Science.gov

Sample records for actively creating stars

  1. Creating physics stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Korea has begun an ambitious 5bn plan to create 50 new institutes dedicated to fundamental research. Michael Banks meets physicist Se-Jung Oh, president of the Institute for Basic Science, to find out more.

  2. Circumstellar bubble created by two massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliani, Z.; van Marle, A. J.; Marcowith, A.

    2013-11-01

    The massive stars are formed in clusters then numerical models of wind-blown bubble should evolve bubble created by several stars. Aims. We develop a two-dimensional (2D) model of the circumstellar bubble created by two massive stars, a 40 M_{odot} star and a 25 M_{odot} star, and follow its evolution with MPI-AMRVAC hydrodynamics code until the end of the stellar evolution and he supernova explosion of each star. The stars are separated by approximately 16 pc and surrounded by a cold medium with a density of 20 particles per cm3. The simulations showed that the evolution of a wind-blown bubble created by two stars deviates from that of the bubbles around single stars. In particular, once one of the stars has exploded, the bubble is too large for the wind of the remaining star to maintain and the outer shell starts to disintegrate. The lack of thermal pressure inside the bubble also changes the behavior of circumstellar features close to the remaining star. The supernovae are contained inside the bubble, which reflects part of the energy back into the circumstellar medium.

  3. Dead Star Creates Celestial Havoc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    A star's spectacular death in the constellation Taurus was observed on Earth as the supernova of 1054 A.D. Now, almost a thousand years later, a superdense neutron star left behind by the stellar death is spewing out a blizzard of extremely high-energy particles into the expanding debris field known as the Crab Nebula.

    This composite image uses data from three of NASA's Great Observatories. The Chandra X-ray image is shown in light blue, the Hubble Space Telescope optical images are in green and dark blue, and the Spitzer Space Telescope's infrared image is in red. The size of the X-ray image is smaller than the others because ultrahigh-energy X-ray emitting electrons radiate away their energy more quickly than the lower-energy electrons emitting optical and infrared light. The neutron star, which has the mass equivalent to the sun crammed into a rapidly spinning ball of neutrons twelve miles across, is the bright white dot in the center of the image.

  4. How Bell Labs creates star performers.

    PubMed

    Kelley, R; Caplan, J

    1993-01-01

    How can managers increase the productivity of professionals when most of their work goes on inside their heads? Robert Kelley and Janet Caplan believe that defining the difference between star performers and average workers is the answer. Many managers assume that top performers are just smarter. But the authors' research at the Bell Laboratories Switching Systems Business Unit (SSBU) has revealed that the real difference between stars and average workers is not IQ but the ways top performers do their jobs. Their study has led to a training program based on the strategies of star performers. The SSBU training program, known as the Productivity Enhancement Group (PEG), uses an expert model to demystify productivity. The star engineers selected to develop the expert model identified and ranked nine work strategies, such as taking initiative, networking, and self-management. Middle performers were also asked what makes for top-quality work, but their definitions and ranking of the strategies differed significantly from those of the top performers. Taking initiative, for example, meant something very different to an average worker than it did to a star. And for the middle performers, the ability to give good presentations was a core strategy, while it was peripheral for the top engineers. Once PEG got underway, respected engineers ran the training sessions, which included case studies, work-related exercises, and frank discussion. The benefits of the program were striking: participants and managers reported substantial productivity increases in both star and average performers. The PEG program may not be a blueprint for other companies, but its message is clear: managers must focus on people, not on technology, to increase productivity in the knowledge economy.

  5. Creating Art Appreciation Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heidt, Ann H.

    1986-01-01

    The experiences of college students enrolled as majors in elementary education in designing art appreciation activities for use in elementary classrooms are described. The college students had no art background. (RM)

  6. Dying star creates sculpture of gas and dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-09-01

    Sculpture of gas and dust hi-res Size hi-res: 125 Kb Credits: ESA, NASA, HEIC and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) Dying star creates sculpture of gas and dust The so-called Cat's Eye Nebula, formally catalogued NGC 6543 and seen here in this detailed view from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, is one of the most complex planetary nebulae ever seen in space. A planetary nebula forms when Sun-like stars gently eject their outer gaseous layers to form bright nebulae with amazing twisted shapes. Hubble first revealed NGC 6543's surprisingly intricate structures including concentric gas shells, jets of high-speed gas and unusual shock-induced knots of gas in 1994. This new image, taken with Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), reveals the full beauty of a bull's-eye pattern of eleven or more concentric rings, or shells, around the Cat’s Eye. Each ‘ring’ is actually the edge of a spherical bubble seen projected onto the sky - which is why it appears bright along its outer edge. High resolution version (JPG format) 125 Kb High resolution version (TIFF format) 2569 Kb Acknowledgment: R. Corradi (Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes, Spain) and Z. Tsvetanov (NASA). Sculpture of gas and dust hi-res Size hi-res: 287 Kb Credits: Nordic Optical Telescope and Romano Corradi (Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes, Spain) Dying star creates sculpture of gas and dust An enormous but extremely faint halo of gaseous material surrounds the Cat’s Eye Nebula and is over three light-years across. Some planetary nebulae been found to have halos like this one, likely formed of material ejected during earlier active episodes in the star's evolution - most likely some 50 000 to 90 000 years ago. This image was taken by Romano Corradi with the Nordic Optical Telescope on La Palma in the Canary Islands. The image is constructed from two narrow-band exposures showing oxygen atoms (1800 seconds, in blue) and nitrogen atoms (1800 seconds, in red). High resolution version (JPG

  7. Observations of active chromosphere stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Africano, J. L.; Klimke, A.; Stencel, R. E.; Noah, P. V.; Bopp, B. W.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that spectroscopic signatures of stellar chromospheric activity are readily observable. The present study is concerned with new photometric and spectroscopic observations of active-chromosphere RS CVn, BY Dra, and FK Com stars. Attention is given to the first results of a synoptic monitoring program of many active chromosphere stars. During the time from 1980 to 1982, photometric and spectroscopic observations of 10 known or suspected active-chromosphere objects were made. The results regarding the individual stars are discussed. Seven stars observed with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) are all spectroscopic binaries.

  8. Pharmacists' Stellar experience can create Five-Star Success.

    PubMed

    Kaldy, Joanne

    2014-12-01

    The evolving health care system has put an increasing emphasis on balancing quality, outcomes, and costs. As part of this evolution, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is using a Five-Star Quality Rating System to evaluate the quality of care provided by Medicare Advantage and Part D prescription drug plans. At the same time, drug plans are using a Five-Star system to rate pharmacies, which contribute to the CMS ratings of nursing facilities. More than ever, pharmacists can play a significant role in helping facilities, plans, and even pharmacies achieve the highest possible ratings and maintain those standards over time. PMID:25521655

  9. Pharmacists' Stellar experience can create Five-Star Success.

    PubMed

    Kaldy, Joanne

    2014-12-01

    The evolving health care system has put an increasing emphasis on balancing quality, outcomes, and costs. As part of this evolution, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is using a Five-Star Quality Rating System to evaluate the quality of care provided by Medicare Advantage and Part D prescription drug plans. At the same time, drug plans are using a Five-Star system to rate pharmacies, which contribute to the CMS ratings of nursing facilities. More than ever, pharmacists can play a significant role in helping facilities, plans, and even pharmacies achieve the highest possible ratings and maintain those standards over time.

  10. The magnetic activity sunlike stars.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, A H

    1984-08-24

    Sunspots, flares, and the myriad time-varying "events" observable in the Sun-the only star whose surface we can examine in detail-are testimony that the Sun is a magnetically variable or active star. Its magnetic field, carried into interplanetary space by the solar wind, produces observable changes in Earth's magnetosphere and variations in the flux of galactic cosmic-ray particles incident upon Earth's upper atmosphere. Centuries of observation have enabled solar scientists to recognize that the Sun's magnetism exists and varies in a globally organized pattern that is somehow coupled to the Sun's rotation. Within the past decade O. C. Wilson demonstrated that analogs of solar activity exist and can be studied in many other dwarf stars. From the continuing study, knowledge of the precise rates of rotation of the stars under investigation is being gained for the first time. The results are expected to increase our understanding of the origin of solar activity and stellar activity in general. PMID:17801135

  11. The magnetic activity sunlike stars.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, A H

    1984-08-24

    Sunspots, flares, and the myriad time-varying "events" observable in the Sun-the only star whose surface we can examine in detail-are testimony that the Sun is a magnetically variable or active star. Its magnetic field, carried into interplanetary space by the solar wind, produces observable changes in Earth's magnetosphere and variations in the flux of galactic cosmic-ray particles incident upon Earth's upper atmosphere. Centuries of observation have enabled solar scientists to recognize that the Sun's magnetism exists and varies in a globally organized pattern that is somehow coupled to the Sun's rotation. Within the past decade O. C. Wilson demonstrated that analogs of solar activity exist and can be studied in many other dwarf stars. From the continuing study, knowledge of the precise rates of rotation of the stars under investigation is being gained for the first time. The results are expected to increase our understanding of the origin of solar activity and stellar activity in general.

  12. Magnetic activity of planet-hosting stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppenhaeger, Katja

    2011-05-01

    Magnetic activity in cool stars is a widely observed phenomenon, however it is still far from being understood. How fundamental stellar parameters like mass and rotational period quantitatively cause a stellar magnetic field which manifests itself in features such as spots, flares and high-energy coronal emission is a lively area of research in solar and stellar astrophysics. Especially for planet-hosting stars, stellar activity profiles are very interesting as exoplanets are affected by high-energy radiation, both at the time of planet formation as well as during the further lifetime of a star-planet system. In extreme cases, the atmosphere of a planet very close to its host star can be strongly heated by the stellar X-ray and EUV emission and finally escape the planet's gravitational attraction, so that the atmosphere of the planet evaporates over time. Theoretically, planets can also affect their host star's magnetic activity. In analogy to processes in binary stars which lead to enhanced - both overall and periodically varying - activity levels, also giant planets might influence the stellar activity by tidal or magnetic interaction processes, however on a weaker level than in binaries. Some indications for such interactions exist from chromospheric measurements in stars with Hot Jupiters. In this thesis I investigate the magnetic activity of planet-hosting stars and especially possible effects from star-planet interactions with an emphasis on stellar coronae in X-rays. I tested a complete sample of all known planet-hosting stars within 30 pc distance from the Sun for correlations of stellar X-ray properties with planetary parameters. A significant correlation exists between the stellar X-ray luminosity and the product of planetary mass and inverse semimajor axis. However, this could be traced back to a selection effect introduced by planetary detection methods. For stars in the solar neighborhood, planets are mainly detected by radial velocity shifts in the

  13. Improving fold activation of small transcription activating RNAs (STARs) with rational RNA engineering strategies.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Sarai; Chappell, James; Sankar, Sitara; Chew, Rebecca; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory RNAs have become integral components of the synthetic biology and bioengineering toolbox for controlling gene expression. We recently expanded this toolbox by creating small transcription activating RNAs (STARs) that act by disrupting the formation of a target transcriptional terminator hairpin placed upstream of a gene. While STARs are a promising addition to the repertoire of RNA regulators, much work remains to be done to optimize the fold activation of these systems. Here we apply rational RNA engineering strategies to improve the fold activation of two STAR regulators. We demonstrate that a combination of promoter strength tuning and multiple RNA engineering strategies can improve fold activation from 5.4-fold to 13.4-fold for a STAR regulator derived from the pbuE riboswitch terminator. We then validate the generality of our approach and show that these same strategies improve fold activation from 2.1-fold to 14.6-fold for an unrelated STAR regulator, opening the door to creating a range of additional STARs to use in a broad array of biotechnologies. We also establish that the optimizations preserve the orthogonality of these STARs between themselves and a set of RNA transcriptional repressors, enabling these optimized STARs to be used in sophisticated circuits. PMID:26134708

  14. Improving fold activation of small transcription activating RNAs (STARs) with rational RNA engineering strategies.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Sarai; Chappell, James; Sankar, Sitara; Chew, Rebecca; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory RNAs have become integral components of the synthetic biology and bioengineering toolbox for controlling gene expression. We recently expanded this toolbox by creating small transcription activating RNAs (STARs) that act by disrupting the formation of a target transcriptional terminator hairpin placed upstream of a gene. While STARs are a promising addition to the repertoire of RNA regulators, much work remains to be done to optimize the fold activation of these systems. Here we apply rational RNA engineering strategies to improve the fold activation of two STAR regulators. We demonstrate that a combination of promoter strength tuning and multiple RNA engineering strategies can improve fold activation from 5.4-fold to 13.4-fold for a STAR regulator derived from the pbuE riboswitch terminator. We then validate the generality of our approach and show that these same strategies improve fold activation from 2.1-fold to 14.6-fold for an unrelated STAR regulator, opening the door to creating a range of additional STARs to use in a broad array of biotechnologies. We also establish that the optimizations preserve the orthogonality of these STARs between themselves and a set of RNA transcriptional repressors, enabling these optimized STARs to be used in sophisticated circuits.

  15. Metallicity gradients and newly created star-forming systems in interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia L.

    2015-08-01

    Interactions play an extremely important role in the evolution of galaxies, changing their morphologies and kinematics. Galaxy collisions may result in the formation of intergalactic star-forming objects, such as HII regions, young clusters and/or tidal dwarf galaxies. Several studies have found a wealth of newly created objects in interacting systems. We will exemplify the problems and challenges in this field and will describe observations of the interacting group NGC 6845, which contains four bright galaxies, two of which have extended tidal tails. We obtained Gemini/GMOS spectra for 28 of the regions located in the galaxies and in the tails. All regions in the latter are star-forming objects according to their line ratios, with ages younger than 10 Myr. A super luminous star forming complex is found in the brightest member of the group, NGC 6845A. Its luminosity reveals a star formation density of 0.19 solar masses, per year, per kpc^2, suggesting that this object is a localized starburst. We derived the gas-phase metallicity gradients across NGC 6845A and its two tails and we find that these are shallower than those for isolated galaxies. We speculate that the observed metallicity gradient may be related to one or more of the following mechanisms: (1) interaction induced inflow of fresh gas to the galaxy center, as seen in simulations, which is expected to dilute the metallicity of the central burst, (2) the formation of young metal-rich star forming regions in the tidal tails, which were born out of enriched gas expelled from the central regions of the system during the interaction and (3) the incremental growth of metals accumulated over time, due to the successful generations of star forming regions along the tails. Finally we will describe our plans to do a search for such objects on Halpha images that will soon be available for 17.5k degrees of the sky, with the A-PLUS survey.

  16. Chromospherically Active Stars in the RAVE Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žerjal, M.; Zwitter, T.; Matijevič, G.; Strassmeier, K. G.

    2014-01-01

    We present a qualitative characterization of activity levels of a large database of ~44,000 candidate RAVE stars (unbiased, magnitude limited medium resolution survey) that show chromospheric emission in the Ca II infrared triplet and this vastly enlarges previously known samples. Our main motivation to study these stars is the anti-correlation of chromospheric activity and stellar ages that could be calibrated using stellar clusters with known ages. Locally linear embedding used for a morphological classification of spectra revealed 53,347 cases with a suggested emission component in the calcium lines. We analyzed a subsample of ~44,000 stars with S/N>20 using a spectral subtraction technique where observed reference spectra of inactive stars were used as templates instead of synthetic ones. Both the equivalent width of the excess emission for each calcium line and their sum is derived for all candidate active stars with no respect to the origin of their emission flux. ~17,800 spectra show a detectable chromospheric flux with at least 2 σ confidence level. The overall distribution of activity levels shows a bimodal shape, with the first peak coinciding with inactive stars and the second with the pre-main-sequence cases.

  17. Saturated Activity: Very Close, Detached Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucinski, Slavek M.

    It is proposed to obtain EUVE spectra of 4 close, synchronized, late-type binary stars with orbital/rotational periods shorter than 1.2 day, to study stellar coronal activity at very high, saturated levels. Among stars of spectral types between late-F to mid-K, only components of very close binary systems (and very rare young stars) can have such short rotational periods. Together with the EGO-1 and EGO-2 results for DH Leo and TZ CrB obtained by others, the spectra will be utilized in a comprehensive discussion of the saturated stellar activity, in relation to and in contrast with, the previously obtained by us spectra of the single, rapidly-rotating young star, AB Dor (P=0.51 day, EGO-1) and of two contact binary systems, 44i Boo (P=0.27 day) and VW Cep (P=0.28 day, EGO-2).

  18. PASS: Creating Physically Active School Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciotto, Carol M.; Fede, Marybeth H.

    2014-01-01

    PASS, a Physically Active School System, is a program by which school districts and schools utilize opportunities for school-based physical activity that enhance overall fitness and cognition, which can be broken down into four integral parts consisting of connecting, communicating, collaborating, and cooperating. There needs to be an…

  19. Chandra Reveals a Compact Nebula Created by a Shooting Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-06-01

    In one of its most bizarre images yet, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory shows the details of a compact nebula that resembles a gigantic cosmic crossbow. The nebula, located in the Vela supernova remnant, is created as a rapidly rotating neutron star, or pulsar, spins out rings and jets of high-energy particles while shooting through space. "What is fascinating is that the jets from the pulsar are directed exactly along the direction of the pulsar's motion," said Dr. George Pavlov of Penn State University, University Park today at the 196th national meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Rochester, New York. "The southern jet looks like a rocket exhaust!" The X-ray jet can be traced all the way in to the neutron star, and an inner ring is seen for the first time. This ring is thought to represent a shock wave due to matter rushing away from the neutron star. More focused flows at the neutron star's polar regions produce jets of particles that blast away at near the speed of light. Pavlov explained that shortly after the star exploded, jets with unequal thrust along the poles of the neutron star could have accelerated it like a rocket. The neutron star is enveloped in a cloud of high-energy particles emitting X rays as they spiral around magnetic field lines. This cloud, or nebula, is embedded in a much larger cloud produced by the supernova and has a swept-back, cometary shape because of its motion through the larger cloud. The dramatic bow-like structure at the leading edge of the nebula is perpendicular to the jets and has the appearance of a cosmic crossbow with the jets as the arrows. This bow and the smaller one inside it, are thought to be the near edges of tilted rings of X-ray emission from high-energy particles produced by the central neutron star. The neutron star-ring-jet system, which resulted from an explosion in the constellation Vela ten thousand or more years ago, is similar to the remarkable structure observed by Chandra in the Crab Nebula

  20. Daybreak Star Preschool Activities Book: A Teacher's "How-to" Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patacsil, Sharon; And Others

    The culturally-based educational materials contained in the Daybreak Star Preschool Activities Book are used with the Native American children in the United Indians of All Tribes Foundation's Daybreak Star Preschool. These educational materials reflect the cultures of the children in the Preschool. The Preschool's primary focus is to create a…

  1. Active optics, adaptive optics, and laser guide stars.

    PubMed

    Hubin, N; Noethe, L

    1993-11-26

    Optical astronomy is crucial to our understanding of the universe, but the capabilities of ground-based telescopes are severely limited by the effects of telescope errors and of the atmosphere on the passage of light. Recently, it has become possible to construct inbuilt corrective devices that can compensate for both types of degradations as observations are conducted. For full use of the newly emerged class of 8-meter telescopes, such active corrective capabilities, known as active and adaptive optics, are essential. Some physical limitations in the adaptive optics field can be overcome by artificially created reference stars, called laser guide stars. These new technologies have lately been applied with success to some medium and very large telescopes. PMID:17736819

  2. Line profile asymmetries in chromospherically active stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Robert C.; Bopp, Bernard W.; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Granados, Arno F.; Henry, Gregory W.; Hall, Douglas S.

    1992-01-01

    A powerful, new probe of chromospheric activity, cross-correlation, has been developed and applied to a variety of stars. In this particular application, an entire CCD spectrum of an active star is correlated with the spectrum of a narrow-line, inactive star of similar spectral type and luminosity class. Using a number of strong lines in this manner enables the detection of absorption profile asymmetries at moderate resolution (lambda/Delta lambda about 40,000) and S/N 150:1. This technique has been applied to 14 systems mostly RS CVn's, with 10 not greater than nu sin i not greater than 50 km/s and P not less than 7 d. Distortions were detected for the first time in five systems: Sigma Gem, IM Peg, GX Lib, UV Crb, and Zeta And. Detailed modeling, incorporating both spectral line profiles and broad-band photometry, is applied to Sigma Gem. Profile asymmetries for this star are fitted by two high-latitude spots covering 5 percent of the stellar surface. The derived spot temperature of 3400 K is lower than found in previous studies. In addition, two well-known systems have been studied: HD 199178 and V711 Tau. Polar spots are found on both.

  3. Active Star Architectures For Fiber Optics Ethernet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linde, Yoseph L.

    1988-12-01

    Ethernet, and the closely related IEEE 802.3 CSMA/CD standard (Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection), is probably the widest used method for high speed Local Area Networks (LANs). The original Ethernet medium was baseband coax but the wide acceptance of the system necessitated the ability to use Ethernet on a variety of media. So far the use of Ethernet on Thin Coax (CheaperNet), Twisted Pair (StarLan) and Broadband Coax has been standardized. Recently, an increased interest in Fiber Optic based LANs resulted in a formation of an IEEE group whose charter is to recommend approaches for Active and Passive Fiber Optic Ethernet systems. The various approaches which are being considered are described in this paper with an emphasis on Active Star based systems.

  4. Star formation around active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, William C.

    1987-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (Seyfert nuclei and their relatives) and intense star formation can both deliver substantial amounts of energy to the vicinity of a galactic nucleus. Many luminous nuclei have energetics dominated by one of these mechanisms, but detailed observations show that some have a mixture. Seeing both phenomena at once raises several interesting questions: (1) Is this a general property of some kinds of nuclei? How many AGNs have surround starbursts, and vice versa? (2) As in 1, how many undiscovered AGNs or starbursts are hidden by a more luminous instance of the other? (3) Does one cause the other, and by what means, or do both reflect common influences such as potential well shape or level of gas flow? (4) Can surrounding star formation tell us anything about the central active nuclei, such as lifetimes, kinetic energy output, or mechanical disturbance of the ISM? These are important points in the understanding of activity and star formation in galactic nuclei. Unfortunately, the observational ways of addressing them are as yet not well formulated. Some preliminary studies are reported, aimed at clarifying the issues involved in study of the relationships between stellar and nonstellar excitement in galactic nuclei.

  5. Active Star Configured Fiber Optic CSMA/CD LANs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truman, Alan K.; Smith, Robert W.; Schmidt, Ronald V.

    1987-01-01

    The widespread use of the IEEE 802.3 CSMA/CD (Ethernet) Local Area Network (LAN) has created demand for a fiber optic physical layer implementation to address security issues, hostile electromagnetic environments, modern structured wiring requirements and distance limitations of coaxial based implementations. Active Star CSMA/CD LANs will be described in this paper which consist of a central wiring Concentrator which supports point to point fiber links to Media Access Units (Transceivers) located at the Host computers. The fiber optic Active Star configured CSMA/CD LAN implementation provides a robust network which meets all the requirements imposed on an Ethernet Physical Layer. Collision detection is reliably performed in the electrical domain of the Concentrator. Network requirements included guaranteed collision detection, network reliability and easy addition and rearrangement of host connections. In addition, the Active Star implementation can provide an increased network diameter to 4.2 km and can support the four basic multimode fiber types, simultaneously, with substantial system margins.

  6. Creating Evidence-Based Research in Adapted Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Greg; Bouffard, Marcel; MacDonald, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Professional practice guided by the best research evidence is a usually referred to as evidence-based practice. The aim of the present paper is to describe five fundamental beliefs of adapted physical activity practices that should be considered in an 8-step research model to create evidence-based research in adapted physical activity. The five…

  7. Chromospherically active stars. I - HD 136905

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, F. C.; Hall, D. S.; Africano, J. L.; Gillies, K.; Quigley, R.

    1985-01-01

    The variable star HD 136905, recently designated GX Librae, is a chromospherically active K1 III single-lined spectroscopic binary with a period of 11.1345 days. It has moderate strength Ca II H and K and ultraviolet emission features, while H-alpha is strongly in absorption. The inclination of the system is 58 + or - 17 deg and the unseen secondary is most likely a G or K dwarf. The v sin i of the primary, 32 + or - 2 km/s, results in a minimum radius of 7.0 + or - 0.4 solar radii. Since the star fills a substantial fracture of its Roche lab, the double-peaked limit curve seen by photometric observers is predominantly ellipsoidal in nature. Both the photometry and the spectroscopy yield values for the period and the time of conjunction that are identical within their uncertainties.

  8. Chromospheric activity of evolved late-type stars - Chromospheric activity in evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquini, L.; Brocato, E.; Pallavicini, R.

    1990-08-01

    Ca II K emission in a homogeneous sample of late-type giants and supergiants is analyzed. The Wilson-Bappu relationship and color-temperature scales are used to construct an H-R diagram which is compared with theoretical evolutionary tracks. It is shown that in spite of the errors involved in the determination of the fundamental stellar parameters, a clear relationship between chromospheric surface activity and stellar mass is present. 5-10 solar mass stars in He burning phase show the highest levels of activity; on the other hand, less massive stars ascending along the Red Giant Branch are extremely quiet. A correlation between surface activity and rotation is found, and it is shown that a knowledge of the stellar evolutionary history is essential for understanding chromospheric emission from evolved stars.

  9. STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN CLASH BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-11-10

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ∼350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ∼0.5–1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions.

  10. Discussion - Winds and magnetic fields of active OB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouret, Jean-Claude; Cidale, Lydia

    2011-07-01

    The discussion on winds and magnetic fields of active OB stars was carried out by S. Owoki, G. Wade, M. Cantiello, O. Kochukhov, M. Smith, C. Neiner, T. Rivinius, H. Henrichs and R. Townsend. The topics were the ability to detect small and large scale magnetic fields in massive stars and the need to consider limits on photometric variability of the star surface brightness.

  11. Permanent active longitudes and activity cycles on RS CVn stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyugina, Svetlana V.; Tuominen, Ilkka

    1998-08-01

    A new analysis of the published long-term photometric observations has revealed permanent active-longitude structures in four RS CVn stars: EI Eri, II Peg, sigma Gem, and HR 7275. Two active longitudes separated by half of the period are found to dominate on the surface during all available seasons. The positions of the longitudes on three stars (EI Eri, II Peg, HR 7275) are migrating in the orbital reference frame, and there is no preferred orientation with respect to the line of centres in the binaries. The rate of migration is approximately constant. In case of sigma Gem the active longitude migration is synchronized with the orbital motion in the direction of the line of centres in the binary. The active region lifetimes can be longer than the time span of the observations (>=15 yr). The periods of the active longitude rotation are determined: for EI Eri 1fd 9510, for II Peg 6fd 7066, for sigma Gem 19fd 604, for HR 7275 28fd 263. Long-term activity cycles of the stars are discovered from the analysis of the relative contribution of the two longitudes to the photometric variability. One longitude is found to be usually more active than the other at a given moment, and the change of the activity level between the longitudes is cyclic with periods of years. The switch of the activity takes a much shorter time, about a few months, similar to the ``flip-flop'' phenomenon found for FK Com stars. Moments of switching are regarded as new tracers of the activity, and total cycles, which return activity to the same longitude, are found to be for EI Eri 9.0 yr, for II Peg 9.3 yr, for sigma Gem 14.9 yr, for HR 7275 17.5 yr.

  12. Jupiter analogues and planets of active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürster, M.; Zechmeister, M.; Endl, M.; Lo Curto, G.; Hartman, H.; Nilsson, H.; Henning, T.; Hatzes, A. P.; Cochran, W. D.

    2013-04-01

    Combined results are now available from a 15 year long search for Jupiter analogues around solar-type stars using the ESO CAT + CES, ESO 3.6 m + CES, and ESO 3.6 m + HARPS instruments. They comprise planet (co-)discoveries (ι Hor and HR 506) and confirmations (three planets in HR 3259) as well as non-confirmations of planets (HR 4523 and ɛ Eri) announced elsewhere. A long-term trend in ɛ Ind found by our survey is probably attributable to a Jovian planet with a period >30 yr, but we cannot fully exclude stellar activity effects as the cause. A 3.8 year periodic variation in HR 8323 can be attributed to stellar activity.

  13. Investigating magnetic activity of F stars with the Kepler mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, S.; García, R. A.; Ballot, J.; Ceillier, T.; Salabert, D.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Régulo, C.; Jiménez, A.; Bloemen, S.

    2014-08-01

    The dynamo process is believed to drive the magnetic activity of stars like the Sun that have an outer convection zone. Large spectroscopic surveys showed that there is a relation between the rotation periods and the cycle periods: the longer the rotation period is, the longer the magnetic activity cycle period will be. We present the analysis of F stars observed by Kepler for which individual p modes have been measure and with surface rotation periods shorter than 12 days. We defined magnetic indicators and proxies based on photometric observations to help characterise the activity levels of the stars. With the Kepler data, we investigate the existence of stars with cycles (regular or not), stars with a modulation that could be related to magnetic activity, and stars that seem to show a flat behaviour.

  14. Autonomous star tracker based on active pixel sensors (APS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, U.

    2004-06-01

    Star trackers are opto-electronic sensors used onboard of satellites for the autonomous inertial attitude determination. During the last years, star trackers became more and more important in the field of the attitude and orbit control system (AOCS) sensors. High performance star trackers are based up today on charge coupled device (CCD) optical camera heads. The Jena-Optronik GmbH is active in the field of opto-electronic sensors like star trackers since the early 80-ties. Today, with the product family ASTRO5, ASTRO10 and ASTRO15, all marked segments like earth observation, scientific applications and geo-telecom are supplied to European and Overseas customers. A new generation of star trackers can be designed based on the APS detector technical features. The measurement performance of the current CCD based star trackers can be maintained, the star tracker functionality, reliability and robustness can be increased while the unit costs are saved.

  15. UBV photometry of ten southern hemisphere active-chromosphere stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, Bernard W.; Africano, John; Quigley, Robert

    1986-01-01

    High-precision UBV photometry of ten southern hemisphere active-chromosphere stars with strong Ca II H and K and/or H-alpha emission has been obtained. Eight of these stars showed variability during June 1985. Complete or partial light curves are presented for the stars, and these data, as well as mean V magnitudes and colors, are compared with the results of other investigators. In a number of cases, significant changes in photometric amplitude are found, which may serve to track the formation and evolution of active regions on these stars.

  16. Observational evidence for enhanced magnetic activity of superflare stars.

    PubMed

    Karoff, Christoffer; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; De Cat, Peter; Bonanno, Alfio; Fogtmann-Schulz, Alexandra; Fu, Jianning; Frasca, Antonio; Inceoglu, Fadil; Olsen, Jesper; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Shi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Superflares are large explosive events on stellar surfaces one to six orders-of-magnitude larger than the largest flares observed on the Sun throughout the space age. Due to the huge amount of energy released in these superflares, it has been speculated if the underlying mechanism is the same as for solar flares, which are caused by magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Here, we analyse observations made with the LAMOST telescope of 5,648 solar-like stars, including 48 superflare stars. These observations show that superflare stars are generally characterized by larger chromospheric emissions than other stars, including the Sun. However, superflare stars with activity levels lower than, or comparable to, the Sun do exist, suggesting that solar flares and superflares most likely share the same origin. The very large ensemble of solar-like stars included in this study enables detailed and robust estimates of the relation between chromospheric activity and the occurrence of superflares. PMID:27009381

  17. Observational evidence for enhanced magnetic activity of superflare stars

    PubMed Central

    Karoff, Christoffer; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; De Cat, Peter; Bonanno, Alfio; Fogtmann-Schulz, Alexandra; Fu, Jianning; Frasca, Antonio; Inceoglu, Fadil; Olsen, Jesper; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Shi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Superflares are large explosive events on stellar surfaces one to six orders-of-magnitude larger than the largest flares observed on the Sun throughout the space age. Due to the huge amount of energy released in these superflares, it has been speculated if the underlying mechanism is the same as for solar flares, which are caused by magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Here, we analyse observations made with the LAMOST telescope of 5,648 solar-like stars, including 48 superflare stars. These observations show that superflare stars are generally characterized by larger chromospheric emissions than other stars, including the Sun. However, superflare stars with activity levels lower than, or comparable to, the Sun do exist, suggesting that solar flares and superflares most likely share the same origin. The very large ensemble of solar-like stars included in this study enables detailed and robust estimates of the relation between chromospheric activity and the occurrence of superflares. PMID:27009381

  18. Observational evidence for enhanced magnetic activity of superflare stars.

    PubMed

    Karoff, Christoffer; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; De Cat, Peter; Bonanno, Alfio; Fogtmann-Schulz, Alexandra; Fu, Jianning; Frasca, Antonio; Inceoglu, Fadil; Olsen, Jesper; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Shi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wei

    2016-03-24

    Superflares are large explosive events on stellar surfaces one to six orders-of-magnitude larger than the largest flares observed on the Sun throughout the space age. Due to the huge amount of energy released in these superflares, it has been speculated if the underlying mechanism is the same as for solar flares, which are caused by magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Here, we analyse observations made with the LAMOST telescope of 5,648 solar-like stars, including 48 superflare stars. These observations show that superflare stars are generally characterized by larger chromospheric emissions than other stars, including the Sun. However, superflare stars with activity levels lower than, or comparable to, the Sun do exist, suggesting that solar flares and superflares most likely share the same origin. The very large ensemble of solar-like stars included in this study enables detailed and robust estimates of the relation between chromospheric activity and the occurrence of superflares.

  19. Observational evidence for enhanced magnetic activity of superflare stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; De Cat, Peter; Bonanno, Alfio; Fogtmann-Schulz, Alexandra; Fu, Jianning; Frasca, Antonio; Inceoglu, Fadil; Olsen, Jesper; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Shi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Superflares are large explosive events on stellar surfaces one to six orders-of-magnitude larger than the largest flares observed on the Sun throughout the space age. Due to the huge amount of energy released in these superflares, it has been speculated if the underlying mechanism is the same as for solar flares, which are caused by magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Here, we analyse observations made with the LAMOST telescope of 5,648 solar-like stars, including 48 superflare stars. These observations show that superflare stars are generally characterized by larger chromospheric emissions than other stars, including the Sun. However, superflare stars with activity levels lower than, or comparable to, the Sun do exist, suggesting that solar flares and superflares most likely share the same origin. The very large ensemble of solar-like stars included in this study enables detailed and robust estimates of the relation between chromospheric activity and the occurrence of superflares.

  20. Practice It: Create a Weekly Activity Plan | Smokefree.gov

    Cancer.gov

    At the beginning of the week, create an activity plan to help you reach your goals. Start by identifying your goals for the week. Based on your goals, write down when you are going to exercise and what you are going to do. If something comes up that keeps you from exercising on one of your selected days, try to find another day (or time) as a make-up. Having a routine is important but so is the ability to adapt your schedule as needed.

  1. Star Formation Activity in CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-11-01

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M⊙ yr-1. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ˜350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ˜0.5-1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel

  2. Active Longitudes and Flip-Flops in Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Heidi; Järvinen, Silva P.

    2007-08-01

    In many active stars the spots concentrate on two permanent active longitudes which are 180 degrees apart. In some of these stars the dominant part of the spot activity changes the longitude every few years. This so-called flip-flop phenomenon was first reported in the early 1990's in the single, late type giant FK Com. Since then flip-flops have been reported also on binary stars, young solar type stars and the Sun itself. Even though this phenomenon has been detected on many different kinds of active stars, still less than ten stars are known to exhibit this effect. Therefore no statistically significant correlation between the stellar parameters and the flip-flop phenomenon can be carried out. Here we present results from investigation where we have studied the long-term photometry of several magnetically active RS CVn binaries to see whether or not they show permanent active longitudes and the flip-flop phenomenon. We find that it is very common for the active regions to occur on permanent active longitudes, and some of these stars also show clear flip-flop phenomenon.

  3. Activities and achievements of the Double Star Committee of the French Astronomical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agati, J. L.; Caille, S.; Debackere, A.; Durand, P.; Losse, F.; Mantle, R.; Mauroy, F.; Mauroy A, P.; Morlet, G.; Pinlou, C.; Salaman, M.; Soule, E. J.; Thorel, Y.; Thorel, J. C.

    2007-08-01

    Created in 1981 by Pierre DURAND with the support of Paul MULLER, the Double Star Committee constitutes ever since a forum of exchange of experiences and information in the field of double stars, particularly visual. The Committee relies on the advice of its scientific counsellors (in particular Pierre BACCHUS, Daniel BONNEAU, Paul COUTEAU and Jean DOMMANGET) to guide the work of its members. By fostering missions in observatories, it has stimulated the activities of observation and measurement of double stars. It has also encouraged the publication of measures (A&A and ``Observations et Travaux '') and raised up missions of verification of double star positions. Under its aegis, many series of measures of double stars made in particular with the 50 cm refractor at the Nice Observatory, either with a filar micrometer or with a CCD camera, were published. Uncertain positions of pairs have been checked and corrected. For the treatment of numerical images of double stars, software aiming in particular at the determination of position elements and the magnitude difference between components were tested and others created (e.g. REDUC and SURFACE). The spar plate double image micrometer of Lyot was developed and its fabrication raised up. Preliminary orbits of double stars were calculated, an amateur participates in the maintenance of the database of double star measures SiDoNie and pursues an historical research on the life and work of Robert JONCKHEERE. The Internet site of the Committee, created in 2005, informs the laypersons as well as the experienced amateurs (http:// saf.etoilesdoubles.free.fr).

  4. Nearby Galaxy is a Hotbed of Star Birth Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This new image taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is of the nearby dwarf galaxy NGC 1569. This galaxy is a hotbed of vigorous star birth activity which blows huge bubbles that riddle its main body. The bubble structure is sculpted by the galactic super-winds and outflows caused by a colossal input of energy from collective supernova explosions that are linked with a massive episode of star birth. The bubbles seen in this image are made of hydrogen gas that glows when hit by the fierce wind and radiation from hot young stars and is racked by supernova shocks. Its 'star factories' are also manufacturing brilliant blue star clusters. NGC 1569 had a sudden onset of star birth about 25 million years ago, which subsided about the time the very earliest human ancestors appeared on Earth. The Marshall Space Flight Center had responsibility for the design, development, and construction of the HST.

  5. Magnetic activity of F stars observed by Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, S.; García, R. A.; Ballot, J.; Ceillier, T.; Salabert, D.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Régulo, C.; Jiménez, A.; Bloemen, S.

    2014-02-01

    Context. The study of stellar activity is important because it can provide new constraints for dynamo models when combined with surface rotation rates and the depth of the convection zone. We know that the dynamo mechanism, which is believed to be the main process that rules the magnetic cycle of solar-like stars, results from the interaction between (differential) rotation, convection, and magnetic field. The Kepler mission has already been collecting data for a large number of stars during four years allowing us to investigate magnetic stellar cycles. Aims: We investigated the Kepler light curves to look for magnetic activity or even hints of magnetic activity cycles. Based on the photometric data we also looked for new magnetic indexes to characterise the magnetic activity of the stars. Methods: We selected a sample of 22 solar-like F stars that have a rotation period shorter than 12 days. We performed a time-frequency analysis using the Morlet wavelet yielding a magnetic proxy for our sample of stars. We computed the magnetic index Sph as the standard deviation of the whole time series and the index ⟨ Sph ⟩, which is the mean of standard deviations measured in subseries of length five times the rotation period of the star. We defined new indicators, such as the contrast between high and low activity, to take into account the fact that complete magnetic cycles are not observed for all the stars. We also inferred the Rossby number of the stars and studied their stellar background. Results: This analysis shows different types of behaviour in the 22 F stars. Two stars show behaviour very similar to magnetic activity cycles. Five stars show long-lived spots or active regions suggesting the existence of active longitudes. Two stars in our sample seem to have a decreasing or increasing trend in the temporal variation of the magnetic proxies. Finally, the last group of stars shows magnetic activity (with the presence of spots) but no sign of cycle. Appendix A is

  6. 77 FR 46089 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; EPA's ENERGY STAR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ... AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; EPA's ENERGY STAR... this action are participants in EPA's ENERGY STAR Program in the Commercial and Industrial Sectors. Title: Information Collection Activities Associated with EPA's ENERGY STAR Program in the Commercial...

  7. Coronal activity cycles in solar analog stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favata, Fabio

    2013-10-01

    We propose continuation into AO13 of the ongoing long-term program for the monitoring of coronal cycles in a sample of five solar-type stars in three stellar systems. The targets have been monitored continuously since AO1, yielding the first unambiguous evidence of cyclic behavior in the X-ray emission from the coronae of cool stars. Thanks to the long-term monitoring our program is starting to show evidence of the complex behavior of stellar cycles, with significant cycle-to-cycle variability becoming apparent. The observations requested in AO-13 will allow us to capitalize on our long-term investment of XMM-Newton observing time and to continue assembling a unique long-term data set that is likely to remain unmatched for a long time.

  8. CA II Emission surface fluxes in active chromosphere stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, B. W.

    1984-01-01

    Ca II emission-line surface fluxes are derived for 14 stars from 17 A/mm photographic spectra. Most of the stars observed are active chromosphere binaries; a few are known X-ray sources or have been observed by the IUE. The status of optical information on each of the objects is reviewed, and new information on v sin i and duplicity is presented.

  9. The suppression of star formation by powerful active galactic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Page, M J; Symeonidis, M; Vieira, J D; Altieri, B; Amblard, A; Arumugam, V; Aussel, H; Babbedge, T; Blain, A; Bock, J; Boselli, A; Buat, V; Castro-Rodríguez, N; Cava, A; Chanial, P; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Conversi, L; Cooray, A; Dowell, C D; Dubois, E N; Dunlop, J S; Dwek, E; Dye, S; Eales, S; Elbaz, D; Farrah, D; Fox, M; Franceschini, A; Gear, W; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Halpern, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Ibar, E; Isaak, K; Ivison, R J; Lagache, G; Levenson, L; Lu, N; Madden, S; Maffei, B; Mainetti, G; Marchetti, L; Nguyen, H T; O'Halloran, B; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Pérez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rawlings, J I; Rigopoulou, D; Riguccini, L; Rizzo, D; Rodighiero, G; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Sánchez Portal, M; Schulz, B; Scott, D; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Stevens, J A; Trichas, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valtchanov, I; Viero, M; Vigroux, L; Wang, L; Ward, R; Wright, G; Xu, C K; Zemcov, M

    2012-05-09

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight correlation between the mass of the black hole and the mass of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming galaxies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimetre wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expelling the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.

  10. The Suppression of Star Formation by Powerful Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, E.

    2012-01-01

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight corre1ation between the mass of the black hole and the mas. of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming ga1axies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(exp 44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expe11ing the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.

  11. Creating Comic Strips. ArtsEdge Curricula, Lessons and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State, Chico

    In society, information/ideas are communicated through various media (words, symbols, illustrations, etc.). When analyzing comic strips, it is noticeable that each has a different style, point of view, setting, plot, and summary, communicated not only through words, but through illustrations and style--creating comic strips can summarize various…

  12. AN ULTRAVIOLET INVESTIGATION OF ACTIVITY ON EXOPLANET HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.

    2013-03-20

    Using the far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) photometry from the NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), we searched for evidence of increased stellar activity due to tidal and/or magnetic star-planet interactions (SPI) in the 272 known FGK planetary hosts observed by GALEX. With the increased sensitivity of GALEX, we are able probe systems with lower activity levels and at larger distances than what has been done to date with X-ray satellites. We compared samples of stars with close-in planets (a < 0.1 AU) to those with far-out planets (a > 0.5 AU) and looked for correlations of excess activity with other system parameters. This statistical investigation found no clear correlations with a, M{sub p} , or M{sub p} /a, in contrast to some X-ray and Ca II studies. However, there is tentative evidence (at a level of 1.8{sigma}) that stars with radial-velocity-(RV)-detected close-in planets are more FUV-active than stars with far-out planets, in agreement with several published X-ray and Ca II results. The case is strengthened to a level of significance to 2.3{sigma} when transit-detected close-in planets are included. This is most likely because the RV-selected sample of stars is significantly less active than the field population of comparable stars, while the transit-selected sample is similarly active. Given the factor of 2-3 scatter in fractional FUV luminosity for a given stellar effective temperature, it is necessary to conduct a time-resolved study of the planet hosts in order to better characterize their UV variability and generate a firmer statistical result.

  13. The role of mitochondrial fusion and StAR phosphorylation in the regulation of StAR activity and steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana F; Orlando, Ulises; Helfenberger, Katia E; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2015-06-15

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein regulates the rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis, i.e. the delivery of cholesterol from the outer (OMM) to the inner (IMM) mitochondrial membrane. StAR is a 37-kDa protein with an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence that is cleaved off during mitochondrial import to yield 30-kDa intramitochondrial StAR. StAR acts exclusively on the OMM and its activity is proportional to how long it remains on the OMM. However, the precise fashion and the molecular mechanism in which StAR remains on the OMM have not been elucidated yet. In this work we will discuss the role of mitochondrial fusion and StAR phosphorylation by the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) as part of the mechanism that regulates StAR retention on the OMM and activity.

  14. The symbiotic star TX CVn has entered an active state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, U.; Castellani, F.; Valisa, P.; Dallaporta, S.; Cherini, G.; Vagnozzi, A.; Righetti, G. L.; Belligoli, R.

    2014-01-01

    After the last active phase that begun in 2003, the symbiotic star TX CVn has now entered a new active phase. In 2003, TX CVn rose to B=10.5 and there it remained until the end of 2007 (Skopal 2007, AN 328, 909), when we started monitoring the variable with various ANS Collaboration telescopes in BVRI bands. Our observations show that the star has spent the following 6 years on a steady decline at a rate of 0.084 mag per year in the B band, that took it from B=10.55 on December 2007 to B=11.02 on September 2013, when the star begun a rapid brightening, reaching B=10.65 by early December 2013.

  15. SWP Echelle Spectra of Chromospherically Active Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    High resolution spectra of the 1150-2000 A region are enormously valuable for probing outer- atmosphere structure in cool stars. For example, such data can be used to separate blends, identify individual emission components in short-period binary systems, determine intensity ratios in close multiplets, estimate reliable emission strengths of lines superimposed on bright stellar continua, and test for the presence or absence of stellar winds at 105 K temperatures. These possibilities are not practical with IUE low-dispersion spectra. However, one must pay a steep-price to obtain useable high-dispersion IUE spectra and the additional dimension of diagnostic information, namely only a handful of the brightest UV sources are accessible even with shift-long exposures. We propose below an observing program to obtain echelle spectra of chromospherically active dwarf stars in the 1150-2000 A shortwavelength region. This program is intended to explore a particular class of objects that heretofore have not been observed at high dispersion with the SWP camera. Futhermore, this program complements previous SWP echelle studies by our group at the University of Colorado of quiet-chromosphere dwarf stars (alpha Cen A, alpha Cen B), active giants (alpha Aur A, lambda And, beta Dra), and the extreme case of the very active RS CVn-type system HR 1099. As described below, highdispersion spectra of these targets have provided a critical interpretive dimension that was lacking in previous low-dispersion studies. However, several fundamental questions have been raised in the course of our exploratory SWP work on what, in practice, are two distinct classes of chromospheric stars: the quiet dwarfs and the active giants. We feel that many of these questions can be answered by bridging the interpretive gap with a careful study of the active dwarfs. Our recent experience with shift-long SWP echelle exposures of chromospheric emission stars has suggested that our previous estimates of

  16. Rotation, differential rotation, and gyrochronology of active Kepler stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhold, Timo; Gizon, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Context. In addition to the discovery of hundreds of exoplanets, the high-precision photometry from the CoRoT and Kepler satellites has led to measurements of surface rotation periods for tens of thousands of stars, which can potentially be used to infer stellar ages via gyrochronology. Aims: Our main goal is to derive ages of thousands of field stars using consistent rotation period measurements derived by different methods. Multiple rotation periods are interpreted as surface differential rotation (DR). We study the dependence of DR with rotation period and effective temperature. Methods: We reanalyze a previously studied sample of 24 124 Kepler stars using different approaches based on the Lomb-Scargle periodogram. Each quarter (Q1-Q14) is treated individually using a prewhitening approach. Additionally, the full time series and their different segments are analyzed. Results: For more than 18 500 stars our results are consistent with the rotation periods from McQuillan et al. (2014, ApJS, 211, 24). Of these, more than 12 300 stars show multiple significant peaks, which we interpret as DR. Dependencies of the DR with rotation period and effective temperature could be confirmed, e.g., the relative DR increases with rotation period. Gyrochronology ages between 100 Myr and 10 Gyr were derived for more than 17 000 stars using different gyrochronology relations, most of them with uncertainties dominated by period variations. We find a bimodal age distribution for Teff between 3200-4700 K. The derived ages reveal an empirical activity-age relation using photometric variability as stellar activity proxy. Additionally, we found 1079 stars with extremely stable (mostly short) periods. Half of these periods may be associated with rotation stabilized by non-eclipsing companions, the other half might be due to pulsations. Conclusions: The derived gyrochronology ages are well constrained since more than ~93.0% of the stars seem to be younger than the Sun where calibration is

  17. The relation between star formation and active nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G. H.

    1987-01-01

    Three questions relevant to the relation between an active nucleus and surrounding star formation are discussed. The infrared stellar CO absorption bands can be used to identify galaxies with large populations of young, massive stars and thus can identify strong starburst unambiguously, such as in NGC 6240, and can help identify composite active/starburst systems such as Arp 220. An active nucleus is probably not required for LINER spectral characteristics; dusty starburst galaxies, particularly if they are nearly edge-on, can produce LINER spectra through the shock heating of their interstellar media by supernovae combined with the obscuration of their nuclei in the optical. The Galactic Center would be an ideal laboratory for studying the interaction of starbursts and active nuclei, if both could be demonstrated to occur there. Failure to detect a cusp in the stellar distribution raises questions about the presence of an active nucleus, which should be answered by additional observations in the near future.

  18. Periods of activity cycles in late-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliorin, N. I.; Ruzmaykin, A. A.; Sokolov, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The mean magnetic field dynamo theory is utilized to obtain the qualitative dependence of the period of activity on the angular velocity of rotation for stars with sufficiently extensive convective shells. The dependence of the cycle period on the spectral class is also discussed.

  19. Chromospherically active stars. 11: Giant with compact hot companions and the barium star scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Busby, Michael R.; Eitter, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    We have determined spectroscopic orbits for three chromsopherically active giants that have hot compact companions. They are HD 160538 (KO III + wd, P = 904 days), HD 165141 (G8 III + wd, P approximately 5200 days), and HD 185510 (KO III + sdB, P = 20.6619 days). By fitting an IUE spectrum with theoretical models, we find the white dwarf companion of HD 165141 has a temperature of about 35,000 K. Spectral types and rotational velocities have been determined for the three giants and distances have been estimated. These three systems and 39 Ceti are compared with the barium star mass-transfer scenario. The long-period mild barium giant HD 165141 as well as HD 185510 and 39 Ceti, which have relatively short periods and normal abundance giants, appear to be consistent with this scenario. The last binary, HD 160538, a system with apparently near solar abundances, a white dwarf companion, and orbital characteristics similar to many barium stars, demonstrates that the existence of a white dwarf companion is insufficient to produce a barium star. The paucity of systems with confirmed white dwarf companions makes abundance analyses of HD 160538 and HD 165141 of great value in examining the role of metallicity in barium star formation.

  20. Chromospherically active stars. 6: Giants with compact hot companions and the barium star scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Busby, Michael R.; Eitter, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    We have determined spectroscopic orbits for three chromospherically active giants that have hot compact companions. They are HD 160538 (K0 III + wd, P = 904 days), HD 165141 (G8 III + wd, P approximately 5200 days), and HD 185510 (K0 III + sdB, P = 20.6619 days). By fitting an IUE spectrum with theoretical models, we find the white dwarf companion of HD 165141 has a temperature of about 35000 K. Spectral types and rotational velocities have been determined for the three giants and distances have been estimated. These three systems and 39 Ceti are compared with the barium star mass-transfer scenario. The long-period mild barium giant HD 165141 as well as HD 185510 and 39 Ceti, which have relatively short periods and normal abundance giants, appear to be consistent with this scenario. The last binary, HD 160538, a system with apparently near solar abundances, a white dwarf companion, and orbital characteristics similar to many barium stars, demonstrates that the existence of a white-dwarf companion is insufficient to produce a barium star. The paucity of systems with confirmed white-dwarf companions makes abundance analyses of HD 160538 and HD 165141 of great value in examining the role of metallicity in barium star formation.

  1. Photometric study of the active binary star V1430 Aquilae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, A.; Sürgit, D.

    2006-05-01

    New BVR light curves and a photometric analysis of the eclipsing binary star V1430 Aql are presented. The light curves were obtained at the Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University Observatory in 2004. The light curves are generally those of detached eclipsing binaries, but there are large asymmetries between maxima. New BVR light curves were analysed with an ILOT procedure. Light curve asymmetries of the system were explained in terms of large dark starspots on the primary component. The primary star shows a long-lived and quasi-poloidal spot distribution with active longitudes in opposite hemispheres. Absolute parameters of the system were derived. We also discuss the evolution of the system: the components are likely to be pre-main sequence stars, but a post-main sequence stage cannot be ruled out. More observations are needed to decide this point.

  2. The Chromospheric Activity-Age Relation for M Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, N. M.; Oswalt, T. D.; Hawley, S. L.

    2000-12-01

    We present preliminary results from our study in which we use moderate resolution spectroscopy to determine the correlation between the chromospheric activity and age of M dwarf stars in wide binary systems. We have observed ~50 M dwarf stars from our sample with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5-m telescope. We measure the ratio of Hα luminosity to the bolometric luminosity (LHα /Lbol) of the M dwarf---a measure of activity that is proven to correlate well with age. This project is unique in that it will extend the chromospheric activity-age relation of low-mass main sequence stars beyond the ages provided by cluster methods. The ages so determined are also independent of the uncertainties in cluster age determinations. The technique has the potential to improve by at least a factor of two the precision and the range over which ages can currently be determined for main sequence stars. Work on this project is supported by the NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program grant NGT-50290 (N.M.S.).

  3. Li abundance in the stars with solar-type activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishenina, T. V.; Soubiran, C.; Kovtyukh, V. V.; Katsova, M. M.; Livshits, M. A.

    Li abundances, atmospheric parameters and rotational velocities for 150 dwarfs have been determined from the high resolution, high signal to noise echelle spectra, obtained with the ELODIE spectrograph at the OHP (France). Among them, there are 101 stars with a determined level of activity, a large part of them being of the BY Dra type. The level of chromospheric and coronal activity of the targets has been evaluated through the logR'_HK index and X-ray flux. We examined the Li abundance behavior with T_eff, vsini and level of the activity. Some correlations between the Li abundances, level of the chromospheric activity and rotational velocities vsini are confirmed. The correlation between the Li abundances and index of the chromospheric activity logR'_HK was found, especially for dwarfs with 5700>T_eff> 5200 K. Those correlations mainly demonstrate that measurable values of the lithium content (higher than the upper limit) refer to the stars with large spot areas in their photospheres. Considering the wider set of stars with high activity levels one can affirm that such a conclusion is valid also for the cooler, earlier K dwarfs. Our results confirm that basic factors of formation of detectable Li abundance and high activity are determined principally by smaller age and fast axial rotation, respectively; and apparently by the depth of the convective zone.

  4. NUCLEAR ACTIVITY IS MORE PREVALENT IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario, D. J.; Lutz, D.; Berta, S.; Popesso, P.; Genzel, R.; Saintonge, A.; Tacconi, L.; Wuyts, S. E-mail: lutz@mpe.mpg.de E-mail: popesso@mpe.mpg.de E-mail: amelie@mpe.mpg.de E-mail: swuyts@mpe.mpg.de; and others

    2013-07-01

    We explore the question of whether low and moderate luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are preferentially found in galaxies that are undergoing a transition from active star formation (SF) to quiescence. This notion has been suggested by studies of the UV-optical colors of AGN hosts, which find them to be common among galaxies in the so-called Green Valley, a region of galaxy color space believed to be composed mostly of galaxies undergoing SF quenching. Combining the deepest current X-ray and Herschel/PACS far-infrared (FIR) observations of the two Chandra Deep Fields with redshifts, stellar masses, and rest-frame photometry derived from the extensive and uniform multi-wavelength data in these fields, we compare the rest-frame U - V color distributions and star formation rate distributions of AGNs and carefully constructed samples of inactive control galaxies. The UV-to-optical colors of AGNs are consistent with equally massive inactive galaxies at redshifts out to z {approx} 2, but we show that such colors are poor tracers of SF. While the FIR distributions of both star-forming AGNs and star-forming inactive galaxies are statistically similar, we show that AGNs are preferentially found in star-forming host galaxies, or, in other words, AGNs are less likely to be found in weakly star-forming or quenched galaxies. We postulate that, among X-ray-selected AGNs of low and moderate accretion luminosities, the supply of cold gas primarily determines the accretion rate distribution of the nuclear black holes.

  5. Solar activity: The Sun as an X-ray star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.

    1981-01-01

    The existence and constant activity of the Sun's outer atmosphere are thought to be due to the continual emergence of magnetic fields from the Solar interior and the stressing of these fields at or near the surface layers of the Sun. The structure and activity of the corona are thus symptomatic of the underlying magnetic dynamo and the existence of an outer turbulent convective zone on the Sun. A sufficient condition for the existence of coronal activity on other stars would be the existence of a magnetic dynamo and an outer convective zone. The theoretical relationship between magnetic fields and coronal activity can be tested by Solar observations, for which the individual loop structures can be resolved. A number of parameters however, which enter into the alternative theoretical formulations remain fixed in all Solar observations. To determine whether these are truly parameters of the theory observations need to be extended to nearby stars on which suitable conditions may occur.

  6. Morphology, star formation, and nuclear activity in void galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedmann, Sophia; Miller, Brendan; Gallo, Elena; Pazar, Beni; Alfvin, Erik

    2015-01-01

    We report on new Chandra observations of six early-type galaxies located within cosmic voids, from a program examining the influence of Mpc-scale environment upon star formation and low-level supermassive black hole activity. Simple feedback prescriptions are predicted to operate independently of the surrounding density once outside the dark matter halo, and further link star formation quenching to black hole activity. Alternatively, mediation of the cold gas supply by the large-scale environment, for example through increased cold-stream accretion and reduced harassment or stripping within more isolated regions, could mutually enhance star formation and (perhaps indirectly) low-level supermassive black hole activity. The six targeted early-type galaxies have comparable stellar masses of 6-9e10 solar, chosen to be near the predicted "critical value" for efficient feedback, but span a wide range of star-formation rates. Specifically, they have SFRs of 6.5, 1.4, 0.45, 0.10, 0.04, and 0.03 solar masses per year. All galaxies are detected in the Chandra ACIS-S observations with 0.3-8 keV X-ray luminosities ranging from 2e39 to 1e41 erg/s. Specifically, they have log Lx values of 40.4, 41.1, 41.1, 39.3, 39.2, and 39.2, again ordered by decreasing SFR. The three galaxies with moderate-to-high star formation rates have nuclear X-ray luminosities that are significantly greater than those of the three galaxies with low star formation rates. This result is more consistent with a symbiotic relationship between current low-level star formation and supermassive black hole activity than with simple feedback quenching models. We additionally situate these galaxies in the context of void and cluster galaxies in the local universe, model their optical surface brightness profiles and color gradients, discuss caveats including the possibility of X-ray binary contamination, and consider other supermassive black hole activity indicators.

  7. Creating Chicago History: Making Outreach Craft Activities Meaningful

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Madeline

    2012-01-01

    When it comes to having a traveling outreach activity for a museum, a craft can seem like the perfect solution. It can seemingly be all things at once--educational, quick and fun. But, if poorly constructed, crafts can also have serious fallbacks. Using the Chicago History Museum and the Millennium Park Family Fun Festival as a case study, this…

  8. Creating Activating Events for Transformative Learning in a Prison Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keen, Cheryl H.; Woods, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we interpreted, in light of Mezirow's theory of transformative learning, interviews with 13 educators regarding their work with marginalized adult learners in prisons in the northeastern United States. Transformative learning may have been aided by the educators' response to unplanned activating events, humor, and respect, and…

  9. MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLES IN THE EXOPLANET HOST STAR {epsilon} ERIDANI

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, T. S.; Mathur, S.; Buccino, A. P.; Mauas, P. J. D.; Petrucci, R.; Brown, B. P.; Soderblom, D. R.; Henry, T. J.; Hall, J. C.; Basu, S.

    2013-02-01

    The active K2 dwarf {epsilon} Eri has been extensively characterized both as a young solar analog and more recently as an exoplanet host star. As one of the nearest and brightest stars in the sky, it provides an unparalleled opportunity to constrain stellar dynamo theory beyond the Sun. We confirm and document the 3-year magnetic activity cycle in {epsilon} Eri originally reported by Hatzes and coworkers, and we examine the archival data from previous observations spanning 45 years. The data show coexisting 3-year and 13-year periods leading into a broad activity minimum that resembles a Maunder minimum-like state, followed by the resurgence of a coherent 3-year cycle. The nearly continuous activity record suggests the simultaneous operation of two stellar dynamos with cycle periods of 2.95 {+-} 0.03 years and 12.7 {+-} 0.3 years, which, by analogy with the solar case, suggests a revised identification of the dynamo mechanisms that are responsible for the so-called 'active' and 'inactive' sequences as proposed by Boehm-Vitense. Finally, based on the observed properties of {epsilon} Eri, we argue that the rotational history of the Sun is what makes it an outlier in the context of magnetic cycles observed in other stars (as also suggested by its Li depletion), and that a Jovian-mass companion cannot be the universal explanation for the solar peculiarities.

  10. Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelato, Hugo Vicente

    1999-01-01

    We will begin our study with a more or less superficial inspection of the "forest" of stars that we see in the skies. The first thing we notice is that, as sources of light, they are much weaker than the Sun. Second, their apparent colors vary; from a bluish-white in most of them to a reddish-yellow, which is rarer. There is also a third aspect, though it is not very obvious to the naked eye: most of the stars group themselves in small families of two, three or more members. A good example is the Alpha Centauri, the closest star to us, which, in fact, is a triple system of stars. Another is the group of 7 stars that make up the Pleiades, which will be discussed later on. In fact, almost half of the stars are double systems with only two members, called binary stars. Most of these double stars, though together, are separated by several astronomical units (one astronomical unit, AU, is the distance from Earth to the sun: see Chapter 1), and revolve around each other over periods of several years. And yet the revolutions of some binary stars, separated by much smaller distances, occur in only a few hours! These stars are so close to each other that they can share enveloping material. Often this exchange occurs in a somewhat violent manner. Local explosions may occur, expelling matter away from the system. In other binary systems, where one of the components is a very compact, dense star, companion material flows more calmly, making up a light disk around the compact star.

  11. The Life Cycles of Stars: An Information & Activity Booklet Grades K-8, 1997-1998. Star-Child--A Learning Center for Young Astronomers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truelove, Elizabeth; Dejoie, Joyce

    This booklet contains information and activities on the life cycle of stars. Materials can be adapted for kindergarten through grade 8 classrooms. Background information on massive stars and medium stars and activities with subjects such as star life, constellation shapes, nebula terminology, astronomical distances, and pulsars is included. The 12…

  12. Spots, activity cycles, and differential rotation on cool stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, I. Yu.

    2005-01-01

    The first results are reported from a search for activity cycles in stars similar to the sun based on modelling their spotting with an algorithm developed at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory. Of the more than thirty program stars, 10 manifested a cyclical variation in their central latitudes and total starspot area. The observed cycles have durations of 4-15 years, i.e., analogous to the 11 year Schwabe sunspot cycle. Most of the stars have a rough analog of the solar butterfly pattern, with a reduction in the average latitude of the spots as their area increases. A flip-flop effect during the epoch of the maximum average latitude is noted in a number of these objects (e.g., the analog LQ Hya of the young sun or the RS CVn-type variable V711 Tau), as well as a reduction in the photometric rotation period of a star as the spots drift toward the equator, an analog of the differential rotation effect in the sun. Unlike in the sun, the observed spot formation cycles do not correlate uniquely with other indicators of activity— chromospheric emission in the CaII HK lines (Be Cet, EK Dra, Dx Leo), H line emission (LQ Hya, VY Ari, EV Lac), or cyclical flare activity (EV Lac). In V833 Tau, BY Dra, EK Dra, and VY Ari short Schwabe cycles coexist with long cycles that are analogous to the Gleissberg solar cycle, in which the spotted area can approach half the entire area of the star.

  13. Star formation in quasar and active galaxy environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coldwell, Georgina V.; Lambas, Diego G.

    2003-09-01

    We use the 2dF public 100 K data release of galaxies and samples of quasars and active galaxies taken from the Véron-Cetty and Véron catalogue to study the nature of galaxies in the surroundings of active objects with redshifts in the range 0.1 < z < 0.2. We explore the distribution of neighbour 2dF galaxy spectral types, η, at different projected distances from the quasars and active galaxies with radial velocity difference ΔV= 500 km s-1. For comparison, we perform a similar analysis on the environment of typical galaxies in the 2dF catalogue, a sample of bright early-type galaxies, i.e. η < -1.4 and MbJ < -21, and also on a sample of 2dF galaxy groups. We find a higher relative fraction of emission-line galaxies, i.e. with 2dF spectral type indices η >3.5, in the vicinity of quasars and active galaxies compared to that in the neighbourhood of typical galaxies, bright early types and groups. This effect extends up to projected distance rp~ 1 h-1 Mpc for active galaxies and rp~ 3 h-1 Mpc for quasars. We also find a tendency for companion galaxies of quasars to be brighter than the neighbours of active galaxies within rp~ 3 h-1 Mpc. We estimate average star-formation rates for objects at different distances from quasars, active galaxies, galaxies and groups. We find a significantly higher star-formation activity within ~2.0 h-1 Mpc from quasars with respect to typical galaxies, which reinforces the idea that star formation is enhanced in the neighbourhood of quasars. Our tests with the group environment provide evidence against quasars being associated with groups. Also, our analysis of the neighbours of bright early types shows that although these galaxies are typical hosts of quasars, their companion galaxies are significantly different in terms of the star-formation activity.

  14. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    This NASA grant covered EUVE observing and data analysis programs during EUVE Cycle 5 GO observing. The research involved a single Guest Observer project 97-EUVE-061 "Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars". The grant provided funding that covered 1.25 months of the PI's salary. The activities undertaken included observation planning and data analysis (both temporal and spectral). This project was awarded 910 ksec of observing time to study seven active binary stars, all but one of which were actually observed. Lambda-And was observed on 1997 Jul 30 - Aug 3 and Aug 7-14 for a total of 297 ksec; these observations showed two large complex flares that were analyzed by Osten & Brown (1999). AR Psc, observed for 350 ksec on 1997 Aug 27 - Sep 13, showed only relatively small flares that were also discussed by Osten & Brown (1999). EUVE observations of El Eri were obtained on 1994 August 24-28, simultaneous with ASCA X-ray spectra. Four flares were detected by EUVE with one of these also observed simultaneously, by ASCA. The other three EUVE observations were of the stars BY Dra (1997 Sep 22-28), V478 Lyr (1998 May 18-27), and sigma Gem (1998 Dec 10-22). The first two stars showed a few small flares. The sigma Gem data shows a beautiful complete flare with a factor of ten peak brightness compared to quiescence. The flare rise and almost all the decay phase are observed. Unfortunately no observations in other spectral regions were obtained for these stars. Analysis of the lambda-And and AR Psc observations is complete and the results were published in Osten & Brown (1999). Analysis of the BY Dra, V478 Lyr and sigma Gem EUVE data is complete and will be published in Osten (2000, in prep.). The El Eri EUV analysis is also completed and the simultaneous EUV/X-ray study will be published in Osten et al. (2000, in prep.). Both these latter papers will be submitted in summer 2000. All these results will form part of Rachel Osten's PhD thesis.

  15. Activity and Brightness Variations of Sun-Like Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Jeffrey C.

    2015-08-01

    Long-term observations of variations in Sun-like stars now span a half century. The Mount Wilson Observatory (MWO) HK Project operated from 1966 to 2003, and the Lowell Observatory Solar-Stellar Spectrograph (SSS) project has operated since 1994; together these programs provide a record of chromospheric activity over multiple stellar cycles for more than 100 stars of V < ~7.5. Long-term photometric monitoring of Sun-like stars, including many of the MWO and SSS targets, began in the early 1980s and continues today at the Fairborn Observatory south of Tucson. I will review progress to date in combining and interpreting the spectrosopic and photometric data sets, including some new results from the most recent years of SSS and Fairborn data. I will also review where deficiencies remain in reconciling and combining the major data sets, and will discuss efforts presently underway to remedy this and provide a long-term record for the benefit of the community.

  16. Chromospherically active stars. X - Spectroscopy and photometry of HD 212280

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Browning, Jared C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Morton, Mary D.; Hall, Douglas S.

    1993-01-01

    The system HD 212280 is a chromospherically active double lined spectroscopic binary with an orbital period of 45.284 days and an eccentricity of 0.50. The spectrum is composite with spectral types of G8 IV and F5-8 V for the components. An estimated inclination of 78 +/- 8 deg results in masses of 1.7 and 1.4 solar mass for the G subgiant and mid-F star, respectively. The distance to the system is estimated to be 112 pc. Photometric observations obtained between 1987 November and 1992 June reveal that HD 212280 is a newly identified variable star with a V amplitude of about 0.15 mag and a mean period of 29.46 days. Our V data were divided into 11 sets and in all but one case two spots were required to fit the data. Lifetimes of 650 days and a minimum of 1350 days have been determined for two of the four spots. The differential rotation coefficient of 0.05 is relatively small. The age of the system is about 1.9 X 10 exp 9 yrs. The G subgiant is rotating slower than pseudosynchronously while the F-type star is rotating faster.

  17. Comparison of the Motivational Climates Created during Multi-Activity Instruction and Sport Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Mitchum B.; Curtner-Smith, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that sport education (SE) may be a superior curriculum model to multi-activity (MA) teaching because its pedagogies and structures create a task-involving motivational climate. The purpose of this study was to describe and compare the objective motivational climates teachers create within the MA and SE models.…

  18. Co-creating Emotionally Safe Environments at Camp: Training Staff To Facilitate Adventure Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownlee, Matt; Yerkes, Rita

    2003-01-01

    An emotionally safe environment helps campers participate in adventure activities. Staff development tips for creating a safe environment include using cooperative goal setting; using parallel training processes; developing working lesson plans that outline facilitation techniques for creating emotionally safe environments; and using co-created…

  19. Rotation, activity, and lithium abundance in cool binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmeier, K. G.; Weber, M.; Granzer, T.; Järvinen, S.

    2012-10-01

    We have used two robotic telescopes to obtain time-series high-resolution optical echelle spectroscopy and V I and/or by photometry for a sample of 60 active stars, mostly binaries. Orbital solutions are presented for 26 double-lined systems and for 19 single-lined systems, seven of them for the first time but all of them with unprecedented phase coverage and accuracy. Eighteen systems turned out to be single stars. The total of 6609 {R=55 000} échelle spectra are also used to systematically determine effective temperatures, gravities, metallicities, rotational velocities, lithium abundances and absolute Hα-core fluxes as a function of time. The photometry is used to infer unspotted brightness, {V-I} and/or b-y colors, spot-induced brightness amplitudes and precise rotation periods. An extra 22 radial-velocity standard stars were monitored throughout the science observations and yield a new barycentric zero point for our STELLA/SES robotic system. Our data are complemented by literature data and are used to determine rotation-temperature-activity relations for active binary components. We also relate lithium abundance to rotation and surface temperature. We find that 74 % of all known rapidly-rotating active binary stars are synchronized and in circular orbits but 26 % (61 systems) are rotating asynchronously of which half have {P_rot>P_orb} and {e>0}. Because rotational synchronization is predicted to occur before orbital circularization active binaries should undergo an extra spin-down besides tidal dissipation. We suspect this to be due to a magnetically channeled wind with its subsequent braking torque. We find a steep increase of rotation period with decreasing effective temperature for active stars, P_rot ∝ T_eff-7, for both single and binaries, main sequence and evolved. For inactive, single giants with {P_rot>100} d, the relation is much weaker, {P_rot ∝ T_eff-1.12}. Our data also indicate a period-activity relation for Hα of the form {R_Hα ∝ P

  20. Spot temperatures and area coverages on active dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarr, Steven H.; Neff, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Two active K dwarfs are examined to determine the temperatures of the stars and to estimate the locations and sizes of cool spots on the stellar surfaces. Two wavelength regions with TiO absorption bands at different temperature sensitivities are modeled simultaneously using the method developed by Huenemoerder and Ramsey (1987). The spectrum of BD +26deg730 shows excess absorption in the TiO band, and the absence of the 8860 A band in HD 82558 indicates that its spots are warmer than those of BD +26deg730.

  1. Stars of the Big Dipper: A 3-D Vector Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Vince H.; Beichner, Robert J.

    2006-03-01

    Most teachers of introductory physics will agree that many students have difficulty with vectors, so much so that we frequently spend a week at the beginning of the semester presenting material that students should know from previous mathematics courses. This review is often quite abstract, with little or no connection to familiar contexts, and seldom includes any motivation for students to "see it again." In this paper we present a vector activity that attempts to address both these issues using the stars of the Big Dipper, in the constellation Ursa Major, as a memorable context.

  2. Time-resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Alexander

    EUVE has provided the first stellar coronal spectra showing individual emission lines, thereby allowing coronal modelling at a level of sophistication previously unattainable. Long EUVE observations have shown the prevalence of large-scale flaring in the coronae of active binary stars. We propose to obtain EUVE DSS spectra and photometry for 8 active binaries, four of which have never been observed by EUVE (EI Eri, AR Psc, V478 Lyr, BY Dra) and four EUV-bright systems that merit reobservation (Sigma CrB, Sigma Gem, Xi UMa, Lambda And). We shall use these observations to derive high quality quiescent coronal spectra for modelling, and to obtain new flare data. We shall try to coordinate these observations with ground-based radio observations and other spacecraft, if the scheduling allows. The proposed observations will significantly increase the available EUVE spectroscopy of active binaries.

  3. EXPLORING THE CONNECTION BETWEEN STAR FORMATION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY IN THE LOCAL UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Heckman, T. M.; Ptak, A.; Schiminovich, D.; Bertincourt, B.; O'Dowd, M.

    2012-10-10

    We study a combined sample of 264 star-forming, 51 composite, and 73 active galaxies using optical spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectra from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. We examine optical and mid-IR spectroscopic diagnostics that probe the amount of star formation and relative energetic contributions from star formation and an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Overall we find good agreement between optical and mid-IR diagnostics. Misclassifications of galaxies based on the SDSS spectra are rare despite the presence of dust obscuration. The luminosity of the [Ne II] 12.8 {mu}m emission line is well correlated with the star formation rate measured from the SDSS spectra, and this holds for the star-forming, composite, and AGN-dominated systems. AGNs show a clear excess of [Ne III] 15.6 {mu}m emission relative to star-forming and composite systems. We find good qualitative agreement between various parameters that probe the relative contributions of the AGN and star formation, including the mid-IR spectral slope, the ratio of the [Ne V] 14.3 {mu}m to [Ne II] {mu}m 12.8 fluxes, the equivalent widths of the 7.7 {mu}m, 11.3 {mu}m, and 17 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features, and the optical 'D' parameter which measures the distance at which a source lies from the locus of star-forming galaxies in the optical BPT emission-line diagnostic diagram. We also consider the behavior of the three individual PAH features by examining how their flux ratios depend upon the degree of AGN dominance. We find that the PAH 11.3 {mu}m feature is significantly suppressed in the most AGN-dominated systems.

  4. EPISODIC STAR FORMATION COUPLED TO REIGNITION OF RADIO ACTIVITY IN 3C 236

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, Grant R.; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Baum, Stefi A.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Sparks, William B.; De Bruyn, Ger; Schoenmakers, Arno P.

    2010-05-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys and STIS FUV/NUV/optical imaging of the radio galaxy 3C 236, whose relic {approx}4 Mpc radio jet lobes and inner 2 kpc compact steep spectrum (CSS) radio source are evidence of multiple epochs of active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity. Consistent with previous results, our data confirm the presence of four bright knots of FUV emission in an arc along the edge of the inner circumnuclear dust disk in the galaxy's nucleus, as well as FUV emission cospatial with the nucleus itself. We interpret these to be sites of recent or ongoing star formation. We present photometry of these knots, as well as an estimate for the internal extinction in the source using line ratios from archival ground-based spectroscopy. We estimate the ages of the knots by comparing our extinction-corrected photometry with stellar population synthesis models. We find the four knots cospatial with the dusty disk to be young, of order {approx}10{sup 7} yr old. The FUV emission in the nucleus, to which we do not expect scattered light from the AGN to contribute significantly, is likely due to an episode of star formation triggered {approx}10{sup 9} yr ago. We argue that the young {approx}10{sup 7} yr old knots stem from an episode of star formation that was roughly coeval with the event resulting in reignition of radio activity, creating the CSS source. The {approx}10{sup 9} yr old stars in the nucleus may be associated with the previous epoch of radio activity that generated the 4 Mpc relic source, before being cut off by exhaustion or interruption. The ages of the knots, considered in the context of both the disturbed morphology of the nuclear dust and the double-double morphology of the 'old' and 'young' radio sources, present evidence for an AGN/starburst connection that is possibly episodic in nature. We suggest that the AGN fuel supply was interrupted for {approx}10{sup 7} yr due to a minor merger event and has now been restored. The

  5. ACTIVITY ANALYSES FOR SOLAR-TYPE STARS OBSERVED WITH KEPLER. I. PROXIES OF MAGNETIC ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    He, Han; Wang, Huaning; Yun, Duo

    2015-11-15

    Light curves of solar-type stars often show gradual fluctuations due to rotational modulation by magnetic features (starspots and faculae) on stellar surfaces. Two quantitative measures of modulated light curves are employed as the proxies of magnetic activity for solar-type stars observed with Kepler telescope. The first is named autocorrelation index i{sub AC}, which describes the degree of periodicity of the light curve; the second is the effective fluctuation range of the light curve R{sub eff}, which reflects the depth of rotational modulation. The two measures are complementary and depict different aspects of magnetic activities on solar-type stars. By using the two proxies i{sub AC} and R{sub eff}, we analyzed activity properties of two carefully selected solar-type stars observed with Kepler (Kepler ID: 9766237 and 10864581), which have distinct rotational periods (14.7 versus 6.0 days). We also applied the two measures to the Sun for a comparative study. The result shows that both the measures can reveal cyclic activity variations (referred to as i{sub AC}-cycle and R{sub eff}-cycle) on the two Kepler stars and the Sun. For the Kepler star with the faster rotation rate, i{sub AC}-cycle and R{sub eff}-cycle are in the same phase, while for the Sun (slower rotator), they are in the opposite phase. By comparing the solar light curve with simultaneous photospheric magnetograms, it is identified that the magnetic feature that causes the periodic light curve during solar minima is the faculae of the enhanced network region, which can also be a candidate of magnetic features that dominate the periodic light curves on the two Kepler stars.

  6. An H-alpha survey of southern hemisphere active chromosphere stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, B. W.; Hearnshaw, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    Because of the variety of extraordinary phenomena exhibited by active chromosphere objects, discovery of new, bright surface-active stars is of considerable importance. Ca II emission is a well-known signature of chromospheric activity, serving even as one of the points of definition of the class of RS CVn binary stars. In connection with the present investigation, spectroscopic observations of 27 Ca II emission stars have been conducted. The observations make it possible to identify unambiguously the most chromospherically active stars in the sample. By observing the H-alpha line, rather than H and K, it is possible to distinguish nine of these stars which are likely to be observational targets as interesting as the extremely surface active objects V711 Tau or FK Com. Of the 27 stars surveyed, two (HD 86005, HD 204128) showed H-alpha as an emission feature above continuum, with estimated equivalent width 1-2 A.

  7. The star formation rates of active galactic nuclei host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Sara L.; Teimoorinia, Hossen; Rosario, David J.; Mendel, J. Trevor

    2016-05-01

    Using artificial neural network predictions of total infrared luminosities (LIR), we compare the host galaxy star formation rates (SFRs) of ˜21 000 optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGN), 466 low-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) and 721 mid-IR-selected AGN. SFR offsets (ΔSFR) relative to a sample of star-forming `main-sequence' galaxies (matched in M⋆, z and local environment) are computed for the AGN hosts. Optically selected AGN exhibit a wide range of ΔSFR, with a distribution skewed to low SFRs and a median ΔSFR = -0.06 dex. The LERGs have SFRs that are shifted to even lower values with a median ΔSFR = -0.5 dex. In contrast, mid-IR-selected AGN have, on average, SFRs enhanced by a factor of ˜1.5. We interpret the different distributions of ΔSFR amongst the different AGN classes in the context of the relative contribution of triggering by galaxy mergers. Whereas the LERGs are predominantly fuelled through low accretion rate secular processes which are not accompanied by enhancements in SFR, mergers, which can simultaneously boost SFRs, most frequently lead to powerful, obscured AGN.

  8. Active Laser Guide Star refocusing system for EAGLE instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugot, Emmanuel; Madec, Fabrice; Vives, Sébastien; Chardin, Elodie; Ferrari, Marc; Le Mignant, David; Gimenez, Jean Luc; Mazzanti, Silvio; Vola, Pascal; Cuby, Jean Gabriel

    We detail the study of a laser guide star (LGS) refocusing system based on an variable curvature mirror (VCM) of high dynamic, in the frame of the EAGLE instrument for the E-ELT. From the top level requirements, an on axis optical design based on an active component is optimised to ensure maximal performance in terms of encircled energy. The refocusing is operated by the VCM, which shape varies with the distance of the sodium layer to the telescope. The VCM system concept is based on an embedded metrology. We detail the finite element analysis (FEA) of the VCM, allowing an optimization of the thickness profile to get an optical quality better than λ/5 RMS at each curvature. Mechanical design and manufacturing of prototypes are also presented.

  9. Active star formation at intermediate Galactic latitude: the case of IRAS 06345-3023

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, J. L.; Palmeirim, P. M.

    2015-04-01

    We report the discovery of a small aggregate of young stars seen in high-resolution, deep near-infrared (JHKS) images towards IRAS 06345-3023 in the outer Galaxy and well below the mid-plane of the Galactic disc. The group of young stars is likely to be composed of low-mass stars, mostly Class I young stellar objects. The stars are seen towards a molecular cloud whose CO map peaks at the location of the IRAS source. The near-infrared images reveal, additionally, the presence of nebular emission with rich morphological features, including arcs in the vicinity of embedded stars, wisps and bright rims of a butterfly-shaped dark cloud. The location of this molecular cloud as a new star formation site well below the Galactic plane in the outer Galaxy indicates that active star formation is taking place at vertical distances larger than those typical of the (thin) disc.

  10. Creating stars, supernovae, and the big bang in the laboratory: Nuclear Astrophysics with the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, G.J.

    1994-02-01

    This talk has been prepared for the Symposium on Novel Approaches to Nuclear Astrophysics hosted by the ACS Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology for the San Diego ACS meeting. This talk indeed describes a truly novel approach. It discusses a proposal for the construction of the National Ignition Facility which could provide the most powerful concentration of laser energy yet attempted. The energy from such a facility could be concentrated in such a way as to reproduce, for the first time in a terrestrial laboratory, an environment which nearly duplicates that which occurs within stars and during the first few moments of cosmic creation during the big bang. These miniature versions of cosmic explosions may allow us to understand better the tumultuous astrophysical environments which have profoundly influenced the origin and evolution of the universe.

  11. Creating Healthy Active Minds for Personal Success (CHAMPS) in Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawley, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide support for middle school physical education programs that meet the developmental needs of students while providing for student choice. With its health and physical education program called Creating Healthy Active Minds for Personal Success (CHAMPS), Moscow Middle School is striving to cultivate student…

  12. Creating Classrooms of and for Activism at the Intersections of Class, Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nishida, Akemi; Fine, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    In this article the authors describe pedagogy which rests on commitments to solidarity, activism, and intersectional understandings of personhood and social (in)justices. The authors seek to create accessible classrooms where our many selves and critical consciousness can be in (dis)comforting conversation with one another. Then, they hope to…

  13. Stars and Planets: A New Set of Middle School Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urquhart, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    A set of lesson plans for grades 6-8 which deal with the sizes and distances of stars and planets using a scale factor of 1 to 10 billion, the life cycle of stars, and the search for planets beyond the solar system. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. On the Correlation between the Magnetic Activity Levels, Metallicities, and Radii of Low-Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Morales, Mercedes

    2007-05-01

    The recent increase in the number of radius measurements of very low mass stars from eclipsing binaries and interferometry of single stars has raised more questions about what could be causing the discrepancy between the observed radii and those predicted by models. The two main explanations being proposed are a correlation between the radii of the stars and either their activity levels or their metallicities. This paper presents a study of such correlations using all the data published to date. The study also investigates correlations between the radius deviations from the models and the masses of the stars. There is no clear correlation between activity level and radius for the single stars in the sample. These single stars are slow rotators, with typical velocities vrotsini<3.0 km s-1. A clear correlation however exists in the case of the faster rotating members of binaries. This result is based on the X-ray emission levels of the stars. There also appears to be an increase in the deviation of the radii of single stars from the models as a function of metallicity, as previously indicated by Berger et al. The stars in binaries do not seem to follow the same trend. Finally, the Baraffe et al. models reproduce well the radius observations below 0.30-0.35 Msolar, where the stars become fully convective, although this result is preliminary since almost all the sample stars in that mass range are slow rotators and metallicities have not been measured for most of them. The results indicate that stellar activity and metallicity play an important role in determining the radius of very low mass stars, at least above 0.35 Msolar.

  15. Pattern formation for active particles on optically created ordered and disordered substrates (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Charles M.; Ray, Dipanjan; Reichhardt, Cynthia J.

    2015-08-01

    There has been tremendous growth in the field of active matter, where the individual particles that comprise the system are self-driven. Examples of this class of system include biological systems such as swimming bacteria and crawling cells. More recently, non-biological swimmers have been created using colloidal Janus particles that undergo chemical reactions on one side to produce self-propulsion. These active matter systems exhibit a wide variety of behaviors that are absent in systems undergoing purely thermal fluctuations, such as transitions from uniform liquids to clusters or living crystals, pushing objects around, ratchet effects, and phase separation in mixtures of active and passive particles. Here we examine the collective effects of active matter disks in the presence of static or dynamic substrates. For colloids, such substrates could be created optically in the form of periodic, random, or quasiperiodic patterns. For thermal particles, increasing the temperature generally increases the diffusion or mobility of the particles when they move over a random or periodic substrates. We find that when the particles are active, increasing the activity can increase the mobility for smaller run lengths but decrease the mobility at large run lengths. Additionally we find that at large run lengths on a structured substrate, a variety of novel active crystalline states can form such as stripes, squares and triangular patterns.

  16. Are passive red spirals truly passive?. The current star formation activity of optically red disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, L.

    2012-07-01

    We used GALEX ultraviolet and WISE 22 μm observations to investigate the current star formation activity of the optically red spirals recently identified as part of the Galaxy Zoo project. These galaxies were accurately selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as pure discs with low or no current star formation activity, representing one of the best optically selected samples of candidate passive spirals. However, we show that these galaxies are not only still forming stars at a significant rate (≳1 M⊙ yr-1) but, more importantly, their star formation activity is not different from that of normal star-forming discs of the same stellar mass (M∗ ≳ 1010.2 M⊙). Indeed, these systems lie on the UV-optical blue sequence, even without any corrections for internal dust attenuation, and they follow the same specific star formation rate vs. stellar mass relation of star-forming galaxies. Our findings clearly show that at high stellar masses, optical colours do not allow to distinguish between actively star-forming and truly quiescent systems.

  17. The Chromospheric Activity and Age Relation among Main Sequence Stars in Wide Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswalt, Terry D.; Zhao, J.

    2011-05-01

    We present a study of the chromospheric activity levels in 36 wide binary systems. Thirty one of the binaries contain a white dwarf component. In such binaries the total age can be estimated by adding the cooling age of the white dwarf to an estimate of the progenitor's main sequence lifetime. To better understand how activity correlates to stellar age, 14 cluster member stars were also observed. Our observations confirm the expectation derived from studies of single main sequence stars that activity decays with age. However, for the first time we demonstrate that this relation extends from 50 Myr to at least 8 Gyr for stars with 1.0 < V-I < 2.4 color index. We also find that little change in activity occurs for stars with V-I < 1.0 and ages between 1 Gyr and 5 Gyr. The slope of constant age lines in the activity vs. V-I plane for young stars is relatively steep, while for old stars it appears to be flatter. In addition, our sample includes five wide binaries consisting of two main sequence stars. These pairs provide a useful reality check on our activity vs. age relation. Support for this project from NSF grant AST-0807919 to Florida Institute of Technology is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. What do the Mt. Wilson stars tell us about solar activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, K.-P.; Mittag, M.; Hempelmann, A.; González-Pérez, J. N.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2013-06-01

    We relate the evolutionary status and mass of the Mt. Wilson project stars with the type and strength of stellar activity as established in decades of monitoring their chromospheric Ca II K line emission. We specifically derive their positions in the Hertzsprung-Russell-diagram (HRD) from Hipparcos parallaxes and SIMBAD B - V data, considering and correcting for the effects of different individual stellar metallicities, and place different activity groups of the Mt. Wilson stars on a common set of Z = 0.02 evolution tracks to obtain a quantitative picture of their relative evolutionary status and mass distribution. We find that, first, the downturn in stellar activity does not depend on absolute age but instead decreases with the relative age as stars advance on the main sequence and thus confirm theoretical expectations, while the most active of the irregularly variable stars are found to scatter around the zero-age main-sequence (ZAMS). Moderately active stars, both with clear cycles like the Sun and those without a dominant activity period, populate the 2nd quarter of main-sequence (MS) evolution. Almost inactive stars are mostly in their 3rd quarter of MS evolution and seem to represent stellar analogues of the solar Maunder minimum state. Totally inactive stars are all in the final quarter of their MS evolution and make up for over 70% of the Mt. Wilson stars that far evolved (the remainders being only weakly active). Most of these are more massive and younger than the Sun. Accordingly, less massive stars did not have enough time to significantly decrease their activity, since they generally evolve more slowly. We find, second, that the Sun is near an apparent upper mass limit for cyclic activity on the MS, because there are no cyclic MS stars much above one solar mass, at least not in the Mt. Wilson sample. Once put in proper perspective with the other Mt. Wilson stars, the Sun indeed ought to be approaching a gradual transition from moderate cyclic activity

  19. Can persuasive messages encourage individuals to create action plans for physical activity?

    PubMed

    Sweet, Shane N; Brawley, Lawrence R; Hatchell, Alexandra; Gainforth, Heather L; Latimer-Cheung, Amy E

    2014-08-01

    Given the positive influence of action planning on physical activity, persuasive messages could be designed to promote action planning. The purpose of this paper was to test action planning messages in two studies. Participants were allocated to one of two message groups, reading either a physical activity only or physical activity plus action planning message (Study 1) and either a gain-framed or loss-framed action planning message (Study 2). The percent of individuals who created an action plan and the quality of the plans were evaluated. In Study 1, individuals in the physical activity plus action planning group created as many action plans as the physical activity only group, but their plans were higher quality. In Study 2, Week 2 differences between the gain- and loss-framed message groups were found for action planning. To our knowledge, these studies were the first to investigate message-induced action planning as a behavior. More research is needed to optimize these messages.

  20. Star Formation Activity in a z>4 Protocluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; Capak, Peter; Sheth, Kartik

    2015-08-01

    Local studies show that galaxy properties are linked to the galaxy number density within their local environment. Galaxy clusters represent the most extreme density environments and are ideal laboratories to investigate the interplay between galaxy evolution and the environment. However, to understand the origin of the galaxy-environment relation, one needs to look back at the epoch of galaxy formation (z > 1), where the local high-density environments of well-established, virialized clusters give way to looser large-scale structures (LSS) extending over regions of several megaparsecs in size (protoclusters). Clustering analysis indicate that at z~2 submm-selected galaxies (SMGs) reside in very massive halos, suggesting that these may trace high-density environments that likely evolve into rich clusters of galaxies. Conversely, recent work has suggests that SMGs are tracers of a broader range of environments, including structures with more modest masses caught in highly active periods. This suggests that since galaxies in these structures are likely caught during episodes of peak starbursts, SMGs may be tracers of a wider range of environments beyond the progenitors of today’s very rich clusters, opening a window for a more complete exploration of the details underpinning the process of galaxy evolution in concert with the assembly of LSS. We undertook a large observing program comprising deep narrow-band Ly-alpha imaging and multi-object spectroscopy using the IMACS camera on Magellan (Las Campanas) to probe for the presence of a galaxy overdensity in the vicinity of a 4-member group of SMGs at z>4. With ~100 spectroscopically-confirmed Ly-alpha emitters, we are in a position to gauge the level of galaxy overdensity in this region. Furthermore, we have initiated a detailed follow-up study of these Ly-alpha emitters to obtain star-formation rates based on the IRAC and MIPS Spitzer archives, in an effort to probe for trends in the intra-LSS distribution.

  1. XUV-driven mass loss from extrasolar giant planets orbiting active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadney, J. M.; Galand, M.; Unruh, Y. C.; Koskinen, T. T.; Sanz-Forcada, J.

    2015-04-01

    Upper atmospheres of Hot Jupiters are subject to extreme radiation conditions that can result in rapid atmospheric escape. The composition and structure of the upper atmospheres of these planets are affected by the high-energy spectrum of the host star. This emission depends on stellar type and age, which are thus important factors in understanding the behaviour of exoplanetary atmospheres. In this study, we focus on Extrasolar Giant Planets (EPGs) orbiting K and M dwarf stars. XUV spectra for three different stars - ɛ Eridani, AD Leonis and AU Microscopii - are constructed using a coronal model. Neutral density and temperature profiles in the upper atmosphere of hypothetical EGPs orbiting these stars are then obtained from a fluid model, incorporating atmospheric chemistry and taking atmospheric escape into account. We find that a simple scaling based solely on the host star's X-ray emission gives large errors in mass loss rates from planetary atmospheres and so we have derived a new method to scale the EUV regions of the solar spectrum based upon stellar X-ray emission. This new method produces an outcome in terms of the planet's neutral upper atmosphere very similar to that obtained using a detailed coronal model of the host star. Our results indicate that in planets subjected to radiation from active stars, the transition from Jeans escape to a regime of hydrodynamic escape at the top of the atmosphere occurs at larger orbital distances than for planets around low activity stars (such as the Sun).

  2. SPI or Spin-up? An UV Investigation of Activity on Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya

    2010-01-01

    Using the near-UV and far-UV photometry of the GALEX All-sky Imaging Survey, we study the effects of tidal and magnetic star-planet interactions (SPI) on the stellar activity of the host stars. We compare samples of stars with close-in planets (a < 0.15 AU) to those with far-out planets (a > 1.5 AU) and show that the former group has on average several times the FUV and NUV luminosity of the latter sample. This is consistent with the X-ray results of Kashyap et al. (2008), who speculate that this may be due to the magnetic influence on the star by its innermost planet, as previously observed in several individual hot Jupiter systems. Our study suggests that increased stellar rotation rate due to the tidal interaction with the planet plays the dominant role in increasing the global stellar activity level. For the stars with close-in planets, the FUV and NUV fluxes are anti-correlated with the stellar synchronization time scales but are not correlated for stars with planets at larger orbital distances. Even though the stars with close-in planets are not fully synchronized (full synchronization in most cases will take longer than the age of the Universe), they have already undergone some increase in rotation rate. This result also suggests that the competing force of magnetic drag slowing down the stars is losing out to tidal spin-up in these systems.

  3. Coronal X-Ray Flares on Active Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordon, Raanan

    2008-09-01

    Stellar coronae are the hot (kT>0.1 keV) tenuous regions in the outer atmospheres of cool-stars. Stellar coronae have been researched for many years, and yet they are poorly understood. In particular, the deviation of coronal chemical composition from photospheric elemental abundances is a long standing mystery. In the solar case, this was labeled the first ionization potential (FIP) effect. While some stellar coronae show a solar-like FIP effect, others show no FIP effect, or an inverse effect, although difficulties in measuring stellar photospheric abundances cast some doubt on these results. A correlation between coronal activity and abundance patterns led to a suggestion that flares affect coronal abundances. However, different variations were observed during flares, with no clear pattern emerging. We investigate a full sample of X-ray flares on stellar coronae from the archives of XMM-Newton and Chandra space observatories. We develop a method for reconstructing emission measure distribution, EMD(T), and abundances that is optimized to reduce systematic uncertainties. We measure variations of coronal abundances during flares, relative to quiescence abundances. This measurement is independent of the photospheric abundances and their related uncertainties. A theoretical analysis of the EMD(T) degeneracy problem is also presented. We find excess emission during flares originates predominantly from temperatures of kT>2 keV, while the low-T emission is very close to quiescence. This result cannot be reconciled with pure radiative-cooling or simple conductive-cooling. Evaporation from low dense regions into higher, thinner corona may aid in explaining this observed behavior. We define a relative measure for the FIP bias and compare the FIP bias of flare vs. quiescence with that of quiescence vs. photospheric (solar). We discovered a general trend where the relative FIP bias during flares is opposite to the quiescence FIP bias, meaning that the flares tend to

  4. GOODS-HERSCHEL: IMPACT OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY ON INFRARED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, Allison; Pope, Alexandra; Alexander, David M.; Charmandaris, Vassilis; Daddi, Emmanuele; Elbaz, David; Gabor, Jared; Mullaney, James; Pannella, Maurilio; Aussel, Herve; Bournaud, Frederic; Dasyra, Kalliopi; Hwang, Ho Seong; Ivison, Rob; Scott, Douglas; Altieri, Bruno; Coia, Daniela; Buat, Veronique; Dannerbauer, Helmut; and others

    2012-11-10

    We explore the effects of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and star formation activity on the infrared (0.3-1000 {mu}m) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of luminous infrared galaxies from z = 0.5 to 4.0. We have compiled a large sample of 151 galaxies selected at 24 {mu}m (S {sub 24} {approx}> 100 {mu}Jy) in the GOODS-N and ECDFS fields for which we have deep Spitzer IRS spectroscopy, allowing us to decompose the mid-IR spectrum into contributions from star formation and AGN activity. A significant portion ({approx}25%) of our sample is dominated by an AGN (>50% of the mid-IR luminosity) in the mid-IR. Based on the mid-IR classification, we divide our full sample into four sub-samples: z {approx} 1 star-forming (SF) sources, z {approx} 2 SF sources, AGNs with clear 9.7 {mu}m silicate absorption, and AGNs with featureless mid-IR spectra. From our large spectroscopic sample and wealth of multi-wavelength data, including deep Herschel imaging at 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m, we use 95 galaxies with complete spectral coverage to create a composite SED for each sub-sample. We then fit a two-temperature component modified blackbody to the SEDs. We find that the IR SEDs have similar cold dust temperatures, regardless of the mid-IR power source, but display a marked difference in the warmer dust temperatures. We calculate the average effective temperature of the dust in each sub-sample and find a significant ({approx}20 K) difference between the SF and AGN systems. We compare our composite SEDs to local templates and find that local templates do not accurately reproduce the mid-IR features and dust temperatures of our high-redshift systems. High-redshift IR luminous galaxies contain significantly more cool dust than their local counterparts. We find that a full suite of photometry spanning the IR peak is necessary to accurately account for the dominant dust temperature components in high-redshift IR luminous galaxies.

  5. Hormonal activation of a kinase cascade localized at the mitochondria is required for StAR protein activity.

    PubMed

    Poderoso, Cecilia; Maloberti, Paula; Duarte, Alejandra; Neuman, Isabel; Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2009-03-01

    It is known that ERK1/2 and MEK1/2 participate in the regulation of Star gene transcription. However, their role in StAR protein post-transcriptional regulation is not described yet. In this study we analyzed the relationship between the MAPK cascade and StAR protein phosphorylation and function. We have demonstrated that (a) steroidogenesis in MA-10 Leydig cells depends on the specific of ERK1/2 activation at the mitochondria; (b) ERK1/2 phosphorylation is driven by mitochondrial PKA and constitutive MEK1/2 in this organelle; (c) active ERK1/2 interacts with StAR protein, leads to StAR protein phosphorylation at Ser(232) only in the presence of cholesterol; (d) directed mutagenesis of Ser(232) (S232A) inhibited in vitro StAR protein phosphorylation by ERK1; (e) transient transfection of MA-10 cells with StAR S232A cDNA markedly reduced the yield of progesterone production. We show that StAR protein is a substrate of ERK1/2, and that mitochondrial ERK1/2 is part of a multimeric complex that regulates cholesterol transport.

  6. Creating active environments across the life course: "thinking outside the square".

    PubMed

    Giles-Corti, B; King, A C

    2009-02-01

    The built environment and physical activity agenda provides a unique opportunity for public health, physical activity and planning researchers to be front and centre of a movement aimed at creating healthier and more sustainable environments. However, in order to optimise environments that encourage physical activity across the life course, researchers in this field need to think beyond their "square" -that is, the target group, setting and physical activity behaviour with which they work. We suggest that researchers working in this field need a better understanding of systems theory to appreciate that a change to one part of a complex system can positively and negatively influence other parts of the system. An understanding of systems theory would help minimise unintended negative consequences to other population subgroups or to other types of physical activity from the implementation of our research findings. In this way, a more comprehensive set of research, practice and programme-related activities may emerge, which will advance physical activity research and practice, and improve population health across the life course.

  7. Photometric Variations in Spotted Pleiades Stars as Probes of Long-Term Activity Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardenett, E.; Milingo, J. B.; Marschall, L. A.; Backman, D. E.

    2004-12-01

    Through the collaborative efforts of undergraduates and faculty at Franklin & Marshall and Gettysburg Colleges, we present new photometric data for 3 K-type stars in the Pleiades. Continuing 8+ years of observations, this data contributes to the long-term study of photometric variations in these stars. These young stars have rotational light curves with V-band amplitudes of a few percent (up to 10% in the most active stars) due to large photospheric active regions or "starspots". Quantifying the level of starspot activity from year to year allows us to look for long-term trends analogous to the solar sunspot cycle. These observations were acquired with the National Undergraduate Research Observatory's (NURO) 31" telescope, which is operated by Lowell Observatory and Northern Arizona University. This work is supported by Franklin & Marshall College, the Delaware Space Grant Consortium, and Arizona Space Grant (NASA Space Grant programs).

  8. Variable X-Ray and UV emission from AGB stars: Accretion activity associated with binarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Sanz-Forcada, Jorge; Sánchez Contreras, Carmen

    2016-07-01

    Almost all of our current understanding of the late evolutionary stages of (1 — 8) Mʘ stars is based on single-star models. However, binarity can drastically affect late stellar evolution, producing dramatic changes in the history and geometry of mass loss that occurs in stars as they evolve off the AGB to become planetary nebulae (PNe). A variety of binary models have been proposed, which can lead to the generation of accretion disks and magnetic fields, which in turn produce the highly collimated jets that have been proposed as the primary agents for the formation of bipolar and multipolar PNe. However, observational evidence of binarity in AGB stars is sorely lacking simply these stars are very luminous and variable, invalidating standard techniques for binary detection. Using an innovative technique of searching for UV emission from AGB stars with GALEX, we have identified a class of AGB stars with far- ultraviolet excesses (fuvAGB stars), that are likely candidates for active accretion associated with a binary companion. We have carried out a pilot survey for X-ray emission from fuvAGB stars. The X-ray fluxes are found to vary in a stochastic or quasi-periodic manner on roughly hour-long times-scales, and simultaneous UV observations show similar variations in the UV fluxes. We discuss several models for the X-ray emission and its variability and find that the most likely scenario for the origin of the X-ray (and FUV) emission involves accretion activity around a main-sequence companion star, with confinement by strong magnetic fields associated with the companion and/or an accretion disk around it.

  9. Creating an active-learning environment in an introductory acoustics course.

    PubMed

    Neilsen, Tracianne B; Strong, William J; Anderson, Brian E; Gee, Kent L; Sommerfeldt, Scott D; Leishman, Timothy W

    2012-03-01

    Research in physics education has indicated that the traditional lecture-style class is not the most efficient way to teach introductory physical science courses at the university level. Current best teaching practices focus on creating an active-learning environment and emphasize the students' role in the learning process. Several of the recommended techniques have recently been applied to Brigham Young University's introductory acoustics course, which has been taught for more than 40 years. Adjustments have been built on a foundation of establishing student-based learning outcomes and attempting to align these objectives with assessments and course activities. Improvements have been made to nearly every aspect of the course including use of class time, assessment materials, and time the students spend out of the classroom. A description of the progress made in improving the course offers suggestions for those seeking to modernize or create a similar course at their institution. In addition, many of the principles can be similarly applied to acoustics education at other academic levels.

  10. Chromospherically Active Stars in the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) Survey. I. The Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žerjal, M.; Zwitter, T.; Matijevič, G.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Bienaymé, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Freeman, K. C.; Grebel, E. K.; Kordopatis, G.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Wyse, R. F. G.

    2013-10-01

    RAVE, the unbiased magnitude limited survey of southern sky stars, contained 456,676 medium-resolution spectra at the time of our analysis. Spectra cover the Ca II infrared triplet (IRT) range, which is a known indicator of chromospheric activity. Our previous work classified all spectra using locally linear embedding. It identified 53,347 cases with a suggested emission component in calcium lines. Here, we use a spectral subtraction technique to measure the properties of this emission. Synthetic templates are replaced by the observed spectra of non-active stars to bypass the difficult computations of non-local thermal equilibrium profiles of the line cores and stellar parameter dependence. We derive both the equivalent width of the excess emission for each calcium line on a 5 Å wide interval and their sum EWIRT for ~44,000 candidate active dwarf stars with signal-to-noise ratio >20, with no cuts on the basis of the source of their emission flux. From these, ~14,000 show a detectable chromospheric flux with at least a 2σ confidence level. Our set of active stars vastly enlarges previously known samples. Atmospheric parameters and, in some cases, radial velocities of active stars derived from automatic pipelines suffer from systematic shifts due to their shallower calcium lines. We re-estimate the effective temperature, metallicity, and radial velocities for candidate active stars. The overall distribution of activity levels shows a bimodal shape, with the first peak coinciding with non-active stars and the second with the pre-main-sequence cases. The catalog will be made publicly available with the next RAVE public data releases.

  11. Intelligent error correction method applied on an active pixel sensor based star tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Uwe

    2005-10-01

    Star trackers are opto-electronic sensors used on-board of satellites for the autonomous inertial attitude determination. During the last years star trackers became more and more important in the field of the attitude and orbit control system (AOCS) sensors. High performance star trackers are based up today on charge coupled device (CCD) optical camera heads. The active pixel sensor (APS) technology, introduced in the early 90-ties, allows now the beneficial replacement of CCD detectors by APS detectors with respect to performance, reliability, power, mass and cost. The company's heritage in star tracker design started in the early 80-ties with the launch of the worldwide first fully autonomous star tracker system ASTRO1 to the Russian MIR space station. Jena-Optronik recently developed an active pixel sensor based autonomous star tracker "ASTRO APS" as successor of the CCD based star tracker product series ASTRO1, ASTRO5, ASTRO10 and ASTRO15. Key features of the APS detector technology are, a true xy-address random access, the multiple windowing read out and the on-chip signal processing including the analogue to digital conversion. These features can be used for robust star tracking at high slew rates and under worse conditions like stray light and solar flare induced single event upsets. A special algorithm have been developed to manage the typical APS detector error contributors like fixed pattern noise (FPN), dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU) and white spots. The algorithm works fully autonomous and adapts to e.g. increasing DSNU and up-coming white spots automatically without ground maintenance or re-calibration. In contrast to conventional correction methods the described algorithm does not need calibration data memory like full image sized calibration data sets. The application of the presented algorithm managing the typical APS detector error contributors is a key element for the design of star trackers for long term satellite applications like

  12. Magnetic Activity of Pre-main Sequence Stars near the Stellar-Substellar Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Principe, David; Kastner, Joel. H.; Rodriguez, David

    2016-01-01

    X-ray observations of pre-main sequence (pre-MS) stars of M-type probe coronal emission and offer a means to investigate magnetic activity at the stellar-substellar boundary. Recent observations of main sequence (MS) stars at this boundary display a decrease in fractional X-ray luminosity (L X /L bol ) by almost two orders of magnitude for spectral types M7 and later. We investigate magnetic activity and search for a decrease in X-ray emission in the pre-MS progenitors of these MS stars. We present XMM-Newton X-ray observations and preliminary results for ~10 nearby (30-70 pc), very low mass pre-MS stars in the relatively unexplored age range of 10-30 Myr. We compare the fractional X-ray luminosities of these 10-30 Myr old stars to younger (1-3 Myr) pre-MS brown dwarfs and find no dependence on spectral type or age suggesting that X-ray activity declines at an age later than ~30 Myr in these very low-mass stars.

  13. Building inhabitant feedback: Creating a reflective practice for environmental design using activity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Dara Suzanne

    The way buildings are designed now, there is little feedback from use involved in the design process. Attempts to correct this problem have been made in the form of Post Occupancy Evaluations (POEs) for 50-years but have largely failed. POEs are the accepted method for environmental designers to collect feedback about buildings in use. They are infrequently conducted, after the building is built, in a one-time only evaluation, and not funded as part of the build process. Other products receive feedback about the design in use from online critiques. Online critiques could provide a platform for feedback from actors engaged with buildings in use for environmental designers to utilize in developing reflective design rationale to avoid adverse consequences in future designs or correct consequences in past and current designs. Since buildings constitute such a large part of the human environment, it's important to research the effects of buildings on their inhabitants. In order for environmental designers to act on feedback from situated use, designers need to have access to that feedback and all actors interacting with the building design need to have an easy, inexpensive, and accessible method to submit feedback. These needs can be addressed by utilizing modern networked and mobile computing to collect and access building feedback. The analysis presented in this dissertation is informed by a thorough evaluation of the theory of reflective practice, activity theory, environmental design, and cognitive science research. From this analysis, I developed the following contributions. First, I expanded Schon's reflective practice by combining his theory with a modified version of activity theory, using activity theory to enrich reflective practice and create Reflective Activity Systems Theory (RAST), which provides a new framework to develop design rationale based on feedback from use and a focus on the activity. Second, I suggest the design of an activity information system

  14. A SUBSTANTIAL DUST DISK SURROUNDING AN ACTIVELY ACCRETING FIRST-ASCENT GIANT STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Melis, C.; Zuckerman, B.; Rhee, Joseph H.; Metchev, Stanimir; Song, Inseok

    2009-05-10

    We report identification of the first unambiguous example of what appears to be a new class of first-ascent giant stars that are actively accreting gas and dust and that are surrounded by substantial dusty disks. These old stars, who are nearing the end of their lives, are experiencing a rebirth into characteristics typically associated with newborn stars. The F2-type first-ascent giant star TYC 4144 329 2 is in a wide separation binary system with an otherwise normal G8 IV star, TYC 4144 329 1. From Keck near-infrared imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy, we are able to determine that these two stars are {approx}1 Gyr old and reside at a distance of {approx}550 pc. One possible explanation for the origin of the accreting material is common-envelope interaction with a low-mass stellar or substellar companion. The gaseous and dusty material around TYC 4144 329 2, as it is similar to the primordial disks observed around young classical T Tauri stars, could potentially give rise to a new generation of planets and/or planetesimals.

  15. Upgrading the Solar-Stellar Connection: News about activity in Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunther, H. M.; Poppenhaeger, K.; Testa, P.; Borgniet, S.; Brun, A. S.; Cegla, H. M.; Garraffo, C.; Kowalski, A.; Shapiro, A.; Shkolnik, E.; Spada, F.; Vidotto, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    In this splinter session, ten speakers presented results on solar and stellar activity and how the two fields are connected. This was followed by a lively discussion and supplemented by short, one-minute highlight talks. The talks presented new theoretical and observational results on mass accretion on the Sun, the activity rate of flare stars, the evolution of the stellar magnetic field on time scales of a single cycle and over the lifetime of a star, and two different approaches to model the radial-velocity jitter in cool stars that is due to the granulation on the surface. Talks and discussion showed how much the interpretation of stellar activity data relies on the sun and how the large number of objects available in stellar studies can extend the parameter range of activity models.

  16. Red Dwarf Stars: Ages, Rotation, Magnetic Dynamo Activity and the Habitability of Hosted Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, S. G.; Guinan, E. F.

    2011-12-01

    We report on our continued efforts to understand and delineate the magnetic dynamo-induced behavior/variability of red dwarf (K5 V - M6 V) stars over their long lifetimes. These properties include: rotation, light variations (from star spots), coronal-chromospheric XUV activity and flares. This study is being carried out as part of the NSF-sponsored Living with a Red Dwarf program. The Living with a Red Dwarf program's database of dM stars with photometrically determined rotation rates (from starspot modulations) continues to expand, as does the inventory of archival XUV observations. Recently, the photometric properties of several hundred dM stars from the Kepler database are being analyzed to determine the rotation rates, starspot areal coverage/distributions and stellar flare rates. When all data setsare combined with ages from cluster/population memberships and kinematics, the determination of Age-Rotation-Activity relationships is possible. Such relationships have broad impacts not only on the studies of magnetic dynamo theory and angular momentum loss of low-mass stars with deep convective zones, but also on the suitability of planets hosted by red dwarfs to support life. With intrinsically low luminosities (L< 0.02L⊙), the liquid water habitable zones (HZs) for hosted planets are very close to their host stars - typically at ˜0.1 AU < HZ < 0.4 AU. Planets located close to their host stars risk damage and atmospheric loss from coronal & chromospheric XUV radiation, flares and plasma blasts via strong winds and coronal mass ejections. In addition, our relationships permit the stellar ages to be determined through measures of either the stars' rotation periods (best way) or XUV activity levels. This also permits a determination of the ages of their hosted planets. We illustrate this with examples of age determinations of the exoplanet systems: GJ 581 and HD 85512 (both with large Earth-size planets within the host star's HZ), GJ 1214 (hot, close

  17. Radial velocity measurements of the chromospherically-active stars (2): HD 28591 = V492 Per

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dadonas, V.; Sperauskas, J.; Fekel, F. C.; Morton, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    From two sets of the spectroscopic observations covering a ten year period we have obtained 59 radial velocities of the chromospherically-active star HD 28591 = V492 Per. It is a G9III single-lined spectroscopic binary with a period of 21.2910 days and a circular orbit. The upsilon sin i of 24.6 km/sec, results in a minimum radius 10.3 solar radii. We estimate a distance of 165 +/- 40 pc and an orbital inclination of 65 +/- 25 degrees. The secondary is probably a mid to late-type K dwarf. The star is brighter than the limiting magnitude of the Bright Star Catalogue. The mean photometric and the orbital periods are identical within their uncertainties. Since the star fills a significant fraction of its Roche lobe, about 62%, the photometric light curve may be the result of starspots and a modest ellipticity effect.

  18. The Evolution of Cyclic Activity of the Sun in the Context of Physical Processes on Late-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsova, Maria M.

    Features of the solar cycle in the context of stellar activity are investigated. We discovered reliably differential rotation in chromospheres of some stars and presented the first stellar butterfly diagrams. These stars possess less regular variability and do not demonstrate excellent cycles. This is the first evidence for differences of the solar activity from processes on stars with Excellent cycles. We compare indices of the chromospheric activity of the Sun with that for above 1,300 northern and southern stars whose activity revealed during planet search programs. We argue the matter pro and con for two possible ways of an evolution of activity from a contraction phase to 10Gyrs. When a young star brakes down, the chromospheric and the coronal activity weaken synchronously. The solar-like activity of the most main sequence F and early G stars does evolve by this path. The activity of the later stars from G5 to K7 after a definite level evolves by another way: the chromospheric activity diminishes up to the solar level, while coronae stay stronger than the solar one. Two possible paths of the evolution of activity are associated with the different depth of the convective zone of these stars. Physically this means that the relative input of small- and large-scale of magnetic fields differs for F-G and K stars.

  19. Characterizing Warm Molecular Hydrogen in Active Star-Forming Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangwala, Naseem

    2014-10-01

    Herschel observations of nearby star-forming galaxies have determined that the warm component of the molecular gas traced by the high-J CO lines dominates the luminosity (~90% of the total CO luminosity) and hence the energetics of the molecular ISM. At the temperatures (T = 300 - 2000 K) and densities (n_H < 1E6 per cubic cm) typically found in our survey, H2 emission is the dominant gas coolant, much more important than CO. A fundamental assumption of all analyses of CO emission has been that CO emission traces H2 over the entire range of physical conditions in the observed sources. However, a direct observational comparison of spatial distributions and kinematics of CO and H2 has never been made for the warm molecular gas. We propose to observe the warm H2, in S(1) and S(2) transitions, with the SOFIA-EXES instrument in a diverse sample of star-forming systems: NGC 253 (starburst nucleus), NGC 6240 (luminous infrared galaxy), NGC 1068 (Seyfert-2), and SgrB2(M)/(N) (Galactic hot cores). The primary goal is to compare these measurements with the warm CO (J = 6-5 transition) observed with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to investigate differences in the kinematics and spatial distributions (for the extended targets) of the two molecules and thereby confirm whether CO is a reliable tracer of H2 in the warm gas.

  20. Ultraviolet and X-ray Activity and Flaring on Low-Mass Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Kevin; Parke Loyd, R. O.; Brown, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. High-energy photons (X-ray to NUV) from these stars regulate the atmospheric temperature profiles and photochemistry on orbiting planets, influencing the production of potential “biomarker” gases. We present results from the MUSCLES Treasury Survey, an ongoing study of time-resolved UV and X-ray spectroscopy of nearby M and K dwarf exoplanet host stars. This program uses contemporaneous Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra (or XMM) observations to characterize the time variability of the energetic radiation field incident on the habitable zones planetary systems at d < 15 pc. We find that all exoplanet host stars observed to date exhibit significant levels of chromospheric and transition region UV emission. M dwarf exoplanet host stars display 30 - 2000% UV emission line amplitude variations on timescales of minutes-to-hours. The relative flare/quiescent UV flux amplitudes on old (age > 1 Gyr) planet-hosting M dwarfs are comparable to active flare stars (e.g., AD Leo), despite their lack of flare activity at visible wavelengths. We also detect similar UV flare behavior on a subset of our K dwarf exoplanet host stars. We conclude that strong flares and stochastic variability are common, even on “optically inactive” M dwarfs hosting planetary systems. These results argue that the traditional assumption of weak UV fields and low flare rates on older low-mass stars needs to be revised.

  1. Exploring the Connection Between Star Formation and AGN Activity in the Local Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Heckman. T. M.; Ptak, Andrew; Schiminovich, D.; O'Dowd, M.; Bertincourt, B.

    2012-01-01

    We study a combined sample of 264 star-forming, 51 composite, and 73 active galaxies using optical spectra from SDSS and mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectra from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. We examine optical and mid-IR spectroscopic diagnostics that probe the amount of star formation and relative energetic con- tributions from star formation and an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Overall we find good agreement between optical and mid-IR diagnostics. Misclassifications of galaxies based on the SDSS spectra are rare despite the presence of dust obscuration. The luminosity of the [NeII] 12.8 micron emission-line is well correlated with the star formation rate (SFR) measured from the SDSS spectra, and this holds for the star forming, composite, and AGN-dominated systems. AGN show a clear excess of [NeIII] 15.6 micron emission relative to star forming and composite systems. We find good qualitative agreement between various parameters that probe the relative contributions of the AGN and star formation, including: the mid-IR spectral slope, the ratio of the [NeV] 14.3 micron to [NeII] micron 12.8 fluxes, the equivalent widths of the 7.7, 11.3, and 17 micron PAH features, and the optical "D" parameter which measures the distance a source lies from the locus of star forming galaxies in the optical BPT emission-line diagnostic diagram. We also consider the behavior of the three individual PAH features by examining how their flux ratios depend upon the degree of AGN-dominance. We find that the PAH 11.3 micron feature is significantly suppressed in the most AGN-dominated systems.

  2. Schools and Obesity Prevention: Creating School Environments and Policies to Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Story, Mary; Nanney, Marilyn S; Schwartz, Marlene B

    2009-01-01

    Context: Research consistently shows that the majority of American children do not consume diets that meet the recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, nor do they achieve adequate levels of daily physical activity. As a result, more children are overweight today than at any other time in U.S. history. Schools offer many opportunities to develop strategies to prevent obesity by creating environments in which children eat healthfully and engage regularly in physical activity. Methods: This article discusses the role of schools in obesity prevention efforts. Current issues in schools' food and physical activity environments are examined, as well as federal, state, and local policies related to food and physical activity standards in schools. The article is organized around four key areas: (1) school food environments and policies, (2) school physical activity environments and policies, (3) school body mass index measurements, and (4) school wellness policies. Recommendations for accelerating change also are addressed. Findings: The article found that (1) competitive foods (foods sold outside of federally reimbursed school meals) are widely available in schools, especially secondary schools. Studies have related the availability of snacks and drinks sold in schools to students' high intake of total calories, soft drinks, total fat and saturated fat, and lower intake of fruits and vegetables; (2) physical activity can be added to the school curriculum without academic consequences and also can offer physical, emotional, and social benefits. Policy leadership has come predominantly from the districts, then the states, and, to a much lesser extent, the federal government; (3) few studies have examined the effectiveness or impact of school-based BMI measurement programs; and (4) early comparative analyses of local school wellness policies suggest that the strongest policies are found in larger school districts and districts with a greater number of

  3. The onset of chromospheric activity among the A- and F- type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Theodore; Landsman, Wayne

    1987-01-01

    IUE observations of C II lambda1335 and C IV lambda1549 and ground-based observations of He I lambda5876 have previously discovered intense levels of chromospheric activity among early F type stars. Virtually all F dwarfs show stronger chromospheric and transition region emission than do the cooler and more deeply convective dwarf stars like the Sun. The IUE spectra and those of He lambda5876 place the onset of stellar activity along the main sequence near a color B - V = 0.28, which corresponds approximately to spectral type FO and an effective temperature of 7300 K. However, existing X-ray observations of A and F stars suggest that coronal activity may reach a peak blueward of this high temperature boundary at B - V = 0.28 before vanishing among the early and mid A-type stars. Discussed are preliminary results of a new effort to refine the location of the high temperature boundary to chromospheric activity among A- and F- type stars, making use of low dispersion short-wavelength spectra from the IUE archives from which the strengths of C IV, C II, and Lyman alpha emission have been measured.

  4. Observations of the Ca II infrared triplet in chromospherically active single and binary stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Robert C.; Bopp, Bernard W.; Henry, Gregory W.; Hall, Douglas S.

    1993-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of the Ca II infrared triplet (8498, 8542, 8662 A) have been obtained for 45 stars which are known or suspected to be chromospherically active. The sample includes both single and binary stars of spectral types from F2 to M5 spanning luminosity classes III, IV, and V. Several different types of activity diagnostics were measured, and their relative merits are discussed. Dependence of chromospheric emission upon rotation period, luminosity, temperature, and duplicity are analyzed. Synchronous binaries show a slight trend of increased emission with decreasing period while the asynchronous binaries show abnormally high activity levels for their rotation periods. Several stars exhibit rotationally modulated emission which is anticorrelated with the stellar brightness. Finally, estimates of chromospheric energy losses are presented with the result that the total loss in the infrared triplet is about twice that of the H and K lines.

  5. Examining How Activity Shapes Students' Interactions While Creating Representations in Early Elementary Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danish, Joshua Adam; Saleh, Asmalina

    2014-09-01

    It is common practice in elementary science classrooms to have students create representations, such as drawings, as a way of exploring new content. While numerous studies suggest the benefits of representation in science, the majority focus on specific, canonical representations, such as graphs. Few offer insight or guidance regarding how teachers might effectively incorporate ad hoc, non-normative student-generated representations in their curricula. This study addresses this gap by detailing the relationship between two designed activities-one that supported more open-ended engagement with referents and the other that promoted a synthesis of referents-and the representational products that students generated as a result. We present data from a mixed age classroom (ages 6-9, N = 32) as students depicted their understanding of loggerhead sea turtles. Findings indicate that students performed better when working alone in the open condition and in collaborative dyads in the synthesize condition. These results suggest that it is necessary to unpack how mediating factors (such as students' cooperative strategies, facilitator feedback and materials used) align, to support or inhibit students' representational activities.

  6. Dissecting galaxies: spatial and spectral separation of emission excited by star formation and AGN activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Rebecca L.; Groves, Brent; Kewley, Lisa J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Hampton, Elise J.; Shastri, Prajval; Scharwächter, Julia; Sutherland, Ralph; Kharb, Preeti; Bhatt, Harish; Jin, Chichuan; Banfield, Julie; Zaw, Ingyin; James, Bethan; Juneau, Stéphanie; Srivastava, Shweta

    2016-10-01

    The optical spectra of Seyfert galaxies are often dominated by emission lines excited by both star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity. Standard calibrations (such as for the star formation rate) are not applicable to such composite (mixed) spectra. In this paper, we describe how integral field data can be used to spectrally and spatially separate emission associated with star formation from emission associated with accretion on to an AGN. We demonstrate our method using integral field data for two AGN host galaxies (NGC 5728 and NGC 7679) from the Siding Spring Southern Seyfert Spectroscopic Snapshot Survey (S7). The spectra of NGC 5728 and NGC 7679 form clear sequences of AGN fraction on standard emission line ratio diagnostic diagrams. We show that the emission line luminosities of the majority (>85 per cent) of spectra along each AGN fraction sequence can be reproduced by linear superpositions of the emission line luminosities of one AGN dominated spectrum and one star formation dominated spectrum. We separate the Hα, Hβ, [N II]λ6583, [S II]λλ6716, 6731, [O III]λ5007 and [O II]λλ3726, 3729 luminosities of every spaxel into contributions from star formation and AGN activity. The decomposed emission line images are used to derive the star formation rates and AGN bolometric luminosities for NGC 5728 and NGC 7679. Our calculated values are mostly consistent with independent estimates from data at other wavelengths. The recovered star-forming and AGN components also have distinct spatial distributions which trace structures seen in high-resolution imaging of the galaxies, providing independent confirmation that our decomposition has been successful.

  7. Disentangling star formation and AGN activity in powerful infrared luminous radio galaxies at 1 < z < 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouart, G.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.; De Breuck, C.; Fioc, M.; Lehnert, M.; Seymour, N.; Stern, D.; Vernet, J.

    2016-09-01

    High-redshift radio galaxies present signs of both star formation and AGN activity, making them ideal candidates to investigate the connection and coevolution of AGN and star formation in the progenitors of present-day massive galaxies. We make use of a sample of 11 powerful radio galaxies spanning 1 star formation by combining the galaxy evolution code PÉGASE.3 with an AGN torus model. We find that three components are necessary to reproduce the observed SEDs: an evolved and massive stellar component, a submm bright young starburst, and an AGN torus. We find that powerful radio galaxies form at very high-redshift, but experience episodic and important growth at 1 star formation differ from source to source, indicating no general trend of the star formation properties in the most infrared luminous high-redshift radio galaxies and no correlation with the AGN bolometric luminosity. Moreover, we find that AGN scattered light have a very limited impact on broad-band SED fitting on our sample. Finally, our analysis also suggests a wide range in origins for the observed star formation,which we partially constrain for some sources.

  8. Chromospherically active stars. II - HD 82558, a young single BY Draconis variable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Bopp, Bernard W.; Africano, John L.; Goodrich, Bret D.; Palmer, Leigh Hunter

    1986-01-01

    It is presently noted that the HD 82558 chromospherically active star is a young and rapidly rotating K2 V single BY Draconis variable with very strong far-UV emission features and an H-alpha line filled to the continuum level by emission. HD 82558 has constant velocity and is not a member of the Hyades Supercluster. Its light curve behavior, which appears to have been stable for several hundred rotation cycles, is reminiscent of that of the young, rapidly rotating, single K V variable H II 1883 in the Pleiades; this stability may be characteristic of young, single, chromospherically active stars.

  9. A Cluster Of Activities On Coma From The Hubble Space Telescope, StarDate, And McDonald Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Mary Kay; Jogee, S.; Fricke, K.; Preston, S.

    2011-01-01

    With a goal of providing a vast audience of students, teachers, the general public, and Spanish-speakers with activities to learn about research on the Coma cluster of galaxies based on the HST ACS Treasury survey of Coma, McDonald Observatory used a many-faceted approach. Since this research offered an unprecedented legacy dataset, part of the challenge was to convey the importance of this project to a diverse audience. The methodology was to create different products for different (overlapping) audiences. Five radio programs were produced in English and Spanish for distribution on over 500 radio stations in the US and Mexico with a listening audience of over 2 million; in addition to the radio listeners, there were over 13,000 downloads of the English scripts and almost 6000 of the Spanish. Images were prepared for use in the StarDate Online Astronomy Picture of the Week, for ViewSpace (used in museums), and for the StarDate/Universo Teacher Guide. A high-school level activity on the Coma Cluster was prepared and distributed both on-line and in an upgraded printed version of the StarDate/Universo Teacher Guide. This guide has been distributed to over 1700 teachers nationally. A YouTube video about careers and research in astronomy using the Coma cluster as an example was produced. Just as the activities were varied, so were the evaluation methods. This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant/Contract/Agreement No. HST-EO-10861.35-A issued through the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  10. Magnetic cycles of Sun-like stars with different levels of coronal and chromospheric activity — comparison with the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimanovskaya, Elena; Bruevich, Vasiliy; Bruevich, Elena

    2016-09-01

    The atmospheric activity of the Sun and Sun-like stars is analyzed involving observations from the HK-project at the Mount Wilson Observatory, the California and Carnegie Planet Search Program at the Keck and Lick Observatories and the Magellan Planet Search Program at the Las Campanas Observatory. We show that for stars of F, G and K spectral classes, the cyclic activity, similar to the 11-yr solar cycle, is different: it becomes more prominent in K-stars. Comparative study of Sun-like stars with different levels of chromospheric and coronal activity confirms that the Sun belongs to stars with a low level of chromospheric activity and stands apart among these stars by its minimum level of coronal radiation and minimum level of variations in photospheric flux.

  11. Creating Tribes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robyn, Elisa

    2000-01-01

    Suggests the use of the "tribal" metaphor to foster team building and collaborative learning in college classes. Offers examples of how linking students in the classroom in tribes builds identification and interdependence through such activities as creating a group myth and participating in membership rituals. The tribal metaphor has also led to…

  12. The Life Cycles of Stars: An Information and Activity Booklet, Grades 9-12, 1997-1998. Imagine the Universe! Probing the Structure & Evaluation of the Cosmos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitlock, Laura A.; Granger, Kara C.

    This booklet contains information and activities on the life cycle of stars. Materials can be adapted for grade 9 through grade 12 classrooms. Background information about star birth and life, black dwarfs, supernovae, white dwarfs, neutron stars, black holes, and the electromagnetic spectrum is included. The seven activities focus on star mass,…

  13. CHROMOSPHERIC ACTIVITY OF SOUTHERN STARS FROM THE MAGELLAN PLANET SEARCH PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Arriagada, Pamela

    2011-06-10

    I present chromospheric-activity measurements of {approx}670 F, G, K, and M main-sequence stars in the Southern Hemisphere, from {approx}8000 archival high-resolution echelle spectra taken at Las Campanas Observatory since 2004. These stars were targets from the Old Magellan Planet Search, and are now potential targets for the New Magellan Planet Search that will look for rocky and habitable planets. Activity indices (S values) are derived from Ca II H and K line cores and then converted to the Mount Wilson system. From these measurements, chromospheric (log R'{sub HK}) indices are derived, which are then used as indicators of the level of radial-velocity jitter, age, and rotation periods these stars present.

  14. A CO LINE AND INFRARED CONTINUUM STUDY OF THE ACTIVE STAR-FORMING COMPLEX W51

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Miju; Lee, Youngung; Choi, Minho; Bieging, John H.; Kulesa, Craig A.; Peters, William L.

    2010-09-15

    We present the results of an extensive observational study of the active star-forming complex W51 that was observed in the J = 2 - 1 transition of the {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO molecules over a 1.{sup 0}25 x 1.{sup 0}00 region with the University of Arizona Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope. We use a statistical equilibrium code to estimate physical properties of the molecular gas. We compare the molecular cloud morphology with the distribution of infrared (IR) and radio continuum sources and find associations between molecular clouds and young stellar objects (YSOs) listed in Spitzer IR catalogs. The ratios of CO lines associated with H II regions are different from the ratios outside the active star-forming regions. We present evidence of star formation triggered by the expansion of the H II regions and by cloud-cloud collisions. We estimate that about 1% of the cloud mass is currently in YSOs.

  15. A CO Line and Infrared Continuum Study of the Active Star-forming Complex W51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Miju; Bieging, John H.; Kulesa, Craig A.; Lee, Youngung; Choi, Minho; Peters, William L.

    2010-09-01

    We present the results of an extensive observational study of the active star-forming complex W51 that was observed in the J = 2 - 1 transition of the 12CO and 13CO molecules over a 1fdg25 × 1fdg00 region with the University of Arizona Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope. We use a statistical equilibrium code to estimate physical properties of the molecular gas. We compare the molecular cloud morphology with the distribution of infrared (IR) and radio continuum sources and find associations between molecular clouds and young stellar objects (YSOs) listed in Spitzer IR catalogs. The ratios of CO lines associated with H II regions are different from the ratios outside the active star-forming regions. We present evidence of star formation triggered by the expansion of the H II regions and by cloud-cloud collisions. We estimate that about 1% of the cloud mass is currently in YSOs.

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF OTHER GALAXY PROPERTIES FOR THE SAME STAR FORMATION ACTIVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa; Bei Yang; He Jizhou; Tang Xiaoxun

    2010-01-01

    Using two volume-limited Main galaxy samples of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 above and below the value of M*, we have investigated the environmental dependence of other galaxy properties for the same star formation activities. Only in the luminous passive class, a strong environmental dependence of the g - r color is observed, but the environmental dependence of other properties in this class is very weak. In other classes, we can conclude that the local density dependence of luminosity, g - r color, concentration index ci, and morphologies for star-forming galaxies and passive ones is much weaker than that obtained in the volume-limited Main galaxy samples. This suggests that star formation activity is a galaxy property very predictive of the local environment. In addition, we also note that passive galaxies are more luminous, redder, highly concentrated, and preferentially 'early type'.

  17. Creating a Star: The Science of Fusion--Fusion Power Would Not Contribute to Global Warming, Acid Rain, or Other Forms of Air Pollution, nor Would It Create Long-Lived Radioactive Waste

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Stephen L.

    2005-01-01

    Fusion is the process that powers the sun and the stars. Since the 1950s, scientists and engineers in the United States and around the world have been conducting fusion research in pursuit of the creation of a new energy source for our planet and to further our understanding and control of plasma, the fourth state of matter that dominates the…

  18. Stellar Activity Mimics a Habitable-zone Planet around Kapteyn's Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Paul; Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, Suvrath

    2015-06-01

    Kapteyn’s star is an old M subdwarf believed to be a member of the Galactic halo population of stars. A recent study has claimed the existence of two super-Earth planets around the star based on radial velocity (RV) observations. The innermost of these candidate planets—Kapteyn b (P = 48 days)—resides within the circumstellar habitable zone (HZ). Given recent progress in understanding the impact of stellar activity in detecting planetary signals, we have analyzed the observed HARPS data for signatures of stellar activity. We find that while Kapteyn’s star is photometrically very stable, a suite of spectral activity indices reveal a large-amplitude rotation signal, and we determine the stellar rotation period to be 143 days. The spectral activity tracers are strongly correlated with the purported RV signal of “planet b,” and the 48-day period is an integer fraction (1/3) of the stellar rotation period. We conclude that Kapteyn b is not a planet in the HZ, but an artifact of stellar activity.

  19. FUV Emission from AGB Stars: Modeling Accretion Activity Associated with a Binary Companion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Alyx Catherine; Sahai, Raghvendra

    2012-01-01

    It is widely believed that the late stages of evolution for Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars are influenced by the presence of binary companions. Unfortunately, there is a lack of direct observational evidence of binarity. However, more recently, strong indirect evidence comes from the discovery of UV emission in a subsample of these objects (fuvAGB stars). AGB stars are comparatively cool objects (< or =3000 K), thus their fluxes falls off drastically for wavelengths 3000 Angstroms and shorter. Therefore, ultraviolet observations offer an important, new technique for detecting the binary companions and/or associated accretion activity. We develop new models of UV emission from fuvAGB stars constrained by GALEX photometry and spectroscopy of these objects. We compare the GALEX UV grism spectra of the AGB M7 star EY Hya to predictions using the spectral synthesis code Cloudy, specifically investigating the ultraviolet wavelength range (1344-2831 Angstroms). We investigate models composed of contributions from a photoionized "hot spot" due to accretion activity around the companion, and "chromospheric" emission from collisionally ionized plasma, to fit the UV observations.

  20. A CORRELATION BETWEEN HOST STAR ACTIVITY AND PLANET MASS FOR CLOSE-IN EXTRASOLAR PLANETS?

    SciTech Connect

    Poppenhaeger, K.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2011-07-01

    The activity levels of stars are influenced by several stellar properties, such as stellar rotation, spectral type, and the presence of stellar companions. Analogous to binaries, planetary companions are also thought to be able to cause higher activity levels in their host stars, although at lower levels. Especially in X-rays, such influences are hard to detect because coronae of cool stars exhibit a considerable amount of intrinsic variability. Recently, a correlation between the mass of close-in exoplanets and their host star's X-ray luminosity has been detected, based on archival X-ray data from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. This finding has been interpreted as evidence for star-planet interactions. We show in our analysis that this correlation is caused by selection effects due to the flux limit of the X-ray data used and due to the intrinsic planet detectability of the radial velocity method, and thus does not trace possible planet-induced effects. We also show that the correlation is not present in a corresponding complete sample derived from combined XMM-Newton and ROSAT data.

  1. A connection between star formation activity and cosmic rays in the starburst galaxy M82.

    PubMed

    2009-12-10

    Although Galactic cosmic rays (protons and nuclei) are widely believed to be mainly accelerated by the winds and supernovae of massive stars, definitive evidence of this origin remains elusive nearly a century after their discovery. The active regions of starburst galaxies have exceptionally high rates of star formation, and their large size-more than 50 times the diameter of similar Galactic regions-uniquely enables reliable calorimetric measurements of their potentially high cosmic-ray density. The cosmic rays produced in the formation, life and death of massive stars in these regions are expected to produce diffuse gamma-ray emission through interactions with interstellar gas and radiation. M82, the prototype small starburst galaxy, is predicted to be the brightest starburst galaxy in terms of gamma-ray emission. Here we report the detection of >700-GeV gamma-rays from M82. From these data we determine a cosmic-ray density of 250 eV cm(-3) in the starburst core, which is about 500 times the average Galactic density. This links cosmic-ray acceleration to star formation activity, and suggests that supernovae and massive-star winds are the dominant accelerators.

  2. A connection between star formation activity and cosmic rays in the starburst galaxy M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VERITAS Collaboration; Acciari, V. A.; Aliu, E.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Bautista, M.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Boltuch, D.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Celik, O.; Cesarini, A.; Chow, Y. C.; Ciupik, L.; Cogan, P.; Colin, P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Duke, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Gibbs, K.; Gillanders, G. H.; Godambe, S.; Grube, J.; Guenette, R.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Horan, D.; Hui, C. M.; Humensky, T. B.; Imran, A.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Kildea, J.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Lebohec, S.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; McCutcheon, M.; Millis, J.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nagai, T.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pizlo, F.; Pohl, M.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Rose, H. J.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Smith, A. W.; Steele, D.; Swordy, S. P.; Theiling, M.; Thibadeau, S.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Wagner, R. G.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Williams, D. A.; Wissel, S.; Wood, M.; Zitzer, B.

    2009-12-01

    Although Galactic cosmic rays (protons and nuclei) are widely believed to be mainly accelerated by the winds and supernovae of massive stars, definitive evidence of this origin remains elusive nearly a century after their discovery. The active regions of starburst galaxies have exceptionally high rates of star formation, and their large size-more than 50 times the diameter of similar Galactic regions-uniquely enables reliable calorimetric measurements of their potentially high cosmic-ray density. The cosmic rays produced in the formation, life and death of massive stars in these regions are expected to produce diffuse γ-ray emission through interactions with interstellar gas and radiation. M82, the prototype small starburst galaxy, is predicted to be the brightest starburst galaxy in terms of γ-ray emission. Here we report the detection of >700-GeV γ-rays from M82. From these data we determine a cosmic-ray density of 250eVcm-3 in the starburst core, which is about 500 times the average Galactic density. This links cosmic-ray acceleration to star formation activity, and suggests that supernovae and massive-star winds are the dominant accelerators.

  3. Lithium Abundance in Solar-type Stars with Low Chromospheric Activity: Application to the Search for Maunder Minimum Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, Dan; Tytler, David; Kirkman, David

    2010-06-01

    We use measurements of lithium abundance to examine the evolutionary history of stars frequently believed to be in a Maunder minimum (MM) state due to their low chromospheric activity. In a sample whose main-sequence membership has been verified using Hipparcos parallax data, we find that stars with very low chromospheric activity log R'HK <= -5.0 have substantially depleted lithium compared with the full sample, with half of these lithium abundances lying more than one standard deviation below the sample mean for their range of color index. One interpretation is that these stars are near the end of their main-sequence lifetime, and therefore their low activity does not necessarily signify a transient MM state in a solar-age star. Conversely, using information in published activity time series for some stars, and combined lithium and activity measurements from the Ursa Major moving group and M67, we find limited evidence that a low-activity star having lithium abundance in the normal range for its color index may be a viable MM candidate. Thus, lithium abundance, which can be readily observed or even retrieved from some of the spectroscopic data collected by recent planet-search surveys, may have value for expanding and refining the program star lists for long-term MM searches. Finally, we find that the use of Hipparcos parallax data to ascertain main-sequence membership sharpens the distinction in sample-mean lithium abundance between stars with planet detections and comparison stars.

  4. LITHIUM ABUNDANCE IN SOLAR-TYPE STARS WITH LOW CHROMOSPHERIC ACTIVITY: APPLICATION TO THE SEARCH FOR MAUNDER MINIMUM ANALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Lubin, Dan; Tytler, David; Kirkman, David

    2010-06-10

    We use measurements of lithium abundance to examine the evolutionary history of stars frequently believed to be in a Maunder minimum (MM) state due to their low chromospheric activity. In a sample whose main-sequence membership has been verified using Hipparcos parallax data, we find that stars with very low chromospheric activity log R'{sub HK} {<=} -5.0 have substantially depleted lithium compared with the full sample, with half of these lithium abundances lying more than one standard deviation below the sample mean for their range of color index. One interpretation is that these stars are near the end of their main-sequence lifetime, and therefore their low activity does not necessarily signify a transient MM state in a solar-age star. Conversely, using information in published activity time series for some stars, and combined lithium and activity measurements from the Ursa Major moving group and M67, we find limited evidence that a low-activity star having lithium abundance in the normal range for its color index may be a viable MM candidate. Thus, lithium abundance, which can be readily observed or even retrieved from some of the spectroscopic data collected by recent planet-search surveys, may have value for expanding and refining the program star lists for long-term MM searches. Finally, we find that the use of Hipparcos parallax data to ascertain main-sequence membership sharpens the distinction in sample-mean lithium abundance between stars with planet detections and comparison stars.

  5. Economic Development Activities at the Young - Rainey Science, Technology, & Research (STAR) Center

    SciTech Connect

    Paul S. Sacco; Carl Smeigh; John Caponiti, Jr.

    2008-06-30

    Project mission was to mitigate the adverse economic effects of closing the U.S. Department of Energy's Pinellas Plant in Largo, Florida. This project was to facilitate the physical renovation of the plant and to help maintain and create jobs for the employees that worked at the plant when DOE terminated its operations. It also included finding and attracting high technology, industrial manufacturing and related firms to utilize the space and high tech equipment to remain at the plant. Stakeholders included the affected plant employees, local government and related public organizations, and businesses and universities in the Tampa Bay Florida area. The $17.6 million funded for this project helped produce 2,780 jobs at the Young - Rainey STAR Center at an average cost of $6,328. Rental income from STAR Center tenants and third party cash input amounted to approximately $66 million over the project period of 13.3 years.

  6. The evolution of chromospheric activity in middle-aged Sun-like stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Jason L.

    2016-01-01

    Ages of stars are difficult to infer because stars change very little during the majority of their lifetimes. However, stars are observed to spin down over time due to magnetic braking, which weakens the magnetic dynamo as well. This spin down has led to a new age dating method called gyrochronology, which has been successfully calibrated for Sun-like stars up to 2.5 Gyr, but is still undetermined at older ages and lower masses. The decay of magnetic activity has also been utilized to empirically calibrate an age relationship at ages less than 600 Myr with nearby young star clusters (e.g. Hyades), and pinned down at 4 Gyr with M67, but the relationship is basically unconstrained at intermediate ages and sub-Solar masses. Advances in observational facilities have brought distant clusters into view, while the discovery of Ruprecht 147 has provided a new benchmark that is the oldest nearby cluster (3 Gyr, 300 pc, Curtis et al. 2013), and which provides a bridge across this historic age gap. I will present new, high quality chromospheric activity data for NGC 752 at 1.5 Gyr and Ruprecht 147 at 3 Gyr. The stars of Ruprecht 147 will demonstrate the typical activity level and variability experienced by the Sun at a time when multicellular life first evolved on Earth. I will also re-evaluate the M67 data by considering contamination by the interstellar medium, with implications for the frequency of Maunder Minima. Finally, I will discuss a new opportunity to investigate stellar spin down and variability in low mass KM dwarfs with the K2 Survey of Ruprecht 147, which will have just concluded in late December 2015.

  7. Star Power: Providing for the Gifted & Talented. Module 5. Enrichment Activities for the Gifted/Talented.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallis, Jackie; Gilman, Sharlene

    The document presents Module 5, enrichment activities for the gifted/talented, of the Star Power modules developed for school personnel who have an interest in or a need to explore the area of gifted and talented education. It is explained in an introductory section that the modules can be used for independent study, for small group interaction,…

  8. The evolution of chromospheric activity of cool giant and subgiant stars

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, T.; Drake, S.A. ST Systems Corp., Greenbelt, MD )

    1989-11-01

    IUE spectra for a large sample of cool subgiant stars are examined, and evidence is found that subgiants in the mass range 1.2-1.6 solar masses undergo a sudden decline in UV transition region emission near B - V = 0.6, which corresponds to spectral type G0 IV. The decline in UV emission coincides with a sharp decrease in stellar rotation rates, and it is suggested that this decay in activity and rotation marks a transformation from acoustic heating in the early F stars to magnetic dynamo-driven activity in the cooler stars, resulting in a strong rotational braking action by stellar wind. For more massive giant stars, there is a similar transformation in the nature of chromospheric activity near B - V = 0.7, or spectral type G0 III, from acoustic heating in the F-type giants to a solarlike dynamo mechanism in the cooler giants. No sign of an abrupt drop in activity near spectral type G5 III at the location of Gray's proposed rotational boundary line is seen. 102 refs.

  9. Magnetic fields and activity of the sun and stars - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, R.

    1983-01-01

    Recent work on the observation and theory of solar and stellar magnetic field activity and its relation to stellar activity is reviewed, emphasizing those aspects relevant to the problem of activity of red dwarf stars. New observational facts relevant to understanding the root cause of stellar surface activity are summarized and theoretical questions concerning the underlying physical basis for the observed correlations between stellar activity, rotation, and magnetic fields are addressed. These include dyanamo theory and the rotation-activity connection as well as flux tube dynamics and plasma heating.

  10. ιHorologi, the first coronal activity cycle in a young solar-like star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Forcada, J.; Stelzer, B.; Metcalfe, T. S.

    2013-05-01

    Context. The shortest chromospheric (Ca ii H&K) activity cycle (1.6 yr) has been recently discovered in the young (~600 Myr) solar-like star ι Hor. Coronal X-ray activity cycles have only been discovered in a few stars other than the Sun, all of them with an older age and a lower activity level than ι Hor. Aims: We intended to find the X-ray coronal counterpart of the chromospheric cycle for ι Hor. This represents the first X-ray cycle observed in an active star, as well as the paradigm of the first coronal cycles in the life of a solar-like star. Methods: We monitored ι Hor with XMM-Newton observations spanning almost two years. The spectra of each observation are fit with two-temperature coronal models to study the long-term variability of the star. Results: We find a cyclic behavior in X-rays very similar to the contemporaneous chromospheric cycle. The continuous chromospheric monitoring for more than three cycle lengths shows a trend toward decreasing amplitude, apparently modulated by a longer term trend. The second cycle is disrupted prior to reaching its maximum, followed by a brief episode of chaotic variability before the cyclic behavior resumes, only to be disrupted again after slightly more than one cycle. Conclusions: We confirm the presence of an activity cycle of ~1.6 yr in ι Hor both in X-rays and Ca ii H&K. It is likely subject to the modulation of a longer, not yet constrained second cycle. The 1.6 yr cycle is the shortest coronal one observed to date, and ι Hor represents the most active star for which a coronal activity cycle has been found. This cycle is probably representative of the first coronal cycles in the life of a solar-like star, at the age when life started on Earth. Table 2 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. Supersaturation and activity-rotation relation in PMS stars: the young cluster h Persei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argiroffi, C.; Caramazza, M.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Moraux, E.; Bouvier, J.; Flaccomio, E.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Several studies showed that the magnetic activity of late-type main-sequence (MS) stars is characterized by different regimes and that their activity levels are well described by the Rossby number, Ro, defined as the ratio between the rotational period Prot and the convective turnover time. Very young pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars show, similarly to MS stars, intense magnetic activity. However, they do not show clear activity-rotation trends, and it still debated which stellar parameters determine their magnetic activity levels. Aims: To bridge the gap between MS and PMS stars, we studied the activity-rotation relation in the young cluster h Persei, a ~13 Myr old cluster, that contains both fast and slow rotators. The cluster members have ended their accretion phase and have developed a radiative core. It therefore offers us the opportunity of studying the activity level of intermediate-age PMS stars with different rotational velocities, excluding any interactions with the circumstellar environment. Methods: We constrained the magnetic activity levels of h Per members by measuring their X-ray emission from a Chandra observation, while rotational periods were obtained previously in the framework of the MONITOR project. By cross-correlating these data, we collected a final catalog of 414 h Per members with known rotational period, effective temperature, and mass. In 169 of these, X-ray emission has also been detected. Results: We found that h Per members with 1.0 M⊙activity regimes: fast rotators clearly show supersaturation, while slower rotators have activity levels compatible to the non-saturated regime. At 13 Myr, h Per is therefore the youngest cluster showing activity-rotation regimes analogous to those of MS stars, indicating that at this age, magnetic field production is most likely regulated by the αΩ type dynamo. Moreover, we observed that supersaturation is better described by Prot than Ro, and that the

  12. Observation and modelling of main-sequence star chromospheres - XII. Two-component model chromospheres for five active dM1e stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdebine, E. R.

    2009-08-01

    We aim to constrain the Hα, CaII H and CaII K profiles from quiescent and active regions on active dM1e stars. A preliminary analysis of all the data available for dM1e stars shows that the Hα/CaII equivalent width (EW) ratio varies by up to a factor of 7 for different stars in our sample. We find that spectroscopic binaries have a significantly smaller ratio than single dM1e stars. We also find that the pre-main-sequence stars Gl 616.2, GJ 1264 and Gl 803 have a ratio lower than main-sequence single dM1e stars. These differences imply that different chromospheric structures are present on different stars, notably the temperature minimum must decrease with an increasing Hα/CaII EW ratio. For these reasons, it is impossible to reproduce all observations with only one grid of model chromospheres. We show that the grid of model chromospheres of Paper VI is adequate to describe the physical conditions that prevail in the chromospheres of spectroscopic binaries and pre-main-sequence M1e stars, but not for the conditions in single dM1e stars. One or more additional grids of model chromospheres will be necessary to reproduce all observations. We use the method developed in Paper XI in this series, in order to build two-component model chromospheres for five M1e field stars: FF And A, FF And B, GJ 1264, AU Mic and Gl 815A. Our solutions provide an exact match of the Hα and the mean CaII H & K EWs within measurement uncertainties. We compare the theoretical profiles and the observed profiles of Hα and the CaII H & K resonance lines. On the one hand, our fits to the CaII lines are reasonably good. On the other hand, our models tend to produce Hα profiles with a central absorption that is too deep. This suggests that the column mass at the transition region for plages is underestimated, but this would imply that the contrast factor between quiescent and active regions in the CaII lines is larger than 5. We find that, except in the cases of FF And A and AU Mic, the total

  13. Interactions and star-formation activity in Wolf-Rayet galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Sánchez, Ángel R.; Esteban, César

    2009-12-01

    We present the main results of the Ph.D. thesis carried out by López-Sánchez (Ph.D. thesis, 2006), in which a detailed morphological, photometric and spectroscopic analysis of a sample of 20 Wolf-Rayet (WR) galaxies was performed. The main aims are the study of the star formation and O and WR stellar populations in these galaxies, and the role that interactions between low surface brightness companion objects have in the triggering of the bursts. We analyze the morphology, stellar populations, physical conditions, chemical abundances and kinematics of the ionized gas, as well as the star-formation activity of each system.

  14. Creating Novel Activated Factor XI Inhibitors through Fragment Based Lead Generation and Structure Aided Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Fjellström, Ola; Akkaya, Sibel; Beisel, Hans-Georg; Eriksson, Per-Olof; Erixon, Karl; Gustafsson, David; Jurva, Ulrik; Kang, Daiwu; Karis, David; Knecht, Wolfgang; Nerme, Viveca; Nilsson, Ingemar; Olsson, Thomas; Redzic, Alma; Roth, Robert; Sandmark, Jenny; Tigerström, Anna; Öster, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Activated factor XI (FXIa) inhibitors are anticipated to combine anticoagulant and profibrinolytic effects with a low bleeding risk. This motivated a structure aided fragment based lead generation campaign to create novel FXIa inhibitor leads. A virtual screen, based on docking experiments, was performed to generate a FXIa targeted fragment library for an NMR screen that resulted in the identification of fragments binding in the FXIa S1 binding pocket. The neutral 6-chloro-3,4-dihydro-1H-quinolin-2-one and the weakly basic quinolin-2-amine structures are novel FXIa P1 fragments. The expansion of these fragments towards the FXIa prime side binding sites was aided by solving the X-ray structures of reported FXIa inhibitors that we found to bind in the S1-S1’-S2’ FXIa binding pockets. Combining the X-ray structure information from the identified S1 binding 6-chloro-3,4-dihydro-1H-quinolin-2-one fragment and the S1-S1’-S2’ binding reference compounds enabled structure guided linking and expansion work to achieve one of the most potent and selective FXIa inhibitors reported to date, compound 13, with a FXIa IC50 of 1.0 nM. The hydrophilicity and large polar surface area of the potent S1-S1’-S2’ binding FXIa inhibitors compromised permeability. Initial work to expand the 6-chloro-3,4-dihydro-1H-quinolin-2-one fragment towards the prime side to yield molecules with less hydrophilicity shows promise to afford potent, selective and orally bioavailable compounds. PMID:25629509

  15. Vanderbilt University Study Creates New Roadmap for Cellular Activity - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists studying cellular processes have long sought to measure redox modifications because they provide one of the normal layers of cell control. But redox disruption or oxidative stress at the cellular level can also create a pathway to diseases like

  16. The host stars of Kepler's habitable exoplanets: superflares, rotation and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, D. J.; Pugh, C. E.; Broomhall, A.-M.; Brown, D. J. A.; Lund, M. N.; Osborn, H. P.; Pollacco, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    We embark on a detailed study of the light curves of Kepler's most Earth-like exoplanet host stars using the full length of Kepler data. We derive rotation periods, photometric activity indices, flaring energies, mass-loss rates, gyrochronological ages, X-ray luminosities and consider implications for the planetary magnetospheres and habitability. Furthermore, we present the detection of superflares in the light curve of Kepler-438, the exoplanet with the highest Earth Similarity Index to date. Kepler-438b orbits at a distance of 0.166 au to its host star, and hence may be susceptible to atmospheric stripping. Our sample is taken from the Habitable Exoplanet Catalogue, and consists of the stars Kepler-22, Kepler-61, Kepler-62, Kepler-174, Kepler-186, Kepler-283, Kepler-296, Kepler-298, Kepler-438, Kepler-440, Kepler-442, Kepler-443 and KOI-4427, between them hosting 15 of the most habitable transiting planets known to date from Kepler.

  17. FREQUENCY OF MAUNDER MINIMUM EVENTS IN SOLAR-TYPE STARS INFERRED FROM ACTIVITY AND METALLICITY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lubin, Dan; Tytler, David; Kirkman, David

    2012-03-10

    We consider the common proposition that the fraction of chromospherically very inactive stars in a solar-type sample is analogous to the fraction of the Sun's main-sequence lifetime spent in a grand minimum state. In a new approach to this proposition, we examine chromospheric activity log R'{sub HK} in a stellar sample having Hipparcos parallax measurements, and having spectroscopically determined metallicity close to solar (-0.1 {<=} [Fe/H] {<=} 0.1). We evaluate height above the Hipparcos main sequence, and estimate age using isochrones, to identify the most Sun-like stars in this sample. As a threshold below which a star is labeled very inactive, we use the peak of the HK activity distribution mapped over the quiet Sun during the 1968 epoch. We estimate the fraction of Maunder Minimum (MM) analog candidates in our sample at 11.1%. Given the 70 yr duration of the historical MM, this suggests that in any given year there is a 1/630 chance of entering a similar grand minimum. There are three important cautions with this type of estimate. First, recent investigation using actual activity and photometric time series has suggested that very low activity may not be a necessary criterion for identifying a non-cycling MM analog candidate. Second, this type of estimate depends very strongly on the choice of very low activity threshold. Third, in instantaneous measurements of log R'{sub HK}, it is not always clear whether a star is a viable MM analog candidate or merely an older star nearing the end of its main-sequence lifetime.

  18. Multiwavelength study of the magnetically active T Tauri star HD 283447

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Welty, Alan D.; Imhoff, Catherine; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Etzel, Paul B.; Phillips, Robert B.; Lonsdale, Colin J.

    1994-01-01

    We observed the luminous T Tauri star HD 283447 = V773 Tauri simultaneously at X-ray, ultraviolet, optical photometric and spectroscopic, and radio wavelengths for several hours on UT 1992 September 11. ROSAT, IUE, Very Large Array (VLA) and an intercontinental Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) network, and three optical observatories participated in the campaign. The star is known for its unusually high and variable nonthermal radio continuum emission. High levels of soft X-ray and Mg II line emission are discovered, with luminosity L(sub x) = 5.5 x 10(exp 30) ergs/s (0.2 - 2 keV) and L(sub Mg II) = 1 x 10(exp 29) ergs/s, respectively. Optically, the spectrum exhibits rather weak characteristics of `classical' T Tauri stars. A faint, broad emission line component, probably due to a collimated wind or infall, is present. During the campaign, the radio luminosity decreased by a factor of 4, while optical/UV lines and X-ray emission remained strong but constant. The large gyrosynchrotron-emitting regions are therefore decoupled from the chromospheric and coronal emission. Five models for the magnetic geometry around the star are discussed; solar-type activity, dipole magnetosphere, star-disk magnetic coupling, disk magnetic fields, and close binary interaction. The data suggest that two magnetic geometries are simultaneously present: complex multipolar fields like those on the Sun, and a large-scale field possibly associated with the circumstellar disk.

  19. Antidotal activity of Averrhoa carambola (Star fruit) on fluoride induced toxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Vasant, Rupal A.

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of fluoride leads to several physiological disturbances in carbohydrate, lipid and antioxidant metabolisms. Averrhoa carambola L. fruit (Star fruit) is a commonly consumed fruit in tropical countries and is an ingredient in folklore medicines. As the fruits have high polyphenolic and antioxidant contents, the present study was undertaken to investigate the potential of star fruit as a dietary supplement in attenuating the fluoride induced hyperglycemia, hypercholesterolemia and oxidative stress in laboratory rats. A four-week exposure to fluoride caused sustained hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and oxidative stress and, when the diet was supplemented with star fruit powder, carbohydrate, lipid and antioxidant profiles were restored significantly. It is surmised that the antihyperglycemic, antihypercholesterolemic and antioxidant activities of star fruit in fluoride exposed rats could be due to the presence of polyphenols, flavonoids, saponins, phytosterols, ascorbic acid and fibers in the fruit, which are all well known regulators of carbohydrate, lipid and antioxidant metabolisms. These findings suggest that star fruit can be used as a dietary supplement in fluoride endemic regions to contain fluoride induced hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and oxidative stress. PMID:26109886

  20. Antidotal activity of Averrhoa carambola (Star fruit) on fluoride induced toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Vasant, Rupal A; Narasimhacharya, A V R L

    2014-06-01

    Consumption of fluoride leads to several physiological disturbances in carbohydrate, lipid and antioxidant metabolisms. Averrhoa carambola L. fruit (Star fruit) is a commonly consumed fruit in tropical countries and is an ingredient in folklore medicines. As the fruits have high polyphenolic and antioxidant contents, the present study was undertaken to investigate the potential of star fruit as a dietary supplement in attenuating the fluoride induced hyperglycemia, hypercholesterolemia and oxidative stress in laboratory rats. A four-week exposure to fluoride caused sustained hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and oxidative stress and, when the diet was supplemented with star fruit powder, carbohydrate, lipid and antioxidant profiles were restored significantly. It is surmised that the antihyperglycemic, antihypercholesterolemic and antioxidant activities of star fruit in fluoride exposed rats could be due to the presence of polyphenols, flavonoids, saponins, phytosterols, ascorbic acid and fibers in the fruit, which are all well known regulators of carbohydrate, lipid and antioxidant metabolisms. These findings suggest that star fruit can be used as a dietary supplement in fluoride endemic regions to contain fluoride induced hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and oxidative stress.

  1. Cosmic web and star formation activity in galaxies at z ∼ 1

    SciTech Connect

    Darvish, B.; Mobasher, B.; Sales, L. V.; Sobral, D.; Scoville, N. Z.; Best, P.; Smail, I.

    2014-11-20

    We investigate the role of the delineated cosmic web/filaments on star formation activity by exploring a sample of 425 narrow-band selected Hα emitters, as well as 2846 color-color selected underlying star-forming galaxies for a large-scale structure at z = 0.84 in the COSMOS field from the HiZELS survey. Using the scale-independent Multi-scale Morphology Filter algorithm, we are able to quantitatively describe the density field and disentangle it into its major components: fields, filaments, and clusters. We show that the observed median star formation rate (SFR), stellar mass, specific SFR, the mean SFR-mass relation, and its scatter for both Hα emitters and underlying star-forming galaxies do not strongly depend on different classes of environment, in agreement with previous studies. However, the fraction of Hα emitters varies with environment and is enhanced in filamentary structures at z ∼ 1. We propose mild galaxy-galaxy interactions as the possible physical agent for the elevation of the fraction of Hα star-forming galaxies in filaments. Our results show that filaments are the likely physical environments that are often classed as the 'intermediate' densities and that the cosmic web likely plays a major role in galaxy formation and evolution which has so far been poorly investigated.

  2. Spectral characterization and differential rotation study of active CoRoT stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, E.; Czesla, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2016-05-01

    The CoRoT space telescope observed nearly 160 000 light curves. Among the most outstanding is that of the young, active planet host star CoRoT-2A. In addition to deep planetary transits, the light curve of CoRoT-2A shows strong rotational variability and a superimposed beating pattern. To study the stars that produce such an intriguing pattern of photometric variability, we identified a sample of eight stars with rotation periods between 0.8 and 11 days and photometric variability amplitudes of up to 7.5%, showing a similar CoRoT light curve. We also obtained high-resolution follow-up spectroscopy with TNG/SARG and carried out a spectral analysis with SME and MOOG. We find that the color dependence of the light curves is consistent with rotational modulation due to starspots and that latitudinal differential rotation provides a viable explanation for the light curves, although starspot evolution is also expected to play an important role. Our MOOG and SME spectral analyses provide consistent results, showing that the targets are dwarf stars with spectral types between F and mid-K. Detectable Li i absorption in four of the targets confirms a low age of 100-400 Myr also deduced from gyrochronology. Our study indicates that the photometric beating phenomenon is likely attributable to differential rotation in fast-rotating stars with outer convection zones.

  3. Increase in multidrug transport activity is associated with oocyte maturation in sea stars.

    PubMed

    Roepke, Troy A; Hamdoun, Amro M; Cherr, Gary N

    2006-12-01

    In this study, we report on the presence of efflux transporter activity before oocyte maturation in sea stars and its upregulation after maturation. This activity is similar to the multidrug resistance (MDR) activity mediated by ATP binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters. In sea star oocytes the efflux activity, as measured by exclusion of calcein-am, increased two-fold 3 h post-maturation. Experiments using specific and non-specific dyes and inhibitors demonstrated that the increase in transporter activity involves an ABCB protein, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and an ABCC protein similar to the MDR-associated protein (MRP)-like transporters. Western blots using an antibody directed against mammalian P-gp recognized a 45 kDa protein in sea star oocytes that increased in abundance during maturation. An antibody directed against sea urchin ABCC proteins (MRP) recognized three proteins in immature oocytes and two in mature oocytes. Experiments using inhibitors suggest that translation and microtubule function are both required for post-maturation increases in transporter activity. Immunolabeling revealed translocation of stored ABCB proteins to the plasma cell membrane during maturation, and this translocation coincided with increased transport activity. These MDR transporters serve protective roles in oocytes and eggs, as demonstrated by sensitization of the oocytes to the maturation inhibitor, vinblastine, by MRP and PGP-specific transporter inhibitors.

  4. Photometric and Polarimetric Activity of the Herbig Ae Star VX Cas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhovskoi, D. N.; Rostopchina, A. N.; Grinin, V. P.; Minikulov, N. Kh.

    2003-04-01

    We present the results of our simultaneous photometric and polarimetric observations of the Herbig Ae/Be star VX Cas acquired in 1987 2001. The star belongs to the UX Ori subtype of young variable stars and exhibits a rather low level of photometric activity: only six Algol-like minima with amplitudes ΔV>1m were recorded in 15 years of observations. Two of these minima, in 1998 and 2001, were the deepest in the history of the star’s photometric studies, with V amplitudes of about 2m. In each case, the dimming was accompanied by an increase in the linear polarization in agreement with the law expected for variable circumstellar extinction. The highest V polarization was about 5%. Observations of VX Cas in the deep minima revealed a turnover of the color tracks, typical of stars of this type and due to an increased contribution from radiation scattered in the circumstellar disk. We separated the observed polarization of VX Cas into interstellar (P is) and intrinsic (P in) components. Their position angles differ by approximately 60°, with P is dominating in the bright state and P in dominating during the deep minima. The competition of these two polarization components leads to changes in both the degree and position angle of the polarization during the star’s brightness variations. Generally speaking, in terms of the behavior of the brightness, color indices, and linear polarization, VX Cas is similar to other UX Ori stars studied by us earlier. A number of episodes of photometric and polarimetric activity suggest that, in their motion along highly eccentric orbits, circumstellar gas and dust clouds can enter the close vicinity of the star (and be disrupted there).

  5. Spots and activity cycles of the star FKCom—2013-2015 data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzin, V. B.; Savanov, I. S.; Dmitrienko, E. S.; Romanyuk, I. I.; Semenko, E. A.; Yakunin, I. A.; Burdanov, A. Yu.

    2016-04-01

    We present an analysis of new photometric and spectropolarimetric observations of a chromospherically active star FKCom. Based on this observational data and the data from the literature sources, applying a common technique, we performed an analysis of a complete set of the available photometric data, which were divided into 218 individual light curves. For each of them a reverse problem of restoring largescale temperature irregularities on the surface of the star from its light curve was solved. We analyzed the time series for the brightness of the star in the U-, B-, and V-bands, the brightness variability amplitudes, the total area of the spots on the surface of the star, and the average brightness of each set considered. The analysis of determination results of the positions of active longitudes leads to the conclusion about the existence of two systems of active regions on the FKCom surface. It was determined that the positions of each of these systems undergo cyclic changes. This confirms the conclusion on the likely absence of a strongly pronounced regularity of the flip-flops in FKCom, earlier suggested by other researchers. The results of the new polarimetric observations FKCom in 2014-2015 are presented. These measurements evidence the legitimacy of the proposed interpretation the behavior of the longitudinal magnetic field strength < B z >, indicating the settling-in of a more symmetric distribution of magnetic region on the FKCom surface. An increasing activity of the star over the recent years, registered from the photometric observations is also consistent with the probable onset of growth in the < B z > parameter starting from 2014.

  6. A SPITZER CENSUS OF STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN THE PIPE NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Forbrich, Jan; Lada, Charles J.; Muench, August A.; Alves, Joao

    2009-10-10

    The Pipe Nebula, a large nearby molecular cloud, lacks obvious signposts of star formation in all but one of more than 130 dust extinction cores that have been identified within it. In order to quantitatively determine the current level of star formation activity in the Pipe Nebula, we analyzed 13 deg{sup 2} of sensitive mid-infrared maps of the entire cloud, obtained with the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer at wavelengths of 24 mum and 70 mum, to search for candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in the high-extinction regions. We argue that our search is complete for class I and typical class II YSOs with luminosities of L {sub bol} approx 0.2 L {sub sun} and greater. We find only 18 candidate YSOs in the high-extinction regions of the entire Pipe cloud. Twelve of these sources are previously known members of a small cluster associated with Barnard 59, the largest and most massive dense core in the cloud. With only six candidate class I and class II YSOs detected toward extinction cores outside of this cluster, our findings emphatically confirm the notion of an extremely low level of star formation activity in the Pipe Nebula. The resulting star formation efficiency for the entire cloud mass is only approx0.06%.

  7. Gyrochronology of Low-mass Stars - Age-Rotation-Activity Relations for Young M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidder, Benjamin; Shkolnik, E.; Skiff, B.

    2014-01-01

    New rotation periods for 34 young <300 Myr), early-M dwarfs within 25 parsecs were measured using photometric data collected with telescopes at Lowell Observatory during 2012 and 2013. An additional 25 rotation periods for members of the same sample were found in the literature. Ages were derived from Hα and X-ray emission, lithium absorption, surface gravity, and kinematic association of members of known young moving groups (YMGs). We compared rotation periods with the estimated ages as well as indicators of magnetic activity, with the intention of strengthening age-rotation-activity relations and assessing the possible use of gyrochronology in young, low-mass stars. We compared ages and rotation periods of our target stars to cluster members spanning 1-600 Myr. Rotation periods at every age exhibit a large scatter, with values typically ranging from 0.2 to 15 days. This suggests that gyrochronology for individual field stars will not be possible without a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms that govern angular momentum evolution. Yet, on average, the data still support the predicted trends for spin-up during contraction and spin-down on the main sequence, with the turnover occurring at around 150 Myr for early Ms. This suggests that rotation period distributions can be helpful in evaluating the ages of coeval groups of stars. Many thanks to the National Science Foundation for their support through the Research Experience for Undergraduates Grant AST- 1004107.

  8. Forecasting life: a study of activity cycles in low-mass stars: lessons from long-term stellar light curves.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Stella

    2012-06-01

    Magnetic activity cycles are indirect traces of magnetic fields and can provide an insight on the nature and action of stellar dynamos and stellar magnetic activity. This, in turn, can determine local space weather and activity effects on stellar habitable zones. Using photometric monitoring of low-mass stars, we study the presence and properties of their magnetic activity cycles. We introduce long-term light curves of our sample stars, and discuss the properties of the observed trends, especially at spectral types where stars are fully convective (later than M3).

  9. ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND THE TRUNCATION OF STAR FORMATION IN K+A GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Michael J. I.; Palamara, David; Moustakas, John; Caldwell, Nelson; Cool, Richard J.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Murray, Stephen S.

    2009-09-20

    We have searched for active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in K+A galaxies, using multiwavelength imaging and spectroscopy in the Booetes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. The K+A galaxies, which have had their star formation rapidly truncated, are selected via their strong Balmer absorption lines and weak Halpha emission. Our sample consists of 24 K+A galaxies selected from 6594 0.10 < z < 0.35 galaxies brighter than I = 20 with optical spectroscopy from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. Two thirds of the K+A galaxies are likely ongoing galaxy mergers, with nearby companion galaxies or tidal tails. Galaxy mergers may be responsible for the truncation of star formation, or we are observing the aftermath of merger triggered starbursts. As expected, the optical colors of K+A galaxies largely fall between blue galaxies with ongoing star formation and red passive galaxies. However, only 1% of the galaxies with colors between the red and blue populations are K+A galaxies, and we conclude that the truncation of star formation in K+A galaxies must have been unusually abrupt ({approx}<100 Myr). We examined the AGN content of K+A galaxies with both optical emission-line ratios (BPT diagrams) and Chandra X-ray imaging. At least half of all K+A galaxies display the optical emission-line ratios of AGNs, and a third of M{sub R} < -22 K+A galaxies host AGNs with X-ray luminosities of {approx}10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. The faintest K+A galaxies do not show clear evidence for hosting AGNs, having emission-line ratios consistent with photoionization by massive stars and few X-ray detections. We speculate that two mechanisms may be responsible for the truncation of star formation in K+A galaxies, with AGN feedback only playing a role in M{sub R} {approx}< -20.5 galaxies.

  10. 3C 273 with NuSTAR: Unveiling the Active Galactic Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Kristin K.; Fürst, Felix; Walton, Dominic J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Ballantyne, David R.; Boggs, Steve E.; Brenneman, Laura W.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Forster, Karl; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Guainazzi, Matteo; Hailey, Charles J.; Madejski, Greg M.; Matt, Giorgio; Stern, Daniel; Walter, Roland; Zhang, William W.

    2015-10-01

    We present results from a 244 ks NuSTAR observation of 3C 273 obtained during a cross-calibration campaign with the Chandra, INTEGRAL, Suzaku, Swift, and XMM-Newton observatories. We show that the spectrum, when fit with a power-law model using data from all observatories except INTEGRAL over the 1–78 keV band, leaves significant residuals in the NuSTAR data between 30 and 78 keV. The NuSTAR 3–78 keV spectrum is well described by an exponentially cutoff power law ({{Γ }}=1.646+/- 0.006, {E}{cutoff}={202}-34+51 keV) with a weak reflection component from cold, dense material. There is also evidence for a weak ({EW}=23+/- 11 eV) neutral iron line. We interpret these features as arising from coronal emission plus reflection off an accretion disk or distant material. Beyond 80 keV INTEGRAL data show clear excess flux relative to an extrapolation of the active galactic nucleus model fit to NuSTAR. This high-energy power law is consistent with the presence of a beamed jet, which begins to dominate over emission from the inner accretion flow at 30–40 keV. Modeling the jet locally (in the NuSTAR + INTEGRAL band) as a power law, we find that the coronal component is fit by {{{Γ }}}{AGN}=1.638+/- 0.045, {E}{cutoff}=47+/- 15 {keV}, and jet photon index by {{{Γ }}}{jet}=1.05+/- 0.4. We also consider Fermi/LAT observations of 3C 273, and here the broadband spectrum of the jet can be described by a log-parabolic model, peaking at ∼2 MeV. Finally, we investigate the spectral variability in the NuSTAR band and find an inverse correlation between flux and Γ.

  11. MID-INFRARED SPECTRAL INDICATORS OF STAR FORMATION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY IN NORMAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Treyer, Marie; Martin, Christopher D.; Wyder, Ted; Schiminovich, David; O'Dowd, Matt; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Charlot, Stephane; Heckman, Timothy; Martins, Lucimara; Seibert, Mark; Van der Hulst, J. M.

    2010-08-20

    We investigate the use of mid-infrared (MIR) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bands, the continuum, and emission lines as probes of star formation (SF) and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in a sample of 100 'normal' and local (z {approx} 0.1) emission-line galaxies. The MIR spectra were obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph as part of the Spitzer-SDSS-GALEX Spectroscopic Survey, which includes multi-wavelength photometry from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared and optical spectroscopy. The continuum and features were extracted using PAHFIT, a decomposition code which we find to yield PAH equivalent widths (EWs) up to {approx}30 times larger than the commonly used spline methods. Despite the lack of extreme objects in our sample (such as strong AGNs, low-metallicity galaxies, or ULIRGs), we find significant variations in PAH, continuum, and emission-line properties, and systematic trends between these MIR properties and optically derived physical properties, such as age, metallicity, and radiation field hardness. We revisit the diagnostic diagram relating PAH EWs and [Ne II]12.8 {mu}m/[O IV]25.9 {mu}m line ratios and find it to be in much better agreement with the standard optical SF/AGN classification than when spline decompositions are used, while also potentially revealing obscured AGNs. The luminosity of individual PAH components, of the continuum, and, with poorer statistics, of the neon emission lines and molecular hydrogen lines are found to be tightly correlated to the total infrared (TIR) luminosity, making individual MIR components good gauges of the total dust emission in SF galaxies. Like the TIR luminosity, these individual components can be used to estimate dust attenuation in the UV and in H{alpha} lines based on energy balance arguments. We also propose average scaling relations between these components and dust-corrected, H{alpha}-derived SF rates.

  12. No Sun-like dynamo on the active star ζ Andromedae from starspot asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roettenbacher, R. M.; Monnier, J. D.; Korhonen, H.; Aarnio, A. N.; Baron, F.; Che, X.; Harmon, R. O.; Kővári, Zs.; Kraus, S.; Schaefer, G. H.; Torres, G.; Zhao, M.; Ten Brummelaar, T. A.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.

    2016-05-01

    Sunspots are cool areas caused by strong surface magnetic fields that inhibit convection. Moreover, strong magnetic fields can alter the average atmospheric structure, degrading our ability to measure stellar masses and ages. Stars that are more active than the Sun have more and stronger dark spots than does the Sun, including on the rotational pole. Doppler imaging, which has so far produced the most detailed images of surface structures on other stars, cannot always distinguish the hemisphere in which the starspots are located, especially in the equatorial region and if the data quality is not optimal. This leads to problems in investigating the north-south distribution of starspot active latitudes (those latitudes with more starspot activity); this distribution is a crucial constraint of dynamo theory. Polar spots, whose existence is inferred from Doppler tomography, could plausibly be observational artefacts. Here we report imaging of the old, magnetically active star ζ Andromedae using long-baseline infrared interferometry. In our data, a dark polar spot is seen in each of two observation epochs, whereas lower-latitude spot structures in both hemispheres do not persist between observations, revealing global starspot asymmetries. The north-south symmetry of active latitudes observed on the Sun is absent on ζ And, which hosts global spot patterns that cannot be produced by solar-type dynamos.

  13. No Sun-like dynamo on the active star ζ Andromedae from starspot asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Roettenbacher, R M; Monnier, J D; Korhonen, H; Aarnio, A N; Baron, F; Che, X; Harmon, R O; Kővári, Zs; Kraus, S; Schaefer, G H; Torres, G; Zhao, M; ten Brummelaar, T A; Sturmann, J; Sturmann, L

    2016-05-12

    Sunspots are cool areas caused by strong surface magnetic fields that inhibit convection. Moreover, strong magnetic fields can alter the average atmospheric structure, degrading our ability to measure stellar masses and ages. Stars that are more active than the Sun have more and stronger dark spots than does the Sun, including on the rotational pole. Doppler imaging, which has so far produced the most detailed images of surface structures on other stars, cannot always distinguish the hemisphere in which the starspots are located, especially in the equatorial region and if the data quality is not optimal. This leads to problems in investigating the north-south distribution of starspot active latitudes (those latitudes with more starspot activity); this distribution is a crucial constraint of dynamo theory. Polar spots, whose existence is inferred from Doppler tomography, could plausibly be observational artefacts. Here we report imaging of the old, magnetically active star ζ Andromedae using long-baseline infrared interferometry. In our data, a dark polar spot is seen in each of two observation epochs, whereas lower-latitude spot structures in both hemispheres do not persist between observations, revealing global starspot asymmetries. The north-south symmetry of active latitudes observed on the Sun is absent on ζ And, which hosts global spot patterns that cannot be produced by solar-type dynamos. PMID:27144357

  14. Disentangling Dominance: Obscured AGN Activity versus Star Formation in BPT-Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trouille, Laura

    2011-11-01

    Approximately 20% of SDSS emission-line galaxies (ELG) lie in the BPT-comp regime, between the Kauffmann et al. (2003) empirically determined SF-dominated regime and the Kewley et al. (2001) theoretically predicted AGN-dominated regime. BPT-AGN, on the other hand, make up only 11% of the ELG population. Whether to include the significant number of BPT-comp in samples of AGN or samples of star-forming galaxies is an open question and has important implications for galaxy evolution studies, metallicity studies, etc. Using a large pectroscopic sample of GOODS-N and LH galaxies with deep Chandra imaging, we perform an X-ray stacking analysis of BPT-comp. We find the stacked signal to be X-ray hard. This X-ray hardness can be indicative of obscured AGN activity or the presence of HMXBs associated with ongoing star formation. In order to distinguish between these scenarios, we perform an IR stacking analysis using Spitzer 24 micron data. The stacked BPT-comp lies well above the expected value for L_x/L_IR for pure star-forming galaxies; similarly for the X-ray detected BPT-comp. We also find that the BPT-comp lie in the AGN-dominated regime of our new TBT diagnostic, which uses [NeIII]/[OII] versus rest-frame g-z colour to identify AGN and star forming galaxies out to z=1.4. [NeIII], which has a higher ionisation potential than other commonly used forbidden emission lines, appears to foster a more reliable selection of AGN-dominated galaxies. These findings suggest that both the X-ray and optical signal in BPT-comp are dominated by obscured or low accretion rate AGN activity rather than star formation. This is in contrast to claims by previous optical emission-line studies that the signal in BPT-comp is dominated by star-formation activity. Therefore, we recommend that groups carefully consider the impact of excluding or including BPT-comp on the interpretation of their results. For example, for studies involving determining the bolometric contribution from AGN activity

  15. Examining How Activity Shapes Students' Interactions While Creating Representations in Early Elementary Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danish, Joshua Adam; Saleh, Asmalina

    2014-01-01

    It is common practice in elementary science classrooms to have students create representations, such as drawings, as a way of exploring new content. While numerous studies suggest the benefits of representation in science, the majority focus on specific, canonical representations, such as graphs. Few offer insight or guidance regarding how…

  16. Popes in the Pizza: Analyzing Activity Reports to Create and Sustain a Strategic Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Charlie; Blythe, Hal; Keeley, E. J.; Forsyth, Ben

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a practical methodology for creating and sustaining strategic planning, the task analysis. Utilizing our Teaching & Learning Center Strategic Plan as a model, we demonstrate how working with a weekly status report provides a comprehensive listing of detail necessary to analyze and revise the plan. The new methodology is…

  17. Feedback in the local Universe: Relation between star formation and AGN activity in early type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaddi, Sravani; O'Dea, Christopher; Baum, Stefi; Jones, Christine; Forman, William; Whitmore, Samantha; Ahmed, Rabeea; Pierce, Katherine; Leary, Sara

    2015-08-01

    Aim: We address the relation between star formation and AGN activity in a large sample of nearby early type (E and S0) galaxies. The redshift range of the galaxies is 0.0002star formation and thus the process of galaxy evolution and formation. Evidence of AGN feedback is found in massive galaxies in galaxy clusters. However, how common AGN feedback is in the local universe and in small scale systems is still not evident.Methods: To answer this question, we carried out a multiple wavelength study of a sample of 231 early type galaxies which were selected to have an apparent K-band magnitude brighter than 13.5 and whose positions correlate with Chandra ACIS-I and ACIS-S sources. The galaxies in the sample are unbiased regarding their star formation and radio source properties. Using the archival observations at radio, IR and UV from VLA, WISE and GALEX respectively, we obtained the radio power, estimate FUV star formation rate (SFR) and other galaxy properties to study AGN activity and ongoing star formation.Results: The relationship between radio power and stellar mass shows that there is an upper envelope of radio power that is a steep function of stellar luminosity. This suggests that less massive galaxies have low radio power while massive galaxies are capable of hosting powerful radio sources. The Radio-MIR relation shows that galaxies with P>=1022 WHz-1 are potential candidates for being AGN. About ~ 7% of the sample show evidence of ongoing star formation with SFR ranging from 10-3 to 1 M⊙yr-1. These are also less massive and radio faint suggesting the absence of active accretion. There is nearly equal fraction of star forming galaxies in radio faint (P<1022 WHz-1) and radio bright galaxies (P>=1022 WHz-1) . Only ~ 5% of the galaxies in our sample have P>=1022 WHz-1 and most of them do not show evidence of bright accretion disks. We see a weak correlation and a dispersion of

  18. Star-formation Activity in the Neighborhood of W–R 1503-160L Star in the Mid-infrared Bubble N46

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Baug, T.; Ojha, D. K.; Janardhan, P.; Ninan, J. P.; Luna, A.; Zinchenko, I.

    2016-07-01

    In order to investigate star-formation (SF) processes in extreme environments, we have carried out a multi-wavelength analysis of the mid-infrared bubble N46, which hosts a WN7 Wolf–Rayet (W–R) star. We have used 13CO line data to trace an expanding shell surrounding the W–R star containing about five condensations within the molecular cloud associated with the bubble. The W–R star is associated with a powerful stellar wind having a mechanical luminosity of ˜4 × 1037 erg s‑1. A deviation of the H-band starlight mean polarization angles around the bubble has also been traced, indicating the impact of stellar wind on the surroundings. The Herschel temperature map shows a temperature range of ˜18–24 K toward the five molecular condensations. The photometric analysis reveals that these condensations are associated with the identified clusters of young stellar objects, revealing ongoing SF process. The densest among these five condensations (peak N(H2) ˜9.2 × 1022 cm‑2 and A V ˜ 98 mag) is associated with a 6.7 GHz methanol maser, an infrared dark cloud, and the CO outflow, tracing active massive SF within it. At least five compact radio sources (CRSs) are physically linked with the edges of the bubble, and each of them is consistent with the radio spectral class of a B0V–B0.5V-type star. The ages of the individual infrared counterparts of three CRSs (˜1–2 Myr) and a typical age of WN7 W–R star (˜4 Myr) indicate that the SF activities around the bubble are influenced by the feedback of the W–R star.

  19. Star-formation Activity in the Neighborhood of W-R 1503-160L Star in the Mid-infrared Bubble N46

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Baug, T.; Ojha, D. K.; Janardhan, P.; Ninan, J. P.; Luna, A.; Zinchenko, I.

    2016-07-01

    In order to investigate star-formation (SF) processes in extreme environments, we have carried out a multi-wavelength analysis of the mid-infrared bubble N46, which hosts a WN7 Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star. We have used 13CO line data to trace an expanding shell surrounding the W-R star containing about five condensations within the molecular cloud associated with the bubble. The W-R star is associated with a powerful stellar wind having a mechanical luminosity of ˜4 × 1037 erg s-1. A deviation of the H-band starlight mean polarization angles around the bubble has also been traced, indicating the impact of stellar wind on the surroundings. The Herschel temperature map shows a temperature range of ˜18-24 K toward the five molecular condensations. The photometric analysis reveals that these condensations are associated with the identified clusters of young stellar objects, revealing ongoing SF process. The densest among these five condensations (peak N(H2) ˜9.2 × 1022 cm-2 and A V ˜ 98 mag) is associated with a 6.7 GHz methanol maser, an infrared dark cloud, and the CO outflow, tracing active massive SF within it. At least five compact radio sources (CRSs) are physically linked with the edges of the bubble, and each of them is consistent with the radio spectral class of a B0V-B0.5V-type star. The ages of the individual infrared counterparts of three CRSs (˜1-2 Myr) and a typical age of WN7 W-R star (˜4 Myr) indicate that the SF activities around the bubble are influenced by the feedback of the W-R star.

  20. Stellar activity as noise in exoplanet detection - I. Methods and application to solar-like stars and activity cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, H.; Andersen, J. M.; Piskunov, N.; Hackman, T.; Juncher, D.; Järvinen, S. P.; Jørgensen, U. G.

    2015-04-01

    The detection of exoplanets using any method is prone to confusion due to the intrinsic variability of the host star. We investigate the effect of cool starspots on the detectability of the exoplanets around solar-like stars using the radial velocity method. For investigating this activity-caused `jitter' we calculate synthetic spectra using radiative transfer, known stellar atomic and molecular lines, different surface spot configurations and an added planetary signal. Here, the methods are described in detail, tested and compared to previously published studies. The methods are also applied to investigate the activity jitter in old and young solar-like stars, and over a solar-like activity cycles. We find that the mean full jitter amplitude obtained from the spot surfaces mimicking the solar activity varies during the cycle approximately between 1 and 9 m s-1. With a realistic observing frequency a Neptune-mass planet on a 1-yr orbit can be reliably recovered. On the other hand, the recovery of an Earth-mass planet on a similar orbit is not feasible with high significance. The methods developed in this study have a great potential for doing statistical studies of planet detectability, and also for investigating the effect of stellar activity on recovered planetary parameters.

  1. No Evidence for Activity Correlations in the Radial Velocities of Kapteyn’s Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglada-Escudé, G.; Tuomi, M.; Arriagada, P.; Zechmeister, M.; Jenkins, J. S.; Ofir, A.; Dreizler, S.; Gerlach, E.; Marvin, C. J.; Reiners, A.; Jeffers, S. V.; Butler, R. Paul; Vogt, S. S.; Amado, P. J.; Rodríguez-López, C.; Berdiñas, Z. M.; Morin, J.; Crane, J. D.; Shectman, S. A.; Díaz, M. R.; Sarmiento, L. F.; Jones, H. R. A.

    2016-10-01

    Stellar activity may induce Doppler variability at the level of a few m s‑1 which can then be confused by the Doppler signal of an exoplanet orbiting the star. To first order, linear correlations between radial velocity measurements and activity indices have been proposed to account for any such correlation. The likely presence of two super-Earths orbiting Kapteyn’s star was reported in Anglada-Escudé et al., but this claim was recently challenged by Robertson et al., who argued for evidence of a rotation period (143 days) at three times the orbital period of one of the proposed planets (Kapteyn’s b, P = 48.6 days) and the existence of strong linear correlations between its Doppler signal and activity data. By re-analyzing the data using global statistics and model comparison, we show that such a claim is incorrect given that (1) the choice of a rotation period at 143 days is unjustified, and (2) the presence of linear correlations is not supported by the data. We conclude that the radial velocity signals of Kapteyn’s star remain more simply explained by the presence of two super-Earth candidates orbiting it. We note that analysis of time series of activity indices must be executed with the same care as Doppler time series. We also advocate for the use of global optimization procedures and objective arguments, instead of claims based on residual analyses which are prone to biases and incorrect interpretations.

  2. EUV-driven ionospheres and electron transport on extrasolar giant planets orbiting active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadney, J. M.; Galand, M.; Koskinen, T. T.; Miller, S.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Unruh, Y. C.; Yelle, R. V.

    2016-03-01

    The composition and structure of the upper atmospheres of extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) are affected by the high-energy spectrum of their host stars from soft X-rays to the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). This emission depends on the activity level of the star, which is primarily determined by its age. In this study, we focus upon EGPs orbiting K- and M-dwarf stars of different ages - ɛ Eridani, AD Leonis, AU Microscopii - and the Sun. X-ray and EUV (XUV) spectra for these stars are constructed using a coronal model. These spectra are used to drive both a thermospheric model and an ionospheric model, providing densities of neutral and ion species. Ionisation - as a result of stellar radiation deposition - is included through photo-ionisation and electron-impact processes. The former is calculated by solving the Lambert-Beer law, while the latter is calculated from a supra-thermal electron transport model. We find that EGP ionospheres at all orbital distances considered (0.1-1 AU) and around all stars selected are dominated by the long-lived H+ ion. In addition, planets with upper atmospheres where H2 is not substantially dissociated (at large orbital distances) have a layer in which H3+ is the major ion at the base of the ionosphere. For fast-rotating planets, densities of short-lived H3+ undergo significant diurnal variations, with the maximum value being driven by the stellar X-ray flux. In contrast, densities of longer-lived H+ show very little day/night variability and the magnitude is driven by the level of stellar EUV flux. The H3+ peak in EGPs with upper atmospheres where H2 is dissociated (orbiting close to their star) under strong stellar illumination is pushed to altitudes below the homopause, where this ion is likely to be destroyed through reactions with heavy species (e.g. hydrocarbons, water). The inclusion of secondary ionisation processes produces significantly enhanced ion and electron densities at altitudes below the main EUV ionisation peak, as

  3. The First X-Ray Imaging Spectroscopy of Quiescent Solar Active Regions with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, Iain G.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Smith, David M.; Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Säm; Hudson, Hugh S.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Marsh, Andrew; White, Stephen M.; Caspi, Amir; Shih, Albert Y.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Stern, Daniel; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Hailey, Charles J.; Zhang, William W.

    2016-03-01

    We present the first observations of quiescent active regions (ARs) using the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), a focusing hard X-ray telescope capable of studying faint solar emission from high-temperature and non-thermal sources. We analyze the first directly imaged and spectrally resolved X-rays above 2 keV from non-flaring ARs, observed near the west limb on 2014 November 1. The NuSTAR X-ray images match bright features seen in extreme ultraviolet and soft X-rays. The NuSTAR imaging spectroscopy is consistent with isothermal emission of temperatures 3.1-4.4 MK and emission measures 1-8 × 1046 cm-3. We do not observe emission above 5 MK, but our short effective exposure times restrict the spectral dynamic range. With few counts above 6 keV, we can place constraints on the presence of an additional hotter component between 5 and 12 MK of ˜ {10}46 cm-3 and ˜ {10}43 cm-3, respectively, at least an order of magnitude stricter than previous limits. With longer duration observations and a weakening solar cycle (resulting in an increased livetime), future NuSTAR observations will have sensitivity to a wider range of temperatures as well as possible non-thermal emission.

  4. CONNECTING FLARES AND TRANSIENT MASS-LOSS EVENTS IN MAGNETICALLY ACTIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Osten, Rachel A.; Wolk, Scott J.

    2015-08-10

    We explore the ramification of associating the energetics of extreme magnetic reconnection events with transient mass-loss in a stellar analogy with solar eruptive events. We establish energy partitions relative to the total bolometric radiated flare energy for different observed components of stellar flares and show that there is rough agreement for these values with solar flares. We apply an equipartition between the bolometric radiated flare energy and kinetic energy in an accompanying mass ejection, seen in solar eruptive events and expected from reconnection. This allows an integrated flare rate in a particular waveband to be used to estimate the amount of associated transient mass-loss. This approach is supported by a good correspondence between observational flare signatures on high flaring rate stars and the Sun, which suggests a common physical origin. If the frequent and extreme flares that young solar-like stars and low-mass stars experience are accompanied by transient mass-loss in the form of coronal mass ejections, then the cumulative effect of this mass-loss could be large. We find that for young solar-like stars and active M dwarfs, the total mass lost due to transient magnetic eruptions could have significant impacts on disk evolution, and thus planet formation, and also exoplanet habitability.

  5. The Fidelity Index provides a systematic quantitation of star activity of DNA restriction endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hua; Therrien, Caitlin; Blanchard, Aine; Guan, Shengxi; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2008-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases are the basic tools of molecular biology. Many restriction endonucleases show relaxed sequence recognition, called star activity, as an inherent property under various digestion conditions including the optimal ones. To quantify this property we propose the concept of the Fidelity Index (FI), which is defined as the ratio of the maximum enzyme amount showing no star activity to the minimum amount needed for complete digestion at the cognate recognition site for any particular restriction endonuclease. Fidelity indices for a large number of restriction endonucleases are reported here. The effects of reaction vessel, reaction volume, incubation mode, substrate differences, reaction time, reaction temperature and additional glycerol, DMSO, ethanol and Mn2+ on the FI are also investigated. The FI provides a practical guideline for the use of restriction endonucleases and defines a fundamental property by which restriction endonucleases can be characterized. PMID:18413342

  6. Coronal temperatures of selected active cool stars as derived from low resolution Einstein observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilhu, Osmi; Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1990-01-01

    Mean coronal temperatures of some active G-K stars were derived from Rev1-processed Einstein-observatory's IPC-spectra. The combined X-ray and transition region emission line data are in rough agreement with static coronal loop models. Although the sample is too small to derive any statistically significant conclusions, it suggests that the mean coronal temperature depends linearly on the inverse Rossby-number, with saturation at short rotation periods.

  7. CoRoT Reveals a Magnetic Activity Cycle in a Sun-Like Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Rafael A.; Mathur, Savita; Salabert, David; Ballot, Jérôme; Régulo, Clara; Metcalfe, Travis S.; Baglin, Annie

    2010-08-01

    The 11-year activity cycle of the Sun is a consequence of a dynamo process occurring beneath its surface. We analyzed photometric data obtained by the CoRoT space mission, showing solarlike oscillations in the star HD49933, for signatures of stellar magnetic activity. Asteroseismic measurements of global changes in the oscillation frequencies and mode amplitudes reveal a modulation of at least 120 days, with the minimum frequency shift corresponding to maximum amplitude as in the Sun. These observations are evidence of a stellar magnetic activity cycle taking place beneath the surface of HD49933 and provide constraints for stellar dynamo models under conditions different from those of the Sun.

  8. Chandra Observation of the Trifid Nebula: X-Ray Emission from the O Star Complex and Actively Forming Pre-Main-Sequence Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Jeonghee; Ramírez, Solange V.; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Lefloch, Bertrand

    2004-06-01

    The Trifid Nebula, a young star-forming H II region, was observed for 16 hr by the ACIS-I detector on board the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We detected 304 X-ray sources, 30% of which are hard sources and 70% of which have near-infrared counterparts. Chandra resolved the HD 164492 multiple system into a number of discrete X-ray sources. X-ray emission is detected from components HD 164492A (an O7.5 III star that ionizes the nebula), B and C (a B6 V star), and possibly D (a Be star). Component C is blended with an unidentified source to the northwest. HD 164492A has a soft spectrum (kT~0.5 keV), while the component C blend shows much harder emission (kT~6 keV). This blend and other hard sources are responsible for the hard emission and Fe K line seen by ASCA, which was previously attributed entirely to HD 164492A. The soft spectrum of the O star is similar to emission seen from other single O stars and is probably produced by shocks within its massive stellar wind. Lack of hard emission suggests that neither a magnetically confined wind shock nor colliding wind emission is important in HD 164492A. A dozen stars are found to have flares in the field, and most of them are pre-main-sequence stars (PMS). Six sources with flares have both optical and Two Micron All Sky Survey counterparts. These counterparts are not embedded, and thus it is likely that these sources are in a later stage of PMS evolution, possibly Class II or III. Two flare sources did not have any near-IR, optical, or radio counterparts. We suggest that these X-ray flare stars are in an early PMS stage (Class I or earlier). We also detected X-ray sources apparently associated with two massive star-forming cores, TC 1 and TC 4. The spectra of these sources show high extinction and X-ray luminosities of (2-5)×1031 ergs s-1. If these sources are Class 0 objects, it is unclear whether their X-ray emission is due to solar-type magnetic activities, as in Class I objects, or to some other mechanism.

  9. A Method for Measuring Active Region Filling Factors on Solar-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giampapa, Mark Steven; Andretta, Vincenzo; Beeck, Benjamin; Reiners, Ansgar; Schussler, Manfred

    2015-04-01

    Radiative diagnostics of “activity” in the Sun and solar-type stars are spatially associated with sites of emergent magnetic flux. The magnetic fields themselves are widely regarded as the surface manifestations of a dynamo mechanism. The further development of both dynamo theory and models of the non-radiative heating of outer stellar atmospheres requires a knowledge of stellar magnetic field properties. In this context, it becomes important to determine the surface distribution, or at least the fractional coverage of, magnetic active regions as one critical constraint for dynamo models. But, while information on the spatial distribution of activity on stellar surfaces can be gathered in some special cases (mostly rapid rotators), such measurements have always been elusive in more solar-like stars. We discuss the challenges and results obtained from a method that relies on the non-linear response of the two principal He I triplet lines (at 1083 nm and 587.6 nm) to infer useful constraints on the fractional area coverage of magnetic active regions on solar-type stars.

  10. Difference at chromospheric levels between rs cvn-type binaries, active and quiet chromosphere single stars, and active and quiet regions in the sun

    SciTech Connect

    Linsky, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper summarizes the differences in the properties of active chromospheres compared with quiet chromospheres by comparing active and quiet regions on the Sun, active and quiet chromosphere stars, and the very active chromospheres seen in close binary systems with chromospheres of single stars. In particular, the chromospheres of the RS CVn-type binary systems UX Arietis and HR 1099 and the chromosphere of UX Arietis during a flare are modeled.

  11. Discovering Geography: Teacher Created Activities for High School and Middle School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, James F., Ed.

    This guide contains 20 classroom activities designed by teachers to study topics in geography with the eventual goal of aiding in the development of geographic literacy in students. The various activities involve map reading skills, climatology, current events, urban development, and community planning. Each activity presentation includes an event…

  12. Navigating the Active Learning Swamp: Creating an Inviting Environment for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Marie C.; Malinowski, Jon C.

    2001-01-01

    Reports on a survey of faculty members (n=29) asking them to define active learning, to rate how effectively different teaching techniques contribute to active learning, and to list the three teaching techniques they use most frequently. Concludes that active learning requires establishing an environment rather than employing a specific teaching…

  13. A Community-Based Volunteer After-School Activity Program Created for Middle School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greaser, Thomas C., Jr.

    This practicum was designed to provide an after-school activity program to middle school students not engaged in interscholastic sports. Utilizing community volunteers, an enrichment-prevention program that featured 19 different activities in 2 class sessions per week over a 10-week period was developed and implemented. Activities included…

  14. A Multi-wavelength Study of Star Formation Activity in the S235 Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Luna, A.; Anandarao, B. G.; Ninan, J. P.; Mallick, K. K.; Mayya, Y. D.

    2016-03-01

    We have carried out an extensive multi-wavelength study to investigate the star formation process in the S235 complex. The S235 complex has a spherelike shell appearance at wavelengths longer than 2 μm and harbors an O9.5V type star approximately at its center. A near-infrared extinction map of the complex traces eight subregions (having AV > 8 mag), and five of them appear to be distributed in an almost regularly spaced manner along the spherelike shell surrounding the ionized emission. This picture is also supported by the integrated 12CO and 13CO intensity maps and by Bolocam 1.1 mm continuum emission. The position-velocity analysis of CO reveals an almost semi-ringlike structure, suggesting an expanding H ii region. We find that the Bolocam clump masses increase as we move away from the location of the ionizing star. This correlation is seen only for those clumps that are distributed near the edges of the shell. Photometric analysis reveals 435 young stellar objects (YSOs), 59% of which are found in clusters. Six subregions (including five located near the edges of the shell) are very well correlated with the dust clumps, CO gas, and YSOs. The average values of Mach numbers derived using NH3 data for three (East 1, East 2, and Central E) out of these six subregions are 2.9, 2.3, and 2.9, indicating these subregions are supersonic. The molecular outflows are detected in these three subregions, further confirming the ongoing star formation activity. Together, all these results are interpreted as observational evidence of positive feedback of a massive star.

  15. ACTIVE LEARNING TO OVERCOME SAMPLE SELECTION BIAS: APPLICATION TO PHOTOMETRIC VARIABLE STAR CLASSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Joseph W.; Starr, Dan L.; Miller, Adam A.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Butler, Nathaniel R.; Berian James, J.; Brink, Henrik; Long, James P.; Rice, John

    2012-01-10

    Despite the great promise of machine-learning algorithms to classify and predict astrophysical parameters for the vast numbers of astrophysical sources and transients observed in large-scale surveys, the peculiarities of the training data often manifest as strongly biased predictions on the data of interest. Typically, training sets are derived from historical surveys of brighter, more nearby objects than those from more extensive, deeper surveys (testing data). This sample selection bias can cause catastrophic errors in predictions on the testing data because (1) standard assumptions for machine-learned model selection procedures break down and (2) dense regions of testing space might be completely devoid of training data. We explore possible remedies to sample selection bias, including importance weighting, co-training, and active learning (AL). We argue that AL-where the data whose inclusion in the training set would most improve predictions on the testing set are queried for manual follow-up-is an effective approach and is appropriate for many astronomical applications. For a variable star classification problem on a well-studied set of stars from Hipparcos and Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment, AL is the optimal method in terms of error rate on the testing data, beating the off-the-shelf classifier by 3.4% and the other proposed methods by at least 3.0%. To aid with manual labeling of variable stars, we developed a Web interface which allows for easy light curve visualization and querying of external databases. Finally, we apply AL to classify variable stars in the All Sky Automated Survey, finding dramatic improvement in our agreement with the ASAS Catalog of Variable Stars, from 65.5% to 79.5%, and a significant increase in the classifier's average confidence for the testing set, from 14.6% to 42.9%, after a few AL iterations.

  16. Sejong Open Cluster Survey (SOS) - V. The Active Star Forming Region SH 2-255-257

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Beomdu; Sung, Hwankyung; Hur, Hyeonoh; Lee, Byeong-Cheol; Bessell, Michael S.; Kim, Jinyoung S.; Lee, Kang Hwan; Park, Byeong-Gon; Jeong, Gwanghui

    2015-12-01

    There is much observational evidence that active star formation is taking place in the H II regions Sh 2-255-257. We present a photometric study of this star forming region (SFR) using imaging data obtained in passbands from the optical to the mid-infrared, in order to study the star formation process. A total of 218 members were identified using various selection criteria based on their observational properties. The SFR is reddened by at least E(B-V) = 0.8 mag, and the reddening law toward the region is normal (R_V = 3.1). From the zero-age main sequence fitting method it is confirmed that the SFR is 2.1 ± 0.3 kpc from the Sun. The median age of the identified members is estimated to be about 1.3 Myr from a comparison of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD) with stellar evolutionary models. The initial mass function (IMF) is derived from the HRD and the near-infrared (J, J-H) color-magnitude diagram. The slope of the IMF is about Γ = -1.6 ± 0.1, which is slightly steeper than that of the Salpeter/Kroupa IMF. It implies that low-mass star formation is dominant in the SFR. The sum of the masses of all the identified members provides the lower limit of the cluster mass (169 M_{⊙}). We also analyzed the spectral energy distribution (SED) of pre-main sequence stars using the SED fitting tool of Robitaille et al., and confirm that there is a significant discrepancy between stellar mass and age obtained from two different methods based on the SED fitting tool and the HRD.

  17. Star-forming galaxy models: Blending star formation into TREESPH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihos, J. Christopher; Hernquist, Lars

    1994-01-01

    We have incorporated star-formation algorithms into a hybrid N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics code (TREESPH) in order to describe the star forming properties of disk galaxies over timescales of a few billion years. The models employ a Schmidt law of index n approximately 1.5 to calculate star-formation rates, and explicitly include the energy and metallicity feedback into the Interstellar Medium (ISM). Modeling the newly formed stellar population is achieved through the use of hybrid SPH/young star particles which gradually convert from gaseous to collisionless particles, avoiding the computational difficulties involved in creating new particles. The models are shown to reproduce well the star-forming properties of disk galaxies, such as the morphology, rate of star formation, and evolution of the global star-formation rate and disk gas content. As an example of the technique, we model an encounter between a disk galaxy and a small companion which gives rise to a ring galaxy reminiscent of the Cartwheel (AM 0035-35). The primary galaxy in this encounter experiences two phases of star forming activity: an initial period during the expansion of the ring, and a delayed phase as shocked material in the ring falls back into the central regions.

  18. A Census of Star Formation and Active Galactic Nuclei Populations in Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Logan H.; Atlee, David Wesley

    2016-01-01

    A recent survey of low-z galaxy clusters observed a disjunction between X-ray and mid-infrared selected populations of active galactic nuclei (X-ray and IR AGNs) (Atlee+ 2011, ApJ 729, 22.). Here we present an analysis of near-infrared spectroscopic data of star-forming galaxies in cluster Abell 1689 in order to confirm the identity of some of their IR AGN and to provide a check on their reported star formation rates. Our sample consists of 24 objects in Abell 1689. H and K band spectroscopic observations of target objects and standard stars were obtained by David Atlee between 2010 May 17 and 2011 June 6 using the Large Binocular Telescope's LUCI instrument. After undergoing initial reductions, standard stars were corrected for telluric absorption using TelFit (Gullikson+ 2014, AJ, 158, 53). Raw detector counts were converted to physical units using the wavelength-dependent response of the grating and the star's reported H and K band magnitudes to produce conversion factors that fully correct for instrumental effects. Target spectra were flux-calibrated using the airmass-corrected transmission profiles produced by TelFit and the associated H band conversion factor (or the average of the two factors, for nights with two standard stars). Star formation rates were calculated using the SFR-L(Ha) relation reported in Kennicutt (1998), with the measured luminosity of the Pa-a emission line at the luminosity distance of the cluster used as a proxy for L(Ha) (Kennicutt 1998, ARA&A 36, 189; Hummer & Stoney 1987, MNRAS 346, 1055). The line ratios H2 2.121 mm/Brg and [FeII]/Pab were used to classify targets as starburst galaxies, AGNs, or LINERs (Rodriguez-Ardila+ 2005, MNRAS, 364, 1041). Jones was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Program, which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  19. Modelling the photosphere of active stars for planet detection and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero, Enrique; Ribas, Ignasi; Jordi, Carme; Morales, Juan Carlos; Perger, Manuel; Rosich, Albert

    2016-02-01

    Context. Stellar activity patterns are responsible for jitter effects that are observed at different timescales and amplitudes in the measurements obtained from photometric and spectroscopic time series observations. These effects are currently in the focus of many exoplanet search projects, since the lack of a well-defined characterization and correction strategy hampers the detection of the signals associated with small exoplanets. Aims: Accurate simulations of the stellar photosphere based on the most recent available models for main-sequence stars can provide synthetic photometric and spectroscopic time series data. These may help to investigate the relation between activity jitter and stellar parameters when considering different active region patterns. Moreover, jitters can be analysed at different wavelength scales (defined by the passbands of given instruments or space missions) to design strategies to remove or minimize them. Methods: We present the StarSim tool, which is based on a model for a spotted rotating photosphere built from the integration of the spectral contribution of a fine grid of surface elements. The model includes all significant effects affecting the flux intensities and the wavelength of spectral features produced by active regions and planets. The resulting synthetic time series data generated with this simulator were used to characterize the effects of activity jitter in extrasolar planet measurements from photometric and spectroscopic observations. Results: Several cases of synthetic data series for Sun-like stars are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the methodology. A specific application for characterizing and modelling the spectral signature of active regions is considered, showing that the chromatic effects of faculae are dominant for low-temperature contrasts of spots. Synthetic multi-band photometry and radial velocity time series are modelled for HD 189733 by adopting the known system parameters and fitting for the

  20. Spectroscopic survey of ASAS eclipsing variables: search for chromospherically active eclipsing binary stars - I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parihar, Padmakar; Messina, S.; Bama, P.; Medhi, B. J.; Muneer, S.; Velu, C.; Ahmad, A.

    2009-05-01

    We have started a spectroscopic survey to identify new chromospherically active components and low-mass pre-main sequence (PMS) stars in recently discovered All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) eclipsing binaries. In this paper, we briefly describe our scientific motivation, the observing tools and the results obtained from the first phase of this survey. Using the available observing facilities in India, the spectroscopic observations of a sample of 180 candidate eclipsing binary stars selected from ASAS-I&II releases were carried out during 2004-2006. The strength of Hα emission was used to characterize the level of chromospheric activity. Our spectroscopic survey reveals that out of 180 stars about 36 binary systems show excess Hα emission. One of the objects in our sample, ASAS 081700-4243.8, displays very strong Hα emission. Follow-up high-resolution spectroscopic observations reveal that this object is indeed very interesting and most likely a classical Be-type system with K0III companion.

  1. Low-level supermassive black hole activity and star formation in isolated ellipticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinkus, Charlotte; Miller, Brendan; Gallo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    We present and discuss Chandra ACIS-S X-ray observations of six early-type galaxies located within cosmic voids. The targeted galaxies have comparable stellar masses of 6-9e10 solar but span a wide range of star formation rates, from 0.03 to 6.5 solar masses per year. These data permit clean investigation of the link, if any, between star formation and low-level supermassive black hole activity. We isolate the nuclear X-ray emission associated with SMBH activity through analyzing the X-ray surface brightness profiles and calculating the predicted X-ray binary contamination within the extraction aperture. The galaxies with higher star formation rates also tend to have greater SMBH-associated X-ray luminosities, perhaps suggestive of a mutual dependence on cold gas. We also compare our void galaxies to cluster early-type galaxies of similar stellar mass, finding that the void galaxies have, on average, more compact optical surface brightness profiles along with greater X-ray luminosities.

  2. Strong variable linear polarization in the cool active star II Peg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosén, Lisa; Kochukhov, Oleg; Wade, Gregg A.

    2014-08-01

    Magnetic fields of cool active stars are currently studied polarimetrically using only circular polarization observations. This provides limited information about the magnetic field geometry since circular polarization is only sensitive to the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field. Reconstructions of the magnetic field topology will therefore not be completely trustworthy when only circular polarization is used. On the other hand, linear polarization is sensitive to the transverse component of the magnetic field. By including linear polarization in the reconstruction the quality of the reconstructed magnetic map is dramatically improved. For that reason, we wanted to identify cool stars for which linear polarization could be detected at a level sufficient for magnetic imaging. Four active RS CVn binaries, II Peg, HR 1099, IM Peg, and σ Gem were observed with the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Mean polarization profiles in all four Stokes parameters were derived using the multi-line technique of least-squares deconvolution (LSD). Not only was linear polarization successfully detected in all four stars in at least one observation, but also, II Peg showed an extraordinarily strong linear polarization signature throughout all observations. This qualifies II Peg as the first promising target for magnetic Doppler imaging in all four Stokes parameters and, at the same time, suggests that other such targets can possibly be identified.

  3. Modulating Antimicrobial Activity and Mammalian Cell Biocompatibility with Glucosamine-Functionalized Star Polymers.

    PubMed

    Wong, Edgar H H; Khin, Mya Mya; Ravikumar, Vikashini; Si, Zhangyong; Rice, Scott A; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2016-03-14

    The development of novel reagents and antibiotics for combating multidrug resistance bacteria has received significant attention in recent years. In this study, new antimicrobial star polymers (14-26 nm in diameter) that consist of mixtures of polylysine and glycopolymer arms were developed and were shown to possess antimicrobial efficacy toward Gram positive bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) (with MIC values as low as 16 μg mL(-1)) while being non-hemolytic (HC50 > 10,000 μg mL(-1)) and exhibit excellent mammalian cell biocompatibility. Structure function analysis indicated that the antimicrobial activity and mammalian cell biocompatibility of the star nanoparticles could be optimized by modifying the molar ratio of polylysine to glycopolymers arms. The technology described herein thus represents an innovative approach that could be used to fight deadly infectious diseases.

  4. EChO spectra and stellar activity II. The case of dM stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandariato, Gaetano; Micela, Giuseppina

    2015-12-01

    EChO is a dedicated mission to investigate exoplanetary atmospheres. When extracting the planetary signal, one has to take care of the variability of the hosting star, which introduces spectral distortion that can be mistaken as planetary signal. Magneticvariability has to be taken into account in particular for M stars. To this purpose, assuming a one spot dominant model for the stellar photosphere, we develop a mixed observational-theoretical tool to extract the spot's parameters from the observed optical spectrum. This method relies on a robust library of spectral M templates, which we derive using the observed spectra of quiet M dwarfs in the SDSS database. Our procedure allows to correct the observed spectra for photospheric activity in most of the analyzed cases, reducing the spectral distortion down to the noise levels. Ongoing refinements of the template library and the algorithm will improve the efficiency of our algorithm.

  5. Create an Adventure Challenge: Using Recess Time to Supplement Physical Activity during the School Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiGiacinto, Kacey Lynn; Jones, Emily

    2010-01-01

    NASPE recommends children ages 5-12 accumulate at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity each day of the week. With the growing occurrence of obesity in the United States, it is clear that too many of America's youth are not meeting the recommended amount of daily physical activity. Given that America's youth are having…

  6. Evaluation of the different forces brought into play during tube foot activities in sea stars.

    PubMed

    Hennebert, Elise; Haesaerts, Delphine; Dubois, Philippe; Flammang, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Sea star tube feet consist of an enlarged and flattened distal extremity (the disc), which makes contact with the substratum, and a proximal contractile cylinder (the stem), which acts as a tether. In this study, the different forces brought into play during tube foot functioning were investigated in two related species. The tube feet of Asterias rubens and Marthasterias glacialis attach to glass with a similar mean tenacity (0.24 and 0.43 MPa, respectively), corresponding to an estimated maximal attachment force of 0.15 and 0.35 N. The contraction force of their retractor muscle averages 0.017 N. The variation of the retractor muscle contraction with its extension ratio follows a typical bell-shaped length-tension curve in which a maximal contraction of approximately 0.04 N is obtained for an extension ratio of approximately 2.3 in both sea star species. The tensile strength of the tube foot stem was investigated considering the two tissues that could assume a load-bearing function, i.e. the retractor muscle and the connective tissue. The latter is a mutable collagenous tissue presenting a fivefold difference in tensile strength between its soft and stiff state. In our experiments, stiffening was induced by disrupting cell membranes or by modifying the ionic composition of the bathing solution. Finally, the force needed to break the tube foot retractor muscle was found to account for 18-25% of the tube foot total breaking force, showing that, although the connective tissue is the tissue layer that supports most of the load exerted on the stem, the contribution of the retractor muscle cannot be neglected in sea stars. All these forces appear well-balanced for proper functioning of the tube feet during the activities of the sea star. They are discussed in the context of two essential activities: the opening of bivalve shells and the maintenance of position in exposed habitats.

  7. NREL Team Creates High-Activity, Durable Platinum Extended Surface Catalyst for Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    Researchers with NREL's Fuel Cell team showed that platinum can replace copper nanowires in such a way that high-surface-area and high-specific-activity catalysts are produced, potentially allowing for lower-cost catalysts.

  8. Creating Neighbourhood Groupings Based on Built Environment Features to Facilitate Health Promotion Activities

    PubMed Central

    Schopflocher, Donald; VanSpronsen, Eric; Spence, John C.; Vallianatos, Helen; Raine, Kim D.; Plotnikoff, Ronald C.; Nykiforuk, Candace I.J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Detailed assessments of the built environment often resist data reduction and summarization. This project sought to develop a method of reducing built environment data to an extent that they can be effectively communicated to researchers and community stakeholders. We aim to help in an understanding of how these data can be used to create neighbourhood groupings based on built environment characteristics and how the process of discussing these neighbourhoods with community stakeholders can result in the development of community-informed health promotion interventions. Methods We used the Irvine Minnesota Inventory (IMI) to assess 296 segments of a semi-rural community in Alberta. Expert raters “created” neighbourhoods by examining the data. Then, a consensus grouping was developed using cluster analysis, and the number of IMI variables to characterize the neighbourhoods was reduced by multiple discriminant function analysis. Results The 296 segments were reduced to a consensus set of 10 neighbourhoods, which could be separated from each other by 9 functions constructed from 24 IMI variables. Biplots of these functions were an effective means of summarizing and presenting the results of the community assessment, and stimulated community action. Conclusions It is possible to use principled quantitative methods to reduce large amounts of information about the built environment into meaningful summaries. These summaries, or built environment neighbourhoods, were useful in catalyzing action with community stakeholders and led to the development of health-promoting built environment interventions. PMID:23618092

  9. Competency-based medical education and scholarship: Creating an active academic culture during residency.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, James A; Hategan, Ana; Azzam, Amin

    2015-10-01

    The competency-based medical education movement has been adopted in several medical education systems across the world. This has the potential to result in a more active involvement of residents in the educational process, inasmuch as scholarship is regarded as a major area of competency. Substantial scholarly activities are well within the reach of motivated residents, especially when faculty members provide sufficient mentoring. These academically empowered residents have the advantage of early experience in the areas of scholarly discovery, integration, application, and teaching. Herein, the authors review the importance of instituting the germinal stages of scholarly productivity in the creation of an active scholarly culture during residency. Clear and consistent institutional and departmental strategies to promote scholarly development during residency are highly encouraged.

  10. Star formation and AGN activity in the most luminous LINERs in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pović, Mirjana; Márquez, Isabel; Netzer, Hagai; Masegosa, Josefa; Nordon, Raanan; Pérez, Enrique; Schoenell, William

    2016-11-01

    This work presents the properties of 42 objects in the group of the most luminous, highest star formation rate (SFR) low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) at z = 0.04-0.11. We obtained long-slit spectroscopy of the nuclear regions for all sources, and FIR data (Herschel and IRAS) for 13 of them. We measured emission-line intensities, extinction, stellar populations, stellar masses, ages, active galactic nuclei (AGN) luminosities, and SFRs. We find considerable differences from other low-redshift LINERs, in terms of extinction, and general similarity to star-forming galaxies. We confirm the existence of such luminous LINERs in the local universe, after being previously detected at z ˜ 0.3 by Tommasin et al. The median stellar mass of these LINERs corresponds to 6-7 × 1010 M⊙ which was found in previous work to correspond to the peak of relative growth rate of stellar populations and therefore for the highest SFRs. Other LINERs although showing similar AGN luminosities have lower SFR. We find that most of these sources have LAGN ˜ LSF suggesting co-evolution of black hole and stellar mass. In general, the fraction of local LINERs on the main sequence of star-forming galaxies is related to their AGN luminosity.

  11. Magnetically elevated accretion disks in active galactic nuclei: broad emission line regions and associated star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.; Silk, Joseph

    2016-10-01

    We propose that the accretion disks fueling active galactic nuclei are supported vertically against gravity by a strong toroidal (φ -direction) magnetic field that develops naturally as the result of an accretion disk dynamo. The magnetic pressure elevates most of the gas carrying the accretion flow at R to large heights z ˜ 0.1 R and low densities, while leaving a thin dense layer containing most of the mass - but contributing very little accretion - around the equator. We show that such a disk model leads naturally to the formation of a broad emission line region through thermal instability. Extrapolating to larger radii, we demonstrate that local gravitational instability and associated star formation are strongly suppressed compared to standard disk models for AGN, although star formation in the equatorial zone is predicted for sufficiently high mass supply rates. This new class of accretion disk models thus appears capable of resolving two longstanding puzzles in the theory of AGN fueling: the formation of broad emission line regions and the suppression of fragmentation thought to inhibit accretion at the required rates. We show that the disk of stars that formed in the Galactic Center a few million years ago could have resulted from an episode of magnetically elevated accretion at ˜0.1 of the Eddington limit.

  12. New Insights on Late-A and Early-F Star Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire Ferrero, R.; Catalano, S.; Marilli, E.; Gouttebroze, P.; Talavera, A.; Bruhweiler, F.

    The onset of chromospheric activity in late-A and early-F stars is here discussed. The detection of Ly- emission core in several A and F atars with the IUE satellite, gives evidence for the presence of chromospheric layers in these stars up to B - V = 0m.19 (Marilli et al., 1996). Semiempirical chromospheric models for Altair allowed us (Freire Ferrero et al., 1995) to explain the observed emission profiles taking into account normal H I interstellar (IS) absorption. However, due to the very high rotational velocity, we analysed alternative hypotheses to explain the observed emissions: (1) circumstellar or shell matter; (2) co-rotating expanding optically thin wind. We ruled out these hypotheses because their effects are negligible and as a consequence, this result reinforces the chromospheric origin of the observed Ly- core in Altair. The stars of our sample, having observed Ly- profilies similar to Altair's and similar stellar and IS properties, should reproduce similar chromospheric behaviour. Here we discuss several important questions that are raised by these results.

  13. Activity and magnetic field structure of the Sun-like planet-hosting star HD 1237

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado-Gómez, J. D.; Hussain, G. A. J.; Grunhut, J.; Fares, R.; Donati, J.-F.; Alecian, E.; Kochukhov, O.; Oksala, M.; Morin, J.; Redfield, S.; Cohen, O.; Drake, J. J.; Jardine, M.; Matt, S.; Petit, P.; Walter, F. M.

    2015-10-01

    We analyse the magnetic activity characteristics of the planet-hosting Sun-like star, HD 1237, using HARPS spectro-polarimetric time-series data. We find evidence of rotational modulation of the magnetic longitudinal field measurements that is consistent with our ZDI analysis with a period of 7 days. We investigate the effect of customising the LSD mask to the line depths of the observed spectrum and find that it has a minimal effect on the shape of the extracted Stokes V profile but does result in a small increase in the S/N (~7%). We find that using a Milne-Eddington solution to describe the local line profile provides a better fit to the LSD profiles in this slowly rotating star, which also affects the recovered ZDI field distribution. We also introduce a fit-stopping criterion based on the information content (entropy) of the ZDI map solution set. The recovered magnetic field maps show a strong (+90 G) ring-like azimuthal field distribution and a complex radial field dominating at mid latitudes (~45 degrees). Similar magnetic field maps are recovered from data acquired five months apart. Future work will investigate how this surface magnetic field distribution affeccts the coronal magnetic field and extended environment around this planet-hosting star.

  14. The X-Ray Luminosity Function of M37 and the Evolution of Coronal Activity in Low-mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, Alejandro; Agüeros, Marcel A.

    2016-10-01

    We use a 440.5 ks Chandra observation of the ≈500 Myr old open cluster M37 to derive the X-ray luminosity functions of its ≤1.2 {M}ȯ stars. Combining detections of 162 M37 members with upper limits for 160 non-detections, we find that its G, K, and M stars have a similar median (0.5–7 keV) X-ray luminosity {L}{{X}}={10}29.0 {erg} {{{s}}}-1, whereas the {L}{{X}}-to-bolometric-luminosity ratio ({L}{{X}}/{L}{bol}) indicates that M stars are more active than G and K stars by ≈ 1 order of magnitude at 500 Myr. To characterize the evolution of magnetic activity in low-mass stars over their first ≈ 600 {{Myr}}, we consolidate X-ray and optical data from the literature for stars in six other open clusters: from youngest to oldest they are, the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), NGC 2547, NGC 2516, the Pleiades, NGC 6475, and the Hyades. For these, we homogenize the conversion of instrumental count rates to {L}{{X}} by applying the same one-temperature emission model as for M37, and obtain masses using the same empirical mass-absolute magnitude relation (except for the ONC). We find that for G and K stars X-ray activity decreases ≈ 2 orders of magnitude over their first 600 Myr, and for M stars, ≈1.5. The decay rate of the median {L}{{X}} follows the relation {L}{{X}}\\propto {t}b, where b=-0.61+/- 0.12 for G stars, ‑0.82 ± 0.16 for K stars, and ‑0.40 ± 0.17 for M stars. In {L}{{X}}/{L}{bol} space, the slopes are ‑0.68 ± 0.12, ‑0.81 ± 0.19, and ‑0.61 ± 0.12, respectively. These results suggest that for low-mass stars the age-activity relation steepens after ≈ 625 {{Myr}}, consistent with the faster decay in activity observed in solar analogs at t\\gt 1 {{Gyr}}.

  15. Catch a Star 2008!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-10-01

    ESO and the European Association for Astronomy Education have just launched the 2008 edition of 'Catch a Star', their international astronomy competition for school students. Now in its sixth year, the competition offers students the chance to win a once-in-a-lifetime trip to ESO's flagship observatory in Chile, as well as many other prizes. CAS logo The competition includes separate categories - 'Catch a Star Researchers' and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' - to ensure that every student, whatever their level, has the chance to enter and win exciting prizes. In teams, students investigate an astronomical topic of their choice and write a report about it. An important part of the project for 'Catch a Star Researchers' is to think about how ESO's telescopes such as the Very Large Telescope (VLT) or future telescopes such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) could contribute to investigations of the topic. Students may also include practical activities such as observations or experiments. For the artistically minded, 'Catch a Star' also offers an artwork competition, 'Catch a Star Artists'. Last year, hundreds of students from across Europe and beyond took part in 'Catch a Star', submitting astronomical projects and artwork. "'Catch a Star' gets students thinking about the wonders of the Universe and the science of astronomy, with a chance of winning great prizes. It's easy to take part, whether by writing about astronomy or creating astronomically inspired artwork," said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. As well as the top prize - a trip to ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile - visits to observatories in Austria and Spain, and many other prizes, can also be won. 'Catch a Star Researchers' winners will be chosen by an international jury, and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' will be awarded further prizes by lottery. Entries for 'Catch a Star Artists' will be displayed on the web and winners

  16. NO CLEAR SUBMILLIMETER SIGNATURE OF SUPPRESSED STAR FORMATION AMONG X-RAY LUMINOUS ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, C. M.; Alexander, D. M.; Mullaney, J. R.; Del Moro, A.; Rovilos, E.; Altieri, B.; Coia, D.; Charmandaris, V.; Daddi, E.; Le Floc'h, E.; Leiton, R.; Dasyra, K.; Dickinson, M.; Kartaltepe, J.; Hickox, R. C.; Ivison, R. J.; Magnelli, B.; Popesso, P.; Rosario, D.; and others

    2012-11-20

    Many theoretical models require powerful active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to suppress star formation in distant galaxies and reproduce the observed properties of today's massive galaxies. A recent study based on Herschel-SPIRE submillimeter observations claimed to provide direct support for this picture, reporting a significant decrease in the mean star formation rates (SFRs) of the most luminous AGNs (L{sub X} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) at z Almost-Equal-To 1-3 in the Chandra Deep Field-North (CDF-N). In this Letter, we extend these results using Herschel-SPIRE 250 {mu}m data in the COSMOS and Chandra Deep Field-South fields to achieve an order-of-magnitude improvement in the number of sources at L{sub X} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}. On the basis of our analysis, we find no strong evidence for suppressed star formation in L{sub X} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} AGNs at z Almost-Equal-To 1-3. The mean SFRs of the AGNs are constant over the broad X-ray luminosity range of L{sub X} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 43}-10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1} (with mean SFRs consistent with typical star-forming galaxies at z Almost-Equal-To 2; (SFRs) Almost-Equal-To 100-200 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}). We suggest that the previous CDF-N results were likely due to low number statistics. We discuss our results in the context of current theoretical models.

  17. Creating Healthier Afterschool Environments in the Healthy Eating Active Communities Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkle, Arnell J.; Yoshida, Sallie

    2014-01-01

    Afterschool programs in California have the potential to play a major role in obesity prevention given that they serve close to a million low-income children. A five-year initiative called the Healthy Eating Active Communities (HEAC) was funded in 2005 by the California Endowment to demonstrate that disparities related to childhood obesity and…

  18. Creating a Cell Map as an Active-Learning Tool in a Biochemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Bianco, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Teaching metabolism to a biochemistry class with diverse academic backgrounds is a challenging task. Often students lack the global perspective that is needed to understand how different metabolic pathways are reciprocally regulated. The classroom activity presented in this article is designed to facilitate the learning of metabolism by having the…

  19. Creating Trans-Inclusive Schools: Introductory Activities That Enhance the Critical Consciousness of Future Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Pedro, Kris Tunac; Jackson, Christopher; Campbell, Erin; Gilley, Jade; Ciarelli, Brock

    2016-01-01

    The Lawrence King murder and other tragedies surrounding transgender youth have prompted a national discussion about the need for schools to be more supportive and inclusive of transgender students. In this multi-authored reflection, the authors describe a series of three introductory activities in an undergraduate educational studies course aimed…

  20. Creating healthy workplaces in Northern Ireland: evaluation of a lifestyle and physical activity assessment programme.

    PubMed

    Addley, K; McQuillan, P; Ruddle, M

    2001-10-01

    An observational study was carried out on 2595 Northern Ireland civil servants who attended a workplace lifestyle and physical activity assessment programme involving self-reported lifestyle history, measurement of physiological parameters and a 6 month follow-up postal questionnaire survey. Almost two-thirds of participants did not engage in regular moderate physical activity, with females twice as likely not to than men. Approximately one in six participants were smokers and three-quarters were found to have body fat estimations above the acceptable level, with females much more likely to be obese than men. Aerobic capacity was below average in 17% of participants and was associated with increasing age, smoking in the under 35s and poor physical activity levels. Excessive alcohol intake was found in 8% of all participants, and was more likely in men and smokers. In the follow-up survey, 83% needed to make one or more changes to their lifestyle. Smoking was the most difficult to change, with only 14% remaining abstinent after 6 months. Almost two-thirds were maintaining improved dietary habits and exercise activity, with around one-half moderating alcohol intake and achieving weight reduction. Overall, the average level of non-attempted behaviour change was one in five (19.6%), tried but failed accounted for almost one in three (31.2%) and successful maintenance of positive lifestyle change occurred in one-half (49.2%). Brief lifestyle and physical activity assessment programmes are effective interventions in getting employees to modify their lifestyles. The impact this has on wider organizational issues such as absenteeism and productivity needs further evaluation.

  1. Application of active controls technology to the NASA Jet Star airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, R. H.; Cahill, J. F.; Campion, M. C.; Bradley, E. S.; Macwilkinson, D. G.; Phillips, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility was studied of modifying a Jet Star airplane into a demonstrator of benefits to be achieved from incorporating active control concepts in the preliminary design of transport type aircraft. Substantial benefits are shown in terms of fuel economy and community noise by virtue of reduction in induced drag through use of a high aspect ratio wing which is made possible by a gust alleviation system. An intermediate configuration was defined which helps to isolate the benefits produced by active controls technology from those due to other configuration variables. Also, an alternate configuration which incorporated composite structures, but not active controls technology, was defined in order to compare the benefits of composite structures with those of active controls technology.

  2. Twinning in fcc lattice creates low-coordinated catalytically active sites in porous gold.

    PubMed

    Krajčí, Marian; Kameoka, Satoshi; Tsai, An-Pang

    2016-08-28

    We describe a new mechanism for creation of catalytically active sites in porous gold. Samples of porous gold prepared by de-alloying Al2Au exhibit a clear correlation between the catalytic reactivity towards CO oxidation and structural defects in the fcc lattice of Au. We have found that on the stepped {211} surfaces quite common twin boundary defects in the bulk structure of porous gold can form long close-packed rows of atoms with the coordination number CN = 6. DFT calculations confirm that on these low-coordinated Au sites dioxygen chemisorbs and CO oxidation can proceed via the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism with the activation energy of 37 kJ/mol or via the CO-OO intermediate with the energy barrier of 19 kJ/mol. The existence of the twins in porous gold is stabilized by the surface energy.

  3. Twinning in fcc lattice creates low-coordinated catalytically active sites in porous gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajčí, Marian; Kameoka, Satoshi; Tsai, An-Pang

    2016-08-01

    We describe a new mechanism for creation of catalytically active sites in porous gold. Samples of porous gold prepared by de-alloying Al2Au exhibit a clear correlation between the catalytic reactivity towards CO oxidation and structural defects in the fcc lattice of Au. We have found that on the stepped {211} surfaces quite common twin boundary defects in the bulk structure of porous gold can form long close-packed rows of atoms with the coordination number CN = 6. DFT calculations confirm that on these low-coordinated Au sites dioxygen chemisorbs and CO oxidation can proceed via the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism with the activation energy of 37 kJ/mol or via the CO-OO intermediate with the energy barrier of 19 kJ/mol. The existence of the twins in porous gold is stabilized by the surface energy.

  4. Activity-based costing via an information system: an application created for a breast imaging center.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, H; Langer, J; Padua, E; Reaves, J

    2001-06-01

    Activity-based costing (ABC) is a process that enables the estimation of the cost of producing a product or service. More accurate than traditional charge-based approaches, it emphasizes analysis of processes, and more specific identification of both direct and indirect costs. This accuracy is essential in today's healthcare environment, in which managed care organizations necessitate responsible and accountable costing. However, to be successfully utilized, it requires time, effort, expertise, and support. Data collection can be tedious and expensive. By integrating ABC with information management (IM) and systems (IS), organizations can take advantage of the process orientation of both, extend and improve ABC, and decrease resource utilization for ABC projects. In our case study, we have examined the process of a multidisciplinary breast center. We have mapped the constituent activities and established cost drivers. This information has been structured and included in our information system database for subsequent analysis.

  5. Activity-based costing via an information system: an application created for a breast imaging center.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, H; Langer, J; Padua, E; Reaves, J

    2001-06-01

    Activity-based costing (ABC) is a process that enables the estimation of the cost of producing a product or service. More accurate than traditional charge-based approaches, it emphasizes analysis of processes, and more specific identification of both direct and indirect costs. This accuracy is essential in today's healthcare environment, in which managed care organizations necessitate responsible and accountable costing. However, to be successfully utilized, it requires time, effort, expertise, and support. Data collection can be tedious and expensive. By integrating ABC with information management (IM) and systems (IS), organizations can take advantage of the process orientation of both, extend and improve ABC, and decrease resource utilization for ABC projects. In our case study, we have examined the process of a multidisciplinary breast center. We have mapped the constituent activities and established cost drivers. This information has been structured and included in our information system database for subsequent analysis. PMID:11442093

  6. Twinning in fcc lattice creates low-coordinated catalytically active sites in porous gold.

    PubMed

    Krajčí, Marian; Kameoka, Satoshi; Tsai, An-Pang

    2016-08-28

    We describe a new mechanism for creation of catalytically active sites in porous gold. Samples of porous gold prepared by de-alloying Al2Au exhibit a clear correlation between the catalytic reactivity towards CO oxidation and structural defects in the fcc lattice of Au. We have found that on the stepped {211} surfaces quite common twin boundary defects in the bulk structure of porous gold can form long close-packed rows of atoms with the coordination number CN = 6. DFT calculations confirm that on these low-coordinated Au sites dioxygen chemisorbs and CO oxidation can proceed via the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism with the activation energy of 37 kJ/mol or via the CO-OO intermediate with the energy barrier of 19 kJ/mol. The existence of the twins in porous gold is stabilized by the surface energy. PMID:27586937

  7. Electrospray deposition in vacuum as method to create functionally active protein immobilization on polymeric substrates.

    PubMed

    Fornari, Enzo; Roberts, Clive J; Temperton, Robert H; O'Shea, James N

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate in this work the deposition of a large biological molecule (fibronectin) on polymeric substrates in a high vacuum environment using an electrospray deposition system. Fibronectin was deposited and its distribution and structure investigated and retention of function (ability to promote cell adhesion) on return to liquid environment is shown. AFM was used to monitor changes in the morphology of the surface before and after fibronectin deposition, whilst the biological activity of the deposited protein is assessed through a quantitative analysis of the biomolecular adhesion and migration of fibroblast cells to the modified surfaces. For the first time we have demonstrated that using high vacuum electrospray deposition it is possible to deposit large protein molecules on polymeric surfaces whilst maintaining the protein activity. The deposition of biological molecules such as proteins with the retention of their activity onto clean well-controlled surfaces under vacuum condition, offers the possibility for future studies utilizing high resolution vacuum based techniques at the atomic and molecular scale providing a greater understanding of protein-surface interface behaviour of relevance to a wide range of applications such as in sensors, diagnostics and tissue engineering.

  8. Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies. III. Co-evolution of Black Hole Growth and Star Formation Activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Rieke, George H.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Wang, Yiping; Hernán-Caballero, Antonio; Rigopoulou, Dimitra

    2013-03-01

    Local luminous infrared (IR) galaxies (LIRGs) have both high star formation rates (SFR) and a high AGN (Seyfert and AGN/starburst composite) incidence. Therefore, they are ideal candidates to explore the co-evolution of black hole (BH) growth and star formation (SF) activity, not necessarily associated with major mergers. Here, we use Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy of a complete volume-limited sample of local LIRGs (distances of <78 Mpc). We estimate typical BH masses of 3 × 107 M ⊙ using [Ne III] 15.56 μm and optical [O III] λ5007 gas velocity dispersions and literature stellar velocity dispersions. We find that in a large fraction of local LIRGs, the current SFR is taking place not only in the inner nuclear ~1.5 kpc region, as estimated from the nuclear 11.3 μm PAH luminosities, but also in the host galaxy. We next use the ratios between the SFRs and BH accretion rates (BHAR) to study whether the SF activity and BH growth are contemporaneous in local LIRGs. On average, local LIRGs have SFR to BHAR ratios higher than those of optically selected Seyferts of similar active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosities. However, the majority of the IR-bright galaxies in the revised-Shapley-Ames Seyfert sample behave like local LIRGs. Moreover, the AGN incidence tends to be higher in local LIRGs with the lowest SFRs. All of this suggests that in local LIRGs there is a distinct IR-bright star-forming phase taking place prior to the bulk of the current BH growth (i.e., AGN phase). The latter is reflected first as a composite and then as a Seyfert, and later as a non-LIRG optically identified Seyfert nucleus with moderate SF in its host galaxy. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under NASA contract 1407.

  9. Deep Chandra observations of HCG 16. I. Active nuclei, star formation, and galactic winds

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, E.; Zezas, A.; Vrtilek, J. M.; David, L. P.; Giacintucci, S.; Trevisan, M.; Ponman, T. J.; Raychaudhury, S.; Mamon, G. A.

    2014-10-01

    We present new, deep Chandra X-ray and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope 610 MHz observations of the spiral-galaxy-rich compact group HCG 16, which we use to examine nuclear activity, star formation, and high-luminosity X-ray binary populations in the major galaxies. We confirm the presence of obscured active nuclei in NGC 833 and NGC 835, and identify a previously unrecognized nuclear source in NGC 838. All three nuclei are variable on timescales of months to years, and for NGC 833 and NGC 835 this is most likely caused by changes in accretion rate. The deep Chandra observations allow us to detect for the first time an Fe Kα emission line in the spectrum of the Seyfert 2 nucleus of NGC 835. We find that NGC 838 and NGC 839 are both starburst-dominated systems, with only weak nuclear activity, in agreement with previous optical studies. We estimate the star formation rates in the two galaxies from their X-ray and radio emission, and compare these results with estimates from the infrared and ultraviolet bands to confirm that star formation in both galaxies is probably declining after galaxy-wide starbursts were triggered ∼400-500 Myr ago. We examine the physical properties of their galactic superwinds, and find that both have temperatures of ∼0.8 keV. We also examine the X-ray and radio properties of NGC 848, the fifth largest galaxy in the group, and show that it is dominated by emission from its starburst.

  10. LOCAL LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES. III. CO-EVOLUTION OF BLACK HOLE GROWTH AND STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY?

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Hernan-Caballero, Antonio; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Rieke, George H.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Wang Yiping; Rigopoulou, Dimitra

    2013-03-10

    Local luminous infrared (IR) galaxies (LIRGs) have both high star formation rates (SFR) and a high AGN (Seyfert and AGN/starburst composite) incidence. Therefore, they are ideal candidates to explore the co-evolution of black hole (BH) growth and star formation (SF) activity, not necessarily associated with major mergers. Here, we use Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy of a complete volume-limited sample of local LIRGs (distances of <78 Mpc). We estimate typical BH masses of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} using [Ne III] 15.56 {mu}m and optical [O III] {lambda}5007 gas velocity dispersions and literature stellar velocity dispersions. We find that in a large fraction of local LIRGs, the current SFR is taking place not only in the inner nuclear {approx}1.5 kpc region, as estimated from the nuclear 11.3 {mu}m PAH luminosities, but also in the host galaxy. We next use the ratios between the SFRs and BH accretion rates (BHAR) to study whether the SF activity and BH growth are contemporaneous in local LIRGs. On average, local LIRGs have SFR to BHAR ratios higher than those of optically selected Seyferts of similar active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosities. However, the majority of the IR-bright galaxies in the revised-Shapley-Ames Seyfert sample behave like local LIRGs. Moreover, the AGN incidence tends to be higher in local LIRGs with the lowest SFRs. All of this suggests that in local LIRGs there is a distinct IR-bright star-forming phase taking place prior to the bulk of the current BH growth (i.e., AGN phase). The latter is reflected first as a composite and then as a Seyfert, and later as a non-LIRG optically identified Seyfert nucleus with moderate SF in its host galaxy.

  11. Microarray Analysis of Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorter-Derived Cells: Creating Harmony between Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Tighe, S.

    2011-01-01

    Although microarray technology is well-established in both the research and clinical fields, it continues to evolve into new areas that require new methods for the successful isolations of nucleic acid from non-traditional sources. Because RNA specifically is a labile molecule, special procedures and considerations must be implemented to avoid degradation from methods such as fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and laser capture microdissection (LCM) to name a few. This presentation will discuss specific methodologies to maximize the success of nucleic acid recovery from these approaches including instrument preparation, extraction methods, and the use of special reagents to deal with problematic samples.

  12. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES, STAR FORMATION, AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY IN BALMER BREAK GALAXIES AT 0 < z < 1

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz Tello, J.; Donzelli, C.; Padilla, N.; Fujishiro, N.; Yoshikawa, T.; Hanami, H.; Hatsukade, B.

    2013-07-01

    We present a spectroscopic study with the derivation of the physical properties of 37 Balmer break galaxies, which have the necessary lines to locate them in star-forming-active galactic nuclei (AGNs) diagnostic diagrams. These galaxies span a redshift range from 0.045 to 0.93 and are somewhat less massive than similar samples of previous works. The studied sample has multiwavelength photometric data coverage from the ultraviolet to mid-infrared (MIR) Spitzer bands. We investigate the connection between star formation and AGN activity via optical, mass-excitation (MEx), and MIR diagnostic diagrams. Through optical diagrams, 31 (84%) star-forming galaxies, two (5%) composite galaxies, and three (8%) AGNs were classified, whereas from the MEx diagram only one galaxy was classified as AGN. A total of 19 galaxies have photometry available in all the IRAC/Spitzer bands. Of these, three AGN candidates were not classified as AGN in the optical diagrams, suggesting they are dusty/obscured AGNs, or that nuclear star formation has diluted their contributions. By fitting the spectral energy distribution of the galaxies, we derived the stellar masses, dust reddening E(B - V), ages, and UV star formation rates (SFRs). Furthermore, the relationship between SFR surface density ({Sigma}{sub SFR}) and stellar mass surface density per time unit ({Sigma}{sub M{sub */{tau}}}) as a function of redshift was investigated using the [O II] {lambda}3727, 3729, H{alpha} {lambda}6563 luminosities, which revealed that both quantities are larger for higher redshift galaxies. We also studied the SFR and specific SFR (SSFR) versus stellar mass and color relations, with the more massive galaxies having higher SFR values but lower SSFR values than less massive galaxies. These results are consistent with previous ones showing that, at a given mass, high-redshift galaxies have on average larger SFR and SSFR values than low-redshift galaxies. Finally, bluer galaxies have larger SSFR values than redder

  13. A CLOSER VIEW OF THE RADIO-FIR CORRELATION: DISENTANGLING THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF STAR FORMATION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Moric, I.; Smolcic, V.; Riechers, D. A.; Scoville, N.; Kimball, A.; Ivezic, Z.

    2010-11-20

    We extend the Unified Radio Catalog, a catalog of sources detected by various (NVSS, FIRST, WENSS, GB6) radio surveys, and SDSS, to IR wavelengths by matching it to the IRAS Point and Faint Source catalogs. By fitting each NVSS-selected galaxy's NUV-NIR spectral energy distribution (SED) with stellar population synthesis models we add to the catalog star formation rates (SFRs), stellar masses, and attenuations. We further add information about optical emission-line properties for NVSS-selected galaxies with available SDSS spectroscopy. Using an NVSS 20 cm (F{sub 1.4{sub GHz}} {approx}> 2.5 mJy) selected sample, matched to the SDSS spectroscopic ('main' galaxy and quasar) catalogs and IRAS data (0.04 < z {approx}< 0.2) we perform an in-depth analysis of the radio-FIR correlation for various types of galaxies, separated into (1) quasars, (2) star-forming, (3) composite, (4) Seyfert, (5) LINER, and (6) absorption line galaxies using the standard optical spectroscopic diagnostic tools. We utilize SED-based SFRs to independently quantify the source of radio and FIR emission in our galaxies. Our results show that Seyfert galaxies have FIR/radio ratios lower than, but still within the scatter of, the canonical value due to an additional (likely active galactic nucleus (AGN)) contribution to their radio continuum emission. Furthermore, IR-detected absorption and LINER galaxies are on average strongly dominated by AGN activity in both their FIR and radio emission; however their average FIR/radio ratio is consistent with that expected for star-forming galaxies. In summary, we find that most AGN-containing galaxies in our NVSS-IRAS-SDSS sample have FIR/radio flux ratios indistinguishable from those of the star-forming galaxies that define the radio-FIR correlation. Thus, attempts to separate AGNs from star-forming galaxies by their FIR/radio flux ratios alone can separate only a small fraction of the AGNs, such as the radio-loud quasars.

  14. Disentangling AGN and Star Formation Activity at High Redshift Using Hubble Space Telescope Grism Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridge, Joanna S.; Zeimann, Gregory R.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Gronwall, Caryl; Ciardullo, Robin; Fox, Derek; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-08-01

    Differentiating between active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity and star formation in z ˜ 2 galaxies is difficult because traditional methods, such as line-ratio diagnostics, change with redshift, while multi-wavelength methods (X-ray, radio, IR) are sensitive to only the brightest AGNs. We have developed a new method for spatially resolving emission lines using the Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 G141 grism spectra and quantifying AGN activity through the spatial gradient of the [O iii]/Hβ line ratio. Through detailed simulations, we show that our novel line-ratio gradient approach identifies ˜40% more low-mass and obscured AGNs than obtained by classical methods. Based on our simulations, we developed a relationship that maps the stellar mass, star formation rate, and measured [O iii]/Hβ gradient to the AGN Eddington ratio. We apply our technique to previously studied stacked samples of galaxies at z ˜ 2 and find that our results are consistent with these studies. This gradient method will also be able to inform other areas of galaxy evolution science, such as inside-out quenching and metallicity gradients, and will be widely applicable to future spatially resolved James Webb Space Telescope data.

  15. Liver segmentation with new supervised method to create initial curve for active contour.

    PubMed

    Zareei, Abouzar; Karimi, Abbas

    2016-08-01

    The liver performs a critical task in the human body; therefore, detecting liver diseases and preparing a robust plan for treating them are both crucial. Liver diseases kill nearly 25,000 Americans every year. A variety of image segmentation methods are available to determine the liver's position and to detect possible liver tumors. Among these is the Active Contour Model (ACM), a framework which has proven very sensitive to initial contour delineation and control parameters. In the proposed method based on image energy, we attempted to obtain an initial segmentation close to the liver's boundary, and then implemented an ACM to improve the initial segmentation. The ACM used in this work incorporates gradient vector flow (GVF) and balloon energy in order to overcome ACM limitations, such as local minima entrapment and initial contour dependency. Additionally, in order to adjust active contour control parameters, we applied a genetic algorithm to produce a proper parameter set close to the optimal solution. The pre-processing method has a better ability to segment the liver tissue during a short time with respect to other mentioned methods in this paper. The proposed method was performed using Sliver CT image datasets. The results show high accuracy, precision, sensitivity, specificity and low overlap error, MSD and runtime with few ACM iterations. PMID:27286186

  16. Liver segmentation with new supervised method to create initial curve for active contour.

    PubMed

    Zareei, Abouzar; Karimi, Abbas

    2016-08-01

    The liver performs a critical task in the human body; therefore, detecting liver diseases and preparing a robust plan for treating them are both crucial. Liver diseases kill nearly 25,000 Americans every year. A variety of image segmentation methods are available to determine the liver's position and to detect possible liver tumors. Among these is the Active Contour Model (ACM), a framework which has proven very sensitive to initial contour delineation and control parameters. In the proposed method based on image energy, we attempted to obtain an initial segmentation close to the liver's boundary, and then implemented an ACM to improve the initial segmentation. The ACM used in this work incorporates gradient vector flow (GVF) and balloon energy in order to overcome ACM limitations, such as local minima entrapment and initial contour dependency. Additionally, in order to adjust active contour control parameters, we applied a genetic algorithm to produce a proper parameter set close to the optimal solution. The pre-processing method has a better ability to segment the liver tissue during a short time with respect to other mentioned methods in this paper. The proposed method was performed using Sliver CT image datasets. The results show high accuracy, precision, sensitivity, specificity and low overlap error, MSD and runtime with few ACM iterations.

  17. Directional transport and active retention of Dpp/BMP create wing vein patterns in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Shinya; Shimmi, Osamu

    2012-06-15

    The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family ligand decapentaplegic (Dpp) plays critical roles in wing vein development during pupal stages in Drosophila. However, how the diffusible Dpp specifies elaborate wing vein patterns remains unknown. Here, we visualized Dpp distribution in the pupal wing and found that it tightly reflects the wing vein patterns. We show that Dpp is directionally transported from the longitudinal veins (LVs) into the posterior crossvein (PCV) primordial region by the extracellular BMP-binding proteins, short gastrulation (Sog) and crossveinless (Cv). Another BMP-type ligand, glass bottom boat (Gbb), also moves into the PCV region and is required for Dpp distribution, presumably as a Dpp-Gbb heterodimer. In contrast, we found that most of the Dpp is actively retained in the LVs by the BMP type I receptor thickveins (Tkv) and a positive feedback mechanism. We provide evidence that the directionality of Dpp transport is manifested by sog transcription that prepatterns the PCV position in a Dpp signal-independent manner. Taken together, our data suggest that spatial distribution of Dpp is tightly regulated at the extracellular level by combination of long-range facilitated transport toward the PCV and short-range signaling by active retention in the LVs, thereby allowing diffusible ligands to form elaborate wing vein patterns.

  18. Warm dust and aromatic bands as quantitative probes of star-formation activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Roussel, H.; Sauvage, M.; Charmandaris, V.

    2004-05-01

    We combine samples of spiral galaxies and starburst systems observed with ISOCAM on board ISO to investigate the reliability of mid-infrared dust emission as a quantitative tracer of star formation activity. The total sample covers very diverse galactic environments and probes a much wider dynamic range in star formation rate density than previous similar studies. We find that both the monochromatic 15 μm continuum and the 5-8.5 μm emission constitute excellent indicators of the star formation rate as quantified by the Lyman continuum luminosity LLyc, within specified validity limits which are different for the two tracers. Normalized to projected surface area, the 15 μm continuum luminosity Σ15 μm,ct is directly proportional to ΣLyc over several orders of magnitude. Two regimes are distinguished from the relative offsets in the observed relationship: the proportionality factor increases by a factor of ≈5 between quiescent disks in spiral galaxies, and moderate to extreme star-forming environments in circumnuclear regions of spirals and in starburst systems. The transition occurs near ΣLyc ˜ 102 L⊙ pc-2 and is interpreted as due to very small dust grains starting to dominate the emission at 15 μm over aromatic species above this threshold. The 5-8.5 μm luminosity per unit projected area is also directly proportional to the Lyman continuum luminosity, with a single conversion factor from the most quiescent objects included in the sample up to ΣLyc ˜ 104 L⊙ pc-2, where the relationship then flattens. The turnover is attributed to depletion of aromatic band carriers in the harsher conditions prevailing in extreme starburst environments. The observed relationships provide empirical calibrations useful for estimating star formation rates from mid-infrared observations, much less affected by extinction than optical and near-infrared tracers in deeply embedded H II regions and obscured starbursts, as well as for theoretical predictions from evolutionary

  19. The Evolution of Accretion and Activity Signatures in Young A Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williger, G. M.; Grady, C. A.; Hamaguchi, K.; Hubrig, S.; Bouret, J.-C.; Roberge, A.; Sahu, M.; Woodgate, B.; Kimble, R.

    2005-12-01

    FUV spectroscopy obtained with FUSE reveals excess continuum light in 12 lightly reddened Herbig Ae stars, as well as the routine presence of emission in a range of ionization stages sampling material from neutral atomic gas to transition region temperature plasma. The FUV excess light is correlated with the near IR colors of the stars which has previously been noted as a tracer of mass accretion rate. In several cases, sufficient data exist to demonstrate that FUV continuum variability is present and is correlated with changes in the FUV emission lines, particularly red-shifted material. Combining the FUV spectra with disk inclination data, we find that the red-shifted C III 1176 emission is seen for inclinations between 0 and 60 degrees with no dependence upon inclination in that range, as expected for funneled accretion scenarios. The FUV excess light and X-ray luminosity show the same evolutionary trend, dropping gradually over the 1st 10 Myr as long as the star is accreting material from the disk. Centrally-cleared A debris disk systems have X-ray luminosities which are at least 3 orders of magnitude fainter than the Herbig Ae stars, demonstrating that the X-ray emission is related to accretion and not to more conventional stellar activity. Plasma at transition region and chromospheric temperatures persists longer, at least in some systems. Recent magnetic field detections for 5 of the FUSE Herbig Ae stars and Beta Pictoris indicate that magnetic fields with typical field strengths of 50 to several hundred Gauss are present over the entire age range where the accretion signatures are seen. This study is based on observations made with the NASA-CNES-CSA Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. FUSE is operated for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University under NASA contract NAS5-32985. Data included in this study were obtained under FUSE GO Programs C126, D065, and the FUSE Legacy program E510. HST observations of HD 163296 and HD 104237 were obtained under HST

  20. Creating experiential learning activities using Web 2.0 tools and technologies: a case study.

    PubMed

    Brixey, Juliana J; Warren, Judith J

    2009-01-01

    Learning is no longer an internal individual activity but occurs through networks and connections. The aim of this project was to teach online health informatics students to use Web 2.0 tools and technologies to form networks and connections through experiential learning assignments. Web 2.0 tools and technologies were evaluated using a criteria checklist prior to implementation for students enrolled in health informatics classes at the University of Kansas School of Nursing. Health informatics students have developed competencies using an instant message service, blogging, concept mapping, social bookmarking, and interacting a virtual environment. In the future, health care professionals will have to work in rapidly changing environments and keep abreast of new innovations and tools, learn to use those tools, and to teach others about the tools.

  1. WebQuests: creating engaging, student-centered, constructivist learning activities.

    PubMed

    Russell, Cynthia K; Burchum, Jacqueline R; Likes, Wendy M; Jacob, Susan; Graff, J Carolyn; Driscoll, Carolyn; Britt, Teresa; Adymy, Cindy; Cowan, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Students entering health professions educational programs today have grown up and grown older in an unparalleled age of computers and connectivity. Yet most of these students face challenges in applying their information technology and information literacy abilities because most of them have never received formal training, have only a limited understanding of the tools they use, and underuse those tools. WebQuests are a unique method for enhancing students' information technology and information literacy competencies. As inquiry-oriented, engaging, and student-centered activities, WebQuests promote high-level thinking and problem-solving skills. Although WebQuests are used extensively in primary and secondary educational institutions, they have received limited attention in higher education settings. The authors describe the history of WebQuests and, using examples from a series of WebQuests used in an undergraduate informatics for healthcare course, offer specific guidelines for developing relevant WebQuests for nursing education.

  2. Creating leptin-like biofunctions by active immunization against chicken leptin receptor in growing chickens.

    PubMed

    Lei, M M; Wu, S Q; Shao, X B; Li, X W; Chen, Z; Ying, S J; Shi, Z D

    2015-01-01

    In this study, immunization against chicken leptin receptor (cLEPR) extracellular domain (ECD) was applied to investigate leptin regulation and LEPR biofunction in growing chicken pullets. A recombinant protein (cLEPR ECD) based on the cLEPR complemenary DNA sequence corresponding to the 582nd to 796th amino acid residues of cLEPR mature peptide was prepared and used as antigen. Immunization against cLEPR ECD in growing chickens increased anti-cLEPR ECD antibody titers in blood, enhanced proportions of phosphorylated janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and served as signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) protein in liver tissue. Chicken live weight gain and abdominal fat mass were significantly decreased (P < 0.05), but feed intake was stimulated by cLEPR ECD immunization (P < 0.05). The treatment also upregulated the gene expression levels of lepR, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), acetyl CoA carboxylase-2 (ACC2), and uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) in liver, abdominal fat, and breast muscle (P < 0.05) but decreased fasn expression levels (P < 0.01). Apart from that of lepR, the expression of appetite-regulating genes, such as orexigenic genes, agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY), were upregulated (P < 0.01), whereas the anorexigenic gene proopiomelanocortin (POMC) was downregulated in the hypothalamic tissue of cLEPR-immunized pullets (P < 0.01). Blood concentrations of metabolic molecules, such as glucose, triglycerides, and very-low-density lipoprotein, were significantly decreased in cLEPR-immunized pullets but those of cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein increased. These results demonstrate that antibodies to membrane proximal cLEPR ECD enhance cLEPR signal transduction, which stimulates metabolism and reduces fat deposition in chickens.

  3. Overexpression of Striated Muscle Activator of Rho Signaling (STARS) Increases C2C12 Skeletal Muscle Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Marita A.; Della Gatta, Paul A.; Ahmad Mir, Bilal; Kowalski, Greg M.; Kloehn, Joachim; McConville, Malcom J.; Russell, Aaron P.; Lamon, Séverine

    2016-01-01

    Background: Skeletal muscle growth and regeneration depend on the activation of satellite cells, which leads to myocyte proliferation, differentiation and fusion with existing muscle fibers. Skeletal muscle cell proliferation and differentiation are tightly coordinated by a continuum of molecular signaling pathways. The striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) is an actin binding protein that regulates the transcription of genes involved in muscle cell growth, structure and function via the stimulation of actin polymerization and activation of serum-response factor (SRF) signaling. STARS mediates cell proliferation in smooth and cardiac muscle models; however, whether STARS overexpression enhances cell proliferation and differentiation has not been investigated in skeletal muscle cells. Results: We demonstrate for the first time that STARS overexpression enhances differentiation but not proliferation in C2C12 mouse skeletal muscle cells. Increased differentiation was associated with an increase in the gene levels of the myogenic differentiation markers Ckm, Ckmt2 and Myh4, the differentiation factor Igf2 and the myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) Myf5 and Myf6. Exposing C2C12 cells to CCG-1423, a pharmacological inhibitor of SRF preventing the nuclear translocation of its co-factor MRTF-A, had no effect on myotube differentiation rate, suggesting that STARS regulates differentiation via a MRTF-A independent mechanism. Conclusion: These findings position STARS as an important regulator of skeletal muscle growth and regeneration. PMID:26903873

  4. CoRoT reveals a magnetic activity cycle in a Sun-like star.

    PubMed

    García, Rafael A; Mathur, Savita; Salabert, David; Ballot, Jérôme; Régulo, Clara; Metcalfe, Travis S; Baglin, Annie

    2010-08-27

    The 11-year activity cycle of the Sun is a consequence of a dynamo process occurring beneath its surface. We analyzed photometric data obtained by the CoRoT space mission, showing solarlike oscillations in the star HD49933, for signatures of stellar magnetic activity. Asteroseismic measurements of global changes in the oscillation frequencies and mode amplitudes reveal a modulation of at least 120 days, with the minimum frequency shift corresponding to maximum amplitude as in the Sun. These observations are evidence of a stellar magnetic activity cycle taking place beneath the surface of HD49933 and provide constraints for stellar dynamo models under conditions different from those of the Sun. PMID:20798310

  5. A THEORY ON THE CONVECTIVE ORIGINS OF ACTIVE LONGITUDES ON SOLAR-LIKE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Maria A.; Fan Yuhong; Miesch, Mark S.

    2013-06-20

    Using a thin flux tube model in a rotating spherical shell of turbulent, solar-like convective flows, we find that the distribution of emerging flux tubes in our simulation is inhomogeneous in longitude, with properties similar to those of active longitudes on the Sun and other solar-like stars. The large-scale pattern of flux emergence our simulations produce exhibits preferred longitudinal modes of low order, drift with respect to a fixed reference system, and alignment across the equator at low latitudes between {+-}15 Degree-Sign . We suggest that these active-longitude-like emergence patterns are the result of columnar, rotationally aligned giant cells present in our convection simulation at low latitudes. If giant convecting cells exist in the bulk of the solar convection zone, this phenomenon, along with differential rotation, could in part provide an explanation for the behavior of active longitudes.

  6. Time-resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars: Coronal Structure and Flares (Part II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Alexander

    EUVE has provided the first stellar coronal spectra showing individual emission lines, thereby allowing coronal modelling at a level of sophistication previously unattainable. Long EUVE observations have shown that large-scale flaring is prevalent in the coronae of active binary stars. We propose to obtain EUVE DSS spectra and photometry for 4 active binaries, one of which has never been observed by EUVE (V478 Lyr) and three EUV-bright systems that merit reobservation (Sigma CrB, Sigma Gem, Xi UMa). We shall use these observations to derive high quality quiescent coronal spectra for measuring emission measure distributions and modelling, and to obtain new flare data. We shall try to coordinate these observations with ground-based radio observations and other spacecraft, if the scheduling allows. The Sigma CrB spectra may be coordinated with AXAF GTO observations. The proposed observations will significantly increase the available EUVE spectroscopy of active binaries.

  7. Hide and Seek: Radial-Velocity Searches for Planets around Active Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, Raphaëlle Dawn

    2015-11-01

    The detection of low-mass extra-solar planets through radial-velocity searches is currently limited by the intrinsic magnetic activity of the host stars. The correlated noise that arises from their natural radial-velocity variability can easily mimic or conceal the orbital signals of super-Earth and Earth-mass extra-solar planets. I developed an intuitive and robust data analysis framework in which the activity-induced variations are modelled with a Gaussian process that has the frequency structure of the photometric variations of the star, thus allowing me to determine precise and reliable planetary masses. I applied this technique to three recently discovered planetary systems: CoRoT-7, Kepler-78 and Kepler-10. I determined the masses of the transiting super-Earth CoRoT-7b and the small Neptune CoRoT-7c to be 4.73 ± 0.95 M⊕ and 13.56 ± 1.08 M⊕, respectively. The density of CoRoT-7b is 6.61 ± 1.72 g.cm-3, which is compatible with a rocky composition. I carried out Bayesian model selection to assess the nature of a previously identified signal at 9 days, and found that it is best interpreted as stellar activity. Despite the high levels of activity of its host star, I determined the mass of the Earth-sized planet Kepler-78b to be 1.76 ± 0.18 M⊕. With a density of 6.2(+1.8:-1.4) g.cm-3, it is also a rocky planet. I found the masses of Kepler-10b and Kepler-10c to be 3.31 ± 0.32 M⊕ and 16.25 ± 3.66 M⊕, respectively. Their densities, of 6.4(+1.1:-0.7) g.cm-3 and 8.1 ± 1.8 g.cm-3, imply that they are both of rocky composition - even the 2 Earth-radius planet Kepler-10c! In parallel, I deepened our understanding of the physical origin of stellar radial-velocity variability through the study of the Sun, which is the only star whose surface can be imaged at high resolution. I found that the full-disc magnetic flux is an excellent proxy for activity-induced radial-velocity variations; this result may become key to breaking the activity barrier in coming

  8. Chromospheric activity and lithium line variations in the spectra of the spotted star LQ Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores Soriano, M.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Weber, M.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Although the relationship between lithium abundance in stars and their magnetic activity is commonly accepted, it is still unclear how the different phenomena related to it can increase the amount of Li, reduce its depletion, or be a source of bias for the measurements. Aims: We study the rotational modulation of chromospheric and photospheric parameters of the young, active, single K2 dwarf LQ Hya and their connection with the variability of the Li i 6708 Å line. Methods: A total of 199 high-resolution STELLA spectra and quasi-simultaneous photometry were used to compute effective temperature, gravity, and chromospheric activity indicators such as Hα and Hβ emission, Balmer decrement, and chromospheric electron density, as a function of the rotational phase. The variation of the Li i 6708 Å line was characterized in terms of equivalent width, abundance, and of 6Li/7Li isotopic ratio in the form of line shifts. Results: Photospheric and chromospheric parameters show clear rotational modulation. Effective temperatures and continuum variations reveal a higher concentration of cool spots on the side of the star on which we also detect stronger chromospheric activity. Increased electron densities and the modulation of the He i D3 line suggest that the source of this activity can be a combination of plages and repeated low-intensity flares. The Li line and other temperature-sensitive lines are clearly enhanced by the spots located on the most active side of the star. Li abundances calculated taking into account the temperature variations simultaneously show, although with high dispersion, a small overabundance of this element that correlates well with the surface magnetic activity. In addition, the Li line center is more intensely redshifted than in the other hemisphere, which might be interpreted as a weak enrichment of 6Li. Based on data obtained with the STELLA robotic telescope in Tenerife, an AIP facility jointly operated by AIP and IAC, and the Vienna

  9. DO MOST ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI LIVE IN HIGH STAR FORMATION NUCLEAR CUSPS?

    SciTech Connect

    Mushotzky, Richard F.; Shimizu, T. Taro; Meléndez, Marcio; Koss, Michael

    2014-02-01

    We present early results of the Herschel PACS (70 and 160 μm) and SPIRE (250, 350, and 500 μm) survey of 313 low redshift (z < 0.05), ultra-hard X-ray (14-195 keV) selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the 58 month Swift/Burst Alert Telescope catalog. Selection of AGNs from ultra-hard X-rays avoids bias from obscuration, providing a complete sample of AGNs to study the connection between nuclear activity and star formation in host galaxies. With the high angular resolution of PACS, we find that >35% and >20% of the sources are ''point-like'' at 70 and 160 μm respectively and many more have their flux dominated by a point source located at the nucleus. The inferred star formation rates (SFRs) of 0.1-100 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} using the 70 and 160 μm flux densities as SFR indicators are consistent with those inferred from Spitzer Ne II fluxes, but we find that 11.25 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon data give ∼3× lower SFR. Using GALFIT to measure the size of the far-infrared emitting regions, we determined the SFR surface density (M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} kpc{sup –2}) for our sample, finding that a significant fraction of these sources exceed the threshold for star formation driven winds (0.1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} kpc{sup –2})

  10. HATS-2b: A transiting extrasolar planet orbiting a K-type star showing starspot activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohler-Fischer, M.; Mancini, L.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Bayliss, D.; Jordán, A.; Csubry, Z.; Zhou, G.; Rabus, M.; Nikolov, N.; Brahm, R.; Espinoza, N.; Buchhave, L. A.; Béky, B.; Suc, V.; Csák, B.; Henning, T.; Wright, D. J.; Tinney, C. G.; Addison, B. C.; Schmidt, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Papp, I.; Lázár, J.; Sári, P.; Conroy, P.

    2013-10-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-2b, the second transiting extrasolar planet detected by the HATSouth survey. HATS-2b is moving on a circular orbit around a V = 13.6 mag, K-type dwarf star (GSC 6665-00236), at a separation of 0.0230 ± 0.0003 AU and with a period of 1.3541 days. The planetary parameters have been robustly determined using a simultaneous fit of the HATSouth, MPG/ESO 2.2 m/GROND, Faulkes Telescope South/Spectral transit photometry, and MPG/ESO 2.2 m/FEROS, Euler 1.2 m/CORALIE, AAT 3.9 m/CYCLOPS radial-velocity measurements. HATS-2b has a mass of 1.37 ± 0.16 MJ, a radius of 1.14 ± 0.03 RJ, and an equilibrium temperature of 1567 ± 30 K. The host star has a mass of 0.88 ± 0.04 M⊙ and a radius of 0.89 ± 0.02 R⊙, and it shows starspot activity. We characterized the stellar activity by analyzing two photometric follow-up transit light curves taken with the GROND instrument, both obtained simultaneously in four optical bands (covering the wavelength range of 3860-9520 Å). The two light curves contain anomalies compatible with starspots on the photosphere of the host star along the same transit chord. Tables of the individual photometric measurements are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/558/A55

  11. Creating a virtual community of practice to investigate legitimate peripheral participation by African American middle school girls in science activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Leslie D.

    How do teenage girls develop an interest in science? What kinds of opportunities can science teachers present to female students that support their engagement with learning science? I studied one aspect of this issue by focusing on ways students could use science to enhance or gain identities that they (probably) already valued. To do that I created technology-rich activities and experiences for an after school class in science and technology for middle school girls who lived in a low socio-economic urban neighborhood. These activities and experiences were designed to create a virtual community of practice whose members used science in diverse ways. Student interest was made evident in their responses to the activities. Four conclusions emerged. (1) Opportunities to learn about the lives and work of admired African American business women interested students in learning by linking it to their middle-class aspirations and their interest in things that money and status can buy. (2) Opportunities to learn about the lives and work of African American women experts in science in a classroom context where students then practiced similar kinds of actual scientific tasks engaged students in relations of legitimate peripheral participation in a virtual and diverse community of practice focused on science which was created in the after-school classes. (3) Opportunities where students used science to show off for family, friends, and supporters of the after-school program, identities they valued, interested them enough that they engaged in long-term science and technology projects that required lots of revisions. (4) In response to the opportunities presented, new and enhanced identities developed around becoming a better student or becoming some kind of scientist.

  12. STRONG VARIABLE ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION FROM Y GEM: ACCRETION ACTIVITY IN AN ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STAR WITH A BINARY COMPANION?

    SciTech Connect

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Neill, James D.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Sanchez Contreras, Carmen

    2011-10-20

    Binarity is believed to dramatically affect the history and geometry of mass loss in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and post-AGB stars, but observational evidence of binarity is sorely lacking. As part of a project to look for hot binary companions to cool AGB stars using the Galaxy Evolution Explorer archive, we have discovered a late-M star, Y Gem, to be a source of strong and variable UV emission. Y Gem is a prime example of the success of our technique of UV imaging of AGB stars in order to search for binary companions. Y Gem's large and variable UV flux makes it one of the most prominent examples of a late-AGB star with a mass accreting binary companion. The UV emission is most likely due to emission associated with accretion activity and a disk around a main-sequence companion star. The physical mechanism generating the UV emission is extremely energetic, with an integrated luminosity of a few x L{sub sun} at its peak. We also find weak CO J = 2-1 emission from Y Gem with a very narrow line profile (FWHM of 3.4 km s{sup -1}). Such a narrow line is unlikely to arise in an outflow and is consistent with emission from an orbiting, molecular reservoir of radius 300 AU. Y Gem may be the progenitor of the class of post-AGB stars which are binaries and possess disks but no outflows.

  13. A 12-year Activity Cycle for the Nearby Planet Host Star HD 219134

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Marshall C.; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; Meschiari, Stefano; Robertson, Paul; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Brugamyer, Erik J.; Caldwell, Caroline; Hatzes, Artie P.; Ramírez, Ivan; Wittenmyer, Robert A.

    2016-04-01

    The nearby (6.5 pc) star HD 219134 was recently shown by Motalebi et al. and Vogt et al. to host several planets, the innermost of which is transiting. We present 27 years of radial velocity (RV) observations of this star from the McDonald Observatory Planet Search program, and 19 years of stellar activity data. We detect a long-period activity cycle measured in the Ca ii SHK index, with a period of 4230 ± 100 days (11.7 years), very similar to the 11 year solar activity cycle. Although the period of the Saturn-mass planet HD 219134 h is close to half that of the activity cycle, we argue that it is not an artifact due to stellar activity. We also find a significant periodicity in the SHK data due to stellar rotation with a period of 22.8 days. This is identical to the period of planet f identified by Vogt et al., suggesting that this RV signal might be caused by rotational modulation of stellar activity rather than a planet. Analysis of our RVs allows us to detect the long-period planet HD 219134 h and the transiting super-Earth HD 219134 b. Finally, we use our long time baseline to constrain the presence of longer period planets in the system, excluding to 1σ objects with M{sin}i\\gt 0.36{M}J at 12 years (corresponding to the orbital period of Jupiter) and M{sin}i\\gt 0.72{M}J at a period of 16.4 years (assuming a circular orbit for an outer companion).

  14. Creating connections to life during life-threatening illness: Creative activity experienced by elderly people and occupational therapists

    PubMed Central

    la Cour, Karen; Josephsson, Staffan; Luborsky, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to discover and characterize components of engagement in creative activity as occupational therapy for elderly people dealing with life-threatening illness, from the perspective of both clients and therapists. Despite a long tradition of use in clinical interventions, key questions remain little addressed concerning how and why people seek these activities and the kinds of benefits that may result. Method Qualitative interviews were conducted with 8 clients and 7 therapists participating in creative workshops using crafts at a nursing home in Sweden. Analysis of the interviews was conducted using a constant comparative method. Findings Engaging in creative activity served as a medium that enabled creation of connections to wider culture and daily life that counters consequences of terminal illness, such as isolation. Creating connections to life was depicted as the core category, carried out in reference to three subcategories: (1) a generous receptive environment identified as the foundation for engaging in creative activity; (2) unfolding creations—an evolving process; (3) reaching beyond for possible meaning horizons. Conclusion The findings suggest that the domain of creative activity can enable the creation of connections to daily life and enlarge the experience of self as an active person, in the face of uncertain life-threatening illness. Ultimately, the features that participants specify can be used to refine and substantiate the use of creative activities in intervention and general healthcare. PMID:16389735

  15. Creating Stimulating Learning and Thinking Using New Models of Activity-Based Learning and Metacognitive-Based Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pang, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a novel way to stimulate learning, creativity, and thinking based on a new understanding of activity-based learning (ABL) and two methods for developing metacognitive-based activities for the classroom. ABL, in this model, is based on the premise that teachers are distillers and facilitators of information…

  16. RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF THE STAR FORMATION ACTIVITIES IN THE NGC 2024 FIR 4 REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju; Lee, Jeong-Eun

    2015-07-15

    Star formation activities in the NGC 2024 FIR 4 region were studied by imaging centimeter continuum sources and water maser sources using several archival data sets from the Very Large Array. The continuum source VLA 9 is elongated in the northwest–southeast direction, consistent with the FIR 4 bipolar outflow axis, and has a flat spectrum in the 6.2–3.6 cm interval. The three water maser spots associated with FIR 4 are also distributed along the outflow axis. One of the spots is located close to VLA 9, and another one is close to an X-ray source. Examinations of the positions of compact objects in this region suggest that the FIR 4 cloud core contains a single low-mass protostar. VLA 9 is the best indicator of the protostellar position. VLA 9 may be a radio thermal jet driven by this protostar, and it is unlikely that FIR 4 contains a high-mass young stellar object (YSO). A methanol 6.7 GHz maser source is located close to VLA 9, at a distance of about 100 AU. The FIR 4 protostar must be responsible for the methanol maser action, which suggests that methanol class II masers are not necessarily excited by high-mass YSOs. Also discussed are properties of other centimeter continuum sources in the field of view and the water masers associated with FIR 6n. Some of the continuum sources are radio thermal jets, and some are magnetically active young stars.

  17. WIDESPREAD AND HIDDEN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT REDSHIFT >0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Juneau, Stephanie; Bournaud, Frederic; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Alexander, David M.; Mullaney, James R.; Magnelli, Benjamin; Hwang, Ho Seong; Willner, S. P.; Coil, Alison L.; Rosario, David J.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Faber, S. M.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Cooper, Michael C.; Frayer, David T.; and others

    2013-02-20

    We characterize the incidence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in 0.3 < z < 1 star-forming galaxies by applying multi-wavelength AGN diagnostics (X-ray, optical, mid-infrared, radio) to a sample of galaxies selected at 70 {mu}m from the Far-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy survey (FIDEL). Given the depth of FIDEL, we detect 'normal' galaxies on the specific star formation rate (sSFR) sequence as well as starbursting systems with elevated sSFR. We find an overall high occurrence of AGN of 37% {+-} 3%, more than twice as high as in previous studies of galaxies with comparable infrared luminosities and redshifts but in good agreement with the AGN fraction of nearby (0.05 < z < 0.1) galaxies of similar infrared luminosities. The more complete census of AGNs comes from using the recently developed Mass-Excitation (MEx) diagnostic diagram. This optical diagnostic is also sensitive to X-ray weak AGNs and X-ray absorbed AGNs, and reveals that absorbed active nuclei reside almost exclusively in infrared-luminous hosts. The fraction of galaxies hosting an AGN appears to be independent of sSFR and remains elevated both on the sSFR sequence and above. In contrast, the fraction of AGNs that are X-ray absorbed increases substantially with increasing sSFR, possibly due to an increased gas fraction and/or gas density in the host galaxies.

  18. Long and short timescale variability of magnetic activity on the BY Dra star BD+26 deg 730

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saar, S. H.; Golub, L.; Bopp, B.; Herbst, W.; Huovelin, J.

    1990-01-01

    BD+26 degree 730 is a very active K5V flare star with a 60 year starspot cycle. Since it is also nearly pole-on, it presents an unusual opportunity to study purely temporal evolution of magnetic activity. Contemporaneous International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE), magnetic flux, polarimetric, and H alpha observations of the star taken over several rotational periods in 1988 are presented. When combined with older photometry, optical and IUE archive spectra, the data show a surprising lack of any activity variability on either short (few days) or long (years) timescales. The lack of variability is suggested to be due to a nearly saturated level of magnetic activity on the star, as indicated by its large magnetic filling factor.

  19. Egyptian "Star Clocks"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, Sarah

    Diagonal, transit, and Ramesside star clocks are tables of astronomical information occasionally found in ancient Egyptian temples, tombs, and papyri. The tables represent the motions of selected stars (decans and hour stars) throughout the Egyptian civil year. Analysis of star clocks leads to greater understanding of ancient Egyptian constellations, ritual astronomical activities, observational practices, and pharaonic chronology.

  20. Thermally activated post-glitch response of the neutron star inner crust and core. I. Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Link, Bennett

    2014-07-10

    Pinning of superfluid vortices is predicted to prevail throughout much of a neutron star. Based on the idea of Alpar et al., I develop a description of the coupling between the solid and liquid components of a neutron star through thermally activated vortex slippage, and calculate the response to a spin glitch. The treatment begins with a derivation of the vortex velocity from the vorticity equations of motion. The activation energy for vortex slippage is obtained from a detailed study of the mechanics and energetics of vortex motion. I show that the 'linear creep' regime introduced by Alpar et al. and invoked in fits to post-glitch response is not realized for physically reasonable parameters, a conclusion that strongly constrains the physics of a post-glitch response through thermal activation. Moreover, a regime of 'superweak pinning', crucial to the theory of Alpar et al. and its extensions, is probably precluded by thermal fluctuations. The theory given here has a robust conclusion that can be tested by observations: for a glitch in the spin rate of magnitude Δν, pinning introduces a delay in the post-glitch response time. The delay time is t{sub d} = 7(t{sub sd}/10{sup 4} yr)((Δν/ν)/10{sup –6}) d, where t{sub sd} is the spin-down age; t{sub d} is typically weeks for the Vela pulsar and months in older pulsars, and is independent of the details of vortex pinning. Post-glitch response through thermal activation cannot occur more quickly than this timescale. Quicker components of post-glitch response, as have been observed in some pulsars, notably, the Vela pulsar, cannot be due to thermally activated vortex motion but must represent a different process, such as drag on vortices in regions where there is no pinning. I also derive the mutual friction force for a pinned superfluid at finite temperature for use in other studies of neutron star hydrodynamics.

  1. An evolutionary model for collapsing molecular clouds and their star formation activity. II. Mass dependence of the star formation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Zamora-Avilés, Manuel; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the evolution and dependence on cloud mass of the star formation rate (SFR) and efficiency (SFE) of star-forming molecular clouds (MCs) within the scenario that clouds are undergoing global collapse and that the SFR is controlled by ionization feedback. We find that low-mass clouds (M {sub max} ≲ 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉}) spend most of their evolution at low SFRs, but end their lives with a mini-burst, reaching a peak SFR ∼10{sup 4} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1}, although their time-averaged SFR is only (SFR) ∼ 10{sup 2} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1}. The corresponding efficiencies are SFE{sub final} ≲ 60% and (SFE) ≲ 1%. For more massive clouds (M {sub max} ≳ 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}), the SFR first increases and then reaches a plateau because the clouds are influenced by stellar feedback since earlier in their evolution. As a function of cloud mass, (SFR) and (SFE) are well represented by the fits (SFR) ≈ 100(1 + M {sub max}/1.4 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}){sup 1.68} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1} and (SFE) ≈ 0.03(M {sub max}/2.5 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}){sup 0.33}, respectively. Moreover, the SFR of our model clouds follows closely the SFR-dense gas mass relation recently found by Lada et al. during the epoch when their instantaneous SFEs are comparable to those of the clouds considered by those authors. Collectively, a Monte Carlo integration of the model-predicted SFR(M) over a Galactic giant molecular cloud mass spectrum yields values for the total Galactic SFR that are within half an order of magnitude of the relation obtained by Gao and Solomon. Our results support the scenario that star-forming MCs may be in global gravitational collapse and that the low observed values of the SFR and SFE are a result of the interruption of each SF episode, caused primarily by the ionizing feedback from massive stars.

  2. Mechanisms for quenching star formation activities in green valley galaxies and its depends on morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xu; Pan, Zhizheng; Lian, Jianhui

    2015-08-01

    Galaxies are categorized into two main populations, red quiescent galaxies and blue star-forming galaxies. One of the key questions is which physical mechanisms are responsible for quenching star formation activities in blue galaxies and the resulting transformation? In this talk, we present research on the morphologies, spectra, and environments of "green valley" galaxies in the COSMOS field and low redshift "green valley" galaxies in SDSS. Our findings suggest that environmental conditions, most likely starvation and harassment, significantly affect the transformation of M* < 10^10.0 Msun blue galaxies into red galaxies, especially at z < 0.5. Using image from SDSS and GALEX, we analyze the radial ultraviolet-optical color distributions in a sample of low redshift green valley galaxies, and investigate how quenching is processing in a galaxy. The early-type "green valley" galaxies (ETGs) have dramatically different radial NUV-r color distributions compared to late-type "green valley" galaxies (LTGs), most of ETGs have blue cores, nearly all LTGs have uniform color profiles that can be well-interpreted as red bulges plus blue disk components. These results suggest that the LTGs follow a general model by which quenching first occurs in the core regions, and then finally extend to the rest of the galaxy; for ETGs, their star formations are centrally concentrated. Our results can be re-examined and have important implications for the IFU surveys, such as MaNGA and SAMI (2013ApJ...776...14P, 2014ApJ...792L...4P, 2015MNRAS.446.1449L).

  3. Zeeman-Doppler imaging of active young solar-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackman, T.; Lehtinen, J.; Rosén, L.; Kochukhov, O.; Käpylä, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Context. By studying young magnetically active late-type stars, i.e. analogues to the young Sun, we can draw conclusions on the evolution of the solar dynamo. Aims: We determine the topology of the surface magnetic field and study the relation between the magnetic field and cool photospheric spots in three young late-type stars. Methods: High-resolution spectropolarimetry of the targets was obtained with the HARPSpol instrument mounted at the ESO 3.6 m telescope. The signal-to-noise ratios of the Stokes IV measurements were boosted by combining the signal from a large number of spectroscopic absorption lines through the least squares deconvolution technique. Surface brightness and magnetic field maps were calculated using the Zeeman-Doppler imaging technique. Results: All three targets show clear signs of magnetic fields and cool spots. Only one of the targets, V1358 Ori, shows evidence of the dominance of non-axisymmetric modes. In two of the targets, the poloidal field is significantly stronger than the toroidal one, indicative of an α2-type dynamo, in which convective turbulence effects dominate over the weak differential rotation. In two of the cases there is a slight anti-correlation between the cool spots and the strength of the radial magnetic field. However, even in these cases the correlation is much weaker than in the case of sunspots. Conclusions: The weak correlation between the measured radial magnetic field and cool spots may indicate a more complex magnetic field structure in the spots or spot groups involving mixed magnetic polarities. Comparison with a previously published magnetic field map shows that on one of the stars, HD 29615, the underlying magnetic field changed its polarity between 2009 and 2013. Based on observations made with the HARPSpol instrument on the ESO 3.6 m telescope at La Silla (Chile), under the program ID 091.D-0836.

  4. A NEW MULTI-BAND RADIAL VELOCITY TECHNIQUE FOR DETECTING EXOPLANETS AROUND ACTIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Bo; Ge Jian E-mail: jge@astrto.ufl.edu

    2012-05-10

    The radial velocity (RV) technique is one of the most efficient ways of detecting exoplanets. However, large RV jitters induced by starspots on an active star can inhibit detection of any exoplanet present or even lead to a false positive detection. This paper presents a new multi-band RV technique capable of substantially reducing starspot-induced RV jitters from stellar RV measurements to allow efficient and accurate extraction of RV signals caused by exoplanets. It takes full advantage of the correlation of RV jitters at different spectral bands and the independence of exoplanet signals at the corresponding bands. Simulations with a single-spot model and a multi-spot model have been conducted to investigate the RV jitter reduction capability of this method. The results show that this method can reduce the RV jitter amplitude by at least an order of magnitude, allowing detection of weaker exoplanet signals without significantly increasing RV observation time and cadence. This method can greatly reduce the observation time required to detect Earth-like planets around solar type stars with {approx}0.1 m s{sup -1} long term Doppler precision if spot-induced jitter is the dominant astrophysical noise source for RV measurements. This method can work efficiently for RV jitter removal if: (1) all the spots on a target star have approximately the same temperature during RV observations; (2) the RV jitter amplitude changes with wavelength, i.e., the RV jitter amplitude ratio, {alpha}, between two different spectral bands is not close to one; (3) the spot-induced RV jitter dominates the RV measurement error.

  5. The Sedentary Time and Activity Reporting Questionnaire (STAR-Q): reliability and validity against doubly labeled water and 7-day activity diaries.

    PubMed

    Csizmadi, Ilona; Neilson, Heather K; Kopciuk, Karen A; Khandwala, Farah; Liu, Andrew; Friedenreich, Christine M; Yasui, Yutaka; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Bryant, Heather E; Lau, David C W; Robson, Paula J

    2014-08-15

    We determined measurement properties of the Sedentary Time and Activity Reporting Questionnaire (STAR-Q), which was designed to estimate past-month activity energy expenditure (AEE). STAR-Q validity and reliability were assessed in 102 adults in Alberta, Canada (2009-2011), who completed 14-day doubly labeled water (DLW) protocols, 7-day activity diaries on day 15, and the STAR-Q on day 14 and again at 3 and 6 months. Three-month reliability was substantial for total energy expenditure (TEE) and AEE (intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.84 and 0.73, respectively), while 6-month reliability was moderate. STAR-Q-derived TEE and AEE were moderately correlated with DLW estimates (Spearman's ρs of 0.53 and 0.40, respectively; P < 0.001), and on average, the STAR-Q overestimated TEE and AEE (median differences were 367 kcal/day and 293 kcal/day, respectively). Body mass index-, age-, sex-, and season-adjusted concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs) were 0.24 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.07, 0.36) and 0.21 (95% CI: 0.11, 0.32) for STAR-Q-derived versus DLW-derived TEE and AEE, respectively. Agreement between the diaries and STAR-Q (metabolic equivalent-hours/day) was strongest for occupational sedentary time (adjusted CCC = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.64, 0.85) and overall strenuous activity (adjusted CCC = 0.64, 95% CI: 0.49, 0.76). The STAR-Q demonstrated substantial validity for estimating occupational sedentary time and strenuous activity and fair validity for ranking individuals by AEE.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Stellar activity and kinematics of FGK stars (Murgas+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgas, F.; Jenkins, J. S.; Rojo, P.; Jones, H. R. A.; Pinfield, D. J.

    2013-02-01

    We present a compilation of stellar activity catalogs combined with galactic velocity information of 2529 F, G, and K stars. The stellar activity catalogs use in this work are: Jenkins et al. 2011 (Cat. J/A+A/531/A8); Gray et al. 2003 (Cat. J/AJ/126/2048), 2006 (Cat. J/AJ/132/161); Henry et al 1996 (Cat. J/A+A/111/439); Wright et al. 2004 (Cat. J/ApJS/152/261); Duncan et al. (1991ApJS...76..383D, Cat. III/159). The galactic velocities are taken from the Jenkins et al. 2011 (Cat. J/A+A/531/A8) and the Geneva-Copenhaguen Survey (GCS) Nordstrom et al. (2004A&A...418..989N, Cat. V/117). (1 data file).

  7. Chromospherically active stars. 13: HD 30957: A double lined K dwarf binary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Dadonas, Virgilijus; Sperauskas, Julius; Vaccaro, Todd R.; Patterson, L. Ronald

    1994-01-01

    HD 30957 is a double-lined spectroscopic binary with a period of 44.395 days and a modest eccentricity of 0.09. The spectral types of the components are K2-3 V and K5 V. The measured v sin i for both components is less than or equal to 3 km/s and the orbital inclination is estimated to be 69 deg. The system is relatively nearby with a parallax of 0.025 sec or a distance of 40 pc. Space motions of the system indicate that it does not belong to any of the known moving groups. Absolute surface fluxes of the Ca II H and K lines have been recomputed and indicate only modest chromospheric activity. If the stars are rotating pseudosynchronously, the lack of light variability is consistent with the value of the critical Rossby number for starspot activity.

  8. Photospheric Activity in Selected Be STARS: lambda Eri and gamma Cas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Myron A.

    1994-01-01

    Recent observations of rapid variations in optical He I lines, X-rays, and FUV wavelengths in the prototypical classical Be stars lambda Eri and star gamma Cas hint that the violent processes occur on the surfaces of these stars almost all the time. We suggest that of these phenomena show greater similarities with magnetic flaring than any other process through to occur on stars.

  9. MHD seismology as a tool to diagnose the coronae of X-ray active sun-like flaring stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A. K.; Lalitha, Sairam

    It is now well accepted that the detection of impulsively generated multiple MHD modes are potentially used in diagnosing the local plasma conditions of the solar corona. Analogously, such analyses can also be significantly used in diagnosing the coronae of X-ray active Sun-like stars. In the present paper, we briefly review the detection of MHD modes in coronae of some X-ray active Sun-like stars, e.g. Proxima Centauri, ξ-Boo etc using XMM-Newton observations, and discuss the implications in deriving physical information about their localized magnetic atmosphere. We conclude that the refinement in the MHD seismology of solar corona is also providing the best analogy to develop the stellar seismology of magnetically active and flaring Sun-like stars to deduce the local physical conditions of their coronae.

  10. Rotational modulation of the chromospheric activity in the young solar-type star, X-1 Orionis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesgaard, A. M.; Simon, T.

    1982-01-01

    The IUE satellite was used to observe one of the youngest G stars (GO V) for which Duncan (1981) derives an age of 6 x 10 to the 8th power years from the Li abundance. Rotational modulation was looked for in the emission flux in the chromospheric and transition region lines of this star. Variations in the Ca 11 K-lines profile were studied with the CHF telescope at Mauna Kea. Results show that the same modulation of the emission flux of Ca 11 due to stellar rotation is present in the transition region feature of C IV and probably of He II. For other UV lines the modulation is not apparent, due to a more complex surface distribution of the active areas or supergranulation network, or a shorter lifetime of the conditions which give rise to these features, or to the uncertainities in the measured line strengths. The Mg II emission flux is constant to within + or - 3.4% implying a rather uniform distribution of Mg II emission areas. The Ca II emission not only shows a measurable variation in intensity but also variations in detailed line profile shape when observed at high resolution.

  11. Relativistic jet activity from the tidal disruption of a star by a massive black hole.

    PubMed

    Burrows, D N; Kennea, J A; Ghisellini, G; Mangano, V; Zhang, B; Page, K L; Eracleous, M; Romano, P; Sakamoto, T; Falcone, A D; Osborne, J P; Campana, S; Beardmore, A P; Breeveld, A A; Chester, M M; Corbet, R; Covino, S; Cummings, J R; D'Avanzo, P; D'Elia, V; Esposito, P; Evans, P A; Fugazza, D; Gelbord, J M; Hiroi, K; Holland, S T; Huang, K Y; Im, M; Israel, G; Jeon, Y; Jeon, Y-B; Jun, H D; Kawai, N; Kim, J H; Krimm, H A; Marshall, F E; P Mészáros; Negoro, H; Omodei, N; Park, W-K; Perkins, J S; Sugizaki, M; Sung, H-I; Tagliaferri, G; Troja, E; Ueda, Y; Urata, Y; Usui, R; Antonelli, L A; Barthelmy, S D; Cusumano, G; Giommi, P; Melandri, A; Perri, M; Racusin, J L; Sbarufatti, B; Siegel, M H; Gehrels, N

    2011-08-24

    Supermassive black holes have powerful gravitational fields with strong gradients that can destroy stars that get too close, producing a bright flare in ultraviolet and X-ray spectral regions from stellar debris that forms an accretion disk around the black hole. The aftermath of this process may have been seen several times over the past two decades in the form of sparsely sampled, slowly fading emission from distant galaxies, but the onset of the stellar disruption event has not hitherto been observed. Here we report observations of a bright X-ray flare from the extragalactic transient Swift J164449.3+573451. This source increased in brightness in the X-ray band by a factor of at least 10,000 since 1990 and by a factor of at least 100 since early 2010. We conclude that we have captured the onset of relativistic jet activity from a supermassive black hole. A companion paper comes to similar conclusions on the basis of radio observations. This event is probably due to the tidal disruption of a star falling into a supermassive black hole, but the detailed behaviour differs from current theoretical models of such events.

  12. Long-term chromospheric activity of non-eclipsing RS CVn-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccino, A. P.; Mauas, P. J. D.

    2009-02-01

    Context: The IUE database provides several UV high and low-resolution spectra of RS CVn-type stars from 1978 to 1996. In particular, many of these stars were monitored continuously during several seasons by IUE. Aims: Our main purpose is to study the short and long-term chromospheric activity of the RS CVn systems most observed by IUE: HD 22 468 (V711 Tau, HR 1099, K1IV+G5V), HD 21 242 (UX Ari, K0IV+G5V), and HD 224 085 (II Peg, K2IV). Methods: We first obtained the Mount Wilson index S from the IUE high and low-resolution spectra. Secondly, we used the Lomb-Scargle periodogram to analyse the mean annual index < S> and the amplitude of the rotational modulation of the index S. Results: For HD 22 468 (V711 Tau, HR 1099), we find a possible chromospheric cycle with a period of ~18 years and a shorter cycle with a period of ~3 years, which could be associated to a chromospheric “flip-flop” cycle. The data of HD 224 085 (II Peg) also suggest a chromospheric cycle of ~21 years and a flip-flop cycle of ~9 years. Finally, we obtained a possible chromospheric cycle of ~7 years for HD 21 242 (UX Ari).

  13. Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Observations of the Active Cool Star AB Doradus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ake, T. B.; Dupree, A. K.; Young, P. R.; Linsky, J. L.; Malina, R. F.; Griffiths, N. W.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Woodgate, B. E.

    2000-07-01

    Far-ultraviolet spectra were obtained of the active cool star AB Doradus (HD 36705) during the calibration and checkout period of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. Observations in this early phase of the mission were taken at a resolving power of 12,000-15,000 (~20-25 km s-1) and covered the spectral range 905-1187 Å. The integrated spectrum exhibits strong, rotationally broadened stellar emission from C III (λλ977, 1175) and O VI (λλ1032, 1037) and many weaker lines. Strong emission lines of C III and O VI exhibit broad wings. The C III λ977 profile shows blueshifted absorption at ~30 km s-1, and C II λ1036 absorption appears superposed on emission in the wing of O VI λ1037. Rotational modulation of C III and O VI is present, in harmony with its photometric variability. Flares were detected in the brightest lines, and subexposures were analyzed to examine flux and profile variations. Downflows that extend to 600 km s-1 during a flare are found in the O VI profiles. These early observations demonstrate that FUSE will be an exceptional instrument for studying chromospheres in cool stars.

  14. Relativistic jet activity from the tidal disruption of a star by a massive black hole.

    PubMed

    Burrows, D N; Kennea, J A; Ghisellini, G; Mangano, V; Zhang, B; Page, K L; Eracleous, M; Romano, P; Sakamoto, T; Falcone, A D; Osborne, J P; Campana, S; Beardmore, A P; Breeveld, A A; Chester, M M; Corbet, R; Covino, S; Cummings, J R; D'Avanzo, P; D'Elia, V; Esposito, P; Evans, P A; Fugazza, D; Gelbord, J M; Hiroi, K; Holland, S T; Huang, K Y; Im, M; Israel, G; Jeon, Y; Jeon, Y-B; Jun, H D; Kawai, N; Kim, J H; Krimm, H A; Marshall, F E; P Mészáros; Negoro, H; Omodei, N; Park, W-K; Perkins, J S; Sugizaki, M; Sung, H-I; Tagliaferri, G; Troja, E; Ueda, Y; Urata, Y; Usui, R; Antonelli, L A; Barthelmy, S D; Cusumano, G; Giommi, P; Melandri, A; Perri, M; Racusin, J L; Sbarufatti, B; Siegel, M H; Gehrels, N

    2011-08-25

    Supermassive black holes have powerful gravitational fields with strong gradients that can destroy stars that get too close, producing a bright flare in ultraviolet and X-ray spectral regions from stellar debris that forms an accretion disk around the black hole. The aftermath of this process may have been seen several times over the past two decades in the form of sparsely sampled, slowly fading emission from distant galaxies, but the onset of the stellar disruption event has not hitherto been observed. Here we report observations of a bright X-ray flare from the extragalactic transient Swift J164449.3+573451. This source increased in brightness in the X-ray band by a factor of at least 10,000 since 1990 and by a factor of at least 100 since early 2010. We conclude that we have captured the onset of relativistic jet activity from a supermassive black hole. A companion paper comes to similar conclusions on the basis of radio observations. This event is probably due to the tidal disruption of a star falling into a supermassive black hole, but the detailed behaviour differs from current theoretical models of such events. PMID:21866154

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE STAR FORMATION RATE, SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATE, AND THE PRESENCE OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI FOR HIGH STELLAR MASS AND LOW STELLAR MASS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa; Song Jun; Chen Yiqing; Jiang Peng; Ding Yingping

    2012-07-10

    Using two volume-limited main galaxy samples of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8 (SDSS DR8), we explore the environmental dependence of the star formation rate (SFR), specific star formation rate (SSFR), and the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) for high stellar mass (HSM) and low stellar mass (LSM) galaxies. It is found that the environmental dependence of the SFR and SSFR for luminous HSM galaxies and faint LSM ones remains very strong: galaxies in the lowest density regime preferentially have higher SFR and SSFR than galaxies in the densest regime, while the environmental dependence of the SFR and SSFR for luminous LSM galaxies is substantially reduced. Our result also shows that the fraction of AGNs in HSM galaxies decreases as a function of density, while the one in LSM galaxies depends very little on local density. In the faint LSM galaxy sample, the SFR and SSFR of galaxies strongly decrease with increasing density, but the fraction of AGNs depends very little on local density. Such a result can rule out that AGNs are fueled by the cold gas in the disk component of galaxies that is also driving the star formation of those galaxies.

  16. Atmospheres around Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryer, Chris L.; Benz, Willy

    1994-12-01

    Interest in the behavior of atmospheres around neutron stars has grown astronomically in the past few years. Some of this interest arrived in the wake of the explosion of Supernova 1987A and its elusive remnant; spawning renewed interest in a method to insure material ``fall-back'' onto the adolescent neutron star in an effort to transform it into a silent black hole. However, the bulk of the activity with atmospheres around neutron stars is concentrated in stellar models with neutron star, rather than white dwarf, cores; otherwise known as Thorne-Zytkow objects. First a mere seed in the imagination of theorists, Thorne-Zytkow objects have grown into an observational reality with an ever-increasing list of formation scenarios and observational prospects. Unfortunately, the analytic work of Chevalier on supernova fall-back implies that, except for a few cases, the stellar simulations of Thorne-Zytkow objects are missing an important aspect of physics: neutrinos. Neutrino cooling removes the pressure support of these atmospheres, allowing accretion beyond the canonical Eddington rate for these objects. We present here the results of detailed hydrodynamical simulations in one and two dimensions with the additional physical effects of neutrinos, advanced equations of state, and relativity over a range of parameters for our atmosphere including entropy and chemical composition as well as a range in the neutron star size. In agreement with Chevalier, we find, under the current list of formation scenarios, that the creature envisioned by Thorne and Zytkow will not survive the enormous appetite of a neutron star. However, neutrino heating (a physical effect not considered in Chevalier's analysis) can play an important role in creating instabilities in some formation schemes, leading to an expulsion of matter rather than rapid accretion. By placing scrutiny upon the formation methods, we can determine the observational prospects for each.

  17. Active optics: variable curvature mirrors for ELT laser guide star refocusing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challita, Zalpha; Hugot, Emmanuel; Madec, Fabrice; Ferrari, Marc; Le Mignant, David; Vivès, Sébastien; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel

    2011-10-01

    The future generation of Extremely Large Telescopes will require a complex combination of technologies for adaptive optics (AO) systems assisted by laser guide stars (LGS). In this context, the distance from the LGS spot to the telescope pupil ranges from about 80 to 200 km, depending on the Sodium layer altitude and the elevation of the telescope. This variation leads to a defocusing effect on the LGS wave-front sensor which needs to be compensated. We propose an active mirror able to compensate for this variation, based on an original optical design including this active optics component. This LGS Variable Curvature Mirror (LGS-VCM) is a 120 mm spherical active mirror able to achieve 820 μm deflection sag with an optical quality better than 150 nm RMS, allowing the radius of curvature variation from F/12 to F/2. Based on elasticity theory, the deformation of the metallic mirror is provided by an air pressure applied on a thin meniscus with a variable thickness distribution. In this article, we detail the analytical development leading to the specific geometry of the active component, the results of finite element analysis and the expected performances in terms of surface error versus the range of refocalisation. Three prototypes have been manufactured to compare the real behavior of the mirror and the simulations data. Results obtained on the prototypes are detailed, showing that the deformation of the VCM is very close to the simulation, and leads to a realistic active concept.

  18. Chromospheric activity in Delta Scuti stars - The suspected variable Tau Cygni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fracassini, M.; Pasinetti Fracassini, L. E.; Mariani, A.; Pastori, L.; Teays, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution IUE spectra of the suspected variable Tau Cyg were obtained to search for a possible variability of the Mg II h, k double-peaked emission. The observations, spanning an interval of about 6.3 h, have shown flux excursions within or just near 15 percent, a value suggested as the detection limit of actual variations with IUE spectra. A variability, difficult to explain, could be present in the ratios Fk2v/Fk2r. The emission fluxes seem to be higher than those of the Delta Scuti variables Rho Pup and Beta Cas. This comparison could give some insights on the possible role of the convection on the pulsational and chromospheric activities of Tau Cyg. A positive correlation between the total emission fluxes and the rotational velocities of these stars was found.

  19. Thermal infrared imaging of GGD27-IRS. The active pre-main sequence star revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspin, C.; Puxley, P. J.; Blanco, P. R.; Pina, R. K.; Pickup, D. A.; Paterson, M. J.; Sylvester, J.; Laird, D. C.; Bridger, A.; Daly, P. N.; Griffin, J. L.

    1994-12-01

    We present near-IR (NIR) 2.2-4.7 micrometer imaging of the core region of the pre-main sequence bipolar CO outflow source GGD27-IRS. Indirect evidence from earlier imaging polarimetry and long-slit spectroscopy suggested that the true young active star in the region, GGD27-ILL, is heavily embedded and completely obscured even at 2 micrometers. Our new 4.7 micrometer images directly detect this source for the first time locating it at 2.0 sec west, 1.3 sec south of the bright NIR source IRS2. This position is 0.2 sec from the position derived from our earlier NIR polarization maps. New mid-IR images of the core region show three point-like sources which are identified as GGD27-ILL, IRS7 and IRS8. We discuss the morphological composition of the core region in light of our discovery.

  20. A Search for Hard X-ray Emission from Active Stars Using CGRO/BATSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. M.; Harmon, B. A.; Lim, J.; Kundu, M. R.

    We report the results of a search for > 20 keV photons from active stars using CGRO/BATSE Earth-occultation observations. Twelve of the "usual suspects" together with 12 "placebo" locations have been analyzed using the BATSE software for occultation analysis developed at NASA/MSFC. There are four detections at the nominal 5sigma level, and eight at the 3sigma level. However the strongest detection (that of AB Dor) shows clear evidence for contamination from the nearby strong source LMC X-4. 18 of the 24 fields yield positive fluxes, indicating a clear bias in the results, and possibly indicating the presence of weak background hard X-ray sources detectable by BATSE in long-term studies.

  1. The photometric variability of the chromospherically active binary star HD 80715

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Hooten, James T.; Hall, Douglas S.; Fekel, Francis C.

    1989-01-01

    Differential UBVRI photometry of the double-lined BY Dra system HD 80715 (K3 V + K3 V) obtained in December 1987 is presented. The star is found to be a variable with a full amplitude of 0.06 mag in V and a period similar or equal to the orbital period of 3.804 days. The mechanism of the variability is interpreted as rotational modulation due to dark starspots. In an attempt to detect chromospheric activity, high-resolution CCD spectra were obtained at Ca II H and K and at Fe I 6430 A and Ca I 6439 A, the photospheric lines normally used for Doppler imaging. HD 80715 shows double H and K emission features at a constant flux level for each component.

  2. Regulation to Create Environments Conducive to Physical Activity: Understanding the Barriers and Facilitators at the Australian State Government Level

    PubMed Central

    Shill, Jane; Mavoa, Helen; Crammond, Brad; Loff, Bebe; Peeters, Anna; Lawrence, Mark; Allender, Steven; Sacks, Gary; Swinburn, Boyd A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Policy and regulatory interventions aimed at creating environments more conducive to physical activity (PA) are an important component of strategies to improve population levels of PA. However, many potentially effective policies are not being broadly implemented. This study sought to identify potential policy/regulatory interventions targeting PA environments, and barriers/facilitators to their implementation at the Australian state/territory government level. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with senior representatives from state/territory governments, statutory authorities and non-government organisations (n = 40) to examine participants': 1) suggestions for regulatory interventions to create environments more conducive to PA; 2) support for preselected regulatory interventions derived from a literature review. Thematic and constant comparative analyses were conducted. Results Policy interventions most commonly suggested by participants fell into two areas: 1) urban planning and provision of infrastructure to promote active travel; 2) discouraging the use of private motorised vehicles. Of the eleven preselected interventions presented to participants, interventions relating to walkability/cycling and PA facilities received greatest support. Interventions involving subsidisation (of public transport, PA-equipment) and the provision of more public transport infrastructure received least support. These were perceived as not economically viable or unlikely to increase PA levels. Dominant barriers were: the powerful ‘road lobby’, weaknesses in the planning system and the cost of potential interventions. Facilitators were: the provision of evidence, collaboration across sectors, and synergies with climate change/environment agendas. Conclusion This study points to how difficult it will be to achieve policy change when there is a powerful ‘road lobby’ and government investment prioritises road infrastructure over PA

  3. IMPLICATIONS OF MASS AND ENERGY LOSS DUE TO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS ON MAGNETICALLY ACTIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Cohen, Ofer; Yashiro, Seiji; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2013-02-20

    Analysis of a database of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and associated flares over the period 1996-2007 finds well-behaved power-law relationships between the 1-8 A flare X-ray fluence and CME mass and kinetic energy. We extrapolate these relationships to lower and higher flare energies to estimate the mass and energy loss due to CMEs from stellar coronae, assuming that the observed X-ray emission of the latter is dominated by flares with a frequency as a function of energy dn/dE = kE {sup -{alpha}}. For solar-like stars at saturated levels of X-ray activity, the implied losses depend fairly weakly on the assumed value of {alpha} and are very large: M-dot {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and E-dot {approx}0.1 L{sub sun}. In order to avoid such large energy requirements, either the relationships between CME mass and speed and flare energy must flatten for X-ray fluence {approx}> 10{sup 31} erg, or the flare-CME association must drop significantly below 1 for more energetic events. If active coronae are dominated by flares, then the total coronal energy budget is likely to be up to an order of magnitude larger than the canonical 10{sup -3} L {sub bol} X-ray saturation threshold. This raises the question of what is the maximum energy a magnetic dynamo can extract from a star? For an energy budget of 1% of L {sub bol}, the CME mass loss rate is about 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1}.

  4. Challenges to Understand Stellar Chromospheres and Stellar Activity: The Limit Case of Late-A and Early-F Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire Ferrero, R.; Gouttebroze, P.

    The onset of chromospheric activity appears at late-A and early-F stars where theories predict atmospheres in radiative equilibrium and shallow or non-existent convective zones. The detection of Ly-α emission cores in several A and F stars, first with the IUE satellite and then with the HST, gives evidence for the presence of chromospheric layers in these stars up to B - V = 0. ^m19 (Catalano et al. [CITE]). Semiempirical chromospheric models for Altair allowed us (Freire et al. [CITE]) to explain the observed emission profiles taking into account normal HI IS absorption. However, due to the very high rotational velocity we analyzed alternative hypotheses like the formation of Ly-α emissions into a corotating expanding wind, but we ruled out this alternative because we obtained inconsistent results. In addition, X-ray emission (originated surely in a corona) strengthen the presence of a chromosphere. Here we place the problem of chromospheric activity of late-A and early-F stars in the general context of the formation of over-photospheric stellar layers, comparing them with late-type star and solar cases.

  5. The 2006/2007 photometric activity of three chromospherically active stars: V2075 Cyg, FG UMa and BM CVn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, A.; Budding, E.; Soydugan, E.; Bakış, H.; Doğru, D.; Doğru, S. S.; Tüysüz, M.; Kaçar, Y.; Dönmez, A.; Soydugan, F.

    2009-08-01

    We present new multiband CCD photometric observations of three chromospherically active stars with long periods (V2075 Cyg, FG UMa and BM CVn). The observations were made at the Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University Observatory in 2006 and 2007. We analyzed BVRI (Bessell) CCD observations of these three RS CVn-type SB1 binaries with the following three steps: (i) Photometric rotation periods were obtained by analyzing their light variations with a differential corrections method and a Fourier transform technique. (ii) Light variations, observed over three or more consecutive orbital cycles, were investigated by using dark (cool) spot models with the program SPOT. (iii) Surface differential rotation coefficients for the primary components of these binaries were derived using our own photometric periods together with orbital periods taken from the literature.

  6. A SINFONI view of the nuclear activity and circumnuclear star formation in NGC 4303

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffel, Rogemar A.; Colina, L.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Piqueras López, J.; Arribas, S.; Riffel, R.; Pastoriza, M.; Sales, Dinalva A.; Dametto, N. Z.; Labiano, A.; Davies, R. I.

    2016-10-01

    We present new maps of emission-line flux distributions and kinematics in both ionized (traced by H I and [Fe II] lines) and molecular (H2) gas of the inner 0.7 × 0.7 kpc2 of the galaxy NGC 4303, with a spatial resolution 40-80 pc and velocity resolution 90-150 km s- 1 obtained from near-IR integral field spectroscopy using the Very Large Telescope instrument SINFONI. The most prominent feature is a 200-250 pc ring of circumnuclear star-forming regions. The emission from ionized and molecular gas shows distinct flux distributions: while the strongest H I and [Fe II] emission comes from regions in the west side of the ring (ages ˜ 4 Myr), the H2 emission is strongest at the nucleus and in the east side of the ring (ages > 10 Myr). We find that regions of enhanced hot H2 emission are anti-correlated with those of enhanced [Fe II] and H I emission, which can be attributed to post-starburst regions that do not have ionizing photons anymore but still are hot enough (≈2000 K) to excite the H2 molecule. The line ratios are consistent with the presence of an active galactic nucleus at the nucleus. The youngest regions have stellar masses in the range 0.3-1.5 × 105 M⊙ and ionized and hot molecular gas masses of ˜0.25-1.2 × 104 M⊙ and ˜2.5-5 M⊙, respectively. The stellar and gas velocity fields show a rotation pattern, with the gas presenting larger velocity amplitudes than the stars, with a deviation observed for the H2 along the nuclear bar, where increased velocity dispersion is also observed, possibly associated with non-circular motions along the bar. The stars in the ring show smaller velocity dispersion than the surroundings, which can be attributed to a cooler dynamics due to their recent formation from cool gas.

  7. "Things to Share and Do" from the Daybreak Star Indian Reader: Classroom Activities for the Middle Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Karleen

    Designed for classroom use, the booklet is a collection of the easiest-to-use classroom ideas taken from past issues of the "Daybreak Star Indian Reader," published monthly throughout the school year by the United Indians of All Tribes Foundation. The selection of articles and activities focus primarily on Plains and Northwest Indian cultures,…

  8. Actively targeted delivery of anticancer drug to tumor cells by redox-responsive star-shaped micelles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chunli; Guo, Xing; Qu, Qianqian; Tang, Zhaomin; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Shaobing

    2014-10-01

    In cancer therapy nanocargos based on star-shaped polymer exhibit unique features such as better stability, smaller size distribution and higher drug capacity in comparison to linear polymeric micelles. In this study, we developed a multifunctional star-shaped micellar system by combination of active targeting ability and redox-responsive behavior. The star-shaped micelles with good stability were self-assembled from four-arm poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer. The redox-responsive behaviors of these micelles triggered by glutathione were evaluated from the changes of micellar size, morphology and molecular weight. In vitro drug release profiles exhibited that in a stimulated normal physiological environment, the redox-responsive star-shaped micelles could maintain good stability, whereas in a reducing and acid environment similar with that of tumor cells, the encapsulated agent was promptly released. In vitro cellular uptake and subcellular localization of these micelles were further studied with confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry against the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa. In vivo and ex vivo DOX fluorescence imaging displayed that these FA-functionalized star-shaped micelles possessed much better specificity to target solid tumor. Both the qualitative and quantitative results of the antitumor effect in 4T1 tumor-bearing BALB/c mice demonstrated that these redox-responsive star-shaped micelles have a high therapeutic efficiency to artificial solid tumor. Therefore, the multifunctional star-shaped micelles are a potential platform for targeted anticancer drug delivery.

  9. Community-driven learning activities, creating futures: 30,000 people can't be wrong - can they?

    PubMed

    Dowrick, Peter W

    2007-03-01

    A major vehicle for the practice of community psychology is through the organization of community-based activities. My colleagues and I have developed many programs for community learning centers, in-school and after school programs, and community technology centers. In the last 10 years, 30,000 people (mostly children) have participated in activities designed for enjoyment and learning, with a view to adding protective factors and reducing negative factors in at-risk communities. Development of these programs for literacy, education, life and work skills, has increasingly followed a community responsive model. Within each program, we created explicit images of future success. That is, people could see themselves being successful where they normally fail: self modeling with feedforward. Data reports show that individuals generalized and maintained their new skills and attitudes, but the sustainability of programs has been variable. Analysis of the variations indicates the importance of program level feedforward that brings the future into the present. The discussion includes consideration of how individual-level and community-level practices can inform each other. PMID:17437187

  10. THE PRESENCE OF WEAK ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN HIGH REDSHIFT STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Shelley A.; Graham, James R.; Ma, C-P; Larkin, James E.

    2010-03-10

    We present [O III 5007 A] observations of the star-forming galaxy (SFG) HDF-BMZ1299 (z = 1.598) using Keck Observatory's adaptive optics system with the near-infrared {integral} field spectrograph OSIRIS. Using previous Halpha and [N II] measurements of the same source, we are able for the first time to use spatially resolved observations to place a high-redshift galaxy's substructure on a traditional H II diagnostic diagram. We find that HDF-BMZ1299's spatially concentrated nebular ratios in the central {approx}1.5 kpc (0.''2) are best explained by the presence of an active galactic nucleus (AGN): log ([N II]/Halpha) = -0.22 +- 0.05 and 2sigma limit of log ([O III]/Hbeta) {approx}>0.26. The dominant energy source of this galaxy is star formation, and integrating a single aperture across the galaxy yields nebular ratios that are composite spectra from both AGN and H II regions. The presence of an embedded AGN in HDF-BMZ1299 may suggest a potential contamination in a fraction of other high-redshift SFGs, and we suggest that this may be a source of the 'elevated' nebular ratios previously seen in seeing-limited metallicity studies. HDF-BMZ1299's estimated AGN luminosity is L{sub Halpha} = (3.7 +- 0.5) x 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1} and L{sub [O{sub III}]} = (5.8 +- 1.9) x 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1}, making it one of the lowest luminosity AGNs discovered at this early epoch.

  11. Determining the Covering Factor of Compton-thick Active Galactic Nuclei with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brightman, M.; Baloković, M.; Stern, D.; Arévalo, P.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Fuerst, F.; Gandhi, P.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Hickox, R. C.; Koss, M.; LaMassa, S.; Puccetti, S.; Rivers, E.; Vasudevan, R.; Walton, D. J.; Zhang, W. W.

    2015-05-01

    The covering factor of Compton-thick (CT) obscuring material associated with the torus in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is at present best understood through the fraction of sources exhibiting CT absorption along the line of sight (NH > 1.5 × 1024 cm-2) in the X-ray band, which reveals the average covering factor. Determining this CT fraction is difficult, however, due to the extreme obscuration. With its spectral coverage at hard X-rays (>10 keV), Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is sensitive to the AGNs covering factor since Compton scattering of X-rays off optically thick material dominates at these energies. We present a spectral analysis of 10 AGNs observed with NuSTAR where the obscuring medium is optically thick to Compton scattering, so-called CT AGNs. We use the torus models of Brightman & Nandra that predict the X-ray spectrum from reprocessing in a torus and include the torus opening angle as a free parameter and aim to determine the covering factor of the CT gas in these sources individually. Across the sample we find mild to heavy CT columns, with NH measured from 1024 to 1026 cm-2, and a wide range of covering factors, where individual measurements range from 0.2 to 0.9. We find that the covering factor, fc, is a strongly decreasing function of the intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosity, LX, where fc = (-0.41 ± 0.13)log10(LX/erg s-1)+18.31 ± 5.33, across more than two orders of magnitude in LX (1041.5-1044 erg s-1). The covering factors measured here agree well with the obscured fraction as a function of LX as determined by studies of local AGNs with LX > 1042.5 erg s-1.

  12. WASP-121 b: a hot Jupiter close to tidal disruption transiting an active F star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delrez, L.; Santerne, A.; Almenara, J.-M.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier-Cameron, A.; Díaz, R. F.; Gillon, M.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Lendl, M.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Neveu-VanMalle, M.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Ségransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Smith, A. M. S.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Udry, S.; Van Grootel, V.; West, R. G.

    2016-06-01

    We present the discovery by the WASP-South survey of WASP-121 b, a new remarkable short-period transiting hot Jupiter. The planet has a mass of 1.183_{-0.062}^{+0.064} MJup, a radius of 1.865 ± 0.044 RJup, and transits every 1.274 9255_{-0.000 0025}^{+0.000 0020} days an active F6-type main-sequence star (V = 10.4, 1.353_{-0.079}^{+0.080} M⊙, 1.458 ± 0.030 R⊙, Teff = 6460 ± 140 K). A notable property of WASP-121 b is that its orbital semimajor axis is only ˜1.15 times larger than its Roche limit, which suggests that the planet is close to tidal disruption. Furthermore, its large size and extreme irradiation (˜7.1 109 erg s-1 cm-2) make it an excellent target for atmospheric studies via secondary eclipse observations. Using the TRAnsiting Planets and PlanetesImals Small Telescope, we indeed detect its emission in the z'-band at better than ˜4σ, the measured occultation depth being 603 ± 130 ppm. Finally, from a measurement of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect with the CORALIE spectrograph, we infer a sky-projected spin-orbit angle of 257.8°_{-5.5°}^{+5.3°}. This result may suggest a significant misalignment between the spin axis of the host star and the orbital plane of the planet. If confirmed, this high misalignment would favour a migration of the planet involving strong dynamical events with a third body.

  13. Star quality.

    PubMed

    Dent, Emma

    2007-09-20

    Around 150 wards are participating in the voluntary Star Wards scheme to provide mental health inpatients with more activities with therapeutic value. Suggested activities range from a library, to horse riding Internet access and comedy. Service users are particularly keen to have more exercise, which can be a challenge in inpatient settings. PMID:17970387

  14. Creating Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drury, John

    Encouraging exploration and practice, this book offers hundreds of exercises and numerous tips covering every step involved in creating poetry. Each chapter is a self-contained unit offering an overview of material in the chapter, a definition of terms, and poetry examples from well-known authors designed to supplement the numerous exercises.…

  15. Creating Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruane, Patricia; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Brookline (Massachusetts) Public Schools has created a telecommunications network that encourages creative thinking, risk taking, thoughtful practice. Interested parties are advised to identify leadership team; rethink resources; identify potentially successful conference groups; learn to make deals; provide training and ongoing support; expect…

  16. Spectroscopic evidence for an engineered, catalytically active Trp radical that creates the unique reactivity of lignin peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew T.; Doyle, Wendy A.; Dorlet, Pierre; Ivancich, Anabella

    2009-01-01

    The surface oxidation site (Trp-171) in lignin peroxidase (LiP) required for the reaction with veratryl alcohol a high-redox-potential (1.4 V) substrate, was engineered into Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CiP) by introducing a Trp residue into a heme peroxidase that has similar protein fold but lacks this activity. To create the catalytic activity toward veratryl alcohol in CiP, it was necessary to reproduce the Trp site and its negatively charged microenvironment by means of a triple mutation. The resulting D179W+R258E+R272D variant was characterized by multifrequency EPR spectroscopy. The spectra unequivocally showed that a new Trp radical [g values of gx = 2.0035(5), gy = 2.0027(5), and gz = 2.0022(1)] was formed after the [Fe(IV)=O Por•+] intermediate, as a result of intramolecular electron transfer between Trp-179 and the porphyrin. Also, the EPR characterization crucially showed that [Fe(IV)=O Trp-179•] was the reactive intermediate with veratryl alcohol. Accordingly, our work shows that it is necessary to take into account the physicochemical properties of the radical, fine-tuned by the microenvironment, as well as those of the preceding [Fe(IV)=O Por•+] intermediate to engineer a catalytically competent Trp site for a given substrate. Manipulation of the microenvironment of the Trp-171 site in LiP allowed the detection by EPR spectroscopy of the Trp-171•, for which direct evidence has been missing so far. Our work also highlights the role of Trp residues as tunable redox-active cofactors for enzyme catalysis in the context of peroxidases with a unique reactivity toward recalcitrant substrates that require oxidation potentials not realized at the heme site. PMID:19805263

  17. Spectroscopic evidence for an engineered, catalytically active Trp radical that creates the unique reactivity of lignin peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew T; Doyle, Wendy A; Dorlet, Pierre; Ivancich, Anabella

    2009-09-22

    The surface oxidation site (Trp-171) in lignin peroxidase (LiP) required for the reaction with veratryl alcohol a high-redox-potential (1.4 V) substrate, was engineered into Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CiP) by introducing a Trp residue into a heme peroxidase that has similar protein fold but lacks this activity. To create the catalytic activity toward veratryl alcohol in CiP, it was necessary to reproduce the Trp site and its negatively charged microenvironment by means of a triple mutation. The resulting D179W+R258E+R272D variant was characterized by multifrequency EPR spectroscopy. The spectra unequivocally showed that a new Trp radical [g values of g(x) = 2.0035(5), g(y) = 2.0027(5), and g(z) = 2.0022(1)] was formed after the [Fe(IV)=O Por(*+)] intermediate, as a result of intramolecular electron transfer between Trp-179 and the porphyrin. Also, the EPR characterization crucially showed that [Fe(IV)=O Trp-179(*)] was the reactive intermediate with veratryl alcohol. Accordingly, our work shows that it is necessary to take into account the physicochemical properties of the radical, fine-tuned by the microenvironment, as well as those of the preceding [Fe(IV)=O Por(*+)] intermediate to engineer a catalytically competent Trp site for a given substrate. Manipulation of the microenvironment of the Trp-171 site in LiP allowed the detection by EPR spectroscopy of the Trp-171(*), for which direct evidence has been missing so far. Our work also highlights the role of Trp residues as tunable redox-active cofactors for enzyme catalysis in the context of peroxidases with a unique reactivity toward recalcitrant substrates that require oxidation potentials not realized at the heme site.

  18. Unbiased identification of signal-activated transcription factors by barcoded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM)

    PubMed Central

    Gosselin, Pauline; Rando, Gianpaolo; Fleury-Olela, Fabienne; Schibler, Ueli

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of transcription factors (TFs) controlling pathways in health and disease is of paramount interest. We designed a widely applicable method, dubbed barcorded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM), to identify signal-activated TFs without any a priori knowledge about their properties. The BC-STAR-PROM library consists of ∼3000 luciferase expression vectors, each harboring a promoter (composed of six tandem repeats of synthetic random DNA) and an associated barcode of 20 base pairs (bp) within the 3′ untranslated mRNA region. Together, the promoter sequences encompass >400,000 bp of random DNA, a sequence complexity sufficient to capture most TFs. Cells transfected with the library are exposed to a signal, and the mRNAs that it encodes are counted by next-generation sequencing of the barcodes. This allows the simultaneous activity tracking of each of the ∼3000 synthetic promoters in a single experiment. Here we establish proof of concept for BC-STAR-PROM by applying it to the identification of TFs induced by drugs affecting actin and tubulin cytoskeleton dynamics. BC-STAR-PROM revealed that serum response factor (SRF) is the only immediate early TF induced by both actin polymerization and microtubule depolymerization. Such changes in cytoskeleton dynamics are known to occur during the cell division cycle, and real-time bioluminescence microscopy indeed revealed cell-autonomous SRF–myocardin-related TF (MRTF) activity bouts in proliferating cells. PMID:27601530

  19. IUE observations of rapidly rotating low-mass stars in young clusters - The relation between chromospheric activity and rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Theodore

    1990-01-01

    If the rapid spindown of low-mass stars immediately following their arrival on the ZAMS results from magnetic braking by coronal winds, an equally sharp decline in their chromospheric emission may be expected. To search for evidence of this effect, the IUE spacecraft was used to observe the chromospheric Mg II emission lines of G-M dwarfs in the nearby IC 2391, Alpha Persei, Pleiades, and Hyades clusters. Similar observations were made of a group of X-ray-selected 'naked' T Tauri stars in Taurus-Auriga. The existence of a decline in activity cannot be confirmed from the resulting data. However, the strength of the chromospheric emission in the Mg II lines of the cluster stars is found to be correlated with rotation rate, being strongest for the stars with the shortest rotation periods and weakest for those with the longest periods. This provides indirect support for such an evolutionary change in activity. Chromospheric activity may thus be only an implicit function of age.

  20. Unbiased identification of signal-activated transcription factors by barcoded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM).

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Pauline; Rando, Gianpaolo; Fleury-Olela, Fabienne; Schibler, Ueli

    2016-08-15

    The discovery of transcription factors (TFs) controlling pathways in health and disease is of paramount interest. We designed a widely applicable method, dubbed barcorded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM), to identify signal-activated TFs without any a priori knowledge about their properties. The BC-STAR-PROM library consists of ∼3000 luciferase expression vectors, each harboring a promoter (composed of six tandem repeats of synthetic random DNA) and an associated barcode of 20 base pairs (bp) within the 3' untranslated mRNA region. Together, the promoter sequences encompass >400,000 bp of random DNA, a sequence complexity sufficient to capture most TFs. Cells transfected with the library are exposed to a signal, and the mRNAs that it encodes are counted by next-generation sequencing of the barcodes. This allows the simultaneous activity tracking of each of the ∼3000 synthetic promoters in a single experiment. Here we establish proof of concept for BC-STAR-PROM by applying it to the identification of TFs induced by drugs affecting actin and tubulin cytoskeleton dynamics. BC-STAR-PROM revealed that serum response factor (SRF) is the only immediate early TF induced by both actin polymerization and microtubule depolymerization. Such changes in cytoskeleton dynamics are known to occur during the cell division cycle, and real-time bioluminescence microscopy indeed revealed cell-autonomous SRF-myocardin-related TF (MRTF) activity bouts in proliferating cells. PMID:27601530

  1. Unbiased identification of signal-activated transcription factors by barcoded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM).

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Pauline; Rando, Gianpaolo; Fleury-Olela, Fabienne; Schibler, Ueli

    2016-08-15

    The discovery of transcription factors (TFs) controlling pathways in health and disease is of paramount interest. We designed a widely applicable method, dubbed barcorded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM), to identify signal-activated TFs without any a priori knowledge about their properties. The BC-STAR-PROM library consists of ∼3000 luciferase expression vectors, each harboring a promoter (composed of six tandem repeats of synthetic random DNA) and an associated barcode of 20 base pairs (bp) within the 3' untranslated mRNA region. Together, the promoter sequences encompass >400,000 bp of random DNA, a sequence complexity sufficient to capture most TFs. Cells transfected with the library are exposed to a signal, and the mRNAs that it encodes are counted by next-generation sequencing of the barcodes. This allows the simultaneous activity tracking of each of the ∼3000 synthetic promoters in a single experiment. Here we establish proof of concept for BC-STAR-PROM by applying it to the identification of TFs induced by drugs affecting actin and tubulin cytoskeleton dynamics. BC-STAR-PROM revealed that serum response factor (SRF) is the only immediate early TF induced by both actin polymerization and microtubule depolymerization. Such changes in cytoskeleton dynamics are known to occur during the cell division cycle, and real-time bioluminescence microscopy indeed revealed cell-autonomous SRF-myocardin-related TF (MRTF) activity bouts in proliferating cells.

  2. BVRI CCD-Photometry of comparison stars in the fields of galaxies with active nuclei. V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroshenko, V. T.; Sergeev, S. G.; Efimov, Yu. S.; Borman, G. A.; Okhmat, D. N.; Pulatova, N. G.; Nazarov, S. V.

    2013-09-01

    Observations of 79 comparison stars in the fields of seven Seyfert galaxies (Akn 79, Mrk 374, Mrk 382, Mrk 478, Mrk 493, Mrk 618, and Mrk 1513) and a single quasar (CTA 102) are reported. The observations were made with CCD photometry in the B, V, R, and I bands. The stellar magnitudes of these stars in the V band range from 12m.9 to 18m.4. The typical photometric uncertainties for magnitude 15 stars are 0m.008, 0m.011, 0m.009 and 0m.015 in the BVRI bands, respectively. For most of these stars the B, V, R, and I magnitudes have not been known previously. A variable star with brightness variations over a period of P = 0.1705 d was found in the field of the galaxy Mrk 478 and the sampled stars in the field of the galaxy Mrk 1513 include a variable with a period of P = 0.2211 d. These stars may be type W UMa contact binary systems with orbital periods of 0.341 and 0.4422 d, respectively. Finding charts for the comparison stars are included. These results can be used for differential photometry of the AGNs.

  3. FUV Spectra of Evolved Late-K and M Stars: Mass Loss Revisited and Stellar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Graham M.

    2002-01-01

    This is the final report for the FUSE Cycle 1 program A100: FUV Spectra of Evolved Late-K and M Stars: Mass Loss revisited and Stellar Activity. Targets alpha TrA (K3 II) and gamma Cru (M3 III) were originally assigned 25 ksec each, to be observed in the medium aperture. Once the in-flight performance and telescope alignment problems were known, the observations were reprogrammed to optimized the scientific return of the program. Alpha TrA was scheduled for 25 ksec observations in both the medium and large apertures. The principle aim of this program was to measure the stellar FUV line and continuum emission, in order to estimate the photoionization radiation field and to determine the level of stellar activity through the fluxes in the collisionally excited high temperature diagnostics: C III 977Angstroms and O VI 1032,1038Angstrom doublet. The medium aperture observations were obtained successfully while the large aperture observations were thought by Johns Hopkins University (JHU)to be lost to satellite problems. There was insufficient signal-to- noise in the medium aperture short wavelength Sic channels to do quantitative science.

  4. Massive stars: flare activity due to infalls of comet-like bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibadov, Subhon; Ibodov, Firuz S.

    2015-01-01

    Passages of comet-like bodies through the atmosphere/chromosphere of massive stars at velocities more than 600 km/s will be accompanied, due to aerodynamic effects as crushing and flattening, by impulse generation of hot plasma within a relatively very thin layer near the stellar surface/photosphere as well as ``blast'' shock wave, i.e., impact-generated photospheric stellar/solar flares. Observational manifestations of such high-temperature phenomena will be eruption of the explosive layer's hot plasma, on materials of the star and ``exploding'' comet nuclei, into the circumstellar environment and variable anomalies in chemical abundances of metal atoms/ions like Fe, Si etc. Interferometric and spectroscopic observations/monitoring of young massive stars with dense protoplanetary discs are of interest for massive stars physics/evolution, including identification of mechanisms for massive stars variability.

  5. Evolution of the chromospheric and coronal activity of intermediate mass stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Alexander

    1986-01-01

    Recent ultraviolet and X-ray observations pertaining to the outer atmospheric structure of intermediate mass (4-6 solar masses) stars and the evolution of their structure are presented. A distance-limited (d equal to or less than 200 pc) IUE ultraviolet survey of early K bright giants shows that C IV emission commonly is present. These stars are almost evenly split between stars showing hybrid-chromospheric and coronal outer atmospheric structures. Exosat observations have been obtained for three hybrid stars, of which only Alpha TrA, the nearest, is detected. The temperature of the emitting plasma is likely to be about 10 to the 6th K. Observtions of six K II stars made with the Einstein satellite show no detections. The general conclusion from the available X-ray data is that early K bright giants are not strong X-ray sources.

  6. Measured Mass-Loss Rates of Solar-like Stars as a Function of Age and Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Brian E.; Müller, Hans-Reinhard; Zank, Gary P.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    2002-07-01

    Collisions between the winds of solar-like stars and the local interstellar medium result in a population of hot hydrogen gas surrounding these stars. Absorption from this hot H I can be detected in high-resolution Lyα spectra of these stars from the Hubble Space Telescope. The amount of absorption can be used as a diagnostic for the stellar mass-loss rate. We present new mass-loss rate measurements derived in this fashion for four stars (ɛ Eri, 61 Cyg A, 36 Oph AB, and 40 Eri A). Combining these measurements with others, we study how mass loss varies with stellar activity. We find that for the solar-like GK dwarfs, the mass loss per unit surface area is correlated with X-ray surface flux. Fitting a power law to this relation yields M~F1.15+/-0.20X. The active M dwarf Proxima Cen and the very active RS CVn system λ And appear to be inconsistent with this relation. Since activity is known to decrease with age, the above power-law relation for solar-like stars suggests that mass loss decreases with time. We infer a power-law relation of M~t-2.00+/-0.52. This suggests that the solar wind may have been as much as 1000 times more massive in the distant past, which may have had important ramifications for the history of planetary atmospheres in our solar system, that of Mars in particular. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  7. Symmetry-breaking magnetic fields create a vortex fluid that exhibits a negative viscosity, active wetting, and strong mixing.

    PubMed

    Martin, James E; Solis, Kyle J

    2014-06-14

    There are many areas of science and technology where being able to generate vigorous, noncontact flow would be desirable. We have discovered that three dimensional, time-dependent electric or magnetic fields having key symmetries can be used to generate controlled fluid motion by the continuous injection of energy. Unlike natural convection, this approach does not require a thermal gradient as an energy source, nor does it require gravity, so space applications are feasible. The result is a highly active material we call a vortex fluid. The homogeneous torque density of this fluid enables it to climb walls, induce ballistic droplet motion, and mix vigorously, even in such complex geometries as porous media. This vortex fluid can also exhibit a negative viscosity, which can immeasurably extend the control range of the "smart fluids" used in electro- and magnetorheological devices and can thus significantly increase their performance. Because the applied fields are uniform and modest in strength, vortex fluids of any scale can be created, making applications of any size, from directing microdroplet motion to controlling damping in magnetorheological dampers that protect bridges and buildings from earthquakes, feasible. PMID:24733404

  8. Symmetry-breaking magnetic fields create a vortex fluid that exhibits a negative viscosity, active wetting, and strong mixing.

    PubMed

    Martin, James E; Solis, Kyle J

    2014-06-14

    There are many areas of science and technology where being able to generate vigorous, noncontact flow would be desirable. We have discovered that three dimensional, time-dependent electric or magnetic fields having key symmetries can be used to generate controlled fluid motion by the continuous injection of energy. Unlike natural convection, this approach does not require a thermal gradient as an energy source, nor does it require gravity, so space applications are feasible. The result is a highly active material we call a vortex fluid. The homogeneous torque density of this fluid enables it to climb walls, induce ballistic droplet motion, and mix vigorously, even in such complex geometries as porous media. This vortex fluid can also exhibit a negative viscosity, which can immeasurably extend the control range of the "smart fluids" used in electro- and magnetorheological devices and can thus significantly increase their performance. Because the applied fields are uniform and modest in strength, vortex fluids of any scale can be created, making applications of any size, from directing microdroplet motion to controlling damping in magnetorheological dampers that protect bridges and buildings from earthquakes, feasible.

  9. Creating a Community–Physical Therapy Partnership to Increase Physical Activity in Urban African-American Adults

    PubMed Central

    Healey, William E.; Reed, Monique; Huber, Gail

    2013-01-01

    Background: Racial disparities in health across the United States remain, and in some cities have worsened despite increased focus at federal and local levels. One approach to addressing health inequity is community-based participatory research (CBPR). Objectives: The purpose of this paper is to describe the develop ment of an ongoing community–physical therapy partnership focused on physical activity (PA), which aims to improve the health of African-American community members and engage physical therapist (PT) students in CBPR. Methods: Three main research projects that resulted from an initial partnership-building seed grant include (1) community focus groups, (2) training of community PA promoters, and (3) pilot investigation of PA promoter effectiveness. Lessons Learned: Results from each project informed the next. Focus groups findings led to development of a PA pro moter training curriculum. PA promoters were accepted by the community, with potential to increase PA. Focus on the community issue of PA fostered and sustained the partnership. Conclusions: Community and academic partners benefitted from funding, structure, and time to create meaningful, trusting, and sustainable relationships committed to improving health. Engaging PT students with community residents provided learning opportunities that promote respect and appreciation of the social, economic, and environmental context of future patients. PMID:24056507

  10. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN GALAXIES AT z approx 0.1: THE EFFECT OF STAR FORMATION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dowd, Matthew J.; Schiminovich, David; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Treyer, Marie A.; Martin, Christopher D.; Wyder, Ted K.; Charlot, S.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Martins, Lucimara P.; Seibert, Mark; Van der Hulst, J. M.

    2009-11-01

    We present the analysis of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) spectra of a sample of 92 typical star-forming galaxies at 0.03 < z < 0.2 observed with the Spitzer intensified Reticon spectrograph (IRS). We compare the relative strengths of PAH emission features with Sloan Digital Sky Survey optical diagnostics to probe the relationship between PAH grain properties and star formation and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) activity. Short-to-long wavelength PAH ratios, and in particular the 7.7 mum-to-11.3 mum feature ratio, are strongly correlated with the star formation diagnostics D{sub n} (4000) and Halpha equivalent width, increasing with younger stellar populations. This ratio also shows a significant difference between active and non-active galaxies, with the active galaxies exhibiting weaker 7.7 mum emission. A hard radiation field as measured by [O{sub III}]/Hbeta and [Ne{sub III}]{sub 15.6m}u{sub m}/[Ne{sub II}]{sub 12.8m}u{sub m} effects PAH ratios differently depending on whether this field results from starburst activity or an AGN. Our results are consistent with a picture in which larger PAH molecules grow more efficiently in richer media and in which smaller PAH molecules are preferentially destroyed by the AGN.

  11. What powers the starburst activity of NGC 1068? Star-driven gravitational instabilities caught in the act

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, Alessandro B.; Fathi, Kambiz

    2016-08-01

    We explore the role that gravitational instability plays in NGC 1068, a nearby Seyfert galaxy that exhibits unusually vigorous starburst activity. For this purpose, we use the Romeo-Falstad disc instability diagnostics and data from the BIMA Survey of Nearby Galaxies, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Spectrographic Areal Unit for Research on Optical Nebulae. Our analysis illustrates that NGC 1068 is a gravitationally unstable `monster'. Its starburst disc is subject to unusually powerful instabilities. Several processes, including feedback from the active galactic nucleus and starburst activity, try to quench such instabilities from inside out by depressing the surface density of molecular gas across the central kpc, but they do not succeed. Gravitational instability `wins' because it is driven by the stars via their much higher surface density. In this process, stars and molecular gas are strongly coupled, and it is such a coupling that ultimately triggers local gravitational collapse/fragmentation in the molecular gas.

  12. Tomography of Accretion Flows in Binary Stars and Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livio, Mario

    2001-01-01

    Under this project, a variety of accretion problems have been studied, with two in particular. In the first, astrophysical jets are observed in many objects ranging from young stars to Active Galactic Nuclei. A major unsolved problem is how do these jets originate from accretion disks. In a series of works, I have examined the launching of outflows from magnetized disks, the extraction of energy from black holes, and the formation of jets in systems like Cataclysmic Variables and supermassive accreting black holes. The results of these works were published in a number of papers. In the second, I examined the potential role of vortices in accretion disks around Young Stellar Objects, for the formation of planets and for angular momentum transport. I showed that vortices are surprisingly stable, and that they are able to concentrate dust in their cores. I also examined the development of spiral shocks in disks. Finally, I studied the evolution of magnetically layered protoplanetary disks, and showed that they exhibit outbursts which could 'pump' the jets that are observed in Herbig-Haro objects. The results of these works were published in a number of papers as well. Additional information on the published papers is contained in the original abstract.

  13. X-ray/microwave relation of different types of active stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guedel, Manuel; Benz, Arnold O.

    1993-01-01

    Coronal active stars of seven classes between spectral types F and M, single and double, are compared in their quiescent radio and X-ray luminosities L(R) and L(X). We find, largely independent of stellar class, log L(X) is less than about log L(R) + 15.5. This general relation points to an intimate connection between the nonthermal, energetic electrons causing the radio emission and the bulk plasma of the corona responsible for thermal X-rays. The relation, observed over six orders of magnitude, suggests that the heating mechanism necessarily involves particle acceleration. We derive requirements for simple models based on optically thin gyrosynchrotron emission of mildly relativistic electrons and thermal X-rays from the bulk plasma. We discuss the possibility that a portion of the accelerated particles heats the ambient plasma by collisions. More likely, plasma heating and particle acceleration may occur in parallel and in the same process, but at a fixed ratio.

  14. Determining the Covering Factor of Compton-Thick Active Galactic Nuclei with NuSTAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brightman, M.; Balokovic, M.; Stern, D.; Arevalo, P.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Christensen, F. E.; Zhang, W. W.

    2015-01-01

    The covering factor of Compton-thick (CT) obscuring material associated with the torus in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is at present best understood through the fraction of sources exhibiting CT absorption along the line of sight (N(sub H) greater than 1.5 x 10(exp 24) cm(exp -2)) in the X-ray band, which reveals the average covering factor. Determining this CT fraction is difficult, however, due to the extreme obscuration. With its spectral coverage at hard X-rays (greater than 10 keV), Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is sensitive to the AGNs covering factor since Compton scattering of X-rays off optically thick material dominates at these energies. We present a spectral analysis of 10 AGNs observed with NuSTAR where the obscuring medium is optically thick to Compton scattering, so-called CT AGNs. We use the torus models of Brightman and Nandra that predict the X-ray spectrum from reprocessing in a torus and include the torus opening angle as a free parameter and aim to determine the covering factor of the CT gas in these sources individually. Across the sample we find mild to heavy CT columns, with N(sub H) measured from 10(exp 24) to 10(exp 26) cm(exp -2), and a wide range of covering factors, where individual measurements range from 0.2 to 0.9. We find that the covering factor, f(sub c), is a strongly decreasing function of the intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosity, L(sub X), where f(sub c) = (-0.41 +/- 0.13)log(sub 10)(L(sub X)/erg s(exp -1))+18.31 +/- 5.33, across more than two orders of magnitude in L(sub X) (10(exp 41.5) - 10(exp 44) erg s(exp -1)). The covering factors measured here agree well with the obscured fraction as a function of LX as determined by studies of local AGNs with L(sub X) greater than 10(exp 42.5) erg s(exp -1).

  15. Photometric activity of UX orionis stars and related objects in the near infrared and optical: CO Ori, RR Tau, UX Ori, and VV Ser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenavrin, V. I.; Rostopchina-Shakhovskaya, A. N.; Grinin, V. P.; Demidova, T. V.; Shakhovskoi, D. N.; Belan, S. P.

    2016-08-01

    This paper continues a study of the photometric activity of UX Ori stars in the optical and near-infrared ( JHKLM bands) initiated in 2000. For comparison, the list of program stars contains two Herbig Ae stars that are photometrically quiet in the optical: MWC480 andHD179218. Fadings ofUXOri stars in the optical ( V band) due to sporadic increases of the circumstellar extinction are also observed in the infrared (IR), but with decreasing amplitude. Two stars, RR Tau and UX Ori, displayed photometric events when V -band fadings were accompanied by an increase in IR fluxes. Among the two Herbig Ae stars that are photometrically quiet in the optical, MWC 480 proved to be fairly active in the IR. Unlike the UX Ori stars, the variation amplitude of MWC 480 increases from the J band to the M band. In the course of the observations, no deep fadings in the IR bands were detected. This indicates that eclipses of the program stars have a local nature, and are due to extinction variations in the innermost regions of the circumstellar disks. The results presented testify to an important role of the alignment of the circumstellar disks relative to the direction towards the observer in determining the observed IR variability of young stars.

  16. Constraining magnetic-activity modulations in three solar-like stars observed by CoRoT and NARVAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, S.; García, R. A.; Morgenthaler, A.; Salabert, D.; Petit, P.; Ballot, J.; Régulo, C.; Catala, C.

    2013-02-01

    Context. Stellar activity cycles are the manifestation of dynamo process running in the stellar interiors. They have been observed from years to decades thanks to the measurement of stellar magnetic proxies on the surface of the stars, such as the chromospheric and X-ray emissions, and to the measurement of the magnetic field with spectropolarimetry. However, all of these measurements rely on external features that cannot be visible during, for example, a Maunder-type minimum. With the advent of long observations provided by space asteroseismic missions, it has been possible to penetrate the stars and study their properties. Moreover, the acoustic-mode properties are also perturbed by the presence of these dynamos. Aims: We track the temporal variations of the amplitudes and frequencies of acoustic modes allowing us to search for signature of magnetic activity cycles, as has already been done in the Sun and in the CoRoT target HD 49933. Methods: We used asteroseimic tools and more classical spectroscopic measurements performed with the NARVAL spectropolarimeter to check that there are hints of any activity cycle in three solar-like stars observed continuously for more than 117 days by the CoRoT satellite: HD 49385, HD 181420, and HD 52265. To consider that we have found a hint of magnetic activity in a star we require finding a change in the amplitude of the p modes that should be anti-correlated with a change in their frequency shifts, as well as a change in the spectroscopic observations in the same direction as the asteroseismic data. Results: Our analysis gives very small variation in the seismic parameters preventing us from detecting any magnetic modulation. However, we are able to provide a lower limit of any magnetic-activity change in the three stars that should be longer than 120 days, which is the length of the time series. Moreover we computed the upper limit for the line-of-sight magnetic field component being 1, 3, and 0.6 G for HD 49385, HD 181420

  17. Star-disk collisions in active galactic nuclei and the origin of the broad line region

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, W.H.; Colgate, S.A. ); Siemiginowska, A. )

    1991-12-05

    Stars of a cluster surrounding the central black hole in an AGN will collide with the accretion disk. For a central black hole of 10{sup 8} M{circle dot} and a cluster with 10{sup 7} {minus} 10{sup 8} stars within a parsec, one estimates that {approximately}10{sup 4} such collisions will occur per year. Collisions are hypersonic (Mach number M {much gt} 1). Some of the wake of the star -- the disk material shocked by its passage -- will follow it out of the disk. Such star tails'' with the estimated masses {delta}m {approximately} 10{sup 25} {minus} 10{sup 27} g subsequently expand, cool and begin to recombine. We propose that -- when illuminated by the ionizing flux from the central source -- they are likely to be the origin of the observed broad emission lines.

  18. Star-disk collisions in active galactic nuclei and the origin of the broad line region

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, W.H.; Colgate, S.A.; Siemiginowska, A.

    1991-12-05

    Stars of a cluster surrounding the central black hole in an AGN will collide with the accretion disk. For a central black hole of 10{sup 8} M{circle_dot} and a cluster with 10{sup 7} {minus} 10{sup 8} stars within a parsec, one estimates that {approximately}10{sup 4} such collisions will occur per year. Collisions are hypersonic (Mach number M {much_gt} 1). Some of the wake of the star -- the disk material shocked by its passage -- will follow it out of the disk. Such ``star tails`` with the estimated masses {delta}m {approximately} 10{sup 25} {minus} 10{sup 27} g subsequently expand, cool and begin to recombine. We propose that -- when illuminated by the ionizing flux from the central source -- they are likely to be the origin of the observed broad emission lines.

  19. A PANCHROMATIC STUDY OF BLAST COUNTERPARTS: TOTAL STAR FORMATION RATE, MORPHOLOGY, ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FRACTION, AND STELLAR MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Ade, Peter A. R.; Cortese, Luca; Dye, Simon; Eales, Stephen; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Pascale, Enzo; Tucker, Carole; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Scott, Douglas; Wiebe, Donald V.; Devlin, Mark J.; Truch, Matthew D. P.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Viero, Marco P.

    2011-02-01

    We carry out a multi-wavelength study of individual galaxies detected by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) and identified at other wavelengths, using data spanning the radio to the ultraviolet (UV). We develop a Monte Carlo method to account for flux boosting, source blending, and correlations among bands, which we use to derive deboosted far-infrared (FIR) luminosities for our sample. We estimate total star-formation rates (SFRs) for BLAST counterparts with z {<=} 0.9 by combining their FIR and UV luminosities. Star formation is heavily obscured at L{sub FIR} {approx}> 10{sup 11} L{sub sun}, z {approx}> 0.5, but the contribution from unobscured starlight cannot be neglected at L{sub FIR} {approx}< 10{sup 11} L{sub sun}, z {approx}< 0.25. We assess that about 20% of the galaxies in our sample show indication of a type 1 active galactic nucleus, but their submillimeter emission is mainly due to star formation in the host galaxy. We compute stellar masses for a subset of 92 BLAST counterparts; these are relatively massive objects, with a median mass of {approx}10{sup 11} M{sub sun}, which seem to link the 24 {mu}m and Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) populations, in terms of both stellar mass and star formation activity. The bulk of the BLAST counterparts at z {approx}< 1 appears to be run-of-the-mill star-forming galaxies, typically spiral in shape, with intermediate stellar masses and practically constant specific SFRs. On the other hand, the high-z tail of the BLAST counterparts significantly overlaps with the SCUBA population, in terms of both SFRs and stellar masses, with observed trends of specific SFR that support strong evolution and downsizing.

  20. Star formation across galactic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jason

    . Complementing this study of normal star-forming galaxies, my study of quasar host galaxies utilizes narrow- and medium-band images of eight Palomar-Green (PG) quasars from the WFPC2 and NICMOS instruments aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Using images of a point-spread function (PSF) star in the same filters, I subtract the PSF of the quasar from each of the target images. The residual light images clearly show the host galaxies of the respective quasars. The narrow-band images were chosen to be centered on the Hbeta, [O II ], [O III], and Paalpha emission lines, allowing the use of line ratios and luminosities to create extinction and star formation maps. Additionally, I utilize the line-ratio maps to distinguish AGN-powered line emission from star formation powered line emission with line-diagnostic diagrams. I find star formation in each of the eight quasar host galaxies in my study. The bulk star-formation rates are lower than expected, suggesting that quasar host galaxies may be dynamically more advanced than previously believed. Seven of the eight quasar host galaxies in this study have higher-than-typical mass-specific star-formation rates. Additionally, I see evidence of shocked gas, supporting the hypotheses presented in earlier works that suggest that AGN activity quenches star formation in its host galaxy by disrupting its gas reservoir.

  1. Star formation and accretion in the circumnuclear disks of active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wutschik, Stephanie; Schleicher, Dominik R. G.; Palmer, Thomas S.

    2013-12-01

    Aims: We explore the evolution of supermassive black holes (SMBH) centered in a circumnuclear disk (CND) as a function of the mass supply from the host galaxy and considering different star formation laws, which may give rise to a self-regulation via the injection of supernova-driven turbulence. Methods: A system of equations describing star formation, black hole accretion and angular momentum transport in the disk was solved self-consistently for an axisymmetric disk in which the gravitational potential includes contributions from the black hole, the disk and the hosting galaxy. Our model extends the framework provided by Kawakatu & Wada (2008, ApJ, 681, 73), by separately considering the inner and outer part of the disk, and by introducing a potentially non-linear dependence of the star formation rate on the gas surface density and the turbulent velocity. The star formation recipes are calibrated using observational data for NGC 1097, while the accretion model is based on turbulent viscosity as a source of angular momentum transport in a thin viscous accretion disk. Results: We find that current data provide no strong constraint on the star formation recipe, and can in particular not distinguish between models entirely regulated by the surface density, and models including a dependence on the turbulent velocity. The evolution of the black hole mass, on the other hand, strongly depends on the applied star formation law, as well as the mass supply from the host galaxy. We suggest to explore the star formation process in local AGN with high-resolution ALMA observations to break the degeneracy between different star formation models.

  2. Nothing to Hide -- An X-ray Survey of Star Formation Activity in the Pipe Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbrich, Jan; Posselt, Bettina; Lada, Charles J.; Covey, Kevin

    2009-09-01

    The Pipe Nebula, a large nearby molecular cloud, lacks obvious signposts of star formation in all but one of more than 130 dust extinction cores that have been identified within it. In a recent mid-infrared survey using Spitzer-MIPS to cover 13 square degrees, we have established that the star formation efficiency for the entire cloud is only ˜0.06%. The mid-infrared data are most sensitive for the earliest evolutionary stages of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs), covering class I protostars and typical class II sources (classical T Tauri stars). X-ray observations allow us to extend our survey to constrain any population of classical and weak-line T Tauri stars. In a first step, we use the ROSAT All-Sky Survey to constrain any overall T Tauri star population of the Pipe Nebula. Due to the fact that the Pipe Nebula is at a distance of only 130 pc, the ROSAT survey is already quite sensitive. Assuming a typical level of extinction, the completeness for G- and K-type stars is estimated to be about 50%. Subsequently, we use XMM-Newton observations pointed at three high-extinction regions within the Pipe Nebula to analyze these areas at higher sensitivity. These three regions are Barnard 59, the only core with ongoing star formation, the ``ring'' (i.e., the highest extinction region in the ``bowl'' of the Pipe), and Barnard 68. We additionally analyze the YSOs of Barnard 59 in the radio continuum to constrain high-energy processes. Overall, our results corroborate our previous Spitzer result that the star formation efficiency of the Pipe Nebula is very low.

  3. The mid-infrared emission of narrow-line active galactic nuclei: Star formation, nuclear activity, and two populations revealed by WISE

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario, David J.; Burtscher, Leonard; Davies, Richard; Genzel, Reinhard; Lutz, Dieter; Tacconi, Linda J.

    2013-12-01

    We explore the nature of the long-wavelength mid-infrared (MIR) emission of a sample of 13,000 local Type II (narrow-line) active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) using 12 μm and 22 μm photometry from the WISE all-sky survey. In combination with FIRST 1.4 GHz photometry, we show that AGNs divide into two relatively distinct populations or 'branches' in the plane of MIR and radio luminosity. Seyfert galaxies lie almost exclusively on an MIR-bright branch (Branch A), while low-ionization nuclear emission line galaxies (LINERs) are split evenly into Branch A and the MIR-faint Branch B. We devise various tests to constrain the processes that define the branches, including a comparison to the properties of pure star-forming inactive galaxies on the MIR-radio plane. We demonstrate that the total MIR emission of objects on Branch A, including most Seyfert galaxies, is governed primarily by host star formation, with ≈15% of the 22 μm luminosity coming from AGN-heated dust. This implies that ongoing dusty star formation is a general property of Seyfert host galaxies. We show that the 12 μm broadband luminosity of AGNs on Branch A is suppressed with respect to star-forming galaxies, possibly due to the destruction of PAHs or deeper 10 μm Si absorption in AGNs. We uncover a correlation between the MIR luminosity and [O III] λ5007 luminosity in AGNs. This suggests a relationship between the star formation rate and nuclear luminosity in the AGN population, but we caution on the importance of selection effects inherent to such AGN-dominated emission-line galaxies in driving such a correlation. We highlight the MIR-radio plane as a useful tool in comparative studies of star formation and nuclear activity in AGNs.

  4. Constraints on Feedback in the Local Universe: The Relation Between Star Formation and AGN Activity in Early Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaddi, Sravani; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Baum, Stefi Alison

    2016-01-01

    We address the relation between star formation and AGN activity in a sample of 231 nearby (0.0002 < z < 0.0358) early type galaxies by carrying out a multi-wavelength study using archival observations in the UV, IR and radio. Our results indicate that early type galaxies in the current epoch are rarely powerful AGNs, with P < 1022 WHz-1 for a majority of the galaxies. Only massive galaxies are capable of hosting powerful radio sources while less massive galaxies are hosts to lower radio power sources. Evidence of ongoing star formation is seen in approximately 7% of the sample. The SFR of these galaxies is less than 0.1 M⊙yr-1. They also tend to be radio faint (P < 1022 WHz-1). There is a nearly equal fraction of star forming galaxies in radio faint (P < 1022 WHz-1) and radio bright galaxies (P ≥ 1022 WHz-1) suggesting that both star formation and radio mode feedback are constrained to be very low in our sample. We notice that our galaxy sample and the Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) follow similar trends in radio power versus SFR. This may be produced if both radio power and SFR are related to stellar mass.

  5. Discovery of 15 Myr Old pre-Main Sequence Stars with Active Accretion and Sizeable Discs in NGC 6611

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido; Panagia, N.; Guarcello, M. G.; Bonito, R.

    2012-01-01

    Attention is given to a population of 110 stars with prominent near-infrared (NIR) excess in the NGC 6611 cluster of the Eagle Nebula that have optical colours typical of pre-main sequence (PMS) stars older than 10 Myr. In principle, their V-I colours would be consistent with those of young PMS objects (< 1 Myr), whose radiation is heavily obscured by a circumstellar disc seen at high inclination and in small part scattered towards the observer by the back side of the disc. However, using theoretical models it is shown here that objects of this type can only account for a few percent of this population. In fact, the spatial distribution of these objects, their X-ray luminosities, their optical brightness and their positions in the colour-magnitude diagram unambiguously indicate that most of these stars are intrinsically older than 10 Myr. Ages range from 8 to 30 Myr with a median value of 15 Myr. This is the largest homogeneous sample to date of Galactic PMS stars considerably older than 10 Myr that are still actively accreting from a circumstellar disc and it allows us to set a lower limit of 5% to the disc frequency at 15 Myr in NGC 6611. These values imply a characteristic exponential lifetime of 5 Myr for disc dissipation.

  6. Magnetic activity cycles in solar-like stars: The cross-correlation technique of p-mode frequency shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Régulo, C.; García, R. A.; Ballot, J.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We set out to study the use of cross-correlation techniques to infer the frequency shifts that are induced by changing magnetic fields in p-mode frequencies and to provide a precise estimation of error bars. Methods: This technique and the calculation of the associated errors is first tested and validated on the Sun where p-mode magnetic behaviour is very well known. These validation tests are performed on 6000-day time series of Sun-as-a-star observations delivered by the SoHO spacecraft. Errors of the frequency shifts are quantified through Monte Carlo simulations. The same methodology is then applied to three solar-like oscillating stars: HD 49933, observed by CoRoT, as well as KIC 3733735 and KIC 7940546, observed by Kepler. Results: We first demonstrate the reliability of the error bars computed with the Monte Carlo simulations using the Sun. From the three stars analyzed, we confirm the presence of a magnetic activity cycle in HD 49933 with this methodology and we unveil the seismic signature of ongoing magnetic variations in KIC 3733735. Finally, the third star, KIC 7940546, seems to be in a quiet regime.

  7. Chromospheres of Coronal Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Wood, Brian E.

    1996-01-01

    We summarize the main results obtained from the analysis of ultraviolet emission line profiles of coronal late-type stars observed with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The excellent GHRS spectra provide new information on magnetohydrodynamic phenomena in the chromospheres and transition regions of these stars. One exciting new result is the discovery of broad components in the transition region lines of active stars that we believe provide evidence for microflare heating in these stars.

  8. More Than a Star, or How Does Solar Activity Impact The Heliosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozarev, K. A.

    2013-10-01

    The past decade has seen dramatic improvements in observations of the Sun and the domain influenced by its electromagnetic and plasma emission - the heliosphere. This has brought about significant advances in our understanding of how the solar corona is heated, how the solar wind is accelerated, and how solar eruptions affect the energetic particle populations in the heliosphere, on time scales from minutes to years. We overview some of the latest advances, focusing on short-term solar activity. In addition, we provide some observational and modeling insight into how eruptive reorganizations of magnetic fields and plasma, known as flares and coronal mass ejections, can create populations of very energetic ionized particles, which pose radiation risks for astronauts and satellites.

  9. ALMA and HST Observations of the Molecular Environment, Star formation Activity and Cluster Dissolution In NGC 1097

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Kartik; Regan, Michael W.; Ngcebetsha, Buntu; Kohno, Kotaro; Teuben, Peter J.; Vogel, Stuart N.; Villard, Eric; Wiklind, Tommy; Lundgren, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Barred spiral galaxies, such as NGC 1097, are an ideal laboratory for studying the interplay between the molecular gas environment and recent star formation activity because there are several dynamically distinct environs (the circumnuclear ring, the bar dust lanes and spurs, the bar end, the inner ring and spiral arms) where the SF activity varies by over three orders of magnitude. We present new ALMA Cycle 1 data showing the CO(1-0), HCN, HCO+, CS, 13CO, C18O emission across the entire disk of NGC 1097 at a resolution of 75 pc (1'). We map the distribution and kinematics of the molecular ISM and quantify the free fall time and shear to constrain what initiates (or inhibits) the star formation activity. By combining the 12m primary array, ACA-7m and total power data we show the most complete maps of NGC 1097. We use the high resolution data to measure the gas inflow rate and accretion onto the circumnuclear ring and constrain the feeding of the central AGN. The 13CO / 12CO ratio across the different environments is used to measure and quantify the diffuse versus dense phases of the molecular ISM across the disk of the galaxy. Finally we compare the ALMA data to new HST UV & optical data to measure the ages and locations of young star clusters. By comparing the cluster age and morphology to the ALMA data we constrain the cluster dissolution time scales as a function of the molecular ISM. Finally we show new JVLA C, X and Ka band continuum data to distinguish between old and young star formation activity.

  10. Coupling hydrodynamics and radiation calculations for star-jet interactions in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Cita, V. M.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Khangulyan, D.; Perucho, M.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Stars and their winds can contribute to the non-thermal emission in extragalactic jets. Because of the complexity of jet-star interactions, the properties of the resulting emission are closely linked to those of the emitting flows. Aims: We simulate the interaction between a stellar wind and a relativistic extragalactic jet and use the hydrodynamic results to compute the non-thermal emission under different conditions. Methods: We performed relativistic axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of a relativistic jet interacting with a supersonic, non-relativistic stellar wind. We computed the corresponding streamlines out of the simulation results and calculated the injection, evolution, and emission of non-thermal particles accelerated in the jet shock, focusing on electrons or e±-pairs. Several cases were explored, considering different jet-star interaction locations, magnetic fields, and observer lines of sight. The jet luminosity and star properties were fixed, but the results are easily scalable when these parameters are changed. Results: Individual jet-star interactions produce synchrotron and inverse Compton emission that peaks from X-rays to MeV energies (depending on the magnetic field), and at ~100-1000 GeV (depending on the stellar type), respectively. The radiation spectrum is hard in the scenarios explored here as a result of non-radiative cooling dominance, as low-energy electrons are efficiently advected even under relatively high magnetic fields. Interactions of jets with cold stars lead to an even harder inverse Compton spectrum because of the Klein-Nishina effect in the cross section. Doppler boosting has a strong effect on the observer luminosity. Conclusions: The emission levels for individual interactions found here are in the line of previous, more approximate, estimates, strengthening the hypothesis that collective jet-star interactions could significantly contribute at high energies under efficient particle acceleration.

  11. Submillimetre observations of galaxy clusters with the BLAST: the star formation activity in Abell 3112

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braglia, Filiberto G.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Devlin, Mark J.; Edge, Alastair; Griffin, Matthew; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter C.; Hughes, David H.; Klein, Jeff; Marsden, Gaelen; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Ngo, Henry; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Patanchon, Guillaume; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Rex, Marie; Scott, Douglas; Semisch, Christopher; Thomas, Nicholas; Truch, Matthew D. P.; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Gregory S.; Valiante, Elisabetta; Viero, Marco P.; Wiebe, Donald V.

    2011-04-01

    We present observations at 250, 350 and 500 μm of the nearby galaxy cluster Abell 3112 (z= 0.075) carried out with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope. Five cluster members are individually detected as bright submillimetre (submm) sources. Their far-infrared spectral energy distributions and optical colours identify them as normal star-forming galaxies of high mass, with globally evolved stellar populations. They all have (B-R) colours of 1.38 ± 0.08, transitional between the blue, active population and the red, evolved galaxies that dominate the cluster core. We stack to estimate the mean submm emission from all cluster members, which is determined to be 16.6 ± 2.5, 6.1 ± 1.9 and 1.5 ± 1.3 mJy at 250, 350 and 500 μm, respectively. Stacking analyses of the submm emission of cluster members reveal trends in the mean far-infrared luminosity with respect to clustercentric radius and KS-band magnitude. We find that a large fraction of submm emission comes from the boundary of the inner, virialized region of the cluster, at clustercentric distances around R500. Stacking also shows that the bulk of the submm emission arises in intermediate-mass galaxies with KS magnitude ˜1 mag fainter than the characteristic magnitude ?. The results and constraints obtained in this work will provide a useful reference for the forthcoming surveys to be conducted on galaxy clusters by Herschel.

  12. Herschel-ATLAS: the connection between star formation and AGN activity in radio-loud and radio-quiet active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürkan, G.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Jarvis, M. J.; Smith, D. J. B.; Bourne, N.; Dunne, L.; Maddox, S.; Ivison, R. J.; Fritz, J.

    2015-10-01

    We examine the relationship between star formation and active galactic nuclei (AGN) activity by constructing matched samples of local (0 < z < 0.6) radio-loud and radio-quiet AGN in the Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey fields. Radio-loud AGN are classified as high-excitation and low-excitation radio galaxies using their emission lines and WISE 22-μm luminosity. AGN accretion and jet powers in these active galaxies are traced by [O III] emission-line and radio luminosity, respectively. Star formation rates (SFRs) and specific star formation rates (SSFRs) were derived using Herschel 250-μm luminosity and stellar mass measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics-John Hopkins University catalogue. In the past, star formation studies of AGN have mostly focused on high-redshift sources to observe the thermal dust emission that peaks in the far-infrared, which limited the samples to powerful objects. However, with Herschel we can expand this to low redshifts. Our stacking analyses show that SFRs and SSFRs of both radio-loud and radio-quiet AGN increase with increasing AGN power but that radio-loud AGN tend to have lower SFR. Additionally, radio-quiet AGN are found to have approximately an order of magnitude higher SSFRs than radio-loud AGN for a given level of AGN power. The difference between the star formation properties of radio-loud and -quiet AGN is also seen in samples matched in stellar mass.

  13. GOODS-HERSCHEL: SEPARATING HIGH-REDSHIFT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND STAR-FORMING GALAXIES USING INFRARED COLOR DIAGNOSTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, Allison; Pope, Alexandra; Charmandaris, Vassilis; Daddi, Emmanuele; Elbaz, David; Pannella, Maurilio; Aussel, Herve; Dasyra, Kalliopi; Leiton, Roger; Scott, Douglas; Magnelli, Benjamin; Popesso, Paola; Altieri, Bruno; Coia, Daniela; Valtchanov, Ivan; Dannerbauer, Helmut; Dickinson, Mark; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Magdis, Georgios

    2013-02-15

    We have compiled a large sample of 151 high-redshift (z = 0.5-4) galaxies selected at 24 {mu}m (S {sub 24} > 100 {mu}Jy) in the GOODS-N and ECDFS fields for which we have deep Spitzer IRS spectroscopy, allowing us to decompose the mid-infrared spectrum into contributions from star formation and activity in the galactic nuclei. In addition, we have a wealth of photometric data from Spitzer IRAC/MIPS and Herschel PACS/SPIRE. We explore how effective different infrared color combinations are at separating our mid-IR spectroscopically determined active galactic nuclei from our star-forming galaxies. We look in depth at existing IRAC color diagnostics, and we explore new color-color diagnostics combining mid-IR, far-IR, and near-IR photometry, since these combinations provide the most detail about the shape of a source's IR spectrum. An added benefit of using a color that combines far-IR and mid-IR photometry is that it is indicative of the power source driving the IR luminosity. For our data set, the optimal color selections are S {sub 250}/S {sub 24} versus S {sub 8}/S {sub 3.6} and S {sub 100}/S {sub 24} versus S {sub 8}/S {sub 3.6}; both diagnostics have {approx}10% contamination rate in the regions occupied primarily by star-forming galaxies and active galactic nuclei, respectively. Based on the low contamination rate, these two new IR color-color diagnostics are ideal for estimating both the mid-IR power source of a galaxy when spectroscopy is unavailable and the dominant power source contributing to the IR luminosity. In the absence of far-IR data, we present color diagnostics using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mid-IR bands which can efficiently select out high-z (z {approx} 2) star-forming galaxies.

  14. Investigating the Quality of Mental Models Deployed by Undergraduate Engineering Students in Creating Explanations: The Case of Thermally Activated Phenomena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazio, Claudio; Battaglia, Onofrio Rosario; Di Paola, Benedetto

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a method aimed at pointing out the quality of the mental models undergraduate engineering students deploy when asked to create explanations for phenomena or processes and/or use a given model in the same context. Student responses to a specially designed written questionnaire are quantitatively analyzed using…

  15. Hot ammonia around young O-type stars. III. High-mass star formation and hot core activity in W51 Main

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddi, C.; Ginsburg, A.; Zhang, Q.

    2016-05-01

    Context. This paper is the third in a series of NH3 multilevel imaging studies in well-known, high-mass star-forming regions. The main goal is to characterize kinematics and physical conditions of (hot and dense) circumstellar molecular gas around O-type young stars. Aims: We want to map at subarcsecond resolution highly excited inversion lines of NH3 in the high-mass star-forming region W51 Main (distance = 5.4 kpc), which is an ideal target to constrain theoretical models of high-mass star formation. Methods: Using the Karl Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA), we mapped the hot and dense molecular gas in W51 Main with ~0.2 arcsec-0.3 arcsec angular resolution in five metastable (J = K) inversion transitions of ammonia (NH3): (J,K) = (6, 6), (7, 7), (9, 9), (10, 10), and (13, 13). These lines arise from energy levels between ~400 K and ~1700 K above the ground state. We also made maps of the (free-free) continuum emission at frequencies between 25 and 36 GHz. Results: We have identified and characterized two main centers of high-mass star formation in W51 Main, which excite hot cores and host one or multiple high-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) at their centers: the W51e2 complex and the W51e8 core (~6'' southward of W51e2). The former breaks down into three further subcores: W51e2-W, which surrounds the well-known hypercompact (HC) HII region, where hot NH3 is observed in absorption, and two additional dusty cores, W51e2-E (~0.8 arcsec to the East) and W51e2-NW (~1'' to the North), where hot NH3 is observed in emission. The velocity maps toward the HC HII region show a clear velocity gradient along the east-west in all lines. The gradient may indicate rotation, although any Keplerian motion must be on smaller scales (<1000 AU) as we do not directly observe a Keplerian velocity profile. The absence of outflow and/or maser activity and the low amount of molecular gas available for accretion (~5 M⊙, assuming [NH3]/[H2] = 10-7) with respect to the mass of the central

  16. Star Formation Activity in the Galactic H II Region Sh2-297

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, K. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Samal, M. R.; Pandey, A. K.; Bhatt, B. C.; Ghosh, S. K.; Dewangan, L. K.; Tamura, M.

    2012-11-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the Galactic H II region Sh2-297, located in the Canis Major OB1 complex. Optical spectroscopic observations are used to constrain the spectral type of ionizing star HD 53623 as B0V. The classical nature of this H II region is affirmed by the low values of electron density and emission measure, which are calculated to be 756 cm-3 and 9.15 × 105 cm-6 pc using the radio continuum observations at 610 and 1280 MHz, and Very Large Array archival data at 1420 MHz. To understand local star formation, we identified the young stellar object (YSO) candidates in a region of area ~7farcm5 × 7farcm5 centered on Sh2-297 using grism slitless spectroscopy (to identify the Hα emission line stars), and near infrared (NIR) observations. NIR YSO candidates are further classified into various evolutionary stages using color-color and color-magnitude (CM) diagrams, giving 50 red sources (H - K > 0.6) and 26 Class II-like sources. The mass and age range of the YSOs are estimated to be ~0.1-2 M ⊙ and 0.5-2 Myr using optical (V/V-I) and NIR (J/J-H) CM diagrams. The mean age of the YSOs is found to be ~1 Myr, which is of the order of dynamical age of 1.07 Myr of the H II region. Using the estimated range of visual extinction (1.1-25 mag) from literature and NIR data for the region, spectral energy distribution models have been implemented for selected YSOs which show masses and ages to be consistent with estimated values. The spatial distribution of YSOs shows an evolutionary sequence, suggesting triggered star formation in the region. The star formation seems to have propagated from the ionizing star toward the cold dark cloud LDN1657A located west of Sh2-297.

  17. Environmental Effects on Star Formation Activity at z ~ 0.9 in the COSMOS Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajisawa, M.; Shioya, Y.; Aida, Y.; Ideue, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.; Nagao, T.; Murayama, T.; Matsubayashi, K.; Riguccini, L.

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the fraction of [O II] emitters in galaxies at z ~ 0.9 as a function of the local galaxy density in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) COSMOS 2 deg2 field. [O II] emitters are selected by the narrowband excess technique with the NB711-band imaging data taken with Suprime-Cam on the Subaru telescope. We carefully selected 614 photo-z-selected galaxies with M U3500 < -19.31 at z = 0.901 - 0.920, which includes 195 [O II] emitters, to directly compare the results with our previous study at z ~ 1.2. We found that the fraction is almost constant at 0.3 Mpc-2 < Σ10th < 10 Mpc-2. We also checked the fraction of galaxies with blue rest-frame colors of NUV - R < 2 in our photo-z-selected sample, and found that the fraction of blue galaxies does not significantly depend on the local density. On the other hand, the semi-analytic model of galaxy formation predicted that the fraction of star-forming galaxies at z ~ 0.9 decreases with increasing projected galaxy density even if the effects of the projection and the photo-z error in our analysis were taken into account. The fraction of [O II] emitters decreases from ~60% at z ~ 1.2 to ~30% at z ~ 0.9 independent of galaxy environment. The decrease of the [O II] emitter fraction could be explained mainly by the rapid decrease of star formation activity in the universe from z ~ 1.2 to z ~ 0.9. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA Inc, under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. Also based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under NASA contract 1407. Also based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; the XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA; the European Southern

  18. Creating an Interactive Globe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Kurt D.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a hands-on geography activity that is designed to teach longitude and latitude to fifth-grade students. Children create a scale model of the earth from a 300 gram weather balloon. This activity incorporates geography, mathematics, science, art, and homework. Provides information for obtaining materials. (KO)

  19. Effects of droplet-vitrification cryopreservation based on physiological and antioxidant enzyme activities of Brassidium shooting star orchid.

    PubMed

    Rahmah, Safrina; Ahmad Mubbarakh, Safiah; Soo Ping, Khor; Subramaniam, Sreeramanan

    2015-01-01

    Protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) of Brassidium Shooting Star orchid were successfully cryopreserved using droplet-vitrification method. Vitrification based cryopreservation protocol is comprised of preculture, osmoprotection, cryoprotection, cooling, rewarming, and growth recovery and each and every step contributes to the achievement of successful cryopreservation. In order to reveal the lethal and nonlethal damage produced by cryopreservation, histological observation, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and biochemical analysis were carried out in both cryopreserved and noncryopreserved PLBs of Brassidium Shooting Star orchid comparing with the control PLBs stock culture. Histological and scanning electron microscopy analyses displayed structural changes in cryopreserved PLBs due to the impact of cryoinjury during exposure to liquid nitrogen. Total soluble protein significantly increased throughout the dehydration process and the highest value was achieved when PLBs were stored in liquid nitrogen. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and catalase (CAT) showed the highest enzyme activities in both dehydration and cryostorage treatments indicating that stress level of PLBs was high during these stages. PMID:25861687

  20. Effects of Droplet-Vitrification Cryopreservation Based on Physiological and Antioxidant Enzyme Activities of Brassidium Shooting Star Orchid

    PubMed Central

    Rahmah, Safrina; Ahmad Mubbarakh, Safiah; Soo Ping, Khor

    2015-01-01

    Protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) of Brassidium Shooting Star orchid were successfully cryopreserved using droplet-vitrification method. Vitrification based cryopreservation protocol is comprised of preculture, osmoprotection, cryoprotection, cooling, rewarming, and growth recovery and each and every step contributes to the achievement of successful cryopreservation. In order to reveal the lethal and nonlethal damage produced by cryopreservation, histological observation, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and biochemical analysis were carried out in both cryopreserved and noncryopreserved PLBs of Brassidium Shooting Star orchid comparing with the control PLBs stock culture. Histological and scanning electron microscopy analyses displayed structural changes in cryopreserved PLBs due to the impact of cryoinjury during exposure to liquid nitrogen. Total soluble protein significantly increased throughout the dehydration process and the highest value was achieved when PLBs were stored in liquid nitrogen. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and catalase (CAT) showed the highest enzyme activities in both dehydration and cryostorage treatments indicating that stress level of PLBs was high during these stages. PMID:25861687

  1. Effects of droplet-vitrification cryopreservation based on physiological and antioxidant enzyme activities of Brassidium shooting star orchid.

    PubMed

    Rahmah, Safrina; Ahmad Mubbarakh, Safiah; Soo Ping, Khor; Subramaniam, Sreeramanan

    2015-01-01

    Protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) of Brassidium Shooting Star orchid were successfully cryopreserved using droplet-vitrification method. Vitrification based cryopreservation protocol is comprised of preculture, osmoprotection, cryoprotection, cooling, rewarming, and growth recovery and each and every step contributes to the achievement of successful cryopreservation. In order to reveal the lethal and nonlethal damage produced by cryopreservation, histological observation, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and biochemical analysis were carried out in both cryopreserved and noncryopreserved PLBs of Brassidium Shooting Star orchid comparing with the control PLBs stock culture. Histological and scanning electron microscopy analyses displayed structural changes in cryopreserved PLBs due to the impact of cryoinjury during exposure to liquid nitrogen. Total soluble protein significantly increased throughout the dehydration process and the highest value was achieved when PLBs were stored in liquid nitrogen. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and catalase (CAT) showed the highest enzyme activities in both dehydration and cryostorage treatments indicating that stress level of PLBs was high during these stages.

  2. Star and Dust Formation Activities in AzTEC-3: A Starburst Galaxy at z=5.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eliahu

    2011-01-01

    Analyses of of high-redshift ultraluminous infrared (IR) galaxies traditionally use the observed optical to submillimeter spectral energy distribution (SED) and estimates of the dynamical mass as observational constraints to derive the star formation rate (SFR), the stellar mass, and age of these objects. In this lecture we add this constraint to the analysis of AzTEC-3, a starburst galaxy at z=5.3. We construct different stellar and chemical evolutionary scenarios, constrained to produce the inferred dust mass and observed luminosity before the associated stellar mass exceeds the observational limit. A robust result of our models is that all scenarios require most of the radiating dust mass to have been accreted in molecular clouds. Our new procedure highlights the importance of a multiwavelength approach, and of the use of dust evolution models in constraining the age and the star formation activity and history in galaxies.

  3. Star and Dust Formation Activities in AzTEC-3: A Starburst Galaxy at z equals 5.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eliahu

    2011-01-01

    Analyses of of high-redshift ultraluminous infrared (IR) galaxies traditionally use the observed optical to submillimeter spectral energy distribution (SED) and estimates of the dynamical mass as observational constraints to derive the star formation rate (SFR), the stellar mass, and age of these objects. In this lecture we add this constraint to the analysis of AzTEC-3, a starburst galaxy at z=5.3. We construct different stellar and chemical evolutionary scenarios, constrained to produce the inferred dust mass and observed luminosity before the associated stellar mass exceeds the observational limit. A robust result of our models is that all scenarios require most of the radiating dust mass to have been accreted in molecular clouds. Our new procedure highlights the importance of a multi wavelength approach, and of the use of dust evolution models in constraining the age and the star formation activity and history in galaxies.

  4. Star Dust Formation Activities in AzTEC-3: A Starburst Galaxy at z=5.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eliahu

    2011-01-01

    Analyses of of high-redshift ultraluminous infrared OR) galaxies traditionally use the observed optical to submillimeter spectral energy distribution (SED) and estimates of the dynamical mass as observational constraints to derive the star formation rate (SFR), the stellar mass, and age of these objects. In this lecture we add this constraint to the analysis of AzTEC-3, a starburst galaxy at z=5.3. We construct different stellar and chemical evolutionary scenarios, constrained to produce the inferred dust mass and observed luminosity before the associated stellar mass exceeds the observational limit. A robust result of our models is that all scenarios require most of the radiating dust mass to have been accreted in molecular clouds. Our new procedure highlights the importance of a multi wavelength approach, and of the use of dust evolution models in constraining the age and the star formation activity and history in galaxies.

  5. Heavy Metal Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    La Silla Telescope Detects Lots of Lead in Three Distant Binaries Summary Very high abundances of the heavy element Lead have been discovered in three distant stars in the Milky Way Galaxy . This finding strongly supports the long-held view that roughly half of the stable elements heavier than Iron are produced in common stars during a phase towards the end of their life when they burn their Helium - the other half results from supernova explosions. All the Lead contained in each of the three stars weighs about as much as our Moon. The observations show that these "Lead stars" - all members of binary stellar systems - have been more enriched with Lead than with any other chemical element heavier than Iron. This new result is in excellent agreement with predictions by current stellar models about the build-up of heavy elements in stellar interiors. The new observations are reported by a team of Belgian and French astronomers [1] who used the Coude Echelle Spectrometer on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at the La Silla Observatory (Chile). PR Photo 26a/01 : A photo of HD 196944 , one of the "Lead stars". PR Photo 26b/01 : A CES spectrum of HD 196944 . The build-up of heavy elements Astronomers and physicists denote the build-up of heavier elements from lighter ones as " nucleosynthesis ". Only the very lightest elements (Hydrogen, Helium and Lithium [2]) were created at the time of the Big Bang and therefore present in the early universe. All the other heavier elements we now see around us were produced at a later time by nucleosynthesis inside stars. In those "element factories", nuclei of the lighter elements are smashed together whereby they become the nuclei of heavier ones - this process is known as nuclear fusion . In our Sun and similar stars, Hydrogen is being fused into Helium. At some stage, Helium is fused into Carbon, then Oxygen, etc. The fusion process requires positively charged nuclei to move very close to each other before they can unite. But with increasing

  6. Creating Active and High-Impact Learning: Moving out of the Classroom with Field-Based Student Consulting Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heriot, Kirk C.; Cook, Ronald G.; Matthews, Charles H.; Simpson, Leo

    2007-01-01

    Active learning has attracted considerable attention in higher education in response to concerns about how and what students are learning. Many pedagogies may be categorized as active learning, although most are classroom-based. The authors propose an alternative to "active learning in the classroom", which they characterize as "active learning…

  7. Star-like gold nanoparticles as highly active substrate for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morasso, Carlo; Mehn, Dora; Vanna, Renzo; Bedoni, Marzia; Pascual García, César; Prosperi, Davide; Gramatica, Furio

    2013-02-01

    Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is a popular method in bio-analytical chemistry and a potentially powerful enabling technology for in vitro diagnostics. SERS combines the excellent chemical specificity of Raman spectroscopy with the good sensitivity provided by enhancement of the signal that is observed when a molecule is located on (or very close to) the surface of nanostructured metallic materials. Star-like gold nanoparticles (SGN) are a new class of multibranched nanoparticles that in the last few years have attracted the attention of SERS community for their plasmonic properties. In this work we present a new method to prepare star-like gold nanoparticles with a simple one step protocol at room temperature using hydroquinone as reducing agent. Besides we compare the enhancement of Raman signal of malachite green, a dye commonly employed as label in biological studies, by star-like gold nanoparticles having different size, directly in liquid. This study shows that SGN provide good enhancement of Raman signal and that the effect of their dimension is strongly dependent on the wavelength used. Moreover preliminary results suggest that SGN produced using this method are characterized by good physical-chemical properties and they can be functionalized using the standard thiol chemistry. Overall, these results suggest that star-like gold nanoparticles produced through this method could be used for the further development of highly specific and sensitive SERS-based bio-analytical tests.

  8. Optical and X-ray studies of chromospherically active stars: FR Cancri, HD 95559 and LO Pegasi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, J. C.; Singh, K. P.; Drake, S. A.; Sagar, R.

    2005-01-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of three chromospherically active stars, namely FR Cnc (= BD +16 degrees 1753), HD 95559 and LO Peg (=BD +22 degrees 4409), including newly obtained optical photometry, (for FR Cnc) low-resolution optical spectroscopy, as well as archival IR and X-ray observations. The BVR photometry carried out during the years 2001 - 2004 has found significant photometric variability to be present in all three stars. For FR Cnc, a photometric period 0.826685 +/- 0.000034 d has been established. The strong variation in the phase and amplitude of the FR Cnc light curves when folded on this period implies the presence of evolving and migrating spots or spot groups on its surface. Two independent spots with migration periods of 0.97 and 0.93 years respectively are inferred. The photometry of HD 95559 suggests the formation of a spot (group) during the interval of our observations. We infer the existence of two independent spots or groups in the photosphere of LO Peg, one of which has a migration period of 1.12 years. The optical spectroscopy of FR Cnc carried out during 2002-2003, reveals the presence of strong and variable Ca I1 H and K, H(sub beta) and H(sub alpha) emission features indicative of high level of chromospheric activity. The value of 5.3 for the ratio of the excess emission in H(sub alpha) to H(sub beta), EH(sub alpha)/EH(sub beta), suggests that the chromospheric emission may arise from an extended off-limb region. We have searched for the presence of color excesses in the near-IR JHK bands of these stars using 2MASS data, but none of them appear to have any significant color excess. We have also analyzed archival X-ray observations of HD 95559 and LO Peg carried out by with the ROSAT observatory. The best fit models to their X-ray spectra imply the presence of two coronal plasma components of differing temperatures and with sub-solar metal abundances. The inferred emission measures and temperatures of these systems are similar to

  9. A dynamo model of magnetic activity in solar-like stars with different rotational velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Choudhuri, Arnab Rai; Kitchatinov, Leonid L.

    2014-08-10

    We attempt to provide a quantitative theoretical explanation for the observations that Ca II H/K emission and X-ray emission from solar-like stars increase with decreasing Rossby number (i.e., with faster rotation). Assuming that these emissions are caused by magnetic cycles similar to the sunspot cycle, we construct flux transport dynamo models of 1 M{sub ☉} stars rotating with different rotation periods. We first compute the differential rotation and the meridional circulation inside these stars from a mean-field hydrodynamics model. Then these are substituted in our dynamo code to produce periodic solutions. We find that the dimensionless amplitude f{sub m} of the toroidal flux through the star increases with decreasing rotation period. The observational data can be matched if we assume the emissions to go as the power 3-4 of f{sub m}. Assuming that the Babcock-Leighton mechanism saturates with increasing rotation, we can provide an explanation for the observed saturation of emission at low Rossby numbers. The main failure of our model is that it predicts an increase of the magnetic cycle period with increasing rotation rate, which is the opposite of what is found observationally. Much of our calculations are based on the assumption that the magnetic buoyancy makes the magnetic flux tubes rise radially from the bottom of the convection zone. Taking into account the fact that the Coriolis force diverts the magnetic flux tubes to rise parallel to the rotation axis in rapidly rotating stars, the results do not change qualitatively.

  10. Star Formation Activity in a Young Galaxy Cluster at Z = 0.866

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laganá, T. F.; Ulmer, M. P.; Martins, L. P.; da Cunha, E.

    2016-07-01

    The galaxy cluster RX J1257+4738 at z = 0.866 is one of the highest redshift clusters with a richness of multi-wavelength data, and is thus a good target to study the star formation-density relation at early epochs. Using a sample of spectroscopically confirmed cluster members, we derive the star-formation rates (SFRs) of our galaxies using two methods: (1) the relation between SFR and total infrared luminosity extrapolated from the observed Spitzer Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer 24 μm imaging data; and (2) spectral energy distribution fitting using the MAGPHYS code, including eight different bands. We show that, for this cluster, the SFR-density relation is very weak and seems to be dominated by the two central galaxies and the SFR presents a mild dependence on stellar mass, with more massive galaxies having higher SFR. However, the specific SFR (SSFR) decreases with stellar mass, meaning that more massive galaxies are forming fewer stars per unit of mass, and thus suggesting that the increase in star-forming members is driven by cluster assembly and infall. If the environment is somehow driving the star formation, one would expect a relation between the SSFR and the cluster centric distance, but that is not the case. A possible scenario to explain this lack of correlation is the contamination by infalling galaxies in the inner part of the cluster, which may be on their initial pass through the cluster center. As these galaxies have higher SFRs for their stellar mass, they enhance the mean SSFR in the center of the cluster.

  11. The Mid-infrared High-ionization Lines from Active Galactic Nuclei and Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Rieke, George H.

    2010-12-01

    We used Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph spectroscopic data on 426 galaxies including quasars, Seyferts, LINERs, and H II galaxies to investigate the relationship among the mid-IR emission lines. There is a tight linear correlation between the [Ne V]14.3 μm and 24.3 μm (97.1 eV) and the [O IV]25.9 μm (54.9 eV) high-ionization emission lines. The correlation also holds for these high-ionization emission lines and the [Ne III]15.56 μm (41 eV) emission line, although only for active galaxies. We used these correlations to calculate the [Ne III] excess due to star formation in Seyfert galaxies. We also estimated the [O IV] luminosity due to star formation in active galaxies and determined that it dominates the [O IV] emission only if the contribution of the active nucleus to the total luminosity is below 5%. We find that the active galactic nucleus dominates the [O IV] emission in most Seyfert galaxies, whereas star formation adequately explains the observed [O IV] emission in optically classified H II galaxies. Finally, we computed photoionization models to determine the physical conditions of the narrow-line region where these high-ionization lines originate. The estimated ionization parameter range is -2.8 < log U < -2.5 and the total hydrogen column density range is 20 < log n H (cm-2) < 21. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under NASA contract 1407.

  12. Kepler Flares. IV. A Comprehensive Analysis of the Activity of the dM4e Star GJ 1243

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverberg, Steven M.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Davenport, James R. A.; Wisniewski, John P.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hilton, Eric J.

    2016-10-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the active dM4e star GJ 1243. We use previous observations and ground-based echelle spectroscopy to determine that GJ 1243 is a member of the Argus association of field stars, suggesting it is ∼ 30{--}50 {{Myr}} old. We analyze 11 months of 1 minute cadence data from Kepler, presenting Kepler flare frequency distributions, as well as determining correlations between flare energy, amplitude, duration, and decay time. We find that the exponent α of the power-law flare energy distribution varies in time, primarily due to completeness of sample and the low frequency of high-energy flares. We also find a deviation from a single power law at high energy. We use ground-based spectroscopic observations that were simultaneous with the Kepler data to provide simultaneous photometric and spectroscopic analysis of three low-energy flares, the lowest-energy dMe flares with detailed spectral analysis to date on any star. The spectroscopic data from these flares extend constraints for radiative hydrodynamic flare models to a lower energy regime than has previously been studied. We use this simultaneous spectroscopy and Kepler photometry to develop approximate conversions from the Kepler bandpass to the traditional U and B bands. This conversion will be a critical factor in comparing any Kepler flare analyses to the canon of previous ground-based flare studies.

  13. Spectroscopic Properties of Cool Stars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: An Analysis of Magnetic Activity and a Search for Subdwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Andrew A.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Covey, Kevin R.; Silvestri, Nicole M.; Raymond, Sean N.; Harris, Hugh C.; Munn, Jeffrey A.; McGehee, Peregrine M.; Ivezić, Željko; Brinkmann, J.

    2004-07-01

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of nearly 8000 late-type dwarfs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using the Hα emission line as an activity indicator, we investigate the fraction of active stars as a function of spectral type and find a peak near type M8, confirming previous results. In contrast to past findings, we find that not all M7-M8 stars are active. We show that this may be a selection effect of the distance distributions of previous samples, since the active stars appear to be concentrated near the Galactic plane. We also examine the activity strength (ratio of the luminosity emitted in Hα to the bolometric luminosity) for each star and find that the mean activity strength is constant over the range M0-M5 and declines at later types. The decline begins at a slightly earlier spectral type than previously found. We explore the effect that activity has on the broadband photometric colors and find no significant differences between active and inactive stars. We also carry out a search for subdwarfs using spectroscopic metallicity indicators and find 60 subdwarf candidates. Several of these candidates are near the extreme subdwarf boundary. The spectroscopic subdwarf candidates are redder by ~0.2 mag in g-r compared with disk dwarfs at the same r-i color.

  14. The different origins of magnetic fields and activity in the Hertzsprung gap stars, OU Andromedae and 31 Comae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, A.; Aurière, M.; Petit, P.; Konstantinova-Antova, R.; Charbonnel, C.; Drake, N. A.

    2016-06-01

    Context. When crossing the Hertzsprung gap, intermediate-mass stars develop a convective envelope. Fast rotators on the main sequence, or Ap star descendants, are expected to become magnetic active subgiants during this evolutionary phase. Aims: We compare the surface magnetic fields and activity indicators of two active, fast rotating red giants with similar masses and spectral class but different rotation rates - OU And (Prot = 24.2 d) and 31 Com (Prot = 6.8 d) - to address the question of the origin of their magnetism and high activity. Methods: Observations were carried out with the Narval spectropolarimeter in 2008 and 2013. We used the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) technique to extract Stokes V and I profiles with high signal-to-noise ratio to detect Zeeman signatures of the magnetic field of the stars. We then provide Zeeman-Doppler imaging (ZDI), activity indicators monitoring, and a precise estimation of stellar parameters. We use state-of-the-art stellar evolutionary models, including rotation, to infer the evolutionary status of our giants, as well as their initial rotation velocity on the main sequence, and we interpret our observational results in the light of the theoretical Rossby numbers. Results: The detected magnetic field of OU Andromedae (OU And) is a strong one. Its longitudinal component Bl reaches 40 G and presents an about sinusoidal variation with reversal of the polarity. The magnetic topology of OU And is dominated by large-scale elements and is mainly poloidal with an important dipole component, as well as a significant toroidal component. The detected magnetic field of 31 Comae (31 Com) is weaker, with a magnetic map showing a more complex field geometry, and poloidal and toroidal components of equal contributions. The evolutionary models show that the progenitors of OU And and 31 Com must have been rotating at velocities that correspond to 30 and 53%, respectively, of their critical rotation velocity on the zero age main sequence

  15. Stimulation of StAR expression by cAMP is controlled by inhibition of highly inducible SIK1 via CRTC2, a co-activator of CREB.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinwoo; Tong, Tiegang; Takemori, Hiroshi; Jefcoate, Colin

    2015-06-15

    In mouse steroidogenic cells the activation of cholesterol metabolism is mediated by steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Here, we visualized a coordinated regulation of StAR transcription, splicing and post-transcriptional processing, which are synchronized by salt inducible kinase (SIK1) and CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC2). To detect primary RNA (pRNA), spliced primary RNA (Sp-RNA) and mRNA in single cells, we generated probe sets by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These methods allowed us to address the nature of StAR gene expression and to visualize protein-nucleic acid interactions through direct detection. We show that SIK1 represses StAR expression in Y1 adrenal and MA10 testis cells through inhibition of processing mediated by CRTC2. Digital image analysis matches qPCR analyses of the total cell culture. Evidence is presented for spatially separate accumulation of StAR pRNA and Sp-RNA at the gene loci in the nucleus. These findings establish that cAMP, SIK and CRTC mediate StAR expression through activation of individual StAR gene loci.

  16. THE IMPACT OF INTERACTIONS, BARS, BULGES, AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI ON STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY IN LOCAL MASSIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Saintonge, Amelie; Fabello, Silvia; Wang Jing; Catinella, Barbara; Tacconi, Linda J.; Genzel, Reinhard; Gracia-Carpio, Javier; Wuyts, Stijn; Kramer, Carsten; Moran, Sean; Heckman, Timothy M.; Schiminovich, David; Schuster, Karl

    2012-10-20

    Using atomic and molecular gas observations from the GASS and COLD GASS surveys and complementary optical/UV data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, we investigate the nature of the variations in the molecular gas depletion time observed across the local massive galaxy population. The large and unbiased COLD GASS sample allows us for the first time to statistically assess the relative importance of galaxy interactions, bar instabilities, morphologies, and the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in regulating star formation efficiency. We find that both the H{sub 2} mass fraction and depletion time vary as a function of the distance of a galaxy from the main sequence traced by star-forming galaxies in the SFR-M {sub *} plane. The longest gas depletion times are found in below-main-sequence bulge-dominated galaxies ({mu}{sub *} >5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M {sub Sun} kpc{sup -2}, C > 2.6) that are either gas-poor (M{sub H{sub 2}}/M {sub *} <1.5%) or else on average less efficient by a factor of {approx}2 than disk-dominated galaxies at converting into stars any cold gas they may have. We find no link between the presence of AGNs and these long depletion times. In the regime where galaxies are disk-dominated and gas-rich, the galaxies undergoing mergers or showing signs of morphological disruptions have the shortest molecular gas depletion times, while those hosting strong stellar bars have only marginally higher global star formation efficiencies as compared to matched control samples. Our interpretation is that the molecular gas depletion time variations are caused by changes in the ratio between the gas mass traced by the CO(1-0) observations and the gas mass in high-density star-forming cores (as traced by observations of, e.g., HCN(1-0)). While interactions, mergers, and bar instabilities can locally increase pressure and raise the ratio of efficiently star-forming gas to CO-detected gas (therefore lowering the CO

  17. Star Light, Star Bright.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iadevaia, David G.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a technique for obtaining a rough measure of the brightness among different stars. Materials needed include a standard 35-mm camera, a plastic ruler, and a photo enlarger. Although a telescope can be used, it is not essential. (JN)

  18. A CENSUS OF BROAD-LINE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN NEARBY GALAXIES: COEVAL STAR FORMATION AND RAPID BLACK HOLE GROWTH

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Fang, Jerome J.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.; Kocevski, Dale D.

    2013-02-15

    We present the first quantified, statistical map of broad-line active galactic nucleus (AGN) frequency with host galaxy color and stellar mass in nearby (0.01 < z < 0.11) galaxies. Aperture photometry and z-band concentration measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are used to disentangle AGN and galaxy emission, resulting in estimates of uncontaminated galaxy rest-frame color, luminosity, and stellar mass. Broad-line AGNs are distributed throughout the blue cloud and green valley at a given stellar mass, and are much rarer in quiescent (red sequence) galaxies. This is in contrast to the published host galaxy properties of weaker narrow-line AGNs, indicating that broad-line AGNs occur during a different phase in galaxy evolution. More luminous broad-line AGNs have bluer host galaxies, even at fixed mass, suggesting that the same processes that fuel nuclear activity also efficiently form stars. The data favor processes that simultaneously fuel both star formation activity and rapid supermassive black hole accretion. If AGNs cause feedback on their host galaxies in the nearby universe, the evidence of galaxy-wide quenching must be delayed until after the broad-line AGN phase.

  19. Star parties in Mexico, extended to Colombia and China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Peimbert, Silvia; Franco, Jose

    2015-08-01

    Sparked by the enthusiasm of the International Year of Astronomy, a set of simultaneous star parties have been held since 2008 in several cities in Mexico. These star parties have raised big expectations among the population and they have been repeated at least yearly. The activity has increased in size and participating sites. The most recent one took place on November 29th 2014, and it included 55 locations across Mexico as well as 5 in Colombia and one in China. To organize this activity a Mexican National Committee was created formed by several universities, the French Embassy, related industries and astronomical societies. We present more information on this activity.

  20. The SEEDS High-Contrast Imaging Survey: Exoplanet and Brown Dwarf Survey for Nearby Young Stars Dated with Gyrochronology and Activity Age Indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Tamura, Motohide; Helminiak, Kris; Mede, Kyle; Brandt, Timothy; Janson, Markus; Kandori, Ryo; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hashimoto, Jun

    2015-12-01

    The SEEDS campaign has successfully discovered and characterized exoplanets, brown dwarfs, and circumstellar disks since it began in 2009, via the direct imaging technique. The survey has targeted nearby young stars, as well as stars associated to star-forming regions, the Pleiades open cluster, moving groups, and debris disks. We selected the nearby young stars that have been dated with age indicators based on stellar rotation periods (i.e., gyrochronology) and chromoshperic/coronal activities. Of these, nearly 40 were observed, with ages mainly between 100 and 1000 Myr and distances less than 40 pc. Our observations typically attain the contrast of ~6 x 10-6 at 1'' and better than ~1 x 10-6 beyond 2'', enabling us to detect a planetary-mass companion even around such old stars. Indeed, the SEEDS team reported the discovery that the nearby Sun-like star GJ 504 hosts a Jovian companion GJ 504b, which has a mass of 3-8.5 Jupiter masses that is inferred according to the hot-start cooling models and our estimated system age of 100-510 Myr. The remaining observations out of the selected ~40 stars have resulted in no detection of additional planets or brown dwarf companions. Meanwhile, we have newly imaged a low-mass stellar companion orbiting the G-type star HIP 10321, for which the presence of companion was previously announced via radial velocity technique. The astrometry and radial velocity measurements are simultaneously analyzed to determine the orbit, providing constraints on the dynamical mass of both objects and stellar evolution models. Here we summarize our direct imaging observations for the nearby young stars dated with gyrochrolorogy and activity age indicators. Furthermore, we report the analysis for the HIP 10321 system with the imaged low-mass companion.

  1. Measurement of 56Fe activity produced in inelastic scattering of neutrons created by cosmic muons in an iron shield.

    PubMed

    Krmar, M; Jovančević, N; Nikolić, D

    2012-01-01

    We report on the study of the intensities of several gamma lines emitted after the inelastic scattering of neutrons in (56)Fe. Neutrons were produced via nuclear processes induced by cosmic muons in the 20tons massive iron cube placed at the Earth's surface and used as a passive shield for the HPGe detector. Relative intensities of detected gamma lines are compared with the results collected in the same iron shield by the use of the (252)Cf neutrons. Assessment against the published data from neutron scattering experiments at energies up to 14MeV is also provided. It allowed us to infer the qualitative information about the average energy of muon-created neutrons in the iron shield.

  2. Creating an Effective Newsletter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shackelford, Ray; Griffis, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    Newsletters are an important resource or form of media. They offer a cost-effective way to keep people informed, as well as to promote events and programs. Production of a newsletter makes an excellent project, relevant to real-world communication, for technology students. This article presents an activity on how to create a short newsletter. The…

  3. In situ oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanocapsules creates highly active cobalt oxide catalysts for hydrocarbon combustion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han; Chen, Chunlin; Zhang, Yexin; Peng, Lixia; Ma, Song; Yang, Teng; Guo, Huaihong; Zhang, Zhidong; Su, Dang Sheng; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Combustion catalysts have been extensively explored to reduce the emission of hydrocarbons that are capable of triggering photochemical smog and greenhouse effect. Palladium as the most active material is widely applied in exhaust catalytic converter and combustion units, but its high capital cost stimulates the tremendous research on non-noble metal candidates. Here we fabricate highly defective cobalt oxide nanocrystals via a controllable oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanoparticles. Strain gradients induced in the nanoconfined carbon shell result in the formation of a large number of active sites featuring a considerable catalytic activity for the combustion of a variety of hydrocarbons (methane, propane and substituted benzenes). For methane combustion, the catalyst displays a unique activity being comparable or even superior to the palladium ones. PMID:26074206

  4. In situ oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanocapsules creates highly active cobalt oxide catalysts for hydrocarbon combustion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Chen, Chunlin; Zhang, Yexin; Peng, Lixia; Ma, Song; Yang, Teng; Guo, Huaihong; Zhang, Zhidong; Su, Dang Sheng; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Combustion catalysts have been extensively explored to reduce the emission of hydrocarbons that are capable of triggering photochemical smog and greenhouse effect. Palladium as the most active material is widely applied in exhaust catalytic converter and combustion units, but its high capital cost stimulates the tremendous research on non-noble metal candidates. Here we fabricate highly defective cobalt oxide nanocrystals via a controllable oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanoparticles. Strain gradients induced in the nanoconfined carbon shell result in the formation of a large number of active sites featuring a considerable catalytic activity for the combustion of a variety of hydrocarbons (methane, propane and substituted benzenes). For methane combustion, the catalyst displays a unique activity being comparable or even superior to the palladium ones.

  5. In situ oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanocapsules creates highly active cobalt oxide catalysts for hydrocarbon combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han; Chen, Chunlin; Zhang, Yexin; Peng, Lixia; Ma, Song; Yang, Teng; Guo, Huaihong; Zhang, Zhidong; Su, Dang Sheng; Zhang, Jian

    2015-06-01

    Combustion catalysts have been extensively explored to reduce the emission of hydrocarbons that are capable of triggering photochemical smog and greenhouse effect. Palladium as the most active material is widely applied in exhaust catalytic converter and combustion units, but its high capital cost stimulates the tremendous research on non-noble metal candidates. Here we fabricate highly defective cobalt oxide nanocrystals via a controllable oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanoparticles. Strain gradients induced in the nanoconfined carbon shell result in the formation of a large number of active sites featuring a considerable catalytic activity for the combustion of a variety of hydrocarbons (methane, propane and substituted benzenes). For methane combustion, the catalyst displays a unique activity being comparable or even superior to the palladium ones.

  6. In situ oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanocapsules creates highly active cobalt oxide catalysts for hydrocarbon combustion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Chen, Chunlin; Zhang, Yexin; Peng, Lixia; Ma, Song; Yang, Teng; Guo, Huaihong; Zhang, Zhidong; Su, Dang Sheng; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Combustion catalysts have been extensively explored to reduce the emission of hydrocarbons that are capable of triggering photochemical smog and greenhouse effect. Palladium as the most active material is widely applied in exhaust catalytic converter and combustion units, but its high capital cost stimulates the tremendous research on non-noble metal candidates. Here we fabricate highly defective cobalt oxide nanocrystals via a controllable oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanoparticles. Strain gradients induced in the nanoconfined carbon shell result in the formation of a large number of active sites featuring a considerable catalytic activity for the combustion of a variety of hydrocarbons (methane, propane and substituted benzenes). For methane combustion, the catalyst displays a unique activity being comparable or even superior to the palladium ones. PMID:26074206

  7. Evidence of a massive planet candidate orbiting the young active K5V star BD+20 1790

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernán-Obispo, M.; Gálvez-Ortiz, M. C.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Kane, S. R.; Barnes, J. R.; de Castro, E.; Cornide, M.

    2010-03-01

    Context. BD+20 1790 is a young active, metal-rich, late-type K5Ve star. We have undertaken a study of stellar activity and kinematics for this star over the past few years. Previous results show a high level of stellar activity, with the presence of prominence-like structures, spots on the surface, and strong flare events, despite the moderate rotational velocity of the star. In addition, radial velocity variations with a semi-amplitude of up to 1 km s-1 were detected. Aims: We investigate the nature of these radial velocity variations, in order to determine whether they are due to stellar activity or the reflex motion of the star induced by a companion. Methods: We have analysed high-resolution echelle spectra by measuring stellar activity indicators and computing radial velocity (RV) and bisector velocity spans. Two-band photometry was also obtained to produce the light curve and determine the photometric period. Results: Based upon the analysis of the bisector velocity span, as well as spectroscopic indices of chromospheric indicators, Ca ii H & K, Hα, and taking the photometric analysis into account, we report that the best explanation for the RV variation is the presence of a substellar companion. The Keplerian fit of the RV data yields a solution for a close-in massive planet with an orbital period of 7.78 days. The presence of the close-in massive planet could also be an interpretation for the high level of stellar activity detected. Since the RV data are not part of a planet search programme, we can consider our results as a serendipitous evidence of a planetary companion. To date, this is the youngest main sequence star for which a planetary candidate has been reported. Based on observations collected at the German-Spanish Astronomical Center, Calar Alto, jointly operated by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie Heidelberg and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC). Based on observations made with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo

  8. SPOON-FEEDING GIANT STARS TO SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES: EPISODIC MASS TRANSFER FROM EVOLVING STARS AND THEIR CONTRIBUTION TO THE QUIESCENT ACTIVITY OF GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Grady, Sean; Guillochon, James

    2013-11-10

    Stars may be tidally disrupted if, in a single orbit, they are scattered too close to a supermassive black hole (SMBH). Tidal disruption events are thought to power luminous but short-lived accretion episodes that can light up otherwise quiescent SMBHs in transient flares. Here we explore a more gradual process of tidal stripping where stars approach the tidal disruption radius by stellar evolution while in an eccentric orbit. After the onset of mass transfer, these stars episodically transfer mass to the SMBH every pericenter passage, giving rise to low-level flares that repeat on the orbital timescale. Giant stars, in particular, will exhibit a runaway response to mass loss and 'spoon-feed' material to the black hole for tens to hundreds of orbital periods. In contrast to full tidal disruption events, the duty cycle of this feeding mode is of order unity for black holes M{sub bh} ∼> 10{sup 7} M{sub ☉}. This mode of quasi-steady SMBH feeding is competitive with indirect SMBH feeding through stellar winds, and spoon-fed giant stars may play a role in determining the quiescent luminosity of local SMBHs.

  9. EVIDENCE OF HOT HIGH VELOCITY PHOTOIONIZED PLASMA FALLING ON ACTIVELY ACCRETING T TAURI STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez de Castro, Ana Ines

    2013-10-01

    The He II (1640 Å) line and the resonance doublet of N V (UV1) provide a good diagnostic tool to constrain the excitation mechanism of hot (T{sub e} > 40,000 K) atmospheric/magnetospheric plasmas in T Tauri stars (TTSs). Making use of the data available in the Hubble Space Telescope archive, this work shows that there are at least two distinct physical components contributing to the radiation in these tracers: the accretion flow sliding on the magnetosphere and the atmosphere. The N V profiles in most sources are symmetric and at rest with respect to the star. The velocity dispersion of the profile increases from non-accreting (σ = 40 km s{sup –1}) to accreting (σ = 120 km s{sup –1}) TTSs, suggesting that the macroturbulence field in the line formation region decreases as the stars approach the main sequence. Evidence of the N V line being formed in a hot solar-like wind has been found in RW Aur, HN Tau, and AA Tau. The He II profile has a strong narrow component that dominates the line flux; the dispersion of this component ranges from 20 to 60 km s{sup –1}. Current data suggest that both accretion shocks and atmospheric emission might contribute to the line flux. In some sources, the He II line shows a broad and redward-shifted emission component often accompanied by semiforbidden O III] emission that has a critical electron density of ∼3.4 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup 3}. In spite of their different origins (inferred from the kinematics of the line formation region), N V and He II fluxes are strongly correlated, with only the possible exception of some of the heaviest accretors.

  10. EVIDENCE FOR LOW EXTINCTION IN ACTIVELY STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z > 6.5

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, F.; Decarli, R.; Carilli, C.; Riechers, D.; Bertoldi, F.; Weiss, A.; Cox, P.; Neri, R.; Maiolino, R.; Ouchi, M.; Egami, E.

    2012-06-20

    We present a search for the [C II] 158 {mu}m fine structure line (a main cooling line of the interstellar medium) and the underlying far-infrared (FIR) continuum in three high-redshift (6.6 < z < 8.2) star-forming galaxies using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. We targeted two Ly{alpha}-selected galaxies (Ly{alpha} emitters, LAEs) with moderate UV-based star formation rates (SFRs {approx} 20 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}; Himiko at z = 6.6 and IOK-1 at z = 7.0) and a gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxy (GRB 090423 at z {approx} 8.2). Based on our 3{sigma} rest-frame FIR continuum limits, previous (rest-frame) UV continuum measurements and spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting, we rule out SED shapes similar to highly obscured galaxies (e.g., Arp 220, M 82) and less extreme dust-rich nearby spiral galaxies (e.g., M 51) for the LAEs. Conservatively assuming an SED shape typical of local spiral galaxies we derive upper limits for the FIR-based star formation rates (SFRs) of {approx}70 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, {approx}50 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, and {approx}40 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} for Himiko, IOK-1, and GRB 090423, respectively. For the LAEs these limits are only a factor {approx}3 higher than the published UV-based SFRs (uncorrected for extinction). This indicates that the dust obscuration in the z > 6 LAEs studied here is lower by a factor of a few than what has recently been found in some LAEs at lower redshift (2 < z < 3.5) with similar UV-based SFRs. A low obscuration in our z > 6 LAE sample is consistent with recent rest-frame UV studies of z {approx} 7 Lyman break galaxies.

  11. CANDELS: THE CORRELATION BETWEEN GALAXY MORPHOLOGY AND STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Bomee; Giavalisco, Mauro; Williams, Christina C.; Guo Yicheng; Faber, S. M.; Van der Wel, Arjen; Kocevski, Dale; Conselice, Christopher J.; Wuyts, Stijn; Dekel, Avishai; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Bell, Eric F.

    2013-09-01

    We discuss the state of the assembly of the Hubble sequence in the mix of bright galaxies at redshift 1.4 < z {<=} 2.5 with a large sample of 1671 galaxies down to H{sub AB} {approx} 26, selected from the HST/ACS and WFC3 images of the GOODS-South field obtained as part of the GOODS and CANDELS observations. We investigate the relationship between the star formation properties and morphology using various parametric diagnostics, such as the Sersic light profile, Gini (G), M{sub 20}, concentration (C), asymmetry (A), and multiplicity ({Psi}) parameters. Our sample clearly separates into massive, red, and passive galaxies versus less massive, blue, and star-forming ones, and this dichotomy correlates very well with the galaxies' morphological properties. Star-forming galaxies show a broad variety of morphological features, including clumpy structures and bulges mixed with faint low surface brightness features, generally characterized by disky-type light profiles. Passively evolving galaxies, on the other hand, very often have compact light distribution and morphology typical of today's spheroidal systems. We also find that artificially redshifted local galaxies have a similar distribution with z {approx} 2 galaxies in a G-M{sub 20} plane. Visual inspection between the rest-frame optical and UV images show that there is a generally weak morphological k-correction for galaxies at z {approx} 2, but the comparison with non-parametric measures show that galaxies in the rest-frame UV are somewhat clumpier than rest-frame optical. Similar general trends are observed in the local universe among massive galaxies, suggesting that the backbone of the Hubble sequence was already in place at z {approx} 2.

  12. Enigma of Runaway Stars Solved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-01-01

    . In fact, this is one of the most `perfect' bow shocks of parabolic form ever observed around an OB-runaway. Moreover, the orientation of the bow shock indicates that the system is moving towards the north; its origin must therefore lie somewhere south of its present position in the sky. It also turns out that the accordingly deduced path of HD77581 crosses a well-known OB-association with the designation Vel OB1 . At the measured distance of Vel OB1 of about 6000 lightyears, the observed proper motion and radial velocity of HD77581 indicate a space velocity of 90 km/sec. With this velocity, it would have taken HD77581 and its compact companion about 2.5 million years to travel the distance between Vel OB1 and its present position. This corresponds exactly to the expected time that has passed since the supernova explosion of the progenitor star of Vela~X-1, as deduced from the observed properties of the binary system. The puzzle comes together Now everything fits! The observation of a bow shock around the OB star HD77581 and its compact companion Vela X-1 supports the scenario originally proposed by Blaauw to create OB-runaway stars by the supernova explosion of the binary companion. Following back the path of the system resulted in the discovery of the place where it was born and from where it escaped after the violent supernova explosion which produced the neutron star that now manifests itself as the strong X-ray source known as Vela X-1. More information about this research project This research project is described in ESO Preprint no.~1199 and will appear shortly as a Letter to the Editor in `Astrophysical Journal' (ApJ 475, L37-L40). Notes: [1] Professor Adriaan Blaauw is a well-known Dutch astronomer (Leiden and Groningen). He participated very actively in the build-up of ESO in the 1950's and 60's and he was ESO Director General from 1970 - 1974. He is the author of ` ESO's Early History - The European Southern Observatory from concept to reality ' (1991). [2

  13. Investigating the quality of mental models deployed by undergraduate engineering students in creating explanations: The case of thermally activated phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Claudio; Battaglia, Onofrio Rosario; Di Paola, Benedetto

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes a method aimed at pointing out the quality of the mental models undergraduate engineering students deploy when asked to create explanations for phenomena or processes and/or use a given model in the same context. Student responses to a specially designed written questionnaire are quantitatively analyzed using researcher-generated categories of reasoning, based on the physics education research literature on student understanding of the relevant physics content. The use of statistical implicative analysis tools allows us to successfully identify clusters of students with respect to the similarity to the reasoning categories, defined as “practical or everyday,” “descriptive,” or “explicative.” Through the use of similarity and implication indexes our method also enables us to study the consistency in students’ deployment of mental models. A qualitative analysis of interviews conducted with students after they had completed the questionnaire is used to clarify some aspects which emerged from the quantitative analysis and validate the results obtained. Some implications of this joint use of quantitative and qualitative analysis for the design of a learning environment focused on the understanding of some aspects of the world at the level of causation and mechanisms of functioning are discussed.

  14. Transcriptional activation of LON Gene by a new form of mitochondrial stress: A role for the nuclear respiratory factor 2 in StAR overload response (SOR).

    PubMed

    Bahat, Assaf; Perlberg, Shira; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Isaac, Sara; Eden, Amir; Lauria, Ines; Langer, Thomas; Orly, Joseph

    2015-06-15

    High output of steroid hormone synthesis in steroidogenic cells of the adrenal cortex and the gonads requires the expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) that facilitates cholesterol mobilization to the mitochondrial inner membrane where the CYP11A1/P450scc enzyme complex converts the sterol to the first steroid. Earlier studies have shown that StAR is active while pausing on the cytosolic face of the outer mitochondrial membrane while subsequent import of the protein into the matrix terminates the cholesterol mobilization activity. Consequently, during repeated activity cycles, high level of post-active StAR accumulates in the mitochondrial matrix. To prevent functional damage due to such protein overload effect, StAR is degraded by a sequence of three to four ATP-dependent proteases of the mitochondria protein quality control system, including LON and the m-AAA membranous proteases AFG3L2 and SPG7/paraplegin. Furthermore, StAR expression in both peri-ovulatory ovarian cells, or under ectopic expression in cell line models, results in up to 3-fold enrichment of the mitochondrial proteases and their transcripts. We named this novel form of mitochondrial stress as StAR overload response (SOR). To better understand the SOR mechanism at the transcriptional level we analyzed first the unexplored properties of the proximal promoter of the LON gene. Our findings suggest that the human nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2), also known as GA binding protein (GABP), is responsible for 88% of the proximal promoter activity, including the observed increase of transcription in the presence of StAR. Further studies are expected to reveal if common transcriptional determinants coordinate the SOR induced transcription of all the genes encoding the SOR proteases.

  15. Creating a Before-School Physical Activity Program: Pre-Service Physical Educators' Experiences and Implications for PETE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMullen, Jaimie; van der Mars, Hans; Jahn, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the experiences of physical education teacher education (PETE) majors enrolled in an internship course that provided them with authentic experiences promoting and facilitating a before-school physical activity (PA) program and to examine the associated implications for PETE programs within the Comprehensive…

  16. Creating a Safe Climate for Active Learning and Student Engagement: An Example from an Introductory Social Work Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ni Raghallaigh, M.; Cunniffe, R.

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the experiences of students who participated in a series of seminars that employed active learning methodologies. The study on which the article is based involved two parts. First, students completed a questionnaire after each seminar, resulting in 468 questionnaires. Second, nine students participated in a focus group where…

  17. THERMAL AND RADIATIVE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK HAVE A LIMITED IMPACT ON STAR FORMATION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, Orianne; Juneau, Stéphanie; Bournaud, Frédéric; Gabor, Jared M.

    2015-02-10

    The effects of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) on their host galaxies depend on the coupling between the injected energy and the interstellar medium (ISM). Here, we model and quantify the impact of long-range AGN ionizing radiation—in addition to the often considered small-scale energy deposition—on the physical state of the multi-phase ISM of the host galaxy and on its total star formation rate (SFR). We formulate an AGN spectral energy distribution matched with observations, which we use with the radiative transfer (RT) code Cloudy to compute AGN ionization in a simulated high-redshift disk galaxy. We use a high-resolution (∼6 pc) simulation including standard thermal AGN feedback and calculate RT in post-processing. Surprisingly, while these models produce significant AGN-driven outflows, we find that AGN ionizing radiation and heating reduce the SFR by a few percent at most for a quasar luminosity (L {sub bol} = 10{sup 46.5} erg s{sup –1}). Although the circumgalactic gaseous halo can be kept almost entirely ionized by the AGN, most star-forming clouds (n ≳ 10{sup 2} {sup –} {sup 3} cm{sup –3}) and even the reservoirs of cool atomic gas (n ∼ 0.3-10 cm{sup –3})—which are the sites of future star formation (SF; 100-200 Myr), are generally too dense to be significantly affected. Our analysis ignores any absorption from a putative torus, making our results upper limits on the effects of ionizing radiation. Therefore, while the AGN-driven outflows can remove substantial amounts of gas in the long term, the impact of AGN feedback on the SF efficiency in the interstellar gas in high-redshift galaxies is marginal, even when long-range radiative effects are accounted for.

  18. Differential Rotation of the Active G5 V Star κ1 Ceti: Photometry from the MOST Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucinski, Slavek M.; Walker, Gordon A. H.; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Kuschnig, Rainer; Shkolnik, Evgenya; Marchenko, Sergey; Bohlender, David A.; Guenther, D. B.; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Sasselov, Dimitar; Weiss, Werner W.

    2004-12-01

    About 30.5 days of nearly uninterrupted broadband photometry of the solar-type star κ1 Ceti, obtained with the MOST (Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars) satellite, shows evidence for two large starspots with different rotation periods of 8.9 and ~9.3 days (ΔΩ/Ω~=4%). Ground-based measurements of Ca II H and K emission in 2002 and 2003 reveal variations in chromospheric activity with a period of about 9.3 days. The data were obtained during the MOST commissioning phase. When the data are combined with historical observations, they indicate that the 9.3 day spot has been stable in its period for over 30 yr. The photometry, with a sampling rate of approximately once per minute, was also used to search for acoustic (p-mode) oscillations in the star. We detect no clear evidence for p-modes in the κ1 Ceti photometry, with a noise level around 7-9 μmag at frequencies in the range of 0.5-4 mHz (3 σ detection limit of 21-27 μmag). There were no flares or planetary transits during 30.5 days of MOST monitoring with light amplitudes greater than 2 mmag (durations >200 minutes) and 3 mmag (2-200 minute durations). While this rules out any close-in planets with Jupiter diameters >=0.5 and orbital inclinations close to 90°, the scatter in differential radial velocities permit a close giant planet in a more highly inclined orbit. Based on data obtained with the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission jointly operated by Dynacon, Inc., the University of Toronto Institute of Aerospace Studies, and the University of British Columbia.

  19. On the coronae of rapidly rotating stars. I - The relation between rotation and coronal activity in RS CVn systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, F. M.; Bowyer, S.

    1981-01-01

    Soft X-ray observations are presented of a nearly complete sample of RS Canum Venaticorum systems taken with the Einstein X-ray Observatory. It is shown that the quiescent coronal activity, as measured by the ratio of the X-ray to bolometric flux, is directly proportional to the angular velocity of the star with the active chromosphere in these systems. This relation is found to hold over two decades in angular velocity. It is also found that the stellar surface gravity has no obvious influence on the ratio of the X-ray luminosity to the bolometric luminosity over two decades in surface gravity. It is pointed out that the linear relation between the ratio of the X-ray luminosity to the bolometric luminosity on the one hand, and the angular velocity, on the other, holds important implications for dynamo theories of the generation of stellar magnetic fields.

  20. The nuclear receptor NR2F2 activates star expression and steroidogenesis in mouse MA-10 and MLTC-1 Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Villarroel, Raifish E; Robert, Nicholas M; Martin, Luc J; Brousseau, Catherine; Tremblay, Jacques J

    2014-07-01

    Testosterone production is dependent on cholesterol transport within the mitochondrial matrix, an essential step mediated by a protein complex containing the steroidogenic acute regulatory (STAR) protein. In steroidogenic Leydig cells, Star expression is hormonally regulated and involves several transcription factors. NR2F2 (COUP-TFII) is an orphan nuclear receptor that plays critical roles in cell differentiation and lineage determination. Conditional NR2F2 knockout prior to puberty leads to male infertility due to insufficient testosterone production, suggesting that NR2F2 could positively regulate steroidogenesis and Star expression. In this study we found that NR2F2 is expressed in the nucleus of some peritubular myoid cells and in interstitial cells, mainly in steroidogenically active adult Leydig cells. In MA-10 and MLTC-1 Leydig cells, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated NR2F2 knockdown reduces basal steroid production without affecting hormone responsiveness. Consistent with this, we found that STAR mRNA and protein levels were reduced in NR2F2-depleted MA-10 and MLTC-1 cells. Transient transfections of Leydig cells revealed that a -986 bp mouse Star promoter construct was activated 3-fold by NR2F2. Using 5' progressive deletion constructs, we mapped the NR2F2-responsive element between -131 and -95 bp. This proximal promoter region contains a previously uncharacterized direct repeat 1 (DR1)-like element to which NR2F2 is recruited and directly binds. Mutations in the DR1-like element that prevent NR2F2 binding severely blunted NR2F2-mediated Star promoter activation. These data identify an essential role for the nuclear receptor NR2F2 as a direct activator of Star gene expression in Leydig cells, and thus in the control of steroid hormone biosynthesis.

  1. Building neuroscientific evidence and creating best practices for Active and Healthy Aging through ubiquitous exergaming and Living Labs.

    PubMed

    Bamidis, Panagiotis D

    2015-08-01

    Ageing is a major global demographic trend, which seems to be intensified. The earlier detection of risks associated with ageing, can enable earlier intervention to ameliorate their negative consequences. Many of these recent efforts are associated with the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and the stemming from them innovations in the fight against this age related decline and frailty. Ubiquitous unobtrusive monitoring and training (recently much blended by means of exergames) has become reality due to the availability of new mobile sensors and devices and the emergence of new technologies and services. The current piece of work presents the different milestones we have achieved as best practices during the past seven years of piloting training and exergaming ICT components in an effort to support Active and Healthy Aging. Our impact verification and results validation methodologies are revisited here in an effort to outline best practices and build up neuroscientific evidence. Finally, this paper demonstrates how the construction of an Active and Healthy Aging Living Lab was materialised in an attempt to gauge evidence based research in the field of active and health aging. PMID:26738090

  2. Building neuroscientific evidence and creating best practices for Active and Healthy Aging through ubiquitous exergaming and Living Labs.

    PubMed

    Bamidis, Panagiotis D

    2015-01-01

    Ageing is a major global demographic trend, which seems to be intensified. The earlier detection of risks associated with ageing, can enable earlier intervention to ameliorate their negative consequences. Many of these recent efforts are associated with the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and the stemming from them innovations in the fight against this age related decline and frailty. Ubiquitous unobtrusive monitoring and training (recently much blended by means of exergames) has become reality due to the availability of new mobile sensors and devices and the emergence of new technologies and services. The current piece of work presents the different milestones we have achieved as best practices during the past seven years of piloting training and exergaming ICT components in an effort to support Active and Healthy Aging. Our impact verification and results validation methodologies are revisited here in an effort to outline best practices and build up neuroscientific evidence. Finally, this paper demonstrates how the construction of an Active and Healthy Aging Living Lab was materialised in an attempt to gauge evidence based research in the field of active and health aging.

  3. ASCA X-ray spectra of the active single stars Beta Ceti and pi(1) Ursae Majoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, S. A.; Singh, K. P.; White, N. E.; Simon, Theodore

    1994-01-01

    We present X-ray spectra obtaiined by ASCA of two single, active stars, the G dwarf pi(1) UMa, and the G9/K0 giant Beta Cet. The spectra of both stars require the presence of at least two plasma components with different temperatures, 0.3-0.4 keV and approximately 0.7 keV, in order for acceptable fits to be obtained. The spectral resolving power and signal-to-noise ratio of the solid state imaging spectrometer (SIS) spectra allow us to formally constrain the coronal abundances of a number of elements. In Beta Cet, we find Mg to be overabundant, while other elements such as O, Ne, and N are underabundant, relative to the solar photospheric values. From the lower signal-to-noise ratio SIS spectrum of pi(1) UMa, we find evidence for underabundances of O, Ne, and Fe. These results are discussed in the context of the present understanding of elemental abundances in solar and stellar coronae.

  4. Chromospherically active stars. III - HD 26337 = EI Eri: An RS CVn candidate for the Doppler-imaging technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Quigley, Robert; Gillies, Kim; Africano, John L.

    1987-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of the chromospherically active G5 IV single-lined binary HD 26337 = EI Eri are presented. An orbital period of 1.94722 days is found for the star. It has moderately strong Ca II H and K emission and strong ultraviolet emission features, while H-alpha is a weak absorption feature that is variable in strength. The inclination of the system is 46 + or - 12 deg, and the unseen secondary is probably a late K or early M dwarf. The v sin i of the primary is 50 + or - 3 km/s, resulting in a minimum radius of 1.9 + or - 0.1 solar radius. The star is within the required limits for Doppler imaging. The primary is close to filling its Roche lobe, resulting in a strong constraint that the mass ratio is 2.6 or greater, with a primary mass of at least 1.4 solar mass. The distance to the system is estimated at 75 pc.

  5. TIME VARIABILITY OF EMISSION LINES FOR FOUR ACTIVE T TAURI STARS. I. OCTOBER-DECEMBER IN 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Mei-Yin; Takami, Michihiro; Karr, Jennifer L.; Shang Hsien; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Manset, Nadine; Beck, Tracy; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Chen, Wen-Ping; Panwar, Neelam

    2013-04-15

    We present optical spectrophotometric monitoring of four active T Tauri stars (DG Tau, RY Tau, XZ Tau, RW Aur A) at high spectral resolution (R {approx}> 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4}), to investigate the correlation between time variable mass ejection seen in the jet/wind structure of the driving source and time variable mass accretion probed by optical emission lines. This may allow us to constrain the understanding of the jet/wind launching mechanism, the location of the launching region, and the physical link with magnetospheric mass accretion. In 2010, observations were made at six different epochs to investigate how daily and monthly variability might affect such a study. We perform comparisons between the line profiles we observed and those in the literature over a period of decades and confirm the presence of time variability separate from the daily and monthly variability during our observations. This is so far consistent with the idea that these line profiles have a long-term variability (3-20 yr) related to episodic mass ejection suggested by the structures in the extended flow components. We also investigate the correlations between equivalent widths and between luminosities for different lines. We find that these correlations are consistent with the present paradigm of steady magnetospheric mass accretion and emission line regions that are close to the star.

  6. The Intrinsic Eddington Ratio Distribution of Active Galactic Nuclei in Star-forming Galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Mackenzie L.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Black, Christine S.; Hainline, Kevin N.; DiPompeo, Michael A.; Goulding, Andy D.

    2016-07-01

    An important question in extragalactic astronomy concerns the distribution of black hole accretion rates of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Based on observations at X-ray wavelengths, the observed Eddington ratio distribution appears as a power law, while optical studies have often yielded a lognormal distribution. There is increasing evidence that these observed discrepancies may be due to contamination by star formation and other selection effects. Using a sample of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, we test whether or not an intrinsic Eddington ratio distribution that takes the form of a Schechter function is consistent with previous work suggesting that young galaxies in optical surveys have an observed lognormal Eddington ratio distribution. We simulate the optical emission line properties of a population of galaxies and AGNs using a broad, instantaneous luminosity distribution described by a Schechter function near the Eddington limit. This simulated AGN population is then compared to observed galaxies via their positions on an emission line excitation diagram and Eddington ratio distributions. We present an improved method for extracting the AGN distribution using BPT diagnostics that allows us to probe over one order of magnitude lower in Eddington ratio, counteracting the effects of dilution by star formation. We conclude that for optically selected AGNs in young galaxies, the intrinsic Eddington ratio distribution is consistent with a possibly universal, broad power law with an exponential cutoff, as this distribution is observed in old, optically selected galaxies and X-rays.

  7. Creating a flipbook as a medium of instruction based on the research on activity test of kencur extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monika, Icha; Yeni, Laili Fitri; Ariyati, Eka

    2016-02-01

    This research aimed to reveal the validity of the flipbook as a medium of learning for the sub-material of environmental pollution in the tenth grade based on the results of the activity test of kencur (Kaempferia galanga) extract to control the growth of the Fusarium oxysporum fungus. The research consisted of two stages. First, testing the validity of the medium of flipbook through validation by seven assessors and analyzed based on the total average score of all aspects. Second, testing the activity of the kencur extract against the growth of Fusarium oxysporum by using the experimental method with 10 treatments and 3 repetitions which were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. The making of the flipbook medium was done through the stages of analysis for the potential and problems, data collection, design, validation, and revision. The validation analysis on the flipbook received an average score of 3.7 and was valid to a certain extent, so it could be used in the teaching and learning process especially in the sub-material of environmental pollution in the tenth grade of the senior high school.

  8. Strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcock, Charles; Farhi, Edward; Olinto, Angela

    1986-01-01

    Strange matter, a form of quark matter that is postulated to be absolute stable, may be the true ground stage of the hadrons. If this hypothesis is correct, neutron stars may convert to 'strange stars'. The mass-radius relation for strange stars is very different from that of neutron stars; there is no minimum mass, and for mass of 1 solar mass or less, mass is proportional to the cube of the radius. For masses between 1 solar mass and 2 solar masses, the radii of strange stars are about 10 km, as for neutron stars. Strange stars may have an exposed quark surface, which is capable of radiating at rates greatly exceeding the Eddington limit, but has a low emissivity for X-ray photons. The stars may have a thin crust with the same composition as the preneutron drip outer layer of a conventional neutron star crust. Strange stars cool efficiently via neutrino emission.

  9. The age-mass-metallicity-activity relation for solar-type stars: comparisons with asteroseismology and the NGC 188 open cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo-Oliveira, D.; Porto de Mello, G. F.; Schiavon, R. P.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The Mount Wilson Ca ii index log(R'_HK) is the accepted standard metric of calibration for the chromospheric activity versus age relation for FGK stars. Recent results claim its inability to discern activity levels, and thus ages, for stars older than ~2 Gyr, which would severely hamper its application to date disk stars older than the Sun. Aims: We present a new activity-age calibration of the Mt. Wilson index that explicitly takes mass and [Fe/H] biases into account; these biases are implicit in samples of stars selected to have precise ages, which have so far not been appreciated. Methods: We show that these selection biases tend to blur the activity-age relation for large age ranges. We calibrate the Mt. Wilson index for a sample of field FGK stars with precise ages, covering a wide range of mass and [Fe/H] , augmented with data from the Pleiades, Hyades, M 67 clusters, and the Ursa Major moving group. Results: We further test the calibration with extensive new Gemini/GMOS log ()R'HK) data of the old, solar [Fe/H] clusters, M 67 and NGC 188. The observed NGC 188 activity level is clearly lower than M 67. We correctly recover the isochronal age of both clusters and establish the viability of deriving usable chromospheric ages for solar-type stars up to at least ~6 Gyr, where average errors are ~0.14 dex provided that we explicitly account for the mass and [Fe/H] dimensions. We test our calibration against asteroseismological ages, finding excellent correlation (ρ = + 0.89). We show that our calibration improves the chromospheric age determination for a wide range of ages, masses, and metallicities in comparison to previous age-activity relations.

  10. Fast Variability in Selected Chromospherically Active Dwarf Stars and Observational Equipment for Their Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanovski, Rumen G.

    2015-06-01

    The observations of variable stars, especially those which show fast changes in their brightness, require high speed and high precision photometry. In order to study events like low amplitude optical oscillations and small scale fluctuations in the light curves, synchronous observations are required. These observations have to be carried out simultaneously at two or more, preferably distant, sites (Romanyuk et al., 2001), which allows the identification and elimination of artifacts produced by the equipment and the atmospheric interferences. In this way the fine structure of the light curve is revealed with a significant certainty. In order to study these events a new high speed time synchronized photometric system had to be designed, which addresses the requirements of the observations of high frequency subtle phenomena during stellar flares. It provides remote automatedand centralized control of the photometric equipment over a computer network,as well as remotemonitoring. Furthermore, some preliminary data processing can be performed at the time the data is obtained.

  11. The Search for Signatures of Transient Mass Loss in Active Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosley, M. K.; Osten, R. A.; Broderick, J. W.; Corbel, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; van Leeuwen, J.; Rowlinson, A.; Zarka, P.; Norman, C.

    2016-10-01

    The habitability of an exoplanet depends on many factors. One such factor is the impact of stellar eruptive events on nearby exoplanets. Currently this is poorly constrained due to heavy reliance on solar scaling relationships and a lack of experimental evidence. Potential impacts of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which are the large eruption of magnetic field and plasma from a star, are space weather and atmospheric stripping. A method for observing CMEs as they travel though the stellar atmosphere is the type II radio burst, and the new Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) provides a means of detection. We report on 15 hr of observation of YZ Canis Minoris (YZ CMi), a nearby M dwarf flare star, taken in LOFAR’s beam-formed observation mode for the purposes of measuring transient frequency-dependent low-frequency radio emission. The observations utilized the Low Band Antenna (10–90 MHz) or High Band Antenna (110–190 MHz) for five three-hour observation periods. In this data set, there were no confirmed type II events in this frequency range. We explore the range of parameter space for type II bursts constrained by our observations. Assuming the rate of shocks is a lower limit to the rate at which CMEs occur, no detections in a total of 15 hr of observation places a limit of {ν }{type{II}}\\lt 0.0667 shocks/hr ≤ ν CME for YZ CMi due to the stochastic nature of the events and the limits of observational sensitivity. We propose a methodology to interpret jointly observed flares and CMEs which will provide greater constraints to CMEs and test the applicability of solar scaling relations.

  12. Stars and Star Myths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eason, Oliver

    Myths and tales from around the world about constellations and facts about stars in the constellations are presented. Most of the stories are from Greek and Roman mythology; however, a few Chinese, Japanese, Polynesian, Arabian, Jewish, and American Indian tales are also included. Following an introduction, myths are presented for the following 32…

  13. Binary stars.

    PubMed

    Paczynacuteski, B

    1984-07-20

    Most stars in the solar neighborhood are either double or multiple systems. They provide a unique opportunity to measure stellar masses and radii and to study many interesting and important phenomena. The best candidates for black holes are compact massive components of two x-ray binaries: Cygnus X-1 and LMC X-3. The binary radio pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 provides the best available evidence for gravitational radiation. Accretion disks and jets observed in close binaries offer a very good testing ground for models of active galactic nuclei and quasars.

  14. Binary stars.

    PubMed

    Paczynacuteski, B

    1984-07-20

    Most stars in the solar neighborhood are either double or multiple systems. They provide a unique opportunity to measure stellar masses and radii and to study many interesting and important phenomena. The best candidates for black holes are compact massive components of two x-ray binaries: Cygnus X-1 and LMC X-3. The binary radio pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 provides the best available evidence for gravitational radiation. Accretion disks and jets observed in close binaries offer a very good testing ground for models of active galactic nuclei and quasars. PMID:17749544

  15. THE ROLE OF GALAXY INTERACTION IN ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY AT z {approx_equal} 1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Ideue, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.; Shioya, Y.; Kajisawa, M.; Nagao, T.; Trump, J. R.; Iovino, A.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Le Fevre, O.; Ilbert, O.; Scoville, N. Z.

    2012-03-01

    In order to understand environmental effects on star formation in high-redshift galaxies, we investigate the physical relationships between the star formation activity, stellar mass, and environment for z {approx_equal} 1.2 galaxies in the 2 deg{sup 2} COSMOS field. We estimate star formation using the [O II]{lambda}3727 emission line and environment from the local galaxy density. Our analysis shows that for massive galaxies (M{sub *} {approx}> 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }), the fraction of [O II] emitters in high-density environments ({Sigma}{sub 10th} {approx}> 3.9 Mpc{sup -2}) is 1.7 {+-} 0.4 times higher than in low-density environments ({Sigma}{sub 10th} {approx}< 1.5 Mpc{sup -2}), while the [O II] emitter fraction does not depend on environment for low-mass M{sub *} {approx}< 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} galaxies. In order to understand what drives these trends, we investigate the role of companion galaxies in our sample. We find that the fraction of [O II] emitters in galaxies with companions is 2.4 {+-} 0.5 times as high as that in galaxies without companions at M{sub *} {approx}> 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. In addition, massive galaxies are more likely to have companions in high-density environments. However, although the number of star-forming galaxies increases for massive galaxies with close companions and in dense environments, the average star formation rate of star-forming galaxies at a given mass is independent of environment and the presence/absence of a close companion. These results suggest that interactions and/or mergers in a high-density environment could induce star formation in massive galaxies at z {approx} 1.2, increasing the fraction of star-forming galaxies with M{sub *} {approx}> 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }.

  16. A high-resolution spectroscopic survey of late-type stars: chromospheric activity, rotation, kinematics, and age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Santiago, J.; Montes, D.; Gálvez-Ortiz, M. C.; Crespo-Chacón, I.; Martínez-Arnáiz, R. M.; Fernández-Figueroa, M. J.; de Castro, E.; Cornide, M.

    2010-05-01

    Aims: We present a compilation of spectroscopic data from a survey of 144 chromospherically active young stars in the solar neighborhood, which may be used to investigate different aspects of its formation and evolution in terms of kinematics and stellar formation history. The data have already been used by us in several studies. With this paper, we make all these data accessible to the scientific community for future studies on different topics. Methods: We performed spectroscopic observations with echelle spectrographs to cover the entirety of the optical spectral range simultaneously. Standard data reduction was performed with the IRAF echelle package. We applied the spectral subtraction technique to reveal chromospheric emission in the stars of the sample. The equivalent width of chromospheric emission lines was measured in the subtracted spectra and then converted to fluxes using equivalent width-flux relationships. Radial and rotational velocities were determined by the cross-correlation technique. Kinematics, equivalent widths of the lithium line λ6707.8 Å and spectral types were also determined. Results: A catalog of spectroscopic data is compiled: radial and rotational velocities, space motion, equivalent widths of optical chromospheric activity indicators from Ca II H & K to the calcium infrared triplet and the lithium line in λ6708 Å. Fluxes in the chromospheric emission lines and R'_HK are also determined for each observation of a star in the sample. We used these data to investigate the emission levels of our stars. The study of the Hα emission line revealed two different populations of chromospheric emitters in the sample, clearly separated in the logFHα/Fbol - (V-J) diagram. The dichotomy may be associated with the age of the stars. Based on observations made with the 2.2 m telescope of the German-Spanish Astronomical Centre, Calar Alto (Almería, Spain), operated jointly by the Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg, and the Spanish

  17. Narrow-band Imagery with the Goddard Fabry-Perot: Probing the Epoch of Active Accretion for PMS Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, Bruce E.; Grady, C.; Endres, M.; Williger, G.

    2006-01-01

    The STIS coronagraphic imaging sample of I'MS stars was surveyed with the Goddard Fabry-Perot (GFP) interferometer to determine what fraction of the stars drive jets, whether there is any difference in behavior for a group of intermediate-mass stars as compared with T Tauri stars, and to search for evolutionary effects. Compared to broad band imaging, the FGP achieves an emission-line nebulosity-to-star contrast gain of between 500 and 3000. To date, we have detected jets associated with classical T Tauri stars spanning a factor of 280 in mass accretion rate in approximately 50% of the STIS coronagraphic imaging sample. We also detected jets or Herbig-HARO knots associated with 5 Herbig Ae stars, all younger than 8 Myr, for a detection fraction which is smaller than the T Tauri survey.

  18. Creating functional sophistication from simple protein building blocks, exemplified by factor H and the regulators of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Makou, Elisavet; Herbert, Andrew P; Barlow, Paul N

    2015-10-01

    Complement control protein modules (CCPs) occur in numerous functionally diverse extracellular proteins. Also known as short consensus repeats (SCRs) or sushi domains each CCP contains approximately 60 amino acid residues, including four consensus cysteines participating in two disulfide bonds. Varying in length and sequence, CCPs adopt a β-sandwich type fold and have an overall prolate spheroidal shape with N- and C-termini lying close to opposite poles of the long axis. CCP-containing proteins are important as cytokine receptors and in neurotransmission, cell adhesion, blood clotting, extracellular matrix formation, haemoglobin metabolism and development, but CCPs are particularly well represented in the vertebrate complement system. For example, factor H (FH), a key soluble regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation, is made up entirely from a chain of 20 CCPs joined by short linkers. Collectively, therefore, the 20 CCPs of FH must mediate all its functional capabilities. This is achieved via collaboration and division of labour among these modules. Structural studies have illuminated the dynamic architectures that allow FH and other CCP-rich proteins to perform their biological functions. These are largely the products of a highly varied set of intramolecular interactions between CCPs. The CCP can act as building block, spacer, highly versatile recognition site or dimerization mediator. Tandem CCPs may form composite binding sites or contribute to flexible, rigid or conformationally 'switchable' segments of the parent proteins.

  19. Creating functional sophistication from simple protein building blocks, exemplified by factor H and the regulators of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Makou, Elisavet; Herbert, Andrew P; Barlow, Paul N

    2015-10-01

    Complement control protein modules (CCPs) occur in numerous functionally diverse extracellular proteins. Also known as short consensus repeats (SCRs) or sushi domains each CCP contains approximately 60 amino acid residues, including four consensus cysteines participating in two disulfide bonds. Varying in length and sequence, CCPs adopt a β-sandwich type fold and have an overall prolate spheroidal shape with N- and C-termini lying close to opposite poles of the long axis. CCP-containing proteins are important as cytokine receptors and in neurotransmission, cell adhesion, blood clotting, extracellular matrix formation, haemoglobin metabolism and development, but CCPs are particularly well represented in the vertebrate complement system. For example, factor H (FH), a key soluble regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation, is made up entirely from a chain of 20 CCPs joined by short linkers. Collectively, therefore, the 20 CCPs of FH must mediate all its functional capabilities. This is achieved via collaboration and division of labour among these modules. Structural studies have illuminated the dynamic architectures that allow FH and other CCP-rich proteins to perform their biological functions. These are largely the products of a highly varied set of intramolecular interactions between CCPs. The CCP can act as building block, spacer, highly versatile recognition site or dimerization mediator. Tandem CCPs may form composite binding sites or contribute to flexible, rigid or conformationally 'switchable' segments of the parent proteins. PMID:26517887

  20. Hysteresis Effect in the Activity Indices of the Atmospheres of the Sun and Solar-Type Stars During the Rising and Falling Phases of Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruevich, E. A.; Yakunina, G. V.

    2016-09-01

    The hysteresis effect that shows up as a nonunique relationship among the emissions from the photosphere, chromosphere, and corona during the rising and falling phases of solar and stellar activity is analyzed. The following solar indices are analyzed and compared in different phases of the cycle: the radiative flux in the hydrogen Lyman alpha line FLα, radio emission at 10.7 cm F10.7, the sunspot number SSN, the radiative flux in the 530.0 nm green coronal line F530.3, the solar constant TSI, and the relative flux ratio c/w (ratio of the fluxes in the center and in the wings) for the 280 nm Mg II line. In stars with cycles, a hysteresis effect is observed between the CaII chromospheric S-activity index for stars in the Mount Wilson HK project and the photospheric flux Fph for these stars.

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON THE STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN GALAXIES AT z {approx_equal} 1.2 IN THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Ideue, Y.; Nagao, T.; Sasaki, S.; Taniguchi, Y.; Shioya, Y.; Saito, T.; Murayama, T.; Trump, J. R.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Aussel, H.; Ilbert, O.; Sanders, D. B.; McCracken, H.; Mobasher, B.

    2009-08-01

    We investigate the relation between the star formation activity in galaxies and environment at z {approx_equal} 1.2 in the Cosmic Evolution Survey field, using the fraction of [O II] emitters and the local galaxy density. The fraction of [O II] emitters appears to be almost constant over the surface density of galaxies between 0.2 and 10 Mpc{sup -2}. This trend is different from that seen in the local universe where the star formation activity is weaker in higher density regions. To understand this difference between z {approx} 1 and z {approx} 0, we study the fraction of non-isolated galaxies as a function of local galaxy density. We find that the fraction of non-isolated galaxies increases with increasing density. Our results suggest that the star formation in galaxies at z {approx} 1 is triggered by galaxy interaction and/or mergers.

  2. MC2: boosted AGN and star formation activity in CIZA J2242.8+5301, a massive post-merger cluster at z = 0.19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobral, David; Stroe, Andra; Dawson, William A.; Wittman, David; Jee, M. James; Röttgering, Huub; van Weeren, Reinout J.; Brüggen, Marcus

    2015-06-01

    Cluster mergers may play a fundamental role in the formation and evolution of cluster galaxies. Stroe et al. revealed unexpected overdensities of candidate Hα emitters near the ˜1-Mpc-wide shock fronts of the massive (˜2 × 1015 M⊙) `Sausage' merging cluster, CIZA J2242.8+5301. We used the Keck/Deep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph and the William Herschel Telescope/AutoFib2+WYFFOS to confirm 83 Hα emitters in and around the merging cluster. We find that cluster star-forming galaxies in the hottest X-ray gas and/or in the cluster subcores (away from the shock fronts) show high [S II]6716/[S II]6761 and high [S II] 6716/Hα, implying very low electron densities (<30 × lower than all other star-forming galaxies outside the cluster) and/or significant contribution from supernovae, respectively. All cluster star-forming galaxies near the cluster centre show evidence of significant outflows (blueshifted Na D ˜200-300 km s-1), likely driven by supernovae. Strong outflows are also found for the cluster Hα active galactic nucleus (AGN). Hα star-forming galaxies in the merging cluster follow the z ˜ 0 mass-metallicity relation, showing systematically higher metallicity (˜0.15-0.2 dex) than Hα emitters outside the cluster (projected R > 2.5 Mpc). This suggests that the shock front may have triggered remaining metal-rich gas which galaxies were able to retain into forming stars. Our observations show that the merger of impressively massive (˜1015 M⊙) clusters can provide the conditions for significant star formation and AGN activity, but, as we witness strong feedback by star-forming galaxies and AGN (and given how massive the merging cluster is), such sources will likely quench in a few 100 Myr.

  3. Reaching for the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper-Davis, Sharon

    1999-01-01

    Describes "Reaching for the Stars," a program which develops teaming and mentoring skills in senior physics students. Phase 1 requires student pairs to design a rocket; Phase 2 pairs seniors with gifted second graders who build the rocket from written instructions; and in Phase 3, pairs of seniors create a children's storybook explaining one of…

  4. Eight Stars of Gold--The Story of Alaska's Flag. Primary Grade Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Museum, Juneau.

    This activities booklet focuses on the story of Alaska's flag. The booklet is intended for teachers to use with primary-grade children. Each activity in the booklet contains background information, a summary and time estimate, Alaska state standards, a step-by-step technique for implementing the activity, assessment tips, materials and resource…

  5. Strange Nonchaotic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, John F.; Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G.; Ditto, William L.

    2015-08-01

    Exploiting the unprecedented capabilities of the planet-hunting Kepler space telescope, which stared at 150 000 stars for four years, we discuss recent evidence that certain stars dim and brighten in complex patterns with fractal features. Such stars pulsate at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the famous golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies is generically attracted toward a “strange” behavior that is geometrically fractal without displaying the “butterfly effect” of chaos. Strange nonchaotic attractors have been observed in laboratory experiments and have been hypothesized to describe the electrochemical activity of the brain, but a bluish white star 16 000 light years from Earth in the constellation Lyra may manifest, in the scale-free distribution of its minor frequency components, the first strange nonchaotic attractor observed in the wild. The recognition of stellar strange nonchaotic dynamics may improve the classification of these stars and refine the physical modeling of their interiors. We also discuss nonlinear analysis of other RR Lyrae stars in Kepler field of view and discuss some toy models for modeling these stars.References: 1) Hippke, Michael, et al. "Pulsation period variations in the RRc Lyrae star KIC 5520878." The Astrophysical Journal 798.1 (2015): 42.2) Lindner, John F., et al. "Strange nonchaotic stars." Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 054101 (2015)

  6. Pulsating Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catelan, M.; Smith, H. A.

    2015-03-01

    This book surveys our understanding of stars which change in brightness because they pulsate. Pulsating variable stars are keys to distance scales inside and beyond the Milky Way galaxy. They test our understanding not only of stellar pulsation theory but also of stellar structure and evolution theory. Moreover, pulsating stars are important probes of the formation and evolution of our own and neighboring galaxies. Our understanding of pulsating stars has greatly increased in recent years as large-scale surveys of pulsating stars in the Milky Way and other Local Group galaxies have provided a wealth of new observations and as space-based instruments have studied particular pulsating stars in unprecedented detail.

  7. Policy change to create supportive environments for physical activity and healthy eating: which options are the most realistic for local government?

    PubMed

    Allender, Steven; Gleeson, Erin; Crammond, Brad; Sacks, Gary; Lawrence, Mark; Peeters, Anna; Loff, Bebe; Swinburn, Boyd

    2012-06-01

    The objective is to identify and test regulatory options for creating supportive environments for physical activity and healthy eating among local governments in Victoria, Australia. A literature review identified nine potential areas for policy intervention at local government level, including the walking environment and food policy. Discussion documents were drafted which summarized the public health evidence and legal framework for change in each area. Levels of support for particular interventions were identified through semi-structured interviews conducted with key informants from local government. We conducted 11 key informant interviews and found support for policy intervention to create environments supportive of physical activity but little support for policy changes to promote healthy eating. Participants reported lack of relevance and competing priorities as reasons for not supporting particular interventions. Promoting healthy eating environments was not considered a priority for local government above food safety. There is a real opportunity for action to prevent obesity at local government level (e.g. mandate the promotion of healthy eating environments). For local government to have a role in the promotion of healthy food environments, regulatory change and suitable funding are required.

  8. Upscaling Self-Sustaining Treatment for Active Remediation (STAR): Experimental Study of Scaling Relationships for Smouldering Combustion to Remediate Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsman, L.; Gerhard, J.; Torero, J.; Scholes, G.; Murray, C.

    2013-12-01

    Self-sustaining Treatment for Active Remediation (STAR) is a relatively new remediation approach for soil contaminated with organic industrial liquids. This technology uses smouldering combustion, a controlled, self-sustaining burning reaction, to destroy nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) and thereby render soil clean. While STAR has been proven at the bench scale, success at industrial scales requires the process to be scaled-up significantly. The objective of this study was to conduct an experimental investigation into how liquid smouldering combustion phenomena scale. A suite of detailed forward smouldering experiments were conducted in short (16 cm dia. x 22 cm high), intermediate (16 cm dia. x 127 cm high), and large (97 cm dia. x 300 cm high; a prototype ex-situ reactor) columns; this represents scaling of up to 530 times based on the volume treated. A range of fuels were investigated, with the majority of experiments conducted using crude oil sludge as well as canola oil as a non-toxic surrogate for hazardous contaminants. To provide directly comparable data sets and to isolate changes in the smouldering reaction which occurred solely due to scaling effects, sand grain size, contaminant type, contaminant concentration and air injection rates were controlled between the experimental scales. Several processes could not be controlled and were identified to be susceptible to changes in scale, including: mobility of the contaminant, heat losses, and buoyant flow effects. For each experiment, the propagation of the smouldering front was recorded using thermocouples and analyzed by way of temperature-time and temperature-distance plots. In combination with the measurement of continuous mass loss and gaseous emissions, these results were used to evaluate the fundamental differences in the way the reaction front propagates through the mixture of sand and fuel across the various scales. Key governing parameters were compared between the small, intermediate, and large

  9. Utilizing the National Physical Activity Plan to create a disease-specific approach: Environmental and Policy Strategies to Increase Physical Activity Among Adults with Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Waterman, Mary B; White, Patience H

    2014-03-01

    The Environmental and Policy Strategies to Increase Physical Activity Among Adults with Arthritis report focuses on the ways to make physical activity more convenient and accessible for adults with arthritis. The report is designed to engage 6 important sectors, which were adapted from the National Physical Activity Plan, as partners with a mutual interest in increasing physical activity among adults with arthritis using environmental and policy strategies. It serves as a call to action for each of these sectors to collaborate and focus more attention on helping people live well with arthritis and be a productive part of our society.

  10. Multiband Photometry of the Chromospherically Active & Spotted Binary System IM Peg—the Guide Star for the Gravity Probe B Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellem, Robert; Guinan, Edward F.; Messina, Sergio; Lanza, Antonino F.; Wasatonic, Richard; McCook, George P.

    2010-06-01

    We report on the starspot properties of IM Pegasi—the guide star of the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) satellite. GP-B's mission is to measure two predicted consequences of general relativity—the frame-dragging and geodetic effects—via its extremely precise onboard gyroscopes. However, IM Peg is a chomospherically active binary system with a luminous K2 III primary star showing rotationally modulated (Prot ≈ 24.5 days) light variations from starspots. The starspots can potentially cause problems as GP-B can erroneously interpret a change in starspot coverage (and corresponding shifts in the light center) as the star's movement. This apparent shift can also be exacerbated by possible changes in the light center (photocenter) of the binary system arising from changes in the light balance with the fainter ~1 Msolar (main-sequence early G-type star) component. Since 2000, we have carried out multiband high-precision photoelectric photometry of IM Peg to determine its activity and starspot coverage. Our photometry uses Strömgren uvby intermediate-band filters, VRI filters, and TiO (720/750 nm) narrowband filter sets. Measurements were made relative to nearby comparison and check stars using 0.8 m and 0.25 m telescopes. Analysis of TiO and multiband continuum photometry constrains the starspot areas, temperatures, and surface distributions. The photometry has been modeled using the maximum entropy and Tikhonov regularizations to determine the properties of starspots and to evaluate the effects of changing starspot areas and distributions on the light center of the binary. Our results indicate that IM Peg's activity should not affect the GP-B mission. We also present a study of IM Peg's long-term starspot cycle, which shows evidence of being 20 yr long. Lastly, we have determined the intrinsic (unspotted) brightness of the star to be V mag = 5.62 ± 0.03.

  11. Magnetic activity and hot Jupiters of young Suns: the weak-line T Tauri stars V819 Tau and V830 Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, J.-F.; Hébrard, E.; Hussain, G. A. J.; Moutou, C.; Malo, L.; Grankin, K.; Vidotto, A. A.; Alencar, S. H. P.; Gregory, S. G.; Jardine, M. M.; Herczeg, G.; Morin, J.; Fares, R.; Ménard, F.; Bouvier, J.; Delfosse, X.; Doyon, R.; Takami, M.; Figueira, P.; Petit, P.; Boisse, I.; MaTYSSE Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We report results of a spectropolarimetric and photometric monitoring of the weak-line T Tauri stars (wTTSs) V819 Tau and V830 Tau within the MaTYSSE (Magnetic Topologies of Young Stars and the Survival of close-in giant Exoplanets) programme, involving the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. At ≃3 Myr, both stars dissipated their discs recently and are interesting objects for probing star and planet formation. Profile distortions and Zeeman signatures are detected in the unpolarized and circularly polarized lines, whose rotational modulation we modelled using tomographic imaging, yielding brightness and magnetic maps for both stars. We find that the large-scale magnetic fields of V819 Tau and V830 Tau are mostly poloidal and can be approximated at large radii by 350-400 G dipoles tilted at ≃30° to the rotation axis. They are significantly weaker than the field of GQ Lup, an accreting classical T Tauri star (cTTS) with similar mass and age which can be used to compare the magnetic properties of wTTSs and cTTSs. The reconstructed brightness maps of both stars include cool spots and warm plages. Surface differential rotation is small, typically ≃4.4 times smaller than on the Sun, in agreement with previous results on wTTSs. Using our Doppler images to model the activity jitter and filter it out from the radial velocity (RV) curves, we obtain RV residuals with dispersions of 0.033 and 0.104 km s-1 for V819 Tau and V830 Tau, respectively. RV residuals suggest that a hot Jupiter may be orbiting V830 Tau, though additional data are needed to confirm this preliminary result. We find no evidence for close-in giant planet around V819 Tau.

  12. Herschel Observed Stripe 82 Quasars and Their Host Galaxies: Connections between AGN Activity and host Galaxy Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, X. Y.; Wu, Xue-Bing

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present a study of 207 quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalogs and the Herschel Stripe 82 survey. Quasars within this sample are high-luminosity quasars with a mean bolometric luminosity of 1046.4 erg s-1. The redshift range of this sample is within z < 4, with a mean value of 1.5 ± 0.78. Because we only selected quasars that have been detected in all three Herschel-SPIRE bands, the quasar sample is complete yet highly biased. Based on the multi-wavelength photometric observation data, we conducted a spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting through UV to FIR. Parameters such as active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosity, far-IR (FIR) luminosity, stellar mass, as well as many other AGN and galaxy properties are deduced from the SED fitting results. The mean star formation rate (SFR) of the sample is 419 M ⊙ yr-1 and the mean gas mass is ˜1011.3 M ⊙. All of these results point to an IR luminous quasar system. Compared with star formation main sequence (MS) galaxies, at least 80 out of 207 quasars are hosted by starburst galaxies. This supports the statement that luminous AGNs are more likely to be associated with major mergers. The SFR increases with the redshift up to z = 2. It is correlated with the AGN bolometric luminosity, where {L}{{FIR}}\\propto {L}{{Bol}}0.46+/- 0.03. The AGN bolometric luminosity is also correlated with the host galaxy mass and gas mass. Yet the correlation between L FIR and L Bol has higher significant level, implies that the link between AGN accretion and the SFR is more primal. The M BH/M * ratio of our sample is 0.02, higher than the value 0.005 in the local universe. It might indicate an evolutionary trend of the M BH-M * scaling relation.

  13. Properties of galaxy groups in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - II. Active galactic nucleus feedback and star formation truncation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinmann, Simone M.; van den Bosch, Frank C.; Yang, Xiaohu; Mo, H. J.; Croton, Darren J.; Moore, Ben

    2006-11-01

    Successfully reproducing the galaxy luminosity function (LF) and the bimodality in the galaxy distribution requires a mechanism that can truncate star formation in massive haloes. Current models of galaxy formation consider two such truncation mechanisms: strangulation, which acts on satellite galaxies, and active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback, which predominantly affects central galaxies. The efficiencies of these processes set the blue fraction of galaxies, fblue(L, M), as a function of galaxy luminosity, L, and halo mass, M. In this paper, we use a galaxy group catalogue extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to determine fblue(L, M). To demonstrate the potential power of these data as a benchmark for galaxy formation models, we compare the results to the semi-analytical model for galaxy formation of Croton et al. Although this model accurately fits the global statistics of the galaxy population, as well as the shape of the conditional LF, there are significant discrepancies when the blue fraction of galaxies as a function of mass and luminosity is compared between the observations and the model. In particular, the model predicts (i) too many faint satellites in massive haloes, (ii) a blue fraction of satellites that is much too low, and (iii) a blue fraction of centrals that is too high and with an inverted luminosity dependence. In the same order, we argue that these discrepancies owe to (i) the neglect of tidal stripping in the semi-analytical model, (ii) the oversimplified treatment of strangulation, and (iii) improper modelling of dust extinction and/or AGN feedback. The data presented here will prove useful to test and calibrate future models of galaxy formation and, in particular, to discriminate between various models for AGN feedback and other star formation truncation mechanisms.

  14. The CoRoT target HD 175726: an active star with weak solar-like oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosser, B.; Michel, E.; Appourchaux, T.; Barban, C.; Baudin, F.; Boumier, P.; Bruntt, H.; Catala, C.; Deheuvels, S.; García, R. A.; Gaulme, P.; Regulo, C.; Roxburgh, I.; Samadi, R.; Verner, G.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Ballot, J.; Benomar, O.; Mathur, S.

    2009-10-01

    Context: The CoRoT short runs give us the opportunity to observe a large variety of late-type stars through their solar-like oscillations. We report observations of the star HD 175726 that lasted for 27 days during the first short run of the mission. The time series reveals a high-activity signal and the power spectrum presents an excess due to solar-like oscillations with a low signal-to-noise ratio. Aims: Our aim is to identify the most efficient tools to extract as much information as possible from the power density spectrum. Methods: The most productive method appears to be the autocorrelation of the time series, calculated as the spectrum of the filtered spectrum. This method is efficient, very rapid computationally, and will be useful for the analysis of other targets, observed with CoRoT or with forthcoming missions such as Kepler and Plato. Results: The mean large separation has been measured to be 97.2±0.5 μHz, slightly below the expected value determined from solar scaling laws. We also show strong evidence for variation of the large separation with frequency. The bolometric mode amplitude is only 1.7±0.25 ppm for radial modes, which is 1.7 times less than expected. Due to the low signal-to-noise ratio, mode identification is not possible for the available data set of HD 175726. The CoRoT space mission, launched on 2006 December 27, was developed and is operated by the CNES, with participation of the Science Programs of ESA, ESAs RSSD, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany and Spain.

  15. Star-forming Activity in the H II Regions Associated with the IRAS 17160–3707 Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandakumar, G.; Veena, V. S.; Vig, S.; Tej, A.; Ghosh, S. K.; Ojha, D. K.

    2016-11-01

    We present a multiwavelength investigation of star formation activity toward the southern H ii regions associated with IRAS 17160–3707, located at a distance of 6.2 kpc with a bolometric luminosity of 8.3 × 105 L ⊙. The ionized gas distribution and dust clumps in the parental molecular cloud are examined in detail using measurements at infrared, submillimeter and radio wavelengths. The radio continuum images at 1280 and 610 MHz obtained using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope reveal the presence of multiple compact sources as well as nebulous emission. At submillimeter wavelengths, we identify seven dust clumps and estimate their physical properties such as temperature: 24–30 K, mass: 300–4800 M ⊙ and luminosity: 9–317 × 102 L ⊙ using modified blackbody fits to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) between 70 and 870 μm. We find 24 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the mid-infrared, with a few of them coincident with the compact radio sources. The SEDs of the YSOs have been fitted by the Robitaille models and the results indicate that those having radio compact sources as counterparts host massive objects in early evolutionary stages with best fit age ≤0.2 Myr. We compare the relative evolutionary stages of clumps using various signposts such as masers, ionized gas, presence of YSOs and infrared nebulosity, and find six massive star-forming clumps and one quiescent clump. Of the former, five are in a relatively advanced stage and one in an earlier stage.

  16. STAR System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doverspike, James E.

    The STAR System is a developmental guidance approach to be used with elementary school children in the 5th or 6th grades. Two basic purposes underlie STAR: to increase learning potential and to enhance personal growth and development. STAR refers to 4 basic skills: sensory, thinking, adapting, and revising. Major components of the 4 skills are:…

  17. Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Villaver, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Eva Villaver; 1. High-mass star formation by gravitational collapse of massive cores M. R. Krumholz; 2. Observations of massive star formation N. A. Patel; 3. Massive star formation in the Galactic center D. F. Figer; 4. An X-ray tour of massive star-forming regions with Chandra L. K. Townsley; 5. Massive stars: feedback effects in the local universe M. S. Oey and C. J. Clarke; 6. The initial mass function in clusters B. G. Elmegreen; 7. Massive stars and star clusters in the Antennae galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 8. On the binarity of Eta Carinae T. R. Gull; 9. Parameters and winds of hot massive stars R. P. Kudritzki and M. A. Urbaneja; 10. Unraveling the Galaxy to find the first stars J. Tumlinson; 11. Optically observable zero-age main-sequence O stars N. R. Walborn; 12. Metallicity-dependent Wolf-Raynet winds P. A. Crowther; 13. Eruptive mass loss in very massive stars and Population III stars N. Smith; 14. From progenitor to afterlife R. A. Chevalier; 15. Pair-production supernovae: theory and observation E. Scannapieco; 16. Cosmic infrared background and Population III: an overview A. Kashlinsky.

  18. Nano-photo active cellulosic fabric through in situ phytosynthesis of star-like Ag/ZnO nanocomposites: Investigation and optimization of attributes associated with photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Aladpoosh, Razieh; Montazer, Majid

    2016-05-01

    In this study, nano-photo active cellulosic fabric was prepared through in situ phytosynthesis of star-like Ag/ZnO nanocomposites using the ashes of Seidlitzia rosmarinus plants so-called Keliab. This is provided alkali media as a vital condition for synthesis of nanocomposites, further increasing the reduce-ability of cellulosic chains by activation of hydroxyl groups. The intermolecular dehydrolysis of intermediates ions under thermal and alkaline conditions leads to formation of Ag/ZnO heterostructure. Various analytical techniques were employed to confirm Ag/ZnO nanocomposites on the cotton fabric. The surface morphology, crystal phase and chemical structure of the treated fabrics were characterized by field emission and scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM and SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Moreover, influence of precursors: silver nitrate, zinc acetate and Keliab solution on attributes associated with photocatalytic activities including self-cleaning, whiteness and wettability was investigated via central composite design (CCD). The treated cotton samples exhibited self-cleaning activities through methylene blue degradation under day-light exposure along with improved wettability and whiteness. The prepared sample in optimized conditions showed good antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli with enhanced fabric tensile strength. PMID:26877003

  19. The Dust Content and Opacity of Actively Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calzetti, Daniela; Armus, Lee; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Kinney, Anne L.; Koornneef, Jan; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa

    2000-01-01

    ), UV - bright star-forming galaxies, these galaxies' FIR emission will be generally undetected in submillimeter surveys, unless: (1) their bolometric luminosity is comparable to or larger than that of ultraluminous FIR galaxies and (2) their FIR SED contains a cool dust component.

  20. NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET ABSORPTION, CHROMOSPHERIC ACTIVITY, AND STAR-PLANET INTERACTIONS IN THE WASP-12 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Haswell, C. A.; Fossati, L.; Holmes, S.; Kolb, U. C.; Busuttil, R.; Carter, A.; Ayres, T.; France, K.; Froning, C. S.; Street, R. A.; Hebb, L.; Cameron, A. Collier; Enoch, B.; Burwitz, V.; Rodriguez, J.; West, R. G.; Pollacco, D.; Wheatley, P. J. E-mail: l.fossati@open.ac.uk E-mail: leslie.hebb@vanderbilt.edu

    2012-11-20

    Extended gas clouds have been previously detected surrounding the brightest known close-in transiting hot Jupiter exoplanets, HD 209458 b and HD 189733 b; we observed the distant but more extreme close-in hot Jupiter system, WASP-12, with Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Near-UV (NUV) transits up to three times deeper than the optical transit of WASP-12 b reveal extensive diffuse gas, extending well beyond the Roche lobe. The distribution of absorbing gas varies between visits. The deepest NUV transits are at wavelength ranges with strong stellar photospheric absorption, implying that the absorbing gas may have temperature and composition similar to those of the stellar photosphere. Our spectra reveal significantly enhanced absorption (greater than 3{sigma} below the median) at {approx}200 individual wavelengths on each of two HST visits; 65 of these wavelengths are consistent between the two visits, using a strict criterion for velocity matching that excludes matches with velocity shifts exceeding {approx}20 km s{sup -1}. Excess transit depths are robustly detected throughout the inner wings of the Mg II resonance lines independently on both HST visits. We detected absorption in Fe II {lambda}2586, the heaviest species yet detected in an exoplanet transit. The Mg II line cores have zero flux, emission cores exhibited by every other observed star of similar age and spectral type are conspicuously absent. WASP-12 probably produces normal Mg II profiles, but the inner portions of these strong resonance lines are likely affected by extrinsic absorption. The required Mg{sup +} column is an order of magnitude greater than expected from the interstellar medium, though we cannot completely dismiss that possibility. A more plausible source of absorption is gas lost by WASP-12 b. We show that planetary mass loss can produce the required column. Our Visit 2 NUV light curves show evidence for a stellar flare. We show that some of the possible transit detections in resonance

  1. 'Marginal' BY Draconis stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, Bernard W.

    1987-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of 52 dK-dM stars, obtained at 640-665 nm (with spectral resolution 70-90 pm) using CCD detectors on the coude-feed telescope at KPNO since 1982, are reported. Data for four stars found to have diluted absorption or weak emission above continuum at H-alpha are presented in tables and spectra and discussed in detail. These objects (Gliese numbers 256, 425A, 900, and 907.1) are shown to be 'marginal' BY Dra stars, single objects of age 2.5-3 Gyr with activity and rotational velocity (3-5 km/s) between those of normal dM stars and those of true BY Dra stars. An explanation based on evolution from the BY Dra stage through marginal BY Dra to inactive dM is proposed.

  2. GLOBAL STAR FORMATION REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, Joseph; Norman, Colin E-mail: norman@stsci.edu

    2009-07-20

    A general treatment of disk star formation is developed from a dissipative multiphase model, with the dominant dissipation due to cloud collisions. The Schmidt-Kennicutt (SK) law emerges naturally for star-forming disks and starbursts. We predict that there should be an inverse correlation between Tully-Fisher law and SK law residuals. The model is extended to include a multiphase treatment of supernova feedback that leads to a turbulent pressure-regulated generalization of the star formation law and is applicable to gas-rich starbursts. Enhanced pressure, as expected in merger-induced star formation, enhances star formation efficiency. An upper limit is derived for the disk star formation rate in starbursts that depends on the ratio of global ISM to cloud pressures. We extend these considerations to the case where the interstellar gas pressure in the inner galaxy is dominated by outflows from a central active galactic nucleus (AGN). During massive spheroid formation, AGN-driven winds trigger star formation, resulting in enhanced supernova feedback and outflows. The outflows are comparable to the AGN-boosted star formation rate and saturate in the super-Eddington limit. Downsizing of both SMBH and spheroids is a consequence of AGN-driven positive feedback. Bondi accretion feeds the central black hole with a specific accretion rate that is proportional to the black hole mass. AGN-enhanced star formation is mediated by turbulent pressure and relates spheroid star formation rate to black hole accretion rate. The relation between black hole mass and spheroid velocity dispersion has a coefficient (Salpeter time to gas consumption time ratio) that provides an arrow of time. Highly efficient, AGN-boosted star formation can occur at high redshift.

  3. Creating healthy futures. 2000 NOVA Award winners.

    PubMed

    Larson, L

    2000-05-01

    Winners of this year's NOVA awards, sponsored by the American Hospital Association and H&HN magazine, all share a broad definition of health. These five stars of community benefit also understand that a community and a health care organization share responsibility for what creates health, and that collaborative efforts are the only way to sustain innovative programs. PMID:11785219

  4. Making Stars … With a Little Help

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    Extremely high star formation rates have been observed in galaxies at high redshifts, posing somewhat of a mystery: how are these enormous rates achieved? A team of scientists has proposed that these high rates of star formation could be explained by feedback from active nuclei at the centers of the galaxies.Pressurized BubbleWe believe that star formation occurs in galaxies as a result of gas clumps that collapse under their own gravity, eventually becoming dense enough to launch nuclear fusion. Recently, theres been mounting evidence that the star formation rate is significantly higher in high-redshift galaxies, particularly those with active galactic nuclei (AGN). Could this simply be caused by a higher gas fraction at higher redshifts? Or is it possible that a different mechanism is at work in these galaxies, producing more efficient star formation?A team of authors led by Rebekka Bieri (Paris Institute of Astrophysics) has proposed that this enhanced star formation may be caused by positive feedback from the active nucleus of the galaxy. The team suggests that an outflow from the AGN could create an over-pressurized bubble around the galactic disk that pushes back on the disk, leading to a higher rate of star formation.Simulating a BoostThe authors test this toy model by simulating the scenario. They model a disk galaxy with roughly a tenth of the mass of the Milky Way, which starts in a relaxed state. The galaxy is then evolved either with or without an applied external pressure, representing the isotropic pressure from the bubble created by the AGN outflow. These models are tested in two different scenarios: one where the initial gas fraction is 10%, and one where the initial gas fraction is 50%.Star formation rates for the low-gas-fraction (left) and high-gas-fraction (right) simulated galaxies. The blue lines show the rates without external pressure; the red lines show the rates with external pressure applied. [Bieri et al. 2015]The simulations show that

  5. An Enhancement of 160um-derived Star-Formation Rates in Active Galaxies to z = 3.2 with the ZFOURGE Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, Michael; Spitler, L.

    2016-08-01

    ZFOURGE is a new imaging survey, which employs unique near-infrared medium- band filters designed to probe galaxy properties over the last 12 billion years. By supplementing the high-quality ZFOURGE galaxy catalogues with data in radio, X- ray, and infrared wavebands, we have studied the complex interplay between AGNs and their host galaxies to a time when the Universe was only 10-15% of its present age. I will report on our study to compare the 160-um derived star-formation rates in active and non-active galaxies and show that AGN hosts, over all redshifts, tend to exhibit an elevated average star-formation activity compared to their non-active counterparts.

  6. Creating a replicable, valid cross-platform buffering technique: The sausage network buffer for measuring food and physical activity built environments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Obesity researchers increasingly use geographic information systems to measure exposure and access in neighborhood food and physical activity environments. This paper proposes a network buffering approach, the “sausage” buffer. This method can be consistently and easily replicated across software versions and platforms, avoiding problems with proprietary systems that use different approaches in creating such buffers. Methods In this paper, we describe how the sausage buffering approach was developed to be repeatable across platforms and places. We also examine how the sausage buffer compares with existing alternatives in terms of buffer size and shape, measurements of the food and physical activity environments, and associations between environmental features and health-related behaviors. We test the proposed buffering approach using data from EAT 2010 (Eating and Activity in Teens), a study examining multi-level factors associated with eating, physical activity, and weight status in adolescents (n = 2,724) in the Minneapolis/St. Paul metropolitan area of Minnesota. Results Results show that the sausage buffer is comparable in area to the classic ArcView 3.3 network buffer particularly for larger buffer sizes. It obtains similar results to other buffering techniques when measuring variables associated with the food and physical activity environments and when measuring the correlations between such variables and outcomes such as physical activity and food purchases. Conclusions Findings from various tests in the current study show that researchers can obtain results using sausage buffers that are similar to results they would obtain by using other buffering techniques. However, unlike proprietary buffering techniques, the sausage buffer approach can be replicated across software programs and versions, allowing more independence of research from specific software. PMID:22554353

  7. Activities and Achievements of the Double Star Committee of the Socié té Astronomique de France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agati, Jean-Louis; Caille, Sébastien; Debackère, André; Durand, Pierre; Losse, Florent; Manté, René; Mauroy, Florence; Mauroy, Pascal; Morlet, Guy; Pinlou, Claude; Salaman, Maurice; Soulié, Edgar; Thorel, Yvonne; Thorel, Jean-Claude

    2007-08-01

    In a synthesis article (see ref. below), the double star expert Paul COUTEAU put the work of French pioneers of double stars observation in the perspective of the double star work carried in the world. After Antoine Yvon VILLARCEAU and Camille FLAMMARION, one prominent pioneer of double stars was Robert JONCKHEERE (1888toiles Doubles, Maurice DURUY (1894le with a 40-cm and later a 60-cm telescope at Le Rouret (Alpes1995) had started the measurement of double stars as an amateur. He was granted permission to measure them with the 38-cm of the Paris Observatory and made an impressive number of measures during his long 2006) made double star observations for the book which was then in preparation under the title La revue des constellations. Their measures remained unpublished; but publication of the measures made by Robert SAGOT is in preparation. At about the same time, the neurology professor Jacques LE BEAU (1908toiles doubles visuelles. That book triggered the interest of more amateur astronomers for double stars and indirectly influenced the creation of a group of double star observers which was transformed into the Commission des É toiles Doubles

  8. Chemical composition and biological activity of star anise Illicium verum extracts against maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais adults.

    PubMed

    Wei, Linlin; Hua, Rimao; Li, Maoye; Huang, Yanzhang; Li, Shiguang; He, Yujie; Shen, Zonghai

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to develop eco-friendly botanical pesticides. Dried fruits of star anise (Illicium verum Hook.f. (Austrobaileyales: Schisandraceae)) were extracted with methyl alcohol (MA), ethyl acetate (EA), and petroleum ether (PE) at 25°C. The constituents were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the repellency and contact toxicity of the extracts against Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) adults were tested. Forty-four compounds, whose concentrations were more than 0.2%, were separated and identified from the MA, EA, and PE extracts. The extraction yields of trans-anethole, the most abundant biologically active compound in I. verum, were 9.7%, 7.5%, and 10.1% in the MA, EA, and PE extracts, respectively. Repellency increased with increasing extract dose. The average repellency rate of the extracts against S. zeamais adults peaked at 125.79 µg/cm(2) 72 hr after treatment. The percentage repellency of the EA extract reached 76.9%, making it a class IV repellent. Contact toxicity assays showed average mortalities of 85.4% (MA), 94.5% (EA), and 91.1% (PE). The EA extract had the lowest median lethal dose, at 21.2 µg/cm(2) 72 hr after treatment. The results suggest that I. verum fruit extracts and trans-anethole can potentially be developed as a grain protectant to control stored-product insect pests. Other active constituents in the EA extract merit further research. PMID:25368036

  9. Chemical Composition and Biological Activity of Star Anise Illicium verum Extracts Against Maize Weevil, Sitophilus zeamais Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Linlin; Hua, Rimao; Li, Maoye; Huang, Yanzhang; Li, Shiguang; He, Yujie; Shen, Zonghai

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to develop eco-friendly botanical pesticides. Dried fruits of star anise (Illicium verum Hook.f. (Austrobaileyales: Schisandraceae)) were extracted with methyl alcohol (MA), ethyl acetate (EA), and petroleum ether (PE) at 25°C. The constituents were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the repellency and contact toxicity of the extracts against Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) adults were tested. Fortyfour compounds, whose concentrations were more than 0.2%, were separated and identified from the MA, EA, and PE extracts. The extraction yields of trans-anethole, the most abundant biologically active compound in I. verum, were 9.7%, 7.5%, and 10.1% in the MA, EA, and PE extracts, respectively. Repellency increased with increasing extract dose. The average repellency rate of the extracts against S. zeamais adults peaked at 125.79 μg/cm2 72 hr after treatment. The percentage repellency of the EA extract reached 76.9%, making it a class IV repellent. Contact toxicity assays showed average mortalities of 85.4% (MA), 94.5% (EA), and 91.1% (PE). The EA extract had the lowest median lethal dose, at 21.2 μg/cm2 72 hr after treatment. The results suggest that I. verum fruit extracts and trans-anethole can potentially be developed as a grain protectant to control stored-product insect pests. Other active constituents in the EA extract merit further research. PMID:25368036

  10. Chromospheric activity on late-type star DM UMa using high-resolution spectroscopic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, LiYun; Pi, QingFeng; Han, Xianming L.; Chang, Liang; Wang, Daimei

    2016-06-01

    We present new 14 high-resolution echelle spectra to discuss the level of chromospheric activity of DM UMa in {He I} D3, {Na I} D1, D2, Hα, and {Ca II} infrared triplet lines (IRT). It is the first time to discover the emissions above the continuum in the {He I} D3 lines on 2015 February 9 and 10. The emission on February 9 is the strongest one ever detected for DM UMa. We analysed these chromospheric active indicators by employing the spectral subtraction technique. The subtracted spectra reveal weak emissions in the {Na I} D1, D2 lines, strong emission in the Hα line, and clear excess emissions in the {Ca II} IRT lines. Our values for the EW8542/EW8498 ratio are on the low side, in the range of 1.0-1.7. There are also clear phase variations of the level of chromospheric activity in equivalent width (EW) light curves in these chromospheric active lines (especially the Hα line). These phenomena might be explained by flare events or rotational modulations of the level of chromospheric activity.

  11. Shadows across mu-Star? Constitutively active mu-opioid receptors revisited.

    PubMed

    Connor, Mark

    2009-04-01

    Constitutively active mu-opioid receptors (mu* receptors) are reported to be formed following prolonged agonist treatment of cells or whole animals. mu* receptors signal in the absence of activating ligand and a blockade of mu* activation of G-proteins by naloxone and naltrexone has been suggested to underlie the profound withdrawal syndrome precipitated by these antagonists in vivo. In this issue of the Journal, Divin et al. examined whether treatment of C6 glioma cells with mu-opioid receptor agonists produced constitutively active mu-opioid receptors or other commonly reported adaptations to prolonged agonist treatment. Adenylyl cyclase superactivation was readily apparent following agonist treatment but there was no evidence of the formation of constitutively active mu-opioid receptors. This result challenges the notion that prolonged agonist exposure inevitably produces mu* receptors, and is consistent with many studies of adaptations in neurons produced by chronic agonist treatment. The investigators provide no explanation of their failure to see mu* receptors in C6 cells, but this is perhaps understandable because the molecular nature of mu* receptors remains elusive, and the precise mechanisms that lead to their formation are unknown. Without knowing exactly what mu* receptors are, how they are formed and how they signal, understanding their role in cellular adaptations to prolonged opioid treatment will remain impossible. Studies such as this should refocus attention on establishing the molecular mechanisms that underlie that phenomenon of mu* receptors. PMID:19368530

  12. A Star on Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Prager, Stewart; Zwicker, Andrew; Hammet, Greg; Tresemer, Kelsey; Diallo, Ahmed

    2014-03-05

    At the Energy Department's Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, scientists are trying to accomplish what was once considered the realm of science fiction: create a star on Earth. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a magnetic fusion device that is used to study the physics principles of spherically shaped plasmas -- hot ionized gases in which, under the right conditions, nuclear fusion will occur. Fusion is the energy source of the sun and all of the stars. Not just limited to theoretical work, the NSTX is enabling cutting-edge research to develop fusion as a future energy source.

  13. A Star on Earth

    ScienceCinema

    Prager, Stewart; Zwicker, Andrew; Hammet, Greg; Tresemer, Kelsey; Diallo, Ahmed

    2016-07-12

    At the Energy Department's Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, scientists are trying to accomplish what was once considered the realm of science fiction: create a star on Earth. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a magnetic fusion device that is used to study the physics principles of spherically shaped plasmas -- hot ionized gases in which, under the right conditions, nuclear fusion will occur. Fusion is the energy source of the sun and all of the stars. Not just limited to theoretical work, the NSTX is enabling cutting-edge research to develop fusion as a future energy source.

  14. Seeing Stars in Serpens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Infant stars are glowing gloriously in this infrared image of the Serpens star-forming region, captured by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

    The reddish-pink dots are baby stars deeply embedded in the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that collapsed to create it. A dusty disk of cosmic debris, or 'protoplanetary disk,' that may eventually form planets, surrounds the infant stars.

    Wisps of green throughout the image indicate the presence of carbon rich molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. On Earth, these molecules can be found on charred barbecue grills and in automobile exhaust. Blue specks sprinkled throughout the image are background stars in our Milky Way galaxy.

    The Serpens star-forming region is located approximately 848 light-years away in the Serpens constellation.

    The image is a three-channel, false-color composite, where emission at 4.5 microns is blue, emission at 8.0 microns is green, and 24 micron emission is red.

  15. Hadron star models. [neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, J. M.; Boerner, G.

    1974-01-01

    The properties of fully relativistic rotating hadron star models are discussed using models based on recently developed equations of state. All of these stable neutron star models are bound with binding energies as high as about 25%. During hadron star formation, much of this energy will be released. The consequences, resulting from the release of this energy, are examined.

  16. The PD-1 Axis Enforces an Anatomical Segregation of CTL Activity that Creates Tumor Niches after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Michonneau, David; Sagoo, Pervinder; Breart, Béatrice; Garcia, Zacarias; Celli, Susanna; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-01-19

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT), a curative treatment for hematologic malignancies, relies on donor cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect. Major complications of HSCT are graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) that targets specific tissues and tumor relapses. However, the mechanisms dictating the anatomical features of GVHD and GVL remain unclear. Here, we show that after HSCT, CTLs exhibited different killing activity in distinct tissues, being highest in the liver and lowest in lymph nodes. Differences were imposed by the microenvironment, partly through differential PD-1 ligand expression, which was strongly elevated in lymph nodes. Two-photon imaging revealed that PD-1 blockade restored CTL sensitivity to antigen and killing in lymph nodes. Weak CTL activity in lymph nodes promoted local tumor escape but could be reversed by anti-PD-1 treatment. Our results uncover a mechanism generating an anatomical segregation of CTL activity that might dictate sites of GVHD and create niches for tumor escape. PMID:26795248

  17. Starring role of toll-like receptor-4 activation in the gut-liver axis

    PubMed Central

    Carotti, Simone; Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Vespasiani-Gentilucci, Umberto; Morini, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of the term “gut-liver axis”, many studies have focused on the functional links of intestinal microbiota, barrier function and immune responses to liver physiology. Intestinal and extra-intestinal diseases alter microbiota composition and lead to dysbiosis, which aggravates impaired intestinal barrier function via increased lipopolysaccharide translocation. The subsequent increased passage of gut-derived product from the intestinal lumen to the organ wall and bloodstream affects gut motility and liver biology. The activation of the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) likely plays a key role in both cases. This review analyzed the most recent literature on the gut-liver axis, with a particular focus on the role of TLR-4 activation. Findings that linked liver disease with dysbiosis are evaluated, and links between dysbiosis and alterations of intestinal permeability and motility are discussed. We also examine the mechanisms of translocated gut bacteria and/or the bacterial product activation of liver inflammation and fibrogenesis via activity on different hepatic cell types. PMID:26600967

  18. Living with a Star: An Educator Guide with Activities in Sun-Earth Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This educator guide is designed to provide references and resource materials to K-12 educators about the connection between the sun and the earth. Chapters include: (1) "Common Questions and Answers"; (2) "Sun-Earth Connection Missions"; (3) "Website Resources"; (4) "NASA CORE Materials"; (5) "Activities"; (6) "NASA Educator Workshop Resources";…

  19. Astronomy: Minds-on the Universe. Supplemental Teaching Activities for Grades K-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marble, Stephen; Fowler, Marilyn, Ed.

    This teachers guide contains activities and materials created to teach astronomy concepts to children from grades K-8. It is organized into four units: (1) Earth and Stars; (2) Spheres and Orbits; (3) Stars and Gravity; and (4) Scales and Measurement. Activities are arranged within each unit around six content topics: (1) Earth; (2) Solar System;…

  20. Identification of striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) as a novel calmodulin target by a newly developed genome-wide screen.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Yusui; Denda, Miwako; Sakane, Kyohei; Ogusu, Tomoko; Takahashi, Sumio; Magari, Masaki; Kanayama, Naoki; Morishita, Ryo; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    To search for novel target(s) of the Ca(2+)-signaling transducer, calmodulin (CaM), we performed a newly developed genome-wide CaM interaction screening of 19,676 GST-fused proteins expressed in human. We identified striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) as a novel CaM target and characterized its CaM binding ability and found that the Ca(2+)/CaM complex interacted stoichiometrically with the N-terminal region (Ala13-Gln35) of STARS in vitro as well as in living cells. Mutagenesis studies identified Ile20 and Trp33 as the essential hydrophobic residues in CaM anchoring. Furthermore, the CaM binding deficient mutant (Ile20Ala, Trp33Ala) of STARS further enhanced its stimulatory effect on SRF-dependent transcriptional activation. These results suggest a connection between Ca(2+)-signaling via excitation-contraction coupling and the regulation of STARS-mediated gene expression in muscles.

  1. Outburst Activity Driven by Evolved Pulsating Star in the Symbiotic Binary AG Dra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gális, R.; Hric, L.; Leedjärv, L.

    2015-12-01

    The symbiotic system AG Dra regularly undergoes quiescent and active stages which consist of the series of individual outbursts. The period analysis of new and historical photometric data, as well as radial velocities, confirmed the presence of the two periods. The longer one around ≈ 550 d is related to the orbital motion and the shorter one ≈355 d could be due to pulsation of the cool component of AG Dra.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Star formation in active and normal galaxies (Tsai+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, M.; Hwang, C.-Y.

    2015-11-01

    We selected 104 active galaxies from the lists of Melendez et al. (2010MNRAS.406..493M), Condon et al. 1991 (cat. J/ApJ/378/65), and Ho & Ulvestad 2001 (cat. J/ApJS/133/77). Most of the sources are identified as Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs), and a few of them are classified as Luminous InfraRed Galaxies (LIRGs). We obtained 3.6 and 8μm infrared images of these galaxies from the Spitzer Archive (http://sha.ipac.caltech.edu/applications/Spitzer/SHA/) and 8GHz images from the VLA archive (http://archive.nrao.edu/archive/archiveimage.html). We also selected a nearby AGN sub-sample containing 21 radio-selected AGNs for further spatial analysis. We selected 25 nearby AGNs exhibiting no detected radio emission in order to compare with the results of the radio-selected sources. For comparison, we also selected normal galaxies with distances less than 15Mpc from the catalog of Tully 1994 (see cat. VII/145). We only selected the galaxies that have Spitzer archive data and are not identified as AGNs in either the Veron-Cetty & Veron 2006 (see cat. VII/258) AGN catalog or in the NED database (http://ned.ipac.caltech.edu/). Our results for the radio-selected and the non-radio-selected active galaxies are listed in Table1, and those for the normal galaxies are listed in Table2. (2 data files).

  3. Further observations of the lambda 10830 He line in stars and their significance as a measure of stellar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements of the lambda 1030 He line in 198 stars are given along with data on other features in that spectral range. Nearly 80% of all G and K stars show some lambda 10830; of these, half are variable and 1/4 show emission. It was confirmed that lambda 10830 is not found in M stars, is weak in F stars, and is particularly strong in close binaries. The line is found in emission in extremely late M and S stars, along with P gamma, but P gamma is not in emission in G and K stars with lambda 10830 emissions. Variable He emission and Ti I emission are found in the RV Tauri variables R Scuti and U Mon. In R Aqr the Fe XIII coronal line lambda 10747 and a line at lambda 11012 which may be singlet He or La II are found, as well as lambda 10830 and P gamma. The nature of coronas or hot chromospheres in the various stars is discussed. It was concluded that the lambda 10830 intensity must be more or less proportional to the energy deposited in the chromosphere corona by non-thermal processes.

  4. Star formation in Galactic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilgys, Romas; Bonnell, Ian A.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the triggering of star formation in clouds that form in Galactic scale flows as the interstellar medium passes through spiral shocks. We use the Lagrangian nature of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations to trace how the star-forming gas is gathered into self-gravitating cores that collapse to form stars. Large-scale flows that arise due to Galactic dynamics create shocks of the order of 30 km s-1 that compress the gas and form dense clouds (n > several × 102 cm-3) in which self-gravity becomes relevant. These large-scale flows are necessary for creating the dense physical conditions for gravitational collapse and star formation. Local gravitational collapse requires densities in excess of n > 103 cm-3 which occur on size scales of ≈1 pc for low-mass star-forming regions (M < 100 M⊙), and up to sizes approaching 10 pc for higher mass regions (M > 103 M⊙). Star formation in the 250 pc region lasts throughout the 5 Myr time-scale of the simulation with a star formation rate of ≈10-1 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. In the absence of feedback, the efficiency of the star formation per free-fall time varies from our assumed 100 per cent at our sink accretion radius to values of <10-3 at low densities.

  5. Patrol of the short wavelength activity and flares of Sun as star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, I.; Avakyan, S.; Leonov, N.; Serova, A.; Voronin, N.

    Monitoring of the spectral range which most affects solar-terrestrial relationship - soft X-ray and extreme UV-radiations allows to solve ? problem of solar activity influence on all aspects of the Sun - Earth ties and to select the most important precursors of solar flares and the solar events related with a flare (such as proton events, high-velocity plasma streams in the solar wind, shock waves, coronal mass ejection and, the most important, the beginning of principal magnetic storms). Solar activity is constantly monitored at present (in the USA) only in two sections of the spectrum of ionizing radiation: <0.8 nm and >115 (119) nm. However, so far there has been no monitoring of the flux in the most geoeffective region of the spectrum (0.8-115 nm) from the entire disk of the sun; this region completely monitors the main part of the ionosphere of the earth and the ionosphere of the other planets of the solar system, including the formation and status of the main ionospheric maxima. This occurs solely because of technical and methodological difficulties in performing the measurements and calibration in this spectral range on spacecraft, because it is necessity to use only windowless optics. At the present the solar the optical - electronic equipment (OEE) is testing and there are plans to launch OEE of Space Solar Patrol (SSP) consisting of solar radiometers and spectrometers at the Russian Module of the International Space Station. So the solving the problem of the permanent monitoring-patrol of ionizing radiation from the full disk of the Sun appears in the main tasks of fundamental scientific studies in space. The results of this monitoring can be contribution in development of simultaneous studies in several sciences, such as: - solar astrophysics (state of all solar atmospheric regions), - meteorology, physics of atmosphere (the influence of solar activity on global changes, climate and weather including the effects of atmo s pheric electricity), - aeronomy

  6. STARs in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Ehrmann, Ingrid; Fort, Philippe; Elliott, David J

    2016-08-15

    STAR (signal transduction and activation of RNA) proteins regulate splicing of target genes that have roles in neural connectivity, survival and myelination in the vertebrate nervous system. These regulated splicing targets include mRNAs such as the Neurexins (Nrxn), SMN2 (survival of motor neuron) and MAG (myelin-associated glycoprotein). Recent work has made it possible to identify and validate STAR protein splicing targets in vivo by using genetically modified mouse models. In this review, we will discuss the importance of STAR protein splicing targets in the CNS (central nervous system). PMID:27528753

  7. MASS OUTFLOW AND CHROMOSPHERIC ACTIVITY OF RED GIANT STARS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. II. M13 AND M92

    SciTech Connect

    Meszaros, Sz.; Dupree, A. K.; Szalai, T. E-mail: dupree@cfa.harvard.edu

    2009-05-15

    High-resolution spectra of 123 red giant stars in the globular cluster M13 and 64 red giant stars in M92 were obtained with Hectochelle at the MMT telescope. Emission and line asymmetries in H{alpha} and Ca II K are identified, characterizing motions in the extended atmospheres and seeking differences attributable to metallicity in these clusters and M15. On the red giant branch, emission in H{alpha} generally appears in stars with T {sub eff} {approx}< 4500 K and log L/L {sub sun}{approx}> 2.75. Fainter stars showing emission are asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars or perhaps binary stars. The line-bisector for H{alpha} reveals the onset of chromospheric expansion in stars more luminous than log (L/L {sub sun}) {approx} 2.5 in all clusters, and this outflow velocity increases with stellar luminosity. However, the coolest giants in the metal-rich M13 show greatly reduced outflow in H{alpha} most probably due to decreased T {sub eff} and changing atmospheric structure. The Ca II K{sub 3} outflow velocities are larger than shown by H{alpha} at the same luminosity and signal accelerating outflows in the chromospheres. Stars clearly on the AGB show faster chromospheric outflows in H{alpha} than RGB objects. While the H{alpha} velocities on the RGB are similar for all metallicities, the AGB stars in the metal-poor M15 and M92 have higher outflow velocities than in the metal-rich M13. Comparison of these chromospheric line profiles in the paired metal-poor clusters, M15 and M92, shows remarkable similarities in the presence of emission and dynamical signatures, and does not reveal a source of the 'second-parameter' effect.

  8. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Dusty Star-Forming Galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei in the Southern Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsden, Danica; Gralla, Megan; Marriage, Tobias A.; Switzer, Eric R.; Partridge, Bruce; Massardi, Marcella; Morales, Gustavo; Addison, Graeme; Bond, J. Richard; Crighton, Devin; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark; Dunner, Rolando; Hajian, Amir; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam; Hughes, John P.; Irwin, Kent; Kosowsky, Arthur; Menanteau, Felipe; Moodley, Kavilan; Niemack, Michael; Page, Lyman; Reese, Erik D.; Schmitt, Benjamin; Sehgal, Neelima; Sievers, Johnathan; Staggs, Suzanne; Swetz, Daniel; Thornton, Robert; Wollack, Edward

    2014-01-01

    We present a catalogue of 191 extragalactic sources detected by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) at 148 and/or 218 GHz in the 2008 Southern survey. Flux densities span 14 -1700 mJy, and we use source spectral indices derived using ACT-only data to divide our sources into two subpopulations: 167 radio galaxies powered by central active galactic nuclei (AGN) and 24 dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs). We cross-identify 97 per cent of our sources (166 of the AGN and 19 of the DSFGs) with those in currently available catalogues. When combined with flux densities from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz survey and follow-up observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the synchrotron-dominated population is seen to exhibit a steepening of the slope of the spectral energy distribution from 20 to 148 GHz, with the trend continuing to 218 GHz. The ACT dust-dominated source population has a median spectral index, A(sub 148-218), of 3.7 (+0.62 or -0.86), and includes both local galaxies and sources with redshift around 6. Dusty sources with no counterpart in existing catalogues likely belong to a recently discovered subpopulation of DSFGs lensed by foreground galaxies or galaxy groups.

  9. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Dusty Star-Forming Galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei in the Southern Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsden, Danica; Gralla, Megan; Marriage, Tobias A.; Switzer, Eric R.; Partridge, Bruce; Massardi, Marcella; Morales, Gustavo; Addison, Graeme; Bond, J. Richard; Crichton, Devin; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark; Duenner, Rolando; Hajian, Amir; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam; Hughes, John P.; Irwin, Kent; Kosowsky, Arthur; Menanteau, Felipe; Moodley, Kavilan; Niemack, Michael; Page, Lyman; Reese, EriK D.; Wollack, Edward

    2013-01-01

    We present a catalog of 191 extragalactic sources detected by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) at 148 GHz and/or 218GHz in the 2008 Southern survey. Flux densities span 14-1700mJy, and we use source spectral indices derived using ACT-only data to divide our sources into two sub-populations: 167 radio galaxies powered by central active galactic nuclei (AGN), and 24 dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs). We cross-identify 97% of our sources (166 of the AGN and 19 of the DSFGs) with those in currently available catalogs. When combined with flux densities from the Australian Telescope 20 GHz survey and follow-up observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the synchrotron-dominated population is seen to exhibit a steepening of the slope of the spectral energy distribution from 20 to 148GHz, with the trend continuing to 218GHz. The ACT dust-dominated source population has a median spectral index, alpha(sub 148-218), of 3.7+0.62 or -0.86, and includes both local galaxies and sources with redshifts as great as 5.6. Dusty sources with no counterpart in existing catalogs likely belong to a recently discovered subpopulation of DSFGs lensed by foreground galaxies or galaxy groups.

  10. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Dusty Star-Forming Galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei in the Southern Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsden, Danica; Gralla, Megan; Marriage, Tobias A.; Switzer, Eric R.; Partridge, Bruce; Massardi, Marcella; Morales, Gustavo; Addison, Graeme; Bond, J. Richard; Crichton, Devin; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark; Dunner, Rolando; Hajian, Amir; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam; Hughes, John P.; Irwin, Kent; Kosowsky, Arthur; Menanteau, Felipe; Moodley, Kavilan; Niemack, Michael; Page, Lyman; Reese, Erik D.; Wollack, Edward

    2014-01-01

    We present a catalogue of 191 extragalactic sources detected by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) at 148 and/or 218 GHz in the 2008 Southern survey. Flux densities span 14 - 1700 mJy, and we use source spectral indices derived using ACT-only data to divide our sources into two subpopulations: 167 radio galaxies powered by central active galactic nuclei (AGN) and 24 dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs). We cross-identify 97 per cent of our sources (166 of the AGN and 19 of the DSFGs) with those in currently available catalogues. When combined with flux densities from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz survey and follow-up observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the synchrotron-dominated population is seen to exhibit a steepening of the slope of the spectral energy distribution from 20 to 148 GHz, with the trend continuing to 218 GHz. The ACT dust-dominated source population has a median spectral index, alpha(sub 148-218), of 3.7 +0.62/-0.86), and includes both local galaxies and sources with redshift around 6. Dusty sources with no counterpart in existing catalogues likely belong to a recently discovered subpopulation of DSFGs lensed by foreground galaxies or galaxy groups.

  11. An Investigation of the Largest Flares in Active Cool Star Binaries with ALEXIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    After a long delay due to the initial problems with the ALEXIS attitude control, the heroic efforts on the part of the ALEXIS satellite team enabled us to carry out this survey. However, the combination of the higher than expected and variable background in the ALEXIS detectors, and the lower throughput of the ALEXIS telescopes resulted in no convincing detections of large flares from the active binary systems. In addition, vignetting-corrected effective exposure times from the ALEXIS aspect solution were not available prior to the end of this contract; therefore, we were unable to convert upper limits measured in ALEXIS counts to the equivalent.

  12. Collapsing Enormous Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    One of the big puzzles in astrophysics is how supermassive black holes (SMBHs) managed to grow to the large sizes weve observed in the very early universe. In a recent study, a team of researchers examines the possibility that they were formed by the direct collapse of supermassive stars.Formation MysterySMBHs billions of times as massive as the Sun have been observed at a time when the universe was less than a billion years old. But thats not enough time for a stellar-mass black hole to grow to SMBH-size by accreting material so another theory is needed to explain the presence of these monsters so early in the universes history. A new study, led by Tatsuya Matsumoto (Kyoto University, Japan), poses the following question: what if supermassive stars in the early universe collapsed directly into black holes?Previous studies of star formation in the early universe have suggested that, in the hot environment of these primordial times, stars might have been able to build up mass much faster than they can today. This could result in early supermassive stars roughly 100,000 times more massive than the Sun. But if these early stars end their lives by collapsing to become massive black holes in the same way that we believe massive stars can collapse to form stellar-mass black holes today this should result in enormously violent explosions. Matusmoto and collaborators set out to model this process, to determine what we would expect to see when it happens!Energetic BurstsThe authors modeled the supermassive stars prior to collapse and then calculated whether a jet, created as the black hole grows at the center of the collapsing star, would be able to punch out of the stellar envelope. They demonstrated that the process would work much like the widely-accepted collapsar model of massive-star death, in which a jet successfully punches out of a collapsing star, violently releasing energy in the form of a long gamma-ray burst (GRB).Because the length of a long GRB is thought to

  13. LANL Activities Supporting Electron Accelerator Production of 99Mo for NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes, LLC

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Gregory E.; Kelsey, Charles T. IV; Woloshun, Keith A.; Holloway, Michael A.; Olivas, Eric R.; Dalmas, Dale A.; Romero, Frank P.; Hurtle, Kenneth P.

    2012-07-11

    Summary of LANL FY12 Activities are: (1) Preparation, performance, and data analysis for the FY12 accelerator tests at ANL - (a) LANL designed and installed a closed-loop helium target cooling system at ANL for the FY12 accelerator tests, (b) Thermal test was performed on March 27, (c) 24 h production test to follow the accelerator upgrade at ANL; (2) Local target shielding design and OTR/IR recommendations - (a) Target dose rate and activation products were calculated with MCNPX, (b) {sup 206}Pb({gamma},2n){sup 204m}Pb vs {sup 204g}Pb branching ratio unpublished, will measure using the LANL microtron, (c) OTR system nearing final configuration, (d) IR prototype system demonstrated during the recent thermal test at ANL; (3) Target housing lifetime estimation - Target housing material specifications and design to be finalized following the thermal test, lifetime not believed to be an issue; and (4) Target cooling system reliability - Long duration system characterizations will begin following the thermal test.

  14. TESTING DIAGNOSTICS OF NUCLEAR ACTIVITY AND STAR FORMATION IN GALAXIES AT z > 1

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Barro, Guillermo; Koo, David C.; Faber, S. M.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Yan, Renbin; Juneau, Stephanie; McLean, Ian S.; Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G.; Villar, Victor

    2013-01-20

    We present some of the first science data with the new Keck/MOSFIRE instrument to test the effectiveness of different AGN/SF diagnostics at z {approx} 1.5. MOSFIRE spectra were obtained in three H-band multi-slit masks in the GOODS-S field, resulting in 2 hr exposures of 36 emission-line galaxies. We compare X-ray data with the traditional emission-line ratio diagnostics and the alternative mass-excitation and color-excitation diagrams, combining new MOSFIRE infrared data with previous HST/WFC3 infrared spectra (from the 3D-HST survey) and multiwavelength photometry. We demonstrate that a high [O III]/H{beta} ratio is insufficient as an active galactic nucleus (AGN) indicator at z > 1. For the four X-ray-detected galaxies, the classic diagnostics ([O III]/H{beta} versus [N II]/H{alpha} and [S II]/H{alpha}) remain consistent with X-ray AGN/SF classification. The X-ray data also suggest that 'composite' galaxies (with intermediate AGN/SF classification) host bona fide AGNs. Nearly {approx}2/3 of the z {approx} 1.5 emission-line galaxies have nuclear activity detected by either X-rays or the classic diagnostics. Compared to the X-ray and line ratio classifications, the mass-excitation method remains effective at z > 1, but we show that the color-excitation method requires a new calibration to successfully identify AGNs at these redshifts.

  15. The Biases of Optical Line-Ratio Selection for Active Galactic Nuclei and the Intrinsic Relationship between Black Hole Accretion and Galaxy Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Sun, Mouyuan; Zeimann, Gregory R.; Luck, Cuyler; Bridge, Joanna S.; Grier, Catherine J.; Hagen, Alex; Juneau, Stephanie; Montero-Dorta, Antonio; Rosario, David J.; Brandt, W. Niel; Ciardullo, Robin; Schneider, Donald P.

    2015-09-01

    We use 317,000 emission-line galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to investigate line-ratio selection of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). In particular, we demonstrate that “star formation (SF) dilution” by H ii regions causes a significant bias against AGN selection in low-mass, blue, star-forming, disk-dominated galaxies. This bias is responsible for the observed preference of AGNs among high-mass, green, moderately star-forming, bulge-dominated hosts. We account for the bias and simulate the intrinsic population of emission-line AGNs using a physically motivated Eddington ratio distribution, intrinsic AGN narrow line region line ratios, a luminosity-dependent {L}{bol}/L[{{O}} {{III}}] bolometric correction, and the observed {M}{BH}-σ relation. These simulations indicate that, in massive ({log}({M}*/{M}⊙ )≳ 10) galaxies, AGN accretion is correlated with specific star formation rate (SFR) but is otherwise uniform with stellar mass. There is some hint of lower black hole occupation in low-mass ({log}({M}*/{M}⊙ )≲ 10) hosts, although our modeling is limited by uncertainties in measuring and interpreting the velocity dispersions of low-mass galaxies. The presence of SF dilution means that AGNs contribute little to the observed strong optical emission lines (e.g., [{{O}} {{III}}] and {{H}}α ) in low-mass and star-forming hosts. However the AGN population recovered by our modeling indicates that feedback by typical (low- to moderate-accretion) low-redshift AGNs has nearly uniform efficiency at all stellar masses, SFRs, and morphologies. Taken together, our characterization of the observational bias and resultant AGN occupation function suggest that AGNs are unlikely to be the dominant source of SF quenching in galaxies, but instead are fueled by the same gas which drives SF activity.

  16. ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS PAIRS FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY. II. EVIDENCE FOR TIDALLY ENHANCED STAR FORMATION AND BLACK HOLE ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xin; Shen Yue; Strauss, Michael A.

    2012-01-20

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are occasionally seen in pairs, suggesting that tidal encounters are responsible for the accretion of material by both central supermassive black holes (BHs). In Paper I of this series, we selected a sample of AGN pairs with projected separations r{sub p} < 100 h{sup -1}{sub 70} kpc and velocity offsets <600 km s{sup -1} from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and quantified their frequency. In this paper, we address the BH accretion and recent star formation properties in their host galaxies. AGN pairs experience stronger BH accretion, as measured by their [O III] {lambda}5007 luminosities (corrected for contribution from star formation) and Eddington ratios, than do control samples of single AGNs matched in redshift and host-galaxy stellar mass. Their host galaxies have stronger post-starburst activity and younger mean stellar ages, as indicated by stronger H{delta} absorption and smaller 4000 A break in their spectra. The BH accretion and recent star formation in the host galaxies both increase with decreasing projected separation in AGN pairs, for r{sub p} {approx}< 10-30 h{sup -1}{sub 70} kpc. The intensity of BH accretion, the post-starburst strength, and the mean stellar ages are correlated between the two AGNs in a pair. The luminosities and Eddington ratios of AGN pairs are correlated with recent star formation in their host galaxies, with a scaling relation consistent with that observed in single AGNs. Our results suggest that galaxy tidal interactions enhance both BH accretion and host-galaxy star formation in close AGN pairs, even though the majority of low-redshift AGNs are not coincident with on-going interactions.

  17. HISTORY AND MODES OF STAR FORMATION IN THE MOST ACTIVE REGION OF THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD, NGC 346

    SciTech Connect

    Cignoni, M.; Tosi, M.; Sabbi, E.; Nota, A.; Gallagher, J. S.

    2011-02-15

    We discuss the star formation history of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) region NGC 346 based on Hubble Space Telescope images. The region contains both field stars and cluster members. Using a classical synthetic color-magnitude diagram (CMD) procedure applied to the field around NGC 346 we find that the star formation pace there has been rising, from a quite low rate 13 Gyr ago to {approx}1.4 x 10{sup -8} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} pc{sup -2} in the last 100 Myr. This value is significantly higher than that in other star-forming regions of the SMC. For NGC 346 itself, we compare theoretical and observed CMDs of several stellar sub-clusters identified in the region, and we derive their basic evolution parameters. We find that NGC 346 experienced different star formation regimes, including a dominant and focused 'high-density mode', with the sub-clusters hosting both pre-main-sequence (PMS) and upper main-sequence (UMS) stars, and a diffuse 'low-density mode', as indicated by the presence of low-mass PMS sub-clusters. Quantitatively, the star formation in the oldest sub-clusters started about 6 Myr ago with remarkable synchronization, it continued at a high rate (up to 2 x 10{sup -5} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} pc{sup -2}) for about 3 Myr and is now progressing at a lower rate. Interestingly, sub-clusters mainly composed of low-mass PMS stars now seem to experience the first episode of star formation, following multi-seeded spatial patterns, instead of resulting from a coherent trigger. Two speculative scenarios are put forth to explain the deficiency of UMS stars: the first invokes underthreshold conditions of the parent gas and the second speculates that the initial mass function is a function of time, with the youngest sub-clusters not having had sufficient time to form more massive stars.

  18. Lithium and Isotopic Ratio Li6/Li7 in Magnetic roAp Stars as an Indicator of Active Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polosukhina, N.; Shavrina, A.; Lyashko, D.; Nesvacil, N.; Drake, N.; Smirnova, M.

    2015-04-01

    The lines of lithium at 6708 Å and 6103 Å are analyzed in high resolution spectra of some sharp-lined and slowly rotating roAp stars. Three spectral synthesis codes— STARSP, ZEEMAN2, and SYNTHM—were used. New lines of rare earth elements (REE) from the DREAM database and the lines calculated on the basis of the NIST energy levels were included. Magnetic splitting and other line broadening processes were taken into account. For both lithium lines, the enhanced abundances of lithium in the atmospheres of the stars studied are obtained. The lithium abundance determined from the Li 6103 Å line is higher than that from the Li 6708 Å for all the stars. This may be evidence of vertical lithium stratification, abnormal temperature distribution, or unidentified blending of the 6103 Å line. Our work on two roAp stars, HD 83368 and HD 60435 (Shavrina et al. 2001) provides evidence of an enhanced lithium abundance near the magnetic-field poles. We can expect similar effects in the sharp-lined roAp stars. High lithium abundance for all the stars and the estimates of the 6Li/7Li ratio (0.2-0.5) can be explained by production of Li in the cosmic ray spallation reactions in the interstellar medium where the stars were born, and by preservation of the original 6Li and 7Li by strong magnetic fields of these stars. The values of the 6Li/7Li ratio expected from production by cosmic rays are about 0.5-0.8 (Knauth et al. 2003; Webber et al. 2002). New laboratory and theoretical gf-values for REE lines are necessary in order to refine our estimates of lithium abundances and the isotopic ratio.

  19. Enhanced anticancer activity of DM1-loaded star-shaped folate-core PLA-TPGS nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaolong; Liang, Yong; Zhu, Yongqiang; Cai, Shiyu; Sun, Leilei; Chen, Tianyi

    2014-10-01

    The efficient delivery of therapeutic drugs into interested cells is a critical challenge to broad application of nonviral vector systems. In this research, emtansine (DM1)-loaded star-shaped folate-core polylactide- d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (FA-PLA-TPGS-DM1) copolymer which demonstrated superior anticancer activity in vitro/ vivo in comparison with linear FA-PLA-TPGS nanoparticles was applied to be a vector of DM1 for FR+ breast cancer therapy. The DM1- or coumarin 6-loaded nanoparticles were fabricated, and then characterized in terms of size, morphology, drug encapsulation efficiency, and in vitro drug release. And the viability of MCF-7/HER2 cells treated with FA-DM1-nanoparticles (NPs) was assessed. Severe combined immunodeficient mice carrying MCF-7/HER2 tumor xenografts were treated in several groups including phosphate-buffered saline control, DM1, DM1-NPs, and FA-DM1-NPs. The antitumor activity was then assessed by survival time and solid tumor volume. All the specimens were prepared for formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue sections for hematoxylin-eosin staining. The data showed that the FA-DM1-NPs could efficiently deliver DM1 into MCF-7/HER2 cells. The cytotoxicity of DM1 to MCF-7/HER2 cells was significantly increased by FA-DM1-NPs when compared with the control groups. In conclusion, the FA-DM1-NPs offered a considerable potential formulation for FR+ tumor-targeting biotherapy.

  20. Pseudosynchronization of Heartbeat Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Mara; Thompson, Susan E.; Hambleton, Kelly; Fuller, Jim; Shporer, Avi; Isaacson, Howard T.; Howard, Andrew; Kurtz, Donald

    2016-01-01

    A type of eccentric binary star that undergoes extreme dynamic tidal forces, known as Heartbeat stars, were discovered by the Kepler Mission. As the two stars pass through periastron, the tidal distortion causes unique brightness variations. Short period, eccentric binary stars, like these, are theorized to pseudosynchronize, or reach a rotational frequency that matches the weighted average orbital angular velocity of the system. This pseudosynchronous rate, as predicted by Hut (1981), depends on the binary's orbital period and eccentricity. We tested whether sixteen heartbeat stars have pseudosynchronized. We measure the rotation rate from obvious spot signatures in the light curve. We measure the eccentricity by fitting the light curve using PHOEBE and are actively carrying out a radial velocity monitoring program with Keck/HIRES in order to improve these orbital parameters. Our initial results show that while most heartbeat stars appear to have pseudosynchronized we find stars with rotation frequencies both longer and shorter than this rate. We thank the SETI Institute REU program, the NSF, and the Kepler Guest Observer Program for making this work possible.

  1. Creating corporate advantage.

    PubMed

    Collis, D J; Montgomery, C A

    1998-01-01

    What differentiates truly great corporate strategies from the merely adequate? How can executives at the corporate level create tangible advantage for their businesses that makes the whole more than the sum of the parts? This article presents a comprehensive framework for value creation in the multibusiness company. It addresses the most fundamental questions of corporate strategy: What businesses should a company be in? How should it coordinate activities across businesses? What role should the corporate office play? How should the corporation measure and control performance? Through detailed case studies of Tyco International, Sharp, the Newell Company, and Saatchi and Saatchi, the authors demonstrate that the answers to all those questions are driven largely by the nature of a company's special resources--its assets, skills, and capabilities. These range along a continuum from the highly specialized at one end to the very general at the other. A corporation's location on the continuum constrains the set of businesses it should compete in and limits its choices about the design of its organization. Applying the framework, the authors point out the common mistakes that result from misaligned corporate strategies. Companies mistakenly enter businesses based on similarities in products rather than the resources that contribute to competitive advantage in each business. Instead of tailoring organizational structures and systems to the needs of a particular strategy, they create plain-vanilla corporate offices and infrastructures. The company examples demonstrate that one size does not fit all. One can find great corporate strategies all along the continuum.

  2. Creating corporate advantage.

    PubMed

    Collis, D J; Montgomery, C A

    1998-01-01

    What differentiates truly great corporate strategies from the merely adequate? How can executives at the corporate level create tangible advantage for their businesses that makes the whole more than the sum of the parts? This article presents a comprehensive framework for value creation in the multibusiness company. It addresses the most fundamental questions of corporate strategy: What businesses should a company be in? How should it coordinate activities across businesses? What role should the corporate office play? How should the corporation measure and control performance? Through detailed case studies of Tyco International, Sharp, the Newell Company, and Saatchi and Saatchi, the authors demonstrate that the answers to all those questions are driven largely by the nature of a company's special resources--its assets, skills, and capabilities. These range along a continuum from the highly specialized at one end to the very general at the other. A corporation's location on the continuum constrains the set of businesses it should compete in and limits its choices about the design of its organization. Applying the framework, the authors point out the common mistakes that result from misaligned corporate strategies. Companies mistakenly enter businesses based on similarities in products rather than the resources that contribute to competitive advantage in each business. Instead of tailoring organizational structures and systems to the needs of a particular strategy, they create plain-vanilla corporate offices and infrastructures. The company examples demonstrate that one size does not fit all. One can find great corporate strategies all along the continuum. PMID:10179655

  3. STAR heavy flavor tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Hao

    2014-11-01

    Hadrons containing heavy quarks are a clean probe of the early dynamic evolution of the dense and hot medium created in high-energy nuclear collisions. To explore heavy quark production at RHIC, the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) for the STAR experiment was built and installed in time for RHIC Run 14. The HFT consists of four layers of silicon detectors. The two outermost layers are silicon strip detectors and the two innermost layers are made from state-of-the-art ultra-thin CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS). This is the first application of a CMOS MAPS detector in a collider experiment. The use of thin pixel sensors plus the use of carbon fiber supporting material limits the material budget to be only 0.4% radiation length per pixel detector layer, enabling the reconstruction of low pT heavy flavor hadrons. The status and performance of the HFT in the RHIC 200 GeV Au + Au run in 2014 are reported. Very good detector efficiency, hit residuals and track resolution (DCAs) were observed in the cosmic ray data and in the Au + Au data.

  4. Pixel response function experimental techniques and analysis of active pixel sensor star cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumo, Patrick; Waldron, Erik; Laine, Juha-Pekka; Evans, Gary

    2015-04-01

    The pixel response function (PRF) of a pixel within a focal plane is defined as the pixel intensity with respect to the position of a point source within the pixel. One of its main applications is in the field of astrometry, which is a branch of astronomy that deals with positioning data of a celestial body for tracking movement or adjusting the attitude of a spacecraft. Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors generally offer better radiation tolerance to protons and heavy ions than CCDs making them ideal candidates for space applications aboard satellites, but like all image sensors they are limited by their spatial frequency response, better known as the modulation transfer function. Having a well-calibrated PRF allows us to eliminate some of the uncertainty in the spatial response of the system providing better resolution and a more accurate centroid estimation. This paper describes the experimental setup for determining the PRF of a CMOS image sensor and analyzes the effect on the oversampled point spread function (PSF) of an image intensifier, as well as the effects due to the wavelength of light used as a point source. It was found that using electron bombarded active pixel sensor (EBAPS) intensification technology had a significant impact on the PRF of the camera being tested as a result of an increase in the amount of carrier diffusion between collection sites generated by the intensification process. Taking the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the resulting data, it was found that the intensified version of a CMOS camera exhibited a PSF roughly 16.42% larger than its nonintensified counterpart.

  5. Star Formation in the Eagle Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    M16 (the Eagle Nebula) is a striking star forming region, with a complex morphology of gas and dust sculpted by the massive stars in NGC 6611. Detailed studies of the famous ``elephant trunks'' dramatically increased our understanding of the massive star feedback into the parent molecular cloud. A rich young stellar population (2-3 Myr) has been identified, from massive O-stars down to substellar masses. Deep into the remnant molecular material, embedded protostars, Herbig-Haro objects and maser sources bear evidence of ongoing star formation in the nebula, possibly triggered by the massive cluster members. M 16 is a excellent template for the study of star formation under the hostile environment created by massive O-stars. This review aims at providing an observational overview not only of the young stellar population but also of the gas remnant of the star formation process.

  6. De novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE) hybrid nuclease with novel DNA binding specificity creates double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Mahfouz, Magdy M; Li, Lixin; Shamimuzzaman, Md; Wibowo, Anjar; Fang, Xiaoyun; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2011-02-01

    Site-specific and rare cutting nucleases are valuable tools for genome engineering. The generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes and can facilitate gene targeting, additions, deletions, and inactivation. Zinc finger nucleases have been used to generate DSBs and subsequently, for genome editing but with low efficiency and reproducibility. The transcription activator-like family of type III effectors (TALEs) contains a central domain of tandem repeats that could be engineered to bind specific DNA targets. Here, we report the generation of a Hax3-based hybrid TALE nuclease with a user-selected DNA binding specificity. We show that the engineered TALE nuclease can bind to its target sequence in vitro and that the homodimeric TALE nuclease can cleave double-stranded DNA in vitro if the DNA binding sites have the proper spacing and orientation. Transient expression assays in tobacco leaves suggest that the hybrid nuclease creates DSB in its target sequence, which is subsequently repaired by nonhomologous end-joining repair. Taken together, our data show the feasibility of engineering TALE-based hybrid nucleases capable of generating site-specific DSBs and the great potential for site-specific genome modification in plants and eukaryotes in general.

  7. The distribution of satellites around massive galaxies at 1 < z < 3 in ZFOURGE/CANDELS: Dependence on star formation activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kawinwanichakij, Lalitwadee; Papovich, Casey; Quadri, Ryan F.; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Mehrtens, Nicola; Spitler, Lee R.; Cowley, Michael; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Glazebrook, Karl; Nanayakkara, Themiya; Labbé, Ivo; Straatman, Caroline M. S.; Allen, Rebecca; Davé, Romeel; Dekel, Avishai; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Hartley, W. G.; Koo, David C.; and others

    2014-09-10

    We study the statistical distribution of satellites around star-forming and quiescent central galaxies at 1 < z < 3 using imaging from the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey and the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey. The deep near-IR data select satellites down to log (M/M {sub ☉}) > 9 at z < 3. The radial satellite distribution around centrals is consistent with a projected Navarro-Frenk-White profile. Massive quiescent centrals, log (M/M {sub ☉}) > 10.78, have ∼2 times the number of satellites compared to star-forming centrals with a significance of 2.7σ even after accounting for differences in the centrals' stellar-mass distributions. We find no statistical difference in the satellite distributions of intermediate-mass quiescent and star-forming centrals, 10.48 < log (M/M {sub ☉}) < 10.78. Compared to the Guo et al. semi-analytic model, the excess number of satellites indicates that quiescent centrals have halo masses 0.3 dex larger than star-forming centrals, even when the stellar-mass distributions are fixed. We use a simple toy model that relates halo mass and quenching, which roughly reproduces the observed quenched fractions and the differences in halo mass between star-forming and quenched galaxies only if galaxies have a quenching probability that increases with halo mass from ∼0 for log (M{sub h} /M {sub ☉}) ∼ 11 to ∼1 for log (M{sub h} /M {sub ☉}) ∼ 13.5. A single halo-mass quenching threshold is unable to reproduce the quiescent fraction and satellite distribution of centrals. Therefore, while halo quenching may be an important mechanism, it is unlikely to be the only factor driving quenching. It remains unclear why a high fraction of centrals remain star-forming even in relatively massive halos.

  8. Early science with the large millimeter telescope: exploring the effect of AGN activity on the relationships between molecular gas, dust, and star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, Allison; Pope, Alexandra; Calzetti, Daniela; Narayanan, Gopal; Schloerb, F. Peter; Yun, Min S.; Aretxaga, Itziar; Montaña, Alfredo; Vega, Olga; Armus, Lee; Helou, George; Shi, Yong

    2014-12-01

    The molecular gas, H{sub 2}, that fuels star formation in galaxies is difficult to observe directly. As such, the ratio of L {sub IR} to L{sub CO}{sup ′} is an observational estimate of the star formation rate compared with the amount of molecular gas available to form stars, which is related to the star formation efficiency and the inverse of the gas consumption timescale. We test what effect an IR luminous active galactic nucleus (AGN) has on the ratio L{sub IR}/L{sub CO}{sup ′} in a sample of 24 intermediate redshift galaxies from the 5 mJy Unbiased Spitzer Extragalactic Survey (5MUSES). We obtain new CO(1-0) observations with the Redshift Search Receiver on the Large Millimeter Telescope. We diagnose the presence and strength of an AGN using Spitzer IRS spectroscopy. We find that removing the AGN contribution to L{sub IR}{sup tot} results in a mean L{sub IR}{sup SF}/L{sub CO}{sup ′} for our entire sample consistent with the mean L{sub IR}/L{sub CO}{sup ′} derived for a large sample of star forming galaxies from z ∼ 0-3. We also include in our comparison the relative amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission for our sample and a literature sample of local and high-redshift ultra luminous infrared galaxies and find a consistent trend between L{sub 6.2}/L{sub IR}{sup SF} and L{sub IR}{sup SF}/L{sub CO}{sup ′}, such that small dust grain emission decreases with increasing L{sub IR}{sup SF}/L{sub CO}{sup ′} for both local and high-redshift dusty galaxies.

  9. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars. PMID:17836594

  10. Star Polymers.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jing M; McKenzie, Thomas G; Fu, Qiang; Wong, Edgar H H; Xu, Jiangtao; An, Zesheng; Shanmugam, Sivaprakash; Davis, Thomas P; Boyer, Cyrille; Qiao, Greg G

    2016-06-22

    Recent advances in controlled/living polymerization techniques and highly efficient coupling chemistries have enabled the facile synthesis of complex polymer architectures with controlled dimensions and functionality. As an example, star polymers consist of many linear polymers fused at a central point with a large number of chain end functionalities. Owing to this exclusive structure, star polymers exhibit some remarkable characteristics and properties unattainable by simple linear polymers. Hence, they constitute a unique class of technologically important nanomaterials that have been utilized or are currently under audition for many applications in life sciences and nanotechnologies. This article first provides a comprehensive summary of synthetic strategies towards star polymers, then reviews the latest developments in the synthesis and characterization methods of star macromolecules, and lastly outlines emerging applications and current commercial use of star-shaped polymers. The aim of this work is to promote star polymer research, generate new avenues of scientific investigation, and provide contemporary perspectives on chemical innovation that may expedite the commercialization of new star nanomaterials. We envision in the not-too-distant future star polymers will play an increasingly important role in materials science and nanotechnology in both academic and industrial settings.

  11. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars.

  12. Modelling the magnetic activity and filtering radial velocity curves of young Suns : the weak-line T Tauri star LkCa 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, J.-F.; Hébrard, E.; Hussain, G.; Moutou, C.; Grankin, K.; Boisse, I.; Morin, J.; Gregory, S. G.; Vidotto, A. A.; Bouvier, J.; Alencar, S. H. P.; Delfosse, X.; Doyon, R.; Takami, M.; Jardine, M. M.; Fares, R.; Cameron, A. C.; Ménard, F.; Dougados, C.; Herczeg, G.; Matysse Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    We report results of a spectropolarimetric and photometric monitoring of the weak-line T Tauri star LkCa 4 within the Magnetic Topologies of Young Stars and the Survival of close-in giant Exoplanets (MaTYSSE) programme, involving ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Despite an age of only 2 Myr and a similarity with prototypical classical T Tauri stars, LkCa 4 shows no evidence for accretion and probes an interesting transition stage for star and planet formation. Large profile distortions and Zeeman signatures are detected in the unpolarized and circularly polarized lines of LkCa 4 using Least-Squares Deconvolution (LSD), indicating the presence of brightness inhomogeneities and magnetic fields at the surface of LkCa 4. Using tomographic imaging, we reconstruct brightness and magnetic maps of LkCa 4 from sets of unpolarized and circularly polarized LSD profiles. The large-scale field is strong and mainly axisymmetric, featuring a ≃2 kG poloidal component and a ≃1 kG toroidal component encircling the star at equatorial latitudes - the latter making LkCa 4 markedly different from classical T Tauri stars of similar mass and age. The brightness map includes a dark spot overlapping the magnetic pole and a bright region at mid-latitudes - providing a good match to the contemporaneous photometry. We also find that differential rotation at the surface of LkCa 4 is small, typically ≃5.5 times weaker than that of the Sun, and compatible with solid-body rotation. Using our tomographic modelling, we are able to filter out the activity jitter in the radial velocity curve of LkCa 4 (of full amplitude 4.3 km s-1) down to an rms precision of 0.055 km s-1. Looking for hot Jupiters around young Sun-like stars thus appears feasible, even though we find no evidence for such planets around LkCa 4.

  13. MOIRCS DEEP SURVEY. VIII. EVOLUTION OF STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY AS A FUNCTION OF STELLAR MASS IN GALAXIES SINCE z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kajisawa, M.; Ichikawa, T.; Yamada, T.; Akiyama, M.; Uchimoto, Y. K.; Yoshikawa, T.; Onodera, M.

    2010-11-01

    We study the evolution of star formation activity of galaxies at 0.5 < z < 3.5 as a function of stellar mass, using very deep NIR data taken with the Multi-Object Infrared Camera and Spectrograph on the Subaru telescope in the GOODS-North region. The NIR imaging data reach K{approx} 23-24 Vega magnitude and they allow us to construct a nearly stellar-mass-limited sample down to {approx}10{sup 9.5-10} M{sub sun} even at z {approx} 3. We estimated star formation rates (SFRs) of the sample with two indicators, namely, the Spitzer/MIPS 24 {mu}m flux and the rest-frame 2800 A luminosity. The SFR distribution at a fixed M{sub star} shifts to higher values with increasing redshift at 0.5 < z < 3.5. More massive galaxies show stronger evolution of SFR at z {approx}> 1. We found galaxies at 2.5 < z < 3.5 show a bimodality in their SSFR distribution, which can be divided into two populations by a constant SSFR of {approx}2 Gyr{sup -1}. Galaxies in the low-SSFR group have SSFRs of {approx}0.5-1.0 Gyr{sup -1}, while the high-SSFR population shows {approx}10 Gyr{sup -1}. The cosmic SFR density (SFRD) is dominated by galaxies with M{sub star} = 10{sup 10-11} M{sub sun} at 0.5 < z < 3.5, while the contribution of massive galaxies with M{sub star} = 10{sup 11-11.5} M{sub sun} shows a strong evolution at z>1 and becomes significant at z {approx} 3, especially in the case with the SFR based on MIPS 24 {mu}m. In galaxies with M{sub star} = 10{sup 10-11.5} M{sub sun}, those with a relatively narrow range of SSFR ({approx}<1 dex) dominates the cosmic SFRD at 0.5 < z < 3.5. The SSFR of galaxies that dominate the SFRD systematically increases with redshift. At 2.5 < z < 3.5, the high-SSFR population, which is relatively small in number, dominates the SFRD. Major star formation in the universe at higher redshift seems to be associated with a more rapid growth of stellar mass of galaxies.

  14. [C II] 158 μm Luminosities and Star Formation Rate in Dusty Starbursts and Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, L.; Lebouteiller, V.; Weedman, D.; Spoon, H.; Bernard-Salas, J.; Engels, D.; Stacey, G.; Houck, J.; Barry, D.; Miles, J.; Samsonyan, A.

    2012-08-01

    Results are presented for [C II] 158 μm line fluxes observed with the Herschel PACS instrument in 112 sources with both starburst and active galactic nucleus (AGN) classifications, of which 102 sources have confident detections. Results are compared with mid-infrared spectra from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrometer and with L ir from IRAS fluxes; AGN/starburst classifications are determined from equivalent width of the 6.2 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) feature. It is found that the [C II] line flux correlates closely with the flux of the 11.3 μm PAH feature independent of AGN/starburst classification, log [f([C II] 158 μm)/f(11.3 μm PAH)] = -0.22 ± 0.25. It is concluded that the [C II] line flux measures the photodissociation region associated with starbursts in the same fashion as the PAH feature. A calibration of star formation rate (SFR) for the starburst component in any source having [C II] is derived comparing [C II] luminosity L([C II]) to L ir with the result that log SFR = log L([C II)]) - 7.08 ± 0.3, for SFR in M ⊙ yr-1 and L([C II]) in L ⊙. The decreasing ratio of L([C II]) to L ir in more luminous sources (the "[C II] deficit") is shown to be a consequence of the dominant contribution to L ir arising from a luminous AGN component because the sources with the largest L ir and smallest L([C II])/L ir are AGNs. Based on observations with the Herschel Space Observatory, which is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  15. DECOMPOSING STAR FORMATION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS WITH SPITZER MID-INFRARED SPECTRA: LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AND CO-EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Hai; Scoville, N. Z.; Yan Lin; Capak, P.; Aussel, H.; Le Floc'h, E.; Salvato, M.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Frayer, D. T.; Sanders, D. B.; Sheth, K.; Taniguchi, Y.

    2010-10-10

    We present Spitzer 7-38 {mu}m spectra for a 24 {mu}m flux-limited sample of galaxies at z {approx} 0.7 in the COSMOS field. The detailed high-quality spectra allow us to cleanly separate star formation (SF) and active galactic nucleus (AGN) in individual galaxies. We first decompose mid-infrared luminosity functions (LFs). We find that the SF 8 {mu}m and 15 {mu}m LFs are well described by Schechter functions. AGNs dominate the space density at high luminosities, which leads to the shallow bright-end slope of the overall mid-infrared LFs. The total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) LF from 70 {mu}m selected galaxies shows a shallower bright-end slope than the bolometrically corrected SF 15 {mu}m LF, owing to the intrinsic dispersion in the mid-to-far-infrared spectral energy distributions. We then study the contemporary growth of galaxies and their supermassive black holes (BHs). Seven of the thirty-one luminous infrared galaxies with Spitzer spectra host luminous AGNs, implying an AGN duty cycle of 23% {+-} 9%. The time-averaged ratio of BH accretion rate and SF rate matches the local M{sub BH} - M{sub bulge} relation and the M{sub BH} - M{sub host} relation at z {approx} 1. These results favor co-evolution scenarios in which BH growth and intense SF happen in the same event but the former spans a shorter lifetime than the latter. Finally, we compare our mid-infrared spectroscopic selection with other AGN identification methods and discuss candidate Compton-thick AGNs in the sample. While only half of the mid-infrared spectroscopically selected AGNs are detected in X-ray, {approx}90% of them can be identified with their near-infrared spectral indices.

  16. The Link between Star Formation and Accretion in LINERs: A Comparison with Other Active Galactic Nucleus Subclasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyapal, S.; Dudik, R. P.; O'Halloran, B.; Gliozzi, M.

    2005-11-01

    We present archival high-resolution X-ray imaging observations of 25 nearby LINERs observed by ACIS on board Chandra. This sample builds on our previously published proprietary and archival X-ray observations and includes the complete set of LINERs with published black hole masses and FIR luminosities that have been observed by Chandra. Of the 82 LINERs observed by Chandra, 41 (50%) display hard nuclear cores consistent with an AGN. The nuclear 2-10 keV luminosities of these AGN-LINERs range from ~2×1038 to ~1×1044 ergs s-1. Reinforcing our previous work, we find a significant correlation between the Eddington ratio, Lbol/LEdd, and the FIR luminosity, LFIR, as well as the IR brightness ratio, LFIR/LB, in the host galaxy of AGN-LINERs that extends over 7 orders of magnitude in Lbol/LEdd. Combining our AGN-LINER sample with galaxies from other AGN subclasses, we find that this correlation is reinforced in a sample of 129 AGNs, extending over almost 9 orders of magnitude in Lbol/LEdd. Using archival and previously published observations of the 6.2 μm PAH feature from ISO, we find that it is unlikely that dust heating by the AGN dominates the FIR luminosity in our sample of AGNs. Our results may therefore imply a fundamental link between the mass accretion rate (M˙), as measured by the Eddington ratio, and the star formation rate (SFR), as measured by the FIR luminosity. Apart from the overall correlation, we find that the different AGN subclasses occupy distinct regions in the LFIR and Lbol/LEdd plane. Assuming a constant radiative efficiency for accretion, our results may imply a variation in the SFR/M˙ ratio as a function of AGN activity level, a result that may have significant consequences for our understanding of galaxy formation and black hole growth.

  17. The MIXR sample: AGN activity versus star formation across the cross-correlation of WISE, 3XMM, and FIRST/NVSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingo, B.; Watson, M. G.; Rosen, S. R.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Ruiz, A.; Blain, A.; Carrera, F. J.; Mateos, S.; Pineau, F.-X.; Stewart, G. C.

    2016-11-01

    We cross-correlate the largest available mid-infrared (Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer - WISE), X-ray (3XMM) and radio (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty centimetres+NRAO VLA Sky Survey) catalogues to define the MIXR sample of AGN and star-forming galaxies. We pre-classify the sources based on their positions on the WISE colour/colour plot, showing that the MIXR triple selection is extremely effective to diagnose the star formation and AGN activity of individual populations, even on a flux/magnitude basis, extending the diagnostics to objects with luminosities and redshifts from SDSS DR12. We recover the radio/mid-IR star formation correlation with great accuracy, and use it to classify our sources, based on their activity, as radio-loud and radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGN), low excitation radio galaxies/low ionization nuclear emission line regions, and non-AGN galaxies. These diagnostics can prove extremely useful for large AGN and galaxy samples, and help develop ways to efficiently triage sources when data from the next generation of instruments becomes available. We study bias in detail, and show that while the widely used WISE colour selections for AGN are very successful at cleanly selecting samples of luminous AGN, they miss or misclassify a substantial fraction of AGN at lower luminosities and/or higher redshifts. MIXR also allows us to test the relation between radiative and kinetic (jet) power in radio-loud AGN, for which a tight correlation is expected due to a mutual dependence on accretion. Our results highlight that long-term AGN variability, jet regulation, and other factors affecting the Q/Lbol relation, are introducing a vast amount of scatter in this relation, with dramatic potential consequences on our current understanding of AGN feedback and its effect on star formation.

  18. The ultraviolet and visible light variability of BP Tauri - Possible clues for the origin of T Tauri star activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Theodore; Vrba, Frederick J.; Herbst, William

    1990-01-01

    BP Tau is a moderate-strength T Tauri star, which has previously been studied photometrically by Vrba et al. (1986, 1989) and shown to have a 7.6-day light cycle. Here, BP Tau was reobserved in order to monitor this star with the IUE satellite. In conjunction with the UV spectroscopy, nearly simultaneous ground-based optical photometry was also obtained. At optical wavelengths, the star was initially found to be varying with a period of 7.6 days. This variability suddenly vanished and was followed by a quiescent state that lasted about 11 days. The star then resumed its variability with a period of about 6.1 days. The UV continuum and most of the UV emission lines appeared to vary in phase with the optical flux. No variations were observed on the very short timescales ranging from several hours to half a day, expected on the basis of axisymmetric, quasi-steady-state accretion disk models of T Tauri stars. However, the nearly week-long variations that were observed may be consistent with a magnetically buffered accretion model, which has been proposed by Uchida and Shibata.

  19. Sounds of a Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-06-01

    colours show element displacements in opposite directions. Geologists monitor how seismic waves generated by earthquakes propagate through the Earth, and thus learn about the inner structure of our planet. The same technique works for stars. The Sun, our nearest star and a typical middle-age member of its class, has been investigated in this way since the 1960's. With "solar seismology" , astronomers have been able to learn much about the inner parts of the star, and not only the outer layers normally visible to the telescopes. In the Sun, heat is bubbling up from the central regions where enormous amount of energy is created by nuclear reactions . In the so-called convective zone , the gas is virtually boiling, and hot gas-bubbles are rising with a speed that is close to that of sound. Much like you can hear when water starts to boil, the turbulent convection in the Sun creates noise . These sound waves then propagate through the solar interior and are reflected on the surface, making it oscillate. This "ringing" is well observed in the Sun, where the amplitude and frequency of the oscillations provide astronomers with plenty of information about the physical conditions in the solar interior. From the Sun to the stars There is every reason to believe that our Sun is a quite normal star of its type. Other stars that are similar to the Sun are therefore likely to pulsate in much the same way as the Sun. The search for such oscillations in other solar-like stars has, however, been a long and difficult one. The problem is simply that the pulsations are tiny, so very great precision is needed in the measurements. However, the last few years have seen considerable progress in asteroseismology, and François Bouchy and Fabien Carrier from the Geneva Observatory have now been able to detect unambiguous acoustic oscillations in the Solar-twin star, Alpha Centauri A. The bright and nearby star Alpha Centauri Alpha Centauri (Alpha Cen) [1] is the brightest star in the constellation

  20. A GALAXY BLAZES WITH STAR FORMATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Most galaxies form new stars at a fairly slow rate, but members of a rare class known as 'starburst' galaxies blaze with extremely active star formation. Scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope are perfecting a technique to determine the history of starburst activity in galaxies by using the colors of star clusters. Measuring the clusters' colors yields information about stellar temperatures. Since young stars are blue, and older stars redder, the colors can be related to the ages, somewhat similar to counting the rings in a fallen tree trunk in order to determine the tree's age. The galaxy NGC 3310 is forming clusters of new stars at a prodigious rate. Astronomer Gerhardt Meurer of The Johns Hopkins University leads a team of collaborators who are studying several starburst galaxies, including NGC 3310, which is showcased in this month's Hubble Heritage image. There are several hundred star clusters in NGC 3310, visible in the Heritage image as the bright blue diffuse objects that trace the galaxy's spiral arms. Each of these star clusters represents the formation of up to about a million stars, a process that takes less than 100,000 years. In addition, hundreds of individual young, luminous stars can be seen throughout the galaxy. Once formed, the star clusters become redder with age as the most massive and bluest stars exhaust their fuel and burn out. Measurements in this image of the wide range of cluster colors show that they have ages ranging from about one million up to more than one hundred million years. This suggests that the starburst 'turned on' over 100 million years ago. It may have been triggered when a companion galaxy collided with NGC 3310. These observations may change astronomers' view of starbursts. Starbursts were once thought to be brief episodes, resulting from catastrophic events like a galactic collision. However, the wide range of cluster ages in NGC 3310 suggests that the starbursting can continue for an extended interval, once

  1. MOST Space-based Photometry of the Transiting Exoplanet System HD 189733: Precise Timing Measurements for Transits across an Active Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller-Ricci, Eliza; Rowe, Jason F.; Sasselov, Dimitar; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Kuschnig, Rainer; Croll, Bryce; Guenther, David B.; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Rucinski, Slavek M.; Walker, Gordon A. H.; Weiss, Werner W.

    2008-07-01

    We have measured transit times for HD 189733b passing in front of its bright (V = 7.67), chromospherically active, and spotted parent star. Nearly continuous broadband optical photometry of this system was obtained with the Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars (MOST) space telescope during 21 days in 2006 August, monitoring 10 consecutive transits. We have used these data to search for deviations from a constant orbital period which can indicate the presence of additional planets in the system that are as yet undetected by Doppler searches. There are no transit timing variations above the level of ±45 s, ruling out super-Earths (of masses 1-4 M⊕) in the 1:2 and 2:3 inner resonances, and planets of 20 M⊕ in the 2:1 outer resonance of the known planet. We also discuss complications in measuring transit times for a planet that transits an active star with large starspots, and how the transits can help constrain and test spot models. This has implications for the large number of such systems expected to be discovered by the COROT and Kepler missions. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission, jointly operated by Dynacon Inc., the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies, and the University of British Columbia, with the assistance of the University of Vienna.

  2. Stellar Activity at the End of the Main Sequence: GHRS Observations of the M8 Ve Star VB 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Wood, Brian E.; Brown, Alexander; Giampapa, Mark S.; Ambruster, Carol

    1995-01-01

    We present Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph observations of the M8 Ve star VB 10 (equal to G1 752B), located very near the end of the stellar main sequence, and its dM3.5 binary companion G1 752A. These coeval stars provide a test bed for studying whether the outer atmospheres of stars respond to changes in internal structure as stars become fully convective near mass 0.3 solar mass (about spectral type M5), where the nature of the stellar magnetic dynamo presumably changes, and near the transition from red to brown dwarfs near mass 0.08 solar mass (about spectral type M9), when hydrogen burning ceases at the end of the main sequence. We obtain upper limits for the quiescent emission of VB 10 but observe a transition region spectrum during a large flare, which indicates that some type of magnetic dynamo must be present. Two indirect lines of evidence-scaling from the observed X-ray emission and scaling from a time-resolved flare on AD Leo suggest that the fraction of the stellar bolometric luminosity that heats the transition region of VB 10 outside of obvious flares is comparable to, or larger than, that for G1 752A. This suggests an increase in the magnetic heating rates, as measured by L(sub line)/L(sub bol) ratios, across the radiative/convective core boundary and as stars approach the red/brown dwarf boundary. These results provide new constraints for dynamo models and models of coronal and transition-region heating in late-type stars.

  3. Determination of Age, Rotation, and Magnetic Activity Relations for dG, dK, and dM Stars: A Search for Candidates that may be Suitable for Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drescher, J. W.; Guinan, E. F.; DeWarf, L. E.; McCook, G. P.; Hamilton, R. T.; Ribas, I.

    2003-05-01

    As part of the ``Sun in Time'' Program, we have been carrying out multi-wavelength (X-ray to near-IR) observations of solar-type (G0 V-G5 V) stars with different ages. These stars serve as proxies for the Sun (and other solar type stars) and cover ages that include most of the Sun's main sequence life time. This program addresses a variety of topics that include: the study of short and long term magnetic dynamo evolution; the physics and energy transfer mechanisms of the chromosphere, transition region, and corona; and the evolution of the XUV spectral irradiance of the Sun and of the high energy radiation effects on paleo-planetary environments and atmospheres. As part of this program, excellent correlations were found among age, rotation period, and magnetically generated coronal X-ray and EUV emissions, transition region and chromospheric FUV-NUV emissions. For example, for this narrow spectral range of solar type stars, the coronal X-ray emission of young main sequence early G stars are ˜100-1000 times stronger than stars near the Sun's age of 4.6 Gyr. We have expanded this program to include samples of nearby dG, dK, and dM stars. The stars selected for study have well determined parallaxes, colors, spectral types and also have observations of age-sensitive measures (= rotation) such as LX, O VI, Ca II HK, Mg II hk emission fluxes. As was done in the ``Sun in Time'' program, most younger stars selected are members of clusters or moving groups. The ages of the some of the older, less active stars are estimated using isochronal fits. The ages of some of the dM stars were estimated from kinematic considerations or associations with nearby hotter stars of known age. We discuss the initial results of this program and show relations between magnetic activity indicators (such LX or Ca II) and age (rotation). We find relations for the late dG and dK stars as long as the physical properties of these stars (colors, Teff, and spectral types) are kept very narrow. We

  4. A multiwavelength photometric census of AGN and star formation activity in the brightest cluster galaxies of X-ray selected clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, T. S.; Edge, A. C.; Stott, J. P.; Ebeling, H.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Metcalfe, N.; Kaiser, N.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2016-09-01

    Despite their reputation as being `red and dead', the unique environment inhabited by brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) can often lead to a self-regulated feedback cycle between radiatively cooling intracluster gas and star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in the BCG. However the prevalence of `active' BCGs, and details of the feedback involved, are still uncertain. We have performed an optical, UV and mid-IR photometric analysis of the BCGs in 981 clusters at 0.03 < z < 0.5, selected from the ROSAT All Sky Survey. Using Pan-STARRS PS1 3π, GALEX and WISE survey data we look for BCGs with photometric colours which deviate from that of the bulk population of passive BCGs - indicative of AGN and/or star formation activity within the BCG. We find that whilst the majority of BCGs are consistent with being passive, at least 14 per cent of our BCGs show a significant colour offset from passivity in at least one colour index. And, where available, supplementary spectroscopy reveals the majority of these particular BCGs show strong optical emission lines. On comparing BCG `activity' with the X-ray luminosity of the host cluster, we find that BCGs showing a colour offset are preferentially found in the more X-ray luminous clusters, indicative of the connection between BCG `activity' and the intracluster medium.

  5. Active galactic nuclei. IV - Supplying black hole clusters by tidal disruption and by tidal capture of stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeger, W. R.; Pacholczyk, A. G.; Stepinski, T. F.

    1992-01-01

    The extent to which individual holes in a cluster of black holes with a mass spectrum can liberate and accrete the resulting material by tidally disrupting stars they encounter, or by capturing stars as binary companions is studied. It is found that the smaller black holes in 'the halo' of such clusters can adequately supply themselves to the level M-dot sub h or greater than 0.0001(M-dot sub h) sub crit, and up to 0.05(M-dot sub h)sub crit for the smallest holes, by tidal disruption, as long as the cluster is embedded in a distribution of stars of relatively high density (not less than 0.1M sub cl/cu pc), and as long as the entire cluster of stars is not too compact (not less than 0.5 pc). Consideration is given to modifications this 'internal' mode of supply introduces in the spectrum emitted by such black hole clusters, and to the current status of their viability as models for AGN and QSOs in light of dynamical studies by Quinlan and Shapiro (1987, 1989).

  6. A Brightness-Referenced Star Identification Algorithm for APS Star Trackers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Qile; Liu, Jingnan; Liu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Star trackers are currently the most accurate spacecraft attitude sensors. As a result, they are widely used in remote sensing satellites. Since traditional charge-coupled device (CCD)-based star trackers have a limited sensitivity range and dynamic range, the matching process for a star tracker is typically not very sensitive to star brightness. For active pixel sensor (APS) star trackers, the intensity of an imaged star is valuable information that can be used in star identification process. In this paper an improved brightness referenced star identification algorithm is presented. This algorithm utilizes the k-vector search theory and adds imaged stars' intensities to narrow the search scope and therefore increase the efficiency of the matching process. Based on different imaging conditions (slew, bright bodies, etc.) the developed matching algorithm operates in one of two identification modes: a three-star mode, and a four-star mode. If the reference bright stars (the stars brighter than three magnitude) show up, the algorithm runs the three-star mode and efficiency is further improved. The proposed method was compared with other two distinctive methods the pyramid and geometric voting methods. All three methods were tested with simulation data and actual in orbit data from the APS star tracker of ZY-3. Using a catalog composed of 1500 stars, the results show that without false stars the efficiency of this new method is 4∼5 times that of the pyramid method and 35∼37 times that of the geometric method. PMID:25299950

  7. A brightness-referenced star identification algorithm for APS star trackers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Qile; Liu, Jingnan; Liu, Ning

    2014-10-08

    Star trackers are currently the most accurate spacecraft attitude sensors. As a result, they are widely used in remote sensing satellites. Since traditional charge-coupled device (CCD)-based star trackers have a limited sensitivity range and dynamic range, the matching process for a star tracker is typically not very sensitive to star brightness. For active pixel sensor (APS) star trackers, the intensity of an imaged star is valuable information that can be used in star identification process. In this paper an improved brightness referenced star identification algorithm is presented. This algorithm utilizes the k-vector search theory and adds imaged stars' intensities to narrow the search scope and therefore increase the efficiency of the matching process. Based on different imaging conditions (slew, bright bodies, etc.) the developed matching algorithm operates in one of two identification modes: a three-star mode, and a four-star mode. If the reference bright stars (the stars brighter than three magnitude) show up, the algorithm runs the three-star mode and efficiency is further improved. The proposed method was compared with other two distinctive methods the pyramid and geometric voting methods. All three methods were tested with simulation data and actual in orbit data from the APS star tracker of ZY-3. Using a catalog composed of 1500 stars, the results show that without false stars the efficiency of this new method is 4~5 times that of the pyramid method and 35~37 times that of the geometric method.

  8. America's Star Libraries: Top-Rated Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lance, Keith Curry; Lyons, Ray

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service 2009, Round 2, identifies 258 "star" libraries. Created by Keith Curry Lance and Ray Lyons and based on 2007 data from the IMLS, it rates 7,268 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three stars. All included libraries,…

  9. INVESTIGATION OF DUAL ACTIVE NUCLEI, OUTFLOWS, SHOCK-HEATED GAS, AND YOUNG STAR CLUSTERS IN MARKARIAN 266

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzarella, J. M.; Chan, B. H. P.; Iwasawa, K. E-mail: bchan@ipac.caltech.edu; and others

    2012-11-01

    Results of observations with the Spitzer, Hubble, GALEX, Chandra, and XMM-Newton space telescopes are presented for the luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) merger Markarian 266. The SW (Seyfert 2) and NE (LINER) nuclei reside in galaxies with Hubble types SBb (pec) and S0/a (pec), respectively. Both companions are more luminous than L* galaxies and they are inferred to each contain a Almost-Equal-To 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} black hole. Although the nuclei have an observed hard X-ray flux ratio of f{sub X} (NE)/f{sub X} (SW) = 6.4, Mrk 266 SW is likely the primary source of a bright Fe K{alpha} line detected from the system, consistent with the reflection-dominated X-ray spectrum of a heavily obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN). Optical knots embedded in an arc with aligned radio continuum radiation, combined with luminous H{sub 2} line emission, provide evidence for a radiative bow shock in an AGN-driven outflow surrounding the NE nucleus. A soft X-ray emission feature modeled as shock-heated plasma with T {approx} 10{sup 7} K is cospatial with radio continuum emission between the galaxies. Mid-infrared diagnostics provide mixed results, but overall suggest a composite system with roughly equal contributions of AGN and starburst radiation powering the bolometric luminosity. Approximately 120 star clusters have been detected, with most having estimated ages less than 50 Myr. Detection of 24 {mu}m emission aligned with soft X-rays, radio continuum, and ionized gas emission extending {approx}34'' (20 kpc) north of the galaxies is interpreted as {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} of dust entrained in an outflowing superwind. At optical wavelengths this Northern Loop region is resolved into a fragmented morphology indicative of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in an expanding shell of ionized gas. Mrk 266 demonstrates that the dust 'blow-out' phase can begin in a LIRG well before the galaxies fully coalesce during a subsequent

  10. Can Children Really Create Knowledge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bereiter, Carl; Scardamalia, Marlene

    2010-01-01

    Can children genuinely create new knowledge, as opposed to merely carrying out activities that resemble those of mature scientists and innovators? The answer is yes, provided the comparison is not to works of genius but to standards that prevail in ordinary research communities. One important product of knowledge creation is concepts and tools…

  11. SIMULTANEOUS MONITORING OF THE PHOTOMETRIC AND POLARIMETRIC ACTIVITY OF THE YOUNG STAR PV Cep IN THE OPTICAL/NEAR-INFRARED BANDS

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzetti, D.; Giannini, T.; Antoniucci, S.; Di Paola, A.; Li Causi, G.; Nisini, B.; Larionov, V. M.; Konstantinova, T. S.; Kopatskaya, E. N.; Arkharov, A. A. E-mail: giannini@oa-roma.inaf.it E-mail: dipaola@oa-roma.inaf.it E-mail: nisini@oa-roma.inaf.it E-mail: azt8@mail.ru E-mail: arkadi@arharov.ru

    2011-05-10

    We present the results of a simultaneous monitoring, lasting more than two years, of the optical and near-infrared photometric and polarimetric activity of the variable protostar PV Cep. During the monitoring period, an outburst with declining phase ({Delta}J {approx} 3 mag) lasting about 120 days occurred in all the photometric bands. A time lag of {approx}30 days between optical and infrared light curves has been measured and interpreted in the framework of an accretion event. This latter is directly recognizable in the significant variations of the near-infrared colors, which appear bluer in the outburst phase, when the star dominates the emission, and redder in the declining phase, when the disk emission prevails. All the observational data have been combined to derive a coherent picture of the complex morphology of the whole PV Cep system that is composed of, in addition to the star and the accretion disk, a variable bi-conical nebula. The mutual interaction between all these components is the cause of the high value of the polarization ({approx} 20%) and of its fluctuations. The observational data concur to indicate that PV Cep is not a genuine EXor star, but rather a more complex object; moreover, the case of PV Cep leads to arguments about the classification of other recently discovered young sources in outburst that have been considered, perhaps oversimplifying, as EXor.

  12. STARS no star on Kauai

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.

    1993-04-01

    The island of Kuai, home to the Pacific Missile Range Facility, is preparing for the first of a series of Star Wars rocket launches expected to begin early this year. The Strategic Defense Initiative plans 40 launches of the Stategic Target System (STARS) over a 10-year period. The focus of the tests appears to be weapons and sensors designed to combat multiple-warhead ICBMs, which will be banned under the START II Treaty that was signed in January. The focus of this article is to express the dubious value of testing the STARS at a time when their application will not be an anticipated problem.

  13. Creating Heliophysics Concept Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, N. A.; Peticolas, L. M.; Paglierani, R.; Mendez, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Center for Science Education at University of California Berkeley's Space Sciences Laboratory is creating concept maps for Heliophysics and would like to get input from scientists. The purpose of this effort is to identify key concepts related to Heliophysics and map their progression to show how students' understanding of Heliophysics might develop from Kindergarten through higher education. These maps are meant to tie into the AAAS Project 2061 Benchmarks for Scientific Literacy and National Science Education Standards. It is hoped that the results of this effort will be useful for curriculum designers developing Heliophysics-related curriculum materials and classroom teachers using Heliophysics materials. The need for concept maps was identified as a result of product analysis undertaken by the NASA Heliophysics Forum Team. The NASA Science Education and Public Outreach Forums have as two of their goals to improve the characterization of the contents of the Science Mission Directorate and Public Outreach (SMD E/PO) portfolio (Objective 2.1) and assist SMD in addressing gaps in the portfolio of SMD E/PO products and project activities (Objective 2.2). An important part of this effort is receiving feedback from solar scientists regarding the inclusion of key concepts and their progression in the maps. This session will introduce the draft concept maps and elicit feedback from scientists.