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Sample records for actively infected cells

  1. MAIT cells are activated during human viral infections.

    PubMed

    van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Scherwitzl, Iris; Hutchinson, Edward C; Leng, Tianqi; Kurioka, Ayako; Kulicke, Corinna; de Lara, Catherine; Cole, Suzanne; Vasanawathana, Sirijitt; Limpitikul, Wannee; Malasit, Prida; Young, Duncan; Denney, Laura; Moore, Michael D; Fabris, Paolo; Giordani, Maria Teresa; Oo, Ye Htun; Laidlaw, Stephen M; Dustin, Lynn B; Ho, Ling-Pei; Thompson, Fiona M; Ramamurthy, Narayan; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Willberg, Christian B; Screaton, Gavin R; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are abundant in humans and recognize bacterial ligands. Here, we demonstrate that MAIT cells are also activated during human viral infections in vivo. MAIT cells activation was observed during infection with dengue virus, hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. This activation-driving cytokine release and Granzyme B upregulation-is TCR-independent but dependent on IL-18 in synergy with IL-12, IL-15 and/or interferon-α/β. IL-18 levels and MAIT cell activation correlate with disease severity in acute dengue infection. Furthermore, HCV treatment with interferon-α leads to specific MAIT cell activation in vivo in parallel with an enhanced therapeutic response. Moreover, TCR-independent activation of MAIT cells leads to a reduction of HCV replication in vitro mediated by IFN-γ. Together these data demonstrate MAIT cells are activated following viral infections, and suggest a potential role in both host defence and immunopathology. PMID:27337592

  2. MAIT cells are activated during human viral infections

    PubMed Central

    van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Scherwitzl, Iris; Hutchinson, Edward C.; Leng, Tianqi; Kurioka, Ayako; Kulicke, Corinna; de Lara, Catherine; Cole, Suzanne; Vasanawathana, Sirijitt; Limpitikul, Wannee; Malasit, Prida; Young, Duncan; Denney, Laura; Barnes, Eleanor; Ball, Jonathan; Burgess, Gary; Cooke, Graham; Dillon, John; Gore, Charles; Foster, Graham; Guha, Neil; Halford, Rachel; Herath, Cham; Holmes, Chris; Howe, Anita; Hudson, Emma; Irving, William; Khakoo, Salim; Koletzki, Diana; Martin, Natasha; Mbisa, Tamyo; McKeating, Jane; McLauchlan, John; Miners, Alec; Murray, Andrea; Shaw, Peter; Simmonds, Peter; Spencer, Chris; Targett-Adams, Paul; Thomson, Emma; Vickerman, Peter; Zitzmann, Nicole; Moore, Michael D.; Fabris, Paolo; Giordani, Maria Teresa; Oo, Ye Htun; Laidlaw, Stephen M.; Dustin, Lynn B.; Ho, Ling-Pei; Thompson, Fiona M.; Ramamurthy, Narayan; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Willberg, Christian B.; Screaton, Gavin R.; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are abundant in humans and recognize bacterial ligands. Here, we demonstrate that MAIT cells are also activated during human viral infections in vivo. MAIT cells activation was observed during infection with dengue virus, hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. This activation—driving cytokine release and Granzyme B upregulation—is TCR-independent but dependent on IL-18 in synergy with IL-12, IL-15 and/or interferon-α/β. IL-18 levels and MAIT cell activation correlate with disease severity in acute dengue infection. Furthermore, HCV treatment with interferon-α leads to specific MAIT cell activation in vivo in parallel with an enhanced therapeutic response. Moreover, TCR-independent activation of MAIT cells leads to a reduction of HCV replication in vitro mediated by IFN-γ. Together these data demonstrate MAIT cells are activated following viral infections, and suggest a potential role in both host defence and immunopathology. PMID:27337592

  3. Microfold Cells Actively Translocate Mycobacterium tuberculosis to Initiate Infection.

    PubMed

    Nair, Vidhya R; Franco, Luis H; Zacharia, Vineetha M; Khan, Haaris S; Stamm, Chelsea E; You, Wu; Marciano, Denise K; Yagita, Hideo; Levine, Beth; Shiloh, Michael U

    2016-08-01

    The prevailing paradigm is that tuberculosis infection is initiated when patrolling alveolar macrophages and dendritic cells within the terminal alveolus ingest inhaled Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). However, definitive data for this model are lacking. Among the epithelial cells of the upper airway, a specialized epithelial cell known as a microfold cell (M cell) overlies various components of mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue. Here, using multiple mouse models, we show that Mtb invades via M cells to initiate infection. Intranasal Mtb infection in mice lacking M cells either genetically or by antibody depletion resulted in reduced invasion and dissemination to draining lymph nodes. M cell-depleted mice infected via aerosol also had delayed dissemination to lymph nodes and reduced mortality. Translocation of Mtb across two M cell transwell models was rapid and transcellular. Thus, M cell translocation is a vital entry mechanism that contributes to the pathogenesis of Mtb. PMID:27452467

  4. Antiviral activity of CYC202 in HIV-1-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Agbottah, Emmanuel; de La Fuente, Cynthia; Nekhai, Sergie; Barnett, Anna; Gianella-Borradori, Athos; Pumfery, Anne; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2005-01-28

    There are currently 40 million individuals in the world infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has led to a significant reduction in AIDS-related morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, up to 25% of patients discontinue their initial HAART regimen. Current HIV-1 inhibitors target the fusion of the virus to the cell and two viral proteins, reverse transcriptase and protease. Here, we examined whether other targets, such as an activated transcription factor, could be targeted to block HIV-1 replication. We specifically asked whether we could target a cellular kinase needed for HIV-1 transcription using CYC202 (R-roscovitine), a pharmacological cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. We targeted the cdk2-cyclin E complex in HIV-1-infected cells because both cdk2 and cyclin E are nonessential during mammalian development and are likely replaced by other kinases. We found that CYC202 effectively inhibits wild type and resistant HIV-1 mutants in T-cells, monocytes, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a low IC(50) and sensitizes these cells to enhanced apoptosis resulting in a dramatic drop in viral titers. Interestingly, the effect of CYC202 is independent of cell cycle stage and more specific for the cdk2-cyclin E complex. Finally, we show that cdk2-cyclin E is loaded onto the HIV-1 genome in vivo and that CYC202 is able to inhibit the uploading of this cdk-cyclin complex onto HIV-1 DNA. Therefore, targeting cellular enzymes necessary for HIV-1 transcription, which are not needed for cell survival, is a compelling strategy to inhibit wild type and mutant HIV-1 strains. PMID:15531588

  5. Flt3 permits survival during infection by rendering dendritic cells competent to activate NK cells.

    PubMed

    Eidenschenk, Céline; Crozat, Karine; Krebs, Philippe; Arens, Ramon; Popkin, Daniel; Arnold, Carrie N; Blasius, Amanda L; Benedict, Chris A; Moresco, Eva Marie Y; Xia, Yu; Beutler, Bruce

    2010-05-25

    A previously unappreciated signal necessary for dendritic cell (DC)-mediated activation of natural killer (NK) cells during viral infection was revealed by a recessive N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutation called warmflash (wmfl). Wmfl homozygotes displayed increased susceptibility to mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. In response to MCMV infection in vivo, delayed NK cell activation was observed, but no intrinsic defects in NK cell activation or function were identified. Rather, coculture experiments demonstrated that NK cells are suboptimally activated by wmfl DCs, which showed impaired cytokine production in response to MCMV or synthetic TLR7 and TLR9 ligands. The wmfl mutation was identified in the gene encoding the Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3). Flt3 ligand (Flt3L) is transiently induced in the serum upon infection or TLR activation. However, antibody blockade reveals no acute requirement for Flt3L, suggesting that the Flt3L --> Flt3 axis programs the development of DCs, making them competent to support NK effector function. In the absence of Flt3 signaling, NK cell activation is delayed and survival during MCMV infection is markedly compromised. PMID:20457904

  6. Flt3 permits survival during infection by rendering dendritic cells competent to activate NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Eidenschenk, Céline; Crozat, Karine; Krebs, Philippe; Arens, Ramon; Popkin, Daniel; Arnold, Carrie N.; Blasius, Amanda L.; Benedict, Chris A.; Moresco, Eva Marie Y.; Xia, Yu; Beutler, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    A previously unappreciated signal necessary for dendritic cell (DC)-mediated activation of natural killer (NK) cells during viral infection was revealed by a recessive N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutation called warmflash (wmfl). Wmfl homozygotes displayed increased susceptibility to mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. In response to MCMV infection in vivo, delayed NK cell activation was observed, but no intrinsic defects in NK cell activation or function were identified. Rather, coculture experiments demonstrated that NK cells are suboptimally activated by wmfl DCs, which showed impaired cytokine production in response to MCMV or synthetic TLR7 and TLR9 ligands. The wmfl mutation was identified in the gene encoding the Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3). Flt3 ligand (Flt3L) is transiently induced in the serum upon infection or TLR activation. However, antibody blockade reveals no acute requirement for Flt3L, suggesting that the Flt3L → Flt3 axis programs the development of DCs, making them competent to support NK effector function. In the absence of Flt3 signaling, NK cell activation is delayed and survival during MCMV infection is markedly compromised. PMID:20457904

  7. Dengue Virus Infection of Mast Cells Triggers Endothelial Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Michael G.; Hermann, Laura L.; Issekutz, Andrew C.; Marshall, Jean S.; Rowter, Derek; Al-Afif, Ayham; Anderson, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Vascular perturbation is a hallmark of severe forms of dengue disease. We show here that antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection of primary human cord blood-derived mast cells (CBMCs) and the human mast cell-like line HMC-1 results in the release of factor(s) which activate human endothelial cells, as evidenced by increased expression of the adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Endothelial cell activation was prevented by pretreatment of mast cell-derived supernatants with a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-specific blocking antibody, thus identifying TNF as the endothelial cell-activating factor. Our findings suggest that mast cells may represent an important source of TNF, promoting vascular endothelial perturbation following antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection. PMID:21068256

  8. Killing of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-infected fibroblasts during latent infection by activated natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Nick C; Goodier, Martin R; Robey, Rebecca C; Bower, Mark; Gotch, Frances M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) establishes life-long infection by evading clearance by the host immune system. In de novo infection and lytic replication, KSHV escapes cytotoxic T cells and NK cells through downregulation of MHC class-I and ICAM-1 molecules and associated antigens involved in forming and sustaining the immunological synapse. However, the efficacy of such mechanisms in the context of the predominantly latent KSHV infection reported in Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) lesions is unclear. Using primary dermal fibroblasts in a novel in vitro model of chronic latent KSHV infection, we generated target cells with viral loads similar to those in spindle cells extracted from KS lesions. We show that latently KSHV-infected fibroblasts had normal levels of MHC-class I, ICAM-1, HLA-E and NKG2D ligand expression, were resistant to NK-cell natural cytotoxicity and were highly susceptible to killing by cytokine-activated immunocompetent NK cells. KSHV-infected fibroblasts expressed normal levels of IFN-γR1 and responded to exogenous IFN-γ by upregulating MHC class I, ICAM-1 and HLA-E and resisting activated NK-cell killing. These data demonstrate that physiologically relevant levels of latent KSHV infection in primary cells cause limited activation of resting NK cells and confer little specific resistance to control by activated NK cells. PMID:21509779

  9. Bacterial Manipulation of NK Cell Regulatory Activity Increases Susceptibility to Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Brandon S.; Schmidt, Rebecca L.; Jamieson, Amanda; Merkel, Patricia; Knight, Vijaya; Cole, Caroline M.; Raulet, David H.; Lenz, Laurel L.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells produce interferon (IFN)-γ and thus have been suggested to promote type I immunity during bacterial infections. Yet, Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) and some other pathogens encode proteins that cause increased NK cell activation. Here, we show that stimulation of NK cell activation increases susceptibility during Lm infection despite and independent from robust NK cell production of IFNγ. The increased susceptibility correlated with IL-10 production by responding NK cells. NK cells produced IL-10 as their IFNγ production waned and the Lm virulence protein p60 promoted induction of IL-10 production by mouse and human NK cells. NK cells consequently exerted regulatory effects to suppress accumulation and activation of inflammatory myeloid cells. Our results reveal new dimensions of the role played by NK cells during Lm infection and demonstrate the ability of this bacterial pathogen to exploit the induction of regulatory NK cell activity to increase host susceptibility. PMID:27295349

  10. Bacterial Manipulation of NK Cell Regulatory Activity Increases Susceptibility to Listeria monocytogenes Infection.

    PubMed

    Clark, Sarah E; Filak, Holly C; Guthrie, Brandon S; Schmidt, Rebecca L; Jamieson, Amanda; Merkel, Patricia; Knight, Vijaya; Cole, Caroline M; Raulet, David H; Lenz, Laurel L

    2016-06-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells produce interferon (IFN)-γ and thus have been suggested to promote type I immunity during bacterial infections. Yet, Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) and some other pathogens encode proteins that cause increased NK cell activation. Here, we show that stimulation of NK cell activation increases susceptibility during Lm infection despite and independent from robust NK cell production of IFNγ. The increased susceptibility correlated with IL-10 production by responding NK cells. NK cells produced IL-10 as their IFNγ production waned and the Lm virulence protein p60 promoted induction of IL-10 production by mouse and human NK cells. NK cells consequently exerted regulatory effects to suppress accumulation and activation of inflammatory myeloid cells. Our results reveal new dimensions of the role played by NK cells during Lm infection and demonstrate the ability of this bacterial pathogen to exploit the induction of regulatory NK cell activity to increase host susceptibility. PMID:27295349

  11. Remote Activation of Host Cell DNA Synthesis in Uninfected Cells Signaled by Infected Cells in Advance of Virus Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Nora; Hennig, Thomas; Serwa, Remigiusz A.; Marchetti, Magda

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses modulate cellular processes and metabolism in diverse ways, but these are almost universally studied in the infected cell itself. Here, we study spatial organization of DNA synthesis during multiround transmission of herpes simplex virus (HSV) using pulse-labeling with ethynyl nucleotides and cycloaddition of azide fluorophores. We report a hitherto unknown and unexpected outcome of virus-host interaction. Consistent with the current understanding of the single-step growth cycle, HSV suppresses host DNA synthesis and promotes viral DNA synthesis in spatially segregated compartments within the cell. In striking contrast, during progressive rounds of infection initiated at a single cell, we observe that infection induces a clear and pronounced stimulation of cellular DNA replication in remote uninfected cells. This induced DNA synthesis was observed in hundreds of uninfected cells at the extended border, outside the perimeter of the progressing infection. Moreover, using pulse-chase analysis, we show that this activation is maintained, resulting in a propagating wave of host DNA synthesis continually in advance of infection. As the virus reaches and infects these activated cells, host DNA synthesis is then shut off and replaced with virus DNA synthesis. Using nonpropagating viruses or conditioned medium, we demonstrate a paracrine effector of uninfected cell DNA synthesis in remote cells continually in advance of infection. These findings have significant implications, likely with broad applicability, for our understanding of the ways in which virus infection manipulates cell processes not only in the infected cell itself but also now in remote uninfected cells, as well as of mechanisms governing host DNA synthesis. IMPORTANCE We show that during infection initiated by a single particle with progressive cell-cell virus transmission (i.e., the normal situation), HSV induces host DNA synthesis in uninfected cells, mediated by a virus-induced paracrine

  12. Effects of immunomodulators on functional activity of innate immunity cells infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Plekhova, N G; Kondrashova, N M; Somova, L M; Drobot, E I; Lyapun, I N

    2015-02-01

    Low activity of bactericidal enzymes was found in innate immunity cells infected with S. pneumonia. The death of these cells was fastened under these conditions. On the contrary, treatment with antibiotic maxifloxacin was followed by an increase in activity of bactericidal enzymes in phagocytes and induced their death via necrosis. Analysis of the therapeutic properties of immunomodulators tinrostim and licopid in combination with maxifloxacin showed that these combinations correct functional activity of cells infected with S. pneumonia. PMID:25708326

  13. Transcriptional activation of bovine leukemia virus in blood cells from experimentally infected, asymptomatic sheep with latent infections.

    PubMed Central

    Lagarias, D M; Radke, K

    1989-01-01

    Infection by bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is characterized by a long latency period, after which some individuals develop B-cell tumors. The behavior of BLV and related retroviruses during the latency period between initial infection and subsequent tumorigenesis is poorly understood. We used in situ hybridization to detect BLV transcripts in individual peripheral blood mononuclear cells from experimentally infected, asymptomatic sheep with latent infections. Viral RNA was not found in most peripheral blood cells that had been isolated as rapidly as possible from circulating blood, but it was present in rare cells. BLV RNA transcripts increased in a biphasic manner within a few hours after the blood cells were placed in culture. Exposure to fetal bovine serum was identified as the principal cause of this transcriptional activation, which occurred in fewer than 1 in 1,000 cells. Agents known to activate immune cells polyclonally caused a further increase in the number of cells containing BLV RNA within 8 h. In some cases, the numbers of viral transcripts within individual cells also increased. Thus, BLV is not detectably expressed in most resting lymphocytes circulating in the blood, but its transcription is activated by components of fetal bovine serum and can be augmented by molecules that mimic activation of immune cells. This activation, which might occur in lymphoid tissue during an immune response, may lead to the synthesis of viral regulatory proteins that are thought to initiate tumorigenesis through host cell genes. Images PMID:2539506

  14. B Cell Infection and Activation by Rabies Virus-Based Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, Andrew G.; Norton, James E.; Dorfmeier, Corin L.; Shen, Shixue

    2013-01-01

    Replication-deficient rabies viruses (RABV) are promising rabies postexposure vaccines due to their prompt and potent stimulation of protective virus neutralizing antibody titers, which are produced in mice by both T-dependent and T-independent mechanisms. To promote such early and robust B cell stimulation, we hypothesized that live RABV-based vaccines directly infect B cells, thereby activating a large pool of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) capable of providing early priming and costimulation to CD4+ T cells. In this report, we show that live RABV-based vaccine vectors efficiently infect naive primary murine and human B cells ex vivo. Infection of B cells resulted in the significant upregulation of early markers of B cell activation and antigen presentation, including CD69, major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II), and CD40 in murine B cells or HLA-DR and CD40 in human B cells compared to mock-infected cells or cells treated with an inactivated RABV-based vaccine. Furthermore, primary B cells infected with a live RABV expressing ovalbumin were able to prime and stimulate naive CD4+ OT-II T cells to proliferate and to secrete interleukin-2 (IL-2), demonstrating a functional consequence of B cell infection and activation by live RABV-based vaccine vectors. We propose that this direct B cell stimulation by live RABV-based vaccines is a potential mechanism underlying their induction of early protective T cell-dependent B cell responses, and that designing live RABV-based vaccines to infect and activate B cells represents a promising strategy to develop a single-dose postexposure rabies vaccine where the generation of early protective antibody titers is critical. PMID:23760241

  15. B cell infection and activation by rabies virus-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Lytle, Andrew G; Norton, James E; Dorfmeier, Corin L; Shen, Shixue; McGettigan, James P

    2013-08-01

    Replication-deficient rabies viruses (RABV) are promising rabies postexposure vaccines due to their prompt and potent stimulation of protective virus neutralizing antibody titers, which are produced in mice by both T-dependent and T-independent mechanisms. To promote such early and robust B cell stimulation, we hypothesized that live RABV-based vaccines directly infect B cells, thereby activating a large pool of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) capable of providing early priming and costimulation to CD4(+) T cells. In this report, we show that live RABV-based vaccine vectors efficiently infect naive primary murine and human B cells ex vivo. Infection of B cells resulted in the significant upregulation of early markers of B cell activation and antigen presentation, including CD69, major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II), and CD40 in murine B cells or HLA-DR and CD40 in human B cells compared to mock-infected cells or cells treated with an inactivated RABV-based vaccine. Furthermore, primary B cells infected with a live RABV expressing ovalbumin were able to prime and stimulate naive CD4(+) OT-II T cells to proliferate and to secrete interleukin-2 (IL-2), demonstrating a functional consequence of B cell infection and activation by live RABV-based vaccine vectors. We propose that this direct B cell stimulation by live RABV-based vaccines is a potential mechanism underlying their induction of early protective T cell-dependent B cell responses, and that designing live RABV-based vaccines to infect and activate B cells represents a promising strategy to develop a single-dose postexposure rabies vaccine where the generation of early protective antibody titers is critical. PMID:23760241

  16. Distinct activation of primary human BDCA1(+) dendritic cells upon interaction with stressed or infected β cells.

    PubMed

    Schulte, B M; Kers-Rebel, E D; Bottino, R; Piganelli, J D; Galama, J M D; Engelse, M A; de Koning, E J P; Adema, G J

    2016-06-01

    Derailment of immune responses can lead to autoimmune type 1 diabetes, and this can be accelerated or even induced by local stress caused by inflammation or infection. Dendritic cells (DCs) shape both innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we report on the responses of naturally occurring human myeloid BDCA1(+) DCs towards differentially stressed pancreatic β cells. Our data show that BDCA1(+) DCs in human pancreas-draining lymph node (pdLN) suspensions and blood-derived BDCA1(+) DCs both effectively engulf β cells, thus mimicking physiological conditions. Upon uptake of enterovirus-infected, but not mock-infected cells, BDCA1(+) DCs induced interferon (IFN)-α/β responses, co-stimulatory molecules and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Notably, induction of stress in β cells by ultraviolet irradiation, culture in serum-free medium or cytokine-induced stress did not provoke strong DC activation, despite efficient phagocytosis. DC activation correlated with the amount of virus used to infect β cells and required RNA within virally infected cells. DCs encountering enterovirus-infected β cells, but not those incubated with mock-infected or stressed β cells, suppressed T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokines and variably induced IFN-γ in allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). Thus, stressed β cells have little effect on human BDCA1(+) DC activation and function, while enterovirus-infected β cells impact these cells significantly, which could help to explain their role in development of autoimmune diabetes in individuals at risk. PMID:26888163

  17. Tetherin/BST-2 promotes dendritic cell activation and function during acute retrovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sam X.; Barrett, Bradley S.; Guo, Kejun; Kassiotis, George; Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Dittmer, Ulf; Gibbert, Kathrin; Santiago, Mario L.

    2016-01-01

    Tetherin/BST-2 is a host restriction factor that inhibits retrovirus release from infected cells in vitro by tethering nascent virions to the plasma membrane. However, contradictory data exists on whether Tetherin inhibits acute retrovirus infection in vivo. Previously, we reported that Tetherin-mediated inhibition of Friend retrovirus (FV) replication at 2 weeks post-infection correlated with stronger natural killer, CD4+ T and CD8+ T cell responses. Here, we further investigated the role of Tetherin in counteracting retrovirus replication in vivo. FV infection levels were similar between wild-type (WT) and Tetherin KO mice at 3 to 7 days post-infection despite removal of a potent restriction factor, Apobec3/Rfv3. However, during this phase of acute infection, Tetherin enhanced myeloid dendritic cell (DC) function. DCs from infected, but not uninfected, WT mice expressed significantly higher MHC class II and the co-stimulatory molecule CD80 compared to Tetherin KO DCs. Tetherin-associated DC activation during acute FV infection correlated with stronger NK cell responses. Furthermore, Tetherin+ DCs from FV-infected mice more strongly stimulated FV-specific CD4+ T cells ex vivo compared to Tetherin KO DCs. The results link the antiretroviral and immunomodulatory activity of Tetherin in vivo to improved DC activation and MHC class II antigen presentation. PMID:26846717

  18. Interleukin-2 from Adaptive T Cells Enhances Natural Killer Cell Activity against Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zeguang; Frascaroli, Giada; Bayer, Carina; Schmal, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Control of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) requires a continuous immune surveillance, thus HCMV is the most important viral pathogen in severely immunocompromised individuals. Both innate and adaptive immunity contribute to the control of HCMV. Here, we report that peripheral blood natural killer cells (PBNKs) from HCMV-seropositive donors showed an enhanced activity toward HCMV-infected autologous macrophages. However, this enhanced response was abolished when purified NK cells were applied as effectors. We demonstrate that this enhanced PBNK activity was dependent on the interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion of CD4+ T cells when reexposed to the virus. Purified T cells enhanced the activity of purified NK cells in response to HCMV-infected macrophages. This effect could be suppressed by IL-2 blocking. Our findings not only extend the knowledge on the immune surveillance in HCMV—namely, that NK cell-mediated innate immunity can be enhanced by a preexisting T cell antiviral immunity—but also indicate a potential clinical implication for patients at risk for severe HCMV manifestations due to immunosuppressive drugs, which mainly suppress IL-2 production and T cell responsiveness. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is never cleared by the host after primary infection but instead establishes a lifelong latent infection with possible reactivations when the host′s immunity becomes suppressed. Both innate immunity and adaptive immunity are important for the control of viral infections. Natural killer (NK) cells are main innate effectors providing a rapid response to virus-infected cells. Virus-specific T cells are the main adaptive effectors that are critical for the control of the latent infection and limitation of reinfection. In this study, we found that IL-2 secreted by adaptive CD4+ T cells after reexposure to HCMV enhances the activity of NK cells in response to HCMV-infected target cells. This is the first direct evidence that the adaptive T cells can

  19. [Functional activity of lymphoblastoid cells infected by human adenovirus type 2 and Epstein-Barr virus].

    PubMed

    Povnitsa, O Iu; Diachenko, N S; Nosach, L N; Olevinskaia, Z M; Zhovnovataia, V L; Polishchuk, V N; Spivak, N Ia

    2005-01-01

    The paper deals with the influence of the adenovirus (Ad) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) on functional activity of lymphocytes, in particular, the production of alpha- and gamma-interferons, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in conditions of mono- or double infection of B- and T-phenotype (CEM) lymphoblastoid cells. It is shown, that Ad, EBV or both viruses induce high enough levels of interferon on both lines of cells and in control epithelial cells. The lymphoblastoid cells infected by viruses deep ability to synthesize alpha- and gamma-interferons under the influence of the corresponding inducers (Newcastle disease virus and hemagglutinine). Nevertheless, the levels of their formation are not high. Rather high parameters of activity of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were revealed during a day in the initial B95-8 cells and superinfected Ad after the effect of LPS of E. coli. Their activity in CEM cells also did not depend on the infection type. PMID:16018208

  20. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells.

    PubMed

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-11-01

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4(+) T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4(+) T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4(+) T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the "Shock and Kill" strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. PMID:26184775

  1. Activation and lysis of human CD4 cells latently infected with HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Pegu, Amarendra; Asokan, Mangaiarkarasi; Wu, Lan; Wang, Keyun; Hataye, Jason; Casazza, Joseph P.; Guo, Xiaoti; Shi, Wei; Georgiev, Ivelin; Zhou, Tongqing; Chen, Xuejun; O'Dell, Sijy; Todd, John-Paul; Kwong, Peter D.; Rao, Srinivas S.; Yang, Zhi-yong; Koup, Richard A.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of AIDS with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) remains lifelong largely because the virus persists in latent reservoirs. Elimination of latently infected cells could therefore reduce treatment duration and facilitate immune reconstitution. Here we report an approach to reduce the viral reservoir by activating dormant viral gene expression and directing T lymphocytes to lyse previously latent, HIV-1-infected cells. An immunomodulatory protein was created that combines the specificity of a HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody with that of an antibody to the CD3 component of the T-cell receptor. CD3 engagement by the protein can stimulate T-cell activation that induces proviral gene expression in latently infected T cells. It further stimulates CD8 T-cell effector function and redirects T cells to lyse these previously latent-infected cells through recognition of newly expressed Env. This immunomodulatory protein could potentially help to eliminate latently infected cells and deplete the viral reservoir in HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:26485194

  2. Exosomes derived from HIV-1-infected cells contain trans-activation response element RNA.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Aarthi; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Das, Ravi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Santos, Steven; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Guendel, Irene; Sampey, Gavin; Dalby, Elizabeth; Iglesias-Ussel, Maria; Popratiloff, Anastas; Hakami, Ramin; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Young, Mary; Subra, Caroline; Gilbert, Caroline; Bailey, Charles; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2013-07-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles produced by healthy and virus-infected cells. Exosomes derived from infected cells have been shown to contain viral microRNAs (miRNAs). HIV-1 encodes its own miRNAs that regulate viral and host gene expression. The most abundant HIV-1-derived miRNA, first reported by us and later by others using deep sequencing, is the trans-activation response element (TAR) miRNA. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of TAR RNA in exosomes from cell culture supernatants of HIV-1-infected cells and patient sera. TAR miRNA was not in Ago2 complexes outside the exosomes but enclosed within the exosomes. We detected the host miRNA machinery proteins Dicer and Drosha in exosomes from infected cells. We report that transport of TAR RNA from the nucleus into exosomes is a CRM1 (chromosome region maintenance 1)-dependent active process. Prior exposure of naive cells to exosomes from infected cells increased susceptibility of the recipient cells to HIV-1 infection. Exosomal TAR RNA down-regulated apoptosis by lowering Bim and Cdk9 proteins in recipient cells. We found 10(4)-10(6) copies/ml TAR RNA in exosomes derived from infected culture supernatants and 10(3) copies/ml TAR RNA in the serum exosomes of highly active antiretroviral therapy-treated patients or long term nonprogressors. Taken together, our experiments demonstrated that HIV-1-infected cells produced exosomes that are uniquely characterized by their proteomic and RNA profiles that may contribute to disease pathology in AIDS. PMID:23661700

  3. A transcriptionally active form of TFIIIC is modified in poliovirus-infected HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, M E; Dasgupta, A

    1990-01-01

    In HeLa cells, RNA polymerase III (pol III)-mediated transcription is severely inhibited by poliovirus infection. This inhibition is due primarily to the reduction in transcriptional activity of the pol III transcription factor TFIIIC in poliovirus-infected cells. However, the specific binding of TFIIIC to the VAI gene B-box sequence, as assayed by DNase I footprinting, is not altered by poliovirus infection. We have used gel retardation analysis to analyze TFIIIC-DNA complexes formed in nuclear extracts prepared from mock- and poliovirus-infected cells. In mock-infected cell extracts, two closely migrating TFIIIC-containing complexes, complexes I and II, were detected in the gel retardation assay. The slower migrating complex, complex I, was absent in poliovirus-infected cell extracts, and an increase occurred in the intensity of the faster-migrating complex (complex II). Also, in poliovirus-infected cell extracts, a new, rapidly migrating complex, complex III, was formed. Complex III may have been the result of limited proteolysis of complex I or II. These changes in TFIIIC-containing complexes in poliovirus-infected cell extracts correlated kinetically with the decrease in TFIIIC transcriptional activity. Complexes I, II, and III were chromatographically separated; only complex I was transcriptionally active and specifically restored pol III transcription when added to poliovirus-infected cell extracts. Acid phosphatase treatment partially converted complex I to complex II but did not affect the binding of complex II or III. Dephosphorylation and limited proteolysis of TFIIIC are discussed as possible mechanisms for the inhibition of pol III-mediated transcription by poliovirus. Images PMID:2204807

  4. Aggressive Peripheral CD70-positive T-cell Lymphoma Associated with Severe Chronic Active EBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Donald R.; Sheehan, Andrea M.; Yi, Zhongzhen; Rodgers, Cheryl C; Bollard, Catherine M; Brenner, Malcolm K; Rooney, Cliona M; Heslop, Helen E; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Severe chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection (CAEBV) in T or NK cells is a rare complication of latent EBV infection. CAEBV associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) consists of polyclonal lesions as well as aggressive lymphomas. Here we report such a patient. In addition, we show that this primary CAEBV associated T-cell lymphoma expresses CD70 and is sensitive to killing by CD70-specific T cells, identifying CD70 as a potential immunotherapeutic target for CAEBV-associated T-cell lymphoma. PMID:21994111

  5. Hybrid spreading mechanisms and T cell activation shape the dynamics of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changwang; Zhou, Shi; Groppelli, Elisabetta; Pellegrino, Pierre; Williams, Ian; Borrow, Persephone; Chain, Benjamin M; Jolly, Clare

    2015-04-01

    HIV-1 can disseminate between susceptible cells by two mechanisms: cell-free infection following fluid-phase diffusion of virions and by highly-efficient direct cell-to-cell transmission at immune cell contacts. The contribution of this hybrid spreading mechanism, which is also a characteristic of some important computer worm outbreaks, to HIV-1 progression in vivo remains unknown. Here we present a new mathematical model that explicitly incorporates the ability of HIV-1 to use hybrid spreading mechanisms and evaluate the consequences for HIV-1 pathogenenesis. The model captures the major phases of the HIV-1 infection course of a cohort of treatment naive patients and also accurately predicts the results of the Short Pulse Anti-Retroviral Therapy at Seroconversion (SPARTAC) trial. Using this model we find that hybrid spreading is critical to seed and establish infection, and that cell-to-cell spread and increased CD4+ T cell activation are important for HIV-1 progression. Notably, the model predicts that cell-to-cell spread becomes increasingly effective as infection progresses and thus may present a considerable treatment barrier. Deriving predictions of various treatments' influence on HIV-1 progression highlights the importance of earlier intervention and suggests that treatments effectively targeting cell-to-cell HIV-1 spread can delay progression to AIDS. This study suggests that hybrid spreading is a fundamental feature of HIV infection, and provides the mathematical framework incorporating this feature with which to evaluate future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25837979

  6. PPARγ Is Activated during Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection and Inhibits Neuronogenesis from Human Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rolland, Maude; Li, Xiaojun; Perez-Berezo, Teresa; Rauwel, Benjamin; Benchoua, Alexandra; Bessières, Bettina; Aziza, Jacqueline; Cenac, Nicolas; Luo, Minhua; Casper, Charlotte; Peschanski, Marc; Gonzalez-Dunia, Daniel; Leruez-Ville, Marianne; Davrinche, Christian; Chavanas, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Congenital infection by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a leading cause of permanent sequelae of the central nervous system, including sensorineural deafness, cerebral palsies or devastating neurodevelopmental abnormalities (0.1% of all births). To gain insight on the impact of HCMV on neuronal development, we used both neural stem cells from human embryonic stem cells (NSC) and brain sections from infected fetuses and investigated the outcomes of infection on Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma (PPARγ), a transcription factor critical in the developing brain. We observed that HCMV infection dramatically impaired the rate of neuronogenesis and strongly increased PPARγ levels and activity. Consistent with these findings, levels of 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9-HODE), a known PPARγ agonist, were significantly increased in infected NSCs. Likewise, exposure of uninfected NSCs to 9-HODE recapitulated the effect of infection on PPARγ activity. It also increased the rate of cells expressing the IE antigen in HCMV-infected NSCs. Further, we demonstrated that (1) pharmacological activation of ectopically expressed PPARγ was sufficient to induce impaired neuronogenesis of uninfected NSCs, (2) treatment of uninfected NSCs with 9-HODE impaired NSC differentiation and (3) treatment of HCMV-infected NSCs with the PPARγ inhibitor T0070907 restored a normal rate of differentiation. The role of PPARγ in the disease phenotype was strongly supported by the immunodetection of nuclear PPARγ in brain germinative zones of congenitally infected fetuses (N = 20), but not in control samples. Altogether, our findings reveal a key role for PPARγ in neurogenesis and in the pathophysiology of HCMV congenital infection. They also pave the way to the identification of PPARγ gene targets in the infected brain. PMID:27078877

  7. NKT cell activation by local α-galactosylceramide administration decreases susceptibility to HSV-2 infection.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Marie Beck; Jensen, Simon Kok; Hansen, Anne Louise; Winther, Henriette; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh; Reinert, Line Sinnathamby; Holm, Christian Kanstrup

    2015-06-01

    NKT cells are a subgroup of T cells, which express a restricted TCR repertoire and are critical for the innate immune responses to viral infections. Activation of NKT cells depends on the major histocompatibility complex-related molecule CD1d, which presents bioactive lipids to NKT cells. The marine sponge derived lipid αGalCer has recently been demonstrated as a specific agonist for activation of human and murine NKT cells. In the present study we investigated the applicability of αGalCer pre-treatment for immune protection against intra-vaginal HSV-2 infection. We found that C57BL/6 WT mice that received local pre-treatment with αGalCer prior to intra-vaginal HSV-2 infection had a lower mean disease score, mortality and viral load in the vagina following infection, compared to mice that did not receive αGalCer pre-treatment. Further, we found increased numbers of CD45 and NK1.1 positive cells in vaginal tissue and elevated levels of IFN-γ in the vaginal tissue and in vaginal fluids 24h after αGalCer pre-treatment. Collectively our data demonstrate a protective effect of αGalCer induced activation of NKT cells in the innate immune protection against viral infection. PMID:25648689

  8. Increased poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase activity in cells infected by human immunodeficiency virus type-1.

    PubMed

    Furlini, G; Re, M C; La Placa, M

    1991-04-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase is a chromatin-bound enzyme which is activated by free DNA ends and is therefore stimulated by a variety of DNA-damaging agents. The enzyme transfers the ADP moiety of NAD to nuclear proteins to create protein-bound ADP-ribose polymers. Under conditions favouring an accelerated poly(ADP-ribose) polymer formation, the enzyme may exhaust cellular NAD pools. At the same time, or shortly thereafter ATP levels drop and cell viability eventually declines. As a series of chemical and physical agents which may play a role in activating latent HIV-1 infection or favouring HIV-1 replication, have a DNA-damaging activity, we investigated the behaviour of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase activity in various types of HIV-1-infected cells. The results obtained show that HIV-1-infected cells to possess an increased poly(ADP-ribosol)ating activity together with an accentuated fragmentation of cellular DNA which are associated with the time course of HIV-1 replication. These data give circumstantial support to the hypothesis that a NAD-depdendent cellular suicide response to DNA damage, could play a role in the death of HIV-1 infected cells. In this respect, the impared immunocompetence of HIV-1-infected patients could bear some resemblance to immune attribution that sometimes accompanies some inborn errors affecting DNA precursor metabolism and DNA integrity. PMID:1906973

  9. Gene expression analysis during acute hepatitis C virus infection associates dendritic cell activation with viral clearance.

    PubMed

    Zabaleta, Aintzane; Riezu-Boj, Jose-Ignacio; Larrea, Esther; Villanueva, Lorea; Lasarte, Juan Jose; Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Fisicaro, Paola; Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Missale, Gabriele; Ferrari, Carlo; Benjelloun, Soumaya; Prieto, Jesús; Sarobe, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Viral clearance during acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with the induction of potent antiviral T-cell responses. Since dendritic cells (DC) are essential in the activation of primary T-cell responses, gene expression was analyzed in DC from patients during acute HCV infection. By using microarrays, gene expression was compared in resting and activated peripheral blood plasmacytoid (pDC) and myeloid (mDC) DC from acute HCV resolving patients (AR) and from patients who become chronically infected (ANR), as well as in healthy individuals (CTRL) and chronically-infected patients (CHR). For pDC, a high number of upregulated genes was found in AR patients, irrespective of DC stimulation. However, for mDC, most evident differences were detected after DC stimulation, again corresponding to upregulated genes in AR patients. Divergent behavior of ANR was also observed when analyzing DC from CTRL and CHR, with ANR patients clustering again apart from these groups. These differences corresponded to metabolism-associated genes and genes belonging to pathways relevant for DC activation and cytokine responses. Thus, upregulation of relevant genes in DC during acute HCV infection may determine viral clearance, suggesting that dysfunctional DC may be responsible for the lack of efficient T-cell responses which lead to chronic HCV infection. PMID:26447929

  10. Peroxidase activity in cotton cell culture infected with Verticillium dahliae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In our studies with cotton, we have shown that the plant’s induced anionic peroxidases bind to chitin, which is a component of the cell wall of the plant pathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae. In binding to the cell wall surface, they disrupt the integrity of the pathogen’s cell wall. Thus, these...

  11. Safety and Efficacy of Activated Transfected Killer Cells for Neutropenic Fungal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Baquir, Beverlie; Fu, Yue; Applebaum, David; Schwartz, Julie; Wang, Amy; Avanesian, Valentina; Spellberg, Brad

    2010-01-01

    Background Invasive fungal infections cause considerable morbidity and mortality in neutropenic patients. White blood cell transfusions are a promising treatment for such infections, but technical barriers have prevented their widespread use. Methods To recapitulate white blood cell transfusions, we are developing a cell-based immunotherapy using a phagocytic cell line, HL-60. We sought to stably transfect HL-60 cells with a suicide trap (herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase), to enable purging of the cells when desired, and a bioluminescence marker, to track the cells in vivo in mice. Results Transfection was stable despite 20 months of continuous culture or storage in liquid nitrogen. Activation of these transfected cells with retinoic acid and dimethyl sulfamethoxazole enhanced their microbicidal effects. Activated transfected killer (ATAK) cells were completely eliminated after exposure to ganciclovir, confirming function of the suicide trap. ATAK cells improved the survival of neutropenic mice with lethal disseminated candidiasis and inhalational aspergillosis. Bioluminescence and histopathologic analysis confirmed that the cells were purged from surviving mice after ganciclovir treatment. Comprehensive necropsy, histopathology, and metabolomic analysis revealed no toxicity of the cells. Conclusions These results lay the groundwork for continued translational development of this promising, novel technology for the treatment of refractory infections in neutropenic hosts. PMID:20397927

  12. Expansion of highly activated invariant natural killer T cells with altered phenotype in acute dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Kamaladasa, A; Wickramasinghe, N; Adikari, T N; Gomes, L; Shyamali, N L A; Salio, M; Cerundolo, V; Ogg, G S; Malavige, G Neelika

    2016-08-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are capable of rapid activation and production of cytokines upon recognition of antigenic lipids presented by CD1d molecules. They have been shown to play a significant role in many viral infections and were observed to be highly activated in patients with acute dengue infection. In order to characterize further their role in dengue infection, we investigated the proportion of iNKT cells and their phenotype in adult patients with acute dengue infection. The functionality of iNKT cells in patients was investigated by both interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4 ex-vivo enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays following stimulation with alpha-galactosyl-ceramide (αGalCer). We found that circulating iNKT cell proportions were significantly higher (P = 0·03) in patients with acute dengue when compared to healthy individuals and were predominantly of the CD4(+) subset. iNKT cells of patients with acute dengue had reduced proportions expressing CD8α and CD161 when compared to healthy individuals. The iNKT cells of patients were highly activated and iNKT activation correlated significantly with dengue virus-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibody levels. iNKT cells expressing Bcl-6 (P = 0·0003) and both Bcl-6 and inducible T cell co-stimulator (ICOS) (P = 0·006) were increased significantly in patients when compared to healthy individuals. Therefore, our data suggest that in acute dengue infection there is an expansion of highly activated CD4(+) iNKT cells, with reduced expression of CD161 markers. PMID:26874822

  13. The activation of p38MAPK and JNK pathways in bovine herpesvirus 1 infected MDBK cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liqian; Yuan, Chen; Huang, Liyuan; Ding, Xiuyan; Wang, Jianye; Zhang, Dong; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    We have shown previously that BHV-1 infection activates Erk1/2 signaling. Here, we show that BHV-1 provoked an early-stage transient and late-stage sustained activation of JNK, p38MAPK and c-Jun signaling in MDBK cells. C-Jun phosphorylation was dependent on JNK. These early events were partially due to the viral entry process. Unexpectedly, reactive oxygen species were not involved in the later activation phase. Interestingly, only activated JNK facilitated the viral multiplication identified through both chemical inhibitor and siRNA. Collectively, this study provides insight into our understanding of early stages of BHV-1 infection. PMID:27590675

  14. Trichomonas vaginalis infection activates cells through toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Zariffard, M Reza; Harwani, Sailesh; Novak, Richard M; Graham, Parrie J; Ji, Xin; Spear, Gregory T

    2004-04-01

    While Trichomonas vaginalis infection can cause inflammation and influx of leukocytes into the female genital tract, the molecular pathways important in inducing these effects are not known. This study determined if infection with T. vaginalis activates cells through toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Genital tract secretions from infected women stimulated TNF-alpha production by cells with functional TLR4 (350 pg/ml) but significantly less by cells that are unresponsive to TLR4 ligands (44 pg/ml, P = 0.001). Secretions collected after clearance of infection also induced significantly lower responses by cells with functional TLR4 (136 pg/ml, P = 0.008). TNF-alpha responses were not reduced by Polymyxin B and did not correlate with beta(2)-defensin levels, indicating that stimulation of cells was not through lipopolysaccharide or beta(2)-defensin. These studies show that T. vaginalis infection results in the appearance in the genital tract of substance(s) that stimulate cells through TLR4, suggesting a mechanism for the inflammation caused by this infection. PMID:15093558

  15. Mechanisms by Which Interleukin-12 Corrects Defective NK Cell Anticryptococcal Activity in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kyei, Stephen K.; Ogbomo, Henry; Li, ShuShun; Timm-McCann, Martina; Xiang, Richard F.; Huston, Shaunna M.; Ganguly, Anutosh; Colarusso, Pina; Gill, M. John

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic yeast and a leading cause of life-threatening meningitis in AIDS patients. Natural killer (NK) cells are important immune effector cells that directly recognize and kill C. neoformans via a perforin-dependent cytotoxic mechanism. We previously showed that NK cells from HIV-infected patients have aberrant anticryptococcal killing and that interleukin-12 (IL-12) restores the activity at least partially through restoration of NKp30. However, the mechanisms causing this defect or how IL-12 restores the function was unknown. By examining the sequential steps in NK cell killing of Cryptococcus, we found that NK cells from HIV-infected patients had defective binding of NK cells to C. neoformans. Moreover, those NK cells that bound to C. neoformans failed to polarize perforin-containing granules to the microbial synapse compared to healthy controls, suggesting that binding was insufficient to restore a defect in perforin polarization. We also identified lower expression of intracellular perforin and defective perforin release from NK cells of HIV-infected patients in response to C. neoformans. Importantly, treatment of NK cells from HIV-infected patients with IL-12 reversed the multiple defects in binding, granule polarization, perforin content, and perforin release and restored anticryptococcal activity. Thus, there are multiple defects in the cytolytic machinery of NK cells from HIV-infected patients, which cumulatively result in defective NK cell anticryptococcal activity, and each of these defects can be reversed with IL-12. PMID:27555306

  16. Activating KIRs and NKG2C in Viral Infections: Toward NK Cell Memory?

    PubMed Central

    Della Chiesa, Mariella; Sivori, Simona; Carlomagno, Simona; Moretta, Lorenzo; Moretta, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important players in the immune defense against viral infections. The contribution of activating killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and CD94/NKG2C in regulating anti-viral responses has recently emerged. Thus, in the hematopoietic stem cell transplantation setting, the presence of donor activating KIRs (aKIRs) may protect against viral infections, while in HIV-infected individuals, KIR3DS1, in combination with HLA-Bw4-I80, results in reduction of viral progression. Since, studies have been performed mainly at the genetic or transcriptional level, the effective size, the function, and the “licensing” status of NK cells expressing aKIRs, as well as the nature of their viral ligands, require further investigation. Certain viral infections, mainly due to Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), can deeply influence the NK cell development and function by inducing a marked expansion of mature NKG2C+ NK cells expressing self-activating KIRs. This suggests that NKG2C and/or aKIRs are involved in the selective proliferation of this subset. The persistent, HCMV-induced, imprinting suggests that NK cells may display unexpected adaptive immune traits. The role of aKIRs and NKG2C in regulating NK cell responses and promoting a memory-like response to certain viruses is discussed. PMID:26617607

  17. Schistosoma mansoni: autoantibodies and polyclonal B cell activation in infected mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, E; Camus, D; Santoro, F; Capron, A

    1981-01-01

    The appearance of autoantibodies was investigated during the course of Schistosoma mansoni infection in C57Bl/6 mice. Anti-liver autoantibodies or lymphocyte-reactive alloantibodies were detected respectively without cell-mediated immunity against liver antigen or lymphocytotoxic activity. Anti-liver, anti-DNA, anti-Ig and anti-lymphocyte antibodies were shown 6-7 weeks after the beginning of the infection concomitantly with the increase of immunoglobulin levels and circulating immune complexes. At this period, the antibody response to polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was increased and the injection of spleen cells from day-45-infected mice to uninfected recipients increased the anti-PVP antibody response. Conversely, the injection of spleen cells from uninfected to infected mice did not modify the anti-PVP Ab response. After 6 weeks of infection, the basal thymidine incorporation of spleen cells was increased contrasting with the marked inhibition of spleen cell response to PHA. The present data are consistent with the induction of a polyclonal non-specific B cell activation by S. mansoni. PMID:6978217

  18. PKR Activation Favors Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus Replication in Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gamil, Amr A.A.; Xu, Cheng; Mutoloki, Stephen; Evensen, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    The double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase R (PKR) is a Type I interferon (IFN) stimulated gene that has important biological and immunological functions. In viral infections, in general, PKR inhibits or promotes viral replication, but PKR-IPNV interaction has not been previously studied. We investigated the involvement of PKR during infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) infection using a custom-made rabbit antiserum and the PKR inhibitor C16. Reactivity of the antiserum to PKR in CHSE-214 cells was confirmed after IFNα treatment giving an increased protein level. IPNV infection alone did not give increased PKR levels by Western blot, while pre-treatment with PKR inhibitor before IPNV infection gave decreased eukaryotic initiation factor 2-alpha (eIF2α) phosphorylation. This suggests that PKR, despite not being upregulated, is involved in eIF2α phosphorylation during IPNV infection. PKR inhibitor pre-treatment resulted in decreased virus titers, extra- and intracellularly, concomitant with reduction of cells with compromised membranes in IPNV-permissive cell lines. These findings suggest that IPNV uses PKR activation to promote virus replication in infected cells. PMID:27338445

  19. Identifying the target cell in primary simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection: highly activated memory CD4(+) T cells are rapidly eliminated in early SIV infection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Veazey, R S; Tham, I C; Mansfield, K G; DeMaria, M; Forand, A E; Shvetz, D E; Chalifoux, L V; Sehgal, P K; Lackner, A A

    2000-01-01

    It has recently been shown that rapid and profound CD4(+) T-cell depletion occurs almost exclusively within the intestinal tract of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaques within days of infection. Here we demonstrate (by three- and four-color flow cytometry) that this depletion is specific to a definable subset of CD4(+) T cells, namely, those having both a highly and/or acutely activated (CD69(+) CD38(+) HLA-DR(+)) and memory (CD45RA(-) Leu8(-)) phenotype. Moreover, we demonstrate that this subset of helper T cells is found primarily within the intestinal lamina propria. Viral tropism for this particular cell type (which has been previously suggested by various studies in vitro) could explain why profound CD4(+) T-cell depletion occurs in the intestine and not in peripheral lymphoid tissues in early SIV infection. Furthermore, we demonstrate that an acute loss of this specific subset of activated memory CD4(+) T cells may also be detected in peripheral blood and lymph nodes in early SIV infection. However, since this particular cell type is present in such small numbers in circulation, its loss does not significantly affect total CD4(+) T cell counts. This finding suggests that SIV and, presumably, human immunodeficiency virus specifically infect, replicate in, and eliminate definable subsets of CD4(+) T cells in vivo. PMID:10590091

  20. B cells pulsed with Helicobacter pylori antigen efficiently activate memory CD8+ T cells from H. pylori-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Azem, Josef; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Lundin, B Samuel

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection causes chronic gastritis that may progress to peptic ulcers or gastric adenocarcinoma and thereby cause major world-wide health problems. Previous studies have shown that CD4+ T cells are important in the immune response to H. pylori in humans, but the role of CD8+ T cells is less clear. In order to study the CD8+ T cell response to H. pylori in greater detail, we have evaluated efficient conditions for activation of CD8+ T cells in vitro. We show that H. pylori-reactive CD8+ T cells can be activated most efficiently by B cells or dendritic cells pulsed with H. pylori antigens. We further show that the majority of CD8+ T cells in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa are memory cells, and that memory CD8+ T cells sorted from peripheral blood of H. pylori-infected individuals respond 15-fold more to H. pylori urease compared to memory cells from uninfected subjects. We conclude that CD8+ T cells do participate in the immune response to H. pylori, and this may have implications for the development of more severe disease outcomes in H. pylori-infected subjects. PMID:16324887

  1. Activation and Recruitment of Regulatory T Cells via Chemokine Receptor Activation in Trichinella spiralis-Infected Mice.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jeong-Bin; Kang, Shin Ae; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yu, Hak Sun

    2016-04-01

    As most infections by the helminth parasite elicit the recruitment of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T (Treg) cells, many scientists have suggested that these cells could be used for the treatment of immune-mediated inflammation and associated diseases. In order to investigate the distribution and alteration of activated Treg cells, we compared the expression levels of Treg cell activation markers in the ileum and gastrocnemius tissues 1, 2, and 4 weeks after infection. The number of Treg cells was monitored using GFP-coded Foxp3 transgenic mice. In mice at 1 week after Trichinella spiralis infection, the number of activated Treg cells was higher than in the control group. In mice at 2 weeks after infection, there was a significant increase in the number of cells expressing Foxp3 and CTLA-4 when compared to the control group and mice at 1 week after infection. At 4 weeks after infection, T. spiralis was easily identifiable in nurse cells in mouse muscles. In the intestine, the expression of Gzmb and Klrg1 decreased over time and that of Capg remained unchanged for the first and second week, then decreased in the 4th week. However, in the muscles, the expression of most chemokine genes was increased due to T. spiralis infection, in particular the expression levels of Gzmb, OX40, and CTLA-4 increased until week 4. In addition, increased gene expression of all chemokine receptors in muscle, CXCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR9, and CCR10, was observed up until the 4th week. In conclusion, various chemokine receptors showed increased expressions combined with recruitment of Treg cells in the muscle tissue. PMID:27180574

  2. Activation and Recruitment of Regulatory T Cells via Chemokine Receptor Activation in Trichinella spiralis-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jeong-Bin; Kang, Shin Ae; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yu, Hak Sun

    2016-01-01

    As most infections by the helminth parasite elicit the recruitment of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T (Treg) cells, many scientists have suggested that these cells could be used for the treatment of immune-mediated inflammation and associated diseases. In order to investigate the distribution and alteration of activated Treg cells, we compared the expression levels of Treg cell activation markers in the ileum and gastrocnemius tissues 1, 2, and 4 weeks after infection. The number of Treg cells was monitored using GFP-coded Foxp3 transgenic mice. In mice at 1 week after Trichinella spiralis infection, the number of activated Treg cells was higher than in the control group. In mice at 2 weeks after infection, there was a significant increase in the number of cells expressing Foxp3 and CTLA-4 when compared to the control group and mice at 1 week after infection. At 4 weeks after infection, T. spiralis was easily identifiable in nurse cells in mouse muscles. In the intestine, the expression of Gzmb and Klrg1 decreased over time and that of Capg remained unchanged for the first and second week, then decreased in the 4th week. However, in the muscles, the expression of most chemokine genes was increased due to T. spiralis infection, in particular the expression levels of Gzmb, OX40, and CTLA-4 increased until week 4. In addition, increased gene expression of all chemokine receptors in muscle, CXCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR9, and CCR10, was observed up until the 4th week. In conclusion, various chemokine receptors showed increased expressions combined with recruitment of Treg cells in the muscle tissue. PMID:27180574

  3. Activation-induced apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells during hepatosplenic Schistosoma mansoni infections.

    PubMed

    Ghoneim, H M; Demian, S R; Heshmat, M G; Ismail, N S; El-Sayed, Laila H

    2008-01-01

    It is well established that programmed cell death (apoptosis) is an important regulator of host responses during infection with a variety of intra- and extra-cellular pathogens. The present work aimed at assessment of in vitro spontaneous and phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced apoptosis in mononuclear cells isolated from patients with hepatosplenic form of S. mansoni infections. Cell death data were correlated to the degree of lymphoproliferative responses to PHA as well as to the serum anti-schistosomal antibody titers. A markedly significant increase in PHA-induced apoptosis in lymphocytes isolated from S. mansoni-infected patients was seen when compared to the corresponding healthy controls. However, a slight difference was recorded between the two studied groups regarding the spontaneous apoptosis. This was accompanied with a significant impairment of in vitro PHA-induced lymphoproliferation of T cells from S. mansoni patients. Data of the present study supports the hypothesis that activation-induced cell death (AICD) is a potentially contributing factor in T helper (Th) cell regulation during chronic stages of schistosomiasis, which represents a critically determinant factor in the host-parasite interaction and might influence the destiny of parasitic infections either towards establishment of chronic infection or towards host death. PMID:20306689

  4. Regulatory T cells and chronic immune activation in human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1)-infected children

    PubMed Central

    Freguja, R; Gianesin, K; Mosconi, I; Zanchetta, M; Carmona, F; Rampon, O; Giaquinto, C; De Rossi, A

    2011-01-01

    The function of CD4+ T cells with regulatory activity (Tregs) is the down-regulation of immune responses. This suppressive activity may limit the magnitude of effector responses, resulting in failure to control human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infection, but may also suppress chronic immune activation, a characteristic feature of HIV-1 disease. We evaluated the correlation between viral load, immune activation and Tregs in HIV-1-infected children. Eighty-nine HIV-1-infected children (aged 6–14 years) were included in the study and analysed for HIV-1 plasmaviraemia, HIV-1 DNA load, CD4 and CD8 cell subsets. Treg cells [CD4+ CD25highCD127lowforkhead box P3 (FoxP3high)] and CD8-activated T cells (CD8+CD38+) were determined by flow cytometry. Results showed that the number of activated CD8+CD38+ T cells increased in relation to HIV-1 RNA plasmaviraemia (r = 0·403, P < 0·0001). The proportion of Tregs also correlated positively with HIV-1 plasmaviraemia (r = 0·323, P = 0·002), but correlated inversely with CD4+ cells (r = −0·312, P = 0·004), thus suggesting a selective expansion along with increased viraemia and CD4+ depletion. Interestingly, a positive correlation was found between the levels of Tregs and CD8+CD38+ T cells (r = 0·305, P = 0·005), and the percentage of Tregs tended to correlate with HIV-1 DNA load (r = 0·224, P = 0·062). Overall, these findings suggest that immune activation contributes to the expansion of Treg cells. In turn, the suppressive activity of Tregs may impair effector responses against HIV-1, but appears to be ineffective in limiting immune activation. PMID:21438872

  5. Prolonged Activation of Virus-Specific CD8+T Cells after Acute B19 Infection

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background Human parvovirus B19 (B19) is a ubiquitous and clinically significant pathogen, causing erythema infectiosum, arthropathy, transient aplastic crisis, and intrauterine fetal death. The phenotype of CD8+ T cells in acute B19 infection has not been studied previously. Methods and Findings The number and phenotype of B19-specific CD8+ T cell responses during and after acute adult infection was studied using HLA–peptide multimeric complexes. Surprisingly, these responses increased in magnitude over the first year post-infection despite resolution of clinical symptoms and control of viraemia, with T cell populations specific for individual epitopes comprising up to 4% of CD8+ T cells. B19-specific T cells developed and maintained an activated CD38+ phenotype, with strong expression of perforin and CD57 and downregulation of CD28 and CD27. These cells possessed strong effector function and intact proliferative capacity. Individuals tested many years after infection exhibited lower frequencies of B19-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, typically 0.05%–0.5% of CD8+ T cells, which were perforin, CD38, and CCR7 low. Conclusion This is the first example to our knowledge of an “acute” human viral infection inducing a persistent activated CD8+ T cell response. The likely explanation—analogous to that for cytomegalovirus infection—is that this persistent response is due to low-level antigen exposure. CD8+ T cells may contribute to the long-term control of this significant pathogen and should be considered during vaccine development. PMID:16253012

  6. Exploiting Innate Immune Cell Activation of a Copper-Dependent Antimicrobial Agent during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Festa, Richard A.; Helsel, Marian E.; Franz, Katherine J.; Thiele, Dennis J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Recalcitrant microbial infections demand new therapeutic options. Here we present an approach that exploits two prongs of the host immune cell antimicrobial response: the oxidative burst and the compartmentalization of copper (Cu) within phagolysosomes. The prochelator QBP is a nontoxic protected form of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8HQ) in which a pinanediol boronic ester blocks metal ion coordination by 8HQ. QBP is deprotected via reactive oxygen species produced by activated macrophages, creating 8HQ and eliciting Cu-dependent killing of the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans in vitro and in mouse pulmonary infection. 8HQ ionophoric activity increases intracellular Cu, overwhelming the Cu-resistance mechanisms of C. neoformans to elicit fungal killing. The Cu-dependent antimicrobial activity of 8HQ against a spectrum of microbial pathogens suggests that this strategy may have broad utility. The conditional activation of Cu ionophores by innate immune cells intensifies the hostile antimicrobial environment and represents a promising approach to combat infectious disease. PMID:25088681

  7. Activation of pulmonary and lymph node dendritic cells during chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Damlund, Dina Silke Malling; Christophersen, Lars; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Alhede, Morten; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2016-06-01

    The majority of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients acquire chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, resulting in increased mortality and morbidity. The chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection is characterized by bacteria growing in biofilm surrounded by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). However, the infection is not eradicated and the inflammatory response leads to gradual degradation of the lung tissue. In CF patients, a Th2-dominated adaptive immune response with a pronounced antibody response is correlated with poorer outcome. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial in bridging the innate immune system with the adaptive immune response. Once activated, the DCs deliver a set of signals to uncommitted T cells that induce development, such as expansion of regulatory T cells and polarization of Th1, Th2 or Th17 subsets. In this study, we characterized DCs in lungs and regional lymph nodes in BALB/c mice infected using intratracheal installation of P. aeruginosa embedded in seaweed alginate in the lungs. A significantly elevated concentration of DCs was detected earlier in the lungs than in the regional lymph nodes. To evaluate whether the chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection leads to activation of DCs, costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 were analyzed. During infection, the DCs showed significant elevation of CD80 and CD86 expression in both the lungs and the regional lymph nodes. Interestingly, the percentage of CD86-positive cells was significantly higher than the percentage of CD80-positive cells in the lymph nodes. In addition, cytokine production from Lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-stimulated DCs was analyzed demonstrating elevated production of IL-6, IL-10 and IL-12. However, production of IL-12 was suppressed earlier than IL-6 and IL-10. These results support that DCs are involved in skewing of the Th1/Th2 balance in CF and may be a possible treatment target. PMID:27009697

  8. Comparative analysis of signature genes in PRRSV-infected porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells at differential activation statuses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activation statuses of monocytic cells including monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are critically important for antiviral immunity. In particular, some devastating viruses, including porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), are capable of directly infecting these c...

  9. Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cells (NFAT) plays a role in SV40 infection

    PubMed Central

    Manley, Kate; O’Hara, Bethany A; Atwood, Walter J

    2008-01-01

    Recent evidence highlighted a role for the transcription factor, Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cells (NFAT), in the transcription of the human polyomavirus JCV. Here we show that NFAT is also important in the transcriptional control of the related polyomavirus, Simian Virus 40 (SV40). Inhibition of NFAT activity reduced SV40 infection of Vero, 293A and HeLa cells, and this block occurred at the stage of viral transcription. Both NFAT3 and NFAT4 bound to the SV40 promoter through κB sites located within the 72bp repeated enhancer region. In Vero cells NFAT was involved in late transcription, but in HeLa and 293A cells both early and late viral transcription required NFAT activity. SV40 large T-Ag was found to increase NFAT activity and provided a positive feedback loop to transactivate the SV40 promoter. PMID:18031784

  10. Nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) plays a role in SV40 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, Kate; O'Hara, Bethany A.; Atwood, Walter J.

    2008-03-01

    Recent evidence highlighted a role for the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT), in the transcription of the human polyomavirus JCV. Here we show that NFAT is also important in the transcriptional control of the related polyomavirus, Simian Virus 40 (SV40). Inhibition of NFAT activity reduced SV40 infection of Vero, 293A, and HeLa cells, and this block occurred at the stage of viral transcription. Both NFAT3 and NFAT4 bound to the SV40 promoter through {kappa}B sites located within the 72 bp repeated enhancer region. In Vero cells, NFAT was involved in late transcription, but in HeLa and 293A cells both early and late viral transcription required NFAT activity. SV40 large T-Ag was found to increase NFAT activity and provided a positive feedback loop to transactivate the SV40 promoter.

  11. Activated human valvular interstitial cells sustain interleukin-17 production to recruit neutrophils in infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chiou-Yueh; Shun, Chia-Tung; Kuo, Yu-Min; Jung, Chiau-Jing; Hsieh, Song-Chou; Chiu, Yen-Ling; Chen, Jeng-Wei; Hsu, Ron-Bin; Yang, Chia-Ju; Chia, Jean-San

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms that underlie valvular inflammation in streptococcus-induced infective endocarditis (IE) remain unclear. We previously demonstrated that streptococcal glucosyltransferases (GTFs) can activate human heart valvular interstitial cells (VIC) to secrete interleukin-6 (IL-6), a cytokine involved in T helper 17 (Th17) cell differentiation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that activated VIC can enhance neutrophil infiltration through sustained IL-17 production, leading to valvular damage. To monitor cytokine and chemokine production, leukocyte recruitment, and the induction or expansion of CD4(+) CD45RA(-) CD25(-) CCR6(+) Th17 cells, primary human VIC were cultured in vitro and activated by GTFs. Serum cytokine levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and neutrophils and Th17 cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in infected valves from patients with IE. The expression of IL-21, IL-23, IL-17, and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor C (Rorc) was upregulated in GTF-activated VIC, which may enhance the proliferation of memory Th17 cells in an IL-6-dependent manner. Many chemokines, including chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), were upregulated in GTF-activated VIC, which might recruit neutrophils and CD4(+) T cells. Moreover, CXCL1 production in VIC was induced in a dose-dependent manner by IL-17 to enhance neutrophil chemotaxis. CXCL1-expressing VIC and infiltrating neutrophils could be detected in infected valves, and serum concentrations of IL-17, IL-21, and IL-23 were increased in patients with IE compared to healthy donors. Furthermore, elevated serum IL-21 levels have been significantly associated with severe valvular damage, including rupture of chordae tendineae, in IE patients. Our findings suggest that VIC are activated by bacterial modulins to recruit neutrophils and that such activities might be further enhanced by the production of Th17-associated cytokines. Together, these factors can amplify

  12. Spatiotemporally Distinct Interactions with Dendritic Cell Subsets Facilitates CD4+ and CD8+ T Cell Activation to Localized Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Hor, Jyh Liang; Whitney, Paul G; Zaid, Ali; Brooks, Andrew G; Heath, William R; Mueller, Scott N

    2015-09-15

    The dynamics of when and where CD4(+) T cells provide help for CD8(+) T cell priming and which dendritic cells (DCs) activate CD4(+) T cells in vivo after localized infection are poorly understood. By using a cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection model combined with intravital 2-photon imaging of the draining lymph node (LN) to concurrently visualize pathogen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, we found that early priming of CD4(+) T cells involved clustering with migratory skin DCs. CD8(+) T cells did not interact with migratory DCs and their activation was delayed, requiring later clustering interactions with LN-resident XCR1(+) DCs. CD4(+) T cells interacted with these late CD8(+) T cell clusters on resident XCR1(+) DCs. Together, these data reveal asynchronous T cell activation by distinct DC subsets and highlight the key role of XCR1(+) DCs as the central platform for cytotoxic T lymphocyte activation and the delivery of CD4(+) T cell help. PMID:26297566

  13. HIV integration site distributions in resting and activated CD4+ T cells infected in culture

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Troy; Agosto, Luis M.; Malani, Nirav; Berry, Charles C.; O'Doherty, Una; Bushman, Frederic

    2010-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to investigate whether the location of HIV integration differs in resting versus activated T cells, a feature that could contribute to the formation of latent viral reservoirs via effects on integration targeting. Design Primary resting or activated CD4+ T cells were infected with purified X4-tropic HIV in the presence and absence of nucleoside triphosphates and genomic locations of integrated provirus determined. Methods We sequenced and analyzed a total of 2661 HIV integration sites using linker-mediated PCR and 454 sequencing. Integration site data sets were then compared to each other and to computationally generated random distributions. Results HIV integration was favored in active transcription units in both cell types, but integration sites from activated cells were found more often in genomic regions that were dense in genes, dense in CpG islands, and enriched in G/C bases. Integration sites from activated cells were also more strongly correlated with histone methylation patterns associated with active genes. Conclusion These data indicate that integration site distributions show modest but significant differences between resting and activated CD4+ T cells, and that integration in resting cells occurs more often in regions that may be suboptimal for proviral gene expression. PMID:19550285

  14. Chronic bacterial infection activates autoreactive B cells and induces isotype switching and autoantigen-driven mutations.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sophie; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Kern, Aurélie; Knapp, Anne-Marie; Eftekhari, Pierre; Da Silva, Sylvia; Jaulhac, Benoît; Brink, Robert; Soulas-Sprauel, Pauline; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Martin, Thierry; Korganow, Anne-Sophie

    2016-01-01

    The links between infections and the development of B-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases are still unclear. In particular, it has been suggested that infection-induced stimulation of innate immune sensors can engage low affinity autoreactive B lymphocytes to mature and produce mutated IgG pathogenic autoantibodies. To test this hypothesis, we established a new knock-in mouse model in which autoreactive B cells could be committed to an affinity maturation process. We show that a chronic bacterial infection allows the activation of such B cells and the production of nonmutated IgM autoantibodies. Moreover, in the constitutive presence of their soluble antigen, some autoreactive clones are able to acquire a germinal center phenotype, to induce Aicda gene expression and to introduce somatic mutations in the IgG heavy chain variable region on amino acids forming direct contacts with the autoantigen. Paradoxically, only lower affinity variants are detected, which strongly suggests that higher affinity autoantibodies secreting B cells are counterselected. For the first time, we demonstrate in vivo that a noncross-reactive infectious agent can activate and induce autoreactive B cells to isotype switching and autoantigen-driven mutations, but on a nonautoimmune background, tolerance mechanisms prevent the formation of consequently dangerous autoimmunity. PMID:26474536

  15. Toso regulates differentiation and activation of inflammatory dendritic cells during persistence-prone virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Lang, P A; Meryk, A; Pandyra, A A; Brenner, D; Brüstle, A; Xu, H C; Merches, K; Lang, F; Khairnar, V; Sharma, P; Funkner, P; Recher, M; Shaabani, N; Duncan, G S; Duhan, V; Homey, B; Ohashi, P S; Häussinger, D; Knolle, P A; Honke, N; Mak, T W; Lang, K S

    2015-01-01

    During virus infection and autoimmune disease, inflammatory dendritic cells (iDCs) differentiate from blood monocytes and infiltrate infected tissue. Following acute infection with hepatotropic viruses, iDCs are essential for re-stimulating virus-specific CD8+ T cells and therefore contribute to virus control. Here we used the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) model system to identify novel signals, which influence the recruitment and activation of iDCs in the liver. We observed that intrinsic expression of Toso (Faim3, FcμR) influenced the differentiation and activation of iDCs in vivo and DCs in vitro. Lack of iDCs in Toso-deficient (Toso–/–) mice reduced CD8+ T-cell function in the liver and resulted in virus persistence. Furthermore, Toso–/– DCs failed to induce autoimmune diabetes in the rat insulin promoter-glycoprotein (RIP-GP) autoimmune diabetes model. In conclusion, we found that Toso has an essential role in the differentiation and maturation of iDCs, a process that is required for the control of persistence-prone virus infection. PMID:25257173

  16. Toso regulates differentiation and activation of inflammatory dendritic cells during persistence-prone virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lang, P A; Meryk, A; Pandyra, A A; Brenner, D; Brüstle, A; Xu, H C; Merches, K; Lang, F; Khairnar, V; Sharma, P; Funkner, P; Recher, M; Shaabani, N; Duncan, G S; Duhan, V; Homey, B; Ohashi, P S; Häussinger, D; Knolle, P A; Honke, N; Mak, T W; Lang, K S

    2015-01-01

    During virus infection and autoimmune disease, inflammatory dendritic cells (iDCs) differentiate from blood monocytes and infiltrate infected tissue. Following acute infection with hepatotropic viruses, iDCs are essential for re-stimulating virus-specific CD8(+) T cells and therefore contribute to virus control. Here we used the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) model system to identify novel signals, which influence the recruitment and activation of iDCs in the liver. We observed that intrinsic expression of Toso (Faim3, FcμR) influenced the differentiation and activation of iDCs in vivo and DCs in vitro. Lack of iDCs in Toso-deficient (Toso(-/-)) mice reduced CD8(+) T-cell function in the liver and resulted in virus persistence. Furthermore, Toso(-/-) DCs failed to induce autoimmune diabetes in the rat insulin promoter-glycoprotein (RIP-GP) autoimmune diabetes model. In conclusion, we found that Toso has an essential role in the differentiation and maturation of iDCs, a process that is required for the control of persistence-prone virus infection. PMID:25257173

  17. FOXP3+Helios+ Regulatory T Cells, Immune Activation, and Advancing Disease in HIV-Infected Children.

    PubMed

    Khaitan, Alka; Kravietz, Adam; Mwamzuka, Mussa; Marshed, Fatma; Ilmet, Tiina; Said, Swalehe; Ahmed, Aabid; Borkowsky, William; Unutmaz, Derya

    2016-08-15

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are functionally suppressive CD4 T cells, critical for establishing peripheral tolerance and controlling inflammatory responses. Previous reports of Tregs during chronic HIV disease have conflicting results with higher or lower levels compared with controls. Identifying true Tregs with suppressive activity proves challenging during HIV infection, as traditional Treg markers, CD25 and FOXP3, may transiently upregulate expression as a result of immune activation (IA). Helios is an Ikaros family transcription factor that marks natural Tregs with suppressive activity and does not upregulate expression after activation. Coexpression of FOXP3 and Helios has been suggested as a highly specific marker of "bona fide" Tregs. We evaluated Treg subsets by FOXP3 coexpressed with either CD25 or Helios and their association with HIV disease progression in perinatally infected HIV-positive children. Identifying Tregs by FOXP3 coexpression with Helios rather than CD25 revealed markedly higher Treg frequencies, particularly in HIV+ children. Regardless of antiretroviral therapy, HIV-infected children had a selective expansion of memory FOXP3+Helios+ Tregs. The rise in memory Tregs correlated with declining HIV clinical status, indicated by falling CD4 percentages and CD4:CD8 ratios and increasing HIV plasma viremia and IA. In addition, untreated HIV+ children exhibited an imbalance between the levels of Tregs and activated T cells. Finally, memory Tregs expressed IA markers CD38 and Ki67 and exhaustion marker, PD-1, that tightly correlated with a similar phenotype in memory CD4 T cells. Overall, HIV-infected children had significant disruptions of memory Tregs that associated with advancing HIV disease. PMID:27003495

  18. Early Activation of Teleost B Cells in Response to Rhabdovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Abós, Beatriz; Castro, Rosario; González Granja, Aitor; Havixbeck, Jeffrey J.; Barreda, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To date, the response of teleost B cells to specific pathogens has been only scarcely addressed. In this work, we have demonstrated that viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), a fish rhabdovirus, has the capacity to infect rainbow trout spleen IgM-positive (IgM+) cells, although the infection is not productive. Consequently, we have studied the effects of VHSV on IgM+ cell functionality, comparing these effects to those elicited by a Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) ligand, poly(I·C). We found that poly(I·C) and VHSV significantly upregulated TLR3 and type I interferon (IFN) transcription in spleen and blood IgM+ cells. Further effects included the upregulated transcription of the CK5B chemokine. The significant inhibition of some of these effects in the presence of bafilomycin A1 (BAF), an inhibitor of endosomal acidification, suggests the involvement of an intracellular TLR in these responses. In the case of VHSV, these transcriptional effects were dependent on viral entry into B cells and the initiation of viral transcription. VHSV also provoked the activation of NF-κB and the upregulation of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) cell surface expression on IgM+ cells, which, along with the increased transcription of the costimulatory molecules CD80/86 and CD83, pointed to VHSV-induced IgM+ cell activation toward an antigen-presenting profile. Finally, despite the moderate effects of VHSV on IgM+ cell proliferation, a consistent effect on IgM+ cell survival was detected. IMPORTANCE Innate immune responses to pathogens established through their recognition by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) have been traditionally ascribed to innate cells. However, recent evidence in mammals has revealed that innate pathogen recognition by B lymphocytes is a crucial factor in shaping the type of immune response that is mounted. In teleosts, these immediate effects of viral encounter on B lymphocytes have not been addressed to date. In our study, we

  19. Porcine parvovirus infection induces apoptosis in PK-15 cells through activation of p53 and mitochondria-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongling; Huang, Yong; Du, Qian; Luo, Xiaomao; Zhang, Liang; Zhao, Xiaomin; Tong, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Porcine parvovirus (PPV) infection has been reported to induce the cytopathic effects (CPE) in some special host cells and contribute the occurrence of porcine parvovirus disease, but the molecular mechanisms underlying PPV-induced CPE are not clear. In this study, we investigated the morphological and molecular changes of porcine kidney cell line (PK-15 cells) infected with PPV. The results showed that PPV infection inhibited the viability of PK-15 cells in a time and concentration dependent manner. PPV infection induced typical apoptotic features including chromatin condensation, apoptotic body formation, nuclear fragmentation, and Annexin V-binding activity. Further studies showed that Bax was increased and translocated to mitochondria, whereas Bcl-2 was decreased in PPV-infected cells, which caused mitochondrial outer-membrane permeabilization, resulting in the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, followed by caspase-9 and caspase-3 activation. However, the expression of Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) did not appear significant changes in the process of PPV-induced apoptosis. Moreover, PPV infection activated p53 signaling, which was involved in the activation of apoptotic signaling induced by PPV infection via regulation of Bax and Bcl-2. Taken together, our results demonstrated that PPV infection induced apoptosis in PK-15 cells through activation of p53 and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway. This study may contribute to shed light on the molecular pathogenesis of PPV infection. PMID:25499817

  20. NK Cell Activation in Human Hantavirus Infection Explained by Virus-Induced IL-15/IL15Rα Expression

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Monika; Björkström, Niklas K.; Gupta, Shawon; Sundström, Karin; Ahlm, Clas; Klingström, Jonas; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf

    2014-01-01

    Clinical infection with hantaviruses cause two severe acute diseases, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). These diseases are characterized by strong immune activation, increased vascular permeability, and up to 50% case-fatality rates. One prominent feature observed in clinical hantavirus infection is rapid expansion of natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood of affected individuals. We here describe an unusually high state of activation of such expanding NK cells in the acute phase of clinical Puumala hantavirus infection. Expanding NK cells expressed markedly increased levels of activating NK cell receptors and cytotoxic effector molecules. In search for possible mechanisms behind this NK cell activation, we observed virus-induced IL-15 and IL-15Rα on infected endothelial and epithelial cells. Hantavirus-infected cells were shown to strongly activate NK cells in a cell-cell contact-dependent way, and this response was blocked with anti-IL-15 antibodies. Surprisingly, the strength of the IL-15-dependent NK cell response was such that it led to killing of uninfected endothelial cells despite expression of normal levels of HLA class I. In contrast, hantavirus-infected cells were resistant to NK cell lysis, due to a combination of virus-induced increase in HLA class I expression levels and hantavirus-mediated inhibition of apoptosis induction. In summary, we here describe a possible mechanism explaining the massive NK cell activation and proliferation observed in HFRS patients caused by Puumala hantavirus infection. The results add further insights into mechanisms behind the immunopathogenesis of hantavirus infections in humans and identify new possible targets for intervention. PMID:25412359

  1. Activation of caspases in intestinal villus epithelial cells of normal and nematode infected rats

    PubMed Central

    Hyoh, Y; Ishizaka, S; Horii, T; Fujiwara, A; Tegoshi, T; Yamada, M; Arizono, N

    2002-01-01

    Background: Small intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) show apoptosis in physiological turnover of cells and in certain inflammatory diseases. Aims: To investigate the role of caspases in the progression of IEC apoptosis in vivo. Methods: IEC were separated along the villus-crypt axis from the jejunum of normal and Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infected rats at 4°C. Caspases were examined by a fluorometric assay method, histochemistry, and immunoblotting. Results: Villus cell rich IEC from normal rats exhibited a high level of caspase-3-like activity whereas activities of caspase-1, -8, and -9 were negligible. Immunoblotting analysis of villus cell rich IEC revealed partial cleavage of procaspase-3 into a 17 kDa molecule as well as cleavage of a caspase-3 substrate, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), whereas in crypt cell rich IEC, caspase-3 cleavage was less significant. Caspase-3 activity was also observed histochemically in villus epithelium on frozen sections of the normal small intestine. IEC prepared at 4°C did not reveal nuclear degradation whereas subsequent incubation in a suspension at 37°C induced intense nuclear degradation within one hour in accordance with increases in active caspase-3. This apoptosis was partially suppressed by the caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk. Nematode infected animals showed villus atrophy together with significant increases in levels of caspase-3 in IEC but not of caspase-1, -8, or -9. Conclusion: Caspase-3 may have an important role in the physiological replacement of IEC as well as in progression of IEC apoptosis induced by nematode infection. PMID:11772970

  2. Virion encapsidated HIV-1 Vpr induces NFAT to prime non-activated T cells for productive infection

    PubMed Central

    Höhne, Kristin; Businger, Ramona; van Nuffel, Anouk; Bolduan, Sebastian; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Baeyens, Ann; Vermeire, Jolien; Malatinkova, Eva; Verhasselt, Bruno; Schindler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The majority of T cells encountered by HIV-1 are non-activated and do not readily allow productive infection. HIV-1 Vpr is highly abundant in progeny virions, and induces signalling and HIV-1 LTR transcription. We hence hypothesized that Vpr might be a determinant of non-activated T-cell infection. Virion-delivered Vpr activated nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) through Ca2+ influx and interference with the NFAT export kinase GSK3β. This leads to NFAT translocation and accumulation within the nucleus and was required for productive infection of unstimulated primary CD4+ T cells. A mutagenesis approach revealed correlation of Vpr-mediated NFAT activation with its ability to enhance LTR transcription and mediate cell cycle arrest. Upon NFAT inhibition, Vpr did not augment resting T-cell infection, and showed reduced G2/M arrest and LTR transactivation. Altogether, Vpr renders unstimulated T cells more permissive for productive HIV-1 infection and stimulates activation of productively infected as well as virus-exposed T cells. Therefore, it could be involved in the establishment and reactivation of HIV-1 from viral reservoirs and might have an impact on the levels of immune activation, which are determinants of HIV-1 pathogenesis. PMID:27383627

  3. Exhaustion of Activated CD8 T Cells Predicts Disease Progression in Primary HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hickling, Stephen; Hurst, Jacob; Meyerowitz, Jodi; Willberg, Christian B.; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Kinloch, Sabine; Babiker, Abdel; Nwokolo, Nneka; Fox, Julie; Fidler, Sarah; Phillips, Rodney; Frater, John

    2016-01-01

    The rate at which HIV-1 infected individuals progress to AIDS is highly variable and impacted by T cell immunity. CD8 T cell inhibitory molecules are up-regulated in HIV-1 infection and associate with immune dysfunction. We evaluated participants (n = 122) recruited to the SPARTAC randomised clinical trial to determine whether CD8 T cell exhaustion markers PD-1, Lag-3 and Tim-3 were associated with immune activation and disease progression. Expression of PD-1, Tim-3, Lag-3 and CD38 on CD8 T cells from the closest pre-therapy time-point to seroconversion was measured by flow cytometry, and correlated with surrogate markers of HIV-1 disease (HIV-1 plasma viral load (pVL) and CD4 T cell count) and the trial endpoint (time to CD4 count <350 cells/μl or initiation of antiretroviral therapy). To explore the functional significance of these markers, co-expression of Eomes, T-bet and CD39 was assessed. Expression of PD-1 on CD8 and CD38 CD8 T cells correlated with pVL and CD4 count at baseline, and predicted time to the trial endpoint. Lag-3 expression was associated with pVL but not CD4 count. For all exhaustion markers, expression of CD38 on CD8 T cells increased the strength of associations. In Cox models, progression to the trial endpoint was most marked for PD-1/CD38 co-expressing cells, with evidence for a stronger effect within 12 weeks from confirmed diagnosis of PHI. The effect of PD-1 and Lag-3 expression on CD8 T cells retained statistical significance in Cox proportional hazards models including antiretroviral therapy and CD4 count, but not pVL as co-variants. Expression of ‘exhaustion’ or ‘immune checkpoint’ markers in early HIV-1 infection is associated with clinical progression and is impacted by immune activation and the duration of infection. New markers to identify exhausted T cells and novel interventions to reverse exhaustion may inform the development of novel immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:27415828

  4. Exhaustion of Activated CD8 T Cells Predicts Disease Progression in Primary HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Matthias; Pantazis, Nikos; Martin, Genevieve E; Hickling, Stephen; Hurst, Jacob; Meyerowitz, Jodi; Willberg, Christian B; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan; Nwokolo, Nneka; Fox, Julie; Fidler, Sarah; Phillips, Rodney; Frater, John

    2016-07-01

    The rate at which HIV-1 infected individuals progress to AIDS is highly variable and impacted by T cell immunity. CD8 T cell inhibitory molecules are up-regulated in HIV-1 infection and associate with immune dysfunction. We evaluated participants (n = 122) recruited to the SPARTAC randomised clinical trial to determine whether CD8 T cell exhaustion markers PD-1, Lag-3 and Tim-3 were associated with immune activation and disease progression. Expression of PD-1, Tim-3, Lag-3 and CD38 on CD8 T cells from the closest pre-therapy time-point to seroconversion was measured by flow cytometry, and correlated with surrogate markers of HIV-1 disease (HIV-1 plasma viral load (pVL) and CD4 T cell count) and the trial endpoint (time to CD4 count <350 cells/μl or initiation of antiretroviral therapy). To explore the functional significance of these markers, co-expression of Eomes, T-bet and CD39 was assessed. Expression of PD-1 on CD8 and CD38 CD8 T cells correlated with pVL and CD4 count at baseline, and predicted time to the trial endpoint. Lag-3 expression was associated with pVL but not CD4 count. For all exhaustion markers, expression of CD38 on CD8 T cells increased the strength of associations. In Cox models, progression to the trial endpoint was most marked for PD-1/CD38 co-expressing cells, with evidence for a stronger effect within 12 weeks from confirmed diagnosis of PHI. The effect of PD-1 and Lag-3 expression on CD8 T cells retained statistical significance in Cox proportional hazards models including antiretroviral therapy and CD4 count, but not pVL as co-variants. Expression of 'exhaustion' or 'immune checkpoint' markers in early HIV-1 infection is associated with clinical progression and is impacted by immune activation and the duration of infection. New markers to identify exhausted T cells and novel interventions to reverse exhaustion may inform the development of novel immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:27415828

  5. Increased frequency of activated T-cells in the Helicobacter pylori-infected antrum and duodenum.

    PubMed

    Strömberg, E; Lundgren, A; Edebo, A; Lundin, S; Svennerholm, A-M; Lindholm, C

    2003-05-25

    Helicobacter pylori colonize the human stomach and duodenum. The infection has been shown to induce a strong T-cell response in the stomach, whereas the response within the duodenum has been poorly characterized. Furthermore, it remains to be elucidated whether the T-cell response may contribute to ulcer formation in the host. In this study, the frequency of different T-cell subsets, their degree of activation and expression of co-stimulatory receptors in biopsies from the duodenum as well as the antrum were studied by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. It was also evaluated whether there are differences in the T-cell responses between duodenal ulcer patients and asymptomatic carriers that might explain why only 10-15% of the infected subjects develop duodenal ulcers. The frequencies of CD4+, CD8+ and CD45RO+, i.e. memory T-cells, were significantly increased in the antrum, and the number of CD25+ cells was considerably higher in both the antrum and duodenum of duodenal ulcer patients and asymptomatic carriers as compared to uninfected individuals. Interestingly, the levels of immunosuppressive CTLA-4+ cells were significantly higher in the duodenum of duodenal ulcer patients, as compared to the asymptomatic carriers. H. pylori cause activation of T-cells in the duodenum as well as in the stomach. Our observation of higher levels of CTLA-4+ cells in the duodenum of duodenal ulcer patients than in the asymptomatic carriers suggests that a suppressive T-cell response may be related to the development of duodenal ulcers. PMID:12738386

  6. Porcine parvovirus infection induces apoptosis in PK-15 cells through activation of p53 and mitochondria-mediated pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hongling; Huang, Yong; Du, Qian; Luo, Xiaomao; Zhang, Liang; Zhao, Xiaomin; Tong, Dewen

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • PPV reduces PK-15 cells viability by inducing apoptosis. • PPV infection induces apoptosis through mitochondria-mediated pathway. • PPV infection activates p53 to regulate the mitochondria apoptotic signaling. - Abstract: Porcine parvovirus (PPV) infection has been reported to induce the cytopathic effects (CPE) in some special host cells and contribute the occurrence of porcine parvovirus disease, but the molecular mechanisms underlying PPV-induced CPE are not clear. In this study, we investigated the morphological and molecular changes of porcine kidney cell line (PK-15 cells) infected with PPV. The results showed that PPV infection inhibited the viability of PK-15 cells in a time and concentration dependent manner. PPV infection induced typical apoptotic features including chromatin condensation, apoptotic body formation, nuclear fragmentation, and Annexin V-binding activity. Further studies showed that Bax was increased and translocated to mitochondria, whereas Bcl-2 was decreased in PPV-infected cells, which caused mitochondrial outer-membrane permeabilization, resulting in the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, followed by caspase-9 and caspase-3 activation. However, the expression of Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) did not appear significant changes in the process of PPV-induced apoptosis. Moreover, PPV infection activated p53 signaling, which was involved in the activation of apoptotic signaling induced by PPV infection via regulation of Bax and Bcl-2. Taken together, our results demonstrated that PPV infection induced apoptosis in PK-15 cells through activation of p53 and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway. This study may contribute to shed light on the molecular pathogenesis of PPV infection.

  7. Phenotypic and Functional Analysis of Activated Regulatory T Cells Isolated from Chronic Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus-infected Mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyo Jin; Oh, Ji Hoon; Ha, Sang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells, which express Foxp3 as a transcription factor, are subsets of CD4(+) T cells. Treg cells play crucial roles in immune tolerance and homeostasis maintenance by regulating the immune response. The primary role of Treg cells is to suppress the proliferation of effector T (Teff) cells and the production of cytokines such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2. It has been demonstrated that Treg cells' ability to inhibit the function of Teff cells is enhanced during persistent pathogen infection and cancer development. To clarify the function of Treg cells under resting or inflamed conditions, a variety of in vitro suppression assays using mouse or human Treg cells have been devised. The main aim of this study is to develop a method to compare the differences in phenotype and suppressive function between resting and activated Treg cells. To isolate activated Treg cells, mice were infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) clone 13 (CL13), a chronic strain of LCMV. Treg cells isolated from the spleen of LCMV CL13-infected mice exhibited both the activated phenotype and enhanced suppressive activity compared with resting Treg cells isolated from naïve mice. Here, we describe the basic protocol for ex vivo phenotype analysis to distinguish activated Treg cells from resting Treg cells. Furthermore, we describe a protocol for the measurement of the suppressive activity of fully activated Treg cells. PMID:27404802

  8. Neisseria gonorrhoeae enhances HIV-1 infection of primary resting CD4+ T cells through TLR2 activation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jian; Rapista, Aprille; Teleshova, Natalia; Mosoyan, Goar; Jarvis, Gary A; Klotman, Mary E; Chang, Theresa L

    2010-03-15

    Sexually transmitted infections increase the likelihood of HIV-1 transmission. We investigated the effect of Neisseria gonorrheae (gonococcus [GC]) exposure on HIV replication in primary resting CD4(+) T cells, a major HIV target cell during the early stage of sexual transmission of HIV. GC and TLR2 agonists, such as peptidylglycan (PGN), Pam(3)CSK(4), and Pam(3)C-Lip, a GC-derived synthetic lipopeptide, but not TLR4 agonists including LPS or GC lipooligosaccharide enhanced HIV-1 infection of primary resting CD4(+) T cells after viral entry. Pretreatment of CD4(+) cells with PGN also promoted HIV infection. Anti-TLR2 Abs abolished the HIV enhancing effect of GC and Pam(3)C-Lip, indicating that GC-mediated enhancement of HIV infection of resting CD4(+) T cells was through TLR2. IL-2 was required for TLR2-mediated HIV enhancement. PGN and GC induced cell surface expression of T cell activation markers and HIV coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4. The maximal postentry HIV enhancing effect was achieved when PGN was added immediately after viral exposure. Kinetic studies and analysis of HIV DNA products indicated that GC exposure and TLR2 activation enhanced HIV infection at the step of nuclear import. We conclude that GC enhanced HIV infection of primary resting CD4(+) T cells through TLR2 activation, which both increased the susceptibility of primary CD4(+) T cells to HIV infection as well as enhanced HIV-infected CD4(+) T cells at the early stage of HIV life cycle after entry. This study provides a molecular mechanism by which nonulcerative sexually transmitted infections mediate enhancement of HIV infection and has implication for HIV prevention and therapeutics. PMID:20147631

  9. Antigen-dependent and –independent contributions to primary memory CD8 T cell activation and protection following infection

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Matthew D.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.

    2015-01-01

    Memory CD8 T-cell activation, including expression of IFN-γ and granzymeB, can be induced by antigen (Ag)-dependent signals through the T-cell-receptor, or by pathogen-derived inflammatory cytokines in an Ag-independent manner. Recent studies have come to conflicting results regarding the contributions of Ag and/or inflammation to memory CD8 T-cell activation. Additionally, research has indicated that inflammation-driven CD8 T-cell responses during un-related infections (bystander activation) have the potential to provide protection, but whether protection occurs in immuno-competent hosts is unclear. To investigate these questions, we examined activation of virus-specific memory CD8 T-cells following infection with L. monocytogenes either expressing or not cognate Ag. We show that Ag and inflammation act synergistically in vitro to induce memory activation. In vivo, we found that when memory CD8 T-cells significantly contribute to clearance of infection, early activation and continued responses by these cells are enhanced by cognate Ag recognition. Mechanistically, we show that bystander responses by memory are dependent upon the dose of infection and the amount of inflammation elicited following infection and are able to provide protection in IFN-γ deficient mice, but not in immuno-competent hosts. The data elucidate the requirements for memory CD8 T-cell activation and the protective role of bystander responses. PMID:26658291

  10. Lysis of herpesvirus-infected cells by macrophages activated with free or liposome-encapsulated lymphokine produced by a murine T cell hybridoma.

    PubMed Central

    Koff, W C; Showalter, S D; Seniff, D A; Hampar, B

    1983-01-01

    Thioglycolate-induced mouse peritoneal macrophages were activated in vitro by the lymphokine designated macrophage-activating factor (MAF) produced by a murine T cell hybridoma to lyse herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2)-infected murine target cells. Comparison of uninfected BALB/c 10E2 cells with HSV-2-infected 10E2 cells showed that macrophages activated with MAF selectively destroyed HSV-2-infected cells and left uninfected cells unharmed, as measured by an 18-h 51Cr-release assay. In contrast, macrophages treated with medium were as efficient as MAF-activated macrophages in suppressing the production of HSV-2 from virus-infected cells. These findings suggest that macrophages must attain an activated state to lyse HSV-2-infected cells. Finally, incubation of macrophages with liposomes containing MAF was shown to be a highly efficient method for activation of macrophages against HSV-2 infected cells. The ability to selectively destroy herpesvirus-infected cells in vitro by macrophages activated with liposome-encapsulated MAF suggests that the therapeutic efficacy of this treatment in vivo should be evaluated. PMID:6358037

  11. Both Cyclophilin Inhibitors and Direct-Acting Antivirals Prevent PKR Activation in HCV-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bobardt, Michael; Chatterji, Udayan; Lim, Precious; Gawlik, Katarzyna; Gallay, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    We and others demonstrated that the contact between NS5A and the host factor CypA is critical for HCV replication. CypI, by disrupting NS5A-CypA complexes, block HCV replication both in vitro and in patients. Since NS5A also binds to PKR, a central component of the IFN response, we investigated the possibility of a relationship between CypA, NS5A and PKR in the IFN response to HCV. HCV-infected cells treated with CypI, DAAs or IFN were analyzed for the expression and activation of various components of the innate response. We found that CypI (cyclosporine A, alisporivir, NIM811 and sanglifehrins), drastically prevented the activation/phosphorylation, but not the expression of IFN-induced PKR in HCV-infected cells. CypI had no effect on the expression or phosphorylation of other components of the innate response such as eiF2, NF-kB, IRF3, IRF9, STAT1 and STAT2, suggesting a specific effect on PKR. No significant activation of IFN-induced PKR was observed in the absence of HCV. Importantly, we found that several classes of DAAs such as NS3/4A protease, NS5B polymerase and NS5A inhibitors also prevented PKR activation. Furthermore, we found that PKR activation by the dsRNA mimic poly I:C cannot be prevented by CypI or DAAs. Our findings suggest that CypI do not have a unique effect on PKR activation, but rather the suppression of HCV replication by any anti-HCV inhibitor, abrogates PKR activation induced by IFN. Moreover, they suggest that the accumulation of dsRNA intermediates allows HCV to exploit the activation of PKR to counteract the IFN response. PMID:24799968

  12. Infection of vascular endothelial cells with herpes simplex virus enhances tissue factor activity and reduces thrombomodulin expression.

    PubMed Central

    Key, N S; Vercellotti, G M; Winkelmann, J C; Moldow, C F; Goodman, J L; Esmon, N L; Esmon, C T; Jacob, H S

    1990-01-01

    Latent infection of vascular cells with herpes-viruses may play a pathogenic role in the development of human atherosclerosis. In a previous study, we found that cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) infected with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) became procoagulant, exemplified both by their enhanced assembly of the prothrombinase complex and by their inability to reduce adhesion of platelets. We now report two further procoagulant consequences of endothelial HSV infection: loss of surface thrombomodulin (TM) activity and induction of synthesis of tissue factor. Within 4 hr of infection of HUVECs, TM activity measured by thrombin-dependent protein C activation declined 21 +/- 3% (P less than 0.05) and by 18 hr, 48 +/- 5% (P less than 0.001). Similar significant TM decrements accompanied infection of bovine aortic endothelial cells. Identical TM loss was induced with HSV-2 infection but not with adenovirus infection. Decreased surface expression of TM antigen (measured by the specific binding of a polyclonal antibody to bovine TM) closely paralleled the loss of TM activity. As examined by Northern blotting, these losses apparently reflected rapid onset (within 4 hr of HSV infection) loss of mRNA for TM. In contrast, HSV infection induced a viral-dose-dependent increase in synthesis of tissue factor protein, adding to the procoagulant state. The results indicate that loss of endothelial protein-synthetic capacity is not a universal effect of HSV infection. We suggest that the procoagulant state induced by reduction in TM activity and amplified tissue factor activity accompanying HSV infection of endothelium could contribute to deposition of thrombi on atherosclerotic plaques and to the "coagulant-necrosis" state that characterizes HSV-infected mucocutaneous lesions. Images PMID:2169619

  13. Bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 infection activates the unfolded protein response in MDBK cells, leading to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kouji; Fujihara, Masatoshi; Harasawa, Ryô

    2009-06-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 (BVDV-2) strains are divided into cytopathic and non-cytopathic biotypes based on the ablity to induce cytopathic effects in cultured cells. The mechanism of cytopathogenicity of BVDV-2 is not well understood. We examined cytopathogenesis in MDBK cells resulting from BVDV-2 infections by microscopic examinations and microarray analysis. We found that BVDV-2 activates endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling pathways that contribute to apoptosis of infected cells. We also monitored the expression of ER stress marker gene by RT-PCR during BVDV-2 infection and demonstrated that infection of MDBK cells with a cytopathic strain of BVDV-2 induces glucose-regulated protein 78 expression. Infection with BVDV-2 also induces DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3 expression and downregulates the lectin-galactoside-binding soluble 1 level. These results show that cytopathic strains of BVDV-2 induce an ER stress response resulting in apoptosis. PMID:19578292

  14. Antiviral activity of Acacia nilotica against Hepatitis C Virus in liver infected cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) belonging to the family Flaviviridae has infected 3% of the population worldwide and 6% of the population in Pakistan. The only recommended standard treatment is pegylated INF-α plus ribavirin. Due to less compatibility of the standard treatment, thirteen medicinal plants were collected from different areas of Pakistan on the basis of undocumented antiviral reports against different viral infections. Medicinal plants were air dried, extracted and screened out against HCV by infecting HCV inoculums of 3a genotype in liver cells. RT-PCR results demonstrate that acetonic and methanolic extract of Acacia nilotica (AN) showed more than 50% reduction at non toxic concentration. From the above results, it can be concluded that by selecting different molecular targets, specific structure-activity relationship can be achieved by doing mechanistic analysis. So, additional studies are required for the isolation and recognition of antiviral compound in AN to establish its importance as antiviral drug against HCV. For further research, we will scrutinize the synergistic effect of active antiviral compound in combination with standard PEG INF-α and ribavirin which may be helpful in exploring further gateways for antiviral therapy against HCV. PMID:21569385

  15. In Vitro Protein-Synthesizing Activity of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Infected Cell Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Grubman, Marvin J.; Summers, Donald F.

    1973-01-01

    Crude cytoplasmic extracts from vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-infected HeLa cells incorporate radioactive amino acids into hot trichloroacetic acid-precipitable material linearly for 10 to 20 min. The material synthesized in vitro corresponds in molecular weight to four of the five VSV structural proteins. However, synthesis of the viral glycoprotein (G) is significantly reduced, whereas the relative amounts of viral structural proteins L and NS synthesized are increased compared with the ratio of the proteins found in the virion. Fractionation of a VSV-infected crude cytoplasmic extract into a cytoplasmic pellet (20,000 × g for 30 min) and a cytoplasmic supernatant results in a significant reduction in protein synthesizing activity of both fractions, although both contain polysomes. The products synthesized by a cytoplasmic supernatant-directed system included all the VSV structural proteins except the glycoprotein, whereas in an in vitro system directed by the cytoplasmic pellet there is a marked reduction in synthesis of the nucleoprotein (N) and also a small relative increase in synthesis of the glycoprotein. Addition of uninfected, preincubated HeLa or L-cell S10 or a HeLa ribosomal fraction to the VSV-infected cytoplasmic pellet results in a 30- to 60-fold stimulation of 35S-methionine incorporation. However, these uninfected extracts do not stimulate 35S-methionine incorporation by the infected crude cytoplasmic extract or the cytoplasmic supernatant. The products synthesized by the stimulated cytoplasmic pellet now include sizeable amounts of the glycoprotein in addition to the other VSV structural proteins. PMID:4355931

  16. Isolation of Enzymatically Active Replication Complexes from Feline Calicivirus-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Green, Kim Y.; Mory, Aaron; Fogg, Mark H.; Weisberg, Andrea; Belliot, Gaël; Wagner, Mariam; Mitra, Tanaji; Ehrenfeld, Ellie; Cameron, Craig E.; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.

    2002-01-01

    A membranous fraction that could synthesize viral RNA in vitro in the presence of magnesium salt, ribonucleotides, and an ATP-regenerating system was isolated from feline calicivirus (FCV)-infected cells. The enzymatically active component of this fraction was designated FCV replication complexes (RCs), by analogy to other positive-strand RNA viruses. The newly synthesized RNA was characterized by Northern blot analysis, which demonstrated the production of both full-length (8.0-kb) and subgenomic-length (2.5-kb) RNA molecules similar to those synthesized in FCV-infected cells. The identity of the viral proteins associated with the fraction was investigated. The 60-kDa VP1 major capsid protein was the most abundant viral protein detected. VP2, a minor structural protein encoded by open reading frame 3 (ORF3), was also present. Nonstructural proteins associated with the fraction included the precursor polypeptides Pro-Pol (76 kDa) and p30-VPg (43 kDa), as well as the mature nonstructural proteins p32 (derived from the N-terminal region of the ORF1 polyprotein), p30 (the putative “3A-like” protein), and p39 (the putative nucleoside triphosphatase). The isolation of enzymatically active RCs containing both viral and cellular proteins should facilitate efforts to dissect the contributions of the virus and the host to FCV RNA replication. PMID:12163578

  17. Stress responses in flavivirus-infected cells: activation of unfolded protein response and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Blázquez, Ana-Belén; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Merino-Ramos, Teresa; Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    The Flavivirus is a genus of RNA viruses that includes multiple long known human, animal, and zoonotic pathogens such as Dengue virus, yellow fever virus, West Nile virus, or Japanese encephalitis virus, as well as other less known viruses that represent potential threats for human and animal health such as Usutu or Zika viruses. Flavivirus replication is based on endoplasmic reticulum-derived structures. Membrane remodeling and accumulation of viral factors induce endoplasmic reticulum stress that results in activation of a cellular signaling response termed unfolded protein response (UPR), which can be modulated by the viruses for their own benefit. Concomitant with the activation of the UPR, an upregulation of the autophagic pathway in cells infected with different flaviviruses has also been described. This review addresses the current knowledge of the relationship between endoplasmic reticulum stress, UPR, and autophagy in flavivirus-infected cells and the growing evidences for an involvement of these cellular pathways in the replication and pathogenesis of these viruses. PMID:24917859

  18. Immunosuppression associated with the development of chronic infections with Rickettsia tsutsugamushi: adherent suppressor cell activity and macrophage activation.

    PubMed Central

    Jerrells, T R

    1985-01-01

    Measures of general immunocompetency such as lymphocyte responses to mitogens and alloantigens and the ability to produce antibody to T-dependent and T-independent antigens were evaluated during the development of chronic infections with Rickettsia tsutsugamushi resulting from subcutaneous infection of BALB/c mice. It was found that a transient immunosuppression was demonstrable regardless of the infecting strain of rickettsiae; however, the immunosuppression produced by the Karp and Kato strains was more pronounced and longer lived. As a marked splenomegaly resulting from inflammatory macrophage influx accompanied this immunosuppression, mitogen- and antigen-induced lymphocyte proliferation was also evaluated after adherent cell depletion or in the presence of indomethacin, and both treatments significantly improved the responses. Isolated splenic macrophages were shown to suppress the responses of lymphocytes from naive mice as well as to exhibit parameters of activation including tumor cell cytolysis and cytostasis and the ability to inhibit the replication of R. tsutsugamushi in vitro. These data suggest an association between macrophage activation involved in rickettsial clearance and a transient immunosuppression. PMID:2931378

  19. Infection-induced type I interferons activate CD11b on B-1 cells for subsequent lymph node accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Waffarn, Elizabeth E.; Hastey, Christine J.; Dixit, Neha; Choi, Youn Soo; Cherry, Simon; Kalinke, Ulrich; Simon, Scott I.; Baumgarth, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Innate-like B-1a lymphocytes rapidly redistribute to regional mediastinal lymph nodes (MedLN) during influenza infection to generate protective IgM. Here we demonstrate that influenza infection-induced type I interferons directly stimulate body cavity B-1 cells and are a necessary signal required for B-1 cell accumulation in MedLN. Vascular mimetic flow chamber studies show that type I interferons increase ligand-mediated B-1 cell adhesion under shear stress by inducing high-affinity conformation shifts of surface-expressed integrins. In vivo trafficking experiments identify CD11b as the non-redundant, interferon-activated integrin required for B-1 cell accumulation in MedLN. Thus CD11b on B-1 cells senses infection-induced innate signals and facilitates their rapid sequester into secondary lymphoid tissues, thereby regulating the accumulation of polyreactive IgM producers at sites of infection. PMID:26612263

  20. Gut dendritic cell activation links an altered colonic microbiome to mucosal and systemic T-cell activation in untreated HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Dillon, S M; Lee, E J; Kotter, C V; Austin, G L; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, D M; Landay, A L; McManus, M C; Robertson, C E; Frank, D N; McCarter, M D; Wilson, C C

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1-associated disruption of intestinal homeostasis is a major factor contributing to chronic immune activation and inflammation. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, but the impact of HIV-1 infection on intestinal DC number and function has not been extensively studied. We compared the frequency and activation/maturation status of colonic myeloid DC (mDC) subsets (CD1c(+) and CD1c(neg)) and plasmacytoid DCs in untreated HIV-1-infected subjects with uninfected controls. Colonic mDCs in HIV-1-infected subjects had increased CD40 but decreased CD83 expression, and CD40 expression on CD1c(+) mDCs positively correlated with mucosal HIV-1 viral load, with mucosal and systemic cytokine production, and with frequencies of activated colon and blood T cells. Percentage of CD83(+)CD1c(+) mDCs negatively correlated with frequencies of interferon-γ-producing colon CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. CD40 expression on CD1c(+) mDCs positively associated with abundance of high prevalence mucosal Prevotella copri and Prevotella stercorea but negatively associated with a number of low prevalence mucosal species, including Rumminococcus bromii. CD1c(+) mDC cytokine production was greater in response to in vitro stimulation with Prevotella species relative to R. bromii. These findings suggest that, during HIV infection, colonic mDCs become activated upon exposure to mucosal pathobiont bacteria leading to mucosal and systemic immune activation. PMID:25921339

  1. Gut Dendritic Cell Activation Links an Altered Colonic Microbiome to Mucosal and Systemic T Cell Activation in Untreated HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, SM; Lee, EJ; Kotter, CV; Austin, GL; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, DM; Landay, AL; McManus, MC; Robertson, CE; Frank, DN; McCarter, MD; Wilson, CC

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1-associated disruption of intestinal homeostasis is a major factor contributing to chronic immune activation and inflammation. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, but the impact of HIV-1 infection on intestinal DC number and function has not been extensively studied. We compared the frequency and activation/maturation status of colonic myeloid DC (mDC) subsets (CD1c+ and CD1cneg) and plasmacytoid DCs in untreated HIV-1-infected subjects with uninfected controls. Colonic mDCs in HIV-1-infected subjects had increased CD40 but decreased CD83 expression, and CD40 expression on CD1c+ mDCs positively correlated with mucosal HIV-1 viral load, with mucosal and systemic cytokine production, and with frequencies of activated colon and blood T cells. Percent of CD83+CD1c+ mDCs negatively correlated with frequencies of IFN-γ-producing colon CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. CD40 expression on CD1c+ mDCs positively associated with abundance of high prevalence mucosal Prevotella copri and P. stercorea, but negatively associated with a number of low prevalence mucosal species including Rumminococcus bromii. CD1c+ mDC cytokine production was greater in response to in vitro stimulation with Prevotella species relative to R. bromii. These findings suggest that during HIV infection, colonic mDCs become activated upon exposure to mucosal pathobiont bacteria leading to mucosal and systemic immune activation. PMID:25921339

  2. Elevated levels of invariant natural killer T-cell and natural killer cell activation correlate with disease progression in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections

    PubMed Central

    Bächle, Susanna M.; Malone, David F.G.; Buggert, Marcus; Karlsson, Annika C.; Isberg, Per-Erik; Biague, Antonio J.; Norrgren, Hans; Medstrand, Patrik; Moll, Markus; Sandberg, Johan K.; Jansson, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we aimed to investigate the frequency and activation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and natural killer (NK) cells among HIV-1, HIV-2, or dually HIV-1/HIV-2 (HIV-D)-infected individuals, in relation to markers of disease progression. Design: Whole blood samples were collected from treatment-naive HIV-1 (n = 23), HIV-2 (n = 34), and HIV-D (n = 11) infected individuals, as well as HIV-seronegative controls (n = 25), belonging to an occupational cohort in Guinea-Bissau. Methods: Frequencies and activation levels of iNKT and NK cell subsets were analysed using multicolour flow cytometry, and results were related to HIV-status, CD4+ T-cell levels, viral load, and T-cell activation. Results: HIV-1, HIV-D, and viremic HIV-2 individuals had lower numbers of CD4+ iNKT cells in circulation compared with seronegative controls. Numbers of CD56bright NK cells were also reduced in HIV-infected individuals as compared with control study participants. Notably, iNKT cell and NK cell activation levels, assessed by CD38 expression, were increased in HIV-1 and HIV-2 single, as well as dual, infections. HIV-2 viremia was associated with elevated activation levels in CD4+ iNKT cells, CD56bright, and CD56dim NK cells, as compared with aviremic HIV-2 infection. Additionally, disease markers such as CD4+ T-cell percentages, viral load, and CD4+ T-cell activation were associated with CD38 expression levels of both iNKT and NK cells, which activation levels also correlated with each other. Conclusion: Our data indicate that elevated levels of iNKT-cell and NK-cell activation are associated with viremia and disease progression markers in both HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections. PMID:27163705

  3. CD4+ T Cell Depletion, Immune Activation and Increased Production of Regulatory T Cells in the Thymus of HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Bandera, Alessandra; Ferrario, Giulio; Saresella, Marina; Marventano, Ivana; Soria, Alessandro; Zanini, Fabio; Sabbatini, Francesca; Airoldi, Monica; Marchetti, Giulia; Franzetti, Fabio; Trabattoni, Daria; Clerici, Mario; Gori, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Mechanisms by which HIV affects the thymus are multiple and only partially known, and the role of thymic dysfunction in HIV/AIDS immunopathogenesis remains poorly understood. To evaluate the effects of HIV infection on intra-thymic precursors of T cells in HIV-infected adults, we conducted a detailed immunophenotypic study of thymic tissue isolated from 7 HIV-infected and 10 HIV-negative adults who were to undergo heart surgery. We found that thymuses of HIV-infected individuals were characterized by a relative depletion of CD4+ single positive T cells and a corresponding enrichment of CD8+ single positive T cells. In addition, thymocytes derived from HIV-infected subjects showed increased levels of activated and proliferating cells. Our analysis also revealed a decreased expression of interleukin-7 receptor in early thymocytes from HIV-infected individuals, along with an increase in this same expression in mature double- and single-positive cells. Frequency of regulatory T cells (CD25+FoxP3+) was significantly increased in HIV-infected thymuses, particularly in priorly-committed CD4 single positive cells. Our data suggest that HIV infection is associated with a complex set of changes in the immunophenotype of thymocytes, including a reduction of intrathymic CD4+ T cell precursors, increased expression of activation markers, changes in the expression pattern of IL-7R and enrichment of T regulatory cells generation. PMID:20520721

  4. Deficiency of the B Cell-Activating Factor Receptor Results in Limited CD169+ Macrophage Function during Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haifeng C.; Huang, Jun; Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Pandyra, Aleksandra A.; Grusdat, Melanie; Shinde, Prashant; McIlwain, David R.; Maney, Sathish Kumar; Gommerman, Jennifer; Löhning, Max; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Mak, Tak W.; Pieper, Kathrin; Sic, Heiko; Speletas, Matthaios; Eibel, Hermann; Ware, Carl F.; Tumanov, Alexei V.; Kruglov, Andrey A.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.; Häussinger, Dieter; Recher, Mike; Lang, Karl S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The B cell-activating factor (BAFF) is critical for B cell development and humoral immunity in mice and humans. While the role of BAFF in B cells has been widely described, its role in innate immunity remains unknown. Using BAFF receptor (BAFFR)-deficient mice, we characterized BAFFR-related innate and adaptive immune functions following infection with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). We identified a critical role for BAFFR signaling in the generation and maintenance of the CD169+ macrophage compartment. Consequently, Baffr−/− mice exhibited limited induction of innate type I interferon production after viral infection. Lack of BAFFR signaling reduced virus amplification and presentation following viral infection, resulting in highly reduced antiviral adaptive immune responses. As a consequence, BAFFR-deficient mice showed exacerbated and fatal disease after viral infection. Mechanistically, transient lack of B cells in Baffr−/− animals resulted in limited lymphotoxin expression, which is critical for maintenance of CD169+ cells. In conclusion, BAFFR signaling affects both innate and adaptive immune activation during viral infections. IMPORTANCE Viruses cause acute and chronic infections in humans resulting in millions of deaths every year. Innate immunity is critical for the outcome of a viral infection. Innate type I interferon production can limit viral replication, while adaptive immune priming by innate immune cells induces pathogen-specific immunity with long-term protection. Here, we show that BAFFR deficiency not only perturbed B cells, but also resulted in limited CD169+ macrophages. These macrophages are critical in amplifying viral particles to trigger type I interferon production and initiate adaptive immune priming. Consequently, BAFFR deficiency resulted in reduced enforced viral replication, limited type I interferon production, and reduced adaptive immunity compared to BAFFR

  5. Activation of type III interferon genes by pathogenic bacteria in infected epithelial cells and mouse placenta.

    PubMed

    Bierne, Hélène; Travier, Laetitia; Mahlakõiv, Tanel; Tailleux, Ludovic; Subtil, Agathe; Lebreton, Alice; Paliwal, Anupam; Gicquel, Brigitte; Staeheli, Peter; Lecuit, Marc; Cossart, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial infections trigger the expression of type I and II interferon genes but little is known about their effect on type III interferon (IFN-λ) genes, whose products play important roles in epithelial innate immunity against viruses. Here, we studied the expression of IFN-λ genes in cultured human epithelial cells infected with different pathogenic bacteria and in the mouse placenta infected with Listeria monocytogenes. We first showed that in intestinal LoVo cells, induction of IFN-λ genes by L. monocytogenes required bacterial entry and increased further during the bacterial intracellular phase of infection. Other Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterococcus faecalis, also induced IFN-λ genes when internalized by LoVo cells. In contrast, Gram-negative bacteria Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Shigella flexneri and Chlamydia trachomatis did not substantially induce IFN-λ. We also found that IFN-λ genes were up-regulated in A549 lung epithelial cells infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and in HepG2 hepatocytes and BeWo trophoblastic cells infected with L. monocytogenes. In a humanized mouse line permissive to fetoplacental listeriosis, IFN-λ2/λ3 mRNA levels were enhanced in placentas infected with L. monocytogenes. In addition, the feto-placental tissue was responsive to IFN-λ2. Together, these results suggest that IFN-λ may be an important modulator of the immune response to Gram-positive intracellular bacteria in epithelial tissues. PMID:22720036

  6. Involvement of fish signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in nodavirus infection induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Huang, Youhua; Huang, Xiaohong; Yang, Ying; Wang, Wei; Yu, Yepin; Qin, Qiwei

    2015-03-01

    The Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling pathway is an important signaling pathway activated by interferons in response to virus infection. Fish STAT3 has been demonstrated to be involved in Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) infection and virus induced paraptosis, but its effects on the replication of other fish viruses still remained uncertain. Here, the roles of grouper STAT3 (Ec-STAT3) in red spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV) infection were investigated. The present data showed that the distribution of phosphorylated Ec-STAT3 was altered in RGNNV infected fish cells, and the promoter activity of STAT3 was significantly increased during virus infection, suggesting that STAT3 activation was involved in RGNNV infection. Using STAT3 specific inhibitor, we found that inhibition of Ec-STAT3 in vitro did not affect the transcription and protein synthesis of RGNNV coat protein (CP), however, the severity of RGNNV induced vacuolation and autophagy was significantly increased. Meanwhile, at the late stage of virus infection, RGNNV induced necrotic cell death was significantly decreased after inhibition of Ec-STAT3. Further studies indicated that Ec-STAT3 inhibition significantly increased the transcript level of autophagy related genes, including UNC-51-like kinase 2 (ULK2) and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II) induced by RGNNV infection. Moreover, the expression of several pro-inflammatory factors, including TNFα, IL-1β and IL-8 were mediated by Ec-STAT3 during RGNNV infection. Together, our results not only firstly revealed that STAT3 exerted novel roles in response to fish virus infection, but also provided new insights into understanding the roles of STAT3 in different forms of programmed cell death. PMID:25555814

  7. Cytomegalovirus generates long-lived antigen-specific NK cells with diminished bystander activation to heterologous infection

    PubMed Central

    Min-Oo, Gundula

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in the host response to cytomegalovirus (CMV) and can mediate an enhanced response to secondary challenge with CMV. We assessed the ability of mouse CMV (MCMV)–induced memory Ly49H+ NK cells to respond to challenges with influenza, an acute viral infection localized to the lung, and Listeria monocytogenes, a systemic bacterial infection. MCMV-memory NK cells did not display enhanced activation or proliferation after infection with influenza or Listeria, as compared with naive Ly49H+ or Ly49H− NK cells. Memory NK cells also showed impaired activation compared with naive cells when challenged with a mutant MCMV lacking m157, highlighting their antigen-specific response. Ex vivo, MCMV-memory NK cells displayed reduced phosphorylation of STAT4 and STAT1 in response to stimulation by IL-12 and type I interferon (IFN), respectively, and IFN-γ production was reduced in response to IL-12 + IL-18 compared with naive NK cells. However, costimulation of MCMV-memory NK cells with IL-12 and m157 antigen rescues their impaired response compared with cytokines alone. These findings reveal that MCMV-primed memory NK cells are diminished in their response to cytokine-driven bystander responses to heterologous infections as they become specialized and antigen-specific for the control of MCMV upon rechallenge. PMID:25422494

  8. Normal T-cell turnover in sooty mangabeys harboring active simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, L A; Lewin, S R; Zhang, L; Gettie, A; Luckay, A; Martin, L N; Skulsky, E; Ho, D D; Cheng-Mayer, C; Marx, P A

    2000-02-01

    Sooty mangabeys naturally infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) remain healthy though they harbor viral loads comparable to those in rhesus macaques that progress to AIDS. To assess the immunologic basis of disease resistance in mangabeys, we compared the effect of SIV infection on T-cell regeneration in both monkey species. Measurement of the proliferation marker Ki-67 by flow cytometry showed that mangabeys harbored proliferating T cells at a level of 3 to 4% in peripheral blood irrespective of their infection status. In contrast, rhesus macaques demonstrated a naturally high fraction of proliferating T cells (7%) that increased two- to threefold following SIV infection. Ki-67(+) T cells were predominantly CD45RA(-), indicating increased proliferation of memory cells in macaques. Quantitation of an episomal DNA product of T-cell receptor alpha rearrangement (termed alpha1 circle) showed that the concentration of recent thymic emigrants in blood decreased with age over a 2-log unit range in both monkey species, consistent with age-related thymic involution. SIV infection caused a limited decrease of alpha1 circle numbers in mangabeys as well as in macaques. Dilution of alpha1 circles by T-cell proliferation likely contributed to this decrease, since alpha1 circle numbers and Ki-67(+) fractions correlated negatively. These findings are compatible with immune exhaustion mediated by abnormal T-cell proliferation, rather than with early thymic failure, in SIV-infected macaques. Normal T-cell turnover in SIV-infected mangabeys provides an explanation for the long-term maintenance of a functional immune system in these hosts. PMID:10627531

  9. Control of Viremia Enables Acquisition of Resting Memory B Cells with Age and Normalization of Activated B Cell Phenotypes in HIV-Infected Children.

    PubMed

    Muema, Daniel M; Macharia, Gladys N; Hassan, Amin S; Mwaringa, Shalton M; Fegan, Greg W; Berkley, James A; Nduati, Eunice W; Urban, Britta C

    2015-08-01

    HIV affects the function of all lymphocyte populations, including B cells. Phenotypic and functional defects of B cells in HIV-infected adults have been well characterized, but defects in children have not been studied to the same extent. We determined the proportion of B cell subsets and frequencies of Ag-specific memory B cells in peripheral blood from HIV-infected children and healthy controls, using flow cytometry and B cell ELISPOT, respectively. In addition, we measured the quantities and avidities of plasma Abs against various Ags by ELISA. We also determined plasma levels of BAFF and expression of BAFF receptors on B cells. Children with high HIV viremia had increased proportions of activated mature B cells, tissue-like memory B cells and plasmablasts, and low proportions of naive B cells when compared with community controls and children with low HIV viremia, similar to adults infected with HIV. HIV-infected groups had lower proportions of resting memory B cells than did community controls. Notably, high HIV viremia prevented the age-dependent accumulation of class-switched resting memory B cells. HIV-infected children, regardless of the level of viremia, showed lower quantities and avidities of IgG and lower frequencies of memory B cells against Expanded Program on Immunization vaccines. The HIV-infected children had an altered BAFF profile that could have affected their B cell compartment. Therefore, B cell defects in HIV-infected children are similar to those seen in HIV-infected adults. However, control of HIV viremia is associated with normalization of activated B cell subsets and allows age-dependent accumulation of resting memory B cells. PMID:26116511

  10. Control of Viremia Enables Acquisition of Resting Memory B Cells with Age and Normalization of Activated B Cell Phenotypes in HIV-Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Muema, Daniel M.; Macharia, Gladys N.; Hassan, Amin S.; Mwaringa, Shalton M.; Fegan, Greg W.; Berkley, James A.; Urban, Britta C.

    2015-01-01

    HIV affects the function of all lymphocyte populations, including B cells. Phenotypic and functional defects of B cells in HIV-infected adults have been well characterized, but defects in children have not been studied to the same extent. We determined the proportion of B cell subsets and frequencies of Ag-specific memory B cells in peripheral blood from HIV-infected children and healthy controls, using flow cytometry and B cell ELISPOT, respectively. In addition, we measured the quantities and avidities of plasma Abs against various Ags by ELISA. We also determined plasma levels of BAFF and expression of BAFF receptors on B cells. Children with high HIV viremia had increased proportions of activated mature B cells, tissue-like memory B cells and plasmablasts, and low proportions of naive B cells when compared with community controls and children with low HIV viremia, similar to adults infected with HIV. HIV-infected groups had lower proportions of resting memory B cells than did community controls. Notably, high HIV viremia prevented the age-dependent accumulation of class-switched resting memory B cells. HIV-infected children, regardless of the level of viremia, showed lower quantities and avidities of IgG and lower frequencies of memory B cells against Expanded Program on Immunization vaccines. The HIV-infected children had an altered BAFF profile that could have affected their B cell compartment. Therefore, B cell defects in HIV-infected children are similar to those seen in HIV-infected adults. However, control of HIV viremia is associated with normalization of activated B cell subsets and allows age-dependent accumulation of resting memory B cells. PMID:26116511

  11. Adenovirus E1A gene induction of susceptibility to lysis by natural killer cells and activated macrophages in infected rodent cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, J L; May, D L; Lewis, A M; Walker, T A

    1987-01-01

    Rodent cells immortalized by the E1A gene of nononcogenic adenoviruses are susceptible to lysis by natural killer (NK) cells and activated macrophages. This cytolysis-susceptible phenotype may contribute to the rejection of adenovirus-transformed cells by immunocompetent animals. Such increased cytolytic susceptibility has also been observed with infected rodent cells. This infection model provided a means to study the role of E1A gene products in induction of cytolytic susceptibility without cell selection during transformation. Deletion mutations outside of the E1A gene had no effect on adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) or Ad5 induction of cytolytic susceptibility in infected hamster cells, while E1A-minus mutant viruses could not induce this phenotype. E1A mutant viruses that induced expression of either E1A 12S or 13S mRNA in infected cells were competent to induce cytolytic susceptibility. Furthermore, there was a correlation between the accumulation of E1A gene products in Ad5-infected cells and the level of susceptibility of such target cells to lysis by NK cells. The results of coinfection studies indicated that the E1A gene products of highly oncogenic Ad12 could not complement the lack of induction of cytolytic susceptibility by E1A-minus Ad5 virus in infected cells and also could not block induction of this infected-cell phenotype by Ad5. These data suggest that expression of the E1A gene of nononcogenic adenoviruses may cause the elimination of infected cells by the immunologically nonspecific host inflammatory cell response prior to cellular transformation. The lack of induction of this cytolysis-susceptible phenotype by Ad12 E1A may result in an increased persistence of Ad12-infected cells in vivo and may lead to an increased Ad12-transformed cell burden for the host. Images PMID:2959793

  12. Salmonella Infection Drives Promiscuous B Cell Activation Followed by Extrafollicular Affinity Maturation.

    PubMed

    Di Niro, Roberto; Lee, Seung-Joo; Vander Heiden, Jason A; Elsner, Rebecca A; Trivedi, Nikita; Bannock, Jason M; Gupta, Namita T; Kleinstein, Steven H; Vigneault, Francois; Gilbert, Tamara J; Meffre, Eric; McSorley, Stephen J; Shlomchik, Mark J

    2015-07-21

    The B cell response to Salmonella typhimurium (STm) occurs massively at extrafollicular sites, without notable germinal centers (GCs). Little is known in terms of its specificity. To expand the knowledge of antigen targets, we screened plasmablast (PB)-derived monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for Salmonella specificity, using ELISA, flow cytometry, and antigen microarray. Only a small fraction (0.5%-2%) of the response appeared to be Salmonella-specific. Yet, infection of mice with limited B cell receptor (BCR) repertoires impaired the response, suggesting that BCR specificity was important. We showed, using laser microdissection, that somatic hypermutation (SHM) occurred efficiently at extrafollicular sites leading to affinity maturation that in turn led to detectable STm Ag-binding. These results suggest a revised vision of how clonal selection and affinity maturation operate in response to Salmonella. Clonal selection initially is promiscuous, activating cells with virtually undetectable affinity, yet SHM and selection occur during the extrafollicular response yielding higher affinity, detectable antibodies. PMID:26187411

  13. Lymphoid cells in the spleens of woodchuck hepatitis virus-infected woodchucks are a site of active viral replication.

    PubMed Central

    Korba, B E; Wells, F; Tennant, B C; Cote, P J; Gerin, J L

    1987-01-01

    Lymphoid cells were purified from the spleens of 15 woodchucks and examined for the presence of woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV). Lymphoid cells from the spleens of eight of eight chronically infected animals contained high levels of WHV RNA and DNA. A 100-fold lower level of WHV DNA was found in the spleen from one of five animals that had recovered from acute WHV infections 2 years before this analysis. No WHV nucleic acids were observed in either of two uninfected animals. WHV DNA patterns in the lymphoid cells from the spleens of the chronically infected animals, which included the presence of single-stranded DNA and RNA-DNA hybrid molecules, were identical to those observed in WHV-infected liver. WHV DNA in these cells was present in intact, 27-nm core particles which also contained the endogenous DNA polymerase activity. These results indicate that the spleen is a site of active WHV DNA replication and is most likely a major source of WHV-infected cells in the circulating lymphoid cell population. Images PMID:3573141

  14. Role of type I interferons in inflammasome activation, cell death, and disease during microbial infection

    PubMed Central

    Malireddi, R. K. Subbarao; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2013-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) were discovered over a half-century ago as antiviral factors. The role of type I IFNs has been studied in the pathogenesis of both acute and chronic microbial infections. Deregulated type I IFN production results in a damaging cascade of cell death, inflammation, and immunological host responses that can lead to tissue injury and disease progression. Here, we summarize the role of type I IFNs in the regulation of cell death and disease during different microbial infections, ranging from viruses and bacteria to fungal pathogens. Understanding the specific mechanisms driving type I IFN-mediated cell death and disease could aid in the development of targeted therapies. PMID:24273750

  15. Natural killer cell activation enhances immune pathology and promotes chronic infection by limiting CD8+ T-cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Lang, Philipp A; Lang, Karl S; Xu, Haifeng C; Grusdat, Melanie; Parish, Ian A; Recher, Mike; Elford, Alisha R; Dhanji, Salim; Shaabani, Namir; Tran, Charles W; Dissanayake, Dilan; Rahbar, Ramtin; Ghazarian, Magar; Brüstle, Anne; Fine, Jason; Chen, Peter; Weaver, Casey T; Klose, Christoph; Diefenbach, Andreas; Häussinger, Dieter; Carlyle, James R; Kaech, Susan M; Mak, Tak W; Ohashi, Pamela S

    2012-01-24

    Infections with HIV, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus can turn into chronic infections, which currently affect more than 500 million patients worldwide. It is generally thought that virus-mediated T-cell exhaustion limits T-cell function, thus promoting chronic disease. Here we demonstrate that natural killer (NK) cells have a negative impact on the development of T-cell immunity by using the murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. NK cell-deficient (Nfil3(-/-), E4BP4(-/-)) mice exhibited a higher virus-specific T-cell response. In addition, NK cell depletion caused enhanced T-cell immunity in WT mice, which led to rapid virus control and prevented chronic infection in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus clone 13- and reduced viral load in DOCILE-infected animals. Further experiments showed that NKG2D triggered regulatory NK cell functions, which were mediated by perforin, and limited T-cell responses. Therefore, we identified an important role of regulatory NK cells in limiting T-cell immunity during virus infection. PMID:22167808

  16. Caspase-8 activity is part of the BeWo trophoblast cell defense mechanisms against Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Ileana; Droguett, Daniel; Castillo, Christian; Liempi, Ana; Muñoz, Lorena; Maya, Juan Diego; Galanti, Norbel; Kemmerling, Ulrike

    2016-09-01

    Congenital Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi that must cross the placental barrier during transmission. The trophoblast constitutes the first tissue in contact with the maternal-blood circulating parasite. Importantly, the congenital transmission rates are low, suggesting the presence of local placental defense mechanisms. Cellular proliferation and differentiation as well as apoptotic cell death are induced by the parasite and constitute part of the epithelial turnover of the trophoblast, which has been suggested to be part of those placental defenses. On the other hand, caspase-8 is an essential molecule in the modulation of trophoblast turnover by apoptosis and by epithelial differentiation. As an approach to study whether T. cruzi induced trophoblast turnover and infection is mediated by caspase-8, we infected BeWo cells (a trophoblastic cell line) with the parasite and determined in the infected cells the expression and enzymatic activity of caspase-8, DNA synthesis (as proliferation marker), β-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) (as differentiation marker) and activity of Caspase-3 (as apoptotic death marker). Parasite load in BeWo cells was measured by DNA quantification using qPCR and cell counting. Our results show that T. cruzi induces caspase-8 activity and that its inhibition increases trophoblast cells infection while decreases parasite induced cellular differentiation and apoptotic cell death, but not cellular proliferation. Thus, caspase-8 activity is part of the BeWo trophoblast cell defense mechanisms against T. cruzi infection. Together with our previous results, we suggest that the trophoblast turnover is part of local placental anti-parasite mechanisms. PMID:27328973

  17. Comparative analysis of signature genes in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)-infected porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells at differential activation statuses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activation statuses of monocytic cells, e.g. monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), are critically important for antiviral immunity. In particular, some devastating viruses, including porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), are capable of directly infecting these cell...

  18. Dysfunctional B-cell activation in cirrhosis due to hepatitis C infection associated with disappearance of CD27+ B-cell population

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Hiroyoshi; Iyer, Tara K.; Carpenter, Erica; Li, Hong; Chang, Kyong-Mi; Vonderheide, Robert H.; Kaplan, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis C virus infection is a leading cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Both advanced solid tumors and hepatitis C have previously been associated with memory B-cell dysfunction. In this study we sought to dissect the impact of viral infection, cirrhosis and liver cancer on memory B-cell frequency and function in the spectrum of HCV disease. Methods Peripheral blood from healthy donors, HCV-infected patients with F1–F2 liver fibrosis, HCV-infected patients with cirrhosis, patients with HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma and non-HCV-infected cirrhotics were assessed for B-cell phenotype by flow cytometry. Isolated B-cells were stimulated with anti-CD40 antibodies and TLR9 agonist for assessment of costimulation marker expression, cytokine production, immunoglobulin production and CD4+ T-cell allostimulatory capacity. Results CD27+ memory B-cells, and more specifically CD27+IgM+ B-cells, were markedly less frequent in cirrhotic patients independent of HCV infection. Circulating B-cells in cirrhotics were hyporesponsive to CD40/TLR9 activation as characterized by CD70 upregulation, TNFβ secretion, IgG production and T-cell allostimulation. Lastly, blockade of TLR4 and TLR9 signaling abrogated the activation of normal donor B-cells by cirrhotic plasma suggesting a role for bacterial translocation in driving B-cell changes in cirrhosis. Conclusion Profound abnormalities in B-cell phenotype and function occur in cirrhosis independent of hepatitis C viral infection. These B-cell defects may explain in part the vaccine hyporesponsiveness and susceptibility to bacterial infection in this population. PMID:21932384

  19. TAK1 regulates NF-{Kappa}B and AP-1 activation in airway epithelial cells following RSV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Nilay; Liu Tianshuang; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Casola, Antonella

    2011-09-30

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of epidemic respiratory diseases in infants and young children. RSV infection of airway epithelial cells induces the expression of immune/inflammatory genes through the activation of a subset of transcription factors, including Nuclear Factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) and AP-1. In this study, we have investigated the signaling pathway leading to activation of these two transcription factors in response to RSV infection. Our results show that IKK{beta} plays a key role in viral-induced NF-{kappa}B activation, while JNK regulates AP-1-dependent gene transcription, as demonstrated by using kinase inactive proteins and chemical inhibitors of the two kinases. Inhibition of TAK1 activation, by overexpression of kinase inactive TAK1 or using cells lacking TAK1 expression, significantly reduced RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B and AP-1 nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity, as well as NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene expression, identifying TAK1 as an important upstream signaling molecule regulating RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B and AP-1 activation. - Highlights: > IKK{beta} is a major kinase involved in RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. > JNK regulates AP-1-dependent gene transcription in RSV infection. > TAK1 is a critical upstream signaling molecule for both pathways in infected cells.

  20. Infected dendritic cells are sufficient to mediate the adjuvant activity generated by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles

    PubMed Central

    Tonkin, Daniel R; Whitmore, Alan; Johnston, Robert E; Barro, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Replicon particles derived from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) are infectious non-propagating particles which act as a safe and potent systemic, mucosal, and cellular adjuvant when delivered with antigen. VEE and VEE replicon particles (VRP) can target multiple cell types including dendritic cells (DCs). The role of these cell types in VRP adjuvant activity has not been previously evaluated, and for these studies we focused on the contribution of DCs to the response to VRP. By analysis of VRP targeting in the draining lymph node, we found that VRP induced rapid recruitment of TNF-secreting monocyte-derived inflammatory dendritic cells. VRP preferentially infected these inflammatory DCs as well as classical DCs and macrophages, with less efficient infection of other cell types. DC depletion suggested that the interaction of VRP with classical DCs was required for recruitment of inflammatory DCs, induction of high levels of many cytokines, and for stable transport of VRP to the draining lymph node. Additionally, in vitro-infected DCs enhanced antigen-specific responses by CD4 and CD8 T cells. By transfer of VRP-infected DCs into mice we showed that these DCs generated an inflammatory state in the draining lymph node similar to that achieved by VRP injection. Most importantly, VRP-infected DCs were sufficient to establish robust adjuvant activity in mice comparable to that produced by VRP injection. These findings indicate that VRP infect, recruit and activate both classical and inflammatory DCs, and those DCs become mediators of the VRP adjuvant activity. PMID:22531556

  1. Exposure of Plasmodium sporozoites to the intracellular concentration of potassium enhances infectivity and reduces cell passage activity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kota Arun; Garcia, Celia R S; Chandran, Vandana R; Van Rooijen, N; Zhou, Yingyao; Winzeler, Elizabeth; Nussenzweig, Victor

    2007-11-01

    Malaria sporozoites migrate through several cells prior to a productive invasion that involves the formation of a parasitophorous vacuole (PV) where sporozoites undergo transformation into Exo-erythorcytic forms (EEFs). The precise mechanism leading to sporozoite activation for invasion is unknown, but prior traversal of host cells is required. During cell migration sporozoites are exposed to large shifts in K(+) concentration. We report here that incubation of sporozoites to the intracellular K(+) concentration enhances 8-10 times the infectivity of Plasmodium berghei and 4-5 times the infectivity of Plasmodium yoelli sporozoites for a hepatocyte cell line, while simultaneously decreasing cell passage activity. The K(+) enhancing effect was time and concentration dependent, and was significantly decreased by K(+) channel inhibitors. Potassium-treated P. berghei sporozoites also showed enhanced numbers of EEFs in non-permissive cell lines. Treated sporozoites had reduced infectivity for mice, but infectivity was enhanced upon Kupffer cell depletion. Transcriptional analysis of K(+) treated and control sporozoites revealed a high degree of correlation in their levels of gene expression, indicating that the observed phenotypic changes are not due to radical changes in gene transcription. Only seven genes were upregulated by more than two-fold in K(+) treated sporozoites. The highest level was noted in PP2C, a phosphatase known to dephosphorylate the AKT potassium channel in plants. PMID:17714805

  2. Application of speckle image correlation for real-time assessment of metabolic activity in herpes virus-infected cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, A. P.; Malygin, A. S.; Mikhailova, J. A.; Borodin, E. M.; Bakharev, A. A.; Poryvayeva, A. P.

    2014-09-01

    Earlier we reported developing a speckle interferometry technique and a device designed to assess the metabolic activity of a cell monolayer cultivated on a glass substrate. This paper aimed at upgrading the technique and studying its potential for real-time assessment of herpes virus development process. Speckle dynamics was recorded in the image plane of intact and virus-infected cell monolayer. HLE-3, L-41 and Vero cells were chosen as research targets. Herpes simplex virus-1-(HSV-1)- infected cell cultures were studied. For 24 h we recorded the digital value of optical signal I in one pixel and parameter η characterizing change in the distribution of the optical signal on 10 × 10-pixel areas. The coefficient of multiple determination calculated by η time dependences for three intact cell cultures equals 0.94. It was demonstrated that the activity parameters are significantly different for intact and virus-infected cells. The difference of η value for intact and HSV-1-infected cells is detectable 10 minutes from the experiment start.

  3. TREM2 governs Kupffer cell activation and explains belr1 genetic resistance to malaria liver stage infection

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Lígia Antunes; Rodrigues-Duarte, Lurdes; Rodo, Joana; Vieira de Moraes, Luciana; Marques, Isabel; Penha-Gonçalves, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium liver stage infection is a target of interest for the treatment of and vaccination against malaria. Here we used forward genetics to search for mechanisms underlying natural host resistance to infection and identified triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) and MHC class II molecules as determinants of Plasmodium berghei liver stage infection in mice. Locus belr1 confers resistance to malaria liver stage infection. The use of newly derived subcongenic mouse lines allowed to map belr1 to a 4-Mb interval on mouse chromosome 17 that contains the Trem2 gene. We show that Trem2 expression in the nonparenchymal liver cells closely correlates with resistance to liver stage infection, implicating TREM2 as a mediator of the belr1 genetic effect. Trem2-deficient mice are more susceptible to liver stage infection than their WT counterparts. We found that Kupffer cells are the principle cells expressing TREM2 in the liver, and that Trem2−/− Kupffer cells display altered functional activation on exposure to P. berghei sporozoites. TREM2 expression in Kupffer cells contributes to the limitation of parasite expansion in isolated hepatocytes in vitro, potentially explaining the increased susceptibility of Trem2−/− mice to liver stage infection. The MHC locus was also found to control liver parasite burden, possibly owing to the expression of MHC class II molecules in hepatocytes. Our findings implicate unexpected Kupffer–hepatocyte cross-talk in the control Plasmodium liver stage infection and demonstrate that TREM2 is involved in host responses against the malaria parasite. PMID:24218563

  4. Fatal cytotoxic T-cell proliferation in chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection in childhood.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Atsuko; Ito, Masafumi; Saga, Shinsuke

    2002-02-01

    Histopathologic features of 5 cases (4 boys and 1 girl; 4-9 years old) with severe chronic active Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection are discussed. All patients died within 3 years after disease onset without developing hematolymphoid malignant neoplasms. The pathology specimens (autopsy, 2 cases; multiple organs and tissues obtained by surgery or biopsy, 3 cases) showed polymorphic lymphocytic proliferation in the lymph nodes (4/5) and spleen (3/3), and systemic lymphocytic infiltration of the liver (4/4), lung (2/2), bone marrow (3/4), and kidney (2/2). Skin lesions were noted clinically in 3 of 5 cases. Two cases had coronary artery aneurysm due to lymphocytic vasculitis. The lymphocytes had a characteristic phenotype of cytotoxic T cells expressing CD3, CD8, and cytotoxic molecules, and were negative for CD4. EBV-encoded small nonpolyadenylated RNAs were detected in the nuclei of the lymphocytes, but latent membrane protein 1 and EBNA2 were not seen. In 4 of 4 cases, an oligoclonal growth pattern of EBV was determined after detecting terminal repetitive sequences by Southern blot. In 3 of 3 cases, the lymphocytes did not have T-cell receptor beta or J(H) gene rearrangement. PMID:11863225

  5. High-risk oncogenic HPV genotype infection associates with increased immune activation and T cell exhaustion in ART-suppressed HIV-1-infected women.

    PubMed

    Papasavvas, Emmanouil; Surrey, Lea F; Glencross, Deborah K; Azzoni, Livio; Joseph, Jocelin; Omar, Tanvier; Feldman, Michael D; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Siminya, Maureen; Swarts, Avril; Yin, Xiangfan; Liu, Qin; Firnhaber, Cynthia; Montaner, Luis J

    2016-05-01

    Persistence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical disease in the context of HIV co-infection can be influenced by introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and sustained immune activation despite ART. We conducted a cross-sectional study in order to evaluate immune activation/exhaustion in ART-suppressed HIV(+) women with or without high-risk (HR) HPV-related cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). 55 South African women were recruited in three groups: HR (-) (n = 16) and HR (+) (n = 15) HPV with negative cervical histopathology, and HR (+) HPV with CIN grade 1/2/3 (n = 24). Sampling included endocervical brushing (HPV DNA genotyping), Pap smear (cytology), colposcopic punch biopsy (histopathology, histochemical evaluation of immune cells), and peripheral blood (clinical assessment, flow cytometry-based immune subset characterization). Statistics were done using R2.5.1. Irrespective of the presence of CIN, HR (+) HPV women had higher circulating levels of T cells expressing markers of activation/exhaustion (CD38, PD1, CTLA-4, BTLA, CD160), Tregs, and myeloid subsets expressing corresponding ligands (PDL1, PDL2, CD86, CD40, HVEM) than HR (-) HPV women. A decrease in circulating NK cells was associated with CIN grade. CD4(+) T cell count associated negatively with T cell exhaustion and expression of negative regulators on myeloid cells. Women with CIN when compared to HR (-) HPV women, had higher cervical cell density in stroma and epithelium for CD4(+), CD68(+), and CD11c(+) cells, and only in stroma for CD8(+) cells. We conclude that in ART-suppressed HIV-infected women with HPV co-infection the levels of T and myeloid cell activation/exhaustion are associated with the presence of HR HPV genotypes. PMID:27467943

  6. Normal and Cystic Fibrosis Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exhibit Distinct Gene Activation Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Balloy, Viviane; Varet, Hugo; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Proux, Caroline; Jagla, Bernd; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Tabary, Olivier; Corvol, Harriet; Chignard, Michel; Guillot, Loïc

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims In cystic fibrosis (CF), Pseudomonas aeruginosa is not eradicated from the lower respiratory tract and is associated with epithelial inflammation that eventually causes tissue damage. To identify the molecular determinants of an effective response to P. aeruginosa infection, we performed a transcriptomic analysis of primary human bronchial epithelial cells from healthy donors (CTRL) 2, 4, and 6 h after induced P. aeruginosa infection. Compared to noninfected cells, infected cells showed changes in gene activity, which were most marked 6 h postinfection and usually consisted in upregulation. Results By comparing for each time point of infection, the transcriptomic response of epithelial cells from CF patients and healthy donors, we identified 851, 638, 667, and 980 differentially expressed genes 0, 2, 4, and 6 h postinfection, respectively. Gene selection followed by bioinformatic analysis showed that most of the differentially expressed genes, either up- or downregulated, were in the protein-binding and catalytic gene-ontology categories. Finally, we established that the protein products of the genes exhibiting the greatest differential upregulation (CSF2, CCL2, TNF, CSF3, MMP1, and MMP10) between CF patients and CTRL were produced in higher amounts by infected cells from CF patients versus CTRL. Conclusions The differentially expressed genes in CF patients may constitute a signature for a detrimental inflammatory response and for an inefficient P. aeruginosa host-cell response. PMID:26485688

  7. Nuclease Activity of Legionella pneumophila Cas2 Promotes Intracellular Infection of Amoebal Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, Felizza F.; Mallama, Celeste A.; Fairbairn, Stephanie G.

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the primary agent of Legionnaires' disease, flourishes in both natural and man-made environments by growing in a wide variety of aquatic amoebae. Recently, we determined that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila promotes intracellular infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmannella vermiformis, the two amoebae most commonly linked to cases of disease. The Cas2 family of proteins is best known for its role in the bacterial and archeal clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)–CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system that constitutes a form of adaptive immunity against phage and plasmid. However, the infection event mediated by L. pneumophila Cas2 appeared to be distinct from this function, because cas2 mutants exhibited infectivity defects in the absence of added phage or plasmid and since mutants lacking the CRISPR array or any one of the other cas genes were not impaired in infection ability. We now report that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila has both RNase and DNase activities, with the RNase activity being more pronounced. By characterizing a catalytically deficient version of Cas2, we determined that nuclease activity is critical for promoting infection of amoebae. Also, introduction of Cas2, but not its catalytic mutant form, into a strain of L. pneumophila that naturally lacks a CRISPR-Cas locus caused that strain to be 40- to 80-fold more infective for amoebae, unequivocally demonstrating that Cas2 facilitates the infection process independently of any other component encoded within the CRISPR-Cas locus. Finally, a cas2 mutant was impaired for infection of Willaertia magna but not Naegleria lovaniensis, suggesting that Cas2 promotes infection of most but not all amoebal hosts. PMID:25547789

  8. Cytomegalovirus Infection of the Rat Developing Brain In Utero Prominently Targets Immune Cells and Promotes Early Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Cloarec, Robin; Bauer, Sylvian; Luche, Hervé; Buhler, Emmanuelle; Pallesi-Pocachard, Emilie; Salmi, Manal; Courtens, Sandra; Massacrier, Annick; Grenot, Pierre; Teissier, Natacha; Watrin, Françoise; Schaller, Fabienne; Adle-Biassette, Homa; Gressens, Pierre; Malissen, Marie; Stamminger, Thomas; Streblow, Daniel N.; Bruneau, Nadine; Szepetowski, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital cytomegalovirus infections are a leading cause of neurodevelopmental disorders in human and represent a major health care and socio-economical burden. In contrast with this medical importance, the pathophysiological events remain poorly known. Murine models of brain cytomegalovirus infection, mostly neonatal, have brought recent insights into the possible pathogenesis, with convergent evidence for the alteration and possible involvement of brain immune cells. Objectives and Methods In order to confirm and expand those findings, particularly concerning the early developmental stages following infection of the fetal brain, we have created a model of in utero cytomegalovirus infection in the developing rat brain. Rat cytomegalovirus was injected intraventricularly at embryonic day 15 (E15) and the brains analyzed at various stages until the first postnatal day, using a combination of gene expression analysis, immunohistochemistry and multicolor flow cytometry experiments. Results Rat cytomegalovirus infection was increasingly seen in various brain areas including the choroid plexi and the ventricular and subventricular areas and was prominently detected in CD45low/int, CD11b+ microglial cells, in CD45high, CD11b+ cells of the myeloid lineage including macrophages, and in CD45+, CD11b– lymphocytes and non-B non-T cells. In parallel, rat cytomegalovirus infection of the developing rat brain rapidly triggered a cascade of pathophysiological events comprising: chemokines upregulation, including CCL2-4, 7 and 12; infiltration by peripheral cells including B-cells and monocytes at E17 and P1, and T-cells at P1; and microglia activation at E17 and P1. Conclusion In line with previous findings in neonatal murine models and in human specimen, our study further suggests that neuroimmune alterations might play critical roles in the early stages following cytomegalovirus infection of the brain in utero. Further studies are now needed to determine which

  9. Infection by HIV-1 blocked by binding of dextrin 2-sulphate to the cell surface of activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cultured T-cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shaunak, S; Gooderham, N J; Edwards, R J; Payvandi, N; Javan, C M; Baggett, N; MacDermot, J; Weber, J N; Davies, D S

    1994-01-01

    1. Structural analogues of a sulphated polysaccharide, dextrin sulphate, were synthesized and tested for their ability to block infection by HIV-1. Using the T-cell lines, C8166 and HPB-ALL, and the laboratory adapted strains of HIV-1.MN, HIV-1.IIIb and HIV-1.RF, dextrin 2-sulphate (D2S) combined the best combination of high anti-HIV-1 activity (95% inhibitory concentration (IC95) = 230 nM) and low anticoagulant activity. It also blocked infection of activated peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMN) cells by five primary viral isolates at an IC95 of 230-3700 nM depending upon the primary viral isolate tested. 2. In saturation binding studies, [3H]-D2S bound to a cell surface protein on HPB-ALL cells in a specific and saturable manner with a Kd of 82 +/- 14 nM and a Bmax of 4.8 +/- 0.3 pmol/10(6) cells. It bound to other human T-cell lines in a similar manner. 3. There was very little binding of [3H]-D2S to freshly isolated PBMN cells (Bmax 0.18 +/- 0.03 pmol/10(6) cells) and these cells could not be infected by HIV-1. Culture of PBMN cells in lymphocyte growth medium (LGM) containing IL-2 did not significantly change the Bmax of [3H]-D2S. In contrast, PBMN cells which had been cultured with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA; 5 micrograms ml-1) for 72 h had a Bmax of [3H]-D2S binding of 7.2 +/- 0.1 pmol/10(6) cells and these cells could be infected by HIV-1. Removal of the PHA and further culture of the PBMN cells in LGM containing IL-2 resulted in a fall in the Bmax to 2.0 +/- 0.1 pmol/10(6) cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7812605

  10. Rotavirus Infection of Cells in Culture Induces Activation of RhoA and Changes in the Actin and Tubulin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano, Jose Luis; Sorondo, Orlando; Alcala, Ana; Vizzi, Esmeralda; Diaz, Yuleima; Ruiz, Marie Christine; Michelangeli, Fabian; Liprandi, Ferdinando; Ludert, Juan E.

    2012-01-01

    Rotavirus infection induces an increase in [Ca2+]cyto, which in turn may affect the distribution of the cytoskeleton proteins in the infected cell. Changes in microfilaments, including the formation of stress fibers, were observed starting at 0.5 h.p.i. using fluorescent phalloidin. Western blot analysis indicated that RhoA is activated between 0.5 and 1 h.p.i. Neither the phosphorylation of RhoA nor the formation of stress fibers were observed in cells infected with virions pre-treated with an anti-VP5* non-neutralizing mAb, suggesting that RhoA activation is stimulated by the interaction of the virus with integrins forming the cell receptor complex. In addition, the structure of the tubulin cytoskeleton was also studied. Alterations of the microtubules were evident starting at 3 h.p.i. and by 7 h.p.i. when microtubules were markedly displaced toward the periphery of the cell cytoplasm. Loading of rotavirus-infected cells with either a Ca2+ chelator (BAPTA) or transfection with siRNAs to silence NSP4, reversed the changes observed in both the microfilaments and microtubules distribution, but not the appearance of stress fibers. These results indicate that alterations in the distribution of actin microfilaments are initiated early during infection by the activation of RhoA, and that latter changes in the Ca2+ homeostasis promoted by NSP4 during infection may be responsible for other alterations in the actin and tubulin cytoskeleton. PMID:23082182

  11. Exosomes from HIV-1-infected Cells Stimulate Production of Pro-inflammatory Cytokines through Trans-activating Response (TAR) RNA.

    PubMed

    Sampey, Gavin C; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Schwab, Angela; Barclay, Robert; Punya, Shreya; Chung, Myung-Chul; Hakami, Ramin M; Zadeh, Mohammad Asad; Lepene, Benjamin; Klase, Zachary A; El-Hage, Nazira; Young, Mary; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2016-01-15

    HIV-1 infection results in a chronic illness because long-term highly active antiretroviral therapy can lower viral titers to an undetectable level. However, discontinuation of therapy rapidly increases virus burden. Moreover, patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy frequently develop various metabolic disorders, neurocognitive abnormalities, and cardiovascular diseases. We have previously shown that exosomes containing trans-activating response (TAR) element RNA enhance susceptibility of undifferentiated naive cells to HIV-1 infection. This study indicates that exosomes from HIV-1-infected primary cells are highly abundant with TAR RNA as detected by RT-real time PCR. Interestingly, up to a million copies of TAR RNA/μl were also detected in the serum from HIV-1-infected humanized mice suggesting that TAR RNA may be stable in vivo. Incubation of exosomes from HIV-1-infected cells with primary macrophages resulted in a dramatic increase of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-β, indicating that exosomes containing TAR RNA could play a direct role in control of cytokine gene expression. The intact TAR molecule was able to bind to PKR and TLR3 effectively, whereas the 5' and 3' stems (TAR microRNAs) bound best to TLR7 and -8 and none to PKR. Binding of TAR to PKR did not result in its phosphorylation, and therefore, TAR may be a dominant negative decoy molecule in cells. The TLR binding through either TAR RNA or TAR microRNA potentially can activate the NF-κB pathway and regulate cytokine expression. Collectively, these results imply that exosomes containing TAR RNA could directly affect the proinflammatory cytokine gene expression and may explain a possible mechanism of inflammation observed in HIV-1-infected patients under cART. PMID:26553869

  12. Bactericidal Activity of Ceragenin CSA-13 in Cell Culture and in an Animal Model of Peritoneal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wnorowska, Urszula; Byfield, Fitzroy J.; Piktel, Ewelina; Wątek, Marzena; Janmey, Paul A.; Savage, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    Ceragenins constitute a novel family of cationic antibiotics characterized by a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activities, which have mostly been assessed in vitro. Using a polarized human lung epithelial cell culture system, we evaluated the antibacterial activities of the ceragenin CSA-13 against two strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1 and Xen5). Additionally, the biodistribution and bactericidal activity of a CSA-13–IRDye 800CW derivate were assessed using an animal model of peritoneal infection after PAO1 challenge. In cell culture, CSA-13 bactericidal activities against PAO1 and Xen5 were higher than the activities of the human cathelicidin peptide LL-37. Increased CSA-13 activity was observed in polarized human lung epithelial cell cultures subjected to butyric acid treatment, which is known to increase endogenous LL-37 production. Eight hours after intravenous or intraperitoneal injection, the greatest CSA-13–IRDye 800CW accumulation was observed in mouse liver and kidneys. CSA-13–IRDye 800CW administration resulted in decreased bacterial outgrowth from abdominal fluid collected from animals subjected to intraperitoneal PAO1 infection. These observations indicate that CSA-13 may synergistically interact with antibacterial factors that are naturally present at mucosal surfaces and it maintains its antibacterial activity in the infected abdominal cavity. Cationic lipids such as CSA-13 represent excellent candidates for the development of new antibacterial compounds. PMID:26248361

  13. Activity-based ubiquitin-specific protease (USP) profiling of virus-infected and malignant human cells

    PubMed Central

    Ovaa, Huib; Kessler, Benedikt M.; Rolén, Ulrika; Galardy, Paul J.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Masucci, Maria G.

    2004-01-01

    The family of ubiquitin (Ub)-specific proteases (USP) removes Ub from Ub conjugates and regulates a variety of cellular processes. The human genome contains many putative USP-encoding genes, but little is known about USP tissue distribution, pattern of expression, activity, and substrate specificity. We have used a chemistry-based functional proteomics approach to identify active USPs in normal, virus-infected, and tumor-derived human cells. Depending on tissue origin and stage of activation/differentiation, different USP activity profiles were revealed. The activity of specific USPs, including USP5, -7, -9, -13, -15, and -22, was up-regulated by mitogen activation or virus infection in normal T and B lymphocytes. UCH-L1 was highly expressed in tumor cell lines of epithelial and hematopoietic cell origin but was not detected in freshly isolated and mitogen-activated cells. Up-regulation of this USP was a late event in the establishment of Epstein–Barr virus-immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines and correlated with enhanced proliferation, suggesting a possible role in growth transformation. PMID:14982996

  14. Early activation of natural killer and B cells in response to primary dengue virus infection in A/J mice.

    PubMed

    Shresta, Sujan; Kyle, Jennifer L; Robert Beatty, P; Harris, Eva

    2004-02-20

    Dengue virus (DEN) causes the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral illness in humans worldwide. Immune mechanisms that are involved in protection and pathogenesis of DEN infection have not been fully elucidated due largely to the lack of an adequate animal model. Therefore, as a first step, we characterized the primary immune response in immunocompetent inbred A/J mice that were infected intravenously with a non-mouse-adapted DEN type 2 (DEN2) strain. A subset (55%) of infected mice developed paralysis by 14 days post-infection (p.i.), harbored infectious DEN in the central nervous system (CNS), and had an elevated hematocrit and a decreased white blood cell (WBC) count. Immunologic studies detected (i). increased numbers of CD69(+) splenic natural killer (NK) and B cells at day 3 p.i., (ii). DEN-specific IgM and IgG responses by days 3 and 7 p.i., respectively, and (iii). splenocyte production of IFNgamma at day 14 p.i. We conclude that the early activities of NK cells, B cells and IgM, and later actions of IFNgamma and IgG likely play a role in the defense against DEN infection. PMID:14980486

  15. Frequency of IFNγ-producing T cells correlates with seroreactivity and activated T cells during canine Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Ashley N; Cooley, Gretchen; Gwyn, Sarah; Orozco, Marcela M; Tarleton, Rick L

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines to prevent Trypanosoma cruzi infection in humans or animals are not available, and in many settings, dogs are an important source of domestic infection for the insect vector. Identification of infected canines is crucial for evaluating peridomestic transmission dynamics and parasite control strategies. As immune control of T. cruzi infection is dependent on humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, we aimed to define a serodiagnostic assay and T cell phenotypic markers for identifying infected dogs and studying the canine T. cruzi-specific immune response. Plasma samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from forty-two dogs living in a T. cruzi-endemic region. Twenty dogs were known to be seropositive and nine seronegative by conventional serologic tests two years prior to our study. To determine canine seroreactivity, we tested sera or plasma samples in a multiplex bead array against eleven recombinant T. cruzi proteins. Ninety-four percent (17/18) of dogs positive by multiplex serology were initially positive by conventional serology. The frequency of IFNγ-producing cells in PBMCs responding to T. cruzi correlated to serological status, identifying 95% of multiplex seropositive dogs. Intracellular staining identified CD4+ and CD8+ T cell populations as the sources of T. cruzi lysate-induced IFNγ. Low expression of CCR7 and CD62L on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells suggested a predominance of effector/effector memory T cells in seropositive canines. These results are the first, to our knowledge, to correlate T. cruzi-specific antibody responses with T cell responses in naturally infected dogs and validate these methods for identifying dogs exposed to T. cruzi. PMID:24456537

  16. CD11b+Ly6C++Ly6G- Cells with Suppressive Activity Towards T Cells Accumulate in Lungs of Influenza a Virus-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Milanez-Almeida, P.; Ulas, T.; Pasztoi, M.; Glage, S.; Schughart, K.; Lutz, M. B.; Schultze, J. L.; Huehn, J.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infection causes an acute respiratory disease characterized by a strong inflammatory immune response and severe immunopathology. Proinflammatory mechanisms are well described in the murine IAV infection model, but less is known about the mechanisms leading to the resolution of inflammation. Here, we analyzed the contribution of CD11b+Ly6C++Ly6G– cells to this process. An accumulation of CD11b+Ly6C++Ly6G– cells within the lungs was observed during the course of IAV infection. Phenotypic characterization of these CD11b+Ly6C++Ly6G– cells by flow cytometry and RNA-Seq revealed an activated phenotype showing both pro- and anti-inflammatory features, including the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by a fraction of cells in an IFN-γ-dependent manner. Moreover, CD11b+Ly6C++Ly6G– cells isolated from lungs of IAV-infected animals displayed suppressive activity when tested in vitro, and iNOS inhibitors could abrogate this suppressive activity. Collectively, our data suggest that during IAV infection, CD11b+Ly6C++Ly6G– cells acquire immunoregulatory function, which might contribute to the prevention of pathology during this life-threatening disease. PMID:26716013

  17. Peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} agonists inhibit the release of proinflammatory cytokines from RSV-infected epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Ralf . E-mail: ralf.arnold@medizin.uni-magdeburg.de; Koenig, Wolfgang

    2006-03-15

    The epithelial cells of the airways are the target cells for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and the site of the majority of the inflammation associated with the disease. Recently, peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties. Therefore, we investigated the role of PPAR{gamma} agonists (15d-PGJ{sub 2}, ciglitazone and troglitazone) on the synthesis of RSV-induced cytokine release from RSV-infected human lung epithelial cells (A549). We observed that all PPAR{gamma} ligands inhibited dose-dependently the release of TNF-{alpha}, GM-CSF, IL-1{alpha}, IL-6 and the chemokines CXCL8 (IL-8) and CCL5 (RANTES) from RSV-infected A549 cells. Concomitantly, the PPAR{gamma} ligands diminished the cellular amount of mRNA encoding for IL-6, CXCL8 and CCL5 and the RSV-induced binding activity of the transcription factors NF-{kappa}B (p65/p50) and AP-1 (c-fos), respectively. Our data presented herein suggest a potential application of PPAR{gamma} ligands in the anti-inflammatory treatment of RSV infection.

  18. Mechanisms of liver fibrosis associated with experimental Fasciola hepatica infection: roles of Fas2 proteinase and hepatic stellate cell activation.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Luis A; Terashima, Angélica; Yi, Pedro; Andrade, Roy; Cubero, Francisco J; Albanis, Efsevia; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Espinoza, Jose R; Friedman, Scott L

    2011-02-01

    We have evaluated the possible mechanisms of liver fibrosis caused by Fasciola hepatica in an animal model and in culture using immortalized human stellate cells. Liver biopsies of F. hepatica-infected rats were performed at wk 8 and 16. Serum-starved LX-2 cells, a human stellate cell line, were exposed to increasing concentrations of Fas2 antigen. The expression of key fibrosis-related genes was evaluated by qRT-PCR. There was a significant correlation between fibrogenic gene expression and both intensity and duration of infection. LX-2 cells exposed to Fas2 showed progressively increased expression of mRNAs for Collagen I, alpha-smooth muscle-actin, platelet-derived growth factor beta receptor, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase II; inhibition of Fas2 cysteine proteinase activity by E-64 abrogated these increases, suggesting that the protease activity of Fas2 is involved in fibrogenic stimulation. In summary, F. hepatica infection is associated with up-regulation of mRNAs associated with hepatic fibrogenesis in vivo and in activated hepatic stellate cells. PMID:21348611

  19. Transient activation of human cytomegalovirus lytic gene expression during latency allows cytotoxic T cell killing of latently infected cells.

    PubMed

    Krishna, B A; Lau, B; Jackson, S E; Wills, M R; Sinclair, J H; Poole, E

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency in the myeloid lineage is maintained by repressive histone modifications around the major immediate early promoter (MIEP), which results in inhibition of the lytic viral life cycle. We now show that pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) relieves this repression of the MIEP and induces transient expression of the viral lytic immediate early (IE) antigens but, importantly, not full virus reactivation. In turn, these latently infected cells now become targets for IE-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) which are present at high frequency in all normal healthy HCMV positive carriers but would normally be unable to target latent (lytic antigen-negative) cells. This approach of transiently inducing viral lytic gene expression by HDAC inhibition, in otherwise latently infected cells, offers a window of opportunity to target and purge the latent myeloid cell reservoir by making these normally immunologically undetectable cells visible to pre-existing host immune responses to viral lytic antigens. PMID:27091512

  20. Transient activation of human cytomegalovirus lytic gene expression during latency allows cytotoxic T cell killing of latently infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, B. A.; Lau, B.; Jackson, S. E.; Wills, M. R.; Sinclair, J. H.; Poole, E.

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency in the myeloid lineage is maintained by repressive histone modifications around the major immediate early promoter (MIEP), which results in inhibition of the lytic viral life cycle. We now show that pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) relieves this repression of the MIEP and induces transient expression of the viral lytic immediate early (IE) antigens but, importantly, not full virus reactivation. In turn, these latently infected cells now become targets for IE-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) which are present at high frequency in all normal healthy HCMV positive carriers but would normally be unable to target latent (lytic antigen-negative) cells. This approach of transiently inducing viral lytic gene expression by HDAC inhibition, in otherwise latently infected cells, offers a window of opportunity to target and purge the latent myeloid cell reservoir by making these normally immunologically undetectable cells visible to pre-existing host immune responses to viral lytic antigens. PMID:27091512

  1. Bos taurus papillomavirus activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells: demonstrating a productive infection.

    PubMed

    Melo, T C; Araldi, R P; Pessoa, N S D; de-Sá-Júnior, P L; Carvalho, R F; Beçak, W; Stocco, R C

    2015-01-01

    Bovine papillomavirus (BPV) is an oncogenic virus with mucous and epithelial tropism. Possible productive virus infection in other tissues, such as blood, has been hypothesized. In order to investigate this possibility, three samples of skin papillomas and blood were collected from bovines with BPV infection and five samples of peripheral blood and one sample of normal tissue were collected from a calf without BPV infection. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from whole blood and examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunofluorescence, in situ hybridization, and electron microscopy. The tissue samples were examined for histopathological and immunohistochemical features. The skin papillomas showed the presence of DNA sequences of BPV-2, BPV-11, and a putative virus type. The blood samples showed DNA sequences of BPV-1, 2, and 4 simultaneously. Immunohistochemistry showed BPV L1 protein in both epithelium and stroma and BPV E2 protein in koilocytes. In situ hybridization confirmed the presence of BPV DNA in PBMCs and immunofluorescence showed nuclear labeling of E2 and L1 BPV proteins in PBMCs. The transcription analysis revealed transcripts of BPV-1 L1, BPV-2 L2, and BPV-4 E7 in blood and papilloma samples of BPV-infected cattle. The comet assay revealed high levels of host cell DNA damage upon BPV infection. Electron microscopy analysis of PBMCs identified the presence of particles in the cytoplasm that are consistent with papillomavirus in size and shape. The productive infection of PBMCs with BPV has been previously discussed and this study provides evidence indicating that PBMCs are a target of BPV. PMID:26681018

  2. Peripheral viral infection induced microglial sensome genes and enhanced microglial cell activity in the hippocampus of neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Ji, Peng; Schachtschneider, Kyle M; Schook, Lawrence B; Walker, Frederick R; Johnson, Rodney W

    2016-05-01

    Although poorly understood, early-life infection is predicted to affect brain microglial cells, making them hypersensitive to subsequent stimuli. To investigate this, we assessed gene expression in hippocampal tissue obtained from a previously published study reporting increased microglial cell activity and reduced hippocampal-dependent learning in neonatal piglets infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), a virus that induces interstitial pneumonia. Infection altered expression of 455 genes, of which 334 were up-regulated and 121 were down-regulated. Functional annotation revealed that immune function genes were enriched among the up-regulated differentially expressed genes (DEGs), whereas calcium binding and synaptic vesicle genes were enriched among the down-regulated DEGs. Twenty-six genes encoding part of the microglia sensory apparatus (i.e., the sensome) were up-regulated (e.g., IL1R1, TLR2, and TLR4), whereas 15 genes associated with the synaptosome and synaptic receptors (e.g., NPTX2, GABRA2, and SLC5A7) were down-regulated. As the sensome may foretell microglia reactivity, we next inoculated piglets with culture medium or PRRSV at PD 7 and assessed hippocampal microglia morphology and function at PD 28 when signs of infection were waning. Consistent with amplification of the sensome, microglia from PRRSV piglets had enhanced responsiveness to chemoattractants, increased phagocytic activity, and secreted more TNFα in response to lipopolysaccharide and Poly I:C. Immunohistochemical staining indicated PRRSV infection increased microglia soma length and length-to-width ratio. Bipolar rod-like microglia not evident in hippocampus of control piglets, were present in infected piglets. Collectively, this study suggests early-life infection alters the microglia sensome as well as microglial cell morphology and function. PMID:26872419

  3. Identification and characterization of a DNA primase activity present in herpes simplex virus type 1-infected HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, A.M.; Wietstock, S.M.; Ruyechan, W.T. )

    1988-03-01

    A novel DNA primase activity has been identified in HeLa cells infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Such an activity has not been detected in mock-infected cells. The primase activity coeluted with a portion of HSV-1 DNA polymerase from single-stranded DNA agarose columns loaded with high-salt extracts derived from infected cells. This DNA primase activity could be distinguished from host HeLa cell DNA primase by several criteria. First, the pH optimum of the HSV primase was relatively broad and peaked at 8.2 to 8.7 pH units. Second, freshly isolated HSV DNA primase was less salt sensitive than the HeLa primase. Third, antibodies raised against individual peptides of the calf thymus DNA polymerase:primase complex cross-reacted with the HeLa primase but did not react with the HSV DNA primase. Fourth, freshly prepared HSV DNA primase appeared to be associated with the HSV polymerase, but after storage at 4{degree}C for several weeks, the DNA primase separated from the viral DNA polymerase. This free DNA primase had an apparent molecular size of approximately 40 kilodaltons, whereas free HeLa DNA primase had an apparent molecular size of approximately 110 kilodaltons. On the basis of these data, the authors believe that the novel DNA primase activity in HSV-infected cells may be virus coded and that this enzyme represents a new and important function involved in the replication of HSV DNA.

  4. Equid herpesvirus 1 infection of endothelial cells requires activation of putative adhesion molecules: an in vitro model

    PubMed Central

    SMITH, D; HAMBLIN, A; EDINGTON, N

    2002-01-01

    Antisera to activated equine endothelial cells, which detected surface molecules of 116 kD, 97 kD, 42 kD and 38 kD, were made to investigate the role of endothelial adhesion molecules in equid herpes virus 1 infection. These putative adhesion molecules could be induced by 17-β oestradiol, chorionic gonadotrophin, or IL-2, as well as by LPS and PWM. In an in vitro flow system, using equine veins or arteries, equid herpesvirus 1 in leucocytes was only transferred to infect endothelial cells if both leucocytes and endothelial cells expressed these surface molecules. Blocking of the membrane molecules with polyclonal antibodies prevented transfer of virus to the endothelial cells, indicating that the adhesion molecules had a key role in effecting transfer of virus. These in vitro observations give particular insight into the reports that in the natural course of infection in horses infection of endothelial cells is restricted to certain tissues, and in a wider context the results illustrate the complexity of factors that may direct tissue tropism. PMID:12165084

  5. Multiple cis Regulatory Elements Control RANTES Promoter Activity in Alveolar Epithelial Cells Infected with Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Casola, Antonella; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Haeberle, Helene; Elliott, Todd F.; Lin, Rongtuan; Jamaluddin, Mohammad; Brasier, Allan R.

    2001-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) produces intense pulmonary inflammation, in part through its ability to induce chemokine synthesis in infected airway epithelial cells. RANTES (regulated upon activation, normally T-cell expressed and presumably secreted) is a CC chemokine which recruits and activates monocytes, lymphocytes, and eosinophils, all cell types present in the lung inflammatory infiltrate induced by RSV infection. In this study, we analyzed the mechanism of RSV-induced RANTES promoter activation in human type II alveolar epithelial cells (A549 cells). Promoter deletion and mutagenesis experiments indicate that RSV requires the presence of five different cis regulatory elements, located in the promoter fragment spanning from −220 to +55 nucleotides, corresponding to NF-κB, C/EBP, Jun/CREB/ATF, and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) binding sites. Although site mutations of the NF-κB, C/EBP, and CREB/AP-1 like sites reduce RSV-induced RANTES gene transcription to 50% or less, only mutations affecting IRF binding completely abolish RANTES inducibility. Supershift and microaffinity isolation assays were used to identify the different transcription factor family members whose DNA binding activity was RSV inducible. Expression of dominant negative mutants of these transcription factors further established their central role in virus-induced RANTES promoter activation. Our finding that the presence of multiple cis regulatory elements is required for full activation of the RANTES promoter in RSV-infected alveolar epithelial cells supports the enhanceosome model for RANTES gene transcription, which is absolutely dependent on binding of IRF transcription factors. The identification of regulatory mechanisms of RANTES gene expression is fundamental for rational design of inhibitors of RSV-induced lung inflammation. PMID:11413310

  6. Fetal Immune Activation to Malaria Antigens Enhances Susceptibility to In Vitro HIV Infection in Cord Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Kevin; Myrie, Latoya; Malhotra, Indu; Mungai, Peter; Muchiri, Eric; Dent, Arlene; King, Christopher L.

    2010-01-01

    Mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains a significant cause of new HIV infections in many countries. To examine whether fetal immune activation as a consequence of prenatal exposure to parasitic antigens increases the risk of MTCT, cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs) from Kenyan and North American newborns were examined for relative susceptibility to HIV infection in vitro. Kenyan CBMCs were 3-fold more likely to be infected with HIV than were North American CBMCs (P = .03). Kenyan CBMCs with recall responses to malaria antigens demonstrated enhanced susceptibility to HIV when compared with Kenyan CBMCs lacking recall responses to malaria (P = .03). CD4+ T cells from malaria-sensitized newborns expressed higher levels of CD25 and human leukocyte antigen DR ex vivo, which is consistent with increased immune activation. CD4+ T cells were the primary reservoir of infection at day 4 after virus exposure. Thus, prenatal exposure and in utero priming to malaria may increase the risk of MTCT. PMID:20687848

  7. Inhibition of host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation decreases new world alphavirus multiplication in infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, Kelsey; Amaya, Moushimi; Mueller, Claudius; Roberts, Brian; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Bailey, Charles; Petricoin, Emanuel; Narayanan, Aarthi

    2014-11-15

    New World alphaviruses belonging to the family Togaviridae are classified as emerging infectious agents and Category B select agents. Our study is focused on the role of the host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the infectious process of New World alphaviruses. Infection of human cells by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) results in the activation of the ERK-signaling cascade. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by the small molecule inhibitor Ag-126 results in inhibition of viral multiplication. Ag-126-mediated inhibition of VEEV was due to potential effects on early and late stages of the infectious process. While expression of viral proteins was down-regulated in Ag-126 treated cells, we did not observe any influence of Ag-126 on the nuclear distribution of capsid. Finally, Ag-126 exerted a broad-spectrum inhibitory effect on New World alphavirus multiplication, thus indicating that the host kinase, ERK, is a broad-spectrum candidate for development of novel therapeutics against New World alphaviruses. - Highlights: • VEEV infection activated multiple components of the ERK signaling cascade. • Inhibition of ERK activation using Ag-126 inhibited VEEV multiplication. • Activation of ERK by Ceramide C6 increased infectious titers of TC-83. • Ag-126 inhibited virulent strains of all New World alphaviruses. • Ag-126 treatment increased percent survival of infected cells.

  8. Fetal Cord Blood Mononuclear Cells Collected At Term from HIV-1 Infected Women Harbor Transcriptionally Active Integrated Proviral DNA

    PubMed Central

    ELLIS, Jane E.; HAIR, Greg A.; LINDSAY, Michael K.; ANSARI, Aftab A.; SUNDSTROM, J. Bruce

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine levels of intrauterine infection and transcriptional activity in cord blood mononuclear cells collected at term from fetuses born to HIV-infected pregnant women on highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). Methods RNA and DNA were isolated from maternal placental tissues and fetal cord blood specimens obtained at term from HIV-infected pregnant women on HAART. Levels of integrated HIV provirus and mRNA transcripts were determined by real-time PCR. Results Detectable levels of transcriptionally active integrated provirus were present in approximately 27% of cord blood samples (n=22) collected from fetuses, born to HIV-positive mothers on HAART. Levels of HIV-p24 antigen in cultures detected in randomly selected cord blood samples confirmed the presence of inducible infectious virus. Conclusions These findings suggest that some fetuses from HIV-infected mothers on HAART who may present as HIV-negative infants postpartum, can harbor circulating leukocytes that are productively infected by intrauterine transmission (IUT) of HIV. PMID:17904964

  9. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) induces expression of B-cell activation markers on in vitro infection of EBV-negative B-lymphoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Calender, A; Billaud, M; Aubry, J P; Banchereau, J; Vuillaume, M; Lenoir, G M

    1987-01-01

    A set of B-cell activation markers, including the EBV/C3d receptor [complement receptor type 2 (CR2) (CD21)], the 45-kDa lymphoblastoid cell-associated (Blast-2) antigen (CD23), and the B-cell restricted activation (Bac-1) antigen (which was recently identified as a potential B-cell growth factor receptor) can be turned on by infecting lymphoma cells that are genome negative for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with the B95-8 immortalizing strain of the virus. The nonimmortalizing EBV variant, strain P3HR-1, which possesses a deletion within the BamHI WYH region of the genome containing the coding sequence for the EBV-determined nuclear antigen 2, does not induce expression of these markers. Other lymphoblastoid cell-associated antigen markers can be activated by infection with either immortalizing or nonimmortalizing viruses. These results suggest that the immortalizing potential of EBV is correlated with its ability to induce expression of B-cell activation markers, which are suspected to play a major role in the physiological pathway leading to lymphoid cell proliferation. The viral genomic region deleted in the nonimmortalizing strain of EBV seems to be required for activation of some of these markers. Human lymphoma cell lines, such as those used in this study, can thus help identify the specific EBV genes involved in lymphoid B-cell proliferation and the mechanism of action of these genes. PMID:2825176

  10. US28 Is a Potent Activator of Phospholipase C during HCMV Infection of Clinically Relevant Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Miller, William E.; Zagorski, William A.; Brenneman, Joanna D.; Avery, Diana; Miller, Jeanette L. C.; O’Connor, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the cytomegalovirus family each encode two or more genes with significant homology to G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). In rodent models of pathogenesis, these viral encoded GPCRs play functionally significant roles, as their deletion results in crippled viruses that cannot traffic properly and/or replicate in virally important target cells. Of the four HCMV encoded GPCRs, US28 has garnered the most attention due to the fact that it exhibits both agonist-independent and agonist-dependent signaling activity and has been demonstrated to promote cellular migration and proliferation. Thus, it appears that the CMV GPCRs play important roles in viral replication in vivo as well as promote the development of virus-associated pathology. In the current study we have utilized a series of HCMV/US28 recombinants to investigate the expression profile and signaling activities of US28 in a number of cell types relevant to HCMV infection including smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells and cells derived from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors. The results indicate that US28 is expressed and exhibits constitutive agonist-independent signaling activity through PLC-β in all cell types tested. Moreover, while CCL5/RANTES and CX3CL1/Fractalkine both promote US28-dependent Ca++ release in smooth muscle cells, this agonist-dependent effect appears to be cell-specific as we fail to detect US28 driven Ca++ release in the GBM cells. We have also investigated the effects of US28 on signaling via endogenous GPCRs including those in the LPA receptor family. Our data indicate that US28 can enhance signaling via endogenous LPA receptors. Taken together, our results indicate that US28 induces a variety of signaling events in all cell types tested suggesting that US28 signaling likely plays a significant role during HCMV infection and dissemination in vivo. PMID:23209769

  11. CIP2A Promotes T-Cell Activation and Immune Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection.

    PubMed

    Côme, Christophe; Cvrljevic, Anna; Khan, Mohd Moin; Treise, Irina; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Au-Yeung, Byron; Sittig, Eleonora; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Chen, Yiling; Oeder, Sebastian; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Horsch, Marion; Aittokallio, Tero; Busch, Dirk H; Ollert, Markus W; Neff, Frauke; Beckers, Johannes; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Fuchs, Helmut; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Chen, Zhi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Westermarck, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    The oncoprotein Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is overexpressed in most malignancies and is an obvious candidate target protein for future cancer therapies. However, the physiological importance of CIP2A-mediated PP2A inhibition is largely unknown. As PP2A regulates immune responses, we investigated the role of CIP2A in normal immune system development and during immune response in vivo. We show that CIP2A-deficient mice (CIP2AHOZ) present a normal immune system development and function in unchallenged conditions. However when challenged with Listeria monocytogenes, CIP2AHOZ mice display an impaired adaptive immune response that is combined with decreased frequency of both CD4+ T-cells and CD8+ effector T-cells. Importantly, the cell autonomous effect of CIP2A deficiency for T-cell activation was confirmed. Induction of CIP2A expression during T-cell activation was dependent on Zap70 activity. Thus, we reveal CIP2A as a hitherto unrecognized mediator of T-cell activation during adaptive immune response. These results also reveal CIP2AHOZ as a possible novel mouse model for studying the role of PP2A activity in immune regulation. On the other hand, the results also indicate that CIP2A targeting cancer therapies would not cause serious immunological side-effects. PMID:27100879

  12. CIP2A Promotes T-Cell Activation and Immune Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cvrljevic, Anna; Khan, Mohd Moin; Treise, Irina; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Au-Yeung, Byron; Sittig, Eleonora; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Chen, Yiling; Oeder, Sebastian; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Horsch, Marion; Aittokallio, Tero; Busch, Dirk H.; Ollert, Markus W.; Neff, Frauke; Beckers, Johannes; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Chen, Zhi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Westermarck, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    The oncoprotein Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is overexpressed in most malignancies and is an obvious candidate target protein for future cancer therapies. However, the physiological importance of CIP2A-mediated PP2A inhibition is largely unknown. As PP2A regulates immune responses, we investigated the role of CIP2A in normal immune system development and during immune response in vivo. We show that CIP2A-deficient mice (CIP2AHOZ) present a normal immune system development and function in unchallenged conditions. However when challenged with Listeria monocytogenes, CIP2AHOZ mice display an impaired adaptive immune response that is combined with decreased frequency of both CD4+ T-cells and CD8+ effector T-cells. Importantly, the cell autonomous effect of CIP2A deficiency for T-cell activation was confirmed. Induction of CIP2A expression during T-cell activation was dependent on Zap70 activity. Thus, we reveal CIP2A as a hitherto unrecognized mediator of T-cell activation during adaptive immune response. These results also reveal CIP2AHOZ as a possible novel mouse model for studying the role of PP2A activity in immune regulation. On the other hand, the results also indicate that CIP2A targeting cancer therapies would not cause serious immunological side-effects. PMID:27100879

  13. Control of pathogenic effector T-cell activities in situ by PD-L1 expression on respiratory inflammatory dendritic cells during respiratory syncytial virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Yao, S; Jiang, L; Moser, EK; Jewett, LB; Wright, J; Du, J; Zhou, B; Davis, SD; Krupp, NL; Braciale, TJ; Sun, J

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract illness in young infants, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals. We demonstrate here that the co-inhibitory molecule programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) is selectively upregulated on T cells within the respiratory tract during both murine and human RSV infection. Importantly, the interaction of PD-1 with its ligand PD-L1 is vital to restrict the pro-inflammatory activities of lung effector T cells in situ, thereby inhibiting the development of excessive pulmonary inflammation and injury during RSV infection. We further identify that PD-L1 expression on lung inflammatory dendritic cells is critical to suppress inflammatory T-cell activities, and an interferon–STAT1–IRF1 axis is responsible for increased PD-L1 expression on lung inflammatory dendritic cells. Our findings suggest a potentially critical role of PD-L1 and PD-1 interactions in the lung for controlling host inflammatory responses and disease progression in clinical RSV infection. PMID:25465101

  14. Infection of SCID mice with Mycobacterium leprae and control with antigen-activated "immune" human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed Central

    Converse, P J; Haines, V L; Wondimu, A; Craig, L E; Meyers, W M

    1995-01-01

    The SCID (severe combined immunodeficient) mouse lacks both B and T cells and tolerates injected mononuclear cells from humans, the principal hosts of Mycobacterium leprae. A SCID mouse model of leprosy could be useful to investigate potential vaccine strategies using human cells in a context in which the growth of the organism is monitored. Initial experiments determined that SCID mice are more susceptible than normal mice to infection and dissemination of M. leprae. Cells from humans, either BCG vaccinated or from countries where leprosy is endemic, were stimulated in vitro with a number of mycobacterial antigens--whole M. leprae, M. leprae cell walls, purified protein derivative of M. tuberculosis, and Mycobacterium bovis BCG--and tested for proliferation and production of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and gamma interferon. Cell walls were the most efficient and consistent in inducing all of these activities. In vitro-activated human cells retain function better after injection into SCID mice than nonactivated cells. To test the ability of cells to affect the growth of M. leprae in the footpads of SCID mice, cells from a known responder to mycobacterial antigens and from a nonresponder were activated by M. leprae cell wall antigens. The cells were harvested and coinjected with fresh M. leprae into the right hind footpads of SCID mice. After 3 months, there was no growth of M. leprae in the footpads of mice coinjected with cells from the mycobacterial antigen responder, while growth was uninhibited in mice receiving cells from the nonresponder. Future experiments will determine requirements for antigen specificity in inhibiting M. leprae multiplication. PMID:7868226

  15. Infection of SCID mice with Mycobacterium leprae and control with antigen-activated "immune" human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Converse, P J; Haines, V L; Wondimu, A; Craig, L E; Meyers, W M

    1995-03-01

    The SCID (severe combined immunodeficient) mouse lacks both B and T cells and tolerates injected mononuclear cells from humans, the principal hosts of Mycobacterium leprae. A SCID mouse model of leprosy could be useful to investigate potential vaccine strategies using human cells in a context in which the growth of the organism is monitored. Initial experiments determined that SCID mice are more susceptible than normal mice to infection and dissemination of M. leprae. Cells from humans, either BCG vaccinated or from countries where leprosy is endemic, were stimulated in vitro with a number of mycobacterial antigens--whole M. leprae, M. leprae cell walls, purified protein derivative of M. tuberculosis, and Mycobacterium bovis BCG--and tested for proliferation and production of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and gamma interferon. Cell walls were the most efficient and consistent in inducing all of these activities. In vitro-activated human cells retain function better after injection into SCID mice than nonactivated cells. To test the ability of cells to affect the growth of M. leprae in the footpads of SCID mice, cells from a known responder to mycobacterial antigens and from a nonresponder were activated by M. leprae cell wall antigens. The cells were harvested and coinjected with fresh M. leprae into the right hind footpads of SCID mice. After 3 months, there was no growth of M. leprae in the footpads of mice coinjected with cells from the mycobacterial antigen responder, while growth was uninhibited in mice receiving cells from the nonresponder. Future experiments will determine requirements for antigen specificity in inhibiting M. leprae multiplication. PMID:7868226

  16. HTLV-1 positive and negative T cells cloned from infected individuals display telomerase and telomere genes deregulation that predominate in activated but untransformed CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Zane, Linda; Sibon, David; Capraro, Valérie; Galia, Perrine; Karam, Maroun; Delfau-Larue, Marie-Hélène; Gilson, Eric; Gessain, Antoine; Gout, Olivier; Hermine, Olivier; Mortreux, Franck; Wattel, Eric

    2012-08-15

    Untransformed HTLV-1 positive CD4(+) cells from infected individuals are selected for expressing tax and displaying morphological features consistent with telomere dysfunctions. We show that in resting HTLV-1 positive CD4(+) cells cloned from patients, hTERT expression parallels tax expression and cell cycling. Upon activation, these cells dramatically augment tax expression, whereas their increase in telomerase activity is about 20 times lower than that of their uninfected counterpart. Activated HTLV-1 positive CD4(+) but not uninfected CD4(+) or CD8(+) clones also repress the transcription of TRF1, TPP1, TANK1, POT1, DNA-PKc and Ku80. Both infected and uninfected lymphocytes from infected individuals shared common telomere gene deregulations toward a pattern consistent with premature senescence. ATLL cells displayed the highest telomerase activity (TA) whereas recovered a telomere gene transcriptome close to that of normal CD4(+) cells. In conclusion HTLV-1-dependent telomere modulations seem involved in clonal expansion, immunosuppression, tumor initiation and progression. PMID:21717459

  17. CD8+ T cells Are Preferentially Activated during Primary Low Dose Leishmania major Infection but Are Completely Dispensable during Secondary Anti-Leishmania Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Okwor, Ifeoma B.; Jia, Ping; Mou, Zhirong; Onyilagha, Chukwunonso; Uzonna, Jude E.

    2014-01-01

    We previously showed that CD8+ T cells are required for optimal primary immunity to low dose Leishmania major infection. However, it is not known whether immunity induced by low dose infection is durable and whether CD8+ T cells contribute to secondary immunity following recovery from low dose infection. Here, we compared primary and secondary immunity to low and high dose L. major infections and assessed the influence of infectious dose on the quality and magnitude of secondary anti-Leishmania immunity. In addition, we investigated the contribution of CD8+ T cells in secondary anti-Leishmania immunity following recovery from low and high dose infections. We found that the early immune response to low and high dose infections were strikingly different: while low dose infection preferentially induced proliferation and effector cytokine production by CD8+ T cells, high dose infection predominantly induced proliferation and cytokine production by CD4+ T cells. This differential activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells by high and low dose infections respectively, was imprinted during in vitro and in vivo recall responses in healed mice. Both low and high dose-infected mice displayed strong infection-induced immunity and were protected against secondary L. major challenge. While depletion of CD4+ cells in mice that healed low and high dose infections abolished resistance to secondary challenge, depletion of CD8+ cells had no effect. Collectively, our results show that although CD8+ T cells are preferentially activated and may contribute to optimal primary anti-Leishmania immunity following low dose infection, they are completely dispensable during secondary immunity. PMID:25412267

  18. Active hepatitis C virus infection in bone marrow and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with mixed cryoglobulinaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielli, A; Manzin, A; Candela, M; Caniglia, M L; Paolucci, S; Danieli, M G; Clementi, M

    1994-01-01

    The presence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genomic sequences was checked in plasma, liver, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and bone marrow cells from 11 patients with mixed cryoglobulinaemia positive for anti-HCV antibodies, and from 11 patients with chronic HCV hepatitis without serological evidence of cryoglobulinaemia. HCV RNA sequences were demonstrated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in seven plasma samples, in six PBMC samples, and in seven bone marrow cell samples from the 11 cryoglobulinaemic subjects; otherwise, viral specific nucleic acids were detected in 10 plasma samples, in one PBMC sample, and in two bone marrow cell samples from the 11 patients with chronic hepatitis. The HCV replicative intermediate was evidenced in four of the six PBMC and in five of the seven bone marrow aspirate HCV RNA-positive samples. Analysis of subpopulations isolated from bone marrow and peripheral blood samples showed HCV RNA sequences in mononuclear cells belonging either the CD2+ subset or to the CD19+ subpopulation or to the adherent cells. Finally, we compared the nucleotide sequences of a large portion (-270 to -59) of the HCV 5'-untranslated region from five patients with mixed cryoglobulinaemia and from seven patients with chronic hepatitis without cryoglobulinaemia; the degree of heterogeneity, compared with the prototype HCV sequence, was similar in both groups. These findings from two groups of HCV-infected patients indicate that transient or permanent active HCV infection of bone marrow and PBMC is frequent in anti-HCV-positive patients with mixed cryoglobulinaemia, and suggest that extra-hepatic infection may play a major role in influencing the pathophysiology of this infection as well as the viral persistence. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8033425

  19. Active human cytomegalovirus infection and glycoprotein b genotypes in brazilian pediatric renal or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients.

    PubMed

    de Campos Dieamant, Débora; Bonon, Sandra Helena Alves; Prates, Liliane Cury; Belangelo, Vera Maria Santoro; Pontes, Erika R; Costa, Sandra Cecília Botelho

    2010-01-01

    A prospective analysis of active Human Cytomegalovirus infection (HCMV) was conducted on 33 pediatric renal or hematopoietic stem cell post-transplant patients. The HCMV-DNA positive samples were evaluated for the prevalence of different gB subtypes and their subsequent correlation with clinical signs. The surveillance of HCMV active infection was based on the monitoring of antigenemia (AGM) and on a nested polymerase chain reaction (N-PCR) for the detection of HCMV in the patients studied. Using restriction analysis of the gB gene sequence by PCR-RFLP (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism), different HCMV strains could be detected and classified in at least four HCMV genotypes. Thirty-three pediatric recipients of renal or bone marrow transplantation were monitored. Twenty out of thirty-three (60.6%) patients demonstrated active HCMV infection. gB1 and gB2 genotypes were more frequent in this population. In this study, we observed that gB2 had correlation with reactivation of HCMV infection and that patients with mixture of genotypes did not show any symptoms of HCMV disease. Future studies has been made to confirm this. PMID:24031463

  20. Longitudinal characterization of dysfunctional T cell-activation during human acute Ebola infection.

    PubMed

    Agrati, C; Castilletti, C; Casetti, R; Sacchi, A; Falasca, L; Turchi, F; Tumino, N; Bordoni, V; Cimini, E; Viola, D; Lalle, E; Bordi, L; Lanini, S; Martini, F; Nicastri, E; Petrosillo, N; Puro, V; Piacentini, M; Di Caro, A; Kobinger, G P; Zumla, A; Ippolito, G; Capobianchi, M R

    2016-01-01

    Data on immune responses during human Ebola virus disease (EVD) are scanty, due to limitations imposed by biosafety requirements and logistics. A sustained activation of T-cells was recently described but functional studies during the acute phase of human EVD are still missing. Aim of this work was to evaluate the kinetics and functionality of T-cell subsets, as well as the expression of activation, autophagy, apoptosis and exhaustion markers during the acute phase of EVD until recovery. Two EVD patients admitted to the Italian National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Lazzaro Spallanzani, were sampled sequentially from soon after symptom onset until recovery and analyzed by flow cytometry and ELISpot assay. An early and sustained decrease of CD4 T-cells was seen in both patients, with an inversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio that was reverted during the recovery period. In parallel with the CD4 T-cell depletion, a massive T-cell activation occurred and was associated with autophagic/apoptotic phenotype, enhanced expression of the exhaustion marker PD-1 and impaired IFN-gamma production. The immunological impairment was accompanied by EBV reactivation. The association of an early and sustained dysfunctional T-cell activation in parallel to an overall CD4 T-cell decline may represent a previously unknown critical point of Ebola virus (EBOV)-induced immune subversion. The recent observation of late occurrence of EBOV-associated neurological disease highlights the importance to monitor the immuno-competence recovery at discharge as a tool to evaluate the risk of late sequelae associated with resumption of EBOV replication. Further studies are required to define the molecular mechanisms of EVD-driven activation/exhaustion and depletion of T-cells. PMID:27031961

  1. Longitudinal characterization of dysfunctional T cell-activation during human acute Ebola infection

    PubMed Central

    Agrati, C; Castilletti, C; Casetti, R; Sacchi, A; Falasca, L; Turchi, F; Tumino, N; Bordoni, V; Cimini, E; Viola, D; Lalle, E; Bordi, L; Lanini, S; Martini, F; Nicastri, E; Petrosillo, N; Puro, V; Piacentini, M; Di Caro, A; Kobinger, G P; Zumla, A; Ippolito, G; Capobianchi, M R

    2016-01-01

    Data on immune responses during human Ebola virus disease (EVD) are scanty, due to limitations imposed by biosafety requirements and logistics. A sustained activation of T-cells was recently described but functional studies during the acute phase of human EVD are still missing. Aim of this work was to evaluate the kinetics and functionality of T-cell subsets, as well as the expression of activation, autophagy, apoptosis and exhaustion markers during the acute phase of EVD until recovery. Two EVD patients admitted to the Italian National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Lazzaro Spallanzani, were sampled sequentially from soon after symptom onset until recovery and analyzed by flow cytometry and ELISpot assay. An early and sustained decrease of CD4 T-cells was seen in both patients, with an inversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio that was reverted during the recovery period. In parallel with the CD4 T-cell depletion, a massive T-cell activation occurred and was associated with autophagic/apoptotic phenotype, enhanced expression of the exhaustion marker PD-1 and impaired IFN-gamma production. The immunological impairment was accompanied by EBV reactivation. The association of an early and sustained dysfunctional T-cell activation in parallel to an overall CD4 T-cell decline may represent a previously unknown critical point of Ebola virus (EBOV)-induced immune subversion. The recent observation of late occurrence of EBOV-associated neurological disease highlights the importance to monitor the immuno-competence recovery at discharge as a tool to evaluate the risk of late sequelae associated with resumption of EBOV replication. Further studies are required to define the molecular mechanisms of EVD-driven activation/exhaustion and depletion of T-cells. PMID:27031961

  2. Antiviral activity of Inonotus obliquus fungus extract towards infection caused by hepatitis C virus in cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Shibnev, V A; Mishin, D V; Garaev, T M; Finogenova, N P; Botikov, A G; Deryabin, P G

    2011-09-01

    Fractions of Inonotus obliquus fungus water extract exhibited a virucidal effect towards hepatitis C virus: it 100-fold reduced its infective properties within 10 min. The antiviral effects of fungus extracts manifested after preventive (24 h before infection) and therapeutic use (during infection of porcine embryo kidney cells). Moreover, the data indicate that the birch fungus extracts inhibit production of infective virus by porcine embryo kidney cells. PMID:22462058

  3. Rapid and transient activation of gamma/delta T cells to interferon gamma production, NK cell-like killing and antigen processing during acute virus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gamma/delta T cells are the majority peripheral blood T cells in young cattle. The role of gamma/delta T cells in innate responses against infection with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) was analyzed on 5 consecutive days following infection. Before infection, bovine gamma/delta T cells expressed...

  4. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of KSHV-Infected Cells Reveals Roles of ORF45-Activated RSK during Lytic Replication

    PubMed Central

    Avey, Denis; Tepper, Sarah; Li, Wenwei; Turpin, Zachary; Zhu, Fanxiu

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic virus which has adapted unique mechanisms to modulate the cellular microenvironment of its human host. The pathogenesis of KSHV is intimately linked to its manipulation of cellular signaling pathways, including the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. We have previously shown that KSHV ORF45 contributes to the sustained activation of both ERK and p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK, a major functional mediator of ERK/MAPK signaling) during KSHV lytic replication. ORF45-activated RSK is required for optimal KSHV lytic gene expression and progeny virion production, though the underlying mechanisms downstream of this activation are still unclear. We hypothesized that the activation of RSK by ORF45 causes differential phosphorylation of cellular and viral substrates, affecting biological processes essential for efficient KSHV lytic replication. Accordingly, we observed widespread and significant differences in protein phosphorylation upon induction of lytic replication. Mass-spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic screening identified putative substrates of ORF45-activated RSK in KSHV-infected cells. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that nuclear proteins, including several transcriptional regulators, were overrepresented among these candidates. We validated the ORF45/RSK-dependent phosphorylation of several putative substrates by employing KSHV BAC mutagenesis, kinase inhibitor treatments, and/or CRISPR-mediated knockout of RSK in KSHV-infected cells. Furthermore, we assessed the consequences of knocking out these substrates on ORF45/RSK-dependent regulation of gene expression and KSHV progeny virion production. Finally, we show data to support that ORF45 regulates the translational efficiency of a subset of viral/cellular genes with complex secondary structure in their 5’ UTR. Altogether, these data shed light on the mechanisms by which KSHV ORF45 manipulates

  5. Lower activation-induced T-cell apoptosis is related to the pathological immune response in secondary infection with hetero-serotype dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wang; Yan, Huacheng; Ma, Yuling; Yu, Tiantian; Guo, Hongxia; Kuang, Yuchan; Ren, Ruiwen; Li, Jintao

    2016-03-01

    The available evidence suggests that dengue virus-specific T lymphocytes and cytokine storm play a pivotal role in the immunopathogenesis of plasma leakage. Investigations are underway to identify the immune profiles associated with increased or decreased risk for severe disease. In this study, CD14+ cells from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients who recovered from DENV-1 infection were infected with DENV-1 or DENV-2 and co-cultured with memory T cells. We found that secondary infection with DENV-2 suppresses the cell reproductive capacity but forms more cell clones and more functional cells to produce more proinflammatory factors (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12 and IL-17) and less regulatory cytokines (IL-10, TGF-β) which results in higher viral replication compared to secondary infection with DENV-1. Memory dengue virus-specific T cells which are induced in a primary dengue virus infection are reactivated by the heterologous serotype of dengue virus and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) during a secondary infection. Dramatically, less apoptosis and more continuous activation of T cells in secondary infection with hetero-serotype DENV were observed. This discovery which has not been reported previously may be the reasonable and vital interpretation for the cytokine storm and severe symptoms observed in secondary infection with DENV. In summary, secondary infection with hetero-serotype DENV elicits the relatively pathological immune response while secondary infection with homologous-serotype DENV induces the relatively protective immune response by activation-induced cell death (AICD) of T cells. PMID:26655144

  6. [A study of the antiherpetic activity of the chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) extracts in the Vero cells infected with the herpes simplex virus].

    PubMed

    Polkovnikova, M V; Nosik, N N; Garaev, T M; Kondrashina, N G; Finogenova, M P; Shibnev, V A

    2014-01-01

    The chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) contains a wide range of excellent bioactive compounds. However, limited information exists on the antiviral activity of the compounds extracted from chaga. A number of subfractions of chaga were obtained using different solvents and different procedures. The subfractions of chaga extracted with water, alcohol, alkali were tested for their toxicity for the Vero cell culture and antiviral effect in the Vero cells infected with the Herpes simplex virus (HSV), Type 1. It was shown that most of the subfractions were not toxic for the Vero cells and had protective effect on the Vero cells infected with HSV. The subfraction IV in the concentration 5 microg/ml protected the Vero cells from cytodestructive action of HSV and no viral DNA was detected in infected cells treated with chaga extracts. Best protective effect was observed when compound was added before or within one hour after the Vero cells were infected with HSV. PMID:25069286

  7. Transcription factor AP-1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: Alterations in activity and expression during Human Papillomavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Jammu and Kashmir (J&K) region of India. A substantial proportion of esophageal carcinoma is associated with infection of high-risk HPV type 16 and HPV18, the oncogenic expression of which is controlled by host cell transcription factor Activator Protein-1 (AP-1). We, therefore, have investigated the role of DNA binding and expression pattern of AP-1 in esophageal cancer with or without HPV infection. Methods Seventy five histopathologically-confirmed esophageal cancer and an equal number of corresponding adjacent normal tissue biopsies from Kashmir were analyzed for HPV infection, DNA binding activity and expression of AP-1 family of proteins by PCR, gel shift assay and immunoblotting respectively. Results A high DNA binding activity and elevated expression of AP-1 proteins were observed in esophageal cancer, which differed between HPV positive (19%) and HPV negative (81%) carcinomas. While JunB, c-Fos and Fra-1 were the major contributors to AP-1 binding activity in HPV negative cases, Fra-1 was completely absent in HPV16 positive cancers. Comparison of AP-1 family proteins demonstrated high expression of JunD and c-Fos in HPV positive tumors, but interestingly, Fra-1 expression was extremely low or nil in these tumor tissues. Conclusion Differential AP-1 binding activity and expression of its specific proteins between HPV - positive and HPV - negative cases indicate that AP-1 may play an important role during HPV-induced esophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:19758438

  8. Expression and characterization of biologically active human hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) by insect cells infected with HGF-recombinant baculovirus.

    PubMed

    Yee, C J; DeFrances, M C; Bell, A; Bowen, W; Petersen, B; Michalopoulos, G K; Zarnegar, R

    1993-08-10

    A cDNA containing the entire coding sequence of human hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) [also known as scatter factor (SF)] was inserted into the genome of Autographa california nuclear polyhedrosis virus (baculovirus) adjacent to the polyhedrin promoter by homologous recombination. Insect cells (Spodoptera frugiperda) infected with the recombinant virus secrete relatively high levels (3-8 mg/L) of biologically active HGF into the culture medium. The recombinant HGF induces pronounced morphological changes and scattering of primary cultures of rat, mouse, and human hepatocytes within 24 h after plating and stimulates DNA synthesis in these cells with the same magnitude as native HGF derived from human placenta or rabbit serum. The human recombinant HGF produced by the insect cells is N-glycosylated, binds to heparin like native HGF, and is recognized by polyclonal antiserums raised against human or rabbit HGF as assessed by immunoblot, ELISA, and immunoneutralization experiments. Metabolic radiolabeling with L-[35S]methionine (pulse-chase experiments) as well as Western blot analysis indicates that the recombinant HGF is synthesized and secreted by the infected insect cells as the unprocessed single-chain form (pro-HGF) when the cells are cultured in serum-free medium. However, when the infected insect cells are cultured in insect culture medium (Grace's medium) containing fetal bovine serum, the secreted HGF is present mainly in the mature heterodimeric form. Addition of serum to the baculovirus-expressed single-chain [125I]HGF in a cell-free system results in conversion to the heterodimeric two-chain form, and the activation is prevented by the serine protease inhibitor PMSF. Incubation of 125I-labeled pro-HGF with rat liver or spleen extracts resulted in conversion of pro-HGF to the heterodimeric two-chain form. A truncated form of HGF containing the N-terminal portion of HGF (kringles 1-3) was also produced in the same expression system. This deleted HGF, by

  9. Helminth Infections Coincident with Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis Inhibit Mono- and Multifunctional CD4+ and CD8+ T Cell Responses in a Process Dependent on IL-10

    PubMed Central

    George, Parakkal Jovvian; Anuradha, Rajamanickam; Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Sridhar, Rathinam; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2014-01-01

    Tissue invasive helminth infections and tuberculosis (TB) are co-endemic in many parts of the world and can trigger immune responses that might antagonize each other. We have previously shown that helminth infections modulate the Th1 and Th17 responses to mycobacterial-antigens in latent TB. To determine whether helminth infections modulate antigen-specific and non-specific immune responses in active pulmonary TB, we examined CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses as well as the systemic (plasma) cytokine levels in individuals with pulmonary TB with or without two distinct helminth infections—Wuchereria bancrofti and Strongyloides stercoralis infection. By analyzing the frequencies of Th1 and Th17 CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and their component subsets (including multifunctional cells), we report a significant diminution in the mycobacterial–specific frequencies of mono- and multi–functional CD4+ Th1 and (to a lesser extent) Th17 cells when concomitant filarial or Strongyloides infection occurs. The impairment in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell cytokine responses was antigen-specific as polyclonal activated T cell frequencies were equivalent irrespective of helminth infection status. This diminution in T cell responses was also reflected in diminished circulating levels of Th1 (IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2)- and Th17 (IL-17A and IL-17F)-associated cytokines. Finally, we demonstrate that for the filarial co-infections at least, this diminished frequency of multifunctional CD4+ T cell responses was partially dependent on IL-10 as IL-10 blockade significantly increased the frequencies of CD4+ Th1 cells. Thus, co-existent helminth infection is associated with an IL-10 mediated (for filarial infection) profound inhibition of antigen-specific CD4+ T cell responses as well as protective systemic cytokine responses in active pulmonary TB. PMID:25211342

  10. Specific activation of dendritic cells enhances clearance of Bacillus anthracis following infection.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Iain J T; Mann, Elizabeth R; Stokes, Margaret G; English, Nicholas R; Knight, Stella C; Williamson, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells are potent activators of the immune system and have a key role in linking innate and adaptive immune responses. In the current study we have used ex vivo pulsed bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDC) in a novel adoptive transfer strategy to protect against challenge with Bacillus anthracis, in a murine model. Pre-pulsing murine BMDC with either recombinant Protective Antigen (PA) or CpG significantly upregulated expression of the activation markers CD40, CD80, CD86 and MHC-II. Passive transfusion of mice with pulsed BMDC, concurrently with active immunisation with rPA in alum, significantly enhanced (p<0.001) PA-specific splenocyte responses seven days post-immunisation. Parallel studies using ex vivo DCs expanded from human peripheral blood and activated under the same conditions as the murine DC, demonstrated that human DCs had a PA dose-related significant increase in the markers CD40, CD80 and CCR7 and that the increases in CD40 and CD80 were maintained when the other activating components, CpG and HK B. anthracis were added to the rPA in culture. Mice vaccinated on a single occasion intra-muscularly with rPA and alum and concurrently transfused intra-dermally with pulsed BMDC, demonstrated 100% survival following lethal B. anthracis challenge and had significantly enhanced (p<0.05) bacterial clearance within 2 days, compared with mice vaccinated with rPA and alum alone. PMID:25380285

  11. Identification of Candidate Agents Active against N. ceranae Infection in Honey Bees: Establishment of a Medium Throughput Screening Assay Based on N. ceranae Infected Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Many flowering plants in both natural ecosytems and agriculture are dependent on insect pollination for fruit set and seed production. Managed honey bees (Apis mellifera) and wild bees are key pollinators providing this indispensable eco- and agrosystem service. Like all other organisms, bees are attacked by numerous pathogens and parasites. Nosema apis is a honey bee pathogenic microsporidium which is widely distributed in honey bee populations without causing much harm. Its congener Nosema ceranae was originally described as pathogen of the Eastern honey bee (Apis cerana) but jumped host from A. cerana to A. mellifera about 20 years ago and spilled over from A. mellifera to Bombus spp. quite recently. N. ceranae is now considered a deadly emerging parasite of both Western honey bees and bumblebees. Hence, novel and sustainable treatment strategies against N. ceranae are urgently needed to protect honey and wild bees. We here present the development of an in vitro medium throughput screening assay for the identification of candidate agents active against N. ceranae infections. This novel assay is based on our recently developed cell culture model for N. ceranae and coupled with an RT-PCR-ELISA protocol for quantification of N. ceranae in infected cells. The assay has been adapted to the 96-well microplate format to allow automated analysis. Several substances with known (fumagillin) or presumed (surfactin) or no (paromomycin) activity against N. ceranae were tested as well as substances for which no data concerning N. ceranae inhibition existed. While fumagillin and two nitroimidazoles (metronidazole, tinidazole) totally inhibited N. ceranae proliferation, all other test substances were inactive. In summary, the assay proved suitable for substance screening and demonstrated the activity of two synthetic antibiotics against N. ceranae. PMID:25658121

  12. Identification of candidate agents active against N. ceranae infection in honey bees: establishment of a medium throughput screening assay based on N. ceranae infected cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Many flowering plants in both natural ecosytems and agriculture are dependent on insect pollination for fruit set and seed production. Managed honey bees (Apis mellifera) and wild bees are key pollinators providing this indispensable eco- and agrosystem service. Like all other organisms, bees are attacked by numerous pathogens and parasites. Nosema apis is a honey bee pathogenic microsporidium which is widely distributed in honey bee populations without causing much harm. Its congener Nosema ceranae was originally described as pathogen of the Eastern honey bee (Apis cerana) but jumped host from A. cerana to A. mellifera about 20 years ago and spilled over from A. mellifera to Bombus spp. quite recently. N. ceranae is now considered a deadly emerging parasite of both Western honey bees and bumblebees. Hence, novel and sustainable treatment strategies against N. ceranae are urgently needed to protect honey and wild bees. We here present the development of an in vitro medium throughput screening assay for the identification of candidate agents active against N. ceranae infections. This novel assay is based on our recently developed cell culture model for N. ceranae and coupled with an RT-PCR-ELISA protocol for quantification of N. ceranae in infected cells. The assay has been adapted to the 96-well microplate format to allow automated analysis. Several substances with known (fumagillin) or presumed (surfactin) or no (paromomycin) activity against N. ceranae were tested as well as substances for which no data concerning N. ceranae inhibition existed. While fumagillin and two nitroimidazoles (metronidazole, tinidazole) totally inhibited N. ceranae proliferation, all other test substances were inactive. In summary, the assay proved suitable for substance screening and demonstrated the activity of two synthetic antibiotics against N. ceranae. PMID:25658121

  13. Activation of NF-κB and AP-1 Mediates Hyperproliferation by Inducing β-Catenin and c-Myc in Helicobacter pylori-Infected Gastric Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Eunyoung; Park, Bohye; Lim, Joo Weon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the gastric mucosa of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-infected patients with gastritis or adenocarcinoma, proliferation of gastric epithelial cells is increased. Hyperproliferation is related to induction of oncogenes, such as β-catenin and c-myc. Even though transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1 are activated in H. pylori-infected cells, whether NF-κB or AP-1 regulates the expression of β-catenein or c-myc in H. pylori-infected cells has not been clarified. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB and AP-1 mediates the expression of oncogenes and hyperproliferation of gastric epithelial cells. Materials and Methods Gastric epithelial AGS cells were transiently transfected with mutant genes for IκBα (MAD3) and c-Jun (TAM67) or treated with a specific NF-κB inhibitor caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) or a selective AP-1 inhibitor SR-11302 to suppress activation of NF-κB or AP-1, respecively. As reference cells, the control vector pcDNA was transfected to the cells. Wild-type cells or transfected cells were cultured with or without H. pylori. Results H. pylori induced activation of NF-κB and AP-1, cell proliferation, and expression of oncogenes (β-catenein, c-myc) in AGS cells, which was inhibited by transfection of MAD3 and TAM67. Wild-type cells and the cells transfected with pcDNA showed similar activities of NF-κB and AP-1, proliferation, and oncogene expression regardless of treatment with H. pylori. Both CAPE and SR-11302 inhibited cell proliferation and expression of oncogenes in H. pylori-infected cells. Conclusion H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB and AP-1 regulates transcription of oncogenes and mediates hyperproliferation in gastric epithelial cells. PMID:26996564

  14. Modeling the Effects of Vorinostat In Vivo Reveals both Transient and Delayed HIV Transcriptional Activation and Minimal Killing of Latently Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R.; Elliott, Julian H; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recent clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Furthermore, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo. PMID:26496627

  15. Modeling the effects of vorinostat in vivo reveals both transient and delayed HIV transcriptional activation and minimal killing of latently infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R.; Elliott, Julian H.; Perelson, Alan S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2015-10-23

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recent clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Lastly, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo.

  16. Modeling the Effects of Vorinostat In Vivo Reveals both Transient and Delayed HIV Transcriptional Activation and Minimal Killing of Latently Infected Cells.

    PubMed

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R; Elliott, Julian H; Perelson, Alan S

    2015-10-01

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recent clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Furthermore, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo. PMID:26496627

  17. Modeling the effects of vorinostat in vivo reveals both transient and delayed HIV transcriptional activation and minimal killing of latently infected cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R.; Elliott, Julian H.; Perelson, Alan S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2015-10-23

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recentmore » clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Lastly, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo.« less

  18. Distinct APC Subtypes Drive Spatially Segregated CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Effector Activity during Skin Infection with HSV-1

    PubMed Central

    Macleod, Bethany L.; Bedoui, Sammy; Hor, Jyh Liang; Mueller, Scott N.; Russell, Tiffany A.; Hollett, Natasha A.; Heath, William R.; Tscharke, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Efficient infection control requires potent T-cell responses at sites of pathogen replication. However, the regulation of T-cell effector function in situ remains poorly understood. Here, we show key differences in the regulation of effector activity between CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells during skin infection with HSV-1. IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells disseminated widely throughout the skin and draining lymph nodes (LN), clearly exceeding the epithelial distribution of infectious virus. By contrast, IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T cells were only found within the infected epidermal layer of the skin and associated hair follicles. Mechanistically, while various subsets of lymphoid- and skin-derived dendritic cells (DC) elicited IFN-γ production by CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells responded exclusively to infected epidermal cells directly presenting viral antigen. Notably, uninfected cross-presenting DCs from both skin and LNs failed to trigger IFN-γ production by CD8+ T-cells. Thus, we describe a previously unappreciated complexity in the regulation of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell effector activity that is subset-specific, microanatomically distinct and involves largely non-overlapping types of antigen-presenting cells (APC). PMID:25121482

  19. Activating Receptors for Self-MHC Class I Enhance Effector Functions and Memory Differentiation of NK Cells during Mouse Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Nabekura, Tsukasa; Lanier, Lewis L

    2016-07-19

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important in host defense against pathogens, and they can subsequently differentiate into memory NK cells. The Ly49 and KIR gene families in rodents and humans encode both inhibitory and activating receptors for MHC class I. The physiological role of activating KIR or Ly49 receptors that recognize self-MHC class I during immune response to viral infections is unknown. Here, we address how the activating Ly49D receptor impacts the NK cell response to mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection by comparing the activation and differentiation of Ly49D-bearing NK cells in mice lacking or expressing H-2D(d), the cognate MHC class I ligand of Ly49D. After MCMV infection, Ly49D augmented IFN-γ production by MCMV-specific Ly49H(+) NK cells and preferentially promoted the generation of memory Ly49H(+) NK cells. Thus, activating receptors for self-MHC class I modulate the differentiation of MCMV-specific NK cells and are beneficial for host defense against MCMV infection. PMID:27438766

  20. Abnormalities in subset distribution, activation, and differentiation of T cells isolated from large intestine biopsies in HIV infection. The Berlin Diarrhoea/Wasting Syndrome Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, T; Ullrich, R; Bergs, C; Schmidt, W; Riecken, E O; Zeitz, M

    1994-01-01

    Intestinal T cells have a unique state of activation and differentiation which might specifically affect or be affected by HIV infection. Lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood are well characterized, but our knowledge about intestinal lymphocytes in HIV infection is incomplete. We therefore analysed lymphocytes isolated from large intestine biopsies of AIDS patients and controls by three-colour cytofluorometry. In the large intestine of HIV-infected patients CD4 T cells were reduced and CD8 T cells were increased compared with controls. Most of the CD8 T cells in the colorectal mucosa of AIDS patients were of the cytotoxic phenotype. Activated and resting CD4 T cells were similarly reduced, the expression of CD25 and HLA-DR of CD8 T cells was unaltered and increased, respectively. In intestinal CD4 T cells the expression of CD29 was decreased, but the expression of CD45RO and HML-1 was normal. CD8 T cells had a decreased expression of all these differentiation markers. Our findings demonstrate substantial alterations in subset distribution, activation, and differentiation of large intestine T cells, which may contribute to the secondary infections and malignancies commonly observed in the gut of AIDS patients. PMID:8137540

  1. Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting of Rickettsia prowazekii-Infected Host Cells Based on Bacterial Burden and Early Detection of Fluorescent Rickettsial Transformants

    PubMed Central

    Driskell, Lonnie O.; Tucker, Aimee M.; Woodard, Andrew; Wood, Raphael R.; Wood, David O.

    2016-01-01

    Rickettsia prowazekii, the causative agent of epidemic typhus, is an obligate intracellular bacterium that replicates only within the cytosol of a eukaryotic host cell. Despite the barriers to genetic manipulation that such a life style creates, rickettsial mutants have been generated by transposon insertion as well as by homologous recombination mechanisms. However, progress is hampered by the length of time required to identify and isolate R. prowazekii transformants. To reduce the time required and variability associated with propagation and harvesting of rickettsiae for each transformation experiment, characterized frozen stocks were used to generate electrocompetent rickettsiae. Transformation experiments employing these rickettsiae established that fluorescent rickettsial populations could be identified using a fluorescence activated cell sorter within one week following electroporation. Early detection was improved with increasing amounts of transforming DNA. In addition, we demonstrate that heterogeneous populations of rickettsiae-infected cells can be sorted into distinct sub-populations based on the number of rickettsiae per cell. Together our data suggest the combination of fluorescent reporters and cell sorting represent an important technical advance that will facilitate isolation of distinct R. prowazekii mutants and allow for closer examination of the effects of infection on host cells at various infectious burdens. PMID:27010457

  2. 2B4 expression on natural killer cells increases in HIV-1 infected patients followed prospectively during highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, S R; Ullum, H; Pedersen, B K; Gerstoft, J; Katzenstein, T L

    2005-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection influences natural killer (NK) cell expression of inhibitory NK receptors and activating natural cytotoxicity receptors. It is unknown whether expression of the co-stimulatory NK cell receptor 2B4 (CD244) on NK cells and CD3+ CD8+ cells are affected by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), low-level viraemia, proviral-DNA or immune activation in HIV-1 infected patients. A total of 101 HAART-treated HIV-1 infected patients with < or = 200 HIV-RNA copies/ml were followed prospectively for 24 months. HIV-RNA was investigated 3-monthly and 2B4 expression on CD3- CD16+ NK cells and CD3+ CD8+ cells, proviral-DNA and plasma soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor (sTNFr)-II were investigated 6-monthly. For comparison, 2B4 expression was investigated in 20 healthy individuals. The concentration of 2B4+ NK cells was initially reduced in HIV-1 infected patients (P < 0.001) but increased to a normal level during the 24 months' follow-up. The concentration of CD3+ CD8+ 2B4+ cells in HIV-1 infected patients was normal and did not change during follow-up. The relative fluorescence intensity (RFI) of 2B4 increased on both NK cells and CD3+ CD8+ cells during follow-up (both P < 0.001). Higher levels of proviral-DNA carrying cells and plasma sTNFrII were associated with reductions in the concentration of 2B4+ NK cells (all P < 0.05). HIV-RNA had no effect on 2B4 expression on NK cells or CD3+ CD8+ cells. These findings demonstrate that the concentration of 2B4+ NK cells normalizes during long-term HAART in HIV-1 infected patients. The finding that proviral-DNA and sTNFrII were associated negatively with the concentration of 2B4+ NK cells suggests that immune activation in HIV-1 infected patients receiving HAART influences the target cell recognition by NK cells. PMID:16045743

  3. Pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis in resistant and susceptible mice: relationship among progression of infection, bronchoalveolar cell activation, cellular immune response, and specific isotype patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Cano, L E; Singer-Vermes, L M; Vaz, C A; Russo, M; Calich, V L

    1995-01-01

    Using the intraperitoneal route of infection, we demonstrated previously that A/Sn mice are resistant and B10.A mice are susceptible to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection. Since paracoccidioidomycosis is a deep systemic granulomatous disorder that involves primarily the lungs and then disseminates to other organs and systems, we herein investigated the course of the infection and the resulting immune responses developed by A/Sn and B10.A mice after intratracheal infection with P. brasiliensis yeast cells. It was observed that A/Sn mice develop a chronic benign pulmonary-restricted infection, whereas B10.A mice present a chronic progressive disseminated disease. A/Sn animals were able to restrict fungal infection to the lungs despite the increased fungal load at the beginning of the infection. This behavior was associated with low mortality rates, the presence of adequate and persistent delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, oxidative burst by bronchoalveolar cells, and production of high levels of specific antibodies in which immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) and IgG3 isotype titers were significantly higher than those observed in the susceptible mice. In contrast, B10.A animals showed a constant pulmonary fungal load and dissemination to the liver and spleen. This infection pattern resulted in high mortality rates, discrete delayed-type hypersensitivity reactivity, poorly activated or nonactivated bronchoalveolar cells, and production of specific IgG2b isotype titers significantly higher than those observed in the resistant mice at week 4 of infection. Thus, A/Sn and B10.A mice maintain the same resistance patterns as those observed previously with the intraperitoneal route of infection. Furthermore, the obtained results suggest that resistance to paracoccidioidomycosis is associated with T-cell, macrophage, and B-cell activities that are known to be mediated by gamma interferon. PMID:7729885

  4. Pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis in resistant and susceptible mice: relationship among progression of infection, bronchoalveolar cell activation, cellular immune response, and specific isotype patterns.

    PubMed

    Cano, L E; Singer-Vermes, L M; Vaz, C A; Russo, M; Calich, V L

    1995-05-01

    Using the intraperitoneal route of infection, we demonstrated previously that A/Sn mice are resistant and B10.A mice are susceptible to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection. Since paracoccidioidomycosis is a deep systemic granulomatous disorder that involves primarily the lungs and then disseminates to other organs and systems, we herein investigated the course of the infection and the resulting immune responses developed by A/Sn and B10.A mice after intratracheal infection with P. brasiliensis yeast cells. It was observed that A/Sn mice develop a chronic benign pulmonary-restricted infection, whereas B10.A mice present a chronic progressive disseminated disease. A/Sn animals were able to restrict fungal infection to the lungs despite the increased fungal load at the beginning of the infection. This behavior was associated with low mortality rates, the presence of adequate and persistent delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, oxidative burst by bronchoalveolar cells, and production of high levels of specific antibodies in which immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) and IgG3 isotype titers were significantly higher than those observed in the susceptible mice. In contrast, B10.A animals showed a constant pulmonary fungal load and dissemination to the liver and spleen. This infection pattern resulted in high mortality rates, discrete delayed-type hypersensitivity reactivity, poorly activated or nonactivated bronchoalveolar cells, and production of specific IgG2b isotype titers significantly higher than those observed in the resistant mice at week 4 of infection. Thus, A/Sn and B10.A mice maintain the same resistance patterns as those observed previously with the intraperitoneal route of infection. Furthermore, the obtained results suggest that resistance to paracoccidioidomycosis is associated with T-cell, macrophage, and B-cell activities that are known to be mediated by gamma interferon. PMID:7729885

  5. CD4+ T cell polyfunctional profile in HIV-TB coinfection are similar between individuals with latent and active TB infection

    PubMed Central

    Canaday, David H.; Sridaran, Sankar; Van Epps, Puja; Aung, Htin; Burant, Christopher J.; Nsereko, Mary; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Betts, Michael R.; Toossi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T cell counts of HIV-infected individuals with pulmonary TB (PTB) are higher than with other opportunistic infections suggesting that progression to PTB is not merely due to T cell depletion but also dysfunction. There are limited data examining T cell functional signatures in human HIV-TB co-infection particularly in PTB which accounts for about 80% of active TB disease overall. We examined a cohort of HIV-infected anti-retroviral naïve individuals in Kampala, Uganda, a TB endemic area using multi-parametric flow cytometry analysis to determine IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-17, and TNF-α production in CD4+ memory T cell subsets. The cytokine frequency and polyfunctionality profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)-specific CD4+ T cells in HIV-infected persons with latent TB infection (LTBI) or PTB is comparable. This similarity suggests that LTBI may represent a smoldering state of persistent MTB replication rather than dormant infection. This may be a contributory mechanism to the significantly increased risk of progression to PTB in this population. PMID:25956974

  6. L-selectin Is Essential for Delivery of Activated CD8+ T Cells to Virus-Infected Organs for Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Rebar N.; Watson, H. Angharad; Vigar, Miriam; Ohme, Julia; Thomson, Amanda; Humphreys, Ian R.; Ager, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes play a critical role in the host response to infection by viruses. The ability to secrete cytotoxic chemicals and cytokines is considered pivotal for eliminating virus. Of equal importance is how effector CD8+ T cells home to virus-infected tissues. L-selectin has not been considered important for effector T cell homing, because levels are low on activatedcells. We report here that, although L-selectin expression is downregulated following T cell priming in lymph nodes, L-selectin is re-expressed on activated CD8+ T cells entering the bloodstream, and recruitment of activated CD8+ T cells from the bloodstream into virus-infected tissues is L-selectin dependent. Furthermore, L-selectin on effector CD8+ T cells confers protective immunity to two evolutionally distinct viruses, vaccinia and influenza, which infect mucosal and visceral organs, respectively. These results connect homing and a function of virus-specific CD8+ T cells to a single molecule, L-selectin. PMID:26804910

  7. Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri infection activates colonic FoxP3+ T cells enhancing their capacity to prevent colitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Helminthic infections protect mice from colitis in murine models of inflammatory bowel disease and also may protect people. Helminths like Heligmosomoides bakeri (Hpb) can induce Tregs. Experiments explored if Hpb infection could protect mice from colitis through activation of colonic Treg and exam...

  8. Experimental scrapie in golden Syrian hamsters: temporal comparison of in vitro cell-fusing activity with brain infectivity and histopathological changes.

    PubMed Central

    Moreau-Dubois, M C; Brown, P; Rohwer, R G; Masters, C L; Franko, M; Gajdusek, D C

    1982-01-01

    Golden Syrain hamsters were inoculated intracerebrally with the hamster-adapted 263K strain of scrapie virus, and the evolution of in vitro cell fusing activity induced by brain suspensions was compared with brain infectivity titers and histological changes. Cell-fusing activity abruptly appeared 4 weeks after inoculation, 1 week before the earliest detectable histopathological changes, at an infectivity level of 7.6 log 50% lethal doses per g of brain. Cell-fusing activity was sustained throughout the remaining 4 weeks of the incubation period and the subsequent 1- to 3-week stage of clinical illness but did not increase with the logarithmic progression of infectivity, which reached a level of 11 log 50% lethal doses per g in the agonal stage of disease. Gliosis was most sensitively detected by a monoclonal antibody reacting with astrocyte intermediate filaments in an indirect immunofluorescence test, anticipating histological recognition of gliosis and spongiform change by 1 to 2 weeks. In vitro cell-fusing activity is thus one of the earliest known biological markers (apart from infectivity itself) of experimental scrapie infection. PMID:6809626

  9. Effects of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs on Helicobacter pylori-Infected Gastric Mucosae of Mice: Apoptosis, Cell Proliferation, and Inflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Il; Lee, Yong Chan; Lee, Kwang Hyoung; Han, Jae Ho; Chon, Chae Yoon; Moon, Young Myoung; Kang, Jin Kyung; Park, In Suh

    2001-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are two well-known important causative factors of gastric damage. While H. pylori increases apoptosis and the proliferation of gastric epithelial cells and is an important factor in peptic ulcer and gastric cancer, NSAIDs induce cell apoptosis and have antineoplastic effects. We investigated the effects of NSAIDs (a nonselective cyclooxygenase [COX] inhibitor [indomethacin] and a selective COX-2 inhibitor [NS-398]) on the apoptosis and proliferation of gastric epithelial cells and gastric inflammation in H. pylori-infected mice. C57BL/6 mice were sacrificed 8 weeks after H. pylori SS1 inoculation. Indomethacin (2 mg/kg) or NS-398 (10 mg/kg) was administered subcutaneously once daily for 10 days before sacrifice. The following were assessed: gastric inflammatory activity, gastric COX protein expression by Western blotting; gastric prostaglandin E2 levels by enzyme immunoassay, apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling, and cell proliferation by Ki67 immunostaining. Compared to the controls, H. pylori infection and/or NSAID treatment increased COX-1 and COX-2 protein expression. Gastric prostaglandin E2 levels, apoptotic index, cell proliferation index, neutrophil activity, and the degree of chronic inflammation were all increased by H. pylori infection, and these effects were significantly decreased by indomethacin treatment. However, NS-398 treatment after H. pylori infection did not induce a significant reduction, although it did result in a tendency to decrease. These results show that NSAIDs can reverse the increased apoptosis and proliferation of epithelial cells and inflammatory activity in the stomachs of H. pylori-infected mice and that, like COX-2 activation, COX-1 induction contributes to the change of gastric mucosal cell turnover and inflammation induced by H. pylori infection. PMID:11447186

  10. Early Gag Immunodominance of the HIV-Specific T-Cell Response during Acute/Early Infection Is Associated with Higher CD8+ T-Cell Antiviral Activity and Correlates with Preservation of the CD4+ T-Cell Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Ghiglione, Yanina; Falivene, Juliana; Socias, María Eugenia; Laufer, Natalia; Coloccini, Romina Soledad; Rodriguez, Ana María; Ruiz, María Julia; Pando, María Ángeles; Giavedoni, Luis David; Cahn, Pedro; Sued, Omar; Salomon, Horacio; Gherardi, María Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    The important role of the CD8+ T-cell response on HIV control is well established. Moreover, the acute phase of infection represents a proper scenario to delineate the antiviral cellular functions that best correlate with control. Here, multiple functional aspects (specificity, ex vivo viral inhibitory activity [VIA] and polyfunctionality) of the HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell subset arising early after infection, and their association with disease progression markers, were examined. Blood samples from 44 subjects recruited within 6 months from infection (primary HIV infection [PHI] group), 16 chronically infected subjects, 11 elite controllers (EC), and 10 healthy donors were obtained. Results indicated that, although Nef dominated the anti-HIV response during acute/early infection, a higher proportion of early anti-Gag T cells correlated with delayed progression. Polyfunctional HIV-specific CD8+ T cells were detected at early time points but did not associate with virus control. Conversely, higher CD4+ T-cell set points were observed in PHI subjects with higher HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell VIA at baseline. Importantly, VIA levels correlated with the magnitude of the anti-Gag cellular response. The advantage of Gag-specific cells may result from their enhanced ability to mediate lysis of infected cells (evidenced by a higher capacity to degranulate and to mediate VIA) and to simultaneously produce IFN-γ. Finally, Gag immunodominance was associated with elevated plasma levels of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP-1β). All together, this study underscores the importance of CD8+ T-cell specificity in the improved control of disease progression, which was related to the capacity of Gag-specific cells to mediate both lytic and nonlytic antiviral mechanisms at early time points postinfection. PMID:23616666

  11. Infection of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells by ANDES Hantavirus enhances pro-inflammatory state, the secretion of active MMP-9 and indirectly enhances endothelial permeability

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Andes virus (ANDV), a rodent-borne Hantavirus, is the major etiological agent of Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in South America, which is mainly characterized by a vascular leakage with high rate of fatal outcomes for infected patients. Currently, neither specific therapy nor vaccines are available against this pathogen. ANDV infects both dendritic and epithelial cells, but in despite that the severity of the disease directly correlates with the viral RNA load, considerable evidence suggests that immune mechanisms rather than direct viral cytopathology are responsible for plasma leakage in HCPS. Here, we assessed the possible effect of soluble factors, induced in viral-activated DCs, on endothelial permeability. Activated immune cells, including DC, secrete gelatinolytic matrix metalloproteases (gMMP-2 and -9) that modulate the vascular permeability for their trafficking. Methods A clinical ANDES isolate was used to infect DC derived from primary PBMC. Maturation and pro-inflammatory phenotypes of ANDES-infected DC were assessed by studying the expression of receptors, cytokines and active gMMP-9, as well as some of their functional status. The ANDES-infected DC supernatants were assessed for their capacity to enhance a monolayer endothelial permeability using primary human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). Results Here, we show that in vitro primary DCs infected by a clinical isolate of ANDV shed virus RNA and proteins, suggesting a competent viral replication in these cells. Moreover, this infection induces an enhanced expression of soluble pro-inflammatory factors, including TNF-α and the active gMMP-9, as well as a decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10 and TGF-β. These viral activated cells are less sensitive to apoptosis. Moreover, supernatants from ANDV-infected DCs were able to indirectly enhance the permeability of a monolayer of primary HUVEC. Conclusions Primary human DCs, that are primarily

  12. Gammaherpesvirus Infection of Human Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Hem Chandra; Mehta, Devan; Lu, Jie; El-Naccache, Darine; Shukla, Sanket K.; Kovacsics, Colleen; Kolson, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gammaherpesviruses human herpesvirus 4 (HHV4) and HHV8 are two prominent members of the herpesvirus family associated with a number of human cancers. HHV4, also known as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a ubiquitous gammaherpesvirus prevalent in 90 to 95% of the human population, is clinically associated with various neurological diseases such as primary central nervous system lymphoma, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, cerebellar ataxia, and encephalitis. However, the possibility that EBV and Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) can directly infect neurons has been largely overlooked. This study has, for the first time, characterized EBV infection in neural cell backgrounds by using the Sh-Sy5y neuroblastoma cell line, teratocarcinoma Ntera2 neurons, and primary human fetal neurons. Furthermore, we also demonstrated KSHV infection of neural Sh-Sy5y cells. These neuronal cells were infected with green fluorescent protein-expressing recombinant EBV or KSHV. Microscopy, genetic analysis, immunofluorescence, and Western blot analyses for specific viral antigens supported and validated the infection of these cells by EBV and KSHV and showed that the infection was efficient and productive. Progeny virus produced from infected neuronal cells efficiently infected fresh neuronal cells, as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Furthermore, acyclovir was effective at inhibiting the production of virus from neuronal cells similar to lymphoblastoid cell lines; this suggests active lytic replication in infected neurons in vitro. These studies represent a potentially new in vitro model of EBV- and KSHV-associated neuronal disease development and pathogenesis. PMID:26628726

  13. A pathogenic long noncoding RNA redesigns the epigenetic landscape of the infected cells by subverting host Histone Deacetylase 6 activity.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Mayte; Pallas, Vicente; Gomez, Gustavo

    2016-09-01

    Viroids - ancient plant-pathogenic long noncoding RNAs - have developed a singular evolutionary strategy based on reprogramming specific phases of host-metabolism to ensure that their infection cycle can be completed in infected cells. However, the molecular aspects governing this transregulatory phenomenon remain elusive. Here, we use immunoprecipitation assays and bisulfite sequencing of rDNA to shown that, in infected cucumber and Nicotiana benthamina plants, Hop stunt viroid (HSVd) recruits and functionally subverts Histone Deacetylase 6 (HDA6) to promote host-epigenetic alterations that trigger the transcriptional alterations observed during viroid pathogenesis. This notion is supported by the demonstration that, during infection, the HSVd-HDA6 complex occurs in vivo and that endogenous HDA6 expression is increased in HSVd-infected cells. Moreover, transient overexpression of recombinant HDA6 reverts the hypomethylation status of rDNA observed in HSVd-infected plants and reduces viroid accumulation. We hypothesize that the host-transcriptional alterations induced as a consequence of viroid-mediated HDA6 recruitment favor spurious recognition of HSVd-RNA as an RNA Pol II template, thereby improving viroid replication. Our results constitute the first description of a physical and functional interaction between a pathogenic RNA and a component of the host RNA silencing mechanism, providing novel evidence of the potential of these pathogenic lncRNAs to physically redesign the host-cell environment and reprogram their regulatory mechanisms. PMID:27174164

  14. In vivo activation of the intracrine vitamin D pathway in innate immune cells and mammary tissue during a bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Corwin D; Reinhardt, Timothy A; Beitz, Donald C; Lippolis, John D

    2010-01-01

    Numerous in vitro studies have shown that toll-like receptor signaling induces 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) 1α-hydroxylase (1α-OHase; CYP27B1) expression in macrophages from various species. 1α-OHase is the primary enzyme that converts 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)). Subsequently, synthesis of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) by 1α-OHase in macrophages has been shown to modulate innate immune responses of macrophages. Despite the numerous in vitro studies that have shown 1α-OHase expression is induced in macrophages, however, evidence that 1α-OHase expression is induced by pathogens in vivo is limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate 1α-OHase gene expression in macrophages and mammary tissue during an in vivo bacterial infection with Streptococcus uberis. In tissue and secreted cells from the infected mammary glands, 1α-OHase gene expression was significantly increased compared to expression in tissue and cells from the healthy mammary tissue. Separation of the cells by FACS9 revealed that 1α-OHase was predominantly expressed in the CD14(+) cells isolated from the infected mammary tissue. The 24-hydroxylase gene, a gene that is highly upregulated by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), was significantly more expressed in tissue and cells from the infected mammary tissue than from the healthy uninfected mammary tissue thus indicating significant local 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) production at the infection site. In conclusion, this study provides the first in vivo evidence that 1α-OHase expression is upregulated in macrophages in response to bacterial infection and that 1α-OHase at the site of infection provides 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) for local regulation of vitamin D responsive genes. PMID:21124742

  15. Narcolepsy: autoimmunity, effector T cell activation due to infection, or T cell independent, major histocompatibility complex class II induced neuronal loss?

    PubMed

    Fontana, Adriano; Gast, Heidemarie; Reith, Walter; Recher, Mike; Birchler, Thomas; Bassetti, Claudio L

    2010-05-01

    Human narcolepsy with cataplexy is a neurological disorder, which develops due to a deficiency in hypocretin producing neurons in the hypothalamus. There is a strong association with human leucocyte antigens HLA-DR2 and HLA-DQB1*0602. The disease typically starts in adolescence. Recent developments in narcolepsy research support the hypothesis of narcolepsy being an immune-mediated disease. Narcolepsy is associated with polymorphisms of the genes encoding T cell receptor alpha chain, tumour necrosis factor alpha and tumour necrosis factor receptor II. Moreover the rate of streptococcal infection is increased at onset of narcolepsy. The hallmarks of anti-self reactions in the tissue--namely upregulation of major histocompatibility antigens and lymphocyte infiltrates--are missing in the hypothalamus. These findings are questionable because they were obtained by analyses performed many years after onset of disease. In some patients with narcolepsy autoantibodies to Tribbles homolog 2, which is expressed by hypocretin neurons, have been detected recently. Immune-mediated destruction of hypocretin producing neurons may be mediated by microglia/macrophages that become activated either by autoantigen specific CD4(+) T cells or superantigen stimulated CD8(+) T cells, or independent of T cells by activation of DQB1*0602 signalling. Activation of microglia and macrophages may lead to the release of neurotoxic molecules such as quinolinic acid, which has been shown to cause selective destruction of hypocretin neurons in the hypothalamus. PMID:20403960

  16. Inhibition of host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation decreases new world alphavirus multiplication in infected cells.

    PubMed

    Voss, Kelsey; Amaya, Moushimi; Mueller, Claudius; Roberts, Brian; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Bailey, Charles; Petricoin, Emanuel; Narayanan, Aarthi

    2014-11-01

    New World alphaviruses belonging to the family Togaviridae are classified as emerging infectious agents and Category B select agents. Our study is focused on the role of the host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the infectious process of New World alphaviruses. Infection of human cells by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) results in the activation of the ERK-signaling cascade. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by the small molecule inhibitor Ag-126 results in inhibition of viral multiplication. Ag-126-mediated inhibition of VEEV was due to potential effects on early and late stages of the infectious process. While expression of viral proteins was down-regulated in Ag-126 treated cells, we did not observe any influence of Ag-126 on the nuclear distribution of capsid. Finally, Ag-126 exerted a broad-spectrum inhibitory effect on New World alphavirus multiplication, thus indicating that the host kinase, ERK, is a broad-spectrum candidate for development of novel therapeutics against New World alphaviruses. PMID:25261871

  17. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Induces Nrf2 Activation in Latently Infected Endothelial Cells through SQSTM1 Phosphorylation and Interaction with Polyubiquitinated Keap1

    PubMed Central

    Gjyshi, Olsi; Flaherty, Stephanie; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Johnson, Karen E.; Chandran, Bala

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), the cellular master regulator of the antioxidant response, dissociates from its inhibitor Keap1 when activated by stress signals and participates in the pathogenesis of viral infections and tumorigenesis. Early during de novo infection of endothelial cells, KSHV induces Nrf2 through an intricate mechanism involving reactive oxygen species (ROS) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). When we investigated the Nrf2 activity during latent KSHV infection, we observed increased nuclear serine-40-phosphorylated Nrf2 in human KS lesions compared to that in healthy tissues. Using KSHV long-term-infected endothelial cells (LTC) as a cellular model for KS, we demonstrated that KSHV infection induces Nrf2 constitutively by extending its half-life, increasing its phosphorylation by protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ) via the infection-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/PGE2 axis and inducing its nuclear localization. Nrf2 knockdown in LTC decreased expression of antioxidant genes and genes involved in KS pathogenesis such as the NAD(P)H quinone oxidase 1 (NQO1), gamma glutamylcysteine synthase heavy unit (γGCSH), the cysteine transporter (xCT), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) genes. Nrf2 activation was independent of oxidative stress but dependent on the autophagic protein sequestosome-1 (SQSTM1; p62). SQSTM1 levels were elevated in LTC, a consequence of protein accumulation due to decreased autophagy and Nrf2-mediated transcriptional activation. SQSTM1 was phosphorylated on serine-351 and -403, while Keap1 was polyubiquitinated with lysine-63–ubiquitin chains, modifications known to increase their mutual affinity and interaction, leading to Keap1 degradation and Nrf2 activation. The latent KSHV protein Fas-associated death domain-like interleukin-1β-converting enzyme-inhibitory protein (vFLIP) increased SQSTM1 expression and activated Nrf2. Collectively, these results demonstrate that KSHV

  18. Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase (IDO) Activity During the Primary Immune Response to Influenza Infection Modifies the Memory T Cell Response to Influenza Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Leo K.; Fox, Julie M.; Mellor, Andrew L.; Tompkins, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The generation of a heterosubtypic memory T cell response is important for cross-protective immunity against unrelated strains of influenza virus. One way to facilitate the generation of the memory T cell population is to control the activity of immune modulatory agents. The enzyme, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), is upregulated during influenza infection by the interferon response where IDO activity depletes tryptophan required in T cell response. In this study, IDO activity was pharmacologically inhibited with 1-methyl-tryptophan (1MT) during the primary response to influenza virus infection and the effect on the memory T cell response was evaluated. 1MT treatment improved the memory T cell response to influenza virus challenge by increasing interferon gamma expression by CD4 and CD8 T cells, and numbers of lung virus-specific CD8+ T cells, and increased the Th1 response as well as modifying the immunodominance hierarchy to increase the number of subdominant epitope specific CD8+ T cells, a feature which may be linked to decreased regulatory T cell function. These changes also accompanied evidence of accelerated lung tissue repair upon virus challenge. These findings suggest that modulation of IDO activity could be exploited in influenza vaccine development to enhance memory T cell responses and reduce disease burden. PMID:24702331

  19. Baseline and Dynamic Expression of Activating NK Cell Receptors in the Control of Chronic Viral Infections: The Paradigm of HIV-1 and HCV

    PubMed Central

    Marras, Francesco; Bozzano, Federica; Ascierto, Maria Libera; De Maria, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell function is regulated by a balance between the triggering of activating and inhibitory receptors expressed on their surface. A relevant effort has been focused so far on the study of KIR carriage/expression setting the basis for NK cell education and self-tolerance. Focus on the evolution and regulation of activating NK receptors has lagged behind so far. Our understanding of activating receptor expression and regulation has recently improved by evidences derived from in vitro and in vivo studies. Virus infection – either acute or chronic – determines preferential expansion of NK cells with specific phenotype, activating receptors, and with recall-like functional activity. Studies on patients with viral infection (HIV and HCV) and specific diverging clinical courses confirm that inter-individual differences may exist in baseline expression of natural cytotoxicity receptors (NKp46 and NKp30). The findings that patients with divergent clinical courses have different kinetics of activating receptor density expression upon NK cell activation in vitro provide an additional, time-dependent, functional parameter. Kinetic changes in receptor expression thus represent an additional parameter to basal receptor density expression. Different expression and inducibilities of activating receptors on NK cells contribute to the high diversity of NK cell populations and may help our understanding of the inter-individual differences in innate responses that underlie divergent disease courses. PMID:25071766

  20. Regulation of de novo translation of host cells by manipulation of PERK/PKR and GADD34-PP1 activity during Newcastle disease virus infection.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ying; Gu, Feng; Mao, Xiang; Niu, Qiaona; Wang, Huaxia; Sun, Yingjie; Song, Cuiping; Qiu, Xusheng; Tan, Lei; Ding, Chan

    2016-04-01

    Viral infections result in cellular stress responses, which can trigger protein translation shutoff via phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α). Newcastle disease virus (NDV) causes severe disease in poultry and selectively kills human tumour cells. In this report, we determined that infection of HeLa human cervical cancer cells and DF-1 chicken fibroblast cells with NDV maintained protein at early infection times, 0-12 h post-infection (p.i.), and gradually inhibited global protein translation at late infection times, 12-24 h p.i. Mechanistic studies showed that translation inhibition at late infection times was accompanied by phosphorylation of eIF2α, a checkpoint of translation initiation. Meanwhile, the eIF2α kinase, PKR, was upregulated and activated by phosphorylation and another eIF2α kinase, PERK, was phosphorylated and cleaved into two fragments. Pharmacological inhibition experiments revealed that only PKR activity was required for eIF2α phosphorylation, suggesting that recognition of viral dsRNA by PKR was responsible for translation shutoff. High levels of phospho-eIF2α led to preferential translation of the transcription factor ATF4 and an increase in GADD34 expression. Functionally, GADD34, in conjunction with PP1, dephosphorylated eIF2a and restored protein translation, benefiting virus protein synthesis. However, PP1 was degraded at late infection times, functionally counteracting the upregulation of GADD34. Taken together, our data support that NDV-induced translation shutoff at late infection times was attributed to sustaining phosphorylation of eIF2α, which is mediated by continual activation of PKR and degradation of PP1. PMID:26869028

  1. E2F Proteins Are Posttranslationally Modified Concomitantly with a Reduction in Nuclear Binding Activity in Cells Infected with Herpes Simplex Virus 1

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Sunil J.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Roizman, Bernard

    2000-01-01

    The transition from G1 to S phase in the cell cycle requires sequential activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (cdk4) and cdk2, which phosphorylate the retinoblastoma protein, causing the release of E2F. Free E2F upregulates the transcription of genes involved in S phase and cell cycle progression. Recent studies from this and other laboratories have shown that herpes simplex virus 1 stabilizes cyclin D3 early in infection and that early events in viral replication are sensitive to inhibitors of some cdks. On the other hand cdk2 is not activated. Here we report studies on the status of members of E2F family in cycling HEp-2 and HeLa cells and quiescent serum-starved, contact-inhibited human lung fibroblasts. The results show that (i) at 8 h postinfection or thereafter, E2F-1 and E2F-5 were posttranslationally modified and/or translocated from nucleus to the cytoplasm, (ii) E2F-4 was hyperphophorylated, and (iii) overall, E2F binding to cognate DNA sites was decreased at late times after infection. These results concurrent with those cited above indicate that late in infection activation of S-phase genes is blocked both by posttranslational modification and translocation of members of E2F family to inactive compartments and by the absence of active cdk2. The observation that E2F were also posttranslationally modified in quiescent human lung fibroblasts that were not in S phase at the time of infection suggests that specific viral gene products are responsible for modification of the members of E2F family and raises the possibility that in infected cells, activation of the S phase gene is an early event in viral infection and is then shut off at late times. This is consistent with the timing of stabilization of cyclin D3 and the events blocked by inhibitors of cdks. PMID:10933691

  2. CD4 T-cell activation and reduced regulatory T-cell populations are associated with early development of cataracts among HIV-infected adults in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Nakanjako, Damalie; Otiti-Sengeri, Juliet; Ssewanyana, Isaac; Nabatanzi, Rose; Bayigga, Lois; Kirimunda, Samuel; Joloba, Moses; Manabe, Yukari C.; Kambugu, Andrew; Colebunders, Robert; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet

    2016-01-01

    Background Cataracts contribute 12% of visual loss among HIV-infected adults in Uganda. Immuno-pathogenesis of cataracts may differ among HIV-infected individuals; thus the need for innovative therapeutic interventions among HIV-infected adults. Methods In a laboratory based case-control study, nested in a clinical/surgical community outreach camp, 50 adults with cataracts eligible for surgery were selected consecutively. HIV testing was done for individuals with unknown HIV sero-status. Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC) were collected from all HIV-positive-adults-with-cataracts (cases) and HIV-negative-adults-with-cataracts (comparative group) and age-matched HIV-negative and HIV-positive- adults- without-cataracts (comparative group). Treg were measured as CD3+CD4+FoxP3+CD25+bright and immune activation as CD3+CD4+CD38+HALDR+ using a Facs Canto II flowcytometer. Mann Whitney test was used to compare expression among the four groups. Results Of 50 adults operated for cataracts, 24 (48%) were female, 25(50%) were HIV-positive. HIV-positive-individuals had cataracts earlier [median; Inter-quartile Range (IQR); 49(44-53) years] than HIV-negative [70 (IQR 59-75) years]; p=0.0005.Treg were lower among individuals with cataracts irrespective of HIV status; p=0.001; but comparable among younger HIV-positive and elderly HIV-negative with cataracts; p=0.301. Immune activation levels were comparable among HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals with cataracts. However, HIV-positive-individuals with cataracts expressed higher levels of immune activation than HIV-positive-individuals without cataracts; p=0.012 and HIV-negative-individuals-with-cataracts expressed higher levels of immune activation that HIV-negative-without-cataracts; p<0.0001. Conclusion CD4 T-cell activation and reduced regulatory T-cell populations were associated with cataracts among adults aging with HIV. We recommend studies on clinical relevance of immune modulation in the prevention of early

  3. Helminth-Induced Interleukin-4 Abrogates Invariant Natural Killer T Cell Activation-Associated Clearance of Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yi-Ju; Fu, Chi-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Helminth infections affect 1 billion people worldwide and render these individuals susceptible to bacterial coinfection through incompletely understood mechanisms. This includes urinary tract coinfection by bacteria and Schistosoma haematobium worms, the etiologic agent of urogenital schistosomiasis. To study the mechanisms of S. haematobium-bacterial urinary tract coinfections, we combined the first tractable model of urogenital schistosomiasis with an established mouse model of bacterial urinary tract infection (UTI). A single bladder exposure to S. haematobium eggs triggers interleukin-4 (IL-4) production and makes BALB/c mice susceptible to bacterial UTI when they are otherwise resistant. Ablation of IL-4 receptor alpha (IL-4Rα) signaling restored the baseline resistance of BALB/c mice to bacterial UTI despite prior exposure to S. haematobium eggs. Interestingly, numbers of NKT cells were decreased in coexposed versus bacterially monoinfected bladders. Given that schistosome-induced, non-natural killer T (NKT) cell leukocyte infiltration may dilute NKT cell numbers in the bladders of coexposed mice without exerting a specific functional effect on these cells, we next examined NKT cell biology on a per-cell basis. Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells from coexposed mice expressed less gamma interferon (IFN-γ) per cell than did those from mice with UTI alone. Moreover, coexposure resulted in lower CD1d expression in bladder antigen-presenting cells (APC) than did bacterial UTI alone in an IL-4Rα-dependent fashion. Finally, coexposed mice were protected from prolonged bacterial infection by administration of α-galactosylceramide, an iNKT cell agonist. Our findings point to a previously unappreciated role for helminth-induced IL-4 in impairment of iNKT cell-mediated clearance of bacterial coexposure. PMID:24643536

  4. A species-specific activation of Toll-like receptor signaling in bovine and sheep bronchial epithelial cells triggered by Mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Han, Fei; Liang, Jinping; Yang, Jiali; Shi, Juan; Xue, Jing; Yang, Li; Li, Yong; Luo, Meihui; Wang, Yujiong; Wei, Jun; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis caused by a Mycobacterium infection remains a major public health problem in most part of the world, in part owing to the transmission of its pathogens between hosts including human, domestic and wild animals. To date, molecular mechanisms of the pathogenesis of TB are still incompletely understood. In addition to alveolar macrophages, airway epithelial cells have also been recently recognized as main targets for Mycobacteria infections. In an effort to understand the pathogen-host interaction between Mycobacteria and airway epithelial cells in domestic animals, in present study, we investigated the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling in bovine and sheep airway epithelial cells in response to an infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis avirulent H37Ra stain or Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine strain, using primary air-liquid interface (ALI) bronchial epithelial culture models. Our results revealed a host and pathogen species-specific TLR-mediated recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), induction and activation of TLR signaling pathways, and substantial induction of inflammatory response in bronchial epithelial cells in response to Mycobacteria infections between these two species. Interestingly, the activation TLR signaling in bovine bronchial epithelial cells induced by Mycobacteria infection was mainly through a myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)-independent TLR signaling pathway, while both MyD88-dependent and independent TLR signaling cascades could be induced in sheep epithelial cells. Equally noteworthy, a BCG infection was able to induce both MyD88-dependent and independent signaling in sheep and bovine airway epithelial cells, but more robust inflammatory responses were induced in sheep epithelial cells relative to the bovines; whereas an H37Ra infection displayed an ability to mainly trigger a MyD88-independent TLR signaling cascade in these two host species, and induce a more extent expression of

  5. In vitro activation of peripheral mononuclear cells by zinc in HIV-infected patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed Central

    Harrer, T; Wolf, B; Näger, W; Schwarz, W; Bergner, D; Kalden, J R

    1992-01-01

    Zinc is a mitogen for peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The optimal mitogenic concentration was found to be 0.05 mmol/l (327 micrograms/dl), four times higher than physiological serum levels. Maximal proliferation was observed after 6 days. Limited dilution technique revealed a frequency of zinc reactive cells of 1:3467 (median; range 1:1628-1:6235). Cord blood mononuclear cells from four of six healthy children could be stimulated to proliferate by zinc. A normal zinc-induced proliferative response could be demonstrated in all six HIV-infected patients in the Walter-Reed-stage I, in nine of 11 patients in Walter-Reed II and in only two of five patients in Walter-Reed III. In Walter-Reed IV to VI all eight patients showed a weak response to zinc (less than 50% of the healthy day control). Decreased zinc serum levels were found in 10 of 28 patients and in one of 16 controls. There was a significant correlation of a diminished zinc-induced proliferation with lower serum levels of zinc and a reduced proportion of CD4 helper cells in HIV-1-infected men. Because of a suppression of mitogenesis by high dose of zinc an excessive intake of zinc as used by some HIV-1-infected patients can presently not be recommended. The value of zinc-induced proliferation for monitoring HIV-infected patients has still to be established. PMID:1638772

  6. A dichotomy in cortical actin and chemotactic actin activity between human memory and naive T cells contributes to their differential susceptibility to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weifeng; Guo, Jia; Yu, Dongyang; Vorster, Paul J; Chen, WanJun; Wu, Yuntao

    2012-10-12

    Human memory and naive CD4 T cells can mainly be identified by the reciprocal expression of the CD45RO or CD45RA isoforms. In HIV-1 infection, blood CD45RO memory CD4 T cells are preferentially infected and serve as a major viral reservoir. The molecular mechanism dictating this differential susceptibility to HIV-1 remains largely obscure. Here, we report that the different susceptibility of memory and naive T cells to HIV is not determined by restriction factors such as Apobec3G or BST2. However, we observed a phenotypic distinction between human CD45RO and CD45RA resting CD4 T cells in their cortical actin density and actin dynamics. CD45RO CD4 T cells possess a higher cortical actin density and can be distinguished as CD45RO(+)Actin(high). In contrast, CD45RA T cells are phenotypically CD45RA(+)Actin(low). In addition, the cortical actin in CD45RO memory CD4 T cells is more dynamic and can respond to low dosages of chemotactic induction by SDF-1, whereas that of naive cells cannot, despite a similar level of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 present on both cells. We further demonstrate that this difference in the cortical actin contributes to their differential susceptibility to HIV-1; resting memory but not naive T cells are highly responsive to HIV-mediated actin dynamics that promote higher levels of viral entry and early DNA synthesis in resting memory CD4 T cells. Furthermore, transient induction of actin dynamics in resting naive T cells rescues HIV latent infection following CD3/CD28 stimulation. These results suggest a key role of chemotactic actin activity in facilitating HIV-1 latent infection of these T cell subsets. PMID:22879601

  7. Natural Killer cell activation distinguishes M. tuberculosis-mediated Immune reconstitution syndrome (IRIS) from chronic HIV and HIV-MTB co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Conradie, F.; Foulkes, A.S.; Ive, P.; Yin, X.; Roussos, K.; Glencross, D.K.; Lawrie, D.; Stevens, W.; Montaner, L.J.; Sanne; Azzoni, L.

    2011-01-01

    Background With increased access to antiretroviral treatment (ART), Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (IRIS) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)-infected populations remains a clinical challenge. We studied a cross-sectional cohort of HIV-infected subjects in Johannesburg (South Africa) to help define the immune correlates that best distinguish IRIS from ongoing MTB cases. Methods We studied HIV+ subjects developing MTB-related unmasking IRIS (u-TB-IRIS) after ART initiation; control groups were HIV subjects and HIV-TB co-infected subjects with comparable ART treatment. Testing was conducted with whole blood-based 4-color flow cytometry and plasma-based Luminex cytokine assessment. Results NK cell activation, C-reactive protein and IL-8 serum concentration were significantly higher in u-TB-IRIS subjects as compared to both control groups. In addition, all MTB co-infected subjects, independent of clinical presentation, had higher neutrophils and T cell activation, together with lower lymphocytes, CD4+ T cell and myeloid DC counts. Using conditional inference tree analysis we show that elevated NK cell activation in combination with lymphocyte count characterizes the immunological profile of u-TB-IRIS. Conclusions Our results support a role for innate immune effectors in the immunopathogenesis of unmasking MTB-related IRIS, and identify new immune parameters defining this pathology. PMID:21826013

  8. Intestinal immune cells in Strongyloides stercoralis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Trajman, A; MacDonald, T T; Elia, C C

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strongyloides stercoralis can cause a wide spectrum of disease in man, ranging from a chronic asymptomatic infection to a hyperinfective, often fatal syndrome. In rodents, spontaneous expulsion of Strongyloides spp occurs after experimental infection. Mast cells, goblet cells, and eosinophils have been identified as possible effectors of this expulsion. AIMS: To investigate intestinal histopathology and mucosal immunity in immunocompetent patients with chronic S stercoralis infection. METHODS: Jejunal biopsies were performed in 19 immunocompetent patients with a positive stool examination for S stercoralis and few or no symptoms, and in seven healthy controls. Specimens were processed for histopathological analysis and stained by the immunoperoxidase technique, using the following monoclonal antibodies: CD2, CD3, CD4, CD8, anti-T cell receptor (TcR) gamma/delta, RFD1 and RFD7 (two different macrophage markers), Ki67+ (proliferating) cells, antihuman leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR, and anticollagen IV. In addition, CD25+ cells, mast cells, IgE expressing cells, calprotectin containing cells, and neutrophil elastase positive cells were stained by the alkaline phosphatase method. RESULTS: Jejunal morphology and the numbers of different T cell subsets, mast cells, IgE expressing cells, eosinophils, and goblet cells were unaffected by S stercoralis infection. Conversely, the numbers of mature macrophages and dividing enterocytes in the crypts were reduced significantly. Crypt enterocytes did not express HLA-DR in both groups. The expression of HLA-DR by villus enterocytes was also comparable in patients and controls. There were no activated (CD25+) cells in the mucosa of either patients or controls. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with seven healthy uninfected volunteers, a group of 19 Brazilians with clinically mild strongyloides infection showed no abnormality of mucosal structure and no increase in non-specific inflammatory cells. Likewise, there was no increase in

  9. Disruption of Early Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Signaling Prevents Classical Activation of Dendritic Cells in Lung-Associated Lymph Nodes and Development of Protective Immunity against Cryptococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jintao; Eastman, Alison J.; Flaczyk, Adam; Neal, Lori M.; Zhao, Guolei; Carolan, Jacob; Malachowski, Antoni N.; Stolberg, Valerie R.; Yosri, Mohammed; Chensue, Stephen W.; Curtis, Jeffrey L.; Osterholzer, John J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF-α) therapies have been increasingly used to treat inflammatory diseases and are associated with increased risk of invasive fungal infections, including Cryptococcus neoformans infection. Using a mouse model of cryptococcal infection, we investigated the mechanism by which disruption of early TNF-α signaling results in the development of nonprotective immunity against C. neoformans. We found that transient depletion of TNF-α inhibited pulmonary fungal clearance and enhanced extrapulmonary dissemination of C. neoformans during the adaptive phase of the immune response. Higher fungal burdens in TNF-α-depleted mice were accompanied by markedly impaired Th1 and Th17 responses in the infected lungs. Furthermore, early TNF-α depletion also resulted in disrupted transcriptional initiation of the Th17 polarization program and subsequent upregulation of Th1 genes in CD4+ T cells in the lung-associated lymph nodes (LALN) of C. neoformans-infected mice. These defects in LALN T cell responses were preceded by a dramatic shift from a classical toward an alternative activation of dendritic cells (DC) in the LALN of TNF-α-depleted mice. Taken together, our results indicate that early TNF-α signaling is required for optimal DC activation, and the initial Th17 response followed by Th1 transcriptional prepolarization of T cells in the LALN, which further drives the development of protective immunity against cryptococcal infection in the lungs. Thus, administration of anti-TNF-α may introduce a particularly greater risk for newly acquired fungal infections that require generation of protective Th1/Th17 responses for their containment and clearance. PMID:27406560

  10. Polyclonal B-cell activation by Neisseria meningitidis capsular polysaccharides elicit antibodies protective against Trypanosoma cruzi infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, T G; Milani, S R; Travassos, L R

    1996-01-01

    A hyperimmune rabbit antiserum against group C Neisseria meningitidis agglutinated and lysed Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes in a complement-mediated reaction. Immunization of rabbits with the purified polysaccharide C from N. meningitidis and of human volunteers with the AC-polysaccharide vaccine against meningitis also resulted in antibody production cross-reactive with T. cruzi infective forms. The rabbit antibodies bound to parasites, lysed metacyclic forms, and recognized several components from lysates of cell-derived trypomastigotes. The sera from six human volunteers reacted with cell-cultured trypomastigotes in vitro, lysed these forms, and recognized glycoconjugates migrating diffusely on the top of immunoblots. One serum also reacted with the isolated mucin-like glycoconjugate carrying the Ssp-3 epitope from cell-derived trypomastigotes, but treatment with sialidase did not abolish this reactivity. The anti-AC human antiserum also protected against HeLa cell infection and markedly decreased the number of parasites liberated after cell burst. The polyclonal response that resulted from human immunization with N. meningitidis polysaccharides A and C comprised trypanolytic antibodies that recognized nonsialylated epitopes expressed on infective forms of the parasite. It is suggested that human AC vaccination could be potentially helpful as an adjuvant to a specific immunotherapy of Chagas disease, developed with native or recombinant antigens of the parasite. PMID:8811466

  11. [Identification of Env-specific monoclonal antibodies from Chinese HIV-1 infected person by B cell activation and RT-PCR cloning].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Min; Xu, Ke; Yu, Shuang-Qing; Ding, Lin-Lin; Luo, Hai-Yan; Flinko, Robin; Lewis, George K; Feng, Xia; Shao, Ji-Rong; Guan, Yong-Jun; Zeng, Yi

    2012-06-01

    To obtain protective human monoclonal antibody from HIV-1 infected person, we adapted a technology for isolating antigen specific monoclonal antibody from human memory B cells through in vitro B cell activation coupled with RT-PCT and expression cloning. Human B cells were purified by negative sorting from PBMCs of HIV-1 infected individuals and memory B cells were further enriched using anti-CD27 microbeads. Two hundred memory B cells per well were cultured in 96-well round-bottom plates Env-specific antibodies in supernatants were with feeder cells in medium containing EBV and CpG. screened by ELISA after 1-2 weeks' culture. Cells from positive wells of Env-specific antibody were harvested and total RNA was isolated. Human VH and Vkappa or Vlambda genes were amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into IgG1 and kappa or lambda expressing vectors. Functional VH and Vkappa or Vlambda were identified by cotransfecting 293T cells with individual heavy chain and light chain clones followed by analysis of culture supernatants by ELISA for Env-specific antibodies. Finally, corresponding mAb was produced by transient transfection of 293T cells with the identified VH and Vkappa/lambda pair and purified by protein A affinity chromatography. Purified monocolonal antibodies were used for HIV-1 specific antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and neutralizing activity assay. Four monocolonal Env-specific antibodies were isolated from one HIV-1 subtype B' infected individual. Two of them showed strong ADCC activity and one showed weak neutralizing activity against HIV-1. Its further studies on their application in therapeutic or prophylactic vaccines against HIV-1 should be grounded. PMID:22978159

  12. Endothelial Cell Proteomic Response to Rickettsia conorii Infection Reveals Activation of the Janus Kinase (JAK)-Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT)-Inferferon Stimulated Gene (ISG)15 Pathway and Reprogramming Plasma Membrane Integrin/Cadherin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingxin; Valbuena, Gustavo; Walker, David H; Gazi, Michal; Hidalgo, Marylin; DeSousa, Rita; Oteo, Jose Antonio; Goez, Yenny; Brasier, Allan R

    2016-01-01

    Rickettsia conorii is the etiologic agent of Mediterranean spotted fever, a re-emerging infectious disease with significant mortality. This Gram-negative, obligately intracellular pathogen is transmitted via tick bites, resulting in disseminated vascular endothelial cell infection with vascular leakage. In the infected human, Rickettsia conorii infects endothelial cells, stimulating expression of cytokines and pro-coagulant factors. However, the integrated proteomic response of human endothelial cells to R. conorii infection is not known. In this study, we performed quantitative proteomic profiling of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with established R conorii infection versus those stimulated with endotoxin (LPS) alone. We observed differential expression of 55 proteins in HUVEC whole cell lysates. Of these, we observed induction of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)1, MX dynamin-like GTPase (MX1), and ISG15 ubiquitin-like modifier, indicating activation of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway occurs in R. conorii-infected HUVECs. The down-regulated proteins included those involved in the pyrimidine and arginine biosynthetic pathways. A highly specific biotinylated cross-linking enrichment protocol was performed to identify dysregulation of 11 integral plasma membrane proteins that included up-regulated expression of a sodium/potassium transporter and down-regulation of α-actin 1. Analysis of Golgi and soluble Golgi fractions identified up-regulated proteins involved in platelet-endothelial adhesion, phospholipase activity, and IFN activity. Thirty four rickettsial proteins were identified with high confidence in the Golgi, plasma membrane, or secreted protein fractions. The host proteins associated with rickettsial infections indicate activation of interferon-STAT signaling pathways; the disruption of cellular adhesion and alteration of antigen presentation pathways in response to rickettsial infections are distinct from

  13. Glial Cell-Elicited Activation of Brain Microvasculature in Response to Brucella abortus Infection Requires ASC Inflammasome-Dependent IL-1β Production.

    PubMed

    Miraglia, M Cruz; Costa Franco, Miriam M; Rodriguez, Ana M; Bellozi, Paula M Q; Ferrari, Carina C; Farias, Maria I; Dennis, Vida A; Barrionuevo, Paula; de Oliveira, Antonio C P; Pitossi, Fernando; Kim, Kwang Sik; Delpino, M Victoria; Oliveira, Sergio Costa; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H

    2016-05-01

    Blood-brain barrier activation and/or dysfunction are a common feature of human neurobrucellosis, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are largely unknown. In this article, we describe an immune mechanism for inflammatory activation of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) in response to infection with Brucella abortus Infection of HBMEC with B. abortus induced the secretion of IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1, and the upregulation of CD54 (ICAM-1), consistent with a state of activation. Culture supernatants (CS) from glial cells (astrocytes and microglia) infected with B. abortus also induced activation of HBMEC, but to a greater extent. Although B. abortus-infected glial cells secreted IL-1β and TNF-α, activation of HBMEC was dependent on IL-1β because CS from B. abortus-infected astrocytes and microglia deficient in caspase-1 and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD failed to induce HBMEC activation. Consistently, treatment of CS with neutralizing anti-IL-1β inhibited HBMEC activation. Both absent in melanoma 2 and Nod-like receptor containing a pyrin domain 3 are partially required for caspase-1 activation and IL-1β secretion, suggesting that multiple apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing CARD-dependent inflammasomes contribute to IL-1β-induced activation of the brain microvasculature. Inflammasome-mediated IL-1β secretion in glial cells depends on TLR2 and MyD88 adapter-like/TIRAP. Finally, neutrophil and monocyte migration across HBMEC monolayers was increased by CS from Brucella-infected glial cells in an IL-1β-dependent fashion, and the infiltration of neutrophils into the brain parenchyma upon intracranial injection of B. abortus was diminished in the absence of Nod-like receptor containing a pyrin domain 3 and absent in melanoma 2. Our results indicate that innate immunity of the CNS set in motion by B. abortus contributes to the activation of the blood-brain barrier in neurobrucellosis and IL-1β mediates

  14. African Swine Fever Virus Infection of Porcine Aortic Endothelial Cells Leads to Inhibition of Inflammatory Responses, Activation of the Thrombotic State, and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Vallée, Isabelle; Tait, Stephen W. G.; Powell, Penelope P.

    2001-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is an asymptomatic infection of warthogs and bushpigs, which has become an emergent disease of domestic pigs, characterized by hemorrhage, lymphopenia, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. It is caused by a large icosohedral double-stranded DNA virus, African swine fever virus (ASFV), with infection of macrophages well characterized in vitro and in vivo. This study shows that virulent isolates of ASFV also infect primary cultures of porcine aortic endothelial cells and bushpig endothelial cells (BPECs) in vitro. Kinetics of early and late gene expression, viral factory formation, replication, and secretion were similar in endothelial cells and macrophages. However, ASFV-infected endothelial cells died by apoptosis, detected morphologically by terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling and nuclear condensation and biochemically by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage at 4 h postinfection (hpi). Immediate-early proinflammatory responses were inhibited, characterized by a lack of E-selectin surface expression and interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-8 mRNA synthesis. Moreover, ASFV actively downregulated interferon-induced major histocompatibility complex class I surface expression, a strategy by which viruses evade the immune system. Significantly, Western blot analysis showed that the 65-kDa subunit of the transcription factor NF-κB, a central regulator of the early response to viral infection, decreased by 8 hpi and disappeared by 18 hpi. Both disappearance of NF-κB p65 and cleavage of PARP were reversed by the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Interestingly, surface expression and mRNA transcription of tissue factor, an important initiator of the coagulation cascade, increased 4 h after ASFV infection. These data suggest a central role for vascular endothelial cells in the hemorrhagic pathogenesis of the disease. Since BPECs infected with ASFV also undergo apoptosis, resistance of the natural host must involve

  15. Active proliferation of Rous sarcoma virus-infected, but not normal, chicken heart mesenchymal cells in culture medium of physiological composition.

    PubMed Central

    Balk, S D

    1980-01-01

    Normal as well as Rous sarcoma virus-infected chicken pectoral and chicken embryo fibroblasts proliferate actively in a plasma containing medium of physiological ion concentrations (Ca2+, 1.2 mM; Mg2+, 0.7 mM). Reduction of medium calcium and magnesium concentrations is necessary to achieve selective quiescence of normal fibroblasts in these cell systems. By contrast, normal chicken heart mesenchymal cells proliferate only sluggishly (one doubling or less during a 6-day period) in a plasma containing medium of physiologic ion concentrations, whereas Rous sarcoma virus-infected heart mesenchymal cells proliferate actively (more than four doublings during an initial 2-day phase of exponential growth). The chicken heart mesenchymal cell system therefore has great potential for studies of the mechanism that initiates cell replication and of the failure in cellular regulatory processes that is responsible for the autonomous initiation of replication of neoplastic cells. From comparison of the chicken heart mesenchymal cell system to dialyzed plasma-based systems in which 3T3 cells tend to proliferative quiescence, it is argued that this proliferative quiescence of 3T3 cells is a result of cell starvation and is not physiologically meaningful. Images PMID:6256750

  16. Viability, infectivity and fatty acid synthetic activity of Perkinsus marinus meront cells incubated in estuarine and artificial seawater.

    PubMed

    Chu, Fu-Lin E; Lund, Eric D

    2006-07-25

    We investigated the viability and fatty acid synthetic activity of in vitro cultured Perkinsus marinus (Dermo) in lipid-free medium and estuarine water, and the infectivity of P. marinus maintained in artificial seawater (ASW). Viability and fatty acid synthetic activity in 7 d old P. marinus meronts maintained in lipid-free medium and estuarine water were tested. The infectivity of meronts incubated in ASW was examined by first incubating P. marinus meronts in ASW for 2, 3 or 7 d, and then inoculating viable ASW-incubated meronts into the shell cavity of individual oysters Crassostrea virginica. P. marinus infection prevalence and intensity in oysters were determined 9 wk post-inoculation. Heavy mortality occurred in meronts maintained in estuarine water, a drop from an initial value of 100% viable to 7.8 and 6.1% after 3 and 14 d incubation, respectively. Viability was 85 and 67% in meronts maintained in lipid-free medium for 3 and 24 d, respectively. Meronts kept in lipid-free medium for 14 d retained their ability to synthesize fatty acids. Viable meronts incubated in ASW remained infective for up to 7 d. The infection prevalences were 85, 48 and 100%, in the treatments inoculated with viable meronts that were incubated in ASW for 2, 3 and 7 d, respectively. Infection prevalence in the group inoculated with viable meronts immediately after they were transferred to ASW ranged from 61 to 85%. Our results suggest that in nature meronts can survive for at least 14 d outside the host. Viable meronts are not only infective, but are also able to replicate and retain their fatty acid synthetic ability for 7 d. PMID:16956060

  17. Low Thymic Activity and Dendritic Cell Numbers Are Associated with the Immune Response to Primary Viral Infection in Elderly Humans.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Axel Ronald; Mälzer, Julia Nora; Domingo, Cristina; Jürchott, Karsten; Grützkau, Andreas; Babel, Nina; Nienen, Mikalai; Jelinek, Tomas; Niedrig, Matthias; Thiel, Andreas

    2015-11-15

    Immunological competence declines progressively with age, resulting in increased susceptibility of the elderly to infection and impaired responses to vaccines. Underlying mechanisms remain largely obscure as they have been related to complex, individual systemic immune properties that are challenging to investigate. In this study, we explored age-related changes in human immunity during a primary virus infection experimentally induced by immunization with live-attenuated yellow fever (YF) vaccine. Applying detailed serology, advanced FACS analysis, and systems biology, we discovered that aged subjects developed fewer neutralizing Abs, mounted diminished YF-specific CD8(+) T cell responses, and showed quantitatively and qualitatively altered YF-specific CD4(+) T cell immunity. Among numerous immune signatures, low in vivo numbers of naive CD4(+) recent thymic emigrants and peripheral dendritic cells correlated well with reduced acute responsiveness and altered long-term persistence of human cellular immunity to YF vaccination. Hence, we reveal in this article that essential elements of immune responses such as recent thymic emigrants and dendritic cells strongly relate to productive immunity in the elderly, providing a conceivable explanation for diminished responsiveness to vaccination with neoantigens and infection with de novo pathogens in the aged population. PMID:26459351

  18. HIV-1-infected and immune-activated macrophages induce astrocytic differentiation of human cortical neural progenitor cells via the STAT3 pathway.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hui; Sun, Lijun; Jia, Beibei; Lan, Xiqian; Zhu, Bing; Wu, Yumei; Zheng, Jialin

    2011-01-01

    Diminished adult neurogenesis is considered a potential mechanism in the pathogenesis of HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD). In HAD, HIV-1-infected and immune-activated brain mononuclear phagocytes (MP; perivascular macrophages and microglia) drive central nervous system (CNS) inflammation and may alter normal neurogenesis. We previously demonstrated HIV-1-infected and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activated monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) inhibit human neural progenitor cell (NPC) neurogenesis, while enhancing astrogliogenesis through the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), in vitro and in vivo. Here we further test the hypothesis that HIV-1-infected/activated MDM promote NPC astrogliogenesis via activation of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), a critical factor for astrogliogenesis. Our results show that LPS-activated MDM-conditioned medium (LPS-MCM) and HIV-infected/LPS-activated MDM-conditioned medium (LPS+HIV-MCM) induced Janus kinase 1 (Jak1) and STAT3 activation. Induction of the Jak-STAT3 activation correlated with increased glia fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression, demonstrating an induction of astrogliogenesis. Moreover, STAT3-targeting siRNA (siSTAT3) decreased MCM-induced STAT3 activation and NPC astrogliogenesis. Furthermore, inflammatory cytokines (including IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α) produced by LPS-activated and/or HIV-1-infected MDM may contribute to MCM-induced STAT3 activation and astrocytic differentiation. These observations were confirmed in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with HIV-1 encephalitis (HIVE). In HIVE mice, siRNA control (without target sequence, sicon) pre-transfected NPCs injected with HIV-1-infected MDM showed more astrocytic differentiation and less neuronal differentiation of NPCs as compared to NPC injection alone. siSTAT3 abrogated HIV-1-infected MDM-induced astrogliogenesis of injected NPCs. Collectively, these

  19. Increase in frequencies of circulating Th-17 cells correlates with microbial translocation, immune activation and exhaustion in HIV-1 infected patients with poor CD4 T-cell reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Valiathan, Ranjini; Asthana, Deshratn

    2016-05-01

    We analyzed the association of circulating Th-17 cells (cTh-17) with immune activation (IA), immune exhaustion (IE) and regulatory T-cells (T-regs) in 20 human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infected patients with impaired restoration of CD4 T-cell counts despite prolonged suppression of plasma viremia (discordant) and compared it with 20 HIV-1 infected patients showing good immunologic and virologic responses (concordant) following highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Discordant HIV-1 infected patients showed significantly higher frequencies of cTh-17 cells compared to concordant patients and healthy controls after PMA+Ionomicin stimulation. Discordant patients also showed higher CD4 T-cell immune activation (HLA-DR+CD38+) than concordant patients which directly correlated with microbial translocation. Additionally, CD4 T-cells of discordant patients showed higher frequencies of CD4 T-cells expressing multiple immune exhaustion markers (Tim3+PD-1+) which correlated with immune activation indicating that combined analysis of inhibitory molecules along with PD-1 might be a better predictor for immune exhaustion of CD4 T-cells. Increased cTh-17 cell frequency correlated inversely with CD4 T-cell percentages and absolute counts and directly with CD4 T-cell immune activation and T-reg frequencies. Persistent CD4 T-cell immune activation might favor differentiation of activated CD4 T-cells toward cTh-17 phenotype in discordant patients. Discordant patients had significantly lower baseline CD4 T-cell counts and higher viral load at the initiation of HAART and higher immune activation and immune exhaustion after being on HAART for long time indicating that these factors might be associated with an increase in cTh-17 cell frequency, thus, increasing the risk of disease progression despite virologic control. PMID:26817581

  20. CD81 controls immunity to Listeria infection through rac-dependent inhibition of proinflammatory mediator release and activation of cytotoxic T cells.

    PubMed

    Martínez del Hoyo, Gloria; Ramírez-Huesca, Marta; Levy, Shoshana; Boucheix, Claude; Rubinstein, Eric; Minguito de la Escalera, María; González-Cintado, Leticia; Ardavín, Carlos; Veiga, Esteban; Yáñez-Mó, María; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2015-06-15

    Despite recent evidence on the involvement of CD81 in pathogen binding and Ag presentation by dendritic cells (DCs), the molecular mechanism of how CD81 regulates immunity during infection remains to be elucidated. To investigate the role of CD81 in the regulation of defense mechanisms against microbial infections, we have used the Listeria monocytogenes infection model to explore the impact of CD81 deficiency in the innate and adaptive immune response against this pathogenic bacteria. We show that CD81(-/-) mice are less susceptible than wild-type mice to systemic Listeria infection, which correlates with increased numbers of inflammatory monocytes and DCs in CD81(-/-) spleens, the main subsets controlling early bacterial burden. Additionally, our data reveal that CD81 inhibits Rac/STAT-1 activation, leading to a negative regulation of the production of TNF-α and NO by inflammatory DCs and the activation of cytotoxic T cells by splenic CD8α(+) DCs. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that CD81-Rac interaction exerts an important regulatory role on the innate and adaptive immunity against bacterial infection and suggests a role for CD81 in the development of novel therapeutic targets during infectious diseases. PMID:25972472

  1. The Immunomodulator VacA Promotes Immune Tolerance and Persistent Helicobacter pylori Infection through Its Activities on T-Cells and Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Djekic, Aleksandra; Müller, Anne

    2016-01-01

    VacA is a pore-forming toxin that has long been known to induce vacuolization in gastric epithelial cells and to be linked to gastric disorders caused by H. pylori infection. Its role as a major colonization and persistence determinant of H. pylori is less well-understood. The purpose of this review is to discuss the various target cell types of VacA and its mechanism of action; specifically, we focus on the evidence showing that VacA targets myeloid cells and T-cells to directly and indirectly prevent H. pylori-specific T-cell responses and immune control of the infection. In particular, the ability of VacA-proficient H. pylori to skew T-cell responses towards regulatory T-cells and the effects of Tregs on H. pylori chronicity are highlighted. The by-stander effects of VacA-driven immunomodulation on extragastric diseases are discussed as well. PMID:27322319

  2. The Immunomodulator VacA Promotes Immune Tolerance and Persistent Helicobacter pylori Infection through Its Activities on T-Cells and Antigen-Presenting Cells.

    PubMed

    Djekic, Aleksandra; Müller, Anne

    2016-01-01

    VacA is a pore-forming toxin that has long been known to induce vacuolization in gastric epithelial cells and to be linked to gastric disorders caused by H. pylori infection. Its role as a major colonization and persistence determinant of H. pylori is less well-understood. The purpose of this review is to discuss the various target cell types of VacA and its mechanism of action; specifically, we focus on the evidence showing that VacA targets myeloid cells and T-cells to directly and indirectly prevent H. pylori-specific T-cell responses and immune control of the infection. In particular, the ability of VacA-proficient H. pylori to skew T-cell responses towards regulatory T-cells and the effects of Tregs on H. pylori chronicity are highlighted. The by-stander effects of VacA-driven immunomodulation on extragastric diseases are discussed as well. PMID:27322319

  3. Mannan binding lectin-associated serine protease 1 is induced by hepatitis C virus infection and activates human hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, A; Baloch, K; Brown, R J P; Wallis, R; Chen, L; Dexter, L; McClure, C P; Shakesheff, K; Thomson, B J

    2013-01-01

    Mannan binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine protease type 1 (MASP-1) has a central role in the lectin pathway of complement activation and is required for the formation of C3 convertase. The activity of MASP-1 in the peripheral blood has been identified previously as a highly significant predictor of the severity of liver fibrosis in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but not in liver disease of other aetiologies. In this study we tested the hypotheses that expression of MASP-1 may promote disease progression in HCV disease by direct activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and may additionally be up-regulated by HCV. In order to do so, we utilized a model for the maintenance of primary human HSC in the quiescent state by culture on basement membrane substrate prior to stimulation. In comparison to controls, recombinant MASP-1 stimulated quiescent human HSCs to differentiate to the activated state as assessed by both morphology and up-regulation of HSC activation markers α-smooth muscle actin and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1. Further, the expression of MASP-1 was up-regulated significantly by HCV infection in hepatocyte cell lines. These observations suggest a new role for MASP-1 and provide a possible mechanistic link between high levels of MASP-1 and the severity of disease in HCV infection. Taken together with previous clinical observations, our new findings suggest that the balance of MASP-1 activity may be proinflammatory and act to accelerate fibrosis progression in HCV liver disease. PMID:23841802

  4. Tregs Modulate Lymphocyte Proliferation, Activation, and Resident-Memory T-Cell Accumulation within the Brain during MCMV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sujata; Hu, Shuxian; Sheng, Wen S.; Singh, Amar; Lokensgard, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation and retention of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) has been reported within post viral-encephalitic brains, however, the full extent to which these cells modulate neuroinflammation is yet to be elucidated. Here, we used Foxp3-DTR (diphtheria toxin receptor) knock-in transgenic mice, which upon administration of low dose diphtheria toxin (DTx) results in specific deletion of Tregs. We investigated the proliferation status of various immune cell subtypes within inflamed central nervous system (CNS) tissue. Depletion of Tregs resulted in increased proliferation of both CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell subsets within the brain at 14 d post infection (dpi) when compared to Treg-sufficient animals. At 30 dpi, while proliferation of CD8+ T-cells was controlled within brains of both Treg-depleted and undepleted mice, proliferation of CD4+ T-cells remained significantly enhanced with DTx-treatment. Previous studies have demonstrated that Treg numbers within the brain rebound following DTx treatment to even higher numbers than in untreated animals. Despite this rebound, CD8+ and CD4+ T-cells proliferated at a higher rate when compared to that of Treg-sufficient mice, thus maintaining sustained neuroinflammation. Furthermore, at 30 dpi we found the majority of CD8+ T-cells were CD127hi KLRG1- indicating that the cells were long lived memory precursor cells. These cells showed marked elevation of CD103 expression, a marker of tissue resident-memory T-cells (TRM) in the CNS, in untreated animals when compared to DTx-treated animals suggesting that generation of TRM is impaired upon Treg depletion. Moreover, the effector function of TRM as indicated by granzyme B production in response to peptide re-stimulation was found to be more potent in Treg-sufficient animals. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Tregs limit neuroinflammatory responses to viral infection by controlling cell proliferation and may direct a larger proportion of lymphocytes within the brain to be maintained

  5. An ENU-induced splicing mutation reveals a role for Unc93b1 in early immune cell activation following Influenza A H1N1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Lafferty, Erin I; Flaczyk, Adam; Angers, Isabelle; Homer, Robert; d’Hennezel, Eva; Malo, Danielle; Piccirillo, Ciriaco A; Vidal, Silvia M; Qureshi, Salman T

    2016-01-01

    Genetic and immunological analysis of host-pathogen interactions can reveal fundamental mechanisms of susceptibility and resistance to infection. Modeling human infectious diseases among inbred mouse strains is a proven approach but is limited by naturally occurring genetic diversity. Using ENU mutagenesis, we created a recessive loss-of-function point mutation in Unc93b1 (unc-93 homolog B1 (C. elegans)), a chaperone for endosomal TLR3, TLR7, and TLR9, that we termed Letr for ‘loss of endosomal TLR response’. We used Unc93b1Letr/Letr mice to study the role of Unc93b1 in the immune response to influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1), an important global respiratory pathogen. During the early phase of infection, Unc93b1Letr/Letr mice had fewer activated exudate macrophages and decreased expression of CXCL10, IFN-γ, and type I IFN. Mutation of Unc93b1 also led to reduced expression of the CD69 activation marker and a concomitant increase in the CD62L naïve marker on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in infected lungs. Finally, loss of endosomal TLR signaling resulted in delayed viral clearance that coincided with increased tissue pathology during infection. Taken together, these findings establish a role for Unc93b1 and endosomal TLRs in the activation of both myeloid and lymphoid cells during the innate immune response to influenza. PMID:24848930

  6. Natural Killer Cell Sensing of Infected Cells Compensates for MyD88 Deficiency but Not IFN-I Activity in Resistance to Mouse Cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Cocita, Clément; Guiton, Rachel; Bessou, Gilles; Chasson, Lionel; Boyron, Marilyn; Crozat, Karine; Dalod, Marc

    2015-05-01

    In mice, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) and natural killer (NK) cells both contribute to resistance to systemic infections with herpes viruses including mouse Cytomegalovirus (MCMV). pDCs are the major source of type I IFN (IFN-I) during MCMV infection. This response requires pDC-intrinsic MyD88-dependent signaling by Toll-Like Receptors 7 and 9. Provided that they express appropriate recognition receptors such as Ly49H, NK cells can directly sense and kill MCMV-infected cells. The loss of any one of these responses increases susceptibility to infection. However, the relative importance of these antiviral immune responses and how they are related remain unclear. In humans, while IFN-I responses are essential, MyD88 is dispensable for antiviral immunity. Hence, a higher redundancy has been proposed in the mechanisms promoting protective immune responses against systemic infections by herpes viruses during natural infections in humans. It has been assumed, but not proven, that mice fail to mount protective MyD88-independent IFN-I responses. In humans, the mechanism that compensates MyD88 deficiency has not been elucidated. To address these issues, we compared resistance to MCMV infection and immune responses between mouse strains deficient for MyD88, the IFN-I receptor and/or Ly49H. We show that selective depletion of pDC or genetic deficiencies for MyD88 or TLR9 drastically decreased production of IFN-I, but not the protective antiviral responses. Moreover, MyD88, but not IFN-I receptor, deficiency could largely be compensated by Ly49H-mediated antiviral NK cell responses. Thus, contrary to the current dogma but consistent with the situation in humans, we conclude that, in mice, in our experimental settings, MyD88 is redundant for IFN-I responses and overall defense against a systemic herpes virus infection. Moreover, we identified direct NK cell sensing of infected cells as one mechanism able to compensate for MyD88 deficiency in mice. Similar mechanisms likely

  7. Quantitative proteomic analysis of HIV-1 infected CD4+ T cells reveals an early host response in important biological pathways: Protein synthesis, cell proliferation, and T-cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Navare, Arti T.; Sova, Pavel; Purdy, David E.; Weiss, Jeffrey M.; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro; Korth, Marcus J.; Chang, Stewart T.; Proll, Sean C.; Jahan, Tahmina A.; Krasnoselsky, Alexei L.; Palermo, Robert E.; Katze, Michael G.

    2012-07-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) depends upon host-encoded proteins to facilitate its replication while at the same time inhibiting critical components of innate and/or intrinsic immune response pathways. To characterize the host cell response on protein levels in CD4+ lymphoblastoid SUP-T1 cells after infection with HIV-1 strain LAI, we used mass spectrometry (MS)-based global quantitation with iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification). We found 266, 60 and 22 proteins differentially expressed (DE) (P-value{<=}0.05) at 4, 8, and 20 hours post-infection (hpi), respectively, compared to time-matched mock-infected samples. The majority of changes in protein abundance occurred at an early stage of infection well before the de novo production of viral proteins. Functional analyses of these DE proteins showed enrichment in several biological pathways including protein synthesis, cell proliferation, and T-cell activation. Importantly, these early changes before the time of robust viral production have not been described before.

  8. Abortive infection of snakehead fish vesiculovirus in ZF4 cells was associated with the RLRs pathway activation by viral replicative intermediates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenwen; Asim, Muhammad; Yi, Lizhu; Hegazy, Abeer M; Hu, Xianqin; Zhou, Yang; Ai, Taoshan; Lin, Li

    2015-01-01

    Snakehead fish vesiculovirus (SHVV) is a negative strand RNA virus which can cause great economic losses in fish culture. To facilitate the study of SHVV-host interactions, the susceptibility of zebrafish embryonic fibroblast cell line (ZF4) to the SHVV was investigated in this report. The results showed that high amount of viral mRNAs and cRNAs were detected at the 3 h post-infection. However, the expressions of the viral mRNAs and cRNA were decreased dramatically after 6 h post-infection. In addition, the expressions of interferon (IFN) and interferon-induced GTP-binding protein Mx were all up regulated significantly at the late stage of the infection. Meanwhile, the expressions of Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and Melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) were also all up-regulated significantly during the infection. Two isoforms of DrLGP2 from zebrafish were also cloned and analyzed. Interestingly, the expression of DrLGP2a but not DrLGP2b was significantly up-regulated at both mRNA and protein levels, indicating that the two DrLGP2 isoforms might play different roles during the SHVV infection. Transfection experiment showed that viral replicative intermediates were required for the activation of IFN-α expression. Taken together, the abortive infection of SHVV in ZF4 cells was associated with the activation of RLRs pathway, which was activated by viral replicative intermediates. PMID:25794284

  9. Presence of Rheumatoid Factor during Chronic HCV Infection Is Associated with Expansion of Mature Activated Memory B-Cells that Are Hypo-Responsive to B-Cell Receptor Stimulation and Persist during the Early Stage of IFN Free Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Avilés, Elane; Kostadinova, Lenche; Rusterholtz, Anne; Cruz-Lebrón, Angelica; Falck-Ytter, Yngve; Anthony, Donald D.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately half of those with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have circulating rheumatoid factor (RF), and a portion of these individuals develop cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. B cell phenotype/function in relation to RF in serum has been unclear. We examined B cell subset distribution, activation state (CD86), cell cycle state (Ki67), and ex-vivo response to BCR, TLR9 and TLR7/8 stimulation, in chronic HCV-infected donors with or without RF, and uninfected donors. Mature-activated B-cells of HCV-infected donors had lower CD86 expression compared to uninfected donors, and in the presence of RF they also showed reduced CD86 expression in response to BCR and TLR9 stimulation. Additionally, mature activated memory B cells of HCV RF+ donors less commonly expressed Ki67+ than HCV RF- donors, and did not proliferate as well in response to BCR stimulation. Proportions of mature-activated B cells were enhanced, while naïve B-cells were lower in the peripheral blood of HCV-RF+ compared to RF- and uninfected donors. None of these parameters normalize by week 8 of IFN free direct acting antiviral (DAA) therapy in HCV RF+ donors, while in RF- donors, mature activated B cell proportions did normalize. These data indicate that while chronic HCV infection alone results in a lower state of activation in mature activated memory B cells, the presence of RF in serum is associated with a more pronounced state of unresponsiveness and an overrepresentation of these B cells in the blood. This phenotype persists at least during the early time window after removal of HCV from the host. PMID:26649443

  10. A Selected Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strain Promotes EGFR-Independent Akt Activation in an Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88-Infected IPEC-J2 Cell Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Yao-Hong; Yang, Jin-Cai; Yang, Gui-Yan; Zhou, Dong; Wang, Jiu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are important intestinal pathogens that cause diarrhea in humans and animals. Although probiotic bacteria may protect against ETEC-induced enteric infections, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In this study, porcine intestinal epithelial J2 cells (IPEC-J2) were pre-incubated with and without Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469 and then exposed to F4+ ETEC. Increases in TLR4 and NOD2 mRNA expression were observed at 3 h after F4+ ETEC challenge, but these increases were attenuated by L. rhamnosus treatment. Expression of TLR2 and NOD1 mRNA was up-regulated in cells pre-treated with L. rhamnosus. Pre-treatment with L. rhamnosus counteracted F4+ ETEC-induced increases in TNF-α concentration. Increased PGE2. concentrations were observed in cells infected with F4+ ETEC and in cells treated with L. rhamnosus only. A decrease in phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was observed at 3 h after F4+ ETEC challenge in cells treated with L. rhamnosus. Pre-treatment with L. rhamnosus enhanced Akt phosphorylation and increased ZO-1 and occludin protein expression. Our findings suggest that L. rhamnosus protects intestinal epithelial cells from F4+ ETEC-induced damage, partly through the anti-inflammatory response involving synergism between TLR2 and NOD1. In addition, L. rhamnosus promotes EGFR-independent Akt activation, which may activate intestinal epithelial cells in response to bacterial infection, in turn increasing tight junction integrity and thus enhancing the barrier function and restricting pathogen invasion. Pre-incubation with L. rhamnosus was superior to co-incubation in reducing the adhesion of F4+ ETEC to IPEC-J2 cells and subsequently attenuating F4+ ETEC-induced mucin layer destruction and suppressing apoptosis. Our data indicate that a selected L. rhamnosus strain interacts with porcine intestinal epithelial cells to maintain the epithelial barrier and promote intestinal epithelial cell activation in

  11. A Selected Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strain Promotes EGFR-Independent Akt Activation in an Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88-Infected IPEC-J2 Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin-Cai; Yang, Gui-Yan; Zhou, Dong; Wang, Jiu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are important intestinal pathogens that cause diarrhea in humans and animals. Although probiotic bacteria may protect against ETEC-induced enteric infections, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In this study, porcine intestinal epithelial J2 cells (IPEC-J2) were pre-incubated with and without Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469 and then exposed to F4+ ETEC. Increases in TLR4 and NOD2 mRNA expression were observed at 3 h after F4+ ETEC challenge, but these increases were attenuated by L. rhamnosus treatment. Expression of TLR2 and NOD1 mRNA was up-regulated in cells pre-treated with L. rhamnosus. Pre-treatment with L. rhamnosus counteracted F4+ ETEC-induced increases in TNF-α concentration. Increased PGE2. concentrations were observed in cells infected with F4+ ETEC and in cells treated with L. rhamnosus only. A decrease in phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was observed at 3 h after F4+ ETEC challenge in cells treated with L. rhamnosus. Pre-treatment with L. rhamnosus enhanced Akt phosphorylation and increased ZO-1 and occludin protein expression. Our findings suggest that L. rhamnosus protects intestinal epithelial cells from F4+ ETEC-induced damage, partly through the anti-inflammatory response involving synergism between TLR2 and NOD1. In addition, L. rhamnosus promotes EGFR-independent Akt activation, which may activate intestinal epithelial cells in response to bacterial infection, in turn increasing tight junction integrity and thus enhancing the barrier function and restricting pathogen invasion. Pre-incubation with L. rhamnosus was superior to co-incubation in reducing the adhesion of F4+ ETEC to IPEC-J2 cells and subsequently attenuating F4+ ETEC-induced mucin layer destruction and suppressing apoptosis. Our data indicate that a selected L. rhamnosus strain interacts with porcine intestinal epithelial cells to maintain the epithelial barrier and promote intestinal epithelial cell activation in

  12. Interferon Regulator Factor 8 (IRF8) Limits Ocular Pathology during HSV-1 Infection by Restraining the Activation and Expansion of CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cheng-Rong; He, Chang; Mahdi, Rashid M.; Chan, Chi-Chao; Wang, Hongsheng; Morse, Herbert C.; Egwuagu, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    Interferon Regulatory Factor-8 (IRF8) is constitutively expressed in monocytes and B cell lineages and plays important roles in immunity to pathogens and cancer. Although IRF8 expression is induced in activated T cells, the functional relevance of IRF8 in T cell-mediated immunity is not well understood. In this study, we used mice with targeted deletion of Irf8 in T-cells (IRF8KO) to investigate the role of IRF8 in T cell-mediated responses during herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection of the eye. In contrast to wild type mice, HSV-1-infected IRF8KO mice mounted a more robust anti-HSV-1 immune response, which included marked expansion of HSV-1-specific CD8+ T cells, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells into the cornea and trigeminal ganglia (TG) and enhanced elimination of virus within the trigeminal ganglion. However, the consequence of the enhanced immunological response was the development of ocular inflammation, limbitis, and neutrophilic infiltration into the cornea of HSV-1-infected IRF8KO mice. Surprisingly, we observed a marked increase in virus-specific memory precursor effector cells (MPEC) in IRF8KO mice, suggesting that IRF8 might play a role in regulating the differentiation of effector CD8+ T cells to the memory phenotype. Together, our data suggest that IRF8 might play a role in restraining excess lymphocyte proliferation. Thus, modulating IRF8 levels in T cells can be exploited therapeutically to prevent immune-mediated ocular pathology during autoimmune and infectious diseases of the eye. PMID:27171004

  13. NKT Cell Immune Responses to Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tessmer, Marlowe S.; Fatima, Ayesha; Paget, Christophe; Trottein, François; Brossay, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Background Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a heterogeneous population of innate T cells that have attracted recent interest because of their potential to regulate immune responses to a variety of pathogens. The most widely studied NKT cell subset is the invariant (i)NKT cells that recognize glycolipids in the context of the CD1d molecule. The multifaceted methods of activation iNKT cells possess and their ability to produce regulatory cytokines has made them a primary target for therapeutic studies. Objective/Methods This review gives insight into the roles of iNKT cells during infectious diseases, particularly viral infections. We also highlight the different mechanisms leading to iNKT cell activation in response to pathogens. Conclusions The iNKT cell versatility allows them to detect and respond to several viral infections. However, therapeutic approaches to specifically target iNKT cells will require additional research. Notably, examination of the roles of non-invariant NKT cells in response to pathogens warrant further investigations. PMID:19236234

  14. Kaposi's-sarcoma-associated-herpesvirus-activated dendritic cells promote HIV-1 trans-infection and suppress CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wan; Qin, Yan; Bai, Lei; Lan, Ke; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2013-06-05

    Infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is commonly occurred in AIDS patients. KSHV and HIV-1 act cooperatively in regulating infection with each other and in human carcinogenesis. Dendritic cells (DCs), as the pivotal cells in host immunity, may be modulated by both viruses, for immunoevasion and dissemination, therefore, the interaction between DCs and each virus has been a prior focus for pathogenesis elucidation. Here, we assessed the potential effect of KSHV on DC–HIV-1 interaction. We found that KSHV stimulation could promote maturation of monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) and impaired the ability of MDDCs to drive proliferation of resting CD4{sup +} T cells, demonstrating the immunosuppression induced by KSHV. More importantly, KSHV-stimulated MDDCs could capture more HIV-1 and efficiently transferred these infectious viruses to Hut/CCR5 T cell line. Our results reveal the novel modulation of DC-mediated HIV-1 dissemination by KSHV, and highlight the importance of studying DC–HIV-1 interaction to elucidate HIV/AIDS pathogenesis. - Highlights: ► KSHV impaired the ability of MDDCs to drive proliferation of resting CD4{sup +} T cells. ► KSHV stimulation matured MDDCs and enhanced HIV-1 endocytosis. ► KSHV stimulated MDDCs increased ICAM-1 expression and tighten contact with T cells. ► KSHV-stimulated MDDCs promoted HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4{sup +} T cells.

  15. Oral Cyclosporin A Inhibits CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein Activity in HIV-Infected Adults Initiating Treatment with Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hulgan, Todd; Donahue, John P.; Smeaton, Laura; Pu, Minya; Wang, Hongying; Lederman, Michael M.; Smith, Kimberly; Valdez, Hernan; Pilcher, Christopher; Haas, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose P-glycoprotein limits tissue penetration of many antiretroviral drugs. We characterized effects of the P-glycoprotein substrate cyclosporin A on T cell P-glycoprotein activity in HIV-infected AIDS Clinical Trials Group study A5138 participants. Methods We studied P-glycoprotein activity on CD4 and CD8 T cells in 16 participants randomized to receive oral cyclosporin A (n=9) or not (n=7) during initiation antiretroviral therapy (ART) that did not include protease or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Results CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein activity decreased by a median of 8 percentage points with cyclosporin A/ART (difference between cyclosporin A/ART versus ART only P=0.001). Plasma trough cyclosporin A concentrations correlated with change in P-glycoprotein activity in several T cell subsets. Conclusions Oral cyclosporin A can inhibit peripheral blood CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein activity. Targeted P-glycoprotein inhibition might enhance delivery of ART to T cells. PMID:19779705

  16. NK cell activity differs between patients with localized and diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis infected with Leishmania mexicana: a comparative study of TLRs and cytokines.

    PubMed

    Cañeda-Guzmán, Isabel Cristina; Salaiza-Suazo, Norma; Fernández-Figueroa, Edith A; Carrada-Figueroa, Georgina; Aguirre-García, Magdalena; Becker, Ingeborg

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania mexicana causes localized (LCL) or diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis (DCL). The cause of dissemination in DCL remains unknown, yet NK cells possibly play a role in activating leishmanicidal mechanisms during innate and adaptive immune responses. We had previously shown that Leishmania lipophosphoglycan (LPG) is a ligand for TLR2, activating human NK cells. We have now analyzed NK cells in LCL and DCL patients. NK numbers and effector mechanisms differed drastically between both groups of patients: DCL patients showed reduced NK cell numbers; diminished IFN-γ and TNF-α production; and lower TLR2, TLR1, and TLR6 expression as compared to LCL patients. The altered protein expression found in NK cells of DCL patients correlated with their down-regulation of IFN-γ gene expression in LPG-stimulated and non-stimulated cells as compared to LCL patients. NK cell response was further analyzed according to gender, age, and disease evolution in LCL patients showing that female patients produced higher IFN-γ levels throughout the disease progression, whereas TLR2 expression diminished in both genders with prolonged disease evolution and age. We furthermore show the activation pathway of LPG binding to TLR2 and demonstrated that TLR2 forms immunocomplexes with TLR1 and TLR6. In addition to the reduced NK cell numbers in peripheral blood, DCL patients also showed reduced NK cell numbers in the lesions. They were randomly scattered within the lesions, showing diminished cytokine production, which contrasts with those of LCL lesions, where NK cells produced IFN-γ and TNF-α and were found within organized granulomas. We conclude that in DCL patients the reduced NK-cell numbers and their diminished activity, evidenced by low TLR expression and low cytokine production, are possibly involved in the severity of the disease. Our results provide new information on the contribution of NK cells in Leishmania infections of the human host. PMID:25397678

  17. Antagonistic activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus LB against intracellular Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infecting human enterocyte-like Caco-2/TC-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Coconnier, M H; Liévin, V; Lorrot, M; Servin, A L

    2000-03-01

    To gain further insight into the mechanism by which lactobacilli develop antimicrobial activity, we have examined how Lactobacillus acidophilus LB inhibits the promoted cellular injuries and intracellular lifestyle of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL1344 infecting the cultured, fully differentiated human intestinal cell line Caco-2/TC-7. We showed that the spent culture supernatant of strain LB (LB-SCS) decreases the number of apical serovar Typhimurium-induced F-actin rearrangements in infected cells. LB-SCS treatment efficiently decreased transcellular passage of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Moreover, LB-SCS treatment inhibited intracellular growth of serovar Typhimurium, since treated intracellular bacteria displayed a small, rounded morphology resembling that of resting bacteria. We also showed that LB-SCS treatment inhibits adhesion-dependent serovar Typhimurium-induced interleukin-8 production. PMID:10698785

  18. Surveillance of active human cytomegalovirus infection in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HLA sibling identical donor): search for optimal cutoff value by real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection still causes significant morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Therefore, it is extremely important to diagnosis and monitor active CMV infection in HSCT patients, defining the CMV DNA levels of virus replication that warrant intervention with antiviral agents in order to accurately prevent CMV disease and further related complications. Methods During the first 150 days after allogeneic HSTC, thirty patients were monitored weekly for active CMV infection by pp65 antigenemia, nested-PCR and real-time PCR assays. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) plot analysis was performed to determine a threshold value of the CMV DNA load by real-time PCR. Results Using ROC curves, the optimal cutoff value by real-time PCR was 418.4 copies/104 PBL (sensitivity, 71.4%; specificity, 89.7%). Twenty seven (90%) of the 30 analyzed patients had active CMV infection and two (6.7%) developed CMV disease. Eleven (40.7%) of these 27 patients had acute GVHD, 18 (66.7%) had opportunistic infection, 5 (18.5%) had chronic rejection and 11 (40.7%) died - one died of CMV disease associated with GVHD and bacterial infection. Conclusions The low incidence of CMV disease in HSCT recipients in our study attests to the efficacy of CMV surveillance based on clinical routine assay. The quantification of CMV DNA load using real-time PCR appears to be applicable to the clinical practice and an optimal cutoff value for guiding timely preemptive therapy should be clinically validated in future studies. PMID:20515464

  19. Natural Killer Cell Activating Receptor NKG2D Is Involved in the Immunosuppressant Effect of Mycophenolate Mofetil and Infection of Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Dong, S; Geng, L; Shen, M-D; Zheng, S-S

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated whether mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), a new immunosuppressant, and its metabolite mycophenolic acid (MPA) influence the activity of liver resident natural killer (NK) cells, resulting in increased susceptibility to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. We isolated the hepatic NK cells of C57BL/6 and C57BL/6JTgN (A1b1HBV) 44Bri) transgenic mice administered MMF in the presence or absence of interleukin (IL)-15, or incubated isolated hepatic NK cells in the presence or absence of MPA and used RT-PCR, immunolabeling to assess the expression of NK receptors Ly49A, NKG2A and NKG2D, and cytokine ELISA and [(3)H]-TdR-release assay to assess the activation and cytotoxic capacity of NK cells. After treatment of MMF in the presence or absence of IL-15, HBsAg titer was also measured in C57BL/6JTgN (A1b1HBV) 44Bri) transgenic mice. After both MPA and MMF treatments, NK cytotoxicity was reduced, NKG2D and Ly49A expression was down-regulated, but NKG2A was up-regulated. Down-regulation of NKG2D could be ameliorated by IL-15, and in HBV-transgenic mice, MMF treatment impaired NK cell activity, but did not influence virus replication, whereas IL-15 treatment depressed HBsAg titer. MPA and MMF mediate down-regulation of NKG2D in vitro and vivo, restricting the cytotoxic capacity of NK cells. Regulation of NKG2D may be important in the effect of immunosuppressant on NK cell activity and involved in HBV infection. PMID:26293053

  20. Rapid activation of spleen dendritic cell subsets following lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection of mice: analysis of the involvement of type 1 IFN.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Maria; Edwards, Matthew J; Reid, Delyth M; Borrow, Persephone

    2005-02-15

    In this study, we report the dynamic changes in activation and functions that occur in spleen dendritic cell (sDC) subsets following infection of mice with a natural murine pathogen, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Within 24 h postinfection (pi), sDCs acquired the ability to stimulate naive LCMV-specific CD8+ T cells ex vivo. Conventional (CD11chigh CD8+ and CD4+) sDC subsets rapidly up-regulated expression of costimulatory molecules and began to produce proinflammatory cytokines. Their tendency to undergo apoptosis ex vivo simultaneously increased, and in vivo the number of conventional DCs in the spleen decreased markedly, dropping approximately 2-fold by day 3 pi. Conversely, the number of plasmacytoid (CD11clowB220+) DCs in the spleen increased, so that they constituted almost 40% of sDCs by day 3 pi. Type 1 IFN production was up-regulated in plasmacytoid DCs by 24 h pi. Analysis of DC activation and maturation in mice unable to respond to type 1 IFNs implicated these cytokines in driving infection-associated phenotypic activation of conventional DCs and their enhanced tendency to undergo apoptosis, but also indicated the existence of type 1 IFN-independent pathways for the functional maturation of DCs during LCMV infection. PMID:15699111

  1. Minor genomic differences between related B6 and B10 mice affect severity of schistosome infection by governing the mode of dendritic cell activation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Patrick M; Sproule, Thomas J; Philip, Vivek M; Roopenian, Derry C; Stadecker, Miguel J

    2015-08-01

    Infection with the helminth Schistosoma mansoni results in hepatointestinal granulomatous inflammation mediated by CD4 T cells directed against parasite eggs. The severity of disease varies greatly in humans and mice; however, the genetic basis of such a heterogenous immune response remains poorly understood. Here we show that, despite their close genetic relationship, C57BL/10SnJ (B10) mice developed significantly more pronounced immunopathology and higher T helper 17 cell responses than C57BL/6J (B6) mice. Similarly, live egg-stimulated B10-derived dendritic cells (DCs) produced significantly more IL-1β and IL-23, resulting in higher IL-17 production by CD4 T cells. Gene expression analysis disclosed a heightened proinflammatory cytokine profile together with a strikingly lower expression of Ym1 in B10 versus B6 mice, consistent with failure of B10 DCs to attain alternative activation. To genetically dissect the differential response, we developed and analyzed congenic mouse strains that capture major regions of allelic variation, and found that the level of inflammation was controlled by a relatively small number of genes in a locus mapping to chromosome 4 117-143 MB. Our study has thus identified novel genomic regions that regulate the severity of the schistosome infection by way of controlling the mode of DC activation and consequent CD4 T-cell subset development. PMID:25959828

  2. Natural Killer Cell Activating Receptor NKG2D Is Involved in the Immunosuppressive Effects of Mycophenolate Mofetil and Hepatitis B Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shuai; Geng, Lei; Shen, Miao-Da; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), a new immunosuppressant, and its metabolite mycophenolic acid (MPA) affect the activity of liver resident natural killer (NK) cells, resulting in increased susceptibility to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Hepatic NK cells were isolated from C57BL/6 and C57BL/6JTgN (A1b1HBV) 44Bri transgenic mice treated with MMF in the presence or absence of IL-15. After incubation of isolated hepatic NK cells in the presence or absence of MPA, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunolabeling were used to assess the expression of NK receptors Ly49A, NKG2A and NKG2D. In addition, cytokine enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and [H]-TdR-release assay were carried out to assess NK cell activation and cytotoxic capacity. After treatment with MMF in the presence or absence of IL-15, HBsAg titers were measured in C57BL/6JTgN (A1b1HBV) 44Bri transgenic mice. Treatment with either MPA or MMF resulted in reduced NK cell cytotoxicity, downregulated NKG2D and Ly49A expression and upregulated NKG2A. Interestingly, NKG2D downregulation was ameliorated by IL-15. In HBV-transgenic mice, MMF treatment impaired NK cell activity but did not affect virus replication, whereas IL-15 treatment reduced HBsAg titers. MPA and MMF mediate NKG2D downregulation both in vitro and in vivo, reducing the cytotoxic capacity of NK cells. These findings indicate that NKG2D regulation may be important in the immunosuppressive effect NK cells and involved in HBV infection. PMID:25828197

  3. Rotavirus infection activates the UPR but modulates its activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rotaviruses are known to modulate the innate antiviral defense response driven by IFN. The purpose of this study was to identify changes in the cellular proteome in response to rotavirus infection in the context of the IFN response. We also sought to identify proteins outside the IFN induction and signaling pathway that were modulated by rotavirus infection. Methods 2D-DIGE and image analysis were used to identify cellular proteins that changed in levels of expression in response to rotavirus infection, IFN treatment, or IFN treatment prior to infection. Immunofluorescence microscopy was used to determine the subcellular localization of proteins associated with the unfolded protein response (UPR). Results The data show changes in the levels of multiple proteins associated with cellular stress in infected cells, including levels of ER chaperones GRP78 and GRP94. Further investigations showed that GRP78, GRP94 and other proteins with roles in the ER-initiated UPR including PERK, CHOP and GADD34, were localized to viroplasms in infected cells. Conclusions Together the results suggest rotavirus infection activates the UPR, but modulates its effects by sequestering sensor, transcription factor, and effector proteins in viroplasms. The data consequently also suggest that viroplasms may directly or indirectly play a fundamental role in regulating signaling pathways associated with cellular defense responses. PMID:21774819

  4. Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections Recommend on Facebook ... Mold . Top of Page Preventing fungal infections in stem cell transplant patients Fungi are difficult to avoid because ...

  5. Comparative proteomic analyses demonstrate enhanced interferon and STAT-1 activation in reovirus T3D-infected HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Ezzati, Peyman; Komher, Krysten; Severini, Giulia; Coombs, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    As obligate intracellular parasites, viruses are exclusively and intimately dependent upon their host cells for replication. During replication viruses induce profound changes within cells, including: induction of signaling pathways, morphological changes, and cell death. Many such cellular perturbations have been analyzed at the transcriptomic level by gene arrays and recent efforts have begun to analyze cellular proteomic responses. We recently described comparative stable isotopic (SILAC) analyses of reovirus, strain type 3 Dearing (T3D)-infected HeLa cells. For the present study we employed the complementary labeling strategy of iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) to examine HeLa cell changes induced by T3D, another reovirus strain, type 1 Lang, and UV-inactivated T3D (UV-T3D). Triplicate replicates of cytosolic and nuclear fractions identified a total of 2375 proteins, of which 50, 57, and 46 were significantly up-regulated, and 37, 26, and 44 were significantly down-regulated by T1L, T3D, and UV-T3D, respectively. Several pathways, most notably the Interferon signaling pathway and the EIF2 and ILK signaling pathways, were induced by virus infection. Western blots confirmed that cells were more strongly activated by live T3D as demonstrated by elevated levels of key proteins like STAT-1, ISG-15, IFIT-1, IFIT-3, and Mx1. This study expands our understanding of reovirus-induced host responses. PMID:25905045

  6. Investigation of Functional Activity of Cells in Granulomatous Inflammatory Lesions from Mice with Latent Tuberculous Infection in the New Ex Vivo Model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The new ex vivo model system measuring functional input of individual granuloma cells to formation of granulomatous inflammatory lesions in mice with latent tuberculous infection has been developed and described in the current study. Monolayer cultures of cells that migrated from individual granulomas were established in the proposed culture settings for mouse spleen and lung granulomas induced by in vivo exposure to BCG vaccine. The cellular composition of individual granulomas was analyzed. The expression of the leukocyte surface markers such as phagocytic receptors CD11b, CD11c, CD14, and CD16/CD32 and the expression of the costimulatory molecules CD80, CD83, and CD86 were tested as well as the production of proinflammatory cytokines (IFNγ and IL-1α) and growth factors (GM-CSF and FGFb) for cells of individual granulomas. The colocalization of the phagocytic receptors and costimulatory molecules in the surface microdomains of granuloma cells (with and without acid-fast BCG-mycobacteria) has also been detected. It was found that some part of cytokine macrophage producers have carried acid-fast mycobacteria. Detected modulation in dynamics of production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and leukocyte surface markers by granuloma cells has indicated continued processes of activation and deactivation of granuloma inflammation cells during the latent tuberculous infection progress in mice. PMID:24198843

  7. Ethanol stimulation of HIV infection of oral epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Yang, Otto O; Xie, Yiming; Campbell, Richard; Chen, Irvin S Y; Pang, Shen

    2004-12-01

    Oral mucosal cells can be infected by exogenous HIV during receptive oral sex or breast-feeding. The risk of oral mucosal infection depends on the infection efficiency of the HIV strains present in the oral cavity, the viral titers, and the defense mechanisms in the oral cavity environment. It is expected that alcohol can weaken the host defense mechanism against HIV infection in the oral cavity. We modified an HIV strain, NL4-3, by inserting the enhanced green fluorescent protein gene and used this virus to infect oral epithelial cells obtained from patients. Various concentrations of ethanol (0%-4%) were added to the infected cells. HIV-infected cells were detected by fluorescent microscopy or fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We found that ethanol significantly increases HIV infection of primary oral epithelial cells (POEs). POEs pretreated with 4% ethanol for less than 10 minutes demonstrated 3- to 6-fold higher susceptibility to infection by the CXCR-4 HIV strain NL4-3. Our studies also demonstrated that HIV infects POEs through a gp120-independent mechanism. We tested an HIV CCR5 strain, JRCSF, and also found its infection efficiency to be stimulated by alcohol. Our results indicate that in cell culture conditions, the ranges of concentrations of alcohol that are commercially available are able to stimulate the infection efficiency of HIV in POEs. PMID:15602121

  8. Lysophosphatidylcholine exacerbates Leishmania major-dendritic cell infection through interleukin-10 and a burst in arginase1 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activities.

    PubMed

    Tounsi, Nabila; Meghari, Soraya; Moser, Muriel; Djerdjouri, Bahia

    2015-03-01

    Leishmania major is an obligate intracellular parasite hosted by phagocytes, including dendritic cells (DCs). Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) a pro-oxidant by-product of phospholipase A2 activity can modulate the maturation and function of DCs. However, little is known about its role in L. major infection. This study examined the effects of LPC and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in BALB/c mouse-derived DC infection by L. major promastigotes, in vitro. Our results showed early divergent effects of LPS and LPC, which lasted up to 24h. In contrast to LPS, LPC worsened DC infection by reversing the immune balance IL-10 vs. TNF-α and IL-6, and inducing a sharp down regulation of CD40 and iNOsynthase activity. In addition, LPC potentiated xanthine oxidase stress, the production of kynurenine by indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO), and arginase1 activity in the expense of iNOsynthase. Taken together, our results highlight some biochemical events bypassing the protective Th1 response. They suggest that LPC could facilitate the proliferation of this obligate intracellular parasite by neutralizing oxidative and nitrosative stresses and sustaining both IDO and arginase1 activities. PMID:25601495

  9. Physcomitrella patens activates reinforcement of the cell wall, programmed cell death and accumulation of evolutionary conserved defense signals...upon Botrytis cinerea infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The moss Physcomitrella patens is an evolutionarily basal model system suitable to analyze plant defense responses activated after pathogen assault. Upon infection with the necrotroph Botrytis cinerea (B. cinerea), several defense mechanisms are induced in P. patens, including the fortification of t...

  10. Activation of the E2F transcription factor in adenovirus-infected cells involves E1A-dependent stimulation of DNA-binding activity and induction of cooperative binding mediated by an E4 gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Raychaudhuri, P; Bagchi, S; Neill, S D; Nevins, J R

    1990-01-01

    Previous experiments have demonstrated that the DNA-binding activity of the E2F transcription factor is increased upon adenovirus infection and that both the E1A and E4 genes are required for activation. In this study, we demonstrated that this enhanced binding of E2F to the E2 promoter is the result of two events. (i) There is stimulation of the DNA-binding activity of the E2F factor; this stimulation is E1A dependent but independent of E4. (ii) There is also induction of a stabilized interaction between E2F molecules bound to adjacent promoter sites; induction of stable E2F binding requires E4 gene function. This two-step activation process was also demonstrated in vitro. A heat-stable fraction from extracts of adenovirus-infected cells, which contains the 19-kilodalton E4 protein, was capable of stimulating stable E2F binding in an ATP-independent manner and appeared to involve direct interaction of the E4 protein with E2F. An extract from virus-infected cells devoid of the E4 19-kilodalton protein stimulated E2F DNA binding without forming the stable complex. This reaction required ATP. We conclude that activation of E2F during adenovirus infection is a two-step process involving a change in both the DNA-binding activity of the factor and the capacity to stabilize the interaction through protein-protein contacts. Images PMID:2139893

  11. Cellular immune response in Echinococcus multilocularis infection in humans. II. Natural killer cell activity and cell subpopulations in the blood and in the periparasitic granuloma of patients with alveolar echinococcosis.

    PubMed Central

    Vuitton, D A; Bresson-Hadni, S; Laroche, L; Kaiserlian, D; Guerret-Stocker, S; Bresson, J L; Gillet, M

    1989-01-01

    In animal models, the development of Echinococcus multilocularis larvae has been shown to correlate with the immune status of the host, and particularly with cellular immunity. In humans, a defect in immune regulation may explain the persistence of cellular infiltration and fibrogenesis. We assessed natural killer (NK) activity in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients with alveolar echinococcosis, and compared in 12 patients who underwent a surgical procedure the cell populations in the PBMC with those present in the periparasitic granuloma. The results indicated that (i) the NK cell activity of the PBMC was significantly altered at the lower NK cell: target cell ratios; (ii) the percentage of CD8+ cells was significantly decreased in the PBMC with an increased CD4:CD8 cell ratio; (iii) inversely, the CD8+ cells constituted the main population of T cells in the liver of most patients; and (iv) the periparasitic granuloma was mainly composed of macrophages, T cells and myofibroblasts in close association with the developing fibrosis. A relatively high number of CD4+ cells in the periparasitic granuloma of two patients with 'abortive' parasitic lesions suggested that, as it is observed in experimental E. multilocularis infection, differential evolution of the phenotypic pattern of the periparasitic granuloma could be related to resistance or sensitivity to infection by E. multilocularis in humans. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2805425

  12. Human intestinal dendritic cells decrease cytokine release against Salmonella infection in the presence of Lactobacillus paracasei upon TLR activation.

    PubMed

    Bermudez-Brito, Miriam; Muñoz-Quezada, Sergio; Gomez-Llorente, Carolina; Matencio, Esther; Bernal, María J; Romero, Fernando; Gil, Angel

    2012-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria have been shown to modulate immune responses and could have therapeutic effects in allergic and inflammatory disorders. However, little is known about the signalling pathways that are engaged by probiotics. Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells that are involved in immunity and tolerance. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) and murine DCs are different from human gut DCs; therefore, in this study, we used human DCs generated from CD34+ progenitor cells (hematopoietic stem cells) harvested from umbilical cord blood; those DCs exhibited surface antigens of dendritic Langerhans cells, similar to the lamina propria DCs in the gut. We report that both a novel probiotic strain isolated from faeces of exclusively breast-fed newborn infants, Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, and its cell-free culture supernatant (CFS) decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in human intestinal DCs challenged with Salmonella. Interestingly, the supernatant was as effective as the bacteria in reducing pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. In contrast, the bacterium was a potent inducer of TGF-β2 secretion, whereas the supernatant increased the secretion of TGF-β1 in response to Salmonella. We also showed that both the bacteria and its supernatant enhanced innate immunity through the activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling. These treatments strongly induced the transcription of the TLR9 gene. In addition, upregulation of the CASP8 and TOLLIP genes was observed. This work demonstrates that L. paracasei CNCM I-4034 enhanced innate immune responses, as evidenced by the activation of TLR signalling and the downregulation of a broad array of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The use of supernatants like the one described in this paper could be an effective and safe alternative to using live bacteria in functional foods. PMID:22905233

  13. Long-Term Effects of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy on CD4+ Cell Evolution among Children and Adolescents Infected with HIV: 5 Years and Counting

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kunjal; Hernán, Miguel A.; Williams, Paige L.; Seeger, John D.; McIntosh, Kenneth; Van Dyke, Russell B.; Seage, George R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Lower percentages of CD4+ T lymphocytes are associated with adverse clinical outcomes among children and adolescents infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). CD4+ lymphocyte percentage generally increases with receipt of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), but long-term follow-up is required to assess whether these increases in CD4+ cell percentage are maintained and whether they lead to normal CD4+ cell percentages in children with severe immunosuppression. Methods The study population included 1236 children and adolescents perinatally infected with HIV who were enrolled in a US-based multicenter prospective cohort study (Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group 219/219C) and who were not receiving HAART at study initiation. We estimated the effects of HAART, HAART with protease inhibitors, and HAART with nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors on CD4+ cell percentage, using marginal structural models to account for confounding by severity. Results Initiation of any type of HAART increased CD4+ cell percentage by 2.34% (95% confidence interval, 1.35%–3.33%) in the first year, relative to noninitiation of HAART. The substantial increases in CD4+ cell percentage observed after the first year of experience with these combination therapies were followed by relatively smaller increases that continued for 5 years after initiation. Although larger increases in CD4+ cell percentage were observed among children with a greater degree of immunosuppression at baseline, the mean CD4+ cell percentage after 5 years of HAART did not reach normal levels. Conclusions Our study supports the initiation of HAART in children before severe immunosuppression occurs for long-term maintenance of normal CD4+ cell percentages. This beneficial result must be weighed against the evidence of potential adverse events associated with the prolonged use of such therapy. PMID:18426371

  14. Activity of andrographolide against chikungunya virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Wintachai, Phitchayapak; Kaur, Parveen; Lee, Regina Ching Hua; Ramphan, Suwipa; Kuadkitkan, Atichat; Wikan, Nitwara; Ubol, Sukathida; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Chu, Justin Jang Hann; Smith, Duncan R.

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus that has recently engendered large epidemics around the world. There is no specific antiviral for treatment of patients infected with CHIKV, and development of compounds with significant anti-CHIKV activity that can be further developed to a practical therapy is urgently required. Andrographolide is derived from Andrographis paniculata, a herb traditionally used to treat a number of conditions including infections. This study sought to determine the potential of andrographolide as an inhibitor of CHIKV infection. Andrographolide showed good inhibition of CHIKV infection and reduced virus production by approximately 3log10 with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 77 μM without cytotoxicity. Time-of-addition and RNA transfection studies showed that andrographolide affected CHIKV replication and the activity of andrographolide was shown to be cell type independent. This study suggests that andrographolide has the potential to be developed further as an anti-CHIKV therapeutic agent. PMID:26384169

  15. Activity of andrographolide against chikungunya virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wintachai, Phitchayapak; Kaur, Parveen; Lee, Regina Ching Hua; Ramphan, Suwipa; Kuadkitkan, Atichat; Wikan, Nitwara; Ubol, Sukathida; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Chu, Justin Jang Hann; Smith, Duncan R

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus that has recently engendered large epidemics around the world. There is no specific antiviral for treatment of patients infected with CHIKV, and development of compounds with significant anti-CHIKV activity that can be further developed to a practical therapy is urgently required. Andrographolide is derived from Andrographis paniculata, a herb traditionally used to treat a number of conditions including infections. This study sought to determine the potential of andrographolide as an inhibitor of CHIKV infection. Andrographolide showed good inhibition of CHIKV infection and reduced virus production by approximately 3log10 with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 77 μM without cytotoxicity. Time-of-addition and RNA transfection studies showed that andrographolide affected CHIKV replication and the activity of andrographolide was shown to be cell type independent. This study suggests that andrographolide has the potential to be developed further as an anti-CHIKV therapeutic agent. PMID:26384169

  16. Phosphatidylazidothymidine and phosphatidyl-ddC: assessment of uptake in mouse lymphoid tissues and antiviral activities in human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells and in Rauscher leukemia virus-infected mice.

    PubMed Central

    Hostetler, K Y; Richman, D D; Sridhar, C N; Felgner, P L; Felgner, J; Ricci, J; Gardner, M F; Selleseth, D W; Ellis, M N

    1994-01-01

    During the early stages of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, although symptoms are absent and viral replication in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is low, substantial levels of HIV replication can be documented in lymphoid tissue [G. Pantaleo, C. Graziosi, J.F. Demarest, L. Butini, M. Montroni, C.H. Fox, J.M. Orenstein, D.P. Kotler, and A.S. Fauci, Nature (London) 362:355-358, 1993, and J. Embretsen, M. Zupancic, J.L. Ribas, A. Burke, P. Racz, K. Tenner-Tacz, and A.T. Haase, Nature (London) 362:359-362, 1993]. This observation suggests that earlier treatment of HIV infection may be indicated and that strategies for enhancing drug targeting to the lymphoid tissue reservoris of HIV infection may be beneficial. To address this issue, we synthesized dioleoylphosphatidyl-ddC (DOP-ddC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidyl-3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (DPP-AZT), phospholipid prodrugs which form lipid bilayers and which are readily incorporated into liposomes. The anti-HIV activity of DOP-ddC was similar to that of ddC in HIV type 1-infected HT4-6C cells, but DPP-AZT was considerably less active than AZT in HT4-6C cells. Liposomes containing DOP-[3H]ddC or DPP-[3H]AZT administered intraperitoneally to mice produced greater levels of total radioactivity over time in plasma, spleen, and lymphoid tissue relative to the results with [3H]ddC and [3H]AZT, respectively. DPP-AZT administered intraperitoneally in liposomes as a single daily dose to mice infected with Rauscher leukemia virus prevented increased spleen weight and reverse transcriptase levels in serum with a dose-response roughly comparable to that of AZT given continuously in the drinking water. DOP-ddC, DPP-AZT, and lipid conjugates of other antiretroviral nucleosides may provide higher levels of drug over time in plasma and in lymph nodes and spleen, important reservoirs of HIV infection, and may represent an interesting alternative approach to antiviral nucleoside treatment of AIDS. PMID:7695264

  17. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aaron Yun; Qiu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    The cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection have been widely documented. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death is often directly associated with disease outcomes (e.g., anemia resulting from loss of erythroid progenitors during parvovirus B19 infection). Apoptosis is the major form of cell death induced by parvovirus infection. However, nonapoptotic cell death, namely necrosis, has also been reported during infection of the minute virus of mice, parvovirus H-1 and bovine parvovirus. Recent studies have revealed multiple mechanisms underlying the cell death during parvovirus infection. These mechanisms vary in different parvoviruses, although the large nonstructural protein (NS)1 and the small NS proteins (e.g., the 11 kDa of parvovirus B19), as well as replication of the viral genome, are responsible for causing infection-induced cell death. Cell cycle arrest is also common, and contributes to the cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection. While viral NS proteins have been indicated to induce cell cycle arrest, increasing evidence suggests that a cellular DNA damage response triggered by an invading single-stranded parvoviral genome is the major inducer of cell cycle arrest in parvovirus-infected cells. Apparently, in response to infection, cell death and cell cycle arrest of parvovirus-infected cells are beneficial to the viral cell lifecycle (e.g., viral DNA replication and virus egress). In this article, we will discuss recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest. PMID:21331319

  18. Polypeptide synthesis in alphavirus-infected Aedes albopictus cells during the establishment of persistent infection.

    PubMed

    Richardson, M A; Boulton, R W; Raghow, R S; Dalgarno, L

    1980-01-01

    Polypeptide synthesis was examined in mosquito cells during the establishment of a persistent infection with two alphaviruses, Ross River virus (RRV) and Semliki Forest virus (SFV), and in vertebrate cells cytopathically-infected with the same viruses. In Aedes albopictus cell, RRV reached peak titres at 34--48 hours p.i. At 12 hours 85 per cent of cells assayed as infected by infective centre assay; by 48 hours when persistence was established, virus production was reduced and less than 5 per cent of cells assayed as infected. There was no shut-down of host polypeptide synthesis during infection. Viral polypeptide synthesis was maximal between 10 and 24 hours p.i. The major viral polypeptides labelled were nucleocapsid protein and envelope protein(s). The precursor polypeptide p95 which was prominent in infected BHK cells was not detected in mosquito cells. Similar results were obtained on SFV infection. During the establishment of persistence there was a coordinate decline in the synthesis of RRV polypeptides, reaching undetectable levels by 72 hours p.i. Subculturing persitently-infected cells led to a small increase in viral polypeptide synthesis and virus titre. In contrast, during RRV growth in BHK celos host protein synthesis was severly inhibited and by 9--11 hours p.i. virus-specific polypeptide synthesis represented more than 90 per cent of total protein synthetic activity. PMID:7356398

  19. Gene Expression Profiles Underlying Selective T-Cell-Mediated Immunity Activity of a Chinese Medicine Granule on Mice Infected with Influenza Virus H1N1

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Na-na; Liu, Qi; Gu, Li-gang; Ge, Shi-jie; Wu, Jun; Ze-ji, Qiu; Qiu, Ze-ji; Zhang, Hong-chun; Chao, En-xiang; Yu, Zhuo-nan

    2014-01-01

    A Chinese medicine granule, Shu-Feng-Xuan-Fei (SFXF), is critical for viral clearance in early phase of influenza virus infection. In this study, 72 ICR mice were randomly divided into six groups: normal control group, virus control group, Oseltamivir group, low-dose SFXF, medium-dose SFXF, and high-dose SFXF. Mice were anesthetized and inoculated with 4LD50 of influenza virus A (H1N1) except normal control group. Oseltamivir group received 11.375 mg·kg−1·d−1 Oseltamivir Phosphate. SFXF 3.76, 1.88 and 0.94 g·kg−1·d−1 were administrated to mice in all SFXF groups. Each group was in equal dose of 0.2ml daily for 4 consecutive days. Mice were sacrificed and then total RNA was extracted in lung tissue. Some genes involved in T-cell-mediated immunity were selected by DNA microarray. These candidate genes were verified by Real-Time PCR and western immunoblotting. Compared with virus control group, in Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, 12 virus-altered genes were significantly reduced following medium-dose SFXF treatment. Eighteen antigen processing presentation-associated genes were upregulated by medium-dose SFXF. In the process of T cell receptor signaling pathway, 19 genes were downregulated by medium-dose SFXF treatment. On exploration into effector T cells activation and cytokines, all of altered genes in virus control group were reversed by medium-dose SFXF. Real-time PCR and western immunoblotting showed that the regulation of medium-dose SFXF in IL-4, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, TLR7, MyD88, p38, and JNK was superior to Oseltamivir and high-dose SFXF group. Therefore, SFXF granules could reduce influenza infected cells and activation of T cells. PMID:24527057

  20. Inactivated E. coli transformed with plasmids that produce dsRNA against infectious salmon anemia virus hemagglutinin show antiviral activity when added to infected ASK cells

    PubMed Central

    García, Katherine; Ramírez-Araya, Sebastián; Díaz, Álvaro; Reyes-Cerpa, Sebastián; Espejo, Romilio T.; Higuera, Gastón; Romero, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) has caused great losses to the Chilean salmon industry, and the success of prevention and treatment strategies is uncertain. The use of RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising approach because during the replication cycle, the ISAV genome must be transcribed to mRNA in the cytoplasm. We explored the capacity of E. coli transformed with plasmids that produce double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to induce antiviral activity when added to infected ASK cells. We transformed the non-pathogenic Escherichia coli HT115 (DE3) with plasmids that expressed highly conserved regions of the ISAV genes encoding the nucleoprotein (NP), fusion (F), hemagglutinin (HE), and matrix (M) proteins as dsRNA, which is the precursor of the RNAi mechanism. The inactivated transformed bacteria carrying dsRNA were tested for their capacity to silence the target ISAV genes, and the dsRNA that were able to inhibit gene expression were subsequently tested for their ability to attenuate the cytopathic effect (CPE) and reduce the viral load. Of the four target genes tested, inactivated E. coli transformed with plasmids producing dsRNA targeting HE showed antiviral activity when added to infected ASK cells. PMID:25932022

  1. Dengue Virus Infection Perturbs Lipid Homeostasis in Infected Mosquito Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Rushika M.; Riley, Catherine; Isaac, Georgis; Hopf- Jannasch, Amber; Moore, Ronald J.; Weitz, Karl K.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Metz, Thomas O.; Adamec, Jiri; Kuhn, Richard J.

    2012-03-22

    Dengue virus causes {approx}50-100 million infections per year and thus is considered one of the most aggressive arthropod-borne human pathogen worldwide. During its replication, dengue virus induces dramatic alterations in the intracellular membranes of infected cells. This phenomenon is observed both in human and vector-derived cells. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry of mosquito cells, we show that this membrane remodeling is directly linked to a unique lipid repertoire induced by dengue virus infection. Specifically, 15% of the metabolites detected were significantly different between DENV infected and uninfected cells while 85% of the metabolites detected were significantly different in isolated replication complex membranes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that intracellular lipid redistribution induced by the inhibition of fatty acid synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in lipid biosynthesis, is sufficient for cell survival but is inhibitory to dengue virus replication. Lipids that have the capacity to destabilize and change the curvature of membranes as well as lipids that change the permeability of membranes are enriched in dengue virus infected cells. Several sphingolipids and other bioactive signaling molecules that are involved in controlling membrane fusion, fission, and trafficking as well as molecules that influence cytoskeletal reorganization are also up regulated during dengue infection. These observations shed light on the emerging role of lipids in shaping the membrane and protein environments during viral infections and suggest membrane-organizing principles that may influence virus-induced intracellular membrane architecture.

  2. Cell-to-cell signaling and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

    PubMed Central

    Van Delden, C.; Iglewski, B. H.

    1998-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bacterium responsible for severe nosocomial infections, life-threatening infections in immunocompromised persons, and chronic infections in cystic fibrosis patients. The bacterium's virulence depends on a large number of cell-associated and extracellular factors. Cell-to-cell signaling systems control the expression and allow a coordinated, cell-density-dependent production of many extracellular virulence factors. We discuss the possible role of cell-to-cell signaling in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa infections and present a rationale for targeting cell-to-cell signaling systems in the development of new therapeutic approaches. PMID:9866731

  3. Effect of Cell Physiological State on Infection by Rat Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Raymond W.; Layman, Kenneth R.; Hand, Russell E.

    1969-01-01

    Infection by rat virus has been studied in cultures of rat embryo cells to evaluate the Margolis-Kilham hypothesis that the virus preferentially infects tissues with actively dividing cells. An enhancement of infection was seen in cultures infected 10 hr after fresh medium was added as compared to infection of stationary cultures (infected before addition of fresh medium). Since addition of fresh medium stimulates deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis, the number of cells per culture synthesizing DNA at the time of infection was compared with the proportion of cells which synthesized viral protein. Cells were infected before the medium change and 10 or 24 hr after the medium change and were pulse-labeled with 3H-thymidine at the time virus was added. The cells were allowed to initiate viral protein synthesis before they were fixed and stained with fluorescein-conjugated anti-rat virus serum. Fluorescence microscopy permitted both labels to be counted simultaneouly and showed that the greatest proportion of cells synthesizing viral protein were those which had incorporated 3H-thymidine at the time of infection. Images PMID:16789120

  4. Activation of the 2-5OAS/RNase L pathway in CVB1 or HAV/18f infected FRhK-4 cells does not require induction of OAS1 or OAS2 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kulka, Michael; Calvo, Mona S.; Ngo, Diana T.; Wales, Samantha Q.; Goswami, Biswendu B.

    2009-05-25

    The latent, constitutively expressed protein RNase L is activated in coxsackievirus and HAV strain 18f infected FRhK-4 cells. Endogenous oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) from uninfected and virus infected cell extracts synthesizes active forms of the triphosphorylated 2-5A oligomer (the only known activator of RNase L) in vitro and endogenous 2-5A is detected in infected cell extracts. However, only the largest OAS isoform, OAS3, is readily detected throughout the time course of infection. While IFNbeta treatment results in an increase in the level of all three OAS isoforms in FRhK-4 cells, IFNbeta pretreatment does not affect the temporal onset or enhancement of RNase L activity nor inhibit virus replication. Our results indicate that CVB1 and HAV/18f activate the 2-5OAS/RNase L pathway in FRhK-4 cells during permissive infection through endogenous levels of OAS, but contrary to that reported for some picornaviruses, CVB1 and HAV/18f replication is insensitive to this activated antiviral pathway.

  5. CD30 is required for activation of a unique subset of interleukin-17A-producing γδ T cells in innate immunity against Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin infection.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Sun, Xun; Shibata, Kensuke; Yamada, Hisakata; Muta, Hiromi; Podack, Eckhard R; Yoshikai, Yasunobu

    2013-10-01

    Interleukin-17A (IL-17A)-producing γδ T cells are known to be activated following Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) infection. Here, we show that CD30, a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily, is important for activation of IL-17A-producing γδ T cells after BCG infection. Vγ1(-) Vγ4(-) γδ T cells preferentially expressing Vγ6/Vδ1 genes were identified as the major source of IL-17A in the peritoneal cavity during the early stage of BCG infection. The number of IL-17A-producing Vγ1(-) Vγ4(-) γδ T cells bearing Vγ6 increased in peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) of wild-type (WT) mice but not in those of CD30 knockout (KO) mice in response to BCG infection. Consistently, CD30 ligand (CD30L) or CD30 expression, predominantly by Vγ1(-) Vγ4(-) γδ T cells, was rapidly upregulated after BCG infection. Inhibition of CD30L/CD30 signaling by in vivo administration of a soluble CD30 and immunoglobulin fusion protein (CD30-Ig) severely impaired activation of IL-17A-producing Vγ1(-) Vγ4(-) γδ T cells in WT mice, while stimulating CD30L/CD30 signaling by in vivo administration of agonistic anti-CD30 monoclonal antibody (MAb) restored IL-17A production by Vγ1(-) Vγ4(-) γδ T cells in CD30L KO mice after BCG infection. These results suggest that CD30 signaling plays an important role in the activation of IL-17A-producing Vγ1(-) Vγ4(-) γδ T cells bearing Vγ6 at an early stage of BCG infection. PMID:23918785

  6. Late cytomegalovirus infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: case reports

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Sâmara Grapiuna; de Matos, Sócrates Bezerra; Botura, Mônica Borges; Meyer, Roberto; Lima, Fernanda Washington de Mendonça

    2013-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus is related to high rates of morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This report highlights the importance of adequate monitoring and management of this infection. We report on two cases of patients with late subclinical cytomegalovirus infection. These patients were monitored for antigenemia by indirect immunofluorescence assay. Active cytomegalovirus infection is most common in the first three months after transplantation however the cases reported herein show the importance of monitoring for active infection after Day +100 post-transplantation. Early detection of active infection enables quick preemptive therapy. In conclusion, we emphasize that patients with risk factors for developing severe or late cytomegalovirus disease should be monitored for more than 100 post-transplant days as late active infection is a reality. PMID:24478611

  7. EFFECTS OF IMMUNOSUPPRESSION WITH CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE ON ACUTE MURINE CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INFECTION AND VIRUS-AUGMENTED NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of cyclophosphamide (CY) treatment on acute murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection were studied to explore the potential usefulness of MCMV as a means of detecting immune dysfunction and to identify host defense mechanisms important for protection against MCMV.

  8. Cytotoxic cells induced after Chlamydia psittaci infection in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lammert, J.K.

    1982-03-01

    The ability of spleen cells from Chlamydia psittaci-infected mice to lyse C. psittaci-infected and uninfected target cell monolayers was studied. The cytotoxicity assay used was a terminal label method in which the number of adherent target cells surviving the interaction with effector cells was determined by measuring the uptake of (3H)uridine by such cells. It was observed that in the first few days postinfection (3 to 5), spleens contained cells that lysed infected and uninfected targets with equal efficiency. Subsequently, infected targets were killed primarily. The activity of effector spleen cells for infected targets continued, although at a reduced level, beyond 21 days postinfection. Intact effector cells were required since a disruption by sonication resulted in a loss of cytotoxicity. The enhanced killing observed with infected targets was also observed when target cells were sensitized with heat- or UV-inactivated C. psittaci. This study suggests that the induction of cytotoxic cells after C. psittaci infection may contribute to the ability of the host to control multiplication of the microorganism.

  9. Suppressor cells in Trypanosoma congolense-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Pearson, T W; Roelants, G E; Lundin, L B; Mayor-Withey, K S

    1979-01-01

    Spleen cells from mice infected with T. congolense strongly suppressed lymphocyte stimulation induced in normal spleen cells by incubation with mitogens or allogeneic cells. Cell dilution studies showed that suppressor activity was extremely strong. Suppressor cell activity was markedly reduced by treatment of spleen cell populations with mitomycin-C and was unaffected by treatment with anti-Thy.1 sera and complement. Removal of cells which bound carbonyl iron or which bound to nylon columns, decreased but did not abolish suppressor activity. PMID:313686

  10. Comparison of the effect of semen from HIV-infected and uninfected men on CD4+ T-cell infection

    PubMed Central

    Camus, Céline; Matusali, Giulia; Bourry, Olivier; Mahe, Dominique; Aubry, Florence; Bujan, Louis; Pasquier, Christophe; Massip, Patrice; Ravel, Célia; Zirafi, Onofrio; Munch, Jan; Roan, Nadia R.; Pineau, Charles; Dejucq-Rainsford, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Semen composition is influenced by HIV-1 infection, yet the impact of semen components on HIV infection of primary target cells has only been studied in samples from HIV-uninfected donors. Design: We compared the effect of seminal plasma (SP) from chronically HIV-infected (SP+) versus uninfected donors (SP–) on HIV-1 infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and CD4+ T cells. Methods: Primary cells were infected with HIV-1 in the presence of SP+ or SP– and analyzed for infection level, metabolic activity, HIV receptor expression, proliferation and activation. SP+ and SP– were compared for infection-enhancing peptides, cytokines and prostaglandin E2 levels. Results: SP– efficiently enhanced HIV-1 R5 infection of CD4+ T cells, whereas SP+ enhancing activity was significantly reduced. RANTES (CCL5) concentrations were elevated in SP+ relative to SP–, whereas the concentrations of infectivity-enhancing peptides [semen-derived enhancer of viral infection (SEVI), SEM1, SEM2] were similar. CCR5 membrane expression levels were reduced on CD4+ T cells shortly postexposure to SP+ compared with SP– and correlated to R5-tropic HIV-1 infection levels, and CCR5 ligands’ concentrations in semen. SP+ and SP– displayed similar enhancing activity on PBMC infection by X4-tropic HIV-1. Addition/depletion of RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted) from SPs modulated their effect on PBMC infection by R5-tropic HIV-1. Conclusion: Semen from HIV-infected donors exhibits a significantly reduced enhancing potential on CD4+ T-cell infection by R5-tropic HIV-1 when compared with semen from uninfected donors. Our data indicate that elevated seminal concentrations of RANTES in HIV-infected men can influence the ability of semen to enhance infection. PMID:26854806

  11. Human NK Cell Diversity in Viral Infection: Ramifications of Ramification

    PubMed Central

    Strauss-Albee, Dara M.; Blish, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a unique lymphocyte lineage with remarkable agility in the rapid destruction of virus-infected cells. They are also the most poorly understood class of lymphocyte. A spectrum of activating and inhibitory receptors at the NK cell surface leads to an unusual and difficult-to-study mechanism of cellular recognition, as well as a very high capacity for diversity at the single-cell level. Here, we review the evidence for the role of NK cells in the earliest stage of human viral infection, and in its prevention. We argue that single-cell diversity is a logical evolutionary adaptation for their position in the immune response and contributes to their ability to kill virus-infected cells. Finally, we look to the future, where emerging single-cell technologies will enable a new generation of rigorous and clinically relevant studies on NK cells accounting for all of their unique and diverse characteristics. PMID:26973646

  12. Identification of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Nuclear Antigen 2 (EBNA2) Target Proteins by Proteome Analysis: Activation of EBNA2 in Conditionally Immortalized B Cells Reflects Early Events after Infection of Primary B Cells by EBV

    PubMed Central

    Schlee, Martin; Krug, Tanja; Gires, Olivier; Zeidler, Reinhard; Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang; Mailhammer, Reinhard; Laux, Gerhard; Sauer, Guido; Lovric, Josip; Bornkamm, Georg W.

    2004-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous B-lymphotropic herpesvirus associated with several malignant tumors, e.g., Burkitt's lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease, and is able to efficiently immortalize primary B lymphocytes in vitro. The growth program of infected B cells is initiated and maintained by the viral transcription factor EBV nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2), which regulates viral and cellular genes, including the proto-oncogene c-myc. In our study, patterns of protein expression in B cells with and without EBNA2 were analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. For this purpose, we used a conditional immortalization system for EBV, a B cell line (EREB2-5) that expresses an estrogen receptor-EBNA2 fusion protein. In order to discriminate downstream targets of c-Myc from c-Myc-independent EBNA2 targets, we used an EREB2-5-derived cell line, P493-6, in which c-Myc is expressed under the control of a tetracycline-regulated promoter. Of 20 identified EBNA2 target proteins, 11 were c-Myc dependent and therefore most probably associated with proliferation, and one of these proteins was a posttranslationally modified protein, i.e., hypusinylated eIF5a. Finally, to estimate the relevance of EBNA2 targets during early EBV infection, we analyzed the proteomes of primary B cells before and after infection with EBV. The protein expression pattern induced upon EBV infection was similar to that following EBNA2 activation. These findings underscore the value of EREB2-5 cells as an appropriate model system for the analysis of early events in the process of EBV-mediated B-cell immortalization. PMID:15047810

  13. Efficacy and Safety of a Preemptive Antiviral Therapy Strategy Based on Combined Virological and Immunological Monitoring for Active Cytomegalovirus Infection in Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, David; Amat, Paula; de la Cámara, Rafael; López, Javier; Vázquez, Lourdes; Serrano, David; Nieto, José; Rovira, Monserrat; Piñana, José Luis; Giménez, Estela; Solano, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background. Preemptive antiviral therapy for active cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients (Allo-SCT) results in overtreatment and a high rate of recurrences. Monitoring of CMV-specific T-cell immunity may help to individualize treatments and minimize these problems. Methods. We conducted a prospective, multicenter, matched comparison-group study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel strategy that consisted of interrupting anti-CMV therapy upon CMV DNAemia clearance and concurrent detection of phosphoprotein 65/immediate-early-1-specific interferon-γ-producing CD8+ T cells at levels of >1 cell/µL (within 30 days after the initiation of therapy). Immunological monitoring was performed on days +7, +14, +21, and +28 after treatment initiation. The primary endpoint was the cumulative incidence of recurrent DNAemia within 2 months after treatment cessation. Secondary endpoints were the length of antiviral treatment courses and the incidence of hematological toxicity. Results. Sixty-one patients were enrolled in the study group. Fifty-six patients were included in the matched-control group. Eleven patients (18%) fulfilled the criteria for antiviral treatment interruption. The cumulative incidence of recurrent CMV DNAemia was significantly lower (P = .02) in these patients than in patients in the comparative groups. Likewise, the length of antiviral treatment courses was significantly shorter in these patients than that in patients in the matched-control group (P = .003). No significant differences in the incidence of hematological toxicity was observed between the comparative groups. Conclusions. Our data support the clinical utility of combining immunological and virological monitoring for the management of CMV infection in a subset of Allo-SCT recipients. PMID:27419179

  14. Co-infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1): does immune activation lead to a faster progression to AIDS?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent data have shown that HTLV-1 is prevalent among HIV positive patients in Mozambique, although the impact of HTLV-1 infection on HIV disease progression remains controversial. Our aim was to determine the phenotypic profile of T lymphocytes subsets among Mozambican patients co-infected by HIV and HTLV-1. Methods We enrolled 29 patients co-infected by HTLV-1 and HIV (co-infected), 59 patients mono-infected by HIV (HIV) and 16 healthy controls (HC), respectively. For phenotypic analysis, cells were stained with the following fluorochrome-labeled anti-human monoclonal antibodies CD4-APC, CD8-PerCP, CD25-PE, CD62L-FITC, CD45RA-FITC. CD45RO-PE, CD38-PE; being analysed by four-colour flow cytometry. Results We initially found that CD4+ T cell counts were significantly higher in co-infected, as compared to HIV groups. Moreover, CD4+ T Lymphocytes from co-infected patients presented significantly higher levels of CD45RO and CD25, but lower levels of CD45RA and CD62L, strongly indicating that CD4+ T cells are more activated under HTLV-1 plus HIV co-infection. Conclusion Our data indicate that HTLV-1/HIV co-infected patients progress with higher CD4+ T cell counts and higher levels of activation markers. In this context, it is conceivable that in co-infected individuals, these higher levels of activation may account for a faster progression to AIDS. PMID:20028500

  15. Discriminating Active Tuberculosis from Latent Tuberculosis Infection by flow cytometric measurement of CD161-expressing T cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qianting; Xu, Qian; Chen, Qi; Li, Jin; Zhang, Mingxia; Cai, Yi; Liu, Haiying; Zhou, Yiping; Deng, Guofang; Deng, Qunyi; Zhou, Boping; Kornfeld, Hardy; Chen, Xinchun

    2015-01-01

    Interferon-gamma Release Assays (IGRAs) significantly increases the possibility for early diagnosis of tuberculosis, but IGRAs alone cannot discriminate active TB from LTBI. Therefore, fast and reliable discrimination of active tuberculosis, especially bacteriology negative tuberculosis, from LTBI is a great necessity. Here we established an assay based on flow cytometric multiparameter assay assessing expression of CD161 along with CD3, CD4, and CD8, whereby a set of indices formulated by the percentages of CD3+CD161+, CD3+CD4+CD161+ and CD3+CD8+CD161+ T cells multiplied with lymphocyte/monocyte ratio were established. Application of the CD3+CD8+CD161+ index to compare a cohort of active tuberculosis with a cohort of LTBI or health control yielded 0.7662 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.6559–0.8552) or 0.7922 (95%  CI 0.6846–0.8763) for sensitivity and 0.9048 (95%  CI 0.8209–0.9580) or 0.8939 (95% CI 0.8392–0.9349) for specificity when the TB cohort was AFB+; the corresponding results were 0.7481 (95%  CI 0.6648–0.8198) or 0.7557 (95%  CI 0.6730–0.8265) for sensitivity and 0.8571 (95%  CI 0.7637–0.9239) or 0.8603 (95%  CI 0.8008–0.9075) for specificity when the TB cohort was AFB−. Our results reveal that in combination with IGRAs, CD161-based indices provide a novel, fast diagnostic solution addressing the limitation of current tuberculosis diagnostics. PMID:26643453

  16. CD4 Depletion in SIV-Infected Macaques Results in Macrophage and Microglia Infection with Rapid Turnover of Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Alexandra M.; Ryan, Emily S.; McGary, Colleen S.; Deleage, Claire; McAtee, Brigitte B.; He, Tianyu; Apetrei, Cristian; Easley, Kirk; Pahwa, Savita; Collman, Ronald G.; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Davenport, Miles P.; Estes, Jacob D.; Silvestri, Guido; Lackner, Andrew A.; Paiardini, Mirko

    2014-01-01

    In rhesus macaques (RMs), experimental depletion of CD4+ T-cells prior to SIV infection results in higher viremia and emergence of CD4-independent SIV-envelopes. In this study we used the rhesus recombinant anti-CD4 antibody CD4R1 to deplete RM CD4+ T-cells prior to SIVmac251 infection and investigate the sources of the increased viral burden and the lifespan of productively infected cells. CD4-depleted animals showed (i) set-point viral load two-logs higher than controls; (ii) macrophages constituting 80% of all SIV vRNA+ cells in lymph node and mucosal tissues; (iii) substantial expansion of pro-inflammatory monocytes; (iv) aberrant activation and infection of microglial cells; and (v) lifespan of productively infected cells significantly longer in comparison to controls, but markedly shorter than previously estimated for macrophages. The net effect of CD4+ T-cell depletion is an inability to control SIV replication and a shift in the tropism of infected cells to macrophages, microglia, and, potentially, other CD4-low cells which all appear to have a shortened in vivo lifespan. We believe these findings have important implications for HIV eradication studies. PMID:25356757

  17. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections. PMID:27077876

  18. NK Cells during Dengue Disease and Their Recognition of Dengue Virus-Infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán, Davis; López-Vergès, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune response, in addition to the B- and T-cell response, plays a role in protection against dengue virus (DENV) infection and the degree of disease severity. Early activation of natural killer (NK) cells and type-I interferon-dependent immunity may be important in limiting viral replication during the early stages of DENV infection and thus reducing subsequent pathogenesis. NK cells may also produce cytokines that reduce inflammation and tissue injury. On the other hand, NK cells are also capable of inducing liver injury at early-time points of DENV infection. In vitro, NK cells can kill antibody-coated DENV-infected cells through antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. In addition, NK cells may directly recognize DENV-infected cells through their activating receptors, although the increase in HLA class I expression may allow infected cells to escape the NK response. Recently, genome-wide association studies have shown an association between MICB and MICA, which encode ligands of the activating NK receptor NKG2D, and dengue disease outcome. This review focuses on recognition of DENV-infected cells by NK cells and on the regulation of expression of NK cell ligands by DENV. PMID:24829565

  19. Microglial activation induces neuronal death in Chandipura virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Abhishek Kumar; Ghosh, Sourish; Pradhan, Sreeparna; Basu, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Neurotropic viruses induce neurodegeneration either directly by activating host death domains or indirectly through host immune response pathways. Chandipura Virus (CHPV) belonging to family Rhabdoviridae is ranked among the emerging pathogens of the Indian subcontinent. Previously we have reported that CHPV induces neurodegeneration albeit the root cause of this degeneration is still an open question. In this study we explored the role of microglia following CHPV infection. Phenotypic analysis of microglia through lectin and Iba-1 staining indicated cells were in an activated state post CHPV infection in cortical region of the infected mouse brain. Cytokine Bead Array (CBA) analysis revealed comparatively higher cytokine and chemokine levels in the same region. Increased level of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), Nitric Oxide (NO) and Reactive Oxygen species (ROS) in CHPV infected mouse brain indicated a strong inflammatory response to CHPV infection. Hence it was hypothesized through our analyses that this inflammatory response may stimulate the neuronal death following CHPV infection. In order to validate our hypothesis supernatant from CHPV infected microglial culture was used to infect neuronal cell line and primary neurons. This study confirmed the bystander killing of neurons due to activation of microglia post CHPV infection. PMID:26931456

  20. Bacterial Infection of endometrial stromal cells influences bovine herpersvirus 4 immediate early gene activation: a new insight into bacterial and viral interaction for uterine disease

    PubMed Central

    Donofrio, Gaetano; Ravanetti, Lara; Cavirani, Sandro; Herath, Shan; Capocefalo, Antonio; Sheldon, Iain Martin

    2009-01-01

    Experimental infection with the gammaherpesvirus Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) rarely establishes disease, yet BoHV-4 is commonly associated with uterine disease in cattle. Uterine disease involves co-infection with bacteria such as Escherichia coli, which stimulate the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) by endometrial cells. BoHV-4 replication depends on Immediate Early 2 (IE2) gene transactivation, and in the present study, PGE2, E. coli or its lipopolysaccharide (LPS), up-regulated the IE2 gene promoter in uterine cells. Bacterial co-infection is important for BoHV-4 uterine disease. PMID:18577555

  1. T cell responses in dengue viral infections.

    PubMed

    Malavige, Gathsaurie Neelika; Ogg, Graham S

    2013-12-01

    Dengue viral infections are the commonest mosquito borne viral infection in the world, affecting more than 100 countries and 390 million individuals annually. Currently, there are no effective antiviral drugs or an effective vaccine to prevent infection. A main hurdle in developing a safe and effective vaccine has been our poor understanding of the complex nature of the protective immune response in acute dengue infection and the presence of four dengue virus (DV) serotypes that are highly homologous. The role of DV specific T cells in the pathogenesis of severe clinical disease in not clear. It has been speculated that highly cross reactive T cells for the previous infecting heterologous DV serotype, which produce pro-inflammatory cytokines, contribute to disease pathogenesis. These cross reactive T cells are believed to be suboptimal in clearing the infection with the current DV-serotype. However, other studies have shown that cross-reactive DV-specific T cells are absent or present in very low frequency during acute infection, appearing only during the convalescent period in the majority of patients. Furthermore, significant apoptosis of T cells occurs in severe acute clinical disease. Overall therefore, it is unclear what role T cells play in contributing to disease pathogenesis during acute dengue infection. Existing data have been complicated by cross-reactivity in T cells assays. These findings can now be re-evaluated in the light of novel technologies to identify serotype-specific T cell responses. PMID:24220605

  2. Pyrimidinergic Receptor Activation Controls Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Souza, Aline Cristina Abreu; Marinho, Ygor; Correa, Gladys; Santoro, Giani França; Coutinho, Claudia Mara Lara Melo; Vommaro, Rossiane Claudia; Coutinho-Silva, Robson

    2015-01-01

    Infection by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is highly prevalent worldwide and may have serious clinical manifestations in immunocompromised patients. T. gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that infects almost any cell type in mammalian hosts, including immune cells. The immune cells express purinergic P2 receptors in their membrane – subdivided into P2Y and P2X subfamilies - whose activation is important for infection control. Here, we examined the effect of treatment with UTP and UDP in mouse peritoneal macrophages infected with T. gondii tachyzoites. Treatment with these nucleotides reduced parasitic load by 90%, but did not increase the levels of the inflammatory mediators NO and ROS, nor did it modulate host cell death by apoptosis or necrosis. On the other hand, UTP and UDP treatments induced early egress of tachyzoites from infected macrophages, in a Ca2+-dependent manner, as shown by scanning electron microscopy analysis, and videomicroscopy. In subsequent infections, prematurely egressed parasites had reduced infectivity, and could neither replicate nor inhibit the fusion of lysosomes to the parasitophorous vacuole. The use of selective agonists and antagonists of the receptor subtypes P2Y2 and P2Y4 and P2Y6 showed that premature parasite egress may be mediated by the activation of these receptor subtypes. Our results suggest that the activity of P2Y host cell receptors controls T. gondii infection in macrophages, highlighting the importance of pyrimidinergic signaling for innate immune system response against infection. Finally the P2Y receptors should be considered as new target for the development of drugs against T. gondii infection. PMID:26192447

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection induces non-apoptotic cell death of human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DCs) connect innate and adaptive immunity, and are necessary for an efficient CD4+ and CD8+ T cell response after infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We previously described the macrophage cell death response to Mtb infection. To investigate the effect of Mtb infection on human DC viability, we infected these phagocytes with different strains of Mtb and assessed viability, as well as DNA fragmentation and caspase activity. In parallel studies, we assessed the impact of infection on DC maturation, cytokine production and bacillary survival. Results Infection of DCs with live Mtb (H37Ra or H37Rv) led to cell death. This cell death proceeded in a caspase-independent manner, and without nuclear fragmentation. In fact, substrate assays demonstrated that Mtb H37Ra-induced cell death progressed without the activation of the executioner caspases, 3/7. Although the death pathway was triggered after infection, the DCs successfully underwent maturation and produced a host-protective cytokine profile. Finally, dying infected DCs were permissive for Mtb H37Ra growth. Conclusions Human DCs undergo cell death after infection with live Mtb, in a manner that does not involve executioner caspases, and results in no mycobactericidal effect. Nonetheless, the DC maturation and cytokine profile observed suggests that the infected cells can still contribute to TB immunity. PMID:22024399

  4. Inapparent Viral Infection of Cells In Vitro III. Manifestations of Infection of L Mouse Cells by Japanese Encephalitis Virus1

    PubMed Central

    Dubbs, D. R.; Scherer, W. F.

    1966-01-01

    Dubbs, D. R. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis), and W. F. Scherer. Inapparent viral infection of cells in vitro. III. Manifestations of infection of L mouse cells by Japanese encephalitis virus. J. Bacteriol. 91:2349–2355. 1966.—Nine strains of Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus were propagated serially in cultures of L cells reaching titers of 103.5 to 106.3. Although cytopathic effects were not seen in cultures of contiguous L cells after infection with JE virus, cell growth was inhibited. Moreover, cell destruction was readily apparent in infected cultures of sparse, noncontiguous L cells. Differences in the size of cell population of infected and noninfected cultures (i) occurred despite only 0.2 to 3.5% of the cells in infected cultures being associated with infectious virus, (ii) were greater in actively growing cultures than in those kept in maintenance media, and (iii) were probably in part related to an interferon produced in infected cultures. Images PMID:4287589

  5. Effect of parasitic infection on dopamine biosynthesis in dopaminergic cells

    PubMed Central

    Martin, H.L.; Alsaady, I.; Howell, G.; Prandovszky, E.; Peers, C.; Robinson, P.; McConkey, G.A.

    2015-01-01

    Infection by the neurotropic agent Toxoplasma gondii alters rodent behavior and can result in neuropsychiatric symptoms in humans. Little is understood regarding the effects of infection on host neural processes but alterations to dopaminergic neurotransmission are implicated. We have previously reported elevated levels of dopamine (DA) in infected dopaminergic cells however the involvement of the host enzymes and fate of the produced DA were not defined. In order to clarify the effects of infection on host DA biosynthetic enzymes and DA packaging we examined enzyme levels and activity and DA accumulation and release in T. gondii-infected neurosecretory cells. Although the levels of the host tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and DOPA decarboxylase and AADC (DDC) did not change significantly in infected cultures, DDC was found within the parasitophorous vacuole (PV), the vacuolar compartment where the parasites reside, as well as in the host cytosol in infected dopaminergic cells. Strikingly, DDC was found within the intracellular parasite cysts in infected brain tissue. This finding could provide some explanation for observations of DA within tissue cysts in infected brain as a parasite-encoded enzyme with TH activity was also localized within tissue cysts. In contrast, cellular DA packaging appeared unchanged in single-cell microamperometry experiments and only a fraction of the increased DA was accessible to high potassium-induced release. This study provides some understanding of how this parasite produces elevated DA within dopaminergic cells without the toxic ramifications of free cytosolic DA. The mechanism for synthesis and packaging of DA by T. gondii-infected dopaminergic cells may have important implications for the effects of chronic T. gondii infection on humans and animals. PMID:26297895

  6. Heat Shock Enhances the Expression of the Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type-I (HTLV-I) Trans-Activator (Tax) Antigen in Human HTLV-I Infected Primary and Cultured T Cells.

    PubMed

    Kunihiro, Marie; Fujii, Hideki; Miyagi, Takuya; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Reiko; Fukushima, Takuya; Ansari, Aftab A; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2016-01-01

    The environmental factors that lead to the reactivation of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) in latently infected T cells in vivo remain unknown. It has been previously shown that heat shock (HS) is a potent inducer of HTLV-I viral protein expression in long-term cultured cell lines. However, the precise HTLV-I protein(s) and mechanisms by which HS induces its effect remain ill-defined. We initiated these studies by first monitoring the levels of the trans-activator (Tax) protein induced by exposure of the HTLV-I infected cell line to HS. HS treatment at 43 °C for 30 min for 24 h led to marked increases in the level of Tax antigen expression in all HTLV-I-infected T cell lines tested including a number of HTLV-I-naturally infected T cell lines. HS also increased the expression of functional HTLV-I envelope gp46 antigen, as shown by increased syncytium formation activity. Interestingly, the enhancing effect of HS was partially inhibited by the addition of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)-inhibitor pifithlin-μ (PFT). In contrast, the HSP 70-inducer zerumbone (ZER) enhanced Tax expression in the absence of HS. These data suggest that HSP 70 is at least partially involved in HS-mediated stimulation of Tax expression. As expected, HS resulted in enhanced expression of the Tax-inducible host antigens, such as CD83 and OX40. Finally, we confirmed that HS enhanced the levels of Tax and gp46 antigen expression in primary human CD4⁺ T cells isolated from HTLV-I-infected humanized NOD/SCID/γc null (NOG) mice and HTLV-I carriers. In summary, the data presented herein indicate that HS is one of the environmental factors involved in the reactivation of HTLV-I in vivo via enhanced Tax expression, which may favor HTLV-I expansion in vivo. PMID:27409630

  7. Heat Shock Enhances the Expression of the Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type-I (HTLV-I) Trans-Activator (Tax) Antigen in Human HTLV-I Infected Primary and Cultured T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kunihiro, Marie; Fujii, Hideki; Miyagi, Takuya; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Reiko; Fukushima, Takuya; Ansari, Aftab A.; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2016-01-01

    The environmental factors that lead to the reactivation of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) in latently infected T cells in vivo remain unknown. It has been previously shown that heat shock (HS) is a potent inducer of HTLV-I viral protein expression in long-term cultured cell lines. However, the precise HTLV-I protein(s) and mechanisms by which HS induces its effect remain ill-defined. We initiated these studies by first monitoring the levels of the trans-activator (Tax) protein induced by exposure of the HTLV-I infected cell line to HS. HS treatment at 43 °C for 30 min for 24 h led to marked increases in the level of Tax antigen expression in all HTLV-I-infected T cell lines tested including a number of HTLV-I-naturally infected T cell lines. HS also increased the expression of functional HTLV-I envelope gp46 antigen, as shown by increased syncytium formation activity. Interestingly, the enhancing effect of HS was partially inhibited by the addition of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)-inhibitor pifithlin-μ (PFT). In contrast, the HSP 70-inducer zerumbone (ZER) enhanced Tax expression in the absence of HS. These data suggest that HSP 70 is at least partially involved in HS-mediated stimulation of Tax expression. As expected, HS resulted in enhanced expression of the Tax-inducible host antigens, such as CD83 and OX40. Finally, we confirmed that HS enhanced the levels of Tax and gp46 antigen expression in primary human CD4+ T cells isolated from HTLV-I-infected humanized NOD/SCID/γc null (NOG) mice and HTLV-I carriers. In summary, the data presented herein indicate that HS is one of the environmental factors involved in the reactivation of HTLV-I in vivo via enhanced Tax expression, which may favor HTLV-I expansion in vivo. PMID:27409630

  8. Huntingtons Disease Mice Infected with Toxoplasma gondii Demonstrate Early Kynurenine Pathway Activation, Altered CD8+ T-Cell Responses, and Premature Mortality.

    PubMed

    Donley, David W; Olson, Andrew R; Raisbeck, Merl F; Fox, Jonathan H; Gigley, Jason P

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine-repeat expansion in the huntingtin protein. Activation of the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation is implicated in the pathogenesis of HD. Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) catalyzes the oxidation of tryptophan to kynurenine, the first step in this pathway. The prevalent, neuroinvasive protozoal pathogen Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) results in clinically silent life-long infection in immune-competent individuals. T. gondii infection results in activation of IDO which provides some protection against the parasite by depleting tryptophan which the parasite cannot synthesize. The kynurenine pathway may therefore represent a point of synergism between HD and T. gondii infection. We show here that IDO activity is elevated at least four-fold in frontal cortex and striata of non-infected N171-82Q HD mice at 14-weeks corresponding to early-advanced HD. T. gondii infection at 5 weeks resulted in elevation of cortical IDO activity in HD mice. HD-infected mice died significantly earlier than wild-type infected and HD control mice. Prior to death, infected HD mice demonstrated decreased CD8+ T-lymphocyte proliferation in brain and spleen compared to wild-type infected mice. We demonstrate for the first time that HD mice have an altered response to an infectious agent that is characterized by premature mortality, altered immune responses and early activation of IDO. Findings are relevant to understanding how T. gondii infection may interact with pathways mediating neurodegeneration in HD. PMID:27611938

  9. Apoptotic activity and anti-Toxoplasma effects of artemether on the tachyzoites and experimental infected Vero and J774 cell lines by Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Mikaeiloo, Hajar; Ghaffarifar, Fatemeh; Dalimi, Abdolhossein; Sharifi, Zohreh; Hassan, Zuhair Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Drugs used for toxoplasmosis have limited efficacy and also severe side effects. A new drug with good efficacy and limited side effects is need of the hour. We studied the effects of artemether on Toxoplasma gondii in vitro conditions. Materials and Methods: Artemether (methyl-ether-qinghaosu) was tested for tachyzoites, J774, and Vero cell lines infected by T. gondii. For evaluating the effect of drugs on Vero cells infected with T. gondii, we designed two separate experiments; in the first experiment, the Vero cells were infected with tachyzoites and then treated with artemether; while in the second one, the tachyzoites were exposed to artemether and then Vero cells were infected with treated tachyzoites. For evaluating the apoptotic effect of artemether on tachyzoites and infected J774 macrophages cell line with T. gondii, we used flow cytometry method. Inhibitory concentration (IC50) was evaluated by intracellular replication of tachyzoites in Vero cells. Results: IC50 for infected Vero cells with tachyzoites was determined as 49.13 μg/ml. In pretreated tachyzoites with artemether before entering into Vero cells, IC50 was calculated as 13.15 μg/ml. In both experiments, artemether showed a higher inhibitory effect than sulfadiazine (positive control). Artemether even at the highest concentrations only showed low cytotoxicity on Vero and J774 cell lines. Apoptosis in tachyzoites rise with an increasing concentration of artemether. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that artemether is effective to control the tachyzoites of T. gondii in vitro and maybe a good alternative drug for toxoplasmosis. PMID:27127321

  10. Contrasting human cytokine responses to promastigote whole-cell extract and the Leishmania analogue receptor for activated C kinase antigen of L. amazonensis in natural infection versus immunization

    PubMed Central

    Azeredo-Coutinho, R B G; Matos, D C S; Armôa, G G R; Maia, R M; Schubach, A; Mayrink, W; Mendonça, S C F

    2008-01-01

    It is known that the same antigen can induce different immune responses, depending upon the way that it is presented to the immune system. The objective of this study was to compare cytokine responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from cutaneous leishmaniasis patients and subjects immunized with a first-generation candidate vaccine composed of killed Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes to a whole-cell promastigote antigen extract (La) and to the recombinant protein LACK (Leishmania analogue receptor for activated C kinase), both from L. amazonensis. Thirty-two patients, 35 vaccinees and 13 healthy subjects without exposure to Leishmania, were studied. Cytokine production was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and enzyme-linked immunospot assay. The interferon (IFN)-γ levels stimulated by La were significantly higher and the levels of interleukin (IL)-10 significantly lower than those stimulated by LACK in the patient group, while LACK induced a significantly higher IFN-γ production and a significantly lower IL-10 production compared with those induced by La in the vaccinated group. LACK also induced a significantly higher frequency of IFN-γ-producing cells than did La in the vaccinated group. The contrast in the cytokine responses stimulated by LACK and La in PBMC cultures from vaccinated subjects versus patients indicates that the human immune response to crude and defined Leishmania antigens as a consequence of immunization differs from that induced by natural infection. PMID:18627399

  11. Novel Inhaled Combination Powder Containing Amorphous Colistin and Crystalline Rifapentine with Enhanced Antimicrobial Activities against Planktonic Cells and Biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa for Respiratory Infections.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi Tony; Sun, Si-Ping; Chan, John Gar Yan; Wang, Ping; Barraud, Nicolas; Rice, Scott A; Wang, Jiping; Li, Jian; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2015-08-01

    Colistin has been increasingly used for the treatment of respiratory infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria. Unfortunately parenteral administration of colistin can cause severe adverse effects. This study aimed to develop an inhaled combination dry powder formulation of colistin and rifapentine for the treatment of respiratory infections. The combination formulation was produced by spray-drying rifapentine particles suspended in an aqueous colistin solution. The combination dry powder had enhanced antimicrobial activities against planktonic cells and biofilm cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, with both minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC) values (2 and 4 mg/L, respectively) being half that of pure colistin (MIC 4 mg/L and MBIC 8 mg/L) and 1/16th that of pure rifapentine (MIC 32 mg/L and MBIC 64 mg/L). High aerosol performance, as measured via an Aerolizer device, was observed with emitted doses>89% and fine particle fraction (FPF) total>76%. The proportion of submicron particles of rifapentine particles was minimized by the attachment of colistin, which increased the overall particle mass and aerodynamic size distribution. Using the spray-drying method described here, stable particles of amorphous colistin and crystalline rifapentine were distributed homogeneously in each stage of the impinger. Unlike the colistin alone formulation, no deterioration in aerosol performance was found for the combination powder when exposed to a high relative humidity of 75%. In our previous study, surface coating by rifampicin contributed to the moisture protection of colistin. Here, a novel approach with a new mechanism was proposed whereby moisture protection was attributed to the carrier effect of elongated crystalline rifapentine particles, which minimized contact between hygroscopic colistin particles. This inhaled combination antibiotic formulation with enhanced aerosol dispersion efficiency and in vitro efficacy

  12. Pseudorabies Virus Infection Alters Neuronal Activity and Connectivity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Kelly M.; Tank, David W.; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-herpesviruses, including human herpes simplex virus 1 & 2, varicella zoster virus and the swine pseudorabies virus (PRV), infect the peripheral nervous system of their hosts. Symptoms of infection often include itching, numbness, or pain indicative of altered neurological function. To determine if there is an in vitro electrophysiological correlate to these characteristic in vivo symptoms, we infected cultured rat sympathetic neurons with well-characterized strains of PRV known to produce virulent or attenuated symptoms in animals. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were made at various times after infection. By 8 hours of infection with virulent PRV, action potential (AP) firing rates increased substantially and were accompanied by hyperpolarized resting membrane potentials and spikelet-like events. Coincident with the increase in AP firing rate, adjacent neurons exhibited coupled firing events, first with AP-spikelets and later with near identical resting membrane potentials and AP firing. Small fusion pores between adjacent cell bodies formed early after infection as demonstrated by transfer of the low molecular weight dye, Lucifer Yellow. Later, larger pores formed as demonstrated by transfer of high molecular weight Texas red-dextran conjugates between infected cells. Further evidence for viral-induced fusion pores was obtained by infecting neurons with a viral mutant defective for glycoprotein B, a component of the viral membrane fusion complex. These infected neurons were essentially identical to mock infected neurons: no increased AP firing, no spikelet-like events, and no electrical or dye transfer. Infection with PRV Bartha, an attenuated circuit-tracing strain delayed, but did not eliminate the increased neuronal activity and coupling events. We suggest that formation of fusion pores between infected neurons results in electrical coupling and elevated firing rates, and that these processes may contribute to the altered neural function seen in PRV-infected

  13. CD8+ T cells control Ross River virus infection in musculoskeletal tissues of infected mice.

    PubMed

    Burrack, Kristina S; Montgomery, Stephanie A; Homann, Dirk; Morrison, Thomas E

    2015-01-15

    Ross River virus (RRV), chikungunya virus, and related alphaviruses cause debilitating polyarthralgia and myalgia. Mouse models of RRV and chikungunya virus have demonstrated a role for the adaptive immune response in the control of these infections. However, questions remain regarding the role for T cells in viral control, including the magnitude, location, and dynamics of CD8(+) T cell responses. To address these questions, we generated a recombinant RRV expressing the H-2(b)-restricted glycoprotein 33 (gp33) determinant derived from the glycoprotein of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Using tetramers, we tracked gp33-specific CD8(+) T cells during RRV-lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. We found that acute RRV infection induces activation of CD8(+) T cell responses in lymphoid and musculoskeletal tissues that peak from 10-14 d postinoculation, suggesting that CD8(+) T cells contribute to control of acute RRV infection. Mice genetically deficient for CD8(+) T cells or wild-type mice depleted of CD8(+) T cells had elevated RRV loads in skeletal muscle tissue, but not joint-associated tissues, at 14 d postinoculation, suggesting that the ability of CD8(+) T cells to control RRV infection is tissue dependent. Finally, adoptively transferred T cells were capable of reducing RRV loads in skeletal muscle tissue of Rag1(-/-) mice, indicating that T cells can contribute to the control of RRV infection in the absence of B cells and Ab. Collectively, these data demonstrate a role for T cells in the control of RRV infection and suggest that the antiviral capacity of T cells is controlled in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:25488988

  14. CD8+ T cells control Ross River virus infection in musculoskeletal tissues of infected mice

    PubMed Central

    Burrack, Kristina S.; Montgomery, Stephanie A.; Homann, Dirk; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Ross River virus (RRV), chikungunya virus (CHIKV), and related alphaviruses cause debilitating polyarthralgia and myalgia. Mouse models of RRV and CHIKV have demonstrated a role for the adaptive immune response in the control of these infections. However, questions remain regarding the role for T cells in viral control, including the magnitude, location, and dynamics of CD8+ T cell responses. To address these questions, we generated a recombinant RRV expressing the H-2b-restricted gp33 determinant derived from the glycoprotein (gp) of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) (“RRV-LCMV”). Utilizing tetramers, we tracked gp33-specific CD8+ T cells during RRV-LCMV infection. We found that acute RRV infection induces activation of CD8+ T cell responses in lymphoid and musculoskeletal tissues that peak from 10 to 14 days post-inoculation (dpi), suggesting that CD8+ T cells contribute to control of acute RRV infection. Mice genetically deficient for CD8+ T cells or wild-type mice depleted of CD8+ T cells had elevated RRV loads in skeletal muscle tissue, but not joint-associated tissues, at 14 dpi, suggesting that the ability of CD8+ T cells to control RRV infection is tissue-dependent. Finally, adoptively transferred T cells were capable of reducing RRV loads in skeletal muscle tissue of Rag1−/− mice, indicating that T cells can contribute to the control of RRV infection in the absence of B cells and antibody. Collectively, these data demonstrate a role for T cells in the control of RRV infection and suggest that the antiviral capacity of T cells is controlled in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:25488988

  15. HIV-Infected Individuals with Low CD4/CD8 Ratio despite Effective Antiretroviral Therapy Exhibit Altered T Cell Subsets, Heightened CD8+ T Cell Activation, and Increased Risk of Non-AIDS Morbidity and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Villar, Sergio; Sainz, Talia; Lee, Sulggi A.; Hunt, Peter W.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Ferre, April L.; Hayes, Timothy L.; Somsouk, Ma; Hsue, Priscilla Y.; Van Natta, Mark L.; Meinert, Curtis L.; Lederman, Michael M.; Hatano, Hiroyu; Jain, Vivek; Huang, Yong; Hecht, Frederick M.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; McCune, Joseph M.; Moreno, Santiago; Deeks, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    A low CD4/CD8 ratio in elderly HIV-uninfected adults is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. A subset of HIV-infected adults receiving effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) fails to normalize this ratio, even after they achieve normal CD4+ T cell counts. The immunologic and clinical characteristics of this clinical phenotype remain undefined. Using data from four distinct clinical cohorts and three clinical trials, we show that a low CD4/CD8 ratio in HIV-infected adults during otherwise effective ART (after CD4 count recovery above 500 cells/mm3) is associated with a number of immunological abnormalities, including a skewed T cell phenotype from naïve toward terminally differentiated CD8+ T cells, higher levels of CD8+ T cell activation (HLADR+CD38+) and senescence (CD28− and CD57+CD28−), and higher kynurenine/tryptophan ratio. Changes in the peripheral CD4/CD8 ratio are also reflective of changes in gut mucosa, but not in lymph nodes. In a longitudinal study, individuals who initiated ART within six months of infection had greater CD4/CD8 ratio increase compared to later initiators (>2 years). After controlling for age, gender, ART duration, nadir and CD4 count, the CD4/CD8 ratio predicted increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Hence, a persistently low CD4/CD8 ratio during otherwise effective ART is associated with increased innate and adaptive immune activation, an immunosenescent phenotype, and higher risk of morbidity/mortality. This ratio may prove useful in monitoring response to ART and could identify a unique subset of individuals needed of novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:24831517

  16. Semen CD4+ T Cells and Macrophages Are Productively Infected at All Stages of SIV infection in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bernard-Stoecklin, Sibylle; Gommet, Céline; Corneau, Aurélien B.; Guenounou, Sabrina; Torres, Claire; Dejucq-Rainsford, Nathalie; Cosma, Antonio; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Le Grand, Roger

    2013-01-01

    The mucosal events of HIV transmission have been extensively studied, but the role of infected cells present in the genital and rectal secretions, and in the semen, in particular, remains a matter of debate. As a prerequisite to a thorough in vivo investigation of the early transmission events through infected cells, we characterized in detail by multi-parameter flow cytometry the changes in macaque seminal leukocytes during SIVmac251 infection, focusing on T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells. Using immunocytofluorescence targeting SIV proteins and real-time quantitative PCR targeting SIV DNA, we investigated the nature of the infected cells on sorted semen leukocytes from macaques at different stages of infection. Finally, we cocultured semen CD4+ T cells and macrophages with a cell line permissive to SIV infection to assess their infectivity in vitro. We found that primary infection induced strong local inflammation, which was associated with an increase in the number of leukocytes in semen, both factors having the potential to favor cell-associated virus transmission. Semen CD4+ T cells and macrophages were productively infected at all stages of infection and were infectious in vitro. Lymphocytes had a mucosal phenotype and expressed activation (CD69 & HLA-DR) and migration (CCR5, CXCR4, LFA-1) markers. CD69 expression was increased in semen T cells by SIV infection, at all stages of infection. Macrophages predominated at all stages and expressed CD4, CCR5, MAC-1 and LFA-1. Altogether, we demonstrated that semen contains the two major SIV-target cells (CD4+ T cells and macrophages). Both cell types can be productively infected at all stages of SIV infection and are endowed with markers that may facilitate transmission of infection during sexual exposure. PMID:24348253

  17. Splenic Damage during SIV Infection: Role of T-Cell Depletion and Macrophage Polarization and Infection.

    PubMed

    Williams, Dionna W; Engle, Elizabeth L; Shirk, Erin N; Queen, Suzanne E; Gama, Lucio; Mankowski, Joseph L; Zink, M Christine; Clements, Janice E

    2016-08-01

    The effects of HIV infection on spleen and its cellular subsets have not been fully characterized, particularly for macrophages in which diverse populations exist. We used an accelerated SIV-infected macaque model to examine longitudinal effects on T-cell and macrophage populations and their susceptibilities to infection. Substantial lymphoid depletion occurred, characterized by follicular burn out and a loss of CD3 T lymphocytes, which was associated with cellular activation and transient dysregulations in CD4/CD8 ratios and memory effector populations. In contrast, the loss of CD68 and CD163(+)CD68(+) macrophages and increase in CD163 cells was irreversible, which began during acute infection and persisted until terminal disease. Mac387 macrophages and monocytes were transiently recruited into spleen, but were not sufficient to mitigate the changes in macrophage subsets. Type I interferon, M2 polarizing genes, and chemokine-chemokine receptor signaling were up-regulated in spleen and drove macrophage alterations. SIV-infected T cells were numerous within the white pulp during acute infection, but were rarely observed thereafter. CD68, CD163, and Mac387 macrophages were highly infected, which primarily occurred in the red pulp independent of T cells. Few macrophages underwent apoptosis, indicating that they are a long-lasting target for HIV/SIV. Our results identify macrophages as an important contributor to HIV/SIV infection in spleen and in promoting morphologic changes through the loss of specific macrophage subsets that mediate splenic organization. PMID:27322772

  18. HIV Infection of Monocytes-Derived Dendritic Cells Inhibits Vγ9Vδ2 T Cells Functions

    PubMed Central

    Sacchi, Alessandra; Rinaldi, Alessandra; Tumino, Nicola; Casetti, Rita; Agrati, Chiara; Turchi, Federica; Bordoni, Veronica; Cimini, Eleonora; Martini, Federico

    2014-01-01

    DCs act as sentinel cells against incoming pathogens and represent the most potent antigen presenting cells, having the unique capability to prime naïve T cells. In addition to their role in induction of adaptive immune responses, DC are also able to activate innate cells as γδ T cells; in particular, a reciprocal crosstalk between DC and γδ T cells was demonstrated. However, whether HIV infection may alter DC-Vγ9Vδ2 T cells cross-talk was not yet described. To clarify this issue, we cultured activated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells with HIV infected monocyte derived DC (MoDC). After 5 days we evaluated MoDC phenotype, and Vγ9Vδ2 T cells activation and proliferation. In our model, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells were not able to proliferate in response to HIV-infected MoDC, although an up-regulation of CD69 was observed. Upon phosphoantigens stimulation, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells proliferation and cytokine production were inhibited when cultured with HIV-infected MoDC in a cell-contact dependent way. Moreover, HIV-infected MoDC are not able to up-regulate CD86 molecules when cultured with activated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, compared with uninfected MoDC. Further, activated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are not able to induce HLA DR up-regulation and CCR5 down-regulation on HIV-infected MoDC. These data indicate that HIV-infected DC alter the capacity of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells to respond to their antigens, pointing out a new mechanisms of induction of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells anergy carried out by HIV, that could contribute to immune evasion. PMID:25340508

  19. Type 1 IFN-independent activation of a subset of interferon stimulated genes in West Nile virus Eg101-infected mouse cells

    PubMed Central

    Pulit-Penaloza, Joanna A.; Scherbik, Svetlana V.; Brinton, Margo A.

    2012-01-01

    Although infection of mouse embryofibroblasts (MEFs) with WNV Eg101 induced interferon (IFN) beta production and STAT1 and STAT2 phosphorylation, these transcription factors (TFs) were not detected in the nucleus or on the promoters of four IRF-3-independent interferon stimulated genes (ISGs): Oas1a and Irf7 (previously characterized as IFN/ISGF3-dependent), Oas1b and Irf1. These ISGs were upregulated in WNV Eg101-infected STAT1−/−, STAT2−/−, and IFN alpha/beta receptor −/− MEFs. Although either IRF-3 or IRF-7 could amplify/sustain Oas1a and Oas1b upregulation at later times after infection, these factors were not required for the initial gene activation. The lack of upregulation of these ISGs in WNV Eg101-infected IRF-3/9−/− MEFs suggested the involvement of IRF-9. Activation of Irf1 in infected MEFs did not depend on any of these IRFs. The data indicate that additional alternative activation mechanisms exist for subsets of ISGs when a virus infection has blocked ISG activation by the canonical IFN-mediated pathway. PMID:22305622

  20. Type 1 IFN-independent activation of a subset of interferon stimulated genes in West Nile virus Eg101-infected mouse cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pulit-Penaloza, Joanna A.; Scherbik, Svetlana V.; Brinton, Margo A.

    2012-04-10

    Although infection of mouse embryofibroblasts (MEFs) with WNV Eg101 induced interferon (IFN) beta production and STAT1 and STAT2 phosphorylation, these transcription factors (TFs) were not detected in the nucleus or on the promoters of four IRF-3-independent interferon stimulated genes (ISGs): Oas1a and Irf7 (previously characterized as IFN/ISGF3-dependent), Oas1b and Irf1. These ISGs were upregulated in WNV Eg101-infected STAT1-/-, STAT2-/-, and IFN alpha/beta receptor -/- MEFs. Although either IRF-3 or IRF-7 could amplify/sustain Oas1a and Oas1b upregulation at later times after infection, these factors were not required for the initial gene activation. The lack of upregulation of these ISGs in WNV Eg101-infected IRF-3/9-/- MEFs suggested the involvement of IRF-9. Activation of Irf1 in infected MEFs did not depend on any of these IRFs. The data indicate that additional alternative activation mechanisms exist for subsets of ISGs when a virus infection has blocked ISG activation by the canonical IFN-mediated pathway.

  1. Ureaplasma parvum infection alters filamin a dynamics in host cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ureaplasmas are among the most common bacteria isolated from the human urogenital tract. Ureaplasmas can produce asymptomatic infections or disease characterized by an exaggerated inflammatory response. Most investigations have focused on elucidating the pathogenic potential of Ureaplasma species, but little attention has been paid to understanding the mechanisms by which these organisms are capable of establishing asymptomatic infection. Methods We employed differential proteome profiling of bladder tissues from rats experimentally infected with U. parvum in order to identify host cell processes perturbed by colonization with the microbe. Tissues were grouped into four categories: sham inoculated controls, animals that spontaneously cleared infection, asymptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI), and complicated UTI. One protein that was perturbed by infection (filamin A) was used to further elucidate the mechanism of U. parvum-induced disruption in human benign prostate cells (BPH-1). BPH-1 cells were evaluated by confocal microscopy, immunoblotting and ELISA. Results Bladder tissue from animals actively colonized with U. parvum displayed significant alterations in actin binding proteins (profilin 1, vinculin, α actinin, and filamin A) that regulate both actin polymerization and cell cytoskeletal function pertaining to focal adhesion formation and signal transduction (Fisher's exact test, P < 0.004; ANOVA, P < 0.02). This phenomenon was independent of clinical profile (asymptomatic vs. complicated UTI). We selected filamin A as a target for additional studies. In the BPH-1 model, we confirmed that U. parvum perturbed the regulation of filamin A. Specifically, infected BPH-1 cells exhibited a significant increase in filamin A phosphorylated at serine2152 (P ≤ 0.01), which correlated with impaired proteolysis of the protein and its normal intracellular distribution. Conclusion Filamin A dynamics were perturbed in both models of infection

  2. Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus Infects but Does Not Replicate in Nonhuman Primate Primary Cells and Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ritzhaupt, Armin; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; Salomon, Daniel R.; Wilson, Carolyn A.

    2002-01-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) can infect human cell lines in vitro; hence, there is a presumed risk of viral exposure to a recipient when pig cells are transplanted into humans (xenotransplantation). Nonhuman primates (NHP) are considered a potential permissive animal model to study the risk of in vivo infection of PERV after xenotransplantation. We set out to determine whether PERV can infect and replicate in NHP primary cells or established cell lines from African green monkey, rhesus macaque, and baboon. We confirm that the NHP cell lines under investigation were infected with PERV as measured by detection of viral DNA and RNA by PCR and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, respectively, indicating that a functional receptor must be present on the cell surface. However, the load of detectable viral DNA in infected NHP cells declined over time, and the cells never had detectable reverse transcriptase activity. Utilizing quantitative real-time TaqMan PCR we found detectable levels of unintegrated DNA intermediates, but the levels were approximately 100-fold lower compared to HEK 293 cells infected with PERV. Virions released from infected NHP cells could productively infect naïve human cell lines, HEK 293 and HeLa, as shown by RT-PCR and RT assay. However, naïve NHP cells remained negative in RT-PCR and RT assay after exposure to virions from infected NHP cells. Together our data demonstrate that NHP cells are not permissive to productive replication by PERV, presumably due to inefficient cell entry and replication. In light of these observations, the appropriateness of NHP as suitable animal models to study PERV infection in vivo needs to be reevaluated. PMID:12388691

  3. Mucosal SIV Vaccines Comprising Inactivated Virus Particles and Bacterial Adjuvants Induce CD8+ T-Regulatory Cells that Suppress SIV-Positive CD4+ T-Cell Activation and Prevent SIV Infection in the Macaque Model

    PubMed Central

    Andrieu, Jean-Marie; Chen, Song; Lai, Chunhui; Guo, Weizhong; Lu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    A new paradigm of mucosal vaccination against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been investigated in the macaque model. A vaccine consisting of inactivated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)mac239 particles together with a living bacterial adjuvant (either the Calmette and Guerin bacillus, Lactobacillus plantarum or Lactobacillus rhamnosus) was administered to macaques via the vaginal or oral/intragastric route. In contrast to all established human and veterinary vaccines, these three vaccine regimens did not elicit SIV-specific antibodies nor cytotoxic T-lymphocytes but induced a previously unrecognized population of non-cytolytic MHCIb/E-restricted CD8+ T-regulatory cells that suppressed the activation of SIV-positive CD4+ T-lymphocytes. SIV reverse transcription was thereby blocked in inactivated CD4+ T-cells; the initial burst of virus replication was prevented and the vaccinated macaques were protected from a challenge infection. For 3–14 months after intragastric immunization, 24 macaques were challenged intrarectally with a high dose of SIVmac239 or with the heterologous strain SIV B670 (both strains grown on macaques PBMC). Twenty-three of these animals were found to be protected for up to 48 months while all 24 control macaques became infected. This protective effect against SIV challenge together with the concomitant identification of a robust ex vivo correlate of protection suggests a new approach for developing an HIV vaccine in humans. The induction of this new class of CD8+ T-regulatory cells could also possibly be used therapeutically for suppressing HIV replication in infected patients and this novel tolerogenic vaccine paradigm may have potential applications for treating a wide range of immune disorders and is likely to may have profound implications across immunology generally. PMID:25071760

  4. Molecular characteristics of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in human immunodeficiency virus-infected and -uninfected patients in the pre-highly active antiretroviral therapy and pre-rituximab era.

    PubMed

    Morton, Lindsay M; Kim, Clara J; Weiss, Lawrence M; Bhatia, Kishor; Cockburn, Myles; Hawes, Debra; Wang, Sophia S; Chang, Cindy; Altekruse, Sean F; Engels, Eric A; Cozen, Wendy

    2014-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection substantially elevates diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) risk, but its impact on the distinct DLBCL subtypes defined by cell of origin is unclear. We compared DLBCL molecular characteristics and prognosis in 51 HIV-infected and 116 HIV-uninfected cases diagnosed during 1977-2003. Using immunohistochemistry to classify cell of origin based on the Tally algorithm, activated B-cell (ABC)-DLBCL was substantially more common in HIV-infected (83%) than in HIV-uninfected (54%) cases (p < 0.001). Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was detected in 63% of DLBCLs in HIV-infected cases, occurring almost exclusively in ABC-DLBCL (74% vs. 13% of germinal center B-cell [GCB]-DLBCL, p = 0.002), but was rarely detected in DLBCLs among HIV-uninfected cases (3%). Among HIV-uninfected cases, MYC/IgH [t(8;14)(q24;q32)] and IgH/BCL2 [t(14;18)(q32;q21)] translocations were significantly more common and BCL6/IgH [t(3;14)(q27;q32)] significantly less common in GCB-DLBCL than in ABC-DLBCL (p = 0.010, < 0.001 and = 0.039, respectively). Among HIV-infected cases, translocations other than MYC/IgH [t(8;14)(q24;q32)] (21%) were rare (≤ 6%) and unrelated to cell of origin. ABC-DLBCL was associated with adverse overall survival compared with GCB-DLBCL regardless of HIV status (pHIV-infected = 0.066; pHIV-uninfected = 0.038). Our data demonstrate key differences in the molecular characteristics, cell of origin and prognosis of DLBCL by HIV status in the pre-highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and pre-rituximab era, supporting biologic differences in lymphomagenesis in the presence of HIV. PMID:23772639

  5. HIV-1 infection, microenvironment and endothelial cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mazzuca, Pietro; Caruso, Arnaldo; Caccuri, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    HIV-1 promotes a generalized immune activation that involves the main targets of HIV-1 infection but also cells that are not sensitive to viral infection. ECs display major dysfunctions in HIV+ patients during long-standing viral infection that persist even in the current cART era, in which new-generation drugs have reduced dysmetabolic side effects and successfully impeded viral replication. In vivo studies have failed to demonstrate the presence of replicating virus in ECs suggesting that a direct role of the virus is unlikely, and implying that the mechanism accounting for vascular dysfunction may rely on the indirect action of molecules released in the microenvironment by HIV-1-infected cells. This article reviews the current understanding of how HIV-1 infection can contribute to vascular dysfunction. In particular, we discuss the emerging role played by different HIV-1 proteins in driving inflammation and EC dysregulation, and highlight the need to target them for therapeutic benefit. PMID:27602413

  6. Dengue Virus Infection Causes the Activation of Distinct NF-κB Pathways for Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase and TNF-α Expression in RAW264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi-Lin; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chen, Chia-Ling; Wan, Shu-Wen; Ou, Yi-Dan; Yu, Chia-Yi; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Tseng, Po-Chun; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Infection with dengue virus (DENV) causes an increase in proinflammatory responses, such as nitric oxide (NO) generation and TNF-α expression; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this inflammatory activation remains undefined, although the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB is generally involved. In addition to TNF-α production in DENV-infected murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells, inducible NO synthase was transcriptionally and posttranslationally elevated and accompanied by NO generation. NF-κB is known to be activated by DENV infection. Pharmacologically inhibiting NF-κB activation abolishes iNOS/NO biosynthesis and TNF-α production. With inhibition, the potential role of NF-κB in oxidative signaling regulation was prevented during DENV infection. Heat-inactivated DENV failed to cause the identified inflammatory responses. Pharmacological inhibition of TLR3 partly decreased NF-κB activation; however, it effectively abolished inducible iNOS/NO biosynthesis but did not inhibit TNF-α production. In contrast to TLR3, viral protein NS2B3 also independently contributed to NF-κB activation to regulate TNF-α production. These results show the distinct pathways for NF-κB activation caused by DENV infection individually for the regulation of iNOS/NO and TNF-α expression. PMID:26199460

  7. Dengue Virus Infection Causes the Activation of Distinct NF-κB Pathways for Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase and TNF-α Expression in RAW264.7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yi-Lin; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chen, Chia-Ling; Wan, Shu-Wen; Ou, Yi-Dan; Yu, Chia-Yi; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Tseng, Po-Chun; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Infection with dengue virus (DENV) causes an increase in proinflammatory responses, such as nitric oxide (NO) generation and TNF-α expression; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this inflammatory activation remains undefined, although the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB is generally involved. In addition to TNF-α production in DENV-infected murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells, inducible NO synthase was transcriptionally and posttranslationally elevated and accompanied by NO generation. NF-κB is known to be activated by DENV infection. Pharmacologically inhibiting NF-κB activation abolishes iNOS/NO biosynthesis and TNF-α production. With inhibition, the potential role of NF-κB in oxidative signaling regulation was prevented during DENV infection. Heat-inactivated DENV failed to cause the identified inflammatory responses. Pharmacological inhibition of TLR3 partly decreased NF-κB activation; however, it effectively abolished inducible iNOS/NO biosynthesis but did not inhibit TNF-α production. In contrast to TLR3, viral protein NS2B3 also independently contributed to NF-κB activation to regulate TNF-α production. These results show the distinct pathways for NF-κB activation caused by DENV infection individually for the regulation of iNOS/NO and TNF-α expression. PMID:26199460

  8. LAG3 Expression in Active Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Bonnie L.; Mehra, Smriti; Ahsan, Muhammad H.; Selman, Moises; Khader, Shabaana A.; Kaushal, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a highly successful pathogen because of its ability to persist in human lungs for long periods of time. MTB modulates several aspects of the host immune response. Lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG3) is a protein with a high affinity for the CD4 receptor and is expressed mainly by regulatory T cells with immunomodulatory functions. To understand the function of LAG3 during MTB infection, a nonhuman primate model of tuberculosis, which recapitulates key aspects of natural human infection in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), was used. We show that the expression of LAG3 is highly induced in the lungs and particularly in the granulomatous lesions of macaques experimentally infected with MTB. Furthermore, we show that LAG3 expression is not induced in the lungs and lung granulomas of animals exhibiting latent tuberculosis infection. However, simian immunodeficiency virus–induced reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection results in an increased expression of LAG3 in the lungs. This response is not observed in nonhuman primates infected with non-MTB bacterial pathogens, nor with simian immunodeficiency virus alone. Our data show that LAG3 was expressed primarily on CD4+ T cells, presumably by regulatory T cells but also by natural killer cells. The expression of LAG3 coincides with high bacterial burdens and changes in the host type 1 helper T-cell response. PMID:25549835

  9. Alternatively Activated Mononuclear Phagocytes from the Skin Site of Infection and the Impact of IL-4Rα Signalling on CD4+T Cell Survival in Draining Lymph Nodes after Repeated Exposure to Schistosoma mansoni Cercariae.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, Catriona T; Sanin, David E; Mountford, Adrian P

    2016-08-01

    In a murine model of repeated exposure of the skin to infective Schistosoma mansoni cercariae, events leading to the priming of CD4 cells in the skin draining lymph nodes were examined. The dermal exudate cell (DEC) population recovered from repeatedly (4x) exposed skin contained an influx of mononuclear phagocytes comprising three distinct populations according to their differential expression of F4/80 and MHC-II. As determined by gene expression analysis, all three DEC populations (F4/80-MHC-IIhigh, F4/80+MHC-IIhigh, F4/80+MHC-IIint) exhibited major up-regulation of genes associated with alternative activation. The gene encoding RELMα (hallmark of alternatively activated cells) was highly up-regulated in all three DEC populations. However, in 4x infected mice deficient in RELMα, there was no change in the extent of inflammation at the skin infection site compared to 4x infected wild-type cohorts, nor was there a difference in the abundance of different mononuclear phagocyte DEC populations. The absence of RELMα resulted in greater numbers of CD4+ cells in the skin draining lymph nodes (sdLN) of 4x infected mice, although they remained hypo-responsive. Using mice deficient for IL-4Rα, in which alternative activation is compromised, we show that after repeated schistosome infection, levels of regulatory IL-10 in the skin were reduced, accompanied by increased numbers of MHC-IIhigh cells and CD4+ T cells in the skin. There were also increased numbers of CD4+ T cells in the sdLN in the absence of IL-4Rα compared to cells from singly infected mice. Although their ability to proliferate was still compromised, increased cellularity of sdLN from 4x IL-4RαKO mice correlated with reduced expression of Fas/FasL, resulting in decreased apoptosis and cell death but increased numbers of viable CD4+ T cells. This study highlights a mechanism through which IL-4Rα may regulate the immune system through the induction of IL-10 and regulation of Fas/FasL mediated cell death

  10. Alternatively Activated Mononuclear Phagocytes from the Skin Site of Infection and the Impact of IL-4Rα Signalling on CD4+T Cell Survival in Draining Lymph Nodes after Repeated Exposure to Schistosoma mansoni Cercariae

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, Catriona T.; Sanin, David E.; Mountford, Adrian P.

    2016-01-01

    In a murine model of repeated exposure of the skin to infective Schistosoma mansoni cercariae, events leading to the priming of CD4 cells in the skin draining lymph nodes were examined. The dermal exudate cell (DEC) population recovered from repeatedly (4x) exposed skin contained an influx of mononuclear phagocytes comprising three distinct populations according to their differential expression of F4/80 and MHC-II. As determined by gene expression analysis, all three DEC populations (F4/80-MHC-IIhigh, F4/80+MHC-IIhigh, F4/80+MHC-IIint) exhibited major up-regulation of genes associated with alternative activation. The gene encoding RELMα (hallmark of alternatively activated cells) was highly up-regulated in all three DEC populations. However, in 4x infected mice deficient in RELMα, there was no change in the extent of inflammation at the skin infection site compared to 4x infected wild-type cohorts, nor was there a difference in the abundance of different mononuclear phagocyte DEC populations. The absence of RELMα resulted in greater numbers of CD4+ cells in the skin draining lymph nodes (sdLN) of 4x infected mice, although they remained hypo-responsive. Using mice deficient for IL-4Rα, in which alternative activation is compromised, we show that after repeated schistosome infection, levels of regulatory IL-10 in the skin were reduced, accompanied by increased numbers of MHC-IIhigh cells and CD4+ T cells in the skin. There were also increased numbers of CD4+ T cells in the sdLN in the absence of IL-4Rα compared to cells from singly infected mice. Although their ability to proliferate was still compromised, increased cellularity of sdLN from 4x IL-4RαKO mice correlated with reduced expression of Fas/FasL, resulting in decreased apoptosis and cell death but increased numbers of viable CD4+ T cells. This study highlights a mechanism through which IL-4Rα may regulate the immune system through the induction of IL-10 and regulation of Fas/FasL mediated cell death

  11. Induction of apoptosis in frog virus 3-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Chinchar, V G; Bryan, Locke; Wang, J; Long, Scott; Chinchar, G D

    2003-02-15

    The ability of frog virus 3 (FV3), the type species of the family Iridoviridae, to induce apoptosis was examined by monitoring DNA cleavage, chromatin condensation, and cell-surface expression of phosphotidylserine (PS) in fathead minnow (FHM) and baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells. In productively infected FHM cells, DNA fragmentation was first noted at 6-7 h postinfection and was clearly seen by 17 h postinfection, while chromatin condensation was detected at 8.5 h postinfection. As with some other viruses, FV3-induced apoptosis did not require de novo viral gene expression as both heat-inactivated and UV-inactivated virus readily triggered DNA fragmentation in FHM cells. Moreover, FV3-induced apoptosis was blocked in FHM cells by the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK, suggesting that virus infection triggers programmed cell death through activation of the caspase cascade. FV3 infection also triggered apoptosis in BHK cells as monitored by TUNEL and annexin V binding assays. To determine whether FV3, similar to other large DNA viruses, encoded proteins that block or delay apoptosis, mock- and FV3-infected FHM cells were osmotically shocked and assayed for DNA fragmentation 3 hours later. DNA fragmentation was clearly seen whether or not shocked cells were previously infected with FV3, indicating that infection with FV3 did not block apoptosis induced by osmotic shock in FHM cells. The above results demonstrate that iridoviruses triggered apoptosis and that the induction of programmed cell death did not require viral gene expression. However, it remains to be determined if virion attachment to target cells is sufficient to induce cell death, or if apoptosis is triggered directly or indirectly by one or more virion-associated proteins. PMID:12642103

  12. NK Cell Subset Redistribution during the Course of Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lugli, Enrico; Marcenaro, Emanuela; Mavilio, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important effectors of innate immunity that play a critical role in the control of human viral infections. Indeed, given their capability to directly recognize virally infected cells without the need of specific antigen presentation, NK cells are on the first line of defense against these invading pathogens. By establishing cellular networks with a variety of cell types such as dendritic cells, NK cells can also amplify anti-viral adaptive immune responses. In turn, viruses evolved and developed several mechanisms to evade NK cell-mediated immune activity. It has been reported that certain viral diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus-1 as well as human cytomegalovirus infections, are associated with a pathologic redistribution of NK cell subsets in the peripheral blood. In particular, it has been observed the expansion of unconventional CD56neg NK cells, whose effector functions are significantly impaired as compared to that of conventional CD56pos NK cells. In this review, we address the impact of these two chronic viral infections on the functional and phenotypic perturbations of human NK cell compartment. PMID:25177322

  13. Phased activity in Heterorhabditis megidis infective juveniles.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, C M; Griffin, C T

    2002-06-01

    The infectivity of Heterorhabditis megidis infective juveniles (IJs) increases during storage in water. We investigated whether this change can be related to other features of the IJs' behaviour. IJs were stored in water for 4 weeks at 20 degrees C, and the following parameters were assessed at intervals: infectivity for Galleria mellonella, dispersal in sand, host-finding on agar, and the percentage of IJs active in water. In addition, the behaviour of the IJs in water was described using 7 categories. Immediately after emerging from the host cadaver, IJs were highly active (99% of IJs in water were active and 65% displayed 'waving', the normal method of forward movement). Maximum responsiveness to host volatiles in an agar plate assay was recorded on day 2 (69% of IJs moved from the point of application and 44% of all IJs in the agar arena moved towards a host) and maximum dispersal in sand (5.8 cm) on day 0. These tendencies declined gradually with age, while infectivity underwent a significant increase from 11 nematodes per insect on day 0 to 38 nematodes per insect on day 9. Three phases could be distinguished in the behaviour of H. megidis IJs: an initial dispersal phase, during which infectivity was low; an infective phase, during which dispersal tendency was declining, and a third phase during which all behaviours (dispersal, infectivity and activity) were declining. Over the 4-week storage period, infectivity of H. megidis IJs was correlated (R2 = 0.83) with the percentage time IJs engaged in 'head thrusting' (a behaviour that resembles penetration). There is no evidence that the observed increase in infectivity of H. megidis strain UK211 could be accounted for by a generally greater level of motor activity, nor by an increase in responsiveness to volatile host cues, and it is suggested that it is due to an increased tendency to attempt penetration. PMID:12118716

  14. Activity of DL-alpha-Difluoromethylarginine and Polyamine Analogues against Cryptosporidium parvum Infection in a T-Cell Receptor Alpha-Deficient Mouse Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The in vivo effectiveness of a series of conformationally restricted polyamine analogs alone and in combination with DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) towards a T-cell receptor-alpha deficient mouse model infection of Cryptosporidium parvum was tested. Polyamine analogues were constructed from ...

  15. In vivo activation of the intracrine vitamin D pathway in innate immune cells and mammary tissue during a bacterial infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The active vitamin D metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), is an important regulator of immune function. The enzyme that synthesizes 1,25(OH)2D3 from 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 is 1alpha-hydroxylase (1alpha-OHase; CYP27B1). Several in vitro studies have shown that TLR signaling induces expre...

  16. TMEM2 inhibits hepatitis B virus infection in HepG2 and HepG2.2.15 cells by activating the JAK-STAT signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X; Xie, C; Li, Y-M; Huang, Z-L; Zhao, Q-Y; Hu, Z-X; Wang, P-P; Gu, Y-R; Gao, Z-L; Peng, L

    2016-01-01

    We have previously observed the downregulation of TMEM2 in the liver tissue of patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and in HepG2.2.15 cells with HBV genomic DNA. In the present study, we investigated the role and mechanism of TMEM2 in HepG2 and HepG2.2.15 during HBV infection HepG2 and HepG2.2.15. HepG2 shTMEM2 cells with stable TMEM2 knockdown and HepG2 TMEM2 and HepG2.2.15 TMEM2 cells with stable TMEM2 overexpression were established using lentivirus vectors. We observed reduced expression of TMEM2 in HBV-infected liver tissues and HepG2.2.15 cells. HBsAg, HBcAg, HBV DNA, and HBV cccDNA levels were significantly increased in HepG2 shTMEM2 cells but decreased in HepG2 TMEM2 and HepG2.2.15 TMEM2 cells compared with naive HepG2 cells. On the basis of the western blotting results, the JAK-STAT signaling pathway was inhibited in HepG2 shTMEM2 cells but activated in HepG2 TMEM2 and HepG2.2.15 TMEM2 cells. In addition, reduced and increased expression of the antiviral proteins MxA and OAS1 was observed in TMEM2-silenced cells (HepG2 shTMEM2 cells) and TMEM2-overexpressing cells (HepG2 TMEM2 and HepG2.2.15 TMEM2 cells), respectively. The expression of Interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) was not affected by TMEM2. However, we found that overexpression and knockdown of TMEM2, respectively, promoted and inhibited importation of IRF9 into nuclei. The luciferase reporter assay showed that IRF9 nuclear translocation affected interferon-stimulated response element activities. In addition, the inhibitory effects of TMEM2 on HBV infection in HepG2 shTMEM2 cells was significantly enhanced by pre-treatment with interferon but significantly inhibited in HepG2.2.15 TMEM2 cells by pre-treatment with JAK1 inhibitor. TMEM2 inhibits HBV infection in HepG2 and HepG2.2.15 by activating the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. PMID:27253403

  17. Tracking and treating activated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, N.H.; Nadithe, V.; Elsayed, M.; Merkel, O.M.

    2014-01-01

    Upon activation, T cells of various subsets are the most important mediators in cell-mediated immune responses. Activated T cells play an important role in immune system related diseases such as chronic inflammatory diseases, viral infections, autoimmune disease, transplant rejection, Crohn disease, diabetes, and many more. Therefore, efforts have been made to both visualize and treat activated T cells specifically. This review summarizes imaging approaches and selective therapeutics for activated T cells and gives an outlook on how tracking and treating can be combined into theragnositc agents for activated T cells. PMID:24660025

  18. Activation of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in Colon-Draining Lymph Nodes during Citrobacter rodentium Infection Involves Pathogen-Sensing and Inflammatory Pathways Distinct from Conventional Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Toivonen, Raine; Kong, Lingjia; Rasool, Omid; Lund, Riikka J; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Hänninen, Arno

    2016-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) bear the main responsibility for initiation of adaptive immune responses necessary for antimicrobial immunity. In the small intestine, afferent lymphatics convey Ags and microbial signals to mesenteric lymph nodes (LNs) to induce adaptive immune responses against microbes and food Ags derived from the small intestine. Whether the large intestine is covered by the same lymphatic system or represents its own lymphoid compartment has not been studied until very recently. We identified three small mesenteric LNs, distinct from small intestinal LNs, which drain lymph specifically from the colon, and studied DC responses to the attaching and effacing pathogen Citrobacter rodentium in these. Transcriptional profiling of conventional (CD11c(high)CD103(high)) DC and plasmacytoid (plasmacytoid DC Ag-1(high)B220(+)CD11c(int)) DC (pDC) populations during steady-state conditions revealed activity of distinct sets of genes in these two DC subsets, both in small intestinal and colon-draining LNs. C. rodentium activated DC especially in colon-draining LNs, and gene expression changed in pDC more profoundly than in conventional DC. Among the genes most upregulated in pDC were C-type lectin receptor CLEC4E, IL-1Rs (IL-1R1 and -2), proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1a and IL-6), and TLR6. Our results indicate that colon immune surveillance is distinct from that of the small intestine in terms of draining LNs, and identify pDC as active sentinels of colonic inflammation and/or microbial dysbiosis. PMID:27183629

  19. Amino acid substitutions in the non-structural proteins 4A or 4B modulate the induction of autophagy in West Nile virus infected cells independently of the activation of the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Blázquez, Ana-Belén; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A.; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2015-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a neurotropic mosquito-borne flavivirus responsible for outbreaks of meningitis and encephalitis. Whereas the activation of autophagy in cells infected with other flaviviruses is well known, the interaction of WNV with the autophagic pathway still remains unclear and there are reports describing opposite findings obtained even analyzing the same viral strain. To clarify this controversy, we first analyzed the induction of autophagic features in cells infected with a panel of WNV strains. WNV was determined to induce autophagy in a strain dependent manner. We observed that all WNV strains or isolates analyzed, except for the WNV NY99 used, upregulated the autophagic pathway in infected cells. Interestingly, a variant derived from this WNV NY99 isolated from a persistently infected mouse increased LC3 modification and aggregation. Genome sequencing of this variant revealed only two non-synonymous nucleotide substitutions when compared to parental NY99 strain. These nucleotide substitutions introduced one amino acid replacement in NS4A and other in NS4B. Using genetically engineered viruses we showed that introduction of only one of these replacements was sufficient to upregulate the autophagic pathway. Thus, in this work we have shown that naturally occurring point mutations in the viral non-structural proteins NS4A and NS4B confer WNV with the ability to induce the hallmarks of autophagy such as LC3 modification and aggregation. Even more, the differences on the induction of an autophagic response observed among WNV variants in infected cells did not correlate with alterations on the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), suggesting an uncoupling of UPR and autophagy during flavivirus infection. The findings here reported could help to improve the knowledge of the cellular processes involved on flavivirus–host cell interactions and contribute to the design of effective strategies to combat these pathogens. PMID:25642225

  20. Cytokine/Chemokine Responses in Activated CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells Isolated from Peripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, and Axillary Lymph Nodes during Acute Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kenway-Lynch, Carys S.; Das, Arpita; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Understanding the cytokine/chemokine networks in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells during the acute phase of infection is crucial to design therapies for the control of early human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication. Here, we measured early changes in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the peripheral blood (PB), bone marrow (BM), and axillary lymph node (ALN) tissue of rhesus macaques infected with SIVMAC251. At 21 days after infection, all tissues showed a statistically significant loss of CD4+ T cells along with immune activation of CD8+ T cells in PB and ALN tissue. Twenty-eight different cytokines/chemokines were quantified in either anti-CD3/28 antibody- or staphylococcal enterotoxin B-stimulated single-positive CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. PB CD4+ T cells produced predominantly interleukin-2 (IL-2), whereas CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in tissues produced β-chemokines both before and 21 days after SIV infection. Tissues generally exhibited massive upregulation of many cytokines/chemokines following infection, possibly in an attempt to mitigate the loss of CD4+ T cells. There was no evidence of a T-helper 1 (TH1)-to-TH2 shift in CD4+ T cells or a T-cytotoxic 1 (TC1)-to-TC2 cytokine shift in CD8+ T cells in PB, BM, and ALN T-cell subsets during the acute phase of SIV infection. Despite the upregulation of several important effector cytokines/chemokines (IL-2, IL-12, IL-17, gamma interferon, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor) by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, upregulation of β-chemokines (CCL2 and CCL22), basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-basic), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and migration inhibition factor (MIF) may provide a poor prognosis either by inducing increased virus replication or by other unknown mechanisms. Therefore, drugs targeting β-chemokines (CCL2 and CCL22), FGF-basic, HGF, or MIF might be important for developing effective vaccines and therapeutics against HIV. IMPORTANCE Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV

  1. Regulation of cell survival and death during Flavivirus infections

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh Roy, Sounak; Sadigh, Beata; Datan, Emmanuel; Lockshin, Richard A; Zakeri, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Flaviviruses, ss(+) RNA viruses, include many of mankind’s most important pathogens. Their pathogenicity derives from their ability to infect many types of cells including neurons, to replicate, and eventually to kill the cells. Flaviviruses can activate tumor necrosis factor α and both intrinsic (Bax-mediated) and extrinsic pathways to apoptosis. Thus they can use many approaches for activating these pathways. Infection can lead to necrosis if viral load is extremely high or to other types of cell death if routes to apoptosis are blocked. Dengue and Japanese Encephalitis Virus can also activate autophagy. In this case the autophagy temporarily spares the infected cell, allowing a longer period of reproduction for the virus, and the autophagy further protects the cell against other stresses such as those caused by reactive oxygen species. Several of the viral proteins have been shown to induce apoptosis or autophagy on their own, independent of the presence of other viral proteins. Given the versatility of these viruses to adapt to and manipulate the metabolism, and thus to control the survival of, the infected cells, we need to understand much better how the specific viral proteins affect the pathways to apoptosis and autophagy. Only in this manner will we be able to minimize the pathology that they cause. PMID:24921001

  2. Regulation of NKT Cell Localization in Homeostasis and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Slauenwhite, Drew; Johnston, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a specialized subset of T lymphocytes that regulate immune responses in the context of autoimmunity, cancer, and microbial infection. Lipid antigens derived from bacteria, parasites, and fungi can be presented by CD1d molecules and recognized by the canonical T cell receptors on NKT cells. Alternatively, NKT cells can be activated through recognition of self-lipids and/or pro-inflammatory cytokines generated during infection. Unlike conventional T cells, only a small subset of NKT cells traffic through the lymph nodes under homeostatic conditions, with the largest NKT cell populations localizing to the liver, lungs, spleen, and bone marrow. This is thought to be mediated by differences in chemokine receptor expression profiles. However, the impact of infection on the tissue localization and function of NKT remains largely unstudied. This review focuses on the mechanisms mediating the establishment of peripheral NKT cell populations during homeostasis and how tissue localization of NKT cells is affected during infection. PMID:26074921

  3. Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection Increases Apoptosis and HIV-1 Replication in HIV-1 Infected Jurkat Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Tan, Jiying; Biswas, Santanu; Zhao, Jiangqin; Devadas, Krishnakumar; Ye, Zhiping; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus infection has a significant impact on public health, since it is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. It is not well-known whether influenza virus infection affects cell death and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 replication in HIV-1-infected patients. Using a lymphoma cell line, Jurkat, we examined the in vitro effects of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus (pH1N1) infection on cell death and HIV-1 RNA production in infected cells. We found that pH1N1 infection increased apoptotic cell death through Fas and Bax-mediated pathways in HIV-1-infected Jurkat cells. Infection with pH1N1 virus could promote HIV-1 RNA production by activating host transcription factors including nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-ĸB), nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) through mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathways and T-cell antigen receptor (TCR)-related pathways. The replication of HIV-1 latent infection could be reactivated by pH1N1 infection through TCR and apoptotic pathways. These data indicate that HIV-1 replication can be activated by pH1N1 virus in HIV-1-infected cells resulting in induction of cell death through apoptotic pathways. PMID:26848681

  4. Aberrant CD8+ T-cell responses and memory differentiation upon viral infection of an ataxia-telangiectasia mouse model driven by hyper-activated Akt and mTORC1 signaling.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Anthony D; Parish, Ian A; McKay, Sharen E; Kaech, Susan M; Shadel, Gerald S

    2011-06-01

    Immune system-related pathology is common in ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) patients and mice that lack the protein kinase, A-T mutated (ATM). However, it has not been studied how ATM influences immune responses to a viral infection. Using the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection model, we show that ATM(-/-) mice, despite having fewer naïve CD8⁺ T cells, effectively clear the virus. However, aberrant CD8⁺ T-cell responses are observed, including defective expansion and contraction, effector-to-memory differentiation, and a switch in viral-epitope immunodominance. T-cell receptor-activated, but not naïve, ATM(-/-) splenic CD8⁺ T cells have increased ribosomal protein S6 and Akt phosphorylation and do not proliferate well in response to IL-15, a cytokine important for memory T-cell development. Accordingly, pharmacological Akt or mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibition during T-cell receptor activation alone rescues the IL-15 proliferation defect. Finally, rapamycin treatment during LCMV infection in vivo increases the number of memory T cells in ATM(-/-) mice. Altogether, these results show that CD8⁺T cells lacking ATM have hyperactive Akt and mTORC1 signaling in response to T-cell receptor activation, which results in aberrant cytokine responses and memory T-cell development. We speculate that similar signaling defects contribute to the immune system pathology of A-T, and that inhibition of Akt and/or mTORC1 may be of therapeutic value. PMID:21641396

  5. Preventing Infections in Sickle Cell Disease: The Unfinished Business.

    PubMed

    Obaro, Stephen K; Tam, P Y Iroh

    2016-05-01

    While encapsulated bacterial agents, particularly Streptococcus pneumoniae, are recognized as important microbes that are associated with serious illness in hosts with sickle cell disease (SCD), multiple pathogens are implicated in infectious manifestations of SCD. Variations in clinical practice have been an obstacle to the universal implementation of infection preventive management through active, targeted vaccination of these individuals and routine usage of antibiotic prophylaxis. Paradoxically, in low-income settings, there is evidence that SCD also increases the risk for several other infections that warrant additional infection preventive measures. The infection preventive care among patients with SCD in developed countries does not easily translate to the adoption of these recommendations globally, which must take into account the local epidemiology of infections, available vaccines and population-specific vaccine efficacy, environment, health care behaviors, and cultural beliefs, as these are all factors that play a complex role in the manifestation of SCD and the prevention of infectious disease morbidity. PMID:26840500

  6. Toxoplasma gondii Actively Inhibits Neuronal Function in Chronically Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Haroon, Fahad; Händel, Ulrike; Angenstein, Frank; Goldschmidt, Jürgen; Kreutzmann, Peter; Lison, Holger; Fischer, Klaus-Dieter; Scheich, Henning; Wetzel, Wolfram; Schlüter, Dirk; Budinger, Eike

    2012-01-01

    Upon infection with the obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii, fast replicating tachyzoites infect a broad spectrum of host cells including neurons. Under the pressure of the immune response, tachyzoites convert into slow-replicating bradyzoites, which persist as cysts in neurons. Currently, it is unclear whether T. gondii alters the functional activity of neurons, which may contribute to altered behaviour of T. gondii–infected mice and men. In the present study we demonstrate that upon oral infection with T. gondii cysts, chronically infected BALB/c mice lost over time their natural fear against cat urine which was paralleled by the persistence of the parasite in brain regions affecting behaviour and odor perception. Detailed immunohistochemistry showed that in infected neurons not only parasitic cysts but also the host cell cytoplasm and some axons stained positive for Toxoplasma antigen suggesting that parasitic proteins might directly interfere with neuronal function. In fact, in vitro live cell calcium (Ca2+) imaging studies revealed that tachyzoites actively manipulated Ca2+ signalling upon glutamate stimulation leading either to hyper- or hypo-responsive neurons. Experiments with the endoplasmatic reticulum Ca2+ uptake inhibitor thapsigargin indicate that tachyzoites deplete Ca2+ stores in the endoplasmatic reticulum. Furthermore in vivo studies revealed that the activity-dependent uptake of the potassium analogue thallium was reduced in cyst harbouring neurons indicating their functional impairment. The percentage of non-functional neurons increased over time In conclusion, both bradyzoites and tachyzoites functionally silence infected neurons, which may significantly contribute to the altered behaviour of the host. PMID:22530040

  7. Toxoplasma gondii actively inhibits neuronal function in chronically infected mice.

    PubMed

    Haroon, Fahad; Händel, Ulrike; Angenstein, Frank; Goldschmidt, Jürgen; Kreutzmann, Peter; Lison, Holger; Fischer, Klaus-Dieter; Scheich, Henning; Wetzel, Wolfram; Schlüter, Dirk; Budinger, Eike

    2012-01-01

    Upon infection with the obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii, fast replicating tachyzoites infect a broad spectrum of host cells including neurons. Under the pressure of the immune response, tachyzoites convert into slow-replicating bradyzoites, which persist as cysts in neurons. Currently, it is unclear whether T. gondii alters the functional activity of neurons, which may contribute to altered behaviour of T. gondii-infected mice and men. In the present study we demonstrate that upon oral infection with T. gondii cysts, chronically infected BALB/c mice lost over time their natural fear against cat urine which was paralleled by the persistence of the parasite in brain regions affecting behaviour and odor perception. Detailed immunohistochemistry showed that in infected neurons not only parasitic cysts but also the host cell cytoplasm and some axons stained positive for Toxoplasma antigen suggesting that parasitic proteins might directly interfere with neuronal function. In fact, in vitro live cell calcium (Ca(2+)) imaging studies revealed that tachyzoites actively manipulated Ca(2+) signalling upon glutamate stimulation leading either to hyper- or hypo-responsive neurons. Experiments with the endoplasmatic reticulum Ca(2+) uptake inhibitor thapsigargin indicate that tachyzoites deplete Ca(2+) stores in the endoplasmatic reticulum. Furthermore in vivo studies revealed that the activity-dependent uptake of the potassium analogue thallium was reduced in cyst harbouring neurons indicating their functional impairment. The percentage of non-functional neurons increased over time In conclusion, both bradyzoites and tachyzoites functionally silence infected neurons, which may significantly contribute to the altered behaviour of the host. PMID:22530040

  8. N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate B cell activity in pre-clinical models: Implications for the immune response to infections.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Jarrett; Gowdy, Kymberly M; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2016-08-15

    B cell antigen presentation, cytokine production, and antibody production are targets of pharmacological intervention in inflammatory and infectious diseases. Here we review recent pre-clinical evidence demonstrating that pharmacologically relevant levels of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) derived from marine fish oils influence key aspects of B cell function through multiple mechanisms. N-3 PUFAs modestly diminish B cell mediated stimulation of classically defined naïve CD4(+) Th1 cells through the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II pathway. This is consistent with existing data showing that n-3 PUFAs suppress the activation of Th1/Th17 cells through direct effects on helper T cells and indirect effects on antigen presenting cells. Mechanistically, n-3 PUFAs lower antigen presentation and T cell signaling by disrupting the formation of lipid microdomains within the immunological synapse. We then review data to show that n-3 PUFAs boost B cell activation and antibody production in the absence and presence of antigen stimulation. This has potential benefits for several clinical populations such as the aged and obese that have poor humoral immunity. The mode of action by which n-3 PUFA boost B cell activation and antibody production remains unclear, but may involve Th2 cytokines, enhanced production of specialized proresolving lipid mediators, and targeting of protein lateral organization in lipid microdomains. Finally, we highlight evidence to show that different n-3 PUFAs are not biologically equivalent, which has implications for the development of future interventions to target B cell activity. PMID:26022530

  9. Quantitative Comparison of HTLV-1 and HIV-1 Cell-to-Cell Infection with New Replication Dependent Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Mazurov, Dmitriy; Ilinskaya, Anna; Heidecker, Gisela; Lloyd, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    We have developed an efficient method to quantify cell-to-cell infection with single-cycle, replication dependent reporter vectors. This system was used to examine the mechanisms of infection with HTLV-1 and HIV-1 vectors in lymphocyte cell lines. Effector cells transfected with reporter vector, packaging vector, and Env expression plasmid produced virus-like particles that transduced reporter gene activity into cocultured target cells with zero background. Reporter gene expression was detected exclusively in target cells and required an Env-expression plasmid and a viral packaging vector, which provided essential structural and enzymatic proteins for virus replication. Cell-cell fusion did not contribute to infection, as reporter protein was rarely detected in syncytia. Coculture of transfected Jurkat T cells and target Raji/CD4 B cells enhanced HIV-1 infection two fold and HTLV-1 infection ten thousand fold in comparison with cell-free infection of Raji/CD4 cells. Agents that interfere with actin and tubulin polymerization strongly inhibited HTLV-1 and modestly decreased HIV-1 cell-to-cell infection, an indication that cytoskeletal remodeling was more important for HTLV-1 transmission. Time course studies showed that HTLV-1 transmission occurred very rapidly after cell mixing, whereas slower kinetics of HIV-1 coculture infection implies a different mechanism of infectious transmission. HTLV-1 Tax was demonstrated to play an important role in altering cell-cell interactions that enhance virus infection and replication. Interestingly, superantigen-induced synapses between Jurkat cells and Raji/CD4 cells did not enhance infection for either HTLV-1 or HIV-1. In general, the dependence on cell-to-cell infection was determined by the virus, the effector and target cell types, and by the nature of the cell-cell interaction. PMID:20195464

  10. Peripheral Vγ9Vδ2 T Cells Are a Novel Reservoir of Latent HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Soriano-Sarabia, Natalia; Archin, Nancie M.; Bateson, Rosalie; Dahl, Noelle P.; Crooks, Amanda M.; Kuruc, JoAnn D.; Garrido, Carolina; Margolis, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Eradication of HIV infection will require the identification of all cellular reservoirs that harbor latent infection. Despite low or lack of CD4 receptor expression on Vδ2 T cells, infection of these cells has previously been reported. We found that upregulation of the CD4 receptor may render primary Vδ2 cells target for HIV infection in vitro and we propose that HIV-induced immune activation may allow infection of γδ T cells in vivo. We assessed the presence of latent HIV infection by measurements of DNA and outgrowth assays within Vδ2 cells in 18 aviremic patients on long-standing antiretroviral therapy. In 14 patients we recovered latent but replication-competent HIV from highly purified Vδ2 cells demonstrating that peripheral Vδ2 T cells are a previously unrecognized reservoir in which latent HIV infection is unexpectedly frequent. PMID:26473478

  11. Innate immune cell response upon Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yulin; Zhang, Lulu; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Jinyu; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Cao, Yongbing; Yan, Tianhua

    2016-07-01

    Candida albicans is a polymorphic fungus which is the predominant cause of superficial and deep tissue fungal infections. This microorganism has developed efficient strategies to invade the host and evade host defense systems. However, the host immune system will be prepared for defense against the microbe by recognition of receptors, activation of signal transduction pathways and cooperation of immune cells. As a consequence, C. albicans could either be eliminated by immune cells rapidly or disseminate hematogenously, leading to life-threatening systemic infections. The interplay between Candida albicans and the host is complex, requiring recognition of the invaded pathogens, activation of intricate pathways and collaboration of various immune cells. In this review, we will focus on the effects of innate immunity that emphasize the first line protection of host defense against invaded C. albicans including the basis of receptor-mediated recognition and the mechanisms of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:27078171

  12. Hypomethylation of host cell DNA synthesized after infection or transformation of cells by herpes simplex virus

    SciTech Connect

    Macnab, J.C.M.; Adams, R.L.P.; Rinaldi, A.; Orr, A.; Clark, L.

    1988-04-01

    Infection of rat embryo cells with herpes simplex virus type 2 caused undermethylation of host cell DNA synthesized during infection. DNA made prior to infection was not demethylated, but some of its degradation products, including methyl dCMP, were incorporated into viral DNA. The use of mutant virus showed that some viral DNA synthesis appears to be required for the inhibition of methylation. Inhibition of methylation cannot be explained by an absence of DNA methyltransferase as the activity of this enzyme did not change during the early period of infection. Inhibition of host cell DNA methylation may be an important step in the transformation of cells by herpesviruses, and various transformed cell lines tested showed reduced levels of DNA methylation.

  13. Dendritic Cells and Their Multiple Roles during Malaria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Kelly N. S.; Chagas, Daniele C. G.; Sulczewski, Fernando B.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in the initiation of adaptive immune responses, efficiently presenting antigens to T cells. This ability relies on the presence of numerous surface and intracellular receptors capable of sensing microbial components as well as inflammation and on a very efficient machinery for antigen presentation. In this way, DCs sense the presence of a myriad of pathogens, including Plasmodium spp., the causative agent of malaria. Despite many efforts to control this infection, malaria is still responsible for high rates of morbidity and mortality. Different groups have shown that DCs act during Plasmodium infection, and data suggest that the phenotypically distinct DCs subsets are key factors in the regulation of immunity during infection. In this review, we will discuss the importance of DCs for the induction of immunity against the different stages of Plasmodium, the outcomes of DCs activation, and also what is currently known about Plasmodium components that trigger such activation. PMID:27110574

  14. Dendritic Cells and Their Multiple Roles during Malaria Infection.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Kelly N S; Chagas, Daniele C G; Sulczewski, Fernando B; Boscardin, Silvia B

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in the initiation of adaptive immune responses, efficiently presenting antigens to T cells. This ability relies on the presence of numerous surface and intracellular receptors capable of sensing microbial components as well as inflammation and on a very efficient machinery for antigen presentation. In this way, DCs sense the presence of a myriad of pathogens, including Plasmodium spp., the causative agent of malaria. Despite many efforts to control this infection, malaria is still responsible for high rates of morbidity and mortality. Different groups have shown that DCs act during Plasmodium infection, and data suggest that the phenotypically distinct DCs subsets are key factors in the regulation of immunity during infection. In this review, we will discuss the importance of DCs for the induction of immunity against the different stages of Plasmodium, the outcomes of DCs activation, and also what is currently known about Plasmodium components that trigger such activation. PMID:27110574

  15. Cell-mediated cytotoxicity of bovine mononuclear cells to IBRV-infected cells: dependence on Sephadex G-10 adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Campos, M; Rossi, C R

    1985-04-01

    Following intranasal inoculation of cattle with infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (IBRV) mononuclear cells that produced a genetically unrestricted cytotoxic response against IBRV-infected, but not against uninfected cells, were present in peripheral blood. Cytotoxicity was detected between 6 and 14 days after primary infection in a 20 h, but not in a 5 h, 51Cr-release assay. Cytotoxic activity was present in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from infected and subsequently hyperimmunized cattle for a considerably longer time. Neither natural cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity, nor antibody produced during the assay was responsible for the cytotoxicity. However, cytotoxicity was dependent upon an adherent mononuclear cell that was partially removed by passage over nylon wool and completely removed by passage over Sephadex G-10. PMID:2408374

  16. Infection in sickle cell disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Booth, Catherine; Inusa, Baba; Obaro, Stephen K

    2010-01-01

    Infection is a significant contributor to morbidity and mortality in sickle cell disease (SCD). The sickle gene confers an increased susceptibility to infection, especially to certain bacterial pathogens, and at the same time infection provokes a cascade of SCD-specific pathophysiological changes. Historically, infection is a major cause of mortality in SCD, particularly in children, and it was implicated in 20-50% of deaths in prospective cohort studies over the last 20 years. Worldwide, it remains the leading cause of death, particularly in less developed nations. In developed countries, measures to prevent and effectively treat infection have made a substantial contribution to improvements in survival and quality of life, and are continually being developed and extended. However, progress continues to lag in less developed countries where the patterns of morbidity and mortality are less well defined and implementation of preventive care is poor. This review provides an overview of how SCD increases susceptibility to infections, the underlying mechanisms for susceptibility to specific pathogens, and how infection modifies the outcome of SCD. It also highlights the challenges in reducing the global burden of mortality in SCD. PMID:19497774

  17. Alteration of cell cycle progression by Sindbis virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Ruirong; Saito, Kengo; Isegawa, Naohisa; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2015-07-10

    We examined the impact of Sindbis virus (SINV) infection on cell cycle progression in a cancer cell line, HeLa, and a non-cancerous cell line, Vero. Cell cycle analyses showed that SINV infection is able to alter the cell cycle progression in both HeLa and Vero cells, but differently, especially during the early stage of infection. SINV infection affected the expression of several cell cycle regulators (CDK4, CDK6, cyclin E, p21, cyclin A and cyclin B) in HeLa cells and caused HeLa cells to accumulate in S phase during the early stage of infection. Monitoring SINV replication in HeLa and Vero cells expressing cell cycle indicators revealed that SINV which infected HeLa cells during G{sub 1} phase preferred to proliferate during S/G{sub 2} phase, and the average time interval for viral replication was significantly shorter in both HeLa and Vero cells infected during G{sub 1} phase than in cells infected during S/G{sub 2} phase. - Highlights: • SINV infection was able to alter the cell cycle progression of infected cancer cells. • SINV infection can affect the expression of cell cycle regulators. • SINV infection exhibited a preference for the timing of viral replication among the cell cycle phases.

  18. HIV-1 Trans Infection of CD4+ T Cells by Professional Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldo, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1990s we have known of the fascinating ability of a complex set of professional antigen presenting cells (APCs; dendritic cells, monocytes/macrophages, and B lymphocytes) to mediate HIV-1 trans infection of CD4+ T cells. This results in a burst of virus replication in the T cells that is much greater than that resulting from direct, cis infection of either APC or T cells, or trans infection between T cells. Such APC-to-T cell trans infection first involves a complex set of virus subtype, attachment, entry, and replication patterns that have many similarities among APC, as well as distinct differences related to virus receptors, intracellular trafficking, and productive and nonproductive replication pathways. The end result is that HIV-1 can sequester within the APC for several days and be transmitted via membrane extensions intracellularly and extracellularly to T cells across the virologic synapse. Virus replication requires activated T cells that can develop concurrently with the events of virus transmission. Further research is essential to fill the many gaps in our understanding of these trans infection processes and their role in natural HIV-1 infection. PMID:24278768

  19. Secretion of Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae Proteins into Infected Cells Suggests an Active Role of Microsporidia in the Control of Host Programs and Metabolic Processes

    PubMed Central

    Senderskiy, Igor V.; Timofeev, Sergey A.; Seliverstova, Elena V.; Pavlova, Olga A.; Dolgikh, Viacheslav V.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular tools of the intracellular protozoan pathogens Apicomplexa and Kinetoplastida for manipulation of host cell machinery have been the focus of investigation for approximately two decades. Microsporidia, fungi-related microorganisms forming another large group of obligate intracellular parasites, are characterized by development in direct contact with host cytoplasm (the majority of species), strong minimization of cell machinery, and acquisition of unique transporters to exploit host metabolic system. All the aforementioned features are suggestive of the ability of microsporidia to modify host metabolic and regulatory pathways. Seven proteins of the microsporidium Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae with predicted signal peptides but without transmembrane domains were overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Western-blot analysis with antibodies against recombinant products showed secretion of parasite proteins from different functional categories into the infected host cell. Secretion of parasite hexokinase and α/β-hydrolase was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, this method showed specific accumulation of A. locustae hexokinase in host nuclei. Expression of hexokinase, trehalase, and two leucine-rich repeat proteins without any exogenous signal peptide led to their secretion in the yeast Pichia pastoris. In contrast, α/β-hydrolase was not found in the culture medium, though a significant amount of this enzyme accumulated in the yeast membrane fraction. These results suggest that microsporidia possess a broad set of enzymes and regulatory proteins secreted into infected cells to control host metabolic processes and molecular programs. PMID:24705470

  20. Secretion of Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae proteins into infected cells suggests an active role of microsporidia in the control of host programs and metabolic processes.

    PubMed

    Senderskiy, Igor V; Timofeev, Sergey A; Seliverstova, Elena V; Pavlova, Olga A; Dolgikh, Viacheslav V

    2014-01-01

    Molecular tools of the intracellular protozoan pathogens Apicomplexa and Kinetoplastida for manipulation of host cell machinery have been the focus of investigation for approximately two decades. Microsporidia, fungi-related microorganisms forming another large group of obligate intracellular parasites, are characterized by development in direct contact with host cytoplasm (the majority of species), strong minimization of cell machinery, and acquisition of unique transporters to exploit host metabolic system. All the aforementioned features are suggestive of the ability of microsporidia to modify host metabolic and regulatory pathways. Seven proteins of the microsporidium Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae with predicted signal peptides but without transmembrane domains were overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Western-blot analysis with antibodies against recombinant products showed secretion of parasite proteins from different functional categories into the infected host cell. Secretion of parasite hexokinase and α/β-hydrolase was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, this method showed specific accumulation of A. locustae hexokinase in host nuclei. Expression of hexokinase, trehalase, and two leucine-rich repeat proteins without any exogenous signal peptide led to their secretion in the yeast Pichia pastoris. In contrast, α/β-hydrolase was not found in the culture medium, though a significant amount of this enzyme accumulated in the yeast membrane fraction. These results suggest that microsporidia possess a broad set of enzymes and regulatory proteins secreted into infected cells to control host metabolic processes and molecular programs. PMID:24705470

  1. Antiviral Innate Immune Activation in HIV-Infected Adults Negatively Affects H1/IC31-Induced Vaccine-Specific Memory CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Nicole; Schindler, Tobias; Kagina, Benjamin M; Zhang, Jitao David; Lukindo, Tedson; Mpina, Maxmillian; Bang, Peter; Kromann, Ingrid; Hoff, Søren T; Andersen, Peter; Reither, Klaus; Churchyard, Gavin J; Certa, Ulrich; Daubenberger, Claudia A

    2015-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health problem, with vaccination being a necessary strategy for disease containment and elimination. A TB vaccine should be safe and immunogenic as well as efficacious in all affected populations, including HIV-infected individuals. We investigated the induction and maintenance of vaccine-induced memory CD4(+) T cells following vaccination with the subunit vaccine H1/IC31. H1/IC31 was inoculated twice on study days 0 and 56 among HIV-infected adults with CD4(+) lymphocyte counts of >350 cells/mm(3). Whole venous blood stimulation was conducted with the H1 protein, and memory CD4(+) T cells were analyzed using intracellular cytokine staining and polychromatic flow cytometry. We identified high responders, intermediate responders, and nonresponders based on detection of interleukin-2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) expressing central (TCM) and effector memory CD4(+) T cells (TEM) 182 days after the first immunization. Amplicon-based transcript quantification using next-generation sequencing was performed to identify differentially expressed genes that correlated with vaccine-induced immune responses. Genes implicated in resolution of inflammation discriminated the responders from the nonresponders 3 days after the first inoculation. The volunteers with higher expression levels of genes involved in antiviral innate immunity at baseline showed impaired H1-specific TCM and TEM maintenance 6 months after vaccination. Our study showed that in HIV-infected volunteers, expression levels of genes involved in the antiviral innate immune response affected long-term maintenance of H1/IC31 vaccine-induced cellular immunity. (The clinical trial was registered in the Pan African Clinical Trials Registry [PACTR] with the identifier PACTR201105000289276.). PMID:25924764

  2. Antiviral Innate Immune Activation in HIV-Infected Adults Negatively Affects H1/IC31-Induced Vaccine-Specific Memory CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Nicole; Schindler, Tobias; Kagina, Benjamin M.; Zhang, Jitao David; Lukindo, Tedson; Mpina, Maxmillian; Bang, Peter; Kromann, Ingrid; Hoff, Søren T.; Andersen, Peter; Reither, Klaus; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Certa, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health problem, with vaccination being a necessary strategy for disease containment and elimination. A TB vaccine should be safe and immunogenic as well as efficacious in all affected populations, including HIV-infected individuals. We investigated the induction and maintenance of vaccine-induced memory CD4+ T cells following vaccination with the subunit vaccine H1/IC31. H1/IC31 was inoculated twice on study days 0 and 56 among HIV-infected adults with CD4+ lymphocyte counts of >350 cells/mm3. Whole venous blood stimulation was conducted with the H1 protein, and memory CD4+ T cells were analyzed using intracellular cytokine staining and polychromatic flow cytometry. We identified high responders, intermediate responders, and nonresponders based on detection of interleukin-2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) expressing central (TCM) and effector memory CD4+ T cells (TEM) 182 days after the first immunization. Amplicon-based transcript quantification using next-generation sequencing was performed to identify differentially expressed genes that correlated with vaccine-induced immune responses. Genes implicated in resolution of inflammation discriminated the responders from the nonresponders 3 days after the first inoculation. The volunteers with higher expression levels of genes involved in antiviral innate immunity at baseline showed impaired H1-specific TCM and TEM maintenance 6 months after vaccination. Our study showed that in HIV-infected volunteers, expression levels of genes involved in the antiviral innate immune response affected long-term maintenance of H1/IC31 vaccine-induced cellular immunity. (The clinical trial was registered in the Pan African Clinical Trials Registry [PACTR] with the identifier PACTR201105000289276.) PMID:25924764

  3. Activation of the PI3K-Akt pathway by human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) oncoprotein Tax increases Bcl3 expression, which is associated with enhanced growth of HTLV-1-infected T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Kousuke; Saito, Mineki; Taniura, Naoko; Okuwa, Takako; Ohara, Yoshiro

    2010-08-01

    Bcl3 is a member of the I{kappa}B family that regulates genes involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis. Recent reports indicated that Bcl3 is overexpressed in HTLV-1-infected T cells via Tax-mediated transactivation, and acts as a negative regulator of viral transcription. However, the role of Bcl3 in cellular signal transduction and the growth of HTLV-1-infected T cells have not been reported. In this study, we showed that the knockdown of Bcl3 by short hairpin RNA inhibited the growth of HTLV-1-infected T cells. Although phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor reduced Bcl3 expression, inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), an effector kinase of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, restored Bcl3 expression in Tax-negative but not in Tax-positive T cells. Our results indicate that the overexpression of Bcl3 in HTLV-1-infected T cells is regulated not only by transcriptional but also by post-transcriptional mechanisms, and is involved in overgrowth of HTLV-1-infected T cells.

  4. 6K2-induced vesicles can move cell to cell during turnip mosaic virus infection.

    PubMed

    Grangeon, Romain; Jiang, Jun; Wan, Juan; Agbeci, Maxime; Zheng, Huanquan; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    To successfully infect plants, viruses replicate in an initially infected cell and then move to neighboring cells through plasmodesmata (PDs). However, the nature of the viral entity that crosses over the cell barrier into non-infected ones is not clear. The membrane-associated 6K2 protein of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) induces the formation of vesicles involved in the replication and intracellular movement of viral RNA. This study shows that 6K2-induced vesicles trafficked toward the plasma membrane and were associated with plasmodesmata (PD). We demonstrated also that 6K2 moved cell-to-cell into adjoining cells when plants were infected with TuMV. 6K2 was then fused to photo-activable GFP (6K2:PAGFP) to visualize how 6K2 moved intercellularly during TuMV infection. After activation, 6K2:PAGFP-tagged vesicles moved to the cell periphery and across the cell wall into adjacent cells. These vesicles were shown to contain the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and viral RNA. Symplasmic movement of TuMV may thus be achieved in the form of a membrane-associated viral RNA complex induced by 6K2. PMID:24409170

  5. Glycolytic control of vacuolar-type ATPase activity: A mechanism to regulate influenza viral infection

    SciTech Connect

    Kohio, Hinissan P.; Adamson, Amy L.

    2013-09-15

    As new influenza virus strains emerge, finding new mechanisms to control infection is imperative. In this study, we found that we could control influenza infection of mammalian cells by altering the level of glucose given to cells. Higher glucose concentrations induced a dose-specific increase in influenza infection. Linking influenza virus infection with glycolysis, we found that viral replication was significantly reduced after cells were treated with glycolytic inhibitors. Addition of extracellular ATP after glycolytic inhibition restored influenza infection. We also determined that higher levels of glucose promoted the assembly of the vacuolar-type ATPase within cells, and increased vacuolar-type ATPase proton-transport activity. The increase of viral infection via high glucose levels could be reversed by inhibition of the proton pump, linking glucose metabolism, vacuolar-type ATPase activity, and influenza viral infection. Taken together, we propose that altering glucose metabolism may be a potential new approach to inhibit influenza viral infection. - Highlights: • Increased glucose levels increase Influenza A viral infection of MDCK cells. • Inhibition of the glycolytic enzyme hexokinase inhibited Influenza A viral infection. • Inhibition of hexokinase induced disassembly the V-ATPase. • Disassembly of the V-ATPase and Influenza A infection was bypassed with ATP. • The state of V-ATPase assembly correlated with Influenza A infection of cells.

  6. Solar cell activation system

    SciTech Connect

    Apelian, L.

    1983-07-05

    A system for activating solar cells involves the use of phosphorescent paint, the light from which is amplified by a thin magnifying lens and used to activate solar cells. In a typical system, a member painted with phosphorescent paint is mounted adjacent a thin magnifying lens which focuses the light on a predetermined array of sensitive cells such as selenium, cadmium or silicon, mounted on a plastic board. A one-sided mirror is mounted adjacent the cells to reflect the light back onto said cells for purposes of further intensification. The cells may be coupled to rechargeable batteries or used to directly power a small radio or watch.

  7. Glycosaminoglycan receptors facilitate infection of mammalian cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A growing list of viruses has been reported to use more than one receptor for binding and internalization during infection of the host cell. Sialic acid residues or glycosaminoglycans, such as heparin sulfate, frequently function in this scenario, as a first contact, charge based, low affinity bindi...

  8. Cells in Dengue Virus Infection In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Noisakran, Sansanee; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Songprakhon, Pucharee; Hsiao, Hui-Mien; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Perng, Guey Chuen

    2010-01-01

    Dengue has been recognized as one of the most important vector-borne emerging infectious diseases globally. Though dengue normally causes a self-limiting infection, some patients may develop a life-threatening illness, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF)/dengue shock syndrome (DSS). The reason why DHF/DSS occurs in certain individuals is unclear. Studies in the endemic regions suggest that the preexisting antibodies are a risk factor for DHF/DSS. Viremia and thrombocytopenia are the key clinical features of dengue virus infection in patients. The amounts of virus circulating in patients are highly correlated with severe dengue disease, DHF/DSS. Also, the disturbance, mainly a transient depression, of hematological cells is a critical clinical finding in acute dengue patients. However, the cells responsible for the dengue viremia are unresolved in spite of the intensive efforts been made. Dengue virus appears to replicate and proliferate in many adapted cell lines, but these in vitro properties are extremely difficult to be reproduced in primary cells or in vivo. This paper summarizes reports on the permissive cells in vitro and in vivo and suggests a hematological cell lineage for dengue virus infection in vivo, with the hope that a new focus will shed light on further understanding of the complexities of dengue disease. PMID:22331984

  9. Spectroscopic investigation of herpes simplex viruses infected cells and their response to antiviral therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erukhimovitch, Vitaly; Talyshinsky, Marina; Souprun, Yelena; Huleihel, Mahmoud

    2006-07-01

    In the present study, we used microscopic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to evaluate the antiviral activity of known antiviral agents against herpes viruses. The antiviral activity of Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) (which is an active compound of propolis) against herpes simplex type 1 and 2 was examined in cell culture. The advantage of microscopic FTIR spectroscopy over conventional FTIR spectroscopy is that it facilitates inspection of restricted regions of cell culture or tissue. Our results showed significant spectral differences at early stages of infection between infected and non-infected cells, and between infected cells treated with the used antiviral agent and those not treated. In infected cells, there was a considerable increase in phosphate levels. Our results show that treatment with used antiviral agent considerably abolish the spectral changes induced by the viral infection. In addition, it is possible to track by FTIR microscopy method the deferential effect of various doses of the drug.

  10. Bioactive activities of natural products against herpesvirus infection.

    PubMed

    Son, Myoungki; Lee, Minjung; Sung, Gi-Ho; Lee, Taeho; Shin, Yu Su; Cho, Hyosun; Lieberman, Paul M; Kang, Hyojeung

    2013-10-01

    More than 90% of adults have been infected with at least one human herpesvirus, which establish long-term latent infection for the life of the host. While anti-viral drugs exist that limit herpesvirus replication, many of these are ineffective against latent infection. Moreover, drug-resistant strains of herpesvirus emerge following chemotherapeutic treatment. For example, resistance to acyclovir and related nucleoside analogues can occur when mutations arise in either HSV thymidine kinase or DNA polymerases. Thus, there exists an unmet medical need to develop new anti-herpesvirus agents with different mechanisms of action. In this Review, we discuss the promise of anti-herpetic substances derived from natural products including extracts and pure compounds from potential herbal medicines. One example is Glycyrrhizic acid isolated from licorice that shows promising antiviral activity towards human gammaherpesviruses. Secondly, we discuss anti-herpetic mechanisms utilized by several natural products in molecular level. While nucleoside analogues inhibit replicating herpesviruses in lytic replication, some natural products can disrupt the herpesvirus latent infection in the host cell. In addition, natural products can stimulate immune responses against herpesviral infection. These findings suggest that natural products could be one of the best choices for development of new treatments for latent herpesvirus infection, and may provide synergistic anti-viral activity when supplemented with nucleoside analogues. Therefore, it is important to identify which natural products are more efficacious anti-herpetic agents, and to understand the molecular mechanism in detail for further advance in the anti-viral therapies. PMID:24173639

  11. Selective culling of high avidity antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection

    PubMed Central

    Ertelt, James M; Johanns, Tanner M; Mysz, Margaret A; Nanton, Minelva R; Rowe, Jared H; Aguilera, Marijo N; Way, Sing Sing

    2011-01-01

    Typhoid fever is a persistent infection caused by host-adapted Salmonella strains adept at circumventing immune-mediated host defences. Given the importance of T cells in protection, the culling of activated CD4+ T cells after primary infection has been proposed as a potential immune evasion strategy used by this pathogen. We demonstrate that the purging of activated antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection requires SPI-2 encoded virulence determinants, and is not restricted only to cells with specificity to Salmonella-expressed antigens, but extends to CD4+ T cells primed to expand by co-infection with recombinant Listeria monocytogenes. Unexpectedly, however, the loss of activated CD4+ T cells during Salmonella infection demonstrated using a monoclonal population of adoptively transferred CD4+ T cells was not reproduced among the endogenous repertoire of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells identified with MHC class II tetramer. Analysis of T-cell receptor variable segment usage revealed the selective loss and reciprocal enrichment of defined CD4+ T-cell subsets after Salmonella co-infection that is associated with the purging of antigen-specific cells with the highest intensity of tetramer staining. Hence, virulent Salmonella triggers the selective culling of high avidity activated CD4+ T-cell subsets, which re-shapes the repertoire of antigen-specific T cells that persist later after infection. PMID:22044420

  12. Coxsackievirus A16 Infection Induces Neural Cell and Non-Neural Cell Apoptosis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Wei, Zhenhong; Ehrlich, Elana S.; Liu, Guanchen; Li, Jingliang; Liu, Xin; Wang, Hong; Yu, Xiao-fang; Zhang, Wenyan

    2014-01-01

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) is one of the main causative pathogens of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Viral replication typically results in host cell apoptosis. Although CA16 infection has been reported to induce apoptosis in the human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cell line, it remains unclear whether CA16 induces apoptosis in diverse cell types, especially neural cells which have important clinical significance. In the current study, CA16 infection was found to induce similar apoptotic responses in both neural cells and non-neural cells in vitro, including nuclear fragmentation, DNA fragmentation and phosphatidylserine translocation. CA16 generally is not known to lead to serious neurological symptoms in vivo. In order to further clarify the correlation between clinical symptoms and cell apoptosis, two CA16 strains from patients with different clinical features were investigated. The results showed that both CA16 strains with or without neurological symptoms in infected patients led to neural and muscle cell apoptosis. Furthermore, mechanistic studies showed that CA16 infection induced apoptosis through the same mechanism in both neural and non-neural cells, namely via activation of both the mitochondrial (intrinsic) pathway-related caspase 9 protein and the Fas death receptor (extrinsic) pathway-related caspase 8 protein. Understanding the mechanisms by which CA16 infection induces apoptosis in both neural and non-neural cells will facilitate a better understanding of CA16 pathogenesis. PMID:25350381

  13. Bioactive Molecules Released From Cells Infected with the Human Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Luganini, Anna; Terlizzi, Maria E.; Gribaudo, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Following primary infection in humans, the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) persists in a latent state throughout the host’s lifetime despite a strong and efficient immune response. If the host experiences some form of immune dysregulation, such as immunosuppression or immunodeficiency, HCMV reactivates, thereby emerging from latency. Thus, in the absence of effective functional immune responses, as occurs in immunocompromised or immunoimmature individuals, both HCMV primary infections and reactivations from latency can cause significant morbidity and mortality. However, even in immunocompetent hosts, HCMV represents a relevant risk factor for the development of several chronic inflammatory diseases and certain forms of neoplasia. HCMV infection may shift between the lytic and latent state, regulated by a delicate and intricate balance between virus-mediated immunomodulation and host immune defenses. Indeed, HCMV is a master in manipulating innate and adaptive host defense pathways, and a large portion of its genome is devoted to encoding immunomodulatory proteins; such proteins may thus represent important virulence determinants. However, the pathogenesis of HCMV-related diseases is strengthened by the activities of bioactive molecules, of both viral and cellular origin, that are secreted from infected cells and collectively named as the secretome. Here, we review the state of knowledge on the composition and functions of HCMV-derived secretomes. In lytic infections of fibroblasts and different types of endothelial cells, the majority of HCMV-induced secreted proteins act in a paracrine fashion to stimulate the generation of an inflammatory microenvironment around infected cells; this may lead to vascular inflammation and angiogenesis that, in turn, foster HCMV replication and its dissemination through host tissues. Conversely, the HCMV secretome derived from latently infected hematopoietic progenitor cells induces an immunosuppressive extracellular environment that

  14. Bioactive Molecules Released From Cells Infected with the Human Cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Luganini, Anna; Terlizzi, Maria E; Gribaudo, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Following primary infection in humans, the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) persists in a latent state throughout the host's lifetime despite a strong and efficient immune response. If the host experiences some form of immune dysregulation, such as immunosuppression or immunodeficiency, HCMV reactivates, thereby emerging from latency. Thus, in the absence of effective functional immune responses, as occurs in immunocompromised or immunoimmature individuals, both HCMV primary infections and reactivations from latency can cause significant morbidity and mortality. However, even in immunocompetent hosts, HCMV represents a relevant risk factor for the development of several chronic inflammatory diseases and certain forms of neoplasia. HCMV infection may shift between the lytic and latent state, regulated by a delicate and intricate balance between virus-mediated immunomodulation and host immune defenses. Indeed, HCMV is a master in manipulating innate and adaptive host defense pathways, and a large portion of its genome is devoted to encoding immunomodulatory proteins; such proteins may thus represent important virulence determinants. However, the pathogenesis of HCMV-related diseases is strengthened by the activities of bioactive molecules, of both viral and cellular origin, that are secreted from infected cells and collectively named as the secretome. Here, we review the state of knowledge on the composition and functions of HCMV-derived secretomes. In lytic infections of fibroblasts and different types of endothelial cells, the majority of HCMV-induced secreted proteins act in a paracrine fashion to stimulate the generation of an inflammatory microenvironment around infected cells; this may lead to vascular inflammation and angiogenesis that, in turn, foster HCMV replication and its dissemination through host tissues. Conversely, the HCMV secretome derived from latently infected hematopoietic progenitor cells induces an immunosuppressive extracellular environment that

  15. Anticoccidial activities of Chitosan on Eimeria papillata-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Latif, Mahmoud; Abdel-Haleem, Heba M; Abdel-Baki, Abdel-Azeem S

    2016-07-01

    Eimeria spp. multiply within the intestinal tract causing severe inflammatory responses. Chitosan (CS), meanwhile, has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory activities in different experimental models. Here, we investigated the effect of CS on the outcome of inflammation caused by Eimeria papillata in the mouse intestine. Investigations were undertaken into the oocyst output in feces and developmental stages and goblet cells in intestinal tissue. Assays for lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide (NO), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were also performed. T cells in intestinal tissue were counted using immunohistochemistry while total IgA in serum or intestinal wash was assayed using ELISA. In addition, mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-4 were detected using real-time PCR. The data indicated a reduction in both oocyst output and in the number of parasite developmental stages following CS treatment, while the goblet cell hypoplasia in infected mice was also inhibited. CS decreased lipid peroxidation, NO, and MPO but did not alter the T cell count or IgA levels in comparison to the infected group. The expression of TNF-α and TGF-β decreased but IL-10 and IL-4 increased after CS treatment in comparison to the non-treated infected group. In conclusion, CS showed anti-inflammatory and protective effects against E. papillata infection. PMID:27041340

  16. Modelling and analysis of dynamics of viral infection of cells and of interferon resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getto, Ph.; Kimmel, M.; Marciniak-Czochra, A.

    2008-08-01

    Interferons are active biomolecules, which help fight viral infections by spreading from infected to uninfected cells and activate effector molecules, which confer resistance from the virus on cells. We propose a new model of dynamics of viral infection, including endocytosis, cell death, production of interferon and development of resistance. The novel element is a specific biologically justified mechanism of interferon action, which results in dynamics different from other infection models. The model reflects conditions prevailing in liquid cultures (ideal mixing), and the absence of cells or virus influx from outside. The basic model is a nonlinear system of five ordinary differential equations. For this variant, it is possible to characterise global behaviour, using a conservation law. Analytic results are supplemented by computational studies. The second variant of the model includes age-of-infection structure of infected cells, which is described by a transport-type partial differential equation for infected cells. The conclusions are: (i) If virus mortality is included, the virus becomes eventually extinct and subpopulations of uninfected and resistant cells are established. (ii) If virus mortality is not included, the dynamics may lead to extinction of uninfected cells. (iii) Switching off the interferon defense results in a decrease of the sum total of uninfected and resistant cells. (iv) Infection-age structure of infected cells may result in stabilisation or destabilisation of the system, depending on detailed assumptions. Our work seems to constitute the first comprehensive mathematical analysis of the cell-virus-interferon system based on biologically plausible hypotheses.

  17. Canine Distemper Virus Epithelial Cell Infection Is Required for Clinical Disease but Not for Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Sawatsky, Bevan; Wong, Xiao-Xiang; Hinkelmann, Sarah; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    To characterize the importance of infection of epithelial cells for morbillivirus pathogenesis, we took advantage of the severe disease caused by canine distemper virus (CDV) in ferrets. To obtain a CDV that was unable to enter epithelial cells but retained the ability to enter immune cells, we transferred to its attachment (H) protein two mutations shown to interfere with the interaction of measles virus H with its epithelial receptor, human nectin-4. As expected for an epithelial receptor (EpR)-blind CDV, this virus infected dog and ferret epithelial cells inefficiently and did not cause cell fusion or syncytium formation. On the other hand, the EpR-blind CDV replicated in cells expressing canine signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM), the morbillivirus immune cell receptor, with similar kinetics to those of wild-type CDV. While ferrets infected with wild-type CDV died within 12 days after infection, after developing severe rash and fever, animals infected with the EpR-blind virus showed no clinical signs of disease. Nevertheless, both viruses spread rapidly and efficiently in immune cells, causing similar levels of leukopenia and inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation activity, two indicators of morbillivirus immunosuppression. Infection was documented for airway epithelia of ferrets infected with wild-type CDV but not for those of animals infected with the EpR-blind virus, and only animals infected with wild-type CDV shed virus. Thus, epithelial cell infection is necessary for clinical disease and efficient virus shedding but not for immunosuppression. PMID:22278252

  18. Plasmodium Infection Promotes Genomic Instability and AID Dependent B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Robbiani, Davide F.; Deroubaix, Stephanie; Feldhahn, Niklas; Oliveira, Thiago Y.; Callen, Elsa; Wang, Qiao; Jankovic, Mila; Silva, Israel T.; Rommel, Philipp C.; Bosque, David; Eisenreich, Tom; Nussenzweig, André; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chronic infection with Plasmodium falciparum was epidemiologically associated with endemic Burkitt’s lymphoma, a mature B cell cancer characterized by chromosome translocation between the c-myc oncogene and Igh, over 50 years ago. Whether infection promotes B cell lymphoma, and if so by what mechanism remains unknown. To investigate the relationship between parasitic disease and lymphomagenesis we used Plasmodium chabaudi (Pc) to produce chronic malaria infection in mice. Pc induces prolonged expansion of germinal centers (GCs), unique compartments where B cells undergo rapid clonal expansion and express activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a DNA mutator. GC B cells elicited during Pc infection suffer widespread DNA damage leading to chromosome translocations. Although infection does not change the overall rate, it modifies lymphomagenesis to favor mature B cell lymphomas that are AID dependent and show chromosome translocations. Thus, malaria infection favors mature B cell cancers by eliciting protracted AID expression in GC B cells. PMID:26276629

  19. Human papillomavirus infections in nonsexually active perinatally HIV infected children.

    PubMed

    Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Puga, Ana; Farhat, Sepideh; Ma, Yifei

    2014-02-01

    Although human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are common in HIV-infected adults, little is known about children. Our objective was to examine the prevalence of and risks for HPV of the oral mucosal and external genital areas in nonsexually active (NSA) perinatally (P) HIV+ children and compare with HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU) children. A convenience sample attending a pediatric clinic were enrolled. Samples for HPV were obtained from the oral and anogenital areas and tested for one of 37 HPV types. The mean age of the 48 PHIV+ children was 14.3±3.9 years vs. 6.2±4.8 for the 52 HEU (p<0.001). Of the 23 PHIV+ girls, 30.4% had anogenital and 17% had oral HPV, and of the 27 HEU girls, 2 (7.4%) anogenital and 0 had oral HPV. Of the boys, 4/23 (17.4%) and 1/25 (4%) PHIV+ had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively, and 3/24 (12.5%) and 1/25 (4%) HEU had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively. Rates of HPV did not differ by age among the PHIV+, whereas older HEU were more likely to have HPV than younger HEU (p=0.07). This large age gap precluded statistical comparison by HIV status. The presence of HPV in NSA PHIV+ children may have implications regarding HPV vaccination efficacy. PMID:24460009

  20. Airway epithelial cell response to human metapneumovirus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, X.; Liu, T.; Spetch, L.; Kolli, D.; Garofalo, R.P.; Casola, A.

    2007-11-10

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in infants, elderly and immunocompromised patients. In this study, we show that hMPV can infect in a similar manner epithelial cells representative of different tracts of the airways. hMPV-induced expression of chemokines IL-8 and RANTES in primary small alveolar epithelial cells (SAE) and in a human alveolar type II-like epithelial cell line (A549) was similar, suggesting that A549 cells can be used as a model to study lower airway epithelial cell responses to hMPV infection. A549 secreted a variety of CXC and CC chemokines, cytokines and type I interferons, following hMPV infection. hMPV was also a strong inducer of transcription factors belonging to nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B, interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) families, which are known to orchestrate the expression of inflammatory and immunomodulatory mediators.

  1. AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELL RESPONSE TO HUMAN METAPNEUMOVIRUS INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    X, Bao; T, Liu; L, Spetch; D, Kolli; R.P, Garofalo; A, Casola

    2007-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in infants, elderly and immunocompromised patients. In this study, we show that hMPV can infect in a similar manner epithelial cells representative of different tracts of the airways. hMPV-induced expression of chemokines IL-8 and RANTES in primary small alveolar epithelial cells (SAE) and in a human alveolar type II-like epithelial cell line (A549) was similar, suggesting that A549 cells can be used as a model to study lower airway epithelial cell responses to hMPV infection. A549 secreted a variety of CXC and CC chemokines, cytokines and type I interferons, following hMPV infection. hMPV was also a strong inducer of transcription factors belonging to nuclear factor (NF)-κB, interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) families, which are known to orchestrate the expression of inflammatory and immuno-modulatory mediators. PMID:17655903

  2. SAMHD1 controls cell cycle status, apoptosis and HIV-1 infection in monocytic THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Bonifati, Serena; Daly, Michele B; St Gelais, Corine; Kim, Sun Hee; Hollenbaugh, Joseph A; Shepard, Caitlin; Kennedy, Edward M; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Schinazi, Raymond F; Kim, Baek; Wu, Li

    2016-08-01

    SAMHD1 limits HIV-1 infection in non-dividing myeloid cells by decreasing intracellular dNTP pools. HIV-1 restriction by SAMHD1 in these cells likely prevents activation of antiviral immune responses and modulates viral pathogenesis, thus highlighting a critical role of SAMHD1 in HIV-1 physiopathology. Here, we explored the function of SAMHD1 in regulating cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in monocytic THP-1 cells. Using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we generated THP-1 cells with stable SAMHD1 knockout. We found that silencing of SAMHD1 in cycling cells stimulates cell proliferation, redistributes cell cycle population in the G1/G0 phase and reduces apoptosis. These alterations correlated with increased dNTP levels and more efficient HIV-1 infection in dividing SAMHD1 knockout cells relative to control. Our results suggest that SAMHD1, through its dNTPase activity, affects cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis, and emphasize a key role of SAMHD1 in the interplay between cell cycle regulation and HIV-1 infection. PMID:27183329

  3. Disseminated rhodococcus equi infection in HIV infection despite highly active antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rhodococcus equi (R.equi) is an acid fast, GRAM + coccobacillus, which is widespread in the soil and causes pulmonary and extrapulmonary infections in immunocompromised people. In the context of HIV infection, R.equi infection (rhodococcosis) is regarded as an opportunistic disease, and its outcome is influenced by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Case presentation We report two cases of HIV-related rhodococcosis that disseminated despite suppressive HAART and anti-rhodococcal treatment; in both cases there was no immunological recovery, with CD4+ cells count below 200/μL. In the first case, pulmonary rhodococcosis presented 6 months after initiation of HAART, and was followed by an extracerebral intracranial and a cerebral rhodococcal abscess 1 and 8 months, respectively, after onset of pulmonary infection. The second case was characterized by a protracted course with spread of infection to various organs, including subcutaneous tissue, skin, colon and other intra-abdominal tissues, and central nervous system; the spread started 4 years after clinical resolution of a first pulmonary manifestation and progressed over a period of 2 years. Conclusions Our report highlights the importance of an effective immune recovery, despite fully suppressive HAART, along with anti-rhodococcal therapy, in order to clear rhodococcal infection. PMID:22168333

  4. Active NF-kappaB signalling is a prerequisite for influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Nimmerjahn, Falk; Dudziak, Diana; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Hobom, Gerd; Riedel, Alexander; Schlee, Martin; Staudt, Louis M; Rosenwald, Andreas; Behrends, Uta; Bornkamm, Georg W; Mautner, Josef

    2004-08-01

    Influenza virus still poses a major threat to human health. Despite widespread vaccination programmes and the development of drugs targeting essential viral proteins, the extremely high mutation rate of influenza virus still leads to the emergence of new pathogenic virus strains. Therefore, it has been suggested that cellular cofactors that are essential for influenza virus infection might be better targets for antiviral therapy. It has previously been reported that influenza virus efficiently infects Epstein-Barr virus-immortalized B cells, whereas Burkitt's lymphoma cells are virtually resistant to infection. Using this cellular system, it has been shown here that an active NF-kappaB signalling pathway is a general prerequisite for influenza virus infection of human cells. Cells with low NF-kappaB activity were resistant to influenza virus infection, but became susceptible upon activation of NF-kappaB. In addition, blocking of NF-kappaB activation severely impaired influenza virus infection of otherwise highly susceptible cells, including the human lung carcinoma cell lines A549 and U1752 and primary human cells. On the other hand, infection with vaccinia virus was not dependent on an active NF-kappaB signalling pathway, demonstrating the specificity of this pathway for influenza virus infection. These results might be of major importance for both the development of new antiviral therapies and the understanding of influenza virus biology. PMID:15269376

  5. Evidence of dysregulation of dendritic cells in primary HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Sabado, Rachel Lubong; O'Brien, Meagan; Subedi, Abhignya; Qin, Li; Hu, Nan; Taylor, Elizabeth; Dibben, Oliver; Stacey, Andrea; Fellay, Jacques; Shianna, Kevin V.; Siegal, Frederick; Shodell, Michael; Shah, Kokila; Larsson, Marie; Lifson, Jeffrey; Nadas, Arthur; Marmor, Michael; Hutt, Richard; Margolis, David; Garmon, Donald; Markowitz, Martin; Valentine, Fred; Borrow, Persephone

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs) are important mediators of both innate and adaptive immunity against pathogens such as HIV. During the course of HIV infection, blood DC numbers fall substantially. In the present study, we sought to determine how early in HIV infection the reduction occurs and whether the remaining DC subsets maintain functional capacity. We find that both myeloid DC and plasmacytoid DC levels decline very early during acute HIV in-fection. Despite the initial reduction in numbers, those DCs that remain in circulation retain their function and are able to stimulate allogeneic T-cell responses, and up-regulate maturation markers plus produce cytokines/chemokines in response to stimulation with TLR7/8 agonists. Notably, DCs from HIV-infected subjects produced significantly higher levels of cytokines/chemokines in response to stimulation with TLR7/8 agonists than DCs from uninfected controls. Further examination of gene expression profiles indicated in vivo activation, either directly or indirectly, of DCs during HIV infection. Taken together, our data demonstrate that despite the reduction in circulating DC numbers, those that remain in the blood display hyperfunctionality and implicates a possible role for DCs in promoting chronic immune activation. PMID:20693428

  6. BACTERIAL FOODBORNE INFECTIONS AFTER HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Nicole; Podczervinski, Sara; Jordan, Kim; Stednick, Zach; Butler-Wu, Susan; McMillen, Kerry; Pergam, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Diarrhea, abdominal pain and fever are common among patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT), but such symptoms are also typical with foodborne infections. The burden of disease caused by foodborne infections in patients undergoing HCT is unknown. We sought to describe bacterial foodborne infection incidence post-transplant within a single-center population of HCT recipients. Methods All HCT recipients transplanted from 2001 through 2011 at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, WA were followed for one year post-transplant. Data were collected retrospectively using center databases, which include information from transplant, on-site examinations, outside records, and collected laboratory data. Patients were considered to have a bacterial foodborne infection if Campylobacter jejuni/coli, Listeria monocytogenes, E. coli 0157:H7, Salmonella species, Shigella species, Vibrio species or Yersinia species were isolated in culture within one-year post-transplant. Non-foodborne infections with these agents and patients with preexisting bacterial foodborne infection (within 30 days of transplant) were excluded from analyses. Results A total of 12/4069 (0.3%) patients developed a bacterial foodborne infection within one year post-transplant. Patients with infections had a median age at transplant of 50.5 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 35–57), and the majority were adults ≥18 years of age (9/12 [75%]), male gender (8/12 [67%]) and post-allogeneic transplant (8/12 [67%]). Infectious episodes occurred at an incidence rate of 1.0 per 100,000 patient-days (95% CI: 0.5–1.7) and at a median of 50.5 days after transplant (IQR: 26–58.5). The most frequent pathogen detected was Campylobacter jejuni/coli (5/12 [42%]) followed by Yersinia (3/12 [25%]), while Salmonella (2/12 [17%]) and Listeria (2/12 [17%]) showed equal frequencies; no cases of Shigella, Vibrio, or E. coli 0157:H7 were detected. Most patients were diagnosed via stool

  7. Directly Infected Resting CD4+T Cells Can Produce HIV Gag without Spreading Infection in a Model of HIV Latency

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Matthew J.; Graf, Erin H.; Agosto, Luis M.; Mexas, Angela M.; Male, Frances; Brady, Troy; Bushman, Frederic D.; O'Doherty, Una

    2012-01-01

    Despite the effectiveness of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in treating individuals infected with HIV, HAART is not a cure. A latent reservoir, composed mainly of resting CD4+T cells, drives viral rebound once therapy is stopped. Understanding the formation and maintenance of latently infected cells could provide clues to eradicating this reservoir. However, there have been discrepancies regarding the susceptibility of resting cells to HIV infection in vitro and in vivo. As we have previously shown that resting CD4+T cells are susceptible to HIV integration, we asked whether these cells were capable of producing viral proteins and if so, why resting cells were incapable of supporting productive infection. To answer this question, we spinoculated resting CD4+T cells with or without prior stimulation, and measured integration, transcription, and translation of viral proteins. We found that resting cells were capable of producing HIV Gag without supporting spreading infection. This block corresponded with low HIV envelope levels both at the level of protein and RNA and was not an artifact of spinoculation. The defect was reversed upon stimulation with IL-7 or CD3/28 beads. Thus, a population of latent cells can produce viral proteins without resulting in spreading infection. These results have implications for therapies targeting the latent reservoir and suggest that some latent cells could be cleared by a robust immune response. PMID:22911005

  8. Novel dengue virus inhibitor 4-HPR activates ATF4 independent of protein kinase R-like Endoplasmic Reticulum Kinase and elevates levels of eIF2α phosphorylation in virus infected cells.

    PubMed

    Fraser, J E; Wang, C; Chan, K W K; Vasudevan, S G; Jans, D A

    2016-06-01

    Infections by dengue virus (DENV) are increasing worldwide, with an urgent need for effective anti-DENV agents. We recently identified N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) retinamide (4-HPR), an anti-DENV agent effective against all 4 serotypes of DENV in cell culture, and in a lethal mouse model for DENV infection (Fraser et al., 2014b). Although identified as an inhibitor of DENV non-structural protein 5 (NS5) recognition by host nuclear import proteins, the precise impact and mode of action of 4-HPR in effecting DENV clearance remains to be defined. Significantly, concurrent with decreased viral RNA and infectious DENV in 4-HPR-treated cells, we previously observed specific up-regulation of transcripts representing the Protein Kinase R-like Endoplasmic Reticulum Kinase (PERK) arm of the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway upon 4-HPR addition. Here we pursue these findings in detail, examining the role of specific PERK pathway components in DENV clearance. We demonstrate that 4-HPR-induced nuclear localization of Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF4), a pathway component downstream from PERK, occurs in a PERK-independent manner, implying activation instead occurs through Integrated Stress Response (ISR) kinases. Significantly, ATF4 does not appear to be required for the antiviral activity of 4-HPR, suggesting transcriptional events induced by ATF4 do not drive the 4-HPR-induced antiviral state. Instead, we demonstrate that 4-HPR induces phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α), a target of ISR kinases which controls translation attenuation, and confirm the importance of phosphorylated-eIF2α in DENV infection using guanabenz, a specific inhibitor of eIF2α dephosphorylation. This study provides the first detailed insight into the cellular effects modulated by 4-HPR in DENV-infected cells, critical to progressing 4-HPR towards the clinic. PMID:26965420

  9. T helper cell activation and human retroviral pathogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, K F; Heeney, J L

    1996-01-01

    T helper (Th) cells are of central importance in regulating many critical immune effector mechanisms. The profile of cytokines produced by Th cells correlates with the type of effector cells induced during the immune response to foreign antigen. Th1 cells induce the cell-mediated immune response, while Th2 cells drive antibody production. Th cells are the preferential targets of human retroviruses. Infections with human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) result in the expansion of Th cells by the action of HTLV (adult T-cell leukemia) or the progressive loss of T cells by the action of HIV (AIDS). Both retrovirus infections impart a high-level activation state in the host immune cells as well as systemically. However, diverging responses to this activation state have contrasting effects on the Th-cell population. In HIV infection, Th-cell loss has been attributed to several mechanisms, including a selective elimination of cells by apoptosis. The induction of apoptosis in HIV infection is complex, with many different pathways able to induce cell death. In contrast, infection of Th cells with HTLV-1 affords the cell a protective advantage against apoptosis. This advantage may allow the cell to escape immune surveillance, providing the opportunity for the development of Th-cell cancer. In this review, we will discuss the impact of Th-cell activation and general immune activation on human retrovirus expression with a focus upon Th-cell function and the progression to disease. PMID:8987361

  10. Gelsolin activity controls efficient early HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV-1 entry into target lymphocytes requires the activity of actin adaptors that stabilize and reorganize cortical F-actin, like moesin and filamin-A. These alterations are necessary for the redistribution of CD4-CXCR4/CCR5 to one pole of the cell, a process that increases the probability of HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-CD4/co-receptor interactions and that generates the tension at the plasma membrane necessary to potentiate fusion pore formation, thereby favouring early HIV-1 infection. However, it remains unclear whether the dynamic processing of F-actin and the amount of cortical actin available during the initial virus-cell contact are required to such events. Results Here we show that gelsolin restructures cortical F-actin during HIV-1 Env-gp120-mediated signalling, without affecting cell-surface expression of receptors or viral co-receptor signalling. Remarkably, efficient HIV-1 Env-mediated membrane fusion and infection of permissive lymphocytes were impaired when gelsolin was either overexpressed or silenced, which led to a loss or gain of cortical actin, respectively. Indeed, HIV-1 Env-gp120-induced F-actin reorganization and viral receptor capping were impaired under these experimental conditions. Moreover, gelsolin knockdown promoted HIV-1 Env-gp120-mediated aberrant pseudopodia formation. These perturbed-actin events are responsible for the inhibition of early HIV-1 infection. Conclusions For the first time we provide evidence that through its severing of cortical actin, and by controlling the amount of actin available for reorganization during HIV-1 Env-mediated viral fusion, entry and infection, gelsolin can constitute a barrier that restricts HIV-1 infection of CD4+ lymphocytes in a pre-fusion step. These findings provide important insights into the complex molecular and actin-associated dynamics events that underlie early viral infection. Thus, we propose that gelsolin is a new factor that can limit HIV-1 infection acting at a pre-fusion step

  11. Modulation of respiratory dendritic cells during Klebsiella pneumonia infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Klebsiella pneumoniae is a leading cause of severe hospital-acquired respiratory tract infections and death but little is known regarding the modulation of respiratory dendritic cell (DC) subsets. Plasmacytoid DC (pDC) are specialized type 1 interferon producing cells and considered to be classical mediators of antiviral immunity. Method By using multiparameter flow cytometry analysis we have analysed the modulation of respiratory DC subsets after intratracheal Klebsiella pneumonia infection. Results Data indicate that pDCs and MoDC were markedly elevated in the post acute pneumonia phase when compared to mock-infected controls. Analysis of draining mediastinal lymph nodes revealed a rapid increase of activated CD103+ DC, CD11b+ DC and MoDC within 48 h post infection. Lung pDC identification during bacterial pneumonia was confirmed by extended phenotyping for 120G8, mPDCA-1 and Siglec-H expression and by demonstration of high Interferon-alpha producing capacity after cell sorting. Cytokine expression analysis of ex vivo-sorted respiratory DC subpopulations from infected animals revealed elevated Interferon-alpha in pDC, elevated IFN-gamma, IL-4 and IL-13 in CD103+ DC and IL-19 and IL-12p35 in CD11b+ DC subsets in comparison to CD11c+ MHC-class IIlow cells indicating distinct functional roles. Antigen-specific naive CD4+ T cell stimulatory capacity of purified respiratory DC subsets was analysed in a model system with purified ovalbumin T cell receptor transgenic naive CD4+ responder T cells and respiratory DC subsets, pulsed with ovalbumin and matured with Klebsiella pneumoniae lysate. CD103+ DC and CD11b+ DC subsets represented the most potent naive CD4+ T helper cell activators. Conclusion These results provide novel insight into the activation of respiratory DC subsets during Klebsiella pneumonia infection. The detection of increased respiratory pDC numbers in bacterial pneumonia may indicate possible novel pDC functions with respect to lung repair

  12. Evaluation of Functional NK Cell Responses in Vaccinated and SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Inchaustegui, Diego A.; Ying, Olivia; Demberg, Thorsten; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    NK cells are crucial components of the innate immune system due to their capacity to exert rapid cytotoxic and immunomodulatory function in the absence of prior sensitization. NK cells can become activated by exposure to target cells and/or by cytokines produced by antigen-presenting cells. In this study, we examined the effects of a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) vaccine regimen and subsequent SIV infection on the cytotoxic and immunomodulatory functions of circulatory NK cells. While vaccination did not significantly impact the capacity of NK cells to kill MHC-devoid 721.221 target cells, SIV-infection led to a significant decrease in target cell killing. NK cells from uninfected macaques were responsive to a low dose (5 ng/ml) of IL-15 pre-activation, leading to significant increases in their cytotoxic potential, however, NK cells from SIV-infected macaques required a higher dose (50 ng/ml) of IL-15 pre-activation in order to significantly increase their cytotoxic potential. By contrast, no differences were observed in the capacity of NK cells from vaccinated and SIV-infected macaques to respond to IL-12 and IL-18. Similarly, NK cells both before and after infection exhibited equivalent responses to Fc-mediated activation. Collectively, our results show that early SIV-infection impairs the natural cytotoxic capacity of circulatory NK cells without affecting Fc-mediated or cytokine-producing function.

  13. Roles and relevance of mast cells in infection and vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yu; Xiang, Zou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In addition to their well-established role in allergy mast cells have been described as contributing to functional regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses in host defense. Mast cells are of hematopoietic origin but typically complete their differentiation in tissues where they express immune regulatory functions by releasing diverse mediators and cytokines. Mast cells are abundant at mucosal tissues which are portals of entry for common infectious agents in addition to allergens. Here, we review the current understanding of the participation of mast cells in defense against infection. We also discuss possibilities of exploiting mast cell activation to provide adequate adjuvant activity that is needed in high-quality vaccination against infectious diseases. PMID:26565602

  14. ERas protein is overexpressed and binds to the activated platelet-derived growth factor β receptor in bovine urothelial tumour cells associated with papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Russo, Valeria; Roperto, Franco; Esposito, Iolanda; Ceccarelli, Dora Maria; Zizzo, Nicola; Leonardi, Leonardo; Capparelli, Rosanna; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe; Roperto, Sante

    2016-06-01

    Embryonic stem cell-expressed Ras (ERas) encodes a constitutively active form of guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) that binds to and activates phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), which in turn phosphorylates and activates downstream targets such as Akt. The current study evaluated ERas regulation and expression in papillomavirus-associated urothelial tumours in cattle grazing on lands rich in bracken fern. ERas was found upregulated and overexpressed by PCR, real time PCR and Western blot. Furthermore, protein overexpression was also confirmed by immunohistochemistry. ERas was found to interact physically and colocalise with the activated platelet derived growth factor β receptor (PDGFβR) by coimmunoprecipitation and laser scanning confocal investigations. Phosphorylation of Akt, a downstream effector both of ERas and PDGFβR, appeared to be increased in urothelial tumour cells. Altogether, these data indicate that ERas/PDGFβR complex could play a role in the pathogenesis of bovine papillomavirus-associated bladder neoplasia. PMID:27256024

  15. Target Cell Cyclophilins Facilitate Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sapp, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Following attachment to primary receptor heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) particles undergo conformational changes affecting the major and minor capsid proteins, L1 and L2, respectively. This results in exposure of the L2 N-terminus, transfer to uptake receptors, and infectious internalization. Here, we report that target cell cyclophilins, peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases, are required for efficient HPV16 infection. Cell surface cyclophilin B (CyPB) facilitates conformational changes in capsid proteins, resulting in exposure of the L2 N-terminus. Inhibition of CyPB blocked HPV16 infection by inducing noninfectious internalization. Mutation of a putative CyP binding site present in HPV16 L2 yielded exposed L2 N-terminus in the absence of active CyP and bypassed the need for cell surface CyPB. However, this mutant was still sensitive to CyP inhibition and required CyP for completion of infection, probably after internalization. Taken together, these data suggest that CyP is required during two distinct steps of HPV16 infection. Identification of cell surface CyPB will facilitate the study of the complex events preceding internalization and adds a putative drug target for prevention of HPV–induced diseases. PMID:19629175

  16. Parasitic Infections in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jarque, Isidro; Salavert, Miguel; Pemán, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic infections are rarely documented in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. However they may be responsible for fatal complications that are only diagnosed at autopsy. Increased awareness of the possibility of parasitic diseases both in autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplant patients is relevant not only for implementing preventive measures but also for performing an early diagnosis and starting appropriate therapy for these unrecognized but fatal infectious complications in hematopoietic transplant recipients. In this review, we will focus on parasitic diseases occurring in this population especially those with major clinical relevance including toxoplasmosis, American trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, malaria, and strongyloidiasis, among others, highlighting the diagnosis and management in hematopoietic transplant recipients. PMID:27413527

  17. Parasitic Infections in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jarque, Isidro; Salavert, Miguel; Pemán, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic infections are rarely documented in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. However they may be responsible for fatal complications that are only diagnosed at autopsy. Increased awareness of the possibility of parasitic diseases both in autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplant patients is relevant not only for implementing preventive measures but also for performing an early diagnosis and starting appropriate therapy for these unrecognized but fatal infectious complications in hematopoietic transplant recipients. In this review, we will focus on parasitic diseases occurring in this population especially those with major clinical relevance including toxoplasmosis, American trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, malaria, and strongyloidiasis, among others, highlighting the diagnosis and management in hematopoietic transplant recipients. PMID:27413527

  18. Hospital infection control in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed Central

    Dykewicz, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Guidelines for Preventing Opportunistic Infections Among Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients contains a section on hospital infection control including evidence-based recommendations regarding ventilation, construction, equipment, plants, play areas and toys, health-care workers, visitors, patient skin and oral care, catheter-related infections, drug-resistant organisms, and specific nosocomial infections. These guidelines are intended to reduce the number and severity of hospital infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. PMID:11294720

  19. The characteristics of NK cells in Schistosoma japonicum-infected mouse spleens.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Cha, Hefei; Yu, Xiuxue; Xie, Hongyan; Wu, Changyou; Dong, Nuo; Huang, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are classic innate immune cells that play roles in many types of infectious disease. Recently, some new characteristics of NK cells were discovered. In this study, C57BL/6 mice were infected with Schistosoma japonicum for 5-6 weeks and lymphocytes were isolated from the spleen to detect some of the NK cell characteristics by multiparametric flow cytometry. The results revealed that the S. japonicum infection induced a large amount of NK cells, although the percentage of NK cells was not increased significantly. At the same time, the results showed that infected mouse splenic NK cells expressed increased levels of CD25 and CD69 and produced more IL-2, IL-4, and IL-17 and less IFN-γ after stimulation with PMA and ionomycin. This meant that NK cells played a role in S. japonicum infection. Moreover, decreased NKG2A/C/E (CD94) expression levels were detected on the surface of NK cells from infected mouse spleens, which might serve as a NK cell activation mechanism. Additionally, high levels of IL-10, but not PD-1, were expressed on the infected mouse NK cells, which implied that functional exhaustion might exist in the splenic NK cells from S. japonicum-infected mice. Collectively, our results suggest that NK cells play important roles in the course of S. japonicum infection. PMID:26319521

  20. Association of alpha interferon production with natural killer cell lysis of U937 cells infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Rappocciolo, G; Toso, J F; Torpey, D J; Gupta, P; Rinaldo, C R

    1989-01-01

    Mononuclear leukocytes from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seronegative and -seropositive homosexual men lysed HIV-infected U937 cells to a significantly greater degree than uninfected U937 cells. Depletion of cell subsets with monoclonal antibodies and complement indicated that the effector cells were primarily of the CD16+ phenotype. Acid-stable alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) production induced by the HIV-infected cells correlated with, although was not an absolute requisite for, preferential lysis of the infected targets. The activity of these CD16+, natural killer (NK) cells decreased in relation to the duration of HIV infection and the presence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Pretreatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-seronegative subjects, but not HIV-seropositive men, with IFN-alpha or recombinant interleukin-2 enhanced lysis of both uninfected and HIV-infected U937 cells. These results suggest that IFN-alpha-associated, NK-like mechanisms are active in the cytotoxic response against HIV-infected cells and that HIV infection results in an early and progressive depression of such responses. Prospective investigations may be useful in determining the role of this NK cell response in the natural history and pathogenesis of HIV infection and the efficacy of therapeutic modalities. PMID:2913035

  1. Selecting agonists from single cells infected with combinatorial antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongkai; Yea, Kyungmoo; Xie, Jia; Ruiz, Diana; Wilson, Ian A; Lerner, Richard A

    2013-05-23

    We describe a system for direct selection of antibodies that are receptor agonists. Combinatorial antibody libraries in lentiviruses are used to infect eukaryotic cells that contain a fluorescent reporter system coupled to the receptor for which receptor agonist antibodies are sought. In this embodiment of the method, very large numbers of candidate antibodies expressing lentivirus and eukaryotic reporter cells are packaged together in a format where each is capable of replication, thereby forging a direct link between genotype and phenotype. Following infection, cells that fluoresce are sorted and the integrated genes encoding the agonist antibodies recovered. We validated the system by illustrating its ability to generate rapidly potent antibody agonists that are complete thrombopoietin phenocopies. The system should be generalizable to any pathway where its activation can be linked to production of a selectable phenotype. PMID:23706638

  2. B cell fate decisions following influenza virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Rothaeusler, Kristina; Baumgarth, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    Summary Rapidly induced, specific antibodies generated in extrafollicular foci are important components of early immune protection to influenza virus. The signal(s) that prompt B cells to participate in extrafollicular rather than germinal center responses are incompletely understood. To study the regulation of early B cell differentiation events following influenza infection, we exploited earlier findings of a strong contribution of C12 idiotype-expressing B cells to the primary hemagglutinin (HA)-specific response against influenza A/PR/8/34. Using an idiotype-specific mAb to C12 and labeled-HA, in conjunction with multicolor flow cytometry, we followed the fate of C12Id-expressing influenza HA-specific B cells in wildtype BALB/c mice, requiring neither genetic manipulation nor adoptive cell transfer. Our studies demonstrate that HA-specific C12Id+ B cells are phenotypically indistinguishable from follicular B cells. While they induced both extrafollicular and germinal center responses, extrafollicular responses were strongly predominant. Provision of increased HA-specific T cell help increased the magnitude of the extrafollicular response, but did not shift the C12Id+ response towards germinal center formation. Collectively the data are consistent with the hypothesis that B cell fate-determination following activation is a stochastic process in which infection-induced innate signals might drive the preferential expansion of the early extrafollicular response. PMID:19946883

  3. Elevated glycosyltransferase activities in infected or traumatized hosts: nonspecific response to inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Canonico, P G; Little, J S; Powanda, M C; Bostian, K A; Beisel, W R

    1980-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infection leads to multifold increases in sialyltransferase, galactosyltransferase, alpha 2-fucosyltransferase, and alpha 3-fucosyltransferase activity of rat liver. Such changes may reflect an increased demand for glycosylation of acute-phase proteins synthesized and secreted by the liver during inflammatory processes. Serum sialyltransferase became elevated in bacteria-infected or burned rats and sandfly fever-infected humans, but did not correlate with acute-phase serum protein changes. These data suggest that nonparenchymal liver cells, such as macrophages, may contribute substantially to elevated sialyltransferase activity in the circulation during infection and, as such, represent a general host response to infection and tissue trauma. PMID:6156910

  4. IRE1α mediates PKR activation in response to Chlamydia trachomatis infection.

    PubMed

    Webster, Steve J; Ellis, Lou; O'Brien, Louise M; Tyrrell, Beatrice; Fitzmaurice, Timothy J; Elder, Matthew J; Clare, Simon; Chee, Ronnie; Gaston, J S Hill; Goodall, Jane C

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase RNA activated (PKR) is a crucial mediator of anti-viral responses but is reported to be activated by multiple non-viral stimuli. However, mechanisms underlying PKR activation, particularly in response to bacterial infection, remain poorly understood. We have investigated mechanisms of PKR activation in human primary monocyte-derived dendritic cells in response to infection by Chlamydia trachomatis. Infection resulted in potent activation of PKR that was dependent on TLR4 and MyD88 signalling. NADPH oxidase was dispensable for activation of PKR as cells from chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients, or mice that lack NADPH oxidase activity, had equivalent or elevated PKR activation. Significantly, stimulation of cells with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-inducing agents resulted in potent activation of PKR that was blocked by an inhibitor of IRE1α RNAse activity. Crucially, infection resulted in robust IRE1α RNAse activity that was dependent on TLR4 signalling and inhibition of IRE1α RNAse activity prevented PKR activation. Finally, we demonstrate that TLR4/IRE1α mediated PKR activation is required for the enhancement of interferon-β production following C. trachomatis infection. Thus, we provide evidence of a novel mechanism of PKR activation requiring ER stress signalling that occurs as a consequence of TLR4 stimulation during bacterial infection and contributes to inflammatory responses. PMID:27021640

  5. Targeted disruption of EBNA1 in EBV-infected cells attenuated cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Ka-Won; Park, Jihyun; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-encoded nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA1) plays a pivotal in an EBV episome replication and persistence. Despite considerable attempts, there are no EBV drugs or vaccines. We attempted to eradicate EBV episomes by targeting EBNA1 using the transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) (E1TN). E1TN-mediated transient knockout (KO) of EBNA1 reduced EBNA1 expression, and caused significant loss of EBV genomes and progressive death of EBV-infected cells. Furthermore, when a mixture of EBV-infected Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL) cells and EBV-negative BL cells was targeted by E1TN, EBV-negative cells were counter-selected while most EBV-infected cells died, further substantiating that EBNA1 KO caused selective death of EBV-infected cells. TALEN-mediated transient targeting of EBNA1 attenuated the growth of EBV-infected cells, implicating a possible therapeutic application of E1TN for EBV-associated disorders. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(4): 226-231] PMID:26879316

  6. Elimination of HIV-1-infected cells by broadly neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bruel, Timothée; Guivel-Benhassine, Florence; Amraoui, Sonia; Malbec, Marine; Richard, Léa; Bourdic, Katia; Donahue, Daniel Aaron; Lorin, Valérie; Casartelli, Nicoletta; Noël, Nicolas; Lambotte, Olivier; Mouquet, Hugo; Schwartz, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The Fc region of HIV-1 Env-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) is required for suppressing viraemia, through mechanisms which remain poorly understood. Here, we identify bNAbs that exert antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in cell culture and kill HIV-1-infected lymphocytes through natural killer (NK) engagement. These antibodies target the CD4-binding site, the glycans/V3 and V1/V2 loops on gp120, or the gp41 moiety. The landscape of Env epitope exposure at the surface and the sensitivity of infected cells to ADCC vary considerably between viral strains. Efficient ADCC requires sustained cell surface binding of bNAbs to Env, and combining bNAbs allows a potent killing activity. Furthermore, reactivated infected cells from HIV-positive individuals expose heterogeneous Env epitope patterns, with levels that are often but not always sufficient to trigger killing by bNAbs. Our study delineates the parameters controlling ADCC activity of bNAbs, and supports the use of the most potent antibodies to clear the viral reservoir. PMID:26936020

  7. Elimination of HIV-1-infected cells by broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bruel, Timothée; Guivel-Benhassine, Florence; Amraoui, Sonia; Malbec, Marine; Richard, Léa; Bourdic, Katia; Donahue, Daniel Aaron; Lorin, Valérie; Casartelli, Nicoletta; Noël, Nicolas; Lambotte, Olivier; Mouquet, Hugo; Schwartz, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The Fc region of HIV-1 Env-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) is required for suppressing viraemia, through mechanisms which remain poorly understood. Here, we identify bNAbs that exert antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in cell culture and kill HIV-1-infected lymphocytes through natural killer (NK) engagement. These antibodies target the CD4-binding site, the glycans/V3 and V1/V2 loops on gp120, or the gp41 moiety. The landscape of Env epitope exposure at the surface and the sensitivity of infected cells to ADCC vary considerably between viral strains. Efficient ADCC requires sustained cell surface binding of bNAbs to Env, and combining bNAbs allows a potent killing activity. Furthermore, reactivated infected cells from HIV-positive individuals expose heterogeneous Env epitope patterns, with levels that are often but not always sufficient to trigger killing by bNAbs. Our study delineates the parameters controlling ADCC activity of bNAbs, and supports the use of the most potent antibodies to clear the viral reservoir. PMID:26936020

  8. α-Lipoic Acid Inhibits Expression of IL-8 by Suppressing Activation of MAPK, Jak/Stat, and NF-κB in H. pylori-Infected Gastric Epithelial AGS Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji Hyun; Cho, Soon Ok

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial cytokine response, associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS), is important in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced inflammation. H. pylori induces the production of ROS, which may be involved in the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/Stat), and oxidant-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), and thus, expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in gastric epithelial cells. α-lipoic acid, a naturally occurring thiol compound, is a potential antioxidant. It shows beneficial effects in treatment of oxidant-associated diseases including diabetes. The present study is purposed to investigate whether α-lipoic acid inhibits expression of inflammatory cytokine IL-8 by suppressing activation of MAPK, Jak/Stat, and NF-κB in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. Gastric epithelial AGS cells were pretreated with or without α-lipoic acid for 2 h and infected with H. pylori in a Korean isolate (HP99) at a ratio of 300:1. IL-8 mRNA expression was analyzed by RT-PCR analysis. IL-8 levels in the medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. NF-κB-DNA binding activity was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Phospho-specific and total forms of MAPK and Jak/Stat were assessed by Western blot analysis. ROS levels were determined using dichlorofluorescein fluorescence. As a result, H. pylori induced increases in ROS levels, mRNA, and protein levels of IL-8, as well as the activation of MAPK [extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2), p38], Jak/Stat (Jak1/2, Stat3), and NF-κB in AGS cells, which was inhibited by α-lipoic acid. In conclusion, α-lipoic acid may be beneficial for prevention and/or treatment of H. pylori infection-associated gastric inflammation. PMID:26632410

  9. α-Lipoic Acid Inhibits Expression of IL-8 by Suppressing Activation of MAPK, Jak/Stat, and NF-κB in H. pylori-Infected Gastric Epithelial AGS Cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Hyun; Cho, Soon Ok; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial cytokine response, associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS), is important in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced inflammation. H. pylori induces the production of ROS, which may be involved in the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/Stat), and oxidant-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), and thus, expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in gastric epithelial cells. α-lipoic acid, a naturally occurring thiol compound, is a potential antioxidant. It shows beneficial effects in treatment of oxidant-associated diseases including diabetes. The present study is purposed to investigate whether α-lipoic acid inhibits expression of inflammatory cytokine IL-8 by suppressing activation of MAPK, Jak/Stat, and NF-κB in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. Gastric epithelial AGS cells were pretreated with or without α-lipoic acid for 2 h and infected with H. pylori in a Korean isolate (HP99) at a ratio of 300:1. IL-8 mRNA expression was analyzed by RT-PCR analysis. IL-8 levels in the medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. NF-κB-DNA binding activity was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Phospho-specific and total forms of MAPK and Jak/Stat were assessed by Western blot analysis. ROS levels were determined using dichlorofluorescein fluorescence. As a result, H. pylori induced increases in ROS levels, mRNA, and protein levels of IL-8, as well as the activation of MAPK [extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2), p38], Jak/Stat (Jak1/2, Stat3), and NF-κB in AGS cells, which was inhibited by α-lipoic acid. In conclusion, α-lipoic acid may be beneficial for prevention and/or treatment of H. pylori infection-associated gastric inflammation. PMID:26632410

  10. Measurement of phenotype and absolute number of circulating heparin-binding hemagglutinin, ESAT-6 and CFP-10, and purified protein derivative antigen-specific CD4 T cells can discriminate active from latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Paul; Barkham, Timothy M S; Tang, Wenying; Kemeny, David M; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Wang, Yee T

    2015-02-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are used as adjunctive tests for the evaluation of suspected cases of active tuberculosis (TB). However, a positive test does not differentiate latent from active TB. We investigated whether flow cytometric measurement of novel combinations of intracellular cytokines and surface makers on CD4 T cells could differentiate between active and latent TB after stimulation with Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific proteins. Blood samples from 60 patients referred to the Singapore Tuberculosis Control Unit for evaluation for active TB or as TB contacts were stimulated with purified protein derivative (PPD), ESAT-6 and CFP-10, or heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA). The CD4 T cell cytokine response (IFN-γ, interleukin-2 [IL-2], interleukin-17A [IL-17A], interleukin-22 [IL-22], granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) and surface marker expression (CD27, CXCR3, and CD154) were then measured. We found that the proportion of PPD-specific CD4 T cells, defined as CD154(+) TNF-α(+) cells that were negative for CD27 and positive for GM-CSF, gave the strongest discrimination between subjects with latent and those with active TB (area under the receiver operator characteristic [ROC] curve of 0.9277; P < 0.0001). Also, the proportions and absolute numbers of HBHA-specific CD4 T cells were significantly higher in those with latent TB infection, particularly CD154(+) TNF-α(+) IFN-γ(+) IL-2(+) and CD154(+) TNF-α(+) CXCR3(+). Finally, we found that the ratio of ESAT-6- and CFP-10-responding to HBHA-responding CD4 T cells was significantly different between the two study populations. In conclusion, we found novel markers of M. tuberculosis-specific CD4 cells which differentiate between active and latent TB. PMID:25520147

  11. Activation of Intestinal Epithelial Stat3 Orchestrates Tissue Defense during Gastrointestinal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wittkopf, Nadine; Pickert, Geethanjali; Billmeier, Ulrike; Mahapatro, Mousumi; Wirtz, Stefan; Martini, Eva; Leppkes, Moritz; Neurath, Markus Friedrich; Becker, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal infections with EHEC and EPEC are responsible for outbreaks of diarrheal diseases and represent a global health problem. Innate first-line-defense mechanisms such as production of mucus and antimicrobial peptides by intestinal epithelial cells are of utmost importance for host control of gastrointestinal infections. For the first time, we directly demonstrate a critical role for Stat3 activation in intestinal epithelial cells upon infection of mice with Citrobacter rodentium – a murine pathogen that mimics human infections with attaching and effacing Escherichia coli. C. rodentium induced transcription of IL-6 and IL-22 in gut samples of mice and was associated with activation of the transcription factor Stat3 in intestinal epithelial cells. C. rodentium infection induced expression of several antimicrobial peptides such as RegIIIγ and Pla2g2a in the intestine which was critically dependent on Stat3 activation. Consequently, mice with specific deletion of Stat3 in intestinal epithelial cells showed increased susceptibility to C. rodentium infection as indicated by high bacterial load, severe gut inflammation, pronounced intestinal epithelial cell death and dissemination of bacteria to distant organs. Together, our data implicate an essential role for Stat3 activation in intestinal epithelial cells during C. rodentium infection. Stat3 concerts the host response to bacterial infection by controlling bacterial growth and suppression of apoptosis to maintain intestinal epithelial barrier function. PMID:25799189

  12. CD4 T Cell Responses in Latent and Chronic Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Senta; Mandaric, Sanja; Oxenius, Annette

    2013-01-01

    The spectrum of tasks which is fulfilled by CD4 T cells in the setting of viral infections is large, ranging from support of CD8 T cells and humoral immunity to exertion of direct antiviral effector functions. While our knowledge about the differentiation pathways, plasticity, and memory of CD4 T cell responses upon acute infections or immunizations has significantly increased during the past years, much less is still known about CD4 T cell differentiation and their beneficial or pathological functions during persistent viral infections. In this review we summarize current knowledge about the differentiation, direct or indirect antiviral effector functions, and the regulation of virus-specific CD4 T cells in the setting of persistent latent or active chronic viral infections with a particular emphasis on herpes virus infections for the former and chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection for the latter. PMID:23717308

  13. Polyclonal Mucosa-Associated Invariant T Cells Have Unique Innate Functions in Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Wei-Jen; Truscott, Steven M.; Eickhoff, Christopher S.; Blazevic, Azra

    2012-01-01

    Mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are a unique population of αβ T cells in mammals that reside preferentially in mucosal tissues and express an invariant Vα paired with limited Vβ T-cell receptor (TCR) chains. Furthermore, MAIT cell development is dependent upon the expression of the evolutionarily conserved major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ib molecule MR1. Using in vitro assays, recent studies have shown that mouse and human MAIT cells are activated by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) infected with diverse microbes, including numerous bacterial strains and yeasts, but not viral pathogens. However, whether MAIT cells play an important, and perhaps unique, role in controlling microbial infection has remained unclear. To probe MAIT cell function, we show here that purified polyclonal MAIT cells potently inhibit intracellular bacterial growth of Mycobacterium bovis BCG in macrophages (MΦ) in coculture assays, and this inhibitory activity was dependent upon MAIT cell selection by MR1, secretion of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and an innate interleukin 12 (IL-12) signal from infected MΦ. Surprisingly, however, the cognate recognition of MR1 by MAIT cells on the infected MΦ was found to play only a minor role in MAIT cell effector function. We also report that MAIT cell-deficient mice had higher bacterial loads at early times after infection compared to wild-type (WT) mice, demonstrating that MAIT cells play a unique role among innate lymphocytes in protective immunity against bacterial infection. PMID:22778103

  14. Testing anti-HIV activity of antiretroviral agents in vitro using flow cytometry analysis of CEM-GFP cells infected with transfection-derived HIV-1 NL4-3.

    PubMed

    Frezza, Caterina; Grelli, Sandro; Federico, Maurizio; Marino-Merlo, Francesca; Mastino, Antonio; Macchi, Beatrice

    2016-06-01

    An assay, specifically optimized to evaluate the anti-HIV activity of antiretrovirals by flow cytometry analysis, is described. As widely used anti-HIV agents, zidovudine (AZT), abacavir (ABC), 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (DDI), lamivudine (3TC), nevirapine (NVP), and efavirenz (EFV), and as drugs of recent approval raltegravir (RAL), etravirine (ETR), and rilpivirine (RPV), were utilized as reference drugs. HIV-1 NL4-3 virus was prepared by transfection of HEK293T cells with purified plasmid DNA and quantified by p24 antigen-capture assay. For infection, CEM-GFP cells were exposed to vehicle or to several concentrations of the drugs for 2 hr at 37 °C before HIV-1 NL4-3 was added to each sample. The adsorption was prolonged for 3 hr at 37 °C. After 72 hr of incubation, HIV-induced GFP expression in infected CEM-GFP cells was assessed by flow cytometry analysis and expressed as % positive cells. For comparison, p24 production in supernatants was assessed by a commercial ELISA kit. On the basis of IC50 values, the anti-HIV activity, as assayed by this method, was EFV > 3TC > AZT > NVP > DDI > ABC and ETR > RPV > RAL. The comparison between the IC50 values calculated through flow cytometry and p24 production revealed overlapping results, showing that the optimized protocol of CEM-GFP infection with HIV NL4-3 is a suitable method to perform quantitative, rapid and low-expensive screening tests to evaluate the in vitro effect of new candidate anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26519867

  15. Trafficking, persistence, and activation state of adoptively transferred allogeneic and autologous SIV-specific CD8+ T-cell clones during acute and chronic SIV infection of rhesus macaques1

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Diane L.; Minang, Jacob T.; Trivett, Matt; Song, Kaimei; Tuscher, Jennifer J.; Li, Yuan; Piatak, Michael; O'Connor, David; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Roederer, Mario; Ohlen, Claes

    2009-01-01

    Despite multiple lines of evidence suggesting their involvement, the precise role of CD8+ T-cells in controlling HIV replication remains unclear. To determine whether CD8+ T cells can limit retroviral replication in the absence of other immune responses, we transferred 1-13 × 109 allogeneic in vitro expanded SIV-specific CD8+ T-cell clones matched for the relevant restricting MHC-I allele into rhesus macaques near the time of intravenous (i.v.) SIV challenge. Additionally, in vitro expanded autologous SIV-specific CD8+ T-cell clones were infused 4-9 months post-infection. Infused cells did not appreciably impact acute or chronic viral replication. The partially MHC-matched allogeneic cells were not detected in the blood or most tissues after 3 days but persisted longer in the lungs as assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Autologous cells transferred i.v. or intraperitoneally (i.p.) were found in BAL and blood samples for up to 8 weeks post-infusion. Interestingly, despite having a nominally activated phenotype (CD69+HLA-DR+), many of these cells persisted in the BAL without dividing. This suggests that expression of such markers by T cells at mucosal sites may not reflect recent activation, but may instead identify stable resident memory T cells. The lack of impact following transfer of such a large number of functional antigen-specific CD8+ T cells on SIV replication may reflect the magnitude of the immune response required to contain the virus. PMID:19949089

  16. Natural killer cell activity during measles.

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, D E; Ward, B J; Jauregui, E; Johnson, R T; Vaisberg, A

    1990-01-01

    Natural killer cells are postulated to play an important role in host anti-viral defences. We measured natural killer cell activity in 30 individuals with acute measles (73 +/- 21 lytic units (LU)/10(7) cells) and 16 individuals with other infectious diseases (149 +/- 95 LU) and found it reduced compared with values for adults (375 +/- 70 LU; P less than 0.001) or children (300 +/- 73 LU, P less than 0.01) without infection. Reduced natural killer cell activity was found in measles patients with (84 +/- 30 LU) and without (55 +/- 18 LU) complications and was present for at least 3 weeks after the onset of the rash. Activity was increased by in vitro exposure of cells to interleukin-2. Depressed natural killer cell activity parallels in time the suppression of other parameters of cell-mediated immunity that occurs during measles. PMID:1696863

  17. Parvovirus Infection Suppresses Long-Term Repopulating Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Segovia, José C.; Guenechea, Guillermo; Gallego, Jesús M.; Almendral, José M.; Bueren, Juan A.

    2003-01-01

    The functional disturbance of self-renewing and multipotent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in viral diseases is poorly understood. In this report, we have assessed the susceptibility of mouse HSCs to strain i of the autonomous parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVMi) in vitro and during persistent infection of an immunodeficient host. Purified 5FUr Lin− Sca-1+ primitive hematopoietic precursors were permissive for MVMi genome replication and the expression of viral gene products. The lymphoid and myeloid repopulating capacity of bone marrow (BM) cells was significantly impaired after in vitro infection, although the degree of functional effect proportionally decreased with the posttransplantation time. This indicated that MVMi targets the heterogeneous compartment of repopulating cells with differential affinity and suggests that the virus may persist in some primitive HSCs in the quiescent stage, killing those eventually recruited for proliferative activity. Immunodeficient SCID mice oronasally infected with MVMi were cured of the characteristic virus-induced lethal leukopenia by transplantation of immunocompetent BM grafts. However, two double-stranded viral DNA species, probably uncommon replicative intermediates, remained in the marrow of every transplanted mouse months after infectious virus clearance. Genetic analysis of the rescued mice showed that the infection ensured a stable engraftment of donor hematopoiesis by markedly depleting the pool of endogenous HSCs. The MVMi-induced suppression of HSC functions illustrates the accessibility of this compartment to infection during a natural viral hematological disease. These results may provide clues to understanding delayed hematopoietic syndromes associated with persistent viral infections and to prospective gene delivery to HSCs in vivo. PMID:12857918

  18. Age-Related Changes in CD8 T Cell Homeostasis and Immunity to Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nikolich-Zugich, Janko; Li, Gang; Uhrlaub, Jennifer L.; Renkema, Kristin R.; Smithey, Megan J.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of CD8 T cell responses to vaccination or infection with various pathogens in both animal models and human subjects have revealed a markedly consistent array of age-related defects. In general, recent work shows that aged CD8 T cell responses are decreased in magnitude, and show poor differentiation into effector cells, with a reduced arsenal of effector functions. Here we review potential mechanisms underlying these defects. We specifically address phenotypic and numeric changes to the naïve CD8 T cell precursor pool, the impact of persistent viral infection(s) and inflammation, and contributions of the aging environment in which these cells are activated. PMID:22554418

  19. Infection with Toxoplasma gondii results in dysregulation of the host cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Molestina, Robert E.; El-Guendy, Nadia; Sinai, Anthony P.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Mammalian cells infected with Toxoplasma gondii are characterized by a profound reprogramming of gene expression. We examined whether such transcriptional responses were linked to changes in the cell cycle of the host. Human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF) in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle were infected with T. gondii and FACS analysis of DNA content was performed. Cell cycle profiles revealed a promotion into the S phase followed by an arrest towards the G2/M boundary with infection. This response was markedly different from that of growth factor stimulation which caused cell cycle entry and completion. Transcriptional profiles of T. gondii-infected HFF showed sustained increases in transcripts associated with a G1/S transition and DNA synthesis coupled to an abrogation of cell cycle regulators critical in G2/M transition relative to growth factor stimulation. These divergent responses correlated with a distinct temporal modulation of the critical cell cycle regulator kinase ERK by infection. While the kinetics of ERK phosphorylation by EGF showed rapid and sustained activation, infected cells displayed an oscillatory pattern of activation. Our results suggest that T. gondii infection induces and maintains a “proliferation response” in the infected cell which may fulfill critical growth requirements of the parasite during intracellular residence. PMID:18182087

  20. Nanotechnology as a New Therapeutic Approach to Prevent the HIV-Infection of Treg Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo-Ruiz, Didiana; De La Mata, Francisco Javier; Gómez, Rafael; Correa-Rocha, Rafael; Muñoz-Fernández, Mª Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV-1 has proved to infect regulatory T cells (Treg) modifying their phenotype and impairing their suppressive capacity. As Treg cells are a crucial component in the preservation of the immune homeostasis, we researched that the antiviral capacity of carboxilan dendrimers prevents the HIV-1 infection of Treg and their effects. The phenotype and suppressive capacity of Treg treated or non-treated with carbosilane dendrimers were studied by flow cytometry. Treated and non-treated Treg from healthy donors were infected with HIV-1NL4.3. The infection of Treg cells by HIV-1, and protective effect of two dendrimers were determined by measuring antigen p24gag in the supernatant of the culture and intracellular. Results The Treg cells were treated with cationic and anionic carbosilane dendrimers. The results showed that both dendrimers did not modify the phenotype and functionality of Treg cells compared with non- treated Treg cells. Anionic dendrimers showed high biocompatibility with normal activity of the Treg cells and in antiviral assays. These dendrimers were highly active against HIV-1 preventing the infection of Treg, and were able to protect the Treg from the Foxp3 downregulation induced by the HIV-1 infection. Conclusions This is the first work showing that the in vitro use of anionic dendrimers prevent the HIV-1 replication and the infection of expanded Treg cells in culture, which raises the possibility to use Treg cells therapeutically in HIV-1-infected subjects. PMID:26785250

  1. Rift Valley fever virus infection induces activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Ermler, Megan E.; Traylor, Zachary; Patel, Krupen; Schattgen, Stefan A.; Vanaja, Sivapriya K.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Hise, Amy G.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammasome activation is gaining recognition as an important mechanism for protection during viral infection. Here, we investigate whether Rift Valley fever virus, a negative-strand RNA virus, can induce inflammasome responses and IL-1β processing in immune cells. We have determined that RVFV induces NLRP3 inflammasome activation in murine dendritic cells, and that this process is dependent upon ASC and caspase-1. Furthermore, absence of the cellular RNA helicase adaptor protein MAVS/IPS-1 significantly reduces extracellular IL-1β during infection. Finally, direct imaging using confocal microscopy shows that the MAVS protein co-localizes with NLRP3 in the cytoplasm of RVFV infected cells. PMID:24418550

  2. Cumulative mechanisms of lymphoid tissue fibrosis and T cell depletion in HIV-1 and SIV infections

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ming; Smith, Anthony J.; Wietgrefe, Stephen W.; Southern, Peter J.; Schacker, Timothy W.; Reilly, Cavan S.; Estes, Jacob D.; Burton, Gregory F.; Silvestri, Guido; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Carlis, John V.; Haase, Ashley T.

    2011-01-01

    The hallmark of HIV-1 and SIV infections is CD4+ T cell depletion. Both direct cell killing and indirect mechanisms related to immune activation have been suggested to cause the depletion of T cells. We have now identified a mechanism by which immune activation-induced fibrosis of lymphoid tissues leads to depletion of naive T cells in HIV-1 infected patients and SIV-infected rhesus macaques. The T regulatory cell response to immune activation increased procollagen production and subsequent deposition as fibrils via the TGF-β1 signaling pathway and chitinase 3-like-1 activity in fibroblasts in lymphoid tissues from patients infected with HIV-1. Collagen deposition restricted T cell access to the survival factor IL-7 on the fibroblastic reticular cell (FRC) network, resulting in apoptosis and depletion of T cells, which, in turn, removed a major source of lymphotoxin-β, a survival factor for FRCs during SIV infection in rhesus macaques. The resulting loss of FRCs and the loss of IL-7 produced by FRCs may thus perpetuate a vicious cycle of depletion of T cells and the FRC network. Because this process is cumulative, early treatment and antifibrotic therapies may offer approaches to moderate T cell depletion and improve immune reconstitution during HIV-1 infection. PMID:21393864

  3. Reduced Frequencies and Activation of Regulatory T Cells After the Treatment of HIV-1-Infected Individuals with the CCR5 Antagonist Maraviroc Are Associated with a Reduction in Viral Loads Rather Than a Direct Effect of the Drug on Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Joedicke, Jara J; Dirks, Miriam; Esser, Stefan; Verheyen, Jens; Dittmer, Ulf

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection and they frequently express the chemokine receptor CCR5. We therefore investigated whether antiretroviral treatment with the CCR5 antagonist Maraviroc affected Tregs in chronically HIV-1-infected individuals. HIV-1-infected patients with high viral loads had elevated frequencies of activated Tregs in the peripheral blood compared with healthy controls. In patients successfully treated with antiretroviral drugs (undetectable viral loads), the frequency and the activation status of Tregs were comparable with healthy controls without any specific effect related to the treatment with Maraviroc. These results indicate that the control of viral replication in general rather than a direct binding of Maraviroc to CCR5-positive Tregs influences Treg responses in successfully treated chronically HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:27035639

  4. Macrophage cell death upon intracellular bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xin-He; Xu, Yunsheng; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Ren, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage-pathogen interaction is a complex process and the outcome of this tag-of-war for both sides is to live or die. Without attempting to be comprehensive, this review will discuss the complexity and significance of the interaction outcomes between macrophages and some facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens as exemplified by Francisella, Salmonella, Shigella and Yersinia. Upon bacterial infection, macrophages can die by a variety of ways, such as apoptosis, autophagic cell death, necrosis, necroptosis, oncosis, pyronecrosis, pyroptosis etc, which is the focus of this review. PMID:26690967

  5. CD31 is required on CD4+ T cells to promote T cell survival during Salmonella infection

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Ewan A; Coughlan, Ruth E; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Bobat, Saeeda; Marshall, Jennifer L; Hussain, Khiyam; Charlesworth, James; Abhyankar, Nikita; Hitchcock, Jessica; Gil, Cristina; López-Macías, Constantino; Henderson, Ian R; Khan, Mahmood; Watson, Steve P; MacLennan, Ian C M; Buckley, Christopher D; Cunningham, Adam F

    2011-01-01

    Haematopoietic cells constitutively express CD31/PECAM1 a signalling, adhesion receptor associated with controlling responses to inflammatory stimuli. Although expressed on CD4+ T cells, its function on these cells is unclear. To address this we have used a model of systemic Salmonella infection that induces high levels of T cell activation and depends upon CD4+ T cells for resolution. Infection of CD31-deficient (CD31KO) mice demonstrates that these mice fail to control infection effectively. During infection, CD31KO mice have diminished numbers of total CD4+ T cells and IFN-γ-secreting Th1 cells. This is despite a higher proportion of CD31KO CD4+ T cells exhibiting an activated phenotype, and an undiminished capacity to prime normally and polarize to Th1. Reduced numbers of T cells reflected the increased propensity of naive and activated CD31KO T cells to undergo apoptosis after infection compared to wild-type (WT) T cells. Using adoptive transfer experiments we show that loss of CD31 on CD4+ T cells alone is sufficient to account for the defective CD31KO T cell accumulation. These data are consistent with CD31 helping to control T cell activation as in its absence T cells have a greater propensity to become activated, resulting in increased susceptibility to become apoptotic. The impact of CD31 loss on T cell homeostasis becomes most pronounced during severe, inflammatory and immunological stresses such as those caused by systemic Salmonella infection. This identifies a novel role for CD31 in regulating CD4 T cell homeostasis. PMID:21734076

  6. Necator americanus Infection: A Possible Cause of Altered Dendritic Cell Differentiation and Eosinophil Profile in Chronically Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Ricardo T.; Cançado, Guilherme G. L.; Freitas, Paula A.; Santiago, Helton C.; Massara, Cristiano Lara; dos Santos Carvalho, Omar; Corrêa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Geiger, Stefan M.; Bethony, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Background Hookworms survive for several years (5 to 7 years) in the host lumen, inducing a robust but largely ineffective immune response. Among the most striking aspects of the immune response to hookworm (as with many other helminths) is the ablation of parasite-specific T cell proliferative response (hyporesponsiveness). While the role of the adaptive immune response in human helminth infection has been well investigated, the role of the innate immune responses (e.g., dendritic cells and eosinophils) has received less attention and remains to be clearly elucidated. Methodology/Principal Findings We report on the differentiation/maturation of host dendritic cells in vitro and the eosinophil activation/function associated with human hookworm infection. Mature DCs (mDCs) from Necator americanus (Necator)–infected individuals showed an impaired differentiation process compared to the mDCs of non-infected individuals, as evidenced by the differential expression of CD11c and CD14. These same hookworm-infected individuals also presented significantly down-regulated expression of CD86, CD1a, HLA-ABC, and HLA-DR. The lower expression of co-stimulatory and antigen presentation molecules by hookworm-infected–derived mDCs was further evidenced by their reduced ability to induce cell proliferation. We also showed that this alternative DC differentiation is partially induced by excreted-secreted hookworm products. Conversely, eosinophils from the same individuals showed a highly activated status, with an upregulation of major cell surface markers. Antigen-pulsed eosinophils from N. americanus–infected individuals induced significant cell proliferation of autologous PBMCs, when compared to non-infected individuals. Conclusion Chronic N. americanus infection alters the host's innate immune response, resulting in a possible modulation of the maturation process of DCs, a functional change that may diminish their ability for antigen presentation and thus contribute to the

  7. Mycoplasma genitalium promotes epithelial crossing and peripheral blood mononuclear cell infection by HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Das, Kishore; De la Garza, Georgina; Siwak, Edward B.; Scofield, Virginia L.; Dhandayuthapani, Subramanian

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Mycoplasma genitalium co-infection in HIV-infected individuals has been reported to increase the shedding of HIV in the urogenital region of females. To better understand this relationship, we investigated the influence of M. genitalium on the transmission and replication of HIV using an in vitro model. Methods The Transwell co-culture system was employed to assess the crossing of an endocervical cell barrier by HIV-1. Immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy were used to assess the distribution of the nectin-1 molecule on M. genitalium-infected epithelial cells of the End1/E6E7 endocervical cell line, grown as monolayers in the insert wells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were cultured in the bottom wells to assess the effects of M. genitalium, passing through the semipermeable culturing membrane, on subsequent HIV infection of susceptible target cells. Results Infection of the endocervical cells with the adhesion-positive M. genitalium G37 strain (wild-type) significantly elevated the passage of HIV across the epithelial cell barrier relative to HIV transfer across endocervical cells infected with the adhesion-negative M. genitalium JB1 strain. Immunostaining of the M. genitalium-G37-infected epithelial cells disclosed capping and internalization of the junctional regulatory protein nectin-1, in association with reduced transepithelial resistance (TER) in the cell monolayer. When PBMC were cultured beneath insert wells containing M. genitalium-G37-infected epithelial cell monolayers, we observed significantly enhanced infectivity and replication of HIV added afterward to the cultures. Conclusions M. genitalium influences events on both sides of a cultured mucosal epithelial monolayer: (1) by infecting the epithelial cells and reducing the integrity of the barrier itself, and (2) by activating HIV target cells below it, thereby promoting HIV infection and progeny virus production. PMID:24661929

  8. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus replication in acutely infected CD4+ cells by CD8+ cells involves a noncytotoxic mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, C M; Erickson, A L; Hsueh, F C; Levy, J A

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism by which CD8+ T cells from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals suppress HIV replication in acutely infected CD4+ T cells was investigated. Cytotoxicity was not involved, as the antiviral activity of the CD8+ cells did not correlate with the ability to lyse HIV-infected or uninfected CD4+ T cells. In addition, the frequency of HIV-infected CD4+ cells increased during coculture with CD8+ T cells even in the absence of detectable levels of virus replication. Moreover, separation of the CD4+ and CD8+ cells by a 0.4-micron-pore-size filter delayed HIV replication, indicating a role, at least in part, for a soluble factor. However, cell contact was required for optimal antiviral activity. These results extend further the observation on the mechanism of antiviral HIV activity by CD8+ cells from infected individuals. They support the conclusion that CD8+ cells can play a major role in preventing development of disease in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:1920621

  9. Impaired Phenotype and Function of T Follicular Helper Cells in HIV-1-Infected Children Receiving ART.

    PubMed

    Bekele, Yonas; Amu, Sylvie; Bobosha, Kidist; Lantto, Rebecka; Nilsson, Anna; Endale, Birtukan; Gebre, Meseret; Aseffa, Abraham; Rethi, Bence; Howe, Rawleigh; Chiodi, Francesca

    2015-07-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are important components in development of specific humoral immune responses; whether the number and biology of Tfh cells is impaired in HIV-1-infected children is not yet studied.The frequency, phenotype, and function of Tfh cells and B cells were determined in blood of HIV-1-infected children receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) and age-matched controls. Flow cytometry was used to characterize the frequency of Tfh cells and B cell subsets. Cytokine expression was measured after in vitro activation of Tfh cells.A reduced frequency of memory Tfh cells (P < 0.001) was identified in HIV-1-infected children and, on these cells, a reduced expression of programmed death-1 (PD-1) and inducible T cell costimulator (ICOS) (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01). Upon activation, the capacity of Tfh cells to express IL-4, an important cytokine for B cell function, was impaired in HIV-1-infected children.B cell subpopulations in HIV-1-infected children displayed significant differences from the control group: the frequency of resting memory (RM) B cells was reduced (P < 0.01) whereas the frequency of exhausted memory B cells increased (P < 0.001). Interestingly, the decline of RM cells correlated with the reduction of memory Tfh cells (P = 0.02).Our study shows that function and phenotype of Tfh cells, pivotal cells for establishment of adaptive B cell responses, are impaired during HIV-1 infection in children. A consistent reduction of memory Tfh cells is associated with declined frequencies of RM B cells, creating a novel link between dysfunctional features of these cell types, major players in establishment of humoral immunity. PMID:26166114

  10. Impaired Phenotype and Function of T Follicular Helper Cells in HIV-1-Infected Children Receiving ART

    PubMed Central

    Bekele, Yonas; Amu, Sylvie; Bobosha, Kidist; Lantto, Rebecka; Nilsson, Anna; Endale, Birtukan; Gebre, Meseret; Aseffa, Abraham; Rethi, Bence; Howe, Rawleigh; Chiodi, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Abstract T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are important components in development of specific humoral immune responses; whether the number and biology of Tfh cells is impaired in HIV-1-infected children is not yet studied. The frequency, phenotype, and function of Tfh cells and B cells were determined in blood of HIV-1-infected children receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) and age-matched controls. Flow cytometry was used to characterize the frequency of Tfh cells and B cell subsets. Cytokine expression was measured after in vitro activation of Tfh cells. A reduced frequency of memory Tfh cells (P < 0.001) was identified in HIV-1-infected children and, on these cells, a reduced expression of programmed death-1 (PD-1) and inducible T cell costimulator (ICOS) (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01). Upon activation, the capacity of Tfh cells to express IL-4, an important cytokine for B cell function, was impaired in HIV-1-infected children. B cell subpopulations in HIV-1-infected children displayed significant differences from the control group: the frequency of resting memory (RM) B cells was reduced (P < 0.01) whereas the frequency of exhausted memory B cells increased (P < 0.001). Interestingly, the decline of RM cells correlated with the reduction of memory Tfh cells (P = 0.02). Our study shows that function and phenotype of Tfh cells, pivotal cells for establishment of adaptive B cell responses, are impaired during HIV-1 infection in children. A consistent reduction of memory Tfh cells is associated with declined frequencies of RM B cells, creating a novel link between dysfunctional features of these cell types, major players in establishment of humoral immunity. PMID:26166114

  11. Differences between Mycobacterium-Host Cell Relationships in Latent Tuberculous Infection of Mice Ex Vivo and Mycobacterial Infection of Mouse Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ufimtseva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The search for factors that account for the reproduction and survival of mycobacteria, including vaccine strains, in host cells is the priority for studies on tuberculosis. A comparison of BCG-mycobacterial loads in granuloma cells obtained from bone marrow and spleens of mice with latent tuberculous infection and cells from mouse bone marrow and peritoneal macrophage cultures infected with the BCG vaccine in vitro has demonstrated that granuloma macrophages each normally contained a single BCG-Mycobacterium, while those acutely infected in vitro had increased mycobacterial loads and death rates. Mouse granuloma cells were observed to produce the IFNγ, IL-1α, GM-CSF, CD1d, CD25, CD31, СD35, and S100 proteins. None of these activation markers were found in mouse cell cultures infected in vitro or in intact macrophages. Lack of colocalization of lipoarabinomannan-labeled BCG-mycobacteria with the lysosomotropic LysoTracker dye in activated granuloma macrophages suggests that these macrophages were unable to destroy BCG-mycobacteria. However, activated mouse granuloma macrophages could control mycobacterial reproduction in cells both in vivo and in ex vivo culture. By contrast, a considerable increase in the number of BCG-mycobacteria was observed in mouse bone marrow and peritoneal macrophages after BCG infection in vitro, when no expression of the activation-related molecules was detected in these cells. PMID:27066505

  12. Tissue myeloid cells in SIV-infected primates acquire viral DNA through phagocytosis of infected T cells.

    PubMed

    Calantone, Nina; Wu, Fan; Klase, Zachary; Deleage, Claire; Perkins, Molly; Matsuda, Kenta; Thompson, Elizabeth A; Ortiz, Alexandra M; Vinton, Carol L; Ourmanov, Ilnour; Loré, Karin; Douek, Daniel C; Estes, Jacob D; Hirsch, Vanessa M; Brenchley, Jason M

    2014-09-18

    The viral accessory protein Vpx, expressed by certain simian and human immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs and HIVs), is thought to improve viral infectivity of myeloid cells. We infected 35 Asian macaques and African green monkeys with viruses that do or do not express Vpx and examined viral targeting of cells in vivo. While lack of Vpx expression affected viral dynamics in vivo, with decreased viral loads and infection of CD4⁺ T cells, Vpx expression had no detectable effect on infectivity of myeloid cells. Moreover, viral DNA was observed only within myeloid cells in tissues not massively depleted of CD4⁺ T cells. Myeloid cells containing viral DNA also showed evidence of T cell phagocytosis in vivo, suggesting that their viral DNA may be attributed to phagocytosis of SIV-infected T cells. These data suggest that myeloid cells are not a major source of SIV in vivo, irrespective of Vpx expression. PMID:25238099

  13. Silibinin Inhibits HIV-1 Infection by Reducing Cellular Activation and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Janela; Lovelace, Erica S.; Elahi, Shokrollah; Maurice, Nicholas J.; Wagoner, Jessica; Dragavon, Joan; Mittler, John E.; Kraft, Zane; Stamatatos, Leonidis; Horton, Helen; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Coombs, Robert W.; Polyak, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Purified silymarin-derived natural products from the milk thistle plant (Silybum marianum) block hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and inhibit T cell proliferation in vitro. An intravenous formulation of silibinin (SIL), a major component of silymarin, displays anti-HCV effects in humans and also inhibits T-cell proliferation in vitro. We show that SIL inhibited replication of HIV-1 in TZM-bl cells, PBMCs, and CEM cells in vitro. SIL suppression of HIV-1 coincided with dose-dependent reductions in actively proliferating CD19+, CD4+, and CD8+ cells, resulting in fewer CD4+ T cells expressing the HIV-1 co-receptors CXCR4 and CCR5. SIL inhibition of T-cell growth was not due to cytotoxicity measured by cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or necrosis. SIL also blocked induction of the activation markers CD38, HLA-DR, Ki67, and CCR5 on CD4+ T cells. The data suggest that SIL attenuated cellular functions involved in T-cell activation, proliferation, and HIV-1 infection. Silymarin-derived compounds provide cytoprotection by suppressing virus infection, immune activation, and inflammation, and as such may be relevant for both HIV mono-infected and HIV/HCV co-infected subjects. PMID:22848626

  14. Cell death by pyroptosis drives CD4 T-cell depletion in HIV-1 infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doitsh, Gilad; Galloway, Nicole L. K.; Geng, Xin; Yang, Zhiyuan; Monroe, Kathryn M.; Zepeda, Orlando; Hunt, Peter W.; Hatano, Hiroyu; Sowinski, Stefanie; Muñoz-Arias, Isa; Greene, Warner C.

    2014-01-01

    The pathway causing CD4 T-cell death in HIV-infected hosts remains poorly understood although apoptosis has been proposed as a key mechanism. We now show that caspase-3-mediated apoptosis accounts for the death of only a small fraction of CD4 T cells corresponding to those that are both activated and productively infected. The remaining over 95% of quiescent lymphoid CD4 T cells die by caspase-1-mediated pyroptosis triggered by abortive viral infection. Pyroptosis corresponds to an intensely inflammatory form of programmed cell death in which cytoplasmic contents and pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, are released. This death pathway thus links the two signature events in HIV infection--CD4 T-cell depletion and chronic inflammation--and creates a pathogenic vicious cycle in which dying CD4 T cells release inflammatory signals that attract more cells to die. This cycle can be broken by caspase 1 inhibitors shown to be safe in humans, raising the possibility of a new class of `anti-AIDS' therapeutics targeting the host rather than the virus.

  15. Signaling through Toll-like receptors triggers HIV-1 replication in latently infected mast cells.

    PubMed

    Sundstrom, J Bruce; Little, Dawn M; Villinger, Francois; Ellis, Jane E; Ansari, Aftab A

    2004-04-01

    Evidence that human progenitor mast cells are susceptible to infection with CCR5-tropic strains of HIV-1 and that circulating HIV-1-infected FcepsilonRIalpha(+) cells with a similar progenitor phenotype have been isolated from AIDS patients has led to speculation that mast cells may serve as a potential reservoir for infectious HIV-1. In this study, progenitor mast cells, developed in vitro from CD34(+) cord blood stem cells, were experimentally infected with the CCR5-tropic strain HIV-1Bal after 28 days in culture as they reached their HIV-1-susceptible progenitor stage. HIV-1 p24 Ag levels were readily detectable by day 7 postinfection (PI), peaked at 2-3 wk PI as mature (tryptase/chymase-positive) HIV-1 infection-resistant mast cells emerged, and then steadily declined to below detectable limits by 10 wk PI, at which point integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA was confirmed by PCR quantitation in ( approximately 34% of) latently infected mast cells. Stimulation by ligands for Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, TLR4, or TLR9 significantly enhanced viral replication in a dose- and time-dependent manner in both HIV-1-infected progenitor and latently infected mature mast cells, without promoting degranulation, apoptosis, cellular proliferation, or dysregulation of TLR agonist-induced cytokine production in infected mast cells. Limiting dilution analysis of TLR activated, latently infected mature mast cells indicated that one in four was capable of establishing productive infections in A301 sentinel cells. Taken together, these results indicate that mast cells may serve both as a viral reservoir and as a model for studying mechanisms of postintegration latency in HIV infection. PMID:15034054

  16. Localised mitogenic activity in horses following infection with Streptococcus equi.

    PubMed

    McLean, R; Rash, N L; Robinson, C; Waller, A S; Paillot, R

    2015-06-01

    Streptococcus equi subspecies equi (S. equi) is the causative agent of strangles, a highly contagious upper respiratory disease of equids. Streptococcus equi produces superantigens (sAgs), which are thought to contribute to strangles pathogenicity through non-specific T-cell activation and pro-inflammatory response. Streptococcus equi infection induces abscesses in the lymph nodes of the head and neck. In some individuals, some abscess material remains into the guttural pouch and inspissates over time to form chondroids which can harbour live S. equi. The aim of this study was to determine the sites of sAg production during infection and therefore improve our understanding of their role. Abscess material, chondroids and serum collected from Equidae with signs of strangles were tested in mitogenic assays. Mitogenic sAg activity was only detected in abscess material and chondroids. Our data support the localised in vivo activity of sAg during both acute and carrier phases of S. equi infection. PMID:25841794

  17. Macrophage Activation by Ursolic and Oleanolic Acids during Mycobacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    López-García, Sonia; Castañeda-Sanchez, Jorge Ismael; Jiménez-Arellanes, Adelina; Domínguez-López, Lilia; Castro-Mussot, Maria Eugenia; Hernández-Sanchéz, Javier; Luna-Herrera, Julieta

    2015-01-01

    Oleanolic (OA) and ursolic acids (UA) are triterpenes that are abundant in vegetables, fruits and medicinal plants. They have been described as active moieties in medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of these triterpenes on macrophages infected in vitro with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). We evaluated production of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cytokines (TNF-α and TGF-β) as well as expression of cell membrane receptors (TGR5 and CD36) in MTB-infected macrophages following treatment with OA and UA. Triterpenes caused reduced MTB growth in macrophages, stimulated production of NO and ROS in the early phase, stimulated TNF-α, suppressed TGF-β and caused over-expression of CD36 and TGR5 receptors. Thus, our data suggest immunomodulatory properties of OA and UA on MTB infected macrophages. In conclusion, antimycobacterial effects induced by these triterpenes may be attributable to the conversion of macrophages from stage M2 (alternatively activated) to M1 (classically activated). PMID:26287131

  18. 5-Lipoxygenase Activity Increases Susceptibility to Experimental Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tristão, Fabrine Sales Massafera; Rocha, Fernanda Agostini; Moreira, Ana Paula; Cunha, Fernando Queiroz; Rossi, Marcos Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic mycosis caused by the thermodimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. Leukotrienes and lipoxins are lipid mediators produced after 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) activation that exhibit pro- and anti-inflammatory roles, respectively. Here, we have investigated the contribution of 5-LO enzymatic activity in PCM using an experimental model of P. brasiliensis infection. B6.129 wild-type (B6.129) and 5-LO-deficient (5-LO−/−) mice were intravenously inoculated with a virulent strain of P. brasiliensis (Pb18), and the survival rate of the infected mice was investigated on different days after yeast infection. 5-LO−/− mice exhibited an increased survival rate associated with a decreased number of CFU. The resistance of 5-LO−/− during PCM was associated with augmented nitric oxide (NO) production and the formation of compact granulomas. In addition, the absence of 5-LO was associated with a diminished number of CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells, higher levels of gamma interferon and interleukin-12, and increased T-bet (a T-box transcription factor that directs Th1 lineage commitment) mRNA levels in the lungs. Taken together, our results show for the first time that 5-LO enzymatic activity increases susceptibility to P. brasiliensis, suggesting that this pathway may be a potential target for therapeutic intervention during PCM. PMID:23381993

  19. Senescence affects endothelial cells susceptibility to dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    AbuBakar, Sazaly; Shu, Meng-Hooi; Johari, Jefree; Wong, Pooi-Fong

    2014-01-01

    Alteration in the endothelium leading to increased vascular permeability contributes to plasma leakage seen in dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). An earlier study showed that senescent endothelial cells (ECs) altered the ECs permeability. Here we investigated the susceptibility of senescing human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to dengue virus infection and determined if dengue virus infection induces HUVECs senescence. Our results suggest that DENV type-2 (DENV-2) foci forming unit (FFU) and extracellular virus RNA copy number were reduced by at least 35% and 85% in infection of the intermediate young and early senescent HUVECs, respectively, in comparison to infection of young HUVECs. No to low infectivity was recovered from infection of late senescent HUVECs. DENV infection also increases the percentage of HUVECs expressing senescence-associated (SA)-β-gal, cells arrested at the G2/M phase or 4N DNA content stage and cells with enlarged morphology, indicative of senescing cells. Alteration of HUVECs morphology was recorded using impedance-based real-time cell analysis system following DENV-2 infection. These results suggest that senescing HUVECs do not support DENV infection and DENV infection induces HUVECs senescence. The finding highlights the possible role of induction of senescence in DENV infection of the endothelial cells. PMID:24782642

  20. Simian immunodeficiency virus selectively infects proliferating CD4+ T cells in neonatal rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolei; Xu, Huanbin; Pahar, Bapi; Alvarez, Xavier; Green, Linda C.; Dufour, Jason; Moroney-Rasmussen, Terri; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2010-01-01

    Infants infected with HIV have a more severe course of disease and persistently higher viral loads than HIV-infected adults. However, the underlying pathogenesis of this exacerbation remains obscure. Here we compared the rate of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell proliferation in intestinal and systemic lymphoid tissues of neonatal and adult rhesus macaques, and of normal and age-matched simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)–infected neonates. The results demonstrate infant primates have much greater rates of CD4+ T-cell proliferation than adult macaques, and that these proliferating, recently “activated” CD4+ T cells are infected in intestinal and other lymphoid tissues of neonates, resulting in selective depletion of proliferating CD4+ T cells in acute infection. This depletion is accompanied by a marked increase in CD8+ T-cell activation and production, particularly in the intestinal tract. The data indicate intestinal CD4+ T cells of infant primates have a markedly accelerated rate of proliferation and maturation resulting in more rapid and sustained production of optimal target cells (activated memory CD4+ T cells), which may explain the sustained “peak” viremia characteristic of pediatric HIV infection. Eventual failure of CD4+ T-cell turnover in intestinal tissues may indicate a poorer prognosis for HIV-infected infants. PMID:20716768

  1. Antiviral Regulation in Porcine Monocytic Cells at Different Activation States

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Raymond R. R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monocytic cells, including macrophages and dendritic cells, exist in different activation states that are critical to the regulation of antimicrobial immunity. Many pandemic viruses are monocytotropic, including porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), which directly infects subsets of monocytic cells and interferes with antiviral responses. To study antiviral responses in PRRSV-infected monocytic cells, we characterized inflammatory cytokine responses and genome-wide profiled signature genes to investigate response pathways in uninfected and PRRSV-infected monocytic cells at different activation states. Our findings showed suppressed interferon (IFN) production in macrophages in non-antiviral states and an arrest of lipid metabolic pathways in macrophages at antiviral states. Importantly, porcine monocytic cells at different activation states were susceptible to PRRSV and responded differently to viral infection. Based on Gene Ontology (GO) analysis, two approaches were used to potentiate antiviral activity: (i) pharmaceutical modulation of cellular lipid metabolism and (ii) in situ PRRSV replication-competent expression of interferon alpha (IFN-α). Both approaches significantly suppressed exogenous viral infection in monocytic cells. In particular, the engineered IFN-expressing PRRSV strain eliminated exogenous virus infection and sustained cell viability at 4 days postinfection in macrophages. These findings suggest an intricate interaction of viral infection with the activation status of porcine monocytic cells. An understanding and integration of antiviral infection with activation status of mono