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Sample records for actively transcribed regions

  1. Drosophila Paf1 modulates chromatin structure at actively transcribed genes.

    PubMed

    Adelman, Karen; Wei, Wenxiang; Ardehali, M Behfar; Werner, Janis; Zhu, Bing; Reinberg, Danny; Lis, John T

    2006-01-01

    The Paf1 complex in yeast has been reported to influence a multitude of steps in gene expression through interactions with RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and chromatin-modifying complexes; however, it is unclear which of these many activities are primary functions of Paf1 and are conserved in metazoans. We have identified and characterized the Drosophila homologs of three subunits of the yeast Paf1 complex and found striking differences between the yeast and Drosophila Paf1 complexes. We demonstrate that although Drosophila Paf1, Rtf1, and Cdc73 colocalize broadly with actively transcribing, phosphorylated Pol II, and all are recruited to activated heat shock genes with similar kinetics; Rtf1 does not appear to be a stable part of the Drosophila Paf1 complex. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated depletion of Paf1 or Rtf1 leads to defects in induction of Hsp70 RNA, but tandem RNAi-chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that loss of neither Paf1 nor Rtf1 alters the density or distribution of phosphorylated Pol II on the active Hsp70 gene. However, depletion of Paf1 reduces trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 in the Hsp70 promoter region and significantly decreases the recruitment of chromatin-associated factors Spt6 and FACT, suggesting that Paf1 may manifest its effects on transcription through modulating chromatin structure. PMID:16354696

  2. Z-DNA-forming sites identified by ChIP-Seq are associated with actively transcribed regions in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Shin, So-I.; Ham, Seokjin; Park, Jihwan; Seo, Seong Hye; Lim, Chae Hyun; Jeon, Hyeongrin; Huh, Jounghyun; Roh, Tae-Young

    2016-01-01

    Z-DNA, a left-handed double helical DNA is structurally different from the most abundant B-DNA. Z-DNA has been known to play a significant role in transcription and genome stability but the biological meaning and positions of Z-DNA-forming sites (ZFSs) in the human genome has not been fully explored. To obtain genome-wide map of ZFSs, Zaa with two Z-DNA-binding domains was used for ChIP-Seq analysis. A total of 391 ZFSs were found and their functions were examined in vivo. A large portion of ZFSs was enriched in the promoter regions and contain sequences with high potential to form Z-DNA. Genes containing ZFSs were occupied by RNA polymerase II at the promoters and showed high levels of expression. Moreover, ZFSs were significantly related to active histone marks such as H3K4me3 and H3K9ac. The association of Z-DNA with active transcription was confirmed by the reporter assay system. Overall, our results suggest that Z-DNA formation depends on chromatin structure as well as sequence composition, and is associated with active transcription in human cells. The global information about ZFSs positioning will provide a useful resource for further understanding of DNA structure-dependent transcriptional regulation. PMID:27374614

  3. Transcribed DNA is preferentially located in the perichromatin region of mammalian cell nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Niedojadlo, Janusz; Perret-Vivancos, Cecile; Kalland, Karl-Henning; Cmarko, Dusan; Cremer, Thomas; Driel, Roel van; Fakan, Stanislav

    2011-02-15

    The precise localization of transcribed DNA and resulting RNA is an important aspect of the functional architecture of the nucleus. To this end we have developed a novel in situ hybridization approach in combination with immunoelectron microscopy, using sense and anti-sense RNA probes that are derived from total cellular or cytoplasmic poly(A+) RNA. This new technology is much more gentle than classical in situ hybridization using DNA probes and shows excellent preservation of nuclear structure. Carried out on ultrathin sections of fixed and resin-embedded COS-7 cells, it revealed at high resolution the localization of the genes that code for the cellular mRNAs. Quantitative analysis shows that most transcribed DNA is concentrated in the perichromatin region, i.e. the interface between subchromosomal compact chromatin domains and the interchromatin space essentially devoid of DNA. The RNA that is produced is found mainly in the perichromatin region and the interchromatin space. These results imply that in the mammalian nucleus the chromatin fiber is folded so that active genes are predominantly present in the perichromatin region, which is the most prominent site of transcription.

  4. Expression of transcribed ultraconserved regions of genome in rat cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Suresh L.; Dharap, Ashutosh; Vemuganti, Raghu

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that 481 regions of the genome (>200 bp) that actively transcribe noncoding RNAs shows 100% homology between humans, rats and mice. These transcribed ultraconserved regions (T-UCRs) are thought to control the essential regulatory functions basic for life in rodents and mammals. Using microarray analysis, we presently show that 107 T-UCRs are actively expressed in adult rat cerebral cortex. They are grouped into intragenic (61) and intergenic (46) based on their genic location. Interestingly, 10 T-UCRs are expressed at unusually high levels in cerebral cortex. Additionally, many T-UCRs also showed cogenic expression. We further analyzed the correlation of intragenic T-UCRs with their host protein coding genes. Surprisingly, most of the expressed intragenic T-UCRs (54 out of 61) displayed a negative correlation with their host gene expression. T-UCRs are thought to control the splicing and transcription of the protein-coding genes that host them and flank them. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the protein products of majority of these genes are nuclear in localization, share protein domains and are involved in the regulation of diverse biological and molecular functions including metabolism, development, cell cycle, binding and transcription factor regulation. In conclusion, this is the first study to shows that many T-UCRs are expressed in rodent brain and they might play a role in physiological brain functions. PMID:24953281

  5. The structure of nucleosomal core particles within transcribed and repressed gene regions.

    PubMed Central

    Studitsky, V M; Belyavsky, A V; Melnikova, A F; Mirzabekov, A D

    1988-01-01

    The arrangement of histones along DNA in nucleosomal core particles within transcribed heat shock gene (hsp 70) region and repressed insertion within ribosomal genes of Drosophila was analysed by using protein-DNA crosslinking methods combined with hybridization tests. In addition, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was employed to compare the overall nucleosomal shape and the nucleosomal DNA size. The arrangement of histones along DNA and general compactness of nucleosomes were shown to be rather similar in transcriptionally active and inactive genomic regions. On the other hand, nucleosomes within transcriptionally active chromatin are characterized by a larger size of nucleosomal DNA produced by micrococcal nuclease digestion and some peculiarity in electrophoretic mobility. Images PMID:3144704

  6. Babesia gibsoni internal transcribed spacer 1 region is highly conserved amongst isolates from dogs across Japan

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Mingming; CAO, Shinuo; VUDRIKO, Patrick; SUZUKI, Hiroshi; SOMA, Takehisa; XUAN, Xuenan

    2016-01-01

    Babesia gibsoni is a tick-borne apicomplexan parasite of dogs that often causes fever and hemolytic anemia with highly variable clinical outcome. In this study, we sequenced the 254bp Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 region (ITS1) of 54 B. gibsoni isolates from 14 different geographical regions of Japan. The 54 isolates shared high sequence identity with each other and with B. gibsoni isolates reported in GenBank database (97.2–100%). Consistent with previous reports, phylogenetic analysis showed that B. gibsoni isolates from Japan formed the same clade with those from U.S.A., Australia, India and Taiwan. Our finding indicates that B. gibsoni ITS1 region is highly conserved among isolates from dogs in Japan, making it a useful genetic marker for molecular epidemiology of the parasite. PMID:26806537

  7. Matrix attachment regions and transcribed sequences within a long chromosomal continuum containing maize Adh1.

    PubMed Central

    Avramova, Z; SanMiguel, P; Georgieva, E; Bennetzen, J L

    1995-01-01

    We provide evidence for the location of matrix attachment sites along a contiguous region of 280 kb on maize chromosome 1. We define nine potential loops that vary in length from 6 kb to > 75 kb. The distribution of the different classes of DNA within this continuum with respect to the predicted structural loops reveals an interesting correlation: the long stretches of mixed classes of highly repetitive DNAs are often segregated into topologically sequestered units, whereas low-copy-number DNAs (including the alcohol dehydrogenase1 [adh1] gene) are positioned in separate loops. Contrary to expectations, several classes of highly repeated elements with representatives in this region were found to be transcribed, and some of these exhibited tissue-specific patterns of expression. PMID:7580257

  8. Identification of Novel Transcribed Regions in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Using RNA-Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingwen; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Kere, Juha; Jiao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) has emerged as a model organism to investigate vertebrate development and human genetic diseases. However, the zebrafish genome annotation is still ongoing and incomplete, and there are still new gene transcripts to be found. With the introduction of massive parallel sequencing, whole transcriptome studies became possible. In the present study, we aimed to discover novel transcribed regions (NTRs) using developmental transcriptome data from RNA sequencing. In order to achieve this, we developed an in-house bioinformatics pipeline for NTR discovery. Using the pipeline, we detected 152 putative NTRs that at the time of discovery were not annotated in Ensembl and NCBI gene database. Four randomly selected NTRs were successfully validated using RT-PCR, and expression profiles of 10 randomly selected NTRs were evaluated using qRT-PCR. The identification of these 152 NTRs provide new information for zebrafish genome annotation as well as new candidates for studies of zebrafish gene function. PMID:27462902

  9. Characterization of Dermanyssus gallinae (Acarina: Dermanissydae) by sequence analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer regions.

    PubMed

    Potenza, L; Cafiero, M A; Camarda, A; La Salandra, G; Cucchiarini, L; Dachà, M

    2009-10-01

    In the present work mites previously identified as Dermanyssus gallinae De Geer (Acari, Mesostigmata) using morphological keys were investigated by molecular tools. The complete internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1), 5.8S ribosomal DNA, and ITS2 region of the ribosomal DNA from mites were amplified and sequenced to examine the level of sequence variations and to explore the feasibility of using this region in the identification of this mite. Conserved primers located at the 3'end of 18S and at the 5'start of 28S rRNA genes were used first, and amplified fragments were sequenced. Sequence analyses showed no variation in 5.8S and ITS2 region while slight intraspecific variations involving substitutions as well as deletions concentrated in the ITS1 region. Based on the sequence analyses a nested PCR of the ITS2 region followed by RFLP analyses has been set up in the attempt to provide a rapid molecular diagnostic tool of D. gallinae.

  10. Determination of internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) in Trichomonas vaginalis isolates and differentiation among Trichomonas species.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Escribano, Alexandra; Nogal-Ruiz, Juan José; Arán, Vicente J; Escario, José Antonio; Gómez-Barrio, Alicia; Alderete, J F

    2014-04-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the 5.8S rRNA gene and the flanked internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of six Trichomonas vaginalis isolates with different metronidazole sensitivity and geographic origin were genotyped. A multiple sequence alignment was performed with different sequences of other isolates available at the GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ databases, which revealed 5 different sequence patterns. Although a stable mutation in position 66 of the ITS1 (C66T) was observed in 26% (9/34) of the T. vaginalis sequences analyzed, there was 99.7% ITS nucleotide sequence identity among isolates for this sequence. The nucleotide sequence variation among other species of the genus Trichomonas ranged from 3.4% to 9.1%. Surprisingly, the % identity between T. vaginalis and Pentatrichomonas hominis was ~83%. There was >40% divergence in the ITS sequence between T. vaginalis and Tritrichomonas spp., including Tritrichomonas augusta, Tritrichomonas muris, and Tritrichomonas nonconforma and with Tetratrichomonas prowazeki. Dendrograms grouped the trichomonadid sequences in robust clades according to their genera. The absence of nucleotide divergence in the hypervariable ITS regions between T. vaginalis isolates suggests the early divergence of the parasite. Importantly, these data show this ITS1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2 region suitable for inter-species differentiation.

  11. Intra-Genomic Internal Transcribed Spacer Region Sequence Heterogeneity and Molecular Diagnosis in Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying; Tsang, Chi-Ching; Xiao, Meng; Cheng, Jingwei; Xu, Yingchun; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) sequencing is the most extensively used technology for accurate molecular identification of fungal pathogens in clinical microbiology laboratories. Intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity, which makes fungal identification based on direct sequencing of PCR products difficult, has rarely been reported in pathogenic fungi. During the process of performing ITS sequencing on 71 yeast strains isolated from various clinical specimens, direct sequencing of the PCR products showed ambiguous sequences in six of them. After cloning the PCR products into plasmids for sequencing, interpretable sequencing electropherograms could be obtained. For each of the six isolates, 10–49 clones were selected for sequencing and two to seven intra-genomic ITS copies were detected. The identities of these six isolates were confirmed to be Candida glabrata (n = 2), Pichia (Candida) norvegensis (n = 2), Candida tropicalis (n = 1) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (n = 1). Multiple sequence alignment revealed that one to four intra-genomic ITS polymorphic sites were present in the six isolates, and all these polymorphic sites were located in the ITS1 and/or ITS2 regions. We report and describe the first evidence of intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity in four different pathogenic yeasts, which occurred exclusively in the ITS1 and ITS2 spacer regions for the six isolates in this study. PMID:26506340

  12. Intra-Genomic Internal Transcribed Spacer Region Sequence Heterogeneity and Molecular Diagnosis in Clinical Microbiology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Tsang, Chi-Ching; Xiao, Meng; Cheng, Jingwei; Xu, Yingchun; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-10-22

    Internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) sequencing is the most extensively used technology for accurate molecular identification of fungal pathogens in clinical microbiology laboratories. Intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity, which makes fungal identification based on direct sequencing of PCR products difficult, has rarely been reported in pathogenic fungi. During the process of performing ITS sequencing on 71 yeast strains isolated from various clinical specimens, direct sequencing of the PCR products showed ambiguous sequences in six of them. After cloning the PCR products into plasmids for sequencing, interpretable sequencing electropherograms could be obtained. For each of the six isolates, 10-49 clones were selected for sequencing and two to seven intra-genomic ITS copies were detected. The identities of these six isolates were confirmed to be Candida glabrata (n=2), Pichia (Candida) norvegensis (n=2), Candida tropicalis (n=1) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (n=1). Multiple sequence alignment revealed that one to four intra-genomic ITS polymorphic sites were present in the six isolates, and all these polymorphic sites were located in the ITS1 and/or ITS2 regions. We report and describe the first evidence of intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity in four different pathogenic yeasts, which occurred exclusively in the ITS1 and ITS2 spacer regions for the six isolates in this study.

  13. Determination of internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) in Trichomonas vaginalis isolates and differentiation among Trichomonas species.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Escribano, Alexandra; Nogal-Ruiz, Juan José; Arán, Vicente J; Escario, José Antonio; Gómez-Barrio, Alicia; Alderete, J F

    2014-04-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the 5.8S rRNA gene and the flanked internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of six Trichomonas vaginalis isolates with different metronidazole sensitivity and geographic origin were genotyped. A multiple sequence alignment was performed with different sequences of other isolates available at the GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ databases, which revealed 5 different sequence patterns. Although a stable mutation in position 66 of the ITS1 (C66T) was observed in 26% (9/34) of the T. vaginalis sequences analyzed, there was 99.7% ITS nucleotide sequence identity among isolates for this sequence. The nucleotide sequence variation among other species of the genus Trichomonas ranged from 3.4% to 9.1%. Surprisingly, the % identity between T. vaginalis and Pentatrichomonas hominis was ~83%. There was >40% divergence in the ITS sequence between T. vaginalis and Tritrichomonas spp., including Tritrichomonas augusta, Tritrichomonas muris, and Tritrichomonas nonconforma and with Tetratrichomonas prowazeki. Dendrograms grouped the trichomonadid sequences in robust clades according to their genera. The absence of nucleotide divergence in the hypervariable ITS regions between T. vaginalis isolates suggests the early divergence of the parasite. Importantly, these data show this ITS1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2 region suitable for inter-species differentiation. PMID:24412628

  14. Structure and variation of human ribosomal DNA: the external transcribed spacer and adjacent regions.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, G N; Szura, L L; Rushford, C; Jackson, D; Erickson, J

    1982-01-01

    A group of human ribosomal DNA (rDNA) recombinants that include the probable site for initiation of transcription have been examined for sequence polymorphism. A detailed restriction map of one rDNA insert was constructed using plasmid subclones and end-labeled segments. Comparison of 16 similar rDNA inserts by restriction and heteroduplex analysis demonstrated striking conservation of the external transcribed spacer and 18S gene regions, but defined a region where restriction sites for the enzymes Sma I, Hpa II, and Hha I become frequent or variable. This region extends for about 400--800 base pairs (bp) at the left end of the rDNA insert and is postulated to contain nontranscribed spacer sequences. The use of cloned rDNA segments as probes for the restriction analysis of genomic rDNA has demonstrated certain fixed sites in the nontranscribed spacer that do not vary significantly among different individuals or tumor cell lines. In contrast, restriction with the enzyme Sal I reveals several variable fragments, one of which has been found only in a retinoblastoma cell line. Images Fig. 6 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:6282117

  15. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as a universal DNA barcode marker for Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Schoch, Conrad L.; Seifert, Keith A.; Huhndorf, Sabine; Robert, Vincent; Spouge, John L.; Levesque, C. André; Chen, Wen; Bolchacova, Elena; Voigt, Kerstin; Crous, Pedro W.; Miller, Andrew N.; Wingfield, Michael J.; Aime, M. Catherine; An, Kwang-Deuk; Bai, Feng-Yan; Barreto, Robert W.; Begerow, Dominik; Bergeron, Marie-Josée; Blackwell, Meredith; Boekhout, Teun; Bogale, Mesfin; Boonyuen, Nattawut; Burgaz, Ana R.; Buyck, Bart; Cai, Lei; Cai, Qing; Cardinali, G.; Chaverri, Priscila; Coppins, Brian J.; Crespo, Ana; Cubas, Paloma; Cummings, Craig; Damm, Ulrike; de Beer, Z. Wilhelm; de Hoog, G. Sybren; Del-Prado, Ruth; Dentinger, Bryn; Diéguez-Uribeondo, Javier; Divakar, Pradeep K.; Douglas, Brian; Dueñas, Margarita; Duong, Tuan A.; Eberhardt, Ursula; Edwards, Joan E.; Elshahed, Mostafa S.; Fliegerova, Katerina; Furtado, Manohar; García, Miguel A.; Ge, Zai-Wei; Griffith, Gareth W.; Griffiths, K.; Groenewald, Johannes Z.; Groenewald, Marizeth; Grube, Martin; Gryzenhout, Marieka; Guo, Liang-Dong; Hagen, Ferry; Hambleton, Sarah; Hamelin, Richard C.; Hansen, Karen; Harrold, Paul; Heller, Gregory; Herrera, Cesar; Hirayama, Kazuyuki; Hirooka, Yuuri; Ho, Hsiao-Man; Hoffmann, Kerstin; Hofstetter, Valérie; Högnabba, Filip; Hollingsworth, Peter M.; Hong, Seung-Beom; Hosaka, Kentaro; Houbraken, Jos; Hughes, Karen; Huhtinen, Seppo; Hyde, Kevin D.; James, Timothy; Johnson, Eric M.; Johnson, Joan E.; Johnston, Peter R.; Jones, E.B. Gareth; Kelly, Laura J.; Kirk, Paul M.; Knapp, Dániel G.; Kõljalg, Urmas; Kovács, Gábor M.; Kurtzman, Cletus P.; Landvik, Sara; Leavitt, Steven D.; Liggenstoffer, Audra S.; Liimatainen, Kare; Lombard, Lorenzo; Luangsa-ard, J. Jennifer; Lumbsch, H. Thorsten; Maganti, Harinad; Maharachchikumbura, Sajeewa S. N.; Martin, María P.; May, Tom W.; McTaggart, Alistair R.; Methven, Andrew S.; Meyer, Wieland; Moncalvo, Jean-Marc; Mongkolsamrit, Suchada; Nagy, László G.; Nilsson, R. Henrik; Niskanen, Tuula; Nyilasi, Ildikó; Okada, Gen; Okane, Izumi; Olariaga, Ibai; Otte, Jürgen; Papp, Tamás; Park, Duckchul; Petkovits, Tamás; Pino-Bodas, Raquel; Quaedvlieg, William; Raja, Huzefa A.; Redecker, Dirk; Rintoul, Tara L.; Ruibal, Constantino; Sarmiento-Ramírez, Jullie M.; Schmitt, Imke; Schüßler, Arthur; Shearer, Carol; Sotome, Kozue; Stefani, Franck O.P.; Stenroos, Soili; Stielow, Benjamin; Stockinger, Herbert; Suetrong, Satinee; Suh, Sung-Oui; Sung, Gi-Ho; Suzuki, Motofumi; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Tedersoo, Leho; Telleria, M. Teresa; Tretter, Eric; Untereiner, Wendy A.; Urbina, Hector; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Vialle, Agathe; Vu, Thuy Duong; Walther, Grit; Wang, Qi-Ming; Wang, Yan; Weir, Bevan S.; Weiß, Michael; White, Merlin M.; Xu, Jianping; Yahr, Rebecca; Yang, Zhu L.; Yurkov, Andrey; Zamora, Juan-Carlos; Zhang, Ning; Zhuang, Wen-Ying; Schindel, David

    2012-01-01

    Six DNA regions were evaluated as potential DNA barcodes for Fungi, the second largest kingdom of eukaryotic life, by a multinational, multilaboratory consortium. The region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 used as the animal barcode was excluded as a potential marker, because it is difficult to amplify in fungi, often includes large introns, and can be insufficiently variable. Three subunits from the nuclear ribosomal RNA cistron were compared together with regions of three representative protein-coding genes (largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, and minichromosome maintenance protein). Although the protein-coding gene regions often had a higher percent of correct identification compared with ribosomal markers, low PCR amplification and sequencing success eliminated them as candidates for a universal fungal barcode. Among the regions of the ribosomal cistron, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has the highest probability of successful identification for the broadest range of fungi, with the most clearly defined barcode gap between inter- and intraspecific variation. The nuclear ribosomal large subunit, a popular phylogenetic marker in certain groups, had superior species resolution in some taxonomic groups, such as the early diverging lineages and the ascomycete yeasts, but was otherwise slightly inferior to the ITS. The nuclear ribosomal small subunit has poor species-level resolution in fungi. ITS will be formally proposed for adoption as the primary fungal barcode marker to the Consortium for the Barcode of Life, with the possibility that supplementary barcodes may be developed for particular narrowly circumscribed taxonomic groups. PMID:22454494

  16. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Indonesia Solanaceae based on DNA sequences of internal transcribed spacer region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Topik; Priyandoko, Didik; Islami, Dina Karina; Wardiny, Putri Yunitha

    2016-02-01

    Solanaceae is one of largest family in Angiosperm group with highly diverse in morphological character. In Indonesia, this group of plant is very popular due to its usefulness as food, ornamental and medicinal plants. However, investigation on phylogenetic relationship among the member of this family in Indonesia remains less attention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the phylogenetics relationship of the family especially distributed in Indonesia. DNA sequences of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of 19 species of Solanaceae and three species of outgroup, which belongs to family Convolvulaceae, Apocynaceae, and Plantaginaceae, were isolated, amplified, and sequenced. Phylogenetic tree analysis based on parsimony method was conducted with using data derived from the ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2, separately, and the combination of all. Results indicated that the phylogenetic tree derived from the combined data established better pattern of relationship than separate data. Thus, three major groups were revealed. Group 1 consists of tribe Datureae, Cestreae, and Petunieae, whereas group 2 is member of tribe Physaleae. Group 3 belongs to tribe Solaneae. The use of the ITS region as a molecular markers, in general, support the global Solanaceae relationship that has been previously reported.

  17. Secondary structure models for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region 1 from symbiotic dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Thornhill, Daniel J; Lord, Jenna B

    2010-07-01

    Ribosomal genes and their spacers have been extensively utilized to examine the biodiversity and phylogenetics of protists. Among these, the internal transcribed spacer regions 1 and 2 (ITS1 and ITS2) are known to form secondary structures that are critically important for proper processing of the pre-rRNA into mature ribosomes. Although the secondary structure of ITS2 has been widely investigated, considerably less is known about ITS1 and its secondary structure. Here, secondary structures of the ITS1 were modeled for 46 ITS "types" from Symbiodinium, a diverse dinoflagellate genus that forms symbioses with many protists and metazoans, using comparative phylogenetic and minimum free energy approaches. The predicted ITS1 secondary structures for each Symbiodinium "type" were highly stable (DeltaG=-46.40 to -85.30 kcal mol(-1) at 37 degrees C) and consisted of an open loop with five helices separated by single-stranded regions. Several structural characteristics were conserved within monophyletic sub-groups, providing additional support for the predicted structures and the relationships within this genus. Finally, the structures were applied to identify potential pseudogenes from five Symbiodinium ITS1 datasets. Consequently, ITS1 secondary structures are useful in understanding the biology and phylogenetics, as well as recognizing and excluding questionable sequences from datasets, of protists such as Symbiodinium.

  18. Heterogeneity of the internal transcribed spacer region in Leishmania tropica isolates from southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Ghatee, Mohammad Amin; Sharifi, Iraj; Kuhls, Katrin; Kanannejad, Zahra; Harandi, Majid Fasihi; de Almeida, Marcos E; Hatam, Gholamreza; Mirhendi, Hossein

    2014-09-01

    Most of cutaneous leishmaniasis cases occur in only 7 countries, including Iran. Leishmania tropica is the main cause of anthroponotic cutaneous leishmaniasis in Iran. In order to study the heterogeneity and phylogeny of L. tropica in southern Iran, a total of 61 isolates were obtained from Bam district and the cities Kerman and Shiraz. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) from the ribosomal DNA locus was amplified and then analysed by sequencing. Analysis of the ITS sequences showed four haplotypes in the isolates, including 3 haplotypes among the 58 isolates from the south eastern region, including Bam district and Kerman city, and 2 haplotypes among the 3 isolates from Shiraz city. The results showed a monophyletic structure for the south eastern population. In comparison to GenBank sequences of L. tropica from different countries, most of the southeast Iranian and Indian isolates are comprised in one cluster, while isolates from other countries and few other Iranian isolates group in a different cluster. Analysis of ITS sequences of south eastern L. tropica showed a homogeneous population which could be the basis for other molecular epidemiology studies using more discriminative markers and tracing possible changes in the population structure of L. tropica. PMID:24932536

  19. Identification of Medically Important Yeast Species by Sequence Analysis of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions

    PubMed Central

    Leaw, Shiang Ning; Chang, Hsien Chang; Sun, Hsiao Fang; Barton, Richard; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Chang, Tsung Chain

    2006-01-01

    Infections caused by yeasts have increased in previous decades due primarily to the increasing population of immunocompromised patients. In addition, infections caused by less common species such as Pichia, Rhodotorula, Trichosporon, and Saccharomyces spp. have been widely reported. This study extensively evaluated the feasibility of sequence analysis of the rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions for the identification of yeasts of clinical relevance. Both the ITS1 and ITS2 regions of 373 strains (86 species), including 299 reference strains and 74 clinical isolates, were amplified by PCR and sequenced. The sequences were compared to reference data available at the GenBank database by using BLAST (basic local alignment search tool) to determine if species identification was possible by ITS sequencing. Since the GenBank database currently lacks ITS sequence entries for some yeasts, the ITS sequences of type (or reference) strains of 15 species were submitted to GenBank to facilitate identification of these species. Strains producing discrepant identifications between the conventional methods and ITS sequence analysis were further analyzed by sequencing of the D1-D2 domain of the large-subunit rRNA gene for species clarification. The rates of correct identification by ITS1 and ITS2 sequence analysis were 96.8% (361/373) and 99.7% (372/373), respectively. Of the 373 strains tested, only 1 strain (Rhodotorula glutinis BCRC 20576) could not be identified by ITS2 sequence analysis. In conclusion, identification of medically important yeasts by ITS sequencing, especially using the ITS2 region, is reliable and can be used as an accurate alternative to conventional identification methods. PMID:16517841

  20. Molecular analysis of fungal populations in patients with oral candidiasis using internal transcribed spacer region.

    PubMed

    Ieda, Shinsuke; Moriyama, Masafumi; Takeshita, Toru; Takashita, Toru; Maehara, Takashi; Imabayashi, Yumi; Shinozaki, Shoichi; Tanaka, Akihiko; Hayashida, Jun-Nosuke; Furukawa, Sachiko; Ohta, Miho; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Nakamura, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is closely associated with changes in the oral fungal flora and is caused primarily by Candida albicans. Conventional methods of fungal culture are time-consuming and not always conclusive. However, molecular genetic analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of fungal rRNA is rapid, reproducible and simple to perform. In this study we examined the fungal flora in patients with oral candidiasis and investigated changes in the flora after antifungal treatment using length heterogeneity-polymerization chain reaction (LH-PCR) analysis of ITS regions. Fifty-two patients with pseudomembranous oral candidiasis (POC) and 30 healthy controls were included in the study. Fungal DNA from oral rinse was examined for fungal species diversity by LH-PCR. Fungal populations were quantified by real-time PCR and previously-unidentified signals were confirmed by nucleotide sequencing. Relationships between the oral fungal flora and treatment-resistant factors were also examined. POC patients showed significantly more fungal species and a greater density of fungi than control individuals. Sixteen fungi were newly identified. The fungal populations from both groups were composed predominantly of C. albicans, though the ratio of C. dubliniensis was significantly higher in POC patients than in controls. The diversity and density of fungi were significantly reduced after treatment. Furthermore, fungal diversity and the proportion of C. dubliniensis were positively correlated with treatment duration. These results suggest that C. dubliniensis and high fungal flora diversity might be involved in the pathogenesis of oral candidiasis. We therefore conclude that LH-PCR is a useful technique for diagnosing and assessing the severity of oral candidal infection.

  1. Homogenous repair of singlet oxygen-induced DNA damage in differentially transcribed regions and strands of human mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Anson, R M; Croteau, D L; Stierum, R H; Filburn, C; Parsell, R; Bohr, V A

    1998-01-01

    Photoactivated methylene blue was used to damage purified DNA and the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of human fibroblasts in culture. The primary product of this reaction is the DNA lesion 7-hydro-8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG). The DNA damage was quantitated using Escherichia coli formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) in a gene-specific damage and repair assay. Assay conditions were refined to give incision at all enzyme-sensitive sites with minimal non-specific cutting. Cultured fibroblasts were exposed to photoactivated methylene blue under conditions that would produce an average of three oxidative lesions per double-stranded mitochondrial genome. Within 9 h, 47% of this damage had been removed by the cells. This removal was due to repair rather than to replication, cell loss or degradation of damaged genomes. The rate of repair was measured in both DNA strands of the frequently transcribed ribosomal region of the mitochondrial genome and in both strands of the non-ribosomal region. Fpg-sensitive alkali-resistant oxidative base damage was efficiently removed from human mtDNA with no differences in the rate of repair between strands or between two different regions of the genome that differ substantially with regard to transcriptional activity. PMID:9421531

  2. The anti-tumor drug bleomycin preferentially cleaves at the transcription start sites of actively transcribed genes in human cells.

    PubMed

    Murray, Vincent; Chen, Jon K; Galea, Anne M

    2014-04-01

    The genome-wide pattern of DNA cleavage at transcription start sites (TSSs) for the anti-tumor drug bleomycin was examined in human HeLa cells using next-generation DNA sequencing. It was found that actively transcribed genes were preferentially cleaved compared with non-transcribed genes. The 143,600 identified human TSSs were split into non-transcribed genes (82,596) and transcribed genes (61,004) for HeLa cells. These transcribed genes were further split into quintiles of 12,201 genes comprising the top 20, 20-40, 40-60, 60-80, and 80-100 % of expressed genes. The bleomycin cleavage pattern at highly transcribed gene TSSs was greatly enhanced compared with purified DNA and non-transcribed gene TSSs. The top 20 and 20-40 % quintiles had a very similar enhanced cleavage pattern, the 40-60 % quintile was intermediate, while the 60-80 and 80-100 % quintiles were close to the non-transcribed and purified DNA profiles. The pattern of bleomycin enhanced cleavage had peaks that were approximately 200 bp apart, and this indicated that bleomycin was identifying the presence of phased nucleosomes at TSSs. Hence bleomycin can be utilized to detect chromatin structures that are present at actively transcribed genes. In this study, for the first time, the pattern of DNA damage by a clinically utilized cancer chemotherapeutic agent was performed on a human genome-wide scale at the nucleotide level.

  3. Isolation and DNA-binding characteristics of a protein involved in transcription activation of two divergently transcribed, essential yeast genes.

    PubMed Central

    Halfter, H; Müller, U; Winnacker, E L; Gallwitz, D

    1989-01-01

    We have identified a protein, BAF1, which has two oppositely oriented, partially overlapping binding sites within a symmetrical sequence located midway between and upstream of the divergently transcribed YPT1 and TUB2 genes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The 120 kd BAF1 protein was purified to near homogeneity and used to delineate the two binding sites and to identify apparent protein contact sites by the missing contact technique, methylation interference and by site-directed mutagenesis. The BAF1-recognition sequence contains a conserved TCN7ACG element recently identified at autonomously replicating sequences (ARS) and in the 5' and 3' flanking region of other yeast genes. The symmetrical sequence of the YPT1/TUB2 intergene region seems not to be involved in DNA replication but activates transcription in an orientation-independent fashion. Images PMID:2684633

  4. Mapping of a replication origin within the promoter region of two unlinked, abundantly transcribed actin genes of Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Bénard, M; Lagnel, C; Pallotta, D; Pierron, G

    1996-03-01

    We analyzed the replication of two unlinked actin genes, ardB and ardC , which are abundantly transcribed in the naturally synchronous plasmodium of the slime mold Physarum polycephalum. Detection and size measurements of single-stranded nascent replication intermediates (RIs) demonstrate that these two genes are concomitantly replicated at the onset of the 3-h S phase and tightly linked to replication origins. Appearance of RIs on neutral-neutral two-dimensional gels at specific time points in early S phase and analysis of their structure confirmed these results and further established that, in both cases, an efficient, site-specific, bidirectional origin of replication is localized within the promoter region of the gene. We also determined similar elongation rates for the divergent replication forks of the ardC gene replicon. Finally, taking advantage of a restriction fragment length polymorphism, we studied allelic replicons and demonstrate similar localizations and a simultaneous firing of allelic replication origins. Computer search revealed a low level of homology between the promoters of ardB and ardC and, most notably, the absence of DNA sequences similar to the yeast autonomously replicating sequence consensus sequence in these Physarum origin regions. Our results with the ardB and ardC actin genes support the model of early replicating origins located within the promoter regions of abundantly transcribed genes in P. polycephalum. PMID:8622700

  5. Energy efficiency trade-offs drive nucleotide usage in transcribed regions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Hua; Lu, Guanting; Bork, Peer; Hu, Songnian; Lercher, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient nutrient usage is a trait under universal selection. A substantial part of cellular resources is spent on making nucleotides. We thus expect preferential use of cheaper nucleotides especially in transcribed sequences, which are often amplified thousand-fold compared with genomic sequences. To test this hypothesis, we derive a mutation-selection-drift equilibrium model for nucleotide skews (strand-specific usage of ‘A' versus ‘T' and ‘G' versus ‘C'), which explains nucleotide skews across 1,550 prokaryotic genomes as a consequence of selection on efficient resource usage. Transcription-related selection generally favours the cheaper nucleotides ‘U' and ‘C' at synonymous sites. However, the information encoded in mRNA is further amplified through translation. Due to unexpected trade-offs in the codon table, cheaper nucleotides encode on average energetically more expensive amino acids. These trade-offs apply to both strand-specific nucleotide usage and GC content, causing a universal bias towards the more expensive nucleotides ‘A' and ‘G' at non-synonymous coding sites. PMID:27098217

  6. Energy efficiency trade-offs drive nucleotide usage in transcribed regions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hua; Lu, Guanting; Bork, Peer; Hu, Songnian; Lercher, Martin J

    2016-04-21

    Efficient nutrient usage is a trait under universal selection. A substantial part of cellular resources is spent on making nucleotides. We thus expect preferential use of cheaper nucleotides especially in transcribed sequences, which are often amplified thousand-fold compared with genomic sequences. To test this hypothesis, we derive a mutation-selection-drift equilibrium model for nucleotide skews (strand-specific usage of 'A' versus 'T' and 'G' versus 'C'), which explains nucleotide skews across 1,550 prokaryotic genomes as a consequence of selection on efficient resource usage. Transcription-related selection generally favours the cheaper nucleotides 'U' and 'C' at synonymous sites. However, the information encoded in mRNA is further amplified through translation. Due to unexpected trade-offs in the codon table, cheaper nucleotides encode on average energetically more expensive amino acids. These trade-offs apply to both strand-specific nucleotide usage and GC content, causing a universal bias towards the more expensive nucleotides 'A' and 'G' at non-synonymous coding sites.

  7. Energy efficiency trade-offs drive nucleotide usage in transcribed regions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hua; Lu, Guanting; Bork, Peer; Hu, Songnian; Lercher, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Efficient nutrient usage is a trait under universal selection. A substantial part of cellular resources is spent on making nucleotides. We thus expect preferential use of cheaper nucleotides especially in transcribed sequences, which are often amplified thousand-fold compared with genomic sequences. To test this hypothesis, we derive a mutation-selection-drift equilibrium model for nucleotide skews (strand-specific usage of 'A' versus 'T' and 'G' versus 'C'), which explains nucleotide skews across 1,550 prokaryotic genomes as a consequence of selection on efficient resource usage. Transcription-related selection generally favours the cheaper nucleotides 'U' and 'C' at synonymous sites. However, the information encoded in mRNA is further amplified through translation. Due to unexpected trade-offs in the codon table, cheaper nucleotides encode on average energetically more expensive amino acids. These trade-offs apply to both strand-specific nucleotide usage and GC content, causing a universal bias towards the more expensive nucleotides 'A' and 'G' at non-synonymous coding sites. PMID:27098217

  8. Relative effects of mutability and selection on single nucleotide polymorphisms in transcribed regions of the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Gorlov, Ivan P; Gorlova, Olga Y; Amos, Christopher I

    2008-01-01

    Motivation Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most common type of genetic variation in humans. However, the factors that affect SNP density are poorly understood. The goal of this study was to estimate the relative effects of mutability and selection on SNP density in transcribed regions of human genes. It is important for prediction of the regions that harbor functional polymorphisms. Results We used frequency-validated SNPs resulting from single-nucleotide substitutions. SNPs were subdivided into five functional categories: (i) 5' untranslated region (UTR) SNPs, (ii) 3' UTR SNPs, (iii) synonymous SNPs, (iv) SNPs producing conservative missense mutations, and (v) SNPs producing radical missense mutations. Each of these categories was further subdivided into nine mutational categories on the basis of the single-nucleotide substitution type. Thus, 45 functional/mutational categories were analyzed. The relative mutation rate in each mutational category was estimated on the basis of published data. The proportion of segregating sites (PSSs) for each functional/mutational category was estimated by dividing the observed number of SNPs by the number of potential sites in the genome for a given functional/mutational category. By analyzing each functional group separately, we found significant positive correlations between PSSs and relative mutation rates (Spearman's correlation coefficient, at least r = 0.96, df = 9, P < 0.001). We adjusted the PSSs for the mutation rate and found that the functional category had a significant effect on SNP density (F = 5.9, df = 4, P = 0.001), suggesting that selection affects SNP density in transcribed regions of the genome. We used analyses of variance and covariance to estimate the relative effects of selection (functional category) and mutability (relative mutation rate) on the PSSs and found that approximately 87% of variation in PSS was due to variation in the mutation rate and approximately 13% was due to selection

  9. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as a universal DNA barcode marker for Fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six DNA regions were evaluated in a multi-national, multi-laboratory consortium as potential DNA barcodes for Fungi, the second largest kingdom of eukaryotic life. The region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 used as the animal barcode was excluded as a potential marker, because it...

  10. Employing 454 amplicon pyrosequencing to reveal intragenomic divergence in the internal transcribed spacer rDNA region in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Daniel L; Carlsen, Tor; Henrik Nilsson, R; Davey, Marie; Schumacher, Trond; Kauserud, Håvard

    2013-01-01

    The rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has been accepted as a DNA barcoding marker for fungi and is widely used in phylogenetic studies; however, intragenomic ITS variability has been observed in a broad range of taxa, including prokaryotes, plants, animals, and fungi, and this variability has the potential to inflate species richness estimates in molecular investigations of environmental samples. In this study 454 amplicon pyrosequencing of the ITS1 region was applied to 99 phylogenetically diverse axenic single-spore cultures of fungi (Dikarya: Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) to investigate levels of intragenomic variation. Three species (one Basidiomycota and two Ascomycota), in addition to a positive control species known to contain ITS paralogs, displayed levels of molecular variation indicative of intragenomic variation; taxon inflation due to presumed intragenomic variation was ≈9%. Intragenomic variability in the ITS region appears to be widespread but relatively rare in fungi (≈3–5% of species investigated in this study), suggesting this problem may have minor impacts on species richness estimates relative to PCR and/or pyrosequencing errors. Our results indicate that 454 amplicon pyrosequencing represents a powerful tool for investigating levels of ITS intragenomic variability across taxa, which may be valuable for better understanding the fundamental mechanisms underlying concerted evolution of repetitive DNA regions. PMID:23789083

  11. Extensive Pyrosequencing Reveals Frequent Intra-Genomic Variations of Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions of Nuclear Ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dezhu; Sun, Yongzhen; Niu, Yunyun; Chen, Zhiduan; Luo, Hongmei; Pang, Xiaohui; Sun, Zhiying; Liu, Chang; Lv, Aiping; Deng, Youping; Larson-Rabin, Zachary; Wilkinson, Mike; Chen, Shilin

    2012-01-01

    Background Internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) is already one of the most popular phylogenetic and DNA barcoding markers. However, the existence of its multiple copies has complicated such usage and a detailed characterization of intra-genomic variations is critical to address such concerns. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we used sequence-tagged pyrosequencing and genome-wide analyses to characterize intra-genomic variations of internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) regions from 178 plant species. We discovered that mutation of ITS2 is frequent, with a mean of 35 variants per species. And on average, three of the most abundant variants make up 91% of all ITS2 copies. Moreover, we found different congeneric species share identical variants in 13 genera. Interestingly, different species across different genera also share identical variants. In particular, one minor variant of ITS2 in Eleutherococcus giraldii was found identical to the ITS2 major variant of Panax ginseng, both from Araliaceae family. In addition, DNA barcoding gap analysis showed that the intra-genomic distances were markedly smaller than those of the intra-specific or inter-specific variants. When each of 5543 variants were examined for its species discrimination efficiency, a 97% success rate was obtained at the species level. Conclusions Identification of identical ITS2 variants across intra-generic or inter-generic species revealed complex species evolutionary history, possibly, horizontal gene transfer and ancestral hybridization. Although intra-genomic multiple variants are frequently found within each genome, the usage of the major variants alone is sufficient for phylogeny construction and species determination in most cases. Furthermore, the inclusion of minor variants further improves the resolution of species identification. PMID:22952830

  12. Intragenomic Variation in the Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 Region of Dientamoeba fragilis as a Molecular Epidemiological Marker▿

    PubMed Central

    Bart, Aldert; van der Heijden, Harold M.; Greve, Sophie; Speijer, Dave; Landman, Wil J.; van Gool, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a parasite that has been recognized to be a causative agent of gastrointestinal symptoms. Because in most studies only some infected persons experience symptoms, it is possible that D. fragilis is a heterogeneous species with variants that display similar morphologies but different pathogenicities. The search for genetic variation in D. fragilis was based on the small-subunit rRNA gene, which was not found to be useful for molecular epidemiology. In this report, we describe the isolation and characterization of additional rRNA gene cluster sequences, the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1)-5.8S rRNA gene-ITS-2 region. For comparative purposes, we also isolated the ITS-1-5.8S rRNA gene-ITS-2 region of Histomonas meleagridis, a protozoan parasite of birds and a close relative of D. fragilis. This region was found to be highly variable, and 11 different alleles of the ITS-1 sequence could be identified. Variation in the ITS-1 region was found to be intragenomic, with up to four different alleles in a single isolate. So-called C profiles were produced from the ITS-1 repertoire of single isolates,. Analysis of the C profiles of isolates from nonrelated patients identified several clearly distinguishable strains of D. fragilis. Within families, it was shown that members can be infected with the same or different strains of D. fragilis. In conclusion, the ITS-1 region can serve as a molecular epidemiological tool for the subtyping of D. fragilis directly from feces. This may serve as a means of studying the transmission, geographical distribution, and relationships between strains and the pathogenicity of this parasite. PMID:18650356

  13. Qualitative polymerase chain reaction methods for detecting major food allergens (peanut, soybean, and wheat) by using internal transcribed spacer region.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Takashi; Watanabe, Satoshi; Temmei, Yusuke; Hiramoto, Masayuki; Kato, Hisanori

    2009-01-01

    Allergen detection methods for peanut, soybean, and wheat were developed by designing PCR primer pairs for specific amplification of a fragment of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region reported for Arachis spp. for peanut, Glycine spp. for soybean, and Triticum and Aegilops spp. for wheat. The target species for detection included not only cultivated, but also wild and ancestor species, which were thought to be potentially allergenic. The ability of the resultant primer pairs to detect the target species was verified using genomic DNA extracted from A. hypogaea for peanut and G max for soybean; T. aestivum, T. turgidum, T. durum, T. aestivum-rye amphidiploid, T. monococcum, T. timopheevi, Ae. speltoides, and Ae. squarrosa for wheat. The LODs were 50-500 fg of target DNA, which were comparable to those of the most sensitive PCR methods previously reported. The results from the present work, as well as those from our previous work on buckwheat and kiwifruit, prove that the ITS region, for its high copy number and interspecific diversity, is particularly useful as the target of allergen detection methods.

  14. Development of PCR primers from internal transcribed spacer region 2 for detection of Phytophthora species infecting potatoes.

    PubMed Central

    Tooley, P W; Bunyard, B A; Carras, M M; Hatziloukas, E

    1997-01-01

    We developed PCR primers and assay methods to detect and differentiate three Phytophthora species which infect potatoes and cause late blight (Phytophthora infestans) and pink rot (P. erythroseptica and P. nicotianae) diseases. Primers based on sequence analysis of internal transcribed spacer region 2 of ribosomal DNA produced PCR products of 456 bp (P. infestans), 136 bp (P. erythroseptica), and 455 bp (P. nicotianae) and were used to detect the pathogens in potato leaf (P. infestans) and tuber (P. infestans, P. erythroseptica, and P. nicotianae) tissue with a sensitivity of 1 to 10 pg of DNA. Leaf and tuber tissue were processed for PCR by a rapid NaOH method as well as a method based on the use of commercially available ion-exchange columns of P. infestans primers and the rapid NaOH extraction method were used to detect late blight in artificially and naturally infected tubers of potato cultivar Red LaSoda. In sampling studies, P. infestans was detected by PCR from artificially infected tubers at 4 days postinoculation, before any visible symptoms were present. The PCR assay and direct tissue extraction methods provide tools which may be used to detect Phytophthora pathogens in potato seedlots and storages and thus limit the transmission and spread of new, aggressive strains of P. infestans in U.S. potato-growing regions. PMID:9097445

  15. Sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region reveals a novel clade of Ichthyophonus sp. from rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, C.; Purcell, M.K.; Gregg, J.L.; LaPatra, S.E.; Winton, J.R.; Hershberger, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    The mesomycetozoean parasite Ichthyophonus hoferi is most commonly associated with marine fish hosts but also occurs in some components of the freshwater rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss aquaculture industry in Idaho, USA. It is not certain how the parasite was introduced into rainbow trout culture, but it might have been associated with the historical practice of feeding raw, ground common carp Cyprinus carpio that were caught by commercial fisherman. Here, we report a major genetic division between west coast freshwater and marine isolates of Ichthyophonus hoferi. Sequence differences were not detected in 2 regions of the highly conserved small subunit (18S) rDNA gene; however, nucleotide variation was seen in internal transcribed spacer loci (ITS1 and ITS2), both within and among the isolates. Intra-isolate variation ranged from 2.4 to 7.6 nucleotides over a region consisting of ~740 bp. Majority consensus sequences from marine/anadromous hosts differed in only 0 to 3 nucleotides (99.6 to 100% nucleotide identity), while those derived from freshwater rainbow trout had no nucleotide substitutions relative to each other. However, the consensus sequences between isolates from freshwater rainbow trout and those from marine/anadromous hosts differed in 13 to 16 nucleotides (97.8 to 98.2% nucleotide identity).

  16. Molecular identification of isolated fungi from unopened containers of greek yogurt by DNA sequencing of internal transcribed spacer region.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Irshad M; Jacobs, Emily; Simpson, Steven; Kerdahi, Khalil

    2014-06-25

    In our previous study, we described the development of an internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1 sequencing method, and used this protocol in species-identification of isolated fungi collected from the manufacturing areas of a compounding company known to have caused the multistate fungal meningitis outbreak in the United States. In this follow-up study, we have analyzed the unopened vials of Greek yogurt from the recalled batch to determine the possible cause of microbial contamination in the product. A total of 15 unopened vials of Greek yogurt belonging to the recalled batch were examined for the detection of fungi in these samples known to cause foodborne illness following conventional microbiological protocols. Fungi were isolated from all of the 15 Greek yogurt samples analyzed. The isolated fungi were genetically typed by DNA sequencing of PCR-amplified ITS1 region of rRNA gene. Analysis of data confirmed all of the isolated fungal isolates from the Greek yogurt to be Rhizomucor variabilis. The generated ITS1 sequences matched 100% with the published sequences available in GenBank. In addition, these yogurt samples were also tested for the presence of five types of bacteria (Salmonella, Listeria, Staphylococcus, Bacillus and Escherichia coli) causing foodborne disease in humans, and found negative for all of them.

  17. Molecular Identification of Isolated Fungi from Unopened Containers of Greek Yogurt by DNA Sequencing of Internal Transcribed Spacer Region

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Irshad M.; Jacobs, Emily; Simpson, Steven; Kerdahi, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    In our previous study, we described the development of an internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1 sequencing method, and used this protocol in species-identification of isolated fungi collected from the manufacturing areas of a compounding company known to have caused the multistate fungal meningitis outbreak in the United States. In this follow-up study, we have analyzed the unopened vials of Greek yogurt from the recalled batch to determine the possible cause of microbial contamination in the product. A total of 15 unopened vials of Greek yogurt belonging to the recalled batch were examined for the detection of fungi in these samples known to cause foodborne illness following conventional microbiological protocols. Fungi were isolated from all of the 15 Greek yogurt samples analyzed. The isolated fungi were genetically typed by DNA sequencing of PCR-amplified ITS1 region of rRNA gene. Analysis of data confirmed all of the isolated fungal isolates from the Greek yogurt to be Rhizomucor variabilis. The generated ITS1 sequences matched 100% with the published sequences available in GenBank. In addition, these yogurt samples were also tested for the presence of five types of bacteria (Salmonella, Listeria, Staphylococcus, Bacillus and Escherichia coli) causing foodborne disease in humans, and found negative for all of them. PMID:25438008

  18. Molecular authentication of Panax ginseng and ginseng products using robust SNP markers in ribosomal external transcribed spacer region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongtao; Kim, Min-Kyeoung; Kwon, Woo-Saeng; Jin, Haizhu; Liang, Zhiqi; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2011-07-15

    Panax ginseng and Panax quinquefolius are the most widely used Panax species, but they are known to have different properties and medicinal values. The aim of this study is to develop a robust and accurate DNA marker for identifying P. ginseng and the origins of ginseng products. Two single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites specific to P. ginseng were exploited from nuclear ribosomal external transcribed spacer (ETS) region. Based on the SNP sites, two specific primers were designed for P. ginseng and P. quinquefolius respectively. P. ginseng can be easily discriminated from P. quinquefolius by amplifying the two specific alleles using multiplex allele-specific PCR. Favorable results can also be obtained from commercial ginseng products. The established method is highly sensitive and can detect 1% of intentional adulteration of P. quinquefolius into P. ginseng down to the 0.1ng level of total DNA. Therefore this study provides a reliable and simple DNA method for authentication of the origins and purities of ginseng products.

  19. Paenibacillus larvae 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions: DNA fingerprinting and characterization.

    PubMed

    Dingman, Douglas W

    2012-07-01

    Paenibacillus larvae is the causative agent of American foulbrood in honey bee (Apis mellifera) larvae. PCR amplification of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the amplified DNA, was performed using genomic DNA collected from 134 P. larvae strains isolated in Connecticut, six Northern Regional Research Laboratory stock strains, four strains isolated in Argentina, and one strain isolated in Chile. Following electrophoresis of amplified DNA, all isolates exhibited a common migratory profile (i.e., ITS-PCR fingerprint pattern) of six DNA bands. This profile represented a unique ITS-PCR DNA fingerprint that was useful as a fast, simple, and accurate procedure for identification of P. larvae. Digestion of ITS-PCR amplified DNA, using mung bean nuclease prior to electrophoresis, characterized only three of the six electrophoresis bands as homoduplex DNA and indicating three true ITS regions. These three ITS regions, DNA migratory band sizes of 915, 1010, and 1474 bp, signify a minimum of three types of rrn operons within P. larvae. DNA sequence analysis of ITS region DNA, using P. larvae NRRL B-3553, identified the 3' terminal nucleotides of the 16S rRNA gene, 5' terminal nucleotides of the 23S rRNA gene, and the complete DNA sequences of the 5S rRNA, tRNA(ala), and tRNA(ile) genes. Gene organization within the three rrn operon types was 16S-23S, 16S-tRNA(ala)-23S, and l6S-5S-tRNA(ile)-tRNA(ala)-23S and these operons were named rrnA, rrnF, and rrnG, respectively. The 23S rRNA gene was shown by I-CeuI digestion and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of genomic DNA to be present as seven copies. This was suggestive of seven rrn operon copies within the P. larvae genome. Investigation of the 16S-23S rDNA regions of this bacterium has aided the development of a diagnostic procedure and has helped genomic mapping investigations via characterization of the ITS regions.

  20. Isolation and characterization of recombinant DNAs containing repeated elements of barley genome: identification of individual actively transcribed families of repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Prosnyak, M.I.; Kartel', N.A.; Ryskov, A.P.

    1986-05-01

    A bank of Escherichia coli clones containing fragments of barley nuclear DNA was obtained using plasmid pBR 322. Clones carrying repeated sequences of the plant genome were selected by means of colony and blot hybridization. Clones with actively transcribed sequences were selected by hybridization to complementary DNA synthesized by means of reverse transcription on a template of total barley poly(A)-containing RNA. Individual families of repeats, two of which contained transcriptionally active sequences of the barley genome, were identified by blot hybridization of recombinant plasmids containing labeled DNA fragments of the inserts of three different clones.

  1. The intergenic region between the divergently transcribed niiA and niaD genes of Aspergillus nidulans contains multiple NirA binding sites which act bidirectionally.

    PubMed Central

    Punt, P J; Strauss, J; Smit, R; Kinghorn, J R; van den Hondel, C A; Scazzocchio, C

    1995-01-01

    The niaD and niiA genes of Aspergillus nidulans, which code, respectively, for nitrate and nitrite reductases, are divergently transcribed, and their ATGs are separated by 1,200 bp. The genes are under the control of the positively acting NirA transcription factor, which mediates nitrate induction. The DNA binding domain of NirA was expressed as a fusion protein with the glutathione S-transferase of Schistosoma japonicum. Gel shift and footprint experiments have shown that in the intergenic region there are four binding sites for the NirA transcription factor. These sites can be represented by the nonpalindromic consensus 5'CTCCGHGG3'. Making use of a bidirectional expression vector, we have analyzed the role of each of the sites in niaD and niiA expression. The sites were numbered from the niiA side. It appeared that site 1 is necessary for the inducibility of niiA only, while sites 2, 3, and to a lesser extent 4 (which is nearer to and strongly affects niaD) act bidirectionally. The results also suggest that of the 10 binding sites for the AreA protein, which mediates nitrogen metabolite repression, those which are centrally located are physiologically important. The insertion of an unrelated upstream activating sequence into the intergenic region strongly affected the expression of both genes, irrespective of the orientation in which the element was inserted. PMID:7565720

  2. DNA authentication of Plantago Herb based on nucleotide sequences of 18S-28S rRNA internal transcribed spacer region.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Fatma Pinar; Yamashita, Hiromi; Guo, Yahong; Terasaka, Kazuyoshi; Kondo, Toshiya; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Shimada, Hiroshi; Fujita, Masao; Kawasaki, Takeshi; Sakai, Eiji; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Goda, Yukihiro; Mizukami, Hajime

    2007-07-01

    Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of nuclear ribosomal RNA gene were amplified from 23 plant- and herbarium specimens belonging to eight Plantago species (P. asiatica, P. depressa, P. major, P. erosa, P. hostifolia, P. camtschatica, P. virginica and P. lanceolata). Sequence comparison indicated that these Plantago species could be identified based on the sequence type of the ITS locus. Sequence analysis of the ITS regions amplified from the crude drug Plantago Herb obtained in the markets indicated that all the drugs from Japan were derived from P. asiatica whereas the samples obtained in China were originated from various Plantago species including P. asiatica, P. depressa, P. major and P. erosa.

  3. Development of a Reverse Genetic System for Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus: Rescue of Recombinant Fluorescent Virus by Using Salmon Internal Transcribed Spacer Region 1 as a Novel Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Toro-Ascuy, Daniela; Tambley, Carolina; Beltran, Carolina; Mascayano, Carolina; Sandoval, Nicolas; Olivares, Eduardo; Medina, Rafael A.; Spencer, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Infectious salmon anemia (ISA) is a serious disease of marine-farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) caused by ISA virus (ISAV), belonging to the genus Isavirus, family Orthomyxoviridae. There is an urgent need to understand the virulence factors and pathogenic mechanisms of ISAV and to develop new vaccine approaches. Using a recombinant molecular biology approach, we report the development of a plasmid-based reverse genetic system for ISAV, which includes the use of a novel fish promoter, the Atlantic salmon internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS-1). Salmon cells cotransfected with pSS-URG-based vectors expressing the eight viral RNA segments and four cytomegalovirus (CMV)-based vectors that express the four proteins of the ISAV ribonucleoprotein complex allowed the generation of infectious recombinant ISAV (rISAV). We generated three recombinant viruses, wild-type rISAV901_09 and rISAVrS6-NotI-HPR containing a NotI restriction site and rISAVS6/EGFP-HPR harboring the open reading frame of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), both within the highly polymorphic region (HPR) of segment 6. All rescued viruses showed replication activity and cytopathic effect in Atlantic salmon kidney-infected cells. The fluorescent recombinant viruses also showed a characteristic cytopathic effect in salmon cells, and the viruses replicated to a titer of 6.5 × 105 PFU/ml, similar to that of the wild-type virus. This novel reverse genetics system offers a powerful tool to study the molecular biology of ISAV and to develop a new generation of ISAV vaccines to prevent and mitigate ISAV infection, which has had a profound effect on the salmon industry. PMID:25480750

  4. Re-feeding rats a high-sucrose diet after 3 days of starvation enhances histone H3 acetylation in transcribed region and expression of jejunal GLUT5 gene.

    PubMed

    Honma, Kazue; Masuda, Yuriko; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Goda, Toshinao

    2014-01-01

    Fasting for 3 days leads to reduction in the expression of GLUT5 and SGLT1 genes in jejunum. Re-feeding a high-sucrose diet in fasted rats enhanced mRNA levels and histone H3 acetylation on transcribed region of GLUT5 gene within 24 h, but not in SGLT1. Responsiveness of jejunal GLUT5 gene is associated with changes in histone H3 acetylation on transcribed region.

  5. Preferential repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage in the transcribed strand of an active human gene is defective in Cockayne syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Leadon, S. A.; Cooper, P. K.

    1993-01-01

    Cells from patients with Cockayne syndrome (CS), which are sensitive to killing by UV although overall damage removal appears normal, are specifically defective in repair of UV damage in actively transcribed genes. Because several CS strains display cross-sensitivity to killing by ionizing radiation, we examined whether ionizing radiation-induced damage in active genes is preferentially repaired by normal cells and whether the radiosensitivity of CS cells can be explained by a defect in this process. We found that ionizing radiation-induced damage was repaired more rapidly in the transcriptionally active metallothionein IIA (MTIIA) gene than in the inactive MTIIB gene or in the genome overall in normal cells as a result of faster repair on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Cells of the radiosensitive CS strain CS1AN are completely defective in this strand-selective repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage, although their overall repair rate appears normal. CS3BE cells, which are intermediate in radiosensitivity, do exhibit more rapid repair of the transcribed strand but at a reduced rate compared to normal cells. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A cells, which are hypersensitive to UV light because of a defect in the nucleotide excision repair pathway but do not show increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation, preferentially repair ionizing radiation-induced damage on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Thus, the ability to rapidly repair ionizing radiation-induced damage in actively transcribing genes correlates with cell survival. Our results extend the generality of preferential repair in active genes to include damage other than bulky lesions. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8248136

  6. 4-Dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase, an enzyme of the sex hormone pathway in Mucor mucedo, is constitutively transcribed but its activity is differently regulated in (+) and (-) mating types.

    PubMed

    Schimek, Christine; Petzold, Annett; Schultze, Kornelia; Wetzel, Jana; Wolschendorf, Frank; Burmester, Anke; Wöstemeyer, Johannes

    2005-09-01

    4-Dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase (TDH) converts the (+) mating type sex pheromone 4-dihydromethyltrisporate into methyltrisporate. In Mucor mucedo, this conversion is required only in the (-) mating type. Expression of the TDH encoding TSP1 gene was analyzed qualitatively using reverse-transcribed PCR. TSP1 is constitutively transcribed in the (+) and in the (-) mating type, irrespective of the mating situation. By immunodetection, the translation product is also formed constitutively. In contrast to gene expression, TDH enzyme activity depends on the sexual status of the mycelium. Activity is restricted to the sexually stimulated (-) mating type. Non-stimulated (-), as well as stimulated and non-stimulated (+) mycelia exhibit no activity and do not influence activity in stimulated (-) mycelia. Time course analysis shows strongly increased enzyme activity at 80 min after stimulation. Low activity exists from the onset of stimulation, indicating that additional regulation mechanisms are involved in TDH function.

  7. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) variation in the Anastrepha fraterculus cryptic species complex (Diptera, Tephritidae) of the Andean region

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Bruce D.; Steck, Gary J.; Norrbom, Allen L.; Rodriguez, Erick J.; Srivastava, Pratibha; Alvarado, Norma Nolazco; Colque, Fredy; Landa, Erick Yábar; Sánchez, Juan José Lagrava; Quisberth, Elizabeth; Peñaranda, Emilio Arévalo; Clavijo, P. A. Rodriguez; Alvarez-Baca, Jeniffer K.; Zapata, Tito Guevara; Ponce, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) was sequenced for Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann, 1830) originating from 85 collections from the northern and central Andean countries of South America including Argentina (Tucumán), Bolivia, Perú, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela. The ITS1 regions of additional specimens (17 collections) from Central America (México, Guatemala, Costa Rica, and Panamá), Brazil, Caribbean Colombia, and coastal Venezuela were sequenced and together with published sequences (Paraguay) provided context for interpretation. A total of six ITS1 sequence variants were recognized in the Andean region comprising four groups. Type I predominates in the southernmost range of Anastrepha fraterculus. Type II predominates in its northernmost range. In the central and northern Andes, the geographic distributions overlap and interdigitate with a strong elevational effect. A discussion of relationships between observed ITS1 types and morphometric types is included. PMID:26798259

  8. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) variation in the Anastrepha fraterculus cryptic species complex (Diptera, Tephritidae) of the Andean region.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Bruce D; Steck, Gary J; Norrbom, Allen L; Rodriguez, Erick J; Srivastava, Pratibha; Alvarado, Norma Nolazco; Colque, Fredy; Landa, Erick Yábar; Sánchez, Juan José Lagrava; Quisberth, Elizabeth; Peñaranda, Emilio Arévalo; Clavijo, P A Rodriguez; Alvarez-Baca, Jeniffer K; Zapata, Tito Guevara; Ponce, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) was sequenced for Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann, 1830) originating from 85 collections from the northern and central Andean countries of South America including Argentina (Tucumán), Bolivia, Perú, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela. The ITS1 regions of additional specimens (17 collections) from Central America (México, Guatemala, Costa Rica, and Panamá), Brazil, Caribbean Colombia, and coastal Venezuela were sequenced and together with published sequences (Paraguay) provided context for interpretation. A total of six ITS1 sequence variants were recognized in the Andean region comprising four groups. Type I predominates in the southernmost range of Anastrepha fraterculus. Type II predominates in its northernmost range. In the central and northern Andes, the geographic distributions overlap and interdigitate with a strong elevational effect. A discussion of relationships between observed ITS1 types and morphometric types is included. PMID:26798259

  9. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) variation in the Anastrepha fraterculus cryptic species complex (Diptera, Tephritidae) of the Andean region.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Bruce D; Steck, Gary J; Norrbom, Allen L; Rodriguez, Erick J; Srivastava, Pratibha; Alvarado, Norma Nolazco; Colque, Fredy; Landa, Erick Yábar; Sánchez, Juan José Lagrava; Quisberth, Elizabeth; Peñaranda, Emilio Arévalo; Clavijo, P A Rodriguez; Alvarez-Baca, Jeniffer K; Zapata, Tito Guevara; Ponce, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) was sequenced for Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann, 1830) originating from 85 collections from the northern and central Andean countries of South America including Argentina (Tucumán), Bolivia, Perú, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela. The ITS1 regions of additional specimens (17 collections) from Central America (México, Guatemala, Costa Rica, and Panamá), Brazil, Caribbean Colombia, and coastal Venezuela were sequenced and together with published sequences (Paraguay) provided context for interpretation. A total of six ITS1 sequence variants were recognized in the Andean region comprising four groups. Type I predominates in the southernmost range of Anastrepha fraterculus. Type II predominates in its northernmost range. In the central and northern Andes, the geographic distributions overlap and interdigitate with a strong elevational effect. A discussion of relationships between observed ITS1 types and morphometric types is included.

  10. Genetic diversity of Histoplasma capsulatum strains isolated from Argentina based on nucleotide sequence variations in the internal transcribed spacer regions of rDNA.

    PubMed

    Landaburu, Fernanda; Cuestas, María Luján; Rubio, Andrea; Elías, Nahuel Alejandro; Daneri, Gabriela Lopez; Veciño, Cecilia; Iovannitti, Cristina A; Mujica, María Teresa

    2014-05-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rDNA genes of 49 Histoplasma capsulatum (48 from clinical samples and one from soil) isolates were examined. Nucleotide sequence heterogeneity within this region was useful for phylogenetic classification of H. capsulatum and species identification. Thus, in 45 of 49 isolates we observed higher percentages of identity in the nucleotide sequences of ITS regions when the isolates studied herein were compared with those reported in our country in the South America B clade. Phylogenetic analyses of rDNA sequences corresponding to the 537 bp of the ITS region obtained from H. capsulatum isolates assigned South America type B clade (45 isolates), North America type 1 and Asia clade (2 isolates each one). H. capsulatum strains isolated from soil and from patients living in Argentina (45 of 49) clustered together with the H. capsulatum isolates of the South America B clade. The high level of genetic similarity among our isolates suggests that almost one genetic population is present in the microenvironment. Isolates described as H. capsulatum var. capsulatum or var. farciminosum (2 isolates) did not form a monophyletic group and were found in the Asia clade. Subsequent studies are needed to properly identify these isolates.

  11. Genetic diversity of Histoplasma capsulatum strains isolated from Argentina based on nucleotide sequence variations in the internal transcribed spacer regions of rDNA.

    PubMed

    Landaburu, Fernanda; Cuestas, María Luján; Rubio, Andrea; Elías, Nahuel Alejandro; Daneri, Gabriela Lopez; Veciño, Cecilia; Iovannitti, Cristina A; Mujica, María Teresa

    2014-05-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rDNA genes of 49 Histoplasma capsulatum (48 from clinical samples and one from soil) isolates were examined. Nucleotide sequence heterogeneity within this region was useful for phylogenetic classification of H. capsulatum and species identification. Thus, in 45 of 49 isolates we observed higher percentages of identity in the nucleotide sequences of ITS regions when the isolates studied herein were compared with those reported in our country in the South America B clade. Phylogenetic analyses of rDNA sequences corresponding to the 537 bp of the ITS region obtained from H. capsulatum isolates assigned South America type B clade (45 isolates), North America type 1 and Asia clade (2 isolates each one). H. capsulatum strains isolated from soil and from patients living in Argentina (45 of 49) clustered together with the H. capsulatum isolates of the South America B clade. The high level of genetic similarity among our isolates suggests that almost one genetic population is present in the microenvironment. Isolates described as H. capsulatum var. capsulatum or var. farciminosum (2 isolates) did not form a monophyletic group and were found in the Asia clade. Subsequent studies are needed to properly identify these isolates. PMID:24299459

  12. Genotyping of Trichomonas vaginalis isolates in Iran by using single stranded conformational polymorphism-PCR technique and internal transcribed spacer regions.

    PubMed

    Matini, M; Rezaeian, M; Mohebali, M; Maghsood, A H; Rabiee, S; Rahimi-Foroushani, A; Fallah, M; Miahipour, A; Rezaie, S

    2012-12-01

    Infection with Trichomonas vaginalis, the causative agent of human urogenital infection, is the most prevalent nonviral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. In spite of the high prevalence and medical importance of trichomoniasis, there is little knowledge about genetic epidemiology and genetic characterisation of this parasite. For this purpose, a Single Stranded Conformation Polymorphism-PCR (SSCP-PCR) typing method was conducted for Iranian T. vaginalis isolates using 5.8s ribosomal gene (rRNA gene) and the flanking internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. Nine hundred and fifty vaginal swab samples were examined in which 50 (5.3%) samples were parasitologically positive and used for molecular identification based on SSCP-PCR and nucleotide sequence analyses. Results of the SSCP analysis showed two distinct reproducible banding patterns (I, II) which were confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis in the ITS1 regions. Frequencies of the SSCP banding patterns I and II were 84% (42/50) and 16% (8/50), respectively. In conclusion, SSCP-PCR analysis provided a reliable and sensitive method for strain genotyping of T. vaginalis based on the ITS1/5.8s/ITS2 region. This finding may help us gain more information about correlation between genetic properties and biological features of this parasite. PMID:23202606

  13. Coordinate regulation of two cytoplasmic RNA species transcribed from early region 2 of the adenovirus 2 genome.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, C J; Rosenthal, R; Bhaduri, S; Raskas, H

    1981-06-01

    Early region 2 (E2) of the adenovirus 2 genome specifies a 72,000-dalton DNA-binding protein that is required for viral DNA replication. Electron microscopy studies have detected two major forms of 20S E2 mRNA, one species with a 5' leader from map position 75 and a second form having a leader from position 72 (Chow et al., J. Mol. Biol. 134:265-303, 1979). Only the species with a leader from position 75 was detected at early times; however, both forms were found at late times. We have analyzed the temporal regulation of E2 expression by documenting mRNA accumulation in the cytoplasm. Kinetic studies of pulse-labeled RNAs demonstrated a peak of E2 cytoplasmic RNa synthesis at 10 to 12 h, coinciding with the time of maximal synthesis of the 72,000-dalton DNA binding protein and viral DNA. To estimate the relative abundances of the two major E2 RNA species at various times during infection, total E2 cytoplasmic and polysomal 20S RNAs were isolated by hybridization-selection with specific DNA probes. The leader sequences in the selected RNAs were then quantitated by further RNA-DNA hybridization. We found that the elevated accumulation rate for E2 cytoplasmic RNA at late times reflected an increase in formation of both major species. Moreover, for all time points examined 66% of the mRNA species had a 5' end from map position 75, and 33% had a 5' terminus from position 72. Continuous labeling experiments provided evidence that both RNA forms have comparable half-lives. The results suggest that the two major species encoded by E2 are regulated in a coordinate fashion late in infection.

  14. Molecular phylogenetic studies of Brassica, rorippa, arabidopsis and allied genera based on the internal transcribed spacer region of 18S-25S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y W; Lai, K N; Tai, P Y; Ma, D P; Li, W H

    1999-12-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of nine genera in four tribes of the family Brassicaceae were estimated from the sequences of the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) of the 18S-25S nuclear ribosomal DNA. The entire ITS region of 16 accessions belonging to 10 species of seven genera was sequenced. Eight published sequences of Brassicaceae were also used. A total of 27 sequences were included in this study; four of them were found to be pseudogenes. Both the neighbor-joining and the parsimony trees suggest that the nine genera can be divided into three groups: (1) Arabidopsis, Cardaminopsis, Capsella, and Lepidium; (2) Rorippa and Cardamine; and (3) Brassica, Sinapis, and Raphanus. In contradiction to the proposal that Cardaminopsis and Arabidopsis be put into an expanded tribe Arabideae, our data show that these two genera are more closely related to Capsella and Lepidium (tribe Lepidieae) than to Rorippa and Cardamine (tribe Arabideae). Further, our data show that within the tribe Brassiceae, Raphanus is more closely related to B. nigra than to the B. oleracea/B. rapa clade. This result is in agreement with the nuclear data obtained in several studies, but is in conflict with the RFLP data of mitochondrial and chloroplast DNA. As pointed out by previous authors, it is possible that Raphanus is a hybrid between the B. nigra and B. oleracea/B. rapa lineages with the latter as the maternal parent.

  15. Molecular variation analysis of Aspergillus flavus using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer rDNA region

    PubMed Central

    Zarrin, Majid; Erfaninejad, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is the second most common disease-causing species of Aspergillus in humans. The fungus is frequently associated with life-threatening infections in immunocompromised hosts. The primary aim of the present study was to analyze the genetic variability among different isolates of A. flavus using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). A total of 62 A. flavus isolates were tested in the study. Molecular variability was searched for by analysis of the PCR amplification of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of ribosomal DNA using restriction enzymes. PCR using primers for ITS1 and ITS4 resulted in a product of ~600 bp. Amplicons were subjected to digestion with restriction endonucleases EcoRI, HaeIII and TaqI. Digestion of the PCR products using these restriction enzymes produced different patterns of fragments among the isolates, with different sizes and numbers of fragments, revealing genetic variability. In conclusion, ITS-RFLP is a useful molecular tool in screening for nucleotide polymorphisms among A. flavus isolates. PMID:27588085

  16. Analysis of the rDNA internal transcribed spacer region of the Fusarium species by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    ZARRIN, MAJID; GANJ, FARZANEH; FARAMARZI, SAMA

    2016-01-01

    The Fusarium species are a widely spread phytopathogen identified in an extensive variety of hosts. The Fusarium genus is one of the most heterogeneous fungi and is difficult to classify. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis is a useful method in detection of DNA polymorphism in objective sequences. The aim of the present study was to identify the phylogenetic associations and usefulness of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as a genetic marker within the most clinically important strain of the Fusarium species. A total of 50 strains of Fusarium spp. were used in the study, including environmental, clinical and reference isolates. The primers ITS1 and ITS4 were used in the study. Two restriction enzymes, HaeIII and SmaI, were assessed for the digestion of PCR products. A PCR product of ~550-base pairs was generated for each Fusarium species. The digested products with HaeIII and SmaI demonstrated that the bands generated for the medically significant Fusarium species, including F. solani, F. oxysporum, F. verticillidea, F. proliferatum and F. fujikuri, have different restriction enzyme patterns. In conclusion, it appears that the PCR-RFLP method used in the present study produces a sufficient restriction profile for differentiation of the most medically significant Fusarium species. PMID:27073635

  17. Combining nested PCR and restriction digest of the internal transcribed spacer region to characterize arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on roots from the field.

    PubMed

    Renker, Carsten; Heinrichs, Jochen; Kaldorf, Michael; Buscot, François

    2003-08-01

    Identification of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on roots is almost impossible with morphological methods and, due to the presence of contaminating fungi, it is also difficult with molecular biological techniques. To allow broad investigation of the population structure of AMF in the field, we have established a new method to selectively amplify the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of most AMF with a unique primer set. Based on available sequences of the rDNA, one primer pair specific for AMF and a few other fungal groups was designed and combined in a nested PCR with the already established primer pair ITS5/ITS4. Amplification from contaminating organisms was reduced by an AluI restriction after the first reaction of the nested PCR. The method was assessed at five different field sites representing different types of habitats. Members of all major groups within the Glomeromycota (except Archaeosporaceae) were detected at the different sites. Gigasporaceae also proved detectable with the method based on cultivated strains. PMID:12938031

  18. DNA fingerprinting of Paenibacillus popilliae and Paenibacillus lentimorbus using PCR-amplified 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions.

    PubMed

    Dingman, Douglas W

    2009-01-01

    Failure to identify correctly the milky disease bacteria, Paenibacillus popilliae and Paenibacillus lentimorbus, has resulted in published research errors and commercial production problems. A DNA fingerprinting procedure, using PCR amplification of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, has been shown to easily and accurately identify isolates of milky disease bacteria. Using 34 P. popilliae and 15 P. lentimorbus strains, PCR amplification of different ITS regions produced three DNA fingerprints. For P. lentimorbus phylogenic group 2 strains and for all P. popilliae strains tested, electrophoresis of amplified DNA produced a migratory pattern (i.e., ITS-PCR fingerprint) exhibiting three DNA bands. P. lentimorbus group 1 strains also produced this ITS-PCR fingerprint. However, the fingerprint was phase-shifted toward larger DNA sizes. Alignment of the respective P. popilliae and P. lentimorbus group 1 ITS DNA sequences showed extensive homology, except for a 108bp insert in all P. lentimorbus ITS regions. This insert occurred at the same location relative to the 23S rDNA and accounted for the phase-shift difference in P. lentimorbus group 1 DNA fingerprints. At present, there is no explanation for this 108bp insert. The third ITS-PCR fingerprint, produced by P. lentimorbus group 3 strains, exhibited approximately eight DNA bands. Comparison of the three fingerprints of milky disease bacteria to the ITS-PCR fingerprints of other Paenibacillus species demonstrated uniqueness. ITS-PCR fingerprinting successfully identified eight unknown isolates as milky disease bacteria. Therefore, this procedure can serve as a standard protocol to identify P. popilliae and P. lentimorbus.

  19. From genus to phylum: large-subunit and internal transcribed spacer rRNA operon regions show similar classification accuracies influenced by database composition.

    PubMed

    Porras-Alfaro, Andrea; Liu, Kuan-Liang; Kuske, Cheryl R; Xie, Gary

    2014-02-01

    We compared the classification accuracy of two sections of the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, individually and combined, and the 5' section (about 600 bp) of the large-subunit rRNA (LSU), using a naive Bayesian classifier and BLASTN. A hand-curated ITS-LSU training set of 1,091 sequences and a larger training set of 8,967 ITS region sequences were used. Of the factors evaluated, database composition and quality had the largest effect on classification accuracy, followed by fragment size and use of a bootstrap cutoff to improve classification confidence. The naive Bayesian classifier and BLASTN gave similar results at higher taxonomic levels, but the classifier was faster and more accurate at the genus level when a bootstrap cutoff was used. All of the ITS and LSU sections performed well (>97.7% accuracy) at higher taxonomic ranks from kingdom to family, and differences between them were small at the genus level (within 0.66 to 1.23%). When full-length sequence sections were used, the LSU outperformed the ITS1 and ITS2 fragments at the genus level, but the ITS1 and ITS2 showed higher accuracy when smaller fragment sizes of the same length and a 50% bootstrap cutoff were used. In a comparison using the larger ITS training set, ITS1 and ITS2 had very similar accuracy classification for fragments between 100 and 200 bp. Collectively, the results show that any of the ITS or LSU sections we tested provided comparable classification accuracy to the genus level and underscore the need for larger and more diverse classification training sets.

  20. Topoisomerase 1-dependent deletions initiated by incision at ribonucleotides are biased to the non-transcribed strand of a highly activated reporter

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jang-Eun; Kim, Nayun; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2015-01-01

    DNA polymerases incorporate ribonucleoside monophosphates (rNMPs) into genomic DNA at a low level and such rNMPs are efficiently removed in an error-free manner by ribonuclease (RNase) H2. In the absence of RNase H2 in budding yeast, persistent rNMPs give rise to short deletions via a mutagenic process initiated by Topoisomerase 1 (Top1). We examined the activity of a 2-bp, rNMP-dependent deletion hotspot [the (TG)2 hotspot] when on the transcribed or non-transcribed strand (TS or NTS, respectively) of a reporter placed in both orientations near a strong origin of replication. Under low-transcription conditions, hotspot activity depended on whether the (TG)2 sequence was part of the newly synthesized leading or lagging strand of replication. In agreement with an earlier study, deletions occurred at a much higher rate when (TG)2 was on the nascent leading strand. Under high-transcription conditions, however, hotspot activity was not dependent on replication direction, but rather on whether the (TG)2 sequence was on the TS or NTS of the reporter. Deletion rates were several orders of magnitude higher when (TG)2 was on the NTS. These results highlight the complex interplay between replication and transcription in regulating Top1-dependent genetic instability. PMID:26271994

  1. A Real-Time PCR Method for Quantifying Viable Ascaris Eggs Using the First Internally Transcribed Spacer Region of Ribosomal DNA▿

    PubMed Central

    Pecson, Brian M.; Barrios, José Antonio; Johnson, David R.; Nelson, Kara L.

    2006-01-01

    Worldwide, 1.4 billion people are infected with the intestinal worm Ascaris lumbricoides. As a result, Ascaris eggs are commonly found in wastewater and sludges. The current microscopy method for detecting viable Ascaris eggs is time- and labor-intensive. The goal of this study was to develop a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) method to determine the levels of total and viable Ascaris eggs in laboratory solutions using the first internally transcribed spacer (ITS-1) region of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and rRNA. ITS-1 rDNA levels were proportional to Ascaris egg cell numbers, increasing as eggs developed from single cells to mature larvae and ultimately reaching a constant level per egg. Treatments causing >99% inactivation (high heat, moderate heat, ammonia, and UV) eliminated this increase in ITS-1 rDNA levels and caused decreases that were dependent on the treatment type. By taking advantage of this difference in ITS-1 rDNA level between viable, larvated eggs and inactivated, single-celled eggs, qPCR results were used to develop inactivation profiles for the different treatments. No statistical difference from the standard microscopy method was found in 75% of the samples (12 of 16). ITS-1 rRNA was detected only in samples containing viable eggs, but the levels were more variable than rDNA levels and ITS-1 rRNA could not be used for quantification. The detection limit of the rDNA-based method was approximately one larvated egg or 90 single-celled eggs; the detection limit for the rRNA-based method was several orders of magnitude higher. The rDNA qPCR method is promising for both research and regulatory applications. PMID:17056687

  2. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) variation in the Anastrepha fraterculus cryptic species complex (Diptera, Tephritidae) of the Andean region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) was sequenced for Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann, 1830) originating from 85 collections from the northern and central Andean countries of South America including Argentina (Tucumán), Bolivia, Perú, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela. The IT...

  3. Co-infection of Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus spp. among livestock in Malaysia as revealed by amplification and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer II DNA region

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus spp. are reported to be the most prevalent and highly pathogenic parasites in livestock, particularly in small ruminants. However, the routine conventional tool used in Malaysia could not differentiate the species accurately and therefore limiting the understanding of the co-infections between these two genera among livestock in Malaysia. This study is the first attempt to identify the strongylids of veterinary importance in Malaysia (i.e., H. contortus and Trichostrongylus spp.) by amplification and sequencing of the Internal Transcribed Spacer II DNA region. Results Overall, 118 (cattle: 11 of 98 or 11.2%; deer: 4 of 70 or 5.7%; goats: 99 of 157 or 63.1%; swine: 4 of 91 or 4.4%) out of the 416 collected fecal samples were microscopy positive with strongylid infection. The PCR and sequencing results demonstrated that 93 samples (1 or 25.0% of deer; 92 or 92.9% of goats) contained H. contortus. In addition, Trichostrongylus colubriformis was observed in 75 (75.8% of 99) of strongylid infected goats and Trichostrongylus axei in 4 (4.0%) of 99 goats and 2 (50.0%) of 4 deer. Based on the molecular results, co-infection of H. contortus and Trichostrongylus spp. (H. contortus + T. colubriformis denoted as HTC; H. contortus + T. axei denoted as HTA) were only found in goats. Specifically, HTC co-infections have higher rate (71 or 45.2% of 157) compared to HTA co-infections (3 or 1.9% of 157). Conclusions The present study is the first molecular identification of strongylid species among livestock in Malaysia which is essential towards a better knowledge of the epidemiology of gastro-intestinal parasitic infection among livestock in the country. Furthermore, a more comprehensive or nationwide molecular-based study on gastro-intestinal parasites in livestock should be carried out in the future, given that molecular tools could assist in improving diagnosis of veterinary parasitology in Malaysia due to its high

  4. Active region seismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, Tom; Braun, D. C.

    1995-01-01

    Active region seismology is concerned with the determination and interpretation of the interaction of the solar acoustic oscillations with near-surface target structures, such as magnetic flux concentration, sunspots, and plage. Recent observations made with a high spatial resolution and a long temporal duration enabled measurements of the scattering matrix for sunspots and solar active regions to be carried out as a function of the mode properties. Based on this information, the amount of p-mode absorption, partial-wave phase shift, and mode mixing introduced by the sunspot, could be determined. In addition, the possibility of detecting the presence of completely submerged magnetic fields was raised, and new procedures for performing acoustic holography of the solar interior are being developed. The accumulating evidence points to the mode conversion of p-modes to various magneto-atmospheric waves within the magnetic flux concentration as being the unifying physical mechanism responsible for these diverse phenomena.

  5. Identification of three yeast species using the conventional and internal transcribed spacer region sequencing methods as first or second global record from human superficial infections.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Sater, Mohamed Ahmed; Moubasher, Abdel-Aal Hassan; Soliman, Zeinab

    2016-10-01

    During the mycological analysis of skin and nail samples taken from patients with onychomycosis and tineas in Assiut city, it is interesting to report that yeast fungi were the main causal agents being cultured from 45.79% of total cases. In general, 21 species of yeast were isolated. Some of these are reported for the first time from clinical specimens. From the literature available up-to-date around the world, this study reports for the first time Saccharomycopsis fibuligera as the causal agent of four clinical cases: two onychomycoses, one tinea capitis and one tinea amiantacea. Also, it is reported here the second record for Trichosporon dohaense from a case of onychomycosis of a 40-year-old woman (after its original description in 2009 by Taj-Aldeen et al. J Clin Microbiol 47: 1791). Candida galli was also reported for the first time from clinical specimen (tinea unguium) in 2014 by Galán-Sánchez et al. Mycopathol 178: 303, and this study reports the second case of onychomycosis by C. galli. These strains were identified on the basis of their phenotypic, biochemical, physiological and genotypic features. Strains and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene sequences of these species are deposited at Assiut University Mycological Center Culture Collection (AUMC) and National Center for Biotechnological Information (NCBI) respectively. PMID:27392537

  6. Identification of transcribed sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Hochgeschwender, U.; Gardiner, K.

    1994-12-31

    The international Human Genome Project is providing three essential ingredients for the efficient identification of diseases genes. One is the high density of polymorphic markers that are critical for the mapping of disease genes to defined chromosomal regions. The second is a physical map in the form of overlapping genomic clones in YACs or cosmids that will allow detailed analysis of the critical region. The third is a transcription map (gene map) that will provide a bank of regionally mapped candidate genes to test for mutations once a disease gene is mapped. In the past 5 years the identification and mapping of several thousand simple-sequence-repeat polymorphisms has provided the first ingredient, and the physical maps of many chromosomes are approaching completion. However, the transcription map is problematic and a long way from being a useful tool. A detailed analysis of the technology involved in building the requisite transcription maps is found in this book, the published proceedings of the third international workshop on the topic, held October 2-4, 1993, in association with the American Society of Human Genetics meeting in New Orleans.

  7. Rhabdovirus-like endogenous viral elements in the genome of Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells are actively transcribed: Implications for adventitious virus detection.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Christoph; Jarvis, Donald L

    2016-07-01

    Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf) cell lines are used to produce several biologicals for human and veterinary use. Recently, it was discovered that all tested Sf cell lines are persistently infected with Sf-rhabdovirus, a novel rhabdovirus. As part of an effort to search for other adventitious viruses, we searched the Sf cell genome and transcriptome for sequences related to Sf-rhabdovirus. To our surprise, we found intact Sf-rhabdovirus N- and P-like ORFs, and partial Sf-rhabdovirus G- and L-like ORFs. The transcribed and genomic sequences matched, indicating the transcripts were derived from the genomic sequences. These appear to be endogenous viral elements (EVEs), which result from the integration of partial viral genetic material into the host cell genome. It is theoretically impossible for the Sf-rhabdovirus-like EVEs to produce infectious virus particles as 1) they are disseminated across 4 genomic loci, 2) the G and L ORFs are incomplete, and 3) the M ORF is missing. Our finding of transcribed virus-like sequences in Sf cells underscores that MPS-based searches for adventitious viruses in cell substrates used to manufacture biologics should take into account both genomic and transcribed sequences to facilitate the identification of transcribed EVE's, and to avoid false positive detection of replication-competent adventitious viruses.

  8. Active region flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foukal, Peter

    1987-01-01

    A wide range of observations has shown that active region phenomena in the photospheric, chromospheric and coronal temperature regimes are dynamical in nature. At the photosphere, recent observations of full line profiles place an upper limit of about + or - 20/msec on any downflows at supergranule cell edges. Observations of the full Stokes 5 profiles in the network show no evidence for downflows in magnetic flux tubes. In the area of chromospheric dynamics, several models were put forward recently to reproduce the observed behavior of spicules. However, it is pointed out that these adiabatic models do not include the powerful radiative dissipation which tend to damp out the large amplitude disturbances that produce the spicular acceleration in the models. In the corona, loop flows along field lines clearly transport mass and energy at rates important for the dynamics of these structures. However, advances in understanding the heating and mass balance of the loop structures seem to require new kinds of observations. Some results are presented using a remote sensing diagnostic of the intensity and orientation of macroscopic plasma electric fields predicted by models of reconnective heating and also wave heating.

  9. Cyanobacterial Ecotypes in Different Optical Microenvironments of a 68°C Hot Spring Mat Community Revealed by 16S-23S rRNA Internal Transcribed Spacer Region Variation†

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Mike J.; Kühl, Michael; Wieland, Andrea; Ward, David M.

    2003-01-01

    We examined the population of unicellular cyanobacteria (Synechococcus) in the upper 3-mm vertical interval of a 68°C region of a microbial mat in a hot spring effluent channel (Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming). Fluorescence microscopy and microsensor measurements of O2 and oxygenic photosynthesis demonstrated the existence of physiologically distinct Synechococcus populations at different depths along a light gradient quantified by scalar irradiance microprobes. Molecular methods were used to evaluate whether physiologically distinct populations could be correlated with genetically distinct populations over the vertical interval. We were unable to identify patterns in genetic variation in Synechococcus 16S rRNA sequences that correlate with different vertically distributed populations. However, patterns of variation at the internal transcribed spacer locus separating 16S and 23S rRNA genes suggested the existence of closely related but genetically distinct populations corresponding to different functional populations occurring at different depths. PMID:12732563

  10. Regional Activities Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on library network activities in Canada, the Third World, Japan, Malaysia, Brazil, and Sweden which were presented at the 1982 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Canada: A Voluntary and Flexible Network," a review by Guy Sylvestre of the political, social, and economic structures affecting…

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of Pythium insidiosum Thai strains using cytochrome oxidase II (COX II) DNA coding sequences and internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS).

    PubMed

    Kammarnjesadakul, Patcharee; Palaga, Tanapat; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya; Mendoza, Leonel; Krajaejun, Theerapong; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch; Tongchusak, Songsak; Denduangboripant, Jessada; Chindamporn, Ariya

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the phylogenetic relationship among Pythium insidiosum isolates in Thailand, we investigated the genomic DNA of 31 P. insidiosum strains isolated from humans and environmental sources from Thailand, and two from North and Central America. We used PCR to amplify the partial COX II DNA coding sequences and the ITS regions of these isolates. The nucleotide sequences of both amplicons were analyzed by the Bioedit program. Phylogenetic analysis using genetic distance method with Neighbor Joining (NJ) approach was performed using the MEGA4 software. Additional sequences of three other Pythium species, Phytophthora sojae and Lagenidium giganteum were employed as outgroups. The sizes of the COX II amplicons varied from 558-564 bp, whereas the ITS products varied from approximately 871-898 bp. Corrected sequence divergences with Kimura 2-parameter model calculated for the COX II and the ITS DNA sequences ranged between 0.0000-0.0608 and 0.0000-0.2832, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis using both the COX II and the ITS DNA sequences showed similar trees, where we found three sister groups (A(TH), B(TH), and C(TH)) among P. insidiosum strains. All Thai isolates from clinical cases and environmental sources were placed in two separated sister groups (B(TH) and C(TH)), whereas the Americas isolates were grouped into A(TH.) Although the phylogenetic tree based on both regions showed similar distribution, the COX II phylogenetic tree showed higher resolution than the one using the ITS sequences. Our study indicates that COX II gene is the better of the two alternatives to study the phylogenetic relationships among P. insidiosum strains. PMID:20818919

  12. Sequence Analysis of the Second Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS2) Region of rDNA for Species Identification of Trichostrongylus Nematodes Isolated From Domestic Livestock in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemikhah, R; Sharbatkhori, M; Mobedi, I; Kia, EB; Harandi, M Fasihi; Mirhendi, H

    2012-01-01

    Background Infectivity of herbivores with Trichostrongylus nematodes is widespread in many countries, having a major economic impact on breeding, survivability, and productivity of domestic livestock. This study was carried out on Trichostrongylus species isolated from domestic livestock in order to develop an easy-to-perform method for species identification. Methods Trichostrongylus isolates were collected from sheep, goat, cattle, and buffaloes in Khuzestan Province, southwest Iran. Primary species identification was carried out based on morphological characterization of male worms. PCR amplification of ITS2-rDNA region was performed on genomic DNA and the products were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequence data was conducted employing Bayesian Inference approach. Consequently, a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) profile was designed to differentiate Trichostrongylus species. Results A consensus sequence of 238 nucleotides was deposited in the GenBank for Iranian isolates of Trichostrongylus species including T. colubriformis, T. capricola, T. probolurus and T. vitrinus. The designated RFLP using restriction enzyme TasI could readily differentiate among species having different ITS2 sequence. The molecular analysis was in concordance with morphological findings. Conclusion Phylogenetic analysis indicated a close relationship among the sequences obtained in this study and reference sequence of relevant species. ITS2-RFLP with TasI is recommended for molecular differentiation of common Trichostrongylus species. PMID:23109944

  13. Utility of internally transcribed spacer region of rDNA (ITS) and β-tubulin gene sequences to infer genetic diversity and migration patterns of Colletotrichum truncatum infecting Capsicum spp.

    PubMed

    Rampersad, Kandyce; Ramdial, Hema; Rampersad, Sephra N

    2016-01-01

    Anthracnose is among the most economically important diseases affecting pepper (Capsicum spp.) production in the tropics and subtropics. Of the three species of Colletotrichum implicated as causal agents of pepper anthracnose, C. truncatum is considered to be the most destructive in agro-ecosystems worldwide. However, the genetic variation and the migration potential of C. truncatum infecting pepper are not known. Five populations were selected for study and a two-locus (internally transcribed spacer region, ITS1-5.8S-ITS2, and β-tubulin, β-TUB) sequence data set was generated and used in the analyses. Sequences of the ITS region were less informative than β -tubulin gene sequences based on comparisons of DNA polymorphism indices. Trinidad had the highest genetic diversity and also had the largest effective population size in pairwise comparisons with the other populations. The Trinidad population also demonstrated significant genetic differentiation from the other populations. AMOVA and STRUCTURE analyses both suggested significant genetic variation within populations more so than among populations. A consensus Maximum Likelihood tree based on β-TUB gene sequences revealed very little intraspecific diversity for all isolates except for Trinidad. Two clades consisting solely of Trinidad isolates may have diverged earlier than the other isolates. There was also evidence of directional migration among the five populations. These findings may have a direct impact on the development of integrated disease management strategies to control C. truncatum infection in pepper. PMID:26843942

  14. Active Region Release Two CMEs

    NASA Video Gallery

    Solar material can be seen blowing off the sun in this video captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) on the night of Feb. 5, 2013. This active region on the sun sent out two coronal ...

  15. The identification and differentiation of the Candida parapsilosis complex species by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA

    PubMed Central

    Barbedo, Leonardo Silva; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Muniz, Mauro de Medeiros; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2016-01-01

    Currently, it is accepted that there are three species that were formerly grouped under Candida parapsilosis: C. para- psilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis, andCandida metapsilosis. In fact, the antifungal susceptibility profiles and distinct virulence attributes demonstrate the differences in these nosocomial pathogens. An accurate, fast, and economical identification of fungal species has been the main goal in mycology. In the present study, we searched sequences that were available in the GenBank database in order to identify the complete sequence for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1-5.8S-ITS2 region, which is comprised of the forward and reverse primers ITS1 and ITS4. Subsequently, an in silico polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to differentiate the C. parapsilosis complex species. Ninety-eight clinical isolates from patients with fungaemia were submitted for analysis, where 59 isolates were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 37 were identified as C. orthopsilosis, and two were identified as C. metapsilosis. PCR-RFLP quickly and accurately identified C. parapsilosis complex species, making this method an alternative and routine identification system for use in clinical mycology laboratories. PMID:27074256

  16. The Ancestral Gene for Transcribed, Low-Copy Repeats in the Prader-Willi/Angleman Region Encodes a Large Protein Implicated in Protein Trafficking that is Deficient in Mice with Neuromuscular and

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Transcribed, low-copy repeat elements are associated with the breakpoint regions of common deletions in Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. We report here the identification of the ancestral gene ( HERC2 ) and a family of duplicated, truncated copies that comprise these low-copy repeats. This gene encodes a highly conserved giant protein, HERC2, that is distantly related to p532 (HERC1), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) implicated in vesicular trafficking. The mouse genome contains a single Herc2 locus, located in the jdf2 (juvenile development and fertility-2) interval of chromosome 7C. We have identified single nucleotide splice junction mutations in Herc2 in three independent N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced jdf2 mutant alleles, each leading to exon skipping with premature termination of translation and/or deletion of conserved amino acids. Therefore, mutations in Herc2 lead to the neuromuscular secretory vesicle and sperm acrosome defects, other developmental abnormalities and juvenile lethality of jdf2 mice. Combined, these findings suggest that HERC2 is an important gene encoding a GEF involved in protein trafficking and degradation pathways in the cell.

  17. The identification and differentiation of the Candida parapsilosis complex species by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA.

    PubMed

    Barbedo, Leonardo Silva; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Muniz, Mauro de Medeiros; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2016-04-01

    Currently, it is accepted that there are three species that were formerly grouped under Candida parapsilosis: C. para- psilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis, and Candida metapsilosis. In fact, the antifungal susceptibility profiles and distinct virulence attributes demonstrate the differences in these nosocomial pathogens. An accurate, fast, and economical identification of fungal species has been the main goal in mycology. In the present study, we searched sequences that were available in the GenBank database in order to identify the complete sequence for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1-5.8S-ITS2 region, which is comprised of the forward and reverse primers ITS1 and ITS4. Subsequently, an in silico polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to differentiate the C. parapsilosis complex species. Ninety-eight clinical isolates from patients with fungaemia were submitted for analysis, where 59 isolates were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 37 were identified as C. orthopsilosis, and two were identified as C. metapsilosis. PCR-RFLP quickly and accurately identified C. parapsilosis complex species, making this method an alternative and routine identification system for use in clinical mycology laboratories.

  18. Application of Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) Primer and PCR Clamping by LNA Oligonucleotide to Enhance the Amplification of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) Regions in Investigating the Community Structures of Plant–Associated Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Ikenaga, Makoto; Tabuchi, Masakazu; Kawauchi, Tomohiro; Sakai, Masao

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous extraction of host plant DNA severely limits investigations of the community structures of plant–associated fungi due to the similar homologies of sequences in primer–annealing positions between fungi and host plants. Although fungal-specific primers have been designed, plant DNA continues to be excessively amplified by PCR, resulting in the underestimation of community structures. In order to overcome this limitation, locked nucleic acid (LNA) primers and PCR clamping by LNA oligonucleotides have been applied to enhance the amplification of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. LNA primers were designed by converting DNA into LNA, which is specific to fungi, at the forward primer side. LNA oligonucleotides, the sequences of which are complementary to the host plants, were designed by overlapping a few bases with the annealing position of the reverse primer. Plant-specific DNA was then converted into LNA at the shifted position from the 3′ end of the primer–binding position. PCR using the LNA technique enhanced the amplification of fungal ITS regions, whereas those of the host plants were more likely to be amplified without the LNA technique. A denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis displayed patterns that reached an acceptable level for investigating the community structures of plant–associated fungi using the LNA technique. The sequences of the bands detected using the LNA technique were mostly affiliated with known isolates. However, some sequences showed low similarities, indicating the potential to identify novel fungi. Thus, the application of the LNA technique is considered effective for widening the scope of community analyses of plant–associated fungi. PMID:27600711

  19. SDO Sees Active Region Outbursts

    NASA Video Gallery

    This close up video by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory shows an active region near the right-hand edge of the sun’s disk, which erupted with at least a dozen minor events over a 30-hour period fr...

  20. Single-Cell DNA barcoding using sequences from the small subunit rRNA and internal transcribed spacer region identifies new species of Trichonympha and Trichomitopsis from the hindgut of the termite Zootermopsis angusticollis.

    PubMed

    Tai, Vera; James, Erick R; Perlman, Steve J; Keeling, Patrick J

    2013-01-01

    To aid in their digestion of wood, lower termites are known to harbour a diverse community of prokaryotes as well as parabasalid and oxymonad protist symbionts. One of the best-studied lower termite gut communities is that of Zootermopsis angusticollis which has been known for almost 100 years to possess 3 species of Trichonympha (T. campanula, T. collaris, and T. sphaerica), 1 species of Trichomitopsis (T. termopsidis), as well as smaller flagellates. We have re-assessed this community by sequencing the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region from a large number of single Trichonympha and Trichomitopsis cells for which morphology was also documented. Based on phylogenetic clustering and sequence divergence, we identify 3 new species: Trichonympha postcylindrica, Trichomitopsis minor, and Trichomitopsis parvus spp. nov. Once identified by sequencing, the morphology of the isolated cells for all 3 new species was re-examined and found to be distinct from the previously described species: Trichonympha postcylindrica can be morphologically distinguished from the other Trichonympha species by an extension on its posterior end, whereas Trichomitopsis minor and T. parvus are smaller than T. termopsidis but similar in size to each other and cannot be distinguished based on morphology using light microscopy. Given that Z. angusticollis has one of the best characterized hindgut communities, the near doubling of the number of the largest and most easily identifiable symbiont species suggests that the diversity of hindgut symbionts is substantially underestimated in other termites as well. Accurate descriptions of the diversity of these microbial communities are essential for understanding hindgut ecology and disentangling the interactions among the symbionts, and molecular barcoding should be a priority for these systems.

  1. 16S-23S Internal Transcribed Spacer Region PCR and Sequencer-Based Capillary Gel Electrophoresis has Potential as an Alternative to High Performance Liquid Chromatography for Identification of Slowly Growing Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Shradha; Kong, Fanrong; Jelfs, Peter; Gray, Timothy J.; Xiao, Meng; Sintchenko, Vitali; Chen, Sharon C-A

    2016-01-01

    Accurate identification of slowly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (SG-NTM) of clinical significance remains problematic. This study evaluated a novel method of SG-NTM identification by amplification of the mycobacterial 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region followed by resolution of amplified fragments by sequencer-based capillary gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Fourteen American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) strains and 103 clinical/environmental isolates (total n = 24 species) of SG-NTM were included. Identification was compared with that achieved by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), in-house PCR and 16S/ITS sequencing. Isolates of all species yielded a SCGE profile comprising a single fragment length (or peak) except for M. scrofulaceum (two peaks). SCGE peaks of ATCC strains were distinct except for peak overlap between Mycobacterium kansasii and M. marinum. Of clinical/environmental strains, unique peaks were seen for 7/17 (41%) species (M. haemophilum, M. kubicae, M. lentiflavum, M. terrae, M. kansasii, M. asiaticum and M. triplex); 3/17 (18%) species were identified by HPLC. There were five SCGE fragment length types (I–V) each of M. avium, M. intracellulare and M. gordonae. Overlap of fragment lengths was seen between M. marinum and M. ulcerans; for M. gordonae SCGE type III and M. paragordonae; M. avium SCGE types III and IV, and M. intracellulare SCGE type I; M. chimaera, M. parascrofulaceum and M. intracellulare SCGE types III and IV; M. branderi and M. avium type V; and M. vulneris and M. intracellulare type V. The ITS-SCGE method was able to provide the first line rapid and reproducible species identification/screening of SG-NTM and was more discriminatory than HPLC. PMID:27749897

  2. Ab Initio Active Region Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Robert F.; Nordlund, A.

    2013-01-01

    The tachocline is not necessary to produce active regions with their global properties. Dynamo action within the convection zone can produce large scale reversing polarity magnetic fields as shown by ASH code and Charboneau et al simulations. Magneto-convection acting on this large scale field produces Omega-loops which emerge through the surface to produce active regions. The field first emerges as small bipoles with horizontal field over granules anchored in vertical fields in the intergranular lanes. The fields are quickly swept into the intergranular lanes and produce a mixed polarity "pepper and salt" pattern. The opposite polarities then migrate toward separate unipolar regions due to the underlying large scale loop structure. When sufficient flux concentrates, pores and sunspots form. We will show movies of magneto-convection simulations of the emerging flux, its migration, and concentration to form pores and spots, as well as the underlying magnetic field evolution. In addition, the same atmospheric data has been used as input to the LILIA Stokes Inversion code to calculate Stokes spectra for the Fe I 630 nm lines and then invert them to determine the magnetic field. Comparisons of the inverted field with the simulation field shows that small-scale, weak fields, less than 100 G, can not be accurately determined because of vertical gradients that are difficult to match in fitting the line profiles. Horizontal smoothing by telescope diffraction further degrades the inversion accuracy.

  3. Distanced Data: Transcribing Other People's Research Tapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilley, Susan A.; Powick, Kelly D.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, we report on our qualitative study involving eight individuals hired to transcribe research tapes in university contexts. We consider issues of data analysis and data trustworthiness and the implications for both when transcription is assigned to someone other than the researcher. We explore the challenges transcribers faced…

  4. A quick transcribing technique for oral data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schleicher, David

    1972-01-01

    Stenographic techniques offer a means for transcribing oral data accurately and efficiently. In one such application, during five Appolo lunar missions, a rough but helpful transcript was produced within minutes. Similarly, lectures, conferences, and audio tapes can be accurately transcribed as promptly as necessary. Computer programs for translating shorthand notes are being developed; they will increase both speed and accuracy of translation.

  5. Solar active region display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golightly, M.; Raben, V.; Weyland, M.

    2003-04-01

    The Solar Active Region Display System (SARDS) is a client-server application that automatically collects a wide range of solar data and displays it in a format easy for users to assimilate and interpret. Users can rapidly identify active regions of interest or concern from color-coded indicators that visually summarize each region's size, magnetic configuration, recent growth history, and recent flare and CME production. The active region information can be overlaid onto solar maps, multiple solar images, and solar difference images in orthographic, Mercator or cylindrical equidistant projections. Near real-time graphs display the GOES soft and hard x-ray flux, flare events, and daily F10.7 value as a function of time; color-coded indicators show current trends in soft x-ray flux, flare temperature, daily F10.7 flux, and x-ray flare occurrence. Through a separate window up to 4 real-time or static graphs can simultaneously display values of KP, AP, daily F10.7 flux, GOES soft and hard x-ray flux, GOES >10 and >100 MeV proton flux, and Thule neutron monitor count rate. Climatologic displays use color-valued cells to show F10.7 and AP values as a function of Carrington/Bartel's rotation sequences - this format allows users to detect recurrent patterns in solar and geomagnetic activity as well as variations in activity levels over multiple solar cycles. Users can customize many of the display and graph features; all displays can be printed or copied to the system's clipboard for "pasting" into other applications. The system obtains and stores space weather data and images from sources such as the NOAA Space Environment Center, NOAA National Geophysical Data Center, the joint ESA/NASA SOHO spacecraft, and the Kitt Peak National Solar Observatory, and can be extended to include other data series and image sources. Data and images retrieved from the system's database are converted to XML and transported from a central server using HTTP and SOAP protocols, allowing

  6. What makes active regions grow.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weart, S.

    1972-01-01

    A study of magnetic flux growth or growth failure in over 100 active regions is shown to indicate that most growth is connected with the emergence of a large batch of flux in the shape of a new arch filament system (AFS). During the recent sunspot maximum, new AFSs appeared at a rate of nearly one per day over the entire sun. Evidence is presented for two proposed hypotheses, namely: (1) a twist in the flux tubes of new AFSs is a key factor in determining which new AFSs will grow; and (2) this twist is related to the well-known asymmetry of sunspot groups.

  7. Cometary nucleus and active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, F. L.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of the icy conglomerate model of cometary nuclei, various observations demonstrate the spotted nature of many or most nuclei, i.e., regions of unusual activity, either high or low. Rotation periods, spin axes and even precession of the axes are determined. The observational evidence for variations in activity over the surfaces of cometary nuclei are listed and discussed. On June 11 the comet IRAS-ARAKI-ALCOCK approached the Earth to a distance of 0.031 AU, the nearest since C/Lexell, 1770 I, providing a unique opportunity for near-nucleus observations. Preliminary analysis of these images establishes the spin axis of the nucleus, with an oblioquity to the orbit plane of approximately 50 deg, and a lag angle of sublimation approximately 35 deg from the solar meridian on the nucleus. Asymmetries of the inner coma suggests a crazy-quilt distribution of ices with differing volatility over the surface of the nucleus. The observations of Comet P/Homes 1892 III, exhibiting two 8-10 magnitude bursts, are carefully analyzed. The grazing encounter produced, besides the first great burst, an active area on the nucleus, which was rotating retrograde with a period of 16.3hr and inclination nearly 180 deg. After the first burst the total magnitude fell less than two magnitudes from November 7 to November 30 (barely naked eye) while the nuclear region remained diffuse or complex, rarely if ever showing a stellar appearance. The fading was much more rapid after the second burst. The grazing encounter distributed a volume of large chunks in the neighborhood of the nucleus, maintaining activity for weeks.

  8. Evolution of active region outflows throughout an active region lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangrilli, L.; Poletto, G.

    2016-10-01

    Context. We have shown previously that SOHO/UVCS data allow us to detect active region (AR) outflows at coronal altitudes higher than those reached by other instrumentation. These outflows are thought to be a component of the slow solar wind. Aims: Our purpose is to study the evolution of the outflows in the intermediate corona from AR 8100, from the time the AR first forms until it dissolves, after several transits at the solar limb. Methods: Data acquired by SOHO/UVCS at the time of the AR limb transits, at medium latitudes and at altitudes ranging from 1.5 to 2.3 R⊙, were used to infer the physical properties of the outflows through the AR evolution. To this end, we applied the Doppler dimming technique to UVCS spectra. These spectra include the H i Lyα line and the O vi doublet lines at 1031.9 and 1037.6 Å. Results: Plasma speeds and electron densities of the outflows were inferred over several rotations of the Sun. AR outflows are present in the newly born AR and persist throughout the entire AR life. Moreover, we found two types of outflows at different latitudes, both possibly originating in the same negative polarity area of the AR. We also analyzed the behavior of the Si xii 520 Å line along the UVCS slit in an attempt to reveal changes in the Si abundance when different regions are traversed. Although we found some evidence for a Si enrichment in the AR outflows, alternative interpretations are also plausible. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that outflows from ARs are detectable in the intermediate corona throughout the whole AR lifetime. This confirms that outflows contribute to the slow wind.

  9. Use of PCR Targeting of Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions and Single-Stranded Conformation Polymorphism Analysis of Sequence Variation in Different Regions of rRNA Genes in Fungi for Rapid Diagnosis of Mycotic Keratitis†

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish; Shukla, P. K.

    2005-01-01

    The increased incidence of fungal infections in the recent past has been attributed to the increase in the number of human immunodeficiency virus-positive and AIDS patients. Early diagnosis of mycoses in patients is crucial for prompt antifungal therapy. Immunological methods of diagnosis have not been found to be satisfactory, and recent research has been diverted to the use of PCR for the sensitive and early diagnosis at the molecular level. In the present study we targeted different regions of the rRNA gene to diagnose cases of mycotic keratitis and identify the causal agents. Six fungus-specific primers (primers ITS1, ITS2, ITS3, ITS4, invSR1R, and LR12R) were used, and the amplified products were analyzed by single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. Dendrograms of these SSCP patterns, prepared on the basis of Jaccard's coefficient, indicated that the PCR products obtained with primer pair ITS1 and ITS2 were the best for the identification of fungi. The results were confirmed by sequencing of the PCR products, and the approach was successfully tested experimentally for the detection of mycotic keratitis caused by Aspergillus fumigatus and was used for the diagnosis of fungal corneal ulcers in patients. PMID:15695661

  10. Emission measure distribution for diffuse regions in solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, Srividya; Tripathi, Durgesh; Klimchuk, James A.; Mason, Helen E.

    2014-11-01

    Our knowledge of the diffuse emission that encompasses active regions is very limited. In this paper we investigate two off-limb active regions, namely, AR 10939 and AR 10961, to probe the underlying heating mechanisms. For this purpose, we have used spectral observations from Hinode/EIS and employed the emission measure (EM) technique to obtain the thermal structure of these diffuse regions. Our results show that the characteristic EM distributions of the diffuse emission regions peak at log T = 6.25 and the coolward slopes are in the range 1.4-3.3. This suggests that both low- as well as high-frequency nanoflare heating events are at work. Our results provide additional constraints on the properties of these diffuse emission regions and their contribution to the background/foreground when active region cores are observed on-disk.

  11. CME Productivity of Active Regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J.; Shen, C.; Ye, P.; Zhang, Q.; Liu, R.; Wang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Solar active regions (ARs) are the major sources of two kinds of the most violent solar eruptions, namely flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Although they are believed to be two phenomena in the same eruptive process, the productivity of them could be quiet different for various ARs. Why is an AR productive? And why is a flare-rich AR CME-poor? To answer these questions, we compared the recent super flare-rich but CME-poor AR 12192, with other four ARs; two were productive in both flares and CMEs and the other two were inert to produce any M-class or intenser flares or CMEs. By investigating the photospheric parameters based on the SDO/HMI vector magnetogram, we find the three productive ARs have larger magnetic flux, current and free magnetic energy than the inert ARs. Furthermore, the two ARs productive in both flares and CMEs contain higher current helicity, concentrating along both sides of the flaring neutral lines, indicating the presence of a seed magnetic structure( that is highly sheared or twisted) of a CME; they also have higher decay index in the low corona, showing weak constraint. The results suggest that productive ARs are always large and have strong current system and sufficient free energy to power flares, and more importantly whether or not a flare is accompanied by a CME is seemingly related to (1) if there is significant sheared or twisted core field serving as the seed of the CME and (2) if the constraint of the overlying arcades is weak enough. Moreover, some productive ARs may frequently produce more than one CME. How does this happen? We do a statistical investigation of waiting times of quasi-homologous CMEs ( CME ssuccessive originating from the same ARs within short intervals) from super ARs in solar cycle 23 to answer this question. The waiting times of quasi-homologous CMEs have a two-component distribution with a separation at about 18 hours, the first component peaks at 7 hours. The correlation analysis among CME waiting times

  12. The Main Sequence of Explosive Solar Active Regions: Comparison of Emerging and Mature Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ron

    2011-01-01

    For mature active regions, an active region s magnetic flux content determines the maximum free energy the active region can have. Most Large flares and CMEs occur in active regions that are near their free-energy limit. Active-region flare power radiated in the GOES 1-8 band increases steeply as the free-energy limit is approached. We infer that the free-energy limit is set by the rate of release of an active region s free magnetic energy by flares, CMEs and coronal heating balancing the maximum rate the Sun can put free energy into the active region s magnetic field. This balance of maximum power results in explosive active regions residing in a "mainsequence" in active-region (flux content, free energy content) phase space, which sequence is analogous to the main sequence of hydrogen-burning stars in (mass, luminosity) phase space.

  13. A Case of Filament - Active Region Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrache, C.; Dumitru, L.

    2010-09-01

    We analyze a huge filament observed between 5 and 19 September 2001. In its evolution it is linked to the active region 9612, observed between 7 and 16 September 2001. The filament has a strange morphology and dynamics: starting as two parallel components (A and B), it becomes a double sigmoid filament when a third component (C ) appears linking the other two. An unusual magnetic topology characterizes this evolution: the active region is located between the parallel components. When the third component becomes observable, it links these ones first below the active region. After a spectacular plasma movement registered in filament (A), this one becomes linked to (B) above the active region. In spite of these dramatically changes of the magnetic topology and filament -- active region switch, no CME is observed. Only a few flares occurring in AR9612 are registered and these ones can be seen in the dynamics of the filament as an expression of large scale magnetic reconnections.

  14. First steps in qualitative data analysis: transcribing.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Julia

    2008-04-01

    Qualitative research in primary care deepens understanding of phenomena such as health, illness and health care encounters. Many qualitative studies collect audio or video data (e.g. recordings of interviews, focus groups or talk in consultation), and these are usually transcribed into written form for closer study. Transcribing appears to be a straightforward technical task, but in fact involves judgements about what level of detail to choose (e.g. omitting non-verbal dimensions of interaction), data interpretation (e.g. distinguishing 'I don't, no' from 'I don't know') and data representation (e.g. representing the verbalization 'hwarryuhh' as 'How are you?'). Representation of audible and visual data into written form is an interpretive process which is therefore the first step in analysing data. Different levels of detail and different representations of data will be required for projects with differing aims and methodological approaches. This article is a guide to practical and theoretical considerations for researchers new to qualitative data analysis. Data examples are given to illustrate decisions to be made when transcribing or assigning the task to others.

  15. Suppression of Active-Region CME Production by the Presence of Other Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ron; Barghouty, Abdulnasser; Khazanov, Igor

    2009-01-01

    From the SOHO mission s data base of MDI full-disk magnetograms spanning solar cycle 23, we have obtained a set of 40,000 magnetograms of 1,300 active regions, tracking each active region across the 30 degree central solar disk. Each active region magnetogram is cropped from the full-disk magnetogram by an automated code. The cadence is 96 minutes. From each active-region magnetogram, we have measured two whole-active-region magnetic quantities: (1) the magnetic size of the active region (the active region s total magnetic flux), and (2) a gauge of the active region s free magnetic energy (part of the free energy is released in the production of a flare and/or CME eruption). From NOAA Flare/CME catalogs, we have obtained the event (Flare/CME/SEP event) production history of each active region. Using all these data, we find that for each type of eruptive event, an active region s expected rate of event production increases as a power law of our gauge of active-region free magnetic energy. We have also found that, among active regions having nearly the same free energy, the rate of the CME production is less when there are many other active regions on the disk than when there are few or none, but there is no significant discernible suppression of the rate of flare production. This indicates that the presence of other active regions somehow tends to inhibit an active region s flare-producing magnetic explosions from becoming CMEs, contrary to the expectation from the breakout model for the production of CMEs.

  16. Active Region Emergence and Remote Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yixing; Welsch, Brian T.

    2016-02-01

    We study the effect of new emerging solar active regions on the large-scale magnetic environment of existing regions. We first present a theoretical approach to quantify the "interaction energy" between new and pre-existing regions as the difference between i) the summed magnetic energies of their individual potential fields and ii) the energy of their superposed potential fields. We expect that this interaction energy can, depending upon the relative arrangements of newly emerged and pre-existing magnetic flux, indicate the existence of "topological" free magnetic energy in the global coronal field that is independent of any "internal" free magnetic energy due to coronal electric currents flowing within the newly emerged and pre-existing flux systems. We then examine the interaction energy in two well-studied cases of flux emergence, but find that the predicted energetic perturbation is relatively small compared to energies released in large solar flares. Next, we present an observational study of the influence of the emergence of new active regions on flare statistics in pre-existing active regions, using NOAA's Solar Region Summary and GOES flare databases. As part of an effort to precisely determine the emergence time of active regions in a large event sample, we find that emergence in about half of these regions exhibits a two-stage behavior, with an initial gradual phase followed by a more rapid phase. Regarding flaring, we find that the emergence of new regions is associated with a significant increase in the occurrence rate of X- and M-class flares in pre-existing regions. This effect tends to be more significant when pre-existing and new emerging active regions are closer. Given the relative weakness of the interaction energy, this effect suggests that perturbations in the large-scale magnetic field, such as topology changes invoked in the "breakout" model of coronal mass ejections, might play a significant role in the occurrence of some flares.

  17. Establishment of regions of genomic activity during the Drosophila maternal to zygotic transition.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Yong; Harrison, Melissa M; Villalta, Jacqueline E; Kaplan, Tommy; Eisen, Michael B

    2014-01-01

    We describe the genome-wide distributions and temporal dynamics of nucleosomes and post-translational histone modifications throughout the maternal-to-zygotic transition in embryos of Drosophila melanogaster. At mitotic cycle 8, when few zygotic genes are being transcribed, embryonic chromatin is in a relatively simple state: there are few nucleosome free regions, undetectable levels of the histone methylation marks characteristic of mature chromatin, and low levels of histone acetylation at a relatively small number of loci. Histone acetylation increases by cycle 12, but it is not until cycle 14 that nucleosome free regions and domains of histone methylation become widespread. Early histone acetylation is strongly associated with regions that we have previously shown to be bound in early embryos by the maternally deposited transcription factor Zelda, suggesting that Zelda triggers a cascade of events, including the accumulation of specific histone modifications, that plays a role in the subsequent activation of these sequences. PMID:25313869

  18. Hinode Captures Images of Solar Active Region

    NASA Video Gallery

    In these images, Hinode's Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) zoomed in on AR 11263 on August 4, 2011, five days before the active region produced the largest flare of this cycle, an X6.9. We show images...

  19. Polar Field Reversals and Active Region Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Gordon; Ettinger, Sophie

    2015-07-01

    We study the relationship between polar field reversals and decayed active region magnetic flux. Photospheric active region flux is dispersed by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion, and is transported poleward by meridional flows and diffusion. We summarize the published evidence from observation and modeling of the influence of meridional flow variations and decaying active region flux's spatial distribution, such as the Joy's law tilt angle. Using NSO Kitt Peak synoptic magnetograms covering cycles 21-24, we investigate in detail the relationship between the transport of decayed active region flux to high latitudes and changes in the polar field strength, including reversals in the magnetic polarity at the poles. By means of stack plots of low- and high-latitude slices of the synoptic magnetograms, the dispersal of flux from low to high latitudes is tracked, and the timing of this dispersal is compared to the polar field changes. In the most abrupt cases of polar field reversal, a few activity complexes (systems of active regions) are identified as the main cause. The poleward transport of large quantities of decayed trailing-polarity flux from these complexes is found to correlate well in time with the abrupt polar field changes. In each case, significant latitudinal displacements were found between the positive and negative flux centroids of the complexes, consistent with Joy's law bipole tilt with trailing-polarity flux located poleward of leading-polarity flux. The activity complexes of the cycle 21 and 22 maxima were larger and longer-lived than those of the cycle 23 and 24 maxima, and the poleward surges were stronger and more unipolar and the polar field changes larger and faster. The cycle 21 and 22 polar reversals were dominated by only a few long-lived complexes whereas the cycle 23 and 24 reversals were the cumulative effects of more numerous, shorter-lived regions. We conclude that sizes and lifetimes of activity complexes are key to

  20. The 17 GHz active region number

    SciTech Connect

    Selhorst, C. L.; Pacini, A. A.; Costa, J. E. R.; Giménez de Castro, C. G.; Valio, A.; Shibasaki, K.

    2014-08-01

    We report the statistics of the number of active regions (NAR) observed at 17 GHz with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph between 1992, near the maximum of cycle 22, and 2013, which also includes the maximum of cycle 24, and we compare with other activity indexes. We find that NAR minima are shorter than those of the sunspot number (SSN) and radio flux at 10.7 cm (F10.7). This shorter NAR minima could reflect the presence of active regions generated by faint magnetic fields or spotless regions, which were a considerable fraction of the counted active regions. The ratio between the solar radio indexes F10.7/NAR shows a similar reduction during the two minima analyzed, which contrasts with the increase of the ratio of both radio indexes in relation to the SSN during the minimum of cycle 23-24. These results indicate that the radio indexes are more sensitive to weaker magnetic fields than those necessary to form sunspots, of the order of 1500 G. The analysis of the monthly averages of the active region brightness temperatures shows that its long-term variation mimics the solar cycle; however, due to the gyro-resonance emission, a great number of intense spikes are observed in the maximum temperature study. The decrease in the number of these spikes is also evident during the current cycle 24, a consequence of the sunspot magnetic field weakening in the last few years.

  1. IS ACTIVE REGION CORE VARIABILITY AGE DEPENDENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry P.

    2012-12-10

    The presence of both steady and transient loops in active region cores has been reported from soft X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of the solar corona. The relationship between the different loop populations, however, remains an open question. We present an investigation of the short-term variability of loops in the core of two active regions in the context of their long-term evolution. We take advantage of the nearly full Sun observations of STEREO and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft to track these active regions as they rotate around the Sun multiple times. We then diagnose the variability of the active region cores at several instances of their lifetime using EIS/Hinode spectral capabilities. We inspect a broad range of temperatures, including for the first time spatially and temporally resolved images of Ca XIV and Ca XV lines. We find that the active region cores become fainter and steadier with time. The significant emission measure at high temperatures that is not correlated with a comparable increase at low temperatures suggests that high-frequency heating is viable. The presence, however, during the early stages, of an enhanced emission measure in the ''hot'' (3.0-4.5 MK) and ''cool'' (0.6-0.9 MK) components suggests that low-frequency heating also plays a significant role. Our results explain why there have been recent studies supporting both heating scenarios.

  2. Organized Subsurface Flows near Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, D. A.; Hindman, B. W.; Toomre, J.; Thompson, M. J.

    2004-04-01

    Local helioseismic techniques, such as ring analysis and time-distance helioseismology, have already shown that large-scale flows near the surface converge towards major active regions. Ring analysis has further demonstrated that at greater depths some active regions exhibit strong outflows. A critique leveled at the ring-analysis results is that the Regularized Least Squares (RLS) inversion kernels on which they are based have negative sidelobes near the surface. Such sidelobes could result in a surface inflow being misidentified as a diverging outflow at depth. In this paper we show that the Optimally Located Averages (OLA) inversion technique, which produces kernels without significant sidelobes, generates flows markedly similar to the RLS results. Active regions are universally zones of convergence near the surface, while large complexes evince strong outflows deeper down.

  3. The Magnetic Free Energy in Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Thomas R.; Mickey, Donald L.; LaBonte, Barry J.

    2001-01-01

    The magnetic field permeating the solar atmosphere governs much of the structure, morphology, brightness, and dynamics observed on the Sun. The magnetic field, especially in active regions, is thought to provide the power for energetic events in the solar corona, such as solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) and is believed to energize the hot coronal plasma seen in extreme ultraviolet or X-rays. The question remains what specific aspect of the magnetic flux governs the observed variability. To directly understand the role of the magnetic field in energizing the solar corona, it is necessary to measure the free magnetic energy available in active regions. The grant now expiring has demonstrated a new and valuable technique for observing the magnetic free energy in active regions as a function of time.

  4. ON THE FORMATION OF ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Robert F.; Nordlund, Ake E-mail: aake@nbi.dk

    2012-07-01

    Magnetoconvection can produce an active region without an initial coherent flux tube. A simulation was performed where a uniform, untwisted, horizontal magnetic field of 1 kG strength was advected into the bottom of a computational domain 48 Mm wide by 20 Mm deep. The up and down convective motions produce a hierarchy of magnetic loops with a wide range of scales, with smaller loops riding 'piggy-back' in a serpentine fashion on larger loops. When a large loop approaches the surface, it produces a small active region with a compact leading spot and more diffuse following spots.

  5. Polar Field Reversals and Active Region Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Gordon; Ettinger, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    We study the relationship between polar field reversals and decayed active region magnetic flux. Photospheric active region flux is dispersed by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion, and is transported poleward by meridional flows and diffusion. Using NSO Kitt Peak synoptic magnetograms, we investigate in detail the relationship between the transport of decayed active region flux to high latitudes and changes in the polar field strength, including reversals in the magnetic polarity at the poles. By means of stack plots of low- and high-latitude slices of the synoptic magnetograms, the dispersal of flux from low to high latitudes is tracked, and the timing of this dispersal is compared to the polar field changes. In the most abrupt cases of polar field reversal, a few activity complexes (systems of active regions) are identified as the main cause. The poleward transport of large quantities of decayed lagging-polarity flux from these complexes is found to correlate well in time with the abrupt polar field changes. In each case, significant latitudinal displacements were found between the positive and negative flux centroids of the complexes, consistent with Joy's law bipole tilt with lagging-polarity flux located poleward of leading-polarity flux. This work is carried out through the National Solar Observatory Summer Research Assistantship (SRA) Program. The National Solar Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  6. Functional analysis of transcribed spacers of yeast ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Musters, W; Boon, K; van der Sande, C A; van Heerikhuizen, H; Planta, R J

    1990-01-01

    Making use of an rDNA unit, containing oligonucleotide tags in both the 17S and 26S rRNA gene, we have analyzed the effect of various deletions in the External Transcribed Spacer (ETS) and in one of the Internal Transcribed Spacers 1 (ITS1) on the process of ribosome formation in yeast. By following the fate of the tagged transcripts of this rDNA unit in vivo by Northern hybridization we found that deleting various parts of the ETS prevents the accumulation of tagged 17S rRNA and its assembly into 40S subunits, but not the formation of 60S subunits. Deleting the central region of ITS1, including a processing site that is used in an early stage of the maturation process, was also found to prevent the accumulation of functional 49 S subunits, whereas no effect on the formation of 60S subunits was detected. The implications of these findings for yeast pre-rRNA processing are discussed. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2249660

  7. Transcribed sequences of the Escherichia coli btuB gene control its expression and regulation by vitamin B12.

    PubMed Central

    Lundrigan, M D; Köster, W; Kadner, R J

    1991-01-01

    The Escherichia coli btuB gene product is an outer membrane protein required for the active transport of vitamin B12 and other cobalamins. Synthesis of BtuB is repressed when cells are grown in the presence of cobalamins. Mapping of the 5' end of the btuB transcript revealed that a 240-nucleotide transcribed leader precedes the coding sequence. Point mutations causing increased expression under repressing conditions were isolated by use of a btuB-lacZ gene fusion. Mutations at many sites within the leader region affected btuB-lacZ regulation, whereas some base changes upstream of the start of transcription affected the absolute level of expression but not its repressibility. Analysis of btuB-phoA gene fusions and btuB-lacZ operon and gene fusions of various lengths showed that sequences within the btuB coding region (between nucleotides +250 and +350) had to be present for proper expression and transcriptional regulation. Sequences within the leader region (up to +250) conferred regulation of translational fusions. These results indicate that btuB expression is controlled at both the transcriptional and translational levels and that different but possibly overlapping sequences in the transcribed region, including the coding region for the transport protein itself, mediate these two modes of regulation. Images PMID:1847525

  8. Solar Eruptions Initiated in Sigmoidal Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savcheva, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    active regions that have been shown to possess high probability for eruption. They present a direct evidence of the existence of flux ropes in the corona prior to the impulsive phase of eruptions. In order to gain insight into their eruptive behavior and how they get destabilized we need to know their 3D magnetic field structure. First, we review some recent observations and modeling of sigmoidal active regions as the primary hosts of solar eruptions, which can also be used as useful laboratories for studying these phenomena. Then, we concentrate on the analysis of observations and highly data-constrained non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) models over the lifetime of several sigmoidal active regions, where we have captured their magnetic field structure around the times of major flares. We present the topology analysis of a couple of sigmoidal regions pointing us to the probable sites of reconnection. A scenario for eruption is put forward by this analysis. We demonstrate the use of this topology analysis to reconcile the observed eruption features with the standard flare model. Finally, we show a glimpse of how such a NLFFF model of an erupting region can be used to initiate a CME in a global MHD code in an unprecedented realistic manner. Such simulations can show the effects of solar transients on the near-Earth environment and solar system space weather.

  9. Asia Section. Regional Activities Division. Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Two papers on library and information activities in developing nations, particularly in India and other Asian countries, were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference. In "IFLA in Asia: A Review of the Work of the Regional Section for Asia," Edward Lim Huck Tee (Malaysia) describes the low level of…

  10. TRACE Observations of Active Region Births

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfson, C. J.; Shine, R. A.

    2000-05-01

    TRACE has recorded the births of a few bona-fide active regions, as well as many ephemeral regions and so-called X-ray bright points. The observations have usually been made serendipitously while studying a nearby, well formed active region. However, a couple of events have been recorded when deliberately looking for emerging flux in quiet portions of an active region belt. This poster will discuss some of the best observations to date, where the quality ranking of the observation is closely coupled to the observing mode TRACE was in and the availability of high resolution (temporal and/or spatial) MDI magnetograms. Included will be the birth of NOAA AR#8699 on 11 September 1999 at about 14 UT (N22E34), AR#8637 on 17 July 1999 at about 4 UT (N11W1), and AR#8885 on 21 February 2000 at about 6 UT (N11W7); these specifics being provided to encourage coordination with other observations. The temporal relationships between the first appearances of magnetic bipoles, EUV loops, chromospheric plage, pores, and sunspots will be discussed as will the growth rate and spatial relationships of these different features and any associated photospheric flows.

  11. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    1998-06-02

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  12. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1996-01-30

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  13. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1998-06-02

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  14. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    1996-01-01

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  15. Magnetic helicity in emerging solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Bobra, M.; Hayashi, K.; Sun, X.; Schuck, P. W.

    2014-04-10

    Using vector magnetic field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we study magnetic helicity injection into the corona in emerging active regions (ARs) and examine the hemispheric helicity rule. In every region studied, photospheric shearing motion contributes most of the helicity accumulated in the corona. In a sample of 28 emerging ARs, 17 follow the hemisphere rule (61% ± 18% at a 95% confidence interval). Magnetic helicity and twist in 25 ARs (89% ± 11%) have the same sign. The maximum magnetic twist, which depends on the size of an AR, is inferred in a sample of 23 emerging ARs with a bipolar magnetic field configuration.

  16. Supergranule Diffusion and Active Region Decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Choudhary, Debi Prasad

    2004-01-01

    Models of the Sun's magnetic dynamo include turbulent diffusion to parameterize the effects of convective motions on the evolution of the Sun's magnetic field. Supergranules are known to dominate the evolution of the surface magnetic field structure as evidenced by the structure of both the active and quiet magnetic network. However, estimates for the dif hivity attributed to su perymules differ by an order of magnitude from about 100 km sup2/s to more than 1000 km sup2/s. We examine this question of the e i v i t y using three merent approaches. 1) We study the decay of more than 30,000 active regions by determining the rate of change in the sunspot area of each active region from day-to-day. 2) We study the decay of a single isolated active region near the time of solar minimum by examining the magnetic field evolution over five solar rotations fiom SOHOMDI magnetograms obtained at 96-minute intervals. 3) We study the characteristics of supergranules that influence the estimates of their diffusive properties - flow speeds and lifetimes as functions of size - fiom SOHO/MDI Dopplergrams.

  17. Active region evolution in the chromosphere and transtition region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shine, R. A.; Schrijver, C. J.

    1988-01-01

    Images in the C IV 1548 A and the Si II 1526 S lines taken with the ultraviolet spectrometer polarimeter (UVSP) instrument on board the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) satellite were combined into movies showing the evolution of active regions and the neighboring supergranulation over several days. The data sets generally consist of 240 by 240 arc second rasters with 3 arc second pixels taken one per orbit (about every 90 minutes). The images are projected on a latitude/longitude grid to remove the forshortening as the region rotates across the solar disk and further processed to remove jitter and gain variations. Movies were made with and without differential rotation. Although there are occasional missing orbits, these series do not suffer from the long nighttime gaps that occur in observations taken at a single groundbased observatory and are excellent for studying changes on time scales of several hours. The longest sequence processed to date runs from 20 Oct. 1980 to 25 Oct. 1980. This was taken during an SMM flare buildup study on AR 2744. Several shorter sequences taken in 1980 and 1984 will also be shown. The results will be presented on a video disk which can be interactively controlled to view the movies.

  18. The putative imprinted locus D15S9 within the common deletion region for the Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes encodes two overlapping mRNAs transcribed from opposite strands

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, C.C.; Driscoll, D.J.; Saitoh, S.

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is typically caused by a deletion of paternal 15q11-q13, or maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) of chromosome 15, while Angelman syndrome is caused by a maternal deletion or paternal UPD of the same region. Therefore, these two clinically distinct neurobehavioral syndromes result from differential expression of imprinted genes within 15q11-q13. A 3.1 kb cDNA, DN34, from the D15S9 locus within 15q11-q13 was isolated from a human fetal brain library. We showed previously that DN34 probe detects a DNA methylation imprint and therefore may represent a candidate imprinted gene. Isolation of genomic clones and DNA sequencing demonstrated that the gene segment encoding the partial cDNA DN34 was split by a 2 kb intron, but did not encode a substantial open reading frame (ORF). Preliminary analysis of expression by RT-PCR suggests that this gene is expressed in fetal but not in tested tissue types from the adult, and thus its imprinting status has not been possible to assess at present. Surprisingly, we found an ORF on the antisense strand of the DN34 cDNA. This ORF encodes a putative polypeptide of 505 amino acid residues containing a RING C{sub 3}HC{sub 4} zinc-finger motif and other features of nuclear proteins. Subsequent characterization of this gene, ZNF127, and a mouse homolog, demonstrated expression of 3.2 kb transcript from all tested fetal and adult tissues. Transcripts initiate from within a CpG-island, shown to be differentially methylated on parental alleles in the human. Interestingly, functional imprinting of the mouse homolog was subsequently demonstrated in an F{sub 1} cross by analyzing a VNTR polymorphism in the mRNA. The ZNF127 gene is intronless, has significant overlap with the DN34 gene on the antisense strand, and a 1 kb 3{prime} end within the 2 kb DN34 intron.

  19. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic analysis of Citrus (L) from north-east India as revealed by meiosis, and molecular analysis of internal transcribed spacer region of rDNA.

    PubMed

    Hynniewta, Marlykynti; Malik, Surendra Kumar; Rao, Satyawada Rama

    2014-12-01

    The north-eastern region of India is reported to be the center of origin and rich in diversity of Citrus (L.) species, where some wild and endangered species namely Citrus indica, Citrus macroptera, Citrus latipes, Citrus ichagensis and Citrus assamensis exist in their natural and undisturbed habitat. In order to have comprehensive information about the extent of genetic variability and the occurrence of cryptic genomic hybridity between and within various Citrus species, a combined approach involving morphological, cytogenetical and molecular approaches were adopted in the present study. Cytogenetic approaches are known to resolve taxonomic riddles in a more efficient manner, by clearly delineating taxa at species and sub species levels. Male meiotic studies revealed a gametic chromosome number of n = 9, without any evidence of numerical variations. Bivalents outnumbered all other types of associations in pollen mother cells (PMCs) analyzed at diplotene, diakinesis and metaphase I. Univalents were frequently encountered in nine species presently studied, though their presence appropriately did not influence the distributional pattern of the chromosomes at anaphases I and II. The molecular approaches for phylogenetic analysis based on sequence data related to ITS 1, ITS 2 and ITS 1 + 5.8 s + ITS 2 of rDNA using maximum parsimony method and Bayesian inference have thrown light on species inter-relationship and evolution of Citrus species confirming our cytogenetical interpretations. The three true basic species i.e. Citrus medica, Citrus maxima and Citrus reticulata with their unique status have been resolved into distinct clades with molecular approaches as well. C. indica which occupies a unique position in the phylogenetic ladder of the genus Citrus has been resolved as a distinct clade and almost behaving as an out-group. The presences of quadrivalents in C. indica also echo and support its unique position. From our study it is amply clear that C

  20. Solar luminosity fluctuations and active region photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, G.A.; Herzog, A.D.; Lawrence, J.K.; Shelton, J.C.

    1984-07-15

    We present monochromatic observations, obtained with a 512 element diode array, of the irradiance fluctuations of the sunspots and faculae of an active region during its disk transit in 1982 August. Bolometric and stray light corrections are approximately equal in magnitude but opposite in sign, so they have not been applied. The maximum sunspot fluctuation, as a fraction of the quiet-Sun irradiance, is -800 parts per million (ppm). Faculae have a maximum irradiance fluctuation of about +200 ppm near the limbs. We find that the facular energy excess is more than 50% of the sunspot energy deficit, which is -5.8 x 10/sup 35/ ergs. These observations show that faculae are an important element in active region energy balance.

  1. Transcribed dark matter: meaning or myth?

    PubMed

    Ponting, Chris P; Belgard, T Grant

    2010-10-15

    Genomic tiling arrays, cDNA sequencing and, more recently, RNA-Seq have provided initial insights into the extent and depth of transcribed sequence across human and other genomes. These methods have led to greatly improved annotations of protein-coding genes, but have also identified transcription outside of annotated exons. One resultant issue that has aroused dispute is the balance of transcription of known exons against transcription outside of known exons. While non-genic 'dark matter' transcription was found by tiling arrays to be pervasive, it was seen to contribute only a small percentage of the polyadenylated transcriptome in some RNA-Seq experiments. This apparent contradiction has been compounded by a lack of clarity about what exactly constitutes a protein-coding gene. It remains unclear, for example, whether or not all transcripts that overlap on either strand within a genomic locus should be assigned to a single gene locus, including those that fail to share promoters, exons and splice junctions. The inability of tiling arrays and RNA-Seq to count transcripts, rather than exons or exon pairs, adds to these difficulties. While there is agreement that thousands of apparently non-coding loci are present outside of protein-coding genes in the human genome, there is vigorous debate of what constitutes evidence for their functionality. These issues will only be resolved upon the demonstration, or otherwise, that organismal or cellular phenotypes frequently result when non-coding RNA loci are disrupted.

  2. Axial Tilt Angles of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Robert F.

    1996-12-01

    Separate Mount Wilson plage and sunspot group data sets are analyzed in this review to illustrate several interesting aspects of active region axial tilt angles. (1) The distribution of tilt angles differs between plages and sunspot groups in the sense that plages have slightly higher tilt angles, on average, than do spot groups. (2) The distributions of average plage total magnetic flux, or sunspot group area, with tilt angle show a consistent effect: those groups with tilt angles nearest the average values are larger (or have a greater total flux) on average than those farther from the average values. Moreover, the average tilt angles on which these size or flux distributions are centered differ for the two types of objects, and represent closely the actual different average tilt angles for these two features. (3) The polarity separation distances of plages and sunspot groups show a clear relationship to average tilt angles. In the case of each feature, smaller polarity separations are correlated with smaller tilt angles. (4) The dynamics of regions also show a clear relationship with region tilt angles. The spot groups with tilt angles nearest the average value (or perhaps 0-deg tilt angle) have on average a faster rotation rate than those groups with extreme tilt angles. All of these tilt-angle characteristics may be assumed to be related to the physical forces that affect the magnetic flux loop that forms the region. These aspects are discussed in this brief review within the context of our current view of the formation of active region magnetic flux at the solar surface.

  3. Solar irradiance variations due to active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Oster, L.; Schatten, K.H.; Sofia, S.

    1982-05-15

    We have been able to reproduce the variations of the solar irradiance observed by ACRIM to an accuracy of better than +- 0.4 W m/sup -2/, assuming that during the 6 month observation period in 1980 the solar luminosity was constant. The improvement over previous attempts is primarily due to the inclusion of faculae. The reproduction scheme uses simple geometrical data on spot and facula areas, and conventional parameters for the respective fluxes and angular dependencies. The quality of reproduction is not very sensitive to most of the details of these parameters; nevertheless, there conventional parameters cannot be very different from their actual values in the solar atmosphere. It is interesting that the time average of the integrated excess emission (over directions) of the faculae cancels out the integrated deficit produced by the spots, within an accuracy of about 10%. If this behavior were maintained over longer periods of time, say, on the order of an activity cycle, active regions could be viewed as a kind of lighthouse where the energy deficit near the normal direction, associated with the spots, is primarily reemitted close to the tangential directions by the faculae. The currently available data suggest that energy ''storage'' associated with the redirection of flux near active regions on the Sun is comparable to the lifetime of the faculae.

  4. Genomic Regions Associated with Multiple Sclerosis Are Active in B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Disanto, Giulio; Sandve, Geir Kjetil; Berlanga-Taylor, Antonio J.; Morahan, Julia M.; Dobson, Ruth; Giovannoni, Gavin; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V.

    2012-01-01

    More than 50 genomic regions have now been shown to influence the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the mechanisms of action, and the cell types in which these associated variants act at the molecular level remain largely unknown. This is especially true for associated regions containing no known genes. Given the evidence for a role for B cells in MS, we hypothesized that MS associated genomic regions co-localized with regions which are functionally active in B cells. We used publicly available data on 1) MS associated regions and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 2) chromatin profiling in B cells as well as three additional cell types thought to be unrelated to MS (hepatocytes, fibroblasts and keratinocytes). Genomic intervals and SNPs were tested for overlap using the Genomic Hyperbrowser. We found that MS associated regions are significantly enriched in strong enhancer, active promoter and strong transcribed regions (p = 0.00005) and that this overlap is significantly higher in B cells than control cells. In addition, MS associated SNPs also land in active promoter (p = 0.00005) and enhancer regions more than expected by chance (strong enhancer p = 0.0006; weak enhancer p = 0.00005). These results confirm the important role of the immune system and specifically B cells in MS and suggest that MS risk variants exert a gene regulatory role. Previous studies assessing MS risk variants in T cells may be missing important effects in B cells. Similar analyses in other immunological cell types relevant to MS and functional studies are necessary to fully elucidate how genes contribute to MS pathogenesis. PMID:22396755

  5. Sequence variation in the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer of Tridacna crocea.

    PubMed

    Yu, E T; Juinio-Meñez, M A; Monje, V D

    2000-11-01

    DNA-based genetic markers are needed to augment existing allozyme markers in the assessment of genetic diversity of wild giant clam populations. The dearth of polymorphic mitochondrial DNA regions amplified from known universal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers has led us to search other regions of the genome for viable sources of DNA polymorphism. We have designed tridacnid-specific PCR primers for the amplification of internal transcribed spacer regions. Sequences of the first internal transcribed spacer segment (ITS-1) revealed very high polymorphism, showing 29% variation arising from base substitutions alone. Preliminary restriction analysis of the ITS regions using 8 restriction enzymes revealed cryptic changes in the DNA sequence. These mutations are promising as marker tools for differentiating geographically separated populations. Such variation in the ITS region can possibly be used for population genetic analysis.

  6. Observations of an active region filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, W. G.; Tang, Y. H.; Fang, C.; Xu, A. A.

    An active region filament was well observed on September 4, 2002 with THEMIS at the Teide observatory and SOHO/MDI. The full Stokes parameters of the filament were obtained in Hα and FeI 6302 Å lines. Using the data, we have studied the fine structure of the filament and obtained the parameters at the barb endpoints, including intensity, velocity and longitudinal magnetic field. Our results indicate: (a) the Doppler velocities are quiet different at barb endpoints; (b) the longitudinal magnetic fields at the barb endpoints are very weak; (c) there is a strong magnetic field structure under the filament spine.

  7. Pederson Current Dissipation In Emerging Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leake, James E.; Linton, M. G.

    2011-05-01

    Pederson current dissipation in emerging active regions. Certain regions of the solar atmosphere, such as the photosphere and chromosphere, as well as prominences, contain a significant amount of neutral atoms, and a complete description of the plasma requires including the effects of partial ionization. In the chromosphere the dissipation of Pederson currents is important for the evolution of emerging magnetic fields. Due to the relatively high number density in the chromosphere, the ion-neutral collision time-scale is much smaller than timescales associated with flux emergence. Hence we use a single-fluid approach to model the partially ionized plasma. Looking at both the emergence of large-scale sub-surface structures, and the emergence and reconnection of undulatory fields, we investigate the effect of Pederson current dissipation on the state of the emerging field, on magnetic reconnection and on dissipative heating of the atmosphere. Specifically we examine the effect of motions across fieldlines in the partially ionized regions, and how this can increase the free energy supplied to the corona by flux emergence. We also look at reconnection associated with flux emergence in the partially ionized atmosphere, and how this can account for observed small-scale brightenings (Ellerman Bombs).

  8. HEROES Observations of a Quiescent Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, A. Y.; Christe, S.; Gaskin, J.; Wilson-Hodge, C.

    2014-12-01

    Hard X-ray (HXR) observations of solar flares reveal the signatures of energetic electrons, and HXR images with high dynamic range and high sensitivity can distinguish between where electrons are accelerated and where they stop. Even in the non-flaring corona, high-sensitivity HXR measurements may be able to detect the presence of electron acceleration. The High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) balloon mission added the capability of solar observations to an existing astrophysics balloon payload, HERO, which used grazing-incidence optics for direct HXR imaging. HEROES measures HXR emission from ~20 to ~75 keV with an angular resolution of 33" HPD. HEROES launched on 2013 September 21 from Fort Sumner, New Mexico, and had a successful one-day flight. We present the detailed analysis of the 7-hour observation of AR 11850, which sets new upper limits on the HXR emission from a quiescent active region, with corresponding constraints on the numbers of tens of keV energetic electrons present. Using the imaging capability of HEROES, HXR upper limits are also obtained for the quiet Sun surrounding the active region. We also discuss what can be achieved with new and improved HXR instrumentation on balloons.

  9. 7th International Workshop on the Identification of Transcribed Sequences. Beyond the Identification of Transcribed Sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Kathleen

    1997-11-19

    The Seventh Annual Human Genome Conference: Beyond the Identification of Transcribed Sequences (BITS) was held November 16-19, 1997 at the Asilomar Conference Center in Monterey, California. The format for the meeting was a combination of oral presentations, group discussions and poster sessions. The original workshop was held to discuss methodologies for the identification of transcribed sequences in mammalian genomes. Over the years, the focus of the workshops has gradually shifted towards functional analysis, with the most dramatic change in emphasis at this meeting, as reflected in the modest change in the workshop title. Topics presented and discussed included: (1) large scale expression and mutational analysis in yeast, C. elegans, Drosophila and zebrafish, (2) comparative mapping of zebrafish, chicken and Fugu; (3) functional analysis in mouse using promoter traps, mutational analysis of biochemical pathways, and Cre/lox constructs; (4) construction of 5 foot end and complete cDNA libraries; (5) expression analysis in mammalian organisms by array screening and differential display; (6) genome organization as determined by detailed transcriptional mapping and genomic sequence analysis; (7) analysis of genomic sequence, including gene and regulatory sequence predictions, annotation of genomic sequence, development of expression databases and verification of sequence analysis predictions; and (8) structural/functional relationships as determined by RNA secondary structure analysis and evolutionary conservation of non-coding sequences.

  10. Analysis of Mammalian rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacers

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Annette W.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacers, ITS1 and ITS2, are widely used for eukaryote phylogenetic studies from the ordinal level to the species level, and there is even a database for ITS2 sequences. However, ITS regions have been ignored in mammalian phylogenetic studies, and only a few rodent and ape sequences are represented in GenBank. The reasons for this dearth, and the remedies, are described here. We have recovered these sequences, mostly >1 kb in length, for 36 mammalian species. Sequence alignment and transcript folding comparisons reveal the rRNA transcript secondary structure. Mammalian ITS regions, though quite long, still fold into the recognizable secondary structure of other eukaryotes. The ITS2 in particular bears the four standard helix loops, and loops II and III have the hallmark characters universal to eukaryotes. Both sequence and insertions/deletions of transcript secondary structure helices observed here support the four superorder taxonomy of Placentalia. On the family level, major unique indels, neatly excising entire helices, will be useful when additional species are represented, resulting in significant further understanding of the details of mammalian evolutionary history. Furthermore, the identification of a highly conserved element of ITS1 common to warm-blooded vertebrates may aid in deciphering the complex mechanism of RNA transcript processing. This is the last major group of terrestrial vertebrates for which rRNA ITS secondary structure has been resolved. PMID:24260162

  11. Identification of human chromosome 22 transcribed sequences with ORF expressed sequence tags

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Sandro J.; Camargo, Anamaria A.; Briones, Marcelo R. S.; Costa, Fernando F.; Nagai, Maria Aparecida; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Zago, Marco A.; Andrade, Luis Eduardo C.; Carrer, Helaine; El-Dorry, Hamza F. A.; Espreafico, Enilza M.; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Giannella-Neto, Daniel; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Gruber, Arthur; Hackel, Christine; Kimura, Edna T.; Maciel, Rui M. B.; Marie, Suely K. N.; Martins, Elizabeth A. L.; Nóbrega, Marina P.; Paçó-Larson, Maria Luisa; Pardini, Maria Inês M. C.; Pereira, Gonçalo G.; Pesquero, João Bosco; Rodrigues, Vanderlei; Rogatto, Silvia R.; da Silva, Ismael D. C. G.; Sogayar, Mari C.; de Fátima Sonati, Maria; Tajara, Eloiza H.; Valentini, Sandro R.; Acencio, Marcio; Alberto, Fernando L.; Amaral, Maria Elisabete J.; Aneas, Ivy; Bengtson, Mário Henrique; Carraro, Dirce M.; Carvalho, Alex F.; Carvalho, Lúcia Helena; Cerutti, Janete M.; Corrêa, Maria Lucia C.; Costa, Maria Cristina R.; Curcio, Cyntia; Gushiken, Tsieko; Ho, Paulo L.; Kimura, Elza; Leite, Luciana C. C.; Maia, Gustavo; Majumder, Paromita; Marins, Mozart; Matsukuma, Adriana; Melo, Analy S. A.; Mestriner, Carlos Alberto; Miracca, Elisabete C.; Miranda, Daniela C.; Nascimento, Ana Lucia T. O.; Nóbrega, Francisco G.; Ojopi, Élida P. B.; Pandolfi, José Rodrigo C.; Pessoa, Luciana Gilbert; Rahal, Paula; Rainho, Claudia A.; da Ro's, Nancy; de Sá, Renata G.; Sales, Magaly M.; da Silva, Neusa P.; Silva, Tereza C.; da Silva, Wilson; Simão, Daniel F.; Sousa, Josane F.; Stecconi, Daniella; Tsukumo, Fernando; Valente, Valéria; Zalcberg, Heloisa; Brentani, Ricardo R.; Reis, Luis F. L.; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel; Simpson, Andrew J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Transcribed sequences in the human genome can be identified with confidence only by alignment with sequences derived from cDNAs synthesized from naturally occurring mRNAs. We constructed a set of 250,000 cDNAs that represent partial expressed gene sequences and that are biased toward the central coding regions of the resulting transcripts. They are termed ORF expressed sequence tags (ORESTES). The 250,000 ORESTES were assembled into 81,429 contigs. Of these, 1,181 (1.45%) were found to match sequences in chromosome 22 with at least one ORESTES contig for 162 (65.6%) of the 247 known genes, for 67 (44.6%) of the 150 related genes, and for 45 of the 148 (30.4%) EST-predicted genes on this chromosome. Using a set of stringent criteria to validate our sequences, we identified a further 219 previously unannotated transcribed sequences on chromosome 22. Of these, 171 were in fact also defined by EST or full length cDNA sequences available in GenBank but not utilized in the initial annotation of the first human chromosome sequence. Thus despite representing less than 15% of all expressed human sequences in the public databases at the time of the present analysis, ORESTES sequences defined 48 transcribed sequences on chromosome 22 not defined by other sequences. All of the transcribed sequences defined by ORESTES coincided with DNA regions predicted as encoding exons by genscan. (http://genes.mit.edu/GENSCAN.html). PMID:11070084

  12. FIP bias in a sigmoidal active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D.; Brooks, D. H.; Démoulin, P.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Green, L. M.; Steed, K.; Carlyle, J.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate first ionization potential (FIP) bias levels in an anemone active region (AR) - coronal hole (CH) complex using an abundance map derived from Hinode/EIS spectra. The detailed, spatially resolved abundance map has a large field of view covering 359'' × 485''. Plasma with high FIP bias, or coronal abundances, is concentrated at the footpoints of the AR loops whereas the surrounding CH has a low FIP bias, ~1, i.e. photospheric abundances. A channel of low FIP bias is located along the AR's main polarity inversion line containing a filament where ongoing flux cancellation is observed, indicating a bald patch magnetic topology characteristic of a sigmoid/flux rope configuration.

  13. Three dimensional structures of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    Three dimensional structure of an active region is determined from observations with the Very Large Array (VLA) at 2, 6, and 20 cm. This region exhibits a single magnetic loop of length approx. 10 to the 10th power cm. The 2 cm radiation is mostly thermal bremsstrahlung and originates from the footpoints of the loop. The 6 and 20 cm radiation is dominated by the low harmonic gyroresonance radiation and originates from the upper portion of the legs or the top of the loop. The loop broadens toward the apex. The top of the loop is not found to be the hottest point, but two temperature maxima on either side of the loop apex are observed, which is consistent with the model proposed for long loops. From 2 and 6 cm observations it can be concluded that the electron density and temperature cannot be uniform in a plane perpendicular to the axis of the loop; the density should decrease away from the axis of the loop.

  14. Multiple Wavelength Observations of Flaring Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    The radio emission of quiescent active regions at 6 cm wavelength marks the legs of magnetic dipoles, and the emission at 20 cm wavelength delineates the radio wavelength counterpart of the coronal loops previously detected at X-ray wavelengths. At both wavelengths the temperatures have coronal values of a few million degrees. The polarization of the radio emission specifies the structure and strength of the coronal magnetic field (H ≈ 600 Gauss at heights h ≈ 4 x 109 cm above sunspot umbrae). At 6 cm and 20 cm wavelength the solar bursts have angular sizes between 5" and 30", brightness temperatures between 2 x 107 K and 2 x 108 K, and degrees of circular polarization between 10% and 90%. The location of the burst energy release is specified with second-of-arc accuracy. At radio wavelengths the bursts occur within the central regions of magnetic loops, while the flaring Ha kernels are located at the loop footpoints. Coronal loops exhibit enhanced radio emission (preburst heating) a few minutes before the release of burst energy. The radio polarization data indicate magnetic changes before and during solar bursts.

  15. The Life Cycle of Active Region Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Thompson, M. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present a contemporary view of how solar active region magnetic fields are understood to be generated, transported and dispersed. Empirical trends of active region properties that guide model development are discussed. Physical principles considered important for active region evolution are introduced and advances in modeling are reviewed.

  16. Balancing acts of SRI and an auto-inhibitory domain specify Set2 function at transcribed chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Niu, Yanling; Li, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Set2-mediated H3K36 methylation ubiquitously functions in coding regions in all eukaryotes. It has been linked to the regulation of acetylation states, histone exchange, alternative splicing, DNA repair and recombination. Set2 is recruited to transcribed chromatin through its SRI domain's direct association with phosphorylated Pol II. However, regulatory mechanisms for histone modifying enzymes like Set2 that travel with elongating Pol II remain largely unknown beyond their initial recruitment events. Here, by fusing Set2 to RNA Pol II, we found that the SRI domain can also recognize linker DNA of chromatin, thereby controlling Set2 substrate specificity. We also discovered that an auto-inhibitory domain (AID) of Set2 primarily restricts Set2 activity to transcribed chromatin and fine-tunes several functions of SRI. Finally, we demonstrated that AID mutations caused hyperactive Set2 in vivo and displayed a synthetic interaction with the histone chaperone FACT. Our data suggest that Set2 is intrinsically regulated through multiple mechanisms and emphasize the importance of a precise temporal control of H3K36 methylation during the dynamic transcription elongation process. PMID:25925577

  17. MAGNETIC ENERGY SPECTRA IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Abramenko, Valentyna; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

    2010-09-01

    Line-of-sight magnetograms for 217 active regions (ARs) with different flare rates observed at the solar disk center from 1997 January until 2006 December are utilized to study the turbulence regime and its relationship to flare productivity. Data from the SOHO/MDI instrument recorded in the high-resolution mode and data from the BBSO magnetograph were used. The turbulence regime was probed via magnetic energy spectra and magnetic dissipation spectra. We found steeper energy spectra for ARs with higher flare productivity. We also report that both the power index, {alpha}, of the energy spectrum, E(k) {approx} k{sup -}{alpha}, and the total spectral energy, W = {integral}E(k)dk, are comparably correlated with the flare index, A, of an AR. The correlations are found to be stronger than those found between the flare index and the total unsigned flux. The flare index for an AR can be estimated based on measurements of {alpha} and W as A = 10{sup b}({alpha}W){sup c}, with b = -7.92 {+-} 0.58 and c = 1.85 {+-} 0.13. We found that the regime of the fully developed turbulence occurs in decaying ARs and in emerging ARs (at the very early stage of emergence). Well-developed ARs display underdeveloped turbulence with strong magnetic dissipation at all scales.

  18. Molecular Identification of Two Strains of Phellinus sp. by Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Two species of cultivated Phellinus sp. were identified as P. baumii by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence analysis. The fruit bodies of the examined strains were similar to those of naturally occurring strains, having a bracket-like form, yellow-to-orange color, and poroid hymenial surfaces. The DNA sequences of ITS region of both strains showed a homology of 99% with ITS1 to ITS2 sequences of P. (Inonotus) baumii strain PB0806. PMID:22783119

  19. The Limit of Free Magnetic Energy in Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2012-01-01

    By measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region fs magnetic field, it has been found previously that (1) there is an abrupt upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region fs magnetic flux content, and (2) the free energy is usually near its limit when the field explodes in a CME/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy ]limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, from measurement of Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograms, we find the magnetic condition that underlies the free ]energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free ]energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find that (1) in active regions at and near their free ]energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non ]free magnetic energy the potential field would have is approximately 1 in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free ]energy limit. This shows that most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than 1 cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches 1, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is 1 or greater, most active regions are compelled to explode. From these results we surmise the magnetic condition that determines the free ]energy limit is the ratio of the free magnetic energy to the non-free energy the active region fs field would have were it completely relaxed to its potential ]field configuration, and that this ratio is approximately 1 at the free-energy limit and in the main sequence of explosive active regions.

  20. Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies associate with transcriptionally active genomic regions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jayson; Shiels, Carol; Sasieni, Peter; Wu, Pei Jun; Islam, Suhail A.; Freemont, Paul S.; Sheer, Denise

    2004-01-01

    The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein is aggregated into nuclear bodies that are associated with diverse nuclear processes. Here, we report that the distance between a locus and its nearest PML body correlates with the transcriptional activity and gene density around the locus. Genes on the active X chromosome are more significantly associated with PML bodies than their silenced homologues on the inactive X chromosome. We also found that a histone-encoding gene cluster, which is transcribed only in S-phase, is more strongly associated with PML bodies in S-phase than in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. However, visualization of specific RNA transcripts for several genes showed that PML bodies were not themselves sites of transcription for these genes. Furthermore, knock-down of PML bodies by RNA interference did not preferentially change the expression of genes closely associated with PML bodies. We propose that PML bodies form in nuclear compartments of high transcriptional activity, but they do not directly regulate transcription of genes in these compartments. PMID:14970191

  1. Statistical Analysis of Acoustic Wave Parameters Near Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabello-Soares, M. Cristina; Bogart, Richard S.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    2016-08-01

    In order to quantify the influence of magnetic fields on acoustic mode parameters and flows in and around active regions, we analyze the differences in the parameters in magnetically quiet regions nearby an active region (which we call “nearby regions”), compared with those of quiet regions at the same disk locations for which there are no neighboring active regions. We also compare the mode parameters in active regions with those in comparably located quiet regions. Our analysis is based on ring-diagram analysis of all active regions observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) during almost five years. We find that the frequency at which the mode amplitude changes from attenuation to amplification in the quiet nearby regions is around 4.2 mHz, in contrast to the active regions, for which it is about 5.1 mHz. This amplitude enhacement (the “acoustic halo effect”) is as large as that observed in the active regions, and has a very weak dependence on the wave propagation direction. The mode energy difference in nearby regions also changes from a deficit to an excess at around 4.2 mHz, but averages to zero over all modes. The frequency difference in nearby regions increases with increasing frequency until a point at which the frequency shifts turn over sharply, as in active regions. However, this turnover occurs around 4.9 mHz, which is significantly below the acoustic cutoff frequency. Inverting the horizontal flow parameters in the direction of the neigboring active regions, we find flows that are consistent with a model of the thermal energy flow being blocked directly below the active region.

  2. Metagenomic data of fungal internal transcribed spacer from serofluid dish, a traditional Chinese fermented food.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Zhao, Yang; Wu, Zhengrong; Liu, Ronghui; Xu, Ruixiang; Yan, Lei; Li, Hongyu

    2016-03-01

    Serofluid dish (or Jiangshui, in Chinese), a traditional food in the Chinese culture for thousands of years, is made from vegetables by fermentation. In this work, microorganism community of the fermented serofluid dish was investigated by the culture-independent method. The metagenomic data in this article contains the sequences of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rRNA genes from 12 different serofluid dish samples. The metagenome comprised of 50,865 average raw reads with an average of 8,958,220 bp and G + C content is 45.62%. This is the first report on metagenomic data of fungal ITS from serofluid dish employing Illumina platform to profile the fungal communities of this little known fermented food from Gansu Province, China. The Metagenomic data of fungal internal transcribed spacer can be accessed at NCBI, SRA database accession no. SRP067411. PMID:26981389

  3. Identification of Transcribed Enhancers by Genome-Wide Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Blinka, Steven; Reimer, Michael H; Pulakanti, Kirthi; Pinello, Luca; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Rao, Sridhar

    2017-01-01

    Recent work has shown that RNA polymerase II-mediated transcription at distal cis-regulatory elements serves as a mark of highly active enhancers. Production of noncoding RNAs at enhancers, termed eRNAs, correlates with higher expression of genes that the enhancer interacts with; hence, eRNAs provide a new tool to model gene activity in normal and disease tissues. Moreover, this unique class of noncoding RNA has diverse roles in transcriptional regulation. Transcribed enhancers can be identified by a common signature of epigenetic marks by overlaying a series of genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation and RNA sequencing datasets. A computational approach to filter non-enhancer elements and other classes of noncoding RNAs is essential to not cloud downstream analysis. Here we present a protocol that combines wet and dry bench methods to accurately identify transcribed enhancers genome-wide as well as an experimental procedure to validate these datasets. PMID:27662872

  4. Tracked Active Region Patches for MDI and HMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turmon, Michael; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Bobra, Monica

    2014-06-01

    We describe tracked active-region patch data products that have been developed for HMI (HMI Active Region Patches, or HARPs) and for MDI (MDI Tracked Active Region Patches, or MDI TARPs). Both data products consist of tracked magnetic features on the scale of solar active regions. The now-released HARP data product covers 2010-present (>2000 regions to date). Like the HARPs, the MDI TARP data set is a catalog of active regions (ARs), indexed by a region ID number, analogous to a NOAA AR number, and time. The TARPs contain 6170 regions spanning 72000 images taken over 1996-2010, and will be availablein the MDI resident archive (RA).MDI TARPs are computed based on the 96-minute synoptic magnetograms and intensitygrams. As with the related HARP data product, the approximate threshold for significance is 100G. Use of both image types together allows faculae and sunspots to be separated out as sub-classes of activity, in addition to identifying the overall active region that they are in. After being identified in single images, the magnetically-active patches are grouped and tracked from image to image. Merges among growing active regions, as well as faint active regions hovering at the threshold of detection, are handled automatically. Regions are tracked from their inception until they decay within view, or transit off the visible disk. For each active region and for each time, a bitmap image is stored containing the precise outline of the active region. Also, metadata such as areas and integrated fluxes are stored for each AR and for each time. Because there is a cross-calibration between the HMI and MDI magnetograms (Liu et al. 2012), it is straightforward to use the same classification and tracking rules for the HMI HARPs and the MDI TARPs. We show results demonstrating region correspondence, region boundary agreement, and agreement of flux metadata using the approximately 140 regions in the May 2010-October 2010 time period. We envision several uses for these data

  5. GLOBAL DYNAMICS OF SUBSURFACE SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Jouve, L.; Brun, A. S.

    2013-01-01

    We present three-dimensional numerical simulations of a magnetic loop evolving in either a convectively stable or unstable rotating shell. The magnetic loop is introduced into the shell in such a way that it is buoyant only in a certain portion in longitude, thus creating an {Omega}-loop. Due to the action of magnetic buoyancy, the loop rises and develops asymmetries between its leading and following legs, creating emerging bipolar regions whose characteristics are similar to those of observed spots at the solar surface. In particular, we self-consistently reproduce the creation of tongues around the spot polarities, which can be strongly affected by convection. We further emphasize the presence of ring-shaped magnetic structures around our simulated emerging regions, which we call 'magnetic necklace' and which were seen in a number of observations without being reported as of today. We show that those necklaces are markers of vorticity generation at the periphery and below the rising magnetic loop. We also find that the asymmetry between the two legs of the loop is crucially dependent on the initial magnetic field strength. The tilt angle of the emerging regions is also studied in the stable and unstable cases and seems to be affected both by the convective motions and the presence of a differential rotation in the convective cases.

  6. OBSERVING CORONAL NANOFLARES IN ACTIVE REGION MOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Testa, Paola; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark; De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Title, Alan; Hansteen, Viggo; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DeForest, Craig

    2013-06-10

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial ({approx}0.''3-0.''4) and temporal (5.5 s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to {approx}15 s, significantly shorter than the minute-scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the 94 A channel, and by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few 10{sup 23} erg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C observations suggest that future observations at comparable high spatial and temporal resolution, with more extensive temperature coverage, are required to determine the exact characteristics of the heating mechanism(s).

  7. Subsurface helicity of active regions 12192 and 10486

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komm, Rudolf; Tripathy, Sushant; Howe, Rachel; Hill, Frank

    2015-04-01

    The active region 10486 that produced the Halloween flares in 2003 initiated our interest in the kinetic helicity of subsurface flows associated with active regions. This lead to the realization that the helicity of subsurface flows is related to the flare activity of active regions. Eleven years later, a similarly enormous active region (12192) appeared on the solar surface. We plan to study the kinetic helicity of the subsurface flows associated with region 12192 and compare it to that of region 10486. For 10486, we have analyzed Dopplergrams obtained with the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) with a dense-pack ring-diagram analysis. For 12192, we have analyzed Dopplergrams from GONG and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We will present the latest results.

  8. A Fractal Dimension Survey of Active Region Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAteer, R. T. James; Gallagher, Peter; Ireland, Jack

    2005-01-01

    A new approach to quantifying the magnetic complexity of active regions using a fractal dimension measure is presented. This fully-automated approach uses full disc MDI magnetograms of active regions from a large data set (2742 days of the SoHO mission; 9342 active regions) to compare the calculated fractal dimension to both Mount Wilson classification and flare rate. The main Mount Wilson classes exhibit no distinct fractal dimension distribution, suggesting a self-similar nature of all active regions. Solar flare productivity exhibits an increase in both the frequency and GOES X-ray magnitude of flares from regions with higher fractal dimensions. Specifically a lower threshold fractal dimension of 1.2 and 1.25 exists as a necessary, but not sufficient, requirement for an active region to produce M- and X-class flares respectively .

  9. Transcribing Disordered Speech: By Target or by Production?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Martin J.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to transcribe disordered speech is a vital tool for speech-language pathologists, as accurate description of a client's speech output is needed for both diagnosis and effective intervention. Clients in the speech clinic often use sounds that are not part of the target sound system and which may, in some cases, be sounds not found in…

  10. Training and Availability of Braille Transcribers in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corn, Anne L.; Wall, Robert S.

    2002-01-01

    A survey of Braille transcribers in 40 states found Braille production systems rely on volunteers and hence Braille transcription is not considered a bona fide career. The majority cited low funding and resources as obstacles to change. Issues of certification, training, availability, and definition are discussed, along with recommendations.…

  11. Transcriptionally Active Regions Are the Preferred Targets for Chromosomal HPV Integration in Cervical Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Irene Kraus; Sandve, Geir Kjetil; Schmitz, Martina; Dürst, Matthias; Hovig, Eivind

    2015-01-01

    Integration of human papillomavirus (HPV) into the host genome is regarded as a determining event in cervical carcinogenesis. However, the exact mechanism for integration, and the role of integration in stimulating cancer progression, is not fully characterized. Although integration sites are reported to appear randomly distributed over all chromosomes, fragile sites, translocation break points and transcriptionally active regions have all been suggested as being preferred sites for integration. In addition, more recent studies have reported integration events occurring within or surrounding essential cancer-related genes, raising the question whether these may reflect key events in the molecular genesis of HPV induced carcinomas. In a search for possible common denominators of the integration sites, we utilized the chromosomal coordinates of 121 viral-cellular fusion transcripts, and examined for statistical overrepresentation of integration sites with various features of ENCODE chromatin information data, using the Genomic HyperBrowser. We find that integration sites coincide with DNA that is transcriptionally active in mucosal epithelium, as judged by the relationship of integration sites to DNase hypersensitivity and H3K4me3 methylation data. Finding an association between integration and transcription is highly informative with regard to the spatio-temporal characteristics of the integration process. These results suggest that integration is an early event in carcinogenesis, more than a late product of chromosomal instability. If the viral integrations were more likely to occur in destabilized regions of the DNA, a completely random distribution of the integration sites would be expected. As a by-product of integration in actively transcribing DNA, a tendency of integration in or close to genes is likely to be observed. This increases the possibility of viral signals to modulate the expression of these genes, potentially contributing to the progression towards

  12. The birth and evolution of solar active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaizauskas, V.

    1993-09-01

    The growth of solar active regions is a well-observed surface phenomenon with its origins concealed in the solar interior. We review the salient facts about the emergence of active regions and the consequences of their growth on the solar atmosphere. The most powerful flares, the ones which display a range of phenomena that still pose serious challenges for high-energy astrophysics, are associated with regions of high magnetic complexity. How does that degree of complexity arise when the vast majority of active regions are simple bipolar entities? In order to gain some insight into that problem, we compare the emergence of magnetic flux in ordinary regions with an instance when magnetic complexity is apparent from the very first appearance of a new region - clearly a subsurface prefabrication of complexity - and with others wherein a new region interacts with a pre-existing one to create the complexity in plain view.

  13. A Mechanistic Model for Cooperative Behavior of Co-transcribing RNA Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Heberling, Tamra; Davis, Lisa; Gedeon, Jakub; Morgan, Charles; Gedeon, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    In fast-transcribing prokaryotic genes, such as an rrn gene in Escherichia coli, many RNA polymerases (RNAPs) transcribe the DNA simultaneously. Active elongation of RNAPs is often interrupted by pauses, which has been observed to cause RNAP traffic jams; yet some studies indicate that elongation seems to be faster in the presence of multiple RNAPs than elongation by a single RNAP. We propose that an interaction between RNAPs via the torque produced by RNAP motion on helically twisted DNA can explain this apparent paradox. We have incorporated the torque mechanism into a stochastic model and simulated transcription both with and without torque. Simulation results illustrate that the torque causes shorter pause durations and fewer collisions between polymerases. Our results suggest that the torsional interaction of RNAPs is an important mechanism in maintaining fast transcription times, and that transcription should be viewed as a cooperative group effort by multiple polymerases. PMID:27517607

  14. A Mechanistic Model for Cooperative Behavior of Co-transcribing RNA Polymerases.

    PubMed

    Heberling, Tamra; Davis, Lisa; Gedeon, Jakub; Morgan, Charles; Gedeon, Tomáš

    2016-08-01

    In fast-transcribing prokaryotic genes, such as an rrn gene in Escherichia coli, many RNA polymerases (RNAPs) transcribe the DNA simultaneously. Active elongation of RNAPs is often interrupted by pauses, which has been observed to cause RNAP traffic jams; yet some studies indicate that elongation seems to be faster in the presence of multiple RNAPs than elongation by a single RNAP. We propose that an interaction between RNAPs via the torque produced by RNAP motion on helically twisted DNA can explain this apparent paradox. We have incorporated the torque mechanism into a stochastic model and simulated transcription both with and without torque. Simulation results illustrate that the torque causes shorter pause durations and fewer collisions between polymerases. Our results suggest that the torsional interaction of RNAPs is an important mechanism in maintaining fast transcription times, and that transcription should be viewed as a cooperative group effort by multiple polymerases.

  15. IFLA General Conference, 1985. Division on Regional Activities. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on regional library activities which were presented at the 1985 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Importance of Information Resources in National Development with Particular Reference to the Asian Scene" (Yogendra P. Dubey, India); (2) "Report of the Activities of the Regional Section for Asia…

  16. Total DNA transcription in vitro: a procedure to detect highly repetitive and transcribable sequences with tRNA-like structures

    SciTech Connect

    Endoh, H.; Okada, N.

    1986-01-01

    Total DNAs from various animals were transcribed in vitro in a HeLa cell extract, and it was found that one to several discrete RNAs were transcribed by RNA polymerase III. With tortoise (Geoclemys reevessi) and newt (Cynops pyrrhogaster), distinct 6.5S and 8S RNAs were transcribed from these respective DNAs. Representative phage clones carrying the 6.5S and 8S RNA genes were isolated from genomic libraries of these animals, and the sequences of these genes were determined. The 5' parts of highly repetitive and transcribable sequences of tortoise and newt were found to have close resemblance to tRNA/sub 1//sup Lys/ (rabbit) gene (78% homology) and a tRNA/sup Glu/ (Drosophila) gene (74% homology, not counting the aminoacyl stem region), respectively. The homologies extended to secondary structures, homologous nucleotides being located on similar secondary structures. It is proposed that many, if not all, highly repetitive and transcribable sequences detected by total DNA transcription have specific tRNA genes as their progenitors.

  17. Software Displays Data on Active Regions of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golightly, Mike; Weyland, Mark; Raben, Vern

    2011-01-01

    The Solar Active Region Display System is a computer program that generates, in near real time, a graphical display of parameters indicative of the spatial and temporal variations of activity on the Sun. These parameters include histories and distributions of solar flares, active region growth, coronal mass ejections, size, and magnetic configuration. By presenting solar-activity data in graphical form, this program accelerates, facilitates, and partly automates what had previously been a time-consuming mental process of interpretation of solar-activity data presented in tabular and textual formats. Intended for original use in predicting space weather in order to minimize the exposure of astronauts to ionizing radiation, the program might also be useful on Earth for predicting solar-wind-induced ionospheric effects, electric currents, and potentials that could affect radio-communication systems, navigation systems, pipelines, and long electric-power lines. Raw data for the display are obtained automatically from the Space Environment Center (SEC) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Other data must be obtained from the NOAA SEC by verbal communication and entered manually. The Solar Active Region Display System automatically accounts for the latitude dependence of the rate of rotation of the Sun, by use of a mathematical model that is corrected with NOAA SEC active-region position data once every 24 hours. The display includes the date, time, and an image of the Sun in H light overlaid with latitude and longitude coordinate lines, dots that mark locations of active regions identified by NOAA, identifying numbers assigned by NOAA to such regions, and solar-region visual summary (SRVS) indicators associated with some of the active regions. Each SRVS indicator is a small pie chart containing five equal sectors, each of which is color-coded to provide a semiquantitative indication of the degree of hazard posed by one aspect of the activity at

  18. 3D MHD Models of Active Region Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, Leon

    2004-01-01

    Present imaging and spectroscopic observations of active region loops allow to determine many physical parameters of the coronal loops, such as the density, temperature, velocity of flows in loops, and the magnetic field. However, due to projection effects many of these parameters remain ambiguous. Three dimensional imaging in EUV by the STEREO spacecraft will help to resolve the projection ambiguities, and the observations could be used to setup 3D MHD models of active region loops to study the dynamics and stability of active regions. Here the results of 3D MHD models of active region loops are presented, and the progress towards more realistic 3D MHD models of active regions. In particular the effects of impulsive events on the excitation of active region loop oscillations, and the generation, propagations and reflection of EIT waves are shown. It is shown how 3D MHD models together with 3D EUV observations can be used as a diagnostic tool for active region loop physical parameters, and to advance the science of the sources of solar coronal activity.

  19. Terminal dual-labeling of a transcribed RNA.

    PubMed

    Li, Shibo; Ma, Dejun; Yi, Long; Mei, Shiyue; Ouyang, Di; Xi, Zhen

    2013-12-01

    We report here a site-specific terminal dual-labeling strategy for a transcribed RNA. The combination of 5'-thiophosphoryl and 3'-amino functionalities enables efficient RNA dual labeling with different fluorophores at both 5'- and 3'-terminal positions specifically. This dual-labeling strategy is applied to pre-miRNA for construction of molecular beacons. The RNA beacons in their native hairpin formation bring the fluorophore and quencher groups into close proximity, leading to fluorescence quenching by FRET effect. Ribonuclease (dicer enzyme or micrococcal nuclease) can efficiently cleave RNA beacons leading to concentration- and time-dependent fluorescence increase. The dual-labeling strategy for transcribed RNAs involves only commercially available reagents, enzymes and native RNA, making it more accessible for general applications.

  20. Regional Observation of Seismic Activity in Baekdu Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Geunyoung; Che, Il-Young; Shin, Jin-Soo; Chi, Heon-Cheol

    2015-04-01

    Seismic unrest in Baekdu Mountain area between North Korea and Northeast China region has called attention to geological research community in Northeast Asia due to her historical and cultural importance. Seismic bulletin shows level of seismic activity in the area is higher than that of Jilin Province of Northeast China. Local volcanic observation shows a symptom of magmatic unrest in period between 2002 and 2006. Regional seismic data have been used to analyze seismic activity of the area. The seismic activity could be differentiated from other seismic phenomena in the region by the analysis.

  1. Active-region designs in quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zasavitskii, I I

    2012-10-31

    This paper analyses the development of active-region designs in quantum cascade lasers. Active-region designs have been demonstrated to date that employ various radiative transitions (vertical, diagonal, interminiband and interband). The lower laser level is depopulated through nonradiative transitions, such as one- or two-phonon (and even three-phonon) relaxation or bound state {yields} continuum transitions. Advances in active-region designs and energy diagram optimisation in the past few years have led to significant improvements in important characteristics of quantum cascade lasers, such as their output power, emission bandwidth, characteristic temperature and efficiency. (invited paper)

  2. Prediction of Active-Region CME Productivity from Magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.

    2004-01-01

    We report results of an expanded evaluation of whole-active-region magnetic measures as predictors of active-region coronal mass ejection (CME) productivity. Previously, in a sample of 17 vector magnetograms of 12 bipolar active regions observed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) vector magnetograph, from each magnetogram we extracted a measure of the size of the active region (the active region s total magnetic flux a) and four measures of the nonpotentiality of the active region: the strong-shear length L(sub SS), the strong-gradient length L(sub SG), the net vertical electric current I(sub N), and the net-current magnetic twist parameter alpha (sub IN). This sample size allowed us to show that each of the four nonpotentiality measures was statistically significantly correlated with active-region CME productivity in time windows of a few days centered on the day of the magnetogram. We have now added a fifth measure of active-region nonpotentiality (the best-constant-alpha magnetic twist parameter (alpha sub BC)), and have expanded the sample to 36 MSFC vector magnetograms of 31 bipolar active regions. This larger sample allows us to demonstrate statistically significant correlations of each of the five nonpotentiality measures with future CME productivity, in time windows of a few days starting from the day of the magnetogram. The two magnetic twist parameters (alpha (sub 1N) and alpha (sub BC)) are normalized measures of an active region s nonpotentially in that they do not depend directly on the size of the active region, while the other three nonpotentiality measures (L(sub SS), L(sub SG), and I(sub N)) are non-normalized measures in that they do depend directly on active-region size. We find (1) Each of the five nonpotentiality measures is statistically significantly correlated (correlation confidence level greater than 95%) with future CME productivity and has a CME prediction success rate of approximately 80%. (2) None of the nonpotentiality

  3. Active Ageing Level of Older Persons: Regional Comparison in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Haque, Md Nuruzzaman

    2016-01-01

    Active ageing level and its discrepancy in different regions (Bangkok, Central, North, Northeast, and South) of Thailand have been examined for prioritizing the policy agenda to be implemented. Attempt has been made to test preliminary active ageing models for Thai older persons and hence active ageing index (AAI, ranges from 0 to 1) has been estimated. Using nationally representative data and confirmatory factor analysis approach, this study justified active ageing models for female and male older persons in Thailand. Results revealed that active ageing level of Thai older persons is not high (mean AAIs for female and male older persons are 0.64 and 0.61, resp., and those are significantly different (p < 0.001)). Mean AAI in Central region is lower than North, Northeast, and South regions but there is no significant difference in the latter three regions of Thailand. Special emphasis should be given to Central region and policy should be undertaken for increasing active ageing level. Implementation of an Integrated Active Ageing Package (IAAP), containing policies for older persons to improve their health and economic security, to promote participation in social groups and longer working lives, and to arrange learning programs, would be helpful for increasing older persons' active ageing level in Thailand. PMID:27375903

  4. Active Ageing Level of Older Persons: Regional Comparison in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Haque, Md Nuruzzaman

    2016-01-01

    Active ageing level and its discrepancy in different regions (Bangkok, Central, North, Northeast, and South) of Thailand have been examined for prioritizing the policy agenda to be implemented. Attempt has been made to test preliminary active ageing models for Thai older persons and hence active ageing index (AAI, ranges from 0 to 1) has been estimated. Using nationally representative data and confirmatory factor analysis approach, this study justified active ageing models for female and male older persons in Thailand. Results revealed that active ageing level of Thai older persons is not high (mean AAIs for female and male older persons are 0.64 and 0.61, resp., and those are significantly different (p < 0.001)). Mean AAI in Central region is lower than North, Northeast, and South regions but there is no significant difference in the latter three regions of Thailand. Special emphasis should be given to Central region and policy should be undertaken for increasing active ageing level. Implementation of an Integrated Active Ageing Package (IAAP), containing policies for older persons to improve their health and economic security, to promote participation in social groups and longer working lives, and to arrange learning programs, would be helpful for increasing older persons' active ageing level in Thailand.

  5. DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC CURRENTS IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Török, T.; Titov, V. S.; Mikić, Z.; Leake, J. E.; Archontis, V.; Linton, M. G.; Dalmasse, K.; Aulanier, G.; Kliem, B.

    2014-02-10

    There has been a long-standing debate on the question of whether or not electric currents in solar active regions are neutralized. That is, whether or not the main (or direct) coronal currents connecting the active region polarities are surrounded by shielding (or return) currents of equal total value and opposite direction. Both theory and observations are not yet fully conclusive regarding this question, and numerical simulations have, surprisingly, barely been used to address it. Here we quantify the evolution of electric currents during the formation of a bipolar active region by considering a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the emergence of a sub-photospheric, current-neutralized magnetic flux rope into the solar atmosphere. We find that a strong deviation from current neutralization develops simultaneously with the onset of significant flux emergence into the corona, accompanied by the development of substantial magnetic shear along the active region's polarity inversion line. After the region has formed and flux emergence has ceased, the strong magnetic fields in the region's center are connected solely by direct currents, and the total direct current is several times larger than the total return current. These results suggest that active regions, the main sources of coronal mass ejections and flares, are born with substantial net currents, in agreement with recent observations. Furthermore, they support eruption models that employ pre-eruption magnetic fields containing such currents.

  6. Solar Irradiance Variations on Active Region Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labonte, B. J. (Editor); Chapman, G. A. (Editor); Hudson, H. S. (Editor); Willson, R. C. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The variations of the total solar irradiance is an important tool for studying the Sun, thanks to the development of very precise sensors such as the ACRIM instrument on board the Solar Maximum Mission. The largest variations of the total irradiance occur on time scales of a few days are caused by solar active regions, especially sunspots. Efforts were made to describe the active region effects on total and spectral irradiance.

  7. Photospheric Magnetic Diffusion by Measuring Moments of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engell, Alexander; Longcope, D.

    2013-07-01

    Photospheric magnetic surface diffusion is an important constraint for the solar dynamo. The HMI Active Region Patches (HARPs) program automatically identify all magnetic regions above a certain flux. In our study we measure the moments of ARs that are no longer actively emerging and can thereby give us good statistical constraints on photospheric diffusion. We also present the diffusion properties as a function of latitude, flux density, and single polarity (leading or following) within each HARP.

  8. Radio Coronal Magnetography of a Large Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, Timothy S.; Gary, Dale E.; White, Stephen; Fleishman, Gregory; Chen, Bin

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative knowledge of coronal magnetic fields is fundamental to understanding energetic phenomena such as solar flares. Flares occur in solar active regions where strong, non-potential magnetic fields provide free energy. While constraints on the coronal magnetic field topology are readily available through high resolution SXR and EUV imaging of solar active regions, useful quantitative measurements of coronal magnetic fields have thus far been elusive. Recent progress has been made at infrared (IR) wavelengths in exploiting both the Zeeman and Hanle effects to infer the line-of-sight magnetic field strength or the orientation of the magnetic field vector in the plane of the sky above the solar limb. However, no measurements of coronal magnetic fields against the solar disk are possible using IR observations. Radio observations of gyroresonance emission from active regions offer the means of measuring coronal magnetic fields above the limb and on the solar disk. In particular, for plasma plasma conditions in the solar corona, active regions typically become optically thick to emission over a range of radio frequencies through gyroresonance absorption at a low harmonic of the electron gyrofrequency. The specific range of resonant frequencies depends on the range of coronal magnetic field strengths present in the active region.The Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array was used in November 2014 to image NOAA/USAF active region AR12209 over a continuous frequency range of 1-8 GHz, corresponding to a wavelength range of 3.75-30 cm. This frequency range is sensitive to coronal magnetic field strengths ranging from ~120-1400G. The active region was observed on four different dates - November 18, 20, 22, and 24 - during which the active region longitude ranged from -15 to +70 degrees, providing a wide range of aspect angles. In this paper we provide a preliminary description of the coronal magnetic field measurements derived from the radio observations.

  9. Earth resources-regional transfer activity contracts review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensko, J., Jr.; Daniels, J. L.; Downs, S. W., Jr.; Jones, N. L.; Morton, R. R.; Paludan, C. T.

    1977-01-01

    A regional transfer activity contracts review held by the Earth Resources Office was summarized. Contracts in the earth resources field primarily directed toward applications of satellite data and technology in solution of state and regional problems were reviewed. A summary of the progress of each contract was given in order to share experiences of researchers across a seven state region. The region included Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and North Carolina. Research in several earth science disciplines included forestry, limnology, water resources, land use, geology, and mathematical modeling. The use of computers for establishment of information retrieval systems was also emphasized.

  10. Tracking Active Region NOAA 12192 in Multiple Carrington Rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Kiran; Tripathy, Sushant C.; Hill, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Active region NOAA 12192 appeared on the visible solar disk on October 18, 2014 and grew rapidly into the largest such region since 1990. During its entire transit across the Earth facing side of the Sun, it produced a significant number of X- and M-class flares. The combination of front-side and helioseismic far-side images clearly indicated that it lived through several Carrington rotations. In this paper, using Dopplergrams from GONG and HMI, we present a study on mode parameters, viz. oscillation frequencies, amplitude, and sub-surface flows and investigate how these vary with the evolution of active region in multiple rotations. We also present a detailed comparison between NOAA 10486 (the biggest active region in cycle 23) and NOAA 12192, and discuss the similarities/differences between them.

  11. Active Tectonics And Modern Geodynamics Of Sub-Yerevan Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanesyan, M.

    2004-05-01

    The given work is dedicated to active tectonics and modern geodynamics of Sub-Yerevan region. This region is interesting as a one of regions with maximal seismic activity in Armenia. The high level of seismic risk of this region is conditioned by high level of seismic hazard, high density of the population, as well as presence of objects of special importance and industrial capacities. The modern structure of Sub-Yerevan region and the adjacent area, as well as the Caucasus entirely, has mosaic-block appearance, typical for collision zone of Arabian and Eurasian plates. Distinctively oriented active faults of various ranges and morphological types are distinguished. These faults, in their turn, form various-scale active blocks of the Earth's crust and their movement defines seismic activity of the region. The researches show, that all strong earthquakes in the region were caused by movements by newest and activated ancient faults. In order to reveal the character of Earth's crust active blocks movement, separation of high gradients of horizontal and vertical movements and definition of stress fields highest concentration regions by GPS observations, high-accuracy leveling and study of earthquake focal mechanisms a new seismotectonic model is developed, which represents a combination of tectonic structure, seismic data, newest and modern movements. On the basis of comparison and analysis of these data zones with potential maximal seismic hazard are separated. The zone of joint of Azat-Sevan active and Yerevan abysmal faults is the most active on the territory of Sub-Yerevan region. The directions relatively the Earth's crust movement in the zones of horizontal and vertical movement gradients lead to conclusion, that Aragats-Tsakhkunian and Gegam active blocks undergo clockwise rotation. This means, that additional concentration of stress must be observed in block corners, that is confirmed by location of strong earthquakes sources. Thus, on the North 1988 Spitak (M

  12. Universities and Economic Development Activities: A UK Regional Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decter, Moira; Cave, Frank; Rose, Mary; Peers, Gill; Fogg, Helen; Smith, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    A number of UK universities prioritize economic development or regeneration activities and for some of these universities such activities are the main focus of their knowledge transfer work. This study compares two regions of the UK--the North West and the South East of England--which have very different levels of economic performance.…

  13. Nuclear rRNA transcript processing versus internal transcribed spacer secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Annette W

    2015-03-01

    rRNA is one of the few universal features of life, making it uniquely suited to assess phylogenetic relationships. The processing of the initial polycistronic rRNA transcript is also a conserved process, involving numerous cleavage events and the generation of secondary structures. The secondary structure of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of nuclear rRNA transcripts are well known for a wide variety of eukaryotes and have been used to aid in the alignment of these sequences for phylogenetic comparisons. By contrast, study of the processing of the initial rRNA transcripts has been largely limited to yeast, mice, rats, and humans. Here I examine the known cleavage sites in the two ITS regions and their positions relative to the secondary structure. A better understanding of the conservation of secondary structures and cleavage sites within the ITS regions will improve evolutionary inferences based on these sequences.

  14. Transcription Factors Bind Thousands of Active and InactiveRegions in the Drosophila Blastoderm

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiao-Yong; MacArthur, Stewart; Bourgon, Richard; Nix, David; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, Venky N.; Hechmer, Aaron; Simirenko, Lisa; Stapleton, Mark; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L.; Chu, Hou Cheng; Ogawa, Nobuo; Inwood, William; Sementchenko, Victor; Beaton, Amy; Weiszmann, Richard; Celniker, Susan E.; Knowles, David W.; Gingeras, Tom; Speed, Terence P.; Eisen, Michael B.; Biggin, Mark D.

    2008-01-10

    Identifying the genomic regions bound by sequence-specific regulatory factors is central both to deciphering the complex DNA cis-regulatory code that controls transcription in metazoans and to determining the range of genes that shape animal morphogenesis. Here, we use whole-genome tiling arrays to map sequences bound in Drosophila melanogaster embryos by the six maternal and gap transcription factors that initiate anterior-posterior patterning. We find that these sequence-specific DNA binding proteins bind with quantitatively different specificities to highly overlapping sets of several thousand genomic regions in blastoderm embryos. Specific high- and moderate-affinity in vitro recognition sequences for each factor are enriched in bound regions. This enrichment, however, is not sufficient to explain the pattern of binding in vivo and varies in a context-dependent manner, demonstrating that higher-order rules must govern targeting of transcription factors. The more highly bound regions include all of the over forty well-characterized enhancers known to respond to these factors as well as several hundred putative new cis-regulatory modules clustered near developmental regulators and other genes with patterned expression at this stage of embryogenesis. The new targets include most of the microRNAs (miRNAs) transcribed in the blastoderm, as well as all major zygotically transcribed dorsal-ventral patterning genes, whose expression we show to be quantitatively modulated by anterior-posterior factors. In addition to these highly bound regions, there are several thousand regions that are reproducibly bound at lower levels. However, these poorly bound regions are, collectively, far more distant from genes transcribed in the blastoderm than highly bound regions; are preferentially found in protein-coding sequences; and are less conserved than highly bound regions. Together these observations suggest that many of these poorly-bound regions are not involved in early

  15. Phenomenology in nursing research: methodology, interviewing and transcribing.

    PubMed

    Balls, Paula

    While nurses can relate to the phenomenological approach because they see it as sharing the values of nursing, this may not be sufficient on its own to start conducting this kind of research. Using examples from my own research experience, this article aims to examine what draws nursing to this method and why nurses think they may be good at it. It also offers practical advice on how to carry out a good interview, how and what to transcribe and how to use quotes to support research.

  16. Project to transcribe old ship logs provides important weather data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-11-01

    Kathy Wendolkowski is a citizen scientist. It's a term that Wendolkowski considers far too lofty for what she claims is simply a happy addiction that she and others have for transcribing old logs from naval ship and other vessels. They perform this task to glean the regularly recorded weather data from those logs for the benefit of science. For Wendolkowski, though, greater satisfaction comes from reading what the logs also reveal about the daily lives of the sailors as well as any accompanying historical drama.

  17. 11p15-subband specific search for transcribed sequences using exon trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Loebbert, R.; Prawitt, D.; Monroe, D.

    1994-09-01

    Evidence from cytogenetic and molecular data suggest that the region 11p15 contains genes involved in different disorders, like Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), long QT syndrome (LQT), Usher syndrome type I and tumor development. Focusing on the subregion 11p15.1, we are isolating and characterizing new transcribed sequences. The applied strategy includes exon amplification and subsequent PCR screening of cDNA libraries. So far 100 YACs and 38 cosmid clones from 11p15.1-15.3 have been collected and are currently arrayed. 16 cosmids have been analyzed for transcribed sequences using the exon amplification scheme developed by Buckler et al. (1991). We were able to identify 18 exons that contain correct open reading frames and map back to the cosmid clones. A data base search revealed that two exons represent parts of known genes from this region (ST5 and AMPD3). Moreover, we identified one exon that represents an EGF-like repeat with homologies to various proteins. Using PCR and primers from the exon sequences, a fetal brain library, which has been arranged in the form of hierarchic arrayed phage pools, was screened. Up to now, two cDNA clones corresponding to different exons were isolated and are currently sequenced.

  18. Eruptions that Drive Coronal Jets in a Solar Active Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Akiyama, Sachiko; Yashiro, Seiji; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2016-01-01

    Solar coronal jets are common in both coronal holes and in active regions (e.g., Shibata et al. 1992, Shimojo et al. 1996, Cirtain et al. 2007. Savcheva et al. 2007). Recently, Sterling et al. (2015), using data from Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA, found that coronal jets originating in polar coronal holes result from the eruption of small-scale filaments (minifilaments). The jet bright point (JBP) seen in X-rays and hotter EUV channels off to one side of the base of the jet's spire develops at the location where the minifilament erupts, consistent with the JBPs being miniature versions of typical solar flares that occur in the wake of large-scale filament eruptions. Here we consider whether active region coronal jets also result from the same minifilament-eruption mechanism, or whether they instead result from a different mechanism (e.g. Yokoyama & Shibata 1995). We present observations of an on-disk active region (NOAA AR 11513) that produced numerous jets on 2012 June 30, using data from SDO/AIA and HMI, and from GOES/SXI. We find that several of these active region jets also originate with eruptions of miniature filaments (size scale 20'') emanating from small-scale magnetic neutral lines of the region. This demonstrates that active region coronal jets are indeed frequently driven by minifilament eruptions. Other jets from the active region were also consistent with their drivers being minifilament eruptions, but we could not confirm this because the onsets of those jets were hidden from our view. This work was supported by funding from NASA/LWS, NASA/HGI, and Hinode. A full report of this study appears in Sterling et al. (2016).

  19. Recovery of RNA synthesis from the DHFR gene following UV-irradiation precedes the removal of photolesions from the transcribed strand.

    PubMed

    Ljungman, M

    1999-03-01

    It is thought that recovery of RNA synthesis following UV-irradiation is closely related to the removal of UV-induced lesions from the transcribed strand of active genes. To test this hypothesis, nascent RNA synthesis from three different locations within the DHFR gene in CHO cells was assessed following exposure to UV light (254 nm). Using both in vivo RNA labeling as well as the nuclear run-on technique, it was found that RNA synthesis from the middle and the 3'-end of the gene was inhibited within 20 min by approximately 30 and 70%, respectively, while RNA synthesis from the 5'-end of the DHFR gene was enhanced. RNA synthesis from the middle portion of the gene fully recovered within 30-45 min of post-UV incubation, while recovery was slower from the 3'-end of the gene. Compared with previously published data for the kinetics of removal of UV-induced DNA lesions from the 5'-half of the DHFR gene in these cells, it is concluded that RNA synthesis resumed significantly faster in this region than could be accounted for by the removal of photolesions from the transcribed strand. Thus, although RNA synthesis was initially inhibited by UV-induced photolesions, the results suggest that RNA polymerase II was able to bypass these lesions prior to their removal.

  20. TARPs: Tracked Active Region Patches from SoHO/MDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turmon, M.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Bobra, M.

    2013-12-01

    We describe progress toward creating a retrospective MDI data product consisting of tracked magnetic features on the scale of solar active regions, abbreviated TARPs (Tracked Active Region Patches). The TARPs are being developed as a backward-looking extension (covering approximately 3500 regions spanning 1996-2010) to the HARP (HMI Active Region Patch) data product that has already been released for HMI (2010-present). Like the HARPs, the MDI TARP data set is designed to be a catalog of active regions (ARs), indexed by a region ID number, analogous to a NOAA AR number, and time. TARPs from MDI are computed based on the 96-minute synoptic magnetograms and pseudo-continuum intensitygrams. As with the related HARP data product, the approximate threshold for significance is 100G. Use of both image types together allows faculae and sunspots to be separated out as sub-classes of activity, in addition to identifying the overall active region that the faculae/sunspots are part of. After being identified in single images, the magnetically-active patches are grouped and tracked from image to image. Merges among growing active regions, as well as faint active regions hovering at the threshold of detection, are handled automatically. Regions are tracked from their inception until they decay within view, or transit off the visible disk. The final data product is indexed by a nominal AR number and time. For each active region and for each time, a bitmap image is stored containing the precise outline of the active region. Additionaly, metadata such as areas and integrated fluxes are stored for each AR and for each time. Because there is a calibration between the HMI and MDI magnetograms (Liu, Hoeksema et al. 2012), it is straightforward to use the same classification and tracking rules for the HARPs (from HMI) and the MDI TARPs. We anticipate that this will allow a consistent catalog spanning both instruments. We envision several uses for the TARP data product, which will be

  1. Footpoint Separation and Evershed Flow of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Aimee Ann; Jones, E. H.

    2012-05-01

    The bipolar nature of active regions and sunspot groups within the Sun’s photosphere is generally attributed to the emergence of magnetic flux tubes that originate from shear and turbulent pumping at the base of the Sun’s convection zone. There is debate, however, as to exactly how well-connected active regions are to solar interior. A connection to the solar interior during the ascent of a flux tube through the convection zone is a requirement within numerical models designed to describe the observed characteristics of active regions, e.g. Joy’s law tilt and latitude emergence, however, these models also predict post-emergence behavior of sunspots that is not supported observationally (Schussler and Rempel, 1995; Fan, 2009; Toth and Gerlei, 2003). It has been suggested (Rubio et al., 2008; Schussler and Rempel, 1995) that a bipolar magnetic region might lose its connection quickly upon emergence. Using data from SDO/HMI, we examine the footpoint separation and the Evershed flow of a number of active regions over time to detect the disconnection process of a sunspot from its magnetic roots.

  2. THz quantum cascade lasers with wafer bonded active regions.

    PubMed

    Brandstetter, M; Deutsch, C; Benz, A; Cole, G D; Detz, H; Andrews, A M; Schrenk, W; Strasser, G; Unterrainer, K

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrate terahertz quantum-cascade lasers with a 30 μm thick double-metal waveguide, which are fabricated by stacking two 15 μm thick active regions using a wafer bonding process. By increasing the active region thickness more optical power is generated inside the cavity, the waveguide losses are decreased and the far-field is improved due to a larger facet aperture. In this way the output power is increased by significantly more than a factor of 2 without reducing the maximum operating temperature and without increasing the threshold current.

  3. Kink Waves in an Active Region Dynamic Fibril

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietarila, A.; Aznar Cuadrado, R.; Hirzberger, J.; Solanki, S. K.

    2011-10-01

    We present high spatial and temporal resolution Ca II 8542 Å observations of a kink wave in an on-disk chromospheric active region fibril. The properties of the wave are similar to those observed in off-limb spicules. From the observed phase and period of the wave we determine a lower limit for the field strength in the chromospheric active region fibril located at the edge of a sunspot to be a few hundred gauss. We find indications that the event was triggered by a small-scale reconnection event higher up in the atmosphere.

  4. Transcribed enhancers lead waves of coordinated transcription in transitioning mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Arner, Erik; Daub, Carsten O.; Vitting-Seerup, Kristoffer; Andersson, Robin; Lilje, Berit; Drabløs, Finn; Lennartsson, Andreas; Rönnerblad, Michelle; Hrydziuszko, Olga; Vitezic, Morana; Freeman, Tom C.; Alhendi, Ahmad M. N.; Arner, Peter; Axton, Richard; Baillie, J. Kenneth; Beckhouse, Anthony; Bodega, Beatrice; Briggs, James; Brombacher, Frank; Davis, Margaret; Detmar, Michael; Ehrlund, Anna; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Eslami, Afsaneh; Fagiolini, Michela; Fairbairn, Lynsey; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Ferrai, Carmelo; Fisher, Malcolm E.; Forrester, Lesley; Goldowitz, Daniel; Guler, Reto; Ha, Thomas; Hara, Mitsuko; Herlyn, Meenhard; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Kai, Chieko; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Khachigian, Levon M.; Klinken, S. Peter; Kojima, Soichi; Koseki, Haruhiko; Klein, Sarah; Mejhert, Niklas; Miyaguchi, Ken; Mizuno, Yosuke; Morimoto, Mitsuru; Morris, Kelly J.; Mummery, Christine; Nakachi, Yutaka; Ogishima, Soichi; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Okazaki, Yasushi; Orlando, Valerio; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Passier, Robert; Patrikakis, Margaret; Pombo, Ana; Qin, Xian-Yang; Roy, Sugata; Sato, Hiroki; Savvi, Suzana; Saxena, Alka; Schwegmann, Anita; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Swoboda, Rolf; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tomoiu, Andru; Winteringham, Louise N.; Wolvetang, Ernst; Yanagi-Mizuochi, Chiyo; Yoneda, Misako; Zabierowski, Susan; Zhang, Peter; Abugessaisa, Imad; Bertin, Nicolas; Diehl, Alexander D.; Fukuda, Shiro; Furuno, Masaaki; Harshbarger, Jayson; Hasegawa, Akira; Hori, Fumi; Ishikawa-Kato, Sachi; Ishizu, Yuri; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Kojima, Miki; Kondo, Naoto; Lizio, Marina; Meehan, Terrence F.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Nishiyori-Sueki, Hiromi; Sahin, Serkan; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Severin, Jessica; de Hoon, Michiel J. L.; Kawai, Jun; Kasukawa, Takeya; Lassmann, Timo; Suzuki, Harukazu; Kawaji, Hideya; Summers, Kim M.; Wells, Christine; Hume, David A.; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Sandelin, Albin; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2015-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that cellular differentiation requires changes to transcriptional networks, dynamic regulation of promoters and enhancers at specific sets of genes has not been previously studied en masse. Exploiting the fact that active promoters and enhancers are transcribed, we simultaneously measured their activity in 19 human and 14 mouse time courses covering a wide range of cell types and biological stimuli. Enhancer RNAs, then messenger RNAs encoding transcription factors, dominated the earliest responses. Binding sites for key lineage transcription factors were simultaneously overrepresented in enhancers and promoters active in each cellular system. Our data support a highly generalizable model in which enhancer transcription is the earliest event in successive waves of transcriptional change during cellular differentiation or activation. PMID:25678556

  5. Socioeconomic and regional differences in active transportation in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Sá, Thiago Hérick; Pereira, Rafael Henrique Moraes; Duran, Ana Clara; Monteiro, Carlos Augusto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To present national estimates regarding walking or cycling for commuting in Brazil and in 10 metropolitan regions. METHODS By using data from the Health section of 2008’s Pesquisa Nacional por Amostra de Domicílio (Brazil’s National Household Sample Survey), we estimated how often employed people walk or cycle to work, disaggregating our results by sex, age range, education level, household monthly income per capita, urban or rural address, metropolitan regions, and macro-regions in Brazil. Furthermore, we estimated the distribution of this same frequency according to quintiles of household monthly income per capita in each metropolitan region of the country. RESULTS A third of the employed men and women walk or cycle from home to work in Brazil. For both sexes, this share decreases as income and education levels rise, and it is higher among younger individuals, especially among those living in rural areas and in the Northeast region of the country. Depending on the metropolitan region, the practice of active transportation is two to five times more frequent among low-income individuals than among high-income individuals. CONCLUSIONS Walking or cycling to work in Brazil is most frequent among low-income individuals and the ones living in less economically developed areas. Active transportation evaluation in Brazil provides important information for public health and urban mobility policy-making PMID:27355465

  6. Potent microRNA suppression by RNA Pol II-transcribed ‘Tough Decoy’ inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bak, Rasmus O.; Hollensen, Anne Kruse; Primo, Maria Nascimento; Sørensen, Camilla Darum; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of gene expression and modulators of diverse biological pathways. Analyses of miRNA function as well as therapeutic managing of miRNAs rely on cellular administration of miRNA inhibitors which may be achieved by the use of viral vehicles. This study explores the miRNA-suppressive capacity of inhibitors expressed intracellularly from lentivirus-derived gene vectors. Superior activity of two decoy-type inhibitors, a “Bulged Sponge” with eight miRNA recognition sites and a hairpin-shaped “Tough Decoy” containing two miRNA recognition sites, is demonstrated in a side-by-side comparison of seven types of miRNA inhibitors transcribed as short RNAs from an RNA Pol III promoter. We find that lentiviral vectors expressing Tough Decoy inhibitors are less vulnerable than Bulged Sponge-encoding vectors to targeting by the cognate miRNA and less prone, therefore, to reductions in transfer efficiency. Importantly, it is demonstrated that Tough Decoy inhibitors retain their miRNA suppression capacity in the context of longer RNA transcripts expressed from an RNA Pol II promoter. Such RNA Pol II-transcribed Tough Decoy inhibitors are new tools in managing of miRNAs and may have potential for temporal and spatial regulation of miRNA activity as well as for therapeutic targeting of miRNAs that are aberrantly expressed in human disease. PMID:23249752

  7. IFLA General Conference, 1989. Division of Regional Activities. Section on Regional Activities--Africa; Section on Regional Activities--Asia and Oceania; Section on Regional Activities--Latin America and the Caribbean. Booklet 80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    There are five papers in this collection from the Division of Regional Activities: (1) "Communication and Information in Contemporary African Society" (Bimpe Aboyade), which discusses how libraries can make themselves relevant to other institutions concerned with information transfer; (2) "Libraries and Rural Development: Village Reading Rooms in…

  8. Inferred flows of electric currents in solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Y. J.; Hong, Q. F.; Hagyard, M. J.; Deloach, A. C.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques to identify sources of major current systems in active regions and their channels of flow are explored. Measured photospheric vector magnetic fields together with high resolution white light and H-alpha photographs provide the data base to derive the current systems in the photosphere and chromosphere of a solar active region. Simple mathematical constructions of active region fields and currents are used to interpret these data under the assumptions that the fields in the lower atmosphere (below 200 km) may not be force free but those in the chromosphere and higher are. The results obtained for the complex active region AR 2372 are: (1) Spots exhibiting significant spiral structure in the penumbral filaments were the source of vertical currents at the photospheric surface; (2) Magnetic neutral lines where the transverse magnetic field was strongly sheared were channels along which a strong current system flowed; (3) The inferred current systems produced a neutral sheet and oppositely-flowing currents in the area of the magnetic delta configuration that was the site of flaring.

  9. IFLA General Conference, 1987. Division of Regional Activities. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Six of the seven papers in this collection focus on regional library activities in Africa, Asia and Oceania, and Latin America and the Caribbean: (1) "Libraries and Information Services in a Changing World: The Challenges African Information Services Face at the End of the 1980s" (Dejen Abate, Ethiopia); (2) "The Computer and Knowledge Information…

  10. Urban, Rural, and Regional Variations in Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Sarah Levin; Kirkner, Gregory J.; Mayo, Kelly; Matthews, Charles E.; Durstine, J. Larry; Hebert, James R.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: There is some speculation about geographic differences in physical activity (PA) levels. We examined the prevalence of physical inactivity (PIA) and whether US citizens met the recommended levels of PA across the United States. In addition, the association between PIA/PA and degree of urbanization in the 4 main US regions (Northeast,…

  11. Early life stress affects limited regional brain activity in depression.

    PubMed

    Du, Lian; Wang, Jingjie; Meng, Ben; Yong, Na; Yang, Xiangying; Huang, Qingling; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Lingling; Qu, Yuan; Chen, Zhu; Li, Yongmei; Lv, Fajin; Hu, Hua

    2016-05-03

    Early life stress (ELS) can alter brain function and increases the risk of major depressive disorder (MDD) in later life. This study investigated whether ELS contributes to differences in regional brain activity between MDD patients and healthy controls (HC), as measured by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF)/fractional (f)ALFF. Eighteen first-episode, treatment-naïve MDD patients and HC were assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. We compared ALFF/fALFF between MDD patients and HC, with or without controlling for ELS, and determined whether ELS level was correlated with regional brain activity in each group. After regressing out ELS, we found that ALFF increased in bilateral amygdala and left orbital/cerebellum, while fALFF decreased in left inferior temporal and right middle frontal gyri in MDD patients relative to controls. ELS positively correlated with regional activity in the left cerebellum in MDD and in the right post-central/inferior temporal/superior frontal cingulate, inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral cerebellum in HC. Our findings indicate that there is only very limited region showing correlation between ELS and brain activity in MDD, while diverse areas in HC, suggesting ELS has few impacts on MDD patients.

  12. A solar cycle timing predictor - The latitude of active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1990-01-01

    A 'Spoerer butterfly' method is used to examine solar cycle 22. It is shown from the latitude of active regions that the cycle can now be expected to peak near November 1989 + or - 8 months, basically near the latter half of 1989.

  13. Unwinding motion of a twisted active region filament

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Kong, D. F.; Liu, J. H.; Xu, C. L.

    2014-12-10

    To better understand the structures of active region filaments and the eruption process, we study an active region filament eruption in active region NOAA 11082 in detail on 2010 June 22. Before the filament eruption, the opposite unidirectional material flows appeared in succession along the spine of the filament. The rising of the filament triggered two B-class flares at the upper part of the filament. As the bright material was injected into the filament from the sites of the flares, the filament exhibited a rapid uplift accompanying the counterclockwise rotation of the filament body. From the expansion of the filament, we can see that the filament consisted of twisted magnetic field lines. The total twist of the filament is at least 5π obtained by using a time slice method. According to the morphology change during the filament eruption, it is found that the active region filament was a twisted flux rope and its unwinding motion was like a solar tornado. We also find that there was a continuous magnetic helicity injection before and during the filament eruption. It is confirmed that magnetic helicity can be transferred from the photosphere to the filament. Using the extrapolated potential fields, the average decay index of the background magnetic fields over the filament is 0.91. Consequently, these findings imply that the mechanism of solar filament eruption could be due to the kink instability and magnetic helicity accumulation.

  14. Early life stress affects limited regional brain activity in depression

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lian; Wang, Jingjie; Meng, Ben; Yong, Na; Yang, Xiangying; Huang, Qingling; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Lingling; Qu, Yuan; Chen, Zhu; Li, Yongmei; Lv, Fajin; Hu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) can alter brain function and increases the risk of major depressive disorder (MDD) in later life. This study investigated whether ELS contributes to differences in regional brain activity between MDD patients and healthy controls (HC), as measured by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF)/fractional (f)ALFF. Eighteen first-episode, treatment-naïve MDD patients and HC were assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. We compared ALFF/fALFF between MDD patients and HC, with or without controlling for ELS, and determined whether ELS level was correlated with regional brain activity in each group. After regressing out ELS, we found that ALFF increased in bilateral amygdala and left orbital/cerebellum, while fALFF decreased in left inferior temporal and right middle frontal gyri in MDD patients relative to controls. ELS positively correlated with regional activity in the left cerebellum in MDD and in the right post-central/inferior temporal/superior frontal cingulate, inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral cerebellum in HC. Our findings indicate that there is only very limited region showing correlation between ELS and brain activity in MDD, while diverse areas in HC, suggesting ELS has few impacts on MDD patients. PMID:27138376

  15. Evolution of two Flaring Active Regions With CME Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, J. K.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2008-12-01

    We study the coronal magnetic field structure of two active regions, one during solar activity minimum (June 2007) and another one during a more active time (January 2004). The temporal evolution was explored with the help of nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic field extrapolations of SOLIS/VSM and NAOJ/SFT photospheric vector magnetograms. We study the active region NOAA 10960 observed on 2007 June 7 with three SOLIS/VSM snapshots taken during a small C1.0 flare of time cadence 10 minutes and six snapshots during a quiet period. The total magnetic energy in the active region was approximately 3 × 1025 J. Before the flare the free magnetic energy was about 5~% of the potential field energy. A part of this excess energy was released during the flare, producing almost a potential configuration at the beginning of the quiet period. The return to an almost potential structure can be assigned to a CME as recorded by the SoHO/LASCO instrument on 2007 June 07 around 10 minutes after the flare peaked, so that whatever magnetic helicity was bodily removed from the structure. This was compared with active region 10540 observed on 2004 January 18 -- 21, which was analyzed with the help of vector magnetograph data from the Solar Flare Telescope in Japan of time cadence of about 1 day. The free energy was Efree≈ 66~% of the total energy which was sufficiently high to power a M6.1 flare on January 20, which was associated with a CME 20 minutes later. The activity of AR 10540 was significantly higher than for AR 10960, as was the total magnetic energy. Furthermore, we found the common feature that magnetic energy accumulates before the flare/CME and a significant part of the excess energy is released during the eruption.

  16. Regional differences in rat conjunctival ion transport activities

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dongfang; Thelin, William R.; Rogers, Troy D.; Stutts, M. Jackson; Randell, Scott H.; Grubb, Barbara R.

    2012-01-01

    Active ion transport and coupled osmotic water flow are essential to maintain ocular surface health. We investigated regional differences in the ion transport activities of the rat conjunctivas and compared these activities with those of cornea and lacrimal gland. The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), sodium/glucose cotransporter 1 (Slc5a1), transmembrane protein 16 (Tmem16a, b, f, and g), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr), and mucin (Muc4, 5ac, and 5b) mRNA expression was characterized by RT-PCR. ENaC proteins were measured by Western blot. Prespecified regions (palpebral, fornical, and bulbar) of freshly isolated conjunctival tissues and cell cultures were studied electrophysiologically with Ussing chambers. The transepithelial electrical potential difference (PD) of the ocular surface was also measured in vivo. The effect of amiloride and UTP on the tear volume was evaluated in lacrimal gland excised rats. All selected genes were detected but with different expression patterns. We detected αENaC protein in all tissues, βENaC in palpebral and fornical conjunctiva, and γENaC in all tissues except lacrimal glands. Electrophysiological studies of conjunctival tissues and cell cultures identified functional ENaC, SLC5A1, CFTR, and TMEM16. Fornical conjunctiva exhibited the most active ion transport under basal conditions amongst conjunctival regions. PD measurements confirmed functional ENaC-mediated Na+ transport on the ocular surface. Amiloride and UTP increased tear volume in lacrimal gland excised rats. This study demonstrated that the different regions of the conjunctiva exhibited a spectrum of ion transport activities. Understanding the specific functions of distinct regions of the conjunctiva may foster a better understanding of the physiology maintaining hydration of the ocular surface. PMID:22814399

  17. Active sonar, beaked whales and European regional policy.

    PubMed

    Dolman, Sarah J; Evans, Peter G H; Notarbartolo-di-Sciara, Giuseppe; Frisch, Heidrun

    2011-01-01

    Various reviews, resolutions and guidance from international and regional fora have been produced in recent years that acknowledge the significance of marine noise and its potential impacts on cetaceans. Within Europe, ACCOBAMS and ASCOBANS have shown increasing attention to the issue. The literature highlights concerns surrounding the negative impacts of active sonar on beaked whales in particular, where concerns primarily relate to the use of mid-frequency active sonar (1-10kHz), as used particularly in military exercises. The authors review the efforts that European regional policies have undertaken to acknowledge and manage possible negative impacts of active sonar and how these might assist the transition from scientific research to policy implementation, including effective management and mitigation measures at a national level.

  18. Patterns of Activity Revealed by a Time Lag Analysis of a Model Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Stephen; Viall, Nicholeen

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the global activity patterns predicted from a model active region heated by distributions of nanoflares that have a range of average frequencies. The activity patterns are manifested in time lag maps of narrow-band instrument channel pairs. We combine an extrapolated magnetic skeleton with hydrodynamic and forward modeling codes to create a model active region, and apply the time lag method to synthetic observations. Our aim is to recover some typical properties and patterns of activity observed in active regions. Our key findings are: 1. Cooling dominates the time lag signature and the time lags between the channel pairs are generally consistent with observed values. 2. Shorter coronal loops in the core cool more quickly than longer loops at the periphery. 3. All channel pairs show zero time lag when the line-of-sight passes through coronal loop foot-points. 4. There is strong evidence that plasma must be re-energized on a time scale comparable to the cooling timescale to reproduce the observed coronal activity, but it is likely that a relatively broad spectrum of heating frequencies operates across active regions. 5. Due to their highly dynamic nature, we find nanoflare trains produce zero time lags along entire flux tubes in our model active region that are seen between the same channel pairs in observed active regions.

  19. DIVERGENT HORIZONTAL SUB-SURFACE FLOWS WITHIN ACTIVE REGION 11158

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Kiran; Tripathy, S. C.; Hill, F. E-mail: stripathy@nso.edu

    2015-07-20

    We measure the horizontal subsurface flow in a fast emerging active region (AR; NOAA 11158) using the ring-diagram technique and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager high spatial resolution Dopplergrams. This AR had a complex magnetic structure and displayed significant changes in morphology during its disk passage. Over a period of six days from 2011 February 11 to 16, the temporal variation in the magnitude of the total velocity is found to follow the trend of magnetic field strength. We further analyze regions of individual magnetic polarity within AR 11158 and find that the horizontal velocity components in these sub-regions have significant variation with time and depth. The leading and trailing polarity regions move faster than the mixed-polarity region. Furthermore, both zonal and meridional components have opposite signs for trailing and leading polarity regions at all depths showing divergent flows within the AR. We also find a sharp decrease in the magnitude of total horizontal velocity in deeper layers around major flares. It is suggested that the re-organization of magnetic fields during flares, combined with the sunspot rotation, decreases the magnitude of horizontal flows or that the flow kinetic energy has been converted into the energy released by flares. After the decline in flare activity and sunspot rotation, the flows tend to follow the pattern of magnetic activity. We also observe less variation in the velocity components near the surface but these tend to increase with depth, further demonstrating that the deeper layers are more affected by the topology of ARs.

  20. THE EVOLUTION OF DARK CANOPIES AROUND ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-M.; Robbrecht, E.; Muglach, K. E-mail: eva.robbrecht@oma.be

    2011-05-20

    As observed in spectral lines originating from the chromosphere, transition region, and low corona, active regions are surrounded by an extensive 'circumfacular' area which is darker than the quiet Sun. We examine the properties of these dark moat- or canopy-like areas using Fe IX 17.1 nm images and line-of-sight magnetograms from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The 17.1 nm canopies consist of fibrils (horizontal fields containing extreme-ultraviolet-absorbing chromospheric material) clumped into featherlike structures. The dark fibrils initially form a quasiradial or vortical pattern as the low-lying field lines fanning out from the emerging active region connect to surrounding network and intranetwork elements of opposite polarity. The area occupied by the 17.1 nm fibrils expands as supergranular convection causes the active-region flux to spread into the background medium; the outer boundary of the dark canopy stabilizes where the diffusing flux encounters a unipolar region of opposite sign. The dark fibrils tend to accumulate in regions of weak longitudinal field and to become rooted in mixed-polarity flux. To explain the latter observation, we note that the low-lying fibrils are more likely to interact with small loops associated with weak, opposite-polarity flux elements in close proximity, than with high loops anchored inside strong unipolar network flux. As a result, the 17.1 nm fibrils gradually become concentrated around the large-scale polarity inversion lines (PILs), where most of the mixed-polarity flux is located. Systematic flux cancellation, assisted by rotational shearing, removes the field component transverse to the PIL and causes the fibrils to coalesce into long PIL-aligned filaments.

  1. Fine thermal structure of a coronal active region.

    PubMed

    Reale, Fabio; Parenti, Susanna; Reeves, Kathy K; Weber, Mark; Bobra, Monica G; Barbera, Marco; Kano, Ryouhei; Narukage, Noriyuki; Shimojo, Masumi; Sakao, Taro; Peres, Giovanni; Golub, Leon

    2007-12-01

    The determination of the fine thermal structure of the solar corona is fundamental to constraining the coronal heating mechanisms. The Hinode X-ray Telescope collected images of the solar corona in different passbands, thus providing temperature diagnostics through energy ratios. By combining different filters to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio, we observed a coronal active region in five filters, revealing a highly thermally structured corona: very fine structures in the core of the region and on a larger scale further away. We observed continuous thermal distribution along the coronal loops, as well as entangled structures, and variations of thermal structuring along the line of sight.

  2. Armenia as a Regional Centre for Astronomy for Development activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A.

    2015-03-01

    The Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory (BAO, Armenia, http://www.bao.am) are among the candidate IAU Regional Nodes for Astronomy for Development activities. It is one of the main astronomical centers of the former Soviet Union and the Middle East region. At present there are 48 qualified researchers at BAO, including six Doctors of Science and 30 PhDs. Five important observational instruments are installed at BAO, the larger ones being 2.6m Cassegrain (ZTA-2.6) and 1m Schmidt (the one that provided the famous Markarian survey). BAO is regarded as a national scientific-educational center, where a number of activities are being organized, such as: international conferences (4 IAU symposia and 1 IAU colloquium, JENAM-2007, etc.), small workshops and discussions, international summer schools (1987, 2006, 2008 and 2010), and Olympiads. BAO collaborates with scientists from many countries. The Armenian Astronomical Society (ArAS, http://www.aras.am/) is an NGO founded in 2001; it has 93 members and it is rather active in the organization of educational, amateur, popular, promotional and other matters. The Armenian Virtual Observatory (ArVO, http://www.aras.am/Arvo/arvo.htm) is one of the 17 national VO projects forming the International Virtual Observatories Alliance (IVOA) and is the only VO project in the region serving also for educational purposes. A number of activities are planned, such as management, coordination and evaluation of the IAU programs in the area of development and education, establishment of the new IAU endowed lectureship program and organization of seminars and public lectures, coordination and initiation of fundraising activities for astronomy development, organization of regional scientific symposia, conferences and workshops, support to Galileo Teacher Training Program (GTTP), production/publication of educational and promotional materials, etc.

  3. Isolation of oogenesis-specific genes transcribed in the germ-line of Calliphora erythrocephala and Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Poly(A){sup +} RNA from early or mid-stage ovarian follicles of C. erythrocephala was used to generate radiolabelled oogenesis-specific cDNA probes for screening the phage libraries. A cDNA probe made from mid-stage embryo poly(A){sup +} RNA was used as the differential screening probe. Thus plaques hybridizing to the two oogenesis-specific probes but not the mid-stage embryo probe were selected as potentially containing oogenesis-specific genes. Two further rounds of screening were used to eliminate false positives and, after plaque purification, restriction digests of the remaining clones were screened by Southern blot hybridization to identify DNA fragments transcribed in an oogenesis-specific manner. In situ hybridization to sections of ovarian follicles has been used to determine the cell types within the follicles in which the various genes are expressed. Radiolabelled RNA probes for four of the C. erythrocephala oogenesis-specific clones and the two D. melanogaster clones have been hybridized to ovarian follicles. Further studies have been concentrated on the two germ-line transcribed, oogenesis-specific clones isolated from the D. melanogaster clone library. Detailed genetic mapping of the DA clone and of these mutations was performed to determine which mutations might represent the DA gene. cDNA clones have been isolated for the transcribed region of clone DA and have been used to further define the transcription unit from this region of the D. melanogaster genome.

  4. Structure and polarization of active region microwave emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.; Alissandrakis, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    Active region radio emission observations made at 6.16 cm wavelength during May 20-27, 1980, are the bases of maps of total intensity and circular polarization presented for the three regions whose Hale numbers are 16850, 16863, and 16864. A detailed comparison is made between these maps and on- and off-band H-alpha pictures and magnetograms. The neutral lines with which the strongest sources were associated have their two opposite polarities close to each other, implying a high magnetic field gradient, and are also associated with arch filament systems. A detailed analysis is undertaken of observations of the circular polarization sense inversion in region 16863. The large scale structure of the magnetic field can be approximated by a dipole with its axis inclined by 11 deg with respect to the photosphere, and with a dipole moment of about 2 x 10 to the 31 power cgs units.

  5. IPS observations of heliospheric density structures associated with active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hick, P.; Jackson, B. V.; Altrock, R.; Woan, G.; Slater, G.

    1996-01-01

    Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements of the 'disturbance factor' g, obtained with the Cambridge (UK) array can be used to explore the heliospheric density structure. We have used these data to construct synoptic (Carrington) maps, representing the large-scale enhancements of the g-factor in the inner heliosphere. These maps emphasize the stable corotating, rather than the transient heliospheric density enhancements. We have compared these maps with Carrington maps of Fe XIV observations National Solar Observatory ((NSO), Sacramento Peak) and maps based on Yohkoh Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT) X-ray observations. Our results indicate that the regions of enhanced g tend to map to active regions rather than the current sheet. The implication is that act ve regions are the dominant source of the small-scale (approximately equal 200 km) density variations present in the quiet solar wind.

  6. Active region upflows. I. Multi-instrument observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanninathan, K.; Madjarska, M. S.; Galsgaard, K.; Huang, Z.; Doyle, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Context. We study upflows at the edges of active regions, called AR outflows, using multi-instrument observations. Aims: This study intends to provide the first direct observational evidence of whether chromospheric jets play an important role in furnishing mass that could sustain coronal upflows. The evolution of the photospheric magnetic field, associated with the footpoints of the upflow region and the plasma properties of active region upflows is investigated with the aim of providing information for benchmarking data-driven modelling of this solar feature. Methods: We spatially and temporally combine multi-instrument observations obtained with the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on board the Hinode, the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Interferometric BI-dimensional Spectro-polarimeter installed at the National Solar Observatory, Sac Peak, to study the plasma parameters of the upflows and the impact of the chromosphere on active region upflows. Results: Our analysis shows that the studied active region upflow presents similarly to those studied previously, i.e. it displays blueshifted emission of 5-20 kms-1 in Fe xii and Fe xiii and its average electron density is 1.8 × 109 cm-3 at 1 MK. The time variation of the density is obtained showing no significant change (in a 3σ error). The plasma density along a single loop is calculated revealing a drop of 50% over a distance of ~20 000 km along the loop. We find a second velocity component in the blue wing of the Fe xii and Fe xiii lines at 105 kms-1 reported only once before. For the first time we study the time evolution of this component at high cadence and find that it is persistent during the whole observing period of 3.5 h with variations of only ±15 kms-1. We also, for the first time, study the evolution of the photospheric magnetic field at high cadence and find that magnetic flux diffusion is

  7. Diagnostics of Coronal Heating in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fludra, Andrzej; Hornsey, Christopher; Nakariakov, Valery

    2015-04-01

    We aim to develop a diagnostic method for the coronal heating mechanism in active region loops. Observational constraints on coronal heating models have been sought using measurements in the X-ray and EUV wavelengths. Statistical analysis, using EUV emission from many active regions, was done by Fludra and Ireland (2008) who studied power-law relationships between active region integrated magnetic flux and emission line intensities. A subsequent study by Fludra and Warren (2010) for the first time compared fully resolved images in an EUV spectral line of OV 63.0 nm with the photospheric magnetic field, leading to the identification of a dominant, ubiquitous variable component of the transition region EUV emission and a discovery of a steady basal heating, and deriving the dependence of the basal heating rate on the photospheric magnetic flux density. In this study, we compare models of single coronal loops with EUV observations. We assess to what degree observations of individual coronal loops made in the EUV range are capable of providing constraints on the heating mechanism. We model the coronal magnetic field in an active region using an NLFF extrapolation code applied to a photospheric vector magnetogram from SDO/HMI and select several loops that match an SDO/AIA 171 image of the same active region. We then model the plasma in these loops using a 1D hydrostatic code capable of applying an arbitrary heating rate as a function of magnetic field strength along the loop. From the plasma parameters derived from this model, we calculate the EUV emission along the loop in AIA 171 and 335 bands, and in pure spectral lines of Fe IX 17.1 nm and Fe XVI 33.5 nm. We use different spatial distributions of the heating function: concentrated near the loop top, uniform and concentrated near the footpoints, and investigate their effect on the modelled EUV intensities. We find a diagnostics based on the dependence of the total loop intensity on the shape of the heating function

  8. Electron acceleration and radiation in evolving complex active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiadis, A.; Gontikakis, C.; Vilmer, N.; Vlahos, L.

    2004-07-01

    We present a model for the acceleration and radiation of solar energetic particles (electrons) in evolving complex active regions. The spatio - temporal evolution of active regions is calculated using a cellular automaton model, based on self-organized criticality. The acceleration of electrons is due to the presence of randomly placed, localized electric fields produced by the energy release process, simulated by the cellular automaton model. We calculate the resulting kinetic energy distributions of the particles and their emitted X-ray radiation spectra using the thick target approximation, and we perform a parametric study with respect to number of electric fields present and thermal temperature of the injected distribution. Finally, comparing our results with the existing observations, we find that they are in a good agreement with the observed X-ray spectra in the energy range 100-1000 keV.

  9. Evidence of active region imprints on the solar wind structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hick, P.; Jackson, B. V.

    1995-01-01

    A common descriptive framework for discussing the solar wind structure in the inner heliosphere uses the global magnetic field as a reference: low density, high velocity solar wind emanates from open magnetic fields, with high density, low speed solar wind flowing outward near the current sheet. In this picture, active regions, underlying closed magnetic field structures in the streamer belt, leave little or no imprint on the solar wind. We present evidence from interplanetary scintillation measurements of the 'disturbance factor' g that active regions play a role in modulating the solar wind and possibly contribute to the solar wind mass output. Hence we find that the traditional view of the solar wind, though useful in understanding many features of solar wind structure, is oversimplified and possibly neglects important aspects of solar wind dynamics

  10. Electric currents and coronal heating in NOAA active region 6952

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, T. R.; Canfield, R. C.; Hudson, H. S.; Mickey, D. L.; Wulser, J. -P.; Martens, P. C. H.; Tsuneta, S.

    1994-01-01

    We examine the spatial and temporal relationship between coronal structures observed with the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on board the Yohkoh spacecraft and the vertical electric current density derived from photospheric vector magnetograms obtained using the Stokes Polarimeter at the Mees Solar Observatory. We focus on a single active region: AR 6952 which we observed on 7 days during 1991 December. For 11 independent maps of the vertical electric current density co-aligned with non-flaring X-ray images, we search for a morphological relationship between sites of high vertical current density in the photosphere and enhanced X-ray emission in the overlying corona. We find no compelling spatial or temporal correlation between the sites of vertical current and the bright X-ray structures in this active region.

  11. Multiple transcribed elements control expression of the Escherichia coli btuB gene.

    PubMed Central

    Franklund, C V; Kadner, R J

    1997-01-01

    Repression by vitamin B12 of the cobalamin transport protein BtuB in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli operates at both the transcriptional and translational levels and is controlled by transcribed sequences within the leader and proximal portion of the btuB coding sequence. The effects of deletions from either end of this region on repression and expression were determined with lac fusions. An element at the 5' end of the transcript and the putative attenuator within the coding sequence were required for transcriptional repression. The presence of either element caused a marked reduction in btuB-lacZ expression which was reversed by the presence of a conserved sequence element in the leader, suggesting the importance of long-range interactions in the btuB leader for expression and regulation. PMID:9190822

  12. Simulation of Active-Region-Scale Flux Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, W.; van der Holst, B.

    2015-12-01

    Shear flows long observed in solar active regions are now understood to be a consequence of the Lorentz force that develops from a complex interaction between magnetic fields and the thermal pressure of the Sun's gravitationally stratified atmosphere. The shearing motions transport magnetic flux and energy from the submerged portion of the field to the corona providing the necessary energy for flares, filament eruptions and CMEs. To further examine this shearing process, we simulate flux emergence on the scale of active regions with a large-scale model of the near surface convection zone constructed on an adaptive spherical grid. This model is designed to simulate flux emerging on the scale of active regions from a depth of 30 Mm. Here, we show results of a twisted flux rope emerging through the hierarchy of granular convection, and examine the flow patterns that arise as the flux approaches the photosphere. We show how these organized flows driven by the Lorentz force cause the coronal field evolve to a highly non-potential configuration capable of driving solar eruptions such as CMEs and flares.

  13. Evidence for coronal turbulence in a quiescent active region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.; Strong, Keith T.

    1986-01-01

    The first evidence for nonthermal broadening of X-ray lines in a quiescent active region was based on a single observation of a limb active region by the Flat Crystal Spectrometer (FCS) on the SMM satellite, reported by Acton et al. (1981). With the renewal of SMM operations, the FCS has been used to further investigate this phenomenon. On April 28, 1984 a map of Mg XI resonance line profiles was made for a bright area in NOAA Active Region 4474 during a nonflaring period. The narrowest line profiles are consistent with the nominal instrumental width plus a thermal width equivalent to about 3 million K, the temperature derived from line ratios of O VIII, Ne IX, and Mg XI. The broadest line profiles are consistent with the instrumental width plus a thermal width equivalent to about 7 million K, but a substantial amount of plasma at this temperature would result in much greater flux in the FCS higher-temperature channels than was seen. If the excess width is attributed solely to plasma turbulence, the corresponding velocity would be about 40 + or - 10 km/s.

  14. A theoretical approach to spot active regions in antimicrobial proteins

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Much effort goes into identifying new antimicrobial compounds able to evade the increasing resistance of microorganisms to antibiotics. One strategy relies on antimicrobial peptides, either derived from fragments released by proteolytic cleavage of proteins or designed from known antimicrobial protein regions. Results To identify these antimicrobial determinants, we developed a theoretical approach that predicts antimicrobial proteins from their amino acid sequence in addition to determining their antimicrobial regions. A bactericidal propensity index has been calculated for each amino acid, using the experimental data reported from a high-throughput screening assay as reference. Scanning profiles were performed for protein sequences and potentially active stretches were identified by the best selected threshold parameters. The method was corroborated against positive and negative datasets. This successful approach means that we can spot active sequences previously reported in the literature from experimental data for most of the antimicrobial proteins examined. Conclusion The method presented can correctly identify antimicrobial proteins with an accuracy of 85% and a sensitivity of 90%. The method can also predict their key active regions, making this a tool for the design of new antimicrobial drugs. PMID:19906288

  15. The Intermediate-line Region in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, T. P.; Różańska, A.; Czerny, B.; Hryniewicz, K.; Ferland, G. J.

    2016-11-01

    We show that the recently observed suppression of the gap between the broad-line region (BLR) and the narrow-line region (NLR) in some active galactic nuclei (AGNs) can be fully explained by an increase of the gas density in the emitting region. Our model predicts the formation of the intermediate-line region (ILR) that is observed in some Seyfert galaxies by the detection of emission lines with intermediate-velocity FWHM ∼ 700–1200 km s‑1. These lines are believed to be originating from an ILR located somewhere between the BLR and NLR. As was previously proved, the apparent gap is assumed to be caused by the presence of dust beyond the sublimation radius. Our computations with the use of the cloudy photoionization code show that the differences in the shape of the spectral energy distribution from the central region of AGNs do not diminish the apparent gap in the line emission in those objects. A strong discontinuity in the line emission versus radius exists for all lines at the dust sublimation radius. However, increasing the gas density to ∼{10}11.5 cm‑3 at the sublimation radius provides the continuous line emission versus radius and fully explains the recently observed lack of apparent gap in some AGNs. We show that such a high density is consistent with the density of upper layers of an accretion disk atmosphere. Therefore, the upper layers of the disk atmosphere can give rise to the formation of observed emission-line clouds.

  16. Regional differences in muscle activation during hamstrings exercise.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Brad J; Contreras, Bret; Tiryaki-Sonmez, Gul; Wilson, Jacob M; Kolber, Morey J; Peterson, Mark D

    2015-01-01

    It is believed that regional activation within a muscle may lead to greater site-specific muscular adaptations in the activated portion of the muscle. Because the hamstrings are a biarticular muscle, it can be theorized that single-joint exercises where movement originates at the hip vs. the knee will result in differential activation of the muscle complex. The purpose of the present study was to assess electromyographic activity in the proximal and distal aspects of the medial and lateral hamstrings during performance of the stiff-legged deadlift (SLDL), a hip-dominant exercise, and the lying leg curl (LLC), a knee-dominant exercise. Ten young, resistance-trained men were recruited from a university population to participate in the study. Employing a within-subject design, participants performed the SLDL and LLC to muscular failure using a load equating to their 8 repetition maximum for each exercise. The order of performance of exercises was counterbalanced between participants so that approximately half of the subjects performed SLDL first and the other half performed LLC first. Surface electromyography was used to record mean normalized muscle activity of the upper lateral hamstrings, lower lateral hamstrings, upper medial hamstrings, and lower medial hamstrings. Results showed that the LLC elicited significantly greater normalized mean activation of the lower lateral and lower medial hamstrings compared with the SLDL (p ≤ 0.05). These findings support the notion that the hamstrings can be regionally targeted through exercise selection. Further investigations are required to determine whether differences in activation lead to greater muscular adaptations in the muscle complex. PMID:24978835

  17. Active region upflows. II. Data driven magnetohydrodynamic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galsgaard, K.; Madjarska, M. S.; Vanninathan, K.; Huang, Z.; Presmann, M.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Observations of many active regions show a slow systematic outflow/upflow from their edges lasting from hours to days. At present no physical explanation has been proven, while several suggestions have been put forward. Aims: This paper investigates one possible method for maintaining these upflows assuming, that convective motions drive the magnetic field to initiate them through magnetic reconnection. Methods: We use Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) data to provide an initial potential 3D magnetic field of the active region NOAA 11123 on 2010 November 13 where the characteristic upflow velocities are observed. A simple 1D hydrostatic atmospheric model covering the region from the photosphere to the corona is derived. Local correlation tracking of the magnetic features in the HMI data is used to derive a proxy for the time dependent velocity field. The time dependent evolution of the system is solved using a resistive 3D magnetohydrodynamic code. Results: The magnetic field contains several null points located well above the photosphere, with their fan planes dividing the magnetic field into independent open and closed flux domains. The stressing of the interfaces between the different flux domains is expected to provide locations where magnetic reconnection can take place and drive systematic flows. In this case, the region between the closed and open flux is identified as the region where observations find the systematic upflows. Conclusions: In the present experiment, the driving only initiates magneto-acoustic waves without driving any systematic upflows at any of the flux interfaces. Movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. On the Periodicity of Energy Release in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldvarg, T. B.; Nagovitsyn, Yu. A.; Solov'Ev, A. A.

    2005-06-01

    We investigate the periodic regimes of energy release on the Sun, namely, the recurrence of solar flares in active regions using the Solar Geophysical Data Journal on Hα flares from 1979 until 1981, which corresponds to the maximum of solar cycle 21. We obtained the following series of periods in the manifestation of flare activity bymeans of a correlation periodogram analysis, a self-similarity function, and a wavelet analysis: ˜1, 2, 3 h as well as ˜0.4, 1, 2, 5 days. We suggest a diffusive model for the quasi-periodic transfer of toroidal magnetic fields from under the photosphere to interpret the retrieved sequence of periods in the enhancement of flare activity. We estimated the typical spatial scales of the magnetic field variations in the solar convection zone: ˜17 000 km.

  19. Monitoring rice farming activities in the Mekong Delta region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, S. T.; Chen, C. F.; Chen, C. R.; Chiang, S. H.; Chang, L. Y.; Khin, L. V.

    2015-12-01

    Half of the world's population depends on rice for survival. Rice agriculture thus plays an important role in the developing world's economy. Vietnam is one of the largest rice producers and suppliers on earth and more than 80% of the exported rice was produced from the Mekong Delta region, which is situated in the southwestern Vietnam and encompasses approximately 40,000 km2. Changes in climate conditions could likely trigger the increase of insect populations and rice diseases, causing the potential loss of rice yields. Monitoring rice-farming activities through crop phenology detection can provide policymakers with timely strategies to mitigate possible impacts on the potential yield as well as rice grain exports to ensure food security for the region. The main objective of this study is to develop a logistic-based algorithm to investigate rice sowing and harvesting activities from the multi-temporal Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-Landsat fusion data. We processed the data for two main cropping seasons (i.e., winter-spring and summer-autumn seasons) through a three-step procedure: (1) MODIS-Landsat data fusion, (2) construction of the time-series enhanced vegetation index 2 (EVI2) data, (3) rice crop phenology detection. The EVI2 data derived from the fusion results between MODIS and Landsat data were compared with that of Landsat data indicated close correlation between the two datasets (R2 = 0.93). The time-series EVI2 data were processed using the double logistic method to detect the progress of sowing and harvesting activities in the region. The comparisons between the estimated sowing and harvesting dates and the field survey data revealed the root mean squared error (RMSE) values of 8.4 and 5.5 days for the winter-spring crop and 9.4 and 12.8 days for the summer-autumn crop, respectively. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of the double logistic-based algorithm for rice crop monitoring from temporal MODIS-Landsat fusion data

  20. FORMATION OF CORONAL HOLES ON THE ASHES OF ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Karachik, Nina V.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Abramenko, Valentyna I. E-mail: apevtsov@nso.ed

    2010-05-10

    We investigate the formation of isolated non-polar coronal holes (CHs) on the remnants of decaying active regions (ARs) at the minimum/early ascending phase of sunspot activity. We follow the evolution of four bipolar ARs and measure several parameters of their magnetic fields including total flux, imbalance, and compactness. As regions decay, their leading and following polarities exhibit different dissipation rates: loose polarity tends to dissipate faster than compact polarity. As a consequence, we see a gradual increase in flux imbalance inside a dissipating bipolar region, and later a formation of a CH in place of more compact magnetic flux. Out of four cases studied in detail, two CHs had formed at the following polarity of the decaying bipolar AR, and two CHs had developed in place of the leading polarity field. All four CHs contain a significant fraction of magnetic field of their corresponding AR. Using potential field extrapolation, we show that the magnetic field lines of these CHs were closed on the polar CH at the North, which at the time of the events was in imbalance with the polar CH at the South. This topology suggests that the observed phenomenon may play an important role in transformation of toroidal magnetic field to poloidal field, which is a key step in transitioning from an old solar cycle to a new one. The timing of this observed transition may indicate the end of solar cycle 23 and the beginning of cycle 24.

  1. Helioseismology of pre-emerging active regions. III. Statistical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, G.; Leka, K. D.; Braun, D. C.; Birch, A. C.

    2014-05-01

    The subsurface properties of active regions (ARs) prior to their appearance at the solar surface may shed light on the process of AR formation. Helioseismic holography has been applied to samples taken from two populations of regions on the Sun (pre-emergence and without emergence), each sample having over 100 members, that were selected to minimize systematic bias, as described in Paper I. Paper II showed that there are statistically significant signatures in the average helioseismic properties that precede the formation of an AR. This paper describes a more detailed analysis of the samples of pre-emergence regions and regions without emergence based on discriminant analysis. The property that is best able to distinguish the populations is found to be the surface magnetic field, even a day before the emergence time. However, after accounting for the correlations between the surface field and the quantities derived from helioseismology, there is still evidence of a helioseismic precursor to AR emergence that is present for at least a day prior to emergence, although the analysis presented cannot definitively determine the subsurface properties prior to emergence due to the small sample sizes.

  2. Classical non-homologous end-joining pathway utilizes nascent RNA for error-free double-strand break repair of transcribed genes

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Anirban; Tapryal, Nisha; Venkova, Tatiana; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Pandita, Raj K.; Sarker, Altaf H.; Sarkar, Partha S.; Pandita, Tej K.; Hazra, Tapas K.

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) leading to loss of nucleotides in the transcribed region can be lethal. Classical non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) is the dominant pathway for DSB repair (DSBR) in adult mammalian cells. Here we report that during such DSBR, mammalian C-NHEJ proteins form a multiprotein complex with RNA polymerase II and preferentially associate with the transcribed genes after DSB induction. Depletion of C-NHEJ factors significantly abrogates DSBR in transcribed but not in non-transcribed genes. We hypothesized that nascent RNA can serve as a template for restoring the missing sequences, thus allowing error-free DSBR. We indeed found pre-mRNA in the C-NHEJ complex. Finally, when a DSB-containing plasmid with several nucleotides deleted within the E. coli lacZ gene was allowed time to repair in lacZ-expressing mammalian cells, a functional lacZ plasmid could be recovered from control but not C-NHEJ factor-depleted cells, providing important mechanistic insights into C-NHEJ-mediated error-free DSBR of the transcribed genome. PMID:27703167

  3. Active tectonics and earthquake potential of the Myanmar region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Sieh, Kerry; Tun, Soe Thura; Lai, Kuang-Yin; Myint, Than

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes geomorphologic evidence for the principal neotectonic features of Myanmar and its immediate surroundings. We combine this evidence with published structural, geodetic, and seismic data to present an overview of the active tectonic architecture of the region and its seismic potential. Three tectonic systems accommodate oblique collision of the Indian plate with Southeast Asia and extrusion of Asian territory around the eastern syntaxis of the Himalayan mountain range. Subduction and collision associated with the Sunda megathrust beneath and within the Indoburman range and Naga Hills accommodate most of the shortening across the transpressional plate boundary. The Sagaing fault system is the predominant locus of dextral motion associated with the northward translation of India. Left-lateral faults of the northern Shan Plateau, northern Laos, Thailand, and southern China facilitate extrusion of rocks around the eastern syntaxis of the Himalaya. All of these systems have produced major earthquakes within recorded history and continue to present major seismic hazards in the region.

  4. Time Dependence of Joy's Law for Emerging Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chintzoglou, Georgios; Zhang, J.; Liu, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Joy's law governs the tilt of Active Regions (ARs) with respect to their absolute heliographic latitude. Together with Hale's law of hemispheric polarity, it is essential in constraining solar dynamo models. However, previous studies on Joy's law show only a weak positive trend between AR tilt angles and latitudes. In this study, we are focusing on the time dependence of Joy's law, for the cases of emerging ARs of Solar Cycle 24. We selected 40 ARs that emerge on the East hemisphere, effectively maximizing the observing time for each AR. Then, by converting the helioprojective maps into heliographic, we determine the geometrical as well as the magnetic-flux-weighted centroids for each emergence case. That way we are able to track the temporal evolution of their physical properties, including locations, fluxes of positive and negative polarities, as well as the tilt angles of these regions in a continuous manner until emergence stops and the ARs assume their final state.

  5. Multi-wavelength Observations of Solar Active Region NOAA 7154

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, M. E.; Nitta, N. V.; Frank. Z. A.; Dame, L.; Suematsu, Y.

    2000-01-01

    We report on observations of a solar active region in May 1992 by the Solar Plasma Diagnostic Experiment (SPDE) in coordination with the Yohkoh satellite (producing soft X-ray images) and ground-based observatories (producing photospheric magnetograms and various filtergrams including those at the CN 3883 A line). The main focus is a study of the physical conditions of hot (T is approximately greater than 3 MK) coronal loops at their foot-points. The coronal part of the loops is fuzzy but what appear to be their footpoints in the transition region down to the photosphere are compact. Despite the morphological similarities, the footpoint emission at 10(exp 5) K is not quantitatively correlated with that at approximately 300 km above the tau (sub 5000) = 1 level, suggesting that the heat transport and therefore magnetic field topology in the intermediate layer is complicated. High resolution imaging observations with continuous temperature coverage are crucially needed.

  6. Influence of the Cardiac Myosin Hinge Region on Contractile Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margossian, Sarkis S.; Krueger, John W.; Sellers, James R.; Cuda, Giovanni; Caulfield, James B.; Norton, Paul; Slayter, Henry S.

    1991-06-01

    The participation of cardiac myosin hinge in contractility was investigated by in vitro motility and ATPase assays and by measurements of sarcomere shortening. The effect on contractile activity was analyzed using an antibody directed against a 20-amino acid peptide within the hinge region of myosin. This antibody bound specifically at the hinge at a distance of 55 nm from the S1/S2 junction, was specific to human, dog, and rat cardiac myosins, did not crossreact with gizzard or skeletal myosin, and had no effect on ATPase activity of purified S1 and myofibrils. However, it completely suppressed the movement of actin filaments in in vitro motility assays and reduced active shortening of sarcomeres of skinned cardiac myocytes by half. Suppression of motion by the antihinge antibody may reflect a mechanical constraint imposed by the antibody upon the mobility of the S2 region of myosin. The results suggest that the steps in the mechanochemical energy transduction can be separately influenced through S2.

  7. Influence of the cardiac myosin hinge region on contractile activity.

    PubMed

    Margossian, S S; Krueger, J W; Sellers, J R; Cuda, G; Caulfield, J B; Norton, P; Slayter, H S

    1991-06-01

    The participation of cardiac myosin hinge in contractility was investigated by in vitro motility and ATPase assays and by measurements of sarcomere shortening. The effect on contractile activity was analyzed using an antibody directed against a 20-amino acid peptide within the hinge region of myosin. This antibody bound specifically at the hinge at a distance of 55 nm from the S1/S2 junction, was specific to human, dog, and rat cardiac myosins, did not crossreact with gizzard or skeletal myosin, and had no effect on ATPase activity of purified S1 and myofibrils. However, it completely suppressed the movement of actin filaments in in vitro motility assays and reduced active shortening of sarcomeres of skinned cardiac myocytes by half. Suppression of motion by the anti-hinge antibody may reflect a mechanical constraint imposed by the antibody upon the mobility of the S2 region of myosin. The results suggest that the steps in the mechanochemical energy transduction can be separately influenced through S2.

  8. High Spatial Resolution Fe XII Observations of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Paola; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo

    2016-08-01

    We use UV spectral observations of active regions with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to investigate the properties of the coronal Fe xii 1349.4 Å emission at unprecedented high spatial resolution (˜0.33″). We find that by using appropriate observational strategies (i.e., long exposures, lossless compression), Fe xii emission can be studied with IRIS at high spatial and spectral resolution, at least for high-density plasma (e.g., post-flare loops and active region moss). We find that upper transition region (TR; moss) Fe xii emission shows very small average Doppler redshifts ({v}{{D}} ˜ 3 km s‑1) as well as modest non-thermal velocities (with an average of ˜24 km s‑1 and the peak of the distribution at ˜15 km s‑1). The observed distribution of Doppler shifts appears to be compatible with advanced three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations in which impulsive heating is concentrated at the TR footpoints of a hot corona. While the non-thermal broadening of Fe xii 1349.4 Å peaks at similar values as lower resolution simultaneous Hinode Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) measurements of Fe xii 195 Å, IRIS observations show a previously undetected tail of increased non-thermal broadening that might be suggestive of the presence of subarcsecond heating events. We find that IRIS and EIS non-thermal line broadening measurements are affected by instrumental effects that can only be removed through careful analysis. Our results also reveal an unexplained discrepancy between observed 195.1/1349.4 Å Fe xii intensity ratios and those predicted by the CHIANTI atomic database.

  9. Ancient Tectonic and Volcanic Activity in the Tharsis Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, S. C.; Kronberg, P.; Hauber, E.; Grott, M.; Steinberger, B.; Torsvik, T. H.; Neukum, G.

    The two topographically dominating volcanic provinces on Mars are the Tharsis and the Elysium regions, situated close to the equator on the dichotomy boundary between the heavily cratered (older) highlands and the northern lowlands (about 100 degrees apart). The regions are characterized by volcanoes whose morphologies are analogous to volcanic landforms on Earth, and the huge volcanoes in the Tharsis region (Olympus Mons and Tharsis Montes) are prime examples resembling many characteristics of Hawaiian shield volcanoes. The main difference between the Martian and terrestrial volcanoes are their size and the length of the flows, possibly due to higher eruption rates, the "stationary" character of the source (no plate tectonics) and the lower gravity. The Tharsis plateau is the topographically most prominent region on Mars, and associated with an areoid high. On Earth, large geoid highs are related to longlived heterogeneities near the core-mantle boundary that are sources for large igneous provinces. The Tharsis' volcanic vent structures were active at least episodically over the past 4 billion years (based on crater count statistics), which indicates long-lived volcanic and magmatic activity. Two major groups of tectonic features are related to the Tharsis bulge: a concentric set of wrinkle ridges indicating compression radial to Tharsis,and several sets of extensional structures that radiate outward from different centers within Tharsis, indicating tension circumferential to Tharsis. No landforms imply ancient plate tectonics. Here, we present surface ages associated with volcanic and tectonic landforms with a special focus on the ancient magma-tectonic environment (see Grott et al. 2006, this volume). We will examine the long-lived volcanism and tectonic surface expressions and discuss whether Mars volcanism could represent deep mantle plumes.

  10. High Spatial Resolution Fe XII Observations of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Paola; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo

    2016-08-01

    We use UV spectral observations of active regions with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to investigate the properties of the coronal Fe xii 1349.4 Å emission at unprecedented high spatial resolution (˜0.33″). We find that by using appropriate observational strategies (i.e., long exposures, lossless compression), Fe xii emission can be studied with IRIS at high spatial and spectral resolution, at least for high-density plasma (e.g., post-flare loops and active region moss). We find that upper transition region (TR; moss) Fe xii emission shows very small average Doppler redshifts ({v}{{D}} ˜ 3 km s-1) as well as modest non-thermal velocities (with an average of ˜24 km s-1 and the peak of the distribution at ˜15 km s-1). The observed distribution of Doppler shifts appears to be compatible with advanced three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations in which impulsive heating is concentrated at the TR footpoints of a hot corona. While the non-thermal broadening of Fe xii 1349.4 Å peaks at similar values as lower resolution simultaneous Hinode Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) measurements of Fe xii 195 Å, IRIS observations show a previously undetected tail of increased non-thermal broadening that might be suggestive of the presence of subarcsecond heating events. We find that IRIS and EIS non-thermal line broadening measurements are affected by instrumental effects that can only be removed through careful analysis. Our results also reveal an unexplained discrepancy between observed 195.1/1349.4 Å Fe xii intensity ratios and those predicted by the CHIANTI atomic database.

  11. From snakes to region-based active contours defined by region-dependent parameters.

    PubMed

    Jehan-Besson, Stéphanie; Gastaud, Muriel; Precioso, Frédéric; Barlaud, Michel; Aubert, Gilles; Debreuve, Eric

    2004-01-10

    Image and sequence segmentation of a the segmentation task are discussed from the point of view of optimizing the segmentation criterion. Such a segmentation criterion involves so-called (boundary and region) descriptors, which, in general, may depend on their respective boundaries or regions. This dependency must be taken into account when one is computing the criterion derivative with respect to the unknown object domain (defined by its boundary). If this dependency not considered, some correctional terms may be omitted. Computing the derivative of the segmentation criterion with a dynamic scheme is described. The scheme is general enough to provide a framework for a wide variety of applications in segmentation. It also provides a theoretical meaning to the philosophy of active contours.

  12. The coronal and transition region temperature structure of a solar active region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, R. H.; Pye, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    Using measurements of EUV and X-ray spectral lines, the differential emission measure vs electron temperature from the transition region to the corona of an active region (electron temperature between 100,000 and 5,000,000 K) is derived. The total emission measure and radiative losses are of the order 3 x 10 to the 48th/cu cm and 4 x 10 to the 26th ergs/sec, respectively. The emission measure at electron temperatures greater than approximately 1,000,000 K (i.e. that mainly responsible for the X-ray emission) is about 75% of the total. The use of the Mg x line at 625 A as an indicator of coronal electron density is also examined. A set of theoretical energy balance models of coronal loops in which the loop divergence is a variable parameter is presented and compared with the observations.

  13. Implications of Special Regions to Conducting Human Activities on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummel, J. D.; Barlow, N. G.; Beaty, D. W.; Jones, M. A.; Hipkin, V.

    2014-12-01

    A MEPAG Science Analysis Group (SAG) has undertaken an analysis of Special Regions (SR) on Mars—regions where indigenous martian life could exist or where Earth microbes, if introduced, could survive and reproduce. The SR-SAG has considered the impact of SR on future human activities on the martian surface. Human exploration requires access to in-situ resources, some of which may be found in SR. Water and oxygen for ISRU are found in the atmosphere, surface/near-surface ice, hydrated minerals, and perchlorates. Water ice is most abundant at latitudes poleward of ~60 degrees, but polar darkness, cold temperatures, and CO2 degassing present hazards to human operations in these regions. Accessible water is more limited toward the equator, though temperature and solar energy conditions become more favorable. The possible presence of liquid water in Recurring Slope Lineae and active gullies leads to their treatment as SR. Fuel for surface operations and propellants for crew ascent could be manufactured from the martian atmosphere and surface materials, but dust in the atmosphere may clog ISRU equipment and perchlorate is toxic to humans. Power may be produced from solar or nuclear energy. Reliance on solar energy limits operations to the equatorial zone where easily accessible ice resources are limited. Nuclear power allows surface operations at a range of latitudes, but waste heat could convert some non-SR into SR. Radiation shielding is necessary for long-term human operations on Mars and could be obtained by deposition of regolith or by water storage in tanks or as ice around habitats, or the use of underground habitats. SR-SAG recognizes that it will be impossible for all human-associated processes and operations to be conducted within entirely closed systems. Protocols need to be established so (1) human missions to Mars will not contaminate SR nor be contaminated by materials from them, and (2) human activities on Mars will avoid converting areas into SR.

  14. Temporal evolution of continental lithospheric strength in actively deforming regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, W.; Pollitz, F.F.

    2008-01-01

    It has been agreed for nearly a century that a strong, load-bearing outer layer of earth is required to support mountain ranges, transmit stresses to deform active regions and store elastic strain to generate earthquakes. However the dept and extent of this strong layer remain controversial. Here we use a variety of observations to infer the distribution of lithospheric strength in the active western United States from seismic to steady-state time scales. We use evidence from post-seismic transient and earthquake cycle deformation reservoir loading glacio-isostatic adjustment, and lithosphere isostatic adjustment to large surface and subsurface loads. The nearly perfectly elastic behavior of Earth's crust and mantle at the time scale of seismic wave propagation evolves to that of a strong, elastic crust and weak, ductile upper mantle lithosphere at both earthquake cycle (EC, ???10?? to 103 yr) and glacio-isostatic adjustment (GIA, ???103 to 104 yr) time scales. Topography and gravity field correlations indicate that lithosphere isostatic adjustment (LIA) on ???106-107 yr time scales occurs with most lithospheric stress supported by an upper crust overlying a much weaker ductile subtrate. These comparisons suggest that the upper mantle lithosphere is weaker than the crust at all time scales longer than seismic. In contrast, the lower crust has a chameleon-like behavior, strong at EC and GIA time scales and weak for LIA and steady-state deformation processes. The lower crust might even take on a third identity in regions of rapid crustal extension or continental collision, where anomalously high temperatures may lead to large-scale ductile flow in a lower crustal layer that is locally weaker than the upper mantle. Modeling of lithospheric processes in active regions thus cannot use a one-size-fits-all prescription of rheological layering (relation between applied stress and deformation as a function of depth) but must be tailored to the time scale and tectonic

  15. THE EXPANSION OF ACTIVE REGIONS INTO THE EXTENDED SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Huw; Jeska, Lauren; Leonard, Drew

    2013-06-01

    Advanced image processing of Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment (LASCO) C2 observations reveals the expansion of the active region closed field into the extended corona. The nested closed-loop systems are large, with an apparent latitudinal extent of 50 Degree-Sign , and expanding to heights of at least 12 R{sub Sun }. The expansion speeds are {approx}10 km s{sup -1} in the AIA/SDO field of view, below {approx}20 km s{sup -1} at 2.3 R{sub Sun }, and accelerate linearly to {approx}60 km s{sup -1} at 5 R{sub Sun }. They appear with a frequency of one every {approx}3 hr over a time period of around three days. They are not coronal mass ejections (CMEs) since their gradual expansion is continuous and steady. They are also faint, with an upper limit of 3% of the brightness of background streamers. Extreme ultraviolet images reveal continuous birth and expansion of hot, bright loops from a new active region at the base of the system. The LASCO images show that the loops span a radial fan-like system of streamers, suggesting that they are not propagating within the main coronal streamer structure. The expanding loops brighten at low heights a few hours prior to a CME eruption, and the expansion process is temporarily halted as the closed field system is swept away. Closed magnetic structures from some active regions are not isolated from the extended corona and solar wind, but can expand to large heights in the form of quiescent expanding loops.

  16. Chromospheric Evolution and the Flare Activity of Super-Active Region NOAA 6555

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    PrasadC, Debi; Ambastha, Ashok; Srivastava, Nandita; Tripathy, Sushanta C.; Hagyard, Mona J.

    1997-01-01

    Super-active region NOAA 6555 was highly flare productive during the period March 21st - 27th, 1991 of its disk passage. We have studied its chromospheric activity using high spatial resolution H alpha filtergrams taken at Udaipur along with MSFC vector magnetograms. A possible relationship of flare productivity and the variation in shear has been explored. Flares were generally seen in those subareas of the active region which possessed closed magnetic field configuration, whereas only minor flares and/or surges occurred in subareas showing open magnetic field configuration. Physical mechanisms responsible for the observed surges are also discussed.

  17. Hinode Observations of an Eruption from a Sigmoidal Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, L. M.; Wallace, A. J.; Kliem, B.

    2012-08-01

    We analyse the evolution of a bipolar active region which produces an eruption during its decay phase. The soft X-ray arcade develops high shear over a time span of two days and transitions to sigmoidal shortly before the eruption. We propose that the continuous sigmoidal soft X-ray threads indicate that a flux rope has formed which is lying low in the solar atmosphere with a bald patch separatrix surface topology. The formation of the flux rope is driven by the photospheric evolution which is dominated by fragmentation of the main polarities, motion due to supergranular flows and cancellation at the polarity inversion line.

  18. SOI/MDI studies of active region seismology and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarbell, Ted D.; Title, Alan; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Scherrer, Phil; Zweibel, Ellen

    1995-01-01

    The solar oscillations investigation (SOI) will study solar active regions using both helioseismic and conventional observation techniques. The Michelson Doppler imager (MDI) can perform Doppler continuum and line depth imagery and can produce longitudinal magnetograms, showing either the full disk or a high resolution field of view. A dynamics program of continuous full disk Doppler observations for two months per year, campaign programs of eight hours of continuous observation per day, and a synoptic magnetic program of about 15 full disk magnetograms per day, are planned. The scientific plans, measurements and observation programs, are described.

  19. The distribution of maximum temperatures of coronal active region loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teske, R. G.; Mayfield, E. B.

    1981-01-01

    Starting with the integrated emission measure distributions of solar active regions, the distribution of the maximum temperature parameter which characterizes individual plasma loops is determined. The observed emission measure distributions were determined by combining EUV and X-ray data from two separate experiments on ATM/Skylab. The present work sets some limits on such an approach. It is found that the distribution of maximum temperature has approximately the same shape as the integrated emission measure distributions, a result which is expected since most of the loop emission measure is near their maximum temperatures.

  20. Substrate-emitting semiconductor laser with a trapezoidal active region

    SciTech Connect

    Dikareva, N V; Nekorkin, S M; Karzanova, M V; Zvonkov, B N; Aleshkin, V Ya; Dubinov, A A; Afonenko, A A

    2014-04-28

    Semiconductor lasers with a narrow (∼2°) directional pattern in the planes both parallel and perpendicular to the p–n junction are fabricated. To achieve a low radiation divergence in the p–n junction plane, the active region in this plane was designed in the form of a trapezium. The narrow directional pattern in the plane perpendicular to the p–n junction was ensured by the use of a leaky mode, through which more than 90% of laser power was coupled out. (lasers)

  1. Emission Measure Distribution and Heating of Two Active Region Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, Durgesh; Klimchuk, James A.; Mason, Helen E.

    2011-01-01

    Using data from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer aboard Hinode, we have studied the coronal plasma in the core of two active regions. Concentrating on the area between opposite polarity moss, we found emission measure distributions having an approximate power-law form EM/T(exp 2.4) from log T = 5.55 up to a peak at log T = 6.57. The observations are explained extremely well by a simple nanoflare model. However, in the absence of additional constraints, the observations could possibly also be explained by steady heating.

  2. Peptides of the Constant Region of Antibodies Display Fungicidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Polonelli, Luciano; Ciociola, Tecla; Magliani, Walter; Zanello, Pier Paolo; D'Adda, Tiziana; Galati, Serena; De Bernardis, Flavia; Arancia, Silvia; Gabrielli, Elena; Pericolini, Eva; Vecchiarelli, Anna; Arruda, Denise C.; Pinto, Marcia R.; Travassos, Luiz R.; Pertinhez, Thelma A.; Spisni, Alberto; Conti, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic peptides with sequences identical to fragments of the constant region of different classes (IgG, IgM, IgA) of antibodies (Fc-peptides) exerted a fungicidal activity in vitro against pathogenic yeasts, such as Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Malassezia furfur, including caspofungin and triazole resistant strains. Alanine-substituted derivatives of fungicidal Fc-peptides, tested to evaluate the critical role of each residue, displayed unaltered, increased or decreased candidacidal activity in vitro. An Fc-peptide, included in all human IgGs, displayed a therapeutic effect against experimental mucosal and systemic candidiasis in mouse models. It is intriguing to hypothesize that some Fc-peptides may influence the antifungal immune response and constitute the basis for devising new antifungal agents. PMID:22470523

  3. The morphology of flare phenomena, magnetic fields, and electric currents in active regions. II - NOAA active region 5747 (1989 October)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leka, K. D.; Canfield, Richard C.; Mcclymont, A. N.; De La Beaujardiere, J.-F.; Fan, Yuhong; Tang, F.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes October 1989 observations in NOAA Active Region 5747 of the morphology of energetic electron precipitation and high-pressure coronal flare plasmas of three flares and their relation to the vector magnetic field and vertical electric currents. The H-alpha spectroheliograms were coaligned with the vector magnetograms using continuum images of sunspots, enabling positional accuracy of a few arcsec. It was found that, during the gradual phase, the regions of the H-alpha flare that show the effects of enhanced pressure in the overlying corona often encompass extrema of the vertical current density, consistent with earlier work showing a close relationship between H-alpha emission and line-of-sight currents. The data are also consistent with the overall morphology and evolution described by erupting-filament models such as those of Kopp and Pneuman (1976) and Sturrock (1989).

  4. Active Region Magnetic Structure Observed in the Photosphere and Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leka, K. D.; Metcalf, Thomas R.

    2001-01-01

    The magnetic flux above sunspots and plage in NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) Active Region 8299 has been measured in the photosphere and the chromosphere. We investigate the vertical magnetic structure above the umbrae, penumbrae and plage regions using quantitative statistical comparisons of the photospheric and chromospheric vector magnetic flux data. The results include: (1) a decrease in flux with height, (2) the direct detection of the superpenumbral canopy in the chromosphere, (3) values for dB/dz which are consistent with earlier investigations when derived from a straight difference between the two datasets but quite low when derived from the delta x B = 0 condition, (4) a monolithic structure in the umbra which extends well into the upper chromosphere with a very complex and varied structure in the penumbra and plage, as evidenced by (5) a uniform magnetic scale height in the umbrae with an abrupt jump to widely varying scale heights in the penumbral and plage regions. Further, we find (6) evidence for a very large (delta z approximately equals 3Mm) height difference between the atmospheric layers sampled in the two magnetograms, almost a factor of three larger than that implied by atmospheric models. We additionally test the apropriateness of using photospheric magnetic flux as a boundary for field-line extrapolations, and find a better agreement with observed coronal structure when the chromospheric flux is used as a boundary.

  5. Plasma Beta Above a Solar Active Region: Rethinking the Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present a model of the plasma beta above an active region and discuss its consequences in terms of coronal magnetic field modeling. The beta-plasma model is representative and derived from a collection of sources. The resulting beta variation with height is used to emphasize the assumption that the magnetic pressure dominates over the plasma pressure must be carefully considered depending on what part of the solar atmosphere is being considered. This paper points out (1) that the paradigm that the coronal magnetic field can be constructed from a force-free magnetic field must be used in the correct context, since the forcefree region is sandwiched between two regions which have beta greater than 1, (2) that the chromospheric MgIICIV magnetic measurements occur near the beta-minimum, and (3) that, moving from the photosphere upwards, beta can return to 1 at relatively low coronal heights, e.g. R approximately 1.2R(sub)s.

  6. Medical Terminology of the Musculoskeletal System. Medical Records. Instructional Unit for the Medical Transcriber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosman, Minna L.

    Following an analysis of the task of transcribing as practiced in a health facility, this study guide was developed to teach the knowledge and skills required of a medical transcriber. The medical record department was identified as a major occupational area, and a task inventory for medical records was developed and used as a basis for a…

  7. Medical Terminology of the Circulatory System. Medical Records. Instructional Unit for the Medical Transcriber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosman, Minna L.

    Developed as a result of an analysis of the task of transcribing as practiced in a health facility, this study guide was designed to teach the knowledge and skills required of a medical transcriber. The medical record department was identified as a major occupational area, and a task inventory for medical records was developed and used as a basis…

  8. Magnetic helicity and free energy in solar active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraitis, K.; Georgoulis, M.; Tziotziou, K.; Archontis, V.

    2013-09-01

    We study the evolution of the non-potential free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity budgets in solar active regions (ARs). For this we use a time-series of a three-dimensional, synthetic AR produced by magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations. As a first step, we calculate the potential magnetic field that has the same normal components with the MHD field along all boundaries of the AR, by solving Laplace's equation. The free magnetic energy of the AR is then easily derived. From the two fields, MHD and potential one, we calculate the corresponding vector potentials with a recently proposed integration method. The knowledge of both fields and their respective vector potentials throughout the AR, allows us to estimate the relative magnetic helicity budget of the AR. Following this procedure for each snapshot of the AR, we reconstruct the evolution of free energy and helicity in the AR. Our method reproduces, for a synthetic AR, the energy/helicity relations known to hold in real active regions.

  9. Multi-Wavelength Study of Active Region Loop Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, D.

    2006-11-01

    Observations have revealed the existence of weak transient disturbances in extended coronal loop systems. These propagating disturbances (PDs) originate from small scale brightenings at the footpoints of the loops and propagate upward along the loops. In all cases observed, the projected propagation speed is close to, but below the expected sound speed in the loops. This suggests that the PDs could be interpreted as slow mode MHD waves. Interpreting the oscillation in terms of different wave modes and/or plasma motions always depend on the line of sight as we observe in the limb or on the center of the disk. The JOP 165 campaign will address some of these questions. MDI and TRACE photospheric and UV imaging of TRACE and SPIRIT have been acquired simultaneously with high temporal and spatial coverage along with the spectroscopic data from CDS. EIT was operated in the shutter-less mode to achieve high Cadence. Some of the off- limb active region dynamics and oscillations observed during this JOP campaign will be focused in this presentation. Plasma condensations and temporal variations in active region loops will be also addressed.

  10. Magnetic field measurements in and above a limb active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Judge

    2013-07-01

    We analyze spectropolarimetric data of a limb active region (NOAA 11302) obtained on September 22nd 2011 using the Facility Infrared Spectrometer (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST). Stokes profiles including lines of Si I 1028.7 nm and He I 1083 nm were obtained in three scans over a 45"x75" area. Simultaneous narrow band Ca II K and G-band intensity data were acquired with a cadence of 5s at the DST. The He I data show not only typical active region polarization signatures, but also signatures in plumes -- cool post flare loops -- which extend many Mm into the corona across the visible limb. The plumes have remarkably uniform brightness, and the plume plasma is significantly Doppler shifted as it drains from the corona. Using carefully constructed observing and calibration sequences and applying Principal Component Analysis to remove instrumental artifacts, we achieved a polarization sensitivity approaching 0.02%. With this sensitivity we attempt to diagnose the vector magnetic fields and plasma properties of chromospheric and cool coronal material in and above NOAA 11302. Inversions using various radiative transfer models in the HAZEL code are remarkably consistent with the idea that plume spectra are formed in a simple, slab-like geometry, but that the ``disk'' spectra are formed under more traditional models (Milne-Eddington). The inverted magnetic data of He I lines are compared with photospheric inversions of DST Si I and Fe I data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory.

  11. Active Region Filaments Might Harbor Weak Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Baso, C. J.; Martínez González, M. J.; Asensio Ramos, A.

    2016-05-01

    Recent spectropolarimetric observations of active region filaments have revealed polarization profiles with signatures typical of the strong field Zeeman regime. The conspicuous absence in those observations of scattering polarization and Hanle effect signatures was then pointed out by some authors. This was interpreted as either a signature of mixed “turbulent” field components or as a result of optical thickness. In this article, we present a natural scenario to explain these Zeeman-only spectropolarimetric observations of active region (AR) filaments. We propose a two-component model, one on top of the other. Both components have horizontal fields, with the azimuth difference between them being close to 90°. The component that lies lower in the atmosphere is permeated by a strong field of the order of 600 G, while the upper component has much weaker fields, of the order of 10 G. The ensuing scattering polarization signatures of the individual components have opposite signs, so its combination along the line of sight reduces—and even can cancel out—the Hanle signatures, giving rise to an apparent Zeeman-only profile. This model is also applicable to other chromospheric structures seen in absorption above ARs.

  12. Photospheric electric current and transition region brightness within an active region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, A. C.; Hagyard, M. J.; Rabin, D.; Moore, R. L.; Smith, B. J., Jr.; West, E. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1984-01-01

    Distributions of vertical electrical current density J(z) calculated from vector measurements of the photospheric magnetic field are compared with ultraviolet spectroheliograms to investigate whether resistive heating is an important source of enhanced emission in the transition region. The photospheric magnetic fields in Active Region 2372 were measured on April 6 and 7, 1980 with the Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograph; ultraviolet wavelength spectroheliograms (L-alpha and N V 1239 A) were obtained with the UV Spectrometer and Polarimeter experiment aboard the Solar Maximum Mission satellite. Spatial registration of the J(z) (5 arcsec resolution) and UV (3 arcsec resolution) maps indicates that the maximum current density is cospatial with a minor but persistent UV enhancement, but there is little detected current associated with other nearby bright areas. It is concluded that, although resistive heating may be important in the transition region, the currents responsible for the heating are largely unresolved in the present measurements and have no simple correlation with the residual current measured on 5-arcsec scales.

  13. Genetic differences in internal transcribed spacer 1 between Dermanyssus gallinae from wild birds and domestic chickens.

    PubMed

    Brännström, S; Morrison, D A; Mattsson, J G; Chirico, J

    2008-06-01

    We investigated the presence of the poultry red mite or the chicken mite, Dermanyssus gallinae De Geer, Acari: Dermanyssidae, in wild bird populations in four different geographical regions of Sweden. The mites identified as D. gallinae were compared genetically with D. gallinae from egg-producing poultry farms in the same regions. The small subunit (SSU) gene, the 5.8S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene and the two internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of the rRNA genes were used in the genetic analysis. All D. gallinae mites had identical SSU rRNA, 5.8S rRNA and ITS2 sequences independent of their origin. By contrast, we identified significant differences in the ITS1 sequences. Based on the differences in the ITS1 sequences, the mites could be divided into two genotypes, of wild and domesticated origin, with no variation within the groups. These results imply that wild bird populations are of low importance, if any, as natural reservoirs of D. gallinae in these four geographical regions of Sweden.

  14. CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, Martin

    2010-08-01

    Between 2001 and 2005, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) created a set of eight Regional Application Centers (RACs) to facilitate the development and deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies. By utilizing the thermal energy that is normally wasted when electricity is produced at central generating stations, Combined Heat and Power installations can save substantial amounts of energy compared to more traditional technologies. In addition, the location of CHP facilities at or near the point of consumption greatly reduces or eliminates electric transmission and distribution losses. The regional nature of the RACs allows each one to design and provide services that are most relevant to the specific economic and market conditions in its particular geographic area. Between them, the eight RACs provide services to all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Through the end of the federal 2009 fiscal year (FY 2009), the primary focus of the RACs was on providing CHP-related information to targeted markets, encouraging the creation and adoption of public policies and incentives favorable to CHP, and providing CHP users and prospective users with technical assistance and support on specific projects. Beginning with the 2010 fiscal year, the focus of the regional centers broadened to include district energy and waste heat recovery and these entities became formally known as Clean Energy Application Centers, as required by the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. In 2007, ORNL led a cooperative effort to establish metrics to quantify the RACs accomplishments. That effort began with the development of a detailed logic model describing RAC operations and outcomes, which provided a basis for identifying important activities and accomplishments to track. A data collection spreadsheet soliciting information on those activities for FY 2008 and all previous years of RAC operations was developed and sent to the RACs in the summer of 2008. This

  15. Active Geodesics: Region-based Active Contour Segmentation with a Global Edge-based Constraint.

    PubMed

    Appia, Vikram; Yezzi, Anthony

    2011-11-01

    We present an active geodesic contour model in which we constrain the evolving active contour to be a geodesic with respect to a weighted edge-based energy through its entire evolution rather than just at its final state (as in the traditional geodesic active contour models). Since the contour is always a geodesic throughout the evolution, we automatically get local optimality with respect to an edge fitting criterion. This enables us to construct a purely region-based energy minimization model without having to devise arbitrary weights in the combination of our energy function to balance edge-based terms with the region-based terms. We show that this novel approach of combining edge information as the geodesic constraint in optimizing a purely region-based energy yields a new class of active contours which exhibit both local and global behaviors that are naturally responsive to intuitive types of user interaction. We also show the relationship of this new class of globally constrained active contours with traditional minimal path methods, which seek global minimizers of purely edge-based energies without incorporating region-based criteria. Finally, we present some numerical examples to illustrate the benefits of this approach over traditional active contour models.

  16. Characteristics, location and origin of flare activity in a complex active region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machado, M. E.; Gary, G. A.; Hagyard, M. J.; Hernandez, A. M.; Rovira, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    The observational characteristics of series of multiple-loop flares from a complex active region are summarized. The location of the highest observed photospheric magnetic shear is found to be the commonly observed site of flare onset, but not, in many cases, the magnetic region where the largest time-integrated energy release is observed. The observations thus reveal a consistent pattern of energy-release processes related to the magnetic-field topology.

  17. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Activates Specific Regions in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Ru-Rong; Schlaepfer, Thomas E.; Aizenman, Carlos D.; Epstein, Charles M.; Qiu, Dike; Huang, Justin C.; Rupp, Fabio

    1998-12-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive technique to induce electric currents in the brain. Although rTMS is being evaluated as a possible alternative to electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of refractory depression, little is known about the pattern of activation induced in the brain by rTMS. We have compared immediate early gene expression in rat brain after rTMS and electroconvulsive stimulation, a well-established animal model for electroconvulsive therapy. Our result shows that rTMS applied in conditions effective in animal models of depression induces different patterns of immediate-early gene expression than does electroconvulsive stimulation. In particular, rTMS evokes strong neural responses in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT) and in other regions involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms. The response in PVT is independent of the orientation of the stimulation probe relative to the head. Part of this response is likely because of direct activation, as repetitive magnetic stimulation also activates PVT neurons in brain slices.

  18. Comparison of Solar Active Region Complexity Andgeomagnetic Activity from 1996 TO 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanskanen, E. I.; Nikbakhsh, S.; Perez-Suarez, D.; Hackman, T.

    2015-12-01

    We have studied the influence of magnetic complexity of solar Active Regions (ARs)on geomagnetic activity from 1996 to 2014. Sunspots are visual indicators of ARswhere the solar magnetic field is disturbed. We have used International, American,Space Environment Service Center (SESC) and Space Weather Prediction Center(SWPC) sunspot numbers to examine ARs. Major manifestations of solar magneticactivity, such as flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), are associated withARs. For this study we chose the Mount Wilson scheme. It classifies ARs in terms oftheir magnetic topology from the least complex (?) to the most complex one ( ?).Several cases have been found where the more complex structures produce strongerflares and CMEs than the less complex ones. We have a list of identified substormsavailable with different phases and their durations. This will be compared to ourmagnetic complexity data to analyse the effects of active region magnetic complexityto the magnetic activity on the vicinity of the Earth.

  19. Chromospheric magnetic fields of an active region filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Solanki, S.; Lagg, A.

    2012-06-01

    Vector magnetic fields of an active region filament are co-spatially and co-temporally mapped in photosphere and upper chromosphere, by using spectro-polarimetric observations made by Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP II) at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT). A Zeeman-based ME inversion is performed on the full Stokes vectors of both the photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm and the chromospheric He I 1083.0 nm lines. We found that the strong magnetic fields, with the field strength of 600 - 800 G in the He I line formation height, are not uncommon among AR filaments. But such strong magnetic field is not always found in AR filaments.

  20. On the modified active region design of interband cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Motyka, M.; Ryczko, K.; Dyksik, M.; Sęk, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Weih, R.; Dallner, M.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2015-02-28

    Type II InAs/GaInSb quantum wells (QWs) grown on GaSb or InAs substrates and designed to be integrated in the active region of interband cascade lasers (ICLs) emitting in the mid infrared have been investigated. Optical spectroscopy, combined with band structure calculations, has been used to probe their electronic properties. A design with multiple InAs QWs has been compared with the more common double W-shaped QW and it has been demonstrated that it allows red shifting the emission wavelength and enhancing the transition oscillator strength. This can be beneficial for the improvements of the ICLs performances, especially when considering their long-wavelength operation.

  1. Investigating Molecular Hydrogen in Active Regions with IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeggli, Sarah A.; Saar, Steven H.; Daw, Adrian N.; Innes, Davina

    2014-06-01

    Molecular hydrogen should be the most abundant molecular species in sunspots, but recent observations with IRIS show that its florescent signature is absent from above the sunspot umbra, but appears brightly during flares. In this poster we continue the analysis of FUV observations of H2 in active regions, examining the correlation between the intensity of the H2 lines and the lines of C II and Si IV which are responsible for their excitation. We particularly focus on differentiating places where H2 is abundant, holes in the chromospheric opacity where FUV photons can enter more deeply into the solar atmosphere, and places where the FUV radiation field is intense, as in flares.

  2. Observational analysis of active region on June, 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovira, M. G.; Luoni, M. L.

    In the recent inaugurated German-Argentinian Solar-Observatory at El Leoncito, a H-alpha Telescope (HASTA) and a mirror coronograph (MICA) are obtained daily images of the solar disk and the inner corona. Since its installation on August 1997, MICA has been imaging the inner corona with high temporal and spatial resolution. Its field-of-view ranges 1.05 to 2.0 solar radii above the sun center. HASTA started operations on May 1998. It has a tunable ( [+1,-1] Å) Lyot-filter with a bandwith of 0.3 Å. In high speed mode full frames can be taken every 2 sec. We study the evolution of an Active Region (AR 9026) and we compare different images as taken in defferent wavelengths. These studies tend to relate flares with coronal mass ejection (CME).

  3. Data-driven Simulations of Evolving Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, M.; DeRosa, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    We present results from numerical simulations of coronal field evolution in response to photospheric driving. In the simulations, the coronal field evolves according to magnetofriction, which ensures that the model field evolves toward a non-linear force-free state. Unlike static field extrapolation methods, this approach takes into account the history of the photospheric field evolution. This allows for the formation of flux ropes as well as current sheets between magnetic domains of connectivity. Using time sequences of HMI magnetograms as the bottom boundary condition, we apply this method to model the emergence and evolution of various active regions. Comparisons of the models with AIA observations and with HMI vector magnetogram inversions will be discussed.

  4. Slow Magnetosonic Waves and Fast Flows in Active Region Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Wang, T. J.; Davila, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast (approx 100-300 km/s) quasiperiodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow-driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux tubes and the establishment of siphon flow.We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast-mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magnetosonic waves is close to the coronal sound speed. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased we find that slow shock-like wave trains are produced. When the upflows are driven periodically, undamped oscillations are produced with periods determined by the periodicity of the upflows. Based on the results of the 3D MHD model we suggest that the observed slow magnetosonic waves and persistent upflows may be produced by the same impulsive events at the bases of ARs.

  5. SLOW MAGNETOSONIC WAVES AND FAST FLOWS IN ACTIVE REGION LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Ofman, L.; Wang, T. J.; Davila, J. M.

    2012-08-01

    Recent extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast ({approx}100-300 km s{sup -1}) quasi-periodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow-driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux tubes and the establishment of siphon flow. We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast-mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magnetosonic waves is close to the coronal sound speed. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased we find that slow shock-like wave trains are produced. When the upflows are driven periodically, undamped oscillations are produced with periods determined by the periodicity of the upflows. Based on the results of the 3D MHD model we suggest that the observed slow magnetosonic waves and persistent upflows may be produced by the same impulsive events at the bases of ARs.

  6. DOME-SHAPED EUV WAVES FROM ROTATING ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Selwa, M.; Poedts, S.; DeVore, C. R. E-mail: stefaan.poedts@wis.kuleuven.be

    2012-03-10

    Recent STEREO observations enabled the study of the properties of EUV waves in more detail. They were found to have a three-dimensional (3D) dome-shaped structure. We investigate, by means of 3D MHD simulations, the formation of EUV waves as the result of the interaction of twisted coronal magnetic loops. The numerical simulation is initialized with an idealized dipolar active region and is performed under coronal (low {beta}) conditions. A sheared rotational motion is applied to the central parts of both the positive and negative flux regions at the photosphere so that the flux tubes in between them become twisted. We find that the twisting motion results in a dome-shaped structure followed in space by a dimming and in time by an energy release (flare). The rotation of the sunspots is the trigger of the wave which initially consists of two fronts that later merge together. The resulting EUV wave propagates nearly isotropically on the disk and {approx}2 times faster in the upward direction. The initial stage of the evolution is determined by the driver, while later the wave propagates freely with a nearly Alfvenic speed.

  7. Sunspot waves and triggering of homologous active region jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, R.; Gupta, G. R.; Mulay, Sargam; Tripathi, Durgesh

    2015-02-01

    We present and discuss multiwavelength observations of five homologous recurrent solar jets that occurred in active region NOAA 11133 on 2010 December 11. These jets were well observed by the Solar Dynamic observatory (SDO) with high spatial and temporal resolution. The speed of the jets ranged between 86 and 267 km s-1. A type III radio burst was observed in association with all the five jets. The investigation of the overall evolution of magnetic field in the source regions suggested that the flux was continuously emerging on longer term. However, all the jets but J5 were triggered during a local dip in the magnetic flux, suggesting the launch of the jets during localized submergence of magnetic flux. Additionally, using the PFSS modelling of the photospheric magnetic field, we found that all the jets were ejected in the direction of open field lines. We also traced sunspot oscillations from the sunspot interior to foot-point of jets and found presence of ˜3 min oscillations in all the SDO/AIA (Atmospheric Imaging Assembly) passbands. The wavelet analysis revealed an increase in amplitude of the oscillations just before the trigger of the jets, that decreased after the jets were triggered. The observations of increased amplitude of the oscillation and its subsequent decrease provides evidence of wave-induced reconnection triggering the jets.

  8. Internal transcribed spacer guided multiplex PCR for species identification of Convolvulus prostratus and Evolvulus alsinoides.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sonal; Shrivastava, Neeta

    2016-05-01

    Shankhpushpi is a reputed drug from an Indian system of medicine for treating mental disorders and enhancing memory. Two herbs, namely Convolvulus prostratus Forssk. and Evolvulus alsinoides (L.) L., are commonly known as Shankhpushpi. Ambiguous vernacular identity can affect the scientific validity of the Shankpushpi-based herbal drug therapy. In the present investigation, a novel and sensitive multiplex PCR method based on polymorphism in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region was developed to establish the molecular identity of C. prostratus and E. alsinoides. DNA was isolated and the ITS region was amplified, sequenced and assembled. Sequences were aligned to identify variable nucleotides in order to develop plant-specific primers. Primers were validated in singleplex reactions and eventually a multiplex assay was developed. This assay was tested for sensitivity and validated by amplifying DNA isolated from the simulated blended powdered plant material. Primers developed for C. prostratus resulted into a 200 bp amplicon and 596 bp for E. alsinoides. The assay was found to be sensitive enough for amplification of low quantities of DNA. The method can detect 10% of the mixing of plants with each other in blended material. This PCR assay can be used for rapid botanical identification of Shankhpushpi plant materials and will improve evidence-based herbal drug therapy. PMID:27175337

  9. Origin and relationships of Saintpaulia (Gesneriaceae) based on ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences.

    PubMed

    Moller, M; Cronk, Q

    1997-07-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of eight species of Saintpaulia H. Wendl., 19 species of Streptocarpus Lindl. (representing all major growth forms within the genus), and two outgroups (Haberlea rhodopensis Friv., Chirita spadiciformis W. T. Wang) were examined using comparative nucleotide sequences from the two internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA. The length of the ITS 1 region ranged from 228 to 249 base pairs (bp) and the ITS 2 region from 196 to 245 bp. Pairwise sequence divergence across both spacers for ingroup and outgroup species ranged from 0 to 29%. Streptocarpus is not monophyletic, and Saintpaulia is nested within Streptocarpus subgenus Streptocarpella. Streptocarpus subgenus Streptocarpus is monophyletic. The ITS sequence data demonstrate that the unifoliate Streptocarpus species form a clade, and are also characterized by a unique 47-bp deletion in ITS 2. The results strongly support the monophyly of (1) Saintpaulia, and (2) Saintpaulia plus the African members of the subgenus Streptocarpella of Streptocarpus. The data suggest the evolution of Saintpaulia from Streptocarpus subgenus Streptocarpella. The differences in flower and vegetative characters are probably due to ecological adaptation leading to a relatively rapid radiation of Saintpaulia. PMID:21708650

  10. Internal transcribed spacer guided multiplex PCR for species identification of Convolvulus prostratus and Evolvulus alsinoides

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sonal; Shrivastava, Neeta

    2016-01-01

    Shankhpushpi is a reputed drug from an Indian system of medicine for treating mental disorders and enhancing memory. Two herbs, namely Convolvulus prostratus Forssk. and Evolvulus alsinoides (L.) L., are commonly known as Shankhpushpi. Ambiguous vernacular identity can affect the scientific validity of the Shankpushpi-based herbal drug therapy. In the present investigation, a novel and sensitive multiplex PCR method based on polymorphism in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region was developed to establish the molecular identity of C. prostratus and E. alsinoides. DNA was isolated and the ITS region was amplified, sequenced and assembled. Sequences were aligned to identify variable nucleotides in order to develop plant-specific primers. Primers were validated in singleplex reactions and eventually a multiplex assay was developed. This assay was tested for sensitivity and validated by amplifying DNA isolated from the simulated blended powdered plant material. Primers developed for C. prostratus resulted into a 200 bp amplicon and 596 bp for E. alsinoides. The assay was found to be sensitive enough for amplification of low quantities of DNA. The method can detect 10% of the mixing of plants with each other in blended material. This PCR assay can be used for rapid botanical identification of Shankhpushpi plant materials and will improve evidence-based herbal drug therapy. PMID:27175337

  11. CpSAT-1, a transcribed satellite sequence from the codling moth, Cydia pomonella.

    PubMed

    Věchtová, Pavlína; Dalíková, Martina; Sýkorová, Miroslava; Žurovcová, Martina; Füssy, Zoltán; Zrzavá, Magda

    2016-08-01

    Satellite DNA (satDNA) is a non-coding component of eukaryotic genomes, located mainly in heterochromatic regions. Relevance of satDNA began to emerge with accumulating evidence of its potential yet hardly comprehensible role that it can play in the genome of many organisms. We isolated the first satDNA of the codling moth (Cydia pomonella, Tortricidae, Lepidoptera), a species with holokinetic chromosomes and a single large heterochromatic element, the W chromosome in females. The satDNA, called CpSAT-1, is located on all chromosomes of the complement, although in different amounts. Surprisingly, the satellite is almost missing in the heterochromatic W chromosome. Additionally, we isolated mRNA from all developmental stages (1st-5th instar larva, pupa, adult), both sexes (adult male and female) and several tissues (Malpighian tubules, gut, heart, testes, and ovaries) of the codling moth and showed the CpSAT-1 sequence was transcribed in all tested samples. Using CpSAT-1 specific primers we amplified, cloned and sequenced 40 monomers from cDNA and gDNA, respectively. The sequence analysis revealed a high mutation rate and the presence of potentially functional motifs, mainly in non-conserved regions of the monomers. Both the chromosomal distribution and the sequence analysis suggest that CPSAT-1 has no function in the C. pomonella genome.

  12. CpSAT-1, a transcribed satellite sequence from the codling moth, Cydia pomonella.

    PubMed

    Věchtová, Pavlína; Dalíková, Martina; Sýkorová, Miroslava; Žurovcová, Martina; Füssy, Zoltán; Zrzavá, Magda

    2016-08-01

    Satellite DNA (satDNA) is a non-coding component of eukaryotic genomes, located mainly in heterochromatic regions. Relevance of satDNA began to emerge with accumulating evidence of its potential yet hardly comprehensible role that it can play in the genome of many organisms. We isolated the first satDNA of the codling moth (Cydia pomonella, Tortricidae, Lepidoptera), a species with holokinetic chromosomes and a single large heterochromatic element, the W chromosome in females. The satDNA, called CpSAT-1, is located on all chromosomes of the complement, although in different amounts. Surprisingly, the satellite is almost missing in the heterochromatic W chromosome. Additionally, we isolated mRNA from all developmental stages (1st-5th instar larva, pupa, adult), both sexes (adult male and female) and several tissues (Malpighian tubules, gut, heart, testes, and ovaries) of the codling moth and showed the CpSAT-1 sequence was transcribed in all tested samples. Using CpSAT-1 specific primers we amplified, cloned and sequenced 40 monomers from cDNA and gDNA, respectively. The sequence analysis revealed a high mutation rate and the presence of potentially functional motifs, mainly in non-conserved regions of the monomers. Both the chromosomal distribution and the sequence analysis suggest that CPSAT-1 has no function in the C. pomonella genome. PMID:27236660

  13. The intergenic region of maize streak virus contains a GC-rich element that activates rightward transcription and binds maize nuclear factors.

    PubMed

    Fenoll, C; Schwarz, J J; Black, D M; Schneider, M; Howell, S H

    1990-12-01

    Maize streak virus (MSV) is transcribed bidirectionally from an intergenic region and rightward transcription produces an RNA that encodes the coat protein. The intergenic region contains promoter elements required for rightward transcription including an upstream activating sequence (UAS) which endows the promoter with full activity in a maize transient expression system. The UAS contains two GC-rich repeats (GC boxes) and a long inverted repeat or hairpin with a loop harboring a TAATATTAC sequence common to all geminiviruses. Deletions through the UAS demonstrated the presence of an element, called the rightward promoter element (rpe1), which is responsible for transcriptional activation. Rpe1 includes the two GC-rich boxes, which are similar in sequence to Sp1 binding sites in mammalian cells, but not the conserved hairpin loop. Rpe1 binds maize nuclear factors in vitro and the characteristics of the binding interaction have been determined by 1) binding competition with oligonucleotides, 2) methidiumpropyl-EDTA footprinting and 3) methylation interference assays. Binding of maize nuclear factors to the UAS generates two major bands, slow and fast migrating bands, in gel retardation assays. Footprinting and factor titration data suggest that the fast bands arise by the binding of factors to one GC box while the slow bands are generated by factors binding to both boxes. The data further indicate that the factors bind to the two GC-rich boxes with little cooperativity and bind on opposite faces of the DNA helix.

  14. Long-Period ULF Wave Activity in the Cusp Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipenko, V.; Belakhovsky, V.; Engebretson, M. J.; Kozlovsky, A.

    2013-12-01

    We compare simultaneous observations of long-period ULF wave activity from the Svalbard/IMAGE and Greenland fluxgate magnetometer profiles covering the expected cusp geomagnetic latitudes. Irregular Pulsations at Cusp Latitudes (IPCL) and narrow-band Pc5 waves are found to be a ubiquitous element of ULF activity in the dayside high-latitude region. To identify the ionospheric projections of the cusp, we use the width of the return signal of the SuperDARN radar covering the Svalbard archipelago, predictions of empirical cusp models, and augmented whenever possible by DMSP identification of magnetospheric boundary domains. The meridional spatial structure of IPCL/Pc5 pulsation spectral power has been found to have a localized latitudinal peak, but not under the cusp proper as was previously thought, but several degrees southward from the equatorward cusp boundary. Possible mechanisms and their relevance to observational data are discussed. The occurrence of IPCL and Pc5 waves in the dayside boundary layers is a challenge to modelers, because so far their mechanism has not been firmly identified.

  15. Regional Triggering of Volcanic Activity Following Large Magnitude Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill-Butler, Charley; Blackett, Matthew; Wright, Robert

    2015-04-01

    There are numerous reports of a spatial and temporal link between volcanic activity and high magnitude seismic events. In fact, since 1950, all large magnitude earthquakes have been followed by volcanic eruptions in the following year - 1952 Kamchatka M9.2, 1960 Chile M9.5, 1964 Alaska M9.2, 2004 & 2005 Sumatra-Andaman M9.3 & M8.7 and 2011 Japan M9.0. While at a global scale, 56% of all large earthquakes (M≥8.0) in the 21st century were followed by increases in thermal activity. The most significant change in volcanic activity occurred between December 2004 and April 2005 following the M9.1 December 2004 earthquake after which new eruptions were detected at 10 volcanoes and global volcanic flux doubled over 52 days (Hill-Butler et al. 2014). The ability to determine a volcano's activity or 'response', however, has resulted in a number of disparities with <50% of all volcanoes being monitored by ground-based instruments. The advent of satellite remote sensing for volcanology has, therefore, provided researchers with an opportunity to quantify the timing, magnitude and character of volcanic events. Using data acquired from the MODVOLC algorithm, this research examines a globally comparable database of satellite-derived radiant flux alongside USGS NEIC data to identify changes in volcanic activity following an earthquake, February 2000 - December 2012. Using an estimate of background temperature obtained from the MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) product (Wright et al. 2014), thermal radiance was converted to radiant flux following the method of Kaufman et al. (1998). The resulting heat flux inventory was then compared to all seismic events (M≥6.0) within 1000 km of each volcano to evaluate if changes in volcanic heat flux correlate with regional earthquakes. This presentation will first identify relationships at the temporal and spatial scale, more complex relationships obtained by machine learning algorithms will then be examined to establish favourable

  16. 77 FR 24952 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Regional Haze...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... ICR (August 26, 2009; 74 FR 43118). The last collection request anticipated the program progressing... AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Regional Haze... organizations and facilities potentially regulated under the regional haze rule. Title: Regional...

  17. The morphology of flare phenomena, magnetic fields, and electric currents in active regions. III - NOAA active region 6233 (1990 August)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De La Beaujardiere, J.-F.; Canfield, Richard C.; Leka, K. D.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the spatial relationship between vertical electric currents and flare phenomena in NOAA Active Region 6233, which was observed 1990, August 28-31 at Mees Solar Observatory. The two flares studied are the 1N/M1.8 flare on August 28, 22:30 UT and the 1N/M1.6 flare on August 29, 20:35 UT. Using Stokes polarimetry we make magnetograms of the region and compute the vertical current density. Using H-alpha imaging spectroscopy we identify sites of intense nonthermal electron precipitation or of high coronal pressure. The precipitation in these flares is barely strong enough to be detectable. We find that both precipitation and high pressure tend to occur near vertical currents, but that neither phenomenon is cospatial with current maxima. In contrast with the conclusion of other authors, we argue that these observations do not support a current-interruption model for flares, unless the relevant currents are primarily horizontal. The magnetic morphology and temporal evolution of these flares suggest that an erupting filament model may be relevant, but this model does not explicitly predict the relationship between precipitation, high pressure, and vertical currents.

  18. ON MAGNETIC ACTIVITY BAND OVERLAP, INTERACTION, AND THE FORMATION OF COMPLEX SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Leamon, Robert J.

    2014-11-20

    Recent work has revealed a phenomenological picture of the how the ∼11 yr sunspot cycle of the Sun arises. The production and destruction of sunspots is a consequence of the latitudinal-temporal overlap and interaction of the toroidal magnetic flux systems that belong to the 22 yr magnetic activity cycle and are rooted deep in the Sun's convective interior. We present a conceptually simple extension of this work, presenting a hypothesis on how complex active regions can form as a direct consequence of the intra- and extra-hemispheric interaction taking place in the solar interior. Furthermore, during specific portions of the sunspot cycle, we anticipate that those complex active regions may be particularly susceptible to profoundly catastrophic breakdown, producing flares and coronal mass ejections of the most severe magnitude.

  19. Contribution of regional brain melanocortin receptor subtypes to elevated activity energy expenditure in lean, active rats.

    PubMed

    Shukla, C; Koch, L G; Britton, S L; Cai, M; Hruby, V J; Bednarek, M; Novak, C M

    2015-12-01

    Physical activity and non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) are crucial factors accounting for individual differences in body weight, interacting with genetic predisposition. In the brain, a number of neuroendocrine intermediates regulate food intake and energy expenditure (EE); this includes the brain melanocortin (MC) system, consisting of MC peptides as well as their receptors (MCR). MC3R and MC4R have emerged as critical modulators of EE and food intake. To determine how variance in MC signaling may underlie individual differences in physical activity levels, we examined behavioral response to MC receptor agonists and antagonists in rats that show high and low levels of physical activity and NEAT, that is, high- and low-capacity runners (HCR, LCR), developed by artificial selection for differential intrinsic aerobic running capacity. Focusing on the hypothalamus, we identified brain region-specific elevations in expression of MCR 3, 4, and also MC5R, in the highly active, lean HCR relative to the less active and obesity-prone LCR. Further, the differences in activity and associated EE as a result of MCR activation or suppression using specific agonists and antagonists were similarly region-specific and directly corresponded to the differential MCR expression patterns. The agonists and antagonists investigated here did not significantly impact food intake at the doses used, suggesting that the differential pattern of receptor expression may by more meaningful to physical activity than to other aspects of energy balance regulation. Thus, MCR-mediated physical activity may be a key neural mechanism in distinguishing the lean phenotype and a target for enhancing physical activity and NEAT.

  20. Observations of the Growth of an Active Region Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Li, Haidong

    2016-10-01

    We present observations of the growth of an active region filament caused by magnetic interactions among the filament and its adjacent superpenumbral filament (SF) and dark thread-like structures (T). Multistep reconnections are identified during the whole growing process. Magnetic flux convergence and cancellation occurring at the positive footpoint region of the filament is the first step reconnection, which resulted in the filament bifurcating into two sets of intertwined threads. One set anchored in situ, while the other set moved toward and interacted with the SF and part of T. This indicates the second step reconnection, which gave rise to the disappearance of the SF and the formation of a long thread-like structure that connects the far ends of the filament and T. The long thread-like structure further interacted with the T and then separated into two parts, representing the third step reconnection. Finally, another similar long thread-like structure, which intertwined with the fixed filament threads, appeared. H α observations show that this twisted structure is a longer sinistral filament. Based on the observed photospheric vector magnetograms, we performed a non-linear force-free field extrapolation to reconstruct the magnetic fields above the photosphere and found that the coronal magnetic field lines associated with the filament consists of two twisted flux ropes winding around each other. These results suggest that magnetic interactions among filaments and their adjacent SFs and T could lead to the growth of the filaments, and the filament is probably supported in a flux rope.

  1. Seismic activity of the San Francisco Bay region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bakun, W.H.

    1999-01-01

    Moment magnitude M with objective confidence-level uncertainties are estimated for felt San Francisco Bay region earthquakes using Bakun and Wentworth's (1997) analysis strategy for seismic intensity observations. The frequency-magnitude distribution is well described for M ???5.5 events since 1850 by a Gutenberg-Richter relation with a b-value of 0.90. The seismic moment rate ??M0/yr since 1836 is 2.68 X 1018 N-m/yr (95% confidence range = 1.29 X 1018 N-m/yr to 4.07 X 1018 N-m/yr); the seismic moment rate since 1850 is nearly the same. ??M0/yr in the 56 years before 1906 is about 10 times that in the 70 years after 1906. In contrast, ??M0/yr since 1977 is about equal that in the 56 years before 1906. 80% (1?? = 14%) of the plate-motion moment accumulation rate is available for release in earthquakes. The historical ??M0/yr and the portion of the plate-motion moment accumulation rate available for release in earthquakes are used in a seismic cycle model to estimate the rate of seismic activity in the twenty-first century. High and low rates of future seismic activity are both permissible given the range of possible seismic-cycle recurrence times T and the uncertainties in the historical ??M0 and in the percentage of plate motion available for release in earthquakes. If the historical seismic moment rate is not greater than the estimated 2.68 X 1018 N-m/yr and the percentage of the plate-motion moment accumulation available for release in earthquakes is not less than the estimated 80%, then for all T, the rate of seismic moment release from now until the next 1906-sized shock will be comparable to the rate from 1836 to 1905 when M 6 1/2 shocks occurred every 15 to 20 years.

  2. FIP BIAS EVOLUTION IN A DECAYING ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.; Yardley, S. L.; Driel-Gesztelyi, L. van; Long, D. M.; Green, L. M.; Brooks, D. H.; Démoulin, P.

    2015-04-01

    Solar coronal plasma composition is typically characterized by first ionization potential (FIP) bias. Using spectra obtained by Hinode’s EUV Imaging Spectrometer instrument, we present a series of large-scale, spatially resolved composition maps of active region (AR)11389. The composition maps show how FIP bias evolves within the decaying AR during the period 2012 January 4–6. Globally, FIP bias decreases throughout the AR. We analyzed areas of significant plasma composition changes within the decaying AR and found that small-scale evolution in the photospheric magnetic field is closely linked to the FIP bias evolution observed in the corona. During the AR’s decay phase, small bipoles emerging within supergranular cells reconnect with the pre-existing AR field, creating a pathway along which photospheric and coronal plasmas can mix. The mixing timescales are shorter than those of plasma enrichment processes. Eruptive activity also results in shifting the FIP bias closer to photospheric in the affected areas. Finally, the FIP bias still remains dominantly coronal only in a part of the AR’s high-flux density core. We conclude that in the decay phase of an AR’s lifetime, the FIP bias is becoming increasingly modulated by episodes of small-scale flux emergence, i.e., decreasing the AR’s overall FIP bias. Our results show that magnetic field evolution plays an important role in compositional changes during AR development, revealing a more complex relationship than expected from previous well-known Skylab results showing that FIP bias increases almost linearly with age in young ARs.

  3. Acetylcholine activity in selective striatal regions supports behavioral flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ragozzino, Michael E; Mohler, Eric G; Prior, Margaret; Palencia, Carlos A; Rozman, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Daily living often requires individuals to flexibly respond to new circumstances. There is considerable evidence that the striatum is part of a larger neural network that supports flexible adaptations. Cholinergic interneurons are situated to strongly influence striatal output patterns which may enable flexible adaptations. The present experiments investigated whether acetylcholine actions in different striatal regions support behavioral flexibility by measuring acetylcholine efflux during place reversal learning. Acetylcholine efflux selectively increased in the dorsomedial striatum, but not dorsolateral or ventromedial striatum during place reversal learning. In order to modulate the M2-class of autoreceptors, administration of oxotremorine sesquifumurate (100 nM) into the dorsomedial striatum, concomitantly impaired reversal learning and an increase in acetylcholine output. These effects were reversed by the m(2) muscarinic receptor antagonist, AF-DX-116 (20 nM). The effects of oxotremorine sesquifumurate and AF-DX-116 on acetylcholine efflux were selective to behaviorally-induced changes as neither treatment affected acetylcholine output in a resting condition. In contrast to reversal learning, acetylcholine efflux in the dorsomedial striatum did not change during place acquisition. The results reveal an essential role for cholinergic activity and define its locus of control to the dorsomedial striatum in cognitive flexibility.

  4. SIMULATION OF THE FORMATION OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, M. C. M.; Title, A. M.; Rempel, M.; Schuessler, M.

    2010-09-01

    We present a radiative magnetohydrodynamics simulation of the formation of an active region (AR) on the solar surface. The simulation models the rise of a buoyant magnetic flux bundle from a depth of 7.5 Mm in the convection zone up into the solar photosphere. The rise of the magnetic plasma in the convection zone is accompanied by predominantly horizontal expansion. Such an expansion leads to a scaling relation between the plasma density and the magnetic field strength such that B {proportional_to} rhov{sup 1/2}. The emergence of magnetic flux into the photosphere appears as a complex magnetic pattern, which results from the interaction of the rising magnetic field with the turbulent convective flows. Small-scale magnetic elements at the surface first appear, followed by their gradual coalescence into larger magnetic concentrations, which eventually results in the formation of a pair of opposite polarity spots. Although the mean flow pattern in the vicinity of the developing spots is directed radially outward, correlations between the magnetic field and velocity field fluctuations allow the spots to accumulate flux. Such correlations result from the Lorentz-force-driven, counterstreaming motion of opposite polarity fragments. The formation of the simulated AR is accompanied by transient light bridges between umbrae and umbral dots. Together with recent sunspot modeling, this work highlights the common magnetoconvective origin of umbral dots, light bridges, and penumbral filaments.

  5. Plasma composition in a sigmoidal anemone active region

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.; Van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Green, L. M.; Carlyle, J.; Brooks, D. H.; Démoulin, P.; Steed, K.

    2013-11-20

    Using spectra obtained by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) instrument onboard Hinode, we present a detailed spatially resolved abundance map of an active region (AR)-coronal hole (CH) complex that covers an area of 359'' × 485''. The abundance map provides first ionization potential (FIP) bias levels in various coronal structures within the large EIS field of view. Overall, FIP bias in the small, relatively young AR is 2-3. This modest FIP bias is a consequence of the age of the AR, its weak heating, and its partial reconnection with the surrounding CH. Plasma with a coronal composition is concentrated at AR loop footpoints, close to where fractionation is believed to take place in the chromosphere. In the AR, we found a moderate positive correlation of FIP bias with nonthermal velocity and magnetic flux density, both of which are also strongest at the AR loop footpoints. Pathways of slightly enhanced FIP bias are traced along some of the loops connecting opposite polarities within the AR. We interpret the traces of enhanced FIP bias along these loops to be the beginning of fractionated plasma mixing in the loops. Low FIP bias in a sigmoidal channel above the AR's main polarity inversion line, where ongoing flux cancellation is taking place, provides new evidence of a bald patch magnetic topology of a sigmoid/flux rope configuration.

  6. Optical Properties of Active Regions in Terahertz Quantum Cascade Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyksik, M.; Motyka, M.; Rudno-Rudziński, W.; Sęk, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Pucicki, D.; Kosiel, K.; Sankowska, I.; Kubacka-Traczyk, J.; Bugajski, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, AlGaAs/GaAs superlattice, with layers' sequence and compositions imitating the active and injector regions of a quantum cascade laser designed for emission in the terahertz spectral range, was investigated. Three independent absorption-like optical spectroscopy techniques were employed in order to study the band structure of the minibands formed within the conduction band. Photoreflectance measurements provided information about interband transitions in the investigated system. Common transmission spectra revealed, in the target range of intraband transitions, mainly a number of lines associated with the phonon-related processes, including two-phonon absorption. In contrast, differential transmittance realized by means of Fourier-transform spectroscopy was utilized to probe the confined states of the conduction band. The obtained energy separation between the second and third confined electron levels, expected to be predominantly contributing to the lasing, was found to be ~9 meV. The optical spectroscopy measurements were supported by numerical calculations performed in the effective mass approximation and XRD measurements for layers' width verification. The calculated energy spacings are in a good agreement with the experimental values.

  7. Plasma Composition in a Sigmoidal Anemone Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D.; Brooks, D. H.; Démoulin, P.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Green, L. M.; Steed, K.; Carlyle, J.

    2013-11-01

    Using spectra obtained by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) instrument onboard Hinode, we present a detailed spatially resolved abundance map of an active region (AR)-coronal hole (CH) complex that covers an area of 359'' × 485''. The abundance map provides first ionization potential (FIP) bias levels in various coronal structures within the large EIS field of view. Overall, FIP bias in the small, relatively young AR is 2-3. This modest FIP bias is a consequence of the age of the AR, its weak heating, and its partial reconnection with the surrounding CH. Plasma with a coronal composition is concentrated at AR loop footpoints, close to where fractionation is believed to take place in the chromosphere. In the AR, we found a moderate positive correlation of FIP bias with nonthermal velocity and magnetic flux density, both of which are also strongest at the AR loop footpoints. Pathways of slightly enhanced FIP bias are traced along some of the loops connecting opposite polarities within the AR. We interpret the traces of enhanced FIP bias along these loops to be the beginning of fractionated plasma mixing in the loops. Low FIP bias in a sigmoidal channel above the AR's main polarity inversion line, where ongoing flux cancellation is taking place, provides new evidence of a bald patch magnetic topology of a sigmoid/flux rope configuration.

  8. Active region emission measure distributions and implications for nanoflare heating

    SciTech Connect

    Cargill, P. J.

    2014-03-20

    The temperature dependence of the emission measure (EM) in the core of active regions coronal loops is an important diagnostic of heating processes. Observations indicate that EM(T) ∼ T{sup a} below approximately 4 MK, with 2 < a < 5. Zero-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of nanoflare trains are used to demonstrate the dependence of a on the time between individual nanoflares (T{sub N} ) and the distribution of nanoflare energies. If T{sub N} is greater than a few thousand seconds, a < 3. For smaller values, trains of equally spaced nanoflares cannot account for the observed range of a if the distribution of nanoflare energies is either constant, randomly distributed, or a power law. Power law distributions where there is a delay between consecutive nanoflares proportional to the energy of the second nanoflare do lead to the observed range of a. However, T{sub N} must then be of the order of hundreds to no more than a few thousand seconds. If a nanoflare leads to the relaxation of a stressed coronal field to a near-potential state, the time taken to build up the required magnetic energy is thus too long to account for the EM measurements. Instead, it is suggested that a nanoflare involves the relaxation from one stressed coronal state to another, dissipating only a small fraction of the available magnetic energy. A consequence is that nanoflare energies may be smaller than previously envisioned.

  9. The distribution of maximum temperatures of coronal active region loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayfield, E. B.; Teske, R. G.

    1980-01-01

    The emission measure distribution across the range 4.5 log T 6.5 was derived for several coronal active regions by combining EUV line fluxes with broadband X-ray fluxes. The distributions of the maximum temperature was then derived using a numerical model. It is shown that the emission measure distribution can be represented over the full range 5.6 log Tm 6.5 by the superposition of simple loop models, if the models incorporate a substantial rise in their individual emission measure distributions near the maximum temperature. The unresolved loops may have substantial area ratios, since it is this ratio that fixes the extent of the rise in the emission measure distribution. Since the bulk of the emission measure is then contributed from the loop tops, the distribution of maximum temperatures has approximately the same shape as does the integrated emission measure distributions. The EUV and X-ray data used were obtained by from two separate experiments on ATM/Skylab.

  10. Geometry of Broad Line Regions of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Xiao-Rong

    2008-02-01

    It has long remained an open question as to the geometry of the broad line region (BLR) in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The reverberation mapping technique which measures the response of the broad emission lines to the ionizing continuum, when combined with multiwavelength continuum fitted by sophisticated accretion disks, provides a way of probing the BLR geometry. We analyze a sample of 35 AGNs, which have been monitored by the reverberation mapping campaign. In view of energy budget, the reverberation-based BH masses are found to be in agreement with those obtained by accretion disk models in two thirds of the present sample while the reverberation mapping methods underestimate the BH masses in about one third of objects, as also suggested by Collin et al. in a recent work. We point out that there are obviously two kinds of BLR geometry, which are strongly dependent on the Eddington ratio, and separated by the value LBol/LEdd~0.1. These results prefer a scenario of the disk and wind configuration of the BLR and identify the Eddington ratio as the physical driver regulating the wind in the BLR.

  11. Simulation of the Formation of a Solar Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; Rempel, M.; Title, A. M.; Schüssler, M.

    2010-09-01

    We present a radiative magnetohydrodynamics simulation of the formation of an active region (AR) on the solar surface. The simulation models the rise of a buoyant magnetic flux bundle from a depth of 7.5 Mm in the convection zone up into the solar photosphere. The rise of the magnetic plasma in the convection zone is accompanied by predominantly horizontal expansion. Such an expansion leads to a scaling relation between the plasma density and the magnetic field strength such that B vprop rhov1/2. The emergence of magnetic flux into the photosphere appears as a complex magnetic pattern, which results from the interaction of the rising magnetic field with the turbulent convective flows. Small-scale magnetic elements at the surface first appear, followed by their gradual coalescence into larger magnetic concentrations, which eventually results in the formation of a pair of opposite polarity spots. Although the mean flow pattern in the vicinity of the developing spots is directed radially outward, correlations between the magnetic field and velocity field fluctuations allow the spots to accumulate flux. Such correlations result from the Lorentz-force-driven, counterstreaming motion of opposite polarity fragments. The formation of the simulated AR is accompanied by transient light bridges between umbrae and umbral dots. Together with recent sunspot modeling, this work highlights the common magnetoconvective origin of umbral dots, light bridges, and penumbral filaments.

  12. THE ORIGIN OF NET ELECTRIC CURRENTS IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dalmasse, K.; Kliem, B.; Török, T.

    2015-09-01

    There is a recurring question in solar physics regarding whether or not electric currents are neutralized in active regions (ARs). This question was recently revisited using three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulations of magnetic flux emergence into the solar atmosphere. Such simulations showed that flux emergence can generate a substantial net current in ARs. Other sources of AR currents are photospheric horizontal flows. Our aim is to determine the conditions for the occurrence of net versus neutralized currents with this second mechanism. Using 3D MHD simulations, we systematically impose line-tied, quasi-static, photospheric twisting and shearing motions to a bipolar potential magnetic field. We find that such flows: (1) produce both direct and return currents, (2) induce very weak compression currents—not observed in 2.5D—in the ambient field present in the close vicinity of the current-carrying field, and (3) can generate force-free magnetic fields with a net current. We demonstrate that neutralized currents are in general produced only in the absence of magnetic shear at the photospheric polarity inversion line—a special condition that is rarely observed. We conclude that  photospheric flows, as magnetic flux emergence, can build up net currents in the solar atmosphere, in agreement with recent observations. These results thus provide support for eruption models based on pre-eruption magnetic fields that possess a net coronal current.

  13. Transcribing and digitizing eighteenth- and nineteenth-century letters for a historical digital repository.

    PubMed

    Dunster, Emily S; Kipnis, Daniel G; Angelo, F Michael

    2014-01-01

    In fall 2011, the Scott Memorial Library purchased 53 letters belonging to an 1841 graduate of Jefferson Medical College, John Plimpton Green. The library staff transcribed and digitized the letters, creating an online collection in the university's institutional repository, Jefferson Digital Commons. This article will detail the process of transcribing and digitizing the collection along with sharing statistics and the benefits of this project to global researchers.

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of Sorghum and related taxa using internal transcribed spacers of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Skinner, D Z; Liang, G H; Hulbert, S H

    1994-09-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of the genus Sorghum and related genera were studied by sequencing the nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer region (ITS). DNA was extracted from 15 Sorghum accessions, including one accession from each of the sections Chaetosorghum and Heterosorghum, four accessions from Parasorghum, two accessions from Stiposorghum, and seven representatives from three species of the section Sorghum (one accession from each of S. propinquum and S. halepense, and five races of S. bicolor). The maize (Zea mays) line, H95, and an accession from Cleistachne sorghoides were also included in the study. Variable nucleotides were used to construct a strict consensus phylogenetic tree. The analyses indicate that S. propinquum, S. halepense and S. bicolor subsp. arundinaceum race aethiopicum may be the closest wild relatives of cultivated sorghum; Sorghum nitidum may be the closest 2n=10 relative to S. bicolor, the sections Chaetosorghum and Heterosorghum appear closely related to each other and more closely related to the section Sorghum than Parasorghum; and the section Parasorghum is not monophyletic. The results also indicate that the genus Sorghum is a very ancient and diverse group.

  15. The Voice Transcription Technique: Use of Voice Recognition Software to Transcribe Digital Interview Data in Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matheson, Jennifer L.

    2007-01-01

    Transcribing interview data is a time-consuming task that most qualitative researchers dislike. Transcribing is even more difficult for people with physical limitations because traditional transcribing requires manual dexterity and the ability to sit at a computer for long stretches of time. Researchers have begun to explore using an automated…

  16. MAGNETIC HELICITY AND ENERGY SPECTRA OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hongqi; Brandenburg, Axel; Sokoloff, D. D.

    2014-04-01

    We compute for the first time the magnetic helicity and energy spectra of the solar active region NOAA 11158 during 2011 February 11-15 at 20° southern heliographic latitude using observational photospheric vector magnetograms. We adopt the isotropic representation of the Fourier-transformed two-point correlation tensor of the magnetic field. The sign of the magnetic helicity turns out to be predominantly positive at all wavenumbers. This sign is consistent with what is theoretically expected for the southern hemisphere. The magnetic helicity normalized to its theoretical maximum value, here referred to as relative helicity, is around 4% and strongest at intermediate wavenumbers of k ≈ 0.4 Mm{sup –1}, corresponding to a scale of 2π/k ≈ 16 Mm. The same sign and a similar value are also found for the relative current helicity evaluated in real space based on the vertical components of magnetic field and current density. The modulus of the magnetic helicity spectrum shows a k {sup –11/3} power law at large wavenumbers, which implies a k {sup –5/3} spectrum for the modulus of the current helicity. A k {sup –5/3} spectrum is also obtained for the magnetic energy. The energy spectra evaluated separately from the horizontal and vertical fields agree for wavenumbers below 3 Mm{sup –1}, corresponding to scales above 2 Mm. This gives some justification to our assumption of isotropy and places limits resulting from possible instrumental artifacts at small scales.

  17. CONTRACTING AND ERUPTING COMPONENTS OF SIGMOIDAL ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Rui; Wang Yuming; Liu Chang; Wang Haimin; Toeroek, Tibor

    2012-10-01

    It has recently been noted that solar eruptions can be associated with the contraction of coronal loops that are not involved in magnetic reconnection processes. In this paper, we investigate five coronal eruptions originating from four sigmoidal active regions, using high-cadence, high-resolution narrowband EUV images obtained by the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). The magnitudes of the flares associated with the eruptions range from GOES class B to class X. Owing to the high-sensitivity and broad temperature coverage of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board SDO, we are able to identify both the contracting and erupting components of the eruptions: the former is observed in cold AIA channels as the contracting coronal loops overlying the elbows of the sigmoid, and the latter is preferentially observed in warm/hot AIA channels as an expanding bubble originating from the center of the sigmoid. The initiation of eruption always precedes the contraction, and in the energetically mild events (B- and C-flares), it also precedes the increase in GOES soft X-ray fluxes. In the more energetic events, the eruption is simultaneous with the impulsive phase of the nonthermal hard X-ray emission. These observations confirm that loop contraction is an integrated process in eruptions with partially opened arcades. The consequence of contraction is a new equilibrium with reduced magnetic energy, as the contracting loops never regain their original positions. The contracting process is a direct consequence of flare energy release, as evidenced by the strong correlation of the maximal contracting speed, and strong anti-correlation of the time delay of contraction relative to expansion, with the peak soft X-ray flux. This is also implied by the relationship between contraction and expansion, i.e., their timing and speed.

  18. Identifying the Main Driver of Active Region Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Mandrini, C. H.; Démoulin, P.; Murray, M. J.

    2012-08-01

    Hinode's EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) has discovered ubiquitous outflows of a few to 50 km s-1 from active regions (ARs). The characteristics of these outflows are very curious in that they are most prominent at the AR boundary and appear over monopolar magnetic areas. They are linked to strong non-thermal line broadening and are stronger in hotter EUV lines. The outflows persist for at least several days. Whereas red-shifted down flows observed in AR closed loops are well understood, to date there is no general consensus for the mechanism(s) driving blue-shifted AR-related outflows. We use Hinode EIS and X-Ray Telescope observations of AR 10942 coupled with magnetic modeling to demonstrate for the first time that the outflows originate from specific locations of the magnetic topology where field lines display strong gradients of magnetic connectivity, namely quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs), or in the limit of infinitely thin QSLs, separatrices. The strongest AR outflows were found to be in the vicinity of QSL sections located over areas of strong magnetic field. We argue that magnetic reconnection at QSLs, separating closed field lines of the AR and either large-scale externally connected or ‘open’ field lines, is a viable mechanism for driving AR outflows which are potentially sources of the slow solar wind. In fact, magnetic reconnection along QSLs (including separatricies) is the first theory to explain the most puzzling characteristics of the outflows, namely their occurrence over monopolar areas at the periphery of ARs and their longevity.

  19. ABRUPT LONGITUDINAL MAGNETIC FIELD CHANGES IN FLARING ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, G. J. D.; Sudol, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    We characterize the changes in the longitudinal photospheric magnetic field during 38 X-class and 39 M-class flares within 65{sup 0} of disk center using 1 minute GONG magnetograms. In all 77 cases, we identify at least one site in the flaring active region where clear, permanent, stepwise field changes occurred. The median duration of the field changes was about 15 minutes and was approximately equal for X-class and for M-class flares. The absolute values of the field changes ranged from the detection limit of {approx}10 G to as high as {approx}450 G in two exceptional cases. The median value was 69 G. Field changes were significantly stronger for X-class than for M-class flares and for limb flares than for disk-center flares. Longitudinal field changes less than 100 G tended to decrease longitudinal field strengths, both close to disk center and close to the limb, while field changes greater than 100 G showed no such pattern. Likewise, longitudinal flux strengths tended to decrease during flares. Flux changes, particularly net flux changes near disk center, correlated better than local field changes with GOES peak X-ray flux. The strongest longitudinal field and flux changes occurred in flares observed close to the limb. We estimate the change of Lorentz force associated with each flare and find that this is large enough in some cases to power seismic waves. We find that longitudinal field decreases would likely outnumber increases at all parts of the solar disk within 65{sup 0} of disk center, as in our observations, if photospheric field tilts increase during flares as predicted by Hudson et al.

  20. ON THE ROLE OF ROTATING SUNSPOTS IN THE ACTIVITY OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 11158

    SciTech Connect

    Vemareddy, P.; Ambastha, A.; Maurya, R. A. E-mail: ambastha@prl.res.in

    2012-12-10

    We study the role of rotating sunspots in relation to the evolution of various physical parameters characterizing the non-potentiality of the active region (AR) NOAA 11158 and its eruptive events using the magnetic field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and multi-wavelength observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. From the evolutionary study of HMI intensity and AIA channels, it is observed that the AR consists of two major rotating sunspots, one connected to a flare-prone region and another with coronal mass ejection (CME). The constructed space-time intensity maps reveal that the sunspots exhibited peak rotation rates coinciding with the occurrence of major eruptive events. Further, temporal profiles of twist parameters, namely, average shear angle, {alpha}{sub av}, {alpha}{sub best}, derived from HMI vector magnetograms, and the rate of helicity injection, obtained from the horizontal flux motions of HMI line-of-sight magnetograms, correspond well with the rotational profile of the sunspot in the CME-prone region, giving predominant evidence of rotational motion causing magnetic non-potentiality. Moreover, the mean value of free energy from the virial theorem calculated at the photospheric level shows a clear step-down decrease at the onset time of the flares revealing unambiguous evidence of energy release intermittently that is stored by flux emergence and/or motions in pre-flare phases. Additionally, distribution of helicity injection is homogeneous in the CME-prone region while in the flare-prone region it is not and often changes sign. This study provides a clear picture that both proper and rotational motions of the observed fluxes played significant roles in enhancing the magnetic non-potentiality of the AR by injecting helicity, twisting the magnetic fields and thereby increasing the free energy, leading to favorable conditions for the observed transient activity.

  1. Rearrangement mutations on the 5' side of the qa-2 gene of Neurospora implicate two regions of qa-1F activator-protein interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Geever, R F; Murayama, T; Case, M E; Giles, N H

    1986-01-01

    Transcriptional activation of the Neurospora crassa qa genes normally requires the positive regulatory gene, qa-1F+, whose function is controlled by the inducer quinic acid and by the product of the negative regulatory gene, qa-1S+. The properties of qa-1F+ activator have been examined in transcriptional mutations of the qa-2 structural gene, in which activator-independent transcription of qa-2 (qa-2ai mutants) occurs in strains having a qa-1F- gene. Seven qa-2ai mutants with DNA rearrangements in different 5' regions of qa-2 were analyzed in qa-1F+ strains. In five with rearrangements at position -190 or further upstream, expression of the qa-2 gene was inducible, and induction was accompanied by a change in the initiation site for transcription from position -45, characteristic of constitutive initiation in qa-2ai mutants to position +1, characteristic of the induced wild type. In two mutants with breakpoints at positions -86 and -53, qa-2 transcription initiated from upstream sequences within the rearrangements but not at the +1 site, and qa-2 expression was noninducible. The results indicate that (i) sequences between positions -190 and -86 are required for positive control of initiation at position +1, and (ii) negative control does not require sequences downstream of position -86. Additional evidence suggests that the product of the qa-1F+ gene in the noninduced state may also interact with distal upstream sequences positioned midway between divergently transcribed qa genes. Images PMID:2940595

  2. The Maximum Free Magnetic Energy Allowed in a Solar Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, D. A.

    2009-05-01

    Two whole-active-region magnetic quantities that can be measured from a line-of-sight magnetogram are LWLSG, a gauge of the total free energy in an active region's magnetic field, and LΦ, a measure of the active region's total magnetic flux. From these two quantities measured from 1865 SOHO/MDI magnetograms that tracked 44 sunspot active regions across the 0.5 RSun central disk, together with each active region's observed production of CMEs, X flares, and M flares, Falconer et al (2009, ApJ, submitted) found that (1) active regions have a maximum attainable free magnetic energy that increases with the magnetic size LΦ of the active region, (2) in (Log LWLSG, Log LΦ) space, CME/flare-productive active regions are concentrated in a straight-line main sequence along which the free magnetic energy is near its upper limit, and (3) X and M flares are restricted to large active regions. Here, from (a) these results, (b) the observation that even the greatest X flares produce at most only subtle changes in active-region magnetograms, and (c) measurements from MSFC vector magnetograms and from MDI line-of-sight magnetograms showing that practically all sunspot active regions have nearly the same area-averaged magnetic field strength: áBñ ≡ ΦA ≈ 300 G, where Φ is the active region's total photospheric flux of field stronger than 100 G and A is the area of that flux, we infer that (1) the maximum allowed ratio of an active region's free magnetic energy to its potential-field energy is 1, and (2) any one CME/flare eruption releases no more than a small fraction (< 10%) of the active region's free magnetic energy. This work was funded by NASA's Heliophysics Division, NSF's Division of Atmospheric Sciences, and AFOSR's MURI Program.

  3. The Maximum Free Magnetic Energy Allowed in a Solar Active Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Two whole-active-region magnetic quantities that can be measured from a line-of-sight magnetogram are (sup L) WL(sub SG), a gauge of the total free energy in an active region's magnetic field, and sup L(sub theta), a measure of the active region's total magnetic flux. From these two quantities measured from 1865 SOHO/MDI magnetograms that tracked 44 sunspot active regions across the 0.5 R(sub Sun) central disk, together with each active region's observed production of CMEs, X flares, and M flares, Falconer et al (2009, ApJ, submitted) found that (1) active regions have a maximum attainable free magnetic energy that increases with the magnetic size (sup L) (sub theta) of the active region, (2) in (Log (sup L)WL(sub SG), Log(sup L) theta) space, CME/flare-productive active regions are concentrated in a straight-line main sequence along which the free magnetic energy is near its upper limit, and (3) X and M flares are restricted to large active regions. Here, from (a) these results, (b) the observation that even the greatest X flares produce at most only subtle changes in active region magnetograms, and (c) measurements from MSFC vector magnetograms and from MDI line-of-sight magnetograms showing that practically all sunspot active regions have nearly the same area-averaged magnetic field strength: =- theta/A approximately equal to 300 G, where theta is the active region's total photospheric flux of field stronger than 100 G and A is the area of that flux, we infer that (1) the maximum allowed ratio of an active region's free magnetic energy to its potential-field energy is 1, and (2) any one CME/flare eruption releases no more than a small fraction (less than 10%) of the active region's free magnetic energy. This work was funded by NASA's Heliophysics Division and NSF's Division of Atmospheric Sciences.

  4. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction detection of transcribed sequences on human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, J.F.; Zhu, Y. )

    1994-03-15

    Seventy-four pairs of oligonucleotides derived from sequence-tagged sites (STSs) on the long arm of human chromosome 21, specifically from bands 21q22.1 to 21q22.3, were used in reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) to detect the presence of expressed sequences in a fetal brain. These STSs included 69 that had not been related to transcribed sequences and 5 that had detected two known genes and three previously isolated cDNA clones. Of the 69 STSs analyzed in RT-PCR, 25 allowed amplification of specific cDNA fragments. The sizes of amplified cDNA fragments match those amplified from either human genomic DNA or somatic hybrid cells containing human chromosome 21. Of the 11 cDNA analyzed in Northern blot hybridizations, 6 hybridized to specific RNA species. The rapid screening for cDNA using previously mapped STSs has provided insight into the distribution of expressed sequences in this region of chromosome 21. Northern blot analysis of the amplified cDNA fragments has revealed interesting candidate genes in two disease loci. The marker D21S267 was previously mapped in the Down syndrome region of chromosome 21, and the marker D21S113 is closely linked to progressive myoclonus epilepsy. The cDNA fragments amplified using the primer sequences derived from D21S267 and D21S113 hybridized to 7- and 6.5-kb transcripts, respectively, which seems to express predominantly in brain. 37 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Physical isolation of nascent RNA chains transcribed by RNA polymerase II: evidence for cotranscriptional splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Wuarin, J; Schibler, U

    1994-01-01

    In order to examine whether splicing can occur cotranscriptionally in mammalian nuclei, we mapped exon-intron boundaries on nascent RNA chains transcribed by RNA polymerase II. A procedure that allows fractionation of nuclei into a chromatin pellet containing DNA, histones, and ternary transcription complexes and a supernatant containing the bulk of the nonhistone proteins and RNAs that are released from their DNA templates was developed. The transcripts of the genes encoding DBP, a transcriptional activator protein, and HMG coenzyme A reductase recovered from the chromatin pellet and the supernatant were analyzed by S1 nuclease mapping. The large majority of the RNA molecules from the pellet appeared to be nascent transcripts, since, in contrast to the transcripts present in the supernatant, they were not cleaved at the polyadenylation site but rather contained heterogeneous 3' termini encompassing this site. Splicing intermediates could be detected among nascent and released transcripts, suggesting that splicing occurs both cotranscriptionally and posttranscriptionally. Our results also indicate that polyadenylation is not required for the splicing of the last DBP intron. In addition to allowing detailed structural analysis of nascent RNA chains, the physical isolation of nascent transcripts also yields reliable measurements of relative transcription rates. Images PMID:7523861

  6. Sequence analysis of the rDNA internal transcribed spacer 2 of five species of South American human malaria mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Fritz, G N

    1998-03-01

    The rDNA internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) was sequenced for 5 species of mosquitoes that may be important vectors of human malaria in certain regions of South America and are difficult to distinguish by morphology: Anopheles evansae, An. nuneztovari, An. rangeli, An. strodei and An. trinkae. ITS2 sequences from samples collected in Ecuador, Bolivia, Venezuela and Brazil were aligned and compared in order to determine the usefulness of this spacer for the elaboration of species specific primers and DNA probes. The ITS2 was found to be different in size (ranging from 333 to 397 bp) and sequence between all pairs of species. Highly variable regions were found primarily at the 3' end of the spacer and were interspersed with relatively conserved sites. Instraspecific sequence variation was limited to a single transversion between specimens of An. rangeli from distant geographic locations suggesting concerted evolution and homogenization of the ITS2. PMID:10520449

  7. Detection of multiple infections by Monocystis strains in a single earthworm host using ribosomal internal transcribed spacer sequence variation.

    PubMed

    Velavan, T P; Schulenburg, H; Michiels, N K

    2010-01-01

    Monocystis sp. are sporocyst-forming apicomplexan parasites common in seminal vesicles of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris where they may account for temporary castration. This study describes the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal cistron of Monocystis sp. This region, including ITS-1, the 5.8S ribosomal RNA gene, and ITS-2, was PCR amplified, cloned, and sequenced for Monocystis sp. isolated from the seminal vesicles of several wild-caught L. terrestris. Our analysis revealed substantial polymorphisms, also within single host organisms, indicating intra-host diversity of parasites. These genetic markers are the first that allow distinction of Monocystis sp. genotypes, opening new avenues for the study of parasite diversity within and between hosts. PMID:19691863

  8. Subunits I and II of Dictyostelium cytochrome c oxidase are specified by a single open reading frame transcribed into a large polycistronic RNA.

    PubMed

    Pellizzari, R; Anjard, C; Bisson, R

    1997-05-16

    A single open reading frame (ORF) encoding cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and II (cox1/2) was identified in the mitochondrial genome of the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. The cox1 coding region shares intron positions with its counterparts in fungi and algae. Northern blot analysis, using exon and intron-specific probes, suggests that the cox1/2 gene is transcribed as part of a large, efficiently processed, polycistronic RNA. PMID:9186775

  9. 76 FR 58533 - Powder River Regional Coal Team Activities; Notice of Public Meeting in Casper, WY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... Bureau of Land Management Powder River Regional Coal Team Activities; Notice of Public Meeting in Casper... River Regional Coal Team (RCT) has scheduled a public meeting for October 26, 2011, to review coal management activities in the Powder River Coal Production Region. DATES: The RCT meeting will begin at 9...

  10. A nucleosome turnover map reveals that the stability of histone H4 Lys20 methylation depends on histone recycling in transcribed chromatin.

    PubMed

    Svensson, J Peter; Shukla, Manu; Menendez-Benito, Victoria; Norman-Axelsson, Ulrika; Audergon, Pauline; Sinha, Indranil; Tanny, Jason C; Allshire, Robin C; Ekwall, Karl

    2015-06-01

    Nucleosome composition actively contributes to chromatin structure and accessibility. Cells have developed mechanisms to remove or recycle histones, generating a landscape of differentially aged nucleosomes. This study aimed to create a high-resolution, genome-wide map of nucleosome turnover in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The recombination-induced tag exchange (RITE) method was used to study replication-independent nucleosome turnover through the appearance of new histone H3 and the disappearance or preservation of old histone H3. The genome-wide location of histones was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation-exonuclease methodology (ChIP-exo). The findings were compared with diverse chromatin marks, including histone variant H2A.Z, post-translational histone modifications, and Pol II binding. Finally, genome-wide mapping of the methylation states of H4K20 was performed to determine the relationship between methylation (mono, di, and tri) of this residue and nucleosome turnover. Our analysis showed that histone recycling resulted in low nucleosome turnover in the coding regions of active genes, stably expressed at intermediate levels. High levels of transcription resulted in the incorporation of new histones primarily at the end of transcribed units. H4K20 was methylated in low-turnover nucleosomes in euchromatic regions, notably in the coding regions of long genes that were expressed at low levels. This transcription-dependent accumulation of histone methylation was dependent on the histone chaperone complex FACT. Our data showed that nucleosome turnover is highly dynamic in the genome and that several mechanisms are at play to either maintain or suppress stability. In particular, we found that FACT-associated transcription conserves histones by recycling them and is required for progressive H4K20 methylation.

  11. A nucleosome turnover map reveals that the stability of histone H4 Lys20 methylation depends on histone recycling in transcribed chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, J. Peter; Shukla, Manu; Menendez-Benito, Victoria; Norman-Axelsson, Ulrika; Audergon, Pauline; Sinha, Indranil; Tanny, Jason C.; Allshire, Robin C.; Ekwall, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosome composition actively contributes to chromatin structure and accessibility. Cells have developed mechanisms to remove or recycle histones, generating a landscape of differentially aged nucleosomes. This study aimed to create a high-resolution, genome-wide map of nucleosome turnover in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The recombination-induced tag exchange (RITE) method was used to study replication-independent nucleosome turnover through the appearance of new histone H3 and the disappearance or preservation of old histone H3. The genome-wide location of histones was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation–exonuclease methodology (ChIP-exo). The findings were compared with diverse chromatin marks, including histone variant H2A.Z, post-translational histone modifications, and Pol II binding. Finally, genome-wide mapping of the methylation states of H4K20 was performed to determine the relationship between methylation (mono, di, and tri) of this residue and nucleosome turnover. Our analysis showed that histone recycling resulted in low nucleosome turnover in the coding regions of active genes, stably expressed at intermediate levels. High levels of transcription resulted in the incorporation of new histones primarily at the end of transcribed units. H4K20 was methylated in low-turnover nucleosomes in euchromatic regions, notably in the coding regions of long genes that were expressed at low levels. This transcription-dependent accumulation of histone methylation was dependent on the histone chaperone complex FACT. Our data showed that nucleosome turnover is highly dynamic in the genome and that several mechanisms are at play to either maintain or suppress stability. In particular, we found that FACT-associated transcription conserves histones by recycling them and is required for progressive H4K20 methylation. PMID:25778913

  12. The Limit of Magnetic-Shear Energy in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2013-01-01

    It has been found previously, by measuring from active ]region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region fs magnetic field, (1) that there is a sharp upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region fs magnetic flux content, and (2) that most active regions are near this limit when their field explodes in a CME/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main ]sequence path bordering the free ]energy ]limit line in (flux content, free ]energy proxy) phase space. Here we present evidence that specifies the underlying magnetic condition that gives rise to the free ]energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find evidence that (1) in active regions at and near their free ]energy limit, the ratio of magnetic ]shear free energy to the non ]free magnetic energy the potential field would have is of order 1 in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free ]energy limit. Evidently, most active regions in which this core ]field energy ratio is much less than 1 cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches 1, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is 1, most active regions are compelled to explode.

  13. The Limit of Magnetic-Shear Energy in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2012-01-01

    It has been found previously, by measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region's magnetic field, (1) that there is a sharp upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region's magnetic flux content, and (2) that most active regions are near this limit when their field explodes in a coronal mass ejection/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy-limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, we present evidence that specifies the underlying magnetic condition that gives rise to the free-energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free-energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find evidence that (1) in active regions at and near their free-energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non-free magnetic energy the potential field would have is of the order of one in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free-energy limit. Evidently, most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than one cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches one, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is one, most active regions are compelled to explode.

  14. THE LIMIT OF MAGNETIC-SHEAR ENERGY IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2012-05-01

    It has been found previously, by measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region's magnetic field, (1) that there is a sharp upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region's magnetic flux content, and (2) that most active regions are near this limit when their field explodes in a coronal mass ejection/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy-limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, we present evidence that specifies the underlying magnetic condition that gives rise to the free-energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free-energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find evidence that (1) in active regions at and near their free-energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non-free magnetic energy the potential field would have is of the order of one in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free-energy limit. Evidently, most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than one cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches one, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is one, most active regions are compelled to explode.

  15. Analysis of body calcium (regional changes in body calcium by in vivo neutron activation analysis)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suki, W.; Johnson, P. C.; Leblanc, A.; Evans, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of space flight on urine and fecal calcium loss was documented during the three long-term Skylab flights. Neutron activation analysis was used to determine regional calcium loss. Various designs for regional analysis were investigated.

  16. Antibody Constant Region Peptides Can Display Immunomodulatory Activity through Activation of the Dectin-1 Signalling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cenci, Elio; Monari, Claudia; Magliani, Walter; Ciociola, Tecla; Conti, Stefania; Gatti, Rita; Bistoni, Francesco; Polonelli, Luciano; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that a synthetic peptide with sequence identical to a CDR of a mouse monoclonal antibody specific for difucosyl human blood group A exerted an immunomodulatory activity on murine macrophages. It was therapeutic against systemic candidiasis without possessing direct candidacidal properties. Here we demonstrate that a selected peptide, N10K, putatively deriving from the enzymatic cleavage of the constant region (Fc) of human IgG1, is able to induce IL-6 secretion and pIkB-α activation. More importantly, it causes an up-regulation of Dectin-1 expression. This leads to an increased activation of β-glucan-induced pSyk, CARD9 and pIkB-α, and an increase in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, IL-12, IL-1β and TNF-α. The increased activation of this pathway coincides with an augmented phagocytosis of non opsonized Candida albicans cells by monocytes. The findings suggest that some Fc-peptides, potentially deriving from the proteolysis of immunoglobulins, may cause an unexpected immunoregulation in a way reminiscent of innate immunity molecules. PMID:22952831

  17. Highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes are impediments to replication fork progression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Azvolinsky, Anna; Giresi, Paul G.; Lieb, Jason D.; Zakian, Virginia A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Replication forks face multiple obstacles that slow their progression. By two-dimensional gel analysis, yeast forks pause at stable DNA protein complexes, and this pausing is greatly increased in the absence of the Rrm3 helicase. We used a genome wide approach to identify 96 sites of very high DNA polymerase binding in wild type cells. Most of these binding sites were not previously identified pause sites. Rather, the most highly represented genomic category among high DNA polymerase binding sites was the open reading frames (ORFs) of highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes. Twice as many pause sites were identified in rrm3 compared to wild type cells as pausing in this strain occurred at both highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes and the previously identified protein DNA complexes. ORFs of highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes are the first class of natural pause sites that are not exacerbated in rrm3 cells. PMID:19560424

  18. LOW-LATITUDE CORONAL HOLES, DECAYING ACTIVE REGIONS, AND GLOBAL CORONAL MAGNETIC STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, G. J. D.; Haislmaier, K. J.

    2013-10-01

    We study the relationship between decaying active-region magnetic fields, coronal holes, and the global coronal magnetic structure using Global Oscillations Network Group synoptic magnetograms, Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory extreme-ultraviolet synoptic maps, and coronal potential-field source-surface models. We analyze 14 decaying regions and associated coronal holes occurring between early 2007 and late 2010, 4 from cycle 23 and 10 from cycle 24. We investigate the relationship between asymmetries in active regions' positive and negative magnetic intensities, asymmetric magnetic decay rates, flux imbalances, global field structure, and coronal hole formation. Whereas new emerging active regions caused changes in the large-scale coronal field, the coronal fields of the 14 decaying active regions only opened under the condition that the global coronal structure remained almost unchanged. This was because the dominant slowly varying, low-order multipoles prevented opposing-polarity fields from opening and the remnant active-region flux preserved the regions' low-order multipole moments long after the regions had decayed. Thus, the polarity of each coronal hole necessarily matched the polar field on the side of the streamer belt where the corresponding active region decayed. For magnetically isolated active regions initially located within the streamer belt, the more intense polarity generally survived to form the hole. For non-isolated regions, flux imbalance and topological asymmetry prompted the opposite to occur in some cases.

  19. A Tale of Two Super-Active Active Regions: On the Magnetic Origin of Flares and CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Dhakal, Suman; Chintzoglou, Georgios

    2015-04-01

    From a comparative study of two super-active active regions, we find that the magnetic origin of CMEs is different from that of flares. NOAA AR 12192 is one of the largest active regions in the recorded history with a sunspot number of 66 and area of 2410 millonths. During its passage through the front disk from Oct. 14-30, 2014, the active region produced 93 C-class, 30 M-class and 6 X-class flares. However, all six X-class flares are confined; in other words, none of them are associated with CMEs; most other flares are also confined. This behavior of low-CME production rate for such as a super active region is rather peculiar, given the usual hand-on-hand occurrence of CMEs with flares. To further strengthen this point, we also investigated the super-active NOAA AR 11429, which had a sunspot number of 28 and area of 1270 millionths. During its passage from March 02-17, 2012, the active region produced 47 C-class, 15 M-class and 3 X-class flares. In this active region, all three X-class flares were accompanied by CMEs, and the same for most M-class flares. Given the relative sizes of the two active regions, the production rates of flares are comparable. But the CME production rates are not. Through a careful study of the magnetic configuration on the surface and the extrapolated magnetic field in the corona, we argue that the generation of flares largely depends on the amount of free energy in the active region. On the other hand, the generation of CMEs largely depends on the complexity, such as measured by magnetic helicity. In particular, we argue that the high CME generation rate in the smaller active region is caused by the emergence and continuous generation of magnetic flux ropes in the region.

  20. Transcribed sequences in the human genome to be held in San Francisco, November 7 and 8, 1992. Final report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Gardiner, K.

    1993-11-01

    The Second International Workshop on the Identification of Transcribed Sequences was held in San Francisco on November 7--8, 1992. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss and evaluate techniques for developing a complete transcriptional map of the human genome. Such a map requires the positions, sequences, and expression patterns of all genes. This goal is being approached from two different directions, each with strengths and weaknesses. One method is to identify the transcribed sequences from genomic DNA of a given region; the other is to systematically sequence and map cDNAs. The cDNA approach yields sequence information rapidly, but mapping each cDNA is a technical challenge. In the first approach, the map locations of genomic sequences are known at the outset, and the challenge is to identify exons. The efficient construction of a transcriptional map will require a diverse array of techniques.

  1. Seismic activity monitoring in the Izvorul Muntelui dam region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borleanu, Felix; Otilia Placinta, Anca; Popa, Mihaela; Adelin Moldovan, Iren; Popescu, Emilia

    2016-04-01

    Earthquakes occurrences near the artificial water reservoirs are caused by stress variation due to the weight of water, weakness of fractures or faults and increasing of pore pressure in crustal rocks. In the present study we aim to investigate how Izvorul Muntelui dam, located in the Eastern Carpathians influences local seismicity. For this purpose we selected from the seismic bulletins computed within National Data Center of National Institute for Earth Physics, Romania, crustal events occurred between 984 and 2015 in a range of 0.3 deg around the artificial lake. Subsequently to improve the seismic monitoring of the region we applied a cross-correlation detector on the continuous recordings of Bicaz (BIZ) seismic stations. Besides the tectonic events we detected sources within this region that periodically generate artificial evens. We couldn't emphasize the existence of a direct correlation between the water level variations and natural seismicity of the investigated area.

  2. Automatic Tracking of Active Regions and Detection of Solar Flares in Solar EUV Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, C.; Aranda, M. C.

    2014-05-01

    Solar catalogs are frequently handmade by experts using a manual approach or semi-automated approach. The appearance of new tools is very useful because the work is automated. Nowadays it is impossible to produce solar catalogs using these methods, because of the emergence of new spacecraft that provide a huge amount of information. In this article an automated system for detecting and tracking active regions and solar flares throughout their evolution using the Extreme UV Imaging Telescope (EIT) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft is presented. The system is quite complex and consists of different phases: i) acquisition and preprocessing; ii) segmentation of regions of interest; iii) clustering of these regions to form candidate active regions which can become active regions; iv) tracking of active regions; v) detection of solar flares. This article describes all phases, but focuses on the phases of tracking and detection of active regions and solar flares. The system relies on consecutive solar images using a rotation law to track the active regions. Also, graphs of the evolution of a region and solar evolution are presented to detect solar flares. The procedure developed has been tested on 3500 full-disk solar images (corresponding to 35 days) taken from the spacecraft. More than 75 % of the active regions are tracked and more than 85 % of the solar flares are detected.

  3. Chromatin looping and eRNA transcription precede the transcriptional activation of gene in the β-globin locus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yea Woon; Lee, Sungkung; Yun, Jangmi; Kim, AeRi

    2015-01-01

    Enhancers are closely positioned with actively transcribed target genes by chromatin looping. Non-coding RNAs are often transcribed on active enhancers, referred to as eRNAs (enhancer RNAs). To explore the kinetics of enhancer–promoter looping and eRNA transcription during transcriptional activation, we induced the β-globin locus by chemical treatment and analysed cross-linking frequency between the β-globin gene and locus control region (LCR) and the amount of eRNAs transcribed on the LCR in a time course manner. The cross-linking frequency was increased after chemical induction but before the transcriptional activation of gene in the β-globin locus. Transcription of eRNAs was increased in concomitant with the increase in cross-linking frequency. These results show that chromatin looping and eRNA transcription precedes the transcriptional activation of gene. Concomitant occurrence of the two events suggests functional relationship between them. PMID:25588787

  4. Chromatin looping and eRNA transcription precede the transcriptional activation of gene in the β-globin locus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yea Woon; Lee, Sungkung; Yun, Jangmi; Kim, AeRi

    2015-03-18

    Enhancers are closely positioned with actively transcribed target genes by chromatin looping. Non-coding RNAs are often transcribed on active enhancers, referred to as eRNAs (enhancer RNAs). To explore the kinetics of enhancer-promoter looping and eRNA transcription during transcriptional activation, we induced the β-globin locus by chemical treatment and analysed cross-linking frequency between the β-globin gene and locus control region (LCR) and the amount of eRNAs transcribed on the LCR in a time course manner. The cross-linking frequency was increased after chemical induction but before the transcriptional activation of gene in the β-globin locus. Transcription of eRNAs was increased in concomitant with the increase in cross-linking frequency. These results show that chromatin looping and eRNA transcription precedes the transcriptional activation of gene. Concomitant occurrence of the two events suggests functional relationship between them.

  5. Synthetic Physical Interactions Map Kinetochore-Checkpoint Activation Regions

    PubMed Central

    Ólafsson, Guðjón; Thorpe, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a key mechanism to regulate the timing of mitosis and ensure that chromosomes are correctly segregated to daughter cells. The recruitment of the Mad1 and Mad2 proteins to the kinetochore is normally necessary for SAC activation. This recruitment is coordinated by the SAC kinase Mps1, which phosphorylates residues at the kinetochore to facilitate binding of Bub1, Bub3, Mad1, and Mad2. There is evidence that the essential function of Mps1 is to direct recruitment of Mad1/2. To test this model, we have systematically recruited Mad1, Mad2, and Mps1 to most proteins in the yeast kinetochore, and find that, while Mps1 is sufficient for checkpoint activation, recruitment of either Mad1 or Mad2 is not. These data indicate an important role for Mps1 phosphorylation in SAC activation, beyond the direct recruitment of Mad1 and Mad2. PMID:27280788

  6. Magnetic field configuration in a flaring active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, J.; Balmaceda, L. A.; Vieira, L. E.

    2015-10-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) provides continuous monitoring of the Sun's vector magnetic field through full-disk photospheric data with both high cadence and high spatial resolution. Here we investigate the evolution of AR 11249 from March 6 to March 7, 2012. We make use of HMI Stokes imaging, SDO/SHARPs, the HMI magnetic field line-of-sight (LOS) maps and the transverse components of the magnetic field as well as LOS velocity maps in order to detect regions with significant flux emergence and/or cancellation. In addition, we apply the Local Correlation Tracking (LCT) technique to the total and signed magnetic flux data and derive maps of horizontal velocity. From this analysis, we were able to pinpoint localized shear regions (and a shear channel) where penumbrae and pore formation areas, with strong linear polarization signals, are stretched and squeezed, showing also important downflows and upflows. We have also utilized Hinode/SP data and compared them to the HMI-SHARPs and the HMI-Stokes spectrograms. The aforementioned shear channel seems to correspond well with the X-class flare main channel of March 7 2012, as observed in AIA/SDO 171, 304 and 1600 Å.

  7. Time course of regional brain activity accompanying auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Ralph E.; Pittman, Brian; Constable, R. Todd; Bhagwagar, Zubin; Hampson, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Background The pathophysiology of auditory verbal hallucinations remains poorly understood. Aims To characterise the time course of regional brain activity leading to auditory verbal hallucinations. Method During functional magnetic resonance imaging, 11 patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder signalled auditory verbal hallucination events by pressing a button. To control for effects of motor behaviour, regional activity associated with hallucination events was scaled against corresponding activity arising from random button-presses produced by 10 patients who did not experience hallucinations. Results Immediately prior to the hallucinations, motor-adjusted activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus was significantly greater than corresponding activity in the right inferior frontal gyrus. In contrast, motor-adjusted activity in a right posterior temporal region overshadowed corresponding activity in the left homologous temporal region. Robustly elevated motor-adjusted activity in the left temporal region associated with auditory verbal hallucinations was also detected, but only subsequent to hallucination events. At the earliest time shift studied, the correlation between left inferior frontal gyrus and right temporal activity was significantly higher for the hallucination group compared with non-hallucinating patients. Conclusions Findings suggest that heightened functional coupling between the left inferior frontal gyrus and right temporal regions leads to coactivation in these speech processing regions that is hallucinogenic. Delayed left temporal activation may reflect impaired corollary discharge contributing to source misattribution of resulting verbal images. PMID:21972276

  8. Gradual tolerance of metabolic activity is produced in mesolimbic regions by chronic cocaine treatment, while subsequent cocaine challenge activates extrapyramidal regions of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hammer, R P; Cooke, E S

    1994-07-01

    Acute administration of cocaine is known to enhance extracellular dopamine levels in the striatum and to activate immediate-early gene expression in striatal neurons. Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRglc) reportedly increases in extrapyramidal and mesolimbic brain regions in response to acute cocaine treatment. However, chronic administration attenuates the cocaine-induced enhancement of regional dopamine response and the induction of immediate-early gene expression in these regions. Chronic treatment also produces tolerance to cocaine's reinforcing effects. Thus, differential responses to cocaine occur with increasing length of treatment. Therefore, we examined the time course of effects of repeated daily cocaine treatment on rCMRglc in rat brain. Acute administration of 10 mg/kg cocaine slightly increased rCMRglc in mesolimbic and extrapyramidal regions. However, no significant effects were observed until more than 7 d of treatment, whereupon rCMRglc was reduced compared to saline treatment in the infralimbic portion of the medial prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, habenula, amygdala, and a few other brain regions. In contrast, after 13 d of 10 mg/kg cocaine treatment, challenge with 30 mg/kg cocaine increased rCMRglc in the striatum, globus pallidus, entopeduncular nucleus, subthalamus, substantia nigra pars reticulata, and a few other regions without affecting limbic or mesolimbic regions. Thus, repeated daily treatment with a low dose of cocaine gradually decreased metabolic activity particularly in mesolimbic regions. Subsequent treatment with a higher dose produced metabolic activation mostly in extrapyramidal regions. This effect of chronic treatment could represent tolerance to the initial metabolic response, which can be replicated thereafter but only by increasing the drug dose. These results suggest that tolerance to the metabolic effects of cocaine in selective mesolimbic circuits may contribute to the

  9. Differential Reading, Naming, and Transcribing Speeds of Japanese Romaji and Hiragana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamada, Jun; Leong, Che Kan

    2005-01-01

    The morpho-syllabic Japanese writing system consists of the phonetic scripts of hiragana and katakana, the logographic kanji derived from Chinese characters and the less well researched romaji based on the Roman alphabet. In four experiments we investigated the speed with which Japanese college students read, named, and transcribed romaji as…

  10. Phonological Transcribing of English Utterances in Teaching Listening Comprehension for Korean Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Yun Kul

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to discuss the importance of listening and to examine whether or not transcribing utterances in English using the Korean alphabet improved the accuracy in English sentences produced by a group of Korean college students. A total population of 120 students was divided into two groups, control and experiment. The…

  11. Alpha2A adrenergic receptor activation inhibits epileptiform activity in the rat hippocampal CA3 region.

    PubMed

    Jurgens, Chris W D; Hammad, Hana M; Lichter, Jessica A; Boese, Sarah J; Nelson, Brian W; Goldenstein, Brianna L; Davis, Kylie L; Xu, Ke; Hillman, Kristin L; Porter, James E; Doze, Van A

    2007-06-01

    Norepinephrine has potent antiepileptic properties, the pharmacology of which is unclear. Under conditions in which GABAergic inhibition is blocked, norepinephrine reduces hippocampal cornu ammonis 3 (CA3) epileptiform activity through alpha(2) adrenergic receptor (AR) activation on pyramidal cells. In this study, we investigated which alpha(2)AR subtype(s) mediates this effect. First, alpha(2)AR genomic expression patterns of 25 rat CA3 pyramidal cells were determined using real-time single-cell reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, demonstrating that 12 cells expressed alpha(2A)AR transcript; 3 of the 12 cells additionally expressed mRNA for alpha(2C)AR subtype and no cells possessing alpha(2B)AR mRNA. Hippocampal CA3 epileptiform activity was then examined using field potential recordings in brain slices. The selective alphaAR agonist 6-fluoronorepinephrine caused a reduction of CA3 epileptiform activity, as measured by decreased frequency of spontaneous epileptiform bursts. In the presence of betaAR blockade, concentration-response curves for AR agonists suggest that an alpha(2)AR mediates this response, as the rank order of potency was 5-bromo-N-(4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-6-quinoxalinamine (UK-14304) >or= epinephrine >6-fluoronorepinephrine > norepinephrine > phenylephrine. Finally, equilibrium dissociation constants (K(b)) of selective alphaAR antagonists were functionally determined to confirm the specific alpha(2)AR subtype inhibiting CA3 epileptiform activity. Apparent K(b) values calculated for atipamezole (1.7 nM), MK-912 (4.8 nM), BRL-44408 (15 nM), yohimbine (63 nM), ARC-239 (540 nM), prazosin (4900 nM), and terazosin (5000 nM) correlated best with affinities previously determined for the alpha(2A)AR subtype (r = 0.99, slope = 1.0). These results suggest that, under conditions of impaired GABAergic inhibition, activation of alpha(2A)ARs is primarily responsible for the antiepileptic actions of norepinephrine in the rat hippocampal CA3

  12. High resolution ALMA observations of dense molecular medium in the central regions of active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Kotaro

    2015-08-01

    I will present recent ALMA results on the dense molecular gas in the central regions of local active galaxies, including NGC 1068, NGC 1097, and NGC 7469, hosting both AGN and circumnuclear starburst regions. Impact of X-ray radiation, outflows, and shocks from active nuclei on the physical and chemical properties of the surrouding dense molecular medium will be discussed.

  13. The Atlantic Canada-New England Region and Environment. A Learning Activity Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine Univ., Orono. New England - Atlantic Provinces - Quebec Center.

    In this Learning Activity Packet (LAP) students examine the geographic and ecological bases of the Eastern international region. The overall objective of activities is to help students comprehend the man-earth relationship concept. By studying this familiar relevant region students gain geographic knowledge and skills applicable to other areas.…

  14. 50 CFR 216.240 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Active Sonar Training (AFAST) § 216.240 Specified activity and specified geographical region. (a... Navy is only authorized if it occurs incidental to the use of the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) sources, high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, explosive sonobuoys, or similar sources,...

  15. 50 CFR 216.240 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Active Sonar Training (AFAST) § 216.240 Specified activity and specified geographical region. (a... Navy is only authorized if it occurs incidental to the use of the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) sources, high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, explosive sonobuoys, or similar sources,...

  16. 50 CFR 216.240 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Active Sonar Training (AFAST) § 216.240 Specified activity and specified geographical region. (a... Navy is only authorized if it occurs incidental to the use of the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) sources, high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, explosive sonobuoys, or similar sources,...

  17. Muscle activity in the classical singer's shoulder and neck region.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, V; Westgaard, R H

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study is to characterize the level of use of the trapezius (TR) and the sternocleidomastoideus (STM) muscles by singing students. We further try to lower the activity in both muscles by use of biofeedback (BF) from electromyographic recordings (EMG). We finally examine whether the experiences from the BF session can be transferred into regular singing by maintaining a mental focus on the experiences made in the BF session. Two groups, each consisting of eight conservatory singing students, all in their first or second year of study, volunteered as subjects. Two singing procedures were used, a song and a sustained tone of maximum possible duration. EMG activity was recorded bilaterally from the TR and STM by use of an ambulatory monitoring system. EMG BF appeared to lower muscle activity in the two muscles, thus the experiences made in the BF session could be transferred into regular singing. We conclude that singers, although having an enhanced awareness of posture, still may have overuse of especially the TR muscle, but probably also the STM muscle.

  18. MAG4 Versus Alternative Techniques for Forecasting Active-Region Flare Productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ronald L.; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.; Khazanov, Igor

    2014-01-01

    MAG4 is a technique of forecasting an active region's rate of production of major flares in the coming few days from a free-magnetic-energy proxy. We present a statistical method of measuring the difference in performance between MAG4 and comparable alternative techniques that forecast an active region's major-flare productivity from alternative observed aspects of the active region. We demonstrate the method by measuring the difference in performance between the "Present MAG4" technique and each of three alternative techniques, called "McIntosh Active-Region Class," "Total Magnetic Flux," and "Next MAG4." We do this by using (1) the MAG4 database of magnetograms and major-flare histories of sunspot active regions, (2) the NOAA table of the major-flare productivity of each of 60 McIntosh active-region classes of sunspot active regions, and (3) five technique-performance metrics (Heidke Skill Score, True Skill Score, Percent Correct, Probability of Detection, and False Alarm Rate) evaluated from 2000 random two-by-two contingency tables obtained from the databases. We find that (1) Present MAG4 far outperforms both McIntosh Active-Region Class and Total Magnetic Flux, (2) Next MAG4 significantly outperforms Present MAG4, (3) the performance of Next MAG4 is insensitive to the forward and backward temporal windows used, in the range of one to a few days, and (4) forecasting from the free-energy proxy in combination with either any broad category of McIntosh active-region classes or any Mount Wilson active-region class gives no significant performance improvement over forecasting from the free-energy proxy alone (Present MAG4).

  19. Atmospheric energetics in regions of intense convective activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    Synoptic-scale budgets of kinetic and total potential energy are computed using 3- and 6-h data at nine times from NASA's fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE IV). Two intense squall lines occurred during the period. Energy budgets for areas that enclose regions of intense convection are shown to have systematic changes that relate to the life cycles of the convection. Some of the synoptic-scale energy processes associated with the convection are found to be larger than those observed in the vicinity of mature cyclones. Volumes enclosing intense convection are found to have large values of cross-contour conversion of potential to kinetic energy and large horizontal export of kinetic energy. Although small net vertical transport of kinetic energy is observed, values at individual layers indicate large upward transport. Transfer of kinetic energy from grid to subgrid scales of motion occurs in the volumes. Latent heat release is large in the middle and upper troposphere and is thought to be the cause of the observed cyclic changes in the budget terms. Total potential energy is found to be imported horizontally in the lower half of the atmosphere, transported aloft, and then exported horizontally. Although local changes of kinetic energy and total potential energy are small, interaction between volumes enclosing convection with surrounding larger volumes is quite large.

  20. Identification of an miRNA candidate reflects the possible significance of transcribed microsatellites in the hairpin precursors of black pepper.

    PubMed

    Joy, Nisha; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2012-06-01

    Plant miRNAs (18-24nt) are generated by the RNase III-type Dicer endonuclease from the endogenous hairpin precursors ('pre-miRNAs') with significant regulatory functions. The transcribed regions display a higher frequency of microsatellites, when compared to other regions of the genomic DNA. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) resulting from replication slippage occurring in transcripts affect the expression of genes. The available experimental evidence for the incidence of SSRs in the miRNA precursors is limited. Considering the potential significance of SSRs in the miRNA genes, we carried out a preliminary analysis to verify the presence of SSRs in the pri-miRNAs of black pepper (Piper nigrum L.). We isolated a (CT) dinucleotide SSR bearing transcript using SMART strategy. The transcript was predicted to be a 'pri-miRNA candidate' with Dicer sites based on miRNA prediction tools and MFOLD structural predictions. The presence of this 'miRNA candidate' was confirmed by real-time TaqMan assays. The upstream sequence of the 'miRNA candidate' by genome walking when subjected to PlantCARE showed the presence of certain promoter elements, and the deduced amino acid showed significant similarity with NAP1 gene, which affects the transcription of many genes. Moreover the hairpin-like precursor overlapped the neighbouring NAP1 gene. In silico analysis revealed distinct putative functions for the 'miRNA candidate', of which majority were related to growth. Hence, we assume that this 'miRNA candidate' may get activated during transcription of NAP gene, thereby regulating the expression of many genes involved in developmental processes. PMID:22367484

  1. Carnosine: effect on aging-induced increase in brain regional monoamine oxidase-A activity.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Soumyabrata; Poddar, Mrinal K

    2015-03-01

    Aging is a natural biological process associated with several neurological disorders along with the biochemical changes in brain. Aim of the present investigation is to study the effect of carnosine (0.5-2.5μg/kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days) on aging-induced changes in brain regional (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus and pons-medulla) mitochondrial monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) activity with its kinetic parameters. The results of the present study are: (1) The brain regional mitochondrial MAO-A activity and their kinetic parameters (except in Km of pons-medulla) were significantly increased with the increase of age (4-24 months), (2) Aging-induced increase of brain regional MAO-A activity including its Vmax were attenuated with higher dosages of carnosine (1.0-2.5μg/kg/day) and restored toward the activity that observed in young, though its lower dosage (0.5μg/kg/day) were ineffective in these brain regional MAO-A activity, (3) Carnosine at higher dosage in young rats, unlike aged rats significantly inhibited all the brain regional MAO-A activity by reducing their only Vmax excepting cerebral cortex, where Km was also significantly enhanced. These results suggest that carnosine attenuated the aging-induced increase of brain regional MAO-A activity by attenuating its kinetic parameters and restored toward the results of MAO-A activity that observed in corresponding brain regions of young rats.

  2. The response regulator SsrB activates transcription and binds to a region overlapping OmpR binding sites at Salmonella pathogenicity island 2.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiuhong; Walthers, Don; Oropeza, Ricardo; Kenney, Linda J

    2004-11-01

    OmpR activates expression of the two-component regulatory system located on Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) that controls the expression of a type III secretion system, as well as many other genes required for systemic infection in mice. Measurements of SsrA and SsrB protein levels under different growth conditions indicate that expression of these two components is uncoupled, i.e. SsrB is produced in the absence of ssrA and vice versa. This result was suggested from our previous studies, in which two promoters at ssrA/B were identified. The isolated C-terminus of SsrB binds to DNA and protects regions upstream of ssrA, ssrB and srfH from DNase I digestion. Furthermore, the C-terminus of SsrB alone is capable of activating transcription in the absence of the N-terminus. Results from beta-galactosidase assays indicate that the N-terminal phosphorylation domain inhibits the C-terminal effector domain. A previous study from our laboratory reported that ssrA-lacZ and ssrB-lacZ transcriptional fusions were substantially reduced in an ssrB null strain. Results from DNase I protection assays provide direct evidence that SsrB binds at ssrA and ssrB, although the binding sites lie within the transcribed regions. Additional regulators clearly affect gene expression at this important locus, and here we provide evidence that SlyA, a transcription factor that contributes to Salmonella virulence, also affects ssrA/B gene expression.

  3. Image patch analysis of sunspots and active regions. I. Intrinsic dimension and correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Kevin R.; Li, Jimmy J.; Delouille, Véronique; De Visscher, Ruben; Watson, Fraser; Hero, Alfred O.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The flare productivity of an active region is observed to be related to its spatial complexity. Mount Wilson or McIntosh sunspot classifications measure such complexity but in a categorical way, and may therefore not use all the information present in the observations. Moreover, such categorical schemes hinder a systematic study of an active region's evolution for example. Aims: We propose fine-scale quantitative descriptors for an active region's complexity and relate them to the Mount Wilson classification. We analyze the local correlation structure within continuum and magnetogram data, as well as the cross-correlation between continuum and magnetogram data. Methods: We compute the intrinsic dimension, partial correlation, and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) of image patches of continuum and magnetogram active region images taken from the SOHO-MDI instrument. We use masks of sunspots derived from continuum as well as larger masks of magnetic active regions derived from magnetogram to analyze separately the core part of an active region from its surrounding part. Results: We find relationships between the complexity of an active region as measured by its Mount Wilson classification and the intrinsic dimension of its image patches. Partial correlation patterns exhibit approximately a third-order Markov structure. CCA reveals different patterns of correlation between continuum and magnetogram within the sunspots and in the region surrounding the sunspots. Conclusions: Intrinsic dimension has the potential to distinguish simple from complex active regions. These results also pave the way for patch-based dictionary learning with a view toward automatic clustering of active regions.

  4. Colors of active regions on comet 67P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oklay, N.; Vincent, J.-B.; Sierks, H.; Besse, S.; Fornasier, S.; Barucci, M. A.; Lara, L.; Scholten, F.; Preusker, F.; Lazzarin, M.; Pajola, M.; La Forgia, F.

    2015-10-01

    The OSIRIS (Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System) scientific imager (Keller et al. 2007) is successfully delivering images of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from its both wide angle camera (WAC) and narrow angle camera (NAC) since ESA's spacecraft Rosetta's arrival to the comet. Both cameras are equipped with filters covering the wavelength range of about 200 nm to 1000 nm. The comet nucleus is mapped with different combination of the filters in resolutions up to 15 cm/px. Besides the determination of the surface morphology in great details (Thomas et al. 2015), such high resolution images provided us a mean to unambiguously link some activity in the coma to a series of pits on the nucleus surface (Vincent et al. 2015).

  5. An active region model for capturing fractal flow patterns in unsaturated soils: model development.

    PubMed

    Liu, H H; Zhang, R; Bodvarsson, G S

    2005-11-01

    Preferential flow commonly observed in unsaturated soils allows rapid movement of solute from the soil surface or vadose zone to the groundwater, bypassing a significant volume of unsaturated soil and increasing the risk of groundwater contamination. A variety of evidence indicates that complex preferential patterns observed from fields are fractals. In this study, we developed a relatively simple active region model to incorporate the fractal flow pattern into the continuum approach. In the model, the flow domain is divided into active and inactive regions. Flow occurs preferentially in the active region (characterized by fractals), and inactive region is simply bypassed. A new constitutive relationship (the portion of the active region as a function of saturation) was derived. The validity of the proposed model is demonstrated by the consistency between field observations and the new constitutive relationship.

  6. An Active Region Model for Capturing Fractal Flow Patterns inUnsaturated Soils: Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Zhang, R.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2005-06-11

    Preferential flow commonly observed in unsaturated soils allows rapid movement of solute from the soil surface or vadose zone to the groundwater, bypassing a significant volume of unsaturated soil and increasing the risk of groundwater contamination. A variety of evidence indicates that complex preferential patterns observed from fields are fractals. In this study, we developed a relatively simple active region model to incorporate the fractal flow pattern into the continuum approach. In the model, the flow domain is divided into active and inactive regions. Flow occurs preferentially in the active region (characterized by fractals), and inactive region is simply bypassed. A new constitutive relationship (the portion of the active region as a function of saturation) was derived. The validity of the proposed model is demonstrated by the consistency between field observations and the new constitutive relationship.

  7. A SYSTEMATIC SURVEY OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE EMISSION IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Harry P.; Winebarger, Amy R.; Brooks, David H.

    2012-11-10

    The recent analysis of observations taken with the EUV Imaging Spectrometer and X-Ray Telescope instruments on Hinode suggests that well-constrained measurements of the temperature distribution in solar active regions can finally be made. Such measurements are critical for constraining theories of coronal heating. Past analysis, however, has suffered from limited sample sizes and large uncertainties at temperatures between 5 and 10 MK. Here we present a systematic study of the differential emission measure distribution in 15 active region cores. We focus on measurements in the 'inter-moss' region, that is, the region between the loop footpoints, where the observations are easier to interpret. To reduce the uncertainties at the highest temperatures we present a new method for isolating the Fe XVIII emission in the AIA/SDO 94 A channel. The resulting differential emission measure distributions confirm our previous analysis showing that the temperature distribution in an active region core is often strongly peaked near 4 MK. We characterize the properties of the emission distribution as a function of the total unsigned magnetic flux. We find that the amount of high-temperature emission in the active region core is correlated with the total unsigned magnetic flux, while the emission at lower temperatures, in contrast, is inversely related. These results provide compelling evidence that high-temperature active region emission is often close to equilibrium, although weaker active regions may be dominated by evolving million degree loops in the core.

  8. Regional vulnerability of the hippocampus to repeated motor activity deprivation.

    PubMed

    Faraji, Jamshid; Soltanpour, Nabiollah; Moeeini, Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Abedin; Pakdel, Shiva; Moharrerie, Alireza; Arjang, Kaveh; Soltanpour, Nasrin; Metz, Gerlinde A S

    2016-03-15

    Spontaneous vertical and horizontal exploratory movements are integral components of rodent behavior. Little is known, however, about the structural and functional consequences of restricted spontaneous exploration. Here, we report two experiments to probe whether restriction in vertical activity (rearing) in rats could induce neuro-hormonal and behavioral disturbances. Rearing movements in rats were deprived for 3h/day for 30 consecutive days by placing the animal into a circular tunnel task. Rats temporarily deprived of rearing behavior showed elevated plasma corticosterone levels but no detectable psychological distress and/or anxiety-related behavior within an elevated plus maze. However, rats emitted a greater number of 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations and spent significantly more time vocalizing than controls when deprived of their rearing behavior. Despite intact spatial performance within wet- and dry-land spatial tasks, rearing-deprived rats also exhibited a significant alteration in search strategies within both spatial tasks along with reduced volume and neuron number in the hippocampal subregion CA2. These data suggest a new approach to test the importance of free exploratory behavior in endocrine and structural manifestations. The results support a central role of the CA2 in spontaneous exploratory behavior and vulnerability to psychological stress. PMID:26723539

  9. Regional vulnerability of the hippocampus to repeated motor activity deprivation.

    PubMed

    Faraji, Jamshid; Soltanpour, Nabiollah; Moeeini, Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Abedin; Pakdel, Shiva; Moharrerie, Alireza; Arjang, Kaveh; Soltanpour, Nasrin; Metz, Gerlinde A S

    2016-03-15

    Spontaneous vertical and horizontal exploratory movements are integral components of rodent behavior. Little is known, however, about the structural and functional consequences of restricted spontaneous exploration. Here, we report two experiments to probe whether restriction in vertical activity (rearing) in rats could induce neuro-hormonal and behavioral disturbances. Rearing movements in rats were deprived for 3h/day for 30 consecutive days by placing the animal into a circular tunnel task. Rats temporarily deprived of rearing behavior showed elevated plasma corticosterone levels but no detectable psychological distress and/or anxiety-related behavior within an elevated plus maze. However, rats emitted a greater number of 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations and spent significantly more time vocalizing than controls when deprived of their rearing behavior. Despite intact spatial performance within wet- and dry-land spatial tasks, rearing-deprived rats also exhibited a significant alteration in search strategies within both spatial tasks along with reduced volume and neuron number in the hippocampal subregion CA2. These data suggest a new approach to test the importance of free exploratory behavior in endocrine and structural manifestations. The results support a central role of the CA2 in spontaneous exploratory behavior and vulnerability to psychological stress.

  10. Triggering an Eruptive Flare by Emerging Flux in a Solar Active-Region Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Rohan E.; Kliem, Bernhard; Ravindra, B.; Chintzoglou, Georgios

    2015-12-01

    A flare and fast coronal mass ejection originated between solar active regions NOAA 11514 and 11515 on 2012 July 1 (SOL2012-07-01) in response to flux emergence in front of the leading sunspot of the trailing region 11515. Analyzing the evolution of the photospheric magnetic flux and the coronal structure, we find that the flux emergence triggered the eruption by interaction with overlying flux in a non-standard way. The new flux neither had the opposite orientation nor a location near the polarity inversion line, which are favorable for strong reconnection with the arcade flux under which it emerged. Moreover, its flux content remained significantly smaller than that of the arcade ({≈} 40 %). However, a loop system rooted in the trailing active region ran in part under the arcade between the active regions, passing over the site of flux emergence. The reconnection with the emerging flux, leading to a series of jet emissions into the loop system, caused a strong but confined rise of the loop system. This lifted the arcade between the two active regions, weakening its downward tension force and thus destabilizing the considerably sheared flux under the arcade. The complex event was also associated with supporting precursor activity in an enhanced network near the active regions, acting on the large-scale overlying flux, and with two simultaneous confined flares within the active regions.

  11. THE FORMATION AND MAGNETIC STRUCTURES OF ACTIVE-REGION FILAMENTS OBSERVED BY NVST, SDO, AND HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Wang, J. C.; Xiang, Y. Y.; Kong, D. F.; Yang, L. H.; Pan, G. M.

    2015-08-15

    To better understand the properties of solar active-region filaments, we present a detailed study on the formation and magnetic structures of two active-region filaments in active region NOAA 11884 during a period of four days. It is found that the shearing motion of the opposite magnetic polarities and the rotation of the small sunspots with negative polarity play an important role in the formation of two active-region filaments. During the formation of these two active-region filaments, one foot of the filaments was rooted in a small sunspot with negative polarity. The small sunspot rotated not only around another small sunspot with negative polarity, but also around the center of its umbra. By analyzing the nonlinear force-free field extrapolation using the vector magnetic fields in the photosphere, twisted structures were found in the two active-region filaments prior to their eruptions. These results imply that the magnetic fields were dragged by the shearing motion between opposite magnetic polarities and became more horizontal. The sunspot rotation twisted the horizontal magnetic fields and finally formed the twisted active-region filaments.

  12. Reliable differentiation of Meyerozyma guilliermondii from Meyerozyma caribbica by internal transcribed spacer restriction fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Meyerozyma guilliermondii (anamorph Candida guilliermondii) and Meyerozyma caribbica (anamorph Candida fermentati) are closely related species of the genetically heterogenous M. guilliermondii complex. Conventional phenotypic methods frequently misidentify the species within this complex and also with other species of the Saccharomycotina CTG clade. Even the long-established sequencing of large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene remains ambiguous. We also faced similar problem during identification of yeast isolates of M. guilliermondii complex from indigenous bamboo shoot fermentation in North East India. There is a need for development of reliable and accurate identification methods for these closely related species because of their increasing importance as emerging infectious yeasts and associated biotechnological attributes. Results We targeted the highly variable internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) and identified seven restriction enzymes through in silico analysis for differentiating M. guilliermondii from M. caribbica. Fifty five isolates of M. guilliermondii complex which could not be delineated into species-specific taxonomic ranks by API 20 C AUX and LSU rRNA gene D1/D2 sequencing were subjected to ITS-restriction fragment length polymorphism (ITS-RFLP) analysis. TaqI ITS-RFLP distinctly differentiated the isolates into M. guilliermondii (47 isolates) and M. caribbica (08 isolates) with reproducible species-specific patterns similar to the in silico prediction. The reliability of this method was validated by ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 sequencing, mitochondrial DNA RFLP and electrophoretic karyotyping. Conclusions We herein described a reliable ITS-RFLP method for distinct differentiation of frequently misidentified M. guilliermondii from M. caribbica. Even though in silico analysis differentiated other closely related species of M. guilliermondii complex from the above two species, it is yet to be confirmed by in vitro analysis using reference

  13. A note on chromospheric fine structure at active region polarity boundaries.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prata, S. W.

    1971-01-01

    High resolution H-alpha filtergrams from Big Bear Solar Observatory reveal that some filamentary features in active regions have fine structure and hence magnetic field transverse to the gross structure and the zero longitudinal field line. These features are distinct from the usual active region filament, in which fine structure, magnetic field, and filament are all parallel to the zero longitudinal field line. The latter occur on boundaries between regions of weaker fields, while the former occur at boundaries between regions of stronger field.

  14. Active region upflow plasma: its relation to small activity and the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandrini, Cristina H.; Culhane, J. Leonard; Cristiani, Germán; Vásquez, Alberto; Van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Baker, Deborah; Pick, Monique; Demoulin, Pascal; Nuevo, Federico

    Recent studies show that active region (AR) upflowing plasma, observed by the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS), can gain access to open field lines and be released into the solar wind via magnetic interchange reconnection occurring below the source surface at magnetic null-points in pseudo-streamer configurations. When only one simple bipolar AR is present on the Sun and it is fully covered by the separatrix of a streamer, like AR 10978 on December 2007, it seems unlikely that the upflowing AR plasma could find its way into the slow solar wind. However, signatures of plasma with AR composition at 1 AU that appears to originate from the West of AR 10978 were recently found by Culhane and coworkers. We present a detailed topology analysis of AR 10978 based on a linear force-free magnetic field model at the AR scale, combined with a global PFSS model. This allows us, on one hand, to explain the variations observed in the upflows to the West of the AR as the result of magnetic reconnection at quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs). While at a global scale, we show that reconnection, occurring in at least two main steps, first at QSLs and later at a high-altitude coronal null-point, allows the AR plasma to get around the topological obstacle of the streamer separatrix and be released into the solar wind.

  15. The effects of activation procedures on regional cerebral blood flow in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Rozenfeld, D.; Wolfson, L.I.

    1981-07-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (r-CBF) can be measured using 133XE and collimated detectors. The radionuclide can be administered either by inhalation or intracarotid injection. Comparison of blood flow determinations at rest and during performance of an activity identifies those brain regions that become active during the performance of the activity. Relatively specific patterns of r-CBF are observed during hand movements, sensory stimulation, eye movements, speech, listening, and reading. Regional CBF changes during reasoning and memorization are less specific and less well characterized. It is clear that brain lesions affect r-CBF responses to various activities, but this effect has not been well correlated with functional deficits or recovery of function. Regional CBF measurement gives information about brain activity and the functional response to experimental manipulation. This approach may well add to our understanding of normal, as well as pathologic, brain functioning.

  16. Evolution of Magnetic Field Twist and Tilt in Active Region NOAA 10930

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindra, B.; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar

    2011-07-01

    Magnetic twist of the active region has been measured over a decade using photospheric vector field data, chromospheric H_alpha data, and coronal loop data. The twist and tilt of the active regions have been measured at the photospheric level with the vector magnetic field measurements. The active region NOAA 10930 is a highly twisted emerging region. The same active region produced several flares and has been extensively observed by Hinode. In this paper, we will show the evolution of twist and tilt in this active region leading up to the two X-class flares. We find that the twist initially increases with time for a few days with a simultaneous decrease in the tilt until before the X3.4 class flare on December 13, 2006. The total twist acquired by the active region is larger than one complete winding before the X3.4 class flare and it decreases in later part of observations. The injected helicity into the corona is negative and it is in excess of 10^43 Mx^2 before the flares.

  17. Preferential repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the transcribed strand of a gene in yeast chromosomes and plasmids is dependent on transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Sweder, K S; Hanawalt, P C

    1992-01-01

    While preferential repair of the transcribed strands within active genes has been demonstrated in organisms as diverse as humans and Escherichia coli, it has not previously been shown to occur in chromosomal genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the transcribed strand of the expressed RPB2 gene in the chromosome of a repair-proficient strain is much more rapid than that in the nontranscribed strand. Furthermore, a copy of the RPB2 gene borne on a centromeric ARS1 plasmid showed the same strand bias in repair. To investigate the relation of this strand bias to transcription, we studied repair in a yeast strain with the temperature-sensitive mutation, rpb1-1, in the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. When exponentially growing rpb1-1 cells are shifted to the nonpermissive temperature, they rapidly cease mRNA synthesis. At the permissive temperature, both rpb1-1 and the wild-type, parental cells exhibited rapid, proficient repair in the transcribed strand of chromosomal and plasmid-borne copies of the RPB2 gene. At the nonpermissive temperature, the rate of repair in the transcribed strand in rpb1-1 cells was reduced to that in the nontranscribed strand. These findings establish the dependence of strand bias in repair on transcription by RNA polymerase II in the chromosomes and in plasmids, and they validate the use of plasmids for analysis of the relation of repair to transcription in yeast. Images PMID:1438266

  18. Mapping brain region activity during chewing: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Onozuka, M; Fujita, M; Watanabe, K; Hirano, Y; Niwa, M; Nishiyama, K; Saito, S

    2002-11-01

    Mastication has been suggested to increase neuronal activities in various regions of the human brain. However, because of technical difficulties, the fine anatomical and physiological regions linked to mastication have not been fully elucidated. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging during cycles of rhythmic gum-chewing and no chewing, we therefore examined the interaction between chewing and brain regional activity in 17 subjects (aged 20-31 years). In all subjects, chewing resulted in a bilateral increase in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals in the sensorimotor cortex, supplementary motor area, insula, thalamus, and cerebellum. In addition, in the first three regions, chewing of moderately hard gum produced stronger BOLD signals than the chewing of hard gum. However, the signal was higher in the cerebellum and not significant in the thalamus, respectively. These results suggest that chewing causes regional increases in brain neuronal activities which are related to biting force.

  19. CommonSense: a preprocessing system to identify errors in large transcribed corpora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Propper, Ryan; Mohajer, Keyvan; Pratt, Vaughan

    2006-04-01

    A system was designed to locate and correct errors in large transcribed corpora. The program, called CommonSense, relies on a set of rules that identify mistakes related to homonyms, words with distinct definitions but identical pronunciations. The system was run on the 1996 and 1997 Broadcast News Speech Corpora, and correctly identified more than 400 errors in these data. Future work may extend CommonSense to automatically correct errors in hypothesis files created as the output of speech recognition systems.

  20. Analysis of the characteristics of solar oscillation modes in active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabello-Soares, M. Cristina; Bogart, Richard S.; Basu, Sarbani

    2008-10-01

    We analyze the characteristics of high-degree solar acoustic modes in the vicinity of magnetic active regions and compare with those of magnetically quiet regions at the same latitude and at nearly the same time. We applied ring-diagram analysis to GONG+ and MDI data, using the 13-parameter mode-fitting model of Basu & Antia [1]. We explore the correlations of variations in mode frequencies, amplitudes, widths, and asymmetries with the total magnetic flux of the analyzed regions.

  1. Complex active regions as the main source of extreme and large solar proton events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishkov, V. N.

    2013-12-01

    A study of solar proton sources indicated that solar flare events responsible for ≥2000 pfu proton fluxes mostly occur in complex active regions (CARs), i.e., in transition structures between active regions and activity complexes. Different classes of similar structures and their relation to solar proton events (SPEs) and evolution, depending on the origination conditions, are considered. Arguments in favor of the fact that sunspot groups with extreme dimensions are CARs are presented. An analysis of the flare activity in a CAR resulted in the detection of "physical" boundaries, which separate magnetic structures of the same polarity and are responsible for the independent development of each structure.

  2. Development of a PCR assay based on the 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer for identification of strictly anaerobic bacterium Zymophilus.

    PubMed

    Felsberg, Jurgen; Jelínková, Markéta; Kubizniaková, Petra; Matoulková, Dagmar

    2015-06-01

    PCR-primers were designed for identification of strictly anaerobic bacteria of the genus Zymophilus based on genus-specific sequences of the 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer region. The specificity of the primers was tested against 37 brewery-related non-target microorganisms that could potentially occur in the same brewery specimens. None DNA was amplified from any of the non-Zymophilus strains tested including genera from the same family (Pectinatus, Megasphaera, Selenomonas), showing thus 100% specificity. PCR assay developed in this study allows an extension of the spectra of detected beer spoilage microorganisms in brewery laboratories. PMID:25725268

  3. MBE growth of active regions for electrically pumped, cw-operating GaSb-based VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani-Shirazi, K.; Bachmann, A.; Boehm, G.; Ziegler, S.; Amann, M.-C.

    2009-03-01

    Electrically pumped, cw-operating, single-mode GaSb-based VCSELs are attractive light sources for trace-gas sensing systems using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) [A. Vicet, D.A. Yarekha, A. Pérona, Y. Rouillard, S. Gaillard, Spectrochimica Acta Part A 58 (2002) 2405-2412]. Only recently, the first electrically pumped (EP) devices emitting at 2.325 μm in cw-mode at room temperature have been reported [A. Bachmann, T. Lim, K. Kashani-Shirazi, O. Dier, C. Lauer, M.-C. Amann, Electronics Letters 44(3) (2008) 202-203]. The fabrication of these devices employs the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of GaSb/AlAsSb-distributed Bragg mirrors, a multi-quantum-well active region made of AlGaAsSb/InGaAsSb and an InAsSb/GaSb-buried-tunnel junction. As VCSELs are usually driven under high injection rates, an optimum electrical design of active regions is essential for high-performance devices. In this paper we present an enhanced simulation of current flow in the active region under operation conditions. The calculation includes carrier transport by drift, diffusion and tunneling. We discuss different design criteria and material compositions for active regions. Active regions with various barrier materials were incorporated into edge emitter samples to evaluate their performance. Aluminum-containing barriers show better internal efficiency compared to active regions with GaSb as the barrier material.

  4. HARPs: Tracked Active Region Patch Data Product from SDO/HMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turmon, M.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Sun, X.; Bobra, M.

    2012-12-01

    We describe an HMI data product consisting of tracked magnetic features on the scale of solar active regions, abbreviated HARPs (HMI Active Region Patches). The HARP data series has been helpful for subsetting individual active regions, for development of near-real-time (NRT) space weather indices for individual active regions, and for defining closed magnetic structures for computationally-intensive algorithms like vector field disambiguation. The data series builds upon the 720s cadence activity masks, which identify large-scale instantaneously-observed magnetic features. Using these masks as a starting point, large spatially-coherent structures are identified using convolution with a longitudinally-extended kernel on a spherical domain. The resulting set of identified regions is then tracked from image to image. The metric for inter-image association is area of overlap between the best current estimate of AR location, as predicted by temporally extrapolating each currently tracked object, and the set of instantaneously-observed magnetic structures. Once completed tracks have been extracted, they are made into a standardized HARP data series by finding the smallest constant-angular-velocity box, of constant width in latitude and longitude, that encompasses all appearances of the active region. This data product is currently available, in definitive and near-real-time forms, with accompanying region-strength, location, and NOAA-AR metadata, on HMI's Joint Science Operations Center (JSOC) data portal.; HARP outlines for three days (2001 February 14, 15, and 16, 00:00 TAI, flipped N-S, selected from the 12-minute cadence original data product). HARPs are shown in the same color (some colors repeated) with a thin white box surrounding each HARP. HARPs are tracked and associated from image to image. HARPs, such as the yellow one in the images above, need not be connected regions. Merges and splits, such as the light blue region, are accounted for automatically.

  5. Regional activation within the vastus medialis in stimulated and voluntary contractions.

    PubMed

    Gallina, Alessio; Ivanova, Tanya D; Garland, S Jayne

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the contribution of muscle fiber orientation at different knee angles to regional activation identified with high-density surface electromyography (HDsEMG). Monopolar HDsEMG signals were collected using a grid of 13 × 5 electrodes placed over the vastus medialis (VM). Intramuscular electrical stimulation was used to selectively activate two regions within VM. The distribution of EMG responses to stimulation was obtained by calculating the amplitude of the compound action potential for each channel; the position of the peak amplitude was tracked across knee angles to describe shifts of the active muscle regions under the electrodes. In a separate experiment, regional activation was investigated in 10 knee flexion-extension movements against a fixed resistance. Intramuscular stimulation of different VM regions resulted in clear differences in amplitude distribution along the columns of the electrode grid (P < 0.001); changes in knee angle resulted in consistent shifts along the rows (P < 0.01) and negligible shifts along the columns of the electrode grid. Regional VM activation was identified in dynamic movement, with distal shifts of the EMG distribution in the eccentric phase of the movement (P < 0.05) and at more flexed knee angles (P < 0.05). HDsEMG was used to describe regional activation across the VM that was not attributable to anatomic factors. Changes in muscle fiber orientation associated with knee joint angle mainly influence the amplitude distribution along the fiber direction. Future studies are needed to understand possible functional roles for regional activation within the VM in dynamic tasks. PMID:27365281

  6. Regional activation of rapid onset vasodilatation in mouse skeletal muscle: regulation through α-adrenoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Moore, Alex W; Bearden, Shawn E; Segal, Steven S

    2010-09-01

    Exercise onset entails motor unit recruitment and the initiation of vasodilatation. Dilatation can ascend the arteriolar network to encompass proximal feed arteries but is opposed by sympathetic nerve activity, which promotes vasoconstriction and inhibits ascending vasodilatation through activating α-adrenoreceptors. Whereas contractile activity can antagonize sympathetic vasoconstriction, more subtle aspects of this interaction remain to be defined. We tested the hypothesis that constitutive activation of α-adrenoreceptors governs blood flow distribution within individual muscles. The mouse gluteus maximus muscle (GM) consists of Inferior and Superior regions. Each muscle region is supplied by its own motor nerve and feed artery with an anastomotic arteriole (resting diameter 25 microm) that spans both muscle regions. In anaesthetized male C57BL/6J mice (3-5 months old), the GM was exposed and superfused with physiological saline solution (35 degrees C; pH 7.4). Stimulating the inferior gluteal motor nerve (0.1 ms pulse, 100 Hz for 500 ms) evoked a brief tetanic contraction and produced rapid (<1 s) onset vasodilatation (ROV; diameter change, 10 +/- 1 μm) of the anastomotic arteriole along the active (Inferior) muscle region but not along the inactive (Superior) region (n = 8). In contrast, microiontophoresis of acetylcholine (1 μm micropipette tip, 1 μA, 500 ms) initiated dilatation that travelled along the anastomotic arteriole from the Inferior into the Superior muscle region (diameter change, 5 +/- 2 μm). Topical phentolamine (1 μm) had no effect on resting diameter but this inhibition of α-adrenoreceptors enabled ROV to spread along the anastomotic arteriole into the inactive muscle region (dilatation, 7 +/- 1 μm; P < 0.05), where remote dilatation to acetylcholine then doubled (P < 0.05). These findings indicate that constitutive activation of α-adrenoreceptors in skeletal muscle can restrict the spread of dilatation within microvascular resistance

  7. NOVEL SPLICED VARIANTS OF IONOTROPIC GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR GLUR6 IN NORMAL HUMAN FIBROBLAST AND BRAIN CELLS ARE TRANSCRIBED BY TISSUE SPECIFIC PROMOTERS

    PubMed Central

    Zhawar, Vikramjit K.; Kaur, Gurpreet; deRiel, Jon K.; Kaur, G. Pal; Kandpal, Raj P.; Athwal, Raghbir S.

    2010-01-01

    The members of the ionotropic glutamate receptor family, namely, a-amino-3-hydroxy-S-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA), kainate, and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, are important mediators of the rapid synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. We have investigated the splicing pattern and expression of the kainate receptor subunit GluR6 in human fibroblast cell lines and brain tissue. We demonstrate the expression of GluR6A variant specifically in brain, and four variants, namely, GluR6B, GluR6C, GluR6D and GluR6E in fibroblast cell lines. The variants GluR6D and GluR6E have not been described before, and appear to be specific for non-neuronal cells. Genomic analysis and cloning of the sequence preceding the transcribed region led to the identification of two tissue specific promoters designated as neuronal promoter PN and non-neuronal promoter PNN. We have used RNA ligase mediated RACE and in silico analyses to locate two sets of transcription start sites, and confirmed specific transcripts initiated by PN and PNN in brain cells and fibroblasts, respectively. The domain structure of variants GluR6D and GluR6E revealed the absence of three transmembrane domains. The lack of these domains suggests that the mature receptors arising from these variant subunits may not function as active channels. Based on these structural features in GluR6D and GluR6E, and the observations that GluR6B, GluR6C, GluR6D and GluR6E are exclusively expressed in non-neuronal cells, it is likely that these receptor subunits function as non-channel signaling proteins. PMID:20230879

  8. Genetic diversity and molecular evolution of Naga King Chili inferred from internal transcribed spacer sequence of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Kehie, Mechuselie; Kumaria, Suman; Devi, Khumuckcham Sangeeta; Tandon, Pramod

    2016-02-01

    Sequences of the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) of nuclear ribosomal DNAs were explored to study the genetic diversity and molecular evolution of Naga King Chili. Our study indicated the occurrence of nucleotide polymorphism and haplotypic diversity in the ITS regions. The present study demonstrated that the variability of ITS1 with respect to nucleotide diversity and sequence polymorphism exceeded that of ITS2. Sequence analysis of 5.8S gene revealed a much conserved region in all the accessions of Naga King Chili. However, strong phylogenetic information of this species is the distinct 13 bp deletion in the 5.8S gene which discriminated Naga King Chili from the rest of the Capsicum sp. Neutrality test results implied a neutral variation, and population seems to be evolving at drift-mutation equilibrium and free from directed selection pressure. Furthermore, mismatch analysis showed multimodal curve indicating a demographic equilibrium. Phylogenetic relationships revealed by Median Joining Network (MJN) analysis denoted a clear discrimination of Naga King Chili from its closest sister species (Capsicum chinense and Capsicum frutescens). The absence of star-like network of haplotypes suggested an ancient population expansion of this chili. PMID:26862481

  9. Genetic diversity and molecular evolution of Naga King Chili inferred from internal transcribed spacer sequence of nuclear ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Kehie, Mechuselie; Kumaria, Suman; Devi, Khumuckcham Sangeeta; Tandon, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    Sequences of the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) of nuclear ribosomal DNAs were explored to study the genetic diversity and molecular evolution of Naga King Chili. Our study indicated the occurrence of nucleotide polymorphism and haplotypic diversity in the ITS regions. The present study demonstrated that the variability of ITS1 with respect to nucleotide diversity and sequence polymorphism exceeded that of ITS2. Sequence analysis of 5.8S gene revealed a much conserved region in all the accessions of Naga King Chili. However, strong phylogenetic information of this species is the distinct 13 bp deletion in the 5.8S gene which discriminated Naga King Chili from the rest of the Capsicum sp. Neutrality test results implied a neutral variation, and population seems to be evolving at drift–mutation equilibrium and free from directed selection pressure. Furthermore, mismatch analysis showed multimodal curve indicating a demographic equilibrium. Phylogenetic relationships revealed by Median Joining Network (MJN) analysis denoted a clear discrimination of Naga King Chili from its closest sister species (Capsicumchinense and Capsicumfrutescens). The absence of star-like network of haplotypes suggested an ancient population expansion of this chili. PMID:26862481

  10. Novel polymorphism of internal transcribed spacers (ITS) and their utilization in phylogenetic analysis of Neanthes glandicincta (Annelida: Polychaeta: Nereididae).

    PubMed

    Shen, Ping-Ping; Zhou, Hong; Gu, Ji-Guang

    2012-08-01

    Sequences of internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) are increasingly being used to infer phylogenetic relationships at or below species levels. Here we report a novel case of ITS polymorphism within Neanthes glandicincta (Annelida: Polychaeta: Nereididae). Two types of ITS sequence (Type I and Type II) were cloned and sequenced, which showed significant differences both in nucleotide composition and length. Variations of these two types sequences also differed from each other with Type I was highly divergent while Type II was highly conserved. Phylogenetic trees inferred from ITS1 and ITS2 sequences showed striking discrepancy in N. glandicincta. Non-concerted evolution of multi-gene is suggested to be responsible for the high degree of polymorphism in ITS regions. Due to the two divergent types of ITS presented within a single N. glandicincta individual, the utilization of ITS regions for delineation of population or closely related species cannot be substantiated. The finding of different types of ITS in a single individual also stresses the need for analyzing a large number of clones whenever ITS sequences obtained by PCR amplification and cloning are being used in phylogenetic reconstruction.

  11. MAG4 versus alternative techniques for forecasting active region flare productivity

    PubMed Central

    Falconer, David A; Moore, Ronald L; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F; Khazanov, Igor

    2014-01-01

    MAG4 is a technique of forecasting an active region's rate of production of major flares in the coming few days from a free magnetic energy proxy. We present a statistical method of measuring the difference in performance between MAG4 and comparable alternative techniques that forecast an active region's major-flare productivity from alternative observed aspects of the active region. We demonstrate the method by measuring the difference in performance between the “Present MAG4” technique and each of three alternative techniques, called “McIntosh Active-Region Class,” “Total Magnetic Flux,” and “Next MAG4.” We do this by using (1) the MAG4 database of magnetograms and major flare histories of sunspot active regions, (2) the NOAA table of the major-flare productivity of each of 60 McIntosh active-region classes of sunspot active regions, and (3) five technique performance metrics (Heidke Skill Score, True Skill Score, Percent Correct, Probability of Detection, and False Alarm Rate) evaluated from 2000 random two-by-two contingency tables obtained from the databases. We find that (1) Present MAG4 far outperforms both McIntosh Active-Region Class and Total Magnetic Flux, (2) Next MAG4 significantly outperforms Present MAG4, (3) the performance of Next MAG4 is insensitive to the forward and backward temporal windows used, in the range of one to a few days, and (4) forecasting from the free-energy proxy in combination with either any broad category of McIntosh active-region classes or any Mount Wilson active-region class gives no significant performance improvement over forecasting from the free-energy proxy alone (Present MAG4). Key Points Quantitative comparison of performance of pairs of forecasting techniques Next MAG4 forecasts major flares more accurately than Present MAG4 Present MAG4 forecast outperforms McIntosh AR Class and total magnetic flux PMID:26213517

  12. Cloning and characterization of the 5' flanking region of the sialomucin complex/rat Muc4 gene: promoter activity in cultured cells.

    PubMed Central

    Price-Schiavi, S A; Perez, A; Barco, R; Carraway, K L

    2000-01-01

    Sialomucin complex (SMC/Muc4) is a heterodimeric glycoprotein complex consisting of a mucin subunit ascites sialoglycoprotein-1 (ASGP-1) and a transmembrane subunit (ASGP-2), which is aberrantly expressed on the surfaces of a variety of tumour cells. SMC is transcribed from a single gene, translated into a large polypeptide precursor, and further processed to yield the mature ASGP-1/ASGP-2 complex. SMC has complex spatial and temporal expression patterns in the normal rat, suggesting that it has complex regulatory mechanisms. A crude exon/intron map of the 5' regions of the SMC/Muc4 gene generated from clones isolated from a normal rat liver genomic DNA library reveals that this gene has a small first exon comprising the 5' untranslated region and signal peptide, followed by a large intron. The second exon appears to be large, comprising the 5' unique region and a large part (probably all) of the tandem repeat domain. This structure is strikingly similar to that reported for the human MUC4 gene. Using PCR-based DNA walking, 2.4 kb of the 5'-flanking region of the SMC/Muc4 gene was cloned and characterized. Promoter-pattern searches yielded multiple motifs commonly found in tissue-specific promoters. Reporter constructs generated from this 2.4 kb fragment demonstrate promoter activity in primary rat mammary epithelial cells (MEC), the human colon tumour cell line HCT-116, and the human lung carcinoma cell line NCI-H292, but not in COS-7 cells, suggesting epithelial cell specificity. Deletion constructs of this sequence transfected into rat MEC or HCT-116 cells demonstrate greatly varying levels of activity, suggesting that there are positive and negative, as well as tissue-specific, regulatory elements in this sequence. Taken together, these data suggest that the rat SMC/Muc4 promoter has been identified, that it is tissue- (epithelial cell-) specific, and that there are both positive and negative, as well as tissue-specific, regulatory elements in the sequence

  13. A Search for Coriolis Forces Acting on Tilt in Bipolar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClintock, B. H.

    2013-12-01

    Bipolar active regions tend to be tilted with respect to the East - West equator of the Sun in accordance with Joy's law that describes the average tilt angle as a function of latitude. As individual bipolar active regions emerge, tilt angles vary with time. Data collected by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory at a higher cadence than previous data allow for a more continuous analysis of emerging regions over their lifetimes. It is theorized that rising magnetic flux-tubes, which emerge as active regions on the surface, are tilted by Coriolis forces acting on the retrograde flow inside the tubes. We will search for and measure any decrease in tilt near the end of emergence, as an indicator of Coriolis forces ending.

  14. MAGNETIC FIELD TOPOLOGY AND THE THERMAL STRUCTURE OF THE CORONA OVER SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; DeRosa, Marc L.; Title, Alan M.

    2010-08-20

    Solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images of quiescent active-region coronae are characterized by ensembles of bright 1-2 MK loops that fan out from select locations. We investigate the conditions associated with the formation of these persistent, relatively cool, loop fans within and surrounding the otherwise 3-5 MK coronal environment by combining EUV observations of active regions made with TRACE with global source-surface potential-field models based on the full-sphere photospheric field from the assimilation of magnetograms that are obtained by the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on SOHO. We find that in the selected active regions with largely potential-field configurations these fans are associated with (quasi-)separatrix layers (QSLs) within the strong-field regions of magnetic plage. Based on the empirical evidence, we argue that persistent active-region cool-loop fans are primarily related to the pronounced change in connectivity across a QSL to widely separated clusters of magnetic flux, and confirm earlier work that suggested that neither a change in loop length nor in base field strengths across such topological features are of prime importance to the formation of the cool-loop fans. We discuss the hypothesis that a change in the distribution of coronal heating with height may be involved in the phenomenon of relatively cool coronal loop fans in quiescent active regions.

  15. 50 CFR 217.151 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... activity and specified geographical region. (a) Regulations in this subpart apply only to Port Dolphin Energy LLC (Port Dolphin) and those persons it authorizes to conduct activities on its behalf for the... incidental to construction and operation of the Port Dolphin Deepwater Port (Port). (b) The taking of...

  16. 50 CFR 217.151 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... activity and specified geographical region. (a) Regulations in this subpart apply only to Port Dolphin Energy LLC (Port Dolphin) and those persons it authorizes to conduct activities on its behalf for the... incidental to construction and operation of the Port Dolphin Deepwater Port (Port). (b) The taking of...

  17. 50 CFR 217.170 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Operation and Maintenance of the Neptune Liquefied Natural Gas Facility Off Massachusetts § 217.170 Specified activity and specified geographical region. (a) Regulations in this subpart apply only to Neptune LNG LLC (Neptune) and those persons it authorizes to conduct activities on its behalf for the...

  18. 50 CFR 217.170 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Operation and Maintenance of the Neptune Liquefied Natural Gas Facility Off Massachusetts § 217.170 Specified activity and specified geographical region. (a) Regulations in this subpart apply only to Neptune LNG LLC (Neptune) and those persons it authorizes to conduct activities on its behalf for the...

  19. 50 CFR 217.170 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Operation and Maintenance of the Neptune Liquefied Natural Gas Facility Off Massachusetts § 217.170 Specified activity and specified geographical region. (a) Regulations in this subpart apply only to Neptune LNG LLC (Neptune) and those persons it authorizes to conduct activities on its behalf for the...

  20. 50 CFR 217.170 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Operation and Maintenance of the Neptune Liquefied Natural Gas Facility Off Massachusetts § 217.170 Specified activity and specified geographical region. (a) Regulations in this subpart apply only to Neptune LNG LLC (Neptune) and those persons it authorizes to conduct activities on its behalf for the...

  1. Regional Quality Assurance Activity in Higher Education in Southeast Asia: Its Characteristics and Driving Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umemiya, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    This article analyses the characteristics and driving forces of regional quality assurance activity in Southeast Asia, which has been actively promoted in recent years by the ASEAN University Network, an organisation for higher education under the auspices of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). There are now more collaborative…

  2. Regional brain activation during meditation shows time and practice effects: an exploratory FMRI study.

    PubMed

    Baron Short, E; Kose, Samet; Mu, Qiwen; Borckardt, Jeffery; Newberg, Andrew; George, Mark S; Kozel, F Andrew

    2010-03-01

    Meditation involves attentional regulation and may lead to increased activity in brain regions associated with attention such as dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined whether DLPFC and ACC were activated during meditation. Subjects who meditate were recruited and scanned on a 3.0 Tesla scanner. Subjects meditated for four sessions of 12 min and performed four sessions of a 6 min control task. Individual and group t-maps were generated of overall meditation response versus control response and late meditation response versus early meditation response for each subject and time courses were plotted. For the overall group (n = 13), and using an overall brain analysis, there were no statistically significant regional activations of interest using conservative thresholds. A region of interest analysis of the entire group time courses of DLPFC and ACC were statistically more active throughout meditation in comparison to the control task. Moreover, dividing the cohort into short (n = 8) and long-term (n = 5) practitioners (>10 years) revealed that the time courses of long-term practitioners had significantly more consistent and sustained activation in the DLPFC and the ACC during meditation versus control in comparison to short-term practitioners. The regional brain activations in the more practised subjects may correlate with better sustained attention and attentional error monitoring. In summary, brain regions associated with attention vary over the time of a meditation session and may differ between long- and short-term meditation practitioners.

  3. Medical Image Segmentation Based on a Hybrid Region-Based Active Contour Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tingting; Xu, Haiyong; Liu, Zhen; Zhao, Yiming; Tian, Wenzhe

    2014-01-01

    A novel hybrid region-based active contour model is presented to segment medical images with intensity inhomogeneity. The energy functional for the proposed model consists of three weighted terms: global term, local term, and regularization term. The total energy is incorporated into a level set formulation with a level set regularization term, from which a curve evolution equation is derived for energy minimization. Experiments on some synthetic and real images demonstrate that our model is more efficient compared with the localizing region-based active contours (LRBAC) method, proposed by Lankton, and more robust compared with the Chan-Vese (C-V) active contour model. PMID:25028593

  4. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Activity in the Gulf Coast Region of Mexico, 2003–2010

    PubMed Central

    Adams, A. Paige; Navarro-Lopez, Roberto; Ramirez-Aguilar, Francisco J.; Lopez-Gonzalez, Irene; Leal, Grace; Flores-Mayorga, Jose M.; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia P. A.; Saxton-Shaw, Kali D.; Singh, Amber J.; Borland, Erin M.; Powers, Ann M.; Tesh, Robert B.; Weaver, Scott C.; Estrada-Franco, Jose G.

    2012-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) has been the causative agent for sporadic epidemics and equine epizootics throughout the Americas since the 1930s. In 1969, an outbreak of Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) spread rapidly from Guatemala and through the Gulf Coast region of Mexico, reaching Texas in 1971. Since this outbreak, there have been very few studies to determine the northward extent of endemic VEEV in this region. This study reports the findings of serologic surveillance in the Gulf Coast region of Mexico from 2003–2010. Phylogenetic analysis was also performed on viral isolates from this region to determine whether there have been substantial genetic changes in VEEV since the 1960s. Based on the findings of this study, the Gulf Coast lineage of subtype IE VEEV continues to actively circulate in this region of Mexico and appears to be responsible for infection of humans and animals throughout this region, including the northern State of Tamaulipas, which borders Texas. PMID:23133685

  5. MAG4 versus Alternative Techniques for Forecasting Active-Region Flare Productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ronald L.; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F; Khazanov, Igor

    2014-06-01

    MAG4 is a technique of forecasting an active region's rate of production of major flares in the coming few days from a free-magnetic-energy proxy. We present a statistical method of measuring the difference in performance between MAG4 and comparable alternative techniques that forecast an active region’s major-flare productivity from alternative observed aspects of the active region. We demonstrate the method by measuring the difference in performance between the “Present MAG4” technique and each of three alternative techniques, called “McIntosh Active-Region Class,” “Total Magnetic Flux,” and “Next MAG4.” We do this by using (1) the MAG4 database of magnetograms and major-flare histories of sunspot active regions, (2) the NOAA table of the major-flare productivity of each of 60 McIntosh active-region classes of sunspot active regions, and (3) five technique-performance metrics (Heidke Skill Score, True Skill Score, Percent Correct, Probability of Detection, and False Alarm Rate) evaluated from 2000 random two-by-two contingency tables obtained from the databases. We find that (1) Present MAG4 far outperforms both McIntosh Active-Region Class and Total Magnetic Flux, (2) Next MAG4 significantly outperforms Present MAG4, (3) the performance of Next MAG4 is insensitive to the forward and backward temporal windows used, in the range of one to a few days, and (4) forecasting from the free-energy proxy in combination with either any broad category of McIntosh active-region classes or any Mount Wilson active-region class gives no significant performance improvement over forecasting from the free-energy proxy alone (Present MAG4). Funding for this research came from NASA’s Game Changing Development Program, Johnson Space Center’s Space Radiation Analysis Group (SRAG), and AFOSR’s Multi-University Research Initiative. In particular, funding was facilitated by Dr. Dan Fry (NASA-JSC) and David Moore (NASA-LaRC).

  6. Cell-free translation of RNA synthesized in vitro by a transcribing nucleoprotein complex prepared from purified vesicular stomatitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Preston, C M; Szilagyi, J F

    1977-01-01

    The RNA species synthesized in vitro by a transcribing nucleoprotein (TNP) complex of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) were translated with high efficiency in a fractionated cell-free system derived from reticulocytes. The use of TNP complexes isolated from VSV Indiana, VSV New Jersey, and Chandipura viruses showed that in each case the predominant polypeptides synthesized had electrophoretic mobilities identical to their virion N, NS, and M polypeptides in proportions reflecting those found in infected cells rather than purified virions. A minor polypeptide corresponding to unglycosylated polypeptide G was also observed, but the in vitro synthesis of polypeptide L was not detected. The addition of RNase inhibitor to transcription mixtures markedly increased the rate of RNA synthesis. Furthermore, the messenger activity of the RNA was significantly enhanced. The inclusion of S-adenosyl L-methionine during transcription substantially increased the messenger activity of the product RNA, suggesting a requirement for methylation. Fractionation by oligodeoxythymidylic acid-cellulose chromatography revealed that the RNA required a polyadnylic acid tract for messenger activity. Images PMID:191633

  7. The lightning activity associated with the dry and moist convections in the Himalayan Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penki, R. K.; Kamra, A. K.

    2013-06-01

    Lightning activity in the dry environment of northwest India and Pakistan (NW) and in the moist environment of northeast India (NE) has been examined from the Optical Transient Detector and Lightning Imaging Sensor data obtained from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite during 1995-2010. In the NW region, seasonal variation of flash rate is annual with a maximum in July but is semi-annual with a primary maximum in April and a secondary maximum in September, in the NE region. On diurnal scale, flash rate is the maximum in the afternoons, in both the NE and NW regions. The correlation of flash rate with convective parameters, viz. surface temperature, convective available potential energy (CAPE) and outgoing long-wave radiation is better with convective activity in the NW than in the NE region. Mean value of aerosol optical depth at 550 nm is ~ 26% higher and is highly correlated with flash rate in NW as compared to that in NE. Results indicate that CAPE is ~ 120 times more efficient in NW than in the NE region for production of lightning. The empirical orthogonal function analysis of flash rate, surface temperature, and CAPE shows that variance of lightning activity in these regions cannot be fully explained by the variance in the surface temperature and CAPE alone, and that some other factors, such as orographic lifting, precipitation, topography, etc., may also contribute to this variance in these mountainous regions. Further, the increase in CAPE due to orographic lifting in the Himalayan foothills in the NE region may contribute to ~ 7.5% increase in lightning activity. Relative roles of the thermally induced and moisture-induced changes in CAPE are examined in these regions. This study merely raises the questions, and that additional research is required for explaining the fundamental reasons for the reported observations here.

  8. Regional distribution pattern of groundwater heavy metals resulting from agricultural activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, J.; Mahvi, A. H.; Jahed, G. R.; Babaei, A. A.

    2008-09-01

    Contaminations of groundwater by heavy metals due to agricultural activities are growing recently. The objective of this study was to evaluate and map regional patterns of heavy metals (Cd, Zn and Cu) in groundwater on a plain with high agricultural activities. The study was conducted to investigate the concentration of heavy metals and distribution in groundwater in regions of Shush Danial and Andimeshk aquifers in the southern part of Iran. Presently, groundwater is the only appropriate and widely used source of drinking water for rural and urban communities in this region. The region covers an area of 1,100 km2 between the Dez and Karkhe rivers, which lead to the Persian Gulf. For this study, the region was divided into four sub-regions A, B, C and D. Additionally, 168 groundwater samples were collected from 42 water wells during the earlier months of 2004. The flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS-Flame) was used to measure the concentration of heavy metals in water samples and the Surfer software was used for determination of the contour map of metal distribution. The results demonstrated that in all of the samples, Cd and Zn concentrations were below the EPA MCLG and EPA secondary standard, respectively. However, the Cu contents of 4.8 % of all samples were higher than EPA MCL. It is also indicated that the concentrations of metals were more pronounced at the southern part of the studied region than at the others. The analysis of fertilizers applied for agricultural activities at this region also indicated that a great majority of the above-mentioned heavy metals were discharged into the environment. Absence of confining layers, proximity to land surface, excess agricultural activities in the southern part and groundwater flow direction that is generally from the north to the southern parts in this area make the southern region of the Shush plain especially vulnerable to pollution by heavy metals than by other contaminants.

  9. Determining heating timescales in solar active region cores from AIA/SDO Fe XVIII images

    SciTech Connect

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry P.

    2014-03-01

    We present a study of the frequency of transient brightenings in the core of solar active regions as observed in the Fe XVIII line component of AIA/SDO 94 Å filter images. The Fe XVIII emission is isolated using an empirical correction to remove the contribution of 'warm' emission to this channel. Comparing with simultaneous observations from EIS/Hinode, we find that the variability observed in Fe XVIII is strongly correlated with the emission from lines formed at similar temperatures. We examine the evolution of loops in the cores of active regions at various stages of evolution. Using a newly developed event detection algorithm, we characterize the distribution of event frequency, duration, and magnitude in these active regions. These distributions are similar for regions of similar age and show a consistent pattern as the regions age. This suggests that these characteristics are important constraints for models of solar active regions. We find that the typical frequency of the intensity fluctuations is about 1400 s for any given line of sight, i.e., about two to three events per hour. Using the EBTEL 0D hydrodynamic model, however, we show that this only sets a lower limit on the heating frequency along that line of sight.

  10. Differential age-related changes in mitochondrial DNA repair activities in mouse brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Gredilla, Ricardo; Garm, Christian; Holm, Rikke; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Stevnsner, Tinna

    2008-01-01

    Aging in the brain is characterized by increased susceptibility to neuronal loss and functional decline, and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are thought to play an important role in these processes. Due to the proximity of mtDNA to the main sites of mitochondrial free radical generation, oxidative stress is a major source of DNA mutations in mitochondria. The base excision repair (BER) pathway removes oxidative lesions from mtDNA, thereby constituting an important mechanism to avoid accumulation of mtDNA mutations. The complexity of the brain implies that exposure and defence against oxidative stress varies among brain regions and hence some regions may be particularly prone to accumulation of mtDNA damages. In the current study we investigated the efficiency of the BER pathway throughout the murine lifespan in mitochondria from cortex and hippocampus, regions that are central in mammalian cognition, and which are severely affected during aging and in neurodegenerative diseases. A regional specific regulation of mitochondrial DNA repair activities was observed with aging. In cortical mitochondria, DNA glycosylase activities peaked at middle-age followed by a significant drop at old age. However, only minor changes were observed in hippocampal mitochondria during the whole lifespan of the animals. Furthermore, DNA glycosylase activities were lower in hippocampal than in cortical mitochondria. Mitochondrial AP endonuclease activity increased in old animals in both brain regions. Our data suggest an important regional specific regulation of mitochondrial BER during aging. PMID:18701195

  11. Identification of furin pro-region determinants involved in folding and activation.

    PubMed Central

    Bissonnette, Lyne; Charest, Gabriel; Longpré, Jean-Michel; Lavigne, Pierre; Leduc, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The pro-region of the subtilisin-like convertase furin acts early in the biosynthetic pathway as an intramolecular chaperone to enable proper folding of the zymogen, and later on as an inhibitor to constrain the activity of the enzyme until it reaches the trans -Golgi network. To identify residues that are important for pro-region function, we initially identified amino acids that are conserved among the pro-regions of various mammalian convertases. Site-directed mutagenesis of 17 selected amino acids within the 89-residue pro-region and biosynthetic labelling revealed that I60A-furin and H66A-furin were rapidly degraded in a proteasome-dependent manner, while W34A-furin and F67A-furin did not show any autocatalytic activation. Intriguingly, the latter mutants proteolytically cleaved pro-von Willebrand factor precursor to the mature polypeptide, suggesting that the mutations permitted proper folding, but did not allow the pro-region to exercise its role in inhibiting the enzyme. Homology modelling of furin's pro-region revealed that residues Ile-60 and His-66 might be crucial in forming the binding interface with the catalytic domain, while residues Trp-34 and Phe-67 might be involved in maintaining a hydrophobic core within the pro-region itself. These results provide structural insights into the dual role of furin's pro-region. PMID:14741044

  12. Variegation of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in regions showing activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oklay, N.; Vincent, J.-B.; Fornasier, S.; Pajola, M.; Besse, S.; Davidsson, B. J. R.; Lara, L. M.; Mottola, S.; Naletto, G.; Sierks, H.; Barucci, A. M.; Scholten, F.; Preusker, F.; Pommerol, A.; Masoumzadeh, N.; Lazzarin, M.; Barbieri, C.; Lamy, P. L.; Rodrigo, R.; Koschny, D.; Rickman, H.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Bertini, I.; Bodewits, D.; Cremonese, G.; Da Deppo, V.; Debei, S.; De Cecco, M.; Fulle, M.; Groussin, O.; Gutiérrez, P. J.; Güttler, C.; Hall, I.; Hofmann, M.; Hviid, S. F.; Ip, W.-H.; Jorda, L.; Keller, H. U.; Knollenberg, J.; Kovacs, G.; Kramm, J.-R.; Kührt, E.; Küppers, M.; Lin, Z.-Y.; Lopez Moreno, J. J.; Marzari, F.; Moreno, F.; Shi, X.; Thomas, N.; Toth, I.; Tubiana, C.

    2016-02-01

    Aims.We carried out an investigation of the surface variegation of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the detection of regions showing activity, the determination of active and inactive surface regions of the comet with spectral methods, and the detection of fallback material. Methods: We analyzed multispectral data generated with Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System (OSIRIS) narrow angle camera (NAC) observations via spectral techniques, reflectance ratios, and spectral slopes in order to study active regions. We applied clustering analysis to the results of the reflectance ratios, and introduced the new technique of activity thresholds to detect areas potentially enriched in volatiles. Results: Local color inhomogeneities are detected over the investigated surface regions. Active regions, such as Hapi, the active pits of Seth and Ma'at, the clustered and isolated bright features in Imhotep, the alcoves in Seth and Ma'at, and the large alcove in Anuket, have bluer spectra than the overall surface. The spectra generated with OSIRIS NAC observations are dominated by cometary emissions of around 700 nm to 750 nm as a result of the coma between the comet's surface and the camera. One of the two isolated bright features in the Imhotep region displays an absorption band of around 700 nm, which probably indicates the existence of hydrated silicates. An absorption band with a center between 800-900 nm is tentatively observed in some regions of the nucleus surface. This absorption band can be explained by the crystal field absorption of Fe2+, which is a common spectral feature seen in silicates.

  13. Minifilament Eruptions that Drive Coronal Jets in a Solar Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David; Panesar, Navdeep; Akiyama, Sachiko; Yashiro, Seiji; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2016-05-01

    Solar coronal jets are common in both coronal holes and in active regions. Recently, Sterling et al. (2015), using data from Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA, found that coronal jets originating in polar coronal holes result from the eruption of small-scale filaments (minifilaments). The jet bright point (JBP) seen in X-rays and hotter EUV channels off to one side of the base of the jet's spire develops at the location where the minifilament erupts, consistent with the JBPs being miniature versions of typical solar flares that occur in the wake of large-scale filament eruptions. Here we consider whether active region coronal jets also result from the same minifilament-eruption mechanism, or whether they instead result from a different mechanism, such as the hitherto popular ``emerging flux'' model for jets. We present observations of an on-disk active region that produced numerous jets on 2012 June 30, using data from SDO/AIA and HMI, and from GOES/SXI. We find that several of these active region jets also originate with eruptions of miniature filaments (size scale ~20'') emanating from small-scale magnetic neutral lines of the region. This demonstrates that active region coronal jets are indeed frequently driven by minifilament eruptions. Other jets from the active region were also consistent with their drivers being minifilament eruptions, but we could not confirm this because the onsets of those jets were hidden from our view. This work was supported by funding from NASA/LWS, NASA/HGI, and Hinode.

  14. Different Modes of Turbulence in the Active Regions of the Solar Photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, L. V.; Kostik, R. I.; Cheremnykh, O. K.

    In work the range of different methods for the analysis of characteristics of turbulent processes in the active regions of the solar photosphere has been used. The changes of fluctuations distribution function and its moments were analyzed, spectral analysis was carried out.It was found out from the observations of active region carried out with the 70-cm vacuum tower telescope VTT in Isanie (Tenerife Island, Spain) that the turbulent processes in the sun photosphere are characterized by two different spectra of turbulence. The first one of them is well known Kolmohorov spectrum, which describes the plasma with zero mean magnetic field. The second one is the Kraichnan spectrum with a different from zero mean magnetic field. Transition from one spectrum type to another one occurs at scale of 3 Mm.We have to note that the scale 3 Mm corresponds to one of mesogranulation and testifies about non-zero mean magnetic fields for the consideration of regions exceeding the granulation in active regions of the photosphere. Besides, this clears the possibility of appearance of selforganizing magnetic plasma structures such as spots, active regions and complexes of activity.

  15. Spontaneous regional brain activity links restrained eating to later weight gain among young women.

    PubMed

    Dong, Debo; Jackson, Todd; Wang, Yulin; Chen, Hong

    2015-07-01

    Theory and prospective studies have linked restrained eating (RE) to risk for future weight gain and the onset of obesity, but little is known about resting state neural activity that may underlie this association. To address this gap, resting fMRI was used to test the extent to which spontaneous neural activity in regions associated with inhibitory control and food reward account for potential relations between baseline RE levels and changes in body weight among dieters over a one-year interval. Spontaneous regional activity patterns corresponding to RE were assessed among 50 young women using regional homogeneity (ReHo) analysis, which measured temporal synchronization of spontaneous fluctuations within a food deprivation condition. Analyses indicated higher baseline RE scores predicted more weight gain at a one-year follow-up. Furthermore, food-deprived dieting women with high dietary restraint scores exhibited more spontaneous local activity in brain regions associated with the expectation and valuation for food reward [i.e., orbitofrontal cortex (OFC)/ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC)] and reduced spontaneous local activity in inhibitory control regions [i.e., bilateral dorsal-lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC)] at baseline. Notably, the association between baseline RE and follow-up weight gain was mediated by decreased local synchronization of the right DLPFC in particular and, to a lesser degree, increased local synchronization of the right VMPFC. In conjunction with previous research, these findings highlight possible neural mechanisms underlying the relation between RE and risk for weight gain. PMID:26004091

  16. Spontaneous regional brain activity links restrained eating to later weight gain among young women.

    PubMed

    Dong, Debo; Jackson, Todd; Wang, Yulin; Chen, Hong

    2015-07-01

    Theory and prospective studies have linked restrained eating (RE) to risk for future weight gain and the onset of obesity, but little is known about resting state neural activity that may underlie this association. To address this gap, resting fMRI was used to test the extent to which spontaneous neural activity in regions associated with inhibitory control and food reward account for potential relations between baseline RE levels and changes in body weight among dieters over a one-year interval. Spontaneous regional activity patterns corresponding to RE were assessed among 50 young women using regional homogeneity (ReHo) analysis, which measured temporal synchronization of spontaneous fluctuations within a food deprivation condition. Analyses indicated higher baseline RE scores predicted more weight gain at a one-year follow-up. Furthermore, food-deprived dieting women with high dietary restraint scores exhibited more spontaneous local activity in brain regions associated with the expectation and valuation for food reward [i.e., orbitofrontal cortex (OFC)/ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC)] and reduced spontaneous local activity in inhibitory control regions [i.e., bilateral dorsal-lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC)] at baseline. Notably, the association between baseline RE and follow-up weight gain was mediated by decreased local synchronization of the right DLPFC in particular and, to a lesser degree, increased local synchronization of the right VMPFC. In conjunction with previous research, these findings highlight possible neural mechanisms underlying the relation between RE and risk for weight gain.

  17. The study of a spatial relationship between the Equatorial coronal hole and the Active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karna, Mahendra; Karna, Nishu

    2016-05-01

    The 11-year solar cycle is characterized by the periodic change in the solar activity like sunspot numbers, coronal holes, active regions, eruptions such as flares and coronal mass ejections. We study the relationship between equatorial coronal holes (ECH) and the active regions (AR) as coronal hole positions and sizes change with the solar cycle. We made a detailed study for two solar maximum: Solar Cycle 23 (1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002) and Solar Cycle 24 (2011, 2012 and 2013). We used publically available Heliophysics Feature Catalogue and NOAA Solar Geophysical data for. Moreover, we used daily Solar Region Summary (SRS) data from SWPC/NOAA website. We examined the position of ECH and AR and noted that during a maximum of 23, the majority of ECH were not near active regions. However, in cycle 24 coronal holes and equatorial holes were more close to each other. Moreover, we noticed the asymmetry in AR migrations towards the lower latitude in both Northern and Southern hemisphere in cycle 23. While, no such notable asymmetrical behavior was observed in a maximum of cycle 24. Our goal is to extend the study with cycle 21 and 22 and examine the correlation between equatorial holes, the active regions, and the flares. This combined study will shed light in determining the distribution of flares.

  18. Intragenomic heterogeneity of the 16S rRNA-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer among Pseudomonas syringae and Pseudomonas fluorescens strains.

    PubMed

    Milyutina, Irina A; Bobrova, Vera K; Matveeva, Eugenia V; Schaad, Norman W; Troitsky, Alexey V

    2004-10-01

    The 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS1) from 14 strains of Pseudomonas syringae and P. fluorescens were sequenced. ITS1 exhibited significant sequence variability among different operons within a single genome. From 1 to 4 types of ITS1 were found in individual genomes of the P. syringae and P. fluorescens strains. A total of eight ITS1 types were identified among strains studied. The ITS1 nucleotide sequences consisted of conserved blocks including, among others, a stem-forming region of box B, tRNAIle and tRNAAla genes and several variable blocks. The differences in the variable regions were mostly due to insertions and/or deletions of nucleotide blocks. The intragenomic heterogeneity of ITS1 was brought about by different combinations of variable blocks, which possibly have resulted from recombination and horizontal transfer.

  19. Mechanism of formation of a dipole magnetic field in the central regions of active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreasyan, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    A model of the formation of large-scale magnetic fields of dipole configuration in the central regions (r ≈ 100 pc) of active galaxies is studied. It is assumed that these regions contain a rapidly rotating, highly ionized gas (Ω ≈ 5·10-15 sec, Ne ≈ 103 cm-3). Ionized matter escapes from the center of the region with a velocity of several hundred km/sec and is entrained by the rotation of the surrounding medium. Biermann's "battery" effect [L. Biermann, Z. Naturforsch., 5a, 65 (1950)] operates under such conditions, and circular electric currents are formed in the medium, which amplify the dipole magnetic fields. During the active phase of a galaxy, about 108 years, the magnetic field strength at the boundary of this region may reach 10-4 10-3 G.

  20. Temperature structure of active regions deduced from helium-like sulphur lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, Tetsuya; Hara, Hirohisa; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Hiei, Eijiro; Bentley, Robert D.; Lang, James; Phillips, Kenneth J. H.; Pike, C. David; Fludra, Andrzej; Bromage, Barbara J. I.

    1995-01-01

    Solar active-region temperatures have been determined from the full-Sun spectra of helium-like sulfur (S XV) observed by the Bragg Crystal Spectrometer on Board the Yohkoh satellite. The average temperature deduced from S XV is demonstrated to vary with the solar activity level: A temperature of 2.5 x 10(exp 6) K is derived from the spectra taken during low solar activity, similar to the general corona, while 4 x 10(exp 6) K is obtained during a higher activity phase. For the latter, the high- temperature tail of the differential emission measure of active regions is found most likely due to the superposition of numerous flare-like events (micro/nano-flares).

  1. Seasonal forecasting of lightning and thunderstorm activity in tropical and temperate regions of the world.

    PubMed

    Dowdy, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Thunderstorms are convective systems characterised by the occurrence of lightning. Lightning and thunderstorm activity has been increasingly studied in recent years in relation to the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and various other large-scale modes of atmospheric and oceanic variability. Large-scale modes of variability can sometimes be predictable several months in advance, suggesting potential for seasonal forecasting of lightning and thunderstorm activity in various regions throughout the world. To investigate this possibility, seasonal lightning activity in the world's tropical and temperate regions is examined here in relation to numerous different large-scale modes of variability. Of the seven modes of variability examined, ENSO has the strongest relationship with lightning activity during each individual season, with relatively little relationship for the other modes of variability. A measure of ENSO variability (the NINO3.4 index) is significantly correlated to local lightning activity at 53% of locations for one or more seasons throughout the year. Variations in atmospheric parameters commonly associated with thunderstorm activity are found to provide a plausible physical explanation for the variations in lightning activity associated with ENSO. It is demonstrated that there is potential for accurately predicting lightning and thunderstorm activity several months in advance in various regions throughout the world. PMID:26865431

  2. Seasonal forecasting of lightning and thunderstorm activity in tropical and temperate regions of the world

    PubMed Central

    Dowdy, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Thunderstorms are convective systems characterised by the occurrence of lightning. Lightning and thunderstorm activity has been increasingly studied in recent years in relation to the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and various other large-scale modes of atmospheric and oceanic variability. Large-scale modes of variability can sometimes be predictable several months in advance, suggesting potential for seasonal forecasting of lightning and thunderstorm activity in various regions throughout the world. To investigate this possibility, seasonal lightning activity in the world’s tropical and temperate regions is examined here in relation to numerous different large-scale modes of variability. Of the seven modes of variability examined, ENSO has the strongest relationship with lightning activity during each individual season, with relatively little relationship for the other modes of variability. A measure of ENSO variability (the NINO3.4 index) is significantly correlated to local lightning activity at 53% of locations for one or more seasons throughout the year. Variations in atmospheric parameters commonly associated with thunderstorm activity are found to provide a plausible physical explanation for the variations in lightning activity associated with ENSO. It is demonstrated that there is potential for accurately predicting lightning and thunderstorm activity several months in advance in various regions throughout the world. PMID:26865431

  3. Seasonal forecasting of lightning and thunderstorm activity in tropical and temperate regions of the world.

    PubMed

    Dowdy, Andrew J

    2016-02-11

    Thunderstorms are convective systems characterised by the occurrence of lightning. Lightning and thunderstorm activity has been increasingly studied in recent years in relation to the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and various other large-scale modes of atmospheric and oceanic variability. Large-scale modes of variability can sometimes be predictable several months in advance, suggesting potential for seasonal forecasting of lightning and thunderstorm activity in various regions throughout the world. To investigate this possibility, seasonal lightning activity in the world's tropical and temperate regions is examined here in relation to numerous different large-scale modes of variability. Of the seven modes of variability examined, ENSO has the strongest relationship with lightning activity during each individual season, with relatively little relationship for the other modes of variability. A measure of ENSO variability (the NINO3.4 index) is significantly correlated to local lightning activity at 53% of locations for one or more seasons throughout the year. Variations in atmospheric parameters commonly associated with thunderstorm activity are found to provide a plausible physical explanation for the variations in lightning activity associated with ENSO. It is demonstrated that there is potential for accurately predicting lightning and thunderstorm activity several months in advance in various regions throughout the world.

  4. Plasma outflows at the border of active regions and the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuevo, F. A.; Mandrini, C. H.; Vásquez, A. M.; Deumoulin, P.; Van Driel-Gesztely, L.; Baker, D.; Cristiani, G. D.; Pick, M.; Culhane, J. L.

    We present a detailed topological analysis of active region (AR) 10978; based on a Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) model. AR 10978 is a standard bipolar region which appears fully covered by the magnetic field lines of a coronal streamer. Despite this simple magnetic configuration; our analysis shows that it is possible for the AR plasma; contained in the outflows observed at the AR borders; to be released into the solar wind via magnetic reconnection.

  5. Detection of cleavage products from an in vivo transcribed cis hairpin ribozyme in turnips using the CaMV plant virus.

    PubMed

    Borneman, J; Tritz, R; Hampel, A; Altschuler, M

    1995-07-01

    In order to examine ribozyme (Rz) activity in vivo, we have adapted a virus to deliver Rz to plants. DNA fragments that code for both active and mutant cis-hairpin Rz were cloned into the double-stranded DNA plant virus, cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV). These Rz constructs successfully infected Brassica campestris rapa (turnip). The plants that were infected with the active-Rz construct showed, on average, a one-week delay in the appearance of viral symptoms, when compared to the mutant-Rz control. Since CaMV replicates through reverse transcription of a full-length RNA intermediate, Rz cloned into the CaMV DNA should be transcribed within this viral RNA. If these Rz constructs cleave, the amount of intact virus RNA should be reduced, resulting in attenuated viral symptoms. In addition, lysate RNase protection assays showed fragments corresponding to the sizes of both the 5' and 3' cis cleavage products in the active Rz tissue. No cleavage products were observed from plant tissue infected with the mutant Rz. Both the attenuated systemic viral symptoms and the cleavage products from the protection assay strongly support in vivo transcription and cleavage of this hairpin Rz. This is the first report of an in vivo transcribed Rz showing cleaved products by direct RNA analysis (non-PCR) in plants or animals.

  6. Using Magnetic Helicity Diagnostics to Determine the Nature of Solar Active-Region Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgoulis, Manolis K.

    Employing a novel nonlinear force-free (NLFF) method that self-consistently infers instantaneous free magnetic-energy and relative magnetic-helicity budgets from single photospheric vector magnetograms, we recently constructed the magnetic energy-helicity (EH) diagram of solar active regions. The EH diagram implies dominant relative helicities of left-handed or right-handed chiralities for the great majority of active regions. The amplitude (budget) of these helicities scales monotonically with the free magnetic energy. This constructive, strongly preferential accumulation of a certain sense of magnetic helicity seems to disqualify recently proposed mechanisms relying on a largely random near-surface convection for the formation of the great majority of active regions. The existing qualitative formation mechanism for these regions remains the conventional Omega-loop emergence following a buoyant ascension from the bottom of the convection zone. However, exceptions to this rule include even eruptive active regions: NOAA AR 11283 is an obvious outlier to the EH diagram, involving significant free magnetic energy with a small relative magnetic helicity. Relying on a timeseries of vector magnetograms of this region, our methodology shows nearly canceling amounts of both senses of helicity and an overall course from a weakly left-handed to a weakly right-handed structure, in the course of which a major eruption occurs. For this and similarly behaving active regions the latest near-surface formation scenario might conceivably be employed successfully. Research partially supported by the EU Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement No. PIRG07-GA-2010-268245 and by the European Union Social Fund (ESF) and Greek national funds through the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" of the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) - Research Funding Program: Thales. Investing in knowledge society through the European Social Fund.

  7. UVCS Observations of Slow Plasma Flow in the Corona Above Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, R.; Habbal, S. R.

    2005-05-01

    The elusive source of slow solar wind has been the subject of ongoing discussion and debate. Observations of solar wind speed near the Earth orbit, first with IPS (interplanetary scintillation) and later with Ulysses in situ measurements, have suggested that some slow solar wind may be associated with active regions (Kojima & Kakinuma 1987; Woo, Habbal & Feldman 2004). The ability of SOHO UVCS Doppler dimming measurements to provide estimates of solar wind speed in the corona (Kohl et al. 1995) has made it possible to investigate the distribution of flow near the Sun. In this paper, we will present results confirming that active regions are one of the sources of slow wind. Insight into the relationship between coronal streamers, active regions and plasma flow will also be discussed.

  8. [Clinical evaluation of rapid identification of bacteria from positive-testing blood culture bottles by internal transcribed spacer PCR].

    PubMed

    Senda, Yasuko; Fujita, Shinichi; Sakai, Yoshio; Wada, Takashi

    2011-05-01

    Delays in diagnosis and initiation of treatment of severe infections such as sepsis greatly influence patient prognosis. Our laboratory introduced rapid identification of bacterial species by PCR for positive blood culture samples as a routine laboratory test since April 2008. We extracted DNA directly from positive blood culture bottles and amplified the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of pathogenic microorganisms by PCR in order to identify bacterial species from electrophoretic patterns of PCR products. Of 167 strains from 167 samples excluding three samples with polymicrobial organisms, 144 strains (86.2%) were correctly identified at species level and 17 strains (10.2%) at genus level. The time required between DNA extraction and bacterial identification was about one and one-half hours. In patients with MRSA sepsis, the time of initiation of treatments such as administration of anti-MRSA drugs and intravascular catheter removal has clearly become earlier with the introduction of ITS-PCR, resulting decreased mortality from 35.0% to 16.0%. Rapid identification of pathogens directly from blood culture bottles by ITS-PCR seems to be useful for appropriate treatment of severe infectious diseases.

  9. Phylogeny of the Macaronesian endemic Crambe section Dendrocrambe (Brassicaceae) based on internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Francisco-Ortega, Javier; Fuertes-Aguilar, Javier; Kim, Seung-Chul; Santos-Guerra, Arnoldo; Crawford, Daniel J; Jansen, Robert K

    2002-12-01

    The 14 species of Crambe L. sect. Dendrocrambe DC. (Brassicaceae) form a monophyletic group endemic to the Canary and Madeira archipelagos. Both parsimony and maximum likelihood analyses of sequence data from the two internal transcribed spacer regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA were used to estimate phylogenetic relationships within this section. These analyses support the monophyly of three major clades. No clade is restricted to a single island, and therefore it appears that inter-island colonization has been the main avenue for speciation in these two archipelagos. The two species endemic to Fuerteventura (C. sventenii) and Madeira (C. fruticosa) comprise a clade, providing the first evidence for a floristic link between the Eastern Canary Islands and the archipelago of Madeira. Both maximum likelihood and weighted parsimony analyses show that this clade is sister to the two other clades, although bootstrap support for this relationship is weak. Parsimony optimizations of ecological zones and island distribution suggest a colonization route from the low-altitude areas of the lowland scrub toward the high-elevation areas of the laurel and pine forests. In addition, Tenerife is likely the ancestral island for species endemic to the five westernmost islands of Gran Canaria, La Gomera, El Hierro, La Palma, and Tenerife.

  10. Taxonomic and ecological discrimination of Fagaceae species based on internal transcribed spacer polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, João Paulo; Carvalho, Ana; Lima-Brito, José

    2014-11-26

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of ribosomal DNA has been used to confirm taxonomic classifications and define phylogenies in several plant species following sequencing or polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) techniques. In this study, co-dominant ITS PCR-RFLP molecular markers were produced in 30 Fagaceae individuals belonging to the Castanea, Fagus and Quercus genera in order to assess the potential of this technique for taxonomic discrimination and determination of phylogenies. The complete ITS region (ITS1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2) was amplified in most of the Fagaceae individuals as a single fragment of ∼700 bp. The ITS amplified products were digested with nine restriction enzymes, but only four (HaeIII, HpaII, TaqI and Sau96I) produced polymorphic/discriminative patterns. The total expected heterozygosity (HE) was 20.31 % and the gene diversity (I), 32.97 %. The ITS polymorphism was higher within the Quercus genus (85.3 %). The ITS PCR-RFLP markers clustered the Fagaceae species according to genus or infrageneric group (in the case of Quercus sp. individuals). Five oaks did not cluster in line with the adopted infrageneric classification, but three of these were grouped according to their actual ecological distributions. The ITS PCR-RFLP markers indicated their potential for phylogenetic studies since all Fagaceae individuals were discriminated according to genus, and most of the oaks were clustered according to infrageneric group or ecological area.

  11. Alternate pathways for processing in the internal transcribed spacer 1 in pre-rRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, L; Archer, R H; Zengel, J M

    1994-01-01

    We have extended the system of Nogi et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88, 1991, 3962-3966) for transcription of rRNA from an RNA polymerase II promoter in strains lacking functional RNA polymerase I. In our strains two differentially marked rRNA transcription units can be expressed alternately. Using this system we have shown that the A2 processing site in the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of the pre-rRNA is dispensable. According to the accepted processing scheme, the A2 site serves to separate the parts of the primary rRNA transcript that are destined for incorporation into the two ribosomal subunits. However, we have found that, when A2 is impaired, separation of the small and large subunit rRNAs occurs at a processing site further downstream in ITS1, indicating that alternate pathways for ITS1 processing exist. Short deletions in the A2 region still allow residual processing at the A2 site. Mapping of the cleavage sites in such deletion transcripts suggests that sequences downstream of the A2 site are used for determining the position of the cleavage. Images PMID:7816631

  12. Genetic variability in Melipona quinquefasciata (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponini) from northeastern Brazil determined using the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS1).

    PubMed

    Pereira, J O P; Freitas, B M; Jorge, D M M; Torres, D C; Soares, C E A; Grangeiro, T B

    2009-01-01

    Melipona quinquefasciata is a ground-nesting South American stingless bee whose geographic distribution was believed to comprise only the central and southern states of Brazil. We obtained partial sequences (about 500-570 bp) of first internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) nuclear ribosomal DNA from Melipona specimens putatively identified as M. quinquefasciata collected from different localities in northeastern Brazil. To confirm the taxonomic identity of the northeastern samples, specimens from the state of Goiás (Central region of Brazil) were included for comparison. All sequences were deposited in GenBank (accession numbers EU073751-EU073759). The mean nucleotide divergence (excluding sites with insertions/deletions) in the ITS1 sequences was only 1.4%, ranging from 0 to 4.1%. When the sites with insertions/deletions were also taken into account, sequence divergences varied from 0 to 5.3%. In all pairwise comparisons, the ITS1 sequence from the specimens collected in Goiás was most divergent compared to the ITS1 sequences of the bees from the other locations. However, neighbor-joining phylogenetic analysis showed that all ITS1 sequences from northeastern specimens along with the sample of Goiás were resolved in a single clade with a bootstrap support of 100%. The ITS1 sequencing data thus support the occurrence of M. quinquefasciata in northeast Brazil. PMID:19554762

  13. Satellite-tagged transcribing sequences in Bubalus bubalis genome undergo programmed modulation in meiocytes: possible implications for transcriptional inactivation.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, M; Gangadharan, S; Kapur, V; Azfer, M A; Prakash, B; Ali, S

    2001-09-01

    We cloned and sequenced a 1378 bp BamHI satellite DNA fraction from the water buffalo Bubalus bubalis and have studied its expression in different tissues. The GC-rich sequences of the resultant contig pDS5 crosshybridize only with bovid DNA and are not conserved evolutionarily. Typing of buffalo genomic DNA using pDS5 with several restriction enzymes revealed multilocus monomorphic bands. Similar typing of cattle, buffalo, goat, sheep, and gaur genomic DNA revealed variations in copy number and allele length giving rise to species-specific band patterns. Expression study of pDS5 in bubaline samples by RNA slot-blot, Northern blot, and RT-PCR showed various levels of signal in all the somatic tissues and germline cells except heart. A GenBank database search revealed homology of pDS5 sequences in the 5' region from nt 1-1261 with collagen gene. An AluI typing analysis of DNA from bubaline semen samples showed consistent loss of two bands. The presence of corresponding bands in somatic tissues suggests a sequence modulation within the pDS5 array in meiocytes during spermatogenesis, which is restored in the somatic cells after fertilization. Modulation of the satellite-tagged transcribing sequence in the meiocytes may be a mechanism of its inactivation.

  14. Detailed correlation of type III radio bursts with H alpha activity. I - Active region of 22 May 1970.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Pasachoff, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Comparison of observations of type III impulsive radio bursts made at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory with high-spatial-resolution cinematographic observations taken at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. Use of the log-periodic radio interferometer makes it possible to localize the radio emission uniquely. This study concentrates on the particularly active region close to the limb on May 22, 1970. Sixteen of the 17 groups were associated with some H alpha activity, 11 of them with the start of such activity.

  15. Theta-Modulated Gamma-Band Synchronization Among Activated Regions During a Verb Generation Task

    PubMed Central

    Doesburg, Sam M.; Vinette, Sarah A.; Cheung, Michael J.; Pang, Elizabeth W.

    2012-01-01

    Expressive language is complex and involves processing within a distributed network of cortical regions. Functional MRI and magnetoencephalography (MEG) have identified brain areas critical for expressive language, but how these regions communicate across the network remains poorly understood. It is thought that synchronization of oscillations between neural populations, particularly at a gamma rate (>30 Hz), underlies functional integration within cortical networks. Modulation of gamma rhythms by theta-band oscillations (4–8 Hz) has been proposed as a mechanism for the integration of local cell coalitions into large-scale networks underlying cognition and perception. The present study tested the hypothesis that these oscillatory mechanisms of functional integration were present within the expressive language network. We recorded MEG while subjects performed a covert verb generation task. We localized activated cortical regions using beamformer analysis, calculated inter-regional phase locking between activated areas, and measured modulation of inter-regional gamma synchronization by theta phase. The results show task-dependent gamma-band synchronization among regions activated during the performance of the verb generation task, and we provide evidence that these transient and periodic instances of high-frequency connectivity were modulated by the phase of cortical theta oscillations. These findings suggest that oscillatory synchronization and cross-frequency interactions are mechanisms for functional integration among distributed brain areas supporting expressive language processing. PMID:22707946

  16. Signatures of Slow Solar Wind Streams from Active Regions in the Inner Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slemzin, V.; Harra, L.; Urnov, A.; Kuzin, S.; Goryaev, F.; Berghmans, D.

    2013-08-01

    The identification of solar-wind sources is an important question in solar physics. The existing solar-wind models ( e.g., the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model) provide the approximate locations of the solar wind sources based on magnetic field extrapolations. It has been suggested recently that plasma outflows observed at the edges of active regions may be a source of the slow solar wind. To explore this we analyze an isolated active region (AR) adjacent to small coronal hole (CH) in July/August 2009. On 1 August, Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer observations showed two compact outflow regions in the corona. Coronal rays were observed above the active-region coronal hole (ARCH) region on the eastern limb on 31 July by STEREO-A/EUVI and at the western limb on 7 August by CORONAS- Photon/TESIS telescopes. In both cases the coronal rays were co-aligned with open magnetic-field lines given by the potential field source surface model, which expanded into the streamer. The solar-wind parameters measured by STEREO-B, ACE, Wind, and STEREO-A confirmed the identification of the ARCH as a source region of the slow solar wind. The results of the study support the suggestion that coronal rays can represent signatures of outflows from ARs propagating in the inner corona along open field lines into the heliosphere.

  17. Determining the solar wind speed above active regions using remote radio-wave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique has made it possible to measure the velocity of portions of the solar wind during its flow outward from the sun. This analysis utilizes spacecraft (ISEE-3) observations of radio emission generated in regions of the solar wind associated with solar active regions. By tracking the source of these radio waves over periods of days, it is possible to measure the motion of the emission regions. Evidence of solar wind acceleration during this outward flow, consistent with theoretical models, has also been obtained.

  18. ON THE STRENGTH OF THE HEMISPHERIC RULE AND THE ORIGIN OF ACTIVE-REGION HELICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-M.

    2013-10-01

    Vector magnetograph and morphological observations have shown that the solar magnetic field tends to have negative (positive) helicity in the northern (southern) hemisphere, although only ∼60%-70% of active regions appear to obey this 'hemispheric rule'. In contrast, at least ∼80% of quiescent filaments and filament channels that form during the decay of active regions follow the rule. We attribute this discrepancy to the difficulty in determining the helicity sign of newly emerged active regions, which are dominated by their current-free component; as the transverse field is canceled at the polarity inversion lines, however, the axial component becomes dominant there, allowing a more reliable determination of the original active-region chirality. We thus deduce that the hemispheric rule is far stronger than generally assumed, and cannot be explained by stochastic processes. Earlier studies have shown that the twist associated with the axial tilt of active regions is too small to account for the observed helicity; here, both tilt and twist are induced by the Coriolis force acting on the diverging flow in the emerging flux tube. However, in addition to this east-west expansion about the apex of the loop, each of its legs must expand continually in cross section during its rise through the convection zone, thereby acquiring a further twist through the Coriolis force. Since this transverse pressure effect is not limited by drag or tension forces, the final twist depends mainly on the rise time, and may be large enough to explain the observed active-region helicity.

  19. Light Bridge in a Developing Active Region. I. Observation of Light Bridge and its Dynamic Activity Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, Shin; Katsukawa, Yukio; Cheung, Mark C. M.

    2015-10-01

    Light bridges, the bright structures that divide the umbra of sunspots and pores into smaller pieces, are known to produce a wide variety of activity events in solar active regions (ARs). It is also known that the light bridges appear in the assembling process of nascent sunspots. The ultimate goal of this series of papers is to reveal the nature of light bridges in developing ARs and the occurrence of activity events associated with the light bridge structures from both observational and numerical approaches. In this first paper, exploiting the observational data obtained by Hinode, the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we investigate the detailed structure of the light bridge in NOAA AR 11974 and its dynamic activity phenomena. As a result, we find that the light bridge has a weak, horizontal magnetic field, which is transported from the interior by a large-scale convective upflow and is surrounded by strong, vertical fields of adjacent pores. In the chromosphere above the bridge, a transient brightening occurs repeatedly and intermittently, followed by a recurrent dark surge ejection into higher altitudes. Our analysis indicates that the brightening is the plasma heating due to magnetic reconnection at lower altitudes, while the dark surge is the cool, dense plasma ejected from the reconnection region. From the observational results, we conclude that the dynamic activity observed in a light bridge structure such as chromospheric brightenings and dark surge ejections are driven by magnetoconvective evolution within the light bridge and its interaction with the surrounding magnetic fields.

  20. Chronic stress and moderate physical exercise prompt widespread common activation and limited differential activation in specific brain regions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Kyung; Han, Pyung-Lim

    2016-10-01

    Chronic stress in rodents produces depressive behaviors, whereas moderate physical exercise counteracts stress-induced depressive behaviors. Chronic stress and physical exercise appear to produce such opposing effects by changing the neural activity of specific brain regions. However, the detailed mechanisms through which the two different types of stimuli regulate brain function in opposite directions are not clearly understood. In the present study, we attempted to explore the neuroanatomical substrates mediating stress-induced behavioral changes and anti-depressant effects of exercise by examining stimulus-dependent c-Fos induction in the brains of mice that were exposed to repeated stress or exercise in a scheduled manner. Systematic and integrated analyses of c-Fos expression profiles indicated that various brain areas, including the prelimbic cortex, lateral septal area, and paraventricular nuclei of hypothalamus were commonly and strongly activated by both stress and exercise, while the lateral habenula and hippocampus were identified as being preferentially activated by stress and exercise, respectively. Exercise-dependent c-Fos expression in all regions examined in the brain occurred in both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. These results suggest that chronic stress and moderate exercise produce counteractive effects on mood behaviors, along with prompting widespread common activation and limited differential activation in specific brain regions. PMID:27539656

  1. Chronic stress and moderate physical exercise prompt widespread common activation and limited differential activation in specific brain regions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Kyung; Han, Pyung-Lim

    2016-10-01

    Chronic stress in rodents produces depressive behaviors, whereas moderate physical exercise counteracts stress-induced depressive behaviors. Chronic stress and physical exercise appear to produce such opposing effects by changing the neural activity of specific brain regions. However, the detailed mechanisms through which the two different types of stimuli regulate brain function in opposite directions are not clearly understood. In the present study, we attempted to explore the neuroanatomical substrates mediating stress-induced behavioral changes and anti-depressant effects of exercise by examining stimulus-dependent c-Fos induction in the brains of mice that were exposed to repeated stress or exercise in a scheduled manner. Systematic and integrated analyses of c-Fos expression profiles indicated that various brain areas, including the prelimbic cortex, lateral septal area, and paraventricular nuclei of hypothalamus were commonly and strongly activated by both stress and exercise, while the lateral habenula and hippocampus were identified as being preferentially activated by stress and exercise, respectively. Exercise-dependent c-Fos expression in all regions examined in the brain occurred in both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. These results suggest that chronic stress and moderate exercise produce counteractive effects on mood behaviors, along with prompting widespread common activation and limited differential activation in specific brain regions.

  2. A regional reconstruction of debris-flow activity in the Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procter, Emily; Bollschweiler, Michelle; Stoffel, Markus; Neumann, Mathias

    2011-09-01

    Dendrogeomorphic dating of historical debris-flow events is a highly valuable tool for improving historical records in the field of natural hazard management. Previous dendrogeomorphic investigations generally have focused on case studies of single torrents; however, regional investigations may offer a more accurate reconstruction of regional patterns of activity and therefore may have an advantage over individual cases. The aim of the study is to provide a regional reconstruction of debris-flow events for a site in the Northern Calcareous Alps of western Austria (Gamperdonatal, Vorarlberg) and to document spatial and temporal morphological changes in individual and neighboring torrents. Analysis of 442 trees (268 Pinus mugo ssp. uncinata, 164 Picea abies, and 10 Abies alba) allowed identification of 579 growth disturbances corresponding to 63 debris-flow events since A.D. 1839. The majority of growth disturbances were in the form of growth suppression or release (76%) owing to the nature of both the deposited material and the process characteristics. Regional patterns of event frequency indicated a paucity of activity in the early to mid-twentieth century and increased activity since A.D. 1948, whereby large events were followed by subsequent years of continued activity of smaller magnitude. Patterns of frequency could be attributed primarily to spatiotemporal changes in channel morphology, but may also be reflective of changes in transport conditions within the valley. This study provides the first regional investigation in the Austrian Alps and contributes to the documentation of tree responses to geomorphic disturbances in calcareous material.

  3. p190RhoGAP has cellular RacGAP activity regulated by a polybasic region.

    PubMed

    Lévay, Magdolna; Bartos, Balázs; Ligeti, Erzsébet

    2013-06-01

    p190RhoGAP is a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) known to regulate actin cytoskeleton dynamics by decreasing RhoGTP levels through activation of the intrinsic GTPase activity of Rho. Although the GAP domain of p190RhoGAP stimulates the intrinsic' GTPase activity of several Rho family members (Rho, Rac, Cdc42) under in vitro conditions, p190RhoGAP is generally regarded as a GAP for RhoA in the cell. The cellular RacGAP activity of the protein has not been proven directly. We have previously shown that the in vitro RacGAP and RhoGAP activity of p190RhoGAP was inversely regulated through a polybasic region of the protein. Here we provide evidence that p190RhoGAP shows remarkable GAP activity toward Rac also in the cell. The cellular RacGAP activity of p190RhoGAP requires an intact polybasic region adjacent to the GAP domain whereas the RhoGAP activity is inhibited by the same domain. Our data indicate that through its alternating RacGAP and RhoGAP activity, p190RhoGAP plays a more complex role in the Rac-Rho antagonism than it was realized earlier.

  4. A Correlation Between Length of Strong-Shear Neutral Lines and Total X-Ray Brightness in Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.

    1997-01-01

    From a sample of 7 MSFC vector magnetograms,of active regions and 17 Yohkoh SXT soft X-ray images of these active regions, we have found that the total x-ray brightness of an entire active region is correlated with the total length of neutral lines on which the magnetic field is both strong (less than 250 G) and strongly sheared (shear angle greater than 75 deg) in the same active region. This correlation, if not fortuitous, is additional evidence of the importance of strong-shear strong-field neutral lines to strong heating in active regions.

  5. Effects of surfactant depletion on regional pulmonary metabolic activity during mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    de Prost, Nicolas; Costa, Eduardo L; Wellman, Tyler; Musch, Guido; Winkler, Tilo; Tucci, Mauro R; Harris, R Scott; Venegas, Jose G; Vidal Melo, Marcos F

    2011-11-01

    Inflammation during mechanical ventilation is thought to depend on regional mechanical stress. This can be produced by concentration of stresses and cyclic recruitment in low-aeration dependent lung. Positron emission tomography (PET) with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) allows for noninvasive assessment of regional metabolic activity, an index of neutrophilic inflammation. We tested the hypothesis that, during mechanical ventilation, surfactant-depleted low-aeration lung regions present increased regional (18)F-FDG uptake suggestive of in vivo increased regional metabolic activity and inflammation. Sheep underwent unilateral saline lung lavage and were ventilated supine for 4 h (positive end-expiratory pressure = 10 cmH(2)O, tidal volume adjusted to plateau pressure = 30 cmH(2)O). We used PET scans of injected (13)N-nitrogen to compute regional perfusion and ventilation and injected (18)F-FDG to calculate (18)F-FDG uptake rate. Regional aeration was quantified with transmission scans. Whole lung (18)F-FDG uptake was approximately two times higher in lavaged than in nonlavaged lungs (2.9 ± 0.6 vs. 1.5 ± 0.3 10(-3)/min; P < 0.05). The increased (18)F-FDG uptake was topographically heterogeneous and highest in dependent low-aeration regions (gas fraction 10-50%, P < 0.001), even after correction for lung density and wet-to-dry lung ratios. (18)F-FDG uptake in low-aeration regions of lavaged lungs was higher than that in low-aeration regions of nonlavaged lungs (P < 0.05). This occurred despite lower perfusion and ventilation to dependent regions in lavaged than nonlavaged lungs (P < 0.001). In contrast, (18)F-FDG uptake in normally aerated regions was low and similar between lungs. Surfactant depletion produces increased and heterogeneously distributed pulmonary (18)F-FDG uptake after 4 h of supine mechanical ventilation. Metabolic activity is highest in poorly aerated dependent regions, suggesting local increased inflammation.

  6. Directory of International and Regional Organizations Conducting Standards-Related Activities, May 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitenberg, Maureen

    1989-05-01

    The directory contains information on 338 international and regional organizations which conduct standardization, certification, laboratory accreditation, or other standards-related activities. The volume describes their work in these areas, the scope of each organization, national affliations of members, U.S. participants, restrictions on membership, as well as the availability of any standards in English. The volume is designed to serve the needs of Federal agencies and standards writers for information on international and regional organizations involved in standardization and related activities. It may also be useful to manufacturers, engineers, purchasing agents, and others.

  7. Comparison of the activity measurements in nuclear medicine services in the Brazilian northeast region.

    PubMed

    de Farias Fragoso, Maria da Conceição; de Albuquerque, Antônio Morais; de Oliveira, Mércia L; de Lima, Fabiana Farias; Barreto, Flávio Chiappetta Paes; de Andrade Lima, Ricardo

    2013-12-01

    The Northeastern Regional Centre for Nuclear Sciences (CRCN-NE), National Nuclear Energy Commission, has organized for the first time in nuclear medicine services (NMSs) in the Brazilian northeast region a comparison of activity measurements for (99m)Tc, (131)I, (67)Ga, (201)Tl and (57)Co. This tool is widely utilized to evaluate not only the accuracy of radionuclide calibrators, but also the competence of NMSs to measure the activity of the radiopharmaceuticals and the performance of the personnel involved in these measurements. The comparison results showed that 90% of the results received from participants are within the ±10% limit established by the Brazilian Norm.

  8. Magnetic Tilts and Polarity Separations in Sunspot Groups and Active Regions the Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkov, S. I.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2006-08-01

    We present the analysis of magnetic tilts in active regions and sunspot groups for 1996-2005 that are automatically extracted from the Solar Feature Catalogues (http://solar.inf.brad.ac.uk ). We investigate the statistical variations of magnetic field tilt in sunspot groups and whole active regions, their longitudinal and latitudinal distributions, drifts and daily polarity separation during different phases of the solar cycle 23. The classification results are compared with the similar research for the previous cycles and the specifics on the cycle 23 is discussed in conjunction to the solar dynamo theory.

  9. RESEARCH PAPER: A logistic model for magnetic energy storage in solar active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hua-Ning; Cui, Yan-Mei; He, Han

    2009-06-01

    Previous statistical analyses of a large number of SOHO/MDI full disk longitudinal magnetograms provided a result that demonstrated how responses of solar flares to photospheric magnetic properties can be fitted with sigmoid functions. A logistic model reveals that these fitted sigmoid functions might be related to the free energy storage process in solar active regions. Although this suggested model is rather simple, the free energy level of active regions can be estimated and the probability of a solar flare with importance over a threshold can be forecast within a given time window.

  10. Real-Time CME Forecasting Using HMI Active-Region Magnetograms and Flare History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ron; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.; Khazanov, Igor

    2011-01-01

    We have recently developed a method of predicting an active region s probability of producing a CME, an X-class Flare, an M-class Flare, or a Solar Energetic Particle Event from a free-energy proxy measured from SOHO/MDI line-of-sight magnetograms. This year we have added three major improvements to our forecast tool: 1) Transition from MDI magnetogram to SDO/HMI magnetogram allowing us near-real-time forecasts, 2) Automation of acquisition and measurement of HMI magnetograms giving us near-real-time forecasts (no older than 2 hours), and 3) Determination of how to improve forecast by using the active region s previous flare history in combination with its free-energy proxy. HMI was turned on in May 2010 and MDI was turned off in April 2011. Using the overlap period, we have calibrated HMI to yield what MDI would measure. This is important since the value of the free-energy proxy used for our forecast is resolution dependent, and the forecasts are made from results of a 1996-2004 database of MDI observations. With near-real-time magnetograms from HMI, near-real-time forecasts are now possible. We have augmented the code so that it continually acquires and measures new magnetograms as they become available online, and updates the whole-sun forecast from the coming day. The next planned improvement is to use an active region s previous flare history, in conjunction with its free-energy proxy, to forecast the active region s event rate. It has long been known that active regions that have produced flares in the past are likely to produce flares in the future, and that active regions that are nonpotential (have large free-energy) are more likely to produce flares in the future. This year we have determined that persistence of flaring is not just a reflection of an active region s free energy. In other words, after controlling for free energy, we have found that active regions that have flared recently are more likely to flare in the future.

  11. Lightning activity variation during the evolution of tropical cyclones in the southwest Pacific region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, A.; Kumar, S.; Kumar, A.

    2015-12-01

    The South Pacific Island countries are vulnerable to natural hazards which cause devastating effects on infrastructure, crops and at times loss of lives and many others. Tropical cyclones (TCs) are one type of natural hazard experienced by Pacific Island countries (PICs). The South Pacific region has two seasons, namely: the cyclone season, running from November to April, and the non-cyclone season, running from May to October. Tropical cyclones are associated with strong winds, rainfall, and thunderstorms generating strong lightning discharges. The analysis of lightning data obtained from the World Wide Lightning Locations Network for the southwest Pacific region, defined as the region bounded between geographic coordinates, latitudes 0 - 40°S, longitudes 135°E - 120°W, during 2013 clearly shows the lightning activity to be higher during the cyclone season due to increased convective activity. The change in the lightning activity with the intensity of 41 TCs of categories 2 to 5 occurring in the southwest Pacific region has been analysed for the years 2005 to 2013. The intensity measurements, as determined by maximum sustained winds and the lightning activity, as determined by flash counts were studied during the stages of evolution of these TCs. Taking into account the lag between peak lightning activity and peak maximum sustained wind, the two quantities; lightning activity and intensity for individual TCs were correlated. Square 10° grid sizes were used along with radial sections to quantify lightning. We quantify lightning occurrences in three distinct sections of the cyclone (eyewall, inner and outer rainbands) to clearly show the lightning characteristics within these different regions. Lightning activity is seen to be greatly variable between different storms, however we do observe lightning outbreaks in the eyewall prior to the intensification of the storm.

  12. Forward modeling transient brightenings and microflares around an active region observed with Hi-C

    SciTech Connect

    Kobelski, Adam R.; McKenzie, David E.

    2014-10-20

    Small-scale flare-like brightenings around active regions are among the smallest and most fundamental of energetic transient events in the corona, providing a testbed for models of heating and active region dynamics. In a previous study, we modeled a large collection of these microflares observed with Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT) using EBTEL and found that they required multiple heating events, but could not distinguish between multiple heating events on a single strand, or multiple strands each experiencing a single heating event. We present here a similar study, but with extreme-ultraviolet data of Active Region 11520 from the High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) sounding rocket. Hi-C provides an order of magnitude improvement to the spatial resolution of XRT, and a cooler temperature sensitivity, which combine to provide significant improvements to our ability to detect and model microflare activity around active regions. We have found that at the spatial resolution of Hi-C (≈0.''3), the events occur much more frequently than expected (57 events detected, only 1 or 2 expected), and are most likely made from strands of the order of 100 km wide, each of which is impulsively heated with multiple heating events. These findings tend to support bursty reconnection as the cause of the energy release responsible for the brightenings.

  13. Action sentences activate sensory motor regions in the brain independently of their status of reality.

    PubMed

    de Vega, Manuel; León, Inmaculada; Hernández, Juan A; Valdés, Mitchell; Padrón, Iván; Ferstl, Evelyn C

    2014-07-01

    Some studies have reported that understanding concrete action-related words and sentences elicits activations of motor areas in the brain. The present fMRI study goes one step further by testing whether this is also the case for comprehension of nonfactual statements. Three linguistic structures were used (factuals, counterfactuals, and negations), referring either to actions or, as a control condition, to visual events. The results showed that action sentences elicited stronger activations than visual sentences in the SMA, extending to the primary motor area, as well as in regions generally associated with the planning and understanding of actions (left superior temporal gyrus, left and right supramarginal gyri). Also, we found stronger activations for action sentences than for visual sentences in the extrastriate body area, a region involved in the visual processing of human body movements. These action-related effects occurred not only in factuals but also in negations and counterfactuals, suggesting that brain regions involved in action understanding and planning are activated by default even when the actions are described as hypothetical or as not happening. Moreover, some of these regions overlapped with those activated during the observation of action videos, indicating that the act of understanding action language and that of observing real actions share neural networks. These results support the claim that embodied representations of linguistic meaning are important even in abstract linguistic contexts.

  14. Hippocampal sub-regional shape and physical activity in older adults.

    PubMed

    Varma, Vijay R; Tang, Xiaoying; Carlson, Michelle C

    2016-08-01

    Hippocampal atrophy is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease pathology, and a target biomarker region for testing intervention efficacy. Over the last few decades, a growing body of evidence from animal and human models suggests that physical activity (PA) is associated with structural benefits to the hippocampus in older adults. Very few human studies, however have explored hippocampal sub-regional specificity of PA; this is significant considering that sub-regions of the hippocampus are associated with distinct cognitive tasks and are differentially affected by disease pathology. This study used objective and self-reported measures of daily walking activity and exercise, and surface-based regional shape analysis using high-field hippocampal sub-regional partitions to explore sub-region specific hippocampal associations in a sample of nondemented, community-dwelling older adults at elevated sociodemographic risk for cognitive decline. Vertex-wise surface areas, which may be more sensitive than global volume measures, were calculated using shape diffeomorphometry, and PA was assessed using step activity monitors and PA questionnaires. We found that daily walking activity in a participant's environment was associated in cross-section mainly with larger surface areas of the subiculum in women. Associations remained significant when controlling for self-reported exercise. Prior studies have found that PA related to exercise and aerobic fitness may be most closely associated with the anterior hippocampus, particularly the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. These novel findings are the first, to our knowledge, in human models to suggest that PA related to navigation that may not reach the level of moderate-intensity exercise may be associated with specific sub-regions of the hippocampus. These findings underscore the importance of better understanding the independent and related biological mechanisms and pathways by which increasing exercise as well as non

  15. Active deformation analysis and evaluation of earthquake hazard in Gafsa region (Southern Atlas of Tunisia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrouni, Nejib; Bouaziz, Samir; Soumaya, Abdelkader; Ben Ayed, Noureddine; Attafi, Khereddine

    2013-04-01

    The Southern Atlas of Tunisia constitutes the transition between Atlas fold and the Northern edge of the Saharan platform. The general direction is near to E-W deflected to N060 whose structural style and geometry of deformation still complex. This domain is Southern part of the seismic zone bordering the Northern African plate as indicated by the large seismic events that occurred periodically. The Gafsa area, more particularly concerned by seismic risk, is bordered to the North by the NW-SE trending "Gafsa Fault" and has significant seismic. The most active tectonic are related to the reactivating of pre-existing NW-SE and E-W trending strike-slip faulting. We will set up the network in the active zone of Gafsa surroundings, in order to cover the area of aftershocks (co-seismic surface rupture) of May 22, 1972 and December 27, 1985 (Ms=4.2) in Gafsa and November 7, 1989 (Ms=4.4) in Metlaoui, December 8, 2010 and in Sidi Aich (Ms=3.66). Paleostress and calculated focal mechanism solutions for the earthquakes show that the active stress field is a NW-SE trending compression. Damage and surface effects of land and urban areas caused by these events demonstrate the vulnerability of cities in the region of Gafsa to seismic activities. The analyses of recent and active deformation in this region has allowed the assessment of urban seismic hazard and take stock seismic zones embedded in a distorted geographic information system (GIS) in close relationship with the regional tectonic setting. This assessment has provided crucial information on the neotectonic deformation and seismotectonics of Gafsa region and its surrounding which affects remote orogenic dynamics and the current state of the North African margin. In particular, the comparison between the deformations and quantified seismic activity has also assessed the risk and the regional seismic hazard and develop a seismotectonic zoning.

  16. Altered Intrinsic Regional Activity and Interregional Functional Connectivity in Post-stroke Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mi; Li, Jiao; Li, Yibo; Li, Rong; Pang, Yajing; Yao, Dezhong; Liao, Wei; Chen, Huafu

    2016-01-01

    Several neuroimaging studies have examined cerebral function in patients who suffer from aphasia, but the mechanism underlying this disorder remains poorly understood. In this study, we examined alterations in the local regional and remote interregional network cerebral functions in aphasia combined with amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and interregional functional connectivity (FC) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. A total of 17 post-stroke aphasic patients, all having suffered a stroke in the left hemisphere, as well as 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls, were enrolled in this study. The aphasic patients showed significantly increased intrinsic regional activity mainly in the contralesional mesial temporal (hippocampus/parahippocampus, [HIP/ParaHIP]) and lateral temporal cortices. In addition, intrinsic regional activity in the contralesional HIP/ParaHIP was negatively correlated with construction score. Aphasic patients showed increased remote interregional FC between the contralesional HIP/ParaHIP and fusiform gyrus, but reduced FC in the ipsilesional occipital and parietal cortices. These findings suggested that the intrinsic regional brain dysfunctions in aphasia were related to interregional functional connectivity. Changes in the intrinsic regional brain activity and associated remote functional connectivity pattern would provide valuable information to enhance the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of aphasia. PMID:27091494

  17. GPS constraints on active deformation in the Isparta Angle region of SW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiryakioğlu, İbrahim; Floyd, Michael; Erdoğan, Saffet; Gülal, Engin; Ergintav, Semih; McClusky, Simon; Reilinger, Robert

    2013-12-01

    We use survey and continuous GPS observations during the period 1997-2010 to investigate active deformation in the Isparta Angle region of SW Anatolia, Turkey. This region, bordered by the Fethiye Burdur Fault Zone (FBFZ) in the west and the SE extension of the Aksehir Simav Fault Zone (AKSFZ) in the east, accommodates a part of the active deformation of W Turkey. Our results show that the Isparta Angle region rotates counter-clockwise (CCW) with respect to Anatolia. Both the FBFZ and the AKSFZ are predominantly transtensional boundaries that accommodate southward motion of the Isparta region with respect to Anatolia. The FBFZ has left-lateral strike-slip behaviour along its SW segment that changes to right-lateral strike-slip along its NE extension. This change in the sense of strike-slip motion is accommodated by extension on a NW-SE striking normal fault system that is associated with the Menderes Graben system. Transtensional fault systems along the boundaries of the Isparta Angle with Anatolia are inconsistent with extrusion models for present-day southward motion. An increase in motion rates towards the Hellenic and Cyprus arc subduction systems, and CCW of the Isparta region, supports dynamic models involving active rollback of the subducting African Plate, toroidal mantle flow around the eastern edge of the subducting African slab near the Hellenic arc/Florence Rise junction, and/or gravitational collapse of the overriding Anatolia Plate.

  18. Phospholipase A2-like activity of human bocavirus VP1 unique region.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiao-Wang; Liu, Wen-Pei; Qi, Zheng-Yu; Duan, Zhao-Jun; Zheng, Li-Shu; Kuang, Zi-Zhou; Zhang, Wan-Ju; Hou, Yun-De

    2008-01-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a new parvovirus first discovered in 2005, which is associated with acute respiratory infection. Analysis of sequence homology has revealed that a putative phospholipase A2 (PLA2) motif exists in the VP1 unique region of HBoV. However, little is known about whether the VP1 unique region of HBoV has PLA2 enzymatic activity and how these critical residues contribute to its PLA2 activity. To address these issues, the VP1 unique region protein and four of its mutants, were expressed in Eschericha coli. The purified VP1 unique protein (VP1U) showed a typical Ca2+-dependent secreted PLA2-like (sPLA2) activity, which was inhibited by sPLA2-specific inhibitors in a time-dependent manner. Mutation of one of the amino acids (21Pro, 41His, 42Asp or 63Asp) in VP1U almost eliminated the sPLA2 activity of HBoV VP1U. These data indicate that VP1U of HBoV has sPLA2-like enzymatic activity, and these residues are crucial for its sPLA2-like activity. Potentially, VP1U may be a target for the development of anti-viral drugs for HBoV.

  19. Differential Activation Patterns in the Same Brain Region Led to Opposite Emotional States.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Kazuhisa; Watanabe, Takeo; Kawato, Mitsuo; Sasaki, Yuka

    2016-09-01

    In human studies, how averaged activation in a brain region relates to human behavior has been extensively investigated. This approach has led to the finding that positive and negative facial preferences are represented by different brain regions. However, using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) decoded neurofeedback (DecNef) method, we found that different patterns of neural activations within the cingulate cortex (CC) play roles in representing opposite directions of facial preference. In the present study, while neutrally preferred faces were presented, multi-voxel activation patterns in the CC that corresponded to higher (or lower) preference were repeatedly induced by fMRI DecNef. As a result, previously neutrally preferred faces became more (or less) preferred. We conclude that a different activation pattern in the CC, rather than averaged activation in a different area, represents and suffices to determine positive or negative facial preference. This new approach may reveal the importance of an activation pattern within a brain region in many cognitive functions.

  20. Differential Activation Patterns in the Same Brain Region Led to Opposite Emotional States.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Kazuhisa; Watanabe, Takeo; Kawato, Mitsuo; Sasaki, Yuka

    2016-09-01

    In human studies, how averaged activation in a brain region relates to human behavior has been extensively investigated. This approach has led to the finding that positive and negative facial preferences are represented by different brain regions. However, using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) decoded neurofeedback (DecNef) method, we found that different patterns of neural activations within the cingulate cortex (CC) play roles in representing opposite directions of facial preference. In the present study, while neutrally preferred faces were presented, multi-voxel activation patterns in the CC that corresponded to higher (or lower) preference were repeatedly induced by fMRI DecNef. As a result, previously neutrally preferred faces became more (or less) preferred. We conclude that a different activation pattern in the CC, rather than averaged activation in a different area, represents and suffices to determine positive or negative facial preference. This new approach may reveal the importance of an activation pattern within a brain region in many cognitive functions. PMID:27608359

  1. Differential Activation Patterns in the Same Brain Region Led to Opposite Emotional States

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Kazuhisa; Watanabe, Takeo; Kawato, Mitsuo; Sasaki, Yuka

    2016-01-01

    In human studies, how averaged activation in a brain region relates to human behavior has been extensively investigated. This approach has led to the finding that positive and negative facial preferences are represented by different brain regions. However, using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) decoded neurofeedback (DecNef) method, we found that different patterns of neural activations within the cingulate cortex (CC) play roles in representing opposite directions of facial preference. In the present study, while neutrally preferred faces were presented, multi-voxel activation patterns in the CC that corresponded to higher (or lower) preference were repeatedly induced by fMRI DecNef. As a result, previously neutrally preferred faces became more (or less) preferred. We conclude that a different activation pattern in the CC, rather than averaged activation in a different area, represents and suffices to determine positive or negative facial preference. This new approach may reveal the importance of an activation pattern within a brain region in many cognitive functions. PMID:27608359

  2. Seasonal distribution of microbial activity in bioaerosols in the outdoor environment of the Qingdao coastal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xi; Qi, Jianhua; Li, Hongtao; Dong, Lijie; Gao, Dongmei

    2016-09-01

    Microbial activities in the atmosphere can indicate the physiological processes of microorganisms and can indirectly affect cloud formation and environmental health. In this study, the microbial activity in bioaerosols collected in the Qingdao coastal region was investigated using the fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis method to detect the enzyme activity of microorganisms. The results showed that the microbial activity ranged from 5.49 to 102 ng/m3 sodium fluorescein from March 2013 to February 2014; the average value was 34.4 ng/m3. Microbial activity has no statistical correlation with total microbial quantity. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that meteorological factors such as atmospheric temperature, relative humidity and wind speed accounted for approximately 35.7% of the variation of the microbial activity, although their individual impacts on microbial activity varied. According to the correlation analysis, atmospheric temperature and wind speed had a significant positive and negative influence on microbial activity, respectively, whereas relative humidity and wind direction had no significant influence. The seasonal distribution of microbial activity in bioaerosols was in the order of summer > autumn > winter > spring, with high fluctuations in the summer and autumn. Microbial activity in bioaerosols differed in different weather conditions such as the sunny, foggy, and hazy days of different seasons. Further in situ observations in different weather conditions at different times and places are needed to understand the seasonal distribution characteristics of microbial activity in bioaerosols and the influence factors of microbial activity.

  3. Cross-modal activation of auditory regions during visuo-spatial working memory in early deafness.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hao; Qin, Wen; Liang, Meng; Ming, Dong; Wan, Baikun; Li, Qiang; Yu, Chunshui

    2015-09-01

    Early deafness can reshape deprived auditory regions to enable the processing of signals from the remaining intact sensory modalities. Cross-modal activation has been observed in auditory regions during non-auditory tasks in early deaf subjects. In hearing subjects, visual working memory can evoke activation of the visual cortex, which further contributes to behavioural performance. In early deaf subjects, however, whether and how auditory regions participate in visual working memory remains unclear. We hypothesized that auditory regions may be involved in visual working memory processing and activation of auditory regions may contribute to the superior behavioural performance of early deaf subjects. In this study, 41 early deaf subjects (22 females and 19 males, age range: 20-26 years, age of onset of deafness < 2 years) and 40 age- and gender-matched hearing controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during a visuo-spatial delayed recognition task that consisted of encoding, maintenance and recognition stages. The early deaf subjects exhibited faster reaction times on the spatial working memory task than did the hearing controls. Compared with hearing controls, deaf subjects exhibited increased activation in the superior temporal gyrus bilaterally during the recognition stage. This increased activation amplitude predicted faster and more accurate working memory performance in deaf subjects. Deaf subjects also had increased activation in the superior temporal gyrus bilaterally during the maintenance stage and in the right superior temporal gyrus during the encoding stage. These increased activation amplitude also predicted faster reaction times on the spatial working memory task in deaf subjects. These findings suggest that cross-modal plasticity occurs in auditory association areas in early deaf subjects. These areas are involved in visuo-spatial working memory. Furthermore, amplitudes of cross-modal activation during the maintenance stage were

  4. Geomorphology of Active Regions on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from Osiris Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, A. T.; Groussin, O.; Jorda, L.; Bouley, S.; Lamy, P. L.; Cremonese, G.; Thomas, N.; Sierks, H.

    2014-12-01

    The geomorphological study of active regions on comets provides valuable insights to understand how comets work and to which extend they may still contain pristine materials on or close to their surface. The Rosetta spacecraft is orbiting comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since summer 2014 and offers a unique opportunity to address this science topic. The Narrow and Wide Angle Cameras of the OSIRIS imaging experiment have acquired numerous images of the nucleus surface, with a spatial resolution down to the meter scale. Here, we focus on the geomorphology of some specific, active, regions of the nucleus, releasing materials from their surface or from their upper layers. With the help of digital terrains models and GIS tools, we map these regions and report their size, area, shape, slopes and surface roughness. This detailed analysis give us a reference point to emphasize their evolution as the comet approaches perihelion, but also provide information on the possibly pristine nature of these morphologies.

  5. The temperature structure and pressure balance of magnetic loops in active regions. [in solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foukal, P.

    1975-01-01

    EUV observations show many active region loops in lines formed at temperatures between 10,000 and 2,000,000 K. The brightest loops are associated with flux tubes leading to the umbrae of sunspots. It is shown that the high visibility of certain loops in transition region lines is due principally to a sharp radial decrease of temperature to chromospheric values toward the loop axis. The plasma density of these cool loops is not significantly greater than in the hot gas immediately surrounding it. Consequently, the internal gas pressure of the cool material is clearly lower. The hot material immediately surrounding the cool loops is generally denser than the external corona by a factor 3-4. When the active region is examined in coronal lines, this hot high pressure plasma shows up as loops that are generally parallel to the cool loops but significantly displaced laterally.

  6. Metric type-III burst asymmetry relative to simple bipolar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, B.V.

    1986-01-01

    Metric type-III solar radio burst positions are compared spatially and temporally to underlying active-region geometry. The positions of these radio bursts have an asymmetric location distribution relative to simple bipolar regions. The type-III bursts show a tendency to occur nearer the leading active region - an association shown before from type-III burst and magnetic-field-polarity measurements. The type-III burst also generally occur to the left of the outward- to inward-directed magnetic field. The asymmetry relative to the outward directed magnetic field has a sense that is consistent with a mechanism of type-III burst production that involves a pre-existing coronal current system situated between expanding closed and open magnetic field lines.

  7. "Not Greenies" at School: Investigating the Discourses of Environmental Activism in Regional Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, Hilary

    2014-01-01

    Implementing environmental activism at school can be socially risky business. This paper explores the narratives of three women who undertook award winning environmental projects in two regional Australian schools. Tara (student, age 15) and Andrea (principal, age 42) document the complex and courageous social negotiations they were forced to…

  8. Magnetic Characteristics of Active Region Heating Observed with TRACE, SOHO/EIT, and Yohkoh/SXT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, J. G.; Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Over the past several years, we have reported results from studies that have compared the magnetic structure and heating of the transition region and corona (both in active regions and in the quiet Sun) by combining X-ray and EUV images from Yohkoh and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) with photospheric magnetograms from ground-based observatories. Our findings have led us to the hypothesis that most heating throughout the corona is driven from near and below the base of the corona by eruptive microflares occurring in compact low-lying "core magnetic fields (i.e., fields rooted along and closely enveloping polarity inversion lines in the photospheric magnetic flux). We now extend these studies, comparing sequences of UV images from Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) with longitudinal magnetograms from Kitt Peak and vector magnetograms from MUSIC. These comparisons confirm the previous results regarding the importance of core-field activity to active region heating. Activity in fields associated with satellite polarity inclusions and/or magnetically sheared configurations is especially prominent. This work is funded by NASA's Office of Space Science through the Sun-Earth Connection Guest Investigator Program and the Solar Physics Supporting Research and Technology Program.

  9. Active region plasma outflows as sources of slow/intermediate solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia M.

    2015-08-01

    L. van Driel-Gesztelyi (1,2,3), D. Baker (1), P. Démoulin (2), Culhane, J.L. (1), M.L. DeRosa (4) C.H. Mandrini (5,6), D.H. Brooks (7), A.N. Fazakerley (1), L.K. Harra (1), L. Zhao (7), T.H. Zurbuchen (7), F.A. Nuevo (5,6), A.M. Vásquez (5,6), G.D. Cristiani (5,6) M. Pick (2)1) UCL/MSSL, UK, (2) Paris Observatory, LESIA, CNRS, France, (3) Konkoly Observatory, Hungary, (4) Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, USA, (5) IAFE, CONICET-UBA, Argentina (6) FCEN, UBA, Argentina (7) Dept. of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Earth Sciences, Univ. of Michigan, USAWe analyse plasma upflows of tens of km/s from the edges of solar active regions discovered by Hinode/EIS and investigate whether or not they become outflows, i.e. find their way into the solar wind. We analyse two magnetic configurations: bipolar and quadrupolar and find that the active region plasma may be directly channeled into the solar wind via interchange reconnection at a high-altitude null point above the active region especially when active regions are located besides coronal holes or in a more complex way via multiple reconnections even from under a closed helmet streamer. We relate the solar observations to in-situ slow/intermediate solar wind streams.

  10. "Power, Regulation and Physically Active Identities": The Experiences of Rural and Regional Living Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, M.; Mooney, A.; Smyth, J.; Payne, W.

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on interpretations of Foucault's techniques of power, we explored the discourses and power relations operative between groups of girls that appeared to influence their participation in Physical Education (PE) and outside of school in sport and physical activity (PA) in rural and regional communities. Interviews and focus groups were…

  11. How Much Energy Can Be Stored in Solar Active Region Magnetic Fields?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linker, J.; Downs, C.; Torok, T.; Titov, V. S.; Lionello, R.; Mikic, Z.; Riley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Major solar eruptions such as X-class flares and very fast coronal mass ejections usually originate in active regions on the Sun. The energy that powers these events is believed to be stored as free magnetic energy (energy above the potential field state) prior to eruption. While coronal magnetic fields are not in general force-free, active regions have very strong magnetic fields and at low coronal heights the plasma beta is therefore very small, making the field (in equilibrium) essentially force-free. The Aly-Sturrock theorem shows that the energy of a fully force-free field cannot exceed the energy of the so-called open field. If the theorem holds, this places an upper limit on the amount of free energy that can be stored: the maximum free energy (MFE) is the difference between the open field energy and the potential field energy of the active region. In thermodynamic MHD simulations of a major eruption (the July 14, 2000 'Bastille' day event) and a modest event (February 13, 2009, we have found that the MFE indeed bounds the energy stored prior to eruption. We compute the MFE for major eruptive events in cycles 23 and 24 to investigate the maximum amount of energy that can be stored in solar active regions.Research supported by AFOSR, NASA, and NSF.

  12. Year-round West Nile Virus Activity, Gulf Coast Region, Texas and Louisiana

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Ray; Siirin, Marina; Randle, Yvonne; Sargent, Chris; Guzman, Hilda; Wuithiranyagool, Taweesak; Higgs, Stephen; Vanlandingham, Dana L.; Bala, Adil A.; Haas, Keith; Zerinque, Brian

    2004-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) was detected in 11 dead birds and two mosquito pools collected in east Texas and southern Louisiana during surveillance studies in the winter of 2003 to 2004. These findings suggest that WNV is active throughout the year in this region of the United States. PMID:15498169

  13. 50 CFR 216.150 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specified activity and specified geographical region. 216.150 Section 216.150 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE...

  14. 50 CFR 217.70 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specified activity and specified geographical region. 217.70 Section 217.70 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKE OF MARINE MAMMALS INCIDENTAL...

  15. Temperature dependence of emission measure in solar X-ray plasmas. I - Nonflaring active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Previous determinations of the form of the emission-measure distribution function for solar active regions are examined. It is found that two analyses in particular are affected by low quality of either observational or atomic data. An alternative method of analysis is discussed.

  16. CURRENT HELICITY OF ACTIVE REGIONS AS A TRACER OF LARGE-SCALE SOLAR MAGNETIC HELICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Gao, Y.; Xu, H.; Moss, D.; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.; Kuzanyan, K.; Sokoloff, D.

    2012-05-20

    We demonstrate that the current helicity observed in solar active regions traces the magnetic helicity of the large-scale dynamo generated field. We use an advanced two-dimensional mean-field dynamo model with dynamo saturation based on the evolution of the magnetic helicity and algebraic quenching. For comparison, we also studied a more basic two-dimensional mean-field dynamo model with simple algebraic alpha-quenching only. Using these numerical models we obtained butterfly diagrams both for the small-scale current helicity and also for the large-scale magnetic helicity, and compared them with the butterfly diagram for the current helicity in active regions obtained from observations. This comparison shows that the current helicity of active regions, as estimated by -A {center_dot} B evaluated at the depth from which the active region arises, resembles the observational data much better than the small-scale current helicity calculated directly from the helicity evolution equation. Here B and A are, respectively, the dynamo generated mean magnetic field and its vector potential. A theoretical interpretation of these results is given.

  17. Regional cholinesterase activity in white-throated sparrow brain is differentially affected by acephate (Orthene?)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vyas, N.B.; Kuenzel, W.J.; Hill, E.F.; Romo, G.A.; Komaragiri, M.V.S.

    1996-01-01

    Effects of a 14-day dietary exposure to an organophosphorus pesticide, acephate (acetylphosphoramidothioic acid O,S-dimethyl ester), were determined on cholinesterase activity in three regions (basal ganglia, hippocampus, and hypothalamus) of the white-throated sparrow, Zonotrichia albicollis, brain. All three regions experienced depressed cholinesterase activity between 0.5-2 ppm acephate. The regions exhibited cholinesterase recovery at 2-16 ppm acephate; however, cholinesterase activity dropped and showed no recovery at higher dietary levels (>16 ppm acephate). Evidence indicates that the recovery is initiated by the magnitude of depression, not the duration. In general, as acephate concentration increased, differences in ChE activity among brain regions decreased. Three terms are introduced to describe ChE response to acephate exposure: (1) ChE resistance threshold, (2) ChE compensation threshold, and (3) ChE depression threshold. It is hypothesized that adverse effects to birds in the field may occur at pesticide exposure levels customarily considered negligible.

  18. Coupled-resonator vertical-cavity lasers with two active gain regions

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Choquette, Kent D.; Chow, Weng W.

    2003-05-20

    A new class of coupled-resonator vertical-cavity semiconductor lasers has been developed. These lasers have multiple resonant cavities containing regions of active laser media, resulting in a multi-terminal laser component with a wide range of novel properties.

  19. Technology Transfer Activities of NASA/MSFC: Enhancing the Southeast Region's Production Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trivoli, George W.

    1998-01-01

    The researcher was charged with the task of developing a simplified model to illustrate the impact of how NASA/MSFC technology transfer activities contribute to shifting outward the Southeast region's and the nation's productive capacity. The report is a background of the impact of technological growth on the nation's production possibility frontier (ppf).

  20. 50 CFR 216.150 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specified activity and specified geographical region. 216.150 Section 216.150 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE...

  1. 50 CFR 216.150 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specified activity and specified geographical region. 216.150 Section 216.150 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE...

  2. Final Report on Regional Exchange Activities During the October 1976-February 1977 Planning Phase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CEMREL, Inc., St. Louis, MO.

    This report describes in detail the Central Midwest Regional Educational Laboratory's (CEMREL) activities during the October 1976-February 1977 planning phase of the nationwide R & D Exchange (RDX) program sponsored by the National Institute of Education. Basically, CEMREL's task during the planning period was to develop plans for the creation and…

  3. FLOWS AT THE EDGE OF AN ACTIVE REGION: OBSERVATION AND INTERPRETATION

    SciTech Connect

    Boutry, C.; Buchlin, E.; Vial, J.-C.; Regnier, S.

    2012-06-10

    Upflows observed at the edges of active regions have been proposed as the source of the slow solar wind. In the particular case of Active Region (AR) 10942, where such an upflow has been already observed, we want to evaluate the part of this upflow that actually remains confined in the magnetic loops that connect AR 10942 to AR 10943. Both active regions were visible simultaneously on the solar disk and were observed by STEREO/SECCHI EUVI. Using Hinode/EIS spectra, we determine the Doppler shifts and densities in AR 10943 and AR 10942 in order to evaluate the mass flows. We also perform magnetic field extrapolations to assess the connectivity between AR 10942 and AR 10943. AR 10943 displays a persistent downflow in Fe XII. Magnetic extrapolations including both ARs show that this downflow can be connected to the upflow in AR 10942. We estimate that the mass flow received by AR 10943 areas connected to AR 10942 represents about 18% of the mass flow from AR 10942. We conclude that the upflows observed on the edge of active regions represent either large-scale loops with mass flowing along them (accounting for about one-fifth of the total mass flow in this example) or open magnetic field structures where the slow solar wind originates.

  4. Activity in preserved left hemisphere regions predicts anomia severity in aphasia.

    PubMed

    Fridriksson, Julius; Bonilha, Leonardo; Baker, Julie M; Moser, Dana; Rorden, Chris

    2010-05-01

    Understanding the neural mechanism that supports preserved language processing in aphasia has implications for both basic and applied science. This study examined brain activation associated with correct picture naming in 15 patients with aphasia. We contrasted each patient's activation to the activation observed in a neurologically healthy control group, allowing us to identify regions with unusual activity patterns. The results revealed that increased activation in preserved left hemisphere areas is associated with better naming performance in aphasia. This relationship was linear in nature; progressively less cortical activation was associated with greater severity of anomia. These findings are consistent with others who suggests that residual language function following stroke relies on preserved cortical areas in the left hemisphere.

  5. Unique Properties of Thermally Tailored Copper: Magnetically Active Regions and Anomalous X-ray Fluorescence Emissions

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    When high-purity copper (≥99.98%wt) is melted, held in its liquid state for a few hours with iterative thermal cycling, then allowed to resolidify, the ingot surface is found to have many small regions that are magnetically active. X-ray fluorescence analysis of these regions exhibit remarkably intense lines from “sensitized elements” (SE), including in part or fully the contiguous series V, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co. The XRF emissions from SE are far more intense than expected from known impurity levels. Comparison with blanks and standards show that the thermal “tailoring” also introduces strongly enhanced SE emissions in samples taken from the interior of the copper ingots. For some magnetic regions, the location as well as the SE emissions, although persistent, vary irregularly with time. Also, for some regions extraordinarily intense “sensitized iron” (SFe) emissions occur, accompanied by drastic attenuation of Cu emissions. PMID:20037657

  6. Tyrosine Hydroxylase Phosphorylation in Catecholaminergic Brain Regions: A Marker of Activation following Acute Hypotension and Glucoprivation

    PubMed Central

    Damanhuri, Hanafi A.; Burke, Peter G. R.; Ong, Lin K.; Bobrovskaya, Larisa; Dickson, Phillip W.; Dunkley, Peter R.; Goodchild, Ann K.

    2012-01-01

    The expression of c-Fos defines brain regions activated by the stressors hypotension and glucoprivation however, whether this identifies all brain sites involved is unknown. Furthermore, the neurochemicals that delineate these regions, or are utilized in them when responding to these stressors remain undefined. Conscious rats were subjected to hypotension, glucoprivation or vehicle for 30, 60 or 120 min and changes in the phosphorylation of serine residues 19, 31 and 40 in the biosynthetic enzyme, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the activity of TH and/or, the expression of c-Fos were determined, in up to ten brain regions simultaneously that contain catecholaminergic cell bodies and/or terminals: A1, A2, caudal C1, rostral C1, A6, A8/9, A10, nucleus accumbens, dorsal striatum and medial prefrontal cortex. Glucoprivation evoked phosphorylation changes in A1, caudal C1, rostral C1 and nucleus accumbens whereas hypotension evoked changes A1, caudal C1, rostral C1, A6, A8/9, A10 and medial prefrontal cortex 30 min post stimulus whereas few changes were evident at 60 min. Although increases in pSer19, indicative of depolarization, were seen in sites where c-Fos was evoked, phosphorylation changes were a sensitive measure of activation in A8/9 and A10 regions that did not express c-Fos and in the prefrontal cortex that contains only catecholaminergic terminals. Specific patterns of serine residue phosphorylation were detected, dependent upon the stimulus and brain region, suggesting activation of distinct signaling cascades. Hypotension evoked a reduction in phosphorylation in A1 suggestive of reduced kinase activity. TH activity was increased, indicating synthesis of TH, in regions where pSer31 alone was increased (prefrontal cortex) or in conjunction with pSer40 (caudal C1). Thus, changes in phosphorylation of serine residues in TH provide a highly sensitive measure of activity, cellular signaling and catecholamine utilization in catecholaminergic brain regions, in the

  7. Forecasting the Solar Drivers of Severe Space Weather from Active-Region Magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ronald L.; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.; Khazanov, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Large flares and fast CMEs are the drivers of the most severe space weather including Solar Energetic Particle Events (SEP Events). Large flares and their co-produced CMEs are powered by the explosive release of free magnetic energy stored in non-potential magnetic fields of sunspot active regions. The free energy is stored in and released from the low-beta regime of the active region s magnetic field above the photosphere, in the chromosphere and low corona. From our work over the past decade and from similar work of several other groups, it is now well established that (1) a proxy of the free magnetic energy stored above the photosphere can be measured from photospheric magnetograms, and (2) an active region s rate of production of major CME/flare eruptions in the coming day or so is strongly correlated with its present measured value of the free-energy proxy. These results have led us to use the large database of SOHO/MDI full-disk magnetograms spanning Solar Cycle 23 to obtain empirical forecasting curves that from an active region s present measured value of the free-energy proxy give the active region s expected rates of production of major flares, CMEs, fast CMEs, and SEP Events in the coming day or so (Falconer et al 2011, Space Weather, 9, S04003). We will present these forecasting curves and demonstrate the accuracy of their forecasts. In addition, we will show that the forecasts for major flares and fast CMEs can be made significantly more accurate by taking into account not only the value of the free energy proxy but also the active region s recent productivity of major flares; specifically, whether the active region has produced a major flare (GOES class M or X) during the past 24 hours before the time of the measured magnetogram. By empirically determining the conversion of the value of free-energy proxy measured from a GONG or HMI magnetogram to that which would be measured from an MDI magnetogram, we have made GONG and HMI magnetograms useable with

  8. Genetic Analyses of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequences Suggest Introgression and Duplication in the Medicinal Mushroom Agaricus subrufescens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Moinard, Magalie; Xu, Jianping; Wang, Shouxian; Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Zhao, Ruilin; Hyde, Kevin D; Callac, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene cluster is widely used in fungal taxonomy and phylogeographic studies. The medicinal and edible mushroom Agaricus subrufescens has a worldwide distribution with a high level of polymorphism in the ITS region. A previous analysis suggested notable ITS sequence heterogeneity within the wild French isolate CA487. The objective of this study was to investigate the pattern and potential mechanism of ITS sequence heterogeneity within this strain. Using PCR, cloning, and sequencing, we identified three types of ITS sequences, A, B, and C with a balanced distribution, which differed from each other at 13 polymorphic positions. The phylogenetic comparisons with samples from different continents revealed that the type C sequence was similar to those found in Oceanian and Asian specimens of A. subrufescens while types A and B sequences were close to those found in the Americas or in Europe. We further investigated the inheritance of these three ITS sequence types by analyzing their distribution among single-spore isolates from CA487. In this analysis, three co-dominant markers were used firstly to distinguish the homokaryotic offspring from the heterokaryotic offspring. The homokaryotic offspring were then analyzed for their ITS types. Our genetic analyses revealed that types A and B were two alleles segregating at one locus ITSI, while type C was not allelic with types A and B but was located at another unlinked locus ITSII. Furthermore, type C was present in only one of the two constitutive haploid nuclei (n) of the heterokaryotic (n+n) parent CA487. These data suggest that there was a relatively recent introduction of the type C sequence and a duplication of the ITS locus in this strain. Whether other genes were also transferred and duplicated and their impacts on genome structure and stability remain to be investigated. PMID:27228131

  9. Genetic Analyses of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequences Suggest Introgression and Duplication in the Medicinal Mushroom Agaricus subrufescens

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Moinard, Magalie; Xu, Jianping; Wang, Shouxian; Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Zhao, Ruilin; Hyde, Kevin D.; Callac, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene cluster is widely used in fungal taxonomy and phylogeographic studies. The medicinal and edible mushroom Agaricus subrufescens has a worldwide distribution with a high level of polymorphism in the ITS region. A previous analysis suggested notable ITS sequence heterogeneity within the wild French isolate CA487. The objective of this study was to investigate the pattern and potential mechanism of ITS sequence heterogeneity within this strain. Using PCR, cloning, and sequencing, we identified three types of ITS sequences, A, B, and C with a balanced distribution, which differed from each other at 13 polymorphic positions. The phylogenetic comparisons with samples from different continents revealed that the type C sequence was similar to those found in Oceanian and Asian specimens of A. subrufescens while types A and B sequences were close to those found in the Americas or in Europe. We further investigated the inheritance of these three ITS sequence types by analyzing their distribution among single-spore isolates from CA487. In this analysis, three co-dominant markers were used firstly to distinguish the homokaryotic offspring from the heterokaryotic offspring. The homokaryotic offspring were then analyzed for their ITS types. Our genetic analyses revealed that types A and B were two alleles segregating at one locus ITSI, while type C was not allelic with types A and B but was located at another unlinked locus ITSII. Furthermore, type C was present in only one of the two constitutive haploid nuclei (n) of the heterokaryotic (n+n) parent CA487. These data suggest that there was a relatively recent introduction of the type C sequence and a duplication of the ITS locus in this strain. Whether other genes were also transferred and duplicated and their impacts on genome structure and stability remain to be investigated. PMID:27228131

  10. Study on sequences of ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacers of clams belonging to the Veneridae family (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han-Liang; Xia, De-Quan; Wu, Ting-Ting; Meng, Xue-Ping; Ji, Hong-Ju; Dong, Zhi-Guo

    2006-08-01

    The first and second internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and ITS2) regions of the ribosomal DNA from four species, Meretrix meretrix L., Cyclina sinensis G., Mercenaria mercenaria L., and Protothaca jedoensis L., belonging to the family Veneridae were amplified by PCR and sequenced. The size of the ITS1 PCR amplification product ranged from 663 bp to 978 bp, with GC contents ranging from 60.78% to 64.97%. The size of the ITS1 sequence ranged from 585 bp to 900 bp, which is the largest range reported thus far in bivalve species, with GC contents ranging from 61.03% to 65.62%. The size of the ITS2 PCR amplification product ranged from 513 bp to 644 bp, with GC contents ranging from 61.29% to 62.73%. The size of the ITS2 sequence ranged from 281 bp to 412 bp, with GC contents ranging from 65.21% to 67.87%. Extensive sequence variation and obvious length polymorphisms were noted for both regions in these species, and sequence similarity of ITS2 was higher than that of ITS1 across species. The complete sequences of 5.8S ribosomal RNA gene were obtained by assembling ITS1 and ITS2 sequences, and the sequence length in all species was 157 bp. The phylogenetic tree of Veneridae clams was reconstructed using ITS2-containing partial sequences of both 5.8S and 28S ribosomal DNA as markers and the corresponding sequence information in Arctica islandica as the outgroup. Tree topologies indicated that P. jedoensis shared a close relationship with M. mercenaria and C. sinensis, a distant relationship with other species.

  11. Yeast tRNA3Leu gene transcribed and spliced in a HeLa cell extract.

    PubMed Central

    Standring, D N; Venegas, A; Rutter, W J

    1981-01-01

    A cloned yeast tRNA3Leu gene containing a 33-base intervening sequence (IVS) is selectively transcribed by a soluble extract from HeLa cells. The 130-nucleotide tRNA3Leu precursor RNA formed is colinear with the gene and contains approximately 4 leader nucleotides and up to 9 trailer nucleotides. The IVS is accurately and efficiently removed by an endogenous HeLa excision-ligase activity to yield the spliced tRNA, the free IVS, and the half-tRNA intermediates. The splicing reaction occurs without prior 5' and 3' maturation of the precursor but, with this exception, this pattern of synthesis and subsequent maturation of the tRNA3Leu precursor conforms to the scheme for tRNA biosynthesis deduced for the xenopus system. Indeed, the two systems utilize similar or identical tRNA3Leu precursors. Our results stress the extraordinary conservation of tRNA biosynthesis in eukaryotes and demonstrate that a HeLa extract provides a useful system for investigating this process. Images PMID:6796956

  12. Storm activity in North Atlantic and precipitation anomalies in European region during winter seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyazilova, N. A.; Vyazilova, A. E.

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show the storm activity influence on the formation of wet and dry zone in North Atlantic and European region during winter seasons 1994/95, 2006/07 and 2007/08 years with positive mode of NAO, 1995/96, 2000/01 and 2005/06 years with negative mode of NAO. The study of storm activity includes the analyses of cyclonic intensity and cyclone track number. Analyses of cyclonic intensity based on calculation cyclone centers number (CCN) and sum of cyclone centers MSLP anomalies (CCMA). This analyses based on automated cyclone tracking algorithm and the 6-hourly MSLP from the NCEP/NCAR reanalyses 2 from 1979 to 2009. Precipitation anomalies were calculated from CMAP archive. Analyses had included the calculation of cyclone track number in all region [30°N-80°N, 50°W-70°E]and selected latitude zone for long cyclones (with lifetime more 2 day) and short cyclones (with lifetime less 2 day). The study had shown the special features of CCN and CCMA patterns in region for long and short cyclones. The study shows, that every winter season short cyclone track number twice as much long cyclone track number. However, the contribution of long cyclones in main determines the CCMA in region. Study had shown that winter seasons with positive NAO mode Nord Europe were outstanding by strong positive precipitation anomalies and strong cyclonic intensity, and during winter seasons with negative NAO mode in this region were observed negative precipitation anomalies and weak cyclonic activity. Standartizide anomalies of integral CCMA for selected latitude zone [55°N-80°N, 50°W-70°E] had shown the intensification of cyclonic activity over North Atlantic and North European region in last years.

  13. Antimicrobial activity of propolis samples from two different regions of Anatolia.

    PubMed

    Kartal, Murat; Yildiz, Sulhiye; Kaya, Serdar; Kurucu, Semra; Topçu, Gülaçti

    2003-05-01

    Antimicrobial activity of two propolis samples from Kazan and Marmaris regions in Turkey were investigated by the disc diffusion method. Antimicrobial activity was tested with four different ethanolic extracts (30, 50, 70, and 96% ethanol) of each sample against seven Gram positive, four Gram negative bacteria and one fungus culture. The activity was found to be mainly due to caffeic acid and its esters. An isomeric mixture containing 3,3-dimethylallyl caffeate, and isopent-3-enyl caffeate was isolated from Kazan propolis samples.

  14. The solar extreme ultra-violet corona: Resolved loops and the unresolved active region corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirtain, Jonathan Wesley

    In this work, physical characteristics of the solar corona as observed in the Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) regime are investigated. The focus will be the regions of intense EUV radiation generally found near the locations of sunspots. These regions are commonly called active regions. Multiple space- based observing platforms have been deployed in the last decade; it is possible to use several of these observatories in combination to develop a more complete picture of the solar corona. Joint Observing Program 146 was created to collect spectroscopic intensities using the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer on Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and EUV images using NASA's Transition Region and Coronal Explorer. The emission line intensities are analyzed to develop an understanding of the temperature and density of the active region coronal plasma. However, the performance of the CDS instrument in the spatial and temporal domains is limited and to compensate for these limitations, data collected by the TRACE instrument provide a high spatial and temporal resolution set of observations. One of the most exciting unsolved problems in solar astrophysics is to understand why the corona maintains a temperature roughly two orders of magnitude higher than the underlying material. A detailed investigation of the coronal emission has provided constraints on models of the heating mechanism, since the temperature, density and evolution of emission rates for multiple ionic species are indicative of the mechanism(s) working to heat the corona. The corona appears to consist of multiple unresolved structures as well as resolved active region structures, called coronal loops. The purpose of the present work is to determine the characteristics of the unresolved background corona. Using the characterizations of the coronal unresolved background, results for loops after background subtraction are also presented. This work demonstrates the magnitude of the unresolved coronal emission with

  15. Correlations of regional postmortem enzyme activities with premortem local glucose metabolic rates in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    McGeer, E G; McGeer, P L; Harrop, R; Akiyama, H; Kamo, H

    1990-12-01

    Correlations were sought between local cerebral metabolic rates (LCMRs) for glucose in various regions of the cortex, determined in premortem PET scans, with the regional activities of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), beta-glucuronidase (Gluc, a probable index of reactive gliosis), and phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG, a possible indice of the large pyramidal neurons) measured on postmortem tissue. Significant negative correlations between LCMRs and Gluc activities were found in 6 PET-scanned cases of Alzheimer disease (AD), and positive correlations of LCMRs with PAG were found in 5. By contrast, a positive correlation with ChAT and AChE was found in only 1. The results are consistent with the metabolic deficits in AD being primarily a reflection of local neuronal loss and gliosis. Similar data on two cases of Huntington's disease showed no significant correlations, while 1 patient with Parkinson dementia showed a significant (negative) correlation only with Gluc.

  16. In situ measurement of methane fluxes and analysis of transcribed particulate methane monooxygenase in desert soils.

    PubMed

    Angel, Roey; Conrad, Ralf

    2009-10-01

    Aerated soils are a biological sink for atmospheric methane. However, the activity of desert soils and the presence of methanotrophs in these soils have hardly been studied. We studied on-site atmospheric methane consumption rates as well as the diversity and expression of the pmoA gene, coding for a subunit of the particulate methane monooxygenase, in arid and hyperarid soils in the Negev Desert, Israel. Methane uptake was only detected in undisturbed soils in the arid region (approximately 90 mm year(-1)) and vertical methane profiles in soil showed the active layer to be at 0-20 cm depth. No methane uptake was detected in the hyperarid soils (approximately 20 mm year(-1)) as well as in disturbed soils in the arid region (i.e. agricultural field and a mini-catchment). Molecular analysis of the methanotrophic community using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and cloning/sequencing of the pmoA gene detected methanotrophs in the active soils, whereas the inactive ones were dominated by sequences of the homologous gene amoA, coding for a subunit of the ammonia monooxygenase. Even in the active soils, methanotrophs (as well as in situ activity) could not be detected in the soil crust, which is the biologically most important layer in desert soils. All pmoA sequences belonged to yet uncultured strains. Transcript analysis showed dominance of sequences clustering within the JR3, formerly identified in Californian grassland soils. Our results show that although active methanotrophs are prevalent in arid soils they seem to be absent or inactive in hyperarid and disturbed arid soils. Furthermore, we postulate that methanotrophs of the yet uncultured JR3 cluster are the dominant atmospheric methane oxidizers in this ecosystem.

  17. Diverse activation pathways in class A GPCRs converge near the G-protein-coupling region.

    PubMed

    Venkatakrishnan, A J; Deupi, Xavier; Lebon, Guillaume; Heydenreich, Franziska M; Flock, Tilman; Miljus, Tamara; Balaji, Santhanam; Bouvier, Michel; Veprintsev, Dmitry B; Tate, Christopher G; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Babu, M Madan

    2016-08-25

    Class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large family of membrane proteins that mediate a wide variety of physiological functions, including vision, neurotransmission and immune responses. They are the targets of nearly one-third of all prescribed medicinal drugs such as beta blockers and antipsychotics. GPCR activation is facilitated by extracellular ligands and leads to the recruitment of intracellular G proteins. Structural rearrangements of residue contacts in the transmembrane domain serve as 'activation pathways' that connect the ligand-binding pocket to the G-protein-coupling region within the receptor. In order to investigate the similarities in activation pathways across class A GPCRs, we analysed 27 GPCRs from diverse subgroups for which structures of active, inactive or both states were available. Here we show that, despite the diversity in activation pathways between receptors, the pathways converge near the G-protein-coupling region. This convergence is mediated by a highly conserved structural rearrangement of residue contacts between transmembrane helices 3, 6 and 7 that releases G-protein-contacting residues. The convergence of activation pathways may explain how the activation steps initiated by diverse ligands enable GPCRs to bind a common repertoire of G proteins. PMID:27525504

  18. The length of a lantibiotic hinge region has profound influence on antimicrobial activity and host specificity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; van Heel, Auke J; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2015-01-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized (methyl)lanthionine containing peptides which can efficiently inhibit the growth of Gram-positive bacteria. As lantibiotics kill bacteria efficiently and resistance to them is difficult to be obtained, they have the potential to be used in many applications, e.g., in pharmaceutical industry or food industry. Nisin can inhibit the growth of Gram-positive bacteria by binding to lipid II and by making pores in their membrane. The C-terminal part of nisin is known to play an important role during translocation over the membrane and forming pore complexes. However, as the thickness of bacterial membranes varies between different species and environmental conditions, this property could have an influence on the pore forming activity of nisin. To investigate this, the so-called "hinge region" of nisin (residues NMK) was engineered to vary from one to six amino acid residues and specific activity against different indicators was compared. Antimicrobial activity in liquid culture assays showed that wild type nisin is most active, while truncation of the hinge region dramatically reduced the activity of the peptide. However, one or two amino acids extensions showed only slightly reduced activity against most indicator strains. Notably, some variants (+2, +1, -1, -2) exhibited higher antimicrobial activity than nisin in agar well diffusion assays against Lactococcus lactis MG1363, Listeria monocytogenes, Enterococcus faecalis VE14089, Bacillus sporothermodurans IC4 and Bacillus cereus 4153 at certain temperatures.

  19. Horizontal flows concurrent with an X2.2 flare in the active region NOAA 11158

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauregard, L.; Verma, M.; Denker, C.

    2012-02-01

    Horizontal proper motions were measured with local correlation tracking (LCT) techniques in active region NOAA 11158 on 2011 February 15 at a time when a major (X2.2) solar flare occurred. The measurements are based on continuum images and magnetograms of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The observed shear flows along the polarity inversion line were rather weak (a few 100 m s-1). The counter-streaming region shifted toward the north after the flare. A small circular area with flow speeds of up to 1.2 km s-1 appeared after the flare near a region of rapid penumbral decay. The LCT signal in this region was provided by small-scale photospheric brigthenings, which were associated with fast traveling moving magnetic features. Umbral strengthening and rapid penumbral decay was observed after the flare. Both phenomena were closely tied to kernels of white-light flare emission. The white-light flare only lasted for about 15 min and peaked 4 min earlier than the X-ray flux. In comparison to other major flares, the X2.2 flare in active region NOAA 11158 only produced diminutive photospheric signatures.

  20. Free Magnetic Energy and Helicity in Active and Quiet Solar Regions and their role in Solar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziotziou, K.; Georgoulis, M. K.; Tsiropoula, G.; Moraitis, K.; Kontogiannis, I.

    2013-09-01

    We present a novel nonlinear force-free method designed to calculate the instantaneous free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity budgets of a solar region from a single photospheric/chromospheric vector magnetogram of the region. Our objective is to study the role of these quantities in solar eruptions and quiet-Sun dynamics. We apply the method to (1) derive the energy/helicity diagram of solar active regions from a sample of 162 vector magnetograms corresponding to 42 different active regions (ARs), suggesting that there exist 4 1031 erg and 2 1042 Mx2 thresholds in free energy and relative helicity, respectively, for ARs to enter eruptive territory, (2) study the dynamics of eruptive NOAA AR 11158 using a high-cadence 5-day time series of vector magnetograms, suggesting the formation of increasingly helical pre-eruption structures and a causal relation between flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and, (3) derive helicity and energy budgets in quiet Sun regions and construct the respective energy/helicity diagram. Our results highlight the importance of these two parameters in AR evolution and quiet-Sun dynamics and instigate further research including detailed analysis with synthetic, magnetohydrodynamical models. This work is supported by EU's Seventh Framework Programme via a Marie Curie Fellowship and by the Hellenic National Space Weather Research Network (HNSWRN) via the THALIS Programme.

  1. CALCULATING ENERGY STORAGE DUE TO TOPOLOGICAL CHANGES IN EMERGING ACTIVE REGION NOAA AR 11112

    SciTech Connect

    Tarr, Lucas; Longcope, Dana

    2012-04-10

    The minimum current corona model provides a way to estimate stored coronal energy using the number of field lines connecting regions of positive and negative photospheric flux. This information is quantified by the net flux connecting pairs of opposing regions in a connectivity matrix. Changes in the coronal magnetic field, due to processes such as magnetic reconnection, manifest themselves as changes in the connectivity matrix. However, the connectivity matrix will also change when flux sources emerge or submerge through the photosphere, as often happens in active regions. We have developed an algorithm to estimate the changes in flux due to emergence and submergence of magnetic flux sources. These estimated changes must be accounted for in order to quantify storage and release of magnetic energy in the corona. To perform this calculation over extended periods of time, we must additionally have a consistently labeled connectivity matrix over the entire observational time span. We have therefore developed an automated tracking algorithm to generate a consistent connectivity matrix as the photospheric source regions evolve over time. We have applied this method to NOAA Active Region 11112, which underwent a GOES M2.9 class flare around 19:00 on 2010 October 16th, and calculated a lower bound on the free magnetic energy buildup of {approx}8.25 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg over 3 days.

  2. Neural regions that underlie reinforcement learning are also active for social expectancy violations.

    PubMed

    Harris, Lasana T; Fiske, Susan T

    2010-01-01

    Prediction error, the difference between an expected and an actual outcome, serves as a learning signal that interacts with reward and punishment value to direct future behavior during reinforcement learning. We hypothesized that similar learning and valuation signals may underlie social expectancy violations. Here, we explore the neural correlates of social expectancy violation signals along the universal person-perception dimensions trait warmth and competence. In this context, social learning may result from expectancy violations that occur when a target is inconsistent with an a priori schema. Expectancy violation may activate neural regions normally implicated in prediction error and valuation during appetitive and aversive conditioning. Using fMRI, we first gave perceivers high warmth or competence behavioral information that led to dispositional or situational attributions for the behavior. Participants then saw pictures of people responsible for the behavior; they represented social groups either inconsistent (rated low on either warmth or competence) or consistent (rated high on either warmth or competence) with the behavior information. Warmth and competence expectancy violations activate striatal regions that represent evaluative and prediction error signals. Social cognition regions underlie consistent expectations. These findings suggest that regions underlying reinforcement learning may work in concert with social cognition regions in warmth and competence social expectancy. This study illustrates the neural overlap between neuroeconomics and social neuroscience.

  3. Antibacterial, Antioxidant, and Anticholinesterase Activities of Plant Seed Extracts from Brazilian Semiarid Region

    PubMed Central

    Farias, Davi Felipe; Souza, Terezinha Maria; Viana, Martônio Ponte; Soares, Bruno Marques; Cunha, Arcelina Pacheco; Vasconcelos, Ilka Maria; Ricardo, Nágila Maria Pontes Silva; Ferreira, Paulo Michel Pinheiro; Melo, Vânia Maria Maciel; Carvalho, Ana Fontenele Urano

    2013-01-01

    The antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticholinesterase activities of ethanolic seed extracts of twenty-one plant species from Brazilian semiarid region were investigated. The extracts were tested for antimicrobial activity against six bacteria strains and three yeasts. Six extracts presented activity against the Gram (−) organism Salmonella choleraesuis and the Gram (+) organisms Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. The MIC values ranged from 4.96 to 37.32 mg/mL. The Triplaris gardneriana extract presented activity against the three species, with MIC values 18.8, 13.76, and 11.15 mg/mL, respectively. Five extracts presented antioxidant activity, with EC50 values ranging from 69.73 μg/mL (T. gardneriana) to 487.51 μg/mL (Licania rigida). For the anticholinesterase activity, eleven extracts were capable of inhibiting the enzyme activity. From those, T. gardneriana, Parkia platycephala and Connarus detersus presented the best activities, with inhibition values of 76.7, 71.5, and 91.9%, respectively. The extracts that presented antimicrobial activity were tested for hemolytic assay against human A, B, and O blood types and rabbit blood. From those, only the Myracrodruon urundeuva extract presented activity (about 20% of hemolysis at the lowest tested concentration, 1.9 µg/mL). Infrared spectroscopy of six representative extracts attested the presence of tannins, polyphenols, and flavonoids, which was confirmed by a qualitative phytochemical assay. PMID:24386637

  4. Antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticholinesterase activities of plant seed extracts from Brazilian semiarid region.

    PubMed

    Farias, Davi Felipe; Souza, Terezinha Maria; Viana, Martônio Ponte; Soares, Bruno Marques; Cunha, Arcelina Pacheco; Vasconcelos, Ilka Maria; Ricardo, Nágila Maria Pontes Silva; Ferreira, Paulo Michel Pinheiro; Melo, Vânia Maria Maciel; Carvalho, Ana Fontenele Urano

    2013-01-01

    The antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticholinesterase activities of ethanolic seed extracts of twenty-one plant species from Brazilian semiarid region were investigated. The extracts were tested for antimicrobial activity against six bacteria strains and three yeasts. Six extracts presented activity against the Gram (-) organism Salmonella choleraesuis and the Gram (+) organisms Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. The MIC values ranged from 4.96 to 37.32 mg/mL. The Triplaris gardneriana extract presented activity against the three species, with MIC values 18.8, 13.76, and 11.15 mg/mL, respectively. Five extracts presented antioxidant activity, with EC50 values ranging from 69.73 μ g/mL (T. gardneriana) to 487.51 μ g/mL (Licania rigida). For the anticholinesterase activity, eleven extracts were capable of inhibiting the enzyme activity. From those, T. gardneriana, Parkia platycephala and Connarus detersus presented the best activities, with inhibition values of 76.7, 71.5, and 91.9%, respectively. The extracts that presented antimicrobial activity were tested for hemolytic assay against human A, B, and O blood types and rabbit blood. From those, only the Myracrodruon urundeuva extract presented activity (about 20% of hemolysis at the lowest tested concentration, 1.9 µg/mL). Infrared spectroscopy of six representative extracts attested the presence of tannins, polyphenols, and flavonoids, which was confirmed by a qualitative phytochemical assay.

  5. Particle acceleration in solar active regions being in the state of self-organized criticality.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahos, Loukas

    We review the recent observational results on flare initiation and particle acceleration in solar active regions. Elaborating a statistical approach to describe the spatiotemporally intermittent electric field structures formed inside a flaring solar active region, we investigate the efficiency of such structures in accelerating charged particles (electrons and protons). The large-scale magnetic configuration in the solar atmosphere responds to the strong turbulent flows that convey perturbations across the active region by initiating avalanche-type processes. The resulting unstable structures correspond to small-scale dissipation regions hosting strong electric fields. Previous research on particle acceleration in strongly turbulent plasmas provides a general framework for addressing such a problem. This framework combines various electromagnetic field configurations obtained by magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) or cellular automata (CA) simulations, or by employing a statistical description of the field’s strength and configuration with test particle simulations. We work on data-driven 3D magnetic field extrapolations, based on a self-organized criticality models (SOC). A relativistic test-particle simulation traces each particle’s guiding center within these configurations. Using the simulated particle-energy distributions we test our results against observations, in the framework of the collisional thick target model (CTTM) of solar hard X-ray (HXR) emission and compare our results with the current observations.

  6. Magnetic Flux Transport and the Long-term Evolution of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Upton, Lisa; Warren, Harry P.; Hathaway, David H.

    2015-12-01

    With multiple vantage points around the Sun, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and Solar Dynamics Observatory imaging observations provide a unique opportunity to view the solar surface continuously. We use He ii 304 Å data from these observatories to isolate and track ten active regions and study their long-term evolution. We find that active regions typically follow a standard pattern of emergence over several days followed by a slower decay that is proportional in time to the peak intensity in the region. Since STEREO does not make direct observations of the magnetic field, we employ a flux-luminosity relationship to infer the total unsigned magnetic flux evolution. To investigate this magnetic flux decay over several rotations we use a surface flux transport model, the Advective Flux Transport model, that simulates convective flows using a time-varying velocity field and find that the model provides realistic predictions when information about the active region's magnetic field strength and distribution at peak flux is available. Finally, we illustrate how 304 Å images can be used as a proxy for magnetic flux measurements when magnetic field data is not accessible.

  7. MAGNETIC FLUX TRANSPORT AND THE LONG-TERM EVOLUTION OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Upton, Lisa; Warren, Harry P.; Hathaway, David H.

    2015-12-20

    With multiple vantage points around the Sun, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and Solar Dynamics Observatory imaging observations provide a unique opportunity to view the solar surface continuously. We use He ii 304 Å data from these observatories to isolate and track ten active regions and study their long-term evolution. We find that active regions typically follow a standard pattern of emergence over several days followed by a slower decay that is proportional in time to the peak intensity in the region. Since STEREO does not make direct observations of the magnetic field, we employ a flux-luminosity relationship to infer the total unsigned magnetic flux evolution. To investigate this magnetic flux decay over several rotations we use a surface flux transport model, the Advective Flux Transport model, that simulates convective flows using a time-varying velocity field and find that the model provides realistic predictions when information about the active region's magnetic field strength and distribution at peak flux is available. Finally, we illustrate how 304 Å images can be used as a proxy for magnetic flux measurements when magnetic field data is not accessible.

  8. Photobleaching reveals complex effects of inhibitors on transcribing RNA polymerase II in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fromaget, Maud; Cook, Peter R. . E-mail: peter.cook@path.ox.ac.uk

    2007-08-15

    RNA polymerase II transcribes most eukaryotic genes. Photobleaching studies have revealed that living Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the catalytic subunit of the polymerase tagged with the green fluorescent protein contain a large rapidly exchanging pool of enzyme, plus a smaller engaged fraction; genetic complementation shows this tagged polymerase to be fully functional. We investigated how transcriptional inhibitors - some of which are used therapeutically - affect the engaged fraction in living cells using fluorescence loss in photobleaching; all were used at concentrations that have reversible effects. Various kinase inhibitors (roscovitine, DRB, KM05283, alsterpaullone, isoquinolinesulfonamide derivatives H-7, H-8, H-89, H-9), proteasomal inhibitors (lactacystin, MG132), and an anti-tumour agent (cisplatin) all reduced the engaged fraction; an intercalator (actinomycin D), two histone deacetylase inhibitors (trichostatin A, sodium butyrate), and irradiation with ultra-violet light all increased it. The polymerase proves to be both a sensitive sensor and effector of the response to these inhibitors.

  9. Selection of enzymes for terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of fungal internally transcribed spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Pablo; Manjón, Jose L

    2009-07-01

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) profiling of the internally transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA of unknown fungal communities is currently unsupported by a broad-range enzyme-choosing rationale. An in silico study of terminal fragment size distribution was therefore performed following virtual digestion (by use of a set of commercially available 135 type IIP restriction endonucleases) of all published fungal ITS sequences putatively annealing to primers ITS1 and ITS4. Different diversity measurements were used to rank primer-enzyme pairs according to the richness and evenness that they showed. Top-performing pairs were hierarchically clustered to test for data dependency. The enzyme set composed of MaeII, BfaI, and BstNI returned much better results than randomly chosen enzyme sets in computer simulations and is therefore recommended for in vitro TRFLP profiling of fungal ITSs.

  10. T7 RNA polymerase cannot transcribe through a highly knotted DNA template.

    PubMed Central

    Portugal, J; Rodríguez-Campos, A

    1996-01-01

    The ability of T7 RNA polymerase to transcribe a plasmid DNA in vitro in its linear, supercoiled, relaxed and knotted forms was analysed. Similar levels of transcription were found on each template with the exception of plasmids showing varying degrees of knotting (obtained using stoichiometric amounts of yeast topoisomerase II). A purified fraction of knotted DNA with a high number of nodes (crosses) was found to be refractory to transcription. The unknotting of the knotted plasmids, using catalytic amounts of topoisomerase II, restored their capacity as templates for transcription to levels similar to those obtained for the other topological forms. These results demonstrate that highly knotted DNA is the only topological form of DNA that is not a template for transcription. We suggest that the regulation of transcription, which depends on the topological state of the template, might be related to the presence of knotted DNA with different number of nodes. PMID:9016657

  11. ACTIVE REGION MOSS: DOPPLER SHIFTS FROM HINODE/EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Durgesh; Mason, Helen E.; Klimchuk, James A.

    2012-07-01

    Studying the Doppler shifts and the temperature dependence of Doppler shifts in moss regions can help us understand the heating processes in the core of the active regions. In this paper, we have used an active region observation recorded by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode on 2007 December 12 to measure the Doppler shifts in the moss regions. We have distinguished the moss regions from the rest of the active region by defining a low-density cutoff as derived by Tripathi et al. in 2010. We have carried out a very careful analysis of the EIS wavelength calibration based on the method described by Young et al. in 2012. For spectral lines having maximum sensitivity between log T = 5.85 and log T = 6.25 K, we find that the velocity distribution peaks at around 0 km s{sup -1} with an estimated error of 4-5 km s{sup -1}. The width of the distribution decreases with temperature. The mean of the distribution shows a blueshift which increases with increasing temperature and the distribution also shows asymmetries toward blueshift. Comparing these results with observables predicted from different coronal heating models, we find that these results are consistent with both steady and impulsive heating scenarios. However, the fact that there are a significant number of pixels showing velocity amplitudes that exceed the uncertainty of 5 km s{sup -1} is suggestive of impulsive heating. Clearly, further observational constraints are needed to distinguish between these two heating scenarios.

  12. Copy Number Variation in Transcriptionally Active Regions of Sexual and Apomictic Boechera Demonstrates Independently Derived Apomictic Lineages[W

    PubMed Central

    Aliyu, Olawale M.; Seifert, Michael; Corral, José M.; Fuchs, Joerg; Sharbel, Timothy F.

    2013-01-01

    In asexual (apomictic) plants, the absence of meiosis and sex is expected to lead to mutation accumulation. To compare mutation accumulation in the transcribed genomic regions of sexual and apomictic plants, we performed a double-validated analysis of copy number variation (CNV) on 10 biological replicates each of diploid sexual and diploid apomictic Boechera, using a high-density (>700 K) custom microarray. The Boechera genome demonstrated higher levels of depleted CNV, compared with enriched CNV, irrespective of reproductive mode. Genome-wide patterns of CNV revealed four divergent lineages, three of which contain both sexual and apomictic genotypes. Hence genome-wide CNV reflects at least three independent origins (i.e., expression) of apomixis from different sexual genetic backgrounds. CNV distributions for different families of transposable elements were lineage specific, and the enrichment of LINE/L1 and long term repeat/Copia elements in lineage 3 apomicts is consistent with sex and meiosis being mechanisms for purging genomic parasites. We hypothesize that significant overrepresentation of specific gene ontology classes (e.g., pollen–pistil interaction) in apomicts implies that gene enrichment could be an adaptive mechanism for genome stability in diploid apomicts by providing a polyploid-like system for buffering the effects of deleterious mutations. PMID:24170129

  13. Copy number variation in transcriptionally active regions of sexual and apomictic Boechera demonstrates independently derived apomictic lineages.

    PubMed

    Aliyu, Olawale M; Seifert, Michael; Corral, José M; Fuchs, Joerg; Sharbel, Timothy F

    2013-10-01

    In asexual (apomictic) plants, the absence of meiosis and sex is expected to lead to mutation accumulation. To compare mutation accumulation in the transcribed genomic regions of sexual and apomictic plants, we performed a double-validated analysis of copy number variation (CNV) on 10 biological replicates each of diploid sexual and diploid apomictic Boechera, using a high-density (>700 K) custom microarray. The Boechera genome demonstrated higher levels of depleted CNV, compared with enriched CNV, irrespective of reproductive mode. Genome-wide patterns of CNV revealed four divergent lineages, three of which contain both sexual and apomictic genotypes. Hence genome-wide CNV reflects at least three independent origins (i.e., expression) of apomixis from different sexual genetic backgrounds. CNV distributions for different families of transposable elements were lineage specific, and the enrichment of LINE/L1 and long term repeat/Copia elements in lineage 3 apomicts is consistent with sex and meiosis being mechanisms for purging genomic parasites. We hypothesize that significant overrepresentation of specific gene ontology classes (e.g., pollen-pistil interaction) in apomicts implies that gene enrichment could be an adaptive mechanism for genome stability in diploid apomicts by providing a polyploid-like system for buffering the effects of deleterious mutations. PMID:24170129

  14. ON THE ORIGIN OF THE ASYMMETRIC HELICITY INJECTION IN EMERGING ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Y.; Alexander, D.; Tian, L.

    2009-12-10

    To explore the possible causes of the observed asymmetric helicity flux in emerging active regions between the leading and following polarities reported in a recent study by Tian and Alexander, we examine the subsurface evolution of buoyantly rising OMEGA-shaped flux tubes using three-dimensional, spherical-shell anelastic MHD simulations. We find that due to the asymmetric stretching of the OMEGA-shaped tube by the Coriolis force, the leading side of the emerging tube has a greater field strength, is more buoyant, and remains more cohesive compared to the following side. As a result, the magnetic field lines in the leading leg show more coherent values of local twist alpha ident to (nabla x B) centre dot B/B {sup 2}, whereas the values in the following leg show large fluctuations and are of mixed sign. On average, however, the field lines in the leading leg do not show a systematically greater mean twist compared to the following leg. Due to the higher rise velocity of the leading leg, the upward helicity flux through a horizontal cross section at each depth in the upper half of the convection zone is significantly greater in the leading polarity region than that in the following leg. This may contribute to the observed asymmetric helicity flux in emerging active regions. Furthermore, based on a simplified model of active region flux emergence into the corona by Longcope and Welsch, we show that a stronger field strength in the leading tube can result in a faster rotation of the leading polarity sunspot driven by torsional Alfven waves during flux emergence into the corona, contributing to a greater helicity injection rate in the leading polarity of an emerging active region.

  15. Relating Alfvén Wave Heating Model to Observations of a Solar Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoritomo, J. Y.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A.

    2012-12-01

    We compared images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory's (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) with simulations of propagating and dissipating Alfvén waves from a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model (van Ballegooijen et. al 2011; Asgari-Targhi & van Ballegooijen 2012). The goal was to search for observational evidence of Alfvén waves in the solar corona and understand their role in coronal heating. We looked at one particular active region on the 5th of May 2012. Certain distinct loops in the SDO/AIA observations were selected and expanded. Movies were created from these selections in an attempt to discover transverse motions that may be Alfvén waves. Using a magnetogram of that day and the corresponding synoptic map, a potential field model was created for the active region. Three-dimensional MHD models for several loops in different locations in the active region were created. Each model specifies the temperature, pressure, magnetic field strength, average heating rate, and other parameters along the loop. We find that the heating is intermittent in the loops and reflection occurs at the transition region. For loops at larger and larger height, a point is reached where thermal non-equilibrium occurs. In the center this critical height is much higher than in the periphery of the active region. Lastly, we find that the average heating rate and coronal pressure decrease with increasing height in the corona. This research was supported by an NSF grant for the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) Solar REU program and a SDO/AIA grant for the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

  16. Flux emergence in the solar active region NOAA 11158: the evolution of net current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemareddy, Panditi; Venkatakrishnan, Parameswaran; Karthikreddy, Solipuram

    2015-09-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the evolution of observed net vertical current using a time series of vector magnetograms of the active region (AR) NOAA 11158 obtained from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. We also discuss the relation of net current to the observed eruptive events. The AR evolved from the βγ to βγδ configuration over a period of six days. The AR had two sub-regions of activity with opposite chirality: one dominated by sunspot rotation producing a strong CME, and the other showing large shear motions producing a strong flare. The net current in each polarity over the CME producing sub-region increased to a maximum and then decreased when the sunspots were separated. The time profile of net current in this sub-region followed the time profile of the rotation rate of the south-polarity sunspot in the same sub-region. The net current in the flaring sub-region showed a sudden increase at the time of the strong flare and remained unchanged until the end of the observation, while the sunspots maintained their close proximity. The systematic evolution of the observed net current is seen to follow the time evolution of total length of strongly sheared polarity inversion lines in both of the sub-regions. The observed photospheric net current could be explained as an inevitable product of the emergence of a twisted flux rope, from a higher pressure confinement below the photosphere into the lower pressure environment of the photosphere.

  17. Evolution of magmatic and hydrothermal activity in the western Arctic and North Atlantic regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokhtin, N. O.; Lobkovsky, L. I.; Novikov, G. V.; Kozlov, E. E.; Bogdanova, O. Yu.; Nikiforov, S. L.

    2016-07-01

    This paper discusses the geodynamic evolution of the lithosphere in the Arctic region during the Phaneorozic and its polyphase lithotectonic reorganization. Spatiotemporal patterns of the mosaic junction of lithospheric plates of different age are presented for the Caledonian-Hercynian stage and for the Cenozoic evolution of the North Atlantic and Arctic oceanic basins. Special attention is given to the intersections of fault systems with different kinematics, which control the manifestation of peculiar magmatism and the formation of numerous mineral deposits. It is shown that the hydrothermal activity of the region is related to the ocean opening in the Eocene and is confined to the mid-ocean ridge.

  18. Active aeolian processes on Mars: A regional study in Arabia and Meridiani Terrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestro, S.; Vaz, D. A.; Fenton, L. K.; Geissler, P. E.

    2011-10-01

    We present evidence of widespread aeolian activity in the Arabia Terra/Meridiani region (Mars), where different kinds of aeolian modifications have been detected and classified. Passing from the regional to the local scale, we describe one particular dune field in Meridiani Planum, where two ripple populations are distinguished by means of different migration rates. Moreover, a consistent change in the ripple pattern is accompanied by significant dune advancement (between 0.4-1 meter in one Martian year) that is locally triggered by large avalanche features. This suggests that dune advancement may be common throughout the Martian tropics.

  19. Active aeolian processes on Mars: A regional study in Arabia and Meridiani Terrae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silvestro, S.; Vaz, D.A.; Fenton, L.K.; Geissler, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    We present evidence of widespread aeolian activity in the Arabia Terra/Meridiani region (Mars), where different kinds of aeolian modifications have been detected and classified. Passing from the regional to the local scale, we describe one particular dune field in Meridiani Planum, where two ripple populations are distinguished by means of different migration rates. Moreover, a consistent change in the ripple pattern is accompanied by significant dune advancement (between 0.4-1 meter in one Martian year) that is locally triggered by large avalanche features. This suggests that dune advancement may be common throughout the Martian tropics. ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. 24-Hour Forecasting of CME/Flare Eruptions from Active-Region Magnetograms (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Barghouty, A.; Khazanov, I. G.; Moore, R. L.

    2010-12-01

    We have developed an automated tool for forecasting severe space weather from full-disk magnetograms. This tool is now being used on a trial basis by NASA’s Space Radiation Analysis Group (SRAG) at JSC. SRAG is responsible for the monitoring and forecasting of exposure the astronauts to particle radiation. The tool is described in Falconer, Barghouty, Khazanov, and Moore (2010), submitted to Space Weather. The new software tool is designed for the empirical forecasting of M- and X-class flares, coronal mass ejections, and solar energetic particle events. For each of these event types, the algorithm is based on the empirical relationship between the event rate and a proxy of the active region’s free magnetic energy. The relationship is determined from ~40,000 active-region magnetograms from ~1,300 active regions that were observed within 30 heliographic degrees from disk center by SOHO/MDI, and that have known histories of flare, coronal mass ejection, and solar energetic particle event production during disk passage. The tool automatically extracts each strong-field magnetic areas from an MDI full-disk magnetogram, identifies each as a NOAA active region, and measures the proxy of the active region’s free magnetic energy from the extracted magnetogram. For each active region, the empirical relationship is then used to convert the free magnetic energy proxy into the active region’s expected event rate (see figure). The expected event rate in turn can be readily converted into the probability that the active region will produce such an event in a given forward time window. We can make this tool applicable to the full-disk line-of-sight magnetograms from SDO/HMI or as a backup, from NSO/GONG. By empirically determining the conversion of the value of free-energy proxy measured from an HMI magnetogram to that which would be measured from an MDI magnetogram, we can use the HMI magnetograms with the empirical relationships determined from our MDI data base to make