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Sample records for actively bleeding peptic

  1. Photocoagulation in the treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Wlodzimierz; Paczkowski, Pawel M.

    1996-03-01

    The authors present their experience in the endoscopic laser photocoagulation of bleeding peptic ulcer. From 1991 to June 1995, 203 patients admitted for UGI bleeding from peptic ulcer have been treated by this method. The source of bleeding was confirmed by endoscopy. The patients were divided into two groups: actively bleeding peptic ulcer (group IA and IB according to Forrest's classification) and ulcer with stigmata of recent bleeding (group IIA/IIB). The former group consisted of 106 patients, among whom over 40 percent (45 patients) presented signs of hypovolemic shock on admission. Nd:YAG laser (Surgical Laser Technologies) was used in a continuous mode with a contact (8 - 20 watts) or non-contact (over 50 watts) method of coagulation. In actively bleeding patients photocoagulation resulted in stopping the hemorrhage in 95 (90%). Recurrent bleeding occurred in 16 cases; in 9 of them it was stopped by repeated photocoagulation. In this group 18 patients required surgical intervention. The mortality was of 10.3% (11 patients). In 97 patients with recent bleeding stigmata photocoagulation provoked heavy hemorrhage in 3 (in 2 cases stopped by prolonged coagulation). In 9 of the remaining 94 patients recurrent bleeding occurred. Nine patients required surgical intervention. Mortality in this group was of 6%.

  2. Update on the endoscopic management of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Holster, Ingrid Lisanne; Kuipers, Ernst Johan

    2011-12-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is the most common gastrointestinal emergency, with peptic ulcer as the most common cause. Appropriate resuscitation followed by early endoscopy for diagnosis and treatment are of major importance in these patients. Endoscopy is recommended within 24 h of presentation. Endoscopic therapy is indicated for patients with high-risk stigmata, in particular those with active bleeding and visible vessels. The role of endoscopic therapy for ulcers with adherent clots remains to be elucidated. Ablative or mechanical therapies are superior to epinephrine injection alone in terms of prevention of rebleeding. The application of an ulcer-covering hemospray is a new promising tool. High dose proton pump inhibitors should be administered intravenously for 72 h after endoscopy in high-risk patients. Helicobacter pylori should be tested for in all patients with peptic ulcer bleeding and eradicated if positive. These recommendations have been captured in a recent international guideline. PMID:21918857

  3. Prophylactic aspirin and risk of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Weil, J.; Colin-Jones, D.; Langman, M.; Lawson, D.; Logan, R.; Murphy, M.; Rawlins, M.; Vessey, M.; Wainwright, P.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the risks of hospitalisation for bleeding peptic ulcer with the current prophylactic aspirin regimens of 300 mg daily or less. DESIGN--A case-control study with hospital and community controls. SETTING--Hospitals in Glasgow, Newcastle, Nottingham, Oxford, and Portsmouth. SUBJECTS--1121 patients with gastric or duodenal ulcer bleeding matched with hospital and community controls. RESULTS--144 (12.8%) cases had been regular users of aspirin (taken at least five days a week for at least the previous month) compared with 101 (9.0%) hospital and 77 (7.8%) community controls. Odds ratios were raised for all doses of aspirin taken, whether compared with hospital or community controls (compared with combined controls: 75 mg, 2.3 (95% confidence interval 1.2 to 4.4); 150 mg, 3.2 (1.7 to 6.5); 300 mg, 3.9 (2.5 to 6.3)). Results were not explained by confounding influences of age, sex, prior ulcer history or dyspepsia, or concurrent non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use. Risks seemed particularly high in patients who took non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs concurrently. CONCLUSION--No conventionally used prophylactic aspirin regimen seems free of the risk of peptic ulcer complications. PMID:7711618

  4. Topical tranexamic acid as a novel treatment for bleeding peptic ulcer: A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Rafeey, Mandana; Shoaran, Maryam; Ghergherechi, Robabeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Peptic ulcers are among the most common causes of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in children. The standard care for GI bleeding is endoscopy for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. We aimed to assess the effect of topical tranexamic acid (TXA) via endoscopic procedures in children with GI bleeding caused by bleeding ulcers. Procedure: In this randomised controlled trial, 120 children were evaluated by diagnostic procedures for GI bleeding, of which 63 (30 girls, 33 boys) aged 1-month to 15 years were recruited. The patients were randomly divided into case and control groups. In the case group, TXA was administered directly under endoscopic therapy. In the control group, epinephrine (1/10,000) was submucosally injected to the four quadrants of ulcer margins as the routine endoscopic therapy. In both groups, the patients received supportive medical therapy with intravenous fluids and proton pump inhibitor drugs. Results: The mean ± standard deviation age of the children was 5 ± 2.03 years. Rebleeding occurred in 15 (11.4%) and 21 (9.8%) patients in the case and control groups, respectively (P = 0.50). The frequency of blood transfusion episodes (P = 0.06) and duration of hospital stay (P = 0.07) were not statistically different between the groups. Conclusion: Using topical TXA via endoscopic procedures may be effective in cases of GI bleedings caused by active bleeding ulcers. In order to establish this therapeutic effect, a large number of clinical studies are needed. PMID:27251517

  5. Peptic activity and gastroduodenal mucosal damage.

    PubMed Central

    Raufman, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    This contribution reviews briefly the history of the discovery and characterization of peptic activity; secretory models and current concepts regarding the regulation of pepsinogen secretion; and evidence that pepsin is a necessary co-factor for gastroduodenal mucosal injury. Several animal studies indicate that peptic activity is required for acid- and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastroduodenal ulceration. A more vigorous approach to the development of anti-peptic drugs for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease is encouraged. Images Figure 1 PMID:9041694

  6. Management of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-related peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sung, J J

    2001-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have superseded Helicobacter pylori infection as the most important cause of peptic ulcer bleeding. Eradication of H. pylori in NSAID users will not affect ulcer healing. In high-risk patients with a history of ulcer bleeding, curing H. pylori infection alone without acid suppression has substantially reduced the risk of rebleeding caused by low-dose aspirin but not nonaspirin NSAIDs. In a study comparing the safety profile of misoprostol in combination with NSAID against nabumetone in high-risk patients with a history of ulcer bleeding, both strategies were unable to confer significant protection against the risk of rebleeding. PMID:11165993

  7. Successful treatment of life-threatening bleeding from a duodenal posterior bulb peptic ulcer by an over-the-scope-clip

    PubMed Central

    Brechmann, Thorsten; Schmiegel, Wolff

    2015-01-01

    Bleeding of peptic ulcer at the posterior duodenal bulb still is a particular endoscopic challenge with increased risk of treatment failure and worse outcome. In this article, we report successful treatment of an actively bleeding peptic ulcer located at the posterior duodenal wall, using an over-the-scope-clip in the case of a 54-year-old male patient with hemorrhagic shock. Incident primary hemostasis was achieved and no adverse events occurred during a follow-up of 60 d. PMID:25663788

  8. Small bowel ulcerative lesions are common in elderly NSAIDs users with peptic ulcer bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tsibouris, Panagiotis; Kalantzis, Chissostomos; Apostolopoulos, Periklis; Zalonis, Antonios; Isaacs, Peter Edward Thomas; Hendrickse, Mark; Alexandrakis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency of small bowel ulcerative lesions in patients with peptic ulcer and define the significance of those lesions. METHODS: In our prospective study, 60 consecutive elderly patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding from a peptic ulceration (cases) and 60 matched patients with a non-bleeding peptic ulcer (controls) underwent small bowel capsule endoscopy, after a negative colonoscopy (compulsory in our institution). Controls were evaluated for non-bleeding indications. Known or suspected chronic inflammatory conditions and medication that could harm the gut were excluded. During capsule endoscopy, small bowel ulcerative lesions were counted thoroughly and classified according to Graham classification. Other small bowel lesions were also recorded. Peptic ulcer bleeding was controlled endoscopically, when adequate, proton pump inhibitors were started in both cases and controls, and Helicobacter pylori eradicated whenever present. Both cases and controls were followed up for a year. In case of bleeding recurrence upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was repeated and whenever it remained unexplained it was followed by repeat colonoscopy and capsule endoscopy. RESULTS: Forty (67%) cases and 18 (30%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P = 0.0001), while 22 (37%) cases and 4 (8%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Among non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) consumers, 39 (95%) cases and 17 (33%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P < 0.0001), while 22 (55%) cases and 4 (10%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Small bowel ulcerative lesions were infrequent among patients not consuming NSAIDs. Mean entry hemoglobin was 9.3 (SD = 1.4) g/dL in cases with small bowel ulcerative lesions and 10.5 (SD = 1.3) g/dL in those without (P = 0.002). Cases with small bowel ulcers necessitate more units of packed red blood cells. During their hospitalization, 6 (27%) cases with small bowel ulcers presented

  9. A randomized controlled trial comparing two different dosages of infusional pantoprazole in peptic ulcer bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yao-Chun; Perng, Chin-Lin; Yang, Tzeng-Huey; Wang, Chaur-Shine; Hsu, Wei-Lun; Wu, Huei-Tang; Cheng, Yang-Chih; Chiang, Ming-Feng; Lin, Hwai-Jeng

    2010-01-01

    AIM The optimal dosage of proton pump inhibitor in bleeding peptic ulcers remains controversial. The aim was to compare the clinical effectiveness of two doses of infusional pantoprazole in peptic ulcer bleeding. METHODS Peptic ulcer patients (n= 120) with bleeding stigmata were enrolled after successful endoscopic therapy. After an initial bolus injection of 80 mg pantoprazole, patients were randomized to receive continuously infused pantoprazole at either 192 mg day−1 or 40 mg every 6 h (i.e. 160 mg day−1) for 3 days. Clinical outcomes between the two groups within 14 days were compared, with 14-day recurrent bleeding regarded as the primary end-point. RESULTS Both groups (n= 60 each) were well matched in demographic and clinical factors upon entry. Bleeding totally recurred in 11 (9.2%) patients, with six (10%) in the 192 mg day−1 group and five (8.3%) in the 160 mg day−1 group (relative risk of bleeding recurrence between two treatments 1.2; 95% CI 0.39, 3.72). All secondary outcomes between the two groups were similar, including the amount of blood transfusion (mean 1179 ml vs. 1203 ml, P > 0.1), hospital stay (mean 9.5 days vs. 9.9 days, P > 0.1), need for surgery (n= 1 vs. n= 0, P > 0.1), and mortality (n= 1 vs. n= 0, P > 0.1). CONCLUSIONS Following endoscopic haemostasis, infusional pantoprazole at either 192 mg day−1 or 40 mg every 6 h appear similar. PMID:20233195

  10. Endoclips vs large or small-volume epinephrine in peptic ulcer recurrent bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Ljubicic, Neven; Budimir, Ivan; Biscanin, Alen; Nikolic, Marko; Supanc, Vladimir; Hrabar, Davor; Pavic, Tajana

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To compare the recurrent bleeding after endoscopic injection of different epinephrine volumes with hemoclips in patients with bleeding peptic ulcer. METHODS: Between January 2005 and December 2009, 150 patients with gastric or duodenal bleeding ulcer with major stigmata of hemorrhage and nonbleeding visible vessel in an ulcer bed (Forrest IIa) were included in the study. Patients were randomized to receive a small-volume epinephrine group (15 to 25 mL injection group; Group 1, n = 50), a large-volume epinephrine group (30 to 40 mL injection group; Group 2, n = 50) and a hemoclip group (Group 3, n = 50). The rate of recurrent bleeding, as the primary outcome, was compared between the groups of patients included in the study. Secondary outcomes compared between the groups were primary hemostasis rate, permanent hemostasis, need for emergency surgery, 30 d mortality, bleeding-related deaths, length of hospital stay and transfusion requirements. RESULTS: Initial hemostasis was obtained in all patients. The rate of early recurrent bleeding was 30% (15/50) in the small-volume epinephrine group (Group 1) and 16% (8/50) in the large-volume epinephrine group (Group 2) (P = 0.09). The rate of recurrent bleeding was 4% (2/50) in the hemoclip group (Group 3); the difference was statistically significant with regard to patients treated with either small-volume or large-volume epinephrine solution (P = 0.0005 and P = 0.045, respectively). Duration of hospital stay was significantly shorter among patients treated with hemoclips than among patients treated with epinephrine whereas there were no differences in transfusion requirement or even 30 d mortality between the groups. CONCLUSION: Endoclip is superior to both small and large volume injection of epinephrine in the prevention of recurrent bleeding in patients with peptic ulcer. PMID:22611315

  11. Efficacy of the heater probe in peptic ulcer with a non-bleeding visible vessel. A controlled, randomised study.

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, J L; Carmona, C; Gálvez, C; de la Mata, M; Miño, G

    1993-01-01

    A controlled, randomised study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of treatment with heater probe in the prevention of rebleeding from peptic ulcer with a non-bleeding visible vessel. One hundred and one patients were randomised into two groups: patients to be treated by heater probe (n = 51) and controls without active treatment (n = 50). In the heater probe group rebleeding occurred in five patients (10%) v 13 (26%) in the control group (p = 0.03), with a comparative risk of 0.38 in favour of the heater probe group. The difference in proportions of successful treatment for each group was 16.2% in favour of the heater probe (95% CI = 2 to 31%). Haemorrhage directly related to heater probe treatment occurred in four patients. In three of them bleeding was easily controlled by further heater probe pulses. There were no other complications and no death in the heater probe group. One patient in the control group died of pulmonary embolism. No significant differences in the length of stay in hospital, blood transfusions, surgical rates, or death were found; the design of the study, however, precluded an adequate assessment of these variables, because the heater probe was an optional rescue treatment when high surgical risk patients rebled. These results suggest that the heater probe is an effective and safe procedure in the prevention of recurrent haemorrhage in peptic ulcer with a non-bleeding visible vessel. PMID:8244132

  12. The Influential Roles of Antibiotics Prophylaxis in Cirrhotic Patients with Peptic Ulcer Bleeding after Initial Endoscopic Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Wei-Chen; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Wu, Keng-Liang; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Wang, Jing-Houng; Lu, Sheng-Nan; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2014-01-01

    The influential roles of antibiotic prophylaxis on cirrhotic patients with peptic ulcer bleeding are still not well documented. The purpose of this study is to clarify these influential roles and to identify the risk factors associated with rebleeding, bacterial infection and in-hospital mortality. A cross-sectional, chart review study was conducted on 210 cirrhotic patients with acute peptic ulcer hemorrhage who underwent therapeutic endoscopic procedures. Patients were divided into group A (with prophylactic intravenous ceftriaxone, n = 74) and group B (without antibiotics, n = 136). The outcomes were length of hospital days, prevention of infection, rebleeding rate and in-hospital mortality. Our results showed that more patients suffered from rebleeding and infection in group B than group A (31.6% vs. 5.4%; p<0.001 and 25% vs. 10.8%; p = 0.014 respectively). The risk factors for rebleeding were active alcoholism, unit of blood transfusion, Rockall score, model for end-stage liver disease score and antibiotic prophylaxis. The risk factors for infection were active alcoholism, Child-Pugh C, Rockall score and antibiotic prophylaxis. Rockall score was the predictive factor for in-hospital mortality. In conclusions, antibiotic prophylaxis in cirrhotic patients after endoscopic interventions for acute peptic ulcer hemorrhage reduced infections and rebleeding rate but not in-hospital mortality. Rockall score was the predictive factor of in-hospital mortality. PMID:24788341

  13. Seasonal changes in gastric mucosal factors associated with peptic ulcer bleeding

    PubMed Central

    YUAN, XIAO-GANG; XIE, CHUAN; CHEN, JIANG; XIE, YONG; ZHANG, KUN-HE; LU, NONG-HUA

    2015-01-01

    A close association has been established between climate and peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). The incidence of PUB in cold climates is significantly higher than that in hot climates. In this study, gastric mucosal damage and its barrier function (through associated barrier factors) in extreme climate conditions were examined to investigate the pathogenesis of PUB in extreme cold climates. Gastric juice and biopsy specimens were collected from 176 patients with peptic ulcer. Conventional hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to exclude malignant ulcers. Helicobacter pylori infections were detected by modified Giemsa staining. pH values of the gastric juice samples were obtained on-site by precise pH dipstick readings. The protein expression levels of heat shock protein (HSP) 70, occludin, nitric oxide synthase (NOS), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and EGF receptor (EGFR) in the gastric mucosa were detected by immunohistochemistry. No significant differences were identified between the high and low bleeding risk groups in the rates of H. pylori infection and the pH values of the gastric juices in the extreme hot or cold climates. Furthermore, no statistically significant differences were identified in the protein expression levels of occludin, NOS, EGF and EGFR between the high and low bleeding risk groups. In the extreme cold climate, the expression of HSP70 and the mucus thickness of the gastric antrum in the high bleeding risk group were significantly lower than those in the low bleeding risk group. The protein expression levels of occludin, HSP70, NOS and EGFR in the extreme cold climate were significantly lower than those in the extreme hot climate, whereas the gastric acid secretion was significantly higher in the extreme cold climate than that in the extreme hot climate. In conclusion, low expression of HSP70 in the gastric mucosa and reduced gastric mucus thickness may play key roles in the mechanism of PUB in extreme cold climates. The significant decrease in

  14. Seasonal changes in gastric mucosal factors associated with peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao-Gang; Xie, Chuan; Chen, Jiang; Xie, Yong; Zhang, Kun-He; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2015-01-01

    A close association has been established between climate and peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). The incidence of PUB in cold climates is significantly higher than that in hot climates. In this study, gastric mucosal damage and its barrier function (through associated barrier factors) in extreme climate conditions were examined to investigate the pathogenesis of PUB in extreme cold climates. Gastric juice and biopsy specimens were collected from 176 patients with peptic ulcer. Conventional hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to exclude malignant ulcers. Helicobacter pylori infections were detected by modified Giemsa staining. pH values of the gastric juice samples were obtained on-site by precise pH dipstick readings. The protein expression levels of heat shock protein (HSP) 70, occludin, nitric oxide synthase (NOS), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and EGF receptor (EGFR) in the gastric mucosa were detected by immunohistochemistry. No significant differences were identified between the high and low bleeding risk groups in the rates of H. pylori infection and the pH values of the gastric juices in the extreme hot or cold climates. Furthermore, no statistically significant differences were identified in the protein expression levels of occludin, NOS, EGF and EGFR between the high and low bleeding risk groups. In the extreme cold climate, the expression of HSP70 and the mucus thickness of the gastric antrum in the high bleeding risk group were significantly lower than those in the low bleeding risk group. The protein expression levels of occludin, HSP70, NOS and EGFR in the extreme cold climate were significantly lower than those in the extreme hot climate, whereas the gastric acid secretion was significantly higher in the extreme cold climate than that in the extreme hot climate. In conclusion, low expression of HSP70 in the gastric mucosa and reduced gastric mucus thickness may play key roles in the mechanism of PUB in extreme cold climates. The significant decrease in

  15. Peptic ulcers accompanied with gastrointestinal bleeding, pylorus obstruction and cholangitis secondary to choledochoduodenal fistula: A case report

    PubMed Central

    XI, BIN; JIA, JUN-JUN; LIN, BING-YI; GENG, LEI; ZHENG, SHU-SEN

    2016-01-01

    Peptic ulcers are an extremely common condition, usually occurring in the stomach and proximal duodenum. However, cases of peptic ulcers accompanied with multiple complications are extremely rare and hard to treat. The present case reinforces the requirement for the early recognition and correct treatment of peptic ulcers accompanied with multiple complications. A 67-year-old man presented with recurrent abdominal pain, fever and melena. The laboratory results showed anemia (hemoglobin 62 g/l) and hypoproteinemia (23 g/l). Abdominal imaging examinations revealed stones in the gallbladder and right liver, with air in the dilated intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile ducts. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography failed due to a deformed pylorus. The patient was finally diagnosed with peptic ulcers accompanied with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, pylorus obstruction and cholangitis secondary to a choledochoduodenal fistula during an emergency pancreatoduodenectomy, which was performed due to a massive hemorrhage of the GI tract. The patient recovered well after the surgery. PMID:26870237

  16. Real-Time PCR Improves Helicobacter pylori Detection in Patients with Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Casalots, Alex; Sanfeliu, Esther; Boix, Loreto; García-Iglesias, Pilar; Sánchez-Delgado, Jordi; Montserrat, Antònia; Bella-Cueto, Maria Rosa; Gallach, Marta; Sanfeliu, Isabel; Segura, Ferran; Calvet, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Histological and rapid urease tests to detect H. pylori in biopsy specimens obtained during peptic ulcer bleeding episodes (PUB) often produce false-negative results. We aimed to examine whether immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR can improve the sensitivity of these biopsies. Patients and Methods We selected 52 histology-negative formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens obtained during PUB episodes. Additional tests showed 10 were true negatives and 42 were false negatives. We also selected 17 histology-positive biopsy specimens obtained during PUB to use as controls. We performed immunohistochemistry staining and real-time PCR for 16S rRNA, ureA, and 23S rRNA for H. pylori genes on all specimens. Results All controls were positive for H. pylori on all PCR assays and immunohistochemical staining. Regarding the 52 initially negative biopsies, all PCR tests were significantly more sensitive than immunohistochemical staining (p<0.01). Sensitivity and specificity were 55% and 80% for 16S rRNA PCR, 43% and 90% for ureA PCR, 41% and 80% for 23S rRNA PCR, and 7% and 100% for immunohistochemical staining, respectively. Combined analysis of PCR assays for two genes were significantly more sensitive than ureA or 23S rRNA PCR tests alone (p<0.05) and marginally better than 16S rRNA PCR alone. The best combination was 16S rRNA+ureA, with a sensitivity of 64% and a specificity of 80%. Conclusions Real-time PCR improves the detection of H. pylori infection in histology-negative formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsy samples obtained during PUB episodes. The low reported prevalence of H. pylori in PUB may be due to the failure of conventional tests to detect infection. PMID:21625499

  17. Cost-effectiveness of high-dose intravenous esomeprazole in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding in the USA and Europe.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ruth E; Nandi, Jyoti

    2010-08-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) is life-threatening and associated with high healthcare costs. Clinical outcomes in PUB depend largely on the risk of rebleeding. Recent data indicate that intravenous proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) reduce rebleeds, the need for surgery and repeat endoscopic treatment. From a policy perspective, it is important to assess the cost-effectiveness of this treatment. Accordingly, a decision-tree model published by Barkun et al. evaluated the costs and benefits of high-dose intravenous esomeprazole in preventing rebleeds in patients with PUB based on data from a multinational, randomized clinical trial comparing this therapeutic approach to intravenous placebo. The results indicate that esomeprazole is cost effective in the USA and Sweden, and cost saving in Spain. These findings agree with most other analyses of intravenous PPIs used in PUB patients at high risk for bleeds. The therapeutic approach provides increased benefits to patients at a relatively small additional cost. PMID:20715913

  18. Non-Helicobacter pylori, non-NSAIDs peptic ulcers: a descriptive study on patients referred to Taleghani hospital with upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Rajabalinia, Hasan; Ghobakhlou, Mehdi; Nikpour, Shahriar; Dabiri, Reza; Bahriny, Rasoul; Sherafat, Somayeh Jahani; Moghaddam, Pardis Ketabi

    2012-01-01

    Aim The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the number and proportion of various causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and actual numbers of non-NSAID, non-Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) peptic ulcers seen in endoscopy of these patients. Background The number and the proportion of patients with non- H.pylori, non-NSAIDs peptic ulcer disease leading to upper gastrointestinal bleeding is believed to be increasing after eradication therapy for H.pylori. Patients and methods Medical records of patients referred to the emergency room of Taleghani hospital from 2010 with a clinical diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (hematemesis, coffee ground vomiting and melena) were included in this study. Patients with hematochezia with evidence of a source of bleeding from upper gastrointestinal tract in endoscopy were also included in this study. Results In this study, peptic ulcer disease (all kinds of ulcers) was seen in 61 patients which were about 44.85% of abnormalities seen on endoscopy of patients. Among these 61 ulcers, 44 were duodenal ulcer, 22 gastric ulcer (5 patients had the both duodenal and gastric ulcers). Multiple biopsies were taken and be sent to laboratory for Rapid Urease Test and pathological examination. About 65.53% of patients had ulcers associated with H.pylori, 9.83% had peptic ulcer disease associated with NSAIDs and 11.47% of patients had ulcers associated with both H.pylori and consumption of NSAIDs. 13.11% of patients had non-NSAIDs non- H.pylori peptic ulcer disease. Conclusion The results of this study supports the results of other studies that suggest the incidence of H.pylori infection related with duodenal ulcer is common, and that non-H pylori and non-NSAIDs duodenal ulcer is also common. PMID:24834225

  19. State-of-the-Art Management of Acute Bleeding Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Al Dhahab, Hisham; McNabb-Baltar, Julia; Al-Taweel, Talal; Barkun, Alan

    2013-01-01

    The management of patients with non variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding has evolved, as have its causes and prognosis, over the past 20 years. The addition of high-quality data coupled to the publication of authoritative national and international guidelines have helped define current-day standards of care. This review highlights the relevant clinical evidence and consensus recommendations that will hopefully result in promoting the effective dissemination and knowledge translation of important information in the management of patients afflicted with this common entity. PMID:24045592

  20. Risk factors determining the need for second-look endoscopy for peptic ulcer bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis and proton pump inhibitor infusion

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Wu, Chung-Tai; Chen, Wei-Ying; Yang, Er-Hsiang; Chen, Po-Jun; Sheu, Bor-Shyang

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: The need for routine second-look endoscopy in cases of peptic ulcer bleeding remains uncertain. We investigated risk factors related to the need for second-look endoscopy after endoscopic hemostasis and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) infusion. Patients and methods: We prospectively enrolled 316 patients with peptic ulcer bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis. Second-look endoscopy was scheduled after 72-hour PPI infusion (Day-3 subgroup) or one day early (Day-2 subgroup). If early rebleeding developed within 3 days, emergent second-look endoscopy was conducted. Risk factors for early rebleeding (use of E2nd score to predict the need for early second-look endoscopy) and persistent major stigmata in the Day-3 subgroup (use of R2nd score to predict the need for routine second-look endoscopy) were analyzed using univariable and multivariable regression. Results: Excluding 10 of 316 patients with early rebleeding, the rate of persistent major stigmata was lower in the Day-3 subgroup than in the Day-2 subgroup (4.8 % vs. 15.4 %, P  = 0.002). Endoscopic epinephrine-injection monotherapy and hypoalbuminemia < 3.0 g/dL were two independent risk factors for early rebleeding (P  ≤ 0.05). The Forrest Ia-Ib type and hypoalbuminemia < 3.5 g/dL were two independent risk factors for persistent major stigmata on the day-3 second-look endoscopy (P  < 0.05). The E2nd score was highly accurate for prediction of early rebleeding (AUROC 0.86; 95 % CI, 0.73~0.99), and the R2nd score could predict persistent major stigmata at second-look endoscopy (AUROC 0.84; 95 % CI, 0.69~0.99). Conclusions: For patients with peptic ulcer bleeding, E2nd and R2nd scores can indicate the need for early and routine second-look endoscopy, respectively (Trial registration identifier: NCT02197039). PMID:27004241

  1. Risk factors influencing the outcome of peptic ulcer bleeding in chronic kidney disease after initial endoscopic hemostasis: A nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chih-Ming; Hsu, Chien-Ning; Tai, Wei-Chen; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shih, Chih-Wei; Ku, Ming-Kun; Yuan, Lan-Ting; Wang, Jiunn-Wei; Tseng, Kuo-Lun; Sun, Wei-Chih; Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Nguang, Seng-Howe; Hsu, Pin-I; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-09-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who had peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) may have more adverse outcomes. This population-based cohort study aimed to identify risk factors that may influence the outcomes of patients with CKD and PUB after initial endoscopic hemostasis. Data from 1997 to 2008 were extracted from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We included a cohort dataset of 1 million randomly selected individuals and a dataset of patients with CKD who were alive in 2008. A total of 18,646 patients with PUB were screened, and 1229 patients admitted for PUB after endoscopic hemostasis were recruited. The subjects were divided into non-CKD (n = 1045) and CKD groups (n = 184). We analyzed the risks of peptic ulcer rebleeding, sepsis events, and mortality among in-hospital patients, and after discharge. Results showed that the rebleeding rates associated with repeat endoscopic therapy (11.96% vs 6.32%, P = 0.0062), death rates (8.7%, vs 2.3%, P < 0.0001), hospitalization cost (US$ 5595±7200 vs US$2408 ± 4703, P < 0.0001), and length of hospital stay (19.6 ± 18.3 vs 11.2 ± 13.1, P < 0.0001) in the CKD group were higher than those in the non-CKD group. The death rate in the CKD group was also higher than that in the non-CKD group after discharge. The independent risk factor for rebleeding during hospitalization was age (odds ratio [OR], 1.02; P = 0.0063), whereas risk factors for death were CKD (OR, 2.37; P = 0.0222), shock (OR, 2.99; P = 0.0098), and endotracheal intubation (OR, 5.31; P < 0.0001). The hazard ratio of rebleeding risk for aspirin users after discharge over a 10-year follow-up period was 0.68 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.45-0.95, P = 0.0223). On the other hand, old age (P < 0.0001), CKD (P = 0.0090), diabetes (P = 0.0470), and congestive heart failure (P = 0.0013) were the independent risk factors for death after discharge. In-hospital patients with CKD and PUB after endoscopic therapy

  2. Does COX1 gene polymorphism (A842G/C50T) influence peptic ulcer bleeding in Indian patients?.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, S; Simon, Ebby George; Joseph, A J; Dutta, Amit Kumar; Chowdhury, Sudipta Dhar; Kurien, Reuben Thomas; Chacko, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    This is a pilot study to test the hypothesis that polymorphisms that may be linked to cyclooxygenase production may affect the likelihood and the nature of bleeding in patients with ulcer disease. Of the two polymorphism that have previously been studied for links we chose the A842G polymorphims. Of the 50 patients with ulcer bleeding who were studied, 8 had a heterozygous polymorphisms and 42 had the normal configuration. On comparing these two groups. there were no significant differences in clinical presentation except that there was a tendency to have less gastric ulcers among those with the A842G/C50T polymorphism. Based on these studies we need to undertake a larger studies comparing these groups with those with ulcers without GI bleeding and those without ulcers PMID:27522738

  3. Aerodynamic Control using Distributed Active Bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2015-11-01

    The global aerodynamic loads on a stationary and pitching airfoil at angles of attack beyond the static and dynamic stall margins, respectively are controlled in wind tunnel experiments using regulated distributed bleed driven by surface pressure differences. High-speed PIV and proper orthogonal decomposition of the vorticity flux on the static airfoil show that the bleed engenders trains of discrete vortices that advect along the surface and are associated with a local instability that is manifested by a time-averaged bifurcation of the vorticity layer near the bleed outlets and alters the vorticity flux over the airfoil and thereby the aerodynamic loads. Active bleed is used on a dynamically pitching airfoil (at reduced frequencies up to k = 0.42) to modulate the evolution of vorticity concentrations during dynamic stall. Time-periodic bleed improved the pitch stability by reducing adverse pitching moment (``negative damping'') that can precipitate structural instabilities. At the same time, the maintains the cycle-average loads to within 5% of the base flow levels by segmenting the vorticity layer during upstroke and promoting early flow attachment during downstroke segments of the pitch cycle. Supported by Georgia Tech VLRCOE.

  4. Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... emergency help. Calm and reassure the person. The sight of blood can be very frightening. If the ... is best for external bleeding, except for an eye injury. Maintain pressure until the bleeding stops. When ...

  5. Peptic Ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    A peptic ulcer is a sore in the lining of your stomach or your duodenum, the first part of your ... Comes and goes for several days or weeks Peptic ulcers happen when the acids that help you digest ...

  6. Predictive Factors for Intractability to Endoscopic Hemostasis in the Treatment of Bleeding Gastroduodenal Peptic Ulcers in Japanese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Mari; Masui, Ryuta; Kondo, Yoshihiro; Yamaguchi, Yoshiharu; Yanamoto, Kenichiro; Noda, Hisatsugu; Okaniwa, Noriko; Sasaki, Makoto; Kasugai, Kunio

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Despite improvements in endoscopic hemostasis and pharmacological therapies, upper gastrointestinal (UGI) ulcers repeatedly bleed in 10% to 20% of patients, and those without early endoscopic reintervention or definitive surgery might be at a high risk for mortality. This study aimed to identify the risk factors for intractability to initial endoscopic hemostasis. Methods We analyzed intractability among 428 patients who underwent emergency endoscopy for bleeding UGI ulcers within 24 hours of arrival at the hospital. Results Durable hemostasis was achieved in 354 patients by using initial endoscopic procedures. Sixty-nine patients with Forrest types Ia, Ib, IIa, and IIb at the second-look endoscopy were considered intractable to the initial endoscopic hemostasis. Multivariate analysis indicated that age ≥70 years (odds ratio [OR], 2.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07 to 4.03), shock on admission (OR, 5.26; 95% CI, 2.43 to 11.6), hemoglobin <8.0 mg/dL (OR, 2.80; 95% CI, 1.39 to 5.91), serum albumin <3.3 g/dL (OR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.07 to 4.89), exposed vessels with a diameter of ≥2 mm on the bottom of ulcers (OR, 4.38; 95% CI, 1.25 to 7.01), and Forrest type Ia and Ib (OR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.33 to 3.00) predicted intractable endoscopic hemostasis. Conclusions Various factors contribute to intractable endoscopic hemostasis. Careful observation after endoscopic hemostasis is important for patients at a high risk for incomplete hemostasis. PMID:24765599

  7. Peptic ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    ... health conditions. Other medicines used for ulcers are: Misoprostol, a drug that may help prevent ulcers in ... acid blocker Have you take a drug called misoprostol The following lifestyle changes may help prevent peptic ...

  8. Peptic Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a good alternative to NSAIDs for most childhood conditions. Signs and Symptoms Although peptic ulcers are rare in kids, if your child has any of these signs and symptoms, call your doctor: burning pain in the abdomen between the breastbone and the belly button (the ...

  9. Randomised comparison between adrenaline injection alone and adrenaline injection plus heat probe treatment for actively bleeding ulcers.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, S. S.; Lau, J. Y.; Sung, J. J.; Chan, A. C.; Lai, C. W.; Ng, E. K.; Chan, F. K.; Yung, M. Y.; Li, A. K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare endoscopic adrenaline injection alone and adrenaline injection plus heat probe for the treatment of actively bleeding peptic ulcers. DESIGN: Randomised prospective study of patients admitted with actively bleeding peptic ulcers. SETTING: One university hospital. SUBJECTS: 276 patients with actively bleeding ulcers detected by endoscopy within 24 hours of admission: 136 patients were randomised to endoscopic adrenaline injection alone and 140 to adrenaline injection plus heat probe treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Initial endoscopic haemostasis; clinical rebleeding; requirement for operation; requirement for blood transfusion; hospital stay, ulcer healing at four weeks; and mortality in hospital. RESULTS: Initial haemostasis was achieved in 131/134 patients (98%) who received adrenaline injection alone and 135/136 patients (99%) who received additional heat probe treatment (P = 0.33). Outcome as measured by clinical rebleeding (12 v 5), requirement for emergency operation (14 v 8), blood transfusion (2 v 3 units), hospital stay (4 v 4 days), ulcer healing at four weeks (79.1% v 74%), and in hospital mortality (7 v 8) were not significantly different in the two groups. In the subgroup of patients with spurting haemorrhage 8/27 (29.6%; 14.5% to 50.3%) patients from the adrenaline injection alone group and 2/31 (6.5%; 1.1% to 22.9%) patients from the dual treatment group required operative intervention. The relative risk of this was lower in the dual treatment group (0.17; 0.03 to 0.87). Hospital stay was significantly shorter in the dual treatment group than the adrenaline injection alone group (4 v 6 days, P = 0.01). CONCLUSION: The addition of heat probe treatment after endoscopic adrenaline injection confers an advantage in ulcers with spurting haemorrhage. PMID:9158465

  10. Early lactate clearance for predicting active bleeding in critically ill patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Wada, Tomoki; Hagiwara, Akiyoshi; Uemura, Tatsuki; Yahagi, Naoki; Kimura, Akio

    2016-08-01

    Not all patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) require emergency endoscopy. Lactate clearance has been suggested as a parameter for predicting patient outcomes in various critical care settings. This study investigates whether lactate clearance can predict active bleeding in critically ill patients with UGIB. This single-center, retrospective, observational study included critically ill patients with UGIB who met all of the following criteria: admission to the emergency department (ED) from April 2011 to August 2014; had blood samples for lactate evaluation at least twice during the ED stay; and had emergency endoscopy within 6 h of ED presentation. The main outcome was active bleeding detected with emergency endoscopy. Classification and regression tree (CART) analyses were performed using variables associated with active bleeding to derive a prediction rule for active bleeding in critically ill UGIB patients. A total of 154 patients with UGIB were analyzed, and 31.2 % (48/154) had active bleeding. In the univariate analysis, lactate clearance was significantly lower in patients with active bleeding than in those without active bleeding (13 vs. 29 %, P < 0.001). Using the CART analysis, a prediction rule for active bleeding is derived, and includes three variables: lactate clearance; platelet count; and systolic blood pressure at ED presentation. The rule has 97.9 % (95 % CI 90.2-99.6 %) sensitivity with 32.1 % (28.6-32.9 %) specificity. Lactate clearance may be associated with active bleeding in critically ill patients with UGIB, and may be clinically useful as a component of a prediction rule for active bleeding. PMID:26837207

  11. Peptic ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    ... patients with ulcer bleeding. Am J Gastroenterol . 2012 Mar;107(3):345-60. PMID: 22310222 www.ncbi. ... NSAID-related ulcer complications. Am J Gastroenterol . 2009 Mar;104(3):728-38. McColl KEL. Helicobacter pylori ...

  12. [Intravesical active prostate bleeding diagnosed in B-mode ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Kirchgesner, T; Danse, E; Tombal, B

    2013-09-01

    Hematuria is one of the most frequent minor complications after prostatic biopsy. We would like to report the case of a 68-year-old patient with massive hematuria after prostatic biopsy and intravesical active prostate bleeding diagnosed in B-mode ultrasonography. PMID:24034804

  13. [Acute gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Baumbach, Robert; Faiss, Siegbert; Cordruwisch, Wolfgang; Schrader, Carsten

    2016-04-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common major emergency (Internal medical or gastroenterological or medical), approximately 85 % of which occur in the upper GI tract. It is estimated that about a half of upper GI bleeds are caused by peptic ulcers. Upper GI bleeds are associated with more severe bleeding and poorer outcomes when compared to middle or lower GI bleeds. Prognostic determinants include bleeding intensity, patient age, comorbid conditions and the concomitant use of anticoagulants. A focused medical history can offer insight into the bleeding intensity, location and potential cause (along with early risk stratification). Initial measures should focus on rapid assessment and resuscitation of unstable patients. The oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) is the gold standard method for localizing the source of bleeding and for interventional therapy. Bleeding as a result of peptic ulcers is treated endoscopically with mechanical and / or thermal techniques in combination with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. When variceal bleeding is suspected, pre-interventional use of vasopressin analogues and antibiotic therapies are recommended. Endoscopically, the first line treatment of esophageal varices is endoscopic ligature therapy, whereas that for gastric varices is the use of Histoacryl injection sclerotherapy. When persistent and continued massive hemorrhage occurs in a patient with known or suspected aortic disease the possibility of an aorto-enteric fistula must be considered. PMID:27078246

  14. Evaluation of Anti-Secretory and Anti-Ulcerogenic Activities of Avipattikar Churna on The Peptic Ulcers in Experimental Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gyawali, Sudesh; Khan, Gulam Muhammad; Lamichane, Shreekrishna; Gautam, Jaya; Ghimire, Saurav; Adhikari, Rashmi; Lamsal, Reshma

    2013-01-01

    Background: Avipattikar churna, a poly-herbal formulation, is one of the popular ayurvedic formulations which is used for peptic ulcer diseases but the scientific documentation with regards to its effect for the indication is lacking. Aims: This study was carried out to evaluate the anti-secretory and the anti-ulcerogenic activities of the churna and to compare its activity with that of ranitidine in a pyloric ligated model of rats. Material and methods: Four groups of rats with 6 animals in each served as the ulcer controls, churna low dose (500 mg/kg), churna high dose (750mg/kg) and ranitidine (25mg/kg). The control group rats received only vehicle (2% (v/v) gum acacia), while the rats of the other groups received the respective dose of the churna or ranitidine which was suspended in the vehicle. The treatments were given twice a day, orally, for two days. After 1 hour of the last dose, pyloric ligations were performed and the rats were sacrificed for evaluation after four hours of the ligations. The gastric contents were collected and its volume, pH and acidity were measured. The numbers of ulcers and their lengths were measured which were used to calculate the gastric irritancy index and the curative ratio. The histological examinations of the gastric tissues were also performed. Results: The churna, in both doses, significantly decreased the volumes of the gastric contents, the ulcer score, the length of the ulcer, the gastric irritancy index and pH increased as compared to those in the control group. The effects of the churna were comparable to that of ranitidine. The histopathological evaluation of the gastric tissue also supported the results. Conclusion: Avipattikar churna has anti-secretory and anti-ulcerogenic effects which are comparable to those of ranitidine in peptic ulcer diseases. PMID:23905120

  15. Computed tomography angiography in patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding*

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Fatima Regina Silva; Cardia, Patricia Prando; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency, with considerable morbidity and mortality rates, and a prompt diagnosis is essential for a better prognosis. In such a context, endoscopy is the main diagnostic tool; however, in cases where the gastrointestinal hemorrhage is massive, the exact bleeding site might go undetected. In addition, a trained professional is not always present to perform the procedure. In an emergency setting, optical colonoscopy presents limitations connected with the absence of bowel preparation, so most of the small bowel cannot be assessed. Scintigraphy cannot accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of the bleeding and is not available at emergency settings. The use of capsule endoscopy is inappropriate in the acute setting, particularly in the emergency department at night, and is a highly expensive method. Digital angiography, despite its high sensitivity, is invasive, presents catheterization-related risks, in addition to its low availability at emergency settings. On the other hand, computed tomography angiography is fast, widely available and minimally invasive, emerging as a promising method in the diagnostic algorithm of these patients, being capable of determining the location and cause of bleeding with high accuracy. Based on a critical literature review and on their own experience, the authors propose a computed tomography angiography protocol to assess the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26811556

  16. Epidemiology of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Kurata, J H; Haile, B M

    1984-05-01

    In the United States about four million people have active peptic ulcers and about 350,000 new cases are diagnosed each year. Four times as many duodenal ulcers as gastric ulcers are diagnosed. Approximately 3000 deaths per year in the United States are due to duodenal ulcer and 3000 to gastric ulcer. There has been a marked decrease in reported hospitalization and mortality rates for peptic ulcer in the United States. Changes in criteria for selecting the underlying cause of death might account for some of the apparent decrease in ulcer mortality rates. Hospitalization rates for duodenal ulcers decreased nearly 50 per cent from 1970 to 1978, but hospitalization rates for gastric ulcers did not decrease. Although this decrease in hospitalization rates may reflect a decrease in duodenal ulcer disease incidence, it appears that changes in coding practices, hospitalization criteria, and diagnostic procedures have contributed to the reported declines in peptic ulcer hospitalization and mortality rates. There is no good evidence to support the popular belief that peptic ulcer is most common in the spring and autumn. The most consistent pattern appears to be low ulcer rates in the summer. There is strong evidence that cigarette smoking, regular use of aspirin, and prolonged use of steroids are associated with the development of peptic ulcer. There is some evidence that coffee and aspirin substitutes may affect ulcers, but most studies do not implicate alcohol, food, or psychological stress as causes of ulcer disease. Genetic factors play a role in both duodenal and gastric ulcer. The first-degree relatives of patients with duodenal ulcer have a two- to threefold increase in risk of getting duodenal ulcer and relatives of gastric ulcer patients have a similarly increased risk of getting a gastric ulcer. About half of the patients with duodenal ulcer have elevated plasma pepsinogen I. A small increase in risk of duodenal ulcer is found in persons with blood group O and in

  17. Colonic Angioectasia Related Hemorrhage: The Importance of Evaluation During Active Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Laczek, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Colonic angioectasia is a common source of lower gastrointestinal bleeding and can be challenging to identify when active bleeding is not present. We present a case that illustrates the utility of evaluating patients with suspected angioectasia-related hemorrhage during episodes of active bleeding. Case Report A 79-year-old woman on chronic anticoagulation secondary to mitral valve replacement presented with recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding over the past three years. She had recurrent episodes of hematochezia in 2009 during which no source was identified despite multiple upper and lower endoscopies. A tagged red blood scan showed active hemorrhage in the ascending colon. Angiography showed non-bleeding angiodysplasia in the cecum and ascending colon and the ascending branch of the right colic artery was prophylactically embolized. She had a recurrent episode of hematochezia in 2010 and no source was identified on EGD, colonoscopy or wireless capsule endoscopy. In 2012, she developed recurrent hematochezia associated with a drop in her hemoglobin level from 10.8g/dL to 6.2g/dL over a two-week period. Her hemodynamics remained normal and she was admitted to our facility. She received a blood transfusion and then underwent colonoscopy while still actively bleeding. Active bleeding was seen in the ascending colon adjacent to which was a very subtle angioectasia which was treated with argon plasma coagulation. She had no further bleeding during her hospital stay. Discussion Direct visualization during colonoscopy is the preferred method to diagnose colonic angioectasia and these lesions often have a distinctive “coral reef” appearance. However, as the images in this case show, the appearance of colonic angioectasia can be subtle with the aberrant vasculature almost indistinguishable from normal vascular patter of the colonic mucosa. Performing colonoscopy during active angioectasia-related bleeding greatly helps to identify and treat

  18. PEPTIC ULCER DISEASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is an ulcerative condition of the stomach or duodenum that may be accompanied by mucosal inflammation. PUD is classified as primary when it occurs in healthy children and as secondary when underlying disorders associated with injury, illness, or drug therapy co-exists. Pri...

  19. Peptic ulcer in hospital

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, H. Daintree

    1962-01-01

    This study corresponds to an estimated 142,250 admissions for peptic ulcer to the wards of National Health Service hospitals in England and Wales during the two years 1956 and 1957. It presents a picture of the incidence and mortality of complications and surgical treatment throughout England and Wales. PMID:14036965

  20. Management of NSAID-associated peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Melcarne, Luigi; García-Iglesias, Pilar; Calvet, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use increases the risk of gastrointestinal complications such as ulcers or bleeding. The presence of factors like advanced age, history of peptic ulcer, Helicobacter pylori infection and the use of anticoagulants or antiplatelet agents increase this risk further. COX-2 inhibitors and antisecretory drugs, particularly proton pump inhibitors, help to minimize the risk of gastrointestinal complications in high-risk patients. This review presents a practical approach to the prevention and treatment of NSAID-associated peptic ulcer disease and examines the new advances in the rational use of NSAIDs. PMID:26775657

  1. The assessment of anticoagulant activity to predict bleeding outcome in atrial fibrillation patients receiving dabigatran etexilate.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yao-Ting; Hu, Yu-Feng; Liao, Jo-Nan; Chern, Chang-Ming; Lin, Yenn-Jiang; Chang, Shih-Lin; Wu, Cheng-Hsueh; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Wang, Kang-Ling; Lu, Tse-Min; Chao, Tze-Fan; Lo, Li-Wei; Hsu, Li-Chi; Chung, Chih-Ping; Chang, Peter M-H; Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Chiou, Chuen-Wang; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2016-06-01

    Special circumstances may require the measurement of the anticoagulant effect of dabigatran etexilate. No data currently link any given coagulation test to bleeding outcomes in patients receiving dabigatran etexilate for atrial fibrillation. Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation patients receiving dabigatran etexilate of 110 mg (DE110) or 150 mg (DE150) were consecutively enrolled. The hemoclot thrombin inhibitor (HTI) assay, prothrombin time, and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) measurements were correlated with bleeding events during a prospective follow-up. There were 17 bleeding events (8.2%) in 208 patients (74.7 ± 10.3 years old, 67.9% male, median follow-up: 364 days), whereas 15 patients with bleeding events used DE110. Compared with DE110, the patients receiving DE150 were younger and more often male and had lower HAS-BLED and CHA2DS2VASc scores and better renal function. Patients' HTI levels were very variable (DE110, 10-90th percentile: 20.5-223.9 ng/ml). A receiver-operator characteristic curve gave a median cutoff HTI level of 117.7 ng/ml to predict bleeding events (C-statistics: 0.65; P = 0.036), but no cutoff could be determined for prothrombin time or APTT. Based on the Kaplan-Meier analysis, a dabigatran etexilate level greater than 117.7 ng/ml was associated with a higher bleeding rate (15.4% vs. 4.9%, P = 0.01). After multivariate Cox regression analysis, HTI levels, history of stroke, and male sex were independent risk factors for bleeding events. Dabigatran etexilate-HTI levels were independently associated with bleeding in patients receiving routine clinical care. Blood sampling at multiple time points might be needed to increase reliability because of high variation of dabigatran etexilate-HTI levels. PMID:26991859

  2. Recombinant activated factor VII in the treatment of bleeds and for the prevention of surgery-related bleeding in congenital haemophilia with inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Santagostino, Elena; Escobar, Miguel; Ozelo, Margareth; Solimeno, Luigi; Arkhammar, Per; Lee, Hye Youn; Rosu, Gabriela; Giangrande, Paul

    2015-06-01

    The availability of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa, eptacog alfa activated) has greatly advanced the care of patients with haemophilia A or B who have developed inhibitors against the infused replacement factor. Recombinant FVIIa is licensed for the on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes and the prevention of bleeding in surgery or invasive procedures in patients with congenital haemophilia with inhibitors. This article attempts to review in detail the extensive evidence of rFVIIa in congenital haemophilia patients with inhibitors. Patients with acute bleeding episodes are best treated on demand at home, to achieve the short- and long-term benefits of rapid bleed control. Key prospective studies have shown that rFVIIa achieves consistently high efficacy rates in the management of acute (including joint) bleeds in inhibitor patients in the home treatment setting. Substantial post-approval data from key registries also support the on-demand efficacy profile of rFVIIa established by the prospective clinical trials. The availability of rFVIIa has allowed major surgery to become a reality for inhibitor patients. Studies in key surgery, including orthopaedic procedures, have found that rFVIIa provides consistently high efficacy rates. Importantly, the wealth of data does not raise any unexpected safety concerns surrounding rFVIIa use; this is likely because rFVIIa is a recombinant product with a localised mechanism of action at the site of vascular injury. In summary, rFVIIa is established as an effective and well-tolerated first-line treatment for on-demand bleeding control and bleed prevention during minor and major (including elective orthopaedic) surgery in inhibitor patients. Use of rFVIIa has been a major step towards narrowing the gap in outcomes between inhibitor patients and non-inhibitor patients. PMID:26073369

  3. Bleeding time

    MedlinePlus

    Bleeding time is a medical test that measures how fast small blood vessels in the skin stop bleeding. ... until the bleeding stops. The provider records the time it takes for the cuts to stop bleeding.

  4. Control of Pitching Airfoil Aerodynamics by Vorticity Flux Modification using Active Bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2014-11-01

    Distributed active bleed driven by pressure differences across a pitching airfoil is used to regulate the vorticity flux over the airfoil's surface and thereby to control aerodynamic loads in wind tunnel experiments. The range of pitch angles is varied beyond the static stall margin of the 2-D VR-7 airfoil at reduced pitching rates up to k = 0.42. Bleed is regulated dynamically using piezoelectric louvers between the model's pressure side near the trailing edge and the suction surface near the leading edge. The time-dependent evolution of vorticity concentrations over the airfoil and in the wake during the pitch cycle is investigated using high-speed PIV and the aerodynamic forces and moments are measured using integrated load cells. The timing of the dynamic stall vorticity flux into the near wake and its effect on the flow field are analyzed in the presence and absence of bleed using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). It is shown that bleed actuation alters the production, accumulation, and advection of vorticity concentrations near the surface with significant effects on the evolution, and, in particular, the timing of dynamic stall vortices. These changes are manifested by alteration of the lift hysteresis and improvement of pitch stability during the cycle, while maintaining cycle-averaged lift to within 5% of the base flow level with significant implications for improvement of the stability of flexible wings and rotor blades. This work is supported by the Rotorcraft Center (VLRCOE) at Georgia Tech.

  5. Recombinant activated factor VII in patients at high risk of bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kubisz, Peter; Stasko, Ján

    2004-01-01

    Currently, recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) (NovoSeven) is indicated for the treatment of spontaneous and surgical bleeding in congenital haemophilia A and B patients with inhibitors to factors VIII (FVIII) and IX (FIX) >5 Bethesda units (BU) worldwide, and in patients with acquired haemophilia, congenital FVII deficiency and Glanzmann's thrombasthenia in Europe. Until April 2003, almost three-quarters of a milion doses of rFVIIa have been administered proving its efficacy and excellent safety record. According to results from initial clinical trials and a large number of case reports, the rFVIIa may be effective not only in treating haemophilia patients but also in treatment of bleeding in patients on oral anticoagulation or heparin, patients with liver diseases, von Willebrand disease (vWD), thrombocytopenia, various platelet defects, congenital or acquired deficiency of FVII, and in subjects without any pre-existing coagulopathy with diffuse life-threatening bleeding triggered by surgery or trauma. This review will briefly summarize rFVIIa mode of action in haemostasis, the current clinical experience with rFVIIa and focus on the alternative use of rFVIIa in patients at the high risk of bleeding in both spontaneous cases and clinical trials reports. PMID:15763970

  6. Impact on postoperative bleeding and cost of recombinant activated factor VII in patients undergoing heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, Allison L.; Lowery, Ashleigh V.; Pajoumand, Mehrnaz; Pham, Si M.; Slejko, Julia F.; Tanaka, Kenichi A.; Mazzeffi, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiac transplantation can be complicated by refractory hemorrhage particularly in cases where explantation of a ventricular assist device is necessary. Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) has been used to treat refractory bleeding in cardiac surgery patients, but little information is available on its efficacy or cost in heart transplant patients. Methods: Patients who had orthotopic heart transplantation between January 2009 and December 2014 at a single center were reviewed. Postoperative bleeding and the total costs of hemostatic therapies were compared between patients who received rFVIIa and those who did not. Propensity scores were created and used to control for the likelihood of receiving rFVIIa in order to reduce bias in our risk estimates. Results: Seventy-six patients underwent heart transplantation during the study period. Twenty-one patients (27.6%) received rFVIIa for refractory intraoperative bleeding. There was no difference in postoperative red blood cell transfusion, chest tube output, or surgical re-exploration between patients who received rFVIIa and those who did not, even after adjusting with the propensity score (P = 0.94, P = 0.60, and P = 0.10, respectively). The total cost for hemostatic therapies was significantly higher in the rFVIIa group (median $10,819 vs. $1,985; P < 0.0001). Subgroup analysis of patients who underwent redo-sternotomy with left ventricular assist device explantation did not show any benefit for rFVIIa either. Conclusions: In this relatively small cohort, rFVIIa use was not associated with decreased postoperative bleeding in patients undergoing heart transplantation; however, it led to significantly higher cost. PMID:27397445

  7. Nutritional care in peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    VOMERO, Nathália Dalcin; COLPO, Elisângela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer is a lesion of the mucosal lining of the upper gastrointestinal tract characterized by an imbalance between aggressive and protective factors of the mucosa, having H. pylori as the main etiologic factor. Dietotherapy is important in the prevention and treatment of this disease. Aim To update nutritional therapy in adults' peptic ulcer. Methods Exploratory review without restrictions with primary sources indexed in Scielo, PubMed, Medline, ISI, and Scopus databases. Results Dietotherapy, as well as caloric distribution, should be adjusted to the patient's needs aiming to normalize the nutritional status and promote healing. Recommended nutrients can be different in the acute phase and in the recovery phase, and there is a greater need of protein and some micronutrients, such as vitamin A, zinc, selenium, and vitamin C in the recovery phase. In addition, some studies have shown that vitamin C has a beneficial effect in eradication of H. pylori. Fibers and probiotics also play a important role in the treatment of peptic ulcer, because they reduce the side effects of antibiotics and help reduce treatment time. Conclusion A balanced diet is vital in the treatment of peptic ulcer, once food can prevent, treat or even alleviate the symptoms involving this pathology. However, there are few papers that innovate dietotherapy; so additional studies addressing more specifically the dietotherapy for treatment of peptic ulcer are necessary. PMID:25626944

  8. Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Peptic Ulcer URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  9. Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Peptic Ulcer URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih. ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  10. Actively bleeding Dieulafoy’s lesion of the small bowel identified by capsule endoscopy and treated by push enteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Giovanni D De; Patrone, Francesco; Rega, Maria; Simeoli, Immacolata; Masone, Stefania; Persico, Giovanni

    2006-01-01

    Dieulafoy’s lesion is an unusual cause of recurrent GI bleeding. This report describes a case of actively bleeding Dieulafoy’s lesion of the small bowel in which the diagnosis was made by capsule endoscopy, followed by treatment with the use of push enteroscopy. The case illustrates that capsule endoscopy and enteroscopy are highly complementary in patients with small bowel diseases. PMID:16804987

  11. [OMEPRAZOL VS RANITIDINE IN UPPER DIGESTIVE BLEEDING

    PubMed

    Regis R, Regina; Bisso A, Aland; Rebaza, Segundo

    1999-01-01

    Pectic ulcer is the most frequent cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. The homeostatic mechanism of bleeding, and coagulation, does not happen with values of pH less than 5,0. Therefore neutralization of gastric acidity (pH more than 5,0) is a recourse of control, improve the evolution and healing of peptic ulcer and to avoid a new bleeding. The aim of this study was to compare the results of treatment with omeprazole and ranitidine, in 57 patients admitted at emergency room of the Hospital Central de la Polic a Nacional del Per with endoscopic diagnosis of peptic ulcer, using Forrest classification. Patients received omeprazole 40 mg in bolus IV, followed by continuos infusion of 8 mg/hour for 72 hours (group A) or ranitidine 50 mg IV each 8 hours for 72 hours (group B). A new endoscopy was made 72 hours after admission demostrated a succesful therapy in both group. Bleeding stopped in 26/27 patients in group A (96,2%) and in 23/30 patients in group B (76,6%) (p<0,05). The results of this study show that the omeprazole IV is more effective than ranitidine IV in the control of UGB because of peptic ulcer and provides a faster healing. PMID:12181579

  12. Gastrointestinal bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... on a lab test such as the fecal occult blood test. Other signs of GI bleeding include: ... ray Volvulus - x-ray GI bleeding - series Fecal occult blood test References Jensen DM. GI hemorrhage and ...

  13. Bleeding gums

    MedlinePlus

    ... form of gum and jawbone disease known as periodontitis . Other causes of bleeding gums include: Any bleeding ... been diagnosed with a vitamin deficiency, take vitamin supplements. Avoid aspirin unless your health care provider has ...

  14. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers. PMID:1801957

  15. Endogenous Heparinoids May Cause Bleeding in Mucor Infection and can be Detected by Nonactivated Thromboelastometry and Treated by Recombinant Activated Factor VII: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Durila, Miroslav; Pavlicek, Petr; Hadacova, Ivana; Nahlovsky, Jiri; Janeckova, Daniela

    2016-02-01

    Mucormycosis is an aggressive fungal infection, which invades endothelial cells of blood vessels. This condition might lead to destruction of endothelium and release of heparin-like substances to the bloodstream and cause life-threatening bleeding, which is not well described in the literature.We present a patient with mucormycosis who experienced life-threatening bleeding, although no standard laboratory test could detect any coagulopathy.The cause of bleeding-coagulopathy was detected only by nonactivated thromboelastometry (NATEM), which revealed the presence of heparin-like substances. After treatment with recombinant activated FVII rotational thromboelastometry, results improved and the patient stopped bleeding. Regular application of the drug was necessary during acute phase of infection to prevent further bleeding.In this case report, we show that NATEM can detect the presence of heparin-like substances in bleeding patient with mucormycosis infection and that recombinant activated FVII can be used to stop and prevent bleeding until infection resolves. PMID:26937941

  16. Endogenous Heparinoids May Cause Bleeding in Mucor Infection and can be Detected by Nonactivated Thromboelastometry and Treated by Recombinant Activated Factor VII

    PubMed Central

    Durila, Miroslav; Pavlicek, Petr; Hadacova, Ivana; Nahlovsky, Jiri; Janeckova, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mucormycosis is an aggressive fungal infection, which invades endothelial cells of blood vessels. This condition might lead to destruction of endothelium and release of heparin-like substances to the bloodstream and cause life-threatening bleeding, which is not well described in the literature. We present a patient with mucormycosis who experienced life-threatening bleeding, although no standard laboratory test could detect any coagulopathy. The cause of bleeding-coagulopathy was detected only by nonactivated thromboelastometry (NATEM), which revealed the presence of heparin-like substances. After treatment with recombinant activated FVII rotational thromboelastometry, results improved and the patient stopped bleeding. Regular application of the drug was necessary during acute phase of infection to prevent further bleeding. In this case report, we show that NATEM can detect the presence of heparin-like substances in bleeding patient with mucormycosis infection and that recombinant activated FVII can be used to stop and prevent bleeding until infection resolves. PMID:26937941

  17. Is sclerosant injection mandatory after an epinephrine injection for arrest of peptic ulcer haemorrhage? A prospective, randomised, comparative study.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, H J; Perng, C L; Lee, S D

    1993-01-01

    A prospective, randomised, comparative study was performed to assess the need for a pure alcohol injection after an epinephrine injection in the arrest of active peptic ulcer bleeding. Sixty four patients with active ulcer bleeding were enrolled in the study. The two groups (epinephrine and epinephrine plus pure alcohol) were matched for sex, age, site of bleed, endoscopic findings, shock, haemoglobin, and concomitant illness at randomisation. The volume of injected epinephrine in the epinephrine and the epinephrine plus pure alcohol groups mean (SD) was 6.0 (3.0) ml and 5.5 (3.0) ml respectively (p > 0.05). The volume of injected pure alcohol in the epinephrine plus pure alcohol group was 1.9 (1.1) ml. Bleeding was initially controlled in 31 (97%) of the epinephrine group and all of the epinephrine plus pure alcohol group. Rebleeding occurred in 11 (36%) of the epinephrine group and in five (16%) of the epinephrine plus pure alcohol group (p > 0.05). Rebleeding was successfully controlled in some patients with treatment by a second injection. Other patients had heat probe thermocoagulation or surgery. Ultimate haemostatic rates were 69% (22/32) and 88% (28/32) for the epinephrine and the epinephrine plus pure alcohol groups respectively (p > 0.05). The epinephrine plus pure alcohol group achieved a better haemostatic effect for spurting haemorrhage (9/10 v 5/11, p < 0.05). The need for emergency operations and blood transfusions were comparable in both groups. The stay in hospital were less in the epinephrine plus pure alcohol group (mean 4.3 v 7.1, p < 0.05). It is concluded that pure alcohol injection after an epinephrine injection can improve the haemostatic rate in patients with spurting haemorrhage and shorten the hospital stay for patients with active bleeding. PMID:8406150

  18. Plasminogen activator inhibitor with very long half-life (VLHL PAI-1) can reduce bleeding in PAI-1-deficient patients.

    PubMed

    Jankun, Jerzy; Skrzypczak-Jankun, Ewa

    2013-08-01

    This review summarizes our current knowledge of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) deficiency and proposes some novel treatments for this condition. PAI-1 is a fast acting inhibitor of tissue and urokinase plasminogen activators (tPA and uPA). PAI-1 controls/slows clot lysis triggered by tPA activated plasminogen. PAI-1 deficiency was once considered to be an extremely rare disorder characterized by frequent and prolonged bleeding episodes. PAI-1 deficiency is now thought to be more frequent than initially reported and is known to be caused by mutations in the PAI-1 gene that produce a dysfunctional PAI-1 protein or slow the secretion of PAI-1 into the circulation. PAI-1 deficiency is characterized by hyperfibrinolysis that results in frequent bleeding episodes. Patients with this condition form normal blood clots that are quickly lysed by unopposed tPA-activated plasmin. Spontaneous bleeding is rare in PAI-1 deficient patients, but moderate hemorrhaging of the knees, elbows, nose, and gums can be triggered by mild trauma. Additionally, prolonged bleeding after surgery is common and menstrual bleeding may be severe. Moderate PAI-1 deficiency is associated with a lifelong bleeding tendency, but severe deficiencies can be life-threatening. The diagnosis of this disorder remains challenging due to the lack of a clear definition of PAI-1 deficiency as well as a lack of standardized tests. Patients with mild PAI-1 deficiency may be treated with antifibrinolytic agents (ε-aminocaproic acid or tranexamic acid); however, not all patients respond well to these treatments. These patients may be treated with wild-type PAI-1; however, this molecule quickly converts into its inactive form. We propose to use PAI-1 with an extended half-life to treat these patients. PMID:23988002

  19. Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... stool Dark blood mixed with stool Signs of bleeding in the lower digestive tract include Black or tarry stool Dark blood mixed with stool Stool mixed or coated with bright red blood GI bleeding is not a disease, but a symptom of ...

  20. Recommendations on the use of recombinant activated factor VII as an adjunctive treatment for massive bleeding – a European perspective

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Rossaint, Rolf; Riou, Bruno; Ozier, Yves; Zideman, David; Spahn, Donat R

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Our aim was to develop consensus guidelines for use of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in massive hemorrhage. Methods A guidelines committee derived the recommendations using clinical trial and case series data identified through searches of available databases. Guidelines were graded on a scale of A to E (with A being the highest) according to the strength of evidence available. Consensus was sought among the committee members for each recommendation. Results A recommendation for the use of rFVIIa in blunt trauma was made (grade B). rFVIIa might also be beneficial in post-partum hemorrhage (grade E), uncontrolled bleeding in surgical patients (grade E), and bleeding after cardiac surgery (grade D). rFVIIa could not be recommended for use in the following: in penetrating trauma (grade B); prophylactically in elective surgery (grade A) or liver surgery (grade B); or in bleeding episodes in patients with Child–Pugh A cirrhosis (grade B). Efficacy of rFVIIa was considered uncertain in bleeding episodes in patients with Child–Pugh B and C cirrhosis (grade C). Monitoring of rFVIIa efficacy should be performed visually and by assessment of transfusion requirements (grade E), while thromboembolic adverse events are a cause for concern. rFVIIa should not be administered to patients considered unsalvageable by the treating medical team. Conclusion There is a rationale for using rFVIIa to treat massive bleeding in certain indications, but only adjunctively to the surgical control of bleeding once conventional therapies have failed. Lack of data from randomized, controlled clinical trials, and possible publication bias of the case series data, limits the strength of the recommendations that can be made. PMID:16919168

  1. Role of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Roja

    2015-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a multifactorial and complex disease involving gastric and duodenal ulcers. Despite medical advances, the management of peptic ulcer and its complications remains a challenge, with high morbidity and death rates for the disease. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that, among a broad reach of natural molecules, dietary polyphenols with multiple biological mechanisms of action play a pivotal part in the management of gastric and duodenal ulcers. The current review confirmed that dietary polyphenols possess protective and therapeutic potential in peptic ulcer mediated by: improving cytoprotection, re-epithelialization, neovascularization, and angiogenesis; up-regulating tissue growth factors and prostaglandins; down-regulating anti-angiogenic factors; enhancing endothelial nitric oxide synthase-derived NO; suppressing oxidative mucosal damage; amplifying antioxidant performance, antacid, and anti-secretory activity; increasing endogenous mucosal defensive agents; and blocking Helicobacter pylori colonization associated gastric morphological changes and gastroduodenal inflammation and ulceration. In addition, anti-inflammatory activity due to down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and cellular and intercellular adhesion agents, suppressing leukocyte-endothelium interaction, inhibiting nuclear signaling pathways of inflammatory process, and modulating intracellular transduction and transcription pathways have key roles in the anti-ulcer action of dietary polyphenols. In conclusion, administration of a significant amount of dietary polyphenols in the human diet or as part of dietary supplementation along with conventional treatment can result in perfect security and treatment of peptic ulcer. Further well-designed preclinical and clinical tests are recommended in order to recognize higher levels of evidence for the confirmation of bioefficacy and safety of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer. PMID:26074689

  2. Role of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Roja

    2015-06-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a multifactorial and complex disease involving gastric and duodenal ulcers. Despite medical advances, the management of peptic ulcer and its complications remains a challenge, with high morbidity and death rates for the disease. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that, among a broad reach of natural molecules, dietary polyphenols with multiple biological mechanisms of action play a pivotal part in the management of gastric and duodenal ulcers. The current review confirmed that dietary polyphenols possess protective and therapeutic potential in peptic ulcer mediated by: improving cytoprotection, re-epithelialization, neovascularization, and angiogenesis; up-regulating tissue growth factors and prostaglandins; down-regulating anti-angiogenic factors; enhancing endothelial nitric oxide synthase-derived NO; suppressing oxidative mucosal damage; amplifying antioxidant performance, antacid, and anti-secretory activity; increasing endogenous mucosal defensive agents; and blocking Helicobacter pylori colonization associated gastric morphological changes and gastroduodenal inflammation and ulceration. In addition, anti-inflammatory activity due to down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and cellular and intercellular adhesion agents, suppressing leukocyte-endothelium interaction, inhibiting nuclear signaling pathways of inflammatory process, and modulating intracellular transduction and transcription pathways have key roles in the anti-ulcer action of dietary polyphenols. In conclusion, administration of a significant amount of dietary polyphenols in the human diet or as part of dietary supplementation along with conventional treatment can result in perfect security and treatment of peptic ulcer. Further well-designed preclinical and clinical tests are recommended in order to recognize higher levels of evidence for the confirmation of bioefficacy and safety of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer. PMID:26074689

  3. Triple gastric peptic ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Radojkovic, Milan; Mihajlovic, Suncica; Stojanovic, Miroslav; Stanojevic, Goran; Damnjanovic, Zoran

    2016-03-01

    Patients with advanced or metastatic cancer have compromised nutritional, metabolic, and immune conditions. Nevertheless, little is known about gastroduodenal perforation in cancer patients. Described in the present report is the case of a 41-year old woman with stage IV recurrent laryngeal cancer, who used homeopathic anticancer therapy and who had triple peptic ulcer perforation (PUP) that required surgical repair. Triple gastric PUP is a rare complication. Self-administration of homeopathic anticancer medication should be strongly discouraged when evidence-based data regarding efficacy and toxicity is lacking. PMID:27193988

  4. Computed tomographic findings in penetrating peptic ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Madrazo, B.L.; Halpert, R.D.; Sandler, M.A.; Pearlberg, J.L.

    1984-12-01

    Four cases of peptic ulcer penetrating the head of the pancreas were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT). Findings common to 3 cases included (a) an ulcer crater, (b) a sinus tract, and (c) enlargement of the head of the pancreas. Unlike other modalities, the inherent spatial resolution of CT allows a convenient diagnosis of this important complication of peptic ulcer disease.

  5. [Gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    In the Digestive Disease Week in 2015 there have been some new contributions in the field of gastrointestinal bleeding that deserve to be highlighted. Treatment of celecoxib with a proton pump inhibitor is safer than treatment with nonselective NSAID and a proton pump inhibitor in high risk gastrointestinal and cardiovascular patients who mostly also take acetylsalicylic acid. Several studies confirm the need to restart the antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy at an early stage after a gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The need for urgent endoscopy before 6-12 h after the onset of upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode may be beneficial in patients with hemodynamic instability and high risk for comorbidity. It is confirmed that in Western but not in Japanese populations, gastrointestinal bleeding episodes admitted to hospital during weekend days are associated with a worse prognosis associated with delays in the clinical management of the events. The strategy of a restrictive policy on blood transfusions during an upper GI bleeding event has been challenged. Several studies have shown the benefit of identifying the bleeding vessel in non varicose underlying gastric lesions by Doppler ultrasound which allows direct endoscopic therapy in the patient with upper GI bleeding. Finally, it has been reported that lower gastrointestinal bleeding diverticula band ligation or hemoclipping are both safe and have the same long-term outcomes. PMID:26520197

  6. Bleeding Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause bleeding, such as endometriosis (EN-doh-MEE-tree-OH-suhss) Large bruises from a minor bump ... 8573 National Hemophilia Foundation Phone: 800-424-2634 World Federation of Hemophilia Phone: 514-875-7944 Return ...

  7. Bleeding time

    MedlinePlus

    A blood pressure cuff is inflated around your upper arm. While the cuff is on your arm, the health care provider makes two ... a tiny amount of bleeding. The blood pressure cuff is immediately deflated. Blotting paper is touched to ...

  8. Bleeding gums

    MedlinePlus

    ... line. This will lead to a condition called gingivitis , or inflamed gums. Plaque that is not removed ... Livingstone; 2009:chap 60. Read More Bleeding disorders Gingivitis Periodontitis Update Date 2/25/2014 Updated by: ...

  9. Purification and assay of opioid activity of low molecular weight enkephalin-immunoreactive peptides generated by peptic digestion of rat plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Shen, F S; Lindberg, I

    1989-01-01

    A low molecular weight Methionine enkephalin-immunoreactive peptide (MEIP) and two Leucine-enkephalin immunoreactive peptides (LEIP) generated by peptic digestion of rat plasma were purified through gel filtration followed by five sequential reverse phase HPLC gradients in different solvent systems. Binding experiments of these peptides to opioid receptors of rat brains were performed. The two LEIPs were able to inhibit binding of [3H]naloxone to opioid receptors in rat brain membranes. No inhibition was found with the MEIP (which represented the only MEIP present in the low molecular weight fraction of pepsin-digested rat plasma). Sequencing revealed that the MEIP is a six residue peptide with the following sequence: Gly-Glu-Tyr-Gly-Phe-Gln. This sequence corresponds to that of residues 422-427 of rat serum albumin. PMID:2537935

  10. Factors related to the failure of endoscopic injection therapy for bleeding gastric ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Brullet, E; Campo, R; Calvet, X; Coroleu, D; Rivero, E; Simó Deu, J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although endoscopic injection therapy is effective in controlling initial haemorrhage from peptic ulcer, between 10% to 30% of patients suffer rebleeding. AIM: To assess the factors that may predict the failure of endoscopic injection in patients bleeding from high risk gastric ulcer. SUBJECTS: One hundred and seventy eight patients admitted for a gastric ulcer with a bleeding or a non-bleeding visible vessel were included. METHODS: Patients received endoscopic therapy by injection for adrenaline and polidocanol. Twelve clinical and endoscopic variables were entered into a multivariate logistic regression model to ascertain their significance as predictive factor of therapeutic failure. RESULTS: Eighty seven per cent (155 of 178) of patients had no further bleeding after endoscopic therapy. Endoscopic injection failed in 23 (13%) patients: 20 (12%) continued to bleed or rebleed, and three (1%) patients could not be treated because of inaccessibility of the lesion. Logistic regression analysis showed that therapeutic failure was significantly related to: (1) the presence of hypovolaemic shock (p = 0.09, OR 2.38, 95% CI: 0.86, 6.56), (2) the presence of active bleeding at endoscopy (p = 0.02, OR 2.98, 95% CI: 1.12, 7.91), (3) ulcer location high on the lesser curvature (p = 0.04, OR 2.79, 95% CI: 1.01, 7.69), and (4) ulcer size larger than 2 cm (p = 0.01, OR 3.64, 95% CI: 1.34, 9.89). CONCLUSION: These variables may enable identification of those patients bleeding from gastric ulcer who would not benefit from injection therapy. PMID:8977333

  11. Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding - review the effectiveness of endoscopic hemostasis methods

    PubMed Central

    Szura, Mirosław; Pasternak, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding is a condition that requires immediate medical intervention and has a high associated mortality rate (exceeding 10%). The vast majority of upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases are due to peptic ulcers. Helicobacter pylori infection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin are the main risk factors for peptic ulcer disease. Endoscopic therapy has generally been recommended as the first-line treatment for upper gastrointestinal bleeding as it has been shown to reduce recurrent bleeding, the need for surgery and mortality. Early endoscopy (within 24 h of hospital admission) has a greater impact than delayed endoscopy on the length of hospital stay and requirement for blood transfusion. This paper aims to review and compare the efficacy of the types of endoscopic hemostasis most commonly used to control non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding by pooling data from the literature. PMID:26421105

  12. Prostaglandins, H2-receptor antagonists and peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Bright-Asare, P; Habte, T; Yirgou, B; Benjamin, J

    1988-01-01

    Peptic ulcer develops when offensive factors overwhelm defensive processes in the gastroduodenal mucosa. Offensive factors include NSAIDs, hydrochloric acid-peptic activity, bile reflux, and some products of the lipoxygenase pathway such as leukotriene B4; whereas defensive processes are largely mediated by prostaglandins through poorly understood mechanisms uniformly termed cytoprotection. Cytoprotection, a physiological process working through the products of arachidonic acid metabolism, may result from the net effect of the protective actions of prostaglandins versus the damaging actions of leukotrienes. Some prostaglandins also have antisecretory effects. Therefore the peptic ulcer healing effects of prostaglandin analogues, all of which have significant antisecretory activity, may be more due to their antisecretory effects than primarily to their effects on mucosal defences. Certain drug-induced gastroduodenal lesions, e.g. NSAID-induced ulcers, which are often unresponsive to H2-receptor antagonists, have been healed and their recurrence prevented by the use of PGE1 and PGE2 analogues. All the prostaglandin analogues investigated to date in humans have the potential for inducing abortion, an important side effect which may limit their worldwide use. The optimal prostaglandin analogue for ulcer healing should not induce abortion and should be potently cytoprotective. The predominant damaging agent in the development of peptic ulcer disease is gastric hydrochloric acid. Thus, the worldwide established efficacy and safety of H2-receptor antagonists such as cimetidine, ranitidine, famotidine and most recently of roxatidine acetate suggest that these agents have become the standard by which other forms of anti-ulcer therapy should be judged. PMID:2905237

  13. Treating traumatic bleeding in a combat setting: possible role of recombinant activated factor VII.

    PubMed

    Martinowitz, Uri; Zaarur, Menashe; Yaron, Bar-Lavie; Blumenfeld, Amir; Martonovits, Giora

    2004-12-01

    Bleeding is clearly a major cause of morbidity and death after trauma. When bleeding is attributable to transection of major vessels, surgical repair is appropriate. Posttraumatic microvascular bleeding attributable to coagulopathy secondary to metabolic derangements, hypothermia, and depletion or dysfunction of cellular and protein components requires a different approach. Although transfusion of blood products may be necessary to replace the blood loss, it does not always correct the problem of microvascular bleeding. The type of injury, mode of care, and treatment objectives differ significantly for combat-wounded soldiers versus civilian trauma patients. Although hemorrhage is responsible for 50% of combat deaths, published information about coagulation monitoring among combat patients is very limited. These articles summarize the appropriate monitoring of hemostasis among combat trauma patients, review the unique nature of combat casualties and the medical system used to treat them, and discuss information available from civilian studies. Because the development of coagulopathy is relatively infrequent in the young, otherwise healthy, military population, the routine screening measures currently used are adequate to guide initial blood product administration. However, as new intravenous hemostatic agents are used for these patients, better laboratory measures will be required. Although hemorrhage is the leading cause of death for combat casualties, catastrophic hemorrhage is rarely a prehospital combat medical management problem because, when it occurs, it tends to cause death before medical care can be provided. In civilian environments, most seriously injured victims can be reached and transported by emergency medical services personnel within minutes; in combat, it often takes hours simply to transport casualties off the battlefield. In combat situations, even if the transport distances are small, the hazardous nature of the forward combat areas frequently

  14. Bleeding during cancer treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... by helping your blood clot. Chemotherapy , radiation , and bone marrow transplants can destroy some of your platelets. If you ... Names Cancer treatment - bleeding; Chemotherapy - bleeding; Radiation - bleeding; Bone marrow transplant - bleeding; Thrombocytopenia - cancer treatment References Doroshow JH. Approach ...

  15. Successful Control of Massive Bleeding in a Child with Burkitt's Lymphoma via a Biosimilar Recombinant Activated Factor VII (AryoSeven™)

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi Pour, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a 4-year-old girl with Burkitt's lymphoma, who suffered from a massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage 3 days after chemotherapy. In spite of applying the common practice in correction of coagulopathy, thrombocytopenia persisted and bleeding became life-threatening. In the present case report, we report a successful control of bleeding with a single-dose administration of a biosimilar recombinant activated human factor VII (AryoSeven). PMID:27478659

  16. What I Need to Know about Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... briefly if you eat or if you take antacids ● ● lasts for minutes to hours ● ● comes and goes ... peptic ulcer and protects it from stomach acid Antacids—such as Tums—can’t heal a peptic ...

  17. Factor eight inhibitor bypass activity (FEIBA) in the management of bleeds in hemophilia patients with high-titer inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tjønnfjord, Geir E; Andre Holme, Pål

    2007-01-01

    The development of high-titer inhibitors to FVIII and less often to other coagulation factors are the most serious complication of hemophilia therapy and makes treatment of bleeds very challenging. At present, bypassing agents, such as factor eight inhibitor bypass activity (FEIBA) and activated recombinant factor VII (rFVIIa) are the only coagulation factor concentrates available for the treatment of bleeds in inhibitor patients. Both products are effective and safe, and their efficacy has been found to be comparable (approximately 80%) in a recent prospective study. A significant number of patients report a better effect of one or the other of the products, and in a minority of the patients none of the products are particularly effective. The hemostatic efficacy of bypassing agents is not considered equal to that of coagulation factor replacement in patients without inhibitors by most physicians. An improvement in hemostatic efficacy may be achieved by optimizing the dosing of by passing agents. However, the lack of standardized and validated laboratory assays reflecting the hemostatic efficacy of the bypassing agents is an obstacle to this achievement. PMID:17969383

  18. Endovascular Treatment of Active Splenic Bleeding After Colonoscopy: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Corcillo, Antonella; Aellen, Steve Zingg, Tobias; Bize, Pierre; Demartines, Nicolas; Denys, Alban

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Colonoscopy is reported to be a safe procedure that is routinely performed for the diagnosis and treatment of colorectal diseases. Splenic rupture is considered to be a rare complication with high mortality and morbidity that requires immediate diagnosis and management. Nonoperative management (NOM), surgical treatment (ST), and, more recently, proximal splenic artery embolization (PSAE) have been proposed as treatment options. The goal of this study was to assess whether PSAE is safe even in high-grade ruptures. Methods: We report two rare cases of post colonoscopy splenic rupture. A systematic review of the literature from 2002 to 2010 (first reported case of PSAE) was performed and the three types of treatment compared. Results: All patients reviewed (77 of 77) presented with intraperitoneal hemorrhage due to isolated splenic trauma. Splenic rupture was high-grade in most patients when grading was possible. Six of 77 patients (7.8 %) were treated with PSAE, including the 2 cases reported herein. Fifty-seven patients (74 %) underwent ST. NOM was attempted first in 25 patients with a high failure rate (11 of 25 [44 %]) and requiring a salvage procedure, such as PSAE or ST. Previous surgery (31 of 59 patients), adhesions (10 of 13), diagnostic colonoscopies (49 of 71), previous biopsies or polypectomies (31 of 57) and female sex (56 of 77) were identified as risk factors. In contrast, splenomegaly (0 of 77 patients), medications that increase the risk of bleeding (13 of 30) and difficult colonoscopies (16 of 51) were not identified as risk factors. PSAE was safe and effective even in elderly patients with comorbidities and those taking medications that increase the risk of bleeding, and the length of the hospital stay was similar to that after ST. Conclusion: We propose a treatment algorithm based on clinical and radiological criteria. Because of the high failure rate after NOM, PSAE should be the treatment of choice to manage grade I through IV splenic

  19. Endoscopy for Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Bae; Youn, Sei Jin

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopy for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding plays an important role in primary diagnosis and management, particularly with respect to identification of high-risk stigmata lesions and to providing endoscopic hemostasis to reduce the risk of rebleeding and mortality. Early endoscopy, defined as endoscopy within the first 24 hours after presentation, improves patient outcome and reduces the length of hospitalization when compared with delayed endoscopy. Various endoscopic hemostatic methods are available, including injection therapy, mechanical therapy, and thermal coagulation. Either single treatment with mechanical or thermal therapy or a treatment that combines more than one type of therapy are effective and safe for peptic ulcer bleeding. Newly developed methods, such as Hemospray powder and over-the-scope clips, may provide additional options. Appropriate decisions and specific treatment are needed depending upon the conditions. PMID:25133117

  20. Endoscopy for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Bae; Yoon, Soon Man; Youn, Sei Jin

    2014-07-01

    Endoscopy for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding plays an important role in primary diagnosis and management, particularly with respect to identification of high-risk stigmata lesions and to providing endoscopic hemostasis to reduce the risk of rebleeding and mortality. Early endoscopy, defined as endoscopy within the first 24 hours after presentation, improves patient outcome and reduces the length of hospitalization when compared with delayed endoscopy. Various endoscopic hemostatic methods are available, including injection therapy, mechanical therapy, and thermal coagulation. Either single treatment with mechanical or thermal therapy or a treatment that combines more than one type of therapy are effective and safe for peptic ulcer bleeding. Newly developed methods, such as Hemospray powder and over-the-scope clips, may provide additional options. Appropriate decisions and specific treatment are needed depending upon the conditions. PMID:25133117

  1. Drug therapy of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Ching, C K; Lam, S K

    Healing of peptic ulcers can be achieved by using a variety of anti-ulcer medications. The most commonly used agents include the histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) and the proton pump inhibitors. They are also efficacious in preventing ulcer recurrence providing maintenance treatment is given. The ideal treatment for peptic ulcers today is aiming at eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection. Successful elimination of the latter not only heals the ulcers but also provides a cure for the disease, so that the patients will no longer require lifelong maintenance medical therapy. PMID:7551483

  2. Peptic (contact ulcer) granuloma of the larynx.

    PubMed Central

    Miko, T L

    1989-01-01

    Review of published work and analysis of clinical data and pathology of four biopsy specimens from two patients with laryngeal contact granuloma showed that its peptic origin was derived from a gastro-oesophago-laryngeal reflux. It is proposed that the term "peptic granuloma" should be given to this phenomenon. This term is given further support on account of the spectacular recovery of the laryngeal lesion following antacid and antireflux treatment, rather than the traditional method of using vocal rest and speech therapy, assumed to be the best way of treating a result of mechanical irritation, the previously accepted cause of laryngeal contact granuloma. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 PMID:2768520

  3. [Peptic ulcer surgery in the aged].

    PubMed

    Michel, D

    1981-04-01

    Particular problems are discussed in 257 patients over 75 years of age, who were treated for peptic ulcer disease between 1960 and 1979. In elderly patients the peptic ulcer is complicated, often requiring emergency surgery. A special problem in the aged is simultaneous appearance of various sicknesses, which produces further complications. The chosen method of surgery is described and the post-operative period and its general and surgical problems are discussed. The result is a concept of indication for surgery, particularly for the elective operation of chronic ulcers not responding to therapy, before the ulcer becomes complicated. PMID:7227008

  4. First trimester bleeding evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dogra, Vikram; Paspulati, Raj Mohan; Bhatt, Shweta

    2005-06-01

    First trimester bleeding is a common presentation in the emergency room. Ultrasound evaluation of patients with first trimester bleeding is the mainstay of the examination. The important causes of first trimester bleeding include spontaneous abortion, ectopic pregnancy, and gestational trophoblastic disease; 50% to 70% of spontaneous abortions are due to genetic abnormalities. In normal pregnancy, the serum beta hCG doubles or increases by at least 66% in 48 hours. The intrauterine GS should be visualized by TVUS with beta hCG levels between 1000 to 2000 mIU/mL IRP. Visualization of the yolk sac within the gestational sac is definitive evidence of intrauterine pregnancy. Embryonic cardiac activity can be identified with CRL of >5 mm. A GS with a mean sac diameter (MSD) of 8 mm or more without a yolk sac and a GS with an MSD of 16 mm or more without an embryo, are important predictors of a nonviable gestation. A GS with a mean sac diameter of 16 mm or more (TVUS) without an embryo is a sonographic sign of anembryonic gestation. A difference of <5 mm between the mean sac diameter and the CRL carries an 80% risk of spontaneous abortion. Approximately 20% of women with first trimester bleeding have a subchorionic hematoma. The presence of an extra ovarian adnexal mass is the most common sonographic finding in ectopic pregnancy. Other findings include the tubal ring sign and hemorrhage. About 26% of ectopic pregnancies have normal pelvic sonograms on TVUS. Complete hydatidiform mole presents with a complex intrauterine mass with multiple anechoic areas of varying sizes (Snowstorm appearance). Twenty-five percent to 65% of molar pregnancies have associated theca-leutin cysts. Arteriovenous malformation of the uterus is a rare but life-threatening cause of vaginal bleeding in the first trimester. The sonographic findings in a patient with first trimester bleeding should be correlated with serum beta hCG levels to arrive at an appropriate clinical diagnosis. PMID:15905817

  5. Refractory peptic ulceration following radiation therapy in primary gastric lymphoma: A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chunyan; Luo, Shiwen; Lv, Nonghua; Chen, Youxiang

    2015-01-01

    The optimal prognosis for primary gastric lymphoma (PGL) is observed in those patients exhibiting PGL with minimal infiltration and who are eligible for radical resection. The initial treatment strategy for high-grade PGL (stages I/II) is chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy, however, subsequent to chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy for PGL, there is a risk of gastric bleeding and perforation. The present study reports two cases of PGL with refractory peptic ulcers that were negative for Helicobacter pylori following radiotherapy. Although the two patients received regular treatment for their ulcers and symptoms, the position and size of the ulcers remained unchanged for a number of years. PMID:25435934

  6. Improving the management of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael J; Hayes, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding remains a major cause of mortality in patients with cirrhosis. The most common source of bleeding is from gastroesophageal varices but non-variceal bleeding from peptic ulcer disease also carries a significant risk in patients with liver disease. The prognosis is related to the severity of the underlying liver disease, and deaths often occur due to liver failure, infection or renal failure. Optimal management should therefore not only achieve haemostasis but address these complications as well. The management of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis includes a range of medical, endoscopic and radiological interventions. This article updates the recent developments in this area and highlights topics where further research is still required. PMID:26581713

  7. An endoscopic laser Doppler flowmetry of a gastroduodenal mucosa at bleeding ulcer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapkin, U. G.; Kapralov, C. V.; Gogolev, A. A.; Lychagov, V. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2006-08-01

    One of the important problems of a bleeding gastroduodenal ulcer surgery is a prognosis of the recurrent hemorrhage and appraisal of endoscopic hemostasis quality. Endoscopic Laser Doppler Flowmetry of a mucous coat of stomach and a duodenum was made on 34 patients for the purpose of investigation of features of microcirculation. Analogous researches are made on 30 patients with a peptic ulcer and on 28 practically healthy people. Analysis of LDF-grams has shown certain differences in regional microcirculations in stomach and duodenal at normal and at a pathology. Increase of regional perfusion in periulcerose zone with its pathology disbalance can serve as a criterion for activities of an alteration processes in gastroduodenal ulcer defining the risk of possible hemorrhage.

  8. Guidelines for endoscopic management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Kakushima, Naomi; Kato, Motohiko; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Hoteya, Shu; Kataoka, Mikinori; Shimaoka, Shunji; Yahagi, Naohisa; Fujimoto, Kazuma

    2016-05-01

    Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society (JGES) has compiled a set of guidelines for endoscopic management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding using evidence-based methods. The major cause of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is peptic gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding. As a result, these guidelines mainly focus on peptic gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding, although bleeding from other causes is also overviewed. From the epidemiological aspect, in recent years in Japan, bleeding from drug-related ulcers has become predominant in comparison with bleeding from Helicobacter pylori (HP)-related ulcers, owing to an increase in the aging population and coverage of HP eradication therapy by national health insurance. As for treatment, endoscopic hemostasis, in which there are a variety of methods, is considered to be the first-line treatment for bleeding from almost all causes. It is very important to precisely evaluate the severity of the patient's condition and stabilize the patient's vital signs with intensive care for successful endoscopic hemostasis. Additionally, use of antisecretory agents is recommended to prevent rebleeding after endoscopic hemostasis, especially for gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding. Eighteen statements with evidence and recommendation levels have been made by the JGES committee of these guidelines according to evidence obtained from clinical research studies. However, some of the statements that are supported by a low level of evidence must be confirmed by further clinical research. PMID:26900095

  9. Symptoms and Causes of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ulcer Disease Next: Diagnosis of Peptic Ulcer Disease Digestive Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients and medical professionals. View the full list of Digestive Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ NIH...Turning Discovery ...

  10. Definition and Facts for Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next: Symptoms and Causes of Peptic Ulcer Disease Digestive Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients and medical professionals. View the full list of Digestive Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ NIH...Turning Discovery ...

  11. Acid peptic diseases: pharmacological approach to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Alex; Kraft, Walter K

    2011-01-01

    Acid peptic disorders are the result of distinctive, but overlapping pathogenic mechanisms leading to either excessive acid secretion or diminished mucosal defense. They are common entities present in daily clinical practice that, owing to their chronicity, represent a significant cost to healthcare. Key elements in the success of controlling these entities have been the development of potent and safe drugs based on physiological targets. The histamine-2 receptor antagonists revolutionized the treatment of acid peptic disorders owing to their safety and efficacy profile. The proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) represent a further therapeutic advance due to more potent inhibition of acid secretion. Ample data from clinical trials and observational experience have confirmed the utility of these agents in the treatment of acid peptic diseases, with differential efficacy and safety characteristics between and within drug classes. Paradigms in their speed and duration of action have underscored the need for new chemical entities that, from a single dose, would provide reliable duration of acid control, particularly at night. Moreover, PPIs reduce, but do not eliminate, the risk of ulcers in patients taking NSAIDs, reflecting untargeted physiopathologic pathways and a breach in the ability to sustain an intragastric pH of more than 4. This review provides an assessment of the current understanding of the physiology of acid production, a discussion of medications targeting gastric acid production and a review of efficacy in specific acid peptic diseases, as well as current challenges and future directions in the treatment of acid-mediated diseases. PMID:21822447

  12. [Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug and Aspirin-induced Peptic Ulcer Disease].

    PubMed

    Shim, Young Kwang; Kim, Nayoung

    2016-06-25

    Despite decreasing Helicobacter pylori prevalence, the prevalence of peptic ulcer disease is increasing in the aged population, mainly due to increasing use of NSAIDs to manage pain and inflammation. In addition, low dose aspirin is employed as an anti-coagulant for those who have suffered or are at high risk of ischemic stroke and cardiovascular disease. However, NSAIDs and aspirin are injurious to mucosa of stomach and duodenum. NSAID-induced inhibition of mucosal prostaglandin synthesis is thought to be a major mechanism of gastrointestinal mucosal injury. The proportion of elderly has increased rapidly in Korea, with the proportion over 65 years old expected to be 24.3% in 2030. In this higher-risk population, the strategy to reduce the incidence of NSAID-related peptic ulcers and complications such as bleeding, obstruction and perforation is very important. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor can be used for reducing the risk of NSAID-related ulcers and upper gastrointestinal (GI) complications. However, continuous use of PPI has several problems. In addition, NSAID-related problems in the lower GI tract have increased, in contrast to the decrease of NSAID-related upper GI disease. The aim of this review is to provide an evidence-based knowledge regarding the mechanism, complications of treatment, and prevention strategies for NSAID- or aspirin-related peptic ulcer disease in Korea. PMID:27312830

  13. Bleeding esophageal varices

    MedlinePlus

    ... air. This produces pressure against the bleeding veins (balloon tamponade). Once the bleeding is stopped, varices can be treated with medicines and medical procedures to prevent future bleeding including: Drugs called ...

  14. Bleeding esophageal varices

    MedlinePlus

    ... air. This produces pressure against the bleeding veins (balloon tamponade). Once the bleeding is stopped, other varices can be treated with medicines and medical procedures to prevent future bleeding, including: Drugs called ...

  15. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal uterine bleeding is any bleeding from the uterus (through your vagina) other than your normal monthly ... or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, ...

  16. Bleeders, bleeding rates, and bleeding score.

    PubMed

    Tosetto, A; Castaman, G; Rodeghiero, F

    2013-06-01

    Bleeding symptoms are frequently reported even in otherwise healthy subjects, and differentiating a normal subject from a patient with a mild bleeding disorder (MBD) can be extremely challenging. The concept of bleeding rate, that is, the number of bleeding episodes occurring within a definite time, could be used as the unifying framework reconciling the bleeding risk observed in congenital and acquired coagulopathies into a single picture. For instance, primary prevention trials have shown that the incidence of non-major bleeding symptoms in normal subjects is around five per 100 person-years, and this figure is in accordance with the number of hemorrhagic symptoms reported by normal controls in observational studies on hemorrhagic disorders. The incidence of non-major bleeding in patients with MBDs (e.g. in patients with type 1 VWD carrying the C1130F mutation) is also strikingly similar with that of patients taking antiplatelet drugs, and the incidence in moderately severe bleeding disorders (e.g. type 2 VWD) parallels that of patients taking vitamin K antagonists. The severity of a bleeding disorder may therefore be explained by a bleeding rate model, which also explains several common clinical observations. Appreciation of the bleeding rate of congenital and acquired conditions and of its environmental/genetic modifiers into a single framework will possibly allow the development of better prediction tools in the coming years and represents a major scientific effort to be pursued. PMID:23809118

  17. The association of Helicobacter pylori infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in peptic ulcer disease

    PubMed Central

    Zapata-Colindres, Juan Carlos; Zepeda-Gómez, Sergio; Montaño-Loza, Aldo; Vázquez-Ballesteros, Edgar; de Jesús Villalobos, José; Valdovinos-Andraca, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) affects 10% of the world population. Helicobacter pylori infection and the use of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) are the principal factors associated with PUD. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a cohort of patients with PUD and determine the association between H pylori infection and NSAID use. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The medical charts of patients with endoscopic diagnosis of PUD were retrospectively reviewed from September 2002 to August 2003. Patients were divided into three groups according to ulcer etiology: H pylori infection (group 1); NSAID use (group 2); and combined H pylori infection and NSAID use (group 3). RESULTS: One hundred two patients were evaluated: 36 men (35.3%) and 66 women (64.7%). Forty patients had H pylori infection, 43 had used NSAIDs and 15 had combined H pylori infection and NSAID use; four patients with ulcers secondary to malignancy were excluded. The frequency of women was significantly higher in group 2 (P=0.01). The mean age of patients in group 1 was significantly lower than in the other two groups (P=0.003). PUD developed earlier in group 3 than in group 2 (5.0±4.7 months versus 1.4±2.1 months, respectively, P=0.018). Thirty-two patients (32.7%) had bleeding peptic ulcer. Group 2 had a higher risk of bleeding peptic ulcer than the other two groups (P=0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The development of PUD was observed earlier in the combined H pylori and NSAID group than in patients with only NSAID use. This suggests a synergic effect between the two risks factors in the development of PUD. PMID:16609757

  18. Safety and efficacy of Hemospray® in upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Alan Hoi Lun; Ou, George; Galorport, Cherry; Amar, Jack; Bressler, Brian; Donnellan, Fergal; Ko, Hin Hin; Lam, Eric; Enns, Robert Allan

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hemospray (Cook Medical, USA) has recently been approved in Canada for the management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestional bleeding (UGIB). OBJECTIVE: To review the authors’ experience with the safety and efficacy of Hemospray for treating UGIB. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed on patients who required endoscopic evaluation for suspected UGIB and were treated with Hemospray. RESULTS: From February 2012 to July 2013, 19 patients (mean age 67.6 years) with UGIB were treated with Hemospray. A bleeding lesion was identified in the esophagus in one (5.3%) patient, the stomach in five (26.3%) and duodenum in 13 (68.4%). Bleeding was secondary to peptic ulcers in 12 (63.2%) patients, Dieulafoy lesions in two (10.5%), mucosal erosion in one (5.3%), angiodysplastic lesions in one (5.3%), ampullectomy in one (5.3%), polypectomy in one (5.3%) and an unidentified lesion in one (5.3%). The lesions showed spurting hemorrhage in four (21.1%) patients, oozing hemorrhage in 11 (57.9%) and no active bleeding in four (21.1%). Hemospray was administered as monotherapy in two (10.5%) patients, first-line modality in one (5.3%) and rescue modality in 16 (84.2%). Hemospray was applied prophylactically to nonbleeding lesions in four (21.1%) patients and therapeutically to bleeding lesions in 15 (78.9%). Acute hemostasis was achieved in 14 of 15 (93.3%) patients. Rebleeding within seven days occurred in seven of 18 (38.9%) patients. Potential adverse events occurred in two (10.5%) patients and included visceral perforation and splenic infarct. Mortality occurred in five (26.3%) patients but the cause of death was unrelated to gastrointestinal bleeding with the exception of one patient who developed hemoperitoneum. CONCLUSIONS: The high rates of both acute hemostasis and recurrent bleeding suggest that Hemospray may be used in high-risk cases as a temporary measure or a bridge toward more definitive therapy. PMID:24501723

  19. [New possibilities in the postoperative measures to prevent bleeding in cardiac surgery. Will the recombinant activated factor VII improve surgical results?].

    PubMed

    Skalski, Janusz H; Czapla, Jerzy; Nadziakiewicz, Paweł; Kaczmarski, Jacek; Zembala, Marian

    2002-01-01

    The authors present the diagnostic and therapeutic management in bleeding episodes associated with cardiosurgical operations, which constitutes the policy that is employed at Department of Cardiac Surgery and Transplantology, Silesian Academy of Medicine, Zabrze, Poland. The paper also presents a compendium of information on the pathophysiology of coagulation processes, most significant from the standpoint of cardiosurgical practice. Separate issues associated with providing optimal hemostasis in patients operated on using cardiopulmonary bypass are discussed, along with the effect of cardiac procedures on coagulation processes. Further, the authors present their clinical observations and experience in the utilization of the recombinant activated factor VII (NovoSeven, NovoNordisk) in two patients with severe perioperative bleeding. In the first case bleeding was associated heart transplantation procedure in a 37-year old woman, who had previously been twice subjected to operations for valvular heart disease. A dysfunction of two artificial valves implanted 15 years previously resulted in considerable heart muscle damage and an extremenally severe form of cardiac insufficiency. Two months after the heart transplant the patient unfortunately died due to infectious complications. In the second patient the recombinant activated factor VII was employed in an attempt at controlling severe bleeding encountered in a 15-year old boy in the course of reoperation in surgical treatment of a complex congenital heart defect. In this case the treatment was successful. In both described patients who were characterized by a high risk of surgical bleeding, the employment of the recombinant activated factor VII led to significant improvement in coagulation system indices and the hemostatic outcome was regarded positive. The authors state that the introduction of the recombinant activated factor VII to clinical practice in a selected group of patients presenting with most serious

  20. The Effect of Intravenous Administration of Active Recombinant Factor VII on Postoperative Bleeding in Cardiac Valve Reoperations; A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Payani, Narges; Foroughi, Mahnoosh; Dabbagh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative bleeding after cardiac reoperations is among the most complicating problems, both for the physicians and for the patients. Many modalities have been used to decrease its adverse effects and the need for blood products administration. Objectives: In a randomized double-blinded clinical trial of redo cardiac valve surgery in adult, the effect of active recombinant factor VII (rFVIIa) on postoperative bleeding was compared with placebo. Chest tube drainage was used for comparison of bleeding between the two groups. Patients and Methods: Two groups of 18 patients undergoing redo valve surgeries were treated and compared regarding chest tube drainage, need for blood products, prothrombin time (PT), partial thromboplastin time (PTT), hemoglobin and hematocrit, platelet count, and international normalized ratio (INR) in first 24 hours after surgery. Bleeding was assessed at 3rd, 12th, and 24th hour after operation. In rFVIIa group, 40 µg/kg of AryoSeven was administered before end of surgery and same volume of normal saline was administered as placebo in the control group. Results: Study groups showed no difference regarding baseline variables. Three patients in rFVIIa group (16.67%) and 13 in placebo group (72.23%) received blood products (P < 0.01). Chest tube blood drainage at 24th hour after operation was 315 ± 177 mL in rFVIIa group and 557 ± 168 mL in control group (P = 0.03). At third and 12th hour after operation, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.71 and P = 0.22, respectively). Postoperative ICU stay was not different; while extubation was longer in the placebo group (352 ± 57 vs. 287 ± 46 minutes; P = 0.003). Conclusions: Our study demonstrated the efficacy of rFVIIa in controlling postoperative bleeding in redo cardiac valve surgeries regarding subsequent blood loss and transfusion requirement; however, outcome results remains to be defined. PMID:25789239

  1. Vaginal bleeding between periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003156.htm Vaginal bleeding between periods To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. This article discusses vaginal bleeding that occurs between a woman's monthly menstrual ...

  2. Sandostatin therapy of acute oesophageal variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    McKee, R F

    1993-01-01

    This communication deals with the emergency control of variceal bleeding rather than the prevention of rebleeding. The current main options of oesophageal tamponade, emergency sclerotherapy and drug therapy are discussed, with particular reference to the use of somatostatin. Sandostatin (Sandoz, Basel), a synthetic long-acting somatostatin analogue, was found to reduce transhepatic venous gradient by 30% with no effect on systemic haemodynamics in a study of 16 stable cirrhotic patients. In a trial comparing intravenous infusion of Sandostatin (SMS) to oesophageal tamponade (OT) in active variceal bleeding, 18 of 20 bleeds in the SMS group and 19 of 20 bleeds in the OT group were controlled at 4 h. Ten in the SMS group and 14 in the OT group had no further bleeding during the 48-hour study period. Thus SMS may be useful in the temporary control of active variceal bleeding. PMID:8359565

  3. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Biecker, Erwin

    2015-11-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions, erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application (oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased. PMID:26558151

  4. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Biecker, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions, erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application (oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased. PMID:26558151

  5. The use of hemospray in portal hypertensive bleeding; a case series.

    PubMed

    Smith, L A; Morris, A J; Stanley, A J

    2014-02-01

    Hemospray is a haemostatic agent licensed for endoscopic haemostasis of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) in Europe and Canada. Hemospray has been shown to be safe and effective in achieving haemostasis in bleeding peptic ulcers in a prospective clinical study and several further case series have described the use of hemospray in other non-variceal causes of gastrointestinal bleeding. Portal hypertensive gastropathy and colopathy are common in patients with portal hypertension. As hemospray is an easy to apply, non-contact method, which can cover large areas of mucosa, it may be of benefit in acute non-variceal portal hypertensive bleeding. We present data from the first four consecutive patients presenting to our institution with acute haemorrhage secondary to non-variceal diffuse portal hypertensive bleeding treated with hemospray. PMID:24140803

  6. Peptic ulcer in childhood. Psychological factors.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, G N; Gargoulas, A; Papaloukas, A; Marinopoulou, A; Rabavilas, A D

    1979-01-01

    Thirty children (20 girls and 10 boys, aged 6-16 years) with primary peptic ulcers, matched in paris for age, sex and socio-economic standard to a group of 30 ulcer-free controls, were submitted to a structured psychiatric interview, a structured 'present psychiatric state' examination and to personality and intelligence tests. With one exception all patients suffered from duodenal ulcer; 3 male patients had personalities with psychopathic elements, 7 patients had nicknames, 5 suffered from psychiatric disorders, 3 had attempted suicide in the past, and 3 had had homosexual experiences. These parameters were negative in all controls. The patients had lower mean IQ, worse scholastic adaptation, more anxious and overprotective parents, higher frequency of faddiness in food and lower frequency of nail-biting than the controls. Psychotraumatic events had preceded the onset of ulcer symptomatology in 11 cases. The findings are discussed and the contribution of psychological factors in the pathogenesis of childhood peptic ulcer is stressed. PMID:550183

  7. Role of phenolic compounds in peptic ulcer: An overview.

    PubMed

    Sumbul, Sabiha; Ahmad, Mohd Aftab; Mohd, Asif; Mohd, Akhtar

    2011-07-01

    Peptic ulcer is the most common gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorder in clinical practice, which affects approximately 5-10% of the people during their life. The use of herbal drugs for the prevention and treatment of various diseases is constantly developing throughout the world. This is particularly true with regard to phenolic compounds that probably constitute the largest group of plants secondary metabolites. Phenolic compounds have attracted special attention due to their health-promoting characteristics. In the past ten years a large number of the studies have been carried out on the effects of phenolic compounds on human health. Many studies have been carried out that strongly support the contribution of polyphenols to the prevention of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, osteoporosis, neurodegenerative diseases, and diabetes mellitus, and suggest a role in the prevention of peptic ulcer. Polyphenols display a number of pharmacological properties in the GIT area, acting as antisecretory, cytoprotective, and antioxidant agents. The antioxidant properties of phenolic compounds have been widely studied, but it has become clear that their mechanisms of action go beyond the modulation of oxidative stress. Various polyphenolic compounds have been reported for their anti-ulcerogenic activity with a good level of gastric protection. Besides their action as gastroprotective, these phenolic compounds can be an alternative for the treatment of gastric ulcers. Therefore, considering the important role of polyphenolic compounds in the prevention or reduction of gastric lesions induced by different ulcerogenic agents, in this review, we have summarized the literature on some potent antiulcer plants, such as, Oroxylum indicum, Zingiber officinale, Olea europaea L., Foeniculum vulgare, Alchornea glandulosa, Tephrosia purpurea, and so on, containing phenolic compounds, namely, baicalein, cinnamic acid, oleuropein, rutin, quercetin, and tephrosin, respectively, as active

  8. Endoscopic management of nonvariceal, nonulcer upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Tjwa, Eric T T L; Holster, I Lisanne; Kuipers, Ernst J

    2014-12-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is the most common emergency condition in gastroenterology. Although peptic ulcer and esophagogastric varices are the predominant causes, other conditions account for up to 50% of UGIBs. These conditions, among others, include angiodysplasia, Dieulafoy and Mallory-Weiss lesions, gastric antral vascular ectasia, and Cameron lesions. Upper GI cancer as well as lesions of the biliary tract and pancreas may also result in severe UGIB. This article provides an overview of the endoscopic management of these lesions, including the role of novel therapeutic modalities such as hemostatic powder and over-the-scope-clips. PMID:25440920

  9. [Direct oral anticoagulant associated bleeding].

    PubMed

    Godier, A; Martin, A-C; Rosencher, N; Susen, S

    2016-07-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) are recommended for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. However, they are associated with hemorrhagic complications. Management of DOAC-induced bleeding remains challenging. Activated or non-activated prothrombin concentrates are proposed, although their efficacy to reverse DOAC is uncertain. Therapeutic options also include antidotes: idarucizumab, antidote for dabigatran, has been approved for use whereas andexanet alpha, antidote for anti-Xa agents, and aripazine, antidote for all DOAC, are under development. Other options include hemodialysis for the treatment of dabigatran-associated bleeding and administration of oral charcoal if recent DOAC ingestion. DOAC plasma concentration measurement is necessary to guide DOAC reversal. We propose an update on DOAC-associated bleeding, integrating the availability of dabigatran antidote and the critical place of DOAC concentration measurements. PMID:27297642

  10. Characterization of multiple platelet activation pathways in patients with bleeding as a high-throughput screening option: use of 96-well Optimul assay

    PubMed Central

    Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C.; Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Chan, Melissa V.; Lundberg, Martina H.; Morgan, Neil V.; Bem, Danai; Nisar, Shaista P.; Leo, Vincenzo C.; Jones, Matthew L.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Daly, Martina E.; Mumford, Andrew D.; Warner, Timothy D.; Watson, Steve P.; Watson, Steve P.; Mumford, Andrew D.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Gissen, Paul; Daly, Martina E.; Lester, Will; Clark, Justin; Williams, Mike; Motwani, Jayashree; Marshall, Dianne; Nyatanga, Priscilla; Mann, Pat; Kirwan, Julie; Wilde, Jonathan; Dunkley, Tracey; Greenway, April; Makris, Michael; Pavord, Sue; Dattani, Rashesh; Grimley, Gerry Dolan Charlotte; Stokley, Simone; Astwood, Emma; Chang, Cherry; Foros, Merri; Trower, Linda; Thachil, Jecko; Hay, Charlie; Pike, Gill; Will, Andrew; Grainger, John; Foulkes, Matt; Fareh, Mona; Talks, Kate; Biss, Tina; Kesteven, Patrick; Hanley, John; Vowles, Julie; Basey, Lesley; Barnes, Michelle; Collins, Peter; Rayment, Rachel; Alikhan, Raza; Morris, Ana Guerrero Rebecca; Mansell, Dianne; Toh, Cheng Hock; Martlew, Vanessa; Murphy, Elaine; Lachmann, Robin; Rose, Peter; Chapman, Oliver; Lokare, Anand; Marshall, Kathryn; Khan, Naseem; Keeling, David; Giangrande, Paul; Austin, Steve; Bevan, David; Alamelu, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Up to 1% of the population have mild bleeding disorders, but these remain poorly characterized, particularly with regard to the roles of platelets. We have compared the usefulness of Optimul, a 96-well plate-based assay of 7 distinct pathways of platelet activation to characterize inherited platelet defects in comparison with light transmission aggregometry (LTA). Using Optimul and LTA, concentration-response curves were generated for arachidonic acid, ADP, collagen, epinephrine, Thrombin receptor activating-peptide, U46619, and ristocetin in samples from (1) healthy volunteers (n = 50), (2) healthy volunteers treated with antiplatelet agents in vitro (n = 10), and (3) patients with bleeding of unknown origin (n = 65). The assays gave concordant results in 82% of cases (κ = 0.62, P < .0001). Normal platelet function results were particularly predictive (sensitivity, 94%; negative predictive value, 91%), whereas a positive result was not always substantiated by LTA (specificity, 67%; positive predictive value, 77%). The Optimul assay was significantly more sensitive at characterizing defects in the thromboxane pathway, which presented with normal responses with LTA. The Optimul assay is sensitive to mild platelet defects, could be used as a rapid screening assay in patients presenting with bleeding symptoms, and detects changes in platelet function more readily than LTA. This trial was registered at www.isrctn.org as #ISRCTN 77951167. PMID:24408324

  11. Characterization of multiple platelet activation pathways in patients with bleeding as a high-throughput screening option: use of 96-well Optimul assay.

    PubMed

    Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C; Kirkby, Nicholas S; Chan, Melissa V; Lundberg, Martina H; Morgan, Neil V; Bem, Danai; Nisar, Shaista P; Leo, Vincenzo C; Jones, Matthew L; Mundell, Stuart J; Daly, Martina E; Mumford, Andrew D; Warner, Timothy D; Watson, Steve P

    2014-02-20

    Up to 1% of the population have mild bleeding disorders, but these remain poorly characterized, particularly with regard to the roles of platelets. We have compared the usefulness of Optimul, a 96-well plate-based assay of 7 distinct pathways of platelet activation to characterize inherited platelet defects in comparison with light transmission aggregometry (LTA). Using Optimul and LTA, concentration-response curves were generated for arachidonic acid, ADP, collagen, epinephrine, Thrombin receptor activating-peptide, U46619, and ristocetin in samples from (1) healthy volunteers (n = 50), (2) healthy volunteers treated with antiplatelet agents in vitro (n = 10), and (3) patients with bleeding of unknown origin (n = 65). The assays gave concordant results in 82% of cases (κ = 0.62, P < .0001). Normal platelet function results were particularly predictive (sensitivity, 94%; negative predictive value, 91%), whereas a positive result was not always substantiated by LTA (specificity, 67%; positive predictive value, 77%). The Optimul assay was significantly more sensitive at characterizing defects in the thromboxane pathway, which presented with normal responses with LTA. The Optimul assay is sensitive to mild platelet defects, could be used as a rapid screening assay in patients presenting with bleeding symptoms, and detects changes in platelet function more readily than LTA. This trial was registered at www.isrctn.org as #ISRCTN 77951167. PMID:24408324

  12. Cost-utility analysis of an adjunctive recombinant activated factor VIIa for on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes in dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Naing, Cho; Poovorawan, Yong; Mak, Joon Wah; Aung, Kyan; Kamolratankul, Pirom

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to assess the cost-utility analysis of using an adjunctive recombinant activated factor VIIa (rFVIIa) in children for controlling life-threatening bleeding in dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF)/dengue shock syndrome (DSS). We constructed a decision-tree model, comparing a standard care and the use of an additional adjuvant rFVIIa for controlling life-threatening bleeding in children with DHF/DSS. Cost and utility benefit were estimated from the societal perspective. The outcome measure was cost per quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Overall, treatment with adjuvant rFVIIa gained QALYs, but the total cost was higher. The incremental cost-utility ratio for the introduction of adjuvant rFVIIa was $4241.27 per additional QALY. Sensitivity analyses showed the utility value assigned for calculation of QALY was the most sensitive parameter. We concluded that despite high cost, there is a role for rFVIIa in the treatment of life-threatening bleeding in patients with DHF/DSS. PMID:25692521

  13. [Non-Helicobacter pylori, Non-nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Peptic Ulcer Disease].

    PubMed

    Chang, Young Woon

    2016-06-25

    Non-Helicobacter pylori, non-NSAID peptic ulcer disease (PUD), termed idiopathic PUD, is increasing in Korea. Diagnosis is based on exclusion of common causes such as H. pylori infection, infection with other pathogens, surreptitious ulcerogenic drugs, malignancy, and uncommon systemic diseases with upper gastrointestinal manifestations. The clinical course of idiopathic PUD is delayed ulcer healing, higher recurrence, higher re-bleeding after initial ulcer healing, and higher mortality than the other types of PUD. Genetic predisposition, older age, chronic mesenteric ischemia, cigarette smoking, concomitant systemic diseases, and psychological stress are considered risk factors for idiopathic PUD. Diagnosis of idiopathic PUD should systematically explore all possible causes. Management of this disease is to treat underlying disease followed by regular endoscopic surveillance to confirm ulcer healing. Continuous proton pump inhibitor therapy is an option for patients who respond poorly to the standard ulcer regimen. PMID:27312831

  14. Computed tomographic staging of traumatic epidural bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.

    1982-09-01

    The computed tomographic findings in 45 patients with post-traumatic epidural hemotomas are subdivided into three categories (acute, subacute, and chronic) and correlated with the severity of bleeding, clot formation, and clot resorption. Active epidural bleeding may be identified in acute cases.

  15. Effect of lapachol, a naphthaquinone isolated from Tectona grandis, on experimental peptic ulcer and gastric secretion.

    PubMed

    Goel, R K; Pathak, N K; Biswas, M; Pandey, V B; Sanyal, A K

    1987-02-01

    Lapachol, a naphthaquinone isolated from the roots of Tectona grandis given at a dose of 5 mg kg-1 p.o. twice daily for 3 days was found to have an anti-ulcerogenic effect on subsequently induced experimental gastric and duodenal ulcers in rats and guinea-pigs. Its action appears to be associated with an effect on the protein content of gastric juice, and it reversed aspirin-induced changes in peptic activity, protein and sialic acid. PMID:2882001

  16. Severe gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, K L

    1994-02-01

    Severe gastrointestinal bleeding is a common cause of admission of the elderly to intensive care units. Differentiation between upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding is made on the basis of history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests. Therapy is based in part on the severity of the bleeding episode and on the cause of the hemorrhage. Therapeutic intervention may involve medical therapy, endoscopic therapy, angiographic therapy, and surgery. Patient outcome is often related to other underlying disease states. PMID:8168017

  17. Bleeding and cupping.

    PubMed Central

    Turk, J. L.; Allen, E.

    1983-01-01

    Bleeding and cupping have been used in medicine since ancient times in the treatment of fevers and local inflammatory disorders. Local bleeding, by 'wet cupping', was effected by a scarificator or by leeches. John Hunter recommended venesection in moderation but preferred leeches for local bleeding. Bleeding as an accepted therapeutic practice went out of vogue in the middle of the nineteenth century as a result of the introduction of modern scientific methods. Dry cupping and the use of leeches, as counter irritants, persisted until the middle of this century. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6338802

  18. [The pewter bleeding bowls].

    PubMed

    Renner, Claude

    2004-01-01

    In the late seventeenth century, then along the eighteen and nineteenth centuries the amount of the bloodlettings was measured by means of three pewter bleeding bowls that held three ounces of blood, about 300 millilitres. In the middle of the nineteenth century new and large bleeding bowls with metric graduations were manufactured only by the Parisian potters. PMID:15359483

  19. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the scope and importance of gastrointestinal bleeding in runners and other athletes, discussing causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related bleeding. Practical tips to mitigate the problem, potentially more troublesome in women because of lower iron stores, are presented (e.g., gradual conditioning and avoidance of prerace…

  20. Surgical bleeding in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. R.; Billica, R. D.; Johnston, S. L. 3rd

    1993-01-01

    A surgical procedure performed during space flight would occur in a unique microgravity environment. Several experiments performed during weightlessness in parabolic flight were reviewed to ascertain the behavior of surgical bleeding in microgravity. Simulations of bleeding using dyed fluid and citrated bovine blood, as well as actual arterial and venous bleeding in rabbits, were examined. The high surface tension property of blood promotes the formation of large fluid domes, which have a tendency to adhere to the wound. The use of sponges and suction will be adequate to prevent cabin atmosphere contamination with all bleeding, with the exception of temporary arterial droplet streams. The control of the bleeding with standard surgical techniques should not be difficult.

  1. Obtaining antimicrobial peptides by controlled peptic hydrolysis of bovine hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Adje, Estelle Yaba; Balti, Rafik; Kouach, Mostafa; Dhulster, Pascal; Guillochon, Didier; Nedjar-Arroume, Naïma

    2011-08-01

    Under standard conditions, the peptides and specially the active peptides were obtained from either the denatured hemoglobin that all structures are completely modified or either the native hemoglobin where all structures are intact. In these conditions, antibacterial peptides were isolated from a very complex peptidic hydrolysate which contains more than one hundred peptides having various sizes and characteristics, involving a complex purification process. The new hydrolysis conditions were obtained by using 40% methanol, 30% ethanol, 20% propanol or 10% butanol. These conditions, where only the secondary structure of hemoglobin retains intact, were followed in order to enrich the hydrolyzed hemoglobin by active peptides or obtain new antibacterial peptides. In these controlled peptic hydrolysis of hemoglobin, a selective and restrictive hydrolysate contained only 29 peptides was obtained. 26 peptides have an antibacterial activity against Micrococcus luteus, Listeria innocua, and Escherichia coli with MIC from 187.1 to 1 μM. Among these peptides, 13 new antibacterial peptides are obtained only in these new hydrolysis conditions. PMID:21510973

  2. Upper GI Bleeding in Children

    MedlinePlus

    Upper GI Bleeding in Children What is upper GI Bleeding? Irritation and ulcers of the lining of the esophagus, stomach or duodenum can result in upper GI bleeding. When this occurs the child may vomit ...

  3. High peptic stricture of the oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Davidson, J S

    1976-02-01

    Fifty-seven patients with high peptic stricture and the lower oesophagus lined by columnar epithelium are considered from the clinical point of view. Information from 115 cases of low stricture is introduced for comparison. The average age of adult patients was 62 years with a sex incidence of 36 females to 21 males. There is little difference between the symptoms of high and low strictures. Radiologically, the majority of high strictures are short and smooth but other types are illustrated. Carcinoma and congenital mid-oesophageal web are considered in the differential diagnosis. There was an associated duodenal ulcer in 10% of cases. In six patients, a high stricture developed soon after an abdominal operation or period of recumbency. Two patients are illustrated showing the process of stricture formation. Four patients are described who had gastric-lined oesophagus but no ulceration of stricture. One patient had a Barrett ulcer in addition to a high stricture. A patient is described in whom the mucosa of the lower oesophagus appeared to be replaced by jejunal mucosa following oesophagojejunostomy. One patient is illustrated in whom a stricture was seen to ascend the oesophagus over a period of six years. Thirty-three patients were treated by dilatation and 24 by operation. Hernial repair is an effective form of treatment. Of 19 patients treated in this way, significant dysphagia persisted in two and slight dysphagia in one. The clinical findings are discussed in relation to the origin of columnar epithelium in the oesophagus. PMID:1257929

  4. Long-term efficacy and safety of rabeprazole in patients taking low-dose aspirin with a history of peptic ulcers: a phase 2/3, randomized, parallel-group, multicenter, extension clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Kato, Mototsugu; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Watanabe, Toshio; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Sugisaki, Nobuyuki; Okada, Yasushi; Ogawa, Hisao; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Fujimoto, Kazuma

    2015-01-01

    A 24-week, double-blind, clinical trial of rabeprazole for the prevention of recurrent peptic ulcers caused by low-dose aspirin (LDA) has been reported, but trials for longer than 24 weeks have not been reported. The aim of this study is to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of rabeprazole for preventing peptic ulcer recurrence on LDA therapy. Eligible patients had a history of peptic ulcers on long-term LDA (81 or 100 mg/day) therapy. Patients with no recurrence of peptic ulcers at the end of the 24-week double-blind phase with rabeprazole (10- or 5-mg once daily) or teprenone (50 mg three times daily) entered the extension phase. Rabeprazole doses were maintained for a maximum of 76 weeks, including the double-blind 24-week period and the extension phase period (long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups). Teprenone was randomly switched to rabeprazole 10 or 5 mg for a maximum of 52 weeks in the extension phase (newly-initiated rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups). The full analysis set consisted of 151 and 150 subjects in the long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups, respectively, and the cumulative recurrence rates of peptic ulcers were 2.2 and 3.7%, respectively. Recurrent peptic ulcers were not observed in the newly-initiated rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups. No bleeding ulcers were reported. No clinically significant safety findings, including cardiovascular events, emerged. The use of long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg once daily prevents the recurrence of peptic ulcers in subjects on low-dose aspirin therapy, and both were well-tolerated. PMID:26060354

  5. Obscure digestive bleeding.

    PubMed

    Van Gossum, A

    2001-02-01

    Obscure digestive bleeding is defined as recurrent bleeding for which no definite source has been identified by routine endoscopic or barium studies. Mucosal vascular abnormality or 'angioectasia' is the most common course of obscure bleeding, especially in elderly patients. Small bowel tumours are more frequent in patients younger than 50 years. However, missed or underestimated upper and lower gastrointestinal lesions at the initial endoscopic investigation may be the source of a so-called obscure intestinal bleeding. The various radiological procedures, including enteroclysis, visceral angiography and CT scan as well as radioisotope bleeding scans have limitations in the case of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Recent developments in magnetic resonance imaging are promising. The different methods of enteroscopy have a similar diagnostic yield, reaching approximately 40-65%. Endoscopic cauterization of small bowel angioectasias seems to be efficacious but randomized trials are needed. Efficacy of hormonal therapy is very controversial. The extent of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies must be based on a number of factors including the patient's parameters, bleeding characteristics and also the result of previous work-up. PMID:11355906

  6. Vaginal or uterine bleeding - overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the vaginal bleeding, including: Dysfunctional uterine bleeding Endometriosis Uterine fibroids Ectopic pregnancy Polycystic ovary syndrome Treatment may include hormonal medicines, pain relievers, and possibly ...

  7. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Casper, Robert F.

    1983-01-01

    Dysfunctional uterine bleeding is most commonly associated with chronic anovulation. Early diagnosis of anovulation is important; the induction of regular withdrawal periods using a progestin such as Provera prevents the development of endometrial hyperplasia with the subsequent inevitable occurrence of a heavy, frightening vaginal bleed. The etiology of dysfunctional uterine bleeding occurring during ovulatory cycles is unknown and all medical therapies at present are necessarily experimental. Hysterectomy is probably the treatment of choice for women who have finished their childbearing career and in whom persisting menorrhagia during ovulatory cycles results in anemia. PMID:21283453

  8. Increased Risk of Peptic Ulcers Following a Cholecystectomy for Gallstones.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Huang, Chung-Chien; Kao, Li-Ting; Lin, Herng-Ching; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective cohort study examined the relationship between a cholecystectomy and the subsequent risk of peptic ulcers using a population-based database. Data for this study were retrieved from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. This study included 5209 patients who had undergone a cholecystectomy for gallstones and 15,627 sex- and age-matched comparison patients. We individually tracked each patient for a 5-year period to identify those who subsequently received a diagnosis of peptic ulcers. We found that of the 20,836 sampled patients, 2033 patients (9.76%) received a diagnosis of peptic ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period: 674 from the study group (12.94% of the patients who underwent a cholecystectomy) and 1359 from the comparison group (8.70% of the comparison patients). The stratified Cox proportional hazard regressions showed that the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for peptic ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period was 1.48 (95% CI = 1.34~1.64) for patients who underwent a cholecystectomy than comparison patients. Furthermore, the adjusted HRs of gastric ulcers and duodenal ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period were 1.70 and 1.71, respectively, for patients who underwent a cholecystectomy compared to comparison patients. This study demonstrated a relationship between a cholecystectomy and a subsequent diagnosis of peptic ulcers. PMID:27469240

  9. Increased Risk of Peptic Ulcers Following a Cholecystectomy for Gallstones

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Huang, Chung-Chien; Kao, Li-Ting; Lin, Herng-Ching; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective cohort study examined the relationship between a cholecystectomy and the subsequent risk of peptic ulcers using a population-based database. Data for this study were retrieved from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. This study included 5209 patients who had undergone a cholecystectomy for gallstones and 15,627 sex- and age-matched comparison patients. We individually tracked each patient for a 5-year period to identify those who subsequently received a diagnosis of peptic ulcers. We found that of the 20,836 sampled patients, 2033 patients (9.76%) received a diagnosis of peptic ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period: 674 from the study group (12.94% of the patients who underwent a cholecystectomy) and 1359 from the comparison group (8.70% of the comparison patients). The stratified Cox proportional hazard regressions showed that the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for peptic ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period was 1.48 (95% CI = 1.34~1.64) for patients who underwent a cholecystectomy than comparison patients. Furthermore, the adjusted HRs of gastric ulcers and duodenal ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period were 1.70 and 1.71, respectively, for patients who underwent a cholecystectomy compared to comparison patients. This study demonstrated a relationship between a cholecystectomy and a subsequent diagnosis of peptic ulcers. PMID:27469240

  10. Vaginal bleeding in pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 9 , bleeding may be a sign of: The placenta separating from the inner wall of the uterus ... the baby is born ( abruptio placentae ) Miscarriage The placenta is covering all or part of the opening ...

  11. Understanding Minor Rectal Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... fever or significant rectal bleeding. Laser or infrared coagulation and sclerotherapy (injection of medicine directly into the ... or if symptoms persist despite rubber band ligation, coagulation or sclerotherapy. What are anal fissures? Tears that ...

  12. GI bleeding - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100162.htm GI bleeding - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... colon, and finally, the rectum and anus. The GI tract is a long, hollow, muscular tube through ...

  13. GI bleeding - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... colon, and finally, the rectum and anus. The GI tract is a long, hollow, muscular tube through ... Bleeding from the GI tract is a common medical problem. Patients usually notice either dark red blood or bright red blood in their ...

  14. Approach to bleeding patient

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, Ramachandran; Sreekanth, Y.; Yadav, Monu

    2014-01-01

    Managing a bleeding patient is very challenging for the perioperative physician. Bleeding in a patient would be due to inherited or acquired disorders of haemostasis. Identifying the patients at risk of bleeding and utilising prophylactic treatment protocols has good outcomes. Along with clinical signs, trends in monitoring coagulation parameters and analysing blood picture are necessary. Management of patients in the postoperative period and in intensive care unit should be focused on normalization of coagulation profile as early as possible with available blood and its products. Available recombinant factors should be given priority as per the approved indications. Exploring the surgical site should be considered for persistent bleeding because haemodynamic compromise, excessive transfusion of fluids, blood and its products and more inotropic support may have a negative impact on the patient outcome. PMID:25535422

  15. Bleeding during cancer treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... barefoot. Use only an electric razor. Use knives, scissors, and other tools carefully. Do not blow your ... bowel movements. To further prevent bleeding: Avoid heavy lifting or playing contact sports. Do not drink alcohol. ...

  16. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  17. Diagnostic and Treatment Approaches for Refractory Peptic Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Refractory peptic ulcers are defined as ulcers that do not heal completely after 8 to 12 weeks of standard anti-secretory drug treatment. The most common causes of refractory ulcers are persistent Helicobacter pylori infection and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Simultaneous use of two or more H. pylori diagnostic methods are recommended for increased sensitivity. Serologic tests may be useful for patients currently taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) or for suspected false negative results, as they are not affected by PPI use. NSAID use should be discontinued when possible. Platelet cyclooxygenase activity tests can confirm surreptitious use of NSAIDs or aspirin. Cigarette smoking can delay ulcer healing. Therefore, patients who smoke should be encouraged to quit. Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) is a rare but important cause of refractory gastroduodenal ulcers. Fasting plasma gastrin levels should be checked if ZES is suspected. If an ulcer is refractory despite a full course of standard PPI treatment, the dose should be doubled and administration of another type of PPI considered. PMID:26240800

  18. Etiology, endoscopic management and mortality of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Bruno da Costa; de Lima, Marcelo Simas; Leonardo, Daniel Valdivia; Retes, Felipe Alves; Kawaguti, Fábio Shiguehissa; Sato, Cezar Fabiano Manabu; Hondo, Fábio Yuji; Safatle-Ribeiro, Adriana Vaz; Ribeiro, Ulysses

    2013-01-01

    Background The source and outcomes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in oncologic patients are poorly investigated. Objective The study aimed to investigate these issues in a tertiary academic referral center specialized in cancer treatment. Methods This was a retrospective study including all patients with cancer referred to endoscopy due to UGIB in 2010. Results UGIB was confirmed in 147 (of 324 patients) referred to endoscopy for a suspected episode of GI bleeding. Tumor was the most common cause of bleeding (N = 35, 23.8%), followed by varices (N = 30, 19.7%), peptic ulcer (N = 29, 16.3%) and gastroduodenal erosions (N = 16, 10.9%). Among the 32 patients with cancer of the upper GI tract, the main causes of bleeding were cancer (N = 27, 84.4%) and peptic ulcer (N = 5, 6.3%). Forty-one patients (27.9%) presented with bleeding from the primary tumor or from a metastatic lesion, and seven received endoscopic therapy, with successful initial hemostasis in six (85.7%). Rebleeding and mortality rates were not different between endoscopically treated (N = 7) and non-treated (N = 34) patients (28.6% vs. 14.7%, p = 0.342; 43.9% vs. 44.1%, p = 0.677). Median survival was 20 days, and the overall 30-day mortality rate was 44.9%. There was no predictive factor of mortality or rebleeding. Conclusion Tumor bleeding is the most common cause of UGIB in cancer patients. UGIB in cancer patients correlates with a high mortality rate regardless of the bleeding source. Current endoscopic treatments may not be effective in preventing rebleeding or improving survival. PMID:24917941

  19. Surgical perspectives in peptic ulcer disease and gastritis.

    PubMed

    Lipof, Tamar; Shapiro, David; Kozol, Robert-A

    2006-05-28

    For much of the twentieth century, surgery was frequently the solution for peptic ulcer disease. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of ulcers paralleled the development of potent pharmaceutical therapy. As the surgical world developed parietal cell vagotomy which would minimize the complications of surgery, patients failing medical therapy became rare. Emergent surgery for complicated peptic ulcers has not declined however. The development of proton pump inhibitors and the full understanding of the impact of H pylori has led to a trend towards minimalism in surgical therapy for complicated peptic ulcer disease. In addition to the changes in patient care, these developments have had an impact on the training of surgeons. This article outlines these trends and developments. PMID:16718847

  20. Inflammation and endometrial bleeding.

    PubMed

    Berbic, M; Ng, C H M; Fraser, I S

    2014-12-01

    Most of the key physiological processes in the human reproductive tract involve a significant inflammatory component. These processes include follicle development, ovulation, implantation, pregnancy, labor, postpartum, remodeling and menstruation. In this context, the term 'inflammation' usually means an influx of leukocytes ('immune cells'), often of different types, into a reproductive tract tissue. These examples of inflammation are not overtly associated with any infective process. There may also be evidence that these invading leukocytes have altered their functions to take on specific and relevant local regulatory roles. Specific sequential changes in different leukocytes can be demonstrated within human endometrium during the different phases of the normal menstrual cycle. Leukocytes are fairly sparse in numbers through the proliferative phase, but increase substantially into and through the secretory phase, so much so that around 40% of all stromal cells in the premenstrual phase are leukocytes, mainly uterine natural killer cells, a large granulated lymphocyte. Other leukocytes which play key roles in menstruation appear to be macrophages, mast cells, dendritic cells, neutrophils, eosinophils and regulatory T cells. Premenstrual withdrawal of progesterone increases the endometrial expression of inflammatory mediators, including IL-8 and MCP-1, which are believed to drive endometrial leukocyte recruitment at this time. Macrophages and neutrophils are rich sources of defensins and whey acid protein motif proteins, which play important roles in ensuring microbial protection while the epithelial barrier is disrupted. Mast cells are increasingly activated as the menstrual phase approaches, and leukocyte proteases trigger a cascade of matrix metalloproteinases and degradation of extracellular matrix. Dendritic cells and other antigen-presenting cells (e.g. macrophages) almost certainly facilitate clearance of cellular debris from the uterine cavity, and reduce

  1. Endoscopic laser Doppler flowmetry in the experiment and in the bleeding gastric and duodenal ulcer clinic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapralov, S. V.; Shapkin, Y. G.; Lychagov, V. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2007-05-01

    One of the most complex problems of emergency surgery is the choice of surgical tactics to deal with bleeding peptic ulcer. Endoscopic hemostasis is prescribed to patients with continuing bleedings and prerelapse syndrome. But till nowdays the objective verification of the prerelapse condition had not been worked out. What is more there are no objective criteria to judge the effectiveness of the carried endohemostasis. The aim of the study was to work out a new objective diagnostic method of pre-recurrence syndrome that can be able to make prognosis for possible gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding recurrence more precise. Laser Doppler flowmetry was the method of studies the regional perfusion. The device used in this work was made at the Optics and Biophysics Department of Saratov State University.

  2. [Diagnosis and Treatment of Peptic Ulcer Disease: Present and Future Perspective].

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Wook

    2016-06-25

    Peptic ulcer disease is one of the most commonly encountered diseases in gastroenterology clinics. After the discovery of Helicobacter pylori by Warren and Marshall, it has been identified as the most important cause of peptic ulcer. Eradication of H. pylori markedly reduces the post-treatment recurrence rate of peptic ulcer. However, as human populations age, the incidence of cardiovascular and musculoskeletal diseases increases and consequent use of aspirin and non-steroidal anti-in-flammatory drugs increases. Thus causes and presenting patterns of peptic ulcer have changed. In this review, I describe new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for peptic ulcer disease and explore future perspectives. PMID:27312832

  3. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Matthew; Lobo, Alan J

    2015-10-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is a frequently encountered medical emergency with an incidence of 84-160/100000 and associated with mortality of approximately 10%. Guidelines from the National Institute for Care and Care Excellence outline key features in the management of AUGIB. Patients require prompt resuscitation and risk assessment using validated tools. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy provides accurate diagnosis, aids in estimating prognosis and allows therapeutic intervention. Endoscopy should be undertaken immediately after resuscitation in unstable patients and within 24 hours in all other patients. Interventional radiology may be required for bleeding unresponsive to endoscopic intervention. Drug therapy depends on the cause of bleeding. Intravenous proton pump inhibitors should be used in patients with high-risk ulcers. Terlipressin and broad-spectrum antibiotics should be used following variceal haemorrhage. Hospitals admitting patients with AUGIB need to provide well organised services and ensure access to relevant services for all patients, and particularly to out of hours endoscopy. PMID:26430191

  4. [Gastrointestinal bleeding in cardiological patients].

    PubMed

    Braun, G; Messmann, H

    2013-11-01

    Oral anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy are risk factors for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. GI bleeding-especially lower GI bleeding-seems to be associated with a poorer outcome. With the introduction of dabigatrane and rivaroxaban, difficulties in the management of bleeding complications arose. Thus, the goal of the authors was to establish a standard operating procedure (SOP) for the treatment of severe GI bleeding associated with rivaroxaban, dabigatrane, and antiplatelet therapy. Bleeding complications during phenprocoumon treatment should be treated with prothrombin complex concentrates and vitamin K1. Dabigatrane elimination is highly dependent to the renal function. The measurement of drug concentrations of dabigatrane and rivaroxaban is useful to indicate an increased risk of bleeding complications. Severe bleeding associated with dabigatrane or rivaroxaban therapy should trigger prothrombin complex therapy, whereby in cases with severe bleeding associated with antiplatelet therapy platelet transfusion should be initiated. Low-dose aspirin should be continued after 24 h. PMID:24150711

  5. Sarcomas arising after radiotherapy for peptic ulcer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lieber, M.R.; Winans, C.S.; Griem, M.L.; Moossa, R.; Elner, V.M.; Franklin, W.A.

    1985-06-01

    Therapeutic gastric irradiation has been used to reduce peptic juice secretion in patients with peptic ulcer disease. Between 1937 and 1968 a total of 2049 patients received such therapy at the University of Chicago. Three of these patients are known to have developed sarcomas in the field of radiation. Two gastric leiomyosarcomas of the stomach were diagnosed 26 and 14 years after treatment and a malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the anterior chest wall was removed six years after gastric irradiation. Of 743 peptic ulcer patients treated without irradiation and constituted as a control group for the study of therapeutic gastric radiation, none is known to have developed sarcoma. As the incidence of sarcoma in these patient groups is known only from the tumor registry of the University of Chicago, other cases of sarcoma may exist in the groups. While an increased incidence of sarcoma has not been proven to occur in patients who received therapeutic gastric irradiation for peptic ulcer disease, the possibility of such a risk should be borne in mind by physicians caring for such patients.

  6. Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Syed Irfan-Ur; Saeian, Kia

    2016-04-01

    In the intensive care unit, vigilance is needed to manage nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. A focused history and physical examination must be completed to identify inciting factors and the need for hemodynamic stabilization. Although not universally used, risk stratification tools such as the Blatchford and Rockall scores can facilitate triage and management. Urgent evaluation for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeds requires prompt respiratory assessment, and identification of hemodynamic instability with fluid resuscitation and blood transfusions if necessary. Future studies are needed to evaluate the indication, safety, and efficacy of emerging endoscopic techniques. PMID:27016164

  7. Endoscopic hemostasis state of the art - Nonvariceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Goelder, Stefan Karl; Brueckner, Juliane; Messmann, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    New endoscopic techniques for hemostasis in nonvariceal bleeding were introduced and known methods further improved. Hemospray and Endoclot are two new compounds for topical treatment of bleeding. Initial studies in this area have shown a good hemostatic effect, especially in active large scale oozing bleeding, e.g., tumor bleedings. For further evaluation larger prospective studies comparing the substanced with other methods of endoscopic hemostasis are needed. For localized active arterial bleeding primary injection therapy in the area of ​​bleeding as well as in the four adjacent quadrants offers a good method to reduce bleeding activity. The injection is technically easy to learn and practicable. After bleeding activity is reduced the bleeding source can be localized more clearly for clip application. Today many different through-the-scope (TTS) clips are available. The ability to close and reopen a clip can aid towards good positioning at the bleeding site. Even more important is the rotatability of a clip before application. Often multiple TTS clips are required for secure closure of a bleeding vessel. One model has the ability to use three clips in series without changing the applicator. Severe arterial bleeding from vessels larger than 2 mm is often unmanageable with these conventional methods. Here is the over-the-scope-clip system another newly available method. It is similar to the ligation of esophageal varices and involves aspiration of tissue into a transparent cap before closure of the clip. Thus a greater vascular occlusion pressure can be achieved and larger vessels can be treated endoscopically. Patients with severe arterial bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract have a very high rate of recurrence after initial endoscopic treatment. These patients should always be managed in an interdisciplinary team of interventional radiologist and surgeons. PMID:26962402

  8. Endoscopic hemostasis state of the art - Nonvariceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Goelder, Stefan Karl; Brueckner, Juliane; Messmann, Helmut

    2016-02-25

    New endoscopic techniques for hemostasis in nonvariceal bleeding were introduced and known methods further improved. Hemospray and Endoclot are two new compounds for topical treatment of bleeding. Initial studies in this area have shown a good hemostatic effect, especially in active large scale oozing bleeding, e.g., tumor bleedings. For further evaluation larger prospective studies comparing the substanced with other methods of endoscopic hemostasis are needed. For localized active arterial bleeding primary injection therapy in the area of ​​bleeding as well as in the four adjacent quadrants offers a good method to reduce bleeding activity. The injection is technically easy to learn and practicable. After bleeding activity is reduced the bleeding source can be localized more clearly for clip application. Today many different through-the-scope (TTS) clips are available. The ability to close and reopen a clip can aid towards good positioning at the bleeding site. Even more important is the rotatability of a clip before application. Often multiple TTS clips are required for secure closure of a bleeding vessel. One model has the ability to use three clips in series without changing the applicator. Severe arterial bleeding from vessels larger than 2 mm is often unmanageable with these conventional methods. Here is the over-the-scope-clip system another newly available method. It is similar to the ligation of esophageal varices and involves aspiration of tissue into a transparent cap before closure of the clip. Thus a greater vascular occlusion pressure can be achieved and larger vessels can be treated endoscopically. Patients with severe arterial bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract have a very high rate of recurrence after initial endoscopic treatment. These patients should always be managed in an interdisciplinary team of interventional radiologist and surgeons. PMID:26962402

  9. Vaginal bleeding in pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... rest of your pregnancy or until the bleeding stops. The bed rest may be complete. Or, you may be able to get up to go to the bathroom, walk around the house, or do light chores. Medication is not needed in most cases. ...

  10. ACG Clinical Guideline: Diagnosis and Management of Small Bowel Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Gerson, Lauren B; Fidler, Jeff L; Cave, David R; Leighton, Jonathan A

    2015-09-01

    Bleeding from the small intestine remains a relatively uncommon event, accounting for ~5-10% of all patients presenting with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Given advances in small bowel imaging with video capsule endoscopy (VCE), deep enteroscopy, and radiographic imaging, the cause of bleeding in the small bowel can now be identified in most patients. The term small bowel bleeding is therefore proposed as a replacement for the previous classification of obscure GI bleeding (OGIB). We recommend that the term OGIB should be reserved for patients in whom a source of bleeding cannot be identified anywhere in the GI tract. A source of small bowel bleeding should be considered in patients with GI bleeding after performance of a normal upper and lower endoscopic examination. Second-look examinations using upper endoscopy, push enteroscopy, and/or colonoscopy can be performed if indicated before small bowel evaluation. VCE should be considered a first-line procedure for small bowel investigation. Any method of deep enteroscopy can be used when endoscopic evaluation and therapy are required. VCE should be performed before deep enteroscopy if there is no contraindication. Computed tomographic enterography should be performed in patients with suspected obstruction before VCE or after negative VCE examinations. When there is acute overt hemorrhage in the unstable patient, angiography should be performed emergently. In patients with occult hemorrhage or stable patients with active overt bleeding, multiphasic computed tomography should be performed after VCE or CTE to identify the source of bleeding and to guide further management. If a source of bleeding is identified in the small bowel that is associated with significant ongoing anemia and/or active bleeding, the patient should be managed with endoscopic therapy. Conservative management is recommended for patients without a source found after small bowel investigation, whereas repeat diagnostic investigations are recommended

  11. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for peptic ulcer disease 2015.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Kiichi; Yoshino, Junji; Akamatsu, Taiji; Itoh, Toshiyuki; Kato, Mototsugu; Kamada, Tomoari; Takagi, Atsushi; Chiba, Toshimi; Nomura, Sachiyo; Mizokami, Yuji; Murakami, Kazunari; Sakamoto, Choitsu; Hiraishi, Hideyuki; Ichinose, Masao; Uemura, Naomi; Goto, Hidemi; Joh, Takashi; Miwa, Hiroto; Sugano, Kentaro; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-03-01

    The Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSGE) revised the evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for peptic ulcer disease in 2014 and has created an English version. The revised guidelines consist of seven items: bleeding gastric and duodenal ulcers, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy, non-eradication therapy, drug-induced ulcer, non-H. pylori, non-nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ulcer, surgical treatment, and conservative therapy for perforation and stenosis. Ninety clinical questions (CQs) were developed, and a literature search was performed for the CQs using the Medline, Cochrane, and Igaku Chuo Zasshi databases between 1983 and June 2012. The guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. Therapy is initially provided for ulcer complications. Perforation or stenosis is treated with surgery or conservatively. Ulcer bleeding is first treated by endoscopic hemostasis. If it fails, surgery or interventional radiology is chosen. Second, medical therapy is provided. In cases of NSAID-related ulcers, use of NSAIDs is stopped, and anti-ulcer therapy is provided. If NSAID use must continue, the ulcer is treated with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) or prostaglandin analog. In cases with no NSAID use, H. pylori-positive patients receive eradication and anti-ulcer therapy. If first-line eradication therapy fails, second-line therapy is given. In cases of non-H. pylori, non-NSAID ulcers or H. pylori-positive patients with no indication for eradication therapy, non-eradication therapy is provided. The first choice is PPI therapy, and the second choice is histamine 2-receptor antagonist therapy. After initial therapy, maintenance therapy is provided to prevent ulcer relapse. PMID:26879862

  12. Bleeding and Clotting Disorders Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... excessive or lengthy bleeding. breakthrough bleedbleeding between infusions of factor product. Campaign for Our Future —NHF ... in a vein for patients who need regular infusions. chromosome —structures in the cell’s nucleus that contain ...

  13. Historical impact to drive research in peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Banić, M; Malfertheiner, P; Babić, Z; Ostojić, R; Kujundzic, M; Fatović-Ferenčić, S; Plesko, S; Petričušić, L

    2011-01-01

    The story of gastric acid secretion began with early ideas on gastric secretion (Spallanzani and de Réaumur, 17th century) and with first descriptions of food digestion (Dupuytren and Bichat, Beaumont, early 18th century), followed by proof that gastric juice contained acid (Prout, early 18th century). The research continued with first descriptions of gastric glands as the source of gastric acid and its changes upon digestive stimulus (Purkinje and Golgi, mid and late 19th century). The theory of 'nervism' - the neuro-reflex stimulation of gastric secretion by vagal nerve (Pavlov, early 20th century) was contrasted by a histamine-mediated concept of gastric secretion (Popielski and Code, mid 20th century). Thus, gastric acid and pepsin (Schwann, early 19th century) were found to be essential for food digestion and studies also pointed to histamine, being the most potent final common chemostimulator of oxyntic cells. The discoveries in etiopathogenesis of mucosal injury were marked by the famous dictum: 'No acid, no ulcer' ('Ohne saueren Magensaft kein peptisches Geschwür', Schwarz, 1910) that later induced the term of 'mucosal defense' and the notion that the breaking of 'gastric mucosal barrier' represents the initial step in the process of mucosal injury (Davenport, Code and Scholer, mid 20th century). The prostaglandins were shown to influence all major components of gastric mucosal barrier, described with the term 'cytoprotection' (Vane, Robert and Jacobson, 1970s). Beginning in the latter half of 19th century, the studies on gastric bacteriology that followed enabled the discovery of association between Campylobacter (Helicobacter) pylori and peptic ulcers (Warren and Marshall, 1980s) that led to worldwide major interventions in treating peptic ulcer disease. The surgical approach to peptic ulcer had been outlined by resection procedures (Billroth, Pean, Moynihan, late 19 century) and vagotomy, with or without drainage procedures (Jaboulay, Latarjet

  14. Helicobacter pylori is not the predominant etiology for peptic ulcers requiring operation.

    PubMed

    Zelickson, Marc S; Bronder, Cathy M; Johnson, Brent L; Camunas, Joseph A; Smith, Dane E; Rawlinson, Dustin; Von, Stephen; Stone, H Harlan; Taylor, Spence M

    2011-08-01

    As the number of patients requiring operation for peptic ulcer disease (PUD) declines, presumed contemporary ulcer etiology has largely been derived from medically treated patients not subjected to surgery. The purpose of this study was to examine the specific causes of PUD in patients requiring surgery. Our Acute Care Surgical Service registry was reviewed for patients operated on for complications of PUD from 2004 to 2009. Emphasis was placed on individual etiologic factors for PUD. There were 128 patients (52% male, 81% white) who underwent emergency operation including: simple patch closure (n = 61, 48%); gastric resection (n = 22, 17%); gastric resection with vagotomy (n = 21, 16%); vagotomy and pyloroplasty (n = 18, 14%); or other procedures (n = 6, 5%). Complications necessitating operation were perforation (n = 79, 62%); bleeding (n = 29, 23%); obstruction (n = 12, 9%); and intractability (n = 8, 6%). Perioperative mortality was 12.5 per cent. Risk factors for PUD included tobacco use (50%), alcohol abuse (34%), and steroids (21%). Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory use was confirmed in 68 (53%) patients. Of the 128 patients, 82 (64%) were tested for Helicobacter pylori, 33 (40%) of which were positive and 49 (60%) negative. Helicobacter pylori, thus, was the confirmed ulcer etiology in only 26 per cent of cases. Unlike contemporary series of medically treated PUD, Helicobacter pylori may not be the predominant etiologic factor in patients who experience complications requiring surgery. A "traditional" surgical approach with liberal use of vagotomy, not antibiotic triple therapy, may well be the preferred treatment consideration in such cases. PMID:21944523

  15. Factors determining the clinical outcome of acute variceal bleed in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Majid, Shahid; Azam, Zahid; Shah, Hasnain Ali; Salih, Mohammad; Hamid, Saeed; Abid, Shahab; Jafri, Wasim

    2009-01-01

    Variceal bleed is a severe complication of portal hypertension. We studied the predictors of failure to control variceal bleed and re-bleed in patients with cirrhosis. We reviewed the case records of 382 consecutive patients admitted with variceal bleed from January 2001 to December 2005. Diagnosis of cirrhosis was made on clinical, laboratory, and radiological parameters. Acute variceal bleeding, failure to control bleed, and re-bleeding were defined according to Baveno III consensus report. Failure to control bleed was observed in 39 (10.2%) patients while in hospital re-bleed occurred in 49 (12.8%) patients. Thirty-four patients died. Diabetes was present in 148 (39%) patients. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, predictors of failure to control bleed were presence of diabetes mellitus and active bleeding at the time of endoscopy; predictors of in-hospital re-bleed were diabetes mellitus and serum bilirubin >3 mg/dL. Diabetes mellitus, active bleeding at endoscopy and bilirubin >3 mg/dL are bad prognostic factors for initial control of variceal bleed, and recurrent bleed in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:19907958

  16. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Silber, G

    1990-09-01

    The differential diagnosis of lower gastrointestinal bleeding in children can be reduced markedly simply by taking into account the age of the child. The clinical condition of the patient can further help narrow the diagnostic possibilities. Newborns and infants who are clinically unstable are more likely to have diseases such as necrotizing enterocolitis, volvulus, Hirschprung disease, intussusception, or Meckel diverticulum. A baby who appears healthy should be examined for swallowed blood, allergic colitis, anal fissures, or lymphonodular hyperplasia. An older child of healthy appearance with bleeding is likely to have a juvenile polyp or infectious colitis, but a child who appears sick may have hemolytic uremic syndrome, Henoch-Schoenlein purpura, or inflammatory bowel disease. This information, along with that gleaned from the physical examination, can lead the pediatrician to determine the need for specific tests, such as abdominal radiographs, stool cultures, and an endoscopic evaluation. We have come a long way in our ability to diagnose the causes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. With the availability of newer radiographic and nuclear medicine modalities and the ability to visualize the colon endoscopically, the need for exploratory laparotomy for diagnosis is rarer. While surgery may still be the therapy of choice, new diagnostic modalities give the surgeon much more preoperative information. PMID:2235771

  17. ABCG2 in peptic ulcer: gene expression and mutation analysis.

    PubMed

    Salagacka-Kubiak, Aleksandra; Żebrowska, Marta; Wosiak, Agnieszka; Balcerczak, Mariusz; Mirowski, Marek; Balcerczak, Ewa

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the participation of polymorphism at position C421A and mRNA expression of the ABCG2 gene in the development of peptic ulcers, which is a very common and severe disease. ABCG2, encoded by the ABCG2 gene, has been found inter alia in the gastrointestinal tract, where it plays a protective role eliminating xenobiotics from cells into the extracellular environment. The materials for the study were biopsies of gastric mucosa taken during a routine endoscopy. For genotyping by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) at position C421A, DNA was isolated from 201 samples, while for the mRNA expression level by real-time PCR, RNA was isolated from 60 patients. The control group of healthy individuals consisted of 97 blood donors. The dominant genotype in the group of peptic ulcer patients and healthy individuals was homozygous CC. No statistically significant differences between healthy individuals and the whole group of peptic ulcer patients and, likewise, between the subgroups of peptic ulcer patients (infected and uninfected with Helicobacter pylori) were found. ABCG2 expression relative to GAPDH expression was found in 38 of the 60 gastric mucosa samples. The expression level of the gene varies greatly among cases. The statistically significant differences between the intensity (p = 0.0375) of H. pylori infection and ABCG2 gene expression have been shown. It was observed that the more intense the infection, the higher the level of ABCG2 expression. PMID:26578453

  18. Molecular hydrogen in human breath: a new strategy for selectively diagnosing peptic ulcer disease, non-ulcerous dyspepsia and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Maity, Abhijit; Pal, Mithun; Maithani, Sanchi; Ghosh, Barnali; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Pradhan, Manik

    2016-01-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilizes molecular hydrogen (H2) as a respiratory substrate during colonization in the gastric mucosa. However, the link between molecular H2 and the pathogenesis of peptic-ulcer disease (PUD) and non-ulcerous dyspepsia (NUD) by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori still remains mostly unknown. Here we provide evidence that breath H2 excretion profiles are distinctly altered by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori for individuals with NUD and PUD. We subsequently unravelled the potential molecular mechanisms responsible for the alteration of H2 in exhaled breath in association with peptic ulcers, encompassing both gastric and duodenal ulcers, along with NUD. We also established that carbon-isotopic fractionations in the acid-mediated bacterial environment regulated by bacterial urease activity cannot discriminate the actual disease state i.e. whether it is peptic ulcer or NUD. However, our findings illuminate the unusual molecular H2 in breath that can track the precise evolution of PUD and NUD, even after the eradication of H. pylori infection. This deepens our understanding of the pathophysiology of PUD and NUD, reveals non-invasively the actual disease state in real-time and thus offers a novel and robust new-generation strategy for treating peptic-ulcer disease together with non-ulcer related complications even when the existing (13)C-urea breath test ((13)C-UBT) fails to diagnose. PMID:27448107

  19. Persistent Bleeding Following a Stapled Hemorrhoidopexy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung Taek; Lee, Jae-Bum; Kim, Mi Jung; Lee, Doo-Seok; Youk, Eui-Gon; Kim, Do-Sun; Lee, Doo-Han

    2016-01-01

    A stapled hemorrhoidopexy (SH) is widely used for treatment of patients with grades III and IV hemorrhoids. The SH is easy to perform, is associated with less pain and allows early return to normal activities. However, complications, whether severe or not, have been reported. Here, we present the case of a female patient with persistent bleeding after a SH. The bleeding was caused by the formation of granulation tissue at the stapler line, diagnosed with sigmoidoscopy, and successfully treated via transanal excision (TAE) under spinal anesthesia. The biopsy showed inflammatory granulation tissue. After the TAE, her symptom was completely gone. PMID:27437395

  20. Analysis of risk factor and clinical characteristics of angiodysplasia presenting as upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Bum; Chung, Woo Chul; Lee, Seok Jong; Sung, Hea Jung; Woo, Seokyung; Kim, Hyo Suk; Jeong, Yeon Oh; Lee, Hyewon; Kim, Yeon-Ji

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Angiodysplasia is important in the differential diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), but the clinical features and outcomes associated with UGIB from angiodysplasia have not been characterized. We aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics and outcomes of angiodysplasia presented as UGIB. Methods: Between January 2004 and December 2013, a consecutive series of patients admitted with UGIB were retrospectively analyzed. Thirty-five patients with bleeding from angiodysplasia were enrolled. We compared them with an asymptomatic control group (incidental finding of angiodysplasia in health screening, n = 58) and bleeding control group (simultaneous finding of angiodysplasia and peptic ulcer bleeding, n = 28). Results: When patients with UGIB from angiodysplasia were compared with the asymptomatic control group, more frequent rates of nonantral location and large sized lesion (≥ 1 cm) were evident in multivariate analysis. When these patients were compared with the bleeding control group, they were older (mean age: 67.94 ± 9.16 years vs.55.07 ± 13.29 years, p = 0.03) and received less transfusions (p = 0.03). They also had more frequent rate of recurrence (40.0% vs. 20.7%, p = 0.02). Conclusions: Non-antral location and large lesions (≥ 1 cm) could be risk factors of UGIB of angiodysplasia. UGIB due to angiodysplasia was more common in older patients. Transfusion requirement would be less and a tendency of clinical recurrence might be apparent. PMID:26828247

  1. Distinctive aspects of peptic ulcer disease, Dieulafoy's lesion, and Mallory-Weiss syndrome in patients with advanced alcoholic liver disease or cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Nojkov, Borko; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To systematically review the data on distinctive aspects of peptic ulcer disease (PUD), Dieulafoy’s lesion (DL), and Mallory-Weiss syndrome (MWS) in patients with advanced alcoholic liver disease (aALD), including alcoholic hepatitis or alcoholic cirrhosis. METHODS: Computerized literature search performed via PubMed using the following medical subject heading terms and keywords: “alcoholic liver disease”, “alcoholic hepatitis”,“ alcoholic cirrhosis”, “cirrhosis”, “liver disease”, “upper gastrointestinal bleeding”, “non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding”, “PUD”, ‘‘DL’’, ‘‘Mallory-Weiss tear”, and “MWS’’. RESULTS: While the majority of acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding with aALD is related to portal hypertension, about 30%-40% of acute GI bleeding in patients with aALD is unrelated to portal hypertension. Such bleeding constitutes an important complication of aALD because of its frequency, severity, and associated mortality. Patients with cirrhosis have a markedly increased risk of PUD, which further increases with the progression of cirrhosis. Patients with cirrhosis or aALD and peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) have worse clinical outcomes than other patients with PUB, including uncontrolled bleeding, rebleeding, and mortality. Alcohol consumption, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, and portal hypertension may have a pathogenic role in the development of PUD in patients with aALD. Limited data suggest that Helicobacter pylori does not play a significant role in the pathogenesis of PUD in most cirrhotic patients. The frequency of bleeding from DL appears to be increased in patients with aALD. DL may be associated with an especially high mortality in these patients. MWS is strongly associated with heavy alcohol consumption from binge drinking or chronic alcoholism, and is associated with aALD. Patients with aALD have more severe MWS bleeding and are more likely to rebleed when compared to non

  2. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Lucy; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a common and debilitating condition with high direct and indirect costs. AUB frequently co-exists with fibroids, but the relationship between the two remains incompletely understood and in many women the identification of fibroids may be incidental to a menstrual bleeding complaint. A structured approach for establishing the cause using the Fédération International de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique (FIGO) PALM-COEIN (Polyp, Adenomyosis, Leiomyoma, Malignancy (and hyperplasia), Coagulopathy, Ovulatory disorders, Endometrial, Iatrogenic and Not otherwise classified) classification system will facilitate accurate diagnosis and inform treatment options. Office hysteroscopy and increasing sophisticated imaging will assist provision of robust evidence for the underlying cause. Increased availability of medical options has expanded the choice for women and many will no longer need to recourse to potentially complicated surgery. Treatment must remain individualised and encompass the impact of pressure symptoms, desire for retention of fertility and contraceptive needs, as well as address the management of AUB in order to achieve improved quality of life. PMID:26803558

  3. Dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB).

    PubMed

    Bulletti, C; Flamigni, C; Prefetto, R A; Polli, V; Giacomucci, E

    1994-09-30

    Cyclic or irregular uterine bleeding is common in perimenarchal and perimenopausal women with or without endometrial hyperplasia. The disturbance often requires surgical treatment because of its negative effects on both blood loss and abnormal endometrial growth including the development of endometrial cancer. The endometrium is often overstimulated during the perimenopausal period when estrogen/progesterone production is unbalanced. A therapeutical approach with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) was proposed in a depot formulation (Zoladex) that induces a sustained and reversible ovarian suppression. To avoid the risk of osteoporosis and to obtain adequate endometrial proliferation and differentiation during ovarian suppression, transdermal 17-beta-estradiol and oral progestin were administered. Results of 20 cases versus 20 controls showed a reduction of metrorrhagia, a normalization of hemoglobin plasma concentration, and an adequate proliferation and secretory differentiation of the endometrium of patients with abnormal endometrial growth. Abnormal uterine bleeding is mainly due to uterine fibrosis and an inadequate estrogen and/or progesterone production or to a disordered estrogen transport from blood into the endometrium. In premenopausal women, endometrial hyperplasia may be part of a continuum that is ultimately manifested in the histological and biological pattern of endometrial carcinoma. The regression of endometrial hyperplasia obtained by using the therapeutic regimen mentioned above represents a preventive measure for endometrial cancer. Finally the normalization of blood loss offers a good medical alternative to surgery for patients with DUB. PMID:7978956

  4. Laboratory issues in bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Lillicrap, D; Nair, S C; Srivastava, A; Rodeghiero, F; Pabinger, I; Federici, A B

    2006-07-01

    The clinical history of the patient and of his/her relatives is the most important tool for making correct diagnosis of inherited or acquired bleeding disorders. Several attempts have been made by clinicians to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of bleeding symptoms. Specific and detailed questionnaires have been designed to quantify the bleeding tendency of patients with von Willebrand's disease (VWD) and a bleeding score has been calculated. VWD is considered the most frequent inherited bleeding disorder according to population studies: however, due to the complexity of its diagnosis, the number of patients with correct diagnosis of VWD in many developing countries is relatively low and most cases remain still under- or misdiagnosed. Once bleeding history is carefully evaluated by means of a bleeding score, the laboratory workout should be organized to find out the specific defect of haemostasis responsible for bleeding. Since factors involved in haemostasis are many, the correct approach must include first level screening tests with the aim to identify the abnormal phase of haemostasis involved: then, second level tests should be focused on the specific factors within the abnormal step of haemostasis. Among many other acquired bleeding disorders related to clinical conditions or to the use of drugs, the acquired inhibitors of haemostasis are rare but should be immediately characterized by appropriate laboratory tests because they can be often life-threatening for the patients. PMID:16683999

  5. Small intestine bleeding due to multifocal angiosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Zacarias Föhrding, Luisa; Macher, Arne; Braunstein, Stefan; Knoefel, Wolfram Trudo; Topp, Stefan Andreas

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of an 84-year-old male patient with primary small intestinal angiosarcoma. The patient initially presented with anemia and melena. Consecutive endoscopy revealed no signs of upper or lower active gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient had been diagnosed 3 years previously with an aortic dilation, which was treated with a stent. Computed tomography suggested an aorto-intestinal fistula as the cause of the intestinal bleeding, leading to operative stent explantation and aortic replacement. However, an aorto-intestinal fistula was not found, and the intestinal bleeding did not arrest postoperatively. The constant need for blood transfusions made an exploratory laparotomy imperative, which showed multiple bleeding sites, predominately in the jejunal wall. A distal loop jejunostomy was conducted to contain the small intestinal bleeding and a segmental resection for histological evaluation was performed. The histological analysis revealed a less-differentiated tumor with characteristic CD31, cytokeratin, and vimentin expression, which led to the diagnosis of small intestinal angiosarcoma. Consequently, the infiltrated part of the jejunum was successfully resected in a subsequent operation, and adjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel was planned. Angiosarcoma of the small intestine is an extremely rare malignant neoplasm that presents with bleeding and high mortality. Early diagnosis and treatment are essential to improve outcome. A small intestinal angiosarcoma is a challenging diagnosis to make because of its rarity, nonspecific symptoms of altered intestinal function, nonspecific abdominal pain, severe melena, and acute abdominal signs. Therefore, a quick clinical and histological diagnosis and decisive measures including surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy should be the aim. PMID:23197897

  6. Tannins, Peptic Ulcers and Related Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Neyres Zinia Taveira; de Souza Falcão, Heloina; Gomes, Isis Fernandes; de Almeida Leite, Thiago Jose; de Morais Lima, Gedson Rodrigues; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria; Tavares, Josean Fechine; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; de Athayde-Filho, Petrônio Filgueiras; Batista, Leonia Maria

    2012-01-01

    This review of the current literature aims to study correlations between the chemical structure and gastric anti-ulcer activity of tannins. Tannins are used in medicine primarily because of their astringent properties. These properties are due to the fact that tannins react with the tissue proteins with which they come into contact. In gastric ulcers, this tannin-protein complex layer protects the stomach by promoting greater resistance to chemical and mechanical injury or irritation. Moreover, in several experimental models of gastric ulcer, tannins have been shown to present antioxidant activity, promote tissue repair, exhibit anti Helicobacter pylori effects, and they are involved in gastrointestinal tract anti-inflammatory processes. The presence of tannins explains the anti-ulcer effects of many natural products. PMID:22489149

  7. [Peptic Ulcer Disease Associated with Helicobacter pylori Infection].

    PubMed

    Yeo, Se-Hwan; Yang, Chang-Hun

    2016-06-25

    Although the global prevalence of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is decreasing, PUD is still one of the most common upper gastrointestinal diseases in the world due to Helicobacter pylori infection and increased use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In Korea, the prevalence of H. pylori infection is also declining, but it is still the major cause of PUD. The outcomes of H. pylori infection are caused by imbalances between bacterial virulence factors, host factors, and environmental influences. In this review, we describe the prevalence trends of H. pylori infection in Korea, the mechanism of H. pylori infection-related PUD, and treatment strategies. PMID:27312829

  8. Benign duodenocolic fistula as a complication of peptic ulcer disease

    PubMed Central

    Kamani, Fereshteh; Abrishami, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    A 44-year-old man with upper abdominal pain, diarrhea and 25 kg weight loss since 3 months ago was admitted. He had a history of dyspepsia and peptic ulcer disease 4 months before admission. Gastroduodenal endoscopy and upper gastrointestinal series with barium study were done. Biopsies and CT-scan ruled out malignancies. Endoscopy and radiology studies revealed a duodenocolic fistula. He underwent right hemicolectomy, fistula en bloc excision, and distal gastrectomy surgery with gastrojejunostomy and ileocolic anastomosis. Radiologic modalities are necessary before surgery. Surgery is the only curative treatment in benign cases and reconstruction method is dependent on patient's situation. PMID:25436101

  9. Omeprazole in infants with cimetidine-resistant peptic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Alliët, P; Raes, M; Bruneel, E; Gillis, P

    1998-02-01

    Twelve neurologically normal infants (age 2.9+/-0.9 months) with peptic esophagitis (grade 2) who did not respond to cimetidine (in addition to positioning, cisapride, and Gaviscon) were treated with omeprazole, 0.5 mg/kg once a day, for 6 weeks. The effectiveness of omeprazole was evaluated in all infants by clinical assessment and endoscopy before and after treatment and by 24-hour gastric pH monitoring during treatment in seven infants. Omeprazole therapy led to a marked decrease in symptoms, endoscopic and histologic signs of esophagitis, and intragastric acidity. PMID:9506656

  10. Endoscopic injection therapy to prevent rebleeding from peptic ulcers with a protruding vessel: a controlled comparative trial.

    PubMed Central

    Rutgeerts, P; Gevers, A M; Hiele, M; Broeckaert, L; Vantrappen, G

    1993-01-01

    Seventy five patients with severely bleeding peptic ulcer were included in a controlled comparative trial to assess the efficacy and safety of endoscopic injection therapy in preventing rebleeding from peptic ulcers that presented at endoscopy with a protruding vessel. Twenty five patients were treated with injection of epinephrine followed by polidocanol, 25 were treated with injection of absolute alcohol, and 25 with sham injection. Rebleeding occurred in 44% of patients in the sham group, 40% of those treated with epinephrine and polidocanol, and in 20% of those treated with absolute ethanol. The difference in the haemostasis rate between the control and ethanol treated subjects nearly reached significance (p = 0.07). A second therapy session resulted in haemostasis rates of 68% in the epinephrine-polidocanol group and of 88% in the absolute ethanol group. These rates after two treatments as well as the emergency surgery rates (32% in the epinephrine-polidocanol group and 8% in the absolute ethanol group; p = 0.07) were not significantly different. In eight of the 11 patients with rebleeding in the sham treatment group, definitive haemostasis was achieved by elective injection therapy. Overall transfusion requirements were mean (SD) 6.0 (0.7) units in the sham group, 6.0 (0.9) in the epinephrine-polidocanol group, and 3.9 (0.5) in the absolute ethanol group. Only the difference between ethanol and sham was significant (p = 0.02). This study shows that injection with absolute ethanol reduces rebleeding in these patients and significantly lowers transfusion requirements. Absolute ethanol was superior to epinephrine-polidocanol, which was not significantly better than sham therapy. PMID:8472981

  11. Management of Acute Variceal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Acute variceal bleeding could be a fatal complication in patients with liver cirrhosis. In patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis accompanied by ascites or hepatic encephalopathy, acute variceal bleeding is associated with a high mortality rate. Therefore, timely endoscopic hemostasis and prevention of relapse of bleeding are most important. The treatment goals for acute variceal bleeding are to correct hypovolemia; achieve rapid hemostasis; and prevent early rebleeding, complications related to bleeding, and deterioration of liver function. If variceal bleeding is suspected, treatment with vasopressors and antibiotics should be initiated immediately on arrival to the hospital. Furthermore, to obtain hemodynamic stability, the hemoglobin level should be maintained at >8 g/dL, systolic blood pressure >90 to 100 mm Hg, heart rate <100/min, and the central venous pressure from 1 to 5 mm Hg. When the patient becomes hemodynamically stable, hemostasis should be achieved by performing endoscopy as soon as possible. For esophageal variceal bleeding, endoscopic variceal ligation is usually performed, and for gastric variceal bleeding, endoscopic variceal obturation is performed primarily. If it is considered difficult to achieve hemostasis through endoscopy, salvage therapy may be carried out while keeping the patient hemodynamically stable. PMID:25133116

  12. RAPID HEALING OF PEPTIC ULCERS IN PATIENTS RECEIVING FRESH CABBAGE JUICE

    PubMed Central

    Cheney, Garnett

    1949-01-01

    Thirteen patients with peptic ulcer were treated with fresh cabbage juice, which, experiments have indicated, contains an antipeptic ulcer factor. This factor (vitamin U) prevents the development of histamin-induced peptic ulcers in guinea pigs. The average crater healing time for seven of these patients who had duodenal ulcer was only 10.4 days, while the average time as reported in the literature, in 62 patients treated by standard therapy, was 37 days. The average crater healing time for six patients with gastric ulcer treated with cabbage juice was only 7.3 days, compared with 42 days, as reported in the literature, for six patients treated by standard therapy. The rapid healing of peptic ulcers observed radiologically and gastroscopically in 13 patients treated with fresh cabbage juice indicates that the anti-peptic ulcer dietary factor may play an important role in the genesis of peptic ulcer in man. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3. PMID:18104715

  13. Microcoil Embolization for Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    D'Othee, Bertrand Janne Surapaneni, Padmaja; Rabkin, Dmitry; Nasser, Imad; Clouse, Melvin

    2006-02-15

    Purpose. To assess outcomes after microcoil embolization for active lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Methods. We retrospectively studied all consecutive patients in whom microcoil embolization was attempted to treat acute lower GI bleeding over 88 months. Baseline, procedural, and outcome parameters were recorded following current Society of Interventional Radiology guidelines. Outcomes included technical success, clinical success (rebleeding within 30 days), delayed rebleeding (>30 days), and major and minor complication rates. Follow-up consisted of clinical, endoscopic, and pathologic data. Results. Nineteen patients (13 men, 6 women; mean age {+-} 95% confidence interval = 70 {+-} 6 years) requiring blood transfusion (10 {+-} 3 units) had angiography-proven bleeding distal to the marginal artery. Main comorbidities were malignancy (42%), coagulopathy (28%), and renal failure (26%). Bleeding was located in the small bowel (n = 5), colon (n 13) or rectum (n = 1). Technical success was obtained in 17 patients (89%); 2 patients could not be embolized due to vessel tortuosity and stenoses. Clinical follow-up length was 145 {+-} 75 days. Clinical success was complete in 13 (68%), partial in 3 (16%), and failed in 2 patients (11%). Delayed rebleeding (3 patients, 27%) was always due to a different lesion in another bowel segment (0 late rebleeding in embolized area). Two patients experienced colonic ischemia (11%) and underwent uneventful colectomy. Two minor complications were noted. Conclusion. Microcoil embolization for active lower GI bleeding is safe and effective in most patients, with high technical and clinical success rates, no procedure-related mortality, and a low risk of bowel ischemia and late rebleeding.

  14. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Approach to abnormal uterine bleeding in nonpregnant reproductive-age women Differential diagnosis of genital tract bleeding in women Postmenopausal uterine bleeding The following organizations also provide reliable health information. ● National Library of Medicine ( www.nlm.nih.gov/ ...

  15. Association of endothelial progenitor cells and peptic ulcer treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    NIE, ZHIHONG; XU, LIMIN; LI, CHUANYUAN; TIAN, TAO; XIE, PINGPING; CHEN, XIA; LI, BOJING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the association between endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and peptic ulcers in patients with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), in association with the efficiency of peptic ulcer treatment. The study recruited healthy subjects and peptic ulcer patients with or without T2DM. All the ulcer patients, including those with and without T2DM, were administered omeprazole for 8 weeks. Peptic ulcer patients with T2DM were additionally treated with glipizide and novolin. Blood samples were then obtained from the three groups following ulcer treatment. CD133+ cells were isolated from the blood samples using magnetic bead selection, and cultured in complete medium 199. Morphological and quantity changes in EPCs were observed by light and fluorescence microscopy. In addition, flow cytometric analysis was used to quantify the number of vascular endothelial cells. The treatment was partially effective in 7 of the 32 peptic ulcer patients without T2DM and 12 of the 32 peptic ulcer patients with T2DM. However, this treatment was ineffective in 20 of the 32 peptic ulcer patients with T2DM. Notably, 25 peptic ulcer patients without T2DM were defined as completely recovered following treatment. In addition, the number of circulating EPCs as well as their colony forming ability was significantly reduced (P<0.05) in the peptic ulcer patients with T2DM following ulcer treatment, compared with the other groups. Circulating EPC counts were significantly increased in peptic ulcer patients without T2DM, as compared with the healthy controls. With regards to colony formation, peptic ulcer patients without T2DM did not exhibit improved colony formation ability. In conclusion, the number of circulating EPCs and their colony-forming ability was significantly reduced in peptic ulcer patients with T2DM following ulcer treatment when compared with the other groups. This suggests that the poor curative effect of peptic ulcer treatment in these

  16. Management of variceal and nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Suzane

    2014-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage remains the most common medical emergency managed by gastroenterologists. Causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in patients with liver cirrhosis can be grouped into two categories: the first includes lesions that arise by virtue of portal hypertension, namely gastroesophageal varices and portal hypertensive gastropathy; and the second includes lesions seen in the general population (peptic ulcer, erosive gastritis, reflux esophagitis, Mallory–Weiss syndrome, tumors, etc.). Emergency upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the standard procedure recommended for both diagnosis and treatment of UGIB. The endoscopic treatment of choice for esophageal variceal bleeding is band ligation of varices. Bleeding from gastric varices is treated by injection with cyanoacrylate. Treatment with vasoactive drugs as well as antibiotic treatment is started before or at the same time as endoscopy. Bleeding from portal hypertensive gastropathy is less frequent, usually chronic and treatment options include β-blocker therapy, injection therapy and interventional radiology. The standard of care of UGIB in patients with cirrhosis includes careful resuscitation, preferably in an intensive care setting, medical and endoscopic therapy, early consideration for placement of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt and, sometimes, surgical therapy or hepatic transplant. PMID:25177367

  17. Periprocedural Bleeding Complications of Brain AVM Embolization with Onyx

    PubMed Central

    Liu, L.; Jiang, C.; He, H.; Li, Y.; Wu, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The advent of Onyx has provided a new method for neurointerventional therapists to treat brain AVMs. Although some retrospective studies have reported complications for AVM embolization with Onyx, periprocedural bleeding complications with Onyx embolization have not yet been described in detail. The aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the factors of Onyx-related bleeding complications and to find a way to avoid and manage these complications. From January 2003, patients with AVMs recruited in our institution started to be treated by Onyx embolization. From January 2007 to July 2009, 143 consecutive interventions were performed in 126 patients using flow-independent microcatheters and Onyx as embolic agents. Seven patients encountered bleeding complications (5.4% per patients and 4.7% per procedures) during or after the endovascular procedures. Among them, five bleeding episodes occurred during procedures, the other two after procedures. Details of the seven patients' clinical presentations, imaging presentations, speculative reasons and management of these complications were recorded. Follow-up data, including postoperative course, clinical symptoms and duration of follow-up were documented. The five active bleedings discovered in procedures were managed in time, and the patients recovered without any new neurological symptoms compared with preoperation. However, of the two bleeding episodes that occurred after interventional procedures, one was detected half an hour later: the patient was remained comatose two months later after resection of right occipital hematoma; the other who encountered intraventricular and midbrain hemorrhage was treated conservatively and suffered Parinaud syndrome and hemianesthesia. Conclusion: Periprocedural bleeding of AVMs embolization is considered a severe and devastating complication. The clinical course and prognosis of bleeding mostly depends on prompt detection and management. Interventional embolization is an

  18. Primary prophylaxis of variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, Jawad A; Kanwal, Fasiha

    2014-12-01

    Gastroesophageal varices are present in almost half of patients with cirrhosis at the time of initial diagnosis. Variceal bleeding occurs in 25% to 35% of patients with cirrhosis. Effective and timely care can prevent variceal bleeding (primary prophylaxis). For example, clinical studies demonstrate that both beta-blockers and endoscopic variceal ligation are effective in preventing a first episode of variceal bleeding. The major challenge is to screen patients in a timely manner and institute a form of therapy that has the highest chance of success in terms of patient compliance and effectiveness. PMID:25440925

  19. Vaginal or uterine bleeding - overview

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal bleeding normally occurs during a woman's menstrual cycle, when she gets her period. Every woman's period is different. Most women have cycles between 24 and 34 days apart. It usually lasts ...

  20. [Gastrointestinal bleeding in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Vartic, M; Chilie, A; Beuran, M

    2006-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) is a frequent finding in intensive care unit (ICU) and has considerable morbidity particularly for the elderly. The most common etiology for upper digestive bleeding is the stress ulcer and for the lower bleeding the diverticular disease of the colon. The predictive risk factors for GIB are age, organ failure, mechanical ventilation and length of stay in ICU. Even though a 4.5 times increase in mortality is seen in these patients it cannot be directly correlated to the bleeding. Routine use of H2 inhibitors is effective only in high risk patients, opposing enteral nutrition which is valuable in all patients. Prophylactic measures resulted in a 50% decrease in incidence of GIB in ICU and also of the mortality. Most of the patients are now treated non-operatively. PMID:17059147

  1. MedlinePlus: Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... looks like coffee grounds Black or tarry stool Dark blood mixed with stool Signs of bleeding in ... lower digestive tract include Black or tarry stool Dark blood mixed with stool Stool mixed or coated ...

  2. Bleeding varices: 1. Emergency management.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, S S; Warren, W D; Galambos, J T; Millikan, W J

    1981-01-01

    The aim of the emergency management of bleeding varices is to stop the hemorrhage nonoperatively if possible, avoiding emergency shunt surgery, an operation that has a higher mortality than elective shunt surgery. Patients with an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage should undergo endoscopy immediately to verify the diagnosis of bleeding varices. They can then be categorized according to whether they stop bleeding spontaneously (group 1), continue to bleed slowly (group 2) or continue to bleed rapidly (group 3). Group 1 patients are discussed in the second part of this two-part series. Group 2 patients are initially treated with vasopressin given intravenously; those who fail to respond should undergo emergency angiography and receive vasopressin intra-arterially. If this fails, patients at low surgical risk should undergo urgent shunt surgery; those at high risk do better with endoscopic sclerotherapy. Group 3 patients are also given an intravenous infusion of vasopressin. Patients at low surgical risk who continue to bleed then receive tamponade with a Sengstaken--Blakemore tube. If this fails, they undergo emergency creation of an H-shaped mesocaval shunt. Patients at high surgical risk who fail to respond to vasopressin given intravenously are next treated intra-arterially. If this fails they are given either endoscopic or transhepatic sclerotherapy. PMID:7006779

  3. Assessment of some Herbal Drugs for Prophylaxis of Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Gohar, Ahmed A; Zaki, Ahmed A

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous (hydrophilic) and chloroform (Lipophilic) extracts of nine medicinal plants currently used in Egyptian traditional medicine to treat some gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorders were tested for their gastro-protective effect against the incidence of peptic ulcer. Indomethacin-induced ulcer in a rat model was used for this testing. Mentha microphylla, Brassica oleracea Capitata (Cabbage), B. oleracea Botrytis (cauliflower) aqueous fraction, Portolaca oleracea polysaccharide fraction, Oreganum marjoranum, Matricaria recutita, Solanum nigrum hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions, in addition to the chloroform fraction of Portolaca oleracea and Cicorium intybus afforded high protection against the incidence of gastric ulcer (~95%). O. syriacum hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions and gum arabic afforded moderate prophylactic effect. L. sicerarea, C. intybus hydrophilic fractions and M. microphylla lipophilic fraction were inactive. Herbs represent excellent resources for cost-effective and readily available gastro-protective remedies without side effects. PMID:25276211

  4. Assessment of some Herbal Drugs for Prophylaxis of Peptic Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Gohar, Ahmed A; Zaki, Ahmed A

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous (hydrophilic) and chloroform (Lipophilic) extracts of nine medicinal plants currently used in Egyptian traditional medicine to treat some gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorders were tested for their gastro-protective effect against the incidence of peptic ulcer. Indomethacin-induced ulcer in a rat model was used for this testing. Mentha microphylla, Brassica oleracea Capitata (Cabbage), B. oleracea Botrytis (cauliflower) aqueous fraction, Portolaca oleracea polysaccharide fraction, Oreganum marjoranum, Matricaria recutita, Solanum nigrum hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions, in addition to the chloroform fraction of Portolaca oleracea and Cicorium intybus afforded high protection against the incidence of gastric ulcer (~95%). O. syriacum hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions and gum arabic afforded moderate prophylactic effect. L. sicerarea, C. intybus hydrophilic fractions and M. microphylla lipophilic fraction were inactive. Herbs represent excellent resources for cost-effective and readily available gastro-protective remedies without side effects. PMID:25276211

  5. Mechanisms of Normal and Abnormal Endometrial Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    Expression of tissue factor (TF), the primary initiator of coagulation, is enhanced in decidualized human endometrial stromal cells (HESC) during the progesterone-dominated luteal phase. Progesterone also augments a second HESC hemostatic factor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). In contrast, progestins inhibit HESC matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, 3 and 9 expression to stabilize endometrial stromal and vascular extracellular matrix. Through these mechanisms decidualized endometrium is rendered both hemostatic and resistant to excess trophoblast invasion in the mid-luteal phase and throughout gestation to prevent hemorrhage and accreta. In non-fertile cycles, progesterone withdrawal results in decreased HESC TF and PAI-expression and increased MMP activity and inflammatory cytokine production promoting the controlled hemorrhage of menstruation and related tissue sloughing. In contrast to these well ordered biochemical processes, unpredictable endometrial bleeding associated with anovulation reflects absence of progestational effects on TF, PAI-1 and MMP activity as well as unrestrained angiogenesis rendering the endometrium non-hemostatic, proteolytic and highly vascular. Abnormal bleeding associated with long-term progestin-only contraceptives results not from impaired hemostasis but from unrestrained angiogenesis leading to large fragile endometrial vessels. This abnormal angiogenesis reflects progestational inhibition of endometrial blood flow promoting local hypoxia and generation of reactive oxygen species that increase production of angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in HESCs and Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) in endometrial endothelial cells while decreasing HESC expression of angiostatic, Ang-1. The resulting vessel fragility promotes bleeding. Aberrant angiogenesis also underlies abnormal bleeding associated with myomas and endometrial polyps however there are gaps in our understanding of this pathology. PMID:21499503

  6. Impaired renal function and bleeding in elderly treated with dabigatran.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, Emmanuelle; Lavenu-Bombled, Cecile; Orostegui-Giron, Lupe; Desconclois, Céline; Assayag, Patrick

    2014-09-01

    Advantages of dabigatran, a thrombin inhibitor, for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation are numerous. Elderly patients with impaired renal function are at high risk of bleeding. Recommendations about the renal monitoring in elderly patients are not precise enough. The hemoclot direct thrombin inhibitor (HTI) assay measures accurately the dabigatran activity. Both could help managing serious bleeding events in selected populations. Four elderly patients recently treated with appropriate doses of dabigatran were hospitalized for major bleeding. Three patients were very elderly (> 80 years) and three had impaired renal function (clearance < 50 ml/min) before treatment initiation. Serious bleeding events occurred shortly after dabigatran initiation (< 2 months). In all cases, there was a documented dabigatran plasma overdose associated with a renal function impairment concomitant with the bleeding. Why should physicians be aware of this finding?: A close follow-up of the renal function in clinically fragile elderly patient, before and during the weeks following dabigatran initiation, could help to detect the risk of major bleeding event. The HTI dosage could help managing the treatment in case of severe bleeding event. PMID:24509332

  7. Uterine doughnut in early proliferating phase: potential pitfall in gastrointestinal bleeding studies.

    PubMed

    Karacalioglu, Ozgur; Ilgan, Seyfettin; Arslan, Nuri; Ozguven, Mehmet

    2003-12-01

    A 41-year-old woman with rectal bleeding was referred to our department for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding study. She was in early post-menstrual period and had stable vital signs. A GI bleeding study with Tc-99m SC revealed uterine blush in the pelvis. The shape of activity and quick fading excluded a GI bleeding. To rule out an intermittent bleeding, patient underwent a second bleeding study with Tc-99m RBC. Serial images showed uterine "doughnut" in the pelvis. The activity neither changed in shape nor showed distal movement with time excluding a GI hemorrhage. Uterus in early proliferating phase could be a potential pitfall in GI bleeding studies. PMID:14971611

  8. CXC chemokine CXCL12 tissue expression and circulating levels in peptic ulcer patients with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Vahid; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein; Mirzaee, Vahid; Khorramdelazad, Hossein

    2016-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is among the most prevalent human infections. CXCL12 is a well-known CXC chemokine involved in inflammation and play major roles in angiogenesis. There is currently very limited data on the role of CXCL12 in peptic ulcer disease. Hence, we aimed to explore whether CXCL12 is involved in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer induced by H. pylori. In this study, we enrolled 102 H. pylori-infected patients, including 51 with active ulcer (GA) and 51 with healing ulcer (GH). We also recruited 50 healthy subjects as control, which did not show any sign or symptoms of chronic inflammatory diseases, infection, or immune-related disorders. Endoscopy was performed to determine the stage of the disease. ELISA was used for detection of H. pylori infection and CXCL12 measurement. We also employed western blotting to detect CXCL12 in ulcerative lesions of H. pylori. Demographic data were also collected by questionnaire. Our results demonstrated that CXCL12 serum levels in GA group (151.8±18.31pg/mL) were significantly higher than those in GH (36.89±6.78pg/mL) and control groups (33.77±9.12pg/mL) (P<0.0001). However, we did not observe a significant difference between GH and control groups. Moreover, overexpression of CXCL12 in gastric lesions of patients in GA group was confirmed by Western blot analysis. According to the result of the present study, it could be concluded that CXCL12 is involved in the pathogenesis and healing of H. pylori-induced peptic ulcer. CXCL12 serum levels may also be used to distinguish between GA and GH phases of the disease. PMID:27269177

  9. Investigation of women with postmenopausal uterine bleeding: clinical practice recommendations.

    PubMed

    Munro, Malcolm G

    2014-01-01

    Postmenopausal uterine bleeding is defined as uterine bleeding after permanent cessation of menstruation resulting from loss of ovarian follicular activity. Bleeding can be spontaneous or related to ovarian hormone replacement therapy or to use of selective estrogen receptor modulators (eg, tamoxifen adjuvant therapy for breast carcinoma). Because anovulatory "cycles" with episodes of multimonth amenorrhea frequently precede menopause, no consensus exists regarding the appropriate interval of amenorrhea before an episode of bleeding that allows for the definition of postmenopausal bleeding. The clinician faces the possibility that an underlying malignancy exists, knowing that most often the bleeding comes from a benign source. Formerly, the gold-standard clinical investigation of postmenopausal uterine bleeding was institution-based dilation and curettage, but there now exist office-based methods for the evaluation of women with this complaint. Strategies designed to implement these diagnostic methods must be applied in a balanced way considering the resource utilization issues of overinvestigation and the risk of missing a malignancy with underinvestigation. Consequently, guidelines and recommendations were developed to consider these issues and the diverse spectrum of practitioners who evaluate women with postmenopausal bleeding. The guideline development group determined that, for initial management of spontaneous postmenopausal bleeding, primary assessment may be with either endometrial sampling or transvaginal ultrasonography, allowing patients with an endometrial echo complex thickness of 4 mm or less to be managed expectantly. Guidelines are also provided for patients receiving selective estrogen receptor modulators or hormone replacement therapy, and for an endometrial echo complex with findings consistent with fluid in the endometrial cavity.� PMID:24377427

  10. Investigation of Women with Postmenopausal Uterine Bleeding: Clinical Practice Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Malcolm G

    2014-01-01

    Postmenopausal uterine bleeding is defined as uterine bleeding after permanent cessation of menstruation resulting from loss of ovarian follicular activity. Bleeding can be spontaneous or related to ovarian hormone replacement therapy or to use of selective estrogen receptor modulators (eg, tamoxifen adjuvant therapy for breast carcinoma). Because anovulatory “cycles” with episodes of multimonth amenorrhea frequently precede menopause, no consensus exists regarding the appropriate interval of amenorrhea before an episode of bleeding that allows for the definition of postmenopausal bleeding. The clinician faces the possibility that an underlying malignancy exists, knowing that most often the bleeding comes from a benign source. Formerly, the gold-standard clinical investigation of postmenopausal uterine bleeding was institution-based dilation and curettage, but there now exist office-based methods for the evaluation of women with this complaint. Strategies designed to implement these diagnostic methods must be applied in a balanced way considering the resource utilization issues of overinvestigation and the risk of missing a malignancy with underinvestigation. Consequently, guidelines and recommendations were developed to consider these issues and the diverse spectrum of practitioners who evaluate women with postmenopausal bleeding. The guideline development group determined that, for initial management of spontaneous postmenopausal bleeding, primary assessment may be with either endometrial sampling or transvaginal ultrasonography, allowing patients with an endometrial echo complex thickness of 4 mm or less to be managed expectantly. Guidelines are also provided for patients receiving selective estrogen receptor modulators or hormone replacement therapy, and for an endometrial echo complex with findings consistent with fluid in the endometrial cavity. PMID:24377427

  11. Management dilemmas in patients with mechanical heart valves and warfarin-induced major bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Panduranga, Prashanth; Al-Mukhaini, Mohammed; Al-Muslahi, Muhanna; Haque, Mohammed A; Shehab, Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    Management of warfarin-induced major bleeding in patients with mechanical heart valves is challenging. There is vast controversy and confusion in the type of treatment required to reverse anticoagulation and stop bleeding as well as the ideal time to restart warfarin therapy safely without recurrence of bleeding and/or thromboembolism. Presently, the treatments available to reverse warfarin-induced bleeding are vitamin K, fresh frozen plasma, prothrombin complex concentrates and recombinant activated factor VIIa. Currently, vitamin K and fresh frozen plasma are the recommended treatments in patients with mechanical heart valves and warfarin-induced major bleeding. The safe use of prothrombin complex concentrates and recombinant activated factor VIIa in patients with mechanical heart valves is controversial and needs well-designed clinical studies. With regard to restarting anticoagulation in patients with warfarin-induced major bleeding and mechanical heart valves, the safe period varies from 7-14 d after the onset of bleeding for patients with intracranial bleed and 48-72 h for patients with extra-cranial bleed. In this review article, we present relevant literature about these controversies and suggest recommendations for management of patients with warfarin-induced bleeding and a mechanical heart valve. Furthermore, there is an urgent need for separate specific guidelines from major associations/ professional societies with regard to mechanical heart valves and warfarin-induced bleeding. PMID:22451852

  12. Peptic ulcer disease and other complications in patients receiving dexamethasone palliation for brain metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Penzner, R.D.; Lipsett, J.A.

    1982-11-01

    A retrospective analysis was done of 106 patients who received radiation therapy for brain metastasis. Dexamethasone therapy was instituted in 97 patients. Peptic ulcer disease developed in 5 of 89 patients (5.6 percent) who received a dosage of at least 12 mg a day, but did not occur in patients who received a lower dose or in those who did not receive steroids. The interval between institution of dexamethasone therapy and the development of peptic ulcer disease ranged from three to nine weeks. Two patients had perforated ulcers, one of whom required surgical resection. Peptic ulcer disease contributed to the general deterioration and death of three of the five patients. Overall, in 14 of the 89 patients (15.7 percent) a complication of steroid therapy developed in the form of peptic ulcer disease, steroid myopathy or diabetes mellitus (or a combination of these).

  13. Comorbidities Affect Risk of Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Crooks, Colin John; West, Joe; Card, Timothy Richard

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims The incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) has not been reduced despite the decreasing incidence of peptic ulcers, strategies to eradicate Helicobacter pylori infection, and prophylaxis against ulceration from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Other factors might therefore be involved in the pathogenesis of GIB. Patients with GIB have increasing nongastrointestinal comorbidity, so we investigated whether comorbidity itself increased the risk of GIB. Methods We conducted a matched case-control study using linked primary and secondary care data collected in England from April 1, 1997 through August 31, 2010. Patients older than 15 years with nonvariceal GIB (n = 16,355) were matched to 5 controls by age, sex, year, and practice (n = 81,636). All available risk factors for GIB were extracted and modeled using conditional logistic regression. Adjusted associations with nongastrointestinal comorbidity, defined using the Charlson Index, were then tested and sequential population attributable fractions calculated. Results Comorbidity had a strong graded association with GIB; the adjusted odds ratio for a single comorbidity was 1.43 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.35–1.52) and for multiple or severe comorbidity was 2.26 (95% CI: 2.14%–2.38%). The additional population attributable fraction for comorbidity (19.8%; 95% CI: 18.4%–21.2%) was considerably larger than that for any other measured risk factor, including aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use (3.0% and 3.1%, respectively). Conclusions Nongastrointestinal comorbidity is an independent risk factor for GIB, and contributes to a greater proportion of patients with bleeding in the population than other recognized risk factors. These findings could help in the assessment of potential causes of GIB, and also explain why the incidence of GIB remains high in an aging population. PMID:23470619

  14. ACG Clinical Guideline: Management of Patients With Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Strate, Lisa L; Gralnek, Ian M

    2016-04-01

    This guideline provides recommendations for the management of patients with acute overt lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Hemodynamic status should be initially assessed with intravascular volume resuscitation started as needed. Risk stratification based on clinical parameters should be performed to help distinguish patients at high- and low-risk of adverse outcomes. Hematochezia associated with hemodynamic instability may be indicative of an upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding source and thus warrants an upper endoscopy. In the majority of patients, colonoscopy should be the initial diagnostic procedure and should be performed within 24 h of patient presentation after adequate colon preparation. Endoscopic hemostasis therapy should be provided to patients with high-risk endoscopic stigmata of bleeding including active bleeding, non-bleeding visible vessel, or adherent clot. The endoscopic hemostasis modality used (mechanical, thermal, injection, or combination) is most often guided by the etiology of bleeding, access to the bleeding site, and endoscopist experience with the various hemostasis modalities. Repeat colonoscopy, with endoscopic hemostasis performed if indicated, should be considered for patients with evidence of recurrent bleeding. Radiographic interventions (tagged red blood cell scintigraphy, computed tomographic angiography, and angiography) should be considered in high-risk patients with ongoing bleeding who do not respond adequately to resuscitation and who are unlikely to tolerate bowel preparation and colonoscopy. Strategies to prevent recurrent bleeding should be considered. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use should be avoided in patients with a history of acute lower GI bleeding, particularly if secondary to diverticulosis or angioectasia. Patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin (secondary prophylaxis) should generally resume aspirin as soon as possible after bleeding ceases and at least within 7 days. The

  15. Surgical management of presacral bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Ausobsky, JR; Vowden, P

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Presacral venous bleeding is an uncommon but potentially life threatening complication of rectal surgery. During the posterior rectal dissection, it is recommended to proceed into the plane between the fascia propria of the rectum and the presacral fascia. Incorrect mobilisation of the rectum outside the Waldeyer’s fascia can tear out the lower presacral venous plexus or the sacral basivertebral veins, causing what may prove to be uncontrollable bleeding. Methods A systematic search of the MEDLINE® and Embase™ databases was performed to obtain primary data published in the period between 1 January 1960 and 31 July 2013. Each article describing variables such as incidence of presacral venous bleeding, surgical approach, number of cases treated and success rate was included in the analysis. Results A number of creative solutions have been described that attempt to provide good tamponade of the presacral haemorrhage, eliminating the need for second operation. However, few cases are reported in the literature. Conclusions As conventional haemostatic measures often fail to control this type of haemorrhage, several alternative methods to control bleeding definitively have been described. We propose a practical comprehensive classification of the available techniques for the management of presacral bleeding. PMID:24780015

  16. Bleed Hole Flow Phenomena Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Boundary-layer bleed is an invaluable tool for controlling the airflow in supersonic aircraft engine inlets. Incoming air is decelerated to subsonic speeds prior to entering the compressor via a series of oblique shocks. The low momentum flow in the boundary layer interacts with these shocks, growing in thickness and, under some conditions, leading to flow separation. To remedy this, bleed holes are strategically located to remove mass from the boundary layer, reducing its thickness and helping to maintain uniform flow to the compressor. The bleed requirements for any inlet design are unique and must be validated by extensive wind tunnel testing to optimize performance and efficiency. To accelerate this process and reduce cost, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center initiated an experimental program to study the flow phenomena associated with bleed holes. Knowledge of these flow properties will be incorporated into computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that will aid engine inlet designers in optimizing bleed configurations before any hardware is fabricated. This ongoing investigation is currently examining two hole geometries, 90 and 20 (both with 5-mm diameters), and various flow features.

  17. A Case of an Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Ruptured Dissection of a Right Aortic Arch

    SciTech Connect

    Born, Christine; Forster, Andreas; Rock, Clemens; Pfeifer, Klaus-Juergen; Rieger, Johannes; Reiser, Maximilian

    2003-09-15

    We report a case of severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a rare underlying cause. The patient was unconscious when he was admitted to the hospital. No chest radiogram was performed. Routine diagnostic measures, including endoscopy, failed to reveal the origin of the bleeding, which was believed to originate from the esophagus secondary to a peptic ulcer or varices. Exploratory laparotomy added no further information, but contrast-enhanced multislice computed tomography (MSCT) of the chest showed dextroposition of the widened aortic arch with a ruptured type-B dissection and a consecutive aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF). The patient died on the day of admission. Noninvasive MSCT angiography gives rapid diagnostic information on patients with occult upper gastrointestinal bleeding and should be considered before more invasive conventional angiography or surgery.

  18. How Can We Maximize Skills for Non-Variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Injection, Clipping, Burning, or Others?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopy has its role in the primary diagnosis and management of acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Main roles of endoscopy are identifying high risk stigmata lesion, and performing endoscopic hemostasis to lower the rebleeding and mortality risks. Early endoscopy within the first 24 hours enables risk classification according to clinical and endoscopic criteria, which guide safe and prompt discharge of low risk patients, and improve outcomes of high risk patients. Techniques including injection therapy, ablative therapy and mechanical therapy have been studied over the recent decades. Combined treatment is more effective than injection treatment, and single treatment with mechanical or thermal method is safe and effective in peptic ulcer bleeding. Specific treatment and correct decisions are needed in various situations depending on the site, location, specific characteristics of lesion and patient's clinical conditions. PMID:22977808

  19. Hemospray treatment is effective for lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Holster, I Lisanne; Brullet, Enric; Kuipers, Ernst J; Campo, Rafel; Fernández-Atutxa, Alberto; Tjwa, Eric T T L

    2014-01-01

    Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is diverse in origin and can be substantial, requiring urgent hemostasis. Hemospray is a promising novel hemostatic agent for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). It has been claimed in a small series that the use of Hemospray is also feasible in LGIB. We aimed to expand our knowledge of the application of Hemospray for the treatment of LGIB in a wider range of conditions to further define the optimal patient population for this new therapeutic modality. We analyzed the outcomes of nine unselected consecutive patients with active LGIB treated with Hemospray in two major hospitals in Europe. Initial hemostasis was achieved after Hemospray application in all patients. Rebleeding occurred in two patients (22%) who were on acetyl salicylic acid and presented with spurting bleeds. These preliminary data show that Hemospray can be effective in the management of LGIB, but suggest cautious use for patients on antithrombotic therapy and spurting bleeds. PMID:24218304

  20. Occurrence of thrombosis in rare bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Saez, Arlette

    2013-09-01

    Paradoxically, there are reports of thrombotic events for some rare bleeding disorders associated with significant bleeding tendency. Afibrinogenemia, factor (F) VII, or FXI deficiencies are those most commonly associated with venous or arterial thrombosis. Pathogenesis is multifactorial and the main conditions associated with this complication relate to the coexistence of inherited or acquired thrombotic risk factors linked to certain specific characteristics of the underlying defect. Patients with afibrinogenemia can develop severe, spontaneous, or recurrent thromboembolic disease. Up to 20% of congenital dysfibrinogenemia patients show predisposition to thrombosis. Thrombotic episodes, particularly deep vein thrombosis, have been reported in 3 to 4% FVII deficient patients, even those who were severely affected. These events have been reported either after infusion of plasma derived FXI concentrate or recombinant activated FVII in FXI deficient patients. So, in addition to factor level, replacement therapy must be individualized and should take into account past personal or family history of bleeding and thrombosis, and other prothrombotic risk factors. Treatment of thrombosis represents a challenge. For mild factor deficiencies, antithrombotic prophylaxis must be considered with or without concomitant use of replacement therapy. For all patients, it is also recommended to control known cardiovascular disease risk factors. PMID:23929306

  1. Acute Appendicitis Is Associated with Peptic Ulcers: A Population-based Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Kao, Li-Ting; Lin, Herng-Ching; Chung, Shiu-Dong; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Despite some studies having indicated a possible association between appendicitis and duodenal ulcers, this association was mainly based on regional samples or limited clinician experiences, and as such, did not permit unequivocal conclusions. In this case-control study, we examined the association of acute appendicitis with peptic ulcers using a population-based database. We included 3574 patients with acute appendicitis as cases and 3574 sex- and age-matched controls. A Chi-squared test showed that there was a significant difference in the prevalences of prior peptic ulcers between cases and controls (21.7% vs. 16.8%, p < 0.001). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of prior peptic ulcers for cases was 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24~1.54, p < 0.001) compared to controls. The results further revealed that younger groups demonstrated higher ORs for prior peptic ulcers among cases than controls. In particular, the adjusted OR for cases < 30 years old was as high as 1.65 (95% CI = 1.25~2.19; p < 0.001) compared to controls. However, we failed to observe an association of acute appendicitis with peptic ulcers in the ≥ 60-year age group (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 0.93~1.52). We concluded that there is an association between acute appendicitis and a previous diagnosis of peptic ulcers. PMID:26643405

  2. Efficacy of ankaferd blood stopper application on non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Gungor, Gokhan; Goktepe, M Hakan; Biyik, Murat; Polat, Ilker; Tuna, Tuncer; Ataseven, Huseyin; Demir, Ali

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively assess the hemostatic efficacy of the endoscopic topical use of ankaferd blood stopper (ABS) in active non-variceal upper gastrointestinal system (GIS) bleeding. METHODS: Endoscopy was performed on 220 patients under suspiciency of GIS bleeding. Patients with active non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) with a spurting or oozing type were included. Firstly, 8-10 cc of isotonic saline was sprayed to bleeding lesions. Then, 8 cc of ABS was applied on lesions in which bleeding continued after isotonic saline application. The other endoscopic therapeutic methods were applied on the lesions in which the bleeding did not stop after ABS. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients had an active NVUGIB with a spurting or oozing type and 193 patients were excluded from the study since they did not have non-variceal active bleeding. 8 cc of ABS was sprayed on to the lesions of 26 patients whose bleeding continued after isotonic saline and in 19 of them, bleeding stopped after ABS. Other endoscopic treatment methods were applied to the remaining patients and the bleeding was stopped with these interventions in 6 of 7 patients. CONCLUSION: ABS is an effective method on NVUGIB, particularly on young patients with no coagulopathy. ABS may be considered as part of a combination treatment with other endoscopic methods. PMID:23293725

  3. Delayed positive gastrointestinal bleeding studies with technetium-99m-red blood cells: Utility of a second injection

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, A.F. )

    1991-02-01

    Two patients studied with technetium-99m-labeled red blood cells (RBCs) for gastrointestinal bleeding had positive findings only on 24-hr delayed images, at which time the site of bleeding could not be ascertained. In each instance, when additional delayed images suggested that active bleeding was occurring, a second aliquot of RBCs was labeled and injected. Sites of active hemorrhage were identified following further imaging in both patients. When delayed GI bleeding images are positive, further views should be obtained to ascertain if the pattern of intraluminal activity changes. If renewed active hemorrhage is suspected, reinjection with a second dose of labeled RBCs may identify the bleeding site.

  4. Is there an association between low dose aspirin and anemia (without overt bleeding)?: narrative review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Overt bleeding associated with low dose aspirin (LDA) is well-recognized, little attention is given to the possibility of association between LDA and occult bleeding, although this is known to occur in healthy volunteers. LDA is used increasingly in primary and secondary prevention of a number of medical conditions, many of which are common in older people, as is anemia. Anemia in older people is associated with adverse outcomes including disability, morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to review the evidence that LDA might cause anemia without overt bleeding. Methods An extensive narrative review was carried out. Electronic searching (including database links) and reference lists of reports were used to identify studies reporting on use of aspirin ≤325 mg/day and anemia or change in hemoglobin (Hb) without overt bleeding. Data were extracted from reports of trials, adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and prevalence studies of adults aged ≥18 years, published since 1980. Results There are few relevant data, with considerable heterogeneity among trial designs, duration, and patient characteristics in studies of LDA. In five randomised trials (n = 5879) in (mostly secondary) prevention, the majority of patients were men without peptic ulcer disease aged 50-70 years and no consistent association between LDA and change in Hb was found. In two smaller studies (n = 609) of primary prevention in healthy patients aged ≥70 years, there was a small but statistically significant fall in Hb with LDA. Observational studies, and data from trials in which use of LDA was not a primary focus of the study, were inconclusive. Conclusions It is not clear whether there is an association between LDA and anemia in the absence of overt bleeding, but there may be an association between LDA and fall in Hb in (a subset of) older patients. The available evidence has significant limitations, which are discussed; studies including more older patients, and

  5. Availability of Blood Urea Nitrogen/Creatinine Ratio in Gastrointestinal Bleeding with Melena in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyu Seon; Kang, Chan Ho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aims of our study were to evaluate the blood urea nitrogen to creatinine ratio (BUN/Cr ratio) for distinguishing between an upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB), and differentiating between the two most common causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) presenting with melena in children. Methods Retrospective data of patients with GIB presenting with melena were analyzed. The data from 60 cases were reviewed including demographics, laboratory findings, diagnostic modalities and results, treatments, and transfusions. Results Among the 60 cases, UGIB and lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) were found in 35 cases (58.3%) and 14 cases (23.3%), respectively. The two common causes of UGIB were varices (37.1%), and peptic ulcer diseases (PUD) (31.4%). The BUN/Cr ratio of 30 or greater was higher in UGIB than LGIB (odds ratio [OR], 6.9; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.3-37.2). In UGIB, the BUN/Cr ratio of the varices group was higher than that of the PUD group (p=0.015). The OR for the BUN/Cr ratio appeared as 1.2 per unit increase in the varices group than the PUD group (95% CI, 1.03-1.3). There was no difference between the PUD group and Meckel's diverticulum group. Conclusion The BUN/Cr ratio was not uneven in differentiating UGIB from LGIB of children with melena in our study. This suggests that BUN/Cr ratio should be interpreted carefully. PMID:25866731

  6. Recent advances on the management of patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Sheasgreen, Christopher; Leontiadis, Grigorios I.

    2013-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common emergency associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The mainstays of therapy include prompt resuscitation, early risk stratification, and appropriate access to endoscopy. Patients with high-risk endoscopic findings should receive endoscopic hemostasis with a modality of established efficacy. The pillar of post-endoscopic therapy is acid-suppression via proton pump inhibitors (PPI), although the optimal dose and route of administration are still unclear. Post-discharge management of patients with peptic ulcers includes standard oral PPI treatment and eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection. The risk of recurrent bleeding should be carefully considered and appropriate gastroprotection should be offered when non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-platelet agents, and/or anticoagulation need to be used. This review seeks to survey new evidence in the management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding that has emerged in the past 3 years and put it into context with recommendations from recent practice guidelines. PMID:24714301

  7. Anti-hemorrhagic activity of Punica granatum L. flower (Persian Golnar) against heavy menstrual bleeding of endometrial origin: a double-blind, randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Goshtasebi, Azita; Mazari, Ziba; Behboudi Gandevani, Samira; Naseri, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Heavy menstrual bleeding of endometrial origin (HMB) is a major healthcare problem in premenopausal women and affects several aspects of women’s health and quality of life (QoL). The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of Persian Golnar (PG) and tranexamic acid (TA) on heavy menstrual bleeding of endometrial origin (HMB) and patients’ QoL. Methods: A double-blind randomized controlled trial with parallel design and block randomization technique was conducted. A total of 94 women with HMB were randomly assigned to take either PG or TA for 5 days from day 1 of menses for three consecutive menstrual cycles. Blood loss was measured by the pictorial blood loss assessment chart (PBAC). Hematological assessments were made before the intervention and after treatment. QoL as a secondary outcome was evaluated using SF-36 and the menorrhagia questionnaire (MQ). Statistical analysis was performed using t-test, paired ttest, χ2 test, Mann–Whitney test, and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: In each group, 38 women (80.8%) completed the 3-month follow-up. Both PG and TA reduced blood loss. PBAC mean (SD) score was reduced from 304.92 (176.17) and 304.44 (192.72) to 164.60 (100.24) and 143.13 (96.07) after the third treatment cycle, respectively (p< 0.001). Furthermore, mean hemoglobin, Hb (SD) concentrations in the PG and TA groups increased significantly from 12.06 (0.86) and 11.53 (0.86)mg/dl to 13.02 (0.82) and 12.72 (0.88) mg/dl (p< 0.001). QoL was significantly improved in both groups (p< 0.001). However, there were no significant differences between the groups after the intervention. Conclusion: The results of the present study demonstrate the efficacy of PG in treating HMB in terms of clinical and QoL indicators. PMID:26157717

  8. Measures of Adiposity Are Associated with Increased Risk of Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, Matthew R.; Khalili, Hamed; Huang, Edward S.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Obesity is associated with systemic inflammation, alterations in the intestinal microbiome, and decreased epithelial integrity. The association between obesity and peptic ulcer has not been thoroughly investigated. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of 47,120 men enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (mean age of 54 years at baseline). Biennially, we updated information on body mass index (BMI), physical activity, smoking, and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) or aspirin. Self-reported waist and hip measurements were validated among a subsample of participants. Self-reported cases of gastric and duodenal ulcers were confirmed by medical record review. Helicobacter pylori status was determined from endoscopic biopsies, serum antibody measurements, and/or stool antigen assays documented in the medical record. We used Cox proportional hazards modeling to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results We documented 272 gastric and 320 duodenal ulcers over 24 years of follow up. The multivariate-adjusted HR for gastric ulcer was 1.83 (95% CI, 1.20–2.78; Ptrend<.01) for obese men (BMI ≥30.0 kg/m2), compared to men with BMIs of 23.0–24.9 kg/m2, and 1.88 (95% CI, 1.06–3.33; Ptrend=.04) for men with waist-to-hip ratios (WHR) ≥1.00, compared to men with WHR of 0.85–0.89. Risk of duodenal ulcer was not associated with BMI (Ptrend=.24) or WHR (Ptrend=.68). In secondary analyses, increased BMI and WHR were each associated with increased risk of H pylori-negative, but not H pylori-positive, ulcers. The effect of BMI on ulcer risk did not change with use of aspirin or NSAID, alcohol consumption, physical activity, or smoking. Conclusions In a large prospective cohort of male health professionals, central and total obesity were associated with increased risk of peptic ulcer—particularly gastric and H pylori-negative ulcers. PMID:24681076

  9. Stimuli of pepsinogen secretion from frog isolated peptic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, H.; Komiyama, K.; Shirakawa, T.; Heldman, A.; Anderson, W.; Hirschowitz, B.I.

    1986-03-05

    The authors have previously studied pepsinogen (Pg) secretion from isolated intact esophageal mucosa of the bullfrog R. catesbeiana. By stimulus-response studies using agonists and antagonists they characterized specific stimulation of cholinergic, adrenergic and peptidergic receptors and interaction of cAMP and Ca/sup 2 +/ dependent pathways. To understand cell mechanisms more definitively and to relate these to morphology it was necessary to isolate peptic cells. Esophageal mucosa was digested with 0.1% collagenase for 80-100 min and sieved through teflon mesh. One esophagus yielded approximately 10/sup 7/ cells, 70% pure and 89 +/- 5% viable. Basal secretion was 3% of Pg content/hr. The cells responded to graded concentrations of bombesin, bethanechol, IBMX, 8Br-cAMP, forskolin, TPA (12-0-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13 acetate) and A23187. The response to (TPA + A23187) was double the additive single output values; (TPA + A23187 + forskolin) stimulated secretion of more than double the sum of the 3 component stimuli. In calcium and magnesium-free medium, the A23187 response and the synergistic response of combinations were both lost. They have identified 3 messengers for Pg cell stimulation - cAMP, Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization and protein kinase C - each of which can be separately stimulated, and when combined are strongly synergistic.

  10. Depression and the Risk of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chih-Chao; Hsu, Yi-Chao; Chang, Kuang-Hsi; Lee, Chang-Yin; Chong, Lee-Won; Lin, Cheng-Li; Shang, Chuin-Shee; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The risk of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) among patients with depression has raised concern. This study determined the association between depression and the subsequent development of PUD using claims data. Patients newly diagnosed with depression in 2000 to 2010 were identified as depression cohort from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The comparison cohort was randomly selected from subjects without depression, frequency matched by age and gender and diagnosis date, with a size 2-fold of the size of the depression cohort. The incidence of PUD was evaluated for both cohorts by the end of 2011. We calculated the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of PUD using the Cox proportional hazards regression model. The depression cohort consisted of 23,536 subjects (129,751 person-years), and the comparison cohort consisted of 47,069 subjects (285,592 person-years). The incidence of PUD was 2-fold higher in the depression cohort than in the comparison cohort (33.2 vs 16.8 per 1000 person-years) with an age adjusted HR of 1.97 (95% CI = 1.89–2.06) or a multivariable adjusted HR of 1.35 (95% CI = 1.29–1.42). Depression might increase the risk of developing PUD. Prospective clinical studies of the relationship between depression and PUD are warranted. PMID:26705225

  11. Thrombosis in rare bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sáez, Arlette

    2012-04-01

    Inherited deficiencies of blood coagulation factors are usually associated with lifelong bleeding tendency. In addition to Haemophilias A and B and von Willebrand disease, congenital deficiencies of such factors as fibrinogen, prothrombin (FII)), FV, FVII, FX, FXI, FXIII, and combined deficiencies occur and can lead to a diversity of clinical conditions. Paradoxically, for some of these disorders associated with significant bleeding tendency there are reports of thrombotic events, both arterial and venous. Thrombosis in hemophilia patients has a multifactorial pathogenesis and the main conditions associated with this complication are the use of long-term central venous catheters, intensive replacement therapy usually in the setting of surgical procedures, the use of bypassing agents or the coexistence of acquired or inherited prothrombotic risk factors. Regarding other rare bleeding disorders, thrombotic phenomena has been described particularly in patients with afibrinogenemia, FXI and FVII deficiency and the events can occur even in young patients, in the presence of concomitant risk factors or spontaneously. Replacement therapy must be individualized and should take into account past history of haemostatic challenges, family history of bleeding and thrombosis, just like the level of factor. For mild deficiencies when patients are asymptomatic the use of antithrombotic prophylaxis must be considered with or without concomitant use of replacement therapy. In patients with history of thrombosis it may be helpful to perform a thrombophilia screening to exclude coexisting prothrombotic defects and for all patients it is recommended to control known cardiovascular disease risk factors. PMID:22507808

  12. Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Calciphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nancy; Haq, Khwaja F; Mahajan, Sugandhi; Nagpal, Prashant; Doshi, Bijal

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Calciphylaxis is associated with a high mortality that approaches 80%. The diagnosis is usually made when obvious skin lesions (painful violaceous mottling of the skin) are present. However, visceral involvement is rare. We present a case of calciphylaxis leading to lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and rectal ulceration of the GI mucosa. CASE REPORT A 66-year-old woman with past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), recently diagnosed ovarian cancer, and on hemodialysis (HD) presented with painful black necrotic eschar on both legs. The radiograph of the legs demonstrated extensive calcification of the lower extremity arteries. The hospital course was complicated with lower GI bleeding. A CT scan of the abdomen revealed severe circumferential calcification of the abdominal aorta, celiac artery, and superior and inferior mesenteric arteries and their branches. Colonoscopy revealed severe rectal necrosis. She was deemed to be a poor surgical candidate due to comorbidities and presence of extensive vascular calcifications. Recurrent episodes of profuse GI bleeding were managed conservatively with blood transfusion as needed. Following her diagnosis of calciphylaxis, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium containing phosphate binders was stopped. She was started on daily hemodialysis with low calcium dialysate bath as well as intravenous sodium thiosulphate. The clinical condition of the patient deteriorated. The patient died secondary to multiorgan failure. CONCLUSIONS Calciphylaxis leading to intestinal ischemia/perforation should be considered in the differential diagnosis in ESRD on HD presenting with abdominal pain or GI bleeding. PMID:26572938

  13. Spontaneous Bleeding Associated with Ginkgo biloba

    PubMed Central

    Bent, Stephen; Goldberg, Harley; Padula, Amy; Avins, Andrew L

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ginkgo biloba (ginkgo) is a herbal remedy used by over 2% of the adult population in the United States. Several review articles have suggested that ginkgo may increase the risk of bleeding. OBJECTIVE To report a case of bleeding associated with using ginkgo, to systematically review the literature for similar case reports, and to evaluate whether using ginkgo is causally related to bleeding. DATA SOURCES We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, IBIDS, and the Cochrane Collaboration Database from 1966 to October 2004 with no language restrictions. REVIEW METHODS Published case reports of bleeding events in persons using ginkgo were selected. Two reviewers independently abstracted a standard set of information to assess whether ginkgo caused the bleeding event. RESULTS Fifteen published case reports described a temporal association between using ginkgo and a bleeding event. Most cases involved serious medical conditions, including 8 episodes of intracranial bleeding. However, 13 of the case reports identified other risk factors for bleeding. Only 6 reports clearly described that ginkgo was stopped and that bleeding did not recur. Bleeding times, measured in 3 reports, were elevated when patients were taking ginkgo. CONCLUSION A structured assessment of published case reports suggests a possible causal association between using ginkgo and bleeding events. Given the widespread use of this herb and the serious nature of the reported events, further studies are needed. Patients using ginkgo, particularly those with known bleeding risks, should be counseled about a possible increase in bleeding risk. PMID:16050865

  14. Association between Periodontal Disease and Peptic Ulcers among Japanese Workers: MY Health Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Kaneto, Chie; Toyokawa, Satoshi; Inoue, Kazuo; Inoue, Mariko; Senba, Toshihiko; Suyama, Yasuo; Miyoshi, Yuji; Kobayashi, Yasuki

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the association between periodontal disease and peptic ulcers in a working population. Methods: Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to all employees of a large insurance company in Japan. The questionnaire asked about their health status and lifestyle habits. Peptic ulcer was defined as either stomach ulcer, duodenal ulcer, or both. For the evaluation of periodontal disease, three indices were used: (a) loss of five or more teeth, (b) having been told of having periodontitis, and (c) periodontal risk score. Results: Of the eligible 28 765 subjects analyzed, peptic ulcer was present in 397 (1.4%). The results of bivariate analyses showed that a significantly higher proportion of subjects with peptic ulcer reported that they lost five or more teeth (35.3 vs. 17.4%, p<0.001) or that they were told they had periodontitis (33.5 vs. 20.7%, p<0.001). Moreover, the periodontal risk score was higher for those with peptic ulcer than those without (mean 0.83 vs. 0.59, p<0.001). In multivariate logistic regression analyses, statistical associations were found between the presence of peptic ulcer and loss of five or more teeth (odds ratio (OR): 1.41, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.13–1.76, p<0.01), having been told of having periodontitis (OR: 1.28, 95% CI: 1.03–1.59, p<0.05), and a 1-point increase in the periodontal risk score (OR: 1.17, 95% CI: 1.04–1.30, p<0.01), respectively. Conclusion: Modest but statistically significant associations were found between the self-reported measures of periodontal disease and peptic ulcers. PMID:22980150

  15. Recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding diagnosed by delayed scintigraphy with Tc-99m-labeled red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Nwakanma, Lois; Meyerrose, Gary; Kennedy, Shalyn; Rakvit, Ariwan; Bohannon, Todd; Silva, Micheal

    2003-08-01

    A 56-year-old woman presented with bright-red blood from the rectum. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed mild gastritis. Colonoscopy demonstrated diverticulosis without active bleeding, and in vitro tagged red blood cell scintigraphy was unremarkable. There was no further evidence of bleeding and the patient was discharged home. The patient returned with recurrent bright-red blood from the rectum. Although delayed scintigraphic images seldom demonstrate the site of bleeding, delayed images at 12 hours demonstrated active bleeding near the hepatic flexure in this patient. This was confirmed with selective mesenteric angiography, and was treated with coil embolization of the tertiary branches of the right middle colic artery. PMID:12897664

  16. Technetium-99m labeled RBC imaging in gastrointestinal bleeding from gastric leiomyoma

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, U.A.; Jhingran, S.G.

    1988-01-01

    Tc-99m labeled RBC imaging is becoming increasingly useful in detecting gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding sites. A patient is presented who had massive GI bleeding from an unsuspected gastric leiomyoma in whom a Tc-99m sulfur colloid GI bleed image was negative. The Tc-99m labeled RBC imaging done on the day after sulfur colloid imaging revealed increased gastric activity due to active bleeding from an intragastric leiomyoma. Tc-99m labeled RBC imaging helped in early detection of the bleeding site resulting in its successful treatment. This experience also reinforces the assertion that Tc-99m labeled RBC imaging may be more helpful than Tc-99m sulfur colloid imaging in patients with upper GI or intermittent bleeding.

  17. Providing Young Women with Credible Health Information about Bleeding Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rhynders, Patricia A.; Sayers, Cynthia A.; Presley, Rodney J.; Thierry, JoAnn M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 1% of U.S. women may have an undiagnosed bleeding disorder, which can diminish quality of life and lead to life-threatening complications during menstruation, childbirth, and surgery. Purpose To understand young women’s knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions about bleeding disorders and determine the preferred messaging strategy (e.g., gain- versus loss-framed messages) for presenting information. Methods In September 2010, a web-assisted personal interview of women aged 18–25 years was conducted. Preliminary analyses were conducted in 2011 with final analyses in 2013. In total, 1,243 women participated. Knowledge of blood disorders was tabulated for these respondents. Menstrual experiences of women at risk for a bleeding disorder were compared with those not at risk using chi-square analyses. Perceived influence of gain- versus loss-framed messages also was compared. Results Participants knew that a bleeding disorder is a condition in which bleeding takes a long time to stop (77%) or blood does not clot (66%). Of the women, 57% incorrectly thought that a bleeding disorder is characterized by thin blood; many were unsure if bleeding disorders involve blood types, not getting a period, or mother and fetus having a different blood type. Women at risk for a bleeding disorder were significantly more likely to report that menstruation interfered with daily activities (36% vs 9%); physical or sports activities (46% vs 21%); social activities (29% vs 7%); and school or work activities (20% vs 9%) than women not at risk. Gain-framed messages were significantly more likely to influence women’s decisions to seek medical care than parallel loss-framed messages. Findings suggest that the most influential messages focus on knowing effective treatment is available (86% gain-framed vs 77% loss-framed); preventing pregnancy complications (79% gain- vs 71% loss-framed); and maintaining typical daily activities during menstrual periods. Conclusions Lack

  18. Bleed water testing program for controlled low strength material

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.

    1996-11-12

    Bleed water measurements for two Controlled Low Strength Material (CLSM) mixes were conducted to provide engineering data for the Tank 20F closure activities. CLSM Mix 1 contained 150 pounds of cement per cubic yard whereas CLSM Mix 2 contained 50 pounds per cub yard. SRS currently used CLSM Mix 2 for various applications. Bleed water percentages and generation rates were measured along with flow and compressive strength. This information will be used to select a mix design for the Tank 20F closure activities and to establish the engineering requirements, such as, lift height, time required between lifts and quantity of bleed water to be removed from the tank during the placement activities. Mix 1 is recommended for placement within Tank 20F because it has better flow characteristics, less segregation, lower percentage of bleed water and slightly higher strength. Optimization of Mix 1 was beyond the scope of this study. However, further testing of thickening additives, such as clays (bentonite), sodium silicate or fine silicas maybe useful for decreasing or eliminating bleed water.

  19. Predictors of re-bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mu-Hsien; Tsou, Yung-Kuan; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Lee, Ching-Song; Liu, Nai-Jen; Sung, Kai-Feng; Cheng, Hao-Tsai

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To predict the re-bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) bleeding. METHODS: Over a 15-year period, data from 161 patients with delayed post-ES bleeding were retrospectively collected from a single medical center. To identify risk factors for re-bleeding after initial successful endoscopic hemostasis, parameters before, during and after the procedure of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography were analyzed. These included age, gender, blood biochemistry, co-morbidities, endoscopic diagnosis, presence of peri-ampullary diverticulum, occurrence of immediate post-ES bleeding, use of needle knife precut sphincterotomy, severity of delayed bleeding, endoscopic features on delayed bleeding, and type of endoscopic therapy. RESULTS: A total of 35 patients (21.7%) had re-bleeding after initial successful endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-ES bleeding. Univariate analysis revealed that malignant biliary stricture, serum bilirubin level of greater than 10 mg/dL, initial bleeding severity, and bleeding diathesis were significant predictors of re-bleeding. By multivariate analysis, serum bilirubin level of greater than 10 mg/dL and initial bleeding severity remained significant predictors. Re-bleeding was controlled by endoscopic therapy in a single (n = 23) or multiple (range, 2-7; n = 6) sessions in 29 of the 35 patients (82.9%). Four patients required transarterial embolization and one went for surgery. These five patients had severe bleeding when delayed post-ES bleeding occurred. One patient with decompensated liver cirrhosis died from re-bleeding. CONCLUSION: Re-bleeding occurs in approximately one-fifth of patients after initial successful endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-ES bleeding. Severity of initial bleeding and serum bilirubin level of greater than 10 mg/dL are predictors of re-bleeding. PMID:27003996

  20. Malignant neoplasms after radiation therapy for peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Carr, Zhanat A; Kleinerman, Ruth A; Stovall, Marilyn; Weinstock, Robert M; Griem, Melvin L; Land, Charles E

    2002-06-01

    Most information on radiation-related cancer risk comes from the Life Span Study (LSS) of the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Stomach cancer mortality rates are much higher in Japan than in the U.S., making the applicability of LSS findings to the U.S. population uncertain. A unique cohort of U.S. patients who were irradiated for peptic ulcer to control gastric secretion provides a different perspective on risk. Cancer mortality data were analyzed and relative risks estimated for 3719 subjects treated by radiotherapy (mean stomach dose 14.8 Gy) and/or by surgery and medication during the period 1936-1965 and followed through 1997 (average 25 years). Compared to the U.S. rates, stomach cancer mortality was significantly increased for irradiated and nonirradiated patients (observed/expected = 3.20 and 1.52, respectively). We observed strong evidence of exposure-related excess mortality from cancer of the stomach (RR 2.6, 95% CI 1.3, 5.1), pancreas (RR 2.7, 95% CI 1.5, 5.1), and lung (RR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1, 2.1), with commensurate radiation dose responses in analyses that included nonexposed patients. However, the dose responses for these cancers were not significant when restricted to exposed patients. Our excess relative risk per gray estimate of 0.20 at doses

  1. Increased Risk of Osteoporosis in Patients With Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Tung, Yi-Ching; Chai, Chee-Yin; Lu, Ying-Yi; Su, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Tai-Hsin; Kuo, Keng-Liang; Lin, Chih-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate osteoporosis risk in patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD) using a nationwide population-based dataset. This Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) analysis included 27,132 patients aged 18 years and older who had been diagnosed with PUD (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] codes 531–534) during 1996 to 2010. The control group consisted of 27,132 randomly selected (age- and gender)-matched patients without PUD. The association between PUD and the risk of developing osteoporosis was estimated using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. During the follow-up period, osteoporosis was diagnosed in 2538 (9.35 %) patients in the PUD group and in 2259 (8.33 %) participants in the non-PUD group. After adjusting for covariates, osteoporosis risk was 1.85 times greater in the PUD group compared to the non-PUD group (13.99 vs 5.80 per 1000 person-years, respectively). Osteoporosis developed 1 year after PUD diagnosis. The 1-year follow-up period exhibited the highest significance between the 2 groups (hazard ratio [HR] = 63.44, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 28.19–142.74, P < 0.001). Osteoporosis risk was significantly higher in PUD patients with proton-pump-inhibitors (PPIs) use (HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.03–1.34) compared to PUD patients without PPIs use. This study revealed a significant association between PUD and subsequent risk of osteoporosis. Therefore, PUD patients, especially those treated with PPIs, should be evaluated for subsequent risk of osteoporosis to minimize the occurrence of adverse events. PMID:27100415

  2. The Association Between Peptic Ulcer Disease and Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tain-Junn; Guo, How-Ran; Chang, Chia-Yu; Weng, Shih-Feng; Li, Pi-I; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Wu, Wen-Shiann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stroke is a common cause of death worldwide, but about 30% of ischemic stroke (IS) patients have no identifiable contributing risk factors. Because peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and vascular events share some common risk factors, we conducted a population-based study to evaluate the association between PUD and IS. We followed up a representative sample of 1 million residents of Taiwan using the National Health Insurance Research Database from 1997 to 2011. We defined patients who received medications for PUD and had related diagnosis codes as the PUD group, and a reference group matched by age and sex was sampled from those who did not have PUD. We also collected data on medical history and monthly income. The events of IS occurred after enrollment were compared between the 2 groups. The data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazard models at the 2-tailed significant level of 0.05. The PUD group had higher income and prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), heart disease, and hyperlipidemia. They also had a higher risk of developing IS with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.31 (95% confidence interval: 1.20–1.41). Other independent risk factors included male sex, older age, lower income, and co-morbidity of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), and heart disease. PUD is a risk factor for IS, independent of conventional risk factors such as male sex, older age, lower income, and co-morbidity of hypertension, DM, and heart disease. Prevention strategies taking into account PUD should be developed and evaluated. PMID:27258514

  3. A Cross-sectional Study of Bleeding Phenotype in Haemophilia A Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Paroskie, Allison; Gailani, Dave; DeBaun, Michael R.; Sidonio, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Haemophilia A carriers have historically been thought to demonstrate normal haemostasis. However, recent data demonstrates that despite normal factor VIII, haemophilia A carriers demonstrate an increased bleeding tendency. We tested the hypothesis that obligate haemophilia carriers demonstrate an increase in bleeding symptoms. A cross sectional study was performed comparing haemophilia A carriers to normal women. Questionnaire assessment included a general bleeding questionnaire, condensed MCMDM-1VWD bleeding assessment tool and Pictorial Bleeding Assessment Chart (PBAC). Laboratory assessment included complete blood count, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen activity, FVIII activity (FVIII:C), von Willebrand factor antigen level, ristocetin cofactor, platelet function analyser-100™ and ABO blood type. 44 haemophilia A carriers and 43 controls were included. Demographic features were similar. Laboratory results demonstrated a statistically significant difference only in FVIII:C (82.5 versus 134%, p value < 0.001). Carriers reported a higher number of bleeding events, and both condensed MCMDM-1 VWD bleeding scores (5 versus 1, p value < 0.001) and PBAC scores (423 versus 182.5, p value = 0.018) were significantly higher in carriers. Haemophilia A carriers exhibit increased bleeding symptoms when compared to normal women. Further studies are necessary to fully understand the bleeding phenotype in this population and optimize clinical management. PMID:25832012

  4. Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Calciphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nancy; Haq, Khwaja F.; Mahajan, Sugandhi; Nagpal, Prashant; Doshi, Bijal

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 66 Final Diagnosis: Calciphylaxis Symptoms: Gastrointesinal haemorrhage Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Hemodialysis • blood transfusions Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Calciphylaxis is associated with a high mortality that approaches 80%. The diagnosis is usually made when obvious skin lesions (painful violaceous mottling of the skin) are present. However, visceral involvement is rare. We present a case of calciphylaxis leading to lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and rectal ulceration of the GI mucosa. Case Report: A 66-year-old woman with past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), recently diagnosed ovarian cancer, and on hemodialysis (HD) presented with painful black necrotic eschar on both legs. The radiograph of the legs demonstrated extensive calcification of the lower extremity arteries. The hospital course was complicated with lower GI bleeding. A CT scan of the abdomen revealed severe circumferential calcification of the abdominal aorta, celiac artery, and superior and inferior mesenteric arteries and their branches. Colonoscopy revealed severe rectal necrosis. She was deemed to be a poor surgical candidate due to comorbidities and presence of extensive vascular calcifications. Recurrent episodes of profuse GI bleeding were managed conservatively with blood transfusion as needed. Following her diagnosis of calciphylaxis, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium containing phosphate binders was stopped. She was started on daily hemodialysis with low calcium dialysate bath as well as intravenous sodium thiosulphate. The clinical condition of the patient deteriorated. The patient died secondary to multiorgan failure. Conclusions: Calciphylaxis leading to intestinal ischemia/perforation should be considered in the differential diagnosis in ESRD on HD presenting with abdominal pain or GI bleeding. PMID:26572938

  5. Research on Supersonic Inlet Bleed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, David O.; Vyas, Manan A.; Slater, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Phase I data results of the Fundamental Inlet Bleed Experiments project at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) are presented which include flow coefficient results for two single-hole boundary-layer bleed configurations. The bleed configurations tested are round holes at inclination angles of 90deg and 20deg both having length-to-diameter ratios of 2.0. Results were obtained at freestream Mach numbers of 1.33, 1.62, 1.98, 2.46, and 2.92 and unit Reynolds numbers of 0.984, 1.89, and 2.46 10(exp 7)/m. Approach boundary-layer data are presented for each flow condition and the flow coefficient results are compared to existing multi-hole data obtained under similar conditions. For the 90deg hole, the single and multi-hole distributions agree fairly well with the exception that under supercritical operation, the multi-hole data chokes at higher flow coefficient levels. This behavior is also observed for the 20deg hole but to a lesser extent. The 20deg hole also shows a markedly different characteristic at subcritical operation. Also presented are preliminary results of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of both configurations at the Mach 1.33 and a unit Reynolds number of 2.46 10(exp 7)/m. Comparison of the results shows the agreement to be very good.

  6. Genomic approaches to bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Peyvandi, F; Hayward, C P M

    2016-07-01

    The genes encoding the coagulation factors were characterized over two decades ago. Since then, significant progress has been made in the genetic diagnosis of the two commonest severe inherited bleeding disorders, haemophilia A and B. Experience with the genetic of inherited rare bleeding disorders and platelet disorders is less well advanced. Rare bleeding disorders are usually inherited as autosomal recessive disorders, while it is now clear that a number of the more common platelet function disorders are inherited as autosomal dominant traits. In both cases, DNA sequencing has been useful since most of these disorders are due to mutations located at the coding regions or splice sites of genes encoding the abnormal protein. However, in 5-10% of patients affected with severe clotting factor deficiencies, no genetic defect can be identified and until recently, the genetic characterization of inherited platelet disorders had been confined to the more prevalent conditions such as Glanzmann disease and Bernard-Soulier syndrome. In patients with no gene mutations identified, so far, the role of next-generation sequencing as well as of other new genomic technologies will very likely have increasing importance. However, such methods require extensive bioinformatics analysis that, in turn will require critical revision of our current diagnostic infrastructure. PMID:27405675

  7. Italian survey on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and gastrointestinal bleeding in children

    PubMed Central

    Cardile, Sabrina; Martinelli, Massimo; Barabino, Arrigo; Gandullia, Paolo; Oliva, Salvatore; Di Nardo, Giovanni; Dall'Oglio, Luigi; Rea, Francesca; de' Angelis, Gian Luigi; Bizzarri, Barbara; Guariso, Graziella; Masci, Enzo; Staiano, Annamaria; Miele, Erasmo; Romano, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate gastrointestinal complications associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs) use in children. METHODS: A retrospective, multicenter study was conducted between January 2005 and January 2013, with the participation of 8 Italian pediatric gastroenterology centers. We collected all the cases of patients who refer to emergency room for suspected gastrointestinal bleeding following NSAIDs consumption, and underwent endoscopic evaluation. Previous medical history, associated risk factors, symptoms and signs at presentation, diagnostic procedures, severity of bleeding and management of gastrointestinal bleeding were collected. In addition, data regarding type of drug used, indication, dose, duration of treatment and prescriber (physician or self-medication) were examined. RESULTS: Fifty-one patients, including 34 males, were enrolled (median age: 7.8 years). Ibuprofen was the most used NSAID [35/51 patients (68.6%)]. Pain was the most frequent indication for NSAIDs use [29/51 patients (56.9%)]. Seven patients had positive family history of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection or peptic ulcer, and 12 had associated comorbidities. Twenty-four (47%) out of 51 patients used medication inappropriately. Hematemesis was the most frequent symptom (33.3%). Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastric lesions in 32/51 (62%) patients, duodenal lesions in 17 (33%) and esophageal lesions in 8 (15%). In 10/51 (19.6%) patients, a diagnosis of H. pylori gastritis was made. Forty-eight (94%) patients underwent medical therapy, with spontaneous bleeding resolution, while in 3/51 (6%) patients, an endoscopic hemostasis was needed. CONCLUSION: The data collected in this study confirms that adverse events with the involvement of the gastrointestinal tract secondary to NSAID use are also common in children PMID:26855547

  8. Platelet function tests, independent of platelet count, are associated with bleeding severity in ITP

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Rachael F.; Gerrits, Anja J.; Berny-Lang, Michelle A.; Brown, Travis; Carmichael, Sabrina L.; Neufeld, Ellis J.; Michelson, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients with similarly low platelet counts differ in their tendency to bleed. To determine if differences in platelet function in ITP patients account for this variation in bleeding tendency, we conducted a single-center, cross-sectional study of pediatric patients with ITP. Bleeding severity (assessed by standardized bleeding score) and platelet function (assessed by whole blood flow cytometry) with and without agonist stimulation was evaluated in 57 ITP patients (median age, 9.9 years). After adjustment for platelet count, higher levels of thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP)-stimulated percent P-selectin- and activated glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa–positive platelets were significantly associated with a lower bleeding score, whereas higher levels of immature platelet fraction (IPF), TRAP-stimulated platelet surface CD42b, unstimulated platelet surface P-selectin, and platelet forward light scatter (FSC) were associated with a higher bleeding score. Thus, platelet function tests related to platelet age (IPF, FSC) and activation through the protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) thrombin receptor (TRAP-stimulated P-selectin, activated GPIIb-IIIa, and CD42b), independent of platelet count, are associated with concurrent bleeding severity in ITP. These tests may be useful markers of future bleeding risk in ITP. PMID:26138687

  9. Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... NY: McGraw-Hill; 2004:chap 251. Lammers RL. Principles of wound management. In: Roberts JR, Hedges JR, eds. Roberts: Clinical ... 2009:chap 39. Simon BC, Hern HG. Wound management principles. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  10. Bleed fastness of fluorescent whitening agents in mass whitened paper.

    PubMed

    Anders, G; Flubacher, M

    1975-01-01

    Paper samples mass whitened with fluorescent whiteing agents (FWAs) of three different types (di-, tetra-, and hexasulfonated derivatives of 4,4'-diaminostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid) were examined for bleed fastness in five different eluents. Fluorescece intensity was measured by a sensitive spectrofluorimetric technique instead of the usual visual assessment. The degree of bleed obtained from each of the FWAs tested was less than 0.4mg/600 cm2 of paper surface area. The FWAs were applied at a normal concentration of use i.e. 0.05% active substance. FWAs with a high degree of sulfonation tend to bleed in aqueous solvents, and those with a lower degree of sulfonation in alcohol solutions. In aqueous acid solutions the degree of bleed was very low in all cases (0.04 mg/600 cm2 of paper surface area). In fatty solutions there was no bleed at all. The limit of detection was 3mug/600 cm2 of paper surface area, with an accuracy of +/-15%. PMID:1064530

  11. Psychological factors in patients with peptic ulcerand functional dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    Faramarzi, Mahbobeh; Kheirkhah, Farzan; Shokri-Shirvani, Javad; Mosavi, Shokofeh; Zarini, Soroush

    2014-01-01

    Background: The role of psychological factors in peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and functional dyspepsia (FD) has not been clearly determined. In this study the role of conflict management styles, psychiatric symptoms, and alexithymia were assessed in patients with PUD and FD and in the healthy individuals. Methods: Ninety subjects [30 PUD (15 women, 15 men), 30 FD (15 women, 15 men), and 30 healthy individuals (15 women, 15 men)] in two endoscopy wards of Babol University of Medical Sciences were evaluated. Three groups were matched with regard to demographic variables. Conflict management styles, psychiatric symptoms, and alexithymia were evaluated by appropriate questionnaires. Results: The patients with PUD reported less mean scores on psychiatric symptoms than the FD patients (depression 12.6±7.5 vs 28±9.5, anxiety 8.2±5.9 vs 18.7±6. obsessive-compulsive disorder 15.7±7.5 vs 21.8±8.4, interpersonal sensitivity 9.5±7.4 vs 16±7, psychoticism 8.03±4.5 vs 14.3±6.3, somatization 12.5±10.8 vs 20.7±8.1, and the total score of psychiatric symptoms 94.4±49.9 vs 160.1±46.6). The mean scores use of unconstructive conflict management styles in PUD patients were lower than FD (dominating 17.7±3.5 vs 20.2±2.7, avoiding 17.5±3 vs 23.8±4.4). Alexithymia symptoms were higher in FD patients than PUD individuals (difficulty in identifying feelings 23.5±6.3 vs 27.8±3.9, difficulty in describing feeling 16.5±4.4 vs 17.3±3.6). The PUD and FD patients had higher scores regarding these variables than the healthy subjects. Conclusion: The results show that both PUD and FD patients experienced more psychiatric symptoms, unconstructive conflict management styles, and alexithymia than the healthy subjects. FD patients had worse psychiatric problems than PUD. PMID:24778780

  12. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis and Gastrointestinal Bleeding: What a Surgeon Should Know

    PubMed Central

    Popeskou, S.; Gavillet, M.; Demartines, N.; Christoforidis, D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents to the surgical community an unusual and often ignored cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. Hemophagocytic syndrome or hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare medical entity characterized by phagocytosis of red blood cells, leucocytes, platelets, and their precursors in the bone marrow by activated macrophages. When intestinal bleeding is present, the management is very challenging with extremely high mortality rates. Early diagnosis and treatment seem to be the most important factors for a successful outcome. We present two cases and review another 18 from the literature. PMID:26199785

  13. Visceral Kaposi's Sarcoma Presenting as Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Naomi; McKenzie, Devon; Fonseca, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Since the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the incidence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome- (AIDS-) related Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) has decreased dramatically. While cutaneous KS is the most common and well-known manifestation, knowledge of alternative sites such as the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is important. GI-KS is particularly dangerous because of its potential for serious complications including perforation, obstruction, or bleeding. We report a rare case of GI-KS presenting as upper GI bleeding in a human immunodeficiency virus- (HIV-) infected transgendered individual. Prompt diagnosis and early initiation of therapy are the cornerstones for management of this potentially severe disease. PMID:26064706

  14. Neonatal uterine bleeding as antecedent of pelvic endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Brosens, Ivo; Brosens, Jan; Benagiano, Giuseppe

    2013-11-01

    We elaborate on a new theory to explain pelvic endometriosis, including endometriosis in premenarcheal girls, based on the finding that the neonatal endometrium can display secretory activity immediately after birth and, in some cases, changes analogous to those seen at menstruation in adults. The neonatal uterus is therefore capable of shedding its endometrium. Indeed, occult vaginal bleeding occurs in a majority of neonates, although overt bleeding is estimated to occur in only 5% of neonates. This may be due to functional plugging of the endocervical canal in the neonate, which in turn would promote retrograde flux of endometrial cells contained in menstrual debris. Ectopic endometrial implantation in a newborn with hydrometrocolpos has been documented. These data, coupled with the observation of a significantly increased risk of endometriosis in adolescents with cervical outflow obstruction and patent Fallopian tubes, indicate that endometriosis, especially in children and young adolescents, may originate from retrograde uterine bleeding soon after birth. PMID:24048011

  15. Acquired antiprothrombin antibodies: an unusual cause of bleeding.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Cristiana; Viveiro, Carolina; Maia, Paulo; Rezende, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Acquired inhibitors of coagulation causing bleeding manifestations are rare in children. They emerge, normally in the context of autoimmune diseases or drug ingestion, but transient and self-limiting cases can occur after viral infection. We describe, an otherwise healthy, 7-year-old girl who had gingival bleeding after a tooth extraction. The prothrombin time (PT) and the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were both prolonged with evidence of an immediate acting inhibitor (lupic anticoagulant). Further coagulation studies demonstrated prothrombin (FII) deficiency and prothrombin directed (FII) antibodies. The serological tests to detect an underlying autoimmune disease were all negative. The coagulation studies normalised alongside the disappearance of the antibody. This article presents lupus anticoagulant hypoprothrombinaemia syndrome (LAHS) as a rare case of acquired bleeding diathesis in childhood. PMID:23299692

  16. Massive Bleeding and Massive Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Meißner, Andreas; Schlenke, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Massive bleeding in trauma patients is a serious challenge for all clinicians, and an interdisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic approach is warranted within a limited time frame. Massive transfusion usually is defined as the transfusion of more than 10 units of packed red blood cells (RBCs) within 24 h or a corresponding blood loss of more than 1- to 1.5-fold of the body's entire blood volume. Especially male trauma patients experience this life-threatening condition within their productive years of life. An important parameter for clinical outcome is to succeed in stopping the bleeding preferentially within the first 12 h of hospital admission. Additional coagulopathy in the initial phase is induced by trauma itself and aggravated by consumption and dilution of clotting factors. Although different aspects have to be taken into consideration when viewing at bleedings induced by trauma compared to those caused by major surgery, the basic strategy is similar. Here, we will focus on trauma-induced massive hemorrhage. Currently there are no definite, worldwide accepted algorithms for blood transfusion and strategies for optimal coagulation management. There is increasing evidence that a higher ratio of plasma and RBCs (e.g. 1:1) endorsed by platelet transfusion might result in a superior survival of patients at risk for trauma-induced coagulopathy. Several strategies have been evolved in the military environment, although not all strategies should be transferred unproven to civilian practice, e.g. the transfusion of whole blood. Several agents have been proposed to support the restoration of coagulation. Some have been used for years without any doubt on their benefit-to-risk profile, whereas great enthusiasm of other products has been discouraged by inefficacy in terms of blood transfusion requirements and mortality or significant severe side effects. This review surveys current literature on fluid resuscitation, blood transfusion, and hemostatic agents currently

  17. Diagnosis of heavy menstrual bleeding.

    PubMed

    Herman, Malou C; Mol, Ben W; Bongers, Marlies Y

    2016-01-01

    Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) is an important health problem. This paper gives an overview of the diagnosis of HMB. For each woman, a thorough history should be taken as one should ascertain whether there are underlying factors that could cause complaints of HMB. Objectively knowing whether or not the blood loss is excessive could also be very beneficial. The pictorial blood assessment chart score can help with diagnosis. Physical examination starts with standard gynecological examination. Imaging tests are widely used in the work-up for women with HMB. The first step in imaging tests should be the transvaginal ultrasound. Other diagnostic tests should only be performed when indicated. PMID:26696006

  18. Acute Upper Gastro-Intestinal Bleeding in Morocco: What Have Changed?

    PubMed Central

    Timraz, A.; Khannoussi, W.; Ajana, F. Z.; Essamri, W.; Benelbarhdadi, I.; Afifi, R.; Benazzouz, M.; Essaid, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. In the present study, we aimed to investigate epidemiological, clinical, and etiological characteristics of acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study was conducted between January 2003 and December 2008. It concerned all cases of acute upper gastroduodenal bleeding benefited from an urgent gastro-intestinal endoscopy in our department in Morocco. Characteristics of patients were evaluated in terms of age, gender, medical history, presenting symptoms, results of rectal and clinical examinations, and endoscopy findings. Results. 1389 cases were registered. As 66% of the patients were male, 34% were female. Mean age was 49. 12% of patients had a history of previous hemorrhage, and 26% had a history of NSAID and aspirin use. Endoscopy was performed in 96%. The gastroduodenal ulcer was the main etiology in 38%, followed by gastritis and duodenitis in 32.5%. Conclusion. AUGIB is still a frequent pathology, threatening patients' life. NSAID and aspirin are still the major risk factors. Their impact due to peptic ulcer remains stable in our country. PMID:21991509

  19. AN UNUSUAL CAUSE OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING.

    PubMed

    Ali, Kishwar; Zarin, Muhammad; Latif, Humera

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal haemorrhage (GI) is a serious condition that presents both diagnostic as well as therapeutic challenges. Resuscitation of the patient is the first and most important step in its management followed by measures to localize and treat the exact source and site of bleeding. These modalities are upper and lower GI endoscopies, radionuclide imaging and angiography. Surgery is the last resort to handle the situation, if the patient does not respond to resuscitative measures and the various interventional procedures fail to locate and stop the bleeding. We present a case of upper GI bleeding which presented with massive per rectal bleeding and the patient was not responding to resuscitation with multiple blood transfusions. Ultimately an exploratory laparotomy was done which revealed an extra-intestinal source of bleeding into the lumen of duodenum, presenting as upper GI bleeding. PMID:26721047

  20. Evaluation of combined famotidine with quercetin for the treatment of peptic ulcer: in vivo animal study

    PubMed Central

    Abourehab, Mohammed AS; Khaled, Khaled A; Sarhan, Hatem AA; Ahmed, Osama AA

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare a combined drug dosage form of famotidine (FAM) and quercetin (QRT) to augment treatment of gastric ulcer. FAM was prepared as freeze-dried floating alginate beads using ion gelation method and then coated with Eudragit RL100 to sustain FAM release. QRT was prepared as solid dispersion with polyvinyl pyrrolidone K30 to improve its solubility. Photo images and scanning electron microscope images of the prepared beads were carried out to detect floating behavior and to reveal surface and core shape of the prepared beads. Anti-ulcerogenic effect and histopathological examination of gastric tissues were carried out to investigate the effect of the combined drug formulation compared with commercial FAM tablets and FAM beads. Gastric glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase, catalase, tissue myeloperoxidase, and lipid peroxidation enzyme activities and levels in rat stomach tissues were also determined. Results revealed that spherical beads were formed with an average diameter of 1.64±0.33 mm. They floated immediately with no lag time before floating, and remained buoyant throughout the test period. Treatment with a combination of FAM beads plus QRT showed the absence of any signs of inflammation or hemorrhage, and significantly prevented the indomethacin-induced decrease in GSH levels (P<0.05) with regain of normal GSH gastric tissue levels. Also, there was a significant difference in the decrease of malondialdehyde level compared to FAM commercial tablets or beads alone (P<0.05). The combined formula significantly improved the myeloperoxidase level compared to both the disease control group and commercial FAM tablet-treated group (P<0.05). Formulation of FAM as floating beads in combination with solid dispersion of QRT improved the anti-ulcer activity compared to commercially available tablets, which reveals a promising application for treatment of peptic ulcer. PMID:25926722

  1. Evaluation of combined famotidine with quercetin for the treatment of peptic ulcer: in vivo animal study.

    PubMed

    Abourehab, Mohammed A S; Khaled, Khaled A; Sarhan, Hatem A A; Ahmed, Osama A A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare a combined drug dosage form of famotidine (FAM) and quercetin (QRT) to augment treatment of gastric ulcer. FAM was prepared as freeze-dried floating alginate beads using ion gelation method and then coated with Eudragit RL100 to sustain FAM release. QRT was prepared as solid dispersion with polyvinyl pyrrolidone K30 to improve its solubility. Photo images and scanning electron microscope images of the prepared beads were carried out to detect floating behavior and to reveal surface and core shape of the prepared beads. Anti-ulcerogenic effect and histopathological examination of gastric tissues were carried out to investigate the effect of the combined drug formulation compared with commercial FAM tablets and FAM beads. Gastric glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase, catalase, tissue myeloperoxidase, and lipid peroxidation enzyme activities and levels in rat stomach tissues were also determined. Results revealed that spherical beads were formed with an average diameter of 1.64±0.33 mm. They floated immediately with no lag time before floating, and remained buoyant throughout the test period. Treatment with a combination of FAM beads plus QRT showed the absence of any signs of inflammation or hemorrhage, and significantly prevented the indomethacin-induced decrease in GSH levels (P<0.05) with regain of normal GSH gastric tissue levels. Also, there was a significant difference in the decrease of malondialdehyde level compared to FAM commercial tablets or beads alone (P<0.05). The combined formula significantly improved the myeloperoxidase level compared to both the disease control group and commercial FAM tablet-treated group (P<0.05). Formulation of FAM as floating beads in combination with solid dispersion of QRT improved the anti-ulcer activity compared to commercially available tablets, which reveals a promising application for treatment of peptic ulcer. PMID:25926722

  2. Evaluation of technetium-99m DTPA for localization of site of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Mahajan, K.K.; Ericsson, S.; Nawaz, K.; Owunwanne, A.; Kouris, K.; Higazy, E.; Awdeh, M.

    1986-11-01

    Intravenous Tc-99m DTPA was evaluated in 34 patients with active upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Active bleeding was detected in 25 patients: nine in the stomach, 12 in the duodenum, and four from esophageal varices. No active bleeding was seen in nine patients (two gastric ulcers and seven duodenal ulcers). Results were correlated with endoscopic and/or surgical findings. All completely correlated except: 1) one case of esophageal varices in which there was disagreement on the site, 2) three cases of duodenal ulcers that were not bleeding on endoscopy but showed mild oozing on delayed images and 3) one case of gastric ulcer, in which no bleeding was detected in the Tc-99m DTPA study, but was found to be bleeding at surgery 24 hours later. The Tc-99m DTPA study is a reliable method for localization of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with an agreement ratio of 85%. This method also can be used safely for follow-up of patients with intermittent bleeding. It is less invasive than endoscopy, is easily repeatable, and has the same accuracy.

  3. Prognostic Factors in Peptic Ulcer Perforations: A Retrospective 14-Year Study

    PubMed Central

    Unver, Mutlu; Fırat, Özgür; Ünalp, Ömer Vedat; Uğuz, Alper; Gümüş, Tufan; Sezer, Taylan Özgür; Öztürk, Şafak; Yoldaş, Tayfun; Ersin, Sinan; Güler, Adem

    2015-01-01

    Regarding the complications of peptic ulcer, a perforation remains the most important fatal complication. The aim of our retrospective study was to determine relations between postoperative morbidity and comorbid disease or perioperative risk factors in perforated peptic ulcer. In total, 239 patients who underwent emergency surgery for perforated peptic ulcer in Ege University General Surgery Department, between June 1999 and May 2013 were included in this study. The clinical data concerning the patient characteristics, operative methods, and complications were collected retrospectively. One hundred seventy-five of the 239 patients were male (73.2%) and 64 were female (26.8%). Mean American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score was 1 in the patients without morbidity, but mean ASA score was 3 in the morbidity and mortality groups. Primary suture and omentoplasty was the selected procedure in 228 of the patients. Eleven patients underwent resection. In total, 105 patients (43.9%) had comorbidities. Thirty-seven patients (67.3%) in the morbidity group had comorbid diseases. Thirteen (92.9%) patients in the mortality group had comorbid diseases. Perforation as a complication of peptic ulcer disease still remains among the frequent indications of urgent abdominal surgery. Among the analyzed parameters, age, ASA score, and having comorbid disease were found to have an effect on both mortality and morbidity. The controversial subject in the present study is regarding the duration of symptoms. The duration of symptoms had no effect on mortality nor morbidity in our study. PMID:26011220

  4. [Diagnosis and therapy of bleeding in ENT].

    PubMed

    Schulz, T; Eßer, D

    2013-12-01

    Bleeding in the oral cavity, nose or ear are common events in the daily routine of ENT specialists. Apart from trivial cases that often get outpatient treatment, there are numerous cases of serious bleeding that require stationary treatment and if necessary, an operative or interventional therapy. In the following section the most frequent types of bleeding, their diagnosis and therapy will be explained. PMID:24285208

  5. Swallowable fluorometric capsule for wireless triage of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Nemiroski, A; Ryou, M; Thompson, C C; Westervelt, R M

    2015-12-01

    Real-time detection of gastrointestinal bleeding remains a major challenge because there does not yet exist a minimally invasive technology that can both i) monitor for blood from an active hemorrhage and ii) uniquely distinguish it from blood left over from an inactive hemorrhage. Such a device would be an important tool for clinical triage. One promising solution, which we have proposed previously, is to inject a fluorescent dye into the blood stream and to use it as a distinctive marker of active bleeding by monitoring leakage into the gastrointestinal tract with a wireless fluorometer. This paper reports, for the first time to our knowledge, the development of a swallowable, wireless capsule with a built-in fluorometer capable of detecting fluorescein in blood, and intended for monitoring gastrointestinal bleeding in the stomach. The embedded, compact fluorometer uses pinholes to define a microliter sensing volume and to eliminate bulky optical components. The proof-of-concept capsule integrates optics, low-noise analog sensing electronics, a microcontroller, battery, and low power Zigbee radio, all into a cylindrical package measuring 11 mm × 27 mm and weighing 10 g. Bench-top experiments demonstrate wireless fluorometry with a limit-of-detection of 20 nM aqueous fluorescein. This device represents a major step towards a technology that would enable simple, rapid detection of active gastrointestinal bleeding, a capability that would save precious time and resources and, ultimately, reduce complications in patients. PMID:26490455

  6. Gadofosveset trisodium-enhanced MR angiography for detection of lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Robert F; Browne, William F; Khanna, Lauren G; Prince, Martin R; Hecht, Elizabeth M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to determine if Gadofosveset trisodium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) could be used for detection and localization of acute lower gastrointestinal (LGI) bleed. Four patients underwent MRA (4 females, mean age of 65 years) for suspected LGI bleeding. MRA detected an active rectal bleed in one patient. All other patients did not demonstrate active bleeding and these true negatives were confirmed by computed tomography angiography, endoscopy, and tagged-red blood cell scan or digital subtraction angiography. Preliminary results suggest that MRA may serve as an alternative technique for detecting acute LGI bleeding when nuclear scintigraphy is unavailable or in the younger radiosensitive population but further investigation in a larger cohort is required. PMID:26355018

  7. Small bowel bleeding: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Gunjan, Deepak; Sharma, Vishal; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2014-01-01

    The small intestine is an uncommon site of gastro-intestinal (GI) bleeding; however it is the commonest cause of obscure GI bleeding. It may require multiple blood transfusions, diagnostic procedures and repeated hospitalizations. Angiodysplasia is the commonest cause of obscure GI bleeding, particularly in the elderly. Inflammatory lesions and tumours are the usual causes of small intestinal bleeding in younger patients. Capsule endoscopy and deep enteroscopy have improved our ability to investigate small bowel bleeds. Deep enteroscopy has also an added advantage of therapeutic potential. Computed tomography is helpful in identifying extra-intestinal lesions. In cases of difficult diagnosis, surgery and intra-operative enteroscopy can help with diagnosis and management. The treatment is dependent upon the aetiology of the bleed. An overt bleed requires aggressive resuscitation and immediate localisation of the lesion for institution of appropriate therapy. Small bowel bleeding can be managed by conservative, radiological, pharmacological, endoscopic and surgical methods, depending upon indications, expertise and availability. Some patients, especially those with multiple vascular lesions, can re-bleed even after appropriate treatment and pose difficult challenge to the treating physician. PMID:24874805

  8. Serendipity in scintigraphic gastrointestinal bleeding studies

    SciTech Connect

    Goergen, T.G.

    1983-09-01

    A retrospective review of 80 scintigraphic bleeding studies performed with Tc-99m sulfur colloid or Tc-99m labeled red blood cells showed five cases where there were abnormal findings not related to bleeding. In some cases, the abnormalities were initially confused with bleeding or could obscure an area of bleeding, while in other cases, the abnormalities represented additional clinical information. These included bone marrow replacement related to tumor and radiation therapy, hyperemia related to a uterine leiomyoma and a diverticular abscess, and a dilated abdominal aorta (aneurysm). Recognition of such abnormalities should prevent an erroneous diagnosis and the additional information may be of clinical value.

  9. [New therapeutical options for heavy gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Braun, Georg; Messmann, Helmut

    2015-06-01

    The number of patients taking new oral anticoagulants is rising, so is the number of serious bleeding events. In severe bleeding, the decision to start a procoagulant therapy is difficult to take. With Idarucizumab and Andexanet Alfa, specific antidotes have been developed against both, direct thrombin inhibitors as well as direct Factor Xa inhibitors. In the endoscopic treatment of severe gastrointestinal bleeding, alternative treatment options are available with Hemospray™, Endoclot™ and new hemostasis clips. Especially in the recurrent ulcer bleeding, the newly developed clips can achieve hemostasis and prevent an operational procedure. PMID:26069913

  10. Cyclical rectal bleeding in colorectal endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Levitt, M D; Hodby, K J; van Merwyk, A J; Glancy, R J

    1989-12-01

    Three case reports of cyclical rectal bleeding in endometriosis affecting rectum and sigmoid colon emphasize the close relationship between such cyclical bleeding and intestinal endometriosis. The cause of bleeding, however, is still unclear. The predilection of endometriotic deposits for the outer layers of the bowel wall suggests that mucosal involvement is not a prerequisite for rectal bleeding. The frequent absence of identifiable intramural haemorrhage casts doubt on the premise that intestinal endometriotic deposits 'menstruate'. The cause may simply be a transient tear in normal mucosa due to swelling of an underlying endometriotic deposit at the time of menstruation. PMID:2597100

  11. Initial failure of angiography to demonstrate a bleeding pancreatic cancer: a case for provocative agents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, FYJ; Lai, PBS; Chong, KL

    2001-01-01

    Background Mesenteric angiography is commonly employed in the modern-day investigation of gastro-intestinal bleeding if the bleeding sites cannot be identified by endoscopic means. Angiography is optimally sensitive in the presence of active bleeding. However, vasospasm may occasionally account for a negative study shortly after bleeding. Case outline A 70-year-old lady with inoperable carcinoma of the pancreas presented with gastro-intestinal bleeding. Although upper endoscopy visualised active bleeding from the tumour, which had invaded into the duodenum, haemostasis could not be achieved endoscopically. Therefore, mesenteric angiography was arranged. Results The initial angiography failed to demonstrate the bleeding site, which only became obvious on a repeat study, when embolisation was performed to achieve haemostasis. Discussion Vasospasm probably accounted for the initial negative study, as the second angiography was able to demonstrate contrast extravasation without the use of any anticoagulant or thrombolytic agent. It is not our routine to give pharmacological agents to provoke bleeding after a negative angiography, but for selected patients this manoeuvre may turn out to be more cost-effective. PMID:18333021

  12. Platelet Function Tests in Bleeding Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Riitta

    2016-04-01

    Functional disorders of platelets can involve any aspect of platelet physiology, with many different effects or outcomes. These include platelet numbers (thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia); changes in platelet production or destruction, or capture to the liver (Ashwell receptor); altered adhesion to vascular injury sites and/or influence on hemostasis and wound healing; and altered activation or receptor functions, shape change, spreading and release reactions, procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activity. Procoagulant membrane alterations, and generation of thrombin and fibrin, also affect platelet aggregation. The above parameters can all be studied, but standardization and quality control of assay methods have been limited despite several efforts. Only after a comprehensive clinical bleeding assessment, including family history, information on drug use affecting platelets, and exclusion of coagulation factor, and tissue deficits, should platelet function testing be undertaken to confirm an abnormality. Current diagnostic tools include blood cell counts, platelet characteristics according to the cell counter parameters, peripheral blood smear, exclusion of pseudothrombocytopenia, whole blood aggregometry (WBA) or light transmission aggregometry (LTA) in platelet-rich plasma, luminescence, platelet function analysis (PFA-100) for platelet adhesion and deposition to collagen cartridges under blood flow, and finally transmission electron microscopy to exclude rare structural defects leading to functional deficits. The most validated test panels are included in WBA, LTA, and PFA. Because platelets are isolated from their natural environment, many simplifications occur, as circulating blood and interaction with vascular wall are omitted in these assays. The target to reach a highly specific platelet disorder diagnosis in routine clinical management can be exhaustive, unless needed for genetic counseling. The elective overall assessment of platelet function disorder

  13. Obstetric management of adolescents with bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    James, Andra H

    2010-12-01

    Adolescents with bleeding disorders who become pregnant must contend with the dual challenges of their bleeding disorder and their pregnancy. Adolescents are more likely to terminate a pregnancy than adult women, and when they do carry a pregnancy, they are more likely to deliver prematurely. Otherwise, they are at risk for the same complications that adult women with bleeding disorders experience, particularly bleeding complications postpartum. Since one half to two thirds of adolescent pregnancies are unplanned, issues related to reproduction should be addressed during routine visits with the pediatrician, hematologist or gynecologist. Girls who are at risk of being carriers for hemophilia A and B, severe von Willebrand disease, and other severe bleeding disorders should have their bleeding disorder status determined before they become pregnant. During pregnancy, a plan should be established to ensure that both mother and fetus deliver safely. Young women at risk for severe bleeding or at risk of having a severely affected infant should be referred for prenatal care and delivery to a center where, in addition to specialists in high-risk obstetrics, there is a hemophilia treatment center or a hematologist with expertise in hemostasis. Prior to delivery or any invasive procedures, young women at risk for severe bleeding should receive prophylaxis. Since administration of desmopressin may result in hyponatremia, whenever available, virally inactivated or recombinant clotting factor concentrates should be used for replacement as opposed to fresh frozen plasma or cryoprecipitate. PMID:20934895

  14. Bleeding duodenal lipoma treated with endoscopic polypectomy.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Harish K; Suresh, Chigamthara C; Alexander, Kadakketh G; Neena, Mampallay

    2008-01-01

    Duodenal lipomas are relatively uncommon and are rarely a source of severe upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. We report the case of a 70-year-old woman who presented with significant upper GI bleed due to a large bleeding duodenal lipoma that was successfully treated by endoscopic polypectomy. PMID:19115610

  15. Persistent Bleeding After Laparoscopic Supracervical Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cholkeri-Singh, Aarathi; Sulo, Suela; Miller, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: In our clinical experience, there seemed to be a correlation between cervical stump bleeding and adenomyosis. Therefore, we wanted to conduct a study to determine whether there was an actual correlation and to identify other risk factors for persistent bleeding after a laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy. Methods: The study included women who underwent laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy from January 1, 2003, through December 31, 2012. Data were collected on age, postmenopausal status, body mass index (BMI), uterine weight, indication for hysterectomy, concomitant bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO), presence of endometriosis, surgical ablation of the endocervix, adenomyosis, presence of endocervix in the specimen, and postoperative bleeding. Results: The study included 256 patients, of whom 187 had no postoperative bleeding after the operation, 40 had bleeding within 12 weeks, and 29 had bleeding after 12 weeks. The 3 groups were comparable in BMI, postmenopausal status, uterine weight, indication for hysterectomy, BSO, surgical ablation of the endocervix, adenomyosis, and the presence of endocervix. However, patients who had postoperative bleeding at more than 12 weeks were significantly younger (P = .002) and had a higher rate of endometriosis (P < .001). Conclusions: Risks factors for postoperative bleeding from the cervical stump include a younger age at the time of hysterectomy and the presence of endometriosis. Therefore, younger patients and those with endometriosis who desire to have no further vaginal bleeding may benefit from total hysterectomy over supracervical hysterectomy. All patients who are undergoing supracervical hysterectomy should be counseled about the possible alternatives, benefits, and risks, including continued vaginal bleeding from the cervical stump and the possibility of requiring future treatment and procedures. PMID:25516706

  16. Bleeding Risk Index in an Anticoagulation Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Aspinall, Sherrie L; DeSanzo, Beth E; Trilli, Lauren E; Good, Chester B

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Outpatient Bleeding Risk Index (BRI) prospectively classified patients who were at high, intermediate, or low risk for warfarin-related major bleeding. However, there are only 2 published validation studies of the index and neither included veterans. OBJECTIVE To determine the accuracy of the BRI in patients attending a Veterans Affairs (VA) anticoagulation clinic and to specifically evaluate the accuracy of the BRI in patients with atrial fibrillation. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. PATIENTS AND MEASUREMENTS Using the BRI, all patients managed by the Anticoagulation Clinic between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2002 were classified as high, intermediate, or low risk for major bleeding. Bleeds were identified via quality-assurance reports. Poisson regression was used to determine whether there was an association between the index and the development of bleeding. RESULTS The rate of major bleeding was 10.6%, 2.5%, and 0.8% per patient-year of warfarin in the high-, intermediate-, and low-risk groups, respectively. Patients in the high-risk category had 14 times the rate of major bleeding of those in the low-risk group (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 14; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.9 to 104.7). The rate of major bleeding was significantly different between the high- and intermediate-risk categories (P<.001). Among those with atrial fibrillation, patients in the high-risk category had 6 times the major bleeding rate of those in the intermediate- and low-risk groups combined (IRR=6; 95% CI, 2.4 to 15.3). CONCLUSIONS The BRI discriminates between high- and intermediate-risk patients in a VA anticoagulation clinic, including those with atrial fibrillation. PMID:16307625

  17. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding: etiology and management.

    PubMed

    Arora, N K; Ganguly, S; Mathur, P; Ahuja, A; Patwari, A

    2002-02-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a potentially fatal condition at times due to loss of large volumes of blood. Common sources of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in children include mucosal lesions and variceal hemorrhage (most commonly extra hepatic portal venous obstruction) and, in intensive care settings infections and drugs are other etiological factors associated with bleeding. Massive upper GI bleeding is life threatening and requires immediate resuscitation measures in the form of protection of the airways, oxygen administration, immediate volume replacement with ringer lactate or normal saline, transfusion of whole blood or packed cells and also monitoring the adequacy of volume replacement by central venous lines and urine output. Upper GI endoscopy is an effective initial diagnostic modality to localize the site and cause of bleeding in almost 85-90% of patients. Antacids supplemented by H2- receptor antagonists, proton pump inhibitors and sucralfate are the mainstay in the treatment of bleeding from mucosal lesion. For variceal bleeds, emergency endoscopy is the treatment of choice after initial haemodynamic stabilization of patient. If facilities for endoscopic sclerotherapy (EST) are not available, pharmacotherapy which decreases the portal pressure is almost equally effective and should be resorted to. Shunt surgery is reserved for patients who do not respond to the above therapy. Beta blockers combined with sclerotherapy have been shown to be the most effective therapy in significantly reducing the risk of recurrent rebleeding from varices as well as the death rates, as compared to any other modality of treatment. Based on studies among adult patients, presence of shock, co-morbidities, underlying diagnosis, presence of stigmata of recent hemorrhage on endoscopy and rebleeding are independent risk factors for mortality due to upper GI bleeding. Rebleeding is more likely to occur if the patient has hematemesis, liver disease, coagulopathy

  18. Resuscitation of Polytrauma Patients: The Management of Massive Skeletal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Guerado, Enrique; Bertrand, Maria Luisa; Valdes, Luis; Cruz, Encarnacion; Cano, Juan Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The term 'severely injured patient' is often synonymous of polytrauma patient, multiply-injured patient or, in some settings, polyfractured patient. Together with brain trauma, copious bleeding is the most severe complication of polytrauma. Consequently hypotension develop. Then, the perfusion of organs may be compromised, with the risk of organ failure. Treatment of chest bleeding after trauma is essential and is mainly addressed via surgical manoeuvres. As in the case of lesions to the pelvis, abdomen or extremities, this approach demonstrates the application of damage control (DC). The introduction of sonography has dramatically changed the diagnosis and prognosis of abdominal bleeding. In stable patients, a contrast CT-scan should be performed before any x-ray projection, because, in an emergency situation, spinal or pelvic fractures be missed by conventional radiological studies. Fractures or dislocation of the pelvis causing enlargement of the pelvic cavity, provoked by an anteroposterior trauma, and in particular cases presenting vertical instability, are the most severe types and require fast stabilisation by closing the pelvic ring diameter to normal dimensions and by stabilising the vertical shear. Controversy still exists about whether angiography or packing should be used as the first choice to address active bleeding after pelvic ring closure. Pelvic angiography plays a significant complementary role to pelvic packing for final haemorrhage control. Apart from pelvic trauma, fracture of the femur is the only fracture provoking acute life-threatening bleeding. If possible, femur fractures should be immobilised immediately, either by external fixation or by a sheet wrap around both extremities. PMID:26312112

  19. Resuscitation of Polytrauma Patients: The Management of Massive Skeletal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Guerado, Enrique; Bertrand, Maria Luisa; Valdes, Luis; Cruz, Encarnacion; Cano, Juan Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The term ‘severely injured patient’ is often synonymous of polytrauma patient, multiply-injured patient or, in some settings, polyfractured patient. Together with brain trauma, copious bleeding is the most severe complication of polytrauma. Consequently hypotension develop. Then, the perfusion of organs may be compromised, with the risk of organ failure. Treatment of chest bleeding after trauma is essential and is mainly addressed via surgical manoeuvres. As in the case of lesions to the pelvis, abdomen or extremities, this approach demonstrates the application of damage control (DC). The introduction of sonography has dramatically changed the diagnosis and prognosis of abdominal bleeding. In stable patients, a contrast CT-scan should be performed before any x-ray projection, because, in an emergency situation, spinal or pelvic fractures be missed by conventional radiological studies. Fractures or dislocation of the pelvis causing enlargement of the pelvic cavity, provoked by an anteroposterior trauma, and in particular cases presenting vertical instability, are the most severe types and require fast stabilisation by closing the pelvic ring diameter to normal dimensions and by stabilising the vertical shear. Controversy still exists about whether angiography or packing should be used as the first choice to address active bleeding after pelvic ring closure. Pelvic angiography plays a significant complementary role to pelvic packing for final haemorrhage control. Apart from pelvic trauma, fracture of the femur is the only fracture provoking acute life-threatening bleeding. If possible, femur fractures should be immobilised immediately, either by external fixation or by a sheet wrap around both extremities. PMID:26312112

  20. [Changes in liver exocrine function after resection of the stomach for peptic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Yusef, M I

    1983-01-01

    Bile components were assayed biochemically in 30 patients at long-term periods after gastric resection for peptic ulcer. The data obtained indicate a considerable drop in the concentration and output of cholic acid and phospholipids in the majority of the patients. The disorders of the concentration and output of cholesterol in both bile portions appeared dissimilar: part of the patients manifested a reduction in the indicators under study, whereas the remaining patients an increase. PMID:6613071

  1. Laparoscopic Repair of Perforated Peptic Ulcer: Outcome and Associated Morbidity and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Alemrajabi, Mahdi; Safari, Saeed; Tizmaghz, Adnan; Alemrajabi, Fatemeh; Shabestanipour, Ghazaal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The mainstay of treatment for perforated peptic ulcer is Omental patch closure. With the advent of laparoscopic surgery, this approach is being used for the treatment of perforated peptic ulcer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of laparoscopy in Firoozgar general hospital over a period of 18 months. The outcome of the laparoscopic approach and the associated morbidity and mortality, operation time, conversion rate and hospital stay were assessed. Methods A prospective analysis of 29 consecutive patients (mean age 37.5 years; 23 men) with perforated peptic ulcers and who had undergone laparoscopic surgery was carried over a period of 18 months from March 2014 until September 2015. Pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative clinical data were collectively analyzed by SPSS 19 for Windows. Results Seventeen patients had a history of cigarette smoking, 11 patients had a history of opium consumption, 19 were chronic NSAID users, 26 had Helicobacter pylori infections, and six had a co-morbid condition. Previous surgical history included laparotomy for pancreatic cancer in two patients, for sigmoid colon cancer in one patient, and for acute appendicitis in four patients. The average operating time for all cases was 47.5 + 20 min. The mean lag time between onset of symptoms and surgery was 20.4 hours. All patients underwent laparoscopic closure of the perforation with Omental patch closure. No morbidity was observed, and none of the patients needed conversion to open surgery. One patient died after 11 months of follow-up due to the progression of underlying pancreatic cancer. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 4.2 days. Conclusions The results of the laparoscopic approach for perforated peptic ulcer were promising, with no conversion to open surgery, no morbidity, and mortality. PMID:27504170

  2. Direct Percutaneous Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, Sailen G.; Castle, Erik P.; Kriegshauser, J. Scott; Huettl, Eric A.

    2010-02-15

    Stomal variceal bleeding can develop in patients with underlying cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Most patients are best treated with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation because this addresses the underlying problem of portal hypertension. However, some patients are not good candidates for TIPS creation because they have end-stage liver disease or encephalopathy. We describe such a patient who presented with recurrent bleeding stomal varices, which was successfully treated with percutaneous coil embolization. The patient had bleeding-free survival for 1 month before death from unrelated causes.

  3. Compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system

    DOEpatents

    Donahoo, Eric E; Ross, Christopher W

    2014-11-25

    A compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine airfoil cooling system to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system may enable cooling fluids to be exhausted from a compressor exhaust plenum through a downstream compressor bleed collection chamber and into the turbine airfoil cooling system. As such, the suction created in the compressor exhaust plenum mitigates boundary layer growth along the inner surface while providing flow of cooling fluids to the turbine airfoils.

  4. A systematic approach for the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic peptic ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chen-Shuan; Chiang, Tsung-Hsien; Lee, Yi-Chia

    2015-01-01

    An idiopathic peptic ulcer is defined as an ulcer with unknown cause or an ulcer that appears to arise spontaneously. The first step in treatment is to exclude common possible causes, including Helicobacter pylori infection, infection with other pathogens, ulcerogenic drugs, and uncommon diseases with upper gastrointestinal manifestations. When all known causes are excluded, a diagnosis of idiopathic peptic ulcer can be made. A patient whose peptic ulcer is idiopathic may have a higher risk for complicated ulcer disease, a poorer response to gastric acid suppressants, and a higher recurrence rate after treatment. Risk factors associated with this disease may include genetic predisposition, older age, chronic mesenteric ischemia, smoking, concomitant diseases, a higher American Society of Anesthesiologists score, and higher stress. Therefore, the diagnosis and management of emerging disease should systematically explore all known causes and treat underlying disease, while including regular endoscopic surveillance to confirm ulcer healing and the use of proton-pump inhibitors on a case-by-case basis. PMID:26354049

  5. [Management of post-coital bleeding: should all women be referred?].

    PubMed

    Dubuisson, Jean; Boukrid, Meriem; Petignat, Patrick

    2013-10-23

    Post-coital bleeding (PCB) is a frequent occurrence in sexually active women. In most cases, bleeding is associated with mild cervical pathology requiring no further specialist advice. In rare cases though, PCB can be the first sign of cervical cancer, in early or advanced stage, and diagnosis and treatment should not be delayed. In the absence of current consensus, we propose to standardize the management of postcoital bleeding through the elaboration of a flow chart based primarily on medical history and a physical examination. The aim is to enable a better identification of patients at risk for cervical cancer and thereby enabling rapid referral to a specialized center. PMID:24245014

  6. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... babies. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Babies often have a low level of vitamin ... Blood clotting tests will be done. The diagnosis is confirmed if a vitamin K shot stops the bleeding ...

  7. CLSM bleed water reduction test results

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.; Rajendran, N.

    1997-04-21

    Previous testing by BSRI/SRTC/Raytheon indicated that the CLSM specified for the Tank 20 closure generates about 6 gallons (23 liters) of bleed water per cubic yard of material (0.76 m3).1 This amount to about 10 percent of the total mixing water. HLWE requested that the CLSM mix be optimized to reduce bleed water while maintaining flow. Elimination of bleed water from the CLSM mix specified for High-Level Waste Tank Closure will result in waste minimization, time savings and cost savings. Over thirty mixes were formulated and evaluated at the on-site Raytheon Test Laboratory. Improved low bleed water CLSM mixes were identified. Results are documented in this report.

  8. Lower GI Bleeding: Epidemiology and Management

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Dennis M.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from the colon is a common reason for hospitalization and is becoming more common in the elderly. While most cases will cease spontaneously, patients with ongoing bleeding or major stigmata of hemorrhage require urgent diagnosis and intervention to achieve definitive hemostasis. Colonoscopy is the primary modality for establishing a diagnosis, risk stratification, and treating some of the most common causes of colonic bleeding, including diverticular hemorrhage which is the etiology in 30 % of cases. Other interventions, including angiography and surgery, are usually reserved for instances of bleeding that cannot be stabilized or allow for adequate bowel preparation for colonoscopy. We discuss the colonoscopic diagnosis, risk stratification, and definitive treatment of colonic hemorrhage in patients presenting with severe hematochezia. PMID:23737154

  9. Systemic causes of excessive uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lusher, J M

    1999-07-01

    In assessing a patient with excessive uterine bleeding, the clinician should consider systemic causes in the differential diagnosis. Both hereditary and acquired conditions can result in mucous membrane bleeding, including menorrhagia, epistaxis, and gum bleeding, as well as excessive bruising. Among hereditary conditions, von Willebrand disease (vWD) is by far the most common, affecting an estimated 1% of the population worldwide. It is important to consider the possibility of vWD, and to establish the proper diagnosis (including subtype), as safe, effective, and easy-to-use treatment is available for most persons with this disorder. This review also covers a number of other systemic conditions that can be manifested by excessive uterine bleeding, including congenital deficiency of factor XI, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and other acquired platelet disorders, acquired autoantibodies against factor VIII (FVIII), and vitamin K deficiency states. PMID:10513767

  10. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding (DUB) (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop AUB. Some illnesses (like thyroid disease or polycystic ovary syndrome ) can mess with the body's hormones. Problems like ... sex. Doctors ask these questions because conditions like polycystic ovary syndrome and some STDs can cause abnormal bleeding. If ...

  11. Genetic analysis of bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Edison, E; Konkle, B A; Goodeve, A C

    2016-07-01

    Molecular genetic analysis of inherited bleeding disorders has been practised for over 30 years. Technological changes have enabled advances, from analyses using extragenic linked markers to next-generation DNA sequencing and microarray analysis. Two approaches for genetic analysis are described, each suiting their environment. The Christian Medical Centre in Vellore, India, uses conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis mutation screening of multiplexed PCR products to identify candidate mutations, followed by Sanger sequencing confirmation of variants identified. Specific analyses for F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions are also undertaken. The MyLifeOurFuture US project between the American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network, the National Hemophilia Foundation, Bloodworks Northwest and Biogen uses molecular inversion probes (MIP) to capture target exons, splice sites plus 5' and 3' sequences and to detect F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions. This allows screening for all F8 and F9 variants in one sequencing run of multiple samples (196 or 392). Sequence variants identified are subsequently confirmed by a diagnostic laboratory. After having identified variants in genes of interest through these processes, a systematic procedure determining their likely pathogenicity should be applied. Several scientific societies have prepared guidelines. Systematic analysis of the available evidence facilitates reproducible scoring of likely pathogenicity. Documentation of frequency in population databases of variant prevalence and in locus-specific mutation databases can provide initial information on likely pathogenicity. Whereas null mutations are often pathogenic, missense and splice site variants often require in silico analyses to predict likely pathogenicity and using an accepted suite of tools can help standardize their documentation. PMID:27405681

  12. Cough-induced Tracheobronchial Mucosal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hira, Harmanjit Singh

    2011-01-01

    A 56-year-old man presented with moderate hemoptysis. It was preceded by a severe bout of cough. Flexible bronchoscopy showed diffuse tracheobronchial mucosal petechiae and bleeding. The patient was not suffering with any coagulopathies. He did not receive antiplatelet drugs. Hemoptysis resolved with cough suppressant. Subsequent bronchoscopy revealed the complete resolution of petechiae. The mechanism of bleeding after the bout of coughing is discussed. PMID:23169019

  13. Engine bleed air reduction in DC-10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, W. H.; Viele, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    An 0.8 percent fuel savings was achieved by a reduction in engine bleed air through the use of cabin air recirculation. The recirculation system was evaluated in revenue service on a DC-10. The cabin remained comfortable with reductions in cabin fresh air (engine bleed air) as much as 50 percent. Flight test verified the predicted fuel saving of 0.8 percent.

  14. Recurrent bleeding of angiomyolipomas in tuberous sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, T; Heindel, W; Vorreuther, R; Engelmann, U; Lackner, K

    1996-01-01

    The diagnostic and therapeutic problems of renal hamartomas are illustrated by a case of recurrence of bleeding angiomyolipomas associated with tuberous sclerosis. Ultrasound and computed tomography provide clear evidence of lipomatous formation while, in rare instances, angiography can demonstrate the existence of multiple vascular tumor compartments. In view of the risk of bleeding, multiple or very large angiomyolipomas should be treated by interventional radiology in the form of superselective tumor embolization or by the most conservative surgery possible. PMID:8903555

  15. [Diagnosis of mild hemophilia A made by massive intraabdominal bleeding in a 13-year-old boy].

    PubMed

    Terao, Yoko; Akiyama, Masaharu; Yokoi, Kentaro; Yamaoka, Masayoshi; Shimizu, Mika; Kato, Yoko; Tanaka, Keiichiro; Baba, Yuji; Kuwashima, Naruo; Ashizuka, Shuichi; Yoshizawa, Jyoji; Motoki, Takanori; Saito, Yoshihiro; Ida, Hiroyuki

    2012-08-01

    We report a 13-year-old boy who had massive intra-abdominal bleeding without a history of bleeding episodes or traumatic cause of bleeding. The patient underwent surgical treatment because bleeding was not controlled after treatment with tranexamic acid and transfusions including fresh-frozen plasma. Bleeding was traced to the lower left lobe of the liver. The mother's side of the family had a history of bleeding episodes in the boy's grandfather, great uncle, and son of a great aunt. A low level of plasma factor VIII coagulant activity (22%) led to a diagnosis of mild hemophilia A. Compared with severe hemophilia, mild hemophilia is more difficult to diagnose because bleeding episodes are less frequent. Most cases are found after incidental trauma or uncontrolled surgery-related bleeding, there is rarely a family history of hemophilia and activated partial thromboplastin time is normal or slightly prolonged. However, bleeding episodes in mild hemophilia may result in excessive, sometimes life-threatening hemorrhage and require early diagnosis and replacement treatment with adequate amounts of factor VIII, as in severe hemophilia. PMID:22975817

  16. Telemetric real-time sensor for the detection of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Schostek, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Melanie; Keller, Jan; Fode, Mario; Melbert, Michael; Schurr, Marc O; Gottwald, Thomas; Prosst, Ruediger L

    2016-04-15

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleedings from ulcers or esophago-gastric varices are life threatening medical conditions which require immediate endoscopic therapy. Despite successful endoscopic hemostasis, there is a significant risk of rebleeding often requiring close surveillance of these patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Any time delay to recognize bleeding may lead to a high blood loss and increases the risk of death. A novel telemetric real-time bleeding sensor can help indicate blood in the stomach: the sensor is swallowed to detect active bleeding or is anchored endoscopically on the gastrointestinal wall close to the potential bleeding source. By telemetric communication with an extra-corporeal receiver, information about the bleeding status is displayed. In this study the novel sensor, which measures characteristic optical properties of blood, has been evaluated in an ex-vivo setting to assess its clinical applicability and usability. Human venous blood of different concentrations, various fluids, and liquid food were tested. The LED-based sensor was able to reliably distinguish between concentrated blood and other liquids, especially red-colored fluids. In addition, the spectrometric quality of the small sensor (size: 6.5mm in diameter, 25.5mm in length) was comparable to a much larger and technically more complex laboratory spectrophotometer. The experimental data confirm the capability of a miniaturized sensor to identify concentrated blood, which could help in the very near future the detection of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and to survey high-risk patients for rebleeding. PMID:26667093

  17. Prevention of bleeding and hemorrhagic complications in surgical patients with inherited factor VII deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wiszniewski, Adam; Szczepanik, Andrzej; Misiak, Andrzej; Bykowska, Ksenia; Szopiński, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    Inherited factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive hemorrhagic disorder. The major clinical symptoms include: bleeding from the oral cavity, epistaxis, menorrhagia, spontaneous hemarthros, bleeding to the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system, and perioperative bleeding. The aim of this study was to present our experience in preventing bleeding and hemorrhagic disorders in surgical patients with inherited FVII deficiency by using recombinant activated FVIIa (rFVIIa), and with prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs). In 2002-2011, 17 patients with inherited FVII deficiency underwent surgery. Thirteen patients had isolated FVII deficiency below 10%, and four patients 10-25. To prevent bleeding and hemorrhagic complications, we administered small single doses of rFVIIa (Novo-Seven) at 12-h intervals to 15 patients on surgery day and on day 1 following surgery, then every 24 h; PCCs were administered (Prothromplex, Beriplex) to two patients. No symptoms of bleeding, hemorrhagic or thromboembolic complications were observed in the perioperative and 1-month observation period in surgical patients treated with rFVIIa. One patient treated with PCC (Prothromplex) developed distal deep vein thrombosis on postoperative day 7. The results suggest that small, single, every 12-h doses of rFVIIa (NovoSeven) and in next days after surgery one time every 24 h are well tolerated and effective for prevention of thromboembolic, bleeding and hemorrhagic complications in FVII-deficient patients. Antithrombotic prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin should be applied in patients using PCCs. PMID:25688458

  18. Scientific evaluation of edible fruits and spices used for the treatment of peptic ulcer in traditional Iranian medicine.

    PubMed

    Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Shams-Ardekani, Mohammad Reza; Abbasabadi, Zahra; Rahimi, Roja

    2013-01-01

    In traditional Iranian medicine (TIM), several edible fruits and spices are thought to have protective and healing effects on peptic ulcer (PU). The present study was conducted to verify anti-PU activity of these remedies. For this purpose, edible fruits and spices proposed for the management of PU in TIM were collected from TIM sources, and they were searched in modern medical databases to find studies that confirmed their efficacy. Findings from modern investigations support the claims of TIM about the efficacy of many fruits and spices in PU. The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica as a beneficial remedy for PU in TIM has been demonstrated to have antioxidant, wound healing, angiogenic, anti-H. pylori, cytoprotective, antisecretory, and anti-inflammatory properties. The fruit of Vitis vinifera has been found to be anti-H. pylori, anti-inflammatory, wound healing, angiogenic, cytoprotective, and antioxidant. The fruit and aril of seed from Myristica fragrans exert their beneficial effects in PU by increasing prostaglandin, modulation of nitric oxide and inflammatory mediators, wound healing, antisecretory, antacid, antioxidant, and anti-H. pylori activities, and improving angiogenesis. Pharmacological and clinical studies for evaluation of efficacy of all TIM fruits and spices in PU and their possible mechanisms of action are recommended. PMID:24066235

  19. Scientific Evaluation of Edible Fruits and Spices Used for the Treatment of Peptic Ulcer in Traditional Iranian Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Shams-Ardekani, Mohammad Reza; Abbasabadi, Zahra; Rahimi, Roja

    2013-01-01

    In traditional Iranian medicine (TIM), several edible fruits and spices are thought to have protective and healing effects on peptic ulcer (PU). The present study was conducted to verify anti-PU activity of these remedies. For this purpose, edible fruits and spices proposed for the management of PU in TIM were collected from TIM sources, and they were searched in modern medical databases to find studies that confirmed their efficacy. Findings from modern investigations support the claims of TIM about the efficacy of many fruits and spices in PU. The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica as a beneficial remedy for PU in TIM has been demonstrated to have antioxidant, wound healing, angiogenic, anti-H. pylori, cytoprotective, antisecretory, and anti-inflammatory properties. The fruit of Vitis vinifera has been found to be anti-H. pylori, anti-inflammatory, wound healing, angiogenic, cytoprotective, and antioxidant. The fruit and aril of seed from Myristica fragrans exert their beneficial effects in PU by increasing prostaglandin, modulation of nitric oxide and inflammatory mediators, wound healing, antisecretory, antacid, antioxidant, and anti-H. pylori activities, and improving angiogenesis. Pharmacological and clinical studies for evaluation of efficacy of all TIM fruits and spices in PU and their possible mechanisms of action are recommended. PMID:24066235

  20. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding: gallstone-induced auto-sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kalipershad, Sujala; Chung, Kin Tong; Jehangir, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    A 67-year-old gentleman with no significant medical history of note presented with sudden onset of epigastric pain, coffee ground vomiting and passing black tarry stool. A series of investigations including blood tests, ultrasound scan, CT abdomen and pelvis with contrast and endoscopy failed to reveal any site of active bleeding. The mystery remained and the patient continued to have upper gastrointestinal bleeding. A second CT abdomen and pelvis with contrast was carried out and showed evidence of contrast extravasation into the duodenum (figure 3). An exploratory laparotomy showed no obvious site of haemorrhage and a loop jejunostomy was performed. The diagnosis of gallstone-induced auto-sphincterotomy was only made, using gastroscope via jejunostomy, when a big gallstone was found in the third part of the duodenum and the papilla was ruptured (figure 5). PMID:22914239

  1. Leukemia following radiotherapy for uterine bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Inskip, P.D.; Monson, R.R.; Wagoner, J.K.; Stovall, M.; Davis, F.G.; Kleinerman, R.A.; Boice, J.D. Jr. )

    1990-05-01

    Mortality due to leukemia among 4483 women treated with radiation to control uterine bleeding between 1925 and 1965 was twice as high as expected based on U.S. population rates (standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 2.0; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.4 to 2.8). Women were followed for an average of 26.4 years. Relative risk was highest 2 to 5 years after treatment (SMR = 8.1) and among women over 55 years at irradiation (SMR = 5.8). The usual method of treatment was intrauterine radium. Average radiation dose to active bone marrow was estimated on the basis of original radiotherapy records (median, 53 cGy). A linear dose-response model provided an adequate fit to the data. The average excess relative risk was 1.9% per cGy (95% CI: 0.8 to 3.2), and the average absolute risk was 2.6 excess leukemia deaths per million women per year per cGy (95% CI: 0.9 to 4.8). Chronic myeloid leukemia predominated during the first 15 years following exposure, whereas acute leukemias and chronic lymphatic leukemia were most common thereafter. The radiation doses experienced during treatment of benign gynecologic disease appear to result in greater leukemia risk per cGy average marrow dose than the considerably higher doses used to treat malignant disease, perhaps because of a decreased likelihood of killing potentially leukemic cells.

  2. Quality laboratory issues in bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Adcock, D M; Mammen, J; Nair, S C; de Lima Montalvão, S A

    2016-07-01

    Selected quality issues pertinent to the determination of accurate results in the haemostasis laboratory are discussed. Specifically, the implementation of a successful external quality-assessment scheme is described, including its impact on result accuracy as well as the programme's unique challenges and opportunities. Errors in the preanalytical phase of laboratory testing represent the greatest source for reporting incorrect test results. Some of the most common preanalytical errors are described including those that necessitate sample rejection. Analytical means to identify potential sources of error and analytical means to overcome particular interferences are described. Representing the most important clinical complication in the treatment of patients with haemophilia, quality issues related to determination of the presence of inhibitory antibodies against factor VIII (FVIII) are reviewed. Heat treatment of patient plasma prior to testing, particularly in patients receiving replacement FVIII concentrate or during induction of immune tolerance to achieve more accurate results is recommended, while screening activated partial thromboplastin time-based mixing tests to rule out inhibitor presence is discouraged. The initiatives presented in this review can be implemented in robust and resource restricted settings to improve the quality of laboratory testing in patients with bleeding disorders. PMID:27405682

  3. Secondary electric power generation with minimum engine bleed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tagge, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    Secondary electric power generation with minimum engine bleed is discussed. Present and future jet engine systems are compared. The role of auxiliary power units is evaluated. Details of secondary electric power generation systems with and without auxiliary power units are given. Advanced bleed systems are compared with minimum bleed systems. A cost model of ownership is given. The difference in the cost of ownership between a minimum bleed system and an advanced bleed system is given.

  4. Intra-arterial administration of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) causes more intracranial bleeding than does intravenous rt-PA in a transient rat middle cerebral artery occlusion model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Intra-arterial (IA) administration of rt-PA for ischemic stroke has the potential for greater thrombolytic efficacy, especially for a large thrombus in the M1 or M2 segment of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is a concern with IA or intravenous (IV) administration especially as the therapeutic window is extended. However, because IA administration delivers a higher local concentration of agent, the incidence and severity of ICH may be greater than with similar doses IV. We investigated the safety of rt-PA administration by IA compared to IV infusion following 6 hours of MCA occlusion (MCAo) with reflow in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Methods Male SHRs were subjected to 6 hours MCAo with 18 hours reflow using a snare ligature model. They were treated with IA saline, IA rt-PA (1, 5, 10, 30 mg/kg), or IV rt-PA (10 and 30 mg/kg) by a 10 to 60 minute infusion beginning approximately 1 minute before reflow. The rats were recovered for 24 hours after MCAo onset at which time Bleeding Score, infarct volume, and Modified Bederson Score were measured. Results Greater hemorrhagic transformation occurred with 10 and 30 mg/kg rt-PA administered IA than IV. The IV 10 mg/kg rt-PA dosage induced significantly less bleeding than did the 1 or 5 mg/kg IA groups. No significant increase in infarct volume was observed after IA or IV treatment. Rats treated with 30 mg/kg rt-PA by either the IA or IV route had greater neurological dysfunction compared to all other groups. Conclusions Administration of rt-PA by the IA route following 6 hours of MCAo results in greater ICH and worse functional recovery than comparable dosages IV. Significantly greater bleeding was observed when the IA dose was a tenth of the IV dose. The increased bleeding did not translate in larger infarct volumes. PMID:21933438

  5. Bleeding and clotting in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Dittus, Christopher; Streiff, Michael; Ansell, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a relatively common inherited vascular disorder that was first described in 1864, and is notable for epistaxis, telangiectasia, and arterial venous malformations. While genetic tests are available, the diagnosis remains clinical, and is based on the Curacao criteria. Patients with HHT are at increased risk for both bleeding and clotting events. Because of these competing complications, hematologists are often faced with difficult clinical decisions. While the majority of management decisions revolve around bleeding complications, it is not infrequent for these patients to require anticoagulation for thrombosis. Any anticoagulation recommendations must take into account the bleeding risks associated with HHT. Recent reviews have found that HHT patients can be safely anticoagulated, with the most frequent complication being worsened epistaxis. Large clinical trials have shown that factor IIa and Xa inhibitors have less intracranial bleeding than warfarin, and basic coagulation research has provided a possible mechanism. This article describes the anticoagulation dilemma posed when a 62-year-old female patient with a history of bleeding events associated with HHT was diagnosed with a pulmonary embolism. The subsequent discussion focuses on the approach to anticoagulation in the HHT patient, and addresses the role of the new oral anticoagulants. PMID:25879004

  6. Bleeding Avoidance Strategies: Consensus and Controversy

    PubMed Central

    Dauerman, Harold L.; Rao, Sunil V.; Resnic, Frederic S.; Applegate, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Bleeding complications after coronary intervention are associated with prolonged hospitalization, increased hospital costs, patient dissatisfaction, morbidity and one year mortality. Bleeding Avoidance Strategies represent a term incorporating multiple modalities that aim to reduce bleeding and vascular complications after cardiovascular catheterization. Recent improvements in the rates of bleeding complications after invasive cardiovascular procedures suggests that the clinical community has successfully embraced specific strategies and improved patient care in this area. There remains controversy regarding the efficacy, safety and/or practicality of 3 key bleeding avoidance strategies for cardiac catheterization and coronary intervention: procedural (radial artery approach, safezone arteriotomy), pharmacologic (multiple agents) and technological (vascular closure devices) approaches to improved access. In this article, we address areas of consensus with respect to selected modalities in order to define the role of each strategy in current practice. Furthermore, we focus on areas of controversy for selected modalities in order to define key areas warranting cautious clinical approaches and the need for future randomized clinical trials in this area. PMID:21700085

  7. NSAIDs and Bleeding in Periodontal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    K, Sharath; Thomas, Biju; Shetty, Nitin; Shetty, Arvind; Shetty, Devanand

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate and compare the clinical effects of ibuprofen and diclofenac sodium on bleeding during periodontal surgery. Materials and Methods: Thirteen medically healthy men and women of mean age 37.5±17.67 (mean age± standard deviation) were selected for the study. All the subjects were divided into three groups: control (C) and test groups (T1) and (T2). Each subject of T1 group and T2 group was given ibuprofen and diclofenac sodium respectively, prior to surgery. Bleeding times of patients were recorded prior to performance of periodontal flap surgical procedures. Results: It was found that there was increased bleeding time and increased peri-operative bleeding when ibuprofen and diclofenac sodium were taken prior to surgery and this was statistically significant. (2.5538 (T1), 1.8385 (T2) versus 1.2385 (C) minute, p= .001) (mean blood loss) and (62.0325 ± 9.0594 (T1), 51.082 ± 9.792 (T2) versus 37.4992 ± 5.99 (C) millilitre, p = .000). Conclusion: The findings of this study suggested that pre-operative administration of ibuprofen and diclofenac sodium could increase bleeding time and peri - operative blood loss. PMID:24995237

  8. An Unsusual Case of Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Guru, Pramod Kumar; Iyer, Vivek N.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 81 Final Diagnosis: Gastrointestinal amyloidosis Symptoms: Gastrointesinal haemorrhage • hypotension Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Endoscopy Specialty: Criitcal Care Medicine Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Amyloidosis is a multisystem disease, and can present with multitude of nonspecific symptoms. Gastrointestinal amyloidosis is common, and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in these patients has a wide differential diagnosis. The present case features the distinctive endoscopic finding of submucosal hematoma as a clue to immunoglobin light chain (AL) amyloid involvement of the gastrointestinal tract. Case Report: An 81-year-old woman with AL amyloidosis was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU) for evaluation of GI bleeding. Prior to the bleeding episode, the patient had undergone paracentesis for management of her ascites related to restrictive cardiomyopathy. Initial evaluation was negative for any intra-abdominal catastrophe related to her recent paracentesis. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was negative for any source of bleeding. However, colonoscopy showed a ruptured submucosal hematoma, which is a rare but classical finding in patients with amyloidosis. The patient was managed conservatively and did not have any further episodes of bleeding in the hospital. She unfortunately died due to her primary illness 6 weeks after discharge from the hospital. Conclusions: The finding of submucosal hematoma on endoscopy is a rare but sentinel sign for amyloidosis involvement in the GI tract. PMID:26979633

  9. [Update on non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2013-10-01

    This article summarizes the main studies in the field of non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding reported in the last American Congress of Gastroenterology (Digestive Disease Week) in 2013. Some of these studies have provided new knowledge and expertise in areas of uncertainty. In this context and among other findings, it has been reported that the administration of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) prior to endoscopy or the early performance of endoscopy-within 6 hours of admission in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) (or colonoscopy within 24 hours in patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding)-does not improve the prognosis of the event. It has also been reported that oral administration of a PPI after endoscopic hemostasis may produce a similar outcome to that of intravenously administered PPI in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). In the field of endoscopic therapy, the use of radiofrequency ablation for antral vascular ectasia is of interest. Regarding UGIB and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), new data confirm the risk of cardiovascular events by stopping treatment with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) after an episode of UGIB, the increased risk of UGIB when associating gastrotoxic drugs, and the need to identify both the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular risks of each NSAID and coxib when prescribing these agents. Finally, there is evidence that both environmental and genetic factors are involved in individual susceptibility to gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:24160953

  10. Bleeding Risk, Management and Outcome in Patients Receiving Non-VKA Oral Anticoagulants (NOACs).

    PubMed

    Werth, Sebastian; Breslin, Tomás; NiAinle, Fionnuala; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Modern direct-acting anticoagulants are rapidly replacing vitamin K antagonists (VKA) in the management of millions of patients worldwide who require anticoagulation. These drugs include agents that inhibit activated factor X (FXa) (such as apixaban and rivaroxaban) or thrombin (such as dabigatran), and are collectively known today as non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs). Since bleeding is the most common and most dangerous side effect of long-term anticoagulation, and because NOACs have very different mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetics compared with VKA, physicians are naturally concerned about the lack of experience regarding frequency, management and outcome of NOAC-associated bleeding in daily care. This review appraises trial and registry (or "real-world") data pertaining to bleeding complications in patients taking NOACs and VKA and provides practical recommendations for the management of acute bleeding situations. PMID:25940651

  11. Aerodynamic Control of a Pitching Airfoil by Distributed Bleed Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2013-11-01

    The aerodynamic forces and moments on a dynamically pitching 2-D airfoil model are controlled in wind tunnel experiments using distributed active bleed. Bleed flow on the suction surface downstream of the leading edge is driven by pressure differences across the airfoil and is regulated by low-power louver actuators. The bleed interacts with cross flows to effect time-dependent variations of the vorticity flux and thereby alters the local flow attachment, resulting in significant changes in pre- and post-stall lift and pitching moment (over 50% increase in baseline post-stall lift). The flow field over the airfoil is measured using high-speed (2000 fps) PIV, resolving the dynamics and characteristic time-scales of production and advection of vorticity concentrations that are associated with transient variations in the aerodynamic forces and moments. In particular, it is shown that the actuation improves the lift hysteresis and pitch stability during the oscillatory pitching by altering the evolution of the dynamic stall vortex and the ensuing flow attachment during the downstroke. Supported by the Rotorcraft Center (VLRCOE) at Georgia Tech.

  12. Massive rectal bleeding distant from a blunt car trauma.

    PubMed

    Gruden, E; Ragot, E; Arienzo, R; Revaux, A; Magri, M; Grossin, M; Leroy, C; Msika, S; Kianmanesh, R

    2010-09-01

    Mesenteric trauma is one of the possible injuries caused by the use of seat belts in case of motor vehicle crash. We report here a rare case of rectal bleeding by rupture of a mesosigmoid haematoma. An emergent laparotomy revealed a mesosigmoid haematoma with a centimetric rectal perforation. The wearing of safety belts added some specific blunt abdominal trauma, which directly depends on lap-and-sash belts. Mesenteric injuries are found out up to 5% of blunt abdominal traumas. "Seat belt mark" leads the surgical team to strongly suspect an intra-abdominal trauma. When "seat belt mark" sign is found, in patients with mild to severe blunt car injuries, CT-scan has to be realised to eliminate intra-abdominal complications, including mesenteric and mesosigmoid ones. In case of proved mesenteric haematoma associated to intestinal bleeding, a surgical treatment must be considered as first choice. Conservative approach remains possible in stable patients but surgical exploration remains necessary in unstable patients with active bleeding. PMID:20638207

  13. Where's the ulcer? Spontaneous bleeding from Zenker's diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Sardana, Nitin; Wallace, Dustin; Agrawal, Radheshyam; Aoun, Elie

    2014-01-01

    An 89-year-old man with a history of coronary artery disease status post coronary artery bypass grafting and atrial fibrillation on aspirin and warfarin, presented to the emergency department with a symptom of haemoptysis. He reported a history of dysphagia for 3 months prior to presentation, but had yet to seek medical attention. On presentation, he was hypotensive and tachycardic with a haemoglobin of 6.6 g/dL and an International Normalised Ratio (INR) of 3.9. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed and showed active bleeding from Zenker's diverticulum. The patient's INR was reversed with fresh frozen plasma and his anaemia was treated with packed red blood cells. The bleeding stopped after reversal of his INR. A barium swallow confirmed a 9 cm Zenker's diverticulum. The patient had a diverticulectomy and cricopharyngeal myotomy. Histology showed mild chronic inflammation of the mucosa, but no ulceration. The patient was discharged without any further bleeding episodes. PMID:24916983

  14. Where's the ulcer? Spontaneous bleeding from Zenker's diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    Sardana, Nitin; Wallace, Dustin; Agrawal, Radheshyam; Aoun, Elie

    2014-01-01

    An 89-year-old man with a history of coronary artery disease status post coronary artery bypass grafting and atrial fibrillation on aspirin and warfarin, presented to the emergency department with a symptom of haemoptysis. He reported a history of dysphagia for 3 months prior to presentation, but had yet to seek medical attention. On presentation, he was hypotensive and tachycardic with a haemoglobin of 6.6 g/dL and an International Normalised Ratio (INR) of 3.9. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed and showed active bleeding from Zenker's diverticulum. The patient's INR was reversed with fresh frozen plasma and his anaemia was treated with packed red blood cells. The bleeding stopped after reversal of his INR. A barium swallow confirmed a 9 cm Zenker's diverticulum. The patient had a diverticulectomy and cricopharyngeal myotomy. Histology showed mild chronic inflammation of the mucosa, but no ulceration. The patient was discharged without any further bleeding episodes. PMID:24916983

  15. Peptic ulcer hemorrhage combined with acute gout: analyses of treatment in 136 cases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenglei; Zhang, Ru; Zhang, Dingguo; Yao, Jun; Shi, Ruiyue; Tang, Qinghong; Wang, Lisheng

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to compare the safety and curative effect of celecoxib and small-dose methylprednisolone sodium succinate in patients with peptic ulcer hemorrhage combined with acute gout. In this randomized, controlled trial, a total of 136 patients with peptic ulcer hemorrhage combined with acute gout were divided into the celecoxib group or the small-dose methylprednisolone sodium succinate group. These patients underwent gastroscopy hemostasis and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. Moreover, for the treatment of gout, the patients were administered either celecoxib or small-dose methylprednisolone sodium succinate. Adverse reactions and the visual analogue scale (VAS) score were recorded for the two groups. The difference in adverse reactions between the two groups was not significant (χ(2) = 0.002, P = 0.967). The duration of evident pain relief after the first dose of treatment showed a significant difference between the two groups (t = 13.728, P < 0.01). The VAS scores before treatment were not significantly different between the two groups (t = -1.786, P = 0.076). The VAS scores at 6 h, 2 days, 4 days, 6 days, and 8 days after treatment were significantly different between the two groups (t = 3.239, 6.586, 6.280, 3.737, 3.215; P = 0.002, 0.000, 0.000, 0.000, 0.002, respectively). In cases that receive effective gastroscopy hemostasis and PPI therapy, small-dose methylprednisolone sodium succinate exhibits a greater clinical curative effect for peptic ulcer hemorrhage combined with acute gout as compared to celecoxib, and is associated with greater safety. PMID:26131224

  16. Role of hemostatic powders in the endoscopic management of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Bustamante-Balén, Marco; Plumé, Gema

    2014-08-15

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding (AGIB) is a prevalent condition with significant influence on healthcare costs. Endoscopy is essential for the management of AGIB with a pivotal role in diagnosis, risk stratification and management. Recently, hemostatic powders have been added to our endoscopic armamentarium to treat gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. These substances are intended to control active bleeding by delivering a powdered product over the bleeding site that forms a solid matrix with a tamponade function. Local activation of platelet aggregation and coagulation cascade may be also boosted. There are currently three powders commercially available: hemostatic agent TC-325 (Hemospray(®)), EndoClot™ polysaccharide hemostatic system, and Ankaferd Bloodstopper(®). Although the available evidence is based on short series of cases and there is no randomized controlled trial yet, these powders seem to be effective in controlling GI bleeding from a variety of origins with a very favorable side effects profile. They can be used either as a primary therapy or a second-line treatment, and they seem to be especially indicated in cases of cancer-related bleeding and lesions with difficult access. In this review, we will comment on the mechanism of action, efficacy, safety and technical challenges of the use of powders in several clinical scenarios and we will try to define the main current indications of use and propose new lines of research in this area. PMID:25133029

  17. Role of hemostatic powders in the endoscopic management of gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante-Balén, Marco; Plumé, Gema

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding (AGIB) is a prevalent condition with significant influence on healthcare costs. Endoscopy is essential for the management of AGIB with a pivotal role in diagnosis, risk stratification and management. Recently, hemostatic powders have been added to our endoscopic armamentarium to treat gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. These substances are intended to control active bleeding by delivering a powdered product over the bleeding site that forms a solid matrix with a tamponade function. Local activation of platelet aggregation and coagulation cascade may be also boosted. There are currently three powders commercially available: hemostatic agent TC-325 (Hemospray®), EndoClot™ polysaccharide hemostatic system, and Ankaferd Bloodstopper®. Although the available evidence is based on short series of cases and there is no randomized controlled trial yet, these powders seem to be effective in controlling GI bleeding from a variety of origins with a very favorable side effects profile. They can be used either as a primary therapy or a second-line treatment, and they seem to be especially indicated in cases of cancer-related bleeding and lesions with difficult access. In this review, we will comment on the mechanism of action, efficacy, safety and technical challenges of the use of powders in several clinical scenarios and we will try to define the main current indications of use and propose new lines of research in this area. PMID:25133029

  18. A Fibreoptic endoscopic study of upper gastrointestinal bleeding at Bugando Medical Centre in northwestern Tanzania: A retrospective review of 240 cases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is recognized as a common and potentially life-threatening abdominal emergency that needs a prompt assessment and aggressive emergency treatment. A retrospective study was undertaken at Bugando Medical Centre in northwestern Tanzania between March 2010 and September 2011 to describe our own experiences with fibreoptic upper GI endoscopy in the management of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in our setting and compare our results with those from other centers in the world. Findings A total of 240 patients representing 18.7% of all patients (i.e. 1292) who had fibreoptic upper GI endoscopy during the study period were studied. Males outnumbered female by a ratio of 2.1:1. Their median age was 37 years and most of patients (60.0%) were aged 40 years and below. The vast majority of the patients (80.4%) presented with haematemesis alone followed by malaena alone in 9.2% of cases. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, alcohol and smoking prior to the onset of bleeding was recorded in 7.9%, 51.7% and 38.3% of cases respectively. Previous history of peptic ulcer disease was reported in 22(9.2%) patients. Nine (3.8%) patients were HIV positive. The source of bleeding was accurately identified in 97.7% of patients. Diagnostic accuracy was greater within the first 24 h of the bleeding onset, and in the presence of haematemesis. Oesophageal varices were the most frequent cause of upper GI bleeding (51.3%) followed by peptic ulcers in 25.0% of cases. The majority of patients (60.8%) were treated conservatively. Endoscopic and surgical treatments were performed in 30.8% and 5.8% of cases respectively. 140 (58.3%) patients received blood transfusion. The median length of hospitalization was 8 days and it was significantly longer in patients who underwent surgical treatment and those with higher Rockall scores (P < 0.001). Rebleeding was reported in 3.3% of the patients. The overall mortality rate of

  19. Bayesian network modelling of upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisha, Nazziwa; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Adam, Mohd Bakri

    2013-09-01

    Bayesian networks are graphical probabilistic models that represent causal and other relationships between domain variables. In the context of medical decision making, these models have been explored to help in medical diagnosis and prognosis. In this paper, we discuss the Bayesian network formalism in building medical support systems and we learn a tree augmented naive Bayes Network (TAN) from gastrointestinal bleeding data. The accuracy of the TAN in classifying the source of gastrointestinal bleeding into upper or lower source is obtained. The TAN achieves a high classification accuracy of 86% and an area under curve of 92%. A sensitivity analysis of the model shows relatively high levels of entropy reduction for color of the stool, history of gastrointestinal bleeding, consistency and the ratio of blood urea nitrogen to creatinine. The TAN facilitates the identification of the source of GIB and requires further validation.

  20. Ectopic Variceal Bleeding From Colonic Stoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Zhou, Jiao-lin; Yang, Ning; Zhang, Guan-nan; Lu, Jun-yang; Xiao, Yi; Qiu, Hui-zhong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Parastomal variceal bleeding is a rare complication of portal hypertension, which often occurs in a recurrent manner and might be life-threatening in extreme situations. Treatment options vary, and no standard therapy has been established. Herein, we report 2 such cases. The first patient suffered from parastomal variceal bleeding after Hartmann procedure for rectal cancer. Stomal revision was performed, but bleeding recurred 1 month later. The second patient developed the disease after Miles procedure for rectal cancer. Embolization via the percutaneous transhepatic approach was performed using the Onyx liquid embolic system (LES) (Micro Therapeutics Inc, dba ev3 Neurovascular) in combination with coils, and satisfactory results were obtained after a 4-month follow-up. Our cases illustrate that surgical revision should be used with caution as a temporary solution due to the high risk of rebleeding, whereas transhepatic embolization via the Onyx LES and coils could be considered a safe and effective choice for skillful managers. PMID:25590847

  1. Re-bleeding events in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding after negative capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães-Costa, Pedro; Bispo, Miguel; Santos, Sofia; Couto, Gilberto; Matos, Leopoldo; Chagas, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate long-term re-bleeding events after a negative capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) and the risk factors associated with the procedure. METHODS: Patients referred to Hospital Egas Moniz (Lisboa, Portugal) between January 2006 and October 2012 with OGIB and a negative capsule endoscopy were retrospectively analyzed. The following study variables were included: demographic data, comorbidities, bleeding-related drug use, hemoglobin level, indication for capsule endoscopy, post procedure details, work-up and follow-up. Re-bleeding rates and associated factors were assessed using a Cox proportional hazard analysis. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the cumulative incidence of re-bleeding at 1, 3 and 5 years, and the differences between factors were evaluated. RESULTS: The study population consisted of 640 patients referred for OGIB investigation. Wireless capsule endoscopy was deemed negative in 113 patients (17.7%). A total of 64.6% of the population was female, and the median age was 69 years. The median follow-up was forty-eight months (interquartile range 24-60). Re-bleeding occurred in 27.4% of the cases. The median time to re-bleeding was fifteen months (interquartile range 2-33). In 22.6% (n = 7) of the population, small-bowel angiodysplasia was identified as the culprit lesion. A univariate analysis showed that age > 65 years old, chronic kidney disease, aortic stenosis, anticoagulant use and overt OGIB were risk factors for re-bleeding; however, on a multivariate analysis, there were no risk factors for re-bleeding. The cumulative risk of re-bleeding at 1, 3 and 5 years of follow-up was 12.9%, 25.6% and 31.5%, respectively. Patients who presented with overt OGIB tended to re-bleed sooner (median time for re-bleeding: 8.5 mo vs 22 mo). CONCLUSION: Patients with OGIB despite a negative capsule endoscopy have a significant re-bleeding risk; therefore, these patients require an extended follow

  2. Immediate bleeding complications in dental implants: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Balaguer-Martí, José-Carlos; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Balaguer-Martínez, José

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A review is made of the immediate or immediate postoperative bleeding complications in dental implants, with a view to identifying the areas of greatest bleeding risk, the causes of bleeding, the length of the implants associated with bleeding, the most frequently implicated blood vessels, and the treatments used to resolve these complications. Material and Methods: A Medline (PubMed) and Embase search was made of articles on immediate bleeding complications in dental implants published in English up until May 2014. Inclusion criteria: studies in humans subjects with severe bleeding immediately secondary to implant placement, which reported the time until the hemorrhage, the implant lenght, the possible cause of bleeding and the treatment. Exclusion criteria: patients receiving anticoagulation treatment. Results: Fifteen articles met the inclusion criteria. The area with the largest number of bleeding complications corresponded to the mandibular canine. The cause of bleeding was lingual cortical bone perforation during implant placement, with damage to the sublingual artery. The implants associated with bleeding were those measuring 15 mm in length or more. Management focused on securing the airway (with intubation or tracheostomy if necessary), with bleeding control. Conclusions: It’s important to pay special attention when the implants are placed in the mandibular anterior zone, especially if long implants are used. The most frequently cause of bleeding was the perforation of the lingual plate. Treatment involves securing the airway, with bleeding control. Key words:Hemorrhage, complications, immediate, bleeding, dental implants. PMID:25475779

  3. The Approach to Occult Gastrointestinal Bleed.

    PubMed

    Naut, Edgar R

    2016-09-01

    Occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not visible and may present with a positive fecal occult blood test or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure bleeding can be overt or occult, with no source identified despite an appropriate diagnostic workup. A stepwise approach to this evaluation after negative upper and lower endoscopy has been shown to be cost effective. This includes repeat endoscopies if warranted, followed by video capsule endoscopy (VCE) if no obstruction is present. If the VCE is positive then specific endoscopic intervention may be possible. If negative, patients may undergo either repeat testing or watchful waiting with iron supplements. PMID:27542424

  4. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: an approach to management.

    PubMed

    Marshall, J K; Lesi, O A; Hunt, R H

    2000-02-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding provides an uncommon but frustrating and resource-intensive challenge for clinicians. Such patients hemorrhage recurrently from sites within the gastrointestinal tract that are not detected by routine endoscopy or radiography, and require a special diagnostic approach to localize or exclude less common bleeding sources such as small bowel angioectasia or neoplasia. The differential diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal hemorrhage is discussed, and the performance of available endoscopic, radiological and surgical diagnostic tools including enteroscopy are examined critically. A stepwise management algorithm that progresses from the history and physical examination to surgical exploration is offered to facilitate early and efficient diagnosis. PMID:10694283

  5. [Jejunal GIST with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Nelly Manrique, María; Frisancho, Oscar; Rivas Wong, Luz; Palomino, Américo

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a woman of 84 years with a history of cardiac arrhythmia and hemorrhoids. She had multiple hospitalizations and transfusions for symptomatic iron deficiency anemia, endoscopic studies showed only small diverticula and colon polyps. He was later hospitalized with bloody stools red wines, upper endoscopy and colonoscopy showed gastritis, small colonic ulcers, colonic polyp and multiple diverticula. Readmitted with bleeding of obscure origin, on that occasion showed gastritis, antral erosions, small ulcers, colon polyps and colon ulcers in the process of healing, capsule endoscopy showed angiodysplasia in jejunum, anterograde enteroscopy detected some erythematous lesions in proximal jejunum without evidence of bleeding. Again hospitalized for melena and abdominal. PMID:22086325

  6. Diagnosis and management of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Tarin, D; Allison, D J; Modlin, I M; Neale, G

    1978-01-01

    Twelve consecutive patients presenting with unexplained recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding were investigated by selective visceral angiography. A cause for the bleeding was shown in all 12 cases, and in eight the lesion responsible was diagnosed radiologically as an area of angiodysplasia. Abnormal areas were pinpointed by fluoroscopy and examination of the resected bowel with a dissecting microscope after injecting the vessels with barium. Histologically these areas had various microvascular abnormalities. Angiodysplasia is a useful descriptive radiological term, but does not seem to represent a single pathological entity. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 FIG 4 FIG 5 PMID:308828

  7. Laparoscopic myomectomy: methods to control bleeding.

    PubMed

    Trehan, Nikita

    2011-01-01

    Most of the surgeons find it difficult to perform myomectomy when it bleeds during the procedure as it becomes difficult to get into the correct plane of dissection. If this bleeding or blood staining of tissues is prevented it will be easier to get into the correct plane of dissection. In several studies, it is found that bilateral uterine artery ligation, at origin, does not interfere with future fertility as the end vessels and collaterals of the uterus are not interfered with. As no energy source is used to incise the myoma once Vasopressin has been used, the myomectomy scar integrity is better, as noted by various surgeons. PMID:22442533

  8. Gas turbine engine with recirculating bleed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, A. P. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbon emissions in a gas turbine engine are reduced by bleeding hot air from the engine cycle and introducing it back into the engine upstream of the bleed location and upstream of the combustor inlet. As this hot inlet air is recycled, the combustor inlet temperature rises rapidly at a constant engine thrust level. In most combustors, this will reduce carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbon emissions significantly. The preferred locations for hot air extraction are at the compressor discharge or from within the turbine, whereas the preferred reentry location is at the compressor inlet.

  9. Diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding: A practical guide for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bong Sik Matthew; Li, Bob T; Engel, Alexander; Samra, Jaswinder S; Clarke, Stephen; Norton, Ian D; Li, Angela E

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common problem encountered in the emergency department and in the primary care setting. Acute or overt gastrointestinal bleeding is visible in the form of hematemesis, melena or hematochezia. Chronic or occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not apparent to the patient and usually presents as positive fecal occult blood or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is recurrent bleeding when the source remains unidentified after upper endoscopy and colonoscopic evaluation and is usually from the small intestine. Accurate clinical diagnosis is crucial and guides definitive investigations and interventions. This review summarizes the overall diagnostic approach to gastrointestinal bleeding and provides a practical guide for clinicians. PMID:25400991

  10. Patients with Gastric Antral Vascular Ectasia (GAVE) Are at a Higher Risk of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in the Absence of Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jennifer; Stine, Jonathan G.; Cornella, Scott L.; Argo, Curtis K.; Cohn, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE) is commonly found in patients with cirrhosis, but it is also associated with other diseases in the absence of cirrhosis. Whether GAVE confers a different severity of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding between patients with and without cirrhosis remains unknown. We aim to examine whether there is a difference in clinically significant GI bleeding due to GAVE in patients with or without cirrhosis. Methods: This is a retrospective case-control study of patients who were diagnosed with GAVE between January 2000 and June 2014. Patients were categorized into cirrhosis and noncirrhosis groups, and those with an additional GI bleeding source were excluded. Univariate comparisons and multivariable models were constructed using logistic regression. Results: In total, 110 patients diagnosed with GAVE on esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) were included in our analysis; 84 patients had cirrhosis (76.4%) and 26 (23.6%) did not. Active GI bleeding was more prevalent in patients without cirrhosis (63.4% vs. 32.1%, p=0.003) despite similar indications for EGD, and endoscopic treatment with argon plasma coagulation (APC) was required more often in this group, approaching statistical significance (27% vs. 10.7%, p=0.056). There was no difference in bleeding severity, as evidenced by similar re-bleeding rates, surgery, or death attributed to uncontrolled bleeding. The strongest independent risk factor for GI bleeding was the absence of cirrhosis (odds ratio (OR): 5.151 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08-24.48, p=0.039). Conclusions: Patients with GAVE in the absence of cirrhosis are at higher risk for active GI bleeding and require more frequent endoscopic treatment than similar patients with cirrhosis. It may be worthwhile to treat GAVE in this population even in the absence of active bleeding. PMID:26807380

  11. Effect of prolonged administration of homologous and heterologous intrinsic factor antibodies on the parietal and peptic cell masses and the secretory function of the rat gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Inada, M; Glass, G B

    1975-08-01

    In order to determine the possible effects of the circulating intrinsic factor antibodies (IFA) on gastric morphology and secretory function, four groups of 12 rats each received intravenous injection daily for 8 to 12 weeks of immunoglobulin G (IgG) fractions separated on DEAE-cellulose columns from various sources: (1) sera of patients with pernicious anemia, containing both IFA and parietal cell antibodies (PCA), (2) sera from patients with atrophic gastritis, containing parietal cell antibody only, and (3) and (4) sera of rabbits immunized with semipurified human or rat intrinsic factor (IF). In addition three control groups of 12 rats each received intravenous injections daily for 8 to 12 weeks of either (5) saline or (6) and (7) IgG processed from human or rabbit normal sera. Still another group of 12 rats (8) did not receive any injections whatsoever for the same duration of time. One-third of the rats were intubated biweekly after histamine stimulation and the hourly outputs of CHl pepsin, and IF were determined. At conclusion of the experiments, rats were killed, the mucosal surface and thickness of the mucosa were measured, and parietal cell and peptic cell masses were counted. The control groups showed either progressive growth of the cellular mass in gastric mucosa and increase of the HCl, pepsin, and IF outputs, or no significant changes. In contrast, rats injected with IgG containing IFA to human or rat IF showed a statistically significant thinning of the gastric mucosa, reduction of peptic cells, which are known to secret IF in this species, and corresponding decreases in the ouputs of pepsin and IF. These became reduced by about 50% from initial values, and by 62 or 75%, respectively, when compared to rats injected with normal human or rabbit IgG's. In rats injected with IgG's from pernicious anemia sera, which contained both IFA and PCA, the outputs of IF, pepsin, and HCl decreased signigicantly, as well as the peptic and parietal cell masses. The

  12. Embolization of Acute Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Resistant to Endoscopic Treatment: Results and Predictors of Recurrent Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Loffroy, Romaric Rao, Pramod; Ota, Shinichi; Lin Mingde; Kwak, Byung-Kook; Geschwind, Jean-Francois

    2010-12-15

    Acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) hemorrhage is a frequent complication associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The most common cause of UGI bleeding is peptic ulcer disease, but the differential diagnosis is diverse and includes tumors; ischemia; gastritis; arteriovenous malformations, such as Dieulafoy lesions; Mallory-Weiss tears; trauma; and iatrogenic causes. Aggressive treatment with early endoscopic hemostasis is essential for a favorable outcome. However, severe bleeding despite conservative medical treatment or endoscopic intervention occurs in 5-10% of patients, requiring surgery or transcatheter arterial embolization. Surgical intervention is usually an expeditious and gratifying endeavor, but it can be associated with high operative mortality rates. Endovascular management using superselective catheterization of the culprit vessel, < sandwich> occlusion, or blind embolization has emerged as an alternative to emergent operative intervention for high-risk patients and is now considered the first-line therapy for massive UGI bleeding refractory to endoscopic treatment. Indeed, many published studies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and its high technical and clinical success rates, which range from 69 to 100% and from 63 to 97%, respectively, even if the choice of the best embolic agent among coils, cyanaocrylate glue, gelatin sponge, or calibrated particles remains a matter of debate. However, factors influencing clinical outcome, especially predictors of early rebleeding, are poorly understood, and few studies have addressed this issue. This review of the literature will attempt to define the role of embolotherapy for acute nonvariceal UGI hemorrhage that fails to respond to endoscopic hemostasis and to summarize data on factors predicting angiographic and embolization failure.

  13. Management of pregnancy and delivery in women with inherited bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Peyvandi, Flora; Bidlingmaier, Christoph; Garagiola, Isabella

    2011-12-01

    Women with inherited bleeding disorders present a wide spectrum of clinical symptoms that vary from mild or moderate bleeding tendency to severe episodes. Monthly haemostatic changes affect these women during menstruation and ovulation. These events may be associated with significant bleeding and pain leading to the limitations in conducting daily activities and adverse effect on quality of life. Likewise, pregnancy and delivery are critical times for affected women. During pregnancy, they may be at greater risk of miscarriage and bleeding complications. In particular, recurrent miscarriage was observed in women with type 3 von Willebrand disease, afibrinogenaemia and severe factor XIII deficiency, and an optimal therapeutic plan is required during their pregnancy. Precautions must be taken at delivery in these women, since they could be at risk of bleeding. The lack of adequate information makes it very difficult to prepare evidence-based guidelines for the prevention of bleedings in affected women and their treatment. A multidisciplinary team of obstetricians, haematologists and paediatricians is required with a good knowledge of these disorders and an awareness of the potential maternal neonatal complications. PMID:21852211

  14. Massive postoperative intramuscular bleeding in acquired von Willebrand's disease.

    PubMed

    Krebs, M; Meyer, B; Quehenberger, P; Turecek, P L; Hejna, M; Sperr, W R; Lechner, K; Pabinger, I

    2002-07-01

    We describe a case of acquired von Willebrand's disease (vWD) associated with monoclonal gammopathy with undetermined significance (MGUS) in a 54-year-old man who was admitted with hemarthrosis and extensive thigh muscle hematoma following arthroscopic surgery and postoperative prophylaxis with low molecular weight heparin. Coagulation tests were compatible with acquired vWD: prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) (56.1 s), decreased levels of factor VIII coagulant activity (23%), low concentrations of von Willebrand's factor (vWF) antigen (13%), and undetectable ristocetin cofactor activity (<10%). Infusion of a vWF-containing factor VIII concentrate failed to normalize the plasma levels of vWF-related parameters. Only additional intravenous administration of immunoglobulins led to a transient normalization of ristocetin cofactor activity, vWF antigen, and factor VIII coagulant activity. While the spontaneous bleeding tendency in this case was mild, surgery and administration of prophylactic doses of low molecular weight heparin led to life-threatening bleeding. PMID:12185511

  15. Laparoscopic repair of perforated peptic ulcers. The role of laparoscopy in generalised peritonitis.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, G. S.; Wemyss-Holden, S. A.; Maddern, G. J.

    2000-01-01

    This non-randomised concurrent cohort study conducted in two teaching hospital Departments of Surgery examined the assumption that the benefits of elective laparoscopic upper gastrointestinal surgery would apply to those with generalised peritonitis due to perforated peptic ulcers. It compared 20 consecutive laparoscopic repairs of perforated peptic ulcers with a concurrent group of 16 consecutive open repairs. There were no differences pre-operatively between the two groups. The mean duration of surgery was similar (P = 0.46). There were no differences in the rate of GI tract recovery, but opiate analgesia requirement in the laparoscopic group was significantly less (P < 0.0001). Intensive care was required in three patients in the laparoscopic group (two with renal failure) and two in the open (no renal failure). Two patients in the laparoscopic and one in the open group died. The median duration of stay was five days in the laparoscopic group and six in the open. This comparison shows that the patho-physiological insult of laparoscopy in the setting of generalised peritonitis does not obviously increase the peri-operative risk of organ failure but objective benefits are small. PMID:10700758

  16. The prevalence of self-reported peptic ulcer in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Sonnenberg, A; Everhart, J E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to draw a current picture of the sociodemographic characteristics of peptic ulcer in the United States. METHODS. During the National Health Interview Survey of 1989, a special questionnaire on digestive diseases was administered to 41,457 randomly selected individuals. Data were retrieved from public use tapes provided by the National Center for Health Statistics. Odds ratios were calculated by logistic regression after adjustment for sample weights in the survey. RESULTS. Of adult US residents, 10% reported having physician-diagnosed ulcer disease, and one third of these individuals reported having an ulcer in the past year. Old age, short education, low family income, being a veteran, and smoking acted as significant and independent risk factors. Gastric and duodenal ulcer occurred in both sexes equally often. Duodenal ulcer was more common in Whites than non-Whites, while gastric ulcer was more common in non-Whites. CONCLUSIONS. The age-related rise and socioeconomic gradients of peptic ulcer represent the historic scars of previous infection rates with Helicobacter pylori. The racial variations reflect different ages at the time of first infection; younger and older age at the acquisition of H. pylori appear to be associated with gastric and duodenal ulcer, respectively. PMID:8633736

  17. Omeprazole in the treatment of peptic ulcers resistant to H2-receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, A S; Neves, B C; Quina, M G

    1990-06-01

    Thirty patients with peptic ulcers resistant to at least 8 weeks of continuous therapy with full-dose H2-receptor antagonists alone or followed by other anti-ulcer drugs, were treated with the gastric proton pump inhibitor omeprazole (40 mg), administered orally once daily for up to 8 weeks. The study design was non-comparative and open; healing was verified by endoscopy. After only 2 weeks of treatment, 21 out of 23 (91%) duodenal ulcer patients were healed, as well as 2 out of 2 patients with both duodenal and gastric ulcer and 1 out of 3 patients with prepyloric ulcer. After 4 weeks, all duodenal ulcers, 1 out of 2 gastric ulcers and 2 out of 3 pre-pyloric ulcers were healed. A further month of therapy healed the gastric ulcer to give an overall healing rate of 97% and leaving only one patient (pre-pyloric ulcer) unhealed at the end of the study. Of 19 patients suffering ulcer symptoms at entry, only two patients reported any symptoms at 2 weeks and one of these (who remained unhealed) continued to have symptoms throughout the study. One patient reported mild asthenia; otherwise, no clinical or biochemical side-effects were recorded. It is concluded that omeprazole is highly effective in healing refractory peptic ulcers. PMID:1983325

  18. Gastrointestinal Bleeding - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... List of All Topics All Gastrointestinal Bleeding - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Arabic (العربية) Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) French ( ...

  19. Acute diquat poisoning with intracerebral bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, S; Wilks, M; Coupe, M

    2001-01-01

    A case of severe diquat poisoning complicated by the development of aggressive behaviour, oliguric renal failure, and intracerebral bleeding is described. The patient was successfully managed and made a complete recovery. In this paper special attention has been given to the major clinical differences between diquat and paraquat intoxication.


Keywords: poisoning; diquat; paraquat PMID:11320278

  20. Endovascular Management of Acute Bleeding Arterioenteric Fistulas

    SciTech Connect

    Leonhardt, Henrik Mellander, Stefan; Snygg, Johan; Loenn, Lars

    2008-05-15

    The objective of this study was to review the outcome of endovascular transcatheter repair of emergent arterioenteric fistulas. Cases of abdominal arterioenteric fistulas (defined as a fistula between a major artery and the small intestine or colon, thus not the esophagus or stomach), diagnosed over the 3-year period between December 2002 and December 2005 at our institution, were retrospectively reviewed. Five patients with severe enteric bleeding underwent angiography and endovascular repair. Four presented primary arterioenteric fistulas, and one presented a secondary aortoenteric fistula. All had massive persistent bleeding with hypotension despite volume substitution and transfusion by the time of endovascular management. Outcome after treatment of these patients was investigated for major procedure-related complications, recurrence, reintervention, morbidity, and mortality. Mean follow-up time was 3 months (range, 1-6 months). All massive bleeding was controlled by occlusive balloon catheters. Four fistulas were successfully sealed with stent-grafts, resulting in a technical success rate of 80%. One patient was circulatory stabilized by endovascular management but needed immediate further open surgery. There were no procedure-related major complications. Mean hospital stay after the initial endovascular intervention was 19 days. Rebleeding occurred in four patients (80%) after a free interval of 2 weeks or longer. During the follow-up period three patients needed reintervention. The in-hospital mortality was 20% and the 30-day mortality was 40%. The midterm outcome was poor, due to comorbidities or rebleeding, with a mortality of 80% within 6 months. In conclusion, endovascular repair is an efficient and safe method to stabilize patients with life-threatening bleeding arterioenteric fistulas in the emergent episode. However, in this group of patients with severe comorbidities, the risk of rebleeding is high and further intervention must be considered

  1. The ORBIT bleeding score: a simple bedside score to assess bleeding risk in atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Emily C.; Simon, DaJuanicia N.; Thomas, Laine E.; Hylek, Elaine M.; Gersh, Bernard J.; Ansell, Jack E.; Kowey, Peter R.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Chang, Paul; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Pencina, Michael J.; Piccini, Jonathan P.; Peterson, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic decisions in atrial fibrillation (AF) are often influenced by assessment of bleeding risk. However, existing bleeding risk scores have limitations. Objectives We sought to develop and validate a novel bleeding risk score using routinely available clinical information to predict major bleeding in a large, community-based AF population. Methods We analysed data from Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation (ORBIT-AF), a prospective registry that enrolled incident and prevalent AF patients at 176 US sites. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we identified factors independently associated with major bleeding among patients taking oral anticoagulation (OAC) over a median follow-up of 2 years (interquartile range = 1.6–2.5). We also created a numerical bedside risk score that included the five most predictive risk factors weighted according to their strength of association with major bleeding. The predictive performance of the full model, the simple five-item score, and two existing risk scores (hypertension, abnormal renal/liver function, stroke, bleeding history or predisposition, labile INR, elderly, drugs/alcohol concomitantly, HAS-BLED, and anticoagulation and risk factors in atrial fibrillation, ATRIA) were then assessed in both the ORBIT-AF cohort and a separate clinical trial population, Rivaroxaban Once-daily oral direct factor Xa inhibition compared with vitamin K antagonism for prevention of stroke and embolism trial in atrial fibrillation (ROCKET-AF). Results Among 7411 ORBIT-AF patients taking OAC, the rate of major bleeding was 4.0/100 person-years. The full continuous model (12 variables) and five-factor ORBIT risk score (older age [75+ years], reduced haemoglobin/haematocrit/history of anaemia, bleeding history, insufficient kidney function, and treatment with antiplatelet) both had good ability to identify those who bled vs. not (C-index 0.69 and 0.67, respectively). These scores both had

  2. Signs and Symptoms of a Bleeding Disorder in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Blood Disorders Signs and Symptoms Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Bleeding Disorders Download and print this fact sheet » Signs and symptoms of a bleeding disorder: I have ...

  3. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air systems used for cabin pressurization: (a) The cabin air system may not be subject to...

  4. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air systems used for cabin pressurization: (a) The cabin air system may not be subject to...

  5. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air systems used for cabin pressurization: (a) The cabin air system may not be subject to...

  6. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air systems used for cabin pressurization: (a) The cabin air system may not be subject to...

  7. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time device. (a) Identification. A bleeding time device is a device, usually employing two spring-loaded blades... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section...

  8. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time device. (a) Identification. A bleeding time device is a device, usually employing two spring-loaded blades... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section...

  9. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  10. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  11. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  12. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  13. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air systems used for cabin pressurization: (a) The cabin air system may not be subject to hazardous... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system....

  15. Gallbladder bleeding-related severe gastrointestinal bleeding and shock in a case with end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jun-Li; Tsai, Shang-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gallbladder (GB) bleeding is very rare and it is caused by cystic artery aneurysm and rupture, or GB wall rupture. For GB rupture, the typical findings are positive Murphy's sign and jaundice. GB bleeding mostly presented as hemobilia. This is the first case presented with severe GI bleeding because of GB rupture-related GB bleeding. After comparing computed tomography, one gallstone spillage was noticed. In addition to gallstones, uremic coagulopathy also worsens the bleeding condition. This is also the first case that patients with GB spillage-related rupture and bleeding were successfully treated by nonsurgical management. Clinicians should bear in mind the rare causes of GI bleeding. Embolization of the bleeding artery should be attempted as soon as possible. PMID:27281100

  16. High rate of Helicobacter pylori reinfection in Lithuanian peptic ulcer patients

    PubMed Central

    Jonaitis, Laimas; Kiudelis, Gediminas; Slepavicius, Paulius; Kupcinskas, Limas

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the frequency of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) reinfection in peptic ulcer patients during 9 years after H. pylori eradication. METHODS: We invited 117 peptic ulcer patients in whom eradication of H. pylori was confirmed 1 year after eradication treatment both by histology and by rapid urease test. In total, 57 patients were available for the study procedures: 34 (59.6%) male, 23 (40.4%) female; mean age 52.3 ± 13.0 years. There were 45 (78.9%) patients with duodenal ulcer and 12 (21.1%) with gastric ulcer. H. pylori was diagnosed by a rapid urease test and histology if endoscopy was performed. If endoscopy was refused, H. pylori was diagnosed by the C14-urea breath test and serology. H. pylori was established if at least one of the tests was positive. RESULTS: The mean follow-up was 8.9 ± 1.0 years (range, 6-12). H. pylori was established in 15 patients. In 2 H. pylori-negative patients, H. pylori was established during the follow-up period and eradicated. Therefore, we consider that reinfection occurred in 17 patients. In the per protocol analysis, reinfection was established in 17 of 57 (29.8%; 95%CI: 19.2-42.2) patients during the follow-up period. The annual rate of infection was 3.36%. If all non-responders were considered H. pylori-negative, reinfection would be 14.5% (17/117), the annual rate being 1.63%. The mean age of patients with reinfection was 51.8 ± 14.0 years, and without reinfection was 52.5 ± 13.0 years, P > 0.05; the mean body mass index of patients with reinfection was 27.2 ± 4.1 kg/m2, and without reinfection was 25.7 ± 4.2 kg/m2, P > 0.05. There were no differences in the reinfection rates according the location of the peptic ulcer, the eradication regimen used, and smoking status. CONCLUSION: The reinfection rate of H. pylori is relatively high in Lithuania and probably related to the high prevalence of H. pylori, what may reflect differences in the socioeconomic status between Western and Eastern European countries

  17. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Chait, Maxwell M

    2010-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is an important worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly. The incidence of LGIB increases with age and corresponds to the increased incidence of specific gastrointestinal diseases that have worldwide regional variation, co-morbid diseases and polypharmacy. The evaluation and treatment of patients is adjusted to the rate and severity of hemorrhage and the clinical status of the patient and may be complicated by the presence of visual, auditory and cognitive impairment due to age and co-morbid disease. Bleeding may be chronic and mild or severe and life threatening, requiring endoscopic, radiologic or surgical intervention. Colonoscopy provides the best method for evaluation and treatment of patients with LGIB. There will be a successful outcome of LGIB in the majority of elderly patients with appropriate evaluation and management. PMID:21160742

  18. Uterine artery embolization for heavy menstrual bleeding.

    PubMed

    Moss, Jonathan; Christie, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Uterine artery embolization (UAE) as a treatment option for fibroids was first reported by Ravina in 1995. Although rapidly adopted by enthusiasts, many were skeptical and its introduction varied widely across the globe. It was not until randomized controlled trials and registries were published and national guidance statements issued that UAE was accepted as a safe and proven treatment for fibroids. The technique is now established as one of the treatment options to be discussed with patients as an alternative to surgery for fibroid-associated heavy menstrual bleeding. Research is on-going to evaluate the relative merits of UAE compared with other medical and surgical treatment options for heavy menstrual bleeding, particularly for women wishing to maintain their fertility. PMID:26756068

  19. Fatal Retroperitoneal Bleeding Caused by Neurofibromatosis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Moerbeek, Patrick R.; van Buijtenen, Jesse M.; van den Heuvel, Baukje; Hoksbergen, Arjan W. J.

    2015-01-01

    A young female was brought into the emergency department with pulseless electrical activity (PEA) after local resection of neurofibromateous lesions. Chest ultrasonography was normal. Abdominal ultrasonography was not performed. After successful resuscitation a total body CT-scan was performed to rule out potential bleeding sources. However, haemodynamic instability reoccurred and the scan had to be aborted at the thoracoabdominal level. No thoracic abnormalities were found. Resuscitation was reinitiated and abdominal ultrasonography was performed, showing a large amount of abdominal fluid. A progressive fall in haemoglobin was noted. Emergency laparotomy was performed, revealing a large retroperitoneal haematoma. Despite ligation and packing, bleeding continued. Postoperative angiography showed active bleeding from a branch of the left internal iliac artery, which could be successfully coiled. Unfortunately, the patient died five days later due to irreversible brain damage. Revision of an MRI scan made one year earlier showed a 10 cm large retroperitoneal neurofibromatous lesion exactly at the location of the current bleeding. This case shows that patients with neurofibromatosis might develop spontaneous life-threatening bleeding from retroperitoneal located lesions. Furthermore, it points out the necessity of focused assessment with ultrasonography of the abdomen in all patients with PEA of unknown origin. PMID:25688270

  20. New direct oral anticoagulants--current therapeutic options and treatment recommendations for bleeding complications.

    PubMed

    Miesbach, Wolfgang; Seifried, Erhard

    2012-10-01

    To date, clinical studies show that the incidence of spontaneous bleeding with new direct oral anticoagulants (DOAs) is comparable to that of established anticoagulants. However, unlike vitamin K antagonists, there are currently no clinically available antidotes or approved reversal agents for new DOAs. Restoring normal coagulation is important in many cases, such as emergency surgeries, serious bleedings, or anticoagulant overdosing. Attempts have been made to restore normal coagulation after treatment with new DOAs using compounds such as recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa), prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC), or FEIBA (factor eight inhibitor bypassing activity). Limited pre-clinical data and even less clinical evidence are available on the usefulness of these methods in restoring normal coagulation for the emergency management of critical bleeding episodes. Evaluating the utility of DOAs is further complicated by the fact that it is unknown how predictive established test systems are of the bleeding risks. Clinical practice requires further evaluation of the emergency management options for the new DOAs to define the agents and the doses that are most useful. Furthermore, patients receiving long-term treatment with a DOA are likely to undergo elective surgery at some point, and there is lack of evidence regarding perioperative treatment regimens under such conditions. This review summarises potential bleeding management options and available data on the new DOAs. PMID:22782297

  1. A rare cause of lower GI bleeding.

    PubMed

    Waleed, Mohammad; Ali, A Mohamed; Saraj, Othman; Babu, Sathish; Morgan, Russell

    2012-01-01

    The authors present a rare case of lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleed due to GI amyloidosis secondary to multiple myeloma. A 79-year-old lady who presented with bloody diarrhoea for 4 weeks. Flexible sigmoidoscopy showed slight oedematous mucosa extending up to the sigmoid colon. CT abdomen showed lytic lesions in the vertebral bodies. 24 h protein analysis and serum electrophoresis suggestive of multiple myeloma, which was confirmed with bone marrow biopsy, revealed plasma cell myeloma. PMID:22962379

  2. Angioembolisation of a Bleeding Meckel's Diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuandao; Chan, Dedrick Kok-Hong; Tan, Ker-Kan

    2015-12-01

    We describe the diagnosis of an adult who presented with hematochezia. This was investigated and found to be from a bleeding Meckel's diverticulum. As this condition is rare in adults, there is no consensus regarding the optimal mode of management. We propose the use of angioembolisation in the diagnostic and therapeutic management of this condition. Our case showed that this strategy is indeed feasible and can achieve good short-term control, allowing for definitive surgery in an elective setting. PMID:26373773

  3. [Catamenial rectal bleeding and sigmoid endometriosis].

    PubMed

    Kazadi Buanga, J; Alcazar, J L; Laparte, M C; Lopez Garcia, G

    1992-01-01

    We describe a case of menstrual rectal bleeding due to sigmoid endometriosis. The history led us to the diagnosis and since a small biopsy of the lesion and scanning could not help us to a conclusive diagnosis we carried out histological examination of a piece removed at operation. This case has led us to estimate the incidence, the difficulties of diagnosis and the present therapeutic measures. PMID:1469232

  4. Situational and Relational Factors Associated With Coitus During Vaginal Bleeding Among Adolescent Women

    PubMed Central

    Hensel, Devon J.; Fortenberry, J. Dennis; Orr, Donald P.

    2013-01-01

    Menstruation is a normal, developmental event anchored in contradictory value systems. Although it demarcates a transition to womanhood, it is often associated with negative sentiments such as shame, camouflage, and discomfort. Certain behavioral expectations, including avoiding sexual intercourse, also accompany menstruation. Research generally has suggested that sex does decrease during menstruation. However, not all sexual activity is suppressed during menses; both individual and relationship factors provide influence. Accordingly, this study investigated situational and relational factors associated with the day-to-day likelihood of sex and vaginal bleeding among 387 (aged 14–17 at enrollment) adolescent women. Generalized estimating equation logistic regression, in SUDAAN 9.0, was used. Predictors of coitus and bleeding included recent sexual activity; past coitus/bleeding; marijuana use before intercourse; and higher partner support, higher sexual interest, and lower feelings of being in love. The findings highlight appropriate areas of focus for information, education, and sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention counseling. PMID:17879170

  5. [Obscure digestive bleeding by ileal carcinoid tumor].

    PubMed

    Nelly Manrique, María; Frisancho, Oscar; Zumaeta, Eduardo; Palomino, Américo; Rodriguez, César

    2011-01-01

    The patient is an 82 year-old female with a history of osteoarthritis, hypothyroidism and anemia for 14 years (receiving blood transfusions). She was admited to our hospital with a nine months history of malaise, anorexia, fatigue and weakness, associated with intermitten episodes of abdominal pain. She was diagnosed anemia and occult blood positive stools. Physical examination revealed a patient in generally fair condition, obese, with mild edema of lower limbs, no changes in the evaluation of chest, cardiovascular, abdomen, etc. Laboratory data was unremarkable, except for iron deficiency anemia. The upper endoscopy showed duodenal ulcer scar, fundic polyposis and chronic gastritis. Colonoscopy revealed some diverticula, a small sessile polyp and internal hemorrhoids. The diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding was made. The CT scan of the abdomen showed gallstones and fatty liver; a radiograph of intestinal transit detected a lesion apparently protruded intestinal loop for distal jejunum; enteroscopy was performed (with one team ball) anterograde and retrograde achieving assess distal jejunum and distal ileum without observing any injuries. The study of capsule endoscopy showed a polypoid tumor intestinal with evidence of having bleeding. Surgery detected the tumor in proximal ileum. The surgical specimen findings showed three tumors 0.7 mm, 10 mm and 15 mm on the proximal ileum. The microscopic examination revealed that these lesions were neuroendocrine tumors (carcinoid). The Ileal carcinoid tumor may rarely presented with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:21544161

  6. Technetium-99m colloidal bismuth subcitrate: A novel method for the evaluation of peptic ulcer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, T.E.; Lyons, K.P.; Raiszadeh, M.; Fardi, M.; Snider, P.

    1984-01-01

    The therapeutic agent colloidal bismuth subcitrate (CBS) selectively binds to peptic ulcers. The authors have developed a method for labeling this agent with Tc-99m. Chromatographic quality control studies of the agent on silica gel coated strips (ITLC-SG) showed that more than 97% of Tc-99m was bound to CBS. During in-vitro stability testing, the radio-label was stable for a minimum of 6 hours. The chromatographic findings are in agreement with the in-vivo distribution of the agent which showed no significant radioactivity in thyroid, kidneys, liver, or bladder. The resulting Tc-99m-CBS solution is administered orally in drinking water. Preliminary animal studies have been conducted on 5 adult 3 kg New Zealand rabbits sedated with 50 mg Ketamine I.M. The rabbits were intubated with I.V. tubing advanced to the stomach. They were given a gastric erosive suspension of 600-1000 mg/kg of pulverized ASA in 10 cc tap water. Four hours later they were given 3-4 mCi of the radiotracer in a 5 cc volume of water. Serial in-vivo images were obtained for 2 hours which included thyroid, abdomen, and urinary bladder. Next the stomachs were excised, opened along the greater curvature, imaged, vigorously washed and reimaged. All 5 rabbits showed avid localized binding of radiotracer which remained fixed even with vigorous washing. Areas of normal appearing mucosa were relatively devoid of radiotracer. This new compound may have significant clinical usefulness in the detection of peptic ulcer disease. In addition, such a non-invasive technique, carrying none of the risks or discomfort of endoscopy could also find application in the evaluation of the response to therapy.

  7. Patterns of bleeding in adolescents with severe haemophilia A.

    PubMed Central

    Aronstam, A; Rainsford, S G; Painter, M J

    1979-01-01

    Eighty-two boys with severe haemophilia A who spent some time at Lord Mayor Treloar College during 1973-7 were studied. All episodes of bleeding that occurred during term time were recorded, along with the number of transfusions. The bleeding frequency among these boys, most of them aged 10-17 years, increased steadily from 8,31 episodes/100 days in 1973 to 12,63 episodes/100 days in 1977. At the same time there was a steady fall in bleeding frequency with age. Altogether 24% of bleeding episodes were into the elbow joint, 22% into the knee, and 15% into the ankle. As the boys grew older the proportion of bleeding episodes in the legs declined and that in the arms increased. The overall results reflect the fact that special schools now see only the severest cases of haemophilia. The pattern of bleeding during adolescence suggests that concepts of management of arm bleeding need modifying. PMID:427411

  8. Treating traumatic bleeding in a combat setting.

    PubMed

    Clifford, C Cloonan

    2004-12-01

    Bleeding is clearly a major cause of morbidity and death after trauma. When bleeding is attributable to transection of major vessels, surgical repair is appropriate. Posttraumatic microvascular bleeding attributable to coagulopathy secondary to metabolic derangements, hypothermia, and depletion or dysfunction of cellular and protein components requires a different approach. Although transfusion of blood products may be necessary to replace the blood loss, it does not always correct the problem of microvascular bleeding. The type of injury, mode of care, and treatment objectives differ significantly for combat-wounded soldiers versus civilian trauma patients. Although hemorrhage is responsible for 50% of combat deaths, published information about coagulation monitoring among combat patients is very limited. These articles summarize the appropriate monitoring of hemostasis among combat trauma patients, review the unique nature of combat casualties and the medical system used to treat them, and discuss information available from civilian studies. Because the development of coagulopathy is relatively infrequent in the young, otherwise healthy, military population, the routine screening measures currently used are adequate to guide initial blood product administration. However, as new intravenous hemostatic agents are used for these patients, better laboratory measures will be required. Although hemorrhage is the leading cause of death for combat casualties, catastrophic hemorrhage is rarely a prehospital combat medical management problem because, when it occurs, it tends to cause death before medical care can be provided. In civilian environments, most seriously injured victims can be reached and transported by emergency medical services personnel within minutes; in combat, it often takes hours simply to transport casualties off the battlefield. In combat situations, even if the transport distances are small, the hazardous nature of the forward combat areas frequently

  9. The cellular basis of traumatic bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Maureane

    2004-12-01

    Bleeding is clearly a major cause of morbidity and death after trauma. When bleeding is attributable to transection of major vessels, surgical repair is appropriate. Posttraumatic microvascular bleeding attributable to coagulopathy secondary to metabolic derangements, hypothermia, and depletion or dysfunction of cellular and protein components requires a different approach. Although transfusion of blood products may be necessary to replace the blood loss, it does not always correct the problem of microvascular bleeding. The type of injury, mode of care, and treatment objectives differ significantly for combat-wounded soldiers versus civilian trauma patients. Although hemorrhage is responsible for 50% of combat deaths, published information about coagulation monitoring among combat patients is very limited. These articles summarize the appropriate monitoring of hemostasis among combat trauma patients, review the unique nature of combat casualties and the medical system used to treat them, and discuss information available from civilian studies. Because the development of coagulopathy is relatively infrequent in the young, otherwise healthy, military population, the routine screening measures currently used are adequate to guide initial blood product administration. However, as new intravenous hemostatic agents are used for these patients, better laboratory measures will be required. Although hemorrhage is the leading cause of death for combat casualties, catastrophic hemorrhage is rarely a prehospital combat medical management problem because, when it occurs, it tends to cause death before medical care can be provided. In civilian environments, most seriously injured victims can be reached and transported by emergency medical services personnel within minutes; in combat, it often takes hours simply to transport casualties off the battlefield. In combat situations, even if the transport distances are small, the hazardous nature of the forward combat areas frequently

  10. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding in the elderly: a rare aetiology masquerading as a diverticular bleed.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Nikita R; Boland, Michael R; Abdelraheem, Omar; Merrigan, Anne B

    2016-01-01

    Bleeding per rectum is a relatively common acute surgical presentation. Common causes include diverticular disease, colitis, haemorrhoids, polyps, etc. An 83-year-old man with a history of recurrent rectosigmoid diverticulitis and bilateral internal iliac artery aneurysms for 2 years presented with rectal bleeding. He was suspected to have a diverticular bleed based on history and examination. A CT scan revealed a large haematoma adjacent to the right isolated internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIIAA) almost indistinguishable from the adjacent rectosigmoid, consistent with a ruptured IIIAA and an ileorectal fistula. The fistula was of a primary vascular enteric type and was accentuated by the inflammation arising from the diverticulitis. Hence, presence of more common or apparently obvious causes should not deter clinicians from thoroughly investigating the case. Rare causes should be kept in mind while dealing with common acute presentations, especially in elderly patients with multiple comorbidities. PMID:27033287

  11. Effects of bleed-hole geometry and plenum pressure on three-dimensional shock-wave/boundary-layer/bleed interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyu, Wei J.; Rimlinger, Mark J.; Shih, Tom I.-P.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to investigate 3D shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions on a flat plate with bleed through one or more circular holes that vent into a plenum. This study was focused on how bleed-hole geometry and pressure ratio across bleed holes affect the bleed rate and the physics of the flow in the vicinity of the holes. The aspects of the bleed-hole geometry investigated include angle of bleed hole and the number of bleed holes. The plenum/freestream pressure ratios investigated range from 0.3 to 1.7. This study is based on the ensemble-averaged, 'full compressible' Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations closed by the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic turbulence model. Solutions to the ensemble-averaged N-S equations were obtained by an implicit finite-volume method using the partially-split, two-factored algorithm of Steger on an overlapping Chimera grid.

  12. Desmopressin and bleeding time in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Burroughs, A K; Matthews, K; Qadiri, M; Thomas, N; Kernoff, P; Tuddenham, E; McIntyre, N

    1985-11-16

    Desmopressin acetate 0.3 microgram/kg was given intravenously to nine patients with chronic liver disease and to a further six such patients in a double blind controlled study versus placebo. Desmopressin acetate significantly shortened the bleeding time compared with basal values in both groups and compared with placebo. There was also a significant decrease in partial thromboplastin time (but not prothrombin time) and significant increases in factor VIII and its components, von Willebrand factor and ristocetin cofactor activity, but not in factors VII, IX, X, XI, or XII. Increased fibrinolysis could be blocked by concomitant administration of tranexamic acid. No important side effects were seen. The multimer pattern of von Willebrand factor was studied for the first time in chronic liver disease. It was normal, but after administration of desmopressin acetate the percentage of multimers of higher molecular weight increased significantly. This may be an important mechanism in the shortening of the bleeding time in cirrhosis, as has been shown in uraemia and other conditions after administration of desmopressin acetate. Desmopressin acetate may be useful in correcting defects in primary haemostasis in chronic liver disease. PMID:3933677

  13. A 41-Year-Old Man with Two Types of Metachronous Peptic Ulcer Complication due to Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome—Regression of Pancreatic Primary after Chemoembolization of Hepatic Metastases: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sarkeshikian, Seyed Saeid; Ghadir, Mohammad Reza

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Gastrinoma should be suspected when the peptic ulcer(s) is postbulbar, multiple, refractory, or recurrent, or ulcer is associated with nephrolithiasis, hypocalcaemia, or erosive esophagitis. The majority of gastrinomas are malignant. Case Presentation. The patient is a 41-year-old Iranian man who has been in good health until 36 months ago when duodenal perforation and two bouts of upper GI bleeding (GIB), each two months apart occurred. He also mentioned mild watery diarrhoea and decreased appetite. Serum gastrin level was elevated. Abdominal CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and three enhancing hepatic masses. CT-guided pancreatic biopsy revealed monotonous cells. Chemoembolization of hepatic metastases was done. New ct images 6 months later showed nearly total regressed hepatic and pancreatic lesions. Conclusion. Beside previously defined situations that take gastrinoma into account as the etiology of PUD, accumulation of PUD complications is highly suggestive of Zollinger-Ellisone syndrome (ZES). Regression of pancreatic primary after chemoembolization of hepatic metastases is unexplainable at the present time. PMID:21811506

  14. Management of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding with Emphasis on Alternatives to Hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Billow, Megan R; El-Nashar, Sherif A

    2016-09-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a common problem that negatively impacts a woman's health-related quality of life and activity. Initial medical treatment includes hormonal and nonhormonal medications. If bleeding persists and no structural abnormalities are present, a repeat trial of medical therapy, a levonorgestrel intrauterine system, or an endometrial ablation can be used dependent on future fertility wishes. The levonorgestrel intrauterine system and endometrial ablation are effective, less invasive, and safe alternatives to a hysterectomy in women with AUB. A hysterectomy is the definitive treatment of AUB irrespective of the suspected cause when alternative treatments fail. Future studies should focus on detection of predictors for treatment outcomes. PMID:27521876

  15. Management of bleeding in vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Chee, Y E; Liu, S E; Irwin, M G

    2016-09-01

    Management of acute coagulopathy and blood loss during major vascular procedures poses a significant haemostatic challenge to anaesthetists. The acute coagulopathy is multifactorial in origin with tissue injury and hypotension as the precipitating factors, followed by dilution, hypothermia, acidemia, hyperfibrinolysis and systemic inflammatory response, all acting as a self-perpetuating spiral of events. The problem is confounded by the high prevalence of antithrombotic agent use in these patients and intraoperative heparin administration. Trials specifically examining bleeding management in vascular surgery are lacking, and much of the literature and guidelines are derived from studies on patients with trauma. In general, it is recommended to adopt permissive hypotension with a restrictive fluid strategy, using a combination of crystalloid and colloid solutions up to one litre during the initial resuscitation, after which blood products should be administered. A restrictive transfusion trigger for red cells remains the mainstay of treatment except for the high-risk patients, where the trigger should be individualized. Transfusion of blood components should be initiated by clinical evidence of coagulopathy such as diffuse microvascular bleeding, and then guided by either laboratory or point-of-care coagulation testing. Prophylactic antifibrinolytic use is recommended for all surgery where excessive bleeding is anticipated. Fibrinogen and prothrombin complex concentrates administration are recommended during massive transfusion, whereas rFVIIa should be reserved until all means have failed. While debates over the ideal resuscitative strategy continue, the approach to vascular haemostasis should be scientific, rational, and structured. As far as possible, therapy should be monitored and goal directed. PMID:27566811

  16. An Unusual Case of Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Fiorino, Kristin N.; Lestini, Brian; Nichols, Kim E.; Anupindi, Sudha A.; Maqbool, Asim

    2011-01-01

    A 10-year-old boy presented with a 3-day history of worsening abdominal pain, fever, emesis and melena. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a right upper quadrant mass that was confirmed by computed tomography angiogram (CTA), which showed an 8 cm well-defined retroperitoneal vascular mass. 123Iodine metaiodobenzylguanidine (123MIBG) scan indicated uptake only in the abdominal mass. Subsequent biopsy revealed a paraganglioma that was treated with chemotherapy. This case represents an unusual presentation of a paraganglioma associated with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and highlights the utility of CTA and 123MIBG in evaluation and treatment. PMID:22606522

  17. Gallbladder visualization during technetium-99m-labeled red cell scintigraphy for gastrointestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Brill, D.R.

    1985-12-01

    Localization of radionuclide activity in the gallbladder was seen on delayed views following injection of 99mTc-labeled red blood cells for gastrointestinal bleeding in five patients. The mechanism for this unusual finding probably relates to labeling of heme, the biochemical precursor of bilirubin. All patients had had prior transfusions. All but one had severe renal impairment, probably an important predisposing factor.

  18. [Role of Allelic Genes of Matrix Metalloproteinases and Their Tissue Inhibitors in the Peptic Ulcer Disease Development].

    PubMed

    Shaymardanova, E Kh; Nurgalieva, A Kh; Khidiyatova, I M; Gabbasova, L V; Kuramshina, O A; Kryukova, A Ya; Sagitov, R B; Munasipov, F R; Khusnutdinova, E Kh

    2016-03-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a chronic disease of the gastrointestinal tract, mainly manifesting itself in the formation of the fairly persistent ulcer defect of the mucous membrane of the stomach and/or duodenum. Association analysis of common polymorphisms of matrix metalloproteinases genes MMP-1 (rs1799750, rs494379), MMP-2 (rs2285052), MMP-3 (rs3025058), MMP-9 (rs3918242, rs17576), and MMP-12 (rs2276109) and their tissue inhibitors TIMP-2 (rs8179090) and TIMP-3 (rs9619311) was carried out in 353 patients with a gastric ulcer or duodenal ulcer and in 325 unrelated healthy individuals from the Republic of Bashkortostan. Associations of polymorphic variants rs1799750 and rs494379 of gene MMP-1, rs3025058 of gene MMP-3, rs3918242 and rs17576 of gene MMP-9, and rs9619311 of gene TIMP-3 with the risk of peptic ulcer disease in Russians and Tatars were revealed. PMID:27281857

  19. CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS AND OUTCOME OF PATIENTS WITH UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING AT THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT OF A TERTIARY HOSPITAL IN NIGERIA

    PubMed Central

    Rukewe, A.; Otegbayo, J.A.; Fatiregun, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a potentially life threatening condition with multiple causes. There is scarcity of health data depicting the clinical characteristics of the condition in African countries. This study was designed to describe the demographic, clinical characteristics and outcome of the patients who presented to our Emergency Department. Method: The records of cohort of all patients admitted with upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding from 1 January 2011 to 31 December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed from admission to discharge or death. Results: There were 169 patients with median age of 44.0 years (range 13-89); 25 (15.0%) of them were known peptic ulcer disease patients. Most (69.2%) of the patients were males. The most common presenting symptom was haematemesis (34.9%) followed by melaena (16.6%). There was a history of NSAIDs use in 16.8% and alcohol ingestion in 12%. Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy was performed in 6.8% cases. Twenty-three (13.6%) patients died. There was association between mortality and diastolic blood pressure; more deaths (1/7; 14.3%) occurred in those with diastolic blood pressure > 90mmHg compared with ≤90mmHg (5/70; 7.1%) (P = 0.002). There were more deaths among patients who did not receive blood transfusion (4/40; 10.0%) compared with those who had blood transfusion (2/37; 5.4%) (P=0.008). Conclusion: The common presentations were haematemesis and melaena, mainly in middle aged men with mortality in one out of seven patients. The high mortality may be due to co-morbidities and poor support services. PMID:27162520

  20. Outcome of Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A Matched Case–control Study

    PubMed Central

    Thanapirom, Kessarin; Ridtitid, Wiriyaporn; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Thungsuk, Rattikorn; Noophun, Phadet; Wongjitrat, Chatchawan; Luangjaru, Somchai; Vedkijkul, Padet; Lertkupinit, Comson; Poonsab, Swangphong; Ratanachu-ek, Thawee; Hansomburana, Piyathida; Pornthisarn, Bubpha; Thongbai, Thirada; Mahachai, Varocha; Treeprasertsuk, Sombat

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: The risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) increases in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) due to the frequent use of antiplatelets. There is some data reporting on treatment outcomes in CAD patients presenting with UGIB. We aim to determine the clinical characteristics and outcomes of UGIB in patients with CAD, compared with non-CAD patients. Patients and Methods: We conducted a prospective multi-center cohort study (THAI UGIB-2010) that enrolled 981 consecutive hospitalized patients with acute UGIB. A matched case–control analysis using this database, which was collected from 11 tertiary referral hospitals in Thailand between January 2010 and September 2011, was performed. Result: Of 981 hospitalized patients with UGIB, there were 61 CAD patients and 244 gender-matched non-CAD patients (ratio 1:4). UGIB patients with CAD were significantly older, and had more frequently used antiplatelets and warfarin than in non-CAD patients. Compared with non-CAD, the CAD patients had significantly higher Glasgow–Blatchford score, full and pre-endoscopic Rockall score and full. Peptic ulcer in CAD patients was identified more often than in non-CAD patients. UGIB patients with CAD and non-CAD had similar outcomes with regard to mortality rate, re-bleeding, surgery, embolization, and packed erythrocyte transfusion. However, CAD patients had longer duration of hospital stays than non-CAD patients. Two CAD patients died from cardiac arrest after endoscopy, whereas three non-CAD patients died from pneumonia and acute renal failure during their hospitalization. Conclusion: In Thailand, patients presenting with UGIB, concomitant CAD did not affect clinical outcome of treatment, compared with non-CAD patients, except for longer hospital stay. PMID:27184638

  1. High-altitude gastrointestinal bleeding: An observation in Qinghai-Tibetan railroad construction workers on Mountain Tanggula

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tian-Yi; Ding, Shou-Quan; Liu, Jin-Liang; Jia, Jian-Hou; Dai, Rui-Chen; Zhu, Dong-Chun; Liang, Bao-Zhu; Qi, De-Tang; Sun, Yong-Fu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) in people from lowland to high altitude and in workers on Mountain Tanggula and its causes as well as treatment and prophylaxis. METHODS: From 2001 to October 2003, we studied GIB in 13 502 workers constructing the railroad on Mountain Tanggula which is 4905 m above the sea level. The incidence of GIB in workers at different altitudes was recorded. Endoscopy was performed when the workers evacuated to Golmud (2808 m) and Xining (2261 m). The available data on altitude GIB were analyzed. RESULTS: The overall incidence of GIB was 0.49% in 13 502 workers. The incidence increased with increasing altitude. The onset of symptoms in most patients was within three weeks after arrival at high altitude. Bleeding manifested as hematemesis, melaena or hematochezia, and might be occult. Endoscopic examination showed that the causes of altitude GIB included hemorrhage gastritis, gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, and gastric erosion. Experimental studies suggested that acute gastric mucosal lesion (AGML) could be induced by hypoxic and cold stress, which might be the pathogenesis of altitude GIB. Those who consumed large amount of alcohol, aspirin or dexamethasone were at a higher risk of developing GIB. Persons who previously suffered from peptic ulcer or high-altitude polycythemia were also at risk of developing GIB. Early diagnosis, evacuation, and treatment led to early recovery. CONCLUSION: GIB is a potentially life threatening disease, if it is not treated promptly and effectively. Early diagnosis, treatment and evacuation lead to an early recovery. Death due to altitude GIB can be avoided if early symptoms and signs are recognized. PMID:17278202

  2. Does Helicobacter pylori Eradication Reduce the Risk of Open Angle Glaucoma in Patients With Peptic Ulcer Disease?

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Wen-Chi; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-09-01

    To investigate whether Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) eradication would influence the risk of primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in patients with peptic ulcer disease. From the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000, 6061 patients with peptic ulcer and receiving H pylori eradication therapy were recruited. The study cohort was subdivided into early (within 1 year) and late (after 1 year) eradication cohorts. The 24,244 control cohort subjects were those who without peptic ulcer and without receiving H pylori eradication therapy and were frequency-matched with the H pylori eradication cohort by age, sex, and the year of receiving H pylori eradication therapy. The higher incidence of POAG was observed in late H pylori eradication cohort and in early H pylori eradication cohort than in control cohort (1.57, 1.32, and 0.95, per 1000 person-year, respectively). However, overall risk of glaucoma was not significantly higher in the late eradication than in the early eradication (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.85, 95% confidence interval = 0.48-1.53). The POAG incidence was greater in the late H pylori eradication cohort when follow-up duration ≤ 5 years (1.59, per 1000 person-years). However, when follow-up duration >5 years, the incidence of POAG was greater in the early H pylori eradication cohort (1.68, per 1000 person-years). These relationships were not associated with a significantly increased or decreased risk of POAG in multivariable analyses. Either early or late H pylori eradication does not significantly reduce the risk of glaucoma in patients with peptic ulcer disease compared with normal control. PMID:26426633

  3. Does Helicobacter pylori Eradication Reduce the Risk of Open Angle Glaucoma in Patients With Peptic Ulcer Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Wen-Chi; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To investigate whether Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) eradication would influence the risk of primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in patients with peptic ulcer disease. From the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000, 6061 patients with peptic ulcer and receiving H pylori eradication therapy were recruited. The study cohort was subdivided into early (within 1 year) and late (after 1 year) eradication cohorts. The 24,244 control cohort subjects were those who without peptic ulcer and without receiving H pylori eradication therapy and were frequency-matched with the H pylori eradication cohort by age, sex, and the year of receiving H pylori eradication therapy. The higher incidence of POAG was observed in late H pylori eradication cohort and in early H pylori eradication cohort than in control cohort (1.57, 1.32, and 0.95, per 1000 person-year, respectively). However, overall risk of glaucoma was not significantly higher in the late eradication than in the early eradication (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.85, 95% confidence interval = 0.48–1.53). The POAG incidence was greater in the late H pylori eradication cohort when follow-up duration ≤5 years (1.59, per 1000 person-years). However, when follow-up duration >5 years, the incidence of POAG was greater in the early H pylori eradication cohort (1.68, per 1000 person-years). These relationships were not associated with a significantly increased or decreased risk of POAG in multivariable analyses. Either early or late H pylori eradication does not significantly reduce the risk of glaucoma in patients with peptic ulcer disease compared with normal control. PMID:26426633

  4. The diagnostic value of endoscopy and Helicobacter pylori tests for peptic ulcer patients in late post-treatment setting

    PubMed Central

    Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid; Andreson, Helena; Lõivukene, Krista; Hütt, Pirje; Kolk, Helgi; Kull, Ingrid; Labotkin, Katrin; Mikelsaar, Marika

    2004-01-01

    Background Guidelines for management of peptic ulcer patients after the treatment are largely directed to detection of H. pylori infection using only non-invasive tests. We compared the diagnostic value of non-invasive and endoscopy based H. pylori tests in a late post-treatment setting. Methods Altogether 34 patients with dyspeptic complaints were referred for gastroscopy 5 years after the treatment of peptic ulcer using a one-week triple therapy scheme. The endoscopic and histologic findings were evaluated according to the Sydney classification. Bacteriological, PCR and cytological investigations and 13C-UBT tests were performed. Results Seventeen patients were defined H. pylori positive by 13C-UBT test, PCR and histological examination. On endoscopy, peptic ulcer persisted in 4 H. pylori positive cases. Among the 6 cases with erosions of the gastric mucosa, only two patients were H. pylori positive. Mucosal atrophy and intestinal metaplasia were revealed both in the H. pylori positive and H. pylori negative cases. Bacteriological examination revealed three clarithromycin resistant H. pylori strains. Cytology failed to prove validity for diagnosing H. pylori in a post-treatment setting. Conclusions In a late post-treatment setting, patients with dyspepsia should not be monitored only by non-invasive investigation methods; it is also justified to use the classical histological evaluation of H. pylori colonisation, PCR and bacteriology as they have shown good concordance with 13C-UBT. Moreover, endoscopy and histological investigation of a gastric biopsy have proved to be the methods with an additional diagnostic value, providing the physician with information about inflammatory, atrophic and metaplastic lesions of the stomach in dyspeptic H. pylori positive and negative patients. Bacteriological methods are suggested for detecting the putative antimicrobial resistance of H. pylori, aimed at successful eradication of infection in persistent peptic ulcer cases. PMID

  5. Emergent Bleeding in Patients Receiving Direct Oral Anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Summers, Richard L; Sterling, Sarah A

    2016-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) offer clinical advantages over warfarin, such as minimal medication and food interactions and fixed dosing without the need for routine monitoring of coagulation status. As with all anticoagulants, bleeding, either spontaneous or provoked, is the most common complication. The long-term use of these drugs is increasing, and there is a crucial need for emergency medicine service professionals to understand the optimal management of associated bleeding. This review aims to describe the indications and pharmacokinetics of available DOACs; to discuss the risk of bleeding; to provide a treatment algorithm to manage DOAC-associated emergency bleeding; and to discuss future directions in bleeding management, including the role of specific reversal agents, such as the recently approved idarucizumab for reversal of the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran. Because air medical personnel are increasingly likely to encounter patients receiving DOACs, it is important that they have an understanding of how to manage patients with emergent bleeding. PMID:27255877

  6. Porcine survival model to simulate acute upper gastrointestinal bleedings.

    PubMed

    Prosst, Ruediger L; Schurr, Marc O; Schostek, Sebastian; Krautwald, Martina; Gottwald, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The existing animal models used for the simulation of acute gastrointestinal bleedings are usually non-survival models. We developed and evaluated a new porcine model (domestic pig, German Landrace) in which the animal remains alive and survives the artificial bleeding without any cardiovascular impairment. This consists of a bleeding catheter which is implanted into the stomach, then subcutaneously tunnelled from the abdomen to the neck where it is exteriorized and fixed with sutures. Using the injection of porcine blood, controllable and reproducible acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding can be simulated while maintaining normal gastrointestinal motility and physiology. Depending on the volume of blood applied through the gastric catheter, the bleeding intensity can be varied from traces of blood to a massive haemorrhage. This porcine model could be valuable, e.g. for testing the efficacy of new bleeding diagnostics in large animals before human use. PMID:26306615

  7. [EMERGENCY TREATMENT OF BLEEDING IN PATIENTS TAKING WARFARIN].

    PubMed

    Prasolov, N V; Shulutko, E M; Bulanov, A Yu; Yatskov, K V; Shcherbakov, O V

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulant therapy with vitamin K antagonists (AVK) is an effective treatment and prevention of thrombosis. One of the major disadvantages of the AVK is a risk for serious bleeding. Prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC), fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and vitamin K1 are available for control of these situations. The experience of special team ofthe Scientific Center for Hematology was the basis for presented retrospective study. Three regimens of warfarin-related bleeding were compared: PCC+ VK for several bleeding, FFP+ VK for different clinical situations and VKfor light bleeding. PCC showed himself as effective and safe hemostatic agent. Transfusions of FFP were sometimes not effective, sometimes led to TACO. Supplementation of vitamin K1 for patients of I and II groups provided more stable control of hemostasis. In III group VK vas effective to stop bleeding. Two impotent sings for conclusion: necessary of laboratory monitoring, TEG first of all; individual balance of hemostasis base of bleeding or thrombotic risks. PMID:26148369

  8. Endovascular Management of Acute Enteric Bleeding from Pancreas Transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Semiz-Oysu, Aslihan; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2007-04-15

    Arterioenteric fistula is a rare but serious complication of enteric drained pancreas transplant, which may lead to massive gastrointestinal bleeding. We present 3 patients with failed enteric drained pancreas transplants and massive gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to arterioenteric fistula. One patient was treated by embolization and the 2 others by stent graft placement. Bleeding was successfully controlled in all cases, at follow up of 5 days, 8 months, and 12 months, respectively. One patient died 24 days after embolization, of unknown causes.

  9. New Trends in Acute Management of Colonic Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Cirocchi, Roberto; Grassi, Veronica; Cavaliere, Davide; Renzi, Claudio; Tabola, Renata; Poli, Giulia; Avenia, Stefano; Farinella, Eleonora; Arezzo, Alberto; Vettoretto, Nereo; D’Andrea, Vito; Binda, Gian Andrea; Fingerhut, Abe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Colonic diverticular disease is the most common cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. In the past, this condition was usually managed with urgent colectomy. Recently, the development of endoscopy and interventional radiology has led to a change in the management of colonic diverticular bleeding. The aim of this systematic review is to define the best treatment for colonic diverticular bleeding. A systematic bibliographic research was performed on the online databases for studies (randomized controlled trials [RCTs], observational trials, case series, and case reports) published between 2005 and 2014, concerning patients admitted with a diagnosis of diverticular bleeding according to the PRISMA methodology. The outcomes of interest were: diagnosis of diverticulosis as source of bleeding; incidence of self-limiting diverticular bleeding; management of non self-limiting bleeding (endoscopy, angiography, surgery); and recurrent diverticular bleeding. Fourteen studies were retrieved for analysis. No RCTs were found. Eleven non-randomized clinical controlled trials (NRCCTs) were included in this systematic review. In all studies, the definitive diagnosis of diverticular bleeding was always made by urgent colonoscopy. The colonic diverticular bleeding stopped spontaneously in over 80% of the patients, but a re-bleeding was not rare. Recently, interventional endoscopy and angiography became the first-line approach, thus relegating emergency colectomy to patients presenting with hemodynamic instability or as a second-line treatment after failure or complications of hemostasis with less invasive treatments. Colonoscopy is effective to diagnose diverticular bleeding. Nowadays, interventional endoscopy and angiographic treatment have gained a leading role and colectomy should only be entertained in case of failure of the former. PMID:26554768

  10. [Avoiding and dealing with bleeding during endoscopic sinus surgery].

    PubMed

    Leunig, A

    2006-04-01

    Endoscopic sinus surgery is one of the most frequent surgical ENT-procedures. Bleeding during surgery may increase complications and may have negative effects on surgery and outcome. The present paper describes strategies to prevent and deal with bleeding during sinus surgery. Preoperative conservative treatment of mucosal inflammation as well the use of adrenalin for decongestion may reduce intraoperative bleeding and hence complications. PMID:16615029

  11. Multiple Polypoid Angiodysplasia with Obscure Overt Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jooyoung; Hwang, Sung Wook; Kim, Jihye; Kang, Jinwoo; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Park, Kyu Joo; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Joo Sung

    2016-01-01

    Angiodysplasia (AD) is increasingly being recognized as a major cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. Morphologically flat lesions are common types of AD, whereas the polypoid types are rare. We report a case of multiple polypoid AD in the small bowel causing severe anemia and requiring surgical treatment. A 60-year-old male patient visited our hospital with dyspnea and hematochezia. He had a history of myocardial infarction and was taking both aspirin and clopidogrel. Capsule endoscopy, enteroscopy, computed tomography, and angiography revealed multifocal vascular lesions with a polypoid shape in the jejunum. Surgical resection was performed because endoscopic treatment was considered impossible with the number and the location of lesions. The risk of recurrent bleeding related to the use of antiplatelet agents also contributed to the decision to perform surgery. AD was histologically diagnosed from the surgical specimen. He resumed taking both aspirin and clopidogrel after surgery. He fully recovered and has been doing well during the several months of follow-up. PMID:26855931

  12. Hemophilic bleeding evaluated by blood pool scanning.

    PubMed

    Green, D; Spies, S M; Rana, N A; Milgram, J W; Mintzer, R

    1981-06-30

    The technique of blood pool scanning was used to examine 15 hemophilic subjects. Employing an in vivo method for erythrocyte labeling with Technetium-99 m, a dynamic perfusion sequence is obtained using a scintillation camera positioned over the area to be examined. This demonstrates the vascularity of the tissue. Subsequently, equilibrium blood pool images of the area are obtained and analyzed with a densitometer to assess relative regional blood volume. In patients who were not bleeding but had chronic arthropathy, vascularity was not increased, and the blood volume of comparable joints was similar. By contrast, marked increases in vascularity and image density were observed in studies of acutely bleeding joints. Chronic hemarthroses were associated with persistent, but less marked increases in joint perfusion. Transient increases in joint vascularity were demonstrated after insertion of knee prostheses. In a patient with a thigh hematoma, the dimensions of the hemorrhage were clearly delineated. Since only a tracer dose of nuclide is infused intravenously, there are no allergic reactions or other side effects of the procedure. Blood pool scanning is a safe, non-invasive technique that augments clinical and radiographic evaluations, and provides a new dimension in the assessment of the hemophilic patient. PMID:6269248

  13. The international, prospective Glanzmann Thrombasthenia Registry: treatment modalities and outcomes of non-surgical bleeding episodes in patients with Glanzmann thrombasthenia.

    PubMed

    Di Minno, Giovanni; Zotz, Rainer B; d'Oiron, Roseline; Bindslev, Niels; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Poon, Man-Chiu

    2015-08-01

    Standard treatment for Glanzmann thrombasthenia is platelet transfusion. Recombinant activated factor VII has been shown to be successful in patients with Glanzmann thrombasthenia with platelet antibodies or who are refractory to platelet transfusions. The Glanzmann Thrombasthenia Registry prospectively collected worldwide information on the effectiveness and safety of platelet transfusion, recombinant activated factor VII and/or antifibrinolytics for the treatment of bleeds in patients with Glanzmann thrombasthenia. Data relating to 829 non-surgical bleeding episodes were entered into the Glanzmann Thrombasthenia Registry (severe/moderate: 216/613; spontaneous/post-traumatic: 630/199). Recombinant activated factor VII alone was used in 124/829 bleeds, recombinant activated factor VII+antifibrinolytics in 107/829, platelets±antifibrinolytics in 312/829, antifibrinolytics alone in 219/829, and recombinant activated factor VII+platelets±antifibrinolytics in 67/829. The proportion of successful treatments to stop bleeding was 91.0% in cases treated with recombinant activated factor VII only, 82.7% for recombinant activated factor VII+antifibrinolytics, 72.7% for treatment with recombinant activated factor VII+platelets±antifibrinolytics, 78.8% for platelets±antifibrinolytics and 84.7% for antifibrinolytics alone. Treatment failure was documented in 18 bleeding events (2% of the total treatments), the majority of which were in patients receiving treatment with antifibrinolytics; bleeding re-started in 6% of bleeds after initial effective treatment. Thirty-five adverse events were reported, none of which was a thromboembolic event. Among treatments that included recombinant activated factor VII, only one patient reported three possibly drug-related non-serious adverse events (nausea, dyspnea and headache). To conclude, non-surgical bleeds were common and often severe in Glanzmann thrombasthenia; both platelets and recombinant activated factor VII appeared to be

  14. Abnormal Bleeding During Menopause Hormone Therapy: Insights for Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    de Medeiros, Sebastião Freitas; Yamamoto, Márcia Marly Winck; Barbosa, Jacklyne Silva

    2013-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to review the involved mechanisms and propose actions for controlling/treating abnormal uterine bleeding during climacteric hormone therapy. Methods A systemic search of the databases SciELO, MEDLINE, and Pubmed was performed for identifying relevant publications on normal endometrial bleeding, abnormal uterine bleeding, and hormone therapy bleeding. Results Before starting hormone therapy, it is essential to exclude any abnormal organic condition, identify women at higher risk for bleeding, and adapt the regimen to suit eachwoman’s characteristics. Abnormal bleeding with progesterone/progestogen only, combined sequential, or combined continuous regimens may be corrected by changing the progestogen, adjusting the progestogen or estrogen/progestogen doses, or even switching the initial regimen to other formulation. Conclusion To diminish the occurrence of abnormal bleeding during hormone therapy (HT), it is important to tailor the regimen to the needs of individual women and identify those with higher risk of bleeding. The use of new agents as adjuvant therapies for decreasing abnormal bleeding in women on HT awaits future studies. PMID:24665210

  15. Low hemoglobin levels are associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Hasegawa, Rumiko; Shirai, Yoshinori; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding can be fatal. Blood test variables were reviewed in search of threshold values to detect the presence of occult upper GI bleeding. The records of 1,023 patients who underwent endoscopy at the National Hospital Organization Shimoshizu Hospital from October 2014, to September 2015, were retrospectively reviewed. Of those, 95 had upper GI bleeding. One-way analysis of variance was applied to blood test variables comparing patients with and without upper GI bleeding. Logistic regression analysis was applied to detect the association of blood test parameters with upper GI bleeding, and receiver-operator characteristics were applied to establish threshold values. White blood cell count (WBC), platelet (Plt) count, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels were higher, and hemoglobin (Hb) and albumin (Alb) levels were lower in patients with upper GI bleeding. Logistic regression analysis showed that low Hb was significantly associated with upper GI bleeding and a Hb value of 10.8 g/dl was established as the threshold for the diagnosis. In patients with upper GI bleeding, WBC, Plt count, and BUN levels were higher and Hb and Alb levels were reduced. Hb at 10.8 g/dl was established as a threshold value to detect upper GI bleeding. PMID:27588176

  16. Modeling of Fixed-Exit Porous Bleed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.; Saunders, John D.

    2008-01-01

    A model has been developed to simulate a fixed-exit porous bleed system for supersonic inlets. The fixed-exit model allows the amount of bleed flow to vary according to local flow conditions and fixed-exit characteristics of the bleed system. This variation is important for the control of shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions within the inlet. The model computes the bleed plenum static pressure rather than requiring its specification. The model was implemented in the Wind-US computational fluid dynamics code. The model was then verified and validated against experimental data for bleed on a flat plate with and without an impinging oblique shock and for bleed in a Mach 3.0 axisymmetric, mixed-compression inlet. The model was able to accurately correlate the plenum pressures with bleed rates and simulate the effect of the bleed on the downstream boundary layer. Further, the model provided a realistic simulation of the initiation of inlet unstart. The results provide the most in-depth examination to date of bleed models for use in the simulation of supersonic inlets. The results also highlight the limitations of the models and aspects that require further research.

  17. Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Risk of Abnormal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Sharma, Eesha

    2016-09-01

    Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) increase the risk of abnormal bleeding by lowering platelet serotonin and hence the efficiency of platelet-driven hemostasis; by increasing gastric acidity and possibly gastric ulceration; and by other mechanisms. The upper gastrointestinal tract is the commonest site of SRI-related abnormal bleeding; bleeding at this location may be increased by concurrent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy and by treatment with antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs. Bleeding at this location may be reduced by concurrent administration of acid-suppressing drugs. PMID:27514297

  18. The Safety of Thoracentesis in Patients with Uncorrected Bleeding Risk

    PubMed Central

    Argento, A. Christine; Murphy, Terrence E.; Araujo, Katy L. B.; Pisani, Margaret A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Thoracentesis is commonly performed to evaluate pleural effusions. Many medications (warfarin, heparin, clopidogrel) or physiological factors (elevated International Normalized Ratio [INR], thrombocytopenia, uremia) increase the risk for bleeding. Frequently these medications are withheld or transfusions are performed to normalize physiological parameters before a procedure. The safety of performing thoracentesis without correction of these bleeding risks has not been prospectively evaluated. Methods: This prospective observational cohort study enrolled 312 patients who underwent thoracentesis. All patients were evaluated for the presence of risk factors for bleeding. Hematocrit levels were obtained pre- and postprocedure, and the occurrence of postprocedural hemothorax was evaluated. Measurements and Main Results: Thoracenteses were performed in 312 patients, 42% of whom had a risk for bleeding. Elevated INR, secondary to liver disease or warfarin, and renal disease were the two most common etiologies for bleeding risk, although many patients had multiple potential bleeding risks. There was no significant difference in pre- and postprocedural hematocrit levels in patients with a bleeding risk when compared with patients with no bleeding risk. No patient developed a hemothorax as a result of the thoracentesis. Conclusions: This single-center, observational study suggests that thoracentesis may be safely performed without prior correction of coagulopathy, thrombocytopenia, or medication-induced bleeding risk. This may reduce the morbidity associated with transfusions or withholding of medications. PMID:23952852

  19. Hemostatic Powders in Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan N

    2015-07-01

    Topical hemostatic agents and powders are an emerging modality in the endoscopic management of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. This systematic review demonstrates the effectiveness and safety of these agents with special emphasis on TC-325 and Ankaferd Blood Stopper. The unique noncontact/nontraumatic application, ability to cover large areas of bleed, and ease of use make these hemostatic agents an attractive option in certain clinical situations, such as massive bleeding with poor visualization, salvage therapy, and diffuse bleeding from luminal malignancies. PMID:26142037

  20. Improvements in Modeling 90 degree Bleed Holes for Supersonic Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.

    2009-01-01

    The modeling of porous bleed regions as boundary conditions in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of supersonic inlet flows has been improved through a scaling of sonic flow coefficient data for 90deg bleed holes. The scaling removed the Mach number as a factor in computing the sonic flow coefficient and allowed the data to be fitted with a quadratic equation, with the only factor being the ratio of the plenum static pressure to the surface static pressure. The implementation of the bleed model into the Wind-US CFD flow solver was simplified by no longer requiring the evaluation of the flow properties at the boundary-layer edge. The quadratic equation can be extrapolated to allow the modeling of small amounts of blowing, which can exist when recirculation of the bleed flow occurs within the bleed region. The improved accuracy of the bleed model was demonstrated through CFD simulations of bleed regions on a flat plate in supersonic flow with and without an impinging oblique shock. The bleed model demonstrated good agreement with experimental data and three-dimensional CFD simulations of bleed holes.

  1. Emergency diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding by fiberoptic endoscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Villar, H V; Roberts Fender, H; Watson, L C; Thompson, J C

    1977-01-01

    Emergency esophagogastroduodenoscopy has been performed in 192 consecutive patients admitted with massive gastrointestinal bleeding. Accurate endoscopic diagnosis was made in 184 or 96%; 58 patients underwent emergency operations to control bleeding with an overall operative mortality of 26%. Excluding 16 patients who underwent emergency portacaval shunting, the operative mortality was 7%. In 6 patients, the bleeding was controlled by endoscopic electrocoagulation. There were no complications. Emergency endoscopy should be done routinely as the primary diagnostic approach in the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:300236

  2. Video capsule endoscopy in left ventricular assist device recipients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Amornsawadwattana, Surachai; Nassif, Michael; Raymer, David; LaRue, Shane; Chen, Chien-Huan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether video capsule endoscopy (VCE) affects the outcomes of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) recipients with gastrointestinal bleeding. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of LVAD recipients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) who underwent VCE at a tertiary medical center between 2005 and 2013. All patients were admitted and monitored with telemetry and all VCE and subsequent endoscopic procedures were performed as inpatients. A VCE study was considered positive only when P2 lesions were found and was regarded as negative if P1 or P0 were identified. All patients were followed until heart transplant, death, or the end of the study. RESULTS: Between 2005 and 2013, 30 patients with LVAD underwent VCE. Completion rate of VCE was 93.3% and there was no capsule retention. No interference of VCE recording or the function of LVAD was found. VCE was positive in 40% of patients (n = 12). The most common finding was active small intestinal bleeding (50%) and small intestinal angiodysplasia (33.3%). There was no difference in the rate of recurrent bleeding between patients with positive and negative VCE study (50.0% vs 55.6%, P = 1.00) during an average of 11.6 ± 9.6 mo follow up. Among patients with positive VCE, the recurrent bleeding rate did not differ whether subsequent endoscopy was performed (50% vs 50%, P = 1.00). CONCLUSION: VCE can be safely performed in LVAD recipients with a diagnostic yield of 40%. VCE does not affect recurrent bleeding in LVAD patients regardless of findings. PMID:27182165

  3. Successful management of severe refractory acquired immune bleeding disorder: Prior to insisting surgery

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jafar, Hassan; Al-Barjas, H.; Hashem, Raed A.; Refaii, Thanaa M.K.; AlSaeed, Ahmad M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Acquired bleeding disorders are rare and may be missed before surgery. Additionally, they may be refractory to conventional treatments. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 50-year-old patient experienced prolonged post-operative bleeding when his bleeding disorder was missed prior to his undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy. Post-operative investigations revealed severe acquired von Willebrand syndrome associated with a monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. A few months later, he required umbilical herniorrhaphy, but he did not respond to attempts to raise his von Willebrand factor antigen and activity levels using conventional therapies, including desmopressin, cryoprecipitate, intravenous immunoglobulin, and Von Willebrand factor concentrate. A triple therapy combination of dexamethasone, intravenous immunoglobulin, and mycophenolate mofetil was administered, with a successful and sustained response, lasting about 2 months. The surgery was performed safely, without any complications. DISCUSSION Conventional acquired von Willebrand syndrome treatment is usually aimed at replacing von Willebrand factor or stimulating its secretion from storage in endothelial cells. In the present case, the alternative treatment was directed against both the humoral and cell-mediated immune mechanisms. CONCLUSION This case of acquired bleeding disorder showed that more attention must be given to a patient's coagulation profile, even if only very minor laboratory coagulation derangements are detected prior to surgery, to avoid missing such rare disorders. The described triple therapy demonstrated good effects and may be considered for inclusion in a controlled randomized study to determine its usefulness for other surgeries delayed due to severe acquired bleeding disorders. To the best of our knowledge, this triple combination treatment has not been previously used for the treatment of severe acquired bleeding disorders that are refractory to conventional therapies. PMID

  4. [Management of massive bleeding in 2013: seven questions and answers].

    PubMed

    Godier, A; Samama, C M; Susen, S

    2013-05-01

    The management of massive bleeding has improved, thanks to high-quality blood components and new transfusion strategies. However, it remains controversial and, despite a huge body of literature, randomised control trials are still lacking. However, the therapeutic approach has also evolved, requiring earlier and more active management. If a 'no delay' management is well recognized, its modes are still discussed. Immediate delivery of blood products with ratios close to 1:1:1 for RBC units/fresh frozen plasma/platelet concentrates, through massive transfusion protocol using blood packs, has been advocated, but yet this approach is not evidence-based. Secondly, a targeted strategy to provide fibrinogen concentrates is under evaluation. Tranexamic acid is effective in trauma patients. Recombinant factor VIIa should only be used on a compassionate basis. PMID:23587620

  5. Fermented Foods: Are They Tasty Medicines for Helicobacter pylori Associated Peptic Ulcer and Gastric Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Mydhily R. B.; Chouhan, Deepak; Sen Gupta, Sourav; Chattopadhyay, Santanu

    2016-01-01

    More than a million people die every year due to gastric cancer and peptic ulcer. Helicobacter pylori infection in stomach is the most important reason for these diseases. Interestingly, only 10–20% of the H. pylori infected individuals suffer from these gastric diseases and rest of the infected individuals remain asymptomatic. The genotypes of H. pylori, host genetic background, lifestyle including smoking and diet may determine clinical outcomes. People from different geographical regions have different food habits, which also include several unique fermented products of plant and animal origins. When consumed raw, the fermented foods bring in fresh inocula of microbes to gastrointestinal tract and several strains of these microbes, like Lactobacillus and Saccharomyces are known probiotics. In vitro and in vivo experiments as well as clinical trials suggest that several probiotics have anti-H. pylori effects. Here we discuss the possibility of using natural probiotics present in traditional fermented food and beverages to obtain protection against H. pylori induced gastric diseases. PMID:27504109

  6. Long-Term Recurrence Rates of Peptic Ulcers without Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jae Hyun; Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Kim, Byung-Wook; Jee, Sam Ryong; Chung, Woo Chul; Shim, Ki-Nam; Baik, Gwang Ho; Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Sang Gyun; Kim, Jin Il

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The purpose of this study is to investigate the recurrence rate of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) over a long follow-up period with PUD patients without Helicobacter pylori. Methods We retrospectively reviewed patients diagnosed with PUD on endoscopy and divided them into two groups: a H. pylori-negative group (HP-negative group), and a group of patients with untreated H. pylori (HP noneradicated group). We compared the recurrence rates of PUD in these two groups and analyzed the factors that affected ulcer recurrence. Results Total of nine hospitals in Korea participated, and a total of 1,761 patients were retrospectively reviewed. The HP-negative group included 553 patients, and the HP noneradicated group included 372 patients. The 5-year cumulative probabilities of PUD recurrence were 36.4% in the HP-negative group and 43.8% in the HP noneradicated group (p=0.113). The factors that were found to affect recurrence in the HP-negative group were elder, male, and comorbid chronic kidney disease. Conclusions The 5-year cumulative probability of PUD recurrence without H. pylori infection after a long-term follow-up was 36.4% and the factors that affected recurrence were elder, male, and comorbid chronic kidney disease. PMID:27114412

  7. Depression and the Risk of Peptic Ulcer Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chih-Chao; Hsu, Yi-Chao; Chang, Kuang-Hsi; Lee, Chang-Yin; Chong, Lee-Won; Lin, Cheng-Li; Shang, Chuin-Shee; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-12-01

    The risk of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) among patients with depression has raised concern. This study determined the association between depression and the subsequent development of PUD using claims data.Patients newly diagnosed with depression in 2000 to 2010 were identified as depression cohort from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The comparison cohort was randomly selected from subjects without depression, frequency matched by age and gender and diagnosis date, with a size 2-fold of the size of the depression cohort. The incidence of PUD was evaluated for both cohorts by the end of 2011. We calculated the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of PUD using the Cox proportional hazards regression model.The depression cohort consisted of 23,536 subjects (129,751 person-years), and the comparison cohort consisted of 47,069 subjects (285,592 person-years). The incidence of PUD was 2-fold higher in the depression cohort than in the comparison cohort (33.2 vs 16.8 per 1000 person-years) with an age adjusted HR of 1.97 (95% CI = 1.89-2.06) or a multivariable adjusted HR of 1.35 (95% CI = 1.29-1.42).Depression might increase the risk of developing PUD. Prospective clinical studies of the relationship between depression and PUD are warranted. PMID:26705225

  8. Increased Subsequent Risk of Peptic Ulcer Diseases in Patients With Bipolar Disorders.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yi-Chao; Hsu, Chih-Chao; Chang, Kuang-Hsi; Lee, Chang-Yin; Chong, Lee-Won; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have reported that patients with bipolar disorders (BDs) exhibit increased physical comorbidity and psychological distress. Studies have shown that schizophrenia and anxiety increase the risk of peptic ulcer diseases (PUDs). Therefore, we conducted this study to determine the association between these 2 diseases and examine the possible risk factors. We used patients diagnosed with BDs from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A comparison cohort comprising patients without BDs was frequency matched by age, sex, and comorbidities, and the occurrence of PUDs was evaluated in both the cohorts. The BD and non-BD cohort consisted of 21,060 patients with BDs and 84,240 frequency-matched patients without BDs, respectively. The incidence of PUDs (hazard ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.43-1.59; P < 0.001) was higher among the patients with BDs than the control patients. Cox models showed that irrespective of comorbidities, BDs were an independent risk factor for PUDs. Patients with BDs exhibit a substantially higher risk for developing PUDs. According to our data, we suggest that, following a diagnosis of BD, practitioners could notice the occurrence of PUD and associated prevention. Further prospective clinical studies investigating the relationship between BDs and PUDs are warranted. PMID:26200637

  9. Increased Subsequent Risk of Peptic Ulcer Diseases in Patients With Bipolar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yi-Chao; Hsu, Chih-Chao; Chang, Kuang-Hsi; Lee, Chang-Yin; Chong, Lee-Won; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have reported that patients with bipolar disorders (BDs) exhibit increased physical comorbidity and psychological distress. Studies have shown that schizophrenia and anxiety increase the risk of peptic ulcer diseases (PUDs). Therefore, we conducted this study to determine the association between these 2 diseases and examine the possible risk factors. We used patients diagnosed with BDs from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A comparison cohort comprising patients without BDs was frequency matched by age, sex, and comorbidities, and the occurrence of PUDs was evaluated in both the cohorts. The BD and non-BD cohort consisted of 21,060 patients with BDs and 84,240 frequency-matched patients without BDs, respectively. The incidence of PUDs (hazard ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.43–1.59; P < 0.001) was higher among the patients with BDs than the control patients. Cox models showed that irrespective of comorbidities, BDs were an independent risk factor for PUDs. Patients with BDs exhibit a substantially higher risk for developing PUDs. According to our data, we suggest that, following a diagnosis of BD, practitioners could notice the occurrence of PUD and associated prevention. Further prospective clinical studies investigating the relationship between BDs and PUDs are warranted. PMID:26200637

  10. Fermented Foods: Are They Tasty Medicines for Helicobacter pylori Associated Peptic Ulcer and Gastric Cancer?

    PubMed

    Nair, Mydhily R B; Chouhan, Deepak; Sen Gupta, Sourav; Chattopadhyay, Santanu

    2016-01-01

    More than a million people die every year due to gastric cancer and peptic ulcer. Helicobacter pylori infection in stomach is the most important reason for these diseases. Interestingly, only 10-20% of the H. pylori infected individuals suffer from these gastric diseases and rest of the infected individuals remain asymptomatic. The genotypes of H. pylori, host genetic background, lifestyle including smoking and diet may determine clinical outcomes. People from different geographical regions have different food habits, which also include several unique fermented products of plant and animal origins. When consumed raw, the fermented foods bring in fresh inocula of microbes to gastrointestinal tract and several strains of these microbes, like Lactobacillus and Saccharomyces are known probiotics. In vitro and in vivo experiments as well as clinical trials suggest that several probiotics have anti-H. pylori effects. Here we discuss the possibility of using natural probiotics present in traditional fermented food and beverages to obtain protection against H. pylori induced gastric diseases. PMID:27504109

  11. Medical management of heavy menstrual bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Maybin, Jacqueline A; Critchley, Hilary OD

    2016-01-01

    Women with benign heavy menstrual bleeding have the choice of a number of medical treatment options to reduce their blood loss and improve quality of life. The role of the clinician is to provide information to facilitate women in making an appropriate choice. Unfortunately, many options can be associated with hormonal side effects, prevention of fertility and lack of efficacy, leading to discontinuation and progression to surgical interventions. Herein, we discuss the various options currently available to women, including antifibrinolytics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory preparations, oral contraceptive pills and oral, injectable and intrauterine progestogens. In addition, we describe the more novel option of selective progesterone receptor modulators and their current benefits and limitations. PMID:26695687

  12. Medical management of heavy menstrual bleeding.

    PubMed

    Maybin, Jacqueline A; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2016-01-01

    Women with benign heavy menstrual bleeding have the choice of a number of medical treatment options to reduce their blood loss and improve quality of life. The role of the clinician is to provide information to facilitate women in making an appropriate choice. Unfortunately, many options can be associated with hormonal side effects, prevention of fertility and lack of efficacy, leading to discontinuation and progression to surgical interventions. Herein, we discuss the various options currently available to women, including antifibrinolytics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory preparations, oral contraceptive pills and oral, injectable and intrauterine progestogens. In addition, we describe the more novel option of selective progesterone receptor modulators and their current benefits and limitations. PMID:26695687

  13. Prostatic carcinoma: rectal bleeding after radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, A.R.; Steckel, R.J.

    1981-06-01

    A 64-year-old man had a prostatic nodule on routine physical examination; per-rectal needle biopsies revealed a single focus of well differentiated adenocarcinoma. The patient had no history of urinary obstruction or of bowel difficulties. Accordingly, this was clinical stage II carcinoma of the prostate. The patient chose to receive external radiation therapy and was given small-field rotational treatment to a dose of 7000 rad (70 Gy) at a rate of 800 rad (8 Gy) weekly. Late in treatment, he experienced transitory diarrhea with flatulence, but this cleared with completion of treatment. Twenty months later he began to note frequent soft bowel movements, occasionally with red blood. At sigmoidoscopy 24 months after completion of treatment, the rectal mucosa was noted to be friable with minimal bleeding, presumably the result of radiation proctitis.

  14. Evaluation of gingival bleeding awareness by comparison of self-reports and clinical measurements of freshman dental students

    PubMed Central

    Baser, Ulku; Germen, Meliha; Erdem, Yelda; Issever, Halim; Yalcin, Funda

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aims of this descriptive, cross-sectional investigation were to evaluate the gingival health awareness of dental students by comparing their clinical gingival bleeding scores and self-reports, and to compare differences in awareness between males and females. Methods: In total, 100 (51 males, 49 females) freshman dental students were included in the study. Periodontal indices recorded were: Presence of plaque percentage (plaque index [PI], %), percentage of sites of bleeding on probing (BOP, %), probing depth, and community periodontal index (CPI). Percent agreement, kappa agreement, sensitivity, and specificity were calculated by comparing their self-reported gingival bleeding and BOP%. Results: The self-reports of gingival bleeding exhibited statistically significant correlations with BOP% in females (r = 0.42, P = 0.003). Female students showed a higher degree of awareness when kappa agreement, 0.23 (males: 0.16, females: 0.39), sensitivity, 48% (males: 42%, females: 51%), and specificity, 95% (males: 90%, females: 100%) were calculated. Although male dental students had higher PI and CPI scores, there was no significant difference by gender in the clinical measurements. Conclusions: According to our results, the validity of self-reported gingival bleeding was higher among dental students than in previous population-based studies. Female dental students showed a higher degree of awareness than males of their gingival health. Half of the included dental students could not differentiate whether they had gingival bleeding when there was actual bleeding. More emphasis should be given to the education of dental students regarding the relationship between gingival bleeding and active periodontal disease. PMID:25202217

  15. Value of early capsular endoscopy for severe gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Clinton L.

    2004-01-01

    This case illustrates the importance of early capsule endoscopy in cases of severe rectal bleeding when initial diagnostic tests do not document the site of bleeding. Although this case occurred in a community hospital capable of performing capsule endoscopy, I practice at a city hospital that serves the poor and underserved and currently does not have capsule endoscopy capability. Over the years, we have seen several cases of severe rectal bleeding where the site of bleeding was never identified, despite multiple diagnostic procedures short of capsule endoscopy. Often times, the bleeding stops spontaneously or ends in emergency surgery where morbidity or mortality is increased. Physicians like myself need to be made aware of this relatively new diagnostic tool that provides added value to standard diagnostic tests for evaluating severe rectal bleeding of unknown etiology. Early identification of the site of rectal bleeding may curtail the need for multiple transfusions, resolve economical burden, and reduce morbidity and mortality associated with severe rectal bleeding. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:15622697

  16. Portal hypertension and gastrointestinal bleeding: Diagnosis, prevention and management

    PubMed Central

    Biecker, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Bleeding from esophageal varices is a life threatening complication of portal hypertension. Primary prevention of bleeding in patients at risk for a first bleeding episode is therefore a major goal. Medical prophylaxis consists of non-selective beta-blockers like propranolol or carvedilol. Variceal endoscopic band ligation is equally effective but procedure related morbidity is a drawback of the method. Therapy of acute bleeding is based on three strategies: vasopressor drugs like terlipressin, antibiotics and endoscopic therapy. In refractory bleeding, self-expandable stents offer an option for bridging to definite treatments like transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). Treatment of bleeding from gastric varices depends on vasopressor drugs and on injection of varices with cyanoacrylate. Strategies for primary or secondary prevention are based on non-selective beta-blockers but data from large clinical trials is lacking. Therapy of refractory bleeding relies on shunt-procedures like TIPS. Bleeding from ectopic varices, portal hypertensive gastropathy and gastric antral vascular ectasia-syndrome is less common. Possible medical and endoscopic treatment options are discussed. PMID:23964137

  17. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Cirrhotic Patients with Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Biecker, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding related to portal hypertension is a serious complication in patients with liver cirrhosis. Most patients bleed from esophageal or gastric varices, but bleeding from ectopic varices or portal hypertensive gastropathy is also possible. The management of acute bleeding has changed over the last years. Patients are managed with a combination of endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment. The endoscopic treatment of choice for esophageal variceal bleeding is variceal band ligation. Bleeding from gastric varices is treated by injection with cyanoacrylate. Treatment with vasoactive drugs as well as antibiotic treatment is started before or at the time point of endoscopy. The first-line treatment for primary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding is nonselective beta blockers. Pharmacologic therapy is recommended for most patients; band ligation is an alternative in patients with contraindications for or intolerability of beta blockers. Treatment options for secondary prophylaxis include variceal band ligation, beta blockers, a combination of nitrates and beta blockers, and combination of band ligation and pharmacologic treatment. A clear superiority of one treatment over the other has not been shown. Bleeding from portal hypertensive gastropathy or ectopic varices is less common. Treatment options include beta blocker therapy, injection therapy, and interventional radiology. PMID:27335828

  18. 14 CFR 33.66 - Bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bleed air system. 33.66 Section 33.66 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.66 Bleed air system....

  19. 14 CFR 33.66 - Bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bleed air system. 33.66 Section 33.66 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.66 Bleed air system....

  20. 14 CFR 33.66 - Bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bleed air system. 33.66 Section 33.66 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.66 Bleed air system....

  1. 14 CFR 33.66 - Bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bleed air system. 33.66 Section 33.66 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.66 Bleed air system....

  2. 14 CFR 33.66 - Bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bleed air system. 33.66 Section 33.66 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.66 Bleed air system....

  3. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section 864.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time...

  4. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section 864.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time...

  5. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section 864.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time...

  6. Management of bleeding complications in patients with cancer on DOACs.

    PubMed

    Schulman, Sam; Shrum, Jeffrey; Majeed, Ammar

    2016-04-01

    There has been a concern that major bleeding events (MBE) on direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) will be more difficult to manage than on vitamin K antagonists. Patients with cancer and DOAC-associated bleeding may be even more of a challenge to manage. We therefore reviewed the literature on bleeding in patients with cancer on DOACs. In addition, we performed an analysis of individual patient data from 5 phase III trials on treatment with dabigatran with focus on those with cancer. In 6 randomized trials the risk of MBE in patients with cancer was similar on treatment with DOACs compared to vitamin K antagonists. Bleeding was in the majority of patients managed with supportive therapy alone. In the individual patient data analysis there were no significant differences in use of hemostatic products, transfusion of red cells, effectiveness of management, bleeding-related mortality or 30-day all-cause mortality between patients with cancer treated with dabigatran or with warfarin. Local hemostatic therapy, including resection of the cancer site was more common in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding with cancer than among those without cancer. We conclude that management of bleeding in patients with cancer and on a DOAC does not pose a greater challenge than management of bleeding in patients without cancer. PMID:27067968

  7. Long-lasting intestinal bleeding in an old patient with multiple mucosal vascular abnormalities and Glanzmann's thrombasthenia: 3-year pharmacological management.

    PubMed

    Coppola, A; De Stefano, V; Tufano, A; Nardone, G; Amoriello, A; Cerbone, A M; Di Minno, G

    2002-09-01

    A 75-year-old woman with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia was admitted because of persistent melaena. Endoscopic examination showed multiple angiodysplastic lesions, with active bleeding in small and large bowel. Electro-coagulation of some lesions, octreotide, conjugated oestrogens and selective embolization of jejunal vessels did not change transfusion requirements. After 8 month-transfusions, ethinylestradiol + norethisterone in association with octreotide was started, leading to no transfusion over the following 9 months. Bleeding recurred after withdrawing octreotide and substituting ethinylestradiol + norgestrel for the ethinylestradiol + norethisterone combination. Re-introduction of octreotide did not improve bleeding; however, a reduction of transfusion requirement was observed when the ethinylestradiol + norethisterone pill was re-administered. The association of octreotide and of an oestrogen-progesterone combination was helpful in the difficult management of recurrent bleeding in this patient with diffuse gastrointestinal vascular abnormalities and a severe condition predisposing to bleeding. PMID:12270009

  8. The role of capsule endoscopy in acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Nadler, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common cause of hospitalization, resulting in about 400,000 hospital admissions annually, with a mortality rate of 5–10%. It is estimated that 5% of acute GI bleedings are of obscure origin with a normal esophagogastroduodenoscopy and ileocolonoscopy. Capsule endoscopy is the state-of-the-art procedure for inspection of the entire small bowel with a high sensitivity for the detection of causes of bleeding. In recent years, many studies have addressed the sensitivity and outcome of capsule-endoscopy procedures in patients with acute GI bleeding. This review looks at the role of capsule endoscopy in the evaluation of patients with acute GI bleeding from either the upper GI tract or small bowel. PMID:24587821

  9. Alternative Treatment for Bleeding Peristomal Varices: Percutaneous Parastomal Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Pabon-Ramos, Waleska M.; Niemeyer, Matthew M.; Dasika, Narasimham L.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To describe how peristomal varices can be successfully embolized via a percutaneous parastomal approach. Methods: The medical records of patients who underwent this procedure between December 1, 2000, and May 31, 2008, were retrospectively reviewed. Procedural details were recorded. Median fluoroscopy time and bleeding-free interval were calculated. Results: Seven patients underwent eight parastomal embolizations. The technical success rate was 88 % (one failure). All embolizations were performed with coils combined with a sclerosant, another embolizing agent, or both. Of the seven successful parastomal embolizations, there were three cases of recurrent bleeding; the median time to rebleeding was 45 days (range 26-313 days). The remaining four patients did not develop recurrent bleeding during the follow-up period; their median bleeding-free interval was 131 days (range 40-659 days). Conclusion: This case review demonstrated that percutaneous parastomal embolization is a feasible technique to treat bleeding peristomal varices.

  10. Endoscopic Management of Tumor Bleeding from Inoperable Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Il

    2015-01-01

    Tumor bleeding is not a rare complication in patients with inoperable gastric cancer. Endoscopy has important roles in the diagnosis and primary treatment of tumor bleeding, similar to its roles in other non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases. Although limited studies have been performed, endoscopic therapy has been highly successful in achieving initial hemostasis. One or a combination of endoscopic therapy modalities, such as injection therapy, mechanical therapy, or ablative therapy, can be used for hemostasis in patients with endoscopic stigmata of recent hemorrhage. However, rebleeding after successful hemostasis with endoscopic therapy frequently occurs. Endoscopic therapy may be a treatment option for successfully controlling this rebleeding. Transarterial embolization or palliative surgery should be considered when endoscopic therapy fails. For primary and secondary prevention of tumor bleeding, proton pump inhibitors can be prescribed, although their effectiveness to prevent bleeding remains to be investigated. PMID:25844339

  11. Successful hemostasis of intractable rectal variceal bleeding using variceal embolization.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung Soo; Kim, Eun Hye; Kim, Man Deuk; Lee, Won Jae; Kim, Seung Up

    2015-02-28

    Portal hypertension causes portosystemic shunting along the gastrointestinal tract, resulting in gastrointestinal varices. Rectal varices and their bleeding is a rare complication, but it can be fatal without appropriate treatment. However, because of its rarity, no established treatment strategy is yet available. In the setting of intractable rectal variceal bleeding, a transjugular intravenous portosystemic shunt can be a treatment of choice to enable portal decompression and thus achieve hemostasis. However, in the case of recurrent rectal variceal bleeding despite successful transjugular intravenous portosystemic shunt, alternative measures to control bleeding are required. Here, we report on a patient with liver cirrhosis who experienced recurrent rectal variceal bleeding even after successful transjugular intravenous portosystemic shunt and was successfully treated with variceal embolization. PMID:25741168

  12. On Supersonic-Inlet Boundary-Layer Bleed Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harloff, Gary J.; Smith, Gregory E.

    1995-01-01

    Boundary-layer bleed in supersonic inlets is typically used to avoid separation from adverse shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions and subsequent total pressure losses in the subsonic diffuser and to improve normal shock stability. Methodologies used to determine bleed requirements are reviewed. Empirical sonic flow coefficients are currently used to determine the bleed hole pattern. These coefficients depend on local Mach number, pressure ratio, hole geometry, etc. A new analytical bleed method is presented to compute sonic flow coefficients for holes and narrow slots and predictions are compared with published data to illustrate the accuracy of the model. The model can be used by inlet designers and as a bleed boundary condition for computational fluid dynamic studies.

  13. New insights to occult gastrointestinal bleeding: From pathophysiology to therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Capilla, Antonio Damián; De La Torre-Rubio, Paloma; Redondo-Cerezo, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is still a clinical challenge for gastroenterologists. The recent development of novel technologies for the diagnosis and treatment of different bleeding causes has allowed a better management of patients, but it also determines the need of a deeper comprehension of pathophysiology and the analysis of local expertise in order to develop a rational management algorithm. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding can be divided in occult, when a positive occult blood fecal test is the main manifestation, and overt, when external sings of bleeding are visible. In this paper we are going to focus on overt gastrointestinal bleeding, describing the physiopathology of the most usual causes, analyzing the diagnostic procedures available, from the most classical to the novel ones, and establishing a standard algorithm which can be adapted depending on the local expertise or availability. Finally, we will review the main therapeutic options for this complex and not so uncommon clinical problem. PMID:25133028

  14. Coagulopathy induced by acidosis, hypothermia and hypocalcaemia in severe bleeding.

    PubMed

    De Robertis, E; Kozek-Langenecker, S A; Tufano, R; Romano, G M; Piazza, O; Zito Marinosci, G

    2015-01-01

    Acidosis, hypothermia and hypocalcaemia are determinants for morbidity and mortality during massive hemorrhages. However, precise pathological mechanisms of these environmental factors and their potential additive or synergistic anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet effects are not fully elucidated and are at least in part controversial. Best available evidences from experimental trials indicate that acidosis and hypothermia progressively impair platelet aggregability and clot formation. Considering the cell-based model of coagulation physiology, hypothermia predominantly prolongs the initiation phase, while acidosis prolongs the propagation phase of thrombin generation. Acidosis increases fibrinogen breakdown while hypothermia impairs its synthesis. Acidosis and hypothermia have additive effects. The effect of hypocalcaemia on coagulopathy is less investigated but it appears that below the cut-off of 0.9 mmol/L, several enzymatic steps in the plasmatic coagulation system are blocked while above that cut-off effects remain without clinical sequalae. The impact of environmental factor on hemostasis is underestimated in clinical practice due to our current practice of using routine coagulation laboratory tests such as partial thromboplastin time or prothrombin time, which are performed at standardized test temperature, after pH correction, and upon recalcification. Temperature-adjustments are feasible in viscoelastic point-of-care tests such as thrombelastography and thromboelastometry which may permit quantification of hypothermia-induced coagulopathy. Rewarming hypothermic bleeding patients is highly recommended because it improves patient outcome. Despite the absence of high-quality evidence, calcium supplementation is clinical routine in bleeding management. Buffer administration may not reverse acidosis-induced coagulopathy but may be essential for the efficacy of coagulation factor concentrates such as recombinant activated factor VII. PMID:24608516

  15. Acquired hemophilia A as a cause of recurrent bleeding into the pleural cavity - case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wojtyś, Małgorzata; Żuk, Ewa; Alchimowicz, Jacek; Grodzki, Tomasz

    2014-09-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a coagulation disorder caused by autoantibodies against blood coagulation factor VIII. The first sign of this disease is often massive bleeding, which can affect patients after routine procedures. The parameter which indicates the presence of this condition is isolated prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The present article describes a case of a 32-year-old man with acute interstitial pneumonia and pleural effusion, in whom a massive hemothorax appeared after thoracocentesis; active bleeding was observed after the introduction of a chest tube. The patient was operated on, and no pinpoint bleeding was discovered during the procedure. Active bleeding was still taking place postoperatively. The patient underwent another operation after 6 days. Once more, no pinpoint bleeding was found. Prolonged APTT was observed. The activity of blood coagulation factor VIII was 3.04%. The presence of antibodies against factor VIII was confirmed, and acquired hemophilia was diagnosed. The article also includes an analysis of the literature on acquired hemophilia. PMID:26336444

  16. Management of bleeding following major trauma: a European guideline

    PubMed Central

    Spahn, Donat R; Cerny, Vladimir; Coats, Timothy J; Duranteau, Jacques; Fernández-Mondéjar, Enrique; Gordini, Giovanni; Stahel, Philip F; Hunt, Beverley J; Komadina, Radko; Neugebauer, Edmund; Ozier, Yves; Riddez, Louis; Schultz, Arthur; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Rossaint, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Evidence-based recommendations can be made with respect to many aspects of the acute management of the bleeding trauma patient, which when implemented may lead to improved patient outcomes. Methods The multidisciplinary Task Force for Advanced Bleeding Care in Trauma was formed in 2005 with the aim of developing guidelines for the management of bleeding following severe injury. Recommendations were formulated using a nominal group process and the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) hierarchy of evidence and were based on a systematic review of published literature. Results Key recommendations include the following: The time elapsed between injury and operation should be minimised for patients in need of urgent surgical bleeding control, and patients presenting with haemorrhagic shock and an identified source of bleeding should undergo immediate surgical bleeding control unless initial resuscitation measures are successful. A damage control surgical approach is essential in the severely injured patient. Pelvic ring disruptions should be closed and stabilised, followed by appropriate angiographic embolisation or surgical bleeding control, including packing. Patients presenting with haemorrhagic shock and an unidentified source of bleeding should undergo immediate further assessment as appropriate using focused sonography, computed tomography, serum lactate, and/or base deficit measurements. This guideline also reviews appropriate physiological targets and suggested use and dosing of blood products, pharmacological agents, and coagulation factor replacement in the bleeding trauma patient. Conclusion A multidisciplinary approach to the management of the bleeding trauma patient will help create circumstances in which optimal care can be provided. By their very nature, these guidelines reflect the current state-of-the-art and will need to be updated and revised as important new evidence becomes available. PMID:17298665

  17. The utility of International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis-Bleeding Assessment Tool and other bleeding questionnaires in assessing the bleeding phenotype in two platelet function defects.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Harmanpreet; Borhany, Munira; Azzam, Hanan; Costa-Lima, Carolina; Ozelo, Margareth; Othman, Maha

    2016-07-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the utility of International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis-Bleeding Assessment Tool (ISTH-BAT) in comparison with the condensed form of Molecular and Clinical Markers for the Diagnosis and Management of type 1 and WHO BATs, in assessing bleeding in two well known and clinically significant platelet function defects. Thirty-eight patients previously diagnosed with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia and 10 with Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BSS) were analyzed. Bleeding scores were significantly higher than that of controls using both electronic bleeding questionnaire (eBQ) and ISTH-BAT with no significant difference between both tools. ISTH-BAT had a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 100%, 76.2%, 0.9 and 1. This was closely similar to eBQ. Both ISTH-BAT and eBQ are efficient in BSS and Glanzmann's thrombasthenia. However, given the ISTH recommendation, ISTH-BAT should be adopted. Larger study including other platelet defects will enhance its utility and support the integration of bleeding scores with standardized laboratory testing to allow for a universal diagnostic approach to patients with suspected bleeding disorders. PMID:27100304

  18. Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and Acute Variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Hassanien, Moataz; EL-Talkawy, Mohamed Darwish; EL-Ghannam, Maged; El Ray, Ahmed; Ali, Abdel Aziz; Taleb, Hoda Abu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in cirrhotic patients remains a serious, unsolved problem, and the risk factors for acute variceal bleeding (AVB) in HCC patients remain unclear. This study aimed to determine the in-hospital mortality (IHM) and factors influencing the clinical outcomes of AVB in patients with liver cirrhosis and HCC. Methods This was a retrospective, non-randomized, clinical study that was conducted in 2014. The study was conducted on 70 patients with liver cirrhosis and HCC presenting by acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIH). All patients were examined endoscopically within 24 hours from presentation and bleeding varices accounted for AUGIH. Full medical history, clinical examination, and laboratory and radiologic data were collected from admission charts, and hospital medical records were statistically analyzed with SSPS version 22. Results Thirty-two patients (45.7%) survived and 38 died (54.3%). Survivors are more likely to be Child-Pugh class A or B, and the non-survivors were class C. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) was highly predictive of IHM at an optimized cut-off value of ≥ 12.9. Higher esophageal varices grades and presence of active bleeding on index endoscopy were significant (p < 0.01) in the non-survivors compared to survivors. Complications of liver cirrhosis and associated major comorbidity were significantly higher (p < 0.01) in the non-survivors than the survivors. Univariate logistic regression analysis identified higher Grade Esophageal Varices and number of transfused packed red blood cells units as two independent predictors of IHM. Conclusions IHM was particularly high (54.3%) among HCC patients with AVB who had MELD score > 12.9, higher grade Esophageal Varices, active bleeding on index endoscopy, more increased needs for blood transfusion, longer hospital stay, decompensated liver disease with major comorbidity. PMID:26516439

  19. Major Bleeding after Percutaneous Image-Guided Biopsies: Frequency, Predictors, and Periprocedural Management

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Sean A.; Milovanovic, Lazar; Midia, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    Major bleeding remains an uncommon yet potentially devastating complication following percutaneous image-guided biopsy. This article reviews two cases of major bleeding after percutaneous biopsy and discusses the frequency, predictors, and periprocedural management of major postprocedural bleeding. PMID:25762845

  20. Stomach specific polymeric low density microballoons as a vector for extended delivery of rabeprazole and amoxicillin for treatment of peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Sandeep; Jain, Ashay; Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd; Mishra, Vijay; Agrawal, Govind P; Kesharwani, Prashant

    2016-05-01

    The study was intended to develop a new intra-gastric floating in situ microballoons system for controlled delivery of rabeprazole sodium and amoxicillin trihydrate for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease. Eudragit S-100 and hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose based low density microballoons systems were fabricated by employing varying concentrations of Eudragit S-100 and hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose, to which varying concentrations of drug was added, and formulated by stirring at various speed and time to optimize the process and formulation variable. The formulation variables like concentration and ratio of polymers significantly affected the in vitro drug release from the prepared floating device. The validation of the gastro-retentive potential of the prepared microballoons was carried out in rabbits by orally administration of microballoons formulation containing radio opaque material. The developed formulations showed improved buoyancy and lower ulcer index as compared to that seen with plain drugs. Ulcer protective efficacies were confirmed in ulcer-bearing mouse model. In conclusion, greater compatibility, higher gastro-retention and higher anti-ulcer activity of the presently fabricated formulations to improve potential of formulation for redefining ulcer treatment are presented here. These learning exposed a targeted and sustained drug delivery potential of prepared microballoons in gastric region for ulcer therapeutic intervention as corroborated by in vitro and in vivo findings and, thus, deserves further attention for improved ulcer treatment. PMID:26859118

  1. Increased Risk of Osteoporosis in Patients With Peptic Ulcer Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Tung, Yi-Ching; Chai, Chee-Yin; Lu, Ying-Yi; Su, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Tai-Hsin; Kuo, Keng-Liang; Lin, Chih-Lung

    2016-04-01

    To investigate osteoporosis risk in patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD) using a nationwide population-based dataset.This Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) analysis included 27,132 patients aged 18 years and older who had been diagnosed with PUD (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] codes 531-534) during 1996 to 2010. The control group consisted of 27,132 randomly selected (age- and gender)-matched patients without PUD. The association between PUD and the risk of developing osteoporosis was estimated using a Cox proportional hazard regression model.During the follow-up period, osteoporosis was diagnosed in 2538 (9.35 %) patients in the PUD group and in 2259 (8.33 %) participants in the non-PUD group. After adjusting for covariates, osteoporosis risk was 1.85 times greater in the PUD group compared to the non-PUD group (13.99 vs 5.80 per 1000 person-years, respectively). Osteoporosis developed 1 year after PUD diagnosis. The 1-year follow-up period exhibited the highest significance between the 2 groups (hazard ratio [HR] = 63.44, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 28.19-142.74, P < 0.001). Osteoporosis risk was significantly higher in PUD patients with proton-pump-inhibitors (PPIs) use (HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.03-1.34) compared to PUD patients without PPIs use.This study revealed a significant association between PUD and subsequent risk of osteoporosis. Therefore, PUD patients, especially those treated with PPIs, should be evaluated for subsequent risk of osteoporosis to minimize the occurrence of adverse events. PMID:27100415

  2. [Medical, social, and economic effectiveness of treatment of day-case patients with peptic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Butorov, I V; Osoianu, Iu P; Maksimov, V V; Butorov, S I

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate medical, social, and economic effectiveness of treatment of day-case patients with peptic ulcer (PU). The subjects of the study were 60 day-case patients with duodenal ulcer aged 18 to 60, who underwent clinical and instrumental examination including esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsy and Helicobacter pylori (HP) detection. The patients received 7-day eradication therapy, which included omeprazol in a dose of 20 mg twice a day, clarithromycin--500 mg twice a day, and metronidazole--500 mg twice a day. There was a control group, which included 60 inpatients treated in Gastroenterology Division of the hospital. The use of the three-component medication in the day-case patients and the inpatients led to disappearance of pain syndrome 7.4 +/- 0.3 and 8.6 +/- 0.2 days after the beginning of the treatment, respectively; dyspepsia disappeared in the day-case patients and the inpatients 7.6 +/- 0.2 and 8.8 +/- 0.3 days after the beginning of the treatment, respectively. HP eradication was effective in 86.7% of the day-case patients, and in 88.3% of the inpatients. The course of the disease was recurrence-free during two years in 80% of the day-case patients, and in 76.4% of the inpatients; the cost of the treatment was 2.1 times higher in the group of inpatients. The results show that high effectiveness of the three-component medication, judging by the results of HP eradication, terms of disappearance of pain syndrome and ulcer healing, allows recommending this regimen for wide clinical application in day-case patients with PU. PMID:16512399

  3. Peptic Ulcer Disease in Healthcare Workers: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong-Yue; Weng, Shih-Feng; Lin, Hung-Jung; Hsu, Chien-Chin; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Su, Shih-Bin; Guo, How-Ran; Huang, Chien-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Health care workers (HCWs) in Taiwan have heavy, stressful workloads, are on-call, and have rotating nightshifts, all of which might contribute to peptic ulcer disease (PUD). We wanted to evaluate the PUD risk in HCWs, which is not clear. Using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified 50,226 physicians, 122,357 nurses, 20,677 pharmacists, and 25,059 other HCWs (dieticians, technicians, rehabilitation therapists, and social workers) as the study cohort, and randomly selected an identical number of non-HCW patients (i.e., general population) as the comparison cohort. Conditional logistical regression analysis was used to compare the PUD risk between them. Subgroup analysis for physician specialties was also done. Nurses and other HCWs had a significantly higher PUD risk than did the general population (odds ratio [OR]: 1.477; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.433-1.521 and OR: 1.328; 95% CI: 1.245-1.418, respectively); pharmacists had a lower risk (OR: 0.884; 95% CI: 0.828-0.945); physicians had a nonsignificantly different risk (OR: 1.029; 95% CI: 0.987-1.072). In the physician specialty subgroup analysis, internal medicine, surgery, Ob/Gyn, and family medicine specialists had a higher PUD risk than other physicians (OR: 1.579; 95% CI: 1.441-1.731, OR: 1.734; 95% CI: 1.565-1.922, OR: 1.336; 95% CI: 1.151-1.550, and OR: 1.615; 95% CI: 1.425-1.831, respectively). In contrast, emergency physicians had a lower risk (OR: 0.544; 95% CI: 0.359-0.822). Heavy workloads, long working hours, workplace stress, rotating nightshifts, and coping skills may explain our epidemiological findings of higher risks for PUD in some HCWs, which might help us improve our health policies for HCWs. PMID:26301861

  4. The Association Between Peptic Ulcer Disease and Ischemic Stroke: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tain-Junn; Guo, How-Ran; Chang, Chia-Yu; Weng, Shih-Feng; Li, Pi-I; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Wu, Wen-Shiann

    2016-05-01

    Stroke is a common cause of death worldwide, but about 30% of ischemic stroke (IS) patients have no identifiable contributing risk factors. Because peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and vascular events share some common risk factors, we conducted a population-based study to evaluate the association between PUD and IS.We followed up a representative sample of 1 million residents of Taiwan using the National Health Insurance Research Database from 1997 to 2011. We defined patients who received medications for PUD and had related diagnosis codes as the PUD group, and a reference group matched by age and sex was sampled from those who did not have PUD. We also collected data on medical history and monthly income. The events of IS occurred after enrollment were compared between the 2 groups. The data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazard models at the 2-tailed significant level of 0.05.The PUD group had higher income and prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), heart disease, and hyperlipidemia. They also had a higher risk of developing IS with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.31 (95% confidence interval: 1.20-1.41). Other independent risk factors included male sex, older age, lower income, and co-morbidity of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), and heart disease.PUD is a risk factor for IS, independent of conventional risk factors such as male sex, older age, lower income, and co-morbidity of hypertension, DM, and heart disease. Prevention strategies taking into account PUD should be developed and evaluated. PMID:27258514

  5. Disulphide bonds in wheat gluten: cystine peptides derived from gluten proteins following peptic and thermolytic digestion.

    PubMed

    Keck, B; Köhler, P; Wieser, H

    1995-06-01

    Gluten from the wheat variety Rektor was extracted with 70% aqueous ethanol. The insoluble portion (whole glutenin) was partially hydrolysed with trypsin at pH 6.5 and separated on a Sephadex G25 column. The high molecular weight fraction 1 was further hydrolysed with pepsin at pH 2.0. To remove low molecular weight proteins, a portion of whole glutenin was extracted with dilute acetic acid. The residue (enriched glutenin), which contained mostly LMW and HMW subunits of glutenin, was hydrolysed with thermolysin at pH 6.5. The peptic and tryptic hydrolysates were separated on a Sephadex G25 column and the peptide fractions with the highest cystine content were separated further by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Cystine peptides were detected by differential chromatography (RP-HPLC prior to and after reduction of disulphide bonds) and then isolated by preparative RP-HPLC. After reduction, cysteine peptides were alkylated and analysed for their amino acid sequence. Altogether, 19 cystine peptides were characterized and assigned to known sequences of gluten proteins; 16 peptides confirmed the positions of disulphide bonds present in LMW subunits and gamma-gliadins, as described previously. For the first time, a cystine peptide has been isolated, representing an intermolecular disulphide bond between the y-type of HMW and LMW subunits. Furthermore, a cystine peptide was assigned to gamma-gliadins; thus, all cysteine residues of gamma-gliadins are documented by at least one cystine peptide. One peptide analysed came from the alpha-amylase inhibitor CM 16. Altogether the results indicate that the intramolecular linkages of gluten proteins are not formed at random, but are strongly directed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7668061

  6. Gedunin and photogedunin of Xylocarpus granatum show significant anti-secretory effects and protect the gastric mucosa of peptic ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, V; Singh, N; Shrivastva, S; Mishra, S K; Dharmani, P; Mishra, V; Palit, G

    2010-07-01

    In the present study, the gastroprotective mechanism of Xylocarpus granatum fruit and its active constituents gedunin and photogedunin was investigated. Chloroform fraction (Fr-CHCl(3)) of X. granatum fruit was evaluated against cold restraint (CRU), aspirin (AS), alcohol (AL) and pyloric ligation (PL) induced gastric ulcer models in rats and histamine (HA) induced duodenal ulcer model in guinea pigs. Potential anti-ulcer activity of Fr-CHCl(3) was observed against CRU (58.28%), AS (67.81%), AL (84.38%), PL (65.66%) and HA (61.93%) induced ulcer models. The standard drug omeprazole (10mg/kg, p.o.) showed 68.25% protection against CRU, 57.08% against AS and 69.42% against PL model and 70.79% against HA induced duodenal ulcer. Sucralfate, another standard drug (500 mg/kg, p.o.) showed 62.72% protection in AL induced ulcer model. Fr-CHCl(3) significantly reduced free acidity (51.42%), total acidity (30.76%) and upregulated mucin secretion by 58.37% respectively. Phytochemical investigations of Fr-CHCl(3) yielded gedunin (36%), photogedunin (2%). Further, Fr-CHCl(3) and its compounds gedunin and photogedunin significantly inhibited H(+) K(+)-ATPase activity in vitro with IC(50) of 89.37, 56.86 and 66.54 microg/ml respectively as compared to the IC(50) value of omeprazole (30.24 microg/ml) confirming their anti-secretory activity. Conclusively, Fr-CHCl(3) of Xylocarpus granatum was found to possess anti-ulcerogenic activity which might be due to its anti-secretory activity and subsequent strengthening of the defensive mechanism. This study is the first of its kind to show significant anti-secretory effect of gedunin and photogedunin. Therefore it could act as a potent therapeutic agent against peptic ulcer disease. PMID:19962286

  7. A comparative study of gastrectomy without vagotomy with either Roux-en-Y or Billroth II anastomosis in peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Rieu, P M; Joosten, H J; Jansen, J B; Lamers, C B

    1994-06-01

    Since recent small uncontrolled studies have suggested that surgery for peptic ulcer comprising partial gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y anastomosis without vagotomy effectively prevents postoperative enterogastric reflux without increasing ulcer recurrence rate, we have compared mortality, ulcer recurrence rate, and complaints in ulcer patients who had undergone partial gastrectomy with either Roux-en-Y (n = 47) or Billroth II anastomosis (n = 47). The groups were comparable with regard to age, sex, ulcer localisation, indication for surgery and number of emergency procedures. During postoperative follow-up, seven patients with Roux-en-Y have died, compared with nine patients with Billroth II gastrectomy. In two of the seven patients who died after Roux-en-Y gastrectomy, but in none of the nine who died after Billroth II resection, death was unequivocally related to postoperative ulcer recurrences. At 1, 2, 3 and 4 years postoperatively, 90 vs. 100% (not significant), 78 vs. 98% (p < 0.01), 72 vs. 95% (p < 0.01) and 72 vs. 95% (p < 0.01) of the patients were in remission after Roux-en-Y and Billroth II gastrectomy, respectively. All ulcers were localized at or just distal to the anastomosis, and were diagnosed within the first 3 postoperative years. We conclude that in peptic ulcer patients the ulcer recurrence rate after Roux-en-Y gastrectomy without vagotomy is considerably higher than after Billroth II resection. Thus, gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y anastomosis without vagotomy cannot be recommended as the primary procedure in patients undergoing partial gastrectomy for peptic ulcer disease. PMID:7959558

  8. BLEEDING OF FEMORAL HEAD DURING TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY FOR OSTEOARTHROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Sotomayor, Marco Yánez; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Silva, Marcelo Faria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the bleeding of the femoral head on hip osteoarthritis in patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty. Methods: One hundred and three hips affected by primary hip osteoarthritis were evaluated. After surgical dislocation, the femoral head was divided into four quadrants, and micro perforations were made in order to observe and assess the presence of bleeding, as early type (EB), late type (LB) or without bleeding (WB). Results: We observed early bleeding (EB) in the upper quadrant in 16 hips (15.5%), late bleeding in 14 hips (13.6%) and no bleeding (WB) in 73 hips (70.9%). The anterior quadrant showed EB in 24 hips (23.3%), LB in 7 hips (6.8%) and WB in 72 hips (69.9%). The lower quadrant presented EB in 40 hips (38.8%), LB 14 hips (13.6%) and WB in 49 hips (47.6%). The posterior quadrant showed EB in 39 hips (37.9%), LB 19 hips (18.4%) and WB in 45 hips (43.7%). Comparing BMI and gender, we found no association between these parameters (p> 0.05). Conclusions: The inferior and posterior quadrant had the highest bleeding levels, following the path of the medial circumflex artery. Level of Evidence III, Therapeutic Study. PMID:26981036

  9. Endoscopic sclerotherapy for hemostasis of acute esophageal variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    ROMANO, G.; AGRUSA, A.; AMATO, G.; DE VITA, G.; FRAZZETTA, G.; CHIANETTA, D.; SORCE, V.; DI BUONO, G.; GULOTTA, G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Currently the most widely used methods for endoscopic control of esophageal varices bleeding are sclerotherapy and rubber band ligation. Although the superiority of band ligation (BL) over endoscopic sclerotherapy (SCL) for the secondary prophylaxis of variceal hemorrhage has been proven, the best approach for acute bleeding remains controversial. Patients and methods We performed a retrospective study between January 2005 and May 2013. We selected 104 patients with gastrointestinal hemorrhage from rupture of esophageal varices treated with endoscopic sclerotherapy. The sclerosing agent used was 1% polidocanol in 89 cases, butyl-cyanoacrylate in 8 cases and sodium tetra-decylsulfate in 4 cases. In 3 cases had not been carried sclerosis because it was not possible to identify the bleeding site. Results Among the 101 patients who underwent endoscopic sclerotherapy 4 presented re-bleeding within 12 hours from first treatment. Other 10 patients (9.9%) presented re-bleeding within a 5-days period. The most frequent complication was ulceration, observed in 4 cases (3.8%). There was only one case of perforation treated conservatively. Conclusions The general improvement in the results of the treatment of variceal acute bleeding might be attributed to better clinical management of these patients. In literature no consensus exists regarding the preferred endoscopic treatment. To date, there is no single method applicable to all patients with bleeding esophageal varices, but sclerotherapy is considered effective, safe and repeatable in experienced hands. PMID:24841679

  10. Variceal bleeding and portal hypertension: new lights on old horizon.

    PubMed

    Bhasin, D K; Siyad, I

    2004-02-01

    New clinical, endoscopic, and imaging modalities for diagnosing varices and predicting bleeding are being investigated. Transnasal endoscopy and ultrathin battery-powered esophagoscopes are being used to improve patient comfort and compliance. Patients who respond to portal pressure-reducing drugs not only have a reduced risk of bleeding, but also a reduced risk of developing other complications, with improved survival. Nitrates have been shown to have no definite role in primary prophylaxis against variceal bleeding. The hemodynamic response to treatment has an independent prognostic value for the risk of variceal bleeding. Newer drugs have been investigated for reducing the hepatic venous pressure gradient, but with little success. Survival after bleeding has increased due to improved patient care and technological advances. Combined radiographic and endoscopic management of gastric varices is evolving and appears to be promising. Nonvariceal bleeding from portal hypertensive gastropathy is increasingly being recognized as a potential cause of bleeding in patients with portal hypertension, and pharmacotherapy with octreotide appears to be promising for the treatment of this condition. Variceal band ligation in children has been found to be as safe and effective as in adults. PMID:14765309

  11. Flow Coefficient Behavior for Boundary Layer Bleed Holes and Slots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, B. P.; Davis, D. O.; Hingst, W. R.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental investigation into the flow coefficient behavior for nine boundary layer bleed orifice configurations is reported. This test was conducted for the purposes of exploring boundary layer control through mass flow removal and does not address issues of stability bleed. Parametric data consist of bleed region flow coefficient as a function of Mach number, bleed plenum pressure, and bleed orifice geometry. Seven multiple hole configurations and two single slot configurations were tested over a supersonic Mach number range of 1.3 to 2.5 (nominal). Advantages gained by using multiple holes in a bleed region instead of a single spanwise slot are discussed and the issue of modeling an entire array of bleed orifices based on the performance of a single orifice is addressed. Preconditioning the flow approaching a 90 degree inclined (normal) hole configuration resulted in a significant improvement in the performance of the configuration. The same preconditioning caused only subtle changes in performance for a 20 degree inclined (slanted) configuration.

  12. Obscure bleeding colonic duplication responds to proton pump inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Jérémie; Projetti, Fabrice; Legros, Romain; Valgueblasse, Virginie; Sarabi, Matthieu; Carrier, Paul; Fredon, Fabien; Bouvier, Stéphane; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique; Sautereau, Denis

    2013-09-21

    We report the case of a 17-year-old male admitted to our academic hospital with massive rectal bleeding. Since childhood he had reported recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding and had two exploratory laparotomies 5 and 2 years previously. An emergency abdominal computed tomography scan, gastroscopy and colonoscopy, performed after hemodynamic stabilization, were considered normal. High-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy was initiated and bleeding stopped spontaneously. Two other massive rectal bleeds occurred 8 h after each cessation of PPI which led to a hemostatic laparotomy after negative gastroscopy and small bowel capsule endoscopy. This showed long tubular duplication of the right colon, with fresh blood in the duplicated colon. Obscure lower gastrointestinal bleeding is a difficult medical situation and potentially life-threatening. The presence of ulcerated ectopic gastric mucosa in the colonic duplication explains the partial efficacy of PPI therapy. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding responding to empiric anti-acid therapy should probably evoke the diagnosis of bleeding ectopic gastric mucosa such as Meckel's diverticulum or gastrointestinal duplication, and gastroenterologists should be aware of this potential medical situation. PMID:24124344

  13. Intraoperative bleeding control by uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery†.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rivas, Diego; Stupnik, Tomaz; Fernandez, Ricardo; de la Torre, Mercedes; Velasco, Carlos; Yang, Yang; Lee, Wentao; Jiang, Gening

    2016-01-01

    Owing to advances in video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS), the majority of pulmonary resections can currently be performed by VATS in a safe manner with a low level of morbidity and mortality. The majority of the complications that occur during VATS can be minimized with correct preoperative planning of the case as well as careful pulmonary dissection. Coordination of the whole surgical team is essential when confronting an emergency such as major bleeding. This is particularly important during the VATS learning curve, where the occurrence of intraoperative complications, particularly significant bleeding, usually ends in a conversion to open surgery. However, conversion should not be considered as a failure of the VATS approach, but as a resource to maintain the patient's safety. The correct assessment of any bleeding is of paramount importance during major thoracoscopic procedures. Inadequate management of the source of bleeding may result in major vessel injury and massive bleeding. If bleeding occurs, a sponge stick should be readily available to apply pressure immediately to control the haemorrhage. It is always important to remain calm and not to panic. With the bleeding temporarily controlled, a decision must be made promptly as to whether a thoracotomy is needed or if the bleeding can be solved through the VATS approach. This will depend primarily on the surgeon's experience. The operative vision provided with high-definition cameras, specially designed or adapted instruments and the new sealants are factors that facilitate the surgeon's control. After experience has been acquired with conventional or uniportal VATS, the rate of complications diminishes and the majority of bleeding events are controlled without the need for conversion to thoracotomy. PMID:26424873

  14. Bleeding complications in critically ill patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jaeyoung; Choi, Sun Mi; Yu, Su Jong; Park, Young Sik; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Min; Yim, Jae-Joon; Yoo, Chul-Gyu; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Lee, Jinwoo

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Patients with liver cirrhosis (LC) are at risk for critical events leading to Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission. Coagulopathy in cirrhotic patients is complex and can lead to bleeding as well as thrombosis. The aim of this study was to investigate bleeding complications in critically ill patients with LC admitted to a medical ICU (MICU). Methods: All adult patients admitted to our MICU with a diagnosis of LC from January 2006 to December 2012 were retrospectively assessed. Patients with major bleeding at the time of MICU admission were excluded from the analysis. Results: A total of 205 patients were included in the analysis. The median patient age was 62 years, and 69.3% of the patients were male. The most common reason for MICU admission was acute respiratory failure (45.4%), followed by sepsis (27.3%). Major bleeding occurred in 25 patients (12.2%). The gastrointestinal tract was the most common site of bleeding (64%), followed by the respiratory tract (20%). In a multivariate analysis, a low platelet count at MICU admission (odds ratio [OR], 0.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97 to 0.99) and sepsis (OR, 8.35; 95% CI, 1.04 to 67.05) were independent risk factors for major bleeding. The ICU fatality rate was significantly greater among patients with major bleeding (84.0% vs. 58.9%, respectively; p = 0.015). Conclusions: Major bleeding occurred in 12.2% of critically ill cirrhotic patients admitted to the MICU. A low platelet count at MICU admission and sepsis were associated with an increased risk of major bleeding during the MICU stay. Further study is needed to better understand hemostasis in critically ill patients with LC. PMID:26805633

  15. Wireless capsule endoscopy: perspectives beyond gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Redondo-Cerezo, Eduardo; Sánchez-Capilla, Antonio Damián; De La Torre-Rubio, Paloma; De Teresa, Javier

    2014-11-14

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (CE) is a technology developed for the endoscopic exploration of the small bowel. The first capsule model was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2001, and its first and essential indication was occult gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Over subsequent years, this technology has been refined to provide superior resolution, increased battery life, and capabilities to view different parts of the GI tract. Indeed, cases for which CE proved useful have increased significantly over the last few years, with new indications for the small bowel and technical improvements that have expanded its use to other parts of the GI tract, including the esophagus and colon. The main challenges in the development of CE are new devices with the ability to provide therapy, air inflation for a better vision of the small bowel, biopsy sampling systems attached to the capsule and the possibility to guide and move the capsule with an external motion control. In this article we review the current and new indications of CE, and the evolving technological changes shaping this technology, which has a promising potential in the coming future of gastroenterology. PMID:25400450

  16. Guideline for Capsule Endoscopy: Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Ki-Nam; Moon, Jeong Seop; Chang, Dong Kyung; Do, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Ji Hyun; Min, Byung Hoon; Jeon, Seong Ran; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2013-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) is considered as a noninvasive and reliable diagnostic tool of examining the entire small bowel. CE has been performed frequently at many medical centers in South Korea; however, there is no evidence-based CE guideline for adequate diagnostic approaches. To provide accurate information and suggest correct testing approaches for small bowel disease, the guideline on CE was developed by the Korean Gut Image Study Group, a part of the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Operation teams for developing the guideline were organized into four areas: obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, small bowel preparation, Crohn's disease, and small bowel tumor. A total of 20 key questions were selected. In preparing this guideline, MEDLINE, Cochrane library, KMbase, KISS, and KoreaMed literature searches were performed. After writing a draft of the guideline, opinions from various experts were reflected before approving the final document. The guideline should be regarded as recommendations only to gastroenterologists in providing care to their patients. These are not absolute rules and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care. Although further revision may be necessary as new data appear, this guideline is expected to play a role for adequate diagnostic approaches of various small bowel diseases. PMID:23423225

  17. Comparison of Endoscopic Variceal Ligation and Endoscopic Variceal Obliteration in Patients with GOV1 Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hyoung Ju; Jun, Chung Hwan; Lee, Du Hyeon; Cho, Eun Ae; Park, Seon Young; Cho, Sung Bum; Park, Chang Hwan; Joo, Young Eun; Kim, HyunSoo; Rew, Jong Sun

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy, rebleeding rates, survival, and complications of endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) with those of endoscopic variceal obliteration (EVO) in patients with acute type 1 gastroesophageal variceal (GOV1) bleeding. Data were collected retrospectively at a single center. A total of 84 patients were selected (20 patients underwent EVL; 64 patients underwent EVO) from February 2004 to September 2011. Their clinical characteristics, laboratory results, vital signs, Child-Pugh score, Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, and overall mortality were evaluated. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups. The success rate in initial control of active bleeding was not significantly different between the EVL and EVO groups (18/20 EVL, or 90.0%, compared with 62/64 EVO, or 96.9%; p=0.239). The early rebleeding rate was also not significantly different between the groups (3/18 EVL, or 16.7% compared with 17/62 EVO, or 27.4%; p=0.422). The late rebleeding rate of the EVL group was lower than that of the EVO group (3/18 EVL, or 16.7%, compared with 26/59 EVO, or 44.1%; p=0.042). The time-to-rebleeding was 594 days for the EVL group and 326 days for the EVO group (p=0.054). In the multivariate analysis, portal vein thrombosis (PVT) was a significant risk factor for early rebleeding. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and previous history of bleeding were significant risk factors for very late rebleeding. In conclusion, EVL is better than EVO in reducing late rebleeding in acute GOV1 bleeding. HCC, PVT, and previous bleeding history were significant risk factors for rebleeding. PMID:23678472

  18. Bleeding following deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest in children.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Emad B; Machado, Sandra; Apostolakis, John

    2007-03-01

    Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) is a technique of extracorporeal circulation commonly used in children with complex congenital heart defects undergoing surgical repairs. The use of profound cooling (20 degrees C) and complete cessation of circulation allow adequate exposure and correction of these complex lesions, with enhanced cerebral protection. However, the profound physiologic state of DHCA results in significant derangement of the coagulation system and a high incidence of postoperative bleeding. This review examines the impact of DHCA on bleeding and transfusion requirements in children and the pathophysiology of DHCA-induced platelet dysfunction. It also focuses on possible pharmacologic interventions to decrease bleeding following DHCA in children. PMID:17484172

  19. Scintigraphic demonstration of gastrointestinal bleeding due to mesenteric varices

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, M.E.; Coleman, R.E. )

    1990-07-01

    Mesenteric varices can appear as massive, acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The small bowel or colon may be involved, varices usually developing at sites of previous surgery or inflammation in patients with portal hypertension. Two patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and protal hypertension presented with rectal bleeding. Tc-99m RBC studies demonstrated varices and extravasation into the adjacent bowel. The varices were documented by mesenteric angiography. Characteristic features of Tc-99m labeled RBC studies can identify mesenteric varices as the cause of intestinal bleeding and localize the abnormal vessels.

  20. Profusely bleeding oral pyogenic granuloma in a teenage girl.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajeev Kumar; Kaushal, Ambrish; Kumar, Rakesh; Pandey, Ramesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Pyogenic granuloma (PG) is a kind of inflammatory hyperplastic soft tissue lesion of the oral cavity. The lesion, however, is not related to infection and arise as a reactive growth in response to various stimuli. It has a very high vascularity because of the presence of numerous prominent capillaries. The lesion has a bleeding tendency, even after a minor traumatic episode, such as during mastication. Bleeding may be at times very severe and difficult to control. We present the case of a profusely bleeding young PG in a young teenage child. PMID:23486345

  1. Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices by Direct Percutaneous Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Arulraj, Ramakrishnan; Mangat, Kamarjit S.; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2011-02-15

    Stomal varices can occur in patients with stoma in the presence of portal hypertension. Suture ligation, sclerotherapy, angiographic embolization, stoma revision, beta blockade, portosystemic shunt, and liver transplantation have been described as therapeutic options for bleeding stomal varices. We report the case of a 21-year-old patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis and colectomy with ileostomy for ulcerative colitis, where stomal variceal bleeding was successfully treated by direct percutaneous embolization. We consider percutaneous embolization to be an effective way of treating acute stomal bleeding in decompensated patients while awaiting decisions regarding shunt procedures or liver transplantation.

  2. Surgical treatment of fibroids in heavy menstrual bleeding.

    PubMed

    Saridogan, Ertan

    2016-01-01

    Uterine fibroids can cause abnormal uterine bleeding and their removal is beneficial in the treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding associated with fibroids for women who would like to preserve their uterus and fertility. Endoscopic (hysteroscopic and laparoscopic) approaches are the preferred methods of fibroid removal when appropriate. In the presence of submucosal fibroids, hysteroscopic resection is a simple, safe and effective treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding and reduces the need for more major surgery, such as hysterectomy. When abdominal myomectomy is required, laparoscopic myomectomy is the preferred choice in selected cases due to its advantages over open myomectomy. PMID:26693796

  3. Management of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients anticoagulated with dabigatran compared with warfarin: a retrospective, comparative case review

    PubMed Central

    Al-hamid, Hussein; Leelasinjaroen, Pornchai; Hashmi, Usman; McCullough, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dabigatran etexilate, was found to be effective for stroke prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Given its predictable pharmacodynamics, laboratory monitoring is not required. Moreover, the risks of overall bleeding, intracranial bleeding, and life-threatening hemorrhage from dabigatran were found to be lower than warfarin. However, a higher risk of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding caused by dabigatran from the randomized evaluation of long-term anticoagulant therapy (RE-LY) trial has raised the concern regarding clinical outcomes of patients with GI bleeding caused by dabigatran compared with warfarin. Methods We retrospectively studied patients who were hospitalized for GI bleeding from dabigatran compared with warfarin with therapeutic anticoagulation monitoring during 2009 to 2012. Initial laboratory findings at presentation, number of transfused packed red blood cells (PRBCs), acute kidney injury, clinical outcomes (e.g., hypotension, tachycardia), length of stay, and death were compared. Results Thirteen patients taking dabigatran and 26 patients who were on warfarin with therapeutic international normalized ratio (INR) were hospitalized during the study period. Demographic data and baseline parameters between the two groups were not significantly different except for concurrent aspirin use (84.6% vs. 50%, P=0.036). Fifty-four percent of patients taking dabigatran did not have activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) level performed at presentation (7/13). The patients with GI bleeding from warfarin received significantly more PRBC transfusions compared with the dabigatran group (1.92±2.2 vs. 0.69±1.1 units, P=0.024). After controlling for initial hemoglobin and history of chronic kidney disease by using multivariate analysis, the patients in the warfarin group were likely to receive more PRBC. Hypotension at presentation was more common in GI bleeding caused by warfarin than dabigatran but the P value was insignificant

  4. Cyanoacrylate Injection Versus Band Ligation in the Endoscopic Management of Acute Gastric Variceal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Weiguang; Ren, Yutang; Bai, Yang; Liu, Side; Zhang, Qiang; Zhi, Fachao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The evidence for optimal endoscopic management of bleeding gastric varices is lacking. The clinical outcome is controversial in trials comparing cyanoacrylate injection and band ligation. To help guide endoscopic decisions regarding acute gastric variceal bleeding, a meta-analysis was conducted. Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and ScienceDirect were searched for all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) containing the 2 interventions. The main outcomes evaluated in the meta-analysis were active bleeding control, blood transfusion, rebleeding, recurrence of varices, complications, and survival. Three RCTs were identified, which included 194 patients with active gastric variceal bleeding from Taiwan and Romania. Active bleeding control was achieved in 46 of 49 (93.9%) patients in the cyanoacrylate injection group, compared with 35 of 44 (79.5%) in the band ligation group (P = 0.032), for a pooled odds ratio of 4.44 (95% confidence interval, 1.14–17.30). Rebleeding rate was comparable in type 2 gastroesophageal varices (GOV2) between the 2 interventions (35.7% vs 34.8%, P = 0.895), but cyanoacrylate injection seemed superior for reducing rebleeding rate in type 1 gastroesophageal varices (GOV1, 26.1% vs 47.7%, P = 0.035) and type 1 isolated gastric varices (IGV1, 17.6% vs 85.7%, P = 0.015). Cyanoacrylate injection was also superior in controlling recurrence of gastric varices to band ligation (36.0% vs 66.0%, P = 0.002). There was no difference in complications or mortality between the 2 interventions. The major limitation of this meta-analysis is the small number of studies/patients included. Compared with band ligation, injection cyanocrylate have an advantage in the control of acute gastric variceal bleeding, also with lower recurrence rate and rebleeding (except GOV2). The limited amount of studies included attenuates the strength of this meta-analysis; therefore, more high-quality RCTs are needed. PMID

  5. Incidence and risk factors of bleeding-related adverse events in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia treated with ibrutinib.

    PubMed

    Lipsky, Andrew H; Farooqui, Mohammed Z H; Tian, Xin; Martyr, Sabrina; Cullinane, Ann M; Nghiem, Khanh; Sun, Clare; Valdez, Janet; Niemann, Carsten U; Herman, Sarah E M; Saba, Nakhle; Soto, Susan; Marti, Gerald; Uzel, Gulbu; Holland, Steve M; Lozier, Jay N; Wiestner, Adrian

    2015-12-01

    Ibrutinib is associated with bleeding-related adverse events of grade ≤ 2 in severity, and infrequently with grade ≥ 3 events. To investigate the mechanisms of bleeding and identify patients at risk, we prospectively assessed platelet function and coagulation factors in our investigator-initiated trial of single-agent ibrutinib for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. At a median follow-up of 24 months we recorded grade ≤ 2 bleeding-related adverse events in 55% of 85 patients. No grade ≥ 3 events occurred. Median time to event was 49 days. The cumulative incidence of an event plateaued by 6 months, suggesting that the risk of bleeding decreases with continued therapy. At baseline, von Willebrand factor and factor VIII levels were often high and normalized on treatment. Platelet function measured via the platelet function analyzer (PFA-100™) was impaired in 22 patients at baseline and in an additional 19 patients on ibrutinib (often transiently). Collagen and adenosine diphosphate induced platelet aggregation was tested using whole blood aggregometry. Compared to normal controls, response to both agonists was decreased in all patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, whether on ibrutinib or not. Compared to untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients, response to collagen showed a mild further decrement on ibrutinib, while response to adenosine diphosphate improved. All parameters associated with a significantly increased risk of bleeding-related events were present at baseline, including prolonged epinephrine closure time (HR 2.74, P=0.012), lower levels of von Willebrand factor activity (HR 2.73, P=0.009) and factor VIII (HR 3.73, P=0.0004). In conclusion, both disease and treatment-related factors influence the risk of bleeding. Patients at greater risk for bleeding of grade ≤ 2 can be identified by clinical laboratory tests and counseled to avoid aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and fish oils. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01500733

  6. Incidence and risk factors of bleeding-related adverse events in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia treated with ibrutinib

    PubMed Central

    Lipsky, Andrew H.; Farooqui, Mohammed Z.H.; Tian, Xin; Martyr, Sabrina; Cullinane, Ann M.; Nghiem, Khanh; Sun, Clare; Valdez, Janet; Niemann, Carsten U.; Herman, Sarah E. M.; Saba, Nakhle; Soto, Susan; Marti, Gerald; Uzel, Gulbu; Holland, Steve M.; Lozier, Jay N.; Wiestner, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Ibrutinib is associated with bleeding-related adverse events of grade ≤2 in severity, and infrequently with grade ≥3 events. To investigate the mechanisms of bleeding and identify patients at risk, we prospectively assessed platelet function and coagulation factors in our investigator-initiated trial of single-agent ibrutinib for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. At a median follow-up of 24 months we recorded grade ≤2 bleeding-related adverse events in 55% of 85 patients. No grade ≥3 events occurred. Median time to event was 49 days. The cumulative incidence of an event plateaued by 6 months, suggesting that the risk of bleeding decreases with continued therapy. At baseline, von Willebrand factor and factor VIII levels were often high and normalized on treatment. Platelet function measured via the platelet function analyzer (PFA-100™) was impaired in 22 patients at baseline and in an additional 19 patients on ibrutinib (often transiently). Collagen and adenosine diphosphate induced platelet aggregation was tested using whole blood aggregometry. Compared to normal controls, response to both agonists was decreased in all patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, whether on ibrutinib or not. Compared to untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients, response to collagen showed a mild further decrement on ibrutinib, while response to adenosine diphosphate improved. All parameters associated with a significantly increased risk of bleeding-related events were present at baseline, including prolonged epinephrine closure time (HR 2.74, P=0.012), lower levels of von Willebrand factor activity (HR 2.73, P=0.009) and factor VIII (HR 3.73, P=0.0004). In conclusion, both disease and treatment-related factors influence the risk of bleeding. Patients at greater risk for bleeding of grade ≤2 can be identified by clinical laboratory tests and counseled to avoid aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and fish oils. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01500733 PMID

  7. Efficacy of FEIBA for acute bleeding and surgical haemostasis in haemophilia A patients with inhibitors: a multicentre registry in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Zülfikar, B; Aydogan, G; Salcioglu, Z; Oner, A F; Kavakli, K; Gursel, T; Zülfikar, H

    2012-05-01

    Long used in established industrialized nations to treat patients with haemophilia and inhibitors, factor eight inhibitor bypassing activity (FEIBA) has, in recent years, been introduced into more geographically diverse settings. Data are needed on how successfully FEIBA therapy has been implemented in new regions. To determine the efficacy and safety of FEIBA for the treatment of acute bleeding and surgical haemostasis in a newly industrialized country. A multicentre registry of haemophilia A patients with inhibitors receiving FEIBA treatment was established in Turkey. With a standardized case report form, data were collected retrospectively on: patient demographics; characteristics of acute bleeding episodes and surgical interventions; FEIBA regimen; and treatment outcomes. Thirty-seven patients received a total of 112 FEIBA treatment courses, 90 for acute bleeding and 22 for surgical haemostasis. The median FEIBA dose per infusion for acute bleeding was 50 IU kg(-1), and for surgery was 100 IU kg(-1). For both acute joint and muscle/soft tissue bleeding and in surgery, haemostasis was attained in a median of two FEIBA infusions. FEIBA was judged effective in 92% of treatment courses for acute bleeding, with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 85-97%. Rates of haemostatic efficacy did not differ significantly between anatomical sites of acute bleeding. The haemostatic efficacy rate of FEIBA in surgery was 86% (CI, 65-97%). No thromboembolic complications or other adverse events occurred during any treatment course. FEIBA has been successfully integrated into clinical practice in Turkey, with rates of haemostatic efficacy comparable to those reported in countries with a longer history of FEIBA usage. PMID:22103429

  8. Post-biliary sphincterotomy bleeding despite covered metallic stent deployment

    PubMed Central

    Donatelli, Gianfranco; Cereatti, Fabrizio; Dumont, Jean-Loup; Dhumane, Parag; Tuszynski, Thierry; Vergeau, Bertrand Marie; Meduri, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Several endoscopic techniques have been proposed for the management of post-sphincterotomy bleeding. Lately, self-expandable metal stents deployment has gained popularity especially as a rescue therapy when other endoscopic techniques fail. Methods-results: We report the case report of a massive post-sphincterotomy bleeding in a patient with a self-expandable metal stent in the biliary tree. Despite the presence of a correctly positioned self-expandable metal stent, a new endoscopic session was required to control the bleeding. Conclusions: Self-expandable metal stent may be useful to manage post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding. However, up to now there is no specifically designed self-expandable metal stent for such complication. Large new designed self-expandable metal stent may be a useful tool for biliary endoscopist. PMID:27489716

  9. Anode reactive bleed and injector shift control strategy

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Jun [Rochester, NY; Chowdhury, Akbar [Pittsford, NY; Lerner, Seth E [Honeoye Falls, NY; Marley, William S [Rush, NY; Savage, David R [Rochester, NY; Leary, James K [Rochester, NY

    2012-01-03

    A system and method for correcting a large fuel cell voltage spread for a split sub-stack fuel cell system. The system includes a hydrogen source that provides hydrogen to each split sub-stack and bleed valves for bleeding the anode side of the sub-stacks. The system also includes a voltage measuring device for measuring the voltage of each cell in the split sub-stacks. The system provides two levels for correcting a large stack voltage spread problem. The first level includes sending fresh hydrogen to the weak sub-stack well before a normal reactive bleed would occur, and the second level includes sending fresh hydrogen to the weak sub-stack and opening the bleed valve of the other sub-stack when the cell voltage spread is close to stack failure.

  10. Beware of Bleeding Risks with Antacids Containing Aspirin

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159221.html Beware of Bleeding Risks With Antacids Containing Aspirin Alka Seltzer, Bromo Seltzer among over- ... 6, 2016 MONDAY, June 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Antacids that contain aspirin may cause stomach or intestinal ...

  11. The comparison of bacteremia and amount of bleeding during septoplasty.

    PubMed

    Koc, Sema; Uysal, Ismail Onder; Uysal, Elif Bilge; Yenişehirli, Gülgün; Duygu, Fazilet

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the amount of bleeding and bacteremia during nasal septal surgery. Seventy-one patients undergoing septoplasty were enrolled in the present study. The amount of bleeding was measured and recorded for each patient. Preoperative and postoperative blood cultures were collected immediately after the induction of anesthesia and 20 min after the operation, respectively. While none of the blood cultures taken preoperatively were positive for any organism, the cultures obtained postoperatively were positive in 9 (12.7%) of 71 patients who underwent septoplasty, and bacteremia was more frequent among those with a greater amount of bleeding during the surgery. The results of this study suggest that although bacteremia had no clinical consequences for patients, patients with more bleeding have an increased risk of developing bacteremia which may cause complications in higher risk individuals. PMID:22037718

  12. Non-endoscopic management strategies for acute esophagogastric variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Satapathy, Sanjaya K.; Sanyal, Arun J

    2014-01-01

    Acute variceal bleeding is a potentially life threatening complication of portal hypertension. Management consists of emergent hemostasis, therapy directed at hemodynamic resuscitation, protection of the airway, and prevention and treatment of complications including prophylactic use of antibiotics. Endoscopic treatment remains the mainstay in the management of acute variceal bleeding in combination with pharmacotherapy aimed at reducing portal pressure. Patients failing first-line therapy are triaged for non-endoscopic means of achieving hemostasis such as TIPS, BRTO or surgically created shunt procedures as rescue procedures, the choice depends on the source of bleeding (esophageal or gastric), size of the varices, portal vein patency, presence or absence of gastro-renal shunt, hepatic reserve and local expertise. The current chapter, intends to highlight only the current non endoscopic treatment approaches for control of acute variceal bleeding. PMID:25440928

  13. Bleeding oesophageal varices with long term follow up.

    PubMed Central

    Spence, R A; Johnston, G W; Odling-Smee, G W; Rodgers, H W

    1984-01-01

    Complete long term follow up was obtained in 27 children who had bled from oesophageal varices. Most presented with haematemesis or melaena at an average age of 5.2 years in the portal vein thrombosis group (20 children) and 9.5 years in the intrahepatic group (7 children). All had splenomegaly. Only 6 of 20 children with portal vein thrombosis had a possible precipitating factor. A total of 182 admissions for bleeding are reported, in 68 of which injection sclerotherapy was used to control bleeding. Control rate with injection sclerotherapy was 97%. Shunts performed below age 10 years were associated with a high thrombosis rate. A conservative approach to bleeding varices in children is recommended with transfusion, pitressin, and injection sclerotherapy. Oesophageal transection may have a role in the emergency management of the few children in whom bleeding is not controlled by injection sclerotherapy. PMID:6609683

  14. Brain Bleed Risk from Warfarin May Be Higher Than Thought

    MedlinePlus

    ... older, with a common heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation. The investigators found that almost one in three ... intracranial" bleed while taking warfarin for the condition. "Atrial fibrillation ("a-fib") is a common heart rhythm disorder ...

  15. Women Smokers at Higher Risk for Brain Bleed

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of stroke usually results from a bleeding aneurysm in the brain. An aneurysm is a small weak spot in a blood ... factors likely increase the risk of developing an aneurysm that eventually ruptures and causes a subarachnoid hemorrhage, ...

  16. Peptic Ulcer Disease in Healthcare Workers: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hong-Yue; Weng, Shih-Feng; Lin, Hung-Jung; Hsu, Chien-Chin; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Su, Shih-Bin; Guo, How-Ran; Huang, Chien-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Health care workers (HCWs) in Taiwan have heavy, stressful workloads, are on-call, and have rotating nightshifts, all of which might contribute to peptic ulcer disease (PUD). We wanted to evaluate the PUD risk in HCWs, which is not clear. Using Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified 50,226 physicians, 122,357 nurses, 20,677 pharmacists, and 25,059 other HCWs (dieticians, technicians, rehabilitation therapists, and social workers) as the study cohort, and randomly selected an identical number of non-HCW patients (i.e., general population) as the comparison cohort. Conditional logistical regression analysis was used to compare the PUD risk between them. Subgroup analysis for physician specialties was also done. Nurses and other HCWs had a significantly higher PUD risk than did the general population (odds ratio [OR]: 1.477; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.433–1.521 and OR: 1.328; 95% CI: 1.245–1.418, respectively); pharmacists had a lower risk (OR: 0.884; 95% CI: 0.828–0.945); physicians had a nonsignificantly different risk (OR: 1.029; 95% CI: 0.987–1.072). In the physician specialty subgroup analysis, internal medicine, surgery, Ob/Gyn, and family medicine specialists had a higher PUD risk than other physicians (OR: 1.579; 95% CI: 1.441–1.731, OR: 1.734; 95% CI: 1.565–1.922, OR: 1.336; 95% CI: 1.151–1.550, and OR: 1.615; 95% CI: 1.425–1.831, respectively). In contrast, emergency physicians had a lower risk (OR: 0.544; 95% CI: 0.359–0.822). Heavy workloads, long working hours, workplace stress, rotating nightshifts, and coping skills may explain our epidemiological findings of higher risks for PUD in some HCWs, which might help us improve our health policies for HCWs. PMID:26301861

  17. Peptidomics of Peptic Digest of Selected Potato Tuber Proteins: Post-Translational Modifications and Limited Cleavage Specificity.

    PubMed

    C K Rajendran, Subin R; Mason, Beth; Udenigwe, Chibuike C

    2016-03-23

    Bioinformatic tools are useful in predicting bioactive peptides from food proteins. This study was focused on using bioinformatics and peptidomics to evaluate the specificity of peptide release and post-translational modifications (PTMs) in a peptic digest of potato protein isolate. Peptides in the protein hydrolysate were identified by LC-MS/MS and subsequently aligned to their parent potato tuber proteins. Five major proteins were selected for further analysis, namely, lipoxygenase, α-1,4-glucan phosphorylase, annexin, patatin, and polyubiquitin, based on protein coverage, abundance, confidence levels, and function. Comparison of the in silico peptide profile generated with ExPASy PeptideCutter and experimental peptidomics data revealed several differences. The experimental peptic cleavage sites were found to vary in number and specificity from PeptideCutter predictions. Average peptide chain length was also found to be higher than predicted with hexapeptides as the smallest detected peptides. Moreover, PTMs, particularly Met oxidation and Glu/Asp deamidation, were observed in some peptides, and these were unaccounted for during in silico analysis. PTMs can be formed during aging of potato tubers, or as a result of processing conditions during protein isolation and hydrolysis. The findings provide insights on the limitations of current bioinformatics tools for predicting bioactive peptide release from proteins, and on the existence of structural modifications that can alter the peptide bioactivity and functionality. PMID:26947758

  18. Heavy menstrual bleeding and health-associated quality of life in women with von Willebrand's disease

    PubMed Central

    GOVOROV, IGOR; EKELUND, LENA; CHAIRETI, ROZA; ELFVINGE, PETRA; HOLMSTRÖM, MARGARETA; BREMME, KATARINA; MINTS, MIRIAM

    2016-01-01

    Women with the inherited bleeding disorder von Willebrand's disease (VWD) face gender-specific hemostatic challenges during menstruation. Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) can negatively affect their overall life activities and the health-associated quality of life. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether women with VWD experienced HMB and an impaired health-associated quality of life. The study subjects were recruited from the Coagulation Unit of Karolinska University Hospital. Information was retrieved from various self-administered forms and medical records. Of the 30 women (18–52 years) that were included in the present study, 50% suffered from HMB, although the majority received treatment for HMB. In addition, almost all the included women perceived limitations in the overall life activities due to menstruation. The health-associated quality of life for women with HMB was significantly lower (P<0.10) with regards to ‘bodily pain’ compared with Swedish women of the general population. In conclusion, women with VWD experienced reduced health-associated quality of life as a result of HMB. Therefore, preventing limitations in overall life activities and improving their health-associated quality of life thorough counseling on menstrual bleeding is important for women with VWD. PMID:27168829

  19. Human CalDAG-GEFI gene (RASGRP2) mutation affects platelet function and causes severe bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Canault, Matthias; Ghalloussi, Dorsaf; Grosdidier, Charlotte; Guinier, Marie; Perret, Claire; Chelghoum, Nadjim; Germain, Marine; Raslova, Hana; Peiretti, Franck; Morange, Pierre E.; Saut, Noemie; Pillois, Xavier; Nurden, Alan T.; Cambien, François; Pierres, Anne; van den Berg, Timo K.; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Tregouet, David-Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    The nature of an inherited platelet disorder was investigated in three siblings affected by severe bleeding. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified the culprit mutation (cG742T) in the RAS guanyl-releasing protein-2 (RASGRP2) gene coding for calcium- and DAG-regulated guanine exchange factor-1 (CalDAG-GEFI). Platelets from individuals carrying the mutation present a reduced ability to activate Rap1 and to perform proper αIIbβ3 integrin inside-out signaling. Expression of CalDAG-GEFI mutant in HEK293T cells abolished Rap1 activation upon stimulation. Nevertheless, the PKC- and ADP-dependent pathways allow residual platelet activation in the absence of functional CalDAG-GEFI. The mutation impairs the platelet’s ability to form thrombi under flow and spread normally as a consequence of reduced Rac1 GTP-binding. Functional deficiencies were confined to platelets and megakaryocytes with no leukocyte alteration. This contrasts with the phenotype seen in type III leukocyte adhesion deficiency caused by the absence of kindlin-3. Heterozygous did not suffer from bleeding and have normal platelet aggregation; however, their platelets mimicked homozygous ones by failing to undergo normal adhesion under flow and spreading. Rescue experiments on cultured patient megakaryocytes corrected the functional deficiency after transfection with wild-type RASGRP2. Remarkably, the presence of a single normal allele is sufficient to prevent bleeding, making CalDAG-GEFI a novel and potentially safe therapeutic target to prevent thrombosis. PMID:24958846

  20. Antisense inhibition of coagulation factor XI prolongs APTT without increased bleeding risk in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Younis, Husam S; Crosby, Jeff; Huh, Jung-Im; Lee, Hong Soo; Rime, Soyub; Monia, Brett; Henry, Scott P

    2012-03-01

    A strategy to produce sufficient anticoagulant properties with reduced risk of bleeding may be possible through inhibition of factor XI (FXI), a component of the intrinsic coagulation cascade. The objective of this work was to determine the safety profile of ISIS 416858, a 2'-methoxyethoxy (2'-MOE) antisense oligonucleotide inhibitor of FXI, with focus on assessment of bleeding risk. Cynomolgus monkeys administered ISIS 416858 (4, 8, 12, and 40 mg/kg/wk, subcutaneous) for up to 13 weeks produced a dose-dependent reduction in FXI (mRNA in liver and plasma activity) and a concomitant increase in activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). ISIS 416858 (20 or 40 mg/kg/wk) reduced plasma FXI activity by 80% at 4 weeks of treatment that resulted in a 33% increase in APTT by 13 weeks with no effects on PT, platelets, or increased bleeding following partial tail amputation or gum and skin laceration. The dose-dependent presence of basophilic granules in multiple tissues in ISIS 416858-treated animals was an expected histologic change for a 2'-MOE antisense oligonucleotide, and no toxicity was attributed to hepatic FXI reduction. Basophilic granules reflect cellular drug uptake and subsequent visualization on hematoxylin staining. These results suggest that ISIS 416858 has an acceptable preclinical safety profile and is a promising clinical candidate to treat thrombotic disease. PMID:22246038

  1. Transarterial embolization for management of severe postcoital bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Eskandari, Armen; Mukherjee, Ashis; McHugh, John

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Postcoital bleeding is an uncommon cause of gynecologic hemorrhage; however, it can be severe in a majority of cases necessitating surgical management. Methods: We report a case of severe postcoital bleeding in a young woman requiring blood transfusion. Results: Hemostasis was achieved using subselective embolization of cervical artery by metallic coils. Conclusion: Our case demonstrates a minimally invasive treatment for control of non-obstetric hemorrhage. PMID:27551425

  2. Jejunal Amyloidoma - a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of localized amyloid tumor of the jejunum which presented with abdominal pain and gastrointestinal bleeding. We reviewed the pathophysiologic process that precipitates bleeding in this rare tumor. We also examined the documented radiologic and endoscopic features of amyloidosis of the small bowel in the light of our reported case. All with a view to add to the growing evidence on this rare tumor which will facilitate accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:20062677

  3. ENDOSCOPIC DIAGNOSIS AND THERAPY IN GASTRO-ESOPAGEAL VARICEAL BLEEDING

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Arun J.

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal variceal hemorrhage is a medical emergency with high morbidity and mortality. Endoscopic therapy is the mainstay of management of bleeding varices. It requires attention to technique and the appropriate choice of therapy for a given patient at a given point in time. Subjects must be monitored continuously after initiation of therapy for control of bleeding and second line definitive therapies introduced quickly if endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment fails. PMID:26142034

  4. Baseline platelet indices and bleeding after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Huczek, Zenon; Kochman, Janusz; Kowara, Michal Krzysztof; Wilimski, Radoslaw; Scislo, Piotr; Scibisz, Anna; Rymuza, Bartosz; Andrzejewska, Renata; Stanecka, Paulina; Filipiak, Krzysztof J; Opolski, Grzegorz

    2015-07-01

    Bleeding complications are frequent and independently predict mortality after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). It has been demonstrated that certain platelet parameters are indicative of platelet reactivity. We sought to determine the possible correlation between simple platelet indices and bleeding complications in patients undergoing TAVI. Platelet indices--platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width and plateletcrit--were measured in 110 consecutive patients on the day preceding TAVI. In-hospital bleeding events after TAVI were assessed according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 classification as any bleeding, major and life-threatening bleeding (MLTB) and need for transfusion. By receiver-operating characteristic analysis, only MPV was able to distinguish between patients with and without any bleeding [area under the curve (AUC) 0.629, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.531-0.719, P = 0.0342], MLTB (AUC 0.730, 95% CI 0.637-0.811, P = 0.0004) and need for transfusion (AUC 0.660, 95% CI 0.563-0.747, P = 0.0045). By multivariate logistic regression, high MPV (>10.6) and low platelet distribution width (<14.8) were associated with increased risk of any bleeding [odds ratio (OR) 4.08, 95% CI 1.66-10.07, P = 0.0022; and OR 3.82, 95% CI 1.41-10.36, P = 0.0084, respectively] and MLTB (OR 10.76, 95% CI 3.05-38, P = 0.0002; and OR 8.46, 95% CI 1.69-42.17, P = 0.0092, respectively). Additionally, high MPV independently correlated with the need for transfusion (OR 4.11, 95% CI 1.71-9.86, P = 0.0016). Larger and less heterogenic platelets may be associated with increased risk of short-term bleeding complications after TAVI. PMID:25811449

  5. Practical approach to endoscopic management for bleeding gastric varices.

    PubMed

    Lim, Young-Suk

    2012-01-01

    Bleeding from gastric varices is generally more severe than bleeding from esophageal varices, although it occurs less frequently. Recently, new endoscopic treatment options and interventional radiological procedures have broadened the therapeutic armamentarium for gastric varices. This review provides an overview of the classification and pathophysiology of gastric varices, an introduction to current endoscopic and interventional radiological management options for gastric varices, and details of a practical approach to endoscopic variceal obturation using N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate. PMID:22563286

  6. A pediatric case of factitious disorder with unexplained bleeding symptoms.

    PubMed

    Uzuner, Selcuk; Bahali, Kayhan; Kurban, Sema; Erenberk, Ufuk; Cakir, Erkan

    2013-01-01

    Factitious disorder is characterized by deliberate production or imitation of physical or psychological symptoms in order to adopt the sick role. The disorder can be seen as factitious bleeding. Factitious bleeding is a rare disorder in pediatric population. The concomitant appearance of hemoptysis and hematuria in the same patient has not been previously reported. In this case report, we present a pediatric case of factitious disorder with both hemoptysis and hematuria. PMID:24199786

  7. Amphetamine-related ischemic colitis causing gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Panikkath, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented with acute lower intestinal bleeding requiring blood transfusion. Multiple initial investigations did not reveal the cause of the bleeding. Colonoscopy performed 2 days later showed features suggestive of ischemic colitis. On detailed history, the patient admitted to using amphetamines, and her urine drug screen was positive for them. She was managed conservatively and advised not to use amphetamines again. She did not have any recurrence on 2-year follow-up. PMID:27365888

  8. Endoscopic Diagnosis and Therapy in Gastroesophageal Variceal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Ashwani; Dharel, Narayan; Sanyal, Arun J

    2015-07-01

    Gastroesophageal variceal hemorrhage is a medical emergency with high morbidity and mortality. Endoscopic therapy is the mainstay of management of bleeding varices. It requires attention to technique and the appropriate choice of therapy for a given patient at a given point in time. Subjects must be monitored continuously after initiation of therapy for control of bleeding, and second-line definitive therapies must be introduced quickly if endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment fails. PMID:26142034

  9. Seven cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding after cold biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Alneaimi, Khaled; Abdelmoula, Ali; Vincent, Magalie; Savale, Camille; Baye, Birane; Lesur, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Routine biopsy of the upper gastrointestinal tract is performed with increasing frequency. It is generally considered to be safe without significant complication. However, gastrointestinal bleeding as a result of cold biopsy is a known complication. We report seven cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding after cold biopsy and discuss clinical data, risks factors, severity and management of this event. We suggest that physicians must be more cautious with this rare but potentially severe complication.

  10. Liquefied Bleed for Stability and Efficiency of High Speed Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, J. David; Davis, David; Barsi, Stephen J.; Deans, Matthew C.; Weir, Lois J.; Sanders, Bobby W.

    2014-01-01

    A mission analysis code was developed to perform a trade study on the effectiveness of liquefying bleed for the inlet of the first stage of a TSTO vehicle. By liquefying bleed, the vehicle weight (TOGW) could be reduced by 7 to 23%. Numerous simplifying assumptions were made and lessons were learned. Increased accuracy in future analyses can be achieved by: Including a higher fidelity model to capture the effect of rescaling (variable vehicle TOGW). Refining specific thrust and impulse models ( T m a and Isp) to preserve fuel-to-air ratio. Implementing LH2 for T m a and Isp. Correlating baseline design to other mission analyses and correcting vehicle design elements. Implementing angle-of-attack effects on inlet characteristics. Refining aerodynamic performance (to improve L/D ratio at higher Mach numbers). Examining the benefit with partial cooling or densification of the bleed air stream. Incorporating higher fidelity weight estimates for the liquefied bleed system (heat exchange and liquid storage versus bleed duct weights) could be added when more fully developed. Adding trim drag or 6-degree-of-freedom trajectory analysis for higher fidelity. Investigating vehicle optimization for each of the bleed configurations.

  11. Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Is Urgent Colonoscopy Necessary for All Hematochezia?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is defined as acute or chronic abnormal blood loss distal to the ligament of Treitz. The incidence of LGIB is only one fifth of that of the upper gastrointestinal tract and is estimated to be 21 to 27 cases per 100,000 adults per year. Acute bleeding is arbitrarily defined as bleeding of <3 days' duration resulting in instability of vital signs, anemia, and/or need for blood transfusion. Chronic bleeding is defined as slow blood loss over a period of several days or longer presenting with symptoms of occult fecal blood, intermittent melena, or scant hematochezia. Bleeding means that the amounts of blood in the feces are too small to be seen but detectable by chemical tests. LGIB is usually chronic and stops spontaneously. Bleeding stop (80%), but male gender and older patients suffer from more severe LGIB. The optimal timing of colonoscopic intervention for LGIB remains uncertain. Urgent colonoscopy may serve to decrease hospital stay. However, urgent colonoscopy is difficult to control, and showed no evidence of improving clinical outcomes or lowering costs as compared with routine elective colonoscopy. PMID:24143306

  12. Bleeding after endoscopic submucosal dissection: Risk factors and preventive methods

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Yosuke; Tsuji, Yosuke; Sakaguchi, Yoshiki; Minatsuki, Chihiro; Asada-Hirayama, Itsuko; Niimi, Keiko; Ono, Satoshi; Kodashima, Shinya; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has become widely accepted as a standard method of treatment for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms because it enables en block resection even for large lesions or fibrotic lesions with minimal invasiveness, and decreases the local recurrence rate. Moreover, specimens resected in an en block fashion enable accurate histological assessment. Taking these factors into consideration, ESD seems to be more advantageous than conventional endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), but the associated risks of perioperative adverse events are higher than in EMR. Bleeding after ESD is the most frequent among these adverse events. Although post-ESD bleeding can be controlled by endoscopic hemostasis in most cases, it may lead to serious conditions including hemorrhagic shock. Even with preventive methods including administration of acid secretion inhibitors and preventive hemostasis, post-ESD bleeding cannot be completely prevented. In addition high-risk cases for post-ESD bleeding, which include cases with the use of antithrombotic agents or which require large resection, are increasing. Although there have been many reports about associated risk factors and methods of preventing post-ESD bleeding, many issues remain unsolved. Therefore, in this review, we have overviewed risk factors and methods of preventing post-ESD bleeding from previous studies. Endoscopists should have sufficient knowledge of these risk factors and preventive methods when performing ESD. PMID:27468187

  13. Primary Prevention of Variceal Bleeding: Pharmacological Therapy Versus Endoscopic Banding

    PubMed Central

    Karadsheh, Zeid; Allison, Harmony

    2013-01-01

    Variceal bleeding is one of the most feared complications in patients with liver cirrhosis. It continues to be a leading cause of death among patients with liver cirrhosis. Although its prognosis has improved over the last several decades, it still carries substantial mortality. Preventing variceal bleeding has been extensively studied and evaluated in several studies in the recent years and the comparison between the different modalities available to prevent variceal bleeding has been an area of discussion. Currently the two most widely used modalities to prevent variceal bleeding are pharmacologic (non-selective beta-blockers [NSBB]) and endoscopic (variceal band ligation [VBL]) which have replaced sclerotherapy in the recent years. In addition to NSBB and recent carvedilol, different other medications have been evaluated including isosorbide mononitrates, spironolactone and angiotensin blocking agents. Comparing the outcomes and adverse effects of these two modalities has been evaluated in different studies. Some studies have showed superiority of VBL until recently, when carvedilol has been included, however; overall mortality has been similar in most trials. Despite that, NSBB remain the first line treatment, as they are cheaper and relatively effective in preventing both esophageal and gastric bleeding. The following sections discuss the primary prevention of variceal bleeding with a focus on NSBB, carvedilol and VBL. PMID:24350068

  14. Bleeding after endoscopic submucosal dissection: Risk factors and preventive methods.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Yosuke; Tsuji, Yosuke; Sakaguchi, Yoshiki; Minatsuki, Chihiro; Asada-Hirayama, Itsuko; Niimi, Keiko; Ono, Satoshi; Kodashima, Shinya; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-07-14

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has become widely accepted as a standard method of treatment for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms because it enables en block resection even for large lesions or fibrotic lesions with minimal invasiveness, and decreases the local recurrence rate. Moreover, specimens resected in an en block fashion enable accurate histological assessment. Taking these factors into consideration, ESD seems to be more advantageous than conventional endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), but the associated risks of perioperative adverse events are higher than in EMR. Bleeding after ESD is the most frequent among these adverse events. Although post-ESD bleeding can be controlled by endoscopic hemostasis in most cases, it may lead to serious conditions including hemorrhagic shock. Even with preventive methods including administration of acid secretion inhibitors and preventive hemostasis, post-ESD bleeding cannot be completely prevented. In addition high-risk cases for post-ESD bleeding, which include cases with the use of antithrombotic agents or which require large resection, are increasing. Although there have been many reports about associated risk factors and methods of preventing post-ESD bleeding, many issues remain unsolved. Therefore, in this review, we have overviewed risk factors and methods of preventing post-ESD bleeding from previous studies. Endoscopists should have sufficient knowledge of these risk factors and preventive methods when performing ESD. PMID:27468187

  15. Novel capsules for potential theranostics of obscure gastrointestinal bleedings.

    PubMed

    Çolak, Bayram; Şakalak, Hüseyin; Çavuşoğlu, Halit; Yavuz, Mustafa Selman

    2016-09-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is identified as persistent or repeated bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract which could not be defined by conventional gastrointestinal endoscopy and radiological examinations. These GI bleedings are assessed through invasive diagnostic and treatment methods including enteroscopy, angiography and endoscopy. In addition, video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is a non-invasive method used to determine the location of the bleeding, however, this does not provide any treatment. Despite of these successful but invasive methods, an effective non-invasive treatment is desperately needed. Herein, we prepare non-invasive theranostic capsules to cure obscure GI bleeding. An effective theranostic capsule containing endothelin as the targeting agent, thrombin-fibrinogen or fibrin as the treating agent, and fluorescein dye as the diagnostic tool is suggested. These theranostic capsules can be administered orally in a simple and non-invasive manner without a risk of complication. By using these novel capsules, one can diagnose obscure GI bleeding with having a possibility of curing. PMID:27515212

  16. Argon plasma coagulation for the endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal tumor bleeding: A retrospective comparison with a non-treated historical cohort

    PubMed Central

    Wodak, Stephanie; Gusmon, Carla C; Safatle-Ribeiro, Adriana Vaz; Kawaguti, Fabio Shiguehissa; Baba, Elisa Ryoka; Pennacchi, Caterina MP; Lima, Marcelo Simas; Ribeiro, Ulysses; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2015-01-01

    Background The endoscopic use of argon plasma coagulation (APC) to achieve hemostasis for upper gastrointestinal tumor bleeding (UGITB) has not been adequately evaluated in controlled trials. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of APC for the treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding from malignant lesions. Methods Between January and September 2011, all patients with UGITB underwent high-potency APC therapy (up to 70 Watts). This group was compared with a historical cohort of patients admitted between January and December 2010, when the endoscopic treatment of bleeding malignancies was not routinely performed. Patients were stratified into two categories, grouping the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status scale: Category I (ECOG 0–2) patients with a good clinical status and Category II (ECOG 3–4) patients with a poor clinical status. Results Our study had 25 patients with UGITB whom underwent APC treatment and 28 patients whom received no endoscopic therapy. The clinical characteristics of the groups were similar, except for endoscopic active bleeding, which was more frequently detected in APC group. We had 15 patients in the APC group whom had active bleeding, and initial hemostasis was obtained in 11 of them (73.3%). In the control group, four patients had active bleeding. There were no differences in 30-day re-bleeding (33.3% in the APC group versus 14.3% in the control group; p = 0.104) and 30-day mortality rates (20.8% in the APC group, versus 42.9% in the control group; p = 0.091). When patients were categorized according to their ECOG status, we found that APC therapy had no impact in re-bleeding and mortality rates (Group I: APC versus no endoscopic treatment: re-bleeding p = 0.412, mortality p = 0.669; Group II: APC versus no endoscopic treatment: re-bleeding p = 0.505, mortality p = 0.580). Hematemesis and site of bleeding located at the esophagus or duodenum were associated with a higher 30-day

  17. Impact Of Standing Bleed Water On Saltstone Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A. D.; Pickenheim, B. R.

    2012-09-28

    The amount of water present during placement and subsequent curing of saltstone has the potential to impact several properties important for grout quality. An active drain water system can remove residual standing water and expose the surface of the placed saltstone to air. Oxidation of the saltstone may result in an increase in the leachability of redox sensitive elements. A dry surface can lead to cracking, causing an increase in hydraulic conductivity. An inactive drain water system can allow standing water that generates unnecessary hydrostatic head on the vault walls. Standing water that cannot be removed via the drain system will be available for potential incorporation into subsequent grout placements. The objective of this work is to study the impact of standing water on grout quality pertaining to disposal units. A series of saltstone mixes were prepared, and cured at ambient temperature to evaluate the impact of standing water on saltstone placement. The samples were managed to control drying effects on leachability by either exposing or capping the samples. The water to premix ratio was varied to represent a range of processing conditions. Samples were analyzed for density, leachability, and hydraulic conductivity. A monolith of each composition was cut into four sections to analyze the homogeneity of the sample with respect to vertical position within the sample. The density of each section was measured by two methods, helium pycnometry and by ASTM 642-06. The results show a trend of increasing density with increasing depth in the samples. This effect is more pronounced with the inclusion of excess bleed water and indicative of increased settling. The leachability of the eight different samples was analyzed by ANS/ANSI 16.1 method. These results indicate that drying of the saltstone during curing leads to decreased Leachability Indices (indicative of more release) for potassium, sodium, rhenium, nitrite, and nitrate. This may be caused by shrinkage

  18. Visualization of a central bleed jet in an axisymmetric, compressible base flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdon, C. J.; Dutton, J. C.

    2003-02-01

    The central bleed jet in an axisymmetric, compressible base flow with a Mach 2.46 free stream was visualized using an acetone planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique. Three bleed flow rates, a low-bleed case (I=0.0038) and two others that bracket the optimal bleed case (I=0.0113 and I=0.0226), were examined. The injection parameter, I, is defined here as the bleed mass flow rate normalized by the product of the base area and freestream mass flux. This study shows that the bleed jet in the low-bleed case is almost instantly deflected outward toward the outer shear layer after it exits from the bleed orifice. When I=0.0113, the bleed fluid carries enough momentum that the bleed jet remains coherent and generally aligned along the symmetry axis for approximately one base radius before it is deflected outward by the primary recirculation region. For the highest bleed rate examined (I=0.0226), the bleed jet remains coherent and aligned along the symmetry axis for approximately 2.5 base radii downstream, where the impingement of freestream fluid causes the bleed jet to symmetrically eject mass downstream. Because the behavior of the bleed jet is much different for pre- and post-optimal bleed rates, some general conclusions can be made about the effect of bleed rate on base drag. For the two lower-bleed cases, there is a base pressure increase because the bleed fluid partially isolates the primary recirculation region from the outer flow, and provides part of the mass necessary for entrainment in the outer shear layer. The bleed jet in the high-bleed case is not as effective at increasing the base pressure, because the jet is shielded from the outer shear layer by the secondary recirculation region, which exists in the annulus between the bleed orifice and the base corner.

  19. Occult gastric bleeding demonstrated by bone scan and Tc-99m-DTPA renal scan

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.W.; Leiter, B.E.; Weitzman, F.; Shapiro, J.H.

    1981-10-01

    A patient is described who had coagulopathy and clinically intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding. The bleeding site was clearly shown on renal and bone imaging performed at a time when the patient was considered clinically to have stopped bleeding. A bleeding gastric ulcer was subsequently demonstrated by radionuclide and contrast angiography, and at surgery.

  20. Risk of Fatal Bleeding in Episodes of Major Bleeding with New Oral Anticoagulants and Vitamin K Antagonists: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Skaistis, Joel; Tagami, Travis

    2015-01-01

    Background The reversibility of new/novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC) is not well understood, whereas the reversal strategies for bleeding associated with vitamin k antagonists (VKA), such as warfarin, is well established. It is unknown whether outcomes are different between bleeds occurring with NOAC compared to VKA use. Objectives This systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials determines the relative odds of fatal bleeding given that a patient suffered a major bleed while on NOAC versus VKA therapy. Search Methods Data on major and fatal bleeding events was sought from randomized controlled trials of NOAC agents compared to VKAs. Main Results 20 trials were included in the meta-analysis. From which, 4056 first-time, major bleeding events were reported and included in the primary analysis. The summary odds ratio for the conditional odds of fatal bleeding given that a major bleeding event occurred was 0.65 [0.52, 0.81] favoring the NOAC agents (p = 0.0001). The reduced odds of fatal bleeding with NOACs was not demonstrated after controlling for bleeding location. Given that an intracranial bleeding event occurred, the summary odds ratio for the conditional odds of fatal bleeding was 0.96 [0.70, 1.32]. For extracranial bleeding events, the summary odds ratio was also statistically insignificant at 0.945 [0.66, 1.35]. Author’s Conclusions The odds ratio calculated in this meta-analysis showed a reduced odds of death in major bleeding associated with NOAC use. This risk reduction was due to a disproportionate amount of intracranial bleeding in the VKA arms. For any given bleeding site, there was no evidence of a significant difference in fatal outcomes from bleeds associated with NOAC versus VKA use. Protocol Registration Protocol registered on PROSPERO under CRD42014013294. PMID:26383245

  1. Visuospatial hemi-inattention following cerebellar/brain stem bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, H; Spang, K; Ebke, M

    2002-01-01

    Neglect is a unilateral lack of responsiveness to stimuli caused by visuospatial hemi-inattention, a unilateral representation deficit and/or a unilateral hypokinesia. It results most frequently from right-hemisphere brain damage, particularly of the parietal lobe but also of the frontal cortex, the basal ganglia, the thalamus, and recently it has also been described after a cerebellar lesion. We report a patient with right-sided bleeding of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, who developed a left-sided visual hemi-inattention. She had no visual field defects, yet she had problems detecting left-sided targets in visual extinction. Furthermore, she was impaired in detecting complex motion on the left side and targets in a fixation offset paradigm. Reactions to left-sided targets in covert shifts of attention were slowed in the invalid condition. Her text reading was impaired as she could not always find the initial word of the next line. However, she was aware of her deficit. Her visuoconstructive ability was normal and she gave no indication of tactile or acoustic extinction. As the cerebellar lesion was located in the right hemisphere and the inattention involved the left side of space, we suggest that the damage to the right brain stem led to a transient imbalance of the noradrenergic ascending activation system which may explain her hemi-inattention. PMID:12221145

  2. Acquired von Willebrand syndrome associated with hypothyroidism: a mild bleeding disorder to be further investigated.

    PubMed

    Federici, Augusto B

    2011-02-01

    Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) is a rare bleeding disorder with laboratory findings similar to those for congenital von Willebrand disease (VWD). Unlike VWD, AVWS usually occurs in individuals with no personal or family history of bleeding. The prevalence of AVWS in the general population is unknown because data from large prospective studies of this syndrome are not available. Although AVWS is more frequently associated with lympho-myeloproliferative and cardiovascular disorders, it can also occur in solid tumors and in immunological and other miscellaneous conditions. Among these miscellaneous conditions, hypothyroidism has been associated with AVWS type 1 with a frequency of ~2 to 5%. In the 47 cases reported in the literature, the low VWF is apparently due to a reduction in its synthesis and/or secretion. Diagnosis of AVWS is based on assays measuring the level and activity of von Willebrand factor (VWF). These tend to be low, whereas factor VIII (FVIII) coagulant activity can be normal. In patients with AVWS associated with hypothyroidism, mucocutaneous bleeding episodes are the most frequent and can be managed with local therapy and/or systemic administrations of antifibrinolytic agents and desmopressin. VWF/FVIII concentrates have been used in only a few patients. The use of thyroid hormones can reverse this abnormality. PMID:21305800

  3. Haemosuccus pancreaticus, an uncommon cause of upper gastro intestinal bleeding: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amir Ali; Charon, Jean Pierre

    2015-06-01

    Haemosuccus Pancreaticus is defined as upper gastro intestinal (GI) bleeding from the ampula of vater via the pancreatic duct. It is most commonly associated with pancreatic inflammation, erosion of the pancrease by aneurysm or pseudo-aneurysm of the splenic artery. We report a 69 year old man with previous history of acute pancreatitis who was admitted with recurrent haematemesis. Initial upper GI endocopy was normal, while admitted, he collapse with abdominal pain and hypotension. He was resuscitated with blood and intravenous fluid. Repeat upper GI endocopy showed fresh blood in the duodenum, but no active bleeding site was demonstrated. An urgent coeliac axis CT angiogram was done which showed an splenic artery pseudo-aneurysm, which was successfully embolized. Patient is well 9 months after the procedure. This case highlights the importance of considering coeliac axis CT angiogram as part of investigation for obscure GI bleeding. PMID:26060169

  4. Comparison of hetastarch to albumin for perioperative bleeding in patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery. A prospective, randomized study.

    PubMed Central

    Gold, M S; Russo, J; Tissot, M; Weinhouse, G; Riles, T

    1990-01-01

    The effects of hetastarch and human albumin solutions on perioperative bleeding and coagulation parameters during abdominal aortic aneurysm repair were compared. In two randomized groups of 20 patients, albumin 5% (group 1) or hetastarch 6% (group 2) 1 g/kg was given during surgery. The remaining perioperative fluids consisted of lactated ringers and packed red blood cells. Perioperative coagulation measurements included partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, activated clotting time, platelet count, and bleeding time. Estimated blood loss and the total amount of crystalloid and blood infused were also measured. The surgeon, blind to the colloid used, subjectively rated bleeding on a scale of 1 to 10. There was no significant difference between groups for any measured parameter at any time. Measurements of coagulation function were within normal limits for both groups. Hetastarch does not cause clotting disorders in patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, at least if the quantities used in this study are not exceeded. PMID:1690974

  5. A novel semi-quantitative method for measuring tissue bleeding.

    PubMed

    Vukcevic, G; Volarevic, V; Raicevic, S; Tanaskovic, I; Milicic, B; Vulovic, T; Arsenijevic, S

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we describe a new semi-quantitative method for measuring the extent of bleeding in pathohistological tissue samples. To test our novel method, we recruited 120 female patients in their first trimester of pregnancy and divided them into three groups of 40. Group I was the control group, in which no dilation was applied. Group II was an experimental group, in which dilation was performed using classical mechanical dilators. Group III was also an experimental group, in which dilation was performed using a hydraulic dilator. Tissue samples were taken from the patients' cervical canals using a Novak's probe via energetic single-step curettage prior to any dilation in Group I and after dilation in Groups II and III. After the tissue samples were prepared, light microscopy was used to obtain microphotographs at 100x magnification. The surfaces affected by bleeding were measured in the microphotographs using the Autodesk AutoCAD 2009 program and its "polylines" function. The lines were used to mark the area around the entire sample (marked A) and to create "polyline" areas around each bleeding area on the sample (marked B). The percentage of the total area affected by bleeding was calculated using the formula: N = Bt x 100 / At where N is the percentage (%) of the tissue sample surface affected by bleeding, At (A total) is the sum of the surfaces of all of the tissue samples and Bt (B total) is the sum of all the surfaces affected by bleeding in all of the tissue samples. This novel semi-quantitative method utilizes the Autodesk AutoCAD 2009 program, which is simple to use and widely available, thereby offering a new, objective and precise approach to estimate the extent of bleeding in tissue samples. PMID:24190861

  6. Hemostatic powder spray: a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Changela, Kinesh; Papafragkakis, Haris; Ofori, Emmanuel; Ona, Mel A; Krishnaiah, Mahesh; Duddempudi, Sushil; Anand, Sury

    2015-05-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The management of gastrointestinal bleeding is often challenging, depending on its location and severity. To date, widely accepted hemostatic treatment options include injection of epinephrine and tissue adhesives such as cyanoacrylate, ablative therapy with contact modalities such as thermal coagulation with heater probe and bipolar hemostatic forceps, noncontact modalities such as photodynamic therapy and argon plasma coagulation, and mechanical hemostasis with band ligation, endoscopic hemoclips, and over-the-scope clips. These approaches, albeit effective in achieving hemostasis, are associated with a 5-10% rebleeding risk. New simple, effective, universal, and safe methods are needed to address some of the challenges posed by the current endoscopic hemostatic techniques. The use of a novel hemostatic powder spray appears to be effective and safe in controlling upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Although initial reports of hemostatic powder spray as an innovative approach to manage gastrointestinal bleeding are promising, further studies are needed to support and confirm its efficacy and safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility, clinical efficacy, and safety of hemostatic powder spray (Hemospray, Cook Medical, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA) as a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding. In this review article, we performed an extensive literature search summarizing case reports and case series of Hemospray for the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. Indications, features, technique, deployment, success rate, complications, and limitations are discussed. The combined technical and clinical success rate of Hemospray was 88.5% (207/234) among the human subjects and 81.8% (9/11) among the porcine models studied. Rebleeding occurred within 72 hours post-treatment in 38 patients (38/234; 16.2%) and in three porcine

  7. Hemostatic powder spray: a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Papafragkakis, Haris; Ofori, Emmanuel; Ona, Mel A.; Krishnaiah, Mahesh; Duddempudi, Sushil; Anand, Sury

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The management of gastrointestinal bleeding is often challenging, depending on its location and severity. To date, widely accepted hemostatic treatment options include injection of epinephrine and tissue adhesives such as cyanoacrylate, ablative therapy with contact modalities such as thermal coagulation with heater probe and bipolar hemostatic forceps, noncontact modalities such as photodynamic therapy and argon plasma coagulation, and mechanical hemostasis with band ligation, endoscopic hemoclips, and over-the-scope clips. These approaches, albeit effective in achieving hemostasis, are associated with a 5–10% rebleeding risk. New simple, effective, universal, and safe methods are needed to address some of the challenges posed by the current endoscopic hemostatic techniques. The use of a novel hemostatic powder spray appears to be effective and safe in controlling upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Although initial reports of hemostatic powder spray as an innovative approach to manage gastrointestinal bleeding are promising, further studies are needed to support and confirm its efficacy and safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility, clinical efficacy, and safety of hemostatic powder spray (Hemospray, Cook Medical, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA) as a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding. In this review article, we performed an extensive literature search summarizing case reports and case series of Hemospray for the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. Indications, features, technique, deployment, success rate, complications, and limitations are discussed. The combined technical and clinical success rate of Hemospray was 88.5% (207/234) among the human subjects and 81.8% (9/11) among the porcine models studied. Rebleeding occurred within 72 hours post-treatment in 38 patients (38/234; 16.2%) and in three porcine

  8. The Clinical Outcomes of Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding Are Not Better than Those of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Min Seob; Cha, Jae Myung; Han, Yong Jae; Yoon, Jin Young; Jeon, Jung Won; Shin, Hyun Phil; Joo, Kwang Ro; Lee, Joung Il

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is increasing; however, predictors of outcomes for patients with LGIB are not as well defined as those for patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). The aim of this study was to identify the clinical outcomes and the predictors of poor outcomes for patients with LGIB, compared to outcomes for patients with UGIB. We identified patients with LGIB or UGIB who underwent endoscopic procedures between July 2006 and February 2013. Propensity score matching was used to improve comparability between LGIB and UGIB groups. The clinical outcomes and predictors of 30-day rebleeding and mortality rate were analyzed between the two groups. In total, 601 patients with UGIB (n = 500) or LGIB (n = 101) were included in the study, and 202 patients with UGIB and 101 patients with LGIB were analyzed after 2:1 propensity score matching. The 30-day rebleeding and mortality rates were 9.9% and 4.5% for the UGIB group, and 16.8% and 5.0% for LGIB group, respectively. After logistic regression analysis, the Rockall score (P = 0.013) and C-reactive protein (CRP; P = 0.047) levels were significant predictors of 30-day mortality in patients with LGIB; however, we could not identify any predictors of rebleeding in patients with LGIB. The clinical outcomes for patients with LGIB are not better than clinical outcomes for patients with UGIB. The clinical Rockall score and serum CRP levels may be used to predict 30-day mortality in patients with LGIB. PMID:27550490

  9. Effective treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding with thalidomide - Chances and limitations.

    PubMed

    Bauditz, Juergen

    2016-03-21

    For more than 50 years bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias has been treated by hormonal therapy with estrogens and progesterons. After a randomized study finally demonstrated that hormones have no effect on bleeding events and transfusion requirements, therapy has switched to endoscopic coagulation. However, angiodysplasias tend to recur over months to years and endoscopy often has to be repeated for long time periods. Thalidomide, which caused severe deformities in newborn children in the 1960s, is now increasingly used after it was shown to suppress tumor necrosis factor alpha, inhibit angiogenesis and to be also effective for treatment of multiple myeloma. In 2011 thalidomide was proven to be highly effective for treatment of bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias in a randomized study. Further evidence by uncontrolled studies exists that thalidomide is also useful for treatment of bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. In spite of this data, endoscopic therapy remains the treatment of choice in many hospitals, as thalidomide is still notorious for its teratogenicity. However, patients with gastrointestinal bleeding related to angiodysplasias are generally at an age in which women have no child-bearing potential. Teratogenicity is therefore no issue for these elderly patients. Other side-effects of thalidomide like neurotoxicity may limit treatment options but can be monitored safely. PMID:27003992

  10. Effective treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding with thalidomide - Chances and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Bauditz, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    For more than 50 years bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias has been treated by hormonal therapy with estrogens and progesterons. After a randomized study finally demonstrated that hormones have no effect on bleeding events and transfusion requirements, therapy has switched to endoscopic coagulation. However, angiodysplasias tend to recur over months to years and endoscopy often has to be repeated for long time periods. Thalidomide, which caused severe deformities in newborn children in the 1960s, is now increasingly used after it was shown to suppress tumor necrosis factor alpha, inhibit angiogenesis and to be also effective for treatment of multiple myeloma. In 2011 thalidomide was proven to be highly effective for treatment of bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias in a randomized study. Further evidence by uncontrolled studies exists that thalidomide is also useful for treatment of bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. In spite of this data, endoscopic therapy remains the treatment of choice in many hospitals, as thalidomide is still notorious for its teratogenicity. However, patients with gastrointestinal bleeding related to angiodysplasias are generally at an age in which women have no child-bearing potential. Teratogenicity is therefore no issue for these elderly patients. Other side-effects of thalidomide like neurotoxicity may limit treatment options but can be monitored safely. PMID:27003992

  11. Spontaneous bleeding from liver after open heart surgery☆

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Najeeb H.; Shah, Mian T.; Obeid, Mahmoud Ali; Gallo, Ricardo; Aliter, Hashem

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Intra-abdominal hemorrhage after open heart surgery is very uncommon in routine clinical practice. There are case reports of having bleeding from spleen or liver after starting low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) postoperatively. PRESENTATION OF CASE Our patient is a 58-year-old man with mitral valve regurgitation, who underwent mitral valve repair and developed intra-abdominal hemorrhage 8 h after open heart surgery. The exploratory laparotomy revealed the source of bleeding from ruptured sub-capsular liver hematoma and oozing from raw areas of the liver surface. Liver packing was done to control the bleeding. DISCUSSION The gastrointestinal complications after open heart surgery are rare and spontaneous bleeding from spleen has been reported. This is the first case from our hospital to have intra-abdominal hemorrhage after open heart surgery. CONCLUSION Spontaneous bleeding from liver is a possible complication after open heart surgery. We submit the case for the academic interest and to discuss the possible cause of hemorrhage. PMID:23948260

  12. Management of bleeding following major trauma: an updated European guideline

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Evidence-based recommendations are needed to guide the acute management of the bleeding trauma patient, which when implemented may improve patient outcomes. Methods The multidisciplinary Task Force for Advanced Bleeding Care in Trauma was formed in 2005 with the aim of developing a guideline for the management of bleeding following severe injury. This document presents an updated version of the guideline published by the group in 2007. Recommendations were formulated using a nominal group process, the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) hierarchy of evidence and based on a systematic review of published literature. Results Key changes encompassed in this version of the guideline include new recommendations on coagulation support and monitoring and the appropriate use of local haemostatic measures, tourniquets, calcium and desmopressin in the bleeding trauma patient. The remaining recommendations have been reevaluated and graded based on literature published since the last edition of the guideline. Consideration was also given to changes in clinical practice that have taken place during this time period as a result of both new evidence and changes in the general availability of relevant agents and technologies. Conclusions This guideline provides an evidence-based multidisciplinary approach to the management of critically injured bleeding trauma patients. PMID:20370902

  13. Endoscopic band ligation for bleeding lesions in the small bowel

    PubMed Central

    Ikeya, Takashi; Ishii, Naoki; Shimamura, Yuto; Nakano, Kaoru; Ego, Mai; Nakamura, Kenji; Takagi, Koichi; Fukuda, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the safety and efficacy of endoscopic band ligation (EBL) for bleeding lesions in the small bowel. METHODS: This is a retrospective study evaluating EBL in six consecutive patients (three males, three females, 46-86 years of age) treated between May 2009 and February 2014: duodenal vascular ectasia; 1, jejunal bleeding diverticulum; 1, ileal Dieulafoy’s lesion; 1 and ileal bleeding diverticula; 3. The success of the initial hemostasis was evaluated, and patients were observed for early rebleeding (within 30 d after EBL), and complications such as perforation and abscess formation. Follow-up endoscopies were performed in four patients. RESULTS: Initial hemostasis was successfully achieved with EBL in all six patients. Eversion was not sufficient in four diverticular lesions. Early rebleeding occurred three days after EBL in one ileal diverticulum, and a repeat endoscopy revealed dislodgement of the O-band and ulcer formation at the banded site. This rebleeding was managed conservatively. Late rebleeding occurred in this case (13 and 21 mo after initial EBL), and re-EBL was performed. Follow-up endoscopies revealed scar formation and the disappearance of vascular lesions at the banded site in the case with a duodenal bleeding lesion, and unresolved ileal diverticula in three cases. Surgery or transarterial embolization was not required without any complications during the median follow-up period of 45 (range, 2-83) mo. CONCLUSION: EBL is a safe and effective endoscopic treatment for hemostasis of bleeding lesions in the small bowel. PMID:25324920

  14. Approach to diagnosis and management of abnormal uterine bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Telner, Deanna E.; Jakubovicz, Difat

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To present a primary care approach to evaluating and managing abnormal uterine bleeding. SOURCES OF INFORMATION Literature searches were conducted on MEDLINE from 1996 to November 2004, EMBASE from 1996 to January 2005, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from the 4th quarter of 2004 to the 3rd quarter of 2005, guideline advisory committee databases, the Canadian Medical Association Infobase, and Clinical Evidence. The quality of evidence ranged from level I to III. MAIN MESSAGE Premenopausal abnormal uterine bleeding can be ovulatory, anovulatory, or anatomic. A variety of hormonal and nonhormonal treatments are available. Patients’ preferences, side effects, and physicians’ comfort should be considered when making treatment decisions. One in 4 cases of endometrial carcinoma occur in premenopausal women, so it is important to investigate women with risk factors. While postmenopausal bleeding is most commonly caused by atrophic vaginitis, bleeding should be investigated to rule out endometrial and cervical carcinoma. CONCLUSION A primary care approach to medical management of abnormal uterine bleeding can help family physicians treat most women in the office as well as help physicians know when to refer women for specialist care. PMID:17872610

  15. A Review on Antiulcer Activity of Few Indian Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Vimala, G.; Gricilda Shoba, F.

    2014-01-01

    Ulcer is a common gastrointestinal disorder which is seen among many people. It is basically an inflamed break in the skin or the mucus membrane lining the alimentary tract. Ulceration occurs when there is a disturbance of the normal equilibrium caused by either enhanced aggression or diminished mucosal resistance. It may be due to the regular usage of drugs, irregular food habits, stress, and so forth. Peptic ulcers are a broad term that includes ulcers of digestive tract in the stomach or the duodenum. The formation of peptic ulcers depends on the presence of acid and peptic activity in gastric juice plus a breakdown in mucosal defenses. A number of synthetic drugs are available to treat ulcers. But these drugs are expensive and are likely to produce more side effects when compared to herbal medicines. The literature revealed that many medicinal plants and polyherbal formulations are used for the treatment of ulcer by various ayurvedic doctors and traditional medicinal practitioners. The ideal aims of treatment of peptic ulcer disease are to relieve pain, heal the ulcer, and delay ulcer recurrence. In this review attempts have been made to know about some medicinal plants which may be used in ayurvedic as well as modern science for the treatment or prevention of peptic ulcer. PMID:24971094

  16. No increase in bleeding identified in type 1 VWD subjects with D1472H sequence variation.

    PubMed

    Flood, Veronica H; Friedman, Kenneth D; Gill, Joan Cox; Haberichter, Sandra L; Christopherson, Pamela A; Branchford, Brian R; Hoffmann, Raymond G; Abshire, Thomas C; Dunn, Amy L; Di Paola, Jorge A; Hoots, W Keith; Brown, Deborah L; Leissinger, Cindy; Lusher, Jeanne M; Ragni, Margaret V; Shapiro, Amy D; Montgomery, Robert R

    2013-05-01

    The diagnosis of von Willebrand disease (VWD) is complicated by issues with current laboratory testing, particularly the ristocetin cofactor activity assay (VWF:RCo). We have recently reported a sequence variation in the von Willebrand factor (VWF) A1 domain, p.D1472H (D1472H), associated with a decrease in the VWF:RCo/VWF antigen (VWF:Ag) ratio but not associated with bleeding in healthy control subjects. This report expands the previous study to include subjects with symptoms leading to the diagnosis of type 1 VWD. Type 1 VWD subjects with D1472H had a significant decrease in the VWF:RCo/VWF:Ag ratio compared with those without D1472H, similar to the findings in the healthy control population. No increase in bleeding score was observed, however, for VWD subjects with D1472H compared with those without D1472H. These results suggest that the presence of the D1472H sequence variation is not associated with a significant increase in bleeding symptoms, even in type 1 VWD subjects. PMID:23520336

  17. Evaluation of Bleeding Rates in Renal Transplant Patients on Therapeutic Intravenous Heparin

    PubMed Central

    Ringenberg, Theresa; Desanto, Heather; Opsha, Yekaterina; Costello, Jennifer; Schiller, Daryl

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is unknown whether coagulation properties differ between renal transplant and nontransplant patients. Objective: To assess whether renal transplant patients on intravenous (IV) heparin, titrated to therapeutic activated partial thromboplastin times (aPPT; 56-93 seconds), experienced a higher rate of bleeding compared to nontransplant patients. Methods: Twenty-nine renal transplant and 29 nontransplant patients receiving IV heparin for a deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, atrial fibrillation, or acute coronary syndrome were randomly identified through a retrospective chart review. Results: Renal transplant patients had higher bleeding rates on IV heparin therapy compared to nontransplant patients (31% vs 6.9%, respectively; P = .041). Renal transplant patients experienced a drop in hemoglobin of at least 1 g/dL or the need for a transfusion more often then nontransplant patients (69% vs 45%, respectively; P = .111), although the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Further research is necessary to identify the factors contributing to increased rates of bleeding in renal transplant patients on IV heparin and to determine the ideal aPTT to appropriately balance anticoagulation in renal transplant patients. PMID:24474835

  18. The experience of girls and young women with inherited bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Khair, K; Holland, M; Pollard, D

    2013-09-01

    Haemophilia carriers and women with inherited bleeding disorders (IBD) experience menorrhagia, bleed following dentistry, surgery, injury or childbirth. Symptoms are easily treated leading to full and active lives. Nevertheless, some girls and women suffer with abnormal bleeding for many years before diagnosis. We explored the experiences of girls and young women (aged 9-34 years) with IBD by means of focus groups which consisted of moderated discussion addressing specific aspects of bleeding, management and coping strategies. Subsequently, these issues were explored further though a paper-based questionnaire distributed via five specialist haemophilia centres in the UK. The study suggested that young women with IBD who are managed at haemophilia centres receive appropriate care and feel well supported. Although the clinic-based literature available to these women is "fit for purpose", it does not fully address the perceived needs specifically regarding sex, menorrhagia, conception and childbirth, the Pill, tattoos/piercings and so on, leading many to turn to other information sources. Most of those who responded to our survey are confident in their lives, able to manage their IBD and take pragmatic views towards the inherited nature of their condition. But there is a substantial subgroup of women who experience stigmatization, isolation and bullying and express concerns relating to fertility and conception. Overall, this cohort would benefit from opportunities for mutual support. This could be via Internet-based social networking and may be of particular value to those who are unable to seek help from traditional medical services due to religious or other cultural barriers. PMID:23607927

  19. [Clinical usefulness of Nephral ST dialyzers in hemodialyzed patients with increased risk of bleeding].

    PubMed

    Kopeć, Jerzy; Sułowicz, Władysław

    2010-01-01

    Hemodialyzed patients with increased risk of bleeding can be dialyzed according to a method of limited anticoagulant use including saline flush technique, regional citrate anticoagulation, regional heparinization or use of membranes with low thrombogenic properties. Methods that limit anticoagulation use are not completely effective, increase work load for the dialysis team and create a risk of complications. The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of Nephral ST dialyzers with poli-acrylonitrile membranes treated with polyethylenimine binding heparin in hemodialyzed patients with increased risk of bleeding. In 12 patients with increased bleeding risk, 121 hemodialyzed sessions were performed utilizing Nephral ST dialyzers. Heparin was not administered during the procedure. Degree of clotting of the dialyzer and the venous drip chamber was evaluated using a 4-degree visual scale. Platelet count, partial activation time of thromboplastine (APTT), thrombin time (TT), antithrombin III, as well as d-dimer concentrations were measured before dialysis and after 15, 120 and 240 minutes of procedure. No complications of massive clotting necessitating premature termination of dialysis was noted. In most sessions trace or small clotting was observed in the dialyzers and drip chambers. No significant differences in platelet count and AT III levels were measured. Increased TT and APTT after 15 minutes of dialysis were observed, which was probably due to release of small amounts of dialyzer membrane heparin. After 120 and 240 minutes these values returned to normal ranges. These observations along with increased d-dimers after 240 minutes suggested an increased risk of clotting during evaluated sessions. Application of Nephral ST dialyzers permits for heparin-free dialysis procedure in patients with increased risk of bleeding. PMID:20557006

  20. Platelet-type von Willebrand disease: a rare, often misdiagnosed and underdiagnosed bleeding disorder.

    PubMed

    Othman, Maha

    2011-07-01

    Platelet-type von Willebrand disease (PT-VWD) is an autosomal dominant rare bleeding disorder characterized by hyperresponsive platelets. This inherent platelet function defect is due to a gain-of-function mutation within the GP1BA gene coding for the platelet surface glycoprotein Ib alpha protein, the receptor for the adhesive protein von Willebrand factor (VWF). The defect results in excessive and unnecessary platelet-VWF interaction with subsequent removal of the hemostatically efficient high molecular weight VWF as well as platelets from the circulation, leading to thrombocytopenia and bleeding diathesis. Patients with PT-VWD present with mild to moderate mucocutaneous bleeding, which becomes more pronounced during pregnancy and following aspirin ingestion or drugs that have antiplatelet activity. Laboratory testing shows low VWF:ristocetin cofactor and low or normal VWF:antigen and characteristically an enhanced ristocetin-induced platelet agglutination (RIPA). These laboratory features are also indicators of the closely similar and more common bleeding disorder type 2B VWD. Simplified RIPA mixing assays, cryoprecipitate challenge, and flow cytometry can differentiate between the two disorders. However, the gold standard is to identify mutations within the VWF gene (indicating type 2B VWD) or the platelet GP1BA gene (confirming PT-VWD). Treatment is based on making a correct diagnosis of PT-VWD where platelet concentrates instead of VWF/factor VIII preparations should be administered. A recent fairly large retrospective/prospective registry-based international study showed that PT-VWD is very rare, likely to be misdiagnosed as type 2B VWD or idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and represents 15% of type 2B VWD diagnoses. PMID:22102188