Science.gov

Sample records for actively cooled structures

  1. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles: Active cooling system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of fuselage cross section and structural arrangement on the performance of actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles are investigated. An active cooling system which maintains the aircraft's entire surface area at temperatures below 394 K at Mach 6 is developed along with a hydrogen fuel tankage thermal protection system. Thermodynamic characteristics of the actively cooled thermal protection systems established are summarized. Design heat loads and coolant flowrate requirements are defined for each major structural section and for the total system. Cooling system weights are summarized at the major component level. Conclusions and recommendations are included.

  2. C-SiC Composite Structures for Active Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, D. B.; Cox, B. N.; Berbon, M. Z.; Porter, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of research being conducted on the use of C-SiC composite structures for actively cooling rocket nozzles. Potential payoffs and design constraints are discussed. Other topics covered include: testing parameters, material selection, thermal analysis of joined tube structure, pressure containment, H2O2 combustion testing, and cooled re-entry.

  3. Structural active cooling applications for the Space Shuttle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masek, R. V.; Niblock, G. A.; Huneidi, F.

    1972-01-01

    Analytic and experimental studies have been conducted to evaluate a number of active cooling approaches to structural thermal protection for the Space Shuttle. The primary emphasis was directed toward the thermal protection system. Trade study results are presented for various heat shield material and TPS arrangements. Both metallic and reusable surface insulation (RSI) concepts were considered. Active systems heat sinks consisted of hydrogen, phase change materials, and expendable water. If consideration is given only to controlling the surface temperature, passive TPS was found to provide the most efficient system. Use of active cooling which incorporates some interior temperature control made the thermally less efficient RSI system more attractive.

  4. Actively cooled plate fin sandwich structural panels for hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. M.; Beuyukian, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    An unshielded actively cooled structural panel was designed for application to a hypersonic aircraft. The design was an all aluminum stringer-stiffened platefin sandwich structure which used a 60/40 mixture of ethylene glycol/water as the coolant. Eight small test specimens of the basic platefin sandwich concept and three fatigue specimens from critical areas of the panel design was fabricated and tested (at room temperature). A test panel representative of all features of the panel design was fabricated and tested to determine the combined thermal/mechanical performance and structural integrity of the system. The overall findings are that; (1) the stringer-stiffened platefin sandwich actively cooling concept results in a low mass design that is an excellent contender for application to a hypersonic vehicle, and (2) the fabrication processes are state of the art but new or modified facilities are required to support full scale panel fabrication.

  5. Flightweight radiantly and actively cooled panel: Thermal and structural performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shore, C. P.; Nowak, R. J.; Kelly, H. N.

    1982-01-01

    A 2- by 4-ft flightweight panel was subjected to thermal/structural tests representative of design flight conditions for a Mach 6.7 transport and to off-design conditions simulating flight maneuvers and cooling system failures. The panel utilized Rene 41 heat shields backed by a thin layer of insulation to radiate away most of the 12 Btu/ft2-sec incident heating. A solution of ethylene glycol in water circulating through tubes in an aluminum-honeycomb-sandwich panel absorbed the remainder of the incident heating (0.8 Btu/sq ft-sec). The panel successfully withstood (1) 46.7 hr of radiant heating which included 53 thermal cycles and 5000 cycles of uniaxial inplane loading of + or - 1200 lfb/in; (2) simulated 2g-maneuver heating conditions and simulated cooling system failures without excessive temperatures on the structural panel; and (3) the extensive thermal/structural tests and the aerothermal tests reported in NASA TP-1595 without significant damage to the structural panel, coolant leaks, or hot-gas ingress to the structural panel.

  6. High heat flux actively cooled honeycomb sandwich structural panel for a hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, L. C.; Pagel, L. L.

    1978-01-01

    The results of a program to design and fabricate an unshielded actively cooled structural panel for a hypersonic aircraft are presented. The design is an all-aluminum honeycomb sandwich with embedded cooling passages soldered to the inside of the outer moldline skin. The overall finding is that an actively cooled structure appears feasible for application on a hypersonic aircraft, but the fabrication process is complex and some material and manufacturing technology developments are required. Results from the program are summarized and supporting details are presented.

  7. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles: Structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of fuselage cross-section (circular and elliptical) and structural arrangement (integral and nonintegral tanks) on the performance of actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles was evaluated. It was found that integrally machined stiffening of the tank walls, while providing the most weight-efficient use of materials, results in higher production costs. Fatigue and fracture mechanics appeared to have little effect on the weight of the three study aircraft. The need for thermal strain relief through insulation is discussed. Aircraft size and magnitude of the internal pressure are seen to be significant factors in tank design.

  8. Design and fabrication of a skin stringer discrete tube actively cooled structural panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, F. M.

    1978-01-01

    The design optimization and practical implementation of actively cooled structural panel concepts was investigated. The desired actively cooled structural panel consisted of the cooled skin and a substructure. The primary load carrying components were fabricated from 2024-T3 aliminum alloy. The 3003-H14 coolant passage tubing was chosen because of its excellent corrosion resistance, workability needed to obtain the desired cross sectional shape, and strength. The Epon 951 adhesive was selected for its excellent structural properties and is the thinnest of available films, 0.064 mm. The Eccobond 58C silver filled epoxy was chosen because of its high thermal conductivity, and the alumina filled Epon 828 was chosen for structural and expansion characteristics.

  9. Evaluation of a large capacity heat pump concept for active cooling of hypersonic aircraft structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagel, L. L.; Herring, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Results of engineering analyses assessing the conceptual feasibility of a large capacity heat pump for enhancing active cooling of hypersonic aircraft structure are presented. A unique heat pump arrangement which permits cooling the structure of a Mach 6 transport to aluminum temperatures without the aid of thermal shielding is described. The selected concept is compatible with the use of conventional refrigerants, with Freon R-11 selected as the preferred refrigerant. Condenser temperatures were limited to levels compatible with the use of conventional refrigerants by incorporating a unique multipass condenser design, which extracts mechanical energy from the hydrogen fuel, prior to each subsequent pass through the condenser. Results show that it is technically feasible to use a large capacity heat pump in lieu of external shielding. Additional analyses are required to optimally apply this concept.

  10. Design and analysis of a plate-fin sandwich actively cooled structural panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    The skin structure of hydrogen fueled hypersonic transport vehicles traveling at Mach 6 and above must be designed to withstand, for relatively long periods of time, the aerodynamic heating effects which are far more severe than those encountered by the supersonic aircraft of today. The use of conventional aircraft materials such as aluminum in combination with forced convection active cooling to accommodate aerodynamic heating is addressed. The basic active cooling concept consists of a stringer stiffened plate-fin sandwich. The sandwich surface is subjected to the aerodynamic heat flux which is transferred, via convection, to a coolant that is forced through the sandwich under pressure. The coolant, in turn, circulates in a closed loop through a hydrogen heat exchanger and back through the skin panel.

  11. Ambient temperature fatigue tests of elements of an actively cooled honeycomb sandwich structural panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, E. L.; Elber, W.

    1977-01-01

    Elements of an actively cooled structural panel for a hypersonic aircraft have been investigated for fatigue characteristics. The study involved a bonded honeycomb sandwich panel with d-shaped coolant tubes. The curved portion of these tubes was embedded in the honeycomb, and the flat portion was bonded or soldered to the inner surface of the outer skin. The elements examined were two plain skin specimens (aluminum alloy); two specimens with skins attached to manifolds and tubes (one specimen was bonded, the other soldered); and a specimen representative of a corner section of the complete cooled sandwich. Sinusoidal loads were applied to all specimens. The honeycomb sandwich specimen was loaded in both tension and compression; the other specimens were loaded in tension only. The cooling tubes were pressurized with oil throughout the fatigue tests. The most significant results of these tests follow: All specimens exceeded their design life of 20,000 cycles without damage. Crack growth rates obtained in the plain skin specimens were used to determine the crack growth characteristics of aluminum alloy. Cracks in skins either bonded or soldered to cooling tubes propagated past the tubes without penetration. The coolant tubes served as crack arresters and temporarily stopped crack growth when a crack reached a tube-skin interface. The honeycomb core demonstrated that it could contain leakage from a tube.

  12. Design and fabrication of a radiative actively cooled honeycomb sandwich structural panel for a hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, D. A.; Pagel, L. L.; Schaeffer, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    The panel assembly consisted of an external thermal protection system (metallic heat shields and insulation blankets) and an aluminum honeycomb structure. The structure was cooled to temperature 442K (300 F) by circulating a 60/40 mass solution of ethylene glycol and water through dee shaped coolant tubes nested in the honeycomb and adhesively bonded to the outer skin. Rene'41 heat shields were designed to sustain 5000 cycles of a uniform pressure of + or - 6.89kPa (+ or - 1.0 psi) and aerodynamic heating conditions equivalent to 136 kW sq m (12 Btu sq ft sec) to a 422K (300 F) surface temperature. High temperature flexible insulation blankets were encased in stainless steel foil to protect them from moisture and other potential contaminates. The aluminum actively cooled honeycomb sandwich structural panel was designed to sustain 5000 cycles of cyclic in-plane loading of + or - 210 kN/m (+ or - 1200 lbf/in.) combined with a uniform panel pressure of + or - 6.89 kPa (?1.0 psi).

  13. Study of structural active cooling and heat sink systems for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This technology investigation was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of a number of thermal protection systems (TPS) concepts which are alternate candidates to the space shuttle baseline TPS. Four independent tasks were performed. Task 1 consisted of an in-depth evaluation of active structural cooling of the space shuttle orbiter. In Task 2, heat sink concepts for the booster were studied to identify and postulate solutions for design problems unique to heat sink TPS. Task 3 consisted of a feasibility demonstration test of a phase change material (PCM) incorporated into a reusable surface insulation (RSI) thermal protection system for the shuttle orbiter. In Task 4 the feasibility of heat pipes for stagnation region cooling was studied for the booster and the orbiter. Designs were developed for the orbiter leading edge and used in trade studies of leading edge concepts. At the time this program was initiated, a 2-stage fully reusable shuttle system was envisioned; therefore, the majority of the tasks were focused on the fully reusable system environments. Subsequently, a number of alternate shuttle system approaches, with potential for reduced shuttle system development funding requirements, were proposed. Where practicable, appropriate shifts in emphasis and task scoping were made to reflect these changes.

  14. Coronal Structures in Cool Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor); Dupree, Andrea K.

    2004-01-01

    Many papers have been published that further elucidate the structure of coronas in cool stars as determined from EUVE, HST, FUSE, Chandra, and XMM-Newton observations. In addition we are exploring the effects of coronas on the He I 1083081 transition that is observed in the infrared. Highlights of these are summarized below including publications during this reporting period and presentations. Ground-based magnetic Doppler imaging of cool stars suggests that active stars have active regions located at high latitudes on their surface. We have performed similar imaging in X-ray to locate the sites of enhanced activity using Chandra spectra. Chandra HETG observations of the bright eclipsing contact binary 44i Boo and Chandra LETG observations for the eclipsing binary VW Cep show X-ray line profiles that are Doppler-shifted by orbital motion. After careful analysis of the spectrum of each binary, a composite line-profile is constructed by adding the individual spectral lines. This high signal-to-noise ratio composite line-profile yields orbital velocities for these binaries that are accurate to 30 km/sec and allows their orbital motion to be studied at higher time resolutions. In conjunction with X-ray lightcurves, the phase-binned composite line-profiles constrain coronal structures to be small and located at high latitudes. These observations and techniques show the power of the Doppler Imaging Technique applied to X-ray line emission.

  15. New fine structure cooling rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    One of the dominant electron cooling processes in the ionosphere is caused by electron impact induced fine structure transitions among the ground state levels of atomic oxygen. This fine structure cooling rate is based on theoretical cross sections. Recent advances in the numerical cross section determinations to include polarization effects and more accurate representations of the atomic target result in new lower values. These cross sections are employed in this paper to derive a new fine structure cooling rate which is between 40% and 60% of the currently used rate. A new generalized formula is presented for the cooling rate (from which the fine structure cooling rate is derived), valid for arbitrary mass and temperature difference of the colliding particles and arbitrary inelastic energy difference.

  16. Cooled Ceramic Matrix Composite Propulsion Structures Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Dickens, Kevin W.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) Program has successfully demonstrated cooled ceramic matrix composite (CMC) technology in a scramjet engine test. This demonstration represented the world s largest cooled nonmetallic matrix composite panel fabricated for a scramjet engine and the first cooled nonmetallic composite to be tested in a scramjet facility. Lightweight, high-temperature, actively cooled structures have been identified as a key technology for enabling reliable and low-cost space access. Tradeoff studies have shown this to be the case for a variety of launch platforms, including rockets and hypersonic cruise vehicles. Actively cooled carbon and CMC structures may meet high-performance goals at significantly lower weight, while improving safety by operating with a higher margin between the design temperature and material upper-use temperature. Studies have shown that using actively cooled CMCs can reduce the weight of the cooled flow-path component from 4.5 to 1.6 lb/sq ft and the weight of the propulsion system s cooled surface area by more than 50 percent. This weight savings enables advanced concepts, increased payload, and increased range. The ability of the cooled CMC flow-path components to operate over 1000 F hotter than the state-of-the-art metallic concept adds system design flexibility to space-access vehicle concepts. Other potential system-level benefits include smaller fuel pumps, lower part count, lower cost, and increased operating margin.

  17. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles, summary. [aircraft design of aircraft fuel systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirrello, C. J.; Baker, A. H.; Stone, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed analytical study was made to investigate the effects of fuselage cross section (circular and elliptical) and the structural arrangement (integral and nonintegral tanks) on aircraft performance. The vehicle was a 200 passenger, liquid hydrogen fueled Mach 6 transport designed to meet a range goal of 9.26 Mn (5000 NM). A variety of trade studies were conducted in the area of configuration arrangement, structural design, and active cooling design in order to maximize the performance of each of three point design aircraft: (1) circular wing-body with nonintegral tanks, (2) circular wing-body with integral tanks and (3) elliptical blended wing-body with integral tanks. Aircraft range and weight were used as the basis for comparison. The resulting design and performance characteristics show that the blended body integral tank aircraft weights the least and has the greatest range capability, however, producibility and maintainability factors favor nonintegral tank concepts.

  18. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles: Aircraft design evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nobe, T.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of fuselage cross sections and structural members on the performance of hypersonic cruise aircraft are evaluated. Representative fuselage/tank area structure was analyzed for strength, stability, fatigue and fracture mechanics. Various thermodynamic and structural tradeoffs were conducted to refine the conceptual designs with the primary objective of minimizing weight and maximizing aircraft range.

  19. Cooled snubber structure for turbine blades

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Clinton A; Campbell, Christian X; Whalley, Andrew; Marra, John J

    2014-04-01

    A turbine blade assembly in a turbine engine. The turbine blade assembly includes a turbine blade and a first snubber structure. The turbine blade includes an internal cooling passage containing cooling air. The first snubber structure extends outwardly from a sidewall of the turbine blade and includes a hollow interior portion that receives cooling air from the internal cooling passage of the turbine blade.

  20. Flat structure cooled detector assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeb, Nathalie; Coutures, Bernard; Gerin, Nicolas; Reale, S.; Guille, B.

    1994-07-01

    Long wavelength IR detectors need to be cooled at cryogenic temperature to achieve high performances. This specific need makes it difficult to integrate the detector because of high cost of dewar and cooling device designed to fulfill severe vibration conditions. A new era for IR detection could begin with flat structures allowing intrinsic vibration resistance for detectors to be plugged on electronics board. Sofradir has carried out a study about feasibility of detector dewar assembly including a flat Joule-Thomson cooler with porous heat exchanger in cooperation with Air Liquide. The aim of this paper is to put forward the interest of such a product. The very good results achieved demonstrate a promising future for such flat structure detector assembly.

  1. Multiphysics Simulation of Active Hypersonic Lip Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, Matthew E.; Wang, Wen-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This article describes the application of the Multidisciplinary Analysis (MDA) solver, Spectrum, in analyzing a hydrogen-cooled hypersonic cowl leading-edge structure. Spectrum, a multiphysics simulation code based on the finite element method, addresses compressible and incompressible fluid flow, structural, and thermal modeling, as well as the interactions between these disciplines. Fluid-solid-thermal interactions in a hydrogen impingement-cooled leading edge are predicted using Spectrum. Two- and semi-three-dimensional models are considered for a leading edge impingement coolant, concept under either specified external heat flux or aerothermodynamic heating from a Mach 5 external flow interaction. The solution accuracy is demonstrated from mesh refinement analysis. With active cooling, the leading edge surface temperature is drastically reduced from 1807 K of the adiabatic condition to 418 K. The internal coolant temperature profile exhibits a sharp gradient near channel/solid interface. Results from two different cooling channel configurations are also presented to illustrate the different behavior of alternative active cooling schemes.

  2. Active cooling from the sixties to NASP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, H. Neale; Blosser, Max L.

    1992-01-01

    Vehicles, such as the X-15 or National Aero-Space Plane, traveling at hypersonic speeds through the earth's atmosphere experience aerodynamic heating. The heating can be severe enough that a thermal protection system is required to limit the temperature of the vehicle structure. Although several categories of thermal protection systems are mentioned briefly, the majority of this paper describes convectively cooled structures for large areas. Convective cooling is a method of limiting structural temperatures by circulating a coolant through the vehicle structure. Efforts to develop convectively cooled structures during the past 30 years--from early engine structures, which were intended to be tested on the X-15, to structural--are described. Many of the lessons learned from these research efforts are presented.

  3. Active cooling from the sixties to NASP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, H. Neale; Blosser, Max L.

    1994-01-01

    Vehicles, such as the X-15 or the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), traveling at hypersonic speeds through the earth's atmosphere experience aerodynamic heating. The heating can be severe enough that a thermal protection system is required to limit the temperature of the vehicle structure. Although several categories of thermal protection systems are mentioned briefly, the majority of the present paper describes convectively cooled structures for large areas. Convective cooling is a method of limiting structural temperatures by circulating a coolant through the vehicle structure. Efforts to develop convectively cooled structures during the past 30 years, from early engine structures which were intended to be tested on the X-15 to structural panels fabricated and tested under the NASP program, are described. Many of the lessons learned from these research efforts are presented.

  4. Review of convectively cooled structures for hypersonic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shore, Charles P.

    1986-01-01

    Resurgent interest in development of Aerospace Plane and Orient Express type vehicles promises to stretch structural technology for hypersonic flight vehicles to the uppermost limits. Significant portions of the structure may require active cooling of some type to survive hostile environments. Despite a lack of recent research activity for cooled structures, a significant body of unclassified knowledge exists concerning such structures. Contractual and in-house research conducted mainly by NASA's Langley Research Center during the 60's and 70's on vehicles very similar to the proposed Orient Express has provided a substantial data base for convectively cooled hypersonic flight structures. Specifically, results are presented for regeneratively cooled structural concepts which have a relatively high heat flux capability and use the hydrogen fuel directly as a coolant; and for structural concepts which use a secondary coolant loop to absorb incident heating and then transfer the absorbed heat to the liquid hydrogen fuel as it flows to the engines. Results are presented to indicate application regions in terms of heat flux capability for various concepts and benefits for each concept. Experience gained and costs are discussed in terms of heat flux capability for various concepts and benefits for each concept. Additionally, experience gained and cost involved with design, fabrication, and testing of full-scale convectively cooled structures are discussed.

  5. Convectively cooled electrical grid structure

    DOEpatents

    Paterson, J.A.; Koehler, G.W.

    1980-11-10

    Undesirable distortions of electrical grid conductors from thermal cycling are minimized and related problems such as unwanted thermionic emission and structural failure from overheating are avoided by providing for a flow of fluid coolant within each conductor. The conductors are secured at each end to separate flexible support elements which accommodate to individual longitudinal expansion and contraction of each conductor while resisting lateral displacements, the coolant flow preferably being directed into and out of each conductor through passages in the flexible support elements. The grid may have a modular or divided construction which facilitates manufacture and repairs.

  6. Convectively cooled electrical grid structure

    DOEpatents

    Paterson, James A.; Koehler, Gary W.

    1982-01-01

    Undesirable distortions of electrical grid conductors (12) from thermal cycling are minimized and related problems such as unwanted thermionic emission and structural failure from overheating are avoided by providing for a flow of fluid coolant within each conductor (12). The conductors (12) are secured at each end to separate flexible support elements (16) which accommodate to individual longitudinal expansion and contraction of each conductor (12) while resisting lateral displacements, the coolant flow preferably being directed into and out of each conductor through passages (48) in the flexible support elements (16). The grid (11) may have a modular or divided construction which facilitates manufacture and repairs.

  7. Chromospheric activity of cool giant stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiman-Cameron, T. Y.

    1986-01-01

    During the seventh year of IUE twenty-six spectra of seventeen cool giant stars ranging in spectral type from K3 thru M6 were obtained. Together with spectra of fifteen stars observed during the sixth year of IUE, these low-resolution spectra have been used to: (1) examine chromospheric activity in the program stars and late type giants in general, and (2) evaluate the extent to which nonradiative heating affects the upper levels of cool giant photospheres. The stars observed in this study all have well determined TiO band strengths, angular diameters (determined from lunar occulations), bolometric fluxes, and effective temperatures. Chromospheric activity can therefore be related to effective temperatures providing a clearer picture of activity among cool giant stars than previously available. The stars observed are listed.

  8. PCM Passive Cooling System Containing Active Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanding, David E.; Bass, David I.

    2005-01-01

    A multistage system has been proposed for cooling a circulating fluid that is subject to intermittent intense heating. The system would be both flexible and redundant in that it could operate in a basic passive mode, either sequentially or simultaneously with operation of a first, active cooling subsystem, and either sequentially or simultaneously with a second cooling subsystem that could be active, passive, or a combination of both. This flexibility and redundancy, in combination with the passive nature of at least one of the modes of operation, would make the system more reliable, relative to a conventional cooling system. The system would include a tube-in-shell heat exchanger, within which the space between the tubes would be filled with a phase-change material (PCM). The circulating hot fluid would flow along the tubes in the heat exchanger. In the basic passive mode of operation, heat would be conducted from the hot fluid into the PCM, wherein the heat would be stored temporarily by virtue of the phase change.

  9. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The balance between heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    We study the long-term evolution of an idealized cool-core galaxy cluster under the influence of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback using three-dimensional high-resolution (60 pc) adaptive mesh refinement simulations. The feedback is modeled with a pair of precessing jets whose power is calculated based on the accretion rate of the cold gas surrounding the supermassive black hole (SMBH). The intracluster medium first cools into clumps along the propagation direction of the jets. As the jet power increases, gas condensation occurs isotropically, forming spatially extended structures that resemble the observed Hα filaments in Perseus and many other cool-core clusters. Jet heating elevates the gas entropy, halting clump formation. The cold gas that is not accreted onto the SMBH settles into a rotating disk of ∼10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. The hot gas cools directly onto the disk while the SMBH accretes from its innermost region, powering the AGN that maintains a thermally balanced state for a few Gyr. The mass cooling rate averaged over 7 Gyr is ∼30 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, an order of magnitude lower than the classic cooling flow value. Medium resolution simulations produce similar results, while in low resolution runs, the cluster experiences cycles of gas condensation and AGN outbursts. Owing to its self-regulating mechanism, AGN feedback can successfully balance cooling with a wide range of model parameters. Our model also produces cold structures in early stages that are in good agreement with the observations. However, the long-lived massive cold disk is unrealistic, suggesting that additional physical processes are still needed.

  10. 40 CFR 401.14 - Cooling water intake structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cooling water intake structures. 401... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.14 Cooling water intake structures. The location, design, construction and capacity of cooling water intake structures of any point source for which a standard...

  11. 40 CFR 401.14 - Cooling water intake structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Cooling water intake structures. 401.14... AND STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.14 Cooling water intake structures. The location, design, construction and capacity of cooling water intake structures of any point source for which a standard...

  12. 40 CFR 401.14 - Cooling water intake structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Cooling water intake structures. 401.14... AND STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.14 Cooling water intake structures. The location, design, construction and capacity of cooling water intake structures of any point source for which a standard...

  13. 40 CFR 401.14 - Cooling water intake structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Cooling water intake structures. 401.14... AND STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.14 Cooling water intake structures. The location, design, construction and capacity of cooling water intake structures of any point source for which a standard...

  14. 40 CFR 401.14 - Cooling water intake structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Cooling water intake structures. 401.14... AND STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.14 Cooling water intake structures. The location, design, construction and capacity of cooling water intake structures of any point source for which a standard...

  15. Design and evaluation of active cooling systems for Mach 6 cruise vehicle wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconarty, W. A.; Anthony, F. M.

    1971-01-01

    Active cooling systems, which included transpiration, film, and convective cooling concepts, are examined. Coolants included hydrogen, helium, air, and water. Heat shields, radiation barriers, and thermal insulation are considered to reduce heat flow to the cooling systems. Wing sweep angles are varied from 0 deg to 75 deg and wing leading edge radii of 0.05 inch and 2.0 inches are examined. Structural temperatures are varied to allow comparison of aluminum alloy, titanium alloy, and superalloy structural materials. Cooled wing concepts are compared among themselves, and with the uncooled concept on the basis of structural weight, cooling system weight, and coolant weight.

  16. Diagnostics for the NBETF actively cooled beamdump

    SciTech Connect

    Theil, E.; Jacobson, V.

    1984-09-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility is currently testing multi-megawatt beams with pulse durations of up to 30 seconds. For this purpose, an actively cooled beam dump composed of heat-absorbing panels tht dissipate the beam energy via high speed water flow has been installed and tested. The panels are mounted in a complex assembly necessary to accommodate the variety of ion sources to be tested. The beam dump required new diagnostics of two kinds: beam diagnostics that provide graphic and quantitative information about the beam, as inferred from energy transferred to the water, and panel diagnostics that provide graphic and quantitative information about the beam dump itself. In this paper we describe our response to these requirements, including new algorithms for beam profiles, and we compare this work to our earlier results for inertial beam dumps. Principal differences are that the power densities on the water-cooled panels can be only indirectly inferred from measurements of the transferred beam energy, and that the acquisition and preparation of raw data is much more complex.

  17. Protection of cooled blades of complex internal structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glamiche, P.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of general protection of cooled blades of complex internal structure was solved by a method called SF technique which makes possible the protection of both external and internal surfaces, as well as those of the orifices of cooling air, whatever their diameter. The SF method is most often applied in the case of pack process, at controlled or high activity; it can be of use on previously uncoated parts, but also on pieces already coated by a thermochemical, chemical or PVD method. The respective thickness of external and internal coatings may be precisely predetermined, no parasitic particle being liable to remain inside the parts after application of the protecting treatment. Results obtained to date by application of this method are illustrated by the presentation and examination of a various selection of advanced turbo engines.

  18. Annual DOE Active Solar Heating and Cooling Contractors Review meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-09-01

    Ninety three project summaries dicussing the following aspects of active solar heating and cooling are presented: Rankine solar cooling systems; absorption solar cooling systems; desiccant solar cooling systems; solar heat pump systems; solar hot water systems; special projects (such as the National Solar Data Network, hybrid solar thermal/photovoltaic applications, and heat transfer and water migration in soils); administrative/management support; and solar collector, storage, controls, analysis, and materials technology.

  19. Two stage serial impingement cooling for isogrid structures

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Morrison, Jay A.

    2014-09-09

    A system for cooling a wall (24) of a component having an outer surface with raised ribs (12) defining a structural pocket (10), including: an inner wall (26) within the structural pocket and separating the wall outer surface within the pocket into a first region (28) outside of the inner wall and a second region (40) enclosed by the inner wall; a plate (14) disposed atop the raised ribs and enclosing the structural pocket, the plate having a plate impingement hole (16) to direct cooling air onto an impingement cooled area (38) of the first region; a cap having a skirt (50) in contact with the inner wall, the cap having a cap impingement hole (20) configured to direct the cooling air onto an impingement cooled area (44) of the second region, and; a film cooling hole (22) formed through the wall in the second region.

  20. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2016-04-26

    Cooling apparatuses are provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The cooling apparatus includes the cold plate and a controller. The cold plate couples to one or more electronic components to be cooled, and includes an adjustable physical configuration. The controller dynamically varies the adjustable physical configuration of the cold plate based on a monitored variable associated with the cold plate or the electronic component(s) being cooled by the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the electronic component(s), and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  1. Heat-activated cooling devices: A guidebook for general audiences

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltsee, G.

    1994-02-01

    Heat-activated cooling is refrigeration or air conditioning driven by heat instead of electricity. A mill or processing facility can us its waste fuel to air condition its offices or plant; using waste fuel in this way can save money. The four basic types of heat-activated cooling systems available today are absorption cycle, desiccant system, steam jet ejector, and steam turbine drive. Each is discussed, along with cool storage and biomass boilers. Steps in determining the feasibility of heat-activated cooling are discussed, as are biomass conversion, system cost and integration, permits, and contractor selection. Case studies are given.

  2. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  3. Passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure

    DOEpatents

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Wade, Gentry E.

    1989-01-01

    A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

  4. Natural circulating passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure

    DOEpatents

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Wade, Gentry E.

    1990-01-01

    A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

  5. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2015-07-28

    A method is provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The method includes: monitoring a variable associated with at least one of the coolant-cooled cold plate or one or more electronic components being cooled by the cold plate; and dynamically varying, based on the monitored variable, a physical configuration of the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the one or more electronic components, and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the coolant-cooled cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  6. Low-temperature solder for joining large cryogenic structures. [cooling cools for the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, J. D.; Sandefur, P. G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Three joining methods were considered for use in fabricating cooling coils for the National Transonic Facility. After analysis and preliminary testing, soldering was chosen as the cooling coil joining technique over mechanical force fit and brazing techniques. Charpy V-Notch tests, cyclic thermal tests (ambient to 77.8 K) and tensile tests at cryogenic temperatures were performed on solder joints to evaluate their structural integrity. It was determined that low temperature solder can be used to ensure good fin-to-tube contact for cooling-coil applications.

  7. Active feedback cooling of massive electromechanical quartz resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Jahng, Junghoon; Lee, Manhee; Stambaugh, Corey; Bak, Wan; Jhe, Wonho

    2011-08-15

    We present a general active feedback cooling scheme for massive electromechanical quartz resonators. We cool down two kinds of macrosized quartz tuning forks and find several characteristic constants for this massive quartz-resonator feedback cooling, in good agreement with theoretical calculations. When combined with conventional cryogenic techniques and low-noise devices, one may reach the quantum sensitivity for macroscopic sensors. This may be useful for high sensitivity measurements and for quantum information studies.

  8. Study of active cooling for supersonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The potential benefits of using the fuel heat sink of hydrogen fueled supersonic transports for cooling large portions of the aircraft wing and fuselage are examined. The heat transfer would be accomplished by using an intermediate fluid such as an ethylene glycol-water solution. Some of the advantages of the system are: (1) reduced costs by using aluminum in place of titanium, (2) reduced cabin heat loads, and (3) more favorable environmental conditions for the aircraft systems. A liquid hydrogen fueled, Mach 2.7 supersonic transport aircraft design was used for the reference uncooled vehicle. The cooled aircraft designs were analyzed to determine their heat sink capability, the extent and location of feasible cooled surfaces, and the coolant passage size and spacing.

  9. Impact of Temperature on Cooling Structural Variation of Forging Dies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piesova, Marianna; Czan, Andrej

    2014-12-01

    The article is focused on the issue of die forging in the automotive industry. The cooling effect of temperature on the structure of forged die are under review. In the article, there is elaborated the analysis of theoretical knowledge in the field, focusing on die forging and experimentally proven effect of the cooling rate on the final structure of forged dies made of hypoeutectic carbon steel C56E2.

  10. Modelling an actively-cooled CPV system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonomano, A.; Mittelman, G.; Faiman, D.; Biryukov, S.; Melnichak, V.; Bukobza, D.; Kabalo, S.

    2012-10-01

    We have constructed a 7-node, 1-dimensional model of the heat flow in a water-cooled CPV receiver. The model is validated against data from a module exposed to solar irradiance at various concentrations up to 1,000X at the PETAL solar dish facility at Sede Boqer.

  11. Modeling a Transient Pressurization with Active Cooling Sizing Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, Monica C.; Plachta, David W.; Elchert, Justin P.

    2011-01-01

    As interest in the area of in-space zero boil-off cryogenic propellant storage develops, the need to visualize and quantify cryogen behavior during ventless tank self-pressurization and subsequent cool-down with active thermal control has become apparent. During the course of a mission, such as the launch ascent phase, there are periods that power to the active cooling system will be unavailable. In addition, because it is not feasible to install vacuum jackets on large propellant tanks, as is typically done for in-space cryogenic applications for science payloads, instances like the launch ascent heating phase are important to study. Numerous efforts have been made to characterize cryogenic tank pressurization during ventless cryogen storage without active cooling, but few tools exist to model this behavior in a user-friendly environment for general use, and none exist that quantify the marginal active cooling system size needed for power down periods to manage tank pressure response once active cooling is resumed. This paper describes the Transient pressurization with Active Cooling Tool (TACT), which is based on a ventless three-lump homogeneous thermodynamic self-pressurization model1 coupled with an active cooling system estimator. TACT has been designed to estimate the pressurization of a heated but unvented cryogenic tank, assuming an unavailable power period followed by a given cryocooler heat removal rate. By receiving input data on the tank material and geometry, propellant initial conditions, and passive and transient heating rates, a pressurization and recovery profile can be found, which establishes the time needed to return to a designated pressure. This provides the ability to understand the effect that launch ascent and unpowered mission segments have on the size of an active cooling system. A sample of the trends found show that an active cooling system sized for twice the steady state heating rate would results in a reasonable time for tank

  12. Structural Assembly for Cold Plate Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaffetti, Mark A. (Inventor); Taddey, Edmund P. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A device including a structural member having a heat spreader and an electronic device mounted directly to a first surface of the heat spreader of the structural member. The device also includes a cold plate mounted directly to the first surface of the heat spreader of the structural member.

  13. Preliminary design activities for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Information on the development of solar heating and cooling systems is presented. The major emphasis is placed on program organization, system size definition, site identification, system approaches, heat pump and equipment design, collector procurement, and other preliminary design activities.

  14. Active cooling requirements for propellant storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    Recent NASA and DOD mission models have indicated future needs for orbital cryogenic storage and supply systems. Two thermal control systems which show the greatest promise for improving propellant storage life were evaluated. One system was an open cycle thermodynamic vent type with a refrigeration system for partial hydrogen reliquefaction located at the LH2 tank and a vapor cooled shield for integrated and non-integrated tank designs to reduce boiloff. The other was a closed system with direct refrigeration at the LH2 tank. A reversed Brayton cycle unit was baselined for the propellant processor. It is concluded that: (1) reliquefaction systems are not attractive for minimizing propellant boiloff; (2) open cycle systems may not be economically attractive for long term storage; (3) a number of refrigeration systems are available to assist in the long term storage of cryogenic propellants; and (4) shields can significantly improve the performance of mechanical coolers.

  15. The Influence of Molecular Cooling in Pregalactic Structure Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancil, P. C.; Abel, T.; Lepp, S.; Dalgarno, A.

    1999-12-01

    The detailed chemistry and cooling in collapsing primordial clouds will be presented for total baryonic densities up to 106 cm-3. The model consists of 160 reactions of 23 species including H2, HD, HeH+, and LiH, and accounts for 8 different cooling and heating mechanisms. The hydrodynamic evolution of the gas is modeled under the assumptions of free-fall, isothermal, and isobaric collapse as well as for the central regions of 105 M⊙ objects in hierarchical scenarios. The latter being drawn from three-dimensional cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. The dominant processes in the reaction network are identified and a minimal model that accurately predicts the full chemistry will be presented. It is found that radiative cooling due to collisional excitation of HD can lower the temperature in a primordial cloud below that reachable through H2 cooling alone. Further, the temperature evolution is influenced by the choice of the adopted H2 radiative cooling function. Implications for globular cluster and primordial star formation, as well as structure formation on small scales and the importance of molecular cooling in general will be discussed. The work of P.C.S. was supported by the DoE ORNL LDRD Seed Money Fund. T.A. acknowledges support from NSF Grant ASC--9318185. The work of S.L. and A.D. was supported by NSF Cooperative Agreement OSR-9353227 and Astronomical Sciences Grant AST-93-01099, respectively.

  16. Cooling Panel Optimization for the Active Cooling System of a Hypersonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youn, B.; Mills, A. F.

    1995-01-01

    Optimization of cooling panels for an active cooling system of a hypersonic aircraft is explored. The flow passages are of rectangular cross section with one wall heated. An analytical fin-type model for incompressible flow in smooth-wall rectangular ducts with coupled wall conduction is proposed. Based on this model, the a flow rate of coolant to each design minimum mass flow rate or coolant for a single cooling panel is obtained by satisfying hydrodynamic, thermal, and Mach number constraints. Also, the sensitivity of the optimal mass flow rate of coolant to each design variable is investigated. In addition, numerical solutions for constant property flow in rectangular ducts, with one side rib-roughened and coupled wall conduction, are obtained using a k-epsilon and wall function turbulence model, these results are compared with predictions of the analytical model.

  17. Thermal and structural tests of a hydrogen cooled panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, C. E.; Duncan, J. D.; Gellersen, E. W.; Demogenes, C.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of the thermal and structural performance of a hydrogen-cooled panel is presented. The panel, which was of brazed Inconel 625 and Inconel 718 construction, was designed for a heat flux of 100 BTU per second-foot squared and an external surface pressure of 100 psi.

  18. The structure, energy balance, and winds of cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Solar magnetic field phenomena which occur in cool stars are summarized. Factors which can produce magnetic fields in stars are listed. Information on cool star atmospheres, provided by high dispersion spectra, is discussed. These spectra show that in Beta Dra (G2 Ib) the transition lines are red shifted (an antiwind), perhaps indicating downflows in closed magnetic flux tubes, as seen in the solar flux tubes above sunspots. The G and K giants and supergiants are classed as active, quiet, or hybrid, depending on whether their atmospheres are dominated by closed magnetic flux tubes, open field geometries, or a predominantly open geometry with a few closed flux tubes embedded.

  19. Physiologic Responses Produced by Active and Passive Personal Cooling Vests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Lee, Hank C.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Luna, Bernadette

    2000-01-01

    Personal thermoregulatory systems which provide chest cooling are used in the industrial and aerospace environments to alleviate thermal stress. However, little information is available regarding the physiologic and circulatory changes produced by routine operation of these systems. The objectives of this study were to document and compare the subjects' response to three cooling vests in their recommended configurations. The Life Enhancement Tech (LET) lightweight active cooling vest with cap, the MicroClimate Systems Change of Phase garment (MCS), and the Steele Vest were each used to cool the chest regions of 12 male and 8 female Healthy subjects (21 to 69 yr.) in this study. The subjects, seated in an upright position at normal room temperature (approx. 22 C), were tested for 60 min. with one of the cooling garments. The LET active garment had an initial coolant fluid inlet temperature of 60 F, and was ramped down to 50 F. Oral, right and left ear canal temperatures were logged manually every 5 min. Arm, leg, chest and rectal temperatures; heart rate; and respiration were recorded continuously on a U.F.I., Inc. Biolog ambulatory monitor. For men, all three vests had similar, significant cooling effects. Decreases in the average rectal temperature, oral temperature, and ear canal temperatures were approximately 0.2 C, 0.2 C and 0.1 C, respectively. In contrast to the men, the female subjects wearing the MCS and Steel vests had similar cooling responses in which the core temperature remained elevated and oral and ear canal temperatures did not drop. The LET active garment cooled most of the female subjects in this study; rectal, oral and ear temperature decreased about 0.2 C, 0.3 C and 0.3 C, respectively. These results show that the garment configurations tested do not elicit a similar thermal response in all subjects. A gender difference is evident. The LET active garment configuration was most effective in decreasing temperatures of the female subjects; the MCS

  20. Fail-safe system for activity cooled supersonic and hypersonic aircraft. [using liquid hydrogen fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. A.; Braswell, D. O.; Richie, C. B.

    1975-01-01

    A fail-safe-system concept was studied as an alternative to a redundant active cooling system for supersonic and hypersonic aircraft which use the heat sink of liquid-hydrogen fuel for cooling the aircraft structure. This concept consists of an abort maneuver by the aircraft and a passive thermal protection system (TPS) for the aircraft skin. The abort manuever provides a low-heat-load descent from normal cruise speed to a lower speed at which cooling is unnecessary, and the passive TPS allows the aircraft skin to absorb the abort heat load without exceeding critical skin temperature. On the basis of results obtained, it appears that this fail-safe-system concept warrants further consideration, inasmuch as a fail-safe system could possibly replace a redundant active cooling system with no increase in weight and would offer other potential advantages.

  1. Cool Active Binaries Recently Studied in the CAAM Stellar Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciçek, C.; Erdem, A.; Soydugan, F.; Doǧru, D.; Özkardeş, B.; Erkan, N.; Budding, E.; Demircan, O.

    2010-12-01

    We summarize recent work on cool active stars in our programme. We carried out photometry at the Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University (COMU) observatory, and high-resolution spectroscopy at Mt John University Observatory, as well as collecting data from other facilties. A combination of analysis methods, including our information limit optimization technique (ILOT) with physically realistic fitting functions, as well as other public-domain software packages, have been used to find reliable parameters. Stars in our recent programme include V1430 Aql, V1034 Her, V340 Gem, SAO 62042, FI Cnc, V2075 Cyg, FG UMa and BM CVn. Light variations, sometimes over numerous consecutive cycles, were analysed. For AB Dor and CF Tuc, we compared broadband (B and V) maculation effects with emission features in the Ca II K and Hα lines. Broadband light curves typically show one or two outstanding maculae. These appear correlated with the main chromospheric activity sites (‘faculae’), that occur at similar latitudes and with comparable size to the photometric umbrae, but sometimes with significant displacements in longitude. The possibility of large-scale bipolar surface structure is considered, keeping in mind solar analogies. Such optical work forms part of broader multiwavelength studies, involving X-ray and microwave observations, also mentioned.

  2. Advanced fabrication techniques for hydrogen-cooled engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchmann, O. A.; Arefian, V. V.; Warren, H. A.; Vuigner, A. A.; Pohlman, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Described is a program for development of coolant passage geometries, material systems, and joining processes that will produce long-life hydrogen-cooled structures for scramjet applications. Tests were performed to establish basic material properties, and samples constructed and evaluated to substantiate fabrication processes and inspection techniques. Results of the study show that the basic goal of increasing the life of hydrogen-cooled structures two orders of magnitude relative to that of the Hypersonic Research Engine can be reached with available means. Estimated life is 19000 cycles for the channels and 16000 cycles for pin-fin coolant passage configurations using Nickel 201. Additional research is required to establish the fatigue characteristics of dissimilar-metal coolant passages (Nickel 201/Inconel 718) and to investigate the embrittling effects of the hydrogen coolant.

  3. Comparison of active cooling devices to passive cooling for rehabilitation of firefighters performing exercise in thermal protective clothing: A report from the Fireground Rehab Evaluation (FIRE) trial

    PubMed Central

    Hostler, David; Reis, Steven E; Bednez, James C; Kerin, Sarah; Suyama, Joe

    2010-01-01

    Background Thermal protective clothing (TPC) worn by firefighters provides considerable protection from the external environment during structural fire suppression. However, TPC is associated with physiological derangements that may have adverse cardiovascular consequences. These derangements should be treated during on-scene rehabilitation periods. Objective The present study examined heart rate and core temperature responses during the application of four active cooling devices, currently being marketed to the fire service for on-scene rehab, and compared them to passive cooling in a moderate temperature (approximately 24°C) and to an infusion of cold (4°C) saline. Methods Subjects exercised in TPC in a heated room. Following an initial exercise period (BOUT 1) the subjects exited the room, removed TPC, and for 20 minutes cooled passively at room temperature, received an infusion of cold normal saline, or were cooled by one of four devices (fan, forearm immersion in water, hand cooling, water perfused cooling vest). After cooling, subjects donned TPC and entered the heated room for another 50-minute exercise period (BOUT 2). Results Subjects were not able to fully recover core temperature during a 20-minute rehab period when provided rehydration and the opportunity to completely remove TPC. Exercise duration was shorter during BOUT 2 when compared to BOUT 1 but did not differ by cooling intervention. The overall magnitude and rate of cooling and heart rate recovery did not differ by intervention. Conclusions No clear advantage was identified when active cooling devices and cold intravenous saline were compared to passive cooling in a moderate temperature after treadmill exercise in TPC. PMID:20397868

  4. Actively Cooled SLMS(TM) Technology for HEL Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacoby, Marc T.; Goodman, William A.; Reily, Jack C.; Kegley, Jeffrey R.; Haight, Harlan J.; Tucker, John; Wright, Ernest R.; Hogue, William D.

    2005-01-01

    Mr. Jacoby is the Chief Scientist for Schafer's Lightweight Optical Systems business area with twenty four years experience in laser and optical systems for space and military applications. He and colleague Dr. Goodman conceived and developed Silicon Lightweight Mirrors (SLMS(TM)) technologies for space applications from the extreme UV to FAR IR wavelengths. Schafer has demonstrated two different methods for actively cooling our Silicon Lightweight Mirrors (SLMS(TM)) technology. Direct internal cooling was accomplished by flowing liquid nitrogen through the continuous open cell core of the SLMS(TM) mirror. Indirect external cooling was accomplished by flowing liquid nitrogen through a CTE matched Cesic square-tube manifold that was bonded to the back of the mirror in the center. Testing was done in the small 4-foot thermal/vacuum chamber located at the NASA/MSFC X-Ray Calibration Facility. Seven thermal diodes were located over the front side of the 5 inch diameter mirror and one was placed on the outlet side of the Cesic manifold. Results indicate that the mirror reaches steady state at 82K in less than four minutes for both cooling methods. The maximum temperature difference of the eight diodes was less than 200 mK when the mirror was internally cooled and covered with MLI to insulate it from the large 300 K aluminum plate that was used to mount it.

  5. UV Observations of Prominence Activation and Cool Loop Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Therese A.; Landi, Enrico

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the thermal and dynamic properties of dynamic structures in and around a prominence channel observed on the limb on 17 April 2003. Observations were taken with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory's Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SOHO/SUMER) in lines formed at temperatures from 80,000 to 1.6 MK. The instrument was pointed to a single location and took a series of 90 s exposures. Two-dimensional context was provided by the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) in the UV and EUV and the Kanzelhohe Solar Observatory in H-alpha. Two dynamic features were studied in depth: an activated prominence and repeated motions in a loop near the prominence. We calculated three-dimensional geometries and trajectories, differential emission measure, and limits on the mass, pressure, average density, and kinetic and thermal energies. These observations provide important tests for models of dynamics in prominences and cool (approx. 10(exp 5) K)loops, which will ultimately lead to a better understanding the mechanism(s) leading to energy and mass flow in these solar features.

  6. Study of fail-safe abort system for an actively cooled hypersonic aircraft, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peeples, M. E.; Herring, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Conceptual designs of a fail-safe abort system for hydrogen fueled actively cooled high speed aircraft are examined. The fail-safe concept depends on basically three factors: (1) a reliable method of detecting a failure or malfunction in the active cooling system, (2) the optimization of abort trajectories which minimize the descent heat load to the aircraft, and (3) fail-safe thermostructural concepts to minimize both the weight and the maximum temperature the structure will reach during descent. These factors are examined and promising approaches are evaluated based on weight, reliability, ease of manufacture and cost.

  7. Experimental and numerical study of open-air active cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Fifi, Salman Amsari

    The topic of my thesis is Experimental and Numerical Study of Open Air Active Cooling. The present research is intended to investigate experimentally and Numerically the effectiveness of cooling large open areas like stadiums, shopping malls, national gardens, amusement parks, zoos, transportation facilities and government facilities or even in buildings outdoor gardens and patios. Our cooling systems are simple cooling fans with different diameters and a mist system. This type of cooling systems has been chosen among the others to guarantee less energy consumption, which will make it the most favorable and applicable for cooling such places mentioned above. In the experiments, the main focus is to study the temperature domain as a function of different fan diameters aerodynamically similar in different heights till we come up with an empirical relationship that can determine the temperature domain for different fan diameters and for different heights of these fans. The experimental part has two stages. The first stage is devoted to investigate the maximum range of airspeed and profile for three different fan diameters and for different heights without mist, while the second stage is devoted to investigate the maximum range of temperature and profile for the three different diameter fans and for different heights with mist. The computational study is devoted to built an experimentally verified mathematical model to be used in the design and optimization of water mist cooling systems, and to compare the mathematical results to the experimental results and to get an insight of how to apply such evaporative mist cooling for different places for different conditions. In this study, numerical solution is presented based on experimental conditions, such dry bulb temperature, wet bulb temperature, relative humidity, operating pressure and fan airspeed. In the computational study, all experimental conditions are kept the same for the three fans except the fan airspeed

  8. HITCAN for actively cooled hot-composite thermostructural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.; Lackney, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    A computer code, high temperature composite analyzer (HITCAN), was developed to analyze/design hot metal matrix composite structures. HITCAN is a general purpose code for predicting the global structural and local stress-strain response of multilayered (arbitrarily oriented) metal matrix structures both at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) and the structural level, including the fabrication process effects. The thermomechanical properties of the constituents are considered to be nonlinearly dependent on several parameters, including temperature, stress, and stress rate. The computational procedure employs an incremental iterative nonlinear approach utilizing a multifactor-interaction material behavior model, i.e., the material properties are expressed in terms of a product of several factors that affect the properties. HITCAN structural analysis capabilities (static, load stepping - a multistep static analysis with material properties updated at each step, modal, and buckling) for cooled hot structures are demonstrated through a specific example problem.

  9. HITCAN for actively cooled hot-composite thermostructural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.; Lackney, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    A computer code, high temperature composite analyzer (HITCAN), was developed to analyze/design hot metal matrix composite structures. HITCAN is a general purpose code for predicting the global structural and local stress-strain response of multilayered (arbitrarily oriented) metal matrix structures both at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) and the structural level, including the fabrication process effects. The thermomechanical properties of the constituents are considered to be nonlinearly dependent on several parameters, including temperature, stress, and stress rate. The computational procedure employs an incremental iterative nonlinear approach utilizing a multifactor-interaction material behavior model, i.e., the material properties are expressed in terms of a product of several factors that affect the properties. HITCAN structural analysis capabilities (static, load stepping - a multistep static analysis with material properties updated at each step, modal, and buckling) for cooled hot structures are demonstrated through a specific example problem.

  10. Finite element thermal analysis of convectively-cooled aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieting, A. R.; Thornton, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    The design complexity and size of convectively-cooled engine and airframe structures for hypersonic transports necessitate the use of large general purpose computer programs for both thermal and structural analyses. Generally thermal analyses are based on the lumped-parameter finite difference technique, and structural analyses are based on the finite element technique. Differences in these techniques make it difficult to achieve an efficient interface. It appears, therefore, desirable to conduct an integrated analysis based on a common technique. A summary is provided of efforts by NASA concerned with the development of an integrated thermal structural analysis capability using the finite element method. Particular attention is given to the development of conduction/forced-convection finite element methodology and applications which illustrate the capabilities of the developed concepts.

  11. High quality actively cooled plasma facing components for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nygren, R.

    1993-12-31

    This paper interweaves some suggestions for developing actively-cooled PFCs (plasma facing components) for future fusion devices with supporting examples taken from the design, fabrication and operation of Tore Supra`s Phase III Outboard Pump Limiter (OPL). This actively-cooled midplane limiter, designed for heat and particle removal during long pulse operation, has been operated in essentially thermally steady state conditions. From experience with testing to identify braze flaws in the OPL, recommendations are made to analyze the impact of joining flaws on thermal-hydraulic performance of PFCs and to validate a method of inspection for such flaws early in the design development. Capability for extensive in-service monitoring of future PFCs is also recommended and the extensive calorimetry and IR thermography used to confirm and update safe operating limits for power handling of the OPL are reviewed.

  12. Thermal/structural analysis of a transpiration cooled nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Peyton B.; Thompson, Jon E.; Babcock, Dale A.; Gray, Carl E., Jr.; Mouring, Chris A.

    1992-01-01

    The 8-foot High Temperature Tunnel (HTT) at LaRC is a combustion driven, high enthalpy blow down wind tunnel. In Mar. 1991, during check out of the transpiration cooled nozzle, pieces of platelets were found in the tunnel test section. It was determined that incorrect tolerancing between the platelets and the housing was the primary cause of the platelet failure. An analysis was performed to determine the tolerance layout between the platelets and the housing to meet the structural and performance criteria under a range of thermal, pressure, and bolt preload conditions. Three recommendations resulted as a product of this analysis.

  13. Structural cooling fluid tube for supporting a turbine component and supplying cooling fluid to transition section

    SciTech Connect

    Charron, Richard; Pierce, Daniel

    2015-08-11

    A shaft cover support for a gas turbine engine is disclosed. The shaft cover support not only provides enhanced support to a shaft cover of the gas turbine engine, but also includes a cooling fluid chamber for passing fluids from a rotor air cooling supply conduit to an inner ring cooling manifold. Furthermore, the shaft cover support may include a cooling shield supply extending from the cooling fluid chamber between the radially outward inlet and the radially inward outlet on the radially extending region and in fluid communication with the cooling fluid chamber for providing cooling fluids to a transition section. The shaft cover support may also provide additional stiffness and reduce interference of the flow from the compressor. In addition, the shaft cover support accommodates a transition section extending between compressor and turbine sections of the gas turbine engine.

  14. Activity and Kinematics of Cool and Ultracool Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Sarah Jane

    The ages of cool and ultracool dwarfs are particularly important. For cool M dwarfs, accurate ages combined with their ubiquity in the stellar disk could lead to a new level of precision in age dating the Galaxy. A better understanding of the chromospheres of M dwarfs could provide important clues about the relationship between activity and age in these low mass stars. Ultracool (late-M and L) dwarfs have the distinction of including both warm, young brown dwarfs and stars with mean ages more representative of the stellar disk. Kinematics are a source of mean ages and could provide or confirm discriminating features between stars and brown dwarfs. This thesis is composed of several different projects, each investigating the activity or kinematics of cool or ultracool dwarfs. First, a sample of nearly 500 L dwarfs selected from SDSS DR7 photometry and spectroscopy is examined; we discovered 200 new L dwarfs and found evidence of a bias towards red J - KS colors in the entire population of previously known L dwarfs. Using the three-dimensional kinematics of 300 SDSS DR7 L dwarfs, we find that their kinematics are consistent with those of the stellar disk and include a previously undetected thick disk component. We also confirmed a relationship between age and J - KS color (due to our large sample of UVW motions and unbiased J - KS colors), with blue L dwarfs having hotter kinematics (consistent with older ages) and redder L dwarfs having colder, younger kinematics. The DR7 L dwarf sample showed no distinct kinematic difference between young brown dwarfs and disk-age stars, perhaps due to a bias towards early spectral types. In order to probe the kinematic distribution of L dwarfs in a volume-limited sample, we began a survey of radial velocities of nearby (d<20pc) L dwarfs using the TripleSpec instrument on the ARC 3.5-m telescope at APO. While several reduction packages were tested on the TripleSpec data, none were found to provide reductions of sufficient quality

  15. Characterization of AN Actively Cooled Metal Foil Thermal Radiation Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, J. R.; Kashani, A.; Helvensteijn, B. P. M.; Salerno, L. J.

    2010-04-01

    Zero boil-off (ZBO) or reduced boil-off (RBO) systems that involve active cooling of large cryogenic propellant tanks will most likely be required for future space exploration missions. For liquid oxygen or methane, such systems could be implemented using existing high technology readiness level (TRL) cryocoolers. However, for liquid hydrogen temperatures (˜20 K) no such coolers exist. In order to partially circumvent this technology gap, the concept of broad area cooling (BAC) has been developed, whereby a low mass thermal radiation shield could be maintained at temperatures around 100 K by steady circulation of cold pressurized gas through a network of narrow tubes. By this method it is possible to dramatically reduce the radiative heat leak to the 20 K tank. A series of experiments, designed to investigate the heat transfer capabilities of BAC systems, have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). Results of the final experiment in this series, investigating heat transfer from a metal foil film to a distributed cooling line, are presented here.

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ACTIVELY COOLED METAL FOIL THERMAL RADIATION SHIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Feller, J. R.; Salerno, L. J.; Kashani, A.; Helvensteijn, B. P. M.

    2010-04-09

    Zero boil-off (ZBO) or reduced boil-off (RBO) systems that involve active cooling of large cryogenic propellant tanks will most likely be required for future space exploration missions. For liquid oxygen or methane, such systems could be implemented using existing high technology readiness level (TRL) cryocoolers. However, for liquid hydrogen temperatures (approx20 K) no such coolers exist. In order to partially circumvent this technology gap, the concept of broad area cooling (BAC) has been developed, whereby a low mass thermal radiation shield could be maintained at temperatures around 100 K by steady circulation of cold pressurized gas through a network of narrow tubes. By this method it is possible to dramatically reduce the radiative heat leak to the 20 K tank. A series of experiments, designed to investigate the heat transfer capabilities of BAC systems, have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). Results of the final experiment in this series, investigating heat transfer from a metal foil film to a distributed cooling line, are presented here.

  17. Small Spacecraft Active Thermal Control: Micro-Vascular Composites Enable Small Satellite Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The Small Spacecraft Integrated Power System with Active Thermal Control project endeavors to achieve active thermal control for small spacecraft in a practical and lightweight structure by circulating a coolant through embedded micro-vascular channels in deployable composite panels. Typically, small spacecraft rely on small body mounted passive radiators to discard heat. This limits cooling capacity and leads to the necessity to design for limited mission operations. These restrictions severely limit the ability of the system to dissipate large amounts of heat from radios, propulsion systems, etc. An actively pumped cooling system combined with a large deployable radiator brings two key advantages over the state of the art for small spacecraft: capacity and flexibility. The use of a large deployable radiator increases the surface area of the spacecraft and allows the radiation surface to be pointed in a direction allowing the most cooling, drastically increasing cooling capacity. With active coolant circulation, throttling of the coolant flow can enable high heat transfer rates during periods of increased heat load, or isolate the radiator during periods of low heat dissipation.

  18. The structure and energy balance of cool star atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    The atmospheric structure and energy balance phenomena associated with magnetic fields in the Sun are reviewed and it is shown that similar phenomena occur in cool stars. The evidence for the weakening or disappearance of transition regions and coronae is discussed together with the appearance of extended cool chromospheres with large mass loss, near V-R = 0.80 in the H-R diagram. Like the solar atmosphere, these atmospheres are not homogeneous and there is considerable evidence for plage regions with bright TR emission lines that overlie dark (presumably magnetic) star spots. The IUE observations are providing important information on the energy balance in these atmospheres that should guide theoretical calculations of the nonradiative heating rate. Recent high dispersion spectra are providing unique information concerning which components of close binary systems are the dominant contributors to the observed emission. A recent unanticipated discovery is that the transition lines are redshifted (an antiwind) in DRa (G2 Ib) and perhaps other stars. Finally, the G and K giants and supergiants are classified into three groups depending on whether their atmospheres are dominated by closed magnetic flux tubes, open field geometries, or a predominately open geometry with a few closed flux tubes embedded.

  19. RF ACCELERATING STRUCTURE FOR THE MUON COOLING EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    CORLETT,J.; GREEN,M.; LI,D.; HOLTKAMP,N.; MORETTI,A.; KIRK,H.G.; PALMER,R.B.; ZHAO,Y.; SUMMERS,D.

    1999-03-29

    The ionization cooling of muons requires longitudinal acceleration of the muons after scattering in a hydrogen target. In order to maximize the accelerating voltage, we propose using linear accelerating structures with cells bounded by thin beryllium metal foils. This produces an on-axis field equivalent to the maximum surface field, whereas with beam-pipes the accelerating field is approximately half that of the peak surface field in the cavity. The muons interact only weakly with the thin foils. A {pi}/2 interleaved cavity structure has been chosen, with alternate cells coupled together externally, and the two groups of cells fed in quadrature. At present they are considering an operating temperature of 77K to gain a factor of at least two in Q-value over room temperature. The authors describe the design of the {pi}/2 interleaved cavity structure, design of an alternative {pi}-mode open structure, preliminary experimental results from a low-power test cavity, and plans for high-power testing.

  20. Vascular structures for volumetric cooling and mechanical strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.-M.; Lorente, S.; Bejan, A.

    2010-02-01

    When solid material is removed in order to create flow channels in a load carrying structure, the strength of the structure decreases. On the other hand, a structure with channels is lighter and easier to transport as part of a vehicle. Here, we show that this trade off can be used for benefit, to design a vascular mechanical structure. When the total amount of solid is fixed and the sizes, shapes, and positions of the channels can vary, it is possible to morph the flow architecture such that it endows the mechanical structure with maximum strength. The result is a multifunctional structure that offers not only mechanical strength but also new capabilities necessary for volumetric functionalities such as self-healing and self-cooling. We illustrate the generation of such designs for strength and fluid flow for several classes of vasculatures: parallel channels, trees with one, two, and three bifurcation levels. The flow regime in every channel is laminar and fully developed. In each case, we found that it is possible to select not only the channel dimensions but also their positions such that the entire structure offers more strength and less flow resistance when the total volume (or weight) and the total channel volume are fixed. We show that the minimized peak stress is smaller when the channel volume (ϕ) is smaller and the vasculature is more complex, i.e., with more levels of bifurcation. Diminishing returns are reached in both directions, decreasing ϕ and increasing complexity. For example, when ϕ =0.02 the minimized peak stress of a design with one bifurcation level is only 0.2% greater than the peak stress in the optimized vascular design with two levels of bifurcation.

  1. Feasibility of Actively Cooled Silicon Nitride Airfoil for Turbine Applications Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2001-01-01

    Nickel-base superalloys currently limit gas turbine engine performance. Active cooling has extended the temperature range of service of nickel-base superalloys in current gas turbine engines, but the margin for further improvement appears modest. Therefore, significant advancements in materials technology are needed to raise turbine inlet temperatures above 2400 F to increase engine specific thrust and operating efficiency. Because of their low density and high-temperature strength and thermal conductivity, in situ toughened silicon nitride ceramics have received a great deal of attention for cooled structures. However, the high processing costs and low impact resistance of silicon nitride ceramics have proven to be major obstacles for widespread applications. Advanced rapid prototyping technology in combination with conventional gel casting and sintering can reduce high processing costs and may offer an affordable manufacturing approach. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center, in cooperation with a local university and an aerospace company, are developing actively cooled and functionally graded ceramic structures. The objective of this program is to develop cost-effective manufacturing technology and experimental and analytical capabilities for environmentally stable, aerodynamically efficient, foreign-object-damage-resistant, in situ toughened silicon nitride turbine nozzle vanes, and to test these vanes under simulated engine conditions. Starting with computer aided design (CAD) files of an airfoil and a flat plate with internal cooling passages, the permanent and removable mold components for gel casting ceramic slips were made by stereolithography and Sanders machines, respectively. The gel-cast part was dried and sintered to final shape. Several in situ toughened silicon nitride generic airfoils with internal cooling passages have been fabricated. The uncoated and thermal barrier coated airfoils and flat plates were burner rig tested for 30 min without

  2. The structure, energy balance, and winds of cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    The phenomena associated with magnetic fields in the Sun are summarized and it is shown that similar phenomena occur in cool stars. High dispersion spectra are providing unique information concerning densities, atmospheric extension, and emission line widths. A recent unanticipated discovery is that the transition lines are redshifted (an antiwind) in beta Dra (G2 Ib) and perhaps other stars. This is interpreted as indicating downflows in closed magnetic flux tubes as are seen in the solar flux tubes above sunspots. The G and K giants and supergiants are classified as active stars, quiet stars, or hybrid stars depending on whether their atmospheres are dominated by closed magnetic flux tubes, open field geometries, or a predominately open geometry with a few closed flux tubes embedded.

  3. Ecological Structure Activity Relationships

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological Structure Activity Relationships, v1.00a, February 2009
    ECOSAR (Ecological Structure Activity Relationships) is a personal computer software program that is used to estimate the toxicity of chemicals used in industry and discharged into water. The program predicts...

  4. Deactivation of the inferior colliculus by cooling demonstrates intercollicular modulation of neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Orton, Llwyd D.; Poon, Paul W. F.; Rees, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    The auditory pathways coursing through the brainstem are organized bilaterally in mirror image about the midline and at several levels the two sides are interconnected. One of the most prominent points of interconnection is the commissure of the inferior colliculus (CoIC). Anatomical studies have revealed that these fibers make reciprocal connections which follow the tonotopic organization of the inferior colliculus (IC), and that the commissure contains both excitatory and, albeit fewer, inhibitory fibers. The role of these connections in sound processing is largely unknown. Here we describe a method to address this question in the anaesthetized guinea pig. We used a cryoloop placed on one IC to produce reversible deactivation while recording electrophysiological responses to sounds in both ICs. We recorded single units, multi-unit clusters and local field potentials (LFPs) before, during and after cooling. The degree and spread of cooling was measured with a thermocouple placed in the IC and other auditory structures. Cooling sufficient to eliminate firing was restricted to the IC contacted by the cryoloop. The temperature of other auditory brainstem structures, including the contralateral IC and the cochlea were minimally affected. Cooling below 20°C reduced or eliminated the firing of action potentials in frequency laminae at depths corresponding to characteristic frequencies up to ~8 kHz. Modulation of neural activity also occurred in the un-cooled IC with changes in single unit firing and LFPs. Components of LFPs signaling lemniscal afferent input to the IC showed little change in amplitude or latency with cooling, whereas the later components, which likely reflect inter- and intra-collicular processing, showed marked changes in form and amplitude. We conclude that the cryoloop is an effective method of selectively deactivating one IC in guinea pig, and demonstrate that auditory processing in the IC is strongly influenced by the other. PMID:23248587

  5. Structural evolution in the crystallization of rapid cooling silver melt

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Z.A.; Dong, K.J.; Yu, A.B.

    2015-03-15

    The structural evolution in a rapid cooling process of silver melt has been investigated at different scales by adopting several analysis methods. The results testify Ostwald’s rule of stages and Frank conjecture upon icosahedron with many specific details. In particular, the cluster-scale analysis by a recent developed method called LSCA (the Largest Standard Cluster Analysis) clarified the complex structural evolution occurred in crystallization: different kinds of local clusters (such as ico-like (ico is the abbreviation of icosahedron), ico-bcc like (bcc, body-centred cubic), bcc, bcc-like structures) in turn have their maximal numbers as temperature decreases. And in a rather wide temperature range the icosahedral short-range order (ISRO) demonstrates a saturated stage (where the amount of ico-like structures keeps stable) that breeds metastable bcc clusters. As the precursor of crystallization, after reaching the maximal number bcc clusters finally decrease, resulting in the final solid being a mixture mainly composed of fcc/hcp (face-centred cubic and hexagonal-closed packed) clusters and to a less degree, bcc clusters. This detailed geometric picture for crystallization of liquid metal is believed to be useful to improve the fundamental understanding of liquid–solid phase transition. - Highlights: • A comprehensive structural analysis is conducted focusing on crystallization. • The involved atoms in our analysis are more than 90% for all samples concerned. • A series of distinct intermediate states are found in crystallization of silver melt. • A novelty icosahedron-saturated state breeds the metastable bcc state.

  6. Fluid flow and heat convection studies for actively cooled airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, A. F.

    1993-01-01

    This report details progress made on the jet impingement - liquid crystal - digital imaging experiment. With the design phase complete, the experiment is currently in the construction phase. In order to reach this phase two design related issues were resolved. The first issue was to determine NASP leading edge active cooling design parameters. Meetings were arranged with personnel at SAIC International, Torrance, CA in order to obtain recent publications that characterized expected leading edge heat fluxes as well as other details of NASP operating conditions. The information in these publications was used to estimate minimum and maximum jet Reynolds numbers needed to accomplish the required leading edge cooling, and to determine the parameters of the experiment. The details of this analysis are shown in Appendix A. One of the concerns for the NASP design is that of thermal stress due to large surface temperature gradients. Using a series of circular jets to cool the leading edge will cause a non-uniform temperature distribution and potentially large thermal stresses. Therefore it was decided to explore the feasibility of using a slot jet to cool the leading edge. The literature contains many investigations into circular jet heat transfer but few investigations of slot jet heat transfer. The first experiments will be done on circular jets impinging on a fiat plate and results compared to previously published data to establish the accuracy of the method. Subsequent experiments will be slot jets impinging on full scale models of the NASP leading edge. Table 1 shows the range of parameters to be explored. Next a preliminary design of the experiment was done. Previous papers which used a similar experimental technique were studied and elements of those experiments adapted to the jet impingement study. Trade-off studies were conducted to determine which design was the least expensive, easy to construct, and easy to use. Once the final design was settled, vendors were

  7. Turbulent Structure in the Upper Chromospheres of Cool Supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, R. E.

    2013-05-01

    Although the contribution of a chromosphere to the total flux may be small, it plays a vital role as the interface between the star and interstellar space, as it is where the stellar wind originates. The very outermost layers of a star are expected to be turbulent. Images of the solar chromosphere and corona reveal both small-scale inhomogeneities (prominences and spaces) and large-scale variability (polar plumes near sunspot minima, streamers near sunspot maxima), and something similar but more exaggerated can be expected in cool supergiants. Samplings of the high chromosphere in late-K supergiants show extreme variability in both density and velocity, and can be thought of as analogues of the solar case. Series of chromospheric-eclipse spectra of the Ca ii K line in 31 Cyg, 32 Cyg and ζAur demonstrate (a) the presence in the high chromosphere of discrete, rapidly-moving clumps of gas, (b) that structures are not stable or symmetrical, either from eclipse to eclipse or from ingress to egress in the same eclipse, (c) plenty of empty space, and (d) huge differences between one late-K supergiant and another. What information can this evidence offer as regards the outer structure and wind of Betelgeuse?

  8. Active cooling for downhole instrumentation: Preliminary analysis and system selection

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1988-03-01

    A feasibility study and a series of preliminary designs and analyses were done to identify candidate processes or cycles for use in active cooling systems for downhole electronic instruments. A matrix of energy types and their possible combinations was developed and the energy conversion process for each pari was identified. The feasibility study revealed conventional as well as unconventional processes and possible refrigerants and identified parameters needing further clarifications. A conceptual design or series od oesigns for each system was formulated and a preliminary analysis of each design was completed. The resulting coefficient of performance for each system was compared with the Carnot COP and all systems were ranked by decreasing COP. The system showing the best combination of COP, exchangeability to other operating conditions, failure mode, and system serviceability is chosen for use as a downhole refrigerator. 85 refs., 48 figs., 33 tabs.

  9. Active solar heating and cooling information user study

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on active solar heating and cooling (SHAC). An earlier study identified the information user groups in the solar community and the priority (to accelerate solar energy commercialization) of getting information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from 19 SHAC groups respondents are analyzed in this report: DOE-Funded Researchers, Non-DOE-Funded Researchers, Representatives of Manufacturers (4 groups), Distributors, Installers, Architects, Builders, Planners, Engineers (2 groups), Representatives of Utilities, Educators, Cooperative Extension Service County Agents, Building Owners/Managers, and Homeowners (2 groups). The data will be used as input to the determination of information products and services the Solar Energy Research Institute, the Solar Energy Information Data Bank Network, and the entire information outreach community should be preparing and disseminating.

  10. Structural cooling fluid tube for supporting a turbine component and supplying cooling fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Charron, Richard; Pierce, Daniel

    2015-02-24

    A shaft cover support for a gas turbine engine is disclosed. The shaft cover support not only provides enhanced support to a shaft cover of the gas turbine engine, but also includes a cooling fluid chamber for passing fluids from a rotor air cooling supply conduit to an inner ring cooling manifold. As such, the shaft cover support accomplishes in a single component what was only partially accomplished in two components in conventional configurations. The shaft cover support may also provide additional stiffness and reduce interference of the flow from the compressor. In addition, the shaft cover support accommodates a transition section extending between compressor and turbine sections of the engine. The shaft cover support has a radially extending region that is offset from the inlet and outlet that enables the shaft cover support to surround the transition, thereby reducing the overall length of this section of the engine.

  11. Performance of active solar space-cooling systems: The 1980 cooling season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, D.; Frock, S.; Logee, T.; Missal, D.; Wetzel, P.

    1980-12-01

    Solar cooling by an absorption chiller is not a cost effective method to use solar heat. This statement is substantiated by careful analysis of each subsystem and equipment component. Good designs and operating procedures are identified. The problems which reduce cost effectiveness are pointed out. There are specific suggestions for improvements. Finally, there is a comparison of solar cooling by absorption chilling and using photovoltaic cells.

  12. Annual DOE active solar heating and cooling contractors' review meeting. Premeeting proceedings and project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    1981-09-01

    Ninety-three project summaries are presented which discuss the following aspects of active solar heating and cooling: Rankine solar cooling systems; absorption solar cooling systems; desiccant solar cooling systems; solar heat pump systems; solar hot water systems; special projects (such as the National Solar Data Network, hybrid solar thermal/photovoltaic applications, and heat transfer and water migration in soils); administrative/management support; and solar collector, storage, controls, analysis, and materials technology. (LEW)

  13. Ignitor Structural Analysis for Double X-points Configurations and Machine Cooling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, A.; Frosi, P.; Coppi, B.

    2009-11-01

    Recent activities carried out by ANSALDO for the Ignitor program include the structural analysis of the machine Load Assembly for two new scenarios that extend the operation of the machine to H- regimes, where the plasma equilibrium configuration is of the double X- point type and the out-of-plane forces increase. A complete structural analysis was carried out for three scenarios with BT= 13 T and Ip= 9 and 10 MA and double X points just outside the plasma chamber, and Ip= 9 MA and double X points just inside the plasma chamber. The lowered values of the plasma current can offset the increase of stress due to the less favorable X-point configuration relative to the ``extended limiter'' configuration. With the cryogenic plant involving gaseous helium and studied by LINDE KRYOTECHNIK AG, the toroidal field coils reach temperatures up to 230 K and the central solenoid coils approach 220 K after a pulse at the most extreme machine parameters, while the vertical field coils remain under 100 K. Several hours are needed to re-cool the machine down to 30 K before each pulse. New calculations are underway to verify the plant cooling performance at reduced parameters but with more stringent cooling times between shots.

  14. Investigation of x ray variability in highly active cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    Ginga x ray observations of highly active cool star coronae were obtained and analyzed in an effort to better understand the nature of their time variability. The possible types of variability studied included x ray occultations via eclipses in a binary system, rotational modulation of x ray emission, flares, and a search for microflaring. Observation of both sigma(sup 2) CrB and Algol were performed successfully by Ginga. The sigma(sup 2) CrB observations occurred on 27 to 30 June 1988, and the Algol observations on 12 to 14 January 1989. In the sigma(sup 2) CrB observation, simultaneous IUE and Very Large Array (VLA) observations were obtained during part of the Ginga observation. Flaring activity was detected on sigma(sup 2) CrB in the Ginga 1.7 to 11 KeV band and in the IUE microwave region. A large flare on Algol which lasted well over 12 hours was detected, began with a maximum temperature of 65 MK which gradually decayed to 36 MK, and evidence was shown of highly ionized Fe line emission.

  15. Temperatures Achieved in Human and Canine Neocortex During Intraoperative Passive or Active Focal Cooling

    PubMed Central

    Han, Rowland H.; Yarbrough, Chester K.; Patterson, Edward E.; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Miller, John W.; Rothman, Steven M.; D'Ambrosio, Raimondo

    2015-01-01

    Focal cortical cooling inhibits seizures and prevents acquired epileptogenesis in rodents. To investigate the potential clinical utility of this treatment modality, we examined the thermal characteristics of canine and human brain undergoing active and passive surface cooling in intraoperative settings. Four patients with intractable epilepsy were treated in a standard manner. Before the resection of a neocortical epileptogenic focus, multiple intraoperative studies of active (custom-made cooled irrigation-perfused grid) and passive (stainless steel probe) cooling were performed. We also actively cooled the neocortices of two dogs with perfused grids implanted for 2 hours. Focal surface cooling of the human brain causes predictable depth-dependent cooling of the underlying brain tissue. Cooling of 0.6–2°C was achieved both actively and passively to a depth of 10–15 mm from the cortical surface. The perfused grid permitted comparable and persistent cooling of canine neocortex when the craniotomy was closed. Thus, the human cortex can easily be cooled with the use of simple devices such as a cooling grid or a small passive probe. These techniques provide pilot data for the design of a permanently implantable device to control intractable epilepsy. PMID:25902001

  16. Temperatures achieved in human and canine neocortex during intraoperative passive or active focal cooling.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Matthew D; Han, Rowland H; Yarbrough, Chester K; Patterson, Edward E; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Miller, John W; Rothman, Steven M; D'Ambrosio, Raimondo

    2015-06-01

    Focal cortical cooling inhibits seizures and prevents acquired epileptogenesis in rodents. To investigate the potential clinical utility of this treatment modality, we examined the thermal characteristics of canine and human brain undergoing active and passive surface cooling in intraoperative settings. Four patients with intractable epilepsy were treated in a standard manner. Before the resection of a neocortical epileptogenic focus, multiple intraoperative studies of active (custom-made cooled irrigation-perfused grid) and passive (stainless steel probe) cooling were performed. We also actively cooled the neocortices of two dogs with perfused grids implanted for 2 hours. Focal surface cooling of the human brain causes predictable depth-dependent cooling of the underlying brain tissue. Cooling of 0.6-2°C was achieved both actively and passively to a depth of 10-15 mm from the cortical surface. The perfused grid permitted comparable and persistent cooling of canine neocortex when the craniotomy was closed. Thus, the human cortex can easily be cooled with the use of simple devices such as a cooling grid or a small passive probe. These techniques provide pilot data for the design of a permanently implantable device to control intractable epilepsy. PMID:25902001

  17. New fine structure cooling rate. [electron impact transitions in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    One of the dominant electron cooling processes in the ionosphere is caused by electron impact induced fine structure transitions among the ground state levels of atomic oxygen. This fine structure cooling rate is based on theoretical cross sections. Recent advances in the numerical cross section determinations to include polarization effects and more accurate representations of the atomic target result in new lower values. These cross sections are employed in this paper to derive a new fine structure cooling rate which is between 40% and 60% of the currently used rate. A new generalized formula is presented for the cooling rate (from which the fine structure cooling rate is derived), valid for arbitrary mass and temperature difference of the colliding particles and arbitrary inelastic energy difference.

  18. 75 FR 52734 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission to OMB for Review and Approval; Cooling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ... FR 35022), EPA sought comments on this ICR pursuant to 5 CFR 1320.8(d). EPA received 1 comment during... information about the electronic docket, go to www.regulations.gov . Title: Cooling Water Intake Structure... transmission, use a cooling water intake structure (CWIS) that uses at least 25 percent of the water...

  19. Passively cooled 405 W ytterbium fibre laser utilising a novel metal coated active fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Jae M. O.; Simakov, Nikita; Hemming, Alexander; Clarkson, W. Andrew; Haub, John

    2016-03-01

    We present a novel metal coated triple clad active fibre design, utilising an all glass inner cladding structure and aluminium outer coating. This metal coated active fibre enables a number of benefits to high power laser design, such as increase robustness and extended operating temperature range. As a demonstration of the advantages of this design a passively cooled ytterbium fibre laser is presented. A 20 m length of active fibre was coiled into a planar arrangement and mounted onto a high emissivity heatsink. Up to 405 W of output power was achieved without the need for active water or forced air cooling. The slope efficiency of this source was 74 % and maximum outer heat sink temperature was ~140°C. This arrangement allowed for significant weight and size savings to be achieved with the active fibre laser head weighing less than 100 g. We will discuss the design choices and trade-offs of metal coated active fibre on high power fibre laser systems as well as the prospects for further power scaling to the kW level.

  20. Simulation of an active cooling system for photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelhakim, Lotfi

    2016-06-01

    Photovoltaic cells are devices that convert solar radiation directly into electricity. However, solar radiation increases the photovoltaic cells temperature [1] [2]. The temperature has an influence on the degradation of the cell efficiency and the lifetime of a PV cell. This work reports on a water cooling technique for photovoltaic panel, whereby the cooling system was placed at the front surface of the cells to dissipate excess heat away and to block unwanted radiation. By using water as a cooling medium for the photovoltaic solar cells, the overheating of closed panel is greatly reduced without prejudicing luminosity. The water also acts as a filter to remove a portion of solar spectrum in the infrared band but allows transmission of the visible spectrum most useful for the PV operation. To improve the cooling system efficiency and electrical efficiency, uniform flow rate among the cooling system is required to ensure uniform distribution of the operating temperature of the PV cells. The aims of this study are to develop a 3D thermal model to simulate the cooling and heat transfer in Photovoltaic panel and to recommend a cooling technique for the PV panel. The velocity, pressure and temperature distribution of the three-dimensional flow across the cooling block were determined using the commercial package, Fluent. The second objective of this work is to study the influence of the geometrical dimensions of the panel, water mass flow rate and water inlet temperature on the flow distribution and the solar panel temperature. The results obtained by the model are compared with experimental results from testing the prototype of the cooling device.

  1. Ducting arrangement for cooling a gas turbine structure

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Morrison, Jay A.

    2015-07-21

    A ducting arrangement (10) for a can annular gas turbine engine, including: a duct (12, 14) disposed between a combustor (16) and a first row of turbine blades and defining a hot gas path (30) therein, the duct (12, 14) having raised geometric features (54) incorporated into an outer surface (80); and a flow sleeve (72) defining a cooling flow path (84) between an inner surface (78) of the flow sleeve (72) and the duct outer surface (80). After a cooling fluid (86) traverses a relatively upstream raised geometric feature (90), the inner surface (78) of the flow sleeve (72) is effective to direct the cooling fluid (86) toward a landing (94) separating the relatively upstream raised geometric feature (90) from a relatively downstream raised geometric feature (94).

  2. Wissler Simulations of a Liquid Cooled and Ventilation Garment (LCVG) for Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kesterson, Matthew; Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis

    2006-01-01

    In order to provide effective cooling for astronauts during extravehicular activities (EVAs), a liquid cooling and ventilation garment (LCVG) is used to remove heat by a series off tubes through which cooling water is circulated. To better predict the effectiveness of the LCG and determine possible modifications to improve performance, computer simulations dealing with the interaction of the cooling garment with the human body have been run using the Wissler Human Model. Simulations have been conducted to predict the heat removal rate for various liquid cooled garment configurations. The current LCVG uses 48 cooling tubes woven into a fabric with cooling water flowing through the tubes. The purpose of the current project is to decrease the overall weight of the LCVG system. In order to achieve this weight reduction, advances in the garment heat removal rates need to be obtained. Currently, increasing the fabric s thermal conductivity along with also examining an increase in the cooling tube conductivity to more efficiently remove the excess heat generated during EVA is being simulated. Initial trials varied cooling water temperature, water flow rate, garment conductivity, tube conductivity, and total number of cooling tubes in the LCVG. Results indicate that the total number of cooling tubes could be reduced to 22 and still achieve the desired heat removal rate of 361 W. Further improvements are being made to the garment network used in the model to account for temperature gradients associated with the spacing of the cooling tubes over the surface of the garment

  3. MEMS Device Being Developed for Active Cooling and Temperature Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.

    2001-01-01

    High-capacity cooling options remain limited for many small-scale applications such as microelectronic components, miniature sensors, and microsystems. A microelectromechanical system (MEMS) is currently under development at the NASA Glenn Research Center to meet this need. It uses a thermodynamic cycle to provide cooling or heating directly to a thermally loaded surface. The device can be used strictly in the cooling mode, or it can be switched between cooling and heating modes in milliseconds for precise temperature control. Fabrication and assembly are accomplished by wet etching and wafer bonding techniques routinely used in the semiconductor processing industry. Benefits of the MEMS cooler include scalability to fractions of a millimeter, modularity for increased capacity and staging to low temperatures, simple interfaces and limited failure modes, and minimal induced vibration.

  4. Study of a fail-safe abort system for an actively cooled hypersonic aircraft. Volume 1: Technical summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirello, C. J.; Herring, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Conceptual designs of a fail-safe abort system for hydrogen fueled actively cooled high speed aircraft are examined. The fail-safe concept depends on basically three factors: (1) a reliable method of detecting a failure or malfunction in the active cooling system, (2) the optimization of abort trajectories which minimize the descent heat load to the aircraft, and (3) fail-safe thermostructural concepts to minimize both the weight and the maximum temperature the structure will reach during descent. These factors are examined and promising approaches are evaluated based on weight, reliability, ease of manufacture and cost.

  5. Active cooling design for scramjet engines using optimization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.; Martin, Carl J.; Lucas, Stephen H.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for using optimization in designing metallic cooling jackets for scramjet engines is presented. The optimal design minimizes the required coolant flow rate subject to temperature, mechanical-stress, and thermal-fatigue-life constraints on the cooling-jacket panels, and Mach-number and pressure constraints on the coolant exiting the panel. The analytical basis for the methodology is presented, and results for the optimal design of panels are shown to demonstrate its utility.

  6. Active cooling design for scramjet engines using optimization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.; Martin, Carl J.; Lucas, Stephen H.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for using optimization in designing metallic cooling jackets for scramjet engines is presented. The optimal design minimizes the required coolant flow rate subject to temperature, mechanical-stress, and thermal-fatigue-life constraints on the cooling-jacket panels, and Mach-number and pressure contraints on the coolant exiting the panel. The analytical basis for the methodology is presented, and results for the optimal design of panels are shown to demonstrate its utility.

  7. Recent advances in convectively cooled engine and airframe structures for hypersonic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, H. N.; Wieting, A. R.; Shore, C. P.; Nowak, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    A hydrogen-cooled structure for a fixed-geometry, airframe-integrated scramjet is described. The thermal/structural problems, concepts, design features, and technological advances are applicable to a broad range of engines. Convectively cooled airframe structural concepts that have evolved from an extensive series of investigations, the technology developments that have led to these concepts, and the benefits that accrue from their use are discussed.

  8. Directly connected heat exchanger tube section and coolant-cooled structure

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Coico, Patrick A.; Graybill, David P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Steinke, Mark E.

    2015-09-15

    A method is provided for fabricating a cooling apparatus for cooling an electronics rack, which includes an air-to-liquid heat exchanger, one or more coolant-cooled structures, and a tube. The heat exchanger is associated with the electronics rack and disposed to cool air passing through the rack, includes a plurality of coolant-carrying tube sections, each tube section having a coolant inlet and outlet, one of which is coupled in fluid communication with a coolant loop to facilitate flow of coolant through the tube section. The coolant-cooled structure(s) is in thermal contact with an electronic component(s) of the rack, and facilitates transfer of heat from the component(s) to the coolant. The tube connects in fluid communication one coolant-cooled structure and the other of the coolant inlet or outlet of the one tube section, and facilitates flow of coolant directly between that coolant-carrying tube section of the heat exchanger and the coolant-cooled structure.

  9. Subcontracted activities related to TES for building heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J.

    1980-01-01

    The subcontract program elements related to thermal energy storage for building heating and cooling systems are outlined. The following factors are included: subcontracts in the utility load management application area; life and stability testing of packaged low cost energy storage materials; and development of thermal energy storage systems for residential space cooling. Resistance storage heater component development, demonstration of storage heater systems for residential applications, and simulation and evaluation of latent heat thermal energy storage (heat pump systems) are also discussed. Application of thermal energy storage for solar application and twin cities district heating are covered including an application analysis and technology assessment of thermal energy storage.

  10. Utilizing of inner porous structure in injection moulds for application of special cooling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, M.; Bobek, J.; Šafka, J.; Habr, J.; Nováková, I.; Běhálek, L.

    2016-04-01

    The article is focused on impact evaluation of controlled inner structure of production tools and new cooling method on regulation of thermal processes for injection moulding technology. The mould inserts with porous structure were cooled by means of liquid CO2 which is very progressive cooling method and enables very fast and intensive heat transfer among the plastic product, the production tool and cooling medium. The inserts were created using rapid prototype technology (DLSM) and they had a bi-component structure consisting of thin compact surface layer and defined porous inner structure of open cell character where liquid CO2 was flowing through. This analyse includes the evaluation of cooling efficiency for different inner structures and different time profiles for dosing of liquid CO2 into the porous structure. The thermal processes were monitored using thermocouples and IR thermal analyse of product surface and experimental device. Intensive heat removal influenced also the final structure and the shape and dimensional accuracy of the moulded parts that were made of semi-crystalline polymer. The range of final impacts of using intensive cooling method on the plastic parts was defined by DSC and dimensional analyses.

  11. Active Control of Jets in Cross-Flow for Film Cooling Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E.

    2003-01-01

    Jets in cross-flow have applications in film cooling of gas turbine vanes, blades and combustor liners. Their cooling effectiveness depends on the extent to which the cool jet-fluid adheres to the cooled component surface. Lift-off of the cooling jet flow or other mechanisms promoting mixing, cause loss of cooling effectiveness as they allow the hot "free-stream" fluid to come in contact with the component surface. The premise of this project is that cooling effectiveness can be improved by actively controlling (e.9. forcing, pulsing) the jet flow. Active control can be applied to prevent/delay lift-off and suppress mixing. Furthermore, an actively controlled film-cooling system coupled with appropriate sensory input (e.g. temperature or heat flux) can adapt to spatial and temporal variations of the hot-gas path. Thus, it is conceivable that the efficiency of film-cooling systems can be improved, resulting in coolant fluid economy. It is envisioned that Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) will play a role in the realization of such systems. As a first step, a feasibility study will be conducted to evaluate the concept, identify actuation and sensory elements and develop a control strategy. Part of this study will be the design of a proof-of-concept experiment and collection of necessary data.

  12. Active noise canceling system for mechanically cooled germanium radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Karl Einar; Burks, Morgan T

    2014-04-22

    A microphonics noise cancellation system and method for improving the energy resolution for mechanically cooled high-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector systems. A classical adaptive noise canceling digital processing system using an adaptive predictor is used in an MCA to attenuate the microphonics noise source making the system more deployable.

  13. Thermal Design of Vapor Cooling of Flight Vehicle Structures Using LH2 Boil-Off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Zoeckler, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Using hydrogen boil-off vapor to cool the structure of a flight vehicle cryogenic upper stage can reduce heat loads to the stage and increase the usable propellant in the stage or extend the life of the stage. The hydrogen vapor can be used to absorb incoming heat as it increases in temperature before being vented overboard. In theory, the amount of heat leaking into the hydrogen tank from the structure will be reduced if the structure is cooled using the propellant boil-off vapor. However, the amount of boil-off vapor available to be used for cooling and the reduction in heat leak to the propellant tank are dependent to each other. The amount of heat leak reduction to the LH2 tank also depends on the total heat load on the stage and the vapor cooling configurations.

  14. Directly connected heat exchanger tube section and coolant-cooled structure

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Coico, Patrick A; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Steinke, Mark E

    2014-04-01

    A cooling apparatus for an electronics rack is provided which includes an air-to-liquid heat exchanger, one or more coolant-cooled structures and a tube. The heat exchanger, which is associated with the electronics rack and disposed to cool air passing through the rack, includes a plurality of distinct, coolant-carrying tube sections, each tube section having a coolant inlet and a coolant outlet, one of which is coupled in fluid communication with a coolant loop to facilitate flow of coolant through the tube section. The coolant-cooled structure(s) is in thermal contact with an electronic component(s) of the rack, and facilitates transfer of heat from the component(s) to the coolant. The tube connects in fluid communication one coolant-cooled structure and the other of the coolant inlet or outlet of the one tube section, and facilitates flow of coolant directly between that coolant-carrying tube section of the heat exchanger and the coolant-cooled structure.

  15. Structural Oil Pan With Integrated Oil Filtration And Cooling System

    DOEpatents

    Freese, V, Charles Edwin

    2000-05-09

    An oil pan for an internal combustion engine includes a body defining a reservoir for collecting engine coolant. The reservoir has a bottom and side walls extending upwardly from the bottom to present a flanged lip through which the oil pan may be mounted to the engine. An oil cooler assembly is housed within the body of the oil pan for cooling lubricant received from the engine. The body includes an oil inlet passage formed integrally therewith for receiving lubricant from the engine and delivering lubricant to the oil cooler. In addition, the body also includes an oil pick up passage formed integrally therewith for providing fluid communication between the reservoir and the engine through the flanged lip.

  16. Observed three-dimensional structure of ocean cooling induced by Pacific tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guihua; Wu, Lingwei; Johnson, Nathaniel C.; Ling, Zheng

    2016-07-01

    Sea surface cooling along tropical cyclone (TC) tracks has been well observed, but a complete understanding of the full three-dimensional structure of upper ocean TC-induced cooling is still needed. In this study, observed ocean temperature profiles derived from Argo floats and TC statistics from 1996 to 2012 are used to determine the three-dimensional structure of TC-induced cooling over the northwest Pacific. The average TC-induced sea surface temperature change derived from Argo reaches -1.4°C, which agrees well with satellite-derived estimates. The Argo profiles further reveal that this cooling can extend to a depth of ~30 m and can persist for about 20 days. The time scale of cooling recovery is somewhat longer in subsurface layers between a depth of ~10-15 m. Over the ocean domain where the mixed layer is shallower (deeper), the cooling is stronger (weaker), shallower (deeper), and more (less) persistent. The effect of initial MLD on the cooling derived from Argo observations may be only half of the idealized piecewise continuous model of tropical cyclone. These findings have implications for the total upper ocean heat content change induced by northwest Pacific TCs.

  17. Development and testing of heat transport fluids for use in active solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Work on heat transport fluids for use with active solar heating and cooling systems is described. Program objectives and how they were accomplished including problems encountered during testing are discussed.

  18. Design and fabrication of a stringer stiffened discrete-tube actively cooled panel for a hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, F. M.; Halenbrook, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    A 0.61 x 1.22 m (2 x 4 ft) test panel was fabricated and delivered to the Langley Research Center for assessment of the thermal and structural features of the optimized panel design. The panel concept incorporated an aluminum alloy surface panel actively cooled by a network of discrete, parallel, redundant, counterflow passage interconnected with appropriate manifolding, and assembled by adhesive bonding. The cooled skin was stiffened with a mechanically fastened conventional substructure of stringers and frames. A 40 water/60 glycol solution was the coolant. Low pressure leak testing, radiography, holography and infrared scanning were applied at various stages of fabrication to assess integrity and uniformity. By nondestructively inspecting selected specimens which were subsequently tested to destruction, it was possible to refine inspection standards as applied to this cooled panel design.

  19. Brazing of the Tore Supra actively cooled Phase III Limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Nygren, R.E.; Walker, C.A.; Lutz, T.J.; Hosking, F.M.; McGrath, R.T.

    1993-12-31

    The head of the water-cooled Tore Supra Phase 3 Limiter is a bank of 14 round OFHC copper tubes, curved to fit the plasma radius, onto which several hundred pyrolytic graphite (PG) tiles and a lesser number of carbon fiber composite tiles are brazed. The small allowable tolerances for fitting the tiles to the tubes and mating of compound curvatures made the brazing and fabrication extremely challenging. The paper describes the fabrication process with emphasis on the procedure for brazing. In the fixturing for vacuum furnace brazing, the tiles were each independently clamped to the tube with an elaborate set of window frame clamps. Braze quality was evaluated with transient heating tests. Some rebrazing was necessary.

  20. Structural design of the toroidal configuration of the HTS SMES cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, H. K.; Koh, D. Y.; Ko, J. S.; Kim, H. B.; Hong, Y. J.; Kim, S. H.; Seong, K. C.

    2011-11-01

    The superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system is working on around 30 K, because the magnet is made of high temperature superconductor. To maintain the cryogenic temperature, the superconducting coil is cooled by cryogen, helium gas or liquid neon. But there are some weak points in the cryogen cooling system. For example periodic charge of the cryogen and size is big and so on. So, we have designed the conduction cooling system for toroidal configuration HTS SMES. The toroidal type HTS SMES has some merits, so it is very small magnetic field leakage, and magnetic field applied perpendicular to the tape surface can be reduced. Our system has 28 numbers of HTS double pancake coils and they are arrayed toroidal configuration. The toroidal inner radius is 162 mm, and outer radius is 599 mm, and height is about 162 mm. In this study, we have designed the cooling structure and analyzed temperature distribution of cooling path, thermal stress and deformation of the cooling structure.

  1. The thermal structure of the cool core in the Phoenix cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozzi, Paolo

    2012-10-01

    The SZ-selected cluster SPT-CLJ2344-4243 at z~0.56 (the Phoenix cluster) shows for the first time a hint of a massive cooling-flow-induced starburst, suggesting that the feedback source responsible for preventing runaway cooling may not yet be fully established. We propose to robustly estimate the emission measure distribution of the cool core in the Phoenix cluster, and its temperature and abundance profiles out to 500 kpc, with a medium-deep (210 ks) EPIC observation, in order to investigate the actual structure of the cool core. The proposed study will provide secure science results with a relatively modest exposure, paving the way to an eventual deeper observation of this exceptional and puzzling source.

  2. Thermo-Elastic Analysis of Internally Cooled Structures Using a Higher Order Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on the thermomechanical behavior of internally cooled silicon nitride structures. Silicon nitride is under consideration for elevated temperature aerospace engine applications. and techniques for lowering the operating temperature of structures composed of this material are under development. Lowering the operating temperature provides a large payoff in terms of fatigue life and may be accomplished through the use of thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) and the novel concept of included cooling channels. Herein, an in-depth study is performed on the behavior of a flame-impinged silicon nitride plate with a TBC and internal channels cooled by forced air. The analysis is performed using the higher order theory for functionally graded materials (HOTFGM), which has been developed through NASA Glenn Research Center funding over the past several years. HOTFGM was chosen over the traditional finite element approach as a prelude to an examination of functionally graded silicon nitride structures for which HOTFGM is ideally suited. To accommodate the analysis requirement% of the internally cooled plate problem, two crucial enhancements were made to the two-dimensional Cartesian-based version of HOTFGM. namely, incorporation of internal boundary capabilities and incorporation of convective boundary conditions. Results indicate the viability and large benefits of cooling the plate via forced air through cooling channels. Furthermore, cooling can positively impact the stress and displacement fields present in the plate, yielding an additional payoff in terms of fatigue life. Finally, a spin-off capability resulted from inclusion of internal boundaries within HOTFGM; the ability to simulate the thermo-elastic response of structures with curved surfaces. This new capability is demonstrated, and through comparison with an analytical solution, shown to be viable and accurate.

  3. Application of formal optimization techniques in thermal/structural design of a heat-pipe-cooled panel for a hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, Charles J.; Riley, Michael F.

    1987-01-01

    Nonlinear mathematical programming methods are used to design a radiantly cooled and heat-pipe-cooled panel for a Mach 6.7 transport. The cooled portion of the panel is a hybrid heat-pipe/actively cooled design which uses heat pipes to transport the absorbed heat to the ends of the panel where it is removed by active cooling. The panels are optimized for minimum mass and to satisfy a set of heat-pipe, structural, geometric, and minimum-gage constraints. Two panel concepts are investigated: cylindrical heat pipes embedded in a honeycomb core and an integrated design which uses a web-core heat-pipe sandwich concept. The latter was lighter and resulted in a design which was less than 10 percent heavier than an all actively cooled concept. The heat-pipe concept, however, is redundant and can sustain a single-point failure, whereas the actively cooled concept cannot. An additional study was performed to determine the optimum number of coolant manifolds per panel for a minimum-mass design.

  4. Evaluation of active cooling systems for a Mach 6 hypersonic transport airframe, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helenbrook, R. G.; Mcconarty, W. A.; Anthony, F. M.

    1971-01-01

    Transpiration and convective cooling concepts are examined for the fuselage and tail surface of a Mach 6 hypersonic transport aircraft. Hydrogen, helium, and water are considered as coolants. Heat shields and radiation barriers are examined to reduce heat flow to the cooled structures. The weight and insulation requirements for the cryogenic fuel tanks are examined so that realistic totals can be estimated for the complete fuselage and tail. Structural temperatures are varied to allow comparison of aluminum alloy, titanium alloy, and superalloy contruction materials. The results of the study are combined with results obtained on the wing structure, obtained in a previous study, to estimate weights for the complete airframe. The concepts are compared among themselves, and with the uncooled concept on the basis of structural weight, cooling system weight, and coolant weight.

  5. Cooling rate dependence of simulated Cu64.5Zr35.5 metallic glass structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryltsev, R. E.; Klumov, B. A.; Chtchelkatchev, N. M.; Shunyaev, K. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations with embedded atom model potential, we study structural evolution of Cu64.5Zr35.5 alloy during the cooling in a wide range of cooling rates γ ∈ (1.5 ṡ 109, 1013) K/s. Investigating short- and medium-range orders, we show that the structure of Cu64.5Zr35.5 metallic glass essentially depends on cooling rate. In particular, a decrease of the cooling rate leads to an increase of abundances of both the icosahedral-like clusters and Frank-Kasper Z16 polyhedra. The amounts of these clusters in the glassy state drastically increase at the γmin = 1.5 ṡ 109 K/s. Analysing the structure of the glass at γmin, we observe the formation of nano-sized crystalline grain of Cu2Zr intermetallic compound with the structure of Cu2Mg Laves phase. The structure of this compound is isomorphous with that for Cu5Zr intermetallic compound. Both crystal lattices consist of two types of clusters: Cu-centered 13-atom icosahedral-like cluster and Zr-centered 17-atom Frank-Kasper polyhedron Z16. That suggests the same structural motifs for the metallic glass and intermetallic compounds of Cu-Zr system and explains the drastic increase of the abundances of these clusters observed at γmin.

  6. Cooling rate dependence of simulated Cu64.5Zr35.5 metallic glass structure.

    PubMed

    Ryltsev, R E; Klumov, B A; Chtchelkatchev, N M; Shunyaev, K Yu

    2016-07-21

    Using molecular dynamics simulations with embedded atom model potential, we study structural evolution of Cu64.5Zr35.5 alloy during the cooling in a wide range of cooling rates γ ∈ (1.5 ⋅ 10(9), 10(13)) K/s. Investigating short- and medium-range orders, we show that the structure of Cu64.5Zr35.5 metallic glass essentially depends on cooling rate. In particular, a decrease of the cooling rate leads to an increase of abundances of both the icosahedral-like clusters and Frank-Kasper Z16 polyhedra. The amounts of these clusters in the glassy state drastically increase at the γmin = 1.5 ⋅ 10(9) K/s. Analysing the structure of the glass at γmin, we observe the formation of nano-sized crystalline grain of Cu2Zr intermetallic compound with the structure of Cu2Mg Laves phase. The structure of this compound is isomorphous with that for Cu5Zr intermetallic compound. Both crystal lattices consist of two types of clusters: Cu-centered 13-atom icosahedral-like cluster and Zr-centered 17-atom Frank-Kasper polyhedron Z16. That suggests the same structural motifs for the metallic glass and intermetallic compounds of Cu-Zr system and explains the drastic increase of the abundances of these clusters observed at γmin. PMID:27448895

  7. System and method of active vibration control for an electro-mechanically cooled device

    DOEpatents

    Lavietes, Anthony D.; Mauger, Joseph; Anderson, Eric H.

    2000-01-01

    A system and method of active vibration control of an electro-mechanically cooled device is disclosed. A cryogenic cooling system is located within an environment. The cooling system is characterized by a vibration transfer function, which requires vibration transfer function coefficients. A vibration controller generates the vibration transfer function coefficients in response to various triggering events. The environments may differ by mounting apparatus, by proximity to vibration generating devices, or by temperature. The triggering event may be powering on the cooling system, reaching an operating temperature, or a reset action. A counterbalance responds to a drive signal generated by the vibration controller, based on the vibration signal and the vibration transfer function, which adjusts vibrations. The method first places a cryogenic cooling system within a first environment and then generates a first set of vibration transfer function coefficients, for a vibration transfer function of the cooling system. Next, the cryogenic cooling system is placed within a second environment and a second set of vibration transfer function coefficients are generated. Then, a counterbalance is driven, based on the vibration transfer function, to reduce vibrations received by a vibration sensitive element.

  8. A practical cooling strategy for reducing the physiological strain associated with firefighting activity in the heat.

    PubMed

    Barr, D; Gregson, W; Sutton, L; Reilly, T

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to establish whether a practical cooling strategy reduces the physiological strain during simulated firefighting activity in the heat. On two separate occasions under high ambient temperatures (49.6 +/- 1.8 degrees C, relative humidity (RH) 13 +/- 2%), nine male firefighters wearing protective clothing completed two 20-min bouts of treadmill walking (5 km/h, 7.5% gradient) separated by a 15-min recovery period, during which firefighters were either cooled (cool) via application of an ice vest and hand and forearm water immersion ( approximately 19 degrees C) or remained seated without cooling (control). There was no significant difference between trials in any of the dependent variables during the first bout of exercise. Core body temperature (37.72 +/- 0.34 vs. 38.21 +/- 0.17 degrees C), heart rate (HR) (81 +/- 9 vs. 96 +/- 17 beats/min) and mean skin temperature (31.22 +/- 1.04 degrees C vs. 33.31 +/- 1 degrees C) were significantly lower following the recovery period in cool compared with control (p < 0.05). Core body temperature remained consistently lower (0.49 +/- 0.02 degrees C; p < 0.01) throughout the second bout of activity in cool compared to control. Mean skin temperature, HR and thermal sensation were significantly lower during bout 2 in cool compared with control (p < 0.05). It is concluded that this practical cooling strategy is effective at reducing the physiological strain associated with demanding firefighting activity under high ambient temperatures. PMID:19401892

  9. Structural origin underlying the effect of cooling rate on solidification point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chen-Hui; Han, Xiu-Jun; Luan, Ying-Wei; Li, Jian-Guo

    2015-11-01

    Solidification behaviors of liquid aluminum at different cooling rates were examined via classical molecular dynamics simulation with an embedded atom method potential. The results demonstrate that solidification point decreases with increasing cooling rate. To explain this phenomenon, solid-like cluster in liquid was analyzed by the structural analysis method of bond order parameters. The results reveal that the size of the largest solid-like cluster in deeply undercooled liquid decreases with the increase of cooling rate, which can provide a structural interpretation to the above phenomenon. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB012900), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51171115), the Natural Science Foundation of Shanghai City, China (Grant No. 10ZR1415700), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20100073120008), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in Universities of China. This work is partially supported by Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  10. Process analyses of ITER Toroidal Field Structure cooling scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, R.; Takami, S.; Iwamoto, A.; Chang, H. S.; Forgeas, A.; Chalifour, M.; Serio, L.

    2014-09-01

    Process studies for Toroidal Field Structure (TF ST) system with a dedicated Auxiliary Cold Box (ACB-ST) have been conducted under 15 MA baseline, including plasma disruptions. ACB-ST consists of two heat exchangers immersed in the Liquid Helium (LHe) subcooler, which are placed at the inlet/outlet of a Supercritical Helium (SHe) cold circulator (centrifugal pump). Robustness of ACB-ST is a key to achieve the stability of TF coil operation since it provides the thermal barrier at the interface of the TF Winding Pack (WP) with ST. The paper discusses the control logic for the nominal plasma operating scenario and for Mitigation to regulate the dynamic heat loads on ST. In addition, the operation field of a cold circulator is described in the case of plasma disruptions. The required performance of heat exchangers in the ACB-ST is assessed based on the expected operating conditions.

  11. Experimental study on active cooling systems used for thermal management of high-power multichip light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop suitable cooling systems for high-power multichip LEDs. To this end, three different active cooling systems were investigated to control the heat generated by the powering of high-power multichip LEDs in two different configurations (30 and 2 × 15 W). The following cooling systems were used in the study: an integrated multi-fin heat sink design with a fan, a cooling system with a thermoelectric cooler (TEC), and a heat pipe cooling device. According to the results, all three systems were observed to be sufficient for cooling high-power LEDs. Furthermore, it was observed that the integrated multifin heat sink design with a fan was the most efficient cooling system for a 30 W high-power multichip LED. The cooling system with a TEC and 46 W input power was the most efficient cooling system for 2 × 15 W high-power multichip LEDs. PMID:25162058

  12. Effect of cooling on supraoptic neurohypophysial neuronal activity and on urine flow in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, A V; Pittman, Q J; Riphagen, C L

    1984-01-01

    The activity of antidromically identified supraoptic neurosecretory neurones was recorded in Sprague-Dawley rats under urethane or sodium pentobarbitone anaesthesia during cooling of the body with a cold pack. Of twelve phasic neurones studied during a complete cooling and rewarming cycle, six displayed an initial increase, followed by a depression in activity during the period of reduced body temperature. The remaining six phasic neurones did not alter their activity during cooling. Non-phasic neurohypophysial neurones displayed a reversible reduction (n = 8), or increase (n = 6) in activity during cooling, while seven neurones were unaffected by changes in body temperature. In four other anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats, urine flow was reduced by approximately 50% during cooling; this was followed by a diuresis after removal of the cold pack and return of body temperature to normal. The antidiuresis did not occur in homozygous Brattleboro rats which lack arginine vasopressin. The electrophysiological data from a proportion of the supraoptic neurohypophysial neurones correlate with the observed changes in urine flow. PMID:6747884

  13. CALL-FOR-ABSTRACTS: SYMPOSIUM ON TECHNOLOGIES FOR PROTECTING AQUATIC ORGANISMS FROM COOLING WATER INTAKE STRUCTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act requires EPA to ensure that the location, design, construction, and capacity of cooling water intake structures reflect the best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impacts. In February 2002, the EPA approved a proposed ...

  14. RBM3 mediates structural plasticity and protective effects of cooling in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Peretti, Diego; Bastide, Amandine; Radford, Helois; Verity, Nicholas; Molloy, Colin; Martin, Maria Guerra; Moreno, Julie A.; Steinert, Joern R; Smith, Tim; Dinsdale, David; Willis, Anne E.; Mallucci, Giovanna R.

    2014-01-01

    In the healthy adult brain synapses are continuously remodelled through a process of elimination and formation known as structural plasticity1. Reduction in synapse number is a consistent early feature of neurodegenerative diseases2, 3, suggesting deficient compensatory mechanisms. While much is known about toxic processes leading to synaptic dysfunction and loss in these disorders2,3, how synaptic regeneration is affected is unknown. In hibernating mammals, cooling induces loss of synaptic contacts, which are reformed on rewarming, a form of structural plasticity4, 5. We have found that similar changes occur in artificially cooled laboratory rodents. Cooling and hibernation also induce a number cold-shock proteins in the brain, including the RNA binding protein, RBM36. The relationship of such proteins to structural plasticity is unknown. Here we show that synapse regeneration is impaired in mouse models of neurodegenerative disease, in association with the failure to induce RBM3. In both prion-infected and 5×FAD (Alzheimer-type) mice7, the capacity to regenerate synapses after cooling declined in parallel with the loss of induction of RBM3. Enhanced expression of RBM3 in the hippocampus prevented this deficit and restored the capacity for synapse reassembly after cooling. Further, RBM3 over-expression, achieved either by boosting endogenous levels through hypothermia prior to the loss of the RBM3 response, or by lentiviral delivery, resulted in sustained synaptic protection in 5×FAD mice and throughout the course of prion disease, preventing behavioural deficits and neuronal loss and significantly prolonging survival. In contrast, knockdown of RBM3 exacerbated synapse loss in both models and accelerated disease and prevented the neuroprotective effects of cooling. Thus, deficient synapse regeneration, mediated at least in part by failure of the RBM3 stress response, contributes to synapse loss throughout the course of neurodegenerative disease. The data support

  15. GALEX Observes Nearby Cool Stars: Constraints on Ultraviolet Coronal Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatley, Jonathan; Welsh, Barry

    2016-01-01

    The GALEX ultraviolet mission (1350-2800A) has detected many late-type dwarf stars. Numerous M-type dwarf stars exhibit flaring and coronal activity; we use GALEX UV photometry to measure the variability of coronal emission in the GALEX NUV and FUV wavebands.

  16. Physical and Structural Studies on the Cryo-cooling of Insulin Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelace, J.; Bellamy, H.; Snell, E. H.; Borgstahl, G.

    2003-01-01

    Reflection profiles were analyzed from microgravity-(mg) and earth-grown insulin crystals to measure mosaicity (h) and to reveal mosaic domain structure and composition. The effects of cryocooling on single and multi-domain crystals were compared. The effects of cryocooling on insulin structure were also re-examined. Microgravity crystals were larger, more homogeneous, and more perfect than earth crystals. Several mg crystals contained primarily a single mosaic domain with havg of 0.005deg. The earth crystals varied in quality and all contained multiple domains with havg of 0.031deg. Cryocooling caused a 43-fold increase in h for mg crystals (havg=0.217deg) and an %fold increase for earth crystals (havg=0.246deg). These results indicate that very well-ordered crystals are not completely protected from the stresses associated with cryocooling, especially when structural perturbations occur. However, there were differences in the reflection profiles. For multi-mosaic domain crystals, each domain individually broadened and separated from the other domains upon cryo-cooling. Cryo-cooling did not cause an increase in the number of domains. A crystal composed of a single domain retained this domain structure and the reflection profiles simply broadened. Therefore, an improved signal-to-noise ratio for each reflection was measured from cryo-cooled single domain crystals relative to cryo-cooled multi-domain crystals. This improved signal, along with the increase in crystal size, facilitated the measurement of the weaker high- resolution reflections. The observed broadening of reflection profiles indicates increased variation in unit cell dimensions which may be linked to cryo-cooling-associated structural changes and disorder.

  17. Thermal design for areas of interference heating on actively cooled hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, R. L.; Stone, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    Numerous actively cooled panel design alternatives for application in regions on high speed aircraft that are subject to interference heating effects were studied. Candidate design concepts were evaluated using mass, producibility, reliability and inspectability/maintainability as figures of merit. Three design approaches were identified as superior within certain regimes of the matrix of design heating conditions considered. Only minor modifications to basic actively cooled panel design are required to withstand minor interference heating effects. Designs incorporating internally finned coolant tubes to augment heat transfer are recommended for moderate design heating conditions. At severe heating conditions, an insulated panel concept is required.

  18. Effect of cooling rate during solidification on the structure of high-speed steel powder particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ershova, L.S.; Smirnov, V.P.

    1985-08-01

    The structure and properties of a P/M high-speed steel form during solidification, hot plastic working, and subsequent heat treatment are the focus here. The character of steel structure variation under the action of high cooling rates during solidification has not yet been sufficiently investigated, therefore it is of interest to study the interrelationship between these factors. An R6M5F3 steel powder was produced by the atomization of molten metal in an apparatus constructed at the Ukranian Scientific-Research Institute of Special Steels, and divided into several fractions. A study was then made of the effect of cooling rate on the phase composition of the steel, degree of alloying of its solid solution and the microstructure and microhardness of the material. As a result of a higher rate of cooling, the amount of metastable M2C carbide inclusions in the structure of P/M R6M5F3 steel increases and the degree of bulk alloying of its grains grows. The increase in the microhardness of powder particles brought about by cooling at a higher rate is due to the formation of finer carbide inclusions during solidification, grain refinement, and an increased degree of alloying of the gamma and alpha solid solutions being formed.

  19. Flow structure and heat exchange analysis in internal cooling channel of gas turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwaba, Ryszard; Kaczynski, Piotr; Doerffer, Piotr; Telega, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the study of the flow structure and heat transfer, and also their correlations on the four walls of a radial cooling passage model of a gas turbine blade. The investigations focus on heat transfer and aerodynamic measurements in the channel, which is an accurate representation of the configuration used in aeroengines. Correlations for the heat transfer coefficient and the pressure drop used in the design of radial cooling passages are often developed from simplified models. It is important to note that real engine passages do not have perfect rectangular cross sections, but include corner fillet, ribs with fillet radii and special orientation. Therefore, this work provides detailed fluid flow and heat transfer data for a model of radial cooling geometry which possesses very realistic features.

  20. Spectroscopic study of a dark lane and a cool loop in a solar limb active region by Hinode/EIS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyoung-Sun; Imada, S.; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Jin-Yi

    2014-01-10

    We investigated a cool loop and a dark lane over a limb active region on 2007 March 14 using the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer. The cool loop is clearly seen in the spectral lines formed at the transition region temperature. The dark lane is characterized by an elongated faint structure in the coronal spectral lines and is rooted on a bright point. We examined their electron densities, Doppler velocities, and nonthermal velocities as a function of distance from the limb. We derived electron densities using the density sensitive line pairs of Mg VII, Si X, Fe XII, Fe XIII, and Fe XIV spectra. We also compared the observed density scale heights with the calculated scale heights from each peak formation temperatures of the spectral lines under the hydrostatic equilibrium. We noted that the observed density scale heights of the cool loop are consistent with the calculated heights, with the exception of one observed cooler temperature; we also found that the observed scale heights of the dark lane are much lower than their calculated scale heights. The nonthermal velocity in the cool loop slightly decreases along the loop, while nonthermal velocity in the dark lane sharply falls off with height. Such a decrease in the nonthermal velocity may be explained by wave damping near the solar surface or by turbulence due to magnetic reconnection near the bright point.

  1. Evidence for Widespread Cooling in an Active Region Observed with the SDO Atmospheric Imaging Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viall, Nicholeen M.; Klimchuk, James A.

    2012-01-01

    A well known behavior of EUV light curves of discrete coronal loops is that the peak intensities of cooler channels or spectral lines are reached at progressively later times. This time lag is understood to be the result of hot coronal loop plasma cooling through these lower respective temperatures. However, loops typically comprise only a minority of the total emission in active regions. Is this cooling pattern a common property of active region coronal plasma, or does it only occur in unique circumstances, locations, and times? The new SDO/AIA data provide a wonderful opportunity to answer this question systematically for an entire active region. We measure the time lag between pairs of SDO/AIA EUV channels using 24 hours of images of AR 11082 observed on 19 June 2010. We find that there is a time-lag signal consistent with cooling plasma, just as is usually found for loops, throughout the active region including the diffuse emission between loops for the entire 24 hour duration. The pattern persists consistently for all channel pairs and choice of window length within the 24 hour time period, giving us confidence that the plasma is cooling from temperatures of greater than 3 MK, and sometimes exceeding 7 MK, down to temperatures lower than approx. 0.8 MK. This suggests that the bulk of the emitting coronal plasma in this active region is not steady; rather, it is dynamic and constantly evolving. These measurements provide crucial constraints on any model which seeks to describe coronal heating.

  2. Technique for Configuring an Actively Cooled Thermal Shield in a Flight System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkfknecht, Peter; Mustafi, Shuvo

    2011-01-01

    Broad area cooling shields are a mass-efficient alternative to conductively cooled thermal radiation shielding. The shield would actively intercept a large portion of incident thermal radiation and transport the heat away using cryogenic helium gas. The design concept consists of a conductive and conformable surface that maximizes heat transfer and formability. Broad Area Cooled (BAC) shields could potentially provide considerable mass savings for spaceflight applications by eliminating the need for a rigid thermal radiation shield for cryogen tanks. The BAC consists of a network of capillary tubes that are thermally connected to a conductive shield material. Chilled helium gas is circulated through the network and transports unwanted heat away from the cryogen tanks. The cryogenic helium gas is pumped and chilled simultaneously using a specialized pulse-tube cryocooler, which further improves the mass efficiency of the system. By reducing the thermal environment temperature from 300 to 100 K, the radiative heat load on a cryogen tank could be reduced by an order of magnitude. For a cryogenic liquid propellant scenario of oxygen and hydrogen, the boiloff of hydrogen would be significantly reduced and completely eliminated for oxygen. A major challenge in implementing this technology on large tanks is that the BAC system must be easily scalable from lab demonstrations to full-scale missions. Also, the BAC shield must be conformable to complex shapes like spheres without losing the ability to maintain constant temperature throughout. The initial design maximizes thermal conductivity between the capillary tube and the conductive radiation shielding by using thin, corrugated aluminum foil with the tube running transverse to the folds. This configuration has the added benefit of enabling the foil to stretch and contract longitudinally. This allows the BAC to conform to the complex curvature of a cryogen tank, which is key to its success. To demonstrate a BAC shield

  3. Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Device Being Developed for Active Cooling and Temperature Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Duane E.

    2003-01-01

    High-capacity cooling options remain limited for many small-scale applications such as microelectronic components, miniature sensors, and microsystems. A microelectromechanical system (MEMS) using a Stirling thermodynamic cycle to provide cooling or heating directly to a thermally loaded surface is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to meet this need. The device can be used strictly in the cooling mode or can be switched between cooling and heating modes in milliseconds for precise temperature control. Fabrication and assembly employ techniques routinely used in the semiconductor processing industry. Benefits of the MEMS cooler include scalability to fractions of a millimeter, modularity for increased capacity and staging to low temperatures, simple interfaces, limited failure modes, and minimal induced vibration. The MEMS cooler has potential applications across a broad range of industries such as the biomedical, computer, automotive, and aerospace industries. The basic capabilities it provides can be categorized into four key areas: 1) Extended environmental temperature range in harsh environments; 2) Lower operating temperatures for electronics and other components; 3) Precision spatial and temporal thermal control for temperature-sensitive devices; and 4) The enabling of microsystem devices that require active cooling and/or temperature control. The rapidly expanding capabilities of semiconductor processing in general, and microsystems packaging in particular, present a new opportunity to extend Stirling-cycle cooling to the MEMS domain. The comparatively high capacity and efficiency possible with a MEMS Stirling cooler provides a level of active cooling that is impossible at the microscale with current state-of-the-art techniques. The MEMS cooler technology builds on decades of research at Glenn on Stirling-cycle machines, and capitalizes on Glenn s emerging microsystems capabilities.

  4. Venus Mobile Explorer with RPS for Active Cooling: A Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leifer, Stephanie D.; Green, Jacklyn R.; Balint, Tibor S.; Manvi, Ram

    2009-01-01

    We present our findings from a study to evaluate the feasibility of a radioisotope power system (RPS) combined with active cooling to enable a long-duration Venus surface mission. On-board power with active cooling technology featured prominently in both the National Research Council's Decadal Survey and in the 2006 NASA Solar System Exploration Roadmap as mission-enabling for the exploration of Venus. Power and cooling system options were reviewed and the most promising concepts modeled to develop an assessment tool for Venus mission planners considering a variety of future potential missions to Venus, including a Venus Mobile Explorer (either a balloon or rover concept), a long-lived Venus static lander, or a Venus Geophysical Network. The concepts modeled were based on the integration of General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules with different types of Stirling cycle heat engines for power and cooling. Unlike prior investigations which reported on single point design concepts, this assessment tool allows the user to generate either a point design or parametric curves of approximate power and cooling system mass, power level, and number of GPHS modules needed for a "black box" payload housed in a spherical pressure vessel.

  5. Performance evaluation of an active solar cooling system utilizing low cost plastic collectors and an evaporatively-cooled absorption chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lof, G. O.; Westhoff, M. A.; Karaki, S.

    1984-02-01

    During the summer of 1982, air conditioning in Solar House 3 at Colorado State University was provided by an evaporatively-cooled absorption chiller. The single-effect lithium bromide chiller is an experimental three-ton unit from which heat is rejected by direct evaporative cooling of the condenser and absorber walls, thereby eliminating the need for a separate cooling tower. Domestic hot water was also provided by use of a double-walled heat exchanger and 80-gal hot water tank. A schematic of the system is given. Objectives of the project were: (1) evaluation of system performance over the course of one cooling season in Fort Collins, Colorado; (2) optimization of system operation and control; (3) development of a TRNSYS compatible model of the chiller; and (4) determination of cooling system performance in several U.S. climates by use of the model.

  6. Two types of dynamic cool coronal structures observed with STEREO and Hinode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Le-Ping

    2009-12-01

    Solar coronal loops show significant plasma motions during their formation and eruption stages. Dynamic cool coronal structures, on the other hand, are often observed to propagate along coronal loops. We report on the discovery of two types of dynamic cool coronal structures, and characterize their fundamental properties. Using the EUV 304 Å images from the Extreme Ultra Violet Imager (EUVI) telescope on the Solar TErrestrial RElation Observatory (STEREO) and the Ca II filtergrams from the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) instrument on Hinode, we study the evolution of an EUV arch and the kinematics of cool coronal structures. The EUV 304 A observations show that a missile-like plasmoid moves along an arch-shaped trajectory, with an average velocity of 31 km s-1. About three hours later, a plasma arch forms along the trajectory, subsequently the top part of the arch fades away and disappears; meanwhile the plasma belonging to the two legs of the arch flows downward to the arch's feet. During the arch formation and disappearance, SOT Ca II images explore dynamic cool coronal structures beneath the arch. By tracking these structures, we classify them into two types. Type I is threadlike in shape and flows downward with a greater average velocity of 72 km s -1 finally it combines with a loop fibril at a chromospheric altitude. Type II is shape-transformable and sometimes rolling as it flows downward with a smaller velocity of 37 km s -1, then disappears insularly in the chromosphere. It is suggested that the two types of structures are possibly controlled by different magnetic configurations.

  7. Effects of Planetary Thermal Structure on the Ascent and Cooling of Magma on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakimoto, Susan E. H.; Zuber, Maria T.

    1995-01-01

    Magellan radar images of the surface of Venus show a spatially broad distribution of volcanic features. Models of magmatic ascent processes to planetary surfaces indicate that the thermal structure of the interior significantly influences the rate of magmatic cooling and thus the amount of magma that can be transported to the surface before solidification. In order to understand which aspects of planetary thermal structure have the greatest influence on the cooling of buoyantly ascending magma, we have constructed magma cooling profiles for a plutonic ascent mechanism, and evaluated the profiles for variations in the surface and mantle temperature, surface temperature gradient, and thermal gradient curvature. Results show that, for a wide variety of thermal conditions, smaller and slower magma bodies are capable of reaching the surface on Venus compared to Earth, primarily due to the higher surface temperature of Venus. Little to no effect on the cooling and transport of magma are found to result from elevated mantle temperatures, elevation-dependent surface temperature variations, or details of the thermal gradient curvature. The enhanced tendency of magma to reach the surface on Venus may provide at least a partial explanation for the extensive spatial distribution of observed volcanism on the surface.

  8. Structure of steady state accretion shocks with several cooling functions: Closed integral-form solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Kinwah; Chanmugam, G.; Shaviv, G.

    1994-01-01

    We present, for the first time, a closed integral-form solution to the accretion shock structures for the case where the cooling is due to optically thin bremsstrahlung emission and a series of power-law cooling functions of density and temperature. Our results can provide useful checks on numerical calculations and simple accurate estimates for valuable parameters such as the shock height. For the case where the cooling rate j = (2/3)Arho(exp 2)(P/rho)(exp 1/2)(1 + epsilon (sub s)(P/P(sub s)(exp alpha)(rho(sub s)/rho)(exp beta)), we find that a substantial amount of the accretion energy is released at the base of the accretion shock in the form of bremsstrahlung radiation. This implies that for a cyclotron-dominated shock (qualitatively given by alpha = 2.0, beta = 3.85, and epsilon(sub s) is much greater than 1), bremsstrahlung cooling still plays a crucial role in determining the shock structure. Our results are shown to be consistent with detailed numerical calculations.

  9. Structural basis of transcription activation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yu; Zhang, Yu; Ebright, Richard H

    2016-06-10

    Class II transcription activators function by binding to a DNA site overlapping a core promoter and stimulating isomerization of an initial RNA polymerase (RNAP)-promoter closed complex into a catalytically competent RNAP-promoter open complex. Here, we report a 4.4 angstrom crystal structure of an intact bacterial class II transcription activation complex. The structure comprises Thermus thermophilus transcription activator protein TTHB099 (TAP) [homolog of Escherichia coli catabolite activator protein (CAP)], T. thermophilus RNAP σ(A) holoenzyme, a class II TAP-dependent promoter, and a ribotetranucleotide primer. The structure reveals the interactions between RNAP holoenzyme and DNA responsible for transcription initiation and reveals the interactions between TAP and RNAP holoenzyme responsible for transcription activation. The structure indicates that TAP stimulates isomerization through simple, adhesive, stabilizing protein-protein interactions with RNAP holoenzyme. PMID:27284196

  10. Activities report in structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-10-01

    A stiffened plate macro-element; a macro-element of elastic pipe filled with liquid; modeling of the structural fuzzy in medium frequency computations; unsteady aerodynamic forces on jet engine air intakes; prediction of buffeting vibrations from unsteady pressure measurements taken in a wind tunnel; aeroelastic behavior of fan blades in the unstarted supersonic domain; wind tunnel study of a helicopter blade stall control; computer-controlled generator of turbulence in a wind tunnel; atmospheric turbulence statistics; adaptation of Neuber's theory to viscoplastic stress concentration; computation of a jet engine disk/flange assembly; and analysis of the damage done to a perforated composite plate under biaxial monotonic and cyclic loading are described.

  11. Shuttle active thermal control system development testing. Volume 5: Integrated radiator/expendable cooling system tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheps, P. B.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted to gather data on a space shuttle active control system (ATCS) incorporating both radiators and an expendable cooling device to provide vehicle heat removal. Two systems were tested and design information was provided for both nominal and limit conditions. The tests verified the concept that an integrated radiator/expendable cooling system can adequately maintain desired water quantities while responding to variations in heat loads and environments. In addition, the need for duct heating was demonstrated, while exhaust nozzle heating was also shown to be unnecessary.

  12. Current Status of Joint AFRL/NASA Microgravity Spray Cooling Research Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalak, Travis; Yerkes,Kirk; McQuillen, John; Golliher, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The Air Force Research Lab and the NASA Glenn Research Center are cooperatively examining spray cooling in a low and a variable gravity environment by conducting experiments principally aboard the NASA Reduced Gravity Aircraft. The objective of these research activities is to examine an effective high-heat flux, high-power thermal management technology using spray cooling for both aircraft and space-based platforms. Previous studies have demonstrated that two phase heat transfer and fluid management are issues that need to be examined. This effort has obtained preliminary results which confirm these concerns. More research is planned.

  13. Mitigation and prevention of exertional heat stress in firefighters: a review of cooling strategies for structural firefighting and hazardous materials responders.

    PubMed

    McEntire, Serina J; Suyama, Joe; Hostler, David

    2013-01-01

    Most duties performed by firefighters require the use of personal protective equipment, which inhibits normal thermoregulation during exertion, creating an uncompensable heat stress. Structured rest periods are required to correct the effects of uncompensable heat stress and ensure that firefighter safety is maintained and that operations can be continued until their conclusion. While considerable work has been done to optimize firefighter cooling during fireground operations, there is little consensus on when or how cooling should be deployed. A systematic review of cooling techniques and practices among firefighters and hazardous materials operators was conducted to describe the state of the science and provide recommendations for deploying resources for fireground rehab (i.e., structured rest periods during an incident). Five electronic databases were searched using a selected combination of key words. One hundred forty publications were found in the initial search, with 27 meeting all the inclusion criteria. Two independent reviewers performed a qualitative assessment of each article based on nine specific questions. From the selected literature, the efficacy of multiple cooling strategies was compared during exertion and immediately following exertion under varying environmental conditions. When considering the literature available for cooling firefighters and hazardous materials technicians during emergency incident rehabilitation, widespread use of cooling devices does not appear to be warranted if ambient temperature and humidity approximate room temperature and protective garments can be removed. When emergency incident rehabilitation must be conducted in hot or humid conditions, active cooling devices are needed. Hand/forearm immersion is likely the best modality for cooling during rehab under hot, humid conditions; however, this therapy has a number of limitations. Cooling during work thus far has been limited primarily to cooling vests and liquid- or

  14. Biosilicified structures for cooling plant leaves: A mechanism of highly efficient midinfrared thermal emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijun; Nie, Qing; Li, Min; Zhang, Fusuo; Zhuang, Jiaqi; Yang, Wensheng; Li, Tiejin; Wang, Yunhua

    2005-11-01

    Biosilicified structures fulfill a variety of crucial functions in biological systems. Here, we present a detailed study of leaf temperatures of silicified leaves of creeping bentgrass (Agrostis palustris) by thermal infrared imaging, and show that biosilicified structures deposited in epidermal cells of plant leaves reduce the heat load of leaves and are remarkably effective in cooling leaves by virtue of highly efficient midinfrared thermal emission (8-12μm) of plant silica. We conclude that biosilicified structures have potential as an environmentally benign practical approach for improving plant tolerance of high temperature.

  15. Cooling rate effects on thermal, structural, and microstructural properties of bio-hydroxyapatite obtained from bovine bone.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Gutierrez, Cristian F; Palechor-Ocampo, Anderzon F; Londoño-Restrepo, Sandra M; Millán-Malo, Beatriz M; Rodriguez-García, Mario E

    2016-02-01

    This article is focused on the study of cooling rate effects on the thermal, structural, and microstructural properties of hydroxyapatite (HAp) obtained from bovine bone. A three-step process was used to obtain BIO-HAp: hydrothermal, calcinations, and cooling. Calcined samples in a furnace and cooling in air (HAp-CAir), water (HAp-CW), and liquid nitrogen (HAp-CN2), as well as an air cooled sample inside the furnace (HAp-CFAir), were studied. According to this study, the low cooling rate that was achieved for air cooled samples inside the furnace produce single crystal BIO-HAp with better crystalline quality; other samples exhibited polycrystalline structures forming micron and submicron grains. PMID:25952013

  16. Advanced fabrication techniques for hydrogen-cooled engine structures. Final report, October 1975-June 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Buchmann, O.A.; Arefian, V.V.; Warren, H.A.; Vuigner, A.A.; Pohlman, M.J.

    1985-11-01

    Described is a program for development of coolant passage geometries, material systems, and joining processes that will produce long-life hydrogen-cooled structures for scramjet applications. Tests were performed to establish basic material properties, and samples constructed and evaluated to substantiate fabrication processes and inspection techniques. Results of the study show that the basic goal of increasing the life of hydrogen-cooled structures two orders of magnitude relative to that of the Hypersonic Research Engine can be reached with available means. Estimated life is 19000 cycles for the channels and 16000 cycles for pin-fin coolant passage configurations using Nickel 201. Additional research is required to establish the fatigue characteristics of dissimilar-metal coolant passages (Nickel 201/Inconel 718) and to investigate the embrittling effects of the hydrogen coolant.

  17. Uncertainties in H2 and HD chemistry and cooling and their role in early structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, S. C. O.; Abel, T.

    2008-08-01

    At low temperatures, the main coolant in primordial gas is molecular hydrogen, H2. Recent work has shown that primordial gas that is not collapsing gravitationally but is cooling from an initially ionized state forms hydrogen deuteride, HD, in sufficient amounts to cool the gas to the temperature of the cosmic microwave background. This extra cooling can reduce the characteristic mass for gravitational fragmentation and may cause a shift in the characteristic masses of Population III stars. Motivated by the importance of the atomic and molecular data for the cosmological question, we assess several chemical and radiative processes that have hitherto been neglected: the sensitivity of the low-temperature H2 cooling rate to the ratio of ortho-H2 to para-H2, the uncertainty in the low-temperature cooling rate of H2 excited by collisions with atomic hydrogen, the effects of cooling from H2 excited by collisions with protons and electrons, and the large uncertainties in the rates of several of the reactions responsible for determining the H2 fraction in the gas. It is shown that the most important of neglected processes is the excitation of H2 by collisions with protons and electrons. Their effect is to cool the gas more rapidly at early times, and consequently to form less H2 and HD at late times. This fact, as well as several of the chemical uncertainties presented here, significantly affects the thermal evolution of the gas. We anticipate that this may lead to clear differences in future detailed three-dimensional studies of first structure formation. In such calculations it has previously been shown that the details of the timing between cooling and merger events decide between immediate runaway gravitational collapse and a slower collapse delayed by turbulent heating. Finally, we show that although the thermal evolution of the gas is in principle sensitive to the ortho-para ratio, in practice the standard assumption of a 3:1 ratio produces results that are almost

  18. Comparison of NASTRAN and MITAS nonlinear thermal analyses of a convectively cooled structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Wieting, A. R.

    1975-01-01

    Comparative steady state nonlinear thermal analyses of a scramjet fuel injection strut are presented. The analyses were performed using the NASTRAN finite element program and MITAS, a lumped-parameter thermal analyzer. The strut is subjected to aerodynamic heating on two sides and is internally cooled by hydrogen flowing from internal manifolds through heat exchangers bonded to the primary structure. Based on coolant temperatures determined by MITAS, NASTRAN predicted temperature distributions throughout the strut which were in close agreement with similar MITAS predictions.

  19. Influence of the cooling method on the structure of 55AlZn coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendala, J.

    2011-05-01

    In metallization processes, metals or metal alloys are used which have a low melting point and good anticorrosion properties. Moreover, they must form durable intermetallic compounds with iron or its alloys. The most common hot-dip metallization technology involves galvanizing, however, molten multi-component metal alloys are used as well. An addition of aluminium to the zinc bath causes an increase in corrosion resistance of the obtained coatings. The article presents results of tests of obtaining coatings by the batch hot-dip method in an 55AlZn bath. Kinetics of the coating growth in the tested alloys were determined in the changeable conditions of bath temperature, dip time and type of cooling. The structure of coatings and their phase composition were revealed. As a result of the tests performed, it has been found that an increase in total thickness of the coatings as a function of the dipping time at a constant temperature is almost of a parabolic nature, whereas an increase in the transient layer is of a linear nature. The structure was identified by the XRD analysis and the morphology of the coatings was tested by means of SEM. It has been found that the cooling process with the use of higher rates of cooling causes a size reduction of the structure in the outer layer and a reduction of thickness of both the intermediate diffusion layer and the whole coating by ca. 25 %.

  20. The use of segregated heat sink structures to achieve enhanced passive cooling for outdoor wireless devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Flaherty, K.; Punch, J.

    2014-07-01

    Environmental standards which govern outdoor wireless equipment can stipulate stringent conditions: high solar loads (up to 1 kW/m2), ambient temperatures as high as 55°C and negligible wind speeds (0 m/s). These challenges result in restrictions on power dissipation within a given envelope, due to the limited heat transfer rates achievable with passive cooling. This paper addresses an outdoor wireless device which features two segregated heat sink structures arranged vertically within a shielded chimney structure: a primary sink to cool temperature-sensitive components; and a secondary sink for high power devices. Enhanced convective cooling of the primary sink is achieved due to the increased mass flow within the chimney generated by the secondary sink. An unshielded heat sink was examined numerically, theoretically and experimentally, to verify the applicability of the methods employed. Nusselt numbers were compared for three cases: an unshielded heat sink; a sink located at the inlet of a shield; and a primary heat sink in a segregated structure. The heat sink, when placed at the inlet of a shield three times the length of the sink, augmented the Nusselt number by an average of 64% compared to the unshielded case. The Nusselt number of the primary was found to increase proportionally with the temperature of the secondary sink, and the optimum vertical spacing between the primary and secondary sinks was found to be close to zero, provided that conductive transfer between the sinks was suppressed.

  1. Definition of the Active Cooling System for the Space Instrument CIVA/Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamartinie, Sujit; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Soufflot, Alain

    2003-03-01

    CIVA/Mars is a space miniaturized spectral imaging microscope. It is designed to in-situ analyze samples on Mars surface. It requires the use of a double cooling system : a passive cooling for the global instrument which will be maintained at a temperature higher than 160 K and an active cooling system for the IR MCT detector matrix which must be maintained at a temperature lower than 140 K. Taking into account the mission constraints, a trade-off analysis of available active cooling systems led to the choice of a thermoelectrical cooler (TEC). Space validation tests of standard multi-stage TECs were performed. Performances did not meet the technical specifications of the instrument. Two types of customized TEC modules were then designed and manufactured : mechanical prototypes from RMT Ltd. and optimized modules from Marlow Ind. A first RMT prototype passed the vibration &shock qualification tests and a second passed the low temperatures vacuum qualification tests with few margins. A Marlow optimized module passed the low temperatures vacuum qualification tests; its characteristics and performances make it compatible with CIVA/Mars. In this paper, the instrument mission and characteristics are first presented. Then TEC design studies are discussed. Finally, optimized TEC space qualification tests are detailed, and the performances analyzed.

  2. The structure of shocks with thermal conduction and radiative cooling. [in astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacey, Cedric G.

    1988-01-01

    A general analysis is presented of the structure of a steady state, plane-parallel shock wave in which both thermal conduction and radiative cooling are important. The fluid is assumed to have a perfect-gas equation of state, with radiative cooling a function only of its temperature and density. Conduction in both diffusive and saturated regimes is treated. For the case of a strong shock, with conductivity and cooling function varying as power laws in temperature, approximate analytic solutions describing the shock wave are derived. For a plasma of solar composition, conduction is found to have a significant effect on the shock temperature and overall thickness of the postshock layer only for shock velocities greater than about 30,000 km/s, corresponding to shock temperatures greater than about 10 to the 10th K, but it affects the local structure of parts of the shock wave at much lower velocities. The effects of conduction are greatly enhanced if the heavy-element abundance is increased.

  3. Cooling rate dependence of structural order in Al90Sm10 metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yang; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Feng; Ye, Zhuo; Ding, Zejun; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2016-07-01

    The atomic structure of Al90Sm10 metallic glass is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. By performing a long sub-Tg annealing, we developed a glass model closer to the experiments than the models prepared by continuous cooling. Using the cluster alignment method, we found that "3661" cluster is the dominating short-range order in the glass samples. The connection and arrangement of "3661" clusters, which define the medium-range order in the system, are enhanced significantly in the sub-Tg annealed sample as compared with the fast cooled glass samples. Unlike some strong binary glass formers such as Cu64.5Zr35.5, the clusters representing the short-range order do not form an interconnected interpenetrating network in Al90Sm10, which has only marginal glass formability.

  4. Active cooling-based surface confinement system for thermal soil treatment

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Newmark, Robin L.

    1997-01-01

    A thermal barrier is disclosed for surface confinement with active cooling to control subsurface pressures during thermal remediation of shallow (5-20 feet) underground contaminants. If steam injection is used for underground heating, the actively cooled thermal barrier allows the steam to be injected into soil at pressures much higher (20-60 psi) than the confining strength of the soil, while preventing steam breakthrough. The rising steam is condensed to liquid water at the thermal barrier-ground surface interface. The rapid temperature drop forced by the thermal barrier drops the subsurface pressure to below atmospheric pressure. The steam and contaminant vapors are contained by the thermal blanket, which can be made of a variety of materials such as steel plates, concrete slabs, membranes, fabric bags, or rubber bladders.

  5. Active cooling-based surface confinement system for thermal soil treatment

    DOEpatents

    Aines, R.D.; Newmark, R.L.

    1997-10-28

    A thermal barrier is disclosed for surface confinement with active cooling to control subsurface pressures during thermal remediation of shallow (5-20 feet) underground contaminants. If steam injection is used for underground heating, the actively cooled thermal barrier allows the steam to be injected into soil at pressures much higher (20-60 psi) than the confining strength of the soil, while preventing steam breakthrough. The rising steam is condensed to liquid water at the thermal barrier-ground surface interface. The rapid temperature drop forced by the thermal barrier drops the subsurface pressure to below atmospheric pressure. The steam and contaminant vapors are contained by the thermal blanket, which can be made of a variety of materials such as steel plates, concrete slabs, membranes, fabric bags, or rubber bladders. 1 fig.

  6. Lightweight, Actively Cooled Ceramic Matrix Composite Thrustcells Successfully Tested in Rocket Combustion Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Elam, Sandra K.; Effinger, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    In a joint effort between the NASA Glenn Research Center and the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, regeneratively cooled ceramic matrix composite (CMC) thrustcells were developed and successfully tested in Glenn's Rocket Combustion Lab. Cooled CMC's offer the potential for substantial weight savings over more traditional metallic parts. Two CMC concepts were investigated. In the first of these concepts, an innovative processing approach utilized by Hyper-Therm, Inc., allowed woven CMC coolant containment tubes to be incorporated into the complex thruster design. In this unique design, the coolant passages had varying cross-sectional shapes but maintained a constant cross-sectional area along the length of the thruster. These thrusters were silicon carbide matrix composites reinforced with silicon carbide fibers. The second concept, which was supplied by Ceramic Composites, Inc., utilized copper cooling coils surrounding a carbon-fiber-reinforced carbon matrix composite. In this design, a protective gradient coating was applied to the inner thruster wall. Ceramic Composites, Inc.'s, method of incorporating the coating into the fiber and matrix eliminated the spallation problem often observed with thermal barrier coatings during hotfire testing. The focus of the testing effort was on screening the CMC material's capabilities as well as evaluating the performance of the thermal barrier or fiber-matrix interfacial coatings. Both concepts were hot-fire tested in gaseous O2/H2 environments. The test matrix included oxygen-to-fuel ratios ranging from 1.5 to 7 with chamber pressures to 400 psi. Steady-state internal wall temperatures in excess of 4300 F were measured in situ for successful 30-sec test runs. Photograph of actively cooled composite thrustcell fabricated by Hyper-Therm is shown. The thrustcell is a silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composite with woven cooling channels. The matrix is formed via chemical vapor infiltration. Photograph of

  7. Thermally Activated Cooling: A Regional Approach for EstimatingBuilding Adoption

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2005-06-01

    This paper examines the economic potential for thermally-activated cooling (TAC) technologies as a component of distributed energy resource (DER) systems in California. A geographic information system (GIS) is used to assess the regional variation of TAC potential and to visualize the geographic pattern of potential adoption. The economic potential and feasibility of DER systems in general, and especially TAC, is highly dependent on regional factors such as retail electricity rates, building cooling loads, and building heating loads. Each of these factors varies with location, and their geographic overlap at different sites is an important determinant in a market assessment of DER and TAC. This analysis uses system payback period as the metric to show the regional variation of TAC potential in California office buildings. The DER system payback with and without TAC is calculated for different regions in California using localized values of retail electricity rates and the weather-dependent variation in building cooling and heating loads. This GIS-based method has numerous applications in building efficiency studies where geographically dependent variables, such as space cooling and heating energy use, play an important role.

  8. L10 structure formation in slow-cooled Fe-Au nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, P.; Zhang, Y.; Kramer, M. J.; Lewis, L. H.; Shield, J. E.

    2012-05-01

    An ordered L10 structure has been formed in near-stoichiometric Fe-Au alloy nanoparticles. The L10 structure with a = 0.367 nm and c = 0.360 nm was observed in nanoclusters with diameters below 10 nm after slow cooling from 600 °C. The stable L10 structure formed from a parent fcc solid solution phase observed in the as-formed clusters. The fcc phase has a lattice parameter of 0.417 nm, significantly expanded compared to both Au and γ-Fe. The saturation magnetization and coercivity of both fcc and L10 structures were much lower than expected considering Fe dilution effects suggesting competing ferromagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic ordering.

  9. Dielectric-loaded waveguide circulator for cryogenically cooled and cascaded maser waveguide structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauss, R. C.; Quinn, R. B. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A dielectrically loaded four port waveguide circulator is used with a reflected wave maser connected to a second port between first and third ports to form one of a plurality of cascaded maser waveguide structures. The fourth port is connected to a waveguide loaded with microwave energy absorbing material. The third (output signal) port of one maser waveguide structure is connected by a waveguide loaded with dielectric material to the first (input) port of an adjacent maser waveguide structure, and the second port is connected to a reflected wave maser by a matching transformer which passes the signal to be amplified into and out of the reflected wavemaser and blocks pumping energy in the reflected wave maser from entering the circulator. A number of cascaded maser waveguide structures are thus housed in a relatively small volume of conductive material placed within a cryogenically cooled magnet assembly.

  10. L10 structure formation in slow-cooled Fe-Au nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, P; Zhang, Ying; Kramer, Matthew J; Lewis, L H; Shield, J E

    2012-05-23

    An ordered L10 structure has been formed in near-stoichiometric Fe-Au alloy nanoparticles. The L10 structure with a = 0.367 nm and c = 0.360 nm was observed in nanoclusters with diameters below 10 nm after slow cooling from 600 °C. The stable L10 structure formed from a parent fcc solid solution phase observed in the as-formed clusters. The fcc phase has a lattice parameter of 0.417 nm, significantly expanded compared to both Au and γ-Fe. The saturation magnetization and coercivity of both fcc and L10 structures were much lower than expected considering Fe dilution effects suggesting competing ferromagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic ordering.

  11. Rapid cooling rates at an active mid-ocean ridge from zircon thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Axel K.; Perfit, Michael R.; Rubin, Kenneth H.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Smith, Matthew C.; Cotsonika, Laurie A.; Zellmer, Georg F.; Ridley, W. Ian; Lovera, Oscar M.

    2011-02-01

    Oceanic spreading ridges are Earth's most productive crust generating environment, but mechanisms and rates of crustal accretion and heat loss are debated. Existing observations on cooling rates are ambiguous regarding the prevalence of conductive vs. convective cooling of lower oceanic crust. Here, we report the discovery and dating of zircon in mid-ocean ridge dacite lavas that constrain magmatic differentiation and cooling rates at an active spreading center. Dacitic lavas erupted on the southern Cleft segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge, an intermediate-rate spreading center, near the intersection with the Blanco transform fault. Their U-Th zircon crystallization ages (29.3 - 4.6 + 4.8 ka; 1σ standard error s.e.) overlap with the (U-Th)/He zircon eruption age (32.7 ± 1.6 ka) within uncertainty. Based on similar 238U- 230Th disequilibria between southern Cleft dacite glass separates and young mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) erupted nearby, differentiation must have occurred rapidly, within ~ 10-20 ka at most. Ti-in-zircon thermometry indicates crystallization at 850-900 °C and pressures > 70-150 MPa are calculated from H 2O solubility models. These time-temperature constraints translate into a magma cooling rate of ~ 2 × 10 - 2 °C/a. This rate is at least one order-of-magnitude faster than those calculated for zircon-bearing plutonic rocks from slow spreading ridges. Such short intervals for differentiation and cooling can only be resolved through uranium-series ( 238U- 230Th) decay in young lavas, and are best explained by dissipating heat convectively at high crustal permeability.

  12. Connecting Star Formation Quenching with Galaxy Structure and Supermassive Black Holes through Gravitational Heating of Cooling Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai

    2014-12-01

    Recent observations suggested that star formation quenching in galaxies is related to galaxy structure. Here we propose a new mechanism to explain the physical origin of this correlation. We assume that while quenching is maintained in quiescent galaxies by a feedback mechanism, cooling flows in the hot halo gas can still develop intermittently. We study cooling flows in a large suite of around 90 hydrodynamic simulations of an isolated galaxy group, and find that the flow development depends significantly on the gravitational potential well in the central galaxy. If the galaxy's gravity is not strong enough, cooling flows result in a central cooling catastrophe, supplying cold gas and feeding star formation to galactic bulges. When the bulge grows prominent enough, compressional heating starts to offset radiative cooling and maintains cooling flows in a long-term hot mode without producing a cooling catastrophe. Our model thus describes a self-limited growth channel for galaxy bulges and naturally explains the connection between quenching and bulge prominence. In particular, we explicitly demonstrate that M*/R_eff1.5 is a good structural predictor of quenching. We further find that the gravity from the central supermassive black hole also affects the bimodal fate of cooling flows, and we predict a more general quenching predictor to be M_bh1.6M*/R_eff1.5, which may be tested in future observational studies.

  13. CONNECTING STAR FORMATION QUENCHING WITH GALAXY STRUCTURE AND SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES THROUGH GRAVITATIONAL HEATING OF COOLING FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fulai

    2014-12-20

    Recent observations suggested that star formation quenching in galaxies is related to galaxy structure. Here we propose a new mechanism to explain the physical origin of this correlation. We assume that while quenching is maintained in quiescent galaxies by a feedback mechanism, cooling flows in the hot halo gas can still develop intermittently. We study cooling flows in a large suite of around 90 hydrodynamic simulations of an isolated galaxy group, and find that the flow development depends significantly on the gravitational potential well in the central galaxy. If the galaxy's gravity is not strong enough, cooling flows result in a central cooling catastrophe, supplying cold gas and feeding star formation to galactic bulges. When the bulge grows prominent enough, compressional heating starts to offset radiative cooling and maintains cooling flows in a long-term hot mode without producing a cooling catastrophe. Our model thus describes a self-limited growth channel for galaxy bulges and naturally explains the connection between quenching and bulge prominence. In particular, we explicitly demonstrate that M{sub ∗}/R{sub eff}{sup 1.5} is a good structural predictor of quenching. We further find that the gravity from the central supermassive black hole also affects the bimodal fate of cooling flows, and we predict a more general quenching predictor to be M{sub bh}{sup 1.6}M{sub ∗}/R{sub eff}{sup 1.5}, which may be tested in future observational studies.

  14. The Cooling Rate of an Active Aa Lava Flow Determined Using an Orbital Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Robert; Garbeil, Harold

    2010-05-01

    The surface temperature of an active lava flow is an important physical property to measure. Through its influence on lava crystallinity, cooling exerts a fundamental control on lava rheology. Remotely sensed thermal radiance data acquired by multispectral sensors such as Landsat Thematic Mapper and the Terra Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer, are of insufficient spectral and radiometric fidelity to allow for realistic determination of lava surface temperatures from Earth orbit. This paper presents results obtained from the analysis of active lava flows using hyperspectral data acquired by NASA's Earth Observing-1 Hyperion imaging spectrometer. The contiguous nature of the measured radiance spectrum in the 0.4-2.5 micron region means that, although sensor saturation most certainly occurs, unsaturated radiance data are always available from even the hottest, and most radiant, active lava flow surfaces. The increased number of wavebands available allows for the assumption of more complex flow surface temperature distributions in the radiance-to-temperature inversion processes. The technique is illustrated by using a hyperspectral image of the active lava lake at Erta Ale volcano, Ethiopia, a well characterized calibration target. We then go on to demonstrate how this approach can be used to constrain the surface cooling rate of an active lava flow at Mount Etna, Sicily, using three images acquired during a four day period in September 2004. The cooling rate of the active channel as determined from space falls within the limits commonly assumed in numerical lava flow models. The results provide insights into the temperature-radiance mixture modeling problem that will aid in the analysis of data acquired by future hyperspectral remote sensing missions, such as NASA's proposed HyspIRI mission.

  15. The effects of TiO opacity on the atmospheric structure of cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krupp, B. M.; Collins, J. G.; Johnson, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    A quantitative investigation is conducted concerning the effect of TiO opacities on the atmospheric temperature structure in late-type stars. Model atmospheres are computed, taking into account opacity-sampling (OS) or straight-mean (SM) opacities for three singlet and three triplet band systems of TiO. Model atmospheres using OS and SM opacities for TiO are compared with models having no TiO, giving attention to the effects of TiO opacities on the temperature structures of various atmospheres and the usefulness of straight-mean TiO opacities in model atmosphere calculations. The results of the model-atmosphere calculations are presented in two graphs. TiO opacities produce a global atmospheric heating which may reach several hundred kelvins. It is shown quantitatively that the TiO molecule is an important source of atmospheric opacity in cool stars of solar composition. The relative importance of TiO opacities to the thermal structure of a stellar atmosphere is influenced in the outer layers by CO and H2O cooling effects and in the deeper layers by CO, CN, and metal line absorption.

  16. The design of multi-megawatt actively cooled beam dumps for the Neutral-Beam Engineering Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, J. A.; Koehler, G.; Wells, R. P.

    1981-10-01

    To test neutral beam sources up to 170 keV, 65 Amps, with 30 second beam on times, actively cooled beam dumps for both the neutral and ionized particles are required. The dumps should be able to dissipate a wide range of power density profiles by utilizing a standard modular panel design which is incorporated into a moveable support structure. The thermal hydraulic design of the panels permit the dissipation of 2 kW/sq cm anywhere on the panel surface. The water requirements of the dumps are optimized by restricting the flow to panel sections where the heat flux falls short of the design value. The mechanical design of the beam-dump structures is described along with tests performed on two different panel designs. The dissipation capabilities of the panels were tested at the critical regions to verify their use in the beam dump assemblies.

  17. Design and fabrication of an actively cooled Langmuir probe for long pulse applications

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, J.A.; Biagi, L.A.; Ehlers, K.W.; Koehler, G.W.

    1985-11-01

    The details of the mechanical design and fabrication for a Langmuir Probe for the continuous monitoring of plasma density are given. The probe was designed for use as a diagnostic tool in the development of long pulse positive ion plasma sources for use on neutral beam systems. The essential design feature of this probe is the incorporation of two electrically isolated cooling water circuits which actively cool the probe tip and probe jacket. The electrical isolation is required to prevent drain currents from the probe body disturbing the measurement of the probe tip current and thereby the plasma density measurement. The successful realization of the design requires precision components and vacuum tight ceramic to refractory metal brazes. To date this design has successfully operated in steady-state in plasma densities up to 250 mA/cmS and surface heat fluxes of 25 W/cmS.

  18. Mitigation of Autoignition Due to Premixing in a Hypervelocity Flow Using Active Wall Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axdahl, Erik; Kumar, Ajay; Wilhite, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Preinjection of fuel on the forebody of an airbreathing vehicle is a proposed method to gain access to hypervelocity flight Mach numbers. However, this creates the possibility of autoignition either near the wall or in the core of the flow, thereby consuming fuel prematurely as well as increasing the amount of pressure drag on the vehicle. The computational fluid dynamics code VULCAN was used to conduct three dimensional simulations of the reacting flow in the vicinity of hydrogen injectors on a flat plate at conditions relevant to a Mach 12 notional flight vehicle forebody to determine the location where autoignition occurs. Active wall cooling strategies were formulated and simulated in response to regions of autoignition. It was found that tangential film cooling using hydrogen or helium were both able to nearly or completely eliminate wall autoignition in the flow domain of interest.

  19. Mathematical modeling of the thermal and hydrodynamic structure of the cooling reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saminskiy, G.; Debolskaya, E.

    2012-04-01

    Hydrothermal conditions of the cooling reservoir is determined by the heat and mass transfer from the water surface to the atmosphere and the processes of heat transfer directly in the water mass of the reservoir. As the capacity of power plants, the corresponding increase in the volume of heated water and the use of deep lakes and reservoirs as coolers there is a need to develop new, more accurate, and the application of existing methods for the numerical simulation. In calculating the hydrothermal regime it must take into account the effect of wind, density (buoyancy) forces, and other data of the cooling reservoir. In addition to solving practical problems it is important to know not only the magnitude of the average temperature, but also its area and depth distribution. A successful solution can be achieved through mathematical modeling of general systems of equations of transport processes and the correct formulation of the problem, based on appropriate initial data. The purpose of the work is application of software package GETM for simulating the hydrothermal regime of cooling reservoir with an estimate of three-dimensional structure of transfer processes, the effects of wind, the friction of the water surface. Three-dimensional models are rarely applied, especially for far-field problems. If such models are required, experts in the field must develop and apply them. Primary physical processes included are surface heat transfer, short-wave and long-wave radiation and penetration, convective mixing, wind and flow induced mixing, entrainment of ambient water by pumped-storage inflows, inflow density stratification as impacted by temperature and dissolved and suspended solids. The model forcing data consists of the system bathymetry developed into the model grid; the boundary condition flow and temperature; the tributary and flow and temperature; and the system meteorology. Ivankovskoe reservoir belongs to the reservoirs of valley type (Tver region, Russia). It

  20. Design and analysis of the DII-D radiative divertor water-cooled structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, M.A.; Smith, J.P.; Baxi, C.B.; Bozek; Chin, E.; Phelps, R.D.; Redler, K.M.; Reis, E.E.

    1995-10-01

    The Radiative Divertor is a major modification to the divertor of DIII-D and is being designed and fabricated for installation in late 1996. The Radiative Divertor Program (RDP) will enhance the dissipative processes in the edge and divertor plasmas to reduce the heat flux and plasma erosion at the divertor target. This approach will have major implications for the heat removal methods used in future devices. The divertor is of slot-type configuration designed to minimize the flow of sputtered and injected impurities back to the core plasma. The new divertor will be composed of toroidally continuous, Inconel 625 water-cooled rings of sandwich construction with an internal water channel, incorporating seam welding to provide the water-to-vacuum seal as well as structural integrity. The divertor structure is designed to withstand electromagnetic loads as a result of halo currents and induced toroidal currents. It also accommodates the thermal differences experienced during the 400 {degrees}C bake used on DIII-D. A low Z plasma-facing surface is provided by mechanically attached graphite tiles. Water flow through the rings will inertially cool these tiles which will be subjected to 38 MW, 10 second pulses. Current schedules call for detailed design in 1996 with installation completed in March 1997. A full size prototype, one-quarter of one ring, is being built to validate manufacturing techniques, machining, roll-forming, and seam welding. The experience and knowledge gained through the fabrication of the prototype is discussed. The design of the electrically isolated (5 kV) vacuum-to-air water feedthroughs supplying the water-cooled rings is also discussed.

  1. Design and analysis of the DIII-D radiative divertor water-cooled structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, M.A.; Smith, J.P.; Baxi, C.B.; Bozek, A.S.; Chin, E.; Phelps, R.D.; Redler, K.M.; Reis, E.E.

    1995-12-31

    The Radiative Divertor is a major modification to the divertor of DIII-D and is being designed and fabricated for installation in late 1996. The Radiative Divertor Program (RDP) will enhance the dissipative processes in the edge and divertor plasmas to reduce the heat flux and plasma erosion at the divertor target. This approach will have major implications for the heat removal methods used in future devices. The divertor is of slot-type configuration designed to minimize the flow of sputtered and injected impurities back to the core plasma. The new divertor will be composed of toroidally continuous, Inconel 625 water-cooled rings of sandwich construction with an internal water channel, incorporating seam welding to provide the water-to-vacuum seal as well as structural integrity. The divertor structure is designed to withstand electro-magnetic loads as a result of halo currents and induced toroidal currents. It also accommodates the thermal differences experienced during the 400 C bake used on DIII-D. A low Z plasma-facing surface is provided by mechanically attached graphite tiles. Water flow through the rings will inertially cool these tiles which will be subjected to 38 MW, 10 second pulses. Current schedules call for detailed design in 1996 with installation completed in March 1997. A full size prototype, one-quarter of one ring, is being built to validate manufacturing techniques, machining, roll-forming, and seam welding. The experience and knowledge gained through the fabrication of the prototype is discussed. The design of the electrically isolated (5 kV) vacuum-to-air water feedthroughs supplying the water-cooled rings is also discussed.

  2. Experimental Study on Active Cooling Systems Used for Thermal Management of High-Power Multichip Light-Emitting Diodes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop suitable cooling systems for high-power multichip LEDs. To this end, three different active cooling systems were investigated to control the heat generated by the powering of high-power multichip LEDs in two different configurations (30 and 2 × 15 W). The following cooling systems were used in the study: an integrated multi-fin heat sink design with a fan, a cooling system with a thermoelectric cooler (TEC), and a heat pipe cooling device. According to the results, all three systems were observed to be sufficient for cooling high-power LEDs. Furthermore, it was observed that the integrated multifin heat sink design with a fan was the most efficient cooling system for a 30 W high-power multichip LED. The cooling system with a TEC and 46 W input power was the most efficient cooling system for 2 × 15 W high-power multichip LEDs. PMID:25162058

  3. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The formation of cold clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-10

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the super-massive black hole. When the intracluster medium in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t{sub TI}/t{sub ff} < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km s{sup –1}. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall toward the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, spatial distribution, and estimated Hα morphology of the clumps are in reasonable agreement with observations, although we do not fully replicate the filamentary morphology of the clumps seen in the observations, probably due to missing physics.

  4. Aerothermal performance of radiatively and actively cooled panel at Mach 6.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shore, C. P.; Weinstein, I.

    1979-01-01

    A flight-weight radiative and actively cooled honeycomb sandwich panel (RACP) was subjected to multiple cycles of both radiant and aerothermal heating. The 0.61 m by 1.22 m test specimen incorporated essential features of a full scale 0.61 m by 6.10 m RACP designed to withstand a heat flux of 136 kW/sq m. The panel consisted of heat shields, a thin layer of high temperature insulation, and an aluminum honeycomb sandwich panel with coolant tubes next to the sandwich skin. A 60/40 mass solution of ethylene glycol/water was used to cool the panel which successfully withstood a total of 3.5 hr of radiant heating and 137 sec exposure to an M = 6.6 test stream. Heat shield temperatures reached 1080 K (1945 deg R), and cooled-panel temperatures reached 382 K (687 deg R) midway between coolant tubes. Simulation of the full scale panel indicated that the full scale RACP would perform as expected. The tests revealed no evidence of coolant leakage or hot gas ingress which would seriously degrade the RACP performance.

  5. Upgrading the Solar-Stellar Connection: News about activity in Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunther, H. M.; Poppenhaeger, K.; Testa, P.; Borgniet, S.; Brun, A. S.; Cegla, H. M.; Garraffo, C.; Kowalski, A.; Shapiro, A.; Shkolnik, E.; Spada, F.; Vidotto, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    In this splinter session, ten speakers presented results on solar and stellar activity and how the two fields are connected. This was followed by a lively discussion and supplemented by short, one-minute highlight talks. The talks presented new theoretical and observational results on mass accretion on the Sun, the activity rate of flare stars, the evolution of the stellar magnetic field on time scales of a single cycle and over the lifetime of a star, and two different approaches to model the radial-velocity jitter in cool stars that is due to the granulation on the surface. Talks and discussion showed how much the interpretation of stellar activity data relies on the sun and how the large number of objects available in stellar studies can extend the parameter range of activity models.

  6. Development and testing of thermal-energy-storage modules for use in active solar heating and cooling systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.C.

    1981-04-01

    Additional development work on thermal-energy-storage modules for use with active solar heating and cooling systems is summarized. Performance testing, problems, and recommendations are discussed. Installation, operation, and maintenance instructions are included. (MHR)

  7. Mutagenic activity associated with cooling tower waters treated with a biocide containing 5-chloro-2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one

    SciTech Connect

    Woodall, G.M.; Pancorbo, O.C.; Blevins, R.D.; Ferslew, K.E.

    1987-08-01

    With the Ames Salmonella-mammalian microsome test, significant mutagenic activity was detected in cooling tower water shortly (same day) after treatment with a biocide (CL2150) containing 5-chloro-2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one(5-chloro-IT). Dose-related mutagenic responses with TA97 (-S9) and TA100 (-S9) were produced with the acid fraction (extracted at pH <2 with methylene chloride) of this cooling water sample (specific mutagenic activities of 281,000 and 188,000 net revertants/L equiv of water, respectively). This mutagenic activity detected in cooling water sampled in mid-summer did not persist beyond the first day of CL2150 treatment. The mutagenic activity displayed by the cooling waters with TA97 (-S9) exceeded that associated with the extractable 5-chloro-IT concentration (determined by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry). 24 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Optimization of Heat-Sink Cooling Structure in EAST with Hydraulic Expansion Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tiejun; Huang, Shenghong; Xie, Han; Song, Yuntao; Zhan, Ping; Ji, Xiang; Gao, Daming

    2011-12-01

    Considering utilization of the original chromium-bronze material, two processing techniques including hydraulic expansion and high temperature vacuum welding were proposed for the optimization of heat-sink structure in EAST. The heat transfer performance of heat-sink with or without cooling tube was calculated and different types of connection between tube and heat-sink were compared by conducting a special test. It is shown from numerical analysis that the diameter of heat-sink channel can be reduced from 12 mm to 10 mm. Compared with the original sample, the thermal contact resistance between tube and heat-sink for welding sample can reduce the heat transfer performance by 10%, while by 20% for the hydraulic expansion sample. However, the welding technique is more complicated and expensive than hydraulic expansion technique. Both the processing technique and the heat transfer performance of heat-sink prototype should be further considered for the optimization of heat-sink structure in EAST.

  9. Cooling water canal improvements to correct structural failures and control Asian clams

    SciTech Connect

    England, W.; Snow, R.E.; Palmer, E.C.

    1995-10-01

    Expansive soils destroyed the floor and impacted the roof support columns of a 600-foot-long concrete cooling water intake canal at the two unit, 700-MW Decker Creek Power Plant in Austin, Texas. These movements exposed clay and silt soils in the canal bottom and provided a habitat for a thriving Asian Clam community which caused operational problems in the plant including unplanned outages. Evaluations were performed to address the structural damages, characterize the clam habitat, and identify concepts to remediate the problem conditions. The various concepts evaluated to eliminate the difficulties are discussed in this paper as well as the basis for selection of the remedial concept. The selected remedial concept consisted of replacing the concrete canal structure with large diameter concrete pipes. The paper also discusses the construction sequence to accomplish the work within a limited outage period.

  10. EVIDENCE FOR WIDESPREAD COOLING IN AN ACTIVE REGION OBSERVED WITH THE SDO ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect

    Viall, Nicholeen M.; Klimchuk, James A.

    2012-07-01

    A well-known behavior of EUV light curves of discrete coronal loops is that the peak intensities of cooler channels or spectral lines are reached at progressively later times than hotter channels. This time lag is understood to be the result of hot coronal loop plasma cooling through these lower respective temperatures. However, loops typically comprise only a minority of the total emission in active regions (ARs). Is this cooling pattern a common property of AR coronal plasma, or does it only occur in unique circumstances, locations, and times? The new Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) data provide a wonderful opportunity to answer this question systematically for an entire AR. We measure the time lag between pairs of SDO/AIA EUV channels using 24 hr of images of AR 11082 observed on 2010 June 19. We find that there is a time-lag signal consistent with cooling plasma, just as is usually found for loops, throughout the AR including the diffuse emission between loops for the entire 24 hr duration. The pattern persists consistently for all channel pairs and choice of window length within the 24 hr time period, giving us confidence that the plasma is cooling from temperatures of greater than 3 MK, and sometimes exceeding 7 MK, down to temperatures lower than {approx}0.8 MK. This suggests that the bulk of the emitting coronal plasma in this AR is not steady; rather, it is dynamic and constantly evolving. These measurements provide crucial constraints on any model which seeks to describe coronal heating.

  11. FLPP NGL Structural Subsystems Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaredson, D.; Ramusat, G.; Appel, S.; Cardone, T.; Persson, J.; Baiocco, P.; Lavelle, F.; Bouilly, Th.

    2012-07-01

    The ESA Future Launchers Preparatory Programme (FLPP) is the basis for new paradigms, investigating the key elements, logic and roadmaps to prepare the development of the safe, reliable and low cost next European Launch Vehicle (LV) for access to space (dubbed NGL - Next Generation LV), with an initial operational capability mid-next decade. In addition to carry cargo to conventional GTO or SSO, the European NGL has to be flexible enough to cope with new pioneering institutional missions as well as the evolving commercial payloads market. This achievement is broached studying three main areas relevant to ELVs: System concepts, Propulsion and Core Technology During the preliminary design activity, a number of design alternatives concerning NGL main structural subsystems have been investigated. Technology is one of the ways to meet the NGL challenges to either improve the performances or to reduce the cost or both. The relevant requirements allow to steer a ‘top-down’ approach for their conception and to propose the most effective technologies. Furthermore, all these technology developments represent a significant ‘bottom-up’ approach investment and concern a large range of activities. The structural subsystems portfolio of the FLPP ‘Core Technology’ activity encompasses major cutting-edge challenges for maturation of the various subsystems leading to reduce overall structural mass, increasing structural margins for robustness, metallic and composite containment of cryogenic propellants, significantly reducing fabrication and operations cost, etc. to derive performing upper and booster stages. Application of concurrent engineering methods will allow developments of performing technology demonstrators in terms of need, demonstration objective, size and cost yielding to safe, low-risk technical approaches for a future development. Potential ability of these advanced structural LV technologies to satisfy the system requirements of the NGL and their current

  12. The Cooling History and Structure of the Ordinary Chondrite Parent Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, P. H.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1996-01-01

    Most major meteorite classes exhibit significant ranges of metamorphism. The effects of metamorphism have been extensively characterized, but the heat source(s) and the metamorphic environment are unknown. Proposed beat sources include Al-26, Fe-60, electromagnetic induction, and impact. It is typically assumed that metamorphism occurred in parent bodies of some sort, but it uncertain whether these bodies were highly structured ("onion skins") or were chaotic mixes of material ("rubble piles"). The lack of simple trends of metallographic cooling rates with petrologic type has been considered supportive of both concepts. In this study, we use induced thermoluminescence (TL) as an indicator of thermal history. The TL of ordinary chondrites is produced by sodic feldspar, and the induced TL peak temperature is related to its crystallographic order/disorder. Ordered feldspar has TL peak temperatures of approx. 120 C, and disordered feldspar has TL peak temperatures of approx. 220 C. While ordered feldspar can be easily disordered in the laboratory by heating above 650 C and is easily quenched in the disordered form, producing ordered feldspar requires cooling at geologic cooling rates. We have measured the induced TL properties of 101 equilibrated ordinary chondrites, including 49 H, 29 L, and 23 LL chondrites. For the H chondrites there is an apparent trend of decreasing induced TL peak temperature with increasing petrologic type. H4 chondrites exhibit a tight range of TL peak temperatures, 190 C - 200 C, while H6 chondrites exhibit TL peak temperatures between 180 C and 190 C. H5 chondrites cover the range between H4 and H6, and also extend up to 210 C. Similar results are obtained for LL chondfiles and most L6 chondrites have lower induced TL peak temperatures than L5 chondrites.

  13. Detection of EUV emission from the low activity dwarf HD 4628: Evidence for a cool corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathioudakis, M.; Drake, J. J.; Vedder, P. W.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Bowyer, S

    1994-01-01

    We present observations of low activity late-type stars obtained with the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE). These stars are the slowest rotators, and acoustic heating may dominate their outer atmospheric heating process. We report detection of EUV emission from the low acitivity K dwarf HD 4628 during the EUVE Deep Survey in the Lexan/boran band. This detection, in conjunction with the non-detection of this object in the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) all-sky survey, suggests the existence of a cool corona with a characteristic temperature of less than 10(exp 6) K. The flux and spectral signature are consistent with current theories of acoustic heating.

  14. A nonventing cooling system for space environment extravehicular activity, using radiation and regenerable thermal storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayes, Stephen A.; Trevino, Luis A.; Dinsmore, Craig E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper outlines the selection, design, and testing of a prototype nonventing regenerable astronaut cooling system for extravehicular activity space suit applications, for mission durations of four hours or greater. The selected system consists of the following key elements: a radiator assembly which serves as the exterior shell of the portable life support subsystem backpack; a layer of phase change thermal storage material, n-hexadecane paraffin, which acts as a regenerable thermal capacitor; a thermoelectric heat pump; and an automatic temperature control system. The capability for regeneration of thermal storage capacity with and without the aid of electric power is provided.

  15. Inquiry-based Science Activities Using The Infrared Zoo and Infrared Yellowstone Resources at Cool Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daou, D.; Gauthier, A.

    2003-12-01

    Inquiry-based activities that utilize the Cool Cosmos image galleries have been designed and developed by K12 teachers enrolled in The Invisible Universe Online for Teachers course. The exploration activities integrate the Our Infrared World Gallery (http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/image_galleries/our_ir_world_gallery.html) with either the Infrared Zoo gallery (http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/image_galleries/ir_zoo/index.html) or the Infrared Yellowstone image http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/image_galleries/ir_yellowstone/index.html) and video (http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/videos/ir_yellowstone/index.html) galleries. Complete instructor guides have been developed for the activities and will be presented by the authors in poster and CD form. Although the activities are written for middle and highschool learners, they can easily be adapted for college audiences. The Our Infrared World Gallery exploration helps learners think critically about visible light and infrared light as they compare sets of images (IR and visible light) of known objects. For example: by taking a regular photograph of a running faucet, can you tell if it is running hot or cold water? What new information does the IR image give you? The Infrared Zoo activities encourage learners to investigate the differences between warm and cold blooded animals by comparing sets of IR and visible images. In one activity, learners take on the role of a pit viper seeking prey in various desert and woodland settings. The main activities are extended into the real world by discussing and researching industrial, medical, and societal applications of infrared technologies. The Infrared Yellowstone lessons give learners a unique perspective on Yellowstone National Park and it's spectacular geologic and geothermal features. Infrared video technology is highlighted as learners make detailed observations about the visible and infrared views of the natural phenomena. The "Cool Cosmos" EPO activities are

  16. Effect of Secondary Cooling Conditions on Solidification Structure and Central Macrosegregation in Continuously Cast High-Carbon Rectangular Billet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jie; Chen, Weiqing

    2015-10-01

    Solidification structures of high carbon rectangular billet with a size of 180 mm × 240 mm in different secondary cooling conditions were simulated using cellular automaton-finite element (CAFE) coupling model. The adequacy of the model was compared with the simulated and the actual macrostructures of 82B steel. Effects of the secondary cooling water intensity on solidification structures including the equiaxed grain ratio and the equiaxed grain compactness were discussed. It was shown that the equiaxed grain ratio and the equiaxed grain compactness changed in the opposite direction at different secondary cooling water intensities. Increasing the secondary cooling water intensity from 0.9 or 1.1 to 1.3 L/kg could improve the equiaxed grain compactness and decrease the equiaxed grain ratio. Besides, the industrial test was conducted to investigate the effect of different secondary cooling water intensities on the center carbon macrosegregation of 82B steel. The optimum secondary cooling water intensity was 0.9 L/kg, while the center carbon segregation degree was 1.10. The relationship between solidification structure and center carbon segregation was discussed based on the simulation results and the industrial test.

  17. A Method Based on Radiative Cooling for Detecting Structural Changes in Undercooled Metallic Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rulison, Aaron J.; Rhim, Won-Kyu

    1995-01-01

    We introduce a structure-sensitive parameter for undercooled melts which can be measured in containerless processing experiments. We have established that the ratio, R(T), of hemispherical total emissivity epsilon(sub T)(T) to constant-pressure specific heat c(sub p)(T) can serve as an indicator which is sensitive to any changes in short range atomic order in undercooled metallic melts. R(T) (triple bonds) epsilon(sub T)(T)/c(sub p)(T) values for nickel, zirconium, and silicon have been obtained using the high temperature electrostatic levitator while the levitated melts were undergoing purely radiative cooling into the deeply undercooled region. R(T) plots for undercooled liquid nickel and zirconium indicate no significant change in short-range structure from their melting temperatures to 15% undercooling. In contrast, liquid silicon shows marked short-range structural changes beginning above its melting temperature and extending throughout the undercooled region. The short-range structure of liquid silicon is related to the highly-directional covalent bonding which characterizes its solid form. The nickel and zirconium data show that epsilon(sub T) varies linearly with T, in support of metal emissivity theories.

  18. Pre-irradiation testing of actively cooled Be-Cu divertor modules

    SciTech Connect

    Linke, J.; Duwe, R.; Kuehnlein, W.

    1995-09-01

    A set of neutron irradiation tests is prepared on different plasma facing materials (PFM) candidates and miniaturized components for ITER. Beside beryllium the irradiation program which will be performed in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, includes different carbon fiber composites (CFQ) and tungsten alloys. The target values for the neutron irradiation will be 0.5 dpa at temperatures of 350{degrees}C and 700{degrees}C, resp.. The post irradiation examination (PIE) will cover a wide range of mechanical tests; in addition the degradation of thermal conductivity will be investigated. To determine the high heat flux (HHF) performance of actively cooled divertor modules, electron beam tests which simulate the expected heat loads during the operation of ITER, are scheduled in the hot cell electron beam facility JUDITH. These tests on a selection of different actively cooled beryllium-copper and CFC-copper divertor modules are performed before and after neutron irradiation; the pre-irradiation testing is an essential part of the program to quantify the zero-fluence high heat flux performance and to detect defects in the modules, in particular in the brazed joints.

  19. Elemental abundances in atmospheres of cool dwarfs with solar-like activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipova, L. I.; Boyarchuk, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    The elemental abundances in the atmosphere of the red dwarf HD 32147, which belongs to the HR 1614 moving groups, are analyzed. The atmospheric parameters determined from spectroscopic data (the condition of equal abundances for neutral and ionized atoms of a given element) differ considerably from those derived from photometry and parallax data. The abundances of several elements are also anomalous, with the anomaly increasing with decreasing ionization potential. It is concluded that this star is a red dwarf displaying solar-like activity; i.e., having dark (cool) spots on its surface, which may sometimes be considerable in size. Modeling synthetic spectra of stars with cool spots on their surfaces, with the spectral lines consisting of two components formed in media with different temperatures, indicate that the spectroscopic atmospheric parameters derived in such cases are incorrect; this can also explain the observed dependence of the elemental abundances on the corresponding ionization potentials. This leads to the conclusion thatHD32147 is indeed a star with solar-like activity. Several other such stars considered as examples display the same anomalies as those of HD 32147. These modeling results are also valid for Ap and Am stars, and are able to explain short-wavelength observations of the Sun and some stars (the FIP effect).

  20. Strong variable linear polarization in the cool active star II Peg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosén, Lisa; Kochukhov, Oleg; Wade, Gregg A.

    2014-08-01

    Magnetic fields of cool active stars are currently studied polarimetrically using only circular polarization observations. This provides limited information about the magnetic field geometry since circular polarization is only sensitive to the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field. Reconstructions of the magnetic field topology will therefore not be completely trustworthy when only circular polarization is used. On the other hand, linear polarization is sensitive to the transverse component of the magnetic field. By including linear polarization in the reconstruction the quality of the reconstructed magnetic map is dramatically improved. For that reason, we wanted to identify cool stars for which linear polarization could be detected at a level sufficient for magnetic imaging. Four active RS CVn binaries, II Peg, HR 1099, IM Peg, and σ Gem were observed with the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Mean polarization profiles in all four Stokes parameters were derived using the multi-line technique of least-squares deconvolution (LSD). Not only was linear polarization successfully detected in all four stars in at least one observation, but also, II Peg showed an extraordinarily strong linear polarization signature throughout all observations. This qualifies II Peg as the first promising target for magnetic Doppler imaging in all four Stokes parameters and, at the same time, suggests that other such targets can possibly be identified.

  1. Design and simulation of a novel high-efficiency cooling heat-sink structure using fluid-thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongqi, Jing; Li, Zhong; Yuxi, Ni; Junjie, Zhang; Suping, Liu; Xiaoyu, Ma

    2015-10-01

    A novel high-efficiency cooling mini-channel heat-sink structure has been designed to meet the package technology demands of high power density laser diode array stacks. Thermal and water flowing characteristics have been simulated using the Ansys-Fluent software. Owing to the increased effective cooling area, this mini-channel heat-sink structure has a better cooling effect when compared with the traditional macro-channel heat-sinks. Owing to the lower flow velocity in this novel high efficient cooling structure, the chillers' water-pressure requirement is reduced. Meanwhile, the machining process of this high-efficiency cooling mini-channel heat-sink structure is simple and the cost is relatively low, it also has advantages in terms of high durability and long lifetime. This heat-sink is an ideal choice for the package of high power density laser diode array stacks. Project supported by the Defense Industrial Technology Development Program (No. B1320133033).

  2. Optimization research on the structure of horizontally-arranged indirect air-cooling tower under strong wind condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guoyong; Gu, Hongfang; Wang, Haijun; Qin, Yongbo

    2013-07-01

    Strong wind has a significant impact on the heat radiation of the air-cooling system. In this research, a numerical calculation model of 2×1000MW horizontally arranged air-cooling tower is established to simulate the flow distribution and heat exchanging capability of three different structures-horizontally-arranged indirect air-cooling tower, tower with guide wall outside, and tower with a cross wall inside-under high-speed wind and extreme-speed wind conditions. The result reveals that the structure with the guide wall outside the tower only works under strong wind condition while the structure with cross wall inside shows the anti-wind capability under both high-speed wind and extreme-speed wind conditions.

  3. Nondestructive test of brazed cooling tubes of prototype bolometer camera housing using active infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Tahiliani, Kumudni; Pandya, Santosh P; Pandya, Shwetang; Jha, Ratneshwar; Govindarajan, J

    2011-01-01

    The active infrared thermography technique is used for assessing the brazing quality of an actively cooled bolometer camera housing developed for steady state superconducting tokamak. The housing is a circular pipe, which has circular tubes vacuum brazed on the periphery. A unique method was adopted to monitor the temperature distribution on the internal surface of the pipe. A stainless steel mirror was placed inside the pipe and the reflected IR radiations were viewed using an IR camera. The heat stimulus was given by passing hot water through the tubes and the temperature distribution was monitored during the transient phase. The thermographs showed a significant nonuniformity in the brazing with a contact area of around 51%. The thermography results were compared with the x-ray radiographs and a good match between the two was observed. Benefits of thermography over x-ray radiography testing are emphasized. PMID:21280850

  4. Materials Property Profiles for Actively Cooled Panels: An Illustration for Scramjet Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermaak, N.; Valdevit, L.; Evans, A. G.

    2009-04-01

    A scheme for identifying and visualizing the material properties that limit the performance of candidate materials for actively cooled aerospace propulsion components is presented and illustrated for combustor panels for Mach 7 hypersonic vehicles. The method provides a framework for exploring the nonlinear interactions between design and materials optimization. By probing the active constraints along the border of feasible design space, the limiting properties have been elucidated for a representative group of candidate materials. Property vectors that enhance design options have also been determined. For one of the promising candidate alloys (the Ni-based superalloy, INCONEL X-750), the possibilities of reclaiming design space and lowering optimal combustor panel weight by tailoring its strength properties are assessed.

  5. Heat-stop structure design with high cooling efficiency for large ground-based solar telescope.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangyi; Gu, Naiting; Rao, Changhui; Li, Cheng

    2015-07-20

    A heat-stop is one of the most important thermal control devices for a large ground-based solar telescope. For controlling the internal seeing effect, the temperature difference between the heat-stop and the ambient environment needs to be reduced, and a heat-stop with high cooling efficiency is required. In this paper, a novel design concept for the heat-stop, in which a multichannel loop cooling system is utilized to obtain higher cooling efficiency, is proposed. To validate the design, we analyze and compare the cooling efficiency for the multichannel and existing single-channel loop cooling system under the same conditions. Comparative results show that the new design obviously enhances the cooling efficiency of the heat-stop, and the novel design based on the multichannel loop cooling system is obviously better than the existing design by increasing the thermal transfer coefficient. PMID:26367826

  6. A high-fat diet impairs cooling-evoked brown adipose tissue activation via a vagal afferent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Madden, Christopher J; Morrison, Shaun F

    2016-08-01

    In dramatic contrast to rats on a control diet, rats maintained on a high-fat diet (HFD) failed to activate brown adipose tissue (BAT) during cooling despite robust increases in their BAT activity following direct activation of their BAT sympathetic premotor neurons in the raphe pallidus. Cervical vagotomy or blockade of glutamate receptors in the nucleus of the tractus solitarii (NTS) reversed the HFD-induced inhibition of cold-evoked BAT activity. Thus, a HFD does not prevent rats from mounting a robust, centrally driven BAT thermogenesis; however, a HFD does alter a vagal afferent input to NTS neurons, thereby preventing the normal activation of BAT thermogenesis to cooling. These results, paralleling the absence of cooling-evoked glucose uptake in the BAT of obese humans, reveal a neural mechanism through which consumption of a HFD contributes to reduced energy expenditure and thus to weight gain. PMID:27354235

  7. Design Study of Small Lead-Cooled Fast Reactors Using SiC Cladding and Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Abu Khalid Rivai; Minoru Takahashi

    2006-07-01

    Effects of SiC cladding and structure on neutronics of reactor core for small lead-cooled fast reactors have been investigated analytically. The fuel of this reactor was uranium nitride with {sup 235}U enrichment of 11% in inner core and 13% in outer core. The reactors were designed by optimizing the use of natural uranium blanket and nitride fuel to prolong the fuel cycle. The fuels can be used without re-shuffling for 15 years. The coolant of this reactor was lead. A calculation was also conducted for steel cladding and structure type as comparison with SiC cladding and structure type. The results of calculation indicated that the neutron energy spectrum of the core using SiC was slightly softer than that using steel. The SiC type reactor was designed to have criticality at the beginning of cycle (BOC), although the steel type reactor could not have critical condition with the same size and geometry. In other words, the SiC type core can be designed smaller than the steel type core. The result of the design analysis showed that neutron flux distributions and power distribution was made flatter because the outer core enrichment was higher than inner core. The peak power densities could remain constant over the reactor operation. The consumption capability of uranium was quite high, i.e. 13% for 125 MWt reactor and 25% for 375 MWt reactor at EOC. (authors)

  8. Impact of Cubic Pin Finned Surface Structure Geometry upon Spray Cooling Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Eric A.; Kim, Jungho; Kiger, Ken

    2005-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the effects of enhanced surface structures on heat flux using spray cooling. The surface enhancements consisted of cubic pin fins machined on the top surface of copper heater blocks. The structure height, pitch, and width were parametrically vaned. Each copper block had a projected cross-sectional area of 2.0 sq cm. Measurements were also obtained on a heater block with a flat surface for baseline comparison purposes. A 2 x 2 nozzle array was used with PF-5060 as the working fluid. Thermal performance data were obtained under nominally degassed (chamber pressure of 41.4 kPa) and gassy conditions (chamber with N2 gas at 100.7 kPa) with a bulk fluid temperature of 20.5 C. Results for both the degassed and gassy cases show that structure width and separation distance have a dominant effect upon the heat transfer for the size ranges used. Cubic pin fin height had little impact upon heat flux. The maximum critical heat flux (CHF) attained for any of the surfaces was 121 W/sq cm, giving an enhancement of 51% relative to the flat surface case under nominally degassed conditions. The gassy case had a maximum CHF of 149 W/sq cm, giving an enhancement of 38% relative to the flat surface case.

  9. Experiments on FTU with an actively water cooled liquid lithium limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzitelli, G.; Apicella, M. L.; Apruzzese, G.; Crescenzi, F.; Iannone, F.; Maddaluno, G.; Pericoli-Ridolfini, V.; Roccella, S.; Reale, M.; Viola, B.; Lyublinski, I.; Vertkov, A.

    2015-08-01

    In order to prevent the overheating of the liquid Li surface and the consequent Li evaporation for T > 500 °C, an advanced version of the liquid lithium limiter has been realized and installed on FTU. This new system, named Cooled Lithium Limiter (CLL), has been optimized to demonstrate the lithium limiter capability to sustain thermal loads as high as 10 MW/m2 with up to 5 s of plasma pulse duration. The CLL operates with an actively cooled system with water circulation at the temperature of about 200 °C, for heating lithium up to the melting point and for the heat removal during the plasma discharges. To characterize CLL during discharges, a fast infrared camera and the spectroscopic signals from Li and D atom emission have been used. The experiments analyzed so far and simulated by ANSYS code, point out that heat loads as high as 2 MW/m2 for 1.5 s have been withstood without problems.

  10. X-ray observations of complex temperature structure in the cool-core cluster A85

    SciTech Connect

    Schenck, David E.; Datta, Abhirup; Burns, Jack O.; Skillman, Sam

    2014-07-01

    X-ray observations were used to examine the complex temperature structure of A85, a cool-core galaxy cluster. Temperature features can provide evidence of merging events which shock heat the intracluster gas. Temperature maps were made from both Chandra and XMM-Newton observations. The combination of a new, long-exposure XMM observation and an improved temperature map binning technique produced the highest fidelity temperature maps of A85 to date. Hot regions were detected near the subclusters to the south and southwest in both the Chandra and XMM temperature maps. The presence of these structures implies A85 is not relaxed. The hot regions may indicate the presence of shocks. The Mach numbers were estimated to be ∼1.9 at the locations of the hot spots. Observational effects will tend to systematically reduce temperature jumps, so the measured Mach numbers are likely underestimated. Neither temperature map showed evidence for a shock in the vicinity of the presumed radio relic near the southwest subcluster. However, the presence of a weak shock cannot be ruled out. There was tension between the temperatures measured by the two instruments.

  11. Isotope shifts and hyperfine structure of the laser-cooling Fe I 358-nm line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huet, N.; Pettens, M.; Bastin, T.

    2015-11-01

    We report on the measurement of the isotope shifts of the 3 d74 s a 5F5-3 d74 p z 5G6o Fe i line at 358 nm between all four stable isotopes ,Fe56Fe54,Fe57 , and Fe58 , as well as the hyperfine structure of that line for Fe57 , the only stable isotope having a nonzero nuclear spin. This line is of primary importance for laser-cooling applications. In addition, an experimental value of the field and specific mass shift coefficients of the transition is reported as well as the hyperfine structure magnetic dipole coupling constant A of the transition excited state in Fe57 , namely A (3 d74 p z 5G6o) =31.241 (48 ) MHz. The measurements were carried out by means of laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy performed on an isotope-enriched iron atomic beam. All measured frequency shifts are reported with relative uncertainties below one third percent.

  12. Fluxless Brazing and Heat Treatment of a Plate-Fin Sandwich Actively Cooled Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.

    1978-01-01

    The processes and techniques used to fabricate plate-fin sandwich actively cooled panels are presented. The materials were 6061 aluminum alloy and brazing sheet having clad brazing alloy. The panels consisted of small scale specimens, fatigue specimens, and a large 0.61 m by 1.22 m test panel. All panels were fluxless brazed in retorts in heated platen presses while exerting external pressure to assure intimate contact of details. Distortion and damage normally associated with that heat treatment were minimized by heat treating without fixtures and solution quenching in an organic polymer solution. The test panel is the largest fluxless brazed and heat treated panel of its configuration known to exist.

  13. Firefighter feedback during active cooling: a useful tool for heat stress management?

    PubMed

    Savage, Robbie J; Lord, Cara; Larsen, Brianna L; Knight, Teagan L; Langridge, Peter D; Aisbett, Brad

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring an individual's thermic state in the workplace requires reliable feedback of their core temperature. However, core temperature measurement technology is expensive, invasive and often impractical in operational environments, warranting investigation of surrogate measures which could be used to predict core temperature. This study examines an alternative measure of an individual's thermic state, thermal sensation, which presents a more manageable and practical solution for Australian firefighters operating on the fireground. Across three environmental conditions (cold, warm, hot & humid), 49 Australian volunteer firefighters performed a 20-min fire suppression activity, immediately followed by 20 min of active cooling using hand and forearm immersion techniques. Core temperature (Tc) and thermal sensation (TS) were measured across the rehabilitation period at five minute intervals. Despite the decline in Tc and TS throughout the rehabilitation period, there was little similarity in the magnitude or rate of decline between each measure in any of the ambient conditions. Moderate to strong correlations existed between Tc and TS in the cool (0.41, p<0.05) and hot & humid (0.57, p<0.05) conditions, however this was resultant in strong correlation during the earlier stages of rehabilitation (first five minutes), which were not evident in the latter stages. Linear regression revealed TS to be a poor predictor of Tc in all conditions (SEE=0.45-0.54°C) with a strong trend for TS to over-predict Tc (77-80% of the time). There is minimal evidence to suggest that ratings of thermal sensation, which represent a psychophysical assessment of an individual's thermal comfort, are an accurate reflection of the response of an individual's core temperature. Ratings of thermal sensation can be highly variable amongst individuals, likely moderated by local skin temperature. In account of these findings, fire managers require a more reliable source of information to guide

  14. Removing Cool Cores and Central Metallicity Peaks in Galaxy Clusters with Powerful Active Galactic Nucleus Outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2010-07-01

    Recent X-ray observations of galaxy clusters suggest that cluster populations are bimodally distributed according to central gas entropy and are separated into two distinct classes: cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) clusters. While it is widely accepted that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback plays a key role in offsetting radiative losses and maintaining many clusters in the CC state, the origin of NCC clusters is much less clear. At the same time, a handful of extremely powerful AGN outbursts have recently been detected in clusters, with a total energy ~1061-1062 erg. Using two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we show that if a large fraction of this energy is deposited near the centers of CC clusters, which is likely common due to dense cores, these AGN outbursts can completely remove CCs, transforming them to NCC clusters. Our model also has interesting implications for cluster abundance profiles, which usually show a central peak in CC systems. Our calculations indicate that during the CC to NCC transformation, AGN outbursts efficiently mix metals in cluster central regions and may even remove central abundance peaks if they are not broad enough. For CC clusters with broad central abundance peaks, AGN outbursts decrease peak abundances, but cannot effectively destroy the peaks. Our model may simultaneously explain the contradictory (possibly bimodal) results of abundance profiles in NCC clusters, some of which are nearly flat, while others have strong central peaks similar to those in CC clusters. A statistical analysis of the sizes of central abundance peaks and their redshift evolution may shed interesting insights on the origin of both types of NCC clusters and the evolution history of thermodynamics and AGN activity in clusters.

  15. Cooled Transmission-Mode NEA-Photocathode with a Band-Graded Active Layer for High Brightness Electron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, L. B.; Rozhkov, S. A.; Bakin, V. V.; Kosolobov, S. N.; Militsyn, B. L.; Scheibler, H. E.; Smith, S. L.; Terekhov, A. S.

    2009-08-01

    A Free-Electron Laser (FEL) places many exacting demands on a Negative Electron Affinity (NEA) photocathode, such as the need for an ultra-fast response time, low energy spread for emitted electrons, high quantum efficiency (Q.E.) and a high average photocurrent. However, these key requirements are conflicting, and cannot be fulfilled by conventional photocathode design. For example, to achieve ˜10 ps response time, the photocathode active layer should be thinned to ˜100-150 nm, but this thickness is insufficient to provide near-complete absorption of light with hv≈ɛg so high Q.E. cannot be achieved. Complete optical absorption and high Q.E. can be obtained using a thin active layer at higher photon energies, but this generates photoelectrons with excess kinetic energy within the semiconductor. These photoelectrons do not thermalise in a thin active layer, so yield a broad energy distribution in the emitted electrons. Moreover, cooling of the conventional semiconductor photocathode structure is ineffective due to its fragility, so it cannot be pressed firmly to a heat sink to attain good thermal contact. Consequently, the maximum CW photocurrent is limited to a few miiliamps. The goal of our work is to develop a new design of NEA-photocathode which is optimised for FEL applications.

  16. Recent results on structural control of an active precision structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, C. C.; Fanson, J. L.; Smith, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes recent results in structural control of an active precision truss structure at JPL. The goal is to develop practical control methodology and to apply to active truss structures intended for high precision space-based optics applications. The active structure considered incorporates piezoelectric active members which apply control forces internal to the structure and thereby improve the structure's dimensional stability. Two approaches to structural control system design were investigated. The first approach uses only noncollocated measurements of acceleration at the location of a simulated optical component to achieve structural stabilization. The second approach is essentially the same as the first one except that a viscous damper was used in place of a truss member on the structure to improve the dampings of selected flexible modes. The corresponding experimental closed-loop results are presented in this paper.

  17. Minimization of corrosion using activated sodium bromide in a medium-size cooling tower

    SciTech Connect

    Nalepa, C.J.; Moore, R.M.; Golson, G.L.; Wolfe, T.W.; Puckorius, P.R.

    1996-07-01

    The cooling tower at the Albermarle Process Development Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, historically used chlorine as a biocide in combination with phosphorus-based corrosion/scale inhibitors. Although this regimen provided biocontrol, sludge and iron buildup was a problem in low-velocity, small cross-sectional areas of piping. A general cleanup of the system was performed in April 1995. This cleanup was followed with a switch to a two-component corrosion inhibitor/dispersant package. Alternate biocides were evaluated at this time. Activated sodium bromide was found to be particularly effective in this tower, which operates at pH {approximately}8.4. Relative to chlorine, the use of activated sodium bromide led to a decrease in general and pitting corrosion on mild steel. The reduced corrosion appears to be due to a combination of both chemical (less attack on passivated metal surfaces) and biological factors (better control of heterotrophic and sessile bacteria). These conclusions are supported by chemical analyses, corrosion meter and coupon data, dip slides, biological activity reaction tests, and visual observations of the tower sump and heat exchanger surfaces.

  18. Case study: Minimization of corrosion using activated sodium bromide in a medium-size cooling tower

    SciTech Connect

    Nalepa, C.J.; Moore, R.M.; Golson, G.L.; Wolfe, T.W.; Puckorius, P.R.

    1996-10-01

    The process loop cooling tower at the Albemarle Process Development Center in Baton Rouge, LA has historically used chlorine as the biocide together with industry accepted phosphorus-based corrosion/scale inhibitors. Although this regimen provided biocontrol, sludge and iron build-up was a recurring problem, especially in low-velocity, small cross-sectional areas of piping. A general clean-up of the system was performed in April, 1995. This clean-up was followed with a switch to a two-component corrosion inhibitor/dispersant package. It was decided to study alternate biocides as well at this time. Activated sodium bromide was found to be particularly effective in this tower, which operates at pH {approximately}8.4. Relative to chlorine, the use of activated sodium bromide led to a decrease in general and pitting corrosion on mild steel while maintaining prior performance on admiralty brass. The reduced corrosion appears to be due to a combination of both chemical (less attack on passivated metal surfaces) and biological factors (better control of heterotrophic and sessile bacteria). These conclusions are supported by chemical analyses, corrosion meter and coupon data, dip slides, BART (biological activity reaction test) tests, and visual observations of the tower sump and heat exchanger surfaces.

  19. Tractor Mechanics. Maintaining and Servicing the Cooling System, Learning Activity Packages 34-40; Maintaining and Servicing Hydraulic Systems, Learning Activity Packages 41-48.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    This series of learning activity packages focuses on two areas of tractor mechanics: (1) maintaining and servicing the cooling system and (2) maintaining and servicing hydraulic systems. Each of the fifteen illustrated learning activity packages follows a typical format: introduction, directions, objectives, learning activities, tools and…

  20. Methodology to determine cost and performance goals for active solar cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, M. L.; Wahlig, M.

    1981-11-01

    Systems analysis is used to calculate the 20 yr. present value of energy savings of solar cooling systems located in Texas, Arizona, Florida, and Washington, DC, and methods of solar system development to meet the cost goals of economic operation are outlined. Solar cooling systems are projected to begin commercial entry in 1986 and reach 20% of the total cooling market by the year 2000, producing 0.14 quads of displaced energy. A numerical simulation was carried out for both residential and commercial solar cooling units with consideration for system cost goals, cost goals per unit collector area, and the cost goals per ton of cooling. System size was targeted as a 3 ton residential chiller and a 25 ton commercial absorption cooling unit. The costs for volume production are provided, along with trends for an incrementally decreasing need for tax incentives, ending in about 1994

  1. Cooling rate of some active lavas determined using an orbital imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Robert; Garbeil, Harold; Davies, Ashley G.

    2010-06-01

    The surface temperature of an active lava flow is an important physical property to measure. Through its influence on lava crystallinity, cooling exerts a fundamental control on lava rheology. Remotely sensed thermal radiance data acquired by multispectral sensors such as Landsat Thematic Mapper and the Terra Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer are of insufficient spectral and radiometric fidelity to allow for realistic determination of lava surface temperatures from Earth orbit. This paper presents results obtained from the analysis of active lava flows using hyperspectral data acquired by NASA's Earth Observing-1 Hyperion imaging spectrometer. The contiguous nature of the measured radiance spectrum in the 0.4-2.5 μm region means that, although sensor saturation most certainly occurs, unsaturated radiance data are always available from even the hottest, and most radiant, active lava flow surfaces. The increased number of wave bands available allows for the assumption of more complex flow surface temperature distributions in the radiance-to-temperature inversion processes. The technique is illustrated by using a hyperspectral image of the active lava lake at Erta Ale volcano, Ethiopia, a well-characterized calibration target, a time series of three Hyperion images of an active lava flow acquired during a 4 day period at Mount Etna, Sicily, as well as a lava flow erupted at Nyamuragira, Democratic Republic of Congo. The results provide insights into the temperature-radiance mixture modeling problem that will aid in the analysis of data acquired by future hyperspectral remote sensing missions, such as NASA's proposed HyspIRI mission.

  2. Design of multi-megawatt actively cooled beam dumps for the Neutral-Beam Engineering Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, J.A.; Koehler, G.; Wells, R.P.

    1981-10-01

    The Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility will test Neutral Beam Sources up to 170 keV, 65 Amps, with 30 second beam-on times. For this application actively cooled beam dumps for both the neutral and ionized particles will be required. The dumps will be able to dissipate a wide range of power density profiles by utilizing a standard modular panel design which is incorporated into a moveable support structure. The thermal hydraulic design of the panels permit the dissipation of 2 kW/cm/sup 2/ anywhere on the panel surface. The water requirements of the dumps are optimized by restricting the flow to panel sections where the heat flux falls short of the design value. The mechanical design of the beam-dump structures is described along with tests performed on a prototype panel. The prototype tests were performed on two different panel designs, one manufactured by Mc Donnell Douglas (MDAC) the other by United Technologies (UT). The dissipation capabilities of the panels were tested at the critical regions to verify their use in the beam dump assemblies.

  3. Thermal and structural behavior of milk fat. 3. Influence of cooling rate and droplet size on cream crystallization.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Christelle; Bourgaux, Claudie; Lesieur, Pierre; Bernadou, Sophie; Keller, Gérard; Ollivon, Michel

    2002-10-01

    Crystallization of triacylglycerols (TG) within milk fat globules of creams is studied with an instrument coupling time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRDT) at both small and wide angles and high-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) at cooling rates of -3 and -1 degrees C/min from 60 to -10 degrees C and compared to that of the anhydrous milk fat (AMF). Simultaneous thermal analysis permits correlation of the formation of the different crystalline species monitored by XRDT to the DSC events. Under the above cooling conditions, milk fat TG sequentially crystallize, within the globules, from about 19 degrees C, in three different lamellar structures with double-chain length (2L) stackings of 47 and 42 A and a triple-chain length (3L) stacking of 71 A, all of alpha type, which are correlated to two or three overlapped exothermic peaks recorded by DSC. Compared to what is observed for AMF, TG crystallization in emulsion (i) favors sub-alpha formation at low temperature and (ii) induces layer stacking defects in 3L crystals. Subsequent heating at 2 degrees C/min shows numerous structural rearrangements before final melting, confirming that (i) cooling at -1 degrees C/min leads to the formation of unstable crystalline varieties in the dispersed state and (ii) a monotropic transition alpha-->beta' takes place. Similar behavior is observed for cooling at -3 degrees C/min and subsequent heating. An overall comparison of the thermal and structural properties of the crystalline species formed as a function of the cooling rate, between >1000 and 0.15 degrees C/min, and stabilization time at 4 degrees C is given. Depending on the cooling rate, at least five crystalline subcell species are observed at wide angles, alpha and sub-alpha, two beta' and one beta. At small angles, at least six lamellar stackings are identified, three 3L and three 2L. However, a single subcell packing (e.g., alpha) might correspond to several longitudinal chain stackings

  4. Experimental characterization of the ITER TF structure cooling in HELIOS test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoa, C.; Rousset, B.; Lacroix, B.; Nicollet, S.; Vallcorba, R.; Bessette, D.; Vostner, A.; Gauthier, F.

    2015-12-01

    During ITER plasma operation, large thermal loads are generated in the stainless steel Toroidal Field (TF) coil casing. To minimize the impact on the temperature of the TF Cable in Conduit Conductor (CICC), these heat loads are intercepted by case cooling channels which are implemented at the interface to the winding pack. One of the design options for the case cooling channels consists of a stainless steel pipe inserted in a rectangular groove which is machined in the casing and filled by a charged resin of high thermal conductivity. A higher number of cooling pipes is arranged at the plasma facing wall of the case, thus providing a better shielding to the TF conductor at high field. To assess the efficiency of the cooling pipes and their thermal coupling with the charged resin, experimental characterizations have been performed. First of all, the thermal resistance vs temperature of some of the individual components of a TF coil has been measured on representative samples in a cryogenic bench. Further characterizations have been performed on an integrated mock-up of the TF cooling scheme at cryogenic temperature in HELIOS test facility at CEA Grenoble. The mock-up consists of a piece of TF casing that can be heated uniformly on its surface, one cooling channel implemented in the groove which is filled with the charged resin, the filler, the ground insulation, the radial plate and one insulated CICC. The cooling pipe and the CICC are cooled by supercritical helium at 4.4 K and 5 bar; the instrumentation consists of temperature, pressure and mass flow sensors. Both stationary and transient operating modes have been investigated to assess the thermal efficiency of the case cooling design. The experimental tests are presented and the first results are discussed and analyzed in this document.

  5. Ciguatoxins activate specific cold pain pathways to elicit burning pain from cooling.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Irina; Touska, Filip; Hess, Andreas; Hinsbey, Rachel; Sattler, Simon; Lampert, Angelika; Sergejeva, Marina; Sharov, Anastasia; Collins, Lindon S; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Engel, Matthias; Cabot, Peter J; Wood, John N; Vlachová, Viktorie; Reeh, Peter W; Lewis, Richard J; Zimmermann, Katharina

    2012-10-01

    Ciguatoxins are sodium channel activator toxins that cause ciguatera, the most common form of ichthyosarcotoxism, which presents with peripheral sensory disturbances, including the pathognomonic symptom of cold allodynia which is characterized by intense stabbing and burning pain in response to mild cooling. We show that intraplantar injection of P-CTX-1 elicits cold allodynia in mice by targeting specific unmyelinated and myelinated primary sensory neurons. These include both tetrodotoxin-resistant, TRPA1-expressing peptidergic C-fibres and tetrodotoxin-sensitive A-fibres. P-CTX-1 does not directly open heterologously expressed TRPA1, but when co-expressed with Na(v) channels, sodium channel activation by P-CTX-1 is sufficient to drive TRPA1-dependent calcium influx that is responsible for the development of cold allodynia, as evidenced by a large reduction of excitatory effect of P-CTX-1 on TRPA1-deficient nociceptive C-fibres and of ciguatoxin-induced cold allodynia in TRPA1-null mutant mice. Functional MRI studies revealed that ciguatoxin-induced cold allodynia enhanced the BOLD (Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent) signal, an effect that was blunted in TRPA1-deficient mice, confirming an important role for TRPA1 in the pathogenesis of cold allodynia. PMID:22850668

  6. Ciguatoxins activate specific cold pain pathways to elicit burning pain from cooling

    PubMed Central

    Vetter, Irina; Touska, Filip; Hess, Andreas; Hinsbey, Rachel; Sattler, Simon; Lampert, Angelika; Sergejeva, Marina; Sharov, Anastasia; Collins, Lindon S; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Engel, Matthias; Cabot, Peter J; Wood, John N; Vlachová, Viktorie; Reeh, Peter W; Lewis, Richard J; Zimmermann, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Ciguatoxins are sodium channel activator toxins that cause ciguatera, the most common form of ichthyosarcotoxism, which presents with peripheral sensory disturbances, including the pathognomonic symptom of cold allodynia which is characterized by intense stabbing and burning pain in response to mild cooling. We show that intraplantar injection of P-CTX-1 elicits cold allodynia in mice by targeting specific unmyelinated and myelinated primary sensory neurons. These include both tetrodotoxin-resistant, TRPA1-expressing peptidergic C-fibres and tetrodotoxin-sensitive A-fibres. P-CTX-1 does not directly open heterologously expressed TRPA1, but when co-expressed with Nav channels, sodium channel activation by P-CTX-1 is sufficient to drive TRPA1-dependent calcium influx that is responsible for the development of cold allodynia, as evidenced by a large reduction of excitatory effect of P-CTX-1 on TRPA1-deficient nociceptive C-fibres and of ciguatoxin-induced cold allodynia in TRPA1-null mutant mice. Functional MRI studies revealed that ciguatoxin-induced cold allodynia enhanced the BOLD (Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent) signal, an effect that was blunted in TRPA1-deficient mice, confirming an important role for TRPA1 in the pathogenesis of cold allodynia. PMID:22850668

  7. Cooling rate and thermal structure determined from progressive magnetization of the dacite dome at Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, D.; Denlinger, R.P.; Rosenbaum, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    Our study of a magnetic anomaly associated with the recently active dacite dome at Mount St. Helens suggests that the dome consists of a hot, nonmagnetized core surrounded by a cool, magnetized carapace and flanking talus. Temporal changes in the magnetic anomaly indicate that the magnetized carapace thickened at an average rate of 0.03 ?? 0.01 m/d from 1984 to 1986. Petrographic and rock magnetic properties of dome samples indicate that the dominant process responsible for these changes is magnetization of extensively oxidized rock at progressively deeper levels within the dome as the rock cools through its blocking temperature, rather than subsequent changes in magnetization caused by further oxidation. Newly extruded material cools rapidly for a short period as heat is conducted outward in response to convective heat loss from its surface. The cooling rate gradually declines for several weeks, and thereafter the material cools at a relatively constant rate by convective heat loss from its interior along fractures that propagate inward. -from Authors

  8. He II EMISSION IN Lyalpha NEBULAE: ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS OR COOLING RADIATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Scarlata, C.; Colbert, J.; Teplitz, H. I.; Bridge, C.; Francis, P.; Palunas, P.; Siana, B.; Williger, G. M.; Woodgate, B.

    2009-12-01

    We present a study of an extended Lyalpha nebula located in a known overdensity at z approx 2.38. The data include multiwavelength photometry covering the rest-frame spectral range from 0.1 to 250 mum, and deep optical spectra of the sources associated with the extended emission. Two galaxies are associated with the Lyalpha nebula. One of them is a dust enshrouded active galactic nucleus (AGN), while the other is a powerful starburst, forming stars at approx>400 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. We detect the He II emission line at 1640 A in the spectrum of the obscured AGN, but detect no emission from other highly ionized metals (C IV or N V) as is expected from an AGN. One scenario that simultaneously reproduces the width of the detected emission lines, the lack of C IV emission, and the geometry of the emitting gas, is that the He II and the Lyalpha emission are the result of cooling gas that is being accreted on the dark matter halo of the two galaxies, Ly1 and Ly2. Given the complexity of the environment associated with our Lyalpha nebula it is possible that various mechanisms of excitation are at work simultaneously.

  9. Highly porous activated carbon based adsorption cooling system employing difluoromethane and a mixture of pentafluoroethane and difluoromethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askalany, Ahmed A.; Saha, Bidyut B.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a simulation for a low-grade thermally powered two-beds adsorption cooling system employing HFC-32 and a mixture of HFC-32 and HFC-125 (HFC-410a) with activated carbon of type Maxsorb III. The present simulation model adopts experimentally measured adsorption isotherms, adsorption kinetics and isosteric heat of adsorption data. Effect of operating conditions (mass flow rate of hot water, driving heat source temperature and evaporator temperature) on the system performance has been studied in detail. The simulation results showed that the system could be powered by low-grade heat source temperature (below 85 °C). AC/HFC-32 and AC/HFC-410a adsorption cooling cycles achieved close specific cooling power and coefficient of performance values of 0.15 kW/kg and 0.3, respectively at a regeneration temperature of 90 °C along with evaporator temperature of 10 °C. The investigated semi continuous adsorption cooling system could produce a cooling power of 9 kW.

  10. Cooling Vest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Because quadriplegics are unable to perspire below the level of spinal injury, they cannot tolerate heat stress. A cooling vest developed by Ames Research Center and Upjohn Company allows them to participate in outdoor activities. The vest is an adaptation of Ames technology for thermal control garments used to remove excess body heat of astronauts. The vest consists of a series of corrugated channels through which cooled water circulates. Its two outer layers are urethane coated nylon, and there is an inner layer which incorporates the corrugated channels. It can be worn as a backpack or affixed to a wheelchair. The unit includes a rechargeable battery, mini-pump, two quart reservoir and heat sink to cool the water.

  11. Heat transfer model to characterize the focal cooling necessary to suppress spontaneous epileptiform activity (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Reynaldo G.; Davalos, Rafael V.; Garcia, Paul A.; Rubinsky, Boris; Berger, Mitchel

    2005-04-01

    Epilepsy is characterized by paroxysmal transient disturbances of the electrical activity of the brain. Symptoms are manifested as impairment of motor, sensory, or psychic function with or without loss of consciousness or convulsive seizures. This paper presents an initial post-operative heat transfer analysis of surgery performed on a 41 year-old man with medically intractable Epilepsy. The surgery involved tumor removal and the resection of adjacent epileptogenic tissue. Electrocorticography was performed before resection. Cold saline was applied to the resulting interictal spike foci resulting in transient, complete cessation of spiking. A transient one dimensional semi-infinite finite element model of the surface of the brain was developed to simulate the surgery. An approximate temperature distribution of the perfused brain was developed by applying the bioheat equation. The model quantifies the surface heat flux reached in achieving seizure cessation to within an order of magnitude. Rat models have previously shown that the brain surface temperature range to rapidly terminate epileptogenic activity is 20-24°C. The developed model predicts that a constant heat flux of approximately -13,000W/m2, applied at the surface of the human brain, would achieve a surface temperature in this range in approximately 3 seconds. A parametric study was subsequently performed to characterize the effects of brain metabolism and brain blood perfusion as a function of the determined heat flux. The results of these findings can be used as a first approximation in defining the specifications of a cooling device to suppress seizures in human models.

  12. Heating and Cooling System Design for a Modern Transportable Container

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Jason E.

    2015-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been tasked with the design of a modern transportable container (MTC) for use in high reliability transportation environments. The container is required to transport cargo capable of generating its own heat and operate under the United States’ climatic extremes. In response to these requirements, active heating and cooling is necessary to maintain a controlled environment inside the container. The following thesis project documents the design of an active heating, active cooling, and combined active heating and cooling system (now referred to as active heating and cooling systems) through computational thermal analyses, scoping of commercial system options, and mechanical integration with the container’s structure.

  13. Simulation of cooling and solidification of three-dimensional bulk borosilicate glass. Effect of structural relaxations

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, N.; George, D.; Ahzi, Said; Remond, Y.; Joulaee, N.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Bouyer, F.

    2013-04-20

    The modeling of the viscoelastic stress evolution and specific volume relaxation of a bulky glass cast is presented in this article and is applied to the experimental cooling process of an inactive nuclear waste vitrification process. The concerned borosilicate glass is solidified and cooled down to ambient temperature in a stainless steel canister, and the thermomechanical response of the package is simulated. There exists a deviant compression of the liquid core due to the large glass package compared to standard tempered glass plates. The stress load development of the glass cast is finally studied for different thermal load scenarios, where the cooling process parameters or the final cooldown rates were changed, and we found a great influence of the studied cooldown rates on the maximum stress buildup at ambient temperature.

  14. Simulation of cooling and solidification of three-dimensional bulk borosilicate glass: effect of structural relaxations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, N.; George, D.; Ahzi, S.; Rémond, Y.; Joulaee, N.; Khaleel, M. A.; Bouyer, F.

    2014-02-01

    The modeling of the viscoelastic stress evolution and specific volume relaxation of a bulky glass cast is presented in this article and is applied to the experimental cooling process of an inactive nuclear waste vitrification process. The concerned borosilicate glass is solidified and cooled down to ambient temperature in a stainless steel canister, and the thermomechanical response of the package is simulated. There exists a deviant compression of the liquid core due to the large glass package compared to standard tempered glass plates. The stress load development of the glass cast is finally studied for different thermal load scenarios, where the cooling process parameters or the final cooldown rates were changed, and we found a great influence of the studied cooldown rates on the maximum stress build-up at ambient temperature.

  15. Development of a thermal and structural analysis procedure for cooled radial turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ganesh N.; Deanna, Russell G.

    1988-06-01

    A procedure for computing the rotor temperature and stress distributions in a cooled radial turbine is considered. Existing codes for modeling the external mainstream flow and the internal cooling flow are used to compute boundary conditions for the heat transfer and stress analyses. An inviscid, quasi three-dimensional code computes the external free stream velocity. The external velocity is then used in a boundary layer analysis to compute the external heat transfer coefficients. Coolant temperatures are computed by a viscous one-dimensional internal flow code for the momentum and energy equation. These boundary conditions are input to a three-dimensional heat conduction code for calculation of rotor temperatures. The rotor stress distribution may be determined for the given thermal, pressure and centrifugal loading. The procedure is applied to a cooled radial turbine which will be tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Representative results from this case are included.

  16. Development of a thermal and structural analysis procedure for cooled radial turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ganesh N.; Deanna, Russell G.

    1988-01-01

    A procedure for computing the rotor temperature and stress distributions in a cooled radial turbine are considered. Existing codes for modeling the external mainstream flow and the internal cooling flow are used to compute boundary conditions for the heat transfer and stress analysis. The inviscid, quasi three dimensional code computes the external free stream velocity. The external velocity is then used in a boundary layer analysis to compute the external heat transfer coefficients. Coolant temperatures are computed by a viscous three dimensional internal flow cade for the momentum and energy equation. These boundary conditions are input to a three dimensional heat conduction code for the calculation of rotor temperatures. The rotor stress distribution may be determined for the given thermal, pressure and centrifugal loading. The procedure is applied to a cooled radial turbine which will be tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Representative results are given.

  17. Development of a thermal and structural analysis procedure for cooled radial turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ganesh N.; Deanna, Russell G.

    1988-01-01

    A procedure for computing the rotor temperature and stress distributions in a cooled radial turbine is considered. Existing codes for modeling the external mainstream flow and the internal cooling flow are used to compute boundary conditions for the heat transfer and stress analyses. An inviscid, quasi three-dimensional code computes the external free stream velocity. The external velocity is then used in a boundary layer analysis to compute the external heat transfer coefficients. Coolant temperatures are computed by a viscous one-dimensional internal flow code for the momentum and energy equation. These boundary conditions are input to a three-dimensional heat conduction code for calculation of rotor temperatures. The rotor stress distribution may be determined for the given thermal, pressure and centrifugal loading. The procedure is applied to a cooled radial turbine which will be tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Representative results from this case are included.

  18. Aero-Thermo-Structural Design Optimization of Internally Cooled Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, G. S.; Martin, T. J.; Dennis, B. H.; Lee, E.; Han, Z.-X.

    1999-01-01

    A set of robust and computationally affordable inverse shape design and automatic constrained optimization tools have been developed for the improved performance of internally cooled gas turbine blades. The design methods are applicable to the aerodynamics, heat transfer, and thermoelasticity aspects of the turbine blade. Maximum use of the existing proven disciplinary analysis codes is possible with this design approach. Preliminary computational results demonstrate possibilities to design blades with minimized total pressure loss and maximized aerodynamic loading. At the same time, these blades are capable of sustaining significantly higher inlet hot gas temperatures while requiring remarkably lower coolant mass flow rates. These results suggest that it is possible to design internally cooled turbine blades that will cost less to manufacture, will have longer life span, and will perform as good, if not better than, film cooled turbine blades.

  19. Active impedance matching of complex structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmartin, Douglas G.; Miller, David W.; Hall, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on active impedance matching of complex structural systems are presented. Topics covered include: traveling wave model; dereverberated mobility model; computation of dereverberated mobility; control problem: optimal impedance matching; H2 optimal solution; statistical energy analysis (SEA) solution; experimental transfer functions; interferometer actuator and sensor locations; active strut configurations; power dual variables; dereverberation of complex structure; dereverberated transfer function; compensators; and relative power flow.

  20. Active-member control of precision structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, J. L.; Blackwood, G. H.; Chu, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results of closed loop experiments that use piezoelectric active-members to control the flexible motion of a precision truss structure. These experiments are directed toward the development of high performance structural systems as part of the Control/Structure Interaction program at JPL. Order of magnitude reductions in dynamic response are achieved with relatively simple control techniques. The practical implementation of high stiffness, high bandwidth active-members in a precision structure highlights specific issues of importance relating to the modelling and implementation of active-member control.

  1. Influence of magnetic field structure on the conduction cooling of flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    A simple model facilitates calculation of the influence of magnetic-field configuration on the conduction cooling rate of a hot post-flare coronal plasma. The magnetic field is taken to be that produced by a line dipole or point dipole at an arbitrary depth below the chromosphere. For the high temperatures (at least 10 million K) produced by flares, the plasma may remain static and isobaric. The influence of the field is such as to increase the heat flux (per unit area) into the chromosphere, but to decrease the total conduction cooling of the flare plasma. This leads to a significant enhancement of the total energy radiated by the flare plasma.

  2. Structural models for nickel electrode active mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornilsen, B. C.; Karjala, P. J.; Loyselle, P. L.

    1988-01-01

    Raman spectroscopic data allow one to distinguish nickel electrode active mass, alpha and beta phase materials. Discharges active mass is not isostructural with beta-Ni(OH)2. This is contrary to the generally accepted model for the discharged beta phase of active mass. It is concluded that charged active mass displays a disordered and nonstoichiometric, nonclose packed structure of the R3 bar m, NiOOH structure type. Raman spectral data and X ray diffraction data are analyzed and shown to be consistent with this structural model.

  3. Structural models for nickel electrode active mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornilsen, Bahne C.; Karjala, P. J.; Loyselle, P. L.

    1987-01-01

    Raman spectroscopic data allow one to distinguish nickel electrode active mass, alpha and beta phase materials. Discharges active mass is not isostructural with beta-Ni(OH)2. This is contrary to the generally accepted model for the discharged beta phase of active mass. It is concluded that charged active mass displays a disordered and nonstoichiometric, nonclose packed structure of the R3 bar m, NiOOH structure type. Raman spectral data and x ray diffraction data are analyzed and shown to be consistent with this structural model.

  4. Cooling rate and thermal structure determined from progressive magnetization of the Dacite Dome at Mount St. Helens, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzurisin, Daniel; Denlinger, Roger P.; Rosenbaum, Joseph G.

    1990-03-01

    Our study of a magnetic anomaly associated with the recently active dacite dome at Mount St. Helens suggests that the dome consists of a hot, nonmagnetized core surrounded by a cool, magnetized carapace and flanking talus. The talus does not contribute to the anomaly because its constituent blocks are randomly oriented. Temporal changes in the magnetic anomaly indicate that the magnetized carapace thickened at an average rate of 0.03±0.01 m/d from 1984 to 1986. Petrographic and rock magnetic properties of dome samples indicate that the dominant process responsible for these changes is magnetization of extensively oxidized rock at progressively deeper levels within the dome as the rock cools through its blocking temperature, rather than subsequent changes in magnetization caused by further oxidation. Newly extruded material cools rapidly for a short period as heat is conducted outward in response to convective heat loss from its surface. The cooling rate gradually declines for several weeks, and thereafter the material cools at a relatively constant rate by convective heat loss from its interior along fractures that propagate inward. The rate of internal convective heat loss through fractures varies with rainfall, snowmelt, and large-scale fracturing during subsequent eruptive episodes. In accordance with a model for solidification of the 1959 lava lake at Kilauea Iki, Hawaii, we picture the dome's magnetized carapace as being a two-phase, porous, convective zone separated from the nonmagnetized core of the dome by a thin, single-phase conductive zone. As a consequence of the heat balance between the conductive and convective zones, the blocking-temperature isotherm migrates inward at a relatively constant rate. If the dome remains inactive, the time scale for its complete magnetization is estimated to be 18-36 years, a forecast which can be refined by shallow drilling into the dome and by continuing studies of its growing magnetic anomaly.

  5. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    The technology of high temperature cooled radial turbines is reviewed. Aerodynamic performance considerations are described. Heat transfer and structural analysis are addressed, and in doing so the following topics are covered: cooling considerations, hot side convection, coolant side convection, and rotor mechanical analysis. Cooled rotor concepts and fabrication are described, and the following are covered in this context: internally cooled rotor, hot isostatic pressure bonded rotor, laminated rotor, split blade rotor, and the NASA radial turbine program.

  6. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    The technology of high temperature cooled radial turbines is reviewed. Aerodynamic performance considerations are described. Heat transfer and structural analysis are addressed, and in doing so the following topics are covered: cooling considerations, hot side convection, coolant side convection, and rotor mechanical analysis. Cooled rotor concepts and fabrication are described, and the following are covered in this context: internally cooled rotor, hot isostatic pressure bonded rotor, laminated rotor, split blade rotor, and the NASA radial turbine program.

  7. Hot topic, warm loops, cooling plasma? Multithermal analysis of active region loops

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S.; Christian, G. M.; Dhaliwal, R. S.; Brooks, D. H.

    2014-11-10

    We have found indications of a relationship between the differential emission measure (DEM) weighted temperature and the cross-field DEM width for coronal loops. The data come from the Hinode X-ray Telescope, the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. These data show that cooler loops tend to have narrower DEM widths. If most loops observed by these instruments are composed of bundles of unresolved magnetic strands and are only observed in their cooling phase, as some studies have suggested, then this relationship implies that the DEM of a coronal loop narrows as it cools. This could imply that fewer strands are seen emitting in the later cooling phase, potentially resolving the long standing controversy of whether the cross-field temperatures of coronal loops are multithermal or isothermal.

  8. Structure-Activity Relationship of Azaindole-Based Glucokinase Activators.

    PubMed

    Paczal, Attila; Bálint, Balázs; Wéber, Csaba; Szabó, Zoltán B; Ondi, Levente; Theret, Isabelle; De Ceuninck, Frédéric; Bernard, Catherine; Ktorza, Alain; Perron-Sierra, Francoise; Kotschy, András

    2016-01-28

    7-Azaindole has been identified as a novel bidentate anchor point for allosteric glucokinase activators. A systematic investigation around three principal parts of the new small molecule glucokinase activators led to a robust SAR in agreement with structural data that also helped to assess the conformational flexibility of the allosteric activation site. The increase in glucose uptake resulting from glucokinase activation in hepatocytes in vitro translated into the efficient lowering of glucose levels in vivo with the best compounds. PMID:26685731

  9. MoXy fiber with active cooling cap for bovine prostate vaporization with high power 200W 532 nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Steven Y.; Kang, Hyun Wook; Pirzadeh, Homa; Stinson, Douglas

    2011-03-01

    A novel MoXyTM fiber delivery device with Active Cooling Cap (ACCTM) is designed to transmit up to 180W of 532 nm laser light to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Under such high power tissue ablation, effective cooling is key to maintaining fiber power transmission and ensuring the reliability of the fiber delivery device To handle high power and reduce fiber degradation, the MoXy fiber features a larger core size (750 micrometer) and an internal fluid channel to ensure better cooling of the fiber tip to prevent the cap from burning, detaching, or shattering during the BPH treatment. The internal cooling channel was created with a metal cap and tubing that surrounds the optical fiber. In this study MoXy fibers were used to investigate the effect of power levels of 120 and 200 W on in-vitro bovine prostate ablation using a 532 nm XPSTM laser system. For procedures requiring more than 100 kJ, the MoXy fiber at 200W removed tissue at twice the rate of the current HPS fiber at 120W. The fiber maintained a constant tissue vaporization rate during the entire tissue ablation process. The coagulation at 200W was about 20% thicker than at 120W. In conclusion, the new fibers at 200W doubled the tissue removal rate, maintained vaporization efficiency throughout delivery of 400kJ energy, and induced similar coagulation to the existing HPS fiber at 120W.

  10. Cool Temperatures Reduce Antifungal Activity of Symbiotic Bacteria of Threatened Amphibians – Implications for Disease Management and Patterns of Decline

    PubMed Central

    Daskin, Joshua H.; Bell, Sara C.; Schwarzkopf, Lin; Alford, Ross A.

    2014-01-01

    Chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is a widespread disease of amphibians responsible for population declines and extinctions. Some bacteria from amphibians’ skins produce antimicrobial substances active against Bd. Supplementing populations of these cutaneous antifungal bacteria might help manage chytridiomycosis in wild amphibians. However, the activity of protective bacteria may depend upon environmental conditions. Biocontrol of Bd in nature thus requires knowledge of how environmental conditions affect their anti-Bd activity. For example, Bd-driven amphibian declines have often occurred at temperatures below Bd’s optimum range. It is possible these declines occurred due to reduced anti-Bd activity of bacterial symbionts at cool temperatures. Better understanding of the effects of temperature on chytridiomycosis development could also improve risk evaluation for amphibian populations yet to encounter Bd. We characterized, at a range of temperatures approximating natural seasonal variation, the anti-Bd activity of bacterial symbionts from the skins of three species of rainforest tree frogs (Litoria nannotis, Litoria rheocola, and Litoria serrata). All three species declined during chytridiomycosis outbreaks in the late 1980s and early 1990s and have subsequently recovered to differing extents. We collected anti-Bd bacterial symbionts from frogs and cultured the bacteria at constant temperatures from 8°C to 33°C. Using a spectrophotometric assay, we monitored Bd growth in cell-free supernatants (CFSs) from each temperature treatment. CFSs from 11 of 24 bacteria showed reduced anti-Bd activity in vitro when they were produced at cool temperatures similar to those encountered by the host species during population declines. Reduced anti-Bd activity of metabolites produced at low temperatures may, therefore, partially explain the association between Bd-driven declines and cool temperatures. We show that to avoid

  11. Cool temperatures reduce antifungal activity of symbiotic bacteria of threatened amphibians--implications for disease management and patterns of decline.

    PubMed

    Daskin, Joshua H; Bell, Sara C; Schwarzkopf, Lin; Alford, Ross A

    2014-01-01

    Chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is a widespread disease of amphibians responsible for population declines and extinctions. Some bacteria from amphibians' skins produce antimicrobial substances active against Bd. Supplementing populations of these cutaneous antifungal bacteria might help manage chytridiomycosis in wild amphibians. However, the activity of protective bacteria may depend upon environmental conditions. Biocontrol of Bd in nature thus requires knowledge of how environmental conditions affect their anti-Bd activity. For example, Bd-driven amphibian declines have often occurred at temperatures below Bd's optimum range. It is possible these declines occurred due to reduced anti-Bd activity of bacterial symbionts at cool temperatures. Better understanding of the effects of temperature on chytridiomycosis development could also improve risk evaluation for amphibian populations yet to encounter Bd. We characterized, at a range of temperatures approximating natural seasonal variation, the anti-Bd activity of bacterial symbionts from the skins of three species of rainforest tree frogs (Litoria nannotis, Litoria rheocola, and Litoria serrata). All three species declined during chytridiomycosis outbreaks in the late 1980s and early 1990s and have subsequently recovered to differing extents. We collected anti-Bd bacterial symbionts from frogs and cultured the bacteria at constant temperatures from 8 °C to 33 °C. Using a spectrophotometric assay, we monitored Bd growth in cell-free supernatants (CFSs) from each temperature treatment. CFSs from 11 of 24 bacteria showed reduced anti-Bd activity in vitro when they were produced at cool temperatures similar to those encountered by the host species during population declines. Reduced anti-Bd activity of metabolites produced at low temperatures may, therefore, partially explain the association between Bd-driven declines and cool temperatures. We show that to avoid

  12. Irreversible structure change of the as prepared FeMnP1-xSix-structure on the initial cooling through the curie temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höglin, Viktor; Cedervall, Johan; Andersson, Mikael Svante; Sarkar, Tapati; Nordblad, Per; Sahlberg, Martin

    2015-01-01

    FeMnP0.75Si0.25 experiences a first order para- to ferromagnetic transition at about 200 K. In common with some other alloy compositions crystallizing in the Fe2P structure, the magnetic transition of the as prepared alloy occurs at a lower temperature than on subsequent cooling events. This virgin effect is found to be accompanied by a magnetostrictively induced irreversible structure change that persists on succeeding cooling heating cycles. These findings provide means to understand and control the thermal hysteresis of the (Fe1-xMnx)2P1-ySiy alloy system which is a promising material class for use in magnetocaloric refrigerators.

  13. Effect of the cooling rate in the crystallization of powdered high-speed steels on the formation of their primary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinushkin, E.P.; Arshava, E.V.; Yakushev, O.S.

    1988-03-01

    The structure formation during solidification of steels R6M5-MP and R6M5F3-MP in a range of cooling rates was studied. Cooling rates were evaluated according to the dendrite parameter. Scanning electron microscopy was used predominantly and the image was formed mainly from the detection of reflected electrons. The structure changed in sequence and an increase of the cooling rate led to stabilization of the front peritectic austenite growth. The eutectic consisted of colonies with predominantly rodlike morphology and crystallization was accompanied by the formation of a fine conglomerate of phases.

  14. Structural Continuities in Protest Activity: The Legacy of Sixties Activism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdam, Doug

    Although recent research suggests that individuals active in social protest in the 1960's maintain their activist identities, the structural links which allow the continuity have yet to be identified. A review of research reveals that the continuity of self-identification, political attitudes and activities, and occupational choices is influenced…

  15. Xanthane sesquiterpenoids: structure, synthesis and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Vasas, Andrea; Hohmann, Judit

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this review is to survey the naturally occurring xanthanes and xanthanolides, their structures, biological activities, structure–activity relationships and synthesis. There has been no comprehensive review of this topic previously. On the basis of 126 references, 112 compounds are summarized. PMID:21321751

  16. Observation of excitonic super-radiance in quantum well structures and its application for laser cooling of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani Nia, Iman; Weinberg, David; Wheaton, Skylar; Weiss, Emily A.; Mohseni, Hooman

    2016-03-01

    Excitons, bound electron-hole pairs, possess distinct physical properties from free electrons and holes that can be employed to improve the performance of optoelectronic devices. In particular, the signatures of excitons are enhanced optical absorption and radiative emission. These characteristics could be of major benefit for the laser cooling of semiconductors, a process which has stringent requirements on the parasitic absorption of incident radiation and the internal quantum efficiency. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dominant ultrafast excitonic super-radiance of our quantum well structure from 78 K up to room temperature. The experimental results are followed by our detailed discussions about the advantages and limitations of this method.

  17. Epicyclic Twin-helix Magnetic Structure for Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    A. Afanasev, R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov

    2010-05-01

    Para­met­ric-res­o­nance Ion­iza­tion Cool­ing (PIC) is en­vi­sioned as the final 6D cool­ing stage of a high-lu­mi­nos­i­ty muon col­lid­er. Im­ple­ment­ing PIC im­pos­es strin­gent con­straints on the cool­ing chan­nel's mag­net­ic op­tics de­sign. This paper pre­sents a lin­ear op­tics so­lu­tion com­pat­i­ble with PIC. Our so­lu­tion con­sists of a su­per­po­si­tion of two op­po­site-he­lic­i­ty equal-pe­ri­od and equal-strength he­li­cal dipole har­mon­ics and a straight nor­mal quadrupole. We demon­strate that such a sys­tem can be ad­just­ed to meet all of the PIC lin­ear op­tics re­quire­ments while re­tain­ing large ac­cep­tance.

  18. Cool Sportswear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    New athletic wear design based on the circulating liquid cooling system used in the astronaut's space suits, allows athletes to perform more strenuous activity without becoming overheated. Techni-Clothes gear incorporates packets containing a heat-absorbing gel that slips into an insulated pocket of the athletic garment and is positioned near parts of the body where heat transfer is most efficient. A gel packet is good for about one hour. Easily replaced from a supply of spares in an insulated container worn on the belt. The products, targeted primarily for runners and joggers and any other athlete whose performance may be affected by hot weather, include cooling headbands, wrist bands and running shorts with gel-pack pockets.

  19. Structure interaction due to thermal bowing of shrouds in steam generator of gas-cooled reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, H.H.

    1981-01-01

    The design of the gas-cooled reactor steam generators includes a tube bundle support plate system which restrains and supports the helical tubes in the steam generator. The support system consists of an array of radially oriented, perforated plates through which the helical tube coils are wound. These support plates have tabs on their edges which fit into vertical slots in the inner and outer shrouds. When the helical tube bundle and support plates are installed in the steam generator, they most likely cannot fit evenly between the inner and outer shrouds. This imperfection leads to different gaps between two extreme sides of the tube bundle and the shrouds. With different gaps through the tube bundle height, the helium flow experiences different cooling effects from the tube bundle. Hence, the temperature distribution in the shrouds will be non-uniform circumferentially since their surrounding helium flow temperatures are varied. These non-uniform temperatures in the shrouds result in the phenomenon of thermal bowing of shrouds.

  20. Cool-temperature-mediated activation of phospholipase C-γ2 in the human hereditary disease PLAID.

    PubMed

    Schade, Anja; Walliser, Claudia; Wist, Martin; Haas, Jennifer; Vatter, Petra; Kraus, Johann M; Filingeri, Davide; Havenith, George; Kestler, Hans A; Milner, Joshua D; Gierschik, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Deletions in the gene encoding signal-transducing inositol phospholipid-specific phospholipase C-γ2 (PLCγ2) are associated with the novel human hereditary disease PLAID (PLCγ2-associated antibody deficiency and immune dysregulation). PLAID is characterized by a rather puzzling concurrence of augmented and diminished functions of the immune system, such as cold urticaria triggered by only minimal decreases in temperature, autoimmunity, and immunodeficiency. Understanding of the functional effects of the genomic alterations at the level of the affected enzyme, PLCγ2, is currently lacking. PLCγ2 is critically involved in coupling various cell surface receptors to regulation of important functions of immune cells such as mast cells, B cells, monocytes/macrophages, and neutrophils. PLCγ2 is unique by carrying three Src (SH) and one split pleckstrin homology domain (spPH) between the two catalytic subdomains (spPHn-SH2n-SH2c-SH3-spPHc). Prevailing evidence suggests that activation of PLCγ2 is primarily due to loss of SH-region-mediated autoinhibition and/or enhanced plasma membrane translocation. Here, we show that the two PLAID PLCγ2 mutants lacking portions of the SH region are strongly (>100-fold), rapidly, and reversibly activated by cooling by only a few degrees. We found that the mechanism(s) underlying PLCγ2 PLAID mutant activation by cool temperatures is distinct from a mere loss of SH-region-mediated autoinhibition and dependent on both the integrity and the pliability of the spPH domain. The results suggest a new mechanism of PLCγ activation with unique thermodynamic features and assign a novel regulatory role to its spPH domain. Involvement of this mechanism in other human disease states associated with cooling such as exertional asthma and certain acute coronary events appears an intriguing possibility. PMID:27196803

  1. Heating and cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Imig, L.A.; Gardner, M.R.

    1982-08-01

    A heating and cooling apparatus capable of cyclic heating and cooling of a test specimen undergoing fatigue testing is discussed. Cryogenic fluid is passed through a block clamped to the speciment to cool the block and the specimen. Heating cartridges penetrate the block to heat the block and the specimen to very hot temperaures. Control apparatus is provided to alternatively activate the cooling and heating modes to effect cyclic heating and cooling between very hot and very cold temperatures. The block is constructed of minimal mass to facilitate the rapid temperature changes. Official Gazette of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

  2. A Thermal Physiological Comparison of Two HazMat Protective Ensembles With and Without Active Convective Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, Rebecca; Carbo, Jorge; Luna, Bernadette; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1998-01-01

    Wearing impermeable garments for hazardous materials clean up can often present a health and safety problem for the wearer. Even short duration clean up activities can produce heat stress injuries in hazardous materials workers. It was hypothesized that an internal cooling system might increase worker productivity and decrease likelihood of heat stress injuries in typical HazMat operations. Two HazMat protective ensembles were compared during treadmill exercise. The different ensembles were created using two different suits: a Trelleborg VPS suit representative of current HazMat suits and a prototype suit developed by NASA engineers. The two life support systems used were a current technology Interspiro Spirolite breathing apparatus and a liquid air breathing system that also provided convective cooling. Twelve local members of a HazMat team served as test subjects. They were fully instrumented to allow a complete physiological comparison of their thermal responses to the different ensembles. Results showed that cooling from the liquid air system significantly decreased thermal stress. The results of the subjective evaluations of new design features in the prototype suit were also highly favorable. Incorporation of these new design features could lead to significant operational advantages in the future.

  3. Quinonaphthothiazines, syntheses, structures and anticancer activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeleń, M.; Pluta, K.; Suwińska, K.; Morak-Młodawska, B.; Latocha, M.; Shkurenko, A.

    2015-11-01

    Two new types of pentacyclic azaphenothiazines being quinonaphthothiazines were obtaining from the reactions of dichlorodiquinolinyl disulfide with 1- and 2-naphthylamines. As the reactions could proceed in many ways, the proper structure elucidation was crucial. The structure determination was based on the 2D NMR spectra (NOESY, HSQC and HMBC) of the methyl derivatives. The final structure evidences came from X-ray analysis of the monocrystals. The new quinonaphthothiazines represent angularly fused pentacyclic ring systems which is folded along the N-S axis. The parent NH-compounds were transformed into the N-derivatives. Some quinonaphthothiazines exhibited promising anticancer activity against glioblastoma SNB-19, melanoma C-32 and human ductal breast epithelial tumor T47D cell lines. The anticancer activity dependent on the nature of the substituents and the ring fusion between the thiazine and naphthalene moieties. Two compounds were more active than the reference drug, cisplatin.

  4. Vibration damping with active carbon fiber structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, Reimund; Kunze, Holger; Riedel, Mathias; Roscher, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a mechatronic strategy for active reduction of vibrations on machine tool struts or car shafts. The active structure is built from a carbon fiber composite with embedded piezofiber actuators that are composed of piezopatches based on the Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) technology, licensed by NASA and produced by Smart Material GmbH in Dresden, Germany. The structure of these actuators allows separate or selectively combined bending and torsion, meaning that both bending and torsion vibrations can be actively absorbed. Initial simulation work was done with a finite element model (ANSYS). This paper describes how state space models are generated out of a structure based on the finite element model and how controller codes are integrated into finite element models for transient analysis and the model-based control design. Finally, it showcases initial experimental findings and provides an outlook for damping multi-mode resonances with a parallel combination of resonant controllers.

  5. Structural Design and Preliminary Evaluation of a Lightweight, Brazed, Air-Cooled Turbine Rotor Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Andre J., Jr.; Morgan, William C.

    1958-01-01

    A lightweight turbine rotor assembly was devised, and components were evaluated in a full-scale jet engine. Thin sheet-metal airfoils were brazed to radial fingers that were an integral part of a number of thin disks composing the turbine rotor. Passages were provided between the disks and in the blades for air cooling. The computed weight of the assembly was 50 percent less than that of a similar turbine of normal construction used in a conventional turbojet engine. Two configurations of sheet-metal test blades simulating the manner of attachment were fabricated and tested in a turbojet engine at rated speed and temperature. After 8-1/2 hours of operation pieces broke loose from the tip sections of the better blades. Severe cracking produced by vibration was determined as the cause of failure. Several methods of overcoming the vibration problem are suggested.

  6. Peptide Bacteriocins--Structure Activity Relationships.

    PubMed

    Etayash, Hashem; Azmi, Sarfuddin; Dangeti, Ramana; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2015-01-01

    With the growing concerns in the scientific and health communities over increasing levels of antibiotic resistance, antimicrobial peptide bacteriocins have emerged as promising alternatives to conventional small molecule antibiotics. A substantial attention has recently focused on the utilization of bacteriocins in food preservation and health safety. Despite the fact that a large number of bacteriocins have been reported, only a few have been fully characterized and structurally elucidated. Since knowledge of the molecular structure is a key for understanding the mechanism of action and therapeutic effects of peptide, we centered our focus in this review on the structure-activity relationships of bacteriocins with a particular focus in seven bacteriocins, namely, nisin, microcin J25, microcin B17, microcin C, leucocin A, sakacin P, and pediocin PA-1. Significant structural changes responsible for the altered activity of the recent bacteriocin analogues are discussed here. PMID:26265354

  7. The Herschel Comprehensive (U)LIRG Emission Survey (HERCULES): CO Ladders, Fine Structure Lines, and Neutral Gas Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M. J. F.; van der Werf, P. P.; Aalto, S.; Armus, L.; Charmandaris, V.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Evans, A. S.; Fischer, J.; Gao, Y.; González-Alfonso, E.; Greve, T. R.; Harris, A. I.; Henkel, C.; Israel, F. P.; Isaak, K. G.; Kramer, C.; Meijerink, R.; Naylor, D. A.; Sanders, D. B.; Smith, H. A.; Spaans, M.; Spinoglio, L.; Stacey, G. J.; Veenendaal, I.; Veilleux, S.; Walter, F.; Weiß, A.; Wiedner, M. C.; van der Wiel, M. H. D.; Xilouris, E. M.

    2015-03-01

    (Ultra) luminous infrared galaxies ((U)LIRGs) are objects characterized by their extreme infrared (8-1000 μm) luminosities (L LIRG > 1011 L ⊙ and L ULIRG > 1012 L ⊙). The Herschel Comprehensive ULIRG Emission Survey (PI: van der Werf) presents a representative flux-limited sample of 29 (U)LIRGs that spans the full luminosity range of these objects (1011 L ⊙ <= L IR <= 1013 L ⊙). With the Herschel Space Observatory, we observe [C II] 157 μm, [O I] 63 μm, and [O I] 145 μm line emission with Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer, CO J = 4-3 through J = 13-12, [C I] 370 μm, and [C I] 609 μm with SPIRE, and low-J CO transitions with ground-based telescopes. The CO ladders of the sample are separated into three classes based on their excitation level. In 13 of the galaxies, the [O I] 63 μm emission line is self absorbed. Comparing the CO excitation to the InfraRed Astronomical Satellite 60/100 μm ratio and to far infrared luminosity, we find that the CO excitation is more correlated to the far infrared colors. We present cooling budgets for the galaxies and find fine-structure line flux deficits in the [C II], [Si II], [O I], and [C I] lines in the objects with the highest far IR fluxes, but do not observe this for CO 4 <= J upp <= 13. In order to study the heating of the molecular gas, we present a combination of three diagnostic quantities to help determine the dominant heating source. Using the CO excitation, the CO J = 1-0 linewidth, and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) contribution, we conclude that galaxies with large CO linewidths always have high-excitation CO ladders, and often low AGN contributions, suggesting that mechanical heating is important. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  8. Structural relationships and vasorelaxant activity of monoterpenes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose of the study The hypotensive activity of the essential oil of Mentha x villosa and its main constituent, the monoterpene rotundifolone, have been reported. Therefore, our objective was to evaluate the vasorelaxant effect of monoterpenes found in medicinal plants and establish the structure-activity relationship of rotundifolone and its structural analogues on the rat superior mesenteric artery. Methods Contractions of the vessels were induced with 10 μM of phenylephine (Phe) in rings with endothelium. During the tonic phase of the contraction, the monoterpenes (10-8 - 10-3, cumulatively) were added to the organ bath. The extent of relaxation was expressed as the percentage of Phe-induced contraction. Results The results from the present study showed that both oxygenated terpenes (rotundifolone, (+)-limonene epoxide, pulegone epoxide, carvone epoxide, and (+)-pulegone) and non-oxygenated terpene ((+)-limonene) exhibit relaxation activity. The absence of an oxygenated molecular structure was not a critical requirement for the molecule to be bioactive. Also it was found that the position of ketone and epoxide groups in the monoterpene structures influence the vasorelaxant potency and efficacy. Major conclusion The results suggest that the presence of functional groups in the chemical structure of rotundifolone is not essential for its vasorelaxant activity. PMID:23351149

  9. The influence of cooling on the advance of lava flows: insights from analogue experiments on the feedbacks between flow dynamics and thermal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garel, F.; Kaminski, E.; Tait, S.; Limare, A.

    2012-12-01

    During an effusive volcanic eruption, the crisis management is mainly based on the prediction of lava flows advance and its velocity. The spreading of a lava flow, seen as a gravity current, depends on its "effective rheology" and the eruptive mass flux. These two parameters are not known a priori during an eruption and a key question is how to evaluate them in near real-time (rather than afterwards.) There is no generic macroscopic model for the rheology of an advancing lava flow, and analogue modelling is a precious tool to empirically estimate the rheology of a complex flow. We investigate through laboratory experiments the simultaneous spreading and cooling of horizontal currents fed at constant rate from a point source. The materials used are silicone oil (isoviscous), and poly-ethylene glycol (PEG) wax injected in liquid state and solidiying during its advance. In the isoviscous case, the temperature field is a passive tracer of the flow dynamics, whereas in the PEG experiments there is a feedback between the cooling of the flow and its effective rheology. We focus on the evolution of the current area and of the surface thermal structure, imaged with an infrared camera, to assess how the thermal structure can be related to the flow rate. The flow advance is continuous in the viscous case, and follows the predictions of Huppert (1982); in that case the surface temperature become steady after a transient time and the radiated heat flux is shown to be proportional to the input rate. For the PEG experiments, the spreading occurs through an alternation of stagnation and overflow phases, with a mean spreading rate decreasing as the experiment goes on. As in the case of lava flows, these experiments can exhibit a compound flow field, solid levees, thermal erosion, liquid overflows and channelization. A key observation is that the effective rheology of the solifying PEG material depends on the input flow rate, with high input rates yielding a rheology closer to the

  10. Development of an active structure flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, R. A.; Wyse, R. E.; Schubert, S. R.

    1993-02-01

    The design and development of the Air Force and TRW's Advanced Control Technology Experiment (ACTEX) flight experiment is described in this paper. The overall objective of ACTEX is to provide an active structure trailblazer which will demonstrate the compatibility of active structures with operational spacecraft performance and lifetime measures. At the heart of the experiment is an active tripod driven by a digitally-programmable analog control electronics subsystem. Piezoceramic sensors and actuators embedded in a graphite epoxy host material provide the sensing and actuation mechanism for the active tripod. Low noise ground-programmable electronics provide a virtually unlimited number of control schemes that can be implemented in the space environment. The flight experiment program provides the opportunity to gather performance, reliability, adaptability, and lifetime performance data on vibration suppression hardware for the next generation of DoD and NASA spacecraft.

  11. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1995-01-01

    Method of active suppression of nonlinear and nonstationary vibrations developed to reduce sonic fatigue and interior noise in high-speed aircraft. Structure of aircraft exhibits periodic, chaotic, and random vibrations when forced by high-intensity sound from jet engines, shock waves, turbulence, and separated flows. Method of suppressing vibrations involves feedback control: Strain gauges or other sensors mounted in paths of propagation of vibrations on structure sense vibrations; outputs of sensors processed into control signal applied to actuator mounted on structure, inducing compensatory forces.

  12. AHA! A Cool Salt Water/Density Activity--The Joy of Designing a Simple Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Gaylen R.

    1998-01-01

    Describes two science activities concerning water density and shares an idea for combining these activities into a third, completely new activity. Demonstrates the joy of rekindling the spirit of scientific thinking in a typical classroom. (PVD)

  13. Stochastic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

  14. Is magma cooling responsible for the periodic activity of Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat, West Indies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caricchi, Luca; Simpson, Guy; Chelle-Michou, Cyril; Neuberg, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    After 400 years of quiescence, Soufrière Hills volcano on Montserrat (SHV) started erupting in 1995. Ongoing deformation and sulphur dioxide emission demonstrate that this volcanic systems is still restless, however, after 5 years of inactivity it remains unclear whether magma extrusion will restart. Also, if such periodically observed activity at SHV will restart, can we use past monitoring data to attempt to forecast the reawakening of this volcano? Cooling of volatile saturated magma leads to crystallisation, the formation of gas bubbles and expansion. Such volumetric variations are not only potentially responsible for deformation signals observed at the surface (Caricchi et al., 2014), but also lead to pressurisation of the magmatic reservoir and eventually renewed magma extrusion (Tait et al., 1989). We postulate that volcanic activity observed at SHM over the last 20 years could be essentially the result of the unavoidable progressive cooling of a magmatic body, which was probably assembled over thousands of years and experienced internal segregation of eruptible lenses of magma (Christopher et al., 2015). To test this hypothesis, we performed thermal modelling to test if the cooling of a shallow magma body emplaced since 1990 could account for the monitoring signals observed at SHV. The results show that progressive cooling of a 4km3 volume of melt could explain the deformation rate currently observed. Using the deformation rate obtained from the modelling for the first 15 years of cooling, a reservoir volume of about 13 km3 (Paulatto et al., 2012) and a critical value of overpressure of 10 MPa, it would have taken approximately only 3 years to pressurise the reservoir to the critical pressure and restart magma extrusion. This is in agreement with the time interval between previous pauses at SHV before 2010. Considering the current deformation rates, we speculate that magma extrusion could restart in 6-8 years after the end of the last event in 2010, hence

  15. Active controls technology to maximize structural efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoy, J. M.; Arnold, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    The implication of the dependence on active controls technology during the design phase of transport structures is considered. Critical loading conditions are discussed along with probable ways of alleviating these loads. Why fatigue requirements may be critical and can only be partially alleviated is explained. The significance of certain flutter suppression system criteria is examined.

  16. Active structures to reduce torsional vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthias, M.; Schlote, D.; Atzrodt, H.

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the development of different active measures to reduce torsional vibrations in power trains. The measures are based on concepts developed for active mounts to reduce the transmission of structure-borne sound. To show the potential of these active measures and investigate their mode of operation to influence torsional vibrations, numerical simulations of powertrains with different active measures were done. First experimental results from tests on an experimental (reduced size) power train were used to align the numerical models. The work was done within the project 'LOEWE-Zentrum AdRIA: Adaptronik - Research, Innovation, Application' funded by the German federal state of Hessen, and the Project AKTos: 'Active control of torsional vibrations by coupling elements' placed in the research Framework program 'Navigation and Maritime Technology for the 21st Century' funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology.

  17. Regional and total body active heating and cooling of a resting diver in water of varied temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardy, Erik; Mollendorf, Joseph; Pendergast, David

    2008-02-01

    Passive insulations alone are not sufficient for maintaining underwater divers in thermal balance or comfort. The purpose of this study was to experimentally determine the active heating and cooling requirements to keep a diver at rest in thermal balance and comfort in water temperatures between 10 and 40 °C. A diver wearing a prototype tubesuit and a wetsuit (3 or 6.5 mm foam neoprene) was fully submersed (0.6 m) in water at a specified temperature (10, 20, 30 and 40 °C). During immersion, the tubesuit was perfused with 30 °C water at a flow rate of 0.5 L min-1 to six individual body regions. An attempt was made to keep skin temperatures below 42 °C in hot water (>30 °C) and elevated but below 32 °C in cold water (<20 °C). A skin temperature of 32 °C is the threshold for maximal body thermal resistance due to vasoconstriction. Skin temperatures and core temperature were monitored during immersion to ensure they remained within set thermal limits. In addition skin heat flux, oxygen consumption and the thermal exchange of the tubesuit were measured. In both wetsuit thicknesses there was a linear correlation between the thermal exchange of the tubesuit and ambient water temperature. In the 6.5 mm wetsuit -214 W to 242 W of heating (-) and cooling (+) was necessary in 10 °C to 40 °C water, respectively. In the 3 mm wetsuit -462 to 342 W was necessary in 10 °C to 40 °C water, respectively. It was therefore concluded that a diver at rest can be kept in thermal balance in 10-40 °C water with active heating and cooling.

  18. On the Influence of Heating Surface Structure on Bubble Detachment in Sub-Cooled Nucleate Boiling Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Wu; Peipei Chen; Jones, Barclay G.; Newell, Ty A.

    2006-07-01

    This research examines the influence of heating surface structure on bubble detachment, which includes bubble departure and bubble lift-off, under sub-cooled nucleate boiling condition, in order to obtain better understanding to the bubble dynamics on horizontal flat heat exchangers. Refrigerant R-134a is chosen as a simulant fluid due to its merits of having smaller surface tension, reduced latent heat, and lower boiling temperature than water. Experiments were run with varying experimental parameters e.g. pressure, inlet sub-cooled level, and flow rate, etc. High speed digital images at frame rates up to 4000 frames/s were obtained, showing characteristics of bubble movement. Bubble radius and center coordinates were calculated via Canny's algorithm for edge detection and Fitzgibbon's algorithm for ellipse fitting. Results were compared against the model proposed by Klausner et al. for prediction of bubble detachment sizes. Good overall agreement was shown, with several minor modifications and suggestions made to the assumptions of the model. (authors)

  19. Thermal, structural and diffraction analyses of a gallium-cooled x- ray monochromator

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.S.; Macrander, A.T.; Mills, D.M.

    1992-06-01

    The next generation of synchrotron radiation sources will produce very high power and power density x-ray beams. For example, the Advanced Photon Source (APS) under construction at Argonne National Laboratory will produce beams containing up to 5 kill of power and peak normal power densities in excess of 150 W/mm{sup 2}. Normally, the first optical component to intercept the x-ray beam is a crystal monochromator. This device typically uses a single crystal of silicon or germanium as a band-pass filter according to Braggs` law of diffraction. Under the severe heat loading of modem synchrotron beams, the performance of the monochromator is degraded by reducing the photon throughput and increasing the beam divergence. This paper describes the methods used to calculate the thermally induced deformations in standardly configured monochromator crystals using finite element analysis. The results of these analyses are compared to recent experiments conducted at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) using a high-performance, gallium-cooled crystal. Computer simulations can be used to evaluate the performance of high-heat-load x-ray optics for future synchrotron sources.

  20. Thermal, structural and diffraction analyses of a gallium-cooled x- ray monochromator

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.S.; Macrander, A.T.; Mills, D.M.

    1992-06-01

    The next generation of synchrotron radiation sources will produce very high power and power density x-ray beams. For example, the Advanced Photon Source (APS) under construction at Argonne National Laboratory will produce beams containing up to 5 kill of power and peak normal power densities in excess of 150 W/mm{sup 2}. Normally, the first optical component to intercept the x-ray beam is a crystal monochromator. This device typically uses a single crystal of silicon or germanium as a band-pass filter according to Braggs' law of diffraction. Under the severe heat loading of modem synchrotron beams, the performance of the monochromator is degraded by reducing the photon throughput and increasing the beam divergence. This paper describes the methods used to calculate the thermally induced deformations in standardly configured monochromator crystals using finite element analysis. The results of these analyses are compared to recent experiments conducted at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) using a high-performance, gallium-cooled crystal. Computer simulations can be used to evaluate the performance of high-heat-load x-ray optics for future synchrotron sources.

  1. Active vibration control of civil structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.; Baker, W.; Fales, J.; Shevitz, D.

    1996-11-01

    This is a final report of a one year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Active vibration control (AVC) of structural and mechanical systems is one of the rapidly advancing areas of engineering research. The multifaceted nature of AVC covers many disciplines, such as sensors and instrumentation, numerical modeling, experimental mechanics, and advanced power systems. This work encompassed a review of the literature on active control of structures focusing both on active control hardware and on control algorithms, a design of an isolation systems using magneto-rheological fluid-filled (MRF) dampers and numerical simulations to study the enhanced vibration mitigation effects of this technology.

  2. Dynamics and Emergent Structures in Active Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, Aparna

    2014-03-01

    In this talk, we consider an active fluid of colloidal sized particles, with the primary manifestation of activity being a self-replenishing velocity along one body axis of the particle. This is a minimal model for varied systems such as bacterial colonies, cytoskeletal filament motility assays vibrated granular particles and self propelled diffusophoretic colloids, depending on the nature of interaction among the particles. Using microscopic Brownian dynamics simulations, coarse-graining using the tools of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics and analysis of macroscopic hydrodynamic theories, we characterize emergent structures seen in these systems, which are determined by the symmetry of the interactions among the active units, such as propagating density waves, dense stationary bands, asters and phase separated isotropic clusters. We identify a universal mechanism, termed ``self-regulation,'' as the underlying physics that leads to these structures in diverse systems. Support from NSF through DMR-1149266 and DMR-0820492.

  3. Modular jet impingement assemblies with passive and active flow control for electronics cooling

    DOEpatents

    Zhou, Feng; Dede, Ercan Mehmet; Joshi, Shailesh

    2016-09-13

    Power electronics modules having modular jet impingement assembly utilized to cool heat generating devices are disclosed. The modular jet impingement assemblies include a modular manifold having a distribution recess, one or more angled inlet connection tubes positioned at an inlet end of the modular manifold that fluidly couple the inlet tube to the distribution recess and one or more outlet connection tubes positioned at an outlet end of the modular manifold that fluidly coupling the outlet tube to the distribution recess. The modular jet impingement assemblies include a manifold insert removably positioned within the distribution recess and include one or more inlet branch channels each including an impinging slot and one or more outlet branch channels each including a collecting slot. Further a heat transfer plate coupled to the modular manifold, the heat transfer plate comprising an impingement surface including an array of fins that extend toward the manifold insert.

  4. Large-Scale Coronal Heating from "Cool" Activity in the Solar Magnetic Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.

    1999-01-01

    In Fe XII images from SOHO/EIT, the quiet solar corona shows structure on scales ranging from sub-supergranular (i.e., bright points and coronal network) to multi-supergranular (large-scale corona). In Falconer et al 1998 (Ap.J., 501, 386) we suppressed the large-scale background and found that the network-scale features are predominantly rooted in the magnetic network lanes at the boundaries of the supergranules. Taken together, the coronal network emission and bright point emission are only about 5% of the entire quiet solar coronal Fe XII emission. Here we investigate the relationship between the large-scale corona and the network as seen in three different EIT filters (He II, Fe IX-X, and Fe XII). Using the median-brightness contour, we divide the large-scale Fe XII corona into dim and bright halves, and find that the bright-half/dim half brightness ratio is about 1.5. We also find that the bright half relative to the dim half has 10 times greater total bright point Fe XII emission, 3 times greater Fe XII network emission, 2 times greater Fe IX-X network emission, 1.3 times greater He II network emission, and has 1.5 times more magnetic flux. Also, the cooler network (He II) radiates an order of magnitude more energy than the hotter coronal network (Fe IX-X, and Fe XII). From these results we infer that: 1) The heating of the network and the heating of the large-scale corona each increase roughly linearly with the underlying magnetic flux. 2) The production of network coronal bright points and heating of the coronal network each increase nonlinearly with the magnetic flux. 3) The heating of the large-scale corona is driven by widespread cooler network activity rather than by the exceptional network activity that produces the network coronal bright points and the coronal network. 4) The large-scale corona is heated by a nonthermal process since the driver of its heating is cooler than it is. This work was funded by the Solar Physics Branch of NASA's office of

  5. Warm and Cool Dinosaurs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannlein, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Presents an art activity in which first grade students draw dinosaurs in order to learn about the concept of warm and cool colors. Explains how the activity also helped the students learn about the concept of distance when drawing. (CMK)

  6. Spectroscopy and electronic structure of jet-cooled NiPd and PdPt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Scott; Spain, Eileen M.; Morse, Michael D.

    1990-03-01

    Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of jet-cooled NiPd and PdPt has revealed a dense vibronic spectrum for NiPd and a much more sparse spectrum for PdPt. Four vibrational progressions have been identified for NiPd, and three have been located for PdPt. High resolution investigations of NiPd have established a ground state bond length of r″0 =2.242±0.005 Å with Ω″=2. The observed spectra have been used to bracket the ionization potentials, giving IP(NiPd)=7.18±0.76 eV and IP(PdPt)=8.27±0.38 eV. In contrast to previous work on Ni2, NiPt, and Pt2, no abrupt onset of rapid predissociation is observed for either NiPd or PdPt. A discussion of this result in terms of the expected potential energy curves for the palladium-containing diatomics is presented, which when combined with the frequencies of the highest energy vibronic bands observed yields estimates of D0(NiPd)≊1.46 eV and D0(PdPt)≊1.98 eV. The lack of observable vibronic transitions in Pd2 above 11 375 cm-1 places D0(Pd2) below 1.41 eV, in agreement with Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry. Finally a comparison of the platinum group dimers and the coinage metal dimers is given, demonstrating the increasing importance of d-orbital contributions to the bonding in the platinum group dimers as one moves down the periodic table. The anomalous behavior of the palladium-containing diatomics is also discussed in terms of the highly stable 4d105s0, 1S0 ground state of atomic palladium.

  7. Polychlorinated biphenyls as hormonally active structural analogues

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, J.D. ); Waller, C.L. )

    1994-03-01

    Among the environmental chemicals that may be able to disrupt the endocrine systems of animals and humans, the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a chemical class of considerable concern. One possible mechanism by which PCBs may interfere with endocrine function is their ability to mimic natural hormones. These actions reflect a close relationship between the physicochemical properties encoded in the PCB molecular structure and the responses they evoke in biological systems. These physiocochemical properties determine the molecular reactivities of PCBs and are responsible for their recognition as biological acceptors and receptors, as well as for triggering molecular mechanisms that lead to tissue response. [open quotes]Coplanarity[close quotes] of PCB phenyl rings and [open quotes]laterality[close quotes] of chlorine atoms are important structural features determining specific binding behavior with proteins and certain toxic responses in biological systems. We compare qualitative structure-activity relationships for PCBs with the limited information on the related non-coplanar chlorinated diphenyl ethers, providing further insights into the nature of the molecular recognition processes and support for the structural relationship of PCBs to thyroid hormones. Steriodlike activity requires conformational restriction and possibility hydroxylation. We offer some simple molecular recognition models to account for the importance of these different structural features in the structure-activity relationships that permit one to express PCB reactivities in terms of dioxin, thyroxine, and estradiol equivalents. The available data support the involvement of PCBs as mimics of thyroid and other steroidal hormones. The potential for reproductive and developmental toxicity associated with human exposure to PCBs is of particular concern. 53 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Preservation of bovine preantral follicle viability and ultra-structure after cooling and freezing of ovarian tissue.

    PubMed

    Celestino, Juliana Jales de Hollanda; dos Santos, Regiane Rodrigues; Lopes, Cláudio Afonso Pinho; Martins, Fabrício Sousa; Matos, Maria Helena Tavares; Melo, Mônica Aline Parente; Báo, Sônia Nair; Rodrigues, Ana Paula Ribeiro; Silva, José Roberto Viana; de Figueiredo, José Ricardo

    2008-11-01

    Bovine preantral follicles within ovarian fragments were exposed and cryopreserved in absence or presence of 1.5M glycerol (GLY), ethylene glycol (EG), propanediol (PROH) or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), undergoing a previous cooling at 20 degrees C for 1h (protocol 1) or at 4 degrees C for 24h (protocol 2) in 0.9% saline solution. At the end of each treatment, preantral follicles were classified as non-viable/viable when they were stained/not stained with trypan blue, respectively. To confirm viability staining, ultra-structure of the follicles was evaluated by transmission electronic microscopy (TEM). Data were compared by Chi-square test (P<0.05). The storage of the ovaries at 20 degrees C for 1h (78%) and 4 degrees C for 24h (80%) did not reduce significantly the percentage of viable preantral follicles when compared to the control (75%). Similar results were obtained when ovarian fragments, respectively, for protocols 1 and 2, were exposed to MEM (78 and 77%), 1.5M EG (78 and 71%), as well as frozen in 1.5M EG (74 and 77%). Percentages of viable follicles in control were similar to those observed after exposure (75%) and freezing (76%) in presence of 1.5M DMSO only when protocol 1 was used. The increase of the concentration from 1.5 to 3.0M, for all cryoprotectants, reduced significantly the percentage of viable preantral follicles after freezing. Ultra-structural analysis has confirmed trypan blue results, showing that not only basement membrane, but also organelles, were intact in viable preantral follicles. In conclusion, ovarian tissue cooling at 4 degrees C for 24h before cryopreservation (protocol 2) does not affect the viability of bovine preantral follicles when 1.5M EG is present in the cryopreservation medium. PMID:17945440

  9. Research on cooling effectiveness in stepped slot film cooling vane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yulong; Wu, Hong; Zhou, Feng; Rong, Chengjun

    2016-06-01

    As one of the most important developments in air cooling technology for hot parts of the aero-engine, film cooling technology has been widely used. Film cooling hole structure exists mainly in areas that have high temperature, uneven cooling effectiveness issues when in actual use. The first stage turbine vanes of the aero-engine consume the largest portion of cooling air, thereby the research on reducing the amount of cooling air has the greatest potential. A new stepped slot film cooling vane with a high cooling effectiveness and a high cooling uniformity was researched initially. Through numerical methods, the affecting factors of the cooling effectiveness of a vane with the stepped slot film cooling structure were researched. This paper focuses on the cooling effectiveness and the pressure loss in different blowing ratio conditions, then the most reasonable and scientific structure parameter can be obtained by analyzing the results. The results show that 1.0 mm is the optimum slot width and 10.0 is the most reasonable blowing ratio. Under this condition, the vane achieved the best cooling result and the highest cooling effectiveness, and also retained a low pressure loss.

  10. Activation energy of water structural transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholmanskiy, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the nature of molecular motions that dominate in the thermodynamics of anomalies of liquid water properties in the range of 0-100 °C has been studied. Temperature dependencies of water properties have been approximated by exponential functions and the activation energies for water structure transitions have been evaluated. The activation energy values were compared with the energy spectra of characteristic vibrations and with those of cooperative molecular motion in the lattice-type structure of hydrogen bonds. It has been found that it is the reaction of hydrogen bond breaking that mainly limits the abnormal dynamics of water viscosity, self-diffusion, dielectric relaxation time and electric conductivity. It has been assumed that the thermodynamics of cooperative motion and resonance phenomena in water clusters form a basis for the differentiation mechanism of extrema points in temperature dependencies of water density, isobaric heat capacity, sound velocity, surface tension coefficient and compressibility.

  11. Betulin Phosphonates; Synthesis, Structure, and Cytotoxic Activity.

    PubMed

    Chrobak, Elwira; Bębenek, Ewa; Kadela-Tomanek, Monika; Latocha, Małgorzata; Jelsch, Christian; Wenger, Emmanuel; Boryczka, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Betulin derivatives are a widely studied group of compounds of natural origin due to their wide spectrum of biological activities. This paper describes new betulin derivatives, containing a phosphonate group. The allyl-vinyl isomerization and synthesis of acetylenic derivatives have been reported. Structural identification of products as E and Z isomers has been carried out using ¹H-, (13)C-, (31)P-NMR, and crystallographic analysis. The crystal structure in the orthorhombic space group and analysis of crystal packing contacts for 29-diethoxyphosphoryl-28-cyclopropylpropynoyloxy-lup-20E(29)-en-3β-ol 8a are reported. All new compounds were tested in vitro for their antiproliferative activity against human T47D (breast cancer), SNB-19 (glioblastoma), and C32 (melanoma) cell lines. PMID:27571057

  12. 76 FR 43230 - National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System-Cooling Water Intake Structures at Existing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ... published April 20, 2011, at 76 FR 22174, must be received on or before August 18, 2011. ADDRESSES: Submit... Water Intake Structures at Existing Facilities and Phase I Facilities AGENCY: Environmental Protection... proposed requirements under section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act for all existing power...

  13. Structure-activity relationship of anthelmintic cyclooctadepsipeptides.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Makoto; Okada, Yumiko; Takahashi, Masaaki; Sakanaka, Osamu; Matsumoto, Maki; Atsumi, Kunio

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between cyclooctadepsipeptides and their anthelmintic efficacy was examined by converting the natural products, PF1022A, PF1022E and PF1022H. Some analogues substituted at the para position of the phenyllactate moiety showed higher or equivalent activity against the parasitic nematode, Ascaridia galli in chicken when compared with the parent compounds. It is suggested that lipophilicity and the polar surface area, in addition to structural requirements of the derivatives, influenced the anthelmintic efficacy in vivo. PMID:21737929

  14. Recent advances in actively cooled high-power laser diode bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrom, Nels P.; Roh, S. D.; Grasso, Daniel M.; Kane, Thomas J.

    2007-02-01

    In order to meet the ever increasing demands of many high power laser diode customers, Nuvonyx has worked to improve a number of key metrics of the diode laser package. The most often challenged specifications are power per bar, efficiency, and reliability in both hard pulse and constant current mode. In response to these requests, Nuvonyx has worked to offer commercial component devices in excess of 100 and 150 watts per bar package in multiple wavelengths. The packages are routinely combined to form single stacks that generate greater than 3.5 kilowatts each and two-dimensional arrays which produce light in excess of 10 kilowatts. These parts all demonstrate predicted lifetimes in excess of 10,000 hours. The micro-channel cooled heat sink has also been improved by closer matching the coefficient of thermal expansion of the cooler to the laser diode bar, which allows for harder solders such as gold-tin to be employed. All of this work has helped to meet the specifications of the most demanding laser diode customers.

  15. Using Activated Transport in Parallel Nanowires for Energy Harvesting and Hot-Spot Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosisio, Riccardo; Gorini, Cosimo; Fleury, Geneviève; Pichard, Jean-Louis

    2015-05-01

    We study arrays of parallel doped semiconductor nanowires in a temperature range where the electrons propagate through the nanowires by phonon-assisted hops between localized states. By solving the random-resistor-network problem, we compute the thermopower S , the electrical conductance G , and the electronic thermal conductance Ke of the device. We investigate how those quantities depend on the position—which can be tuned with a back gate—of the nanowire impurity band with respect to the equilibrium electrochemical potential. We show that large power factors can be reached near the band edges, when S self-averages to large values while G is small but scales with the number of wires. Calculating the amount of heat exchanged locally between the electrons inside the nanowires and the phonons of the environment, we show that phonons are mainly absorbed near one electrode and emitted near the other when a charge current is driven through the nanowires near their band edges. This phenomenon could be exploited for a field control of the heat exchange between the phonons and the electrons at submicron scales in electronic circuits. It could be also used for cooling hot spots.

  16. Initial measurements with an actively cooled calorimeter in a large pool fire

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, J.A.; Kent, L.A.; Wix, S.D.

    1993-11-01

    The initial measurements with a 1 m {times} 1 m water cooled vertical flat plate calorimeter located 0.8 m above and inside a 6 m {times} 6 m JP-4 pool fire are described. Heat fluxes in ten vertical 0. 1 m high {times} 1 m wide zones were measured by means of water calorimetry in quasi-steady-state. The calorimeter face also included an array of intrinsic thermocouples to measure surface temperatures, and an array of Schmidt-Boelter radiometers for a second, more responsive, method of heat flux measurement. Other experimental measurement devices within the pool fire included velocity probes, directional flame thermometers (DFTs), and thermocouples. Water calorimetry indicated heat fluxes of about 65 to 70 kW/m{sup 2} with a gradual decrease with increasing height above the pool. Intrinsic thermocouple measurements recorded typical calorimeter surface temperatures of about 500{degrees}C, with spatial variations of {plus_minus}150{degrees}C. Gas velocities across the calorimeter face averaged 3.4 m/s with a predominant upward component, but with an off-vertical skew. Temperatures of 800 to 1100{degrees}C were measured with the DFTS. The observed decrease in heat flux with increasing vertical height is consistent with analytical fire models derived for constant temperature surfaces. Results from several diagnostics also indicated trends and provided additional insight into events that occurred during the fire. Some events are correlated, and possible explanations are discussed.

  17. Active isolation of vibrations with adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guigou, C.; Fuller, C. R.; Wagstaff, P. R.

    1991-01-01

    Vibration transmission in structures is controlled by means of a technique which employs distributed arrays of piezoelectric transducers bonded to the supporting structure. Distributed PVDF piezoelectric strips are employed as error sensors, and a two-channel feedforward adaptive LMS algorithm is used for minimizing error signals and thereby controlling the structure. A harmonic force input excites a thick plate, and a receiving plate is configured with three pairs of piezoelectric actuators. Modal analyses are performed to determine the resonant frequencies of the system, and a scanning laser vibrometer is used to study the shape of the response of the receiving plate during excitation with and without the control algorithm. Efficient active isolation of the vibrations is achieved with modal suppression, and good control is noted in the on-resonance cases in which increased numbers of PVDF sensors and piezoelectric actuators are employed.

  18. Methylglyoxal can modify GAPDH activity and structure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyon Jae; Howell, Scott K; Sanford, Rebecca J; Beisswenger, Paul J

    2005-06-01

    The activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) can play an important role in regulating multiple upstream pathways relating to the development of diabetic complications. GAPDH can be modified by a number of metabolic factors, including oxidative and glycation products. To study the effect of glycation on GAPDH we have measured GAPDH structure and activity after exposure of the enzyme to the potent alpha dicarbonyl sugar methylglyoxal (MG). Rabbit GAPDH was incubated with 10-1000 microM MG for 96 hours, and enzyme activity was measured at intervals by a spectrophotometric assay. Isoelectric focusing of purified and cellular GAPDH was performed with a PROTEAN IEF system and the bands visualized by Western blotting. The mass of glycated and native GAPDH was determined by MALDI with a Applied Biosystems Voyager System 6235. GAPDH activity (at 96 h) was decreased by 20% with 1.0 micromolar MG and showed progressively greater suppression of activity with increasing concentrations up to 1 mM, where activity was decreased by 97%. Reduction in GAPDH activity was rapidly decreasing by 69.2% by two hours with 1 mM MG. IEF showed an isoelectric point (IEP) of 8.5 for native GAPDH, while measurable changes were seen with modification by MG levels of 1 mM (IEP 7.5) and 50 microM (IEP 8.0). With MALDI, GAPDH mass increased from 36.012 kDa to 37.071 after exposure to 50 microM MG and to 40.625 following 1 mM MG. This indicates addition of 12.75 and 55.6 MG residues, respectively, to GAPDH. GAPDH can be modified by methylglyoxal intracellular concentrations close to those previously observed in vivo, with measurable changes in isoelectric point and mass. These modifications can lead to decreased enzyme activity, suggesting that conditions associated with elevated intracellular MG could modify GAPDH activity in vivo. PMID:16037232

  19. Bipart: Learning Block Structure for Activity Detection

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yang; Lo, Henry Z.; Ding, Wei; Amaral, Kevin; Crouter, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity consists complex behavior, typically structured in bouts which can consist of one continuous movement (e.g. exercise) or many sporadic movements (e.g. household chores). Each bout can be represented as a block of feature vectors corresponding to the same activity type. This paper introduces a general distance metric technique to use this block representation to first predict activity type, and then uses the predicted activity to estimate energy expenditure within a novel framework. This distance metric, dubbed Bipart, learns block-level information from both training and test sets, combining both to form a projection space which materializes block-level constraints. Thus, Bipart provides a space which can improve the bout classification performance of all classifiers. We also propose an energy expenditure estimation framework which leverages activity classification in order to improve estimates. Comprehensive experiments on waist-mounted accelerometer data, comparing Bipart against many similar methods as well as other classifiers, demonstrate the superior activity recognition of Bipart, especially in low-information experimental settings. PMID:25328361

  20. Cognition Is Cool: Can Hemispheric Activation Be Assessed by Tympanic Membrane Thermometry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherbuin, Nicolas; Brinkman, Cobie

    2004-01-01

    Hemispheric activation during cognitive tasks using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be difficult to interpret, uncomfortable, and is not widely available. This study investigated whether tympanic membrane thermometry could be used as a broad measure of hemispheric activation. Infrared probes measured ear temperature continuously…

  1. High energy electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    High energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. The questions of using electron cooling with and without a magnetic field are presented for discussion at this workshop. The electron cooling method was suggested by G. Budker in the middle sixties. The original idea of the electron cooling was published in 1966. The design activities for the NAP-M project was started in November 1971 and the first run using a proton beam occurred in September 1973. The first experiment with both electron and proton beams was started in May 1974. In this experiment good result was achieved very close to theoretical prediction for a usual two component plasma heat exchange.

  2. In service feed-back of the TORE-SUPRA actively cooled inner first wall

    SciTech Connect

    Schlosser, J.; Chappuis, P.; Chatelier, M.

    1994-12-31

    The TORE-SUPRA inner first wall has been designed to sustain a steady state 1 MW/m{sup 2} incident heat flux. It is made of square stainless steel tubes cooled by a pressurized loop protected by brazed graphite tiles. This wall covers 22 m{sup 2} of the high field side of the inner vacuum vessel. Over 12000 plasma shots (up to 8 MW of additional power and as long as 60 s) have been done in TORE-SUPRA with a majority of them positioned on the inner wall. Long shot experiments have shown that for this type of components a high reliability is needed for the joining technique of the protective tiles. High power experiments have also shown that a precise alignment ({plus_minus} 0.5 mm) is also needed for the large belt limiters. In order to improve the overall reliability of this component calculations were done to evaluate the local heat flux and the limits associated to different geometrical mismatches in the inner first wall. The brazing and service thermomechanical stresses have been evaluated by finite element calculation. Mock-ups (same concept with CFC tiles replacing the graphite ones) were successfully heat flux tested on an e-beam facility. New sectors are being manufactured following a new design (compatible with the existing one) and are going to be installed in the vessel. Industrial brazing tests have shown that reliability of the joint is strongly related to the quality of the C.F.C. Non destructive testing of the braze joint by infrared measurements has been evaluated and a minimum detectable size defect has been determined. The in-service observation of this element will give a better sense of a zero defect component for steady state operation.

  3. Structural requirements of bitter taste receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Brockhoff, Anne; Behrens, Maik; Niv, Masha Y.; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    An important question in taste research is how 25 receptors of the human TAS2R family detect thousands of structurally diverse compounds. An answer to this question may arise from the observation that TAS2Rs in general are broadly tuned to interact with numerous substances. Ultimately, interaction with chemically diverse agonists requires architectures of binding pockets tailored to combine flexibility with selectivity. The present study determines the structure of hTAS2R binding pockets. We focused on a subfamily of closely related hTAS2Rs exhibiting pronounced amino acid sequence identities but unique agonist activation spectra. The generation of chimeric and mutant receptors followed by calcium imaging analyses identified receptor regions and amino acid residues critical for activation of hTAS2R46, -R43, and -R31. We found that the carboxyl-terminal regions of the investigated receptors are crucial for agonist selectivity. Intriguingly, exchanging two residues located in transmembrane domain seven between hTAS2R46, activated by strychnine, and hTAS2R31, activated by aristolochic acid, was sufficient to invert agonist selectivity. Further mutagenesis revealed additional positions involved in agonist interaction. The transfer of functionally relevant amino acids identified in hTAS2R46 to the corresponding positions of hTAS2R43 and -R31 resulted in pharmacological properties indistinguishable from the parental hTAS2R46. In silico modeling of hTAS2R46 allowed us to visualize the putative mode of interaction between agonists and hTAS2Rs. Detailed structure-function analyses of hTAS2Rs may ultimately pave the way for the development of specific antagonists urgently needed for more sophisticated analyses of human bitter taste perception. PMID:20534469

  4. Antioxidant activity of taxifolin: an activity-structure relationship.

    PubMed

    Topal, Fevzi; Nar, Meryem; Gocer, Hulya; Kalin, Pınar; Kocyigit, Umit M; Gülçin, İlhami; Alwasel, Saleh H

    2016-08-01

    Taxifolin is a kind of flavanonol, whose biological ability. The objectives of this study were to investigate the antioxidants and antiradical activities of taxifolin by using different in vitro bioanalytical antioxidant methods including DMPD√(+), ABTS√(+), [Formula: see text], and DPPH√-scavenging effects, the total antioxidant influence, reducing capabilities, and Fe(2+)-chelating activities. Taxifolin demonstrated 81.02% inhibition of linoleic acid emulsion peroxidation at 30 µg/mL concentration. At the same concentration, standard antioxidants including trolox, α-tocopherol, BHT, and BHA exhibited inhibitions of linoleic acid emulsion as 88.57, 73.88, 94.29, and 90.12%, respectively. Also, taxifolin exhibited effective DMPD√(+), ABTS√(+), [Formula: see text], and DPPH√-scavenging effects, reducing capabilities, and Fe(2+)-chelating effects. The results obtained from this study clearly showed that taxifolin had marked antioxidant, reducing ability, radical scavenging and metal-chelating activities. Also, this study exhibits a scientific shore for the significant antioxidant activity of taxifolin and its structure-activity insight. PMID:26147349

  5. Transient heat transfer behavior of water spray evaporative cooling on a stainless steel cylinder with structured surface for safety design application in high temperature scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aamir, Muhammad; Liao, Qiang; Hong, Wang; Xun, Zhu; Song, Sihong; Sajid, Muhammad

    2016-05-01

    High heat transfer performance of spray cooling on structured surface might be an additional measure to increase the safety of an installation against any threat caused by rapid increase in the temperature. The purpose of present experimental study is to explore heat transfer performance of structured surface under different spray conditions and surface temperatures. Two cylindrical stainless steel samples were used, one with pyramid pins structured surface and other with smooth surface. Surface heat flux of 3.60, 3.46, 3.93 and 4.91 MW/m2 are estimated for sample initial average temperature of 600, 700, 800 and 900 °C, respectively for an inlet pressure of 1.0 MPa. A maximum cooling rate of 507 °C/s was estimated for an inlet pressure of 0.7 MPa at 900 °C for structured surface while for smooth surface maximum cooling rate of 356 °C/s was attained at 1.0 MPa for 700 °C. Structured surface performed better to exchange heat during spray cooling at initial sample temperature of 900 °C with a relative increase in surface heat flux by factor of 1.9, 1.56, 1.66 and 1.74 relative to smooth surface, for inlet pressure of 0.4, 0.7, 1.0 and 1.3 MPa, respectively. For smooth surface, a decreasing trend in estimated heat flux is observed, when initial sample temperature was increased from 600 to 900 °C. Temperature-based function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Limited published work is available about the application of structured surface spray cooling techniques for safety of stainless steel structures at very high temperature scenario such as nuclear safety vessel and liquid natural gas storage tanks.

  6. Cooling history of the Upper Cretaceous Palgongsan Granite, Gyeongsang Basin, SE Korea and its tectonic implication for uplift on the active continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyoun Soo; Lee, Yong Il

    2005-07-01

    Apatite and zircon fission track analyses were carried out to reconstruct the cooling and inferred uplift history of the Cretaceous Palgongsan Granite, Gyeongsang Basin, Korea. The Palgongsan Granite is one of the Bulguksa intrusive rocks that formed by arc-related plutonism during Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary time. Fission track dating of the Palgongsan Granite yielded nearly concordant ages of 53 and 65 Ma for apatite and zircon, respectively. The Palgongsan Granite also shows a simple cooling pattern, which suggests that it has not been affected by any thermal event after emplacement. The cooling history derived from fission track data combined with other thermochronometric data indicates that the Palgongsan Granite experienced relatively rapid cooling in earlier stage (> 30 °C/Ma). The initial rapid cooling rate during the Late Cretaceous has been caused by the large thermal contrast between the granite body and the country rocks. After reaching thermal equilibrium with the surrounding country rocks, the cooling rate of the Palgongsan Granite was abruptly decreased in late stage. In this late stage, the decelerated cooling rate is interpreted to have been controlled by uplift and erosion processes, and the average exhumation rate is calculated to be ca. 50 m/my over the temperature range from 100 °C to the surface temperature. The cooling history of the Palgongsan Granite is in good agreement with that of the Ryoke Granitic Belt in Southwest Japan, as well as those of the Taebaeksan Range and other Bulguksa intrusive rocks in the Gyeongsang Basin. This suggests that such cooling was probably caused by regional uplift and exhumation processes on the East Asian active continental margin. Compared with the uplift rates of the Andes, the uplift rates on the eastern Pacific margin appear to be higher than those on the western Pacific margin.

  7. Active (air-cooled) vs. passive (phase change material) thermal management of high power lithium-ion packs: Limitation of temperature rise and uniformity of temperature distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbah, Rami; Kizilel, R.; Selman, J. R.; Al-Hallaj, S.

    The effectiveness of passive cooling by phase change materials (PCM) is compared with that of active (forced air) cooling. Numerical simulations were performed at different discharge rates, operating temperatures and ambient temperatures of a compact Li-ion battery pack suitable for plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) propulsion. The results were also compared with experimental results. The PCM cooling mode uses a micro-composite graphite-PCM matrix surrounding the array of cells, while the active cooling mode uses air blown through the gaps between the cells in the same array. The results show that at stressful conditions, i.e. at high discharge rates and at high operating or ambient temperatures (for example 40-45 °C), air-cooling is not a proper thermal management system to keep the temperature of the cell in the desirable operating range without expending significant fan power. On the other hand, the passive cooling system is able to meet the operating range requirements under these same stressful conditions without the need for additional fan power.

  8. Transient convective structures in a cooled water layer in the presence of a drift flow and a surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutov, V. P.; Rybushkina, G. V.

    2016-02-01

    The paper is concerned with three-dimensional convective structures arising in a water layer cooled from above and covered by an adsorbed insoluble surfactant. The water is subjected to a laminar drift flow produced by tangential stresses on a free surface. The surface diffusion of the surfactant are taken into account within the approximation of a nondeformable flat surface. After appropriate reformulation of standard equations governing gravity-capillary convection and surfactant concentration, the problem is solved numerically using a pseudospectral method employed in our previous work. Development of the convective structures with increasing Reynolds number, surfactant film elasticity, and layer thickness is studied. The minimal layer thickness is chosen taking into account the results of relevant laboratory experiments. The cell-to-roll transition is revealed in the thin layer with increasing Reynolds number. The role of dissipation due to the surfactant film is elucidated by comparison with purely gravitational convection. The turbulent convection arising in a thicker layer subjected to a laminar shear flow is examined. Disordered streets containing elongated cells and swirl-like motions are revealed. Images of the surface temperature and the perturbed surfactant concentration are compared.

  9. Active Control Of Structure-Borne Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, S. J.

    1994-11-01

    The successful practical application of active noise control requires an understanding of both its acoustic limitations and the limitations of the electrical control strategy used. This paper is concerned with the active control of sound in enclosures. First, a review is presented of the fundamental physical limitations of using loudspeakers to achieve either global or local control. Both approaches are seen to have a high frequency limit, due to either the acoustic modal overlap, or the spatial correlation function of the pressure field. These physical performance limits could, in principle, be achieved with either a feedback or a feedforward control strategy. These strategies are reviewed and the use of adaptive digital filters is discussed for both approaches. The application of adaptive feedforward control in the control of engine and road noise in cars is described. Finally, an indirect approach to the active control of sound is discussed, in which the vibration is suppressed in the structural paths connecting the source of vibration to the enclosure. Two specific examples of this strategy are described, using an active automotive engine mount and the incorporation of actuators into helicopter struts to control gear-meshing tones. In both cases good passive design can minimize the complexity of the active controller.

  10. Structural Basis for Plexin Activation and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Youxin; Janssen, Bert J C; Malinauskas, Tomas; Vangoor, Vamshidhar R; Coles, Charlotte H; Kaufmann, Rainer; Ni, Tao; Gilbert, Robert J C; Padilla-Parra, Sergi; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen; Jones, E Yvonne

    2016-08-01

    Class A plexins (PlxnAs) act as semaphorin receptors and control diverse aspects of nervous system development and plasticity, ranging from axon guidance and neuron migration to synaptic organization. PlxnA signaling requires cytoplasmic domain dimerization, but extracellular regulation and activation mechanisms remain unclear. Here we present crystal structures of PlxnA (PlxnA1, PlxnA2, and PlxnA4) full ectodomains. Domains 1-9 form a ring-like conformation from which the C-terminal domain 10 points away. All our PlxnA ectodomain structures show autoinhibitory, intermolecular "head-to-stalk" (domain 1 to domain 4-5) interactions, which are confirmed by biophysical assays, live cell fluorescence microscopy, and cell-based and neuronal growth cone collapse assays. This work reveals a 2-fold role of the PlxnA ectodomains: imposing a pre-signaling autoinhibitory separation for the cytoplasmic domains via intermolecular head-to-stalk interactions and supporting dimerization-based PlxnA activation upon ligand binding. More generally, our data identify a novel molecular mechanism for preventing premature activation of axon guidance receptors. PMID:27397516

  11. BK channel activation: structural and functional insights

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Urvi S.; Cui, Jianmin

    2010-01-01

    The voltage and Ca2+ activated K+ (BK) channels are involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter release and neuronal excitability. Structurally, BK channels are homologous to voltage- and ligand-gated K+ channels, having a voltage sensor and pore as the membrane-spanning domain and a cytosolic domain containing metal binding sites. Recently published electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) and X-ray crystallographic structures of the BK channel provided the first look into the assembly of these domains, corroborating the close interactions among these domains during channel gating that have been suggested by functional studies. This review discusses these latest findings and an emerging new understanding about BK channel gating and implications for diseases such as epilepsy, in which mutations in BK channel genes have been associated. PMID:20663573

  12. Synthetic retinoids: structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Jonathan H; Collings, Jonathan C; Whiting, Andrew; Przyborski, Stefan A; Marder, Todd B

    2009-11-01

    Retinoid signalling pathways are involved in numerous processes in cells, particularly those mediating differentiation and apoptosis. The endogenous ligands that bind to the retinoid receptors, namely all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) and 9-cis-retinoic acid, are prone to double-bond isomerisation and to oxidation by metabolic enzymes, which can have significant and deleterious effects on their activities and selectivities. Many of these problems can be overcome through the use of synthetic retinoids, which are often much more stable, as well as being more active. Modification of their molecular structures can result in retinoids that act as antagonists, rather than agonists, or exhibit a large degree of selectivity for particular retinoid-receptor isotypes. Several such selective retinoids are likely to be of value as pharmaceutical agents with reduced toxicities, particularly in cancer therapy, as reagents for controlling cell differentiation, and as tools for elucidating the precise roles that specific retinoid signalling pathways play within cells. PMID:19821467

  13. Effect of soaking, boiling, and steaming on total phenolic contentand antioxidant activities of cool season food legumes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Baojun; Chang, Sam K C

    2008-09-01

    The effects of soaking, boiling and steaming processes on the total phenolic components and antioxidant activity in commonly consumed cool season food legumes (CSFL's), including green pea, yellow pea, chickpea and lentil were investigated. As compared to original unprocessed legumes, all processing steps caused significant (p<0.05) decreases in total phenolic content (TPC), DPPH free radical scavenging activity (DPPH) in all tested CSFL's. All soaking and atmospheric boiling treatments caused significant (p<0.05) decreases in oxygen radical absorbing capacity (ORAC). However, pressure boiling and pressure steaming caused significant (p<0.05) increases in ORAC values. Steaming treatments resulted in a greater retention of TPC, DPPH, and ORAC values in all tested CSFL's as compared to boiling treatments. To obtain cooked legumes with similar palatability and firmness, pressure boiling shortened processing time as compared to atmospheric boiling, resulted in insignificant differences in TPC, DPPH for green and yellow pea. However, TPC and DPPH in cooked lentils differed significantly between atmospheric and pressure boiling. As compared to atmospheric processes, pressure processes significantly increased ORAC values in both boiled and steamed CSFL's. Greater TPC, DPPH and ORAC values were detected in boiling water than that in soaking and steaming water. Boiling also caused more solid loss than steaming. Steam processing exhibited several advantages in retaining the integrity of the legume appearance and texture of the cooked product, shortening process time, and greater retention of antioxidant components and activities. PMID:26050159

  14. The Cosmic History of Hot Gas Cooling and Radio AGN Activity in Massive Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, A. L. R.; Lehmer, B. D.; Alexander, D. M.; Brandt, W. M.; Luo, B.; Miller, N.; Xue, Y. Q.; Stott, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    We study the X-ray properties of 393 optically selected early-type galaxies (ETGs) over the redshift range of z approx equals 0.0-1.2 in the Chandra Deep Fields. To measure the average X-ray properties of the ETG population, we use X-ray stacking analyses with a subset of 158 passive ETGs (148 of which were individually undetected in X-ray). This ETG subset was constructed to span the redshift ranges of z = 0.1-1.2 in the approx equals 4 Ms CDF-S and approx equals 2 Ms CDF-N and z = 0.1-0.6 in the approx equals 250 ks E-CDF-S where the contribution from individually undetected AGNs is expected to be negligible in our stacking. We find that 55 of the ETGs are detected individually in the X-rays, and 12 of these galaxies have properties consistent with being passive hot-gas dominated systems (i.e., systems not dominated by an X-ray bright Active Galactic Nucleus; AGN). On the basis of our analyses, we find little evolution in the mean 0.5-2 keY to B-band luminosity ratio (L(sub x) /L(sub Beta) varies as [1 +z]) since z approx equals 1.2, implying that some heating mechanism prevents the gas from cooling in these systems. We consider that feedback from radio-mode AGN activity could be responsible for heating the gas. We select radio AGNs in the ETG population using their far-infrared/radio flux ratio. Our radio observations allow us to constrain the duty cycle history of radio AGN activity in our ETG sample. We estimate that if scaling relations between radio and mechanical power hold out to z approx equals 1.2 for the ETG population being studied here, the average mechanical power from AGN activity is a factor of approx equals1.4 -- 2.6 times larger than the average radiative cooling power from hot gas over the redshift range z approx equals 0-1.2. The excess of inferred AGN mechanical power from these ETGs is consistent with that found in the local Universe for similar types of galaxies.

  15. Coronal temperatures of selected active cool stars as derived from low resolution Einstein observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilhu, Osmi; Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1990-01-01

    Mean coronal temperatures of some active G-K stars were derived from Rev1-processed Einstein-observatory's IPC-spectra. The combined X-ray and transition region emission line data are in rough agreement with static coronal loop models. Although the sample is too small to derive any statistically significant conclusions, it suggests that the mean coronal temperature depends linearly on the inverse Rossby-number, with saturation at short rotation periods.

  16. Hierarchically structured activated carbon for ultracapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mok-Hwa; Kim, Kwang-Bum; Park, Sun-Min; Roh, Kwang Chul

    2016-02-01

    To resolve the pore-associated bottleneck problem observed in the electrode materials used for ultracapacitors, which inhibits the transport of the electrolyte ions, we designed hierarchically structured activated carbon (HAC) by synthesizing a mesoporous silica template/carbon composite and chemically activating it to simultaneously remove the silica template and increase the pore volume. The resulting HAC had a well-designed, unique porous structure, which allowed for large interfaces for efficient electric double-layer formation. Given the unique characteristics of the HAC, we believe that the developed synthesis strategy provides important insights into the design and fabrication of hierarchical carbon nanostructures. The HAC, which had a specific surface area of 1,957 m2 g-1, exhibited an extremely high specific capacitance of 157 F g-1 (95 F cc-1), as well as a high rate capability. This indicated that it had superior energy storage capability and was thus suitable for use in advanced ultracapacitors.

  17. Hierarchically structured activated carbon for ultracapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mok-Hwa; Kim, Kwang-Bum; Park, Sun-Min; Roh, Kwang Chul

    2016-01-01

    To resolve the pore-associated bottleneck problem observed in the electrode materials used for ultracapacitors, which inhibits the transport of the electrolyte ions, we designed hierarchically structured activated carbon (HAC) by synthesizing a mesoporous silica template/carbon composite and chemically activating it to simultaneously remove the silica template and increase the pore volume. The resulting HAC had a well-designed, unique porous structure, which allowed for large interfaces for efficient electric double-layer formation. Given the unique characteristics of the HAC, we believe that the developed synthesis strategy provides important insights into the design and fabrication of hierarchical carbon nanostructures. The HAC, which had a specific surface area of 1,957 m2 g−1, exhibited an extremely high specific capacitance of 157 F g−1 (95 F cc−1), as well as a high rate capability. This indicated that it had superior energy storage capability and was thus suitable for use in advanced ultracapacitors. PMID:26878820

  18. Hydrothermal activity in Tertiary Icelandic crust: Implication for cooling processes along slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pałgan, D.; Devey, C. W.; Yeo, I. A.

    2015-12-01

    Known hydrothermal activity along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge is mostly high-temperature venting, controlled by volcano-tectonic processes confined to ridge axes and neotectonic zones ~15km wide on each side of the axis (e.g. TAG or Snake Pit). However, extensive exploration and discoveries of new hydrothermal fields in off-axis regions (e.g. Lost City, MAR) show that hydrothermalism may, in some areas, be dominated by off-axis venting. Little is known about nature of such systems, including whether low-temperature "diffuse" venting dominates rather than high-temperature black-smokers. This is particularly interesting since such systems may transport up to 90% of the hydrothermal heat to the oceans. In this study we use Icelandic hot springs as onshore analogues for off-shore hydrothermal activity along the MAR to better understand volcano-tectonic controls on their occurrence, along with processes supporting fluid circulation. Iceland is a unique laboratory to study how new oceanic crust cools and suggests that old crust may not be as inactive as previously thought. Our results show that Tertiary (>3.3 Myr) crust of Iceland (Westfjords) has widespread low-temperature hydrothermal activity. Lack of tectonism (indicated by lack of seismicity), along with field research suggest that faults in Westfjords are no longer active and that once sealed, can no longer support hydrothermal circulation, i.e. none of the hot springs in the area occur along faults. Instead, dyke margins provide open and permeable fluid migration pathways. Furthermore, we suggest that the Reykjanes Ridge (south of Iceland) may be similar to Westfjords with hydrothermalism dominated by off-axis venting. Using bathymetric data we infer dyke positions and suggest potential sites for future exploration located away from neotectonic zone. We also emphasise the importance of biological observations in seeking for low-temperature hydrothermal activity, since chemical or optical methods are not sufficient.

  19. An Investigation of the Largest Flares in Active Cool Star Binaries with ALEXIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    After a long delay due to the initial problems with the ALEXIS attitude control, the heroic efforts on the part of the ALEXIS satellite team enabled us to carry out this survey. However, the combination of the higher than expected and variable background in the ALEXIS detectors, and the lower throughput of the ALEXIS telescopes resulted in no convincing detections of large flares from the active binary systems. In addition, vignetting-corrected effective exposure times from the ALEXIS aspect solution were not available prior to the end of this contract; therefore, we were unable to convert upper limits measured in ALEXIS counts to the equivalent.

  20. Program plan for reliability and maintainability in active solar heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    This document presents a plan for the Department of Energy, Office of Solar Applications for Buildings program addressing reliability and maintainability (R and M) of active solar energy systems. The goal of the R and M program is to accelerate the removal of reliability and maintainability as major concerns impeding the widespread adoption of solar energy systems. Specific objectives that support that goal are as follows: (1) provide all groups that have solar R and M concerns with the information that is available to the program and that can assist in alleviating those concerns; (2) assist the solar energy industry in improving levels of R and M performance in state-of-the-art solar energy systems, components, and materials; (3) assist in the early development of a viable infrastructure for the design, manufacture, installation, and maintenance of reliable, maintainable, and durable solar energy systems; (4) assist in the development of appropriate standards, code provisions, and certification programs relating to the R and M performance of solar energy systems, components, and materials; and (5) develop the information required to support the other activities within the R and M program. These objectives correspond to five areas of action: regulations, research and development, technology transfer, solar industry infrastructure development, and data collection and analysis. (WHK)

  1. Structure formation in sugar containing pectin gels - influence of tartaric acid content (pH) and cooling rate on the gelation of high-methoxylated pectin.

    PubMed

    Kastner, H; Kern, K; Wilde, R; Berthold, A; Einhorn-Stoll, U; Drusch, S

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was the application of a recently published method, using structuring parameters calculated from dG'/dt, for the characterisation of the pectin sugar acid gelation process. The influence of cooling rate and pH on structure formation of HM pectin gels containing 65 wt.% sucrose were investigated. The results show that the structure formation process as well as the properties of the final gels strongly depended on both parameters. With increasing cooling rates from 0.5 to 1.0 K/min the initial structuring temperature slightly decreased and the maximum structuring velocity increased. The lower the cooling rates, the firmer and more elastic were the final gels. With increasing acid content (decreasing pH from 2.5-2.0) the initial structuring temperatures were nearly constant. The final gel properties varied visibly but not systematically. Gels with the lowest and highest pH were less elastic and weaker compared to those with medium acid concentrations. PMID:24099540

  2. Cooling wall

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.I.

    1995-07-01

    Protecting the shells of blast furnaces is being resolved by installing cast iron cooling plates. The cooling plates become non-operational in three to five years. The problem is that defects occur in manufacturing the cooling plates. With increased volume and intensity of work placed on blast furnaces, heat on the cast iron cooling plates reduces their reliability that limits the interim repair period of blast furnaces. Scientists and engineers from the Ukraine studied this problem for several years, developing a new method of cooling the blast furnace shaft called the cooling wall. Traditional cast iron plates were replaced by a screen of steel tubes, with the area between the tubes filled with fireproof concrete. Before placing the newly developed furnace shaft into operation, considerable work was completed such as theoretical calculations, design, research of temperature fields and tension. Continual testing over many years confirms the value of this research in operating blast furnaces. The cooling wall works with water cooling as well as vapor cooling and is operating in 14 blast furnaces in the Ukraine and two in Russia, and has operated for as long as 14 years.

  3. Definition and empirical structure of the range of stellar chromospheres-coronae across the H-R diagram: Cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Major advances in our understanding of non-radiative heating and other activity in stars cooler than T sub eff = 10,000K has occured in the last few years. This observational evidence is reviewed and the trends that are now becoming apparent are discussed. The evidence for non-radiatively heated outer atmospheric layers (chromospheres, transition regions, and coronae) in dwarf stars cooler than spectral type A7, in F and G giants, pre-main sequence stars, and close bindary systems is unambiguous, as is the evidence for chromospheres in the K and M giants and supergiants. The existence of non-radiative heating in the outer layers of the A stars remains undetermined despite repeated searches at all wavelengths. Two important trends in the data are the decrease in plasma emission measure with age on the main sequence and decreasing rotational velocity. Variability and atmospheric inhomogeneity are commonly seen, and there is considerable evidence that magnetic fields define the geometry and control the energy balance in the outer atmospheric layers. In addition, the microwave observations imply that non-thermal electrons are confined in coronal magnetic flux tubes in at least the cool dwarfs and RS CVn systems. The chromospheres in the K and M giants and supergiants are geometrically extended, as are the coronae in the RS CVn systems and probably also in other stars.

  4. Thermal/structural analyses of several hydrogen-cooled leading-edge concepts for hypersonic flight vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.; Mockler, Theodore T.; Tong, Mike

    1990-01-01

    The aerodynamic heating at high flight Mach numbers, when shock interference heating is included, can be extremely high and can exceed the capability of most conventional metallic and potential ceramic materials available. Numerical analyses of the heat transfer and thermal stresses are performed on three actively cooled leading-edge geometries (models) made of three different materials to address the issue of survivability in a hostile environment. These analyses show a mixture of results from one configuration to the next. Results for each configuration are presented and discussed. Combinations of enhanced internal film coefficients and high material thermal conductivity of copper and tungsten are predicted to maintain the maximum wall temperature for each concept within acceptable operating limits. The exception is the TD nickel material which is predicted to melt for most cases. The wide range of internal impingement film coefficients (based on correlations) for these conditions can lead to a significant uncertainty in expected leading-edge wall temperatures. The equivalent plastic strain, inherent in each configuration which results from the high thermal gradients, indicates a need for further cyclic analysis to determine component life.

  5. Cathepsin activities and membrane integrity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) oocytes after freezing to -196 degrees C using controlled slow cooling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T; Rawson, D M; Tosti, L; Carnevali, O

    2008-04-01

    This study investigated enzymatic activity of cathepsins and the membrane integrity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) oocytes after freezing to -196 degrees C using controlled slow cooling. Stage III oocytes (>0.5mm), obtained through dissection of anaesthetised female fish and desegregation of ovarian cumulus, were exposed to 2M methanol or 2M DMSO (both prepared in Hank's medium) for 30min at 22 degrees C before being loaded into 0.5ml plastic straws and placed into a programmable cooler. After controlled slow freezing, samples were plunged into liquid nitrogen (LN) and held for at least 10min, and thawed by immersing straws into a 27 degrees C water bath for 10s. Thawed oocytes were washed twice in Hank's medium. Cathepsin activity and membrane integrity of oocytes were assessed both after cryoprotectant treatment at 22 degrees C and after freezing in LN. Cathepsin B and L colorimetric analyses were performed using substrates Z-Arg-ArgNNap and Z-Phe-Arg-4MbetaNA-HCl, respectively, and 2-naphthylamine and 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine were used as standards. Cathepsin D activity was performed by analysing the level of hydrolytic action on haemoglobin. Oocytes membrane integrity was assessed using 0.2% Trypan blue staining for 5min. Analysis of cathepsin activities showed that whilst the activity of cathepsin B and D was not affected by 2M DMSO treatment, their activity was lowered when treated with 2M methanol. Following freezing to -196 degrees C, the activity of all cathepsins (B, D and L) was significantly decreased in both 2M DMSO and 2M methanol. Trypan blue staining showed that 63.0+/-11.3% and 72.7+/-5.2% oocytes membrane stayed intact after DMSO and methanol treatment for 30min at 22 degrees C, respectively, whilst 14.9+/-2.6% and 1.4+/-0.8% stayed intact after freezing in DMSO and methanol to -196 degrees C. The results indicate that cryoprotectant treatment and freezing modified the activities of lysosomal enzymes involved in oocyte maturation and yolk

  6. THE PRACTICE OF STRUCTURE ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS (SAR) IN TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Both qualitative and quantitative modeling methods relating chemical structure to biological activity, called structure-activity relationship analyses or SAR, are applied to the prediction and characterization of chemical toxicity. This minireview will discuss some generic issue...

  7. An Active Broad Area Cooling Model of a Cryogenic Propellant Tank with a Single Stage Reverse Turbo-Brayton Cycle Cryocooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, Monica C.; Tomsik, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    As focus shifts towards long-duration space exploration missions, an increased interest in active thermal control of cryogenic propellants to achieve zero boil-off of cryogens has emerged. An active thermal control concept of considerable merit is the integration of a broad area cooling system for a cryogenic propellant tank with a combined cryocooler and circulator system that can be used to reduce or even eliminate liquid cryogen boil-off. One prospective cryocooler and circulator combination is the reverse turbo-Brayton cycle cryocooler. This system is unique in that it has the ability to both cool and circulate the coolant gas efficiently in the same loop as the broad area cooling lines, allowing for a single cooling gas loop, with the primary heat rejection occurring by way of a radiator and/or aftercooler. Currently few modeling tools exist that can size and characterize an integrated reverse turbo-Brayton cycle cryocooler in combination with a broad area cooling design. This paper addresses efforts to create such a tool to assist in gaining a broader understanding of these systems, and investigate their performance in potential space missions. The model uses conventional engineering and thermodynamic relationships to predict the preliminary design parameters, including input power requirements, pressure drops, flow rate, cycle performance, cooling lift, broad area cooler line sizing, and component operating temperatures and pressures given the cooling load operating temperature, heat rejection temperature, compressor inlet pressure, compressor rotational speed, and cryogenic tank geometry. In addition, the model allows for the preliminary design analysis of the broad area cooling tubing, to determine the effect of tube sizing on the reverse turbo-Brayton cycle system performance. At the time this paper was written, the model was verified to match existing theoretical documentation within a reasonable margin. While further experimental data is needed for full

  8. The Structure of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriss, Gerard A.

    1997-01-01

    We are continuing our systematic investigation of the nuclear structure of nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN). Upon completion, our study will characterize hypothetical constructs such as narrow-line clouds, obscuring tori, nuclear gas disks. and central black holes with physical measurements for a complete sample of nearby AGN. The major scientific goals of our program are: (1) the morphology of the NLR; (2) the physical conditions and dynamics of individual clouds in the NLR; (3) the structure and physical conditions of the warm reflecting gas; (4) the structure of the obscuring torus; (5) the population and morphology of nuclear disks/tori in AGN; (6) the physical conditions in nuclear disks; and (7) the masses of central black holes in AGN. We will use the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to obtain high-resolution images and spatially resolved spectra. Far-UV spectroscopy of emission and absorption in the nuclear regions using HST/FOS and the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) will help establish physical conditions in the absorbing and emitting gas. By correlating the dynamics and physical conditions of the gas with the morphology revealed through our imaging program, we will be able to examine mechanisms for fueling the central engine and transporting angular momentum. The kinematics of the nuclear gas disks may enable us to measure the mass of the central black hole. Contemporaneous X-ray observations using ASCA will further constrain the ionization structure of any absorbing material. Monitoring of variability in the UV and X-ray absorption will be used to determine the location of the absorbing gas, possibly in the outflowing warm reflecting gas, or the broad-line region, or the atmosphere of the obscuring torus. Supporting ground-based observations in the optical, near-IR, imaging polarimetry, and the radio will complete our picture of the nuclear structures. With a comprehensive survey of these characteristics in a complete sample of nearby AGN, our

  9. The spatial structure of transnational human activity.

    PubMed

    Deutschmann, Emanuel

    2016-09-01

    Starting from conflictive predictions of hitherto disconnected debates in the natural and social sciences, this article examines the spatial structure of transnational human activity (THA) worldwide (a) across eight types of mobility and communication and (b) in its development over time. It is shown that the spatial structure of THA is similar to that of animal displacements and local-scale human motion in that it can be approximated by Lévy flights with heavy tails that obey power laws. Scaling exponent and power-law fit differ by type of THA, being highest in refuge-seeking and tourism and lowest in student exchange. Variance in the availability of resources and opportunities for satisfying associated needs appears to explain these differences. Over time (1960-2010), the Lévy-flight pattern remains intact and remarkably stable, contradicting the popular notion that socio-technological trends lead to a "death of distance." Humans have not become more "global" over time, they rather became more mobile in general, i.e. they move and communicate more at all distances. Hence, it would be more adequate to speak of "mobilization" than of "globalization." Longitudinal change occurs only in some types of THA and predominantly at short distances, indicating regional rather than global shifts. PMID:27480376

  10. Cool C4 Photosynthesis - Pyruvate Pi dikinase expression and activity corresponds to the exceptional cold tolerance of carbon assimilation in Miscanthus x giganteus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biofuel feedstock grass Miscanthus x giganteus is exceptional among C4 species in its high productivity in cold climates. It can maintain photosynthetically active leaves at temperatures 6°C below the minimum for Zea mays (maize), which allows it a longer growing season in cool climates. Underst...

  11. Latent TGF-[beta] structure and activation

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Minlong; Zhu, Jianghai; Wang, Rui; Chen, Xing; Mi, Lizhi; Walz, Thomas; Springer, Timothy A.

    2011-09-16

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta} is stored in the extracellular matrix as a latent complex with its prodomain. Activation of TGF-{beta}1 requires the binding of {alpha}v integrin to an RGD sequence in the prodomain and exertion of force on this domain, which is held in the extracellular matrix by latent TGF-{beta} binding proteins. Crystals of dimeric porcine proTGF-{beta}1 reveal a ring-shaped complex, a novel fold for the prodomain, and show how the prodomain shields the growth factor from recognition by receptors and alters its conformation. Complex formation between {alpha}v{beta}6 integrin and the prodomain is insufficient for TGF-{beta}1 release. Force-dependent activation requires unfastening of a 'straitjacket' that encircles each growth-factor monomer at a position that can be locked by a disulphide bond. Sequences of all 33 TGF-{beta} family members indicate a similar prodomain fold. The structure provides insights into the regulation of a family of growth and differentiation factors of fundamental importance in morphogenesis and homeostasis.

  12. Structural Requirements for CNS Active Opioid Glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Lefever, Mark; Li, Yingxue; Anglin, Bobbi; Muthu, Dhanasekaran; Giuvelis, Denise; Lowery, John J; Knapp, Brian I; Bidlack, Jean M; Bilsky, Edward J; Polt, Robin

    2015-08-13

    Glycopeptides related to β-endorphin penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of mice to produce antinociception. Two series of glycopeptides were assessed for opioid receptor binding affinity. Attempts to alter the mu-selectivity of [D-Ala(2),N-MePhe(4),Gly-ol(5)]enkephalin (DAMGO)-related glycopeptides by altering the charged residues of the amphipathic helical address were unsuccessful. A series of pan-agonists was evaluated for antinociceptive activity (55 °C tail flick) in mice. A flexible linker was required to maintain antinociceptive activity. Circular dichroism (CD) in H2O, trifluoroethanol (TFE), and SDS micelles confirmed the importance of the amphipathic helices (11s → 11sG → 11) for antinociception. The glycosylated analogues showed only nascent helices and random coil conformations in H2O. Chemical shift indices (CSI) and nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE) with 600 MHz NMR and CD confirmed helical structures in micelles, which were rationalized by molecular dynamics calculations. Antinociceptive studies with mice confirm that these glycosylated endorphin analogues are potential drug candidates that penetrate the BBB to produce potent central effects. PMID:26125201

  13. Active structural waveguide for sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czajkowski, Karol; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Zmojda, Jacek; Miluski, Piotr; Dorosz, Dominik

    2014-05-01

    In the article a microstructural active optical fiber for sensing application was presented. Construction consists of three hexagonal rings and a core made of SiO2 - Al2O3 - Sb2O3 glass co-doped with 1Yb2O3/0.1Tm2O3 [mol%]. Developed optical fiber is characterized by upconversion luminescence (λp=980nm) at 480nm (Tm3+: 1G4→3H6) and 650 nm (Tm3+ : 1G4→3F4). Population of thulium levels was attained in result of the Yb 3+→Tm3+ upconversion energy transfer. Sensing application of elaborated active photonic structure was presented on the example of aqueous fluorescein solution. Fabricated microstructural optical fiber enables to measure of the fluorescein solutions with the concentration of (0.25 - 5.42)·10-4 [mol%]. Sensitivity of the elaborated measurement setup is 1.51·104 [1/mol%].

  14. Cool Shelter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praeger, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    Amid climbing energy costs and tightening budgets, administrators at school districts, colleges and universities are looking for all avenues of potential savings while promoting sustainable communities. Cool metal roofing can save schools money and promote sustainable design at the same time. Cool metal roofing keeps the sun's heat from collecting…

  15. A high-resolution lake sediment record of glacier activity from SE Greenland defines abrupt Holocene cooling events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balascio, N. L.; Bradley, R. S.; D'Andrea, W. J.

    2013-12-01

    Orbital driven changes in high latitude summer insolation during the Holocene are responsible for the primary millennial-scale climate trends in the Arctic. Following deglaciation, maximum summer temperatures generally occurred during the early to mid-Holocene and declined through the late Holocene. Superimposed on this gradual cooling trend are centennial- and decadal-scale intervals that indicate more rapid perturbations of the arctic climate system. Highly resolved sedimentary records from terrestrial and marine sites help to better characterize climate system dynamics during the Holocene and investigate forcing and feedback mechanism that operate on different timescales. Reconstructing glacial activity can provide valuable paleoclimate information about trends in summer temperature and/or winter precipitation. Proglacial lakes contain sediment archives of meltwater input from glaciers and typically have high sedimentation rates preserving detailed information on glacial activity. However, interpreting proglacial sedimentary records can be difficult because 1) there may be significant input of sediment from non-glacial sources, 2) there is often a lack of organic material for radiocarbon dating, and 3) not all glaciers are sensitive to rapid climatic changes. Here we present a c. 10 cal ka BP record of glacier activity from Kulusuk Lake (65.6°N, 37.1°W; 202 m a.s.l.), a proglacial lake in southeast Greenland that is well constrained by radiocarbon dates and shows a clear signal of changes in glacial input throughout the Holocene. Kulusuk Lake is presently fed by meltwater from two cirque glaciers. It has a small catchment and no other significant source of sediment input. A 3.5 m sediment core contains distinct lithologic changes defined by grain size, magnetic susceptibility, organic content, and scanning XRF data. During the early Holocene, an overall decrease in meltwater input from 8.7-7.7 ka indicates the retreat of the glaciers in response to regional

  16. Active Deformation in the Greater Himalayan Zone in Western Nepal from Inversion of New (U-Th)/He Cooling Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. E.; Burbank, D.

    2015-12-01

    Much of the central Himalaya features an abrupt rise in mean elevation from ~1.5 km in the Lesser Himalaya to ~4-5 km Greater Himalaya and Tibetan Plateau. This physiographic transition is known as PT2, and is often interpreted as the surface expression of transport over a ramp in the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT). In western Nepal, however, the same rise in elevation occurs over two distinct topographic steps (PT2-N and PT2-S). In previous work, Harvey et al. (2015) argue that this anomalous topography is the result of recent southward-migration of mid-crustal deformation along the MHT. Due to the seismogenic potential of the MHT it is important to constrain its geometry in the western Nepal seismic gap, which has not had a large earthquake in over 600 years. To test the above hypothesis, we perform [U-Th]/He dating on 39 apatite and 47 zircon samples collected along seven relief transects throughout western Nepal. We constrain exhumation histories by inverting these new cooling ages with the 3-D thermo-kinematic model Pecube. Five transects collected from the Greater Himalaya north of PT2-N are best fit by relatively rapid exhumation rates (~1-2 km/Myr) since ~4 Ma. The other two, collected from farther south near PT2-S, require rapid (~1-2 km/Myr) exhumation until around 8-11 Ma, followed by much slower (~0.1-0.2 km/Myr) exhumation until at least the late Pliocene. Assuming that exhumation rates reflect uplift rates, the rapid Plio-Pleistocene exhumation in the Greater Himalaya north of PT2-N suggest that this physiographic transition is similar to that at the foot of the Greater Himalaya in central Nepal. It follows that active deformation is occurring along a NW-trend as much as 100 km farther north than would be expected if simply projecting PT2 across western Nepal. This finding is consistent with transport over a more northerly MHT ramp or perhaps oblique slip along the recently identified, surface-breaking WNFZ. Although the geomorphology and microseismicity

  17. Monolithically Peltier-cooled laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hava, S.; Hunsperger, R.G.; Sequeira, H.B.

    1984-04-01

    A new method of cooling a GaAs/GaAlAs laser in an optical integrated circuit or on a discrete chip, by adding an integral thermoelectric (Peltier) cooling and heat spreading device to the laser, is presented. This cooling both reduces and stabilizes the laser junction temperature to minimize such deleterious effects as wavelength drift due to heating. A unified description of the electrical and thermal properties of a monolithic semiconductor mesa structure is given. Here it is shown that an improvement in thermal characteristics is obtained by depositing a relatively thick metallic layer, and by using this layer as a part of an active Peltier structure. Experimental results reveal a 14-percent increase in emitted power (external quantum efficiency) due to passive heat spreading and a further 8-percent if its Peltier cooler is operated. Fabrication techniques used to obtain devices exhibiting the above performance characteristics are given. 21 references.

  18. Calculation of vibrational branching ratios and hyperfine structure of 24Mg19F and its suitability for laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liang; Yin, Yanning; Wei, Bin; Xia, Yong; Yin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    More recently, laser cooling of the diatomic radical magnesium monofluoride (24Mg19F ) is being experimentally preformed [Appl. Phys. Express 8, 092701 (2015), 10.7567/APEX.8.092701 and Opt. Express 22, 28645 (2014), 10.1364/OE.22.028645] and was also studied theoretically [Phys. Rev. A 91, 042511 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.042511]. However, some important problems still remain unsolved, so, in our paper, we perform further theoretical study for the feasibility of laser cooling and trapping the 24Mg19F molecule. At first, the highly diagonal Franck-Condon factors of the main transitions are verified by the closed-form approximation, Morse approximation, and Rydberg-Klein-Rees inversion methods, respectively. Afterwards, we investigate the lower X 2Σ1/2 + hyperfine manifolds using a quantum effective Hamiltonian approach and obtain the zero-field hyperfine spectrum with an accuracy of less than 30 kHz ˜5 μ K compared with the experimental results, and then find out that one cooling beam and one or two repumping beams with their first-order sidebands are enough to implement an efficient laser slowing and cooling of 24Mg19F . Meanwhile, we also calculate the accurate hyperfine structure magnetic g factors of the rotational state (X 2Σ1/2 +,N =1 ) and briefly discuss the influence of the external fields on the hyperfine structure of 24Mg19F as well as its possibility of preparing three-dimensional magneto-optical trapping. Finally we give an explanation for the difference between the Stark and Zeeman effects from the perspective of parity and time reversal symmetry. Our study shows that, besides appropriate excitation wavelengths, the short lifetime for the first excited state A 2Π1 /2 , and lighter mass, the 24Mg19F radical could be a good candidate molecule amenable to laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping.

  19. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, William F.

    1996-01-01

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers.

  20. Cooling rate effects on the structure and transformation behavior of Cu-Zn-Al shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohan, Nicoleta-Monica; Suru, Marius-Gabriel; Pricop, Bogdan; Bujoreanu, Leandru-Gheorghe

    2014-11-01

    Different fragments of a hot-rolled and homogenized Cu-Zn-Al shape memory alloy (SMA) were subjected to thermal cycling by means of a differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) device. During thermal cycling, heating was performed at the same constant rate of increasing temperature while cooling was carried out at different rates of decreasing temperature. For each cooling rate, the temperature decreased in the same thermal interval. During each cooling stage, an exothermic peak (maximum) was observed on the DSC thermogram. This peak was associated with forward martensitic transformation. The DSC thermograms were analyzed with PROTEUS software: the critical martensitic transformation start (Ms) and finish (Mf) temperatures were determined by means of integral and tangent methods, and the dissipated heat was evaluated by the area between the corresponding maximum plot and a sigmoid baseline. The effects of the increase in cooling rate, assessed from a calorimetric viewpoint, consisted in the augmentation of the exothermic peak and the delay of direct martensitic transformation. The latter had the tendency to move to lower critical transformation temperatures. The martensite plates changed in morphology by becoming more oriented and by an augmenting in surface relief, which corresponded with the increase in cooling rate as observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  1. Cooling rate correction and Detection of mineralogical evolution during Thellier-Thellier's experiments on baked clays. Applications to French protohistoric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanos, P.; Hervé, G.; Chauvin, A.; Perron d'Arc, M.

    2011-12-01

    Archaeointensity protocols have been considerably improved since the last years to better detect multidomain (MD) grains effects or mineralogical evolutions during Thellier's experiments. Current published data respect more strict criteria and take into account the anisotropy of thermoremanent magnetization (TRM). However the effect of the cooling rate on the intensity of the TRM acquired during cooling, which depends on the type of the ferromagnetic grains, remains difficult to precisely quantify. The main problem is to estimate the true cooling rate of the archeological structures and usually a 24 hours cooling is assumed. An experimental study of 35 small bricks baked in two kilns during summer 2007 and 2008 (in Sallèles d'Aude, southern France) gives new elements about the cooling rate correction. The used kilns are of two different sizes, similar to classical archaeological structures. Intensity of the geomagnetic field (43 μT) in the kilns and the temperature decrease during the cooling (around 12 hours for the small kiln and 70 hours for the other one) were measured. Discrepancies between the TRM intensity after fast (1.5 hour in the laboratory) and low cooling of 24 hours are over a very wide range between -5 and +30%. The use of the true cooling rate of the kilns (respectively 12 and 72 hours) gives mean archaeointensities (43.8±1.8 μT and 42.7±2.2 μT) corresponding to the intensity of the field measured within them. By applying the usual cooling of 24 hours, the intensity of the field is underestimated by 3 μT in the small kiln and is overestimated by 3 μT in the bigger kiln. Consequently, a wrong cooling rate correction may explain the dispersion between archaeointensities. The second aspect of the presentation corresponds to the detection of mineralogical evolution during successive heatings of the Thellier-Thellier's protocol. This problem is particularly important for the millennia BC in Europe, as very well heated structures are less common

  2. Cool School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Suzanne

    1980-01-01

    The design for Floyd Elementary School in Miami (Florida) seeks to harness solar energy to provide at least 70 percent of the annual energy for cooling needs and 90 percent for hot water. (Author/MLF)

  3. Cooling, AGN Feedback, and Star Formation in Simulated Cool-core Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.; Ruszkowski, Mateusz; Voit, G. Mark; O'Shea, Brian W.; Donahue, Megan

    2015-10-01

    Numerical simulations of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) feedback in cool-core galaxy clusters have successfully avoided classical cooling flows, but often produce too much cold gas. We perform adaptive mesh simulations that include momentum-driven AGN feedback, self-gravity, star formation, and stellar feedback, focusing on the interplay between cooling, AGN heating, and star formation in an isolated cool-core cluster. Cold clumps triggered by AGN jets and turbulence form filamentary structures tens of kpc long. This cold gas feeds both star formation and the supermassive black hole (SMBH), triggering an AGN outburst that increases the entropy of the intracluster medium (ICM) and reduces its cooling rate. Within 1-2 Gyr, star formation completely consumes the cold gas, leading to a brief shutoff of the AGN. The ICM quickly cools and redevelops multiphase gas, followed by another cycle of star formation/AGN outburst. Within 6.5 Gyr, we observe three such cycles. There is good agreement between our simulated cluster and the observations of cool-core clusters. ICM cooling is dynamically balanced by AGN heating, and a cool-core appearance is preserved. The minimum cooling time to free-fall time ratio typically varies between a few and ≳ 20. The star formation rate (SFR) covers a wide range, from 0 to a few hundred {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1, with an average of ˜ 40 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1. The instantaneous SMBH accretion rate shows large variations on short timescales, but the average value correlates well with the SFR. Simulations without stellar feedback or self-gravity produce qualitatively similar results, but a lower SMBH feedback efficiency (0.1% compared to 1%) results in too many stars.

  4. Optimum optical structures for active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, R. R.; Richard, R. M.; Hansen, J. G. R.

    1980-01-01

    A NASTRAN structural analysis of a lightweight mirror structure has been completed and is compared with previous experimental measurements. A preliminary design for a 4 meter aperture, 6 meter focal length primary mirror is presented.

  5. Jet-Cooled Laser Spectroscopy of a Jahn-Teller and Pseudo Jahn-Teller Active Molecule: the Nitrate Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming-Wei; Takematsu, Kana; Okumura, Mitchio; Miller, Terry A.

    2009-06-01

    Well-known as an important intermediate in atmospheric chemistry, the nitrate radical (NO_3) has been extensively studied both experimentally and theoretically. The three energetically lowest electronic states (tilde{X} ^{2}A_{2}^', tilde{A} ^{2}E^'', and tilde{B} ^{2}E^') are strongly coupled by vibronic interactions and hence it is a textbook molecule for understanding the coupling between nearby potential energy surfaces. Such coupling has been treated in considerable detail theoretically. However, corresponding experimental characterization of the interaction is much less detailed. The experimental results primarily consist of IR measurements of vibrational transitions in the ground state. In addition, the electronically forbidden tilde{A}-tilde{X} transition has been observed in ambient temperature CRDS studies. To understand both the Jahn-Teller and pseudo Jahn-Teller coupling in the molecule, further measurements are required with different selection rules and/or higher resolution to resolve the rotational structures of different transitions. In our group, a high-resolution (source Δν≈ 100 MHz in NIR region), jet-cooled CRDS system can be applied to rotationally resolve the electronically forbidden tilde{A}-tilde{X} transition. Furthermore, our high-resolution LIF/SEP system (source Δν≈ 100 MHz) can provide the direct, rotationally resolved measurements of the tilde{B}-tilde{X} and tilde{B}-tilde{A} transitions by operating in the LIF and SEP modes respectively. Such data can provide unambiguous spectral assignments in the tilde{X}, tilde{A} and tilde{B} states. J. F. Stanton, J. Chem. Phys., 126, 134309 (2007) K. Kawaguchi, E. Hirota, T. Ishiwata, and I. Tanaka, J. Chem. Phys., 93, 951 (1990) K. Kawaguchi, T. Ishiwata, E. Hirota, and I. Tanaka, Chem. Phys., 231, 193 (1998) A. Deev, J. Sommar, and M. Okumura, J. Chem. Phys., 122, 224305 (2005) S. Wu, P. Dupré, and T. A. Miller, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 8, 1682, (2006)

  6. Sisyphus cooling of lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Paul; Kim, Geena; Joshi, Trinity; Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Tiarks, Daniel; Müller, Holger

    2014-02-01

    Laser cooling to sub-Doppler temperatures by optical molasses is thought to be inhibited in atoms with unresolved, near-degenerate hyperfine structure in the excited state. We demonstrate that such cooling is possible in one to three dimensions, not only near the standard D2 line for laser cooling, but over a wide range extending to the D1 line. Via a combination of Sisyphus cooling followed by adiabatic expansion, we reach temperatures as low as 40 μK, which corresponds to atomic velocities a factor of 2.6 above the limit imposed by a single-photon recoil. Our method requires modest laser power at a frequency within reach of standard frequency-locking methods. It is largely insensitive to laser power, polarization and detuning, magnetic fields, and initial hyperfine populations. Our results suggest that optical molasses should be possible with all alkali-metal species.

  7. Raman cooling in silicon photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yin-Chung; Bahl, Gaurav

    2016-03-01

    Laser cooling of solids can be achieved through various photon up-conversion processes including anti-Stokes photoluminescence and anti-Stokes light scattering. While it has been shown that cooling using photoluminescence-based methods can achieve efficiency comparable to that of thermoelectric cooling, the reliance on specific transitions of the rare-earth dopants limits material choice. Light scattering, on the other hand, occurs in all materials, and has the potential to enable cooling in most materials. We show that by engineering the photonic density of states of a material, one can suppress the Stokes process, and enhance the anti-Stokes radiation. We employ the well-known diamond-structured photonic crystal patterned in crystalline silicon to demonstrate theoretically that when operating within a high transparency regime, the net energy removal rate from phonon annihilation can overcome the optical absorption. The engineered photonic density of states can thus enable simultaneous cooling of all Raman-active phonon modes and the net cooling of the solid.

  8. Passive Reactor Cooling Using Capillary Porous Wick

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Christopher G.; Lin, Thomas F.

    2006-07-01

    Long-term reliability of actively pumped cooling systems is a concern in space-based nuclear reactors. Capillary-driven passive cooling systems are being considered as an alternative to gravity-driven systems. The high surface tension of liquid lithium makes it attractive as the coolant in a capillary-driven cooling system. A system has been conceived in which the fuel rod of a reactor is surrounded by a concentric wick through which liquid lithium flows to provide cooling under normal and emergency operating conditions. Unheated wicking experiments at three pressures using four layered screen mesh wicks of different porosities and three relatively high surface tension fluids have been conducted to gain insight into capillary phenomena for such a capillary cooling system. All fluids tested demonstrated wicking ability in each of the wick structures for all pressures, and wicking ability for each fluid increased with decreasing wick pore size. An externally heated wicking experiment with liquid lithium as the wicking fluid was also conducted. In addition to wicking experiments, a heater rod is under development to simulate the fuel rod of a space based nuclear reactor by providing a heat flux of up to 110 kW/m{sup 2}. Testing of this heater rod has shown its ability to undergo repeated cycling from below 533 K to over 1255 K without failure. This heater rod will be integrated into lithium wicking experiments to provide more realistic simulation of the proposed capillary-driven space nuclear reactor cooling system. (authors)

  9. Cooling tower with concrete support structure, fiberglass panels, and a fan supported by the liquid distribution system

    SciTech Connect

    Bardo, C. J.; Clark Jr., J. L.; Dylewski, A. J.; Seawell, J. Q.

    1985-09-24

    A liquid cooling tower includes precast concrete support legs and cross beams and fiberglass reinforced polyester resin side and top panels. A liquid distribution system is supplied with liquid by a vertically extending main pipe, and a fan and fan motor are supported by the main pipe.

  10. Patterns of fish assemblage structure and dynamics in waters of the Savannah River Plant. Comprehensive Cooling Water Study final report

    SciTech Connect

    Aho, J.M.; Anderson, C.S.; Floyd, K.B.; Negus, M.T.; Meador, M.R.

    1986-06-01

    Research conducted as part of the Comprehensive Cooling Water Study (CCWS) has elucidated many factors that are important to fish population and community dynamics in a variety of habitats on the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Information gained from these studies is useful in predicting fish responses to SRP operations. The overall objective of the CCWS was (1) to determine the environmental effects of SRP cooling water withdrawals and discharges and (2) to determine the significance of the cooling water impacts on the environment. The purpose of this study was to: (1) examine the effects of thermal plumes on anadromous and resident fishes, including overwintering effects, in the SRP swamp and associated tributary streams; (2) assess fish spawning and locate nursery grounds on the SRP; (3) examine the level of use of the SRP by spawning fish from the Savannah River, this objective was shared with the Savannah River Laboratory, E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company; and (4) determine impacts of cooling-water discharges on fish population and community attributes. Five studies were designed to address the above topics. The specific objectives and a summary of the findings of each study are presented.

  11. Active versus passive damping in large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Gary L.; Mclaren, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    Optimal passive and active damping control can be considered in the context of a general control/structure optimization problem. Using a mean square output response approach, it is shown that the weight sensitivity of the active and passive controllers can be used to determine an optimal mix of active and passive elements in a flexible structure.

  12. Cooling rate and thermal structure determined from progressive magnetization of the dacite dome at Mount St. Helens, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Dzurisin, D. ); Denlinger, R.P. ); Rosenbaum, J.G. )

    1990-03-10

    The study suggests that the dome consists of a hot, nonmagnetized core surrounded by a cool magnetized carapace and flanking talus. Temporal changes in the magnetic anomaly indicate that the magnetized carapace thickened at an average rate of 0.03 {plus minus} 0.01 m/d from 1984 to 1986. Petrographic and rock magnetic properties of dome samples indicate that the dominant process responsible for these changes is magnetization of extensively oxidized rock at progressively deeper levels within the dome as the rock cools through its blocking temperature, rather than subsequent changes in magetization caused by further oxidation. Newly extruded material cools rapidly for a short period as heat is conducted outward in response to convective heat loss from its surface. The cooling rate gradually declines for several weeks, and thereafter the material cools at a relatively constant rate by convective heat loss from its interior along fractures that propagate inward. The rate of internal convective heat loss through fractures varies with rainfall, snowmelt, and large-scale fracturing during subsequent eruptive episodes. In accordance with a model for solidification of the 1959 lava lake at Kilauea Iki, Hawaii, the authors picture the dome's magnetized carapace as being a two-phase, porous, convective zone separated from the nonmagnetized core of the dome by a thin, single-phase conductive zone. As a consequence of the heat balance between the conductive and convective zones, the blocking-temperature isotherm migrates inward at a relatively constant rate. If the dome remains inactive, the time scale for its complete magnetization is estimated to be 18-36 years, a forecast which can be refined by shallow drilling into the dome and by continuing studies of its growing magnetic anomaly.

  13. Regeneratively Cooled Porous Media Jacket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mungas, Greg (Inventor); Fisher, David J. (Inventor); London, Adam Pollok (Inventor); Fryer, Jack Merrill (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The fluid and heat transfer theory for regenerative cooling of a rocket combustion chamber with a porous media coolant jacket is presented. This model is used to design a regeneratively cooled rocket or other high temperature engine cooling jacket. Cooling jackets comprising impermeable inner and outer walls, and porous media channels are disclosed. Also disclosed are porous media coolant jackets with additional structures designed to transfer heat directly from the inner wall to the outer wall, and structures designed to direct movement of the coolant fluid from the inner wall to the outer wall. Methods of making such jackets are also disclosed.

  14. Kinetic model for predicting the concentrations of active halogens species in chlorinated saline cooling waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, W.R.; Lietzke, M.H.

    1981-08-01

    A kinetic model has been developed for describing the speciation of chlorine-produced oxidants in seawater as a function of time. The model is applicable under a broad variety of conditions, including all pH range, salinities, temperatures, ammonia concentrations, organic amine concentrations, and chlorine doses likely to be encountered during power plant cooling water chlorination. However, the effects of sunlight are not considered. The model can also be applied to freshwater and recirculating water systems with cooling towers. The results of the model agree with expectation, however, complete verification is not feasible at the present because analytical methods for some of the predicted species are lacking.

  15. Updating of ASME Nuclear Code Case N-201 to Accommodate the Needs of Metallic Core Support Structures for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors Currently in Development

    SciTech Connect

    Mit Basol; John F. Kielb; John F. MuHooly; Kobus Smit

    2007-05-02

    On September 29, 2005, ASME Standards Technology, LLC (ASME ST-LLC) executed a multi-year, cooperative agreement with the United States DOE for the Generation IV Reactor Materials project. The project's objective is to update and expand appropriate materials, construction, and design codes for application in future Generation IV nuclear reactor systems that operate at elevated temperatures. Task 4 was embarked upon in recognition of the large quantity of ongoing reactor designs utilizing high temperature technology. Since Code Case N-201 had not seen a significant revision (except for a minor revision in September, 2006 to change the SA-336 forging reference for 304SS and 316SS to SA-965 in Tables 1.2(a) and 1.2(b), and some minor editorial changes) since December 1994, identifying recommended updates to support the current high temperature Core Support Structure (CSS) designs and potential new designs was important. As anticipated, the Task 4 effort identified a number of Code Case N-201 issues. Items requiring further consideration range from addressing apparent inconsistencies in definitions and certain material properties between CC-N-201 and Subsection NH, to inclusion of additional materials to provide the designer more flexibility of design. Task 4 developed a design parameter survey that requested input from the CSS designers of ongoing high temperature gas cooled reactor metallic core support designs. The responses to the survey provided Task 4 valuable input to identify the design operating parameters and future needs of the CSS designers. Types of materials, metal temperature, time of exposure, design pressure, design life, and fluence levels were included in the Task 4 survey responses. The results of the survey are included in this report. This research proves that additional work must be done to update Code Case N-201. Task 4 activities provide the framework for the Code Case N-201 update and future work to provide input on materials. Candidate

  16. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, W.F.

    1996-05-07

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers. 10 figs.

  17. Black holes, cooling flows and galaxy formation.

    PubMed

    Peacock, J A

    2005-03-15

    Central black holes in galaxies are now well established as a ubiquitous phenomenon, and this fact is important for theories of cosmological structure formation. Merging of galaxy haloes must preserve the proportionality between black hole mass and baryonic mass; the way in which this happens may help solve difficulties with existing ing models of galaxy formation, which suffer from excessive cooling and thus over- produce stars. Feedback from active nuclei may be the missing piece of the puzzle, regulating galaxy-scale cooling flows. Such a process now seems to be observed in cluster-scale cooling flows, where dissipation of sound waves generated by radio lobes can plausibly balance the energy lost in X-rays, at least in a time-averaged sense. PMID:15681292

  18. Neutron Damage in Mechanically-Cooled High-Purity Germanium Detectors for Field-Portable Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) Systems

    SciTech Connect

    E.H. Seabury; C.J. Wharton; A.J. Caffrey; J.B. McCabe; C. DeW. Van Siclen

    2013-10-01

    Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation (PGNAA) systems require the use of a gamma-ray spectrometer to record the gamma-ray spectrum of an object under test and allow the determination of the object’s composition. Field-portable systems, such as Idaho National Laboratory’s PINS system, have used standard liquid-nitrogen-cooled high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to perform this function. These detectors have performed very well in the past, but the requirement of liquid-nitrogen cooling limits their use to areas where liquid nitrogen is readily available or produced on-site. Also, having a relatively large volume of liquid nitrogen close to the detector can impact some assessments, possibly leading to a false detection of explosives or other nitrogen-containing chemical. Use of a mechanically-cooled HPGe detector is therefore very attractive for PGNAA applications where nitrogen detection is critical or where liquid-nitrogen logistics are problematic. Mechanically-cooled HPGe detectors constructed from p-type germanium, such as Ortec’s trans-SPEC, have been commercially available for several years. In order to assess whether these detectors would be suitable for use in a fielded PGNAA system, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been performing a number of tests of the resistance of mechanically-cooled HPGe detectors to neutron damage. These detectors have been standard commercially-available p-type HPGe detectors as well as prototype n-type HPGe detectors. These tests compare the performance of these different detector types as a function of crystal temperature and incident neutron fluence on the crystal.

  19. I-Xe structure of ILAFEGH 009 and shallowater: Evidence for early formation and rapid cooling of impact-derived enstatite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehm, K.; Nichols, R. H., Jr.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Mccoy, T. J.; Keil, K.

    1993-01-01

    Enstatite meteorites have proven to be ideal samples for past studies of the I-Xe system. This work focuses on two enstatite meteorites that were formed by impact processes. Ilafegh 009 is a clast-free impact melt rock from the EL chondrite parent body. The Shallowater aubrite likely formed when a fully molten planetesimal collided with a solid planetesimal, mixing fragments of the solid planetesimal into the enstatite mantle of the molten planetesimal. A complex three-stage cooling history resulted from this mixing and later break-up and reassembly of the parent body. The present study indicates that the I-Xe structure of these two meteorites resulted from in situ decay of live I-129 and that both experienced xenon closure of the iodine host phase at approximately the same time. I-Xe cooling rates are consistent with the cooling rates derived from mineralogic and petrologic studies of these objects. The similarities in ages suggest that the region of the nebula in which enstatite parent bodies formed must have experienced an intense early bombardment.

  20. Stochastic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Bisognano, J.; Leemann, C.

    1982-03-01

    Stochastic cooling is the damping of betatron oscillations and momentum spread of a particle beam by a feedback system. In its simplest form, a pickup electrode detects the transverse positions or momenta of particles in a storage ring, and the signal produced is amplified and applied downstream to a kicker. The time delay of the cable and electronics is designed to match the transit time of particles along the arc of the storage ring between the pickup and kicker so that an individual particle receives the amplified version of the signal it produced at the pick-up. If there were only a single particle in the ring, it is obvious that betatron oscillations and momentum offset could be damped. However, in addition to its own signal, a particle receives signals from other beam particles. In the limit of an infinite number of particles, no damping could be achieved; we have Liouville's theorem with constant density of the phase space fluid. For a finite, albeit large number of particles, there remains a residue of the single particle damping which is of practical use in accumulating low phase space density beams of particles such as antiprotons. It was the realization of this fact that led to the invention of stochastic cooling by S. van der Meer in 1968. Since its conception, stochastic cooling has been the subject of much theoretical and experimental work. The earliest experiments were performed at the ISR in 1974, with the subsequent ICE studies firmly establishing the stochastic cooling technique. This work directly led to the design and construction of the Antiproton Accumulator at CERN and the beginnings of p anti p colliding beam physics at the SPS. Experiments in stochastic cooling have been performed at Fermilab in collaboration with LBL, and a design is currently under development for a anti p accumulator for the Tevatron.

  1. Warm and Cool Cityscapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jubelirer, Shelly

    2012-01-01

    Painting cityscapes is a great way to teach first-grade students about warm and cool colors. Before the painting begins, the author and her class have an in-depth discussion about big cities and what types of buildings or structures that might be seen in them. They talk about large apartment and condo buildings, skyscrapers, art museums,…

  2. 40 CFR 725.238 - Activities conducted outside a structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... structure. 725.238 Section 725.238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS Exemptions for Research and Development Activities § 725.238 Activities conducted outside a structure....

  3. 40 CFR 725.238 - Activities conducted outside a structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... structure. 725.238 Section 725.238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... for Research and Development Activities § 725.238 Activities conducted outside a structure. (a... test. (3) Certification of the following: (i) Compliance with the conditions of the exemption...

  4. 40 CFR 725.238 - Activities conducted outside a structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... structure. 725.238 Section 725.238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... for Research and Development Activities § 725.238 Activities conducted outside a structure. (a... test. (3) Certification of the following: (i) Compliance with the conditions of the exemption...

  5. 40 CFR 725.238 - Activities conducted outside a structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... structure. 725.238 Section 725.238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... for Research and Development Activities § 725.238 Activities conducted outside a structure. (a... test. (3) Certification of the following: (i) Compliance with the conditions of the exemption...

  6. Structural health monitoring activities at National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Doebling, S.W.; James, G.H.; Simmermacher, T.

    1997-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory have on-going programs to assess damage in structures and mechanical systems from changes in their dynamic characteristics. This paper provides a summary of how both institutes became involved with this technology, their experience in this field and the directions that their research in this area will be taking in the future.

  7. Control of sound radiation with active/adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.; Rogers, C. A.; Robertshaw, H. H.

    1992-01-01

    Recent research is discussed in the area of active structural acoustic control with active/adaptive structures. Progress in the areas of structural acoustics, actuators, sensors, and control approaches is presented. Considerable effort has been given to the interaction of these areas with each other due to the coupled nature of the problem. A discussion is presented on actuators bonded to or embedded in the structure itself. The actuators discussed are piezoceramic actuators and shape memory alloy actuators. The sensors discussed are optical fiber sensors, Nitinol fiber sensors, piezoceramics, and polyvinylidene fluoride sensors. The active control techniques considered are state feedback control techniques and least mean square adaptive algorithms. Results presented show that significant progress has been made towards controlling structurally radiated noise by active/adaptive means applied directly to the structure.

  8. The biological activity of structurally defined inositol glycans

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Meenakshi; Azev, Viatcheslav N; d’Alarcao, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Background The inositol glycans (IGs) are glycolipid-derived carbohydrates produced by insulin-sensitive cells in response to insulin treatment. IGs exhibit an array of insulin-like activities including stimulation of lipogenesis, glucose transport and glycogen synthesis, suggesting that they may be involved in insulin signal transduction. However, because the natural IGs are structurally heterogeneous and difficult to purify to homogeneity, an understanding of the relationship between structure and biological activity has relied principally on synthetic IGs of defined structure. Discussion This article briefly describes what is known about the role of IGs in signal transduction and reviews the specific biological activities of the structurally defined IGs synthesized and tested to date. Conclusion A pharmacophore for IG activity begins to emerge from the reviewed data and the structural elements necessary for activity are summarized. PMID:20390053

  9. Encountering Death: Structured Activities for Death Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Ira David; And Others

    This book is intended to be used as a supplement to standard textbooks on death and dying for college students. Chapter 1 "Encountering Death in the Self" builds the foundation for increased self-awareness for the study of death and dying. Chapter 2 "Encountering Death in the Family" provides activities which are appropriate for a wide variety of…

  10. Active longitudes: Structure, dynamics, and rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, E. V.

    Greenwich data for 1879-2005 (cycles 12-23) are used to study the longitude distribution of sunspot group areas summed over a Carrington rotation s(CR) separately in the southern and northern hemispheres. The zones of active longitudes (AL) are identified, and their behaviour (location, shift, and intensity variations) is analyzed over the time interval under consideration. In particular, we have studied the active longitudes in two reference frames corresponding to the rotation periods T = 27.2753 and T = 27.00 days. The AL zones are shown to consist of a set of individual narrow sunspot formation zones rotating rigidly with the Carrington period T ˜ 27.2753 days. The lifetime of the sunspot formation zones exceeds significantly that of individual sunspots and may reach 15-20 rotations. Besides the rigidly rotating active longitudes we have revealed the active longitudes that migrate in the Carrington reference frame at different (greater and smaller than Carrington) angular velocities. Quasi-biennial oscillations (QBO) of the total sunspot areas in the northern and southern longitudinal sectors corresponding to AL zones are studied for the period 1879-2004 using the spectral and correlation analysis methods. The relationships between the antipodal, symmetric about the equator, and adjoining AL zones are analyzed.

  11. THE COOLING OF CORONAL PLASMAS. IV. CATASTROPHIC COOLING OF LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Cargill, P. J.; Bradshaw, S. J.

    2013-07-20

    We examine the radiative cooling of coronal loops and demonstrate that the recently identified catastrophic cooling is due to the inability of a loop to sustain radiative/enthalpy cooling below a critical temperature, which can be >1 MK in flares, 0.5-1 MK in active regions, and 0.1 MK in long tenuous loops. Catastrophic cooling is characterized by a rapid fall in coronal temperature, while the coronal density changes by a small amount. Analytic expressions for the critical temperature are derived and show good agreement with numerical results. This effect considerably limits the lifetime of coronal plasmas below the critical temperature.

  12. Structure of Thermally Activated TRP Channels

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Matthew R.; Moiseenkova-Bell, Vera Y.

    2015-01-01

    Temperature sensation is important for adaptation and survival of organisms. While temperature has the potential to affect all biological macromolecules, organisms have evolved specific thermosensitive molecular detectors that are able to transduce temperature changes into physiologically relevant signals. Among these thermosensors are ion channels from the transient receptor potential (TRP) family. Prime candidates include TRPV1–4, TRPA1, and TRPM8 (the so-called “thermoTRP” channels), which are expressed in sensory neurons and gated at specific temperatures. Electrophysiological and thermodynamic approaches have been employed to determine the nature by which thermoTRPs detect temperature and couple temperature changes to channel gating. To further understand how thermoTRPs sense temperature, high-resolution structures of full-length thermoTRPs channels will be required. Here, we will discuss current progress in unraveling the structures of thermoTRP channels. PMID:25366237

  13. Methods of beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1996-02-01

    Diverse methods which are available for particle beam cooling are reviewed. They consist of some highly developed techniques such as radiation damping, electron cooling, stochastic cooling and the more recently developed, laser cooling. Methods which have been theoretically developed, but not yet achieved experimentally, are also reviewed. They consist of ionization cooling, laser cooling in three dimensions and stimulated radiation cooling.

  14. Active healing of delaminated composite structure using piezoelectric actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Jung Woo; Kim, Heung Soo

    2014-03-01

    Recently, light weight structure becomes an object of attention because increase of energy efficiency becomes the most important global hot issue. Then, composite structures, which have inherent high strength and stiffness to weight ratio, are in the limelight for light weight structures. However, complex failure modes of composite structure are still remains unsolved problem and become main obstacle of wide application of composite structures. Delamination is one of frequent damage phenomenon of laminated composite structure. Delamination can cause reduction of structural stiffness and decrement of natural frequencies. This might induce increase of structural vibration and resonant phenomenon of operating structures. Then, delamination should be detected and complemented. In this work, active control scheme and piezoelectric actuators are used to reduce the delamination effect of damaged composite structure. At first, finite element model for delaminated composite structure is constructed based on improved layerwise theory and then state space control model is established. After design and implementation of active controller, dynamic characteristics and structural performances of damaged composite structure are investigated and effectiveness of active healing is evaluated.

  15. Surface-cooling effects on compressible boundary-layer instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seddougui, Sharon O.; Bowles, R. I.; Smith, F. T.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of surface cooling on compressible boundary layer instability is discussed theoretically for both viscous and inviscid modes, at high Reynolds numbers. The cooling enhances the surface heat transfer and shear stress, creating a high heat transfer sublayer. This has the effect of distorting and accentuating the viscous Tollmien-Schlichting modes to such an extent that their spatial growth rates become comparable with, and can even exceed, the growth rates of inviscid modes, including those found previously. This is for moderate cooling, and it applies at any Mach number. In addition, the moderate cooling destabilizes otherwise stable viscous or inviscid modes, in particular triggering outward-traveling waves at the edge of the boundary layer in the supersonic regime. Severe cooling is also discussed as it brings compressible dynamics directly into play within the viscous sublayer. All the new cooled modes found involve the heat transfer sublayer quite actively, and they are often multi-structured in form and may be distinct from those observed in previous computational and experimental investigations. The corresponding nonlinear processes are also pointed out with regard to transition in the cooled compressible boundary layer. Finally, comparisons with Lysenko and Maslov's (1984) experiments on surface cooling are presented.

  16. Berkeley Lab's Cool Your School Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ivan Berry

    2012-07-30

    Cool Your School is a series of 6th-grade, classroom-based, science activities rooted in Berkeley Lab's cool-surface and cool materials research and aligned with California science content standards. The activities are designed to build knowledge, stimulate curiosity, and carry the conversation about human-induced climate change, and what can be done about it, into the community.

  17. Berkeley Lab's Cool Your School Program

    ScienceCinema

    Ivan Berry

    2013-06-24

    Cool Your School is a series of 6th-grade, classroom-based, science activities rooted in Berkeley Lab's cool-surface and cool materials research and aligned with California science content standards. The activities are designed to build knowledge, stimulate curiosity, and carry the conversation about human-induced climate change, and what can be done about it, into the community.

  18. Electronic cooling using thermoelectric devices

    SciTech Connect

    Zebarjadi, M.

    2015-05-18

    Thermoelectric coolers or Peltier coolers are used to pump heat in the opposite direction of the natural heat flux. These coolers have also been proposed for electronic cooling, wherein the aim is to pump heat in the natural heat flux direction and from hot spots to the colder ambient temperature. In this manuscript, we show that for such applications, one needs to use thermoelectric materials with large thermal conductivity and large power factor, instead of the traditionally used high ZT thermoelectric materials. We further show that with the known thermoelectric materials, the active cooling cannot compete with passive cooling, and one needs to explore a new set of materials to provide a cooling solution better than a regular copper heat sink. We propose a set of materials and directions for exploring possible materials candidates suitable for electronic cooling. Finally, to achieve maximum cooling, we propose to use thermoelectric elements as fins attached to copper blocks.

  19. Electronic cooling using thermoelectric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebarjadi, M.

    2015-05-01

    Thermoelectric coolers or Peltier coolers are used to pump heat in the opposite direction of the natural heat flux. These coolers have also been proposed for electronic cooling, wherein the aim is to pump heat in the natural heat flux direction and from hot spots to the colder ambient temperature. In this manuscript, we show that for such applications, one needs to use thermoelectric materials with large thermal conductivity and large power factor, instead of the traditionally used high ZT thermoelectric materials. We further show that with the known thermoelectric materials, the active cooling cannot compete with passive cooling, and one needs to explore a new set of materials to provide a cooling solution better than a regular copper heat sink. We propose a set of materials and directions for exploring possible materials candidates suitable for electronic cooling. Finally, to achieve maximum cooling, we propose to use thermoelectric elements as fins attached to copper blocks.

  20. Experimental evaluation of active-member control of precision structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, James; Blackwood, Gary; Chu, Cheng-Chih

    1989-01-01

    The results of closed loop experiments that use piezoelectric active-members to control the flexible motion of a precision truss structure are described. These experiments are directed toward the development of high-performance structural systems as part of the Control/Structure Interaction (CSI) program at JPL. The focus of CSI activity at JPL is to develop the technology necessary to accurately control both the shape and vibration levels in the precision structures from which proposed large space-based observatories will be built. Structural error budgets for these types of structures will likely be in the sub-micron regime; optical tolerances will be even tighter. In order to achieve system level stability and local positioning at this level, it is generally expected that some form of active control will be required.

  1. Origami-inspired active structures: a synthesis and review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peraza-Hernandez, Edwin A.; Hartl, Darren J.; Malak, Richard J., Jr.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2014-09-01

    Origami, the ancient art of paper folding, has inspired the design of engineering devices and structures for decades. The underlying principles of origami are very general, which has led to applications ranging from cardboard containers to deployable space structures. More recently, researchers have become interested in the use of active materials (i.e., those that convert various forms of energy into mechanical work) to effect the desired folding behavior. When used in a suitable geometry, active materials allow engineers to create self-folding structures. Such structures are capable of performing folding and/or unfolding operations without being kinematically manipulated by external forces or moments. This is advantageous for many applications including space systems, underwater robotics, small scale devices, and self-assembling systems. This article is a survey and analysis of prior work on active self-folding structures as well as methods and tools available for the design of folding structures in general and self-folding structures in particular. The goal is to provide researchers and practitioners with a systematic view of the state-of-the-art in this important and evolving area. Unifying structural principles for active self-folding structures are identified and used as a basis for a quantitative and qualitative comparison of numerous classes of active materials. Design considerations specific to folded structures are examined, including the issues of crease pattern identification and fold kinematics. Although few tools have been created with active materials in mind, many of them are useful in the overall design process for active self-folding structures. Finally, the article concludes with a discussion of open questions for the field of origami-inspired engineering.

  2. Structural interpretation of activity cliffs revealed by systematic analysis of structure-activity relationships in analog series.

    PubMed

    Sisay, Mihiret T; Peltason, Lisa; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2009-10-01

    Discontinuity in structure-activity relationships (SARs) is caused by so-called activity cliffs and represents one of the major caveats in SAR modeling and lead optimization. At activity cliffs, small structural modifications of compounds lead to substantial differences in potency that are essentially unpredictable using quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) methods. In order to better understand SAR discontinuity at the molecular level of detail, we have analyzed different compound series in combinatorial analog graphs and determined substitution patterns that introduce activity cliffs of varying magnitude. So identified SAR determinants were then analyzed on the basis of complex crystal structures to enable a structural interpretation of SAR discontinuity and underlying activity cliffs. In some instances, SAR discontinuity detected within analog series could be well rationalized on the basis of structural data, whereas in others a structural explanation was not possible. This reflects the intrinsic complexity of small molecule SARs and suggests that the analysis of short-range receptor-ligand interactions seen in X-ray structures is insufficient to comprehensively account for SAR discontinuity. However, in other cases, SAR information extracted from ligands was incomplete but could be deduced taking X-ray data into account. Thus, taken together, these findings illustrate the complementarity of ligand-based SAR analysis and structural information. PMID:19761254

  3. Structural Determinants of Sleeping Beauty Transposase Activity.

    PubMed

    Abrusán, György; Yant, Stephen R; Szilágyi, András; Marsh, Joseph A; Mátés, Lajos; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Barabás, Orsolya; Ivics, Zoltán

    2016-08-01

    Transposases are important tools in genome engineering, and there is considerable interest in engineering more efficient ones. Here, we seek to understand the factors determining their activity using the Sleeping Beauty transposase. Recent work suggests that protein coevolutionary information can be used to classify groups of physically connected, coevolving residues into elements called "sectors", which have proven useful for understanding the folding, allosteric interactions, and enzymatic activity of proteins. Using extensive mutagenesis data, protein modeling and analysis of folding energies, we show that (i) The Sleeping Beauty transposase contains two sectors, which span across conserved domains, and are enriched in DNA-binding residues, indicating that the DNA binding and endonuclease functions of the transposase coevolve; (ii) Sector residues are highly sensitive to mutations, and most mutations of these residues strongly reduce transposition rate; (iii) Mutations with a strong effect on free energy of folding in the DDE domain of the transposase significantly reduce transposition rate. (iv) Mutations that influence DNA and protein-protein interactions generally reduce transposition rate, although most hyperactive mutants are also located on the protein surface, including residues with protein-protein interactions. This suggests that hyperactivity results from the modification of protein interactions, rather than the stabilization of protein fold. PMID:27401040

  4. Macrodomains: Structure, Function, Evolution, and Catalytic Activities.

    PubMed

    Rack, Johannes Gregor Matthias; Perina, Dragutin; Ahel, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    Recent developments indicate that macrodomains, an ancient and diverse protein domain family, are key players in the recognition, interpretation, and turnover of ADP-ribose (ADPr) signaling. Crucial to this is the ability of macrodomains to recognize ADPr either directly, in the form of a metabolic derivative, or as a modification covalently bound to proteins. Thus, macrodomains regulate a wide variety of cellular and organismal processes, including DNA damage repair, signal transduction, and immune response. Their importance is further indicated by the fact that dysregulation or mutation of a macrodomain is associated with several diseases, including cancer, developmental defects, and neurodegeneration. In this review, we summarize the current insights into macrodomain evolution and how this evolution influenced their structural and functional diversification. We highlight some aspects of macrodomain roles in pathobiology as well as their emerging potential as therapeutic targets. PMID:26844395

  5. Design Concepts for Cooled Ceramic Matrix Composite Turbine Vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This project demonstrated that higher temperature capabilities of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) can be used to reduce emissions and improve fuel consumption in gas turbine engines. The work involved closely coupling aerothermal and structural analyses for the first-stage vane of a high-pressure turbine (HPT). These vanes are actively cooled, typically using film cooling. Ceramic materials have structural and thermal properties different from conventional metals used for the first-stage HPT vane. This project identified vane configurations that satisfy CMC structural strength and life constraints while maintaining vane aerodynamic efficiency and reducing vane cooling to improve engine performance and reduce emissions. The project examined modifications to vane internal configurations to achieve the desired objectives. Thermal and pressure stresses are equally important, and both were analyzed using an ANSYS® structural analysis. Three-dimensional fluid and heat transfer analyses were used to determine vane aerodynamic performance and heat load distributions.

  6. Shivering and tachycardic responses to external cooling in mice are substantially suppressed by TRPV1 activation but not by TRPM8 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Feketa, Viktor V.; Balasubramanian, Adithya; Flores, Christopher M.; Player, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Mild decrease of core temperature (32–34°C), also known as therapeutic hypothermia, is a highly effective strategy of neuroprotection from ischemia and holds significant promise in the treatment of stroke. However, induction of hypothermia in conscious stroke patients is complicated by cold-defensive responses, such as shivering and tachycardia. Although multiple thermoregulatory responses may be altered by modulators of thermosensitive ion channels, TRPM8 (transient receptor potential melastatin 8) and TRPV1 (TRP vanilloid 1), it is unknown whether these agents affect cold-induced shivering and tachycardia. The current study aimed to determine the effects of TRPM8 inhibition and TRPV1 activation on the shivering and tachycardic responses to external cooling. Conscious mice were treated with TRPM8 inhibitor compound 5 or TRPV1 agonist dihydrocapsaicin (DHC) and exposed to cooling at 10°C. Shivering was measured by electromyography using implanted electrodes in back muscles, tachycardic response by electrocardiography, and core temperature by wireless transmitters in the abdominal cavity. The role of TRPM8 was further determined using TRPM8 KO mice. TRPM8 ablation had no effect on total electromyographic muscle activity (vehicle: 24.0 ± 1.8; compound 5: 23.8 ± 2.0; TRPM8 KO: 19.7 ± 1.9 V·s/min), tachycardia (ΔHR = 124 ± 31; 121 ± 13; 121 ± 31 beats/min) and drop in core temperature (−3.6 ± 0.1; −3.4 ± 0.4; −3.6 ± 0.5°C) during cold exposure. TRPV1 activation substantially suppressed muscle activity (vehicle: 25.6 ± 3.0 vs. DHC: 5.1 ± 2.0 V·s/min), tachycardia (ΔHR = 204 ± 25 vs. 3 ± 35 beats/min) and produced a profound drop in core temperature (−2.2 ± 0.6 vs. −8.9 ± 0.6°C). In conclusion, external cooling-induced shivering and tachycardia are suppressed by TRPV1 activation, but not by TRPM8 inhibition. This suggests that TRPV1 agonists may be combined with external physical cooling to achieve more rapid and effective hypothermia

  7. Shivering and tachycardic responses to external cooling in mice are substantially suppressed by TRPV1 activation but not by TRPM8 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Feketa, Viktor V; Balasubramanian, Adithya; Flores, Christopher M; Player, Mark R; Marrelli, Sean P

    2013-11-01

    Mild decrease of core temperature (32-34°C), also known as therapeutic hypothermia, is a highly effective strategy of neuroprotection from ischemia and holds significant promise in the treatment of stroke. However, induction of hypothermia in conscious stroke patients is complicated by cold-defensive responses, such as shivering and tachycardia. Although multiple thermoregulatory responses may be altered by modulators of thermosensitive ion channels, TRPM8 (transient receptor potential melastatin 8) and TRPV1 (TRP vanilloid 1), it is unknown whether these agents affect cold-induced shivering and tachycardia. The current study aimed to determine the effects of TRPM8 inhibition and TRPV1 activation on the shivering and tachycardic responses to external cooling. Conscious mice were treated with TRPM8 inhibitor compound 5 or TRPV1 agonist dihydrocapsaicin (DHC) and exposed to cooling at 10°C. Shivering was measured by electromyography using implanted electrodes in back muscles, tachycardic response by electrocardiography, and core temperature by wireless transmitters in the abdominal cavity. The role of TRPM8 was further determined using TRPM8 KO mice. TRPM8 ablation had no effect on total electromyographic muscle activity (vehicle: 24.0 ± 1.8; compound 5: 23.8 ± 2.0; TRPM8 KO: 19.7 ± 1.9 V·s/min), tachycardia (ΔHR = 124 ± 31; 121 ± 13; 121 ± 31 beats/min) and drop in core temperature (-3.6 ± 0.1; -3.4 ± 0.4; -3.6 ± 0.5°C) during cold exposure. TRPV1 activation substantially suppressed muscle activity (vehicle: 25.6 ± 3.0 vs. DHC: 5.1 ± 2.0 V·s/min), tachycardia (ΔHR = 204 ± 25 vs. 3 ± 35 beats/min) and produced a profound drop in core temperature (-2.2 ± 0.6 vs. -8.9 ± 0.6°C). In conclusion, external cooling-induced shivering and tachycardia are suppressed by TRPV1 activation, but not by TRPM8 inhibition. This suggests that TRPV1 agonists may be combined with external physical cooling to achieve more rapid and effective hypothermia. PMID

  8. The dance of heating and cooling in galaxy clusters: three-dimensional simulations of self-regulated active galactic nuclei outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, M.; Melioli, C.; Brighenti, F.; D'Ercole, A.

    2011-02-01

    It is now widely accepted that heating processes play a fundamental role in galaxy clusters, struggling in an intricate but fascinating ‘dance' with its antagonist, radiative cooling. Last-generation observations, especially X-ray, are giving us tiny hints about the notes of this endless ballet. Cavities, shocks, turbulence and wide absorption lines indicate that the central active nucleus is injecting a huge amount of energy in the intracluster medium. However, which is the real dominant engine of self-regulated heating? One of the models we propose is massive subrelativistic outflows, probably generated by a wind disc or just the result of the entrainment on kpc scale by the fast radio jet. Using a modified version of the adaptive mesh refinement code FLASH 3.2, we have explored several feedback mechanisms that self-regulate the mechanical power. Two are the best schemes that answer our primary question, that is, quenching cooling flow and at the same time preserving a cool core appearance for a long-term evolution (7 Gyr): one is more explosive (with efficiencies ˜ 5 × 10-3-10-2), triggered by central cooled gas, and the other is gentler, ignited by hot gas Bondi accretion (with ɛ= 0.1). These three-dimensional simulations show that the total energy injected is not the key aspect, but the results strongly depend on how energy is given to the intracluster medium. We follow the dynamics of the best models (temperature, density, surface brightness maps and profiles) and produce many observable predictions: buoyant bubbles, ripples, turbulence, iron abundance maps and hydrostatic equilibrium deviation. We present an in-depth discussion of the merits and flaws of all our models, with a critical eye towards observational concordance.

  9. Structure-activity relationship of indoloquinoline analogs anti-MRSA.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min; Kamada, Tomonori; Takeuchi, Aya; Nishioka, Hiromi; Kuroda, Teruo; Takeuchi, Yasuo

    2015-12-01

    Indolo[3,2-b]quinoline analogs (3a-3s), 4-(acridin-9-ylamino) phenol hydrochloride (4), benzofuro[3,2-b]quinoline (3t), indeno[1,2-b]quinolines (3u and 3v) have been synthesized. Those compounds were found to exhibit anti-bacterial activity towards Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (anti-MRSA activity). Structure-activity relationship studies were conducted that indoloquinoline ring, benzofuroquinoline ring and 4-aminophenol group are essential structure for anti-MRSA activity. PMID:26522949

  10. Structural snapshots of actively translating human ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Behrmann, Elmar; Loerke, Justus; Budkevich, Tatyana V; Yamamoto, Kaori; Schmidt, Andrea; Penczek, Pawel A; Vos, Matthijn R; Bürger, Jörg; Mielke, Thorsten; Scheerer, Patrick; Spahn, Christian M T

    2015-05-01

    Macromolecular machines, such as the ribosome, undergo large-scale conformational changes during their functional cycles. Although their mode of action is often compared to that of mechanical machines, a crucial difference is that, at the molecular dimension, thermodynamic effects dominate functional cycles, with proteins fluctuating stochastically between functional states defined by energetic minima on an energy landscape. Here, we have used cryo-electron microscopy to image ex-vivo-derived human polysomes as a source of actively translating ribosomes. Multiparticle refinement and 3D variability analysis allowed us to visualize a variety of native translation intermediates. Significantly populated states include not only elongation cycle intermediates in pre- and post-translocational states, but also eEF1A-containing decoding and termination/recycling complexes. Focusing on the post-translocational state, we extended this assessment to the single-residue level, uncovering striking details of ribosome-ligand interactions and identifying both static and functionally important dynamic elements. PMID:25957688

  11. Structural snapshots of actively translating human ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Behrmann, Elmar; Loerke, Justus; Budkevich, Tatyana V.; Yamamoto, Kaori; Schmidt, Andrea; Penczek, Pawel A.; Vos, Matthijn R.; Bürger, Jörg; Mielke, Thorsten; Scheerer, Patrick; Spahn, Christian M.T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Macromolecular machines, such as the ribosome, undergo large-scale conformational changes during their functional cycles. While their mode of action is often compared to that of mechanical machines, a crucial difference is that at the molecular dimension, thermodynamic effects dominate functional cycles, with proteins fluctuating stochastically between functional states defined by energetic minima on an energy landscape. Here, we have used cryo-electron microscopy to image ex vivo-derived human polysomes as a source of actively translating ribosomes. Multiparticle refinement and three-dimensional variability analysis allowed us to visualize a variety of native translation intermediates. Significantly populated states include not only elongation cycle intermediates in pre- and post-translocational states, but also eEF1A-containing decoding and termination/recycling complexes. Focusing on the post-translocational state, we extended this assessment to the single-residue level, uncovering striking details of ribosome-ligand interactions and identifying both static and functionally important dynamic elements. PMID:25957688

  12. Active damping of spacecraft structural appendage vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, Joseph V. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An active vibration damper system, for bending in two orthogonal directions and torsion, in each of three mutually perpendicular axes is located at the extremities of the flexible appendages of a space platform. The system components for each axis includes: an accelerometer, filtering and signal processing apparatus, and a DC motor-inertia wheel torquer. The motor torquer, when driven by a voltage proportional to the relative vibration tip velocity, produces a reaction torque for opposing and therefore damping a specific modal velocity of vibration. The relative tip velocity is obtained by integrating the difference between the signal output from the accelerometer located at the end of the appendage with the output of a usually carried accelerometer located on a relatively rigid body portion of the space platform. A selector switch, with sequential stepping logic or highest modal vibration energy logic, steps to another modal tip velocity channel and receives a signal voltage to damp another vibration mode. In this manner, several vibration modes can be damped with a single sensor/actuator pair. When a three axis damper is located on each of the major appendages of the platform, then all of the system vibration modes can be effectively damped.

  13. Development of magnetostrictive active members for control of space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce G.; Avakian, Kevin M.; Fenn, Ralph C.; Gaffney, Monique S.; Gerver, Michael J.; Hawkey, Timothy J.; Boudreau, Donald J.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this Phase 2 Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) project was to determine the technical feasibility of developing magnetostrictive active members for use as truss elements in space structures. Active members control elastic vibrations of truss-based space structures and integrate the functions of truss structure element, actively controlled actuator, and sensor. The active members must control structural motion to the sub-micron level and, for many proposed space applications, work at cryogenic temperatures. Under this program both room temperature and cryogenic temperature magnetostrictive active members were designed, fabricated, and tested. The results of these performance tests indicated that room temperature magnetostrictive actuators feature higher strain, stiffness, and force capability with lower amplifier requirements than similarly sized piezoelectric or electrostrictive active members, at the cost of higher mass. Two different cryogenic temperature magnetostrictive materials were tested at liquid nitrogen temperatures, both with larger strain capability than the room temperature magnetostrictive materials. The cryogenic active member development included the design and fabrication of a cryostat that allows operation of the cryogenic active member in a space structure testbed.

  14. REACTOR COOLING

    DOEpatents

    Quackenbush, C.F.

    1959-09-29

    A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF STRUCTURE ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS FOR ASSESSING ECOLOGICAL RISKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the field of environmental toxicology, structure activity relationships (SARs) have developed as scientifically-credible tools for predicting the effects of chemicals when little or no empirical data are available.

  16. Historical Earthquakes and Active Structure for Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsereteli, Nino; Varazanashivli, Otar

    2014-05-01

    Long-term seismic history is an important foundation for reliable assessment of seismic hazard and risk. Therefore, completeness of earthquake catalogues in the longest historical part is very important. Survived historical sources, as well as special researches from the institutes, museums, libraries and archives in Georgia, the Caucasus and the Middle East indicate to high level of seismicity which entailed numerous human casualties and destruction on the territory of Georgia during the historical period. The study and detailed analysis of these original documents and researches have allowed us to create a new catalogue of historical earthquakes of Georgia from 1250 BC to 1900 AD. The method of the study is based on a multidisciplinary approach, i.e. on the joint use of methods of history and paleoseismology, archeoseismology, seismotectonics, geomorphology, etc. We present here a new parametric catalogue of 44 historic earthquakes of Georgia and a full "descriptor" of all the phenomena described in it. Constructed on its basis, the summarized map of the distribution of maximum damage in the historical period (before 1900) on the territory of Georgia clearly shows the main features of the seismic field during this period. In particular, in the axial part and the southern slope of the Greater Caucasus there is a seismic gap, which was filled in 1991 by the strongest earthquake and its aftershocks in Racha. In addition, it is also obvious that very high seismic activity in the central and eastern parts of the Javakheti highland is not described in historical materials and this fact requires further searches of various kinds of sources that contain data about historical earthquakes. We hope that this catalogue will enable to create a new joint (instrumental and historical) parametric earthquake catalogue of Georgia and will serve to assess the real seismic hazard and risk in the country.

  17. Chemical and magnetic properties of rapidly cooled metastable ferri-ilmenite solid solutions - IV: the fine structure of self-reversed thermoremanent magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Peter; McEnroe, S. A.; Fabian, K.; Harrison, R. J.; Thomas, C. I.; Mukai, H.

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic experiments, a Monte Carlo simulation and transmission electron microscopy observations combine to confirm variable chemical phase separation during quench and annealing of metastable ferri-ilmenite compositions, caused by inhomogeneous Fe-Ti ordering and anti-ordering. Separation begins near interfaces between growing ordered and anti-ordered domains, the latter becoming progressively enriched in ilmenite component, moving the Ti-impoverished hematite component into Fe-enriched diffusion waves near the interfaces. Even when disordered regions are eliminated, Fe-enriched waves persist and enlarge on anti-phase boundaries between growing and shrinking ordered and anti-ordered domains. Magnetic results and conceptual models show that magnetic ordering with falling T initiates in the Fe-enriched wave crests. Although representing only a tiny fraction of material, identified at highest Ts on a field-cooling curve, they control the `pre-destiny' of progressive magnetization at lower T. They can provide a positive magnetic moment in a minority of ordered ferrimagnetic material, which, by exchange coupling, then creates a self-reversed negative moment in the remaining majority. Four Ts or T ranges are recognized on typical field-cooling curves: TPD is the T range of `pre-destination'; TC is the predominant Curie T where major positive magnetization increases sharply; TMAX is where magnetization reaches a positive maximum, beyond which it is outweighed by self-reversed magnetization and TZM is the T where total magnetization passes zero. Disposition of these Ts on cooling curves indicate the fine structure of self-reversed thermoremanent magnetization. These results confirm much earlier suspicions that the `x-phase' responsible for self-reversed magnetization resides in Fe-enriched phase boundaries.

  18. Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings: Activities of the Private Sector of the Building Community and Its Perceived Needs Relative to Increased Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Committee on Solar Energy in the Heating and Cooling of Buildings.

    This report is essentially a collection of information gathered from a broad cross-section of the building community that provides a description of the state of affairs existing mid-1974 through mid-1975 in the private sector of the building community with regard to solar heating and cooling of buildings. The report additionally contains…

  19. Structure-Activity Relationships in Nitro-Aromatic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, R. A.; Rahman, S.; Crespo-Hernández, C. E.

    Many nitro-aromatic compounds show mutagenic and carcinogenic properties, posing a potential human health risk. Despite this potential health hazard, nitro-aromatic compounds continue to be emitted into ambient air from municipal incinerators, motor vehicles, and industrial power plants. As a result, understanding the structural and electronic factors that influence mutagenicity in nitro-aromatic compounds has been a long standing objective. Progress toward this goal has accelerated over the years, in large part due to the synergistic efforts among toxicology, computational chemistry, and statistical modeling of toxicological data. The concerted influence of several structural and electronic factors in nitro-aromatic compounds makes the development of structure-activity relationships (SARs) a paramount challenge. Mathematical models that include a regression analysis show promise in predicting the mutagenic activity of nitro-aromatic compounds as well as in prioritizing compounds for which experimental data should be pursued. A major challenge of the structure-activity models developed thus far is their failure to apply beyond a subset of nitro-aromatic compounds. Most quantitative structure-activity relationship papers point to statistics as the most important confirmation of the validity of a model. However, the experimental evidence shows the importance of the chemical knowledge in the process of generating models with reasonable applicability. This chapter will concisely summarize the structural and electronic factors that influence the mutagenicity in nitro-aromatic compounds and the recent efforts to use quantitative structure-activity relationships to predict those physicochemical properties.

  20. Eliciting Production of L2 Target Structures through Priming Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Kim; Trofimovich, Pavel; Neumann, Heike

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the pedagogical applications of structural priming research in an English for academic purposes (EAP) context, investigating whether priming activities are an effective tool for eliciting production of target grammatical structures. University students across four EAP classes carried out a total of 6 information-exchange…

  1. The Ups and Downs of Structure-Activity Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Rajarshi

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter we discuss the landscape view of structure-activity relationships (SARs). The motivation for such a view is that SARs come in a variety of forms, such as those where small changes in structure lead to small changes in activity or where small structural lead to significant changes in activity (also termed activity cliffs). Thus, an SAR dataset is viewed as landscape comprised of smooth plains, rolling hills and jagged gorges. We review the history of this view and early quantitative approaches that attempted to encode the landscape. We then discuss some recent developments that directly characterize structure-activity landscapes, in one case with the goal of higlighting activity cliffs while the other allows one to resolve different types of SAR that may be present in a dataset. We highlight some applications of these approaches, such as predictive model development and SAR elucidation, to SAR datasets obtained from the literatur. Finally, we conclude with a sumary of the landscape approach and why it provides an intuitive and rigorous alternative to standard views of structure-activity data. PMID:20838965

  2. Sol-gel composite coatings as anti-corrosion barrier for structural materials of lead-bismuth eutectic cooled fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasada, Ryuta; Dou, Peng

    2013-09-01

    In order to protect the structural components of lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) cooled fast breeder reactors (FBRs) from liquid metal corrosion, advanced aluminum-yttrium nano- and micro-composite coatings were developed using an improved sol-gel process, which includes dipping specimens in a Y-added sol-gel solution dispersed with ultrafine α-Al2O3 powders prepared by mechanical milling. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and field emission electron probe microprobe analyzer (FE-EPMA) analyses revealed that the coatings are composed of alumina with high density. Accelerated corrosion tests were conducted on coated specimens in liquid LBE at 650 °C under dynamic conditions. After the corrosion tests, no cracking, spallation, erosion and liquid metal (e.g., lead) penetration occurred to the coatings, indicating that the coatings possess an enhanced dynamic LBE corrosion resistance. The superior LBE corrosion resistance is due to the presence of the nano-structured composite particles integrated into the coatings and the addition of trace amount of yttrium. Severe erosion and penetration of liquid Pb occurred to the Al2O3 nano- and micro-composite coatings. After the corrosion tests, no cracking, spallation, erosion and liquid metal (e.g., lead) penetration occurred to the newly-developed aluminum-yttrium nano- and micro-composite coatings, indicating that the coatings possess an enhanced dynamic LBE corrosion resistance. Therefore we can conclude that the coatings possess an enhanced dynamic LBE corrosion resistance under the experimental conditions chosen here. It is a way to protect the structural materials of LBE cooled FBRs from liquid metal corrosion. The much improved corrosion resistance of aluminum-yttrium nano- and micro-composite coatings, relative to Al2O3 nano- and micro-composite coatings, is due to the much higher density and the significantly superior high temperature strength resulting from using of finer Al2O3 seeding particles and adding trace

  3. Opposing Effects of Neuronal Activity on Structural Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Fauth, Michael; Tetzlaff, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The connectivity of the brain is continuously adjusted to new environmental influences by several activity-dependent adaptive processes. The most investigated adaptive mechanism is activity-dependent functional or synaptic plasticity regulating the transmission efficacy of existing synapses. Another important but less prominently discussed adaptive process is structural plasticity, which changes the connectivity by the formation and deletion of synapses. In this review, we show, based on experimental evidence, that structural plasticity can be classified similar to synaptic plasticity into two categories: (i) Hebbian structural plasticity, which leads to an increase (decrease) of the number of synapses during phases of high (low) neuronal activity and (ii) homeostatic structural plasticity, which balances these changes by removing and adding synapses. Furthermore, based on experimental and theoretical insights, we argue that each type of structural plasticity fulfills a different function. While Hebbian structural changes enhance memory lifetime, storage capacity, and memory robustness, homeostatic structural plasticity self-organizes the connectivity of the neural network to assure stability. However, the link between functional synaptic and structural plasticity as well as the detailed interactions between Hebbian and homeostatic structural plasticity are more complex. This implies even richer dynamics requiring further experimental and theoretical investigations. PMID:27445713

  4. Opposing Effects of Neuronal Activity on Structural Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Fauth, Michael; Tetzlaff, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The connectivity of the brain is continuously adjusted to new environmental influences by several activity-dependent adaptive processes. The most investigated adaptive mechanism is activity-dependent functional or synaptic plasticity regulating the transmission efficacy of existing synapses. Another important but less prominently discussed adaptive process is structural plasticity, which changes the connectivity by the formation and deletion of synapses. In this review, we show, based on experimental evidence, that structural plasticity can be classified similar to synaptic plasticity into two categories: (i) Hebbian structural plasticity, which leads to an increase (decrease) of the number of synapses during phases of high (low) neuronal activity and (ii) homeostatic structural plasticity, which balances these changes by removing and adding synapses. Furthermore, based on experimental and theoretical insights, we argue that each type of structural plasticity fulfills a different function. While Hebbian structural changes enhance memory lifetime, storage capacity, and memory robustness, homeostatic structural plasticity self-organizes the connectivity of the neural network to assure stability. However, the link between functional synaptic and structural plasticity as well as the detailed interactions between Hebbian and homeostatic structural plasticity are more complex. This implies even richer dynamics requiring further experimental and theoretical investigations. PMID:27445713

  5. Surface structure of α-Cr2O3(0001) after activated oxygen exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Chamberlin, Sara E.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2013-09-13

    The surface structure of a-Cr2O3(0001) before and after exposure to activated oxygen from an ECR plasma source was investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD). Epitaxial Cr2O3(0001) thin films were deposited on Al2O3(0001) substrates by oxygen-plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (OPA-MBE). When cooled or annealed in vacuum, strong evidence for a Cr-Cr-O3- termination was obtained by comparing the Cr3+ XPD azimuthal scan to single scattering simulations. However, after plasma exposure, a high binding energy feature was observed in the Cr 2p XPS spectrum that possesses an ordered structure distinct from the underlying Cr3+ of Cr2O3, which remains Cr-Cr-O3-like. Investigation of this new surface structure with simulations of various candidate structures tentatively rules out CrO2-like configurations. The high binding energy feature likely arises from a higher oxidation state of Cr. One possibility is the oxidation of the surface layer of Cr to Cr6- with a double chromyl structure (O=Cr=O).

  6. Surface structure of α-Cr2O3(0001) after activated oxygen exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Chamberlin, Sara E.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2013-12-01

    The surface structure of α-Cr2O3(0001) before and after exposure to activated oxygen from an ECR plasma source was investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD). Epitaxial Cr2O3(0001) thin films were deposited on Al2O3(0001) substrates by oxygen-plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (OPA-MBE). When cooled or annealed in vacuum, strong evidence for a Crsbnd Crsbnd O3sbnd termination was obtained by comparing the Cr3 + XPD azimuthal scan to single scattering simulations. However, after plasma exposure, a high binding energy feature was observed in the Cr 2p XPS spectrum that possesses an ordered structure distinct from the underlying Cr3 + of Cr2O3, which remains Cr-Cr-O3-like. Investigation of this new surface structure with simulations of various candidate structures tentatively rules out CrO2-like configurations. The high binding energy feature likely arises from a higher oxidation state of Cr. One possibility is the oxidation of the surface layer of Cr to Cr6 - δ with a double chromyl structure (Odbnd Crdbnd O).

  7. Formation of Cool Cores in Galaxy Clusters via Hierarchical Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Burns, Jack O.; Loken, Chris; Norman, Michael L.; Bryan, Greg

    2004-05-01

    We present a new scenario for the formation of cool cores in rich galaxy clusters, based on results from recent high spatial dynamic range, adaptive mesh Eulerian hydrodynamic simulations of large-scale structure formation. We find that cores of cool gas, material that would be identified as a classical cooling flow on the basis of its X-ray luminosity excess and temperature profile, are built from the accretion of discrete stable subclusters. Any ``cooling flow'' present is overwhelmed by the velocity field within the cluster; the bulk flow of gas through the cluster typically has speeds up to about 2000 km s-1, and significant rotation is frequently present in the cluster core. The inclusion of consistent initial cosmological conditions for the cluster within its surrounding supercluster environment is crucial when the evolution of cool cores in rich galaxy clusters is simulated. This new model for the hierarchical assembly of cool gas naturally explains the high frequency of cool cores in rich galaxy clusters, despite the fact that a majority of these clusters show evidence of substructure that is believed to arise from recent merger activity. Furthermore, our simulations generate complex cluster cores in concordance with recent X-ray observations of cool fronts, cool ``bullets,'' and filaments in a number of galaxy clusters. Our simulations were computed with a coupled N-body, Eulerian, adaptive mesh refinement, hydrodynamics cosmology code that properly treats the effects of shocks and radiative cooling by the gas. We employ up to seven levels of refinement to attain a peak resolution of 15.6 kpc within a volume 256 Mpc on a side and assume a standard ΛCDM cosmology.

  8. Analysis of construction conditions affecting the structural response of the cooling tower at Willow Island, West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, H.S.; Fattal, S.G.

    1980-07-01

    The initial investigation of the Willow Island cooling tower collapse (NBSIR 78-1578) established that the most probable cause of the collapse was the imposition of construction loads on the tower before the concrete had gained adequate strength. The analysis presented herein responds to questions outside the scope of that investigation which considered only actual conditions existing at the time of the collapse. The present investigation shows that failure would initiate in lift 28 if the concrete strength in that lift is 100 psi (6.9 MPa) or less, and to maintain a safety factor of 2.0, the concrete strength in that lift should be 4000 psi (27.6 MPa). This study also reveals that even if an additional bolt had been introduced between each exterior jumpform beam and the tower, the stresses would not have been relieved enough to prevent failure of lift 28. Finally, it is shown, that if the ground anchor point of the static line had been kept at the location occupied just prior to its last move to a location near the center of the tower, the stresses in the shell due to construction loads would have been relieved to the extent that failure of lift 28 would probably not have occurred.

  9. Dialogic Activity Structures for Project-Based Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polman, Joseph L.

    2004-01-01

    Activity structures such as classroom lessons and initiation-reply-evaluation sequences are important cultural tools that help students and teachers accomplish everyday activity, but they are not well adapted to open-ended inquiry conducted by students in small groups with teacher guidance. In this research, I identified alternative activity…

  10. Structure-Based Simulations Reveal Concerted Dynamics of GPCR Activation

    PubMed Central

    Leioatts, Nicholas; Suresh, Pooja; Romo, Tod D.; Grossfield, Alan

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a vital class of proteins that transduce biological signals across the cell membrane. However, their allosteric activation mechanism is not fully understood; crystal structures of active and inactive receptors have been reported, but the functional pathway between these two states remains elusive. Here, we employ structure-based (Gō-like) models to simulate activation of two GPCRs, rhodopsin and the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR). We used data-derived reaction coordinates that capture the activation mechanism for both proteins, showing that activation proceeds through quantitatively different paths in the two systems. Both reaction coordinates are determined from the dominant concerted motions in the simulations so the technique is broadly applicable. There were two surprising results. First, the main structural changes in the simulations were distributed throughout the transmembrane bundle, and not localized to the obvious areas of interest, such as the intracellular portion of helix 6. Second, the activation (and deactivation) paths were distinctly non-monotonic, populating states that were not simply interpolations between the inactive and active structures. These transitions also suggest a functional explanation for β2AR’s basal activity: it can proceed through a more broadly defined path during the observed transitions. PMID:24889093

  11. Topological structure dynamics revealing collective evolution in active nematics

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xia-qing; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2013-01-01

    Topological defects frequently emerge in active matter like bacterial colonies, cytoskeleton extracts on substrates, self-propelled granular or colloidal layers and so on, but their dynamical properties and the relations to large-scale organization and fluctuations in these active systems are seldom touched. Here we reveal, through a simple model for active nematics using self-driven hard elliptic rods, that the excitation, annihilation and transportation of topological defects differ markedly from those in non-active media. These dynamical processes exhibit strong irreversibility in active nematics in the absence of detailed balance. Moreover, topological defects are the key factors in organizing large-scale dynamic structures and collective flows, resulting in multi-spatial temporal effects. These findings allow us to control the self-organization of active matter through topological structures. PMID:24346733

  12. Structure-cardiac activity relationship of C19-diterpenoid alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Jian, Xi-Xian; Tang, Pei; Liu, Xiu-Xiu; Chao, Ruo-Bing; Chen, Qiao-Hong; She, Xue-Ke; Chen, Dong-Lin; Wang, Feng-Peng

    2012-06-01

    Thirty three C19-diterpenoid alkaloids, twenty-two prepared from known C19-diterpenoid alkaloids and eleven isolated from Aconitum and Delphinium spp. were evaluated for their cardiac activity in the isolated bullfrog heart assay. Among them, eleven compounds exhibited cardiac activity, with average rate of amplitude increase in the range of 16-118%. Compound 7, mesaconine (17), hypaconine (25), and beiwutinine (26) exhibited strong cardiac activities relative to the reference drug. The structure-activity relationship data acquired indicated that an alpha-hydroxyl group at C-15, a hydroxyl group at C-8, an alpha-methoxyl or hydroxyl group at C-1, and a secondary amine or N-methyl group in ring A are important structure features necessary for the cardiac activities of the aconitine-type C19-diterpenoid alkaloids without any ester groups. In addition, an alpha-hydroxyl group at C-3 is also helpful for the cardiac activity of these alkaloids. PMID:22816290

  13. The dimeric structure of factor XI and zymogen activation

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yipeng; Verhamme, Ingrid M.; Smith, Stephen B.; Sun, Mao-fu; Matafonov, Anton; Cheng, Qiufang; Smith, Stephanie A.; Morrissey, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Factor XI (fXI) is a homodimeric zymogen that is converted to a protease with 1 (1/2-fXIa) or 2 (fXIa) active subunits by factor XIIa (fXIIa) or thrombin. It has been proposed that the dimeric structure is required for normal fXI activation. Consistent with this premise, fXI monomers do not reconstitute fXI-deficient mice in a fXIIa-dependent thrombosis model. FXI activation by fXIIa or thrombin is a slow reaction that can be accelerated by polyanions. Phosphate polymers released from platelets (poly-P) can enhance fXI activation by thrombin and promote fXI autoactivation. Poly-P increased initial rates of fXI activation 30- and 3000-fold for fXIIa and thrombin, respectively. FXI monomers were activated more slowly than dimers by fXIIa in the presence of poly-P. However, this defect was not observed when thrombin was the activating protease, nor during fXI autoactivation. The data suggest that fXIIa and thrombin activate fXI by different mechanisms. FXIIa may activate fXI through a trans-activation mechanism in which the protease binds to 1 subunit of the dimer, while activating the other subunit. For activation by thrombin, or during autoactivation, the data support a cis-activation mechanism in which the activating protease binds to and activates the same fXI subunit. PMID:23515926

  14. A structural pathway for activation of the kinesin motor ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Mikyung; Zhang, Xiaohua; Park, Cheon-Gil; Park, Hee-Won; Endow, Sharyn A.

    2001-01-01

    Molecular motors move along actin or microtubules by rapidly hydrolyzing ATP and undergoing changes in filament-binding affinity with steps of the nucleotide hydrolysis cycle. It is generally accepted that motor binding to its filament greatly increases the rate of ATP hydrolysis, but the structural changes in the motor associated with ATPase activation are not known. To identify the conformational changes underlying motor movement on its filament, we solved the crystal structures of three kinesin mutants that decouple nucleotide and microtubule binding by the motor, and block microtubule-activated, but not basal, ATPase activity. Conformational changes in the structures include a disordered loop and helices in the switch I region and a visible switch II loop, which is disordered in wild-type structures. Switch I moved closer to the bound nucleotide in two mutant structures, perturbing water-mediated interactions with the Mg2+. This could weaken Mg2+ binding and accelerate ADP release to activate the motor ATPase. The structural changes we observe define a signaling pathway within the motor for ATPase activation that is likely to be essential for motor movement on microtubules. PMID:11387196

  15. Selection of active member locations in adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G.-S.; Bruno, R.; Salama, M.

    1989-01-01

    The effective use of multiple passive and active members in adaptive structures necessitates that these members be optimally distributed throughout the structure. In truss structures, the problem falls into the class of combinatorial optimization for which the solution becomes exceedingly intractable as the problem size increases. This is overcome by using the simulated annealing algorithm to obtain near optimal locations for passive and/or active members. The maximization of the rate of energy dissipation over a finite time period as the measure of optimality is adopted. The selection of optimal locations for both passive and active members is consistently treated through the use of the energy dissipation rate criterion within the simulated annealing algorithm. Numerical examples are used to illustrate the effectiveness of the methodology for large truss structures.

  16. Control of resonance phenomenon in flexible structures via active support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakolpour Saleh, A. R.; Mailah, M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper introduces the concept of active support to cope with the resonance phenomenon in the flexible structures. A valid computational platform for the flexible structure was first presented via a finite difference (FD) approach. Then, the active support mechanism was applied to the simulation algorithm through which the performance of the proposed methodology in suppressing the resonance phenomenon was evaluated. The flexible structure was thus excited with the external disturbance and the system response with and without the effect of the active support was investigated through a simulation study. The simulation outcomes clearly demonstrated effective resonance suppression in the flexible structure. Finally, an experimental rig was developed to investigate the validity of the proposed technique. The experimental results revealed an acceptable agreement with the simulation outcomes through which the validity of the proposed control method was affirmed.

  17. Surface modification of active material structures in battery electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, Michael; Tikhonov, Konstantin

    2016-02-02

    Provided herein are methods of processing electrode active material structures for use in electrochemical cells or, more specifically, methods of forming surface layers on these structures. The structures are combined with a liquid to form a mixture. The mixture includes a surface reagent that chemically reacts and forms a surface layer covalently bound to the structures. The surface reagent may be a part of the initial liquid or added to the mixture after the liquid is combined with the structures. In some embodiments, the mixture may be processed to form a powder containing the structures with the surface layer thereon. Alternatively, the mixture may be deposited onto a current collecting substrate and dried to form an electrode layer. Furthermore, the liquid may be an electrolyte containing the surface reagent and a salt. The liquid soaks the previously arranged electrodes in order to contact the structures with the surface reagent.

  18. Cooling Rate Determination in Additively Manufactured Aluminum Alloy 2219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brice, Craig A.; Dennis, Noah

    2015-05-01

    Metallic additive manufacturing processes generally utilize a conduction mode, welding-type approach to create beads of deposited material that can be arranged into a three-dimensional structure. As with welding, the cooling rates in the molten pool are relatively rapid compared to traditional casting techniques. Determination of the cooling rate in the molten pool is critical for predicting the solidified microstructure and resultant properties. In this experiment, wire-fed electron beam additive manufacturing was used to melt aluminum alloy 2219 under different thermal boundary conditions. The dendrite arm spacing was measured in the remelted material, and this information was used to estimate cooling rates in the molten pool based on established empirical relationships. The results showed that the thermal boundary conditions have a significant effect on the resulting cooling rate in the molten pool. When thermal conduction is limited due to a small thermal sink, the dendrite arm spacing varies between 15 and 35 µm. When thermal conduction is active, the dendrite arm spacing varies between 6 and 12 µm. This range of dendrite arm spacing implies cooling rates ranging from 5 to 350 K/s. Cooling rates can vary greatly as thermal conditions change during deposition. A cooling rate at the higher end of the range could lead to significant deviation from microstructural equilibrium during solidification.

  19. Transpiration Cooling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyo D.; Ries, Heidi R.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Choi, Sang H.

    1997-01-01

    The transpiration cooling method was considered for a scram-jet engine to accommodate thermally the situation where a very high heat flux (200 Btu/sq. ft sec) from hydrogen fuel combustion process is imposed to the engine walls. In a scram-jet engine, a small portion of hydrogen fuel passes through the porous walls of the engine combustor to cool the engine walls and at the same time the rest passes along combustion chamber walls and is preheated. Such a regenerative system promises simultaneously cooling of engine combustor and preheating the cryogenic fuel. In the experiment, an optical heating method was used to provide a heat flux of 200 Btu/sq. ft sec to the cylindrical surface of a porous stainless steel specimen which carried helium gas. The cooling efficiencies by transpiration were studied for specimens with various porosity. The experiments of various test specimens under high heat flux have revealed a phenomenon that chokes the medium flow when passing through a porous structure. This research includes the analysis of the system and a scaling conversion study that interprets the results from helium into the case when hydrogen medium is used.

  20. Assessment of Alphamagnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Upper Experiment Structural Configuration Shielding Effectiveness Associated with Change from Cryo-Cooled Magnet to Permanent Magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, Robert

    2012-01-01

    In the spring of 2010, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer 2 (AMS-02) underwent a series of system level electromagnetic interference control measurements, followed by thermal vacuum testing. Shortly after completion of the thermal vacuum testing, the project decided to remove the cryogenically cooled superconducting magnet, and replace it with the original permanent magnet design employed in the earlier AMS- 01 assembly. Doing so necessitated several structural changes, as well as removal or modification of numerous electronic and thermal control devices and systems. At this stage, the project was rapidly approaching key milestone dates for hardware completion and delivery for launch, and had little time for additional testing or assessment of any impact to the electromagnetic signature of the AMS-02. Therefore, an analytical assessment of the radiated emissions behavioural changes associated with the system changes was requested.

  1. Observation of winds in cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Sufficient observational material - ultraviolet spectroscopic measures, quantitative optical spectroscopy, and X-ray photometry exists to enable discernment of the presence and character of mass loss in cool stars and to establish meaningful constraints on theoretical models. Two determinants of atmospheric wind structure - temperature and gravity - may suffice in a most superficial way to define the wind and atmospheric structure in a star; however more extensive observations demonstrate the importance of magnetic surface activity and its particular geometrical configuration. Successive observations of an active binary system and a supergiant star reveal that magnetic activity and perhaps mass loss occur on restricted regions of a stellar surface and that long lived structures are present in a wind.

  2. Structure and Mechanism of the Phosphotyrosyl Phosphatase Activator

    SciTech Connect

    Chao,Y.; Xing, Y.; Chen, Y.; Xu, Y.; Lin, Z.; Li, Z.; Jeffrey, P.; Stock, J.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator (PTPA), also known as PP2A phosphatase activator, is a conserved protein from yeast to human. Here we report the 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of human PTPA, which reveals a previously unreported fold consisting of three subdomains: core, lid, and linker. Structural analysis uncovers a highly conserved surface patch, which borders the three subdomains, and an associated deep pocket located between the core and the linker subdomains. The conserved surface patch and the deep pocket are responsible for binding to PP2A and ATP, respectively. PTPA and PP2A A-C dimer together constitute a composite ATPase. PTPA binding to PP2A results in a dramatic alteration of substrate specificity, with enhanced phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity and decreased phosphoserine phosphatase activity. This function of PTPA strictly depends on the composite ATPase activity. These observations reveal significant insights into the function and mechanism of PTPA and have important ramifications for understanding PP2A function.

  3. Quantitative Structure-Antifungal Activity Relationships for cinnamate derivatives.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Laura M; Ruiz, Diego; Romanelli, Gustavo P; Duchowicz, Pablo R

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) are established with the aim of analyzing the fungicidal activities of a set of 27 active cinnamate derivatives. The exploration of more than a thousand of constitutional, topological, geometrical and electronic molecular descriptors, which are calculated with Dragon software, leads to predictions of the growth inhibition on Pythium sp and Corticium rolfsii fungi species, in close agreement to the experimental values extracted from the literature. A set containing 21 new structurally related cinnamate compounds is prepared. The developed QSAR models are applied to predict the unknown fungicidal activity of this set, showing that cinnamates like 38, 28 and 42 are expected to be highly active for Pythium sp, while this is also predicted for 28 and 34 in C. rolfsii. PMID:26410195

  4. Structural basis of AMPK regulation by small molecule activators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bing; Sanders, Matthew J.; Carmena, David; Bright, Nicola J.; Haire, Lesley F.; Underwood, Elizabeth; Patel, Bhakti R.; Heath, Richard B.; Walker, Philip A.; Hallen, Stefan; Giordanetto, Fabrizio; Martin, Stephen R.; Carling, David; Gamblin, Steven J.

    2013-12-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a major role in regulating cellular energy balance by sensing and responding to increases in AMP/ADP concentration relative to ATP. Binding of AMP causes allosteric activation of the enzyme and binding of either AMP or ADP promotes and maintains the phosphorylation of threonine 172 within the activation loop of the kinase. AMPK has attracted widespread interest as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes and, more recently, cancer. A number of direct AMPK activators have been reported as having beneficial effects in treating metabolic diseases, but there has been no structural basis for activator binding to AMPK. Here we present the crystal structure of human AMPK in complex with a small molecule activator that binds at a site between the kinase domain and the carbohydrate-binding module, stabilising the interaction between these two components. The nature of the activator-binding pocket suggests the involvement of an additional, as yet unidentified, metabolite in the physiological regulation of AMPK. Importantly, the structure offers new opportunities for the design of small molecule activators of AMPK for treatment of metabolic disorders.

  5. Active Piezoelectric Structures for Tip Clearance Management Assessed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Managing blade tip clearance in turbomachinery stages is critical to developing advanced subsonic propulsion systems. Active casing structures with embedded piezoelectric actuators appear to be a promising solution. They can control static and dynamic tip clearance, compensate for uneven deflections, and accomplish electromechanical coupling at the material level. In addition, they have a compact design. To assess the feasibility of this concept and assist the development of these novel structures, the NASA Lewis Research Center developed in-house computational capabilities for composite structures with piezoelectric actuators and sensors, and subsequently used them to simulate candidate active casing structures. The simulations indicated the potential of active casings to modify the blade tip clearance enough to improve stage efficiency. They also provided valuable design information, such as preliminary actuator configurations (number and location) and the corresponding voltage patterns required to compensate for uneven casing deformations. An active ovalization of a casing with four discrete piezoceramic actuators attached on the outer surface is shown. The center figure shows the predicted radial displacements along the hoop direction that are induced when electrostatic voltage is applied at the piezoceramic actuators. This work, which has demonstrated the capabilities of in-house computational models to analyze and design active casing structures, is expected to contribute toward the development of advanced subsonic engines.

  6. The temperature structure and pressure balance of magnetic loops in active regions. [in solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foukal, P.

    1975-01-01

    EUV observations show many active region loops in lines formed at temperatures between 10,000 and 2,000,000 K. The brightest loops are associated with flux tubes leading to the umbrae of sunspots. It is shown that the high visibility of certain loops in transition region lines is due principally to a sharp radial decrease of temperature to chromospheric values toward the loop axis. The plasma density of these cool loops is not significantly greater than in the hot gas immediately surrounding it. Consequently, the internal gas pressure of the cool material is clearly lower. The hot material immediately surrounding the cool loops is generally denser than the external corona by a factor 3-4. When the active region is examined in coronal lines, this hot high pressure plasma shows up as loops that are generally parallel to the cool loops but significantly displaced laterally.

  7. Structural analogues of diosgenyl saponins: synthesis and anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Kaskiw, Matthew J; Tassotto, Mary Lynn; Mok, Mac; Tokar, Stacey L; Pycko, Roxanne; Th'ng, John; Jiang, Zi-Hua

    2009-11-15

    Saponins display various biological activities including anti-tumor activity. Recently intensive research has been focused on developing saponins for tumor therapies. The diosgenyl saponin dioscin is one of the most common steroidal saponins and exhibits potent anticancer activity in several human cancer cells through apoptosis-inducing pathways. In this paper, we describe the synthesis of several diosgenyl saponin analogues containing either a 2-amino-2-deoxy-beta-d-glucopyranosyl residue or an alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->4)-2-amino-2-deoxy-beta-d-glucopyranosyl residue with different acyl substituents on the amino group. The cytotoxic activity of these compounds was evaluated in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and HeLa cervical cancer cells. Structure-activity relationship studies show that the disaccharide saponin analogues are in general less active than their corresponding monosaccharide analogues. The incorporation of an aromatic nitro functionality into these saponin analogues does not exhibit significant effect on their cytotoxic activity. PMID:19819703

  8. Cooling for a rotating anode X-ray tube

    DOEpatents

    Smither, Robert K.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for cooling a rotating anode X-ray tube. An electromagnetic motor is provided to rotate an X-ray anode with cooling passages in the anode. These cooling passages are coupled to a cooling structure located adjacent the electromagnetic motor. A liquid metal fills the passages of the cooling structure and electrical power is provided to the motor to rotate the anode and generate a rotating magnetic field which moves the liquid metal through the cooling passages and cooling structure.

  9. Erosion-corrosion of cooled thermal sprayed coatings impacted by mixtures of quartz and chemically active compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.; Luer, K.

    1996-08-01

    A series of erosion-corrosion tests was carried out on AISI 1018 steel and four thermal sprayed coatings using a nozzle type elevated temperature erosion tester. The erodent particles were mechanical mixtures of SiO{sub 2} (quartz) with 1--4% NaCl or 1--4% KCl. The specimens were water-cooled on the backside. Test conditions attempted to simulate erosion-corrosion (E-C) conditions at the tubes in the convection pass of FBC boilers. The effect of Cl-bearing salt/quartz mixtures on the E-C wastage mechanisms of these materials were investigated. It was found that the E-C wastage of 1018 steel and carbide coating specimens increased with increasing amounts of NaCl and KCl doped in the quartz. Among the four coatings tested, a WC-17CoCr coating demonstrated the lowest thickness loss of all of the quartz/salt mixtures while the Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-25NiCr coating exhibited the highest E-C wastage. Meanwhile, quartz doped with NaCl or KCl had no effect on the E-C wastage of an HVOF Ni20Cr15Mo metal coating. The accelerating effect of doping alkali chlorides increased with both specimen surface temperature and environmental temperature.

  10. Modeling the Effect of Active Fiber Cooling on the Microstructure of Fiber-Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nguyen Q.; Peterson, Sean D.; Gupta, Nikhil; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.

    2009-08-01

    A modified pressure infiltration process was recently developed to synthesize carbon-fiber-reinforced aluminum matrix composites. In the modified process, the ends of carbon fibers are extended out of the crucible to induce selective cooling. The process is found to be effective in improving the quality of composites. The present work is focused on determining the effect of the induced conductive heat transfer on the composite system through numerical methods. Due to the axisymmetry of the system, a two-dimensional (2-D) model is studied that can be expanded into three dimensions. The variables in this transient analysis include the fiber radius, fiber length, and melt superheat temperature. The results show that the composite system can be tailored to have a temperature on the fiber surface that is lower than the melt, to promote nucleation on the fiber surface. It is also observed that there is a point of inflection in the temperature profile along the particle/melt interface at which there is no temperature gradient in the radial direction. The information about the inflection point can be used to control the diffusion of solute atoms in the system. The result can be used in determining the optimum fiber volume fraction in metal matrix composite (MMC) materials to obtain the desired microstructure.

  11. Database of Active Structures From the Indo-Asian Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styron, Richard; Taylor, Michael; Okoronkwo, Kelechi

    2010-05-01

    The ongoing collision of India and Asia has produced a vast system of folds and faults, many of which are active today, as evidenced by such recent deadly earthquakes as the 12 May 2008 Sichuan quake [Parsons et al., 2008]. Understanding these events requires knowledge of the region’s geologic structures. Taylor and Yin [2009] have assembled HimaTibetMap-1.0, a multiformat, comprehensive database of first-order active structures in central Asia that may aid researchers, educators, and students in their studies of Indo-Asian tectonics. For example, this database may be used by seismologists, geodesists, and modelers to identify structures in particular locations that contribute to active deformation, or it may be used by teachers to illustrate concepts such as continental collision or distributed deformation of continents.

  12. Wireless sensor networks for active vibration control in automobile structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mieyeville, Fabien; Ichchou, Mohamed; Scorletti, Gérard; Navarro, David; Du, Wan

    2012-07-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are nowadays widely used in monitoring and tracking applications. This paper presents the feasibility of using WSNs in active vibration control strategies. The method employed here involves active-structural acoustic control using piezoelectric sensors distributed on a car structure. This system aims at being merged with a WSN whose head node collects data and processes control laws so as to command piezoelectric actuators wisely placed on the structure. We will study the feasibility of implementing WSNs in active vibration control and introduce a complete design methodology to optimize hardware/software and control law synergy in mechatronic systems. A design space exploration will be conducted so as to identify the best WSN platform and the resulting impact on control.

  13. Mechanisms underlying the cooling observed within the TTL during the active spells of organized deep convection of the Indian Summer Monsoon with COSMC RO and In-situ Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Kusuma; Reddy, Narendra

    Climate impact of the Asian monsoon as a tropical phenomena has been studied for decades in the past for its tropospheric component. However, the effort towards assessing the role of the Asian summer monsoon in the climate system with focus on the Upper Troposphere into the Lower Stratosphere (UTLS) is being addressed only in the recent times. Deep convective vertical fluxes of water and other chemical species penetrate and ventilate the TTL for redistribution of species in to stratosphere. However, the mechanisms underlying such convective transports are yet to be understood. Our specific goal here is to investigate the impact of organized deep moist convection of the Indian summer monsoon on thermal structure of UTLS, and to understand the underlying mechanisms. Since active monsoon spells are manifestations of organized deep convection embedded with overshooting convective elements, it becomes absolutely imperative to understand the impact of organized monsoon convection on three time scales, namely, (i) super synoptic scales of convectively intense active monsoon spells, (ii) on synoptic time scales of convectively disturbed conditions, and finally on (iii) cloud scales. Impact of deep convection on UTLS processes is examined here based on analysis of COSMIC RO and the METEOSAT data for the period, 2006-2011 and the in-situ measurements available from the national programme, PRWONAM during 2009-10 over the Indian land region and from the International field programme, JASMINE during 1999 over the Bay of Bengal. On all the three time scales during (i) the active monsoon spells, (ii) the disturbed periods and (iii) during the passage of deep core of MCSs, we inferred that the Coldpoint Tropopause Temperatures (CPT) lower at relatively lower CPT Altitudes (CPTA) unlike in the cases determined by normal temperature lapse rates; these unusual cases are described here as ‘Unlike Normal’ cases. TTL thickness shrinks during the convective conditions. During the

  14. The sequential structure of brain activation predicts skill.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John R; Bothell, Daniel; Fincham, Jon M; Moon, Jungaa

    2016-01-29

    In an fMRI study, participants were trained to play a complex video game. They were scanned early and then again after substantial practice. While better players showed greater activation in one region (right dorsal striatum) their relative skill was better diagnosed by considering the sequential structure of whole brain activation. Using a cognitive model that played this game, we extracted a characterization of the mental states that are involved in playing a game and the statistical structure of the transitions among these states. There was a strong correspondence between this measure of sequential structure and the skill of different players. Using multi-voxel pattern analysis, it was possible to recognize, with relatively high accuracy, the cognitive states participants were in during particular scans. We used the sequential structure of these activation-recognized states to predict the skill of individual players. These findings indicate that important features about information-processing strategies can be identified from a model-based analysis of the sequential structure of brain activation. PMID:26707716

  15. Impact of active controls technology on structural integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Thomas; Austin, Edward; Donley, Shawn; Graham, George; Harris, Terry

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the findings of The Technical Cooperation Program to assess the impact of active controls technology on the structural integrity of aeronautical vehicles and to evaluate the present state-of-the-art for predicting the loads caused by a flight-control system modification and the resulting change in the fatigue life of the flight vehicle. The potential for active controls to adversely affect structural integrity is described, and load predictions obtained using two state-of-the-art analytical methods are given.

  16. Structural Model of Active Bax at the Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Bleicken, Stephanie; Jeschke, Gunnar; Stegmueller, Carolin; Salvador-Gallego, Raquel; García-Sáez, Ana J.; Bordignon, Enrica

    2016-01-01

    Bax plays a central role in the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Upon activation, cytosolic Bax monomers oligomerize on the surface of mitochondria and change conformation concertedly to punch holes into the outer membrane. The subsequent release of cytochrome c initiates cell death. However, the structure of membrane-inserted Bax and its mechanism of action remain largely unknown. Here, we propose a 3D model of active Bax at the membrane based on double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy in liposomes and isolated mitochondria. We show that active Bax is organized at the membrane as assemblies of dimers. In addition to a stable dimerization domain, each monomer contains a more flexible piercing domain involved in interdimer interactions and pore formation. The most important structural change during Bax activation is the opening of the hairpin formed by helices 5 and 6, which adopts a clamp-like conformation central to the mechanism of mitochondrial permeabilization. PMID:25458844

  17. Penoxsulam--structure-activity relationships of triazolopyrimidine sulfonamides.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Timothy C; Martin, Timothy P; Mann, Richard K; Pobanz, Mark A

    2009-06-15

    The discovery of the sulfonamide herbicides, which inhibit the enzyme acetolactate synthase (ALS), has resulted in many investigations to exploit their herbicidal activity. One area which proved particularly productive was the N-aryltriazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine sulfonamides, providing three commercial herbicides, cloransulam-methyl, diclosulam and florasulam. Additional structure-activity investigations by reversing the sulfonamide linkage resulted in the discovery of triazolopyrimidine sulfonamides with cereal crop selectivity and high levels of grass and broadleaf weed control. Research efforts to exploit these high levels of weed activity ultimately led to the discovery of penoxsulam, a new herbicide developed for grass, sedge and broadleaf weed control in rice. Synthetic efforts and structure-activity relationships leading to the discovery of penoxsulam will be discussed. PMID:19464188

  18. Shaping inhibition: activity dependent structural plasticity of GABAergic synapses

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Carmen E.; Méndez, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory transmission through the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shapes network activity in the mammalian cerebral cortex by filtering synaptic incoming information and dictating the activity of principal cells. The incredibly diverse population of cortical neurons that use GABA as neurotransmitter shows an equally diverse range of mechanisms that regulate changes in the strength of GABAergic synaptic transmission and allow them to dynamically follow and command the activity of neuronal ensembles. Similarly to glutamatergic synaptic transmission, activity-dependent functional changes in inhibitory neurotransmission are accompanied by alterations in GABAergic synapse structure that range from morphological reorganization of postsynaptic density to de novo formation and elimination of inhibitory contacts. Here we review several aspects of structural plasticity of inhibitory synapses, including its induction by different forms of neuronal activity, behavioral and sensory experience and the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved. We discuss the functional consequences of GABAergic synapse structural plasticity for information processing and memory formation in view of the heterogenous nature of the structural plasticity phenomena affecting inhibitory synapses impinging on somatic and dendritic compartments of cortical and hippocampal neurons. PMID:25386117

  19. Shaping inhibition: activity dependent structural plasticity of GABAergic synapses.

    PubMed

    Flores, Carmen E; Méndez, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory transmission through the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shapes network activity in the mammalian cerebral cortex by filtering synaptic incoming information and dictating the activity of principal cells. The incredibly diverse population of cortical neurons that use GABA as neurotransmitter shows an equally diverse range of mechanisms that regulate changes in the strength of GABAergic synaptic transmission and allow them to dynamically follow and command the activity of neuronal ensembles. Similarly to glutamatergic synaptic transmission, activity-dependent functional changes in inhibitory neurotransmission are accompanied by alterations in GABAergic synapse structure that range from morphological reorganization of postsynaptic density to de novo formation and elimination of inhibitory contacts. Here we review several aspects of structural plasticity of inhibitory synapses, including its induction by different forms of neuronal activity, behavioral and sensory experience and the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved. We discuss the functional consequences of GABAergic synapse structural plasticity for information processing and memory formation in view of the heterogenous nature of the structural plasticity phenomena affecting inhibitory synapses impinging on somatic and dendritic compartments of cortical and hippocampal neurons. PMID:25386117

  20. Pressure loadings of Soviet-designed VVER (Water-Cooled, Water-Moderated Energy Reactor) reactor release mitigation structures from large-break LOCAs

    SciTech Connect

    Sienicki, J.J.; Horak, W.C.; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY )

    1989-01-01

    Analyses have been carried out of the pressurization of the accident release mitigation structures of Soviet-designed VVER (Water-Cooled, Water-Moderated Energy Reactor) pressurized water reactors following large-break loss-of-coolant accidents. Specific VVER systems for which calculations were performed are the VVER-440 model V230, VVER-440 model V213, and VVER-1000 model V320. Descriptions of the designs of these and other VVER models are contained in the report DOE/NE-0084. The principal objective of the current analyses is to calculate the time dependent pressure loadings inside the accident localization or containment structures immediately following the double-ended guillotine rupture of a primary coolant pipe. In addition, the pressures are compared with the results of calculations of the response of the structures to overpressure. Primary coolant system thermal hydraulic conditions and the fluid conditions at the break location were calculated with the RETRAN-02 Mod2 computer code (Agee, 1984). Pressures and temperatures inside the building accident release mitigation structures were obtained from the PACER (Pressurization Accompanying Coolant Escape from Ruptures) multicompartment containment analysis code developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The analyses were carried out using best estimate models and conditions rather than conservative, bounding-type assumptions. In particular, condensation upon structure and equipment was calculated using correlations based upon analyses of the HDR, Marviken, and Battelle Frankfurt containment loading experiments. The intercompartment flow rates incorporate an effective discharge coefficient and liquid droplet carryover fraction given by expressions of Schwan determined from analyses of the Battelle Frankfurt and Marviken tests. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Activity and cool spots on the surfaces of G-type stars with superflares from observations with the Kepler Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanov, I. S.; Dmitrienko, E. S.

    2015-09-01

    The properties of active regions (cool spots) on the surfaces of 279 G-type stars in which more than 1500 superflares with energies of 1033-1036 erg were detected are analyzed. Diagrams plotting the superflare energy against activity parameters of the stars (the area of their magnetic spots) are considered, and a more extensive study of the activity of two stars with the highest numbers of flares is presented. The range of variation of the superflare energies (up to two orders of magnitude) is realized over the entire interval of rotation periods. It is proposed that the plot of superflare energy vs. rotational period is bimodal. There are probably no appreciable differences in the maximum flare energies for the two groups of objects, which have rotational periods of more than and less than 10 days. Three groups of stars with different surface spottednesses can be distinguished in a plot of superflare energy vs. cool-spot area. The range of variation of the flare energy within a group is roughly the same for these three groups. Most of the points on this diagram lie to the right of the dependence corresponding to B = 3000Gand an inclination i = 90° (the first two groups of objects). It is confirmed that the flare activity is not related directly to circumpolar active regions, since the majority of the points on the diagram lie to the right of the dependence for B = 1000 G and i = 3°. Analysis of stars from the sample, including objects with more than 20 superflares, shows that large variations of the energy (by up to two orders of magnitude) can be reached with small variations of the spottedness parameter S for a single star. Appreciable variability of the spottedness (by factors of five to six) was detected for only two objects from the sample (KIC 10422252 and KIC 11764567). These stars displayed an increase in the flare energy by orders of magnitude for any spottedness level. The activity of KIC 11551430 and KIC 11764567 is analyzed in detail using all

  2. Structure-Activity Relationship of Fluoroquinolones Against K. pneumoniae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-hong; Zhang, Rui-zhou; Cheng, Xin-lu; Yang, Xiang-dong

    2007-04-01

    The structure-activity relationship of fluoroquinolones, which show anti-K. pneumoniae activity, was studied by using principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). The PCA results showed that the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy, energy difference between the highest occupied and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, dipole moment, net atomic charge on atom I, molecular polarizability, partition coefficient and molecular refractivity of these compounds are responsible for the separation between high-activity and low-activity groups. The HCA results were similar to those obtained with PCA. By using the chemometric results, four synthetic compounds were analyzed through PCA and HCA, and three of them are proposed as active molecules against K. pneumoniae which is consistent with the results of clinical experiments. The methodologies of PCA and HCA provide a reliable rule for classifying new fluoroquinolones with anti-K. pneumoniae activity.

  3. The Stability of Radiatively Cooling Jets I. Linear Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardee, Philip E.; Stone, James M.

    1997-01-01

    The results of a spatial stability analysis of a two-dimensional slab jet, in which optically thin radiative cooling is dynamically important, are presented. We study both magnetized and unmagnetized jets at external Mach numbers of 5 and 20. We model the cooling rate by using two different cooling curves: one appropriate to interstellar gas, and the other to photoionized gas of reduced metallicity. Thus, our results will be applicable to both protostellar (Herbig-Haro) jets and optical jets from active galactic nuclei. We present analytical solutions to the dispersion relations in useful limits and solve the dispersion relations numerically over a broad range of perturbation frequencies. We find that the growth rates and wavelengths of the unstable Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) modes are significantly different from the adiabatic limit, and that the form of the cooling function strongly affects the results. In particular, if the cooling curve is a steep function of temperature in the neighborhood of the equilibrium state, then the growth of K-H modes is reduced relative to the adiabatic jet. On the other hand, if the cooling curve is a shallow function of temperature, then the growth of K-H modes can be enhanced relative to the adiabatic jet by the increase in cooling relative to heating in overdense regions. Inclusion of a dynamically important magnetic field does not strongly modify the important differences between an adiabatic jet and a cooling jet, provided the jet is highly supermagnetosonic and not magnetic pressure-dominated. In the latter case, the unstable modes behave more like the transmagnetosonic magnetic pressure-dominated adiabatic limit. We also plot fluid displacement surfaces associated with the various waves in a cooling jet in order to predict the structures that might arise in the nonlinear regime. This analysis predicts that low-frequency surface waves and the lowest order body modes will be the most effective at producing observable features in

  4. Low-cost Active Structural Control Space Experiment (LASC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinett, Rush; Bukley, Angelia P.

    1992-01-01

    The DOE Lab Director's Conference identified the need for the DOE National Laboratories to actively and aggressively pursue ways to apply DOE technology to problems of national need. Space structures are key elements of DOD and NASA space systems and a space technology area in which DOE can have a significant impact. LASC is a joint agency space technology experiment (DOD Phillips, NASA Marshall, and DOE Sandia). The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: phase 4 investigator testbed; control of large flexible structures in orbit; INFLEX; Controls, Astrophysics; and structures experiments in space; SARSAT; and LASC mission objectives.

  5. Structural and mechanistic insights into Mps1 kinase activation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Yuting; Gao, Yuefeng; Xu, Quanbin; Wang, Feng; Zhu, Songcheng; Old, William; Resing, Katheryn; Ahn, Natalie; Lei, Ming; Liu, Xuedong

    2010-11-05

    Mps1 is one of the several essential kinases whose activation is required for robust mitotic spindle checkpoint signalling. The activity of Mps1 is tightly regulated and increases dramatically during mitosis or in response to spindle damage. To understand the molecular mechanism underlying Mps1 regulation, we determined the crystal structure of the kinase domain of Mps1. The 2.7-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure shows that the Mps1 kinase domain adopts a unique inactive conformation. Intramolecular interactions between the key Glu residue in the {alpha}C helix of the N-terminal lobe and the backbone amides in the catalytic loop lock the kinase in the inactive conformation. Autophosphorylation appears to be a priming event for kinase activation. We identified Mps1 autophosphorylation sites in the activation and the P+1 loops. Whereas activation loop autophosphorylation enhances kinase activity, autophosphorylation at the P+1 loop (T686) is associated with the active kinase. Mutation of T686 autophosphorylation site impairs both autophosphorylation and transphosphorylation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that phosphorylation of T676 may be a priming event for phosphorylation at T686. Finally, we identified two critical lysine residues in the loop between helices {alpha}EF and {alpha}F that are essential for substrate recruitment and maintaining high levels of kinase activity. Our studies reveal critical biochemical mechanisms for Mps1 kinase regulation.

  6. Structural Requirements for the Procoagulant Activity of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Gansler, Julia; Jaax, Miriam; Leiting, Silke; Appel, Bettina; Greinacher, Andreas; Fischer, Silvia; Preissner, Klaus T.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acids, especially extracellular RNA, are exposed following tissue- or vessel damage and have previously been shown to activate the intrinsic blood coagulation pathway in vitro and in vivo. Yet, no information on structural requirements for the procoagulant activity of nucleic acids is available. A comparison of linear and hairpin-forming RNA- and DNA-oligomers revealed that all tested oligomers forming a stable hairpin structure were protected from degradation in human plasma. In contrast to linear nucleic acids, hairpin forming compounds demonstrated highest procoagulant activities based on the analysis of clotting time in human plasma and in a prekallikrein activation assay. Moreover, the procoagulant activities of the DNA-oligomers correlated well with their binding affinity to high molecular weight kininogen, whereas the binding affinity of all tested oligomers to prekallikrein was low. Furthermore, four DNA-aptamers directed against thrombin, activated protein C, vascular endothelial growth factor and nucleolin as well as the naturally occurring small nucleolar RNA U6snRNA were identified as effective cofactors for prekallikrein auto-activation. Together, we conclude that hairpin-forming nucleic acids are most effective in promoting procoagulant activities, largely mediated by their specific binding to kininogen. Thus, in vivo application of therapeutic nucleic acids like aptamers might have undesired prothrombotic or proinflammatory side effects. PMID:23226277

  7. Active vibration control of structures undergoing bending vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An active vibration control subassembly for a structure (such as a jet engine duct or a washing machine panel) undergoing bending vibrations caused by a source (such as the clothes agitator of the washing machine) independent of the subassembly. A piezoceramic actuator plate is vibratable by an applied electric AC signal. The plate is connected to the structure such that vibrations in the plate induced by the AC signal cause canceling bending vibrations in the structure and such that the plate is compressively pre-stressed along the structure when the structure is free of any bending vibrations. The compressive prestressing increases the amplitude of the canceling bending vibrations before the critical tensile stress level of the plate is reached. Preferably, a positive electric DC bias is also applied to the plate in its poling direction.

  8. [Structure and Activity of Fungal Lipases in Bile Salt Solutions].

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, L R; Bakirova, D R; Valiullina, Yu A; Idiyatullin, B Z; Faizullin, D A; Zueva, O S; Zuev, Yu F

    2016-01-01

    The changes in structure and catalytic properties of fungal lipases (Candida rugosa, Rhizomucor miehei, Mucor javanicus) were investigated in micellar solutions of bile salts that differ in hydrophilic-lypophilic balance and reaction medium properties. The methods of circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence were applied to estimate the changes in peptide structure within complexes with bile salt micelles. Bile salts do not exert a significant influence on the structure of the enzymes under study: in Rh. miehei and M. javanicus lipases the alpha helix content slightly decreased, the influence of bile salts on the C. rugosa structure was not revealed. Despite negligible structural modifications in the enzymes, in bile salt solutions a considerable change in their catalytic properties was observed: an abrupt decrease in catalytic effectiveness. Substrate-bile salts micelles complex formation was demonstrated by the NMR self-diffusion method. The model of a regulation of fungal lipase activity was proposed. PMID:27192825

  9. Cooled artery extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An artery vapor trap. A heat pipe artery is constructed with an extension protruding from the evaporator end of the heat pipe beyond the active area of the evaporator. The vapor migrates into the artery extension because of gravity or liquid displacement, and cooling the extension condenses the vapor to liquid, thus preventing vapor lock in the working portion of the artery by removing vapor from within the active artery. The condensed liquid is then transported back to the evaporator by the capillary action of the artery extension itself or by wick located within the extension.

  10. Cooling apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Mayes, James C.

    2009-05-05

    A device and method provide for cooling of a system having an energy source, one or more devices that actively consume energy, and one or more devices that generate heat. The device may include one or more thermoelectric coolers ("TECs") in conductive engagement with at least one of the heat-generating devices, and an energy diverter for diverting at least a portion of the energy from the energy source that is not consumed by the active energy-consuming devices to the TECs.

  11. STUDIES OF RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN MOLECULAR STRUCTURE AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY BY PATTERN RECOGNITION METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The attempt to rationalize the connections between the molecular structures of organic compounds and their biological activities comprises the field of structure-activity relations (SAR) studies. Correlations between structure and activity are important for the understanding and ...

  12. The effect of field cooling on a spin-chiral domain structure in a magnetoelectric helimagnet Ba0.5Sr1.5Zn2Fe12O22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraoka, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Oura, M.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kimura, T.

    2015-06-01

    Spin-chiral domain structures near a cleaved crystal face of a magnetoelectric helimagnet, Ba0.5Sr1.5Zn2Fe12O22, were examined after various magnetic and electric field-cooling procedures by means of the scanning resonant X-ray microdiffraction technique using circularly polarized X-rays. We have found that the application of a magnetic field (1-2 k Oe) during the field-cooling procedure stabilizes one of the handedness among the two spin-chiral states (left- or right-handed screw structure) and makes nearly a single spin-chiral domain in the vicinity of the cleaved crystal face. However, it makes the degree of the spin chirality spatially inhomogeneous even within a domain. We discuss the observed field-cooling effect in terms of possible formation of spin-chiral domains with "stripe-type" domain walls accompanied by randomly-distributed ferromagnetic islands.

  13. Jet-cooled laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of cyclohexoxy: rotational and fine structure of molecules in nearly degenerate electronic States.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinjun; Miller, Terry A

    2014-12-26

    The rotational structure of the previously observed B̃(2)A' ← X̃(2)A″ and B̃(2)A' ← Ã(2)A' laser-induced fluorescence spectra of jet-cooled cyclohexoxy radical (c-C6H11O) [ Zu, L.; Liu, J.; Tarczay, G.; Dupré, P; Miller, T. A. Jet-cooled laser spectroscopy of the cyclohexoxy radical. J. Chem. Phys. 2004 , 120 , 10579 ] has been analyzed and simulated using a spectroscopic model that includes the coupling between the nearly degenerate X̃ and à states separated by ΔE. The rotational and fine structure of these two states is reproduced by a 2-fold model using one set of molecular constants including rotational constants, spin-rotation constants (ε's), the Coriolis constant (Aζt), the quenched spin-orbit constant (aζed), and the vibronic energy separation between the two states (ΔE0). The energy level structure of both states can also be reproduced using an isolated-state asymmetric top model with rotational constants and effective spin-rotation constants (ε's) and without involving Coriolis and spin-orbit constants. However, the spin-orbit interaction introduces transitions that have no intensity using the isolated-state model but appear in the observed spectra. The line intensities are well simulated using the 2-fold model with an out-of-plane (b-) transition dipole moment for the B̃ ← X̃ transitions and in-plane (a and c) transition dipole moment for the B̃ ← à transitions, requiring the symmetry for the X̃ (Ã) state to be A″ (A'), which is consistent with a previous determination and opposite to that of isopropoxy, the smallest secondary alkoxy radical. The experimentally determined Ã-X̃ separation and the energy level ordering of these two states with different (A' and A″) symmetries are consistent with quantum chemical calculations. The 2-fold model also enables the independent determination of the two contributions to the Ã-X̃ separation: the relativistic spin-orbit interaction (magnetic effect) and the nonrelativistic

  14. AIR COOLED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Szilard, L.

    1958-05-27

    A nuclear reactor of the air-cooled, graphite moderated type is described. The active core consists of a cubicle mass of graphite, approximately 25 feet in each dimension, having horizontal channels of square cross section extending between two of the opposite faces, a plurality of cylindrical uranium slugs disposed in end to end abutting relationship within said channels providing a space in the channels through which air may be circulated, and a cadmium control rod extending within a channel provided in the moderator. Suitable shielding is provlded around the core, as are also provided a fuel element loading and discharge means, and a means to circulate air through the coolant channels through the fuel charels to cool the reactor.

  15. Synthesis, Antifungal Activity, and Structure Activity Relationships of Coruscanone A Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Babu, K. Suresh; Li, Xing-Cong; Jacob, Melissa R.; Zhang, Qifeng; Khan, Shabana I.; Ferreira, Daneel; Clark, Alice M.

    2008-01-01

    Coruscanone A, a plant derived cyclopentenedione derivative, showed potent in vitro antifungal activity against Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans, comparable to amphotericin B and fluconazole. A series of analogs have been synthesized by modification of the cyclopentenedione ring, the enolic methoxy functionality, and the side chain styryl moiety of this natural product lead. A structurally close 1,4-benzoquinone analog was also prepared. All the compounds were examined for their in vitro activity against major opportunistic fungal pathogens including C. albicans, C. neoformans and Aspergillus fumigatus, and fluconazole-resistant C. albicans strains, with several analogs demonstrating potent antifungal activity. Structure activity relationship studies indicate that the 2-methoxymethylene-cyclopent-4-ene-1,3-dione structural moiety is the pharmacophore responsible for the antifungal activity of this class of compounds, while the side chain styryl-like moiety plays an important complementary role, presumably contributing to target binding. PMID:17181171

  16. Chemical and structural features influencing the biological activity of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Priyadarsini, K Indira

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin, a polyphenolic natural product, exhibits therapeutic activity against a number of diseases, attributed mainly to its chemical structure and unique physical, chemical, and biological properties. It is a diferuloyl methane molecule [1,7-bis (4-hydroxy-3- methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione)] containing two ferulic acid residues joined by a methylene bridge. It has three important functionalities: an aromatic o-methoxy phenolic group, α, β-unsaturated β-diketo moiety and a seven carbon linker. Extensive research in the last two decades has provided evidence for the role of these different functional groups in its crucial biological activities. A few highlights of chemical structural features associated with the biological activity of curcumin are: The o-methoxyphenol group and methylenic hydrogen are responsible for the antioxidant activity of curcumin, and curcumin donates an electron/ hydrogen atom to reactive oxygen species. Curcumin interacts with a number of biomolecules through non-covalent and covalent binding. The hydrogen bonding and hydrophobicity of curcumin, arising from the aromatic and tautomeric structures along with the flexibility of the linker group are responsible for the non-covalent interactions. The α, β-unsaturated β-diketone moiety covalently interacts with protein thiols, through Michael reaction. The β-diketo group forms chelates with transition metals, there by reducing the metal induced toxicity and some of the metal complexes exhibit improved antioxidant activity as enzyme mimics. New analogues with improved activity are being developed with modifications on specific functional groups of curcumin. The physico-chemical and structural features associated with some of the biological activities of curcumin and important analogues are summarized in this article. PMID:23116315

  17. The structure-activity relationships of the antiviral chemotherapeutic activity of isatin β-thiosemicarbazone

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, D. J.; Sadler, P. W.

    1960-01-01

    As part of an investigation devoted to the development of new antiviral agents a compound of established antiviral activity has been subjected to systematic structural modification. The structure-activity data so obtained have been used in the design of new compounds, some of which are described. The compound chosen was isatin β-thiosemicarbazone, which has high activity against neurovaccinia infection in mice, and a 4-point parallel-line assay of in vivo chemotherapeutic activity has been developed, which has enabled the activity of the derivatives to be determined against isatin β-thiosemicarbazone as a standard. The overall dimensions of the isatin β-thiosemicarbazone molecule appear to be nearly maximal for the retention of high activity, as all substituents in the aromatic ring decrease the activity irrespective of their nature or position. The projection of the -CS.NH2 group in relation to the ring nitrogen was found to be critical, as the α-thiosemicarbazone was inactive. A number of modifications of the side-chain were investigated:all led to reduction or loss of antiviral activity. The antiviral activity showed a positive correlation with chloroform solubility over a considerable range. The most active compound encountered was 1-ethylisatin β-thiosemicarbazone, with an activity of 286 (isatin β-thiosemicarbazone≡100). Isatin β-thiosemicarbazone showed no activity against 15 other viruses, and 20 related compounds showed on activity against ectromelia. PMID:13797622

  18. Preliminary study on nano- and micro-composite sol-gel based alumina coatings on structural components of lead-bismuth eutectic cooled fast breeder reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Peng; Kasada, Ryuta

    2011-02-01

    In order to protect the structural components of lead-bismuth eutectic cooled fast breeder reactors from liquid metal corrosion, Al 2O 3 nano- and micro-composite coatings were developed using an improved sol-gel process, which includes dipping specimens in a sol-gel solution dispersed with fine α-Al 2O 3 powders prepared by mechanical milling. Accelerated corrosion tests were conducted on coated specimens in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic at 500 °C under dynamic conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses revealed that the coatings are composed of α-Al 2O 3 and they are about 10 μm thick. After the corrosion tests, no spallation occurred on the coatings, and neither Pb nor Bi penetrated into the coatings, which indicates that the coatings possess an enhanced dynamic LBE corrosion resistance to lead-bismuth eutectic corrosion. The nano-structured composite particles integrated into the coatings play an important role in achieving such superior lead-bismuth eutectic corrosion resistance.

  19. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for fluoroelastomer/chlorofluorocarbon systems

    SciTech Connect

    Paciorek, K.J.L.; Masuda, S.R.; Nakahara, J.H. ); Snyder, C.E. Jr.; Warner, W.M. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports on swell, tensile, and modulus data that were determined for a fluoroelastomer after exposure to a series of chlorofluorocarbon model fluids. Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) were developed for the swell as a function of the number of carbons and chlorines and for tensile strength as a function of carbon number and chlorine positions in the chlorofluorocarbons.

  20. MICROBIAL COMMUNITY STRUCTURE AND ENZYME ACTIVITIES IN SEMIARID AGRICULTURAL SOILS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of management on the microbial community structure and enzyme activities of three semiarid soils from Southern High Plains of Texas were investigated. The soils (sandy clay loam, fine sandy loam and loam) were under continuous cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) or in cotton -peanut (Arachis h...

  1. Relating Concepts and Applications through Structured Active Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Leonard

    The central research question in this study was whether structured active learning affects the abilities of science and engineering undergraduates to relate abstract concepts and realistic applications more than a relatively traditional instructional method. More specifically, the research was designed to determine whether differences in the…

  2. Structural Basis for Catalytic Activation of a Serine Recombinase

    SciTech Connect

    Keenholtz, Ross A.; Rowland, Sally-J.; Boocock, Martin R.; Stark, W. Marshall; Rice, Phoebe A.

    2014-10-02

    Sin resolvase is a site-specific serine recombinase that is normally controlled by a complex regulatory mechanism. A single mutation, Q115R, allows the enzyme to bypass the entire regulatory apparatus, such that no accessory proteins or DNA sites are required. Here, we present a 1.86 {angstrom} crystal structure of the Sin Q115R catalytic domain, in a tetrameric arrangement stabilized by an interaction between Arg115 residues on neighboring subunits. The subunits have undergone significant conformational changes from the inactive dimeric state previously reported. The structure provides a new high-resolution view of a serine recombinase active site that is apparently fully assembled, suggesting roles for the conserved active site residues. The structure also suggests how the dimer-tetramer transition is coupled to assembly of the active site. The tetramer is captured in a different rotational substate than that seen in previous hyperactive serine recombinase structures, and unbroken crossover site DNA can be readily modeled into its active sites.

  3. Distributed active control of large flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, C. C.; Baz, A.

    1986-01-01

    This progress report summarizes the research work performed at the Catholic University of America on the research grant entitled Distributed Active Control of Large Flexible Space Structures, funded by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, under grant number NAG5-749, during the period of March 15, 1986 to September 15, 1986.

  4. 40 CFR 725.234 - Activities conducted inside a structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Activities conducted inside a structure. 725.234 Section 725.234 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS...

  5. 40 CFR 725.234 - Activities conducted inside a structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Activities conducted inside a structure. 725.234 Section 725.234 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS...

  6. 40 CFR 725.234 - Activities conducted inside a structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Activities conducted inside a structure. 725.234 Section 725.234 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS...

  7. 40 CFR 725.234 - Activities conducted inside a structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Activities conducted inside a structure. 725.234 Section 725.234 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS...

  8. 40 CFR 725.234 - Activities conducted inside a structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Activities conducted inside a structure. 725.234 Section 725.234 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS...

  9. Structural Dynamics Experimental Activities in Ultra-Lightweight and Inflatable Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Lassiter, John O.; Ross, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports recently completed structural dynamics experimental activities with new ultralightweight and inflatable space structures (a.k.a., "Gossamer" spacecraft) at NASA Langley Research Center, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Nine aspects of this work are covered, as follows: 1) inflated, rigidized tubes, 2) active control experiments, 3) photogrammetry, 4) laser vibrometry, 5) modal tests of inflatable structures, 6) in-vacuum modal tests, 7) tensioned membranes, 8) deployment tests, and 9) flight experiment support. Structural dynamics will play a major role in the design and eventual in-space deployment and performance of Gossamer spacecraft, and experimental R&D work such as this is required now to validate new analytical prediction methods. The activities discussed in the paper are pathfinder accomplishments, conducted on unique components and prototypes of future spacecraft systems.

  10. Structural Dynamics Experimental Activities in Ultra-Lightweight and Inflatable Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Lassiter, John O.; Ross, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports recently completed structural dynamics experimental activities with new ultra-lightweight and inflatable space structures (a.k.a., "Gossamer" spacecraft) at NASA Langley Research Center, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Nine aspects of this work are covered: 1) inflated, rigidized tubes, 2) active control experiments, 3) photogrammetry, 4) laser vibrometry, 5) modal tests of inflatable structures, 6) in-vacuum modal tests, 7) tensioned membranes, 8) deployment tests, and 9) flight experiment support. Structural dynamics will play a major role in the design and eventually in-space deployment and performance of Gossamer spacecraft. Experimental research and development such as this is required to validate new analysis methods. The activities discussed in the paper are pathfinder accomplishments. conducted on unique components and prototypes of future spacecraft systems.

  11. GAS COOLED NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Long, E.; Rodwell, W.

    1958-06-10

    A gas-cooled nuclear reactor consisting of a graphite reacting core and reflector structure supported in a containing vessel is described. A gas sealing means is included for sealing between the walls of the graphite structure and containing vessel to prevent the gas coolant by-passing the reacting core. The reacting core is a multi-sided right prismatic structure having a pair of parallel slots around its periphery. The containing vessel is cylindrical and has a rib on its internal surface which supports two continuous ring shaped flexible web members with their radially innermost ends in sealing engagement within the radially outermost portion of the slots. The core structure is supported on ball bearings. This design permits thermal expansion of the core stracture and vessel while maintainirg a peripheral seal between the tvo elements.

  12. Longitudinal structure of solar activity: Regular and stochastic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erofeev, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    The ratio of regular and stochastic components in the behavior of the longitudinal-temporal distribution of solar activity is studied with the use of correlation and spectral analysis of data on sunspot groups for 12 solar cycles. It was found that data samples of about 10 years in length often (in 50% of cases) show the presence of regular structures in the longitudinal distribution of sunspot groups. However, these structures are nonstationary; their characteristic scales and rotation periods vary when changing from one 10-year interval to another. The behavior of the longitudinal structure of sunspot activity is mainly stochastic on a long time scale (50-100 years); it is characterized by a wide spectrum of spatial scales and a continuous spectrum of rotation periods, which takes a period from 25.6 to 28.5 days.

  13. Pore structure of the activated coconut shell charcoal carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budi, E.; Nasbey, H.; Yuniarti, B. D. P.; Nurmayatri, Y.; Fahdiana, J.; Budi, A. S.

    2014-09-01

    The development of activated carbon from coconut shell charcoal has been investigated by using physical method to determine the influence of activation parameters in term of temperature, argon gas pressure and time period on the pore structure of the activated carbon. The coconut shell charcoal was produced by pyrolisis process at temperature of about 75 - 150 °C for 6 hours. The charcoal was activated at various temperature (532, 700 and 868 °C), argon gas pressure (6.59, 15 and 23.4 kgf/cm2) and time period of (10, 60 and 120 minutes). The results showed that the pores size were reduced and distributed uniformly as the activation parameters are increased.

  14. Structure of a bacterial toxin-activating acyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Nicholas P.; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    Secreted pore-forming toxins of pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli hemolysin (HlyA) insert into host–cell membranes to subvert signal transduction and induce apoptosis and cell lysis. Unusually, these toxins are synthesized in an inactive form that requires posttranslational activation in the bacterial cytosol. We have previously shown that the activation mechanism is an acylation event directed by a specialized acyl-transferase that uses acyl carrier protein (ACP) to covalently link fatty acids, via an amide bond, to specific internal lysine residues of the protoxin. We now reveal the 2.15-Å resolution X-ray structure of the 172-aa ApxC, a toxin-activating acyl-transferase (TAAT) from pathogenic Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. This determination shows that bacterial TAATs are a structurally homologous family that, despite indiscernible sequence similarity, form a distinct branch of the Gcn5-like N-acetyl transferase (GNAT) superfamily of enzymes that typically use acyl-CoA to modify diverse bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic substrates. A combination of structural analysis, small angle X-ray scattering, mutagenesis, and cross-linking defined the solution state of TAATs, with intermonomer interactions mediated by an N-terminal α-helix. Superposition of ApxC with substrate-bound GNATs, and assay of toxin activation and binding of acyl-ACP and protoxin peptide substrates by mutated ApxC variants, indicates the enzyme active site to be a deep surface groove. PMID:26016525

  15. An active control strategy for achieving weak radiator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Naghshineh, K. . Acoustics and Radar Technology Lab.); Koopmann, G.H. . Center for Acoustics and Vibration)

    1994-01-01

    A general control strategy is presented for active suppression of total radiated sound power from harmonically excited structures based on the measurement of their response. Using the measured response of the structure together with knowledge of its structural mobility, and equivalent primary excitation force is found at discrete points along the structure. Using this equivalent primary force and performing a quadratic optimization of the power radiated form the structure, a set of control forces is found at selected points on the structure that results in minimum radiated sound power. A numerical example of this strategy is presented for a simply supported beam in a rigid baffle excited by a harmonic plane wave incident at an oblique angle. A comparison of the response of the beam with and without control forces shows a large reduction in the controlled response displacement magnitude. In addition, as the result of the action of the control forces, the magnitude of the wave number spectrum of the beam's response in the supersonic region is decreased substantially. The effect of the number and location of the actuators on reductions in sound power level is also studied. The actuators located at the anti-nodes of structural modes within the supersonic region together with those located near boundaries are found to be the most effective in controlling the radiation of sound from a structure.

  16. Structural aspects of calcium-release activated calcium channel function

    PubMed Central

    Stathopulos, Peter B; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Store-operated calcium (Ca2+) entry is the process by which molecules located on the endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) respond to decreased luminal Ca2+ levels by signaling Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ channels (CRAC) channels to open on the plasma membrane (PM). This activation of PM CRAC channels provides a sustained cytosolic Ca2+ elevation associated with myriad physiological processes. The identities of the molecules which mediate SOCE include stromal interaction molecules (STIMs), functioning as the ER/SR luminal Ca2+ sensors, and Orai proteins, forming the PM CRAC channels. This review examines the current available high-resolution structural information on these CRAC molecular components with particular focus on the solution structures of the luminal STIM Ca2+ sensing domains, the crystal structures of cytosolic STIM fragments, a closed Orai hexameric crystal structure and a structure of an Orai1 N-terminal fragment in complex with calmodulin. The accessible structural data are discussed in terms of potential mechanisms of action and cohesiveness with functional observations. PMID:24213636

  17. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    SciTech Connect

    GIURGIUTIU,VICTOR; REDMOND,JAMES M.; ROACH,DENNIS P.; RACKOW,KIRK A.

    2000-03-08

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (NM) impedance technique are sighted and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high-frequency EIM impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acoustic-ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens, (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  18. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    SciTech Connect

    GIURGIUTIU,VICTOR; REDMOND,JAMES M.; ROACH,DENNIS P.; RACKOW,KIRK A.

    2000-02-29

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance technique are cited and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high-frequency E/M impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acousto-ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  19. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor; Redmond, James M.; Roach, Dennis P.; Rackow, Kirk

    2000-06-01

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance technique are cited and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high frequency E/M impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acousto- ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens, (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  20. Structured variability in Purkinje cell activity during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Sauerbrei, Britton A.; Lubenov, Evgueniy V.; Siapas, Athanassios G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The cerebellum is a prominent vertebrate brain structure that is critically involved in sensorimotor function. During locomotion, cerebellar Purkinje cells are rhythmically active, shaping descending signals and coordinating commands from higher brain areas with the step cycle. However, the variation in this activity across steps has not been studied, and its statistical structure, afferent mechanisms, and relationship to behavior remain unknown. Here, using multi-electrode recordings in freely moving rats, we show that behavioral variables systematically influence the shape of the step-locked firing rate. This effect depends strongly on the phase of the step cycle and reveals a functional clustering of Purkinje cells. Furthermore, we find a pronounced disassociation between patterns of variability driven by the parallel and climbing fibers. These results suggest that Purkinje cell activity not only represents step phase within each cycle, but is also shaped by behavior across steps, facilitating control of movement under dynamic conditions. PMID:26291165

  1. The magnetic field structure in the active solar corona.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.

    1971-01-01

    The structure of the magnetic field of the active solar corona is discussed with reference to optical and radio observations of the solar atmosphere. Eclipse observations provide evidence of fine scale structures in the solar atmosphere that appear to relate to the coronal magnetic field. The coronal magnetic field used for comparison is calculated from potential theory; the influence of solar activity upon the potential theory field is discussed with reference to observations of the Faraday rotation of a microwave signal from Pioneer 6 as it was occulted by the solar atmosphere. Evidence has been found suggesting the existence of expanding magnetic bottles located at 10 solar radii above flaring active regions. The dynamics of these events is discussed. It is further suggested that these magnetic bottles are an important component in the solar corona.

  2. Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) Design: Safety, Neutronics, Thermal Hydraulics, Structural Mechanics, Fuel, Core, and Plant Design

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C

    2010-02-22

    The idea of developing fast spectrum reactors with molten lead (or lead alloy) as a coolant is not a new one. Although initially considered in the West in the 1950s, such technology was not pursued to completion because of anticipated difficulties associated with the corrosive nature of these coolant materials. However, in the Soviet Union, such technology was actively pursued during the same time frame (1950s through the 1980s) for the specialized role of submarine propulsion. More recently, there has been a renewal of interest in the West for such technology, both for critical systems as well as for Accelerator Driven Subcritical (ADS) systems. Meanwhile, interest in the former Soviet Union, primarily Russia, has remained strong and has expanded well beyond the original limited mission of submarine propulsion. This section reviews the past and current status of LFR development.

  3. Liquid rocket engine fluid-cooled combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A monograph on the design and development of fluid cooled combustion chambers for liquid propellant rocket engines is presented. The subjects discussed are (1) regenerative cooling, (2) transpiration cooling, (3) film cooling, (4) structural analysis, (5) chamber reinforcement, and (6) operational problems.

  4. High-efficiency impurity activation by precise control of cooling rate during atmospheric pressure thermal plasma jet annealing of 4H-SiC wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Keisuke; Hanafusa, Hiroaki; Ashihara, Ryuhei; Hayashi, Shohei; Murakami, Hideki; Higashi, Seiichiro

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated high-temperature and rapid annealing of a silicon carbide (SiC) wafer by atmospheric pressure thermal plasma jet (TPJ) irradiation for impurity activation. To reduce the temperature gradient in the SiC wafer, a DC current preheating system and the lateral back-and-forth motion of the wafer were introduced. A maximum surface temperature of 1835 °C within 2.4 s without sample breakage was achieved, and aluminum (Al), phosphorus (P), and arsenic (As) activations in SiC were demonstrated. We have investigated precise control of heating rate (Rh) and cooling rate (Rc) during rapid annealing of P+-implanted 4H-SiC and its impact on impurity activation. No dependence of resistivity on Rh was observed, while increasing Rc significantly decreased resistivity. A minimum resistivity of 0.0025 Ω·cm and a maximum carrier concentration of 2.9 × 1020 cm-3 were obtained at Rc = 568 °C/s.

  5. Passive and Active Sensing Technologies for Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Richard

    A combination of passive and active sensing technologies is proposed as a structural health monitoring solution for several applications. Passive sensing is differentiated from active sensing in that with the former, no energy is intentionally imparted into the structure under test; sensors are deployed in a pure detection mode for collecting data mined for structural health monitoring purposes. In this thesis, passive sensing using embedded fiber Bragg grating optical strain gages was used to detect varying degrees of impact damage using two different classes of features drawn from traditional spectral analysis and auto-regressive time series modeling. The two feature classes were compared in detail through receiver operating curve performance analysis. The passive detection problem was then augmented with an active sensing system using ultrasonic guided waves (UGWs). This thesis considered two main challenges associated with UGW SHM including in-situ wave propagation property determination and thermal corruption of data. Regarding determination of wave propagation properties, of which dispersion characteristics are the most important, a new dispersion curve extraction method called sparse wavenumber analysis (SWA) was experimentally validated. Also, because UGWs are extremely sensitive to ambient temperature changes on the structure, it significantly affects the wave propagation properties by causing large errors in the residual error in the processing of the UGWs from an array. This thesis presented a novel method that compensates for uniform temperature change by considering the magnitude and phase of the signal separately and applying a scalable transformation.

  6. Crustal structure and active tectonics in the Eastern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brückl, E.; Behm, M.; Decker, K.; Grad, M.; Guterch, A.; Keller, G. R.; Thybo, H.

    2010-04-01

    During the last decade, a series of controlled source seismic experiments brought new insight into the crustal and lithospheric structure of the Eastern Alps and their adjacent tectonic provinces. A fragmentation of the lithosphere into three blocks, Europe (EU), Adria (AD), and the new Pannonian fragment (PA), was interpreted and a triple junction was inferred. The goal of this study has been to relate these deep crustal structures to active tectonics. We used elastic plate modeling to reconsider the Moho fragmentation. We interpret subduction of EU below AD and PA from north to south and underthusting of AD mantle below PA from southwest to northeast. The Moho fragmentation correlates well with major upper crustal structures and is supported by gravity, seismic, and geodetic data. An analysis of crustal thickening suggests that active convergence is associated with continued thrusting and lateral extrusion in the central Eastern Alps and thickening of the Adriatic indenter under the Southern Alps. According to the velocity relations at the triple junction, PA moves relative to EU and AD along ENE and SE striking faults, mainly by strike slip. An eastward directed extensional component is compensated by the lateral extrusion of the central Eastern Alps. The Periadriatic (Insubric) line east of the triple junction and the mid-Hungarian fault zone have relatively recently lost their role as first-order active structures. We favor the idea that the Pannonian fragment and the TISZA block merged to a "soft" microplate surrounded by the Eastern and Southern Alpine, Carpathian, and Dinaric orogens.

  7. Partitioning and lipophilicity in quantitative structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Dearden, J C

    1985-01-01

    The history of the relationship of biological activity to partition coefficient and related properties is briefly reviewed. The dominance of partition coefficient in quantitation of structure-activity relationships is emphasized, although the importance of other factors is also demonstrated. Various mathematical models of in vivo transport and binding are discussed; most of these involve partitioning as the primary mechanism of transport. The models describe observed quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) well on the whole, confirming that partitioning is of key importance in in vivo behavior of a xenobiotic. The partition coefficient is shown to correlate with numerous other parameters representing bulk, such as molecular weight, volume and surface area, parachor and calculated indices such as molecular connectivity; this is especially so for apolar molecules, because for polar molecules lipophilicity factors into both bulk and polar or hydrogen bonding components. The relationship of partition coefficient to chromatographic parameters is discussed, and it is shown that such parameters, which are often readily obtainable experimentally, can successfully supplant partition coefficient in QSARs. The relationship of aqueous solubility with partition coefficient is examined in detail. Correlations are observed, even with solid compounds, and these can be used to predict solubility. The additive/constitutive nature of partition coefficient is discussed extensively, as are the available schemes for the calculation of partition coefficient. Finally the use of partition coefficient to provide structural information is considered. It is shown that partition coefficient can be a valuable structural tool, especially if the enthalpy and entropy of partitioning are available. PMID:3905374

  8. Wide-range analysis of genetic structure of Betula maximowicziana, a long-lived pioneer tree species and noble hardwood in the cool temperate zone of Japan.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Y; Ide, Y

    2005-11-01

    Betula maximowicziana is a long-lived pioneer tree species in Japanese cool temperate forests that plays an important role in maintenance of the forest ecosystem and has high economic value. Here we assess the wide-range genetic structure of 23 natural populations of B. maximowicziana using 11 simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci. Genetic diversity within populations was relatively low in all populations (mean H(E), 0.361; mean allelic richness, 2.80; mean rare allelic richness, 1.02). The population differentiation was also relatively low (F(ST), 0.062). Genetic distance-based and Bayesian clustering analysis revealed that the populations examined here could be divided into a southern group and a northern group. Analysis of rare allelic richness and Bayesian clustering revealed evidence for both southern and northern refugia during the last glacial period. Furthermore, a comparison of regional genetic diversity revealed significant clines in allelic richness. In spatial genetic structure evaluation, significant isolation by distance (IBD) was detected among the 23 populations, but not within regions. Moreover, significant population bottlenecks were found in all populations under infinite allele model (IAM) assumptions. These unusual, significant bottlenecks might be because of the processes of postglacial colonization and the species' characters and/or life history as a long-lived pioneer tree species. The wide-range, regional genetic structure found in this study provides an important baseline for conservation and forest management, including the identification of evolutionarily significant units (ESUs) and/or management units (MUs) of B. maximowicziana. PMID:16262849

  9. Active shape control of composite structures under thermal loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binette, P.; Dano, M.-L.; Gendron, G.

    2009-02-01

    Maintaining the shape of high-precision structures such as space antennas and optical mirrors is still a challenging issue for designers. These structures are subjected to varying temperature conditions which often introduce thermal distortions. The development of smart materials offers great potential to correct the shape and to minimize the surface error. In this study, shape control of a composite structure under thermal loading using piezocomposites is investigated. The composite structure is made of a foam core and two carbon-epoxy face sheets. Macro-fiber composite (MFC™) patches are bonded on one side of the structure. The structure is subjected to a through-the-thickness temperature gradient which induces thermal distortion, essentially in the form of bending. The objective is to apply electric potential to the MFC™ actuators such that the deflection can be minimized. Finite-element analyses are conducted using the commercial software ABAQUS. Experiments are performed to study thermally induced distortion, piezoelectric actuation, and compensation of thermal distortion using MFC™ actuators. Numerical and experimental results are compared. A control loop based on strain measurements is used to actively control the structure. The results show that MFC™ actuators can compensate thermal distortion at all times, and that this is an efficient methodology.

  10. Method for the evaluation of structure-activity relationship information associated with coordinated activity cliffs.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Dilyana; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-08-14

    Activity cliffs are generally defined as pairs of active compounds having a large difference in potency. Although this definition of activity cliffs focuses on compound pairs, the vast majority of cliffs are formed in a coordinated manner. This means that multiple highly and weakly potent compounds form series of activity cliffs, which often overlap. In activity cliff networks, coordinated cliffs emerge as disjoint activity cliff clusters. Recently, we have identified all cliff clusters from current bioactive compounds and analyzed their topologies. For structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis, activity cliff clusters are of high interest, since they contain more SAR information than cliffs that are individually considered. For medicinal chemistry applications, a key question becomes how to best extract SAR information from activity cliff clusters. This represents a challenging problem, given the complexity of many activity cliff configurations. Herein we introduce a generally applicable methodology to organize activity cliff clusters on the basis of structural relationships, prioritize clusters, and systematically extract SAR information from them. PMID:25014781

  11. Structure-antimicrobial activity relationship between pleurocidin and its enantiomer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juneyoung

    2008-01-01

    To develop novel antibiotic peptides useful as therapeutic drugs, the enantiomeric analogue of pleurocidin (Ple), which is a well known 25-mer antimicrobial peptide, was designed for proteolytic resistance by D-amino acids substitution. The proteolytic resistance was confirmed by using HPLC after the digestion with various proteases. To investigate the antibiotic effect of L- and D-Ple, the antibacterial activity and hemolytic effect were tested against human erythrocytes. The D-Ple showed a decreased antibacterial activity and a dramatically decreased hemolytic activity compared with L-Ple. The hemolytic effect of analogue was further confirmed by using calcein leakage measurement with liposome. To elucidate these results, the secondary structure of the peptides was investigated by using circular dichroism spectroscopy. The results revealed that D-Ple, as well as L-Ple, had typical α-helical structures which were mirror images, with a different helicity. These results suggested that the discrepancy of the structure between the two peptides made their antibacterial activity distinct. PMID:18779649

  12. Association between Family Structure and Physical Activity of Chinese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijuan; Qi, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study examines the association between family structure and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) of adolescents in China. Methods. The participants included 612 adolescents (317 boys and 295 girls) from Shanghai with ages ranging from 10 to 16 years. Accelerometers were used to measure the duration of MVPA of adolescents, and questionnaires on family structure were completed by the parents of these adolescents. Results. Findings suggested that family structure significantly increased the likelihood of adolescents engaging in physical activity (PA) and explained 6% of MPVA variance. Adolescents living in single-parent households and step families were more physically active than those living in two-parent homes and with biological parents, respectively. However, adolescents residing with grandparents were less active than those living with neither grandparent. No significant difference was found in MVPA time between adolescents living with one sibling and those without siblings. Conclusion. Family environment may be considered in the development of PA interventions and policies, and adolescents living with their grandparents may be targeted in PA promotion. PMID:27123446

  13. Structure and activity of the acid-sensing ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Thomas W.; Frey, Erin N.

    2012-01-01

    The acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are a family of proton-sensing channels expressed throughout the nervous system. Their activity is linked to a variety of complex behaviors including fear, anxiety, pain, depression, learning, and memory. ASICs have also been implicated in neuronal degeneration accompanying ischemia and multiple sclerosis. As a whole, ASICs represent novel therapeutic targets for several clinically important disorders. An understanding of the correlation between ASIC structure and function will help to elucidate their mechanism of action and identify potential therapeutics that specifically target these ion channels. Despite the seemingly simple nature of proton binding, multiple studies have shown that proton-dependent gating of ASICs is quite complex, leading to activation and desensitization through distinct structural components. This review will focus on the structural aspects of ASIC gating in response to both protons and the newly discovered activators GMQ and MitTx. ASIC modulatory compounds and their action on proton-dependent gating will also be discussed. This review is dedicated to the memory of Dale Benos, who made a substantial contribution to our understanding of ASIC activity. PMID:22843794

  14. Dynamically limiting energy consumed by cooling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-05-26

    Cooling apparatuses and methods are provided which include one or more coolant-cooled structures associated with an electronics rack, a coolant loop coupled in fluid communication with one or more passages of the coolant-cooled structure(s), one or more heat exchange units coupled to facilitate heat transfer from coolant within the coolant loop, and N controllable components associated with the coolant loop or the heat exchange unit(s), wherein N.gtoreq.1. The N controllable components facilitate circulation of coolant through the coolant loop or transfer of heat from the coolant via the heat exchange unit(s). A controller is coupled to the N controllable components, and dynamically adjusts operation of the N controllable components, based on Z input parameters and one or more specified constraints, to provide a specified cooling to the coolant-cooled structure(s), while limiting energy consumed by the N controllable components, wherein Z.gtoreq.1.

  15. Dynamically limiting energy consumed by cooling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-06-09

    Cooling methods are provided which include providing: one or more coolant-cooled structures associated with an electronics rack, a coolant loop coupled in fluid communication with one or more passages of the coolant-cooled structure(s), one or more heat exchange units coupled to facilitate heat transfer from coolant within the coolant loop, and N controllable components associated with the coolant loop or the heat exchange unit(s), wherein N.gtoreq.1. The N controllable components facilitate circulation of coolant through the coolant loop or transfer of heat from the coolant via the heat exchange unit(s). A controller is also provided to dynamically adjust operation of the N controllable components, based on Z input parameters and one or more specified constraints, and provide a specified cooling to the coolant-cooled structure(s), while limiting energy consumed by the N controllable components, wherein Z.gtoreq.1.

  16. Project S'COOL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Carolyn J.; Chambers, Lin H.

    1998-01-01

    The Students Clouds Observations On-Line or S'COOL project was piloted in 1997. It was created with the idea of using students to serve as one component of the validation for the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument which was launched with the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) in November, 1997. As part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise CERES is interested in the role clouds play in regulating our climate. Over thirty schools became involved in the initial thrust of the project. The CERES instrument detects the location of clouds and identifies their physical properties. S'COOL students coordinate their ground truth observations with the exact overpass of the satellite at their location. Their findings regarding cloud type, height, fraction and opacity as well as surface conditions are then reported to the NASA Langley Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data is then accessible to both the CERES team for validation and to schools for educational application via the Internet. By March of 1998 ninety-three schools, in nine countries had enrolled in the S'COOL project. Joining the United States participants were from schools in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Norway, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland. The project is gradually becoming the global project envisioned by the project s creators. As students obtain the requested data useful for the scientists, it was hoped that students with guidance from their instructors would have opportunity and motivation to learn more about clouds and atmospheric science as well.

  17. Sensitivity of actively damped structures to imperfections and modeling errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    1989-01-01

    The sensitivity of actively damped response of structures with respect to errors in the structural modeling is studied. Two ways of representing errors are considered. The first approach assumes errors in the form of spatial variations (or imperfections) in the assumed mass and stiffness properties of the structures. The second approach assumes errors due to such factors as unknown joint stiffnesses, discretization errors, and nonlinearities. These errors are represented here as discrepancies between experimental and analytical mode shapes and frequencies. The actively damped system considered here is a direct-rate feedback regulator based on a number of colocated velocity sensors and force actuators. The response of the controlled structure is characterized by the eigenvalues of the closed-loop system. The effects of the modeling errors are thus presented as the sensitivity of the eigenvalues of the closed-loop system. Results are presented for two examples: (1) a three-span simply supported beam controlled by three sensors and actuators, and (2) a laboratory structure consisting of a cruciform beam supported by cables.

  18. Synthesis and photocatalytic activity of titania microspheres with hierarchical structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Qian-Qian; Cao, Ying; Yang, Lin; Zhang, Pei-Pei; Wang, Kui; Wang, Hua-Jie

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Lauryl alcohol directs the formation of titania with hierarchical structures. {yields} Hierarchical structures endow the higher specific area to titania. {yields} Titania had a higher photocatalytic activity than commercial Degussa P25. {yields} The synthesis process of the target product is low-cost. -- Abstract: A combined sol-gel and solvothermal process was introduced to fabricate the titania microspheres with hierarchical structures by using lauryl alcohol as the structure-directing agent. Scanning electron microscope, high-resolution transmission electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectrograph and powder X-ray powder diffraction indicated that the molar ratio of lauryl alcohol, water and tetra-n-butyl titanate was the key factor for the formation of the mono-dispersed titania with anatase phase and the optimal ratio was 1.2:4:1. The diameter of the end-product was 523 {+-} 74 nm and it was composed of smaller nanoparticles with about 6.8 nm size in diameter. Photocatalytic activity of the end-product was investigated by employing Rhodamine B and Methylene blue as the model compounds. The target microspheres exhibited the higher photocatalytic efficiency compared with commercial Degussa P25 titania and this result might be due to the hierarchical structures of microspheres according to the analysis of Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface areas.

  19. Active and passive vibration suppression for space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyland, David C.

    1991-01-01

    The relative benefits of passive and active vibration suppression for large space structures (LSS) are discussed. The intent is to sketch the true ranges of applicability of these approaches using previously published technical results. It was found that the distinction between active and passive vibration suppression approaches is not as sharp as might be thought at first. The relative simplicity, reliability, and cost effectiveness touted for passive measures are vitiated by 'hidden costs' bound up with detailed engineering implementation issues and inherent performance limitations. At the same time, reliability and robustness issues are often cited against active control. It is argued that a continuum of vibration suppression measures offering mutually supporting capabilities is needed. The challenge is to properly orchestrate a spectrum of methods to reap the synergistic benefits of combined advanced materials, passive damping, and active control.

  20. Activation and micropore structure of carbon-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.

    1997-12-01

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The main focus of recent work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites to produce controlled pore structures. Processes have been developed using activation in steam and CO{sub 2}, and a less conventional method involving oxygen chemisorption and subsequent heat treatment. Another objective has been to explore applications for the activated composites in environmental applications related to fossil energy production.