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Sample records for actively bleeding peptic

  1. Endoscopic Management of Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min

    2015-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods. PMID:25844337

  2. Endoscopic management of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min; Kim, Byung-Wook

    2015-03-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods.

  3. Acid inhibition and peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Štimac, D; Franjić, N; Krznarić, Ž

    2011-01-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is one of the most common emergency situations in medicine. Combined pharmacological and endoscopic therapy together with emerging interventional radiological procedures are successfully treating peptic ulcer disease, reserving surgical procedures for only a small portion of patients unresponsive to 'conventional' therapy. Technological advancement has seen a great improvement in the field of endoscopic treatment in the form of various methods of hemostasis. However, pharmacological therapy with proton pump inhibitors still plays the central role in the peptic ulcer bleeding treatment algorithm.

  4. Treatment and prognosis in peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg

    2014-02-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is a frequent cause of admission. Despite several advances in treatment the 30-day mortality seems unchanged at a level around 11%. Use of risk scoring systems is shown to be advantageous in the primary assessment of patients presenting with symptoms of peptic ulcer bleeding. Studies performed outside Denmark have demonstrated that use of risk scoring systems facilitates identification of low-risk patients suitable for outpatient management. Nevertheless, these systems have not been implemented for routine use in Denmark. This is mainly explained by concerns about the external validity due to considerable inter-country variation in patients' characteristics. In recent years, transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) has become increasingly used for achievement of haemostasis in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding not responding to endoscopic therapy. As rebleeding is associated with poor outcome TAE could, in theory, also be beneficial as a supplementary treatment in patients with ulcer bleeding responding to endoscopic therapy. This has not been examined previously. Several studies have concluded that peptic ulcer bleeding is associated with excess long-term mortality. These findings are, however, questioned as the studies were based on life-table analysis, unmatched control groups, or did not perform adequate adjustment for comorbidity. Treatment with blood transfusion is, among patients undergoing cardiac bypass surgery, shown to increase the long-term mortality. Despite frequent use of blood transfusion in treatment of peptic ulcer bleeding a possible adverse effect of on long-term survival has not been examined in these patients.

  5. Treatment and prognosis in peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg

    2014-01-01

    successful endoscopic haemostasis improves outcome in patients with PUB with active bleeding, a non-bleeding visible vessel, or an adherent clot (Study II) 3. To examine the short- and long-term mortality in PUB compared to a matched control group including identification of predictive factors for adverse outcome, identification of underlying causes of death, and investigation of a possible association between treatment with blood transfusion and long-term mortality (Study III). Study I was conducted as a prospective validation study. During a two-year period 831 patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage were included. The study demonstrated that the Glasgow Blatchford Score (GBS) was superior to the other risk scoring systems at predicting need for hospital-based intervention. The GBS was found to be favourable for the assessment of Danish patients presenting with symptoms of upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. According to the findings of Study 1 implementation of the GBS at a 1000-bed hospital would be associated with a 90.000 EUR annual saving through avoidance of admission of patients in very low risk of needing hospital-based intervention. None of the examined risk scoring systems were suitable for predicting risk of rebleeding or 30-day mortality. Study II was designed as a non-blinded, stratified, parallel group, randomized controlled trial. Patients were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to receive STAE within 24 hours from therapeutic endoscopy or to continue standard treatment. A total of 105 patients were included. After adjustment for possible imbalances STAE was associated with a clear trend of reduced rate of rebleeding (P=.079). Numbers needed to treat in order to avoid one case of rebleeding was 10. Study III was conducted as a prospective cohort study. The long-term survival of 455 patients admitted with peptic ulcer bleeding was compared to an age- and sex-matched control group consisting of 2224 individuals selected from the same geographical

  6. Endoscopic management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yidan; Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the indications, technical aspects, and comparative effectiveness of the endoscopic treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by peptic ulcer. Pre-endoscopic considerations, such as the use of prokinetics and timing of endoscopy, are reviewed. In addition, this article examines aspects of postendoscopic care such as the effectiveness, dosing, and duration of postendoscopic proton-pump inhibitors, Helicobacter pylori testing, and benefits of treatment in terms of preventing rebleeding; and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet agents, and oral anticoagulants, including direct thrombin and Xa inhibitors, following acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

  7. Photocoagulation in the treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Wlodzimierz; Paczkowski, Pawel M.

    1996-03-01

    The authors present their experience in the endoscopic laser photocoagulation of bleeding peptic ulcer. From 1991 to June 1995, 203 patients admitted for UGI bleeding from peptic ulcer have been treated by this method. The source of bleeding was confirmed by endoscopy. The patients were divided into two groups: actively bleeding peptic ulcer (group IA and IB according to Forrest's classification) and ulcer with stigmata of recent bleeding (group IIA/IIB). The former group consisted of 106 patients, among whom over 40 percent (45 patients) presented signs of hypovolemic shock on admission. Nd:YAG laser (Surgical Laser Technologies) was used in a continuous mode with a contact (8 - 20 watts) or non-contact (over 50 watts) method of coagulation. In actively bleeding patients photocoagulation resulted in stopping the hemorrhage in 95 (90%). Recurrent bleeding occurred in 16 cases; in 9 of them it was stopped by repeated photocoagulation. In this group 18 patients required surgical intervention. The mortality was of 10.3% (11 patients). In 97 patients with recent bleeding stigmata photocoagulation provoked heavy hemorrhage in 3 (in 2 cases stopped by prolonged coagulation). In 9 of the remaining 94 patients recurrent bleeding occurred. Nine patients required surgical intervention. Mortality in this group was of 6%.

  8. [Guidelines of treatment for non-bleeding peptic ulcer disease].

    PubMed

    Cheung, Dae Young; Jung, Hwoon Yong; Song, Ho June; Jung, Sung Woo; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2009-11-01

    Over the past century, since the introduction of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), antacid, histamine H2-receptor antagonists (H2RA), proton pump inhibitors (PPI), and discovery of Helicobacter pylori infection, the paradigm of peptic ulcer disease has changed with marked decrease in morbidity and mortality. However, peptic ulcer disease still occupies a position as a major health problem with increase of aged population and NSAIDs usage. In daily general practice, the management of peptic ulcer disease is directed according to the presence of bleeding or not. For non-bleeding peptic ulcer disease, proper acid suppression and the correction of underlying causes such as Helicobacter pylori infection and NSAID use is the main stay of treatment. Though a complete understanding of pathophysiology and a perfect treatment strategy are still a challenge, this guideline aims to provide practical recommendations based on evidences or consensus of experts through in-depth literature review and expert meeting.

  9. Intravenous proton pump inhibitors for peptic ulcer bleeding: Clinical benefits and limits.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Sheu, Bor-Shyang

    2011-03-16

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is a common disease and recurrent bleeding is an independent risk factor of mortality. Infusion with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) prevents recurrent bleeding after successful endoscopic therapy. A gastric acidic environment of less than pH 5.4 alters coagulation function and activates pepsin to disaggregate platelet plugs. Gastric acid is secreted by H(+), K(+)-ATPase, naming the proton pump. This update review focuses on the mechanism and the role of PPIs in the clinical management of patients with peptic ulcer bleeding. An intravenous omeprazole bolus followed by high-dose continuous infusion for 72 h after successful endoscopic therapy can prevent the recurrent bleeding. In the Asian, however, the infusion dosage can possibly be diminished whilst preserving favorable control of the intragastric pH and thereby still decreasing rates of recurrent bleeding. Irrespective of the infusion dosage of PPIs, rates of recurrent bleeding remain high in patients with co-morbidities. Because recurrent peptic ulcer bleeding may be prolonged in those with co-morbidities, a low-dose infusion of IV PPIs for up to 7-day may result in better control of recurrent bleeding of peptic ulcers. Due to the inter-patient variability in CYP2C19 genotypes, the infusion form of new generation PPIs, such as esomeprazole, should be promising for the prevention of recurrent bleeding. This article offers a comprehensive review of clinical practice, highlighting the indication, the optimal dosage, the duration, and the potential limitation of PPIs infusion for peptic ulcer bleeding.

  10. Challenges in the management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lau, James Y W; Barkun, Alan; Fan, Dai-ming; Kuipers, Ernst J; Yang, Yun-sheng; Chan, Francis K L

    2013-06-08

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency worldwide, a major cause of which are bleeding peptic ulcers. Endoscopic treatment and acid suppression with proton-pump inhibitors are cornerstones in the management of the disease, and both treatments have been shown to reduce mortality. The role of emergency surgery continues to diminish. In specialised centres, radiological intervention is increasingly used in patients with severe and recurrent bleeding who do not respond to endoscopic treatment. Despite these advances, mortality from the disorder has remained at around 10%. The disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities who use antiplatelet agents, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and anticoagulants. The management of such patients, especially those at high cardiothrombotic risk who are on anticoagulants, is a challenge for clinicians. We summarise the published scientific literature about the management of patients with bleeding peptic ulcers, identify directions for future clinical research, and suggest how mortality can be reduced.

  11. CT scan diagnosis of bleeding peptic ulcer after gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Husain, Syed; Ahmed, Ahmed R; Johnson, Joseph; Boss, Thad; O'Malley, William

    2007-11-01

    Investigation of the bypassed stomach in patients with suspected peptic ulcer disease presents a major challenge to bariatric surgeons. Various methods have been suggested for visualization of the duodenum and bypassed stomach. These include endoscopy via percutaneous gastrostomy access, retrograde endoscopy and virtual gastroscopy using CT scan. We present a case of peptic ulcer bleeding diagnosed with the help of conventional CT scan. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second such case reported in the literature and the first in the bariatric population.

  12. Recent Developments in the Endoscopic Treatment of Patients with Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jae-Young

    2016-01-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is an internal medical emergency. Endoscopic hemostasis has been shown to improve the survival rate of patients with peptic ulcer bleeding. Although the established hemostatic modalities, including injection, thermal therapy, and mechanical therapy, are effective in controlling peptic ulcer bleeding, hemostasis can be difficult to achieve in some cases. As a result, recent, new endoscopic hemostatic modalities, including over-the-scope clips, topical hemostatic sprays, and endoscopic ultrasonography-guided angiotherapy, have been developed. PMID:27744666

  13. Mucosal polymerase chain reaction for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Lo, Wen-Ching; Perng, Chin-Lin; Tseng, Guan-Ying; Li, Anna Fen-Yau; Ou, Yueh-Hsing

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) has been linked to chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and MALT-lymphoma. Conventional invasive tests are less sensitive than non-invasive tests in diagnosing H pylori infection in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers. Polymerase chain reaction is a sensitive and accurate method for diagnosing H pylori infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic role of mucosal polymerase chain reaction for H pylori infection in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers. METHODS: In patients with bleeding, non-bleeding peptic ulcers and chronic gastritis, we checked rapid urease test, histology, bacterial culture and mucosal polymerase chain reaction for detecting H pylori infection. Positive H pylori infection was defined as positive culture or both a positive histology and a positive rapid urease test. For mucosal polymerase chain reaction of H pylori, we checked vacA (s1a, s1b, s1c, s2, m1, m1T, m2), iceA1, iceA2 and cag A. RESULTS: Between October 2000 and April 2002, 88 patients with bleeding peptic ulcers (males/females: 60/28, gastric ulcers/duodenal ulcers: 55/33), 81 patients with non-bleeding peptic ulcers (males/females: 54/27, gastric ulcers/duodenal ulcers: 45/36) and 37 patients with chronic gastritis (males/females: 24/13) were enrolled in this study. In patients with bleeding peptic ulcers, non-bleeding peptic ulcers and chronic gastritis, 45 patients (51%), 71 patients (88%) and 20 patients (54%) respectively were found to have positive H pylori infection (P<0.001). In patients with bleeding peptic ulcers, non-bleeding peptic ulcers and chronic gastritis, polymerase chain reaction for H pylori infection was positive in 54 patients (61%), 70 patients (86%) and 20 patients (54%) respectively (P<0.001). The sensitivity, positive predictive value and diagnostic accuracy of mucosal polymerase reaction for H pylori infection were significantly lower in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers (84%, 79% and 81

  14. Topical tranexamic acid as a novel treatment for bleeding peptic ulcer: A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Rafeey, Mandana; Shoaran, Maryam; Ghergherechi, Robabeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Peptic ulcers are among the most common causes of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in children. The standard care for GI bleeding is endoscopy for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. We aimed to assess the effect of topical tranexamic acid (TXA) via endoscopic procedures in children with GI bleeding caused by bleeding ulcers. Procedure: In this randomised controlled trial, 120 children were evaluated by diagnostic procedures for GI bleeding, of which 63 (30 girls, 33 boys) aged 1-month to 15 years were recruited. The patients were randomly divided into case and control groups. In the case group, TXA was administered directly under endoscopic therapy. In the control group, epinephrine (1/10,000) was submucosally injected to the four quadrants of ulcer margins as the routine endoscopic therapy. In both groups, the patients received supportive medical therapy with intravenous fluids and proton pump inhibitor drugs. Results: The mean ± standard deviation age of the children was 5 ± 2.03 years. Rebleeding occurred in 15 (11.4%) and 21 (9.8%) patients in the case and control groups, respectively (P = 0.50). The frequency of blood transfusion episodes (P = 0.06) and duration of hospital stay (P = 0.07) were not statistically different between the groups. Conclusion: Using topical TXA via endoscopic procedures may be effective in cases of GI bleedings caused by active bleeding ulcers. In order to establish this therapeutic effect, a large number of clinical studies are needed. PMID:27251517

  15. Peptic activity and gastroduodenal mucosal damage.

    PubMed Central

    Raufman, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    This contribution reviews briefly the history of the discovery and characterization of peptic activity; secretory models and current concepts regarding the regulation of pepsinogen secretion; and evidence that pepsin is a necessary co-factor for gastroduodenal mucosal injury. Several animal studies indicate that peptic activity is required for acid- and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastroduodenal ulceration. A more vigorous approach to the development of anti-peptic drugs for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease is encouraged. Images Figure 1 PMID:9041694

  16. Seasonal pattern in the incidence of bleeding caused by peptic ulcer in Israel.

    PubMed

    Bendahan, J; Gilboa, S; Paran, H; Neufeld, D; Pomerantz, I; Novis, B; Freund, U

    1992-06-01

    We have reviewed all endoscopies performed in our hospital between 1977 and 1986. During that period, 1337 endoscopies were performed to identify bleeding from peptic ulcers. Excluded were cases in which a predisposing factor was found, such as the use of ulcerogenic drugs. Also excluded were chronic or critically ill patients. The remaining 540 cases were reviewed. In 447 of those cases, the bleeding lesion was a duodenal ulcer, whereas, in 93 cases, a gastric ulcer was found (a ratio of 5:1). The seasonal variation in the incidence of bleeding from peptic ulcers was evaluated. We found a significant difference in bleeding in the cold and hot seasons, the incidence being significantly greater during the cold season (November until February). A similar pattern was found for bleeding from both duodenal and gastric ulcers.

  17. Intramural hematoma of duodenum: An unusual complication after endoscopic therapy for a bleeding peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ramesh; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Bhatia, Vikram; Garg, Hitendra Kumar; Sundar, Shyam

    2011-04-01

    Intramural hematoma of duodenum (IDH) is a relatively unusual complication associated with endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer. This unusual condition is usually seen in children following blunt trauma to the abdomen. We describe here a case of IDH occurring following endoscopic therapy for bleeding duodenal ulcer in an adult patient with end-stage renal disease. The hematomas appeared on the second day of endoscopic intervention, caused transient duodenal obstruction and resolved spontaneously with conservative treatment in a week.

  18. Small bowel ulcerative lesions are common in elderly NSAIDs users with peptic ulcer bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tsibouris, Panagiotis; Kalantzis, Chissostomos; Apostolopoulos, Periklis; Zalonis, Antonios; Isaacs, Peter Edward Thomas; Hendrickse, Mark; Alexandrakis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency of small bowel ulcerative lesions in patients with peptic ulcer and define the significance of those lesions. METHODS: In our prospective study, 60 consecutive elderly patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding from a peptic ulceration (cases) and 60 matched patients with a non-bleeding peptic ulcer (controls) underwent small bowel capsule endoscopy, after a negative colonoscopy (compulsory in our institution). Controls were evaluated for non-bleeding indications. Known or suspected chronic inflammatory conditions and medication that could harm the gut were excluded. During capsule endoscopy, small bowel ulcerative lesions were counted thoroughly and classified according to Graham classification. Other small bowel lesions were also recorded. Peptic ulcer bleeding was controlled endoscopically, when adequate, proton pump inhibitors were started in both cases and controls, and Helicobacter pylori eradicated whenever present. Both cases and controls were followed up for a year. In case of bleeding recurrence upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was repeated and whenever it remained unexplained it was followed by repeat colonoscopy and capsule endoscopy. RESULTS: Forty (67%) cases and 18 (30%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P = 0.0001), while 22 (37%) cases and 4 (8%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Among non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) consumers, 39 (95%) cases and 17 (33%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P < 0.0001), while 22 (55%) cases and 4 (10%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Small bowel ulcerative lesions were infrequent among patients not consuming NSAIDs. Mean entry hemoglobin was 9.3 (SD = 1.4) g/dL in cases with small bowel ulcerative lesions and 10.5 (SD = 1.3) g/dL in those without (P = 0.002). Cases with small bowel ulcers necessitate more units of packed red blood cells. During their hospitalization, 6 (27%) cases with small bowel ulcers presented

  19. Long-term prognosis in patients continuing taking antithrombotics after peptic ulcer bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi-Xu; Dong, Bo; Hong, Biao; Gong, Yi-Qun; Wang, Wei; Wang, Jue; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Jiang, Wei-Jun

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the long-term prognosis in peptic ulcer patients continuing taking antithrombotics after ulcer bleeding, and to determine the risk factors that influence the prognosis. METHODS All clinical data of peptic ulcer patients treated from January 1, 2009 to January 1, 2014 were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Patients were divided into either a continuing group to continue taking antithrombotic drugs after ulcer bleeding or a discontinuing group to discontinue antithrombotic drugs. The primary outcome of follow-up in peptic ulcer bleeding patients was recurrent bleeding, and secondary outcome was death or acute cardiovascular disease occurrence. The final date of follow-up was December 31, 2014. Basic demographic data, complications, and disease classifications were analyzed and compared by t- or χ2-test. The number of patients that achieved various outcomes was counted and analyzed statistically. A survival curve was drawn using the Kaplan-Meier method, and the difference was compared using the log-rank test. COX regression multivariate analysis was applied to analyze risk factors for the prognosis of peptic ulcer patients. RESULTS A total of 167 patients were enrolled into this study. As for the baseline information, differences in age, smoking, alcohol abuse, and acute cardiovascular diseases were statistically significant between the continuing and discontinuing groups (70.8 ± 11.4 vs 62.4 ± 12.0, P < 0.001; 8 (8.2%) vs 15 (21.7%), P < 0.05; 65 (66.3%) vs 13 (18.8%), P < 0.001). At the end of the study, 18 patients had recurrent bleeding and three patients died or had acute cardiovascular disease in the continuing group, while four patients had recurrent bleeding and 15 patients died or had acute cardiovascular disease in the discontinuing group. The differences in these results were statistically significant (P = 0.022, P = 0.000). The Kaplan-Meier survival curve indicated that the incidence of recurrent bleeding was higher in patients

  20. Are higher doses of proton pump inhibitors better in acute peptic bleeding?

    PubMed

    Villalón, Alejandro; Olmos, Roberto; Rada, Gabriel

    2016-06-24

    Although there is broad consensus about the benefits of proton pump inhibitors in acute upper peptic bleeding, there is still controversy over their optimal dosing. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews including 27 randomized trials addressing this question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded high-dose proton pump inhibitors probably result in little or no difference in re-bleeding rate or mortality. The risk/benefit and cost/benefit balance probably favor use of low-doses.

  1. The influential roles of antibiotics prophylaxis in cirrhotic patients with peptic ulcer bleeding after initial endoscopic treatments.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shih-Cheng; Chen, Jen-Chieh; Tai, Wei-Chen; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Wu, Keng-Liang; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Wang, Jing-Houng; Lu, Sheng-Nan; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2014-01-01

    The influential roles of antibiotic prophylaxis on cirrhotic patients with peptic ulcer bleeding are still not well documented. The purpose of this study is to clarify these influential roles and to identify the risk factors associated with rebleeding, bacterial infection and in-hospital mortality. A cross-sectional, chart review study was conducted on 210 cirrhotic patients with acute peptic ulcer hemorrhage who underwent therapeutic endoscopic procedures. Patients were divided into group A (with prophylactic intravenous ceftriaxone, n = 74) and group B (without antibiotics, n = 136). The outcomes were length of hospital days, prevention of infection, rebleeding rate and in-hospital mortality. Our results showed that more patients suffered from rebleeding and infection in group B than group A (31.6% vs. 5.4%; p<0.001 and 25% vs. 10.8%; p = 0.014 respectively). The risk factors for rebleeding were active alcoholism, unit of blood transfusion, Rockall score, model for end-stage liver disease score and antibiotic prophylaxis. The risk factors for infection were active alcoholism, Child-Pugh C, Rockall score and antibiotic prophylaxis. Rockall score was the predictive factor for in-hospital mortality. In conclusions, antibiotic prophylaxis in cirrhotic patients after endoscopic interventions for acute peptic ulcer hemorrhage reduced infections and rebleeding rate but not in-hospital mortality. Rockall score was the predictive factor of in-hospital mortality.

  2. Seasonal changes in gastric mucosal factors associated with peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao-Gang; Xie, Chuan; Chen, Jiang; Xie, Yong; Zhang, Kun-He; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2015-01-01

    A close association has been established between climate and peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). The incidence of PUB in cold climates is significantly higher than that in hot climates. In this study, gastric mucosal damage and its barrier function (through associated barrier factors) in extreme climate conditions were examined to investigate the pathogenesis of PUB in extreme cold climates. Gastric juice and biopsy specimens were collected from 176 patients with peptic ulcer. Conventional hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to exclude malignant ulcers. Helicobacter pylori infections were detected by modified Giemsa staining. pH values of the gastric juice samples were obtained on-site by precise pH dipstick readings. The protein expression levels of heat shock protein (HSP) 70, occludin, nitric oxide synthase (NOS), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and EGF receptor (EGFR) in the gastric mucosa were detected by immunohistochemistry. No significant differences were identified between the high and low bleeding risk groups in the rates of H. pylori infection and the pH values of the gastric juices in the extreme hot or cold climates. Furthermore, no statistically significant differences were identified in the protein expression levels of occludin, NOS, EGF and EGFR between the high and low bleeding risk groups. In the extreme cold climate, the expression of HSP70 and the mucus thickness of the gastric antrum in the high bleeding risk group were significantly lower than those in the low bleeding risk group. The protein expression levels of occludin, HSP70, NOS and EGFR in the extreme cold climate were significantly lower than those in the extreme hot climate, whereas the gastric acid secretion was significantly higher in the extreme cold climate than that in the extreme hot climate. In conclusion, low expression of HSP70 in the gastric mucosa and reduced gastric mucus thickness may play key roles in the mechanism of PUB in extreme cold climates. The significant decrease in

  3. Peptic ulcers accompanied with gastrointestinal bleeding, pylorus obstruction and cholangitis secondary to choledochoduodenal fistula: A case report

    PubMed Central

    XI, BIN; JIA, JUN-JUN; LIN, BING-YI; GENG, LEI; ZHENG, SHU-SEN

    2016-01-01

    Peptic ulcers are an extremely common condition, usually occurring in the stomach and proximal duodenum. However, cases of peptic ulcers accompanied with multiple complications are extremely rare and hard to treat. The present case reinforces the requirement for the early recognition and correct treatment of peptic ulcers accompanied with multiple complications. A 67-year-old man presented with recurrent abdominal pain, fever and melena. The laboratory results showed anemia (hemoglobin 62 g/l) and hypoproteinemia (23 g/l). Abdominal imaging examinations revealed stones in the gallbladder and right liver, with air in the dilated intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile ducts. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography failed due to a deformed pylorus. The patient was finally diagnosed with peptic ulcers accompanied with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, pylorus obstruction and cholangitis secondary to a choledochoduodenal fistula during an emergency pancreatoduodenectomy, which was performed due to a massive hemorrhage of the GI tract. The patient recovered well after the surgery. PMID:26870237

  4. Validity of peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding diagnoses in administrative databases: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Montedori, Alessandro; Abraha, Iosief; Chiatti, Carlos; Cozzolino, Francesco; Orso, Massimiliano; Luchetta, Maria Laura; Rimland, Joseph M; Ambrosio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Administrative healthcare databases are useful to investigate the epidemiology, health outcomes, quality indicators and healthcare utilisation concerning peptic ulcers and gastrointestinal bleeding, but the databases need to be validated in order to be a reliable source for research. The aim of this protocol is to perform the first systematic review of studies reporting the validation of International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision and 10th version (ICD-9 and ICD-10) codes for peptic ulcer and upper gastrointestinal bleeding diagnoses. Methods and analysis MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library databases will be searched, using appropriate search strategies. We will include validation studies that used administrative data to identify peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding diagnoses or studies that evaluated the validity of peptic ulcer and upper gastrointestinal bleeding codes in administrative data. The following inclusion criteria will be used: (a) the presence of a reference standard case definition for the diseases of interest; (b) the presence of at least one test measure (eg, sensitivity, etc) and (c) the use of an administrative database as a source of data. Pairs of reviewers will independently abstract data using standardised forms and will evaluate quality using the checklist of the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) criteria. This systematic review protocol has been produced in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis Protocol (PRISMA-P) 2015 statement. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval is not required given that this is a protocol for a systematic review. We will submit results of this study to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. The results will serve as a guide for researchers validating administrative healthcare databases to determine appropriate case definitions for peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal

  5. High Dose versus Low Dose Intravenous Pantoprazole in Bleeding Peptic Ulcer: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Masjedizadeh, Abdol Rahim; Hajiani, Eskandar; Alavinejad, Pezhman; Hashemi, Seyed Jalal; Shayesteh, Ali Akbar; Jamshidian, Noordin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The appropriate dose of proton pump inhibitors for treatment of patients with upper (GI) bleeding remains controversial. This study compares high-dose versus low-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor (PPI) infusion for prevention of GI bleeding complications. METHODS A total of 166 patients with bleeding peptic ulcers underwent therapeutic endoscopy using concomitant therapy by argon plasma coagulation (APC) and diluted epinephrine injection. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: high-dose pantoprazole (80 mg bolus, 8 mg per hour) and low-dose pantoprazole (40 mg bolus, 4 mg per hour) infused for three days. Initial outcomes were rebleeding, need for surgery, hemoglobin drop more than two units, and hospitalization for more than five days. Secondary outcome included mortality rate. RESULTS Overall, 166 patients (83 patients per group) enrolled in the study. The average age of patients in the high-dose group was 59.5±15.6 years and 52.3±13.3 years in the low-dose group (p=0.58). Males comprised 69.7% of patients. In the high-dose group, the mean number of units of transfused blood was 3.3±1.71 and in the low-dose group, it was 2.82±1.73 (p=0.50). There were 36 (43.37%) patients in the high-dose group and 40 (48.19%) in the low-dose group who were hospitalized for more than 5 days (p=0.53). Rebleeding was observed in 27 (32.53%) patients in the high-dose group and in 21 (25.30%) in the low-dose group (p=0.30). There were no significant differences observed in drop in hemoglobin of more than two units (p=0.15), mortality (p=0.99) and surgery (p=0.75) between the two groups. CONCLUSION For controlling peptic ulcer bleeding, there is no difference between high dose and low dose pantoprazole infusion. PMID:25093061

  6. Real-Time PCR Improves Helicobacter pylori Detection in Patients with Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Casalots, Alex; Sanfeliu, Esther; Boix, Loreto; García-Iglesias, Pilar; Sánchez-Delgado, Jordi; Montserrat, Antònia; Bella-Cueto, Maria Rosa; Gallach, Marta; Sanfeliu, Isabel; Segura, Ferran; Calvet, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Histological and rapid urease tests to detect H. pylori in biopsy specimens obtained during peptic ulcer bleeding episodes (PUB) often produce false-negative results. We aimed to examine whether immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR can improve the sensitivity of these biopsies. Patients and Methods We selected 52 histology-negative formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens obtained during PUB episodes. Additional tests showed 10 were true negatives and 42 were false negatives. We also selected 17 histology-positive biopsy specimens obtained during PUB to use as controls. We performed immunohistochemistry staining and real-time PCR for 16S rRNA, ureA, and 23S rRNA for H. pylori genes on all specimens. Results All controls were positive for H. pylori on all PCR assays and immunohistochemical staining. Regarding the 52 initially negative biopsies, all PCR tests were significantly more sensitive than immunohistochemical staining (p<0.01). Sensitivity and specificity were 55% and 80% for 16S rRNA PCR, 43% and 90% for ureA PCR, 41% and 80% for 23S rRNA PCR, and 7% and 100% for immunohistochemical staining, respectively. Combined analysis of PCR assays for two genes were significantly more sensitive than ureA or 23S rRNA PCR tests alone (p<0.05) and marginally better than 16S rRNA PCR alone. The best combination was 16S rRNA+ureA, with a sensitivity of 64% and a specificity of 80%. Conclusions Real-time PCR improves the detection of H. pylori infection in histology-negative formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsy samples obtained during PUB episodes. The low reported prevalence of H. pylori in PUB may be due to the failure of conventional tests to detect infection. PMID:21625499

  7. Non-Helicobacter pylori, non-NSAIDs peptic ulcers: a descriptive study on patients referred to Taleghani hospital with upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Rajabalinia, Hasan; Ghobakhlou, Mehdi; Nikpour, Shahriar; Dabiri, Reza; Bahriny, Rasoul; Sherafat, Somayeh Jahani; Moghaddam, Pardis Ketabi

    2012-01-01

    Aim The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the number and proportion of various causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and actual numbers of non-NSAID, non-Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) peptic ulcers seen in endoscopy of these patients. Background The number and the proportion of patients with non- H.pylori, non-NSAIDs peptic ulcer disease leading to upper gastrointestinal bleeding is believed to be increasing after eradication therapy for H.pylori. Patients and methods Medical records of patients referred to the emergency room of Taleghani hospital from 2010 with a clinical diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (hematemesis, coffee ground vomiting and melena) were included in this study. Patients with hematochezia with evidence of a source of bleeding from upper gastrointestinal tract in endoscopy were also included in this study. Results In this study, peptic ulcer disease (all kinds of ulcers) was seen in 61 patients which were about 44.85% of abnormalities seen on endoscopy of patients. Among these 61 ulcers, 44 were duodenal ulcer, 22 gastric ulcer (5 patients had the both duodenal and gastric ulcers). Multiple biopsies were taken and be sent to laboratory for Rapid Urease Test and pathological examination. About 65.53% of patients had ulcers associated with H.pylori, 9.83% had peptic ulcer disease associated with NSAIDs and 11.47% of patients had ulcers associated with both H.pylori and consumption of NSAIDs. 13.11% of patients had non-NSAIDs non- H.pylori peptic ulcer disease. Conclusion The results of this study supports the results of other studies that suggest the incidence of H.pylori infection related with duodenal ulcer is common, and that non-H pylori and non-NSAIDs duodenal ulcer is also common. PMID:24834225

  8. Early Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Vietnamese Patients with Acute Peptic Ulcer Bleeding: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Quach, Duc Trong; Luu, Mai Ngoc; To, Thuy-HuongThi; Bui, Quy Nhuan; Tran, Tuan Anh; Tran, Binh Duy; Vo, Minh-Cong Hong; Tanaka, Shinji; Uemura, Naomi

    2017-01-01

    Aims. To investigate H. pylori infection rate and evaluate a combined set of tests for H. pylori diagnosis in Vietnamese patients with acute peptic ulcer bleeding (PUD). Methods. Consecutive patients with acute PUB were enrolled prospectively. Rapid urease test (RUT) with 3 biopsies was carried out randomly. Patients without RUT or with negative RUT received urea breath test (UBT) and serological and urinary H. pylori antibody tests. H. pylori was considered positive if RUT or any noninvasive test was positive. Patients were divided into group A (RUT plus noninvasive tests) and group B (only noninvasive tests). Results. The overall H. pylori infection rate was 94.2% (161/171). Groups A and B had no differences in demographic characteristics, bleeding severity, endoscopic findings, and proton pump inhibitor use. H. pylori-positive rate in group A was significantly higher than that in group B (98.2% versus 86.7%, p = 0.004). The positive rate of RUT was similar at each biopsy site but significantly increased if RUT results from 2 or 3 sites were combined (p < 0.05). Conclusions. H. pylori infection rate in Vietnamese patients with acute PUB is high. RUT is an excellent test if at least 2 biopsies are taken. PMID:28133477

  9. Peptic ulcer perforation: sonographic imaging of active fluid leakage.

    PubMed

    Minardos, Ioannis; Ioannis, Minardos; Ziogana, Dimitra; Dimitra, Ziogana; Hristopoulos, Hristos; Hristos, Hristopoulos; Dermitzakis, Ioannis; Ioannis, Dermitzakis

    2006-01-01

    Sonography is not the method of choice for the evaluation of suspected peptic ulcer perforation (PUP). However, indirect sonographic signs and direct visualization of PUP have been reported by several authors in recent years. We report a case of an elderly woman who presented with severe abdominal pain and positive rebound sign, in whom abdominal sonography demonstrated indirect signs of PUP, the site of perforation, and active air fluid leakage through the perforated anterior prepyloric antral wall.

  10. [Peptic ulcer

    PubMed

    Carvalho, A S

    2000-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present a current review about pathogenesis, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of peptic ulcer disease in children, based on the reviewed publications and the author personal experience. METHODS: We revised the most relevant articles about peptic ulcer in children, published from the last 20 years. RESULTS: The gastroduodenal peptic ulcer is very common in adults, mostly in the developing countries. Although it is less frequent in children, the optical fibroendoscopy has improved the number of diagnosed cases. The peptic ulcer is classified as its etiology in primary and secondary. The secondary peptic ulcer is related to a subjacent disease or use of drugs, while the primary ulcer happens in the absence of underlying systemic diseases The primary duodenal ulcer is the most common presentation, and there are strong evidences of the H. pylori association in the etiology. Clinical presentation changes with age and ulcer type. Secondary ulcers are mostly acute and sometimes dramatic, while the primary ones have a chronic evolution mostly similar to patients with functional recurrent abdominal pain, but the presence of epigastric pain, feeding-related pain, vomiting, bleeding, familiar history for peptic ulcer, nocturnal pain, and male gender are strongly related to peptic ulcer. The acid antisecretory agents have great efficacy on relieving symptoms and solving ulcerate lesion, although the H. pylori eradication itself prevents primary duodenal ulcer recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: The primary peptic ulcer involve many factors in Its etiopathogenesis, being H. pylori the most important of them Although there isn t yet a ideal therapeutic course. The antibiotics play an important role in peptic ulcer and the H. pylori research must be done for na accurate diagnosis and treatment.

  11. Bleeding peptic ulcer caused by ectopic gastric mucosa in a duplicated segment of jejunum

    SciTech Connect

    Newmark, H.; Ching, G.; Halls, J.; Levy, I.J.

    1981-02-01

    The authors present a case in which a patient suffered a bleeding jejunal ulcer caused by heterotopic gastric mucosa in a congenital duplication of a segment of jejunum. This is the first case diagnosed preoperatively by two different radiographic means. These lesions were shown by both pertechnetate flow and barium small bowel studies. The rarity of these entities and the modalities used for diagnosis are described.

  12. Risk factors influencing the outcome of peptic ulcer bleeding in chronic kidney disease after initial endoscopic hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chih-Ming; Hsu, Chien-Ning; Tai, Wei-Chen; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shih, Chih-Wei; Ku, Ming-Kun; Yuan, Lan-Ting; Wang, Jiunn-Wei; Tseng, Kuo-Lun; Sun, Wei-Chih; Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Nguang, Seng-Howe; Hsu, Pin-I; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who had peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) may have more adverse outcomes. This population-based cohort study aimed to identify risk factors that may influence the outcomes of patients with CKD and PUB after initial endoscopic hemostasis. Data from 1997 to 2008 were extracted from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We included a cohort dataset of 1 million randomly selected individuals and a dataset of patients with CKD who were alive in 2008. A total of 18,646 patients with PUB were screened, and 1229 patients admitted for PUB after endoscopic hemostasis were recruited. The subjects were divided into non-CKD (n = 1045) and CKD groups (n = 184). We analyzed the risks of peptic ulcer rebleeding, sepsis events, and mortality among in-hospital patients, and after discharge. Results showed that the rebleeding rates associated with repeat endoscopic therapy (11.96% vs 6.32%, P = 0.0062), death rates (8.7%, vs 2.3%, P < 0.0001), hospitalization cost (US$ 5595±7200 vs US$2408 ± 4703, P < 0.0001), and length of hospital stay (19.6 ± 18.3 vs 11.2 ± 13.1, P < 0.0001) in the CKD group were higher than those in the non-CKD group. The death rate in the CKD group was also higher than that in the non-CKD group after discharge. The independent risk factor for rebleeding during hospitalization was age (odds ratio [OR], 1.02; P = 0.0063), whereas risk factors for death were CKD (OR, 2.37; P = 0.0222), shock (OR, 2.99; P = 0.0098), and endotracheal intubation (OR, 5.31; P < 0.0001). The hazard ratio of rebleeding risk for aspirin users after discharge over a 10-year follow-up period was 0.68 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.45–0.95, P = 0.0223). On the other hand, old age (P < 0.0001), CKD (P = 0.0090), diabetes (P = 0.0470), and congestive heart failure (P = 0.0013) were the independent risk factors for death after discharge. In-hospital patients with CKD and PUB after

  13. Preadmission use of SSRIs alone or in combination with NSAIDs and 30-day mortality after peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Gasse, Christiane; Christensen, Steffen; Riis, Anders; Mortensen, Preben B; Adamsen, Sven; Thomsen, Reimar W

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) increases the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and this risk is amplified by concomitant use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The aim of the study was to examine the impact of SSRI use alone or in combination with NSAIDs on 30-day mortality after peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). MATERIAL AND METHODS. A population-based cohort study of patients with a first hospitalization with PUB in three Danish counties was carried out between 1991 and 2005 using medical databases. We calculated 30-day mortality rate ratios (MRRs) associated with the use of SSRIs, alone or in combination with NSAIDs, adjusted for important covariates. RESULTS. Of 7415 patients admitted with PUB, 5.9% used SSRIs only, and 3.8% used SSRIs in combination with NSAIDs, with a 30-day mortality of 11.8% and 11.3%, respectively. Compared with patients who used neither SSRIs nor NSAIDs, the adjusted 30-day MRR was 1.02 (95% CI: 0.76-1.36) for current users of SSRIs and 0.89 (0.62-1.28) for the combined use of SSRIs with NSAIDs. There was a 2.11-fold (95% CI 1.35-3.30) increased risk of death associated with SSRI use starting within 60 days of admission; for those younger than 80 years, the adjusted MRR was 1.54 (0.72-3.29), and 2.57 (1.47-4.49) for those older than 80 years. CONCLUSIONS. Use of SSRIs, alone or in combination with NSAIDs, was not associated with increased 30-day mortality following PUB. However, increased mortality was found in patients who started SSRI therapy, particularly among those older than 80 years. We can only speculate on whether this finding is due to pharmacological action or confounding factors.

  14. Intraoperative scintigraphy for active small intestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, A.; Palestro, C.; Lewis, B.S.; Katz, L.B. )

    1990-11-01

    Localizing active sites of bleeding within the small intestine remains a difficult task. Endoscopic, angiographic or scintigraphic studies may point to the small intestine as the site of blood loss, but at operation, without a palpable lesion, the exact site of bleeding remains elusive. Patients are managed at laparotomy with intraoperative endoscopy, angiography, multiple enterotomies, blind resections, or placement of an enterostomy. We describe two patients in whom intraoperative scintigraphy accurately identified active sites of bleeding in the small intestine when other modalities failed. Intraoperative scintigraphy is rapid, easy to perform and is an effective means of identifying active sites of bleeding within the small intestine.

  15. Management of Peptic Ulcer Bleeding in Different Case Volume Workplaces: Results of a Nationwide Inquiry in Hungary

    PubMed Central

    Rácz, István; Kárász, Tibor; Lukács, Krisztina; Rácz, Ferenc; Kersák, János; Wacha, Judit; Szalóki, Tibor; Szász, Magdolna; Gyenes, István; Altorjay, István

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a national survey to evaluate the recent endoscopic treatment and drug therapy of peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) patients and to compare practices in high and low case volume Hungarian workplaces. A total of 62 gastroenterology units participated in the six-month study. A total of 3033 PUB cases and a mean of 8.15 ± 3.9 PUB cases per month per unit were reported. In the 23 high case volume units (HCV), there was a mean of 12.9 ± 5.4 PUB cases/month, whereas in the 39 low case volume units (LCV), a mean of 5.3 ± 2.9 PUB cases/month were treated during the study period. In HCV units, endoscopic therapies for Forrest Ia, Ib, and IIa ulcers were significantly more often used than in LCV units (86% versus 68%; P = 0.001). Among patients with stigmata of recent haemorrhage (Forrest I, II), bolus + continuous infusion PPI was given significantly more frequently in HCV than in LCV units (49.6% versus 33.2%; P = 0.001). Mortality in HCV units was less than in LCV units (2.7% versus 4.3%; P = 0.023). The penetration of evidence-based recommendations for PUB management is stronger in HCV units resulting lower mortality. PMID:22988454

  16. Endoscopic treatment for high-risk bleeding peptic ulcers: A randomized, controlled trial of epinephrine alone with epinephrine plus fresh frozen plasma

    PubMed Central

    Khodadoostan, Mahsa; Karami-Horestani, Mohammad; Shavakhi, Ahmad; Sebghatollahi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common and potentially life-threatening emergency with substantial mortality. Fresh frozen plasma (FFP), a good source of coagulation factors, might be an ideal injection agent based on its physiologic properties. Therefore, we evaluated the role of FFP as a hemostatic agent in patients with high-risk bleeding peptic ulcers. Materials and Methods: From August 2015 to April 2016, 108 consecutive patients with high-risk bleeding ulcers were admitted to our university hospital. They were randomly assigned to undergo injection of epinephrine alone (A) or epinephrine plus FFP (B). The primary outcomes assessed were the initial hemostasis, recurrent bleeding, hospital stay, blood transfusion, surgery rate, and 14-day mortality. Results: Initial hemostasis was achieved in 47 of 50 patients (94%) in the Group A and 49 of 50 patients (98%) in the Group B (P = 0.61). There were no significant differences in the rate of recurrent bleeding between Group A (14%) and Group B (8%) (P = 0.52). We found no significant differences between Group A and Group B with respect to the surgery rate, bleeding death, procedure-related death, and duration of hospitalization (P > 0.05). Conclusion: It is concluded the injection of epinephrine alone was equally effective as injection of epinephrine plus FFP to endoscopic hemostasis. Epinephrine alone and epinephrine plus FFP were not different in recurrent bleeding, rate of surgery, blood transfusion, or mortality. PMID:28331521

  17. Risk of Rebleeding and Mortality in Cirrhotic Patients with Peptic Ulcer Bleeding: A 12-Year Nationwide Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shih-Cheng; Hsu, Chien-Ning; Liang, Chih-Ming; Tai, Wei-Chen; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shih, Chih-Wei; Ku, Ming-Kun; Yuan, Lan-Ting; Wang, Jiunn-Wei; Tseng, Kuo-Lun; Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Nguang, Seng-Howe; Hsu, Pin-I; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2017-01-01

    Although a few studies have investigated the risks of peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) in cirrhotic patients, large population-based studies on in-hospital and long-term reports on recurrent PUB in a cohort of cirrhotic patients are lacking. This 12-year nationwide cohort study aimed to investigate the risks of in-hospital and long-term rebleeding and mortality in cirrhotic patients and to identify possible risk factors. Patient data from 1997 to 2008 were extracted from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. A total of 15,575 patients who were discharged with a diagnosis of PUB were identified after strict exclusions (n = 2889). Among them, patients with cirrhosis (n = 737) and those with chronic hepatitis (n = 1044) were compared to propensity-score matched normal controls at a ratio of 1:1. Accumulated in-hospital and long-term follow-up PUB-free survival rates were analyzed in patients with cirrhosis, patients with chronic hepatitis, and matched controls. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to identify each independent risk factor. Compared with matched controls, patients with cirrhosis exhibited a 2.62-fold (95% CI: 1.74–3.92) higher risk of developing in-hospital rebleeding, but the risk of long-term rebleeding was comparable between cirrhotic patients and matched controls (hazard ratio: 1.29, 95% CI: 0.8–2.09). On the other hand, no significant difference was observed in in-hospital and long-term rebleeding between chronic hepatitis patients and matched controls. We compared the survival rates of cirrhotic and chronic hepatitis patients to that of matched controls. After propensity score matching, both cirrhotic and chronic hepatitis patients showed significantly lower survival than the matched controls (P < 0.0001 and 0.033, respectively) during the 12-year follow-up period. However, in-hospital and long-term rebleeding rates were not significantly different between chronic hepatitis patients and matched controls (P = 0.251 and 0

  18. Aerodynamic Control using Distributed Active Bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2015-11-01

    The global aerodynamic loads on a stationary and pitching airfoil at angles of attack beyond the static and dynamic stall margins, respectively are controlled in wind tunnel experiments using regulated distributed bleed driven by surface pressure differences. High-speed PIV and proper orthogonal decomposition of the vorticity flux on the static airfoil show that the bleed engenders trains of discrete vortices that advect along the surface and are associated with a local instability that is manifested by a time-averaged bifurcation of the vorticity layer near the bleed outlets and alters the vorticity flux over the airfoil and thereby the aerodynamic loads. Active bleed is used on a dynamically pitching airfoil (at reduced frequencies up to k = 0.42) to modulate the evolution of vorticity concentrations during dynamic stall. Time-periodic bleed improved the pitch stability by reducing adverse pitching moment (``negative damping'') that can precipitate structural instabilities. At the same time, the maintains the cycle-average loads to within 5% of the base flow levels by segmenting the vorticity layer during upstroke and promoting early flow attachment during downstroke segments of the pitch cycle. Supported by Georgia Tech VLRCOE.

  19. Risk factors influencing the outcome of peptic ulcer bleeding in chronic kidney disease after initial endoscopic hemostasis: A nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chih-Ming; Hsu, Chien-Ning; Tai, Wei-Chen; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shih, Chih-Wei; Ku, Ming-Kun; Yuan, Lan-Ting; Wang, Jiunn-Wei; Tseng, Kuo-Lun; Sun, Wei-Chih; Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Nguang, Seng-Howe; Hsu, Pin-I; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-09-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who had peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) may have more adverse outcomes. This population-based cohort study aimed to identify risk factors that may influence the outcomes of patients with CKD and PUB after initial endoscopic hemostasis. Data from 1997 to 2008 were extracted from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We included a cohort dataset of 1 million randomly selected individuals and a dataset of patients with CKD who were alive in 2008. A total of 18,646 patients with PUB were screened, and 1229 patients admitted for PUB after endoscopic hemostasis were recruited. The subjects were divided into non-CKD (n = 1045) and CKD groups (n = 184). We analyzed the risks of peptic ulcer rebleeding, sepsis events, and mortality among in-hospital patients, and after discharge. Results showed that the rebleeding rates associated with repeat endoscopic therapy (11.96% vs 6.32%, P = 0.0062), death rates (8.7%, vs 2.3%, P < 0.0001), hospitalization cost (US$ 5595±7200 vs US$2408 ± 4703, P < 0.0001), and length of hospital stay (19.6 ± 18.3 vs 11.2 ± 13.1, P < 0.0001) in the CKD group were higher than those in the non-CKD group. The death rate in the CKD group was also higher than that in the non-CKD group after discharge. The independent risk factor for rebleeding during hospitalization was age (odds ratio [OR], 1.02; P = 0.0063), whereas risk factors for death were CKD (OR, 2.37; P = 0.0222), shock (OR, 2.99; P = 0.0098), and endotracheal intubation (OR, 5.31; P < 0.0001). The hazard ratio of rebleeding risk for aspirin users after discharge over a 10-year follow-up period was 0.68 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.45-0.95, P = 0.0223). On the other hand, old age (P < 0.0001), CKD (P = 0.0090), diabetes (P = 0.0470), and congestive heart failure (P = 0.0013) were the independent risk factors for death after discharge. In-hospital patients with CKD and PUB after endoscopic therapy

  20. [Treatment of peptic ulcer related to rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Imaeda, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Hiromasa; Goto, Makoto

    2002-08-01

    Rheumatic diseases often have gastrointestinal(GI) manifestations, and may present as GI bleeding and perforation due to peptic ulcer associated with high mortality. Major causes of peptic ulcer related to rheumatic diseases are drugs such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug(NSAID) and corticosteroid, and vasculitis. The analgesic effects of NSAID often mask abdominal pain until they cause GI bleeding and perforation. Therefore, it is important to make early diagnosis of peptic ulcer with upper gastrointestinal endoscope. Fundamental treatment of NSAID induced peptic ulcer is to quit it, however it is difficult because of activity of rheumatic diseases. Also, most NSAID induced peptic ulcers heal by administration of proton pump inhibitor or misoprostol. Corticosteroid pulse therapy or administration of immunosuppressant agents is effective for vasculitis induced peptic ulcer, however it is difficult to make diagnosis of it. Development of NSAID with less side effects such as cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors and establishment of diagnosis and treatment of peptic ulcer related to rheumatic diseases are expected.

  1. Tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene polymorphism in patients with gastric ulcer complicated with bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong-Soo; Hwang, Kyu-Yoon; Chung, Il-Kwon; Park, Sang-Heum; Lee, Moon-Ho; Kim, Sun-Joo; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2003-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) may be involved in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcers through suppression of fibrinolysis. This study was designed to investigate associations of t-PA and PAI-1 genes with clinical features of the patients with bleeding gastric ulcers. Eighty-four patients with peptic ulcers and 100 controls were studied between January 1998 and April 2000. We used polymerase chain reaction and endonuclease digestion to genotype for 4G/5G polymorphism in the promoter region of the PAI-1 gene and the Alurepeat insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in intron h of the t-PA gene. Various clinical features, including lesion site, bleeding event, recurrence of ulcer, and rebleeding, were assessed using a multiple logistic regression model. The genotype distributions of both the t-PA and PAI-1 genes did not differ between the patient and control groups. The occurrence of the I/D or D/D genotype of t-PA was significantly higher in cases of duodenal ulcer (adjusted OR=4.39, 95% CI=1.12-17.21). When a dominant effect (i.e., 4G/4G or 4G/5G versus 5G/5G) of the 4G allele was assumed, the PAI-1 4G/4G genotype was independently associated with rebleeding after hemostasis (adjusted OR=5.07, 95% CI=1.03-24.87). Our data suggest that t-PA gene polymorphism is associated with duodenal ulcers, and that the PAI-1 gene may be a risk factor leading to recurrent bleeding after initial hemostasis. PMID:12589088

  2. Advances in gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2016-09-01

    The main innovations of the latest meeting of the Gastroenterological Association (2016) concerning upper gastrointestinal bleeding from the clinician's perspective can be summarised as follows: a) The Glasgow-Blatchford scale has the best accuracy in predicting the need for surgical intervention and hospital mortality; b) Prognostic scales for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding are also useful for lower gastrointestinal bleeding; c) Preliminary data suggest that treatment with hemospray does not seem to be superior to current standard treatment in controlling active peptic ulcer bleeding; d) Either famotidine or a proton pump inhibitor may be effective in preventing haemorrhagic recurrence in patients taking aspirin, but this finding needs to be confirmed in further studies; e) There was confirmation of the need to re-introduce antiplatelet therapy as early as possible in patients with antiplatelet-associated gastrointestinal bleeding in order to prevent cardiovascular mortality; f) Routine clinical practice suggests that gastrointestinal or cardiovascular complications with celecoxib or traditional NSAIDs are very low; g) Dabigatran is associated with an increased incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding compared with apixaban or warfarin. At least half of the episodes are located in the lower gastrointestinal tract; h) Implant devices for external ventricular circulatory support are associated with early gastrointestinal bleeding in up to one third of patients; the bleeding is often secondary to arteriovenous malformations.

  3. Surgery in Bleeding Peptic Ulcers *

    PubMed Central

    Ward-McQuaid, J. N.; Pease, J. C.; Smith, A. McEwen; Twort, R. J.

    1960-01-01

    This paper records a study of 400 patients admitted for haematemesis and melaena. Emergency surgery was undertaken on selected patients but the overall mortality increased when more frequent emergency operations were performed in the latter half of the series. PMID:13783125

  4. Randomised comparison between adrenaline injection alone and adrenaline injection plus heat probe treatment for actively bleeding ulcers.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, S. S.; Lau, J. Y.; Sung, J. J.; Chan, A. C.; Lai, C. W.; Ng, E. K.; Chan, F. K.; Yung, M. Y.; Li, A. K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare endoscopic adrenaline injection alone and adrenaline injection plus heat probe for the treatment of actively bleeding peptic ulcers. DESIGN: Randomised prospective study of patients admitted with actively bleeding peptic ulcers. SETTING: One university hospital. SUBJECTS: 276 patients with actively bleeding ulcers detected by endoscopy within 24 hours of admission: 136 patients were randomised to endoscopic adrenaline injection alone and 140 to adrenaline injection plus heat probe treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Initial endoscopic haemostasis; clinical rebleeding; requirement for operation; requirement for blood transfusion; hospital stay, ulcer healing at four weeks; and mortality in hospital. RESULTS: Initial haemostasis was achieved in 131/134 patients (98%) who received adrenaline injection alone and 135/136 patients (99%) who received additional heat probe treatment (P = 0.33). Outcome as measured by clinical rebleeding (12 v 5), requirement for emergency operation (14 v 8), blood transfusion (2 v 3 units), hospital stay (4 v 4 days), ulcer healing at four weeks (79.1% v 74%), and in hospital mortality (7 v 8) were not significantly different in the two groups. In the subgroup of patients with spurting haemorrhage 8/27 (29.6%; 14.5% to 50.3%) patients from the adrenaline injection alone group and 2/31 (6.5%; 1.1% to 22.9%) patients from the dual treatment group required operative intervention. The relative risk of this was lower in the dual treatment group (0.17; 0.03 to 0.87). Hospital stay was significantly shorter in the dual treatment group than the adrenaline injection alone group (4 v 6 days, P = 0.01). CONCLUSION: The addition of heat probe treatment after endoscopic adrenaline injection confers an advantage in ulcers with spurting haemorrhage. PMID:9158465

  5. Peptic Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the stomach lining), peptic ulcer disease, and even stomach cancer later in life. In the past, having peptic ulcers meant living with a chronic condition for several years or even a lifetime. But ... pylori infection, and gastric ulcers, which may stem from other causes. It's ...

  6. Aerodynamic Control of a Pitching Airfoil using Distributed Active Bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2012-11-01

    Aero-effected flight control using distributed active bleed driven by pressure differences across lifting surface and regulated by integrated louver actuators is investigated in wind tunnel experiments. The interaction between unsteady bleed and the cross flows alters the apparent aerodynamic shape of the lifting surface by regulating the accumulation and shedding of vorticity concentrations, and consequently the distributions of forces and moments. The present experiments are conducted using a 2-D dynamically-pitching VR-7 airfoil model from pre- to post-stall angles of attack. The effects of leading edge bleed at high angles of attack on the formation and evolution of the dynamic stall vorticity concentrations are investigated at high reduced frequencies (k > 0.1) using PIV phase-locked to the airfoil's motion. The time-dependent bleed enables broad-range variation in lift and pitching moment with significant extension of the stall margin. In particular, bleed actuation reduces the extent of ``negative damping'' or pitching moment instability with minimal lift penalty. Supported by NTRC-VLRCOE, monitored by Dr. Mike Rutkowski.

  7. Cytotoxic isolates of Helicobacter pylori from Peptic Ulcer Diseases decrease K+-dependent ATPase Activity in HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Shanjana, Awasthi; Archana, Ayyagari

    2003-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is a Gram negative bacterium that plays a central role in the etiology of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer diseases. However, not all H. pylori positive cases develop advanced disease. This discriminatory behavior has been attributed to the difference in virulence of the bacteria. Among all virulence factors, cytotoxin released by H. pylori is the most important factor. In this work, we studied variation in H. pylori isolates from Indian dyspeptic patients on the basis of cytotoxin production and associated changes in K+-dependent ATPase (one of its targets) enzyme activity in HeLa cells. Methods The patients were retrospectively grouped on the basis of endoscopic and histopathological observation as having gastritis or peptic ulcer. The HeLa cells were incubated with the broth culture filtrates (BCFs) of H. pylori isolates from patients of both groups and observed for the cytopathic effects: morphological changes and viability. In addition, the K+-dependent ATPase activity was measured in HeLa cells extracts. Results The cytotoxin production was observed in 3/7 (gastritis) and 4/4 (peptic ulcer) H. pylori isolates. The BCFs of cytotoxin producing H. pylori strains reduced the ATPase activity of HeLa cells to 40% of that measured with non-cytotoxin producing H. pylori strains (1.33 μmole Pi/mg protein and 3.36 μmole Pi/mg protein, respectively, p < 0.05). The decreased activity of ATPase enzyme or the release of cytotoxin also correlated with the increased pathogenicity indices of the patients. Conclusions Our results suggest that the isolation of cytotoxic H. pylori is more common in severe form of acid peptic diseases (peptic ulcer) than in gastritis patients from India. Also the cytotoxin released by H. pylori impairs the ion-transporting ATPase and is a measure of cytotoxicity. PMID:14604441

  8. Lung Laceration with Active Bleeding, Contusion and Hemothorax

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    para- coronal and para-sagittal reconstructions. History Our patient is a 31 year old active duty male deployed troop suffering a gunshot...the missile path. The Parenchymal tearing is evident by the obliquely oriented, sausage -shaped opacity representing bleeding into a resultant...CXR is confirmed on the above para-axial CT reformatted through the missile path (dotted arrow). Note the sausage -shaped opacity obliquely oriented

  9. Indigenous anti-ulcer activity of Musa sapientum on peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Prabha, P.; Karpagam, Thirunethiran; Varalakshmi, B.; Packiavathy, A. Sohna Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Background: Peptic ulcer disease (PUD), encompassing gastric and duodenal ulcers is the most prevalent gastrointestinal disorder. The pathophysiology of PUD involves an imbalance between offensive factors like acid, pepsin and defensive factors like nitric oxide and growth factors. The clinical evaluation of antiulcer drugs showed tolerance, incidence of relapses and side-effects that make their efficacy arguable. An indigenous drug like Musa sapientum possessing fewer side-effects is the major thrust area of present day research, aiming at a better and safer approach for the management of PUD. Material and Methods: The unripe plantain bananas (Musa sapientum) were shade-dried, powdered and used for phytochemical analysis and as antiulcer drug. In our present study Group I rats served as control and were treated with saline, Group II was indomethacin-induced ulcerated rats, Group III received aqueous extract of Musa sapientum along with indomethacin and Group IV received esomeprazole along with indomethacin for 21 days. The anti-ulcerogenic activity was investigated by performing hematological, mucosal, antioxidant profile in comparison with the standard drug esomeprazole. Results: Our findings from High - Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HPTLC) analysis showed that Musa sapientum has an active compound a monomeric flavonoid (leucocyanidin) with anti-ulcerogenic activity. Results were expressed as mean ± SD. All our results are in congruous with the results of standard drug esomeprazole. Conclusion: It could be clearly concluded that administration of the aqueous extract of Musa sapientum at the dose used in this study tends to ameliorate ulcers. Its use in indigenous medicine should be scientifically scrutinized with further research. PMID:22224045

  10. Active Bleeding after Cardiac Surgery: A Prospective Observational Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Fellahi, Jean-Luc; Bertet, Héléna; Faucanie, Marie; Amour, Julien; Blanloeil, Yvonnick; Lanquetot, Hervé; Ouattara, Alexandre; Picot, Marie Christine

    2016-01-01

    Main Objectives To estimate the incidence of active bleeding after cardiac surgery (AB) based on a definition directly related on blood flow from chest drainage; to describe the AB characteristics and its management; to identify factors of postoperative complications. Methods AB was defined as a blood loss > 1.5 ml/kg/h for 6 consecutive hours within the first 24 hours or in case of reoperation for hemostasis during the first 12 postoperative hours. The definition was applied in a prospective longitudinal observational study involving 29 French centers; all adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass were included over a 3-month period. Perioperative data (including blood product administration) were collected. To study possible variation in clinical practice among centers, patients were classified into two groups according to the AB incidence of the center compared to the overall incidence: “Low incidence” if incidence is lower and “High incidence” if incidence is equal or greater than overall incidence. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors of postoperative complications. Results Among 4,904 patients, 129 experienced AB (2.6%), among them 52 reoperation. Postoperative bleeding loss was 1,000 [820;1,375] ml and 1,680 [1,280;2,300] ml at 6 and 24 hours respectively. Incidence of AB varied between centers (0 to 16%) but was independent of in-centre cardiac surgical experience. Comparisons between groups according to AB incidence showed differences in postoperative management. Body surface area, preoperative creatinine, emergency surgery, postoperative acidosis and red blood cell transfusion were risk factors of postoperative complication. Conclusions A blood loss > 1.5 ml/kg/h for 6 consecutive hours within the first 24 hours or early reoperation for hemostasis seems a relevant definition of AB. This definition, independent of transfusion, adjusted to body weight, may assess real time bleeding occurring

  11. Peptic ulcer disease today.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuhong; Padol, Ireneusz T; Hunt, Richard H

    2006-02-01

    Over the past few decades, since the introduction of histamine H(2)-receptor antagonists, proton-pump inhibitors, cyclo-oxygenase-2-selective anti-inflammatory drugs (coxibs), and eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection, the incidence of peptic ulcer disease and ulcer complications has decreased. There has, however, been an increase in ulcer bleeding, especially in elderly patients. At present, there are several management issues that need to be solved: how to manage H. pylori infection when eradication failure rates are high; how best to prevent ulcers developing and recurring in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and aspirin users; and how to treat non-NSAID, non-H. pylori-associated peptic ulcers. Looking for H. pylori infection, the overt or surreptitious use of NSAIDs and/or aspirin, and the possibility of an acid hypersecretory state are important diagnostic considerations that determine the therapeutic approach. Combined treatment with antisecretory therapy and antibiotics for 1-2 weeks is the first-line choice for H. pylori eradication therapy. For patients at risk of developing an ulcer or ulcer complications, it is important to choose carefully which anti-inflammatory drugs, nonselective NSAIDs or coxibs to use, based on a risk assessment of the patient, especially if the high-risk patient also requires aspirin. Testing for and eradicating H. pylori infection in patients is recommended before starting NSAID therapy, and for those currently taking NSAIDs, when there is a history of ulcers or ulcer complications. Understanding the pathophysiology and best treatment strategies for non-NSAID, non-H. pylori-associated peptic ulcers presents a challenge.

  12. Aspirin-induced peptic ulcer and genetic polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Shiotani, Akiko; Sakakibara, Takashi; Nomura, Maki; Yamanaka, Yoshiyuki; Nishi, Ryuji; Imamura, Hiroshi; Tarumi, Ken-ichi; Kamada, Tomoari; Hata, Jiro; Haruma, Ken

    2010-05-01

    There are a few studies of the association between genetic polymorphisms and the risks of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin)-induced ulcer or its complications. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), A-842G and C50T, exhibited increased sensitivity to aspirin and had lower prostaglandin synthesis capacity, lacking statistical significance in the association with bleeding peptic ulcer. A recent Japanese study indicated that the number of COX-1-1676T alleles was a significant risk factor for peptic ulcer in users of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). There are some genetic polymorphisms for aspirin resistance, such as platelet membrane glycoproteins, thromboxane A2 (TXA2) receptor, platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase and coagulation factor XIII; however, data on the frequency of gastrointestinal (GI) events in these variants are lacking. Carrying the CYP2C9 variants is reported a significantly increased risk of non-aspirin NSAID-related GI bleeding. The polymorphisms of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) have been associated with development of peptic ulcer or gastric cancer. In a recent investigation, carriage of the IL-1beta-511 T allele was significantly associated with peptic ulcer among low-dose aspirin users. Hypoacidity in corpus gastritis related to polymorphisms of pro-inflammatory cytokines seems to reduce NSAIDs or aspirin-related injury. Data on which polymorphisms are significant risk factors for GI events in aspirin users are still lacking and further large-scale clinical studies are required.

  13. Computed tomography angiography in patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Reis, Fatima Regina Silva; Cardia, Patricia Prando; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency, with considerable morbidity and mortality rates, and a prompt diagnosis is essential for a better prognosis. In such a context, endoscopy is the main diagnostic tool; however, in cases where the gastrointestinal hemorrhage is massive, the exact bleeding site might go undetected. In addition, a trained professional is not always present to perform the procedure. In an emergency setting, optical colonoscopy presents limitations connected with the absence of bowel preparation, so most of the small bowel cannot be assessed. Scintigraphy cannot accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of the bleeding and is not available at emergency settings. The use of capsule endoscopy is inappropriate in the acute setting, particularly in the emergency department at night, and is a highly expensive method. Digital angiography, despite its high sensitivity, is invasive, presents catheterization-related risks, in addition to its low availability at emergency settings. On the other hand, computed tomography angiography is fast, widely available and minimally invasive, emerging as a promising method in the diagnostic algorithm of these patients, being capable of determining the location and cause of bleeding with high accuracy. Based on a critical literature review and on their own experience, the authors propose a computed tomography angiography protocol to assess the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding.

  14. Computed tomography angiography in patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding*

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Fatima Regina Silva; Cardia, Patricia Prando; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency, with considerable morbidity and mortality rates, and a prompt diagnosis is essential for a better prognosis. In such a context, endoscopy is the main diagnostic tool; however, in cases where the gastrointestinal hemorrhage is massive, the exact bleeding site might go undetected. In addition, a trained professional is not always present to perform the procedure. In an emergency setting, optical colonoscopy presents limitations connected with the absence of bowel preparation, so most of the small bowel cannot be assessed. Scintigraphy cannot accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of the bleeding and is not available at emergency settings. The use of capsule endoscopy is inappropriate in the acute setting, particularly in the emergency department at night, and is a highly expensive method. Digital angiography, despite its high sensitivity, is invasive, presents catheterization-related risks, in addition to its low availability at emergency settings. On the other hand, computed tomography angiography is fast, widely available and minimally invasive, emerging as a promising method in the diagnostic algorithm of these patients, being capable of determining the location and cause of bleeding with high accuracy. Based on a critical literature review and on their own experience, the authors propose a computed tomography angiography protocol to assess the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26811556

  15. Evaluation of Anti-Secretory and Anti-Ulcerogenic Activities of Avipattikar Churna on The Peptic Ulcers in Experimental Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gyawali, Sudesh; Khan, Gulam Muhammad; Lamichane, Shreekrishna; Gautam, Jaya; Ghimire, Saurav; Adhikari, Rashmi; Lamsal, Reshma

    2013-01-01

    Background: Avipattikar churna, a poly-herbal formulation, is one of the popular ayurvedic formulations which is used for peptic ulcer diseases but the scientific documentation with regards to its effect for the indication is lacking. Aims: This study was carried out to evaluate the anti-secretory and the anti-ulcerogenic activities of the churna and to compare its activity with that of ranitidine in a pyloric ligated model of rats. Material and methods: Four groups of rats with 6 animals in each served as the ulcer controls, churna low dose (500 mg/kg), churna high dose (750mg/kg) and ranitidine (25mg/kg). The control group rats received only vehicle (2% (v/v) gum acacia), while the rats of the other groups received the respective dose of the churna or ranitidine which was suspended in the vehicle. The treatments were given twice a day, orally, for two days. After 1 hour of the last dose, pyloric ligations were performed and the rats were sacrificed for evaluation after four hours of the ligations. The gastric contents were collected and its volume, pH and acidity were measured. The numbers of ulcers and their lengths were measured which were used to calculate the gastric irritancy index and the curative ratio. The histological examinations of the gastric tissues were also performed. Results: The churna, in both doses, significantly decreased the volumes of the gastric contents, the ulcer score, the length of the ulcer, the gastric irritancy index and pH increased as compared to those in the control group. The effects of the churna were comparable to that of ranitidine. The histopathological evaluation of the gastric tissue also supported the results. Conclusion: Avipattikar churna has anti-secretory and anti-ulcerogenic effects which are comparable to those of ranitidine in peptic ulcer diseases. PMID:23905120

  16. Management of duodenal ulcer bleeding resistant to endoscopy: Surgery is dead!

    PubMed Central

    Loffroy, Romaric

    2013-01-01

    Acute massive duodenal bleeding is one of the most frequent complications of peptic ulcer disease. Endoscopy is the first-line method for diagnosing and treating actively bleeding peptic ulcers because its success rate is high. Of the small group of patients whose bleeding fails to respond to endoscopic therapy, increasingly the majority is referred for embolotherapy. Indeed, advances in catheter-based techniques and newer embolic agents, as well as recognition of the effectiveness of minimally invasive treatment options, have expanded the role of interventional radiology in the management of hemorrhage from peptic ulcers over the past decade. Embolization may be effective for even the most gravely ill patients for whom surgery is not a viable option, even when extravasation is not visualized by angiography. However, it seems that careful selection of the embolic agents according to the bleeding vessel may play a role in a successful outcome. The role of the surgeon in this clinical sphere is dramatically diminishing and will certainly continue to diminish in ensuing years, surgery being typically reserved for patients whose bleeding failed to respond all previous treatments. Such a setting has become extremely rare. PMID:23467545

  17. Peptic ulcer disease: clinically relevant causes and treatments.

    PubMed

    Mynatt, Ryan P; Davis, George A; Romanelli, Frank

    2009-02-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a significant cause of morbidity and in certain cases mortality among affected individuals. Proper identification and treatment of peptic ulcer disease is imperative to decreasing its associated sequellae. The most common causes of peptic ulcer disease are the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and infection with Helicobacter pylori. Initial assessment of the patient with dyspepsia is paramount, as the presence of symptoms will dictate further management. With currently available treatment regimens and the ability to reduce gastrointestinal bleeding it is important for all clinicians to have knowledge of this disease, its diagnosis, and pharmacotherapy.

  18. Does pelvic hematoma on admission computed tomography predict active bleeding at angiography for pelvic fracture?

    PubMed

    Brown, Carlos V R; Kasotakis, George; Wilcox, Alison; Rhee, Peter; Salim, Ali; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2005-09-01

    Pelvic angiography plays an increasing role in the management of pelvic fractures (PFs). Little has been written regarding the size of pelvic hematoma on admission computed tomography (CT) and how it relates to angiography results after PF. This is a retrospective review of trauma patients with PF who underwent an admission abdominal/pelvic CT scan and pelvic angiography from 2001 to 2003. CT pelvic hematoma was measured and classified as minimal or significant based on hematoma dimensions. Presence of a contrast blush on CT scan was also documented. Thirty-seven patients underwent an admission CT scan and went on to pelvic angiography. Of the 22 patients with significant pelvic hematoma, 73 per cent (n = 16) had bleeding at angiography. Fifteen patients had minimal pelvic hematoma, with 67 per cent (n = 10) showing active bleeding at angiography. In addition, five of six patients (83%) with no pelvic hematoma had active bleeding at angiography. Six patients had a blush on CT scan, with five of these (83%) having a positive angiogram. But, 22 of 31 (71%) patients with no blush on CT scan had bleeding at angiography. The absence of a pelvic hematoma or contrast blush should not alter indications for pelvic angiography, as they do not reliably exclude active pelvic bleeding.

  19. Unexpected Tc-99m labelled erythrocyte scintigraphy finding of a patient with suspicion of active bleeding into renal haematoma.

    PubMed

    Koç, Zehra Pinar; Balci, Tansel Ansal; Celiker, Hüseyin

    2011-08-11

    A 36-year-old male patient with suspicion of active bleeding into renal haematoma loge was sent to our clinic for Tc-99m labelled erythrocyte scintigraphy. Scintigraphy showed no active bleeding to renal haematoma but coexisting active haemorrhage of stomach which was confirmed as erosive bulbitis with further endoscopy.

  20. Increased Serum Activity of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 in Patients with Acute Variceal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh Sang; Jung, Hyuk Sang; Bae, Kyung Sook; Jung, Young Kul; Kim, Yeon Suk; Choi, Duck Joo; Kim, Yun Soo

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and -9 can degrade essential components of vascular integrity. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between those MMPs and variceal bleeding (VB). Methods Fifteen controls, 12 patients with acute ulcer bleeding (UB) group, 37 patients with varix (V group), and 35 patients with acute VB group were enrolled. Serum was obtained to measure MMP-2 and -9 activity by zymogram protease assays. Results The activity levels of these compounds were compared with the controls' median value. The median MMP-9 activity was 1.0 in controls, 1.05 in the UB group, 0.43 in the V group, and 0.96 in the VB group. The level of MMP-9 activity was higher in the VB group than in the V group (p<0.001). In the VB group, there was a signifi cant decrease in MMP-9 activity over time after bleeding (p<0.001). The median MMP-2 activity level was 1.0 in controls, 1.01 in the UB group, 1.50 in the V group, and 1.55 in the VB group. The level of MMP-2 activity was similar in the VB and V groups. Conclusions The level of MMP-9 activity increased in association with VB. The role of MMP-9 in the pathogenesis of VB should be verified. PMID:22570756

  1. Control of Pitching Airfoil Aerodynamics by Vorticity Flux Modification using Active Bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2014-11-01

    Distributed active bleed driven by pressure differences across a pitching airfoil is used to regulate the vorticity flux over the airfoil's surface and thereby to control aerodynamic loads in wind tunnel experiments. The range of pitch angles is varied beyond the static stall margin of the 2-D VR-7 airfoil at reduced pitching rates up to k = 0.42. Bleed is regulated dynamically using piezoelectric louvers between the model's pressure side near the trailing edge and the suction surface near the leading edge. The time-dependent evolution of vorticity concentrations over the airfoil and in the wake during the pitch cycle is investigated using high-speed PIV and the aerodynamic forces and moments are measured using integrated load cells. The timing of the dynamic stall vorticity flux into the near wake and its effect on the flow field are analyzed in the presence and absence of bleed using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). It is shown that bleed actuation alters the production, accumulation, and advection of vorticity concentrations near the surface with significant effects on the evolution, and, in particular, the timing of dynamic stall vortices. These changes are manifested by alteration of the lift hysteresis and improvement of pitch stability during the cycle, while maintaining cycle-averaged lift to within 5% of the base flow level with significant implications for improvement of the stability of flexible wings and rotor blades. This work is supported by the Rotorcraft Center (VLRCOE) at Georgia Tech.

  2. Thrombocytosis in a patient with upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xingshun; De Stefano, Valerio; Shao, Xiaodong; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2017-01-01

    Summary Reported here is a case of upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to a peptic ulcer involving an extremely high platelet count of 989 × 109/L. Myeloproliferative neoplasms were ruled out on the basis of gene mutation testing and a bone marrow biopsy. After the cessation of index bleeding, the platelet count decreased markedly. Thus, reactive thrombocytosis was considered as a possibility. PMID:28357187

  3. Helicobacter pylori infection and peptic ulcer in eastern Turkish children: is it more common than known?

    PubMed

    Uğraş, Meltem; Pehlivanoğlu, Ender

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is mainly acquired in childhood and is frequent in developing countries. The infection is associated with chronic gastritis in all infected children, but peptic ulcer disease develops in a small number of them. In our country, H. pylori infection and associated peptic ulcer disease are common. In eastern Turkey, we found peptic ulcer disease in 13.2% of children who underwent endoscopic examination. Peptic ulcers were mostly gastric ulcers and H. pylori-positive in the studied population, and most of the children were admitted due to abdominal pain. As there are no well-established criteria leading directly to diagnosis, pediatricians should include H. pylori infection and peptic ulcer disease in the differential diagnosis list when evaluating children with abdominal pain, failure to thrive and upper gastrointestinal system bleeding.

  4. Peptic ulcer disease in childhood in Zaria, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ameh, E A

    1999-03-01

    Over a 10-year period in a busy paediatric surgical unit, six children were operated upon for peptic ulcer disease, four of whom presented with complications (pyloric stenosis, two; perforation, one; bleeding, one). Truncal vagotomy with a drainage procedure was the operation of choice in five of the children in whom there were no complications. One child suspected of having Zollinger-Ellison syndrome had recurrence of symptoms. Symptoms of peptic ulcer disease in children are non-specific, and in our environment such symptoms are frequently considered to be due to parasitic infestation. Barium meal is not very sensitive in diagnosis in children, and the relative lack of availability of endoscopic services limits pre-operative diagnosis. It is suggested that peptic ulcer disease be considered in children who have persistent or recurrent abdominal pain of obscure aetiology.

  5. Peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Malfertheiner, Peter; Chan, Francis K L; McColl, Kenneth E L

    2009-10-24

    Peptic ulcer disease had a tremendous effect on morbidity and mortality until the last decades of the 20th century, when epidemiological trends started to point to an impressive fall in its incidence. Two important developments are associated with the decrease in rates of peptic ulcer disease: the discovery of effective and potent acid suppressants, and of Helicobacter pylori. With the discovery of H pylori infection, the causes, pathogenesis, and treatment of peptic ulcer disease have been rewritten. We focus on this revolution of understanding and management of peptic ulcer disease over the past 25 years. Despite substantial advances, this disease remains an important clinical problem, largely because of the increasingly widespread use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and low-dose aspirin. We discuss the role of these agents in the causes of ulcer disease and therapeutic and preventive strategies for drug-induced ulcers. The rare but increasingly problematic H pylori-negative NSAID-negative ulcer is also examined.

  6. Hypothalamic digoxin, hemispheric chemical dominance, and peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Ravi Kumar; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2003-10-01

    The isoprenoid pathway produces three key metabolites--endogenous digoxin-like factor (EDLF) (membrane sodium-potassium ATPase inhibitor and regulator of neurotransmitter transport), ubiquinone (free radical scavenger), and dolichol (regulator of glycoconjugate metabolism). The pathway was assessed in peptic ulcer and acid peptic disease and its relation to hemispheric dominance studied. The activity of HMG CoA reductase, serum levels of EDLF, magnesium, tryptophan catabolites, and tyrosine catabolites were measured in acid peptic disease, right hemispheric dominant, left hemispheric dominant, and bihemispheric dominant individuals. All the patients with peptic ulcer disease were right-handed/left hemispheric dominant by the dichotic listening test. The pathway was upregulated with increased EDLF synthesis in peptic ulcer disease (PUD). There was increase in tryptophan catabolites and reduction in tyrosine catabolites in these patients. The ubiquinone levels were low and free radical production increased. Dolichol and glycoconjugate levels were increased and lysosomal stability reduced in patients with acid peptic disease (APD). There was increase in cholesterol:phospholipid ratio with decreased glyco conjugate levels in membranes of patients with PUD. Acid peptic disease represents an elevated EDLF state which can modulate gastric acid secretion and the structure of the gastric mucous barrier. It can also lead to persistence of Helicobacter pylori infection. The biochemical pattern obtained in peptic ulcer disease is similar to those obtained in left-handed/right hemispheric chemically dominant individuals. But all the patients with peptic ulcer disease were right-handed/left hemispheric dominant by the dichotic listen ing test. Hemispheric chemical dominance has no correlation with handedness or the dichotic listening test. Peptic ulcer disease occurs in right hemispheric chemically dominant individuals and is a reflection of altered brain function.

  7. Impact on postoperative bleeding and cost of recombinant activated factor VII in patients undergoing heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, Allison L.; Lowery, Ashleigh V.; Pajoumand, Mehrnaz; Pham, Si M.; Slejko, Julia F.; Tanaka, Kenichi A.; Mazzeffi, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiac transplantation can be complicated by refractory hemorrhage particularly in cases where explantation of a ventricular assist device is necessary. Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) has been used to treat refractory bleeding in cardiac surgery patients, but little information is available on its efficacy or cost in heart transplant patients. Methods: Patients who had orthotopic heart transplantation between January 2009 and December 2014 at a single center were reviewed. Postoperative bleeding and the total costs of hemostatic therapies were compared between patients who received rFVIIa and those who did not. Propensity scores were created and used to control for the likelihood of receiving rFVIIa in order to reduce bias in our risk estimates. Results: Seventy-six patients underwent heart transplantation during the study period. Twenty-one patients (27.6%) received rFVIIa for refractory intraoperative bleeding. There was no difference in postoperative red blood cell transfusion, chest tube output, or surgical re-exploration between patients who received rFVIIa and those who did not, even after adjusting with the propensity score (P = 0.94, P = 0.60, and P = 0.10, respectively). The total cost for hemostatic therapies was significantly higher in the rFVIIa group (median $10,819 vs. $1,985; P < 0.0001). Subgroup analysis of patients who underwent redo-sternotomy with left ventricular assist device explantation did not show any benefit for rFVIIa either. Conclusions: In this relatively small cohort, rFVIIa use was not associated with decreased postoperative bleeding in patients undergoing heart transplantation; however, it led to significantly higher cost. PMID:27397445

  8. Recombinant activated factor VII does not reduce bleeding in rabbits treated with aspirin and clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Hindy-François, Clemence; Bachelot-Loza, Christilla; Le Bonniec, Bernard; Grelac, Francoise; Dizier, Blandine; Godier, Anne; Emmerich, Joseph; Gaussem, Pascale; Samama, Charles-Marc

    2010-10-01

    Combined antiplatelet agents (cAPA), aspirin plus clopidogrel, increase the risk of bleeding. We hypothesised that recombinant activated FVIIa (rFVIIa), which normalises thrombin generation in platelet-rich plasma from patients treated with cAPA, could limit this bleeding risk. It was the objective of this study to investigate the efficacy and safety of rFVIIa compared to placebo, in a bleeding and thrombosis model in rabbits treated with aspirin and clopidogrel. New-Zealand rabbits, randomised into two groups (Placebo1, n=36 ; cAPA, n=34), were anaesthetised, ventilated and monitored for blood pressure, temperature and carotid blood flow. The Folts model was applied to a carotid artery. Cyclic flow reductions (CFR) were recorded over a first 20-min period (Obs1). Each rabbit was then randomly assigned into one of three subgroups (Placebo2, 40μg/kg rFVIIa, 160 μg/kg rFVIIa) and CFR were monitored for a second 20-min period (Obs2). Ear bleeding time (BT) was measured at the end of each period. Hepatosplenic (HS) section was performed at the end of the experiment and HS blood loss defines the primary endpoint. Secondary endpoints were thrombosis (CFR), prothrombin time, platelet aggregation, and thrombin generation. Non- parametric statistical tests were used (p<0.05). cAPA significantly increased HS blood loss, BT and suppressed CFR compared to Placebo1 (p<0.05). rFVIIa injection did not modify HS blood loss, BT or CFR rate in Placebo1 rabbits nor in cAPA animals. These effects were unaffected by either rFVIIa dose. rFVIIa accelerated thrombin generation but had no effect on platelet aggregation in citrated platelet-rich plasma. rFVIIa did not modify HS blood loss associated with cAPA in rabbits.

  9. Optimal management of peptic ulcer disease in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Pilotto, Alberto; Franceschi, Marilisa; Maggi, Stefania; Addante, Filomena; Sancarlo, Daniele

    2010-07-01

    Recent data report that the incidence of peptic ulcer is decreasing in the general population; conversely, the rates of gastric and duodenal ulcer hospitalization and mortality remain very high in older patients. Two major factors that might explain this epidemiological feature in the elderly population are the high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and the increasing prescriptions of gastroduodenal damaging drugs, including NSAIDs and/or aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid). The main goals for treating peptic ulcer disease in old age are to reduce recurrence of the disease and to prevent complications, especially bleeding and perforation. The available treatments for peptic ulcer are essentially based on gastric acid suppression with antisecretory drugs and the eradication of H. pylori infection. The aim of this article is to report the available data on clinical efficacy and tolerability of peptic ulcer treatments in elderly patients and provide recommendations for their optimal use in this special population. Proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-based triple therapies for 7 days are highly effective for the cure of H. pylori-positive peptic ulcers as well as for reducing ulcer recurrence. Antisecretory drugs are also the treatment of choice for NSAID- or aspirin-related peptic ulcers and are useful as preventive therapy in chronic users of NSAIDs and low-dose aspirin as antiplatelet therapy. Antisecretory PPI therapy has a favourable tolerability profile in geriatric patients; however, monitoring is suggested in older patients with frequent pulmonary infections, gastrointestinal malabsorption, unexplained chronic diarrhoea, osteoporosis or those taking concomitant cytochrome P450 2C19-metabolized medications. The overall approach to the geriatric patient should include a comprehensive geriatric assessment that ensures multidimensional evaluation of the patient in order to better define the clinical risk of adverse outcomes in the older patient with peptic ulcer and

  10. Visualization of an actively bleeding cortical vessel into the subdural space by CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Dalfino, John C; Boulos, Alan S

    2010-10-01

    Spontaneous subdural hematomas of arterial origin are rare with only a few published case reports in the literature. In the CT era, vessel imaging of extra-axial hematomas is not commonly performed. In this case report we present a patient with a large, spontaneous acute subdural hematoma that demonstrated active contrast extravasation from a small cortical vessel on CT angiography. During surgical evacuation the vessel was confirmed to be a small cortical artery that was bulging through the arachnoid membrane and bleeding into the subdural space. The historical, radiographic, and clinical aspects of this unusual cause of subdural hematoma are discussed.

  11. [Peptic ulcer disease and stress].

    PubMed

    Herszényi, László; Juhász, Márk; Mihály, Emese; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2015-08-30

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of peptic ulcer disease revolutionised our views on the etiology and treatment of the disease. This discovery has tempted many experts to conclude that psychological factors and, specifically, stress are unimportant. However, Helicobacter pylori infection alone does not explain fully the incidence and prevalence of peptic ulcer disease. It has been demonstrated that stress can cause peptic ulcer disease even in the absence of Helicobacter pylori infection, supporting a multicausal model of peptic ulcer etiology. Psychological stress among other risk factors can function as a cofactor with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  12. Is recombinant activated factor VII effective in the treatment of excessive bleeding after paediatric cardiac surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Okonta, Kelechi E.; Edwin, Frank; Falase, Bode

    2012-01-01

    A best evidence topic in paediatric cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether recombinant activated factor VII was effective for the treatment of excessive bleeding after paediatric cardiac surgery. Altogether 150 papers were found using the reported search; 13 papers were identified that provided the best evidence to answer the question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these studies were tabulated. A total of 311 children experienced excessive bleeding following cardiac surgery that was refractory to the conventional methods of achieving haemostasis. One hundred and ninety-two patients received the rFVIIa while 116 were in control arm from five studies. The primary end-point was on chest tube drainage, the plasma prothrombin time, the activated partial thromboplastin time after the administration of rFVIIa and the secondary end-point was reduction of blood products transfusion. Thrombosis was a complication in 8 patients (4.2%); three deaths (1.6%) but not attributable to thromboembolic events following the use of rFVIIa. Most of the studies failed to clearly state the doses but the extracted doses ranged between 30 and 180 µg/kg/dose, the interval between doses ranged between 15 and 120 min with a maximum of four doses. However, most of the patients had 180 µg/kg/dose with interval between dose of 2 h and maximum of two doses with dosage moderated with respect to weight, prior coagulopathy and responsiveness. There were two randomized studies with good sample size. One showed no significant differences in the secondary end points between the two arms and noted no adverse complications. However, the rFVIIa was used prophylactically. The other observed that there were no increase in thromboembolic events rather rFVIIa was effective in decreasing excessive bleeding that may complicate cardiac surgery in children

  13. Comparison of low- and high-dose recombinant activated factor VII for postcardiac surgical bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Aly Makram

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the Study: A retrospective observational study to compare safety and efficacy of high and low doses of recombinant activated factor VIIa (rFVIIa) in severe postcardiac surgical bleeding. Patients and Methods: From 2004 to 2014, all patients who received rFVIIa for bleeding after cardiac surgery were included and arranged in two groups; Group 1: Low dose (40–50 mcg/kg) (n = 98) and Group 2: High dose (90–120 mcg/kg) (n = 156). Results: There was no significant difference in demographic and surgical characteristics of both groups on admission to Cardiac Surgical Intensive Care Unit (CSICU). There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding the reduction in chest tube bleeding in the first 6 h or the transfusion requirement in the 24 h after admission to CSICU. A total of 15 patients (5.9%) had thromboembolic adverse events. (Seven (7.1%) patients in Group 1 compared to 8 (5.1%) patients in Group 2, P = 0.58). There were no significant differences in all-cause mortality at 30 days (2% in Group 1 vs. 3.2% in Group 2, P = 0.6) and at hospital discharge between the two study groups (6.1% in Group 1 vs. 8.3% in Group 2, P = 0.5), respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding the need for re-exploration, days on mechanical ventilation, CSICU, or hospital stay. Conclusion: In this report, Low-dose rFVIIa showed equivalent efficacy and safety to high-dose rFVIIa. Further prospective randomized studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:27688624

  14. Regulatory mechanisms of cAMP levels as a multiple target for antiplatelet activity and less bleeding risk.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Palomo, Iván

    2014-08-01

    Platelet activation is a critical component of atherothrombosis. The multiple pathways of platelet activation limit the effect of specific receptor/pathway inhibitors, resulting in limited clinical efficacy. Recent research has confirmed that combination therapy results in enhanced antithrombotic efficacy without increasing bleeding risk. In this way, the best-known inhibitor and turn off signaling in platelet activation is cAMP. In this article we discuss the mechanisms of regulation of intraplatelet cAMP levels, a) platelet-dependent pathway: Gi/Gs protein-coupled receptors, phosphodiesterase inhibition and activation of PPARs and b) platelet-independent pathway: inhibition of adenosine uptake by erythrocytes. With respect to the association between intraplatelet cAMP levels and bleeding risk it is possible to establish that compounds/drugs with pleitropic effect for increased intraplatelet cAMP level could have an antithrombotic activity with less risk of bleeding.

  15. Bleeding Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Normally, if you get hurt, your body forms a blood clot to stop the bleeding. For blood ... body needs cells called platelets and proteins known as clotting factors. If you have a bleeding disorder, ...

  16. Bleeding gums

    MedlinePlus

    ... periodontal exam. DO NOT use tobacco, since it makes bleeding gums worse. Control gum bleeding by applying pressure directly on the gums with a gauze pad soaked in ice water. If you have been diagnosed with a ...

  17. [OMEPRAZOL VS RANITIDINE IN UPPER DIGESTIVE BLEEDING

    PubMed

    Regis R, Regina; Bisso A, Aland; Rebaza, Segundo

    1999-01-01

    Pectic ulcer is the most frequent cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. The homeostatic mechanism of bleeding, and coagulation, does not happen with values of pH less than 5,0. Therefore neutralization of gastric acidity (pH more than 5,0) is a recourse of control, improve the evolution and healing of peptic ulcer and to avoid a new bleeding. The aim of this study was to compare the results of treatment with omeprazole and ranitidine, in 57 patients admitted at emergency room of the Hospital Central de la Polic a Nacional del Per with endoscopic diagnosis of peptic ulcer, using Forrest classification. Patients received omeprazole 40 mg in bolus IV, followed by continuos infusion of 8 mg/hour for 72 hours (group A) or ranitidine 50 mg IV each 8 hours for 72 hours (group B). A new endoscopy was made 72 hours after admission demostrated a succesful therapy in both group. Bleeding stopped in 26/27 patients in group A (96,2%) and in 23/30 patients in group B (76,6%) (p<0,05). The results of this study show that the omeprazole IV is more effective than ranitidine IV in the control of UGB because of peptic ulcer and provides a faster healing.

  18. [Peptic ulcer in children].

    PubMed

    Sawada, Atsushi

    2004-03-01

    H. pylori infection is the main cause of peptic ulcer in children. Japan pediatric H. pylori research meeting made the guideline for diagnosis and eradication therapy for H. pylori. This guideline showed the methods for diagnose and the eradication therapy for children with H. pylori infection. Many pediatric patients have been free from some abdominal symptoms after eradication therapy for H. pylori. However we need endoscopy for diagnose in spite of children. And recently new non-invasive diagnostic devices are developed and some species acquired tolerance for clarithromycin. Therefore we hope that a new guideline for children will be written soon.

  19. Critical bleeding in vascular surgery: expanding the indication of recombinant activated factor VII.

    PubMed

    Tawfick, Wael A; Tawfik, Sherif; Hynes, Niamh; Mahendran, Bhaskarapandian; Sultan, Sherif

    2006-01-01

    Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) is considered a universal hemostatic agent. We present our experience with rFVIIa in vascular surgery patients who developed major hemorrhagic complications with no obvious major vessel bleeding as an expansion of the indications of rFVIIa. Of 973 major complex vascular procedures, 18 patients with intractable bleeding were administered 40 to 80 mug/kg rFVIIa. Blood and by-products transfused, pH, coagulation profile, platelet count, and preoperative antiplatelets and anticoagulants were recorded.Twelve patients (67%) showed clinical improvement. Six remained unstable despite further hemostatic measures and died perioperatively. Thirty-three percent (n = 6) received over 20 U of blood before rFVIIa administration. All but one died within the first 24 hours (p = .0175). Seven patients had acidosis with a pH of 7.3 or less. Five of them died within 24 hours (p = .05). Six patients had a platelet count below 100,000/cm3, five of whom died perioperatively (p = .0175). Patients with an international normalized ratio above 1.2 had a better survival rate because rFVIIa was used early. There were no signs of systemic or local thrombotic events. The amount of blood and plasma transfused was significantly reduced after rFVIIa administration.rFVIIa is a safe adjunct for patients with significant hemorrhagic complications, with a low risk of thrombotic complications. We found it effective if administered early with measures to achieve hemodynamic stability and correction of acidosis.

  20. Definition and Facts for Peptic Ulcers (Stomach Ulcers)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nutrition Clinical Trials Definition & Facts for Peptic Ulcers (Stomach Ulcers) What is a peptic ulcer? A peptic ... is a sore on the lining of your stomach or duodenum. Rarely, a peptic ulcer may develop ...

  1. Circumventing furin enhances factor VIII biological activity and ameliorates bleeding phenotypes in hemophilia models

    PubMed Central

    Siner, Joshua I.; Samelson-Jones, Benjamin J.; Crudele, Julie M.; French, Robert A.; Lee, Benjamin J.; Zhou, Shanzhen; Merricks, Elizabeth; Raymer, Robin; Camire, Rodney M.; Arruda, Valder R.

    2016-01-01

    Processing by the proprotein convertase furin is believed to be critical for the biological activity of multiple proteins involved in hemostasis, including coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). This belief prompted the retention of the furin recognition motif (amino acids 1645–1648) in the design of B-domain–deleted FVIII (FVIII-BDD) products in current clinical use and in the drug development pipeline, as well as in experimental FVIII gene therapy strategies. Here, we report that processing by furin is in fact deleterious to FVIII-BDD secretion and procoagulant activity. Inhibition of furin increases the secretion and decreases the intracellular retention of FVIII-BDD protein in mammalian cells. Our new variant (FVIII-ΔF), in which this recognition motif is removed, efficiently circumvents furin. FVIII-ΔF demonstrates increased recombinant protein yields, enhanced clotting activity, and higher circulating FVIII levels after adeno-associated viral vector–based liver gene therapy in a murine model of severe hemophilia A (HA) compared with FVIII-BDD. Moreover, we observed an amelioration of the bleeding phenotype in severe HA dogs with sustained therapeutic FVIII levels after FVIII-ΔF gene therapy at a lower vector dose than previously employed in this model. The immunogenicity of FVIII-ΔF did not differ from that of FVIII-BDD as a protein or a gene therapeutic. Thus, contrary to previous suppositions, FVIII variants that can avoid furin processing are likely to have enhanced translational potential for HA therapy. PMID:27734034

  2. Acid-reducing vagotomy is associated with reduced risk of subsequent ischemic heart disease in complicated peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shih-Chi; Fang, Chu-Wen; Chen, William Tzu-Liang; Muo, Chih-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Persistent exacerbation of a peptic ulcer may lead to a complicated peptic ulcer (perforation or/and bleeding). The management of complicated peptic ulcers has shifted from acid-reducing vagotomy, drainage, and gastrectomy to simple local suture or non-operative (endoscopic/angiographic) hemostasis. We were interested in the long-term effects of this trend change. In this study, complicated peptic ulcer patients who received acid-reducing vagotomy were compared with those who received simple suture/hemostasis to determine the risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD). This retrospective cohort study analyzed 335,680 peptic ulcer patients recorded from 2000 to 2006 versus 335,680 age-, sex-, comorbidity-, and index-year matched comparisons. Patients with Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection were excluded. In order to identify the effect of vagus nerve severance, patients who received gastrectomy or antrectomy were also excluded. The incidence of IHD in both cohorts, and in the complicated peptic ulcer patients who received acid-reducing vagotomy versus those who received simple suture or hemostasis was evaluated. The overall incidence of IHD was higher in patients with peptic ulcer than those without peptic ulcer (17.00 vs 12.06 per 1000 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of 1.46 based on multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis controlling for age, sex, Charlson's comorbidity index, and death (competing risk). While comparing peptic ulcer patients with acid-reducing vagotomy to those with simple suture/hemostasis or those without surgical treatment, the aHR (0.58) was the lowest in the acid-reducing vagotomy group. Patients with peptic ulcer have an elevated risk of IHD. However, complicated peptic ulcer patients who received acid-reducing vagotomy were associated with reduced risk of developing IHD. PMID:27977613

  3. Management of non variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: position statement of the Catalan Society of Gastroenterology.

    PubMed

    García-Iglesias, Pilar; Botargues, Josep-Maria; Feu Caballé, Faust; Villanueva Sánchez, Càndid; Calvet Calvo, Xavier; Brullet Benedi, Enric; Cánovas Moreno, Gabriel; Fort Martorell, Esther; Gallach Montero, Marta; Gené Tous, Emili; Hidalgo Rosas, José-Manuel; Lago Macía, Amelia; Nieto Rodríguez, Ana; Papo Berger, Michel; Planella de Rubinat, Montserrat; Saló Rich, Joan; Campo Fernández de Los Ríos, Rafel

    2017-01-18

    In recent years there have been advances in the management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding that have helped reduce rebleeding and mortality. This document positioning of the Catalan Society of Digestologia is an update of evidence-based recommendations on management of gastrointestinal bleeding peptic ulcer.

  4. [Gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    In the Digestive Disease Week in 2015 there have been some new contributions in the field of gastrointestinal bleeding that deserve to be highlighted. Treatment of celecoxib with a proton pump inhibitor is safer than treatment with nonselective NSAID and a proton pump inhibitor in high risk gastrointestinal and cardiovascular patients who mostly also take acetylsalicylic acid. Several studies confirm the need to restart the antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy at an early stage after a gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The need for urgent endoscopy before 6-12 h after the onset of upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode may be beneficial in patients with hemodynamic instability and high risk for comorbidity. It is confirmed that in Western but not in Japanese populations, gastrointestinal bleeding episodes admitted to hospital during weekend days are associated with a worse prognosis associated with delays in the clinical management of the events. The strategy of a restrictive policy on blood transfusions during an upper GI bleeding event has been challenged. Several studies have shown the benefit of identifying the bleeding vessel in non varicose underlying gastric lesions by Doppler ultrasound which allows direct endoscopic therapy in the patient with upper GI bleeding. Finally, it has been reported that lower gastrointestinal bleeding diverticula band ligation or hemoclipping are both safe and have the same long-term outcomes.

  5. Beyond stopping the bleed: short-term episodic prophylaxis with recombinant activated factor FVII in haemophilia patients with inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Šalek, Silva Zupančić; Auerswald, Günter; Benson, Gary; Dolan, Gerry; Duffy, Anne; Hermans, Cedric; Jiménez-Yuste, Victor; Ljung, Rolf; Morfini, Massimo; Santagostino, Elena; Lambert, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Preventing haemarthroses and arthropathy is a major challenge in patients with haemophilia and inhibitors, as treatment options are limited. One potential strategy is short-term episodic prophylaxis, which extends bypassing agent therapy beyond the resolution of bleeding to include the post-bleed inflammatory phase. At the 13th Zürich Haemophilia Forum, an expert panel reviewed the rationale behind this strategy, explored its current use with recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) and considered treatment monitoring and optimisation. Two protocols are currently used for short-term episodic prophylaxis, both of which stipulate on-demand rFVIIa until resolution of bleeding, followed by daily dosing for ≥3 days to prevent re-bleeds. Short-term episodic prophylaxis should be individualised to optimise outcomes, perhaps through early treatment initiation or by combining rFVIIa with other treatments (e.g. factor VIII, tranexamic acid). Encouraging treatment compliance can also improve outcomes. Additionally, there is a need to develop objective clinical outcome measures, biomarkers and imaging protocols that can monitor treatment outcomes and joint disease in patients with inhibitors. A proactive approach incorporating a systematic package of care is needed. Currently, short-term episodic prophylaxis with rFVIIa may be an alternative treatment option to on-demand treatment for patients with inhibitors. PMID:26674816

  6. Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Peptic Ulcer URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  7. [Guidelines of diagnosis for peptic ulcer disease].

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Gyun; Kim, Jae Gyu; Shin, Sung Kwan; Kim, Hyun Soo; Seol, Sang Young

    2009-11-01

    Peptic ulcer is one of the most prevalent diseases in gastrointestinal field. Recently, evolution was made for pathophysiology of peptic ulcer from "no acid, no ulcer" to Helicobacter pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The prevalence of peptic ulcer disease is estimated about 10% in Korea, and has declined due to Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy. Peptic ulcer has the cycle of exacerbation and improvement in the clinical course, and has not occasionally any clinical symptom. Helicobacter pylori eradication has made the marked reduction of relapse of peptic ulcer disease. Although nationwide endoscopic screening has enabled accurate diagnosis of peptic ulcer disease, general guideline for diagnosis of peptic ulcer has not made in Korea. Herein, we propose a guideline for the diagnosis of peptic ulcer according to domestic, international clinical studies, and experts opinions with level of evidence and grade of recommendation.

  8. A Bleeding Duodenal GIST Masquerading as Refractory Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jason D.; Oh, Stephen; Clark, Clancy

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract; however, the occurrence of a GIST in the duodenum is rare. Our case demonstrates the importance of considering GIST in the evaluation of refractory duodenal ulcers, as well as the utilization of endoscopic ultrasound in the evaluation of these lesions. PMID:28119940

  9. Nutritional care in peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    VOMERO, Nathália Dalcin; COLPO, Elisângela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer is a lesion of the mucosal lining of the upper gastrointestinal tract characterized by an imbalance between aggressive and protective factors of the mucosa, having H. pylori as the main etiologic factor. Dietotherapy is important in the prevention and treatment of this disease. Aim To update nutritional therapy in adults' peptic ulcer. Methods Exploratory review without restrictions with primary sources indexed in Scielo, PubMed, Medline, ISI, and Scopus databases. Results Dietotherapy, as well as caloric distribution, should be adjusted to the patient's needs aiming to normalize the nutritional status and promote healing. Recommended nutrients can be different in the acute phase and in the recovery phase, and there is a greater need of protein and some micronutrients, such as vitamin A, zinc, selenium, and vitamin C in the recovery phase. In addition, some studies have shown that vitamin C has a beneficial effect in eradication of H. pylori. Fibers and probiotics also play a important role in the treatment of peptic ulcer, because they reduce the side effects of antibiotics and help reduce treatment time. Conclusion A balanced diet is vital in the treatment of peptic ulcer, once food can prevent, treat or even alleviate the symptoms involving this pathology. However, there are few papers that innovate dietotherapy; so additional studies addressing more specifically the dietotherapy for treatment of peptic ulcer are necessary. PMID:25626944

  10. Circuit life versus bleeding risk: the impact of achieved activated partial thromboplastin time versus achieved filtration fraction.

    PubMed

    MacEwen, Clare; Watkinson, Peter; Winearls, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    Whilst prolonging hemofilter (circuit) life, heparin increases bleeding risk. The impact of achieved activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) on circuit life and bleeding risk has not been assessed in a modern critically ill cohort. Lowering filtration fraction may be an alternative means of prolonging circuit life, but is often overlooked in critical care. An observational study of 309 consecutive circuits in a general intensive care unit was conducted using a wide target APTT range. Multilevel modeling was used to predict circuit life and bleeding according to achieved APTT and filtration fraction. Independent predictors of circuit failure (i.e. unplanned ending of treatment) included filtration fraction (P<0.001, HR 1.07 per 1% increase), peak APTT (P<0.001, HR 0.8 per 10 s increase or 0.3 APTR increase) and baseline PT (P=0.014, HR 0.91 for every 50% increase). The only significant predictor of bleeding was peak APTT (P=0.017, OR 1.05 per 10 s increase). Every 10 s APTT increase was associated with a 20% reduction in circuit failure, but a 5% increase in hemorrhage. A 3% reduction in filtration fraction was associated with the same improvement in circuit life as a 10 s increase in APTT. Increasing APTT prolongs circuit life but carries a substantial risk of bleeding even in modern practice. Filtration fraction has a large impact on circuit life in the critically ill: a 3% reduction in filtration fraction, e.g. by increasing blood flow or delivering some of the clearance via dialysis, would be expected to reduce circuit failure as much as a 10 s increase in APTT.

  11. Therapy of peptic ulcer with semax peptide.

    PubMed

    Ivanikov, I O; Brekhova, M E; Samonina, G E; Myasoedov, N F; Ashmarin, I P

    2002-07-01

    Experiments used is combination with traditional preparations (omeprasole, de-nol, and solcoseril), Semax peptide (Met-Glu-His-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro) possessing nootropic and neuroprotective activity significantly promoted ulcer healing in patients with refractory peptic ulcers. On day 14 of treatment ulcer healing was observed in 89.5% patients receiving intranasal Semax (1% solution, 2-4 drops 3 times a day for 10 days) vs. 30.8% in the control group. Clinical studies of antiulcer activity of Semax in different combinations with usual antiulcer drugs are needed.

  12. Peptic ulcer disease in children.

    PubMed

    Dohil, R; Hassall, E

    2000-02-01

    A peptic ulcer in a child looks the same as it does in an adult, and many of the aetiologies of peptic ulcer disease in children are similar to those in adults. However, there are many differences between children and adults, especially in the areas of clinical presentation, the prevalences of different types of ulcer disease, and the prevalence of complications of ulcer disease. Therefore the approach to diagnosis and management in children is often at variance with that in adults. One important example is the approach to suspected Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) disease in children, in which consensus groups have advised a considerably different approach in children. While the chapter deals with the full range of peptic ulcer disease in children, the focus is on those aspects in which there are differences between adults and children.

  13. Prevalence of CagA and VacA antibodies in children with Helicobacter pylori-associated peptic ulcer compared to prevalence in pediatric patients with active or nonactive chronic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Alarcón, T; Martínez, M J; Urruzuno, P; Cilleruelo, M L; Madruga, D; Sebastian, M; Domingo, D; Sanz, J C; López-Brea, M

    2000-09-01

    VacA and CagA serological responses were detected in pediatric patients: 44 and 56%, respectively, in peptic ulcer (PU) patients, 33.3 and 44.4% in active chronic gastritis (ACG) patients, and 23.2 and 39.2% in non-ACG patients. Higher seroprevalence to CagA+VacA and to CagA+VacA+35-kDa antigen was found among PU patients. However, a low level of sensitivity and specificity was found for indirect detection of PU patients.

  14. Etiopathogenetic principles and peptic ulcer disease classification.

    PubMed

    Tytgat, G N J

    2011-01-01

    Ulceration corresponds to tissue loss, breaching the muscularis mucosae. When ulcers develop in the acid-peptic environment of the gastroduodenum, they are traditionally called peptic ulcer (PUD). Ulcers never develop spontaneously in a healthy gastroduodenal mucosa. Ulceration is the ultimate consequence of a disequilibrium between aggressive injurious factors and defensive mucosa-protective factors. The dominant aggressors are strong acid and high proteolytic (pepsin) activity in gastric secretions. The dominant defensors are the phospholipid surfactant layer, covering the mucus bicarbonate gel, the mucus bicarbonate layer covering the epithelium, the tight junctional structures between the epithelial cells, restricting proton permeability, and the epithelial trefoil peptides, contributing to healing after injury. Initially, acid-peptic aggression was considered the overwhelming cause of PUD, supported by the pioneering work of Schwartz, launching the dictum 'no acid, no ulcer'. This led to the universal therapy directed against intragastric acidity, also interfering with peptic activity when the pH was >4. The therapeutic sequence went from large doses of antacids to H(2)-receptor antagonists and finally to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). The longer the intragastric pH was >3, the quicker ulcer healing was seen. Unfortunately, ulcers often recurred after stopping therapy, demanding maintenance therapy to keep the ulcers healed and to prevent the need for surgery (vagotomy, partial gastric resection). Later on, the emphasis gradually shifted to weakening/failing of the defensive factors, raising the vulnerability of the gastroduodenal mucosa to luminal secretions. Leading injurious mechanisms jeopardizing the mucosal integrity are numerous: infections, especially Helicobacter pylori, drug-induced injury, particularly acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), physicochemical and caustic injury, vascular disorders, interfering

  15. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers.

  16. Association of vagus nerve severance and decreased risk of subsequent type 2 diabetes in peptic ulcer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shih-Chi; Chen, William Tzu-Liang; Fang, Chu-Wen; Muo, Chih-Hsin; Sung, Fung-Chang; Hsu, Chung Y.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Vagus nerve may play a role in serum glucose modulation. The complicated peptic ulcer patients (with perforation or/and bleeding) who received surgical procedures with or without vagotomy provided 2 patient populations for studying the impact of vagus nerve integrity. We assessed the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in peptic ulcer patients without and with complications by surgical treatment received in a retrospective population study using the National Health Insurance database in Taiwan. A cohort of 163,385 patients with peptic ulcer and without Helicobacter pylori infection in 2000 to 2003 was established. A randomly selected cohort of 163,385 persons without peptic ulcer matched by age, sex, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, Charlson comorbidity index score, and index year was utilized for comparison. The risks of developing diabetes in both cohorts and in the complicated peptic ulcer patients who received truncal vagotomy or simple suture/hemostasis (SSH) were assessed at the end of 2011. The overall diabetes incidence was higher in patients with peptic ulcer than those without peptic ulcer (15.87 vs 12.60 per 1000 person-years) by an adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of 1.43 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.40–1.47) based on the multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis (competing risk). Comparing ulcer patients with truncal vagotomy and SSH or those without surgical treatment, the aHR was the lowest in the vagotomy group (0.48, 95% CI = 0.41–0.56). Peptic ulcer patients have an elevated risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Moreover, there were associations of vagus nerve severance and decreased risk of subsequent type 2 diabetes in complicated peptic ulcer patients. PMID:27930533

  17. Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding - review the effectiveness of endoscopic hemostasis methods

    PubMed Central

    Szura, Mirosław; Pasternak, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding is a condition that requires immediate medical intervention and has a high associated mortality rate (exceeding 10%). The vast majority of upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases are due to peptic ulcers. Helicobacter pylori infection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin are the main risk factors for peptic ulcer disease. Endoscopic therapy has generally been recommended as the first-line treatment for upper gastrointestinal bleeding as it has been shown to reduce recurrent bleeding, the need for surgery and mortality. Early endoscopy (within 24 h of hospital admission) has a greater impact than delayed endoscopy on the length of hospital stay and requirement for blood transfusion. This paper aims to review and compare the efficacy of the types of endoscopic hemostasis most commonly used to control non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding by pooling data from the literature. PMID:26421105

  18. Gastric acid inhibition in the treatment of peptic ulcer hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ghassemi, Kevin A; Kovacs, Thomas O G; Jensen, Dennis M

    2009-12-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding from peptic ulcer disease is a common clinical event, resulting in considerable patient morbidity and significant health care costs. Inhibiting gastric acid secretion is a key component in improving clinical outcomes, including reducing rebleeding, transfusion requirements, and surgery. Raising intragastric pH promotes clot stability and reduces the influences of gastric acid and pepsin. Patients with high-risk stigmata for ulcer bleeding (arterial bleeding, nonbleeding visible vessels, and adherent clots) benefit significantly from and should receive high-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) after successful endoscopic hemostasis. For patients with low-risk stigmata (flat spots or clean ulcer base), oral PPI therapy alone is sufficient. For oozing bleeding (an intermediate risk finding), successful endoscopic hemostasis and oral PPI are recommended. Using intravenous PPIs before endoscopy appears to reduce the frequency of finding high-risk stigmata on later endoscopy, but has not been shown to improve clinical outcomes. High-dose oral PPIs may be as effective as intravenous infusion in achieving positive clinical outcomes, but this has not been documented by randomized studies and its cost-effectiveness is unclear.

  19. Acid-reducing vagotomy is associated with reduced risk of subsequent ischemic heart disease in complicated peptic ulcer: An Asian population study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shih-Chi; Fang, Chu-Wen; Chen, William Tzu-Liang; Muo, Chih-Hsin

    2016-12-01

    Persistent exacerbation of a peptic ulcer may lead to a complicated peptic ulcer (perforation or/and bleeding). The management of complicated peptic ulcers has shifted from acid-reducing vagotomy, drainage, and gastrectomy to simple local suture or non-operative (endoscopic/angiographic) hemostasis. We were interested in the long-term effects of this trend change. In this study, complicated peptic ulcer patients who received acid-reducing vagotomy were compared with those who received simple suture/hemostasis to determine the risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD).This retrospective cohort study analyzed 335,680 peptic ulcer patients recorded from 2000 to 2006 versus 335,680 age-, sex-, comorbidity-, and index-year matched comparisons. Patients with Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection were excluded. In order to identify the effect of vagus nerve severance, patients who received gastrectomy or antrectomy were also excluded. The incidence of IHD in both cohorts, and in the complicated peptic ulcer patients who received acid-reducing vagotomy versus those who received simple suture or hemostasis was evaluated.The overall incidence of IHD was higher in patients with peptic ulcer than those without peptic ulcer (17.00 vs 12.06 per 1000 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of 1.46 based on multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis controlling for age, sex, Charlson's comorbidity index, and death (competing risk). While comparing peptic ulcer patients with acid-reducing vagotomy to those with simple suture/hemostasis or those without surgical treatment, the aHR (0.58) was the lowest in the acid-reducing vagotomy group.Patients with peptic ulcer have an elevated risk of IHD. However, complicated peptic ulcer patients who received acid-reducing vagotomy were associated with reduced risk of developing IHD.

  20. Bleeding Disorders in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Button Past Emails CDC Features Bleeding Disorders in Women Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... a bleeding disorder. What is excessive bleeding in women? Women with excessive bleeding may experience heavy, hard- ...

  1. Successful Control of Massive Bleeding in a Child with Burkitt's Lymphoma via a Biosimilar Recombinant Activated Factor VII (AryoSeven™)

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi Pour, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a 4-year-old girl with Burkitt's lymphoma, who suffered from a massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage 3 days after chemotherapy. In spite of applying the common practice in correction of coagulopathy, thrombocytopenia persisted and bleeding became life-threatening. In the present case report, we report a successful control of bleeding with a single-dose administration of a biosimilar recombinant activated human factor VII (AryoSeven). PMID:27478659

  2. A postmarketing surveillance study of dexrabeprazole in the treatment of acid peptic disorders.

    PubMed

    Jain, S C

    2009-02-01

    Dexrabeprazole [R(+) rabeprazole] is a novel proton-pump inhibitor which has recently become available in India for the treatment of acid peptic diseases. Experimental and clinical studies have shown superiority of dexrabeprazole (at half the recommended rabeprazole dose) over rabeprazole in terms of favourable pharmacokinetics, better efficacy and faster and greater healing activity. Results of present study in a large population of 4931 patients of acid peptic disorders, reconfirmed safety and efficacy of dexrabeprazole 10 mg once daily in the treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and also showed its effectiveness in the treatment of patients with peptic ulcers (gastric/duodenal).

  3. Acid peptic disease in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Linder, J D; Wilcox, C M

    2001-06-01

    GERD and peptic ulcer disease are important diseases in the elderly. GERD presents similarly in the elderly and the young, although elderly patients may have less severe symptoms yet more severe mucosal disease and a higher prevalence of BE. Although the prevalence of H. pylori is falling, the elderly remain at risk for peptic ulcer because of the widespread use of NSAIDS. The presentation of peptic ulcer disease in the elderly can be subtle and atypical when compared with younger patients, leading to a delay in diagnosis. Because of comorbidity in the aged, peptic ulcer disease and its complications result in increased morbidity and mortality rates.

  4. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems for therapeutic management of peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Garg, Tarun; Kumar, Animesh; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    A peptic ulcer, stomach ulcer, or gastric ulcer, also known as peptic ulcer disease (PUD), is a very common chronic disorder of the stomach which is mainly caused by damage or impairment of the stomach lining. Various factors such as pepsin, gastric acid, H. pylori, NSAIDs, prostaglandins, mucus, bicarbonate, and blood flow to mucosa play an important role in causing peptic ulcers. In this review article, our main focus is on some important gastroretentive drug delivery systems (GRDDS) (floating, bioadhesive, high density, swellable, raft forming, superporous hydrogel, and magnetic systems) which will be helpful in gastroretention of different dosage forms for treatment of peptic ulcer. GRDDS provides a mean for controlled release of compounds that are absorbed by active transport in the upper intestine. It also enables controlled delivery for paracellularly absorbed drugs without a decrease in bioavailability. The above approaches are specific for targeting and leading to a marked improvement in the quality of life for a large number of patients. In the future, it is expected that they will become of growing significance, finally leading to improved efficiencies of various types of pharmacotherapies.

  5. Idiopathic omental bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Henry, D; Satgunam, S

    2012-01-01

    Omental bleeding without any evidence of trauma, aneurysms, or other pathology has been rarely described in the literature. We report a case of a 24 year-old female on aspirin/acetaminophen/caffeine for migraines who presented with abdominal pain and tachycardia. Computed tomography angiography revealed active extravasation in the right lower quadrant. During exploratory laparotomy, a small bleeding artery within the greater omentum was suture ligated, and two liters of fresh and clotted blood were evacuated. The patient recovered successfully. We review the diagnosis and management of this rare condition. PMID:24960788

  6. Role of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Roja

    2015-06-07

    Peptic ulcer disease is a multifactorial and complex disease involving gastric and duodenal ulcers. Despite medical advances, the management of peptic ulcer and its complications remains a challenge, with high morbidity and death rates for the disease. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that, among a broad reach of natural molecules, dietary polyphenols with multiple biological mechanisms of action play a pivotal part in the management of gastric and duodenal ulcers. The current review confirmed that dietary polyphenols possess protective and therapeutic potential in peptic ulcer mediated by: improving cytoprotection, re-epithelialization, neovascularization, and angiogenesis; up-regulating tissue growth factors and prostaglandins; down-regulating anti-angiogenic factors; enhancing endothelial nitric oxide synthase-derived NO; suppressing oxidative mucosal damage; amplifying antioxidant performance, antacid, and anti-secretory activity; increasing endogenous mucosal defensive agents; and blocking Helicobacter pylori colonization associated gastric morphological changes and gastroduodenal inflammation and ulceration. In addition, anti-inflammatory activity due to down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and cellular and intercellular adhesion agents, suppressing leukocyte-endothelium interaction, inhibiting nuclear signaling pathways of inflammatory process, and modulating intracellular transduction and transcription pathways have key roles in the anti-ulcer action of dietary polyphenols. In conclusion, administration of a significant amount of dietary polyphenols in the human diet or as part of dietary supplementation along with conventional treatment can result in perfect security and treatment of peptic ulcer. Further well-designed preclinical and clinical tests are recommended in order to recognize higher levels of evidence for the confirmation of bioefficacy and safety of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer.

  7. Role of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Roja

    2015-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a multifactorial and complex disease involving gastric and duodenal ulcers. Despite medical advances, the management of peptic ulcer and its complications remains a challenge, with high morbidity and death rates for the disease. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that, among a broad reach of natural molecules, dietary polyphenols with multiple biological mechanisms of action play a pivotal part in the management of gastric and duodenal ulcers. The current review confirmed that dietary polyphenols possess protective and therapeutic potential in peptic ulcer mediated by: improving cytoprotection, re-epithelialization, neovascularization, and angiogenesis; up-regulating tissue growth factors and prostaglandins; down-regulating anti-angiogenic factors; enhancing endothelial nitric oxide synthase-derived NO; suppressing oxidative mucosal damage; amplifying antioxidant performance, antacid, and anti-secretory activity; increasing endogenous mucosal defensive agents; and blocking Helicobacter pylori colonization associated gastric morphological changes and gastroduodenal inflammation and ulceration. In addition, anti-inflammatory activity due to down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and cellular and intercellular adhesion agents, suppressing leukocyte-endothelium interaction, inhibiting nuclear signaling pathways of inflammatory process, and modulating intracellular transduction and transcription pathways have key roles in the anti-ulcer action of dietary polyphenols. In conclusion, administration of a significant amount of dietary polyphenols in the human diet or as part of dietary supplementation along with conventional treatment can result in perfect security and treatment of peptic ulcer. Further well-designed preclinical and clinical tests are recommended in order to recognize higher levels of evidence for the confirmation of bioefficacy and safety of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer. PMID:26074689

  8. Endovascular Treatment of Active Splenic Bleeding After Colonoscopy: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Corcillo, Antonella; Aellen, Steve Zingg, Tobias; Bize, Pierre; Demartines, Nicolas; Denys, Alban

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Colonoscopy is reported to be a safe procedure that is routinely performed for the diagnosis and treatment of colorectal diseases. Splenic rupture is considered to be a rare complication with high mortality and morbidity that requires immediate diagnosis and management. Nonoperative management (NOM), surgical treatment (ST), and, more recently, proximal splenic artery embolization (PSAE) have been proposed as treatment options. The goal of this study was to assess whether PSAE is safe even in high-grade ruptures. Methods: We report two rare cases of post colonoscopy splenic rupture. A systematic review of the literature from 2002 to 2010 (first reported case of PSAE) was performed and the three types of treatment compared. Results: All patients reviewed (77 of 77) presented with intraperitoneal hemorrhage due to isolated splenic trauma. Splenic rupture was high-grade in most patients when grading was possible. Six of 77 patients (7.8 %) were treated with PSAE, including the 2 cases reported herein. Fifty-seven patients (74 %) underwent ST. NOM was attempted first in 25 patients with a high failure rate (11 of 25 [44 %]) and requiring a salvage procedure, such as PSAE or ST. Previous surgery (31 of 59 patients), adhesions (10 of 13), diagnostic colonoscopies (49 of 71), previous biopsies or polypectomies (31 of 57) and female sex (56 of 77) were identified as risk factors. In contrast, splenomegaly (0 of 77 patients), medications that increase the risk of bleeding (13 of 30) and difficult colonoscopies (16 of 51) were not identified as risk factors. PSAE was safe and effective even in elderly patients with comorbidities and those taking medications that increase the risk of bleeding, and the length of the hospital stay was similar to that after ST. Conclusion: We propose a treatment algorithm based on clinical and radiological criteria. Because of the high failure rate after NOM, PSAE should be the treatment of choice to manage grade I through IV splenic

  9. Evaluation of Aryoseven Safety (Recombinant Activated Factor VII) in Patients with Bleeding Disorders (An Observational Post-Marketing Surveillance Study)

    PubMed Central

    Toogeh, Gholamreza; Abolghasemi, Hassan; Eshghi, Peyman; Managhchi, Mohammadreza; Shaverdi-niasari, Mohammadreza; Karimi, Katayoon; Roostaei, Samin; Emran, Neda; Abdollahi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recombinant activated factor VII induces hemostasis in patients with coagulopathy disorders. AryoSeven™ as a safe Iranian Recombinant activated factor VII has been available on our market. This study was performed to establish the safety of AryoSeven on patients with coagulopathy disorder. Methods: This single-center, descriptive, cross sectional study was carried out in Thrombus and Homeostasis Research Center ValiAsr Hospital during 2013-2014. Fifty one patients with bleeding disorders who received at least one dose of Aryoseven were enrolled. Patients’ demographic data and adverse effect of drug and reaction related to Aryoseven or previous usage of Recombinant activated FVII were recorded in questionnaires. Finally data were analyzed to compare side effects of Aryoseven and other Recombinant activated FVII brands. Results: Aryoseven was prescribed for 51 Patients. Of all participants with mean age 57.18+21.38 yr, 31 cases were male and 26 subjects had past history of recombinant activated FVII usage. Glanzman was the most frequent disorder followed by congenital FVII deficiency, hemophilia with inhibitors, factor 5 deficiency, acquired hemophilia, hemophilia A with inhibitor, and hemophilia A or B with inhibitor. The majority of bleeding episodes had occurred in joints. Three patients (5.9%) complained about adverse effects of Aryoseven vs. 11.5 % about adverse effects of other brands. However this difference was not significant, statistically. Conclusion: Based on monitor patients closely for any adverse events, we concluded that Aryoseven administration under careful weighing of benefit versus potential harm may comparable with other counterpart drugs. PMID:27799968

  10. Computed tomographic findings in penetrating peptic ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Madrazo, B.L.; Halpert, R.D.; Sandler, M.A.; Pearlberg, J.L.

    1984-12-01

    Four cases of peptic ulcer penetrating the head of the pancreas were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT). Findings common to 3 cases included (a) an ulcer crater, (b) a sinus tract, and (c) enlargement of the head of the pancreas. Unlike other modalities, the inherent spatial resolution of CT allows a convenient diagnosis of this important complication of peptic ulcer disease.

  11. [Peptic ulcer disease etiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Bak-Romaniszyn, Leokadia; Wojtuń, Stanisław; Gil, Jerzy; Płaneta-Małecka, Izabela

    2004-01-01

    Authors in this article present etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic procedures and treatment of peptic ulcer disease in children and adults. Increased gastric acid output, Helicobacter pylori, NSAIDs and stress are the basic risk factors in peptic ulcer disease. H. pylori infection is a widely known risk factor in peptic ulcer disease and influences diagnostic and treatment procedures. Primary ulcer disease concerns mainly duodenum and is accompanied by H. pylori infection. Gastroscopy and Helicobacter tests are the only reliable procedures to diagnose peptic ulcer disease. Nowadays the most important aim in peptic ulcer treatment is the H. pylori eradication. Therapy with two antibiotics and a protein pomp inhibitor eradicates the bacteria, treats the ulceration and lowers the number of ulcer recurrence. In non-infected H. pylori ulcers or in a long-term treatment protein pomp inhibitors and H2-inhibitors are effective as well in gastroprotective therapy.

  12. Triple gastric peptic ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Radojkovic, Milan; Mihajlovic, Suncica; Stojanovic, Miroslav; Stanojevic, Goran; Damnjanovic, Zoran

    2016-03-01

    Patients with advanced or metastatic cancer have compromised nutritional, metabolic, and immune conditions. Nevertheless, little is known about gastroduodenal perforation in cancer patients. Described in the present report is the case of a 41-year old woman with stage IV recurrent laryngeal cancer, who used homeopathic anticancer therapy and who had triple peptic ulcer perforation (PUP) that required surgical repair. Triple gastric PUP is a rare complication. Self-administration of homeopathic anticancer medication should be strongly discouraged when evidence-based data regarding efficacy and toxicity is lacking.

  13. Perforated peptic ulcer - an update

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kin Tong; Shelat, Vishalkumar G

    2017-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) affects 4 million people worldwide annually. The incidence of PUD has been estimated at around 1.5% to 3%. Perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) is a serious complication of PUD and patients with PPU often present with acute abdomen that carries high risk for morbidity and mortality. The lifetime prevalence of perforation in patients with PUD is about 5%. PPU carries a mortality ranging from 1.3% to 20%. Thirty-day mortality rate reaching 20% and 90-d mortality rate of up to 30% have been reported. In this review we have summarized the current evidence on PPU to update readers. This literature review includes the most updated information such as common causes, clinical features, diagnostic methods, non-operative and operative management, post-operative complications and different scoring systems of PPU. With the advancement of medical technology, PUD can now be treated with medications instead of elective surgery. The classic triad of sudden onset of abdominal pain, tachycardia and abdominal rigidity is the hallmark of PPU. Erect chest radiograph may miss 15% of cases with air under the diaphragm in patients with bowel perforation. Early diagnosis, prompt resuscitation and urgent surgical intervention are essential to improve outcomes. Exploratory laparotomy and omental patch repair remains the gold standard. Laparoscopic surgery should be considered when expertise is available. Gastrectomy is recommended in patients with large or malignant ulcer. PMID:28138363

  14. Bleeding esophageal varices

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicine may be injected into the varices. A rubber band may be placed around the bleeding veins ( ... nadolol that reduce the risk of bleeding. A rubber band can be placed around the bleeding veins ...

  15. Tri-potassium di-citrato bismuthate: a report of its pharmacological properties and therapeutic efficacy in peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Brogden, R N; Pinder, R M; Sawyer, P R; Speight, T M; Avery, G S

    1976-12-01

    Tri-potassium di-citrato bismuthate is a complex bismuth salt stable in colloidal form advocated for the treatment of peptic ulcer. Preliminary placebo-controlled trials in small numbers of ambulant patients with endoscopically proven peptic ulcer, strongly suggest that the compound accelerates the rate of healing of gastric and duodenal ulcer within 4 weeks of treatment. However, trials involving larger numbers of patients followed-up for longer periods are required before a clear verdict on the efficacy of tripotassium di-citrato bismuthate in gastric and duodenal ulcer can be given. There are no reliable data on the effect of the drug on ulcer recurrence rate. Side-effects are negligible and the drug could become an important therapeutic agent in peptic ulcer therapy if results of further study are conclusive. The drug causes dark discolouration of the stools and this should be borne in mind when considering the possibility of the presence of intestinal bleeding.

  16. An endoscopic laser Doppler flowmetry of a gastroduodenal mucosa at bleeding ulcer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapkin, U. G.; Kapralov, C. V.; Gogolev, A. A.; Lychagov, V. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2006-08-01

    One of the important problems of a bleeding gastroduodenal ulcer surgery is a prognosis of the recurrent hemorrhage and appraisal of endoscopic hemostasis quality. Endoscopic Laser Doppler Flowmetry of a mucous coat of stomach and a duodenum was made on 34 patients for the purpose of investigation of features of microcirculation. Analogous researches are made on 30 patients with a peptic ulcer and on 28 practically healthy people. Analysis of LDF-grams has shown certain differences in regional microcirculations in stomach and duodenal at normal and at a pathology. Increase of regional perfusion in periulcerose zone with its pathology disbalance can serve as a criterion for activities of an alteration processes in gastroduodenal ulcer defining the risk of possible hemorrhage.

  17. Vaginal bleeding between periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... periods; Intermenstrual bleeding; Spotting; Metrorrhagia Images Female reproductive anatomy Bleeding between periods Uterus References Bulun SE. The physiology and pathology of the female reproductive axis. In: ...

  18. Current Medical Management of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lukie, Bryan E.

    1989-01-01

    Peptic ulceration occurs when the digestive action of gastric secretions overcomes gastroduodenal mucosal defences. The therapeutic strategy used to correct this imbalance uses drugs that either reduce gastric secretion or increase mucosal resistance. Traditional therapies of dietary manipulation and antacid administration no longer play major roles in peptic ulcer therapy. Uncomplicated peptic ulcers respond quite well to drug treatment, although recurrences are common and may require long-term maintenance therapy. Drug-induced gastric ulcers have represented a challenging problem, for which effective therapy is now available. PMID:21249091

  19. The limitations of current therapy in peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Salena, B J; Hunt, R H

    1987-05-01

    The current therapeutic approach to peptic ulcer disease includes agents that reduce gastric acidity and hence peptic activity, inactivate or adsorb pepsin, create a physical barrier against the effects of acid and pepsin, or enhance mucosal defence. Profound gastric acid reduction may predispose to infection, and it has been suggested that carcinogenesis is possible, although a cause-effect relationship has never been established. The side-effects of therapy are well-described, and may limit the therapeutic approach. Healing rates correlate closely with acid suppression in duodenal ulcer, but not entirely in gastric ulcer. Maintenance therapy lowers the relapse rate, but does not alter the ulcer diathesis. The optimal strategy for long-term management remains unclear, but in the future one should consider outcome measures which include a decrease in pain, improvement in the quality of life, reduction work loss, and a reduction of complications, in addition to ulcer healing. The ideal therapy should be efficacious, safe, and convenient--with no side-effects--and cost-effective. New agents should suppress acid and peptic activity, while enhancing the gastric mucosal defence mechanisms (such as mucosal blood flow, mucus, and bicarbonate secretion) and stimulating gastric cellular regeneration and restitution.

  20. Association of vagus nerve severance and decreased risk of subsequent type 2 diabetes in peptic ulcer patients: An Asian population cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shih-Chi; Chen, William Tzu-Liang; Fang, Chu-Wen; Muo, Chih-Hsin; Sung, Fung-Chang; Hsu, Chung Y

    2016-12-01

    Vagus nerve may play a role in serum glucose modulation. The complicated peptic ulcer patients (with perforation or/and bleeding) who received surgical procedures with or without vagotomy provided 2 patient populations for studying the impact of vagus nerve integrity. We assessed the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in peptic ulcer patients without and with complications by surgical treatment received in a retrospective population study using the National Health Insurance database in Taiwan.A cohort of 163,385 patients with peptic ulcer and without Helicobacter pylori infection in 2000 to 2003 was established. A randomly selected cohort of 163,385 persons without peptic ulcer matched by age, sex, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, Charlson comorbidity index score, and index year was utilized for comparison. The risks of developing diabetes in both cohorts and in the complicated peptic ulcer patients who received truncal vagotomy or simple suture/hemostasis (SSH) were assessed at the end of 2011.The overall diabetes incidence was higher in patients with peptic ulcer than those without peptic ulcer (15.87 vs 12.60 per 1000 person-years) by an adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of 1.43 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.40-1.47) based on the multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis (competing risk). Comparing ulcer patients with truncal vagotomy and SSH or those without surgical treatment, the aHR was the lowest in the vagotomy group (0.48, 95% CI = 0.41-0.56).Peptic ulcer patients have an elevated risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Moreover, there were associations of vagus nerve severance and decreased risk of subsequent type 2 diabetes in complicated peptic ulcer patients.

  1. Active Clearance of Chest Tubes Reduces Re-Exploration for Bleeding After Ventricular Assist Device Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mary E.; Haglund, Nicholas A.; Perrault, Louis; Kushwaha, Sudhir S.; Stulak, John M.; Boyle, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Chest tubes are utilized to evacuate shed blood after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation, however, they can become clogged, leading to retained blood. We implemented a protocol for active tube clearance (ATC) of chest tubes to determine if this might reduce interventions for retained blood. A total of 252 patients underwent LVAD implantation. Seventy-seven patients had conventional chest tube drainage (group 1), whereas 175 patients had ATC (group 2). A univariate and multivariate analysis adjusting for the use of conventional sternotomy (CS) and minimally invasive left thoracotomy (MILT) was performed. Univariate analysis revealed a 65% reduction in re-exploration (43–15%, p < 0.001), and an 82% reduction in delayed sternal closure (DSC; 34–6%, p <0.001). In a sub-analysis of CS only, there continued to be statistically significant 53% reduction in re-exploration (45% vs. 21%, p = 0.0011), and a 77% reduction in DSC (35% vs. 8%, p < 0.001) in group 2. Using a logistic regression model adjusting for CS versus MILT, there was a significant reduction in re-exploration (odds ratio [OR] = 0.44 [confidence interval {CI} = 0.23–0.85], p = 0.014) and DSC (OR = 0.20 [CI = 0.08–0.46], p <0.001) in group 2. Actively maintaining chest tube patency after LVAD implantation significantly reduces re-exploration and DSC. PMID:27556153

  2. Effect of High-Dose-Rate {sup 192}Ir Source Activity on Late Rectal Bleeding After Intracavitary Radiation Therapy for Uterine Cervix Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Osamu Yoshioka, Yasuo; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Morimoto, Masahiro; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Kawaguchi, Yoshifumi; Konishi, Koji; Nakamura, Satoaki; Shiomi, Hiroya; Inoue, Takehiro

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: This retrospective study analyzed the effect of the activity of high-dose-rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir source on late rectal bleeding after HDR intracavitary radiotherapy (ICRT) in patients with uterine cervix cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred thirty-two patients who underwent HDR-ICRT and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) were analyzed. The rectal point dose in ICRT was calculated by inserting a lead wire into the rectal lumen and summed with the whole-pelvic EBRT dose. The rectal biologic effective dose (BED) was calculated. The relationship between averaged source activity or the BED and late rectal bleeding were analyzed. Results: Three-year actuarial rectal bleeding probabilities were 46% ({>=}100 Gy{sub 3}) and 18% ({<=} 100 Gy{sub 3}), respectively (p < 0.005). When patients were divided into four groups according to rectal BED ({>=} or {<=}100 Gy{sub 3}) and source activity ({>=} or {<=}2.4 cGy.m{sup 2}.h{sup -1}), the group with both a high BED and high activity showed significantly greater probability (58% at 3 years; p < 0.005). It was noted that the probability of the group with BED of 100 Gy{sub 3} or greater was high, but that was not the case with 2.4 cGy.m{sup 2}.h{sup -1} or less. Conclusion: This is the first clinical report concerning the source activity effect of HDR {sup 192}Ir on late rectal bleeding in patients undergoing HDR-ICRT. This suggests that when source activity is higher than 2.4 cGy.m{sup 2}.h{sup -1}, ICRT should be performed with more caution not to exceed 100 Gy{sub 3} in total.

  3. The hemostatic profile of recombinant activated factor VII. Can low concentrations stop bleeding in off-label indications?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background High concentrations of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) can stop bleeding in hemophilic patients. However the rFVIIa dose needed for stopping haemhorrage in off-label indications is unknown. Since thrombin is the main hemostatic agent, this study investigated the effect of rFVIIa and tissue factor (TF) on thrombin generation (TG) in vitro. Methods Lag time (LT), time to peak (TTP), peak TG (PTG), and area under the curve after 35 min (AUCo-35 min) with the calibrated automated thrombography was used to evaluate TG. TG was assayed in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) samples from 29 healthy volunteers under basal conditions and after platelet stimulation with 5.0 μg/ml, 2.6 μg/ml, 0.5 μg/ml, 0.25 μg/ml, and 0.125 μg/ml rFVIIa alone and in normal platelet-poor plasma (PPP) samples from 22 healthy volunteers, rFVIIa in combination with various concentrations of TF (5.0, 2.5, 1.25 and 0.5 pM). Results In PRP activated by rFVIIa, there was a statistically significant increase in TG compared to basal values. A significant TF dose-dependent shortening of LT and increased PTG and AUCo→35 min were obtained in PPP. The addition of rFVIIa increased the effect of TF in shorting the LT and increasing the AUCo→35 min with no effect on PTG but were independent of rFVIIa concentration. Conclusion Low concentrations of rFVIIa were sufficient to form enough thrombin in normal PRP or in PPP when combined with TF, and suggest low concentrations for normalizing hemostasis in off-label indications. PMID:20444280

  4. The Effect of Intravenous Administration of Active Recombinant Factor VII on Postoperative Bleeding in Cardiac Valve Reoperations; A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Payani, Narges; Foroughi, Mahnoosh; Dabbagh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative bleeding after cardiac reoperations is among the most complicating problems, both for the physicians and for the patients. Many modalities have been used to decrease its adverse effects and the need for blood products administration. Objectives: In a randomized double-blinded clinical trial of redo cardiac valve surgery in adult, the effect of active recombinant factor VII (rFVIIa) on postoperative bleeding was compared with placebo. Chest tube drainage was used for comparison of bleeding between the two groups. Patients and Methods: Two groups of 18 patients undergoing redo valve surgeries were treated and compared regarding chest tube drainage, need for blood products, prothrombin time (PT), partial thromboplastin time (PTT), hemoglobin and hematocrit, platelet count, and international normalized ratio (INR) in first 24 hours after surgery. Bleeding was assessed at 3rd, 12th, and 24th hour after operation. In rFVIIa group, 40 µg/kg of AryoSeven was administered before end of surgery and same volume of normal saline was administered as placebo in the control group. Results: Study groups showed no difference regarding baseline variables. Three patients in rFVIIa group (16.67%) and 13 in placebo group (72.23%) received blood products (P < 0.01). Chest tube blood drainage at 24th hour after operation was 315 ± 177 mL in rFVIIa group and 557 ± 168 mL in control group (P = 0.03). At third and 12th hour after operation, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.71 and P = 0.22, respectively). Postoperative ICU stay was not different; while extubation was longer in the placebo group (352 ± 57 vs. 287 ± 46 minutes; P = 0.003). Conclusions: Our study demonstrated the efficacy of rFVIIa in controlling postoperative bleeding in redo cardiac valve surgeries regarding subsequent blood loss and transfusion requirement; however, outcome results remains to be defined. PMID:25789239

  5. Bruising and Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, pregnancy, systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus), or kidney failure Prior excessive or unusual bleeding or transfusions Family history of excessive bleeding People are asked about use ...

  6. Vaginal bleeding - hormonal

    MedlinePlus

    ... abnormal uterine bleeding is caused by a hormone imbalance. DUB is more common in teenagers or in women who are approaching menopause. DUB is unpredictable. The bleeding may be very heavy or light and can occur often or randomly.

  7. Perforated peptic ulcer in an adolescent girl.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Shepard; Edden, Yair; Orkin, Boris; Erlichman, Matityahu

    2012-07-01

    A perforated peptic ulcer in a child is a rare entity. Severe abdominal pain in an ill-appearing child with a rigid abdomen and possibly with signs of shock is the typical presenting feature of this life-threatening complication of peptic ulcer disease. We present a case of a 14.5-year-old adolescent girl who developed abdominal and shoulder pain that resolved after 1 day. She was then completely well for 2 days until the abdominal and shoulder pain recurred. On examination, she appeared well, but in pain. A chest radiograph revealed a large pneumoperitoneum. She underwent emergent laparoscopic omental patch repair of a perforated ulcer on the anterior wall of her stomach. Result of a urea breath test to detect Helicobacter pylori was negative. The differential diagnosis of pneumoperitoneum in children is discussed, as are childhood perforated peptic ulcer in general, and the unique clinical features present in this case in particular.

  8. Bleeding during cancer treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... throwing up blood or your vomit looks like coffee grounds Long or heavy periods (women) Headaches that do not go away or are very bad Blurry or double vision Abdominal pains Alternative Names Cancer treatment - bleeding; Chemotherapy - bleeding; Radiation - bleeding; Bone marrow ...

  9. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... treat abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  10. [Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug and Aspirin-induced Peptic Ulcer Disease].

    PubMed

    Shim, Young Kwang; Kim, Nayoung

    2016-06-25

    Despite decreasing Helicobacter pylori prevalence, the prevalence of peptic ulcer disease is increasing in the aged population, mainly due to increasing use of NSAIDs to manage pain and inflammation. In addition, low dose aspirin is employed as an anti-coagulant for those who have suffered or are at high risk of ischemic stroke and cardiovascular disease. However, NSAIDs and aspirin are injurious to mucosa of stomach and duodenum. NSAID-induced inhibition of mucosal prostaglandin synthesis is thought to be a major mechanism of gastrointestinal mucosal injury. The proportion of elderly has increased rapidly in Korea, with the proportion over 65 years old expected to be 24.3% in 2030. In this higher-risk population, the strategy to reduce the incidence of NSAID-related peptic ulcers and complications such as bleeding, obstruction and perforation is very important. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor can be used for reducing the risk of NSAID-related ulcers and upper gastrointestinal (GI) complications. However, continuous use of PPI has several problems. In addition, NSAID-related problems in the lower GI tract have increased, in contrast to the decrease of NSAID-related upper GI disease. The aim of this review is to provide an evidence-based knowledge regarding the mechanism, complications of treatment, and prevention strategies for NSAID- or aspirin-related peptic ulcer disease in Korea.

  11. Approach to a child with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Sunit; Jain, Puneet; Jayashree, M; Lal, Sadhna

    2013-04-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a potentially life threatening medical emergency requiring an appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Therefore, the primary focus in a child with UGIB is resuscitation and stabilization followed by a diagnostic evaluation. The differential diagnosis of UGIB in children is determined by age and severity of bleed. In infants and toddlers mucosal bleed (gastritis and stress ulcers) is a common cause. In children above 2 y variceal bleeding due to Extra-Hepatic Portal Venous Obstruction (EHPVO) is the commonest cause of significant UGIB in developing countries as against peptic ulcer in the developed countries. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the most accurate and useful diagnostic tool to evaluate UGIB in children. Parenteral vitamin K (infants, 1-2 mg/dose; children, 5-10 mg) and parenteral Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPI's), should be administered empirically in case of a major UGIB. Octreotide infusion is useful in control of significant UGIB due to variceal hemorrhage. A temporarily placed, Sengstaken-Blakemore tube can be life saving if pharmacologic/ endoscopic methods fail to control variceal bleeding. Therapy in patients having mucosal bleed is directed at neutralization and/or prevention of gastric acid release; High dose Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs, Pantoprazole) are more efficacious than H2 receptor antagonists for this purpose.

  12. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Biecker, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions, erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application (oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased. PMID:26558151

  13. [Peptic ulcer disease. Clinical evaluation in 2006].

    PubMed

    Malfertheiner, P; Bellutti, M

    2006-06-01

    Treatment of peptic ulcer disease has undergone a radical change due to the discovery of its main cause, the Helicobacter pylori infection. The management of the chronic infection is now the primary aim. Treatment of peptic ulcer essentially consists of eradicating H. pylori. A current problem is the resistance developed by H. pylori to the antibiotics used in eradication regimen. Ulcers that are induced by nonsteroidal antirheumatic (NSAR) agents and acetylsalicylic acid are gaining in importance. Optimized inhibition of acid secretion with proton pump inhibitors has made it possible to both prevent and cure ulcers in the stomach and duodenum caused by NSAR agents.

  14. Peptic Ulcer Disease in Bangladesh: A Multi-centre Study.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, C K; Khan, M R; Alam, F; Shil, B C; Kabir, M S; Mahmuduzzaman, M; Das, S C; Masud, H; Roy, P K

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of peptic ulcer has steadily declined through out the world. This decreasing trend is also noticeable in this subcontinent. The point prevalence of peptic ulcer (PUD) in Bangladesh was around 15% in eighties. The aim of this study was to see the present prevalence of peptic ulcer at endoscopy and to identify changing trends in the occurrence of peptic ulcer in Bangladesh. This retrospective analysis of the endoscopic records of multiple tertiary referral centres of Dhaka city were done from January 2012 to July 2013. A total of 5608 subjects were the study samples. We included those patients having peptic ulcer in the form of duodenal ulcer, benign gastric ulcer including pre-pyloric ulcer and gastric outlet obstruction due to peptic ulcer. Duodenal ulcer and benign gastric ulcer were found in 415(7.4%) and 184(3.28%) patients respectively and gastric outlet obstruction due to peptic ulcer was found in 23(0.40%) patients.

  15. Cost-utility analysis of an adjunctive recombinant activated factor VIIa for on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes in dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Naing, Cho; Poovorawan, Yong; Mak, Joon Wah; Aung, Kyan; Kamolratankul, Pirom

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to assess the cost-utility analysis of using an adjunctive recombinant activated factor VIIa (rFVIIa) in children for controlling life-threatening bleeding in dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF)/dengue shock syndrome (DSS). We constructed a decision-tree model, comparing a standard care and the use of an additional adjuvant rFVIIa for controlling life-threatening bleeding in children with DHF/DSS. Cost and utility benefit were estimated from the societal perspective. The outcome measure was cost per quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Overall, treatment with adjuvant rFVIIa gained QALYs, but the total cost was higher. The incremental cost-utility ratio for the introduction of adjuvant rFVIIa was $4241.27 per additional QALY. Sensitivity analyses showed the utility value assigned for calculation of QALY was the most sensitive parameter. We concluded that despite high cost, there is a role for rFVIIa in the treatment of life-threatening bleeding in patients with DHF/DSS.

  16. Octreotide in variceal bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, A K

    1994-01-01

    Bleeding from oesophageal varices has a high death rate. Injection sclerotherapy is the most appropriate treatment but facilities for this are not always available. Balloon tamponade and vasoactive therapy may be used as stop gap measures. Somatostatin and octreotide are therapeutic candidates for the treatment of variceal bleeding and there are several trials that have compared somatostatin and octreotide with other treatments for this condition. The results of these trials are summarised and discussed. A meta analysis of the group of trials of placebo or H2 antagonists v somatostatin or octreotide showed a significant advantage of somatostatin or octreotide in terms of efficacy, but no difference in mortality. The trials discussed seem to show that somatostatin and octreotide are at least as effective as other treatments, with the benefit of fewer adverse effects, and thus represent the best vasoactive agents. Additionally, they may have a role as adjuvant treatment to emergency sclerotherapy for active bleeders and this must be further investigated. PMID:8206396

  17. Acid peptic diseases: pharmacological approach to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Alex; Kraft, Walter K

    2011-01-01

    Acid peptic disorders are the result of distinctive, but overlapping pathogenic mechanisms leading to either excessive acid secretion or diminished mucosal defense. They are common entities present in daily clinical practice that, owing to their chronicity, represent a significant cost to healthcare. Key elements in the success of controlling these entities have been the development of potent and safe drugs based on physiological targets. The histamine-2 receptor antagonists revolutionized the treatment of acid peptic disorders owing to their safety and efficacy profile. The proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) represent a further therapeutic advance due to more potent inhibition of acid secretion. Ample data from clinical trials and observational experience have confirmed the utility of these agents in the treatment of acid peptic diseases, with differential efficacy and safety characteristics between and within drug classes. Paradigms in their speed and duration of action have underscored the need for new chemical entities that, from a single dose, would provide reliable duration of acid control, particularly at night. Moreover, PPIs reduce, but do not eliminate, the risk of ulcers in patients taking NSAIDs, reflecting untargeted physiopathologic pathways and a breach in the ability to sustain an intragastric pH of more than 4. This review provides an assessment of the current understanding of the physiology of acid production, a discussion of medications targeting gastric acid production and a review of efficacy in specific acid peptic diseases, as well as current challenges and future directions in the treatment of acid-mediated diseases. PMID:21822447

  18. The STOP the Bleeding Campaign

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, traumatic injuries worldwide are responsible for over 5 million deaths annually. Post-traumatic bleeding caused by traumatic injury-associated coagulopathy is the leading cause of potentially preventable death among trauma patients. Despite these facts, awareness of this problem is insufficient and treatment options are often unclear. The STOP the Bleeding Campaign therefore aims to increase awareness of the phenomenon of post-traumatic coagulopathy and its appropriate management by publishing European guidelines for the management of the bleeding trauma patient, by promoting and monitoring the implementation of these guidelines and by preparing promotional and educational material, organising activities and developing health quality management tools. The campaign aims to reduce the number of patients who die within 24 hours after arrival in the hospital due to exsanguination by a minimum of 20% within the next 5 years. PMID:23635083

  19. The association of Helicobacter pylori infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in peptic ulcer disease

    PubMed Central

    Zapata-Colindres, Juan Carlos; Zepeda-Gómez, Sergio; Montaño-Loza, Aldo; Vázquez-Ballesteros, Edgar; de Jesús Villalobos, José; Valdovinos-Andraca, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) affects 10% of the world population. Helicobacter pylori infection and the use of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) are the principal factors associated with PUD. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a cohort of patients with PUD and determine the association between H pylori infection and NSAID use. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The medical charts of patients with endoscopic diagnosis of PUD were retrospectively reviewed from September 2002 to August 2003. Patients were divided into three groups according to ulcer etiology: H pylori infection (group 1); NSAID use (group 2); and combined H pylori infection and NSAID use (group 3). RESULTS: One hundred two patients were evaluated: 36 men (35.3%) and 66 women (64.7%). Forty patients had H pylori infection, 43 had used NSAIDs and 15 had combined H pylori infection and NSAID use; four patients with ulcers secondary to malignancy were excluded. The frequency of women was significantly higher in group 2 (P=0.01). The mean age of patients in group 1 was significantly lower than in the other two groups (P=0.003). PUD developed earlier in group 3 than in group 2 (5.0±4.7 months versus 1.4±2.1 months, respectively, P=0.018). Thirty-two patients (32.7%) had bleeding peptic ulcer. Group 2 had a higher risk of bleeding peptic ulcer than the other two groups (P=0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The development of PUD was observed earlier in the combined H pylori and NSAID group than in patients with only NSAID use. This suggests a synergic effect between the two risks factors in the development of PUD. PMID:16609757

  20. Bleeding and cupping.

    PubMed Central

    Turk, J. L.; Allen, E.

    1983-01-01

    Bleeding and cupping have been used in medicine since ancient times in the treatment of fevers and local inflammatory disorders. Local bleeding, by 'wet cupping', was effected by a scarificator or by leeches. John Hunter recommended venesection in moderation but preferred leeches for local bleeding. Bleeding as an accepted therapeutic practice went out of vogue in the middle of the nineteenth century as a result of the introduction of modern scientific methods. Dry cupping and the use of leeches, as counter irritants, persisted until the middle of this century. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6338802

  1. [The pewter bleeding bowls].

    PubMed

    Renner, Claude

    2004-01-01

    In the late seventeenth century, then along the eighteen and nineteenth centuries the amount of the bloodlettings was measured by means of three pewter bleeding bowls that held three ounces of blood, about 300 millilitres. In the middle of the nineteenth century new and large bleeding bowls with metric graduations were manufactured only by the Parisian potters.

  2. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the scope and importance of gastrointestinal bleeding in runners and other athletes, discussing causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related bleeding. Practical tips to mitigate the problem, potentially more troublesome in women because of lower iron stores, are presented (e.g., gradual conditioning and avoidance of prerace…

  3. Gastritis, dyspepsia and peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Dore, M P; Graham, D Y

    2008-06-01

    Peptic ulcer disease remains a common problem and it most frequently due to the presence of an Helicobacter pylori infection or use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Dyspepsia is neither sensitive or specific for diagnosing peptic ulcer disease. The approach to patients with dyspepsia is to arrive at a definitive diagnosis without unnecessary exposure to invasive or costly diagnostic procedures. Non-invasive testing is preferred with endoscopy being reserved for those with alarm markers or above a specified age (e.g., 55 years in Western countries). Patients negative for H. pylori infection should receive an empiric trial of acid suppression for 4 to 8 weeks and if beneficial it can be continued.

  4. Surgical bleeding in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. R.; Billica, R. D.; Johnston, S. L. 3rd

    1993-01-01

    A surgical procedure performed during space flight would occur in a unique microgravity environment. Several experiments performed during weightlessness in parabolic flight were reviewed to ascertain the behavior of surgical bleeding in microgravity. Simulations of bleeding using dyed fluid and citrated bovine blood, as well as actual arterial and venous bleeding in rabbits, were examined. The high surface tension property of blood promotes the formation of large fluid domes, which have a tendency to adhere to the wound. The use of sponges and suction will be adequate to prevent cabin atmosphere contamination with all bleeding, with the exception of temporary arterial droplet streams. The control of the bleeding with standard surgical techniques should not be difficult.

  5. Plasma DPP4 activity is associated with no-reflow and major bleeding events in Chinese PCI-treated STEMI patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing Wei; Chen, Yun Dai; Chen, Wei Ren; Jing, Jing; Liu, Jie; Yang, Yong Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) is an important regulator of incretins and inflammation, and it is involved in the pathophysiological process of myocardial infarction (MI). This study investigated the role of plasma DPP4 activity (DPP4a) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who had undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We recruited 747 consecutive PCI-treated STEMI patients from a tertiary referral center from January 2014 to October 2015. The outcomes of interest were the rates of no-reflow, in-hospital major adverse cardiac or cerebrovascular events (iMACCE), in-hospital complications (IHC) and in-hospital major bleeding. The DPP4a was lower in STEMI patients compared with the controls (p < 0.0001). Multivariate logistic-regression analyses (adjusted for confounding variables) showed that a 1 U/L increase in DPP4a was associated with an increased rate of no-reflow events (odds ratio [OR]: 1.07; 95% CI: 1.02–1.11; p < 0.01) and a decreased rate of major bleeding events (OR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.82–0.98; p = 0.02). There were no associations between DPP4a and either iMACCE or IHC. In conclusions, high levels of DPP4a are independently associated with an increased rate of no-reflow events and a decreased rate of major bleeding events in PCT-treated STEMI patients. PMID:28000723

  6. Emergency endoscopic variceal ligation in cirrhotic patients with blood clots in the stomach but no active bleeding or stigmata increases the risk of rebleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Jin; Choi, Cheol Woong; Kang, Dae Hwan; Kim, Hyung Wook; Park, Su Bum; Hong, Young Mi; Yoon, Ki Tae; Cho, Mong; Nam, Hyung Seok; Islam, SM Bakhtiar UI

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of emergency variceal ligation for the prevention of rebleeding in cirrhotic patients who are found on initial endoscopy to have blood clots in the stomach but no actively bleeding esophageal and gastric varices or stigmata. Methods This study included 28 cirrhotic patients who underwent emergency prophylactic EVL and 41 who underwent an elective intervention between January 2009 and June 2014. Clinical outcomes were analyzed, including the rebleeding, 6-week mortality, and rebleeding-free survival rates. Results The rebleeding rate was higher in the emergency than in the elective group (28.6% vs. 7.3%, P=0.041). Multivariate analysis showed that emergency prophylactic EVL (odds ratio [OR] = 7.4, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.634.8, P=0.012) and Child-Pugh score C (OR=10.6, 95% CI=1.4-80.8, P=0.022) were associated with rebleeding. In the emergency group, the gastric varices were associated with rebleeding (OR=12.0, 95% CI=1.7-83.5, P=0.012). Conclusion Emergency EVL may be associated with variceal rebleeding when blood clots are present in the stomach without active esophageal and gastric variceal bleeding or stigmata. Elective intervention should be considered as a safer strategy for preventing variceal rebleeding in this situation. PMID:28081590

  7. Upper GI Bleeding in Children

    MedlinePlus

    Upper GI Bleeding in Children What is upper GI Bleeding? Irritation and ulcers of the lining of the esophagus, stomach or duodenum can result in upper GI bleeding. When this occurs the child may vomit ...

  8. Canonical correlation analysis of factors involved in the occurrence of peptic ulcers.

    PubMed

    Bayyurt, Nizamettin; Abasiyanik, M Fatih; Sander, Ersan; Salih, Barik A

    2007-01-01

    The impact of risk factors on the development of peptic ulcers has been shown to vary among different populations. We sought to establish a correlation between these factors and their involvement in the occurrence of peptic ulcers for which a canonical correlation analysis was applied. We included 7,014 patient records (48.6% women, 18.4% duodenal ulcer [DU], 4.6% gastric ulcer [GU]) of those underwent upper gastroendoscopy for the last 5 years. The variables measured are endoscopic findings (DU, GU, antral gastritis, erosive gastritis, pangastritis, pyloric deformity, bulbar deformity, bleeding, atrophy, Barret esophagus and gastric polyp) and risk factors (age, gender, Helicobacter pylori infection, smoking, alcohol, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs] and aspirin intake). We found that DU had significant positive correlation with bulbar deformity (P=2.6 x 10(-23)), pyloric deformity (P=2.6 x 10(-23)), gender (P=2.6 x 10(-23)), H. pylori (P=1.4 x 10(-15)), bleeding (P=6.9 x 10(-15)), smoking (P=1.4 x 10(-7)), aspirin use (P=1.1 x 10(-4)), alcohol intake (P=7.7 x 10(-4)), and NSAIDs (P=.01). GU had a significantly positive correlation with pyloric deformity (P=1,6 x 10(-15)), age (P=2.6 x 10(-14)), bleeding (P=3.7 x 10(-8)), gender (P=1.3 x 10(-7)), aspirin use (P=1.1 x 10(-6)), bulbar deformity (P=7.4 x 10(-4)), alcohol intake (P=.03), smoking (P=.04), and Barret esophagus (P=.03). The level of significance was much higher in some variables with DU than with GU and the correlations with GU in spite of being highly significant the majority, were small in magnitude. In conclusion, Turkish patients with the following endoscopic findings bulbar deformity and pyloric deformity are high-risk patients for peptic ulcers with the risk of the occurrence of DU being higher than that of GU. Factors such as H. pylori, smoking, alcohol use, and NSAIDs use (listed in a decreasing manner) are risk factors that have significant impact on the occurrence of DU

  9. Vaginal bleeding in pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 9 , bleeding may be a sign of: The placenta separating from the inner wall of the uterus ... the baby is born ( abruptio placentae ) Miscarriage The placenta is covering all or part of the opening ...

  10. Bleeding into the skin

    MedlinePlus

    Protect aging skin. Avoid trauma such as bumping or pulling on skin areas. For a cut or scrape, use direct pressure to stop the bleeding. If you have a drug reaction, ask your provider about stopping the drug. Otherwise, follow ...

  11. Menorrhagia (Heavy Menstrual Bleeding)

    MedlinePlus

    ... effect of using a nonhormonal intrauterine device for birth control. When an IUD is the cause of excessive menstrual bleeding, you may need to remove it. Pregnancy complications. A single, heavy, late period may be due to a miscarriage. If ...

  12. GI bleeding - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100162.htm GI bleeding - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... colon, and finally, the rectum and anus. The GI tract is a long, hollow, muscular tube through ...

  13. Bronchial hypersecretion, chronic airflow limitation, and peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Kauffmann, F; Brille, D

    1981-11-01

    Men with and men without a history of peptic ulcers were compared using respiratory symptoms and spirographic measurements taken from data recorded in an epidemiologic study. Among the 1,049 men examined, 7% reported a history of peptic ulcer. A clear relationship appeared between bronchial hypersecretion and peptic ulcers. It persisted after adjustment for age, smoking habits, social class, and country of origin. Men with ulcers inhaled tobacco smoke more often. Ulcers, smoking, and chronic phlegm were independently related to a lower body build index. It seems that the relationship between smoking and ulcers was greater among men with chronic phlegm, and it is postulated that peptic ulcers and "chronic bronchitis" might be related to a "common secretory disorder." After adjustment for age, men with a history of peptic ulcers had, not a lower FEV1, but a higher vital capacity. A slightly lower FEV1/VC ratio cannot in such cases be considered as an index of chronic airflow limitation.

  14. Effect of the oral intake of probiotic Pediococcus acidilactici BA28 on Helicobacter pylori causing peptic ulcer in C57BL/6 mice models.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Baljinder; Garg, Neena; Sachdev, Atul; Kumar, Balvir

    2014-01-01

    Probiotic lactic acid bacteria are being proposed to cure peptic ulcers by reducing colonization of Helicobacter pylori within the stomach mucosa and by eradicating already established infection. In lieu of that, in vitro inhibitory activity of pediocin-producing probiotic Pediococcus acidilactici BA28 was evaluated against H. pylori by growth inhibition assays. Further, chronic gastritis was first induced in two groups of C57BL/6 mice by orogastric inoculation with H. pylori with polyethylene catheter, and probiotic P. acidilactici BA28 was orally administered to study the eradication and cure of peptic ulcer disease. H. pylori and P. acidilactici BA28 were detected in gastric biopsy and fecal samples of mice, respectively. A probiotic treatment with P. acidilactici BA28, which is able to eliminate H. pylori infection and could reverse peptic ulcer disease, is being suggested as a co-adjustment with conventional antibiotic treatment. The study provided an evidence of controlling peptic ulcer disease, by diet mod

  15. Laboratory evaluation of a bleeding patient.

    PubMed Central

    Wallerstein, R O

    1989-01-01

    Most causes of abnormal bleeding can be determined from a complete blood count including platelet count and bleeding, prothrombin, activated partial thromboplastin, and thrombin times. Occasionally, further evaluation is necessary, such as tests of factor XIII function, fibrinolysis, and vascular integrity. Possible diagnoses include disseminated intravascular coagulation, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, vitamin K deficiency, von Willebrand's disease, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, acquired inhibitors of factor VIII, lupus anticoagulants, and coagulation disorders related to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. PMID:2660407

  16. Managing peptic ulcer and gastroesophageal reflux disease in elderly Chinese patients--focus on esomeprazole.

    PubMed

    Tang, Raymond S Y; Wu, Justin C Y

    2013-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are not uncommon in elderly patients. Clinical presentations of these acid-related disorders may be atypical in the geriatric population. Older individuals are at increased risk for poor outcomes in complicated PUD and for development of GERD complications. Multiple risk factors (eg, Helicobacter pylori [HP], use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], aspirin) contribute to the development of PUD. Recent data has shown that HP-negative, NSAID-negative idiopathic peptic ulcers are on the rise and carry a higher risk of recurrent ulcer bleeding and mortality. Effective management of PUD in the geriatric population relies on identification and modification of treatable risk factors. Elderly patients with GERD often require long-term acid suppressive therapy. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) including esomeprazole are effective in the treatment of reflux esophagitis, maintenance of GERD symptomatic control, and management of PUD as well as its complications. Potential safety concerns of long-term PPI use have been reported in the literature. Clinicians should balance the risks and benefits before committing elderly patients to long-term PPI therapy.

  17. Role of phenolic compounds in peptic ulcer: An overview.

    PubMed

    Sumbul, Sabiha; Ahmad, Mohd Aftab; Mohd, Asif; Mohd, Akhtar

    2011-07-01

    Peptic ulcer is the most common gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorder in clinical practice, which affects approximately 5-10% of the people during their life. The use of herbal drugs for the prevention and treatment of various diseases is constantly developing throughout the world. This is particularly true with regard to phenolic compounds that probably constitute the largest group of plants secondary metabolites. Phenolic compounds have attracted special attention due to their health-promoting characteristics. In the past ten years a large number of the studies have been carried out on the effects of phenolic compounds on human health. Many studies have been carried out that strongly support the contribution of polyphenols to the prevention of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, osteoporosis, neurodegenerative diseases, and diabetes mellitus, and suggest a role in the prevention of peptic ulcer. Polyphenols display a number of pharmacological properties in the GIT area, acting as antisecretory, cytoprotective, and antioxidant agents. The antioxidant properties of phenolic compounds have been widely studied, but it has become clear that their mechanisms of action go beyond the modulation of oxidative stress. Various polyphenolic compounds have been reported for their anti-ulcerogenic activity with a good level of gastric protection. Besides their action as gastroprotective, these phenolic compounds can be an alternative for the treatment of gastric ulcers. Therefore, considering the important role of polyphenolic compounds in the prevention or reduction of gastric lesions induced by different ulcerogenic agents, in this review, we have summarized the literature on some potent antiulcer plants, such as, Oroxylum indicum, Zingiber officinale, Olea europaea L., Foeniculum vulgare, Alchornea glandulosa, Tephrosia purpurea, and so on, containing phenolic compounds, namely, baicalein, cinnamic acid, oleuropein, rutin, quercetin, and tephrosin, respectively, as active

  18. Role of phenolic compounds in peptic ulcer: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Sumbul, Sabiha; Ahmad, Mohd. Aftab; Mohd., Asif; Mohd., Akhtar

    2011-01-01

    Peptic ulcer is the most common gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorder in clinical practice, which affects approximately 5-10% of the people during their life. The use of herbal drugs for the prevention and treatment of various diseases is constantly developing throughout the world. This is particularly true with regard to phenolic compounds that probably constitute the largest group of plants secondary metabolites. Phenolic compounds have attracted special attention due to their health-promoting characteristics. In the past ten years a large number of the studies have been carried out on the effects of phenolic compounds on human health. Many studies have been carried out that strongly support the contribution of polyphenols to the prevention of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, osteoporosis, neurodegenerative diseases, and diabetes mellitus, and suggest a role in the prevention of peptic ulcer. Polyphenols display a number of pharmacological properties in the GIT area, acting as antisecretory, cytoprotective, and antioxidant agents. The antioxidant properties of phenolic compounds have been widely studied, but it has become clear that their mechanisms of action go beyond the modulation of oxidative stress. Various polyphenolic compounds have been reported for their anti-ulcerogenic activity with a good level of gastric protection. Besides their action as gastroprotective, these phenolic compounds can be an alternative for the treatment of gastric ulcers. Therefore, considering the important role of polyphenolic compounds in the prevention or reduction of gastric lesions induced by different ulcerogenic agents, in this review, we have summarized the literature on some potent antiulcer plants, such as, Oroxylum indicum, Zingiber officinale, Olea europaea L., Foeniculum vulgare, Alchornea glandulosa, Tephrosia purpurea, and so on, containing phenolic compounds, namely, baicalein, cinnamic acid, oleuropein, rutin, quercetin, and tephrosin, respectively, as active

  19. [Non-Helicobacter pylori, Non-nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Peptic Ulcer Disease].

    PubMed

    Chang, Young Woon

    2016-06-25

    Non-Helicobacter pylori, non-NSAID peptic ulcer disease (PUD), termed idiopathic PUD, is increasing in Korea. Diagnosis is based on exclusion of common causes such as H. pylori infection, infection with other pathogens, surreptitious ulcerogenic drugs, malignancy, and uncommon systemic diseases with upper gastrointestinal manifestations. The clinical course of idiopathic PUD is delayed ulcer healing, higher recurrence, higher re-bleeding after initial ulcer healing, and higher mortality than the other types of PUD. Genetic predisposition, older age, chronic mesenteric ischemia, cigarette smoking, concomitant systemic diseases, and psychological stress are considered risk factors for idiopathic PUD. Diagnosis of idiopathic PUD should systematically explore all possible causes. Management of this disease is to treat underlying disease followed by regular endoscopic surveillance to confirm ulcer healing. Continuous proton pump inhibitor therapy is an option for patients who respond poorly to the standard ulcer regimen.

  20. Misoprostol in peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Watkinson, G; Akbar, F A

    1987-01-01

    Misoprostol, a synthetic prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) methyl ester analog has potent antisecretory and cytoprotective effects on the gastric and duodenal mucosa which should make it an effective drug in the treatment of gastric and duodenal ulcer. In two multicenter, randomised, double-blind, controlled studies involving over 900 patients with endoscopically proven benign gastric ulcer and in six similar studies involving over 2000 patients with active duodenal ulcers, differing doses of misoprostol have been compared with either placebo therapy or with conventional doses of cimetidine. In these studies misoprostol 800 mcg daily given as two or four divided doses has been shown to produce rates of complete ulcer healing and pain relief which were significantly superior to placebo therapy and comparable to those achieved with cimetidine. Drug related adverse effects were infrequent. A dose related diarrhea occurred in a small proportion of patients which seldom necessitated suspension of therapy. Because of the known uterotropic effect of prostaglandins the drug should not be used in pregnant women or women of child bearing age unless they are using adequate contraceptive measures. No clinically significant adverse, hematological or biochemical effects have been reported. Two studies suggested that misoprostol reduced the adverse effect of smoking on the healing of duodenal ulcer. In addition, misoprostol has been shown to protect the gastro-duodenal mucosa from the damaging effects of alcohol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This action may prove of value in the treatment of ulcer patients who are inveterate smokers, alcohol users or who are compelled to consume non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain relief from rheumatic and allied diseases.

  1. Endoscopic laser Doppler flowmetry in the experiment and in the bleeding gastric and duodenal ulcer clinic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapralov, S. V.; Shapkin, Y. G.; Lychagov, V. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2007-05-01

    One of the most complex problems of emergency surgery is the choice of surgical tactics to deal with bleeding peptic ulcer. Endoscopic hemostasis is prescribed to patients with continuing bleedings and prerelapse syndrome. But till nowdays the objective verification of the prerelapse condition had not been worked out. What is more there are no objective criteria to judge the effectiveness of the carried endohemostasis. The aim of the study was to work out a new objective diagnostic method of pre-recurrence syndrome that can be able to make prognosis for possible gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding recurrence more precise. Laser Doppler flowmetry was the method of studies the regional perfusion. The device used in this work was made at the Optics and Biophysics Department of Saratov State University.

  2. Endoscopic hemostasis state of the art - Nonvariceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Goelder, Stefan Karl; Brueckner, Juliane; Messmann, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    New endoscopic techniques for hemostasis in nonvariceal bleeding were introduced and known methods further improved. Hemospray and Endoclot are two new compounds for topical treatment of bleeding. Initial studies in this area have shown a good hemostatic effect, especially in active large scale oozing bleeding, e.g., tumor bleedings. For further evaluation larger prospective studies comparing the substanced with other methods of endoscopic hemostasis are needed. For localized active arterial bleeding primary injection therapy in the area of ​​bleeding as well as in the four adjacent quadrants offers a good method to reduce bleeding activity. The injection is technically easy to learn and practicable. After bleeding activity is reduced the bleeding source can be localized more clearly for clip application. Today many different through-the-scope (TTS) clips are available. The ability to close and reopen a clip can aid towards good positioning at the bleeding site. Even more important is the rotatability of a clip before application. Often multiple TTS clips are required for secure closure of a bleeding vessel. One model has the ability to use three clips in series without changing the applicator. Severe arterial bleeding from vessels larger than 2 mm is often unmanageable with these conventional methods. Here is the over-the-scope-clip system another newly available method. It is similar to the ligation of esophageal varices and involves aspiration of tissue into a transparent cap before closure of the clip. Thus a greater vascular occlusion pressure can be achieved and larger vessels can be treated endoscopically. Patients with severe arterial bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract have a very high rate of recurrence after initial endoscopic treatment. These patients should always be managed in an interdisciplinary team of interventional radiologist and surgeons. PMID:26962402

  3. Rare Jejunal Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Christman, Emily; Hassell, Lewis A.; Kastens, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Severe gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) secondary to jejunal diverticulosis (JD) is very rare. Delay in establishing a diagnosis is common and GIB from JD is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We report an illustrative case diagnosed by push enteroscopy and managed with surgery. PMID:27800518

  4. Long-term efficacy and safety of rabeprazole in patients taking low-dose aspirin with a history of peptic ulcers: a phase 2/3, randomized, parallel-group, multicenter, extension clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Kato, Mototsugu; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Watanabe, Toshio; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Sugisaki, Nobuyuki; Okada, Yasushi; Ogawa, Hisao; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Fujimoto, Kazuma

    2015-01-01

    A 24-week, double-blind, clinical trial of rabeprazole for the prevention of recurrent peptic ulcers caused by low-dose aspirin (LDA) has been reported, but trials for longer than 24 weeks have not been reported. The aim of this study is to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of rabeprazole for preventing peptic ulcer recurrence on LDA therapy. Eligible patients had a history of peptic ulcers on long-term LDA (81 or 100 mg/day) therapy. Patients with no recurrence of peptic ulcers at the end of the 24-week double-blind phase with rabeprazole (10- or 5-mg once daily) or teprenone (50 mg three times daily) entered the extension phase. Rabeprazole doses were maintained for a maximum of 76 weeks, including the double-blind 24-week period and the extension phase period (long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups). Teprenone was randomly switched to rabeprazole 10 or 5 mg for a maximum of 52 weeks in the extension phase (newly-initiated rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups). The full analysis set consisted of 151 and 150 subjects in the long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups, respectively, and the cumulative recurrence rates of peptic ulcers were 2.2 and 3.7%, respectively. Recurrent peptic ulcers were not observed in the newly-initiated rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups. No bleeding ulcers were reported. No clinically significant safety findings, including cardiovascular events, emerged. The use of long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg once daily prevents the recurrence of peptic ulcers in subjects on low-dose aspirin therapy, and both were well-tolerated. PMID:26060354

  5. Long-term efficacy and safety of rabeprazole in patients taking low-dose aspirin with a history of peptic ulcers: a phase 2/3, randomized, parallel-group, multicenter, extension clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Kato, Mototsugu; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Watanabe, Toshio; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Sugisaki, Nobuyuki; Okada, Yasushi; Ogawa, Hisao; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Fujimoto, Kazuma

    2015-05-01

    A 24-week, double-blind, clinical trial of rabeprazole for the prevention of recurrent peptic ulcers caused by low-dose aspirin (LDA) has been reported, but trials for longer than 24 weeks have not been reported. The aim of this study is to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of rabeprazole for preventing peptic ulcer recurrence on LDA therapy. Eligible patients had a history of peptic ulcers on long-term LDA (81 or 100 mg/day) therapy. Patients with no recurrence of peptic ulcers at the end of the 24-week double-blind phase with rabeprazole (10- or 5-mg once daily) or teprenone (50 mg three times daily) entered the extension phase. Rabeprazole doses were maintained for a maximum of 76 weeks, including the double-blind 24-week period and the extension phase period (long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups). Teprenone was randomly switched to rabeprazole 10 or 5 mg for a maximum of 52 weeks in the extension phase (newly-initiated rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups). The full analysis set consisted of 151 and 150 subjects in the long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups, respectively, and the cumulative recurrence rates of peptic ulcers were 2.2 and 3.7%, respectively. Recurrent peptic ulcers were not observed in the newly-initiated rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups. No bleeding ulcers were reported. No clinically significant safety findings, including cardiovascular events, emerged. The use of long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg once daily prevents the recurrence of peptic ulcers in subjects on low-dose aspirin therapy, and both were well-tolerated.

  6. Vaginal bleeding in late pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000627.htm Vaginal bleeding in late pregnancy To use the sharing ... JavaScript. One out of 10 women will have vaginal bleeding during their 3rd trimester. At times, it ...

  7. Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding Iron Deficiency Anemia Vitamin Deficiency Anemia Anemia of Chronic Disease Aplastic Anemia Autoimmune ... Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding Iron Deficiency Anemia Vitamin Deficiency Anemia Anemia of Chronic Disease Aplastic Anemia Autoimmune ...

  8. Peptic ulcer disease in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    El Mouzan, Mohammad Issa; Abdullah, Asaad Mohammad

    2004-12-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) has been reported to occur in children worldwide, but no information is available for our community. The aim of the study was to report our experience on the pattern of this condition in Saudi Arabian children. The records of all children below 18 years of age who were diagnosed by endoscopy to have PUD over a period of 10 years were analysed. From 1993 to 2002, 24 children out of 521(5 per cent) who presented with upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) symptoms were diagnosed by endoscopy to have PUD. All but one (96 per cent) were Saudi nationals, the average age was 15 years (range 5-18 years), and the male to female ratio was 7:1. The commonest presentation was chronic abdominal pain in 15/24 (63 per cent) of the children, followed by vomiting associated with abdominal pain in four (17 per cent). Hematemesis and melena occurred in three (13 per cent), and two children (8 per cent), respectively. There were 20 duodenal (92 per cent) and four gastric ulcers. The primary type was the most common, occurring in 19 (79 per cent) of the children. Histopathology results of antral biopsies were available for 15 children; all of them had antral gastritis. Helicobacter pylori organisms were present in 13/15 (87 per cent) of the antral biopsy specimens. In Saudi children, peptic ulcer disease occurs more commonly in boys. It is a rare cause of upper GIT symptoms, but highly associated with H. pylori antral gastritis. This study documents a pattern similar to descriptions from other countries.

  9. Peptic ulcer surgery: selection for operation by `earning'

    PubMed Central

    Small, W. P.; Cay, E. L.; Dugard, P.; Sircus, W.; Falconer, C. W. A.; Smith, A. N.; McManus, J. P. A.; Bruce, John

    1969-01-01

    Two groups of patients with chronic peptic ulcer were studied to determine the influence of duration of symptoms and age at operation on the result of surgical treatment. Independent physical and psychiatric assessments were made. Statistical analysis of the findings indicates that selection for operation by `earning' is unreliable in that it fails to identify that group of patients liable to do badly. In its place, a combined physical and psychiatric preoperative assessment of the peptic ulcer patient is recommended. PMID:5366281

  10. Elective surgery on factor VIII inhibitor patients using continuous infusion of recombinant activated factor VII: plasma factor VII activity of 10 IU/ml is associated with an increased incidence of bleeding.

    PubMed

    Smith, M P; Ludlam, C A; Collins, P W; Hay, C R; Wilde, J T; Grigeri, A; Melsen, T; Savidge, G F

    2001-10-01

    We examined recombinant activated factor VII (rVIIa) administered by continuous infusion to eight patients with inhibitors to factor VIII, undergoing elective surgery. rVIIa was infused at a fixed rate of 16.5 microg/kg/h for a median of 13.5 days (range 1-26). There was effective haemostasis at this infusion rate in only one of two minor procedures and two of six major operations. Three patients experienced excessive bleeding despite plasma factor VII activity around 10 IU/ml. Serious bleeding occurred in two other patients caused by procedural errors unrelated to rVIIa and required re-operation. The median rVIIa clearance on day 1 was 57 ml/h/kg (range 18-100) and on day 3 was 100 ml/h/kg (range 61-200). Clearance on the final infusion day was not significantly different from day 3. The infusion did not induce pathological activation of the coagulation mechanism. The only thrombotic adverse events were two episodes of superficial thrombophlebitis of the infused vein in one subject. In conclusion, the 16.5 microg/kg/h infusion rate reliably achieves plasma factor VII activity levels of 10 IU/ml, but this level does not provide reliable haemostasis.

  11. The effects of oral administration of Yunnan Baiyao on blood coagulation in beagle dogs as measured by kaolin-activated thromboelastography and buccal mucosal bleeding times.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Jami; Boysen, Søren; Wagg, Catherine; Chalhoub, Serge

    2017-01-01

    We examined the effects of oral administration of Yunnan Baiyao (YB) on hemostasis by measuring buccal mucosal bleeding times (BMBTs) and doing citrated kaolin-activated whole-blood thromboelastography (TEG). In a randomized controlled crossover trial 8 beagle dogs were given either placebo or 1000 mg of YB orally every 12 h for 5 consecutive treatments. Blood was drawn 24 h before treatment and 2 and 24 h after the last treatment, and the BMBT was measured in each sample in duplicate. The TEG analysis was done in duplicate 60 ± 5 min after sample collection. There were no adverse effects of treatment and no significant differences between the control and treatment BMBTs or TEG parameters at any time point. Significant differences were found between baseline and 24 h after the last treatment within the treatment group for the TEG parameters LY30 and LY60 and within the control group for the TEG parameters MA, G, LY30, and LY60. Thus, at the dose and frequency of administration in this study YB did not appear to have any clinically significant effects on the measured coagulation parameters. The differences within the treatment group were likely due to analytic error since similar differences were seen in the control group. Further studies with a larger sample, as well as more direct measures of platelet function, are needed.

  12. Management of Patients with Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Strate, Lisa L.; Gralnek, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    This guideline provides recommendations for the management of patients with acute overt lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Hemodynamic status should be initially assessed with intravascular volume resuscitation started as needed. Risk stratification based upon clinical parameters should be performed to help distinguish patients at high and low-risk of adverse outcomes. Hematochezia associated with hemodynamic instability may be indicative of an upper GI bleeding source and thus warrants an upper endoscopy. In the majority of patients, colonoscopy should be the initial diagnostic procedure and should be performed within 24 hours of patient presentation after adequate colon preparation. Endoscopic hemostasis therapy should be provided to patients with high risk endoscopic stigmata of bleeding including active bleeding, non-bleeding visible vessel, or adherent clot. The endoscopic hemostasis modality used (mechanical, thermal, injection or combination) is most often guided by the etiology of bleeding, access to the bleeding site, and endoscopist experience with the various hemostasis modalities. Repeat colonoscopy, with endoscopic hemostasis performed if indicated, should be considered for patients with evidence of recurrent bleeding. Radiographic interventions (tagged red blood cell scintigraphy, CT angiography, angiography) should be considered in high-risk patients with ongoing bleeding who do not respond adequately to resuscitation, and who are unlikely to tolerate bowel preparation and colonoscopy. Strategies to prevent recurrent bleeding should be considered. NSAID use should be avoided in patients with a history of acute lower GI bleeding particularly if secondary to diverticulosis or angioectasia. In patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin (secondary prophylaxis), aspirin should not be discontinued. The exact timing depends on the severity of bleeding, perceived adequacy of hemostasis and the risk of a thromboembolic event. Surgery

  13. Facts about Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Button Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts about Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vitamins ... serious bleeding problems if not supplemented. What is Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding or VKDB? Vitamin K deficiency bleeding or ...

  14. Mortality in trauma patients with active arterial bleeding managed by embolization or surgical packing: An observational cohort study of 66 patients

    PubMed Central

    Froberg, Lonnie; Helgstrand, Frederik; Clausen, Caroline; Steinmetz, Jacob; Eckardt, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Exsanguination due to coagulopathy and vascular injury is a common cause of death among trauma patients. Arterial injury can be treated either by angiography and embolization or by explorative laparotomy and surgical packing. The purpose of this study was to compare 30-day mortality and blood product consumption in trauma patients with active arterial haemorrhage in the abdominal and/or pelvic region treated with either angiography and embolization or explorative laparotomy and surgical packing. Material and Methods: From January 1st 2006 to December 31st 2011 2,173 patients with an ISS of >9 were admitted to the Trauma Centre of Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Denmark. Of these, 66 patients met the inclusion criteria: age above 15 years and active arterial haemorrhage from the abdominal and/or pelvic region verified by a CT scan at admission. Gender, age, initial oxygen saturation, pulse rate and respiratory rate, mechanism of injury, ISS, Probability of Survival, treatment modality, 30-day mortality and number and type of blood products applied were retrieved from the TARN database, patient records and the Danish Civil Registration System. Results: Thirty-one patients received angiography and embolization, and 35 patients underwent exploratory laparotomy and surgical packing. Gender, age, initial oxygen saturation, pulse rate and respiratory rate, ISS and Probability of Survival were comparable in the two groups. Conclusion: A significant increased risk of 30-day mortality (P = 0.04) was found in patients with active bleeding treated with explorative laparotomy and surgical packing compared to angiography and embolization when data was adjusted for age and ISS. No statistical significant difference (P > 0.05) was found in number of transfused blood products applied in the two groups of patients. PMID:27512332

  15. Pathogenicity island cag, vacA and IS605 genotypes in Mexican strains of Helicobacter pylori associated with peptic ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. Two major virulence factors of H. pylori have been described: the pathogenicity island cag (cag PAI) and the vacuolating cytotoxin gene (vacA). Virtually all strains have a copy of vacA, but its genotype varies. The cag PAI is a region of 32 genes in which the insertion of IS605 elements in its middle region has been associated with partial or total deletions of it that have generated strains with varying virulence. Accordingly, the aim of this work was to determine the cag PAI integrity, vacA genotype and IS605 status in groups of isolates from Mexican patients with non-peptic ulcers (NPU), non-bleeding peptic ulcers (NBPU), and bleeding peptic ulcers (BPU). Methods The cag PAI integrity was performed by detection of eleven targeted genes along this locus using dot blot hybridization and PCR assays. The vacA allelic, cag PAI genotype 1 and IS605 status were determined by PCR analysis. Results Groups of 16-17 isolates (n = 50) from two patients with NPU, NBPU, and BPU, respectively, were studied. 90% (45/50) of the isolates harbored a complete cag PAI. Three BPU isolates lacked the cag PAI, and two of the NBPU had an incomplete cag PAI: the first isolate was negative for three of its genes, including deletion of the cagA gene, whereas the second did not have the cagM gene. Most of the strains (76%) had the vacA s1b/m1 genotype; meanwhile the IS605 was not present within the cag PAI of any strain but was detected elsewhere in the genome of 8% (4/50). Conclusion The patients had highly virulent strains since the most of them possessed a complete cag PAI and had a vacA s1b/m1 genotype. All the isolates presented the cag PAI without any IS605 insertion (genotype 1). Combined vacA genotypes showed that 1 NPU, 2 NBPU, and 1 BPU patients (66.6%) had a mixed infection; coexistence of H. pylori strains with different cag PAI status was observed in 1 NBPU and 2 BPU (50

  16. Dietary phosphilipids and sterols protective against peptic ulceration.

    PubMed

    Tovey, F I; Bardhan, K D; Hobsley, M

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of duodenal ulceration in regions of developing countries with a stable diet is related to the staple food(s) in that diet. A higher prevalence occurs in areas where the diet is principally milled rice, refined wheat or maize, yams, cassava, sweet potato or green bananas, and a lower prevalence in areas where the staple diet is based on unrefined wheat or maize, soya, certain millets or certain pulses. Experiments using animal peptic ulcer models showed that the lipid fraction in foods from the staple diets of low prevalence areas gave protection against both gastric and duodenal ulceration, including ulceration due to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and also promoted healing of ulceration. The protective activity was found to lie in the phospholipid, sterol and sterol ester fractions of the lipid. Amongst individual phospholipids present in the phospholipid fraction, phosphatidyl ethanolamine (cephalin) and phosphatidyl choline (Lecithin) predominated. The sterol fraction showing activity contained β-sitosterol, stigmasterol and an unidentified isomer of β-sitosterol. The evidence shows that dietary phytosterols and phospholipids, both individually and in combination, have a protective effect on gastroduodenal mucosa. These findings may prove to be important in the prevention and management of duodenal and gastric ulceration including ulceration due to NSAIDs.

  17. Rare bleeding disorders in children: identification and primary care management.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Suchitra S

    2013-11-01

    Bleeding symptoms are common in healthy children but occasionally may indicate an underlying congenital or acquired bleeding diathesis. The rare bleeding disorders (RBDs) comprise inherited deficiencies of coagulation factors I (congenital fibrinogen deficiencies), II, V, VII, X, XI, and XIII and combined factor deficiencies, most notably of factors V and VIII and of vitamin K-dependent factors. These disorders often manifest during childhood and may present with recurrent or even serious or life-threatening bleeding episodes, particularly during the neonatal period. Accordingly, primary care and other nonhematologist pediatric providers should be familiar with the clinical presentation and initial evaluation of these rare disorders. Bleeding manifestations generally vary within the same RBD and may be indistinguishable from 1 RBD to another or from other more common bleeding disorders. Serious bleeding events such as intracranial hemorrhage may be heralded by less serious bleeding symptoms. The results of initial coagulation studies, especially prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time, are often helpful in narrowing down the potential factor deficiency, with factor XIII deficiency being an exception. Consultation with a hematologist is advised to facilitate accurate diagnosis and to ensure proper management and follow-up. The approach to bleeding episodes and invasive procedures is individualized and depends on the severity, frequency, and, in the case of procedures, likelihood of bleeding. Prophylaxis may be appropriate in children with recurrent serious bleeding and specifically after life-threatening bleeding episodes. When available, specific purified plasma-derived or recombinant factor concentrates, rather than fresh frozen plasma or cryoprecipitate, are the treatment of choice.

  18. [Guidelines of treatment for peptic ulcer disease in special conditions].

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Moon, Jeong Seop; Jee, Sam Ryong; Shin, Woon Geon; Park, Soo-Heon

    2009-11-01

    The pathogenesis, incidence, complication rates, response to acid suppression and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy in peptic ulcer associated with chronic disease such as liver cirrhosis, chronic renal failure, diabetes mellitus, and critically ill conditions are different from those with general population, so that the management strategies also should be differentiated. The eradication of H. pylori are not so effective for preventing recurrence of peptic ulcer in liver cirrhosis patients as shown in general population, and conservative managements such as preventing deterioration of hepatic function and decrease in portal pressure are mandatory to reduce the risk of ulcer recurrence. The standard triple therapy for H. pylori eradication are as effective in chronic renal failure patients as in normal population, but the frequency of side effects of amoxicillin is higher in the patients not receiving dialysis therapy. Delay in eradication therapy until beginning of dialysis therapy or modification of eradication regimen should be considered in such cases. High prevalence of asymptomatic peptic ulcers and increased mortality in complicated peptic ulcer disease warrant regular endoscopic surveillance in diabetic patients, especially with angiopathy. The prolongation of duration of eradication therapy also should be considered in diabetic patients with angiopathic complication because of lower eradication rate with standard triple regimens as compared to normal population. Prophylactic acid suppressive therapy is highly recommended in critically ill patients with multiple risk factors. Herein, we propose evidence-based treatment guidelines for the management of peptic ulcer disease in special conditions based on literature review and experts opinion.

  19. Bleeding manifestations in snake bite.

    PubMed

    Devaraj, T

    1979-06-01

    Bleeding following bites by the Malayan Pit Viper can either be local or systemic. Bleeding at the site of the bite is due to the local action of the venom as a vasculotoxin. Systemic bleeding occurs with severe poisoning and appears to be mainly dependent on platelet deficiency and the co-existing defibrination syndrome appears to play a minor role in the initiation of bleeding. Thus in the clinical situation non-clotting blood with no overt bleeding can continue up to weeks when specific antivenene is not given. Assessment of the severity of poisoning can easily be made at the bedside. Specific viper antivenene rapidly corrects the spontaneous bleeding and clotting defect of severe systemic poisoning but has no effect on local poisoning.

  20. Diagnostic and Treatment Approaches for Refractory Peptic Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Refractory peptic ulcers are defined as ulcers that do not heal completely after 8 to 12 weeks of standard anti-secretory drug treatment. The most common causes of refractory ulcers are persistent Helicobacter pylori infection and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Simultaneous use of two or more H. pylori diagnostic methods are recommended for increased sensitivity. Serologic tests may be useful for patients currently taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) or for suspected false negative results, as they are not affected by PPI use. NSAID use should be discontinued when possible. Platelet cyclooxygenase activity tests can confirm surreptitious use of NSAIDs or aspirin. Cigarette smoking can delay ulcer healing. Therefore, patients who smoke should be encouraged to quit. Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) is a rare but important cause of refractory gastroduodenal ulcers. Fasting plasma gastrin levels should be checked if ZES is suspected. If an ulcer is refractory despite a full course of standard PPI treatment, the dose should be doubled and administration of another type of PPI considered. PMID:26240800

  1. Medical management of acid-peptic disorders of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Eswaran, Sheila; Roy, Michael A

    2005-10-01

    In the past 30 years, medicine has witnessed an unprecedented evolution in acid-peptic disorder management, fueled by major advances in our understanding of the physiology of acid secretion and the gastric mucosal barrier. The other pivotal development in understanding these disorders has been the recognition of Helicobacter pylori's role in the pathophysiology of peptic ulcer disease,chronic gastritis, and even gastric malignancy. This evolution continues as H pylori wanes in significance, and medicine is challenged by treating iatrogenic conditions brought on by ulcerogenic anti-inflammatory drugs. Following a description of the relevant physiology and biochemistry of gastric acid secretion and the gastric mucosal barrier, this article describes the current medicinal arsenal available to treat acid-peptic disorders of the stomach.

  2. Peptic ulceration may be a hormonal deficiency disease.

    PubMed

    Love, Jack W

    2008-01-01

    Evidence is reviewed that Helicobacter pylori infection may cause a deficiency of the hormone secretin that allows peptic ulcer disease to develop by impairing the body's defenses to gastric acid. Secretin is released into the circulation from the S-cells of the duodenal crypts in response to gastric acid entering the duodenum. Once in the circulation, secretin has five well-documented effects that protect the upper intestine from gastric acid: it stimulates secretion of bicarbonate rich exocrine pancreatic juice; it stimulates secretion of alkaline bile; it stimulates secretion of alkaline mucus from the duodenal submucosal glands of Brunner; it inhibits the humoral phase of gastric secretion; and it inhibits gastric motility, thereby delaying gastric emptying. Impaired secretin release and reduced duodenal S-cells have been documented in peptic ulcer patients compared with control patients. Clinical evidence that patients with H. pylori infection and peptic ulceration have increased gastric secretion and motility and decreased duodenal bicarbonate response to gastric acid, all of which normalize after eradication of the infection, could be explained by reversible impairment of the secretin mechanism. Gastric metaplasia in the duodenum with H. pylori infection is known to reduce the S-cell population. The fact that not all patients with H. pylori infection develop peptic ulceration suggests that degree of secretin deficiency determined by extent of the infection must reach a critical level for peptic ulceration to occur. Peptic ulceration may be a hormonal deficiency disease, a result of secretin deficiency caused by H. pylori infection. It may be the first example of a specific hormonal deficiency disease caused by a specific bacterial infection.

  3. The significance and work-up of minor gastrointestinal bleeding in hospitalized nursing home patients.

    PubMed Central

    Suatengco, R.; Posner, G. L.; Marsh, F.

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-seven consecutive admissions from nursing homes who underwent a gastrointestinal (GI) consult for coffee ground vomitus or occult GI bleeding to evaluate the outcome were reviewed retrospectively to determine whether a GI work-up was or would have been useful. There were 15 deaths, all associated with severe infection or respiratory failure. Endoscopy, barium studies, and a history of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use or peptic ulcer disease did not affect the management or outcome. No patient developed major GI bleeding. When nursing home patients present with coffee ground vomitus or newly found occult blood in the stool, efforts should be made to identify and vigorously treat any acute underlying infection or respiratory failure. Endoscopy is not helpful in this clinical situation. Both the primary care physician and the GI consultant should be aware of these associations and should focus on the underlying etiology. PMID:7473849

  4. [Diagnosis and Treatment of Peptic Ulcer Disease: Present and Future Perspective].

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Wook

    2016-06-25

    Peptic ulcer disease is one of the most commonly encountered diseases in gastroenterology clinics. After the discovery of Helicobacter pylori by Warren and Marshall, it has been identified as the most important cause of peptic ulcer. Eradication of H. pylori markedly reduces the post-treatment recurrence rate of peptic ulcer. However, as human populations age, the incidence of cardiovascular and musculoskeletal diseases increases and consequent use of aspirin and non-steroidal anti-in-flammatory drugs increases. Thus causes and presenting patterns of peptic ulcer have changed. In this review, I describe new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for peptic ulcer disease and explore future perspectives.

  5. The effects of two synthetic glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists, Ro 43-8857 and L-700,462, on platelet aggregation and bleeding in guinea-pigs and dogs: evidence that Ro 43-8857 is orally active.

    PubMed

    Cook, N S; Bruttger, O; Pally, C; Hagenbach, A

    1993-11-15

    In vitro platelet aggregation studies in whole blood were used to define the species-specificity profile of two synthetic GP-IIb/IIIa antagonists, Ro 43-8857 and L-700,462. Aggregation of rhesus monkey platelets was inhibited with a similar potency to human platelets, whereas both compounds were poor antagonists in mini-pig, rabbit or hamster blood. Compared to human platelets, Ro 43-8857 was 2-3-fold less active as an inhibitor of dog and guinea-pig platelet aggregation, whereas L-700,462 was, respectively, 4- and 14-fold less active in these species. In vivo investigations with these two compounds were performed in anesthetized guinea-pigs and conscious dogs, with bleeding times measured on small mesenteric arteries or on the inner jowl respectively. Ex vivo ADP-induced whole blood platelet aggregation was completely inhibited in guinea-pigs by Ro 43-8857 following intravenous administration of 0.1 mg/kg and intraduodenal administration of 3 mg/kg, with a duration of action exceeding 5 hours. Mesenteric bleeding times were prolonged by Ro 43-8857 only at doses causing supra-maximal inhibition of aggregation, suggesting these two effects could be partially dissociated. L-700,462 (3 mg/kg i.v.) was shorter acting than Ro 43-8857 in guinea-pigs (duration approximately 1 hour) and the anti-aggregatory effect was accompanied by mesenteric bleeding time prolongations. In conscious dogs, ex vivo aggregation was inhibited to approximately 80% by Ro 43-8857 (0.3 mg/kg i.v. or 10 mg/kg p.o.) and L-700,462 (1 mg/kg i.v.). However, bleeding time prolongations accompanied these anti-aggregatory effects with both compounds. In conclusion, we have shown clear differences between two synthetic GP-IIb/IIIa antagonists, both in terms of their species-specificity in vitro and in terms of their in vivo profile, and in particular the propensity to promote bleeding from mesenteric arteries in guinea-pigs. However, the ability of Ro 43-8857 to discriminate between anti-aggregatory and

  6. Microcoil Embolization for Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    D'Othee, Bertrand Janne Surapaneni, Padmaja; Rabkin, Dmitry; Nasser, Imad; Clouse, Melvin

    2006-02-15

    Purpose. To assess outcomes after microcoil embolization for active lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Methods. We retrospectively studied all consecutive patients in whom microcoil embolization was attempted to treat acute lower GI bleeding over 88 months. Baseline, procedural, and outcome parameters were recorded following current Society of Interventional Radiology guidelines. Outcomes included technical success, clinical success (rebleeding within 30 days), delayed rebleeding (>30 days), and major and minor complication rates. Follow-up consisted of clinical, endoscopic, and pathologic data. Results. Nineteen patients (13 men, 6 women; mean age {+-} 95% confidence interval = 70 {+-} 6 years) requiring blood transfusion (10 {+-} 3 units) had angiography-proven bleeding distal to the marginal artery. Main comorbidities were malignancy (42%), coagulopathy (28%), and renal failure (26%). Bleeding was located in the small bowel (n = 5), colon (n 13) or rectum (n = 1). Technical success was obtained in 17 patients (89%); 2 patients could not be embolized due to vessel tortuosity and stenoses. Clinical follow-up length was 145 {+-} 75 days. Clinical success was complete in 13 (68%), partial in 3 (16%), and failed in 2 patients (11%). Delayed rebleeding (3 patients, 27%) was always due to a different lesion in another bowel segment (0 late rebleeding in embolized area). Two patients experienced colonic ischemia (11%) and underwent uneventful colectomy. Two minor complications were noted. Conclusion. Microcoil embolization for active lower GI bleeding is safe and effective in most patients, with high technical and clinical success rates, no procedure-related mortality, and a low risk of bowel ischemia and late rebleeding.

  7. Vaginal Bleeding: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bleeding (American Academy of Family Physicians) Also in Spanish Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (Beyond the Basics) (UpToDate) Abnormal ... College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists) - PDF Also in Spanish Vaginal Bleeding (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and ...

  8. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn

    MedlinePlus

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn (VKDB) is a bleeding disorder in babies. It most often develops shortly ... Control and Prevention. Notes from the field: late vitamin K deficiency bleeding in infants whose parents declined vitamin K ...

  9. Medical therapy of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    McQuaid, K R; Isenberg, J I

    1992-04-01

    The gastric duodenal mucosa normally is protected from the damaging effects of gastric acid and pepsin by ill-defined mechanisms. Ulcers may arise when there is an imbalance between the aggressive and defensive factors that renders the mucosa susceptible to damage. A variety of factors have been identified that may favor the development of peptic ulcers, but no single pathophysiologic defect applies in all ulcer patients. In duodenal ulcers, gastric acid hypersecretion is observed in as many as one third of patients; however, most patients with duodenal ulcers secrete normal amounts of gastric acid. Decreased mucosal bicarbonate secretion may be important in at least some duodenal ulcer patients. Use of NSAIDs may cause either gastric or duodenal ulcers, probably through the inhibition of mucosal prostaglandin synthesis and disruption of mucosal defenses. Finally, a recently identified bacterium, H. pylori, causes a chronic gastritis that is found in the overwhelming majority of patients with duodenal ulcers and non-NSAID-associated gastric ulcers. This bacterium may play a pivotal role in ulcer pathogenesis and, especially, in ulcer recurrences. A number of drugs of proved efficacy are available for the treatment of acute duodenal and gastric ulcers. The H2 receptor antagonists administered once daily remain the mainstay of ulcer therapy because of their efficacy, ease of use, and excellent safety profile. More thorough and long-lasting acid inhibition is afforded by the H+/K(+)-ATPase inhibitor omeprazole. This agent also promotes more rapid ulcer healing, but in most patients, this minor advantage may not justify the higher cost. It is not known whether more rapid healing will translate into lower ulcer complication rates. Until further data are available, this drug may be preferable in patients with large or complicated ulcers. In patients with refractory ulcers, omeprazole is clearly superior to other available agents. Agents that promote mucosal defense

  10. Sarcomas arising after radiotherapy for peptic ulcer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lieber, M.R.; Winans, C.S.; Griem, M.L.; Moossa, R.; Elner, V.M.; Franklin, W.A.

    1985-06-01

    Therapeutic gastric irradiation has been used to reduce peptic juice secretion in patients with peptic ulcer disease. Between 1937 and 1968 a total of 2049 patients received such therapy at the University of Chicago. Three of these patients are known to have developed sarcomas in the field of radiation. Two gastric leiomyosarcomas of the stomach were diagnosed 26 and 14 years after treatment and a malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the anterior chest wall was removed six years after gastric irradiation. Of 743 peptic ulcer patients treated without irradiation and constituted as a control group for the study of therapeutic gastric radiation, none is known to have developed sarcoma. As the incidence of sarcoma in these patient groups is known only from the tumor registry of the University of Chicago, other cases of sarcoma may exist in the groups. While an increased incidence of sarcoma has not been proven to occur in patients who received therapeutic gastric irradiation for peptic ulcer disease, the possibility of such a risk should be borne in mind by physicians caring for such patients.

  11. A no bleed implant.

    PubMed

    Ersek, R A; Navarro, J A; Nemeth, D Z; Sas, G

    1993-01-01

    Breast implants have evolved from the original saline-filled, smooth-surfaced silicone rubber bag to silicone gel-filled smooth-walled sacs to a combination of a silicone gel-filled bag within a saline-filled sac, and, most recently, a reversed, double-lumen implant with a saline bag inside of a gel-filled bag. Texture-surfaced implants were first used in 1970 when the standard silicone gel-filled implant was covered with a polyurethane foam. Because of concerns about the degradation products of this foam, they were removed from the market in 1991. In 1975 double-lumen silicone textured implants were developed, followed by silicone gel-filled textured implants. In 1990 a new radiolucent, biocompatible gel was produced that reduced the problem of radioopacity of silicone implants. Because of the gel's sufficiently low coefficient of friction, leakage caused by fold flaw fracture may also be decreased. We present a case where this new biocompatible gel implant was repositioned after four months. The resulting scar capsule in this soft breast was thin [< 0.002 cm (0.008 in.)] and evenly textured as a mirror image of the textured silicone surface. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray defraction spectrophotometry revealed no silicone bleed.

  12. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for peptic ulcer disease 2015.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Kiichi; Yoshino, Junji; Akamatsu, Taiji; Itoh, Toshiyuki; Kato, Mototsugu; Kamada, Tomoari; Takagi, Atsushi; Chiba, Toshimi; Nomura, Sachiyo; Mizokami, Yuji; Murakami, Kazunari; Sakamoto, Choitsu; Hiraishi, Hideyuki; Ichinose, Masao; Uemura, Naomi; Goto, Hidemi; Joh, Takashi; Miwa, Hiroto; Sugano, Kentaro; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-03-01

    The Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSGE) revised the evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for peptic ulcer disease in 2014 and has created an English version. The revised guidelines consist of seven items: bleeding gastric and duodenal ulcers, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy, non-eradication therapy, drug-induced ulcer, non-H. pylori, non-nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ulcer, surgical treatment, and conservative therapy for perforation and stenosis. Ninety clinical questions (CQs) were developed, and a literature search was performed for the CQs using the Medline, Cochrane, and Igaku Chuo Zasshi databases between 1983 and June 2012. The guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. Therapy is initially provided for ulcer complications. Perforation or stenosis is treated with surgery or conservatively. Ulcer bleeding is first treated by endoscopic hemostasis. If it fails, surgery or interventional radiology is chosen. Second, medical therapy is provided. In cases of NSAID-related ulcers, use of NSAIDs is stopped, and anti-ulcer therapy is provided. If NSAID use must continue, the ulcer is treated with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) or prostaglandin analog. In cases with no NSAID use, H. pylori-positive patients receive eradication and anti-ulcer therapy. If first-line eradication therapy fails, second-line therapy is given. In cases of non-H. pylori, non-NSAID ulcers or H. pylori-positive patients with no indication for eradication therapy, non-eradication therapy is provided. The first choice is PPI therapy, and the second choice is histamine 2-receptor antagonist therapy. After initial therapy, maintenance therapy is provided to prevent ulcer relapse.

  13. Vaginal or uterine bleeding - overview

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal bleeding normally occurs during a woman's menstrual cycle, when she gets her period. Every woman's period is different. Most women have cycles between 24 and 34 days apart. It usually lasts ...

  14. Bevacizumab and gastrointestinal bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Ou, George; Galorport, Cherry; Enns, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of severe, refractory gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in a patient with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) whose massive transfusion dependence was lifted shortly after treatment with bevacizumab, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor. The patient’s bleeding had been refractory to repeated endoscopic interventions, tranexamic acid, and tamoxifen. However, following treatment with bevacizumab at 5 mg/kg every other week, nearly 300 units of packed red blood cell transfusions were avoided in one year’s time. Despite its relatively high cost, bevacizumab may have a more active role in the management of severe GI bleeding in HHT if such remarkable response can be consistently demonstrated. PMID:28070235

  15. Peptic ulcer among Polish rural population and the nicotinic index.

    PubMed

    Schabowski, J

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the results of observations concerning the effect of cigarette smoking on the prevalence of peptic ulcer among 6,512 rural inhabitants aged 20-64, selected by two-stage sampling. Of these, 2,506 (38.6%) were regular smokers. In order to determine precisely the negative effect of smoking on the human body the nicotinic index was used (N.I.), calculated by multiplying the number of cigarettes smoked daily by the period of smoking (years). The three-stage scale of the nicotinic index was applied: I degrees - N.I. < 100, II degrees - N.I. = 100-300, III degrees - N.I. > 300. The mean value of the nicotinic index calculated for the total number of smokers in the study was 290.3. A statistically significant higher N.I. was observed in patients with peptic ulcer - 432.5, compared to patients with other diseases - 337.2, and healthy individuals - 203.3. Among patients with peptic ulcer the highest percentage of people with N.I. > 300 was noted (59.0%), compared to patients with other diseases (42.9%) and those who were healthy (22. 6%). The differences observed between patients with peptic ulcer and those of the remaining groups were highly statistically significant (p<0.001). The percentage of people with the lowest value of the nicotinic index (N.I.<100) in individual groups was: in patients with peptic ulcer - 13.5% (the lowest), among patients with other diseases - 25.0%, in the group of healthy individuals - 38.5% (the highest). An increase was noted in the incidence of peptic ulcer with the value of the nicotinic index. Peptic ulcer occurred in 3.8% of patients with N.I. < 100, in 6.4% of those with N.I. = 100-300, and in 13.2% of patients with N.I. > 300. An increase in the percentage of patients with the nicotinic index was observed irrespective of the site of ulcer. It became most evident among patients who underwent surgical treatment due to peptic ulcer, where the highest value of the nicotinic index (N.I. > 300) was noted in 79.5%, in

  16. Molecular hydrogen in human breath: a new strategy for selectively diagnosing peptic ulcer disease, non-ulcerous dyspepsia and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Maity, Abhijit; Pal, Mithun; Maithani, Sanchi; Ghosh, Barnali; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Pradhan, Manik

    2016-07-22

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilizes molecular hydrogen (H2) as a respiratory substrate during colonization in the gastric mucosa. However, the link between molecular H2 and the pathogenesis of peptic-ulcer disease (PUD) and non-ulcerous dyspepsia (NUD) by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori still remains mostly unknown. Here we provide evidence that breath H2 excretion profiles are distinctly altered by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori for individuals with NUD and PUD. We subsequently unravelled the potential molecular mechanisms responsible for the alteration of H2 in exhaled breath in association with peptic ulcers, encompassing both gastric and duodenal ulcers, along with NUD. We also established that carbon-isotopic fractionations in the acid-mediated bacterial environment regulated by bacterial urease activity cannot discriminate the actual disease state i.e. whether it is peptic ulcer or NUD. However, our findings illuminate the unusual molecular H2 in breath that can track the precise evolution of PUD and NUD, even after the eradication of H. pylori infection. This deepens our understanding of the pathophysiology of PUD and NUD, reveals non-invasively the actual disease state in real-time and thus offers a novel and robust new-generation strategy for treating peptic-ulcer disease together with non-ulcer related complications even when the existing (13)C-urea breath test ((13)C-UBT) fails to diagnose.

  17. Bleeding varices: 1. Emergency management.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, S S; Warren, W D; Galambos, J T; Millikan, W J

    1981-01-01

    The aim of the emergency management of bleeding varices is to stop the hemorrhage nonoperatively if possible, avoiding emergency shunt surgery, an operation that has a higher mortality than elective shunt surgery. Patients with an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage should undergo endoscopy immediately to verify the diagnosis of bleeding varices. They can then be categorized according to whether they stop bleeding spontaneously (group 1), continue to bleed slowly (group 2) or continue to bleed rapidly (group 3). Group 1 patients are discussed in the second part of this two-part series. Group 2 patients are initially treated with vasopressin given intravenously; those who fail to respond should undergo emergency angiography and receive vasopressin intra-arterially. If this fails, patients at low surgical risk should undergo urgent shunt surgery; those at high risk do better with endoscopic sclerotherapy. Group 3 patients are also given an intravenous infusion of vasopressin. Patients at low surgical risk who continue to bleed then receive tamponade with a Sengstaken--Blakemore tube. If this fails, they undergo emergency creation of an H-shaped mesocaval shunt. Patients at high surgical risk who fail to respond to vasopressin given intravenously are next treated intra-arterially. If this fails they are given either endoscopic or transhepatic sclerotherapy. PMID:7006779

  18. Coagulation is more affected by quick than slow bleeding in patients with massive blood loss.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Yang, Dejuan; Zheng, Dongyou

    2017-03-01

    Profuse blood loss affects blood coagulation to various degrees. However, whether bleeding speed affects coagulation remains uncertain. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of bleeding speed on coagulation function. A total of 141 patients in the Department of Thoracic Surgery of our hospital were evaluated between January 2007 and February 2014. There are two groups of patients, those who received decortication for chronic encapsulated empyema were called the slow-bleeding group, and those who received thoracoscopic upper lobectomy were called the fast bleeding group; each group was further subdivided into three: group A, 1000 ml ≤ bleeding amount < 1500 ml; group B, 1500 ml ≤ bleeding amount < 1700 ml; group C, 1700 ml ≤ bleeding amount < 2000 ml. Then, coagulation function was assessed in all patients before and during surgery and at 1, 2, and 24 h after surgery, measuring prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen, blood pressure, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and platelets. Bleeding duration was overtly longer in the slow-bleeding group than that in quick bleeding individuals (2.3 ± 0.25 h vs. 0.41 ± 0.13 h, P < 0.001). Fibrinogen, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and platelets strikingly decreased, whereas prothrombin time and APTT values significantly increased with bleeding amounts in both quick and slow-bleeding groups. Interestingly, compared with slow-bleeding patients, coagulation indices at each time point and bleeding amounts had significant differences in the quick bleeding group.Increased consumption of coagulation factors in quick bleeding may have greater impact on coagulation function.

  19. Historical impact to drive research in peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Banić, M; Malfertheiner, P; Babić, Z; Ostojić, R; Kujundzic, M; Fatović-Ferenčić, S; Plesko, S; Petričušić, L

    2011-01-01

    The story of gastric acid secretion began with early ideas on gastric secretion (Spallanzani and de Réaumur, 17th century) and with first descriptions of food digestion (Dupuytren and Bichat, Beaumont, early 18th century), followed by proof that gastric juice contained acid (Prout, early 18th century). The research continued with first descriptions of gastric glands as the source of gastric acid and its changes upon digestive stimulus (Purkinje and Golgi, mid and late 19th century). The theory of 'nervism' - the neuro-reflex stimulation of gastric secretion by vagal nerve (Pavlov, early 20th century) was contrasted by a histamine-mediated concept of gastric secretion (Popielski and Code, mid 20th century). Thus, gastric acid and pepsin (Schwann, early 19th century) were found to be essential for food digestion and studies also pointed to histamine, being the most potent final common chemostimulator of oxyntic cells. The discoveries in etiopathogenesis of mucosal injury were marked by the famous dictum: 'No acid, no ulcer' ('Ohne saueren Magensaft kein peptisches Geschwür', Schwarz, 1910) that later induced the term of 'mucosal defense' and the notion that the breaking of 'gastric mucosal barrier' represents the initial step in the process of mucosal injury (Davenport, Code and Scholer, mid 20th century). The prostaglandins were shown to influence all major components of gastric mucosal barrier, described with the term 'cytoprotection' (Vane, Robert and Jacobson, 1970s). Beginning in the latter half of 19th century, the studies on gastric bacteriology that followed enabled the discovery of association between Campylobacter (Helicobacter) pylori and peptic ulcers (Warren and Marshall, 1980s) that led to worldwide major interventions in treating peptic ulcer disease. The surgical approach to peptic ulcer had been outlined by resection procedures (Billroth, Pean, Moynihan, late 19 century) and vagotomy, with or without drainage procedures (Jaboulay, Latarjet

  20. Multidetector CT angiography for acute gastrointestinal bleeding: technique and findings.

    PubMed

    Artigas, José M; Martí, Milagros; Soto, Jorge A; Esteban, Helena; Pinilla, Inmaculada; Guillén, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common reason for emergency department admissions and an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Factors that complicate its clinical management include patient debility due to comorbidities; intermittence of hemorrhage; and multiple sites of simultaneous bleeding. Its management, therefore, must be multidisciplinary and include emergency physicians, gastroenterologists, and surgeons, as well as radiologists for diagnostic imaging and interventional therapy. Upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding is usually managed endoscopically, with radiologic intervention reserved as an alternative to be used if endoscopic therapy fails. Endoscopy is often less successful in the management of acute lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding, where colonoscopy may be more effective. The merits of performing bowel cleansing before colonoscopy in such cases might be offset by the resultant increase in response time and should be weighed carefully against the deficits in visualization and diagnostic accuracy that would result from performing colonoscopy without bowel preparation. In recent years, multidetector computed tomographic (CT) angiography has gained acceptance as a first-line option for the diagnosis and management of lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding. In selected cases of upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding, CT angiography also provides accurate information about the presence or absence of active bleeding, its source, and its cause. This information helps shorten the total diagnostic time and minimizes or eliminates the need for more expensive and more invasive procedures.

  1. Distinctive aspects of peptic ulcer disease, Dieulafoy's lesion, and Mallory-Weiss syndrome in patients with advanced alcoholic liver disease or cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Nojkov, Borko; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To systematically review the data on distinctive aspects of peptic ulcer disease (PUD), Dieulafoy’s lesion (DL), and Mallory-Weiss syndrome (MWS) in patients with advanced alcoholic liver disease (aALD), including alcoholic hepatitis or alcoholic cirrhosis. METHODS: Computerized literature search performed via PubMed using the following medical subject heading terms and keywords: “alcoholic liver disease”, “alcoholic hepatitis”,“ alcoholic cirrhosis”, “cirrhosis”, “liver disease”, “upper gastrointestinal bleeding”, “non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding”, “PUD”, ‘‘DL’’, ‘‘Mallory-Weiss tear”, and “MWS’’. RESULTS: While the majority of acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding with aALD is related to portal hypertension, about 30%-40% of acute GI bleeding in patients with aALD is unrelated to portal hypertension. Such bleeding constitutes an important complication of aALD because of its frequency, severity, and associated mortality. Patients with cirrhosis have a markedly increased risk of PUD, which further increases with the progression of cirrhosis. Patients with cirrhosis or aALD and peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) have worse clinical outcomes than other patients with PUB, including uncontrolled bleeding, rebleeding, and mortality. Alcohol consumption, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, and portal hypertension may have a pathogenic role in the development of PUD in patients with aALD. Limited data suggest that Helicobacter pylori does not play a significant role in the pathogenesis of PUD in most cirrhotic patients. The frequency of bleeding from DL appears to be increased in patients with aALD. DL may be associated with an especially high mortality in these patients. MWS is strongly associated with heavy alcohol consumption from binge drinking or chronic alcoholism, and is associated with aALD. Patients with aALD have more severe MWS bleeding and are more likely to rebleed when compared to non

  2. Progress in the treatment of bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Garrett E

    2011-01-01

    The availability of plasma-derived and recombinant coagulation factors has transformed the management of patients with bleeding disorders, such as hemophilia and von Willebrand disease (VWD). However, several important clinical challenges remain that have become the focus of current research in coagulation therapy. Two prospective, non-interventional studies (HyQoL-Europe and HyQoL-Canada) are evaluating the impact of major transitional life events, such as changes in social, work and living situations, on the quality of life of adolescents and young adults with hemophilia A who are treated with the recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) concentrate Helixate®. A better understanding of the impact of these transitional life events on quality of life may help to develop improved interventions and counseling techniques that minimize the negative effects of these events on patients with bleeding disorders. A new clinical development program has been launched to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the low-volume, highly active, plasma-derived von Willebrand factor (VWF)/FVIII concentrate Biostate®. The program, known as SWIFT (Studies with von Willebrand factor/factor VIII) includes four clinical trials involving adult and pediatric patients with hemophilia A or VWD. Lastly, fusion of human recombinant albumin to recombinant coagulation factor IX (rFIX) has created a new fusion protein (rIX-FP) that retains the biological activity of rFIX and has a more favorable pharmacokinetic profile due to the longer half-life. The use of this novel fusion protein may offer several advantages to patients with hemophilia B: less frequent administration, prolonged protection from bleeding and improved compliance--increasing the likelihood of a positive clinical outcome. These examples of current research endeavors are intended to enhance the treatment experience as well as provide new and improved therapies for patients with bleeding disorders.

  3. ABCG2 in peptic ulcer: gene expression and mutation analysis.

    PubMed

    Salagacka-Kubiak, Aleksandra; Żebrowska, Marta; Wosiak, Agnieszka; Balcerczak, Mariusz; Mirowski, Marek; Balcerczak, Ewa

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the participation of polymorphism at position C421A and mRNA expression of the ABCG2 gene in the development of peptic ulcers, which is a very common and severe disease. ABCG2, encoded by the ABCG2 gene, has been found inter alia in the gastrointestinal tract, where it plays a protective role eliminating xenobiotics from cells into the extracellular environment. The materials for the study were biopsies of gastric mucosa taken during a routine endoscopy. For genotyping by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) at position C421A, DNA was isolated from 201 samples, while for the mRNA expression level by real-time PCR, RNA was isolated from 60 patients. The control group of healthy individuals consisted of 97 blood donors. The dominant genotype in the group of peptic ulcer patients and healthy individuals was homozygous CC. No statistically significant differences between healthy individuals and the whole group of peptic ulcer patients and, likewise, between the subgroups of peptic ulcer patients (infected and uninfected with Helicobacter pylori) were found. ABCG2 expression relative to GAPDH expression was found in 38 of the 60 gastric mucosa samples. The expression level of the gene varies greatly among cases. The statistically significant differences between the intensity (p = 0.0375) of H. pylori infection and ABCG2 gene expression have been shown. It was observed that the more intense the infection, the higher the level of ABCG2 expression.

  4. Cisplatin-induced peptic ulcers, vagotomy, adrenal and calcium modulation.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, S K; San Antonio, J D; Sokhansanj, A; Miller, C

    1994-04-01

    Cytochemical and autoradiographic studies in Wistar rats [Crl:(WI)BR] show that cisplatin treatment (9 mg/kg) inhibits the release of acetylcholine from the axonal endings of the stomach smooth muscle resulting in bloating of the stomach and ulceration. Cisplatin also induces corticosteroid release from the adrenal gland stimulating peptic ulceration. Vagotomy helps ameliorate the effect but not eliminate it. Calcium supplementation restores normal neuromuscular function to gastric smooth muscle, thereby eliminating the gastro-intestinal toxicity due to cisplatin.

  5. Optimal use of proton pump inhibitors for treating acid peptic diseases in primary care.

    PubMed

    Tack, J; Louis, E; Persy, V; Urbain, D

    2013-12-01

    Heartburn, reflux and epigastric pain are frequently encountered symptoms in primary care medicine. Acid peptic diseases such as peptic ulcer and gastrointestinal reflux disease have a high prevalence, can have important impact on patient quality of life and represent a considerable health care cost. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the most potent pharmacological inhibitors of gastric acid secretion currently available and are the mainstay medical therapy for acid peptic diseases. This review summarizes current evidence on treatment of acid-peptic diseases with proton pump inhibitors and provides primary care clinicians with best practice guidelines for optimal use of these drugs.

  6. Surgical management of presacral bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Ausobsky, JR; Vowden, P

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Presacral venous bleeding is an uncommon but potentially life threatening complication of rectal surgery. During the posterior rectal dissection, it is recommended to proceed into the plane between the fascia propria of the rectum and the presacral fascia. Incorrect mobilisation of the rectum outside the Waldeyer’s fascia can tear out the lower presacral venous plexus or the sacral basivertebral veins, causing what may prove to be uncontrollable bleeding. Methods A systematic search of the MEDLINE® and Embase™ databases was performed to obtain primary data published in the period between 1 January 1960 and 31 July 2013. Each article describing variables such as incidence of presacral venous bleeding, surgical approach, number of cases treated and success rate was included in the analysis. Results A number of creative solutions have been described that attempt to provide good tamponade of the presacral haemorrhage, eliminating the need for second operation. However, few cases are reported in the literature. Conclusions As conventional haemostatic measures often fail to control this type of haemorrhage, several alternative methods to control bleeding definitively have been described. We propose a practical comprehensive classification of the available techniques for the management of presacral bleeding. PMID:24780015

  7. A new factor in the blood of patients with peptic ulcer. Distribution in blood fractions.

    PubMed

    Necheles, H; Geisel, A; Berg, M; Jefferson, N C

    1975-08-01

    Previous work on a factor in the blood of patients with peptic ulcer which contracts smooth muscle was confirmed and the work extended to investigation of the activity of blood fractions. Whole heparinized blood and its fractions were tested on a strip of guinea pig ileum and height of contraction and latent period were used as criteria of activity. Whole heparinized blood of ulcer patients had significantly higher activity than that of normal controls. Differences between the fractions of ulcer patients and controls were less significant. With the lysed buffy coat, however, while the differences between the height of contraction between the groups did not differ statistically, the speed of the reaction (shorter latent period) was significantly greater in the ulcer patients. The cellular alterations causing this response are unknown.

  8. Clinical approach to the patient with unexpected bleeding.

    PubMed

    Teitel, J M

    2000-10-01

    Bleeding can be considered unexpected if it is disproportionate to the intensity of the haemostatic stress in a patient with no known haemorrhagic disorder or if it occurs in a patient in whom a bleeding disorder has been characterized but is adequately treated. A thorough history usually allows the clinician to predict reasonably accurately whether the patient is likely to have a systemic haemostatic defect (and if so whether it is congenital or acquired), or whether the bleeding likely has a purely anatomical basis. The nature of bleeding is instructive with respect to preliminary categorization. Thus, mucocutaneous bleeding suggests defects of primary haemostasis (disordered platelet-vascular interactions). Bleeding into deeper structures is more suggestive of coagulation defects leading to impaired fibrin clot formation, and delayed bleeding after primary haemostasis is characteristic of hyperfibrinolysis. Localized bleeding suggests an anatomical cause, although an underlying haemostatic defect may coexist. Where bleeding is so acutely threatening as to require urgent intervention, diagnosis and treatment must proceed simultaneously. In the case of minor haemorrhage (not threatening to life or limb) it may be preferable to defer therapy while the nature of the bleeding disorder is methodically investigated. Initial laboratory evaluation is guided by the preliminary clinical impression. The amount of blood loss can be inferred from the haematocrit or haemoglobin concentration, and the platelet count will quickly identify cases in which thrombocytopenia is the likely cause of bleeding. In the latter instance, examination of the red cell morphology, leucocyte differential, and mean platelet volume may allow the aetiological mechanism to be presumptively identified as hypoproliferative or consumptive. With regard to coagulation testing, the activated PTT, prothrombin time, and thrombin time usually constitute an adequate battery of screening tests, unless the

  9. A Case of an Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Ruptured Dissection of a Right Aortic Arch

    SciTech Connect

    Born, Christine; Forster, Andreas; Rock, Clemens; Pfeifer, Klaus-Juergen; Rieger, Johannes; Reiser, Maximilian

    2003-09-15

    We report a case of severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a rare underlying cause. The patient was unconscious when he was admitted to the hospital. No chest radiogram was performed. Routine diagnostic measures, including endoscopy, failed to reveal the origin of the bleeding, which was believed to originate from the esophagus secondary to a peptic ulcer or varices. Exploratory laparotomy added no further information, but contrast-enhanced multislice computed tomography (MSCT) of the chest showed dextroposition of the widened aortic arch with a ruptured type-B dissection and a consecutive aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF). The patient died on the day of admission. Noninvasive MSCT angiography gives rapid diagnostic information on patients with occult upper gastrointestinal bleeding and should be considered before more invasive conventional angiography or surgery.

  10. Vaginal bleeding in early pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... sex? Did you bleed afterward? What is your blood type? Your provider can test your blood type. If it is Rh negative, you will need treatment with a medicine called Rho(D) immune globulin to prevent complications with future pregnancies. ... If something other than blood comes out, call ...

  11. Intra-abdominal bleeding in appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Thongprayoon, C; Pasa-Arj, S

    1991-08-01

    A 34-year-old woman, gravida 6 with 10 weeks of gestation was admitted because of abdominal pain and fainting. On physical examination she had hypotension, was pale with abdominal tenderness and guarding. Culdocentesis yielded unclotted blood. Immediate laparotomy was performed, because a diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy was made. About 2,500 ml of fresh blood was found in the abdominal cavity. Appendicular artery tear caused active arterial bleeding. The torn appendicular artery was observed to be the consequence of perforated appendicitis, which, in turn, was caused by a faecalith. Appendectomy was performed and she made a good recovery.

  12. [Peptic ulcer disease in liver cirrhosis: role of Helicobacter pylori infection and therapeutic approach].

    PubMed

    Mitrică, Dana; Constantinescu, R; Drug, V L; Stanciu, C

    2011-01-01

    Peptic ulcer has frequently been associated with liver cirrhosis. The death rate for peptic ulcer in cirrhotics has been reported to be five times higher than in general population. The underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Different factors have been claimed to be involved, such as alterations in serum gastrin level, gastric acid secretions, mucosal blood flow and decreased prostaglandin production in gastric mucosa. Moreover, Helicobacter pylori infection, when accurately assessed, is detectable in most peptic ulcer cirrhotics. Since the H. pylori infection strongly correlates with peptic ulcer in general population, it is necessary to clarify the role of H. pylori in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer in cirrhosis before eradication can be proposed as a preventive measure.

  13. Severe and refractory peptic ulcer disease: the diagnostic dilemma: case report and comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Guzzo, James L; Duncan, Mona; Bass, Barbara L; Bochicchio, Grant V; Napolitano, Lena M

    2005-11-01

    The recognition of Helicobacter pylori infection as a cause of peptic ulcer disease, medical regimens to eradicate the organism, and the widespread use of proton pump inhibition to suppress gastric acid secretion have revolutionized the management of peptic ulcer disease. As a result, successful medical management of peptic ulcer disease has largely supplanted the need for gastric surgery by general surgeons. Surgery is reserved for complications of the disease, refractory disease, or rare causes of ulcer disease such as gastrinoma and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. In this report, we describe a case of intractable peptic ulcer disease that progressed to gastric outlet obstruction despite maximal medical therapy. We review the diagnostic studies utilized to evaluate the potential etiologies of peptic ulcer disease and the difficulty in diagnosing gastrinoma and Zollinger-Ellison in the setting of potent medical acid suppression therapy.

  14. Gastrointestinal Bleeding: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bleeding (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Also in Spanish GI bleeding - slideshow (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Diagnosis and Tests Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Long-Term ( ...

  15. Emerging trends in peptic ulcer disease and damage control surgery in the H. pylori era.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian R; Stabile, Bruce E

    2005-09-01

    The prevalence of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and the frequency of operation have been decreasing for decades. Immigration of patients harboring Helicobacter pylori may reverse these longstanding declines. The experience with a large public hospital population in an area of high immigration may portend future national trends. A 10-year retrospective study analyzed the changing demographics of PUD and the frequency and nature of surgical intervention. A total of 2,182 patients were diagnosed with PUD, 1,173 in the early period (1995-1999) and 1,009 in the recent period (2000-2004). The proportion of Hispanic patients increased from 39.3 per cent to 47.5 per cent (P = 0.017). The ratio of male to female patients decreased from 1.7:1 to 1.3:1 (P = 0.003). The PUD operation rate decreased from 6.7 per cent to 3.8 per cent (P = 0.004). Among operated patients, the frequency of H. pylori testing increased from 41.8 per cent to 81.6 per cent (P = 0.039). Acute perforation and bleeding necessitated the vast majority (87.2%) of operations. The use of acid-reducing operations declined from 50.6 per cent to 31.6 per cent in favor of nonacid-reducing "damage control" procedures. Contrary to historic trends, in the predominately immigrant public hospital patient population studied, 1) the incidence of PUD is decreasing only modestly, 2) male predominance is disappearing, 3) gastric ulcer (GU) is more prevalent than duodenal ulcer (DU), but DU requires operation more frequently than GU, and 4) there is a marked decrease in use of acid-reducing operations reflecting a new "damage control" surgical approach to acute PUD complications in the H. pylori era.

  16. Peptic ulcer disease in endogenous hypercortisolism: myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Hatipoglu, Esra; Caglar, Asli Sezgin; Caglar, Erkan; Ugurlu, Serdal; Tuncer, Murat; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2015-11-01

    Many clinicians believe hypercortisolism is ulcerogenic. However, data from clinical studies show that prophylaxis for peptic ulcer disease is no longer recommended in patients receiving corticosteroid treatment. This has not yet been verified in endogenous hypercortisolism by controlled clinical studies. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the relationship between endogenous Cushing's syndrome (CS) and peptic ulcer disease and Helicobacter pylori infection. The study group contained 20 cases with CS resulting from ACTH-dependent endogenous hypercortisolism. The control groups consisted of 14 age- and gender-matched cases receiving exogenous corticosteroid therapy and 100 cases of dyspepsia with non-cushingoid features. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed on all cases. Biopsies were taken from five different points: two samples from the antrum, two samples from the corpus, and one sample from the fundus. A histological diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection was also obtained from evaluation of biopsy specimens. The frequency of stomach and duodenal ulcers did not vary between the groups (p = 0.5 and p = 0.7). Antral gastritis was less frequent and pangastritis was more common in cases with CS compared to the healthy controls (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001). The incidence of Candida esophagitis was more frequent in cases with CS compared to cases with corticosteroid treatment and healthy controls (p = 0.03). Histopathological findings and frequency of Helicobacter pylori based on pathology results did not vary between the three groups. It is possible that neither exogenous nor endogenous corticosteroid excess directly causes peptic ulcer or Helicobacter pylori infection. Prophylactic use of proton pump inhibitors is not compulsory for hypercortisolism of any type.

  17. Providing Young Women with Credible Health Information about Bleeding Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rhynders, Patricia A.; Sayers, Cynthia A.; Presley, Rodney J.; Thierry, JoAnn M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 1% of U.S. women may have an undiagnosed bleeding disorder, which can diminish quality of life and lead to life-threatening complications during menstruation, childbirth, and surgery. Purpose To understand young women’s knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions about bleeding disorders and determine the preferred messaging strategy (e.g., gain- versus loss-framed messages) for presenting information. Methods In September 2010, a web-assisted personal interview of women aged 18–25 years was conducted. Preliminary analyses were conducted in 2011 with final analyses in 2013. In total, 1,243 women participated. Knowledge of blood disorders was tabulated for these respondents. Menstrual experiences of women at risk for a bleeding disorder were compared with those not at risk using chi-square analyses. Perceived influence of gain- versus loss-framed messages also was compared. Results Participants knew that a bleeding disorder is a condition in which bleeding takes a long time to stop (77%) or blood does not clot (66%). Of the women, 57% incorrectly thought that a bleeding disorder is characterized by thin blood; many were unsure if bleeding disorders involve blood types, not getting a period, or mother and fetus having a different blood type. Women at risk for a bleeding disorder were significantly more likely to report that menstruation interfered with daily activities (36% vs 9%); physical or sports activities (46% vs 21%); social activities (29% vs 7%); and school or work activities (20% vs 9%) than women not at risk. Gain-framed messages were significantly more likely to influence women’s decisions to seek medical care than parallel loss-framed messages. Findings suggest that the most influential messages focus on knowing effective treatment is available (86% gain-framed vs 77% loss-framed); preventing pregnancy complications (79% gain- vs 71% loss-framed); and maintaining typical daily activities during menstrual periods. Conclusions Lack

  18. Assessing upper gastrointestinal bleeding in adults.

    PubMed

    Pezzulo, Gabrielle; Kruger, Danielle

    2014-09-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a potentially life-threatening condition requiring accurate, prompt, and appropriate patient evaluation and management. Clinicians of all specialties must know the best practices for preventing and managing upper GI bleeding. This article focuses on assessing and managing adults with acute nonvariceal upper GI bleeding.

  19. Predictors of re-bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mu-Hsien; Tsou, Yung-Kuan; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Lee, Ching-Song; Liu, Nai-Jen; Sung, Kai-Feng; Cheng, Hao-Tsai

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To predict the re-bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) bleeding. METHODS: Over a 15-year period, data from 161 patients with delayed post-ES bleeding were retrospectively collected from a single medical center. To identify risk factors for re-bleeding after initial successful endoscopic hemostasis, parameters before, during and after the procedure of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography were analyzed. These included age, gender, blood biochemistry, co-morbidities, endoscopic diagnosis, presence of peri-ampullary diverticulum, occurrence of immediate post-ES bleeding, use of needle knife precut sphincterotomy, severity of delayed bleeding, endoscopic features on delayed bleeding, and type of endoscopic therapy. RESULTS: A total of 35 patients (21.7%) had re-bleeding after initial successful endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-ES bleeding. Univariate analysis revealed that malignant biliary stricture, serum bilirubin level of greater than 10 mg/dL, initial bleeding severity, and bleeding diathesis were significant predictors of re-bleeding. By multivariate analysis, serum bilirubin level of greater than 10 mg/dL and initial bleeding severity remained significant predictors. Re-bleeding was controlled by endoscopic therapy in a single (n = 23) or multiple (range, 2-7; n = 6) sessions in 29 of the 35 patients (82.9%). Four patients required transarterial embolization and one went for surgery. These five patients had severe bleeding when delayed post-ES bleeding occurred. One patient with decompensated liver cirrhosis died from re-bleeding. CONCLUSION: Re-bleeding occurs in approximately one-fifth of patients after initial successful endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-ES bleeding. Severity of initial bleeding and serum bilirubin level of greater than 10 mg/dL are predictors of re-bleeding. PMID:27003996

  20. Analysis of Delayed Bleeding after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Gastric Epithelial Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Shinichi; Cho, Songde; Kotachi, Takahiro; Shimizu, Akinori; Matuura, Genta; Nonaka, Michihiro; Hamada, Toshihide; Hirata, Ken; Nakanishi, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Aim. Delayed bleeding after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for gastric epithelial neoplasms is a major complication. We investigated factors related to post-ESD bleeding to identify preventive measures. Methods. The study included 161 gastric epithelial neoplasms in 142 patients from June 2007 to September 2010. Post-ESD bleeding was defined as an ulcer with active bleeding or apparent exposed vessels diagnosed by an emergency endoscopy or a planned follow-up endoscopy. We analyzed associations between bleeding and the following factors: age, sex, morphology, pathology, tumor depth, ulcer presence/absence, location, size of the resected lesion, duration of the procedure, the number of times bleeding occurred during ESD, and the use of anticoagulants and/or antiplatelet drugs. Subsequently, we examined characteristics of bleeding cases. Results. Post-ESD bleeding occurred in 21 lesions. Univariate analysis of these cases showed that ulcer presence/absence (P < 0.001), middle or lower third lesions (P = 0.036), circumference (P = 0.014), and a post-ESD ulcer with an extended lesser curve (P = 0.009) were significant predictors of bleeding. Multivariate analysis showed that ulcer presence/absence (OR 9.73, 95% CI 2.28–41.53) was the only significant predictor. Conclusion. Ulcer presence/absence was considered the most significant predictor of post-ESD bleeding. PMID:22536221

  1. Association of endothelial progenitor cells and peptic ulcer treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    NIE, ZHIHONG; XU, LIMIN; LI, CHUANYUAN; TIAN, TAO; XIE, PINGPING; CHEN, XIA; LI, BOJING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the association between endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and peptic ulcers in patients with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), in association with the efficiency of peptic ulcer treatment. The study recruited healthy subjects and peptic ulcer patients with or without T2DM. All the ulcer patients, including those with and without T2DM, were administered omeprazole for 8 weeks. Peptic ulcer patients with T2DM were additionally treated with glipizide and novolin. Blood samples were then obtained from the three groups following ulcer treatment. CD133+ cells were isolated from the blood samples using magnetic bead selection, and cultured in complete medium 199. Morphological and quantity changes in EPCs were observed by light and fluorescence microscopy. In addition, flow cytometric analysis was used to quantify the number of vascular endothelial cells. The treatment was partially effective in 7 of the 32 peptic ulcer patients without T2DM and 12 of the 32 peptic ulcer patients with T2DM. However, this treatment was ineffective in 20 of the 32 peptic ulcer patients with T2DM. Notably, 25 peptic ulcer patients without T2DM were defined as completely recovered following treatment. In addition, the number of circulating EPCs as well as their colony forming ability was significantly reduced (P<0.05) in the peptic ulcer patients with T2DM following ulcer treatment, compared with the other groups. Circulating EPC counts were significantly increased in peptic ulcer patients without T2DM, as compared with the healthy controls. With regards to colony formation, peptic ulcer patients without T2DM did not exhibit improved colony formation ability. In conclusion, the number of circulating EPCs and their colony-forming ability was significantly reduced in peptic ulcer patients with T2DM following ulcer treatment when compared with the other groups. This suggests that the poor curative effect of peptic ulcer treatment in these

  2. Association of endothelial progenitor cells and peptic ulcer treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zhihong; Xu, Limin; Li, Chuanyuan; Tian, Tao; Xie, Pingping; Chen, Xia; Li, Bojing

    2016-05-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the association between endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and peptic ulcers in patients with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), in association with the efficiency of peptic ulcer treatment. The study recruited healthy subjects and peptic ulcer patients with or without T2DM. All the ulcer patients, including those with and without T2DM, were administered omeprazole for 8 weeks. Peptic ulcer patients with T2DM were additionally treated with glipizide and novolin. Blood samples were then obtained from the three groups following ulcer treatment. CD133(+) cells were isolated from the blood samples using magnetic bead selection, and cultured in complete medium 199. Morphological and quantity changes in EPCs were observed by light and fluorescence microscopy. In addition, flow cytometric analysis was used to quantify the number of vascular endothelial cells. The treatment was partially effective in 7 of the 32 peptic ulcer patients without T2DM and 12 of the 32 peptic ulcer patients with T2DM. However, this treatment was ineffective in 20 of the 32 peptic ulcer patients with T2DM. Notably, 25 peptic ulcer patients without T2DM were defined as completely recovered following treatment. In addition, the number of circulating EPCs as well as their colony forming ability was significantly reduced (P<0.05) in the peptic ulcer patients with T2DM following ulcer treatment, compared with the other groups. Circulating EPC counts were significantly increased in peptic ulcer patients without T2DM, as compared with the healthy controls. With regards to colony formation, peptic ulcer patients without T2DM did not exhibit improved colony formation ability. In conclusion, the number of circulating EPCs and their colony-forming ability was significantly reduced in peptic ulcer patients with T2DM following ulcer treatment when compared with the other groups. This suggests that the poor curative effect of peptic ulcer treatment in these

  3. Tannins, Peptic Ulcers and Related Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Neyres Zinia Taveira; de Souza Falcão, Heloina; Gomes, Isis Fernandes; de Almeida Leite, Thiago Jose; de Morais Lima, Gedson Rodrigues; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria; Tavares, Josean Fechine; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; de Athayde-Filho, Petrônio Filgueiras; Batista, Leonia Maria

    2012-01-01

    This review of the current literature aims to study correlations between the chemical structure and gastric anti-ulcer activity of tannins. Tannins are used in medicine primarily because of their astringent properties. These properties are due to the fact that tannins react with the tissue proteins with which they come into contact. In gastric ulcers, this tannin-protein complex layer protects the stomach by promoting greater resistance to chemical and mechanical injury or irritation. Moreover, in several experimental models of gastric ulcer, tannins have been shown to present antioxidant activity, promote tissue repair, exhibit anti Helicobacter pylori effects, and they are involved in gastrointestinal tract anti-inflammatory processes. The presence of tannins explains the anti-ulcer effects of many natural products. PMID:22489149

  4. Tannins, peptic ulcers and related mechanisms.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Neyres Zinia Taveira; de Souza Falcão, Heloina; Gomes, Isis Fernandes; de Almeida Leite, Thiago Jose; de Morais Lima, Gedson Rodrigues; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria; Tavares, Josean Fechine; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; de Athayde-Filho, Petrônio Filgueiras; Batista, Leonia Maria

    2012-01-01

    This review of the current literature aims to study correlations between the chemical structure and gastric anti-ulcer activity of tannins. Tannins are used in medicine primarily because of their astringent properties. These properties are due to the fact that tannins react with the tissue proteins with which they come into contact. In gastric ulcers, this tannin-protein complex layer protects the stomach by promoting greater resistance to chemical and mechanical injury or irritation. Moreover, in several experimental models of gastric ulcer, tannins have been shown to present antioxidant activity, promote tissue repair, exhibit anti Helicobacter pylori effects, and they are involved in gastrointestinal tract anti-inflammatory processes. The presence of tannins explains the anti-ulcer effects of many natural products.

  5. Research on Supersonic Inlet Bleed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, David O.; Vyas, Manan A.; Slater, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Phase I data results of the Fundamental Inlet Bleed Experiments project at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) are presented which include flow coefficient results for two single-hole boundary-layer bleed configurations. The bleed configurations tested are round holes at inclination angles of 90deg and 20deg both having length-to-diameter ratios of 2.0. Results were obtained at freestream Mach numbers of 1.33, 1.62, 1.98, 2.46, and 2.92 and unit Reynolds numbers of 0.984, 1.89, and 2.46 10(exp 7)/m. Approach boundary-layer data are presented for each flow condition and the flow coefficient results are compared to existing multi-hole data obtained under similar conditions. For the 90deg hole, the single and multi-hole distributions agree fairly well with the exception that under supercritical operation, the multi-hole data chokes at higher flow coefficient levels. This behavior is also observed for the 20deg hole but to a lesser extent. The 20deg hole also shows a markedly different characteristic at subcritical operation. Also presented are preliminary results of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of both configurations at the Mach 1.33 and a unit Reynolds number of 2.46 10(exp 7)/m. Comparison of the results shows the agreement to be very good.

  6. How to effectively manage the event of bleeding complications when using anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Maria Teresa; Prandoni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Since affecting hemostasis, all the anticoagulant drugs carry a risk of bleeding. Minor bleeds may be managed without the need to reverse the anticoagulant effect, which is instead a key step to ensure efficacious hemostasis in major and life-threatening bleeding. Drug withdrawal applies to all anticoagulants. Unfractionated heparin can be neutralized by protamine, which may partly neutralize low-molecular-weight heparins. There is no antidote for fondaparinux, and recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) may be considered for critical bleeding. For vitamin K antagonists-induced major bleeding, rapid reversal with prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC) or plasma and intravenous vitamin K to confer lasting correction are recommended. PCC, activated PCC and rFVIIa are suggested for major bleeding related to new direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC), despite proper studies are lacking. Premarketing studies are ongoing on new antidotes (idarucizumab, andexanet, aripazine), which appear to be suitable for the treatment of DOAC-induced life-threatening hemorrhage.

  7. Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2009:chap 39. Simon BC, Hern HG. Wound management principles. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  8. Platelet function tests, independent of platelet count, are associated with bleeding severity in ITP.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, Andrew L; Grace, Rachael F; Gerrits, Anja J; Berny-Lang, Michelle A; Brown, Travis; Carmichael, Sabrina L; Neufeld, Ellis J; Michelson, Alan D

    2015-08-13

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients with similarly low platelet counts differ in their tendency to bleed. To determine if differences in platelet function in ITP patients account for this variation in bleeding tendency, we conducted a single-center, cross-sectional study of pediatric patients with ITP. Bleeding severity (assessed by standardized bleeding score) and platelet function (assessed by whole blood flow cytometry) with and without agonist stimulation was evaluated in 57 ITP patients (median age, 9.9 years). After adjustment for platelet count, higher levels of thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP)-stimulated percent P-selectin- and activated glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa-positive platelets were significantly associated with a lower bleeding score, whereas higher levels of immature platelet fraction (IPF), TRAP-stimulated platelet surface CD42b, unstimulated platelet surface P-selectin, and platelet forward light scatter (FSC) were associated with a higher bleeding score. Thus, platelet function tests related to platelet age (IPF, FSC) and activation through the protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) thrombin receptor (TRAP-stimulated P-selectin, activated GPIIb-IIIa, and CD42b), independent of platelet count, are associated with concurrent bleeding severity in ITP. These tests may be useful markers of future bleeding risk in ITP.

  9. Endovascular management for significant iatrogenic portal vein bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Woo; Shin, Ji Hoon; Park, Jonathan K; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Ko, Gi-Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Sung, Kyu-Bo

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite conservative treatment, hemorrhage from an intrahepatic branch of the portal vein can cause hemodynamic instability requiring urgent intervention. Purpose To retrospectively report the outcomes of hemodynamically significant portal vein bleeding after endovascular management. Material and Methods During a period of 15 years, four patients (2 men, 2 women; median age, 70.5 years) underwent angiography and embolization for iatrogenic portal vein bleeding. Causes of hemorrhage, angiographic findings, endovascular treatment, and complications were reported. Results Portal vein bleeding occurred after percutaneous liver biopsy (n = 2), percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (n = 1), and percutaneous cholecystostomy (n = 1). The median time interval between angiography and percutaneous procedure was 5 h (range, 4-240 h). Common hepatic angiograms including indirect mesenteric portograms showed active portal vein bleeding into the peritoneal cavity with (n = 1) or without (n = 2) an arterioportal (AP) fistula, and portal vein pseudoaneurysm alone with an AP fistula (n = 1). Successful transcatheter arterial embolization (n = 2) or percutaneous transhepatic portal vein embolization (n = 2) was performed. Embolic materials were n-butyl cyanoacrylate alone (n = 2) or in combination with gelatin sponge particles and coils (n = 2). There were no major treatment-related complications or patient mortality within 30 days. Conclusion Patients with symptomatic or life-threatening portal vein bleeding following liver-penetrating procedures can successfully be managed with embolization.

  10. Clinical Outcomes of Endoscopic Hemostasis in Marginal Ulcer Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Yasushi; Takenaka, Ryuta; Hori, Keisuke; Takemoto, Koji; Kawano, Seiji; Kawahara, Yoshiro; Fujiki, Shigeatsu; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    The usefulness of endoscopy in marginal ulcer bleeding has rarely been studied, and the optimal method for preventing rebleeding is unclear. Here we assessed the efficacy of endoscopy in marginal ulcer bleeding and examined the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in the prevention of rebleeding. A total of 28 patients with marginal ulcer bleeding (21 men, 7 women; median age 58.5 years) were treated by endoscopy. We analyzed the clinical characteristics, results of endoscopic therapy, characteristics of rebleeding patients, and relation between the use of PPIs and the duration of rebleeding. Sixteen patients had active bleeding. Initial hemostasis was achieved in all patients. There were no procedure-related adverse events. Rebleeding occurred in one patient within the first month and in 7 patients thereafter. There was a significant difference in the rebleeding rate between the patients who received a PPI and those who did not. In a multivariate analysis, the non-use of PPIs was a risk factor for rebleeding (hazard ratio, 6.22). Therapeutic endoscopy is effective in achieving hemostasis from marginal ulcer bleeding. PPIs may prevent rebleeding from marginal ulcers.

  11. CXC chemokine CXCL12 tissue expression and circulating levels in peptic ulcer patients with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Vahid; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein; Mirzaee, Vahid; Khorramdelazad, Hossein

    2016-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is among the most prevalent human infections. CXCL12 is a well-known CXC chemokine involved in inflammation and play major roles in angiogenesis. There is currently very limited data on the role of CXCL12 in peptic ulcer disease. Hence, we aimed to explore whether CXCL12 is involved in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer induced by H. pylori. In this study, we enrolled 102 H. pylori-infected patients, including 51 with active ulcer (GA) and 51 with healing ulcer (GH). We also recruited 50 healthy subjects as control, which did not show any sign or symptoms of chronic inflammatory diseases, infection, or immune-related disorders. Endoscopy was performed to determine the stage of the disease. ELISA was used for detection of H. pylori infection and CXCL12 measurement. We also employed western blotting to detect CXCL12 in ulcerative lesions of H. pylori. Demographic data were also collected by questionnaire. Our results demonstrated that CXCL12 serum levels in GA group (151.8±18.31pg/mL) were significantly higher than those in GH (36.89±6.78pg/mL) and control groups (33.77±9.12pg/mL) (P<0.0001). However, we did not observe a significant difference between GH and control groups. Moreover, overexpression of CXCL12 in gastric lesions of patients in GA group was confirmed by Western blot analysis. According to the result of the present study, it could be concluded that CXCL12 is involved in the pathogenesis and healing of H. pylori-induced peptic ulcer. CXCL12 serum levels may also be used to distinguish between GA and GH phases of the disease.

  12. Acquired antiprothrombin antibodies: an unusual cause of bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Cristiana; Viveiro, Carolina; Maia, Paulo; Rezende, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Acquired inhibitors of coagulation causing bleeding manifestations are rare in children. They emerge, normally in the context of autoimmune diseases or drug ingestion, but transient and self-limiting cases can occur after viral infection. We describe, an otherwise healthy, 7-year-old girl who had gingival bleeding after a tooth extraction. The prothrombin time (PT) and the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were both prolonged with evidence of an immediate acting inhibitor (lupic anticoagulant). Further coagulation studies demonstrated prothrombin (FII) deficiency and prothrombin directed (FII) antibodies. The serological tests to detect an underlying autoimmune disease were all negative. The coagulation studies normalised alongside the disappearance of the antibody. This article presents lupus anticoagulant hypoprothrombinaemia syndrome (LAHS) as a rare case of acquired bleeding diathesis in childhood. PMID:23299692

  13. Acquired antiprothrombin antibodies: an unusual cause of bleeding.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Cristiana; Viveiro, Carolina; Maia, Paulo; Rezende, Teresa

    2013-01-07

    Acquired inhibitors of coagulation causing bleeding manifestations are rare in children. They emerge, normally in the context of autoimmune diseases or drug ingestion, but transient and self-limiting cases can occur after viral infection. We describe, an otherwise healthy, 7-year-old girl who had gingival bleeding after a tooth extraction. The prothrombin time (PT) and the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were both prolonged with evidence of an immediate acting inhibitor (lupic anticoagulant). Further coagulation studies demonstrated prothrombin (FII) deficiency and prothrombin directed (FII) antibodies. The serological tests to detect an underlying autoimmune disease were all negative. The coagulation studies normalised alongside the disappearance of the antibody. This article presents lupus anticoagulant hypoprothrombinaemia syndrome (LAHS) as a rare case of acquired bleeding diathesis in childhood.

  14. Gastrointestinal bleeding and possible hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Leisa L

    2012-03-01

    An 88-year-old female, living independently in the community, developed duodenal and gastric ulcers from using overthe-counter naproxen sodium for pain related to a shoulder fracture and arthritis of the knees. She was hospitalized and received packed red blood cells and intravenous proton pump inhibitor therapy. During her hospitalization, she developed atrial fibrillation (AF). Warfarin was not prescribed for stroke prevention because of the gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. The patient was initially placed on atenolol, and then amiodarone was added. After a two-week hospital stay she was discharged to a nursing facility to gain strength, further correct her anemia, and receive physical therapy for the shoulder and ambulation problems from arthritis of the knees. The amiodarone was continued in the nursing facility. After 15 days of amiodarone therapy (hospital and nursing facility), a laboratory report indicated an elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone level. Levothyroxine was prescribed. The patient was eventually discharged to an assisted living facility once her strength returned and her ambulation improved. GI bleeding with anemia and weakness from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and changes in thyroid function with amiodarone therapy for AF will be discussed.

  15. Assessment of some Herbal Drugs for Prophylaxis of Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Gohar, Ahmed A; Zaki, Ahmed A

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous (hydrophilic) and chloroform (Lipophilic) extracts of nine medicinal plants currently used in Egyptian traditional medicine to treat some gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorders were tested for their gastro-protective effect against the incidence of peptic ulcer. Indomethacin-induced ulcer in a rat model was used for this testing. Mentha microphylla, Brassica oleracea Capitata (Cabbage), B. oleracea Botrytis (cauliflower) aqueous fraction, Portolaca oleracea polysaccharide fraction, Oreganum marjoranum, Matricaria recutita, Solanum nigrum hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions, in addition to the chloroform fraction of Portolaca oleracea and Cicorium intybus afforded high protection against the incidence of gastric ulcer (~95%). O. syriacum hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions and gum arabic afforded moderate prophylactic effect. L. sicerarea, C. intybus hydrophilic fractions and M. microphylla lipophilic fraction were inactive. Herbs represent excellent resources for cost-effective and readily available gastro-protective remedies without side effects. PMID:25276211

  16. Peptic ulcer disease and other complications in patients receiving dexamethasone palliation for brain metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Penzner, R.D.; Lipsett, J.A.

    1982-11-01

    A retrospective analysis was done of 106 patients who received radiation therapy for brain metastasis. Dexamethasone therapy was instituted in 97 patients. Peptic ulcer disease developed in 5 of 89 patients (5.6 percent) who received a dosage of at least 12 mg a day, but did not occur in patients who received a lower dose or in those who did not receive steroids. The interval between institution of dexamethasone therapy and the development of peptic ulcer disease ranged from three to nine weeks. Two patients had perforated ulcers, one of whom required surgical resection. Peptic ulcer disease contributed to the general deterioration and death of three of the five patients. Overall, in 14 of the 89 patients (15.7 percent) a complication of steroid therapy developed in the form of peptic ulcer disease, steroid myopathy or diabetes mellitus (or a combination of these).

  17. [Clinical-immunological and microbiological parallels in chronic generalized parodontitis and peptic ulcer of the stomach].

    PubMed

    Orekhova, L Iu; Neĭzberg, D M; Stiuf, I Iu

    2006-01-01

    Clinical, immunological and DNA diagnostic examinations of 101 patients with chronic generalized parodontitis and peptic ulcer have revealed similar features of immunological disorders of gastric and oral mucosa and the role of Helicobacter pylori.

  18. Evaluation of technetium-99m DTPA for localization of site of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Mahajan, K.K.; Ericsson, S.; Nawaz, K.; Owunwanne, A.; Kouris, K.; Higazy, E.; Awdeh, M.

    1986-11-01

    Intravenous Tc-99m DTPA was evaluated in 34 patients with active upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Active bleeding was detected in 25 patients: nine in the stomach, 12 in the duodenum, and four from esophageal varices. No active bleeding was seen in nine patients (two gastric ulcers and seven duodenal ulcers). Results were correlated with endoscopic and/or surgical findings. All completely correlated except: 1) one case of esophageal varices in which there was disagreement on the site, 2) three cases of duodenal ulcers that were not bleeding on endoscopy but showed mild oozing on delayed images and 3) one case of gastric ulcer, in which no bleeding was detected in the Tc-99m DTPA study, but was found to be bleeding at surgery 24 hours later. The Tc-99m DTPA study is a reliable method for localization of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with an agreement ratio of 85%. This method also can be used safely for follow-up of patients with intermittent bleeding. It is less invasive than endoscopy, is easily repeatable, and has the same accuracy.

  19. Laparoscopic Repair for Perforated Peptic Ulcer in Children.

    PubMed

    Reusens, Helena; Dassonville, Martine; Steyaert, Henri

    2016-07-25

    Introduction A perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) is a rare but major complication of gastroduodenal peptic ulcer disease. Literature is scarce on this subject in the pediatric population and most articles describe a surgical treatment by laparotomy. We aim to review all our cases of pediatric PPU treated over the past 16 years and compare these to literature to deduce potential benefits and disadvantages regarding laparoscopic treatment of PPU in children. Materials and Methods A retrospective study of all cases of PPU treated at the Lenval Hospital in Nice (France) and the Queen Fabiola University Hospital for Children in Brussels (Belgium) between 1998 and 2015 was performed. Results A total of five children were treated for PPU (2 females). The average age was 11 years (range, 3-17). All of them were surgically treated with laparoscopic simple suture of the perforation and placement of an omental patch. There were no mortalities, no conversions, and no extra-abdominal complications or wound dehiscences. Mean operating time was 78.6 minutes (range, 70-115 minutes). Mean duration of intravenous treatment was 6 days (range, 4-12 days). One reintervention was performed for abdominal infection. In one patient, an abdominal drain was left in place for 2 days. The mean time before refeeding was 3.4 days (range, 3-4 days) and mean length of stay was 12 days (range, 7-30 days). Conclusion Laparoscopic repair is safe and feasible for PPU and should be the gold standard for treatment of PPU in children.

  20. Swallowable fluorometric capsule for wireless triage of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Nemiroski, A; Ryou, M; Thompson, C C; Westervelt, R M

    2015-12-07

    Real-time detection of gastrointestinal bleeding remains a major challenge because there does not yet exist a minimally invasive technology that can both i) monitor for blood from an active hemorrhage and ii) uniquely distinguish it from blood left over from an inactive hemorrhage. Such a device would be an important tool for clinical triage. One promising solution, which we have proposed previously, is to inject a fluorescent dye into the blood stream and to use it as a distinctive marker of active bleeding by monitoring leakage into the gastrointestinal tract with a wireless fluorometer. This paper reports, for the first time to our knowledge, the development of a swallowable, wireless capsule with a built-in fluorometer capable of detecting fluorescein in blood, and intended for monitoring gastrointestinal bleeding in the stomach. The embedded, compact fluorometer uses pinholes to define a microliter sensing volume and to eliminate bulky optical components. The proof-of-concept capsule integrates optics, low-noise analog sensing electronics, a microcontroller, battery, and low power Zigbee radio, all into a cylindrical package measuring 11 mm × 27 mm and weighing 10 g. Bench-top experiments demonstrate wireless fluorometry with a limit-of-detection of 20 nM aqueous fluorescein. This device represents a major step towards a technology that would enable simple, rapid detection of active gastrointestinal bleeding, a capability that would save precious time and resources and, ultimately, reduce complications in patients.

  1. Nonsurgical techniques to control massive bleeding.

    PubMed

    Zentai, Christian; Grottke, Oliver; Spahn, Donat R; Rossaint, Rolf

    2013-03-01

    Significant advancements in nonsurgical and surgical approaches to control bleeding in severely injured patients have also improved the treatment of critical trauma-related coagulopathy. Nonsurgical procedures such as angiographic embolization are progressively considered to terminate arterial bleeding from pelvic fractures. The disturbance of coagulation may aggravate bleeding and hamper surgical procedures. The administration of coagulation factors and factor concentrates may be useful for correcting systemic coagulopathy and reducing the need for fresh frozen plasma, platelet, and red blood cell transfusions, which are associated with various adverse outcomes. In this review, nonsurgical management of critical trauma bleeding is discussed.

  2. Small bowel bleeding: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Gunjan, Deepak; Sharma, Vishal; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2014-01-01

    The small intestine is an uncommon site of gastro-intestinal (GI) bleeding; however it is the commonest cause of obscure GI bleeding. It may require multiple blood transfusions, diagnostic procedures and repeated hospitalizations. Angiodysplasia is the commonest cause of obscure GI bleeding, particularly in the elderly. Inflammatory lesions and tumours are the usual causes of small intestinal bleeding in younger patients. Capsule endoscopy and deep enteroscopy have improved our ability to investigate small bowel bleeds. Deep enteroscopy has also an added advantage of therapeutic potential. Computed tomography is helpful in identifying extra-intestinal lesions. In cases of difficult diagnosis, surgery and intra-operative enteroscopy can help with diagnosis and management. The treatment is dependent upon the aetiology of the bleed. An overt bleed requires aggressive resuscitation and immediate localisation of the lesion for institution of appropriate therapy. Small bowel bleeding can be managed by conservative, radiological, pharmacological, endoscopic and surgical methods, depending upon indications, expertise and availability. Some patients, especially those with multiple vascular lesions, can re-bleed even after appropriate treatment and pose difficult challenge to the treating physician. PMID:24874805

  3. Acute Upper Gastro-Intestinal Bleeding in Morocco: What Have Changed?

    PubMed Central

    Timraz, A.; Khannoussi, W.; Ajana, F. Z.; Essamri, W.; Benelbarhdadi, I.; Afifi, R.; Benazzouz, M.; Essaid, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. In the present study, we aimed to investigate epidemiological, clinical, and etiological characteristics of acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study was conducted between January 2003 and December 2008. It concerned all cases of acute upper gastroduodenal bleeding benefited from an urgent gastro-intestinal endoscopy in our department in Morocco. Characteristics of patients were evaluated in terms of age, gender, medical history, presenting symptoms, results of rectal and clinical examinations, and endoscopy findings. Results. 1389 cases were registered. As 66% of the patients were male, 34% were female. Mean age was 49. 12% of patients had a history of previous hemorrhage, and 26% had a history of NSAID and aspirin use. Endoscopy was performed in 96%. The gastroduodenal ulcer was the main etiology in 38%, followed by gastritis and duodenitis in 32.5%. Conclusion. AUGIB is still a frequent pathology, threatening patients' life. NSAID and aspirin are still the major risk factors. Their impact due to peptic ulcer remains stable in our country. PMID:21991509

  4. [Anatlysis of HSPA1B A1267G gene polymorphism in peptic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, M J; Salehi, Z; Sabet, E E; Ejtehadi, F

    2014-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a common illness, affecting a considerable number of people worldwide, and its occurrence can be influenced by environmental and genetic factors. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) function mostly as molecular chaperones, and are induced by various stresses. The A to G transition at position 1267 of the HSPA1B gene was shown to correlate with changes in the level of HSPA mRNA expression. Here, the relation between A1267G polymorphism of the HSPAIB gene and risk of peptic ulcer in the Iranian population was evaluated. One hundred subjects, who underwent gastroscopy, took part in the study. DNA samples extracted from the biopsy tissues were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). After gastroscopy, peptic ulcer was diagnosed for 50 patients; among them the distribution of AA/AB/BB genotypes was 10, 88 and 2%, respectively. As for the other 50 subjects (without peptic ulcer) included in the control group, the AA/AB/BB genotypes were identified as 40, 52 and 8%, respectively. A significant association was found between the HSPA1B genotype and peptic ulcer (6.76 OR; 95% CI, 2.26-20.2; p = 0.0006). Thus, the HSPA1B A1267G polymorphism may be a marker of susceptibility to peptic ulcer.

  5. Platelet Function Tests in Bleeding Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Riitta

    2016-04-01

    Functional disorders of platelets can involve any aspect of platelet physiology, with many different effects or outcomes. These include platelet numbers (thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia); changes in platelet production or destruction, or capture to the liver (Ashwell receptor); altered adhesion to vascular injury sites and/or influence on hemostasis and wound healing; and altered activation or receptor functions, shape change, spreading and release reactions, procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activity. Procoagulant membrane alterations, and generation of thrombin and fibrin, also affect platelet aggregation. The above parameters can all be studied, but standardization and quality control of assay methods have been limited despite several efforts. Only after a comprehensive clinical bleeding assessment, including family history, information on drug use affecting platelets, and exclusion of coagulation factor, and tissue deficits, should platelet function testing be undertaken to confirm an abnormality. Current diagnostic tools include blood cell counts, platelet characteristics according to the cell counter parameters, peripheral blood smear, exclusion of pseudothrombocytopenia, whole blood aggregometry (WBA) or light transmission aggregometry (LTA) in platelet-rich plasma, luminescence, platelet function analysis (PFA-100) for platelet adhesion and deposition to collagen cartridges under blood flow, and finally transmission electron microscopy to exclude rare structural defects leading to functional deficits. The most validated test panels are included in WBA, LTA, and PFA. Because platelets are isolated from their natural environment, many simplifications occur, as circulating blood and interaction with vascular wall are omitted in these assays. The target to reach a highly specific platelet disorder diagnosis in routine clinical management can be exhaustive, unless needed for genetic counseling. The elective overall assessment of platelet function disorder

  6. Managing acute upper GI bleeding, preventing recurrences.

    PubMed

    Albeldawi, Mazen; Qadeer, Mohammed A; Vargo, John J

    2010-02-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is common and potentially life-threatening and needs a prompt assessment and aggressive medical management. All patients need to undergo endoscopy to diagnose, assess, and possibly treat any underlying lesion. In addition, patients found to have bleeding ulcers should receive a proton pump inhibitor, the dosage and duration of treatment depending on the endoscopic findings and clinical factors.

  7. Comparison of Bypassing Agents in Bleeding Reduction in Treatment of Bleeding Episodes in Patients With Haemophilia and Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Golestani, Mina; Eshghi, Peyman; Rasekh, Hamid Reza; Cheraghali, Abdol Majid; Salamzadeh, Jamshid; Imani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Context: Mild-to-moderate bleeding disorders in haemophilia are primarily treated via recombinant activated factor VII a (rFVIIa) or activated prothrombin complex concentrate (aPCC). However, the efficacy of each bypassing agents may vary and none of them is universally effective. Evidence Acquisition: After reviewing the databases of PubMed, Scopus, MD Consult, Ovid, Trip database, Google Scholar, ProQuest and the Cochrane Library, finally, 17 papers published from 2000 to 2013 were extracted. We used as a random effect model in meta-analysis. Comprehensive meta-analysis (CMA) software was used for calculating and estimating the mean of bleeding reduction and performing meta-analysis. Results: The mean of bleeding reduction in aPCC and rFVIIa were 71.2% with CI 95% (lower limit 86.8% and upper limit 82%) and 72.3% with CI 95% (lower limit 57.6% and upper limit 83.4%), respectively. Conclusions: Although differences between the two products were very close to each other, they reported similar effects on joint bleeds. Further clinical studies should be performed by incorporating a standardized measurement in comparative efficacy of aPCC and rFVIIa. PMID:25763245

  8. Treatment modalities for bleeding esophagogastric varices.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Mamada, Yasuhiro; Taniai, Nobuhiko; Yoshioka, Masato; Hirakata, Atsushi; Kawano, Youichi; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Tetsuya; Ueda, Junji; Uchida, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    Bleeding from esophageal varices (EVs) or gastric varices (GVs) is a catastrophic complication of chronic liver disease. In this paper, we review the management of bleeding EVs and GVs. DIAGNOSIS OF EVS AND GVS: The grading system for esophagogastric varices proposed by the Japan Society for Portal Hypertension classifies GVs into those involving the cardia (Lg-c), the fundus (Lg-f), and both the cardia and the fundus (Lg-cf). In this review, we divide GVs into 2 categories: Lg-c (cardiac varices: CVs) and Lg-cf or Lg-f (fundal varices: FVs). TREATMENT MODALITIES FOR EVS AND GVS: Treatment modalities for EVs and GVs include placement of a Sengstaken-Blakemore tube, pharmacologic therapy, surgery, interventional radiology, and endoscopic treatment. MANAGEMENT OF BLEEDING EVS AND GVS: In Japan, endoscopic treatment has recently become the therapy of choice for bleeding EVs or GVs. In other countries, especially the United States, vasoactive drugs and endoscopic treatment are routinely used to manage variceal hemorrhage. BLEEDING EVS: Endoscopic variceal ligation is useful for controlling bleeding from EVs. However, confirmation of ligation precisely at the site of bleeding is usually difficult in patients with massive variceal bleeding. The site of acute bleeding can generally be identified by means of water instillation and suction. Ligation is then performed at the bleeding point. If endoscopic hemostasis is unsuccessful, a Sengstaken-Blakemore tube is used as a temporary bridge to other treatments. Transportal obliteration is useful for blocking variceal blood flow. BLEEDING GVS: Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy with a tissue adhesive, such as N-butyl-cyanoacrylate or isobutyl-2-cyanoacrylate, is effective for acute bleeding from GVs. However, bleeding from the GV injection site and rebleeding from the rupture point have been reported in patients receiving endoscopic injection sclerotherapy. If endoscopic hemostasis is unsuccessful, a Sengstaken-Blakemore tube

  9. Assessment of bleeding disorders in Sheehan's syndrome: are bleeding disorders the underlying cause of Sheehan's syndrome?

    PubMed

    Gokalp, Deniz; Tuzcu, Alpaslan; Bahceci, Mithat; Ayyildiz, Orhan; Erdemoglu, Mahmut; Alpagat, Gulistan

    2011-01-01

    Sheehan's syndrome (SS) is an adenopituitary insufficiency caused by hypovolemia secondary to excessive blood loss during or after childbirth. However, the mechanism of postpartum hemorrhage and ischemia is not clear. We aimed to evaluate the bleeding disorders among patients with SS, in comparison with healthy controls. In addition, we investigated underlying causes in postpartum hemorrhage that begin the event. The present study was conducted at the Dicle University School of Medicine. Forty-eight patients with SS and 50 age-matched female healthy controls were included. Biochemical and hormonal variables were measured, as was platelet function by means of closure times (PFA-100 testing using collagen plus epinephrine and collagen plus ADP), von Willebrand factor (vWF) level, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), international normalized ratio (INR), and coagulation factors. Although PT and INR were significantly higher in patients with SS (both P<0.01), aPTT and levels of fibrinogen, vWF, and factors II, V, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI, and XII did not differ significantly. Closure times with collagen/epinephrine and collagen/ADP also did not differ significantly between patients with SS and control patients. The nonspecific etiology and presence of excessive postpartum hemorrhage in patients with SS suggest that coagulation disorders may play a role in their predisposition to bleeding. The increased PT and INR noted might implicate bleeding diathesis as the underlying etiology, although no significant decreases were noted in factor levels. Further studies are needed to elucidate this complex mechanism of this disorder.

  10. Scintigraphic diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding with /sup 99/. mu. Tc-labeled blood-pool agents

    SciTech Connect

    Miskowiak, J.; Nielsen, S.; Munck, O.

    1981-11-01

    Abdominal scintigraphy with /sup 99/..mu..Tc-labeled albumin or red blood cells was used in 68 patients to localize gastrointestinal bleeding or confirm that it had stopped. Acute, active bleeding was identified in 33 patients; characteristic patterns of bleeding from the stomach, biliary passages, small intestine, and colon are shown. Sensitivity was 0.86 (95% confidence limits, 0.57-0.98) and specificity was 1.0 (95% confidence limits, 0.82-1.0) in 33 patients who had scintigraphy and endoscopy performed in succession. Abdominal scintigraphy appears to be a valuable supplement to conventional diagnostic methods. In upper gastrointestinal bleeding, scintigraphy should be considered when endoscopy fails. In lower intestinal bleeding, scintigraphy should be the method of choice.

  11. Scintigraphic diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding with /sup 99/mTc-labeled blood-pool agents

    SciTech Connect

    Miskowiak, J.; Nielsen, S.L.; Munck, O.

    1981-01-01

    Abdominal scintigraphy with /sup 99/mTc-labeled albumin or red blood cells was used in 68 patients to localize gastrointestinal bleeding or confirm that it had stopped. Acute, active bleeding was identified in 33 patients; characteristic patterns of bleeding from the stomach, biliary passages, small intestine, and colon are shown. Sensitivity was 0.86 (95% confidence limits, 0.57-0.98) and specificity was 1.0 (95% confidence limits, 0.82-1.0) in 33 patients who had scintigraphy and endoscopy performed in succession. Abdominal scintigraphy appears to be a valuable supplement to conventional diagnostic methods. In upper gastrointestinal bleeding, scintigraphy should be considered when endoscopy fails. In lower intestinal bleeding, scintigraphy should be the method of choice.

  12. Improving care and treatment options for women and girls with bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Roshni

    2015-12-01

    Women and girls may experience increased bleeding symptoms as carriers of haemophilia. They can also be affected by other hereditary bleeding diatheses such as von Willebrand disease, platelet dysfunction defects or deficiencies of coagulation factors (F) such as FI, FII, FV, FVII, FX, FXI and FXIII. In addition to general bleeding symptoms, such disorders pose unique problems for women due to their impact on reproductive health. Women and adolescent girls with undiagnosed bleeding disorders frequently experience heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB; menorrhagia), leading to impairment of daily activities. Other gynaecological and obstetric manifestations, for example miscarriage, bleeding during pregnancy and postpartum haemorrhage (PPH), can occur. Treatment for HMB should consider patient wishes relating to preservation of fertility, and management options include hormonal measures, desmopressin, antifibrinolytics, platelet concentrate transfusions and clotting factor therapy. During pregnancy, monitoring clotting factor levels informs the need for prophylactic therapy; subsequent haemostatic cover can minimise PPH. Under-recognition of bleeding disorders in females may lead to inappropriate, or lack of, treatment. This may be avoided by increased disease awareness, prompt and accurate diagnosis, and a multidisciplinary approach to patient care. This review considers the range of hereditary bleeding disorders that may affect women and adolescent girls, and their evaluation and management.

  13. Massive posttraumatic bleeding: epidemiology, causes, clinical features, and therapeutic management.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2013-02-01

    Bleeding typically results as a consequence of derangements of primary hemostasis, secondary hemostasis, or both, and can be dramatically amplified by the presence of other predisposing conditions, especially inherited bleeding disorders. Life-threatening hemorrhages are, however, almost exclusively caused by penetrating wounds, blunt traumas of chest and abdomen, suicide attempts, amputations, bone fractures with concomitant injury to internal organs and blood vessels, and shearing forces from sudden rotation, violent flexion, extension, or deceleration injuries. The pathogenesis of posttraumatic bleeding is complex and multifaceted. The most dramatic phenomenon that always accompanies major hemorrhages is the abrupt and considerable loss of intravascular volume, that further leads to hypovolemic shock, also known as hemorrhagic shock, culminating with peripheral ischemia, especially in those tissues where oxygen delivery is more critical (i.e., central nervous system and myocardium). The mortality rate of severe posttraumatic bleeding can be as high as 50%, especially when an appropriate treatment is not established in a timely manner. The damage control sequence basically entails a four-step approach including damage control surgery, damage control resuscitation with fluid restoration, and hemocomponents administration, as well as correction of the coagulopathy with platelets, antifibrinolytic (e.g., tranexamic acid), and/or procoagulant agents such as fresh frozen plasma, prothrombin complex concentrate, or recombinant-activated Factor VII.

  14. Comparison of thrombin generation assay with conventional coagulation tests in evaluation of bleeding risk in patients with rare bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Zekavat, Omid R; Haghpanah, Sezaneh; Dehghani, Javad; Afrasiabi, Abdolreza; Peyvandi, Flora; Karimi, Mehran

    2014-09-01

    Based on the premise that the capacity of plasma to generate thrombin in vitro is a comprehensive and precise functional test of the clotting system, we designed a cross-sectional, single-center study involving 83 patients with rare bleeding disorders (RBDs) to compare the usefulness of the thrombin generation (TG) assay versus conventional tests including prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) in predicting bleeding risk in patients with RBD in southern Iran. The TG parameters consisted of endogenous thrombin potential, lag time, peak, time to peak (ttPeak), and start tail. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve showed statistically significant associations between bleeding risk and lag time, ttPeak, and start tail. We determined cutoff values for these 3 TG parameters and obtained a negative predictive value of 86% to 90% in patients with RBD who had a bleeding score (BS) ≤13. The ROC curves for the association of PT and aPTT with BS did not indicate any significant association. Correlation analysis supported the results of ROC curve analysis, only lag time, ttPeak, and start tail showed significant positive correlations with BS (P < .05). Disease severity based on plasma factor activity was significantly associated with prolonged lag time and ttPeak and with prolonged PT (P <.05). We suggest that TG assay is a potentially more useful tool for predicting the bleeding risk in patients with RBD. However, the small sample size in different RBD subgroups precluded subgroup analysis. Prospective multicenter studies with larger numbers of patients are therefore advisable.

  15. Vitamin K antagonists: beyond bleeding.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Thilo; Floege, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Warfarin is the most widely used oral anticoagulant in clinical use today. Indications range from prosthetic valve replacement to recurrent thromboembolic events due to antiphospholipid syndrome. In hemodialysis (HD) patients, warfarin use is even more frequent than in the nonrenal population due to increased cardiovascular comorbidities. The use of warfarin in dialysis patients with atrial fibrillation requires particular caution because side effects may outweigh the assumed benefit of reduced stroke rates. Besides increased bleeding risk, coumarins exert side effects which are not in the focus of clinical routine, yet they deserve special consideration in dialysis patients and should influence the decision of whether or not to prescribe vitamin K antagonists in cases lacking clear guidelines. Issues to be taken into consideration in HD patients are the induction or acceleration of cardiovascular calcifications, a 10-fold increased risk of calciphylaxis and problems related to maintaining a target INR range. New anticoagulants like direct thrombin inhibitors are promising but have not yet been approved for ESRD patients. Here, we summarize the nontraditional side effects of coumarins and give recommendations about the use of vitamin K antagonists in ESRD patients.

  16. Depression and the Risk of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chih-Chao; Hsu, Yi-Chao; Chang, Kuang-Hsi; Lee, Chang-Yin; Chong, Lee-Won; Lin, Cheng-Li; Shang, Chuin-Shee; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The risk of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) among patients with depression has raised concern. This study determined the association between depression and the subsequent development of PUD using claims data. Patients newly diagnosed with depression in 2000 to 2010 were identified as depression cohort from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The comparison cohort was randomly selected from subjects without depression, frequency matched by age and gender and diagnosis date, with a size 2-fold of the size of the depression cohort. The incidence of PUD was evaluated for both cohorts by the end of 2011. We calculated the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of PUD using the Cox proportional hazards regression model. The depression cohort consisted of 23,536 subjects (129,751 person-years), and the comparison cohort consisted of 47,069 subjects (285,592 person-years). The incidence of PUD was 2-fold higher in the depression cohort than in the comparison cohort (33.2 vs 16.8 per 1000 person-years) with an age adjusted HR of 1.97 (95% CI = 1.89–2.06) or a multivariable adjusted HR of 1.35 (95% CI = 1.29–1.42). Depression might increase the risk of developing PUD. Prospective clinical studies of the relationship between depression and PUD are warranted. PMID:26705225

  17. Stimuli of pepsinogen secretion from frog isolated peptic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, H.; Komiyama, K.; Shirakawa, T.; Heldman, A.; Anderson, W.; Hirschowitz, B.I.

    1986-03-05

    The authors have previously studied pepsinogen (Pg) secretion from isolated intact esophageal mucosa of the bullfrog R. catesbeiana. By stimulus-response studies using agonists and antagonists they characterized specific stimulation of cholinergic, adrenergic and peptidergic receptors and interaction of cAMP and Ca/sup 2 +/ dependent pathways. To understand cell mechanisms more definitively and to relate these to morphology it was necessary to isolate peptic cells. Esophageal mucosa was digested with 0.1% collagenase for 80-100 min and sieved through teflon mesh. One esophagus yielded approximately 10/sup 7/ cells, 70% pure and 89 +/- 5% viable. Basal secretion was 3% of Pg content/hr. The cells responded to graded concentrations of bombesin, bethanechol, IBMX, 8Br-cAMP, forskolin, TPA (12-0-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13 acetate) and A23187. The response to (TPA + A23187) was double the additive single output values; (TPA + A23187 + forskolin) stimulated secretion of more than double the sum of the 3 component stimuli. In calcium and magnesium-free medium, the A23187 response and the synergistic response of combinations were both lost. They have identified 3 messengers for Pg cell stimulation - cAMP, Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization and protein kinase C - each of which can be separately stimulated, and when combined are strongly synergistic.

  18. Epstein-Barr Virus Association with Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas-Mondragón, María G.; Torres, Javier; Flores-Luna, Lourdes; Carreón-Talavera, Ricardo; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) use are considered the main risk to develop peptic ulcer disease (PUD). However, PUD also occurs in the absence of HP infection and/or NSAID use. Recently, we have found evidence that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation increases the risk to develop premalignant and malignant gastric lesions. Objective. To study a possible association between EBV and PUD. Methods. Antibodies against an EBV reactivation antigen, HP, and the HP virulence factor CagA were measured in sera from 207 Mexican subjects, controls (healthy individuals, n = 129), and PUD patients (n = 78, 58 duodenal and 20 gastric ulcers). Statistical associations were estimated. Results. Duodenal PUD was significantly associated with high anti-EBV IgG titers (p = 0.022, OR = 2.5), while anti-EBV IgA was positively associated with gastric PUD (p = 0.002, OR = 10.1). Conclusions. Our study suggests that EBV reactivation in gastric and duodenal epithelium increases the risk to develop PUD. PMID:26199856

  19. Assessment of multi-modality evaluations of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Law, Ryan; Varayil, Jithinraj E; WongKeeSong, Louis M; Fidler, Jeff; Fletcher, Joel G; Barlow, John; Alexander, Jeffrey; Rajan, Elizabeth; Hansel, Stephanie; Becker, Brenda; Larson, Joseph J; Enders, Felicity T; Bruining, David H; Coelho-Prabhu, Nayantara

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine the frequency of bleeding source detection in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) who underwent double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) after pre-procedure imaging [multiphase computed tomography enterography (MPCTE), video capsule endoscopy (VCE), or both] and assess the impact of imaging on DBE diagnostic yield. METHODS Retrospective cohort study using a prospectively maintained database of all adult patients presenting with OGIB who underwent DBE from September 1st, 2002 to June 30th, 2013 at a single tertiary center. RESULTS Four hundred and ninety five patients (52% females; median age 68 years) underwent DBE for OGIB. AVCE and/or MPCTE performed within 1 year prior to DBE (in 441 patients) increased the diagnostic yield of DBE (67.1% with preceding imaging vs 59.5% without). Using DBE as the gold standard, VCE and MPCTE had a diagnostic yield of 72.7% and 32.5% respectively. There were no increased odds of finding a bleeding site at DBE compared to VCE (OR = 1.3, P = 0.150). There were increased odds of finding a bleeding site at DBE compared to MPCTE (OR = 5.9, P < 0.001). In inpatients with overt OGIB, diagnostic yield of DBE was not affected by preceding imaging. CONCLUSION DBE is a safe and well-tolerated procedure for the diagnosis and treatment of OGIB, with a diagnostic yield that may be increased after obtaining a preceding VCE or MPCTE. However, inpatients with active ongoing bleeding may benefit from proceeding directly to antegrade DBE. PMID:28216967

  20. Resuscitation of Polytrauma Patients: The Management of Massive Skeletal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Guerado, Enrique; Bertrand, Maria Luisa; Valdes, Luis; Cruz, Encarnacion; Cano, Juan Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The term ‘severely injured patient’ is often synonymous of polytrauma patient, multiply-injured patient or, in some settings, polyfractured patient. Together with brain trauma, copious bleeding is the most severe complication of polytrauma. Consequently hypotension develop. Then, the perfusion of organs may be compromised, with the risk of organ failure. Treatment of chest bleeding after trauma is essential and is mainly addressed via surgical manoeuvres. As in the case of lesions to the pelvis, abdomen or extremities, this approach demonstrates the application of damage control (DC). The introduction of sonography has dramatically changed the diagnosis and prognosis of abdominal bleeding. In stable patients, a contrast CT-scan should be performed before any x-ray projection, because, in an emergency situation, spinal or pelvic fractures be missed by conventional radiological studies. Fractures or dislocation of the pelvis causing enlargement of the pelvic cavity, provoked by an anteroposterior trauma, and in particular cases presenting vertical instability, are the most severe types and require fast stabilisation by closing the pelvic ring diameter to normal dimensions and by stabilising the vertical shear. Controversy still exists about whether angiography or packing should be used as the first choice to address active bleeding after pelvic ring closure. Pelvic angiography plays a significant complementary role to pelvic packing for final haemorrhage control. Apart from pelvic trauma, fracture of the femur is the only fracture provoking acute life-threatening bleeding. If possible, femur fractures should be immobilised immediately, either by external fixation or by a sheet wrap around both extremities. PMID:26312112

  1. Direct Percutaneous Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, Sailen G.; Castle, Erik P.; Kriegshauser, J. Scott; Huettl, Eric A.

    2010-02-15

    Stomal variceal bleeding can develop in patients with underlying cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Most patients are best treated with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation because this addresses the underlying problem of portal hypertension. However, some patients are not good candidates for TIPS creation because they have end-stage liver disease or encephalopathy. We describe such a patient who presented with recurrent bleeding stomal varices, which was successfully treated with percutaneous coil embolization. The patient had bleeding-free survival for 1 month before death from unrelated causes.

  2. Detection of gastrointestinal bleeding by radionuclide scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.; Luna, E.; Kingsley, S.; Prince, M.; Herrera, N.

    1984-01-01

    Scanning with Technetium /sup 99m/ labeled autologous red blood cells was performed in 59 patients with clinical suspicion of acute and/or intermittent, chronic gastrointestinal bleeding. In 36 patients (61%), a definite site of bleeding could be demonstrated. A strong correlation with other modalities such as upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy, contrast angiography, and surgical exploration was found. Overall sensitivity of the procedure was 91%; specificity 100% and accuracy 93.3%. It is suggested that radionuclide scintigraphy provides a completely noninvasive, simple, and sensitive procedure which may be routinely used for the detection and localization of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  3. Compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system

    DOEpatents

    Donahoo, Eric E; Ross, Christopher W

    2014-11-25

    A compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine airfoil cooling system to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system may enable cooling fluids to be exhausted from a compressor exhaust plenum through a downstream compressor bleed collection chamber and into the turbine airfoil cooling system. As such, the suction created in the compressor exhaust plenum mitigates boundary layer growth along the inner surface while providing flow of cooling fluids to the turbine airfoils.

  4. Secreted and membrane-bound mucins and idiopathic peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Niv, Yaron; Boltin, Doron

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of Helicobacter pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-negative peptic ulcer disease has increased over the last two decades, especially in the Western world and in countries with low H. pylori infection rates. Idiopathic peptic ulcer disease is a recently described entity which relates to peptic ulcers not caused by H. pylori, NSAID/aspirin therapy, other ulcerogenic organisms and drugs, or other rare malignant and benign diseases. Structural and secreted mucins create the unstirred gastric mucus layer and maintain a stable pH above the gastric mucosa. This mucous layer prevents enzymatic attack by acid and pepsin. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase by NSAID and aspirin inhibits prostaglandin production, inhibits mucin and bicarbonate secretion, and exposes the mucosa to the toxic effects of acid and intragastric enzymes. There is also a complex relationship between H. pylori and different mucin subtypes which on one hand facilitates mucin invasion but on the other hand protects the gastric mucosa. Genetic and epigenetic changes in the mucin molecule may be responsible for idiopathic peptic ulcer disease, but this hypothesis must be further investigated. Herein, the mucin hypothesis of idiopathic peptic ulcer disease is explored.

  5. Protective effects of ginger and marshmallow extracts on indomethacin-induced peptic ulcer in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zaghlool, Sameh S.; Shehata, Basim A.; Abo-Seif, Ali A.; Abd El-Latif, Hekma A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gastric ulcer is one of the most serious diseases. Most classic treatment lines produce adverse drug reactions. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the protective effects of two natural extracts, namely ginger and marshmallow extracts, on indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer in rats. Materials and Methods: Animals were divided into five groups; a normal control group, an ulcer control group, and three treatment groups receiving famotidine (20 mg/kg), ginger (100 mg/kg), and marshmallow (100 mg/kg). Treatments were given orally on a daily basis for 14 days prior to a single intra-peritoneal administration of indomethacin (20 mg/kg). Results: Indomethacin administration resulted in significant ulcerogenic effect evidenced by significant elevations in ulcer number, ulcer index, and blood superoxide dismutase activity accompanied by significant decreases in gastric mucosal nitric oxide and glutathione levels. In addition, elevations in gastric mucosal lipid peroxides and histamine content were observed. Alternatively, pretreatment with famotidine, ginger or marshmallow significantly corrected macroscopic and biochemical findings, supported microscopically by results of histopathological study. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that administration of either ginger or marshmallow extract could protect against indomethacin-induced peptic ulcer in rats presumably via their antioxidant properties and inhibition of histamine release. PMID:26283843

  6. Ileal polypoid lymphangiectasia bleeding diagnosed and treated by double balloon enteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min Seon; Lee, Beom Jae; Gu, Dae Hoe; Pyo, Jeung-Hui; Kim, Kyeong Jin; Lee, Yun Ho; Joo, Moon Kyung; Park, Jong-Jae; Kim, Jae Seon; Bak, Young-Tae

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease characterized by focal or diffuse dilated enteric lymphatics with impaired lymph drainage. It causes protein-losing enteropathy and may lead to gastrointestinal bleeding. Commonly, lymphangiectasia presents as whitish spots or specks. To our knowledge, small bowel bleeding resulting from polypoid intestinal lymphangiectasia has not been reported. Here, we report a rare case of active bleeding from the small bowel caused by polypoid lymphangiectasia with a review of the relevant literature. An 80-year-old woman was hospitalized for melena. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy could not identify the source of bleeding. Subsequent colonoscopy showed fresh bloody material gushing from the small bowel. An abdominal-pelvic contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan did not reveal any abnormal findings. Video capsule endoscopy showed evidence of active and recent bleeding in the ileum. To localize the bleeding site, we performed double balloon enteroscopy by the anal approach. A small, bleeding, polypoid lesion was found in the distal ileum and was successfully removed using endoscopic snare electrocautery. PMID:24363538

  7. Ileal polypoid lymphangiectasia bleeding diagnosed and treated by double balloon enteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Seon; Lee, Beom Jae; Gu, Dae Hoe; Pyo, Jeung-Hui; Kim, Kyeong Jin; Lee, Yun Ho; Joo, Moon Kyung; Park, Jong-Jae; Kim, Jae Seon; Bak, Young-Tae

    2013-12-07

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease characterized by focal or diffuse dilated enteric lymphatics with impaired lymph drainage. It causes protein-losing enteropathy and may lead to gastrointestinal bleeding. Commonly, lymphangiectasia presents as whitish spots or specks. To our knowledge, small bowel bleeding resulting from polypoid intestinal lymphangiectasia has not been reported. Here, we report a rare case of active bleeding from the small bowel caused by polypoid lymphangiectasia with a review of the relevant literature. An 80-year-old woman was hospitalized for melena. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy could not identify the source of bleeding. Subsequent colonoscopy showed fresh bloody material gushing from the small bowel. An abdominal-pelvic contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan did not reveal any abnormal findings. Video capsule endoscopy showed evidence of active and recent bleeding in the ileum. To localize the bleeding site, we performed double balloon enteroscopy by the anal approach. A small, bleeding, polypoid lesion was found in the distal ileum and was successfully removed using endoscopic snare electrocautery.

  8. Menstrual bleeding from an endometriotic lesion.

    PubMed

    Burney, Richard O; Lathi, Ruth B

    2009-05-01

    We present a case in which endometriotic lesions were observed to be focally hemorrhagic at laparoscopy performed during menstruation. Red vesicular lesions likely represent early disease with intact capacity for hormonally induced menstrual bleeding.

  9. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding (DUB) (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop AUB. Some illnesses (like thyroid disease or polycystic ovary syndrome ) can mess with the body's hormones. Problems like ... sex. Doctors ask these questions because conditions like polycystic ovary syndrome and some STDs can cause abnormal bleeding. If ...

  10. Engine bleed air reduction in DC-10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, W. H.; Viele, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    An 0.8 percent fuel savings was achieved by a reduction in engine bleed air through the use of cabin air recirculation. The recirculation system was evaluated in revenue service on a DC-10. The cabin remained comfortable with reductions in cabin fresh air (engine bleed air) as much as 50 percent. Flight test verified the predicted fuel saving of 0.8 percent.

  11. Sustained pro-haemostatic activity of rFVIIa in plasma and platelets in non-bleeding pigs may explain the efficacy of a once-daily prophylaxis in humans.

    PubMed

    Schut, A M; Hyseni, A; Adelmeijer, J; Meijers, J C M; De Groot, P G; Lisman, T

    2014-08-01

    Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) is registered for treatment of inhibitor-complicated haemophilia, and a once-daily prophylactic administration of rFVIIa is successful in reducing the number of bleeding events. This suggests that a single rFVIIa dose has a pro-haemostatic effect up to 24 hours (h), which is difficult to explain given its half-life of 2 h. In this study, six pigs received a 90 µg/kg rFVIIa bolus. Plasma was collected and platelets were isolated at various time points up to 48 h, and analysed for FVIIa levels and associated haemostatic activity. Elevated plasma FVIIa levels were detected up to 24 h post-administration (36 (32-56) mU/ml [median (interquartile range [IQR]), 24 h] vs 2 (2-14) mU/ml [baseline]). Corresponding prothrombin time (PT) values remained shortened compared to baseline until 24 h post-administration (9.4 (9.3-9.9) seconds (s) [24 h] vs 10.5 (10.2-11.0) s [baseline], p ≤0.01). The lag time in thrombin generation testing as well as clotting times in plasma-based assays were shortened up to 12 or 24 h post-administration, respectively (lag times 1.8 (1.7-2.1) minutes (min) [12 h] vs 2.3 (2.3-2.6) min [baseline], p ≤0.01 and clotting times 3.8 (3.2-3.9) min [24 h] vs 5.2 (4.6-5.5) min [baseline], p ≤0.001). Platelet FVIIa levels were elevated up to 48 h (7.7 (3.4-9.0) ng VIIa/mg actin [48 h] vs 2.5 (0.7-4.8) ng VIIa/mg actin [baseline]). In conclusion, elevated and haemostatically active plasma and platelet FVIIa levels are detectable up to 24-48 h following rFVIIa administration in pigs. This prolonged pro-haemostatic effect of FVIIa may explain the prophylactic efficacy of a once-daily rFVIIa treatment.

  12. Unravelling the pathogenic role of Helicobacter pylori in peptic ulcer: potential new therapies and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Telford, J L; Covacci, A; Ghiara, P; Montecucco, C; Rappuoli, R

    1994-10-01

    The recognition that peptic ulcer is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Helicobacter pylori has revolutionized the approach to diagnosis and therapy of this condition. Treatment of the symptoms of peptic ulcer with drugs that block acid secretion is already being replaced by antibiotic eradication of the causative agent. Studies of the molecular events that lead to H. pylori pathogenesis have shown that clinical isolates can be divided into two groups, only one of which produces a cytotoxin and is associated with severe disease. The cloning of the genes coding for molecules specific for disease-associated strains of H. pylori, and the development of animal models that mimic the human pathology, will provide the basis for better strategies to treat and prevent peptic-ulcer disease.

  13. A systematic approach for the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic peptic ulcers.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chen-Shuan; Chiang, Tsung-Hsien; Lee, Yi-Chia

    2015-09-01

    An idiopathic peptic ulcer is defined as an ulcer with unknown cause or an ulcer that appears to arise spontaneously. The first step in treatment is to exclude common possible causes, including Helicobacter pylori infection, infection with other pathogens, ulcerogenic drugs, and uncommon diseases with upper gastrointestinal manifestations. When all known causes are excluded, a diagnosis of idiopathic peptic ulcer can be made. A patient whose peptic ulcer is idiopathic may have a higher risk for complicated ulcer disease, a poorer response to gastric acid suppressants, and a higher recurrence rate after treatment. Risk factors associated with this disease may include genetic predisposition, older age, chronic mesenteric ischemia, smoking, concomitant diseases, a higher American Society of Anesthesiologists score, and higher stress. Therefore, the diagnosis and management of emerging disease should systematically explore all known causes and treat underlying disease, while including regular endoscopic surveillance to confirm ulcer healing and the use of proton-pump inhibitors on a case-by-case basis.

  14. Healing of aspirin-associated peptic ulcer disease despite continued salicylate ingestion.

    PubMed

    O'Laughlin, J C; Silvoso, G R; Ivey, K J

    1981-05-01

    Patients who have rheumatic disease and who are undergoing long-term aspirin therapy have a high incidence of peptic ulcer disease. Whether it is possible to heal long-term aspirin-related peptic ulcer disease if aspirin intake is continued is unknown. Nine patients with rheumatic disease who were receiving long-term aspirin therapy and who had 15 endoscopically verified gastric and/or duodenal ulcers were studied. Patients were treated daily with 1,200 mg of cimetidine plus at least 120 mL of antacid (Mylanta II), while continuing aspirin therapy at the same dose and type. By eight weeks, 14 ulcers had healed. This study shows that some aspirin-associated peptic ulcers can be healed, despite continued aspirin intake, by intensive medical therapy aimed at lowering intragastric acidity.

  15. Antisecretory, antioxidative and antiapoptotic effects of montelukast on pyloric ligation and water immersion stress induced peptic ulcer in rat.

    PubMed

    Muthuraman, Arunachalam; Sood, Shailja

    2010-07-01

    In the present study, we tried to explore the mechanism of montelukast as an antiulcerogenic agent in pyloric ligation (PL) and water immersion stress (WIS) induced peptic ulcer. The ameliorative effects of montelukast (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg, p.o.) on gastric volume and total acidity were studied in PL model. We have investigated the alteration in the ulcerative index, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, reduced glutathione, activity of myeloperoxidase, and total calcium level in both models. Estimation of DNA fragmentation by gel electrophoresis was also performed. Medium and higher doses of montelukast showed significant (p<0.05) ameliorative potential on all the above parameters as compared with omeprazole treated group. DNA fragmentation pattern clearly indicated the antiapoptotic effect of montelukast in preventing mucosal erosion in both models. Hence, the gastroprotective effect of montelukast may be attributed to its antisecretory, antioxidative along with its antiapoptotic effect.

  16. Peptic ulcer as a risk factor for postherpetic neuralgia in adult patients with herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jen-Yin; Lan, Kuo-Mao; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Tseng, Su-Feng; Weng, Shih-Feng; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2015-02-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia is the most common complication of herpes zoster. Identifying predictors for postherpetic neuralgia may help physicians screen herpes zoster patients at risk of postherpetic neuralgia and undertake preventive strategies. Peptic ulcer has been linked to immunological dysfunctions and malnutrition, both of which are predictors of postherpetic neuralgia. The aim of this retrospective case-control study was to determine whether adult herpes zoster patients with peptic ulcer were at greater risk of postherpetic neuralgia. Adult zoster patients without postherpetic neuralgia and postherpetic neuralgia patients were automatically selected from a medical center's electronic database using herpes zoster/postherpetic neuralgia ICD-9 codes supported with inclusion and exclusion criteria. Consequently, medical record review was performed to validate the diagnostic codes and all pertaining data including peptic ulcer, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and ulcerogenic medications. Because no standard pain intensity measurement exists, opioid usage was used as a proxy measurement for moderate to severe pain. In total, 410 zoster patients without postherpetic neuralgia and 115 postherpetic neuralgia patients were included. Multivariate logistic regressions identified 60 years of age and older, peptic ulcer and greater acute herpetic pain as independent predictors for postherpetic neuralgia. Among etiologies of peptic ulcer, H. pylori infection and usage of non-selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were significantly associated with the increased risk of postherpetic neuralgia; conversely, other etiologies were not significantly associated with the postherpetic neuralgia risk. In conclusion, 60 years of age and older, peptic ulcer and greater acute herpetic pain are independent predictors for postherpetic neuralgia in adult herpes zoster patients.

  17. Increased Risk of Osteoporosis in Patients With Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Tung, Yi-Ching; Chai, Chee-Yin; Lu, Ying-Yi; Su, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Tai-Hsin; Kuo, Keng-Liang; Lin, Chih-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate osteoporosis risk in patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD) using a nationwide population-based dataset. This Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) analysis included 27,132 patients aged 18 years and older who had been diagnosed with PUD (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] codes 531–534) during 1996 to 2010. The control group consisted of 27,132 randomly selected (age- and gender)-matched patients without PUD. The association between PUD and the risk of developing osteoporosis was estimated using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. During the follow-up period, osteoporosis was diagnosed in 2538 (9.35 %) patients in the PUD group and in 2259 (8.33 %) participants in the non-PUD group. After adjusting for covariates, osteoporosis risk was 1.85 times greater in the PUD group compared to the non-PUD group (13.99 vs 5.80 per 1000 person-years, respectively). Osteoporosis developed 1 year after PUD diagnosis. The 1-year follow-up period exhibited the highest significance between the 2 groups (hazard ratio [HR] = 63.44, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 28.19–142.74, P < 0.001). Osteoporosis risk was significantly higher in PUD patients with proton-pump-inhibitors (PPIs) use (HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.03–1.34) compared to PUD patients without PPIs use. This study revealed a significant association between PUD and subsequent risk of osteoporosis. Therefore, PUD patients, especially those treated with PPIs, should be evaluated for subsequent risk of osteoporosis to minimize the occurrence of adverse events. PMID:27100415

  18. A Smart Capsule System for Automated Detection of Intestinal Bleeding Using HSL Color Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongying; Yan, Xueping; Jia, Ziru; Pi, Xitian

    2016-01-01

    There are no ideal means for the diagnosis of intestinal bleeding diseases as of now, particularly in the small intestine. This study investigated an intelligent intestinal bleeding detection capsule system based on color recognition. After the capsule is swallowed, the bleeding detection module (containing a color-sensitive adsorptive film that changes color when absorbing intestinal juice,) is used to identify intestinal bleeding features. A hue-saturation-light color space method can be applied to detect bleeding according to the range of H and S values of the film color. Once bleeding features are recognized, a wireless transmission module is activated immediately to send an alarm signal to the outside; an in vitro module receives the signal and sends an alarm. The average power consumption of the entire capsule system is estimated to be about 2.1mW. Owing to its simplicity, reliability, and effectiveness, this system represents a new approach to the clinical diagnosis of intestinal bleeding diseases. PMID:27902728

  19. The bleeding score predicts clinical outcomes and replacement therapy in adults with von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Federici, Augusto B; Bucciarelli, Paolo; Castaman, Giancarlo; Mazzucconi, Maria G; Morfini, Massimo; Rocino, Angiola; Schiavoni, Mario; Peyvandi, Flora; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2014-06-26

    Analyses of the bleeding tendency by means of the bleeding score (BS) have been proposed until now to confirm diagnosis but not to predict clinical outcomes in patients with inherited von Willebrand disease (VWD). We prospectively followed up, for 1 year, 796 Italian patients with different types of VWD to determine whether the previous BS of European VWD1 is useful to predict the occurrence of spontaneous bleeds severe enough to require replacement therapy with desmopressin (DDAVP) and/or von Willebrand factor (VWF)/factor VIII concentrates. Among the 796 patients included, 75 (9.4%) needed treatment of 232 spontaneous bleeding events. BS >10 and VWF:ristocetin cofactor activity <10 U/dL were associated with the risk of bleeding, but only a BS >10 remained highly associated in a multivariable Cox proportional hazard model (adjusted hazard ratio: 7.27 [95% confidence interval, 3.83-13.83]). Although the bleeding event-free survival was different in VWD types, only a BS >10 could predict for each type which patient had bleeding events severe enough to require treatment with DDAVP and/or concentrates. Therefore, BS can be considered a simple predictor of clinical outcomes of VWD and may identify patients needing intensive therapeutic regimens.

  20. Periesophageal Pseudoaneurysms: Rare Cause of Refractory Bleeding Treated with Transarterial Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rachit D.; Komorowski, Daniel J.; Smallfield, George B.

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old female with history of systemic lupus erythematosus, prior cytomegalovirus esophagitis treated with ganciclovir, and long segment Barrett's esophagus (Prague class C8 M9) with high grade dysplasia treated with radiofrequency ablation presented to the hospital with hematemesis. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed multiple esophageal ulcers with active arterial spurting which could not be controlled with endoscopic interventions including placement of hemostatic clips. An emergent angiogram demonstrated actively bleeding saccular dilations (pseudoaneurysms) in the esophageal branches of the lower thoracic aorta as well as left gastric artery for which gelfoam and coil embolization was initially successful. Due to recurrence of massive bleeding, she subsequently underwent emergent esophagectomy and bipolar exclusion. Pathology demonstrated submucosal hemorrhage, esophagitis with dysplastic Barrett's mucosa, and an ulcer containing cytomegaloviral inclusions. We report the first case of arterial bleeding from periesophageal pseudoaneurysms as well as use of angiographic embolization for arterial bleeding in the esophagus. PMID:27812392

  1. [Development of a perforated peptic ulcer in a child during high dose prednisolone treatment].

    PubMed

    Moll Harboe, Kirstine; Midtgaard, Helle; Wewer, Vibeke; Cortes, Dina

    2012-09-24

    Since perforated peptic ulcer is uncommon in children proton pump inhibitor prophylaxis is not routinely recommended when children are treated with high dose steroids. We describe a case of perforated ulcer in a six-year-old patient with nephrotic syndrome treated with high dose prednisolone. Initially, ulcer was not suspected due to uncharacteristic symptoms. The child developed peritoneal signs and surgery revealed a perforated peptic ulcer in the stomach. We recommend treatment with proton pump inhibitors if children, who are treated with high dose steroids develop abdominal symptoms, which can be caused by an ulcus.

  2. [Hyperhomocysteinemia and cardiovascular risk profile in ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease comorbidity patients].

    PubMed

    Zharkova, A V; Orlovs'kyĭ, V F

    2014-01-01

    Present article is devoted to the study of the clinic features of ischemic heart desease associated with acid peptic disease. It was shown the more evident increase of myocardial infarction risk in associated pathology patients. Such results have to be caused by the special risk factor. As such factor we desided to study the hyperhomosysteinemia. During research there were discovered that the lowest vitamin B12 serum level and the highest homocysteine serum level have been registrated in associated pathology (ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease according to long-term proton pump inhibitor use) patients. It was shown evident correlation between that changes and dyslipidemia.

  3. Psychological Factors in 155 Patients with Functional Uterine Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Dutton, W. A.

    1965-01-01

    One hundred and fifty-five women with functional uterine bleeding were studied to evaluate the importance of concomitant psychological disorders. Psychological illnesses were diagnosed in 128 patients (82.6%), most of which arose from problems directly related to sexual or reproductive functions. The remaining 27 patients (17.4%) were different in that they were psychologically stable and all but two were at puberty or approaching the menopause. Histological studies of endometrial samples from 135 of these patients indicated little evidence of abnormal sex hormone activity; 77 (57%) showed normal secretory phase endometrium and 32 (23.7%), proliferative phase endometrium. The remaining 26 (19.2%) showed evidence of some endocrine dysfunction, 15 such specimens being obtained from psychologically stable patients. It is probable that psychological disturbances are the principal cause of functional uterine bleeding during the prime reproductive years. The psychological component of the illness is the most important and determines the ultimate prognosis. PMID:14261152

  4. [Bleeding after extracorporeal circulation and epsilon-aminocaproic acid].

    PubMed

    Saussine, M; Delpech, S; Allien, M; Grolleau, D; Daures, M F; Coulon, P; Chaptal, P A

    1985-01-01

    In order to assess the efficacy of epsilon aminocaproic acid in reducing bleeding after extracorporeal circulation for aorto-coronary bypass grafting, a double blind study was carried out in 57 patients. The efficiency of epsilon aminocaproic acid was assessed by the fibrinolytic activity as measured by a Von Kaulla test one hour after injection of protamine, by the amount of blood transfusions required and by the measurement of blood losses between the end of the injection of protamine and transfer of the patient to the intensive care unit, and then during the first 24 h following operation. No significant difference (p less than 0.05) between the group of treated patients and the group with placebo could be found concerning the postoperative bleeding, the amount of blood transfusions necessary and the occurrence of fibrinolysis. It was therefore concluded that there was no reason to routinely use epsilon aminocaproic acid after aorto-coronary bypass grafting.

  5. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding: gallstone-induced auto-sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kalipershad, Sujala; Chung, Kin Tong; Jehangir, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    A 67-year-old gentleman with no significant medical history of note presented with sudden onset of epigastric pain, coffee ground vomiting and passing black tarry stool. A series of investigations including blood tests, ultrasound scan, CT abdomen and pelvis with contrast and endoscopy failed to reveal any site of active bleeding. The mystery remained and the patient continued to have upper gastrointestinal bleeding. A second CT abdomen and pelvis with contrast was carried out and showed evidence of contrast extravasation into the duodenum (figure 3). An exploratory laparotomy showed no obvious site of haemorrhage and a loop jejunostomy was performed. The diagnosis of gallstone-induced auto-sphincterotomy was only made, using gastroscope via jejunostomy, when a big gallstone was found in the third part of the duodenum and the papilla was ruptured (figure 5). PMID:22914239

  6. An update on the management of acute esophageal variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Lourdes; Tandon, Puneeta; Abraldes, Juan G

    2017-01-01

    The mortality rate in acute variceal haemorrhage remains high (around 15%). Treatment is based on the combined use of vasoactive drugs, endoscopic band ligation, and prophylactic antibiotics. Effective resuscitation (haemostasis, volume management) is essential to prevent complications. Treatment failure is best managed by transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). Balloon tamponade or specifically designed covered oesophageal stents can be used as a bridge to definitive therapy in unstable patients. Early, pre-emptive TIPS should be the first choice in patients at high risk of treatment failure (Child-Pugh B with active bleeding or Child-Pugh C<14). This article reviews the most recent advances in the management of variceal bleeding and discusses the recent recommendations of the Baveno VI consensus conference.

  7. TRALI Syndrome Complicated by Retroperitoneal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay A; Zeltsman, David

    2011-09-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is an underdiagnosed and underreported syndrome which by itself is the third leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. The incidence of TRALI is reported to be 1 in 2000 to 5000 transfusions. When combined with uncontrollable bleeding, survival is unachievable. We report the case of a 25-year-old man, who underwent open heart surgery as an infant to correct his congenital heart disease in association with right pulmonary artery atresia. He presented with hemoptysis secondary to aspergilloma and required a pneumonectomy of the nonfunctional right lung. During pneumolysis, significant bleeding occurred from the superior vena cava. The patient required a blood transfusion and was placed on cardiopulmonary bypass to control the bleeding. Simultaneous occurrence of severe pulmonary edema and retroperitoneal bleeding were noted. Approximately 8 L of frothy edema fluid were drained from the only functional left lung starting ~15 minutes after the transfusion and lasting for several hours until the end of the case. It most likely represented TRALI syndrome. Increasing abdominal girth and poor volume return to the pump were consistent with and pathognomonic for retroperitoneal bleeding. Though primary surgical bleeding in the chest was controlled successfully and a pneumonectomy performed without further difficulty, we were unable to separate the patient from cardiopulmonary bypass due to the inability to oxygenate. As a result, we could not reverse the anti-coagulation which potentially exacerbated the retroperitoneal bleeding. After multiple unsuccessful attempts the patient succumbed. This ill-fated case demonstrates the quandary of obtaining vascular access for emergency cardiopulmonary bypass while in the right thoracotomy position. It may be beneficial to have both the femoral artery and vein cannulated before positioning a patient in a lateral decubitus position. In addition, early direct access to the right atrium

  8. Similar bleeding phenotype in young children with haemophilia A or B: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Clausen, N; Petrini, P; Claeyssens-Donadel, S; Gouw, S C; Liesner, R

    2014-11-01

    The bleeding phenotype has been suggested to differ between haemophilia A and B. More knowledge on the bleeding phenotype at initiation of treatment is important to optimize patient care. The aim of this study was to investigate the severity of the bleeding phenotype and the variation in bleeding in children with severe or moderate haemophilia A and B. Consecutive, previously untreated patients with severe or moderate haemophilia A and B (factor VIII or IX activity <0.01 or 0.01-0.05 IU mL(-1) respectively) born between January 1st 2000 and January 1st 2010 were included. Primary outcome was severity of bleeding tendency. Secondary outcome was variation in bleeding pattern. A total of 582 patients with severe haemophilia A and 76 with severe haemophilia B did not differ in age at first exposure to clotting factor (0.81 vs. 0.88 years, P = 0.20), age at first bleed (0.82 vs. 0.88 years, P = 0.36), and age at first joint bleed (1.18 vs. 1.20 years, P = 0.59). Patients with moderate haemophilia were older compared to patients with severe haemophilia. In patients with moderate haemophilia there were no clear differences between haemophilia A and B. Severity and variation in bleeding phenotype are similar during the early stage of treatment in patients with severe and moderate haemophilia A and B respectively. The findings imply that children with haemophilia B should be observed and treated as vigilantly as those with haemophilia A.

  9. Prevention of Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Phillippi, Julia C; Holley, Sharon L; Morad, Anna; Collins, Michelle R

    2016-07-07

    The risk that a newborn will develop vitamin K deficiency bleeding is 1700/100,000 (one out of 59) if vitamin K is not administered. When intramuscular vitamin K is administered, the risk of vitamin K deficiency bleeding is reduced to 1/100,000. While women may have misconceptions about vitamin K prophylaxis for their newborns, health care providers should be prepared with factual information. Prophylaxis is needed even for healthy newborns without risk factors for bleeding. Other forms of vitamin K supplementation, including oral administration of Food and Drug Administration-approved vitamin K preparations and maternal supplements during pregnancy or lactation, do not have the same effectiveness as the parenteral form. The formulations of vitamin K approved for use in the United States have not been associated with childhood leukemia or other childhood health problems. Care providers need to give accurate information to families regarding the risks and benefits of vitamin K prophylaxis. An interprofessional approach to education can be effective in increasing acceptance of vitamin K prophylaxis and decreasing the incidence of vitamin K deficiency bleeding. This article uses a case study approach to highlight common misconceptions about vitamin K prophylaxis and discuss a recent interprofessional collaboration to prevent vitamin K deficiency bleeding.

  10. Bleeding Avoidance Strategies: Consensus and Controversy

    PubMed Central

    Dauerman, Harold L.; Rao, Sunil V.; Resnic, Frederic S.; Applegate, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Bleeding complications after coronary intervention are associated with prolonged hospitalization, increased hospital costs, patient dissatisfaction, morbidity and one year mortality. Bleeding Avoidance Strategies represent a term incorporating multiple modalities that aim to reduce bleeding and vascular complications after cardiovascular catheterization. Recent improvements in the rates of bleeding complications after invasive cardiovascular procedures suggests that the clinical community has successfully embraced specific strategies and improved patient care in this area. There remains controversy regarding the efficacy, safety and/or practicality of 3 key bleeding avoidance strategies for cardiac catheterization and coronary intervention: procedural (radial artery approach, safezone arteriotomy), pharmacologic (multiple agents) and technological (vascular closure devices) approaches to improved access. In this article, we address areas of consensus with respect to selected modalities in order to define the role of each strategy in current practice. Furthermore, we focus on areas of controversy for selected modalities in order to define key areas warranting cautious clinical approaches and the need for future randomized clinical trials in this area. PMID:21700085

  11. Bleeding avoidance strategies. Consensus and controversy.

    PubMed

    Dauerman, Harold L; Rao, Sunil V; Resnic, Frederic S; Applegate, Robert J

    2011-06-28

    Bleeding complications after coronary intervention are associated with prolonged hospitalization, increased hospital costs, patient dissatisfaction, morbidity, and 1-year mortality. Bleeding avoidance strategies is a term incorporating multiple modalities that aim to reduce bleeding and vascular complications after cardiovascular catheterization. Recent improvements in the rates of bleeding complications after invasive cardiovascular procedures suggest that the clinical community has successfully embraced specific strategies and improved patient care in this area. There remains controversy regarding the efficacy, safety, and/or practicality of 3 key bleeding avoidance strategies for cardiac catheterization and coronary intervention: procedural (radial artery approach, safezone arteriotomy), pharmacological (multiple agents), and technological (vascular closure devices) approaches to improved access. In this paper, we address areas of consensus with respect to selected modalities in order to define the role of each strategy in current practice. Furthermore, we focus on areas of controversy for selected modalities in order to define key areas warranting cautious clinical approaches and the need for future randomized clinical trials in this area.

  12. Evaluation of combined famotidine with quercetin for the treatment of peptic ulcer: in vivo animal study.

    PubMed

    Abourehab, Mohammed A S; Khaled, Khaled A; Sarhan, Hatem A A; Ahmed, Osama A A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare a combined drug dosage form of famotidine (FAM) and quercetin (QRT) to augment treatment of gastric ulcer. FAM was prepared as freeze-dried floating alginate beads using ion gelation method and then coated with Eudragit RL100 to sustain FAM release. QRT was prepared as solid dispersion with polyvinyl pyrrolidone K30 to improve its solubility. Photo images and scanning electron microscope images of the prepared beads were carried out to detect floating behavior and to reveal surface and core shape of the prepared beads. Anti-ulcerogenic effect and histopathological examination of gastric tissues were carried out to investigate the effect of the combined drug formulation compared with commercial FAM tablets and FAM beads. Gastric glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase, catalase, tissue myeloperoxidase, and lipid peroxidation enzyme activities and levels in rat stomach tissues were also determined. Results revealed that spherical beads were formed with an average diameter of 1.64±0.33 mm. They floated immediately with no lag time before floating, and remained buoyant throughout the test period. Treatment with a combination of FAM beads plus QRT showed the absence of any signs of inflammation or hemorrhage, and significantly prevented the indomethacin-induced decrease in GSH levels (P<0.05) with regain of normal GSH gastric tissue levels. Also, there was a significant difference in the decrease of malondialdehyde level compared to FAM commercial tablets or beads alone (P<0.05). The combined formula significantly improved the myeloperoxidase level compared to both the disease control group and commercial FAM tablet-treated group (P<0.05). Formulation of FAM as floating beads in combination with solid dispersion of QRT improved the anti-ulcer activity compared to commercially available tablets, which reveals a promising application for treatment of peptic ulcer.

  13. Aerodynamic Control of a Pitching Airfoil by Distributed Bleed Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2013-11-01

    The aerodynamic forces and moments on a dynamically pitching 2-D airfoil model are controlled in wind tunnel experiments using distributed active bleed. Bleed flow on the suction surface downstream of the leading edge is driven by pressure differences across the airfoil and is regulated by low-power louver actuators. The bleed interacts with cross flows to effect time-dependent variations of the vorticity flux and thereby alters the local flow attachment, resulting in significant changes in pre- and post-stall lift and pitching moment (over 50% increase in baseline post-stall lift). The flow field over the airfoil is measured using high-speed (2000 fps) PIV, resolving the dynamics and characteristic time-scales of production and advection of vorticity concentrations that are associated with transient variations in the aerodynamic forces and moments. In particular, it is shown that the actuation improves the lift hysteresis and pitch stability during the oscillatory pitching by altering the evolution of the dynamic stall vortex and the ensuing flow attachment during the downstroke. Supported by the Rotorcraft Center (VLRCOE) at Georgia Tech.

  14. Fatty acid composition and mechanisms of the protective effects of myrtle berry seed aqueous extract in alcohol-induced peptic ulcer in rat.

    PubMed

    Jabri, Mohamed-Amine; Rtibi, Kais; Tounsi, Haifa; Hosni, Karim; Marzouki, Lamjed; Sakly, Mohsen; Sebai, Hichem

    2016-11-10

    This study aimed to investigate the antiulcer and antioxidant activities of myrtle berry seed aqueous extract (MBSAE) in a peptic ulcer model induced by ethanol in male Wistar rats. MBSAE is rich in total polyphenols, total flavonoids, and unsaturated fatty acids, particularly linoleic (18:2) and oleic (18:1) acids. MBSAE also exhibited in vitro antioxidant activity using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) (IC50 = 172.1 μg/mL) and superoxide anion (IC50 = 200.24 μg/mL) scavenging activities. In vivo, MBSAE provided dose-dependent protection against ethanol-induced gastric and duodenal macroscopic and histological alterations. Also, it inhibited secretory profile disturbances and lipid peroxidation, and preserved normal antioxidant enzyme activities and nonenzymatic antioxidant levels. More importantly, we showed that acute alcohol intoxication increased gastric and duodenal calcium, hydrogen peroxide, and free iron levels, whereas MBSAE treatment protected against intracellular mediator deregulation. In conclusion, we suggest that MBSAE has potent protective effects against alcohol-induced peptic ulcer in rat. This protection might be related in part to its antioxidant properties as well as its opposite effects on some studied intracellular mediators.

  15. Prognostic factors in peptic ulcer perforations: a retrospective 14-year study.

    PubMed

    Unver, Mutlu; Fırat, Özgür; Ünalp, Ömer Vedat; Uğuz, Alper; Gümüş, Tufan; Sezer, Taylan Özgür; Öztürk, Şafak; Yoldaş, Tayfun; Ersin, Sinan; Güler, Adem

    2015-05-01

    Regarding the complications of peptic ulcer, a perforation remains the most important fatal complication. The aim of our retrospective study was to determine relations between postoperative morbidity and comorbid disease or perioperative risk factors in perforated peptic ulcer. In total, 239 patients who underwent emergency surgery for perforated peptic ulcer in Ege University General Surgery Department, between June 1999 and May 2013 were included in this study. The clinical data concerning the patient characteristics, operative methods, and complications were collected retrospectively. One hundred seventy-five of the 239 patients were male (73.2%) and 64 were female (26.8%). Mean American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score was 1 in the patients without morbidity, but mean ASA score was 3 in the morbidity and mortality groups. Primary suture and omentoplasty was the selected procedure in 228 of the patients. Eleven patients underwent resection. In total, 105 patients (43.9%) had comorbidities. Thirty-seven patients (67.3%) in the morbidity group had comorbid diseases. Thirteen (92.9%) patients in the mortality group had comorbid diseases. Perforation as a complication of peptic ulcer disease still remains among the frequent indications of urgent abdominal surgery. Among the analyzed parameters, age, ASA score, and having comorbid disease were found to have an effect on both mortality and morbidity. The controversial subject in the present study is regarding the duration of symptoms. The duration of symptoms had no effect on mortality nor morbidity in our study.

  16. Bayesian network modelling of upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisha, Nazziwa; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Adam, Mohd Bakri

    2013-09-01

    Bayesian networks are graphical probabilistic models that represent causal and other relationships between domain variables. In the context of medical decision making, these models have been explored to help in medical diagnosis and prognosis. In this paper, we discuss the Bayesian network formalism in building medical support systems and we learn a tree augmented naive Bayes Network (TAN) from gastrointestinal bleeding data. The accuracy of the TAN in classifying the source of gastrointestinal bleeding into upper or lower source is obtained. The TAN achieves a high classification accuracy of 86% and an area under curve of 92%. A sensitivity analysis of the model shows relatively high levels of entropy reduction for color of the stool, history of gastrointestinal bleeding, consistency and the ratio of blood urea nitrogen to creatinine. The TAN facilitates the identification of the source of GIB and requires further validation.

  17. Role of hemostatic powders in the endoscopic management of gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante-Balén, Marco; Plumé, Gema

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding (AGIB) is a prevalent condition with significant influence on healthcare costs. Endoscopy is essential for the management of AGIB with a pivotal role in diagnosis, risk stratification and management. Recently, hemostatic powders have been added to our endoscopic armamentarium to treat gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. These substances are intended to control active bleeding by delivering a powdered product over the bleeding site that forms a solid matrix with a tamponade function. Local activation of platelet aggregation and coagulation cascade may be also boosted. There are currently three powders commercially available: hemostatic agent TC-325 (Hemospray®), EndoClot™ polysaccharide hemostatic system, and Ankaferd Bloodstopper®. Although the available evidence is based on short series of cases and there is no randomized controlled trial yet, these powders seem to be effective in controlling GI bleeding from a variety of origins with a very favorable side effects profile. They can be used either as a primary therapy or a second-line treatment, and they seem to be especially indicated in cases of cancer-related bleeding and lesions with difficult access. In this review, we will comment on the mechanism of action, efficacy, safety and technical challenges of the use of powders in several clinical scenarios and we will try to define the main current indications of use and propose new lines of research in this area. PMID:25133029

  18. Novel Therapeutic Strategies in the Management of Non-Variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Garber, Ari; Jang, Sunguk

    2016-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, the most common etiology of which is peptic ulcer disease, remains a persistent challenge despite a reduction in both its incidence and mortality. Both pharmacologic and endoscopic techniques have been developed to achieve hemostasis, with varying degrees of success. Among the pharmacologic therapies, proton pump inhibitors remain the mainstay of treatment, as they reduce the risk of rebleeding and requirement for recurrent endoscopic evaluation. Tranexamic acid, a derivative of the amino acid lysine, is an antifibrinolytic agent whose role requires further investigation before application. Endoscopically delivered pharmacotherapy, including Hemospray (Cook Medical), EndoClot (EndoClot Plus Inc.), and Ankaferd Blood Stopper (Ankaferd Health Products), in addition to standard epinephrine, show promise in this regard, although their mechanisms of action require further investigation. Non-pharmacologic endoscopic techniques use one of the following two methods to achieve hemostasis: ablation or mechanical tamponade, which may involve using endoscopic clips, cautery, argon plasma coagulation, over-the-scope clipping devices, radiofrequency ablation, and cryotherapy. This review aimed to highlight these novel and fundamental hemostatic strategies and the research supporting their efficacy. PMID:27744662

  19. Angiography in gastrointestinal bleeding in children

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerovitz, M.F.; Fellows, K.E.

    1984-10-01

    Twenty-seven children aged 1 day to 16 years studied arteriographically for acute or chronic gastrointestinal bleeding were reviewed. Children with known esophageal varices and portal hypertension were excluded. Final diagnoses were made in 25 patients by means of surgery, endoscopy, biopsy, laboratory data, and clinical follow-up. Of these 25 cases, arteriography gave a correct diagnosis in 64% and was falsely negative in 36%. The common causes of bleeding in this study were gastric and duodenal ulcers, gastritis, vascular malformations, and typhlitis. Transcatheter therapy was attempted in six acute bleeders, with success in three (50%).

  20. Evaluation for bleeding disorders in suspected child abuse.

    PubMed

    Anderst, James D; Carpenter, Shannon L; Abshire, Thomas C

    2013-04-01

    Bruising or bleeding in a child can raise the concern for child abuse. Assessing whether the findings are the result of trauma and/or whether the child has a bleeding disorder is critical. Many bleeding disorders are rare, and not every child with bruising/bleeding concerning for abuse requires an evaluation for bleeding disorders. In some instances, however, bleeding disorders can present in a manner similar to child abuse. The history and clinical evaluation can be used to determine the necessity of an evaluation for a possible bleeding disorder, and prevalence and known clinical presentations of individual bleeding disorders can be used to guide the extent of the laboratory testing. This clinical report provides guidance to pediatricians and other clinicians regarding the evaluation for bleeding disorders when child abuse is suspected.

  1. Bleeding with dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban. No antidote, and little clinical experience.

    PubMed

    2013-06-01

    Dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban are oral anticoagulants used to prevent or treat thrombosis in a variety of situations. Like all anticoagulants, these drugs can provoke bleeding. How should patients be managed if bleeding occurs during dabigatran, rivaroxaban or apixaban therapy? How can the risk of bleeding be reduced in patients who require surgery or other invasive procedures? To answer these questions, we reviewed the available literature, using the standard Prescrire methodology. In clinical trials, warfarin, enoxaparin, dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban were associated with a similar frequency of severe bleeding. Numerous reports of severe bleeding associated with dabigatran have been recorded since this drug was first marketed. Some situations are associated with a particularly high bleeding risk, including: even mild renal failure, advanced age, extremes in body weight and drug-drug interactions, particularly with antiplatelet agents (including aspirin), nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, and many drugs used in cardiovascular indications. In patients treated with dabigatran, rivaroxaban or apixaban, changes in the INR (international normalised ratio) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) do not correlate with the dose. In early 2013, there is still no routine coagulation test suitable for monitoring these patients; specific tests are only available in specialised laboratories. In early 2013 there is no antidote for dabigatran, rivaroxaban or apixaban, nor any specific treatment with proven efficacy for severe bleeding linked to these drugs. Recommendations on the management of bleeding in this setting are based mainly on pharmacological parameters and on scarce experimen-Haemodialysis reduces the plasma concentration of dabigatran, while rivaroxaban and apixaban cannot be eliminated by dialysis. Prothrombin complex concentrates and recombinant activated factor VII seem to have little or no efficacy, and they carry a poorly documented

  2. Emergency single-balloon enteroscopy in overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: Efficacy and safety

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, Rolando; Rodrigues, Adélia; Fernandes, Carlos; Ribeiro, Iolanda; Fraga, José; Carvalho, João

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the impact of emergency single-balloon enteroscopy (SBE) on the diagnosis and treatment for active overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). Methods SBE procedures for OGIB were retrospectively reviewed and sub-divided according to the bleeding types: active-overt and inactive-overt bleeding. The patient’s history, laboratory results, endoscopic findings and therapeutic interventions were registered. Emergency SBE was defined as an endoscopy that was performed for active-overt OGIB, within 24 hours of clinical presentation. Results Between January 2010 and February 2013, 53 SBEs were performed in 43 patients with overt OGIB. Seventeen emergency SBEs were performed in 15 patients with active overt-OGIB procedures (group A), which diagnosed the bleeding source in 14: angiodysplasia (n = 5), ulcers/erosions (n = 3), bleeding tumors (gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), n = 3; neuroendocrine tumor, n = 1), and erosioned polyps (n = 2). Endoscopic treatment was performed in nine patients, with one or multiple hemostatic therapies: argon plasma coagulation (n = 5), epinephrine submucosal injection (n = 5), hemostatic clips (n = 3), and polypectomy (n = 2). Twenty-eight patients with inactive bleeding (group B) were submitted to 36 elective SBEs, which successfully diagnosed 18 cases. The diagnostic yield in group A (93.3%) was significantly higher than in group B (64.3%)—Fisher’s exact test, p = 0.038. Conclusion This study revealed an important role of emergency SBE in the diagnosis of bleeding etiology in active overt OGIB. PMID:25452844

  3. Diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding: A practical guide for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bong Sik Matthew; Li, Bob T; Engel, Alexander; Samra, Jaswinder S; Clarke, Stephen; Norton, Ian D; Li, Angela E

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common problem encountered in the emergency department and in the primary care setting. Acute or overt gastrointestinal bleeding is visible in the form of hematemesis, melena or hematochezia. Chronic or occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not apparent to the patient and usually presents as positive fecal occult blood or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is recurrent bleeding when the source remains unidentified after upper endoscopy and colonoscopic evaluation and is usually from the small intestine. Accurate clinical diagnosis is crucial and guides definitive investigations and interventions. This review summarizes the overall diagnostic approach to gastrointestinal bleeding and provides a practical guide for clinicians. PMID:25400991

  4. Duodenal variceal bleed: an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleed and a difficult diagnosis to make

    PubMed Central

    Bhagani, Shradha; Winters, Conchubhair; Moreea, Sulleman

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of recurrent upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in a man aged 57 years with primary biliary cholangitis who was ultimately diagnosed with an isolated duodenal variceal bleed, which was successfully treated with histoacryl glue injection. Duodenal varices are an uncommon presentation of portal hypertension and can result in significant GI bleeding with a high mortality. Diagnosis can be difficult and therapeutic options limited. Endoscopic variceal sclerotherapy with histoacryl glue provides an effective treatment, though endoscopists need to remain aware of and vigilant for the serious complications of this treatment option. PMID:28242804

  5. Is it all about cutoffs? Can DIC scores predict bleeding in APL?

    PubMed

    Chang, Hung

    2013-01-01

    Predicting outcome with a scoring system should be interpreted with caution. In the application of the disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) scoring system, a key point is to use well-established cutoff values for the variables. In the article by Mitrovic et al., activated partial thromboplastin time was presented by seconds, while prothrombin time (PT) was expressed as percentage. Such expressions appear confusing and contradictory. In the DIC scoring system, scoring of PT is determined by prolongation in seconds. I cannot see the reason to use the percentage of PT in this article. Furthermore, the PT cutoff was defined as 50%, which may be entirely arbitrary. We had conducted an investigation in our hospital cohort. We had analyzed our cohort by the chi-square method to determine the correlation between DIC scores and bleeding events. We found no relationship between scores and events of bleeding or fatal bleeding. However, reanalysis using a cutoff DIC ≧6 revealed a marginally significant difference in bleeding risk between high-score and low-score patients (P = 0.046). The difference was insignificant for life-threatening bleeding. While our experience appears to support authors' conclusion that DIC score ≧6 is associated with bleeding in acute promyelocytic leukemia patients, we remain skeptical in regard to such manipulations. We believe subsequent studies on a large-scale basis or more accumulated data critically reviewed by experts are needed to shed lights on this important issue.

  6. Italian Registry of Congenital Bleeding Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Giampaolo, Adele; Abbonizio, Francesca; Arcieri, Romano; Hassan, Hamisa Jane

    2017-01-01

    In Italy, the surveillance of people with bleeding disorders is based on the National Registry of Congenital Coagulopathies (NRCC) managed by the Italian National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità). The NRCC collects epidemiological and therapeutic data from the 54 Hemophilia Treatment Centers, members of the Italian Association of Hemophilia Centres (AICE). The number of people identified with bleeding disorders has increased over the years, with the number rising from approx. 7000 in 2000 to over 11,000 in 2015. The NRCC includes 4020 patients with hemophilia A and 859 patients with hemophilia B. The prevalence of the rare type 3 vWD is 0.20/100,000 inhabitants. Less common congenital bleeding disorders include the following deficiencies: Factor I (fibrinogen), Factor II (prothrombin), Factor V, Factor VII, Factor X, Factor XI and Factor XIII, which affect 1953 patients. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection affects 1561 patients, more than 200 of whom have two infections (HCV + HIV). Estimated hemophilia-related drug consumption in 2015 was approx. 550 million IU of FVIII for hemophilia A patients and approx. 70 million IU of FIX for hemophilia B patients. The NRCC, with its bleeding disorder data set, is a tool that can provide answers to fundamental questions in public health, monitoring care provision and drug treatment, as well as facilitating clinical and epidemiological research. PMID:28335488

  7. Acute diquat poisoning with intracerebral bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, S; Wilks, M; Coupe, M

    2001-01-01

    A case of severe diquat poisoning complicated by the development of aggressive behaviour, oliguric renal failure, and intracerebral bleeding is described. The patient was successfully managed and made a complete recovery. In this paper special attention has been given to the major clinical differences between diquat and paraquat intoxication.


Keywords: poisoning; diquat; paraquat PMID:11320278

  8. Bleeding complications with the P2Y12 receptor antagonists clopidogrel and ticagrelor in the PLATelet inhibition and patient Outcomes (PLATO) trial.

    PubMed

    Becker, Richard C; Bassand, Jean Pierre; Budaj, Andrzej; Wojdyla, Daniel M; James, Stefan K; Cornel, Jan H; French, John; Held, Claes; Horrow, Jay; Husted, Steen; Lopez-Sendon, Jose; Lassila, Riitta; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Storey, Robert F; Harrington, Robert A; Wallentin, Lars

    2011-12-01

    AIMS More intense platelet-directed therapy for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) may increase bleeding risk. The aim of the current analysis was to determine the rate, clinical impact, and predictors of major and fatal bleeding complications in the PLATO study. METHODS AND RESULTS PLATO was a randomized, double-blind, active control international, phase 3 clinical trial in patients with acute ST elevation and non-ST-segment elevation ACS. A total of 18 624 patients were randomized to either ticagrelor, a non-thienopyridine, reversibly binding platelet P2Y(12) receptor antagonist, or clopidogrel in addition to aspirin. Patients randomized to ticagrelor and clopidogrel had similar rates of PLATO major bleeding (11.6 vs. 11.2%; P = 0.43), TIMI major bleeding (7.9 vs. 7.7%, P = 0.56) and GUSTO severe bleeding (2.9 vs. 3.1%, P = 0.22). Procedure-related bleeding rates were also similar. Non-CABG major bleeding (4.5 vs. 3.8%, P = 0.02) and non-procedure-related major bleeding (3.1 vs. 2.3%, P = 0.05) were more common in ticagrelor-treated patients, primarily after 30 days on treatment. Fatal bleeding and transfusion rates did not differ between groups. There were no significant interactions for major bleeding or combined minor plus major bleeding between treatment groups and age ≥75 years, weight <60 kg, region, chronic kidney disease, creatinine clearance <60 mL/min, aspirin dose >325 mg on the day of randomization, pre-randomization clopidogrel administration, or clopidogrel loading dose. CONCLUSION Ticagrelor compared with clopidogrel was associated with similar total major bleeding but increased non-CABG and non-procedure-related major bleeding, primarily after 30 days on study drug treatment. Fatal bleeding was low and did not differ between groups.

  9. Genome Sequencing of 10 Helicobacter pylori Pediatric Strains from Patients with Nonulcer Dyspepsia and Peptic Ulcer Disease.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Alexandra; Rocha, Raquel; Vale, Filipa F; Vieira, Luís; Sampaio, Daniel A; Dias, Ricardo; Gomes, João P; Oleastro, Mónica

    2015-02-05

    We present draft genome sequences of 10 Helicobacter pylori clinical strains isolated from children. This will be important for future studies of comparative genomics in order to better understand the virulence determinants underlying peptic ulcer disease.

  10. Endovascular Management of Acute Bleeding Arterioenteric Fistulas

    SciTech Connect

    Leonhardt, Henrik Mellander, Stefan; Snygg, Johan; Loenn, Lars

    2008-05-15

    The objective of this study was to review the outcome of endovascular transcatheter repair of emergent arterioenteric fistulas. Cases of abdominal arterioenteric fistulas (defined as a fistula between a major artery and the small intestine or colon, thus not the esophagus or stomach), diagnosed over the 3-year period between December 2002 and December 2005 at our institution, were retrospectively reviewed. Five patients with severe enteric bleeding underwent angiography and endovascular repair. Four presented primary arterioenteric fistulas, and one presented a secondary aortoenteric fistula. All had massive persistent bleeding with hypotension despite volume substitution and transfusion by the time of endovascular management. Outcome after treatment of these patients was investigated for major procedure-related complications, recurrence, reintervention, morbidity, and mortality. Mean follow-up time was 3 months (range, 1-6 months). All massive bleeding was controlled by occlusive balloon catheters. Four fistulas were successfully sealed with stent-grafts, resulting in a technical success rate of 80%. One patient was circulatory stabilized by endovascular management but needed immediate further open surgery. There were no procedure-related major complications. Mean hospital stay after the initial endovascular intervention was 19 days. Rebleeding occurred in four patients (80%) after a free interval of 2 weeks or longer. During the follow-up period three patients needed reintervention. The in-hospital mortality was 20% and the 30-day mortality was 40%. The midterm outcome was poor, due to comorbidities or rebleeding, with a mortality of 80% within 6 months. In conclusion, endovascular repair is an efficient and safe method to stabilize patients with life-threatening bleeding arterioenteric fistulas in the emergent episode. However, in this group of patients with severe comorbidities, the risk of rebleeding is high and further intervention must be considered

  11. Embolization of Acute Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Resistant to Endoscopic Treatment: Results and Predictors of Recurrent Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Loffroy, Romaric Rao, Pramod; Ota, Shinichi; Lin Mingde; Kwak, Byung-Kook; Geschwind, Jean-Francois

    2010-12-15

    Acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) hemorrhage is a frequent complication associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The most common cause of UGI bleeding is peptic ulcer disease, but the differential diagnosis is diverse and includes tumors; ischemia; gastritis; arteriovenous malformations, such as Dieulafoy lesions; Mallory-Weiss tears; trauma; and iatrogenic causes. Aggressive treatment with early endoscopic hemostasis is essential for a favorable outcome. However, severe bleeding despite conservative medical treatment or endoscopic intervention occurs in 5-10% of patients, requiring surgery or transcatheter arterial embolization. Surgical intervention is usually an expeditious and gratifying endeavor, but it can be associated with high operative mortality rates. Endovascular management using superselective catheterization of the culprit vessel, < sandwich> occlusion, or blind embolization has emerged as an alternative to emergent operative intervention for high-risk patients and is now considered the first-line therapy for massive UGI bleeding refractory to endoscopic treatment. Indeed, many published studies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and its high technical and clinical success rates, which range from 69 to 100% and from 63 to 97%, respectively, even if the choice of the best embolic agent among coils, cyanaocrylate glue, gelatin sponge, or calibrated particles remains a matter of debate. However, factors influencing clinical outcome, especially predictors of early rebleeding, are poorly understood, and few studies have addressed this issue. This review of the literature will attempt to define the role of embolotherapy for acute nonvariceal UGI hemorrhage that fails to respond to endoscopic hemostasis and to summarize data on factors predicting angiographic and embolization failure.

  12. The ORBIT bleeding score: a simple bedside score to assess bleeding risk in atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Emily C.; Simon, DaJuanicia N.; Thomas, Laine E.; Hylek, Elaine M.; Gersh, Bernard J.; Ansell, Jack E.; Kowey, Peter R.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Chang, Paul; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Pencina, Michael J.; Piccini, Jonathan P.; Peterson, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic decisions in atrial fibrillation (AF) are often influenced by assessment of bleeding risk. However, existing bleeding risk scores have limitations. Objectives We sought to develop and validate a novel bleeding risk score using routinely available clinical information to predict major bleeding in a large, community-based AF population. Methods We analysed data from Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation (ORBIT-AF), a prospective registry that enrolled incident and prevalent AF patients at 176 US sites. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we identified factors independently associated with major bleeding among patients taking oral anticoagulation (OAC) over a median follow-up of 2 years (interquartile range = 1.6–2.5). We also created a numerical bedside risk score that included the five most predictive risk factors weighted according to their strength of association with major bleeding. The predictive performance of the full model, the simple five-item score, and two existing risk scores (hypertension, abnormal renal/liver function, stroke, bleeding history or predisposition, labile INR, elderly, drugs/alcohol concomitantly, HAS-BLED, and anticoagulation and risk factors in atrial fibrillation, ATRIA) were then assessed in both the ORBIT-AF cohort and a separate clinical trial population, Rivaroxaban Once-daily oral direct factor Xa inhibition compared with vitamin K antagonism for prevention of stroke and embolism trial in atrial fibrillation (ROCKET-AF). Results Among 7411 ORBIT-AF patients taking OAC, the rate of major bleeding was 4.0/100 person-years. The full continuous model (12 variables) and five-factor ORBIT risk score (older age [75+ years], reduced haemoglobin/haematocrit/history of anaemia, bleeding history, insufficient kidney function, and treatment with antiplatelet) both had good ability to identify those who bled vs. not (C-index 0.69 and 0.67, respectively). These scores both had

  13. Physical activity benefits and risks on the gastrointestinal system.

    PubMed

    Martin, Donald

    2011-12-01

    This review evaluates the current understanding of the benefits and risks of physical activity and exercise on the gastrointestinal system. A significant portion of endurance athletes are affected by gastrointestinal symptoms, but most symptoms are transient and do not have long-term consequences. Conversely, physical activity may have a protective effect on the gastrointestinal system. There is convincing evidence that physical activity reduces the risk of colon cancer. The evidence is less convincing for gastric and pancreatic cancers, gastroesophageal reflux disease, peptic ulcer disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, cholelithiasis, diverticular disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and constipation. Physical activity may reduce the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding and inflammatory bowel disease, although this has not been proven unequivocally. This article provides a critical review of the evidence-based literature concerning exercise and physical activity effects on the gastrointestinal system and provides physicians with a better understanding of the evidence behind exercise prescriptions for patients with gastrointestinal disorders. Well-designed prospective randomized trials evaluating the risks and benefits of exercise and physical activity on gastrointestinal disorders are recommended for future research.

  14. Stent Patients Face Higher Risk of Death After Bleeding, Clots

    MedlinePlus

    ... 164108.html Stent Patients Face Higher Risk of Death After Bleeding, Clots Prolonged treatment to prevent clots ... some patients are still at increased risk of death if they suffer either blockages or bleeding events, ...

  15. An Overview of History, Pathogenesis and Treatment of Perforated Peptic Ulcer Disease with Evaluation of Prognostic Scoring in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, V; Shivani, A

    2014-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease including both gastric and duodenal ulcer form a substantial part of patients seeking surgical opinion world-wide. The concept of acid in peptic ulcer disease, which was the basis of treatment of peptic ulcer was revolutionized by the discovery of H2-receptor antagonists, that led to the principle of acid suppression therapy for duodenal ulcer which followed decades of preference for surgical interventions in the form of gastric resections, vagotomy etc., After the discovery of Helicobacter pylori organism as the causative factor a triple drug regime was identified to treat peptic disease which was further modified to sequential therapy to avoid antibiotic resistance. This recognition has not concluded the chapter on peptic ulcers. The management of ulcer disease and its complications remain a surgical challenge. All the materials for this review have been accessed from various internet search engines. The references have been narrowed down to 34 by excluding cross references, duplicated citations, pediatric studies, case reports, iatrogenic and malignant perforations and including microbiological, immunohistochemistry references and studies with more than a sample size of ten. Case control, cohort studies, prospective/retrospective, metaanalytical studies were preferred in that order. This article attempts to take an overview of all aspects of the management of peptic ulcer. PMID:24669326

  16. An overview of history, pathogenesis and treatment of perforated peptic ulcer disease with evaluation of prognostic scoring in adults.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, V; Shivani, A

    2014-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease including both gastric and duodenal ulcer form a substantial part of patients seeking surgical opinion world-wide. The concept of acid in peptic ulcer disease, which was the basis of treatment of peptic ulcer was revolutionized by the discovery of H2-receptor antagonists, that led to the principle of acid suppression therapy for duodenal ulcer which followed decades of preference for surgical interventions in the form of gastric resections, vagotomy etc., After the discovery of Helicobacter pylori organism as the causative factor a triple drug regime was identified to treat peptic disease which was further modified to sequential therapy to avoid antibiotic resistance. This recognition has not concluded the chapter on peptic ulcers. The management of ulcer disease and its complications remain a surgical challenge. All the materials for this review have been accessed from various internet search engines. The references have been narrowed down to 34 by excluding cross references, duplicated citations, pediatric studies, case reports, iatrogenic and malignant perforations and including microbiological, immunohistochemistry references and studies with more than a sample size of ten. Case control, cohort studies, prospective/retrospective, metaanalytical studies were preferred in that order. This article attempts to take an overview of all aspects of the management of peptic ulcer.

  17. Hemostatic Powders in Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan N

    2015-07-01

    Topical hemostatic agents and powders are an emerging modality in the endoscopic management of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. This systematic review demonstrates the effectiveness and safety of these agents with special emphasis on TC-325 and Ankaferd Blood Stopper. The unique noncontact/nontraumatic application, ability to cover large areas of bleed, and ease of use make these hemostatic agents an attractive option in certain clinical situations, such as massive bleeding with poor visualization, salvage therapy, and diffuse bleeding from luminal malignancies.

  18. Gastrointestinal angiodysplasia and bleeding in von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Franchini, M; Mannucci, P M

    2014-09-02

    Von Willebrand disease (VWD), the most common genetic bleeding disorder, is characterised by a quantitative or qualitative defect of von Willebrand factor (VWF). Patients with VWD suffer from mucocutaneous bleeding, of severity usually proportional to the degree of VWF defect. In particular, gastrointestinal bleeding associated with angiodysplasia is often a severe symptom of difficult management. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of VWD-associated gastrointestinal angiodysplasia and related bleeding.

  19. Postoperative bleeding in a patient with normal screening coagulation tests.

    PubMed

    Nourbakhsh, Eva; Anvari, Reza; D'cunha, Nicholas; Thaxton, Lauren; Malik, Asim; Nugent, Kenneth

    2011-09-01

    A 54-year-old man was brought to the emergency room after a head-on collision. He had multiple fractures in his lower extremities and required immediate surgery. After surgery, the patient had a persistent drop in hemoglobin, hematocrit and platelets despite red blood cell transfusions. Laboratory studies included normal prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, normal plasminogen functional activity, negative antiplatelet antibodies, normal platelet functional analysis and negative disseminated intravascular coagulation screen. Factor XIII antigen levels were 25% of predicted, and the diagnosis of factor XIII deficiency was made. The patient was treated with cryoprecipitate, and the bleeding stopped. Patients with factor XIII deficiency have either a rare congenital or acquired coagulation disorder. Both presentations have normal standard laboratory clotting tests, and the diagnosis requires an assay measuring factor XIII activity or antigen levels. The usual treatment includes cryoprecipitate, fresh-frozen plasma or recombinant factor XIII. This deficiency should be considered in patients with unexplained spontaneous, traumatic or postoperative bleeding.

  20. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air systems used for cabin pressurization: (a) The cabin air system may not be subject to...

  1. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air systems used for cabin pressurization: (a) The cabin air system may not be subject to...

  2. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  3. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  4. Gallbladder bleeding-related severe gastrointestinal bleeding and shock in a case with end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jun-Li; Tsai, Shang-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gallbladder (GB) bleeding is very rare and it is caused by cystic artery aneurysm and rupture, or GB wall rupture. For GB rupture, the typical findings are positive Murphy's sign and jaundice. GB bleeding mostly presented as hemobilia. This is the first case presented with severe GI bleeding because of GB rupture-related GB bleeding. After comparing computed tomography, one gallstone spillage was noticed. In addition to gallstones, uremic coagulopathy also worsens the bleeding condition. This is also the first case that patients with GB spillage-related rupture and bleeding were successfully treated by nonsurgical management. Clinicians should bear in mind the rare causes of GI bleeding. Embolization of the bleeding artery should be attempted as soon as possible. PMID:27281100

  5. Is there any role of acid reducing gastric surgery in peptic ulcer perforation?

    PubMed

    Nivatvongs, Supanit

    2005-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is known to be the prime factor of peptic ulcer disease as well as NSAID usage. Although medical treatment of the bacteria can eliminate the problem for more than 90% of the infected people but the cost of treatment is high then acid reducing gastric surgery still has a definite role. The prevalence of H. pylori in peptic ulcer perferation is still unknown also whether vagotomy and gastrectomy could eradicate H. pylori. Now laparoscopic surgery especially the simple repair of the perforation has became routinely used in many part of the world. So acid reducing gastric surgery is a good choice in chronic user of NSAID and also an option for people who have H. pylori infection.

  6. [Is the successful eradication of Helicobacter pylori sufficient for the healing of peptic ulcer?].

    PubMed

    Pregun, István; Herszényi, László; Juhász, Márk; Miheller, Pál; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2006-03-12

    Helicobacter pylori has a major role in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease. Cure of the infection is essential in ulcer healing, but an additional PPI therapy after completing eradication treatment is widespread in clinical practice. In the present work clinical studies evaluating peptic ulcer healing followed or not by PPI treatment after eradication therapy were analyzed. The results of these trials are concordant that only a minority of patients with duodenal ulcer would benefit from prolonged acid suppressive treatment, a successful eradication therapy (that counts for a large proportion) is sufficient. There are less data available concerning gastric ulcer: successful eradication is also essential to ulcer healing and to avoid relapse, however it seems that post-eradication PPI therapy might be beneficial.

  7. Secondary prophylaxis for esophageal variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Albillos, Agustín; Tejedor, Marta

    2014-05-01

    Combination therapy with beta-blockers and endoscopic band ligation (EBL) is the standard prophylaxis of esophageal variceal rebleeding in cirrhosis. Beta-blockers are the backbone of combination therapy, since their benefit extend to other complications of portal hypertension. EBL carries the risk of post-banding ulcer bleeding, which explains why overall rebleeding is reduced when beta-blockers are added to EBL, and not when EBL is added to beta-blockers. TIPS is the rescue treatment, but it could be considered as first choice in patients that first bleed while on beta-blockers, those with contraindications to beta-blockers or with refractory ascites, and those with fundal varices.

  8. Multiple Polypoid Angiodysplasia with Obscure Overt Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jooyoung; Hwang, Sung Wook; Kim, Jihye; Kang, Jinwoo; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Park, Kyu Joo; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Joo Sung

    2016-01-01

    Angiodysplasia (AD) is increasingly being recognized as a major cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. Morphologically flat lesions are common types of AD, whereas the polypoid types are rare. We report a case of multiple polypoid AD in the small bowel causing severe anemia and requiring surgical treatment. A 60-year-old male patient visited our hospital with dyspnea and hematochezia. He had a history of myocardial infarction and was taking both aspirin and clopidogrel. Capsule endoscopy, enteroscopy, computed tomography, and angiography revealed multifocal vascular lesions with a polypoid shape in the jejunum. Surgical resection was performed because endoscopic treatment was considered impossible with the number and the location of lesions. The risk of recurrent bleeding related to the use of antiplatelet agents also contributed to the decision to perform surgery. AD was histologically diagnosed from the surgical specimen. He resumed taking both aspirin and clopidogrel after surgery. He fully recovered and has been doing well during the several months of follow-up.

  9. Risk factors for major bleeding in the SEATTLE II trial

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, Immad; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Liu, Ping-Yu; Piazza, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis minimizes the risk of intracranial bleeding compared with systemic full-dose fibrinolytic therapy for pulmonary embolism (PE). However, major bleeding is nevertheless a potential complication. We analyzed the 150-patient SEATTLE II trial of submassive and massive PE patients to describe those who suffered major bleeding events following ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis and to identify risk factors for bleeding. Major bleeding was defined as GUSTO severe/life-threatening or moderate bleeds within 72 hours of initiation of the procedure. Of the 15 patients with major bleeding, four (26.6%) developed access site-related bleeding. Multiple venous access attempts were more frequent in the major bleeding group (27.6% vs 3.6%; p<0.001). All patients with major bleeding had femoral vein access for device delivery. Patients who developed major bleeding had a longer intensive care stay (6.8 days vs 4.7 days; p=0.004) and longer hospital stay (12.9 days vs 8.4 days; p=0.004). The frequency of inferior vena cava filter placement was 40% in patients with major bleeding compared with 13% in those without major bleeding (p=0.02). Massive PE (adjusted odds ratio 3.6; 95% confidence interval 1.01–12.9; p=0.049) and multiple venous access attempts (adjusted odds ratio 10.09; 95% confidence interval 1.98–51.46; p=0.005) were independently associated with an increased risk of major bleeding. In conclusion, strategies for improving venous access should be implemented to reduce the risk of major bleeding associated with ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01513759; EKOS Corporation 10.13039/100006522 PMID:27913777

  10. The role of endoscopy in pediatric gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Markus; Geiß, Andrea; Greiner, Peter; Wellner, Ulrich; Richter-Schrag, Hans-Jürgen; Bausch, Dirk; Fischer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Gastrointestinal bleeding in children and adolescents accounts for up to 20 % of referrals to gastroenterologists. Detailed management guidelines exist for gastrointestinal bleeding in adults, but they do not encompass children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to assess gastrointestinal bleeding in pediatric patients and to determine an investigative management algorithm accounting for the specifics of children and adolescents. Patients and methods: Pediatric patients with gastrointestinal bleeding admitted to our endoscopy unit from 2001 to 2009 (n = 154) were identified. Retrospective statistical and neural network analysis was used to assess outcome and to determine an investigative management algorithm. Results: The source of bleeding could be identified in 81 % (n = 124/154). Gastrointestinal bleeding was predominantly lower gastrointestinal bleeding (66 %, n = 101); upper gastrointestinal bleeding was much less common (14 %, n = 21). Hematochezia was observed in 94 % of the patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 95 of 101). Hematemesis (67 %, n = 14 of 21) and melena (48 %, n = 10 of 21) were associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The sensitivity and specificity of a neural network to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 98 % and 63.6 %, respectively and to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 75 % and 96 % respectively. The sensitivity and specifity of hematochezia alone to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 94.2 % and 85.7 %, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for hematemesis and melena to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 82.6 % and 94 %, respectively. We then developed an investigative management algorithm based on the presence of hematochezia and hematemesis or melena. Conclusions: Hematochezia should prompt colonoscopy and hematemesis or melena should prompt esophagogastroduodenoscopy. If no

  11. Risk factors for major bleeding in the SEATTLE II trial.

    PubMed

    Sadiq, Immad; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Liu, Ping-Yu; Piazza, Gregory

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis minimizes the risk of intracranial bleeding compared with systemic full-dose fibrinolytic therapy for pulmonary embolism (PE). However, major bleeding is nevertheless a potential complication. We analyzed the 150-patient SEATTLE II trial of submassive and massive PE patients to describe those who suffered major bleeding events following ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis and to identify risk factors for bleeding. Major bleeding was defined as GUSTO severe/life-threatening or moderate bleeds within 72 hours of initiation of the procedure. Of the 15 patients with major bleeding, four (26.6%) developed access site-related bleeding. Multiple venous access attempts were more frequent in the major bleeding group (27.6% vs 3.6%; p<0.001). All patients with major bleeding had femoral vein access for device delivery. Patients who developed major bleeding had a longer intensive care stay (6.8 days vs 4.7 days; p=0.004) and longer hospital stay (12.9 days vs 8.4 days; p=0.004). The frequency of inferior vena cava filter placement was 40% in patients with major bleeding compared with 13% in those without major bleeding ( p=0.02). Massive PE (adjusted odds ratio 3.6; 95% confidence interval 1.01-12.9; p=0.049) and multiple venous access attempts (adjusted odds ratio 10.09; 95% confidence interval 1.98-51.46; p=0.005) were independently associated with an increased risk of major bleeding. In conclusion, strategies for improving venous access should be implemented to reduce the risk of major bleeding associated with ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01513759; EKOS Corporation 10.13039/100006522.

  12. Is childhood physical abuse associated with peptic ulcer disease? Findings from a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Fuller-Thomson, Esme; Bottoms, Jennifer; Brennenstuhl, Sarah; Hurd, Marion

    2011-11-01

    This study investigated childhood physical abuse and ulcers in a regionally representative community sample. Age, race and sex were controlled for in addition to five clusters of potentially confounding factors: adverse childhood conditions, adult socioeconomic status, current health behaviors, current stress and marital status, and history of mood/anxiety disorders. Childhood physical abuse is associated with many negative physical and psychological adult health outcomes. Two recent studies demonstrate a potential link between childhood physical abuse and peptic ulcer disease in adulthood. The authors use regional data for the Canadian provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey. Of the 13,069 respondents with complete data on abuse and ulcers, 7.3% (n = 1,020) report that they had been physically abused as a child by someone close to them and 3.0% (n = 493) report that they had been diagnosed with peptic ulcers by a health professional. The regional response rate is approximately 84%. Findings show that those reporting abuse had more than twice the prevalence of ulcers than did those not reporting abuse (6.6% vs. 2.7%). The fully adjusted odd ratio of peptic ulcers among those who had reported childhood physical abuse is 1.68 (95% CI = 1.22, 2.32). A significant and stable relationship between childhood physical abuse and peptic ulcers is found, even when taking into account five clusters of potentially confounding factors. Prospective studies that apply the biopsychosocial model are likely to be the most effective for identifying the pathways that connect childhood physical abuse and ulcer disease.

  13. Jejunogastric intussusception presenting as tumor bleed

    PubMed Central

    Rather, Shiraz Ahmad; Dar, Tanveer Iqbal; Wani, Rauf A; Khan, Asima

    2010-01-01

    Jejunogastric intussusception (JGI) is a rare but serious complication of previous gastrectomy or gastrojejunostomy, and a delayed diagnosis can lead to catastrophe. It can present as hematemesis, and an endoscopist aware of the condition can diagnose it early. We present a case of JGI presenting as hematemesis and diagnosed as tumor bleed on endoscopy. Diagnosis of JGI was confirmed on laparotomy, gangrenous efferent limb was resected and a fresh gastrojejunostomy performed. PMID:21063568

  14. Single session treatment for bleeding hemorrhoids

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, S.J.; Rypins, E.B.; Houck, J.; Thrower, S.

    1987-12-01

    Fifty consecutive outpatients with bleeding internal hemorrhoids were prospectively treated with a single application of rubber band ligation or infrared coagulation. Complete follow-up observation was obtained in 48 patients (23 underwent rubber band ligation and 25 underwent infrared coagulation). At one month after treatment, 22 patients who underwent rubber band ligation and 16 who underwent infrared coagulation, were symptomatically improved (p less than 0.05). At six months, 15 patients who had undergone rubber band ligation and ten who had infrared coagulation treatment, remained improved (p less than 0.05). There was no statistical difference in the discomfort experienced by either group during or after the procedure as determined by a self-assessment scale. Two patients who underwent rubber band ligation experienced complications--a thrombosed external hemorrhoid developed in one patient and another had delayed rectal bleeding. Although associated with occasional complications after treatment, rubber band ligation is more effective than in infrared coagulation for single session treatment of bleeding internal hemorrhoids.

  15. Fatal Retroperitoneal Bleeding Caused by Neurofibromatosis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Moerbeek, Patrick R.; van Buijtenen, Jesse M.; van den Heuvel, Baukje; Hoksbergen, Arjan W. J.

    2015-01-01

    A young female was brought into the emergency department with pulseless electrical activity (PEA) after local resection of neurofibromateous lesions. Chest ultrasonography was normal. Abdominal ultrasonography was not performed. After successful resuscitation a total body CT-scan was performed to rule out potential bleeding sources. However, haemodynamic instability reoccurred and the scan had to be aborted at the thoracoabdominal level. No thoracic abnormalities were found. Resuscitation was reinitiated and abdominal ultrasonography was performed, showing a large amount of abdominal fluid. A progressive fall in haemoglobin was noted. Emergency laparotomy was performed, revealing a large retroperitoneal haematoma. Despite ligation and packing, bleeding continued. Postoperative angiography showed active bleeding from a branch of the left internal iliac artery, which could be successfully coiled. Unfortunately, the patient died five days later due to irreversible brain damage. Revision of an MRI scan made one year earlier showed a 10 cm large retroperitoneal neurofibromatous lesion exactly at the location of the current bleeding. This case shows that patients with neurofibromatosis might develop spontaneous life-threatening bleeding from retroperitoneal located lesions. Furthermore, it points out the necessity of focused assessment with ultrasonography of the abdomen in all patients with PEA of unknown origin. PMID:25688270

  16. Platelet Dysfunction in Thrombosis Patients Treated with Vitamin K Antagonists and Recurrent Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    van der Meijden, Paola E. J.; Bouman, Annemieke C.; Feijge, Marion A. H.; van Oerle, René; Spronk, Henri M. H.; Hamulyák, Karly; ten Cate-Hoek, Arina J.; ten Cate, Hugo; Heemskerk, Johan W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recurrent bleeding can complicate the treatment of thrombosis patients with vitamin K antagonists (VKA), even at a well-regulated level of anticoagulation. In this proof-of-principle study, we investigated whether alterations in platelet function or von Willebrand factor (vWf) contribute to a bleeding phenotype in these patients. Methods In this case-control study 33 well-regulated patients without bleeding events (controls) and 33 patients with recurrent bleeding (cases) were retrospectively included. Thrombin generation and vWf were determined in plasma. Platelet function was assessed by light transmission aggregometry and flow cytometry using a validated panel of agonists. Results Thrombin generation was similarly reduced in controls and cases, in comparison to normal plasma. Plasma vWf level was above the normal range in 85% of controls and 67% of the cases. vWf activity was similarly increased in all patients in comparison to healthy volunteers. Platelet aggregation was in the normal range for almost all patients irrespective of the type of agonist. However, in response to a low collagen dose, platelets from 21% of controls and 27% of cases showed diminished responses. Agonist-induced secretion of alpha- and dense-granules or integrin αIIbβ3 activation were affected in platelets from neither controls nor cases. Conclusion Recurrent bleeding in well-controlled patients on VKA therapy is not explained by anti-hemostatic changes in platelet or vWf function. PMID:23724024

  17. Time trends in peptic ulcer surgery, 1956 to 1986. A nation-wide survey in Sweden.

    PubMed Central

    Gustavsson, S; Nyrén, O

    1989-01-01

    To establish time trends in surgical rates for peptic ulcer disease, all surgical departments in Sweden were requested to complete a questionnaire regarding elective operations for gastric and duodenal ulcers and emergency operations for ulcer perforations performed in 1956, 1966, 1976, and 1986. A total of 8558 operations were reported for these years. The incidence of elective surgery declined steadily, the rates being 72.1, 45.0, 31.9, and 10.7 per 100,000 inhabitants. The male:female ratio fell from 4.2 to 1.5:1, while the duodenal/gastric ulcer ratio remained virtually unchanged. The operation rate for perforation decreased by 50%, from 12.8 to 6.4 per 100,000 inhabitants. We conclude that there has been a dramatic decline in elective peptic ulcer surgery in Sweden that began long before the advent of fiberoptic endoscopy, highly selective vagotomy, or H2-receptor antagonists. The comparable decline in emergency procedures suggests that true changes in the incidence or severity of the disease have occurred. In the future the few patients still needing elective surgery for peptic ulcer may have to be served by a small number of specialized centers. PMID:2589883

  18. [Peptic ulcer disease and helicobacter pylori: How we know what we know].

    PubMed

    Scholl, Raphael

    2015-07-01

    The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is one of the main causes of peptic ulcers. But how was this causal relationship demonstrated? A historical and philosophical analysis of a series of studies conducted during the 1980s can elucidate the question. In the beginning, a mere correlation between the newly discovered bacterium and peptic ulcers was found in gastric biopsies. It remained an open question whether the bacterium caused the disease, or whether it constituted merely an opportunistic infection. Yet determining the direction of causality was difficult in the absence of an animal model: Even though gastritis was observed in a courageous self-experiment involving a swallowed bacterial culture, tf!e significance of the individual case was small. The failings of the self-experiment could only be rectified by a randomised, placebo-controlled trial which met the requirements of Koch's third postulate. Moreover, it was necessary to gain an initial understanding of the mechanism by which the causal relationship between H. pylori and peptic ulcers is mediated: How, forexample, does the bacterium survive in the acid environment of the stomach? The study of the case from the perspective of the history and philosophy of science illustrates how medical knowledge is established incrementally.

  19. Water-soluble vitamin deficiencies in complicated peptic ulcer patients soon after ulcer onset in Japan.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Kazumasa; Akimoto, Teppei; Kusakabe, Makoto; Sato, Wataru; Yamada, Akiyoshi; Yamawaki, Hiroshi; Kodaka, Yasuhiro; Shinpuku, Mayumi; Nagoya, Hiroyuki; Shindo, Tomotaka; Ueki, Nobue; Kusunoki, Masafumi; Kawagoe, Tetsuro; Futagami, Seiji; Tsukui, Taku; Sakamoto, Choitsu

    2013-01-01

    We investigated over time whether contemporary Japanese patients with complicated peptic ulcers have any water-soluble vitamin deficiencies soon after the onset of the complicated peptic ulcers. In this prospective cohort study, fasting serum levels of water-soluble vitamins (vitamins B1, B2, B6, B12, C, and folic acid) and homocysteine were measured at 3 time points (at admission, hospital discharge, and 3 mo after hospital discharge). Among the 20 patients who were enrolled in the study, 10 consecutive patients who completed measurements at all 3 time points were analyzed. The proportion of patients in whom any of the serum water-soluble vitamins that we examined were deficient was as high as 80% at admission, and remained at 70% at discharge. The proportion of patients with vitamin B6 deficiency was significantly higher at admission and discharge (50% and 60%, respectively, p<0.05) than at 3 mo after discharge (10%). In conclusion, most patients with complicated peptic ulcers may have a deficiency of one or more water-soluble vitamins in the early phase of the disease after the onset of ulcer complications, even in a contemporary Japanese population.

  20. Impact of nonresective operations for complicated peptic ulcer disease in a high-risk population.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian R; Wilson, Samuel Eric

    2010-10-01

    Over the past two decades, surgery for complicated peptic ulcer disease has evolved to a "less-is-more" approach due predominately to improved medical therapy. This study sought to determine whether a nonresective operative strategy has been an effective and prudent approach. A 20-year retrospective evaluation was conducted to compare outcomes of patients from the first decade (1990-1999) with those from the more recent decade (2000-2009). In all, 50 patients underwent surgery for complications of peptic ulcer disease, 36 in the early period and 14 in the later period, with 94 per cent being urgent or emergent. Acid-reducing procedures (vagotomy) decreased significantly from 29 to 7 over the two periods (P = 0.04), as did gastric resections from 23 to 3 (P = 0.01). The prevalence of H. pylori and use of NSAIDs both increased from 28 per cent to 36 per cent and 31 per cent to 43 per cent, respectively. Postoperative mortality remained unchanged, 22 per cent vs. 7 per cent (P = 0.41) over the two periods. Resections and definitive acid-reducing procedures continue to decline with no increase in adverse outcomes. This more moderate operative approach to complicated peptic ulcer surgery is appropriate given the trend towards lower mortality and improved medical treatment. In our high-risk veteran population, overall perioperative mortality, length of stay, and reoperations have been reduced.

  1. A systematic approach for the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic peptic ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chen-Shuan; Chiang, Tsung-Hsien; Lee, Yi-Chia

    2015-01-01

    An idiopathic peptic ulcer is defined as an ulcer with unknown cause or an ulcer that appears to arise spontaneously. The first step in treatment is to exclude common possible causes, including Helicobacter pylori infection, infection with other pathogens, ulcerogenic drugs, and uncommon diseases with upper gastrointestinal manifestations. When all known causes are excluded, a diagnosis of idiopathic peptic ulcer can be made. A patient whose peptic ulcer is idiopathic may have a higher risk for complicated ulcer disease, a poorer response to gastric acid suppressants, and a higher recurrence rate after treatment. Risk factors associated with this disease may include genetic predisposition, older age, chronic mesenteric ischemia, smoking, concomitant diseases, a higher American Society of Anesthesiologists score, and higher stress. Therefore, the diagnosis and management of emerging disease should systematically explore all known causes and treat underlying disease, while including regular endoscopic surveillance to confirm ulcer healing and the use of proton-pump inhibitors on a case-by-case basis. PMID:26354049

  2. Situational and Relational Factors Associated With Coitus During Vaginal Bleeding Among Adolescent Women

    PubMed Central

    Hensel, Devon J.; Fortenberry, J. Dennis; Orr, Donald P.

    2013-01-01

    Menstruation is a normal, developmental event anchored in contradictory value systems. Although it demarcates a transition to womanhood, it is often associated with negative sentiments such as shame, camouflage, and discomfort. Certain behavioral expectations, including avoiding sexual intercourse, also accompany menstruation. Research generally has suggested that sex does decrease during menstruation. However, not all sexual activity is suppressed during menses; both individual and relationship factors provide influence. Accordingly, this study investigated situational and relational factors associated with the day-to-day likelihood of sex and vaginal bleeding among 387 (aged 14–17 at enrollment) adolescent women. Generalized estimating equation logistic regression, in SUDAAN 9.0, was used. Predictors of coitus and bleeding included recent sexual activity; past coitus/bleeding; marijuana use before intercourse; and higher partner support, higher sexual interest, and lower feelings of being in love. The findings highlight appropriate areas of focus for information, education, and sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention counseling. PMID:17879170

  3. Situational and relational factors associated with coitus during vaginal bleeding among adolescent women.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Devon J; Fortenberry, J Dennis; Orr, Donald P

    2007-08-01

    Menstruation is a normal, developmental event anchored in contradictory value systems. Although it demarcates a transition to womanhood, it is often associated with negative sentiments such as shame, camouflage and discomfort. Certain behavioral expectations, including avoiding sexual intercourse, also accompany menstruation. Research has generally suggested that sex does decrease during menstruation. However, not all sexual activity is suppressed during menses; both individual and relationship factors provide influence. Accordingly, this study investigated situational and relational factors associated with the day-to-day likelihood of sex and vaginal bleeding among 387 (aged 14-17 at enrollment) adolescent women. Generalized estimating equation logistic regression, in SUDAAN 9.0, was used; predictors of coitus and bleeding included recent sexual activity, past coitus/bleeding, marijuana use before intercourse and higher partner support, higher sexual interest and lower feelings of being in love. The findings highlight appropriate areas of focus for information, education and STI prevention counseling.

  4. Bleeding from duodenal ulcer in a patient with bilio-pancreatic diversion.

    PubMed

    Garancini, Mattia; Luperto, Margherita; Delitala, Alberto; Maternini, Matteo; Uggeri, Franco

    2011-12-01

    Scopinaro's bilio-pancreatic diversion is considered as an acceptable malabsorptive surgical approach for the treatment of morbid obesity. We describe a case of acute recurrent gastro-intestinal bleeding in a patient with a previous Scopinaro's bilio-pancreatic diversion. At the first admission in our department, gastroscopy, colonoscopy, contrast-enhanced computerized tomography and angiography resulted negative for active bleeding. Hypovolemic shock indicated laparotomy and an intraoperative enteroscopy performed through a small enterotomy showed an ulcerative perforation sourced in an ischemic portion of a distended duodenal stump, with a bleeding branch of gastro-duodenal artery at the bottom. Hemorrhage was stopped with stitches. Two years later a new episode of duodenal bleeding associated with severe malnutrition occurred. A covered chronic ischemic perforation sustained by duodenal distension due to biliopancreatic limb sub-obstruction appeared to be the most probable etiology of the recurrent duodenal bleeding. The patient underwent again to laparotomy and adhesiolysis; hemorrhage was stopped by means of ligation of gastroduodenal artery and bilio-pancreatic diversion was converted into a standard Roux-en-Y gastroenterostomy with an entero-entero anastomosis 40 cm from the Treitz ligament in order to restore an anatomo-functional condition guaranteeing normal absorption and intestinal transit. After Scopinaro's bilio-pancreatic diversion duodenal bleeding can represent a rare serious presentation of biliopancreatic limb obstruction; because of the complex anatomical reconstruction performed during this intervention, the duodenum results unavailable during upper gastro-intestinal endoscopy, and if a duodenal bleeding is suspected laparotomy followed by enteroscopy represents an effective diagnostic approach.

  5. Patterns of bleeding in adolescents with severe haemophilia A.

    PubMed Central

    Aronstam, A; Rainsford, S G; Painter, M J

    1979-01-01

    Eighty-two boys with severe haemophilia A who spent some time at Lord Mayor Treloar College during 1973-7 were studied. All episodes of bleeding that occurred during term time were recorded, along with the number of transfusions. The bleeding frequency among these boys, most of them aged 10-17 years, increased steadily from 8,31 episodes/100 days in 1973 to 12,63 episodes/100 days in 1977. At the same time there was a steady fall in bleeding frequency with age. Altogether 24% of bleeding episodes were into the elbow joint, 22% into the knee, and 15% into the ankle. As the boys grew older the proportion of bleeding episodes in the legs declined and that in the arms increased. The overall results reflect the fact that special schools now see only the severest cases of haemophilia. The pattern of bleeding during adolescence suggests that concepts of management of arm bleeding need modifying. PMID:427411

  6. Scientific Evaluation of Edible Fruits and Spices Used for the Treatment of Peptic Ulcer in Traditional Iranian Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Shams-Ardekani, Mohammad Reza; Abbasabadi, Zahra; Rahimi, Roja

    2013-01-01

    In traditional Iranian medicine (TIM), several edible fruits and spices are thought to have protective and healing effects on peptic ulcer (PU). The present study was conducted to verify anti-PU activity of these remedies. For this purpose, edible fruits and spices proposed for the management of PU in TIM were collected from TIM sources, and they were searched in modern medical databases to find studies that confirmed their efficacy. Findings from modern investigations support the claims of TIM about the efficacy of many fruits and spices in PU. The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica as a beneficial remedy for PU in TIM has been demonstrated to have antioxidant, wound healing, angiogenic, anti-H. pylori, cytoprotective, antisecretory, and anti-inflammatory properties. The fruit of Vitis vinifera has been found to be anti-H. pylori, anti-inflammatory, wound healing, angiogenic, cytoprotective, and antioxidant. The fruit and aril of seed from Myristica fragrans exert their beneficial effects in PU by increasing prostaglandin, modulation of nitric oxide and inflammatory mediators, wound healing, antisecretory, antacid, antioxidant, and anti-H. pylori activities, and improving angiogenesis. Pharmacological and clinical studies for evaluation of efficacy of all TIM fruits and spices in PU and their possible mechanisms of action are recommended. PMID:24066235

  7. Effects of bleed-hole geometry and plenum pressure on three-dimensional shock-wave/boundary-layer/bleed interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyu, Wei J.; Rimlinger, Mark J.; Shih, Tom I.-P.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to investigate 3D shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions on a flat plate with bleed through one or more circular holes that vent into a plenum. This study was focused on how bleed-hole geometry and pressure ratio across bleed holes affect the bleed rate and the physics of the flow in the vicinity of the holes. The aspects of the bleed-hole geometry investigated include angle of bleed hole and the number of bleed holes. The plenum/freestream pressure ratios investigated range from 0.3 to 1.7. This study is based on the ensemble-averaged, 'full compressible' Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations closed by the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic turbulence model. Solutions to the ensemble-averaged N-S equations were obtained by an implicit finite-volume method using the partially-split, two-factored algorithm of Steger on an overlapping Chimera grid.

  8. Correlating clinical manifestations with factor levels in rare bleeding disorders: a report from Southern India.

    PubMed

    Viswabandya, A; Baidya, S; Nair, S C; Abraham, A; George, B; Mathews, V; Chandy, M; Srivastava, A

    2012-05-01

    Data on the clinical manifestations of patients with clotting factor defects other than Haemophilia A, B and von Willebrand disease are limited because of their rarity. Due to their autosomal recessive nature of inheritance, these diseases are more common in areas where there is higher prevalence of consanguinity. There is no previous large series reported from southern India where consanguinity is common. Our aim was to analyze clinical manifestations of patients with rare bleeding disorders and correlate their bleeding symptoms with corresponding factor level. Data were collected in a standardized format from our centre over three decades on 281 patients who were diagnosed with rare bleeding disorders (fibrinogen, prothrombin, factor V (FV), FVII, FX, FXI, FXIII and combined FV or FVIII deficiency). Patients with liver dysfunction or those on medications which can affect factor level were excluded. All patients with <50% factor levels were included in this analysis. Patients were analysed for their salient clinical manifestations and it was correlated with their factor levels. The data shows that FXIII deficiency is the commonest and FXI deficiency is the rarest in Southern India. There was no significant difference in bleeding symptoms among those who were < or >1% factor coagulant activities among all disorders, except for few symptoms in FVII and FX deficiency. An international collaborative study is essential to find out the best way of classifying severity in patients with rare bleeding disorders.

  9. [Peritoneal bleeding due to acquired hemophilia during an abdominal sepsis clinical picture].

    PubMed

    Vázquez, J A; Chiacchiara, D N; Adducci, M C; Pilipec, A E; Leone, G; González, E

    2006-10-01

    Bleeding diatheses are frequent alterations during sepsis and surgical-anesthetic aggression. Generally, the bleeding is related with platelet dysfunction, inadequate surgical hemostasis, vitamin K deficit, etc. We present the case of a patient with no background of coagulopathy who, after two surgical interventions, developed abdominal sepsis and peritoneal hematoma after puncture for drainage of abdominal collection, due to an autoimmune origin factor VIII acquired deficit. The hematoma caused a picture of hypovolemic shock that required transfusion of several units of red blood cells, expansion and drug support. Finally, the bleeding was controlled by treatment with immunosuppressants, recombinant activated factor VII (RFVIIa) and polyvalent gammaglobulin. The peritoneal hematoma was drained surgically and the patient evolved towards improvement until being discharged from the intensive therapy unit.

  10. Assessment of recombinant factor VIIa as an antidote for bleeding induced in the rabbit by low molecular weight heparin.

    PubMed

    Chan, S; Kong, M; Minning, D M; Hedner, U; Marder, V J

    2003-04-01

    While protamine sulfate reverses the anticoagulant effect of standard heparin, there currently is no effective antidote for low molecular weight heparin (LMWH)-induced bleeding. Recently, recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) was approved by the FDA for use in hemophilia patients with factor (F)VIII or FIX inhibitors. However, this new pro-hemostatic agent has potential utility in other clinical scenarios. In this study, we utilized a well-characterized rabbit ear puncture model to test the efficacy of rFVIIa to reverse LMWH-induced prolonged bleeding. Animals were first treated with bolus intravenous LMWH (1800 anti-FXa U kg(-1)) which increased the primary bleeding time approximately fourfold and raised the plasma anti-FXa activity immediately and continuously throughout the 90-min experiment. In a randomized and blinded fashion, animals then received either rFVIIa (400 microg kg(-1)) or placebo by bolus intravenous injection, following which the ear puncture bleeding times were measured, along with blood levels of heparin (anti-FXa activity) and FVII. FVII activity increased 5.3-fold over baseline in treated animals, decreasing by only 24% over the full observation period. The rFVIIa-treated animals showed a slight decrease in bleeding time immediately after injection, but there was no statistically significant difference in bleeding after rFVIIa or placebo administration. In this study using a rabbit ear bleeding model, rFVIIa was not an effective antidote to LMWH-induced bleeding. However, the bolus injection of LMWH produced a very high blood anti-FXa level, which may have precluded rFVIIa effectiveness.

  11. What is happening? The evolving role of the blood bank in the management of the bleeding patient: The impact of TEG as an early diagnostic predictor for bleeding.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Aurora; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2014-12-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding and treatment of coagulopathy, the management of the bleeding patient remains as a major challenge. Traditionally, the main task of the blood bank has been to guarantee the supply of high quality blood and blood components/products to the hospital. Decisions regarding the use of blood components have always been the clinicians' responsibility, with little active involvement of the transfusion service. In the last years, many hospitals have implemented the use of "acute transfusion packages" for massively bleeding patients and point-of-care (POC) instruments such as TEG and RoTEM for monitoring coagulation status in this patient group. This, in addition to the implementation of patient blood management programs in the hospitals, has led to an increasing involvement of transfusion medicine specialists in transfusion decision making, especially regarding strategies for monitoring and treatment of the massively bleeding patient. This new trend may contribute to a more optimal management and monitoring of the bleeding patient, as POC testing may be used as an early predictor for blood usage. The blood bank should optimise the use of POC testing to provide accurate information in a cost-effective way.

  12. Utility of preoperative in vitro platelet function tests for predicting bleeding risk in patients undergoing functional endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A-Jin; Kim, Sang-Gyung

    2016-01-01

    Background It is necessary to predict the bleeding risk in patients undergoing functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). To evaluate the adequacy of primary hemostasis, preoperative hemostatic screening tests are used. In the present study, we determined whether there is a positive correlation between prolonged closure time (CT) with collagen/epinephrine (CT-epi), prothrombin time (PT), international normalized ratio (INR), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and bleeding during FESS. Patients and methods We reviewed the medical records of 90 patients without bleeding histories who had undergone FESS from March 2013 to June 2014. More than 200 mL of blood loss was defined as moderate bleeding during surgery. With respect to bleeding during surgery, we determined the sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV) and positive predictive value (PPV) of CT-epi, PT, INR and aPTT. Results Of the 90 patients, 17 (18.9%) patients had preoperative prolonged CT values and three (17.6%) patients had bleeding. In comparison, five (6.8%) of the 73 (81.1%) patients who had undergone FESS with preoperative normal PFA values experienced bleeding (P=0.171). On the other hand, patients with prolonged PT values (2, 2.2%), prolonged INR values (3, 3.3%) or prolonged PTT values (1, 1.1%) had no bleeding episode. Preoperative CT had low sensitivity (44.4%) and PPV (23.5%). Conclusion During preoperative period, the hemostatic screening may not be helpful to detect the bleeding tendency in adult patients undergoing FESS. Routine measurement of CT-epi, PT, INR and aPTT for preoperative screening may not be recommended for FESS patients. PMID:27799837

  13. Gallbladder visualization during technetium-99m-labeled red cell scintigraphy for gastrointestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Brill, D.R.

    1985-12-01

    Localization of radionuclide activity in the gallbladder was seen on delayed views following injection of 99mTc-labeled red blood cells for gastrointestinal bleeding in five patients. The mechanism for this unusual finding probably relates to labeling of heme, the biochemical precursor of bilirubin. All patients had had prior transfusions. All but one had severe renal impairment, probably an important predisposing factor.

  14. Prevalence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk factors among the general population and osteoarthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Hyuck; Yun, Jae Moon; Chang, Chong Bum; Piao, Heng; Yu, Su Jong; Shin, Dong Wook

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess the prevalence of possible risk factors of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) and their age-group specific trend among the general population and osteoarthritis patients. METHODS We utilized data from the National Health Insurance Service that included claims data and results of the national health check-up program. Comorbid conditions (peptic ulcer, diabetes, liver disease, chronic renal failure, and gastroesophageal reflux disease), concomitant drugs (aspirin, clopidogrel, cilostazol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, steroid, anticoagulants, and SSRI), personal habits (smoking, and alcohol consumption) were considered as possible UGIB risk factors. We randomly imputed the prevalence of infection in the data considering the age-specific prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in Korea. The prevalence of various UGIB risk factors and the age-group specific trend of the prevalence were identified. Prevalence was compared between osteoarthritis patients and others. RESULTS A total of 801926 subjects (93855 osteoarthritis patients) aged 20 and above were included. The prevalence of individual and concurrent multiple risk factors became higher as the age increased. The prevalence of each comorbid condition and concomitant drug were higher in osteoarthritis patients. Thirty-five point zero two percent of the overall population and 68.50% of osteoarthritis patients had at least one or more risk factors of UGIB. The prevalence of individual and concurrent multiple risk factors in younger age groups were also substantial. Furthermore, when personal habits (smoking, and alcohol consumption) and H. pylori infection were included, the prevalence of concurrent multiple risk factors increased greatly even in younger age groups. CONCLUSION Prevalence of UGIB risk factors was high in elderly population, but was also considerable in younger population. Patient with osteoarthritis was at higher UGIB risk than those without osteoarthritis

  15. Low-dose tertiary prophylactic therapy reduces total number of bleeds and improves the ability to perform activities of daily living in adults with severe haemophilia A: a single-centre experience from Beijing.

    PubMed

    Hua, Baolai; Lian, Xiaoyun; Li, Kuixing; Lee, Adrienne; Poon, Man-Chiu; Zhao, Yongqiang

    2016-03-01

    Full-dose prophylaxis treatment for persons with haemophilia is not affordable in China due to its economic constraints, particularly in adults requiring higher clotting factor (CFC) doses. Low-dose tertiary prophylaxis for adults with severe haemophilia A (SHA) in Beijing became feasible and implemented when government insurance covering 85% CFC cost in Beijing began in December 2009. The aim of this study was to evaluate the benefits of low-dose tertiary prophylaxis in SHA adults. Analysis of data on 33 patients on low-dose tertiary prophylaxis (5-10 IU/kg, two to three times per week) at the Haemophilia Treatment Center, Peking Union Medical College Hospital between December 2009 and December 2013. The 33 patients (age 18-60 years, mean 33.4) were on prophylaxis for 20.8 ± 9.9 months (compared with prior on-demand therapy for 20.0 ± 11.7 months). Prophylaxis resulted in significant decrease in annual bleeding rate (ABR, 11.8 ± 7.6 vs. 41.5 ± 20.7, 71.1% reduction, P < 0.0001), and significant improvement in Functional Independence Score in Haemophilia (FISH) measurement reflecting improvement in self-care and mobility. Radiologic (Pettersson) joint score was neither improved nor deteriorated. Ten of the 33 patients originally wheel chair and bed-bound began to walk and function independently in their daily lives. Low-dose tertiary prophylaxis for adults with SHA in China is feasible and beneficial. Although the average ABR remained high, a significant improvement in self-care and mobility measured by FISH was observed. These promising clinical experiences form the basis for further formal studies with more defined therapeutic protocol and outcome measures for affordable prophylaxis regimens in haemophilia adults in China.

  16. Enteral alimentation and gastrointestinal bleeding in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Pingleton, S K; Hadzima, S K

    1983-01-01

    The incidence of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in mechanically ventilated ICU patients receiving enteral alimentation was reviewed and compared to bleeding occurring in ventilated patients receiving prophylactic antacids or cimetidine. Of 250 patients admitted to our ICU during a 1-yr time period, 43 ventilated patients were studied. Patients in each group were comparable with respect to age, respiratory diagnosis, number of GI hemorrhage risk factors, and number of ventilator, ICU, and hospital days. Twenty-one patients had evidence of GI bleeding. Fourteen of 20 patients receiving antacids and 7 of 9 patients receiving cimetidine had evidence of GI bleeding. No bleeding occurred in 14 patients receiving enteral alimentation. Complications of enteral alimentation were few and none required discontinuation of enteral alimentation. Our preliminary data suggest the role of enteral alimentation in critically ill patients may include not only protection against malnutrition but also protection against GI bleeding.

  17. Multiple Polypoid Angiodysplasia with Obscure Overt Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jooyoung; Hwang, Sung Wook; Kim, Jihye; Kang, Jinwoo; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Park, Kyu Joo; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Joo Sung

    2016-01-01

    Angiodysplasia (AD) is increasingly being recognized as a major cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. Morphologically flat lesions are common types of AD, whereas the polypoid types are rare. We report a case of multiple polypoid AD in the small bowel causing severe anemia and requiring surgical treatment. A 60-year-old male patient visited our hospital with dyspnea and hematochezia. He had a history of myocardial infarction and was taking both aspirin and clopidogrel. Capsule endoscopy, enteroscopy, computed tomography, and angiography revealed multifocal vascular lesions with a polypoid shape in the jejunum. Surgical resection was performed because endoscopic treatment was considered impossible with the number and the location of lesions. The risk of recurrent bleeding related to the use of antiplatelet agents also contributed to the decision to perform surgery. AD was histologically diagnosed from the surgical specimen. He resumed taking both aspirin and clopidogrel after surgery. He fully recovered and has been doing well during the several months of follow-up. PMID:26855931

  18. Endovascular Management of Acute Enteric Bleeding from Pancreas Transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Semiz-Oysu, Aslihan; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2007-04-15

    Arterioenteric fistula is a rare but serious complication of enteric drained pancreas transplant, which may lead to massive gastrointestinal bleeding. We present 3 patients with failed enteric drained pancreas transplants and massive gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to arterioenteric fistula. One patient was treated by embolization and the 2 others by stent graft placement. Bleeding was successfully controlled in all cases, at follow up of 5 days, 8 months, and 12 months, respectively. One patient died 24 days after embolization, of unknown causes.

  19. Gastrointestinal Bleeding from Metastatic Prostate Adenocarcinoma to the Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Koop, Andree; Brauhmbhatt, Bhaumik; Lewis, Jason

    2017-01-01

    We present a rare case of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding associated with metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma to the stomach. Prostate cancer, which is the most common noncutaneous malignancy among men, rarely spreads to the stomach, with only 7 cases reported in the English literature. Symptoms may include abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and GI bleeding. Our patient was treated with epinephrine injection and bipolar cautery, but GI bleeding recurred 7 months later when he had worsening of his thrombocytopenia while using ibuprofen. PMID:28377935

  20. Management of acute variceal bleeding: emphasis on endoscopic therapy.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Andrés

    2010-05-01

    Acute variceal bleeding is one of the most serious and feared complications of patients with portal hypertension. The most common cause of portal hypertension is advanced liver disease. Patients with esophageal and gastric varices may bleed because of a progressive increase in portal pressure that causes them to grow and finally rupture. This article will review the current management strategies for acute variceal bleeding with emphasis on endoscopic therapy for the acute episode.

  1. New Trends in Acute Management of Colonic Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Cirocchi, Roberto; Grassi, Veronica; Cavaliere, Davide; Renzi, Claudio; Tabola, Renata; Poli, Giulia; Avenia, Stefano; Farinella, Eleonora; Arezzo, Alberto; Vettoretto, Nereo; D’Andrea, Vito; Binda, Gian Andrea; Fingerhut, Abe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Colonic diverticular disease is the most common cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. In the past, this condition was usually managed with urgent colectomy. Recently, the development of endoscopy and interventional radiology has led to a change in the management of colonic diverticular bleeding. The aim of this systematic review is to define the best treatment for colonic diverticular bleeding. A systematic bibliographic research was performed on the online databases for studies (randomized controlled trials [RCTs], observational trials, case series, and case reports) published between 2005 and 2014, concerning patients admitted with a diagnosis of diverticular bleeding according to the PRISMA methodology. The outcomes of interest were: diagnosis of diverticulosis as source of bleeding; incidence of self-limiting diverticular bleeding; management of non self-limiting bleeding (endoscopy, angiography, surgery); and recurrent diverticular bleeding. Fourteen studies were retrieved for analysis. No RCTs were found. Eleven non-randomized clinical controlled trials (NRCCTs) were included in this systematic review. In all studies, the definitive diagnosis of diverticular bleeding was always made by urgent colonoscopy. The colonic diverticular bleeding stopped spontaneously in over 80% of the patients, but a re-bleeding was not rare. Recently, interventional endoscopy and angiography became the first-line approach, thus relegating emergency colectomy to patients presenting with hemodynamic instability or as a second-line treatment after failure or complications of hemostasis with less invasive treatments. Colonoscopy is effective to diagnose diverticular bleeding. Nowadays, interventional endoscopy and angiographic treatment have gained a leading role and colectomy should only be entertained in case of failure of the former. PMID:26554768

  2. High-altitude gastrointestinal bleeding: An observation in Qinghai-Tibetan railroad construction workers on Mountain Tanggula

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tian-Yi; Ding, Shou-Quan; Liu, Jin-Liang; Jia, Jian-Hou; Dai, Rui-Chen; Zhu, Dong-Chun; Liang, Bao-Zhu; Qi, De-Tang; Sun, Yong-Fu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) in people from lowland to high altitude and in workers on Mountain Tanggula and its causes as well as treatment and prophylaxis. METHODS: From 2001 to October 2003, we studied GIB in 13 502 workers constructing the railroad on Mountain Tanggula which is 4905 m above the sea level. The incidence of GIB in workers at different altitudes was recorded. Endoscopy was performed when the workers evacuated to Golmud (2808 m) and Xining (2261 m). The available data on altitude GIB were analyzed. RESULTS: The overall incidence of GIB was 0.49% in 13 502 workers. The incidence increased with increasing altitude. The onset of symptoms in most patients was within three weeks after arrival at high altitude. Bleeding manifested as hematemesis, melaena or hematochezia, and might be occult. Endoscopic examination showed that the causes of altitude GIB included hemorrhage gastritis, gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, and gastric erosion. Experimental studies suggested that acute gastric mucosal lesion (AGML) could be induced by hypoxic and cold stress, which might be the pathogenesis of altitude GIB. Those who consumed large amount of alcohol, aspirin or dexamethasone were at a higher risk of developing GIB. Persons who previously suffered from peptic ulcer or high-altitude polycythemia were also at risk of developing GIB. Early diagnosis, evacuation, and treatment led to early recovery. CONCLUSION: GIB is a potentially life threatening disease, if it is not treated promptly and effectively. Early diagnosis, treatment and evacuation lead to an early recovery. Death due to altitude GIB can be avoided if early symptoms and signs are recognized. PMID:17278202

  3. Improvements in Modeling 90 degree Bleed Holes for Supersonic Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.

    2009-01-01

    The modeling of porous bleed regions as boundary conditions in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of supersonic inlet flows has been improved through a scaling of sonic flow coefficient data for 90deg bleed holes. The scaling removed the Mach number as a factor in computing the sonic flow coefficient and allowed the data to be fitted with a quadratic equation, with the only factor being the ratio of the plenum static pressure to the surface static pressure. The implementation of the bleed model into the Wind-US CFD flow solver was simplified by no longer requiring the evaluation of the flow properties at the boundary-layer edge. The quadratic equation can be extrapolated to allow the modeling of small amounts of blowing, which can exist when recirculation of the bleed flow occurs within the bleed region. The improved accuracy of the bleed model was demonstrated through CFD simulations of bleed regions on a flat plate in supersonic flow with and without an impinging oblique shock. The bleed model demonstrated good agreement with experimental data and three-dimensional CFD simulations of bleed holes.

  4. Endometrial bleeding in postmenopausal women: with and without hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Archer, David F

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to present a review of the potential mechanisms involved in the occurrence of endometrial bleeding in postmenopausal women using hormone therapy. Selected literature on the incidence of bleeding in postmenopausal women using estrogen progestogen therapy was reviewed. The incidence of spotting and bleeding in women using continuous-combined hormone therapy was presented. Relevant articles related to the role of angiogenic factors and vasculogenesis in the endometrium, endometrial leukocytes, and endometrial metalloproteinases were used for the review. The cause or etiology of endometrial bleeding with hormone therapy is unknown. Several options are known to alter angiogenesis or be involved in tissue remodeling during normal menstruation. Vascular endothelial growth factor and thrombospondin-1 are proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors that could cause dysfunction in vasculogenesis that could result in blood vessel fragility and bleeding. The role of pericytes in maintaining vessel morphology and integrity is discussed. Endometrial leukocytes and metalloproteinases are involved in normal menstruation, but their role in postmenopausal bleeding is not clear suggesting involvement of mechanisms in the bleeding. There is limited information on clinical investigation into the etiology of postmenopausal bleeding associated with hormone therapy. The major cause of hormone therapy-related bleeding is unknown. Alterations in angiogenic factors that could result in vascular dysfunction and vessel breakdown provide a working hypothesis as to the potential cause of vessel breakdown.

  5. Modeling of Fixed-Exit Porous Bleed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.; Saunders, John D.

    2008-01-01

    A model has been developed to simulate a fixed-exit porous bleed system for supersonic inlets. The fixed-exit model allows the amount of bleed flow to vary according to local flow conditions and fixed-exit characteristics of the bleed system. This variation is important for the control of shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions within the inlet. The model computes the bleed plenum static pressure rather than requiring its specification. The model was implemented in the Wind-US computational fluid dynamics code. The model was then verified and validated against experimental data for bleed on a flat plate with and without an impinging oblique shock and for bleed in a Mach 3.0 axisymmetric, mixed-compression inlet. The model was able to accurately correlate the plenum pressures with bleed rates and simulate the effect of the bleed on the downstream boundary layer. Further, the model provided a realistic simulation of the initiation of inlet unstart. The results provide the most in-depth examination to date of bleed models for use in the simulation of supersonic inlets. The results also highlight the limitations of the models and aspects that require further research.

  6. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in cirrhosis: clinical and endoscopic correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Terés, J; Bordas, J M; Bru, C; Diaz, F; Bruguera, M; Rodes, J

    1976-01-01

    The clinical data of 180 episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in 168 patients with cirrhosis of the liver are examined. The source of bleeding had been determined by early endoscopy in all cases. In men under the age of 50 years, and without symptoms of liver failure, bleeding was due to ruptured gastro-oesophageal varices in 84% of cases. Severe liver failure was associated with acute lesions of gastric mucosa in many cases. No presumptive diagnosis of the source of haemorrhage could be based on the examination of other clinical data (presence of ascites, mode of presentation and pattern of bleeding, history of ulcer disease, alcoholism, and previous medication. PMID:1083824

  7. The Safety of Thoracentesis in Patients with Uncorrected Bleeding Risk

    PubMed Central

    Argento, A. Christine; Murphy, Terrence E.; Araujo, Katy L. B.; Pisani, Margaret A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Thoracentesis is commonly performed to evaluate pleural effusions. Many medications (warfarin, heparin, clopidogrel) or physiological factors (elevated International Normalized Ratio [INR], thrombocytopenia, uremia) increase the risk for bleeding. Frequently these medications are withheld or transfusions are performed to normalize physiological parameters before a procedure. The safety of performing thoracentesis without correction of these bleeding risks has not been prospectively evaluated. Methods: This prospective observational cohort study enrolled 312 patients who underwent thoracentesis. All patients were evaluated for the presence of risk factors for bleeding. Hematocrit levels were obtained pre- and postprocedure, and the occurrence of postprocedural hemothorax was evaluated. Measurements and Main Results: Thoracenteses were performed in 312 patients, 42% of whom had a risk for bleeding. Elevated INR, secondary to liver disease or warfarin, and renal disease were the two most common etiologies for bleeding risk, although many patients had multiple potential bleeding risks. There was no significant difference in pre- and postprocedural hematocrit levels in patients with a bleeding risk when compared with patients with no bleeding risk. No patient developed a hemothorax as a result of the thoracentesis. Conclusions: This single-center, observational study suggests that thoracentesis may be safely performed without prior correction of coagulopathy, thrombocytopenia, or medication-induced bleeding risk. This may reduce the morbidity associated with transfusions or withholding of medications. PMID:23952852

  8. A pilot study of Helicobacter pylori genotypes and cytokine gene polymorphisms in reflux oesophagitis and peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Akdogan, R A; Ozgur, O; Gucuyeter, S; Kaklikkaya, N; Cobanoglu, U; Aydin, F

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes various diseases such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. While majority of the people infected with H. pylori is asymptomatic, 15-20 % of them develop such diseases. The main factors, which determine the development of H. pylori related diseases might be bacterial virulence, host genetic and environmental factors.The aim of this study was to reveal the factors that play a role in the disease development in patients with reflux esophagitis and peptic ulcer, infected with Helicobacter pylori. Environmental factors such as medical agents, smoking and body mass index were evaluated. The factors specific to bacteria such as vacA, CagA, babA and iceA virulence genotypes and the host factors such as IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, interferon-γ, TNF-α, ve TGF-β1 gene polymorphisms were compared between the two groups.H. pylori infected twenty five patients with reflux esophagitis and peptic ulcer were enrolled in the study. There was no statistical difference between the two groups regarding environmental factors. IL-2 -330T +166T (p=0.037) and IL10 -1082A; -819C (p=0.049) gene polymorphisms were significantly more common in the group of patients with peptic ulcer compared to the group with reflux esophagitis. In both groups of patients, either with reflux esophagitis or peptic ulcer, multiple H. pylori virulence genotypes (cagA, vacA, babA) (mean values 74 %, 78 %, 54 % respectively) were observed.In this study, we revealed that cytokine gene polymorphisms may play a role in the development peptic ulcer while H. pylori virulence genotypes seem to be crucial for the development of associated diseases (Tab. 4, Ref. 51).

  9. Video capsule endoscopy in left ventricular assist device recipients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Amornsawadwattana, Surachai; Nassif, Michael; Raymer, David; LaRue, Shane; Chen, Chien-Huan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether video capsule endoscopy (VCE) affects the outcomes of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) recipients with gastrointestinal bleeding. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of LVAD recipients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) who underwent VCE at a tertiary medical center between 2005 and 2013. All patients were admitted and monitored with telemetry and all VCE and subsequent endoscopic procedures were performed as inpatients. A VCE study was considered positive only when P2 lesions were found and was regarded as negative if P1 or P0 were identified. All patients were followed until heart transplant, death, or the end of the study. RESULTS: Between 2005 and 2013, 30 patients with LVAD underwent VCE. Completion rate of VCE was 93.3% and there was no capsule retention. No interference of VCE recording or the function of LVAD was found. VCE was positive in 40% of patients (n = 12). The most common finding was active small intestinal bleeding (50%) and small intestinal angiodysplasia (33.3%). There was no difference in the rate of recurrent bleeding between patients with positive and negative VCE study (50.0% vs 55.6%, P = 1.00) during an average of 11.6 ± 9.6 mo follow up. Among patients with positive VCE, the recurrent bleeding rate did not differ whether subsequent endoscopy was performed (50% vs 50%, P = 1.00). CONCLUSION: VCE can be safely performed in LVAD recipients with a diagnostic yield of 40%. VCE does not affect recurrent bleeding in LVAD patients regardless of findings. PMID:27182165

  10. [Management of massive bleeding in 2013: seven questions and answers].

    PubMed

    Godier, A; Samama, C M; Susen, S

    2013-05-01

    The management of massive bleeding has improved, thanks to high-quality blood components and new transfusion strategies. However, it remains controversial and, despite a huge body of literature, randomised control trials are still lacking. However, the therapeutic approach has also evolved, requiring earlier and more active management. If a 'no delay' management is well recognized, its modes are still discussed. Immediate delivery of blood products with ratios close to 1:1:1 for RBC units/fresh frozen plasma/platelet concentrates, through massive transfusion protocol using blood packs, has been advocated, but yet this approach is not evidence-based. Secondly, a targeted strategy to provide fibrinogen concentrates is under evaluation. Tranexamic acid is effective in trauma patients. Recombinant factor VIIa should only be used on a compassionate basis.

  11. Parsley extract inhibits in vitro and ex vivo platelet aggregation and prolongs bleeding time in rats.

    PubMed

    Gadi, Dounia; Bnouham, Mohamed; Aziz, Mohammed; Ziyyat, Abderrahim; Legssyer, Abdelkhaleq; Legrand, Chantal; Lafeve, Françoise Fauvel; Mekhfi, Hassane

    2009-08-17

    Many cardiovascular diseases are associated with an increase in blood platelet activity. In Morocco, parsley (Petroselinum crispum, Apiaceae) is one of the medicinal herbs used to treat cardiovascular diseases such as arterial hypertension. In this study, crude aqueous extract (CAE) of parsley was evaluated for its anti-platelet activity in experimental animals on platelet aggregation in vitro and ex vivo; and on bleeding time in vivo. The in vitro aggregation was monitored after pre-incubation of platelets with CAE. The bleeding time and ex vivo aggregation were performed after oral treatment. CAE inhibited dose dependently platelet aggregation in vitro induced by thrombin, ADP, collagen and epinephrine. The oral administration of CAE (3g/kg) inhibited significantly (p<0.001) platelet aggregation ex vivo and prolonged bleeding time (p<0.001) without changes in the platelet amount. The prolongation of bleeding time by CAE may be attributed to the observed inhibition of platelet aggregation. These effects could be related in part to the polyphenolic compounds present in the extract. These results support the hypothesis that the dietary intake of parsley may be benefit in the normalization of platelet hyperactivation, in the nutritional prevention of cardiovascular diseases and are potentially interesting in the development of new prevention strategies.

  12. Arteriovenous malformation in chronic gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Cavett, C M; Selby, J H; Hamilton, J L; Williamson, J W

    1977-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations of the gastrointestinal tract are uncommon and treatment is problematic because routine barium contrast studies and endoscopy fail to demonstrate the lesion. Diagnosis is by selective mesenteric arteriography, demonstrating a characteristic vascular tuft and very early venous phase. Two cases of arteriovenous malformation are presented and 47 other reported cases are reviewed. Forty-five per cent were found in the cecum; 37, or 80%, involved the distal ileum, cecum ascending colon, or hepatic flexure. Seventy-five per cent of all patients fall into the 50--80 year age range. The literature reveals a recurring pattern of chronic gastrointestinal blood loss, anemia, and delay (even negative abdominal explorations) before the diagnosis is finally made. A more aggressive approach to chronic gastrointestinal bleeding is suggested through the use of selective mesenteric arteriography. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:299801

  13. Medical management of heavy menstrual bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Maybin, Jacqueline A; Critchley, Hilary OD

    2016-01-01

    Women with benign heavy menstrual bleeding have the choice of a number of medical treatment options to reduce their blood loss and improve quality of life. The role of the clinician is to provide information to facilitate women in making an appropriate choice. Unfortunately, many options can be associated with hormonal side effects, prevention of fertility and lack of efficacy, leading to discontinuation and progression to surgical interventions. Herein, we discuss the various options currently available to women, including antifibrinolytics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory preparations, oral contraceptive pills and oral, injectable and intrauterine progestogens. In addition, we describe the more novel option of selective progesterone receptor modulators and their current benefits and limitations. PMID:26695687

  14. Tooth extraction, bleeding and pain control.

    PubMed

    Al-Bahlani, S; Sherriff, A; Crawford, P J

    2001-10-01

    Local anaesthesia is used routinely in dental surgery; it is effective in both pain control and--through the vasoconstrictors often contained within it--the reduction of bleeding. The extraction of deciduous teeth under general anaesthesia is often carried out without these local effects. There are no previous studies to investigate the combined effect of local anaesthesia with general anaesthesia on blood loss and pain control. A randomised, controlled clinical trial was carried out with one hundred children aged 3-5 years. Ethical approval and informed consent were obtained. Surface anaesthetic cream (EMLA) was placed on the hand into which the intravenous access was to be placed. One to two ml of blood was taken at the time of induction as a baseline of the patient's level of haematin pigment. Children in the experimental group were given one quarter of a cartridge (0.5 ml) of local anaesthetic containing epinephrine (1:80,000) in each quadrant before tooth extraction; all blood in swabs, suction equipment and disposables was collected and digested with NaOH. The children were observed for 11 minutes post-operatively for any signs of distress. Total blood loss was calculated by comparison of the baseline sample and the shed blood digests. This study showed that using local anaesthesia for dental extractions under general anaesthesia was associated with decreased blood loss (p = 0.001). The second finding--which has not been reported before--was that this use of local anaesthesia was shown to cause distress to this age group of children upon recovery from the general anaesthetic (p <0.0001). The use of local anaesthetic in this situation provided a useful reduction in post-operative bleeding. However, its use was associated with greater post-operative distress.

  15. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section 864.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time...

  16. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section 864.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time...

  17. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section 864.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time...

  18. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section 864.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time...

  19. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section 864.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time...

  20. 14 CFR 33.66 - Bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bleed air system. 33.66 Section 33.66 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.66 Bleed air system....

  1. 14 CFR 33.66 - Bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bleed air system. 33.66 Section 33.66 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.66 Bleed air system....

  2. Recurrent peptic ulcer disease in a pediatric patient with type 1 neurofibromatosis and primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Lionetti, E; Francavilla, R; Ruggieri, M; Di Stefano, V; Principi, M B; Pavone, L

    2009-10-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 is an autosomal dominant neurocutaneous disorder with characteristic features of skin and central nervous system involvement. Gastrointestinal complications are rare, especially during childhood. In adults, only two cases of peptic ulcer have been reported in neurofibromatosis, both due to Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) may be primary or secondary in nature and it may be life threatening in the acute phase due to the risk of perforation. A case of recurrent gastrointestinal hemorrhage in a child with systemic neurofibromatosis and primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is presented. The upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed the presence of multiple gastric ulcers. The ulcers scarred after the long-term administration of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), but recurred after the suspension. Laboratory and imaging studies excluded Zollinger-Ellison syndrome and other known causes of PUD, suggesting a potential role of neurofibromatosis itself and primary ciliary dyskinesia in developing of recurrent PUD. As early diagnosis of PUD is vital for patient survival, this case report highlights the possible association of neurofibromatosis and PCD with this condition, responsive to PPI therapy and the potential need of gastric protection before complications arise.

  3. Coagulopathy induced by acidosis, hypothermia and hypocalcaemia in severe bleeding.

    PubMed

    De Robertis, E; Kozek-Langenecker, S A; Tufano, R; Romano, G M; Piazza, O; Zito Marinosci, G

    2015-01-01

    Acidosis, hypothermia and hypocalcaemia are determinants for morbidity and mortality during massive hemorrhages. However, precise pathological mechanisms of these environmental factors and their potential additive or synergistic anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet effects are not fully elucidated and are at least in part controversial. Best available evidences from experimental trials indicate that acidosis and hypothermia progressively impair platelet aggregability and clot formation. Considering the cell-based model of coagulation physiology, hypothermia predominantly prolongs the initiation phase, while acidosis prolongs the propagation phase of thrombin generation. Acidosis increases fibrinogen breakdown while hypothermia impairs its synthesis. Acidosis and hypothermia have additive effects. The effect of hypocalcaemia on coagulopathy is less investigated but it appears that below the cut-off of 0.9 mmol/L, several enzymatic steps in the plasmatic coagulation system are blocked while above that cut-off effects remain without clinical sequalae. The impact of environmental factor on hemostasis is underestimated in clinical practice due to our current practice of using routine coagulation laboratory tests such as partial thromboplastin time or prothrombin time, which are performed at standardized test temperature, after pH correction, and upon recalcification. Temperature-adjustments are feasible in viscoelastic point-of-care tests such as thrombelastography and thromboelastometry which may permit quantification of hypothermia-induced coagulopathy. Rewarming hypothermic bleeding patients is highly recommended because it improves patient outcome. Despite the absence of high-quality evidence, calcium supplementation is clinical routine in bleeding management. Buffer administration may not reverse acidosis-induced coagulopathy but may be essential for the efficacy of coagulation factor concentrates such as recombinant activated factor VII.

  4. On Supersonic-Inlet Boundary-Layer Bleed Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harloff, Gary J.; Smith, Gregory E.

    1995-01-01

    Boundary-layer bleed in supersonic inlets is typically used to avoid separation from adverse shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions and subsequent total pressure losses in the subsonic diffuser and to improve normal shock stability. Methodologies used to determine bleed requirements are reviewed. Empirical sonic flow coefficients are currently used to determine the bleed hole pattern. These coefficients depend on local Mach number, pressure ratio, hole geometry, etc. A new analytical bleed method is presented to compute sonic flow coefficients for holes and narrow slots and predictions are compared with published data to illustrate the accuracy of the model. The model can be used by inlet designers and as a bleed boundary condition for computational fluid dynamic studies.

  5. New insights to occult gastrointestinal bleeding: From pathophysiology to therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Capilla, Antonio Damián; De La Torre-Rubio, Paloma; Redondo-Cerezo, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is still a clinical challenge for gastroenterologists. The recent development of novel technologies for the diagnosis and treatment of different bleeding causes has allowed a better management of patients, but it also determines the need of a deeper comprehension of pathophysiology and the analysis of local expertise in order to develop a rational management algorithm. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding can be divided in occult, when a positive occult blood fecal test is the main manifestation, and overt, when external sings of bleeding are visible. In this paper we are going to focus on overt gastrointestinal bleeding, describing the physiopathology of the most usual causes, analyzing the diagnostic procedures available, from the most classical to the novel ones, and establishing a standard algorithm which can be adapted depending on the local expertise or availability. Finally, we will review the main therapeutic options for this complex and not so uncommon clinical problem. PMID:25133028

  6. Acoustic resonance phenomena in air bleed channels in aviation engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksentsev, A. A.; Sazhenkov, A. N.; Sukhinin, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    The existence of axial-radial acoustic resonance oscillations of the basic air flow in bleed channels of aviation engines is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. Numerical and analytical methods are used to determine the frequency of acoustic resonance oscillations for the lowest modes of open and closed bleed channels of the PS-90A engine. Experimental investigations reveal new acoustic resonance phenomena arising in the air flow in bleed channel cavities in the core duct of this engine owing to instability of the basic air flow. The results of numerical, analytical, and experimental studies of the resonance frequencies reached in the flow in bleed channel cavities in the core duct of the PS-90A engine are found to be in reasonable agreement. As a result, various types of resonance oscillations in bleed channels can be accurately described.

  7. Evaluating for suspected child abuse: conditions that predispose to bleeding.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Shannon L; Abshire, Thomas C; Anderst, James D

    2013-04-01

    Child abuse might be suspected when children present with cutaneous bruising, intracranial hemorrhage, or other manifestations of bleeding. In these cases, it is necessary to consider medical conditions that predispose to easy bleeding/bruising. When evaluating for the possibility of bleeding disorders and other conditions that predispose to hemorrhage, the pediatrician must consider the child's presenting history, medical history, and physical examination findings before initiating a laboratory investigation. Many medical conditions can predispose to easy bleeding. Before ordering laboratory tests for a disease, it is useful to understand the biochemical basis and clinical presentation of the disorder, condition prevalence, and test characteristics. This technical report reviews the major medical conditions that predispose to bruising/bleeding and should be considered when evaluating for abusive injury.

  8. Bleeding disorders in the tribe: result of consanguineous in breeding

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the frequency and clinical features of bleeding disorders in the tribe as a result of consanguineous marriages. Design Cross Sectional Study Introduction Countries in which consanguinity is a normal practice, these rare autosomal recessive disorders run in close families and tribes. Here we describe a family, living in village Ali Murad Chandio, District Badin, labeled as haemophilia. Patients & Methods Our team visited the village & developed the pedigree of the whole extended family, up to seven generations. Performa was filled by incorporating patients, family history of bleeding, signs & symptoms, and bleeding from any site. From them 144 individuals were screened with CBC, bleeding time, platelet aggregation studies & RiCoF. While for PT, APTT, VWF assay and Factor VIII assay, samples were kept frozen at -70 degrees C until tested. Results The family tree of the seven generations comprises of 533 individuals, 63 subjects died over a period of 20 years and 470 were alive. Out of all those 144 subjects were selected on the basis of the bleeding history. Among them 98(68.1%) were diagnosed to have a bleeding disorder; 44.9% patients were male and 55.1% patients were female. Median age of all the patients was 20.81, range (4 months- 80 yrs). The results of bleeding have shown that majority had gum bleeding, epistaxis and menorrhagia. Most common bleeding disorder was Von Willebrand disease and Platelet functional disorders. Conclusion Consanguineous marriages keep all the beneficial and adversely affecting recessive genes within the family; in homozygous states. These genes express themselves and result in life threatening diseases. Awareness, education & genetic counseling will be needed to prevent the spread of such common occurrence of these bleeding disorders in the community. PMID:20822539

  9. Acquired hemophilia A as a cause of recurrent bleeding into the pleural cavity - case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wojtyś, Małgorzata; Żuk, Ewa; Alchimowicz, Jacek; Grodzki, Tomasz

    2014-09-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a coagulation disorder caused by autoantibodies against blood coagulation factor VIII. The first sign of this disease is often massive bleeding, which can affect patients after routine procedures. The parameter which indicates the presence of this condition is isolated prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The present article describes a case of a 32-year-old man with acute interstitial pneumonia and pleural effusion, in whom a massive hemothorax appeared after thoracocentesis; active bleeding was observed after the introduction of a chest tube. The patient was operated on, and no pinpoint bleeding was discovered during the procedure. Active bleeding was still taking place postoperatively. The patient underwent another operation after 6 days. Once more, no pinpoint bleeding was found. Prolonged APTT was observed. The activity of blood coagulation factor VIII was 3.04%. The presence of antibodies against factor VIII was confirmed, and acquired hemophilia was diagnosed. The article also includes an analysis of the literature on acquired hemophilia.

  10. Acquired hemophilia A as a cause of recurrent bleeding into the pleural cavity – case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Żuk, Ewa; Alchimowicz, Jacek; Grodzki, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a coagulation disorder caused by autoantibodies against blood coagulation factor VIII. The first sign of this disease is often massive bleeding, which can affect patients after routine procedures. The parameter which indicates the presence of this condition is isolated prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The present article describes a case of a 32-year-old man with acute interstitial pneumonia and pleural effusion, in whom a massive hemothorax appeared after thoracocentesis; active bleeding was observed after the introduction of a chest tube. The patient was operated on, and no pinpoint bleeding was discovered during the procedure. Active bleeding was still taking place postoperatively. The patient underwent another operation after 6 days. Once more, no pinpoint bleeding was found. Prolonged APTT was observed. The activity of blood coagulation factor VIII was 3.04%. The presence of antibodies against factor VIII was confirmed, and acquired hemophilia was diagnosed. The article also includes an analysis of the literature on acquired hemophilia. PMID:26336444

  11. Significance of serum markers pepsinogen I and II for chronic atrophic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Matsukura, N; Onda, M; Tokunaga, A; Fujita, I; Okuda, T; Mizutani, T; Kyono, S; Yamashita, K

    1993-01-01

    Chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) is closely correlated with gastric cancer and is predominant in Japan. Epidemiologically, food habits are the primary factor in both CAG and gastric cancer. Two potential serum markers for CAG have recently been investigated, i.e., the concentration of serum pepsinogen (PG) and the presence of serum antibodies against Helicobacter pylori. Serum PG I and II and the PG I:PG II ratio have been reported to be useful as indicators of recurrent peptic ulcer and for screening of patients at risk from gastric cancer. In this study, we examined PG I and II in serum from 483 patients by RIA (DAINABOT), and endoscopic examination performed in the same patients before serological assay revealed CAG in 68, peptic ulcer in 91, and gastric cancer in 48. Analysis of the mean values according to patients age showed that CAG patients in their forties to eighties had low (< 40 ng/ml) levels of PG I, peptic ulcer patients in their teens to eighties had high (> or = 70 ng/ml) levels, except for those in their seventies, and gastric cancer patients in their twenties to sixties had low (< 3.0) PG I:PG II ratios, except for those in their sixties. Thus serum PG assay has potential utility for detection of CAG, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer.

  12. Efficacy of Levofloxacin-Based Third-Line Therapy for the Eradication of Helicobacter pylori in Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Joo Hyun; Kim, Sang Gyun; Song, Ji Hyun; Hwang, Jae Jin; Lee, Dong Ho; Han, Jae Pil; Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Ji Hyun; Jeon, Seong Woo; Kim, Gwang Ha; Shim, Ki-Nam; Shin, Woon Geon; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Sun Moon; Chung, Il-Kwon; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Heung Up; Lee, Joongyub; Kim, Jae Gyu

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims The resistance rate of Helicobacter pylori is gradually increasing. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of levofloxacin-based third-line H. pylori eradication in peptic ulcer disease. Methods Between 2002 and 2014, 110 patients in 14 medical centers received levofloxacin-based third-line H. pylori eradication therapy for peptic ulcer disease. Of these, 88 were included in the study; 21 were excluded because of lack of follow-up and one was excluded for poor compliance. Their eradication rates, treatment regimens and durations, and types of peptic ulcers were analyzed. Results The overall eradiation rate was 71.6%. The adherence rate was 80.0%. All except one received a proton-pump inhibitor, amoxicillin, and levofloxacin. One received a proton-pump inhibitor, amoxicillin, levofloxacin, and clarithromycin, and the eradication was successful. Thirty-one were administered the therapy for 7 days, 25 for 10 days, and 32 for 14 days. No significant differences were observed in the eradication rates between the three groups (7-days, 80.6% vs 10-days, 64.0% vs 14-days, 68.8%, p=0.353). Additionally, no differences were found in the eradiation rates according to the type of peptic ulcer (gastric ulcer, 73.2% vs duodenal/gastroduodenal ulcer, 68.8%, p=0.655). Conclusions Levofloxacin-based third-line H. pylori eradication showed efficacy similar to that of previously reported first/second-line therapies. PMID:27609487

  13. Thrombelastographic changes and early rebleeding in cirrhotic patients with variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Chau, T; Chan, Y; Patch, D; Tokunaga, S; Greenslade, L; Burroughs, A

    1998-01-01

    Background—Routine coagulation tests do not necessarily reflect haemostasis in vivo in cirrhotic patients, particularly those who have bleeding varices. Thrombelastography (TEG) can provide a global assessment of haemostatic function from initial clot formation to clot dissolution. 
Aim—To evaluate TEG changes in cirrhotic patients with variceal bleeding and their association with early rebleeding. 
Patients/Methods—Twenty cirrhotic patients with active variceal bleeding had serial TEG and routine coagulation tests daily for seven days. The TEG variables before the day of rebleeding (n = 6) were compared with those of patients without rebleeding (n =14). 
Results—Baseline characteristics of the rebleeding and non-rebleeding groups were comparable apart from a higher incidence of uncontrolled infection on the day of rebleeding in the rebleeding group (p = 0.007). The patients in the rebleeding group were more hypocoagulable before the day of rebleeding as shown by longer r (42 v 24 mm, p<0.001) and k (48 v 13 mm, p<0.001) and smaller a (12 v 38°, p<0.001) compared with the mean of daily results of the non-rebleeding group. Routine coagulation tests, however, showed no significant differences between the two groups. 
Conclusion—The results of serial TEG measurements suggest that hypocoagulability may be associated with early rebleeding in cirrhotic patients. 

 Keywords: thrombelastography; variceal bleeding; early rebleeding; cirrhosis PMID:10189856

  14. Colonoscopic findings and management of patients with outbreak typhoid fever presenting with lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Shaikhani, Mohammad A R; Husein, Hiwa A B; Karbuli, Taha A; Mohamed, Mohamed Abdulrahman

    2013-09-01

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) along with intestinal perforation is a well-known complication of typhoid fever. Reports of colonoscopic appearance and intervention of typhoid perforation involve only few cases. This series reports the colonoscopic findings and the role of colonoscopic hemostatic interventions in controlling the bleeding ileocolonic lesions. During the typhoid fever outbreak in Sulaymaniyah City in Iraqi Kurdistan Region, we received 52 patients with LGIB manifesting as fresh bleeding per rectum or melena. We performed total colonoscopy with ileal intubation for all cases. The findings were recorded and endoscopic hemostatic intervention with adrenaline-saline injection and argon plasma coagulation was applied to actively bleeding lesion. These patients were young, 11-30 years of age, with female preponderance. Blood culture was positive in 50 %. Colonoscopic findings were mostly located in the ileocecal region, although other areas of the colon were involved in many cases. Twenty-four percent of the cases required endoscopic hemostatic intervention by adrenaline injection with argon plasma coagulation which was effective in all patients except one who died in spite of surgical intervention in addition of endoscopic hemostasis. Dual endoscopic hemostatic intervention can be a safe and effective management option for patients with LGIB due to typhoid fever.

  15. Bleeding spectrum in children with moderate or severe von Willebrand disease: Relevance of pediatric-specific bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Yvonne V; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Boender, Johan; Mauser-Bunschoten, Evelien P; van der Bom, Johanna G; de Meris, Joke; Smiers, Frans J; Granzen, Bernd; Brons, Paul; Tamminga, Rienk Y J; Cnossen, Marjon H; Leebeek, Frank W G

    2015-12-01

    The bleeding phenotype of children with von Willebrand disease (VWD) needs to be characterized in detail to facilitate diagnosis during childhood and aid in the planning and assessment of treatment strategies. The objective was to evaluate the occurrence, type, and severity of bleeding in a large cohort of children with moderate and severe VWD. We included 113 children (aged 0-16 years) with Type 1 (n = 60), 2 (n = 44), and 3 (n = 9) VWD with von Willebrand factor (VWF) antigen and/or VWF ristocetin cofactor levels ≤ 30 U/dL from a nation-wide cross-sectional study ("Willebrand in the Netherlands" study). Bleeding severity and frequency were determined using the International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis-Bleeding Assessment Tool (ISTH-BAT) with supplementary pediatric-specific bleeding symptoms (umbilical stump bleeding, cephalohematoma, cheek hematoma, conjunctival bleeding, postcircumcision and postvenipuncture bleeding). We found that all 26 postmenarche girls experienced menorrhagia. Other common bleedings were cutaneous (81%), oropharyngeal (64%), prolonged bleeding from minor wounds (58%), and epistaxis (56%). Pediatric-specific bleeding symptoms were present in 44% of patients. ISTH-BAT bleeding score was higher in index cases than in affected family members (median, 12.0 vs. 6.5, P < 0.001), higher in Type 3 VWD than in Type 2 or 1 (17.0 vs. 10.5 or 6.5, P < 0.001) and higher in children with severe (<10 U/dL) than moderate VWD (10-30 U/dL) (11.0 vs. 7.0, P < 0.001). Frequency of any bleeding, epistaxis, and oral cavity was higher in types 2 and 3 than in Type 1 VWD and was associated with VWF levels. We conclude that pediatric-specific bleeding symptoms occurred in a large proportion of children with moderate or severe VWD and should be included when evaluating children for VWD.

  16. Major Bleeding after Percutaneous Image-Guided Biopsies: Frequency, Predictors, and Periprocedural Management

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Sean A.; Milovanovic, Lazar; Midia, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    Major bleeding remains an uncommon yet potentially devastating complication following percutaneous image-guided biopsy. This article reviews two cases of major bleeding after percutaneous biopsy and discusses the frequency, predictors, and periprocedural management of major postprocedural bleeding. PMID:25762845

  17. Protect Your Baby from Bleeds: Talk to Your Healthcare Provider about Vitamin K

    MedlinePlus

    ... your baby from VKDB. Protect Your Baby from Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding Before having a baby, most parents don’ ... she gets the shot after birth. What is vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB)? Vitamin K deficiency bleeding or VKDB, ...

  18. Flow Coefficient Behavior for Boundary Layer Bleed Holes and Slots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, B. P.; Davis, D. O.; Hingst, W. R.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental investigation into the flow coefficient behavior for nine boundary layer bleed orifice configurations is reported. This test was conducted for the purposes of exploring boundary layer control through mass flow removal and does not address issues of stability bleed. Parametric data consist of bleed region flow coefficient as a function of Mach number, bleed plenum pressure, and bleed orifice geometry. Seven multiple hole configurations and two single slot configurations were tested over a supersonic Mach number range of 1.3 to 2.5 (nominal). Advantages gained by using multiple holes in a bleed region instead of a single spanwise slot are discussed and the issue of modeling an entire array of bleed orifices based on the performance of a single orifice is addressed. Preconditioning the flow approaching a 90 degree inclined (normal) hole configuration resulted in a significant improvement in the performance of the configuration. The same preconditioning caused only subtle changes in performance for a 20 degree inclined (slanted) configuration.

  19. Intraoperative bleeding control by uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery†.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rivas, Diego; Stupnik, Tomaz; Fernandez, Ricardo; de la Torre, Mercedes; Velasco, Carlos; Yang, Yang; Lee, Wentao; Jiang, Gening

    2016-01-01

    Owing to advances in video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS), the majority of pulmonary resections can currently be performed by VATS in a safe manner with a low level of morbidity and mortality. The majority of the complications that occur during VATS can be minimized with correct preoperative planning of the case as well as careful pulmonary dissection. Coordination of the whole surgical team is essential when confronting an emergency such as major bleeding. This is particularly important during the VATS learning curve, where the occurrence of intraoperative complications, particularly significant bleeding, usually ends in a conversion to open surgery. However, conversion should not be considered as a failure of the VATS approach, but as a resource to maintain the patient's safety. The correct assessment of any bleeding is of paramount importance during major thoracoscopic procedures. Inadequate management of the source of bleeding may result in major vessel injury and massive bleeding. If bleeding occurs, a sponge stick should be readily available to apply pressure immediately to control the haemorrhage. It is always important to remain calm and not to panic. With the bleeding temporarily controlled, a decision must be made promptly as to whether a thoracotomy is needed or if the bleeding can be solved through the VATS approach. This will depend primarily on the surgeon's experience. The operative vision provided with high-definition cameras, specially designed or adapted instruments and the new sealants are factors that facilitate the surgeon's control. After experience has been acquired with conventional or uniportal VATS, the rate of complications diminishes and the majority of bleeding events are controlled without the need for conversion to thoracotomy.

  20. Efficacy of Zinc Sulfate in Peptic Ulcer Disease: A Randomized Double-Blind Clinical Trial Study

    PubMed Central

    Parhizkar, Baran; Sheikhesmaeili, Farshad; Roshani, Mohammad; Nayebi, Morteza; Gharibi, Fardin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer is a common disease that affects millions of people worldwide. Considering its global prevalence finding new approach for treating is important. Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of zinc sulfate on gastric and duodenal ulcer treatment. Materials and Methods This double-blind clinical trial study was done on 90 patients who were admitted to the gastrointestinal endoscopy clinic of Tohid hospital in Sanandaj, Iran. All patients were diagnosed with gastric and duodenal ulcers. They were randomly divided into two-intervention and control groups, using block randomization with block sizes of 4. Patients and researcher were unaware of the grouping. To assess the level of zinc, blood samples were taken. In case of positive Rapid Urease Test (RUT), triple therapy regimen including amoxicillin, clarithromycin and omeprazole was administered for two weeks. For intervention group in addition to "triple therapy", an oral dose of Zinc Sulfate 220mg capsules were administered daily, while the control group received placebo capsules. Results A total of 54.5% and 57% of the patients in the intervention and control groups had gastric ulcer respectively. The Rapid Urease Test (RUT) result of 72.7% of intervention group and 83.3% of control group was positive (p = 0.24). Serum zinc level of 20.9% of intervention group and 35.7% of control group was lower than the normal level (p = 0.13). The mean of serum zinc level of intervention group and control group were 81.9 and 78.9 mg dL respectively (p = 0.4). After intervention, peptic ulcer in 81.8% of the intervention group and 83.3% of the control groups were improved (p= 0.85). Response to treatment were higher in patients with normal zinc levels compared to patients with abnormal levels (77.5% vs. 22.5%, p=0.019). Conclusion A daily dose of 220mg zinc sulfate was not significantly effective on peptic ulcer. However, patients with normal zinc levels had better ulcer treatment. PMID

  1. Helicobacter pylori and its involvement in gastritis and peptic ulcer formation.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Konturek, P C; Konturek, J W; Plonka, M; Czesnikiewicz-Guzik, M; Brzozowski, T; Bielanski, W

    2006-09-01

    Modern gastroenterology started in early 19(th) century with the identification by W. Prout of the inorganic (hydrochloric) acid in the stomach and continued through 20(th) century with the discoveries by I.P. Pavlov of neuro-reflex stimulation of gastric secretion for which he was awarded first Nobel Prize in 1904. When concept of nervism or complete neural control of all digestive functions reached apogeum in Eastern Europe, on the other side of Europe (in United Kingdom), E. Edkins discovered in 1906 that a hormone, gastrin, may serve as chemical messenger in stimulation of gastric acid secretion, while L. Popielski revealed in 1916 that histamine is the most potent gastric secretagogue. K. Schwartz, without considering neural or hormonal nature of gastric secretory stimulation, enunciated in 1910 famous dictum; "no acid no ulcer"; and suggested gastrectomy as the best medication for excessive gastric acid secretion and peptic ulcer. In early 70s, J.W. Black, basing on earlier L. Popielski's histamine concept, identified histamine-H(2) receptors (H(2)-R) and obtained their antagonists, which were found very useful in the control of gastric acid secretion and ulcer therapy for which he was awarded in 1972 second Nobel Prize in gastrology. With discovery by G. Sachs in 1973 of proton pumps and their inhibitors (PPI), even more effective in gastric acid inhibition and ulcer therapy than H(2)-R antagonists, gastric surgery, namely gastrectomy, practiced since first gastric resection in 1881 by L. Rydygier, has been considered obsolete for ulcer treatment. Despite of the progress in gastric pharmacology, the ulcer disease remained essentially "undefeated" and showed periodic exacerbation and relapses. The discovery of spiral bacteria in the stomach in 1983 by B.J. Marshall and R.J. Warren, Australian, clinical researches, awarded in 2005 the Nobel Prize for the third time in gastrology, has been widely considered as a major breakthrough in pathophysiology of

  2. Technological value of SPECT/CT fusion imaging for the diagnosis of lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z G; Zhang, G X; Hao, S H; Zhang, W W; Zhang, T; Zhang, Z P; Wu, R X

    2015-11-24

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical value of diagnosing and locating lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) fusion imaging with 99mTc labeled red blood cells ((99m)Tc-RBC). Fifty-six patients with suspected lower GI bleeding received a preoperative intravenous injection of (99m)Tc-RBC and each underwent planar, SPECT/CT imaging of the lower abdominal region. The location and path of lower GI bleeding were diagnosed by contrastive analysis of planar and SPECT/CT fusion imaging. Among the 56 patients selected, there were abnormalities in concentrated radionuclide activity with planar imaging in 50 patients and in SPECT/CT fusion imaging in 52 patients. Moreover, bleeding points that were coincident with the surgical results were evident with planar imaging in 31 patients and with SPECT/CT fusion imaging in 48 patients. The diagnostic sensitivity of planar imaging and SPECT/CT fusion imaging were 89.3% (50/56) and 92.9% (52/56), respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant (χ(2) = 0.11, P > 0.05). The corresponding positional accuracy values were 73.8% (31/42) and 92.3% (48/52), and the difference was statistically significant (χ(2) = 4.63, P < 0.05). (99m)Tc- RBC SPECT/CT fusion imaging is an effective, simple, and accurate method that can be used for diagnosing and locating lower GI bleeding.

  3. Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices by Direct Percutaneous Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Arulraj, Ramakrishnan; Mangat, Kamarjit S.; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2011-02-15

    Stomal varices can occur in patients with stoma in the presence of portal hypertension. Suture ligation, sclerotherapy, angiographic embolization, stoma revision, beta blockade, portosystemic shunt, and liver transplantation have been described as therapeutic options for bleeding stomal varices. We report the case of a 21-year-old patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis and colectomy with ileostomy for ulcerative colitis, where stomal variceal bleeding was successfully treated by direct percutaneous embolization. We consider percutaneous embolization to be an effective way of treating acute stomal bleeding in decompensated patients while awaiting decisions regarding shunt procedures or liver transplantation.

  4. Is tranexamic acid effective for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed

    Flores, Sebastián; Avilés, Carolina; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-12-07

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding constitutes a medical-surgical emergency given its important associated morbidity and mortality. The antifibrinolytic tranexamic acid might help stopping bleeding, but controversy remains about its role in this setting. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified five systematic reviews including eight randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded tranexamic acid probably decreases rebleeding and mortality, without increasing thromboembolic adverse effects in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  5. Transvaginal Ultrasound for the Diagnosis of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Karen C; Goldstein, Steven R

    2017-03-01

    Transvaginal ultrasound is the first-line imaging test for the evaluation of abnormal uterine bleeding in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Transvaginal ultrasound can be used to diagnose structural causes of abnormal bleeding such as polyps, adenomyosis, leiomyomas, hyperplasia, and malignancy, and can also be beneficial in making the diagnosis of ovulatory dysfunction. Traditional 2-dimensional imaging is often enhanced by the addition of 3-dimension imaging with coronal reconstruction and saline infusion sonohysterography. In this article we discuss specific ultrasound findings and technical considerations useful in the diagnosis of abnormal uterine bleeding.

  6. Scintigraphic demonstration of gastrointestinal bleeding due to mesenteric varices

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, M.E.; Coleman, R.E. )

    1990-07-01

    Mesenteric varices can appear as massive, acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The small bowel or colon may be involved, varices usually developing at sites of previous surgery or inflammation in patients with portal hypertension. Two patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and protal hypertension presented with rectal bleeding. Tc-99m RBC studies demonstrated varices and extravasation into the adjacent bowel. The varices were documented by mesenteric angiography. Characteristic features of Tc-99m labeled RBC studies can identify mesenteric varices as the cause of intestinal bleeding and localize the abnormal vessels.

  7. Bleeding following deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest in children.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Emad B; Machado, Sandra; Apostolakis, John

    2007-03-01

    Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) is a technique of extracorporeal circulation commonly used in children with complex congenital heart defects undergoing surgical repairs. The use of profound cooling (20 degrees C) and complete cessation of circulation allow adequate exposure and correction of these complex lesions, with enhanced cerebral protection. However, the profound physiologic state of DHCA results in significant derangement of the coagulation system and a high incidence of postoperative bleeding. This review examines the impact of DHCA on bleeding and transfusion requirements in children and the pathophysiology of DHCA-induced platelet dysfunction. It also focuses on possible pharmacologic interventions to decrease bleeding following DHCA in children.

  8. Peptic ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    ... days: Two different antibiotics to kill H pylori Proton pump inhibitors such as omeprazole (Prilosec), lansoprazole (Prevacid), ... NSAIDs, you will likely need to take a proton pump inhibitor for 8 weeks. You may also ...

  9. Peptic Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Looking for Health Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development ( ... improve with an acid suppressor and stopping or changing the NSAID. No antibiotics are needed to treat ...

  10. Peptic Ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause is infection with a bacterium called Helicobacter pylori. Another cause is the long-term use of ... worse. To see if you have an H. pylori infection, your doctor will test your blood, breath, ...

  11. Helicobacter pylori virulence genes and host genetic polymorphisms as risk factors for peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection plays an important role in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Several factors have been proposed as possible H. pylori virulence determinants; for example, bacterial adhesins and gastric inflammation factors are associated with an increased risk of PUD. However, differences in bacterial virulence factors alone cannot explain the opposite ends of the PUD disease spectrum, that is duodenal and gastric ulcers; presumably, both bacterial and host factors contribute to the differential response. Carriers of the high-producer alleles of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1B, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α who also carry low-producer allele of anti-inflammatory cytokines have severe gastric mucosal inflammation, whereas carriers of the alternative alleles have mild inflammation. Recent reports have suggested that the PSCA and CYP2C19 ultra-rapid metabolizer genotypes are also associated with PUD.

  12. Helicobacter pylori virulence genes and host genetic polymorphisms as risk factors for peptic ulcer disease

    PubMed Central

    Yamaoka, Yoshio; Miftahussurur, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection plays an important role in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Several factors have been proposed as possible H. pylori virulence determinants; for example, bacterial adhesins and gastric inflammation factors are associated with an increased risk of PUD. However, differences in bacterial virulence factors alone cannot explain the opposite ends of the PUD disease spectrum, i.e., duodenal and gastric ulcers; presumably, both bacterial and host factors contribute to the differential response. Carriers of the high-producer alleles of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1B, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-α who also carry low-producer allele carriers of anti-inflammatory cytokines have severe gastric mucosal inflammation, whereas carriers of the alternative alleles have mild inflammation. Recent reports have suggested that the PSCA and CYP2C19 ultra-rapid metabolizer genotypes are also associated with PUD. PMID:26470920

  13. Automated Analysis of Vital Signs Identified Patients with Substantial Bleeding Prior to Hospital Arrival

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    culminating with the first and only deployment of an automated emergency care decision system on board active air ambulances: the APPRAISE system , a...hardware/software platform for automated, real-time analysis of vital-sign data. After developing the APPRAISE system using data from trauma patients...APPRAISE system provided consistent determination of whether or not patients were bleeding. We found that the automated APPRAISE system using a

  14. CagA antibodies in Japanese children with nodular gastritis or peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Kato, S; Sugiyama, T; Kudo, M; Ohnuma, K; Ozawa, K; Iinuma, K; Asaka, M; Blaser, M J

    2000-01-01

    cagA(+) Helicobacter pylori strains have been linked to more severe gastric inflammation, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer in adults, but there have been few studies of cagA in children. We examined the relationship between H. pylori cagA status and clinical status in Japanese children. Forty H. pylori-positive children were studied: 15 with nodular gastritis, 5 with gastric ulcers, and 20 with duodenal ulcers. H. pylori status was confirmed by biopsy-based tests and serum anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody. As controls, 77 asymptomatic children with sera positive for anti-H. pylori IgG were enrolled. Levels of IgG antibodies to CagA in serum were measured by an antigen-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In 16 patients with successful H. pylori eradication, posttreatment levels of CagA and H. pylori IgG antibodies also were studied. The CagA antibody seropositivities of asymptomatic controls (81.8%) and patients with nodular gastritis, gastric ulcers, and duodenal ulcers (80.0 to 95.0%) were not significantly different. Compared with pretreatment levels of CagA antibodies, posttreatment levels decreased progressively and significantly. We conclude that, as in Japanese adults, a high prevalence of cagA(+) H. pylori strains was found in Japanese children, and that there was no association with nodular gastritis or peptic ulcer disease. In the assessment of eradicative therapies, monitoring of serum anti-CagA antibodies does not appear to offer any direct benefit over monitoring of anti-H. pylori antibodies.

  15. Technetium-99m colloidal bismuth subcitrate: A novel method for the evaluation of peptic ulcer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, T.E.; Lyons, K.P.; Raiszadeh, M.; Fardi, M.; Snider, P.

    1984-01-01

    The therapeutic agent colloidal bismuth subcitrate (CBS) selectively binds to peptic ulcers. The authors have developed a method for labeling this agent with Tc-99m. Chromatographic quality control studies of the agent on silica gel coated strips (ITLC-SG) showed that more than 97% of Tc-99m was bound to CBS. During in-vitro stability testing, the radio-label was stable for a minimum of 6 hours. The chromatographic findings are in agreement with the in-vivo distribution of the agent which showed no significant radioactivity in thyroid, kidneys, liver, or bladder. The resulting Tc-99m-CBS solution is administered orally in drinking water. Preliminary animal studies have been conducted on 5 adult 3 kg New Zealand rabbits sedated with 50 mg Ketamine I.M. The rabbits were intubated with I.V. tubing advanced to the stomach. They were given a gastric erosive suspension of 600-1000 mg/kg of pulverized ASA in 10 cc tap water. Four hours later they were given 3-4 mCi of the radiotracer in a 5 cc volume of water. Serial in-vivo images were obtained for 2 hours which included thyroid, abdomen, and urinary bladder. Next the stomachs were excised, opened along the greater curvature, imaged, vigorously washed and reimaged. All 5 rabbits showed avid localized binding of radiotracer which remained fixed even with vigorous washing. Areas of normal appearing mucosa were relatively devoid of radiotracer. This new compound may have significant clinical usefulness in the detection of peptic ulcer disease. In addition, such a non-invasive technique, carrying none of the risks or discomfort of endoscopy could also find application in the evaluation of the response to therapy.

  16. Frequency of ABO blood group in peptic ulcer disease in Iranian subjects.

    PubMed

    Rasmi, Y; Sadreddini, M; Peirovi, T; Jamali, M; Khosravifar, F; Dadkhah, A; Fatemi, F; Rahmati, M; Zargari, M; Sharifi, R

    2009-07-01

    The relationship between ABO blood group distribution and Peptic Ulcer Disease (PUD) has been widely evaluated in the past. But data concerning the same evaluation are very limited in Iran. This study sought to determine the distribution of ABO blood group in patients with PUD in Iranian subjects. Eighty-one patients with PUD (51 male and 30 female; mean age: 49 +/- 18 years) who attended our endoscopy section were enrolled. Blood samples were used for ABO/Rhesus (Rh) blood group antigen typing. The ABO blood group phenotype distribution in subjects was as follows: 37.1% (30/81) for group A, 23.4% (19/81) for group B, 35.6% (28/81) for group O and 4.9% (4/81) for group AB. Rh positivity was found in 63% (51/81) of patients. In local healthy population, ABO/Rh blood group distribution was 33.8, 20.7, 34.7, 8.4 and 89.6% for A, B, O, AB and Rh, respectively. AB blood group distribution in healthy population was higher than PUD (8.4 vs 4.9%). In contrast, Rh positivity of PUD in Iran is lower than healthy subjects (63 vs 89.6%). Variation in the results of studies is related to different study communities. According to these results, probably ABO/Rh blood group has an important role in patients with peptic ulceration. The functional significance of ABO blood group distribution might be associated with biological behavior of PUD. The impact of blood group on PUD may be a focus for further studies.

  17. Do statins protect against upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed Central

    Gulmez, Sinem Ezgi; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Aalykke, Claus; Dall, Michael; Andries, Alin; Andersen, Birthe Søgaard; Hansen, Jane Møller; Andersen, Morten; Hallas, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    AIMS Recently, an apparent protective effect of statins against upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB) was postulated in a post hoc analysis of a randomized trial. We aimed to evaluate the effect of statin use on acute nonvariceal UGB alone or in combinations with low-dose aspirin and other antithrombotic drugs. METHODS A population-based case–control study was conducted in the County of Funen, Denmark. Cases (n = 3652) were all subjects with a first discharge diagnosis of serious UGB from a hospital during the period 1995 to 2006. Age- and gender-matched controls (10 for each case) (n = 36 502) were selected by a risk set sampling. Data on all subjects' drug exposure and past medical history were retrieved from a prescription database and from the County's patient register. Confounders were controlled by conditional logistic regression. RESULTS The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) associating use of statins with UGB were 0.94 (0.78–1.12) for current use, 1.40 (0.89–2.20) for recent use and 1.42 (0.96–2.10) for past use. The lack of effect was consistent across most patient subgroups, different cumulative or current statin doses and different statin substances. In explorative analyses, a borderline significant protective effect was observed for concurrent users of low-dose aspirin [OR 0.43 (0.18–1.05)]. CONCLUSION Statins do not prevent UGB, except possibly in users of low-dose aspirin. PMID:19371320

  18. Aspirin use and post-operative bleeding from dental extractions.

    PubMed

    Brennan, M T; Valerin, M A; Noll, J L; Napeñas, J J; Kent, M L; Fox, P C; Sasser, H C; Lockhart, P B

    2008-08-01

    Aspirin is a common, chronically administered preventive treatment for cardiovascular disease, but is often discontinued prior to invasive dental procedures because of concern for bleeding complications. We hypothesized that aspirin does not cause increased bleeding following a single tooth extraction. Thirty-six healthy persons requiring a tooth extraction were randomized to receive 325 mg/day aspirin or placebo for 4 days. Cutaneous bleeding time (BT) and platelet aggregation tests were obtained prior to extraction. The primary outcome measure, oral BT, and secondary bleeding outcomes were evaluated during and following extraction. No significant baseline differences, except for diastolic blood pressure, were found between groups. There were no differences in oral BT, cutaneous BT, secondary outcome measures, or compliance. Whole-blood aggregation results were significantly different between the aspirin and placebo groups. These findings suggest that there is no indication to discontinue aspirin for persons requiring single-tooth extraction.

  19. Study Tracks Bleeding Risk from Common Blood Thinners

    MedlinePlus

    ... as vitamin K antagonists (which includes Coumadin/warfarin); clopidogrel (Plavix); or other blood-thinning medications. Low-dose ... risk of the subdural hematoma bleed; use of clopidogrel plus a second blood-thinning pill was associated ...

  20. A rare cause of recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding: mesenteric hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Kazimi, Mircelal; Ulas, Murat; Ibis, Cem; Unver, Mutlu; Ozsan, Nazan; Yilmaz, Funda; Ersoz, Galip; Zeytunlu, Murat; Kilic, Murat; Coker, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage accounts for approximately 20% of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The most common causes of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage in adults are diverticular disease, inflammatory bowel disease, benign anorectal diseases, intestinal neoplasias, coagulopathies and arterio-venous malformations. Hemangiomas of gastrointestinal tract are rare. Mesenteric hemangiomas are also extremely rare. We present a 25-year-old female who was admitted to the emergency room with recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. An intraluminal bleeding mass inside the small intestinal segment was detected during explorative laparotomy as the cause of the recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. After partial resection of small bowel segment, the histopathologic examination revealed a cavernous hemagioma of mesenteric origin. Although rare, gastrointestinal hemangioma should be thought in differential diagnosis as a cause of recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:19178725

  1. Lag model for turbulent boundary layers over rough bleed surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Sloan, M. L.; Paynter, G. C.

    1994-07-01

    Boundary-layer mass removal (bleed) through spanwise bands of holes on a surface is used to prevent or control separation and to stabilize the normal shock in supersonic inlets. The addition of a transport equation lag relationship for eddy viscosity to the rough wall algebraic turbulence model of Cebeci and Chang was found to improve agreement between predicted and measured mean velocity distributions downstream of a bleed band. The model was demonstrated for a range of bleed configurations, bleed rates, and local freestream Mach numbers. In addition, the model was applied to the boundary-layer development over acoustic lining materials for the inlets and nozzles of commercial aircraft. The model was found to yield accurate results for integral boundary-layer properties unless there was a strong adverse pressure gradient.

  2. Anode reactive bleed and injector shift control strategy

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Jun [Rochester, NY; Chowdhury, Akbar [Pittsford, NY; Lerner, Seth E [Honeoye Falls, NY; Marley, William S [Rush, NY; Savage, David R [Rochester, NY; Leary, James K [Rochester, NY

    2012-01-03

    A system and method for correcting a large fuel cell voltage spread for a split sub-stack fuel cell system. The system includes a hydrogen source that provides hydrogen to each split sub-stack and bleed valves for bleeding the anode side of the sub-stacks. The system also includes a voltage measuring device for measuring the voltage of each cell in the split sub-stacks. The system provides two levels for correcting a large stack voltage spread problem. The first level includes sending fresh hydrogen to the weak sub-stack well before a normal reactive bleed would occur, and the second level includes sending fresh hydrogen to the weak sub-stack and opening the bleed valve of the other sub-stack when the cell voltage spread is close to stack failure.

  3. Evaluation and Management of Adolescents with Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Tanya L Kowalczyk; Miller, Rachel J; Mullins, Eric S

    2015-09-01

    The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists support the use of new terminology for abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) to consistently categorize AUB by etiology. The term AUB can be further classified as AUB/heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) (replacing the term "menorrhagia") or AUB/intermenstrual bleeding (replacing the term "metrorrhagia"). Although many cases of AUB in adolescent women are attributable to immaturity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, underlying bleeding disorders should be considered in women with AUB/HMB. This article reviews the new terminology for AUB, discusses important relevant features of history and examination, presents the laboratory evaluation of HMB, and describes hormonal (oral contraceptive pills, progestin-only methods, long-acting reversible contraceptives including intrauterine systems), hematologic (tranexamic acid and desmopressin), and surgical management options for AUB/HMB.

  4. [Fiberendoscopic injection therapy of bleeding gastrointestinal lesions (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Liehr, H; Brunswig, D; Gallenkamp, H; Seez, P; Zilly, W

    1979-06-01

    In 28 patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding emergency fiberendoscopy was combined with aethoxysclerole (1%) injection of the bleeding lesion with purpose to controll haemorrhage. In 61% of 31 proceudres done in patients with oesophageal varices (n = 19) haemorrhage was controlled, and in further 16% deminuation of bleeding intensity was noted. In the remaining cases (n = 7) the procedure was ineffective. Only patients with Child C liver cirrhosis having oesophageal varices stages III and IV finally died because of uncontrolled haemorrhage. In 9 patients with bleeding from other lesions (gastric erosions and ulcers, Mallory-Weiss-Syndrome, erosio simplex Dieulafoy) haemorrhage was controlled in 8 patients. The method is practicable and efficient, but does not determine better the final outcome of patients with livercirrhosis Child C having oesophageal varices stages III and IV. In other cases tube treatment was avoided. The operation lethality within the series was 1,5%.

  5. Bleeding oesophageal varices with long term follow up.

    PubMed Central

    Spence, R A; Johnston, G W; Odling-Smee, G W; Rodgers, H W

    1984-01-01

    Complete long term follow up was obtained in 27 children who had bled from oesophageal varices. Most presented with haematemesis or melaena at an average age of 5.2 years in the portal vein thrombosis group (20 children) and 9.5 years in the intrahepatic group (7 children). All had splenomegaly. Only 6 of 20 children with portal vein thrombosis had a possible precipitating factor. A total of 182 admissions for bleeding are reported, in 68 of which injection sclerotherapy was used to control bleeding. Control rate with injection sclerotherapy was 97%. Shunts performed below age 10 years were associated with a high thrombosis rate. A conservative approach to bleeding varices in children is recommended with transfusion, pitressin, and injection sclerotherapy. Oesophageal transection may have a role in the emergency management of the few children in whom bleeding is not controlled by injection sclerotherapy. PMID:6609683

  6. Transarterial embolization for management of severe postcoital bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Eskandari, Armen; Mukherjee, Ashis; McHugh, John

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Postcoital bleeding is an uncommon cause of gynecologic hemorrhage; however, it can be severe in a majority of cases necessitating surgical management. Methods: We report a case of severe postcoital bleeding in a young woman requiring blood transfusion. Results: Hemostasis was achieved using subselective embolization of cervical artery by metallic coils. Conclusion: Our case demonstrates a minimally invasive treatment for control of non-obstetric hemorrhage. PMID:27551425

  7. Severe Epistaxis from an Intracranial Vascular Bleed from Grenade Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    Severe Epistaxis from an Intracranial Vascular Bleed from Grenade Injury Radiology Corner Case 27 Severe Epistaxis from an Intracranial ...neck injuries. In particular, this case focuses on an intracranial vascular injury generated by a hand grenade with the diagnosis assisted by...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Severe Epistaxis from an Intracranial Vascular Bleed from Grenade Injury 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  8. Amphetamine-related ischemic colitis causing gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Panikkath, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented with acute lower intestinal bleeding requiring blood transfusion. Multiple initial investigations did not reveal the cause of the bleeding. Colonoscopy performed 2 days later showed features suggestive of ischemic colitis. On detailed history, the patient admitted to using amphetamines, and her urine drug screen was positive for them. She was managed conservatively and advised not to use amphetamines again. She did not have any recurrence on 2-year follow-up. PMID:27365888

  9. ENDOSCOPIC DIAGNOSIS AND THERAPY IN GASTRO-ESOPAGEAL VARICEAL BLEEDING

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Arun J.

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal variceal hemorrhage is a medical emergency with high morbidity and mortality. Endoscopic therapy is the mainstay of management of bleeding varices. It requires attention to technique and the appropriate choice of therapy for a given patient at a given point in time. Subjects must be monitored continuously after initiation of therapy for control of bleeding and second line definitive therapies introduced quickly if endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment fails. PMID:26142034

  10. A pediatric case of factitious disorder with unexplained bleeding symptoms.

    PubMed

    Uzuner, Selcuk; Bahali, Kayhan; Kurban, Sema; Erenberk, Ufuk; Cakir, Erkan

    2013-01-01

    Factitious disorder is characterized by deliberate production or imitation of physical or psychological symptoms in order to adopt the sick role. The disorder can be seen as factitious bleeding. Factitious bleeding is a rare disorder in pediatric population. The concomitant appearance of hemoptysis and hematuria in the same patient has not been previously reported. In this case report, we present a pediatric case of factitious disorder with both hemoptysis and hematuria.

  11. Pro- and anticoagulant properties of factor V in pathogenesis of thrombosis and bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Dahlbäck, Björn

    2016-05-01

    Factor V (FV) serves an important role in the regulation of blood coagulation, having both pro- and anticoagulant properties. The circulating high molecular weight single-chain FV molecule undergoes a series of proteolytic cleavages during both activation of coagulation and during anticoagulant regulation of coagulation by activated protein C (APC). It is noteworthy that mutations in the factor V gene (F5) either cause thrombosis or bleeding. New insights into the importance and complexity of FV functions have been generated from elucidation of the pathogenic mechanisms of two familial mutations in the F5 gene. The first mutation was identified as a result of the discovery of APC resistance as the most common risk factor for venous thrombosis. The mutation (FV Leiden) predicts the Arg(506) Gln replacement, which impairs the normal regulation of FVa by APC, as the Arg506 site is an important APC cleavage site. In addition, elucidation of APC resistance resulted in the discovery of the anticoagulant APC cofactor activity of FV. The second FV mutation (FV(A2440G) ), identified in a family with an autosomal dominant bleeding disorder, has led to the discovery of an alternative splicing generating a previously unidentified FV isoform (FV-Short), which inhibits coagulation via an unexpected and intriguing mechanism involving the coagulation inhibitor TFPI-α. These are naturally occurring mutations in the F5 gene that have generated new knowledge on the role of FV in regulation of coagulation and the importance of genetic risk factors for thrombosis and bleeding.

  12. Liquefied Bleed for Stability and Efficiency of High Speed Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, J. David; Davis, David; Barsi, Stephen J.; Deans, Matthew C.; Weir, Lois J.; Sanders, Bobby W.

    2014-01-01

    A mission analysis code was developed to perform a trade study on the effectiveness of liquefying bleed for the inlet of the first stage of a TSTO vehicle. By liquefying bleed, the vehicle weight (TOGW) could be reduced by 7 to 23%. Numerous simplifying assumptions were made and lessons were learned. Increased accuracy in future analyses can be achieved by: Including a higher fidelity model to capture the effect of rescaling (variable vehicle TOGW). Refining specific thrust and impulse models ( T m a and Isp) to preserve fuel-to-air ratio. Implementing LH2 for T m a and Isp. Correlating baseline design to other mission analyses and correcting vehicle design elements. Implementing angle-of-attack effects on inlet characteristics. Refining aerodynamic performance (to improve L/D ratio at higher Mach numbers). Examining the benefit with partial cooling or densification of the bleed air stream. Incorporating higher fidelity weight estimates for the liquefied bleed system (heat exchange and liquid storage versus bleed duct weights) could be added when more fully developed. Adding trim drag or 6-degree-of-freedom trajectory analysis for higher fidelity. Investigating vehicle optimization for each of the bleed configurations.

  13. Bleeding after endoscopic submucosal dissection: Risk factors and preventive methods

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Yosuke; Tsuji, Yosuke; Sakaguchi, Yoshiki; Minatsuki, Chihiro; Asada-Hirayama, Itsuko; Niimi, Keiko; Ono, Satoshi; Kodashima, Shinya; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has become widely accepted as a standard method of treatment for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms because it enables en block resection even for large lesions or fibrotic lesions with minimal invasiveness, and decreases the local recurrence rate. Moreover, specimens resected in an en block fashion enable accurate histological assessment. Taking these factors into consideration, ESD seems to be more advantageous than conventional endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), but the associated risks of perioperative adverse events are higher than in EMR. Bleeding after ESD is the most frequent among these adverse events. Although post-ESD bleeding can be controlled by endoscopic hemostasis in most cases, it may lead to serious conditions including hemorrhagic shock. Even with preventive methods including administration of acid secretion inhibitors and preventive hemostasis, post-ESD bleeding cannot be completely prevented. In addition high-risk cases for post-ESD bleeding, which include cases with the use of antithrombotic agents or which require large resection, are increasing. Although there have been many reports about associated risk factors and methods of preventing post-ESD bleeding, many issues remain unsolved. Therefore, in this review, we have overviewed risk factors and methods of preventing post-ESD bleeding from previous studies. Endoscopists should have sufficient knowledge of these risk factors and preventive methods when performing ESD. PMID:27468187

  14. Upper gastrointestinal ectopic variceal bleeding treated with various endoscopic modalities

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Eunae; Jun, Chung Hwan; Choi, Sung Kyu; Kim, Hyun Soo; Park, Chang Hwan; Rew, Jong Sun; Cho, Sung Bum; Kim, Hee Joon; Han, Mingui; Cho, Kyu Man

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Ectopic variceal bleeding is a rare (2–5%) but fatal gastrointestinal bleed in patients with portal hypertension. Patients with ectopic variceal bleeding manifest melena, hematochezia, or hematemesis, which require urgent managements. Definitive therapeutic modalities of ectopic varices are not yet standardized because of low incidence. Various therapeutic modalities have been applied on the basis of the experiences of experts or availability of facilities, with varying results. Patient concerns: We have encountered eight cases of gastrointestinal ectopic variceal bleeding in five patients in the last five years. Diagnoses: All patients were diagnosed with liver cirrhosis presenting melena or hematemesis. Interventions: All patients were treated with various endoscopic modalities (endoscopic variceal obturation [EVO] with cyanoacrylate in five cases, endoscopic variceal band ligation (EVL) in two cases, hemoclipping in one case). Outcomes: Satisfactory hemostasis was achieved without radiologic interventions in all cases. EVO and EVL each caused one case of portal biliopathy, and EVL induced ulcer bleeding in one case. Lessons: EVO generally accomplished better results of variceal obturations than EVL or hemoclipping, without serious adverse events. EVO may be an effective modality for control of ectopic variceal bleeding without radiologic intervention or surgery. PMID:28072750

  15. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori-Negative, Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Related Peptic Ulcer Disease in Patients Referred to Afzalipour Hospital.

    PubMed

    Seyed Mirzaei, Seyed Mahdi; Zahedi, Mohammad Javad; Shafiei Pour, Sara

    2015-10-01

    BACKGROUND Although Helicobacter pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the main causes of peptic ulcers disease (PUD), recently the prevalence of idiopathic peptic ulcer (IPU) is increasing in most parts of the world. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of IPU in Kerman, the center of largest province in south-east Iran. METHODS We included 215 patients with peptic ulcer in our study. Combined methods rapid urease test (RUT), histology, and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed on endoscopic samples of peptic ulcers. NSAID use was determined by medical history. SPSS software version 16 was used for data analysis. p value<0.05 was considered as statistically significant. RESULTS Of 215 consecutive patients with peptic ulcer, four (1.8%) had H.pylorinegative and NSAID-negative PUD. There were not significant differences between patients with IPU and patients with peptic ulcer associated with H.pylori or NSAIDs regarding the sex, age, cigarette smoking, and opioid abuse. CONCLUSION Our study showed that in contrast to other reports from western and some Asian countries, the prevalence of IPU is low in Kerman and H.pylori infection is still the major cause of PUD. We recommend a large and multi-central study to determine the prevalence of IPU in Iran.

  16. Impact Of Standing Bleed Water On Saltstone Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A. D.; Pickenheim, B. R.

    2012-09-28

    The amount of water present during placement and subsequent curing of saltstone has the potential to impact several properties important for grout quality. An active drain water system can remove residual standing water and expose the surface of the placed saltstone to air. Oxidation of the saltstone may result in an increase in the leachability of redox sensitive elements. A dry surface can lead to cracking, causing an increase in hydraulic conductivity. An inactive drain water system can allow standing water that generates unnecessary hydrostatic head on the vault walls. Standing water that cannot be removed via the drain system will be available for potential incorporation into subsequent grout placements. The objective of this work is to study the impact of standing water on grout quality pertaining to disposal units. A series of saltstone mixes were prepared, and cured at ambient temperature to evaluate the impact of standing water on saltstone placement. The samples were managed to control drying effects on leachability by either exposing or capping the samples. The water to premix ratio was varied to represent a range of processing conditions. Samples were analyzed for density, leachability, and hydraulic conductivity. A monolith of each composition was cut into four sections to analyze the homogeneity of the sample with respect to vertical position within the sample. The density of each section was measured by two methods, helium pycnometry and by ASTM 642-06. The results show a trend of increasing density with increasing depth in the samples. This effect is more pronounced with the inclusion of excess bleed water and indicative of increased settling. The leachability of the eight different samples was analyzed by ANS/ANSI 16.1 method. These results indicate that drying of the saltstone during curing leads to decreased Leachability Indices (indicative of more release) for potassium, sodium, rhenium, nitrite, and nitrate. This may be caused by shrinkage

  17. Population impact of strategies designed to reduce peptic ulcer risks associated with NSAID use.

    PubMed

    Langman, Michael

    2003-04-01

    The risk of ulcer complications rises steeply with dose for aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) but estimates of the overall incidence of bleeding ulcer are unreliable. Drug utilisation data, epidemiological data on the frequency of bleeding ulcer and death, and the relative risks associated with different NSAIDs, indicate that the number of cases of bleeding ulcer attributable to NSAIDs in the United Kingdom is approximately 2,400. Substitution of ibuprofen at a dose of 2.4 g/day for all other NSAIDs would reduce the number of events attributable to NSAIDs from 2,431 to 695 annually. At a dose of 1200 mg/day, substituting ibuprofen or another safe NSAID would be likely to reduce events to zero. Similarly, substitution of ibuprofen 2.4 g/day for all other NSAIDs would reduce attributable ulcer mortality to 80. The total number of excess cases attributable to aspirin is 753 annually. If prophylactic aspirin was prescribed solely at a dose of 75 mg/day, the number of cases would fall to 445 annually and the number of related deaths from 87 to 51 annually. NSAIDs and aspirin account for approximately one-third and previous ulcer for about one-fifth of the overall risk of bleeding ulcer and its complications.

  18. National estimates of the characteristics of individuals infected with HIV who are likely to report and receive treatment for painful bleeding gums.

    PubMed

    Sy, Aldrich A; Freed, Benjamin A; Chau, Fouy K; Marcus, Marvin

    2011-01-01

    Painful bleeding gums may be associated with HIV infection. This study examined the characteristics of persons reporting the symptom "painful bleeding gums" and their likelihood of accessing care. The study population consisted of persons receiving care for HIV as part of the HIV Cost and Services Utilization Study (HCSUS). In this national population, 5.3% reported painful bleeding gums. Significant differences in reporting painful bleeding gums were found between Hispanics/Whites, oral health status, and presence of other symptoms. Compared to younger persons, those in the middle age group were more likely to seek treatment, while persons with the highest CD4 counts were more likely to seek treatment than those with the lowest CD4 counts. This study showed that reporting painful bleeding gums was a function of ethnicity, other symptoms, and perceived oral health, while seeking treatment for painful bleeding gums was related to age and CD4 counts. Dentists and other health care providers can have an active role in improving the quality of life of persons living with HIV by being aware of the relationships that exist between patients with HIV and painful bleeding gums.

  19. Bleeding associated with acquired factor V inhibitor in a patient on warfarin treated successfully with prednisolone

    PubMed Central

    Khalafallah, Alhossain; Grabek, Julian; Hayes, Robert; Mohamed, Muhajir

    2013-01-01

    An 85-year-old man on warfarin for atrial fibrillation presented with skin bleeding. International normalised ratio (INR) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were elevated and did not correct even after warfarin reversal with vitamin K, prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) and fresh frozen plasma. Mixing coagulation studies with normal plasma suggested the presence of an inhibitor rather than the multiple coagulation factor deficiencies expected with warfarin. Assays of the common-pathway coagulation factors revealed factor V concentration <2% with inhibitor level elevated to 11 Bethesda units. The bleeding resolved following a course of corticosteroids. Coagulation studies and factor V level returned to normal along with resolution of the inhibitor. We report the case of the diagnostic dilemma posed and successful therapy implemented despite the limited evidence-based data being available for the treatment of this rare condition. PMID:23921688

  20. Haemosuccus pancreaticus, an uncommon cause of upper gastro intestinal bleeding: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amir Ali; Charon, Jean Pierre

    2015-06-01

    Haemosuccus Pancreaticus is defined as upper gastro intestinal (GI) bleeding from the ampula of vater via the pancreatic duct. It is most commonly associated with pancreatic inflammation, erosion of the pancrease by aneurysm or pseudo-aneurysm of the splenic artery. We report a 69 year old man with previous history of acute pancreatitis who was admitted with recurrent haematemesis. Initial upper GI endocopy was normal, while admitted, he collapse with abdominal pain and hypotension. He was resuscitated with blood and intravenous fluid. Repeat upper GI endocopy showed fresh blood in the duodenum, but no active bleeding site was demonstrated. An urgent coeliac axis CT angiogram was done which showed an splenic artery pseudo-aneurysm, which was successfully embolized. Patient is well 9 months after the procedure. This case highlights the importance of considering coeliac axis CT angiogram as part of investigation for obscure GI bleeding.

  1. A novel mutation in the F5 gene (factor V Amsterdam) associated with bleeding independent of factor V procoagulant function.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Marisa L R; Bakhtiari, Kamran; Peter, Jorge; Marquart, J Arnoud; Meijers, Joost C M; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2015-03-12

    We investigated a small Dutch family with a bleeding diathesis, prolonged prothrombin, and activated partial thromboplastin times, in whom no classifying diagnosis was made. The 2 affected relatives had severely decreased in vitro thrombin generation, and levels of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) were strongly increased. To identify the genetic cause of the bleeding diathesis, we performed whole exome sequencing analysis of all living relatives. We found a novel gain-of-function mutation in the F5 gene (c.C2588G), which leads to an aberrant splicing of F5 and ultimately to a short factor V protein (missing 623 amino acids from the B domain), which we called factor V Amsterdam. Factor V Amsterdam binds to TFPI, prolonging its half-life and concentration. This is the second report of an association between a shorter form of factor V and increased TFPI levels, resulting in severely reduced thrombin generation and a bleeding tendency.

  2. Exsanguinating bleeding following tooth extraction in a 12-year-old girl: a rare case of acquired haemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Todo, Kimito; Ohmae, Tadaki; Osamura, Toshio; Kiyosawa, Nobuyuki; Sugimoto, Mitsuhiko; Shima, Midori; Imamura, Toshihiko; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2015-12-01

    Acquired haemophilia A (AHA) is a life-threatening haemorrhagic disorder that occurs with various underlying conditions such as autoimmune disease, drug reactions, lymphoproliferative diseases, solid tumours and pregnancy/postpartum status. However, in half of all reported cases, the underlying disease is unknown. Most AHA cases develop in adults; paediatric/adolescent cases are extremely rare. The main clinical symptom is bleeding into the skin, muscles, soft tissues and/or mucous membranes. Here, we report the case of an otherwise healthy 12-year-old girl who presented with prolonged bleeding postexodontia. After being diagnosed with AHA, she was successfully treated with recombinant activated factor VII infusion and oral prednisolone. To avoid such unanticipated bleeding when performing dental extraction, preoperative haemostatic screening tests are recommended.

  3. Is Limited Prehospital Resuscitation with Plasma More Beneficial than Using a Synthetic Colloid? An Experimental Study in Rabbits with Parenchymal Bleeding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    Is limited prehospital resuscitation with plasma more beneficial than using a synthetic colloid ? An experimental study in rabbits with parenchymal...with plasma more beneficial than using a synthetic colloid ? An experimental study in rabbits with parenchymal bleeding 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...subjects with active bleeding compared with a single plasma protein solution (5% albumin) or the synthetic colloid (Hextend) that is currently used on the

  4. [NOAC: Real-life data and the role of antidotes for the treatment of bleeding].

    PubMed

    Darius, H

    2017-03-01

    The non-vitamin K antagonists (NOAC) are an integral component of our antithrombotic prevention and therapy. For four of the NOAC, their non-inferiority or even superiority versus vitamin K antagonists (VKA) has been proven. Thus, the management of special patient cohorts or the management of active bleeding complications is a focus of current discussion.In addition to prospective trials, numerous retrospective analyses of health insurers or public health provider data have been analyzed and published as "real life" or "real-world evidence" data. In almost all data sets the results of the NOAC approval trials were confirmed, demonstrating their non-inferiority or even superiority versus VKA. Attempts to compare the various NOAC with each other must be viewed critically since the real-world evidence (RWE) analysis provides very divergent results depending on the cohorts analyzed. Thus, a substantial prescriber-bias must be taken into account and never be excluded.In order to improve the management of bleeding complications, NOAC antidotes were developed. While the factors Xa antidote, andexanet alpha, a modified coagulation factor deleted of an intrinsic activity, will not be available before 2018, the dabigatran antidote idarucizumab is already in clinical use. Idarucizumab, a monoclonal antibody fragment directed against dabigatran, is able to completely antagonize the effect of dabigatran within minutes. Therefore, the drug has the potential to terminate life-threatening bleeding complications earlier and make emergency surgical or interventional procedures possible without an elevated bleeding risk.

  5. Association of Helicobacter pylori cagA Gene with Gastric Cancer and Peptic Ulcer in Saudi Patients.

    PubMed

    Saber, Taisir; Ghonaim, Mabrouk M; Yousef, Amany R; Khalifa, Amany; Al Qurashi, Hesham; Shaqhan, Mohammad; Samaha, Mohammad

    2015-07-01

    This study was conducted to assess the relationship between occurrence of gastric cancer and peptic ulcer, and the presence of H. pylori cagA gene and anti-CagA IgG, and to estimate the value of these antibodies in detecting infection by cagA gene-positive H. pylori strains in Saudi patients. The study included 180 patients who were subjected to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in Taif province and Western region of Saudi Arabia (60 gastric cancer, 60 peptic ulcer, and 60 with non-ulcer dyspepsia). Gastric biopsy specimens were obtained and tested for H. pylori infection by rapid urease test and culture. PCR was performed on the isolated strains and biopsy specimens for detection of the cagA gene. Blood samples were collected and tested for CagA IgG by ELISA. H. pylori infection was detected among 72.8% of patients. The cagA gene and anti-CagA IgG were found in 63.4% and 61.8% of H. pylori-infected patients, respectively. They were significantly (p < 0.01) higher in patients with gastric cancer and peptic ulcer compared with those with non-ulcer dyspepsia. Detection of the CagA IgG was 91.6% sensitive, 89.6% specific, and 90.8% accurate compared with detection of the cagA gene. Its positive and negative predictive values were 93.8% and 86%, respectively. The study showed a significant association between the presence of the cagA gene and gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease, and between anti-CagA IgG and the cagA gene in Saudi patients. However, a further larger study is required to confirm this finding.

  6. A novel semi-quantitative method for measuring tissue bleeding.

    PubMed

    Vukcevic, G; Volarevic, V; Raicevic, S; Tanaskovic, I; Milicic, B; Vulovic, T; Arsenijevic, S

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we describe a new semi-quantitative method for measuring the extent of bleeding in pathohistological tissue samples. To test our novel method, we recruited 120 female patients in their first trimester of pregnancy and divided them into three groups of 40. Group I was the control group, in which no dilation was applied. Group II was an experimental group, in which dilation was performed using classical mechanical dilators. Group III was also an experimental group, in which dilation was performed using a hydraulic dilator. Tissue samples were taken from the patients' cervical canals using a Novak's probe via energetic single-step curettage prior to any dilation in Group I and after dilation in Groups II and III. After the tissue samples were prepared, light microscopy was used to obtain microphotographs at 100x magnification. The surfaces affected by bleeding were measured in the microphotographs using the Autodesk AutoCAD 2009 program and its "polylines" function. The lines were used to mark the area around the entire sample (marked A) and to create "polyline" areas around each bleeding area on the sample (marked B). The percentage of the total area affected by bleeding was calculated using the formula: N = Bt x 100 / At where N is the percentage (%) of the tissue sample surface affected by bleeding, At (A total) is the sum of the surfaces of all of the tissue samples and Bt (B total) is the sum of all the surfaces affected by bleeding in all of the tissue samples. This novel semi-quantitative method utilizes the Autodesk AutoCAD 2009 program, which is simple to use and widely available, thereby offering a new, objective and precise approach to estimate the extent of bleeding in tissue samples.

  7. Hemostatic powder spray: a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Papafragkakis, Haris; Ofori, Emmanuel; Ona, Mel A.; Krishnaiah, Mahesh; Duddempudi, Sushil; Anand, Sury

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The management of gastrointestinal bleeding is often challenging, depending on its location and severity. To date, widely accepted hemostatic treatment options include injection of epinephrine and tissue adhesives such as cyanoacrylate, ablative therapy with contact modalities such as thermal coagulation with heater probe and bipolar hemostatic forceps, noncontact modalities such as photodynamic therapy and argon plasma coagulation, and mechanical hemostasis with band ligation, endoscopic hemoclips, and over-the-scope clips. These approaches, albeit effective in achieving hemostasis, are associated with a 5–10% rebleeding risk. New simple, effective, universal, and safe methods are needed to address some of the challenges posed by the current endoscopic hemostatic techniques. The use of a novel hemostatic powder spray appears to be effective and safe in controlling upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Although initial reports of hemostatic powder spray as an innovative approach to manage gastrointestinal bleeding are promising, further studies are needed to support and confirm its efficacy and safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility, clinical efficacy, and safety of hemostatic powder spray (Hemospray, Cook Medical, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA) as a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding. In this review article, we performed an extensive literature search summarizing case reports and case series of Hemospray for the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. Indications, features, technique, deployment, success rate, complications, and limitations are discussed. The combined technical and clinical success rate of Hemospray was 88.5% (207/234) among the human subjects and 81.8% (9/11) among the porcine models studied. Rebleeding occurred within 72 hours post-treatment in 38 patients (38/234; 16.2%) and in three porcine

  8. The Clinical Outcomes of Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding Are Not Better than Those of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is increasing; however, predictors of outcomes for patients with LGIB are not as well defined as those for patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). The aim of this study was to identify the clinical outcomes and the predictors of poor outcomes for patients with LGIB, compared to outcomes for patients with UGIB. We identified patients with LGIB or UGIB who underwent endoscopic procedures between July 2006 and February 2013. Propensity score matching was used to improve comparability between LGIB and UGIB groups. The clinical outcomes and predictors of 30-day rebleeding and mortality rate were analyzed between the two groups. In total, 601 patients with UGIB (n = 500) or LGIB (n = 101) were included in the study, and 202 patients with UGIB and 101 patients with LGIB were analyzed after 2:1 propensity score matching. The 30-day rebleeding and mortality rates were 9.9% and 4.5% for the UGIB group, and 16.8% and 5.0% for LGIB group, respectively. After logistic regression analysis, the Rockall score (P = 0.013) and C-reactive protein (CRP; P = 0.047) levels were significant predictors of 30-day mortality in patients with LGIB; however, we could not identify any predictors of rebleeding in patients with LGIB. The clinical outcomes for patients with LGIB are not better than clinical outcomes for patients with UGIB. The clinical Rockall score and serum CRP levels may be used to predict 30-day mortality in patients with LGIB. PMID:27550490

  9. Gallbladder bleeding-related severe gastrointestinal bleeding and shock in a case with end-stage renal disease: A case report.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jun-Li; Tsai, Shang-Feng

    2016-06-01

    Gallbladder (GB) bleeding is very rare and it is caused by cystic artery aneurysm and rupture, or GB wall rupture. For GB rupture, the typical findings are positive Murphy's sign and jaundice. GB bleeding mostly presented as hemobilia. This is the first case presented with severe GI bleeding because of GB rupture-related GB bleeding. After comparing computed tomography, one gallstone spillage was noticed. In addition to gallstones, uremic coagulopathy also worsens the bleeding condition. This is also the first case that patients with GB spillage-related rupture and bleeding were successfully treated by nonsurgical management. Clinicians should bear in mind the rare causes of GI bleeding. Embolization of the bleeding artery should be attempted as soon as possible.

  10. Antiplatelet Drugs: Mechanisms and Risks of Bleeding Following Cardiac Operations

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, Victor A.; Ferraris, Suellen P.; Saha, Sibu P.

    2011-01-01

    Preoperative antiplatelet drug use is common in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The impact of these drugs on bleeding and blood transfusion varies. We hypothesize that review of available evidence regarding drug-related bleeding risk, underlying mechanisms of platelet dysfunction, and variations in patient response to antiplatelet drugs will aid surgeons as they assess preoperative risk and attempt to limit perioperative bleeding. The purpose of this review is to (1) examine the role that antiplatelet drugs play in excessive postoperative blood transfusion, (2) identify possible mechanisms to explain patient response to antiplatelet drugs, and (3) formulate a strategy to limit excessive blood product usage in these patients. We reviewed available published evidence regarding bleeding risk in patients taking preoperative antiplatelet drugs. In addition, we summarized our previous research into mechanisms of antiplatelet drug-related platelet dysfunction. Aspirin users have a slight but significant increase in blood product usage after CABG (0.5 U of nonautologous blood per treated patient). Platelet adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor inhibitors are more potent antiplatelet drugs than aspirin but have a half-life similar to aspirin, around 5 to 10 days. The American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons guidelines recommend discontinuation, if possible, of ADP inhibitors 5 to 7 days before operation because of excessive bleeding risk, whereas aspirin should be continued during the entire perioperative period in most patients. Individual variability in response to aspirin and other antiplatelet drugs is common with both hyper- and hyporesponsiveness seen in 5 to 25% of patients. Use of preoperative antiplatelet drugs is a risk factor for increased perioperative bleeding and blood transfusion. Point-of-care tests can identify patients at high risk for perioperative bleeding and blood

  11. Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Serum Pepsinogen I Concentration in Peptic Ulcer Patients: Effect of Bacterial Eradication

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sill Moo; Park, Joongwon; Chang, Sae Kyung; Yoo, Byung Chul; Kim, Ho Jung

    1996-01-01

    Objectives: In order to test the hypothesis that H. pylori infections in the gastric antrum increase pepsinogen I release, fasting serum pepsinogen I concentrations were compared in peptic ulcer patients with and without H. pylori infection. A randomized prospective study was performed to determine whether the increased serum pepsinogen I concentrations associated with H. pylori infection respond to treatment that eradicates H. pylori. Methods: Fasting serum pepsinogen I concentrations were measured by RIA in 736 patients with endoscopically and histologically confirmed benign peptic ulcer with and without H. pylori infection. Out of 511 patients with H. pylori infection, 110 patients (group 1) were randomly selected and were treated with metronidazole and tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate combined with ranitidine and antacid, and 97 patients (group 2) were treated only with ranitidine and antacid. The third group, 54 patients free of H. pylori infection, was designed to evaluate the influence of H2-receptor antagonist and antacid on the change of pepsinogen I. Fasting pepsinogen I concentration and H. pylori status were compared before and after the treatment. Results: Patients infected by H. pylori (gastric ulcer 208, duodenal ulcer 303; total 511) had significantly higher fasting serum pepsinogen I concentrations than H. pylori negative patients (gastric ulcer 110, duodenal ulcer 115: total 225). Mean pepsinogen I level of the former was 124.3±46.9 and that of the latter was 77.9±25.8 ng/ml. (p<0.0001) The difference in serum pepsinogen I concentrations according to the location of ulcer crater was significant only in non-infected subjects e.g., mean pepsinogen I level H. pylori-negative gastric ulcer was significantly lower than that of H. pylori-negative duodenal ulcer patients. H. pylori was eradicated in all the patients who had received antibacterial therapy for 4 weeks and serum pepsinogen I concentrations were significantly decreased from 129.8+43.0 to

  12. Risk of bleeding after dentoalveolar surgery in patients taking anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Broekema, Ferdinand I; van Minnen, Baucke; Jansma, Johan; Bos, Rudolf R M

    2014-03-01

    To avoid increasing the risk of thromboembolic events, it is recommended that treatment with anticoagulants should be continued during dentoalveolar operations. We have evaluated the incidence of bleeding after dentoalveolar operations in a prospective study of 206 patients, 103 who were, and 103 who were not, taking anticoagulants. Seventy-one were taking thrombocyte aggregation inhibitors and 32 vitamin K antagonists. Patients were treated according to guidelines developed at the Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), The Netherlands. The operations studied included surgical extraction (when the surgeon had to incise the gingiva before extraction), non-surgical extraction, apicectomy, and placement of implants. Patients were given standard postoperative care and those taking vitamin K antagonists used tranexamic acid mouthwash postoperatively. No patient developed a severe bleed that required intervention. Seven patients (7%) taking anticoagulants developed mild postoperative bleeds. Patients taking vitamin K antagonists reported 3 episodes (9%) compared with 4 (6%) in the group taking thrombocyte aggregation inhibitors. Among patients not taking anticoagulants, two (2%) developed mild bleeding. The differences between the groups were not significant. All bleeding was controlled by the patients themselves with compression with gauze. We conclude that dentoalveolar surgery is safe in patients being treated with anticoagulants provided that the conditions described in the ACTA guidelines are met.

  13. Prediction and Reduction of Noise in Pneumatic Bleed Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghavi Nezhad, Shervin

    This study investigates numerically the fluid mechanics and acoustics of pneumatic bleed valves used in turbofan engines. The goal is to characterized the fundamental processes of noise generation and devise strategies for noise reduction. Three different methods are employed for both analysis and redesign of the bleed valve to reduce noise. The bleed valve noise problem is carefully divided into multiple smaller problems. For large separations and tonal noises, the unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) method is utilized. This method is also applied in the re-designing of the bleed valve geometry. For the bleed valve muffler, which is comprised of perforated plates and a honeycomb, a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) method combined with a simplified acoustic analogy is used. The original muffler design is modified to improve noise attenuation. Finally, for sound scattering through perforated plates, a fully implicit linearized Euler solver is developed. The problem of sound interaction with perforated plates is studied from two perspectives. In the first study the effect of high--speed mean flow is considered and it is shown that at Strouhal numbers of around 0.2-0.25 there is an increase in transmitted incident sound. In the second part, the interaction of holes in two--dimensional perforated plates is investigated using three different configurations. The study demonstrates that the hole interaction has a significant impact on sound attenuation, especially at high frequencies.

  14. Ameboma: an unusual cause of gastrointestinal bleeding during severe leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe leptospirosis occurs mainly in a tropical environment and includes icterus, acute renal failure and hemorrhages. These bleedings, which are mainly a consequence of acute homeostatic disturbances, can also reveal simultaneous diseases. Coinfections with other tropical diseases have been previously reported during leptospirosis. To our knowledge, invasive amebiasis, which can induce gastrointestinal bleedings, has never been described in the course of severe leptospirosis. Case presentation In this report, we describe a case of a 60 year-old man living in Reunion Island (Indian Ocean, France) admitted to our intensive care unit for severe Leptospira interrogans serovar icterohaemorrhagiae infection with neurological, renal, liver and hematological involvement. Two lower gastrointestinal bleedings occurred 7 and 15 days after admission. The first episode was promoted by hemostatic disturbances while the second bleeding occurred during low-dose heparin therapy. Colonoscopy revealed a pseudo-tumoral inflammatory mass of the recto-sigmoid junction. Histological examination found trophozoites inside mucinous exudate suggestive of Entamoeba histolytica. Amoebic serology was strongly positive whereas careful detection of cysts or trophozoites on saline-wet mount was negative in three consecutive samples of stools. Amoxicillin followed by metronidazole therapy, combined with supportive care, led to an improvement in the clinical and biological patient’s condition and endoscopic appearances. Conclusion Clinicians should be aware that gastrointestinal bleeding during severe leptospirosis could not solely be the consequences of hemostatic disturbances. Careful endoscopic evaluation that may reveal curable coinfections should also be considered. PMID:24894109

  15. [Blood transfusion and adjunctive therapy in the bleeding trauma patient].

    PubMed

    Ozier, Y

    2008-11-01

    Uncontrolled hemorrhage is the most common cause of potentially preventable death in massive trauma. In addition to the early identification of potential bleeding sources and angiographic embolisation or surgical bleeding control, in-hospital management will aim at maintain tissue oxygenation with volume replacement using crystalloids, colloids and RBC. In general, RBC transfusion is recommended to maintain hemoglobin between 7-10g/dL. The complex combination of clotting factors and platelets consumption, loss and dilution, shock, hypothermia, acidosis and colloid-induced hemostatic alterations leads to coagulopathic bleeding. Most guidelines recommend the use of FFP in significant bleeding complicated by coagulopathy (PT, aPTT >1.5 times control). Platelets should be administered to maintain a platelet count above 50 x 10(9)/L (100 x 10(9)/L in patients with traumatic brain injury). However, standard laboratory tests have poor correlation with in vivo coagulopathy and the test results are not rapidly available. Empiric guidelines derived from mathematical hemodilution models developed in elective surgery settings may not be appropriate for trauma settings where significant bleeding may have already occurred. Moreover, coagulopathy is frequently present on admission in severely injured patients. Recent litterature suggests that FFP and platelets should be given early and more often to injured patients requiring massive transfusion. The place of adjunctive hemostatic therapy is discussed.

  16. Management of bleeding following major trauma: an updated European guideline

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Evidence-based recommendations are needed to guide the acute management of the bleeding trauma patient, which when implemented may improve patient outcomes. Methods The multidisciplinary Task Force for Advanced Bleeding Care in Trauma was formed in 2005 with the aim of developing a guideline for the management of bleeding following severe injury. This document presents an updated version of the guideline published by the group in 2007. Recommendations were formulated using a nominal group process, the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) hierarchy of evidence and based on a systematic review of published literature. Results Key changes encompassed in this version of the guideline include new recommendations on coagulation support and monitoring and the appropriate use of local haemostatic measures, tourniquets, calcium and desmopressin in the bleeding trauma patient. The remaining recommendations have been reevaluated and graded based on literature published since the last edition of the guideline. Consideration was also given to changes in clinical practice that have taken place during this time period as a result of both new evidence and changes in the general availability of relevant agents and technologies. Conclusions This guideline provides an evidence-based multidisciplinary approach to the management of critically injured bleeding trauma patients. PMID:20370902

  17. Effective treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding with thalidomide - Chances and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Bauditz, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    For more than 50 years bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias has been treated by hormonal therapy with estrogens and progesterons. After a randomized study finally demonstrated that hormones have no effect on bleeding events and transfusion requirements, therapy has switched to endoscopic coagulation. However, angiodysplasias tend to recur over months to years and endoscopy often has to be repeated for long time periods. Thalidomide, which caused severe deformities in newborn children in the 1960s, is now increasingly used after it was shown to suppress tumor necrosis factor alpha, inhibit angiogenesis and to be also effective for treatment of multiple myeloma. In 2011 thalidomide was proven to be highly effective for treatment of bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias in a randomized study. Further evidence by uncontrolled studies exists that thalidomide is also useful for treatment of bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. In spite of this data, endoscopic therapy remains the treatment of choice in many hospitals, as thalidomide is still notorious for its teratogenicity. However, patients with gastrointestinal bleeding related to angiodysplasias are generally at an age in which women have no child-bearing potential. Teratogenicity is therefore no issue for these elderly patients. Other side-effects of thalidomide like neurotoxicity may limit treatment options but can be monitored safely. PMID:27003992

  18. Endoscopic band ligation for bleeding lesions in the small bowel

    PubMed Central

    Ikeya, Takashi; Ishii, Naoki; Shimamura, Yuto; Nakano, Kaoru; Ego, Mai; Nakamura, Kenji; Takagi, Koichi; Fukuda, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the safety and efficacy of endoscopic band ligation (EBL) for bleeding lesions in the small bowel. METHODS: This is a retrospective study evaluating EBL in six consecutive patients (three males, three females, 46-86 years of age) treated between May 2009 and February 2014: duodenal vascular ectasia; 1, jejunal bleeding diverticulum; 1, ileal Dieulafoy’s lesion; 1 and ileal bleeding diverticula; 3. The success of the initial hemostasis was evaluated, and patients were observed for early rebleeding (within 30 d after EBL), and complications such as perforation and abscess formation. Follow-up endoscopies were performed in four patients. RESULTS: Initial hemostasis was successfully achieved with EBL in all six patients. Eversion was not sufficient in four diverticular lesions. Early rebleeding occurred three days after EBL in one ileal diverticulum, and a repeat endoscopy revealed dislodgement of the O-band and ulcer formation at the banded site. This rebleeding was managed conservatively. Late rebleeding occurred in this case (13 and 21 mo after initial EBL), and re-EBL was performed. Follow-up endoscopies revealed scar formation and the disappearance of vascular lesions at the banded site in the case with a duodenal bleeding lesion, and unresolved ileal diverticula in three cases. Surgery or transarterial embolization was not required without any complications during the median follow-up period of 45 (range, 2-83) mo. CONCLUSION: EBL is a safe and effective endoscopic treatment for hemostasis of bleeding lesions in the small bowel. PMID:25324920

  19. Aero-Effected Flight Control Using Distributed Active Bleed

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-30

    CL, while inducing a nose- up pitching moment CM as it nears the trailing edge. When the vortex is advected into the wake, it leaves a separated...transfer to the cross flow either mechanically (e.g. flaps , Liu, Tsao, Tai, and Ho, 1994), fluidically (control jets, Glezer and Amitay, 2002), by induced ...integrated into a small, thin-membrane flapping wing and achieved considerable improvement in its aerodynamic performance. The present

  20. The Development of Diabetes after Subtotal Gastrectomy with Billroth II Anastomosis for Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Hua; Hsu, Che-Ming; Lin, Cheng-Li

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A duodenal bypass after a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass operation for obesity can ameliorate the development of diabetes mellitus (DM). We attempted to determine the subsequent risk of developing DM after subtotal gastrectomy with Billroth II anastomosis (SGBIIA) for peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Methods We identified 662 patients undergoing SGBIIA for PUD between 2000 and 2011 from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database as the study cohort, and we randomly selected 2647 controls from the peptic ulcer population not undergoing SGBIIA and were frequency-matched by age, sex, and index year for the control cohort. All patient cases in both cohorts were followed until the end of 2011 to measure the incidence of DM. We analyzed DM risk by using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results The patients who underwent SGBIIA demonstrated a lower cumulative incidence of DM compared with the control cohort (log-rank test, P < .001 and 6.73 vs 12.6 per 1000 person-y). The difference in the DM risk between patients with and without SGBIIA increased gradually with the follow-up duration. Age and sex did not affect the subsequent risk of developing DM, according to the multivariable Cox regression model. Nevertheless, the SGBIIA cohort exhibited a lower DM risk after we adjusted for the comorbidities of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and coronary artery disease (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR): 0.56, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.40–0.78). The incidence rate ratio (IRR) of DM in the SGBIIA cohort was lower than that in the control cohort for all age groups (age ≤ 49 y, IRR: 0.40, 95% CI: 0.16–0.99; age 50–64 y, IRR: 0.54, 95% CI: 0.31–0.96; age ≧ 65 y, IRR: 0.57, 95% CI: 0.36–0.91). Moreover, the IRR of DM was significantly lower in the SGBIIA cohort with comorbidities (IRR: 0.50, 95% CI: 0.31–0.78) compared with those without a comorbidity (IRR: 0.65, 95% CI: 0.40–1.04). Conclusion The findings of this population-based cohort study revealed that

  1. Bleeding in patients using new anticoagulants or antiplatelet agents: risk factors and management.

    PubMed

    Levi, M M; Eerenberg, E; Löwenberg, E; Kamphuisen, P W

    2010-02-01

    The most important adverse effect of antithrombotic treatment is the occurrence of bleeding. In case of serious or even life-threatening bleeding in a patient who uses anticoagulant agents or when patient on anticoagulants needs to undergo an urgent invasive procedure, anticoagulant treatment can be reversed by various specific strategies. Heparin and heparin derivatives can be counteracted by protamine sulphate, whereas the anticoagulant effect of vitamin K antagonists may be neutralised by administration of vitamin K or prothrombin complex concentrates. The antihaemostatic effect of aspirin and other antiplatelet strategies can be corrected by the administration of platelet concentrate and/or desmopressin, if needed. Recently, a new generation of anticoagulants with a greater specificity towards activated coagulation factors has been introduced and most of these agents are currently being evaluated in clinical studies, showing promising results. The new-generation anticoagulants include specific inhibitors of factor IIa or factor Xa (including pentasaccharides) and antiplatelet agents belonging to the class of thienopyridine derivatives. A limitation of the new class of anti-IIa and anti-Xa agents may be the lack of an appropriate strategy to reverse the effect if a bleeding event occurs, although in some cases the administration of recombinant factor VIIa may be an option.

  2. Bleeding risk and reversal strategies for old and new anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents.

    PubMed

    Levi, M; Eerenberg, E; Kamphuisen, P W

    2011-09-01

    The most important adverse effect of antithrombotic treatment is the occurrence of bleeding. In the case of severe bleeding in a patient who uses anticoagulant agents or when a patient on anticoagulants needs to undergo an urgent invasive procedure, it may be useful to reverse anticoagulant treatment. Conventional anticoagulants such as vitamin K antagonists may be neutralized by administration of vitamin K or prothrombin complex concentrates, whereas heparin and heparin derivatives can be counteracted by protamine sulphate. The anti-hemostatic effect of aspirin and other antiplatelet strategies can be corrected by the administration of platelet concentrate and/or desmopressin, if needed. Recently, a new generation of anticoagulants with a greater specificity towards activated coagulation factors as well as new antiplatelet agents have been introduced and these drugs show promising results in clinical studies. A limitation of these new agents may be the lack of an appropriate strategy to reverse the effect if a bleeding event occurs, although experimental studies show hopeful results for some of these agents.

  3. Gastrointestinal bleeding in patients on novel oral anticoagulants: Risk, prevention and management

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Ka-Shing; Leung, Wai K

    2017-01-01

    Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs), which include direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran) and direct factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban), are gaining popularity in the prevention of embolic stroke in non-valvular atrial fibrillation as well as in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism. However, similar to traditional anticoagulants, NOACs have the side effects of bleeding, including gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB). Results from both randomized clinical trials and observations studies suggest that high-dose dabigatran (150 mg b.i.d), rivaroxaban and high-dose edoxaban (60 mg daily) are associated with a higher risk of GIB compared with warfarin. Other risk factors of NOAC-related GIB include concomitant use of ulcerogenic agents, older age, renal impairment, Helicobacter pylori infection and a past history of GIB. Prevention of NOAC-related GIB includes proper patient selection, using a lower dose of certain NOACs and in patients with renal impairment, correction of modifiable risk factors, and prescription of gastroprotective agents. Overt GIB can be managed by withholding NOACs followed by delayed endoscopic treatment. In severe bleeding, additional measures include administration of activated charcoal, use of specific reversal agents such as idarucizumab for dabigatran and andexanent alfa for factor Xa inhibitors, and urgent endoscopic management. PMID:28373761

  4. Super-Selective Mesenteric Embolization Provides Effective Control of Lower GI Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Pham, Toan; Tran, Bob Anh; Ooi, Kevin; Mykytowycz, Marcus; McLaughlin, Stephen; Croxford, Matthew; Skinner, Iain; Faragher, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and super-selective mesenteric artery embolization (SMAE) in managing lower GI bleeding (LGIB). Method. A retrospective case series of patients with LGIB treated with SMAE in our health service. Patients with confirmed active LGIB, on either radionuclide scintigraphy (RS) or contrast-enhanced multidetector CT angiography (CE-MDCT), were referred for DSA +/- SMAE. Data collected included patient characteristics, screening modality, bleeding territory, embolization technique, technical and clinical success, short-term to medium-term complications, 30-day mortality, and progression to surgery related to procedural failure or complications. Results. There were fifty-five hospital admissions with acute unstable lower gastrointestinal bleeding which were demonstrable on CE-MDCT or RS over a 31-month period. Eighteen patients proceed to embolization, with immediate success in all. Eight patients (44%) had clinical rebleeding after intervention, warranting repeated imaging. Only one case (5.6%) demonstrated radiological rebleeding and was reembolized. Complication rate was excellent: no bowel ischaemia, ischaemic stricture, progression to surgery, or 30-day mortality. Conclusion. SMAE is a viable, safe, and effective first-line management for localised LGIB. Our results overall compare favourably with the published experiences of other institutions. It is now accepted practice at our institution to manage localised LGIB with embolization.

  5. Super-Selective Mesenteric Embolization Provides Effective Control of Lower GI Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Bob Anh; Ooi, Kevin; Mykytowycz, Marcus; McLaughlin, Stephen; Croxford, Matthew; Skinner, Iain; Faragher, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and super-selective mesenteric artery embolization (SMAE) in managing lower GI bleeding (LGIB). Method. A retrospective case series of patients with LGIB treated with SMAE in our health service. Patients with confirmed active LGIB, on either radionuclide scintigraphy (RS) or contrast-enhanced multidetector CT angiography (CE-MDCT), were referred for DSA +/− SMAE. Data collected included patient characteristics, screening modality, bleeding territory, embolization technique, technical and clinical success, short-term to medium-term complications, 30-day mortality, and progression to surgery related to procedural failure or complications. Results. There were fifty-five hospital admissions with acute unstable lower gastrointestinal bleeding which were demonstrable on CE-MDCT or RS over a 31-month period. Eighteen patients proceed to embolization, with immediate success in all. Eight patients (44%) had clinical rebleeding after intervention, warranting repeated imaging. Only one case (5.6%) demonstrated radiological rebleeding and was reembolized. Complication rate was excellent: no bowel ischaemia, ischaemic stricture, progression to surgery, or 30-day mortality. Conclusion. SMAE is a viable, safe, and effective first-line management for localised LGIB. Our results overall compare favourably with the published experiences of other institutions. It is now accepted practice at our institution to manage localised LGIB with embolization. PMID:28210507

  6. Characteristics and interactions of Helicobacter pylori and H. pylori-infected human gastroduodenal epithelium in peptic ulcer: a transmission electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hongyuan; Li, Qian; Liu, Xiaolian; Li, Yingchao

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been presumed to be an initiating factor in a previously recognized chain of events, starting with active chronic gastritis and leading to atrophy of the mucosal membrane, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia (intraepithelial neoplasia), and finally culminating in gastric carcinoma. Adherence of H. pylori to the gastroduodenal epithelium is believed to be an important step in the induction of active chronic inflammation of the mucosal layer. However, it is not clear how the pathogen chronically colonizes the gastroduodenal epithelium. In this study, 30 biopsy specimens from H. pylori-positive peptic ulcer (15 for gastric ulcer, 15 for duodenal ulcer) patients were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to observe the structural adherence of H. pylori to gastroduodenal epithelium while ten healthy postulants were served as controls. We also investigated the interaction between H. pylori and gastroduodenal epithelial cells. Morphological appearances of both the pathogen and the cells as well as features of colonization, attachment, and internalization were observed. H. pylori exhibited both spiral and coccoid forms. Cytoplasmic vacuolar degeneration played by the vacuolating toxin (VacA) was apparent in gastroduodenal epithelial cells. Specially, a number of tumor cells were found in H. pylori-positive gastric intestinal metaplasia (IM) mucosa under TEM which provided an ultrastructural evidence of IM carrying a particularly high risk for the development of gastric cancer.

  7. The need to clot: a review of current management strategies for adverse bleeding events with new oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Whalley, D; Skappak, C; Lang, E S

    2014-07-01

    The new factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors have offered alternatives to traditional anticoagulants, with benefits of no routine monitoring, less drug interactions, and oral administration. Current approved uses of these agents include prophylaxis of stroke in non-valvular atrial fibrillation and prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) following hip and knee arthroplasty. However, concern over bleeding risk in the context of having no specific antidotes available is a topic of focus for many physicians in an acute care setting. This manuscript examines the recent literature in the management of acute bleeding and the various methods of reversing anticoagulation in this setting. Literature published over the last 18 months (2011/07/01-present) was gathered from PubMed, Ovid, and Medline under a combined search strategy covering bleeding, reversal, and new oral anticoagulants, both factor Xa and direct thrombin inhibitors. The use of prothrombin complex concentrate, fresh frozen plasma, activated recombinant factor VII, activated prothrombin complex concentrate, as well as adjuncts of charcoal, hemodialysis, and antifibrinolytics are discussed. Recommendations are based on the determination of the severity of the bleed and physiological markers of anticoagulation, and involve the use of prothrombin complex concentrate, activated recombinant factor VII, and adjunctive therapy as appropriate.

  8. The experience of girls and young women with inherited bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Khair, K; Holland, M; Pollard, D

    2013-09-01

    Haemophilia carriers and women with inherited bleeding disorders (IBD) experience menorrhagia, bleed following dentistry, surgery, injury or childbirth. Symptoms are easily treated leading to full and active lives. Nevertheless, some girls and women suffer with abnormal bleeding for many years before diagnosis. We explored the experiences of girls and young women (aged 9-34 years) with IBD by means of focus groups which consisted of moderated discussion addressing specific aspects of bleeding, management and coping strategies. Subsequently, these issues were explored further though a paper-based questionnaire distributed via five specialist haemophilia centres in the UK. The study suggested that young women with IBD who are managed at haemophilia centres receive appropriate care and feel well supported. Although the clinic-based literature available to these women is "fit for purpose", it does not fully address the perceived needs specifically regarding sex, menorrhagia, conception and childbirth, the Pill, tattoos/piercings and so on, leading many to turn to other information sources. Most of those who responded to our survey are confident in their lives, able to manage their IBD and take pragmatic views towards the inherited nature of their condition. But there is a substantial subgroup of women who experience stigmatization, isolation and bullying and express concerns relating to fertility and conception. Overall, this cohort would benefit from opportunities for mutual support. This could be via Internet-based social networking and may be of particular value to those who are unable to seek help from traditional medical services due to religious or other cultural barriers.

  9. [In vitro effects of hemocoagulase atrix and its effective components on blood coagulation of patients with bleeding disorders].

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Juan; Wang, Zhao-Yue; Jiang, Ming-Hua; Zhang, Wei; Cao, Li-Juan; Sun, Xiong-Hua; Zhang, Jian; Bai, Xia; Ruan, Chang-Geng

    2012-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the pro coagulation effects of hemocoagulase atrix and its effective components (batroxobin and factor X activator) on plasma of normal subjects and patients with bleeding disorders and their mechanisms. Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and prothrombin time (PT) were measured. The factor (F)X activation and thrombin generation were analyzed by using chromogenic substrate method. The results showed that the plasma APTT of normal subjects was shortened by hemocoagulase atrix, batroxobin and FX activator, and the effect of FX activator was found to be concentration-dependent (r = 0.889, P < 0.05). The prolonged APTT of plasma from patients with bleeding disorders could be corrected by hemocoagulase atrix, batroxobin and FX activator, but PT showed no great changes resulted from the treatments. FX activator could promote FX activation and thrombin generation, while neither hemocoagulase atrix nor batroxobin showed such abilities. It is concluded that hemocoagulase atrix promotes coagulation process, and corrects coagulation abnormalities in patients with bleeding disorders, its main component batroxobin directly acts on fibrinogen, and FX activator promotes thrombin generation through activating FX.

  10. Reduced bleed air extraction for DC-10 cabin air conditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, W. H.; Viele, M. R.; Hrach, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    It is noted that a significant fuel savings can be achieved by reducing bleed air used for cabin air conditioning. Air in the cabin can be recirculated to maintain comfortable ventilation rates but the quality of the air tends to decrease due to entrainment of smoke and odors. Attention is given to a development system designed and fabricated under the NASA Engine Component Improvement Program to define the recirculation limit for the DC-10. It is shown that with the system, a wide range of bleed air reductions and recirculation rates is possible. A goal of 0.8% fuel savings has been achieved which results from a 50% reduction in bleed extraction from the engine.

  11. Recurrent Epistaxis and Bleeding as the Initial Manifestation of Brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Kamali Aghdam, Mojtaba; Davari, Kambiz; Eftekhari, Kambiz

    2016-03-01

    Severe thrombocytopenia with bleeding is rarely reported in children with brucellosis, and recurrent epistaxis is extremely rare. Brucellosis with hemorrhage should be differentiated from viral hemorrhagic fever, malignancy, and other blood disorders. Bone marrow aspiration (BMA) is mandatory to differentiate from other blood diseases. An 8-year-old boy was admitted with recurrent epistaxis, petechiae and purpura on face and extremities and bleeding from the gums. During the hospitalization, he was febrile and complained of muscle pain. Leukopenias associated with thrombocytopenia were observed. BMA showed to be normal. Among the multiple tests requested, only serum agglutination test (SAT) and 2-MercaptoEthanol test (2-ME) were positive. He was treated with Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) associated with co-trimoxazole and rifampin. Finally, fever subsided, and he was discharged with good condition and normal platelet count. Brucellosis should be a differential diagnosis in patients with fever and bleeding disorders and a history of consumption of unpasteurized dairy, in endemic areas.

  12. Bedside Bleeding Control, Review Paper and Proposed Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Simman, Richard; Reynolds, David; Saad, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Bleeding is a common occurrence in practice, but occasionally it may be challenging issue to overcome. It can come from numerous sources such as, trauma, during or post-surgical intervention, disorders of platelet and coagulation factors and increased fibrinolysis, wounds and cancers. This paper was inspired from our experience with a patient admitted to a local long term acute care facility with a large fungating right breast cancerous wound. During her hospital stay spontaneous bleeding from her breast cancerous mass was encountered and became more frequent and significant over the period of her stay. Different hemostatic technologies were used to control her bleeding. We felt that it was important to share our experience with our colleagues to help with potential similar situation that they may face. PMID:24527382

  13. Dosimetric Analysis of Radiation-Induced Gastric Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Mary; Normolle, Daniel; Pan, Charlie C.; Dawson, Laura A.; Amarnath, Sudha; Ensminger, William D.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced gastric bleeding has been poorly understood. In this study, we describe dosimetric predictors for gastric bleeding after fractionated radiotherapy and compare several predictive models. Materials & Methods The records of 139 sequential patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for intrahepatic malignancies between January 1999 and April 2002 were reviewed. Median follow-up was 7.4 months. Logistic regression and Lyman normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for the occurrence of ≥ grade 3 gastric bleed were fit to the data. The principle of maximum likelihood was used to estimate parameters for all models. Results Sixteen of 116 evaluable patients (14%) developed gastric bleeds, at a median time of 4.0 months (mean 6.5 months, range 2.1–28.3 months) following completion of RT. The median and mean of the maximum doses to the stomach were 61 and 63 Gy (range 46 Gy–86 Gy), respectively, after bio-correction to equivalent 2 Gy daily fractions. The Lyman NTCP model with parameters adjusted for cirrhosis was most predictive of gastric bleed (AUROC=0.92). Best fit Lyman NTCP model parameters were n =0.10, and m =0.21, with TD50(normal) =56 Gy and TD50(cirrhosis) = 22 Gy. The low n value is consistent with the importance of maximum dose; a lower TD50 value for the cirrhosis patients points out their greater sensitivity. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the Lyman NTCP model has utility for predicting gastric bleeding, and that the presence of cirrhosis greatly increases this risk. These findings should facilitate the design of future clinical trials involving high-dose upper abdominal radiation. PMID:22541965

  14. Dosimetric Analysis of Radiation-induced Gastric Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Mary; Normolle, Daniel; Pan, Charlie C.; Dawson, Laura A.; Amarnath, Sudha; Ensminger, William D.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced gastric bleeding has been poorly understood. In this study, we described dosimetric predictors for gastric bleeding after fractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The records of 139 sequential patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for intrahepatic malignancies were reviewed. Median follow-up was 7.4 months. The parameters of a Lyman normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for the occurrence of {>=}grade 3 gastric bleed, adjusted for cirrhosis, were fitted to the data. The principle of maximum likelihood was used to estimate parameters for NTCP models. Results: Sixteen of 116 evaluable patients (14%) developed gastric bleeds at a median time of 4.0 months (mean, 6.5 months; range, 2.1-28.3 months) following completion of RT. The median and mean maximum doses to the stomach were 61 and 63 Gy (range, 46-86 Gy), respectively, after biocorrection of each part of the 3D dose distributions to equivalent 2-Gy daily fractions. The Lyman NTCP model with parameters adjusted for cirrhosis predicted gastric bleed. Best-fit Lyman NTCP model parameters were n=0.10 and m=0.21 and with TD{sub 50} (normal) = 56 Gy and TD{sub 50} (cirrhosis) = 22 Gy. The low n value is consistent with the importance of maximum dose; a lower TD{sub 50} value for the cirrhosis patients points out their greater sensitivity. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the Lyman NTCP model has utility for predicting gastric bleeding and that the presence of cirrhosis greatly increases this risk. These findings should facilitate the design of future clinical trials involving high-dose upper abdominal radiation.

  15. Management of adult Jehovah's Witness patients with acute bleeding.

    PubMed

    Berend, Kenrick; Levi, Marcel

    2009-12-01

    Because of the firm refusal of transfusion of blood and blood components by Jehovah's Witnesses, the management of Jehovah's Witness patients with severe bleeding is often complicated by medical, ethical, and legal concerns. Because of a rapidly growing and worldwide membership, physicians working in hospitals should be prepared to manage these patients. Appropriate management of a Jehovah's Witness patient with severe bleeding entails understanding of the legal and ethical issues involved, and meticulous medical management, including treatment of hypovolemic shock, local hemostatic interventions, and administration of prohemostatic agents, when appropriate. In addition, high-dose recombinant erythropoietin in combination with supplemental iron may enhance the speed of hemoglobin synthesis.

  16. hypertensive intracranial bleed due to mid aortic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Poovazhagi, Varadarajan; Pauline, Leema; Balakrishnan, N

    2014-03-01

    The authors describe an 11-y-old child with intracranial bleed due to malignant hypertension. Child presented with hypertension, right hemiparesis, feeble femoral pulses and lower limb blood pressure less than the upper limb. CT angiogram revealed narrowing of the abdominal aorta with thinned out left renal artery and hypoplasia of the left kidney. A diagnosis of Mid aortic syndrome was arrived at. CT brain revealed left ganglio capsular bleed. Child was treated with antihypertensives and steriods in view of suspected Takayasu arteritis. Child recovered with minimal hemiparesis and is being followed up.

  17. Life-threatening bleeding from gastric mucosal angiokeratomas during anticoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eungu; Kim, Yoon-Myung; Kim, Dae-Hee; Yoo, Han-Wook; Lee, Beom Hee

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Angiokeratomas are the earliest manifestation of Fabry disease (FD), and the extent of their appearance is related to disease severity. Angiokeratomas are mostly found on cutaneous regions. Patient concerns, diagnoses, interventions, and outcomes: Here we report an FD patient with widespread gastrointestinal angiokeratomas who developed life-threatening bleeding following anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation. Lessons: Careful observation for gastrointestinal bleeding is warranted for patients on anticoagulation with extensive cutaneous angiokeratomas. Furthermore, our experience suggests that surveillance is needed to assess the prevalence and extent of gastrointestinal angiokeratomas in patients with FD. PMID:28178158

  18. [Management of bleeding and coagulopathy following major trauma].

    PubMed

    Etxaniz, A; Pita, E

    2016-05-01

    Bleeding is the most common preventable cause of death in trauma patients. Acute traumatic coagulopathy is a specific condition with a different pathophysiology from other causes of the massive bleeding. An early identification of the coagulopathy is fundamental to implementing rapid treatment. There have been many changes in the management of massive hemorrhage, for example, the administration of the tranexamic acid and the use of balanced transfusion ratio. This review presents these practical points, some of them with scientific evidence, in order to achieve a beneficial effect for patient outcomes.

  19. Metastatic Testicular Choriocarcinoma: A Rare Cause of Upper GI Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Jacqueline; Armstrong, Sharon; Walsh, Shaun; Groome, Max; Mowat, Craig

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in an otherwise healthy 18-year-old man who presented with melena. Endoscopy revealed an ulcerated mass in the stomach and pathology confirmed this to be a malignant, poorly differentiated choriocarcinoma. Further imaging showed a left testicular mass with evidence of pulmonary, gastric, and brain metastases, and blood tests revealed an hCG level of 32,219 U/L. He was diagnosed with advanced metastatic testicular choriocarcinoma and underwent intensive induction chemotherapy and an orchidectomy. Metastatic testicular choriocarcinoma is a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26504875

  20. An unreported complication of intravenously administered ibuprofen: gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sarici, S U; Dabak, O; Erdinc, K; Okutan, V; Lenk, M K

    2012-03-01

    Ibuprofen is used for the closure of ductus arteriosus either intravenously or enterally. Although intraventricular hemorrhage, necrotizing enterocolitis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, transient renal failure, oliguria, hyponatremia and thrombocytopenia are reported complications during or after ibuprofen treatment, gastrointestinal bleeding, to our knowledge, has not been reported previously. We herein report a premature newborn, in whom ibuprofen was used intravenously for the closure of ductus arteriosus and gastrointestinal bleeding developed as a complication, and aim to discuss this rare adverse effect. In conclusion, we emphasize the importance of close follow-up of premature newborns during intravenous ibuprofen treatment considering also the other rare systemic side effects reported in the literature.

  1. Increased Subsequent Risk of Peptic Ulcer Diseases in Patients With Bipolar Disorders.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yi-Chao; Hsu, Chih-Chao; Chang, Kuang-Hsi; Lee, Chang-Yin; Chong, Lee-Won; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have reported that patients with bipolar disorders (BDs) exhibit increased physical comorbidity and psychological distress. Studies have shown that schizophrenia and anxiety increase the risk of peptic ulcer diseases (PUDs). Therefore, we conducted this study to determine the association between these 2 diseases and examine the possible risk factors. We used patients diagnosed with BDs from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A comparison cohort comprising patients without BDs was frequency matched by age, sex, and comorbidities, and the occurrence of PUDs was evaluated in both the cohorts. The BD and non-BD cohort consisted of 21,060 patients with BDs and 84,240 frequency-matched patients without BDs, respectively. The incidence of PUDs (hazard ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.43-1.59; P < 0.001) was higher among the patients with BDs than the control patients. Cox models showed that irrespective of comorbidities, BDs were an independent risk factor for PUDs. Patients with BDs exhibit a substantially higher risk for developing PUDs. According to our data, we suggest that, following a diagnosis of BD, practitioners could notice the occurrence of PUD and associated prevention. Further prospective clinical studies investigating the relationship between BDs and PUDs are warranted.

  2. Fermented Foods: Are They Tasty Medicines for Helicobacter pylori Associated Peptic Ulcer and Gastric Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Mydhily R. B.; Chouhan, Deepak; Sen Gupta, Sourav; Chattopadhyay, Santanu

    2016-01-01

    More than a million people die every year due to gastric cancer and peptic ulcer. Helicobacter pylori infection in stomach is the most important reason for these diseases. Interestingly, only 10–20% of the H. pylori infected individuals suffer from these gastric diseases and rest of the infected individuals remain asymptomatic. The genotypes of H. pylori, host genetic background, lifestyle including smoking and diet may determine clinical outcomes. People from different geographical regions have different food habits, which also include several unique fermented products of plant and animal origins. When consumed raw, the fermented foods bring in fresh inocula of microbes to gastrointestinal tract and several strains of these microbes, like Lactobacillus and Saccharomyces are known probiotics. In vitro and in vivo experiments as well as clinical trials suggest that several probiotics have anti-H. pylori effects. Here we discuss the possibility of using natural probiotics present in traditional fermented food and beverages to obtain protection against H. pylori induced gastric diseases. PMID:27504109

  3. Helicobacter pylori eradication as prevention against chronic peptic ulcer disease in children.

    PubMed

    Maciorkowska, E; Kaczmarski, M; Skowrońska, J; Cieśla, J M; Chrzanowska, U; Olejnik, B T; Sacharewicz, A; Ryszczuk, E

    2005-01-01

    The changes caused by Helicobacter pylori are a slow, progressing inflammatory process developing from several to dozen years. H. pylori infection leads to an inflammatory response in the gastric mucosa with granulocyte infiltrates in an acute form of the inflammation, and lymphocytes, plasmatic, macrophages and eosinophils in a chronic form inducing the development of gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer in some patients. The frequency and the type of morphological changes in the gastric mucosa were analyzed in children with positive IgG against H. pylori and the incidence of gastric and duodenal ulcers in family members of children examined was evaluated in our study. Gastritis was reported in 68.8% of children with positive IgG against H. pylori. Gastric ulcer was confirmed in 37.1% of families of children included in the study. Duodenal ulcers were found in 22.9% of families. The results obtained, indicate the usefulness of long-term observation and clinical follow-up of children with chronic gastritis of H. pylori ethiology taking into consideration bacterium eradication as prophylaxis of peptic ulceration.

  4. Risk factors and therapeutic response in Chinese patients with peptic ulcer disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shou-Wu; Chang, Chi-Sen; Lee, Teng-Yu; Yeh, Hong-Zen; Tung, Chun-Fang; Peng, Yen-Chun

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To assess the risk factors and the efficacy of medications of patients with gastric and duodenal ulcers among Chinese patients in Taiwan. METHODS: Patients with peptic ulcers, diagnosed by upper endoscopy, were retrospectively collected between January 2008 and December 2008. The differences were compared. RESULTS: Among all 448 cases, 254 (56.6%) and 194 (43.4%) patients had gastric ulcers and duodenal ulcers respectively. Patients with gastric ulcers were younger than those with duodenal ulcers. Although more men existed, there was a female predominance in middle-aged cases. Patients with duodenal ulcers had a higher rate of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection (62.4% vs 43.3%, P = 0.001), and those with gastric ulcers owned a significantly higher amount of aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use (7.5% vs 1.5%, 6.7% vs 2.1%, P = 0.001). Tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking had no different impact between these two groups. Proton-pump inhibitors and H2-receptor antagonists (H2RA) were effective, but significantly less so in cases with duodenal ulcers receiving H2RAs, or in those with H. pylori infection and a history of NSAID use. CONCLUSION: Patients with gastric ulcers had lower H. pylori infection but more aspirin or NSAID use. Antisecretory therapy was ineffective in gastric ulcers underwent H2RA treatment, and cases combined H. pylori infection and NSAID use. PMID:20419840

  5. Fermented Foods: Are They Tasty Medicines for Helicobacter pylori Associated Peptic Ulcer and Gastric Cancer?

    PubMed

    Nair, Mydhily R B; Chouhan, Deepak; Sen Gupta, Sourav; Chattopadhyay, Santanu

    2016-01-01

    More than a million people die every year due to gastric cancer and peptic ulcer. Helicobacter pylori infection in stomach is the most important reason for these diseases. Interestingly, only 10-20% of the H. pylori infected individuals suffer from these gastric diseases and rest of the infected individuals remain asymptomatic. The genotypes of H. pylori, host genetic background, lifestyle including smoking and diet may determine clinical outcomes. People from different geographical regions have different food habits, which also include several unique fermented products of plant and animal origins. When consumed raw, the fermented foods bring in fresh inocula of microbes to gastrointestinal tract and several strains of these microbes, like Lactobacillus and Saccharomyces are known probiotics. In vitro and in vivo experiments as well as clinical trials suggest that several probiotics have anti-H. pylori effects. Here we discuss the possibility of using natural probiotics present in traditional fermented food and beverages to obtain protection against H. pylori induced gastric diseases.

  6. Long-Term Recurrence Rates of Peptic Ulcers without Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jae Hyun; Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Kim, Byung-Wook; Jee, Sam Ryong; Chung, Woo Chul; Shim, Ki-Nam; Baik, Gwang Ho; Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Sang Gyun; Kim, Jin Il

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The purpose of this study is to investigate the recurrence rate of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) over a long follow-up period with PUD patients without Helicobacter pylori. Methods We retrospectively reviewed patients diagnosed with PUD on endoscopy and divided them into two groups: a H. pylori-negative group (HP-negative group), and a group of patients with untreated H. pylori (HP noneradicated group). We compared the recurrence rates of PUD in these two groups and analyzed the factors that affected ulcer recurrence. Results Total of nine hospitals in Korea participated, and a total of 1,761 patients were retrospectively reviewed. The HP-negative group included 553 patients, and the HP noneradicated group included 372 patients. The 5-year cumulative probabilities of PUD recurrence were 36.4% in the HP-negative group and 43.8% in the HP noneradicated group (p=0.113). The factors that were found to affect recurrence in the HP-negative group were elder, male, and comorbid chronic kidney disease. Conclusions The 5-year cumulative probability of PUD recurrence without H. pylori infection after a long-term follow-up was 36.4% and the factors that affected recurrence were elder, male, and comorbid chronic kidney disease. PMID:27114412

  7. Combined use of omeprazole and a novel antioxidative cytoprotectant for the treatment of peptic ulcer. Facilitation of ulcer healing in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju Mi; Choi, Seul Min; Kim, Dong Hwan; Oh, Tae Young; Ahn, Byoung Ok; Kwon, Jong Won; Kim, Won Bae

    2005-01-01

    Peptic ulcer and gastroesophageal reflux are common acid-peptic related diseases. The pathophysiology of peptic ulcer disease has been centered on an imbalance between aggressive and defensive factors. This study was conducted to examine whether the combined use of omeprazole (CAS 73590-58-6), a proton pump inhibitor, and DA-9601, a novel anti-ulcer formulation of the extract of Artemisia asiatica Nakai, has synergistic effects on various peptic ulcers and gastroesophageal reflux diseases in animal models. An optimal combination ratio of omeprazole and DA-9601 was investigated in an acetic acid-induced ulcer model. In the results, oral pretreatment with omeprazole and DA-9601 (combination ratio, 1:3) significantly reduced alcohol-, indometacin-, acetic acid-, and cysteamine-induced gastrointestinal lesions in a synergistical manner in rats. The combination treatment also significantly attenuated the gross and histopathological lesions in an experimental reflux esophagitis model as compared to the single treatment of omeprazole or DA-9601. In an alcohol-induced gastritis model, the combined treatment resulted in a significant decrease in lipid peroxidation with concomitant increases in glutathione content and prostaglandin E2 level, which was proportional to the inhibitory effect of the combination therapy. These results suggest that the combined therapy with omeprazole and DA-9601, a cytoprotectant, can be beneficial for the treatment of peptic ulcer and reflux esophagitis.

  8. A Review on Antiulcer Activity of Few Indian Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Vimala, G.; Gricilda Shoba, F.

    2014-01-01

    Ulcer is a common gastrointestinal disorder which is seen among many people. It is basically an inflamed break in the skin or the mucus membrane lining the alimentary tract. Ulceration occurs when there is a disturbance of the normal equilibrium caused by either enhanced aggression or diminished mucosal resistance. It may be due to the regular usage of drugs, irregular food habits, stress, and so forth. Peptic ulcers are a broad term that includes ulcers of digestive tract in the stomach or the duodenum. The formation of peptic ulcers depends on the presence of acid and peptic activity in gastric juice plus a breakdown in mucosal defenses. A number of synthetic drugs are available to treat ulcers. But these drugs are expensive and are likely to produce more side effects when compared to herbal medicines. The literature revealed that many medicinal plants and polyherbal formulations are used for the treatment of ulcer by various ayurvedic doctors and traditional medicinal practitioners. The ideal aims of treatment of peptic ulcer disease are to relieve pain, heal the ulcer, and delay ulcer recurrence. In this review attempts have been made to know about some medicinal plants which may be used in ayurvedic as well as modern science for the treatment or prevention of peptic ulcer. PMID:24971094

  9. Stomach specific polymeric low density microballoons as a vector for extended delivery of rabeprazole and amoxicillin for treatment of peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Sandeep; Jain, Ashay; Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd; Mishra, Vijay; Agrawal, Govind P; Kesharwani, Prashant

    2016-05-01

    The study was intended to develop a new intra-gastric floating in situ microballoons system for controlled delivery of rabeprazole sodium and amoxicillin trihydrate for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease. Eudragit S-100 and hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose based low density microballoons systems were fabricated by employing varying concentrations of Eudragit S-100 and hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose, to which varying concentrations of drug was added, and formulated by stirring at various speed and time to optimize the process and formulation variable. The formulation variables like concentration and ratio of polymers significantly affected the in vitro drug release from the prepared floating device. The validation of the gastro-retentive potential of the prepared microballoons was carried out in rabbits by orally administration of microballoons formulation containing radio opaque material. The developed formulations showed improved buoyancy and lower ulcer index as compared to that seen with plain drugs. Ulcer protective efficacies were confirmed in ulcer-bearing mouse model. In conclusion, greater compatibility, higher gastro-retention and higher anti-ulcer activity of the presently fabricated formulations to improve potential of formulation for redefining ulcer treatment are presented here. These learning exposed a targeted and sustained drug delivery potential of prepared microballoons in gastric region for ulcer therapeutic intervention as corroborated by in vitro and in vivo findings and, thus, deserves further attention for improved ulcer treatment.

  10. Gedunin and photogedunin of Xylocarpus granatum show significant anti-secretory effects and protect the gastric mucosa of peptic ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, V; Singh, N; Shrivastva, S; Mishra, S K; Dharmani, P; Mishra, V; Palit, G

    2010-07-01

    In the present study, the gastroprotective mechanism of Xylocarpus granatum fruit and its active constituents gedunin and photogedunin was investigated. Chloroform fraction (Fr-CHCl(3)) of X. granatum fruit was evaluated against cold restraint (CRU), aspirin (AS), alcohol (AL) and pyloric ligation (PL) induced gastric ulcer models in rats and histamine (HA) induced duodenal ulcer model in guinea pigs. Potential anti-ulcer activity of Fr-CHCl(3) was observed against CRU (58.28%), AS (67.81%), AL (84.38%), PL (65.66%) and HA (61.93%) induced ulcer models. The standard drug omeprazole (10mg/kg, p.o.) showed 68.25% protection against CRU, 57.08% against AS and 69.42% against PL model and 70.79% against HA induced duodenal ulcer. Sucralfate, another standard drug (500 mg/kg, p.o.) showed 62.72% protection in AL induced ulcer model. Fr-CHCl(3) significantly reduced free acidity (51.42%), total acidity (30.76%) and upregulated mucin secretion by 58.37% respectively. Phytochemical investigations of Fr-CHCl(3) yielded gedunin (36%), photogedunin (2%). Further, Fr-CHCl(3) and its compounds gedunin and photogedunin significantly inhibited H(+) K(+)-ATPase activity in vitro with IC(50) of 89.37, 56.86 and 66.54 microg/ml respectively as compared to the IC(50) value of omeprazole (30.24 microg/ml) confirming their anti-secretory activity. Conclusively, Fr-CHCl(3) of Xylocarpus granatum was found to possess anti-ulcerogenic activity which might be due to its anti-secretory activity and subsequent strengthening of the defensive mechanism. This study is the first of its kind to show significant anti-secretory effect of gedunin and photogedunin. Therefore it could act as a potent therapeutic agent against peptic ulcer disease.

  11. Control of shock-wave boundary-layer interactions by bleed in supersonic mixed compression inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukuda, M. K.; Reshotko, E.; Hingst, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine the effect of bleed region geometry and bleed rate on shock wave-boundary layer interactions in an axisymmetric, mixed-compression inlet at a Mach number of 2.5. The full realizable reduction in transformed form factor is obtained by bleeding off about half the incident boundary layer mass flow. Bleeding upstream or downstream of the shock-induced pressure rise is preferable to bleeding across the shock-induced pressure rise. Slanted holes are more effective than normal holes. Two different bleed hole sizes were tested without detectable difference in performance.

  12. Successful Treatment of Small Intestinal Bleeding in a Crohn's Patient with Noncirrhotic Portal Hypertension by Transjugular Portosystemic Shunt Placement and Infliximab Treatment.

    PubMed

    Heimgartner, Benjamin; Dawson, Heather; De Gottardi, Andrea; Wiest, Reiner; Niess, Jan Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Small intestinal bleeding in Crohn's disease patients with noncirrhotic portal hypertension and partial portal and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis is a life-threatening event. Here, a case is reported in which treatment with azathioprine may have resulted in nodular regenerative hyperplasia, portal hypertension and portal vein thrombosis. The 56-year-old patient with Crohn's disease developed nodular regenerative hyperplasia under treatment with azathioprine. He was admitted with severe bleeding. Gastroscopy showed small esophageal varices without bleeding stigmata. Blood was detected in the terminal ileum. CT scan revealed a partial portal vein thrombosis with extension to the superior mesenteric vein, thickening of the jejunal wall and splenomegaly. Because intestinal bleeding could not be controlled by conservative treatment, the thrombus was aspirated and a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) was placed. Switching the immunosuppressive medication to infliximab controlled Crohn's disease activity. Bleeding was stopped, hemoglobin normalized, and thrombocytopenia and bowel movements improved. In summary, small intestinal bleeding in a Crohn's patient with nodular regenerative hyperplasia, portal hypertension and portal vein thrombosis can be efficiently treated by TIPS. TIPS placement together with infliximab treatment led to the improvement of the blood panel and remission in this patient.

  13. Two cases of vaginal bleeding in pet rats

    PubMed Central

    Sadar, Miranda J.; Parker, Dennilyn L.; Burgess, Hilary; Wojnarowicz, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Two unrelated rats were presented to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine emergency service for vaginal bleeding. Each was taken to surgery due to marked blood loss and suspicion of uterine pathology. Despite similar clinical presentation, gross and histopathologic examination revealed 2 different underlying disease processes, uterine dilatation with mild endometritis and vaginal polyp. PMID:22210942

  14. Bleeding Duodenal: Varices Treatment by TIPS and Transcatheter Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Lopera, Jorge E. Arthurs, Blain; Scheuerman, Christian; Sandoz, Charles; Petersosn, Scott; Castaneda-Zuniga, Wildriodo

    2008-03-15

    We describe our clinical experience in 4 patients with portal hypertension who presented with bleeding mesenteric varices originating from the superior mesenteric vein with retrograde filling of collaterals draining into the inferior vena cava. The clinical presentation, imaging findings, and potential therapeutic management are discussed.

  15. The Effect of Ferric Chloride on Superficial Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Saeed; Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Sahba, Sare

    2015-01-01

    Background: Controlling superficial bleeding, despite all the progress in surgical science, is still a challenge in some settings. Objectives: This study assesses the hemostatic effects of ferric chloride and compares it with the standard method (suturing technique) to control superficial bleeding. Materials and Methods: In this animal model study, 60 male Wistar rats were used. An incision, 2 cm long and 0.5 cm deep was made on rat skin and the hemostasis time was recorded using ferric chloride at different concentrations (5%, 10%, 15%, 25%, and 50%) and then using a control (i.e. control of bleeding by suturing). The skin tissue was examined for pathological changes. Finally, the obtained data were entered into SPSS (ver. 16) and analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test, Mann-Whitney, Kolmogorov-Smirnov, and Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Results: The hemostasis time for the ferric chloride concentration group was significantly less than for the control group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Ferric chloride may be an effective hemostatic agent to control superficial bleeding in rats. PMID:25825694

  16. Management of anticoagulation in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Radaelli, Franco; Dentali, Francesco; Repici, Alessandro; Amato, Arnaldo; Paggi, Silvia; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Dumonceau, Jean Marc

    2015-08-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding represents the most common adverse event associated with the use of oral anticoagulant therapy. Due to increasing prescription of anticoagulants worldwide, gastroenterologists are more and more called to deal with bleeding patients taking these medications. Their management is challenging because several issues have to be taken into account, such as the severity of bleeding, the intensity of anticoagulation, the patient's thrombotic risk and endoscopy findings. The recent introduction into the marketplace of new direct oral anticoagulants, for whom specific reversal agents are still lacking, further contributes to make the decision-making process even more demanding. Available evidence on this topic is limited and practice guidelines by gastroenterology societies only marginally address key issues for clinicians, including when and how to reverse coagulopathy, the optimal timing of endoscopy and when and how to resume anticoagulation thereafter. The present paper reviews the evidence in the literature and provides practical algorithms to support clinicians in the management of patients on anticoagulants who present with acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

  17. Inherited bleeding disorders: a 14-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Eid, Suhair S; Kamal, Nazmi R; Shubeilat, Taisir S; Wael, Abu-Ghoush Mohammed

    2008-01-01

    Congenital bleeding disorders comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases that reflect abnormalities of blood vessels, coagulation proteins, and platelets. A 14-year retrospective study (1991-2005) was conducted for patients referred to the coagulation section of the Hematology Department (King Hussein Medical Center, Amman, Jordan), who had suffered from bleeding tendencies to assess the prevalence of bleeding disorders among Jordanians and to describe their clinical manifestations. Four hundred and three patients matched our criteria. All patients were screened with routine coagulation assays and a complete blood cell count; a factor assay was performed if indicated by the results of the screening assays. A total of 168 patients (41.6%) were diagnosed with a bleeding disorder caused by a factor deficiency, of which 17.1% were described as hemophilia A (n=69), 6.2% were described as vWD (n=25), and 4.2% were described as hemophilia B (n=17). A subset of the total patient population comprising 14.1% of the patients were diagnosed with a Rare Inherited Coagulation Deficiency (RICD), where 4.0% were FX deficient (n=16), 3.7% were FVII deficient (n=15), 3.7% were FV deficient (n=15), 2.5% were FXI deficient (n=10), and 0.2% were diagnosed with afibrinogenemia (n=1).

  18. Hemoperitoneum secondary to intercostal arterial bleeding in a trauma patient

    PubMed Central

    Laeeq, K.; Cheung, S.; Phillips, B.

    2017-01-01

    Blunt trauma resulting in rib fractures can be associated with hemothorax, pneumothorax, pulmonary contusions or less frequently chest and abdominal wall hematomas. Our case describes the first report of hemoperitoneum secondary to intercostal arterial bleeding from blunt trauma in a patient on anticoagulation. PMID:28108633

  19. Nasal packing in sphenopalatine artery bleeding: therapeutic or harmful?

    PubMed

    Sireci, F; Speciale, R; Sorrentino, R; Turri-Zanoni, M; Nicolotti, M; Canevari, F R

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study is to present our management protocol of sphenopalatine artery bleeding, demonstrating that nasoendoscopic cautery (NC) was a more effective method than the nasal packing, in terms of shorter inpatient stay and reduced complications rate. We present ten posterior epistaxis not resolved by nasal packing. Tabotamp(®) was placed in the area of sphenopalatine foramen and/or in those parts of the posterior nasal cavity, where it was suspected that bleeding origins. In two cases, the bleeding was resolved in this way, instead eight cases needed of subperiosteal cauterization of sphenopalatine artery by Dessi bipolar forceps (MicroFrance(®)). 4 of these 8 patients evidenced a remarkable bleeding removing nasal packing (Hb before-nasal packing = 15 ± 0.69 versus Hb after-nasal packing = 13.3 ± 0.81; t student = 2.94; p value = 0.025). These four patients showed a deviation of the nasal septum ipsilateral to epistaxis, and according our experience, a traumatism of sphenopalatine area can be caused by Merocel(®) nasal packing in this condition. During follow-up, no recurrences of nasal bleeding have been observed in such patients. Nasal packing must be considered if posterior epistaxis is severe, but always taking into account the specific anatomy of patient and in particular septal spurs that can further compromise sphenopalatine artery. In our experience, the endoscopic endonasal cauterization of the sphenopalatine branches represented a safe and effective procedure.

  20. Coagulation factor V(A2440G) causes east Texas bleeding disorder via TFPIα.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Lisa M; Tran, Sinh; Livaja, Ruzica; Bensend, Tracy A; Milewicz, Dianna M; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2013-09-01

    The autosomal dominantly inherited east Texas bleeding disorder is linked to an A2440G variant in exon 13 of the F5 gene. Affected individuals have normal levels of coagulation factor V (FV) activity, but demonstrate inhibition of global coagulation tests. We demonstrated that the A2440G mutation causes upregulation of an alternatively spliced F5 transcript that results in an in-frame deletion of 702 amino acids of the large activation fragment, the B domain. The approximately 250-kDa FV isoform (FV-short), which can be fully activated by thrombin, is present in all A2440G carriers' plasma (n = 16). FV-short inhibits coagulation through an indirect mechanism by forming a complex with tissue factor pathway inhibitor-α (TFPIα), resulting in an approximately 10-fold increase in plasma TFPIα, suggesting that the TFPIα:FV-short complexes are retained in circulation. The TFPIα:FV-short complexes efficiently inhibit thrombin generation of both intrinsic and extrinsic coagulation pathways. These data demonstrate that the east Texas bleeding disorder-associated F5(A2440G) leads to the formation of the TFPIα:FV-short complex, which inhibits activation and propagation of coagulation.