulas (defined as a fistula between a major artery and the small intestine or colon, thus not the esophagus or stomach), diagnosed over the 3-year period between December 2002 and December 2005 at our institution, were retrospectively reviewed. Five patients with severe enteric bleeding underwent angiography and endovascular repair. Four presented primary arterioenteric fistulas, and one presented a secondary aortoenteric fistula. All had massive persistent bleeding with hypotension despite volume substitution and transfusion by the time of endovascular management. Outcome after treatment of these patients was investigated for major procedure-related complications, recurrence, reintervention, morbidity, and mortality. Mean follow-up time was 3 months (range, 1-6 months). All massive bleeding was controlled by occlusive balloon catheters. Four fistulas were successfully sealed with stent-grafts, resulting in a technical success rate of 80%. One patient was circulatory stabilized by endovascular management but needed immediate further open surgery. There were no procedure-related major complications. Mean hospital stay after the initial endovascular intervention was 19 days. Rebleeding occurred in four patients (80%) after a free interval of 2 weeks or longer. During the follow-up period three patients needed reintervention. The in-hospital mortality was 20% and the 30-day mortality was 40%. The midterm outcome was poor, due to comorbidities or rebleeding, with a mortality of 80% within 6 months. In conclusion, endovascular repair is an efficient and safe method to stabilize patients with life-threatening bleeding arterioenteric fistulas in the emergent episode. However, in this group of patients with severe comorbidities, the risk of rebleeding is high and further intervention must be considered

  10. Embolization of Acute Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Resistant to Endoscopic Treatment: Results and Predictors of Recurrent Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Loffroy, Romaric Rao, Pramod; Ota, Shinichi; Lin Mingde; Kwak, Byung-Kook; Geschwind, Jean-Francois

    2010-12-15

    Acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) hemorrhage is a frequent complication associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The most common cause of UGI bleeding is peptic ulcer disease, but the differential diagnosis is diverse and includes tumors; ischemia; gastritis; arteriovenous malformations, such as Dieulafoy lesions; Mallory-Weiss tears; trauma; and iatrogenic causes. Aggressive treatment with early endoscopic hemostasis is essential for a favorable outcome. However, severe bleeding despite conservative medical treatment or endoscopic intervention occurs in 5-10% of patients, requiring surgery or transcatheter arterial embolization. Surgical intervention is usually an expeditious and gratifying endeavor, but it can be associated with high operative mortality rates. Endovascular management using superselective catheterization of the culprit vessel, < sandwich> occlusion, or blind embolization has emerged as an alternative to emergent operative intervention for high-risk patients and is now considered the first-line therapy for massive UGI bleeding refractory to endoscopic treatment. Indeed, many published studies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and its high technical and clinical success rates, which range from 69 to 100% and from 63 to 97%, respectively, even if the choice of the best embolic agent among coils, cyanaocrylate glue, gelatin sponge, or calibrated particles remains a matter of debate. However, factors influencing clinical outcome, especially predictors of early rebleeding, are poorly understood, and few studies have addressed this issue. This review of the literature will attempt to define the role of embolotherapy for acute nonvariceal UGI hemorrhage that fails to respond to endoscopic hemostasis and to summarize data on factors predicting angiographic and embolization failure.

  11. [Peptic ulcer disease and helicobacter pylori: How we know what we know].

    PubMed

    Scholl, Raphael

    2015-07-01

    The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is one of the main causes of peptic ulcers. But how was this causal relationship demonstrated? A historical and philosophical analysis of a series of studies conducted during the 1980s can elucidate the question. In the beginning, a mere correlation between the newly discovered bacterium and peptic ulcers was found in gastric biopsies. It remained an open question whether the bacterium caused the disease, or whether it constituted merely an opportunistic infection. Yet determining the direction of causality was difficult in the absence of an animal model: Even though gastritis was observed in a courageous self-experiment involving a swallowed bacterial culture, tf!e significance of the individual case was small. The failings of the self-experiment could only be rectified by a randomised, placebo-controlled trial which met the requirements of Koch's third postulate. Moreover, it was necessary to gain an initial understanding of the mechanism by which the causal relationship between H. pylori and peptic ulcers is mediated: How, forexample, does the bacterium survive in the acid environment of the stomach? The study of the case from the perspective of the history and philosophy of science illustrates how medical knowledge is established incrementally.

  12. Time trends in peptic ulcer surgery, 1956 to 1986. A nation-wide survey in Sweden.

    PubMed Central

    Gustavsson, S; Nyrén, O

    1989-01-01

    To establish time trends in surgical rates for peptic ulcer disease, all surgical departments in Sweden were requested to complete a questionnaire regarding elective operations for gastric and duodenal ulcers and emergency operations for ulcer perforations performed in 1956, 1966, 1976, and 1986. A total of 8558 operations were reported for these years. The incidence of elective surgery declined steadily, the rates being 72.1, 45.0, 31.9, and 10.7 per 100,000 inhabitants. The male:female ratio fell from 4.2 to 1.5:1, while the duodenal/gastric ulcer ratio remained virtually unchanged. The operation rate for perforation decreased by 50%, from 12.8 to 6.4 per 100,000 inhabitants. We conclude that there has been a dramatic decline in elective peptic ulcer surgery in Sweden that began long before the advent of fiberoptic endoscopy, highly selective vagotomy, or H2-receptor antagonists. The comparable decline in emergency procedures suggests that true changes in the incidence or severity of the disease have occurred. In the future the few patients still needing elective surgery for peptic ulcer may have to be served by a small number of specialized centers. PMID:2589883

  13. The ORBIT bleeding score: a simple bedside score to assess bleeding risk in atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Emily C.; Simon, DaJuanicia N.; Thomas, Laine E.; Hylek, Elaine M.; Gersh, Bernard J.; Ansell, Jack E.; Kowey, Peter R.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Chang, Paul; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Pencina, Michael J.; Piccini, Jonathan P.; Peterson, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic decisions in atrial fibrillation (AF) are often influenced by assessment of bleeding risk. However, existing bleeding risk scores have limitations. Objectives We sought to develop and validate a novel bleeding risk score using routinely available clinical information to predict major bleeding in a large, community-based AF population. Methods We analysed data from Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation (ORBIT-AF), a prospective registry that enrolled incident and prevalent AF patients at 176 US sites. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we identified factors independently associated with major bleeding among patients taking oral anticoagulation (OAC) over a median follow-up of 2 years (interquartile range = 1.6–2.5). We also created a numerical bedside risk score that included the five most predictive risk factors weighted according to their strength of association with major bleeding. The predictive performance of the full model, the simple five-item score, and two existing risk scores (hypertension, abnormal renal/liver function, stroke, bleeding history or predisposition, labile INR, elderly, drugs/alcohol concomitantly, HAS-BLED, and anticoagulation and risk factors in atrial fibrillation, ATRIA) were then assessed in both the ORBIT-AF cohort and a separate clinical trial population, Rivaroxaban Once-daily oral direct factor Xa inhibition compared with vitamin K antagonism for prevention of stroke and embolism trial in atrial fibrillation (ROCKET-AF). Results Among 7411 ORBIT-AF patients taking OAC, the rate of major bleeding was 4.0/100 person-years. The full continuous model (12 variables) and five-factor ORBIT risk score (older age [75+ years], reduced haemoglobin/haematocrit/history of anaemia, bleeding history, insufficient kidney function, and treatment with antiplatelet) both had good ability to identify those who bled vs. not (C-index 0.69 and 0.67, respectively). These scores both had

  14. Utility of a Pediatric Bleeding Questionnaire as a Screening Tool for von Willebrand Disease in Apparently Healthy Children

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Nupur; Pedersen, Rachelle; James, Paula; Shott, Susan; Valentino, Leonard A.

    2015-01-01

    von Willebrand disease (VWD), an inherited bleeding disorder caused by deficiency or dysfunction of von Willebrand factor (VWF) is diagnosed when a personal and often a family history of excessive mucocutaneous bleeding is present along with abnormal laboratory studies. An accurate assessment of hemorrhagic symptoms is key in suspecting VWD but presents a challenge especially in children due to overlap between normal and abnormal bleeding. Bleeding questionnaire (BQ) scores have been validated in adults and have recently been validated in children with VWD for assessing bleeding severity. However there is limited data supporting their use prospectively in healthy children with bleeding complaints. The objectives of this study were to obtain normative data from children and validate a pediatric BQ to determine the discriminative ability of its total score and its individual components for identifying children likely to have VWD. Methods The pediatric BQ was administered to 1281 multiethnic, healthy children between 30 days and 18 years of age presenting to a general pediatric office and to 35 children with VWD based on VWF antigen, activity and multimer pattern. Results When children with total BQ scores of 3 or more were predicted to have VWD, the sensitivity was 97.2%, the specificity was 97.1%, the positive predictive value was 48.6%, and the negative predictive value was 99.9%. Conclusions The pediatric BQ may help discriminate a significant bleeding history from otherwise trivial bleeding and may be integrated into the primary care algorithm for evaluating children suspected of having VWD. PMID:25982122

  15. Signs and Symptoms of a Bleeding Disorder in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Blood Disorders Signs and Symptoms Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Bleeding Disorders Download and print this fact sheet » Signs and symptoms of a bleeding disorder: I have ...

  16. Thromboelastography identifies children with rare bleeding disorders and predicts bleeding phenotype.

    PubMed

    Zia, A N; Chitlur, M; Rajpurkar, M; Ozgonenel, B; Lusher, J; Callaghan, J H; Callaghan, M U

    2015-01-01

    Rare bleeding disorders (RBDs) comprise 3-5% of all congenital bleeding disorders. They can evade typical coagulation screening tests and there is a poor correlation between laboratory results and bleeding phenotype. Thromboelastography (TEG) measures coagulation globally in whole blood samples. The aims of this study were to evaluate the utility of TEG as an adjunct to the routine screening tests employed for the diagnosis of RBDs and to correlate TEG results with the bleeding phenotype in RBDs. TEG parameters and clot kinetics were compared to bleeding phenotypes (asymptomatic, mild, moderate and severe) in 26 RBD patients and 30 normal controls. Clot kinetics correlated strongly with RBDs and with the severity of bleeding phenotype with mean maximum rate of thrombus generation (MRTG) 15.4 mm min(-1) in controls vs. 6.0 in RBDs (P < 0.0001, Wilcoxin). The mean MRTG was 7.7 in mildly symptomatic, 5.5 in moderately symptomatic and 4.1 in severely symptomatic patients (P < 0.0001, Kruskal-Wallis). Disorders that are often missed by conventional screening tests, dysfibrinogenaemia and platelet disorders displayed a distinctive TEG curve with markedly decreased maximum amplitude (MA) and low MRTG values. Factor XIII and PAI deficient patients displayed increased fibrinolysis in addition to low MRTGs. All patients with RBDs, but none of the normal controls, had abnormal clot kinetics suggesting that TEG may be an effective screening test for RBDs.

  17. Injection and Cautery Methods for Nonvariceal Bleeding Control.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Cristina; Rotondano, Gianluca; Marmo, Riccardo

    2015-07-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding remains one of the most common challenges faced by gastroenterologists and endoscopists in daily clinical practice. Endoscopic management of nonvariceal bleeding has been shown to improve clinical outcomes, with significant reduction of recurrent bleeding, need for surgery, and mortality. Early upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is recommended in all patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding within 24 hours of presentation, although appropriate resuscitation, stabilization of hemodynamic parameters, and optimization of comorbidity before endoscopy are essential. PMID:26142035

  18. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  19. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  20. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  1. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  2. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  3. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air... contamination following any probable failure of the turbocharger or its lubrication system. (b) The...

  4. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air... contamination following any probable failure of the turbocharger or its lubrication system. (b) The...

  5. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air... contamination following any probable failure of the turbocharger or its lubrication system. (b) The...

  6. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air... contamination following any probable failure of the turbocharger or its lubrication system. (b) The...

  7. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air... contamination following any probable failure of the turbocharger or its lubrication system. (b) The...

  8. Scientific Evaluation of Edible Fruits and Spices Used for the Treatment of Peptic Ulcer in Traditional Iranian Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Shams-Ardekani, Mohammad Reza; Abbasabadi, Zahra; Rahimi, Roja

    2013-01-01

    In traditional Iranian medicine (TIM), several edible fruits and spices are thought to have protective and healing effects on peptic ulcer (PU). The present study was conducted to verify anti-PU activity of these remedies. For this purpose, edible fruits and spices proposed for the management of PU in TIM were collected from TIM sources, and they were searched in modern medical databases to find studies that confirmed their efficacy. Findings from modern investigations support the claims of TIM about the efficacy of many fruits and spices in PU. The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica as a beneficial remedy for PU in TIM has been demonstrated to have antioxidant, wound healing, angiogenic, anti-H. pylori, cytoprotective, antisecretory, and anti-inflammatory properties. The fruit of Vitis vinifera has been found to be anti-H. pylori, anti-inflammatory, wound healing, angiogenic, cytoprotective, and antioxidant. The fruit and aril of seed from Myristica fragrans exert their beneficial effects in PU by increasing prostaglandin, modulation of nitric oxide and inflammatory mediators, wound healing, antisecretory, antacid, antioxidant, and anti-H. pylori activities, and improving angiogenesis. Pharmacological and clinical studies for evaluation of efficacy of all TIM fruits and spices in PU and their possible mechanisms of action are recommended. PMID:24066235

  9. Scientific evaluation of edible fruits and spices used for the treatment of peptic ulcer in traditional Iranian medicine.

    PubMed

    Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Shams-Ardekani, Mohammad Reza; Abbasabadi, Zahra; Rahimi, Roja

    2013-01-01

    In traditional Iranian medicine (TIM), several edible fruits and spices are thought to have protective and healing effects on peptic ulcer (PU). The present study was conducted to verify anti-PU activity of these remedies. For this purpose, edible fruits and spices proposed for the management of PU in TIM were collected from TIM sources, and they were searched in modern medical databases to find studies that confirmed their efficacy. Findings from modern investigations support the claims of TIM about the efficacy of many fruits and spices in PU. The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica as a beneficial remedy for PU in TIM has been demonstrated to have antioxidant, wound healing, angiogenic, anti-H. pylori, cytoprotective, antisecretory, and anti-inflammatory properties. The fruit of Vitis vinifera has been found to be anti-H. pylori, anti-inflammatory, wound healing, angiogenic, cytoprotective, and antioxidant. The fruit and aril of seed from Myristica fragrans exert their beneficial effects in PU by increasing prostaglandin, modulation of nitric oxide and inflammatory mediators, wound healing, antisecretory, antacid, antioxidant, and anti-H. pylori activities, and improving angiogenesis. Pharmacological and clinical studies for evaluation of efficacy of all TIM fruits and spices in PU and their possible mechanisms of action are recommended. PMID:24066235

  10. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Chait, Maxwell M

    2010-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is an important worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly. The incidence of LGIB increases with age and corresponds to the increased incidence of specific gastrointestinal diseases that have worldwide regional variation, co-morbid diseases and polypharmacy. The evaluation and treatment of patients is adjusted to the rate and severity of hemorrhage and the clinical status of the patient and may be complicated by the presence of visual, auditory and cognitive impairment due to age and co-morbid disease. Bleeding may be chronic and mild or severe and life threatening, requiring endoscopic, radiologic or surgical intervention. Colonoscopy provides the best method for evaluation and treatment of patients with LGIB. There will be a successful outcome of LGIB in the majority of elderly patients with appropriate evaluation and management. PMID:21160742

  11. Duodenal bleeding from metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rangasamy, Priya; Versland, Mark

    2011-04-20

    Massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to malignancy is relatively uncommon and the duodenum is the least frequently involved site. Duodenal metastasis is rare in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and early detection, especially in case of a solitary mass, helps in planning further therapy. We report a case of intractable upper gastrointestinal bleeding from metastatic RCC to the duodenum. The patient presented with melena and anemia, 13 years after nephrectomy for RCC. On esophagogastroduodenoscopy, a submucosal mass was noted in the duodenum, biopsies of which revealed metastatic RCC. In conclusion, metastasis from RCC should be considered in nephrectomized patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms and a complete evaluation, especially endoscopic examination followed by biopsy, is suggested.

  12. Uterine artery embolization for heavy menstrual bleeding.

    PubMed

    Moss, Jonathan; Christie, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Uterine artery embolization (UAE) as a treatment option for fibroids was first reported by Ravina in 1995. Although rapidly adopted by enthusiasts, many were skeptical and its introduction varied widely across the globe. It was not until randomized controlled trials and registries were published and national guidance statements issued that UAE was accepted as a safe and proven treatment for fibroids. The technique is now established as one of the treatment options to be discussed with patients as an alternative to surgery for fibroid-associated heavy menstrual bleeding. Research is on-going to evaluate the relative merits of UAE compared with other medical and surgical treatment options for heavy menstrual bleeding, particularly for women wishing to maintain their fertility. PMID:26756068

  13. Duodenal Bleeding from Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rangasamy, Priya; Versland, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to malignancy is relatively uncommon and the duodenum is the least frequently involved site. Duodenal metastasis is rare in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and early detection, especially in case of a solitary mass, helps in planning further therapy. We report a case of intractable upper gastrointestinal bleeding from metastatic RCC to the duodenum. The patient presented with melena and anemia, 13 years after nephrectomy for RCC. On esophagogastroduodenoscopy, a submucosal mass was noted in the duodenum, biopsies of which revealed metastatic RCC. In conclusion, metastasis from RCC should be considered in nephrectomized patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms and a complete evaluation, especially endoscopic examination followed by biopsy, is suggested. PMID:21577373

  14. Association between early Helicobacter pylori eradication and a lower risk of recurrent complicated peptic ulcers in end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shen-Shong; Hu, Hsiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients exhibit an increased incidence of peptic ulcer disease. Helicobacter pylori plays a central role in the development of peptic ulcers. The effect of early H pylori eradication on the recurrence of complicated peptic ulcer disease in ESRD patients remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to explore whether early H pylori eradication therapy in ESRD patients can reduce the risk of recurrent complicated peptic ulcers.We conducted a population-based cohort study and recruited patients with ESRD who had developed peptic ulcers. We categorized patients into early (time lag ≦120 days after peptic ulcer diagnosis) and late H pylori eradication therapy groups. The Cox proportional hazards model was used. The endpoint was based on hospitalization for complicated recurrent peptic ulcers.The early and late H pylori eradication therapy groups consisted of 2406 and 1356 ESRD patients, respectively, in a time lag of 120 days. After adjusting for possible confounders, the early eradication group exhibited a lower rate of complicated recurrent peptic ulcer disease (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.64-0.91, P = 0.003) in a time lag of ≦120 days, but a similar rate of complicated recurrent peptic ulcer disease in time lags of ≦1 year (HR = 0.97, 95% CI 0.79-1.19, P = 0.758) and 2 years (HR = 1.11, 95% CI 0.86-1.44, P = 0.433) compared with the late eradication group.We recommend administering H pylori eradication within 120 days after peptic ulcer diagnosis to H pylori infected ESRD patients who have developed peptic ulcers.

  15. The Evaluation of Rectal Bleeding in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Elizabeth; Nicolaidis, Christina; Helfand, Mark

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND Though primary care patients commonly present with rectal bleeding, the optimal evaluation strategy remains unknown. OBJECTIVE To compare the cost-effectiveness of four diagnostic strategies in the evaluation of rectal bleeding. DESIGN Cost-effectiveness analysis using a Markov decision model. DATA SOURCES Systematic review of the literature, Medicare reimbursement data, Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Cancer Registry. TARGET POPULATION Patients over age 40 with otherwise asymptomatic rectal bleeding. TIME HORIZON The patient's lifetime. PERSPECTIVE Modified societal perspective. INTERVENTIONS Watchful waiting, flexible sigmoidoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy followed by air contrast barium enema (FS+ACBE), and colonoscopy. OUTCOME MEASURES Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. RESULTS OF BASE-CASE ANALYSIS The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for colonoscopy compared with flexible sigmoidoscopy was $5,480 per quality-adjusted year of life saved (QALY). Watchful waiting and FS+ACBE were more expensive and less effective than colonoscopy. RESULTS OF SENSITIVITY ANALYSES The cost of colonoscopy was reduced to $1,686 per QALY when age at entry was changed to 45. Watchful waiting became the least expensive strategy when community procedure charges replaced Medicare costs, when age at entry was maximized to 80, or when the prevalence of polyps was lowered to 7%, but the remaining strategies provided greater life expectancy at relatively low cost. The strategy of FS+ACBE remained more expensive and less effective in all analyses. In the remaining sensitivity analyses, the incremental cost-effectiveness of colonoscopy compared with flexible sigmoidoscopy never rose above $34,000. CONCLUSIONS Colonoscopy is a cost-effective method to evaluate otherwise asymptomatic rectal bleeding, with a low cost per QALY compared to other strategies. PMID:15693933

  16. Neurenteric Cyst Presenting with Bleeding Per Rectum

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Taruna; Rattan, Kamal Nain

    2016-01-01

    Neurenteric cyst in the thoracic cavity may produce a myriad of clinical features. We report a 7-month-old girl who presented with significant bleeding per rectum. On imaging, a mediastinal cystic structure with air-fluid levels was evident with cervico-thoracic vertebral anomalies. The cyst was excised and histopathology showed intestinal mucosal lining with heterotopic pancreatic tissue confirming the diagnosis of neurenteric cyst.

  17. Neurenteric Cyst Presenting with Bleeding Per Rectum.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Taruna; Parmar, Padam; Rattan, Kamal Nain

    2016-01-01

    Neurenteric cyst in the thoracic cavity may produce a myriad of clinical features. We report a 7-month-old girl who presented with significant bleeding per rectum. On imaging, a mediastinal cystic structure with air-fluid levels was evident with cervico-thoracic vertebral anomalies. The cyst was excised and histopathology showed intestinal mucosal lining with heterotopic pancreatic tissue confirming the diagnosis of neurenteric cyst. PMID:27672582

  18. Neurenteric Cyst Presenting with Bleeding Per Rectum.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Taruna; Parmar, Padam; Rattan, Kamal Nain

    2016-01-01

    Neurenteric cyst in the thoracic cavity may produce a myriad of clinical features. We report a 7-month-old girl who presented with significant bleeding per rectum. On imaging, a mediastinal cystic structure with air-fluid levels was evident with cervico-thoracic vertebral anomalies. The cyst was excised and histopathology showed intestinal mucosal lining with heterotopic pancreatic tissue confirming the diagnosis of neurenteric cyst.

  19. Neurenteric Cyst Presenting with Bleeding Per Rectum

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Taruna; Rattan, Kamal Nain

    2016-01-01

    Neurenteric cyst in the thoracic cavity may produce a myriad of clinical features. We report a 7-month-old girl who presented with significant bleeding per rectum. On imaging, a mediastinal cystic structure with air-fluid levels was evident with cervico-thoracic vertebral anomalies. The cyst was excised and histopathology showed intestinal mucosal lining with heterotopic pancreatic tissue confirming the diagnosis of neurenteric cyst. PMID:27672582

  20. Thalidomide in angiodysplasia-related bleeding.

    PubMed

    Boey, J P; Hahn, U; Sagheer, S; McRae, S J

    2015-09-01

    Gastrointestinal haemorrhage from angiodysplastic lesions is not only difficult to identify, but often refractory to endoscopic intervention. Patients often require substantial transfusion support. Thalidomide has emerged as a promising medical strategy in angiodysplasia-related bleeding. We present our experience and report the findings from a review of the literature. Despite its side-effect profile, thalidomide remains the therapeutic modality with the best evidence in this difficult clinical scenario.

  1. The role of endoscopy in pediatric gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Markus; Geiß, Andrea; Greiner, Peter; Wellner, Ulrich; Richter-Schrag, Hans-Jürgen; Bausch, Dirk; Fischer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Gastrointestinal bleeding in children and adolescents accounts for up to 20 % of referrals to gastroenterologists. Detailed management guidelines exist for gastrointestinal bleeding in adults, but they do not encompass children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to assess gastrointestinal bleeding in pediatric patients and to determine an investigative management algorithm accounting for the specifics of children and adolescents. Patients and methods: Pediatric patients with gastrointestinal bleeding admitted to our endoscopy unit from 2001 to 2009 (n = 154) were identified. Retrospective statistical and neural network analysis was used to assess outcome and to determine an investigative management algorithm. Results: The source of bleeding could be identified in 81 % (n = 124/154). Gastrointestinal bleeding was predominantly lower gastrointestinal bleeding (66 %, n = 101); upper gastrointestinal bleeding was much less common (14 %, n = 21). Hematochezia was observed in 94 % of the patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 95 of 101). Hematemesis (67 %, n = 14 of 21) and melena (48 %, n = 10 of 21) were associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The sensitivity and specificity of a neural network to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 98 % and 63.6 %, respectively and to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 75 % and 96 % respectively. The sensitivity and specifity of hematochezia alone to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 94.2 % and 85.7 %, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for hematemesis and melena to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 82.6 % and 94 %, respectively. We then developed an investigative management algorithm based on the presence of hematochezia and hematemesis or melena. Conclusions: Hematochezia should prompt colonoscopy and hematemesis or melena should prompt esophagogastroduodenoscopy. If no

  2. The role of endoscopy in pediatric gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Markus; Geiß, Andrea; Greiner, Peter; Wellner, Ulrich; Richter-Schrag, Hans-Jürgen; Bausch, Dirk; Fischer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Gastrointestinal bleeding in children and adolescents accounts for up to 20 % of referrals to gastroenterologists. Detailed management guidelines exist for gastrointestinal bleeding in adults, but they do not encompass children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to assess gastrointestinal bleeding in pediatric patients and to determine an investigative management algorithm accounting for the specifics of children and adolescents. Patients and methods: Pediatric patients with gastrointestinal bleeding admitted to our endoscopy unit from 2001 to 2009 (n = 154) were identified. Retrospective statistical and neural network analysis was used to assess outcome and to determine an investigative management algorithm. Results: The source of bleeding could be identified in 81 % (n = 124/154). Gastrointestinal bleeding was predominantly lower gastrointestinal bleeding (66 %, n = 101); upper gastrointestinal bleeding was much less common (14 %, n = 21). Hematochezia was observed in 94 % of the patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 95 of 101). Hematemesis (67 %, n = 14 of 21) and melena (48 %, n = 10 of 21) were associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The sensitivity and specificity of a neural network to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 98 % and 63.6 %, respectively and to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 75 % and 96 % respectively. The sensitivity and specifity of hematochezia alone to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 94.2 % and 85.7 %, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for hematemesis and melena to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 82.6 % and 94 %, respectively. We then developed an investigative management algorithm based on the presence of hematochezia and hematemesis or melena. Conclusions: Hematochezia should prompt colonoscopy and hematemesis or melena should prompt esophagogastroduodenoscopy. If no

  3. Single session treatment for bleeding hemorrhoids

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, S.J.; Rypins, E.B.; Houck, J.; Thrower, S.

    1987-12-01

    Fifty consecutive outpatients with bleeding internal hemorrhoids were prospectively treated with a single application of rubber band ligation or infrared coagulation. Complete follow-up observation was obtained in 48 patients (23 underwent rubber band ligation and 25 underwent infrared coagulation). At one month after treatment, 22 patients who underwent rubber band ligation and 16 who underwent infrared coagulation, were symptomatically improved (p less than 0.05). At six months, 15 patients who had undergone rubber band ligation and ten who had infrared coagulation treatment, remained improved (p less than 0.05). There was no statistical difference in the discomfort experienced by either group during or after the procedure as determined by a self-assessment scale. Two patients who underwent rubber band ligation experienced complications--a thrombosed external hemorrhoid developed in one patient and another had delayed rectal bleeding. Although associated with occasional complications after treatment, rubber band ligation is more effective than in infrared coagulation for single session treatment of bleeding internal hemorrhoids.

  4. Corpus luteum hemorrhage in women with bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Ron; Brenner, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Bleeding into the corpus luteum following ovulation rarely has clinical significance in healthy women, but may lead to life-threatening hemorrhage in women with congenital or acquired bleeding disorders. Women who are at an increased risk for corpus luteum hemorrhage (CLH) can be divided in two categories; first, those taking anticoagulants because of a thrombotic disorder; and second, women with congenital bleeding disorders. The management and prevention of CLH is still unsettled and the literature dealing with this problem is based on case reports only. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment options of an acute bleeding event and prevention modalities of CLH in women with bleeding disorders.

  5. New direct oral anticoagulants--current therapeutic options and treatment recommendations for bleeding complications.

    PubMed

    Miesbach, Wolfgang; Seifried, Erhard

    2012-10-01

    To date, clinical studies show that the incidence of spontaneous bleeding with new direct oral anticoagulants (DOAs) is comparable to that of established anticoagulants. However, unlike vitamin K antagonists, there are currently no clinically available antidotes or approved reversal agents for new DOAs. Restoring normal coagulation is important in many cases, such as emergency surgeries, serious bleedings, or anticoagulant overdosing. Attempts have been made to restore normal coagulation after treatment with new DOAs using compounds such as recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa), prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC), or FEIBA (factor eight inhibitor bypassing activity). Limited pre-clinical data and even less clinical evidence are available on the usefulness of these methods in restoring normal coagulation for the emergency management of critical bleeding episodes. Evaluating the utility of DOAs is further complicated by the fact that it is unknown how predictive established test systems are of the bleeding risks. Clinical practice requires further evaluation of the emergency management options for the new DOAs to define the agents and the doses that are most useful. Furthermore, patients receiving long-term treatment with a DOA are likely to undergo elective surgery at some point, and there is lack of evidence regarding perioperative treatment regimens under such conditions. This review summarises potential bleeding management options and available data on the new DOAs. PMID:22782297

  6. Situational and Relational Factors Associated With Coitus During Vaginal Bleeding Among Adolescent Women

    PubMed Central

    Hensel, Devon J.; Fortenberry, J. Dennis; Orr, Donald P.

    2013-01-01

    Menstruation is a normal, developmental event anchored in contradictory value systems. Although it demarcates a transition to womanhood, it is often associated with negative sentiments such as shame, camouflage, and discomfort. Certain behavioral expectations, including avoiding sexual intercourse, also accompany menstruation. Research generally has suggested that sex does decrease during menstruation. However, not all sexual activity is suppressed during menses; both individual and relationship factors provide influence. Accordingly, this study investigated situational and relational factors associated with the day-to-day likelihood of sex and vaginal bleeding among 387 (aged 14–17 at enrollment) adolescent women. Generalized estimating equation logistic regression, in SUDAAN 9.0, was used. Predictors of coitus and bleeding included recent sexual activity; past coitus/bleeding; marijuana use before intercourse; and higher partner support, higher sexual interest, and lower feelings of being in love. The findings highlight appropriate areas of focus for information, education, and sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention counseling. PMID:17879170

  7. Approach to the diagnosis and management of common bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Rydz, Natalia; James, Paula D

    2012-10-01

    Mild mucocutaneous bleeding symptoms are common in the general population. Differentiating normal from pathological bleeding complaints begins with a detailed bleeding history that assesses: the pattern (primary versus secondary hemostasis), the severity, and the onset (congenital versus acquired) of bleeding. Bleeding assessment tools have been developed to aid in determining whether bleeding symptoms are outside of the normal range. Although the clinical pattern of bleeding and family history directs laboratory investigations, von Willebrand disease, the most common and best characterized of the primary hemostatic disorders, is often the first diagnosis to be considered. Clinical management focuses on the particular symptoms experienced by the patient. Medical interventions include replacement of the factor that is deficient or defective, or indirect treatments, such as antifibrinolytics (tranexamic acid), desmopression, and hormone-based therapy (e.g., oral contraceptive pill for menorrhagia).

  8. Patterns of bleeding in adolescents with severe haemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Aronstam, A; Rainsford, S G; Painter, M J

    1979-02-17

    Eighty-two boys with severe haemophilia A who spent some time at Lord Mayor Treloar College during 1973-7 were studied. All episodes of bleeding that occurred during term time were recorded, along with the number of transfusions. The bleeding frequency among these boys, most of them aged 10-17 years, increased steadily from 8,31 episodes/100 days in 1973 to 12,63 episodes/100 days in 1977. At the same time there was a steady fall in bleeding frequency with age. Altogether 24% of bleeding episodes were into the elbow joint, 22% into the knee, and 15% into the ankle. As the boys grew older the proportion of bleeding episodes in the legs declined and that in the arms increased. The overall results reflect the fact that special schools now see only the severest cases of haemophilia. The pattern of bleeding during adolescence suggests that concepts of management of arm bleeding need modifying.

  9. Patterns of bleeding in adolescents with severe haemophilia A.

    PubMed Central

    Aronstam, A; Rainsford, S G; Painter, M J

    1979-01-01

    Eighty-two boys with severe haemophilia A who spent some time at Lord Mayor Treloar College during 1973-7 were studied. All episodes of bleeding that occurred during term time were recorded, along with the number of transfusions. The bleeding frequency among these boys, most of them aged 10-17 years, increased steadily from 8,31 episodes/100 days in 1973 to 12,63 episodes/100 days in 1977. At the same time there was a steady fall in bleeding frequency with age. Altogether 24% of bleeding episodes were into the elbow joint, 22% into the knee, and 15% into the ankle. As the boys grew older the proportion of bleeding episodes in the legs declined and that in the arms increased. The overall results reflect the fact that special schools now see only the severest cases of haemophilia. The pattern of bleeding during adolescence suggests that concepts of management of arm bleeding need modifying. PMID:427411

  10. Localization of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding by technetium 99m-labeled red blood cell scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Wang, C S; Tzen, K Y; Huang, M J; Wang, J Y; Chen, M F

    1992-01-01

    When a bleeding source from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract cannot be identified with conventional diagnostic studies, it is known as GI bleeding of an obscure origin. In the past three years, in vivo Technetium 99m-labeled red blood cell scintigraphy (RBC scan) has been added to our armamentarium for the diagnosis of obscure GI bleeding. Out of a total of 26 cases, the bleeders could be detected in 12 or 46.2% by RBC scan. The time required ranged from 15 minutes to 24 hours (median, one hour). In 14 patients with active bleeding during the scan period, 11 had positive scans (sensitivity, 78.6%). In 12 patients with inactive bleeding, 11 had negative scans (specificity, 91.7%). Angiography was conducted in nine cases, with all showing negative findings; however, six of them had a positive focus by RBC scan. Laparotomy was performed in seven scan-positive patients, and in three scan-negative patients because of a positive Meckel's scan (two cases) or recurrent bleeding (one case). Of the 12 scan-positive patients, incorrect localization was noted in two patients due to rapid transit of the labeled RBC in the small bowel. False localization could be prevented by shortening the sequential imaging interval. It is concluded that an RBC scan is a very sensitive and safe tool for detection of GI bleeding of an intermittent nature, because the bleeder can be monitored for 24 hours after a single injection. It can be used as a preangiographic screening test and to guide the surgeon in surgical planning or decision-making.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1352337

  11. Postmarketing surveillance of rabeprazole in upper gastrointestinal peptic lesions in Japanese patients with coexisting hepatic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Isao; Nakamura, Kimihide; Sato, Yoichi; Sato, Yuzuru; Sezai, Shuichi; Ikeda, Yusei; Shinmura, Wahei; Watahiki, Hajime; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Hioki, Yayuki; Suzuki, Masao; Kumada, Takashi; Honda, Takashi; Rikitoku, Tomoo; Hisanaga, Yasuhiro; Fukui, Hiroshi; Yamao, Junichi; Kawasaki, Hironaka; Hosoda, Akihide; Onji, Morikazu; Matsui, Hidetaka; Sata, Michio; Torimura, Takuji; Oho, Kazuhiko; Maekawa, Ryuichiro; Takagi, Yoshiyuki; Shakado, Satoshi; Nakayama, Masafumi; Gondo, Kazuhisa; Fukushima, Hirofumi; Kusaba, Taku; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Hori, Takeshi; Iida, Yozo; Yutoku, Kouki; Maetani, Noboru; Kubo, Yoshitsugu; Miyata, Yoshifumi

    2006-01-01

    Background: Many Japanese patients with hepatic disorders confirmed on diagnostic imaging and coexisting upper gastrointestinal (GI) peptic lesions receive treatment with proton pump inhibitors. Some pharmacotherapies used to treat peptic ulcers have been associated with adverse drug reactions (ADRs), including elevated liver enzyme levels. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the tolerability and effectiveness of rabeprazole sodium in treating peptic lesions in patients with coexisting hepatic disorders. Methods: This open-label, practice-based, postmarketing surveillance investigation was conducted at 15 centers across Japan. Male and female patients aged ≥18 years with peptic lesions confirmed on upper GI endoscopy and with underlying hepatic disease were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to receive rabeprazole 10 or 20 mg PO (tablet) QD after a meal for up to 8 weeks. Tolerability was assessed using monitoring of the incidence of ADRs determined by direct patient questioning, spontaneous reporting, and laboratory assessment. All patients who received at least 1 dose of study drug were included in the tolerability assessment. Effectiveness was assessed at baseline and study end using the rates of achievement of improvement on endoscopy, relief of subjective/objective symptoms (rates of improvement in epigastric pain and heartburn), and global improvement. The effectiveness analysis included all patients with complete data before and after treatment. Subanalyses were conducted to determine the effectiveness of drug by identification of the proportion of patients with coexisting hepatic disorders (cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis, and other hepatic diseases [eg, alcoholic hepatitis, fatty liver]) and by peptic lesion (gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, stomal ulcer, and reflux esophagitis) who achieved improvement. Results: A total of 114 patients were enrolled; 108 patients were included in the tolerability analysis (81 men, 27 women; mean age, 59

  12. Effects of bleed-hole geometry and plenum pressure on three-dimensional shock-wave/boundary-layer/bleed interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyu, Wei J.; Rimlinger, Mark J.; Shih, Tom I.-P.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to investigate 3D shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions on a flat plate with bleed through one or more circular holes that vent into a plenum. This study was focused on how bleed-hole geometry and pressure ratio across bleed holes affect the bleed rate and the physics of the flow in the vicinity of the holes. The aspects of the bleed-hole geometry investigated include angle of bleed hole and the number of bleed holes. The plenum/freestream pressure ratios investigated range from 0.3 to 1.7. This study is based on the ensemble-averaged, 'full compressible' Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations closed by the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic turbulence model. Solutions to the ensemble-averaged N-S equations were obtained by an implicit finite-volume method using the partially-split, two-factored algorithm of Steger on an overlapping Chimera grid.

  13. Does Helicobacter pylori infection eradication modify peptic ulcer prevalence? A 10 years' endoscopical survey

    PubMed Central

    Nervi, Giorgio; Liatopoulou, Stefania; Cavallaro, Lucas Giovanni; Gnocchi, Alessandro; Bò, Nadia Dal; Rugge, Massimo; Iori, Veronica; Cavestro, Giulia Martina; Maino, Marta; Colla, Giancarlo; Franzè, Angelo; Mario, Francesco Di

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To compare peptic ulcer prevalence in patients referred for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in two Italian hospitals in pre-Helicobacter era and ten years after the progressive diffusion of eradication therapy. METHODS: We checked all the endoscopic examinations consecutively performed in the Gastroenterology Unit of Padova during 1986-1987 and 1995-1996, and in the Gastroenterology Unit of Parma during 1992 and 2002. Chi Square test was used for statistic analysis. RESULTS: Data from both the endoscopic centers showed a statistically significant decrease in the prevalence of ulcers: from 12.7% to 6.3% (P < 0.001) in Padova and from 15.6% to 12% (P < 0.001) in Parma. The decrease was significant both for duodenal (from 8.8% to 4.8%, P < 0.001) and gastric ulcer (3.9% to 1.5%, P < 0.001) in Padova, and only for duodenal ulcer in Parma (9.2% to 6.1%, P < 0.001; gastric ulcer: 6.3% to 5.8%, NS). CONCLUSION: Ten years of extensive Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) eradication in symptomatic patients led to a significant reduction in peptic ulcer prevalence. This reduction was particularly evident in Padova, where a project for the sensibilization of H pylori eradication among general practioners was carried out between 1990 and 1992. Should our hypothesis be true, H pylori eradication might in the future lead to peptic ulcer as a rare endoscopic finding. PMID:16688832

  14. Numerical Simulation of Bleeding from Ruptured Vessels in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitt, Darren L.

    2000-11-01

    With the projected increase of manned space activity in the forthcoming years, there will be a heightened risk of serious injury and/or need for surgical procedures resulting in significant blood loss. The bleeding process may be quite different in a microgravity environment compared with the terrestrial setting. Owing to the removal of normally dominant body forces, the mechanism by which the blood exits a ruptured vessel may be greatly influenced by surface tension. Consequently, blood may be ejected from a blood vessel in the form of droplets rather than a continuous leakage; stable domes of blood surrounding a wound may also be possible. The present study represents the first step towards a theoretical and computational model of the bleeding process in microgravity. A finite element-based numerical model (FIDAP 8.5) is developed for the problem of blood loss from a single ruptured vessel into a quiescent, miscible medium. Computations are carried out in two-dimensions and three-dimensions to investigate the rate of blood loss as a function of flow pulsatility, red blood cell concentration, rupture geometry, and vessel wall elasticity. Blood will be modeled as a Newtonian fluid with a concentration-dependent viscosity (Casson's model).

  15. Correlating clinical manifestations with factor levels in rare bleeding disorders: a report from Southern India.

    PubMed

    Viswabandya, A; Baidya, S; Nair, S C; Abraham, A; George, B; Mathews, V; Chandy, M; Srivastava, A

    2012-05-01

    Data on the clinical manifestations of patients with clotting factor defects other than Haemophilia A, B and von Willebrand disease are limited because of their rarity. Due to their autosomal recessive nature of inheritance, these diseases are more common in areas where there is higher prevalence of consanguinity. There is no previous large series reported from southern India where consanguinity is common. Our aim was to analyze clinical manifestations of patients with rare bleeding disorders and correlate their bleeding symptoms with corresponding factor level. Data were collected in a standardized format from our centre over three decades on 281 patients who were diagnosed with rare bleeding disorders (fibrinogen, prothrombin, factor V (FV), FVII, FX, FXI, FXIII and combined FV or FVIII deficiency). Patients with liver dysfunction or those on medications which can affect factor level were excluded. All patients with <50% factor levels were included in this analysis. Patients were analysed for their salient clinical manifestations and it was correlated with their factor levels. The data shows that FXIII deficiency is the commonest and FXI deficiency is the rarest in Southern India. There was no significant difference in bleeding symptoms among those who were < or >1% factor coagulant activities among all disorders, except for few symptoms in FVII and FX deficiency. An international collaborative study is essential to find out the best way of classifying severity in patients with rare bleeding disorders.

  16. A pilot study of Helicobacter pylori genotypes and cytokine gene polymorphisms in reflux oesophagitis and peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Akdogan, R A; Ozgur, O; Gucuyeter, S; Kaklikkaya, N; Cobanoglu, U; Aydin, F

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes various diseases such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. While majority of the people infected with H. pylori is asymptomatic, 15-20 % of them develop such diseases. The main factors, which determine the development of H. pylori related diseases might be bacterial virulence, host genetic and environmental factors.The aim of this study was to reveal the factors that play a role in the disease development in patients with reflux esophagitis and peptic ulcer, infected with Helicobacter pylori. Environmental factors such as medical agents, smoking and body mass index were evaluated. The factors specific to bacteria such as vacA, CagA, babA and iceA virulence genotypes and the host factors such as IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, interferon-γ, TNF-α, ve TGF-β1 gene polymorphisms were compared between the two groups.H. pylori infected twenty five patients with reflux esophagitis and peptic ulcer were enrolled in the study. There was no statistical difference between the two groups regarding environmental factors. IL-2 -330T +166T (p=0.037) and IL10 -1082A; -819C (p=0.049) gene polymorphisms were significantly more common in the group of patients with peptic ulcer compared to the group with reflux esophagitis. In both groups of patients, either with reflux esophagitis or peptic ulcer, multiple H. pylori virulence genotypes (cagA, vacA, babA) (mean values 74 %, 78 %, 54 % respectively) were observed.In this study, we revealed that cytokine gene polymorphisms may play a role in the development peptic ulcer while H. pylori virulence genotypes seem to be crucial for the development of associated diseases (Tab. 4, Ref. 51).

  17. SUBTOTAL GASTRIC RESECTION FOR PEPTIC ULCER—Preliminary Report of a Variation in Technique

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Gunther W.

    1953-01-01

    Internists as well as surgeons agree that subtotal gastric resection is a satisfactory method of treatment for a selected group of patients with intractable or complicated peptic ulcer. A short historical review of the development of the operation is given. The importance of removing a large portion of the acid pepsin-secreting area of the stomach is stressed. A variation from the usual method of resection accomplishes this and at the same time leaves a satisfactory gastric pouch and lessens the incidence of the dumping syndrome. PMID:13032792

  18. [Lipid peroxidation in patients with multiple peptic ulcers in the stomach and duodenum].

    PubMed

    Ioffe, I V

    2004-08-01

    Under the observation there were 62 patients with multiple ulcers of a stomach and duodenum from 23 till 65 years old, randomized under the sex, age and character of pathological process (sizes and localization of peptical ulcers). In all patients the parameters of lipids peroxidation were studied. The increase of intensity the peroxidation of lipids were revealed, at the expense of augmentation in a peripheric blood of the patients of concentration of a final metabolite peroxidation of lipids--malon's dialdehyde and intermediate products--dien's conjugates. The rising of a parameter hemolysis peroxidation of erythrocytes is marked also.

  19. Management of bleeding in vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Chee, Y E; Liu, S E; Irwin, M G

    2016-09-01

    Management of acute coagulopathy and blood loss during major vascular procedures poses a significant haemostatic challenge to anaesthetists. The acute coagulopathy is multifactorial in origin with tissue injury and hypotension as the precipitating factors, followed by dilution, hypothermia, acidemia, hyperfibrinolysis and systemic inflammatory response, all acting as a self-perpetuating spiral of events. The problem is confounded by the high prevalence of antithrombotic agent use in these patients and intraoperative heparin administration. Trials specifically examining bleeding management in vascular surgery are lacking, and much of the literature and guidelines are derived from studies on patients with trauma. In general, it is recommended to adopt permissive hypotension with a restrictive fluid strategy, using a combination of crystalloid and colloid solutions up to one litre during the initial resuscitation, after which blood products should be administered. A restrictive transfusion trigger for red cells remains the mainstay of treatment except for the high-risk patients, where the trigger should be individualized. Transfusion of blood components should be initiated by clinical evidence of coagulopathy such as diffuse microvascular bleeding, and then guided by either laboratory or point-of-care coagulation testing. Prophylactic antifibrinolytic use is recommended for all surgery where excessive bleeding is anticipated. Fibrinogen and prothrombin complex concentrates administration are recommended during massive transfusion, whereas rFVIIa should be reserved until all means have failed. While debates over the ideal resuscitative strategy continue, the approach to vascular haemostasis should be scientific, rational, and structured. As far as possible, therapy should be monitored and goal directed. PMID:27566811

  20. Management of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding with Emphasis on Alternatives to Hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Billow, Megan R; El-Nashar, Sherif A

    2016-09-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a common problem that negatively impacts a woman's health-related quality of life and activity. Initial medical treatment includes hormonal and nonhormonal medications. If bleeding persists and no structural abnormalities are present, a repeat trial of medical therapy, a levonorgestrel intrauterine system, or an endometrial ablation can be used dependent on future fertility wishes. The levonorgestrel intrauterine system and endometrial ablation are effective, less invasive, and safe alternatives to a hysterectomy in women with AUB. A hysterectomy is the definitive treatment of AUB irrespective of the suspected cause when alternative treatments fail. Future studies should focus on detection of predictors for treatment outcomes. PMID:27521876

  1. Devil's claw root: ulcers and gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed

    2013-12-01

    Harpagophytum procumbens, or devil's claw, is an African plant whose root is used to relieve minor joint symptoms. Several cases of gastrointestinal bleeding associated with the use of devil's claw root have been reported. A systematic review of the adverse effects of devil's claw root in about 20 randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials showed mainly gastrointestinal effects: gastralgia and dyspepsia. In practice, devil's claw root exposes patients to the risk of sometimes serious upper gastrointestinal disorders, yet has no established efficacy beyond a placebo effect. It is best avoided. PMID:24600731

  2. What is happening? The evolving role of the blood bank in the management of the bleeding patient: The impact of TEG as an early diagnostic predictor for bleeding.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Aurora; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2014-12-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding and treatment of coagulopathy, the management of the bleeding patient remains as a major challenge. Traditionally, the main task of the blood bank has been to guarantee the supply of high quality blood and blood components/products to the hospital. Decisions regarding the use of blood components have always been the clinicians' responsibility, with little active involvement of the transfusion service. In the last years, many hospitals have implemented the use of "acute transfusion packages" for massively bleeding patients and point-of-care (POC) instruments such as TEG and RoTEM for monitoring coagulation status in this patient group. This, in addition to the implementation of patient blood management programs in the hospitals, has led to an increasing involvement of transfusion medicine specialists in transfusion decision making, especially regarding strategies for monitoring and treatment of the massively bleeding patient. This new trend may contribute to a more optimal management and monitoring of the bleeding patient, as POC testing may be used as an early predictor for blood usage. The blood bank should optimise the use of POC testing to provide accurate information in a cost-effective way.

  3. Utility of preoperative in vitro platelet function tests for predicting bleeding risk in patients undergoing functional endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A-Jin; Kim, Sang-Gyung

    2016-01-01

    Background It is necessary to predict the bleeding risk in patients undergoing functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). To evaluate the adequacy of primary hemostasis, preoperative hemostatic screening tests are used. In the present study, we determined whether there is a positive correlation between prolonged closure time (CT) with collagen/epinephrine (CT-epi), prothrombin time (PT), international normalized ratio (INR), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and bleeding during FESS. Patients and methods We reviewed the medical records of 90 patients without bleeding histories who had undergone FESS from March 2013 to June 2014. More than 200 mL of blood loss was defined as moderate bleeding during surgery. With respect to bleeding during surgery, we determined the sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV) and positive predictive value (PPV) of CT-epi, PT, INR and aPTT. Results Of the 90 patients, 17 (18.9%) patients had preoperative prolonged CT values and three (17.6%) patients had bleeding. In comparison, five (6.8%) of the 73 (81.1%) patients who had undergone FESS with preoperative normal PFA values experienced bleeding (P=0.171). On the other hand, patients with prolonged PT values (2, 2.2%), prolonged INR values (3, 3.3%) or prolonged PTT values (1, 1.1%) had no bleeding episode. Preoperative CT had low sensitivity (44.4%) and PPV (23.5%). Conclusion During preoperative period, the hemostatic screening may not be helpful to detect the bleeding tendency in adult patients undergoing FESS. Routine measurement of CT-epi, PT, INR and aPTT for preoperative screening may not be recommended for FESS patients. PMID:27799837

  4. The efficacy of Hemospray in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding from tumor

    PubMed Central

    Pittayanon, Rapat; Prueksapanich, Piyapan; Rerknimitr, Rungsun

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Currently, conventional endoscopic treatments provide an unsatisfactory hemostatic outcome in upper gastrointestinal bleeding from tumor. Hemospray has been shown to be useful in many active gastrointestinal bleeding conditions. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of Hemospray and conventional endoscopic hemostasis. Patients and methods: Fourteen patients with active upper gastrointestinal bleeding from tumor were recruited. Hemospray was applied at the bleeding site until hemostasis was achieved. Four patients were excluded because they prematurely received definitive therapy to prevent further bleeding within 48 hours. Another 10 patients from historical control were matched based on the type of gastrointestinal tumors. The 14-day rebleeding rates, length of hospital stay (LOS) and mortality rate at 30-day follow up were assessed. Results: Baseline characteristics including age, stage of tumor, and Blatchford score did not differ between the two groups. The 14-day rebleeding rate in the Hemospray group was 3 times lower than the control group but not statistically significant (10 % vs. 30 %; P = 0.60). LOS was no different between the 2 groups (28.2 ± 21.2 vs. 23.8 ± 12.5 days; P = 0.26). The 30-day mortality rate in the Hemospray group was 3 times lower than that of in the conventional therapy group but not significant (10 % vs. 30 %, P = 0.7). Conclusions: Hemospray is a promising therapy for initial hemostasis in upper gastrointestinal bleeding from tumor because it can achieve hemostasis during the first 14 days, thus potentially allowing sufficient time before appropriate definitive intervention is considered. PMID:27652296

  5. The efficacy of Hemospray in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding from tumor

    PubMed Central

    Pittayanon, Rapat; Prueksapanich, Piyapan; Rerknimitr, Rungsun

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Currently, conventional endoscopic treatments provide an unsatisfactory hemostatic outcome in upper gastrointestinal bleeding from tumor. Hemospray has been shown to be useful in many active gastrointestinal bleeding conditions. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of Hemospray and conventional endoscopic hemostasis. Patients and methods: Fourteen patients with active upper gastrointestinal bleeding from tumor were recruited. Hemospray was applied at the bleeding site until hemostasis was achieved. Four patients were excluded because they prematurely received definitive therapy to prevent further bleeding within 48 hours. Another 10 patients from historical control were matched based on the type of gastrointestinal tumors. The 14-day rebleeding rates, length of hospital stay (LOS) and mortality rate at 30-day follow up were assessed. Results: Baseline characteristics including age, stage of tumor, and Blatchford score did not differ between the two groups. The 14-day rebleeding rate in the Hemospray group was 3 times lower than the control group but not statistically significant (10 % vs. 30 %; P = 0.60). LOS was no different between the 2 groups (28.2 ± 21.2 vs. 23.8 ± 12.5 days; P = 0.26). The 30-day mortality rate in the Hemospray group was 3 times lower than that of in the conventional therapy group but not significant (10 % vs. 30 %, P = 0.7). Conclusions: Hemospray is a promising therapy for initial hemostasis in upper gastrointestinal bleeding from tumor because it can achieve hemostasis during the first 14 days, thus potentially allowing sufficient time before appropriate definitive intervention is considered.

  6. Gallbladder visualization during technetium-99m-labeled red cell scintigraphy for gastrointestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Brill, D.R.

    1985-12-01

    Localization of radionuclide activity in the gallbladder was seen on delayed views following injection of 99mTc-labeled red blood cells for gastrointestinal bleeding in five patients. The mechanism for this unusual finding probably relates to labeling of heme, the biochemical precursor of bilirubin. All patients had had prior transfusions. All but one had severe renal impairment, probably an important predisposing factor.

  7. Porcine survival model to simulate acute upper gastrointestinal bleedings.

    PubMed

    Prosst, Ruediger L; Schurr, Marc O; Schostek, Sebastian; Krautwald, Martina; Gottwald, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The existing animal models used for the simulation of acute gastrointestinal bleedings are usually non-survival models. We developed and evaluated a new porcine model (domestic pig, German Landrace) in which the animal remains alive and survives the artificial bleeding without any cardiovascular impairment. This consists of a bleeding catheter which is implanted into the stomach, then subcutaneously tunnelled from the abdomen to the neck where it is exteriorized and fixed with sutures. Using the injection of porcine blood, controllable and reproducible acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding can be simulated while maintaining normal gastrointestinal motility and physiology. Depending on the volume of blood applied through the gastric catheter, the bleeding intensity can be varied from traces of blood to a massive haemorrhage. This porcine model could be valuable, e.g. for testing the efficacy of new bleeding diagnostics in large animals before human use. PMID:26306615

  8. Common management issues in pediatric patients with mild bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Sarah H

    2012-10-01

    Type 1 von Willebrand disease and mild platelet function defects are among the most common disorders seen by pediatric hematologists. The management and prevention of bleeding in these patients can be challenging, as there are limited published data to guide clinical practice, and a complete lack of randomized clinical trials. Desmopressin (DDAVP) and antifibrinolytics are the mainstays of treatment in these patients, yet the optimal dosing and timing of these agents to prevent or resolve bleeding, while minimizing adverse side effects, is sometimes unclear. DDAVP-induced hyponatremia is a particularly under-recognized complication in children with bleeding disorders who undergo surgery. Clinicians need to be aware of local measures that are equally important in treating problems such as epistaxis and surgical bleeding. This review will discuss the published literature and provide practical suggestions regarding four common management issues in the care of children and adolescents with mild bleeding disorders: epistaxis, heavy menstrual bleeding, dental extractions, and tonsillectomy.

  9. Enteral alimentation and gastrointestinal bleeding in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Pingleton, S K; Hadzima, S K

    1983-01-01

    The incidence of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in mechanically ventilated ICU patients receiving enteral alimentation was reviewed and compared to bleeding occurring in ventilated patients receiving prophylactic antacids or cimetidine. Of 250 patients admitted to our ICU during a 1-yr time period, 43 ventilated patients were studied. Patients in each group were comparable with respect to age, respiratory diagnosis, number of GI hemorrhage risk factors, and number of ventilator, ICU, and hospital days. Twenty-one patients had evidence of GI bleeding. Fourteen of 20 patients receiving antacids and 7 of 9 patients receiving cimetidine had evidence of GI bleeding. No bleeding occurred in 14 patients receiving enteral alimentation. Complications of enteral alimentation were few and none required discontinuation of enteral alimentation. Our preliminary data suggest the role of enteral alimentation in critically ill patients may include not only protection against malnutrition but also protection against GI bleeding.

  10. Porcine survival model to simulate acute upper gastrointestinal bleedings.

    PubMed

    Prosst, Ruediger L; Schurr, Marc O; Schostek, Sebastian; Krautwald, Martina; Gottwald, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The existing animal models used for the simulation of acute gastrointestinal bleedings are usually non-survival models. We developed and evaluated a new porcine model (domestic pig, German Landrace) in which the animal remains alive and survives the artificial bleeding without any cardiovascular impairment. This consists of a bleeding catheter which is implanted into the stomach, then subcutaneously tunnelled from the abdomen to the neck where it is exteriorized and fixed with sutures. Using the injection of porcine blood, controllable and reproducible acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding can be simulated while maintaining normal gastrointestinal motility and physiology. Depending on the volume of blood applied through the gastric catheter, the bleeding intensity can be varied from traces of blood to a massive haemorrhage. This porcine model could be valuable, e.g. for testing the efficacy of new bleeding diagnostics in large animals before human use.

  11. [Bleeding complications in acute myeloblastic leukemia (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Sutor, A H

    1979-03-01

    Bleeding is common in acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). At the time of diagnosis, the danger of bleeding cannot be predicted by laboratory means. However, the following factors represent increased risks: Promyeloblastic leukemia, high blast count, low fibrinogen, low plasminogen. From coagulation studies performed at the time of bleeding complications, the pathomechanism leading to bleeding complications usually cannot be detected. The question whether impairment of production, consumption coagulopathy, or primary fibrinolysis causes the bleeding complications can only be answered by controlling frequently clinical and hemostatic criteria, which include the thrombocytic stystem as well as plasmatic coagulation and fibrinolysis. At the present time, the therapy of bleeding complications in AML is symptomatic. It consists of transfusion with thrombocytes or fresh whole blood, respectively. Coagulation factor concentrates should only be given in combination with Heparin to prevent the deterioration of consumption coagulopathy.

  12. Ultrasound assessment of the endometrium for irregular vaginal bleeding.

    PubMed

    McFarlin, Barbara L

    2006-01-01

    Irregular vaginal bleeding is a common symptom of women seeking gynecologic care. Etiologies of irregular vaginal bleeding can be classified into the following categories: pregnancy related (retained products of conception, threatened or missed abortion, or ectopic pregnancy), hormonal (disorders of ovulation, menopause, or hormonal contraceptive use), structural (polyps, myomas, or arteriovenous malformation), neoplasm (endometrial cancer), and infection (endometritis). After the history and physical examination, the initial evaluation of irregular vaginal bleeding has traditionally involved an endometrial biopsy. Transvaginal ultrasound has revolutionized the evaluation of the gynecologic ultrasound examination by providing a minimally invasive means to determine the etiology for the bleeding. Transvaginal ultrasound assessment of the endometrial cavity allows treatment to be tailored to the specific cause of irregular vaginal bleeding, thus saving women time, money, and exposure to unnecessary interventions. The purpose of this article is to give the clinician critical information regarding the capabilities of ultrasound to evaluate women with irregular vaginal bleeding.

  13. Bleeding and other presentations in Thai patients with dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2004-10-01

    Dengue infection is a major public health problem, affecting the general population in Southeast Asia. Hematologic aberrations in dengue infection include atypical lymphocytosis, coagulopathy, and predominant thrombocytopenia. Bleeding and other presentations in 30 Thai patients with dengue infection during an endemic season (2003) are presented. A review of the clinical presentation of these patients was performed. All had fever as a chief complaint. The three most common complaints were fever (100%), vomiting (90%), and cough (90%), respectively. Concerning bleeding, only eight cases (26.6%) had signs of bleeding. Those manifestations included petechiae (seven cases, 23.3%) and melena (one case, 3.3%). Skin bleeding (petechiae) due to thrombocytopenia is the most common bleeding manifestation in dengue infection. However, physicians should not overlook bleeding from other less common sites such as the gastrointestinal tract and genitourinary tract.

  14. [EMERGENCY TREATMENT OF BLEEDING IN PATIENTS TAKING WARFARIN].

    PubMed

    Prasolov, N V; Shulutko, E M; Bulanov, A Yu; Yatskov, K V; Shcherbakov, O V

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulant therapy with vitamin K antagonists (AVK) is an effective treatment and prevention of thrombosis. One of the major disadvantages of the AVK is a risk for serious bleeding. Prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC), fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and vitamin K1 are available for control of these situations. The experience of special team ofthe Scientific Center for Hematology was the basis for presented retrospective study. Three regimens of warfarin-related bleeding were compared: PCC+ VK for several bleeding, FFP+ VK for different clinical situations and VKfor light bleeding. PCC showed himself as effective and safe hemostatic agent. Transfusions of FFP were sometimes not effective, sometimes led to TACO. Supplementation of vitamin K1 for patients of I and II groups provided more stable control of hemostasis. In III group VK vas effective to stop bleeding. Two impotent sings for conclusion: necessary of laboratory monitoring, TEG first of all; individual balance of hemostasis base of bleeding or thrombotic risks.

  15. Hemophilic bleeding evaluated by blood pool scanning.

    PubMed

    Green, D; Spies, S M; Rana, N A; Milgram, J W; Mintzer, R

    1981-06-30

    The technique of blood pool scanning was used to examine 15 hemophilic subjects. Employing an in vivo method for erythrocyte labeling with Technetium-99 m, a dynamic perfusion sequence is obtained using a scintillation camera positioned over the area to be examined. This demonstrates the vascularity of the tissue. Subsequently, equilibrium blood pool images of the area are obtained and analyzed with a densitometer to assess relative regional blood volume. In patients who were not bleeding but had chronic arthropathy, vascularity was not increased, and the blood volume of comparable joints was similar. By contrast, marked increases in vascularity and image density were observed in studies of acutely bleeding joints. Chronic hemarthroses were associated with persistent, but less marked increases in joint perfusion. Transient increases in joint vascularity were demonstrated after insertion of knee prostheses. In a patient with a thigh hematoma, the dimensions of the hemorrhage were clearly delineated. Since only a tracer dose of nuclide is infused intravenously, there are no allergic reactions or other side effects of the procedure. Blood pool scanning is a safe, non-invasive technique that augments clinical and radiographic evaluations, and provides a new dimension in the assessment of the hemophilic patient. PMID:6269248

  16. [Albumin and artificial colloids for massive bleeding].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Rapid and massive bleeding has to be counteracted by efficient volume restoration against rapid loss of intravascular volume. There are two phases of volume management for massive bleeding, uncontrolled phase and controlled phase. During initial uncontrolled phase, rapid infusion of crystalloid with RCC (red cell concentrate) is the first choice of volume management to prevent shock and profound decline of hemoglobin level. After shifting to the next controlled phase, artificial colloids and RCC become the next choice for efficient volume restoration. Although albumin has not been proven to improve prognosis in clinical studies, anti-inflammatory effect could be expected. Albumin infusion may be followed in this phase, and also albumin concentrate may be beneficial to reduce subsequent tissue edema due to massive infusion of crystalloid and artificial colloid. A new generation of hydroxyethyl starch is a promising blood substitute, designed with minimum side effect. Although renal damage especially in septic patient and coagulation disorder are theoretically suspected, beneficial effect as volume expansion overwhelms these stochastic side effects. Since the side effect depends on the dose and how much it remains in the body, a purposeful use during volume expansion phase should be recommended.

  17. Low-dose tertiary prophylactic therapy reduces total number of bleeds and improves the ability to perform activities of daily living in adults with severe haemophilia A: a single-centre experience from Beijing.

    PubMed

    Hua, Baolai; Lian, Xiaoyun; Li, Kuixing; Lee, Adrienne; Poon, Man-Chiu; Zhao, Yongqiang

    2016-03-01

    Full-dose prophylaxis treatment for persons with haemophilia is not affordable in China due to its economic constraints, particularly in adults requiring higher clotting factor (CFC) doses. Low-dose tertiary prophylaxis for adults with severe haemophilia A (SHA) in Beijing became feasible and implemented when government insurance covering 85% CFC cost in Beijing began in December 2009. The aim of this study was to evaluate the benefits of low-dose tertiary prophylaxis in SHA adults. Analysis of data on 33 patients on low-dose tertiary prophylaxis (5-10 IU/kg, two to three times per week) at the Haemophilia Treatment Center, Peking Union Medical College Hospital between December 2009 and December 2013. The 33 patients (age 18-60 years, mean 33.4) were on prophylaxis for 20.8 ± 9.9 months (compared with prior on-demand therapy for 20.0 ± 11.7 months). Prophylaxis resulted in significant decrease in annual bleeding rate (ABR, 11.8 ± 7.6 vs. 41.5 ± 20.7, 71.1% reduction, P < 0.0001), and significant improvement in Functional Independence Score in Haemophilia (FISH) measurement reflecting improvement in self-care and mobility. Radiologic (Pettersson) joint score was neither improved nor deteriorated. Ten of the 33 patients originally wheel chair and bed-bound began to walk and function independently in their daily lives. Low-dose tertiary prophylaxis for adults with SHA in China is feasible and beneficial. Although the average ABR remained high, a significant improvement in self-care and mobility measured by FISH was observed. These promising clinical experiences form the basis for further formal studies with more defined therapeutic protocol and outcome measures for affordable prophylaxis regimens in haemophilia adults in China.

  18. Endovascular Management of Acute Enteric Bleeding from Pancreas Transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Semiz-Oysu, Aslihan; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2007-04-15

    Arterioenteric fistula is a rare but serious complication of enteric drained pancreas transplant, which may lead to massive gastrointestinal bleeding. We present 3 patients with failed enteric drained pancreas transplants and massive gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to arterioenteric fistula. One patient was treated by embolization and the 2 others by stent graft placement. Bleeding was successfully controlled in all cases, at follow up of 5 days, 8 months, and 12 months, respectively. One patient died 24 days after embolization, of unknown causes.

  19. The prevalence of self-reported peptic ulcer in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Sonnenberg, A; Everhart, J E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to draw a current picture of the sociodemographic characteristics of peptic ulcer in the United States. METHODS. During the National Health Interview Survey of 1989, a special questionnaire on digestive diseases was administered to 41,457 randomly selected individuals. Data were retrieved from public use tapes provided by the National Center for Health Statistics. Odds ratios were calculated by logistic regression after adjustment for sample weights in the survey. RESULTS. Of adult US residents, 10% reported having physician-diagnosed ulcer disease, and one third of these individuals reported having an ulcer in the past year. Old age, short education, low family income, being a veteran, and smoking acted as significant and independent risk factors. Gastric and duodenal ulcer occurred in both sexes equally often. Duodenal ulcer was more common in Whites than non-Whites, while gastric ulcer was more common in non-Whites. CONCLUSIONS. The age-related rise and socioeconomic gradients of peptic ulcer represent the historic scars of previous infection rates with Helicobacter pylori. The racial variations reflect different ages at the time of first infection; younger and older age at the acquisition of H. pylori appear to be associated with gastric and duodenal ulcer, respectively. PMID:8633736

  20. Peptic ulcer at the end of the 20th century: biological and psychological risk factors.

    PubMed

    Levenstein, S

    1999-11-01

    The prevailing concept of peptic ulcer etiology has swung over entirely in just a few years from the psychological to the infectious, yet the rich literature documenting an association between psychosocial factors and ulcer is not invalidated by the discovery of Helicobacter pylori. Physical and psychological stressors interact to induce ulcers in animal models, concrete life difficulties and subjective distress predict the development of ulcers in prospective cohorts, shared catastrophes such as war and earthquakes lead to surges in hospitalizations for complicated ulcers, and stress or anxiety can worsen ulcer course. Many known ulcer risk factors, including smoking, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, heavy drinking, loss of sleep and skipping breakfast, can increase under stress; the association of low socioeconomic status with ulcer is also accounted for in part by psychosocial factors. Among possible physiological mechanisms, stress may induce gastric hypersecretion, reduce acid buffering in the stomach and the duodenum, impair gastroduodenal blood flow, and affect healing or inflammation through psychoneuroimmunological mechanisms. Psychosocial factors seem to be particularly prominent among idiopathic or complicated ulcers, but they are probably operative in run of the mill H pylori disease as well, either through additive effects or by facilitating the spread of the organism across the pylorus, while gastrointestinal damage by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can also be potentiated by stress. Although the clinical importance of peptic ulcer is fading along with the millennium, due to secular trends and new therapies, it remains worthy of study as a splendid example of the biopsychosocial model.

  1. Amylase clearance in differentiating acute pancreatitis from peptic ulcer with hyperamylasemia.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, A L; Lesser, P B

    1975-03-01

    Thirty-four patients with abdominal pain, tenderness, and hyperamylasemia suggesting acute pancreatitis were studied prospectively to elucidate the relationship between peptic ulcer disease and pancreatitis. Confirming evidence of pancreatitis and/or ulcer was obtained either at laparotomy of by upper gastrointestinal roentgenograms. The presence or absence of pancreatitis was substantiated by measurement of the amylase/creatinine clearance ratio, which is significantly higher (p less than 0.001) in patients with acute pancreatitis (9.3 plus or minus 0.9), than in patients without pancreatitis (3.1 plus or minus 0.2). Nine of the 34 patients were found to have gastric or duodenal ulcers. However, seven of the nine, despite an elevated serum amylase, had no sign of pancreatitis at surgery, on radiological examination, or by elevation of the amylase/creatinine clearance ratio (3.1 plus or minus 0.4). It is suggested that hyperamylasemia associated with peptic ulcer disease is most often not indicative of acute pancreatitis and that treatment is most appropriately directed at the ulcer.

  2. The Safety of Thoracentesis in Patients with Uncorrected Bleeding Risk

    PubMed Central

    Argento, A. Christine; Murphy, Terrence E.; Araujo, Katy L. B.; Pisani, Margaret A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Thoracentesis is commonly performed to evaluate pleural effusions. Many medications (warfarin, heparin, clopidogrel) or physiological factors (elevated International Normalized Ratio [INR], thrombocytopenia, uremia) increase the risk for bleeding. Frequently these medications are withheld or transfusions are performed to normalize physiological parameters before a procedure. The safety of performing thoracentesis without correction of these bleeding risks has not been prospectively evaluated. Methods: This prospective observational cohort study enrolled 312 patients who underwent thoracentesis. All patients were evaluated for the presence of risk factors for bleeding. Hematocrit levels were obtained pre- and postprocedure, and the occurrence of postprocedural hemothorax was evaluated. Measurements and Main Results: Thoracenteses were performed in 312 patients, 42% of whom had a risk for bleeding. Elevated INR, secondary to liver disease or warfarin, and renal disease were the two most common etiologies for bleeding risk, although many patients had multiple potential bleeding risks. There was no significant difference in pre- and postprocedural hematocrit levels in patients with a bleeding risk when compared with patients with no bleeding risk. No patient developed a hemothorax as a result of the thoracentesis. Conclusions: This single-center, observational study suggests that thoracentesis may be safely performed without prior correction of coagulopathy, thrombocytopenia, or medication-induced bleeding risk. This may reduce the morbidity associated with transfusions or withholding of medications. PMID:23952852

  3. Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Risk of Abnormal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Sharma, Eesha

    2016-09-01

    Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) increase the risk of abnormal bleeding by lowering platelet serotonin and hence the efficiency of platelet-driven hemostasis; by increasing gastric acidity and possibly gastric ulceration; and by other mechanisms. The upper gastrointestinal tract is the commonest site of SRI-related abnormal bleeding; bleeding at this location may be increased by concurrent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy and by treatment with antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs. Bleeding at this location may be reduced by concurrent administration of acid-suppressing drugs. PMID:27514297

  4. Abnormal Bleeding During Menopause Hormone Therapy: Insights for Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    de Medeiros, Sebastião Freitas; Yamamoto, Márcia Marly Winck; Barbosa, Jacklyne Silva

    2013-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to review the involved mechanisms and propose actions for controlling/treating abnormal uterine bleeding during climacteric hormone therapy. Methods A systemic search of the databases SciELO, MEDLINE, and Pubmed was performed for identifying relevant publications on normal endometrial bleeding, abnormal uterine bleeding, and hormone therapy bleeding. Results Before starting hormone therapy, it is essential to exclude any abnormal organic condition, identify women at higher risk for bleeding, and adapt the regimen to suit eachwoman’s characteristics. Abnormal bleeding with progesterone/progestogen only, combined sequential, or combined continuous regimens may be corrected by changing the progestogen, adjusting the progestogen or estrogen/progestogen doses, or even switching the initial regimen to other formulation. Conclusion To diminish the occurrence of abnormal bleeding during hormone therapy (HT), it is important to tailor the regimen to the needs of individual women and identify those with higher risk of bleeding. The use of new agents as adjuvant therapies for decreasing abnormal bleeding in women on HT awaits future studies. PMID:24665210

  5. Clinical Evaluation of Bleeding and Bruising in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Neutze, Dana; Roque, Jodi

    2016-02-15

    Bleeding and bruising are common symptoms in the primary care setting. The patient history can help determine whether the bruising or bleeding is abnormal. The International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis has developed a bleeding assessment tool that can be used to indicate possible pathology. A family history of bleeding problems may suggest a hereditary coagulation defect. Such a history is especially important in children who may not have experienced a major bleeding episode. Medication review can identify pharmacologic causes of the bleeding or bruising. Physical examination findings such as mucocutaneous bleeding suggest that the underlying condition is caused by platelet dysfunction, whereas hemarthroses or hematomas are more common in coagulopathy. If the history and physical examination findings suggest a bleeding diathesis, initial laboratory testing includes a complete blood count, peripheral blood smear, prothrombin time (PT), and partial thromboplastin time (PTT). A normal PT and PTT indicate a platelet disorder, the most common of which is von Willebrand disease. A normal PT and prolonged PTT signal a deficit in the intrinsic pathway, and a mixing study should be performed. A vitamin K challenge is indicated in patients with an abnormal PT and normal PTT. A workup for liver failure is warranted in patients with prolonged PT and PTT. If initial testing does not reveal an etiology in a patient with a high suspicion for a bleeding disorder, the patient should be referred to a hematologist for additional evaluation. PMID:26926815

  6. Low hemoglobin levels are associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Hasegawa, Rumiko; Shirai, Yoshinori; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding can be fatal. Blood test variables were reviewed in search of threshold values to detect the presence of occult upper GI bleeding. The records of 1,023 patients who underwent endoscopy at the National Hospital Organization Shimoshizu Hospital from October 2014, to September 2015, were retrospectively reviewed. Of those, 95 had upper GI bleeding. One-way analysis of variance was applied to blood test variables comparing patients with and without upper GI bleeding. Logistic regression analysis was applied to detect the association of blood test parameters with upper GI bleeding, and receiver-operator characteristics were applied to establish threshold values. White blood cell count (WBC), platelet (Plt) count, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels were higher, and hemoglobin (Hb) and albumin (Alb) levels were lower in patients with upper GI bleeding. Logistic regression analysis showed that low Hb was significantly associated with upper GI bleeding and a Hb value of 10.8 g/dl was established as the threshold for the diagnosis. In patients with upper GI bleeding, WBC, Plt count, and BUN levels were higher and Hb and Alb levels were reduced. Hb at 10.8 g/dl was established as a threshold value to detect upper GI bleeding. PMID:27588176

  7. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in cirrhosis: clinical and endoscopic correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Terés, J; Bordas, J M; Bru, C; Diaz, F; Bruguera, M; Rodes, J

    1976-01-01

    The clinical data of 180 episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in 168 patients with cirrhosis of the liver are examined. The source of bleeding had been determined by early endoscopy in all cases. In men under the age of 50 years, and without symptoms of liver failure, bleeding was due to ruptured gastro-oesophageal varices in 84% of cases. Severe liver failure was associated with acute lesions of gastric mucosa in many cases. No presumptive diagnosis of the source of haemorrhage could be based on the examination of other clinical data (presence of ascites, mode of presentation and pattern of bleeding, history of ulcer disease, alcoholism, and previous medication. PMID:1083824

  8. Modeling of Fixed-Exit Porous Bleed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.; Saunders, John D.

    2008-01-01

    A model has been developed to simulate a fixed-exit porous bleed system for supersonic inlets. The fixed-exit model allows the amount of bleed flow to vary according to local flow conditions and fixed-exit characteristics of the bleed system. This variation is important for the control of shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions within the inlet. The model computes the bleed plenum static pressure rather than requiring its specification. The model was implemented in the Wind-US computational fluid dynamics code. The model was then verified and validated against experimental data for bleed on a flat plate with and without an impinging oblique shock and for bleed in a Mach 3.0 axisymmetric, mixed-compression inlet. The model was able to accurately correlate the plenum pressures with bleed rates and simulate the effect of the bleed on the downstream boundary layer. Further, the model provided a realistic simulation of the initiation of inlet unstart. The results provide the most in-depth examination to date of bleed models for use in the simulation of supersonic inlets. The results also highlight the limitations of the models and aspects that require further research.

  9. The international, prospective Glanzmann Thrombasthenia Registry: treatment modalities and outcomes of non-surgical bleeding episodes in patients with Glanzmann thrombasthenia

    PubMed Central

    Di Minno, Giovanni; Zotz, Rainer B; d’Oiron, Roseline; Bindslev, Niels; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Poon, Man-Chiu

    2015-01-01

    Standard treatment for Glanzmann thrombasthenia is platelet transfusion. Recombinant activated factor VII has been shown to be successful in patients with Glanzmann thrombasthenia with platelet antibodies or who are refractory to platelet transfusions. The Glanzmann Thrombasthenia Registry prospectively collected worldwide information on the effectiveness and safety of platelet transfusion, recombinant activated factor VII and/or antifibrinolytics for the treatment of bleeds in patients with Glanzmann thrombasthenia. Data relating to 829 non-surgical bleeding episodes were entered into the Glanzmann Thrombasthenia Registry (severe/moderate: 216/613; spontaneous/post-traumatic: 630/199). Recombinant activated factor VII alone was used in 124/829 bleeds, recombinant activated factor VII+antifibrinolytics in 107/829, platelets±antifibrinolytics in 312/829, antifibrinolytics alone in 219/829, and recombinant activated factor VII+platelets±antifibrinolytics in 67/829. The proportion of successful treatments to stop bleeding was 91.0% in cases treated with recombinant activated factor VII only, 82.7% for recombinant activated factor VII+antifibrinolytics, 72.7% for treatment with recombinant activated factor VII+platelets±antifibrinolytics, 78.8% for platelets±antifibrinolytics and 84.7% for antifibrinolytics alone. Treatment failure was documented in 18 bleeding events (2% of the total treatments), the majority of which were in patients receiving treatment with antifibrinolytics; bleeding re-started in 6% of bleeds after initial effective treatment. Thirty-five adverse events were reported, none of which was a thromboembolic event. Among treatments that included recombinant activated factor VII, only one patient reported three possibly drug-related non-serious adverse events (nausea, dyspnea and headache). To conclude, non-surgical bleeds were common and often severe in Glanzmann thrombasthenia; both platelets and recombinant activated factor VII appeared to be

  10. An update on pediatric bleeding disorders: bleeding scores, benign joint hypermobility, and platelet function testing in the evaluation of the child with bleeding symptoms.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Sarah H

    2012-05-01

    Evaluating a child with symptoms of easy bruising and/or bleeding remains a challenge in pediatric hematology, and there is no "one size fits all" approach. This review focuses on recent research in three elements of the evaluation of a child with a suspected bleeding disorder. We will first discuss the development of the standardized Pediatric Bleeding Questionnaire, and its applications in research and clinical settings. We will then discuss the relationship between benign hypermobility syndromes and hemostasis, and the importance of including a Beighton Score in the physical examination of any child presenting with unusual bruising or bleeding. While prolonged bleeding times and abnormal platelet aggregation are common findings in children with benign hypermobility, normal coagulation studies do not exclude the presence of a connective tissue disorder in a child presenting with easy bleeding and joint hypermobility on examination. Finally, we will discuss the current state of knowledge regarding the laboratory evaluation of platelet function in children. Platelet function disorders are among the most common inherited bleeding disorders. However, testing for such disorders is time-consuming and requires a step-wise approach. We will review the indications for and limitations of the most commonly utilized platelet function laboratory studies.

  11. Detection of bleeding disorders in Lebanon: outcomes of a pilot programme.

    PubMed

    Djambas Khayat, C; Samaha, H; Noun, P; Bakhos Asmar, J D; Taher, A; Adib, S; Inati, A; Sakr, S

    2014-03-01

    To promote management and awareness of bleeding disorders in Lebanon, a pilot programme was launched in 2009 by the Lebanese Hemophilia Association assisted by World Federation of Hemophilia. The aim of this study was to diagnose patients with bleeding disorders and to assess the potential challenges in implementing a screening programme. The pilot project was launched in 26 social health centres in the Bekaa valley. The study tools included the evaluation of the Tossetto Bleeding Score and the Pictorial Bleeding Assessment Chart (PBAC) for menstruation. Persons with a bleeding score higher than 2 and PBAC higher than 185 were eligible for further blood tests including the prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, complete blood count, bleeding time and von Willebrand ristocetin cofactor activity. 643 patients were enrolled, of whom 60.6% were women. Overall, 91 persons had an abnormal score. 50 eligible patients were tested: 32 had normal tests, nine new patients with severe Von Willebrand were discovered, 4 had VW:RiCo of 40, 3 prolonged APTT and 2 thrombocytopaenia. There was a clear correlation between the severity of the score and the willingness to perform the tests (P = 0.02). Women were reluctant to participate fully when investigators were men. The probability of adherence to the screening protocol is significantly increased when directed by women health care professional. For patients with milder forms, global screening programmes were neither feasible nor acceptable but those more severely affected have to be identified. Providers are crucial in preselecting patients with blood problems who are not coping well. PMID:24283945

  12. Clinical profile and outcome of surgical treatment of perforated peptic ulcers in Northwestern Tanzania: A tertiary hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Perforated peptic ulcer is a serious complication of peptic ulcers with potential risk of grave complications. There is paucity of published reports on perforated peptic ulcer disease in our local environment. This study was conducted to evaluate the clinical presentation, management and outcome of patients with peptic ulcer perforation in our setting and to identify predictors of outcome of these patients. Methods This was a combined retrospective and prospective study of patients who were operated for perforated peptic ulcers at Bugando Medical Centre between April 2006 and March 2011. Data were collected using a pre-tested and coded questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS computer software version 15.0. Ethical approval to conduct the study was obtained from relevant authority before the commencement of the study. Results A total of 84 patients were studied. Males outnumbered females by a ratio of 1.3: 1. Their median age was 28 years and the modal age group was 21-30 years. The median duration of illness was 5.8 days. The majority of patients (69.0%) had no previous history of treatment for peptic ulcer disease. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, alcohol and smoking was reported in 10.7%, 85.7% and 64.3% respectively. Eight (9.5%) patients were HIV positive with a median CD4 count of 220 cells/μl. Most perforations were located on the duodenum {90.4%) with the duodenal to gastric ulcers ratio of 12.7: 1. Graham's omental patch (Graham's omentopexy) of the perforations was performed in 83.3% of cases. Complication and mortality rates were 29.8% and 10.7% respectively. The factors significantly related to complications were premorbid illness, HIV status, CD 4 count < 200 cells/μl, treatment delay and acute perforation (P < 0.001). Mortality rate was high in patients who had age ≥ 40 years, delayed presentation (>24 hrs), shock at admission (systolic BP < 90 mmHg), HIV positivity, low CD4 count (<200 cells/μl), gastric ulcers

  13. Medical management of heavy menstrual bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Maybin, Jacqueline A; Critchley, Hilary OD

    2016-01-01

    Women with benign heavy menstrual bleeding have the choice of a number of medical treatment options to reduce their blood loss and improve quality of life. The role of the clinician is to provide information to facilitate women in making an appropriate choice. Unfortunately, many options can be associated with hormonal side effects, prevention of fertility and lack of efficacy, leading to discontinuation and progression to surgical interventions. Herein, we discuss the various options currently available to women, including antifibrinolytics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory preparations, oral contraceptive pills and oral, injectable and intrauterine progestogens. In addition, we describe the more novel option of selective progesterone receptor modulators and their current benefits and limitations. PMID:26695687

  14. Parsley extract inhibits in vitro and ex vivo platelet aggregation and prolongs bleeding time in rats.

    PubMed

    Gadi, Dounia; Bnouham, Mohamed; Aziz, Mohammed; Ziyyat, Abderrahim; Legssyer, Abdelkhaleq; Legrand, Chantal; Lafeve, Françoise Fauvel; Mekhfi, Hassane

    2009-08-17

    Many cardiovascular diseases are associated with an increase in blood platelet activity. In Morocco, parsley (Petroselinum crispum, Apiaceae) is one of the medicinal herbs used to treat cardiovascular diseases such as arterial hypertension. In this study, crude aqueous extract (CAE) of parsley was evaluated for its anti-platelet activity in experimental animals on platelet aggregation in vitro and ex vivo; and on bleeding time in vivo. The in vitro aggregation was monitored after pre-incubation of platelets with CAE. The bleeding time and ex vivo aggregation were performed after oral treatment. CAE inhibited dose dependently platelet aggregation in vitro induced by thrombin, ADP, collagen and epinephrine. The oral administration of CAE (3g/kg) inhibited significantly (p<0.001) platelet aggregation ex vivo and prolonged bleeding time (p<0.001) without changes in the platelet amount. The prolongation of bleeding time by CAE may be attributed to the observed inhibition of platelet aggregation. These effects could be related in part to the polyphenolic compounds present in the extract. These results support the hypothesis that the dietary intake of parsley may be benefit in the normalization of platelet hyperactivation, in the nutritional prevention of cardiovascular diseases and are potentially interesting in the development of new prevention strategies.

  15. Identification of a Serratia marcescens virulence factor that promotes hemolymph bleeding in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kenichi; Adachi, Tatsuo; Hara, Takashi; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2014-03-01

    Injection of culture supernatant of Serratia marcescens, a Gram-negative bacterium pathogenic to a wide range of host animals including insects and mammals, into the hemolymph of silkworm (Bombyx mori) larvae led to continuous flow of the hemolymph (blood of insects) from the injection site. The amount of hemolymph lost within 60 min reached 15-20% of the total larval weight. Using a bioassay with live silkworms, we purified Serralysin, a metalloprotease that requires divalent cations for its activity, as the factor responsible for the promotion of hemolymph bleeding from the culture supernatant of S. marcescens. Recombinant protein also induced hemolymph bleeding in silkworms. Moreover, the culture supernatant of an S. marcescens disruption mutant of the ser gene showed attenuated ability to promote hemolymph bleeding. In addition, this bleeding-promoting activity of the S. marcescens culture supernatant was attenuated by disruption of the wecA gene, which is involved in the biosynthesis of the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen. These findings suggest that Serralysin metalloprotease contributes to the pathogenesis of S. marcescens by inhibiting wound healing, which leads to a massive loss of hemolymph from silkworm larvae.

  16. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section 864.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time...

  17. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section 864.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time...

  18. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section 864.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time...

  19. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section 864.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time...

  20. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section 864.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time...

  1. 14 CFR 33.66 - Bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.66 Bleed air system. The engine must supply bleed air without adverse effect on the engine, excluding reduced thrust or...

  2. Impact of inherited bleeding disorders on pregnancy and postpartum hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Shirin; Moghaddam-Banaem, Lida; Ekhtesari, Fatemeh; Ala, Fereydoun A

    2012-10-01

    Inherited bleeding disorders are caused by various genetic defects in the proteins involved in haemostasis. Female patients or carriers are faced with the risk of haemorrhage throughout life. During pregnancy and postpartum, this complication affects the health of either the mother or the baby, or both. This retrospective cohort study was designed to assess the occurrence of obstetric bleeding in the three trimesters of pregnancy, along with primary and secondary postpartum haemorrhage among 100 women with inherited bleeding disorders. A questionnaire was designed in order to collect historical data. The patients were evaluated in three groups: haemophilia carriers, von Willebrand disease (VWD) and rare bleeding disorders. In comparison with normal women, significantly severe bleeding was observed among patients in all of the five stages. VWD patients showed a higher frequency of bleeding in first trimester but the rate of miscarriage was lower. Haemophilia carriers were threatened with bleeding complications during the prenatal period, but they also had the highest frequency of postpartum haemorrhage. Based on our results, vaginal bleeding is a serious threat in all three patient groups, especially during the first trimester of pregnancy and in the postpartum period.

  3. 14 CFR 33.66 - Bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bleed air system. 33.66 Section 33.66 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.66 Bleed air system....

  4. 14 CFR 33.66 - Bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bleed air system. 33.66 Section 33.66 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.66 Bleed air system....

  5. 14 CFR 33.66 - Bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bleed air system. 33.66 Section 33.66 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.66 Bleed air system....

  6. 14 CFR 33.66 - Bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bleed air system. 33.66 Section 33.66 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.66 Bleed air system....

  7. Management of bleeding complications in patients with cancer on DOACs.

    PubMed

    Schulman, Sam; Shrum, Jeffrey; Majeed, Ammar

    2016-04-01

    There has been a concern that major bleeding events (MBE) on direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) will be more difficult to manage than on vitamin K antagonists. Patients with cancer and DOAC-associated bleeding may be even more of a challenge to manage. We therefore reviewed the literature on bleeding in patients with cancer on DOACs. In addition, we performed an analysis of individual patient data from 5 phase III trials on treatment with dabigatran with focus on those with cancer. In 6 randomized trials the risk of MBE in patients with cancer was similar on treatment with DOACs compared to vitamin K antagonists. Bleeding was in the majority of patients managed with supportive therapy alone. In the individual patient data analysis there were no significant differences in use of hemostatic products, transfusion of red cells, effectiveness of management, bleeding-related mortality or 30-day all-cause mortality between patients with cancer treated with dabigatran or with warfarin. Local hemostatic therapy, including resection of the cancer site was more common in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding with cancer than among those without cancer. We conclude that management of bleeding in patients with cancer and on a DOAC does not pose a greater challenge than management of bleeding in patients without cancer. PMID:27067968

  8. Impact of inherited bleeding disorders on pregnancy and postpartum hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Shirin; Moghaddam-Banaem, Lida; Ekhtesari, Fatemeh; Ala, Fereydoun A

    2012-10-01

    Inherited bleeding disorders are caused by various genetic defects in the proteins involved in haemostasis. Female patients or carriers are faced with the risk of haemorrhage throughout life. During pregnancy and postpartum, this complication affects the health of either the mother or the baby, or both. This retrospective cohort study was designed to assess the occurrence of obstetric bleeding in the three trimesters of pregnancy, along with primary and secondary postpartum haemorrhage among 100 women with inherited bleeding disorders. A questionnaire was designed in order to collect historical data. The patients were evaluated in three groups: haemophilia carriers, von Willebrand disease (VWD) and rare bleeding disorders. In comparison with normal women, significantly severe bleeding was observed among patients in all of the five stages. VWD patients showed a higher frequency of bleeding in first trimester but the rate of miscarriage was lower. Haemophilia carriers were threatened with bleeding complications during the prenatal period, but they also had the highest frequency of postpartum haemorrhage. Based on our results, vaginal bleeding is a serious threat in all three patient groups, especially during the first trimester of pregnancy and in the postpartum period. PMID:22821002

  9. Efficacy of Zinc Sulfate in Peptic Ulcer Disease: A Randomized Double-Blind Clinical Trial Study

    PubMed Central

    Parhizkar, Baran; Sheikhesmaeili, Farshad; Roshani, Mohammad; Nayebi, Morteza; Gharibi, Fardin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer is a common disease that affects millions of people worldwide. Considering its global prevalence finding new approach for treating is important. Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of zinc sulfate on gastric and duodenal ulcer treatment. Materials and Methods This double-blind clinical trial study was done on 90 patients who were admitted to the gastrointestinal endoscopy clinic of Tohid hospital in Sanandaj, Iran. All patients were diagnosed with gastric and duodenal ulcers. They were randomly divided into two-intervention and control groups, using block randomization with block sizes of 4. Patients and researcher were unaware of the grouping. To assess the level of zinc, blood samples were taken. In case of positive Rapid Urease Test (RUT), triple therapy regimen including amoxicillin, clarithromycin and omeprazole was administered for two weeks. For intervention group in addition to "triple therapy", an oral dose of Zinc Sulfate 220mg capsules were administered daily, while the control group received placebo capsules. Results A total of 54.5% and 57% of the patients in the intervention and control groups had gastric ulcer respectively. The Rapid Urease Test (RUT) result of 72.7% of intervention group and 83.3% of control group was positive (p = 0.24). Serum zinc level of 20.9% of intervention group and 35.7% of control group was lower than the normal level (p = 0.13). The mean of serum zinc level of intervention group and control group were 81.9 and 78.9 mg dL respectively (p = 0.4). After intervention, peptic ulcer in 81.8% of the intervention group and 83.3% of the control groups were improved (p= 0.85). Response to treatment were higher in patients with normal zinc levels compared to patients with abnormal levels (77.5% vs. 22.5%, p=0.019). Conclusion A daily dose of 220mg zinc sulfate was not significantly effective on peptic ulcer. However, patients with normal zinc levels had better ulcer treatment. PMID

  10. Scoring systems for outcome prediction in patients with perforated peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) often present with acute, severe illness that carries a high risk for morbidity and mortality. Mortality ranges from 3-40% and several prognostic scoring systems have been suggested. The aim of this study was to review the available scoring systems for PPU patients, and to assert if there is evidence to prefer one to the other. Material and methods We searched PubMed for the mesh terms “perforated peptic ulcer”, “scoring systems”, “risk factors”, ”outcome prediction”, “mortality”, ”morbidity” and the combinations of these terms. In addition to relevant scores introduced in the past (e.g. Boey score), we included recent studies published between January 2000 and December 2012) that reported on scoring systems for prediction of morbidity and mortality in PPU patients. Results A total of ten different scoring systems used to predict outcome in PPU patients were identified; the Boey score, the Hacettepe score, the Jabalpur score the peptic ulcer perforation (PULP) score, the ASA score, the Charlson comorbidity index, the sepsis score, the Mannheim Peritonitis Index (MPI), the Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II), the simplified acute physiology score II (SAPS II), the Mortality probability models II (MPM II), the Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enumeration of Mortality and Morbidity physical sub-score (POSSUM-phys score). Only four of the scores were specifically constructed for PPU patients. In five studies the accuracy of outcome prediction of different scoring systems was evaluated by receiver operating characteristics curve (ROC) analysis, and the corresponding area under the curve (AUC) among studies compared. Considerable variation in performance both between different scores and between different studies was found, with the lowest and highest AUC reported between 0.63 and 0.98, respectively. Conclusion While the Boey score and the ASA score

  11. Rare and unusual bleeding manifestations in congenital bleeding disorders: an annotated review.

    PubMed

    Girolami, Antonio; Vettore, Silvia; Ruzzon, Elisabetta; Marinis, Giulia Berti de; Fabris, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Epistaxis, superficial and deep hematomas, hemarthrosis, gastrointestinal bleeding, hematuria represent the most frequent hemorrhagic events in congenital coagulation disorders. Occasionally, bleeding manifestations occur in unusual sites or are peculiar. A clotting defect may alter the clinical aspect of skin conditions or infections (hemorrhagic scabies or varicella). Hemobilia may occur as a complication of transjugular liver biopsy in hemophilia or Bernard-Soulier syndrome. Hemarthrosis of small joints of feet and hands occur in patients with hemophilia treated with protease inhibitors. Intramedullary hematomas of long bones have been described in α2-plasmin inhibitor or fibrinogen deficiencies. Spleen fracture with consequent hemoperitoneum has been reported in patients with fibrinogen deficiency. Rectus muscle sheath hematoma may occur in patients with factor VII (FVII)or FX deficiency. Acute or subacute intestinal obstruction may be caused by intramural wall hematomas in hemophilia and von Willebrand (vW)-disease. Physicians should always keep in mind that a congenital hemorrhagic disorder may cause bleeding in any tissue of the body and therefore alter the normal clinical features of a given disease.

  12. Evaluation of gingival bleeding awareness by comparison of self-reports and clinical measurements of freshman dental students

    PubMed Central

    Baser, Ulku; Germen, Meliha; Erdem, Yelda; Issever, Halim; Yalcin, Funda

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aims of this descriptive, cross-sectional investigation were to evaluate the gingival health awareness of dental students by comparing their clinical gingival bleeding scores and self-reports, and to compare differences in awareness between males and females. Methods: In total, 100 (51 males, 49 females) freshman dental students were included in the study. Periodontal indices recorded were: Presence of plaque percentage (plaque index [PI], %), percentage of sites of bleeding on probing (BOP, %), probing depth, and community periodontal index (CPI). Percent agreement, kappa agreement, sensitivity, and specificity were calculated by comparing their self-reported gingival bleeding and BOP%. Results: The self-reports of gingival bleeding exhibited statistically significant correlations with BOP% in females (r = 0.42, P = 0.003). Female students showed a higher degree of awareness when kappa agreement, 0.23 (males: 0.16, females: 0.39), sensitivity, 48% (males: 42%, females: 51%), and specificity, 95% (males: 90%, females: 100%) were calculated. Although male dental students had higher PI and CPI scores, there was no significant difference by gender in the clinical measurements. Conclusions: According to our results, the validity of self-reported gingival bleeding was higher among dental students than in previous population-based studies. Female dental students showed a higher degree of awareness than males of their gingival health. Half of the included dental students could not differentiate whether they had gingival bleeding when there was actual bleeding. More emphasis should be given to the education of dental students regarding the relationship between gingival bleeding and active periodontal disease. PMID:25202217

  13. Approach to a child with bleeding in the emergency room.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Deepak; Oberoi, Sapna; Marwaha, R K; Singhi, Sunit C

    2013-05-01

    A bleeding child is a cause of great concern and often, panic, for parents and pediatricians alike. Causes of bleeding could be trivial or secondary to an underlying bleeding disorder or a potentially serious systemic illness. Based on etiology, they can be categorized into disorders affecting platelets or the coagulation cascade and can be inherited or acquired. A systematic approach with relevant clinical history and examination along with appropriate laboratory investigations aid in reaching the diagnosis promptly. Indication and administration of blood products including fresh frozen plasma, cryoprecipitate, random donor and single donor apheresis platelets is elaborated. Management of hemophilia, Von Willebrand disease, disseminated intravascular coagulation and bleeding in cyanotic congenital heart disease, among other causes is outlined. Role of antifibrinolytic therapy, desmopressin and recombinant factor VIIa is briefly described. The review outlines the approach to a bleeding child in the emergency room. Practical points in history, examination, investigations and management are discussed. Management in resource constraint setting of developing countries is addressed.

  14. Evaluating for suspected child abuse: conditions that predispose to bleeding.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Shannon L; Abshire, Thomas C; Anderst, James D

    2013-04-01

    Child abuse might be suspected when children present with cutaneous bruising, intracranial hemorrhage, or other manifestations of bleeding. In these cases, it is necessary to consider medical conditions that predispose to easy bleeding/bruising. When evaluating for the possibility of bleeding disorders and other conditions that predispose to hemorrhage, the pediatrician must consider the child's presenting history, medical history, and physical examination findings before initiating a laboratory investigation. Many medical conditions can predispose to easy bleeding. Before ordering laboratory tests for a disease, it is useful to understand the biochemical basis and clinical presentation of the disorder, condition prevalence, and test characteristics. This technical report reviews the major medical conditions that predispose to bruising/bleeding and should be considered when evaluating for abusive injury.

  15. Endoscopic Management of Tumor Bleeding from Inoperable Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Il

    2015-01-01

    Tumor bleeding is not a rare complication in patients with inoperable gastric cancer. Endoscopy has important roles in the diagnosis and primary treatment of tumor bleeding, similar to its roles in other non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases. Although limited studies have been performed, endoscopic therapy has been highly successful in achieving initial hemostasis. One or a combination of endoscopic therapy modalities, such as injection therapy, mechanical therapy, or ablative therapy, can be used for hemostasis in patients with endoscopic stigmata of recent hemorrhage. However, rebleeding after successful hemostasis with endoscopic therapy frequently occurs. Endoscopic therapy may be a treatment option for successfully controlling this rebleeding. Transarterial embolization or palliative surgery should be considered when endoscopic therapy fails. For primary and secondary prevention of tumor bleeding, proton pump inhibitors can be prescribed, although their effectiveness to prevent bleeding remains to be investigated. PMID:25844339

  16. New insights to occult gastrointestinal bleeding: From pathophysiology to therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Capilla, Antonio Damián; De La Torre-Rubio, Paloma; Redondo-Cerezo, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is still a clinical challenge for gastroenterologists. The recent development of novel technologies for the diagnosis and treatment of different bleeding causes has allowed a better management of patients, but it also determines the need of a deeper comprehension of pathophysiology and the analysis of local expertise in order to develop a rational management algorithm. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding can be divided in occult, when a positive occult blood fecal test is the main manifestation, and overt, when external sings of bleeding are visible. In this paper we are going to focus on overt gastrointestinal bleeding, describing the physiopathology of the most usual causes, analyzing the diagnostic procedures available, from the most classical to the novel ones, and establishing a standard algorithm which can be adapted depending on the local expertise or availability. Finally, we will review the main therapeutic options for this complex and not so uncommon clinical problem. PMID:25133028

  17. Alternative Treatment for Bleeding Peristomal Varices: Percutaneous Parastomal Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Pabon-Ramos, Waleska M.; Niemeyer, Matthew M.; Dasika, Narasimham L.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To describe how peristomal varices can be successfully embolized via a percutaneous parastomal approach. Methods: The medical records of patients who underwent this procedure between December 1, 2000, and May 31, 2008, were retrospectively reviewed. Procedural details were recorded. Median fluoroscopy time and bleeding-free interval were calculated. Results: Seven patients underwent eight parastomal embolizations. The technical success rate was 88 % (one failure). All embolizations were performed with coils combined with a sclerosant, another embolizing agent, or both. Of the seven successful parastomal embolizations, there were three cases of recurrent bleeding; the median time to rebleeding was 45 days (range 26-313 days). The remaining four patients did not develop recurrent bleeding during the follow-up period; their median bleeding-free interval was 131 days (range 40-659 days). Conclusion: This case review demonstrated that percutaneous parastomal embolization is a feasible technique to treat bleeding peristomal varices.

  18. Comparative effectiveness of flossing and brushing in reducing interproximal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Graves, R C; Disney, J A; Stamm, J W

    1989-05-01

    This study assesses the comparative effectiveness of three types of dental floss and toothbrushing in reducing interproximal bleeding sites, measured by stimulation with wooden interdental cleaners using the interdental bleeding index assessment method. The 119 adult subjects with gingival inflammation were randomly assigned to one of four groups at the beginning of a supervised 2 week clinical trial. The toothbrushing only group achieved a 35% reduction in bleeding sites and the three flossing groups all demonstrated dramatic reductions of about 67%. The three varieties of dental flosses were about equally effective in reducing interproximal bleeding and doubly effective as toothbrushing alone. Compared to probing, the interdental bleeding index method is considered a simplified method of assessing interproximal gingival inflammation.

  19. On Supersonic-Inlet Boundary-Layer Bleed Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harloff, Gary J.; Smith, Gregory E.

    1995-01-01

    Boundary-layer bleed in supersonic inlets is typically used to avoid separation from adverse shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions and subsequent total pressure losses in the subsonic diffuser and to improve normal shock stability. Methodologies used to determine bleed requirements are reviewed. Empirical sonic flow coefficients are currently used to determine the bleed hole pattern. These coefficients depend on local Mach number, pressure ratio, hole geometry, etc. A new analytical bleed method is presented to compute sonic flow coefficients for holes and narrow slots and predictions are compared with published data to illustrate the accuracy of the model. The model can be used by inlet designers and as a bleed boundary condition for computational fluid dynamic studies.

  20. Evaluating for suspected child abuse: conditions that predispose to bleeding.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Shannon L; Abshire, Thomas C; Anderst, James D

    2013-04-01

    Child abuse might be suspected when children present with cutaneous bruising, intracranial hemorrhage, or other manifestations of bleeding. In these cases, it is necessary to consider medical conditions that predispose to easy bleeding/bruising. When evaluating for the possibility of bleeding disorders and other conditions that predispose to hemorrhage, the pediatrician must consider the child's presenting history, medical history, and physical examination findings before initiating a laboratory investigation. Many medical conditions can predispose to easy bleeding. Before ordering laboratory tests for a disease, it is useful to understand the biochemical basis and clinical presentation of the disorder, condition prevalence, and test characteristics. This technical report reviews the major medical conditions that predispose to bruising/bleeding and should be considered when evaluating for abusive injury. PMID:23530171

  1. Management of bleeding following major trauma: a European guideline

    PubMed Central

    Spahn, Donat R; Cerny, Vladimir; Coats, Timothy J; Duranteau, Jacques; Fernández-Mondéjar, Enrique; Gordini, Giovanni; Stahel, Philip F; Hunt, Beverley J; Komadina, Radko; Neugebauer, Edmund; Ozier, Yves; Riddez, Louis; Schultz, Arthur; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Rossaint, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Evidence-based recommendations can be made with respect to many aspects of the acute management of the bleeding trauma patient, which when implemented may lead to improved patient outcomes. Methods The multidisciplinary Task Force for Advanced Bleeding Care in Trauma was formed in 2005 with the aim of developing guidelines for the management of bleeding following severe injury. Recommendations were formulated using a nominal group process and the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) hierarchy of evidence and were based on a systematic review of published literature. Results Key recommendations include the following: The time elapsed between injury and operation should be minimised for patients in need of urgent surgical bleeding control, and patients presenting with haemorrhagic shock and an identified source of bleeding should undergo immediate surgical bleeding control unless initial resuscitation measures are successful. A damage control surgical approach is essential in the severely injured patient. Pelvic ring disruptions should be closed and stabilised, followed by appropriate angiographic embolisation or surgical bleeding control, including packing. Patients presenting with haemorrhagic shock and an unidentified source of bleeding should undergo immediate further assessment as appropriate using focused sonography, computed tomography, serum lactate, and/or base deficit measurements. This guideline also reviews appropriate physiological targets and suggested use and dosing of blood products, pharmacological agents, and coagulation factor replacement in the bleeding trauma patient. Conclusion A multidisciplinary approach to the management of the bleeding trauma patient will help create circumstances in which optimal care can be provided. By their very nature, these guidelines reflect the current state-of-the-art and will need to be updated and revised as important new evidence becomes available. PMID:17298665

  2. Long-lasting intestinal bleeding in an old patient with multiple mucosal vascular abnormalities and Glanzmann's thrombasthenia: 3-year pharmacological management.

    PubMed

    Coppola, A; De Stefano, V; Tufano, A; Nardone, G; Amoriello, A; Cerbone, A M; Di Minno, G

    2002-09-01

    A 75-year-old woman with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia was admitted because of persistent melaena. Endoscopic examination showed multiple angiodysplastic lesions, with active bleeding in small and large bowel. Electro-coagulation of some lesions, octreotide, conjugated oestrogens and selective embolization of jejunal vessels did not change transfusion requirements. After 8 month-transfusions, ethinylestradiol + norethisterone in association with octreotide was started, leading to no transfusion over the following 9 months. Bleeding recurred after withdrawing octreotide and substituting ethinylestradiol + norgestrel for the ethinylestradiol + norethisterone combination. Re-introduction of octreotide did not improve bleeding; however, a reduction of transfusion requirement was observed when the ethinylestradiol + norethisterone pill was re-administered. The association of octreotide and of an oestrogen-progesterone combination was helpful in the difficult management of recurrent bleeding in this patient with diffuse gastrointestinal vascular abnormalities and a severe condition predisposing to bleeding. PMID:12270009

  3. Long-lasting intestinal bleeding in an old patient with multiple mucosal vascular abnormalities and Glanzmann's thrombasthenia: 3-year pharmacological management.

    PubMed

    Coppola, A; De Stefano, V; Tufano, A; Nardone, G; Amoriello, A; Cerbone, A M; Di Minno, G

    2002-09-01

    A 75-year-old woman with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia was admitted because of persistent melaena. Endoscopic examination showed multiple angiodysplastic lesions, with active bleeding in small and large bowel. Electro-coagulation of some lesions, octreotide, conjugated oestrogens and selective embolization of jejunal vessels did not change transfusion requirements. After 8 month-transfusions, ethinylestradiol + norethisterone in association with octreotide was started, leading to no transfusion over the following 9 months. Bleeding recurred after withdrawing octreotide and substituting ethinylestradiol + norgestrel for the ethinylestradiol + norethisterone combination. Re-introduction of octreotide did not improve bleeding; however, a reduction of transfusion requirement was observed when the ethinylestradiol + norethisterone pill was re-administered. The association of octreotide and of an oestrogen-progesterone combination was helpful in the difficult management of recurrent bleeding in this patient with diffuse gastrointestinal vascular abnormalities and a severe condition predisposing to bleeding.

  4. The role of psychosocial factors in peptic ulcer disease: beyond Helicobacter pylori and NSAIDs.

    PubMed

    Jones, Michael P

    2006-04-01

    A variety of organic etiologies are associated with peptic ulcer disease, and the most relevant of these are infection with Helicobacter pylori and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Between 5% and 20% of patients with gastric or duodenal ulcer, however, lack an identifiable organic etiology. In these patients particularly and in all ulcer patients in general, psychosocial factors may play a significant role. At present, there is no definitive study proving a causal relationship between psychological stress and the development of ulcer disease. Studies to date suffer from significant methodological limitations and have not effectively addressed the poor correlation between ulcer craters and ulcer symptoms. A conservative application of available data would suggest that psychosocial factors play a significant role in symptom perception and reporting in patients with dyspeptic symptoms and may play a role in ulcer formation. PMID:16581366

  5. Helicobacter pylori virulence genes and host genetic polymorphisms as risk factors for peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection plays an important role in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Several factors have been proposed as possible H. pylori virulence determinants; for example, bacterial adhesins and gastric inflammation factors are associated with an increased risk of PUD. However, differences in bacterial virulence factors alone cannot explain the opposite ends of the PUD disease spectrum, that is duodenal and gastric ulcers; presumably, both bacterial and host factors contribute to the differential response. Carriers of the high-producer alleles of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1B, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α who also carry low-producer allele of anti-inflammatory cytokines have severe gastric mucosal inflammation, whereas carriers of the alternative alleles have mild inflammation. Recent reports have suggested that the PSCA and CYP2C19 ultra-rapid metabolizer genotypes are also associated with PUD.

  6. Helicobacter pylori virulence genes and host genetic polymorphisms as risk factors for peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection plays an important role in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Several factors have been proposed as possible H. pylori virulence determinants; for example, bacterial adhesins and gastric inflammation factors are associated with an increased risk of PUD. However, differences in bacterial virulence factors alone cannot explain the opposite ends of the PUD disease spectrum, that is duodenal and gastric ulcers; presumably, both bacterial and host factors contribute to the differential response. Carriers of the high-producer alleles of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1B, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α who also carry low-producer allele of anti-inflammatory cytokines have severe gastric mucosal inflammation, whereas carriers of the alternative alleles have mild inflammation. Recent reports have suggested that the PSCA and CYP2C19 ultra-rapid metabolizer genotypes are also associated with PUD. PMID:26470920

  7. A 41-Year-Old Man with Two Types of Metachronous Peptic Ulcer Complication due to Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome—Regression of Pancreatic Primary after Chemoembolization of Hepatic Metastases: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sarkeshikian, Seyed Saeid; Ghadir, Mohammad Reza

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Gastrinoma should be suspected when the peptic ulcer(s) is postbulbar, multiple, refractory, or recurrent, or ulcer is associated with nephrolithiasis, hypocalcaemia, or erosive esophagitis. The majority of gastrinomas are malignant. Case Presentation. The patient is a 41-year-old Iranian man who has been in good health until 36 months ago when duodenal perforation and two bouts of upper GI bleeding (GIB), each two months apart occurred. He also mentioned mild watery diarrhoea and decreased appetite. Serum gastrin level was elevated. Abdominal CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and three enhancing hepatic masses. CT-guided pancreatic biopsy revealed monotonous cells. Chemoembolization of hepatic metastases was done. New ct images 6 months later showed nearly total regressed hepatic and pancreatic lesions. Conclusion. Beside previously defined situations that take gastrinoma into account as the etiology of PUD, accumulation of PUD complications is highly suggestive of Zollinger-Ellisone syndrome (ZES). Regression of pancreatic primary after chemoembolization of hepatic metastases is unexplainable at the present time. PMID:21811506

  8. Acquired hemophilia A as a cause of recurrent bleeding into the pleural cavity - case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wojtyś, Małgorzata; Żuk, Ewa; Alchimowicz, Jacek; Grodzki, Tomasz

    2014-09-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a coagulation disorder caused by autoantibodies against blood coagulation factor VIII. The first sign of this disease is often massive bleeding, which can affect patients after routine procedures. The parameter which indicates the presence of this condition is isolated prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The present article describes a case of a 32-year-old man with acute interstitial pneumonia and pleural effusion, in whom a massive hemothorax appeared after thoracocentesis; active bleeding was observed after the introduction of a chest tube. The patient was operated on, and no pinpoint bleeding was discovered during the procedure. Active bleeding was still taking place postoperatively. The patient underwent another operation after 6 days. Once more, no pinpoint bleeding was found. Prolonged APTT was observed. The activity of blood coagulation factor VIII was 3.04%. The presence of antibodies against factor VIII was confirmed, and acquired hemophilia was diagnosed. The article also includes an analysis of the literature on acquired hemophilia.

  9. Acquired hemophilia A as a cause of recurrent bleeding into the pleural cavity – case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Żuk, Ewa; Alchimowicz, Jacek; Grodzki, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a coagulation disorder caused by autoantibodies against blood coagulation factor VIII. The first sign of this disease is often massive bleeding, which can affect patients after routine procedures. The parameter which indicates the presence of this condition is isolated prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The present article describes a case of a 32-year-old man with acute interstitial pneumonia and pleural effusion, in whom a massive hemothorax appeared after thoracocentesis; active bleeding was observed after the introduction of a chest tube. The patient was operated on, and no pinpoint bleeding was discovered during the procedure. Active bleeding was still taking place postoperatively. The patient underwent another operation after 6 days. Once more, no pinpoint bleeding was found. Prolonged APTT was observed. The activity of blood coagulation factor VIII was 3.04%. The presence of antibodies against factor VIII was confirmed, and acquired hemophilia was diagnosed. The article also includes an analysis of the literature on acquired hemophilia. PMID:26336444

  10. Bleeding spectrum in children with moderate or severe von Willebrand disease: Relevance of pediatric-specific bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Yvonne V; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Boender, Johan; Mauser-Bunschoten, Evelien P; van der Bom, Johanna G; de Meris, Joke; Smiers, Frans J; Granzen, Bernd; Brons, Paul; Tamminga, Rienk Y J; Cnossen, Marjon H; Leebeek, Frank W G

    2015-12-01

    The bleeding phenotype of children with von Willebrand disease (VWD) needs to be characterized in detail to facilitate diagnosis during childhood and aid in the planning and assessment of treatment strategies. The objective was to evaluate the occurrence, type, and severity of bleeding in a large cohort of children with moderate and severe VWD. We included 113 children (aged 0-16 years) with Type 1 (n = 60), 2 (n = 44), and 3 (n = 9) VWD with von Willebrand factor (VWF) antigen and/or VWF ristocetin cofactor levels ≤ 30 U/dL from a nation-wide cross-sectional study ("Willebrand in the Netherlands" study). Bleeding severity and frequency were determined using the International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis-Bleeding Assessment Tool (ISTH-BAT) with supplementary pediatric-specific bleeding symptoms (umbilical stump bleeding, cephalohematoma, cheek hematoma, conjunctival bleeding, postcircumcision and postvenipuncture bleeding). We found that all 26 postmenarche girls experienced menorrhagia. Other common bleedings were cutaneous (81%), oropharyngeal (64%), prolonged bleeding from minor wounds (58%), and epistaxis (56%). Pediatric-specific bleeding symptoms were present in 44% of patients. ISTH-BAT bleeding score was higher in index cases than in affected family members (median, 12.0 vs. 6.5, P < 0.001), higher in Type 3 VWD than in Type 2 or 1 (17.0 vs. 10.5 or 6.5, P < 0.001) and higher in children with severe (<10 U/dL) than moderate VWD (10-30 U/dL) (11.0 vs. 7.0, P < 0.001). Frequency of any bleeding, epistaxis, and oral cavity was higher in types 2 and 3 than in Type 1 VWD and was associated with VWF levels. We conclude that pediatric-specific bleeding symptoms occurred in a large proportion of children with moderate or severe VWD and should be included when evaluating children for VWD.

  11. Bleeding spectrum in children with moderate or severe von Willebrand disease: Relevance of pediatric-specific bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Yvonne V; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Boender, Johan; Mauser-Bunschoten, Evelien P; van der Bom, Johanna G; de Meris, Joke; Smiers, Frans J; Granzen, Bernd; Brons, Paul; Tamminga, Rienk Y J; Cnossen, Marjon H; Leebeek, Frank W G

    2015-12-01

    The bleeding phenotype of children with von Willebrand disease (VWD) needs to be characterized in detail to facilitate diagnosis during childhood and aid in the planning and assessment of treatment strategies. The objective was to evaluate the occurrence, type, and severity of bleeding in a large cohort of children with moderate and severe VWD. We included 113 children (aged 0-16 years) with Type 1 (n = 60), 2 (n = 44), and 3 (n = 9) VWD with von Willebrand factor (VWF) antigen and/or VWF ristocetin cofactor levels ≤ 30 U/dL from a nation-wide cross-sectional study ("Willebrand in the Netherlands" study). Bleeding severity and frequency were determined using the International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis-Bleeding Assessment Tool (ISTH-BAT) with supplementary pediatric-specific bleeding symptoms (umbilical stump bleeding, cephalohematoma, cheek hematoma, conjunctival bleeding, postcircumcision and postvenipuncture bleeding). We found that all 26 postmenarche girls experienced menorrhagia. Other common bleedings were cutaneous (81%), oropharyngeal (64%), prolonged bleeding from minor wounds (58%), and epistaxis (56%). Pediatric-specific bleeding symptoms were present in 44% of patients. ISTH-BAT bleeding score was higher in index cases than in affected family members (median, 12.0 vs. 6.5, P < 0.001), higher in Type 3 VWD than in Type 2 or 1 (17.0 vs. 10.5 or 6.5, P < 0.001) and higher in children with severe (<10 U/dL) than moderate VWD (10-30 U/dL) (11.0 vs. 7.0, P < 0.001). Frequency of any bleeding, epistaxis, and oral cavity was higher in types 2 and 3 than in Type 1 VWD and was associated with VWF levels. We conclude that pediatric-specific bleeding symptoms occurred in a large proportion of children with moderate or severe VWD and should be included when evaluating children for VWD. PMID:26375306

  12. Technetium-99m colloidal bismuth subcitrate: A novel method for the evaluation of peptic ulcer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, T.E.; Lyons, K.P.; Raiszadeh, M.; Fardi, M.; Snider, P.

    1984-01-01

    The therapeutic agent colloidal bismuth subcitrate (CBS) selectively binds to peptic ulcers. The authors have developed a method for labeling this agent with Tc-99m. Chromatographic quality control studies of the agent on silica gel coated strips (ITLC-SG) showed that more than 97% of Tc-99m was bound to CBS. During in-vitro stability testing, the radio-label was stable for a minimum of 6 hours. The chromatographic findings are in agreement with the in-vivo distribution of the agent which showed no significant radioactivity in thyroid, kidneys, liver, or bladder. The resulting Tc-99m-CBS solution is administered orally in drinking water. Preliminary animal studies have been conducted on 5 adult 3 kg New Zealand rabbits sedated with 50 mg Ketamine I.M. The rabbits were intubated with I.V. tubing advanced to the stomach. They were given a gastric erosive suspension of 600-1000 mg/kg of pulverized ASA in 10 cc tap water. Four hours later they were given 3-4 mCi of the radiotracer in a 5 cc volume of water. Serial in-vivo images were obtained for 2 hours which included thyroid, abdomen, and urinary bladder. Next the stomachs were excised, opened along the greater curvature, imaged, vigorously washed and reimaged. All 5 rabbits showed avid localized binding of radiotracer which remained fixed even with vigorous washing. Areas of normal appearing mucosa were relatively devoid of radiotracer. This new compound may have significant clinical usefulness in the detection of peptic ulcer disease. In addition, such a non-invasive technique, carrying none of the risks or discomfort of endoscopy could also find application in the evaluation of the response to therapy.

  13. Major Bleeding after Percutaneous Image-Guided Biopsies: Frequency, Predictors, and Periprocedural Management

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Sean A.; Milovanovic, Lazar; Midia, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    Major bleeding remains an uncommon yet potentially devastating complication following percutaneous image-guided biopsy. This article reviews two cases of major bleeding after percutaneous biopsy and discusses the frequency, predictors, and periprocedural management of major postprocedural bleeding. PMID:25762845

  14. BLEEDING OF FEMORAL HEAD DURING TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY FOR OSTEOARTHROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Sotomayor, Marco Yánez; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Silva, Marcelo Faria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the bleeding of the femoral head on hip osteoarthritis in patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty. Methods: One hundred and three hips affected by primary hip osteoarthritis were evaluated. After surgical dislocation, the femoral head was divided into four quadrants, and micro perforations were made in order to observe and assess the presence of bleeding, as early type (EB), late type (LB) or without bleeding (WB). Results: We observed early bleeding (EB) in the upper quadrant in 16 hips (15.5%), late bleeding in 14 hips (13.6%) and no bleeding (WB) in 73 hips (70.9%). The anterior quadrant showed EB in 24 hips (23.3%), LB in 7 hips (6.8%) and WB in 72 hips (69.9%). The lower quadrant presented EB in 40 hips (38.8%), LB 14 hips (13.6%) and WB in 49 hips (47.6%). The posterior quadrant showed EB in 39 hips (37.9%), LB 19 hips (18.4%) and WB in 45 hips (43.7%). Comparing BMI and gender, we found no association between these parameters (p> 0.05). Conclusions: The inferior and posterior quadrant had the highest bleeding levels, following the path of the medial circumflex artery. Level of Evidence III, Therapeutic Study. PMID:26981036

  15. Neonatal bleeding in haemophilia: a European cohort study.

    PubMed

    Richards, M; Lavigne Lissalde, G; Combescure, C; Batorova, A; Dolan, G; Fischer, K; Klamroth, R; Lambert, T; Lopez-Fernandez, M; Pérez, R; Rocino, A; Fijnvandraat, K

    2012-02-01

    Birth is the first haemostatic challenge for a child with haemophilia. Our aim was to examine the association between perinatal risk factors and major neonatal bleeding in infants with haemophilia. This observational cohort study in 12 European haemophilia treatment centres (HTC) incorporated 508 children with haemophilia A or B, born between 1990 and 2008. Risk factors for bleeding were analysed by univariate analysis. Head bleeds occurred in 18 (3·5%) children within the first 28 d of life, including three intraparenchymal bleeds, one subdural haematoma and 14 cephalohaematomas. Intra-cranial bleeds were associated with long-term neurological sequelae in two (0·4%) cases; no deaths occurred. Assisted delivery (forceps/vacuum) was the only risk factor for neonatal head bleeding [Odds Ratio (OR) 8·84: 95% confidence interval (CI) 3·05-25·61]. Mild haemophilia and maternal awareness of her haemophilia carrier status seemed to be protective (OR 0·24; 95%CI 0·05-1·05 and OR 0·34; 95%CI 0·10-1·21, respectively), but due to the low number of events this was not statistically significant. We found no association between neonatal head bleeding and country, maternal age, parity, gestational age or presence of HTC. Maternal awareness of carrier status protected against assisted delivery (unadjusted OR 0·37; 95%CI 0·15-0·90; adjusted OR 0·47 (95%CI 0·18-1·21). PMID:22146054

  16. Impact of emergency angiography in massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Browder, W; Cerise, E J; Litwin, M S

    1986-01-01

    Fifty patients with massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding were initially managed with emergency angiography. The average age was 67.2; mean hematocrit, 23.7; and average transfusion, 7.6 units. Thirty-six patients (72%) had bleeding site located; bleeding sites were distributed throughout the colon. Etiologies of bleeding included diverticular disease (19 patients) and arteriovenous malformations (15 patients). Twenty of 22 (91%) patients receiving selective intra-arterial vasopressin stopped bleeding; however, 50% rebled on cessation of vasopressin. Thirty-five of 50 (70%) patients underwent surgery, with 57% operated on electively after vasopressin therapy. Seventeen patients had segmental colectomy, with no rebleeding. Nine of the 17 patients had diverticular disease in the remaining colon. Operative morbidity in these 35 patients was significantly improved when compared to previously reported patients undergoing emergency subtotal colectomy without angiography (8.6% vs. 37%) (p less than 0.02). Emergency angiography successfully locates the bleeding site, allowing for segmental colectomy. Vasopressin infusion transiently halts bleeding, permitting elective surgery in many instances. PMID:3094466

  17. Flow Coefficient Behavior for Boundary Layer Bleed Holes and Slots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, B. P.; Davis, D. O.; Hingst, W. R.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental investigation into the flow coefficient behavior for nine boundary layer bleed orifice configurations is reported. This test was conducted for the purposes of exploring boundary layer control through mass flow removal and does not address issues of stability bleed. Parametric data consist of bleed region flow coefficient as a function of Mach number, bleed plenum pressure, and bleed orifice geometry. Seven multiple hole configurations and two single slot configurations were tested over a supersonic Mach number range of 1.3 to 2.5 (nominal). Advantages gained by using multiple holes in a bleed region instead of a single spanwise slot are discussed and the issue of modeling an entire array of bleed orifices based on the performance of a single orifice is addressed. Preconditioning the flow approaching a 90 degree inclined (normal) hole configuration resulted in a significant improvement in the performance of the configuration. The same preconditioning caused only subtle changes in performance for a 20 degree inclined (slanted) configuration.

  18. Wireless capsule endoscopy: Perspectives beyond gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Cerezo, Eduardo; Sánchez-Capilla, Antonio Damián; De La Torre-Rubio, Paloma; De Teresa, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (CE) is a technology developed for the endoscopic exploration of the small bowel. The first capsule model was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2001, and its first and essential indication was occult gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Over subsequent years, this technology has been refined to provide superior resolution, increased battery life, and capabilities to view different parts of the GI tract. Indeed, cases for which CE proved useful have increased significantly over the last few years, with new indications for the small bowel and technical improvements that have expanded its use to other parts of the GI tract, including the esophagus and colon. The main challenges in the development of CE are new devices with the ability to provide therapy, air inflation for a better vision of the small bowel, biopsy sampling systems attached to the capsule and the possibility to guide and move the capsule with an external motion control. In this article we review the current and new indications of CE, and the evolving technological changes shaping this technology, which has a promising potential in the coming future of gastroenterology. PMID:25400450

  19. Wireless capsule endoscopy: perspectives beyond gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Redondo-Cerezo, Eduardo; Sánchez-Capilla, Antonio Damián; De La Torre-Rubio, Paloma; De Teresa, Javier

    2014-11-14

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (CE) is a technology developed for the endoscopic exploration of the small bowel. The first capsule model was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2001, and its first and essential indication was occult gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Over subsequent years, this technology has been refined to provide superior resolution, increased battery life, and capabilities to view different parts of the GI tract. Indeed, cases for which CE proved useful have increased significantly over the last few years, with new indications for the small bowel and technical improvements that have expanded its use to other parts of the GI tract, including the esophagus and colon. The main challenges in the development of CE are new devices with the ability to provide therapy, air inflation for a better vision of the small bowel, biopsy sampling systems attached to the capsule and the possibility to guide and move the capsule with an external motion control. In this article we review the current and new indications of CE, and the evolving technological changes shaping this technology, which has a promising potential in the coming future of gastroenterology.

  20. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori-Negative, Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Related Peptic Ulcer Disease in Patients Referred to Afzalipour Hospital.

    PubMed

    Seyed Mirzaei, Seyed Mahdi; Zahedi, Mohammad Javad; Shafiei Pour, Sara

    2015-10-01

    BACKGROUND Although Helicobacter pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the main causes of peptic ulcers disease (PUD), recently the prevalence of idiopathic peptic ulcer (IPU) is increasing in most parts of the world. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of IPU in Kerman, the center of largest province in south-east Iran. METHODS We included 215 patients with peptic ulcer in our study. Combined methods rapid urease test (RUT), histology, and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed on endoscopic samples of peptic ulcers. NSAID use was determined by medical history. SPSS software version 16 was used for data analysis. p value<0.05 was considered as statistically significant. RESULTS Of 215 consecutive patients with peptic ulcer, four (1.8%) had H.pylorinegative and NSAID-negative PUD. There were not significant differences between patients with IPU and patients with peptic ulcer associated with H.pylori or NSAIDs regarding the sex, age, cigarette smoking, and opioid abuse. CONCLUSION Our study showed that in contrast to other reports from western and some Asian countries, the prevalence of IPU is low in Kerman and H.pylori infection is still the major cause of PUD. We recommend a large and multi-central study to determine the prevalence of IPU in Iran.

  1. Surgical treatment of fibroids in heavy menstrual bleeding.

    PubMed

    Saridogan, Ertan

    2016-01-01

    Uterine fibroids can cause abnormal uterine bleeding and their removal is beneficial in the treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding associated with fibroids for women who would like to preserve their uterus and fertility. Endoscopic (hysteroscopic and laparoscopic) approaches are the preferred methods of fibroid removal when appropriate. In the presence of submucosal fibroids, hysteroscopic resection is a simple, safe and effective treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding and reduces the need for more major surgery, such as hysterectomy. When abdominal myomectomy is required, laparoscopic myomectomy is the preferred choice in selected cases due to its advantages over open myomectomy. PMID:26693796

  2. Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices by Direct Percutaneous Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Arulraj, Ramakrishnan; Mangat, Kamarjit S.; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2011-02-15

    Stomal varices can occur in patients with stoma in the presence of portal hypertension. Suture ligation, sclerotherapy, angiographic embolization, stoma revision, beta blockade, portosystemic shunt, and liver transplantation have been described as therapeutic options for bleeding stomal varices. We report the case of a 21-year-old patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis and colectomy with ileostomy for ulcerative colitis, where stomal variceal bleeding was successfully treated by direct percutaneous embolization. We consider percutaneous embolization to be an effective way of treating acute stomal bleeding in decompensated patients while awaiting decisions regarding shunt procedures or liver transplantation.

  3. Bleeding following deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest in children.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Emad B; Machado, Sandra; Apostolakis, John

    2007-03-01

    Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) is a technique of extracorporeal circulation commonly used in children with complex congenital heart defects undergoing surgical repairs. The use of profound cooling (20 degrees C) and complete cessation of circulation allow adequate exposure and correction of these complex lesions, with enhanced cerebral protection. However, the profound physiologic state of DHCA results in significant derangement of the coagulation system and a high incidence of postoperative bleeding. This review examines the impact of DHCA on bleeding and transfusion requirements in children and the pathophysiology of DHCA-induced platelet dysfunction. It also focuses on possible pharmacologic interventions to decrease bleeding following DHCA in children. PMID:17484172

  4. Is tranexamic acid effective for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed

    Flores, Sebastián; Avilés, Carolina; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-12-07

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding constitutes a medical-surgical emergency given its important associated morbidity and mortality. The antifibrinolytic tranexamic acid might help stopping bleeding, but controversy remains about its role in this setting. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified five systematic reviews including eight randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded tranexamic acid probably decreases rebleeding and mortality, without increasing thromboembolic adverse effects in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  5. Hemorrhagic acalculous cholecystitis: an unusual location of uremic bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Chun; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2009-09-01

    Hemorrhagic acalculous cholecystitis is a rare but potentially fatal disease. An increased bleeding tendency is present in both acute and chronic renal failure with impaired platelet function. We herein present a case of hemorrhagic acalculous cholecystitis in a hemodialysis patient who suffered from acute abdomen and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The pathogenesis may have been associated with ischemia and reperfusion injury, eventually leading to necrosis of the gallbladder wall. Abdominal ultrasound can aid in diagnosis. Biliary colic, jaundice, and melena are the typical symptoms of hemorrhagic cholecystitis, particularly in a patient with unexplained gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:19762317

  6. Is tranexamic acid effective for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed

    Flores, Sebastián; Avilés, Carolina; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding constitutes a medical-surgical emergency given its important associated morbidity and mortality. The antifibrinolytic tranexamic acid might help stopping bleeding, but controversy remains about its role in this setting. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified five systematic reviews including eight randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded tranexamic acid probably decreases rebleeding and mortality, without increasing thromboembolic adverse effects in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26730585

  7. Scintigraphic demonstration of gastrointestinal bleeding due to mesenteric varices

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, M.E.; Coleman, R.E. )

    1990-07-01

    Mesenteric varices can appear as massive, acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The small bowel or colon may be involved, varices usually developing at sites of previous surgery or inflammation in patients with portal hypertension. Two patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and protal hypertension presented with rectal bleeding. Tc-99m RBC studies demonstrated varices and extravasation into the adjacent bowel. The varices were documented by mesenteric angiography. Characteristic features of Tc-99m labeled RBC studies can identify mesenteric varices as the cause of intestinal bleeding and localize the abnormal vessels.

  8. Bleeding from peristomal varices: perspectives on prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Fucini, C; Wolff, B G; Dozois, R R

    1991-12-01

    Peristomal variceal bleeding is a serious complication in patients with chronic liver disease undergoing colon surgery with a stoma. Our aim was to examine the morbidity of bleeding for peristomal, perianastomotic, and esophageal varices in a group of patients with chronic liver disease who underwent colectomy at the Mayo Clinic between 1970 and 1988. Morbidity was evaluated in terms of the number of major bleeding episodes and the number of units of blood transfused. The treatment of bleeding was also evaluated. One hundred seventeen patients (74 males and 43 females) aged 11-78 years were studied. Sixty-two patients (53 percent) had a permanent stoma, while 55 patients (47 percent) had a colonic resection and anastomosis. Sixty-seven patients (62 percent) had chronic ulcerative colitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. In the stoma group, bleeding appeared from stomal and/or esophageal varices in 19 patients (31 percent), while, in the non-stoma group, bleeding exclusively from the esophageal varices occurred in eight patients (15 percent). Perianastomotic variceal bleeding was never observed. The 5-year cumulative probabilities of one major bleed occurring from gastrointestinal varices appeared to be similar between the two groups. Patients who bled from peristomal varices with or without esophageal bleeding (n = 17) rebled more frequently (6.5 +/- 5.5 vs. 3 +/- 1.6; P less than 0.05) and were transfused more often (14.9 +/- 12.3 vs. 7.5 +/- 4.1; P less than 0.05) than patients who bled exclusively from esophageal varices (n = 10). No difference was found in the incidence of recurrent bleeding and the number of units of blood transfused between patients who bled exclusively from peristomal varices (n = 10) and those who bled from both peristomal and esophageal varices (n = 7). Medical and local measures were more effective in controlling esophageal bleeding than in controlling peristomal bleeding. Therefore, patients with chronic liver disease who must undergo

  9. Omeprazole versus placebo for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding: randomised double blind controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Daneshmend, T. K.; Hawkey, C. J.; Langman, M. J.; Logan, R. F.; Long, R. G.; Walt, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the possible therapeutic role of omeprazole, a powerful proton pump inhibitor, in unselected patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. DESIGN--Double blind placebo controlled parallel group study. Active treatment was omeprazole 80 mg intravenously immediately, then three doses of 40 mg intravenously at eight hourly intervals, then 40 mg orally at 12 hourly intervals. Treatment was started within 12 hours of admission and given for four days or until surgery, discharge, or death. SETTING--The medical wards of University and City Hospitals, Nottingham. SUBJECTS--1147 consecutive patients aged 18 years or more admitted over 40 months with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Mortality from all causes; rate of rebleeding, transfusion requirements, and operation rate; effect of treatment on endoscopic appearances at initial endoscopy. RESULTS--Of 1147 patients included in the intention to treat analysis, 569 received placebo and 578 omeprazole. No significant differences were found between the placebo and omeprazole groups for rates of transfusion (302 (53%) placebo v 298 (52%) omeprazole), rebleeding (100 (18%) v 85 (15%)), operation (63 (11%) v 62 (11%)), and death (30 (5.3%) v 40 (6.9%)). However, there was an unexpected but significant reduction in endoscopic signs of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients treated with omeprazole compared with those treated with placebo (236 (45%) placebo v 176 (33%) omeprazole; p less than 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS--Omeprazole failed to reduce mortality, rebleeding, or transfusion requirements, although the reduction in endoscopic signs of bleeding suggests that inhibition of acid may be capable of influencing intragastric bleeding. Our data do not justify the routine use of acid inhibiting drugs in the management of haematemesis and melaena. PMID:1737157

  10. [Role of Allelic Genes of Matrix Metalloproteinases and Their Tissue Inhibitors in the Peptic Ulcer Disease Development].

    PubMed

    Shaymardanova, E Kh; Nurgalieva, A Kh; Khidiyatova, I M; Gabbasova, L V; Kuramshina, O A; Kryukova, A Ya; Sagitov, R B; Munasipov, F R; Khusnutdinova, E Kh

    2016-03-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a chronic disease of the gastrointestinal tract, mainly manifesting itself in the formation of the fairly persistent ulcer defect of the mucous membrane of the stomach and/or duodenum. Association analysis of common polymorphisms of matrix metalloproteinases genes MMP-1 (rs1799750, rs494379), MMP-2 (rs2285052), MMP-3 (rs3025058), MMP-9 (rs3918242, rs17576), and MMP-12 (rs2276109) and their tissue inhibitors TIMP-2 (rs8179090) and TIMP-3 (rs9619311) was carried out in 353 patients with a gastric ulcer or duodenal ulcer and in 325 unrelated healthy individuals from the Republic of Bashkortostan. Associations of polymorphic variants rs1799750 and rs494379 of gene MMP-1, rs3025058 of gene MMP-3, rs3918242 and rs17576 of gene MMP-9, and rs9619311 of gene TIMP-3 with the risk of peptic ulcer disease in Russians and Tatars were revealed.

  11. Does Helicobacter pylori Eradication Reduce the Risk of Open Angle Glaucoma in Patients With Peptic Ulcer Disease?

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Wen-Chi; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-09-01

    To investigate whether Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) eradication would influence the risk of primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in patients with peptic ulcer disease. From the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000, 6061 patients with peptic ulcer and receiving H pylori eradication therapy were recruited. The study cohort was subdivided into early (within 1 year) and late (after 1 year) eradication cohorts. The 24,244 control cohort subjects were those who without peptic ulcer and without receiving H pylori eradication therapy and were frequency-matched with the H pylori eradication cohort by age, sex, and the year of receiving H pylori eradication therapy. The higher incidence of POAG was observed in late H pylori eradication cohort and in early H pylori eradication cohort than in control cohort (1.57, 1.32, and 0.95, per 1000 person-year, respectively). However, overall risk of glaucoma was not significantly higher in the late eradication than in the early eradication (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.85, 95% confidence interval = 0.48-1.53). The POAG incidence was greater in the late H pylori eradication cohort when follow-up duration ≤ 5 years (1.59, per 1000 person-years). However, when follow-up duration >5 years, the incidence of POAG was greater in the early H pylori eradication cohort (1.68, per 1000 person-years). These relationships were not associated with a significantly increased or decreased risk of POAG in multivariable analyses. Either early or late H pylori eradication does not significantly reduce the risk of glaucoma in patients with peptic ulcer disease compared with normal control.

  12. Association of Helicobacter pylori cagA Gene with Gastric Cancer and Peptic Ulcer in Saudi Patients.

    PubMed

    Saber, Taisir; Ghonaim, Mabrouk M; Yousef, Amany R; Khalifa, Amany; Al Qurashi, Hesham; Shaqhan, Mohammad; Samaha, Mohammad

    2015-07-01

    This study was conducted to assess the relationship between occurrence of gastric cancer and peptic ulcer, and the presence of H. pylori cagA gene and anti-CagA IgG, and to estimate the value of these antibodies in detecting infection by cagA gene-positive H. pylori strains in Saudi patients. The study included 180 patients who were subjected to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in Taif province and Western region of Saudi Arabia (60 gastric cancer, 60 peptic ulcer, and 60 with non-ulcer dyspepsia). Gastric biopsy specimens were obtained and tested for H. pylori infection by rapid urease test and culture. PCR was performed on the isolated strains and biopsy specimens for detection of the cagA gene. Blood samples were collected and tested for CagA IgG by ELISA. H. pylori infection was detected among 72.8% of patients. The cagA gene and anti-CagA IgG were found in 63.4% and 61.8% of H. pylori-infected patients, respectively. They were significantly (p < 0.01) higher in patients with gastric cancer and peptic ulcer compared with those with non-ulcer dyspepsia. Detection of the CagA IgG was 91.6% sensitive, 89.6% specific, and 90.8% accurate compared with detection of the cagA gene. Its positive and negative predictive values were 93.8% and 86%, respectively. The study showed a significant association between the presence of the cagA gene and gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease, and between anti-CagA IgG and the cagA gene in Saudi patients. However, a further larger study is required to confirm this finding.

  13. Does Helicobacter pylori Eradication Reduce the Risk of Open Angle Glaucoma in Patients With Peptic Ulcer Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Wen-Chi; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To investigate whether Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) eradication would influence the risk of primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in patients with peptic ulcer disease. From the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000, 6061 patients with peptic ulcer and receiving H pylori eradication therapy were recruited. The study cohort was subdivided into early (within 1 year) and late (after 1 year) eradication cohorts. The 24,244 control cohort subjects were those who without peptic ulcer and without receiving H pylori eradication therapy and were frequency-matched with the H pylori eradication cohort by age, sex, and the year of receiving H pylori eradication therapy. The higher incidence of POAG was observed in late H pylori eradication cohort and in early H pylori eradication cohort than in control cohort (1.57, 1.32, and 0.95, per 1000 person-year, respectively). However, overall risk of glaucoma was not significantly higher in the late eradication than in the early eradication (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.85, 95% confidence interval = 0.48–1.53). The POAG incidence was greater in the late H pylori eradication cohort when follow-up duration ≤5 years (1.59, per 1000 person-years). However, when follow-up duration >5 years, the incidence of POAG was greater in the early H pylori eradication cohort (1.68, per 1000 person-years). These relationships were not associated with a significantly increased or decreased risk of POAG in multivariable analyses. Either early or late H pylori eradication does not significantly reduce the risk of glaucoma in patients with peptic ulcer disease compared with normal control. PMID:26426633

  14. Penetration of the left ventricular myocardium by benign peptic ulceration: two cases and a review of the published work.

    PubMed Central

    Porteous, C; Williams, D; Foulis, A; Sugden, B A

    1984-01-01

    Two cases of penetration of the left ventricular myocardium by benign peptic ulcer are reported. Twenty five similar cases in the world published work are reviewed. The condition is only possible when there are fibrous adhesions between the stomach and diaphragm and the pericardium. In addition, the left lobe of the liver may be small. Alternatively, an ulcer within a hiatus hernia may erode into the left ventricle. Images PMID:6501586

  15. Cyanoacrylate Injection Versus Band Ligation in the Endoscopic Management of Acute Gastric Variceal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Weiguang; Ren, Yutang; Bai, Yang; Liu, Side; Zhang, Qiang; Zhi, Fachao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The evidence for optimal endoscopic management of bleeding gastric varices is lacking. The clinical outcome is controversial in trials comparing cyanoacrylate injection and band ligation. To help guide endoscopic decisions regarding acute gastric variceal bleeding, a meta-analysis was conducted. Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and ScienceDirect were searched for all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) containing the 2 interventions. The main outcomes evaluated in the meta-analysis were active bleeding control, blood transfusion, rebleeding, recurrence of varices, complications, and survival. Three RCTs were identified, which included 194 patients with active gastric variceal bleeding from Taiwan and Romania. Active bleeding control was achieved in 46 of 49 (93.9%) patients in the cyanoacrylate injection group, compared with 35 of 44 (79.5%) in the band ligation group (P = 0.032), for a pooled odds ratio of 4.44 (95% confidence interval, 1.14–17.30). Rebleeding rate was comparable in type 2 gastroesophageal varices (GOV2) between the 2 interventions (35.7% vs 34.8%, P = 0.895), but cyanoacrylate injection seemed superior for reducing rebleeding rate in type 1 gastroesophageal varices (GOV1, 26.1% vs 47.7%, P = 0.035) and type 1 isolated gastric varices (IGV1, 17.6% vs 85.7%, P = 0.015). Cyanoacrylate injection was also superior in controlling recurrence of gastric varices to band ligation (36.0% vs 66.0%, P = 0.002). There was no difference in complications or mortality between the 2 interventions. The major limitation of this meta-analysis is the small number of studies/patients included. Compared with band ligation, injection cyanocrylate have an advantage in the control of acute gastric variceal bleeding, also with lower recurrence rate and rebleeding (except GOV2). The limited amount of studies included attenuates the strength of this meta-analysis; therefore, more high-quality RCTs are needed. PMID

  16. Post-partum hemorrhage in women with rare bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Peyvandi, Flora; Menegatti, Marzia; Siboni, Simona Maria

    2011-02-01

    Post-partum hemorrhage (PPH) accounts for a substantial fraction of maternal deaths in the general population. Among all women, however, those affected with rare bleeding disorders (RBDs) represent a particular group since to usual bleeding symptoms, they are likely to experience bleedings associated to obstetrical and gynaecological problems. Pregnancy and childbirth, two important stages in the life of a woman, pose a special clinical challenge in women with RBDs, since information about these issues are really scarce and limited to few case reports. These data show that all women with RBDs, except for FXI deficiency, have to be considered potentially at risk for developing PPH, therefore they should be monitored carefully during and immediately after pregnancy. The implication is that women with bleeding disorders may require prophylaxis and/or close observation for several weeks and should be followed by a multidisciplinary team including expertises such as laboratory haematologist, obstetrician-gynaecologist, anaesthesiologist, family physician, and laboratory technician.

  17. Factors that can minimize bleeding complications after renal biopsy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, M S; Chen, J Z; Xu, A P

    2014-10-01

    Renal biopsy is a very important diagnostic tool in the evaluation of renal diseases. However, bleeding remains to be one of the most serious complications in this procedure. Many new techniques have been improved to make it safer. The risk factors and predictors of bleeding after percutaneous renal biopsy have been extensively reported in many literatures, and generally speaking, the common risk factors for renal biopsy complications focus on hypertension, high serum creatinine, bleeding diatheses, amyloidosis, advanced age, gender and so on. Our primary purpose of this review is to summarize current measures in recent years literature aiming at minimizing the bleeding complication after the renal biopsy, including the drug application before and after renal biopsy, operation details in percutaneous renal biopsies, nursing and close monitoring after the biopsy and other kinds of biopsy methods.

  18. Post-biliary sphincterotomy bleeding despite covered metallic stent deployment

    PubMed Central

    Donatelli, Gianfranco; Cereatti, Fabrizio; Dumont, Jean-Loup; Dhumane, Parag; Tuszynski, Thierry; Vergeau, Bertrand Marie; Meduri, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Several endoscopic techniques have been proposed for the management of post-sphincterotomy bleeding. Lately, self-expandable metal stents deployment has gained popularity especially as a rescue therapy when other endoscopic techniques fail. Methods-results: We report the case report of a massive post-sphincterotomy bleeding in a patient with a self-expandable metal stent in the biliary tree. Despite the presence of a correctly positioned self-expandable metal stent, a new endoscopic session was required to control the bleeding. Conclusions: Self-expandable metal stent may be useful to manage post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding. However, up to now there is no specifically designed self-expandable metal stent for such complication. Large new designed self-expandable metal stent may be a useful tool for biliary endoscopist. PMID:27489716

  19. Anode reactive bleed and injector shift control strategy

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Jun [Rochester, NY; Chowdhury, Akbar [Pittsford, NY; Lerner, Seth E [Honeoye Falls, NY; Marley, William S [Rush, NY; Savage, David R [Rochester, NY; Leary, James K [Rochester, NY

    2012-01-03

    A system and method for correcting a large fuel cell voltage spread for a split sub-stack fuel cell system. The system includes a hydrogen source that provides hydrogen to each split sub-stack and bleed valves for bleeding the anode side of the sub-stacks. The system also includes a voltage measuring device for measuring the voltage of each cell in the split sub-stacks. The system provides two levels for correcting a large stack voltage spread problem. The first level includes sending fresh hydrogen to the weak sub-stack well before a normal reactive bleed would occur, and the second level includes sending fresh hydrogen to the weak sub-stack and opening the bleed valve of the other sub-stack when the cell voltage spread is close to stack failure.

  20. Thrombosis and bleeding: when opposites are not so far apart.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2005-01-01

    Thrombotic events in patients with inherited bleeding disorders occur only rarely. However, in some cases, the co-existence of acquired or inherited prothrombotic risk factors may overcome the hypocoagulative state, modulating the clinical phenotype to a decrease in bleeding symptoms or even to an increase in the likelihood of developing thrombotic complications. This review summarizes the cases of thrombosis reported in the literature and analyzes the most important risk factors for thrombosis in patients with a congenital bleeding tendency. Data were identified by searches of the published literature, including PubMed, references from reviews and abstracts from the most important meetings on this topic. There is increasing evidence that thrombotic complications in patients with hereditary bleeding disorders have a multifactorial pathogenesis, depending on acquired (coagulation factor replacement therapy, central venous catheters, surgery, viral infections) and/or inherited (thrombophilic gene mutations) prothrombotic risk factors.

  1. Acute carpal tunnel syndrome as a result of spontaneous bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Chenicheri; Jarrahnejad, Payam; Balakrishnan, Anila; Huettner, William C

    2008-01-01

    Acute carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common compression neuropathy of the upper extremity following trauma. A rare occurence of spontaneous bleeding into the carpal tunnel, presenting as acute carpal tunnel syndrome, is presented. PMID:19721797

  2. Women Smokers at Higher Risk for Brain Bleed

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of stroke usually results from a bleeding aneurysm in the brain. An aneurysm is a small weak spot in a blood ... factors likely increase the risk of developing an aneurysm that eventually ruptures and causes a subarachnoid hemorrhage, ...

  3. Incidence and risk factors of bleeding-related adverse events in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia treated with ibrutinib

    PubMed Central

    Lipsky, Andrew H.; Farooqui, Mohammed Z.H.; Tian, Xin; Martyr, Sabrina; Cullinane, Ann M.; Nghiem, Khanh; Sun, Clare; Valdez, Janet; Niemann, Carsten U.; Herman, Sarah E. M.; Saba, Nakhle; Soto, Susan; Marti, Gerald; Uzel, Gulbu; Holland, Steve M.; Lozier, Jay N.; Wiestner, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Ibrutinib is associated with bleeding-related adverse events of grade ≤2 in severity, and infrequently with grade ≥3 events. To investigate the mechanisms of bleeding and identify patients at risk, we prospectively assessed platelet function and coagulation factors in our investigator-initiated trial of single-agent ibrutinib for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. At a median follow-up of 24 months we recorded grade ≤2 bleeding-related adverse events in 55% of 85 patients. No grade ≥3 events occurred. Median time to event was 49 days. The cumulative incidence of an event plateaued by 6 months, suggesting that the risk of bleeding decreases with continued therapy. At baseline, von Willebrand factor and factor VIII levels were often high and normalized on treatment. Platelet function measured via the platelet function analyzer (PFA-100™) was impaired in 22 patients at baseline and in an additional 19 patients on ibrutinib (often transiently). Collagen and adenosine diphosphate induced platelet aggregation was tested using whole blood aggregometry. Compared to normal controls, response to both agonists was decreased in all patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, whether on ibrutinib or not. Compared to untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients, response to collagen showed a mild further decrement on ibrutinib, while response to adenosine diphosphate improved. All parameters associated with a significantly increased risk of bleeding-related events were present at baseline, including prolonged epinephrine closure time (HR 2.74, P=0.012), lower levels of von Willebrand factor activity (HR 2.73, P=0.009) and factor VIII (HR 3.73, P=0.0004). In conclusion, both disease and treatment-related factors influence the risk of bleeding. Patients at greater risk for bleeding of grade ≤2 can be identified by clinical laboratory tests and counseled to avoid aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and fish oils. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01500733 PMID

  4. Incidence and risk factors of bleeding-related adverse events in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia treated with ibrutinib.

    PubMed

    Lipsky, Andrew H; Farooqui, Mohammed Z H; Tian, Xin; Martyr, Sabrina; Cullinane, Ann M; Nghiem, Khanh; Sun, Clare; Valdez, Janet; Niemann, Carsten U; Herman, Sarah E M; Saba, Nakhle; Soto, Susan; Marti, Gerald; Uzel, Gulbu; Holland, Steve M; Lozier, Jay N; Wiestner, Adrian

    2015-12-01

    Ibrutinib is associated with bleeding-related adverse events of grade ≤ 2 in severity, and infrequently with grade ≥ 3 events. To investigate the mechanisms of bleeding and identify patients at risk, we prospectively assessed platelet function and coagulation factors in our investigator-initiated trial of single-agent ibrutinib for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. At a median follow-up of 24 months we recorded grade ≤ 2 bleeding-related adverse events in 55% of 85 patients. No grade ≥ 3 events occurred. Median time to event was 49 days. The cumulative incidence of an event plateaued by 6 months, suggesting that the risk of bleeding decreases with continued therapy. At baseline, von Willebrand factor and factor VIII levels were often high and normalized on treatment. Platelet function measured via the platelet function analyzer (PFA-100™) was impaired in 22 patients at baseline and in an additional 19 patients on ibrutinib (often transiently). Collagen and adenosine diphosphate induced platelet aggregation was tested using whole blood aggregometry. Compared to normal controls, response to both agonists was decreased in all patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, whether on ibrutinib or not. Compared to untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients, response to collagen showed a mild further decrement on ibrutinib, while response to adenosine diphosphate improved. All parameters associated with a significantly increased risk of bleeding-related events were present at baseline, including prolonged epinephrine closure time (HR 2.74, P=0.012), lower levels of von Willebrand factor activity (HR 2.73, P=0.009) and factor VIII (HR 3.73, P=0.0004). In conclusion, both disease and treatment-related factors influence the risk of bleeding. Patients at greater risk for bleeding of grade ≤ 2 can be identified by clinical laboratory tests and counseled to avoid aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and fish oils. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01500733.

  5. Efficacy of FEIBA for acute bleeding and surgical haemostasis in haemophilia A patients with inhibitors: a multicentre registry in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Zülfikar, B; Aydogan, G; Salcioglu, Z; Oner, A F; Kavakli, K; Gursel, T; Zülfikar, H

    2012-05-01

    Long used in established industrialized nations to treat patients with haemophilia and inhibitors, factor eight inhibitor bypassing activity (FEIBA) has, in recent years, been introduced into more geographically diverse settings. Data are needed on how successfully FEIBA therapy has been implemented in new regions. To determine the efficacy and safety of FEIBA for the treatment of acute bleeding and surgical haemostasis in a newly industrialized country. A multicentre registry of haemophilia A patients with inhibitors receiving FEIBA treatment was established in Turkey. With a standardized case report form, data were collected retrospectively on: patient demographics; characteristics of acute bleeding episodes and surgical interventions; FEIBA regimen; and treatment outcomes. Thirty-seven patients received a total of 112 FEIBA treatment courses, 90 for acute bleeding and 22 for surgical haemostasis. The median FEIBA dose per infusion for acute bleeding was 50 IU kg(-1), and for surgery was 100 IU kg(-1). For both acute joint and muscle/soft tissue bleeding and in surgery, haemostasis was attained in a median of two FEIBA infusions. FEIBA was judged effective in 92% of treatment courses for acute bleeding, with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 85-97%. Rates of haemostatic efficacy did not differ significantly between anatomical sites of acute bleeding. The haemostatic efficacy rate of FEIBA in surgery was 86% (CI, 65-97%). No thromboembolic complications or other adverse events occurred during any treatment course. FEIBA has been successfully integrated into clinical practice in Turkey, with rates of haemostatic efficacy comparable to those reported in countries with a longer history of FEIBA usage.

  6. Apoplexy in an intradural clival chordoma causing intraventricular bleed

    PubMed Central

    Mohindra, Sandeep; Kapoor, Ankur; Kursa, Gopi Krishna; Mohindra, Satyawati; Saikia, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Background: A few cases depicting apoplexy in a chordoma have been reported. Rarely, this intratumoral bleed may spillover into intracerebral or intraventricular regions. Case Description: The authors report an intradural variety of clival chordoma presenting with apoplexy and spillover of blood into lateral ventricle. Clinical presentation, radiological scans, and relevant literature is also described. Conclusions: In a stable case of clival chordoma, intratumoral bleed or apoplexy may cause rapid neurological worsening and warranting urgent surgical intervention. PMID:26862453

  7. Endoscopic Carbon Dioxide Laser Photocoagulation Of Bleeding Canine Gastric Ulcers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Dov; Ron, Nimrod; Orgad, Uri; Katzir, Abraham

    1987-04-01

    This is the first report which describes carbon dioxide laser photocoagulation of upper gastrointestinal bleeding via a flexible endoscope, using an infrared transmitting siver nalide fiber. Various laser parameters were checked to determine the optimal conditions for hemostasis. Both the acute effects of laser irradiation on tissue and the chronic effects on healing process were examined. Preliminary results indicate that carbon dioxide laser beam can successfully photocoagulate moderately bleeding ulcers.

  8. A pediatric case of factitious disorder with unexplained bleeding symptoms.

    PubMed

    Uzuner, Selcuk; Bahali, Kayhan; Kurban, Sema; Erenberk, Ufuk; Cakir, Erkan

    2013-01-01

    Factitious disorder is characterized by deliberate production or imitation of physical or psychological symptoms in order to adopt the sick role. The disorder can be seen as factitious bleeding. Factitious bleeding is a rare disorder in pediatric population. The concomitant appearance of hemoptysis and hematuria in the same patient has not been previously reported. In this case report, we present a pediatric case of factitious disorder with both hemoptysis and hematuria. PMID:24199786

  9. ENDOSCOPIC DIAGNOSIS AND THERAPY IN GASTRO-ESOPAGEAL VARICEAL BLEEDING

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Arun J.

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal variceal hemorrhage is a medical emergency with high morbidity and mortality. Endoscopic therapy is the mainstay of management of bleeding varices. It requires attention to technique and the appropriate choice of therapy for a given patient at a given point in time. Subjects must be monitored continuously after initiation of therapy for control of bleeding and second line definitive therapies introduced quickly if endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment fails. PMID:26142034

  10. Amphetamine-related ischemic colitis causing gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Panikkath, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented with acute lower intestinal bleeding requiring blood transfusion. Multiple initial investigations did not reveal the cause of the bleeding. Colonoscopy performed 2 days later showed features suggestive of ischemic colitis. On detailed history, the patient admitted to using amphetamines, and her urine drug screen was positive for them. She was managed conservatively and advised not to use amphetamines again. She did not have any recurrence on 2-year follow-up. PMID:27365888

  11. Transarterial embolization for management of severe postcoital bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Eskandari, Armen; Mukherjee, Ashis; McHugh, John

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Postcoital bleeding is an uncommon cause of gynecologic hemorrhage; however, it can be severe in a majority of cases necessitating surgical management. Methods: We report a case of severe postcoital bleeding in a young woman requiring blood transfusion. Results: Hemostasis was achieved using subselective embolization of cervical artery by metallic coils. Conclusion: Our case demonstrates a minimally invasive treatment for control of non-obstetric hemorrhage. PMID:27551425

  12. Detection of Intrathoracic Bleeding by 99mTc-Labeled Red Blood Cell SPECT/CT After Wedge Biopsy of Pulmonary Angiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Provost, Karine; Charest, Mathieu

    2016-09-01

    A 52-y-old man presenting with dyspnea and a massive effusion in the right pleural cavity underwent wedge biopsies of pulmonary lesions found on thoracic CT, leading to a diagnosis of pleural angiosarcoma. Bleeding developed postoperatively and was investigated using pulmonary CT angiography, which failed to identify a site of active bleeding. (99m)Tc-labeled red blood cell (RBC) SPECT/CT of the chest was performed, and the site was rapidly located. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in the literature of localization of intrathoracic bleeding using (99m)Tc-RBC SPECT/CT. PMID:27363446

  13. Human CalDAG-GEFI gene (RASGRP2) mutation affects platelet function and causes severe bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Canault, Matthias; Ghalloussi, Dorsaf; Grosdidier, Charlotte; Guinier, Marie; Perret, Claire; Chelghoum, Nadjim; Germain, Marine; Raslova, Hana; Peiretti, Franck; Morange, Pierre E.; Saut, Noemie; Pillois, Xavier; Nurden, Alan T.; Cambien, François; Pierres, Anne; van den Berg, Timo K.; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Tregouet, David-Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    The nature of an inherited platelet disorder was investigated in three siblings affected by severe bleeding. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified the culprit mutation (cG742T) in the RAS guanyl-releasing protein-2 (RASGRP2) gene coding for calcium- and DAG-regulated guanine exchange factor-1 (CalDAG-GEFI). Platelets from individuals carrying the mutation present a reduced ability to activate Rap1 and to perform proper αIIbβ3 integrin inside-out signaling. Expression of CalDAG-GEFI mutant in HEK293T cells abolished Rap1 activation upon stimulation. Nevertheless, the PKC- and ADP-dependent pathways allow residual platelet activation in the absence of functional CalDAG-GEFI. The mutation impairs the platelet’s ability to form thrombi under flow and spread normally as a consequence of reduced Rac1 GTP-binding. Functional deficiencies were confined to platelets and megakaryocytes with no leukocyte alteration. This contrasts with the phenotype seen in type III leukocyte adhesion deficiency caused by the absence of kindlin-3. Heterozygous did not suffer from bleeding and have normal platelet aggregation; however, their platelets mimicked homozygous ones by failing to undergo normal adhesion under flow and spreading. Rescue experiments on cultured patient megakaryocytes corrected the functional deficiency after transfection with wild-type RASGRP2. Remarkably, the presence of a single normal allele is sufficient to prevent bleeding, making CalDAG-GEFI a novel and potentially safe therapeutic target to prevent thrombosis. PMID:24958846

  14. Optimizing human apyrase to treat arterial thrombosis and limit reperfusion injury without increasing bleeding risk.

    PubMed

    Moeckel, Douglas; Jeong, Soon Soeg; Sun, Xiaofeng; Broekman, M Johan; Nguyen, Annie; Drosopoulos, Joan H F; Marcus, Aaron J; Robson, Simon C; Chen, Ridong; Abendschein, Dana

    2014-08-01

    In patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing reperfusion therapy to restore blood flow through blocked arteries, simultaneous inhibition of platelet P2Y12 receptors with the current standard of care neither completely prevents recurrent thrombosis nor provides satisfactory protection against reperfusion injury. Additionally, these antiplatelet drugs increase the risk of bleeding. To devise a different strategy, we engineered and optimized the apyrase activity of human nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-3 (CD39L3) to enhance scavenging of extracellular adenosine diphosphate, a predominant ligand of P2Y12 receptors. The resulting recombinant protein, APT102, exhibited greater than four times higher adenosine diphosphatase activity and a 50 times longer plasma half-life than did native apyrase. Treatment with APT102 before coronary fibrinolysis with intravenous recombinant human tissue-type plasminogen activator in conscious dogs completely prevented thrombotic reocclusion and significantly decreased infarction size by 81% without increasing bleeding time. In contrast, clopidogrel did not prevent coronary reocclusion and increased bleeding time. In a murine model of myocardial reperfusion injury caused by transient coronary artery occlusion, APT102 also decreased infarct size by 51%, whereas clopidogrel was not effective. These preclinical data suggest that APT102 should be tested for its ability to safely and effectively maximize the benefits of myocardial reperfusion therapy in patients with arterial thrombosis.

  15. Heavy menstrual bleeding and health-associated quality of life in women with von Willebrand's disease

    PubMed Central

    GOVOROV, IGOR; EKELUND, LENA; CHAIRETI, ROZA; ELFVINGE, PETRA; HOLMSTRÖM, MARGARETA; BREMME, KATARINA; MINTS, MIRIAM

    2016-01-01

    Women with the inherited bleeding disorder von Willebrand's disease (VWD) face gender-specific hemostatic challenges during menstruation. Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) can negatively affect their overall life activities and the health-associated quality of life. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether women with VWD experienced HMB and an impaired health-associated quality of life. The study subjects were recruited from the Coagulation Unit of Karolinska University Hospital. Information was retrieved from various self-administered forms and medical records. Of the 30 women (18–52 years) that were included in the present study, 50% suffered from HMB, although the majority received treatment for HMB. In addition, almost all the included women perceived limitations in the overall life activities due to menstruation. The health-associated quality of life for women with HMB was significantly lower (P<0.10) with regards to ‘bodily pain’ compared with Swedish women of the general population. In conclusion, women with VWD experienced reduced health-associated quality of life as a result of HMB. Therefore, preventing limitations in overall life activities and improving their health-associated quality of life thorough counseling on menstrual bleeding is important for women with VWD. PMID:27168829

  16. Elastic adhesive dressing treatment of bleeding wounds in trauma victims.

    PubMed

    Naimer, S A; Chemla, F

    2000-11-01

    Conventional methods for hemorrhage control in the trauma patient fall short of providing a full solution for the life-threatening bleeding injury. The tourniquet is limited specifically to injuries of the distal limbs. Local pressure or tight bandaging with military bandages is cumbersome and often insufficient. Therefore, we sought a superior method to stop bleeding in emergency situations. Our objective is report and description of our experience with this method. Since 1992 our trauma team repeatedly encountered multiple trauma victims presenting with bleeding wounds. We achieved hemorrhage control by means of an adhesive elastic bandage applied directly over a collection of 4 x 4 gauze pads placed on the wound surface. The roll is then wrapped around the body surface, over the bleeding site, until sufficient pressure is reached to terminate ongoing hemorrhage. Three typical cases are described in detail. Adhesive elastic dressing compression was successful in fully controlling bleeding without compromise of distal blood flow. Our method corresponded to the demand for an immediate, effective and lasting form of hemorrhage control without complications. Furthermore, this technique proved successful even over body surfaces normally recognized as difficult to compress. We experienced equal favorable success while working during transit by either ambulance or helicopter transportation. We find our preliminary experience using elastic adhesive dressing for bleeding control encouraging and suggest that this may substitute existing practices as the selected treatment when indicated. This method is presently underrecognized for this purpose. Development of a single unit bandage may further enhance success in the future.

  17. Liquefied Bleed for Stability and Efficiency of High Speed Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, J. David; Davis, David; Barsi, Stephen J.; Deans, Matthew C.; Weir, Lois J.; Sanders, Bobby W.

    2014-01-01

    A mission analysis code was developed to perform a trade study on the effectiveness of liquefying bleed for the inlet of the first stage of a TSTO vehicle. By liquefying bleed, the vehicle weight (TOGW) could be reduced by 7 to 23%. Numerous simplifying assumptions were made and lessons were learned. Increased accuracy in future analyses can be achieved by: Including a higher fidelity model to capture the effect of rescaling (variable vehicle TOGW). Refining specific thrust and impulse models ( T m a and Isp) to preserve fuel-to-air ratio. Implementing LH2 for T m a and Isp. Correlating baseline design to other mission analyses and correcting vehicle design elements. Implementing angle-of-attack effects on inlet characteristics. Refining aerodynamic performance (to improve L/D ratio at higher Mach numbers). Examining the benefit with partial cooling or densification of the bleed air stream. Incorporating higher fidelity weight estimates for the liquefied bleed system (heat exchange and liquid storage versus bleed duct weights) could be added when more fully developed. Adding trim drag or 6-degree-of-freedom trajectory analysis for higher fidelity. Investigating vehicle optimization for each of the bleed configurations.

  18. Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Is Urgent Colonoscopy Necessary for All Hematochezia?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is defined as acute or chronic abnormal blood loss distal to the ligament of Treitz. The incidence of LGIB is only one fifth of that of the upper gastrointestinal tract and is estimated to be 21 to 27 cases per 100,000 adults per year. Acute bleeding is arbitrarily defined as bleeding of <3 days' duration resulting in instability of vital signs, anemia, and/or need for blood transfusion. Chronic bleeding is defined as slow blood loss over a period of several days or longer presenting with symptoms of occult fecal blood, intermittent melena, or scant hematochezia. Bleeding means that the amounts of blood in the feces are too small to be seen but detectable by chemical tests. LGIB is usually chronic and stops spontaneously. Bleeding stop (80%), but male gender and older patients suffer from more severe LGIB. The optimal timing of colonoscopic intervention for LGIB remains uncertain. Urgent colonoscopy may serve to decrease hospital stay. However, urgent colonoscopy is difficult to control, and showed no evidence of improving clinical outcomes or lowering costs as compared with routine elective colonoscopy. PMID:24143306

  19. Bleeding after endoscopic submucosal dissection: Risk factors and preventive methods

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Yosuke; Tsuji, Yosuke; Sakaguchi, Yoshiki; Minatsuki, Chihiro; Asada-Hirayama, Itsuko; Niimi, Keiko; Ono, Satoshi; Kodashima, Shinya; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has become widely accepted as a standard method of treatment for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms because it enables en block resection even for large lesions or fibrotic lesions with minimal invasiveness, and decreases the local recurrence rate. Moreover, specimens resected in an en block fashion enable accurate histological assessment. Taking these factors into consideration, ESD seems to be more advantageous than conventional endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), but the associated risks of perioperative adverse events are higher than in EMR. Bleeding after ESD is the most frequent among these adverse events. Although post-ESD bleeding can be controlled by endoscopic hemostasis in most cases, it may lead to serious conditions including hemorrhagic shock. Even with preventive methods including administration of acid secretion inhibitors and preventive hemostasis, post-ESD bleeding cannot be completely prevented. In addition high-risk cases for post-ESD bleeding, which include cases with the use of antithrombotic agents or which require large resection, are increasing. Although there have been many reports about associated risk factors and methods of preventing post-ESD bleeding, many issues remain unsolved. Therefore, in this review, we have overviewed risk factors and methods of preventing post-ESD bleeding from previous studies. Endoscopists should have sufficient knowledge of these risk factors and preventive methods when performing ESD. PMID:27468187

  20. Novel capsules for potential theranostics of obscure gastrointestinal bleedings.

    PubMed

    Çolak, Bayram; Şakalak, Hüseyin; Çavuşoğlu, Halit; Yavuz, Mustafa Selman

    2016-09-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is identified as persistent or repeated bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract which could not be defined by conventional gastrointestinal endoscopy and radiological examinations. These GI bleedings are assessed through invasive diagnostic and treatment methods including enteroscopy, angiography and endoscopy. In addition, video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is a non-invasive method used to determine the location of the bleeding, however, this does not provide any treatment. Despite of these successful but invasive methods, an effective non-invasive treatment is desperately needed. Herein, we prepare non-invasive theranostic capsules to cure obscure GI bleeding. An effective theranostic capsule containing endothelin as the targeting agent, thrombin-fibrinogen or fibrin as the treating agent, and fluorescein dye as the diagnostic tool is suggested. These theranostic capsules can be administered orally in a simple and non-invasive manner without a risk of complication. By using these novel capsules, one can diagnose obscure GI bleeding with having a possibility of curing. PMID:27515212

  1. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding due to multifocal intestinal angiosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Chagoya, Dolores; Figueroa-Ruiz, Marco; López-Gómez, Javier; Nava-Leyva, Héctor; Álvarez-Ponce, Carlos Eduardo; Guzmán-Sombrero, Gustavo; Velazquez-Garcia, José

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intestinal angiosarcomas are an extremely rare and aggressive vascular tumors, with a few cases reported in the literature. Presentation of case A 45 years-old male arrived to our hospital with intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding presenting melena and weight loss, he has antecedent of pelvic radiotherapy ten years before admission for an unknown pelvic tumor. Emergency surgery was required because of uncontrolled bleeding and hemodynamic instability. Histopathological findings revealed a multifocal high-grade epithelioid angiosarcoma, with cells reactive for CD31, keratins CKAE 1/AE3 and factor VIII. Discussion Angiosarcomas are aggressive tumors with a high rate of lymph node metastasis and peripheral organs. The diagnosis is difficult because it present nonspecific clinical presentation, radiological and histopathological findings. There are few reports of angiosarcoma involving the small intestine and the most common presentation are abdominal pain and gastrointestinal bleeding. There is not enough information for intestinal angiosarcoma secondary to radiation therapy, but there have been proposed criteria for diagnosis: no microscopic or clinical evidence of antecedent malignant lesion, angiosarcoma presented in the field of irradiation, long latency period between radiation and angiosarcoma and histological confirmation. We suspect our patient course with a secondary form of angiosarcoma. Therapy for bleeding angiosarcoma consists in control of bleeding and medical management to stabilize the patient. Once accomplished surgical resection is required. Conclusion We should keep in mind this tumors as a cause of obscure intestinal bleeding in patients with medical history of radiation therapy. PMID:25853844

  2. Ultrasound contrast agents for bleeding detection and acoustic hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zderic, Vesna; Luo, Wenbo; Brayman, Andrew; Crum, Lawrence; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-04-01

    Objective: To investigate the application of ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) in improving both therapeutic and diagnostic aspects of ultrasound-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. Methods: Incisions (3 cm long, 0.5 cm deep) were made in rabbit livers (in anterior surface for HIFU treatment, or posterior surface for bleeding detection). UCA Optison (~0.1 ml/kg) was injected into mesenteric vein or ear vein. A HIFU applicator (5.5 MHz, 6400 W/cm2) was scanned manually over the incision until hemostasis was achieved. Occult bleeding was monitored with Doppler ultrasound. Results: The presence of Optison produced 37% reduction in hemostasis times normalized to initial bleeding rates. Gross and histological observations showed similar appearance of HIFU lesions produced in the presence of Optison and control HIFU lesions. The temperature reached 100°C in both HIFU only and HIFU+UCA treatments. Tension strength of hemostatic liver incisions was 0.9+/-0.5 N. Almost no bleeding could be detected before Optison injection. First appearance of contrast enhancement localized at the bleeding site was 15 s after Optison injection, and lasted for ~50 s. Conclusion: The presence of UCA during HIFU treatment of liver incisions resulted in shortening of HIFU application times and better visualization of bleeding sites.

  3. Predicting risk of upper gastrointestinal bleed and intracranial bleed with anticoagulants: cohort study to derive and validate the QBleed scores

    PubMed Central

    Coupland, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate risk algorithms (QBleed) for estimating the absolute risk of upper gastrointestinal and intracranial bleed for patients with and without anticoagulation aged 21-99 years in primary care. Design Open cohort study using routinely collected data from general practice linked to hospital episode statistics data and mortality data during the five year study period between 1 January 2008 and 1 October 2013. Setting 565 general practices in England contributing to the national QResearch database to develop the algorithm and 188 different QResearch practices to validate the algorithm. All 753 general practices had data linked to hospital episode statistics and mortality data at individual patient level. Endpoint Gastrointestinal bleed and intracranial bleed recorded on either the linked mortality data or the linked hospital records. Participants We studied 4.4 million patients in the derivation cohort with 16.4 million person years of follow-up. During follow-up, 21 641 patients had an incident upper gastrointestinal bleed and 9040 had an intracranial bleed. For the validation cohort, we identified 1.4 million patients contributing over 4.9 million person years of follow-up. During follow-up, 6600 patients had an incident gastrointestinal bleed and 2820 had an intracranial bleed. We excluded patients without a valid Townsend score for deprivation and those prescribed anticoagulants in the 180 days before study entry. Risk factors Candidate variables recorded on the general practice computer system before entry to the cohort, including personal variables (age, sex, Townsend deprivation score, ethnicity), lifestyle variables (smoking, alcohol intake), chronic diseases, prescribed drugs, clinical values (body mass index, systolic blood pressure), and laboratory test results (haemoglobin, platelets). We also included previous bleed recorded before entry to the study. Results The final QBleed algorithms incorporated 21 variables. When applied

  4. Impact Of Standing Bleed Water On Saltstone Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A. D.; Pickenheim, B. R.

    2012-09-28

    The amount of water present during placement and subsequent curing of saltstone has the potential to impact several properties important for grout quality. An active drain water system can remove residual standing water and expose the surface of the placed saltstone to air. Oxidation of the saltstone may result in an increase in the leachability of redox sensitive elements. A dry surface can lead to cracking, causing an increase in hydraulic conductivity. An inactive drain water system can allow standing water that generates unnecessary hydrostatic head on the vault walls. Standing water that cannot be removed via the drain system will be available for potential incorporation into subsequent grout placements. The objective of this work is to study the impact of standing water on grout quality pertaining to disposal units. A series of saltstone mixes were prepared, and cured at ambient temperature to evaluate the impact of standing water on saltstone placement. The samples were managed to control drying effects on leachability by either exposing or capping the samples. The water to premix ratio was varied to represent a range of processing conditions. Samples were analyzed for density, leachability, and hydraulic conductivity. A monolith of each composition was cut into four sections to analyze the homogeneity of the sample with respect to vertical position within the sample. The density of each section was measured by two methods, helium pycnometry and by ASTM 642-06. The results show a trend of increasing density with increasing depth in the samples. This effect is more pronounced with the inclusion of excess bleed water and indicative of increased settling. The leachability of the eight different samples was analyzed by ANS/ANSI 16.1 method. These results indicate that drying of the saltstone during curing leads to decreased Leachability Indices (indicative of more release) for potassium, sodium, rhenium, nitrite, and nitrate. This may be caused by shrinkage

  5. Argon plasma coagulation for the endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal tumor bleeding: A retrospective comparison with a non-treated historical cohort

    PubMed Central

    Wodak, Stephanie; Gusmon, Carla C; Safatle-Ribeiro, Adriana Vaz; Kawaguti, Fabio Shiguehissa; Baba, Elisa Ryoka; Pennacchi, Caterina MP; Lima, Marcelo Simas; Ribeiro, Ulysses; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2015-01-01

    Background The endoscopic use of argon plasma coagulation (APC) to achieve hemostasis for upper gastrointestinal tumor bleeding (UGITB) has not been adequately evaluated in controlled trials. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of APC for the treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding from malignant lesions. Methods Between January and September 2011, all patients with UGITB underwent high-potency APC therapy (up to 70 Watts). This group was compared with a historical cohort of patients admitted between January and December 2010, when the endoscopic treatment of bleeding malignancies was not routinely performed. Patients were stratified into two categories, grouping the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status scale: Category I (ECOG 0–2) patients with a good clinical status and Category II (ECOG 3–4) patients with a poor clinical status. Results Our study had 25 patients with UGITB whom underwent APC treatment and 28 patients whom received no endoscopic therapy. The clinical characteristics of the groups were similar, except for endoscopic active bleeding, which was more frequently detected in APC group. We had 15 patients in the APC group whom had active bleeding, and initial hemostasis was obtained in 11 of them (73.3%). In the control group, four patients had active bleeding. There were no differences in 30-day re-bleeding (33.3% in the APC group versus 14.3% in the control group; p = 0.104) and 30-day mortality rates (20.8% in the APC group, versus 42.9% in the control group; p = 0.091). When patients were categorized according to their ECOG status, we found that APC therapy had no impact in re-bleeding and mortality rates (Group I: APC versus no endoscopic treatment: re-bleeding p = 0.412, mortality p = 0.669; Group II: APC versus no endoscopic treatment: re-bleeding p = 0.505, mortality p = 0.580). Hematemesis and site of bleeding located at the esophagus or duodenum were associated with a higher 30-day

  6. A rare cause of bleeding after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy : pseudo-aneurysm of the gastro-omental artery.

    PubMed

    Mege, D; Louis, G; Berthet, B

    2013-01-01

    A serious complication of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is bleeding that is primarily located along the staples lines. Bleeding may be due to several causes, including hematomas, trocar sites, or visceral pseudo-aneurysms. We reported here a case of bleeding related to a pseudo-aneurysm of the gastro-omental artery. An LSG was performed on a 43-year-old woman (BMI = 46 kg/m2) without apparent surgical complications. Fifteen days later, she was admitted to the emergency department for hematemesis and symptoms of hemorrhagic shock. Abdominal computed tomography angiography revealed blood in the stomach, without a digestive leak, and active bleeding from a pseudo-aneurysm of the gastro-omental artery. An arterial embolisation was performed with the sandwich technique and angiographic guide wires and the placement of several detachable coils. The patient was discharged two days later. We demonstrated for the first time that post-LSG bleeding may involve a pseudo-aneurysm of the gastro-omental artery.

  7. Impact of Mean Platelet Volume on Combined Safety Endpoint and Vascular and Bleeding Complications following Percutaneous Transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Magri, Caroline J.; Chieffo, Alaide; Durante, Alessandro; Latib, Azeem; Maisano, Francesco; Cioni, Michela; Agricola, Eustachio; Covello, Remo Daniel; Gerli, Chiara; Franco, Annalisa; Spagnolo, Pietro; Alfieri, Ottavio; Colombo, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Background. Vascular and bleeding complications remain important complications in patients undergoing percutaneous transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TF-TAVI). Platelets play an important role in bleeding events. Mean platelet volume (MPV) is an indicator of platelet activation. The objective of this study was to assess whether low MPV is an indicator of major vascular and bleeding complications following TF-TAVI. Methods. A retrospective cohort study of 330 subjects undergoing TF-TAVI implantation was performed. The primary study endpoint was the occurrence of combined safety endpoint (CSEP); secondary endpoints included major vascular complications and life-threatening bleeding. Endpoints were defined according to Valve Academic Research Consortium 2. Results. The CSEP at 30 days was reached in 30.9%; major vascular complications were observed in 14.9% while life-threatening bleeding occurred in 20.6%. Logistic Euroscore and MPV were independent predictors of CSEP. Predictors of vascular complications were female sex, previous myocardial infarction, red blood cell distribution width (RDW), and MPV while predictors of life-threatening bleeding were peripheral arterial disease, RDW, and MPV. Conclusion. A low baseline MPV was shown for the first time to be a significant predictor of CSEP, major vascular complications, and life-threatening bleeding following TF-TAVI. PMID:24455712

  8. Evaluation of the effect of green tea extract on the prevention of gingival bleeding after posterior mandibular teeth extraction: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Rasool; Haghighat, Abbas; Fanaei, Mehrdad; Asghari, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Background. Removing tooth results in gingival bleeding. Several measures are taken to stop bleeding. In this study, the effect of green tea extract on cessation of bleeding and oozing after removing of mandibular molars was investigated. Methods. This was a randomized controlled clinical trial carried out on 62 patients who were referred for extraction of their mandibular molars. The volunteers were randomly and equally divided into treatment and control groups. In the first group, green tea extract-impregnated sterile gauze was used after removing the tooth while in the second group, green tea extract-free gauze was applied. Active bleeding and oozing monitoring was done every 5 minutes until cessation of bleeding and one hour after that, respectively. The results were compared using t-test. Results. The mean ± SD of bleeding duration in green tea group was significantly lower than control group (5.87 ± 1.76 versus 10.09 ± 3.61 minutes, P = 0.001). In addition, the number of people with oozing one hour after surgery was significantly lower in the green tea group (6 versus 29 persons, P = 0.001). Conclusion. This study showed that green tea extract contributes to significant decline in bleeding of the socket caused by tooth extraction as well as reduction of oozing. PMID:25024733

  9. Occult gastric bleeding demonstrated by bone scan and Tc-99m-DTPA renal scan

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.W.; Leiter, B.E.; Weitzman, F.; Shapiro, J.H.

    1981-10-01

    A patient is described who had coagulopathy and clinically intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding. The bleeding site was clearly shown on renal and bone imaging performed at a time when the patient was considered clinically to have stopped bleeding. A bleeding gastric ulcer was subsequently demonstrated by radionuclide and contrast angiography, and at surgery.

  10. Complex haemostatic abnormalities as a cause of bleeding after neurosurgery in a patient with Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Mitrovic, Mirjana; Elezovic, Ivo; Grujicic, Danica; Miljic, Predrag; Suvajdzic, Nada

    2015-01-01

    We report a treatment-naïve patient with Gaucher disease (GD) who experienced repeated bleeding after three neurosurgeries for a brain tumour, identified as an oligoastrocytoma. The patient had normal values on basic haemostatic tests: prothrombin time, 75-105%; activated partial thromboplastin time, 30.3-34 s; and mild thrombocytopaenia, 96-115 × 10(9 )cells/l. However, additional tests showed mild von Willebrand factor (vWF) deficiency (vWF antigen, 56%; vWF ristocetin cofactor, 49%; factor VIII [FVIII], 54%) and abnormal collagen-mediated platelet aggregation (0.45-0.55). Bleeding control was achieved after vWF/FVIII concentrate and platelet transfusions. This case raises questions about the safe platelet count and basic haemostatic tests for assessing bleeding risk in patients with GD prior to surgery. In patients with GD, a minimum haemostatic evaluation should include platelet count and basic haemostatic tests such as fibrinogen, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time as well as platelet function tests and assessing vWF and FVIII levels. Specific coagulation factors or platelet function deficiencies should be corrected with factor concentrates or platelet transfusions.

  11. Haemosuccus pancreaticus, an uncommon cause of upper gastro intestinal bleeding: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amir Ali; Charon, Jean Pierre

    2015-06-01

    Haemosuccus Pancreaticus is defined as upper gastro intestinal (GI) bleeding from the ampula of vater via the pancreatic duct. It is most commonly associated with pancreatic inflammation, erosion of the pancrease by aneurysm or pseudo-aneurysm of the splenic artery. We report a 69 year old man with previous history of acute pancreatitis who was admitted with recurrent haematemesis. Initial upper GI endocopy was normal, while admitted, he collapse with abdominal pain and hypotension. He was resuscitated with blood and intravenous fluid. Repeat upper GI endocopy showed fresh blood in the duodenum, but no active bleeding site was demonstrated. An urgent coeliac axis CT angiogram was done which showed an splenic artery pseudo-aneurysm, which was successfully embolized. Patient is well 9 months after the procedure. This case highlights the importance of considering coeliac axis CT angiogram as part of investigation for obscure GI bleeding. PMID:26060169

  12. Haemosuccus pancreaticus, an uncommon cause of upper gastro intestinal bleeding: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amir Ali; Charon, Jean Pierre

    2015-06-01

    Haemosuccus Pancreaticus is defined as upper gastro intestinal (GI) bleeding from the ampula of vater via the pancreatic duct. It is most commonly associated with pancreatic inflammation, erosion of the pancrease by aneurysm or pseudo-aneurysm of the splenic artery. We report a 69 year old man with previous history of acute pancreatitis who was admitted with recurrent haematemesis. Initial upper GI endocopy was normal, while admitted, he collapse with abdominal pain and hypotension. He was resuscitated with blood and intravenous fluid. Repeat upper GI endocopy showed fresh blood in the duodenum, but no active bleeding site was demonstrated. An urgent coeliac axis CT angiogram was done which showed an splenic artery pseudo-aneurysm, which was successfully embolized. Patient is well 9 months after the procedure. This case highlights the importance of considering coeliac axis CT angiogram as part of investigation for obscure GI bleeding.

  13. A novel semi-quantitative method for measuring tissue bleeding.

    PubMed

    Vukcevic, G; Volarevic, V; Raicevic, S; Tanaskovic, I; Milicic, B; Vulovic, T; Arsenijevic, S

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we describe a new semi-quantitative method for measuring the extent of bleeding in pathohistological tissue samples. To test our novel method, we recruited 120 female patients in their first trimester of pregnancy and divided them into three groups of 40. Group I was the control group, in which no dilation was applied. Group II was an experimental group, in which dilation was performed using classical mechanical dilators. Group III was also an experimental group, in which dilation was performed using a hydraulic dilator. Tissue samples were taken from the patients' cervical canals using a Novak's probe via energetic single-step curettage prior to any dilation in Group I and after dilation in Groups II and III. After the tissue samples were prepared, light microscopy was used to obtain microphotographs at 100x magnification. The surfaces affected by bleeding were measured in the microphotographs using the Autodesk AutoCAD 2009 program and its "polylines" function. The lines were used to mark the area around the entire sample (marked A) and to create "polyline" areas around each bleeding area on the sample (marked B). The percentage of the total area affected by bleeding was calculated using the formula: N = Bt x 100 / At where N is the percentage (%) of the tissue sample surface affected by bleeding, At (A total) is the sum of the surfaces of all of the tissue samples and Bt (B total) is the sum of all the surfaces affected by bleeding in all of the tissue samples. This novel semi-quantitative method utilizes the Autodesk AutoCAD 2009 program, which is simple to use and widely available, thereby offering a new, objective and precise approach to estimate the extent of bleeding in tissue samples. PMID:24190861

  14. A novel semi-quantitative method for measuring tissue bleeding.

    PubMed

    Vukcevic, G; Volarevic, V; Raicevic, S; Tanaskovic, I; Milicic, B; Vulovic, T; Arsenijevic, S

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we describe a new semi-quantitative method for measuring the extent of bleeding in pathohistological tissue samples. To test our novel method, we recruited 120 female patients in their first trimester of pregnancy and divided them into three groups of 40. Group I was the control group, in which no dilation was applied. Group II was an experimental group, in which dilation was performed using classical mechanical dilators. Group III was also an experimental group, in which dilation was performed using a hydraulic dilator. Tissue samples were taken from the patients' cervical canals using a Novak's probe via energetic single-step curettage prior to any dilation in Group I and after dilation in Groups II and III. After the tissue samples were prepared, light microscopy was used to obtain microphotographs at 100x magnification. The surfaces affected by bleeding were measured in the microphotographs using the Autodesk AutoCAD 2009 program and its "polylines" function. The lines were used to mark the area around the entire sample (marked A) and to create "polyline" areas around each bleeding area on the sample (marked B). The percentage of the total area affected by bleeding was calculated using the formula: N = Bt x 100 / At where N is the percentage (%) of the tissue sample surface affected by bleeding, At (A total) is the sum of the surfaces of all of the tissue samples and Bt (B total) is the sum of all the surfaces affected by bleeding in all of the tissue samples. This novel semi-quantitative method utilizes the Autodesk AutoCAD 2009 program, which is simple to use and widely available, thereby offering a new, objective and precise approach to estimate the extent of bleeding in tissue samples.

  15. Fermented Foods: Are They Tasty Medicines for Helicobacter pylori Associated Peptic Ulcer and Gastric Cancer?

    PubMed

    Nair, Mydhily R B; Chouhan, Deepak; Sen Gupta, Sourav; Chattopadhyay, Santanu

    2016-01-01

    More than a million people die every year due to gastric cancer and peptic ulcer. Helicobacter pylori infection in stomach is the most important reason for these diseases. Interestingly, only 10-20% of the H. pylori infected individuals suffer from these gastric diseases and rest of the infected individuals remain asymptomatic. The genotypes of H. pylori, host genetic background, lifestyle including smoking and diet may determine clinical outcomes. People from different geographical regions have different food habits, which also include several unique fermented products of plant and animal origins. When consumed raw, the fermented foods bring in fresh inocula of microbes to gastrointestinal tract and several strains of these microbes, like Lactobacillus and Saccharomyces are known probiotics. In vitro and in vivo experiments as well as clinical trials suggest that several probiotics have anti-H. pylori effects. Here we discuss the possibility of using natural probiotics present in traditional fermented food and beverages to obtain protection against H. pylori induced gastric diseases. PMID:27504109

  16. Long-Term Recurrence Rates of Peptic Ulcers without Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jae Hyun; Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Kim, Byung-Wook; Jee, Sam Ryong; Chung, Woo Chul; Shim, Ki-Nam; Baik, Gwang Ho; Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Sang Gyun; Kim, Jin Il

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The purpose of this study is to investigate the recurrence rate of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) over a long follow-up period with PUD patients without Helicobacter pylori. Methods We retrospectively reviewed patients diagnosed with PUD on endoscopy and divided them into two groups: a H. pylori-negative group (HP-negative group), and a group of patients with untreated H. pylori (HP noneradicated group). We compared the recurrence rates of PUD in these two groups and analyzed the factors that affected ulcer recurrence. Results Total of nine hospitals in Korea participated, and a total of 1,761 patients were retrospectively reviewed. The HP-negative group included 553 patients, and the HP noneradicated group included 372 patients. The 5-year cumulative probabilities of PUD recurrence were 36.4% in the HP-negative group and 43.8% in the HP noneradicated group (p=0.113). The factors that were found to affect recurrence in the HP-negative group were elder, male, and comorbid chronic kidney disease. Conclusions The 5-year cumulative probability of PUD recurrence without H. pylori infection after a long-term follow-up was 36.4% and the factors that affected recurrence were elder, male, and comorbid chronic kidney disease. PMID:27114412

  17. Increased Subsequent Risk of Peptic Ulcer Diseases in Patients With Bipolar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yi-Chao; Hsu, Chih-Chao; Chang, Kuang-Hsi; Lee, Chang-Yin; Chong, Lee-Won; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have reported that patients with bipolar disorders (BDs) exhibit increased physical comorbidity and psychological distress. Studies have shown that schizophrenia and anxiety increase the risk of peptic ulcer diseases (PUDs). Therefore, we conducted this study to determine the association between these 2 diseases and examine the possible risk factors. We used patients diagnosed with BDs from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A comparison cohort comprising patients without BDs was frequency matched by age, sex, and comorbidities, and the occurrence of PUDs was evaluated in both the cohorts. The BD and non-BD cohort consisted of 21,060 patients with BDs and 84,240 frequency-matched patients without BDs, respectively. The incidence of PUDs (hazard ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.43–1.59; P < 0.001) was higher among the patients with BDs than the control patients. Cox models showed that irrespective of comorbidities, BDs were an independent risk factor for PUDs. Patients with BDs exhibit a substantially higher risk for developing PUDs. According to our data, we suggest that, following a diagnosis of BD, practitioners could notice the occurrence of PUD and associated prevention. Further prospective clinical studies investigating the relationship between BDs and PUDs are warranted. PMID:26200637

  18. Fermented Foods: Are They Tasty Medicines for Helicobacter pylori Associated Peptic Ulcer and Gastric Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Mydhily R. B.; Chouhan, Deepak; Sen Gupta, Sourav; Chattopadhyay, Santanu

    2016-01-01

    More than a million people die every year due to gastric cancer and peptic ulcer. Helicobacter pylori infection in stomach is the most important reason for these diseases. Interestingly, only 10–20% of the H. pylori infected individuals suffer from these gastric diseases and rest of the infected individuals remain asymptomatic. The genotypes of H. pylori, host genetic background, lifestyle including smoking and diet may determine clinical outcomes. People from different geographical regions have different food habits, which also include several unique fermented products of plant and animal origins. When consumed raw, the fermented foods bring in fresh inocula of microbes to gastrointestinal tract and several strains of these microbes, like Lactobacillus and Saccharomyces are known probiotics. In vitro and in vivo experiments as well as clinical trials suggest that several probiotics have anti-H. pylori effects. Here we discuss the possibility of using natural probiotics present in traditional fermented food and beverages to obtain protection against H. pylori induced gastric diseases. PMID:27504109

  19. Management and outcome of bleeding pseudoaneurysm associated with chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jun-Te; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Hung, Chien-Fu; Chen, Han-Ming; Hwang, Tsann-Long; Jan, Yi-Yin; Chen, Miin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    Background A bleeding pseudoaneurysm in patients with chronic pancreatitis is a rare and potentially lethal complication. Optimal treatment of bleeding peripancreatic pseudoaneurysm remains controversial. This study reports on experience at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CGMH) in managing of bleeding pseudoaneurysms associated with chronic pancreatitis. Methods The medical records of 9 patients (8 males and 1 female; age range, 28 – 71 years; median, 36 years) with bleeding pseudoaneurysms associated with chronic pancreatitis treated at CGMH between Aug. 1992 and Sep. 2004 were retrospectively reviewed. Alcohol abuse (n = 7;78%) was the predominant predisposing factor. Diagnoses of bleeding pseudoaneurysms were based on angiographic (7/7), computed tomographic (4/7), ultrasound (2/5), and surgical (2/2) findings. Whether surgery or angiographic embolization was performed was primarily based on patient clinical condition. Median follow-up was 38 months (range, 4 – 87 months). Results Abdominal computed tomography revealed bleeding pseudoaneurysms in 4 of 7 patients (57%). Angiography determined correct diagnosis in 7 patients (7/7, 100%). The splenic artery was involved in 5 cases, the pancreaticoduodenal artery in 2, the gastroduodenal artery in 1, and the middle colic artery in 1. Initial treatment was emergency (n = 4) or elective (n = 3) surgery in 7 patients and arterial embolization in 2. Rebleeding was detected after initial treatment in 3 patients. Overall, 5 arterial embolizations and 9 surgical interventions were performed; the respective rates of success of these treatments were 20% (1/5) and 89% (8/9). Five patients developed pseudocysts before treatment (n = 3) or following intervention (n = 2). Pseudocyst formation was identified in 2 of the 3 rebleeding patients. Five patients underwent surgical treatment for associated pseudocysts and bleeding did not recur. One patient died from angiography-related complications. Overall mortality rate was 11% (1

  20. Management of bleeding following major trauma: an updated European guideline

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Evidence-based recommendations are needed to guide the acute management of the bleeding trauma patient, which when implemented may improve patient outcomes. Methods The multidisciplinary Task Force for Advanced Bleeding Care in Trauma was formed in 2005 with the aim of developing a guideline for the management of bleeding following severe injury. This document presents an updated version of the guideline published by the group in 2007. Recommendations were formulated using a nominal group process, the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) hierarchy of evidence and based on a systematic review of published literature. Results Key changes encompassed in this version of the guideline include new recommendations on coagulation support and monitoring and the appropriate use of local haemostatic measures, tourniquets, calcium and desmopressin in the bleeding trauma patient. The remaining recommendations have been reevaluated and graded based on literature published since the last edition of the guideline. Consideration was also given to changes in clinical practice that have taken place during this time period as a result of both new evidence and changes in the general availability of relevant agents and technologies. Conclusions This guideline provides an evidence-based multidisciplinary approach to the management of critically injured bleeding trauma patients. PMID:20370902