Science.gov

Sample records for actively perform simple

  1. Enabling people with developmental disabilities to actively follow simple instructions and perform designated physical activities according to simple instructions with Nintendo Wii Balance Boards by controlling environmental stimulation.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Chung, Chiao-Chen; Shih, Ching-Tien; Chen, Ling-Che

    2011-01-01

    The latest researches have adopted software technology turning the Nintendo Wii Balance Board into a high performance standing location detector. This study extended Wii Balance Board functionality to assess whether two people with developmental disabilities would be able to actively perform designated physical activities according to simple instructions by controlling their favorite environmental stimulation using Nintendo Wii Balance Boards. This study was carried out according to an A-B-A-B design. Data showed that both participants significantly increased their target response (performing a designated physical activity) by activating the control system to produce their preferred environmental stimulation during the intervention phases.

  2. Activation of the arousal response can impair performance on a simple motor task.

    PubMed

    Noteboom, J T; Fleshner, M; Enoka, R M

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of arousal in men and women on the moment-to-moment performance of a simple motor task. We examined the control of a precision task in the presence and absence of imposed stressors. Twenty-nine subjects (14 men, 15 women; 18--44 yr) were randomly assigned to either a control group or one of two stressor groups, Mental Math or Electric Shock. Subjects presented with Math and Shock stressors, which lasted 10 min, experienced significant increases in cognitive and physiological arousal compared with baseline and control subjects. Heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and electrodermal activity were elevated 5--80% with presentation of the stressors, whereas diastolic blood pressure and salivary cortisol were unchanged. The greater levels of cognitive and physiological arousal were associated with reductions in steadiness of a pinch grip for the Shock subjects (approximately 130% reduction from baseline) but not for the subjects in the Math group, who experienced heightened arousal but no change in steadiness (10% reduction from baseline). Although women exhibited more of a reduction in steadiness than men, the effect was largely unrelated to the magnitude of the change in arousal.

  3. Enabling People with Developmental Disabilities to Actively Follow Simple Instructions and Perform Designated Occupational Activities According to Simple Instructions with Battery-Free Wireless Mice by Controlling Environmental Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Chang, Man-Ling

    2012-01-01

    This study extended Battery-free wireless mouse functionality to assess whether two people with developmental disabilities would be able to actively perform designated simple occupational activities according to simple instructions by controlling their favorite environmental stimulation using Battery-free wireless mice with a newly developed…

  4. Enabling People with Developmental Disabilities to Actively Follow Simple Instructions and Perform Designated Physical Activities According to Simple Instructions with Nintendo Wii Balance Boards by Controlling Environmental Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Chung, Chiao-Chen; Shih, Ching-Tien; Chen, Ling-Che

    2011-01-01

    The latest researches have adopted software technology turning the Nintendo Wii Balance Board into a high performance standing location detector. This study extended Wii Balance Board functionality to assess whether two people with developmental disabilities would be able to actively perform designated physical activities according to simple…

  5. Enabling People with Developmental Disabilities to Actively Perform Designated Occupational Activities according to Simple Instructions with a Nintendo Wii Remote Controller by Controlling Environmental Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Wang, Shu-Hui; Chang, Man-Ling; Shih, Ching-Hsiang

    2012-01-01

    The latest researches have adopted software technology, turning the Nintendo Wii Remote Controller into a high performance three-dimensional object orientation detector. This study extended Wii Remote Controller functionality to assess whether two people with developmental disabilities would be able to actively perform designated simple…

  6. Earthways: Simple Environmental Activities for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrash, Carol

    This book presents simple environmental activities designed for young children. The contents are organized seasonally and each section features subsections: The Whole Earth Home and Classroom, Bringing Nature In, The Season Garden, Seasonal Crafts, and Supplying the Missing Links. These sections provide information on how to set up an indoor…

  7. Simple model for predicting microchannel heat sink performance and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Tsung-Hsun; Chein, Reiyu

    2012-05-01

    A simple model was established to predict microchannel heat sink performance based on energy balance. Both hydrodynamically and thermally developed effects were included. Comparisons with the experimental data show that this model provides satisfactory thermal resistance prediction. The model is further extended to carry out geometric optimization on the microchannel heat sink. The results from the simple model are in good agreement as compared with those obtained from three-dimensional simulations.

  8. Development and validation of a simple high performance thin layer chromatography method combined with direct 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl assay to quantify free radical scavenging activity in wine.

    PubMed

    Agatonovic-Kustrin, Snezana; Morton, David W; Yusof, Ahmad P

    2016-04-15

    The aim of this study was to: (a) develop a simple, high performance thin layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method combined with direct 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay to rapidly assess and compare free radical scavenging activity or anti-oxidant activity for major classes of polyphenolics present in wines; and (b) to investigate relationship between free radical scavenging activity to the total polyphenolic content (TPC) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in the wine samples. The most potent free radical scavengers that we tested for in the wine samples were found to be resveratrol (polyphenolic non-flavonoid) and rutin (flavonoid), while polyphenolic acids (caffeic acid and gallic acid) although present in all wine samples were found to be less potent free radical scavengers. Therefore, the total antioxidant capacity was mostly affected by the presence of resveratrol and rutin, while total polyphenolic content was mostly influenced by the presence of the less potent free radical scavengers gallic and caffeic acids.

  9. Simple Activity Demonstrates Wind Energy Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    Wind energy is an exciting and clean energy option often described as the fastest-growing energy system on the planet. With some simple materials, teachers can easily demonstrate its key principles in their classroom. (Contains 1 figure and 2 tables.)

  10. A Simple Case Study of a Grid Performance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aydt, Ruth; Gunter, Dan; Quesnel, Darcy; Smith, Warren; Taylor, Valerie; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This document presents a simple case study of a Grid performance system based on the Grid Monitoring Architecture (GMA) being developed by the Grid Forum Performance Working Group. It describes how the various system components would interact for a very basic monitoring scenario, and is intended to introduce people to the terminology and concepts presented in greater detail in other Working Group documents. We believe that by focusing on the simple case first, working group members can familiarize themselves with terminology and concepts, and productively join in the ongoing discussions of the group. In addition, prototype implementations of this basic scenario can be built to explore the feasibility of the proposed architecture and to expose possible shortcomings. Once the simple case is understood and agreed upon, complexities can be added incrementally as warranted by cases not addressed in the most basic implementation described here. Following the basic performance monitoring scenario discussion, unresolved issues are introduced for future discussion.

  11. Curvature of spacetime: A simple student activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Monika; Smith, Warren; Jackson, Matthew

    2016-12-01

    The following is a description of an inexpensive and simple student experiment for measuring the differences between the three types of spacetime topology—Euclidean (flat), Riemann (spherical), and Lobachevskian (saddle) curvatures. It makes use of commonly available tools and materials, and requires only a small amount of construction. The experiment applies to astronomical topics such as gravity, spacetime, general relativity, as well as geometry and mathematics.

  12. Performance of Simple Gas Foil Thrust Bearings in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Foil bearings are self-acting hydrodynamics devices used to support high speed rotating machinery. The advantages that they offer to process fluid lubricated machines include: high rotational speed capability, no auxiliary lubrication system, non-contacting high speed operation, and improved damping as compared to rigid hydrodynamic bearings. NASA has had a sporadic research program in this technology for almost 6 decades. Advances in the technology and understanding of foil journal bearings have enabled several new commercial products in recent years. These products include oil-free turbochargers for both heavy trucks and automobiles, high speed electric motors, microturbines for distributed power generation, and turbojet engines. However, the foil thrust bearing has not received a complimentary level of research and therefore has become the weak link of oil-free turbomachinery. In an effort to both provide machine designers with basic performance parameters and to elucidate the underlying physics of foil thrust bearings, NASA Glenn Research Center has completed an effort to experimentally measure the performance of simple gas foil thrust bearing in air. The database includes simple bump foil supported thrust bearings with full geometry and manufacturing techniques available to the user. Test conditions consist of air at ambient pressure and temperatures up to 500 C and rotational speeds to 55,000 rpm. A complete set of axial load, frictional torque, and rotational speed is presented for two different compliant sub-structures and inter-pad gaps. Data obtained from commercially available foil thrust bearings both with and without active cooling is presented for comparison. A significant observation made possible by this data set is the speed-load capacity characteristic of foil thrust bearings. Whereas for the foil journal bearing the load capacity increases linearly with rotational speed, the foil thrust bearing operates in the hydrodynamic high speed limit. In

  13. A Simple Laboratory Exercise Illustrating Active Transport in Yeast Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambuk, Boris U.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a simple laboratory activity illustrating the chemiosmotic principles of active transport in yeast cells. Demonstrates the energy coupling mechanism of active a-glucoside uptake by Saccaromyces cerevisiae cells with a colorimetric transport assay using very simple equipment. (Contains 22 references.) (Author/YDS)

  14. Enzyme Activity Experiments Using a Simple Spectrophotometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurlbut, Jeffrey A.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Experimental procedures for studying enzyme activity using a Spectronic 20 spectrophotometer are described. The experiments demonstrate the effect of pH, temperature, and inhibitors on enzyme activity and allow the determination of Km, Vmax, and Kcat. These procedures are designed for teaching large lower-level biochemistry classes. (MR)

  15. CMOS Active-Pixel Image Sensor With Simple Floating Gates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Nakamura, Junichi; Kemeny, Sabrina E.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental complementary metal-oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) active-pixel image sensor integrated circuit features simple floating-gate structure, with metal-oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) as active circuit element in each pixel. Provides flexibility of readout modes, no kTC noise, and relatively simple structure suitable for high-density arrays. Features desirable for "smart sensor" applications.

  16. Microarrays Made Simple: "DNA Chips" Paper Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    DNA microarray technology is revolutionizing biological science. DNA microarrays (also called DNA chips) allow simultaneous screening of many genes for changes in expression between different cells. Now researchers can obtain information about genes in days or weeks that used to take months or years. The paper activity described in this article…

  17. Simple construction and performance of a conical plastic cryocooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, N.

    1985-01-01

    Low power cryocoolers with conical displacers offer several advantages over stepped displacers. The described fabrication process allows quick and reproducible manufacturing of plastic conical displacer units. This could be of commercial interest, but it also makes systematic optimization feasible by constructing a number of different models. The process allows for a wide range of displacer profiles. Low temperature performance as dominated by regenerator losses, and several effects are discussed. A simple device is described which controls gas flow during expansion.

  18. Initial Kernel Timing Using a Simple PIM Performance Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Daniel S.; Block, Gary L.; Springer, Paul L.; Sterling, Thomas; Brockman, Jay B.; Callahan, David

    2005-01-01

    This presentation will describe some initial results of paper-and-pencil studies of 4 or 5 application kernels applied to a processor-in-memory (PIM) system roughly similar to the Cascade Lightweight Processor (LWP). The application kernels are: * Linked list traversal * Sun of leaf nodes on a tree * Bitonic sort * Vector sum * Gaussian elimination The intent of this work is to guide and validate work on the Cascade project in the areas of compilers, simulators, and languages. We will first discuss the generic PIM structure. Then, we will explain the concepts needed to program a parallel PIM system (locality, threads, parcels). Next, we will present a simple PIM performance model that will be used in the remainder of the presentation. For each kernel, we will then present a set of codes, including codes for a single PIM node, and codes for multiple PIM nodes that move data to threads and move threads to data. These codes are written at a fairly low level, between assembly and C, but much closer to C than to assembly. For each code, we will present some hand-drafted timing forecasts, based on the simple PIM performance model. Finally, we will conclude by discussing what we have learned from this work, including what programming styles seem to work best, from the point-of-view of both expressiveness and performance.

  19. Circadian Effects on Simple Components of Complex Task Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clegg, Benjamin A.; Wickens, Christopher D.; Vieane, Alex Z.; Gutzwiller, Robert S.; Sebok, Angelia L.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to advance understanding and prediction of the impact of circadian rhythm on aspects of complex task performance during unexpected automation failures, and subsequent fault management. Participants trained on two tasks: a process control simulation, featuring automated support; and a multi-tasking platform. Participants then completed one task in a very early morning (circadian night) session, and the other during a late afternoon (circadian day) session. Small effects of time of day were seen on simple components of task performance, but impacts on more demanding components, such as those that occur following an automation failure, were muted relative to previous studies where circadian rhythm was compounded with sleep deprivation and fatigue. Circadian low participants engaged in compensatory strategies, rather than passively monitoring the automation. The findings and implications are discussed in the context of a model that includes the effects of sleep and fatigue factors.

  20. A Simple Protein Precipitation-based Simultaneous Quantification of Lovastatin and Its Active Metabolite Lovastatin Acid in Human Plasma by Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry using Polarity Switching.

    PubMed

    Wujian, Ju; Kuan-Wei, Peng; Sihyung, Yang; Huijing, Sun; Mario, Sampson; Zhuo, Wang Michael

    2015-05-01

    Lovastatin is an anti-cholesterol lactone drug indicated for the treatment of hyperlipidemia and to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. It is converted to the β-hydroxy acid form (lovastatin acid) in vivo, which is the major pharmacologically active metabolite. Here, we describe the development and validation of an ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS)-based method utilizing polarity switching for the simultaneous quantification of lovastatin and lovastatin acid in human plasma. Simple protein precipitation extraction and direct injection of the extracted samples without drying/reconstitution showed good recoveries of both analytes (~70%). The developed method exhibited satisfactory intra-day and inter-day accuracy and precision. The interconversion between lovastatin and lovastatin acid during sample preparation and storage was minimal (< 1.9%). The lower limits of quantification were 0.5 and 0.2 nM (or 0.2 and 0.084 ng/mL) for lovastatin and lovastatin acid, respectively, using only 50 μL of plasma during extraction. The validated method was successfully applied to analyze plasma samples obtained from a healthy human subject who enrolled in a clinical drug interaction study involving lovastatin.

  1. Brain Gym. Simple Activities for Whole Brain Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, Paul E.; Dennison, Gail E.

    This booklet contains simple movements and activities that are used with students in Educational Kinesiology to enhance their experience of whole brain learning. Whole brain learning through movement repatterning and Brain Gym activities enable students to access those parts of the brain previously unavailable to them. These movements of body and…

  2. Assisting Persons with Multiple Disabilities to Move through Simple Occupational Activities with Automatic Prompting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta; Campodonico, Francesca; Groeneweg, Jop

    2008-01-01

    The present study assessed the possibility of assisting four persons with multiple disabilities to move through and perform simple occupational activities arranged within a room with the help of automatic prompting. The study involved two multiple probe designs across participants. The first multiple probe concerned the two participants with…

  3. A simple wavelength division multiplexing system for active learning teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zghal, Mourad; Ghalila, Hassen; Ben Lakhdar, Zohra

    2009-06-01

    The active learning project consists in a series of workshops for educators, researchers and students and promotes an innovative method of teaching physics using simple, inexpensive materials that can be fabricated locally. The objective of the project is to train trainers and inspire students to learn physics. The workshops are based on the use of laboratory work and hands-on activities in the classroom. The interpretation of these experiments is challenging for some students, and the experiments can lead to a significant amount of discussion. The workshops are organized within the framework of the project ``Active Learning in Optics and Photonics" (ALOP) mainly funded by UNESCO, with the support of ICTP (Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics) and SPIE. ALOP workshops offer high school, college or university physics teachers the opportunity to improve their conceptual understanding of optics. These workshops usually run for five days and cover several of the topics usually found in any introductory university physics program. Optics and photonics are used as subject matter because it is relevant as well as adaptable to research and educational conditions in many developing countries [1]. In this paper, we will mainly focus on a specific topic of the ALOP workshops, namely optical communications and Wavelength Division Multiplexing technology (WDM). This activity was originally developed by Mazzolini et al [2]. WDM is a technology used in fibre-optic communications for transmitting two or more separate signals over a single fibre optic cable by using a separate wavelength for each signal. Multiple signals are carried together as separate wavelengths of light in a multiplexed signal. Simple and inexpensive WDM system was implemented in our laboratory using light emitting diodes or diode lasers, plastic optical fibres, a set of optical filters and lenses, prism or grating, and photodiodes. Transmission of audio signals using home-made, simple

  4. Performance of a simple Closed Aquatic Ecosystem (CAES) in space.

    PubMed

    Wang, G-H; Li, G-B; Hu, C-X; Liu, Y-D; Song, L-R; Tong, G-H; Liu, X-M; Cheng, E-T

    2004-01-01

    A simple Closed Aquatic Ecosystem (CAES) consisting of single-celled green algae (Chlorella pyrenoidosa, producer), a spiral snail (Bulinus australianus, consumer) and a data acquisition and control unit was flown on the Chinese Spacecraft SHENZHOU-II in January 2001 for 7 days. In order to study the effect of microgravity on the operation of CAES, a 1 g centrifuge reference group in space, a ground 1 g reference group and a ground 1 g centrifuge reference group (1.4 g group) were run concurrently. Real-time data about algae biomass (calculated from transmission light intensity), temperature, light and centrifugation of the CAES were logged at minute intervals. It was found that algae biomass of both the microgravity group and the ground 1 g-centrifuge reference group (1.4 g) fluctuated during the experiment, but the algae biomass of the 1 g centrifuge reference group in space and the ground 1 g reference group increased during the experiment. The results may be attributable to influences of microgravity and 1.4 g gravity on the algae and snails metabolisms. Microgravity is the main factor to affect the operation of CAES in space and the contribution of microgravity to the effect was also estimated. These data may be valuable for the establishment of a complex CELSS in the future.

  5. Simple algorithms for calculating optical communication performance through turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, J. H.; Harney, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Propagation through turbulence can impose severe limitations on the performance of atmospheric optical communication links. Previous studies have established quantitative results for turbulence-induced beam spread, angular spread, and scintillation. This paper develops communication-theory results for single-bit and message transmission through turbulence. Programmable calculator algorithms for evaluating these results are given, and used to examine system performance in some realistic scenarios. These algorithms make it possible for the uninitiated communication engineer to rapidly assess the effects of turbulence on an atmospheric optical communication link.

  6. Scout: high-performance heterogeneous computing made simple

    SciTech Connect

    Jablin, James; Mc Cormick, Patrick; Herlihy, Maurice

    2011-01-26

    Researchers must often write their own simulation and analysis software. During this process they simultaneously confront both computational and scientific problems. Current strategies for aiding the generation of performance-oriented programs do not abstract the software development from the science. Furthermore, the problem is becoming increasingly complex and pressing with the continued development of many-core and heterogeneous (CPU-GPU) architectures. To acbieve high performance, scientists must expertly navigate both software and hardware. Co-design between computer scientists and research scientists can alleviate but not solve this problem. The science community requires better tools for developing, optimizing, and future-proofing codes, allowing scientists to focus on their research while still achieving high computational performance. Scout is a parallel programming language and extensible compiler framework targeting heterogeneous architectures. It provides the abstraction required to buffer scientists from the constantly-shifting details of hardware while still realizing higb-performance by encapsulating software and hardware optimization within a compiler framework.

  7. Emergent smectic order in simple active particle models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanczuk, Pawel; Chaté, Hugues; Chen, Leiming; Ngo, Sandrine; Toner, John

    2016-06-01

    Novel ‘smectic-P’ behavior, in which self-propelled particles form rows and move on average along them, occurs generically within the orientationally ordered phase of simple models that we simulate. Both apolar (head-tail symmetric) and polar (head-tail asymmetric) models with aligning and repulsive interactions exhibit slow algebraic decay of smectic order with system size up to some finite length scale, after which faster decay occurs. In the apolar case, this scale is that of an undulation instability of the rows. In the polar case, this instability is absent, but traveling fluctuations disrupt the rows in large systems and motion and smectic order may spontaneously globally rotate. These observations agree with a new hydrodynamic theory which we present here. Variants of our models also exhibit active smectic ‘A’ and ‘C’ order, with motion orthogonal and oblique to the layers respectively.

  8. A new simple dynamo model for solar activity cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, Nobumitsu; Schmitt, Dieter

    2015-04-01

    The solar magnetic activity cycle has been investigated in an elaborated manner with several types of dynamo models [1]. In most of the current mean-field approaches, the inhomogeneity of the large-scale flow is treated as an essential ingredient in the mean magnetic field equation whereas it is completely neglected in the turbulence equation. In this work, a new simple model for the solar activity cycle is proposed. The present model differs from the previous ones mainly in two points. First, in addition to the helicity coefficient α, we consider a term related to the cross helicity, which represents the effect of the inhomogeneous mean flow, in the turbulent electromotive force [2, 3]. Second, this transport coefficient (γ) is not treated as an adjustable parameter, but the evolution equation for γ is simultaneously solved. The basic scenario for the solar activity cycle in this approach is as follows: The toroidal field is induced by the toroidal rotation in mediation by the turbulent cross helicity. Then due to the α or helicity effect, the poloidal field is generated from the toroidal field. The poloidal field induced by the α effect produces a turbulent cross helicity whose sign is opposite to the original one (negative cross-helicity production). The cross helicity with this opposite sign induces a reversed toroidal field. Results of the eigenvalue analysis of the model equations are shown, which confirm the above scenario. References [1] Charbonneau, Living Rev. Solar Phys. 7, 3 (2010). [2] Yoshizawa, A. Phys. Fluids B 2, 1589 (1990). [3] Yokoi, N. Geophys. Astrophys. Fluid Dyn. 107, 114 (2013).

  9. A New Simple Dynamo Model for Stellar Activity Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, N.; Schmitt, D.; Pipin, V.; Hamba, F.

    2016-06-01

    A new simple dynamo model for stellar activity cycle is proposed. By considering an inhomogeneous flow effect on turbulence, it is shown that turbulent cross helicity (velocity-magnetic-field correlation) enters the expression of turbulent electromotive force as the coupling coefficient for the mean absolute vorticity. This makes the present model different from the current α-Ω-type models in two main ways. First, in addition to the usual helicity (α) and turbulent magnetic diffusivity (β) effects, we consider the cross-helicity effect as a key ingredient of the dynamo process. Second, the spatiotemporal evolution of cross helicity is solved simultaneously with the mean magnetic fields. The basic scenario is as follows. In the presence of turbulent cross helicity, the toroidal field is induced by the toroidal rotation. Then, as in usual models, the α effect generates the poloidal field from the toroidal one. This induced poloidal field produces a turbulent cross helicity whose sign is opposite to the original one (negative production). With this cross helicity of the reversed sign, a reversal in field configuration starts. Eigenvalue analyses of the simplest possible model give a butterfly diagram, which confirms the above scenario and the equatorward migrations, the phase relationship between the cross helicity and magnetic fields. These results suggest that the oscillation of the turbulent cross helicity is a key for the activity cycle. The reversal of the cross helicity is not the result of the magnetic-field reversal, but the cause of the latter. This new model is expected to open up the possibility of the mean-field or turbulence closure dynamo approaches.

  10. Implementation of the Simple Endoscopic Activity Score in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Koutroumpakis, Efstratios; Katsanos, Konstantinos H.

    2016-01-01

    Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn's Disease (SES-CD) was developed as an attempt to simplify Crohn's Disease Endoscopic Index of Severity (CDEIS). Since it was constructed from CDEIS, SES-CD performs comparably but also carries similar limitations. Several studies have utilized SES-CD scoring to describe disease severity or response to therapy. Some of them used SES-CD score as a continuous variable while others utilized certain cutoff values to define severity grades. All SES-CD cutoff values reported in published clinical trials were empirically selected by experts. Although in most of the studies that used SEC-CD scoring to define disease severity, a score <3 reflected inactive disease, no study is using score 0 to predefine inactivity. Studies applying SES-CD to define response to treatment used score 0. There is no optimal SES-CD cut-off for endoscopic remission. The quantification of mucosal healing using SES-CD scoring has not been standardized yet. As the definition of mucosal healing by SES-CD is unset, the concept of deep remission is also still evolving. Serum and fecal biomarkers as well as new radiologic imaging techniques are complementary to SES-CD. Current practice as well as important changes in endoscopy should be taken into consideration when defining SES-CD cutoffs. The optimal timing of SES-CD scoring to assess mucosal healing is not defined yet. To conclude, SES-CD represents a valuable tool. However, a consensus agreement on its optimal use is required. PMID:27184635

  11. A cheap simple ammeter for batteries-and-bulbs activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, David T.

    2000-04-01

    The use of batteries and bulbs to teach the fundamentals of circuit analysis has been with us for many years. Even recent innovations in pedagogy seem to rely on batteries and bulbs. In addition, the California Science Content Standards for fourth grade require that "students know how to design and build simple series and parallel circuits using components such as wires, batteries, and bulbs." These standards go on to indicate that students should be able to use a compass to detect magnetic fields and know that electric currents produce magnetic fields.

  12. Nordic Walking: A Simple Lifetime Physical Activity for Every Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Luis; Fernandez-Rio, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Children who become competent in a wide variety of motor skills and movement patterns are more likely to remain physically active for life. Physical education can achieve this goal by providing an extensive selection of activities and by including learning units that encourage students to increase their skill level and stay active year-round.…

  13. Theory of simple biochemical ``shape recognition'' via diffusion from activator coated nanoshapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, D. R.

    2008-09-01

    Inspired by recent experiments, we model the shape sensitivity, via a typical threshold initiation response, of an underlying complex biochemical reaction network to activator coated nanoshapes. Our theory re-emphasizes that shape effects can be vitally important for the onset of functional behavior in nanopatches and nanoparticles. For certain critical or particular shapes, activator coated nanoshapes do not evoke a threshold response in a complex biochemical network setting, while for different critical or specific shapes, the threshold response is rapidly achieved. The model thus provides a general theoretical understanding for how activator coated nanoshapes can enable a chemical system to perform simple "shape recognition," with an associated "all or nothing" response. The novel and interesting cases of the chemical response due to a nanoshape that shrinks with time is additionally considered, as well as activator coated nanospheres. Possible important applications of this work include the initiation of blood clotting by nanoshapes, nanoshape effects in nanocatalysis, physiological toxicity to nanoparticles, as well as nanoshapes in nanomedicine, drug delivery, and T cell immunological response. The aim of the theory presented here is that it inspires further experimentation on simple biochemical shape recognition via diffusion from activator coated nanoshapes.

  14. Detection of bacterial phosphatase activity by means of an original and simple test.

    PubMed Central

    Satta, G; Grazi, G; Varaldo, P E; Fontana, R

    1979-01-01

    A new test for the detection of bacterial phosphatase activity has been devised. The test is performed using agar media containing both methyl green (MG) and phenolphthalein diphosphate (PDP); in these media phosphatase-producing strains grow deep-green-stained colonies whereas non-producing strains do not. A total of 739 different strains were tested, including 593 staphylococci, 95 micrococci, 11 streptococci, 10 corynebacteria, 14 enterobacteria, and 16 candidae. All strains found phosphatase-positive according to the conventional phosphatase test displayed deep-green-stained colonies on MG-PDP media, whereas all phosphatase-negative strains showed unstained colonies on the same media. The main advantages of the present phosphatase test as compared with other conventional ones are that it is more simple to perform, it can reveal the phosphatase activity of colonies grown in deep agar, and can be incorporated into commercial multitest kits. PMID:87403

  15. Simple platform for chronic imaging of hippocampal activity during spontaneous behaviour in an awake mouse

    PubMed Central

    Villette, Vincent; Levesque, Mathieu; Miled, Amine; Gosselin, Benoit; Topolnik, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Chronic electrophysiological recordings of neuronal activity combined with two-photon Ca2+ imaging give access to high resolution and cellular specificity. In addition, awake drug-free experimentation is required for investigating the physiological mechanisms that operate in the brain. Here, we developed a simple head fixation platform, which allows simultaneous chronic imaging and electrophysiological recordings to be obtained from the hippocampus of awake mice. We performed quantitative analyses of spontaneous animal behaviour, the associated network states and the cellular activities in the dorsal hippocampus as well as estimated the brain stability limits to image dendritic processes and individual axonal boutons. Ca2+ imaging recordings revealed a relatively stereotyped hippocampal activity despite a high inter-animal and inter-day variability in the mouse behavior. In addition to quiet state and locomotion behavioural patterns, the platform allowed the reliable detection of walking steps and fine speed variations. The brain motion during locomotion was limited to ~1.8 μm, thus allowing for imaging of small sub-cellular structures to be performed in parallel with recordings of network and behavioural states. This simple device extends the drug-free experimentation in vivo, enabling high-stability optophysiological experiments with single-bouton resolution in the mouse awake brain. PMID:28240275

  16. Simple platform for chronic imaging of hippocampal activity during spontaneous behaviour in an awake mouse.

    PubMed

    Villette, Vincent; Levesque, Mathieu; Miled, Amine; Gosselin, Benoit; Topolnik, Lisa

    2017-02-27

    Chronic electrophysiological recordings of neuronal activity combined with two-photon Ca(2+) imaging give access to high resolution and cellular specificity. In addition, awake drug-free experimentation is required for investigating the physiological mechanisms that operate in the brain. Here, we developed a simple head fixation platform, which allows simultaneous chronic imaging and electrophysiological recordings to be obtained from the hippocampus of awake mice. We performed quantitative analyses of spontaneous animal behaviour, the associated network states and the cellular activities in the dorsal hippocampus as well as estimated the brain stability limits to image dendritic processes and individual axonal boutons. Ca(2+) imaging recordings revealed a relatively stereotyped hippocampal activity despite a high inter-animal and inter-day variability in the mouse behavior. In addition to quiet state and locomotion behavioural patterns, the platform allowed the reliable detection of walking steps and fine speed variations. The brain motion during locomotion was limited to ~1.8 μm, thus allowing for imaging of small sub-cellular structures to be performed in parallel with recordings of network and behavioural states. This simple device extends the drug-free experimentation in vivo, enabling high-stability optophysiological experiments with single-bouton resolution in the mouse awake brain.

  17. A simple and sensitive biosensor strain for detecting toxoflavin using β-galactosidase activity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Okhee; Lee, Yongsang; Han, Inyoung; Kim, Hongsup; Goo, Eunhye; Kim, Jinwoo; Hwang, Ingyu

    2013-12-15

    In this study, we developed a simple and sensitive biosensor for the determination of toxoflavin (which is toxic to various plants, fungi, animals, and bacteria) in natural samples based on β-galactosidase activity. The proposed toxoflavin detection method for toxin-producing bacteria or toxin-contaminated foods is simple and cost effective. Burkholderia glumae, a species known to cause rice grain rot and wilt in various field crops, produces toxoflavin under the control of a LysR-type transcriptional regulator ToxR and its ligand toxoflavin. As the expression of toxoflavin biosynthetic genes requires toxoflavin as a co-activator of ToxR, a novel biosensor stain was constructed based on lacZ reporter gene integration into the first gene of the toxoflavin biosynthesis operon, toxABCDE of B. glumae. The biosensor was composed of a sensor strain (COK71), substrates (X-gal or ONPG), and culture medium, without any complex preparation process. We demonstrated that the biosensor strain is highly specific to toxoflavin, and can quantify relative amounts of toxoflavin compared with known concentrations of toxoflavin. The proposed method was reliable and simple; samples containing 50-500 nM of toxoflavin could be analyzed. More importantly, the proposed biosensor strain could identify toxoflavin-producing bacteria in real samples. The excellent performance of this biosensor is useful for diagnostic purposes, such as detecting toxoflavin-contaminated foods and environmental samples.

  18. Two Simple Activities to Bring Rainbows into the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isik, Hakan; Yurumezoglu, Kemal

    2012-01-01

    A rainbow reveals the colors of sunlight in a breathtaking way, but the formation of this natural event cannot be controlled by human beings. Transforming this out-of-class experience into a teaching activity is a challenge for science educators. This paper outlines two activities for rainbow formation in the science classroom in cases of good…

  19. A Simple and Accurate Method for Measuring Enzyme Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Din-Yan

    1997-01-01

    Presents methods commonly used for investigating enzyme activity using catalase and presents a new method for measuring catalase activity that is more reliable and accurate. Provides results that are readily reproduced and quantified. Can also be used for investigations of enzyme properties such as the effects of temperature, pH, inhibitors,…

  20. Linking Language: Simple Language and Literacy Activities throughout the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockwell, Robert; Hoge, Debra Reichert; Searcy, Bill

    This book provides practical, everyday activities to weave language development and early literacy activities into the daily schedule in an early childhood education program. The chapters are organized by areas common in most early childhood environments: (1) circle time; (2) snack time; (3) dramatic play; (4) outdoor play; (5) art; (6) sand and…

  1. Simple Machines Made Simple.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Andre, Ralph E.

    Simple machines have become a lost point of study in elementary schools as teachers continue to have more material to cover. This manual provides hands-on, cooperative learning activities for grades three through eight concerning the six simple machines: wheel and axle, inclined plane, screw, pulley, wedge, and lever. Most activities can be…

  2. IMAGING BRAIN ACTIVATION: SIMPLE PICTURES OF COMPLEX BIOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Dienel, Gerald A.; Cruz, Nancy F.

    2009-01-01

    Elucidation of biochemical, physiological, and cellular contributions to metabolic images of brain is important for interpretation of images of brain activation and disease. Discordant brain images obtained with [14C]deoxyglucose (DG) and [1- or 6-14C]glucose were previously ascribed to increased glycolysis and rapid [14C]lactate release from tissue, but direct proof of [14C]lactate release from activated brain structures is lacking. Analysis of factors contributing to images of focal metabolic activity evoked by monotonic acoustic stimulation of conscious rats reveals that labeled metabolites of [1- or 6-14C]glucose are quickly released from activated cells due to decarboxylation reactions, spreading via gap junctions, and efflux via lactate transporters. Label release from activated tissue accounts for most of the additional [14C]glucose consumed during activation compared to rest. Metabolism of [3,4-14C]glucose generates about four times more [14C]lactate compared to 14CO2 in extracellular fluid suggesting that most lactate is not locally oxidized. In brain slices, direct assays of lactate uptake from extracellular fluid demonstrate that astrocytes have faster influx and higher transport capacity than neurons. Also, lactate transfer from a single astrocyte to other gap junction-coupled astrocytes exceeds astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttling. Astrocytes and neurons have excess capacities for glycolysis, and oxidative metabolism in both cell types rises during sensory stimulation. The energetics of brain activation is quite complex and the proportion of glucose consumed by astrocytes and neurons, lactate generation by either cell type, and the contributions of both cell types to brain images during brain activation are likely to vary with the stimulus paradigm and activated pathways. PMID:19076439

  3. Optoelectronic Chaos in a Simple Light Activated Feedback Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joiner, K. L.; Palmero, F.; Carretero-González, R.

    The nonlinear dynamics of an optoelectronic negative feedback switching circuit is studied. The circuit, composed of a bulb, a photoresistor, a thyristor and a linear resistor, corresponds to a nightlight device whose light is looped back into its light sensor. Periodic bifurcations and deterministic chaos are obtained by the feedback loop created when the thyristor switches on the bulb in the absence of light being detected by the photoresistor and the bulb light is then looped back into the nightlight to switch it off. The experimental signal is analyzed using tools of delay-embedding reconstruction that yield a reconstructed attractor with fractional dimension and positive Lyapunov exponent suggesting chaotic behavior for some parameter values. We construct a simple circuit model reproducing experimental results that qualitatively matches the different dynamical regimes of the experimental apparatus. In particular, we observe an order-chaos-order transition as the strength of the feedback is varied corresponding to varying the distance between the nightlight bulb and its photo-detector. A two-dimensional parameter diagram of the model reveals that the order-chaos-order transition is generic for this system.

  4. Simple Method for Assaying Colistin Methanesulfonate in Plasma and Urine Using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Milne, Robert W.; Nation, Roger L.; Turnidge, John D.; Coulthard, Kingsley; Valentine, Jason

    2002-01-01

    A simple and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic method is described for the determination of colistimethate sodium in plasma and urine. The accuracy and reproducibility was within 10.1 and 11.2% with rat plasma and urine, respectively. Several commonly coadministered antibacterial agents do not interfere with the assay. PMID:12234867

  5. A simple assay for measuring catalase activity: a visual approach.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Tadayuki; Tajima, Akiko; Sugimoto, Shinya; Okuda, Ken-ichi; Hironaka, Ippei; Kamata, Yuko; Takada, Koji; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu

    2013-10-30

    In this study, an assay that combines the ease and simplicity of the qualitative approach for measuring catalase activity was developed. The assay reagents comprised only hydrogen peroxide and Triton X-100. The enzyme-generated oxygen bubbles trapped by Triton X-100 were visualized as foam, whose height was estimated. A calibration plot using the defined unit of catalase activity yielded the best linear fit over a range of 20-300 units (U) (y = 0.3794x - 2.0909, r(2) = 0.993). The assay precision and reproducibility at 100 U were 4.6% and 4.8%, respectively. The applicability of the assay for measuring the catalase activity of various samples was assessed using laboratory strains of Escherichia coli, catalase-deficient isogenic mutants, clinically isolated Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, and human cells. The assay generated reproducible results. In conclusion, this new assay can be used to measure the catalase activity of bacterial isolates and human cells.

  6. "Student as Worker:" A Simple Yet Effective Career Education Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Mark J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes career education activity, "Student as Worker," in which elementary school children pretend school is their job and respond to questions about what is expected of them on the job as students. Responses are related to factors considered important in most jobs, such as punctuality, appropriate attire, hard work and effort, competency,…

  7. Centers Made Simple: A Management and Activity Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Laureen

    2005-01-01

    Drawing from her own experiences, teacher and author Laureen Reynolds shares management strategies, helpful suggestions, and quick tips to take the mystery out of setting up centers and demonstrates how to make the most of valuable classroom time. The activities outlined in this book are designed to appeal to students of all abilities, and range…

  8. Sand and Water Play: Simple, Creative Activities for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Sherrie; Cox, Amy

    Based on the view that creative play and hands-on experiences are essential to the development of well-balanced children and that their teachers have the responsibility to create an environment that can stimulate children's senses and curiosity, this book provides activities incorporating the use of sand and water tables into the classroom on a…

  9. Activation of Acetone and Other Simple Ketones in Anaerobic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Heider, Johann; Schühle, Karola; Frey, Jasmin; Schink, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Acetone and other ketones are activated for subsequent degradation through carboxylation by many nitrate-reducing, phototrophic, and obligately aerobic bacteria. Acetone carboxylation leads to acetoacetate, which is subsequently activated to a thioester and degraded via thiolysis. Two different types of acetone carboxylases have been described, which require either 2 or 4 ATP equivalents as an energy supply for the carboxylation reaction. Both enzymes appear to combine acetone enolphosphate with carbonic phosphate to form acetoacetate. A similar but more complex enzyme is known to carboxylate the aromatic ketone acetophenone, a metabolic intermediate in anaerobic ethylbenzene metabolism in denitrifying bacteria, with simultaneous hydrolysis of 2 ATP to 2 ADP. Obligately anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria activate acetone to a four-carbon compound as well, but via a different process than bicarbonate- or CO2-dependent carboxylation. The present evidence indicates that either carbon monoxide or a formyl residue is used as a cosubstrate, and that the overall ATP expenditure of this pathway is substantially lower than in the known acetone carboxylase reactions.

  10. Classroom Activities: Simple Strategies to Incorporate Student-Centered Activities within Undergraduate Science Lectures.

    PubMed

    Lom, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The traditional science lecture, where an instructor delivers a carefully crafted monolog to a large audience of students who passively receive the information, has been a popular mode of instruction for centuries. Recent evidence on the science of teaching and learning indicates that learner-centered, active teaching strategies can be more effective learning tools than traditional lectures. Yet most colleges and universities retain lectures as their central instructional method. This article highlights several simple collaborative teaching techniques that can be readily deployed within traditional lecture frameworks to promote active learning. Specifically, this article briefly introduces the techniques of: reader's theatre, think-pair-share, roundtable, jigsaw, in-class quizzes, and minute papers. Each technique is broadly applicable well beyond neuroscience courses and easily modifiable to serve an instructor's specific pedagogical goals. The benefits of each technique are described along with specific examples of how each technique might be deployed within a traditional lecture to create more active learning experiences.

  11. A simple modern correctness condition for a space-based high-performance multiprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probst, David K.; Li, Hon F.

    1992-01-01

    A number of U.S. national programs, including space-based detection of ballistic missile launches, envisage putting significant computing power into space. Given sufficient progress in low-power VLSI, multichip-module packaging and liquid-cooling technologies, we will see design of high-performance multiprocessors for individual satellites. In very high speed implementations, performance depends critically on tolerating large latencies in interprocessor communication; without latency tolerance, performance is limited by the vastly differing time scales in processor and data-memory modules, including interconnect times. The modern approach to tolerating remote-communication cost in scalable, shared-memory multiprocessors is to use a multithreaded architecture, and alter the semantics of shared memory slightly, at the price of forcing the programmer either to reason about program correctness in a relaxed consistency model or to agree to program in a constrained style. The literature on multiprocessor correctness conditions has become increasingly complex, and sometimes confusing, which may hinder its practical application. We propose a simple modern correctness condition for a high-performance, shared-memory multiprocessor; the correctness condition is based on a simple interface between the multiprocessor architecture and a high-performance, shared-memory multiprocessor; the correctness condition is based on a simple interface between the multiprocessor architecture and the parallel programming system.

  12. Molecular dynamics study of the structure and performance of simple and double bases propellants.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiufang; Zhu, Weihua; Xiao, Jijun; Xiao, Heming

    2008-08-15

    To investigate the structure and performance of simple and double bases propellants, the nitrocellulose (NC), nitroglycerin (NG), and double mixed system (NC+NG) have been simulated by using the molecular dynamics (MD) method with the COMPASS force field. The interactions between NC and NG have been analyzed by means of pair correlation functions. The mechanical properties of the three model systems, i.e. elastic coefficients, modulus, Cauchy pressure, and Poisson's ratio, etc., have been obtained. It is found that the rigidity, ductibility, and tenacity of the double bases propellants (NC+NG) are stronger than those of simple base propellants (NC), which attributes to the effect of NG and the strong interactions between NC and NG. The detonation properties of the three systems have also been calculated and the results show that compared with the simple base propellant (NC), the detonation heat and detonation velocity of the double base propellants (NC+NG) are increased.

  13. Effective coordination number: A simple indicator of activation energies for NO dissociation on Rh(100) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Prasenjit; Pushpa, Raghani; Gironcoli, Stefano de

    2009-12-15

    We have used density-functional theory to compute the activation energy for the dissociation of NO on two physical and two hypothetical systems: unstrained and strained Rh(100) surfaces and monolayers of Rh atoms on strained and unstrained MgO(100) surfaces. We find that the activation energy, relative to the gas phase, is reduced when a monolayer of Rh is placed on MgO, due both to the chemical nature of the substrate and the strain imposed by the substrate. The former effect is the dominant one, though both effects are of the same order of magnitude. We find that both effects are encapsulated in a simple quantity which we term as the 'effective coordination number'(n{sub e}); the activation energy is found to vary linearly with n{sub e}. We have compared the performance of n{sub e} as a predictor of activation energy of NO dissociation on the above-mentioned Rh surfaces with the two well-established indicators, namely, the position of the d-band center and the coadsorption energy of N and O. We find that for the present systems n{sub e} performs as well as the other two indicators.

  14. PARduino: A Simple Device Measuring and Logging Photosynthetically Active Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, H. R.; Findley, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR, 400 to 700 nm) is one of the primary controls of forest carbon and water relations. In complex terrain, PAR has high spatial-variability. Given the high cost of commercial datalogging equipment, spatially-distributed measurements of PAR have been typically modeled using geographic coordinates and terrain indices. Here, we present a design for a low cost, field-deployable device for measuring and logging PAR built around an Arduino microcontroller (we named it PARduino). PARduino provides for widely distributed sensor arrays and tests the feasibility of using hobbyist-grade electronics for collecting scientific data. PARduino components include a LiCor quantum sensor, EME Systems signal converter/amplifier, and Sparkfun's Arduino Pro Mini microcontroller. Additional components include a real time clock, a microSD flash memory card, and a custom printed circuit board (PCB). We selected the components with an eye towards ease of assembly. Everything can be connected to the PCB using through-hole soldering techniques. Since the device will be deployed in remote research plots that lack easy access to line power, battery life was also a consideration in the design. Extended deployment is possible because PARduino's software keeps it in a low-power sleep mode until ready to make a measurement. PARduino will be open-source hardware for use and improvement by others.

  15. A simple method for evaluating the trapping performance of acoustic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Lee, Changyang; Ho Lam, Kwok; Kirk Shung, K.

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a rapid and simple method to evaluate the trapping performance of high frequency focused ultrasonic transducers for acoustic tweezer applications. The method takes into consideration the friction between the particle to be trapped and the surface that it resides on. As a result it should be more reliable and accurate than the methods proposed previously. The trapping force produced by a 70-MHz press-focused transducer was measured to evaluate the performance of this approach. This method demonstrates its potential in optimizing the excitation conditions for acoustic tweezer applications and the design of acoustic tweezers.

  16. A simple method for evaluating the trapping performance of acoustic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Lee, Changyang; Ho Lam, Kwok; Kirk Shung, K

    2013-02-25

    The purpose of this paper is to present a rapid and simple method to evaluate the trapping performance of high frequency focused ultrasonic transducers for acoustic tweezer applications. The method takes into consideration the friction between the particle to be trapped and the surface that it resides on. As a result it should be more reliable and accurate than the methods proposed previously. The trapping force produced by a 70-MHz press-focused transducer was measured to evaluate the performance of this approach. This method demonstrates its potential in optimizing the excitation conditions for acoustic tweezer applications and the design of acoustic tweezers.

  17. Simple Learned Weighted Sums of Inferior Temporal Neuronal Firing Rates Accurately Predict Human Core Object Recognition Performance

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ha; Solomon, Ethan A.; DiCarlo, James J.

    2015-01-01

    To go beyond qualitative models of the biological substrate of object recognition, we ask: can a single ventral stream neuronal linking hypothesis quantitatively account for core object recognition performance over a broad range of tasks? We measured human performance in 64 object recognition tests using thousands of challenging images that explore shape similarity and identity preserving object variation. We then used multielectrode arrays to measure neuronal population responses to those same images in visual areas V4 and inferior temporal (IT) cortex of monkeys and simulated V1 population responses. We tested leading candidate linking hypotheses and control hypotheses, each postulating how ventral stream neuronal responses underlie object recognition behavior. Specifically, for each hypothesis, we computed the predicted performance on the 64 tests and compared it with the measured pattern of human performance. All tested hypotheses based on low- and mid-level visually evoked activity (pixels, V1, and V4) were very poor predictors of the human behavioral pattern. However, simple learned weighted sums of distributed average IT firing rates exactly predicted the behavioral pattern. More elaborate linking hypotheses relying on IT trial-by-trial correlational structure, finer IT temporal codes, or ones that strictly respect the known spatial substructures of IT (“face patches”) did not improve predictive power. Although these results do not reject those more elaborate hypotheses, they suggest a simple, sufficient quantitative model: each object recognition task is learned from the spatially distributed mean firing rates (100 ms) of ∼60,000 IT neurons and is executed as a simple weighted sum of those firing rates. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We sought to go beyond qualitative models of visual object recognition and determine whether a single neuronal linking hypothesis can quantitatively account for core object recognition behavior. To achieve this, we designed a

  18. Simple Learned Weighted Sums of Inferior Temporal Neuronal Firing Rates Accurately Predict Human Core Object Recognition Performance.

    PubMed

    Majaj, Najib J; Hong, Ha; Solomon, Ethan A; DiCarlo, James J

    2015-09-30

    To go beyond qualitative models of the biological substrate of object recognition, we ask: can a single ventral stream neuronal linking hypothesis quantitatively account for core object recognition performance over a broad range of tasks? We measured human performance in 64 object recognition tests using thousands of challenging images that explore shape similarity and identity preserving object variation. We then used multielectrode arrays to measure neuronal population responses to those same images in visual areas V4 and inferior temporal (IT) cortex of monkeys and simulated V1 population responses. We tested leading candidate linking hypotheses and control hypotheses, each postulating how ventral stream neuronal responses underlie object recognition behavior. Specifically, for each hypothesis, we computed the predicted performance on the 64 tests and compared it with the measured pattern of human performance. All tested hypotheses based on low- and mid-level visually evoked activity (pixels, V1, and V4) were very poor predictors of the human behavioral pattern. However, simple learned weighted sums of distributed average IT firing rates exactly predicted the behavioral pattern. More elaborate linking hypotheses relying on IT trial-by-trial correlational structure, finer IT temporal codes, or ones that strictly respect the known spatial substructures of IT ("face patches") did not improve predictive power. Although these results do not reject those more elaborate hypotheses, they suggest a simple, sufficient quantitative model: each object recognition task is learned from the spatially distributed mean firing rates (100 ms) of ∼60,000 IT neurons and is executed as a simple weighted sum of those firing rates. Significance statement: We sought to go beyond qualitative models of visual object recognition and determine whether a single neuronal linking hypothesis can quantitatively account for core object recognition behavior. To achieve this, we designed a

  19. Classroom Activities: Simple Strategies to Incorporate Student-Centered Activities within Undergraduate Science Lectures

    PubMed Central

    Lom, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The traditional science lecture, where an instructor delivers a carefully crafted monolog to a large audience of students who passively receive the information, has been a popular mode of instruction for centuries. Recent evidence on the science of teaching and learning indicates that learner-centered, active teaching strategies can be more effective learning tools than traditional lectures. Yet most colleges and universities retain lectures as their central instructional method. This article highlights several simple collaborative teaching techniques that can be readily deployed within traditional lecture frameworks to promote active learning. Specifically, this article briefly introduces the techniques of: reader’s theatre, think-pair-share, roundtable, jigsaw, in-class quizzes, and minute papers. Each technique is broadly applicable well beyond neuroscience courses and easily modifiable to serve an instructor’s specific pedagogical goals. The benefits of each technique are described along with specific examples of how each technique might be deployed within a traditional lecture to create more active learning experiences. PMID:23494568

  20. A simple delay-line 4-PPM demodulator with near-optimum performance.

    PubMed

    Stevens, M L; Boroson, D M

    2012-02-27

    We describe a simple 4-PPM demodulator that uses analog delay lines and simple 1-bit comparators to determine the least-significant bit and most-significant bit of the 4-PPM encoded data without additional digital signal processing. We show that with good optical filtering the comparator-based demodulator can theoretically operate with sensitivity only 0.23 dB from the optimum 4-ary receiver. We describe as an example of this approach the demodulator built for the Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration and show measured performance within 1.1 dB of the expected sensitivity. The technique is extendable to higher-order, and higher-symbol-rate orthogonal modulation formats.

  1. A simple, high performance Thomson scattering diagnostic for high temperature plasma research

    SciTech Connect

    Hartog, D.J.D.; Cekic, M.

    1994-02-01

    This Thomson scattering diagnostic is used to measure the electron temperature and density of the plasma in the MST reversed-field pinch, a magnetic confinement fusion research device. This diagnostic system is unique for its type in that it combines high performance with simple design and low cost components. In the design of this instrument, careful attention was given to the suppression of stray laser line light with simple and effective beam dumps, viewing dumps, aperatures, and a holographic edge filter. This allows the use of a single grating monochromator for dispersion of the Thomson scattered spectrum onto the microchannel plate detector. Alignment and calibration procedures for the laser beam delivery system, the scattered light collection system, and the spectrometer and detector are described. A sample Thomson scattered spectrum illustrates typical data.

  2. A Simple Analytic Model for Estimating Mars Ascent Vehicle Mass and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolley, Ryan C.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) is a crucial component in any sample return campaign. In this paper we present a universal model for a two-stage MAV along with the analytic equations and simple parametric relationships necessary to quickly estimate MAV mass and performance. Ascent trajectories can be modeled as two-burn transfers from the surface with appropriate loss estimations for finite burns, steering, and drag. Minimizing lift-off mass is achieved by balancing optimized staging and an optimized path-to-orbit. This model allows designers to quickly find optimized solutions and to see the effects of design choices.

  3. What Is Life? An Activity to Convey the Complexities of This Simple Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prud'homme-Genereux, Annie

    2013-01-01

    "What is life?" This deceptively simple question lies at the heart of biology. In this activity, students work in groups to come up with their own definition using a set of prompting cards that differs for each team. In doing so, students gain an appreciation of the complexities of addressing this question. The activity takes approximately 60-90…

  4. In Search of a Better Bean: A Simple Activity to Introduce Plant Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaccarotella, Kim; James, Roxie

    2014-01-01

    Measuring plant stem growth over time is a simple activity commonly used to introduce concepts in growth and development in plant biology (Reid & Pu, 2007). This Quick Fix updates the activity and incorporates a real-world application: students consider possible effects of soil substrate and sunlight conditions on plant growth without needing…

  5. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Performance evaluation of simple linear iterative clustering algorithm on medical image processing.

    PubMed

    Cong, Jinyu; Wei, Benzheng; Yin, Yilong; Xi, Xiaoming; Zheng, Yuanjie

    2014-01-01

    Simple Linear Iterative Clustering (SLIC) algorithm is increasingly applied to different kinds of image processing because of its excellent perceptually meaningful characteristics. In order to better meet the needs of medical image processing and provide technical reference for SLIC on the application of medical image segmentation, two indicators of boundary accuracy and superpixel uniformity are introduced with other indicators to systematically analyze the performance of SLIC algorithm, compared with Normalized cuts and Turbopixels algorithm. The extensive experimental results show that SLIC is faster and less sensitive to the image type and the setting superpixel number than other similar algorithms such as Turbopixels and Normalized cuts algorithms. And it also has a great benefit to the boundary recall, the robustness of fuzzy boundary, the setting superpixel size and the segmentation performance on medical image segmentation.

  7. A Simple and Efficient Method to Detect Nuclear Factor Activation in Human Neutrophils by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Erick; Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in peripheral blood. These cells are the first to appear at sites of inflammation and infection, thus becoming the first line of defense against invading microorganisms. Neutrophils possess important antimicrobial functions such as phagocytosis, release of lytic enzymes, and production of reactive oxygen species. In addition to these important defense functions, neutrophils perform other tasks in response to infection such as production of proinflammatory cytokines and inhibition of apoptosis. Cytokines recruit other leukocytes that help clear the infection, and inhibition of apoptosis allows the neutrophil to live longer at the site of infection. These functions are regulated at the level of transcription. However, because neutrophils are short-lived cells, the study of transcriptionally regulated responses in these cells cannot be performed with conventional reporter gene methods since there are no efficient techniques for neutrophil transfection. Here, we present a simple and efficient method that allows detection and quantification of nuclear factors in isolated and immunolabeled nuclei by flow cytometry. We describe techniques to isolate pure neutrophils from human peripheral blood, stimulate these cells with anti-receptor antibodies, isolate and immunolabel nuclei, and analyze nuclei by flow cytometry. The method has been successfully used to detect NF-κB and Elk-1 nuclear factors in nuclei from neutrophils and other cell types. Thus, this method represents an option for analyzing activation of transcription factors in isolated nuclei from a variety of cell types. PMID:23603868

  8. Use of the Simple Infiltrated Microstructure Polarization Loss Estimation (SIMPLE) model to describe the performance of nano-composite solid oxide fuel cell cathodes.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Jason D; Wang, Lin; Call, Ann V; Barnett, Scott A

    2012-11-28

    Nano-composite Sm(0.5)Sr(0.5)CoO(3-δ) (SSC)-Ce(0.9)Gd(0.1)O(1.95) (GDC) and La(0.6)Sr(0.4)Co(0.8)Fe(0.2)O(3-δ) (LSCF)-GDC Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) cathodes with various infiltrate loading levels were prepared through multiple nitrate solution infiltrations into porous GDC ionic conducting (IC) scaffolds. Microstructural analyses indicated that the average SSC and average LSCF hemispherical particle radii remained roughly constant, at 25 nm, across multiple infiltration-gelation-firing sequences. Comparisons between symmetric cell polarization resistance measurements and Simple Infiltrated Microstructure Polarization Loss Estimation (SIMPLE) model predictions showed that the SIMPLE model was able to predict the performance of heavily infiltrated SSC-GDC and LSCF-GDC cathodes with accuracies better than 55% and 70%, respectively (without the use of fitting parameters). Poor electronic conduction between mixed ionic electronic conducting (MIEC) infiltrate particles was found in lightly infiltrated cathodes. Since these electronic conduction losses were not accounted for by the SIMPLE model, larger discrepancies between the SIMPLE-model-predicted and measured polarization resistances were observed for lightly infiltrated cathodes. This work demonstrates that the SIMPLE model can be used to quickly determine the lowest possible polarization resistance of a variety of infiltrated MIEC on IC nano-composite cathodes (NCC's) when the NCC microstructure and an experimentally-applicable set of intrinsic MIEC oxygen surface resistances and IC bulk oxygen conductivities are known. Currently, this model is the only one capable of predicting the polarization resistance of heavily infiltrated MIEC on IC NCC's as a function of temperature, cathode thickness, nano-particle size, porosity, and composition.

  9. Performance effects of nicotine during selective attention, divided attention, and simple stimulus detection: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Britta; Ross, Thomas J; Wolkenberg, Frank A; Shakleya, Diaa M; Huestis, Marilyn A; Stein, Elliot A

    2009-09-01

    Attention-enhancing effects of nicotine appear to depend on the nature of the attentional function. Underlying neuroanatomical mechanisms, too, may vary depending on the function modulated. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study recorded blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) activity in minimally deprived smokers during tasks of simple stimulus detection, selective attention, or divided attention after single-blind application of a transdermal nicotine (21 mg) or placebo patch. Smokers' performance in the placebo condition was unimpaired as compared with matched nonsmokers. Nicotine reduced reaction time (RT) in the stimulus detection and selective attention but not divided attention condition. Across all task conditions, nicotine reduced activation in frontal, temporal, thalamic, and visual regions and enhanced deactivation in so-called "default" regions. Thalamic effects correlated with RT reduction selectively during stimulus detection. An interaction with task condition was observed in middle and superior frontal gyri, where nicotine reduced activation only during stimulus detection. A visuomotor control experiment provided evidence against nonspecific effects of nicotine. In conclusion, although prefrontal activity partly displayed differential modulation by nicotine, most BOLD effects were identical across tasks, despite differential performance effects, suggesting that common neuronal mechanisms can selectively benefit different attentional functions. Overall, the effects of nicotine may be explained by increased functional efficiency and downregulated task-independent "default" functions.

  10. A simple assay for lipid hydroperoxides based on triphenylphosphine oxidation and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Maeda, H

    1991-09-01

    A simple and sensitive method was developed to measure total hydroperoxides. After the reduction of hydroperoxides with triphenylphosphine (TP) in cyclohexane at 30°C, the amount of triphenylphosphine oxide (TPO) produced is determined by reverse-phase or normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in combination with an ultraviolet (UV)-detector by measuring absorption at 220 or 260 nm. TPO was shown to be gener-ated stoichiometrically by reduction of known amounts of either cumene hydroperoxide or methyl 13-hydroper-oxyoctadecadienoate. For various lipids at low levels of oxidation, the peroxide values determined by this method were in good agreement with those obtained by conventional iodometry. The detection limit of TPO in HPLC using absorption at 220 nm was less than 10 pmol. Consequently, total hydroperoxides in lipids at levels corresponding to less than a peroxide value of 1 can be estimated by the TP method on a 10-mg sample.

  11. Simple approach to predict APD/PMT lidar detector performance under sky background using dimensionless parametrization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agishev, Ravil; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred; Gilerson, Alexander; Ahmed, Samir

    2006-08-01

    In this paper, we developed a simple approach to predict the APD/PMT (avalanche photodiode/photomultiplier) lidar detector performance in the presence of residual skylight background. By normalizing all relevant photodetector noise sources to the quantum noise, we obtain quantitative expressions for the degradation of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the increasing threshold sensitivity of and decreasing lidar operation range. To apply the formalism to any lidar photodetectors operating in the ultra violet, visible and near-infrared spectral regions and to perform a comparative analysis of PMT and APD capabilities as the best photodetectors for ultra-violet (UV), visible (Vis) and near infra-red (NIR) lidar, we utilize a set of spectral characteristics that are built from an envelope of individual PMT and APD component responses. On this basis, the general analysis of system performance under intense background conditions is developed, and practical recommendations on detector use for each spectral region are given. The dimensionless formalism and the generalized detector spectral models used allows our analysis to be applied to nearly any lidar receiver operating over very different signal/background situations.

  12. Validation of a simple method for predicting the disinfection performance in a flow-through contactor.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Valentin; Barbeau, Benoit

    2014-02-01

    Despite its shortcomings, the T10 method introduced by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in 1989 is currently the method most frequently used in North America to calculate disinfection performance. Other methods (e.g., the Integrated Disinfection Design Framework, IDDF) have been advanced as replacements, and more recently, the USEPA suggested the Extended T10 and Extended CSTR (Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactor) methods to improve the inactivation calculations within ozone contactors. To develop a method that fully considers the hydraulic behavior of the contactor, two models (Plug Flow with Dispersion and N-CSTR) were successfully fitted with five tracer tests results derived from four Water Treatment Plants and a pilot-scale contactor. A new method based on the N-CSTR model was defined as the Partially Segregated (Pseg) method. The predictions from all the methods mentioned were compared under conditions of poor and good hydraulic performance, low and high disinfectant decay, and different levels of inactivation. These methods were also compared with experimental results from a chlorine pilot-scale contactor used for Escherichia coli inactivation. The T10 and Extended T10 methods led to large over- and under-estimations. The Segregated Flow Analysis (used in the IDDF) also considerably overestimated the inactivation under high disinfectant decay. Only the Extended CSTR and Pseg methods produced realistic and conservative predictions in all cases. Finally, a simple implementation procedure of the Pseg method was suggested for calculation of disinfection performance.

  13. A simple model of PV system performance and its use in fault detection

    SciTech Connect

    Firth, S.K.; Lomas, K.J.; Rees, S.J.

    2010-04-15

    Results are presented from a monitoring study of the performance of a sample of UK domestic PV systems. Five-minute average climatic and performance data was recorded for 27 PV systems at two sites for up to 2 years of operation. On average, the annual energy losses due to faults were 3.6% (Site A, first year of operation), 6.6% (Site A, second year of operation) and 18.9% (Site B, first year of operation). Simple empirical models are constructed to describe the performance of the PV systems under 'normal operation' (when no faults occur). New analysis techniques are developed which estimate the energy losses of four different fault categories: sustained zero efficiency faults; brief zero efficiency faults; shading; and non-zero efficiency non-shading faults. The results demonstrate that faults have the potential to cause significant energy losses in domestic PV systems. The benefits of applying the data analysis techniques described in this work to PV system clusters and other urban micro-generation technologies are discussed. (author)

  14. A Simple and Effective Protein Folding Activity Suitable for Large Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Brian

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive hands-on simulation of protein folding suitable for use in large lecture classes. This activity uses a minimum of parts, tools, and skill to simulate some of the fundamental principles of protein folding. The major concepts targeted are that proteins begin as linear polypeptides and fold to…

  15. Hydrodynamic Voltammetry as a Rapid and Simple Method for Evaluating Soil Enzyme Activities

    PubMed Central

    Sazawa, Kazuto; Kuramitz, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Soil enzymes play essential roles in catalyzing reactions necessary for nutrient cycling in the biosphere. They are also sensitive indicators of ecosystem stress, therefore their evaluation is very important in assessing soil health and quality. The standard soil enzyme assay method based on spectroscopic detection is a complicated operation that requires the removal of soil particles. The purpose of this study was to develop a new soil enzyme assay based on hydrodynamic electrochemical detection using a rotating disk electrode in a microliter droplet. The activities of enzymes were determined by measuring the electrochemical oxidation of p-aminophenol (PAP), following the enzymatic conversion of substrate-conjugated PAP. The calibration curves of β-galactosidase (β-gal), β-glucosidase (β-glu) and acid phosphatase (AcP) showed good linear correlation after being spiked in soils using chronoamperometry. We also performed electrochemical detection using real soils. Hydrodynamic chronoamperometry can be used to assess the AcP in soils, with a detection time of only 90 s. Linear sweep voltammetry was used to measure the amount of PAP released from β-gal and β-glu by enzymatic reaction after 60 min. For the assessment of soil enzymes, the results of hydrodynamic voltammetry assay compared favorably to those using a standard assay procedure, but this new procedure is more user-friendly, rapid and simple. PMID:25746097

  16. Comparison of simple additive weighting (SAW) and composite performance index (CPI) methods in employee remuneration determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlitasari, L.; Suhartini, D.; Benny

    2017-01-01

    The process of determining the employee remuneration for PT Sepatu Mas Idaman currently are still using Microsoft Excel-based spreadsheet where in the spreadsheet there is the value of criterias that must be calculated for every employee. This can give the effect of doubt during the assesment process, therefore resulting in the process to take much longer time. The process of employee remuneration determination is conducted by the assesment team based on some criterias that have been predetermined. The criteria used in the assessment process are namely the ability to work, human relations, job responsibility, discipline, creativity, work, achievement of targets, and absence. To ease the determination of employee remuneration to be more efficient and effective, the Simple Additive Weighting (SAW) method is used. SAW method can help in decision making for a certain case, and the calculation that generates the greatest value will be chosen as the best alternative. Other than SAW, also by using another method was the CPI method which is one of the calculating method in decision making based on performance index. Where SAW method was more faster by 89-93% compared to CPI method. Therefore it is expected that this application can be an evaluation material for the need of training and development for employee performances to be more optimal.

  17. A Standing Location Detector Enabling People with Developmental Disabilities to Control Environmental Stimulation through Simple Physical Activities with Nintendo Wii Balance Boards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated whether two people with developmental disabilities would be able to actively perform simple physical activities by controlling their favorite environmental stimulation using Nintendo Wii Balance Boards with a newly developed standing location detection program (SLDP, i.e., a new software program turning a Nintendo Wii Balance…

  18. A Three-Dimensional Object Orientation Detector Assisting People with Developmental Disabilities to Control Their Environmental Stimulation through Simple Occupational Activities with a Nintendo Wii Remote Controller

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Chang, Man-Ling; Mohua, Zhang

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated whether two people with developmental disabilities would be able to actively perform simple occupational activities to control their preferred environmental stimulation using a Nintendo Wii Remote Controller with a newly developed three-dimensional object orientation detection program (TDOODP, i.e. a new software program,…

  19. An Object Location Detector Enabling People with Developmental Disabilities to Control Environmental Stimulation through Simple Occupational Activities with Battery-Free Wireless Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed whether two persons with developmental disabilities would be able to actively perform simple occupational activities by controlling their favorite environmental stimulation using battery-free wireless mice with a newly developed object location detection program (OLDP, i.e., a new software program turning a battery-free…

  20. Persistent Focal Behavior and Physical Activity Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erfle, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the proclivity and performance attributes of focal students across time and activities using data from 9,345 students. Three systematic focal behavior partitions are examined: Across activities, across time, and across activities and time. A student's performance is focal if it ends in 0 or 5 for push-ups and 0 for curl-ups.…

  1. A simple high-performance liquid chromatographic assay for ciprofloxacin in human serum.

    PubMed

    Jim, L K; el-Sayed, N; al-Khamis, K I

    1992-04-01

    A simple and selective high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method for the determination of ciprofloxacin in serum has been developed and evaluated. Serum protein was precipitated with acetonitrile. The drug and the internal standard (quinine) were evaluated from a 10 microns U-Bondapack C-18 cartridge at ambient temperature with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile: 0.1 M sodium dihydrogen phosphate (20:80%, v/v) adjusted to pH 3.9 with phosphoric acid, and at a flow rate of 2.5 ml/min. The effluent was monitored on a fluorescence detector using an excitation and emission wavelength of 280 and 455 nm, respectively. Each analysis required no longer than 6 min. Quantification was achieved by the measurement of the peak-height ratio and the limit of quantification for ciprofloxacin in serum is 25 ng/ml. The intraday coefficient of variation (CV) ranged from 0.4 to 5.8%, and interday CV from 4.6 to 8.8% at three different concentrations. Relative recovery ranged from 98 to 100.2% at three different concentrations. Preliminary stability tests show that ciprofloxacin is stable for at least 3 weeks in serum after freezing.

  2. Relative performance of the two hands in simple and choice reaction time tasks

    PubMed Central

    Nisiyama, M.; Ribeiro-do-Valle, L.E.

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence that the left hemisphere is more competent for motor control than the right hemisphere. This study investigated whether this hemispheric asymmetry is expressed in the latency/duration of sequential responses performed by the left and/or right hands. Thirty-two right-handed young adults (16 males, 16 females; 18-25 years old) were tested in a simple or choice reaction time task. They responded to a left and/or right visual target by moving their left and/or right middle fingers between two keys on each side of the midline. Right hand reaction time did not differ from left hand reaction time. Submovement times were longer for the right hand than the left hand when the response was bilateral. Pause times were shorter for the right hand than the left hand, both when the responses were unilateral or bilateral. Reaction time results indicate that the putatively more efficient response preparation by the left hemisphere motor mechanisms is not expressed behaviorally. Submovement time and pause time results indicate that the putatively more efficient response execution by the left hemisphere motor mechanisms is expressed behaviorally. In the case of the submovements, the less efficient motor control of the left hand would be compensated by a more intense attention to this hand. PMID:24345871

  3. A simple high-performance liquid chromatographic practical approach for determination of flurbiprofen

    PubMed Central

    Akhlaq, Muhammad; Khan, Gul Majid; Wahab, Abdul; Khan, Arshad; Hussain, Abid; Nawaz, Asif; Abdelkader, Hamdy

    2011-01-01

    A simple, rapid, sensitive, and specific high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay for flurbiprofen has been developed and validated practically. The chromatography was conducted using Gemini C18 column (5 μm; 4.6 mm × 250 mm, Phenomenex, California, USA). The mobile phase containing disodium hydrogen phosphate solution (30 mM) pH 7.0 and acetonitrile (50:50); and the isocratic flow rate of 1.0 ml/min were used in the current study. Detection was made at 247 nm. The calibration curve was linear (r ≥ 0.9996) over the concentration range of 5-50 μm/ml. Mean percentage (%) recovery ± % relative standard deviation (RSD) ranged from 97.07 ± 0.008 to 103.66 ± 0.013. Within-day and between-day precision were also in acceptable range of 98.83 ± 0.004 to 104.56 ± 0.009. In order to confirm the practical applicability of the method developed, flurbiprofen controlled release matrix tablets were subjected to the dissolution studies and the release rate was analyzed. The reported HPLC for flurbiprofen provides several advantages of simplicity, high specificity, accuracy, and very short run-cycle time. It is suggested that the method should be used for the routine quality control analysis of flurbiprofen pure drug and its dosage forms. PMID:22171311

  4. Assessing the Performance of Computationally Simple and Complex Representations of Aerosol Processes using a Testbed Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast, J. D.; Ma, P.; Easter, R. C.; Liu, X.; Zaveri, R. A.; Rasch, P.

    2012-12-01

    Predictions of aerosol radiative forcing in climate models still contain large uncertainties, resulting from a poor understanding of certain aerosol processes, the level of complexity of aerosol processes represented in models, and the ability of models to account for sub-grid scale variability of aerosols and processes affecting them. In addition, comparing the performance and computational efficiency of new aerosol process modules used in various studies is problematic because different studies often employ different grid configurations, meteorology, trace gas chemistry, and emissions that affect the temporal and spatial evolution of aerosols. To address this issue, we have developed an Aerosol Modeling Testbed (AMT) to systematically and objectively evaluate aerosol process modules. The AMT consists of the modular Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, a series of testbed cases for which extensive in situ and remote sensing measurements of meteorological, trace gas, and aerosol properties are available, and a suite of tools to evaluate the performance of meteorological, chemical, aerosol process modules. WRF contains various parameterizations of meteorological, chemical, and aerosol processes and includes interactive aerosol-cloud-radiation treatments similar to those employed by climate models. In addition, the physics suite from a global climate model, Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5), has also been ported to WRF so that these parameterizations can be tested at various spatial scales and compared directly with field campaign data and other parameterizations commonly used by the mesoscale modeling community. In this study, we evaluate simple and complex treatments of the aerosol size distribution and secondary organic aerosols using the AMT and measurements collected during three field campaigns: the Megacities Initiative Local and Global Observations (MILAGRO) campaign conducted in the vicinity of Mexico City during March 2006, the

  5. A simple and rapid test of physical performance in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Albarrati, Ali Mufraih; Gale, Nichola S; Enright, Stephanie; Munnery, Margaret M; Cockcroft, John R; Shale, Dennis J

    2016-01-01

    Impaired physical performance is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but its assessment can be difficult in routine clinical practice. We compared the timed up and go (TUG) test and other easily applied assessments of physical performance with the 6-minute walk distance (6MWD). In a longitudinal study of comorbidities in COPD, submaximal physical performance was determined in 520 patients and 150 controls using the TUG test and 6MWD. Spirometry, body composition, handgrip strength, the COPD assessment test, St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), and the modified Medical Research Council dyspnoea scale were also determined. Patients and controls were similar in age, body mass index, and sex proportions. The TUG in the patients was greater than that in the control group, P=0.001, and was inversely related to 6MWD (r=−0.71, P<0.001) and forced expiratory volume in one second predicted (r=−0.19, P<0.01) and was directly related to the SGRQ activity (r=0.39, P<0.001), SGRQ total (r=0.37, P<0.001), and total COPD assessment test scores (r=0.37, P<0.001). The TUG identified the difference in physical performance between patients and controls. The TUG test and validated questionnaires provide a measure of physical performance, which is rapid and could be used in clinical practice. PMID:27536090

  6. Supercapacitive performance of hierarchical porous carbon microspheres prepared by simple one-pot method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qinglan; Wang, Xianyou; Wu, Chun; Liu, Jing; Wang, Hao; Gao, Jiao; Zhang, Youwei; Shu, Hongbo

    2014-05-01

    The hierarchical porous carbon microspheres (HPCMSs) using furfuryl alcohol as carbon resource have been prepared by a simple one-pot method. The HPCMSs are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherm at 77 K, cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge/discharge tests, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cycle life measurements in 6 M KOH. The results show that all the HPCMSs samples, which can be fabricated by adjusting the ratio of furfuryl alcohol/tetraethyl orthosilicate, possess three-dimensionally tailored pore structures with unique micro-, meso- and macroporous systems. Particularly, the HPCMS-2 prepared at the mole ratio of 2/1 (furfuryl alcohol/tetraethyl orthosilicate) shows the largest specific surface area of 709 m2 g-1, and the HPCMS-2 electrode owns specific capacitance as high as 221 F g-1 at the current density of 1 A g-1. The supercapacitor using HPCMS-2 as the active material shows high specific capacitance and excellent cycle stability, which exhibits a specific capacitance of 56 F g-1 at the charge/discharge current density of 0.5 A g-1. Furthermore, the HPCMS-2 supercapacitor delivers high energy densities of 6.1 Wh kg-1 at the power density of 5000 W kg-1, revealing a promising application in supercapacitors.

  7. Simple model for active nematics: quasi-long-range order and giant fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Chaté, Hugues; Ginelli, Francesco; Montagne, Raúl

    2006-05-12

    We propose a simple microscopic model for active nematic particles similar in spirit to the Vicsek model for self-propelled polar particles. In two dimensions, we show that this model exhibits a Kosterlitz-Thouless-like transition to quasi-long-range orientational order and that in this nonequilibrium context, the ordered phase is characterized by giant density fluctuations, in agreement with the predictions of Ramaswamy et al.

  8. Differential Purkinje cell simple spike activity and pausing behavior related to cerebellar modules

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haibo; Voges, Kai; Lin, Zhanmin; Ju, Chiheng

    2015-01-01

    The massive computational capacity of the cerebellar cortex is conveyed by Purkinje cells onto cerebellar and vestibular nuclei neurons through their GABAergic, inhibitory output. This implies that pauses in Purkinje cell simple spike activity are potentially instrumental in cerebellar information processing, but their occurrence and extent are still heavily debated. The cerebellar cortex, although often treated as such, is not homogeneous. Cerebellar modules with distinct anatomical connectivity and gene expression have been described, and Purkinje cells in these modules also differ in firing rate of simple and complex spikes. In this study we systematically correlate, in awake mice, the pausing in simple spike activity of Purkinje cells recorded throughout the entire cerebellum, with their location in terms of lobule, transverse zone, and zebrin-identified cerebellar module. A subset of Purkinje cells displayed long (>500-ms) pauses, but we found that their occurrence correlated with tissue damage and lower temperature. In contrast to long pauses, short pauses (<500 ms) and the shape of the interspike interval (ISI) distributions can differ between Purkinje cells of different lobules and cerebellar modules. In fact, the ISI distributions can differ both between and within populations of Purkinje cells with the same zebrin identity, and these differences are at least in part caused by differential synaptic inputs. Our results suggest that long pauses are rare but that there are differences related to shorter intersimple spike intervals between and within specific subsets of Purkinje cells, indicating a potential further segregation in the activity of cerebellar Purkinje cells. PMID:25717166

  9. A simple and simultaneous identification method for aloe, catechu and gambir by high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Kim, Young Ho; Lee, Wonjae; Lee, Young Keun; Kim, Kyung Tae; Kang, Jong Seong

    2016-01-05

    An effective and rapid method was developed for the simultaneous identification of aloe, catechu and gambir by high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector (HPLC-DAD). Identification of three maker compounds presented in three medicinal materials was performed on high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). Under the optimal HPLC chromatographic conditions, sixty-two samples were processed on an Optimapak C18 column using a solvent system of acetonitrile (from 10% to 35%) and 0.1% phosphoric acid solution (from 90% to 65%) at a total flow rate of 1.0 mL/min and detected at 270 nm. All calibration curves exhibited good linear relationship (r(2)>0.9992). The relative standard deviation values of intra-day and inter-day precision were less than 1% and 2%, respectively. The recoveries of three analytes ranged from 99.48 to 100.97% with low RSDs (<2%). For the first time, this study demonstrates that the processed aloe, catechu and gambir are sold in local material markets in China and Korea without their correct identification. It indicates the existent of high potential medicinal risk by misuse of three medicinal materials. The developed HPLC method can be applied to prevent unexpected biological activity due to misapplication of medicinal materials.

  10. Dynamic Stabilization of Simple Fractures With Active Plates Delivers Stronger Healing Than Conventional Compression Plating

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Stanley; Bliven, Emily K.; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Kindt, Philipp; Augat, Peter; Henschel, Julia; Fitzpatrick, Daniel C.; Madey, Steven M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Active plates dynamize a fracture by elastic suspension of screw holes within the plate. We hypothesized that dynamic stabilization with active plates delivers stronger healing relative to standard compression plating. Methods: Twelve sheep were randomized to receive either a standard compression plate (CP) or an active plate (ACTIVE) for stabilization of an anatomically reduced tibial osteotomy. In the CP group, absolute stabilization was pursued by interfragmentary compression with 6 cortical screws. In the ACTIVE group, dynamic stabilization after bony apposition was achieved with 6 elastically suspended locking screws. Fracture healing was analyzed weekly on radiographs. After sacrifice 9 weeks postsurgery, the torsional strength of healed tibiae and contralateral tibiae was measured. Finally, computed tomography was used to assess fracture patterns and healing modes. Results: Healing in both groups included periosteal callus formation. ACTIVE specimens had almost 6 times more callus area by week 9 (P < 0.001) than CP specimens. ACTIVE specimens recovered on average 64% of their native strength by week 9, and were over twice as strong as CP specimens, which recovered 24% of their native strength (P = 0.008). Microcomputed tomography demonstrated that compression plating induced a combination of primary bone healing and gap healing. Active plating consistently stimulated biological bone healing by periosteal callus formation. Conclusions: Compared with compression plating, dynamic stabilization of simple fractures with active plates delivers significantly stronger healing. PMID:27861456

  11. Topological determinants of self-sustained activity in a simple model of excitable dynamics on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fretter, Christoph; Lesne, Annick; Hilgetag, Claus C.; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2017-02-01

    Simple models of excitable dynamics on graphs are an efficient framework for studying the interplay between network topology and dynamics. This topic is of practical relevance to diverse fields, ranging from neuroscience to engineering. Here we analyze how a single excitation propagates through a random network as a function of the excitation threshold, that is, the relative amount of activity in the neighborhood required for the excitation of a node. We observe that two sharp transitions delineate a region of sustained activity. Using analytical considerations and numerical simulation, we show that these transitions originate from the presence of barriers to propagation and the excitation of topological cycles, respectively, and can be predicted from the network topology. Our findings are interpreted in the context of network reverberations and self-sustained activity in neural systems, which is a question of long-standing interest in computational neuroscience.

  12. Topological determinants of self-sustained activity in a simple model of excitable dynamics on graphs

    PubMed Central

    Fretter, Christoph; Lesne, Annick; Hilgetag, Claus C.; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2017-01-01

    Simple models of excitable dynamics on graphs are an efficient framework for studying the interplay between network topology and dynamics. This topic is of practical relevance to diverse fields, ranging from neuroscience to engineering. Here we analyze how a single excitation propagates through a random network as a function of the excitation threshold, that is, the relative amount of activity in the neighborhood required for the excitation of a node. We observe that two sharp transitions delineate a region of sustained activity. Using analytical considerations and numerical simulation, we show that these transitions originate from the presence of barriers to propagation and the excitation of topological cycles, respectively, and can be predicted from the network topology. Our findings are interpreted in the context of network reverberations and self-sustained activity in neural systems, which is a question of long-standing interest in computational neuroscience. PMID:28186182

  13. Performance Based Education. Technology Activity Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Custer, Rodney L., Ed.

    These Technology Activity Modules are designed to serve as an implementation resource for technology education teachers as they integrate technology education with Missouri's Academic Performance Standards and provide a source of activities and activity ideas that can be used to integrate and reinforce learning across the curriculum. The modules…

  14. Performance on a simple response time task: Is sleep or work more important for miners?

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Sally A; Paech, Gemma M; Dorrian, Jillian; Roach, Gregory D; Jay, Sarah M

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the impact of work- and sleep-related factors on an objective measure of response time in a field setting. Thirty-five mining operators working 12-h shift patterns completed daily sleep and work diaries, wore activity monitors continuously and completed palm-based psychomotor vigilance tests (palmPVT) at the start and end of each shift. Linear mixed models were used to test the main effects on response time of roster, timing of test, sleep history and prior wake. The time at which the test occurred was a significant predictor of response time (F₃(,)₄₀₃(.)₄ = 6.72, p < .01) with the end of night shifts being associated with significantly slower response times than the start of night shifts, and the start or end of day shifts. Further, the amount of sleep obtained in the 24h prior to the test was also a significant predictor of response time (F₃(,)₄₀₇(.)₀ = 3.05, p < .01). The results suggest that, as expected, the end of night shift is associated with changes in response time indicative of performance impairments. Of more interest however is that immediate sleep history was also predictive of changes in response time with lower amounts of prior sleep related to slower response times. The current data provides further evidence that sleep is a primary mediator of performance, independent of roster pattern.

  15. Ceftriaxone pharmacokinetics by new simple and sensitive ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography method.

    PubMed

    Campos, Michel Leandro; de Moura Alonso, Juliana; Dos Santos Martins, Evelin; Oliveira, Jonata Augusto; Hussni, Carlos Alberto; Peccinini, Rosângela Gonçalves

    2017-02-27

    Ceftriaxone is a cephalosporin antibiotic with a potent antimicrobial activity and excellent penetration in most body fluids such as pleural, peritoneal, spinal and brain. These facts contribute to the application of ceftriaxone in the treatment of bacterial peritonitis, an abdominal disorder in veterinary medicine, with potential risk of death. The determination of ceftriaxone levels in plasma and peritoneal fluid may be used to assess the pharmacokinetic profile at various instances of administration and allows observing if the concentrations needed are being achieved. Therefore a method was developed and validated for the determination of ceftriaxone in plasma and peritoneal fluid which after was applied in a pharmacokinetic profile study. The bioanalytical method validation was performed according to widely acceptable experiments. Two horses were used as a model of the method applicability; ceftriaxone was intraperitoneally administered to these animals as a single dose. The plasma and peritoneal fluid analysis were performed using an UHPLC system in reverse phase chromatography mode in fully validated conditions. The methods have shown linearity between 0.49 and 500μg/mL for plasma, and between 0.24 and 500μg/mL for peritoneal fluid. The quantitative analysis of ceftriaxone in these matrices allows monitoring of the therapy. This method showed improved sensitivity as well as the quantitation in peritoneal fluid.

  16. Simple control-theoretic models of human steering activity in visually guided vehicle control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Ronald A.

    1991-01-01

    A simple control theoretic model of human steering or control activity in the lateral-directional control of vehicles such as automobiles and rotorcraft is discussed. The term 'control theoretic' is used to emphasize the fact that the model is derived from a consideration of well-known control system design principles as opposed to psychological theories regarding egomotion, etc. The model is employed to emphasize the 'closed-loop' nature of tasks involving the visually guided control of vehicles upon, or in close proximity to, the earth and to hypothesize how changes in vehicle dynamics can significantly alter the nature of the visual cues which a human might use in such tasks.

  17. Effect of Observation of Simple Hand Movement on Brain Activations in Patients with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy: An fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinomais, Mickael; Lignon, Gregoire; Chinier, Eva; Richard, Isabelle; Minassian, Aram Ter; The Tich, Sylvie N'Guyen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to examine and compare brain activation in patients with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) during observation of simple hand movement performed by the paretic and nonparetic hand. Nineteen patients with clinical unilateral CP (14 male, mean age 14 years, 7-21 years) participated…

  18. Simple Protocol for Secondary School Hands-On Activity: Electrophoresis of Pre-Stained Nucleic Acids on Agar-Agar Borate Gels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britos, Leticia; Goyenola, Guillermo; Orono, Silvia Umpierrez

    2004-01-01

    An extremely simple, inexpensive, and safe method is presented, which emulates nucleic acids isolation and electrophoretic analysis as performed in a research environment, in the context of a secondary school hands-on activity. The protocol is amenable to an interdisciplinary approach, taking into consideration the electrical and chemical…

  19. Persons with moderate Alzheimer's disease use simple technology aids to manage daily activities and leisure occupation.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Renna, Caterina; Pinto, Katia; De Vanna, Floriana; Caffò, Alessandro O; Stasolla, Fabrizio

    2014-09-01

    Two studies assessed technology-aided programs to support performance of daily activities and selection/activation of music items with patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease. In Study I, four patients were presented with activity-related pictorial instructions via a computer fitted with inexpensive, commercial software. In Study II, four patients were (a) presented with different music options and (b) allowed to select and activate the preferred option via a microswitch response. Study I showed that each patient learned to perform the two activities available with percentages of correct responses exceeding 85 by the end of the intervention. Study II showed that all patients learned to choose and activate music options. Psychology students, employed in a social validation check, scored the patients' behavior within the program better than their behavior in a control situation. The relevance and usability of simplified pictorial-instruction programs and music choice programs for patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease were discussed.

  20. Performance Considerations for the SIMPL Single Photon, Polarimetric, Two-Color Laser Altimeter as Applied to Measurements of Forest Canopy Structure and Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, Philip W.; Harding, David J.; Valett, Susan R.; Vasilyev, Aleksey A.; Yu, Anthony W.

    2012-01-01

    The Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon-counting Lidar (SIMPL) is a multi-beam, micropulse airborne laser altimeter that acquires active and passive polarimetric optical remote sensing measurements at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. SIMPL was developed to demonstrate advanced measurement approaches of potential benefit for improved, more efficient spaceflight laser altimeter missions. SIMPL data have been acquired for wide diversity of forest types in the summers of 2010 and 2011 in order to assess the potential of its novel capabilities for characterization of vegetation structure and composition. On each of its four beams SIMPL provides highly-resolved measurements of forest canopy structure by detecting single-photons with 15 cm ranging precision using a narrow-beam system operating at a laser repetition rate of 11 kHz. Associated with that ranging data SIMPL provides eight amplitude parameters per beam unlike the single amplitude provided by typical laser altimeters. Those eight parameters are received energy that is parallel and perpendicular to that of the plane-polarized transmit pulse at 532 nm (green) and 1064 nm (near IR), for both the active laser backscatter retro-reflectance and the passive solar bi-directional reflectance. This poster presentation will cover the instrument architecture and highlight the performance of the SIMPL instrument with examples taken from measurements for several sites with distinct canopy structures and compositions. Specific performance areas such as probability of detection, after pulsing, and dead time, will be highlighted and addressed, along with examples of their impact on the measurements and how they limit the ability to accurately model and recover the canopy properties. To assess the sensitivity of SIMPL's measurements to canopy properties an instrument model has been implemented in the FLIGHT radiative transfer code, based on Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport. SIMPL data collected in 2010 over

  1. A simple liposome assay for the screening of zinc ionophore activity of polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Clergeaud, Gael; Dabbagh-Bazarbachi, Husam; Ortiz, Mayreli; Fernández-Larrea, Juan B; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2016-04-15

    An efficient liposomal system for screening the zinc ionophore activity of a selected library consisting of the most relevant dietary polyphenols is presented. The zinc ionophore activity was demonstrated by exploring the use of zinc-specific fluorophore FluoZin-3 loaded liposomes as simple membrane tools that mimic the cell membrane. The zinc ionophore activity was demonstrated as the capacity of polyphenols to transport zinc cations across the liposome membrane and increase the zinc-specific fluorescence of the encapsulated fluorophore FluoZin-3. In addition, the zinc chelation strength of the polyphenols was also tested in a competition assay based on the fluorescence quenching of zinc-dependent fluorescence emitted by zinc-FluoZin-3 complex. Finally, the correlation between the chelation capacity and ionophore activity is demonstrated, thus underlining the sequestering or ionophoric activity that the phenolic compounds can display, thus, providing better knowledge of the importance of the structural conformation versus their biological activity. Furthermore, the assays developed can be used as tools for rapid, high-throughput screening of families of polyphenols towards different biometals.

  2. Analysis and Simple Circuit Design of Double Differential EMG Active Electrode.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Federico Nicolás; Spinelli, Enrique Mario; Haberman, Marcelo Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of the voltage amplifier needed for double differential (DD) sEMG measurements and a novel, very simple circuit for implementing DD active electrodes. The three-input amplifier that standalone DD active electrodes require is inherently different from a differential amplifier, and general knowledge about its design is scarce in the literature. First, the figures of merit of the amplifier are defined through a decomposition of its input signal into three orthogonal modes. This analysis reveals a mode containing EMG crosstalk components that the DD electrode should reject. Then, the effect of finite input impedance is analyzed. Because there are three terminals, minimum bounds for interference rejection ratios due to electrode and input impedance unbalances with two degrees of freedom are obtained. Finally, a novel circuit design is presented, including only a quadruple operational amplifier and a few passive components. This design is nearly as simple as the branched electrode and much simpler than the three instrumentation amplifier design, while providing robust EMG crosstalk rejection and better input impedance using unity gain buffers for each electrode input. The interference rejection limits of this input stage are analyzed. An easily replicable implementation of the proposed circuit is described, together with a parameter design guideline to adjust it to specific needs. The electrode is compared with the established alternatives, and sample sEMG signals are obtained, acquired on different body locations with dry contacts, successfully rejecting interference sources.

  3. Analysis and Simple Circuit Design of Double Differential EMG Active Electrode.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Federico Nicolas; Spinelli, Enrique Mario; Haberman, Marcelo Alejandro

    2015-12-22

    In this paper we present an analysis of the voltage amplifier needed for double differential (DD) sEMG measurements and a novel, very simple circuit for implementing DD active electrodes. The three-input amplifier that standalone DD active electrodes require is inherently different from a differential amplifier, and general knowledge about its design is scarce in the literature. First, the figures of merit of the amplifier are defined through a decomposition of its input signal into three orthogonal modes. This analysis reveals a mode containing EMG crosstalk components that the DD electrode should reject. Then, the effect of finite input impedance is analyzed. Because there are three terminals, minimum bounds for interference rejection ratios due to electrode and input impedance unbalances with two degrees of freedom are obtained. Finally, a novel circuit design is presented, including only a quadruple operational amplifier and a few passive components. This design is nearly as simple as the branched electrode and much simpler than the three instrumentation amplifier design, while providing robust EMG crosstalk rejection and better input impedance using unity gain buffers for each electrode input. The interference rejection limits of this input stage are analyzed. An easily replicable implementation of the proposed circuit is described, together with a parameter design guideline to adjust it to specific needs. The electrode is compared with the established alternatives, and sample sEMG signals are obtained, acquired on different body locations with dry contacts, successfully rejecting interference sources.

  4. Increased hydrophobicity and estrogenic activity of simple phenols with silicon and germanium-containing substituents.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shinya; Miyajima, Yu; Masuno, Hiroyuki; Kagechika, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-10

    Here, we report the systematic synthesis and characterization of simple phenols bearing a trialkyl(aryl)silyl or trialkyl(aryl)germyl functional group as a hydrophobic substituent. These silicon and germanium analogues exhibited higher hydrophobicity than the corresponding carbon analogues, with a difference in log P value of approximately 0.6, independent of the alkyl(aryl) species. Trimethylsilylphenol and trimethylgermylphenol exhibited smaller pK(a) values than the corresponding carbon analogue or unsubstituted phenol, indicating that trialkylsilyl and trialkylgermyl functional groups have a negative substituent constant (σ). The trialkylsilyl- and trialkylgermylphenols exhibited more potent estrogenic activity as compared with the carbon analogues. The substituent parameters and structure-activity relationship reported here may be helpful for drug discovery utilizing the heavier group 14 elements.

  5. Clear & Simple

    MedlinePlus

    ... the audience themselves. It is important to get direct audience involvement at some point to test the ... words are defined clearly. Sentences are simple, specific, direct, and written in the active voice. Each idea ...

  6. Effect of steam addition on cycle performance of simple and recuperated gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented for the cycle efficiency and specific power of simple and recuperated gas turbine cycles in which steam is generated and used to increase turbine flow. Calculations showed significant improvements in cycle efficiency and specific power by adding steam. The calculations were made using component efficiencies and loss assumptions typical of stationary powerplants. These results are presented for a range of operating temperatures and pressures. Relative heat exchanger size and the water use rate are also examined.

  7. A simple synthesis method of sulfur-free Fe-N-C catalyst witih high ORR activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Zhongfen; Johnston, Christina M; Zelenay, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    To try to deconvolute which factors affect the activity and durability of metal-nitrogen-carbon (M-N-C) type non-precious catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), M-N-C catalysts based on ion chloride, polyaniline (PANI) and Ketjen Black carbon support were synthesized using different synthetic conditions. The catalysts were characterized electrochemically and tested as cathodes for Hydrogen fuel cells. PANI is usually chemically oxidative polymerized using ammonium persulfate (APS) as oxidant. To eliminate sulfur in the synthesized catalysts, a simple synthesis method using ion chloride as oxidant for aniline polymerization was developed. Two different aniline polymerization conditions led to very different product morphologies. Synthesized at low initial proton concentration, the final product was composed of dense micrometer sized particles. A decomposable salt was found to be able to prohibit PANI cross linking during the drying and annealing process and thus led to porous product. The porous catalyst has much higher ORR activity than the dense product due to more accessible active sites. Synthesized at high proton concentration, the catalyst appeared to be porous. The decomposable salt treatment did not make too much improvement in the porous structure and electrochemical activity. However, fuel cell testing using air as cathode feeder indicates that the salt treatment improves mass transfer in the cathode layer. Catalyst synthesized using this simple method has performance comparable to our state-of-the art catalyst synthesized in a much more complicated procedure. The factor that sulfur sources are completely eliminated in the synthesis suggests that sulfur is not necessary for the ORR catalysis activity.

  8. Modulation of in vitro natural cell-mediated activity against enteropathogenic bacteria by simple sugars.

    PubMed Central

    Nencioni, L; Villa, L; Boraschi, D; Tagliabue, A

    1985-01-01

    Lymphoid cells from mouse Peyer's patches and spleens were tested in a 2-h in vitro assay for their natural activity against the enteropathogenic bacteria Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella enteritidis, Salmonella tel aviv, and Shigella sp. X16. The antibacterial activity expressed by normal cells was detected against all the bacterial strains tested with the exception of Peyer's patch lymphocytes against S. tel aviv and splenocytes against Shigella sp. X16. To determine whether the different expression of natural antibacterial activity might be due to lectin-like proteins interacting with the saccharidic moieties of the bacterial wall, 11 simple sugars were preincubated with the effector cells before the in vitro assays. We found that some of them could block the natural antibacterial activity as well as induce antibacterial activity when this was not spontaneously expressed. Interestingly, a different panel of sugars among those employed was observed to affect the antibacterial activities for each of the above-mentioned bacterial targets and each effector cell. However, the same panel of sugars was able to block or stimulate the lymphocyte activity when bacteria with the same somatic antigens as two substrains of S. typhimurium and one strain of Salmonella schottmuelleri were employed. To further investigate the interaction between effector cells and bacteria, effector cells or Shigella sp. X16 targets were treated with proteolytic, glycolytic, and lipolytic enzymes before the in vitro assays. Furthermore, EDTA was used to analyze the role of divalent cations in this experimental system. The results obtained suggest that lectin-like proteins playing a role in this interaction are present not only on lymphocytes but also on bacteria and that divalent cations are essential for the expression of in vitro antibacterial activity. PMID:3967926

  9. Can simple interactions capture complex features of neural activity underlying behavior in a virtual reality environment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshulam, Leenoy; Gauthier, Jeffrey; Brody, Carlos; Tank, David; Bialek, William

    The complex neural interactions which are abundant in most recordings of neural activity are relatively poorly understood. A prime example of such interactions can be found in the in vivo neural activity which underlies complex behaviors of mice, imaged in brain regions such as hippocampus and parietal cortex. Experimental techniques now allow us to accurately follow these neural interactions in the simultaneous activity of large neuronal populations of awake behaving animals. Here, we demonstrate that pairwise maximum entropy models can predict a surprising number of properties of the neural activity. The models, that are constrained with activity rates and interactions between pairs of neurons, are well fit to the activity `states' in the hippocampus and cortex of mice performing cognitive tasks while navigating in a virtual reality environment.

  10. Activation of attention networks using frequency analysis of a simple auditory-motor paradigm.

    PubMed

    Astrakas, Loukas G; Teicher, Martin; Tzika, A Aria

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to devise a paradigm that stimulates attention using a frequency-based analysis of the data acquired during a motor task. Six adults (30-40 years of age) and one child (10 years) were studied. Each subject was requested to attend to "start" and "stop" commands every 20 s alternatively and had to respond with the motor task every second time. Attention was stimulated during a block-designed, motor paradigm in which a start-stop commands cycle produced activation at the fourth harmonic of the motor frequency. We disentangled the motor and attention functions using statistical analysis with subspaces spanned by vectors generated by a truncated trigonometric series of motor and attention frequency. During our auditory-motor paradigm, all subjects showed activation in areas that belong to an extensive attention network. Attention and motor functions were coactivated but with different frequencies. While the motor-task-related areas were activated with slower frequency than attention, the activation in the attention-related areas was enhanced every time the subject had to start or end the motor task. We suggest that although a simple block-designed, auditory-motor paradigm stimulates the attention network, motor preparation, and motor inhibition concurrently, a frequency-based analysis can distinguish attention from motor functions. Due to its simplicity the paradigm can be valuable in studying children with attention deficit disorders.

  11. Active Tailoring of Lift Distribution to Enhance Cruise Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamm, Jeffrey D. (Technical Monitor); Pfeiffer, Neal J.; Christians, Joel G.

    2005-01-01

    During Phase I of this project, Raytheon Aircraft Company (RAC) has analytically and experimentally evaluated key components of a system that could be implemented for active tailoring of wing lift distribution using low-drag, trailing-edge modifications. Simple systems such as those studied by RAC could be used to enhance the cruise performance of a business jet configuration over a range of typical flight conditions. The trailing-edge modifications focus on simple, deployable mechanisms comprised of extendable small flap panels over portions of the span that could be used to subtly but positively optimize the lift and drag characteristics. The report includes results from low speed wind tunnel testing of the trailing-edge devices, descriptions of potential mechanisms for automation, and an assessment of the technology.

  12. A Simple and Fast Kinetic Assay for the Determination of Fructan Exohydrolase Activity in Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.).

    PubMed

    Gasperl, Anna; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that fructans are the main constituent of water-soluble carbohydrates in forage grasses and cereal crops of temperate climates, little knowledge is available on the regulation of the enzymes involved in fructan metabolism. The analysis of enzyme activities involved in this process has been hampered by the low affinity of the fructan enzymes for sucrose and fructans used as fructosyl donor. Further, the analysis of fructan composition and enzyme activities is restricted to specialized labs with access to suited HPLC equipment and appropriate fructan standards. The degradation of fructan polymers with high degree of polymerization (DP) by fructan exohydrolases (FEHs) to fructosyloligomers is important to liberate energy in the form of fructan, but also under conditions where the generation of low DP polymers is required. Based on published protocols employing enzyme coupled endpoint reactions in single cuvettes, we developed a simple and fast kinetic 1-FEH assay. This assay can be performed in multi-well plate format using plate readers to determine the activity of 1-FEH against 1-kestotriose, resulting in a significant time reduction. Kinetic assays allow an optimal and more precise determination of enzyme activities compared to endpoint assays, and enable to check the quality of any reaction with respect to linearity of the assay. The enzyme coupled kinetic 1-FEH assay was validated in a case study showing the expected increase in 1-FEH activity during cold treatment. This assay is cost effective and could be performed by any lab with access to a plate reader suited for kinetic measurements and readings at 340 nm, and is highly suited to assess temporal changes and relative differences in 1-FEH activities. Thus, this enzyme coupled kinetic 1-FEH assay is of high importance both to the field of basic fructan research and plant breeding.

  13. A Simple and Fast Kinetic Assay for the Determination of Fructan Exohydrolase Activity in Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.)

    PubMed Central

    Gasperl, Anna; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Prud’homme, Marie-Pascale; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that fructans are the main constituent of water-soluble carbohydrates in forage grasses and cereal crops of temperate climates, little knowledge is available on the regulation of the enzymes involved in fructan metabolism. The analysis of enzyme activities involved in this process has been hampered by the low affinity of the fructan enzymes for sucrose and fructans used as fructosyl donor. Further, the analysis of fructan composition and enzyme activities is restricted to specialized labs with access to suited HPLC equipment and appropriate fructan standards. The degradation of fructan polymers with high degree of polymerization (DP) by fructan exohydrolases (FEHs) to fructosyloligomers is important to liberate energy in the form of fructan, but also under conditions where the generation of low DP polymers is required. Based on published protocols employing enzyme coupled endpoint reactions in single cuvettes, we developed a simple and fast kinetic 1-FEH assay. This assay can be performed in multi-well plate format using plate readers to determine the activity of 1-FEH against 1-kestotriose, resulting in a significant time reduction. Kinetic assays allow an optimal and more precise determination of enzyme activities compared to endpoint assays, and enable to check the quality of any reaction with respect to linearity of the assay. The enzyme coupled kinetic 1-FEH assay was validated in a case study showing the expected increase in 1-FEH activity during cold treatment. This assay is cost effective and could be performed by any lab with access to a plate reader suited for kinetic measurements and readings at 340 nm, and is highly suited to assess temporal changes and relative differences in 1-FEH activities. Thus, this enzyme coupled kinetic 1-FEH assay is of high importance both to the field of basic fructan research and plant breeding. PMID:26734049

  14. A simple but efficient voice activity detection algorithm through Hilbert transform and dynamic threshold for speech pathologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz P., D.; Villa, Luisa F.; Salazar, Carlos; Quintero, O. L.

    2016-04-01

    A simple but efficient voice activity detector based on the Hilbert transform and a dynamic threshold is presented to be used on the pre-processing of audio signals. The algorithm to define the dynamic threshold is a modification of a convex combination found in literature. This scheme allows the detection of prosodic and silence segments on a speech in presence of non-ideal conditions like a spectral overlapped noise. The present work shows preliminary results over a database built with some political speech. The tests were performed adding artificial noise to natural noises over the audio signals, and some algorithms are compared. Results will be extrapolated to the field of adaptive filtering on monophonic signals and the analysis of speech pathologies on futures works.

  15. Denitrification of nitrate-contaminated groundwater using a simple immobilized activated sludge bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhengfang; Wang, Feng; Bi, Haitao; Wang, Zhongyou; Liu, Guo-hua

    2012-01-01

    A simple anaerobic-activated sludge system, in which microorganisms are immobilized by a novel functional carrier, was used for removing nitrate in groundwater. The operating conditions, including hydraulic retention time (HRT), C/N ratio, temperature and NO(3)(-)-N loading concentration were investigated. The NO(3)(-)-N concentration, residual chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nitrite accumulation were used as indicators to assess the water quality of the effluent. The anaerobic biomass loading capacity in the carrier was 12.8 g/L and the denitrifying Pseudomonas sp. and Rhodocyclaceae bacterium were dominant among the immobilized microorganisms in the anaerobic-activated sludge. Under operating conditions of HRT= 1.5 h, C/N= 2-3 and T= 16.8-20 °C, the removal efficiency of NO(3)(-)-N exceeded 93%, corresponding to a relatively high denitrification rate of 0.73 kg NO(3)(-)-N m(-3) d(-1), when the NO(3)(-)-N loading concentration was 50 mg/L. The NO(3)(-)-N concentration of the effluent always met regulatory criteria for drinking water (<10 mg/L) in the main developed and developing countries. The effluent COD was also below 10 mg/L. Although some nitrite accumulated (0-1.77 mg/L) during the operating period, it can be decreased through adjusting the operating pH and HRT. The immobilized activated sludge system may be useful for the removal of nitrate from groundwater.

  16. Active inversion tectonics, simple shear folding and back-thrusting at Rioni Basin, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibaldi, A.; Alania, V.; Bonali, F. L.; Enukidze, O.; Tsereteli, N.; Kvavadze, N.; Varazanashvili, O.

    2017-03-01

    The Rioni Basin, located between the Greater and Lesser Caucasus in Georgia, is an outstanding example of ongoing inversion tectonics. Marine and continental deposits of Cretaceous-Neogene age have been locally uplifted since the end of Miocene. The uplifted area totals 1300 km2, and Plio-Quaternary river deposits have been raised up to 200 m above the surrounding plains. Inversion tectonics has been accompanied by the development of south-vergent asymmetrical folds and strike-slip faults along the border of the uplifted area. The folds have locally an en-échelon geometry and microtectonic data indicate rotation of the paleostress direction over time, suggesting simple shear deformation. In the interiors of the uplifted area, there are gentle symmetrical folds and one main active south-dipping reverse fault, corresponding to a backthrust. Morphostructural evidence, as well as the tilting of Quaternary strata, the offset of Quaternary alluvial deposits and the presence of crustal seismic activity, indicate that compressional tectonics is still active. The combination of field data with seismic reflection sections shows that inversion tectonics took place through a series of north-dipping blind thrusts and a wedge with passive back-thrusting. Uplift and contraction are more developed along the eastern part of the study area, suggesting the westward propagation of the closure of the Transcaucasian depression.

  17. Simple spontaneously active Hebbian learning model: Homeostasis of activity and connectivity, and consequences for learning and epileptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, David; Tang, Aonan; Hsu, Murielle; Beggs, John M.

    2007-10-01

    A spontaneously active neural system that is capable of continual learning should also be capable of homeostasis of both firing rate and connectivity. Experimental evidence suggests that both types of homeostasis exist, and that connectivity is maintained at a state that is optimal for information transmission and storage. This state is referred to as the critical state. We present a simple stochastic computational Hebbian learning model that incorporates both firing rate and critical homeostasis, and we explore its stability and connectivity properties. We also examine the behavior of our model with a simulated seizure and with simulated acute deafferentation. We argue that a neural system that is more highly connected than the critical state (i.e., one that is “supercritical”) is epileptogenic. Based on our simulations, we predict that the postseizural and postdeafferentation states should be supercritical and epileptogenic. Furthermore, interventions that boost spontaneous activity should be protective against epileptogenesis.

  18. Simple determination of performance of explosives without using any experimental data.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein

    2005-03-17

    A simple procedure is introduced by which detonation pressure of CaHbNcOd explosives can be predicted from a, b, c, d and calculated gas phase heat of formation of explosives at any loading density without using any assumed detonation products and experimental data. It is shown here that the loading density, simply calculated heat of formation by additivity rule and atomic composition can be integrated into an empirical formula for predicting the detonation pressure of proposed explosives. Calculated detonation pressures by the introduced method for both pure and explosive formulations show good agreement with respect to measured detonation pressure over a wide range of loading density. The deviations are within about experimental errors.

  19. Simple method for high-performance stretchable composite conductors with entrapped air bubbles.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyejin; Kim, Dae-Gon; Jang, Nam-Su; Kong, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Jong-Man

    2016-12-01

    We integrate air bubbles into conductive elastic composite-based stretchable conductors to make them mechanically less stiff and electrically more robust against physical deformations. A surfactant facilitates both the formation and maintenance of air bubbles inside the elastic composites, leading to a simple fabrication of bubble-entrapped stretchable conductors. Based on the unique bubble-entrapped architecture, the elastic properties are greatly enhanced and the resistance change in response to tensile strains can clearly be controlled. The bubble-entrapped conductor achieves ~80 % elongation at ~3.4 times lower stress and ~44.8 % smaller change in the electrical resistance at 80 % tensile strain, compared to bare conductor without air bubbles.

  20. A simple preparation method for spherical carbons and their anodic performance in lithium secondary batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Ou Jung; Jung, Yoon Seok; Kim, Ji Hyun; Oh, Seung M.

    This work reports a simple preparation method for spherical hard carbons and graphites. The phenolic resin and methylnaphthalene-derived mesophase pitch (MNMP) powders are employed as the precursor for hard carbon and graphite, respectively. The irregular-shaped precursor powders are converted to spherical carbons by first coating with fine-grained fumed silica powder and carbonizing/graphitizing under an argon atmosphere. Two characteristic features are observed in this preparation. First, among the used silica powders, only those having a hydrophobic surface group are effective for the irregular to sphere conversion. Second, the conversion takes place near the glass transition temperature of the resin and the softening point of the pitch, respectively. Based on these observations, an irregular to sphere conversion mechanism has been proposed. The spherical carbon powders exhibit a higher tap density and smaller surface area than those of the irregular-shaped ones, which is an advantageous feature for practical lithium batteries.

  1. The Effect of Binocular Rivalry on the Performance of a Simple Target Detection/Recognition Task

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    distribution is unlimited. E .LkC-TE S • 2 4 JAN 1980 HARRY G . ARMSTRONG AEROSPACE MEDICAL RESEARCH LABORATORY HUMAN SYSTEMS DIVISION AIR FORCE...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION AUTHORITY 3 DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY OF REPORT 2b. DECLASSIFICATION /DOWNGRADING SCHEDULE Approved for public release; d ...istributiorl is unlimited. 4. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER( S ) S . MONITORING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER( S ) AAMRL-TR-88-056 Śa. NAME OF PERFORMING

  2. Simple method for the measurement of the hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activity of anaerobic sludges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, J.D.; Coughlan, M.F.; Colleran, E.

    1996-01-01

    The specific hydrogenotrophic activity of anaerobic sludges is usually assayed by gas chromatographic analysis for methane in the headspace of sealed test vials. Gas is sampled with a pressure lock syringe which allows quantification independent of the pressure prevailing in the vials. An alternative method was developed using pressure transducer monitoring of the decrease in headspace gas pressure as the H2/CO2 substrate is converted to CH4. Application of a simple formula related the decrease at each sample point to millilitres of CH4 produced and gave values for the specific hydrogenotrophic activity of granular anaerobic sludge which were in good agreement with the values obtained by the more labor-intensive gas chromatographic method. The simplicity of the method facilitates multiple replicate analyses and allows more accurate determination of initial rates than is achievable by the gas chromatographic method which is prone to analytical error at the very low concentrations of CH4 present in the headspace during the early stages of the assay. Mass transfer of H2 from headspace to liquid was found to be rate-limiting and to result in significant under-estimation of the specific hydrogenotrophic activity of the granular sludge. A test protocol, which used a vial volatile suspended solids concentration between 1.7 and 8 g l-1; a 1:5 ratio between liquid and headspace; incubation of the vials horizontally with vigorous shaking (180 rev./min) and an initial H2/CO2 (80/20) gas pressure of 100-150 kPa was found to give reproducible and maximal values for the specific hydrogenotrophic activity of the test sludge.

  3. A rapid and simple assay for growth hormone-binding protein activity in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Baumann, G; Shaw, M A; Amburn, K

    1988-12-01

    The newly discovered circulating growth hormone binding proteins dictate a re-evaluation of the state of GH in plasma in health and disease as the binding proteins are known to affect GH metabolism and action. We describe a rapid and simple GH-binding assay that allows determination of free and complexed plasma GH, as well as GH-binding protein activity as an index of GH-binding protein levels, with relative ease. The method is based on incubation of plasma with 125I-GH and separation of bound from free GH on small DEAE-cellulose columns; it can be used on a large scale for routine determinations. The results obtained by this method are comparable to those obtained with the previously used slow and more cumbersome gel filtration technique. Initial data obtained in normal subjects and certain disease states show that the bound fraction of plasma GH is similar in men, women and children, is unaffected by pregnancy or acute infection, but is marginally decreased in liver cirrhosis. In acromegaly, binding protein activity also appears normal when allowance is made for partial saturation of the binding proteins by the high prevailing GH levels. The technique we describe should facilitate investigations of normal and abnormal regulation of the GH binding proteins.

  4. Performance of improved magnetostrictive vibrational power generator, simple and high power output for practical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, Toshiyuki

    2015-05-07

    Vibration based power generation technology is utilized effectively in various fields. Author has invented novel vibrational power generation device using magnetostrictive material. The device is based on parallel beam structure consisting of a rod of iron-gallium alloy wound with coil and yoke accompanied with permanent magnet. When bending force is applied on the tip of the device, the magnetization inside the rod varies with induced stress due to the inverse magnetostrictive effect. In vibration, the time variation of the magnetization generates voltage on the wound coil. The magnetostrictive type is advantageous over conventional such using piezoelectric or moving magnet types in high efficiency and high robustness, and low electrical impedance. Here, author has established device configuration, simple, rigid, and high power output endurable for practical applications. In addition, the improved device is lower cost using less volume of Fe-Ga and permanent magnet compared to our conventional, and its assembly by soldering is easy and fast suitable for mass production. Average power of 3 mW/cm{sup 3} under resonant vibration of 212 Hz and 1.2 G was obtained in miniature prototype using Fe-Ga rod of 2 × 0.5× 7 mm{sup 3}. Furthermore, the damping effect was observed, which demonstrates high energy conversion of the generator.

  5. Simple synthesis of ZnO nanoflowers and its photocatalytic performances toward the photodegradation of metamitron

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yan; Jin, Jingjie; Li, Xianliang; Han, Yide; Meng, Hao; Wang, Tianyu; Zhang, Xia

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Fabrication of ZnO nanoflowers assembled from thin and uniform nanosheets. • The material possesses photocatalytic acitivity toward degradation of metamitron. • The catalyst features excellent cycling stability for at least 5 cycle times. • The promising mechanism of photocatalysis of metamitron is also discussed. - Abstract: Large-scale ZnO nanoflowers assembled from numerous thin and uniform nanosheets with a thickness of around 20 nm, were successfully prepared through a facile one-step hydrothermal synthesis route by using zinc acetate, sodium citrate and sodium hydroxide in water solution. The method was simple, green and effective. The obtained ZnO nanoflowers exhibited remarkable photocatalytic acitivity and good cycle stability for the degradation of metamitron under a 300 W of Osram{sup ®} ultra-vitalux lamp light emitting UV and visible radiation over 300–600 nm. UV–vis spectrophotometery was used to measure the rate of photodecomposition of metamitron. The results indicate that about 97% of the metamitron disappeared in the suspension of flower-like ZnO microspheres within four hours, and the degradation efficiency were not changed even after 5 cycle times.

  6. Value-Added Funding: A Simple, Easy-to-Understand Model to Reward Performance. DO THIS!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Complete College America, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The mere mention of so-called "performance funding" makes college presidents and the higher education community nervous. It's an understandable reaction to a concept that too often results in an overly complex outcome. Still, the basic principle of "investing the limited resources states have in the results they want" is fundamentally sound--and…

  7. A Simple Criterion to Estimate Performance of Pulse Jet Mixed Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Pease, Leonard F.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Minette, Michael J.

    2016-07-10

    Pulse jet mixed process vessels comprise a key element of the U.S. Department of Energy’s strategy to process millions of gallons of legacy nuclear waste slurries. Slurry suctioned into a pulse jet mixer (PJM) tube at the end of one pulse is pneumatically driven from the PJM toward the bottom of the vessel at the beginning of the next pulse, forming a jet. The jet front traverses the distance from nozzle outlet to the bottom of the vessel and spreads out radially. Varying numbers of PJMs are typically arranged in a ring configuration within the vessel at a selected radius and operated concurrently. Centrally directed radial flows from neighboring jets collide to create a central upwell that elevates the solids in the center of the vessel when the PJM tubes expel their contents. An essential goal of PJM operation is to elevate solids to the liquid surface to minimize stratification. Solids stratification may adversely affect throughput of the waste processing plant. Unacceptably high slurry densities at the base of the vessel may plug the pipeline through which the slurry exits the vessel. Additionally, chemical reactions required for processing may not achieve complete conversion. To avoid these conditions, a means of predicting the elevation to which the solids rise in the central upwell that can be used during vessel design remains essential. In this paper we present a simple criterion to evaluate the extent of solids elevation achieved by a turbulent upwell jet. The criterion asserts that at any location in the central upwell the local velocity must be in excess of a cutoff velocity to remain turbulent. We find that local velocities in excess of 0.6 m/s are necessary for turbulent jet flow through both Newtonian and yield stress slurries. By coupling this criterion with the free jet velocity equation relating the local velocity to elevation in the central upwell, we estimate the elevation at which turbulence fails, and consequently the elevation at which the

  8. Performance of the Tariff Method: validation of a simple additive algorithm for analysis of verbal autopsies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Verbal autopsies provide valuable information for studying mortality patterns in populations that lack reliable vital registration data. Methods for transforming verbal autopsy results into meaningful information for health workers and policymakers, however, are often costly or complicated to use. We present a simple additive algorithm, the Tariff Method (termed Tariff), which can be used for assigning individual cause of death and for determining cause-specific mortality fractions (CSMFs) from verbal autopsy data. Methods Tariff calculates a score, or "tariff," for each cause, for each sign/symptom, across a pool of validated verbal autopsy data. The tariffs are summed for a given response pattern in a verbal autopsy, and this sum (score) provides the basis for predicting the cause of death in a dataset. We implemented this algorithm and evaluated the method's predictive ability, both in terms of chance-corrected concordance at the individual cause assignment level and in terms of CSMF accuracy at the population level. The analysis was conducted separately for adult, child, and neonatal verbal autopsies across 500 pairs of train-test validation verbal autopsy data. Results Tariff is capable of outperforming physician-certified verbal autopsy in most cases. In terms of chance-corrected concordance, the method achieves 44.5% in adults, 39% in children, and 23.9% in neonates. CSMF accuracy was 0.745 in adults, 0.709 in children, and 0.679 in neonates. Conclusions Verbal autopsies can be an efficient means of obtaining cause of death data, and Tariff provides an intuitive, reliable method for generating individual cause assignment and CSMFs. The method is transparent and flexible and can be readily implemented by users without training in statistics or computer science. PMID:21816107

  9. Working memory is not fixed-capacity: More active storage capacity for real-world objects than for simple stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Timothy F.; Störmer, Viola S.; Alvarez, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Visual working memory is the cognitive system that holds visual information active to make it resistant to interference from new perceptual input. Information about simple stimuli—colors and orientations—is encoded into working memory rapidly: In under 100 ms, working memory ‟fills up,” revealing a stark capacity limit. However, for real-world objects, the same behavioral limits do not hold: With increasing encoding time, people store more real-world objects and do so with more detail. This boost in performance for real-world objects is generally assumed to reflect the use of a separate episodic long-term memory system, rather than working memory. Here we show that this behavioral increase in capacity with real-world objects is not solely due to the use of separate episodic long-term memory systems. In particular, we show that this increase is a result of active storage in working memory, as shown by directly measuring neural activity during the delay period of a working memory task using EEG. These data challenge fixed-capacity working memory models and demonstrate that working memory and its capacity limitations are dependent upon our existing knowledge. PMID:27325767

  10. Laterally tapered undercut active waveguide fabricated by simple wet etching method for vertical waveguide directional coupler.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fang-Zheng; Chiu, Yi-Jen; Tsai, Shun-An; Wu, Tsu-Hsiu

    2008-05-26

    A novel structure, namely a laterally tapered undercut active-waveguide (LTUAWG) for an optical spot-size converter (SSC) is proposed and demonstrated in this paper. Using a selectively undercut-etching-active-region (UEAR) on a laterally tapered ridge to define a LTUAWG, a vertical waveguide directional coupler (VWGDC) can be fabricated simply by a wet etching-based technique. The VWGDC comprises a top LTUAWG and a bottom passive waveguide (PWG). An electroabsorption modulator (EAM) is monolithically integrated with a LTUAWG-VWGDC serving as the connecting active waveguide (AWG) and the optical transmission testing device. Through a loss budget analysis on an EAM-integrated VWGDC, an optical mode transfer loss of -1.6 dB is observed between the PWG and the AWG. By comparing the reverse directions of optical excitation, the identical optical transmission relations with bias are observed, further verifying the high efficiency properties in a SSC. Optical misalignment tolerance is employed to test the two transferred optical modes. 1dB misalignment tolerance of +/-2.9 microm (horizontal) and +/-2.2 microm (vertical) is obtained from the PWG, which is better than the value of +/-1.9 microm (horizontal) and +/-1.6 microm (vertical) from the AWG. Far-field angle measurement shows 6.0 degrees (horizontal) 9.3 degrees (vertical) and 11 degrees (horizontal) x 20 degrees (vertical) for the PWG and the AWG, respectively, exhibiting the capability of a mode transformer. All of these measurements are also examined by a 3D beam propagation method (BPM) showing quite consistent results. In this wet etching technique, no regrowth is needed during processing. Furthermore, UEAR processing controlled by in situ monitoring can lead to a simple way for submicron-size processing, showing that a highly reliable processing technique can thus be expected. A low cost of fabrication can also be realized, indicating that this method can be potentially used in optoelectronic integration.

  11. Interactions of motivation and reinforcement during the performance of a simple instrumental reflex by a monkey.

    PubMed

    Norkin, I M; Shul'govskii, V V

    1992-01-01

    The dynamics of the performance of an instrumental task by Macaca rhesus monkeys was investigated in an automated experiment. Three monkeys were trained to complete a movement with a lever in response to a light stimulus. It was demonstrated that the performance of the instrumental reflex by the monkeys is comprised of the alternation of blocks of more or less continuous realizations and pauses between them. The relationship of the intensity of the work of the monkeys to the time from the beginning of the experiment was studied, and a comparison was made of the magnitude of the intensity for the three monkeys. The average intensity of the work of the monkeys within the blocks of continuous realizations is a constant and individual value. The influence of the degree of deprivation and of the delivery of out-of-turn reinforcement on the work of the monkeys was also investigated.

  12. Dramatic improvement of membrane performance for microalgae harvesting with a simple bubble-generator plate.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Taewoon; Oh, You-Kwan; Kim, Bohwa; Han, Jong-In

    2015-06-01

    To overcome fouling issue in membrane-based algae harvesting and thus make an otherwise promising harvesting option more competitive, a bubble-generator plate was developed. According to computational fluid dynamics analysis, the plate generated substantial hydrodynamic power in terms of high pressure, velocity, and shear stress. When installed in a membrane filtration system with membranes of different surface and structural characteristics (one prepared by the phase inversion method, and a commercial one) the bubble-generator was indeed effective in reducing fouling. Without the plate, the much cheaper homemade membrane had the similar performance as the commercial one. Use of the bubble-generator considerably improved the performance of both membranes, and revealed a valuable synergy with the asymmetrical structure of the homemade membrane. This result clearly showed that the ever-problematic fouling could be mitigated in a rather easy manner, and in so doing, that membrane technology could indeed become a practical option for algae harvesting.

  13. Simple Detection-Performance Analysis of Multistatic Sonar for Anti-Submarine Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    information being passed to a central tracking node. We start with three schematic monostatic detection-probability curves, ranging from almost a cookie ...tracking, brings no advantage for a cookie -cutter detection probability. With the exponential shape, on the other hand, a multi- static field can be...networking, whether to centralise tracking or to perform multi- statics, gives very little advantage when the monostatic pd curve is close to a cookie

  14. A Simple Luminescent Adenylate-Cyclase Functional Assay for Evaluation of Bacillus anthracis Edema Factor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Israeli, Ma’ayan; Rotem, Shahar; Elia, Uri; Bar-Haim, Erez; Cohen, Ofer; Chitlaru, Theodor

    2016-01-01

    Edema Factor (EF), the toxic sub-unit of the Bacillus anthracis Edema Toxin (ET) is a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase whose detrimental activity in the infected host results in severe edema. EF is therefore a major virulence factor of B. anthracis. We describe a simple, rapid and reliable functional adenylate-cyclase assay based on inhibition of a luciferase-mediated luminescence reaction. The assay exploits the efficient adenylate cyclase-mediated depletion of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP), and the strict dependence on ATP of the light-emitting luciferase-catalyzed luciferin-conversion to oxyluciferin, which can be easily visualized. The assay exhibits a robust EF-dose response decrease in luminescence, which may be specifically reverted by anti-EF antibodies. The application of the assay is exemplified in: (a) determining the presence of EF in B. anthracis cultures, or its absence in cultures of EF-defective strains; (b) evaluating the anti-EF humoral response in experimental animals infected/vaccinated with B. anthracis; and (c) rapid discrimination between EF producing and non-producing bacterial colonies. Furthermore, the assay may be amenable with high-throughput screening for EF inhibitory molecules. PMID:27548219

  15. Simple ITC method for activity and inhibition studies on human salivary α-amylase.

    PubMed

    Lehoczki, Gábor; Szabó, Kármen; Takács, István; Kandra, Lili; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi

    2016-12-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) has an increasing significance in enzyme kinetic studies owing to its general applicability and sensitivity. In the present work, we aimed at developing a simple ITC-based screening procedure for the measurement of human salivary α-amylase (HSA) activity. Reaction of two substrates was studied with three independent methods (ITC, HPLC and spectrophotometry). ITC experiments were made using free and chromophore-containing maltooligomers of different length as substrates. Detailed studies revealed that maltoheptaose or longer oligomers could model properly starch and the presence of aromatic chromophore group did not affect the KM values considerably. It is the first time, when ITC was used to investigate of HSA-catalysed hydrolysis of different substrates (2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl-4-O-α-D-galactopyranosyl-maltoside, maltoheptaose and starch) in the presence of acarbose inhibitor. All measured IC50 values are in micromolar range (0.9, 18.6 and 29.0 μM, respectively) and increased in parallel with the degree of polymerisation of substrates.

  16. Duplicative activation mechanisms of two trypanosome telomeric VSG genes with structurally simple 5' flanks.

    PubMed

    Matthews, K R; Shiels, P G; Graham, S V; Cowan, C; Barry, J D

    1990-12-25

    In the mammalian bloodstream, African trypanosomes express variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes from a family of long and complex telomeric expression sites. VSG switching generally occurs by the duplication of different VSG genes into these sites by gene conversion involving a series of 70 base pair (70bp) repeats in the 5' flank. In contrast, when VSG is first synthesised by trypanosomes in the tsetse fly at the metacyclic stage, a separate set of telomeric expression sites is activated. These latter telomeres appear not to act as recipients in gene conversion. We have found that the structure of two such expression sites is simple, with very short 70bp repeat regions and very little other sequence in common with bloodstream expression sites. However, the two telomeres readily act as donors in VSG gene conversion in the bloodstream and we show for one a consistent association of the conversion 5' end point with the short 70bp repeat region. These findings help explain why a very predictable set of VSGs is expressed in the tsetse fly and have implications for VSG gene conversion mechanisms.

  17. A simple method for the prediction of the detonation performances of metal-containing explosives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Jichuan; Su, Hui; Li, Shenghua; Zhang, Shaowen; Pang, Siping

    2014-06-26

    Accurate prediction to the detonation performances of different kinds of energetic materials has attracted significant attention in the area of high energy density materials (HEDMs). A common approach for the estimation of CHNO explosives is the Kamlet-Jacobs (K-J) equation. However, with the development of energetic materials, the components of explosives are no longer restricted to CHNO elements. In this study, we have extended the K-J equation to the calculation of certain metal-containing explosives. A new empirical method, in which metal elements are assumed to form metallic oxides, has been developed on the basis of the largest exothermic principle. In this method, metal oxides can be deemed as inert solids that release heat other than gases. To evaluate the prediction accuracy of new method, a commercial program EXPLO5 has been employed for the calculation. The difference involved in the ways of treating products has been taken into account, and the detonation parameters from two methods were subject to close comparison. The results suggest that the mean absolute values (MAVs) of relative deviation for detonation velocity (D) and detonation pressure (P) are less than 5%. Overall, this new method has exhibited excellent accuracy and simplicity, affording an efficient way to estimate the performance of explosives without relying on sophisticated computer programs. Therefore, it will be helpful in designing and synthesizing new metallic energetic compounds.

  18. Use of simple x-ray measurement in the performance analysis of cryogenic RF accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    D. Dotson; M. Drury; R. May; C. Reece

    1996-10-01

    X-ray emission by radiofrequency (RF) resonant cavities has long been known to accelerator health physicists as a potentially serious source of radiation exposure. The authors points out the danger of klystrons and microwave cavities by stating that the radiation source term is erratic and may be unpredictable depending on microscopic surface conditions which change with time. He also states the x-ray output is a rapidly increasing function of RF input power. At Jefferson Lab, the RF cavities used to accelerate the electron beam employ superconducting technology. X-rays are emitted at high cavity gradients, and measurements of cavity x-rays are valuable for health physics purposes and provide a useful diagnostic tool for assessing cavity performance. The quality factor (Q) for superconducting RF resonant cavities used at Jefferson Lab, is typically 5 x 10{sup 9} for the nominal design gradient of 5 MVm{sup {minus}1}. This large value for Q follows from the small resistive loss in superconducting technology. The operating frequency is 1,497 MHz. In the absence of beam, the input power for a cavity is typically 750 W and the corresponding dissipated power is 2.6 W. At 5 MWm{sup {minus}1}, the input power is 3 kW fully beam loaded. At higher gradients, performance degradation tends to occur due to the onset of electron field emission from defects in the cavity.

  19. Effects of aripiprazole and haloperidol on neural activation during a simple motor task in healthy individuals: A functional MRI study.

    PubMed

    Goozee, Rhianna; O'Daly, Owen; Handley, Rowena; Reis Marques, Tiago; Taylor, Heather; McQueen, Grant; Hubbard, Kathryn; Pariante, Carmine; Mondelli, Valeria; Reinders, Antje A T S; Dazzan, Paola

    2017-04-01

    The dopaminergic system plays a key role in motor function and motor abnormalities have been shown to be a specific feature of psychosis. Due to their dopaminergic action, antipsychotic drugs may be expected to modulate motor function, but the precise effects of these drugs on motor function remain unclear. We carried out a within-subject, double-blind, randomized study of the effects of aripiprazole, haloperidol and placebo on motor function in 20 healthy men. For each condition, motor performance on an auditory-paced task was investigated. We entered maps of neural activation into a random effects general linear regression model to investigate motor function main effects. Whole-brain imaging revealed a significant treatment effect in a distributed network encompassing posterior orbitofrontal/anterior insula cortices, and the inferior temporal and postcentral gyri. Post-hoc comparison of treatments showed neural activation after aripiprazole did not differ significantly from placebo in either voxel-wise or region of interest analyses, with the results above driven primarily by haloperidol. We also observed a simple main effect of haloperidol compared with placebo, with increased task-related recruitment of posterior cingulate and precentral gyri. Furthermore, region of interest analyses revealed greater activation following haloperidol compared with placebo in the precentral and post-central gyri, and the putamen. These diverse modifications in cortical motor activation may relate to the different pharmacological profiles of haloperidol and aripiprazole, although the specific mechanisms underlying these differences remain unclear. Evaluating healthy individuals can allow investigation of the effects of different antipsychotics on cortical activation, independently of either disease-related pathology or previous treatment. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1833-1845, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A facile and simple high-performance polydimethylsiloxane casting based on self-polymerization dopamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xing; Zhang, Lu-lu; Sun, Jian-hai; Li, Hui; Cui, Da-fu

    2014-09-01

    We present a new and facile method for polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) casting by dip-coating the master molds in an aqueous solution of dopamine. A poly(dopamine) film formed by self-polymerization of dopamine is used as the surface anti-adhesion coating for PDMS de-molding. Different master molds, such as metal, silicon and PDMS replica, were used to verify the feasibility of this proposed PDMS casting method. The poly(dopamine) coatings at various fabrication conditions were studied by using surface plasmon resonance technology. We found that it is very easy to form repeated poly(dopamine) coatings with similar thicknesses and density at fairly flexible conditions of self-polymerization. The water contact angles of the PDMS master molds and the positive PDMS replicas were studied after the PDMS master molds were immersed in the dopamine coating solution for different times. The de-molding process was then measured by surface plasmon resonance technology. The surface morphology of the master molds and the PDMS replicas were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Results demonstrate that the poly(dopamine) coating exhibits a strong release property in the PDMS de-molding process and has good stickiness after PDMS de-molding a dozen times. The package performances of the PDMS replicas were detected and compared by bonding experiments. PDMS replicas after a second round of de-molding present a little higher package performance than that of the PDMS replicas with an anti-sticking agent of silane. The biochemical properties of PDMS replicas were studied through fluorescence immunoassay experiments. The PDMS replicas present similar biochemical properties to the bare PDMS. This biomimetic surface modification method of dopamine for PDMS casting has a great potential for preparing microdevices for various biological and clinical applications.

  1. Neural representations and mechanisms for the performance of simple speech sequences

    PubMed Central

    Bohland, Jason W.; Bullock, Daniel; Guenther, Frank H.

    2010-01-01

    Speakers plan the phonological content of their utterances prior to their release as speech motor acts. Using a finite alphabet of learned phonemes and a relatively small number of syllable structures, speakers are able to rapidly plan and produce arbitrary syllable sequences that fall within the rules of their language. The class of computational models of sequence planning and performance termed competitive queuing (CQ) models have followed Lashley (1951) in assuming that inherently parallel neural representations underlie serial action, and this idea is increasingly supported by experimental evidence. In this paper we develop a neural model that extends the existing DIVA model of speech production in two complementary ways. The new model includes paired structure and content subsystems (cf. MacNeilage, 1998) that provide parallel representations of a forthcoming speech plan, as well as mechanisms for interfacing these phonological planning representations with learned sensorimotor programs to enable stepping through multi-syllabic speech plans. On the basis of previous reports, the model’s components are hypothesized to be localized to specific cortical and subcortical structures, including the left inferior frontal sulcus, the medial premotor cortex, the basal ganglia and thalamus. The new model, called GODIVA (Gradient Order DIVA), thus fills a void in current speech research by providing formal mechanistic hypotheses about both phonological and phonetic processes that are grounded by neuroanatomy and physiology. This framework also generates predictions that can be tested in future neuroimaging and clinical case studies. PMID:19583476

  2. Bayesian Optimal Interval Design: A Simple and Well-Performing Design for Phase I Oncology Trials.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ying; Hess, Kenneth R; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Gilbert, Mark R

    2016-09-01

    Despite more than two decades of publications that offer more innovative model-based designs, the classical 3 + 3 design remains the most dominant phase I trial design in practice. In this article, we introduce a new trial design, the Bayesian optimal interval (BOIN) design. The BOIN design is easy to implement in a way similar to the 3 + 3 design, but is more flexible for choosing the target toxicity rate and cohort size and yields a substantially better performance that is comparable with that of more complex model-based designs. The BOIN design contains the 3 + 3 design and the accelerated titration design as special cases, thus linking it to established phase I approaches. A numerical study shows that the BOIN design generally outperforms the 3 + 3 design and the modified toxicity probability interval (mTPI) design. The BOIN design is more likely than the 3 + 3 design to correctly select the MTD and allocate more patients to the MTD. Compared with the mTPI design, the BOIN design has a substantially lower risk of overdosing patients and generally a higher probability of correctly selecting the MTD. User-friendly software is freely available to facilitate the application of the BOIN design. Clin Cancer Res; 22(17); 4291-301. ©2016 AACR.

  3. Skin and scales of teleost fish: Simple structure but high performance and multiple functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernerey, Franck J.; Barthelat, Francois

    2014-08-01

    Natural and man-made structural materials perform similar functions such as structural support or protection. Therefore they rely on the same types of properties: strength, robustness, lightweight. Nature can therefore provide a significant source of inspiration for new and alternative engineering designs. We report here some results regarding a very common, yet largely unknown, type of biological material: fish skin. Within a thin, flexible and lightweight layer, fish skins display a variety of strain stiffening and stabilizing mechanisms which promote multiple functions such as protection, robustness and swimming efficiency. We particularly discuss four important features pertaining to scaled skins: (a) a strongly elastic tensile behavior that is independent from the presence of rigid scales, (b) a compressive response that prevents buckling and wrinkling instabilities, which are usually predominant for thin membranes, (c) a bending response that displays nonlinear stiffening mechanisms arising from geometric constraints between neighboring scales and (d) a robust structure that preserves the above characteristics upon the loss or damage of structural elements. These important properties make fish skin an attractive model for the development of very thin and flexible armors and protective layers, especially when combined with the high penetration resistance of individual scales. Scaled structures inspired by fish skin could find applications in ultra-light and flexible armor systems, flexible electronics or the design of smart and adaptive morphing structures for aerospace vehicles.

  4. Neural representations and mechanisms for the performance of simple speech sequences.

    PubMed

    Bohland, Jason W; Bullock, Daniel; Guenther, Frank H

    2010-07-01

    Speakers plan the phonological content of their utterances before their release as speech motor acts. Using a finite alphabet of learned phonemes and a relatively small number of syllable structures, speakers are able to rapidly plan and produce arbitrary syllable sequences that fall within the rules of their language. The class of computational models of sequence planning and performance termed competitive queuing models have followed K. S. Lashley [The problem of serial order in behavior. In L. A. Jeffress (Ed.), Cerebral mechanisms in behavior (pp. 112-136). New York: Wiley, 1951] in assuming that inherently parallel neural representations underlie serial action, and this idea is increasingly supported by experimental evidence. In this article, we developed a neural model that extends the existing DIVA model of speech production in two complementary ways. The new model includes paired structure and content subsystems [cf. MacNeilage, P. F. The frame/content theory of evolution of speech production. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 21, 499-511, 1998 ] that provide parallel representations of a forthcoming speech plan as well as mechanisms for interfacing these phonological planning representations with learned sensorimotor programs to enable stepping through multisyllabic speech plans. On the basis of previous reports, the model's components are hypothesized to be localized to specific cortical and subcortical structures, including the left inferior frontal sulcus, the medial premotor cortex, the basal ganglia, and the thalamus. The new model, called gradient order DIVA, thus fills a void in current speech research by providing formal mechanistic hypotheses about both phonological and phonetic processes that are grounded by neuroanatomy and physiology. This framework also generates predictions that can be tested in future neuroimaging and clinical case studies.

  5. Simple Saucers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2008-01-01

    With standardized English Language Arts exams on the horizon, the author thought a game of Antonyms would provide not only a quick language arts activity for her sixth graders, but also a nice segue to an art lesson in contrast. In this article, she describes a project, a simple saucer on a pedestal base, which required students to demonstrate…

  6. Self-Reported vs. Performance-Based Assessments of a Simple Mobility Task among Older Adults in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Roedersheimer, Kyle M.; Pereira, Greg F.; Jones, Christopher W.; Braz, Valerie A.; Mangipudi, Sowmya A.; Platts-Mills, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Accurate information about the mobility of independently-living older adults is essential in determining whether they may be safely discharged home from the emergency department (ED). We assessed the accuracy of self-reported ability to complete a simple mobility task among older ED patients. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of cognitively intact patients aged 65 years and older who were neither nursing home residents nor critically ill conducted in two academic EDs. Consenting participants were asked whether they could get out of bed, walk 10 feet, turn around, and get back in bed without assistance, and if not, whether they could perform this task with a cane, walker, or human assistance. Each participant was then asked to perform the task and was provided with a mobility device or human assistance as needed. Results Of 272 patients who met eligibility criteria and answered the physical task question, 161 (59%) said they could do the task unassisted, 45 (17%) said they could do it with a cane or walker, 21 (8%) said they could do it with human assistance, and 45 (17%) said they would be unable to do it even with human assistance. Among those who said they could do the task either with or without assistance and who were subsequently willing to attempt the task (N=172), discrepancies between self-reported ability and actual performance were common. Of those who said they could perform the task without assistance, 12% required some assistance or were unable to complete the task. Of those who said they could perform the task with a cane or walker, 48% required either human assistance or were unable to perform the task. Of those who said they could perform the task with human assistance, 24% were unable to perform the task even with human assistance. Conclusion In this sample of older adults receiving care in the ED, the accuracy of their self-reported ability to perform a simple mobility task was poor, particularly for those who reported some need

  7. Effect of observation of simple hand movement on brain activations in patients with unilateral cerebral palsy: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Dinomais, Mickael; Lignon, Gregoire; Chinier, Eva; Richard, Isabelle; Ter Minassian, Aram; Tich, Sylvie N'Guyen The

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to examine and compare brain activation in patients with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) during observation of simple hand movement performed by the paretic and nonparetic hand. Nineteen patients with clinical unilateral CP (14 male, mean age 14 years, 7-21 years) participated in the study. Hand motor impairment was assessed using the sequential finger opposition task. Using fMRI block design, brain activation was examined following observation at rest of a simple opening-closing hand movement, performed by either the left or right hand of an actor. Eighteen fMRI dataset were analyzed. Observing hand movement produced large bilateral activations in temporo-parieto-fronto-occipital network, comprising most of the nodes of the well described action-observation network. For either side, observing hand movements recruits the primary motor cortex (M1), contralateral to the viewed hand, as would be expected in healthy persons. Viewing movement performed by an actor's hand representing the paretic side of patients activated more strongly ipsilesional M1 than viewing movement performed by an actor's hand representing the nonparetic side of patients. Observation of hand movement in patients with CP engaged the motor execution network regardless of the degree of motor impairment.

  8. Aberrant Oscillatory Activity during Simple Movement in Task-Specific Focal Hand Dystonia.

    PubMed

    Hinkley, Leighton B N; Dolberg, Rebecca; Honma, Susanne; Findlay, Anne; Byl, Nancy N; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2012-01-01

    In task-specific focal hand dystonia (tspFHD), the temporal dynamics of cortical activity in the motor system and how these processes are related to impairments in sensory and motor function are poorly understood. Here, we use time-frequency reconstructions of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data to elaborate the temporal and spatial characteristics of cortical activity during movement. A self-paced finger tapping task during MEG recording was performed by 11 patients with tspFHD and 11 matched healthy controls. In both groups robust changes in beta (12-30 Hz) and high gamma (65-90 Hz) oscillatory activity were identified over sensory and motor cortices during button press. A significant decrease [p < 0.05, 1% False Discovery Rate (FDR) corrected] in high gamma power during movements of the affected hand was identified over ipsilateral sensorimotor cortex in the period prior to (-575 ms) and following (725 ms) button press. Furthermore, an increase (p < 0.05, 1% FDR corrected) in beta power suppression following movement of the affected hand was identified over visual cortex in patients with tspFHD. For movements of the unaffected hand, a significant (p < 0.05, 1% FDR corrected) increase in beta power suppression was identified over secondary somatosensory cortex (S2) in the period following button press in patients with tspFHD. Oscillatory activity within in the tspFHD group was however not correlated with clinical measures. Understanding these aberrant oscillatory dynamics can provide the groundwork for interventions that focus on modulating the timing of this activity.

  9. Physical performance and creative activities of centenarians.

    PubMed

    Antonini, F M; Magnolfi, S U; Petruzzi, E; Pinzani, P; Malentacchi, F; Petruzzi, I; Masotti, G

    2008-01-01

    The human functional autonomy is reduced progressively with advancing age, although a considerable proportion of the centenarians maintain a good level of autosufficiency for the basic performance of the everyday life. Even if males have a lower probability to reach the centenarian age than females do, the male centenarians display generally better functional conditions than the females. Actually, there are no systemic studies on centenarian works or activities; nevertheless, the examples of several representative persons (artists, scientists, explorers, etc.) who remained active even after this age indicate that such a possibility is realistic, and that the maintenance of vital interest and passions, thus preserving competence and professional attitudes, is not in conflict with the reaching of extreme longevity.

  10. Hand function and performance of daily activities in systemic lupus erythematosus: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Malcus Johnsson, P; Sandqvist, G; Nilsson, J-Å; Bengtsson, A A; Sturfelt, G; Nived, O

    2015-07-01

    This clinical study was performed to investigate hand problems in individuals with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in comparison with healthy controls, and to explore problems in the performance of daily activities related to these hand problems, in order to objectify findings from a previous mail survey. We also investigated whether a simple hand test could detect hand problems in SLE. All individuals, 71 with SLE and 71 healthy controls, were examined for manifestations in body structures and body functions of the hands with a study-specific protocol. The simple hand test was performed by all the individuals and the arthritis impact measurement scale (AIMS 2) questionnaire was completed by the SLE individuals. In the SLE group, 58% had some kind of difficulty in the simple hand test, compared with 8% in the control group. Fifty percent of the SLE individuals experienced problems in performing daily activities due to hand deficits. Pain in the hands, reduced strength and dexterity, Raynaud's phenomenon and trigger finger were the most prominent body functions affecting the performance of daily activities. Deficits in hand function are common in SLE and affect the performance of daily activities. The simple hand test may be a useful tool in detecting hand problems.

  11. Radon Adsorbed in Activated Charcoal--A Simple and Safe Radiation Source for Teaching Practical Radioactivity in Schools and Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Mustapha, Amidu O.; Karunakara, N.

    2012-01-01

    Simple procedures for teaching practical radioactivity are presented in a way that attracts students' attention and does not make them apprehensive about their safety. The radiation source is derived from the natural environment. It is based on the radioactivity of radon, a ubiquitous inert gas, and the adsorptive property of activated charcoal.…

  12. A simple and rapid technique for radiochemical separation of iodine radionuclides from irradiated tellurium using an activated charcoal column.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Sankha; Saha Das, Sujata

    2009-10-01

    A simple and inexpensive method for the separation of medically useful no-carrier-added (nca) iodine radionuclides from bulk amounts of irradiated tellurium dioxide (TeO(2)) target was developed. The beta(-) emitting (131)I radionuclide, produced by the decay of (131)Te through the (nat)Te(n, gamma)(131)Te nuclear reaction, was used for standardization of the radiochemical separation procedure. The radiochemical separation was performed by precipitation followed by column (activated charcoal) chromatography. Quantitative post-irradiation recovery of the TeO(2) target material (98-99%), in a form suitable for reuse in future irradiations, was achieved. The overall radiochemical yield for the complete separation of (131)I was 75-85% (n=8). The separated nca (131)I was of high, approximately 99%, radionuclidic and radiochemical purities and did not contain detectable amounts of the target material. This method can be adopted for the radiochemical separation of other different iodine radionuclides produced from tellurium matrices through cyclotron as well as reactor irradiation.

  13. Exercise-induced Alteration in Brain Activity during Motor Performance under Cognitive Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-02

    stress . It is possible that the correlated activity between EEG and EMG is used for “fine-tuning” brain activity during the performance of fine motor...brain and muscle during simple fine motor performance under stress after high-intensity physical exertion. Healthy young adults were assigned to...leg resistance exercise. Oscillations in EEG and corticomuscular coherence in beta band both tended to decrease 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE

  14. Subdominant Dense Clusters Allow for Simple Learning and High Computational Performance in Neural Networks with Discrete Synapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldassi, Carlo; Ingrosso, Alessandro; Lucibello, Carlo; Saglietti, Luca; Zecchina, Riccardo

    2015-09-01

    We show that discrete synaptic weights can be efficiently used for learning in large scale neural systems, and lead to unanticipated computational performance. We focus on the representative case of learning random patterns with binary synapses in single layer networks. The standard statistical analysis shows that this problem is exponentially dominated by isolated solutions that are extremely hard to find algorithmically. Here, we introduce a novel method that allows us to find analytical evidence for the existence of subdominant and extremely dense regions of solutions. Numerical experiments confirm these findings. We also show that the dense regions are surprisingly accessible by simple learning protocols, and that these synaptic configurations are robust to perturbations and generalize better than typical solutions. These outcomes extend to synapses with multiple states and to deeper neural architectures. The large deviation measure also suggests how to design novel algorithmic schemes for optimization based on local entropy maximization.

  15. A Simple Method for Encouraging Active Participation in Small-Group Discussion Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Adrian

    1977-01-01

    A format for a small-group teaching session is described that could be modified for any subject in a medical curriculum. The technique discussed uses subgroups and a simple recording chart that have been successful in teaching microbiology to medical students. (LBH)

  16. Sound science-A simple and robust hands-on loudspeaker activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Molly; Stonick, Virginia

    1999-09-01

    This article describes a simple and very robust loudspeaker, comprising nothing more than a cream-cheese tub with lid, a screw, a magnet, wire, and tape. When plugged into a boom-box speaker output, it generates "high-fidelity" sound and much student enthusiasm.

  17. The Effects of Writing Activities on Grade 4 Children's Understanding of Simple Machines, Inventions, and Inventors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucknott, Joan M.; Yore, Larry D.

    This paper explores the effects of infusing writing-to-learn strategies into an inquiry-oriented science unit on simple machines, inventions and inventors. This study used an intact group pretest and posttest design to capture the ecological validity of a classroom of grade 4 students and teacher. The design incorporated quantitative research…

  18. AHA! A Cool Salt Water/Density Activity--The Joy of Designing a Simple Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Gaylen R.

    1998-01-01

    Describes two science activities concerning water density and shares an idea for combining these activities into a third, completely new activity. Demonstrates the joy of rekindling the spirit of scientific thinking in a typical classroom. (PVD)

  19. A rapid, sensitive, simple plate assay for detection of microbial alginate lyase activity.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Shailesh S; Salunke, Bipinchandra K; Kim, Beom Soo

    2015-09-01

    Screening of microorganisms capable of producing alginate lyase enzyme is commonly carried out by investigating their abilities to grow on alginate-containing solid media plates and occurrence of a clearance zone after flooding the plates with agents such as 10% (w/v) cetyl pyridinium chloride (CPC), which can form complexes with alginate. Although the CPC method is good, advantageous, and routinely used, the agar in the media interferes with the action of CPC, which makes judgment about clearance zones very difficult. In addition, this method takes a minimum of 30 min to obtain the zone of hydrolysis after flooding and the hydrolyzed area is not sharply discernible. An improved plate assay is reported herein for the detection of extracellular alginate lyase production by microorganisms. In this method, alginate-containing agar plates are flooded with Gram's iodine instead of CPC. Gram's iodine forms a bluish black complex with alginate but not with hydrolyzed alginate, giving sharp, distinct zones around the alginate lyase producing microbial colonies within 2-3 min. Gram's iodine method was found to be more effective than the CPC method in terms of visualization and measurement of zone size. The alginate-lyase-activity area indicated using the Gram's iodine method was found to be larger than that indicated by the CPC method. Both methods (CPC and Gram's iodine) showed the largest alginate lyase activity area for Saccharophagus degradans (ATCC 43961) followed by Microbulbifer mangrovi (KCTC 23483), Bacillus cereus (KF801505) and Paracoccus sp. LL1 (KP288668) grown on minimal sea salt medium. The rate of growth and metabolite production in alginate-containing minimal sea salt liquid medium, followed trends similar to that of the zone activity areas for the four bacteria under study. These results suggested that the assay developed in this study of Gram's iodine could be useful to predict the potential of microorganisms to produce alginate lyase. The method also

  20. Photochemiluminescent detection of antiradical activity; III: A simple assay of ascorbate in blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Lewin, G; Popov, I

    1994-06-01

    A simple procedure to determine the ascorbate in blood plasma was elaborated based on a temporary inhibition of the photo-induced, O(-.)2-mediated, chemiluminescence emanating from oxidation of luminol. To remove the interferences, mainly from urate, a simple enzyme-free one-step method for plasma sample preparation by means of a gel filtration was combined with the photochemiluminescent investigation of the eluate. The results of the photochemiluminescent assay of ascorbate coincide well (r = 0.994) with a photometric method with ascorbate oxidase. The mean value of ascorbate in human blood plasma, obtained from 37 healthy volunteers, was 59.6 +/- 25.8 mumol/l. Patients with atherosclerosis having a myocardial infarction in their anamnesis displayed significantly lower values: 27.2 +/- 12.8 mumol/l (n = 32), P < 0.001.

  1. Assessing physical activity of women of childbearing age. Ongoing work to develop and evaluate simple methods.

    PubMed

    Löf, Marie; Hannestad, Ulf; Forsum, Elisabet

    2002-09-01

    Simple methods were developed and evaluated to assess total energy expenditure in 24 healthy, Swedish women planning pregnancy. Total energy expenditure was measured by the doubly-labeled water method (reference method) and three simple methods: heart rate recording, movement registration by an accelerometer, and a questionnaire. Mean total energy expenditure obtained by the four methods varied between 2,530 kcal per 24 hours (10,570 kJ/24 hours) and 2,730 kcal per 24 hours (11,420 kJ/24 hours). No significant difference between the results obtained by the different methods was found. The mean difference between the simple method and the reference method was for the questionnaire 204 +/- 508 kcal per 24 hours (853 +/- 2,124 kJ/24 hours), for the heart rate recorder 58 +/- 338 kcal per 24 hours (241 +/- 1,416 kJ/24 hours) and for the accelerometer 6 +/- 325 kcal per 24 hours (25 +/- 1,360 kJ/24 hours). The heart rate recorder and the questionnaire overestimated high and underestimated low energy expenditures. The accelerometer and the heart rate recorder were able to assess mean total energy expenditure of groups. No systematic bias was found when the accelerometer was used.

  2. A simple high-performance matrix-free biomass molten carbonate fuel cell without CO2 recirculation

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Rong; Tao, Shanwen

    2016-01-01

    In previous reports, flowing CO2 at the cathode is essential for either conventional molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) based on molten carbonate/LiAlO2 electrolytes or matrix-free MCFCs. For the first time, we demonstrate a high-performance matrix-free MCFC without CO2 recirculation. At 800°C, power densities of 430 and 410 mW/cm2 are achieved when biomass—bamboo charcoal and wood, respectively–is used as fuel. At 600°C, a stable performance is observed during the measured 90 hours after the initial degradation. In this MCFC, CO2 is produced at the anode when carbon-containing fuels are used. The produced CO2 then dissolves and diffuses to the cathode to react with oxygen in open air, forming the required CO32− or CO42− ions for continuous operation. The dissolved O2− ions may also take part in the cell reactions. This provides a simple new fuel cell technology to directly convert carbon-containing fuels such as carbon and biomass into electricity with high efficiency. PMID:27540588

  3. A simple high-performance matrix-free biomass molten carbonate fuel cell without CO2 recirculation.

    PubMed

    Lan, Rong; Tao, Shanwen

    2016-08-01

    In previous reports, flowing CO2 at the cathode is essential for either conventional molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) based on molten carbonate/LiAlO2 electrolytes or matrix-free MCFCs. For the first time, we demonstrate a high-performance matrix-free MCFC without CO2 recirculation. At 800°C, power densities of 430 and 410 mW/cm(2) are achieved when biomass-bamboo charcoal and wood, respectively-is used as fuel. At 600°C, a stable performance is observed during the measured 90 hours after the initial degradation. In this MCFC, CO2 is produced at the anode when carbon-containing fuels are used. The produced CO2 then dissolves and diffuses to the cathode to react with oxygen in open air, forming the required [Formula: see text] or [Formula: see text] ions for continuous operation. The dissolved [Formula: see text] ions may also take part in the cell reactions. This provides a simple new fuel cell technology to directly convert carbon-containing fuels such as carbon and biomass into electricity with high efficiency.

  4. Fast, simple, and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography method for measuring vitamins A and E in human blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chao; Burgyan, Maria; Bunch, Dustin R; Reineks, Edmunds; Jackson, Raymond; Steinle, Roxanne; Wang, Sihe

    2014-09-01

    Vitamins A and E are fat-soluble vitamins that play important roles in several physiological processes. Monitoring their concentrations is needed to detect deficiency and guide therapy. In this study, we developed a high-performance liquid chromatography method to measure the major forms of vitamin A (retinol) and vitamin E (α-tocopherol and γ-tocopherol) in human blood plasma. Vitamins A and E were extracted with hexane and separated on a reversed-phase column using methanol as the mobile phase. Retinol was detected by ultraviolet absorption, whereas tocopherols were detected by fluorescence emission. The chromatographic cycle time was 4.0 min per sample. The analytical measurement range was 0.03-5.14, 0.32-36.02, and 0.10-9.99 mg/L for retinol, α-tocopherol, and γ-tocopherol, respectively. Intr-aassay and total coefficient of variation were <6.0% for all compounds. This method was traceable to standard reference materials offered by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Reference intervals were established using plasma samples collected from 51 healthy adult donors and were found to be 0.30-1.20, 6.0-23.0, and 0.3-3.2 mg/L for retinol, α-tocopherol, and γ-tocopherol, respectively. In conclusion, we developed and validated a fast, simple, and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography method for measuring the major forms of vitamins A and E in human plasma.

  5. Hierarchical structured carbon derived from bagasse wastes: A simple and efficient synthesis route and its improved electrochemical properties for high-performance supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Haobin; Hu, Hang; Dong, Hanwu; Xiao, Yong; Cai, Yijin; Lei, Bingfu; Liu, Yingliang; Zheng, Mingtao

    2016-01-01

    Bagasse-derived hierarchical structured carbon (BDHSC) with tunable porosity and improved electrochemical performance is prepared via simple and efficient hydrothermal carbonization combined with KOH activation. Experimental results show that sewage sludge acts as a cheap and efficient structure-directing agent to regulate the morphology, adjust the porosity, and thus improve the supercapacitive performance of BDHSC. The as-resulted BDHSC exhibits an interconnected framework with high specific surface area (2296 m2 g-1), high pore volume (1.34 cm3 g-1), and hierarchical porosity, which offer a more favorable pathway for electrolyte penetration and transportation. Compared to the product obtained from bagasse without sewage sludge, the unique interconnected BDHSC exhibits enhanced supercapacitive performances such as higher specific capacitance (320 F g-1), and better rate capability (capacitance retention over 70.8% at a high current density of 50 A g-1). Moreover, the BDHSC-based symmetric supercapacitor delivers a maximum energy density of over 20 Wh kg-1 at 182 W kg-1 and presents an excellent long-term cycling stability. The developed approach in the present work can be useful not only in production of a variety of novel hierarchical structured carbon with promising applications in high-performance energy storage devices, but also in high-value utilization of biomass wastes and high-ash-content sewage sludge.

  6. PARduino: a simple and inexpensive device for logging photosynthetically active radiation.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Holly R; Findley, Matthew C; Csavina, Janae

    2014-06-01

    Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400-700 nm) is one of the primary controls of forest carbon and water relations. In complex terrain, PAR has high spatial variability. Given the high cost of commercial datalogging equipment, spatially distributed measurements of PAR have been typically modeled using geographic coordinates and terrain indices. Here, we present a design for a low-cost, field-deployable device for measuring and recording PAR built around an Arduino microcontroller-named PARduino. PARduino provides for widely distributed sensor arrays and tests the feasibility of using open-source, hobbyist-grade electronics for collecting scientific data. PARduino components include a quantum sensor, an EME Systems signal converter/amplifier and an Arduino Pro Mini microcontroller. Additional components include a real-time clock, a microSD Flash memory card and a custom printed circuit board. The components were selected for ease of assembly. We found strong agreement between the PARduino datalogger system and National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable sensors logged by an industry standard datalogger (slope = 0.99, SE < 0.01, P < 0.01; intercept = - 14.84, SE = 0.78, P < 0.01). The average difference between the two systems was 22.0 µmol m(-2) s(-1) with PARduino typically underestimating PAR. The average percentage difference between systems was 3.49%. On average, PARduino performed within the factory absolute calibration of the PAR sensor; however, larger errors occurred at low PAR levels. Using open-source technologies such as this can make it possible to develop a spatially distributed sensor network within the constraints of a typical research budget.

  7. Design of a simple active controller to suppress helicopter air resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, M. D.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1988-01-01

    A coupled rotor/fuselage helicopter analysis with the important effects of blade torsional flexibility, unsteady aerodynamics, and forward flight is presented. Using this mathematical model, a nominal configuration is selected that experiences an air resonance instability throughout most of its flight envelope. A simple multivariable compensator using conventional swashplate inputs and a single body roll rate measurement is then designed. The controller design is based on a linear estimator in conjunction with optimal feedback gains, and the design is done in the frequency domain using the Loop Transfer Recovery method. The controller is shown to suppress the air resonance instability throughout wide range helicopter loading conditions and forward flight speeds.

  8. The Reality-Based Learning Method: A Simple Method for Keeping Teaching Activities Relevant and Effective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Louise W.; Van Doren, Doris C.

    2004-01-01

    Active and experiential learning theory have not dramatically changed collegiate classroom teaching methods, although they have long been included in the pedagogical literature. This article presents an evolved method, reality based learning, that aids professors in including active learning activities with feelings of clarity and confidence. The…

  9. Get Kids Moving: Simple Activities To Build Gross-Motor Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Highlights the importance of activities to build gross motor skills and provides hints for encouraging such activities. Specific areas of activities presented are: (1) running and jumping; (2) music games; (3) action games; (4) races; (5) bed sheets or parachutes; (6) hula hoops; (7) balls; (8) batting; (9) balance; and (10) creative movement. (SD)

  10. Distilling Complex Model Results into Simple Models for use in Assessing Compliance with Performance Standards for Low Level Waste Disposal Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur S. Rood

    2007-02-01

    Assessing the long term performance of waste disposal facility requires numerical simulation of saturated and unsaturated groundwater flow and contaminant transport. Complex numerical models have been developed to try to realistically simulate subsurface flow and transport processes. These models provide important information about system behavior and identify important processes, but may not be practical for demonstrating compliance with performance standards because of excessively long computer simulation times and input requirements. Two approaches to distilling the behavior of a complex model into simpler formulations that are practical for demonstrating compliance with performance objectives are examined in this paper. The first approach uses the information obtained from the complex model to develop a simple model that mimics the complex model behavior for stated performance objectives. The simple model may need to include essential processes that are important to assessing performance, such as time-variable infiltration and waste emplacement rates, subsurface heterogeneity, sorption, decay, and radioactive ingrowth. The approach was applied to a Low-Level Waste disposal site at the Idaho National Laboratory where a complex three dimensional vadose zone model was developed first to understand system behavior and important processes. The complex model was distilled down to a relatively simple one-dimensional vadose zone model and three-dimensional aquifer transport model. Comparisons between the simple model and complex model of vadose zone fluxes and groundwater concentrations showed relatively good agreement between the models for both fission and activation products (129I, 36Cl, 99Tc) and actinides (238U, 239Pu, 237Np). Application of the simple model allowed for Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis and simulations of numerous disposal and release scenarios. The second approach investigated was the response surface model. In the response surface model approach

  11. Enhanced-performance active fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentilman, Richard L.; McNeal, Kelley; Schmidt, Gerald E.; Pizzochero, Alessandro E.; Rossetti, George A., Jr.

    2003-08-01

    Active fiber composites (AFCs) find applications in a variety of industrial, commercial, and aerospace markets as both actuators and sensors. Among the key attributes of AFCs relative to conventional monolithic piezoceramic actuators are high strain energy density, unidirectional response, conformability, and robustness. Recently, performance enhancements in AFCs have been demonstrated through the use of a modified injection molding process to produce piezoceramic modules with multiple identical fibers of a uniform rectangular cross section. AFC actuators made from Type II PZT fiber modules exhibit free micro-strains of 1830 +/- 30 ppm at a peak-peak E-field drive of 26.1 kV/cm, and show exceptional part-to-part uniformity. In addition, AFCs made from injection molded PMN-PT fiber modules show a low-field d33 of 650 pm/V. The successful incorporation of PMN-PT materials into AFCs also demonstrates the viability of using highly textured ceramic PMN-PT piezofibers, for which even larger increases in strain response are expected.

  12. Detection of arecoline by simple high-performance thin-layer chromatographic method in Indian nontobacco pan masala.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Anjan; Hazra, Alok Kumar; Sur, Tapas Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Chewing the habit of blended pan masala containing areca nut with or without tobacco is a common practice in the Indian subcontinent. Arecoline, a pyridine alkaloid presence in areca nut alarmed for oral carcinogenesis and strictly prohibited in the western world. However, in India using blended pan masala is very popular among young and old individuals. In this context, we aimed to detect arecoline in Indian blended nontobacco pan masala sold in Kolkata using a simple densitometric high-performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method and for alarming their use in common people. Eleven popularly Indian blended nontobacco pan masala were collected from the territory of Kolkata and isolated arecoline, following solvent extraction method derived for pyridine alkaloid. The quantitative analysis of arecoline was measured using automated software-based HPTLC instruments and validated the method according to International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. Arecoline was detected in all 11 blended nontobacco pan masala samples in a range of minimum 130 to maximum 415 μg/g dry samples. Arecoline is hazardous carcinogenic compound, so the use of Indian blended nontobacco pan masala should be restricted. Further, the method was found suitable for routine quantitative analysis of arecoline in areca nut containing substances.

  13. Detection of arecoline by simple high-performance thin-layer chromatographic method in Indian nontobacco pan masala

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Anjan; Hazra, Alok Kumar; Sur, Tapas Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Chewing the habit of blended pan masala containing areca nut with or without tobacco is a common practice in the Indian subcontinent. Arecoline, a pyridine alkaloid presence in areca nut alarmed for oral carcinogenesis and strictly prohibited in the western world. However, in India using blended pan masala is very popular among young and old individuals. In this context, we aimed to detect arecoline in Indian blended nontobacco pan masala sold in Kolkata using a simple densitometric high-performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method and for alarming their use in common people. Eleven popularly Indian blended nontobacco pan masala were collected from the territory of Kolkata and isolated arecoline, following solvent extraction method derived for pyridine alkaloid. The quantitative analysis of arecoline was measured using automated software-based HPTLC instruments and validated the method according to International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. Arecoline was detected in all 11 blended nontobacco pan masala samples in a range of minimum 130 to maximum 415 μg/g dry samples. Arecoline is hazardous carcinogenic compound, so the use of Indian blended nontobacco pan masala should be restricted. Further, the method was found suitable for routine quantitative analysis of arecoline in areca nut containing substances. PMID:26605162

  14. A simple procedure for the preparation of fritless columns by entrapping conventional high performance liquid chromatography sorbents.

    PubMed

    Chirica, G S; Remcho, V T

    2000-09-01

    A rapid and direct method for immobilizing conventional high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) packing material inside fritless capillaries has been developed. Due to the simple composition of the entrapment matrix (tetraethoxysilane, alkyltriethoxysilane, ethanol and water), straightforward manufacturing procedure and modest equipment requirement, the method can readily be transferred to any laboratory and easily automated. The entrapment procedure has minimal influence on the structure and chromatographic properties of the original reverse-phase sorbent. Various immobilization solutions have been tested, and a comparison between columns entrapped with different immobilization mixtures and conventional packed capillaries is presented. High efficiency separations were obtained using tert-butyl-triethoxysilane entrapped columns in both capillary electrochromatography (reduced plate heights of 1.1-1.4 were measured) and microliquid chromatography (reduced plate heights of 2.2-2.6 were observed) formats. Elimination of frits, stabilization of the packed bed and on-the-fly customization of column length render mechanically robust columns that are remarkably stable over time, from which manufacturing imperfections can be removed easily.

  15. The Value of Simple Models: Performance of a Spatially-explicit Seasonal Model for Valuing Water Provisioning (InVEST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamel, P.; Guswa, A. J.; Wemple, B. C.; Mohammed, I. N.; Sharp, R.

    2015-12-01

    Valuing hydrologic ecosystem services (ES) requires a truly integrated approach, linking knowledge of hydrologic processes to that of the socio-economic context of a region. Although both the hydrological and socio-economic dimensions are complex, practitioners need simple and credible models to address pressing questions brought by global change. We developed such a model for the supply, service, and value of water provisioning; available to the ES community through the open-source InVEST (Integrated Valuation of Ecosytem Services and Trade-offs) software. The model is characterized by i) low data requirements, with the aim of being applied in data-scarce environments; ii) spatially-explicit outputs, to easily address spatial planning questions; iii) a seasonal time-step, representing a compromise between data knowledge and ability to address season-dependent questions (water supply for irrigation, hydropower production); iv) explicit representation of beneficiaries, to facilitate valuation of the provisioning service for different groups; v) flexible valuation framework, to address a variety of ES questions. The model theory is based on the recent advances in hydrology, using the "limits" concept for water balance modeling and spatial indices for subsurface and surface runoff. We tested the model performance in the Mad River catchment, Vermont, USA, comparing its results with the data-intensive RHESSys model for two typical ES questions: the identification of hotspots of service and valuation of the provisioning service for hydropower production. Uncertainty analyses, including sensitivity analyses and Monte Carlo analyses, were performed to quantify uncertainty in both hydrological outputs and service provisioning, and improve guidance for users. We present these results through a range of spatial and non-spatial outputs, emphasizing the importance of results interpretation and visualization for ES assessments.

  16. A simple active controller to suppress helicopter air resonance in hover and forward flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, P. P.; Takahashi, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    A coupled rotor/fuselage helicopter analysis with the important effects of blade torsional flexibility, unsteady aerodynamics, and forward flight is presented. This model is used to illustrate the effect of unsteady aerodynamics, forward flight, and torsional flexibility on air resonance. Next, a nominal configuration, which experiences air resonance in forward flight, is selected. A simple multivariable compensator using conventional swashplate inputs and a single body roll rate measurement is then designed. The controller design is based on a linear estimator in conjunction with optimal feedback gains, and the design is done in the frequency domain using the loop-transfer recovery method. The controller is shown to suppress the air resonance instability throughout wide range helicopter loading conditions and forward flight speeds.

  17. Teaching Activity Report: A Concise and Simple Summary of Individual Instructional Effort. AIR Forum 1979 Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCollester, Charles W.; Farrell, Richard L., Jr.

    The University of Notre Dame developed the Teaching Activity Report in an effort to present professors with meaningful summaries of their individual instructional efforts each semester. Geared to meet the needs of the individual instructors and their superiors, the Teaching Activity Report synthesizes all facets of the individual's instructional…

  18. The Structural Challenge: A Simple Design-Based Science Activity to Foster Creativity among Kinaesthetic Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amir, Nazir; Subramaniam, R.

    2014-01-01

    A suitable way for teachers to present science content and foster creativity in less academically inclined students is by getting them to engage in design-based science activities and guiding them along the way. This study illustrates how a design-and-make activity was carried out with the aim of getting students to showcase their creativity while…

  19. A Simple Activity to Facilitate Proportional Reasoning in the Contexts of Density, Dissolving, and Nanoparticles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamed, Kastro

    2008-01-01

    To address the confusion resulting from difficulties with proportional reasoning among preservice physical science students, a cube-assembly activity was used to bring a sense of concreteness to abstract ideas. The activity took students from the concrete step of assembling cubes of various sizes and directly measuring their properties to slightly…

  20. Effect of Low and Very Low Doses of Simple Phenolics on Plant Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Malarczyk, Elżbieta; Kochmańska-Rdest, Janina; Paździoch-Czochra, Marzanna

    2004-01-01

    Changes in the activity of horseradish peroxidase resulting from an addition of ethanol water dilutions of 19 phenolic compounds were observed. For each compound, the enzyme activity was plotted against the degree of dilution expressed as n = –log100 (mol/L) in the range 0 ≤ n ≥ 20. All the curves showed sinusoidal activity, more or less regular, with two to four peaks on average. Each analyzed compound had a characteristic sinusoidal shape, which was constant for samples of peroxidase from various commercial firms. This was clearly visible after function fitting to experimental results based on the Marquadt–Levenberg algorithm using the least-squares method. Among the 19 phenolics, the highest amplitudes were observed for phenol and iso- and vanillate acids and aldehydes. The specific character of each of the analyzed curves offers a possibility of choosing proper dilutions of phenolic compound for activating or inhibiting of peroxidase activity. PMID:19330128

  1. A simple and rapid technique for recovery of (99m)Tc from low specific activity (n,gamma)(99)Mo based on solvent extraction and column chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Sankha; Das, Sujata Saha; Barua, Luna

    2010-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive method of separation of (99m)Tc from (99)Mo produced by neutron activation of (98)Mo via the (98)Mo(n,gamma)(99)Mo nuclear reaction is described. The recovery of (99m)Tc was performed by solvent extraction technique followed by column (active alumina) chromatography. The overall radiochemical yield for the complete separation of (99m)Tc was 85-95% (n=10). The separated Na[(99m)Tc]TcO(4) was of high radionuclidic, radiochemical, and chemical purities. The method can be adopted for routine use of (99m)Tc in hospital radio-pharmacies utilizing low-medium specific activity (n,gamma)(99)Mo produced in a research reactor.

  2. Age-related differences in lexical access, spreading activation, and simple pronunciation.

    PubMed

    Balota, D A; Duchek, J M

    1988-03-01

    An experiment was conducted to address age-related differences in lexical access, spreading activation, and pronunciation. Both young and older adults participated in a delayed pronunciation task to trace the time course of lexical access and a semantic priming task to trace the time course of spreading activation. In the delayed pronunciation task, subjects were presented a word and then, after varying delays, were presented a cue to pronounce the word aloud. Older adults benefited considerably more from the preexposure to the word than did the younger adults, suggesting an age-related difference in lexical access time. In the semantic priming pronunciation task, semantic relatedness (related vs. neutral), strength of the relationship (high vs. low), and prime-target stimulus onset asynchrony (200 ms, 350 ms, 500 ms, 650 ms, and 800 ms) were factorially crossed with age to investigate age-related differences in the buildup of semantic activation across time. The results from this task indicated that the activation pattern of the older adults closely mimicked that of the younger adults. Finally, the results of both tasks indicated that older adults were slower at both their onset to pronounce and their actual production durations (i.e., from onset to offset) in the pronunciation task. The results were interpreted as suggesting that input and output processes are slowed with age, but that the basic retrieval mechanism of spreading activation is spared by age.

  3. Noise-induced ectopic activity in a simple cardiac cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, Harold

    2005-03-01

    Ectopic activity in the form of premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) is relatively common in the normal heart. Although PVCs are normally harmless, sometimes but rarely PVCs can generate spiral waves of activation through interaction with other waves of activation, potentially progressing to ventricular tachycardia, followed by ventricular fibrillation and sudden cardiac death. Clusters of PVCs have been found to be significantly more dangerous than isolated PVCs. We model PVC generation by applying triggers (noise) to the generic FitzHugh-Nagumo model as substrate, and study the effects the noise level and excitability. We find: exponential waiting time behavior at fixed parameter levels; no evidence of clustering at fixed parameter levels; and a sharp increase in PVCs as excitability approaches the auto-oscillatory threshold or noise increases beyond a similar threshold. This produces sharp increases in theoretical rates of PVC-induced fibrillation, consistent with results of A Gelzer et al. in animal models. Partially supported by the NSF and NIH.

  4. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry for simple and simultaneous quantification of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Jamwal, Rohitash; Topletz, Ariel R; Ramratnam, Bharat; Akhlaghi, Fatemeh

    2017-03-24

    Cannabis is used widely in the United States, both recreationally and for medical purposes. Current methods for analysis of cannabinoids in human biological specimens rely on complex extraction process and lengthy analysis time. We established a rapid and simple assay for quantification of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), 11-hydroxy Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannbinol (THCCOOH) in human plasma by U-HPLC-MS/MS usingΔ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-D3 (THC-D3) as the internal standard. Chromatographic separation was achieved on an Acquity BEH C18 column using a gradient comprising of water (0.1% formic acid) and methanol (0.1% formic acid) over a 6 min run-time. Analytes from 200μL plasma were extracted using acetonitrile (containing 1% formic acid and THC-D3). Mass spectrometry was performed in positive ionization mode, and total ion chromatogram was used for quantification of analytes. The assay was validated according to guidelines set forth by Food and Drug Administration of the United States. An eight-point calibration curve was fitted with quadratic regression (r(2)>0.99) from 1.56 to 100ngmL(-1) and a lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of 1.56ngmL(-1) was achieved. Accuracy and precision calculated from six calibration curves was between 85-115% while the mean extraction recovery was >90% for all the analytes. Several plasma phospholipids eluted after the analytes thus did not interfere with the assay. Bench-top, freeze-thaw, auto-sampler and short-term stability ranged from 92.7 to 106.8% of nominal values. Application of the method was evaluated by quantification of analytes in human plasma from six subjects.

  5. The value of simple tests for peristaltic activity in hiatus hernia

    PubMed Central

    Powis, S. J. A.; Collis, J. Leigh

    1970-01-01

    A study has been made of oesophageal peristaltic activity as viewed at barium swallows, in an effort to see whether this is helpful in assessing the type and degree of oesophageal lesions associated with hiatus hernia. It has not been possible to establish a clinical usefulness from such testing as the frequency with which peristaltic upset occurs is too marginal. PMID:5485006

  6. Studies of Portuguese and British Primary Pupils Learning Science through Simple Activities in the Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardoso, Maria de Lurdes; Solomon, Joan

    2002-01-01

    Considers how Portuguese and British parents of primary pupils rose to the challenge of having parents help them by taking part in home science activities, taking into account the recent history of science education in the two countries. Shows that the learning atmosphere is very different from that of school, being more conducive to relaxed and…

  7. Higher-Order Activity beyond the Word Level: Cortical Dynamics of Simple Transitive Sentence Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin-Loeches, M.; Casado, P.; Hinojosa, J.A.; Carretie, L.; Munoz, F.; Pozo, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Slow electrophysiological effects, which fluctuate throughout the course of a sentence, independent of transient responses to individual words, have been reported. However, this type of activity has scarcely been studied, and with only limited use of electrophysiological information, so that the brain areas in which these variations originate have…

  8. Running Simulations without Ruining Your Life: Simple Ways to Incorporate Active Learning into Your Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazier, Rebecca A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the growing availability and popularity of simulations and other active teaching techniques, many instructors may be deterred from using simulations because of the potentially high costs involved. Instructors could spend a preponderance of their time and resources developing and executing simulations, but such an approach is not necessary.…

  9. Metabolic Myopathies and Physical Activity: When Fatigue Is More Than Simple Exertion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarnopolsky, Mark A.

    2002-01-01

    When patients experience fatigue and muscle cramps beyond exercise adaptation, physicians should consider metabolic myopathies. The most common conditions seen in active patients are myoadenylate deaminase deficiency and disorders such as McArdle's disease. Targeted family histories and basic laboratory studies help rule out conditions mimicking…

  10. Performance of several simple, noninvasive models for assessing significant liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xianghua; Xu, Cheng; He, Dengming; Li, Maoshi; Zhang, Huiyan; Wu, Quanxin; Xiang, Dedong; Wang, Yuming

    2015-01-01

    Aim To compare the performance of several simple, noninvasive models comprising various serum markers in diagnosing significant liver fibrosis in the same sample of patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) with the same judgment standard. Methods A total of 308 patients with CHB who had undergone liver biopsy, laboratory tests, and liver stiffness measurement (LSM) at the Southwest Hospital, Chongqing, China between March 2010 and April 2014 were retrospectively studied. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and area under ROC curves (AUROCs) were used to analyze the results of the models, which incorporated age-platelet (PLT) index (API model), aspartate transaminase (AST) to alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio (AAR model), AST to PLT ratio index (APRI model), γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) to PLT ratio index (GPRI model), GGT-PLT-albumin index (S index model), age-AST-PLT-ALT index (FIB-4 model), and age-AST-PLT-ALT-international normalized ratio index (Fibro-Q model). Results The AUROCs of the S index, GPRI, FIB-4, APRI, API, Fibro-Q, AAR, and LSM for predicting significant liver fibrosis were 0.726 (P < 0.001), 0.726 (P < 0.001), 0.621 (P = 0.001), 0.619 (P = 0.001), 0.580 (P = 0.033), 0.569 (P = 0.066), 0.495 (P = 0.886), and 0.757 (P < 0.001), respectively. The S index and GPRI had the highest correlation with histopathological scores (r = 0.373, P < 0.001; r = 0.372, P < 0.001, respectively) and LSM values (r = 0.516, P < 0.001; r = 0.513, P < 0.001, respectively). When LSM was combined with S index and GPRI, the AUROCs were 0.753 (P < 0.001) and 0.746 (P < 0.001), respectively. Conclusion S index and GPRI had the best diagnostic performance for significant liver fibrosis and were robust predictors of significant liver fibrosis in patients with CHB for whom transient elastography was unavailable. PMID:26088852

  11. Activation energies for addition of O/3P/ to simple olefins.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Description of relative rate measurements for the addition of O(3P) to C2H4, C2F4, C3H6, and C4H8-1 in liquid argon at 87.5 K. The data strongly indicate that the activation energies for the addition of O(3P) to the double bonds of propylene and butene-1 are identical, probably to within 0.1 kcal/mole. It is very doubtful that differences in pre-exponential factors or other factors such as solvent effects, could invalidate this conclusion. A similar argument holds for the C2H4 and C2F4 reactions. Furthermore, the experiments suggest that the activation energy for addition of O(3P) to the double bond of butene-1 is about 0.1 kcal/mole.

  12. Industry activities to improve valve performance

    SciTech Connect

    Callaway, C.

    1996-12-01

    Motor-operated valve issues refuse to go away. For over a decade the industry and the NRC have been focusing extraordinary resources on assuring these special components operate when called upon. Now that industry has fixed the design deficiencies, it is focusing on assuring that they perform their safety function within the current licensing basis for the remainder of plant life. NEI supported the efforts by ASME to develop OMN-1 and was encouraged that the industry and the NRC worked together to develop risk and performance based approaches to maintain MOV performance.

  13. Structural mechanism of RPA loading on DNA during activation of a simple pre-replication complex.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaohua; Klimovich, Vitaly; Arunkumar, Alphonse I; Hysinger, Erik B; Wang, Yingda; Ott, Robert D; Guler, Gulfem D; Weiner, Brian; Chazin, Walter J; Fanning, Ellen

    2006-11-29

    We report that during activation of the simian virus 40 (SV40) pre-replication complex, SV40 T antigen (Tag) helicase actively loads replication protein A (RPA) on emerging single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). This novel loading process requires physical interaction of Tag origin DNA-binding domain (OBD) with the RPA high-affinity ssDNA-binding domains (RPA70AB). Heteronuclear NMR chemical shift mapping revealed that Tag-OBD binds to RPA70AB at a site distal from the ssDNA-binding sites and that RPA70AB, Tag-OBD, and an 8-nucleotide ssDNA form a stable ternary complex. Intact RPA and Tag also interact stably in the presence of an 8-mer, but Tag dissociates from the complex when RPA binds to longer oligonucleotides. Together, our results imply that an allosteric change in RPA quaternary structure completes the loading reaction. A mechanistic model is proposed in which the ternary complex is a key intermediate that directly couples origin DNA unwinding to RPA loading on emerging ssDNA.

  14. SIMPLE: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endres, Frank L.

    Symbolic Interactive Matrix Processing Language (SIMPLE) is a conversational matrix-oriented source language suited to a batch or a time-sharing environment. The two modes of operation of SIMPLE are conversational mode and programing mode. This program uses a TAURUS time-sharing system and cathode ray terminals or teletypes. SIMPLE performs all…

  15. Synthesis of pyrite FeS2 nanorods by simple hydrothermal method and its photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Gallardo, M. V.; Ayala, A. M.; Pal, Mou; Cortes Jacome, M. A.; Toledo Antonio, J. A.; Mathews, N. R.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, FeS2 nanorods were synthetized by hydrothermal method. The advantages of our process were the high yield, simplicity and reproducibility. The material was studied in detail using different experimental tools such as XRD, SEM, HRTEM, EDXS, XPS, Raman, and UV-vis reflectance. XRD pattern and Raman data revealed good crystalline quality for the as synthesized pyrite FeS2. SEM analysis displayed the rod-like morphologies of FeS2 which seemed to grow radially from a center giving a flower-like appearance. From TEM images the approximate length and diameter of nano-rods were determined as 275 and 15 nm respectively. The material showed excellent photocatalytic activity which was assessed from the degradation of the methlyene blue.

  16. A simple, inexpensive video camera setup for the study of avian nest activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sabine, J.B.; Meyers, J.M.; Schweitzer, Sara H.

    2005-01-01

    Time-lapse video photography has become a valuable tool for collecting data on avian nest activity and depredation; however, commercially available systems are expensive (>USA $4000/unit). We designed an inexpensive system to identify causes of nest failure of American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) and assessed its utility at Cumberland Island National Seashore, Georgia. We successfully identified raccoon (Procyon lotor), bobcat (Lynx rufus), American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos), and ghost crab (Ocypode quadrata) predation on oystercatcher nests. Other detected causes of nest failure included tidal overwash, horse trampling, abandonment, and human destruction. System failure rates were comparable with commercially available units. Our system's efficacy and low cost (<$800) provided useful data for the management and conservation of the American Oystercatcher.

  17. Coordinated motor activity in simulated spinal networks emerges from simple biologically plausible rules of connectivity.

    PubMed

    Dale, Nicholas

    2003-01-01

    The spinal motor circuits of the Xenopus embryo have been simulated in a 400-neuron network. To explore the consequences of differing patterns of synaptic connectivity within the network for the generation of the motor rhythm, a system of biologically plausible rules was devised to control synapse formation by three parameters. Each neuron had an intrinsic probability of synapse formation (P(soma), specified by a space constant lambda) that was a monotonically decreasing function of its soma location in the rostro-caudal axis of the simulated network. The neurons had rostral and caudal going axons of specified length (L(axon)) associated with a probability of synapse formation (P(axon)). The final probability of synapse formation was the product of P(soma) and P(axon). Realistic coordinated activity only occurred when L(axon) and the probabilities of interconnection were sufficiently high. Increasing the values of the three network parameters reduced the burst duration, cycle period, and rostro-caudal delay and increased the reliability with which the network functioned as measured by the coefficient of variance of these parameters. Whereas both L(axon) and P(axon) had powerful and consistent effects on network output, the effects of lambda on burst duration and rostro-caudal delay were more variable and depended on the values of the other two parameters. This network model can reproduce the rostro-caudal coordination of swimming without using coupled oscillator theory. The changes in network connectivity and resulting changes in activity explored by the model mimic the development of the motor pattern for swimming in the real embryo.

  18. Modifying Charge and Hydrophilicity of Simple Ru(II) Polypyridyl Complexes Radically Alters Biological Activities: Old Complexes, Surprising New Tricks

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Compounds capable of light-triggered cytotoxicity are appealing potential therapeutics, because they can provide spatial and temporal control over cell killing to reduce side effects in cancer therapy. Two simple homoleptic Ru(II) polypyridyl complexes with almost-identical photophysical properties but radically different physiochemical properties were investigated as agents for photodynamic therapy (PDT). The two complexes were identical, except for the incorporation of six sulfonic acids into the ligands of one complex, resulting in a compound carrying an overall −4 charge. The negatively charged compound exhibited significant light-mediated cytotoxicity, and, importantly, the negative charges resulted in radical alterations of the biological activity, compared to the positively charged analogue, including complete abrogation of toxicity in the dark. The charges also altered the subcellular localization properties, mechanism of action, and even the mechanism of cell death. The incorporation of negative charged ligands provides a simple chemical approach to modify the biological properties of light-activated Ru(II) cytotoxic agents. PMID:25249443

  19. A simple synthesis method for nanostructured Co-WC/carbon composites with enhanced oxygen reduction reaction activity

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jun; Kim, Hye-min; Saito, Nagahiro; Lee, Myeong-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Co nanoparticles (Co NPs) and nanoscale tungsten carbide (WC) are successfully synthesized simultaneously with mesoporous structured carbon black (C) using an innovative simple method, which is known as solution plasma processing (SPP), and NPs are also loaded onto carbon black at the same time by SPP. The introduction of Co NPs led to not only superior oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity in terms of onset potential and peak potential, but also to a more efficient electron transfer process compared to that of pure WC. Co-WC/C also showed durability for long-term operation better than that of commercial Pt/C. These results clearly demonstrate that the presence of Co NPs significantly enhanced the ORR and charge transfer number of neighboring WC NPs in ORR activities. In addition, it was proved that SPP is a simple method (from synthesis of NPs and carbon black to loading on carbon black) for the large-scale synthesis of NP-carbon composite. Therefore, SPP holds great potential as a candidate for next-generation synthetic methods for the production of NP-carbon composites. PMID:27877856

  20. Simple preparation of tungsten supported carbon nanoreactors for specific applications: Adsorption, catalysis and electrochemical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayani, Vishal J.; Mayani, Suranjana V.; Kim, Sang Wook

    2015-08-01

    Porous carbon supported tungsten carbide nanoreactors, two sizes (∼25 and 170 nm), were designed using economical petroleum pitch residue followed by tungsten (W) doping. X-ray diffractions showed both carbon tungsten composites (CTC-25 and CTC-170) contained tungsten subcarbide (W2C) and monocarbide (WC) as the major and minor crystalline phases, respectively. The present study provides a multiple perspective of carbon tungsten composites (CTCs) for methanol oxidation (as an electrode), adsorption (as an adsorbent) and degradation (as a solid catalyst) of methylene blue (MB). The operational electrodes were designed from both CTCs and used as a catalyst in an electrocatalysis process. The electrocatalysts exhibited high and stable catalytic performance (CTCE-25 > CTCE-170) in methanol electro-oxidation. The newly synthesized W-doped carbon nanoreactors were used successfully as an adsorbent for MB and a heterogeneous catalyst for MB oxidation. Ordered CTC-25 and CTC-170 exhibited dynamic MB adsorption within 15 min and complete oxidation of MB in 25-40 min. A synergetic effect between tungsten carbide and the carbon cage framework was noted.

  1. A Simple test for the existence of two accretion modes in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Jester, Sebastian; /Fermilab

    2005-02-01

    By analogy to the different accretion states observed in black-hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs), it appears plausible that accretion disks in active galactic nuclei (AGN) undergo a state transition between a radiatively efficient and inefficient accretion flow. If the radiative efficiency changes at some critical accretion rate, there will be a change in the distribution of black hole masses and bolometric luminosities at the corresponding transition luminosity. To test this prediction, the author considers the joint distribution of AGN black hole masses and bolometric luminosities for a sample taken from the literature. The small number of objects with low Eddington-scaled accretion rates m < 0.01 and black hole masses M{sub BH} < 10{sup 9} M{sub {circle_dot}} constitutes tentative evidence for the existence of such a transition in AGN. Selection effects, in particular those associated with flux-limited samples, systematically exclude objects in particular regions of the (M{sub BH}, L{sub bol}) plane. Therefore, they require particular attention in the analysis of distributions of black hole mass, bolometric luminosity, and derived quantities like the accretion rate. The author suggests further observational tests of the BHXB-AGN unification scheme which are based on the jet domination of the energy output of BHXBs in the hard state, and on the possible equivalence of BHXB in the very high (or steep power-law) state showing ejections and efficiently accreting quasars and radio galaxies with powerful radio jets.

  2. Simple procedure for the synthesis of high specific activity tritiated (6S)-5-formyltetrahydrofolate

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, R.G.; Colman, P.D.

    1982-05-01

    The 5-position of tetrahydrofolate was found to be unusually reactive with low concentrations of formic acid in the presence of a water-soluble carbodiimide. The product of this reaction has neutral and acid ultraviolet spectra and chromatographic behavior consistent with its identity as 5-formyltetrahydrofolate (leucovoriun). When enzymatically synthesized (6S)-tetrahydrofolate was used as starting material, the product supported the growth of folate-depleted L1210 cells at one-half the concentration required for authentic (6R,S)-leucovorin. This reaction has been used to produce high specific activity (44 Ci/mmol) (/sup 3/H)(6S)-5-formyltetrahydrofolate in high yield. Experiments with (/sup 14/C)formic acid indicate that 1 mol of formate reacted per mol of tetrahydrofolate but that no reaction occurred with a variety of other folate compounds. (6S)-5-Formyltetrahydrofolate, labeled in the formyl group with /sup 14/C, has also been synthesized using this reaction. These easily produced, labeled folates should allow close examination of the transport and utilization of leucovorin and of the mechanism of reversal of methotrexate toxicity by reduced folate cofactors.

  3. A simple method for activating the platelets used in microfluidic platelet aggregation tests: Stirring-induced platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hoyoon; Kim, Gyehyu; Lim, Chaeseung; Lee, ByoungKwon; Shin, Sehyun

    2016-01-01

    High-shear stimulation is well known as one of the key factors affecting platelet activation and aggregation, which can lead to the formation of a thrombus. In one of our previous studies, we introduced migration distance-based platelet function analysis in a microfluidic system. In this study, we set out to examine the effects of stirring on shear-induced platelet activation and aggregation in a chamber system by using a rotating stirrer. We found that the rotating stirrer caused not only rotational shear flow but also a strong radial secondary flow. The latter flow led to efficient mixing in the chamber. Moreover, the rotational flow led to the generation of shear stress, the magnitude of which can be controlled to activate the platelets. Activated platelets tend to aggregate themselves. The maximum platelet aggregation was observed at a critical shear rate of 3100 s−1, regardless of the stirrer shape. Furthermore, the time taken to attain maximum aggregation was significantly shortened when using a wide stirrer (30 s) instead of a narrow one (180 s). When using a flat stirrer, the non-uniform shear field in the chamber system was resolved with the radial secondary flow-induced mixing; thus, most of the platelets were homogenously activated. The stirring-induced platelet activation mechanism was experimentally confirmed in a microfluidic system for a platelet aggregation test while monitoring the migration distance until the microfluidic channel is occluded. Our findings indicate that the present system, consisting of a rotating stirrer and a confined chamber, provides effective shear stimulation for activating platelets and inducing platelet aggregates. PMID:28058084

  4. A simple method for activating the platelets used in microfluidic platelet aggregation tests: Stirring-induced platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hoyoon; Kim, Gyehyu; Lim, Chaeseung; Lee, ByoungKwon; Shin, Sehyun

    2016-11-01

    High-shear stimulation is well known as one of the key factors affecting platelet activation and aggregation, which can lead to the formation of a thrombus. In one of our previous studies, we introduced migration distance-based platelet function analysis in a microfluidic system. In this study, we set out to examine the effects of stirring on shear-induced platelet activation and aggregation in a chamber system by using a rotating stirrer. We found that the rotating stirrer caused not only rotational shear flow but also a strong radial secondary flow. The latter flow led to efficient mixing in the chamber. Moreover, the rotational flow led to the generation of shear stress, the magnitude of which can be controlled to activate the platelets. Activated platelets tend to aggregate themselves. The maximum platelet aggregation was observed at a critical shear rate of 3100 s(-1), regardless of the stirrer shape. Furthermore, the time taken to attain maximum aggregation was significantly shortened when using a wide stirrer (30 s) instead of a narrow one (180 s). When using a flat stirrer, the non-uniform shear field in the chamber system was resolved with the radial secondary flow-induced mixing; thus, most of the platelets were homogenously activated. The stirring-induced platelet activation mechanism was experimentally confirmed in a microfluidic system for a platelet aggregation test while monitoring the migration distance until the microfluidic channel is occluded. Our findings indicate that the present system, consisting of a rotating stirrer and a confined chamber, provides effective shear stimulation for activating platelets and inducing platelet aggregates.

  5. Cognitive Analysis of U.S. and Chinese Students' Mathematical Performance on Tasks Involving Computation, Simple Problem Solving, and Complex Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Jinfa

    1995-01-01

    This document is 7th in the Journal for Research in Mathematics Education monograph series. The mathematical performance of (n=250) U.S. 6th-grade students from both private and public schools and (n=425) Chinese 6th-graders from both key and common schools was examined on multiple-choice tasks assessing computation and simple problem solving, and…

  6. SIMPLE SAMPLE CLEAN UP PROCEDURE AND HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHOD FOR THE ANALYSIS OF CYANURIC ACID IN HUMAN URINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyanuric acide (CA) is widely used as a chlorine stabilizer in outdoor pools. No simple method exists for CA measurement in the urine of exposed swimmers. The high hydrophilicity of CA makes usage of solid phase sorbents to extract it from urine nearly impossible because of samp...

  7. A Simulation Study on the Performance of the Simple Difference and Covariance-Adjusted Scores in Randomized Experimental Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petscher, Yaacov; Schatschneider, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Research by Huck and McLean (1975) demonstrated that the covariance-adjusted score is more powerful than the simple difference score, yet recent reviews indicate researchers are equally likely to use either score type in two-wave randomized experimental designs. A Monte Carlo simulation was conducted to examine the conditions under which the…

  8. Using a simple apparatus to measure direct and diffuse photosynthetically active radiation at remote locations.

    PubMed

    Cruse, Michael J; Kucharik, Christopher J; Norman, John M

    2015-01-01

    Plant canopy interception of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) drives carbon dioxide (CO2), water and energy cycling in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Quantifying intercepted PAR requires accurate measurements of total incident PAR above canopies and direct beam and diffuse PAR components. While some regional data sets include these data, e.g. from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program sites, they are not often applicable to local research sites because of the variable nature (spatial and temporal) of environmental variables that influence incoming PAR. Currently available instrumentation that measures diffuse and direct beam radiation separately can be cost prohibitive and require frequent adjustments. Alternatively, generalized empirical relationships that relate atmospheric variables and radiation components can be used but require assumptions that increase the potential for error. Our goal here was to construct and test a cheaper, highly portable instrument alternative that could be used at remote field sites to measure total, diffuse and direct beam PAR for extended time periods without supervision. The apparatus tested here uses a fabricated, solar powered rotating shadowband and other commercially available parts to collect continuous hourly PAR data. Measurements of total incident PAR had nearly a one-to-one relationship with total incident radiation measurements taken at the same research site by an unobstructed point quantum sensor. Additionally, measurements of diffuse PAR compared favorably with modeled estimates from previously published data, but displayed significant differences that were attributed to the important influence of rapidly changing local environmental conditions. The cost of the system is about 50% less than comparable commercially available systems that require periodic, but not continual adjustments. Overall, the data produced using this apparatus indicates that this instrumentation has the potential to support

  9. Potential and K+ activity in skinned muscle fibers. Evidence against a simple Donnan equilibrium.

    PubMed Central

    Godt, R. E.; Baumgarten, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    It has been suggested that potentials measured with conventional microelectrodes in chemically or mechanically skinned muscle fibers arise from a Donnan equilibrium due to myofilament fixed charges. This hypothesis was tested in mechanically skinned frog (Rana pipiens) semitendinosus fibers by measuring the distribution potential (Ed) between fiber and bath with 3 M KCl-filled microelectrodes and the K+ activity gradient (aik/aok) with K+ ion-selective microelectrodes (KISE). If skinned fibers are a Donnan system, Ed should become more positive as pH is decreased, altering the fixed charge on the myofilaments. Consistent with this expectation, Ed was -4.4, -0.6, and +4.8 mV in ATP-containing solutions and -6.5, -2.2, and +8.4 mV in ATP-free solutions at pH 7, 6, and 5, respectively. Donnan equilibrium also requires that all mobile ionic species be in electrochemical equilibrium. In ATP-containing solutions, this was true for K+ at pH 7. At pH 5, however, KISE indicated that K+ was not in equilibrium; average Ed was 5.9 mV positive to the K+ equilibrium potential, and aik/aok was 1.04, while the Donnan prediction was 0.83. In contrast, KISE measurements in ATP-free solutions indicated that K+ was in equilibrium at all pH studied. Skinned fibers in ATP-containing media are not equilibrium systems because ATPase reactions occur. Under our conditions, frog myofibrils hydrolyze 0.4 and 0.08 mumol ATP/min X mg myofibrillar protein at pH 7 and 5, respectively. It is suggested that in the presence of ATP, Ed is a superposition of Donnan and diffusion potentials, the latter arising from differences in the mobilities of anionic substrate and products that diffuse through the charged myofilament lattice. A coupling to diffusion of K+, the predominant counter ion, is required for macroscopic electroneutrality. This coupling may be the origin of the nonequilibrium K+ distribution. PMID:6230113

  10. Rapid and simple method for the determination of emodin in tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum) by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to a diode array detector.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lian-Xin; Wang, Jing-Bo; Hu, Li-Xue; Zhao, Jiang-Lin; Xiang, Da-Bing; Zou, Liang; Zhao, Gang

    2013-01-30

    A simple and rapid method for determining emodin, an active factor presented in tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum), by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to a diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) has been developed. Emodin was separated from an extract of buckwheat on a Kromasil-ODS C(18) (250 mm × 4.6 mm × 5 μm) column. The separation is achieved within 15 min on the ODS column. Emodin can be quantified using an external standard method detecting at 436 nm. Good linearity is obtained with a correlation coefficient exceeding 0.9992. The limit of detection and the limit of quantification are 5.7 and 19 μg/L, respectively. This method shows good reproducibility for the quantification of the emodin with a relative standard deviation value of 4.3%. Under optimized extraction conditions, the recovery of emodin was calculated as >90%. The validated method is successfully applied to quantify the emodin in tartary buckwheat and its products.

  11. Brain activation during visual working memory correlates with behavioral mobility performance in older adults.

    PubMed

    Kawagoe, Toshikazu; Suzuki, Maki; Nishiguchi, Shu; Abe, Nobuhito; Otsuka, Yuki; Nakai, Ryusuke; Yamada, Minoru; Yoshikawa, Sakiko; Sekiyama, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Functional mobility and cognitive function often decline with age. We previously found that functional mobility as measured by the Timed Up and Go Test (TUG) was associated with cognitive performance for visually-encoded (i.e., for location and face) working memory (WM) in older adults. This suggests a common neural basis between TUG and visual WM. To elucidate this relationship further, the present study aimed to examine the neural basis for the WM-mobility association. In accordance with the well-known neural compensation model in aging, we hypothesized that "attentional" brain activation for easy WM would increase in participants with lower mobility. The data from 32 healthy older adults were analyzed, including brain activation during easy WM tasks via functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and mobility performance via both TUG and a simple walking test. WM performance was significantly correlated with TUG but not with simple walking. Some prefrontal brain activations during WM were negatively correlated with TUG performance, while positive correlations were found in subcortical structures including the thalamus, putamen and cerebellum. Moreover, activation of the subcortical regions was significantly correlated with WM performance, with less activation for lower WM performers. These results indicate that older adults with lower mobility used more cortical (frontal) and fewer subcortical resources for easy WM tasks. To date, the frontal compensation has been proposed separately in the motor and cognitive domains, which have been assumed to compensate for dysfunction of the other brain areas; however, such dysfunction was less clear in previous studies. The present study observed such dysfunction as degraded activation associated with lower performance, which was found in the subcortical regions. We conclude that a common dysfunction-compensation activation pattern is likely the neural basis for the association between visual WM and functional mobility.

  12. Brain activation during visual working memory correlates with behavioral mobility performance in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Kawagoe, Toshikazu; Suzuki, Maki; Nishiguchi, Shu; Abe, Nobuhito; Otsuka, Yuki; Nakai, Ryusuke; Yamada, Minoru; Yoshikawa, Sakiko; Sekiyama, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Functional mobility and cognitive function often decline with age. We previously found that functional mobility as measured by the Timed Up and Go Test (TUG) was associated with cognitive performance for visually-encoded (i.e., for location and face) working memory (WM) in older adults. This suggests a common neural basis between TUG and visual WM. To elucidate this relationship further, the present study aimed to examine the neural basis for the WM-mobility association. In accordance with the well-known neural compensation model in aging, we hypothesized that “attentional” brain activation for easy WM would increase in participants with lower mobility. The data from 32 healthy older adults were analyzed, including brain activation during easy WM tasks via functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and mobility performance via both TUG and a simple walking test. WM performance was significantly correlated with TUG but not with simple walking. Some prefrontal brain activations during WM were negatively correlated with TUG performance, while positive correlations were found in subcortical structures including the thalamus, putamen and cerebellum. Moreover, activation of the subcortical regions was significantly correlated with WM performance, with less activation for lower WM performers. These results indicate that older adults with lower mobility used more cortical (frontal) and fewer subcortical resources for easy WM tasks. To date, the frontal compensation has been proposed separately in the motor and cognitive domains, which have been assumed to compensate for dysfunction of the other brain areas; however, such dysfunction was less clear in previous studies. The present study observed such dysfunction as degraded activation associated with lower performance, which was found in the subcortical regions. We conclude that a common dysfunction—compensation activation pattern is likely the neural basis for the association between visual WM and functional

  13. Advanced Performance Modeling with Combined Passive and Active Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Dovrolis, Constantine; Sim, Alex

    2015-04-15

    To improve the efficiency of resource utilization and scheduling of scientific data transfers on high-speed networks, the "Advanced Performance Modeling with combined passive and active monitoring" (APM) project investigates and models a general-purpose, reusable and expandable network performance estimation framework. The predictive estimation model and the framework will be helpful in optimizing the performance and utilization of networks as well as sharing resources with predictable performance for scientific collaborations, especially in data intensive applications. Our prediction model utilizes historical network performance information from various network activity logs as well as live streaming measurements from network peering devices. Historical network performance information is used without putting extra load on the resources by active measurement collection. Performance measurements collected by active probing is used judiciously for improving the accuracy of predictions.

  14. Simple Platform Method for the Synthesis of Densely Functionalized Microgels by Modification of Active Ester Latex Particles.

    PubMed

    Han, Kang; Tiwari, Rahul; Heuser, Thomas; Walther, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    This study reports a simple and versatile synthesis route for the preparation of highly uniform and densely functionalized aqueous microgels by modification of latex particles composed of an active ester monomer (pentafluorophenyl acrylate; PFPA). The hydrophobic nature of the PFPA allows synthesizing very uniform latex particles via emulsion polymerization, whose size can be controlled by the surfactant concentration, while the degree of crosslinking is a function of the added crosslinker. The high reactivity of the PFPA groups toward nucleophilic substitution delivers a platform method to synthesize functional microgels by reaction with functional amines. This study demonstrates this process for the dense functionalization of the entire particle with an amine carrying a pH-responsive unit. This study further describes the influence of the crosslinking degree on the ability for swelling of the resulting microgels in aqueous dispersion.

  15. Simple dialkyl pyrazole-3,5-dicarboxylates show in vitro and in vivo activity against disease-causing trypanosomatids.

    PubMed

    Reviriego, Felipe; Olmo, Francisco; Navarro, Pilar; Marín, Clotilde; Ramírez-Macías, Inmaculada; García-España, Enrique; Albelda, María Teresa; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Ramón; Sánchez-Moreno, Manuel; Arán, Vicente J

    2017-04-03

    The synthesis and antiprotozoal activity of some simple dialkyl pyrazole-3,5-dicarboxylates (compounds 2-6) and their sodium salts (pyrazolates) (compounds 7-9) against Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania infantum and Leishmania braziliensis are reported. In most cases the studied compounds showed, especially against the clinically significant amastigote forms, in vitro activities higher than those of the reference drugs (benznidazole for T. cruzi and glucantime for Leishmania spp.); furthermore, the low non-specific cytotoxicities against Vero cells and macrophages shown by these compounds led to good selectivity indexes, which are 8-72 times higher for T. cruzi amastigotes and 15-113 times higher for Leishmania spp. amastigotes than those of the respective reference drugs. The high efficiency of diethyl ester 3 and its sodium salt 8 against the mentioned protozoa was confirmed by further in vitro assays on infection rates and by an additional in vivo study in a murine model of acute and chronic Chagas disease. The inhibitory capacity of compounds 3 and 8 on the essential iron superoxide dismutase of the aforementioned parasites may be related to the observed anti-trypanosomatid activity. The low acute toxicity of compounds 3 and 8 in mice is also reported in this article.

  16. Physical Activity Predicts Performance in an Unpracticed Bimanual Coordination Task

    PubMed Central

    Boisgontier, Matthieu P.; Serbruyns, Leen; Swinnen, Stephan P.

    2017-01-01

    Practice of a given physical activity is known to improve the motor skills related to this activity. However, whether unrelated skills are also improved is still unclear. To test the impact of physical activity on an unpracticed motor task, 26 young adults completed the international physical activity questionnaire and performed a bimanual coordination task they had never practiced before. Results showed that higher total physical activity predicted higher performance in the bimanual task, controlling for multiple factors such as age, physical inactivity, music practice, and computer games practice. Linear mixed models allowed this effect of physical activity to be generalized to a large population of bimanual coordination conditions. This finding runs counter to the notion that generalized motor abilities do not exist and supports the existence of a “learning to learn” skill that could be improved through physical activity and that impacts performance in tasks that are not necessarily related to the practiced activity. PMID:28265253

  17. Effects of Vigorous Intensity Physical Activity on Mathematics Test Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, David S.; Hannon, James C.; Castelli, Darla M.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of an acute bout of physical activity on academic performance in school-based settings is under researched. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between a single, vigorous (70-85%) bout of physical activity completed during physical education on standardized mathematics test performance among 72, eighth grade students…

  18. A simple route to improve rate performance of LiFePO4/reduced graphene oxide composite cathode by adding Mg2+ via mechanical mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuan; Liu, Hao; Gong, Li; Hou, Yanglong; Li, Quan

    2017-04-01

    Introducing Mg2+ to LiFePO4 and reduced graphene oxide composite via mechanical mixing and annealing leads to largely improved rate performance of the cathode (e.g. ∼78 mA h g-1 at 20 C for LiFePO4 and reduced graphene oxide composite with Mg2+ introduction vs. ∼37 mA h g-1 at 20 C for LiFePO4 and reduced graphene oxide composite). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy unravels that the enhanced reduction of Fe2+ to Fe0 occurs in the simultaneous presence of Mg2+ and reduced graphene oxide, which is beneficial for the rate capability of cathode. The simple fabrication process provides a simple and effective means to improve the rate performance of the LiFePO4 and reduced graphene oxide composite cathode.

  19. Simple ortho- and para-hydroquinones as compounds neuroprotective against oxidative stress in a manner associated with specific transcriptional activation

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Takumi Saitoh, Sachie; Hosaka, Manami; Kosaka, Kunio

    2009-02-06

    Electrophilic compounds protect neurons through the activation of the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway and the induction of phase-2 enzymes [T. Satoh, S.A. Lipton, Redox regulation of neuronal survival by electrophilic compounds, Trends Neurosci. 30 (2007) 38-45; T. Satoh, S. Okamoto, J. Cui, Y. Watanabe, K. Furuta, M. Suzuki, K. Tohyama, S.A. Lipton, Activation of the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway for neuroprotection by electrophilic phase II inducers. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 103 (2006) 768-773]. Hydroquinone-type electrophilic compounds such as tert-butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ) and carnosic acid (CA) have attracted special attention, because the oxidative conversion of 'hydroquinone' to 'quinone' is essential for the transcriptional activation of the above-mentioned enzymes [T. Satoh, K. Kosaka, K. Itoh, A. Kobayashi, M. Yamamoto, Y. Shimojo, C. Kitajima, J. Cui, J. Kamins, S. Okamoto, T. Shirasawa, S.A. Lipton, Carnosic acid, a catechol-type electrophilic compound, protect neurons both in vitro and in vivo through activation of the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway via S-alkylation of specific cysteine, J. Neurochem. 104 (2008) 1161-1131; A.D. Kraft, D.A. Johnson, J.A. Johnson, Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2-dependent antioxidant response element activation by tert-butylhydroquinone and sulforaphane occurring preferentially in astrocytes conditions neurons against oxidative insult, J. Neurosci. 24 (2004) 1101-1112]. In the present study, we examined the relationship between electrophilicity and the protective effects afforded by electrophilic compounds. Electrophilicity was assessed in terms of the ability of a compound to bind to a cysteine on bovine serum albumin, by which we found that neuroprotective hydroquinones [TBHQ (para-) and CA (ortho-)] had distinctive patterns of cysteine binding compared with other electrophilic compounds. Further, we found that isomers of simple ortho- and para-hydroquinones such as 2-methylhydroquinone (para-) and 4-methyl-catechol (ortho-) [not in abstract] had

  20. Determination of grepafloxacin in plasma and urine by a simple and rapid high-performance liquid chromatographic method.

    PubMed

    Kamberi, M; Kamberi, P; Nakano, S

    2000-05-12

    A rapid, specific, sensitive and economical method has been developed and validated for the determination of grepafloxacin in human plasma and urine. The assay consisted of reversed-phase HPLC with UV detection. Plasma proteins were removed by a fast and efficient procedure that has eliminated the need for costly extraction and evaporation. For the urine samples, the only required sample preparation was dilution. Separation was achieved on a reversed-phase TSK gel column with an isocratic mobile system. The method had a quantification limit of 0.05 microg/ml in plasma and 0.5 microg/ml in urine. The coefficients of variation (C.V.) were less than 4% for within- and between-day analyses. The method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study, and was proved to be simple, fast and reproducible.

  1. Simple and sensitive high performance liquid chromatography method with fluorescence detection for therapeutic drug monitoring of topiramate.

    PubMed

    Milosheska, Daniela; Vovk, Tomaž; Grabnar, Iztok; Roškar, Robert

    2015-01-01

    A simple, sensitive, accurate, precise and inexpensive HPLC method with fluorescence detection, suitable for routine therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of an antiepileptic drug topiramate, was developed and validated. The determination of plasma topiramate concentration was carried out after precolumn derivatization, using 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan as a fluorescent labeling agent and bendroflumethiazide as an internal standard. The standard calibration curve was linear over the concentration range of 0.01-24 μg/mL (r² > 0.9998). The intra- and inter-day accuracies expressed as bias were from 1.4 to 9.9% and from 1.9 to 10.2%, respectively. The intra- and inter-day precisions were below 7.9% and 2.7%, respectively. The validated method was applied for the measurement of plasma topiramate concentrations in patients with epilepsy. The reported method is appropriate for TDM of topiramate as well as for pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence studies.

  2. Simple and Large Scale Construction of MoS2-g-C3N4 Heterostructures Using Mechanochemistry for High Performance Electrochemical Supercapacitor and Visible Light Photocatalytic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Sajid Ali; Cho, Moo Hwan

    2017-02-01

    The design of heterojunctions for efficient electrochemical energy storage and environmental remediation are promising for future energy and environment applications. In this study, a molybdenum disulfide-graphitic carbon nitride (MoS2-g-C3N4) heterojunction was designed by applying simple mechanochemistry, which can be scaled up for mass production. The physical-chemical and photophysical properties of the as-prepared MoS2-g-C3N4 heterojunction were analyzed using a range of characterization techniques. The supercapacitance performance was determined by electrochemical half-cell measurements, and visible light-induced photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic performance was studied using photocurrent and model organic pollutant degradation experiments. The resulting MoS2-g-C3N4 under the optimized experimental conditions showed significantly higher photocatalytic activity and photoelectrochemical performance under similar visible photoirradiation conditions compared to the bare materials. The resulting heterostructure electrode delivered a higher capacitance of 240.85 F/g than the bare material (48.77 F/g) with good capacitance retention. The superior performance was attributed mainly to the robust light harvesting ability, improved charge separation, high surface area, increased mass transfer, and capacitive and conductive behavior. The convenient and mass production of heterojunctions using a simple and cost-effective method will provide a good example for the efficient design of visible light active photocatalysts and capacitor electrode materials for environmental remediation and energy storage device applications.

  3. Simple and Large Scale Construction of MoS2-g-C3N4 Heterostructures Using Mechanochemistry for High Performance Electrochemical Supercapacitor and Visible Light Photocatalytic Applications.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Sajid Ali; Cho, Moo Hwan

    2017-02-27

    The design of heterojunctions for efficient electrochemical energy storage and environmental remediation are promising for future energy and environment applications. In this study, a molybdenum disulfide-graphitic carbon nitride (MoS2-g-C3N4) heterojunction was designed by applying simple mechanochemistry, which can be scaled up for mass production. The physical-chemical and photophysical properties of the as-prepared MoS2-g-C3N4 heterojunction were analyzed using a range of characterization techniques. The supercapacitance performance was determined by electrochemical half-cell measurements, and visible light-induced photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic performance was studied using photocurrent and model organic pollutant degradation experiments. The resulting MoS2-g-C3N4 under the optimized experimental conditions showed significantly higher photocatalytic activity and photoelectrochemical performance under similar visible photoirradiation conditions compared to the bare materials. The resulting heterostructure electrode delivered a higher capacitance of 240.85 F/g than the bare material (48.77 F/g) with good capacitance retention. The superior performance was attributed mainly to the robust light harvesting ability, improved charge separation, high surface area, increased mass transfer, and capacitive and conductive behavior. The convenient and mass production of heterojunctions using a simple and cost-effective method will provide a good example for the efficient design of visible light active photocatalysts and capacitor electrode materials for environmental remediation and energy storage device applications.

  4. Simple and Large Scale Construction of MoS2-g-C3N4 Heterostructures Using Mechanochemistry for High Performance Electrochemical Supercapacitor and Visible Light Photocatalytic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Sajid Ali; Cho, Moo Hwan

    2017-01-01

    The design of heterojunctions for efficient electrochemical energy storage and environmental remediation are promising for future energy and environment applications. In this study, a molybdenum disulfide-graphitic carbon nitride (MoS2-g-C3N4) heterojunction was designed by applying simple mechanochemistry, which can be scaled up for mass production. The physical-chemical and photophysical properties of the as-prepared MoS2-g-C3N4 heterojunction were analyzed using a range of characterization techniques. The supercapacitance performance was determined by electrochemical half-cell measurements, and visible light-induced photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic performance was studied using photocurrent and model organic pollutant degradation experiments. The resulting MoS2-g-C3N4 under the optimized experimental conditions showed significantly higher photocatalytic activity and photoelectrochemical performance under similar visible photoirradiation conditions compared to the bare materials. The resulting heterostructure electrode delivered a higher capacitance of 240.85 F/g than the bare material (48.77 F/g) with good capacitance retention. The superior performance was attributed mainly to the robust light harvesting ability, improved charge separation, high surface area, increased mass transfer, and capacitive and conductive behavior. The convenient and mass production of heterojunctions using a simple and cost-effective method will provide a good example for the efficient design of visible light active photocatalysts and capacitor electrode materials for environmental remediation and energy storage device applications. PMID:28240228

  5. A Simple, Rapid and Reliable Method to Determine Imipramine and Desipramine in Mouse Serum Using Ultra-High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Shin, Yujin; Chun, Kwang-Hoon; Yoon, Hye-Ran; Lee, Jeongmi

    2016-04-01

    A rapid and sensitive ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometric (UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS) method was developed for quantification of imipramine, one of the most widely used tricyclic antidepressants, and desipramine, an active metabolite of imipramine, in mouse serum. The developed method included a simple protein precipitation with acetonitrile in 50 μL of serum and analyte separation on an Acquity UPLC BEH C18 column using a gradient elution of acetonitrile with 0.1% formic acid and 20 mM ammonium formate. As a result, the entire analysis time was <20 min including the sample preparation and the LC-MS analysis. The limit of quantification was 5.0 ng mL(-1) for both imipramine and desipramine, and calibration curves were linear over the concentration range of 5.0-1,000.0 and 5.0-250.0 ng mL(-1) for imipramine and desipramine, respectively. Intraday precisions at three levels were 2.2-3.6 and 1.7-4.2% for imipramine and desipramine, respectively, whereas interday precisions were 2.6-5.0 and 2.0-8.4% for imipramine and desipramine, respectively. Accuracy ranged between 93.6 and 106.6% for imipramine and 94.1 and 106.4% for desipramine. Absolute recovery was 96.0-97.6% for imipramine and 87.0-99.5% for desipramine. Finally, the described method was applied to mice administered with imipramine, demonstrating the suitability for quantification of imipramine and desipramine for therapeutic drug monitoring or bioequivalence studies.

  6. Simple and robust determination of the activity signature of key carbohydrate metabolism enzymes for physiological phenotyping in model and crop plants.

    PubMed

    Jammer, Alexandra; Gasperl, Anna; Luschin-Ebengreuth, Nora; Heyneke, Elmien; Chu, Hyosub; Cantero-Navarro, Elena; Großkinsky, Dominik K; Albacete, Alfonso A; Stabentheiner, Edith; Franzaring, Jürgen; Fangmeier, Andreas; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    The analysis of physiological parameters is important to understand the link between plant phenotypes and their genetic bases, and therefore is needed as an important element in the analysis of model and crop plants. The activities of enzymes involved in primary carbohydrate metabolism have been shown to be strongly associated with growth performance, crop yield, and quality, as well as stress responses. A simple, fast, and cost-effective method to determine activities for 13 key enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism has been established, mainly based on coupled spectrophotometric kinetic assays. The comparison of extraction buffers and requirement for dialysis of crude protein extracts resulted in a universal protein extraction protocol, suitable for the preparation of protein extracts from different organs of various species. Individual published kinetic activity assays were optimized and adapted for a semi-high-throughput 96-well assay format. These assays proved to be robust and are thus suitable for physiological phenotyping, enabling the characterization and diagnosis of the physiological state. The potential of the determination of distinct enzyme activity signatures as part of a physiological fingerprint was shown for various organs and tissues from three monocot and five dicot model and crop species, including two case studies with external stimuli. Differential and specific enzyme activity signatures are apparent during inflorescence development and upon in vitro cold treatment of young inflorescences in the monocot ryegrass, related to conditions for doubled haploid formation. Likewise, treatment of dicot spring oilseed rape with elevated CO2 concentration resulted in distinct patterns of enzyme activity responses in leaves.

  7. A simple and specific high performance liquid chromatography method for the assay of a series of novel dermal penetration enhancers.

    PubMed

    Michniak, B B; Seyda, K L

    1993-02-01

    Synopsis A series of clofibric acid amides has been synthesized and previously reported by the authors as possessing enhancer activity in vitro in athymic nude mouse skin against model drugs, hydrocortisone-21-acetate and beta-methasone-17-valerate. An assay was required for each of these enhancers however, which would be specific for each compound and would also separate model drugs and their metabolite peaks. This study reports reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography assays for clofibric acid amide and seven derivatives (Ia-Ig). All enhancers showed maximum absorption at 232 nm, betamethasone (BM) and its valerate (BMV) at 238 nm, and hydrocortisone (HC) and its acetate (HCA) at 242 nm. Practical units of detection for the amides were 0.46-2.8 mug ml(-1) and peaks were sharp and well-separated from steroid peaks in three vehicles - methanol alone. Franz diffusion cell receptor phase samples (isotonic phosphate buffer), and full-thickness athymic nude mouse skin extracts in methanol. Mobile phases consisted of various proportions of acetonitrile and water, some with 2-propanol. The octyl amide for example, with mobile phase CH(3)CN: H(2)O (85:15) at 1 ml min(-1) had a retention time (t(R)) of 7.9 mins. Under the same conditions, retention times for the steroids were HC, t(R)= 3.3 mins; HCA, t(R)= 4.3 mins; BM, t(R)= 3.4 mins; BMV, t(R)= 4.6 mins. Résumé Les auteurs avaient démontré dans un article précédent le pouvoir accélérateur de pénétration dermique in vitro d'une gamme d'amides d'acide clofibrique sur la peau de souris sans poils, et sans thymus avec des médicaments types tels que l'acetate 21 d'hydrocortisone et le valerate 17 de beta-metasone. Il a cependant été requis, pour chacun de ces accélérateurs, un test spécifique pour chaque composition, permettant de séparer chaque médicament et les pics des métabolites. Cette étude décrit des tests par chromatographie liquide à haute performance en phase inverse pour l

  8. Europium nanoparticle-based simple to perform dry-reagent immunoassay for the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Talha, Sheikh M; Salminen, Teppo; Juntunen, Etvi; Spangar, Anni; Gurramkonda, Chandrasekhar; Vuorinen, Tytti; Khanna, Navin; Pettersson, Kim

    2016-03-01

    Hepatitis B infection, caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV), presents a huge global health burden. Serological diagnosis of HBV mainly relies on the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Although there are high sensitivity commercial HBsAg enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) available, many low-resource laboratories lacking trained technicians continue to use rapid point-of-care assays with low sensitivities for HBsAg detection, due to their simplicity to operate. We developed a time-resolved fluorometric dry-reagent HBsAg immunoassay which meets the detection limit of high sensitivity EIAs but is simple to operate. To develop the assay, anti-HBsAg monoclonal antibody coated on europium nanoparticles was dried atop of biotinylated anti-HBsAg polyclonal antibody immobilized on streptavidin-coated microtiter wells. To test a sample in dry-reagent assay, serum sample and assay buffer were added to the wells, incubated, washed and europium signals were measured. The assay showed a detection limit of 0.25 ng/ml using HBsAg spiked in serum sample. When evaluated with 24 HBV positive and 37 negative serum samples, assay showed 100% sensitivity and specificity. Assay wells are stable for at least 26 weeks when stored at 4°C, and can tolerate elevated temperatures of up to 35°C for two weeks. The developed assay has high potential to be used in low-resource laboratories.

  9. Adsorption of a Textile Dye on Commercial Activated Carbon: A Simple Experiment to Explore the Role of Surface Chemistry and Ionic Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Angela; Nunes, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an adsorption experiment is proposed using commercial activated carbon as adsorbent and a textile azo dye, Mordant Blue-9, as adsorbate. The surface chemistry of the activated carbon is changed through a simple oxidation treatment and the ionic strength of the dye solution is also modified, simulating distinct conditions of water…

  10. A Simple Colorimetric Assay for Specific Detection of Glutathione-S Transferase Activity Associated with DDT Resistance in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Rajatileka, Shavanti; Steven, Andrew; Hemingway, Janet; Ranson, Hilary; Paine, Mark; Vontas, John

    2010-01-01

    Background Insecticide-based methods represent the most effective means of blocking the transmission of vector borne diseases. However, insecticide resistance poses a serious threat and there is a need for tools, such as diagnostic tests for resistance detection, that will improve the sustainability of control interventions. The development of such tools for metabolism-based resistance in mosquito vectors lags behind those for target site resistance mutations. Methodology/Principal Findings We have developed and validated a simple colorimetric assay for the detection of Epsilon class Glutathione transferases (GST)-based DDT resistance in mosquito species, such as Aedes aegypti, the major vector of dengue and yellow fever worldwide. The colorimetric assay is based on the specific alkyl transferase activity of Epsilon GSTs for the haloalkene substrate iodoethane, which produces a dark blue colour highly correlated with AaGSTE2-2-overexpression in individual mosquitoes. The colour can be measured visually and spectrophotometrically. Conclusions/Significance The novel assay is substantially more sensitive compared to the gold standard CDNB assay and allows the discrimination of moderate resistance phenotypes. We anticipate that it will have direct application in routine vector monitoring as a resistance indicator and possibly an important impact on disease vector control. PMID:20824165

  11. Effects of stereotype threat, perceived discrimination, and examiner race on neuropsychological performance: simple as black and white?

    PubMed

    Thames, April D; Hinkin, Charles H; Byrd, Desiree A; Bilder, Robert M; Duff, Kimberley J; Mindt, Monica Rivera; Arentoft, Alyssa; Streiff, Vanessa

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the predictive roles of stereotype threat and perceived discrimination and the mediating role of examiner-examinee racial discordance on neuropsychological performance in a non-clinical sample of African American and Caucasian individuals. Ninety-two African American (n = 45) and Caucasian (n = 47) adults were randomly assigned to either a stereotype threat or non-threat condition. Within each condition, participants were randomly assigned to either a same race or different race examiner. All participants underwent neuropsychological testing and completed a measure of perceived discrimination. African Americans in the stereotype threat condition performed significantly worse on global NP (Mz = -.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] [-0.07, -0.67] than African Americans in the non-threat condition (Mz = 0.09, CI [0.15, 0.33]. African Americans who reported high levels of perceived discrimination performed significantly worse on memory tests when tested by an examiner of a different race, Mz = -1.19, 95% CI [-1.78, -.54], than African Americans who were tested by an examiner of the same race, Mz = 0.24, 95% CI [-0.24, 0.72]. The current study underscores the importance of considering the role of contextual variables in neuropsychological performance, as these variables may obscure the validity of results among certain racial/ethnic groups.

  12. Enhanced electrochemical performance of porous activated carbon by forming composite with graphene as high-performance supercapacitor electrode material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Hang; Yang, Jia-Ying; Wu, Xiong-Wei; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Yu, Jin-Gang; Wu, Yu-Ping

    2017-02-01

    In this work, a novel activated carbon containing graphene composite was developed using a fast, simple, and green ultrasonic-assisted method. Graphene is more likely a framework which provides support for activated carbon (AC) particles to form hierarchical microstructure of carbon composite. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurement, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman spectra analysis, XRD, and XPS were used to analyze the morphology and surface structure of the composite. The electrochemical properties of the supercapacitor electrode based on the as-prepared carbon composite were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), charge/discharge, and cycling performance measurements. It exhibited better electrochemical performance including higher specific capacitance (284 F g-1 at a current density of 0.5 A g-1), better rate behavior (70.7% retention), and more stable cycling performance (no capacitance fading even after 2000 cycles). It is easier for us to find that the composite produced by our method was superior to pristine AC in terms of electrochemical performance due to the unique conductive network between graphene and AC.

  13. Simple Machine Junk Cars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herald, Christine

    2010-01-01

    During the month of May, the author's eighth-grade physical science students study the six simple machines through hands-on activities, reading assignments, videos, and notes. At the end of the month, they can easily identify the six types of simple machine: inclined plane, wheel and axle, pulley, screw, wedge, and lever. To conclude this unit,…

  14. Physical activity helps to control music performance anxiety.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Sérgio F; Marocolo, Moacir; Corrêa, Elisangela N V; Morato, Gledys S G; da Mota, Gustavo R

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated if regular physical activity could influence musical performance anxiety (MPA) in college music students. Levels of MPA, as measured with the Kenny MPA Inventory, and a survey about the physical activity habits were obtained from 87 students of music. The results showed that physically active musicians had lower MPA scores (p<0.05) than non-active ones, independent of gender. We conclude that there is an association between physical activity and minor MPA, and studies with a longitudinal design should be done to explore this important issue.

  15. An Activation Likelihood Estimation Meta-Analysis Study of Simple Motor Movements in Older and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Turesky, Ted K.; Turkeltaub, Peter E.; Eden, Guinevere F.

    2016-01-01

    The functional neuroanatomy of finger movements has been characterized with neuroimaging in young adults. However, less is known about the aging motor system. Several studies have contrasted movement-related activity in older versus young adults, but there is inconsistency among their findings. To address this, we conducted an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis on within-group data from older adults and young adults performing regularly paced right-hand finger movement tasks in response to external stimuli. We hypothesized that older adults would show a greater likelihood of activation in right cortical motor areas (i.e., ipsilateral to the side of movement) compared to young adults. ALE maps were examined for conjunction and between-group differences. Older adults showed overlapping likelihoods of activation with young adults in left primary sensorimotor cortex (SM1), bilateral supplementary motor area, bilateral insula, left thalamus, and right anterior cerebellum. Their ALE map differed from that of the young adults in right SM1 (extending into dorsal premotor cortex), right supramarginal gyrus, medial premotor cortex, and right posterior cerebellum. The finding that older adults uniquely use ipsilateral regions for right-hand finger movements and show age-dependent modulations in regions recruited by both age groups provides a foundation by which to understand age-related motor decline and motor disorders. PMID:27799910

  16. An Activation Likelihood Estimation Meta-Analysis Study of Simple Motor Movements in Older and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Turesky, Ted K; Turkeltaub, Peter E; Eden, Guinevere F

    2016-01-01

    The functional neuroanatomy of finger movements has been characterized with neuroimaging in young adults. However, less is known about the aging motor system. Several studies have contrasted movement-related activity in older versus young adults, but there is inconsistency among their findings. To address this, we conducted an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis on within-group data from older adults and young adults performing regularly paced right-hand finger movement tasks in response to external stimuli. We hypothesized that older adults would show a greater likelihood of activation in right cortical motor areas (i.e., ipsilateral to the side of movement) compared to young adults. ALE maps were examined for conjunction and between-group differences. Older adults showed overlapping likelihoods of activation with young adults in left primary sensorimotor cortex (SM1), bilateral supplementary motor area, bilateral insula, left thalamus, and right anterior cerebellum. Their ALE map differed from that of the young adults in right SM1 (extending into dorsal premotor cortex), right supramarginal gyrus, medial premotor cortex, and right posterior cerebellum. The finding that older adults uniquely use ipsilateral regions for right-hand finger movements and show age-dependent modulations in regions recruited by both age groups provides a foundation by which to understand age-related motor decline and motor disorders.

  17. Validity of simple field tests as indicators of match-related physical performance in top-level professional soccer players.

    PubMed

    Rampinini, E; Bishop, D; Marcora, S M; Ferrari Bravo, D; Sassi, R; Impellizzeri, F M

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the construct validity of selected field tests as indicators of match-related physical performance. During the competitive season, eighteen professional soccer players (age 26.2 +/- 4.5 yrs, mass 80.8 +/- 7.8 kg, and height 181.9 +/- 3.7 cm) completed an incremental running field test to exhaustion, a vertical-jump and a repeated-sprint ability (RSA) test. Match physical performance was quantified during official matches using a video-computerized, semi-automatic, match analysis image recognition system, (ProZone, Leeds, UK). The selected measures of match physical performance were: total distance covered (TD), high intensity running (HIR: > 14.4 km . h (-1)), very high intensity running (VHIR:> 19.8 km . h (-1)), sprinting (> 25.2 km . h (-1)) and top running speed. Significant correlations were found between peak speed reached during the incremental field test and TD (r = 0.58, R (2) = 0.34; p < 0.05), HIR (r = 0.65, R (2) = 0.42; p < 0.01) and VHIR (r = 0.64, R (2) = 0.41; p < 0.01). Significant correlations were also found between RSA mean time and VHIR (r = - 0.60, R (2) = 0.36; p < 0.01) and sprinting distance (r = - 0.65, R (2) = 0.42; p < 0.01). Significant differences were found between the best and worst group as defined by the median split technique for peak speed (TD = 12 011 +/- 747 m vs. 10 712 +/- 669, HIR = 3192 +/- 482 m vs. 2314 +/- 347 m, and VHIR = 1014 +/- 120 vs. 779 +/- 122 m, respectively; p < 0.05) and RSA mean time (VHIR = 974 +/- 162 m vs. 819 +/- 144 m, and sprinting = 235 +/- 56 vs. 164 +/- 58 m, respectively; p < 0.05). In conclusion, this study gives empirical support to the construct validity of RSA and incremental running tests as measures of match-related physical performance in top-level professional soccer players.

  18. Active damping performance of the KAGRA seismic attenuation system prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yoshinori; Sekiguchi, Takanori; Takahashi, Ryutaro; Aso, Yoichi; Barton, Mark; Erasmo Peña Arellano, Fabián; Shoda, Ayaka; Akutsu, Tomotada; Miyakawa, Osamu; Kamiizumi, Masahiro; Ishizaki, Hideharu; Tatsumi, Daisuke; Hirata, Naoatsu; Hayama, Kazuhiro; Okutomi, Koki; Miyamoto, Takahiro; Ishizuka, Hideki; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Flaminio, Raffaele

    2016-05-01

    The Large-scale Cryogenic Gravitational wave Telescope (formerly LCGT now KAGRA) is presently under construction in Japan. This May we assembled a prototype of the seismic attenuation system (SAS) for the beam splitter and the signal recycling mirrors of KAGRA, which we call Type-B SAS, and evaluated its performance at NAOJ (Mitaka, Toyko). We investigated its frequency response, active damping performance, vibration isolation performance and long-term stability both in and out of vacuum. From the frequency response test and the active damping performance test, we confirmed that the SAS worked as we designed and that all mechanical resonances which could disturb lock acquisition and observation are damped within 1 minute, which is required for KAGRA, by the active controls.

  19. Performance in physiology evaluation: possible improvement by active learning strategies.

    PubMed

    Montrezor, Luís H

    2016-12-01

    The evaluation process is complex and extremely important in the teaching/learning process. Evaluations are constantly employed in the classroom to assist students in the learning process and to help teachers improve the teaching process. The use of active methodologies encourages students to participate in the learning process, encourages interaction with their peers, and stimulates thinking about physiological mechanisms. This study examined the performance of medical students on physiology over four semesters with and without active engagement methodologies. Four activities were used: a puzzle, a board game, a debate, and a video. The results show that engaging in activities with active methodologies before a physiology cognitive monitoring test significantly improved student performance compared with not performing the activities. We integrate the use of these methodologies with classic lectures, and this integration appears to improve the teaching/learning process in the discipline of physiology and improves the integration of physiology with cardiology and neurology. In addition, students enjoy the activities and perform better on their evaluations when they use them.

  20. Early Childhood: Simple Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Clare B.; Shafer, Kathryn E.

    1987-01-01

    Encourages teachers to take advantage of the natural curiosity of young children in enhancing their interest in science. Describes four simple activities involving water, living and non-living things, air pollution, and food. (TW)

  1. Task-free MRI predicts individual differences in brain activity during task performance.

    PubMed

    Tavor, I; Parker Jones, O; Mars, R B; Smith, S M; Behrens, T E; Jbabdi, S

    2016-04-08

    When asked to perform the same task, different individuals exhibit markedly different patterns of brain activity. This variability is often attributed to volatile factors, such as task strategy or compliance. We propose that individual differences in brain responses are, to a large degree, inherent to the brain and can be predicted from task-independent measurements collected at rest. Using a large set of task conditions, spanning several behavioral domains, we train a simple model that relates task-independent measurements to task activity and evaluate the model by predicting task activation maps for unseen subjects using magnetic resonance imaging. Our model can accurately predict individual differences in brain activity and highlights a coupling between brain connectivity and function that can be captured at the level of individual subjects.

  2. Relationship between Complex and Simple Spike Activity in Macaque Caudal Vermis during Three-Dimensional Vestibular Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Yakusheva, Tatyana; Blazquez, Pablo M.; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2013-01-01

    Lobules 10 and 9 in the caudal posterior vermis [also known as nodulus and uvula (NU)] are thought important for spatial orientation and balance. Here, we characterize complex spike (CS) and simple spike (SS) activity in response to three-dimensional vestibular stimulation. The strongest modulation was seen during translation (CS: 12.8 ± 1.5, SS: 287.0 ± 23.2 spikes/s/G, 0.5 Hz). Preferred directions tended to cluster along the cardinal axes (lateral, fore-aft, vertical) for CSs and along the semicircular canal axes for SSs. Most notably, the preferred directions for CS/SS pairs arising from the same Purkinje cells were rarely aligned. During 0.5 Hz pitch/roll tilt, only about a third of CSs had significant modulation. Thus, most CSs correlated best with inertial rather than net linear acceleration. By comparison, all SSs were selective for translation and ignored changes in spatial orientation relative to gravity. Like SSs, tilt modulation of CSs increased at lower frequencies. CSs and SSs had similar response dynamics, responding to linear velocity during translation and angular position during tilt. The most salient finding is that CSs did not always modulate out-of-phase with SSs. The CS/SS phase difference varied broadly among Purkinje cells, yet for each cell it was precisely matched for the otolith-driven and canal-driven components of the response. These findings illustrate a spatiotemporal mismatch between CS/SS pairs and provide the first comprehensive description of the macaque NU, an important step toward understanding how CSs and SSs interact during complex movements and spatial disorientation. PMID:20554862

  3. Impact of physical activity on nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in people with nonalcoholic simple fatty liver: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Kenji; Kai, Yuko; Kitano, Naruki; Uchida, Ken; Kuchiki, Tsutomu; Nagamatsu, Toshiya

    2016-07-01

    Preventing nonalcoholic simple fatty liver (NASFL) from progressing to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a key to avoiding cirrhosis. Physical activity (PA) may help manage fatty liver; however, there is a lack of prospective studies showing an association between PA and NASH. Our current prospective study investigated whether PA prevents NASFL from progressing to NASH. Study data were obtained from the health check-up program of Meiji Yasuda Shinjuku Medical Center in Tokyo, Japan. From a baseline survey between 2005 and 2007, 1149 people with NASFL met eligibility criteria including low alcohol consumption. We followed participants until 2014 assessing liver status via ultrasound and liver enzyme levels, including alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). We classified participants with fatty liver and higher levels of either ALT or AST as having NASH. Through a self-reported questionnaire, we classified PA into three intensities: moderate low-intensity PA (MLPA, 3-5 METs), moderate high-intensity PA (MHPA, 5-7 METs), and vigorous-intensity PA (VPA, ≥7 METs). During a mean follow-up of 4.2years (4804person-years), 318 of the 1149 participants (27.7%) progressed from NASFL to NASH. A multivariate-adjusted Cox model showed a significant preventive effect of VPA on progression to NASH (HR=0.55, 95% CI=0.32-0.94) and no significant associations between MLPA (HR=1.01, 95% CI=0.79-1.30) or MHPA (HR=0.97, 95% CI=0.66-1.42) and progression to NASH. Only VPA prevented NASFL from progressing to NASH; MLPA and MHPA had no preventive effect on NASH. Higher intensity PA may be needed to manage NASH.

  4. [The influence of treatment with formoterol, formoterol with tiotropium, formoterol with inhaled glucocorticosteroid and tiotropium on lung functions, tolerance of exercise and simple, morning everyday activities in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)].

    PubMed

    Szmidt, Mirosław

    2012-01-01

    Bronchodilators - long-acting b2-adrenergic agonists (formoterol and salmeterol) and a long-acting antimuscarinic drug (tiotropium), are the main drugs applied in symptomatic treatment of COPD. In patients with COPD, dyspnea is frequently associated with simple everyday activities. Two questionnaires have been published recently as a means of assessing the patients' ability to perform morning activities and symptoms. Dynamic hyperinflation is the pathophysiological disorder responsible for dyspnea and decreased exercise tolerance in COPD. Formoterol is faster than salmeterol in diminishing air-trapping. It has been shown that treatment with formoterol and tiotropium in COPD patients improves FEV(1), FVC, IC, symptoms score and quality of life in comparison with tiotropium applied alone. Among LABA and inhaled glucocorticosteroids combinations, those containing formoterol have a more beneficial effect on the ability to perform simple morning activities (budesonide/formoterol was better than fluticasone/salmeterol). Beclomethasone/formoterol - 400/24 mcg/die, in comparison with fluticasone/salmeterol - 500/100 mcg/die significantly reduced air-trapping and dyspnea in COPD patients. The comparison of budesonide/formoterol - 400/12 mcg 2 x die with beclomethasone/ /formoterol - 200/12 mcg 2 x die has shown similar influence of both combinations on FEV(1), dyspnea, 6-minute walk test, symptoms score and quality of life. The addition of budesonide and formoterol combination to tiotropium gives further benefits: reduces number of exacerbations, improves FEV1, symptoms score and performance of simple morning routines. Doctors should pay more attention to symptoms and limitations in simple activities in the morning and adequately adjust the treatment.

  5. On the performance of a simple parallel implementation of the ILU-PCG for the Poisson equation on irregular domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibou, Frédéric; Min, Chohong

    2012-05-01

    We report on the performance of a parallel algorithm for solving the Poisson equation on irregular domains. We use the spatial discretization of Gibou et al. (2002) [6] for the Poisson equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions, while we use a finite volume discretization for imposing Neumann boundary conditions (Ng et al., 2009; Purvis and Burkhalter, 1979) [8,10]. The parallelization algorithm is based on the Cuthill-McKee ordering. Its implementation is straightforward, especially in the case of shared memory machines, and produces significant speedup; about three times on a standard quad core desktop computer and about seven times on a octa core shared memory cluster. The implementation code is posted on the authors' web pages for reference.

  6. Simple preparation of lotus-root shaped meso-/macroporous TiO₂ and their DSSC performances.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jin-Yeon; Bae, Sang-Eun; Won, Yong Sun; Huh, Seong

    2015-06-15

    In pursuit of superior TiO2 photoanode materials for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), we prepared lotus-root shaped meso-/macroporous TiO2. The lotus-root shaped meso-/macroporous TiO2 was easily prepared by using a cetyltrimethylammonium hydroxide (CTAOH) template in aqueous solution. The crystallization of the as-prepared amorphous lotus-root shaped TiO2 was performed at 700 °C in air. Crystalline anatase phase with a very small portion of rutile phase was generated after the heat treatment at 700 °C and the BET surface area of crystalline lotus-root shaped meso-/macroporous TiO2 material (LR-700) was 30.0 m(2) g(-1). The wall of LR-700 displayed well-developed mesoporosity with a pore dimension of 28.3 nm. Periodically arranged microscale one-dimensional (1D) macropores were also observed in the particles. The photon-to-current conversion efficiencies (η) of LR-700 photoanodes in Grätzel type DSSCs were examined. The conversion efficiency of DSSC prepared by mixing nanoparticulate Evonik P25 and LR-700 (ratio=85:150 by mass) was 28% greater compared to the reference electrode using P25. Incident photon-to-current efficiencies (IPCE) of the DSSCs were dramatically improved by employing the photoanodes composed of a mixture of P25 and LR-700 but impedance analysis indicated that P25/LR-700 mixed cells have resistances similar to the standard P25 reference cell. Thus, photovoltaic performances could be improved mainly due to the increases of dye uptake and external quantum efficiency by using a mixed photoanode composed of LR-700 and nanocrystalline P25 particles.

  7. A simple method to retrospectively estimate patient dose-area product for chest tomosynthesis examinations performed using VolumeRAD

    SciTech Connect

    Båth, Magnus Svalkvist, Angelica; Söderman, Christina

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the present work was to develop and validate a method of retrospectively estimating the dose-area product (DAP) of a chest tomosynthesis examination performed using the VolumeRAD system (GE Healthcare, Chalfont St. Giles, UK) from digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) data available in the scout image. Methods: DICOM data were retrieved for 20 patients undergoing chest tomosynthesis using VolumeRAD. Using information about how the exposure parameters for the tomosynthesis examination are determined by the scout image, a correction factor for the adjustment in field size with projection angle was determined. The correction factor was used to estimate the DAP for 20 additional chest tomosynthesis examinations from DICOM data available in the scout images, which was compared with the actual DAP registered for the projection radiographs acquired during the tomosynthesis examination. Results: A field size correction factor of 0.935 was determined. Applying the developed method using this factor, the average difference between the estimated DAP and the actual DAP was 0.2%, with a standard deviation of 0.8%. However, the difference was not normally distributed and the maximum error was only 1.0%. The validity and reliability of the presented method were thus very high. Conclusions: A method to estimate the DAP of a chest tomosynthesis examination performed using the VolumeRAD system from DICOM data in the scout image was developed and validated. As the scout image normally is the only image connected to the tomosynthesis examination stored in the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) containing dose data, the method may be of value for retrospectively estimating patient dose in clinical use of chest tomosynthesis.

  8. Monoclonal antibody heterogeneity analysis and deamidation monitoring with high-performance cation-exchange chromatofocusing using simple, two component buffer systems.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xuezhen; Kutzko, Joseph P; Hayes, Michael L; Frey, Douglas D

    2013-03-29

    The use of either a polyampholyte buffer or a simple buffer system for the high-performance cation-exchange chromatofocusing of monoclonal antibodies is demonstrated for the case where the pH gradient is produced entirely inside the column and with no external mixing of buffers. The simple buffer system used was composed of two buffering species, one which becomes adsorbed onto the column packing and one which does not adsorb, together with an adsorbed ion that does not participate in acid-base equilibrium. The method which employs the simple buffer system is capable of producing a gradual pH gradient in the neutral to acidic pH range that can be adjusted by proper selection of the starting and ending pH values for the gradient as well as the buffering species concentration, pKa, and molecular size. By using this approach, variants of representative monoclonal antibodies with isoelectric points of 7.0 or less were separated with high resolution so that the approach can serve as a complementary alternative to isoelectric focusing for characterizing a monoclonal antibody based on differences in the isoelectric points of the variants present. Because the simple buffer system used eliminates the use of polyampholytes, the method is suitable for antibody heterogeneity analysis coupled with mass spectrometry. The method can also be used at the preparative scale to collect highly purified isoelectric variants of an antibody for further study. To illustrate this, a single isoelectric point variant of a monoclonal antibody was collected and used for a stability study under forced deamidation conditions.

  9. A simple and rapid method for detection of paraquat in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bin; Chen, Yuguo

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an effective analytical method to determine the concentration of paraquat in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), which can provide methodological support for diagnosis, therapy, and prognostic evaluation of acute poisoning related to paraquat. The plasma samples were deproteinized with 35% perchloric acid. Then the paraquat was extracted from the samples and separated on Ultimate XB-C18 column with a mobile phase consisting of 0.1 M phosphate buffer (containing 75 mM sodium heptane sulfonate) and methyl cyanides (PH 3.0), flow rate of 1 mL/min, column temperature of 28°C and a detection wave length on 258 nm. A good linearity was obtained within the range of 0.2 to 500 g/ml in human plasma. The average rate of absolute and relative recovery were about 100.6% and 101.31%, accompanied by the variations less than 3% and 6% respectively. The within- and between-day relative standard deviations were all less than 6%. After repeated freeze and thaw of plasma samples, no significant difference was observed for the concentration of paraquat (P>0.05). The method was validated by successfully applying in one patient with acute paraquat poisoning. Due to the celerity, accuracy and no-interference by other components of blood sample, this method was suitable for determination the concentration of paraquat in human plasma. PMID:26770298

  10. Simple and simultaneous determination for 12 phenothiazines in human serum by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Einosuke; Nakamura, Takako; Terada, Masaru; Shinozuka, Tatsuo; Hashimoto, Chikako; Kurihara, Katsuyoshi; Honda, Katsuya

    2007-07-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method has been developed for the simultaneous analysis of the 12 phenothiazines (chlorpromazine, fluphenazine, levomepromazine, perazine, perphenazine, prochlorperazine, profenamine, promethazine, propericiazine, thioproperazine, thioridazine and trifluoperazine) in human serum using HPLC/UV. The separation was achieved using a C(18) reversed-phase column (250 mm x 4.6 mm I.D., particle size 5 microm, Inersil ODS-SP). The mobile phase, consisting of acetonitrile-methanol-30 mM NaH(2)PO(4) (pH 5.6) (300:200:500, v/v/v), was delivered at a flow rate of 0.9 mL/min and UV detection was carried out at 250 nm. The recoveries of the 12 phenothiazines spiked into serum samples were 87.6-99.8%. Regression equations for the 12 phenothiazines showed excellent linearity, with detection limits of 3.2-5.5 ng/mL for serum. The inter-day and intra-day coefficients of variation for serum samples were commonly below 8.8%. The selectivity, accuracy and precision of this method are satisfactory for clinical and forensic purposes. This sensitive and selective method offers the opportunity for simultaneous screening and quantification of almost all phenothiazines available in Japan for the purposes of clinical and forensic applications.

  11. A simple high-performance liquid chromatography for the determination of linezolid in human plasma and saliva.

    PubMed

    Hara, Shuuji; Uchiyama, Masanobu; Yoshinari, Masami; Matsumoto, Taichi; Jimi, Shiro; Togawa, Atsushi; Takata, Tohru; Takamatsu, Yasushi

    2015-09-01

    Linezolid is an antimicrobial agent for the treatment of multiresistant Gram-positive infections. A practical high-performance liquid chromatography method was developed for the determination of linezolid in human plasma and saliva. Linezolid and an internal standard (o-ethoxybenzamide) were extracted from plasma and saliva with ethyl acetate and analyzed on a Capcell Pak C18 MG column with UV detection at 254 nm. The calibration curve was linear through the range 0.5-50 µg/mL using a 200 μL sample volume. The intra- and interday precisions were all <6.44% for plasma and 5.60% for saliva. The accuracies ranged from 98.8 to 110% for both matrices. The mean recoveries of linezolid were 80.8% for plasma and 79.0% for saliva. This method was used to determine the plasma and saliva concentrations of linezolid in healthy volunteers who were orally administered a 600 mg dose of linezolid. Our liquid-liquid extraction procedure is easy and requires a small volume of plasma or saliva (200 μL). This small volume can be advantageous in clinical pharmacokinetic studies, especially if children participate.

  12. Exploring the Process of Energy Generation in Pathophysiology by Targeted Metabolomics: Performance of a Simple and Quantitative Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riera-Borrull, Marta; Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Hernández-Aguilera, Anna; Luciano, Fedra; Ras, Rosa; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Camps, Jordi; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Menendez, Javier A.; Joven, Jorge; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities in mitochondrial metabolism and regulation of energy balance contribute to human diseases. The consequences of high fat and other nutrient intake, and the resulting acquired mitochondrial dysfunction, are essential to fully understand common disorders, including obesity, cancer, and atherosclerosis. To simultaneously and noninvasively measure and quantify indirect markers of mitochondrial function, we have developed a method based on gas chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry and an electron ionization interface, and validated the system using plasma from patients with peripheral artery disease, human cancer cells, and mouse tissues. This approach was used to increase sensibility in the measurement of a wide dynamic range and chemical diversity of multiple intermediate metabolites used in energy metabolism. We demonstrate that our targeted metabolomics method allows for quick and accurate identification and quantification of molecules, including the measurement of small yet significant biological changes in experimental samples. The apparently low process variability required for its performance in plasma, cell lysates, and tissues allowed a rapid identification of correlations between interconnected pathways. Our results suggest that delineating the process of energy generation by targeted metabolomics can be a valid surrogate for predicting mitochondrial dysfunction in biological samples. Importantly, when used in plasma, targeted metabolomics should be viewed as a robust and noninvasive source of biomarkers in specific pathophysiological scenarios.

  13. Development and validation of a simple protocol to rapidly determine the performance of biofilters for VOC treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Deshusses, M.A.; Johnson, C.T.

    2000-02-01

    A protocol has been developed for the rapid determination of complete elimination characteristics of target pollutants in waste air biofilters. The protocol involves the determination of two pollutant concentration profiles along the height of a three-segment biofilter under carefully chosen conditions. The combination of the data results in 12 points on the elimination capacity vs load curve which is sufficient to fully characterize a system. The protocol conditions were chosen to enable characterization of biofiltration systems with VOC elimination capacities ranging from 20 to 120 g m{sup {minus}3} h{sup {minus}1}. The protocol was then applied to 18 different VOCs, and the results compared well with previously published data, when available. Maximum removal performance of classes of compounds in the biofilter followed the sequence alcohols > esters > ketones >aromatics alkanes. An attempt was made to correlate the pollutant elimination with Henry's coefficient, and the octanol/water partition coefficient and trends were obtained. The results suggest that biodegradation of VOCs in biofilters is influenced both by the pollutant availability and to a lesser extent by the hydrophobicity of the treated compounds.

  14. ANTERIOR GLENOID RIM EROSION MEASURED BY X-RAY EXAM: A SIMPLE WAY TO PERFORM THE BERNAGEAU PROFILE VIEW

    PubMed Central

    Ikemoto, Roberto Yukio; Nascimento, Luis Gustavo Prata; Bueno, Rogerio Serpone; Strose, Eric; Almeida, Luis Henrique Oliveira; Murachovsky, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze whether the Bernageau radiographic view is adequate for studying the anterior glenoid rim and to determine the distance between the posterior and anterior glenoid rims. Methods: Fifty patients (31 males) with a mean age of 34 years were evaluated by positioning their arm at 160° forward flexion and body at 70° to the x-ray chassis, while positioning the x-ray tube at 30° craniocaudally, centered on the scapula spine. Three of the authors measured the distance between the posterior and anterior glenoid rim three times. The variability and reproducibility of this distance were studied. Three shoulder surgeons performed a subjective evaluation by answering whether it was possible to evaluate the anterior glenoid rim in the view studied. Results: The mean distance was 24.48 mm ± 0.332 mm (left) and 24.82 mm ± 0.316 mm (right). The Anderson-Darling test showed that the measurements had normal distribution, and Pearson's correlation showed significant reproducibility (P < 0.01). The first observer found that 67% of the x-ray images were suitable for evaluating the anterior glenoid rim. The second found that 81% were suitable and the third, 78%. The kappa coefficient showed that the second and third observers had substantial agreement of opinion. Conclusion: The Bernageau view provided a suitable x-ray image for studying the anterior glenoid rim and for assessing erosion after comparison with the unaffected side. PMID:27026960

  15. Characterization of At- species in simple and biological media by high performance anion exchange chromatography coupled to gamma detector.

    PubMed

    Sabatié-Gogova, A; Champion, J; Huclier, S; Michel, N; Pottier, F; Galland, N; Asfari, Z; Chérel, M; Montavon, G

    2012-04-06

    Astatine is a rare radioelement belonging to the halogen group. Considering the trace amounts of astatine produced in cyclotrons, its chemistry cannot be evaluated by spectroscopic tools. Analytical tools, provided that they are coupled with a radioactive detection system, may be an alternative way to study its chemistry. In this research work, high performance anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC) coupled to a gamma detector (γ) was used to evaluate astatine species under reducing conditions. Also, to strengthen the reliability of the experiments, a quantitative analysis using a reactive transport model has been done. The results confirm the existence of one species bearing one negative charge in the pH range 2-7.5. With respect to the other halogens, its behavior indicates the existence of negative ion, astatide At(-). The methodology was successfully applied to the speciation of the astatine in human serum. Under fixed experimental conditions (pH 7.4-7.5 and redox potential of 250 mV) astatine exists mainly as astatide At(-) and does not interact with the major serum components. Also, the method might be useful for the in vitro stability assessment of (211)At-labeled molecules potentially applicable in nuclear medicine.

  16. Performance of Straight Steel Fibres Reinforced Alkali Activated Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faris, Meor Ahmad; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Nizar Ismail, Khairul; Muniandy, Ratnasamy; Putra Jaya, Ramadhansyah

    2016-06-01

    This paper focus on the performance of alkali activated concrete produced by using fly ash activated by sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solutions. These alkali activated concrete were reinforced with straight steel fibres with different weight percentage starting from 0 % up to 5 %. Chemical composition of raw material in the production alkali activated concrete which is fly ash was first identified by using X-ray fluorescence. Results reveal there have an effect of straight steel fibres inclusion to the alkali activated concrete. Highest compressive strength of alkali activated concrete which is 67.72 MPa was obtained when 3 % of straight fibres were added. As well as flexural strength, highest flexural strength which is 6.78 MPa was obtained at 3 % of straight steel fibres inclusions.

  17. A simple, sensitive, and rapid method for the determination of cotinine in urine by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection.

    PubMed

    Rabbaa-Khabbaz, Lydia; Abi Daoud, Rita; Karam-Sarkis, Dolla

    2006-10-01

    Cotinine levels in biological fluids are a reliable indicator of the presence of nicotine. In this paper, a simple and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) procedure for the determination of cotinine in urine following liquid-liquid extraction with dichloromethane in an alkaline medium is described. Calibration curves show linearity over the 50 to 3000 ng/mL range with low intra- and interday variability as well as good selectivity and specificity. No solid-phase extraction is performed because the liquid dichloromethane extraction step yields excellent results. This method is a good alternative for routine analysis of urinary cotinine in laboratories where gas chromatography or HPLC-mass spectrometry is not available.

  18. The Effect of Combining Analogy-Based Simulation and Laboratory Activities on Turkish Elementary School Students' Understanding of Simple Electric Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unlu, Zeynep Koyunlu; Dokme, Ibilge

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the combination of both analogy-based simulation and laboratory activities as a teaching tool was more effective than utilizing them separately in teaching the concepts of simple electricity. The quasi-experimental design that involved 66 seventh grade students from urban Turkish elementary…

  19. Surfactant-activated lipase hybrid nanoflowers with enhanced enzymatic performance

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jiandong; Zhao, Yamin; Liu, Ronglin; Zhong, Cheng; Jia, Shiru

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of materials have been extensively used as platforms for enzyme immobilization to improve catalytic performance. However, activity of the most of the enzymes was declined after immobilization. Here, we develop a surfactant-activated lipase-inorganic flowerlike hybrid nanomaterials with rational design based on interfacial activation and self-assembly. The resulting surfactant-activated lipase-inorganic hybird nanoflower (activated hNF-lipase) exhibited 460% and 200% higher activity than native lipase and conventional lipase-inorganic hybird nanoflower (hNF-lipase). Furthermore, the activated hNF-lipase displayed good reusability due to its monodispersity and mechanical properties, and had excellent long-time stability. The superior catalytic performances were attributed to both the conformational modulation of surfactants and hierarchical structure of nanoflowers, which not only anchored lipases in an active form, but also decreased the enzyme-support negative interaction and mass-transfer limitations. This new biocatalytic system is promising to find widespread use in applications related to biomedicine, biosensor, and biodiesel. PMID:27297609

  20. Mystery of Foil Air Bearings for Oil-free Turbomachinery Unlocked: Load Capacity Rule-of-thumb Allows Simple Estimation of Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Valco, Mark J.

    2002-01-01

    The Oil-Free Turbomachinery team at the NASA Glenn Research Center has unlocked one of the mysteries surrounding foil air bearing performance. Foil air bearings are self-acting hydrodynamic bearings that use ambient air, or any fluid, as their lubricant. In operation, the motion of the shaft's surface drags fluid into the bearing by viscous action, creating a pressurized lubricant film. This lubricating film separates the stationary foil bearing surface from the moving shaft and supports load. Foil bearings have been around for decades and are widely employed in the air cycle machines used for cabin pressurization and cooling aboard commercial jetliners. The Oil-Free Turbomachinery team is fostering the maturation of this technology for integration into advanced Oil-Free aircraft engines. Elimination of the engine oil system can significantly reduce weight and cost and could enable revolutionary new engine designs. Foil bearings, however, have complex elastic support structures (spring packs) that make the prediction of bearing performance, such as load capacity, difficult if not impossible. Researchers at Glenn recently found a link between foil bearing design and load capacity performance. The results have led to a simple rule-of-thumb that relates a bearing's size, speed, and design to its load capacity. Early simple designs (Generation I) had simple elastic (spring) support elements, and performance was limited. More advanced bearings (Generation III) with elastic supports, in which the stiffness is varied locally to optimize gas film pressures, exhibit load capacities that are more than double those of the best previous designs. This is shown graphically in the figure. These more advanced bearings have enabled industry to introduce commercial Oil-Free gas-turbine-based electrical generators and are allowing the aeropropulsion industry to incorporate the technology into aircraft engines. The rule-of-thumb enables engine and bearing designers to easily size and

  1. Improving the performance of solar flare prediction using active longitudes information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Zhang, L.; Wang, H.; Li, L.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Solar flare prediction models normally depend on properties of active regions, such as sunspot area, McIntosh classifications, Mount Wilson classifications, and various measures of the magnetic field. Nevertheless, the positional information of active regions has not been used. Aims: We define a metric, DARAL (distance between active regions and predicted active longitudes), to depict the positional relationship between active regions and predicted active longitudes and add DARAL to our solar flare prediction model to improve its performance. Methods: Combining DARAL with other solar magnetic field parameters, we build a solar flare prediction model with the instance-based learning method, which is a simple and effective algorithm in machine learning. We extracted 70 078 active region instances from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) magnetograms containing 1055 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) active regions within 30° of the solar disk center from 1996 to 2007 and used them to train and test the solar flare prediction model. Results: Using four performance measures (true positive rate, true negative rate, true skill statistic, and Heidke skill score), we compare performances of the solar flare prediction model with and without DARAL. True positive rate, true negative rate, true skill statistic, and Heidke skill score increase by 6.7% ± 1.3%, 4.2% ± 0.5%, 10.8% ± 1.4% and 8.7% ± 1.0%, respectively. Conclusions: The comparison indicates that the metric DARAL is beneficial to performances of the solar flare prediction model.

  2. Atypical Brain Activation during Simple & Complex Levels of Processing in Adult ADHD: An fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, T. Sigi; Bookheimer, Susan; McGough, James J.; Phillips, Joseph M.; McCracken, James T.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Executive dysfunction in ADHD is well supported. However, recent studies suggest that more fundamental impairments may be contributing. We assessed brain function in adults with ADHD during simple and complex forms of processing. Method: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging with forward and backward digit spans to investigate…

  3. Extra-Curricular Activities and Academic Performance in Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriana, Juan Antonio; Alos, Francisco; Alcala, Rocio; Pino, Maria-Jose; Herruzo, Javier; Ruiz, Rosario

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: In this paper we study the possible influence of extra-curricular activities (study-related and/or sports) on academic performance of first- and second-year pupils in "Educacion Secundaria Obligatoria (ESO)" [N.T. seventh- and eighth-graders]. Method: We randomly selected 12 schools in the city (9 public and 3 private), and…

  4. Prior-to-Exam: What Activities Enhance Performance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoads, C. J.; Healy, Therese

    2013-01-01

    Can instructors impact their student performance by recommending an activity just prior to taking an exam? In this study, college students were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups (study, exercise, or meditation) or a control group. Each group was given two different types of tests; a traditional concept exam, and a non-traditional…

  5. DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

  6. Gelatin-agar lumbosacral spine phantom: a simple model for learning the basic skills required to perform real-time sonographically guided central neuraxial blocks.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia Wei; Karmakar, Manoj K; Li, Xiang; Kwok, Wing Hong; Ngan Kee, Warwick Dean

    2011-02-01

    This report describes the preparation of a gelatin-agar spine phantom that was used for spinal sonography and to practice the hand-eye coordination skills required to perform sonographically guided central neuraxial blocks. The phantom was prepared by embedding a lumbosacral spine model into a mixture of gelatin and agar in a plastic box. Cellulose powder and chlorhexidine were also added to the mixture, after which it was allowed to solidify. Sonography of the osseous elements of the lumbosacral spine in the phantom was then performed, and their sonographic appearances were compared to those in volunteers. Simulated real-time sonographically guided paramedian spinal needle insertions were also performed in the phantom. The texture and echogenicity of the phantom were subjectively comparable to those of tissue in vivo. The osseous elements of the spine in the phantom were clearly delineated, and their sonographic appearances were comparable to those seen in vivo in the volunteers. During the simulated sonographically guided spinal injections, the needle could be clearly visualized, but the phantom provided little tactile feedback. In conclusion, the gelatin-agar spine phantom is a simple and inexpensive sonographic spine model that has a tissuelike texture and echogenicity. It can be used to study the osseous anatomy of the lumbar spine and practice the skills required to perform sonographically guided central neuraxial blocks.

  7. The ability of people with Parkinson's disease to modify dual-task performance in response to instructions during simple and complex walking tasks.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Valerie E; Shumway-Cook, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Gait impairments are a common and consequential motor symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD). A cognitive strategy that incorporates instructions to concentrate on specific parameters of walking is an effective approach to gait rehabilitation for persons with PD during single-task and simple dual-task walking conditions. This study examined the ability to modify dual-task walking in response to instructions during a complex walking task in people with PD compared to healthy older adults (HOA). Eleven people with PD and twelve HOA performed a cognitive task while walking with either a usual base or a narrow base of support. Dual-task walking and cognitive task performance were characterized under two conditions-when participants were instructed focus on walking and when they were instructed to focus on the cognitive task. During both usual base and narrow base walking, instructions affected cognitive task response latency, with slower performance when instructed to focus on walking compared to the cognitive task. Regardless of task or instructions, cognitive task performance was slower in participants with PD compared to HOA. During usual base walking, instructions influenced gait speed for both people with PD and HOA, with faster gait speed when instructed to focus on walking compared to the cognitive task. In contrast, during the narrow base walking, instructions affected gait speed only for HOA, but not for people with PD. This suggests that among people with PD the ability to modify walking in response to instructions depends on the complexity of the walking task.

  8. Simple Spectroscope

    NASA Video Gallery

    This lesson integrates a series of activities to introduce the measurement of waves. Activities guide the students to explore the relationship between frequency and wavelength and apply it to expla...

  9. Simple Bond Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold

    2005-08-01

    Simple bond cleavage is a class of fragmentation reactions in which a single bond is broken, without formation of new bonds between previously unconnected atoms. Because no bond making is involved, simple bond cleavages are endothermic, and activation energies are generally higher than for rearrangement eliminations. The rate of simple bond cleavage reactions is a strong function of the internal energy of the molecular ion, which reflects a loose transition state that resembles reaction products, and has a high density of accessible states. For this reason, simple bond cleavages tend to dominate fragmentation reactions for highly energized molecular ions. Simple bond cleavages have negligible reverse activation energy, and hence they are used as valuable probes of ion thermochemistry, since the energy dependence of the reactions can be related to the bond energy. In organic mass spectrometry, simple bond cleavages of odd electron ions can be either homolytic or heterolytic, depending on whether the fragmentation is driven by the radical site or the charge site. Simple bond cleavages of even electron ions tend to be heterolytic, producing even electron product ions and neutrals.

  10. Hanford immobilized low-activity tank waste performance assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, F.M.

    1998-03-26

    The Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the planned disposal of the vitrified low-level fraction of waste presently contained in Hanford Site tanks. The tank waste is the by-product of separating special nuclear materials from irradiated nuclear fuels over the past 50 years. This waste has been stored in underground single and double-shell tanks. The tank waste is to be retrieved, separated into low and high-activity fractions, and then immobilized by private vendors. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will receive the vitrified waste from private vendors and plans to dispose of the low-activity fraction in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. The high-level fraction will be stored at Hanford until a national repository is approved. This report provides the site-specific long-term environmental information needed by the DOE to issue a Disposal Authorization Statement that would allow the modification of the four existing concrete disposal vaults to provide better access for emplacement of the immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) containers; filling of the modified vaults with the approximately 5,000 ILAW containers and filler material with the intent to dispose of the containers; construction of the first set of next-generation disposal facilities. The performance assessment activity will continue beyond this assessment. The activity will collect additional data on the geotechnical features of the disposal sites, the disposal facility design and construction, and the long-term performance of the waste. Better estimates of long-term performance will be produced and reviewed on a regular basis. Performance assessments supporting closure of filled facilities will be issued seeking approval of those actions necessary to conclude active disposal facility operations. This report also analyzes the long-term performance of the currently planned disposal system as a basis

  11. Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Scott; Eddy, Sarah L; McDonough, Miles; Smith, Michelle K; Okoroafor, Nnadozie; Jordt, Hannah; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2014-06-10

    To test the hypothesis that lecturing maximizes learning and course performance, we metaanalyzed 225 studies that reported data on examination scores or failure rates when comparing student performance in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses under traditional lecturing versus active learning. The effect sizes indicate that on average, student performance on examinations and concept inventories increased by 0.47 SDs under active learning (n = 158 studies), and that the odds ratio for failing was 1.95 under traditional lecturing (n = 67 studies). These results indicate that average examination scores improved by about 6% in active learning sections, and that students in classes with traditional lecturing were 1.5 times more likely to fail than were students in classes with active learning. Heterogeneity analyses indicated that both results hold across the STEM disciplines, that active learning increases scores on concept inventories more than on course examinations, and that active learning appears effective across all class sizes--although the greatest effects are in small (n ≤ 50) classes. Trim and fill analyses and fail-safe n calculations suggest that the results are not due to publication bias. The results also appear robust to variation in the methodological rigor of the included studies, based on the quality of controls over student quality and instructor identity. This is the largest and most comprehensive metaanalysis of undergraduate STEM education published to date. The results raise questions about the continued use of traditional lecturing as a control in research studies, and support active learning as the preferred, empirically validated teaching practice in regular classrooms.

  12. Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Scott; Eddy, Sarah L.; McDonough, Miles; Smith, Michelle K.; Okoroafor, Nnadozie; Jordt, Hannah; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2014-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that lecturing maximizes learning and course performance, we metaanalyzed 225 studies that reported data on examination scores or failure rates when comparing student performance in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses under traditional lecturing versus active learning. The effect sizes indicate that on average, student performance on examinations and concept inventories increased by 0.47 SDs under active learning (n = 158 studies), and that the odds ratio for failing was 1.95 under traditional lecturing (n = 67 studies). These results indicate that average examination scores improved by about 6% in active learning sections, and that students in classes with traditional lecturing were 1.5 times more likely to fail than were students in classes with active learning. Heterogeneity analyses indicated that both results hold across the STEM disciplines, that active learning increases scores on concept inventories more than on course examinations, and that active learning appears effective across all class sizes—although the greatest effects are in small (n ≤ 50) classes. Trim and fill analyses and fail-safe n calculations suggest that the results are not due to publication bias. The results also appear robust to variation in the methodological rigor of the included studies, based on the quality of controls over student quality and instructor identity. This is the largest and most comprehensive metaanalysis of undergraduate STEM education published to date. The results raise questions about the continued use of traditional lecturing as a control in research studies, and support active learning as the preferred, empirically validated teaching practice in regular classrooms. PMID:24821756

  13. Quantifying the Performance of Individual Players in a Team Activity

    PubMed Central

    Duch, Jordi; Waitzman, Joshua S.; Amaral, Luís A. Nunes

    2010-01-01

    Background Teamwork is a fundamental aspect of many human activities, from business to art and from sports to science. Recent research suggest that team work is of crucial importance to cutting-edge scientific research, but little is known about how teamwork leads to greater creativity. Indeed, for many team activities, it is not even clear how to assign credit to individual team members. Remarkably, at least in the context of sports, there is usually a broad consensus on who are the top performers and on what qualifies as an outstanding performance. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to determine how individual features can be quantified, and as a test bed for other team-based human activities, we analyze the performance of players in the European Cup 2008 soccer tournament. We develop a network approach that provides a powerful quantification of the contributions of individual players and of overall team performance. Conclusions/Significance We hypothesize that generalizations of our approach could be useful in other contexts where quantification of the contributions of individual team members is important. PMID:20585387

  14. Creating functional sophistication from simple protein building blocks, exemplified by factor H and the regulators of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Makou, Elisavet; Herbert, Andrew P; Barlow, Paul N

    2015-10-01

    Complement control protein modules (CCPs) occur in numerous functionally diverse extracellular proteins. Also known as short consensus repeats (SCRs) or sushi domains each CCP contains approximately 60 amino acid residues, including four consensus cysteines participating in two disulfide bonds. Varying in length and sequence, CCPs adopt a β-sandwich type fold and have an overall prolate spheroidal shape with N- and C-termini lying close to opposite poles of the long axis. CCP-containing proteins are important as cytokine receptors and in neurotransmission, cell adhesion, blood clotting, extracellular matrix formation, haemoglobin metabolism and development, but CCPs are particularly well represented in the vertebrate complement system. For example, factor H (FH), a key soluble regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation, is made up entirely from a chain of 20 CCPs joined by short linkers. Collectively, therefore, the 20 CCPs of FH must mediate all its functional capabilities. This is achieved via collaboration and division of labour among these modules. Structural studies have illuminated the dynamic architectures that allow FH and other CCP-rich proteins to perform their biological functions. These are largely the products of a highly varied set of intramolecular interactions between CCPs. The CCP can act as building block, spacer, highly versatile recognition site or dimerization mediator. Tandem CCPs may form composite binding sites or contribute to flexible, rigid or conformationally 'switchable' segments of the parent proteins.

  15. A C-di-GMP-proflavine-hemin supramolecular complex has peroxidase activity--implication for a simple colorimetric detection.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shizuka; Roelofs, Kevin; Lee, Vincent T; Sintim, Herman O

    2012-03-01

    Herein, we demonstrate that the bacterial signaling molecule, c-di-GMP, can enhance the peroxidation of hemin when proflavine is present. The c-di-GMP-proflavine-hemin nucleotidezyme can oxidize the colorless compound 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), ABTS, to the colored radical cation ABTS˙(+) and hence provides simple colorimetric detection of c-di-GMP at low micromolar concentrations.

  16. Simple in-situ growth of layered Ni3S2 thin film electrode for the development of high-performance supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Fengzhen; Jiang, Dan; Chen, Xinman; Pan, Xuexue; Kuang, Liping; Zhang, Yong; Alameh, Kamal; Ding, Baofu

    2017-03-01

    A novel Ni3S2 film, comprising interconnected nanoparticles, on Ni foam is synthesized by using a simple one-step hydrothermal approach. The Ni3S2 film electrode exhibits excellent pseudocapacitor characteristics, 1) a huge specific capacitance up to 2230 F g-1 attained at a current density of 5 mA cm-2, and 2) a nearly perfect retention rate of 91% at a current density of 10 mA cm-2 after 3000 cycles. These experimentally demonstrated that the special nanoparticle-interconnected structure in conjunction with the high-performance electrode characteristics, make the Ni3S2 film electrode an attractive and competitive candidate for the development of advanced high-efficiency electrochemical energy storage devices.

  17. Unusual non-fluorescent broad spectrum siderophore activity (SID EGYII) by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain EGYII DSM 101801 and a new insight towards simple siderophore bioassay.

    PubMed

    Embaby, Amira M; Heshmat, Yasmin; Hussein, Ahmed

    2016-03-01

    Present study highlights an unusual non-fluorescent hydroxamate broad spectrum siderophore (SID EGYII) activity from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain EGYII DSM 101801, a soil bacterial isolate, along with simple low cost effective siderophore bioassay. Detection of SID EGYII activity qualitatively was proved by masking this activity against Erwinia amylovora strain EGY1 DSM 101800, an indicator strain, in well-cut diffusion assay containing 100 µM FeCl3. SID EGYII activity was expressed quantitatively as arbitrary units [Siderophore arbitrary units (SAU)] 380 SAU/mL against E. amylovora strain EGY1 DSM 101800. Maximal SID EGYII activity was achieved upon growing P. aeruginosa strain EGYII DSM 101801 in PYB broth at 180 rpm for 24 h. SID EGYII displayed a broad spectrum antimicrobial activity against some human pathogens (i.e., Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and yeasts) and a fireblight plant pathogen. Interestingly, transformants of Escherichia coli JM109 (DE3)pSID/EGYII harboring P. aeruginosa strain EGYII DSM 101801 plasmid demonstrated a perceivable antimicrobial activity against E. amylovora strain EGY1 DSM 101800. The broad spectrum antimicrobial activity of the unusual non-fluorescent SID EGYII would underpin its high potential in targeting bacterial pathogens posing probable threats to human health and agricultural economy. The present simple low cost effective bioassay is a new insight towards an alternative to the expensive cumbersome siderophore Chrome Azurol S assay.

  18. A simple surrogate test method to rank the wear performance of prospective ceramic materials under hip prosthesis edge-loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Anthony P; Brannon, Rebecca M

    2014-02-01

    This research has developed a novel test method for evaluating the wear resistance of ceramic materials under severe contact stresses simulating edge loading in prosthetic hip bearings. Simply shaped test specimens - a cylinder and a spheroid - were designed as surrogates for an edge-loaded, head/liner implant pair. Equivalency of the simpler specimens was assured in the sense that their theoretical contact dimensions and pressures were identical, according to Hertzian contact theory, to those of the head/liner pair. The surrogates were fabricated in three ceramic materials: Al2 O3 , zirconia-toughened alumina (ZTA), and ZrO2 . They were mated in three different material pairs and reciprocated under a 200 N normal contact force for 1000-2000 cycles, which created small (<1 mm(2) ) wear scars. The three material pairs were ranked by their wear resistance, quantified by the volume of abraded material measured using an interferometer. Similar tests were performed on edge-loaded hip implants in the same material pairs. The surrogates replicated the wear rankings of their full-scale implant counterparts and mimicked their friction force trends. The results show that a proxy test using simple test specimens can validly rank the wear performance of ceramic materials under severe, edge-loading contact stresses, while replicating the beginning stage of edge-loading wear. This simple wear test is therefore potentially useful for screening and ranking new, prospective materials early in their development, to produce optimized candidates for more complicated full-scale hip simulator wear tests.

  19. Swimming and other activities: applied aspects of fish swimming performance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castro-Santos, Theodore R.; Farrell, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    Human activities such as hydropower development, water withdrawals, and commercial fisheries often put fish species at risk. Engineered solutions designed to protect species or their life stages are frequently based on assumptions about swimming performance and behaviors. In many cases, however, the appropriate data to support these designs are either unavailable or misapplied. This article provides an overview of the state of knowledge of fish swimming performance – where the data come from and how they are applied – identifying both gaps in knowledge and common errors in application, with guidance on how to avoid repeating mistakes, as well as suggestions for further study.

  20. APOLLO 9: Dave scott performs Extra Vehicular Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Dave Scott performs Extra Vehicular Activities around the Command Module 'Gumdrop'. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 9: The Duet of Spider & Gumdrop': part of a documentary series made in the early 70's on the APOLLO missions, and narrated by Burgess Meredith. (Actual date created is not known at this time) Mission: APOLLO 9: Earth orbital flight with James A. McDivitt, David R. Scott, and Russell Schweickart. First flight of the Lunar Module. Performed rendezvous, docking and E.V.A..Mission Duration 241hrs 0m 54s.

  1. PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE-POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON-WET AIR REGENERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The investigation summarized in the report was undertaken to evaluate the performance of powdered activated carbon (PAC) technology used in conjunction with wet air regeneration (WAR) at municipal wastewater treatment plants. Excessive ash concentrations accumulated in the mixed ...

  2. Metabolic and Biomechanical Measures of Gait Efficiency of Three Multi-Axial, Vertical Shock and Energy Storing Return Prosthetic Feet During Simple & Complex Mobility Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0748 TITLE: Metabolic and Biomechanical Measures of Gait Efficiency of Three Multi-Axial...Metabolic and Biomechanical Measures of Gait Efficiency of Three Multi-Axial, Vertical Shock and Energy Storing Return Prosthetic Feet During Simple... athlete . Amputee performance will also be compared to a non-amputee control group. Body At this time we can report that 100% of experimental

  3. Simple-design ultra-low phase noise microwave frequency synthesizers for high-performing Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, B.; Calosso, C. E.; Abdel Hafiz, M.; Micalizio, S.; Boudot, R.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the development and characterization of novel 4.596 GHz and 6.834 GHz microwave frequency synthesizers devoted to be used as local oscillators in high-performance Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks. The key element of the synthesizers is a custom module that integrates a high spectral purity 100 MHz oven controlled quartz crystal oscillator frequency-multiplied to 1.6 GHz with minor excess noise. Frequency multiplication, division, and mixing stages are then implemented to generate the exact output atomic resonance frequencies. Absolute phase noise performances of the output 4.596 GHz signal are measured to be -109 and -141 dB rad2/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz Fourier frequencies, respectively. The phase noise of the 6.834 GHz signal is -105 and -138 dB rad2/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The performances of the synthesis chains contribute to the atomic clock short term fractional frequency stability at a level of 3.1 × 10-14 for the Cs cell clock and 2 × 10-14 for the Rb clock at 1 s averaging time. This value is comparable with the clock shot noise limit. We describe the residual phase noise measurements of key components and stages to identify the main limitations of the synthesis chains. The residual frequency stability of synthesis chains is measured to be at the 10-15 level for 1 s integration time. Relevant advantages of the synthesis design, using only commercially available components, are to combine excellent phase noise performances, simple-architecture, low-cost, and to be easily customized for signal output generation at 4.596 GHz or 6.834 GHz for applications to Cs or Rb vapor-cell frequency standards.

  4. Simple-design ultra-low phase noise microwave frequency synthesizers for high-performing Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    François, B.; Calosso, C. E.; Micalizio, S.; Abdel Hafiz, M.; Boudot, R.

    2015-09-15

    We report on the development and characterization of novel 4.596 GHz and 6.834 GHz microwave frequency synthesizers devoted to be used as local oscillators in high-performance Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks. The key element of the synthesizers is a custom module that integrates a high spectral purity 100 MHz oven controlled quartz crystal oscillator frequency-multiplied to 1.6 GHz with minor excess noise. Frequency multiplication, division, and mixing stages are then implemented to generate the exact output atomic resonance frequencies. Absolute phase noise performances of the output 4.596 GHz signal are measured to be −109 and −141 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz Fourier frequencies, respectively. The phase noise of the 6.834 GHz signal is −105 and −138 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The performances of the synthesis chains contribute to the atomic clock short term fractional frequency stability at a level of 3.1 × 10{sup −14} for the Cs cell clock and 2 × 10{sup −14} for the Rb clock at 1 s averaging time. This value is comparable with the clock shot noise limit. We describe the residual phase noise measurements of key components and stages to identify the main limitations of the synthesis chains. The residual frequency stability of synthesis chains is measured to be at the 10{sup −15} level for 1 s integration time. Relevant advantages of the synthesis design, using only commercially available components, are to combine excellent phase noise performances, simple-architecture, low-cost, and to be easily customized for signal output generation at 4.596 GHz or 6.834 GHz for applications to Cs or Rb vapor-cell frequency standards.

  5. Simple-design ultra-low phase noise microwave frequency synthesizers for high-performing Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    François, B; Calosso, C E; Abdel Hafiz, M; Micalizio, S; Boudot, R

    2015-09-01

    We report on the development and characterization of novel 4.596 GHz and 6.834 GHz microwave frequency synthesizers devoted to be used as local oscillators in high-performance Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks. The key element of the synthesizers is a custom module that integrates a high spectral purity 100 MHz oven controlled quartz crystal oscillator frequency-multiplied to 1.6 GHz with minor excess noise. Frequency multiplication, division, and mixing stages are then implemented to generate the exact output atomic resonance frequencies. Absolute phase noise performances of the output 4.596 GHz signal are measured to be -109 and -141 dB rad(2)/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz Fourier frequencies, respectively. The phase noise of the 6.834 GHz signal is -105 and -138 dB rad(2)/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The performances of the synthesis chains contribute to the atomic clock short term fractional frequency stability at a level of 3.1 × 10(-14) for the Cs cell clock and 2 × 10(-14) for the Rb clock at 1 s averaging time. This value is comparable with the clock shot noise limit. We describe the residual phase noise measurements of key components and stages to identify the main limitations of the synthesis chains. The residual frequency stability of synthesis chains is measured to be at the 10(-15) level for 1 s integration time. Relevant advantages of the synthesis design, using only commercially available components, are to combine excellent phase noise performances, simple-architecture, low-cost, and to be easily customized for signal output generation at 4.596 GHz or 6.834 GHz for applications to Cs or Rb vapor-cell frequency standards.

  6. A set of four simple performance measures reflecting adherence to guidelines predicts hospitalization: a claims-based cohort study of patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Carola A; Brändle, Michael; Rapold, Roland; Reich, Oliver; Rosemann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background The link between guideline adherence and outcomes is a highly demanded issue in diabetes care. We aimed to assess the adherence to guidelines and its impact on hospitalization using a simple set of performance measures among patients with diabetes. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study, using health care claims data for adult patients with treated diabetes (2011–2013). Patients were categorized into three drug treatment groups (with oral antidiabetic agents [OAs] only, in combination with insulin, and insulin only). Performance measures were based on international established guidelines for diabetes care. Multivariate logistic regression models predicted the probability of hospitalization (2013) by adherence level (2011) among all treatment groups. Results A total of 40,285 patients with diabetes were enrolled in 2011. Guideline adherence was quite low: about 70% of all patients received a biannual hemoglobin A1c measurement and 19.8% had undergone an annual low-density lipoprotein cholesterol test. Only 4.8% were exposed to full adherence including all performance measures (OAs: 3.7%; insulin: 7.7%; and in combination: 7.2%). Increased guideline adherence was associated with decreased probability of hospitalization. This effect was strongest in patients using OAs and insulin in combination. Conclusion Our study showed that measures to reflect physicians’ guideline adherence in diabetes care can easily be calculated based on already available datasets. Furthermore, these measures are clearly linked with the probability of hospitalization suggesting that a better guideline adherence by physicians could help to prevent a large number of hospitalizations. PMID:27042016

  7. Simple fabrication of hydrophilic nanochannels using the chemical bonding between activated ultrathin PDMS layer and cover glass by oxygen plasma.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Hyun; Cui, Yidan; Lee, Min Jung; Nam, Seong-Won; Oh, Doori; Kang, Seong Ho; Kim, Youn Sang; Park, Sungsu

    2011-01-21

    This study describes a simple and low cost method for fabricating enclosed transparent hydrophilic nanochannels by coating low-viscosity PDMS (monoglycidyl ether-terminated polydimethylsiloxane) as an adhesion layer onto the surface of the nanotrenches that are molded with a urethane-based UV-curable polymer, Norland Optical Adhesive (NOA 63). In detail, the nanotrenches made of NOA 63 were replicated from a Si master mold and coated with 6 nm thick layer of PDMS. These nanotrenches underwent an oxygen plasma treatment and finally were bound to a cover glass by chemical bonding between silanol and hydroxyl groups. Hydrophobic recovery that is observed in the bulk PDMS was not observed in the thin film of PDMS on the mold and the PDMS-coated nanochannel maintained its surface hydrophilicity for at least one month. The potentials of the nanochannels for bioapplications were demonstrated by stretching λ-DNA (48,502 bp) in the channels. Therefore, this fabrication approach provides a practical solution for the simple fabrication of the nanochannels for bioapplications.

  8. A simple and rapid ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method to determine plasma biotin in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Shigeaki; Nishizawa, Manabu; Ando, Itiro; Oguma, Shiro; Sato, Emiko; Imai, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Masako

    2016-08-01

    A simple, rapid, and selective method for determination of plasma biotin was developed using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). After single-step protein precipitation with methanol, biotin and stable isotope-labeled biotin as an internal standard (IS) were chromatographed on a pentafluorophenyl stationary-phase column (2.1 × 100 mm, 2.7 μm) under isocratic conditions using 10 mm ammonium formate-acetonitrile (93:7, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.6 mL/min. The total chromatographic runtime was 5 min for each injection. Detection was performed in a positive electrospray ionization mode by monitoring selected ion transitions at m/z 245.1/227.0 and 249.1/231.0 for biotin and the IS, respectively. The calibration curve was linear in the range of 0.05-2 ng/mL using 300 μL of plasma. The intra- and inter-day precisions were all <7.1%. The accuracy varied from -0.7 to 8.2%. The developed UHPLC-MS/MS method was successfully applied to determine plasma biotin concentrations in hemodialysis patients. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Development and validation of a simple stability-indicating high performance liquid chromatographic method for the determination of miconazole nitrate in bulk and cream formulations.

    PubMed

    De Zan, María M; Cámara, María S; Robles, Juan C; Kergaravat, Silvina V; Goicoechea, Héctor C

    2009-08-15

    A simple and stability-indicating high performance liquid chromatographic method was developed and validated for the determination of miconazole nitrate in bulk and cream preparations. The extraction step for cream samples consisted in a warming, cooling and centrifugation procedure that assures the elimination of the lipophilic matrix component, in order to avoid further precipitation in the chromatographic system. Separation was achieved on a ZORBAX Eclipse XDB - C18 (4.6 mm x 150 mm, 5 microm particle size) column, using a mobile phase consisting of water, methanol and acetonitrile, in a flow and solvent gradient elution for 15 min. The column was maintained at 25 degrees C and 10 microL of solutions were injected. UV detection was performed at 232 nm, although employment of a diode array detector allowed selectivity confirmation by peak purity evaluation. The method was validated reaching satisfactory results for selectivity, precision and accuracy. Degradation products in naturally aged samples could be simultaneously evaluated, without interferences in the quantitative analysis.

  10. Fair performance comparison of different carbon blacks in lithium-sulfur batteries with practical mass loadings - Simple design competes with complex cathode architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jozwiuk, Anna; Sommer, Heino; Janek, Jürgen; Brezesinski, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    The lithium-sulfur system is one of the most promising next generation battery systems, as elemental sulfur is cheap, abundant and has a high theoretical specific capacity. Although much research is conducted on complex sulfur/carbon composites and architectures, it is difficult to compare the performance of the cathodes to one another. Factors, such as different electrolyte composition and cell components strongly affect the cyclability of the battery. Here, we show the importance of optimizing "standard" conditions to allow for fair performance comparison of different carbon blacks. Our optimal electrolyte-to-sulfur ratio is 11 μL mgsulfur-1 and high concentrations of LiNO3 (>0.6 M) are needed because nitrate is consumed continuously during cycling. Utilizing these standard conditions, we tested the cycling behavior of four types of cathodes with individual carbon blacks having different specific surface areas, namely Printex-A, Super C65, Printex XE-2 and Ketjenblack EC-600JD. Both the specific capacity and polysulfide adsorption capability clearly correlate with the surface area of the carbon being used. High specific capacities (>1000 mAh gsulfur-1 at C/5) are achieved with high surface area carbons. We also demonstrate that a simple cathode using Ketjenblack EC-600JD as the conductive matrix material can well compete with those having complex architectures or additives.

  11. A simple L-cysteine-assisted method for the growth of MoS2 nanosheets on carbon nanotubes for high-performance lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-Keun; Yu, Seung-Ho; Woo, Seunghee; Quan, Bo; Lee, Dong-Chan; Kim, Min Kun; Sung, Yung-Eun; Piao, Yuanzhe

    2013-02-21

    We introduce a simple process to synthesize few-layered MoS(2) nanosheets supported on coaxial carbon nanotubes through an L-cysteine-assisted hydrothermal route, in which L-cysteine, a cheap and ordinary amino acid, plays a fundamental role in controlling the morphology of the hybrid material and the binder to help the growth of MoS(2) nanosheets on the surface of the carbon nanotubes. It is also demonstrated that the polypeptide formed by L-cysteine can be transformed into amorphous carbon by heat treatment under an inert atmosphere. The materials exhibit high capacity and excellent cycling performance when used as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. The specific capacity of a composite with 1 : 4 molar ratio of MoS(2) to carbon nanotubes is 736.5 mAh g(-1) after the first cycle, increased for several initial cycles, and remains at 823.4 mAh g(-1) even after 30 cycles, when cycled at a current density of 100 mA g(-1). At a very high current density of 1600 mA g(-1), the material shows a stable capacity of approximately 530 mAh g(-1) after 30 cycles. The noteworthy improvement in the electrochemical performance of the material can be attributed to their unique structure and the synergistic effects of amorphous carbon and few-layered MoS(2).

  12. Validation of a pair of computer codes for estimation and optimization of subsonic aerodynamic performance of simple hinged-flap systems for thin swept wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Harry W.; Darden, Christine M.

    1988-01-01

    Extensive correlations of computer code results with experimental data are employed to illustrate the use of linearized theory attached flow methods for the estimation and optimization of the aerodynamic performance of simple hinged flap systems. Use of attached flow methods is based on the premise that high levels of aerodynamic efficiency require a flow that is as nearly attached as circumstances permit. A variety of swept wing configurations are considered ranging from fighters to supersonic transports, all with leading- and trailing-edge flaps for enhancement of subsonic aerodynamic efficiency. The results indicate that linearized theory attached flow computer code methods provide a rational basis for the estimation and optimization of flap system aerodynamic performance at subsonic speeds. The analysis also indicates that vortex flap design is not an opposing approach but is closely related to attached flow design concepts. The successful vortex flap design actually suppresses the formation of detached vortices to produce a small vortex which is restricted almost entirely to the leading edge flap itself.

  13. Background activities, induction, and behavioral allocation in operant performance.

    PubMed

    Baum, William M; Davison, Michael

    2014-09-01

    In experiments on operant behavior, other activities, called "background" activities, compete with the operant activities. Herrnstein's (1970) formulation of the matching law included background reinforcers in the form of a parameter rO, but remained vague about the activities (BO) that produce rO. To gain more understanding, we analyzed data from three studies of performance with pairs of variable-interval schedules that changed frequently in the relative rate at which they produced food: Baum and Davison (2014), Belke and Heyman (1994), and Soto, McDowell, and Dallery (2005). Results sometimes deviated from the matching law, suggesting variation in rO. When rO was calculated from the matching equation, two results emerged: (a) rO is directly proportional to BO, as in a ratio schedule; and (b) rO and BO depend on the food rate, which is to say that BO consists of activities induced by food, as a phylogenetically important event. Other activities unrelated to food (BN ) correspond to Herrnstein's original conception of rO and may be included in the matching equation. A model based on Baum's (Baum, 2012) concepts of allocation, induction, and contingency explained the deviations from the matching law. In the model, operant activity B, BO, and BN competed unequally in the time allocation: B and BO both replaced BN , BO replaced lever pressing (Soto et al.), and key pecking replaced BO (Baum & Davison). Although the dependence of rO and BO on food rate changes Herrnstein's (1970) formulation, the model preserved the generalized matching law for operant activities by incorporating power-function induction.

  14. Associations between Tactile Sensory Threshold and Postural Performance and Effects of Healthy Aging and Subthreshold Vibrotactile Stimulation on Postural Outcomes in a Simple Dual Task

    PubMed Central

    Dettmer, Marius; Pourmoghaddam, Amir; Lee, Beom-Chan; Layne, Charles S.

    2016-01-01

    Specific activities that require concurrent processing of postural and cognitive tasks may increase the risk for falls in older adults. We investigated whether peripheral receptor sensitivity was associated with postural performance in a dual-task and whether an intervention in form of subthreshold vibration could affect performance. Ten younger (age: 20–35 years) and ten older adults (70–85 years) performed repeated auditory-verbal 1-back tasks while standing quietly on a force platform. Foot sole vibration was randomly added during several trials. Several postural control and performance measures were assessed and statistically analyzed (significance set to α-levels of .05). There were moderate correlations between peripheral sensitivity and several postural performance and control measures (r = .45 to .59). Several postural performance measures differed significantly between older and younger adults (p < 0.05); addition of vibration did not affect outcome measures. Aging affects healthy older adults' performance in dual-tasks, and peripheral sensitivity may be a contributor to the observed differences. A vibration intervention may only be useful when there are more severe impairments of the sensorimotor system. Hence, future research regarding the efficacy of sensorimotor interventions in the form of vibrotactile stimulation should focus on older adults whose balance is significantly affected. PMID:27143967

  15. Will Global Warming Cause a Rise in Sea Level? A Simple Activity about the States of Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oguz, Ayse

    2009-01-01

    In this activity, a possible problem related to global warming is clarified by the principle of states of water. The activity consists of an experiment that includes three scientific principles: Archimedes' Principle, the Law of Conservation of Matter, and the fluidity of liquids. The experiment helps students raise questions and open new horizons…

  16. Simple 2,4-diacylphloroglucinols as classic transient receptor potential-6 activators--identification of a novel pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Leuner, K; Heiser, J H; Derksen, S; Mladenov, M I; Fehske, C J; Schubert, R; Gollasch, M; Schneider, G; Harteneck, C; Chatterjee, S S; Müller, W E

    2010-03-01

    The naturally occurring acylated phloroglucinol derivative hyperforin was recently identified as the first specific canonical transient receptor potential-6 (TRPC6) activator. Hyperforin is the major antidepressant component of St. John's wort, which mediates its antidepressant-like properties via TRPC6 channel activation. However, its pharmacophore moiety for activating TRPC6 channels is unknown. We hypothesized that the phloroglucinol moiety could be the essential pharmacophore of hyperforin and that its activity profile could be due to structural similarities with diacylglycerol (DAG), an endogenous nonselective activator of TRPC3, TRPC6, and TRPC7. Accordingly, a few 2-acyl and 2,4-diacylphloroglucinols were tested for their hyperforin-like activity profiles. We used a battery of experimental models to investigate all functional aspects of TRPC6 activation, including ion channel recordings, Ca(2+) imaging, neurite outgrowth, and inhibition of synaptosomal uptake. Phloroglucinol itself was inactive in all of our assays, which was also the case for 2-acylphloroglucinols. For TRPC6 activation, the presence of two symmetrically acyl-substitutions with appropriate alkyl chains in the phloroglucinol moiety seems to be an essential prerequisite. Potencies of these compounds in all assays were comparable with that of hyperforin for activating the TRPC6 channel. Finally, using structure-based modeling techniques, we suggest a binding mode for hyperforin to TRPC6. Based on this modeling approach, we propose that DAG is able to activate TRPC3, TRPC6, and TRPC7 because of higher flexibility within the chemical structure of DAG compared with the rather rigid structures of hyperforin and the 2,4-diacylphloroglucinol derivatives.

  17. Is there a difference between active and less active children and adolescents in jump performance?

    PubMed

    Keiner, Michael; Sander, Andre; Wirth, Klaus; Schmidtbleicher, Dietmar

    2013-06-01

    Training and activity level are important predictors of motor development. At present, many children and adolescents do not participate in any sport activity in their leisure time. In this investigation, we analyzed the level of performance of the stretch and shortening cycle (SSC) in childhood and youth. Data of 801 participants were recorded for 2 separate groups, those in elite soccer associations and those who were less active in their leisure time. All the participants completed the following performance tests: the squat jump, the countermovement jump and the drop jump from varying heights. All the participants answered a questionnaire to determine their level of activity. Comparisons of performance were made across the 2 groups. The data showed a significant (p < 0.05) advantage for soccer players in nearly every variable involved in the performance of the SSC. The analysis of the questionnaire highlights the fact that approximately a quarter of students are inactive in their leisure time, which means they do not participate in any sport activity except for school sports. The data show that many children and adolescents do not participate in sport activities in their leisure time. Furthermore, many of these children and adolescents have a body mass index >25. The results of this investigation support the fact that inactivity is correlated with a low training level in children and youth.

  18. Properties and Performance of Alkali-Activated Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Robert J.

    Alkali-activated concrete (AAC) made with industrial byproducts as the sole binder is rapidly emerging as a sustainable alternative to ordinary portland cement concrete (PCC). Despite its exemplary mechanical performance and durability, there remain several barriers to widespread commercialization of AAC. This dissertation addresses several of these barriers. Mathematical models are proposed which efficiently and accurately predict the compressive strength of AAC as a function of activator composition, binder type, and curing condition. The relationships between compressive strength and other mechanical properties (i.e., tensile strength and modulus of elasticity) are discussed, as are stress-strain relationships. Several aspects related to the durability of AAC are also discussed, including dimensional stability under drying conditions, alkali-silica reactivity, and chloride permeability. The results of these experimental investigations are disseminated in the context of real-world applicability.

  19. PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT ASSISTANCE ACTIVITIES IN THE DOE COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, R.

    2012-01-23

    The United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) has established a Performance Assessment Community of Practice (PA CoP) to foster the sharing of information among performance assessment (PA) and risk assessment practitioners, regulators and oversight personnel. The general intent is to contribute to continuous improvement in the consistency, technical adequacy and quality of implementation of PAs and risk assessments around the DOE Complex. The PA CoP activities have involved commercial disposal facilities and international participants to provide a global perspective. The PA CoP has also sponsored annual technical exchanges as a means to foster improved communication and to share lessons learned from on-going modelling activities. The PA CoP encourages activities to provide programmatic and technical assistance in the form of sharing experience and lessons learned with practitioners during the development of PAs and risk assessments. This assistance complements DOE-EM reviews through the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) that are conducted after modelling efforts are completed. Such up-front assistance is providing additional value in terms of improving consistency and sharing of information. There has been a substantial increase in the amount of assistance being provided. The assistance has been well received by practitioners and regulators that have been involved. The paper highlights assistance and sharing of information that has been conducted in the last two years to support activities underway in support of proposed disposal facilities at Paducah, Portsmouth, and the Idaho National Laboratory and tank closure at Hanford.

  20. Optimization of an Active Twist Rotor Blade Planform for Improved Active Response and Forward Flight Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekula, Martin K; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the optimum blade tip planform for a model-scale active twist rotor. The analysis identified blade tip design traits which simultaneously reduce rotor power of an unactuated rotor while leveraging aeromechanical couplings to tailor the active response of the blade. Optimizing the blade tip planform for minimum rotor power in forward flight provided a 5 percent improvement in performance compared to a rectangular blade tip, but reduced the vibration control authority of active twist actuation by 75 percent. Optimizing for maximum blade twist response increased the vibration control authority by 50 percent compared to the rectangular blade tip, with little effect on performance. Combined response and power optimization resulted in a blade tip design which provided similar vibration control authority to the rectangular blade tip, but with a 3.4 percent improvement in rotor performance in forward flight.

  1. Improved electrochemical performances of 9LiFePO 4·Li 3V 2(PO 4)/C composite prepared by a simple solid-state method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, J. Y.; Tu, J. P.; Zhang, L.; Wang, X. L.; Zhou, Y.; Qiao, Y. Q.; Lu, Y.

    9LiFePO 4·Li 3V 2(PO 4) 3/C is synthesized via a carbon thermal reaction using petroleum coke as both reduction agent and carbon source. The as-prepared material is not a simple mixture of LiFePO 4 (LFP) and Li 3V 2(PO 4) 3 (LVP), but a composite possessing two phases: one is V-doped LFP and the other is Fe-doped LVP. The typical structure enhances the electrical conductivity of the composite and improves the electrochemical performances. The first discharge capacity of 9LFP·LVP/C in 18650 type cells is 168 mAh g -1 at 1 C (1 C 9LFP·LVP/C = 166 mA g -1), and exhibits high reversible discharge capacity of 125 mAh g -1 at 10 C even after 150 cycles. At the temperature of -20 °C, the reversible capacity of 9LFP·LVP/C can maintain 75% of that at room temperature.

  2. A simple sample preparation for simultaneous determination of chloramphenicol and its succinate esters in food products using high-performance liquid chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Amelin, Vasiliy; Korotkov, Anton

    2017-02-01

    A simple method is described for the determination of chloramphenicol and its succinate esters in food products. Examination of food products using high-performance liquid chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry showed the presence not only of chloramphenicol but also of its succinate forms. A scheme is proposed for determining chloramphenicol and its succinate esters (calculated as chloramphenicol) in meat (beef, pork, poultry), milk, liver, kidney, eggs, fish and honey. Analytes are extracted from a 1.0 g sample with 5 ml acetonitrile. It was found that using the method of standard addition and diluting the extract with water leads to the elimination of matrix effects and also eliminates errors associated with peak splitting due to the separate elution of the differing forms of the analyte. Validation results were satisfactory, with recoveries from 85% to 111% (meat, milk, liver, kidney, eggs, fish and honey) and a relative standard deviation (RSD) lower than 13% for spiked levels of 0.3, 1.0 and 5 µg kg(-)(1). The limits of detection and quantification (calculated as chloramphenicol for all forms) were 0.1 and 0.3 µg kg(-)(1), respectively. The RSD of the results of the analysis was < 10%. The duration of the analysis was less than 1 h.

  3. Molecularly imprinted polymer cartridges coupled on-line with high performance liquid chromatography for simple and rapid analysis of human insulin in plasma and pharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Moein, Mohammad Mahdi; Javanbakht, Mehran; Akbari-adergani, Behrouz

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, a novel method is described for automated determination of human insulin in biological fluids using principle of sequential injection on a molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) cartridge as a sample clean-up technique combined with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The water-compatible molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were prepared using methacrylic acid as a functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as a cross-linker, chloroform as a porogen and insulin as a template molecule. The imprinted polymers were then employed as the solid-phase extraction sorbent for on-line extraction of insulin from human plasma samples. To achieve the best condition, influential parameters on the extraction efficiency were thoroughly investigated. Rapid and simple analysis of the hormone was successfully accomplished through the good selectivity of the prepared sorbent coupled with HPLC. Limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) of 0.2 ng mL(-1), 0.7 ng mL(-1), and 0.03 ng mL(-1), 0.1 ng mL(-1) were obtained in plasma and urine respectively. The obtained data exhibited the great recoveries for extraction of insulin from human plasma and pharmaceutical samples, higher than 87%.

  4. A simple and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography method for determination of ciprofloxacin in bioavailability studies of conventional and gastroretentive prolonged-release formulations

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Jaber; Rezazadeh, Mahboubeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: A very simple, sensitive, and accurate high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with ultraviolet detector was developed and applied to determine ciprofloxacin in human plasma following administration of a gastroretentive formulation developed in our laboratory. Materials and Methods: HPLC analysis was performed on a C18 μ-Bondapack column (250 mm × 3.9 mm) using acetonitrile: potassium dihydrogen phosphate solution 0.1 M (20:80, v/v, pH 3) at a flow rate of 1.5 ml/min and eluate was monitored at 276 nm. After addition of phenacetin as internal standard, plasma samples were treated with 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH: 7) and followed by extraction with dichloromethane. The method was validated for linearity, precision, accuracy, limit of quantitation (LOQ), robustness, stability, and applied in bioavailability studies of our developed gastroretentive formulation in healthy volunteers. Results: The calibration curves were linear over the concentration range 0.025–4 μg/ml with the detection limit of 15 ng/ml. Accuracy % were within 93–115 and the coefficient of variance % ranged from 0.20 to 12.8. The very low LOQ (25 ng/ml) allowed avoiding fluorometric detection which is more expensive and is not available in all laboratories. Ciprofloxacin was stable in samples with no evidence of degradation during 3 freeze-thaw cycles and 3 months storage at –70°C. Conclusion: This validated HPLC method was successfully used for the determination of ciprofloxacin in human plasma following oral administration of controlled release formulation, conventional immediate-release tablets and when administered concomitantly with divalent and trivalent cations such as aluminum-, magnesium-, or calcium-containing products under which the bioavailability of ciprofloxacin is significantly reduced. PMID:27995102

  5. Simple, high throughput ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry trace analysis of perfluorinated alkylated substances in food of animal origin: milk and fish.

    PubMed

    Lacina, Ondrej; Hradkova, Petra; Pulkrabova, Jana; Hajslova, Jana

    2011-07-15

    The present study documents development and validation of a novel approach for determination of 23 perfluorinated alkylated substances (PFASs) in food of animal origin represented by milk and fish. The list of target analytes comprises four classes of PFASs, both ionic and non-ionic: 11 perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs), 4 perfluorosulphonic acids (PFSAs), 5 perfluorosulphonamides (FOSAs) and 3 perfluorophosphonic acids (PFPAs). Fast sample preparation procedure is based on an extraction of target analytes with acetonitrile (MeCN) and their transfer (supported by inorganic salts and acidification) into the organic phase. Removing of matrix co-extracts by a simple dispersive solid phase extraction (SPE) employing ENVI-Carb and C18 sorbents is followed by an efficient sample pre-concentration performed by acetonitrile evaporation and subsequent dilution of residue in a small volume of methanol (matrix equivalent in the final extracts was 16 and 8 g mL(-1), for milk and fish respectively). Using modern instrumentation consisting of ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) hyphenated with a tandem mass spectrometer (MS/MS), limits of quantification (LOQs) as low as 0.001-0.006 μg kg(-1) for milk and 0.002-0.013 μg kg(-1) for fish can be achieved. Under these conditions, a wide spectrum of PFASs, including minor representatives, can be determined which enables collecting data required for human exposure studies. The pilot study employing the new method for examination of milk and canned fish samples was realized. Whereas in majority of canned fish products a wide spectrum of PFCAs, perfluorooctanesulphonic acid (PFOS) and perfluoro-1-octanesulphonamide (PFOSA) was detected, only in a few milk samples very low concentrations (LOQ levels) of PFOS and perfluorooctansulphonic acid (PFDS) were found.

  6. Buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine quantification in human plasma by simple protein precipitation and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lüthi, Guillaume; Blangy, Valeria; Eap, Chin B; Ansermot, Nicolas

    2013-04-15

    A highly sensitive ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method was developed for the quantification of buprenorphine and its major metabolite norbuprenorphine in human plasma. In order to speed up the process and decrease costs, sample preparation was performed by simple protein precipitation with acetonitrile. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of this extraction technique for the quantification of buprenorphine in plasma. Matrix effects were strongly reduced and selectivity increased by using an efficient chromatographic separation on a sub-2 μm column (Acquity UPLC BEH C18 1.7 μm, 2.1×50 mm) in 5 min with a gradient of ammonium formate 20 mM pH 3.05 and acetonitrile as mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.4 ml/min. Detection was made using a tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in positive electrospray ionization mode, using multiple reaction monitoring. The procedure was fully validated according to the latest Food and Drug Administration guidelines and the Société Française des Sciences et Techniques Pharmaceutiques. Very good results were obtained by using a stable isotope-labeled internal standard for each analyte, to compensate for the variability due to the extraction and ionization steps. The method was very sensitive with lower limits of quantification of 0.1 ng/ml for buprenorphine and 0.25 ng/ml for norbuprenorphine. The upper limit of quantification was 250 ng/ml for both drugs. Trueness (98.4-113.7%), repeatability (1.9-7.7%), intermediate precision (2.6-7.9%) and internal standard-normalized matrix effects (94-101%) were in accordance with international recommendations. The procedure was successfully used to quantify plasma samples from patients included in a clinical pharmacogenetic study and can be transferred for routine therapeutic drug monitoring in clinical laboratories without further development.

  7. Performance Assessment Assistance Activities in the DOE Complex - 12325

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Roger R.; Phifer, Mark A.; Letourneau, Martin J.

    2012-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) has established a Performance Assessment Community of Practice (PA CoP) to foster the sharing of information among performance assessment (PA) and risk assessment practitioners, regulators and oversight personnel. The general intent is to contribute to continuous improvement in the consistency, technical adequacy and quality of implementation of PAs and risk assessments around the DOE Complex. The PA CoP activities have involved commercial disposal facilities and international participants to provide a global perspective. The PA CoP has also sponsored annual technical exchanges as a means to foster improved communication and to share lessons learned from on-going modelling activities. The PA CoP encourages activities to provide programmatic and technical assistance in the form of sharing experience and lessons learned with practitioners during the development of PAs and risk assessments. This assistance complements DOE-EM reviews through the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) that are conducted after modelling efforts are completed. Such up-front assistance is providing additional value in terms of improving consistency and sharing of information. There has been a substantial increase in the amount of assistance being provided. The assistance has been well received by practitioners and regulators that have been involved. The paper highlights assistance and sharing of information that has been conducted in the last two years to support activities underway in support of proposed disposal facilities at Paducah, Portsmouth, and the Idaho National Laboratory and tank closure at Hanford. DOE-EM established the PA CoP to help improve the consistency and quality of implementation of modelling activities around the DOE Complex. The PA CoP has sponsored annual technical exchanges as a means to foster improved communication and to share lessons learned from ongoing

  8. Progressive hypoxia decouples activity and aerobic performance of skate embryos

    PubMed Central

    Di Santo, Valentina; Tran, Anna H.; Svendsen, Jon C.

    2016-01-01

    Although fish population size is strongly affected by survival during embryonic stages, our understanding of physiological responses to environmental stressors is based primarily on studies of post-hatch fishes. Embryonic responses to acute exposure to changes in abiotic conditions, including increase in hypoxia, could be particularly important in species exhibiting long developmental time, as embryos are unable to select a different environment behaviourally. Given that oxygen is key to metabolic processes in fishes and aquatic hypoxia is becoming more severe and frequent worldwide, organisms are expected to reduce their aerobic performance. Here, we examined the metabolic and behavioural responses of embryos of a benthic elasmobranch fish, the little skate (Leucoraja erinacea), to acute progressive hypoxia, by measuring oxygen consumption and movement (tail-beat) rates inside the egg case. Oxygen consumption rates were not significantly affected by ambient oxygen levels until reaching 45% air saturation (critical oxygen saturation, Scrit). Below Scrit, oxygen consumption rates declined rapidly, revealing an oxygen conformity response. Surprisingly, we observed a decoupling of aerobic performance and activity, as tail-beat rates increased, rather than matching the declining metabolic rates, at air saturation levels of 55% and below. These results suggest a significantly divergent response at the physiological and behavioural levels. While skate embryos depressed their metabolic rates in response to progressive hypoxia, they increased water circulation inside the egg case, presumably to restore normoxic conditions, until activity ceased abruptly around 9.8% air saturation. PMID:27293746

  9. Pallidal spiking activity reflects learning dynamics and predicts performance

    PubMed Central

    Noblejas, Maria Imelda; Mizrahi, Aviv D.; Dauber, Omer; Bergman, Hagai

    2016-01-01

    The basal ganglia (BG) network has been divided into interacting actor and critic components, modulating the probabilities of different state–action combinations through learning. Most models of learning and decision making in the BG focus on the roles of the striatum and its dopaminergic inputs, commonly overlooking the complexities and interactions of BG downstream nuclei. In this study, we aimed to reveal the learning-related activity of the external segment of the globus pallidus (GPe), a downstream structure whose computational role has remained relatively unexplored. Recording from monkeys engaged in a deterministic three-choice reversal learning task, we found that changes in GPe discharge rates predicted subsequent behavioral shifts on a trial-by-trial basis. Furthermore, the activity following the shift encoded whether it resulted in reward or not. The frequent changes in stimulus–outcome contingencies (i.e., reversals) allowed us to examine the learning-related neural activity and show that GPe discharge rates closely matched across-trial learning dynamics. Additionally, firing rates exhibited a linear decrease in sequences of correct responses, possibly reflecting a gradual shift from goal-directed execution to automaticity. Thus, modulations in GPe spiking activity are highest for attention-demanding aspects of behavior (i.e., switching choices) and decrease as attentional demands decline (i.e., as performance becomes automatic). These findings are contrasted with results from striatal tonically active neurons, which show none of these task-related modulations. Our results demonstrate that GPe, commonly studied in motor contexts, takes part in cognitive functions, in which movement plays a marginal role. PMID:27671661

  10. Activation in the Right Inferior Parietal Lobule Reflects the Representation of Musical Structure beyond Simple Pitch Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Royal, Isabelle; Vuvan, Dominique T.; Zendel, Benjamin Rich; Robitaille, Nicolas; Schönwiesner, Marc; Peretz, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Pitch discrimination tasks typically engage the superior temporal gyrus and the right inferior frontal gyrus. It is currently unclear whether these regions are equally involved in the processing of incongruous notes in melodies, which requires the representation of musical structure (tonality) in addition to pitch discrimination. To this aim, 14 participants completed two tasks while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging, one in which they had to identify a pitch change in a series of non-melodic repeating tones and a second in which they had to identify an incongruous note in a tonal melody. In both tasks, the deviants activated the right superior temporal gyrus. A contrast between deviants in the melodic task and deviants in the non-melodic task (melodic > non-melodic) revealed additional activity in the right inferior parietal lobule. Activation in the inferior parietal lobule likely represents processes related to the maintenance of tonal pitch structure in working memory during pitch discrimination. PMID:27195523

  11. Simple and efficient synthesis of 5'-aryl-5'-deoxyguanosine analogs by azide-alkyne click reaction and their antileishmanial activities.

    PubMed

    Daligaux, Pierre; Pomel, Sébastien; Leblanc, Karine; Loiseau, Philippe M; Cavé, Christian

    2016-05-01

    A series of non-hydrolysable 5'-aryl substituted GDP analogs has been synthesized by reacting 5'-azido-5'-deoxyguanosine with different aryl- and benzyloxy-alkynes. Cu(I) nanoparticles in water were found to be the most efficient catalyst, producing the desired 5'-arylguanosines with good yields. The synthesized compounds were screened for in vitro antileishmanial activity against Leishmania donovani axenic amastigotes and intramacrophage amastigotes stages. The 4-(3-nitrobenzyl)-1,2,3-triazole 5'-substituted guanosine analog was found to be the most active in the series with an IC50 of 8.6 μM on axenic amastigotes. Despite a rather low in vitro antileishmanial activity on the intramacrophage amastigotes, the absence of cytotoxicity on RAW 264.7 macrophages justifies further pharmacomodulations making this antileishmanial series promising.

  12. Cell Assembly Dynamics of Sparsely-Connected Inhibitory Networks: A Simple Model for the Collective Activity of Striatal Projection Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Angulo-Garcia, David; Berke, Joshua D.; Torcini, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Striatal projection neurons form a sparsely-connected inhibitory network, and this arrangement may be essential for the appropriate temporal organization of behavior. Here we show that a simplified, sparse inhibitory network of Leaky-Integrate-and-Fire neurons can reproduce some key features of striatal population activity, as observed in brain slices. In particular we develop a new metric to determine the conditions under which sparse inhibitory networks form anti-correlated cell assemblies with time-varying activity of individual cells. We find that under these conditions the network displays an input-specific sequence of cell assembly switching, that effectively discriminates similar inputs. Our results support the proposal that GABAergic connections between striatal projection neurons allow stimulus-selective, temporally-extended sequential activation of cell assemblies. Furthermore, we help to show how altered intrastriatal GABAergic signaling may produce aberrant network-level information processing in disorders such as Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases. PMID:26915024

  13. Performance Benchmarking Tsunami Models for NTHMP's Inundation Mapping Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horrillo, Juan; Grilli, Stéphan T.; Nicolsky, Dmitry; Roeber, Volker; Zhang, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    The coastal states and territories of the United States (US) are vulnerable to devastating tsunamis from near-field or far-field coseismic and underwater/subaerial landslide sources. Following the catastrophic 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) accelerated the development of public safety products for the mitigation of these hazards. In response to this initiative, US coastal states and territories speeded up the process of developing/enhancing/adopting tsunami models that can be used for developing inundation maps and evacuation plans. One of NTHMP's requirements is that all operational and inundation-based numerical (O&I) models used for such purposes be properly validated against established standards to ensure the reliability of tsunami inundation maps as well as to achieve a basic level of consistency between parallel efforts. The validation of several O&I models was considered during a workshop held in 2011 at Texas A&M University (Galveston). This validation was performed based on the existing standard (OAR-PMEL-135), which provides a list of benchmark problems (BPs) covering various tsunami processes that models must meet to be deemed acceptable. Here, we summarize key approaches followed, results, and conclusions of the workshop. Eight distinct tsunami models were validated and cross-compared by using a subset of the BPs listed in the OAR-PMEL-135 standard. Of the several BPs available, only two based on laboratory experiments are detailed here for sake of brevity; since they are considered as sufficiently comprehensive. Average relative errors associated with expected parameters values such as maximum surface amplitude/runup are estimated. The level of agreement with the reference data, reasons for discrepancies between model results, and some of the limitations are discussed. In general, dispersive models were found to perform better than nondispersive models, but differences were relatively small, in part

  14. Development of a simple and rapid assay for methylase activity based on DNA hairpin probe and Sybr Green I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yi; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2012-03-01

    Methylase is vital for a large number of biological reactions. Here we developed a new method for DNA methylase activity analysis. In this paper, a DNA hairpin probe with a sequence of 5'-GATC-3' in the stem region was designed. The 5'-GATC-3' sequence was targeted by Dam MTase and was methylated. Subsequently, restriction enzyme Dpnl recognized the site and cut it. Then the haipin probe was transformed into three single stranded DNA. This enzymatic process can be monitored by the change of SYBR green I fluorescence. The current label free assay is an useful tool for DNA methylase activity analysis due to its simplicity, speedability, and low cost.

  15. Development of a simple and rapid assay for methylase activity based on DNA hairpin probe and Sybr Green I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yi; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2011-11-01

    Methylase is vital for a large number of biological reactions. Here we developed a new method for DNA methylase activity analysis. In this paper, a DNA hairpin probe with a sequence of 5'-GATC-3' in the stem region was designed. The 5'-GATC-3' sequence was targeted by Dam MTase and was methylated. Subsequently, restriction enzyme Dpnl recognized the site and cut it. Then the haipin probe was transformed into three single stranded DNA. This enzymatic process can be monitored by the change of SYBR green I fluorescence. The current label free assay is an useful tool for DNA methylase activity analysis due to its simplicity, speedability, and low cost.

  16. Learning about Modes in Atomic Force Microscopy by Means of Hands-On Activities Based on a Simple Apparatus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phuapaiboon, Unchada; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Osotchan, Tanakorn

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the results of using a low-cost hands-on setup in combination with accompanying activities to promote understanding of the contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM). This contact mode setup enabled learners to study how AFM works by hand scanning using probing cantilevers with different characteristics on…

  17. The Risk Is That There Is "No Risk": A Simple, Innovative Intervention to Increase Children's Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Anita C.; Luckett, Tim; Tranter, Paul J.; Naughton, Geraldine A.; Wyver, Shirley R.; Ragen, Jo; Spies, Greta

    2009-01-01

    School playgrounds offer everyday opportunities for physically active and social play that combats obesity, develops skills, and promotes well-being. However, teachers' fear of the legal consequences of injury can elicit over-zealous risk reduction with the result that playgrounds lack challenge, and the potential benefits of play become limited.…

  18. Simple one-pot synthesis of solid-core@porous-shell alloyed PtAg nanocrystals for the superior catalytic activity toward hydrogen evolution and glycerol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Weng, Xuexiang; Liu, Qing; Wang, Ai-Jun; Yuan, Junhua; Feng, Jiu-Ju

    2017-05-15

    In this work, solid-core@porous-shell alloyed PtAg nanocrystals (PtAg NCs) were fabricated via a simple one-pot co-reduction wet-chemical method on a large scale. Diprophylline (DPP) was employed as the stabilizing agent and shape-directing agent, without any surfactant, polymer, seed or template. The products were mainly analyzed by a series of characterization technique. The hierarchical architectures had enhanced stability and improved electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and glycerol oxidation reaction (GOR) in contrast with commercial available Pt/C and Pt black catalysts. For the prepared PtAg NCs catalyst, the Tafel slope is 40mVdec(-1) toward HER in 0.5M H2SO4, coupled with the specific activity and mass activity of 77.91mAcm(-2) and 1303mAmg(-1)Pt toward GOR, respectively.

  19. Endoperoxide polyketides from a Chinese Plakortis simplex: further evidence of the impact of stereochemistry on antimalarial activity of simple 1,2-dioxanes.

    PubMed

    Chianese, Giuseppina; Persico, Marco; Yang, Fan; Lin, Hou-Wen; Guo, Yue-Wei; Basilico, Nicoletta; Parapini, Silvia; Taramelli, Donatella; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio; Fattorusso, Caterina

    2014-09-01

    Chemical investigation of the organic extract obtained from the sponge Plakortis simplex collected in the South China Sea afforded five new polyketide endoperoxides (2 and 4-7), along with two known analogues (1 and 3). The stereostructures of these metabolites have been deduced on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and chemical conversion. The isolated endoperoxide derivatives have been tested for their in vitro antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum strains, showing IC50 values in the low micromolar range. The structure-activity relationships were analyzed by means of a detailed computational investigation and rationalized in the light of the mechanism of action proposed for this class of simple antimalarials. The relative orientation of the atoms involved in the putative radical generation and transfer reaction was demonstrated to have a great impact on the antimalarial activity. The resulting 3D pharmacophoric model can be a useful guide to design simple and effective antimalarial lead compounds belonging to the class of 1,2-dioxanes.

  20. Tuning reactivity and site selectivity of simple arenes in C-H activation: ortho-arylation of anisoles via arene-metal π-complexation.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Paolo; Krämer, Katrina; Larrosa, Igor

    2014-12-31

    Current approaches to achieve site selectivity in the C-H activation of arenes involve the use of directing groups or highly electron-poor arenes. In contrast, simple arenes, such as anisole, are characterized by poor reactivity and selectivity. We report that π-complexation to a Cr(CO)3 unit enhances the reactivity of anisoles providing an unprecedented ortho-selective arylation. This mild methodology can be used for the late stage functionalization of bioactive compounds containing the anisole motif, allowing the construction of novel organic scaffolds with few synthetic steps.

  1. Tuning Reactivity and Site Selectivity of Simple Arenes in C–H Activation: Ortho-Arylation of Anisoles via Arene–Metal π-Complexation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Current approaches to achieve site selectivity in the C–H activation of arenes involve the use of directing groups or highly electron-poor arenes. In contrast, simple arenes, such as anisole, are characterized by poor reactivity and selectivity. We report that π-complexation to a Cr(CO)3 unit enhances the reactivity of anisoles providing an unprecedented ortho-selective arylation. This mild methodology can be used for the late stage functionalization of bioactive compounds containing the anisole motif, allowing the construction of novel organic scaffolds with few synthetic steps. PMID:25510851

  2. Simple enzymatic assays for the in vitro motor activity of transcription termination factor Rho from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Boudvillain, Marc; Walmacq, Céline; Schwartz, Annie; Jacquinot, Frédérique

    2010-01-01

    The transcription termination factor Rho from Escherichia coli is a ring-shaped homo-hexameric protein that preferentially interacts with naked cytosine-rich Rut (Rho utilization) regions of nascent RNA transcripts. Once bound to the RNA chain, Rho uses ATP as an energy source to produce mechanical work and disruptive forces that ultimately lead to the dissociation of the ternary transcription complex. Although transcription termination assays have been useful to study Rho activity in various experimental contexts, they do not report directly on Rho mechanisms and kinetics. Here, we describe complementary ATP-dependent RNA-DNA helicase and streptavidin displacement assays that can be used to monitor in vitro Rho's motor activity in a more direct and quantitative manner.

  3. [A simple method of synthesis of triterpene glycosides similar to glycyrrhizic acid and their hepatoprotective activity in vitro].

    PubMed

    Mikhailova, L R; Baltina, L A; Baltina, L A; Kondratenko, R M; Nepogodiev, S A; Field, R A; Kunert, O; Yin, M Ch

    2009-01-01

    A simplified method of synthesis of triterpene l,2-trans-glycosides was developed using the glycosylation of glycyrrhetic acid (GLA) and 18,19-dehydro-GLA by beta-pyranose peracetates in the presence of SnCl(4) and molecular sieves 4 A. The synthesized glycosides exhibited hepatoprotective activity toward the human hepatoma HepG2 cell line on the model of alcohol hepatitis and decreased the level of TNF-alpha protein.

  4. Testing a simple control law to reduce broadband frequency harmonic vibrations using semi-active tuned mass dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutinho, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    This paper is focused on the control problems related to semi-active tuned mass dampers (TMDs) used to reduce harmonic vibrations, specially involving civil structures. A simplified version of the phase control law is derived and its effectiveness is investigated and evaluated. The objective is to improve the functioning of control systems of this type by simplifying the measurement process and reducing the number of variables involved, making the control system more feasible and reliable. Because the control law is of ON/OFF type, combined with appropriate trigger conditions, the activity of the actuation system may be significantly reduced, which may be of few seconds a day in many practical cases, increasing the durability of the device and reducing its maintenance. Moreover, due to the ability of the control system to command the motion of the inertial mass, the semi-active TMD is relatively insensitive to its initial tuning, resulting in the capability of self-tuning and in the possibility of controlling several vibration modes of a structure over a significant broadband frequency.

  5. Students' Performance in Investigative Activity and Their Understanding of Activity Aims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomes, Alessandro Damasio Trani; Borges, A. Tarciso; Justi, Rosaria

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the students' understanding of the aims of an investigative activity and their performance when conducting it. One hundred and eighty-one year nine students from a public middle school in Brazil took part in the study. Students working in pairs were asked to investigate two problems using a…

  6. Aberrant Functional Activation in School Age Children At-Risk for Mathematical Disability: A Functional Imaging Study of Simple Arithmetic Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Nicole; Cannistraci, Christopher J.; Rogers, Baxter P.; Gatenby, J. Christopher; Fuchs, Lynn S.; Anderson, Adam W.; Gore, John C.

    2009-01-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to explore the patterns of brain activation associated with different levels of performance in exact and approximate calculation tasks in well-defined cohorts of children with mathematical calculation difficulties (MD) and typically developing controls. Both groups of children activated the same…

  7. Performance and approval procedures for active personal dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Ginjaume, M

    2011-03-01

    Active personal dosemeters (APDs) are well accepted as useful and reliable instruments for individual dosimetry measurements. The increasing concern about studying the behaviour of APDs in pulsed fields is illustrated through revision of the results of the most representative studies on the performance of APDs in the last 5 y. The deficiencies of APDs in pulsed fields are discussed together with proposals to overcome them. Although there are no legal constraints or technical limitations for recognising APDs for legal dosimetry in facilities with continuous radiation fields, APDs continue to be mainly used as operational dosemeters. The approval procedures applicable to APDs, especially the approach undertaken by Germany, are presented. Finally, some trends in the developments and use of APDs are summarised.

  8. Simple and Sensitive High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) Method with UV Detection for Mycophenolic Acid Assay in Human Plasma. Application to a Bioequivalence Study

    PubMed Central

    Danafar, Hossein; Hamidi, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A simple and available reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with UV detection has been developed and validated for mycophenolic acid (MPA) assay in human plasma. Methods: MPA was extracted from plasma with protein precipitation method by acetonitrile: percholeric acid: methanol (75:5:20 v/v/v). The drug separation was achieved using a C8 analytical column and a mobile phase of 0.1M triethylammonium phosphate (pH=5.4)-acetonitril (65:35, v/v), with a flow rate of 1.5 ml/min. The detection wavelength was 304 nm. Limit of detection (LOD) of the method was determined as the lowest MPA concentration producing a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of about 3. Limit of quantitation (LOQ) was determined as the lowest MPA concentration capable of being quantitated with enough accuracy and precision. Results: The method showed significant linear response-concentration relationship throughout the MPA concentration range of 0.2-10 µg/ml. A typical linear regression equation of the method was: y = 8.5523 x + 0.094, with x and y representing MPA concentration (in µg/ml) and peak height respectively, and the regression coefficient (r) of 0.9816. The average within-run and between-run variations of 7.81 and 4.78 percent. The average drug recovery from plasma was 95.24 percent throughout the linear concentration range. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) of the method were 0.05 and 0.2 µg/ml, respectively. The practical applicability of the method was proven throughout a bioequivalence study. Conclusion: The results showed the acceptable degree of linearity, sensitivity, precision, accuracy and recovery for the method. The method was used successfully for quantitation of MPA in plasma samples of healthy volunteers throughout a bioequivalence study. PMID:26819930

  9. Development and validation of a simple and sensitive high performance liquid chromatographic method for the simultaneous determination of anastrozole, bicalutamide, tamoxifen, and their synthetic impurities.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Fabio Pereira; Garcia, Pedro Lopez

    2012-11-15

    A simple and sensitive analytical method for simultaneous determination of anastrozole, bicalutamide, and tamoxifen as well as their synthetic impurities, anastrozole pentamethyl, bicalutamide 3-fluoro-isomer, and tamoxifen e-isomer, was developed and validated by using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The separation was achieved on a Symmetry(®) C-8 column (100×4.6 mm i.d., 3.5 μm) at room temperature (±24 °C), with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile/water containing 0.18% N,N dimethyloctylamine and pH adjusted to 3.0 with orthophosphoric acid (46.5/53.5, v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL min(-1) within 20 min. The detection was made at a wavelength of 270 nm by using ultraviolet (UV) detector. No interference peaks from excipients and relative retention time indicated the specificity of the method. The calibration curve showed correlation coefficients (r) >0.99 calculated by linear regression and analysis of variance (ANOVA). The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ), respectively, were 2.2 and 6.7 μg mL(-1) for anastrozole, 2.61 and 8.72 μg mL(-1) for bicalutamide, 2.0 and 6.7 μg mL(-1) for tamoxifen, 0.06 and 0.22 μg mL(-1) for anastrozole pentamethyl, 0.02 and 0.07 μg mL(-1) for bicalutamide 3-fluoro-isomer, and 0.002 and 0.007 μg mL(-1) for tamoxifen e-isomer. Intraday and interday relative standard deviations (RSDs) were <2.0% (drugs) and <10% (degradation products) as well as the comparison between two different analysts, which were calculated by f test.

  10. A simple method for the determination of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid in seawater matrix with high performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu; Liu, Baomin; Yuan, Dongxing; Ma, Jian

    2016-12-01

    Glyphosate (GLYP) is an important herbicide which is also used as the phosphorus source for marine organisms. The wide applications of GLYP can lead to its accumulation in oceans and coastal waters, thus creating environmental issues. However, there is limited methods for detection of GLYP and its degradation product, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in saline samples. Therefore, a simple and fast method for the quantification of GLYP and AMPA in seawater matrix has been developed based on the derivatization with 9-fluorenylmethylchloroformate (FMOC-Cl), separation with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and detection with fluorescence detector (FLD). In order to maximize sensitivity, the derivatization procedure was carefully optimized regarding concentration of FMOC-Cl, volume of borate buffer, pH of borate buffer, mixing and derivatization time. The derivatization reaction could be completed within 30min in seawater samples without any additional clean-up or desalting steps. Under the optimized conditions, the developed HPLC method showed a wide linear response (up to several mg/L, R(2)>0.99). The limits of detection were 0.60μg/L and 0.30μg/L for GLYP and AMPA in seawater matrix, respectively. The relative standard deviation was 14.0% for GLYP (1.00mg/L) and 3.1% for AMPA (100μg/L) in saline samples with three different operators (n=24). This method was applied to determine the concentration of GLYP and AMPA in seawater culture media and the recovery data indicated minimal matrix interference. Due to its simplicity, high reproducibility and successful application in seawater culture media analysis, this method is a potentially useful analytical technique for both marine research and environmental science.

  11. A simple and efficient dispersion correction to the Hartree-Fock theory (3): A comprehensive performance comparison of HF-Dtq with MP2 and DFT-Ds.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tatsusada; Hayashi, Takahisa; Mashima, Akira; Sasahara, Katsunori; Chuman, Hiroshi

    2016-01-15

    Accurate prediction of the intermolecular interaction energy (ΔEbind) has been a challenging and serious problem. Current in silico drug screening demands efficient and accurate evaluation of ΔEbind for ligands and their target proteins. It is desirable that ΔEbind including the dispersion interaction energy (Edisp) is calculated using a post-Hartree-Fock (HF) theory, such as the high-order coupled-cluster one, with a larger basis set. However, it remains computationally too expensive to apply such a one to large molecular systems. As another problem, it is necessary to consider the contribution of the basis set superposition error (BSSE) in calculation of ΔEbind. In Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett. 2014 and 2015, we proposed simple and efficient corrections of dispersion and BSSE for the HF theory, which is not able to express the dispersion interaction energy correctly. The current Letter, as the final one in the series, aims to verify the HF theory enhanced by the dispersion correction (HF-Dtq) in the light of reproducibility of 'accurate' intermolecular ligand-protein interaction energy values, with comprehensive comparison with the MP2 and recently proposed various DFT-D theories. Taking ΔEbind calculated with the coupled-cluster theory coupled with a complete basis set as a reference, ΔEbind of over a hundred small sized noncovalent complexes as well as real ligand-protein complexes models was systematically examined in terms of accuracy and computational cost. The comprehensive comparison in the current work showed that HF-Dtq is a practical and reliable approach for in silico drug screening and quantitative structure-activity relationships.

  12. A simple QSPR model for the prediction of the adsorbability of organic compounds onto activated carbon cloth.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Zhu, L; Fang, D; Liu, L; Bai, Z; Wang, L; Xu, W

    2013-01-01

    A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) model was proposed between the molecular descriptors representing the molecular structure and the Freundlich adsorbability parameter (K) for a set of 55 organic compounds onto activated carbon cloth. The best linear model was composed of three descriptors, which were selected by stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis. The statistical parameters provided by the linear model were r² = 0.7744, r²(adj) = 0.7551, s = 0.169 for the training set; and r² = 0.6725, r²(adj) = 0.6316, s = 0.196 for the external test set, respectively. The stability and predictive power of the proposed model were further verified using Y-randomization tests, five-fold cross-validation and leave-many-out cross-validation. The model may give some insight into the main structural features that affect the adsorption of the investigated compounds onto activated carbon cloth.

  13. A simple fabrication for sulfur doped graphitic carbon nitride porous rods with excellent photocatalytic activity degrading RhB dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Qianjing; Liu, Jianjun; Yu, Yingchun; Zuo, Shengli; Li, Baoshan

    2017-01-01

    Constructing special nanostructures with large surface areas and tuning the band gap by element doping are efficient strategies to enhance the photocatalytic activity of semiconductor materials. Here we combined both strategies in one material to form sulfur-doped graphitic carbon nitride porous rods (S-pg-C3N4) in one pot by simply pyrolysis of the melamine-trithiocyanuric acid complex with different temperatures. The samples were characterized by XRD, FT-IR, and elemental analysis; nitrogen adsorption isotherms, SEM and TEM images; and UV-vis DRS and photoluminescence spectra. Characterizations showed that S-pg-C3N4 possessed porous rod structure with a larger surface area (20-52 m2/g) than that of bulk g-C3N4, and the surface area of the S-pg-C3N4 samples increased with the increase of heating temperature. Meanwhile, the trace sulfur remained in the framework of g-C3N4 formed sulfur doped g-C3N4, and the visible light absorption edge of the S-pg-C3N4 was extended, corresponding to a narrowed band gap. As a result, the S-pg-C3N4 samples exhibited an enhanced physical adsorption and photocatalytic activity in the degradation of Rhodamine B dye under visible light.

  14. Simple fabrication of N-doped mesoporous TiO2 nanorods with the enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiufeng; Lu, Juan; Jiang, Jingjing; Li, Xiaobin; Lu, Mengna; Yuan, Guotao; Wang, Zuoshan; Zheng, Min; Seo, Hyo Jin

    2014-01-16

    N-doped mesoporous TiO2 nanorods were fabricated by a modified and facile sol-gel approach without any templates. Ammonium nitrate was used as a raw source of N dopants, which could produce a lot of gasses such as N2, NO2, and H2O in the process of heating samples. These gasses were proved to be vitally important to form the special mesoporous structure. The samples were characterized by the powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectrometer, nitrogen adsorption isotherms, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and UV-visible absorption spectra. The average length and the cross section diameter of the as-prepared samples were ca. 1.5 μm and ca. 80 nm, respectively. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated by photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solution. The N-doped mesoporous TiO2 nanorods showed an excellent photocatalytic activity, which may be attributed to the enlarged surface area (106.4 m2 g-1) and the narrowed band gap (2.05 eV). Besides, the rod-like photocatalyst was found to be easy to recycle.

  15. Simple fabrication of N-doped mesoporous TiO2 nanorods with the enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    N-doped mesoporous TiO2 nanorods were fabricated by a modified and facile sol–gel approach without any templates. Ammonium nitrate was used as a raw source of N dopants, which could produce a lot of gasses such as N2, NO2, and H2O in the process of heating samples. These gasses were proved to be vitally important to form the special mesoporous structure. The samples were characterized by the powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectrometer, nitrogen adsorption isotherms, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and UV-visible absorption spectra. The average length and the cross section diameter of the as-prepared samples were ca. 1.5 μm and ca. 80 nm, respectively. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated by photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solution. The N-doped mesoporous TiO2 nanorods showed an excellent photocatalytic activity, which may be attributed to the enlarged surface area (106.4 m2 g-1) and the narrowed band gap (2.05 eV). Besides, the rod-like photocatalyst was found to be easy to recycle. PMID:24428848

  16. Performance and biofilm activity of nitrifying biofilters removing trihalomethanes.

    PubMed

    Wahman, David G; Katz, Lynn E; Speitel, Gerald E

    2011-02-01

    Nitrifying biofilters seeded with three different mixed-culture sources removed trichloromethane (TCM) and dibromochloromethane (DBCM) with removals reaching 18% for TCM and 75% for DBCM. In addition, resuspended biofilm removed TCM, bromodichloromethane (BDCM), DBCM, and tribromomethane (TBM) in backwash batch kinetic tests, demonstrating that the biofilters contained organisms capable of biotransforming the four regulated trihalomethanes (THMs) commonly found in treated drinking water. Upon the initial and subsequent increased TCM addition, total ammonia nitrogen (TOTNH(3)) removal decreased and then reestablished, indicating an adjustment by the biofilm bacteria. In addition, changes in DBCM removal indicated a change in activity related to DBCM. The backwash batch kinetic tests provided a useful tool to evaluate the biofilm's bacteria. Based on these experiments, the biofilters contained bacteria with similar THM removal kinetics to those seen in previous batch kinetic experiments. Overall, performance or selection does not seem based specifically on nutrients, source water, or source cultures and most likely results from THM product toxicity, and the use of GAC media appeared to offer benefits over anthracite for biofilter stability and long-term performance, although the reasons for this advantage are not apparent based on research to date.

  17. Isoflavones made simple - genistein's agonist activity for the beta-type estrogen receptor mediates their health benefits.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark Frederick

    2006-01-01

    Soy isoflavones, the focus of much research and controversy, are often referred to as "weak estrogens". In fact, genistein is a relatively potent agonist for the recently characterized beta isoform of the estrogen receptor (ERbeta). The low nanomolar serum concentrations of unconjugated free genistein achieved with high-nutritional intakes of soy isoflavones are near the binding affinity of genistein for this receptor, but are about an order of magnitude lower than genistein's affinity for the "classical" alpha isoform of the estrogen receptor (ERalpha). Moreover, these concentrations are far too low to inhibit tyrosine kinases or topoisomerase II, in vitro activities of genistein often cited as potential mediators of its physiological effects. The thesis that these physiological effects are in fact mediated by ERbeta activation provides a satisfying rationale for genistein's clinical activities. Hepatocytes do not express ERbeta; this explains why soy isoflavones, unlike oral estrogen, neither modify serum lipids nor provoke the prothrombotic effects associated with increased risk for thromboembolic disorders. The lack of uterotrophic activity of soy isoflavones reflects the fact that ERalpha is the exclusive mediator of estrogen's impact in this regard. Vascular endothelium expresses both ERalpha and ERbeta, each of which has the potential to induce and activate nitric oxide synthase; this may account for the favorable influence of soy isoflavones on endothelial function in postmenopausal women and ovariectomized rats. The ERbeta expressed in osteoblasts may mediate the reported beneficial impact of soy isoflavones on bone metabolism. Suggestive evidence that soy-rich diets decrease prostate cancer risk, accords well with the observation that ERbeta appears to play an antiproliferative role in healthy prostate. In the breast, ERalpha promotes epithelial proliferation, whereas ERbeta has a restraining influence in this regard - consistent with the emerging view

  18. Performance of a coincidence based blood activity monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.

    1989-12-01

    A new device has been constructed that measures the positron emitting radio-tracer concentration in arterial blood by extracting blood with a peristaltic pump, then measuring the activity concentration by detecting coincident pairs of 511 keV photons with a pair of heavy inorganic scintillators attached to photomultiplier tubes. The sensitivity of this device is experimentally determined to be 610 counts/second per {mu}Ci/ml, and has a paralyzing dead time of 1.2 {mu}s, so is capable of measuring blood activity concentration as high as 1 mCi/ml. Its performance is compared to two other blood monitoring methods: discrete blood samples counted with a well counter and device that uses a plastic scintillator to directly detect positrons. The positron detection efficiency of this device for {sup 18}F is greater than the plastic scintillation counter, and also eliminates the radioisotope dependent correction factors necessary to convert count rate to absolute concentration. Coincident photon detection also has the potential of reducing the background compared to direct positron detection, thereby increasing the minimum detectable isotope concentration. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Prescribed Active Learning Increases Performance in Introductory Biology

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Eileen; Parks, John W.; Cunningham, Matthew; Hurley, David; Haak, David; Dirks, Clarissa; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2007-01-01

    We tested five course designs that varied in the structure of daily and weekly active-learning exercises in an attempt to lower the traditionally high failure rate in a gateway course for biology majors. Students were given daily multiple-choice questions and answered with electronic response devices (clickers) or cards. Card responses were ungraded; clicker responses were graded for right/wrong answers or participation. Weekly practice exams were done as an individual or as part of a study group. Compared with previous versions of the same course taught by the same instructor, students in the new course designs performed better: There were significantly lower failure rates, higher total exam points, and higher scores on an identical midterm. Attendance was higher in the clicker versus cards section; attendance and course grade were positively correlated. Students did better on clicker questions if they were graded for right/wrong answers versus participation, although this improvement did not translate into increased scores on exams. In this course, achievement increases when students get regular practice via prescribed (graded) active-learning exercises. PMID:17548875

  20. Development of High Performance CFRP/Metal Active Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, Hiroshi; Haga, Osamu; Imori, Masataka

    This paper describes development of high performance CFRP/metal active laminates mainly by investigating the kind and thickness of the metal. Various types of the laminates were made by hot-pressing of an aluminum, aluminum alloys, a stainless steel and a titanium for the metal layer as a high CTE material, a unidirectional CFRP prepreg as a low CTE/electric resistance heating material, a unidirectional KFRP prepreg as a low CTE/insulating material. The aluminum and its alloy type laminates have almost the same and the highest room temperature curvatures and they linearly change with increasing temperature up to their fabrication temperature. The curvature of the stainless steel type jumps from one to another around its fabrication temperature, whereas the titanium type causes a double curvature and its change becomes complicated. The output force of the stainless steel type attains the highest of the three under the same thickness. The aluminum type successfully increased its output force by increasing its thickness and using its alloys. The electric resistance of the CFRP layer can be used to monitor the temperature, that is, the curvature of the active laminate because the curvature is a function of temperature.

  1. Facile synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles decorated graphene oxide composite via simple solvothermal route and their photocatalytic activity on methylene blue degradation.

    PubMed

    Atchudan, Raji; Edison, Thomas Nesakumar Jebakumar Immanuel; Perumal, Suguna; Karthikeyan, Dhanapalan; Lee, Yong Rok

    2016-09-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles decorated graphene oxide (ZnO@GO) composite was synthesized by simple solvothermal method where zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles and graphene oxide (GO) were synthesized via simple thermal oxidation and Hummers method, respectively. The obtained materials were thoroughly characterized by various physico-chemical techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectrum shows the intensity of D to G value was close to one which confirms the obtained GO and ZnO@GO composite possesses moderate graphitization. TEM images shows the ZnO nanoparticles mean size of 15±5nm were dispersed over the wrinkled graphene layers. The photocatalytic performance of ZnO@GO composite on degradation of methylene blue (MB) is investigated and the results show that the GO plays an important role in the enhancement of photocatalytic performance. The synthesized ZnO@GO composite achieves a maximum degradation efficiency of 98.5% in a neutral solution under UV-light irradiation for 15min as compared with pure ZnO (degradation efficiency is 49% after 60min of irradiation) due to the increased light absorption, the reduced charge recombination with the introduction of GO. Moreover, the resulting ZnO@GO composite possesses excellent degradation efficiency as compared to ZnO nanoparticles alone on MB.

  2. Improvement of the anodic bioelectrocatalytic activity of mixed culture biofilms by a simple consecutive electrochemical selection procedure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Harnisch, Falk; Fricke, Katja; Sietmann, Rabea; Schröder, Uwe

    2008-12-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that the anodic, bioelectrocatalytic performance of wastewater inoculum based, mixed culture microbial biofilms can be considerably improved by using a consecutive, purely electrochemical selection and biofilm acclimatization procedure. The procedure may represent an alternative to a repetitive mechanical biofilm removal, re-suspension and electrochemically facilitated biofilm formation. By using the proposed technique, the bioelectrocatalytic current density was increased from the primary to the secondary biofilm from 250 microAcm(-2) to about 500 microAcm(-2); and the power density of respective microbial fuel cells could be increased from 686 mWm(-2) to 1487 mWm(-2). The electrochemical characterization of the biofilms reveals a strong similarity to Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms, which may indicate a dominating role of this bacterium in the biofilms.

  3. Cloning of the bronze locus in maize by a simple and generalizable procedure using the transposable controlling element Activator (Ac)

    PubMed Central

    Fedoroff, Nina V.; Furtek, Douglas B.; Nelson, Oliver E.

    1984-01-01

    The bronze (bz) locus of maize has been cloned by an indirect procedure utilizing the cloned transposable controlling element Activator (Ac). Restriction endonuclease fragments of maize DNA were cloned in bacteriophage λ and recombinant phage with homology to the center of the Ac element were isolated. The cloned fragments were analyzed to determine which contained sequences that were structurally identical to a previously isolated Ac element. Two such fragments were identified. Sequences flanking the Ac element were subcloned and used to probe genomic DNA from plants with well-defined mutations at the bz locus. By this means, it was established that one of the genomic clones contained a bz locus sequence. The subcloned probe fragment was then used to clone a nonmutant Bz allele of the locus. The method described here should prove useful in cloning other loci with Ac insertion mutations. Images PMID:16593478

  4. The Relationship between Amygdala Activation and Passive Exposure Time to an Aversive Cue during a Continuous Performance Task

    PubMed Central

    Strigo, Irina A.; Simmons, Alan N.; Matthews, Scott C.; Craig, Arthur D. (Bud)

    2010-01-01

    The allocation of attention modulates negative emotional processing in the amygdala. However, the role of passive exposure time to emotional signals in the modulation of amygdala activity during active task performance has not been examined. In two functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) experiments conducted in two different groups of healthy human subjects, we examined activation in the amygdala due to cued anticipation of painful stimuli while subjects performed a simple continuous performance task (CPT) with either a fixed or a parametrically varied trial duration. In the first experiment (N = 16), engagement in the CPT during a task with fixed trial duration produced the expected attenuation of amygdala activation, but close analysis suggested that the attenuation occurred during the period of active engagement in CPT, and that amygdala activity increased proportionately during the remainder of each trial, when subjects were passively exposed to the pain cue. In the second experiment (N = 12), the duration of each trial was parametrically varied, and we found that amygdala activation was linearly related to the time of passive exposure to the anticipatory cue. We suggest that amygdala activation during negative anticipatory processing depends directly on the passive exposure time to the negative cue. PMID:21124739

  5. Rice husk based porous carbon loaded with silver nanoparticles by a simple and cost-effective approach and their antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jianghu; Yang, Yunhua; Hu, Yonghui; Li, Fangbai

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we chose rice husk as raw material and synthesized successfully porous carbon loaded with silver nanoparticles (RH-Ag) composites by simple and cost-effective method. The as-prepared RH-Ag composites have a BET-specific surface area of 1996 m(2) g(-1) and result in strong capacity of bacteria adsorption. The result of antibacterial study indicated that the RH-Ag system displayed antibacterial activity that was two times better than pure Ag NPs. Our study demonstrates that the antibacterial activity of RH-Ag composites may be attributed to their strong adsorption ability with bacteria and result in the disorganization of the bacterial membrane ultrastructure. In addition, RH-Ag system was found to be durative slow-releasing of silver ions and biocompatible for human skin keratinocytes cells. In terms of these advantages, the RH-Ag composites have potential application in antibacterial infections and therapy.

  6. A simple microplate-based method for the determination of α-amylase activity using the glucose assay kit (GOD method).

    PubMed

    Visvanathan, Rizliya; Jayathilake, Chathuni; Liyanage, Ruvini

    2016-11-15

    For the first time, a reliable, simple, rapid and high-throughput analytical method for the detection and quantification of α-amylase inhibitory activity using the glucose assay kit was developed. The new method facilitates rapid screening of a large number of samples, reduces labor, time and reagents and is also suitable for kinetic studies. This method is based on the reaction of maltose with glucose oxidase (GOD) and the development of a red quinone. The test is done in microtitre plates with a total volume of 260μL and an assay time of 40min including the pre-incubation steps. The new method is tested for linearity, sensitivity, precision, reproducibility and applicability. The new method is also compared with the most commonly used 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid (DNSA) method for determining α-amylase activity.

  7. Identification of Physically Underdeveloped Pupils: Activities to Improve Their Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, Washington, DC.

    Screening tests consisting of observation procedures and simple physical exercises requiring only a chinning bar, stopwatch, and record forms are suggested for identifying pupils aged ten to seventeen who are underdeveloped in strength, flexibility, agility, or cardiorespiratory endurance. Classes should be divided into pairs with one pupil acting…

  8. Improved PVDF membrane performance by doping extracellular polymeric substances of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yan-Fang; Huang, Bao-Cheng; Qian, Chen; Wang, Long-Fei; Yu, Han-Qing

    2017-04-15

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane has been widely applied in water and wastewater treatment because of its high mechanical strength, thermal stability and chemical resistance. However, the hydrophobic nature of PVDF membrane makes it readily fouled, substantially reducing water flux and overall membrane rejection ability. In this work, an in-situ blending modifier, i.e., extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from activated sludge, was used to enhance the anti-fouling ability of PVDF membrane. Results indicate that the pure water flux of the membrane and its anti-fouling performance were substantially improved by blending 8% EPS into the membrane. By introducing EPS, the membrane hydrophilicity was increased and the cross section morphology was changed when it interacted with polyvinl pyrrolidone, resulting in the formation of large cavities below the finger-like pores. In addition, the fraction of pores with a size of 100-500 nm increased, which was also beneficial to improving membrane performance. Surface thermodynamic calculations indicate the EPS-functionalized membrane had a higher cohesion free energy, implying its good pollutant rejection and anti-fouling ability. This work provides a simple, efficient and cost-effective method to improve membrane performance and also extends the applications of EPS.

  9. An Approach for Performance Assessments of Extravehicular Activity Gloves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aitchison, Lindsay; Benosn, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The Space Suit Assembly (SSA) Development Team at NASA Johnson Space Center has invested heavily in the advancement of rear-entry planetary exploration suit design but largely deferred development of extravehicular activity (EVA) glove designs, and accepted the risk of using the current flight gloves, Phase VI, for unique mission scenarios outside the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) Program realm of experience. However, as design reference missions mature, the risks of using heritage hardware have highlighted the need for developing robust new glove technologies. To address the technology gap, the NASA Game-Changing Technology group provided start-up funding for the High Performance EVA Glove (HPEG) Project in the spring of 2012. The overarching goal of the HPEG Project is to develop a robust glove design that increases human performance during EVA and creates pathway for future implementation of emergent technologies, with specific aims of increasing pressurized mobility to 60% of barehanded capability, increasing the durability by 100%, and decreasing the potential of gloves to cause injury during use. The HPEG Project focused initial efforts on identifying potential new technologies and benchmarking the performance of current state of the art gloves to identify trends in design and fit leading to establish standards and metrics against which emerging technologies can be assessed at both the component and assembly levels. The first of the benchmarking tests evaluated the quantitative mobility performance and subjective fit of two sets of prototype EVA gloves developed ILC Dover and David Clark Company as compared to the Phase VI. Both companies were asked to design and fabricate gloves to the same set of NASA provided hand measurements (which corresponded to a single size of Phase Vi glove) and focus their efforts on improving mobility in the metacarpal phalangeal and carpometacarpal joints. Four test subjects representing the design-to hand

  10. A Simple Green Synthesis of Palladium Nanoparticles with Sargassum Alga and Their Electrocatalytic Activities Towards Hydrogen Peroxide.

    PubMed

    Momeni, S; Nabipour, I

    2015-08-01

    This study presents the synthesis of palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs) using the extract derived from the marine alga, Sargassum bovinum, collected from Persian Gulf area. Water-soluble compounds that exist in the marine alga extract were the main cause of the reduction of palladium ions to Pd nanoparticles. The basic properties of PdNPs produced in this method were confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). TEM confirmed the monodispersed and octahedral shape of PdNPs within the size ranges from 5 to 10 nm. Catalytic performance of the biosynthetic PdNPs was investigated by electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). PdNP-modified carbon ionic liquid electrode (PdNPs/CILE) was developed as a nonenzymatic sensor for the determination of hydrogen peroxide. Amperometric measurements showed that PdNPs/CILE is a reliable sensor for the detection of hydrogen peroxide in the range of 5.0 μM-15.0 mM with a sensitivity of 284.35 mAmM(-1) cm(-2) and a detection limit of 1.0 μM. Moreover, PdNPs/CILE exhibits a wide linear range, high sensitivity and selectivity, and excellent stability for the detection of H2O2 in aqueous solutions.

  11. Active load path adaption in a simple kinematic load-bearing structure due to stiffness change in the structure's supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehb, C. M.; Platz, R.; Melz, T.

    2016-09-01

    Load-bearing structures with kinematic functions enable and disable degrees of freedom and are part of many mechanical engineering applications. The relative movement between a wheel and the body of a car or a landing gear and an aircraft fuselage are examples for load-bearing systems with defined kinematics. In most cases, the load is transmitted through a predetermined load path to the structural support interfaces. However, unexpected load peaks or varying health condition of the system's supports, which means for example varying damping and stiffness characteristics, may require an active adjustment of the load path. However, load paths transmitted through damaged or weakened supports can be the reason for reduced comfort or even failure. In this paper a simplified 2D two mass oscillator with two supports is used to numerically investigate the potential of controlled adaptive auxiliary kinematic guidance elements in a load-bearing structure to adapt the load path depending on the stiffness change, representing damage of the supports. The aim is to provide additional forces in the auxiliary kinematic guidance elements for two reasons. On the one hand, one of the two supports that may become weaker through stiffness change will be relieved from higher loading. On the other hand, tilting due to different compliance in the supports will be minimized. Therefore, shifting load between the supports during operation could be an effective option.

  12. Reuse performance of granular-activated carbon and activated carbon fiber in catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shiying; Li, Lei; Xiao, Tuo; Zhang, Jun; Shao, Xueting

    2017-03-01

    Recently, activated carbon was investigated as an efficient heterogeneous metal-free catalyst to directly activate peroxymonosulfate (PMS) for degradation of organic compounds. In this paper, the reuse performance and the possible deactivation reasons of granular-activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fiber (ACF) in PMS activation were investigated. As results indicated, the reusability of GAC, especially in the presence of high PMS dosage, was relatively superior to ACF in catalyzed PMS oxidation of Acid Orange 7 (AO7), which is much more easily adsorbed by ACF than by GAC. Pre-oxidation experiments were studied and it was demonstrated that PMS oxidation on ACF would retard ACF's deactivation to a big extent. After pre-adsorption with AO7, the catalytic ability of both GAC and ACF evidently diminished. However, when methanol was employed to extract the AO7-spent ACF, the catalytic ability could recover quite a bit. GAC and ACF could also effectively catalyze PMS to degrade Reactive Black 5 (RB5), which is very difficult to be adsorbed even by ACF, but both GAC and ACF have poor reuse performance for RB5 degradation. The original organic compounds or intermediate products adsorbed by GAC or ACF would be possibly responsible for the deactivation.

  13. Can the evaluation of a simple test object be used to predict the performance of a contrast-detail analysis in digital mammography?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosmans, H.; Lemmens, K.; Jacobs, J.; Vandenbroucke, D.; Zanca, F.; Michielsen, K.; Verbrugge, B.; Smans, K.; Marchal, G.

    2009-02-01

    The purpose was to find the correlation between a Figure of Merit (FoM) calculated from a new (simple) test object for Quality Control in digital mammography and CDMAM threshold thicknesses. The FoM included the signal difference to noise ratio, modulation transfer function of the complete system (including scatter and grid) and normalized noise power spectrum. The pre-programmed exposure settings for clinical work were used, as was done for the CDMAM acquisitions. The FoM is calculated from 2 images only (an image from the QC test object and an image of a corresponding homogeneous plate imaged with the same exposure settings). This FoM was evaluated in frequencies that match with the diameters of the gold disks in the CDMAM phantom. Computerized CDMAM analysis uses 16 images per system. The software program "cdcom" (www.euref.org) was used for the 4-AFC experiment. All matrices were averaged, smoothed with a Gaussian filter and psychometric curves were fitted through the correctly detected fractions to obtain the threshold thickness with a detectability of 62.5% for all diameters. Images have been acquired on 10 different systems (2 computed radiography (CR) systems, 6 direct radiology (DR) systems and 2 photon counting systems). The reproducibility of the QC metrics from images of the new phantom was assessed. The standard error on the mean of the FoM was for the highest frequency 8.1% for a CR system and 5.6% for a DR system. The main component in this error is due to the NNPS and the limited number of independent pixels used in this analysis. Parameters calculated from both phantoms are sensitive to variation in mean glandular dose levels. Present results show a weak correlation (R2=0.60) between the FoM at 5lp/mm and CDMAM threshold values for the 0.1mm objects when all system data are pooled. If evaluated for separate systems, the correlation holds promise for automated, periodic performance evaluations of digital mammography systems with the simplified

  14. Performance of active vibration control technology: the ACTEX flight experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nye, T. W.; Manning, R. A.; Qassim, K.

    1999-12-01

    This paper discusses the development and results of two intelligent structures space-flight experiments, each of which could affect architecture designs of future spacecraft. The first, the advanced controls technology experiment I (ACTEX I), is a variable stiffness tripod structure riding as a secondary payload on a classified spacecraft. It has been operating well past its expected life since becoming operational in 1996. Over 60 on-orbit experiments have been run on the ACTEX I flight experiment. These experiments form the basis for in-space controller design problems and for concluding lifetime/reliability data on the active control components. Transfer functions taken during the life of ACTEX I have shown consistent predictability and stability in structural behavior, including consistency with those measurements taken on the ground prior to a three year storage period and the launch event. ACTEX I can change its modal characteristics by employing its dynamic change mechanism that varies preloads in portions of its structure. Active control experiments have demonstrated maximum vibration reductions of 29 dB and 16 dB in the first two variable modes of the system, while operating over a remarkable on-orbit temperature range of -80 °C to 129 °C. The second experiment, ACTEX II, was successfully designed, ground-tested, and integrated on an experimental Department of Defense satellite prior to its loss during a launch vehicle failure in 1995. ACTEX II also had variable modal behavior by virtue of a two-axis gimbal and added challenges of structural flexibility by being a large deployable appendage. Although the loss of ACTEX II did not provide space environment experience, ground testing resulted in space qualifying the hardware and demonstrated 21 dB, 14 dB, and 8 dB reductions in amplitude of the first three primary structural modes. ACTEX II could use either active and/or passive techniques to affect vibration suppression. Both experiments trailblazed

  15. A simple optical model to estimate diffuse attenuation coefficient of photosynthetically active radiation in an extremely turbid lake from surface reflectance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunlin; Liu, Xiaohan; Yin, Yan; Wang, Mingzhu; Qin, Boqiang

    2012-08-27

    Accurate estimation of the diffuse attenuation coefficient is critical for our understanding and modelling of key physical, chemical, and biological processes in water bodies. For extremely turbid, shallow, Lake Taihu in China, we synchronously monitored the diffuse attenuation coefficient of photosynthetically active radiation (Kd(PAR)) and the remote sensing reflectance at 134 sites. Kd(PAR)) varied greatly among different sites from 1.62 to 14.68 m(-1) with a mean value of 5.62 ± 2.99 m(-1). A simple optical model from near-infrared remote sensing reflectance of MODIS channels 2 (859 nm) and 15 (748 nm) was calibrated, and validated, to estimate Kd(PAR). With the simple optical model, the root mean square error and mean relative error were 0.95 m(-1) and 17.0% respectively at 748 nm, and 0.98 m(-1) and 17.6% at 859 nm, based on an independent validation data set. Our results showed a good precision of estimation for Kd(PAR) using the new simple optical model, contrasting with the poor estimations derived from existing empirical and semi-analytical models developed in clear, open ocean waters or slightly turbid coastal waters. Although at 748 nm the model had slightly higher precision than at 859 nm, the spatial resolution at 859 nm was four times that at 748 nm. Therefore, we propose a new model based on the MODIS-derived normalized water-leaving radiances at a wavelength of 859 nm, for accurate retrieval of Kd(PAR) in extremely turbid, shallow lakes with Kd(PAR) larger than 1.5 m(-1).

  16. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Reveals a Temporal Cascade of Task-Related and Default-Mode Activations During a Simple Target Detection Task

    PubMed Central

    Walz, Jennifer M.; Goldman, Robin I.; Carapezza, Michael; Muraskin, Jordan; Brown, Truman R.; Sajda, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Focused attention continuously and inevitably fluctuates, and to completely understand the mechanisms responsible for these modulations it is necessary to localize the brain regions involved. During a simple visual oddball task, neural responses measured by electroencephalography (EEG) modulate primarily with attention, but source localization of the correlates is a challenge. In this study we use single-trial analysis of simultaneously-acquired scalp EEG and functional magnetic resonance image (fMRI) data to investigate the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) correlates of modulations in task-related attention, and we unravel the temporal cascade of these transient activations. We hypothesize that activity in brain regions associated with various task-related cognitive processes modulates with attention, and that their involvements occur transiently in a specific order. We analyze the fMRI BOLD signal by first regressing out the variance linked to observed stimulus and behavioral events. We then correlate the residual variance with the trial-to-trial variation of EEG discriminating components for identical stimuli, estimated at a sequence of times during a trial. Post-stimulus and early in the trial, we find activations in right-lateralized frontal regions and lateral occipital cortex, areas that are often linked to task-dependent processes, such as attentional orienting, and decision certainty. After the behavioral response we see correlates in areas often associated with the default-mode network and introspective processing, including precuneus, angular gyri, and posterior cingulate cortex. Our results demonstrate that during simple tasks both task-dependent and default-mode networks are transiently engaged, with a distinct temporal ordering and millisecond timescale. PMID:23962956

  17. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI reveals a temporal cascade of task-related and default-mode activations during a simple target detection task.

    PubMed

    Walz, Jennifer M; Goldman, Robin I; Carapezza, Michael; Muraskin, Jordan; Brown, Truman R; Sajda, Paul

    2014-11-15

    Focused attention continuously and inevitably fluctuates, and to completely understand the mechanisms responsible for these modulations it is necessary to localize the brain regions involved. During a simple visual oddball task, neural responses measured by electroencephalography (EEG) modulate primarily with attention, but source localization of the correlates is a challenge. In this study we use single-trial analysis of simultaneously-acquired scalp EEG and functional magnetic resonance image (fMRI) data to investigate the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) correlates of modulations in task-related attention, and we unravel the temporal cascade of these transient activations. We hypothesize that activity in brain regions associated with various task-related cognitive processes modulates with attention, and that their involvements occur transiently in a specific order. We analyze the fMRI BOLD signal by first regressing out the variance linked to observed stimulus and behavioral events. We then correlate the residual variance with the trial-to-trial variation of EEG discriminating components for identical stimuli, estimated at a sequence of times during a trial. Post-stimulus and early in the trial, we find activations in right-lateralized frontal regions and lateral occipital cortex, areas that are often linked to task-dependent processes, such as attentional orienting, and decision certainty. After the behavioral response we see correlates in areas often associated with the default-mode network and introspective processing, including precuneus, angular gyri, and posterior cingulate cortex. Our results demonstrate that during simple tasks both task-dependent and default-mode networks are transiently engaged, with a distinct temporal ordering and millisecond timescale.

  18. Simple one step synthesis of nonionic dithiol surfactants and their self-assembling with silver nanoparticles: Characterization, surface properties, biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd-Elaal, Ali A.; Tawfik, Salah M.; Shaban, Samy M.

    2015-07-01

    Simple esterification of 2-mercaptoacetic acid and polyethylene glycol with different molecular weights was done to form the desired nonionic dithiol surfactants. The chemical structures of synthesized thiol surfactants were confirmed using FT-IR and 1H NMR spectra. The surface activity of the synthesized surfactants was determined by measurement of the surface tension at different temperatures. The surface activity measurements showed their high tendency towards adsorption and micellization. The thermodynamic parameters of micellization (ΔGmic, ΔHmic and ΔSmic) and adsorption (ΔGads, ΔGads and ΔSads) showed their tendency toward adsorption at the interfaces and also micellization in the bulk of their solutions. The nanostructure of the synthesized nonionic dithiol surfactants with silver nanoparticles was prepared and investigated using UV and TEM techniques. Screening tests of the synthesized dithiol surfactants and their nanostructure with silver nanoparticles, against gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Microccus luteus), gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Bordatella pertussis) and fungi (Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans) showed that they are highly active biocides. The presence of silver nanoparticles enhancement the biological activities of the individual synthesized nonionic dithiol surfactants.

  19. Regression-based prediction of net energy expenditure in children performing activities at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Sarton-Miller, Isabelle; Holman, Darryl J; Spielvogel, Hilde

    2003-01-01

    We developed a simple, non-invasive, and affordable method for estimating net energy expenditure (EE) in children performing activities at high altitude. A regression-based method predicts net oxygen consumption (VO(2)) from net heart rate (HR) along with several covariates. The method is atypical in that, the "net" measures are taken as the difference between exercise and resting VO(2) (DeltaVO(2)) and the difference between exercise and resting HR (DeltaHR); DeltaVO(2) partially corrects for resting metabolic rate and for posture, and DeltaHR controls for inter-individual variation in physiology and for posture. Twenty children between 8 and 13 years of age, born and raised in La Paz, Bolivia (altitude 3,600m), made up the reference sample. Anthropometric measures were taken, and VO(2) was assessed while the children performed graded exercise tests on a cycle ergometer. A repeated-measures prediction equation was developed, and maximum likelihood estimates of parameters were found from 75 observations on 20 children. The final model included the variables DeltaHR, DeltaHR(2), weight, and sex. The effectiveness of the method was established using leave-one-out cross-validation, yielding a prediction error rate of 0.126 for a mean DeltaVO(2) of 0.693 (SD 0.315). The correlation between the predicted and measured DeltaVO(2) was r = 0.917, suggesting that a useful prediction equation can be produced using paired VO(2) and HR measurements on a relatively small reference sample. The resulting prediction equation can be used for estimating EE from HR in free-living children performing habitual activities in the Bolivian Andes.

  20. Influence of activated carbon porosity and surface oxygen functionalities' presence on adsorption of acetonitrile as a simple polar volatile organic compound.

    PubMed

    Furmaniak, Sylwester

    2015-01-01

    Based on series of porous carbon models, systematic Monte Carlo studies on the adsorption of acetonitrile (as a simple representative of polar volatile organic compounds) were performed. The influence of porosity and chemical composition of the carbon surface on CH3CN adsorption was studied and it was shown that both the factors influenced the adsorption mechanism. A decrease in the pore size and the introduction of oxygen surface groups led to a rise in adsorption energy and to an increase in the filling of accessible volume in the low-pressure part of the isotherm. However, from a practical point of view, it is easier to increase the adsorption by introducing polar groups on the carbon surface than by modifying the porosity.

  1. Automated ambulatory assessment of cognitive performance, environmental conditions, and motor activity during military operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, Harris R.; Kramer, F. Matthew; Montain, Scott J.; Niro, Philip; Young, Andrew J.

    2005-05-01

    Until recently scientists had limited opportunities to study human cognitive performance in non-laboratory, fully ambulatory situations. Recently, advances in technology have made it possible to extend behavioral assessment to the field environment. One of the first devices to measure human behavior in the field was the wrist-worn actigraph. This device, now widely employed, can acquire minute-by-minute information on an individual"s level of motor activity. Actigraphs can, with reasonable accuracy, distinguish sleep from waking, the most critical and basic aspect of human behavior. However, rapid technologic advances have provided the opportunity to collect much more information from fully ambulatory humans. Our laboratory has developed a series of wrist-worn devices, which are not much larger then a watch, which can assess simple and choice reaction time, vigilance and memory. In addition, the devices can concurrently assess motor activity with much greater temporal resolution then the standard actigraph. Furthermore, they continuously monitor multiple environmental variables including temperature, humidity, sound and light. We have employed these monitors during training and simulated military operations to collect information that would typically be unavailable under such circumstances. In this paper we will describe various versions of the vigilance monitor and how each successive version extended the capabilities of the device. Samples of data from several studies are presented, included studies conducted in harsh field environments during simulated infantry assaults, a Marine Corps Officer training course and mechanized infantry (Stryker) operations. The monitors have been useful for documenting environmental conditions experienced by wearers, studying patterns of sleep and activity and examining the effects of nutritional manipulations on warfighter performance.

  2. The Expression of a Xylanase Targeted to ER-Protein Bodies Provides a Simple Strategy to Produce Active Insoluble Enzyme Polymers in Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Llop-Tous, Immaculada; Ortiz, Miriam; Torrent, Margarita; Ludevid, M. Dolors

    2011-01-01

    Background Xylanases deserve particular attention due to their potential application in the feed, pulp bleaching and paper industries. We have developed here an efficient system for the production of an active xylanase in tobacco plants fused to a proline-rich domain (Zera) of the maize storage protein γ-zein. Zera is a self-assembling domain able to form protein aggregates in vivo packed in newly formed endoplasmic reticulum-derived organelles known as protein bodies (PBs). Methodology/Principal Findings Tobacco leaves were transiently transformed with a binary vector containing the Zera-xylanase coding region, which was optimized for plant expression, under the control of the 35S CaMV promoter. The fusion protein was efficiently expressed and stored in dense PBs, resulting in yields of up to 9% of total protein. Zera-xylanase was post-translationally modified with high-mannose-type glycans. Xylanase fused to Zera was biologically active not only when solubilized from PBs but also in its insoluble form. The resistance of insoluble Zera-xylanase to trypsin digestion demonstrated that the correct folding of xylanase in PBs was not impaired by Zera oligomerization. The activity of insoluble Zera-xylanase was enhanced when substrate accessibility was facilitated by physical treatments such as ultrasound. Moreover, we found that the thermostability of the enzyme was improved when Zera was fused to the C-terminus of xylanase. Conclusion/Significance In the present work we have successfully produced an active insoluble aggregate of xylanase fused to Zera in plants. Zera-xylanase chimeric protein accumulates within ER-derived protein bodies as active aggregates that can easily be recovered by a simple density-based downstream process. The production of insoluble active Zera-xylanase protein in tobacco outlines the potential of Zera as a fusion partner for producing enzymes of biotechnological relevance. Zera-PBs could thus become efficient and low-cost bioreactors for

  3. Plasma levels of soluble CD27: a simple marker to monitor immune activation during potent antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected subjects

    PubMed Central

    DE MILITO, A; ALEMAN, S; MARENZI, R; SÖNNERBORG, A; FUCHS, D; ZAZZI, M; CHIODI, F

    2002-01-01

    Plasma levels of soluble CD27 (sCD27) are elevated in diseases characterized by T cell activation and are used as a marker of immune activation. We assessed the usefulness of determining plasma sCD27 as a marker for monitoring immune activation in HIV-1-infected patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). A first cross-sectional examination of 68 HIV-1-infected and 18 normal subjects showed high levels of sCD27 in HIV-1 infection; plasma sCD27 was correlated to HIV-1 viraemia and inversely correlated to CD4+ T cell count. Twenty-six HIV-1-infected patients undergoing HAART were studied at baseline and after 6, 12, 18 and 24 months of therapy. Seven additional patients under HAART were analysed at baseline, during and after interruption of therapy. In the total population, HAART induced a significant and progressive reduction, but not a normalization, of plasma levels of sCD27 after 24 months. A full normalization of plasma sCD27 was observed in the virological responders (undetectable HIV-1 RNA at months 18 and 24) and also in patients with moderate immunodeficiency at baseline (CD4+ T cell count >200 cells/mm3). Changes in plasma neopterin paralleled the changes in sCD27 but only baseline sCD27 levels were predictive of a greater increase in CD4+ T cell count during the follow-up. Discontinuation of therapy resulted in a rapid increase of sCD27 plasma levels associated with viraemia rebound and drop in CD4+ T cell count. Our findings suggest that plasma sCD27 may represent an alternative and simple marker to monitor immune activation during potent antiretroviral therapy. HIV-1-induced immune activation can be normalized by HAART in successfully treated patients where the disease is not advanced. PMID:11966765

  4. A simple fluorescent probe for the determination of dissolved oxygen based on the catalytic activation of oxygen by iron(II) chelates.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Abbas, M E; Zhu, Lihua; Zhou, Wenyi; Li, Kejing; Tang, Heqing; Liu, Shushen; Li, Weiying

    2009-04-27

    This work aims at establishing a simple fluorescent probe for the determination of dissolved oxygen. It is found that iron(II) ions activate oxygen to produce reactive species being capable of oxidizing non-fluorescent coumarin to fluorescent 7-hydroxycoumarin. However, this process is not effective because the yield of the reactive species is very low in the presence of simple iron(II) salts alone. The addition of organic ligands such as oxalate results in the formation of complexes between iron(II) ions, which leads to considerable increase in the yield of reactive species (such as hydroxyl radicals) and then increase in the fluorescence intensity of 7-hydroxycoumarin to a significant level. It has been observed that in the mixture solution of iron(II) ions, ligand, coumarin, and dissolved oxygen, there is an excellent linear response between the fluorescence and dissolved oxygen. Therefore, a new spectrofluorimetric method has been proposed for the determination of dissolved oxygen by using catalytic activation of O(2) by iron(II) chelates. Under optimized conditions, a linear correlation (r=0.995) has been observed between the fluorescence intensity of 7-hydroxycoumarin at 456 nm and the concentration of dissolved oxygen over the range of 0.96-9.22 mg L(-1). The limit of detection for dissolved oxygen at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 has been estimated to be 0.35 mg L(-1). The proposed method has been applied to determine the concentration of dissolved oxygen in practical water samples with results as satisfactory as that obtained by the standard iodometric method.

  5. Lithium Iron Phosphate Cell Performance Evaluations for Lunar Extravehicular Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha

    2007-01-01

    Lithium-ion battery cells are being evaluated for their ability to provide primary power and energy storage for NASA s future Exploration missions. These missions include the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, the Ares Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage, Extravehicular Activities (EVA, the advanced space suit), the Lunar Surface Ascent Module (LSAM), and the Lunar Precursor and Robotic Program (LPRP), among others. Each of these missions will have different battery requirements. Some missions may require high specific energy and high energy density, while others may require high specific power, wide operating temperature ranges, or a combination of several of these attributes. EVA is one type of mission that presents particular challenges for today s existing power sources. The Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for the advanced Lunar surface suit will be carried on an astronaut s back during eight hour long sorties, requiring a lightweight power source. Lunar sorties are also expected to occur during varying environmental conditions, requiring a power source that can operate over a wide range of temperatures. Concepts for Lunar EVAs include a primary power source for the PLSS that can recharge rapidly. A power source that can charge quickly could enable a lighter weight system that can be recharged while an astronaut is taking a short break. Preliminary results of Al23 Ml 26650 lithium iron phosphate cell performance evaluations for an advanced Lunar surface space suit application are discussed in this paper. These cells exhibit excellent recharge rate capability, however, their specific energy and energy density is lower than typical lithium-ion cell chemistries. The cells were evaluated for their ability to provide primary power in a lightweight battery system while operating at multiple temperatures.

  6. Nicotine and metabolites determination in human plasma by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: a simple approach for solving contamination problem and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Liachenko, Natalia; Boulamery, Audrey; Simon, Nicolas

    2015-10-01

    A quantitative method using ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry is described for simultaneous determination of nicotine and its metabolites (cotinine and trans-3'- hydroxycotinine) in human plasma. Aliquots of 0.25 mL of plasma specimens were used for analysis, and 3 analytes were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction. The main problem was blank plasma contamination with environmental nicotine. Activated charcoal was used to avoid this analytical interference. For optimized chromatographic performance, a basic mobile phase consisting of 0.2% ammonia in water (mobile phase A, pH10.6) and acetonitrile (mobile phase B) was selected. The analytes were separated on a 50 mm × 2.1 mm BEH C18 column, 1.7 μm particle size, and quantified by MS/MS using multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) in positive mode. The chromatographic separation was achieved in 3 min followed by 1.2 min of column equilibration. The calibration curves were linear in the concentration range of 10-1000 ng/mL with correlation coefficients exceeding 0.99. Within-day precisions and between-day precisions (CV, %) were <15 %. The accuracy expressed as bias was within ±15% for all analytes. The recovery values ranged from 50% to 97%. The ions used for quantification of nicotine, cotinine and 3-OH-cotinine were 166.9 > 129.7; 176.9 > 79.7; 192.9 > 79.7 m/z, respectively. The original blank sample preparation solved the problem of contamination in a cost-effective and efficient way. The validated method has been routinely used for analysis of nicotine and metabolites and determination of hydroxycotinine/cotinine metabolic ratio. This biomarker seems to be interesting at predicting response of nicotine patch replacement therapies.

  7. Algorithms for Performance, Dependability, and Performability Evaluation using Stochastic Activity Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deavours, Daniel D.; Qureshi, M. Akber; Sanders, William H.

    1997-01-01

    Modeling tools and technologies are important for aerospace development. At the University of Illinois, we have worked on advancing the state of the art in modeling by Markov reward models in two important areas: reducing the memory necessary to numerically solve systems represented as stochastic activity networks and other stochastic Petri net extensions while still obtaining solutions in a reasonable amount of time, and finding numerically stable and memory-efficient methods to solve for the reward accumulated during a finite mission time. A long standing problem when modeling with high level formalisms such as stochastic activity networks is the so-called state space explosion, where the number of states increases exponentially with size of the high level model. Thus, the corresponding Markov model becomes prohibitively large and solution is constrained by the the size of primary memory. To reduce the memory necessary to numerically solve complex systems, we propose new methods that can tolerate such large state spaces that do not require any special structure in the model (as many other techniques do). First, we develop methods that generate row and columns of the state transition-rate-matrix on-the-fly, eliminating the need to explicitly store the matrix at all. Next, we introduce a new iterative solution method, called modified adaptive Gauss-Seidel, that exhibits locality in its use of data from the state transition-rate-matrix, permitting us to cache portions of the matrix and hence reduce the solution time. Finally, we develop a new memory and computationally efficient technique for Gauss-Seidel based solvers that avoids the need for generating rows of A in order to solve Ax = b. This is a significant performance improvement for on-the-fly methods as well as other recent solution techniques based on Kronecker operators. Taken together, these new results show that one can solve very large models without any special structure.

  8. The performance of integrated active fiber composites in carbon fiber laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnykowycz, M.; Brunner, A. J.

    2011-07-01

    Piezoelectric elements integrated into fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix laminates can provide various functions in the resulting adaptive or smart composite. Active fiber composites (AFC) composed of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) fibers can be used as a component in a smart material system, and can be easily integrated into woven composites. However, the impact of integration on the device and its functionality has not been fully investigated. The current work focuses on the integration and performance of AFC integrated into carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminates, focusing on the strain sensor performance of the AFC-CFRP laminate under tensile loading conditions. AFC were integrated into cross-ply CFRP laminates using simple insertion and interlacing of the CFRP plies, with the AFC always placed in the 90° ply cutout area. Test specimens were strained to different strain levels and then cycled with a 0.01% strain amplitude, and the resulting signal from the AFC was monitored. Acoustic emission monitoring was performed during tensile testing to provide insight to the failure characteristics of the PZT fibers. The results were compared to those from past studies on AFC integration; the strain signal of AFC integrated into CFRP was much lower than that for AFC integrated into woven glass fiber laminates. However, the profiles of the degradations of the AFC signal resulting from the strain were nearly identical, showing that the PZT fibers fragmented in a similar manner for a given global strain. The sensor performance recovered upon unloading, which is attributed to the closure of cracks between PZT fiber fragments.

  9. Activation in a frontoparietal cortical network underlies individual differences in the performance of an embedded figures task.

    PubMed

    Walter, Elizabeth; Dassonville, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The Embedded Figures Test (EFT) requires observers to search for a simple geometric shape hidden inside a more complex figure. Surprisingly, performance in the EFT is negatively correlated with susceptibility to illusions of spatial orientation, such as the Roelofs effect. Using fMRI, we previously demonstrated that regions in parietal cortex are involved in the contextual processing associated with the Roelofs task. In the present study, we found that similar parietal regions (superior parietal cortex and precuneus) were more active during the EFT than during a simple matching task. Importantly, these parietal activations overlapped with regions found to be involved during contextual processing in the Roelofs illusion. Additional parietal and frontal areas, in the right hemisphere, showed strong correlations between brain activity and behavioral performance during the search task. We propose that the posterior parietal regions are necessary for processing contextual information across many different, but related visuospatial tasks, with additional parietal and frontal regions serving to coordinate this processing in participants proficient in the task.

  10. Sputtering TiO2 on LiCoO2 composite electrodes as a simple and effective coating to enhance high-voltage cathode performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Aijun; Lu, Yanting; Wang, Qingji; Xu, Jin; Wang, Weihang; Dai, Xinyi; Li, Jingze

    2017-04-01

    Surface coating is a key strategy in lithium-ion battery technologies to achieve a high and stable battery performance. Increasing the operation voltage is a direct way to increase the energy density of the battery. In this work, TiO2 is directly sputtered on as-fabricated LiCoO2 composite electrodes, enabling a controllable oxide coating on the topmost of the electrode. With an optimum coating, the discharge capacity is able to reach 160 mAh g-1 (86.5% retention) after 100 cycles within 3.0-4.5 V at 1 C, which is increased by 40% compared to that of the bare electrode. The high-voltage rate capability of LiCoO2 is also remarkably enhanced after TiO2-coating as reflected by the much larger capacity at 10 C (109 vs. 74 mAh g-1). The artificially introduced oxide coating is believed to make the LiCoO2 electrode more resistant to interfacial side reactions at high voltage and thus minimizes the irreversible loss of the active material upon long cycling. The TiO2 coating layer is also possible to partially react with the decomposition product of electrolyte (e.g. HF) and form a more stable and conductive interphase containing TiFx, which is responsible for the improvement of the rate capability.

  11. The effect of malathion on the activity, performance, and microbial ecology of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Rauglas, Erik; Martin, Seth; Bailey, Kandace; Magnuson, Matthew; Phillips, Rebecca; Harper, Willie F

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of a VX (O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate) surrogate (malathion) on the activity, performance, and ecology of activated sludge bioreactors. In the presence of malathion, the maximum observed respiration rates varied between 43 and 53 μg/O2 min, generally similar to the 49 μg O2/min rates observed in controls. Malathion did not alter the respiration ratio of O2 consumed-to-CO2 produced nor did it impact the shape of the oxygen consumption curves during respirometry. Shorter term (12 h) batch tests showed that both chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia removal were not negatively impacted by the presence of 0.1-3 mg/L malathion. Longer term continuous addition (i.e. 40 days) of 0.1 mg/L of malathion also had no effect on COD and ammonia removal. In contrast to shorter term exposures, longer term continuous addition of 3 mg/L of malathion negatively impacted both COD and nitrogen removal and was associated with shifts in the abundance of species that are common to activated sludge. These results illustrate the impact that chemicals like malathion may have on COD removal, and nitrification, as well as the robustness of activated sludge microbial communities.

  12. The Impact of Employment and Physical Activity on Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreopoulos, Giuliana Campanelli; Antoniou, Eliana; Panayides, Alexandros; Vassiliou, Evros

    2008-01-01

    Over the last twenty years, many contributions appeared on the relationship between working during school and academic performance using both quantitative and qualitative research methods. The obvious assumption is that a full time working student will show a lower academic performance relatively to a part time working student or a full time…

  13. A simple method for analyzing actives in random RNAi screens: introducing the “H Score” for hit nomination & gene prioritization

    PubMed Central

    Bhinder, Bhavneet; Djaballah, Hakim

    2013-01-01

    Due to the numerous challenges in hit identification from random RNAi screening, we have examined current practices with a discovery of a variety of methodologies employed and published in many reports; majority of them, unfortunately, do not address the minimum associated criteria for hit nomination, as this could potentially have been the cause or may well be the explanation as to the lack of confirmation and follow up studies, currently facing the RNAi field. Overall, we find that these criteria or parameters are not well defined, in most cases arbitrary in nature, and hence rendering it extremely difficult to judge the quality of and confidence in nominated hits across published studies. For this purpose, we have developed a simple method to score actives independent of assay readout; and provide, for the first time, a homogenous platform enabling cross-comparison of active gene lists resulting from different RNAi screening technologies. Here, we report on our recently developed method dedicated to RNAi data output analysis referred to as the BDA method applicable to both arrayed and pooled RNAi technologies; wherein the concerns pertaining to inconsistent hit nomination and off-target silencing in conjugation with minimal activity criteria to identify a high value target are addressed. In this report, a combined hit rate per gene, called “H score”, is introduced and defined. The H score provides a very useful tool for stringent active gene nomination, gene list comparison across multiple studies, prioritization of hits, and evaluation of the quality of the nominated gene hits. PMID:22934950

  14. Simple SAR demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulpa, Krzysztof; Misiurewicz, Jacek; Baranowski, Piotr; Wojdołowicz, Grzegorz

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a simple SAR radar demonstrator build using commercially available (COTS) components. For the microwave analog front end, a standard police radar microwave head has been used. The Motorola DSP processor board, equipped with ADC and DAC, has been used for generating of modulating signal and for signal acquisition. The raw radar signal (I and Q components) have been recorded on 2.5" HDD. The signal processing has been performed on standard PC computer after copying the recorded data. The aim of constructing simple and relatively cheap demonstrator was to provide the students the real-life unclassified radar signals and motivate them to test and develop various kinds of SAR and ISAR algorithms, including image formation, motion compensation and autofocusing. The simple microwave frontend hardware has a lot of non-idealities, so for obtaining nice SAR image it was necessary to develop the number of correction algorithms at the calibration stage. The SAR demonstrator have been tested using car as a moving platform. The flight tests with a small airborne platform are planned for the summer.

  15. Soil climate and decomposer activity in Sub-Saharan Africa estimated from standard weather station data: a simple climate index for soil carbon balance calculations.

    PubMed

    Andrén, Olof; Kihara, Job; Bationo, André; Vanlauwe, Bernard; Kätterer, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    Soil biological activity was calculated on a daily basis, using standard meteorological data from African weather stations, a simple soil water model, and commonly used assumptions regarding the relations between temperature, soil water content, and biological activity. The activity factor r(e_clim) is calculated from daily soil moisture and temperature, thereby taking the daily interaction between temperature and moisture into account. Annual mean r(e_clim) was normalized to 1 in Central Sweden (clay loam soil, no crop), where the original calibration took place. Since soils vary in water storage capacity and plant cover will affect transpiration, we used this soil under no crop for all sites, thereby only including climate differences. The Swedish r(e_clim) value, 1, corresponds to ca. 50% annual mass loss of, e.g., cereal straw incorporated into the topsoil. African mean annual r(e_clim) values varied between 1.1 at a hot and dry site (Faya, Chad) and 4.7 at a warm and moist site (Brazzaville, Congo). Sites in Kenya ranged between r(e_clim) = 2.1 at high altitude (Matanya) and 4.1 in western Kenya (Ahero). This means that 4.1 times the Swedish C input to soil is necessary to maintain Swedish soil carbon levels in Ahero, if soil type and management are equal. Diagrams showing daily r(e_clim) dynamics are presented for all sites, and differences in within-year dynamics are discussed. A model experiment indicated that a Swedish soil in balance with respect to soil carbon would lose 41% of its soil carbon during 30 y, if moved to Ahero, Kenya. If the soil was in balance in Ahero with respect to soil carbon, and then moved to Sweden, soil carbon mass would increase by 64% in 30 y. The validity of the methodology and results is discussed, and r(e_clim) is compared with other climate indices. A simple method to produce a rough estimate of r(e_clim) is suggested.

  16. A simple method for preparation of Ag nanofilm used as active, stable, and biocompatible SERS substrate by using electrostatic self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Liu, Renming; Si, Minzhen; Kang, Yipu; Zi, Xingfa; Liu, Zhenquan; Zhang, Deqing

    2010-03-01

    A new SERS-active Ag nanofilm on the surface of a glass slide has been prepared by a low-cost electrochemical strategy using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) at a proper voltage. The two-dimensional morphology of the Ag nanofilm has been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The average size of the aggregated particles on the surface of the Ag nanofilm is up to ca. 200+/-50 nm, which is much larger than that of PVA-protected Ag colloidal nanoparticles (PVA-Ag CNPs, 45+/-8 nm). Meanwhile, many nano-scale regions with average sizes of ca. 300+/-50 nm are formed between the adjacent Ag nanoparticles. By the SERS measurements of human serum (HS) and hemoglobin (Hb), this Ag nanofilm is shown to be an excellent SERS substrate with good stability and biocompatibility. As the fabrication process of this SERS substrate is simple and inexpensive, this method may be used in large-scale preparation of substrates that have been widely applied in Raman analysis. In addition, this SERS-active Ag nanofilm can serve as a novel SERS substrate in biochemical analysis due to the biocompatibility.

  17. Final Report: Performance Modeling Activities in PERC2

    SciTech Connect

    Allan Snavely

    2007-02-25

    Progress in Performance Modeling for PERC2 resulted in: • Automated modeling tools that are robust, able to characterize large applications running at scale while simultaneously simulating the memory hierarchies of mul-tiple machines in parallel. • Porting of the requisite tracer tools to multiple platforms. • Improved performance models by using higher resolution memory models that ever before. • Adding control-flow and data dependency analysis to the tracers used in perform-ance tools. • Exploring and developing several new modeling methodologies. • Using modeling tools to develop performance models for strategic codes. • Application of modeling methodology to make a large number of “blind” per-formance predictions on certain mission partner applications, targeting most cur-rently available system architectures. • Error analysis to correct some systematic biases encountered as part of the large-scale blind prediction exercises. • Addition of instrumentation capabilities for communication libraries other than MPI. • Dissemination the tools and modeling methods to several mission partners, in-cluding DoD HPCMO and two DARPA HPCS vendors (Cray and IBM), as well as to the wider HPC community via a series of tutorials.

  18. Metabolic and Biomechanical Measures of Gait Efficiency of Three Multi-Axial, Vertical Shock and Energy Storing-Return Prosthetic Feet During Simple and Complex Mobility Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    three different multi-function prosthetic feet (vertical shock, torsion control, multiaxial and energy storing). At this time, the study is still...function prosthetic feet (vertical shock, torsion control, multiaxial and energy storing). Subjects will be recruited based on a history of active...bioenergetic differences exist between feet conditions during the performance of a field Obstacle Course in total and per obstacle. Aim 5: To

  19. Effect of pre-acclimation of granular activated carbon on microbial electrolysis cell startup and performance.

    PubMed

    LaBarge, Nicole; Yilmazel, Yasemin Dilsad; Hong, Pei-Ying; Logan, Bruce E

    2017-02-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can generate methane by fixing carbon dioxide without using expensive catalysts, but the impact of acclimation procedures on subsequent performance has not been investigated. Granular activated carbon (GAC) was used to pre-enrich electrotrophic methanogenic communities, as GAC has been shown to stimulate direct transfer of electrons between different microbial species. MEC startup times using pre-acclimated GAC were improved compared to controls (without pre-acclimation or without GAC), and after three fed batch cycles methane generation rates were similar (P>0.4) for GAC acclimated to hydrogen (22±9.3nmolcm(-3)d(-1)), methanol (25±9.7nmolcm(-3)d(-1)), and a volatile fatty acid (VFA) mix (22±11nmolcm(-3)d(-1)). However, MECs started with GAC but no pre-acclimation had lower methane generation rates (13±4.1nmolcm(-3)d(-1)), and MECs without GAC had the lowest rates (0.7±0.8nmolcm(-3)d(-1) after cycle 2). Microbes previously found in methanogenic MECs, or previously shown to be capable of exocellular electron transfer, were enriched on the GAC. Pre-acclimation using GAC is therefore a simple approach to enrich electroactive communities, improve methane generation rates, and decrease startup times in MECs.

  20. Aberrant functional activation in school age children at-risk for mathematical disability: A functional imaging study of simple arithmetic skill

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Nicole; Cannistraci, Christopher J.; Rogers, Baxter P.; Gatenby, J. Christopher; Fuchs, Lynn S.; Anderson, Adam W.; Gore, John C.

    2009-01-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to explore the patterns of brain activation associated with different levels of performance in exact and approximate calculation tasks in well defined cohorts of children with mathematical calculation difficulties (MD) and typically developing controls. Both groups of children activated the same network of brain regions; however, children in the MD group had significantly increased activation in parietal, frontal, and cingulate cortices during both calculation tasks. A majority of the differences occurred in anatomical brain regions associated with cognitive resources such as executive functioning and working memory that are known to support higher level arithmetic skill but are not specific to mathematical processing. We propose that these findings are evidence that children with MD use the same types of problem solving strategies as TD children, but their weak mathematical processing system causes them to employ a more developmentally immature and less efficient form of the strategies. PMID:19410589

  1. Activity composition relationships in silicate melts: Annual performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Glazner, A.F.

    1987-01-01

    Work performed during the first two years of this project includes construction of furnace laboratory and calibration of instruments, installation of an electron microprobe, and determination of phase equilibria along a basalt-rhyolite mixing line. This latter study comprises the bulk of work performed to date. We completed approximately 100 experiments on the one-atmosphere phase equilibria of balalt-rhyolite mixtures. Starting materials were an alkali basalt from Pisgah Crater, California, and a high-silica rhyolite from the Bishop Tuff, Owens Valley, California. These materials were chosen because the compositional trend of the mixtures mimics many continental calc-alkaline suites. 5 figs.

  2. The performance of measurement-based simple models for the x-band complex permittivity of 370 ohms/sq. Kapton XC

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, Brian B; Whites, Kieth W; Amert, Tony

    2009-01-01

    The X-band complex permittivity of a commercially-available, carbon loaded, polyamide film is measured. Simple though approximate models are obtained which are shown to be necessary and suitable for analytic or computational modeling of thin absorbing structures realized with the thin lossy film. The utility of each model is tested against experimental results for thin high-impedance surface (HIS) enhanced Salisbury absorbers, enhanced in the sense that the HIS augmented absorber is much thinner than a conventional Salisbury absorber. Kapton XC(reg.) is a commercially-available, carbon-loaded polyamide film manufactured by Dupont(reg.). Though these films are exceptionally durable and available in a range of surface resistivities, their effective permittivity is complex valued and, therefore, their sheet impedance is frequency dependent as is typical of carbon-loaded dielectrics. We have measured the X-band complex permittivity of Kapton XC(reg.) with a manufacture's quoted direct current (DC) sheet resistivity of approximately 370 {Omega}/sq. and thicknesses of 40.0 {mu}m. This study showed the need for relatively precise knowledge of the real part of a carbon particulate loaded, lossy thin film's permittivity in order to accurately engineer the reflection coefficient of high-impedance surface enhanced electromagnetic absorbers. Specifically, simple, approximate models can be obtained for the X-band complex pennittivity of commercially available, carbon loaded, 370 {Omega}/sq., Kapton XC(reg.) thin film. These simple, approximate models can be used in the analytic modeling of high-impedance surface enhanced X-band absorbers or computational modeling of other possibly more complicated absorbing structures which are composed, in part, of 370 {Omega}/sq. Kapton XC(reg.) and designed to operate within the X-band. Finally, the results of this study illustrate the need for simgle models for calculating the complex permittivity spectra of 370 {Omega}/sq. Kapton XC

  3. Contextualizing Performances: Comparing Performances during TOEFL iBT™ and Real-Life Academic Speaking Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Lindsay; Swain, Merrill

    2014-01-01

    In this study we compare test takers' performance on the Speaking section of the TOEFL iBT™and their performances during their real-life academic studies. Thirty international graduate students from mixed language backgrounds in two different disciplines (Sciences and Social Sciences) responded to two independent and four integrated speaking tasks…

  4. A simple method for the synthesis of a polar-embedded and polar-endcapped reversed-phase chromatographic packing with low activity of residue silanols.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-yan; Li, Zhi-yong; Liu, Dan; Xue, Ying-wen; Shi, Zhi-guo

    2016-04-22

    Octadecyl bonded silica (ODS) is the most popular packing for reversed-phase chromatography. However, it generally demonstrates bad resolution for polar analytes because of the residue silanols and its poor stability in aqueous mobile phase. To address the problem, a new reversed-phase packing containing both polar-embedded and polar-endcapped moieties was proposed. It was prepared by a very simple method, in which the epoxide addition reaction of 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane with 1-octadecanethiol proceeded simultaneously with the reaction of silane coupling onto silica particles. By controlling the molecular ratio of 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane to 1-octadecanethiol higher than 1.0 (1.56 for the present study), both polar-embedded and polar-endcapped moieties were achieved onto the packing. The performance of the packing was evaluated in detail. The results demonstrated that neutral, acidic and basic analytes were well separated on the packing. The column efficiency for phenanthrene was 34,200 theoretical plates per meter. In addition, four nucleotides can be separated in 100% phosphate buffered saline solution with good reproducibility, which indicates the packing has good stability in aqueous mobile phase. Amitriptyline, a typical basic analytes, was eluted out with relatively symmetric peak shape (asymmetry factor of 1.36), which implies that the packing has not suffered from the negative effect of residue silanols significantly. Good stability in buffer solution of pH ranging from 2.0 to 10.0 was also documented for the packing.

  5. Reflexive Processes in the Musician Performer's Professional Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nussipzhanova, Bibigul N.; Dzherdimalieva, Gulnar M.; Stamgaziev, Ramazan U.

    2016-01-01

    The article attempts to identify the gradual development of the category of reflection as one of the driving factors of self-actualization, to reveal meaningful face value and basic directions of its multi-dimensional interpretation. The profiling property of a performer's reflexive action acts as a basic psychological foundation in the…

  6. Activity-Based Costing Model for Assessing Economic Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeHayes, Daniel W.; Lovrinic, Joseph G.

    1994-01-01

    An economic model for evaluating the cost performance of academic and administrative programs in higher education is described. Examples from its application at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis are used to illustrate how the model has been used to control costs and reengineer processes. (Author/MSE)

  7. Work Engagement, Performance, and Active Learning: The Role of Conscientiousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakker, Arnold B.; Demerouti, Evangelia; ten Brummelhuis, Lieke L.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examines whether the relationship between work engagement and job performance is moderated by the extent to which individuals are inclined to work hard, careful, and goal-oriented. On the basis of the literature, it was hypothesized that conscientiousness strengthens the relationship between work engagement and supervisor ratings…

  8. Toward a mathematical formalism of performance, task difficulty, and activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samaras, George M.

    1988-01-01

    The rudiments of a mathematical formalism for handling operational, physiological, and psychological concepts are developed for use by the man-machine system design engineer. The formalism provides a framework for developing a structured, systematic approach to the interface design problem, using existing mathematical tools, and simplifying the problem of telling a machine how to measure and use performance.

  9. Factor- and Item-Level Analyses of the 38-Item Activities Scale for Kids-Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagley, Anita M.; Gorton, George E.; Bjornson, Kristie; Bevans, Katherine; Stout, Jean L.; Narayanan, Unni; Tucker, Carole A.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Children and adolescents highly value their ability to participate in relevant daily life and recreational activities. The Activities Scale for Kids-performance (ASKp) instrument measures the frequency of performance of 30 common childhood activities, and has been shown to be valid and reliable. A revised and expanded 38-item ASKp (ASKp38)…

  10. A simple, generalizable method for measuring individual research productivity and its use in the long-term analysis of departmental performance, including between-country comparisons

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A simple, generalizable method for measuring research output would be useful in attempts to build research capacity, and in other contexts. Methods A simple indicator of individual research output was developed, based on grant income, publications and numbers of PhD students supervised. The feasibility and utility of the indicator was examined by using it to calculate research output from two similarly-sized research groups in different countries. The same indicator can be used to assess the balance in the research “portfolio” of an individual researcher. Results Research output scores of 41 staff in Research Department A had a wide range, from zero to 8; the distribution of these scores was highly skewed. Only about 20% of the researchers had well-balanced research outputs, with approximately equal contributions from grants, papers and supervision. Over a five-year period, Department A's total research output rose, while the number of research staff decreased slightly, in other words research productivity (output per head) rose. Total research output from Research Department B, of approximately the same size as A, was similar, but slightly higher than Department A. Conclusions The proposed indicator is feasible. The output score is dimensionless and can be used for comparisons within and between countries. Modeling can be used to explore the effect on research output of changing the size and composition of a research department. A sensitivity analysis shows that small increases in individual productivity result in relatively greater increases in overall departmental research output. The indicator appears to be potentially useful for capacity building, once the initial step of research priority setting has been completed. PMID:23317431

  11. Constructing Bi24O31Cl10/BiOCl heterojunction via a simple thermal annealing route for achieving enhanced photocatalytic activity and selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Su, Yiguo; Zhao, Qihang; Du, Chunfang; Liu, Zhiliang

    2016-01-01

    This work reports on the construction of a Bi24O31Cl10/BiOCl heterojunction via a simple thermal annealing method. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicated that the phase transformation from BiOCl to Bi24O31Cl10 could be realized during the thermal annealing process. The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) binding energy shifts, Raman spectra and Fouier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectra confirmed the formation of the Bi24O31Cl10/BiOCl heterojunction. The obtained Bi24O31Cl10/BiOCl photocatalyst showed excellent conversion efficiency and selectivity toward photocatalytic conversion of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde under visible light irradiation. The radical scavengers and electron spin resonance (ESR) results suggested that the photogenerated holes were the dominant reactive species responsible for the photocatalytic oxidation of benzyl alcohol and superoxide radicals were not involved in the photocatalytic process. The in-situ generation of Bi24O31Cl10/BiOCl heterojunction may own superior interfacial contact than the two-step synthesized heterojunctions, which promotes the transfer of photogenerated charge carriers and is favorable for excellent photocatalytic activities. PMID:27340032

  12. Constructing Bi24O31Cl10/BiOCl heterojunction via a simple thermal annealing route for achieving enhanced photocatalytic activity and selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Su, Yiguo; Zhao, Qihang; Du, Chunfang; Liu, Zhiliang

    2016-06-01

    This work reports on the construction of a Bi24O31Cl10/BiOCl heterojunction via a simple thermal annealing method. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicated that the phase transformation from BiOCl to Bi24O31Cl10 could be realized during the thermal annealing process. The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) binding energy shifts, Raman spectra and Fouier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectra confirmed the formation of the Bi24O31Cl10/BiOCl heterojunction. The obtained Bi24O31Cl10/BiOCl photocatalyst showed excellent conversion efficiency and selectivity toward photocatalytic conversion of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde under visible light irradiation. The radical scavengers and electron spin resonance (ESR) results suggested that the photogenerated holes were the dominant reactive species responsible for the photocatalytic oxidation of benzyl alcohol and superoxide radicals were not involved in the photocatalytic process. The in-situ generation of Bi24O31Cl10/BiOCl heterojunction may own superior interfacial contact than the two-step synthesized heterojunctions, which promotes the transfer of photogenerated charge carriers and is favorable for excellent photocatalytic activities.

  13. 29 CFR 784.155 - Activities performed in wholesale establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... employment in “marketing * * * storing, or distributing” the named aquatic products or byproducts, as applied to the wholesaling of fish and seafood, affords exemption to such activities as unloading the aquatic... & Company, Inc., N.D. Ga., 47 F. Supp. 650). Office and clerical employees of a wholesaler who...

  14. 29 CFR 784.155 - Activities performed in wholesale establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... employment in “marketing * * * storing, or distributing” the named aquatic products or byproducts, as applied to the wholesaling of fish and seafood, affords exemption to such activities as unloading the aquatic... & Company, Inc., N.D. Ga., 47 F. Supp. 650). Office and clerical employees of a wholesaler who...

  15. 29 CFR 784.155 - Activities performed in wholesale establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... employment in “marketing * * * storing, or distributing” the named aquatic products or byproducts, as applied to the wholesaling of fish and seafood, affords exemption to such activities as unloading the aquatic... & Company, Inc., N.D. Ga., 47 F. Supp. 650). Office and clerical employees of a wholesaler who...

  16. Performance in Physiology Evaluation: Possible Improvement by Active Learning Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montrezor, Luís H.

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation process is complex and extremely important in the teaching/learning process. Evaluations are constantly employed in the classroom to assist students in the learning process and to help teachers improve the teaching process. The use of active methodologies encourages students to participate in the learning process, encourages…

  17. Performing Citizenship Down Under: Educating the Active Citizen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Bronwyn; Black, Rosalyn

    2014-01-01

    In democracies such as Australia and New Zealand, education policy increasingly seeks to foster active citizens who are committed to social justice and change. Whilst many aspects of these initiatives are to be applauded for their commitment to empowering young people, in this paper we describe some of the ambiguities that attend young people's…

  18. A Simple and Sensitive LC-MS/MS Method for Determination of Four Major Active Diterpenoids from Andrographis paniculata in Human Plasma and Its Application to a Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Pholphana, Nanthanit; Panomvana, Duangchit; Rangkadilok, Nuchanart; Suriyo, Tawit; Ungtrakul, Teerapat; Pongpun, Wanwisa; Thaeopattha, Saichit; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2016-01-01

    Andrographis paniculata contains four major active diterpenoids, including andrographolide (1), 14-deoxy-11, 12-didehydroandrographolide (2), neoandrographolide (3), and 14-deoxyandrographolide (4), which exhibit differences in types and/or degrees of their pharmacological activity. Previous pharmacokinetic studies in humans reported only the parameters of compound 1 and its analytical method in human plasma. The purpose of this study was to develop a simple, sensitive, and selective liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry technique for the simultaneous determination of all four major active diterpenoids in the A. paniculata product in human plasma. These four diterpenoids in plasma samples were extracted by a simple protein precipitation method with methanol and separated on a Kinetex C18 column using a gradient system with a mobile phase of acetonitrile and water. The liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry was performed in the negative mode, and the multiple reaction monitoring mode was used for the quantitation. The method showed a good linearity over a wide concentration range of 2.50-500 ng/mL for 1 and over the range of 1.00-500 ng/mL for the other diterpenoids with a correlation coefficient R(2) > 0.995. The lower limit of quantification of 1 was found to be 2.50 ng/mL, while those of the other diterpenoids were 1.00 ng/mL. The intraday and interday accuracy (relative error) ranged from 0.03 % to 10.03 %, and the intraday and interday precisions (relative standard deviation) were in the range of 2.05-9.67 %. The extraction recovery (86.54-111.56 %) with a relative standard deviation of 2.78-8.61 % and the matrix effect (85.15-112.36 %) were within the acceptance criteria. Moreover, these four major active diterpenoids were stable in plasma samples at the studied storage conditions with a relative error ≤-9.79 % and a relative standard deviation ≤ 9.26 %. Hence, this present method was successfully validated

  19. Synergistic Effect of Simple Sugars and Carboxymethyl Cellulose on the Production of a Cellulolytic Cocktail from Bacillus sp. AR03 and Enzyme Activity Characterization.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Adriana P; Pisa, José H; Valdeón, Daniel H; Perotti, Nora I; Martínez, María A

    2016-04-01

    A cellulase-producing bacterium isolated from pulp and paper feedstock, Bacillus sp. AR03, was evaluated by means of a factorial design showing that peptone and carbohydrates were the main variables affecting enzyme production. Simple sugars, individually and combined with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), were further examined for their influence on cellulase production by strain AR03. Most of the mono and disaccharides assayed presented a synergistic effect with CMC. As a result, a peptone-based broth supplemented with 10 g/L sucrose and 10 g/L CMC maximized enzyme production after 96 h of cultivation. This medium was used to produce endoglucanases in a 1-L stirred tank reactor in batch mode at 30 °C, which reduced the fermentation period to 48 h and reaching 3.12 ± 0.02 IU/mL of enzyme activity. Bacillus sp. AR03 endoglucanases showed an optimum temperature of 60 °C and a pH of 6.0 with a wide range of pH stability. Furthermore, presence of 10 mM Mn(2+) and 5 mM Co(2+) produced an increase of enzyme activity (246.7 and 183.7 %, respectively), and remarkable tolerance to NaCl, Tween 80, and EDTA was also observed. According to our results, the properties of the cellulolytic cocktail from Bacillus sp. AR03 offer promising features in view of potential biorefinery applications.

  20. Central as well as Peripheral Attentional Bottlenecks in Dual-Task Performance Activate Lateral Prefrontal Cortices

    PubMed Central

    Szameitat, André J.; Vanloo, Azonya; Müller, Hermann J.

    2016-01-01

    Human information processing suffers from severe limitations in parallel processing. In particular, when required to respond to two stimuli in rapid succession, processing bottlenecks may appear at central and peripheral stages of task processing. Importantly, it has been suggested that executive functions are needed to resolve the interference arising at such bottlenecks. The aims of the present study were to test whether central attentional limitations (i.e., bottleneck at the decisional response selection stage) as well as peripheral limitations (i.e., bottleneck at response initiation) both demand executive functions located in the lateral prefrontal cortex. For this, we re-analyzed two previous studies, in which a total of 33 participants performed a dual-task according to the paradigm of the psychological refractory period (PRP) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In one study (N = 17), the PRP task consisted of two two-choice response tasks known to suffer from a central bottleneck (CB group). In the other study (N = 16), the PRP task consisted of two simple-response tasks known to suffer from a peripheral bottleneck (PB group). Both groups showed considerable dual-task costs in form of slowing of the second response in the dual-task (PRP effect). Imaging results are based on the subtraction of both single-tasks from the dual-task within each group. In the CB group, the bilateral middle frontal gyri and inferior frontal gyri were activated. Higher activation in these areas was associated with lower dual-task costs. In the PB group, the right middle frontal and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) were activated. Here, higher activation was associated with higher dual-task costs. In conclusion we suggest that central and peripheral bottlenecks both demand executive functions located in lateral prefrontal cortices (LPFC). Differences between the CB and PB groups with respect to the exact prefrontal areas activated and the correlational patterns

  1. The potential of at-home prediction of the formation of urolithiasis by simple multi-frequency electrical conductivity of the urine and the comparison of its performance with urine ion-related indices, color and specific gravity.

    PubMed

    Silverio, Angelito A; Chung, Wen-Yaw; Cheng, Cheanyeh; Wang, Hai-Lung; Kung, Chien-Min; Chen, Jun; Tsai, Vincent F S

    2016-04-01

    It is important to control daily diet, water intake and life style as well as monitor the quality of urine for urolithiasis prevention. For decades, many ion-related indices have been developed for predicting the formation of urinary stones or urolithiasis, such as EQUILs, relative supersaturation (RSS), Tiselius indices (TI), Robertson risk factor algorithms (RRFA) and more recently, the Bonn risk index. However, they mostly demand robust laboratory analysis, are work-intensive, and even require complex computational programs to get the concentration patterns of several urine analytes. A simple and fast platform for measuring multi-frequency electrical conductivity (MFEC) of morning spot urine (random urine) to predict the onset of urolithiasis was implemented in this study. The performance thereof was compared to ion-related indices, urine color and specific gravity. The concentrations of relevant ions, color, specific gravity (SG) and MFEC (MFEC tested at 1, 10, 100, 5001 KHz and 1 MHz) of 80 random urine samples were examined after collection. Then, the urine samples were stored at 4 °C for 24 h to determine whether sedimentation would occur or not. Ion-activity product index of calcium oxalate (AP(CaOx) EQ2) was calculated. The correlation between AP(CaOx) EQ2, urine color, SG and MFEC were analyzed. AP(CaOx) EQ2, urine color and MFEC (at 5 frequencies) all demonstrated good prediction (p = 0.01, 0.01, 0.01, respectively) for stone formation. The positive correlation between AP(CaOx) EQ2 and MFEC is also significant (p = 0.01). MFEC provides a good metric for predicting the onset of urolithiasis, which is comparable to conventional ion-related indices and urine color. This technology can be implemented with much ease for objectively monitoring the quality of urine at points-of-care or at home.

  2. Aspects of achievable performance for quarter-car active suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türkay, Semiha; Akçay, Hüseyin

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, constraints on the transfer functions from the road disturbance to the vertical acceleration, the suspension travel, and the tire deflection are derived for a quarter-car active suspension system using the vertical acceleration and/or the suspension travel measurements for feedback. The derived constraints complement the similar constraints in the literature. By using the factorization approach to feedback stability, it is shown that tire damping couples the motions of the sprung and unsprung masses; and eliminates a constraint at the wheel-hop frequency. The influence of tire damping on the design of an active suspension system for a quarter-car model by a mixture of the LQG methodology and the interpolation approach is also illustrated.

  3. Report of activities performed, July 1, 1980-June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The Numerical Data Advisory Board (NDAB) is a body within the National Research Council composed of a general board with specialized committees and panels. The objective of NDAB and its committees and panels is the improvement in quality, reliability, availability, accessibility, dissemination, utilization, and management of data. NDAB seeks to promote an appreciation of the importance of evaluated data to scientists, engineers, regulators, and others who require reliable numerical data for research and for decision making. NDAB is an interdisciplinary body with representation from physical, chemical, engineering, biological, and geological sciences. Selected sociotechnical, socioeconomic, and transient, or soft data topics are also covered. An effective path of communication with international data activities is maintained by scheduling NDAB meetings jointly with the US National Committee for CODATA, the Committee on Data for Science and Technology of the International Council for Scientific Unions (ICSU). An active government liaison relationship is maintained to facilitate input from, and discussion with branches of agencies that deal with technical data and information programs. NDAB has addressed both broad, generic cross-cutting data problems pertinent to all agencies that support R and D programs, as well as specific issues. For some of the specific topics, ad hoc meetings with subgroups of NDAB and the specific agencies requesting such discussions were held. Meetings held by NDAB for the time period covered by this report, as well as other activities, are summarized in Attachment A.

  4. Muscular activity and its relationship to biomechanics and human performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ariel, Gideon

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to address the issue of muscular activity, human motion, fitness, and exercise. Human activity is reviewed from the historical perspective as well as from the basics of muscular contraction, nervous system controls, mechanics, and biomechanical considerations. In addition, attention has been given to some of the principles involved in developing muscular adaptations through strength development. Brief descriptions and findings from a few studies are included. These experiments were conducted in order to investigate muscular adaptation to various exercise regimens. Different theories of strength development were studied and correlated to daily human movements. All measurement tools used represent state of the art exercise equipment and movement analysis. The information presented here is only a small attempt to understand the effects of exercise and conditioning on Earth with the objective of leading to greater knowledge concerning human responses during spaceflight. What makes life from nonliving objects is movement which is generated and controlled by biochemical substances. In mammals. the controlled activators are skeletal muscles and this muscular action is an integral process composed of mechanical, chemical, and neurological processes resulting in voluntary and involuntary motions. The scope of this discussion is limited to voluntary motion.

  5. The influence of sex differences and individual task performance on brain activation during planning.

    PubMed

    Unterrainer, J M; Ruff, C C; Rahm, B; Kaller, C P; Spreer, J; Schwarzwald, R; Halsband, U

    2005-01-15

    Several studies have attempted to identify the neuronal basis of sex differences in cognition. However, group differences in cognitive ability rather than genuine neurocognitive differences between the sexes may account for their results. Here, we compare with functional magnetic resonance imaging the relation between gender, individual task performance, and planning-related brain activation. Men and women preselected to display identical performance scores showed a strong relation between individual task performance and activation of the right dorsolateral prefrontal and right inferior parietal cortex activation during a visuospatial planning task. No gender-specific activations were found. However, a different pattern emerged when subjects had to execute the motor responses to the problems. Better performance was associated with right dorsolateral prefrontal and right parahippocampal activations, and females exhibited a stronger right hippocampal activation than males. These findings underline that an individual's performance level rather than his or her sex largely determines the neuronal activation patterns during higher-level cognition.

  6. 78 FR 22855 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Annual Performance Report for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-17

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Annual Performance Report for Historically... of Collection: Annual Performance Report for Historically Black Colleges and Universities Master's... information collection. Respondents/Affected Public: Private sector. Total Estimated Number of...

  7. 78 FR 3394 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request-Performance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request--Performance Reporting System, Management Evaluation AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service (FNS...: Performance Reporting System, Management Evaluation. OMB Number: 0584-0010. Expiration Date: 4/30/2013....

  8. Polyphosphate Kinase from Activated Sludge Performing Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal†

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Katherine D.; Dojka, Michael A.; Pace, Norman R.; Jenkins, David; Keasling, Jay D.

    2002-01-01

    A novel polyphosphate kinase (PPK) was retrieved from an uncultivated organism in activated sludge carrying out enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR). Acetate-fed laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactors were used to maintain sludge with a high phosphorus content (approximately 11% of the biomass). PCR-based clone libraries of small subunit rRNA genes and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were used to verify that the sludge was enriched in Rhodocyclus-like β-Proteobacteria known to be associated with sludges carrying out EBPR. These organisms comprised approximately 80% of total bacteria in the sludge, as assessed by FISH. Degenerate PCR primers were designed to retrieve fragments of putative ppk genes from a pure culture of Rhodocyclus tenuis and from organisms in the sludge. Four novel ppk homologs were found in the sludge, and two of these (types I and II) shared a high degree of amino acid similarity with R. tenuis PPK (86 and 87% similarity, respectively). Dot blot analysis of total RNA extracted from sludge demonstrated that the Type I ppk mRNA was present, indicating that this gene is expressed during EBPR. Inverse PCR was used to obtain the full Type I sequence from sludge DNA, and a full-length PPK was cloned, overexpressed, and purified to near homogeneity. The purified PPK has a specific activity comparable to that of other PPKs, has a requirement for Mg2+, and does not appear to operate in reverse. PPK activity was found mainly in the particulate fraction of lysed sludge microorganisms. PMID:12324346

  9. High-performance characteristics of silicon inverse opal synthesized by the simple magnesium reduction as anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jae-Hun; Kim, Kwang-Hyun; Jung, Dong-Won; Kim, Ketack; Lee, Sung-Man; Oh, Eun-Suok

    2015-12-01

    Inverse silicon opal (ISi) and carbon-coated inverse Si opal (C-ISi) structures are prepared from the simple thermal reduction method using magnesium and investigated as the anode materials in lithium-ion batteries. The ISi and C-ISi samples comprise continuously arranged inverse opal structures, constructed by Si nanoparticles. The macroporous structures in ∼1 μm range are favourable for lithium-ion transport and more importantly for absorbing volumetric change in the silicon nanoparticles. Moreover, the carbon coating on the inverse Si opal improves the electrical conductivity and acts as a mechanical buffer for the volume change. C-ISi sample shows a high capacity of 1550 mAh g-1 at the 100th cycle with very stable cycle retention, whereas the ISi and pristine Si samples show 1146.4 mAh g-1 and approximately zero, respectively, at the 100th cycle with rapid capacity fading. Surprisingly, the volumetric expansion of C-ISi electrode after 100th cycles is only 16.1%, which is as low as that for commercial graphite electrodes.

  10. A simple high performance liquid chromatographic method for the quantification of total cotinine, total 3'-hydroxycotinine and caffeine in the plasma of smokers.

    PubMed

    Ghosheh, O A; Browne, D; Rogers, T; de Leon, J; Dwoskin, L P; Crooks, P A

    2000-08-15

    A simple isocratic HPLC procedure has been developed for the quantification of caffeine and the nicotine metabolites cotinine, 3'-hydroxycotinine, cotinine glucuronide and 3'-hydroxycotinine glucuronide in the plasma of smokers. The glucuronide conjugates were determined indirectly via initial basic hydrolysis of the analyte sample followed by quantification of the resulting deconjugation product. Plasma was basified, extracted with dichloromethane, evaporated, the residue dissolved water and an aliquot part was analyzed by HPLC. The method utilized a Partisil-10 SCX cation-exchange column and an isocratic mobile phase of sodium phosphate buffer: methanol (92:8 v/v, 0.1 M, adjusted to pH 4.8 with triethylamine) at a flow rate of 1.5 ml/min. UV detection was at 254 nm. All solutes were separated with good resolution, and quantification was determined using an internal standard of N,N-diethylnicotinamide. The retention times were: caffeine 5.1 min, 3'-hydroxycotinine 7.2 min, N,N-diethylnicotinamide 9.5 min, and cotinine 15.5 min. Detection limits for caffeine, 3'-hydroxycotinine, cotinine, and total cotinine were 10 ng/ml; the detection limit for total 3'-hydroxycotinine was 20 ng/ml. The inter-day and intra-day variations for all analytes were between 1 and 8%. This analytical method is suitable for the determination of caffeine and nicotine metabolite levels in large numbers of clinical samples.

  11. NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission Status and Science Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Entekhabi, Dara; O'Neill, Peggy; Njoku, Eni; Entin, Jared K.

    2016-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory was launched January 31, 2015, and its L-band radiometer and radar instruments became operational since mid-April 2015. The SMAP radiometer has been operating flawlessly, but the radar transmitter ceased operation on July 7. This paper provides a status summary of the calibration and validation of the SMAP instruments and the quality assessment of its soil moisture and freeze/thaw products. Since the loss of the radar in July, the SMAP project has been conducting two parallel activities to enhance the resolution of soil moisture products. One of them explores the Backus Gilbert optimum interpolation and de-convolution techniques based on the oversampling characteristics of the SMAP radiometer. The other investigates the disaggregation of the SMAP radiometer data using the European Space Agency's Sentinel-1 C-band synthetic radar data to obtain soil moisture products at about 1 to 3 kilometers resolution. In addition, SMAP's L-band data have found many new applications, including vegetation opacity, ocean surface salinity and hurricane ocean surface wind mapping. Highlights of these new applications will be provided.

  12. The effects of chewing versus caffeine on alertness, cognitive performance and cardiac autonomic activity during sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Mark; Pavy, Alan; van den Heuvel, Cameron

    2006-12-01

    Chewing has been shown to alleviate feelings of sleepiness and improve cognitive performance during the day. This study investigated the effect of chewing on alertness and cognitive performance across one night without sleep as well as the possible mediating role of cardiac autonomic activity. Fourteen adults participated in a randomized, counterbalanced protocol employing a chewing, placebo and caffeine condition. Participants completed tasks assessing psychomotor vigilance, tracking, grammatical reasoning, alertness and sleepiness each hour across the night. All participants received either placebo or caffeine (200 mg), while the chewing condition also chewed on a tasteless and odorless substance for 15 min each hour. Heart rate (HR), root mean square of the successive differences in R-R intervals on the ECG (RMSSD), and preejection period (PEP) were simultaneously recorded. Alertness and cognitive performance amongst the chewing condition did not differ or were in fact worse when compared with placebo. Similarly, measures of HR and RMSSD remained the same between these two conditions; however, PEP was reduced in the later part of the night in the chewing condition compared with a relative increase for placebo. Caffeine led to improved speed and accuracy on cognitive tasks and increased alertness when compared with chewing. Relative increases in RMSSD and reductions in HR were demonstrated following caffeine; however, no change in PEP was seen. Strong associations between cardiac parasympathetic activity and complex cognitive tasks, as well as between subjective alertness and simpler cognitive tasks, suggest a differential process mediating complex versus simple cognitive performance during sleep deprivation.

  13. A simple, rapid and validated high-performance liquid chromatography method suitable for clinical measurements of human mercaptalbumin and non-mercaptalbumin.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Keiko; Shimosawa, Tatsuo; Okubo, Shigeo; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    Background Human mercaptalbumin and human non-mercaptalbumin have been reported as markers for various pathological conditions, such as kidney and liver diseases. These markers play important roles in redox regulations throughout the body. Despite the recognition of these markers in various pathophysiologic conditions, the measurements of human mercaptalbumin and non-mercaptalbumin have not been popular because of the technical complexity and long measurement time of conventional methods. Methods Based on previous reports, we explored the optimal analytical conditions for a high-performance liquid chromatography method using an anion-exchange column packed with a hydrophilic polyvinyl alcohol gel. The method was then validated using performance tests as well as measurements of various patients' serum samples. Results We successfully established a reliable high-performance liquid chromatography method with an analytical time of only 12 min per test. The repeatability (within-day variability) and reproducibility (day-to-day variability) were 0.30% and 0.27% (CV), respectively. A very good correlation was obtained with the results of the conventional method. Conclusions A practical method for the clinical measurement of human mercaptalbumin and non-mercaptalbumin was established. This high-performance liquid chromatography method is expected to be a powerful tool enabling the expansion of clinical usefulness and ensuring the elucidation of the roles of albumin in redox reactions throughout the human body.

  14. Optogenetics in Mice Performing a Visual Discrimination Task: Measurement and Suppression of Retinal Activation and the Resulting Behavioral Artifact.

    PubMed

    Danskin, Bethanny; Denman, Daniel; Valley, Matthew; Ollerenshaw, Douglas; Williams, Derric; Groblewski, Peter; Reid, Clay; Olsen, Shawn; Blanche, Timothy; Waters, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetic techniques are used widely to perturb and interrogate neural circuits in behaving animals, but illumination can have additional effects, such as the activation of endogenous opsins in the retina. We found that illumination, delivered deep into the brain via an optical fiber, evoked a behavioral artifact in mice performing a visually guided discrimination task. Compared with blue (473 nm) and yellow (589 nm) illumination, red (640 nm) illumination evoked a greater behavioral artifact and more activity in the retina, the latter measured with electrical recordings. In the mouse, the sensitivity of retinal opsins declines steeply with wavelength across the visible spectrum, but propagation of light through brain tissue increases with wavelength. Our results suggest that poor retinal sensitivity to red light was overcome by relatively robust propagation of red light through brain tissue and stronger illumination of the retina by red than by blue or yellow light. Light adaptation of the retina, via an external source of illumination, suppressed retinal activation and the behavioral artifact without otherwise impacting behavioral performance. In summary, long wavelength optogenetic stimuli are particularly prone to evoke behavioral artifacts via activation of retinal opsins in the mouse, but light adaptation of the retina can provide a simple and effective mitigation of the artifact.

  15. Synthesis of the SRM Fragmentation Activities Performed within VEGA Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarry, A.; Meyer-Lasalle, F.; Le Falc'her, D.

    2013-09-01

    In the frame of VEGA program and especially the first flight on February 13, 2013, safety was a major concern. The default of the launcher and its impact on the close range were amongst the development phase topics because of the propellant masses at stake and the surrounding inhabited environment. A task group composed of members from ESA, CNES and industrial partners involved was formed for this matter.All SRMs are equipped with destruction chains. While P80 (first stage) is functioning, the Zefiri remain unpressurized. A scenario was set stating that the activation of Zefiri cutting chord creates an ignited gap inside the propellant. This ought to propagate till the inner bore, driving the explosion of the motor.This scenario was studied through small scale tests and numerical simulation, providing confidence on the feasibility of the destruction of the SRMs as well as inputs in terms of safety delays.

  16. The Performance of Geopolymers Activated by Sodium Hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyeontaek; Kang, Seunggu

    2015-08-01

    Geopolymers, a group of promising environmentally friendly materials that can work as cement substitutes, should be fabricated from SiO2-Al2O3-CaO mixtures containing large amounts of amorphous phases to ensure optimal chemical and physical properties. In this study, it was shown that geopolymers with enhanced mechanical strengths, as high as 115 MPa, could be obtained from perfectly amorphous slag from spent catalyst (SSC) discharged during automobile catalyst recycling. Geopolymer processing involved alkali-activation using a 16 M NaOH solution of pH13. The varying SSC grain size was the main experimental factor of interest, in combination with curing temperature and aging time. Variations in the mechanical strengths of the resulting geopolymers are explained by the occurrence of 10-50 nm-sized crystals and the presence of voids and pores dozens to hundreds of micrometers in size.

  17. EEG activity during the performance of complex mental problems.

    PubMed

    Jausovec, N; Jausovec, K

    2000-04-01

    This study investigated differences in cognitive processes related to problem complexity. It was assumed that these differences would be reflected in respondents' EEG activity--spectral power and coherence. A second issue of the study was to compare differences between the lower (alpha(1) = 7.9-10.0 Hz), and upper alpha band (alpha(2) = 10.1-12.9 Hz). In the first experiment two well-defined problems with two levels of complexity were used. Only minor differences in EEG power and coherence measures related to problem complexity were observed. In the second experiment divergent production problems resembling tasks on creativity tests were compared with dialectic problems calling for creative solutions. Differences in EEG power measures were mainly related to the form of problem presentation (figural/verbal). In contrast, coherence was related to the level of creativity needed to solve a problem. Noticeable increased intra- and interhemispheric cooperation between mainly the far distant brain regions was observed in the EEG activity of respondents while solving the dialectic problems. These results are explained by the more intense involvement of the long cortico-cortical fiber system in creative thinking. Differences between the lower and upper alpha band were significant for the power and coherence measures. In Experiment 2, fewer differences were observed in power measures in the upper alpha band than in the lower alpha band. A reverse pattern was observed for the coherence measures. These results hint to a functional independence of the two alpha bands, however, they do not allow to draw firm conclusions about their functional meanings. The study showed that it is unlikely that individuals solve well- and ill-defined problems by employing similar cognitive strategies.

  18. Validation of a simple model to predict the performance of methane oxidation systems, using field data from a large scale biocover test field.

    PubMed

    Geck, Christoph; Scharff, Heijo; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria; Gebert, Julia

    2016-10-01

    On a large scale test field (1060m(2)) methane emissions were monitored over a period of 30months. During this period, the test field was loaded at rates between 14 and 46gCH4m(-2)d(-1). The total area was subdivided into 60 monitoring grid fields at 17.7m(2) each, which were individually surveyed for methane emissions and methane oxidation efficiency. The latter was calculated both from the direct methane mass balance and from the shift of the carbon dioxide - methane ratio between the base of the methane oxidation layer and the emitted gas. The base flux to each grid field was back-calculated from the data on methane oxidation efficiency and emission. Resolution to grid field scale allowed the analysis of the spatial heterogeneity of all considered fluxes. Higher emissions were measured in the upslope area of the test field. This was attributed to the capillary barrier integrated into the test field resulting in a higher diffusivity and gas permeability in the upslope area. Predictions of the methane oxidation potential were estimated with the simple model Methane Oxidation Tool (MOT) using soil temperature, air filled porosity and water tension as input parameters. It was found that the test field could oxidize 84% of the injected methane. The MOT predictions seemed to be realistic albeit the higher range of the predicted oxidations potentials could not be challenged because the load to the field was too low. Spatial and temporal emission patterns were found indicating heterogeneity of fluxes and efficiencies in the test field. No constant share of direct emissions was found as proposed by the MOT albeit the mean share of emissions throughout the monitoring period was in the range of the expected emissions.

  19. A simple and efficient method for imidazolinone herbicides determination in soil by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kemmerich, Magali; Bernardi, Gabrieli; Adaime, Martha B; Zanella, Renato; Prestes, Osmar D

    2015-09-18

    The use of pesticides in agriculture has generated numerous consequences to the environment, requiring analysis of the persistent residues in soil, water and air. The variability of soil properties interferes in the extraction of pesticide residues with robustness and accuracy. The group of imidazolinones herbicides, widely used for weed control, becomes an additional task in multiresidue extraction procedures because of their low pKa values. In order to determine these compounds in soil samples, different methods have been proposed, however they can be very laborious and require more time and well trained analysts. Thus, this study aimed to develop a simple and efficient method for determination of imidazolinones (imazamox, imazapic, imazapyr, imazaquin and imazethapyr) residues in soil, using an extraction with aqueous ammonium acetate solution (0.5 M) and clean-up with dispersive solid phase extraction employing PSA, followed by UHPLC-MS/MS analysis. Satisfactory values of accuracy (70-93%) and RSD (≤17%) were achieved, as well as lower limit of quantification (5.0 μg kg(-1)). Considering the matrix and compounds complexity, the developed and validated method proved to be an excellent tool for rapid analysis (20 min), with reliability for application in real samples with wide pH range. In the analysis of 22 real samples, the method allowed the quantification of imazapic (5.84 and 12.1 μg kg(-1)), imazapyr (5.3 μg kg(-1)) and imazethapyr (24.0 and 37.7 μg kg(-1)) in three samples.

  20. High-performance super capacitors based on activated anthracite with controlled porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun-Chul; Byamba-Ochir, Narandalai; Shim, Wang-Geun; Balathanigaimani, M. S.; Moon, Hee

    2015-02-01

    Mongolian anthracite is chemically activated using potassium hydroxide as an activation agent to make activated carbon materials. Prior to the chemical activation, the chemical agent is introduced by two different methods as follows, (1) simple physical mixing, (2) impregnation. The physical properties such as specific surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and adsorption energy distribution are measured to assess them as carbon electrode materials for electric double-layer capacitors (EDLC). The surface functional groups and morphology are also characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses respectively. The electrochemical results for the activated carbon electrodes in 3 M sulfuric acid electrolyte solution indicate that the activated Mongolian anthracite has relatively large specific capacitances in the range of 120-238 F g-1 and very high electrochemical stability, as they keep more than 98% of initial capacitances until 1000 charge/discharge cycles.

  1. The development of a performance assessment methodology for activity based intelligence: A study of spatial, temporal, and multimodal considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Christian M.

    Activity Based Intelligence (ABI) is the derivation of information from a series of in- dividual actions, interactions, and transactions being recorded over a period of time. This usually occurs in Motion imagery and/or Full Motion Video. Due to the growth of unmanned aerial systems technology and the preponderance of mobile video devices, more interest has developed in analyzing people's actions and interactions in these video streams. Currently only visually subjective quality metrics exist for determining the utility of these data in detecting specific activities. One common misconception is that ABI boils down to a simple resolution problem; more pixels and higher frame rates are better. Increasing resolution simply provides more data, not necessary more informa- tion. As part of this research, an experiment was designed and performed to address this assumption. Nine sensors consisting of four modalities were place on top of the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science in order to record a group of participants executing a scripted set of activities. The multimodal characteristics include data from the visible, long-wave infrared, multispectral, and polarimetric regimes. The activities the participants were scripted to cover a wide range of spatial and temporal interactions (i.e. walking, jogging, and a group sporting event). As with any large data acquisition, only a subset of this data was analyzed for this research. Specifically, a walking object exchange scenario and simulated RPG. In order to analyze this data, several steps of preparation occurred. The data were spatially and temporally registered; the individual modalities were fused; a tracking algorithm was implemented, and an activity detection algorithm was applied. To develop a performance assessment for these activities a series of spatial and temporal degradations were performed. Upon completion of this work, the ground truth ABI dataset will be released to the community for further analysis.

  2. Effects of dietary stachyose on growth performance, digestive enzyme activities and intestinal morphology of juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Haibin; Zhang, Yanjiao; Mai, Kangsen; Ai, Qinghui; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Wenbing; Li, Yanxian; Liu, Jintao

    2015-10-01

    A 12-week feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary stachyose on the growth performance, digestive enzymes activities and intestinal structures of juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L). Five isonitrogenous (49.58% crude protein) and isolipidic (10.50% crude lipid) diets were formulated to contain 0 (Control), 0.625% (S-0.625), 1.25% (S-1.25), 2.5% (S-2.5) and 5% (S-5) stachyose, respectively. With the increase of stachyose level, the growth performance and feed utilization of turbot, such as the specific growth rate, final mean body weight, weight gain rate and feed efficiency, increased significantly ( P< 0.05) and then stabilized. The feed intake of fish fed S-5 was significantly higher ( P< 0.05) than that of fish in other groups. The activities of trypsin, intestinal caseinolytic, stomach and intestinal amylase were significantly influenced by stachyose ( P<0.05). The highest values of trypsin and intestinal caseinolytic activities were observed in group S-1.25, while the highest activity of stomach amylase and the lowest activity of intestine amylase were observed in group S-5. No lesion or damage was found on the distal intestine structures of fish from all treatments, while the height of simple folds in the distal intestine was significantly increased ( P< 0.05) when 1.25% or 2.5% stachyose was added in the diets. These results indicated that moderate level of stachyose (1.25%) improves the growth performance, feed utilization, digestive enzyme activities and the distal intestine structures of juvenile turbot.

  3. SU-E-I-51: Quantitative Assessment of X-Ray Imaging Detector Performance in a Clinical Setting - a Simple Approach Using a Commercial Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoeberg, J; Bujila, R; Omar, A; Nowik, P; Mobini-Kesheh, S; Lindstroem, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To measure and compare the performance of X-ray imaging detectors in a clinical setting using a dedicated instrument for the quantitative determination of detector performance. Methods: The DQEPro (DQE Instruments Inc., London, Ontario Canada) was used to determine the MTF, NPS and DQE using an IEC compliant methodology for three different imaging modalities: conventional radiography (CsI-based detector), general-purpose radioscopy (CsI-based detector), and mammography (a-Se based detector). The radiation qualities (IEC) RQA-5 and RQA-M-2 were used for the CsI-based and a-Se-based detectors, respectively. The DQEPro alleviates some of the difficulties associated with DQE measurements by automatically positioning test devices over the detector, guiding the user through the image acquisition process and providing software for calculations. Results: A comparison of the NPS showed that the image noise of the a-Se detector was less correlated than the CsI detectors. A consistently higher performance was observed for the a-Se detector at all spatial frequencies (MTF: 0.97@0.25 cy/mm, DQE: 0.72@0.25 cy/mm) and the DQE drops off slower than for the CsI detectors. The CsI detector used for conventional radiography displayed a higher performance at low spatial frequencies compared to the CsI detector used for radioscopy (DQE: 0.65 vs 0.60@0.25 cy/mm). However, at spatial frequencies above 1.3 cy/mm, the radioscopy detector displayed better performance than the conventional radiography detector (DQE: 0.35 vs 0.24@2.00 cy/mm). Conclusion: The difference in the MTF, NPS and DQE that was observed for the two different CsI detectors and the a-Se detector reflect the imaging tasks that the different detector types are intended for. The DQEPro has made the determination and calculation of quantitative metrics of X-ray imaging detector performance substantially more convenient and accessible to undertake in a clinical setting.

  4. Concurrent and Longitudinal Relationships Between Cognitive Activity, Cognitive Performance, and Brain Volume in Older Adult Women

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Kirk I.; Espeland, Mark A.; Smith, J. Carson; Tindle, Hilary A.; Rapp, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated (a) cross-sectional associations between cognitive activity, cognitive performance, and MRI measures and (b) longitudinal associations between cognitive activity and change in cognitive performance, using structural equation modeling (SEM). Method. Women’s Health Initiative Memory Study (WHIMS) Extension participants who continued annual neuropsychological assessments by telephone and completed a concurrent questionnaire of cognitive activities and MRI scans were included (mean age = 81.4 years; N = 393). Cognitive performance was measured by tests of attention, working memory, verbal fluency, executive function, and memory. Cognitive activity was measured by self-reported participation in a variety of cognitive activities (e.g., reading books, playing games, computer activities; N = 11 items) during the previous 12 months. MRI measures included gray and white matter normal and white matter lesion volumes. Results. SEM demonstrated a significant association between cognitive activity and baseline cognitive performance but not change over 2–3 years. Gray and white matter was associated with cognitive performance but not cognitive activity. All effects remained significant after modeling covariates (age, education, depressive symptoms, WHIMS intervention assignment, and intracranial volume). Conclusions. Cognitive activity benefits current cognitive performance but is not associated with change over 2–3 years. Cognitive activity and MRI volumes are independently associated with cognitive performance, suggesting distinct cognitive and brain reserve constructs. PMID:25209372

  5. Development of a simple combining apparatus to perform a magnetic stirring-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and its application for the analysis of carbamate and organophosphorus pesticides in tea drinks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuhong; Cheng, Jing; Zhou, Hongbin; Wang, Xiaohua; Cheng, Min

    2013-07-17

    This study introduced a simple combining apparatus for performing a magnetic stirring-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (MSA-DLLME) for the detection of trace carbamate and organophosphorus pesticides in tea drinks coupled with high performance liquid chromatography. The simple combining apparatus was made up of a sample vial and a cut plastic dropper. The bulb end of the cut plastic dropper was inserted into the neck of the sample vial and the open tip end of the plastic dropper was then cut to an appropriate length. The combining apparatus made was then used to perform the MSA-DLLME. In this experiment, 1-octanol was injected into the tea drink sample solution and the extraction process accelerated by magnetic agitation. The sample solution turned clear and separated into two layers after leaving it alone for several minutes. The cut plastic dropper was gently put down into the sample vial, and then the liquid level of the sample solution elevated up to the tip of the plastic dropper for the collection of low-density extractant. Finally, the collected extractant was drawn out by a microsyringe and injected into the high performance liquid chromatography-diode-array detector for analysis. A series of extraction parameters were investigated and optimized. Under the most favorable conditions, high enrichment factors were obtained for carbofuran, carbaryl and isocarbophos (between 130 and 185). The limits of detection (S/N=3) were in the range of 0.13-0.61 μg L(-1), and the relative standard deviation varied below 7.8% (n=5). Additionally, good recoveries were obtained between 79.4% and 114.4% in the three tea drinks. The simple combining apparatus utilized in this MSA-DLLME method was shown to be economical, fast, and convenient for the collection of low density extractant.

  6. Visual observations of glottic activity during didgeridoo performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izdebski, Krzysztof; Hyde, Lydia; Ward, Ronald R.; Ross, Joel C.

    2012-02-01

    Australian didgeridoo is a reed-less hollow conically shape wooden tubular wind instrument typically measuring up to 150 cm in length, with distal and proximal diameters ranging from 150 to 30 mm. This tube allows a player to produce only a narrow variety of sound and sounds effects because it is coupled directly to the player's vocal tract. The typical frequency of the tube typically called the drone, is approximately within 60 to 100 Hz range. This tone generation modulated by lip vibration is supported by circular breathing, allowing for an uninterrupted (indefinite) length of sound generation. Inhalation introduces sound pulsation, while specific tonal effects can be consciously created by manipulation of the player's lips and/or the vocal tract, including conscious phonation using vocal folds vibration, all used to enrich both the sound and the artistic meaning of the played sequence. Though the results of the research on the acoustics of this instrument are often reported in the literature, physiologic data regarding vocal tract configurations, and especially on the behavior of the vocal folds in regulation of ventilation and in phonation, remain less than underreported. The data presented here comprises (as far as we were able to determine) the first ever physiologic account of vocal fold activity in a didgeridoo player observed with help of trans-nasal endoscopy. Our focus was to reveal the work of t

  7. On the aerodynamics and performance of active vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Ron; Farokhi, Saeed

    1993-01-01

    As a building block in the development of smart lift-enhancement devices, a new concept for flow control using active vortex generators (AVGs) is presented. Ramp, wedge, and doublet wedge (Wheeler) VG configurations are investigated. The AVGs are designed to conform to the surface of the wing section at low alpha. As the section approaches the stall, they are deployed and accordingly, alpha(stall) and C(lmax) are increased. A qualitative analysis of the flow around the various VG configurations was conducted in a low speed wind tunnel at 1.6 ft/s and a Reynolds number of approximately 3400. The results demonstrate that ramp VGs produce vortices that have the longest distance at breakdown. The VGs were also applied to a 25-in. span, 8-in. chord NACA 4415 wing section. Optimization studies were conducted on the spanwise spacing, chordwise position, and size of statically deployed VGs. The test results demonstrate a 14-percent increase in C(lmax) while increasing alpha (stall) by up to 3.

  8. STS-110 Astronaut Jerry Ross Performs Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis on April 8, 2002, the STS-110 mission prepared the International Space Station (ISS) for future space walks by installing and outfitting the 43-foot-long Starboard side S0 (S-zero) truss and preparing the first railroad in space, the Mobile Transporter. The 27,000 pound S0 truss was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) marked the first use of the Station's robotic arm to maneuver space walkers around the Station and was the first time all of a shuttle crew's space walks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. In this photograph, Astronaut Jerry L. Ross, mission specialist, anchored on the end of the Canadarm2, moves near the newly installed S0 truss. Astronaut Lee M. E. Morin, mission specialist, (out of frame), worked in tandem with Ross during this fourth and final scheduled session of EVA for the STS-110 mission. The final major task of the space walk was the installation of a beam, the Airlock Spur, between the Quest Airlock and the S0. The spur will be used by space walkers in the future as a path from the airlock to the truss.

  9. Simple Kidney Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... How They Work Kidney Disease A-Z Simple Kidney Cysts What are simple kidney cysts? Simple kidney cysts are abnormal, fluid-filled ... that form in the kidneys. What are the kidneys and what do they do? The kidneys are ...

  10. Simple Elbow Dislocation.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, April

    2015-11-01

    Simple elbow dislocation refers to those elbow dislocations that do not involve an osseous injury. A complex elbow dislocation refers to an elbow that has dislocated with an osseous injury. Most simple elbow dislocations are treated nonoperatively. Understanding the importance of the soft tissue injury following a simple elbow dislocation is a key to being successful with treatment.

  11. Using Importance-Performance Analysis to Guide Instructional Design of Experiential Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Sheri; Hsu, Yu-Chang; Kinney, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Designing experiential learning activities requires an instructor to think about what they want the students to learn. Using importance-performance analysis can assist with the instructional design of the activities. This exploratory study used importance-performance analysis in an online introduction to criminology course. There is limited…

  12. 21 CFR 212.20 - What activities must I perform to ensure drug quality?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What activities must I perform to ensure drug quality? 212.20 Section 212.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... DRUGS (Eff. 12-12-2011) Quality Assurance § 212.20 What activities must I perform to ensure drug...

  13. Leadership Development in Students: Teachers' Opinions Regarding Activities That Can Be Performed at Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parlar, Hanifi; Türkoglu, Muhammet Emin; Cansoy, Ramazan

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to examine teachers' opinions regarding the activities that can be performed at schools to ensure leadership development in students. Accordingly, an attempt to reveal what the leadership qualities of students should be, the activities that can be performed for the acquisition of leadership qualities and the applicability level of…

  14. Mesoporous anatase TiO{sub 2}/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites: A simple template-free synthesis and their high photocatalytic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Qi; Zhong, Yong-Hui; Chen, Xing; Huang, Xing-Jiu; Wu, Yu-Cheng

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Mesoporous TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles with anatase phase were assembled on reduced graphene oxide via a template-free one-step hydrothermal method. • The TiO{sub 2}/rGO nanocomposites have better adsorption capacity and photocatalytic degradation efficiency for dyes removal. • Improved dye adsorption and photogenerated charge separation are responsible for enhanced activity. - Abstract: Mesoporous anatase phase TiO{sub 2} was assembled on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) using a template-free one-step hydrothermal process. The nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area. Morphology of TiO{sub 2} was related to the content of graphene oxide. TiO{sub 2}/rGO nanocomposites exhibited excellent photocatalytic activity for the photo-degradation of methyl orange. The degradation rate was 4.5 times greater than that of pure TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. This difference was attributed to the thin two-dimensional graphene sheet. The graphene sheet had a large surface area, high adsorption capacity, and acted as a good electron acceptor for the transfer of photo-generated electrons from the conduction band of TiO{sub 2}. The enhanced surface adsorption characteristics and excellent charge transport separation were independent properties of the photocatalytic degradation process.

  15. Activities, self-referent memory beliefs, and cognitive performance: evidence for direct and mediated relations.

    PubMed

    Jopp, Daniela; Hertzog, Christopher

    2007-12-01

    In this study, the authors investigated the role of activities and self-referent memory beliefs for cognitive performance in a life-span sample. A factor analysis identified 8 activity factors, including Developmental Activities, Experiential Activities, Social Activities, Physical Activities, Technology Use, Watching Television, Games, and Crafts. A second-order general activity factor was significantly related to a general factor of cognitive function as defined by ability tests. Structural regression models suggested that prediction of cognition by activity level was partially mediated by memory beliefs, controlling for age, education, health, and depressive affect. Models adding paths from general and specific activities to aspects of crystallized intelligence suggested additional unique predictive effects for some activities. In alternative models, nonsignificant effects of beliefs on activities were detected when cognition predicted both variables, consistent with the hypothesis that beliefs derive from monitoring cognition and have no influence on activity patterns.

  16. ZnO-nanorod-array/p-GaN high-performance ultra-violet light emitting devices prepared by simple solution synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Shrawan Kumar; Luan, Chunyan; To, Chap Hang; Kutsay, Oleksandr; Kováč, Jaroslav; Zapien, Juan Antonio; Bello, Igor; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2012-11-01

    Pure ultra-violet (UV) (378 nm) electroluminescence (EL) from zinc oxide (ZnO)-nanorod-array/p-gallium nitride (GaN) light emitting devices (LEDs) is demonstrated at low bias-voltages (˜4.3 V). Devices were prepared merely by solution-synthesis, without any involvement of sophisticated material growth techniques or preparation methods. Three different luminescence characterization techniques, i.e., photo-luminescence, cathodo-luminescence, and EL, provided insight into the nature of the UV emission mechanism in solution-synthesized LEDs. Bias dependent EL behaviour revealed blue-shift of EL peaks and increased peak sharpness, with increasing the operating voltage. Accelerated bias stress tests showed very stable and repeatable electrical and EL performance of the solution-synthesized nanorod LEDs.

  17. 42 CFR 460.136 - Internal quality assessment and performance improvement activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Internal quality assessment and performance...) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Quality Assessment and Performance Improvement § 460.136 Internal quality assessment and performance improvement activities. (a) Quality assessment...

  18. 42 CFR 460.136 - Internal quality assessment and performance improvement activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal quality assessment and performance...) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Quality Assessment and Performance Improvement § 460.136 Internal quality assessment and performance improvement activities. (a) Quality assessment...

  19. 42 CFR 460.136 - Internal quality assessment and performance improvement activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Internal quality assessment and performance...) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Quality Assessment and Performance Improvement § 460.136 Internal quality assessment and performance improvement activities. (a) Quality assessment...

  20. 42 CFR 460.136 - Internal quality assessment and performance improvement activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Internal quality assessment and performance...) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Quality Assessment and Performance Improvement § 460.136 Internal quality assessment and performance improvement activities. (a) Quality assessment...

  1. 42 CFR 460.136 - Internal quality assessment and performance improvement activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Internal quality assessment and performance...) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Quality Assessment and Performance Improvement § 460.136 Internal quality assessment and performance improvement activities. (a) Quality assessment...

  2. New and vintage solutions to enhance the plasma metabolome coverage by LC-ESI-MS untargeted metabolomics: the not-so-simple process of method performance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tulipani, Sara; Mora-Cubillos, Ximena; Jáuregui, Olga; Llorach, Rafael; García-Fuentes, Eduardo; Tinahones, Francisco J; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina

    2015-03-03

    Although LC-MS untargeted metabolomics continues to expand into exiting research domains, methodological issues have not been solved yet by the definition of unbiased, standardized and globally accepted analytical protocols. In the present study, the response of the plasma metabolome coverage to specific methodological choices of the sample preparation (two SPE technologies, three sample-to-solvent dilution ratios) and the LC-ESI-MS data acquisition steps of the metabolomics workflow (four RP columns, four elution solvent combinations, two solvent quality grades, postcolumn modification of the mobile phase) was investigated in a pragmatic and decision tree-like performance evaluation strategy. Quality control samples, reference plasma and human plasma from a real nutrimetabolomic study were used for intermethod comparisons. Uni- and multivariate data analysis approaches were independently applied. The highest method performance was obtained by combining the plasma hybrid extraction with the highest solvent proportion during sample preparation, the use of a RP column compatible with 100% aqueous polar phase (Atlantis T3), and the ESI enhancement by using UHPLC-MS purity grade methanol as both organic phase and postcolumn modifier. Results led to the following considerations: submit plasma samples to hybrid extraction for removal of interfering components to minimize the major sample-dependent matrix effects; avoid solvent evaporation following sample extraction if loss in detection and peak shape distortion of early eluting metabolites are not noticed; opt for a RP column for superior retention of highly polar species when analysis fractionation is not feasible; use ultrahigh quality grade solvents and "vintage" analytical tricks such as postcolumn organic enrichment of the mobile phase to enhance ESI efficiency. The final proposed protocol offers an example of how novel and old-fashioned analytical solutions may fruitfully cohabit in untargeted metabolomics

  3. Observation of Simple Intransitive Actions: The Effect of Familiarity

    PubMed Central

    Plata Bello, Julio; Modroño, Cristián; Marcano, Francisco; González–Mora, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Humans are more familiar with index – thumb than with any other finger to thumb grasping. The effect of familiarity has been previously tested with complex, specialized and/or transitive movements, but not with simple intransitive ones. The aim of this study is to evaluate brain activity patterns during the observation of simple and intransitive finger movements with differing degrees of familiarity. Methodology A functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) study was performed using a paradigm consisting of the observation of 4 videos showing a finger opposition task between the thumb and the other fingers (index, middle, ring and little) in a repetitive manner with a fixed frequency (1 Hz). This movement is considered as the pantomime of a precision grasping action. Results Significant activity was identified in the bilateral Inferior Parietal Lobule and premotor regions with the selected level of significance (FDR [False Discovery Rate] = 0.01). The extent of the activation in both regions tended to decrease when the finger that performed the action was further from the thumb. More specifically, this effect showed a linear trend (index>middle>ring>little) in the right parietal and premotor regions. Conclusions The observation of less familiar simple intransitive movements produces less activation of parietal and premotor areas than familiar ones. The most important implication of this study is the identification of differences in brain activity during the observation of simple intransitive movements with different degrees of familiarity. PMID:24073213

  4. Simple size control of TiO2 nanoparticles and their electrochemical performance: emphasizing the contribution of the surface area to lithium storage at high-rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Joohyun; Um, Ji Hyun; Lee, Kyung Jae; Yu, Seung-Ho; Kim, Young-Jae; Sung, Yung-Eun; Lee, Jin-Kyu

    2016-03-01

    The particle size effects of TiO2 nanoparticles (TNPs), which are composed of small crystallites, on Li ion storage are a very fundamental and important subject. However, size control of TNPs under 200 nm using a sol-gel method has been limited due to the highly reactive precursor, titanium alkoxide. In this study, TNPs with various sizes even under 100 nm are obtained by controlling the reactant concentrations in a mixed solvent of ethanol and acetonitrile. Among them, three different sizes of TNPs are prepared to compare the Li ion storage capacity, and 60 nm TNPs are found to have the best reversible capacity of 182 mA h g-1 after 50 cycles at 1 C and a remarkable rate performance of 120 mA h g-1 at 10 C. Capacity increase upon cycling is observed in the size-controlled TNPs, and the explanation of this phenomenon is proposed to the lattice volume expansion of TiO2 upon intercalation for enabling further penetration of the electrolyte into the particles' interior. Moreover, the capacity at high rates is more closely related to the surface area from Hg porosimetry analysis than from typical N2 adsorption/desorption analysis.The particle size effects of TiO2 nanoparticles (TNPs), which are composed of small crystallites, on Li ion storage are a very fundamental and important subject. However, size control of TNPs under 200 nm using a sol-gel method has been limited due to the highly reactive precursor, titanium alkoxide. In this study, TNPs with various sizes even under 100 nm are obtained by controlling the reactant concentrations in a mixed solvent of ethanol and acetonitrile. Among them, three different sizes of TNPs are prepared to compare the Li ion storage capacity, and 60 nm TNPs are found to have the best reversible capacity of 182 mA h g-1 after 50 cycles at 1 C and a remarkable rate performance of 120 mA h g-1 at 10 C. Capacity increase upon cycling is observed in the size-controlled TNPs, and the explanation of this phenomenon is proposed to the lattice

  5. Sensitive and simple determination of bromate in foods disinfected with hypochlorite reagents using high performance liquid chromatography with post-column derivatization.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Azusa; Kubota, Hiroki; Komiya, Satomi; Sato, Kyoko; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Koshiishi, Ichiro

    2012-11-02

    A novel analytical method for the quantification of bromate in fresh foods using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a post-column reaction has been developed. The fresh food sample solutions were pretreated with homogenization, centrifugal ultrafiltration and subsequent solid phase extraction using a strong anion-exchange resin. After separation on a strong anion-exchange chromatography column using a highly concentrated NaCl solution (0.3M) as the eluent, the bromate was quantified by detection using a post-column reaction with a non-carcinogenic reagent (tetramethylbenzidine). The developed HPLC technique made it possible to quantify bromate in salt-rich fresh foods. The recoveries from fresh foods spiked with bromate at low levels (2 or 10 ng/g) satisfactorily ranged from 75.3 to 90.7%. The lowest quantification limit in fresh foods was estimated to be 0.6 ng/g as bromic acid. The method should be helpful for the quantification of bromate in fresh foods disinfected with hypochlorite solutions.

  6. Graphene-Enveloped Poly(N-vinylcarbazole)/Sulfur Composites with Improved Performances for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries by A Simple Vibrating-Emulsification Method.

    PubMed

    Qu, Guoxing; Cheng, Jianli; Li, Xiaodong; Huang, Ling; Ni, Wei; Wang, Zhiyu; Wang, Bin

    2015-08-05

    We prepared the Poly(N-vinylcarbazole)/sulfur@reduced graphene oxide (PVK/S@RGO) composites via a facile vibrating-emulsification synthesis method, which consist of the composites cores of large sulfur particles integrated into PVK conductive network and the conducting shell of reduced graphene oxide sheets. The PVK in the composites plays multiple roles in different processes. In preparation processes, PVK functions as dispersants to prevent sulfur particles from aggregating into excessively large size. And in the cycling test, PVK could play as additional electroactive binders and barriers to reinforce the electrode stability, accommodate volume change and reduce polysulfides shuttling. The resulting PVK/S@RGO composites containing 71 wt % sulfur exhibit excellent cycling performance and rate properties with a high discharge capacity of 843.5 mA h g(-1) and a charge capacity retention of 77% (only 0.07% capacity degradation per cycle) from 20th to 400th at 1 C, corresponding to an average Coulombic efficiency of over 94%.

  7. Determination of Ten Corticosteroids in Illegal Cosmetic Products by a Simple, Rapid, and High-Performance LC-MS/MS Method

    PubMed Central

    Polizzotto, Giuseppe; Macaluso, Andrea; Cammilleri, Gaetano; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of our present work was the development of a rapid high-performance liquid chromatography method with electrospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometry detection (LC-ESI-MS/MS) for the determination of several corticosteroids in cosmetic products. Corticosteroids are suspected to be illegally added in cosmetic preparations in order to enhance the curative effect against some skin diseases. Sample preparation step consists in a single extraction with acetonitrile followed by centrifugation and filtration. The compounds were separated by reversed-phase chromatography with water and acetonitrile (both with 0.1% formic acid) gradient elution and detected by ESI-MS positive and negative ionization mode. The method was validated at the validation level of 0.1 mg kg−1. Linearity was studied in the 5–250 μg L−1 range and linear coefficients (r2) were all over 0.99. The accuracy and precision of the method were satisfactory. The LOD ranged from 0.085 to 0.109 mg kg−1 and the LOQ from 0.102 to 0.121 mg kg−1. Mean recoveries for all the analytes were within the range 91.9–99.2%. The developed method is sensitive and useful for detection, quantification, and confirmation of these corticosteroids in cosmetic preparations and can be applied in the analysis of the suspected samples under investigation. PMID:28293261

  8. Simple and sensitive determination of hydrazine in drinking water by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry after derivatization with naphthalene-2,3-dialdehyde.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jin-Aa; Shin, Ho-Sang

    2015-05-22

    An ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed to determine the level of hydrazine in drinking water. The method is based on the derivatization of hydrazine with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde (NDA) in water. The optimum conditions for UPLC-MS/MS detection were determined as follows: derivatization reagent dosage, 50mg/L of NDA; pH 2; and reaction time, 1min; room temperature. The formed derivative was injected into an LC system without extraction or purification procedures. Under the established conditions, the method was used to detect hydrazine in raw drinking water and chlorinated drinking water. The limits of detection and quantification for hydrazine in drinking water were 0.003μg/L and 0.01μg/L, respectively. The accuracy was in the range of 97-104%, and precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, was less than 9% in drinking water. Hydrazine was detected at a concentration of 0.13μg/L in one sample among 24 raw drinking water samples and in a range of 0.04-0.45μg/L in three samples among 24 chlorinated drinking water samples.

  9. Simple respiratory protection--evaluation of the filtration performance of cloth masks and common fabric materials against 20-1000 nm size particles.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, Samy; Eimer, Benjamin; Shaffer, Ronald E

    2010-10-01

    A shortage of disposable filtering facepiece respirators can be expected during a pandemic respiratory infection such as influenza A. Some individuals may want to use common fabric materials for respiratory protection because of shortage or affordability reasons. To address the filtration performance of common fabric materials against nano-size particles including viruses, five major categories of fabric materials including sweatshirts, T-shirts, towels, scarves, and cloth masks were tested for polydisperse and monodisperse aerosols (20-1000 nm) at two different face velocities (5.5 and 16.5 cm s⁻¹) and compared with the penetration levels for N95 respirator filter media. The results showed that cloth masks and other fabric materials tested in the study had 40-90% instantaneous penetration levels against polydisperse NaCl aerosols employed in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health particulate respirator test protocol at 5.5 cm s⁻¹. Similarly, varying levels of penetrations (9-98%) were obtained for different size monodisperse NaCl aerosol particles in the 20-1000 nm range. The penetration levels of these fabric materials against both polydisperse and monodisperse aerosols were much higher than the penetrations for the control N95 respirator filter media. At 16.5 cm s⁻¹ face velocity, monodisperse aerosol penetrations slightly increased, while polydisperse aerosol penetrations showed no significant effect except one fabric mask with an increase. Results obtained in the study show that common fabric materials may provide marginal protection against nanoparticles including those in the size ranges of virus-containing particles in exhaled breath.

  10. A rapid and simple high-performance liquid chromatography method for the determination of human plasma levofloxacin concentration and its application to bioequivalence studies.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi-Ling; Yang, Min; Yu, Xi-Yong; Peng, Huai-Yan; Shan, Zhi-Xin; Chen, Shu-Zhen; Lin, Qiu-Xiong; Liu, Xiao-Ying; Chen, Tie-Feng; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Lin, Shu-Guang

    2007-10-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography method with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD) for the determination of levofloxacin in human plasma is described. Neutralized with phosphate buffer (pH 7.0), the sample (0.1 mL) was extracted with dichlormethane (1 mL). After voltex-mixing and centrifuged at 3000g for 6 min at 4 degrees C, the upper aqueous layer was aspirated using a micro vacuum pump and the organic layer was directly transferred to a clean test tube without pipetting. The organic solvent was evaporated and the residues were reconstituted with the mobile phase. Levofloxacin and terazosin (internal standard, IS) were chromatographically separated on a C(18) column with a mobile phase containing phosphate buffer (pH 3.0, 10 mm), acetonitrile and triethylamine (76:24:0.076, v/v/v) at a flow rate of 1 mL/min. The analytes were detected using fluorescence detection at an excitation and emission wavelength of 295 and 440 nm, respectively. The linear range of the calibration curves was 0.0521-5.213 microg/mL for levofloxacin with a lower limit of quantitation (0.0521 microg/mL). The retention times of levofloxacin and terazosin were 2.5 and 3.1 min, respectively. Within- and between-run precision was less than 12 and 11%, respectively. Accuracy ranged from -6.3 to 4.5%. The recovery ranged from 86 to 89% at the concentrations of 0.0521, 0.5213 and 5.213 microg/mL. The present HPLC-FLD method is sensitive, efficient and reliable. The method described herein has been successfully used for the pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence studies of a levofloxacin formulation product after oral administration to healthy Chinese volunteers.

  11. A sensitive and simple ultra-high-performance-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry based method for the quantification of D-amino acids in body fluids.

    PubMed

    Visser, Wouter F; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M; Ophoff, Roel; Bakker, Steven; Klomp, Leo W; Berger, Ruud; de Koning, Tom J

    2011-10-07

    D-Amino acids are increasingly being recognized as important signaling molecules in mammals, including humans. D-Serine and D-aspartate are believed to act as signaling molecules in the central nervous system. Interestingly, several other D-amino acids also occur in human plasma, but very little is currently known regarding their function and origin. Abnormal levels of D-amino acids have been implicated in the pathogenesis of different diseases, including schizophrenia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), indicating that D-amino acid levels hold potential as diagnostic markers. Research into the biological functions of D-amino acids is hindered, however, by the lack of sufficiently sensitive, high-throughput analytical methods. In particular, the interference of large amounts of L-amino acids in biological samples and the low concentrations of D-amino acids are challenging. In this paper, we compared 7 different chiral derivatization agents for the analysis of D-amino acids and show that the chiral reagent (S)-NIFE offers outstanding performance in terms of sensitivity and enantioselectivity. An UPLC-MS/MS based method for the quantification of D-amino acids human biological fluids was then developed using (S)-NIFE. Baseline separation (R(s)>2.45) was achieved for the isomers of all 19 chiral proteinogenic amino acids. The limit of detection was <1 nM for all amino acids except d-alanine (1.98 nM), d-methionine (1.18 nM) and d-asparagine (5.15 nM). For measurements in human plasma, cerebrospinal fluid and urine, the accuracy ranged between 85% and 107%. The intra-assay and inter-assay were both <16% RSD for these three different matrices. Importantly, the method does not suffer from spontaneous racemization during sample preparation and derivatization. Using the described method, D-amino acid levels in human cerebrospinal fluid, plasma and urine were measured.

  12. Simple method for the simultaneous analysis of pipecolic acid and lysine by high-performance liquid chromatography and its application to rumen liquor and plasma of ruminants.

    PubMed

    Hussain-Yusuf, H; Onodera, R; Nasser, M E; Sato, H

    1999-11-26

    A high-performance liquid chromatography method for the simultaneous determination of pipecolic acid (Pip) and lysine (Lys), a precursor of Pip, in the rumen liquor and plasma of ruminant animals was established. Samples of rumen liquor and plasma were deproteinized with 50% acetonitrile and derivatized with a fluorescent agent 9-fluorenylmethyloxy carbonyl chloride (Fmoc-Cl). Chromatographic separation was achieved on a TSK gel ODS-80TM column using a reversed-phase gradient elution system. For the gradient elution, two mobile phases, A and B, were needed, both commonly consisted of: 5 mM L-proline, 2.5 mM cupric sulfate and 6.5 mM ammonium acetate. Mobile phase B additionally contains 50% (v/v) acetonitrile. The pH of both mobile phases was adjusted to 7.0. Derivatized Pip and Lys were detected on a fluorescent detector at excitation and emission wavelengths of 260 and 313 nm, respectively. The calibration curves were linear within the range 0 to 1 mM (r>0.999). The average recoveries for Pip and Lys were 95.9+/-1.8 and 93.2+/-2.5% in rumen liquor and 98.3+/-1.4 and 97.5+/-1.3% in plasma, respectively. The limits of detection for Pip and Lys were 0.6 and 0.7 microM in rumen liquor and 0.01 and 0.05 microM in plasma. The assay has acceptable precision, relative standard deviation (RSD) for reproducibility (within-day and day-to-day variation) were less than 5.2% for aqueous (5.0 microM Pip and Lys), MB9 (5.0 microM Pip and Lys), plasma (7.1 microM Pip and 85.6 microM Lys) and rumen liquor (28.4 microM Pip and 10.2 microM Lys) samples. The levels of Pip and Lys in faunated goats, determined from three animals over a period of two days sampling, were found to be 36.8+/-18.1 and 14.6+/-2.8 microM in rumen liquor, and 7.3+/-2.5 and 137.3+/-38.0 microM in plasma at 1 h after feeding. This is the first report on the normal levels of Pip in the rumen liquor and plasma of faunated goat.

  13. A user oriented computer program for the analysis of microwave mixers, and a study of the effects of the series inductance and diode capacitance on the performance of some simple mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, P. H.; Kerr, A. R.

    1979-01-01

    A user oriented computer program for analyzing microwave and millimeter wave mixers with a single Schottky barrier diode of known I-V and C-V characteristics is described. The program first performs a nonlinear analysis to determine the diode conductance and capacitance waveforms produced by the local oscillator. A small signal linear analysis is then used to find the conversion loss, port impedances, and input noise temperature of the mixer. Thermal noise from the series resistance of the diode and shot noise from the periodically pumped current in the diode conductance are considered. The effects of the series inductance and diode capacitance on the performance of some simple mixer circuits using a conventional Schottky diode, a Schottky diode in which there is no capacitance variation, and a Mott diode are studied. It is shown that the parametric effects of the voltage dependent capacitance of a conventional Schottky diode may be either detrimental or beneficial depending on the diode and circuit parameters.

  14. A simple method for the assay of colistin in human plasma, using pre-column derivatization with 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate in solid-phase extraction cartridges and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Milne, R W; Nation, R L; Turnidge, J D; Coulthard, K; Johnson, D W

    2001-09-25

    A simple, selective and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method is described for the determination of colistin in human plasma. Derivatization with 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate was performed in the same solid-phase extraction C18 cartridge used for sample pre-treatment, followed by reversed-phase HPLC with fluorimetric detection. Quantification was achieved using the ratio of the summed peak areas of colistin A and B derivatives to that of the derivative of netilmicin (internal standard). Linear calibration curves were obtained within the concentrations of colistin sulfate from 0.10 to 4.0 mg/l in plasma. Accuracy was within 10% and reproducibility (RSD) was less than 10%.

  15. Monitoring and evaluating the quality consistency of Compound Bismuth Aluminate tablets by a simple quantified ratio fingerprint method combined with simultaneous determination of five compounds and correlated with antioxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingchun; Liu, Zhongbo; Sun, Guoxiang; Wang, Yan; Ling, Junhong; Gao, Jiayue; Huang, Jiahao

    2015-01-01

    A combination method of multi-wavelength fingerprinting and multi-component quantification by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with diode array detector (DAD) was developed and validated to monitor and evaluate the quality consistency of herbal medicines (HM) in the classical preparation Compound Bismuth Aluminate tablets (CBAT). The validation results demonstrated that our method met the requirements of fingerprint analysis and quantification analysis with suitable linearity, precision, accuracy, limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ). In the fingerprint assessments, rather than using conventional qualitative "Similarity" as a criterion, the simple quantified ratio fingerprint method (SQRFM) was recommended, which has an important quantified fingerprint advantage over the "Similarity" approach. SQRFM qualitatively and quantitatively offers the scientific criteria for traditional Chinese medicines (TCM)/HM quality pyramid and warning gate in terms of three parameters. In order to combine the comprehensive characterization of multi-wavelength fingerprints, an integrated fingerprint assessment strategy based on information entropy was set up involving a super-information characteristic digitized parameter of fingerprints, which reveals the total entropy value and absolute information amount about the fingerprints and, thus, offers an excellent method for fingerprint integration. The correlation results between quantified fingerprints and quantitative determination of 5 marker compounds, including glycyrrhizic acid (GLY), liquiritin (LQ), isoliquiritigenin (ILG), isoliquiritin (ILQ) and isoliquiritin apioside (ILA), indicated that multi-component quantification could be replaced by quantified fingerprints. The Fenton reaction was employed to determine the antioxidant activities of CBAT samples in vitro, and they were correlated with HPLC fingerprint components using the partial least squares regression (PLSR) method. In

  16. Monitoring and Evaluating the Quality Consistency of Compound Bismuth Aluminate Tablets by a Simple Quantified Ratio Fingerprint Method Combined with Simultaneous Determination of Five Compounds and Correlated with Antioxidant Activities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingchun; Liu, Zhongbo; Sun, Guoxiang; Wang, Yan; Ling, Junhong; Gao, Jiayue; Huang, Jiahao

    2015-01-01

    A combination method of multi-wavelength fingerprinting and multi-component quantification by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with diode array detector (DAD) was developed and validated to monitor and evaluate the quality consistency of herbal medicines (HM) in the classical preparation Compound Bismuth Aluminate tablets (CBAT). The validation results demonstrated that our method met the requirements of fingerprint analysis and quantification analysis with suitable linearity, precision, accuracy, limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ). In the fingerprint assessments, rather than using conventional qualitative “Similarity” as a criterion, the simple quantified ratio fingerprint method (SQRFM) was recommended, which has an important quantified fingerprint advantage over the “Similarity” approach. SQRFM qualitatively and quantitatively offers the scientific criteria for traditional Chinese medicines (TCM)/HM quality pyramid and warning gate in terms of three parameters. In order to combine the comprehensive characterization of multi-wavelength fingerprints, an integrated fingerprint assessment strategy based on information entropy was set up involving a super-information characteristic digitized parameter of fingerprints, which reveals the total entropy value and absolute information amount about the fingerprints and, thus, offers an excellent method for fingerprint integration. The correlation results between quantified fingerprints and quantitative determination of 5 marker compounds, including glycyrrhizic acid (GLY), liquiritin (LQ), isoliquiritigenin (ILG), isoliquiritin (ILQ) and isoliquiritin apioside (ILA), indicated that multi-component quantification could be replaced by quantified fingerprints. The Fenton reaction was employed to determine the antioxidant activities of CBAT samples in vitro, and they were correlated with HPLC fingerprint components using the partial least squares regression (PLSR) method

  17. Part A: Assessing the performance of the COMFA outdoor thermal comfort model on subjects performing physical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenny, Natasha A.; Warland, Jon S.; Brown, Robert D.; Gillespie, Terry G.

    2009-09-01

    This study assessed the performance of the COMFA outdoor thermal comfort model on subjects performing moderate to vigorous physical activity. Field tests were conducted on 27 subjects performing 30 min of steady-state activity (walking, running, and cycling) in an outdoor environment. The predicted COMFA budgets were compared to the actual thermal sensation (ATS) votes provided by participants during each 5-min interval. The results revealed a normal distribution in the subjects’ ATS votes, with 82% of votes received in categories 0 (neutral) to +2 (warm). The ATS votes were significantly dependent upon sex, air temperature, short and long-wave radiation, wind speed, and metabolic activity rate. There was a significant positive correlation between the ATS and predicted budgets (Spearman’s rho = 0.574, P < 0.01). However, the predicted budgets did not display a normal distribution, and the model produced erroneous estimates of the heat and moisture exchange between the human body and the ambient environment in 6% of the cases.

  18. Simple wavelength assignment protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryaputra, Stephen; Touch, Joseph D.; Bannister, Joseph A.

    2000-10-01

    IP routers can be coupled with wavelength-selective optical cross- connects to support existing Internet infrastructure in a wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) optical network. Because optical wavelength routing is transparent to IP, packets can bypass traditional forwarding and pass directly through the optical cross-connect, resulting in very high throughput and low delay routing. This approach shares features with label switching, but wavelengths are much more scarce resource than labels. Because optical switches have larger switching times than electronic switches, and wavelength conversions are expensive, wavelength label swapping is not easily done. Wavelength label assignments must consider these limitations to be practical in an optical environment. The performance of an instance of this approach, called Packet over Wavelengths (POW) has been simulated and studied. A new signaling protocol, Simple Wavelength Assignment Protocol (SWAP) is devised to be POW signaling protocol. SWAP takes into account the optical device limitations, and is designed to minimize wavelength conversion, utilize wavelengths with the merging of flows, and reduce the reconfiguration of optical switches. SWAP, to our knowledge, is the first approach to combine signaling and wavelength assignment in an on- line protocol. This paper describes high level SWAP design challenges, decision, and overhead.

  19. Effects of Color Stimulation on Performance and Activity of Hyperactive and Nonhyperactive Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zentall, Sydney S.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretically based investigation of color stimulation effects on hyperactivity was conducted. Findings were that stimulation added early or late to a sustained attention task can normalize the performance of hyperactive children and reduce their activity. (Author/LMO)

  20. Activity and Task Performance of Hyperactive Children as a Function of Environmental Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zentall, Sydney S.; Zentall, Thomas R.

    1976-01-01

    Hyperactive children in a high-stimulation environment were significantly less active and performed an academically related task no worse than when placed in a low-stimulation environment. Understimulation rather than overstimulation apparently precipitates hyperactive behavior. (Author)

  1. 77 FR 33808 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review: Airline Service Quality Performance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-07

    ... Research & Innovative Technology Administration Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review: Airline Service Quality Performance--Part 234 AGENCY: Research & Innovative Technology Administration..., DC, on May 31, 2012. Patricia Hu, Director, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, Research...

  2. 75 FR 41920 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Airline Service Quality Performance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Research & Innovative Technology Administration Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Airline Service Quality Performance--Part 234 AGENCY: Research & Innovative Technology...

  3. 77 FR 18306 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Airline Service Quality Performance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... Research & Innovative Technology Administration Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Airline Service Quality Performance AGENCY: Research & Innovative Technology Administration (RITA), Bureau... 20, 2012. Patricia Hu Director, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, Research and...

  4. Performance error-related activity in monkey striatum during social interactions

    PubMed Central

    Báez-Mendoza, Raymundo; Schultz, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring our performance is fundamental to motor control while monitoring other’s performance is fundamental to social coordination. The striatum is hypothesized to play a role in action selection, action initiation, and action parsing, but we know little of its role in performance monitoring. Furthermore, the striatum contains neurons that respond to own and other’s actions. Therefore, we asked if striatal neurons signal own and conspecific’s performance errors. Two macaque monkeys sitting across a touch-sensitive table in plain view of each other took turns performing a simple motor task to obtain juice rewards while we recorded single striatal neurons from one monkey at a time. Both monkeys made more errors after individually making an error but made fewer errors after a conspecific error. Thus, monkeys’ behavior was influenced by their own and their conspecific’s past behavior. A population of striatal neurons responded to own and conspecific’s performance errors independently of a negative reward prediction error signal. Overall, these data suggest that monkeys are influenced by social errors and that striatal neurons signal performance errors. These signals might be important for social coordination, observational learning and adjusting to an ever-changing social landscape. PMID:27849004

  5. A Simple "Tubeless" Telescope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straulino, S.; Bonechi, L.

    2010-01-01

    Two lenses make it possible to create a simple telescope with quite large magnification. The set-up is very simple and can be reproduced in schools, provided the laboratory has a range of lenses with different focal lengths. In this article, the authors adopt the Keplerian configuration, which is composed of two converging lenses. This instrument,…

  6. The neural coding of expected and unexpected monetary performance outcomes: dissociations between active and observational learning.

    PubMed

    Bellebaum, C; Jokisch, D; Gizewski, E R; Forsting, M; Daum, I

    2012-02-01

    Successful adaptation to the environment requires the learning of stimulus-response-outcome associations. Such associations can be learned actively by trial and error or by observing the behaviour and accompanying outcomes in other persons. The present study investigated similarities and differences in the neural mechanisms of active and observational learning from monetary feedback using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Two groups of 15 subjects each - active and observational learners - participated in the experiment. On every trial, active learners chose between two stimuli and received monetary feedback. Each observational learner observed the choices and outcomes of one active learner. Learning performance as assessed via active test trials without feedback was comparable between groups. Different activation patterns were observed for the processing of unexpected vs. expected monetary feedback in active and observational learners, particularly for positive outcomes. Activity for unexpected vs. expected reward was stronger in the right striatum in active learning, while activity in the hippocampus was bilaterally enhanced in observational and reduced in active learning. Modulation of activity by prediction error (PE) magnitude was observed in the right putamen in both types of learning, whereas PE related activations in the right anterior caudate nucleus and in the medial orbitofrontal cortex were stronger for active learning. The striatum and orbitofrontal cortex thus appear to link reward stimuli to own behavioural reactions and are less strongly involved when the behavioural outcome refers to another person's action. Alternative explanations such as differences in reward value between active and observational learning are also discussed.

  7. Tadpole swimming performance and activity affected by acute exposure to sublethal levels of carbaryl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, C.M.

    1997-01-01

    General activity and swimming performance (i.e., sprint speed and distance) of plains leopard frog tadpoles (Rana blairi) were examined after acute exposure to three sublethal concentrations of carbaryl (3.5, 5.0, and 7.2 mg/L). Both swimming performance and spontaneous swimming activity are important for carrying out life history functions (e.g., growth and development) and for escaping from predators. Measured tadpole activity diminished by nearly 90% at 3.5 mg/L carbaryl and completely ceased at 7.2 mg/L. Sprint speed and sprint distance also decreased significantly following exposure. Carbaryl affected both swimming performance and activity after just 24 h, suggesting that 24 h may be an adequate length of exposure to determine behavioral effects on tadpoles. Slight recovery of activity levels was noted at 24 and 48 h post-exposure; no recovery of swimming performance was observed. Reduction in activity and swimming performance may result in increased predation rates and, because activity is closely associated with feeding, may result in slowed growth leading to a failure to emerge before pond drying or an indirect reduction in adult fitness. Acute exposure to sublethal toxicants such as carbaryl may not only affect immediate survival of tadpoles but also impact critical life history functions and generate changes at the local population level.

  8. Simple circuit performs binary addition and subtraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, R. A.; Schaefer, D. H.

    1965-01-01

    Ripple adder reduces the number of logic circuits required to preform binary addition and subtraction. The adder uses dual input and delayed output flip-flops in one register. The contents of this register are summed with those of a standard register through conventional AND/gates.

  9. Performances of Student Activism: Sound, Silence, Gender, and Dis/ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasque, Penny A.; Vargas, Juanita Gamez

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores the various performances of activism by students through sound, silence, gender, and dis/ability and how these performances connect to social change efforts around issues such as human trafficking, homeless children, hunger, and children with varying abilities.

  10. Performance Assessment of the Spare Parts for the Activation of Relocated Systems (SPARES) Forecasting Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Development and Performance..........12 ISSL/ FOSSL Performance Assessment..........12 Mission Change Data Collection System. ....... 17 Recording MCD Data at...Mission Change Special Level Detail Records (216).... .................. 35 SBSS Range Citeria...............7 Analysis of New Activation Spares Support...78 Item Record Data Files ................ 78 Mission Change Data (MCD) Files from the Five Source Bases. .................... 79

  11. Giving meaning to measure: linking self-reported fatigue and function to performance of everyday activities.

    PubMed

    Mallinson, Trudy; Cella, David; Cashy, John; Holzner, Bernhard

    2006-03-01

    Fatigue, a common symptom of cancer patients, particularly those on active treatment, is generally evaluated using self-report methods, yet it remains unclear how self-reported fatigue scores relate to performance of daily activities. This study examines the relationships among self-reported and performance-based measures of function in patients receiving chemotherapy (CT) to link self-reported fatigue measures to self-report and performance-based measures of function. Self-reported fatigue using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue (FACIT-F) and self-reported physical function using the physical function 10 subscale of the Short Form 36 (SF-36) (PF-10) were measured in 64 patients within 2 weeks of beginning CT (n=64) and after three cycles of CT (n=48). Motor and cognitive functions were captured using five self-reported and seven observed-performance measures at each time point. Significant correlations between self-reported and observed measures ranged from 0.30 to 0.71. Self-reported fatigue correlated (0.30-0.45) with performance-based function. FACIT-F scores in the range of 30 and below and PF-10 scores in the range of 50 and below were related to an increased difficulty performing everyday activities. Observed measures of physical performance correlate moderately with self-reported fatigue and self-reported physical function. These relationships enable one to begin linking fatigue scores directly to a person's ability to perform everyday activities.

  12. A longitudinal study of poor performance and subclinical respiratory viral activity in Standardbred trotters

    PubMed Central

    Back, Helena; Penell, Johanna; Pringle, John; Isaksson, Mats; Ronéus, Nils; Treiberg Berndtsson, Louise; Ståhl, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Introduction While clinical respiratory disease is considered a main cause of poor performance in horses, the role of subclinical respiratory virus infections is less clear and needs further investigation. Aims and objectives In this descriptive longitudinal study the relationship of markers of subclinical respiratory viral activity to occurrence of poor performance in racing Standardbred trotters was investigated. Material and methods 66 elite Standardbred trotters were followed for 13 months by nasal swabs analysed with qPCR for equine influenza virus, equine arteritis virus, equine rhinitis B virus (ERBV), equine herpesvirus type 1(EHV-1) and equine herpesvirus type 4 (EHV-4) and serology to equine rhinitis A virus (ERAV), ERBV, EHV-1 and EHV-4, as well as the acute phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA). Findings on lab analyses were subsequently assessed for possible correlations to workload performance and trainer opinion measures of poor performance. Results Despite occurrence of poor performance and subclinical viral activity the authors were unable to detect association neither between subclinical viral activity and poor performance, nor between SAA elevations and either viral activity or poor performance. Conclusions Consistent with earlier study results, antibody titres to ERBV remained high for at least a year and few horses two years or older were seronegative to either ERAV or ERBV. In absence of clinical signs, serology to common respiratory viruses appears to have little diagnostic benefit in evaluation of poor performance in young athletic horses. PMID:26392904

  13. CF6 Jet Engine Performance Improvement: High Pressure Turbine Active Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, S. E.; Fasching, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    An active clearance control system was developed which reduces fuel consumption and performance degradation. This system utilizes compressor discharge air during takeoff and fan discharge air during cruise to impinge on the shroud structure to improve the thermal response. The system was evaluated in component and engine tests. The test results demonstrated a performance improvement of 0.7 percent in cruise SFC.

  14. 78 FR 64929 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Annual Performance Reports for Title...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Annual Performance Reports for Title III and... to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Annual Performance Reports for....), ED is proposing an extension of an existing information collection. DATES: Interested persons...

  15. Annual Summary of Immobilized Low Activity Tank Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment for 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, F. M.

    2002-08-01

    As required by the Department of Energy ( DOE), an annual summary of the adequacy of the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment (ILAW PA) is necessary in each year in which a full performance assessment is not issued.

  16. Performance degradation and altered cerebral activation during dual performance: Evidence for a bottom-up attentional system

    PubMed Central

    Gazes, Yunglin; Rakitin, Brian C.; Steffener, Jason; Habeck, Christian; Butterfield, Brady; Ghez, Claude; Stern, Yaakov

    2012-01-01

    Subjects performed a continuous tracking concurrently with an intermittent visual detection task to investigate the existence of competition for a capacity-limited stage (a bottleneck stage). Both perceptual and response-related processes between the two tasks were examined behaviorally and the changes in brain activity during dual-tasking relative to single-task were also assessed. Tracking error and joystick speed were analyzed for changes that were time-locked to visual detection stimuli. The associated brain activations were examined with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). These were analyzed using mixed block and event-related models to tease apart sustained neural activity and activations associated with individual events. Increased tracking error and decreased joystick speed were observed relative to the target stimuli in the dual-task condition only, which supports the existence of a bottleneck stage in response-related processes. Neuroimaging data show decreased activation to target relative to non-target stimuli in the dual-task condition in the left primary motor and somatosensory cortices controlling right-hand tracking, consistent with the tracking interference observed in behavioral data. Furthermore, the ventral attention system, rather than the dorsal attention system, was found to mediate task coordination between tracking and visual detection. PMID:20188768

  17. The Prisoner's Dilemma and Economics 101: Do Active Learning Exercises Correlate with Student Performance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byun, Chong Hyun Christie

    2014-01-01

    The importance of active learning in the classroom has been well established in the field of Economic education. This paper examines the connection between active learning and performance outcomes in an Economics 101 course. Students participated in single play simultaneous move game with a clear dominant strategy, modeled after the Prisoner's…

  18. The Relationship between Engagement in Cocurricular Activities and Academic Performance: Exploring Gender Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zacherman, Avi; Foubert, John

    2014-01-01

    The effects of time spent in cocurricular activities on academic performance was tested. A curvilinear relationship between hours per week spent involved in cocurricular activities and grade point average was discovered such that a low amount of cocurricular involvement was beneficial to grades, while a high amount can potentially hurt academic…

  19. Relation between Academic Performance and Students' Engagement in Digital Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertheussen, Bernt Arne; Myrland, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the effect of student engagement in digital learning activities on academic performance for 120 students enrolled in an undergraduate finance course. Interactive practice and exam problem files were available to each student, and individual download activity was automatically recorded during the first 50 days of the course.…

  20. Relationships between Writing Motivation, Writing Activity, and Writing Performance: Effects of Grade, Sex, and Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troia, Gary A.; Harbaugh, Allen G.; Shankland, Rebecca K.; Wolbers, Kimberly A.; Lawrence, Ann M.

    2013-01-01

    A convenience sample of 618 children and adolescents in grades 4 through 10, excluding grade 8, were asked to complete a writing motivation and activity scale and to provide a timed narrative writing sample to permit an examination of the relationships between writing motivation, writing activity, writing performance, and the student…

  1. Patterns of Brain-Electrical Activity during Declarative Memory Performance in 10-Month-Old Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morasch, Katherine C.; Bell, Martha Ann

    2009-01-01

    This study of infant declarative memory concurrently examined brain-electrical activity and deferred imitation performance in 10-month-old infants. Continuous electroencephalogram (EEG) measures were collected throughout the activity-matched baseline, encoding (modeling) and retrieval (delayed test) phases of a within-subjects deferred imitation…

  2. Excellent performance of cobalt-impregnated activated carbon in peroxymonosulfate activation for acid orange 7 oxidation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tianyin; Chen, Jiabin; Wang, Zhongming; Guo, Xin; Crittenden, John C

    2017-03-01

    Cobalt-impregnated activated carbon (GAC/Co) was used to produce sulfate radical (SO4(·-)) from peroxymonosulfate (PMS) in aqueous solution (hereafter called PMS activation). We evaluated its effectiveness by examining the degradation of orange acid 7 (AO7). GAC/Co exhibited high activity to activate PMS to degrade AO7. The degradation efficiency of AO7 increased with increasing dosage of GAC/Co or PMS and elevated temperatures. pH 8 was most favorable for the degradation of AO7 by GAC/Co-activated PMS. The radical quenching experiments indicated that the reactions most likely took place both in the bulk solution and on the surface of GAC/Co. We found that SO4(·-) played a dominant role in AO7 degradation. Sodium chloride (NaCl) which presents in most dye wastewater had a significant impact on AO7 degradation. Low dosages (<0.4 M) of NaCl showed a slight inhibitory effect, whereas high dosages (0.8 M) increased the reaction rate. HOCl was confirmed as the main contributor for accelerating AO7 degradation with high concentration of NaCl. In a continuous-flow reaction with an empty-bed contact time of 1.35 min, AO7 was not detected in the effluent for 0 to 18.72 L of treated influent volume (156 h) and 85% removal efficiency was still observed after 40.32 L of treated volume (336 h). Finally, the azo bond and the naphthalene structure in AO7 were destroyed and the degradation pathway was proposed.

  3. Metabolic and Biomechanical Measures of Gait Efficiency of Three Multi-Axial, Vertical Shock and Energy Storing Return Prosthetic Feet During Simple & Complex Mobility Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    the performance of ten highly mobile transtibial amputees on an obstacle course and laboratory setting utilizing three different multi-function...5 Introduction The purpose of the study is to assess the performance of 14 highly mobile transtibial amputees on an...or highly accomplished recreational/competitive amputee athlete. Amputee performance will also be compared to a non- amputee control group. Body

  4. Research Activity in Computational Physics utilizing High Performance Computing: Co-authorship Network Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sul-Ah; Jung, Youngim

    2016-10-01

    The research activities of the computational physicists utilizing high performance computing are analyzed by bibliometirc approaches. This study aims at providing the computational physicists utilizing high-performance computing and policy planners with useful bibliometric results for an assessment of research activities. In order to achieve this purpose, we carried out a co-authorship network analysis of journal articles to assess the research activities of researchers for high-performance computational physics as a case study. For this study, we used journal articles of the Scopus database from Elsevier covering the time period of 2004-2013. We extracted the author rank in the physics field utilizing high-performance computing by the number of papers published during ten years from 2004. Finally, we drew the co-authorship network for 45 top-authors and their coauthors, and described some features of the co-authorship network in relation to the author rank. Suggestions for further studies are discussed.

  5. Water-activated graphite felt as a high-performance electrode for vanadium redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabtamu, Daniel Manaye; Chen, Jian-Yu; Chang, Yu-Chung; Wang, Chen-Hao

    2017-02-01

    A simple, green, novel, time-efficient, and potentially cost-effective water activation method was employed to enhance the electrochemical activity of graphite felt (GF) electrodes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). The GF electrode prepared with a water vapor injection time of 5 min at 700 °C exhibits the highest electrochemical activity for the VO2+/VO2+ couple among all the tested electrodes. This is attributed to the small, controlled amount of water vapor that was introduced producing high contents of oxygen-containing functional groups, such as sbnd OH groups, on the surface of the GF fibers, which are known to be electrochemically active sites for vanadium redox reactions. Charge-discharge tests further confirm that only 5 min of GF water activation is required to improve the efficiency of the VRFB cell. The average coulombic efficiency, voltage efficiency, and energy efficiency are 95.06%, 87.42%, and 83.10%, respectively, at a current density of 50 mA cm-2. These voltage and energy efficiencies are determined to be considerably higher than those of VRFB cells assembled using heat-treated GF electrodes without water activation and pristine GF electrodes.

  6. Asymmetric AgPd-AuNR heterostructure with enhanced photothermal performance and SERS activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Liu, Zeke; Kang, Xiaolin; Guo, Jun; Ma, Wanli; Cheng, Si

    2016-01-28

    Most as-reported nanostructures through galvanic replacement reactions are still symmetric hollow structures, until now. Asymmetric structures fabricated through a galvanic replacement reaction have been rarely reported. However, asymmetric heterostructures can generally lead to new intriguing properties through asymmetric synergistic coupling. Here, we report a simple synthesis of an asymmetric one-ended AgPd bimetal on Au nanorods (AuNR) by combining a galvanic replacement reaction with an Ostwald ripening process. The morphological evolution from a nanodumbbell to a dandelion structure is thoroughly investigated. The unique asymmetric AgPd-AuNR heterostructures possess the required plasmonic performance and avoid strong damping caused by the poor plasmonic metal Pd, resulting in a superior photothermal heating performance and enhanced SERS sensitivity for in situ monitoring of a catalytic reaction compared with the symmetric counterparts.

  7. Simple inflationary quintessential model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Haro, Jaume; Amorós, Jaume; Pan, Supriya

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of a flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker geometry, we present a non-geodesically past complete model of our Universe without the big bang singularity at finite cosmic time, describing its evolution starting from its early inflationary era up to the present accelerating phase. We found that a hydrodynamical fluid with nonlinear equation of state could result in such scenario, which after the end of this inflationary stage, suffers a sudden phase transition and enters into the stiff matter dominated era, and the Universe becomes reheated due to a huge amount of particle production. Finally, it asymptotically enters into the de Sitter phase concluding the present accelerated expansion. Using the reconstruction technique, we also show that this background provides an extremely simple inflationary quintessential potential whose inflationary part is given by the well-known 1-dimensional Higgs potential, i.e., a double well inflationary potential, and the quintessential one by an exponential potential that leads to a deflationary regime after this inflation, and it can depict the current cosmic acceleration at late times. Moreover the Higgs potential leads to a power spectrum of the cosmological perturbations which fit well with the latest Planck estimations. Further, we compared our viable potential with some known inflationary quintessential potential, which shows that our quintessential model, that is, the Higgs potential combined with the exponential one, is an improved version of them because it contains an analytic solution that allows us to perform all analytic calculations. Finally, we have shown that the introduction of a nonzero cosmological constant simplifies the potential considerably with an analytic behavior of the background which again permits us to evaluate all the quantities analytically.

  8. The coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism with brain activation is similar for simple and complex stimuli in human primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Griffeth, Valerie E M; Simon, Aaron B; Buxton, Richard B

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative functional MRI (fMRI) experiments to measure blood flow and oxygen metabolism coupling in the brain typically rely on simple repetitive stimuli. Here we compared such stimuli with a more naturalistic stimulus. Previous work on the primary visual cortex showed that direct attentional modulation evokes a blood flow (CBF) response with a relatively large oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) response in comparison to an unattended stimulus, which evokes a much smaller metabolic response relative to the flow response. We hypothesized that a similar effect would be associated with a more engaging stimulus, and tested this by measuring the primary human visual cortex response to two contrast levels of a radial flickering checkerboard in comparison to the response to free viewing of brief movie clips. We did not find a significant difference in the blood flow-metabolism coupling (n=%ΔCBF/%ΔCMRO2) between the movie stimulus and the flickering checkerboards employing two different analysis methods: a standard analysis using the Davis model and a new analysis using a heuristic model dependent only on measured quantities. This finding suggests that in the primary visual cortex a naturalistic stimulus (in comparison to a simple repetitive stimulus) is either not sufficient to provoke a change in flow-metabolism coupling by attentional modulation as hypothesized, that the experimental design disrupted the cognitive processes underlying the response to a more natural stimulus, or that the technique used is not sensitive enough to detect a small difference.

  9. A Simple Raman Spectrometer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blond, J. P.; Boggett, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses some basic physical ideas about light scattering and describes a simple Raman spectrometer, a single prism monochromator and a multiplier detector. This discussion is intended for British undergraduate physics students. (HM)

  10. Fibrosis and Simple Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... caffeine and other stimulants found in coffee, tea, chocolate, and many soft drinks. Studies have not found ... side effects. How do fibrosis and simple cysts affect your risk for breast cancer? Neither fibrosis nor ...

  11. A Simple Water Channel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, A. S.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a simple water channel, for use with an overhead projector. It is run from a water tap and may be used for flow visualization experiments, including the effect of streamlining and elementary building aerodynamics. (MLH)

  12. Simple Machines Simply Put.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood, James J.

    1994-01-01

    Students explore the workings of the lever, wheel and axle, and the inclined plane as they build simple toys--a bulldozer and a road grader. The project takes four weeks. Diagrams and procedures are included. (PR)

  13. Assessment of antioxidant activity in Victorian marine algal extracts using high performance thin-layer chromatography and multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Agatonovic-Kustrin, Snezana; Morton, David W; Ristivojević, Petar

    2016-10-14

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate a rapid and simple high performance thin layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method to screen for antioxidant activity in algal samples. 16 algal species were collected from local Victorian beaches. Fucoxanthin, one of the most abundant marine carotenoids was quantified directly from the HPTLC plates before derivatization, while derivatization either with 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) or ferric chloride (FeCl3) was used to analyze antioxidants in marine algae, based on their ability to scavenge non biological stable free radical (DPPH) or to chelate iron ions. Principal component analysis of obtained HPTLC fingerprints has classified algae species into 5 groups according to their chemical/antioxidant profiles. The investigated brown algae samples were found to be rich in non-and moderate-polar compounds and phenolic compounds with antioxidant activity. Most of the phenolic iron chelators also have shown free radical scavenging activity. Strong positive and significant correlations between total phenolic content and DPPH radical scavenging activity showed that, phenolic compounds, including flavonoids are the main contributors of antioxidant activity in these species. The results suggest that certain brown algae possess significantly higher antioxidant potential when compared to red or green algae and could be considered for future applications in medicine, dietary supplements, cosmetics or food industries. Cystophora monilifera extract was found to have the highest antioxidant concentration, followed by Zonaria angustata, Cystophora pectinate, Codium fragile, and Cystophora pectinata. Fucoxanthin was found mainly in the brown algae species. The proposed methods provide an edge in terms of screening for antioxidants and quantification of antioxidant constituents in complex mixtures. The current application also demonstrates flexibility and versatility of a standard HPTLC system in the drug discovery. Proposed

  14. Simple Ontology Format (SOFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokine, Alexandre

    2011-10-01

    Simple Ontology Format (SOFT) library and file format specification provides a set of simple tools for developing and maintaining ontologies. The library, implemented as a perl module, supports parsing and verification of the files in SOFt format, operations with ontologies (adding, removing, or filtering of entities), and converting of ontologies into other formats. SOFT allows users to quickly create ontologies using only a basic text editor, verify it, and portray it in a graph layout system using customized styles.

  15. Encouraging overweight students with intellectual disability to actively perform walking activity using an air mouse combined with preferred stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Jui; Chang, Man-Ling; Shih, Ching-Hsiang

    2016-08-01

    This study continues the research on using an air mouse as a physical activity detector. An air mouse is embedded with a MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) gyro sensor, which can measure even the slightest movement in the air. The air mouse was strapped to one of each participant's calves to detect walking activity. This study was conducted to evaluate whether four students with intellectual disability who were overweight and disliked exercising could be motivated to engage in walking actively by linking the target response with preferred stimulation. Single-subject research with ABAB design was adopted in this study. The experimental data showed substantial increases in the participants' target responses (i.e. the performance of the activity of walking) during the intervention phases compared to the baseline phases. The practical and developmental implications of the findings are discussed.

  16. Fluoxetine modulates motor performance and cerebral activation of patients recovering from stroke.

    PubMed

    Pariente, J; Loubinoux, I; Carel, C; Albucher, J F; Leger, A; Manelfe, C; Rascol, O; Chollet, F

    2001-12-01

    In order to determine the influence of a single dose of fluoxetine on the cerebral motor activation of lacunar stroke patients in the early phase of recovery, we conducted a prospective, double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled study on 8 patients with pure motor hemiparesia. Each patient underwent two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) examinations: one under fluoxetine and one under placebo. The first was performed 2 weeks after stroke onset and the second a week later. During the two fMRI examinations, patients performed an active controlled motor task with the affected hand and a passive one conducted by the examiner with the same hand. Motor performance was evaluated by motor tests under placebo and under fluoxetine immediately before the examinations to investigate the effect of fluoxetine on motor function. Under fluoxetine, during the active motor task, hyperactivation in the ipsilesional primary motor cortex was found. Moreover, fluoxetine significantly improved motor skills of the affected side. We found that a single dose of fluoxetine was enough to modulate cerebral sensory-motor activation in patients. This redistribution of activation toward the motor cortex output activation was associated with an enhancement of motor performance.

  17. Intrinsic muscle strength and voluntary activation of both lower limbs and functional performance after stroke.

    PubMed

    Horstman, Astrid M; Beltman, Marijke J; Gerrits, Karin H; Koppe, Peter; Janssen, Thomas W; Elich, Peter; de Haan, Arnold

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the nature of muscle weakness in both legs after stroke compared with able-bodied control individuals and to examine whether there is a relationship between the degree of muscle weakness and coactivation of knee extensors and flexors as well as voluntary activation capacity of knee extensors of both paretic and non-paretic legs and indices of functional performance. Maximal voluntary isometric torques of knee extensors (MVCe) and flexors (MVCf) were determined in 14 patients (bilaterally) and 12 able-bodied controls. Simultaneous measurements were made of torque and surface EMG from agonist and antagonist muscles. Coactivation was calculated. Supramaximal triplets were evoked with electrical stimulation to estimate maximal torque capacity and degree of voluntary activation of knee extensors. MVCs, activation and coactivation parameters were correlated to scores of seven functional performance tests. MVCe, MVCf and voluntary activation were lower in paretic lower limb (PL) compared with both non-paretic lower limb (NL) and control. Besides, all these parameters of NL were also lower than control. Electrically evoked torque capacity of knee extensors of PL was about 60% of both NL and control, which were not significantly different from each other. Strong significant correlations between strength, as well as voluntary activation, and functional performance were found. Coactivation did not correlate well with functional performance. Thus, whereas for NL activation failure can explain weakness, for PL both activation failure and reduced intrinsic torque capacity are responsible for the severe weakness. Activation capacity and muscle strength correlated strongly to functional performance, while coactivation did not.

  18. A simple phenomenology for 2 γ+ states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamfir, N. V.; Bucurescu, D.; Casten, R. F.; Ivascu, M.

    1990-05-01

    Based on the microscopic structure of the first gamma vibrational state, a simple but efficient parametrization for the energies of the 2 γ+ states in all (non-magic) nuclei with Z>20 is introduced. A simple analytic formula, similar to that existing for the 3 1- -states, with mass and total active nucleon number dependence, fits the 2 γ+ energies rather well.

  19. Fast, simple, combinatorial routes to the fabrication of reusable, plasmonically active gold nanostructures by interferometric lithography of self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Tsargorodska, Anna; El Zubir, Osama; Darroch, Brice; Cartron, Michaël L; Basova, Tamara; Hunter, C Neil; Nabok, Alexei V; Leggett, Graham J

    2014-08-26

    We describe a fast, simple method for the fabrication of reusable, robust gold nanostructures over macroscopic (cm(2)) areas. A wide range of nanostructure morphologies is accessible in a combinatorial fashion. Self-assembled monolayers of alkylthiolates on chromium-primed polycrystalline gold films are patterned using a Lloyd's mirror interferometer and etched using mercaptoethylamine in ethanol in a rapid process that does not require access to clean-room facilities. The use of a Cr adhesion layer facilitates the cleaning of specimens by immersion in piranha solution, enabling their repeated reuse without significant change in their absorbance spectra over two years. A library of 200 different nanostructures was prepared and found to exhibit a range of optical behavior. Annealing yielded structures with a uniformly high degree of crystallinity that exhibited strong plasmon bands. Using a combinatorial approach, correlations were established between the preannealing morphologies (determined by the fabrication conditions) and the postannealing optical properties that enabled specimens to be prepared "to order" with a selected localized surface plasmon resonance. The refractive index sensitivity of gold nanostructures formed in this way was found to correlate closely with measurements reported for structures fabricated by other methods. Strong enhancements were observed in the Raman spectra of tetra-tert-butyl-substituted phthalocyanine. The shift in the position of the plasmon band after site-specific attachment of histidine-tagged green fluorescent protein (His-GFP) and bacteriochlorophyll a was measured for a range of nanostructured films, enabling the rapid identification of the one that yielded the largest shift. This approach offers a simple route to the production of durable, reusable, macroscopic arrays of gold nanostructures with precisely controllable morphologies.

  20. Annual Summary of Immobilized Low Activity Tank Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    MANN, F M

    2000-05-01

    As required by the Department of Energy (DOE) order on radioactive waste management (DOE 1999a) as implemented by the Maintenance Plan for the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment (Mann 2000a), an annual summary of the adequacy of the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment (ILAW PA) must be submitted to DOE headquarters each year that a performance assessment is not submitted. Considering the results of data collection and analysis, the conclusions of the 1998 version of the ILAW PA (Mann 1998) as conditionally approved (DOE 1999b) remain valid, but new information indicates more conservatism in the results than previously estimated. A white paper (Mann 2000b) is attached as Appendix A to justify this statement. Recent ILAW performance estimates used on the waste form and geochemical data have resulted in increased confidence that the disposal of ILAW will meet performance objectives. The ILAW performance assessment program will continue to interact with science and technology activities, disposal facility design staff, and operations, as well as to continue to collect new waste form and disposal system data to further increase the understanding of the impacts of the disposal of ILAW. The next full performance assessment should be issued in the spring of 2001.