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Sample records for activin receptor iib

  1. Characterization of the Ligand Binding Functionality of the Extracellular Domain of Activin Receptor Type IIB

    PubMed Central

    Sako, Dianne; Grinberg, Asya V.; Liu, June; Davies, Monique V.; Castonguay, Roselyne; Maniatis, Silas; Andreucci, Amy J.; Pobre, Eileen G.; Tomkinson, Kathleen N.; Monnell, Travis E.; Ucran, Jeffrey A.; Martinez-Hackert, Erik; Pearsall, R. Scott; Underwood, Kathryn W.; Seehra, Jasbir; Kumar, Ravindra

    2010-01-01

    The single transmembrane domain serine/threonine kinase activin receptor type IIB (ActRIIB) has been proposed to bind key regulators of skeletal muscle mass development, including the ligands GDF-8 (myostatin) and GDF-11 (BMP-11). Here we provide a detailed kinetic characterization of ActRIIB binding to several low and high affinity ligands using a soluble activin receptor type IIB-Fc chimera (ActRIIB.Fc). We show that both GDF-8 and GDF-11 bind the extracellular domain of ActRIIB with affinities comparable with those of activin A, a known high affinity ActRIIB ligand, whereas BMP-2 and BMP-7 affinities for ActRIIB are at least 100-fold lower. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrate that ActRIIB binds GDF-11 and activin A in different ways such as, for example, substitutions in ActRIIB Leu79 effectively abolish ActRIIB binding to activin A yet not to GDF-11. Native ActRIIB has four isoforms that differ in the length of the C-terminal portion of their extracellular domains. We demonstrate that the C terminus of the ActRIIB extracellular domain is crucial for maintaining biological activity of the ActRIIB.Fc receptor chimera. In addition, we show that glycosylation of ActRIIB is not required for binding to activin A or GDF-11. Together, our findings reveal binding specificity and activity determinants of the ActRIIB receptor that combine to effect specificity in the activation of distinct signaling pathways. PMID:20385559

  2. The effects of a soluble activin type IIB receptor on obesity and insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Akpan, Imo; Goncalves, Marcus D.; Dhir, Ravindra; Yin, Xiaoyan; Pistilli, Emidio; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Khurana, Tejvir; Ucran, Jeffrey; Lachey, Jennifer; Ahima, Rexford S.

    2009-01-01

    Myostatin, also known as Growth and Differentiation Factor 8, is a secreted protein that inhibits muscle growth. Disruption of myostatin signaling increases muscle mass and decreases glucose, but it is unclear whether these changes are related. We treated mice on chow and high-fat diets with a soluble activin receptor type IIB (ActRIIB.Fc) which is a putative endogenous signaling receptor for myostatin and other ligands of the TGF-β superfamily. After 4 weeks, RAP-031 increased lean and muscle mass, grip strength, and contractile force. RAP-031 enhanced the ability of insulin to suppress glucose production under clamp conditions in high-fat fed mice, but did not significantly change insulin-mediated glucose disposal. The hepatic insulin sensitizing effect of RAP-031 treatment was associated with increased adiponectin levels. RAP-031 treatment for 10 weeks further increased muscle mass and drastically reduced fat content in mice on either chow or high-fat diet. RAP-031 suppressed hepatic glucose production and increased peripheral glucose uptake in chow fed mice. In contrast, RAP-031 suppressed glucose production with no apparent change in glucose disposal in high-fat diet mice. Our findings demonstrate that disruption of ActRIIB signaling is a viable pharmacological approach for treating obesity and diabetes. PMID:19668253

  3. Goat activin receptor type IIB knockdown by muscle specific promoter driven artificial microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amrutlal K; Shah, Ravi K; Patel, Utsav A; Tripathi, Ajai K; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2014-10-10

    Activin receptor type IIB (ACVR2B) is a transmembrane receptor which mediates signaling of TGF beta superfamily ligands known to function in regulation of muscle mass, embryonic development and reproduction. ACVR2B antagonism has shown to enhance the muscle growth in several disease and transgenic models. Here, we show ACVR2B knockdown by RNA interference using muscle creatine kinase (MCK) promoter driven artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs). Among the various promoter elements tested, the ∼1.26 kb MCK promoter region showed maximum transcriptional activity in goat myoblasts cells. We observed up to 20% silencing in non-myogenic 293T cells and up to 32% silencing in myogenic goat myoblasts by MCK directed amiRNAs by transient transfection. Goat myoblasts stably integrated with MCK directed amiRNAs showed merely 8% silencing in proliferating myoblasts which was increased to 34% upon induction of differentiation at transcript level whereas up to 57% silencing at protein level. Knockdown of ACVR2B by 5'-UTR derived amiRNAs resulted in decreased SMAD2/3 signaling, increased expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) and enhanced proliferation and differentiation of myoblasts. Unexpectedly, knockdown of ACVR2B by 3'-UTR derived amiRNAs resulted in increased SMAD2/3 signaling, reduced expression of MRFs and suppression of myogenesis. Our study offers muscle specific knockdown of ACVR2B as a potential strategy to enhance muscle mass in the farm animal species.

  4. Activin Receptor Type IIB Inhibition Improves Muscle Phenotype and Function in a Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Elisabeth R.; Sweeney, H. Lee

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that causes progressive muscle atrophy and weakness. Using adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer, we evaluated the potential to improve skeletal muscle weakness via systemic, postnatal inhibition of either myostatin or all signaling via the activin receptor type IIB (ActRIIB). After demonstrating elevated p-SMAD3 content and differential content of ActRIIB ligands, 4-week-old male C/C SMA model mice were treated intraperitoneally with 1x1012 genome copies of pseudotype 2/8 virus encoding a soluble form of the ActRIIB extracellular domain (sActRIIB) or protease-resistant myostatin propeptide (dnMstn) driven by a liver specific promoter. At 12 weeks of age, muscle mass and function were improved in treated C/C mice by both treatments, compared to controls. The fast fiber type muscles had a greater response to treatment than did slow muscles, and the greatest therapeutic effects were found with sActRIIB treatment. Myostatin/activin inhibition, however, did not rescue C/C mice from the reduction in motor unit numbers of the tibialis anterior muscle. Collectively, this study indicates that myostatin/activin inhibition represents a potential therapeutic strategy to increase muscle mass and strength, but not neuromuscular junction defects, in less severe forms of SMA. PMID:27870893

  5. A Soluble Activin Receptor Type IIB Does Not Improve Blood Glucose in Streptozotocin-Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Guo, Tingqing; Portas, Jennifer; McPherron, Alexandra C.

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), or insulin dependent DM, is accompanied by decreased muscle mass. The growth factor myostatin (MSTN) is a negative regulator of muscle growth, and a loss of MSTN signaling has been shown to increase muscle mass and prevent the development of obesity, insulin resistance and lipodystrophic diabetes in mice. The effects of MSTN inhibition in a T1DM model on muscle mass and blood glucose are unknown. We asked whether MSTN inhibition would increase muscle mass and decrease hyperglycemia in mice treated with streptozotocin (STZ) to destroy pancreatic beta cells. After diabetes developed, mice were treated with a soluble MSTN/activin receptor fused to Fc (ACVR2B:Fc). ACVR2B:Fc increased body weight and muscle mass compared to vehicle treated mice. Unexpectedly, ACVR2B:Fc reproducibly exacerbated hyperglycemia within approximately one week of administration. ACVR2B:Fc treatment also elevated serum levels of the glucocorticoid corticosterone. These results suggest that although MSTN/activin inhibitors increased muscle mass, they may be counterproductive in improving health in patients with T1DM. PMID:25561902

  6. Cripto forms a complex with activin and type II activin receptors and can block activin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Peter C.; Harrison, Craig A.; Vale, Wylie

    2003-01-01

    Activin, nodal, Vg1, and growth and differentiation factor 1 are members of the transforming growth factor β superfamily and signal via the activin type II (ActRII/IIB) and type I (ALK4) serine/threonine kinase receptors. Unlike activins, however, signaling by nodal, Vg1, and growth and differentiation factor 1 requires a coreceptor from the epidermal growth factor-Cripto-FRL1-Cryptic protein family such as Cripto. Cripto has important roles during development and oncogenesis and binds nodal or related ligands and ALK4 to facilitate assembly of type I and type II receptor signaling complexes. Because Cripto mediates signaling via activin receptors and binds directly to ALK4, we tested whether transfection with Cripto would affect the ability of activin to signal and/or interact with its receptors. Here we show that Cripto can form a complex with activin and ActRII/IIB. We were unable to detect activin binding to Cripto in the absence of ActRII/IIB, indicating that unlike nodal, activin requires type II receptors to bind Cripto. If cotransfected with ActRII/IIB and ALK4, Cripto inhibited crosslinking of activin to ALK4 and the association of ALK4 with ActRII/IIB. In addition, Cripto blocked activin signaling when transfected into either HepG2 cells or 293T cells. We have also shown that under conditions in which Cripto facilitates nodal signaling, it antagonizes activin. Inhibition of activin signaling provides an additional example of a Cripto effect on the regulation of signaling by transforming growth factor-β superfamily members. Because activin is a potent inhibitor of cell growth in multiple cell types, these results provide a mechanism that may partially explain the oncogenic action of Cripto. PMID:12682303

  7. Pretreatment with a soluble activin type IIB receptor/Fc fusion protein improves hypoxia-induced muscle dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Pistilli, Emidio E.; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Mosqueira, Matias; Lachey, Jennifer; Seehra, Jasbir

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia, or reduced oxygen, occurs in a variety of clinical and environmental situations. Hypoxic exposure is associated with decreased muscle mass and a concomitant reduction in exercise capacity, although the exact mechanisms are not completely understood. The activin type IIB receptor (ActRIIB) is a receptor for transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) superfamily members that are involved in the negative regulation of lean tissue mass. Given that hypoxia has negative effects on muscle mass and function and that modulation of the ActRIIB has been shown to increase muscle mass, we tested the hypothesis that pharmacological targeting of the ActRIIB for 2 wk would attenuate the loss of muscle mass and function in mice after exposure to normobaric hypoxia. ActRIIB modulation was achieved using a soluble activin receptor/Fc fusion protein (sActRIIB) in mice housed in a hypoxic chamber for 1 or 2 wk. Hypoxia induced a reduction in body weight in PBS- and sActRIIB-treated mice, although sActRIIB-treated mice remained larger throughout the hypoxic exposure. The absolute forces generated by extensor digitorum longus muscles were also significantly greater in sActRIIB- than PBS-treated mice and were more resistant to eccentric contraction-induced force drop after eccentric lengthening contractions. In summary, sActRIIB pretreatment attenuated hypoxia-induced muscle dysfunction. These data suggest that targeting the ActRIIB is an effective strategy to counter hypoxia-induced muscle dysfunction and to preacclimatize to hypoxia in clinical or high-altitude settings. PMID:19864340

  8. Pretreatment with a soluble activin type IIB receptor/Fc fusion protein improves hypoxia-induced muscle dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pistilli, Emidio E; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Mosqueira, Matias; Lachey, Jennifer; Seehra, Jasbir; Khurana, Tejvir S

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia, or reduced oxygen, occurs in a variety of clinical and environmental situations. Hypoxic exposure is associated with decreased muscle mass and a concomitant reduction in exercise capacity, although the exact mechanisms are not completely understood. The activin type IIB receptor (ActRIIB) is a receptor for transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) superfamily members that are involved in the negative regulation of lean tissue mass. Given that hypoxia has negative effects on muscle mass and function and that modulation of the ActRIIB has been shown to increase muscle mass, we tested the hypothesis that pharmacological targeting of the ActRIIB for 2 wk would attenuate the loss of muscle mass and function in mice after exposure to normobaric hypoxia. ActRIIB modulation was achieved using a soluble activin receptor/Fc fusion protein (sActRIIB) in mice housed in a hypoxic chamber for 1 or 2 wk. Hypoxia induced a reduction in body weight in PBS- and sActRIIB-treated mice, although sActRIIB-treated mice remained larger throughout the hypoxic exposure. The absolute forces generated by extensor digitorum longus muscles were also significantly greater in sActRIIB- than PBS-treated mice and were more resistant to eccentric contraction-induced force drop after eccentric lengthening contractions. In summary, sActRIIB pretreatment attenuated hypoxia-induced muscle dysfunction. These data suggest that targeting the ActRIIB is an effective strategy to counter hypoxia-induced muscle dysfunction and to preacclimatize to hypoxia in clinical or high-altitude settings.

  9. A Soluble Activin Receptor IIB Fails to Prevent Muscle Atrophy in a Mouse Model of Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Graham, Zachary A; Collier, Lauren; Peng, Yuanzhen; Saéz, Juan C; Bauman, William A; Qin, Weiping; Cardozo, Christopher P

    2016-06-15

    Myostatin (MST) is a potent regulator of muscle growth and size. Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in marked atrophy of muscle below the level of injury. Currently, there is no effective pharmaceutical treatment available to prevent sublesional muscle atrophy post-SCI. To determine whether inhibition of MST with a soluble activin IIB receptor (RAP-031) prevents sublesional SCI-induced muscle atrophy, mice were randomly assigned to the following groups: Sham-SCI; SCI+Vehicle group (SCI-VEH); and SCI+RAP-031 (SCI-RAP-031). SCI was induced by complete transection at thoracic level 10. Animals were euthanized at 56 days post-surgery. RAP-031 reduced, but did not prevent, body weight loss post-SCI. RAP-031 increased total lean tissue mass compared to SCI-VEH (14.8%). RAP-031 increased forelimb muscle mass post-SCI by 38% and 19% for biceps and triceps, respectively (p < 0.001). There were no differences in hindlimb muscle weights between the RAP-031 and SCI-VEH groups. In the gastrocnemius, messenger RNA (mRNA) expression was elevated for interleukin (IL)-6 (8-fold), IL-1β (3-fold), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (8-fold) in the SCI-VEH, compared to the Sham group. Muscle RING finger protein 1 mRNA was 2-fold greater in the RAP-031 group, compared to Sham-SCI. RAP-031 did not influence cytokine expression. Bone mineral density of the distal femur and proximal tibia were decreased post-SCI (-26% and -28%, respectively) and were not altered by RAP-031. In conclusion, MST inhibition increased supralesional muscle mass, but did not prevent sublesional muscle or bone loss, or the inflammation in paralyzed muscle.

  10. The role of myostatin and activin receptor IIB in the regulation of unloading-induced myofiber type-specific skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Babcock, Lyle W; Knoblauch, Mark; Clarke, Mark S F

    2015-09-15

    Chronic unloading induces decrements in muscle size and strength. This adaptation is governed by a number of molecular factors including myostatin, a potent negative regulator of muscle mass. Myostatin must first be secreted into the circulation and then bind to the membrane-bound activin receptor IIB (actRIIB) to exert its atrophic action. Therefore, we hypothesized that myofiber type-specific atrophy observed after hindlimb suspension (HLS) would be related to myofiber type-specific expression of myostatin and/or actRIIB. Wistar rats underwent HLS for 10 days, after which the tibialis anterior was harvested for frozen cross sectioning. Simultaneous multichannel immunofluorescent staining combined with differential interference contrast imaging was employed to analyze myofiber type-specific expression of myostatin and actRIIB and myofiber type cross-sectional area (CSA) across fiber types, myonuclei, and satellite cells. Hindlimb suspension (HLS) induced significant myofiber type-specific atrophy in myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIx (P < 0.05) and MHC IIb myofibers (P < 0.05). Myostatin staining associated with myonuclei was less in HLS rats compared with controls, while satellite cell staining for myostatin remained unchanged. In contrast, the total number myonuclei and satellite cells per myofiber was reduced in HLS compared with ambulatory control rats (P < 0.01). Sarcoplasmic actRIIB staining differed between myofiber types (I < IIa < IIx < IIb) independent of loading conditions. Myofiber types exhibiting the greatest cytoplasmic staining of actRIIB corresponded to those exhibiting the greatest degree of atrophy following HLS. Our data suggest that differential expression of actRIIB may be responsible for myostatin-induced myofiber type-selective atrophy observed during chronic unloading.

  11. Targeting the Activin Type IIB Receptor to Improve Muscle Mass and Function in the mdx Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pistilli, Emidio E.; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Goncalves, Marcus D.; Ahima, Rexford S.; Lachey, Jennifer; Seehra, Jasbir; Khurana, Tejvir

    2011-01-01

    The activin receptor type IIB (ActRIIB) is a transmembrane receptor for transforming growth factor-β superfamily members, including myostatin, that are involved in the negative regulation of skeletal muscle mass. We tested the translational hypothesis that blocking ligand binding to ActRIIB for 12 weeks would stimulate skeletal muscle growth and improve muscle function in the mdx mouse. ActRIIB was targeted using a novel inhibitor comprised of the extracellular portion of the ActRIIB fused to the Fc portion of murine IgG (sActRIIB), at concentrations of 1.0 and 10.0 mg/kg−1 body weight. After 12 weeks of treatment, the 10.0 mg/kg−1 dose caused a 27% increase in body weight with a concomitant 33% increase in lean muscle mass. Absolute force production of the extensor digitorum longus muscle ex vivo was higher in mice after treatment with either dose of sActRIIB, and the specific force was significantly higher after the lower dose (1.0 mg/kg−1), indicating functional improvement in the muscle. Circulating creatine kinase levels were significantly lower in mice treated with sActRIIB, compared with control mice. These data show that targeting the ActRIIB improves skeletal muscle mass and functional strength in the mdx mouse model of DMD, providing a therapeutic rationale for use of this molecule in treating skeletal myopathies. PMID:21356379

  12. Targeting the activin type IIB receptor to improve muscle mass and function in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Pistilli, Emidio E; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Goncalves, Marcus D; Ahima, Rexford S; Lachey, Jennifer; Seehra, Jasbir; Khurana, Tejvir

    2011-03-01

    The activin receptor type IIB (ActRIIB) is a transmembrane receptor for transforming growth factor-β superfamily members, including myostatin, that are involved in the negative regulation of skeletal muscle mass. We tested the translational hypothesis that blocking ligand binding to ActRIIB for 12 weeks would stimulate skeletal muscle growth and improve muscle function in the mdx mouse. ActRIIB was targeted using a novel inhibitor comprised of the extracellular portion of the ActRIIB fused to the Fc portion of murine IgG (sActRIIB), at concentrations of 1.0 and 10.0 mg/kg(-1) body weight. After 12 weeks of treatment, the 10.0 mg/kg(-1) dose caused a 27% increase in body weight with a concomitant 33% increase in lean muscle mass. Absolute force production of the extensor digitorum longus muscle ex vivo was higher in mice after treatment with either dose of sActRIIB, and the specific force was significantly higher after the lower dose (1.0 mg/kg(-1)), indicating functional improvement in the muscle. Circulating creatine kinase levels were significantly lower in mice treated with sActRIIB, compared with control mice. These data show that targeting the ActRIIB improves skeletal muscle mass and functional strength in the mdx mouse model of DMD, providing a therapeutic rationale for use of this molecule in treating skeletal myopathies.

  13. Myostatin, activin receptor IIb, and follistatin-like-3 gene expression are altered in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle of obese mice.

    PubMed

    Allen, David L; Cleary, Allison S; Speaker, Kristin J; Lindsay, Sarah F; Uyenishi, Jill; Reed, Jason M; Madden, Molly C; Mehan, Ryan S

    2008-05-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth inhibitor expressed in muscle and adipose. We sought to determine whether expression of MSTN, its receptor activin RIIb (ActRIIb), or its binding protein follistatin-like-3 (FSTL3) are altered in subcutaneous or visceral adipose or in skeletal muscle in response to obesity. MSTN and ActRIIb mRNA levels were low in subcutaneous (SQF) and visceral fat (VF) from wild-type mice but were 50- to 100-fold higher in both SQF and VF from ob/ob compared with wild-type mice. FSTL3 mRNA levels were increased in SQF but decreased in VF in ob/ob compared with wild-type mice. Moreover, MSTN mRNA levels were twofold greater in tibialis anterior (TA) from ob/ob mice, whereas ActRIIb and FSTL3 mRNA levels were unchanged. MSTN mRNA levels were also increased in TA and SQF from mice on a high-fat diet. Injection of ob/ob mice with recombinant leptin caused FSTL3 mRNA levels to decrease in both VF and SQF in ob/ob mice; MSTN and ActRIIb mRNA levels tended to decrease only in VF. Finally, MSTN mRNA levels and promoter activity were low in adipogenic 3T3-L1 cells, but an MSTN promoter-reporter construct was activated in 3T3-L1 cells by cotransfection with the adipogenic transcription factors SREBP-1c, C/EBPalpha, and PPARgamma. These results demonstrate that expression of MSTN and its associated binding proteins can be modulated in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle by chronic obesity and suggest that alterations in their expression may contribute to the changes in growth and metabolism of lean and fat tissues occurring during obesity.

  14. Variations in activin receptor, inhibin/activin subunit and follistatin mRNAs in human prostate tumour tissues

    PubMed Central

    Schaik, R H N van; Wierikx, C D J; Timmerman, M A; Oomen, M H; Weerden, W M van; Kwast, T H van der; Steenbrugge, G J van; Jong, F H de

    1999-01-01

    The possible role of activin in the regulation of malignant prostatic growth was studied using RNAase protection assays of activin receptors, inhibin/activin subunits and follistatin mRNAs in the human prostatic carcinoma cell lines LNCaP-FGC, -R and -LNO, in human prostatic carcinoma xenografts and in human prostatic tissue. Activin receptor types IA (ActRIA), IB (ActRIB), IIA (ActRIIA) and IIB (ActRIIB) mRNAs were generally expressed in prostate pithelial cells, with significantly lower levels of ActRIB mRNA in prostate tumour aterial when compared to non-malignant tissue (P< 0.05; Mann–Whitney U -test). Inhibin/activin βA- and βB-subunit mRNA expression was also found in prostate tissue. Androgen-independent xenografts expressed significantly lower amounts of βB-subunit mRNA when compared to androgen-dependent xenografts (P< 0.05). While βB-subunit mRNA was expressed by LNCaP-FGC and -LNO cells, virtually no expression was found in the androgen-independent LNCaP-R line. Inhibin α-subunit mRNA levels were low or undetectable in all samples investigated. Follistatin mRNA was undetectable in LNCaP-sublines, while low levels were found in prostatic tissues. In androgen-independent LNCaP-R cells, activin inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that prostate tumour progression is accompanied by a decrease of the inhibitory effect of locally produced activin by either a decrease in the expression of activin βB-subunit mRNA or by a decrease of ActRIB mRNA levels. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10638976

  15. Identification of a Drosophila activin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Childs, S R; Wrana, J L; Arora, K; Attisano, L; O'Connor, M B; Massagué, J

    1993-01-01

    Activins are cytokines of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily that control various events during vertebrate embryo development and cell differentiation in the adult, and act through transmembrane receptors that contain a cytoplasmic protein-serine/threonine kinase domain. We describe the identification, deduced primary structure, and expression pattern of Atr-II, a receptor serine/threonine kinase found in Drosophila. With the exception of the spacing of 10 cysteine residues, the extracellular domain of Atr-II is very dissimilar from those of vertebrate activin receptors, yet it binds activin with high affinity and specificity. The kinase domain sequence of Atr-II is 60% identical to those of activin receptors from vertebrates, suggesting similarities in their signaling mechanisms. Maternal Atr-II transcript and its product are abundant in the oocyte. During development, the highest levels of Atr-II transcript and protein are observed in the mesoderm and gut. The possible role of an activin signaling system in Drosophila development is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8415726

  16. Development of Novel Activin-Targeted Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Justin L; Walton, Kelly L; Al-Musawi, Sara L; Kelly, Emily K; Qian, Hongwei; La, Mylinh; Lu, Louis; Lovrecz, George; Ziemann, Mark; Lazarus, Ross; El-Osta, Assam; Gregorevic, Paul; Harrison, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    Soluble activin type II receptors (ActRIIA/ActRIIB), via binding to diverse TGF-β proteins, can increase muscle and bone mass, correct anemia or protect against diet-induced obesity. While exciting, these multiple actions of soluble ActRIIA/IIB limit their therapeutic potential and highlight the need for new reagents that target specific ActRIIA/IIB ligands. Here, we modified the activin A and activin B prodomains, regions required for mature growth factor synthesis, to generate specific activin antagonists. Initially, the prodomains were fused to the Fc region of mouse IgG2A antibody and, subsequently, “fastener” residues (Lys45, Tyr96, His97, and Ala98; activin A numbering) that confer latency to other TGF-β proteins were incorporated. For the activin A prodomain, these modifications generated a reagent that potently (IC50 5 nmol/l) and specifically inhibited activin A signaling in vitro, and activin A-induced muscle wasting in vivo. Interestingly, the modified activin B prodomain inhibited both activin A and B signaling in vitro (IC50 ~2 nmol/l) and in vivo, suggesting it could serve as a general activin antagonist. Importantly, unlike soluble ActRIIA/IIB, the modified prodomains did not inhibit myostatin or GDF-11 activity. To underscore the therapeutic utility of specifically antagonising activin signaling, we demonstrate that the modified activin prodomains promote significant increases in muscle mass. PMID:25399825

  17. Two distinct transmembrane serine/threonine kinases from Drosophila melanogaster form an activin receptor complex.

    PubMed Central

    Wrana, J L; Tran, H; Attisano, L; Arora, K; Childs, S R; Massagué, J; O'Connor, M B

    1994-01-01

    A transmembrane protein serine/threonine kinase, Atr-I, that is structurally related to receptors for members of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) family has been cloned from Drosophila melanogaster. The spacing of extracellular cysteines and the cytoplasmic domain of Atr-I resemble most closely those of the recently described mammalian type I receptors for TGF-beta and activin. When expressed alone in test cells, Atr-I is unable to bind TGF-beta, activin, or bone morphogenetic protein 2. However, Atr-I binds activin efficiently when coexpressed with the distantly related Drosophila activin receptor Atr-II, with which it forms a heteromeric complex. Atr-I can also bind activin in concert with mammalian activin type II receptors. Two alternative forms of Atr-I have been identified that differ in an ectodomain region encompassing the cysteine box motif characteristic of receptors in this family. Comparison of Atr-I with other type I receptors reveals the presence of a characteristic 30-amino-acid domain immediately upstream of the kinase region in all these receptors. This domain, of unknown function, contains a repeated Gly-Ser sequence and is therefore referred to as the GS domain. Maternal Atr-I transcripts are abundant in the oocyte and widespread during embryo development and in the imaginal discs of the larva. The structural properties, binding specificity, and dependence on type II receptors define Atr-I as an activin type I receptor from D. melanogaster. These results indicate that the heteromeric kinase structure is a general feature of this receptor family. Images PMID:8289834

  18. Activin receptor signaling regulates cocaine-primed behavioral and morphological plasticity.

    PubMed

    Gancarz, Amy M; Wang, Zi-Jun; Schroeder, Gabrielle L; Damez-Werno, Diane; Braunscheidel, Kevin M; Mueller, Lauren E; Humby, Monica S; Caccamise, Aaron; Martin, Jennifer A; Dietz, Karen C; Neve, Rachael L; Dietz, David M

    2015-07-01

    Activin receptor signaling, including the transcription factor Smad3, was upregulated in the rat nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell following withdrawal from cocaine. Direct genetic and pharmacological manipulations of this pathway bidirectionally altered cocaine seeking while governing morphological plasticity in NAc neurons. Thus, Activin/Smad3 signaling is induced following withdrawal from cocaine, and such regulation may be a key molecular mechanism underlying behavioral and cellular plasticity in the brain following cocaine self-administration.

  19. The transforming growth factor beta type II receptor can replace the activin type II receptor in inducing mesoderm.

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, A; Lin, H Y; Lodish, H F; Kintner, C R

    1994-01-01

    The type II receptors for the polypeptide growth factors transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) and activin belong to a new family of predicted serine/threonine protein kinases. In Xenopus embryos, the biological effects of activin and TGF-beta 1 are strikingly different; activin induces a full range of mesodermal cell types in the animal cap assay, while TGF-beta 1 has no effects, presumably because of the lack of functional TGF-beta receptors. In order to assess the biological activities of exogenously added TGF-beta 1, RNA encoding the TGF-beta type II receptor was introduced into Xenopus embryos. In animal caps from these embryos, TGF-beta 1 and activin show similar potencies for induction of mesoderm-specific mRNAs, and both elicit the same types of mesodermal tissues. In addition, the response of animal caps to TGF-beta 1, as well as to activin, is blocked by a dominant inhibitory ras mutant, p21(Asn-17)Ha-ras. These results indicate that the activin and TGF-beta type II receptors can couple to similar signalling pathways and that the biological specificities of these growth factors lie in their different ligand-binding domains and in different competences of the responding cells. Images PMID:8196664

  20. An Activin Receptor IA/Activin-Like Kinase-2 (R206H) Mutation in Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Esparza, Rafael; Pacheco-Tovar, Deyanira; Bollain-Y-Goytia, Juan José; Torres Del Muro, Felipe; Ramírez-Sandoval, Roxana; Pacheco-Tovar, María Guadalupe; Castañeda-Ureña, María; Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza

    2013-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is an exceptionally rare genetic disease that is characterised by congenital malformations of the great toes and progressive heterotopic ossification (HO) in specific anatomical areas. This disease is caused by a mutation in activin receptor IA/activin-like kinase-2 (ACVR1/ALK2). A Mexican family with one member affected by FOP was studied. The patient is a 19-year-old female who first presented with symptoms of FOP at 8 years old; she developed spontaneous and painful swelling of the right scapular area accompanied by functional limitation of movement. Mutation analysis was performed in which genomic DNA as PCR amplified using primers flanking exons 4 and 6, and PCR products were digested with Cac8I and HphI restriction enzymes. The most informative results were obtained with the exon 4 flanking primers and the Cac8I restriction enzyme, which generated a 253 bp product that carries the ACVR1 617G>A mutation, which causes an amino acid substitution of histidine for arginine at position 206 of the glycine-serine (GS) domain, and its mutation results in the dysregulation of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling that causes FOP.

  1. Activin-receptor signaling regulates cocaine-primed behavioral and morphological plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Gancarz, Amy M.; Wang, Zi-Jun; Schroeder, Gabrielle L.; Damez-Werno, Diane; Braunscheidel, Kevin; Mueller, Lauren E.; Humby, Monica S.; Caccamise, Aaron; Martin, Jennifer A.; Dietz, Karen C.; Neve, Rachael L.; Dietz, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is a life-long relapsing disorder that results from long-term adaptations within the brain. We find that Activin-receptor signaling, including the transcription factor Smad3, is upregulated in the rat nucleus accumbens shell following withdrawal from cocaine. Direct genetic and pharmacological manipulations of this pathway bidirectionally alter cocaine seeking, while governing morphological plasticity in nucleus accumbens neurons. These findings reveal that Activin/Smad3 signaling is induced following withdrawal from cocaine, and such regulation may be a key molecular mechanism underlying behavioral and cellular plasticity in the brain following cocaine self-administration. PMID:26030849

  2. An antibody blocking activin type II receptors induces strong skeletal muscle hypertrophy and protects from atrophy.

    PubMed

    Lach-Trifilieff, Estelle; Minetti, Giulia C; Sheppard, KellyAnn; Ibebunjo, Chikwendu; Feige, Jerome N; Hartmann, Steffen; Brachat, Sophie; Rivet, Helene; Koelbing, Claudia; Morvan, Frederic; Hatakeyama, Shinji; Glass, David J

    2014-02-01

    The myostatin/activin type II receptor (ActRII) pathway has been identified to be critical in regulating skeletal muscle size. Several other ligands, including GDF11 and the activins, signal through this pathway, suggesting that the ActRII receptors are major regulatory nodes in the regulation of muscle mass. We have developed a novel, human anti-ActRII antibody (bimagrumab, or BYM338) to prevent binding of ligands to the receptors and thus inhibit downstream signaling. BYM338 enhances differentiation of primary human skeletal myoblasts and counteracts the inhibition of differentiation induced by myostatin or activin A. BYM338 prevents myostatin- or activin A-induced atrophy through inhibition of Smad2/3 phosphorylation, thus sparing the myosin heavy chain from degradation. BYM338 dramatically increases skeletal muscle mass in mice, beyond sole inhibition of myostatin, detected by comparing the antibody with a myostatin inhibitor. A mouse version of the antibody induces enhanced muscle hypertrophy in myostatin mutant mice, further confirming a beneficial effect on muscle growth beyond myostatin inhibition alone through blockade of ActRII ligands. BYM338 protects muscles from glucocorticoid-induced atrophy and weakness via prevention of muscle and tetanic force losses. These data highlight the compelling therapeutic potential of BYM338 for the treatment of skeletal muscle atrophy and weakness in multiple settings.

  3. Activin Type 2 Receptor Restoration in MSI-H Colon Cancer Suppresses Growth and Enhances Migration With Activin

    PubMed Central

    JUNG, BARBARA H.; BECK, STAYCE E.; CABRAL, JENNIFER; CHAU, EDDY; CABRERA, BETTY L.; FIORINO, ANTONIO; SMITH, E. JULIETA; BOCANEGRA, MELANIE; CARETHERS, JOHN M.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Colon cancers with high-frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H) develop frameshift mutations in tumor suppressors as part of their pathogenesis. ACVR2 is mutated at its exon 10 polyadenine tract in >80% of MSI-H colon cancers, coinciding with loss of protein. ACVR2 transmits the growth effects of activin via phosphorylation of SMAD proteins to affect gene transcription. The functional effect of activin in colon cancers has not been studied. We developed and characterized a cell model in which we studied how activin signaling affects growth. Methods hMLH1 and ACVR2 mutant HCT116 cells were previously stably transferred with chromosome 2 (HCT116+chr2), restoring a single regulated copy of wild-type ACVR2 but not hMLH1. Both HCT116+chr2 and parental HCT116 cells (as well as HEC59 and ACVR2 and hMSH2 complemented HEC59+chr2 cells) were assessed for genetic complementation and biologic function. Results HCT116+chr2 cells and HEC59+chr2 cells, but not ACVR2-mutant HCT116 or HEC59 cells, acquired wild-type ACVR2 as well as expression of ACVR2 wild-type messenger RNA. Complemented ACVR2 protein complexed with ACVR1 with activin treatment, generating nuclear phosphoSMAD2 and activin-specific gene transcription. ACVR2-restored cells showed decreased growth and reduced S phase but increased cellular migration following activin treatment. ACVR2 small interfering RNA reversed these effects in complemented cells. Conclusions ACVR2-complemented MSI-H colon cancers restore activin-SMAD signaling, decrease growth, and slow their cell cycle following ligand stimulation but show increased cellular migration. Activin is growth suppressive and enhances migration similar to transforming growth factor β in colon cancer, indicating that abrogation of the effects of activin contribute to the pathogenesis of MSI-H colon cancers. PMID:17258738

  4. Activin receptor-like kinases: a diverse family playing an important role in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loomans, Holli A; Andl, Claudia D

    2016-01-01

    The role and function of the members of the TGFβ superfamily has been a substantial area of research focus for the last several decades. During that time, it has become apparent that aberrations in TGFβ family signaling, whether through the BMP, Activin, or TGFβ arms of the pathway, can result in tumorigenesis or contribute to its progression. Downstream signaling regulates cellular growth under normal physiological conditions yet induces diverse processes during carcinogenesis, ranging from epithelial- to-mesenchymal transition to cell migration and invasion to angiogenesis. Due to these observations, the question has been raised how to utilize and target components of these signaling pathways in cancer therapy. Given that these cascades include both ligands and receptors, there are multiple levels at which to interfere. Activin receptor-like kinases (ALKs) are a group of seven type I receptors responsible for TGFβ family signal transduction and are utilized by many ligands within the superfamily. The challenge lies in specifically targeting the often-overlapping functional effects of BMP, Activin, or TGFβ signaling during cancer progression. This review focuses on the characteristic function of the individual receptors within each subfamily and their recognized roles in cancer. We next explore the clinical utility of therapeutically targeting ALKs as some have shown partial responses in Phase I clinical trials but disappointing outcomes when used in Phase II studies. Finally, we discuss the challenges and future directions of this body of work. PMID:27904762

  5. Involvement of activin signaling in abnormalities of mouse vagina exposed neonatally to diethylstilbestrol.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tadaaki; Iguchi, Taisen; Sato, Tomomi

    2011-06-01

    Perinatal exposure to a synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol (DES), causes cervicovaginal adenosis and permanent hyperplastic cornified vaginal epithelium with keratinization in mice. To investigate the mechanisms of the induction of vaginal abnormalities by DES, we have focused on activin A signaling. We have found that the βA-subunit mRNA is mainly expressed in the neonatal vaginal stroma, whereas activin A receptor type IB is localized in the neonatal vaginal epithelium. SMAD2, the intracellular signaling protein, is phosphorylated in the neonatal vagina. Cell proliferation in the vaginal epithelium grown in vitro is reduced by DES treatment or by activin signaling suppression through inhibin treatment. Thus, activin A (a homodimer of the βA-subunit) in the stroma stimulates epithelial cell proliferation in the neonatal vagina. DES treatment decreases the expression of the βA-subunit and activin receptor IIB but increases the expression of the βB-subunit and inhibin receptor. Neonatal DES treatment inhibits the phosphorylation of SMAD2 in the vaginal epithelium, indicating the inhibition of activin A signaling in the vaginal epithelium by neonatal DES treatment. Treatment with DES or inhibin, a native antagonist of activin, induces adenosis-like structures and keratinization in the vagina grown in vitro. These data suggest that the suppression of activin A signaling by DES is involved in the induction of cervicovaginal adenosis and keratinization in the neonatal mouse vaginal epithelium.

  6. RAP-011, an activin receptor ligand trap, increases hemoglobin concentration in hepcidin transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Jacqueline M; Barkataki, Sangjucta; Berger, Alan E; Cheadle, Chris; Xue, Qian-Li; Sung, Victoria; Roy, Cindy N

    2015-01-01

    Over expression of hepcidin antimicrobial peptide is a common feature of iron-restricted anemia in humans. We investigated the erythroid response to either erythropoietin or RAP-011, a "murinized" ortholog of sotatercept, in C57BL/6 mice and in hepcidin antimicrobial peptide 1 over expressing mice. Sotatercept, a soluble, activin receptor type IIA ligand trap, is currently being evaluated for the treatment of anemias associated with chronic renal disease, myelodysplastic syndrome, β-thalassemia, and Diamond Blackfan anemia and acts by inhibiting signaling downstream of activin and other Transforming Growth Factor-β superfamily members. We found that erythropoietin and RAP-011 increased hemoglobin concentration in C57BL/6 mice and in hepcidin antimicrobial peptide 1 over expressing mice. While erythropoietin treatment depleted splenic iron stores in C57BL/6 mice, RAP-011 treatment did not deplete splenic iron stores in mice of either genotype. Bone marrow erythroid progenitors from erythropoietin-treated mice exhibited iron-restricted erythropoiesis, as indicated by increased median fluorescence intensity of transferrin receptor immunostaining by flow cytometry. In contrast, RAP-011-treated mice did not exhibit the same degree of iron-restricted erythropoiesis. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that RAP-011 can improve hemoglobin concentration in hepcidin antimicrobial peptide 1 transgenic mice. Our data support the hypothesis that RAP-011 has unique biologic effects which prevent or circumvent depletion of mouse splenic iron stores. RAP-011 may, therefore, be an appropriate therapeutic for trials in human anemias characterized by increased expression of hepcidin antimicrobial peptide and iron-restricted erythropoiesis.

  7. RAP-011, an activin receptor ligand trap, increases hemoglobin concentration in Hepcidin transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Jacqueline M.; Barkataki, Sangjucta; Berger, Alan E.; Cheadle, Chris; Xue, Qian-Li; Sung, Victoria; Roy, Cindy N.

    2014-01-01

    Over expression of hepcidin antimicrobial peptide is a common feature of iron-restricted anemia in humans. We investigated the erythroid response to either erythropoietin or RAP-011, a “murinized” ortholog of sotatercept, in C57BL/6 mice and in hepcidin antimicrobial peptide over expressing mice. Sotatercept, a soluble, activin receptor type IIA ligand trap, is currently being evaluated for the treatment of anemias associated with chronic renal disease, myelodysplastic syndrome, β-thalassemia, and Diamond Blackfan anemia and acts by inhibiting signaling downstream of activin and other Transforming Growth Factor-β superfamily members. We found that erythropoietin and RAP-011 increased hemoglobin concentration in C57BL/6 mice and in hepcidin antimicrobial peptide over expressing mice. While erythropoietin treatment depleted splenic iron stores in C57BL/6 mice, RAP-011 treatment did not deplete splenic iron stores in mice of either genotype. Bone marrow erythroid progenitors from erythropoietin-treated mice exhibited iron-restricted erythropoiesis, as indicated by increased median fluorescence intensity of transferrin receptor immunostaining by flow cytometry. In contrast, RAP-011-treated mice did not exhibit the same degree of iron-restricted erythropoiesis. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that RAP-011 can improve hemoglobin concentration in hepcidin antimicrobial peptide transgenic mice. Our data support the hypothesis that RAP-011 has unique biologic effects which prevent or circumvent depletion of mouse splenic iron stores. RAP-011 may, therefore, be an appropriate therapeutic for trials in human anemias characterized by increased expression of hepcidin antimicrobial peptide and iron-restricted erythropoiesis. PMID:25236856

  8. The structure of the follistatin:activin complex reveals antagonism of both type I and type II receptor binding

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, T.B.; Lerch, T.F.; Cook, R.W.; Woodruff, T.K.; Jardetzky, T.S.

    2010-03-08

    TGF-{beta} ligands stimulate diverse cellular differentiation and growth responses by signaling through type I and II receptors. Ligand antagonists, such as follistatin, block signaling and are essential regulators of physiological responses. Here we report the structure of activin A, a TGF-{beta} ligand, bound to the high-affinity antagonist follistatin. Two follistatin molecules encircle activin, neutralizing the ligand by burying one-third of its residues and its receptor binding sites. Previous studies have suggested that type I receptor binding would not be blocked by follistatin, but the crystal structure reveals that the follistatin N-terminal domain has an unexpected fold that mimics a universal type I receptor motif and occupies this receptor binding site. The formation of follistatin:BMP:type I receptor complexes can be explained by the stoichiometric and geometric arrangement of the activin:follistatin complex. The mode of ligand binding by follistatin has important implications for its ability to neutralize homo- and heterodimeric ligands of this growth factor family.

  9. Activin A induces skeletal muscle catabolism via p38β mitogen‐activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hui; Zhang, Guohua; Sin, Ka Wai Thomas; Liu, Zhelong; Lin, Ren‐Kuo; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Activation of type IIB activin receptor (ActRIIB) in skeletal muscle leads to muscle atrophy because of increased muscle protein degradation. However, the intracellular signalling mechanism that mediates ActRIIB‐activated muscle catabolism is poorly defined. Methods We investigated the role of p38β mitogen‐activated protein kinases (MAPK) in mediating ActRIIB ligand activin A‐activated muscle catabolic pathways in C2C12 myotubes and in mice with perturbation of this kinase pharmacologically and genetically. Results Treatment of C2C12 myotubes with activin A or myostatin rapidly activated p38 MAPK and its effector C/EBPβ within 1 h. Paradoxically, Akt was activated at the same time through a p38 MAPK‐independent mechanism. These events were followed by up‐regulation of ubiquitin ligases atrogin1 (MAFbx) and UBR2 (E3α‐II), as well as increase in LC3‐II, a marker of autophagosome formation, leading to myofibrillar protein loss and myotube atrophy. The catabolic effects of activin A were abolished by p38α/β MAPK inhibitor SB202190. Using small interfering RNA‐mediated gene knockdown, we found that the catabolic activity of activin A was dependent on p38β MAPK specifically. Importantly, systemic administration of activin A to mice similarly activated the catabolic pathways in vivo, and this effect was blocked by SB202190. Further, activin A failed to activate the catabolic pathways in mice with muscle‐specific knockout of p38β MAPK. Interestingly, activin A up‐regulated MuRF1 in a p38 MAPK‐independent manner, and MuRF1 did not appear responsible for activin A‐induced myosin heavy chain loss and muscle atrophy. Conclusions ActRIIB‐mediated activation of muscle catabolism is dependent on p38β MAPK‐activated signalling. PMID:27897407

  10. Structures of an ActRIIB:activin A complex reveal a novel binding mode for TGF-beta ligand:receptor interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, T.B.; Woodruff, T.K.; Jardetzky, T.S.

    2010-03-08

    The TGF-{beta} superfamily of ligands and receptors stimulate cellular events in diverse processes ranging from cell fate specification in development to immune suppression. Activins define a major subgroup of TGF-{beta} ligands that regulate cellular differentiation, proliferation, activation and apoptosis. Activins signal through complexes formed with type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors. We have solved the crystal structure of activin A bound to the extracellular domain of a type II receptor, ActRIIB, revealing the details of this interaction. ActRIIB binds to the outer edges of the activin finger regions, with the two receptors juxtaposed in close proximity, in a mode that differs from TGF-{beta}3 binding to type II receptors. The dimeric activin A structure differs from other known TGF-{beta} ligand structures, adopting a compact folded-back conformation. The crystal structure of the complex is consistent with recruitment of two type I receptors into a close packed arrangement at the cell surface and suggests that diversity in the conformational arrangements of TGF-{beta} ligand dimers could influence cellular signaling processes.

  11. Structures of an ActRIIB:activin A complex reveal a novel binding mode for TGF-β ligand:receptor interactions

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Thomas B.; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2003-01-01

    The TGF-β superfamily of ligands and receptors stimulate cellular events in diverse processes ranging from cell fate specification in development to immune suppression. Activins define a major subgroup of TGF-β ligands that regulate cellular differentiation, proliferation, activation and apoptosis. Activins signal through complexes formed with type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors. We have solved the crystal structure of activin A bound to the extracellular domain of a type II receptor, ActRIIB, revealing the details of this interaction. ActRIIB binds to the outer edges of the activin finger regions, with the two receptors juxtaposed in close proximity, in a mode that differs from TGF-β3 binding to type II receptors. The dimeric activin A structure differs from other known TGF-β ligand structures, adopting a compact folded-back conformation. The crystal structure of the complex is consistent with recruitment of two type I receptors into a close packed arrangement at the cell surface and suggests that diversity in the conformational arrangements of TGF-β ligand dimers could influence cellular signaling processes. PMID:12660162

  12. Specific activin receptor-like kinase 3 inhibitors enhance liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tsugawa, Daisuke; Oya, Yuki; Masuzaki, Ryota; Ray, Kevin; Engers, Darren W; Dib, Martin; Do, Nhue; Kuramitsu, Kaori; Ho, Karen; Frist, Audrey; Yu, Paul B; Bloch, Kenneth D; Lindsley, Craig W; Hopkins, Corey R; Hong, Charles C; Karp, Seth J

    2014-12-01

    Pharmacologic agents to enhance liver regeneration after injury would have wide therapeutic application. Based on previous work suggesting inhibition of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling stimulates liver regeneration, we tested known and novel BMP inhibitors for their ability to accelerate regeneration in a partial hepatectomy (PH) model. Compounds were produced based on the 3,6-disubstituted pyrazolo[1,5-a] pyrimidine core of the BMP antagonist dorsomorphin and evaluated for their ability to inhibit BMP signaling and enhance liver regeneration. Antagonists of the BMP receptor activin receptor-like kinase 3 (ALK3), including LDN-193189 (LDN; 4-[6-[4-(1-piperazinyl)phenyl]pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl]-quinoline), DMH2 (4-(2-(4-(3-(quinolin-4-yl)pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-6-yl)phenoxy)ethyl)morpholine; VU0364849), and the novel compound VU0465350 (7-(4-isopropoxyphenyl)-3-(1H-pyrazol-4-yl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine; VU5350), blocked SMAD phosphorylation in vitro and in vivo, and enhanced liver regeneration after PH. In contrast, an antagonist of the BMP receptor ALK2, VU0469381 (5-(6-(4-methoxyphenyl)pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)quinolone; 1LWY), did not affect liver regeneration. LDN did not affect liver synthetic or metabolic function. Mechanistically, LDN increased serum interleukin-6 levels and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation in the liver, and modulated other factors known to be important for liver regeneration, including suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 and p53. These findings suggest that inhibition of ALK3 may be part of a therapeutic strategy for treating human liver disease.

  13. Activin B Induces Noncanonical SMAD1/5/8 Signaling via BMP Type I Receptors in Hepatocytes: Evidence for a Role in Hepcidin Induction by Inflammation in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Canali, Susanna; Core, Amanda B; Zumbrennen-Bullough, Kimberly B; Merkulova, Maria; Wang, Chia-Yu; Schneyer, Alan L; Pietrangelo, Antonello; Babitt, Jodie L

    2016-03-01

    Induction of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin contributes to the anemia of inflammation. Bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6) signaling is a central regulator of hepcidin expression in the liver. Recently, the TGF-β/BMP superfamily member activin B was implicated in hepcidin induction by inflammation via noncanonical SMAD1/5/8 signaling, but its mechanism of action and functional significance in vivo remain uncertain. Here, we show that low concentrations of activin B, but not activin A, stimulate prolonged SMAD1/5/8 signaling and hepcidin expression in liver cells to a similar degree as canonical SMAD2/3 signaling, and with similar or modestly reduced potency compared with BMP6. Activin B stimulates hepcidin via classical activin type II receptors ACVR2A and ACVR2B, noncanonical BMP type I receptors activin receptor-like kinase 2 and activin receptor-like kinase 3, and SMAD5. The coreceptor hemojuvelin binds to activin B and facilitates activin B-SMAD1/5/8 signaling. Activin B-SMAD1/5/8 signaling has some selectivity for hepatocyte-derived cells and is not enabled by hemojuvelin in other cell types. Liver activin B mRNA expression is up-regulated in multiple mouse models of inflammation associated with increased hepcidin and hypoferremia, including lipopolysaccharide, turpentine, and heat-killed Brucella abortus models. Finally, the activin inhibitor follistatin-315 blunts hepcidin induction by lipopolysaccharide or B. abortus in mice. Our data elucidate a novel mechanism for noncanonical SMAD activation and support a likely functional role for activin B in hepcidin stimulation during inflammation in vivo.

  14. An activin receptor IIA ligand trap promotes erythropoiesis resulting in a rapid induction of red blood cells and haemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Carrancio, Soraya; Markovics, Jennifer; Wong, Piu; Leisten, Jim; Castiglioni, Paola; Groza, Matthew C; Raymon, Heather K; Heise, Carla; Daniel, Tom; Chopra, Rajesh; Sung, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Sotatercept (ACE-011), a recombinant human fusion protein containing the extracellular domain of the human Activin receptor IIA, binds to and inhibits activin and other members of the transforming growth factor -β (TGF-β) superfamily. Administration of sotatercept led to a rapid and sustained increase in red blood cell (RBC) count and haemoglobin (Hb) in healthy volunteers (phase I clinical trials), but the mechanism is not fully understood. Mice treated with RAP-011 (murine ortholog of ACE-011) respond with a rapid (within 24 h) increase in haematocrit, Hb, and RBC count. These effects are accompanied by an equally rapid stimulation of late-stage erythroid precursors in the bone marrow (BM). RAP-011 also induces a significant increase in erythroid burst-forming units and erythropoietin, which could contribute to additional, sustained effects on RBC production. Further in vitro co-culture studies demonstrate that BM accessory cells are required for RAP-011 effects. To better understand which TGF-β family ligand(s) mediate RAP-011 effects, we evaluated the impact of several of these ligands on erythroid differentiation. Our data suggest that RAP-011 may act to rescue growth differentiation factor 11/Activin A-induced inhibition of late-stage erythropoiesis. These data define the mechanism of action of a novel agent that regulates RBC differentiation and provide the rationale to develop sotatercept for the treatment of anaemia and ineffective erythropoiesis. PMID:24635723

  15. Activin type IB receptor signaling in prostate cancer cells promotes lymph node metastasis in a xenograft model

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Kimitaka; Wang, Lixiang; Goto, Yutaka; Mukasa, Chizu; Ashida, Kenji; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ActRIB signaling induces Snail and S100A4 expressions in prostate cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The prostate cancer cell lines expressing an active form of ActRIB were established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ActRIB signaling promotes EMT and lymph node metastasis in xenograft model. -- Abstract: Activin, a member of the transforming growth factor-{beta} family, has been known to be a growth and differentiating factor. Despite its pluripotent effects, the roles of activin signaling in prostate cancer pathogenesis are still unclear. In this study, we established several cell lines that express a constitutive active form of activin type IB receptor (ActRIBCA) in human prostate cancer cells, ALVA41 (ALVA-ActRIBCA). There was no apparent change in the proliferation of ALVA-ActRIBCA cells in vitro; however, their migratory ability was significantly enhanced. In a xenograft model, histological analysis revealed that the expression of Snail, a cell-adhesion-suppressing transcription factor, was dramatically increased in ALVA-ActRIBCA tumors, indicating epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Finally, mice bearing ALVA-ActRIBCA cells developed multiple lymph node metastases. In this study, we demonstrated that ActRIBCA signaling can promote cell migration in prostate cancer cells via a network of signaling molecules that work together to trigger the process of EMT, and thereby aid in the aggressiveness and progression of prostate cancers.

  16. Generation of a specific activin antagonist by modification of the activin A propeptide.

    PubMed

    Makanji, Yogeshwar; Walton, Kelly L; Chan, Karen L; Gregorevic, Paul; Robertson, David M; Harrison, Craig A

    2011-10-01

    Elevated activin A levels in inhibin-deficient mice promote the development of gonadal tumors and induce cachexia by reducing muscle, liver, stomach, and fat mass. Because activin A is an important regulator of tissue growth, inhibiting the actions of this TGFβ family ligand may halt or reverse pathology in diseased tissues. In this study, we modified the activin A propeptide to generate a specific activin antagonist. Propeptides mediate the synthesis and secretion of all TGFβ ligands and, for some family members (e.g. TGFβ1), bind the mature growth factor with high enough affinity to confer latency. By linking the C-terminal region of the TGFβ1 propeptide to the N-terminal region of the activin A propeptide, we generated a chimeric molecule [activin/TGFβ1 propeptide (AT propeptide)] with increased affinity for activin A. The AT propeptide was 30-fold more potent than the activin A propeptide at suppressing activin-induced FSH release by LβT2 pituitary gonadotrope cells. Binding of the AT propeptide to activin A shields the type II receptor binding site, thereby reducing Smad2 phosphorylation and downstream signaling. In comparison with the commonly used activin antagonists, follistatin (IC(50) 0.42 nM), soluble activin type II receptor A-Fc (IC(50) 0.47 nM), and soluble activin type II receptor B-Fc (IC(50) 0.91 nM), the AT propeptide (IC(50) 2.6 nM) was slightly less potent. However, it was more specific, inhibiting activin A and activin B (IC(50) 10.26 nM) but not the closely related ligands, myostatin and growth differentiation factor-11. As such, the AT propeptide represents the first specific activin antagonist, and it should be an effective reagent for blocking activin actions in vivo.

  17. EDTA dependent pseudothrombocytopenia caused by antibodies against the cytoadhesive receptor of platelet gpIIB-IIIA.

    PubMed Central

    Casonato, A; Bertomoro, A; Pontara, E; Dannhauser, D; Lazzaro, A R; Girolami, A

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To clarify the mechanisms involved in the development of EDTA dependent pseudothrombocytopenia, particularly the platelet receptors. METHODS--Platelets were measured in 33 patients with pseudothrombocytopenia, using different anticoagulants to collect blood samples (direct test). The results were compared with the counts obtained by adding patients' serum or immunoglobulins to normal blood samples (indirect test). The role of platelet function was explored using ASA, PGE1, and apyrase as platelet inhibitors. The contribution of platelet receptor/s was investigated using antigens to gpIb-IX and gpIIb-IIIa monoclonal antibodies. Immunoglobulin class was estimated by the ability of IgG, IgA, and IgM antibodies to prevent platelet clumping. RESULTS--Agglutinating antibodies were IgA in 40%, IgG in 30%, and IgM in 10% of patients studied. Both patients' serum and immunoglobulins induced platelet clumping in normal samples anticoagulated with EDTA (indirect test). This was prevented by incubation of blood samples at 37 degrees C and almost completely inhibited by the platelet inhibitors ASA, PGE1, and apyrase. Pseudothrombocytopenia was also entirely prevented by an antigen to gpIIb-IIIa monoclonal antibody that recognises fibrinogen and the von Willebrand factor binding site. Pseudothrombocytopenia was almost completely abolished after the addition of RGD peptide, the recognition sequence of cytoadhesive proteins. CONCLUSIONS--These findings suggest that EDTA dependent pseudothrombocytopenia is caused by agglutinating antibodies that recognise cytoadhesive receptors on platelet gpIIb-IIIa and that an efficient platelet metabolism is required. PMID:8089218

  18. Molecular characterization of Activin Receptor Type IIA and its expression during gonadal maturation and growth stages in rohu carp.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Siddhi; Mohanty, Mausumee; Bit, Amrita; Sahoo, Lakshman; Das, Sachidananda; Jayasankar, Pallipuram; Das, Paramananda

    2017-01-01

    Activin receptor type IIA (ActRIIA), a transmembrane serine/threonine kinase receptor is an important regulator of physiological traits, viz., reproduction and body growth in vertebrates including teleosts. However, existing knowledge of its role in regulating fish physiology is limited. To address this, we have cloned and characterized the ActRIIA cDNA of Labeo rohita (rohu), an economically important fish species of the Indian subcontinent. Comparative expression profiling of the receptor gene at various reproductive and growth stages supports to its role in promoting oocyte maturation, spermatogenesis and skeletal muscle development via interaction with multiple ligands of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family. The full-length cDNA of rohu ActRIIA was found to be of 1587bp length encoding 528 amino acids. The three-dimensional structure of the intracellular kinase domain of rohu ActRIIA has also been predicted. Phylogenetic relationship studies showed that the gene is evolutionarily conserved across the vertebrate lineage implicating that the functioning of the receptor is more or less similar in vertebrates. Taken together, these findings could be an initial step towards the use of ActRIIA as a potential candidate gene marker for understanding the complex regulatory mechanism of fish reproduction and growth.

  19. Specificity and Structure of a High Affinity Activin Receptor-like Kinase 1 (ALK1) Signaling Complex

    PubMed Central

    Townson, Sharon A.; Martinez-Hackert, Erik; Greppi, Chloe; Lowden, Patricia; Sako, Dianne; Liu, June; Ucran, Jeffrey A.; Liharska, Katia; Underwood, Kathryn W.; Seehra, Jasbir; Kumar, Ravindra; Grinberg, Asya V.

    2012-01-01

    Activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1), an endothelial cell-specific type I receptor of the TGF-β superfamily, is an important regulator of normal blood vessel development as well as pathological tumor angiogenesis. As such, ALK1 is an important therapeutic target. Thus, several ALK1-directed agents are currently in clinical trials as anti-angiogenic cancer therapeutics. Given the biological and clinical importance of the ALK1 signaling pathway, we sought to elucidate the biophysical and structural basis underlying ALK1 signaling. The TGF-β family ligands BMP9 and BMP10 as well as the three type II TGF-β family receptors ActRIIA, ActRIIB, and BMPRII have been implicated in ALK1 signaling. Here, we provide a kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of BMP9 and BMP10 interactions with ALK1 and type II receptors. Our data show that BMP9 displays a significant discrimination in type II receptor binding, whereas BMP10 does not. We also report the crystal structure of a fully assembled ternary complex of BMP9 with the extracellular domains of ALK1 and ActRIIB. The structure reveals that the high specificity of ALK1 for BMP9/10 is determined by a novel orientation of ALK1 with respect to BMP9, which leads to a unique set of receptor-ligand interactions. In addition, the structure explains how BMP9 discriminates between low and high affinity type II receptors. Taken together, our findings provide structural and mechanistic insights into ALK1 signaling that could serve as a basis for novel anti-angiogenic therapies. PMID:22718755

  20. New function of the myostatin/activin type I receptor (ALK4) as a mediator of muscle atrophy and muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pasteuning-Vuhman, Svitlana; Boertje-van der Meulen, Johanna W.; van Putten, Maaike; Overzier, Maurice; ten Dijke, Peter; Kiełbasa, Szymon M.; Arindrarto, Wibowo; Wolterbeek, Ron; Lezhnina, Ksenia V.; Ozerov, Ivan V.; Aliper, Aleksandr M.; Hoogaars, Willem M.; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Loomans, Cindy J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle fibrosis and impaired muscle regeneration are major contributors to muscle wasting in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Muscle growth is negatively regulated by myostatin (MSTN) and activins. Blockage of these pathways may improve muscle quality and function in DMD. Antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) were designed specifically to block the function of ALK4, a key receptor for the MSTN/activin pathway in skeletal muscle. AON-induced exon skipping resulted in specific Alk4 down-regulation, inhibition of MSTN activity, and increased myoblast differentiation in vitro. Unexpectedly, a marked decrease in muscle mass (10%) was found after Alk4 AON treatment in mdx mice. In line with in vitro results, muscle regeneration was stimulated, and muscle fiber size decreased markedly. Notably, when Alk4 was down-regulated in adult wild-type mice, muscle mass decreased even more. RNAseq analysis revealed dysregulated metabolic functions and signs of muscle atrophy. We conclude that ALK4 inhibition increases myogenesis but also regulates the tight balance of protein synthesis and degradation. Therefore, caution must be used when developing therapies that interfere with MSTN/activin pathways.—Pasteuning-Vuhman, S., Boertje-van der Meulen, J. W., van Putten, M., Overzier, M., ten Dijke, P., Kiełbasa, S. M., Arindrarto, W., Wolterbeek, R., Lezhnina, K. V., Ozerov, I. V., Aliper, A. M., Hoogaars, W. M., Aartsma-Rus, A., Loomans, C. J. M. New function of the myostatin/activin type I receptor (ALK4) as a mediator of muscle atrophy and muscle regeneration. PMID:27733450

  1. Endothelial expression of Fc gamma receptor IIb in the full-term human placenta.

    PubMed

    Mishima, T; Kurasawa, G; Ishikawa, G; Mori, M; Kawahigashi, Y; Ishikawa, T; Luo, S-S; Takizawa, T; Goto, T; Matsubara, S; Takeshita, T; Robinson, J M; Takizawa, T

    2007-01-01

    In the third trimester, human placental endothelial cells express Fc gamma receptor IIb (FcgammaRIIb). This expression is unique because FcgammaRIIb is generally expressed on immune cells and is typically undetectable in adult endothelial cells. Recently, we found a novel FcgammaRIIb-defined, IgG-containing organelle in placental endothelial cells; this organelle may be a key structure for the transcytosis of IgG across the endothelial layer. In this study, we verify the expression of FcgammaRIIb in endothelial placenta cells and use reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and sequencing analyses to define the expressed FCGR2B mRNA transcript variant. We also investigated the distribution of FCGR2B mRNA and protein within the vascular tree of the full-term human placenta by RT-PCR and quantitative microscopy. The mRNA sequence of FCGR2B expressed specifically in placental endothelial cells is that of transcript variant 2. FcgammaRIIb expression and synthesis occur throughout the placental vascular tree but do not extend into the umbilical cord. This study provides additional information on FcgammaRIIb expression in the human placenta.

  2. Biogenesis of the platelet receptor for fibrinogen: evidence for separate precursors for glycoproteins IIb and IIIa

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, P.F.; Rosa, J.P.; Lingappa, V.R.; Kan, Y.W.; McEver, R.P.; Shuman, M.A.

    1986-03-01

    Congenital absence of platelet glycoproteins IIb and IIIa (GPIIb and GPIIIa) results in a severe bleeding disorder characterized by defective platelet aggregation and failure of fibrinogen to bind to platelets. GPIIb is a two-chain protein containing disulfide-linked ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits. GPIIb and GPIIIa are present as a heterodimeric, noncovalent complex in the platelet plasma membrane and function as the fibrinogen receptor. To characterize synthesis of these two proteins, RNA isolated from a human leukemia cell line that contains GPIIb and GPIIIa was translated in a wheat germ cell-free system. Polyclonal antibodies specific for each protein immunoprecipitated distinct (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled precursors, indicating that GPIIb and GPIIIa are translated from separate mRNAs. Moreover, using specific antibodies against either intact unreduced GPIIb or the ..beta.. subunit, the authors obtained evidence for synthesis of a common polypeptide precursor for GPIIb..cap alpha.. and GPIIb..gamma... Based on experiments using microsomal membranes, it appears that GPIIb is integrated into the platelet membrane with little or no cytoplasmic component. These results suggest that precursors of GPIIb and GPIIIa may be encoded by separate genes and that each precursor is processed before delivery to the plasma membrane.

  3. Ionizing Radiation Alters Human Embryonic Stem Cell Properties and Differentiation Capacity by Diminishing the Expression of Activin Receptors.

    PubMed

    Luft, Sabine; Arrizabalaga, Onetsine; Kulish, Ireen; Nasonova, Elena; Durante, Marco; Ritter, Sylvia; Schroeder, Insa S

    2017-03-01

    Exposure of the embryo to ionizing radiation (IR) is detrimental as it can cause genotoxic stress leading to immediate and latent consequences such as functional defects, malformations, or cancer. Human embryonic stem (hES) cells can mimic the preimplantation embryo and help to assess the biological effects of IR during early development. In this study, we describe the alterations H9 hES cells exhibit after X-ray irradiation in respect to cell cycle progression, apoptosis, genomic stability, stem cell signaling, and their capacity to differentiate into definitive endoderm. Early postirradiation, hES cells responded with an arrest in G2/M phase, elevated apoptosis, and increased chromosomal aberrations. Significant downregulation of stem cell signaling markers of the TGF beta-, Wnt-, and Hedgehog pathways was observed. Most prominent were alterations in the expression of activin receptors. However, hES cells responded differently depending on the culture conditions chosen for maintenance. Enzymatically passaged cells were less sensitive to IR than mechanically passaged ones showing fewer apoptotic cells and fewer changes in the stem cell signaling 24 h after irradiation, but displayed higher levels of chromosomal aberrations. Even though many of the observed changes were transient, surviving hES cells, which were differentiated 4 days postirradiation, showed a lower efficiency to form definitive endoderm than their mock-irradiated counterparts. This was demonstrated by lower expression levels of SOX17 and microRNA miR-375. In conclusion, hES cells are a suitable tool for the IR risk assessment during early human development. However, careful choice of the culture methods and a vigorous monitoring of the stem cell quality are mandatory for the use of these cells. Exposure to IR influences the stem cell properties of hES cells even when immediate radiation effects are overcome. This warrants consideration in the risk assessment of radiation effects during the

  4. Regulation of hepcidin expression by inflammation-induced activin B

    PubMed Central

    Kanamori, Yohei; Sugiyama, Makoto; Hashimoto, Osamu; Murakami, Masaru; Matsui, Tohru; Funaba, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Activin B is induced in response to inflammation in the liver and enhances hepcidin expression, but the source of activin B and the molecular mechanism underlying hepcidin induction are not clear yet. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation induced inhibin βB but not inhibin α or inhibin βA expression in the liver, implicating activin B induction. Immunoreactive inhibin βB was detected in endothelial cells and Kupffer cells in LPS-treated liver. Activin B, but not activin A or activin AB, directly increased hepcidin expression. Activin B induced phosphorylation and activation of Smad1/5/8, the BMP-regulated (BR)-Smads. The stimulation of hepcidin transcription by activin B was mediated by ALK2 and ActRIIA, receptors for the TGF-β family. Unexpectedly, activin B-induced hepcidin expression and BR-Smad phosphorylation were resistant to the effects of LDN-193189, an ALK2/3/6 inhibitor. ALK2 and ActRIIA complex formation in response to activin B may prevent the approach of LDN-193189 to ALK2 to inhibit its activity. Activin B also induced phosphorylation of Smad2/3, the TGF-β/activin-regulated (AR)-Smad, and increased expression of connective tissue growth factor, a gene related to liver fibrogenesis, through ALK4 and ActRIIA/B. Activin B-induced activation of the BR-Smad pathway was also detected in non-liver-derived cells. The present study reveals the broad signaling of activin B, which is induced in non-parenchymal cells in response to hepatic inflammation, in hepatocytes. PMID:27922109

  5. Fc gamma receptor IIb participates in maternal IgG trafficking of human placental endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    ISHIKAWA, TOMOKO; TAKIZAWA, TAKAMI; IWAKI, JUN; MISHIMA, TAKUYA; UI-TEI, KUMIKO; TAKESHITA, TOSHIYUKI; MATSUBARA, SHIGEKI; TAKIZAWA, TOSHIHIRO

    2015-01-01

    The human placental transfer of maternal IgG is crucial for fetal and newborn immunity. Low-affinity immunoglobulin gamma Fc region receptor IIb2 (FCGR2B2 or FcγRIIb2) is exclusively expressed in an IgG-containing, vesicle-like organelle (the FCGR2B2 compartment) in human placental endothelial cells; thus, we hypothesized that the FCGR2B2 compartment functions as an IgG transporter. In this study, to examine this hypothesis, we performed in vitro bio-imaging analysis of IgG trafficking by FCGR2B2 compartments using human umbilical vein endothelial cells transfected with a plasmid vector containing enhanced GFP-tagged FCGR2B2 (pFCGR2B2-EGFP). FCGR2B2-EGFP signals were detected as intracellular vesicular structures similar to FCGR2B2 compartments in vivo. The internalization and transcytosis of IgG was significantly higher in the pFCGR2B2-EGFP-transfected cells than in the mock-transfected cells, and the majority of the internalized IgG was co-localized with the FCGR2B2-EGFP signals. Furthermore, we isolated FCGR2B2 compartments from the human placenta and found that the Rab family of proteins [RAS-related protein Rab family (RABs)] were associated with FCGR2B2 compartments. Among the RABs, RAB3D was expressed predominantly in placental endothelial cells. The downregulation of RAB3D by small interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in a marked reduction in the FCGR2B2-EGFP signals at the cell periphery. Taken together, these findings suggest that FCGR2B2 compartments participate in the transcytosis of maternal IgG across the human placental endothelium and that RAB3D plays a role in regulating the intracellular dynamics of FCGR2B2 compartments. PMID:25778799

  6. Gonadotropin-induced changes in oviducal mRNA expression levels of sex steroid hormone receptors and activin-related signaling factors in the alligator.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brandon C; Forouhar, Sara; Kohno, Satomi; Botteri, Nicole L; Hamlin, Heather J; Guillette, Louis J

    2012-01-15

    Oviducts respond to hormonal cues from ovaries with tissue proliferation and differentiation in preparation of transporting and fostering gametes. These responses produce oviducal microenvironments conducive to reproductive success. Here, we investigated changes in circulating plasma sex steroid hormones concentrations and ovarian and oviducal mRNA expression to an in vivo gonadotropin (FSH) challenge in sexually immature, five-month-old alligators. Further, we investigated differences in these observed responses between alligators hatched from eggs collected at a heavily-polluted (Lake Apopka, FL) and minimally-polluted (Lake Woodruff, FL) site. In oviducts, we measured mRNA expression of estrogen, progesterone, and androgen receptors and also beta A and B subunits which homo- or heterodimerize to produce the transforming growth factor activin. In comparison, minimal inhibin alpha subunit mRNA expression suggests that these oviducts produce a primarily activin-dominated signaling milieu. Ovaries responded to a five-day FSH challenge with increased expression of steroidogenic enzyme mRNA which was concomitant with increased circulating sex steroid hormone concentrations. Oviducts in the FSH-challenged Lake Woodruff alligators increased mRNA expression of progesterone and androgen receptors, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and the activin signaling antagonist follistatin. In contrast, Lake Apopka alligators displayed a diminished increase in ovarian CYP19A1 aromatase expression and no increase in oviducal AR expression, as compared to those observed in Lake Woodruff alligators. These results demonstrate that five-month-old female alligators display an endocrine-responsive ovarian-oviducal axis and environmental pollution exposure may alter these physiological responses.

  7. Gonadotropin-induced changes in oviducal mRNA expression levels of sex steroid hormone receptors and activin-related signaling factors in the alligator

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brandon C.; Forouhar, Sara; Kohno, Satomi; Botteri, Nicole L.; Hamlin, Heather J.; Guillette, Louis J.

    2011-01-01

    Oviducts respond to hormonal cues from ovaries with tissue proliferation and differentiation in preparation of transporting and fostering gametes. These responses produce oviducal microenvironments conducive to reproductive success. Here we investigated changes in circulating plasma sex steroid hormones concentrations and ovarian and oviducal mRNA expression to an in vivo gonadotropin (FSH) challenge in sexually immature, five-month-old alligators. Further, we investigated differences in these observed responses between alligators hatched from eggs collected at a heavily-polluted (Lake Apopka, FL) and minimally-polluted (Lake Woodruff, FL) site. In oviducts, we measured mRNA expression of estrogen, progesterone, and androgen receptors and also beta A and B subunits which homo- or heterodimerize to produce the transforming growth factor activin. In comparison, minimal inhibin alpha subunit mRNA expression suggests that these oviducts produce a primarily activin-dominated signaling milieu. Ovaries responded to a five-day FSH challenge with increased expression of steroidogenic enzyme mRNA which was concomitant with increased circulating sex steroid hormone concentrations. Oviducts in the FSH-challenged Lake Woodruff alligators increased mRNA expression of progesterone and androgen receptors, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and the activin signaling antagonist follistatin. In contrast, Lake Apopka alligators displayed a diminished increase in ovarian CYP19A1 aromatase expression and no increase in oviducal AR expression, as compared to those observed in Lake Woodruff alligators. These results demonstrate that five-month-old female alligators display an endocrine-responsive ovarian-oviducal axis and environmental pollution exposure may alter these physiological responses. PMID:22154572

  8. Structure-based virtual screening of small-molecule antagonists of platelet integrin αIIbβ3 that do not prime the receptor to bind ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negri, Ana; Li, Jihong; Naini, Sarasija; Coller, Barry S.; Filizola, Marta

    2012-09-01

    Integrin αIIbβ3 has emerged as an important therapeutic target for thrombotic vascular diseases owing to its pivotal role in mediating platelet aggregation through interaction with adhesive ligands. In the search for effective anti-thrombotic agents that can be administered orally without inducing the high-affinity ligand binding state, we recently discovered via high-throughput screening of 33,264 compounds a novel, αIIbβ3-selective inhibitor (RUC-1) of adenosine-5'-diphosphate (ADP) -induced platelet aggregation that exhibits a different chemical scaffold and mode of binding with respect to classical Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-mimicking αIIbβ3 antagonists. Most importantly, RUC-1 and its higher-affinity derivative, RUC-2, do not induce major conformational changes in the protein β3 subunit or prime the receptor to bind ligand. To identify additional αIIbβ3-selective chemotypes that inhibit platelet aggregation through similar mechanisms, we screened in silico over 2.5 million commercially available, `lead-like' small molecules based on complementarity to the predicted binding mode of RUC-2 into the RUC-1-αIIbβ3 crystal structure. This first reported structure-based virtual screening application to the αIIbβ3 integrin led to the identification of 2 αIIbβ3-selective antagonists out of 4 tested, which compares favorably with the 0.003 % "hit rate" of our previous high-throughput chemical screening study. The newly identified compounds, like RUC-1 and RUC-2, showed specificity for αIIbβ3 compared to αVβ3 and did not prime the receptor to bind ligand. They thus may hold promise as αIIbβ3 antagonist therapeutic scaffolds.

  9. Sotatercept, a soluble activin receptor type 2A IgG-Fc fusion protein for the treatment of anemia and bone loss.

    PubMed

    Raje, Noopur; Vallet, Sonia

    2010-10-01

    Sotatercept (ACE-011), under development by Acceleron Pharma Inc in collaboration with Celgene Corp, is a chimeric protein containing the extracellular domain of the activin receptor 2A (ACVR2A) fused to the Fc domain of human IgG1. Sotatercept contains the binding site of ACVR2A and interferes with downstream signaling cascades, in particular the SMAD pathway, by sequestering activin. The murine counterpart of sotatercept, referred to as RAP-011, has been extensively evaluated in preclinical studies, in particular in models of cancer- and osteoporosis-related bone loss, and the developing companies envisage that sotatercept may also have potential for the treatment of cancer and cancer-related bone loss. In a phase I clinical trial in postmenopausal females, sotatercept increased hematocrit levels, and, in a phase II trial in patients with multiple myeloma, a trend toward improvement in osteolytic lesions as well as antitumor activity was observed. At the time of publication, phase II trials in patients with anemia were ongoing. Future clinical development will rely on an evaluation of the benefits and complications of sotatercept administration, focusing in particular on suppression of ovarian function and increases in hematocrit levels without a consequent risk of hypertension and thrombosis.

  10. Activin suppresses LPS-induced Toll-like receptor, cytokine and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in normal human melanocytes by inhibiting NF-κB and MAPK pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Il; Park, Seung-Won; Kang, In Jung; Shin, Min Kyung; Lee, Mu-Hyoung

    2015-10-01

    Activins are dimeric growth and differentiation factors that belong to the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β superfamily of structurally related signaling proteins. In the present study, we examined the mechanisms through which activin regulates the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced transcription of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), cytokines and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in human melanocytes, as well as the involvement of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Cell proliferation was analyzed by cell viability assay, mRNA expression was detected by RT-qPCR, and protein expression was measured by western blot analysis. LPS increased the mRNA expression of TLRs (TLR1-10) and cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α], as well as the mRNA and protein expression of iNOS. Activin decreased the LPS-induced TLR and cytokine mRNA expression, as well as the LPS-induced iNOS mRNA and protein expression. In addition, activin suppressed NF-κB p65 activation and blocked inhibitor of NF-κB (IκBα) degradation in LPS-stimulated melanocytes, and reduced LPS-induced p38 MAPK and MEK/ERK activation. On the whole, our results demonstrated that activin inhibited TLR and cytokine expression in LPS-activated normal human melanocytes and suppressed LPS-induced iNOS gene expression. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory effects of activin were shown to be mediated through the suppression of NF-κB and MAPK signaling, resulting in reduced TLR and iNOS expression, and in the inhibition of inflammatory cytokine expression.

  11. Myosin IIb-dependent Regulation of Actin Dynamics Is Required for N-Methyl-D-aspartate Receptor Trafficking during Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Bu, Yunfei; Wang, Ning; Wang, Shaoli; Sheng, Tao; Tian, Tian; Chen, Linlin; Pan, Weiwei; Zhu, Minsheng; Luo, Jianhong; Lu, Wei

    2015-10-16

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) synaptic incorporation changes the number of NMDARs at synapses and is thus critical to various NMDAR-dependent brain functions. To date, the molecules involved in NMDAR trafficking and the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we report that myosin IIb is an essential molecule in NMDAR synaptic incorporation during PKC- or θ burst stimulation-induced synaptic plasticity. Moreover, we demonstrate that myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)-dependent actin reorganization contributes to NMDAR trafficking. The findings from additional mutual occlusion experiments demonstrate that PKC and MLCK share a common signaling pathway in NMDAR-mediated synaptic regulation. Because myosin IIb is the primary substrate of MLCK and can regulate actin dynamics during synaptic plasticity, we propose that the MLCK- and myosin IIb-dependent regulation of actin dynamics is required for NMDAR trafficking during synaptic plasticity. This study provides important insights into a mechanical framework for understanding NMDAR trafficking associated with synaptic plasticity.

  12. FOXL2-induced follistatin attenuates activin A-stimulated cell proliferation in human granulosa cell tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jung-Chien; Chang, Hsun-Ming; Qiu, Xin; Fang, Lanlan; Leung, Peter C.K.

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Activin A stimulates cell proliferation in KGN human granulosa cell tumor-derived cell line. •Cyclin D2 mediates activin A-induced KGN cell proliferation. •FOXL2 induces follistatin expression in KGN cells. •FOXL2-induced follistatin attenuates activin A-stimulated KGN cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Human granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) are rare, and their etiology remains largely unknown. Recently, the FOXL2 402C > G (C134W) mutation was found to be specifically expressed in human adult-type GCTs; however, its function in the development of human GCTs is not fully understood. Activins are members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily, which has been shown to stimulate normal granulosa cell proliferation; however, little is known regarding the function of activins in human GCTs. In this study, we examined the effect of activin A on cell proliferation in the human GCT-derived cell line KGN. We show that activin A treatment stimulates KGN cell proliferation. Treatment with the activin type I receptor inhibitor SB431542 blocks activin A-stimulated cell proliferation. In addition, our results show that cyclin D2 is induced by treatment with activin A and is involved in activin A-stimulated cell proliferation. Moreover, the activation of Smad signaling is required for activin A-induced cyclin D2 expression. Finally, we show that the overexpression of the wild-type FOXL2 but not the C134W mutant FOXL2 induced follistatin production. Treatment with exogenous follistatin blocks activin A-stimulated cell proliferation, and the overexpression of wild-type FOXL2 attenuates activin A-stimulated cell proliferation. These results suggest that FOXL2 may act as a tumor suppressor in human adult-type GCTs by inducing follistatin expression, which subsequently inhibits activin-stimulated cell proliferation.

  13. Seasonal changes in immunoreactivity of activin signaling component proteins in wild ground squirrel testes.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xia; Zhang, Haolin; Zhang, Mengyuan; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Xiao; Song, Moshi; Zhou, Jiao; Xu, Meiyu; Weng, Qiang; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    The seasonal spermatogenesis and localization of inhibin/activin subunits (alpha, betaA, betaB) in the testes of wild ground squirrel has been previously described; however, the expression pattern of activin receptors and cytoplasmic signaling SMADs has not been detected in any seasonal breeders. The objective of this study was to investigate the abundance and cellular localization of activin signaling components in testes of the wild ground squirrel during the breeding and nonbreeding seasons. The immunolocalizations of ActRIIB (activin type II receptor B) and activin-related SMADs (phospho-SMAD2/3, SMAD4 and SMAD7) were observed by immunohistochemistry. Total proteins were extracted from testicular tissues in the breeding and nonbreeding seasons and were used for Western blotting analysis for ActRIIB and SMADs. Immunoreactivities of activin signaling components were greater in the testes of the breeding season, and then decreased to a relatively low level in the nonbreeding season. ActRIIB and related SMADs were widely spread in the active testes, while spermatogonia were the predominant cellular sites of activin signal transduction during arrested spermatogenesis. The dynamic regulation of activin type II receptor and SMADs indicated that the activin signal pathway played an important paracrine role in seasonal spermatogenesis of the wild ground squirrel. Furthermore, the distinct localizations and immunoreactivity of ActRIIB and SMADs might suggest different functions of activin in seasonal spermatogenesis.

  14. GATA6 Promotes Angiogenic Function and Survival in Endothelial Cells by Suppression of Autocrine Transforming Growth Factor β/Activin Receptor-like Kinase 5 Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Froese, Natali; Kattih, Badder; Breitbart, Astrid; Grund, Andrea; Geffers, Robert; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Kispert, Andreas; Wollert, Kai C.; Drexler, Helmut; Heineke, Joerg

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the transcriptional regulation of angiogenesis could lead to the identification of novel therapeutic targets. We showed here that the transcription factor GATA6 is expressed in different human primary endothelial cells as well as in vascular endothelial cells of mice in vivo. Activation of endothelial cells was associated with GATA6 nuclear translocation, chromatin binding, and enhanced GATA6-dependent transcriptional activation. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of GATA6 after growth factor stimulation led to a dramatically reduced capacity of macro- and microvascular endothelial cells to proliferate, migrate, or form capillary-like structures on Matrigel. Adenoviral overexpression of GATA6 in turn enhanced angiogenic function, especially in cardiac endothelial microvascular cells. Furthermore, GATA6 protected endothelial cells from undergoing apoptosis during growth factor deprivation. Mechanistically, down-regulation of GATA6 in endothelial cells led to increased expression of transforming growth factor (TGF) β1 and TGFβ2, whereas enhanced GATA6 expression, accordingly, suppressed Tgfb1 promoter activity. High TGFβ1/β2 expression in GATA6-depleted endothelial cells increased the activation of the activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK5) and SMAD2, and suppression of this signaling axis by TGFβ neutralizing antibody or ALK5 inhibition restored angiogenic function and survival in endothelial cells with reduced GATA6 expression. Together, these findings indicate that GATA6 plays a crucial role for endothelial cell function and survival, at least in part, by suppressing autocrine TGFβ expression and ALK5-dependent signaling. PMID:21127043

  15. Targeting activin receptor-like kinase 1 inhibits angiogenesis and tumorigenesis through a mechanism of action complementary to anti-VEGF therapies.

    PubMed

    Hu-Lowe, Dana D; Chen, Enhong; Zhang, Lianglin; Watson, Katherine D; Mancuso, Patrizia; Lappin, Patrick; Wickman, Grant; Chen, Jeffrey H; Wang, Jianying; Jiang, Xin; Amundson, Karin; Simon, Ronald; Erbersdobler, Andreas; Bergqvist, Simon; Feng, Zheng; Swanson, Terri A; Simmons, Brett H; Lippincott, John; Casperson, Gerald F; Levin, Wendy J; Stampino, Corrado Gallo; Shalinsky, David R; Ferrara, Katherine W; Fiedler, Walter; Bertolini, Francesco

    2011-02-15

    Genetic and molecular studies suggest that activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1) plays an important role in vascular development, remodeling, and pathologic angiogenesis. Here we investigated the role of ALK1 in angiogenesis in the context of common proangiogenic factors [PAF; VEGF-A and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)]. We observed that PAFs stimulated ALK1-mediated signaling, including Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and Id-1 expression, cell spreading, and tubulogenesis of endothelial cells (EC). An antibody specifically targeting ALK1 (anti-ALK1) markedly inhibited these events. In mice, anti-ALK1 suppressed Matrigel angiogenesis stimulated by PAFs and inhibited xenograft tumor growth by attenuating both blood and lymphatic vessel angiogenesis. In a human melanoma model with acquired resistance to a VEGF receptor kinase inhibitor, anti-ALK1 also delayed tumor growth and disturbed vascular normalization associated with VEGF receptor inhibition. In a human/mouse chimera tumor model, targeting human ALK1 decreased human vessel density and improved antitumor efficacy when combined with bevacizumab (anti-VEGF). Antiangiogenesis and antitumor efficacy were associated with disrupted co-localization of ECs with desmin(+) perivascular cells, and reduction of blood flow primarily in large/mature vessels as assessed by contrast-enhanced ultrasonography. Thus, ALK1 may play a role in stabilizing angiogenic vessels and contribute to resistance to anti-VEGF therapies. Given our observation of its expression in the vasculature of many human tumor types and in circulating ECs from patients with advanced cancers, ALK1 blockade may represent an effective therapeutic opportunity complementary to the current antiangiogenic modalities in the clinic.

  16. Activin Signaling in the Pathogenesis and Therapy of Neuropsychiatric Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Link, Andrea S.; Zheng, Fang; Alzheimer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Activins are members of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) family and serve as multifunctional regulatory proteins in many tissues and organs. In the brain, activin A, which is formed by two disulfide-linked βA subunits, is recognized as the predominant player in activin signaling. Over the last years, considerable progress has been made in elucidating novel and unexpected functions of activin in the normal and diseased brain and in deciphering the underlying molecular mechanisms. Initially identified as a neurotrophic and protective factor during development and in several forms of acute injury, the scope of effects of activin A in the adult central nervous system (CNS) has been considerably broadened by now. Here, we will highlight recent findings that bear significance for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of various neuropsychiatric diseases and might hold promise for novel therapeutic strategies. While the basal level of activin A in the adult brain is low, significant short-term up-regulation occurs in response to increased neuronal activity. In fact, brief exposure to an enriched environment (EE) is already sufficient to considerably strengthen activin signaling. Enhancement of this pathway tunes the performance of glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses in a fashion that impacts on cognitive functions and affective behavior, counteracts death-inducing signals through extrasynaptic NMDA receptors (NMDARs), and stimulates adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. We will discuss how impaired activin signaling is involved in anxiety disorders, depression, drug dependence, and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, and how reinforcement of activin signaling might be exploited for therapeutic interventions. PMID:27242425

  17. Endoglin and activin receptor-like kinase 1 heterozygous mice have a distinct pulmonary and hepatic angiogenic profile and response to anti-VEGF treatment.

    PubMed

    Ardelean, Daniela S; Jerkic, Mirjana; Yin, Melissa; Peter, Madonna; Ngan, Bo; Kerbel, Robert S; Foster, F Stuart; Letarte, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a vascular dysplasia associated with dysregulated angiogenesis and arteriovascular malformations. The disease is caused by mutations in endoglin (ENG; HHT1) or activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1; HHT2) genes, coding for transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) superfamily receptors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in HHT and beneficial effects of anti-VEGF treatment were recently reported in HHT patients. To investigate the systemic angiogenic phenotype of Endoglin and Alk1 mutant mice and their response to anti-VEGF therapy, we assessed microvessel density (MVD) in multiple organs after treatment with an antibody to mouse VEGF or vehicle. Lungs were the only organ showing an angiogenic defect, with reduced peripheral MVD and secondary right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), yet distinctly associated with a fourfold increase in thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) in Eng (+/-) versus a rise in angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) in Alk1 (+/-) mice. Anti-VEGF treatment did reduce lung VEGF levels but interestingly, led to an increase in peripheral pulmonary MVD and attenuation of RVH; it also normalized TSP-1 and Ang-2 expression. Hepatic MVD, unaffected in mutant mice, was reduced by anti-VEGF therapy in heterozygous and wild type mice, indicating a liver-specific effect of treatment. Contrast-enhanced micro-ultrasound demonstrated a reduction in hepatic microvascular perfusion after anti-VEGF treatment only in Eng (+/-) mice. Our findings indicate that the mechanisms responsible for the angiogenic imbalance and the response to anti-VEGF therapy differ between Eng and Alk1 heterozygous mice and raise the need for systemic monitoring of anti-angiogenic therapy effects in HHT patients.

  18. Complete reversal of muscle wasting in experimental cancer cachexia: Additive effects of activin type II receptor inhibition and β-2 agonist.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Míriam; Busquets, Sílvia; Penna, Fabio; Zhou, Xiaolan; Marmonti, Enrica; Betancourt, Angelica; Massa, David; López-Soriano, Francisco J; Han, H Q; Argilés, Josep M

    2016-04-15

    Formoterol is a highly potent β2-adrenoceptor-selective agonist, which is a muscle growth promoter in many animal species. Myostatin/activin inhibition reverses skeletal muscle loss and prolongs survival of tumor-bearing animals. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the effects of a combination of the soluble myostatin receptor ActRIIB (sActRIIB) and the β2-agonist formoterol in the cachectic Lewis lung carcinoma model. The combination of formoterol and sActRIIB was extremely effective in reversing muscle wasting associated with experimental cancer cachexia in mice. Muscle weights from tumor-bearing animals were completely recovered following treatment and this was also reflected in the measured grip strength. This combination increased food intake in both control and tumor-bearing animals. The double treatment also prolonged survival significantly without affecting the weight and growth of the primary tumor. In addition, it significantly reduced the number of metastasis. Concerning the mechanisms for the preservation of muscle mass during cachexia, the effects of formoterol and sActRIIB seemed to be additive, since formoterol reduced the rate of protein degradation (as measured in vitro as tyrosine release, using incubated isolated individual muscles) while sActRIIB only affected protein synthesis (as measured in vivo using tritiated phenylalanine). Formoterol also increased the rate of protein synthesis and this seemed to be favored by the presence of sActRIIB. Combining formoterol and sActRIIB seemed to be a very promising treatment for experimental cancer cachexia. Further studies in human patients are necessary and may lead to a highly effective treatment option for muscle wasting associated with cancer.

  19. Activin Decoy Receptor ActRIIB:Fc Lowers FSH and Therapeutically Restores Oocyte Yield, Prevents Oocyte Chromosome Misalignments and Spindle Aberrations, and Increases Fertility in Midlife Female SAMP8 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Amelia C. L.; Lee, Se-Jin; Chaffin, Charles L.; Merchenthaler, István

    2016-01-01

    Women of advanced maternal age (AMA) (age ≥ 35) have increased rates of infertility, miscarriages, and trisomic pregnancies. Collectively these conditions are called “egg infertility.” A root cause of egg infertility is increased rates of oocyte aneuploidy with age. AMA women often have elevated endogenous FSH. Female senescence-accelerated mouse-prone-8 (SAMP8) has increased rates of oocyte spindle aberrations, diminished fertility, and rising endogenous FSH with age. We hypothesize that elevated FSH during the oocyte's FSH-responsive growth period is a cause of abnormalities in the meiotic spindle. We report that eggs from SAMP8 mice treated with equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) for the period of oocyte growth have increased chromosome and spindle misalignments. Activin is a molecule that raises FSH, and ActRIIB:Fc is an activin decoy receptor that binds and sequesters activin. We report that ActRIIB:Fc treatment of midlife SAMP8 mice for the duration of oocyte growth lowers FSH, prevents egg chromosome and spindle misalignments, and increases litter sizes. AMA patients can also have poor responsiveness to FSH stimulation. We report that although eCG lowers yields of viable oocytes, ActRIIB:Fc increases yields of viable oocytes. ActRIIB:Fc and eCG cotreatment markedly reduces yields of viable oocytes. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that elevated FSH contributes to egg aneuploidy, declining fertility, and poor ovarian response and that ActRIIB:Fc can prevent egg aneuploidy, increase fertility, and improve ovarian response. Future studies will continue to examine whether ActRIIB:Fc works via FSH and/or other pathways and whether ActRIIB:Fc can prevent aneuploidy, increase fertility, and improve stimulation responsiveness in AMA women. PMID:26713784

  20. Dickkopf-3 Upregulates VEGF in Cultured Human Endothelial Cells by Activating Activin Receptor-Like Kinase 1 (ALK1) Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Busceti, Carla L.; Marchitti, Simona; Bianchi, Franca; Di Pietro, Paola; Riozzi, Barbara; Stanzione, Rosita; Cannella, Milena; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Bruno, Valeria; Volpe, Massimo; Fornai, Francesco; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Rubattu, Speranza

    2017-01-01

    Dkk-3 is a member of the dickkopf protein family of secreted inhibitors of the Wnt pathway, which has been shown to enhance angiogenesis. The mechanism underlying this effect is currently unknown. Here, we used cultured HUVECs to study the involvement of the TGF-β and VEGF on the angiogenic effect of Dkk-3. Addition of hrDkk-3 peptide (1 or 10 ng/ml) to HUVECs for 6 or 12 h enhanced the intracellular and extracellular VEGF protein levels, as assessed by RTPCR, immunoblotting, immunocytochemistry and ELISA. The increase in the extracellular VEGF levels was associated to the VEGFR2 activation. Pharmacological blockade of VEGFR2 abrogated Dkk-3-induced endothelial cell tubes formation, indicating that VEGF is a molecular player of the angiogenic effects of Dkk-3. Moreover, Dkk-3 enhanced Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation and recruited Smad4 to the VEGF gene promoter, suggesting that Dkk-3 activated ALK1 receptor leading to a transcriptional activation of VEGF. This mechanism was instrumental to the increased VEGF expression and endothelial cell tubes formation mediated by Dkk-3, because both effects were abolished by siRNA-mediated ALK1 knockdown. In summary, we have found that Dkk-3 activates ALK1 to stimulate VEGF production and induce angiogenesis in HUVECs. PMID:28352232

  1. Regulation of development of rat stem and progenitor Leydig cells by activin.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Wang, Y; Li, X; Liu, S; Wang, G; Lin, H; Zhu, Q; Guo, J; Chen, H; Ge, H-S; Ge, R-S

    2017-01-01

    Stem Leydig cells have been demonstrated to differentiate into adult Leydig cells via intermediate stages of progenitor and immature Leydig cells. However, the exact regulatory mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesized that the development of stem or progenitor Leydig cells depends upon locally produced growth factors. Microarray analysis revealed that the expression levels of activin type I receptor (Acvr1) and activin A receptor type II-like 1 (Acvrl1) were stem > progenitor = immature = adult Leydig cells. This indicates that their ligand activin might play an important role in stem and progenitor Leydig cell proliferation and differentiation. When seminiferous tubules were incubated with 1 or 10 ng/mL activin A for 3 days, it concentration-dependently increased EdU incorporation into stem Leydig cells by up to 20-fold. When progenitor Leydig cells were incubated with 1 or 10 ng/mL activin A for 2 days, it concentration-dependently increased (3) H-thymidine incorporation into progenitor Leydig cells by up to 200%. Real-time PCR analysis showed that activin A primarily increased Pcna expression but reduced Star, Hsd3b1, and Cyp17a1 expression levels. Activin A also significantly inhibited the basal and luteinizing hormone-stimulated androgen production. In conclusion, activin A primarily stimulates the proliferation of stem and progenitor Leydig cells, but inhibits the differentiation of stem and progenitor Leydig cells into the Leydig cell lineage in rat testis.

  2. Structure–activity correlations of variant forms of the B pentamer of Escherichia coli type II heat-labile enterotoxin LT-IIb with Toll-like receptor 2 binding

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, Vivian; Pace, Jim; Nawar, Hesham F.; King-Lyons, Natalie; Liang, Shuang; Connell, Terry D.; Hajishengallis, George

    2012-12-01

    Structural data for the S74D variant of the pentameric B subunit of type II heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli reveal a smaller pore opening that may explain its reduced Toll-like receptor binding affinity compared to that of the wild type enterotoxin. The explanation for the enhanced Toll-like receptor binding affinity of the S74A variant is more complex than simply being attributed to the pore opening. The pentameric B subunit of the type II heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli (LT-IIb-B{sub 5}) is a potent signaling molecule capable of modulating innate immune responses. It has previously been shown that LT-IIb-B{sub 5}, but not the LT-IIb-B{sub 5} Ser74Asp variant [LT-IIb-B{sub 5}(S74D)], activates Toll-like receptor (TLR2) signaling in macrophages. Consistent with this, the LT-IIb-B{sub 5}(S74D) variant failed to bind TLR2, in contrast to LT-IIb-B{sub 5} and the LT-IIb-B{sub 5} Thr13Ile [LT-IIb-B{sub 5}(T13I)] and LT-IIb-B{sub 5} Ser74Ala [LT-IIb-B{sub 5}(S74A)] variants, which displayed the highest binding activity to TLR2. Crystal structures of the Ser74Asp, Ser74Ala and Thr13Ile variants of LT-IIb-B{sub 5} have been determined to 1.90, 1.40 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively. The structural data for the Ser74Asp variant reveal that the carboxylate side chain points into the pore, thereby reducing the pore size compared with that of the wild-type or the Ser74Ala variant B pentamer. On the basis of these crystallographic data, the reduced TLR2-binding affinity of the LT-IIb-B{sub 5}(S74D) variant may be the result of the pore of the pentamer being closed. On the other hand, the explanation for the enhanced TLR2-binding activity of the LT-IIb-B{sub 5}(S74A) variant is more complex as its activity is greater than that of the wild-type B pentamer, which also has an open pore as the Ser74 side chain points away from the pore opening. Data for the LT-IIb-B{sub 5}(T13I) variant show that four of the five variant side chains point to the outside

  3. Activin A Stimulates Aromatase via the ALK4-Smad Pathway in Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Juan; Qu, Juan; Lu, Pinhong; Mao, Yundong; Qi, Xiaochen; Ji, Hui; Liu, Jiayin

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent disease. We previously found that the expression of Activin A was upregulated in the peritoneal fluid of patients with endometriosis. The results of the present study indicated that Activin A induced estradiol secretion and P450arom expression in endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) derived from endometriosis patients. The mechanism of estrogenic synthesis was regulated by the Activin-Smad pathway in endometrial lesions. The data showed that the effect of Activin A on ESCs was partially abrogated by pretreatment with an inhibitor of ALK4 (the type I receptor, ActRIB) and Smad4-siRNA. Cumulatively, these data suggest that Activin A promotes the secretion of estradiol from ESCs by increasing the expression of P450arom via the ALK4-Smad pathway. These findings indicate the ALK4-Smad pathway may promote ectopic lesion survival and development. PMID:27833918

  4. Activin Receptor-Like Kinase Receptors ALK5 and ALK1 Are Both Required for TGFβ-Induced Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Kroon, Laurie M. G.; Narcisi, Roberto; Blaney Davidson, Esmeralda N.; Cleary, Mairéad A.; van Beuningen, Henk M.; Koevoet, Wendy J. L. M.; van Osch, Gerjo J. V. M.; van der Kraan, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are promising for cartilage regeneration because BMSCs can differentiate into cartilage tissue-producing chondrocytes. Transforming Growth Factor β (TGFβ) is crucial for inducing chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs and is known to signal via Activin receptor-Like Kinase (ALK) receptors ALK5 and ALK1. Since the specific role of these two TGFβ receptors in chondrogenesis is unknown, we investigated whether ALK5 and ALK1 are expressed in BMSCs and whether both receptors are required for chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs. Materials & Methods ALK5 and ALK1 gene expression in human BMSCs was determined with RT-qPCR. To induce chondrogenesis, human BMSCs were pellet-cultured in serum-free chondrogenic medium containing TGFβ1. Chondrogenesis was evaluated by aggrecan and collagen type IIα1 RT-qPCR analysis, and histological stainings of proteoglycans and collagen type II. To overexpress constitutively active (ca) receptors, BMSCs were transduced either with caALK5 or caALK1. Expression of ALK5 and ALK1 was downregulated by transducing BMSCs with shRNA against ALK5 or ALK1. Results ALK5 and ALK1 were expressed in in vitro-expanded as well as in pellet-cultured BMSCs from five donors, but mRNA levels of both TGFβ receptors did not clearly associate with chondrogenic induction. TGFβ increased ALK5 and decreased ALK1 gene expression in chondrogenically differentiating BMSC pellets. Neither caALK5 nor caALK1 overexpression induced cartilage matrix formation as efficient as that induced by TGFβ. Moreover, short hairpin-mediated downregulation of either ALK5 or ALK1 resulted in a strong inhibition of TGFβ-induced chondrogenesis. Conclusion ALK5 as well as ALK1 are required for TGFβ-induced chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs, and TGFβ not only directly induces chondrogenesis, but also modulates ALK5 and ALK1 receptor signaling in BMSCs. These results imply that optimizing cartilage formation by

  5. Regulation of FSHβ induction in LβT2 cells by BMP2 and an Activin A/BMP2 chimera, AB215.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae Woo; Ahn, Chihoon; Shim, Sun Young; Gray, Peter C; Kwiatkowski, Witek; Choe, Senyon

    2014-10-01

    Activins and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) share activin type 2 signaling receptors but utilize different type 1 receptors and Smads. We designed AB215, a potent BMP2-like Activin A/BMP2 chimera incorporating the high-affinity type 2 receptor-binding epitope of Activin A. In this study, we compare the signaling properties of AB215 and BMP2 in HEK293T cells and gonadotroph LβT2 cells in which Activin A and BMP2 synergistically induce FSHβ. In HEK293T cells, AB215 is more potent than BMP2 and competitively blocks Activin A signaling, while BMP2 has a partial blocking activity. Activin A signaling is insensitive to BMP pathway antagonism in HEK293T cells but is strongly inhibited by constitutively active (CA) BMP type 1 receptors. By contrast, the potencies of AB215 and BMP2 are indistinguishable in LβT2 cells and although AB215 blocks Activin A signaling, BMP2 has no inhibitory effect. Unlike HEK293T, Activin A signaling is strongly inhibited by BMP pathway antagonism in LβT2 cells but is largely unaffected by CA BMP type 1 receptors. BMP2 increases phospho-Smad3 levels in LβT2 cells, in both the absence and the presence of Activin A treatment, and augments Activin A-induced FSHβ. AB215 has the opposite effect and sharply decreases basal phospho-Smad3 levels and blocks Smad2 phosphorylation and FSHβ induction resulting from Activin A treatment. These findings together demonstrate that while AB215 activates the BMP pathway, it has opposing effects to those of BMP2 on FSHβ induction in LβT2 cells apparently due to its ability to block Activin A signaling.

  6. Cellular distribution of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) and B (VEGFB) and VEGF receptors 1 and 2 in focal cortical dysplasia type IIB

    PubMed Central

    Boer, Karin; Troost, Dirk; Spliet, Wim G. M.; van Rijen, Peter C.; Gorter, Jan A.

    2008-01-01

    Members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family are key signaling proteins in the induction and regulation of angiogenesis, both during development and in pathological conditions. However, signaling mediated through VEGF family proteins and their receptors has recently been shown to have direct effects on neurons and glial cells. In the present study, we immunocytochemically investigated the expression and cellular distribution of VEGFA, VEGFB, and their associated receptors (VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2) in focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) type IIB from patients with medically intractable epilepsy. Histologically normal temporal cortex and perilesional regions displayed neuronal immunoreactivity (IR) for VEGFA, VEGFB, and VEGF receptors (VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2), mainly in pyramidal neurons. Weak IR was observed in blood vessels and there was no notable glial IR within the grey and white matter. In all FCD specimens, VEGFA, VEGFB, and both VEGF receptors were highly expressed in dysplastic neurons. IR in astroglial and balloon cells was observed for VEGFA and its receptors. VEGFR-1 displayed strong endothelial staining in FCD. Double-labeling also showed expression of VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFR-1 in cells of the microglia/macrophage lineage. The neuronal expression of both VEGFA and VEGFB, together with their specific receptors in FCD, suggests autocrine/paracrine effects on dysplastic neurons. These autocrine/paracrine effects could play a role in the development of FCD, preventing the death of abnormal neuronal cells. In addition, the expression of VEGFA and its receptors in glial cells within the dysplastic cortex indicates that VEGF-mediated signaling could contribute to astroglial activation and associated inflammatory reactions. PMID:18317782

  7. Activin Acts with Nerve Growth Factor to Regulate Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide mRNA in Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pin; Hall, Alison K.

    2009-01-01

    Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP) increases in sensory neurons after inflammation and plays an important role in abnormal pain responses, but how this neuropeptide is regulated is not well understood. Both activin A and Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) increase in skin after inflammation and induce CGRP in neurons in vivo and in vitro. This study was designed to understand how neurons integrate these two signals to regulate the neuropeptide important for inflammatory pain. In adult dorsal root ganglion neurons, NGF but not activin alone produced a dose-dependent increase in CGRP mRNA. When added together with NGF, activin synergistically increased CGRP mRNA, indicating that sensory neurons combine these signals. Studies were then designed to learn if that combination occurred at a common receptor or shared intracellular signals. Studies with Activin IB receptor or trkA inhibitors suggested that each ligand required its cognate receptor to stimulate the neuropeptide. Further, activin did not augment NGF-initiated intracellular MAPK signals but instead stimulated Smad phosphorylation, suggesting these ligands initiated parallel signals in the cytoplasm. Activin synergy required several NGF intracellular signals to be present. Because activin did not further stimulate, but did require NGF intracellular signals, it appears that activin and NGF converge not in receptor or cytoplasmic signals, but in transcriptional mechanisms to regulate CGRP in sensory neurons after inflammation. PMID:17964731

  8. Ah Receptor Activation by Dioxin Disrupts Activin, BMP, and WNT Signals During the Early Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells and Inhibits Cardiomyocyte Functions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Kurita, Hisaka; Carreira, Vinicius; Ko, Chia-I; Fan, Yunxia; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Puga, Alvaro

    2016-02-01

    The AHR is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates gene-environment interactions. Genome-wide expression profiling during differentiation of mouse ES cells into cardiomyocytes showed that AHR activation by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; Dioxin (TCDD), its prototypical ligand, disrupted the expression of multiple homeobox transcription factors and inhibited cardiomyocyte contractility. Here we treated ES cells with TCDD at daily differentiation intervals to investigate whether TCDD-induced loss of contractility had a developmental window of sensitivity. Surprisingly, contractility was an AHR-dependent TCDD target solely between differentiation days 0 and 3 during the period of panmesoderm development, when TCDD also disrupted expression of genes in the TGFβ/BMP2/4 and wingless-type MMTV integration site (WNT)signaling pathways, suppressed the secretion of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP4), WNT3a, and WNT5a and elevated the secretion of Activin A, as determined by ELISA of the secreted proteins in the culture medium. Supplementing the culture medium with BMP4, WNT3a, or WNT5a during the first 3 days of differentiation successfully countered TCDD-induced impairment of contractility, while anti-WNT3a, or anti-WNT5a antibodies or continuous Noggin (a BMP4 antagonist) or Activin A treatment inhibited the contractile phenotype. In Ahr(+/+), but not in Ahr(-) (/) (-) ES cells, TCDD treatment significantly increased mitochondrial copy number, suggestive of mitochondrial stress and remodeling. Sustained AHR activation during ES cell differentiation appears to disrupt the expression of signals critical to the ontogeny of cardiac mesoderm and cause the loss of contractility in the resulting cardiomyocyte lineage.

  9. Ah Receptor Activation by Dioxin Disrupts Activin, BMP, and WNT Signals During the Early Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells and Inhibits Cardiomyocyte Functions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qin; Kurita, Hisaka; Carreira, Vinicius; Ko, Chia-I; Fan, Yunxia; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Puga, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    The AHR is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates gene-environment interactions. Genome-wide expression profiling during differentiation of mouse ES cells into cardiomyocytes showed that AHR activation by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; Dioxin (TCDD), its prototypical ligand, disrupted the expression of multiple homeobox transcription factors and inhibited cardiomyocyte contractility. Here we treated ES cells with TCDD at daily differentiation intervals to investigate whether TCDD-induced loss of contractility had a developmental window of sensitivity. Surprisingly, contractility was an AHR-dependent TCDD target solely between differentiation days 0 and 3 during the period of panmesoderm development, when TCDD also disrupted expression of genes in the TGFβ/BMP2/4 and wingless-type MMTV integration site (WNT)signaling pathways, suppressed the secretion of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP4), WNT3a, and WNT5a and elevated the secretion of Activin A, as determined by ELISA of the secreted proteins in the culture medium. Supplementing the culture medium with BMP4, WNT3a, or WNT5a during the first 3 days of differentiation successfully countered TCDD-induced impairment of contractility, while anti-WNT3a, or anti-WNT5a antibodies or continuous Noggin (a BMP4 antagonist) or Activin A treatment inhibited the contractile phenotype. In Ahr+/+, but not in Ahr−/− ES cells, TCDD treatment significantly increased mitochondrial copy number, suggestive of mitochondrial stress and remodeling. Sustained AHR activation during ES cell differentiation appears to disrupt the expression of signals critical to the ontogeny of cardiac mesoderm and cause the loss of contractility in the resulting cardiomyocyte lineage. PMID:26572662

  10. Activin A is increased in the nucleus accumbens following a cocaine binge

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi-Jun; Martin, Jennifer A.; Gancarz, Amy M.; Adank, Danielle N.; Sim, Fraser J.; Dietz, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Drug addiction is a long-lasting disease characterized by compulsive drug intake mediated in part by neuronal and biological adaptations in key brain areas, such as the nucleus accumbens (NAc). While we previously demonstrated involvement of the activin 2a receptor in drug taking, the role of its ligand, activin A, in cocaine relapse is unknown. Activin A levels in the NAc were assessed via ELISA and immunohistochemistry (in neurons, astrocytes, and microglia) following a cocaine binge paradigm. Cocaine exposure significantly increased the levels of activin A in the NAc of animals that had self-administered cocaine prior to the 14-day withdrawal compared with levels in saline controls. This was accompanied by an increase in the proportion of IBA1+ microglia in the NAc that were immunopositive for activin A. In contrast, the proportions of NeuN+ neurons and GFAP+ astrocytes that were immunopositive for activin A remained unaltered. In conclusion, these data suggest that increased secretion of activin A, particularly from microglia, in the NAc represents a novel potential target for the treatment of cocaine relapse. PMID:28272550

  11. Crystal structure of the soluble form of the human fcgamma-receptor IIb: a new member of the immunoglobulin superfamily at 1.7 A resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Sondermann, P; Huber, R; Jacob, U

    1999-01-01

    Fcgamma-receptors (FcgammaRs) represent the link between the humoral and cellular immune responses. Via the binding to FcgammaR-positive cells, immunocomplexes trigger several functions such as endocytosis, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxity (ADCC) and the release of mediators, making them a valuable target for the modulation of the immune system. We solved the crystal structure of the soluble human Fcgamma-receptor IIb (sFcgammaRIIb) to 1.7 A resolution. The structure reveals two typical immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains enclosing an angle of approximately 70 degrees, leading to a heart-shaped overall structure. In contrast to the observed flexible arrangement of the domains in other members of the Ig superfamily, the two domains are anchored by several hydrogen bonds. The structure reveals that the residues relevant for IgG binding, which were already partially characterized by mutagenesis studies, are located within the BC, C'E and FG loops between the beta-strands of the second domain. Moreover, we discuss a model for the sFcgammaRIIb:IgG complex. In this model, two FcgammaR molecules bind one IgG molecule with their second domains, while the first domain points away from the complex and is therefore available for binding other cell surface molecules, by which potential immunosuppressing functions could be mediated. PMID:10064577

  12. Activin A, B and AB decrease progesterone production by down-regulating StAR in human granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsun-Ming; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Huang, He-Feng; Shi, Feng-Tao; Leung, Peter C K

    2015-09-05

    Activins are homo- or heterodimers of inhibin β subunits that play important roles in the reproductive system. Our previous work has shown that activins A (βAβA), B (βBβB) and AB (βAβB) induce aromatase/estradiol, but suppress StAR/progesterone production in human granulosa-lutein cells. However, the underlying molecular determinants of these effects have not been examined. In this continuing study, we used immortalized human granulosa cells (SVOG) to investigate the effects of activins in regulating StAR/progesterone and the potential mechanisms of action. In SVOG cells, activins A, B and AB produced comparable down-regulation of StAR expression and progesterone production. In addition, all three activin isoforms induced equivalent phosphorylation of both SMAD2 and SMAD3. Importantly, the activin-induced down-regulation of StAR, increase in SMAD2/3 phosphorylation, and decrease in progesterone were abolished by the TGF-β type I receptor inhibitor SB431542. Interestingly, the small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of ALK4 but not ALK5 reversed the activin-induced suppression of StAR. Furthermore, the knockdown of SMAD4 or SMAD2 but not SMAD3 abolished the inhibitory effects of all three activin isoforms on StAR expression. These results provide evidence that activins A, B and AB down-regulate StAR expression and decrease progesterone production in human granulosa cells, likely via an ALK4-mediated SMAD2/SMAD4-dependent pathway. Our findings provide important insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulatory effects of activins on human granulosa cell steroidogenesis.

  13. Effects of the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor antagonist c7E3 Fab and anticoagulants on platelet aggregation and thrombin potential under high coagulant challenge in vitro.

    PubMed

    Koestenberger, M; Gallistl, S; Cvirn, G; Roschitz, B; Muntean, W

    2000-07-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the combined effects of the platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor antagonist c7E3 Fab (abciximab) and the anticoagulants unfractionated heparin (UH), low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), and recombinant hirudin (rH) on platelet aggregation and thrombin generation under high coagulant challenge by extrinsic activation of platelet-rich plasma. Platelet aggregation and thrombin generation were assessed simultaneously in the presence of different concentrations of abciximab and anticoagulants. Increasing concentrations of abciximab resulted in a dose-dependent anti-aggregating effect with a maximum at 20 microg/ml. Doses of 5, 10, and 20 microg/ml abciximab prolonged the lag phase until the onset of platelet aggregation, but this effect was independent of the dosage used. Abciximab had no influence on the thrombin potential under our high coagulant challenge. UH, LMWH, and rH showed a dose-dependent prolongation of the lag phase until the onset of platelet aggregation and decreased the thrombin potential. Addition of anticoagulants did not contribute to further inhibition of platelet aggregation in the presence of abciximab, but the combination of abciximab and anticoagulants exhibited an additive effect on prolongation of the lag phase until the onset of platelet aggregation. Addition of abciximab to anticoagulants did not result in further decrease of the thrombin potential. Our study demonstrates the respective specific effects of abciximab and anticoagulants on platelet aggregation and thrombin potential under high coagulant challenge, and also an additive effect of abciximab and the anticoagulants UH, LMWH, and rH on the lag phase until the onset of platelet aggregation.

  14. The role of macrophages in the susceptibility of Fc gamma receptor IIb deficient mice to Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Surawut, Saowapha; Ondee, Thunnicha; Taratummarat, Sujittra; Palaga, Tanapat; Pisitkun, Prapaporn; Chindamporn, Ariya; Leelahavanichkul, Asada

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunctional polymorphisms of FcγRIIb, an inhibitory receptor, are associated with Systemic Lupus Erythaematosus (SLE). Cryptococcosis is an invasive fungal infection in SLE, perhaps due to the de novo immune defect. We investigated cryptococcosis in the FcγRIIb−/− mouse-lupus-model. Mortality, after intravenous C. neoformans-induced cryptococcosis, in young (8-week-old) and older (24-week-old) FcγRIIb−/− mice, was higher than in age-matched wild-types. Severe cryptococcosis in the FcγRIIb−/− mice was demonstrated by high fungal burdens in the internal organs with histological cryptococcoma-like lesions and high levels of TNF-α and IL-6, but not IL-10. Interestingly, FcγRIIb−/− macrophages demonstrated more prominent phagocytosis but did not differ in killing activity in vitro and the striking TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 levels, compared to wild-type cells. Indeed, in vivo macrophage depletion with liposomal clodronate attenuated the fungal burdens in FcγRIIb−/− mice, but not wild-type mice. When administered to wild-type mice, FcγRIIb−/− macrophages with phagocytosed Cryptococcus resulted in higher fungal burdens than FcγRIIb+/+ macrophages with phagocytosed Cryptococcus. These results support, at least in part, a model whereby, in FcγRIIb−/− mice, enhanced C. neoformans transmigration occurs through infected macrophages. In summary, prominent phagocytosis, with limited effective killing activity, and high pro-inflammatory cytokine production by FcγRIIb−/− macrophages were correlated with more severe cryptococcosis in FcγRIIb−/− mice. PMID:28074867

  15. Activin A programs human TFH cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Locci, Michela; Wu, Jennifer; Arumemi, Fortuna; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Dahlberg, Carol; Miller, Andrew T.; Crotty, Shane

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Follicular helper T (TFH) cells are CD4+ T cells specialized in helping B cells and are associated both with protective antibody responses and autoimmune diseases. The promise of targeting TFH cells therapeutically has been limited by fragmentary understanding of extrinsic signals regulating human TFH cell differentiation. A screen of a human protein library identified activin A as new regulator of TFH cell differentiation. Activin A orchestrated expression of multiple TFH-associated genes, independently or in concert with additional signals. TFH programming by activin A was antagonized by the cytokine IL-2. Activin A’s capacity to drive TFH cell differentiation in vitro was conserved for non-human primates but not mice. Finally, activin A-induced TFH programming was dependent on SMAD2 and SMAD3 signaling and blocked by pharmacological inhibitors. PMID:27376469

  16. αIIbβ3: structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Coller, B. S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary During the past decade, advanced techniques in structural biology have provided atomic level information on the platelet integrin αIIbβ3 activation mechanism that results in it adopting a high-affinity ligand-binding conformation(s). This review focuses on advances in imaging intact αIIbβ3 in a lipid bilayer in the absence of detergent and new structural insights into the changes in the ligand-binding pocket with receptor activation and ligand binding. It concludes with descriptions of novel therapeutic αIIbβ3 antagonists being developed based on an advanced knowledge of the receptor’s structure. PMID:26149019

  17. Overexpression of activin-A and -B in malignant mesothelioma – Attenuated Smad3 signaling responses and ERK activation promote cell migration and invasive growth

    SciTech Connect

    Tamminen, Jenni A.; Yin, Miao; Rönty, Mikko; Sutinen, Eva; Pasternack, Arja; Ritvos, Olli; Myllärniemi, Marjukka; Koli, Katri

    2015-03-01

    Activin-A and activin-B, members of the TGF-β superfamily, are regulators of reproductive functions, inflammation and wound healing. These dimeric molecules regulate various cellular activities such as proliferation, migration and suvival. Malignant mesothelioma is an asbestos exposure related tumor affecting mainly pleura and it usually has a dismal prognosis. Here, we demonstrate that both activin-A and -B are abundantly expressed in mesothelioma tumor tissue as well as in cultured primary and established mesothelioma cells. Migratory and invasive mesothelioma cells were also found to have attenuated activation of the Smad2/3 pathway in response to activins. Migration and invasive growth of the cells in three-dimentional matrix was prevented by inhibition of activin activity using a soluble activin receptor 2B (sActR2B-Fc). This was associated with decreased ERK activity. Furthermore, migration and invasive growth was significantly inhibited by blocking ERK phosphorylation. Mesothelioma tumors are locally invasive and our results clearly suggest that acivins have a tumor-promoting function in mesothelioma through increasing expression and switching from canonical Smad3 pathway to non-canonical ERK pathway signaling. Blocking activin activity offers a new therapeutic approach for inhibition of mesothelioma invasive growth. - Highlights: • Activin-A and activin-B are highly expressed in mesothelioma. • Mesothelioma cell migration and invasive growth can be blocked with sActR2B. • Activin induced Smad3 activity is attenuated in invasive mesothelioma cells. • Activins induce ERK activity in mesothelioma cells.

  18. Activin B promotes endometrial cancer cell migration by down-regulating E-cadherin via SMAD-independent MEK-ERK1/2-SNAIL signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Siyuan; Klausen, Christian; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Leung, Peter C.K.

    2016-01-01

    High-risk type II endometrial cancers account for ~30% of cases but ~75% of deaths due, in part, to their tendency to metastasize. Histopathological studies of type II endometrial cancers (non-endometrioid, mostly serous) suggest overproduction of activin B and down-regulation of E-cadherin, both of which are associated with reduced survival. Our previous studies have shown that activin B increases the migration of type II endometrial cancer cell lines. However, little is known about the relationship between activin B signaling and E-cadherin in endometrial cancer. We now demonstrate that activin B treatment significantly decreases E-cadherin expression in both a time- and concentration-dependent manner in KLE and HEC-50 cell lines. Interestingly, these effects were not inhibited by knockdown of SMAD2, SMAD3 or SMAD4. Rather, the suppressive effects of activin B on E-cadherin were mediated by MEK-ERK1/2-induced production of the transcription factor SNAIL. Importantly, activin B-induced cell migration was inhibited by forced-expression of E-cadherin or pre-treatment with the activin/TGF-β type I receptor inhibitor SB431542 or the MEK inhibitor U0126. We have identified a novel SMAD-independent pathway linking enhanced activin B signaling to reduced E-cadherin expression and increased migration in type II endometrial cancer. PMID:27223076

  19. Effects of platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor blockade by a chimeric monoclonal antibody (abciximab) on acute and six-month outcomes after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty for acute myocardial infarction. EPIC investigators.

    PubMed

    Lefkovits, J; Ivanhoe, R J; Califf, R M; Bergelson, B A; Anderson, K M; Stoner, G L; Weisman, H F; Topol, E J

    1996-05-15

    Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) for acute myocardial infarction is an attractive alternative to thrombolysis, but is still limited by recurrent ischemia and restenosis. We determined whether adjunctive platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor blockade improved outcomes in patients undergoing direct and rescue PTCA in the Evaluation of c7E3 for Prevention of Ischemic Complications (EPIC) trial. Of the 2,099 patients undergoing percutaneous intervention who randomly received chimeric 7E3 Fab (c7E3) as a bolus, a bolus and 12-hour infusion, or placebo, 42 underwent direct PTCA for acute myocardial infarction and 22 patients had rescue PTCA after failed thrombolysis. The primary composite end point comprised death, reinfarction, repeat intervention, or bypass surgery. Outcomes were assessed at 30 days and 6 months. Baseline characteristics were similar in direct and rescue PTCA patients. Pooling the 2 groups, c7E3 bolus and infusion reduced the primary composite end point by 83% (26.1% placebo vs 4.5% c7E3 bolus and infusion, p = 0.06). No reinfarctions or repeat urgent interventions occurred in c7E3 bolus and infusion patients at 30 days, although there was a trend toward more deaths in c7E3-treated patients. Major bleeding was increased with c7E3 (24% vs 13%, p = 0.28). At 6 months, ischemic events were reduced from 47.8% with placebo to 4.5% with c7E3 bolus and infusion (p = 0.002), particularly reinfarction (p = 0.05) and repeat revascularization (p = 0.002). We conclude that adjunctive c7E3 therapy during direct and rescue PTCA decreased acute ischemic events and clinical restenosis in the EPIC trial. These data provide initial evidence of benefit for glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor blockade during PTCA for acute myocardial infarction.

  20. A truncated, activin-induced Smad3 isoform acts as a transcriptional repressor of FSHβ expression in mouse pituitary.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Youn; Zhu, Jie; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2011-08-06

    The receptor-regulated protein Smad3 is key player in the signaling cascade stimulated by the binding of activin to its cell surface receptor. Upon phosphorylation, Smad3 forms a heterocomplex with Smad2 and Smad4, translocates to the nucleus and acts as a transcriptional co-activator. We have identified a unique isoform of Smad3 that is expressed in mature pituitary gonadotropes. 5' RACE revealed that this truncated Smad3 isoform is transcribed from an ATG site within exon 4 and consists of 7 exons encoding half of the linker region and the MH2 region. In pituitary cells, the truncated Smad3 isoform was phosphorylated upon activin treatment, in a manner that was temporally distinct from the phosphorylation of full-length Smad3. Activin-induced phosphorylation of Smad3 and the truncated Smad3 isoform was blocked by both follistatin and siRNA-mediated knockdown of Smad3. The truncated Smad3 isoform antagonized Smad3-mediated, activin-responsive promoter activity. We propose that the pituitary gonadotrope contains an ultra-short, activin-responsive feedback loop utilizing two different isoforms of Smad3, one which acts as an agonist (Smad3) and another that acts as an intracrine antagonist (truncated Smad3 isoform) to regulate FSHβ production.

  1. Activin Potentiates Proliferation in Mature Avian Auditory Sensory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    McCullar, Jennifer S.; Ty, Sidya; Campbell, Sean; Oesterle, Elizabeth C.

    2010-01-01

    Humans and other mammals are highly susceptible to permanent hearing and balance deficits due to an inability to regenerate sensory hair cells lost to inner ear trauma. In contrast, nonmammalian vertebrates, such as birds, robustly regenerate replacement hair cells and restore hearing and balance functions to near-normal levels. There is considerable interest in understanding the cellular mechanisms responsible for this difference in regenerative capacity. Here we report on involvement of the TGFβ superfamily type II activin receptors, Acvr2a and Acvr2b, in regulating proliferation in mature avian auditory sensory epithelium. Cultured, posthatch avian auditory sensory epithelium treated with Acvr2a and Acvr2b inhibitors shows decreased proliferation of support cells, the cell type that gives rise to new hair cells. Conversely, addition of activin A, an Acvr2a/b ligand, potentiates support cell proliferation. Neither treatment (inhibitor or ligand) affected hair cell survival, suggesting a specific effect of Acvr2a/b signaling on support cell mitogenicity. Using immunocytochemistry, Acvr2a, Acvr2b, and downstream Smad effector proteins were differentially localized in avian and mammalian auditory sensory epithelia. Collectively, these data suggest that signaling through Acvr2a/b promotes support cell proliferation in mature avian auditory sensory epithelium and that this signaling pathway may be incomplete, or actively blocked, in the adult mammalian ear. PMID:20071511

  2. Activin and TGF-β effects on brain development and neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Griselda; Velasco, Iván

    2012-11-01

    Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) family members are ubiquitously expressed, participating in the regulation of many processes in different cell types both in embryonic and adult stages. Several members of this family, including Activins, TGF-β1-3 and Nodal, have been implicated in the development and maintenance of various organs, in which stem cells play important roles. Although TGF-β was initially considered an injury-related cytokine, it became clear that not only TGF-β, but other members of this family, play critical roles in morphogenesis and cell lineage specification. During brain development, Activin and TGF-βs as well as their cognate receptors, are expressed in different patterns. The roles of Activin and TGF-β during CNS development are sometimes contradictory, because these proteins present different actions depending on the cell type and the context. The aim of this review is to summarize current information on the actions of TGF-β members during developing brain, and also on Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells (NSPC). We focus on the TGF-β subgroup, specifically on the effects of TGF-β1 and Activin A. In the first section we describe the main characteristics of the ligands, its receptors as well as the proteins and mechanisms involved in signaling. Next, we discuss the main advances concerning TGF-β1 and Activin actions during brain development and their roles in NSPC fate decision and neuroprotection both in vitro and in vivo. The emerging picture from these studies suggests that these growth factors can be used to manipulate neurogenesis and might help to achieve restoration after brain deterioration.

  3. Activin A secreted by human mesenchymal stem cells induces neuronal development and neurite outgrowth in an in vitro model of Alzheimer's disease: neurogenesis induced by MSCs via activin A.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Eon; Lee, Jeongmin; Chang, Eun Hyuk; Kim, Jong Hwa; Sung, Ji-Hee; Na, Duk L; Chang, Jong Wook

    2016-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive loss of memory in addition to cortical atrophy. Cortical atrophy in AD brains begins in the parietal and temporal lobes, which are near the subventricular zone (SVZ). The aim of this study was to activate the neurogenesis in the SVZ of AD brains by human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Neural stem cells (NSCs) were isolated from SVZ of 4-month-old 5XFAD mice. Co-culture of hMSCs with SVZ-derived NSCs from 5XFAD mice induced neuronal development and neurite outgrowth. To examine the inducing factor of neurogenesis, human cytokine array was performed with co-cultured media, and revealed elevated release of activin A from hMSCs. Also, we confirmed that the mRNA levels of activin A and activin receptor in the SVZ of 5XFAD mice were significantly lower than normal mice. Treatment of human recombinant activin A in SVZ-derived NSCs from 5XFAD mice induced neuronal development and neurite outgrowth. These data suggest that use of hMSCs and activin A to recover neurogenesis in future studies of cortical regeneration to treat AD.

  4. Proteolytic degradation of the RGD-binding and non-RGD-binding conformers of human platelet integrin glycoprotein IIb/IIIa: clues for identification of regions involved in the receptor's activation.

    PubMed Central

    Calvete, J J; Mann, K; Schäfer, W; Fernandez-Lafuente, R; Guisán, J M

    1994-01-01

    The human integrin glycoprotein (GP)IIb/IIIa plays a central role in haemostasis as an inducible receptor for fibrinogen and other RGD-containing adhesive proteins at the platelet plasma membrane. Expression of the fibrinogen receptor on platelet activation involves conformational changes in the quaternary structure of GPIIb/IIIa. Little is known, however, about the nature of this conformational transition. Given that isolated GPIIb/IIIa contains a mixture of RGD-binding and non-RGD-binding heterodimers, we used limited proteolysis as a tool for investigating the structural differences between the two conformers. Comparison of their fragmentation patterns shows that, whereas in the non-RGD-binding form of GPIIb/IIIa the N-terminal half of the heavy chain of GPIIb (GPIIbH) and the central region of GPIIIa are cleaved by endoproteinase Arg-C, these domains associate tightly with one another in the RGD-binding GPIIb/IIIa and are thus protected from proteolysis. In addition, the C-terminal half of GPIIb becomes more susceptible to degradation in the non-RGD-binding GPIIb/IIIa conformer. Our interpretation, in the context of available structural and functional data, is that a major relative reorientation of the GPIIbH and GPIIIa extracellular domains takes place along the subunit interface during the conformational transition of the platelet integrin. Images Figure 1 PMID:8129707

  5. Testicular activin and follistatin levels are elevated during the course of experimental autoimmune epididymo–orchitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Nour; Michel, Vera; Bhushan, Sudhanshu; Wahle, Eva; Hayward, Susan; Ludlow, Helen; de Kretser, David M.; Loveland, Kate L.; Schuppe, Hans-Christian; Meinhardt, Andreas; Hedger, Mark P.; Fijak, Monika

    2017-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune epididymo-orchitis (EAEO) is a model of chronic inflammation, induced by immunisation with testicular antigens, which reproduces the pathology of some types of human infertility. Activins A and B regulate spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis, but are also pro-inflammatory, pro-fibrotic cytokines. Expression of the activins and their endogenous antagonists, inhibin and follistatin, was examined in murine EAEO. Adult untreated and adjuvant-treated control mice showed no pathology. All mice immunised with testis antigens developed EAEO by 50 days, characterised by loss of germ cells, immune cell infiltration and fibrosis in the testis, similar to biopsies from human inflamed testis. An increase of total CD45+ leukocytes, comprising CD3+ T cells, CD4 + CD8− and CD4 + CD25+ T cells, and a novel population of CD4 + CD8+ double positive T cells was also detected in EAEO testes. This was accompanied by increased expression of TNF, MCP-1 and IL-10. Activin A and B and follistatin protein levels were elevated in EAEO testes, with peak activin expression during the active phase of the disease, whereas mRNA expression of the inhibin B subunits (Inha and Inhbb) and activin receptor subunits (Acvr1b and Acvr2b) were downregulated. These data suggest that activin–follistatin regulation may play a role during the development of EAEO. PMID:28205525

  6. Identification and expression of Smads associated with TGF-beta/activin/nodal signaling pathways in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynuchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Smad proteins are essential components of the TGF-beta/activin/nodal family signaling pathway. We report the identification and characterization of transcripts representing 3 receptor Smads (Smad2a, Smad2b, Smad3), 2 common Smads (Smad4a, Smad4b) and one inhibitory Smad (Smad7). Phylogenetic an...

  7. Activin A accelerates the progression of fetal oocytes throughout meiosis and early oogenesis in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gui-Jin; Zhang, Xi-Feng; Wang, Jun-Jie; Sun, Yuan-Chao; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Cheng, Shun-Feng; Li, Lan; De Felici, Massimo; Shen, Wei

    2015-10-15

    Activins can exert several roles in ovary development. However, little is known about their involvement in early mammalian oogenesis. In this study, we reported that activin receptors (including ActRIA, ActRIB, ActRIIA, and ActRIIB) are expressed throughout the development of the mouse ovaries from 12.5 days postcoitum (dpc) to 21 days postparturition (dpp). Moreover, we found that in vitro, the addition of activin A (ActA) to the culture medium of 12.5 dpc ovarian tissues accelerated the progression of oocytes throughout meiotic prophase I stages. This result was reproduced in vivo following administration of ActA to pregnant mice. The in vitro effect of ActA was associated with increased expression of premeiotic and meiotic genes (including Dazl, Spo11, Stra8, Scp3, and Rec8) in the ovarian tissues. Mechanistically, ActA-dependent SMAD3 signaling modulated the expression of members of the retinoic acid (RA) system, including the RA degradation CYP26B1 enzyme and the RA receptors. Finally, ActA promoted the survival and growth of fetal and early postnatal oocytes and primordial follicle assembly both in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, the present study identifies new roles of ActA in early oogenesis and suggested that ActA and RA might cooperate in promoting meiosis in female germ cells.

  8. Saturn I/IB Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Pictured is a dual position Saturn I/IB test at the T-Stand at Marshall Space Flight Center. This stand was built to test two articles at the same time, thus providing engineers at MSFC with the opportunity to compare identical burns.

  9. Serum activin B concentration as predictive biomarker for ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, Pooja; Senthilkumar, G P; Rajendiran, Soundravally; Sivaraman, K; Soundararaghavan, S; Kulandhasamy, Maheshwari

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of activin B in discriminating tubal ectopic pregnancy (tEP) from intrauterine miscarriages (IUM), and normal viable intrauterine pregnancy (IUP). We included 28 women with tEP, 31 women with IUM, and 29 normal IUP, confirmed both by clinical examination and ultrasonography. Serum activin B concentration was measured at the time of admission using the ELISA kit. The median serum activin B concentration was found to be significantly decreased in both tEP (p=0.004) and IUM (p=0.022) compared to normal IUP. When compared between tEP and IUM, activin B concentrations did not differ significantly. ROC analysis of activin B and free β-hCG demonstrated AUC of 0.722 and 0.805, respectively to discriminate tEP from viable IUP. The model including both activin B and free β-hCG improved the discriminating potential with greater AUC (0.824), and specificity (93%) than individual one. To discriminate tEP from IUM, activin B, free β-hCG and combination of both performed poorly. We conclude that serum activin B concentration is lower in tubal ectopic pregnancy, and can discriminate it from normal pregnancy with moderate accuracy. It also shows improved diagnostic potential along with free β-hCG, but cannot distinguish tEP from IUM reliably.

  10. The role of activin in mammary gland development and oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dunphy, Karen A; Schneyer, Alan L; Hagen, Mary J; Jerry, D Joseph

    2011-06-01

    TGFβ contributes to mammary gland development and has paradoxical roles in breast cancer because it has both tumor suppressor and tumor promoter activity. Another member of the TGFβ superfamily, activin, also has roles in the developing mammary gland, but these functions, and the role of activin in breast cancer, are not well characterized. TGFβ and activin share the same intracellular signaling pathways, but divergence in their signaling pathways are suggested. The purpose of this review is to compare the spatial and temporal expression of TGFβ and activin during mammary gland development, with consideration given to their functions during each developmental period. We also review the contributions of TGFβ and activin to breast cancer resistance and susceptibility. Finally, we consider the systemic contributions of activin in regulating obesity and diabetes; and the impact this regulation has on breast cancer. Elevated levels of activin in serum during pregnancy and its influence on pregnancy associated breast cancer are also considered. We conclude that evidence demonstrates that activin has tumor suppressing potential, without definitive indication of tumor promoting activity in the mammary gland, making it a good target for development of therapeutics.

  11. An activin A/BMP2 chimera, AB204, displays bone-healing properties superior to those of BMP2.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Byung-Hak; Esquivies, Luis; Ahn, Chihoon; Gray, Peter C; Ye, Sang-Kyu; Kwiatkowski, Witek; Choe, Senyon

    2014-09-01

    Recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP2) has been used clinically to treat bone fractures in human patients. However, the high doses of rhBMP2 required for a therapeutic response can cause undesirable side effects. Here, we demonstrate that a novel Activin A/BMP2 (AB2) chimera, AB204, promotes osteogenesis and bone healing much more potently and effectively than rhBMP2. Remarkably, 1 month of AB204 treatment completely heals tibial and calvarial defects of critical size in mice at a concentration 10-fold lower than a dose of rhBMP2 that only partially heals the defect. We determine the structure of AB204 to 2.3 Å that reveals a distinct BMP2-like fold in which the Activin A sequence segments confer insensitivity to the BMP2 antagonist Noggin and an affinity for the Activin/BMP type II receptor ActRII that is 100-fold greater than that of BMP2. The structure also led to our identification of a single Activin A-derived amino acid residue, which, when mutated to the corresponding BMP2 residue, resulted in a significant increase in the affinity of AB204 for its type I receptor BMPRIa and a further enhancement in AB204's osteogenic potency. Together, these findings demonstrate that rationally designed AB2 chimeras can provide BMP2 substitutes with enhanced potency for treating non-union bone fractures.

  12. An Activin A/BMP2 chimera displays bone healing properties superior to those of BMP2

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Byung-Hak; Esquivies, Luis; Ahn, Chihoon; Gray, Peter C.; Ye, Sang-kyu; Kwiatkowski, Witek; Choe, Senyon

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 (rhBMP2) has been used clinically to treat bone fractures in human patients. However, the high doses of rhBMP2 required for a therapeutic response can cause undesirable side effects. Here, we demonstrate that a novel Activin A/BMP2 (AB2) chimera, AB204, promotes osteogenesis and bone healing much more potently and effectively than rhBMP2. Remarkably, 1 month of AB204 treatment completely heals tibial and calvarial defects of critical size in mice at a concentration 10-fold lower than a dose of rhBMP2 that only partially heals the defect. We determine the structure of AB204 to 2.3 Å that reveals a distinct BMP2-like fold in which the Activin A sequence segments confer insensitivity to the BMP2 antagonist Noggin and an affinity for the Activin/BMP type II receptor ActRII that is 100-fold greater than that of BMP2. The structure also led to our identification of a single Activin A-derived amino acid residue which when mutated to the corresponding BMP2 residue resulted in a significant increase in the affinity of AB204 for its type I receptor BMPRIa and a further enhancement in AB204's osteogenic potency. Together, these findings demonstrate that rationally designed AB2 chimeras can provide BMP2 substitutes with enhanced potency for treating non-union bone fractures. PMID:24692083

  13. Alternative Splicing of Type II Procollagen: IIB or not IIB?

    PubMed Central

    McAlinden, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    Over two decades ago, two isoforms of the type II procollagen gene (COL2A1) were discovered. These isoforms, named IIA and IIB, are generated in a developmentally-regulated manner by alternative splicing of exon 2. Chondroprogenitor cells synthesize predominantly IIA isoforms (containing exon 2) while differentiated chondrocytes produce mainly IIB transcripts (devoid of exon 2). Importantly, this IIA-to-IIB alternative splicing switch occurs only during chondrogenesis. More recently, two other isoforms have been reported (IIC and IID) that also involve splicing of exon 2; these findings highlight the complexities involving regulation of COL2A1 expression. The biological significance of why different isoforms of COL2A1 exist within the context of skeletal development and maintenance is still not completely understood. This review will provide current knowledge on COL2A1 isoform expression during chondrocyte differentiation and what is known about some of the mechanisms that control exon 2 alternative splicing. Utilization of mouse models to address the biological significance of Col2a1 alternative splicing in vivo will also be discussed. From the knowledge acquired to date, some new questions and concepts are now being proposed on the importance of Col2a1 alternative splicing in regulating extracellular matrix assembly and how this may subsequently affect cartilage and endochondral bone quality and function. PMID:24669942

  14. Binding of a fibrinogen mimetic stabilizes integrin αIIbβ3's open conformation

    PubMed Central

    Hantgan, Roy R.; Rocco, Mattia; Nagaswami, Chandrasekaran; Weisel, John W.

    2001-01-01

    The platelet integrin αIIbβ3 is representative of a class of heterodimeric receptors that upon activation bind extracellular macromolecular ligands and form signaling clusters. This study examined how occupancy of αIIbβ3's fibrinogen binding site affected the receptor's solution structure and stability. Eptifibatide, an integrin antagonist developed to treat cardiovascular disease, served as a high-affinity, monovalent model ligand with fibrinogen-like selectivity for αIIbβ3. Eptifibatide binding promptly and reversibly perturbed the conformation of the αIIbβ3 complex. Ligand-specific decreases in its diffusion and sedimentation coefficient were observed at near-stoichiometric eptifibatide concentrations, in contrast to the receptor-perturbing effects of RGD ligands that we previously observed only at a 70-fold molar excess. Eptifibatide promoted αIIbβ3 dimerization 10-fold more effectively than less selective RGD ligands, as determined by sedimentation equilibrium. Eptifibatide-bound integrin receptors displayed an ectodomain separation and enhanced assembly of dimers and larger oligomers linked through their stalk regions, as seen by transmission electron microscopy. Ligation with eptifibatide protected αIIbβ3 from SDS-induced subunit dissociation, an effect on electrophoretic mobility not seen with RGD ligands. Despite its distinct cleft, the open conformer resisted guanidine unfolding as effectively as the ligand-free integrin. Thus, we provide the first demonstration that binding a monovalent ligand to αIIbβ3's extracellular fibrinogen-recognition site stabilizes the receptor's open conformation and enhances self-association through its distant transmembrane and/or cytoplasmic domains. By showing how eptifibatide and RGD peptides, ligands with distinct binding sites, each affects αIIbβ3's conformation, our findings provide new mechanistic insights into ligand-linked integrin activation, clustering and signaling. PMID:11468358

  15. TGFβ/Activin signalling is required for ribosome biogenesis and cell growth in Drosophila salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Martins, Torcato; Eusebio, Nadia; Correia, Andreia; Marinho, Joana; Casares, Fernando; Pereira, Paulo S

    2017-01-01

    Signalling by TGFβ superfamily factors plays an important role in tissue growth and cell proliferation. In Drosophila, the activity of the TGFβ/Activin signalling branch has been linked to the regulation of cell growth and proliferation, but the cellular and molecular basis for these functions are not fully understood. In this study, we show that both the RII receptor Punt (Put) and the R-Smad Smad2 are strongly required for cell and tissue growth. Knocking down the expression of Put or Smad2 in salivary glands causes alterations in nucleolar structure and functions. Cells with decreased TGFβ/Activin signalling accumulate intermediate pre-rRNA transcripts containing internal transcribed spacer 1 regions accompanied by the nucleolar retention of ribosomal proteins. Thus, our results show that TGFβ/Activin signalling is required for ribosomal biogenesis, a key aspect of cellular growth control. Importantly, overexpression of Put enhanced cell growth induced by Drosophila Myc, a well-characterized inducer of nucleolar hypertrophy and ribosome biogenesis.

  16. TGFβ/Activin signalling is required for ribosome biogenesis and cell growth in Drosophila salivary glands

    PubMed Central

    Eusebio, Nadia; Correia, Andreia; Marinho, Joana; Casares, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Signalling by TGFβ superfamily factors plays an important role in tissue growth and cell proliferation. In Drosophila, the activity of the TGFβ/Activin signalling branch has been linked to the regulation of cell growth and proliferation, but the cellular and molecular basis for these functions are not fully understood. In this study, we show that both the RII receptor Punt (Put) and the R-Smad Smad2 are strongly required for cell and tissue growth. Knocking down the expression of Put or Smad2 in salivary glands causes alterations in nucleolar structure and functions. Cells with decreased TGFβ/Activin signalling accumulate intermediate pre-rRNA transcripts containing internal transcribed spacer 1 regions accompanied by the nucleolar retention of ribosomal proteins. Thus, our results show that TGFβ/Activin signalling is required for ribosomal biogenesis, a key aspect of cellular growth control. Importantly, overexpression of Put enhanced cell growth induced by Drosophila Myc, a well-characterized inducer of nucleolar hypertrophy and ribosome biogenesis. PMID:28123053

  17. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of bone morphogenetic proteins and activins in the skin: potential benefits for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Moura, J; da Silva, L; Cruz, M T; Carvalho, E

    2013-09-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and activins are phylogenetically conserved proteins, belonging to the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, that signal through the phosphorylation of receptor-regulated Smad proteins, activating different cell responses. They are involved in various steps of skin morphogenesis and wound repair, as can be evidenced by the fact that their expression is increased in skin injuries. BMPs play not only a role in bone regeneration but are also involved in cartilage, tendon-like tissue and epithelial regeneration, maintain vascular integrity, capillary sprouting, proliferation/migration of endothelial cells and angiogenesis, promote neuron and dendrite formation, alter neuropeptide levels and are involved in immune response modulation, at least in animal models. On the other hand, activins are involved in wound repair through the regulation of skin and immune cell migration and differentiation, re-epithelialization and granulation tissue formation, and also promote the expression of collagens by fibroblasts and modulate scar formation. This review aims at enunciating the effects of BMPs and activins in the skin, namely in skin development, as well as in crucial phases of skin wound healing, such as inflammation, angiogenesis and repair, and will focus on the effects of these proteins on skin cells and their signaling pathways, exploring the potential therapeutic approach of the application of BMP-2, BMP-6 and activin A in chronic wounds, particularly diabetic foot ulcerations.

  18. Amino acid sequence and molecular modelling of glycoprotein IIb-IIIa and fibronectin receptor iso-antagonists from Trimeresurus elegans venom.

    PubMed Central

    Scaloni, A; Di Martino, E; Miraglia, N; Pelagalli, A; Della Morte, R; Staiano, N; Pucci, P

    1996-01-01

    Low-molecular-mass Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-containing polypeptides were isolated from the venom of Trimeresurus elegans by a simple two-step procedure consisting of membrane filtration and reverse-phase HPLC. A combination of electrospray MS, fast-atom bombardment MS and Edman degradation allowed us to ascertain the presence in the venom of different isoforms and to determine their primary structures. The amino acid sequences resembled the structure of elegantin, the only disintegrin previously reported from the T. elegans venom [Williams, Rucinski, Holt and Niewiarowski (1990) Biochim. Biophys, Acta 1039, 81-89]. MS analyses indicated the occurrence of differential proteolytic processing at both the N-terminus and the C-termins of the polypeptide chains. The amino acid sequence alignment of the elegantin isoforms with known components of the disintegrin family demonstrated the complete conservation of the 12 cysteine residues involved in disulphide bridges. Molecular modelling of elegantins predicted an overall folding of these molecules quite similar to that reported for the kistrin solution structure. The newly identified polypeptide isoforms strongly inhibited ADP-induced aggregation in both human and canine platelet-rich plasma but showed a different species-dependent specificity. These molecules were also able to inhibit B16-BL6 murine melanoma cell adhesion to immobilized fibronectin. The comparison of the structures and biological activities of elegantin isoforms and kistrin allowed us to highlight some structural features that, in addition to the RGD locus might be involved in the interaction of these snake-venom polypeptides with the integrin receptors on the platelet and cell surface. PMID:8920980

  19. Activation of FGFR(IIIc) isoforms promotes activin-induced mesendoderm development in mouse embryonic stem cells and reduces Sox17 coexpression in EpCAM+ cells.

    PubMed

    Peterslund, Janny M L; Serup, Palle

    2011-05-01

    Activin induces the formation of definitive endoderm from mouse ES cells dependent on active fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) signaling. Here we report that Fgf4 is dispensable for activin A-induced differentiation of mouse ES cells into endoderm. We find that Fgf4(-/-) cells readily differentiate into definitive endoderm without exogenous administration of Fgf4. Additionally, we investigate the spatio-temporal dynamics of Fgf receptor (FGFR) isoform distribution in activin A-treated ES cell cultures and find that FGFR(III)c isoforms are expressed in DE as well as non-DE populations, whereas FGFR2(III)b and FGFR4 are found specifically enriched in the DE fraction. Ligands that preferentially activate the FGFR(III)c isoforms induce mesendoderm markers T and Gsc, but reduce expression of the DE marker Sox17 in activin-induced EpCAM(+) cells. In contrast, ligands specifically activating FGFR(III)b isoforms have no effect on either population. Activation of FGFR(III)c isoforms results in a strong mitogenic effect on activin A-induced ES cell progeny early in the differentiation period whereas activation of FGFR(III)b isoforms has only a moderate mitogenic effect confined to the late differentiation period. We conclude that FGFR(III)c-isoform activation selectively drives the differentiation of mES cells toward mesendoderm and that Fgf4 is dispensable for the differentiation into definitive endoderm.

  20. Triciribine Phosphate, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-13

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  1. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 interacts with activin and GnRH to modulate gonadotrophin secretion in LbetaT2 gonadotrophs.

    PubMed

    Nicol, L; Faure, M-O; McNeilly, J R; Fontaine, J; Taragnat, C; McNeilly, A S

    2008-03-01

    We have shown previously that, in sheep primary pituitary cells, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP)-4 inhibits FSHbeta mRNA expression and FSH release. In contrast, in mouse LbetaT2 gonadotrophs, others have shown a stimulatory effect of BMPs on basal or activin-stimulated FSHbeta promoter-driven transcription. As a species comparison with our previous results, we used LbetaT2 cells to investigate the effects of BMP-4 on gonadotrophin mRNA and secretion modulated by activin and GnRH. BMP-4 alone had no effect on FSH production, but enhanced the activin+GnRH-induced stimulation of FSHbeta mRNA and FSH secretion, without any effect on follistatin mRNA. BMP-4 reduced LHbeta mRNA up-regulation in response to GnRH (+/-activin) and decreased GnRH receptor expression, which would favour FSH, rather than LH, synthesis and secretion. In contrast to sheep pituitary gonadotrophs, which express only BMP receptor types IA (BMPRIA) and II (BMPRII), LbetaT2 cells also express BMPRIB. Smad1/5 phosphorylation induced by BMP-4, indicating activation of BMP signalling, was the same whether BMP-4 was used alone or combined with activin+/-GnRH. We hypothesized that activin and/or GnRH pathways may be modulated by BMP-4, but neither the activin-stimulated phosphorylation of Smad2/3 nor the GnRH-induced ERK1/2 or cAMP response element-binding phosphorylation were modified. However, the GnRH-induced activation of p38 MAPK was decreased by BMP-4. This was associated with increased FSHbeta mRNA levels and FSH secretion, but decreased LHbeta mRNA levels. These results confirm 1. BMPs as important modulators of activin and/or GnRH-stimulated gonadotrophin synthesis and release and 2. important species differences in these effects, which could relate to differences in BMP receptor expression in gonadotrophs.

  2. Generalized IIB supergravity from exceptional field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baguet, Arnaud; Magro, Marc; Samtleben, Henning

    2017-03-01

    The background underlying the η-deformed AdS 5 × S 5 sigma-model is known to satisfy a generalization of the IIB supergravity equations. Their solutions are related by T-duality to solutions of type IIA supergravity with non-isometric linear dilaton. We show how the generalized IIB supergravity equations can be naturally obtained from exceptional field theory. Within this manifestly duality covariant formulation of maximal supergravity, the generalized IIB supergravity equations emerge upon imposing on the fields a simple Scherk-Schwarz ansatz which respects the section constraint.

  3. Activins and inhibins: Novel regulators of thymocyte development

    SciTech Connect

    Licona-Limon, Paula; Aleman-Muench, German; Macias-Silva, Marina; Garcia-Zepeda, Eduardo A.; Fortoul, Teresa I.; Soldevila, Gloria

    2009-04-03

    Activins and inhibins are members of the transforming growth factor-{beta} superfamily that act on different cell types and regulate a broad range of cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, we provide the first evidence that activins and inhibins regulate specific checkpoints during thymocyte development. We demonstrate that both activin A and inhibin A promote the DN3-DN4 transition in vitro, although they differentially control the transition to the DP stage. Whereas activin A induces the accumulation of a CD8{sup +}CD24{sup hi}TCR{beta}{sup lo} intermediate subpopulation, inhibin A promotes the differentiation of DN4 to DP. In addition, both activin A and inhibin A appear to promote CD8{sup +}SP differentiation. Moreover, inhibin {alpha} null mice have delayed in vitro T cell development, showing both a decrease in the DN-DP transition and reduced thymocyte numbers, further supporting a role for inhibins in the control of developmental signals taking place during T cell differentiation in vivo.

  4. Radiation-induced increase in expression of the alpha IIb beta 3 integrin in melanoma cells: effects on metastatic potential.

    PubMed

    Onoda, J M; Piechocki, M P; Honn, K V

    1992-06-01

    We investigated the effects of nonlethal gamma radiation on the metastatic potential of the murine tumor cell line, B16 melanoma. The ability of B16 cells to adhere to fibronectin, which is in part mediated by the alpha IIb beta 3 integrin receptor, is predictive of metastatic potential. We determined that exposure to 0.25-2.5 Gy gamma radiation significantly enhanced B16 cell adhesion to fibronectin. The radiation-enhanced adhesion was dependent on enhanced expression of the alpha IIb beta 3 integrin. We observed that 15 min after 0.5 Gy radiation, 99% of irradiated B16 tumor cells were positively labeled with monoclonal antibodies directed against alpha IIb beta 3 compared to 22% of sham-irradiated cells. Radiation-enhanced expression of the alpha IIb beta 3 receptor is reversible and down-regulation begins within 2-4 h postirradiation. Finally, we found that irradiation significantly enhanced the ability of B16 cells to form metastases in a lung colony assay. It is concluded that a relationship exists between radiation effects on the B16 tumor cells, alpha IIb beta 3 receptor expression, adhesion in vitro, and metastasis in vivo. We suggest that low-dose radiation, at levels comparable to those used in fractionated or hyperfractionated radiotherapy, may alter the metastatic phenotype and potential of surviving tumor cells via a rapid alteration in their surface expression of alpha IIb beta 3 integrin receptors.

  5. Covariant action for type IIB supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Ashoke

    2016-07-01

    Taking clues from the recent construction of the covariant action for type II and heterotic string field theories, we construct a manifestly Lorentz covariant action for type IIB supergravity, and discuss its gauge fixing maintaining manifest Lorentz invariance. The action contains a (non-gravitating) free 4-form field besides the usual fields of type IIB supergravity. This free field, being completely decoupled from the interacting sector, has no physical consequence.

  6. Presence of cytoadhesins (IIb-IIIa-like glycoproteins) on human metastatic melanomas but not on benign melanocytes.

    PubMed

    McGregor, B C; McGregor, J L; Weiss, L M; Wood, G S; Hu, C H; Boukerche, H; Warnke, R A

    1989-10-01

    Glycoproteins IIb and IIIa, a heterodimer complex, play a vital role in blood platelet aggregation and are members of a wide family of membrane receptors known as integrins or cytoadhesins. Cellular interaction to extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesive proteins is mediated by integrins. Certain tumor cells are known to interact with ECM and blood platelets in the process of metastasis. However, it is not known if tumor cells, compared with their normal counterparts, acquire IIb-IIIa-like receptors to help them in their metastatic spread. In this study, monoclonal antibodies directed against the IIb-IIIa platelet glycoprotein complex were used on frozen biopsies of normal and various tumor tissues to detect the presence of these integrins. These studies demonstrate the presence of IIb-IIIa-like glycoproteins on the cells of metastatic malignant melanoma but not on benign melanocytes and rarely on other tumors. The presence of integrins on melanomas may help explain their propensity for frequent metastasis.

  7. Structure and activation of pro-activin A

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuelu; Fischer, Gerhard; Hyvönen, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Activins are growth factors with multiple roles in the development and homeostasis. Like all TGF-β family of growth factors, activins are synthesized as large precursors from which mature dimeric growth factors are released proteolytically. Here we have studied the activation of activin A and determined crystal structures of the unprocessed precursor and of the cleaved pro-mature complex. Replacing the natural furin cleavage site with a HRV 3C protease site, we show how the protein gains its bioactivity after proteolysis and is as active as the isolated mature domain. The complex remains associated in conditions used for biochemical analysis with a dissociation constant of 5 nM, but the pro-domain can be actively displaced from the complex by follistatin. Our high-resolution structures of pro-activin A share features seen in the pro-TGF-β1 and pro-BMP-9 structures, but reveal a new oligomeric arrangement, with a domain-swapped, cross-armed conformation for the protomers in the dimeric protein. PMID:27373274

  8. CEACAM1 regulates integrin αIIbβ3-mediated functions in platelets.

    PubMed

    Yip, Jana; Alshahrani, Musaed; Beauchemin, Nicole; Jackson, Denise E

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have implicated that the Ig-ITIM superfamily member, CEACAM1 may regulate integrin function. While CEACAM1 has been demonstrated to play a role as an inhibitory co-receptor of ITAM-associated GPVI/FcR γ-chain signaling pathways in platelets, its physiologic role in integrin αIIbβ3-mediated platelet function is unclear. In this study, we investigate the functional importance of Ceacam1 in murine platelets. We show that CEACAM1 is constitutively associated with integrin αIIbβ3 in resting human and mouse platelets as demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation studies. Using Ceacam1-deficient mice, we show that they have prolonged tail bleeding times and volume of blood lost that is corrected by reconstitution with platelet Ceacam1. Ceacam1(-/-) platelets have moderate integrin αIIbβ3 mediated functional defects with impaired kinetics of platelet spreading on fibrinogen and failure to retract fibrin clots in vitro. This functional integrin αIIbβ3 defect could not be attributed to altered integrin αIIbβ3 expression. Ceacam1(-/-) platelets displayed normal "inside-out" signaling properties as demonstrated by normal agonist-induced binding of soluble (fluorescein isothiocyanate) FITC-fibrinogen, JON/A antibody binding, and increases in cytosolic free calcium levels. This study provides direct evidence that Ceacam1 is essential for normal integrin αIIbβ3-mediated platelet function and that disruption of mouse Ceacam1 induced moderate integrin αIIbβ3-mediated functional defects.

  9. Annular Anionic Lipids Stabilize the Integrin αIIbβ3 Transmembrane Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Thomas; Suk, Jae-Eun; Ye, Feng; Situ, Alan J.; Mazumder, Parichita; Ginsberg, Mark H.; Ulmer, Tobias S.

    2015-01-01

    Cationic membrane-proximal amino acids determine the topology of membrane proteins by interacting with anionic lipids that are restricted to the intracellular membrane leaflet. This mechanism implies that anionic lipids interfere with electrostatic interactions of membrane proteins. The integrin αIIbβ3 transmembrane (TM) complex is stabilized by a membrane-proximal αIIb(Arg995)-β3(Asp723) interaction; here, we examine the influence of anionic lipids on this complex. Anionic lipids compete for αIIb(Arg995) contacts with β3(Asp723) but paradoxically do not diminish the contribution of αIIb(Arg995)-β3(Asp723) to TM complex stability. Overall, anionic lipids in annular positions stabilize the αIIbβ3 TM complex by up to 0.50 ± 0.02 kcal/mol relative to zwitterionic lipids in a headgroup structure-dependent manner. Comparatively, integrin receptor activation requires TM complex destabilization of 1.5 ± 0.2 kcal/mol, revealing a sizeable influence of lipid composition on TM complex stability. We implicate changes in lipid headgroup accessibility to small molecules (physical membrane characteristics) and specific but dynamic protein-lipid contacts in this TM helix-helix stabilization. Thus, anionic lipids in ubiquitous annular positions can benefit the stability of membrane proteins while leaving membrane-proximal electrostatic interactions intact. PMID:25632962

  10. A defined peptide that inhibits the formation of the glycoprotein IIb and IIIa complex.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Thomas M; Zhu, Jiaqian

    2005-01-01

    Collagen-platelet interaction plays an important role in hemostasis and pathological thrombosis. The proposed mechanism of the interaction was the activation of platelets-->releasing of contents from granules-->aggregation. The common end point is the platelets and fibrin aggregates. Platelet glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa (the alphaIIbbeta3 integrin) complexes serve as a receptor for the binding of fibrinogen to form firmed aggregates. Blockading of GP IIb/IIIa has been proposed to prevent platelet aggregation independent of the substance(s) responsible for activating the platelets. The development of various forms of GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor has resulted in the inhibition of platelet aggregation, although studies of alphaIIbbeta3 receptor function and various GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors have demonstrated the potential for these agents to produce effects on other aspects of platelet function as well as having nonplatelet effects. This study investigated platelet inhibition provided by blocking the GP IIb/IIIa complex formation by using a peptide derived from the GP IIIa molecule. The peptide inhibits both types I and III collagen-induced platelet aggregation in a dose-dependent manner. The defined peptide interferes with the formation of the GP IIb/IIIa complex by inhibiting the binding of FITC-PAC-1 onto ADP-, type I collagen-, and type III collagen-activated platelets. However, P-selectin secretion is not affected by the peptide. In addition, the peptide is not interfering with the binding of FITC-PAC-1 to platelets that were preincubated with indomethacin. Results from this study may suggest that the defined peptide is an effective agent to block the interaction of types I and III collagen with platelets.

  11. Action of T-activin on activity of human natural killer cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Cheknev, S.B.; Saidov, M.Z.; Koval'chuk, L.V.; Pavlyuk, A.S.; Arion, V.Ya.

    1986-09-01

    This paper describes a study of the action of T-activin on activity of human natural killer cells (NKC) in vitro. The K-562 chronic human myeloid leukemia cells, cultured in vitro, used as targets were labeled with /sup 3/H-uridine. The experimental results indicate that T-activin can depress NKC activity but under certain conditions, it can also stimulate NKC. T-activin possesses immunoregulatory properties relative to NKC activity in vitro.

  12. [Effect of T-activin on enzymes in the metabolism of xenobiotics].

    PubMed

    Arion, V Ia; Khromenkov, Iu I; Tagirova, A K; Karaulov, A V; Breusov, Iu N

    1987-01-01

    Effect of T-activin on some xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and several immunity parametres in secondary immune deficiency (subacute and chronic benzene intoxication) were investigated. T-activin was shown to regulate the xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme system. The compound decreased the enzymatic activity in subacute benzene intoxication, approaching their values up to the control level. In chronic benzene intoxications, which were accompanied by decrease in xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes activity, except of glutathione-S-transferase, T-activin stimulated these enzymes. At the same time, T-activin increased some immunological parameters in these models. Thymus-tropic peptides appear to be the bioregulators of some in vivo systems.

  13. Activin A induces growth arrest through a SMAD- dependent pathway in hepatic progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Activin A, an important member of transforming growth factor-β superfamily, is reported to inhibit proliferation of mature hepatocyte. However, the effect of activin A on growth of hepatic progenitor cells is not fully understood. To that end, we attempted to evaluate the potential role of activin A in the regulation of hepatic progenitor cell proliferation. Results Using the 2-acetaminofluorene/partial hepatectomy model, activin A expression decreased immediately after partial hepatectomy and then increased from the 9th to 15th day post surgery, which is associated with the attenuation of oval cell proliferation. Activin A inhibited oval cell line LE6 growth via activating the SMAD signaling pathway, which manifested as the phosphorylation of SMAD2/3, the inhibition of Rb phosphorylation, the suppression of cyclinD1 and cyclinE, and the promotion of p21WAF1/Cip1 and p15INK4B expression. Treatment with activin A antagonist follistatin or blocking SMAD signaling could diminish the anti-proliferative effect of activin A. By contrast, inhibition of the MAPK pathway did not contribute to this effect. Antagonizing activin A activity by follistatin administration enhanced oval cell proliferation in the 2-acetylaminofluorene/partial hepatectomy model. Conclusion Activin A, acting through the SMAD pathway, negatively regulates the proliferation of hepatic progenitor cells. PMID:24628936

  14. Superstring vertex operators in type IIB matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Kitazawa, Yoshihisa; Nagaoka, Satoshi

    2008-06-15

    We clarify the relation between the vertex operators in type IIB matrix model and superstring. Green-Schwarz light-cone closed superstring theory is obtained from IIB matrix model on two-dimensional noncommutative backgrounds. Superstring vertex operators should be reproduced from those of IIB matrix model through this connection. Indeed, we confirm that supergravity vertex operators in IIB matrix model on the two-dimensional backgrounds reduce to those in superstring theory. Noncommutativity plays an important role in our identification. Through this correspondence, we can reproduce superstring scattering amplitudes from IIB matrix model.

  15. αIIbβ3 variants defined by next-generation sequencing: Predicting variants likely to cause Glanzmann thrombasthenia

    PubMed Central

    Buitrago, Lorena; Rendon, Augusto; Liang, Yupu; Simeoni, Ilenia; Negri, Ana; Filizola, Marta; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Coller, Barry S.; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Ballmaier, Matthias; Bariana, Tadbir; Bellissimo, Daniel; Bertoli, Marta; Bray, Paul; Bury, Loredana; Carrell, Robin; Cattaneo, Marco; Collins, Peter; French, Deborah; Favier, Remi; Freson, Kathleen; Furie, Bruce; Germeshausen, Manuela; Ghevaert, Cedric; Gomez, Keith; Goodeve, Anne; Gresele, Paolo; Guerrero, Jose; Hampshire, Dan J.; Hadinnapola, Charaka; Heemskerk, Johan; Henskens, Yvonne; Hill, Marian; Hogg, Nancy; Johnsen, Jill; Kahr, Walter; Kerr, Ron; Kunishima, Shinji; Laffan, Michael; Natwani, Amit; Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite; Nurden, Paquita; Nurden, Alan; Ormiston, Mark; Othman, Maha; Ouwehand, Willem; Perry, David; Vilk, Shoshana Ravel; Reitsma, Pieter; Rondina, Matthew; Simeoni, Ilenia; Smethurst, Peter; Stephens, Jonathan; Stevenson, William; Szkotak, Artur; Turro, Ernest; Van Geet, Christel; Vries, Minka; Ward, June; Waye, John; Westbury, Sarah; Whiteheart, Sidney; Wilcox, David; Zhang, Bi

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing is transforming our understanding of human genetic variation but assessing the functional impact of novel variants presents challenges. We analyzed missense variants in the integrin αIIbβ3 receptor subunit genes ITGA2B and ITGB3 identified by whole-exome or -genome sequencing in the ThromboGenomics project, comprising ∼32,000 alleles from 16,108 individuals. We analyzed the results in comparison with 111 missense variants in these genes previously reported as being associated with Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT), 20 associated with alloimmune thrombocytopenia, and 5 associated with aniso/macrothrombocytopenia. We identified 114 novel missense variants in ITGA2B (affecting ∼11% of the amino acids) and 68 novel missense variants in ITGB3 (affecting ∼9% of the amino acids). Of the variants, 96% had minor allele frequencies (MAF) < 0.1%, indicating their rarity. Based on sequence conservation, MAF, and location on a complete model of αIIbβ3, we selected three novel variants that affect amino acids previously associated with GT for expression in HEK293 cells. αIIb P176H and β3 C547G severely reduced αIIbβ3 expression, whereas αIIb P943A partially reduced αIIbβ3 expression and had no effect on fibrinogen binding. We used receiver operating characteristic curves of combined annotation-dependent depletion, Polyphen 2-HDIV, and sorting intolerant from tolerant to estimate the percentage of novel variants likely to be deleterious. At optimal cut-off values, which had 69–98% sensitivity in detecting GT mutations, between 27% and 71% of the novel αIIb or β3 missense variants were predicted to be deleterious. Our data have implications for understanding the evolutionary pressure on αIIbβ3 and highlight the challenges in predicting the clinical significance of novel missense variants. PMID:25827233

  16. αIIbβ3 variants defined by next-generation sequencing: predicting variants likely to cause Glanzmann thrombasthenia.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Lorena; Rendon, Augusto; Liang, Yupu; Simeoni, Ilenia; Negri, Ana; Filizola, Marta; Ouwehand, Willem H; Coller, Barry S

    2015-04-14

    Next-generation sequencing is transforming our understanding of human genetic variation but assessing the functional impact of novel variants presents challenges. We analyzed missense variants in the integrin αIIbβ3 receptor subunit genes ITGA2B and ITGB3 identified by whole-exome or -genome sequencing in the ThromboGenomics project, comprising ∼32,000 alleles from 16,108 individuals. We analyzed the results in comparison with 111 missense variants in these genes previously reported as being associated with Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT), 20 associated with alloimmune thrombocytopenia, and 5 associated with aniso/macrothrombocytopenia. We identified 114 novel missense variants in ITGA2B (affecting ∼11% of the amino acids) and 68 novel missense variants in ITGB3 (affecting ∼9% of the amino acids). Of the variants, 96% had minor allele frequencies (MAF) < 0.1%, indicating their rarity. Based on sequence conservation, MAF, and location on a complete model of αIIbβ3, we selected three novel variants that affect amino acids previously associated with GT for expression in HEK293 cells. αIIb P176H and β3 C547G severely reduced αIIbβ3 expression, whereas αIIb P943A partially reduced αIIbβ3 expression and had no effect on fibrinogen binding. We used receiver operating characteristic curves of combined annotation-dependent depletion, Polyphen 2-HDIV, and sorting intolerant from tolerant to estimate the percentage of novel variants likely to be deleterious. At optimal cut-off values, which had 69-98% sensitivity in detecting GT mutations, between 27% and 71% of the novel αIIb or β3 missense variants were predicted to be deleterious. Our data have implications for understanding the evolutionary pressure on αIIbβ3 and highlight the challenges in predicting the clinical significance of novel missense variants.

  17. Activin B: detection by an immunoenzymometric assay in human serum during ovarian stimulation and late pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vihko, K K; Bläuer, M; Kujansuu, E; Vilska, S; Albäck, T; Tuimala, R; Tuohimaa, P; Punnonen, R

    1998-04-01

    A recently developed immunoenzymometric assay for activin B has been characterized further by measurement during ovarian stimulation and pregnancy. The assay is based on a monoclonal anti-peptide antibody, anti-betaB(101-115). In addition to quantitative analyses, the antibody has been used for immunohistochemical localization of the activin betaB-subunit in human term placenta. Serum samples obtained from patients suffering from tubal factor infertility who were admitted for in-vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment protocols or from patients with proven fertility who were admitted for laparoscopic tubal ligation were collected. The aim was to correlate serum activin B concentrations with other parameters during IVF and with phases of the menstrual cycle. Serum samples obtained from healthy pregnant volunteers were studied to correlate activin B concentrations with clinical parameters. During the IVF treatment protocols, activin B was detectable in all patients studied, and a significant negative correlation was observed between serum activin B and oestradiol concentrations. On the other hand, no significant difference was observed in activin B concentrations when serum samples obtained from patients at different phases of the menstrual cycle were compared, and low concentrations of activin B were observed in the samples obtained from these patients. During pregnancy, a positive correlation was observed between serum activin B concentrations and gestational age. In immunohistochemical analyses of human placental tissue obtained from healthy parturients, the activin betaB-subunit was present in trophoblast, amniotic epithelial and Hofbauer cells. The results suggest a potential clinical application in female reproductive medicine for serum activin B measurements.

  18. Role of activins and inducible nitric oxide in the pathogenesis of ectopic pregnancy in patients with or without Chlamydia trachomatis infection.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Bassem; Al-Azemi, Majedah; Geary, Ian; Eley, Adrian; Ledger, William

    2009-10-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infection can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy (EP), infertility, and chronic pelvic pain in women. Activins and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) are produced by the human fallopian tube, and we speculate that tubal activins and iNOS may be involved in the immune response to C. trachomatis in humans and their pathological alteration may result in tubal pathology and the development of EP. Blood and fallopian tubes were collected from 14 women with EP. Sera were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect antibodies against chlamydial heat shock protein 60 (chsp60) and the major outer membrane protein of C. trachomatis. Confirmation of C. trachomatis serology was made using the microimmunofluorescence test. The patients were classified into three groups according to their serological results, and immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR were performed to investigate the expression of candidate molecules by tubal epithelial cells among the three groups. This is the first study to show an increase in the expression of activin betaA subunit, type II receptors, follistatin, and iNOS within the human fallopian tube of EP patients who were serologically positive for C. trachomatis. A similar expression profile was observed in the fallopian tubes with detectable antibodies only against chsp60. These results were shown at the mRNA and protein levels. We suggest that tubal activin A, its type II receptors, follistatin, and NO could be involved in the microbial-mediated immune response within the fallopian tube, and their pathological expression may lead to tubal damage and the development of EP.

  19. Activin A in the Regulation of Corneal Neovascularization and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Poulaki, Vassiliki; Mitsiades, Nicholas; Kruse, Friedrich E.; Radetzky, Sven; Iliaki, Eirini; Kirchhof, Bernd; Joussen, Antonia M.

    2004-01-01

    Activin A, a dimeric glycoprotein that belongs to the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, governs cellular differentiation in a wide variety of models and has been implicated in the regulation of angiogenesis. We examined the role of activin A and its downstream signaling pathway in a murine model of inflammatory corneal neovascularization induced by mechanical injury (debridement), and in vitro in corneal epithelial cells. Activin A expression increased steadily from day 2 until day 8 after mechanical debridement in vivo, paralleling vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. Administration of recombinant activin A in mice increased the area of neovascularization, VEGF expression, and the kinase activities of p38 and p42/44 MAPKs after mechanical debridement. Systemic inhibition of activin A in vivo with a neutralizing antibody reduced the area of neovascularization, VEGF expression, and p38 and p42/44 MAPK activity, whereas administration of an isotype-matched control antibody had no effect. In vitro treatment with activin A increased VEGF secretion, as well as p38 and p42/44 MAPK activity in corneal epithelial cells, whereas concurrent administration of specific inhibitors of p38 or p42/44 MAPK abolished the stimulatory effect of activin A on VEGF production. We conclude that activin A stimulates inflammatory corneal angiogenesis by increasing VEGF levels through a p38 and p42/44 MAPK-dependent mechanism. PMID:15039217

  20. Expression, localization and control of activin A release from human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Borges, Lavinia E; Bloise, Enrrico; Dela Cruz, Cynthia; Massai, Lauretta; Ciarmela, Pasquapina; Apa, Rosanna; Luisi, Stefano; Severi, Filiberto M; Petraglia, Felice; Reis, Fernando M

    2015-01-01

    Activin-A is a member of the TGFβ superfamily found in maternal and umbilical cord blood throughout gestation. We investigated whether human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) express activin-A in vivo and tested the effects of vasoactive (endothelin-1), pro-inflammatory (interferon-γ, interleukin-8) and anti-inflammatory (dexamethasone, urocortin) factors on activin-A release by isolated HUVEC in vitro. Activin βA subunit protein and mRNA were strongly localized in the endothelial cells of umbilical veins and were also detectable in scattered cells of the cord connective tissue. Dimeric activin-A was detected in the HUVEC culture medium at picomolar concentrations. Activin-A release by HUVEC decreased after cell incubation with urocortin (p < 0.01), whereas no effect was observed with interleukin-8, interferon-γ, endothelin-1 or dexamethasone. In summary, activin-A is present in the human umbilical vein endothelium in vivo and is produced and released by isolated HUVEC. Activin-A secretion is inhibited in vitro by urocortin, a neuropeptide with predominantly anti-inflammatory action.

  1. Role of activin-A in cigarette smoke-induced inflammation and COPD.

    PubMed

    Verhamme, Fien M; Bracke, Ken R; Amatngalim, Gimano D; Verleden, Geert M; Van Pottelberge, Geert R; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Joos, Guy F; Brusselle, Guy G

    2014-04-01

    Activin-A is a pleiotropic cytokine belonging to the transforming growth factor-β superfamily and has been implicated in asthma and pulmonary fibrosis. However, the role of activin-A and its endogenous inhibitor, follistatin, in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is unknown. We first quantified activin-A and follistatin in the lungs of air- or cigarette smoke-exposed mice and in the lungs of patients with COPD by immunohistochemistry, ELISA and quantitative real-time PCR. We subsequently studied the effect of cigarette smoke on primary human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. Next, activin-A signalling was antagonised in vivo by administration of follistatin in mice exposed to air or cigarette smoke for 4 weeks. Protein levels of activin-A were increased in the airway epithelium of patients with COPD compared with never-smokers and smokers. Cigarette smoke-exposed human bronchial epithelial cells expressed higher levels of activin-A and lower levels of follistatin. Both mRNA and protein levels of activin-A were increased in the lungs of cigarette smoke-exposed mice, whereas follistatin levels were reduced upon cigarette smoke exposure. Importantly, administration of follistatin attenuated the cigarette smoke-induced increase of inflammatory cells and mediators in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in mice. These results suggest that an imbalance between activin-A and follistatin contributes to the pathogenesis of cigarette smoke-induced inflammation and COPD.

  2. Activin in the Brain Modulates Anxiety-Related Behavior and Adult Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ageta, Hiroshi; Murayama, Akiko; Migishima, Rika; Kida, Satoshi; Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Yokoyama, Minesuke; Inokuchi, Kaoru

    2008-01-01

    Activin, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, is an endocrine hormone that regulates differentiation and proliferation of a wide variety of cells. In the brain, activin protects neurons from ischemic damage. In this study, we demonstrate that activin modulates anxiety-related behavior by analyzing ACM4 and FSM transgenic mice in which activin and follistatin (which antagonizes the activin signal), respectively, were overexpressed in a forebrain-specific manner under the control of the αCaMKII promoter. Behavioral analyses revealed that FSM mice exhibited enhanced anxiety compared to wild-type littermates, while ACM4 mice showed reduced anxiety. Importantly, survival of newly formed neurons in the subgranular zone of adult hippocampus was significantly decreased in FSM mice, which was partially rescued in ACM4/FSM double transgenic mice. Our findings demonstrate that the level of activin in the adult brain bi-directionally influences anxiety-related behavior. These results further suggest that decreases in postnatal neurogenesis caused by activin inhibition affect an anxiety-related behavior in adulthood. Activin and its signaling pathway may represent novel therapeutic targets for anxiety disorder as well as ischemic brain injury. PMID:18382659

  3. Atypical Activin A and IL-10 Production Impairs Human CD16+ Monocyte Differentiation into Anti-Inflammatory Macrophages.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Érika; Domínguez-Soto, Ángeles; Nieto, Concha; Flores-Sevilla, José Luis; Pacheco-Blanco, Mariana; Campos-Peña, Victoria; Meraz-Ríos, Marco A; Vega, Miguel A; Corbí, Ángel L; Sánchez-Torres, Carmen

    2016-02-01

    Human CD14(++)CD16(-) and CD14(+/lo)CD16(+) monocyte subsets comprise 85 and 15% of blood monocytes, respectively, and are thought to represent distinct stages in the monocyte differentiation pathway. However, the differentiation fates of both monocyte subsets along the macrophage (Mϕ) lineage have not yet been elucidated. We have now evaluated the potential of CD14(++) CD16(-) and CD16(+) monocytes to differentiate and to be primed toward pro- or anti-inflammatory Mϕs upon culture with GM-CSF or M-CSF, respectively (subsequently referred to as GM14, M14, GM16, or M16). Whereas GM16 and GM14 were phenotypic and functionally analogous, M16 displayed a more proinflammatory profile than did M14. Transcriptomic analyses evidenced that genes associated with M-CSF-driven Mϕ differentiation (including FOLR2, IL10, IGF1, and SERPINB2) are underrepresented in M16 with respect to M14. The preferential proinflammatory skewing of M16 relative to M14 was found to be mediated by the secretion of activin A and the low levels of IL-10 produced by M16. In fact, activin A receptor blockade during the M-CSF-driven differentiation of CD16(+) monocytes, or addition of IL-10-containing M14-conditioned medium, significantly enhanced their expression of anti-inflammatory-associated molecules while impairing their acquisition of proinflammatory-related markers. Thus, we propose that M-CSF drives CD14(++)CD16- monocyte differentiation into bona fide anti-inflammatory Mϕs in a self-autonomous manner, whereas M-CSF-treated CD16(+) monocytes generate Mϕs with a skewed proinflammatory profile by virtue of their high activin A expression unless additional anti-inflammatory stimuli such as IL-10 are provided.

  4. Impaired growth of pancreatic exocrine cells in transgenic mice expressing human activin {beta}E subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Osamu . E-mail: ohashim@vmas.kitasato-u.ac.jp; Ushiro, Yuuki; Sekiyama, Kazunari; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Yoshioka, Kazuki; Mutoh, Ken-Ichiro; Hasegawa, Yoshihisa

    2006-03-10

    Activins, TGF-{beta} superfamily members, have multiple functions in a variety of cells and tissues. Recently, additional activin {beta} subunit genes, {beta}C and {beta}E, have been identified. To explore the role of activin E, we created transgenic mice overexpressing human activin {beta}E subunit. There were pronounced differences in the pancreata of the transgenic animals as compared with their wild-type counterparts. Pancreatic weight, expressed relative to total body weight, was significantly reduced. Histologically, adipose replacement of acini in the exocrine pancreas was observed. There was a significant decrease in the number of PCNA-positive cells in the acinar cells, indicating reduced proliferation in the exocrine pancreas of the transgenic mice. However, quantitative pancreatic morphometry showed that the total number and mass of the islets of the transgenic mice were comparable with those of the nontransgenic control mice. Our findings suggest a role for activin E in regulating the proliferation of pancreatic exocrine cells.

  5. String coupling and interactions in type IIB matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Kitazawa, Yoshihisa; Nagaoka, Satoshi

    2009-05-15

    We investigate the interactions of closed strings in a IIB matrix model. The basic interaction of the closed superstring is realized by the recombination of two intersecting strings. Such interaction is investigated in a IIB matrix model via two-dimensional noncommutative gauge theory in the IR limit. By estimating the probability of the recombination, we identify the string coupling g{sub s} in the IIB matrix model. We confirm that our identification is consistent with matrix string theory.

  6. Tiling of R7 Axons in the Drosophila Visual System is Mediated Both by Transduction of an Activin Signal to the Nucleus and by Mutual Repulsion

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Chun-Yuan; Herman, Tory; Yonekura, Shinichi; Gao, Shuying; Wang, Jian; Serpe, Mihaela; O’Connor, Michael B.; Zipursky, S. Lawrence; Lee, Chi-Hon

    2009-01-01

    Summary The organization of neuronal wiring into layers and columns is a common feature of both vertebrate and invertebrate brains. In the Drosophila visual system, each R7 photoreceptor axon projects within a single column to a specific layer of the optic lobe. We refer to the restriction of terminals to single columns as tiling. In a genetic screen based on an R7-dependent behavior, we identified the Activin receptor Baboon and the nuclear import adaptor Importin-α3 as being required to prevent R7 axon terminals from overlapping with the terminals of R7s in neighboring columns. This tiling function requires the Baboon ligand, dActivin, the transcription factor, dSmad2, and retrograde transport from the growth cone to the R7 nucleus. We propose that dActivin is an autocrine signal that restricts R7 growth cone motility, and we demonstrate that it acts in parallel with a paracrine signal that mediates repulsion between R7 terminals. PMID:18054857

  7. Cyclophilin A is an important mediator of platelet function by regulating integrin αIIbβ3 bidirectional signalling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian; Soe, Nwe Nwe; Sowden, Mark; Xu, Yingqian; Modjeski, Kristina; Baskaran, Padmamalini; Kim, Yeonghwan; Smolock, Elaine M; Morrell, Craig N; Berk, Bradford C

    2014-05-05

    Cyclophilin A (CyPA) is an important mediator in cardiovascular diseases. It possesses peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity (PPIase) and chaperone functions, which regulate protein folding, intracellular trafficking and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Platelet glycoprotein receptor αIIbβ3 integrin activation is the common pathway for platelet activation. It was our objective to understand the mechanism by which CyPA-regulates αIIbβ3 activation in platelets. Mice deficient for CyPA (CyPA-/-) had prolonged tail bleeding time compared to wild-type (WT) controls despite equivalent platelet numbers. In vitro studies revealed that CyPA-/- platelets exhibited dramatically decreased thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. In vivo, formation of occlusive thrombi following FeCl3 injury was also significantly impaired in CyPA-/- mice compared with WT-controls. Furthermore, CyPA deficiency inhibited flow-induced thrombus formation in vitro. Flow cytometry demonstrated that thrombin-induced ROS production and αIIbβ3 activation were reduced in CyPA-/- platelets. Coimmunoprecipitation studies showed ROS-dependent increased association of CyPA and αIIbβ3. This association was dependent upon the PPIase activity of CyPA. Significantly, fibrinogen-platelet binding, platelet spreading and cytoskeleton reorganisation were also altered in CyPA-/- platelets. Moreover, CyPA deficiency prevented thrombin-induced αIIbβ3 and cytoskeleton association. In conclusion, CyPA is an important mediator in platelet function by regulation of αIIbβ3 bidirectionalsignalling through increased ROS production and facilitating interaction between αIIbβ3 and the cell cytoskeleton.

  8. Arsenic processing of yeast isolates IIB-As1 & IIB-As2 and production of glutathione under stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Muneer, Bushra; Lali, Tayyaba; Iqbal, Muhammad J; Shakoori, Farah R; Shakoori, Abdul R

    2016-10-01

    Four arsenic resistant yeast were isolated from the industrial wastewater. Two strains IIB-As1 and IIB-As2 identified as Candida tropicalis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, respectively. IIB-As1 and IIB-As2 showed maximum arsenic resistance. IIB-As1 showed maximum growth at 35 °C whereas it was 30 °C for IIB-As2. The yeast isolate showed typical growth curves, but arsenic extended the lag phase. Glutathione plays an important role in metal tolerance. In the present study, As increased the level glutathione and non-protein thiols in yeast isolates. Removal of As from supernatant was analyzed using the atomic absorption spectrophotometer. They removed arsenic from the medium after 72 h of incubation. Both yeast strains efficiently removed arsenic from the industrial effluent when used individually or in consortia.

  9. PCSK6 regulated by LH inhibits the apoptosis of human granulosa cells via activin A and TGFβ2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Fan, Deng-Xuan; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Ming-Qing; Wu, Hai-Xia; Jin, Li-Ping

    2014-07-01

    Mammalian proprotein convertases (PCs) play an important role in folliculogenesis, as they proteolytically activate a variety of substrates such as the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) superfamily. PC subtilism/kexin 6 (PCSK6) is a member of the PC family and is ubiquitously expressed and implicated in many physiological and pathological processes. However, in human granulosa cells, the expression of the PC family members, their hormonal regulation, and the function of PCs are not clear. In this study, we found that PCSK6 is the most highly expressed PC family member in granulosa cells. LH increased PCSK6 mRNA level and PCSK6 played an anti-apoptosis function in KGN cells. Knockdown of PCSK6 not only increased the secretion of activin A and TGFβ2 but also decreased the secretion of follistatin, estrogen, and the mRNA levels of FSH receptor (FSHR) and P450AROM (CYP19A1). We also found that, in the KGN human granulosa cell line, TGFβ2 and activin A could promote the apoptosis of KGN cells and LH could regulate the follistatin level. These data indicate that PCSK6, which is regulated by LH, is highly expressed in human primary granulosa cells of pre-ovulatory follicles and plays important roles in regulating a series of downstream molecules and apoptosis of KGN cells.

  10. Activin inhibits binding of transcription factor Pit-1 to the growth hormone promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Struthers, R S; Gaddy-Kurten, D; Vale, W W

    1992-01-01

    Activin A is a potent growth and differentiation factor related to transforming growth factor beta. In somatotrophs, activin suppresses the biosynthesis and secretion of growth hormone (GH) and cellular proliferation. We report here that, in MtTW15 somatotrophic tumor cells, activin decreased GH mRNA levels and inhibited expression of transfected GH promoter--chloramphenicol acetyltransferase fusion genes. Deletion mapping of nucleotide sequences mediating this inhibition led to the identification of a region that has previously been characterized as binding the pituitary-specific transcription factor Pit-1/GHF-1. Characterization of nuclear factor binding to this region demonstrated that binding of Pit-1 to the GH promoter is lost on activin treatment. These results indicate that activin-induced repression of GH biosynthesis is mediated by the loss of tissue-specific transcription factor binding to the GH promoter and suggest a possible general mechanism for other activin responses, whereby activin regulates the function of other POU- or homeodomain-containing transcription factors. Images PMID:1454833

  11. Activin A Predicts Left Ventricular Remodeling and Mortality in Patients with ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jeng-Feng; Hsu, Shun-Yi; Teng, Ming-Sheng; Wu, Semon; Hsieh, Chien-An; Jang, Shih-Jung; Liu, Chih-Jen; Huang, Hsuan-Li; Ko, Yu-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background Activin A levels increase in a variety of heart diseases including ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The aim of this study is to investigate whether the level of activin A can be beneficial in predicting left ventricular remodeling, heart failure, and death in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Methods We enrolled 278 patients with STEMI who had their activin A levels measured on day 2 of hospitalization. Echocardiographic studies were performed at baseline and were repeated 6 months later. Thereafter, the clinical events of these patients were followed for a maximum of 3 years, including all-cause death and readmission for heart failure. Results During hospitalization, higher activin A level was associated with higher triglyceride level, lower left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and lower left ventricular end diastolic ventricular volume index (LVEDVI) in multivariable linear regression model. During follow-up, patients with activin A levels > 129 pg/ml had significantly lower LVEF, and higher LVEDVI at 6 months. Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that activin A level > 129 pg/ml was a predictor of all-cause death (p = 0.022), but not a predictor of heart failure (p = 0.767). Conclusions Activin A level > 129 pg/ml predicts worse left ventricular remodeling and all-cause death in STEMI. PMID:27471355

  12. Effects of Activin A on the phenotypic properties of human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Sugii, Hideki; Maeda, Hidefumi; Tomokiyo, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Naohide; Wada, Naohisa; Koori, Katsuaki; Hasegawa, Daigaku; Hamano, Sayuri; Yuda, Asuka; Monnouchi, Satoshi; Akamine, Akifumi

    2014-09-01

    Periodontal ligament (PDL) tissue plays an important role in tooth preservation by structurally maintaining the connection between the tooth root and the bone. The mechanisms involved in the healing and regeneration of damaged PDL tissue, caused by bacterial infection, caries and trauma, have been explored. Accumulating evidence suggests that Activin A, a member of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily and a dimer of inhibinβa, contributes to tissue healing through cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation of various target cells. In bone, Activin A has been shown to exert an inhibitory effect on osteoblast maturation and mineralization. However, there have been no reports examining the expression and function of Activin A in human PDL cells (HPDLCs). Thus, we aimed to investigate the biological effects of Activin A on HPDLCs. Activin A was observed to be localized in HPDLCs and rat PDL tissue. When PDL tissue was surgically damaged, Activin A and IL-1β expression increased and the two proteins were shown to be co-localized around the lesion. HPDLCs treated with IL-1β or TNF-α also up-regulated the expression of the gene encoding inhibinβa. Activin A promoted chemotaxis, migration and proliferation of HPDLCs, and caused an increase in fibroblastic differentiation of these cells while down-regulating their osteoblastic differentiation. These osteoblastic inhibitory effects of Activin A, however, were only noted during the early phase of HPDLC osteoblastic differentiation, with later exposures having no effect on differentiation. Collectively, our results suggest that Activin A could be used as a therapeutic agent for healing and regenerating PDL tissue in response to disease, trauma or surgical reconstruction.

  13. Activin a release into cerebrospinal fluid in a subset of patients with severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Phillips, David J; Nguyen, Phuong; Adamides, Alexios A; Bye, Nicole; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Kossmann, Thomas; Vallance, Shirley; Murray, Lynnette; Morganti-Kossmann, Maria C

    2006-09-01

    Activin A is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily and has been demonstrated to be elevated during inflammation and to have neuroprotective properties following neural insults. In this study, we examined whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) induced a response in activin A or in the concentrations of its binding protein, follistatin. Thirty-nine patients with severe TBI had daily, matched cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum samples collected post-TBI and these were assayed for activin A and follistatin using specific immunoassays. Concentrations of both molecules were assessed relative to a variety of clinical parameters, such as the Glasgow Coma Score, computer tomography classification of TBI, measurement of injury markers, cell metabolism and membrane breakdown products. In about half of the patients, there was a notable increase in CSF activin A concentrations in the first few days post-TBI. There were only minor perturbations in either serum activin or in either CSF or serum follistatin concentrations. The CSF activin A response was not related to any of the common TBI indices, but was strongly correlated with two common markers of brain damage, neuronal specific enolase and S100-beta. Further, activin A levels were also associated with indices of metabolism, such as lactate and pyruvate, excitotoxicity (glutamate) and membrane lipid breakdown products such as glycerol. In one of the two patients who developed a CSF infection, activin A concentrations in CSF became markedly elevated. Thus, some TBI patients have an early release of activin A into the CSF that may result from activation of inflammatory and/or neuroprotective pathways.

  14. The potential role of activin and follistatin in lung transplant dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Snell, James N; Westall, Glen P; Snell, Gregory I

    2015-01-01

    Activin A, a member of the transforming growth factor β super-family, is a key regulator of multiple biological pathways including the physiological processes of organ development and homeostasis; as well as the pathological processes of inflammation, remodelling and fibrosis. Dysregulation of activin A and its naturally occurring antagonist follistatin, contribute to the development of disease in multiple organ systems. In this review, we summarize the regulation of activin A, its dysregulated expression in a number of respiratory diseases and postulate its potential role in contributing to allograft dysfunction following lung transplantation.

  15. Platelet and megakaryocyte dense granules contain glycoproteins Ib and IIb-IIIa.

    PubMed

    Youssefian, T; Massé, J M; Rendu, F; Guichard, J; Cramer, E M

    1997-06-01

    Platelets contain two main types of secretory organelles, the dense granules and the alpha-granules. P-selectin, a specific receptor for leukocytes that is present in the alpha-granule membrane, has also been demonstrated to be associated with the dense granule limiting membrane, showing that a relationship exists between these two types of secretory granules. We have previously shown that the plasma membrane receptors glycoproteins (Gp) IIb-IIIa and Ib are also present in the alpha-granule membrane. To document further the composition of the dense granule membrane, we have used immunoelectron microscopy in the present work to determine if the dense granule membrane also contains these glycoproteins. First, the cytochemical method of Richards and Da Prada (J Histochem Cytochem 25:1322, 1977), which specifically enhances dense body electron density, was combined with immunogold-labeled anti-Gp IIb-IIIa or anti-Gp Ib antibody. A consistent and reproducible labeling for Gp IIb-IIIa, but less for Gp Ib, was found in the membrane of platelet dense granules. Subsequently, double immunogold labeling was performed on frozen thin sections of resting platelets using antibodies directed against the dense body components granulophysin or P-selectin, followed by anti-Gp IIb-IIIa or anti-Gp Ib. Consistent labeling for Gp IIb-IIIa and weaker labeling for Gp Ib were detected in dense bodies. The possibility that the granulophysin-positive structures could be lysosomes was excluded by the presence of P-selectin. Immunogold labeling of isolated dense granule fractions confirmed these results. Identical findings were made on human cultured megakaryocytes using double immunolabeling. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the presence of Gp IIb-IIIa and Gp Ib on the dense granule membrane. This observation provides additional evidence of similarities between the alpha-granule and dense granule membranes and raises the possibility of a dual mechanism responsible for the formation of

  16. Pituitary gonadotropins FSH and LH are oppositely regulated by the activin/follistatin system in a basal teleost, the eel.

    PubMed

    Aroua, Salima; Maugars, Gersende; Jeng, Shan-Ru; Chang, Ching-Fong; Weltzien, Finn-Arne; Rousseau, Karine; Dufour, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    European eels are blocked at a prepubertal silver stage due to a deficient production of pituitary gonadotropins. We investigated the potential role of activin/follistatin system in the control of eel gonadotropins. Through the development of qPCR assays for European eel activin β(B) and follistatin, we first analyzed the tissue distribution of the expression of these two genes. Both activin β(B) and follistatin are expressed in the brain, pituitary and gonads. In addition, a striking expression of both transcripts was also found in the retina and in adipose tissue. The effects of recombinant human activins and follistatin on eel gonadotropin gene expression were studied using primary cultures of eel pituitary cells. Activins A and B strongly stimulated FSHβ subunit expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In contrast, activin reduced LHβ expression, an inhibitory effect which was highlighted in the presence of testosterone, a known activator of eel LHβ expression. No effect of activin was observed on other pituitary hormones. Follistatin antagonized both the stimulatory and inhibitory effects of activin on FSHβ and LHβ expression, respectively. Activin is the first major stimulator of FSH expression evidenced in the eel. These results in a basal teleost further support the ancient origin and strong conservation of the activin/follistatin system in the control of FSH in vertebrates. In contrast, the opposite regulation of FSH and LH may have emerged in the teleost lineage.

  17. Tissue absence initiates regeneration through follistatin-mediated inhibition of activin signaling.

    PubMed

    Gaviño, Michael A; Wenemoser, Danielle; Wang, Irving E; Reddien, Peter W

    2013-09-10

    Regeneration is widespread, but mechanisms that activate regeneration remain mysterious. Planarians are capable of whole-body regeneration and mount distinct molecular responses to wounds that result in tissue absence and those that do not. A major question is how these distinct responses are activated. We describe a follistatin homolog (Smed-follistatin) required for planarian regeneration. Smed-follistatin inhibition blocks responses to tissue absence but does not prevent normal tissue turnover. Two activin homologs (Smed-activin-1 and Smed-activin-2) are required for the Smed-follistatin phenotype. Finally, Smed-follistatin is wound-induced and expressed at higher levels following injuries that cause tissue absence. These data suggest that Smed-follistatin inhibits Smed-Activin proteins to trigger regeneration specifically following injuries involving tissue absence and identify a mechanism critical for regeneration initiation, a process important across the animal kingdom. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00247.001.

  18. The vitamin D analog ED-71 is a potent regulator of intestinal phosphate absorption and NaPi-IIb.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alex J; Zhang, Fanjie; Ritter, Cynthia S

    2012-11-01

    The vitamin D analog ED-71 [1α,25-dihydroxy-2β-(3-hydroxypropyloxy)vitamin D(3)] has been approved for treatment of osteoporosis in Japan, but its effects on mineral metabolism have not been fully explored. We investigated the actions of ED-71 on phosphate (Pi) absorption and induction of the intestinal sodium/phosphate cotransporters. Oral treatment of vitamin D-deficient rats with ED-71 (20 pmol every other day for 8 d) produced a maximal 8-fold increase in duodenal Pi absorption, measured by the in situ loop method, whereas 1,25-dihyroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25(OH)(2)D(3]), at doses up to 150 pmol, had no effect. This action of ED-71 was attributable to a dramatic 24-fold induction of sodium-dependent Pi transporter type IIb (NaPi-IIb) mRNA in the duodenum; Pit-1 and Pit-2 mRNA levels were not increased. In vitamin D-replete rats, ED-71 treatment (50 pmol) at 72 and 24 h before death increased NaPi-IIb mRNA in the duodenum and jejunum, but not the ileum, whereas 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) at 1000 pmol was ineffective in all segments. Single oral doses of ED-71 increased mouse intestinal NaPi-IIb mRNA and protein between 6 and 24 h. Surprisingly, rat lung NaPi-IIb was not increased by ED-71, despite its coexpression with the vitamin D receptor in alveolar type II cells. However, ED-71 did not induce intestinal NaPi-IIb in vitamin D receptor-ablated mice. The greater potency of ED-71 than 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) on NaPi-IIb appears to be due to much higher and more prolonged levels of ED-71 in the circulation. In summary, ED-71, due to its disparate pharmacokinetics, is a much more potent inducer of intestinal Pi absorption and NaPi-IIb than 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), suggesting a role for this analog in the treatment of Pi-wasting disorders.

  19. Is inflation from unwinding fluxes IIB?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautason, Fridrik Freyr; Schillo, Marjorie; Van Riet, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we argue that the mechanism of unwinding inflation is naturally present in warped compactifications of type IIB string theory with local throats. The unwinding of flux is caused by its annihilation against branes. The resulting inflaton potential is linear with periodic modulations. We initiate an analysis of the inflationary dynamics and cosmological observables, which are highly constrained by moduli stabilization. For the simplified model of single-Kähler Calabi-Yau spaces we find that many, though not all of the consistency constraints can be satisfied. Particularly, in this simple model geometric constraints are in tension with obtaining the observed amplitude of the scalar power spectrum. However, we do find 60 efolds of inflation with a trans-Planckian field excursion which offers the hope that slightly more complicated models can lead to a fully consistent explicit construction of large field inflation of this kind.

  20. Type IIB flux compactifications on twistor bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaanpur, Ali

    2014-02-01

    We construct a U(1) bundle over N(1,1), usually considered as an SO(3) bundle on CP2, and show that type IIB supergravity can be consistently compactified over it. With the five form flux turned on, there is a solution for which the metric becomes Einstein. We further turn on 3-form fluxes and show that there is a one parameter family of solutions. In particular, there is a limiting solution of large 3-form fluxes for which two U(1) fiber directions of the metric shrink to zero size. We also discuss compactifications over N(1,1) to AdS3. All solutions turn out to be non-supersymmetric.

  1. Activin B promotes initiation and development of hair follicles in mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qin; Zhang, Min; Kong, Yanan; Chen, Shixuan; Chen, Yinghua; Wang, Xueer; Zhang, Lei; Lang, Weiya; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Activin B has been reported to promote the regeneration of hair follicles during wound healing. However, its role in the development and life cycle of hair follicles has not been elucidated. In our study, the effect of activin B on mouse hair follicles of cultured and neonatal mouse skin was investigated. In these models, PBS or activin B (5, 10 or 50 ng/ml) was applied, and hair follicle development was monitored. Hair follicle initiation and development was examined using hematoxylin and eosin staining, alkaline phosphatase activity staining, Oil Red O+ staining, and the detection of TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling cell apoptosis. Activin B was found to efficiently induce the initiation of hair follicles in the skin of both cultured and neonatal mice and to promote the development of hair follicles in neonatal mouse skin. Moreover, activin-B-treated hair follicles were observed to enter the anagen stage from the telogen stage and to remain in the anagen stage. These results demonstrate that activin B promotes the initiation and development of hair follicles in mice.

  2. Activin A-Smad Signaling Mediates Connective Tissue Growth Factor Synthesis in Liver Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ze-Yang; Jin, Guan-Nan; Wang, Wei; Sun, Yi-Min; Chen, Wei-Xun; Chen, Lin; Liang, Hui-Fang; Datta, Pran K.; Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Liver progenitor cells (LPCs) are activated in chronic liver damage and may contribute to liver fibrosis. Our previous investigation reported that LPCs produced connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2), an inducer of liver fibrosis, yet the regulatory mechanism of the production of CTGF/CCN2 in LPCs remains elusive. In this study, we report that Activin A is an inducer of CTGF/CCN2 in LPCs. Here we show that expression of both Activin A and CTGF/CCN2 were upregulated in the cirrhotic liver, and the expression of Activin A positively correlates with that of CTGF/CCN2 in liver tissues. We go on to show that Activin A induced de novo synthesis of CTGF/CCN2 in LPC cell lines LE/6 and WB-F344. Furthermore, Activin A contributed to autonomous production of CTGF/CCN2 in liver progenitor cells (LPCs) via activation of the Smad signaling pathway. Smad2, 3 and 4 were all required for this induction. Collectively, these results provide evidence for the fibrotic role of LPCs in the liver and suggest that the Activin A-Smad-CTGF/CCN2 signaling in LPCs may be a therapeutic target of liver fibrosis. PMID:27011166

  3. Substantial Increases Occur in Serum Activins and Follistatin during Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    de Kretser, David M.; Bensley, Jonathan G.; Phillips, David J.; Levvey, Bronwyn J.; Snell, Greg I.; Lin, Enjarn; Hedger, Mark P.; O’Hehir, Robyn E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung transplantation exposes the donated lung to a period of anoxia. Re-establishing the circulation after ischemia stimulates inflammation causing organ damage. Since our published data established that activin A is a key pro-inflammatory cytokine, we assessed the roles of activin A and B, and their binding protein, follistatin, in patients undergoing lung transplantation. Methods Sera from 46 patients participating in a published study of remote ischemia conditioning in lung transplantation were used. Serum activin A and B, follistatin and 11 other cytokines were measured in samples taken immediately after anaesthesia induction, after remote ischemia conditioning or sham treatment undertaken just prior to allograft reperfusion and during the subsequent 24 hours. Results Substantial increases in serum activin A, B and follistatin occurred after the baseline sample, taken before anaesthesia induction and peaked immediately after the remote ischemia conditioning/sham treatment. The levels remained elevated 15 minutes after lung transplantation declining thereafter reaching baseline 2 hours post-transplant. Activin B and follistatin concentrations were lower in patients receiving remote ischemia conditioning compared to sham treated patients but the magnitude of the decrease did not correlate with early transplant outcomes. Conclusions We propose that the increases in the serum activin A, B and follistatin result from a combination of factors; the acute phase response, the reperfusion response and the use of heparin-based anti-coagulants. PMID:26820896

  4. Activin A-Smad Signaling Mediates Connective Tissue Growth Factor Synthesis in Liver Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ze-Yang; Jin, Guan-Nan; Wang, Wei; Sun, Yi-Min; Chen, Wei-Xun; Chen, Lin; Liang, Hui-Fang; Datta, Pran K; Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-03-22

    Liver progenitor cells (LPCs) are activated in chronic liver damage and may contribute to liver fibrosis. Our previous investigation reported that LPCs produced connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2), an inducer of liver fibrosis, yet the regulatory mechanism of the production of CTGF/CCN2 in LPCs remains elusive. In this study, we report that Activin A is an inducer of CTGF/CCN2 in LPCs. Here we show that expression of both Activin A and CTGF/CCN2 were upregulated in the cirrhotic liver, and the expression of Activin A positively correlates with that of CTGF/CCN2 in liver tissues. We go on to show that Activin A induced de novo synthesis of CTGF/CCN2 in LPC cell lines LE/6 and WB-F344. Furthermore, Activin A contributed to autonomous production of CTGF/CCN2 in liver progenitor cells (LPCs) via activation of the Smad signaling pathway. Smad2, 3 and 4 were all required for this induction. Collectively, these results provide evidence for the fibrotic role of LPCs in the liver and suggest that the Activin A-Smad-CTGF/CCN2 signaling in LPCs may be a therapeutic target of liver fibrosis.

  5. Immunohistochemical localization of inhibin/activin subunits in the wild ground squirrel (Citellus dauricus Brandt) ovary.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xia; Weng, Jiaju; Zhang, Haolin; Li, Xiaonan; Zhang, Mengyuan; Xu, Meiyu; Weng, Qiang; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    The intraovarian function of gonadally produced inhibin and activin has been extensively studied in experimental models for decades, yet their presence and function have been rarely reported in wild rodents. With our seasonal breeding model, the wild ground squirrel, we aimed to investigate the possible roles of these peptides in the seasonal folliculogenesis. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting have been used to detect the cellular localization and expression patterns of inhibin/activin subunits (α, β(A) and β(B)). In the breeding season ovary, all three subunits were present in granulosa cells, theca cells of antral follicles and interstitial cells, with the strongest immunostaining in granulosa cells. Following ovulation, the corpora lutea become a major site of inhibin/activin synthesis. In the nonbreeding season ovary, inhibin/activin α and β(A) subunits were weakly immunopositive in granulosa cells of early stage follicles, while β(B) subunit was undetectable. The expression level of inhibin/activin subunit proteins were generally higher in the ovaries of the breeding season, and then decreased to a relatively low level during the nonbreeding season. The dynamic expression of inhibin/activin subunits indicated that they might play important paracrine and/or autocrine roles during the seasonal folliculogenesis of the wild ground squirrel.

  6. Activin-like kinase 2 functions in peri-implantation uterine signaling in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Caterina; Tripurani, Swamy K; Large, Michael J; Edson, Mark A; Creighton, Chad J; Hawkins, Shannon M; Kovanci, Ertug; Kaartinen, Vesa; Lydon, John P; Pangas, Stephanie A; DeMayo, Francesco J; Matzuk, Martin M

    2013-11-01

    Implantation of a blastocyst in the uterus is a multistep process tightly controlled by an intricate regulatory network of interconnected ovarian, uterine, and embryonic factors. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) ligands and receptors are expressed in the uterus of pregnant mice, and BMP2 has been shown to be a key regulator of implantation. In this study, we investigated the roles of the BMP type 1 receptor, activin-like kinase 2 (ALK2), during mouse pregnancy by producing mice carrying a conditional ablation of Alk2 in the uterus (Alk2 cKO mice). In the absence of ALK2, embryos demonstrate delayed invasion into the uterine epithelium and stroma, and upon implantation, stromal cells fail to undergo uterine decidualization, resulting in sterility. Mechanistically, microarray analysis revealed that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (Cebpb) expression is suppressed during decidualization in Alk2 cKO females. These findings and the similar phenotypes of Cebpb cKO and Alk2 cKO mice lead to the hypothesis that BMPs act upstream of CEBPB in the stroma to regulate decidualization. To test this hypothesis, we knocked down ALK2 in human uterine stromal cells (hESC) and discovered that ablation of ALK2 alters hESC decidualization and suppresses CEBPB mRNA and protein levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis of decidualizing hESC confirmed that BMP signaling proteins, SMAD1/5, directly regulate expression of CEBPB by binding a distinct regulatory sequence in the 3' UTR of this gene; CEBPB, in turn, regulates the expression of progesterone receptor (PGR). Our work clarifies the conserved mechanisms through which BMPs regulate peri-implantation in rodents and primates and, for the first time, uncovers a linear pathway of BMP signaling through ALK2 to regulate CEBPB and, subsequently, PGR during decidualization.

  7. Activin-Like Kinase 2 Functions in Peri-implantation Uterine Signaling in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Clementi, Caterina; Tripurani, Swamy K.; Large, Michael J.; Edson, Mark A.; Creighton, Chad J.; Hawkins, Shannon M.; Kovanci, Ertug; Kaartinen, Vesa; Lydon, John P.; Pangas, Stephanie A.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2013-01-01

    Implantation of a blastocyst in the uterus is a multistep process tightly controlled by an intricate regulatory network of interconnected ovarian, uterine, and embryonic factors. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) ligands and receptors are expressed in the uterus of pregnant mice, and BMP2 has been shown to be a key regulator of implantation. In this study, we investigated the roles of the BMP type 1 receptor, activin-like kinase 2 (ALK2), during mouse pregnancy by producing mice carrying a conditional ablation of Alk2 in the uterus (Alk2 cKO mice). In the absence of ALK2, embryos demonstrate delayed invasion into the uterine epithelium and stroma, and upon implantation, stromal cells fail to undergo uterine decidualization, resulting in sterility. Mechanistically, microarray analysis revealed that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (Cebpb) expression is suppressed during decidualization in Alk2 cKO females. These findings and the similar phenotypes of Cebpb cKO and Alk2 cKO mice lead to the hypothesis that BMPs act upstream of CEBPB in the stroma to regulate decidualization. To test this hypothesis, we knocked down ALK2 in human uterine stromal cells (hESC) and discovered that ablation of ALK2 alters hESC decidualization and suppresses CEBPB mRNA and protein levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis of decidualizing hESC confirmed that BMP signaling proteins, SMAD1/5, directly regulate expression of CEBPB by binding a distinct regulatory sequence in the 3′ UTR of this gene; CEBPB, in turn, regulates the expression of progesterone receptor (PGR). Our work clarifies the conserved mechanisms through which BMPs regulate peri-implantation in rodents and primates and, for the first time, uncovers a linear pathway of BMP signaling through ALK2 to regulate CEBPB and, subsequently, PGR during decidualization. PMID:24244176

  8. Inhibition of activin A ameliorates skeletal muscle injury and rescues contractile properties by inducing efficient remodeling in female mice.

    PubMed

    Yaden, Benjamin C; Wang, Yan X; Wilson, Jonathan M; Culver, Alexander E; Milner, Andrea; Datta-Mannan, Amita; Shetler, Pamela; Croy, Johnny E; Dai, Guoli; Krishnan, Venkatesh

    2014-04-01

    Activin A, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, provides pleiotropic regulation of fibrosis and inflammation. We aimed at determining whether selective inhibition of activin A would provide a regenerative benefit. The introduction of activin A into normal muscle increased the expression of inflammatory and muscle atrophy genes Tnf, Tnfrsf12a, Trim63, and Fbxo32 by 3.5-, 10-, 2-, and 4-fold, respectively. The data indicate a sensitive response of muscle to activin A. Two hours after cardiotoxin-induced muscle damage, local activin A protein expression increased by threefold to ninefold. Neutralization of activin A with a specific monoclonal antibody in this muscle injury model decreased the muscle protein levels of lymphotoxin α and Il17a by 32% and 42%, respectively. Muscle histopathological features showed that activin A antibody-treated mice displayed an increase in muscle degradation, with the concomitant 9.2-fold elevation in F4/80-positive cells 3 days after injury. At the same time, the number of Pax7/Myod1-positive cells also increased, indicative of potentiated muscle precursor activation. Ultimately, activin A inhibition resulted in rapid recovery of muscle contractile properties indicated by a restoration of maximum and specific force. In summary, selective inhibition of activin A with a monoclonal antibody in muscle injury leads to the early onset of tissue degradation and subsequent enhanced myogenesis, thereby accelerating muscle repair and functional recovery.

  9. [Mean platelet volume: interactions with platelet aggregation activity and glycoprotein IIb-IIIa and Ib expression levels].

    PubMed

    Khaspekova, S G; Ziuriaev, I T; Iakushkin, V V; Naĭmushin, Ia A; Sirotkina, O V; Zaĭtseva, N O; Ruda, M Ia; Mazurov, A V

    2014-01-01

    Increased mean platelet volume (MPV) is an independent risk factor of thrombotic events in patients with cardiovascular diseases. Interactions of MPV with platelet aggregation activity and contents of glycoprotein (GP) IIb-IIIa (alphaIIb/beta3 integrin, fibrinogen receptor) and GP Ib (von Willebrand factor receptor) were investigated in this study. Investigation was performed in a group of healthy volunteers (n = 38) and in a group of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). In patients blood was collected at days 1, 3-5 and 8-12 after ACS development. As an antiaggregant therapy all patients received acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, inhibitor of thromboxane A2 synthesis) and most of them--clopidogrel (ADP receptor antagonist) with the exception of part of the patients (n = 44) at day 1 who had not taken clopidogrel before first blood collection. In volunteers platelet aggregation was stimulated by 1.25, 2.5, 5 and 20 M ADP, and in patients--by 5 and 20 M ADP. GP IIb-IIIa and GP Ib content on platelet surface was measured using 125I-labelled monoclonal antibodies. GP IIb-IIIa and GP Ib genetic polymorphisms were determined in ACS patients. In healthy donors significant correlations between MPV and aggregation levels were revealed at 1.25 and 2.5 M ADP (coefficients of correlation (r)--0.396 and 0.373, p < 0.05) and at 5 and 20 those interactions did not reach significant level (r--0.279 and 0.205, p > 0.05). Correlations between MPV and aggregation levels were observed at day 1 of ACS in a subgroup of patients who received ASA but had not started clopidogrel treatment (r--0.526, p < 0.01 and 0.368, p < 0.05 for 5 and 20 M ADP respectively). Interactions between these parameters were not registered upon combined treatment with ASA and clopidogrel. Strong direct correlations between MPV and GP IIb-IIIa and GP Ib contents were detected in healthy donors and ACS patients (at all time points) -r from 0.439 to 0.647 (p < or = 0.001 for all correlations). Genetic

  10. Type IIb SN 2011fu: spectral and light curve evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Garoffolo, A.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Isern, J.; NTT-TNG Large Programme

    2013-05-01

    Type IIb supernovae (SNe) are a subclass of core-collapse supernovae that appear to be a hybrid between SNe characterized by the presence of H in their spectra (Type II) and Type Ib/c SNe (those that do not exhibit H features in their spectra but possibly HeI). We present some preliminary results of the photometric and spectroscopic analysis of type IIb supernova 2011fu. In principle, the characteristics of SN 2001fu are pretty similar to those of canonical type IIb SNe, but its Bessel UBVRI and Sloan uriz light curves (LCs) present an early peak resembling the unique case of the well studied type IIb SN 1993J (Richmond et al. 1994, AJ, 107, 1022).

  11. Influence of activin A supplementation during human embryonic stem cell derivation on germ cell differentiation potential.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Galbha; Heindryckx, Björn; Warrier, Sharat; O'Leary, Thomas; Van der Jeught, Margot; Lierman, Sylvie; Vossaert, Liesbeth; Deroo, Tom; Deforce, Dieter; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M; De Sutter, Petra

    2013-12-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are more similar to "primed" mouse epiblast stem cells (mEpiSCs). mEpiSCs, which are derived in Activin A, show an increased propensity to form primordial germ cell (PGC)-like cells in response to bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4). Hence, we hypothesized that hESCs derived in the presence of Activin A may be more competent in differentiating towards PGC-like cells after supplementation with BMP4 compared to standard hESC lines. We were able to successfully derive two hESC lines in the presence of Activin A, which were pluripotent and showed higher base levels of STELLA and cKIT compared to standard hESC lines derived without Activin A addition. Furthermore, upon differentiation as embryoid bodies in the presence of BMP4, we observed upregulation of VASA at day 7, both at the transcript and protein level compared to standard hESC lines, which appeared to take longer time for PGC specification. Unlike other hESC lines, nuclear pSMAD2/3 presence confirmed that Activin signalling was switched on in Activin A-derived hESC lines. They were also responsive to BMP4 based on nuclear detection of pSMAD1/5/8 and showed endodermal differentiation as a result of GATA-6 expression. Hence, our results provide novel insights into the impact of hESC derivation in the presence of Activin A and its subsequent influence on germ cell differentiation potential in vitro.

  12. Activation induced morphological changes and integrin αIIbβ3 activity of living platelets.

    PubMed

    Posch, Sandra; Neundlinger, Isabel; Leitner, Michael; Siostrzonek, Peter; Panzer, Simon; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Ebner, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Platelets are essential in hemostasis. Upon activation they undergo a shape-change accompanied with receptor presentation. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) were used as powerful tools for exploring morphological changes as well as receptor activities of platelets. Imaging time series was accomplished with and without fixation steps at the single platelet level. Hereby the response of mechanical stimulation of the platelet by the AFM cantilever tip was directly observed. We demonstrate that living and fixed platelets develop filopodia after a short activation time followed by their disappearance including cellular bleb formation. Thereafter a second filopodia formation (filopodia extrusion) was observed; those filopodia subsequently disappeared again, and finally platelets detached from the support due to cell death. We determined the influence of mechanical stress on the chronology of morphological changes of platelets and demonstrated shear force induced filopodia formation. Through recordings over several hours, topographical AFM images over the full platelet lifetime - from early activation up to apoptosis - are presented. SMFS measurements on living platelets allowed determining the activation state of the most prominent membrane receptor integrin αIIbβ3 at all different phases of activation. αIIbβ3 was fully activated, independent of the morphological state.

  13. Type IIb Supernovae with Compact and Extended Progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Roger A.; Soderberg, Alicia M.

    2010-03-01

    The classic example of a Type IIb supernova is SN 1993J, which had a cool extended progenitor surrounded by a dense wind. There is evidence for another category of Type IIb supernova that has a more compact progenitor with a lower density, probably fast, wind. Distinguishing features of the compact category are weak optical emission from the shock heated envelope at early times, nonexistent or very weak H emission in the late nebular phase, rapidly evolving radio emission, rapid expansion of the radio shell, and expected nonthermal as opposed to thermal X-ray emission. Type IIb supernovae that have one or more of these features include SNe 1996cb, 2001ig, 2003bg, 2008ax, and 2008bo. All of these with sufficient radio data (the last four) show evidence for presupernova wind variability. We estimate a progenitor envelope radius ~1 × 1011 cm for SN 2008ax, a value consistent with a compact Wolf-Rayet progenitor. Supernovae in the SN 1993J extended category include SN 2001gd and probably the Cas A supernova. We suggest that the compact Type IIb events be designated Type cIIb and the extended ones Type eIIb. The H envelope mass dividing these categories is ~0.1 M sun.

  14. αIIbβ3-integrin Ligands: Abciximab and Eptifibatide as Proapoptotic Factors in MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kononczuk, Joanna; Surazynski, Arkadiusz; Czyzewska, Urszula; Prokop, Izabela; Tomczyk, Michal; Palka, Jerzy; Miltyk, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Integrin receptors are considered to be the key factors in carcinogenesis. αIIbβ3-Integrin (GP IIb/IIIa) is the main glycoprotein of the surface of platelets, its presence has also been noted on the certain cancer cell lines. The molecular mechanism of its action in cancer cells remains unknown. This study presents effects of two αIIbβ3-inhibitors: Abciximab and Eptifibatide on apoptosis, expression of proline oxidase (POX), signaling molecules ERK 1/2, transcription factor NF-κB and HIF-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as well as DNA biosynthesis, collagen biosynthesis and prolidase activity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Both ligands induced apoptosis, however we found significant differences in molecular mechanism of action between tested αIIbβ3-inhibitors. These differences include expression of POX, HIF-1α, NF-κB,VEGF and collagen biosynthesis. Eptifibatide presented stronger proapoptotic activity in MCF-7 cells than Abciximab. Results of this study suggest that Eptifibatide may be considered as a novel candidate for development of new anticancer therapy.

  15. Activin Signaling Targeted by Insulin/dFOXO Regulates Aging and Muscle Proteostasis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Hua; Kang, Ping; Hernandez, Ana Maria; Tatar, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Reduced insulin/IGF signaling increases lifespan in many animals. To understand how insulin/IGF mediates lifespan in Drosophila, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing analysis with the insulin/IGF regulated transcription factor dFOXO in long-lived insulin/IGF signaling genotypes. Dawdle, an Activin ligand, is bound and repressed by dFOXO when reduced insulin/IGF extends lifespan. Reduced Activin signaling improves performance and protein homeostasis in muscles of aged flies. Activin signaling through the Smad binding element inhibits the transcription of Autophagy-specific gene 8a (Atg8a) within muscle, a factor controlling the rate of autophagy. Expression of Atg8a within muscle is sufficient to increase lifespan. These data reveal how insulin signaling can regulate aging through control of Activin signaling that in turn controls autophagy, representing a potentially conserved molecular basis for longevity assurance. While reduced Activin within muscle autonomously retards functional aging of this tissue, these effects in muscle also reduce secretion of insulin-like peptides at a distance from the brain. Reduced insulin secretion from the brain may subsequently reinforce longevity assurance through decreased systemic insulin/IGF signaling. PMID:24244197

  16. Activin A suppresses osteoblast mineralization capacity by altering extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and impairing matrix vesicle (MV) production.

    PubMed

    Alves, Rodrigo D A M; Eijken, Marco; Bezstarosti, Karel; Demmers, Jeroen A A; van Leeuwen, Johannes P T M

    2013-10-01

    During bone formation, osteoblasts deposit an extracellular matrix (ECM) that is mineralized via a process involving production and secretion of highly specialized matrix vesicles (MVs). Activin A, a transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily member, was previously shown to have inhibitory effects in human bone formation models through unclear mechanisms. We investigated these mechanisms elicited by activin A during in vitro osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Activin A inhibition of ECM mineralization coincided with a strong decline in alkaline phosphatase (ALP(1)) activity in extracellular compartments, ECM and matrix vesicles. SILAC-based quantitative proteomics disclosed intricate protein composition alterations in the activin A ECM, including changed expression of collagen XII, osteonectin and several cytoskeleton-binding proteins. Moreover, in activin A osteoblasts matrix vesicle production was deficient containing very low expression of annexin proteins. ECM enhanced human mesenchymal stem cell osteogenic development and mineralization. This osteogenic enhancement was significantly decreased when human mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on ECM produced under activin A treatment. These findings demonstrate that activin A targets the ECM maturation phase of osteoblast differentiation resulting ultimately in the inhibition of mineralization. ECM proteins modulated by activin A are not only determinant for bone mineralization but also possess osteoinductive properties that are relevant for bone tissue regeneration.

  17. Immunolocalization of inhibin/activin subunit proteins during the breeding season in testes and scented glands of muskrats (Ondatra zibethicus).

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoting; Zhang, Haolin; Weng, Jiaju; Sheng, Xia; Lu, Lu; Hu, Xiao; Liu, Shuqiang; Xu, Meiyu; Weng, Qiang; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the cellular immunolocalization of inhibin a and inhibin/activin (β(A) and β(B)) subunits in the muskrat testes and scented glands during the breeding season. Inhibin α and inhibin/activin (β(A) and β(B)) subunits were expressed in Sertoli cells and Leydig cells of testes and glandular cells of scented glands, respectively. Also, positive signals of inhibin α and inhibin/activin (β(A) and β(B)) subunits by Western blotting were both observed in testicular and scented glandular tissues. These results suggested that the testes and scented glands of the muskrats had the ability to synthesize inhibins and activins and that activins and inhibins might play an important role in testicular and scented glandular function in muskrats.

  18. Low miR-143/miR-145 Cluster Levels Induce Activin A Overexpression in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas, Which Contributes to Poor Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Bufalino, Andreia; Cervigne, Nilva K.; de Oliveira, Carine Ervolino; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Rodrigues, Priscila Campioni; Macedo, Carolina Carneiro Soares; Sobral, Lays Martin; Miguel, Marcia Costa; Lopes, Marcio Ajudarte; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Lambert, Daniel W.; Salo, Tuula A.; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Graner, Edgard; Coletta, Ricardo D.

    2015-01-01

    Deregulated expression of activin A is reported in several tumors, but its biological functions in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) are unknown. Here, we investigate whether activin A can play a causal role in OSCCs. Activin A expression was assessed by qPCR and immunohistochemistry in OSCC tissues. Low activin A-expressing cells were treated with recombinant activin A and assessed for apoptosis, proliferation, adhesion, migration, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Those phenotypes were also evaluated in high activin A-expressing cells treated with follistatin (an activin A antagonist) or stably expressing shRNA targeting activin A. Transfections of microRNA mimics were performed to determine whether the overexpression of activin A is regulated by miR-143/miR-145 cluster. Activin A was overexpressed in OSCCs in comparison with normal oral mucosa, and high activin A levels were significantly associated with lymph node metastasis, tumor differentiation and poor survival. High activin A levels promoted multiple properties associated with malignant transformation, including decreased apoptosis and increased proliferation, migration, invasion and EMT. Both miR-143 and miR-145 were markedly downregulated in OSCC cell lines and in clinical specimens, and inversely correlated to activin A levels. Forced expression of miR-143 and miR-145 in OSCC cells significantly decreased the expression of activin A. Overexpression of activin A in OSCCs, which is controlled by downregulation of miR-143/miR-145 cluster, regulates apoptosis, proliferation and invasiveness, and it is clinically correlated with lymph node metastasis and poor survival. PMID:26317418

  19. Cell proliferation in mouse tissues after thymectomy and t-activin administration

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, S.G.; Arion, V.Y.; Brevsov, Y.N.; Kremli, S.M.

    1985-06-01

    Cell proliferation was studied in mouse tissues on a model of immunodeficiency, namely at different times after splenectomy, and also after immunocorrection with the thymus preparation T-Activin, which is known to restore many functions of the T system of immunity. Mice either received thymectomy, mock thymectomy, or were injected with T-Activin. Tritium-thymidine was injected before the mice were killed. The results of investigation of mitotic activity during the 24-h period in the corneal epithelium 9 days after thymectomy are presented. Thymectomy performed on adult animals leads to a decrease in the intensity of cell proliferation in the epithelial tissues and to a disturbance of the rhythm of proliferation soon after the operation. The experiments show that a lyphocyte function such as the regulation of proliferation remains sensitive to T-Activin, an immunoactive factor of the thymus.

  20. Signaling activity of transforming growth factor beta type II receptors lacking specific domains in the cytoplasmic region.

    PubMed Central

    Wieser, R; Attisano, L; Wrana, J L; Massagué, J

    1993-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) type II receptor (T beta R-II) is a transmembrane serine/threonine kinase that contains two inserts in the kinase region and a serine/threonine-rich C-terminal extension. T beta R-II is required for TGF-beta binding to the type I receptor, with which it forms a heteromeric receptor complex, and its kinase activity is required for signaling by this complex. We investigated the role of various cytoplasmic regions in T beta R-II by altering or deleting these regions and determining the signaling activity of the resulting products in cell lines made resistant to TGF-beta by inactivation of the endogenous T beta R-II. TGF-beta binding to receptor I and responsiveness to TGF-beta in these cells can be restored by transfection of wild-type T beta R-II. Using this system, we show that the kinase insert 1 and the C-terminal tail of T beta R-II, in contrast to the corresponding regions in most tyrosine kinase receptors, are not essential to specify ligand-induced responses. Insert 2 is necessary to support the catalytic activity of the receptor kinase, and its deletion yields a receptor that is unable to mediate any of the responses tested. However, substitution of this insert with insert 2 from the activin receptor, ActR-IIB, does not diminish the ability of T beta R-II to elicit these responses. A truncated T beta R-II lacking the cytoplasmic domain still binds TGF-beta, supports ligand binding to receptor I, and forms a complex with this receptor. However, TGF-beta binding to receptor I facilitated by this truncated T beta R-II fails to inhibit cell proliferation, activate extracellular matrix protein production, or activate transcription from a promoter containing TGF-beta-responsive elements. We conclude that the transcriptional and antiproliferative responses to TGF-beta require both components of a heteromeric receptor complex that differs from tyrosine kinase receptors in its mode of signaling. Images PMID:8246946

  1. Effects of the Activin A–Follistatin System on Myocardial Cell Apoptosis through the Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Pathway in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Miao; Mao, Cuiying; Li, Jiayu; Han, Fanglei; Yang, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Background: A previous study suggested that activin A inhibited myocardial cell apoptosis. This study thus aimed to explore the effects of the activin A–follistatin system on myocardial cell apoptosis in heart failure (HF) rats in order to determine whether or not the mechanism operates through the endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) pathway. Methods: Myocardial infarction (MI) by vascular deprivation was used to induce HF. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect activin A, follistatin and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) contents in serum. Immunohistochemical staining for activin A, follistatin, CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP) and caspase-3 was performed on the myocardial tissue. The activin A-stimulated apoptosis of H9c2 cells was tested by flow cytometry. Western blot was used to detect the expression levels of activin A, follistatin and ERS-related proteins. Results: It was found that the high expression of activin A could cause activin A–follistatin system imbalance, inducing myocardial cell apoptosis via ERS in vivo. When HF developed to a certain stage, the expression of follistatin was upregulated to antagonize the expression of activin A. Activin A inhibited cardiomyocyte apoptosis with a low concentration and promoted apoptosis with a high concentration in vitro, also via ERS. Conclusion: Activin A–follistatin system participated in ERS-mediated myocardial cell apoptosis in HF. PMID:28208629

  2. [Molecular cloning of the DNA sequence of activin beta A subunit gene mature peptides from panda and related species and its application in the research of phylogeny and taxonomy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Jing; Wang, Xiao-Xing; Wang, Ya-Jun; Wang, Xi-Zhong; He, Guang-Xin; Chen, Hong-Wei; Fei, Li-Song

    2002-09-01

    Activin, which is included in the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) superfamily of proteins and receptors, is known to have broad-ranging effects in the creatures. The mature peptide of beta A subunit of this gene, one of the most highly conserved sequence, can elevate the basal secretion of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in the pituitary and FSH is pivotal to organism's reproduction. Reproduction block is one of the main reasons which cause giant panda to extinct. The sequence of Activin beta A subunit gene mature peptides has been successfully amplified from giant panda, red panda and malayan sun bear's genomic DNA by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with a pair of degenerate primers. The PCR products were cloned into the vector pBlueScript+ of Esherichia coli. Sequence analysis of Activin beta A subunit gene mature peptides shows that the length of this gene segment is the same (359 bp) and there is no intron in all three species. The sequence encodes a peptide of 119 amino acid residues. The homology comparison demonstrates 93.9% DNA homology and 99% homology in amino acid among these three species. Both GenBank blast search result and restriction enzyme map reveal that the sequences of Activin beta A subunit gene mature peptides of different species are highly conserved during the evolution process. Phylogeny analysis is performed with PHYLIP software package. A consistent phylogeny tree has been drawn with three different methods. The software analysis outcome accords with the academic view that giant panda has a closer relationship to the malayan sun bear than the red panda. Giant panda should be grouped into the bear family (Uersidae) with the malayan sun bear. As to the red panda, it would be better that this animal be grouped into the unique family (red panda family) because of great difference between the red panda and the bears (Uersidae).

  3. The syndrome of central hypothyroidism and macroorchidism: IGSF1 controls TRHR and FSHB expression by differential modulation of pituitary TGFβ and Activin pathways.

    PubMed

    García, Marta; Barrio, Raquel; García-Lavandeira, Montserrat; Garcia-Rendueles, Angela R; Escudero, Adela; Díaz-Rodríguez, Esther; Gorbenko Del Blanco, Darya; Fernández, Ana; de Rijke, Yolanda B; Vallespín, Elena; Nevado, Julián; Lapunzina, Pablo; Matre, Vilborg; Hinkle, Patricia M; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C S; de Miguel, María P; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José Manuel; Nistal, Manuel; Alvarez, Clara V; Moreno, José C

    2017-03-06

    IGSF1 (Immunoglobulin Superfamily 1) gene defects cause central hypothyroidism and macroorchidism. However, the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease remain unclear. Based on a patient with a full deletion of IGSF1 clinically followed from neonate to adulthood, we investigated a common pituitary origin for hypothyroidism and macroorchidism, and the role of IGSF1 as regulator of pituitary hormone secretion. The patient showed congenital central hypothyroidism with reduced TSH biopotency, over-secretion of FSH at neonatal minipuberty and macroorchidism from 3 years of age. His markedly elevated inhibin B was unable to inhibit FSH secretion, indicating a status of pituitary inhibin B resistance. We show here that IGSF1 is expressed both in thyrotropes and gonadotropes of the pituitary and in Leydig and germ cells in the testes, but at very low levels in Sertoli cells. Furthermore, IGSF1 stimulates transcription of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor (TRHR) by negative modulation of the TGFβ1-Smad signaling pathway, and enhances the synthesis and biopotency of TSH, the hormone secreted by thyrotropes. By contrast, IGSF1 strongly down-regulates the activin-Smad pathway, leading to reduced expression of FSHB, the hormone secreted by gonadotropes. In conclusion, two relevant molecular mechanisms linked to central hypothyroidism and macroorchidism in IGSF1 deficiency are identified, revealing IGSF1 as an important regulator of TGFβ/Activin pathways in the pituitary.

  4. Ramipril attenuates left ventricular remodeling by regulating the expression of activin A-follistatin in a rat model of heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qun; Liu, Haiyan; Liu, Miao; Yang, Chunyan; Yang, Jie; Liu, Zhonghui; Yang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that overexpression of ACT A can lead to ventricular remodeling in rat models of heart failure. Furthermore, recently work studying demonstrated that stimulation of activin An expression in rat aortic smooth muscle (RASM) cells by angiotensin II (Ang II). Ramipril is a recently developed angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor. To investigate the effects of Ramipril on expression of ACT A-FS, we established the rat model of heart failure after myocardial infarction (MI), and divided into either a sham operation (SO), MI, or MI-Ramipril group. We found that Ramipril significantly attenuates collagen-I and III deposition (col-I and III). Notably, we determined that expression of ACT A and II activin receptor (ActRII) were significantly down-regulated in the non-infarcted area of the left ventricle in the Ramipril group, whereas the mRNA and protein levels of FS were markedly up-regulated. Our data suggested that Ramipril benefited left ventricular remodeling by reducing fibrosis and collagen accumulation in the left ventricle of rats after myocardial infarction. This observation was also associated with down-regulation of ACT A expression. This study elucidated a new protective mechanism of Ramipril and suggests a novel strategy for treatment of post-infarct remodeling and subsequent heart failure. PMID:27642098

  5. The syndrome of central hypothyroidism and macroorchidism: IGSF1 controls TRHR and FSHB expression by differential modulation of pituitary TGFβ and Activin pathways

    PubMed Central

    García, Marta; Barrio, Raquel; García-Lavandeira, Montserrat; Garcia-Rendueles, Angela R.; Escudero, Adela; Díaz-Rodríguez, Esther; Gorbenko Del Blanco, Darya; Fernández, Ana; de Rijke, Yolanda B.; Vallespín, Elena; Nevado, Julián; Lapunzina, Pablo; Matre, Vilborg; Hinkle, Patricia M.; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C. S.; de Miguel, María P.; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José Manuel; Nistal, Manuel; Alvarez, Clara V.; Moreno, José C.

    2017-01-01

    IGSF1 (Immunoglobulin Superfamily 1) gene defects cause central hypothyroidism and macroorchidism. However, the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease remain unclear. Based on a patient with a full deletion of IGSF1 clinically followed from neonate to adulthood, we investigated a common pituitary origin for hypothyroidism and macroorchidism, and the role of IGSF1 as regulator of pituitary hormone secretion. The patient showed congenital central hypothyroidism with reduced TSH biopotency, over-secretion of FSH at neonatal minipuberty and macroorchidism from 3 years of age. His markedly elevated inhibin B was unable to inhibit FSH secretion, indicating a status of pituitary inhibin B resistance. We show here that IGSF1 is expressed both in thyrotropes and gonadotropes of the pituitary and in Leydig and germ cells in the testes, but at very low levels in Sertoli cells. Furthermore, IGSF1 stimulates transcription of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor (TRHR) by negative modulation of the TGFβ1-Smad signaling pathway, and enhances the synthesis and biopotency of TSH, the hormone secreted by thyrotropes. By contrast, IGSF1 strongly down-regulates the activin-Smad pathway, leading to reduced expression of FSHB, the hormone secreted by gonadotropes. In conclusion, two relevant molecular mechanisms linked to central hypothyroidism and macroorchidism in IGSF1 deficiency are identified, revealing IGSF1 as an important regulator of TGFβ/Activin pathways in the pituitary. PMID:28262687

  6. Green-Schwarz superstring from type IIB matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Kitazawa, Yoshihisa; Nagaoka, Satoshi

    2008-01-15

    We construct a Green-Schwarz (GS) light-cone closed superstring theory from the type IIB matrix model. A GS light-cone string action is derived from the two-dimensional N=8 U(n) noncommutative Yang-Mills (NCYM) theory by identifying a noncommutative scale with a string scale. The supersymmetry transformation for the light-cone gauge action is also derived from supersymmetry transformation for the IIB matrix model. By identifying the physical states and interaction vertices, string theory is perturbatively reproduced.

  7. Human eosinophil activin A synthesis and mRNA stabilization are induced by the combination of IL-3 plus TNF

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Elizabeth A.; Esnault, Stephane; Johnson, Sean H.; Liu, Lin Ying; Malter, James S.; Burnham, Mandy E.; Jarjour, Nizar N.

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils contribute to immune regulation and wound healing/fibrosis in various diseases including asthma. Growing appreciation for the role of activin A in such processes led us to hypothesize that eosinophils are a source of this TGF-β superfamily member. TNFα (TNF) induces activin A by other cell types and is often present at the site of allergic inflammation along with the eosinophil activating common β (βc) chain-signaling cytokines (IL-5, IL-3, GM-CSF). Previously, we established that the combination of TNF plus a βc chain-signaling cytokine synergistically induces eosinophil synthesis of the remodeling enzyme MMP-9. Therefore, eosinophils were stimulated ex vivo by these cytokines and in vivo through an allergen-induced airway inflammatory response. In contrast to IL-5+TNF or GM-CSF+TNF, the combination of IL-3+TNF synergistically induced activin A synthesis and release by human blood eosinophils. IL-3+TNF enhanced activin A mRNA stability, which required sustained signaling of pathways downstream of p38 and ERK MAP kinases. In vivo, following segmental airway allergen challenge of subjects with mild allergic asthma, activin A mRNA was upregulated in airway eosinophils compared to circulating eosinophils, and ex vivo, circulating eosinophils tended to release activin A in response to IL-3+TNF. These data provide evidence that eosinophils release activin A and that this function is enhanced when eosinophils are present in an allergen-induced inflammatory environment. Moreover, these data provide the first evidence for post-transcriptional control of activin A mRNA. We propose that, an environment rich in IL-3+TNF will lead to eosinophil–derived activin A, which plays an important role in regulating inflammation and/or fibrosis. PMID:27001469

  8. Wounds increase activin in skin and a vasoactive neuropeptide in sensory ganglia.

    PubMed

    Cruise, Bethany A; Xu, Pin; Hall, Alison K

    2004-07-01

    Successful healing of skin wounds requires sensory innervation and the release of vasoactive neuropeptides that dilate blood vessels and deliver serum proteins to the wound, and that cause pain that protects from further injury. Activin has been proposed as a target-derived regulator of sensory neuropeptides during development, but its role in the mature nervous system is unknown. While adult skin contains a low level of activin, protein levels in skin adjacent to a wound increase rapidly after an excision. Neurons containing the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) increased in sensory ganglia that projected to the wounded skin, but not in ganglia that projected to unwounded skin, suggesting that neurons respond to a local skin signal. Indeed, many adult sensory neurons respond with increased CGRP expression to the application of activin in vitro and utilize a smad-mediated signal transduction pathway in this response. A second skin-derived factor nerve growth factor (NGF) also increased in wounded skin and increased CGRP in cultured adult dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons but with lower efficacy. Together, these data support the hypothesis that activin made by skin cells regulates changes in sensory neuropeptides following skin injury, thereby promoting vasodilation and wound healing.

  9. Role of activin, inhibin, and follistatin in the pathogenesis of bovine cystic ovarian disease.

    PubMed

    Stangaferro, Matías L; Matiller, Valentina; Díaz, Pablo U; Ortega, Hugo H; Rey, Florencia; Rodríguez, Fernanda M; Silva, Manuel A; Salvetti, Natalia R

    2014-08-01

    Cystic ovarian disease (COD) is an important cause of infertility in dairy cattle. Although many researchers have focused their work on the endocrine changes related to this disease, evidence indicates that intraovarian components play an important role in follicular persistence. Activin, inhibin, and follistatin participate as intraovarian regulatory molecules involved in follicular cell proliferation, differentiation, steroidogenesis, oocyte maturation, and corpus luteum function. Given the importance of these factors in folliculogenesis, we examined the expression and immunolocalization of activin/inhibin βA-subunit, inhibin α-subunit, and follistatin in the ovaries of healthy estrus-synchronized cows and in those of cows with spontaneous or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-induced COD. We also studied inhibin B (α βB) levels in serum and follicular fluid. We found an increased expression of the βA-subunit of activin A/inhibin A, the α-subunit of inhibin, and follistatin in granulosa cells of spontaneous follicular cysts by immunohistochemistry, and decreased concentrations of inhibin B (α βB) in the follicular fluid of spontaneous follicular cysts. These results, together with those previously obtained, indicate that the expression of the components of the activin-inhibin-follistatin system is altered. This could lead to multiple alterations in important functions in the ovary like the balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic factors, follicular proliferation/apoptosis, and steroidogenesis, which may contribute to the follicular persistence and endocrine changes found in cattle with COD.

  10. Serum Activin A and Follistatin Levels in Gestational Diabetes and the Association of the Activin A-Follistatin System with Anthropometric Parameters in Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Näf, Silvia; Escote, Xavier; Ballesteros, Mónica; Yañez, Rosa Elena; Simón-Muela, Inmaculada; Gil, Pilar; Albaiges, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Context The Activin A-Follistatin system has emerged as an important regulator of lipid and glucose metabolism with possible repercussions on fetal growth. Objective To analyze circulating activin A, follistatin and follistatin-like-3 (FSTL3) levels and their relationship with glucose metabolism in pregnant women and their influence on fetal growth and neonatal adiposity. Design and methods A prospective cohort was studied comprising 207 pregnant women, 129 with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and 78 with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and their offspring. Activin A, follistatin and FSTL3 levels were measured in maternal serum collected in the early third trimester of pregnancy. Serial fetal ultrasounds were performed during the third trimester to evaluate fetal growth. Neonatal anthropometry was measured to assess neonatal adiposity. Results Serum follistatin levels were significantly lower in GDM than in NGT pregnant women (8.21±2.32 ng/mL vs 9.22±3.41, P = 0.012) whereas serum FSTL3 and activin A levels were comparable between the two groups. Serum follistatin concentrations were negatively correlated with HOMA-IR and positively with ultrasound growth parameters such as fractional thigh volume estimation in the middle of the third trimester and percent fat mass at birth. Also, in the stepwise multiple linear regression analysis serum follistatin levels were negatively associated with HOMA-IR (β = −0.199, P = 0.008) and the diagnosis of gestational diabetes (β = −0.138, P = 0.049). Likewise, fractional thigh volume estimation in the middle of third trimester and percent fat mass at birth were positively determined by serum follistatin levels (β = 0.214, P = 0.005 and β = 0.231, P = 0.002, respectively). Conclusions Circulating follistatin levels are reduced in GDM compared with NGT pregnant women and they are positively associated with fetal growth and neonatal adiposity. These data suggest a role of the Activin

  11. D-branes in Type IIB plane wave background

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Bum-Hoon

    2007-01-12

    We classify and summarize the intersecting supersymmetric D-branes in the type IIB plane wave background, based on the Green-Schwarz superstring formulation. Many new configurations appears if we turn on the electric or magnetic background fields or boost the D-branes. Applications to the phenomelogical models are left for further study.

  12. Sequential sup 1 H NMR assignments of kistrin, a potent platelet aggregation inhibitor and glycoprotein IIb-IIIa antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, M.; Wagner, G. )

    1992-02-04

    Sequence-specific nuclear magnetic resonances assignments have been obtained for the protons of kistrin. Kistrin is a small naturally occurring snake venom protein that inhibits platelet aggregation by blocking the interaction of fibrinogen with the membrane-bound glycoprotein IIb-IIIa (GP IIb-IIIa), a receptor from the integrin family. Kistrin has an Arg-Gly-Asp sequence which is believed to form an adhesion recognition sequence that is essential for activity. Therefore, the interaction between kistrin and GP IIb-IIIa may provide important information on the motif used by integrins to recognize their target proteins which bear RGD sequences. Kistrin consists of 68 residues and contains six intramolecular disulfide bonds. Although one-third of the amide protons are protected from exchange with the solvent, there appears to be little or no regular secondary structure. The large number of NOE's between residues separated by two and three positions in the sequence indicates that the protein contains a large number of tightly packed loops. Along with the sequential assignments, this paper also discusses the construction and use of computerized data bases for manipulating NMR results. A strategy for computer-assisted sequential resonance using these data bases is also presented.

  13. [Molecular cloning of activin betaA subunit mature peptide from peafowl and its application in taxonomy and phylogeny].

    PubMed

    Zou, Fang-Dong; Tong, Xin-Xin; Yue, Bi-Song

    2005-03-01

    The sequences of activin gene betaA subunit mature peptide have been amplified from white peafowl, blue peafowl (pavo cristatus) and green peafowl (pavo muticus) genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with a pair of degenerate primers. The target fragments were cloned into the vector pMD18-T and sequenced. The length of activin gene betaA subunit mature peptide is 345bp, which encoded a peptide of 115 amino acid residues. Sequence analysis of activin gene betaA subunit mature peptide demonstrated that the identity of nucleotide is 98.0% between blue peaflowl and green peafowl, and the identity of that is 98.8% between blue peaflowl and white peafow. Sequences comparison in NCBI revealed that the sequences of activin gene betaA subunit mature peptides of different species are highly conserved during evolution process. In addition, the restriction enzyme map of activins is high similar between white peafowl and blue peafowl. Phylogenetic tree was constructed with Mega 2 and Clustalxldx software. The result showed that white peafowl has a closer relationship to blue peafowl than to green peafowl. Considered the nucleotide differences of peafowls' activin gene betaA subunit mature peptides, a highly conserved region, we supported that white peafowl was derived from blue peafowl, and it is more possible the hybrid but just the product of color mutation, or maybe as a subspecies of Pavo genus.

  14. The Role of Activin A and B and the Benefit of Follistatin Treatment in Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Doreen Y.P.; Lu, Bo; Hayward, Susan; de Kretser, David M.; Cowan, Peter J.; Dwyer, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Activins, members of the TGF-β superfamily, are key drivers of inflammation and are thought to play a significant role in ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), a process inherent to renal transplantation that negatively impacts early and late allograft function. Follistatin (FS) is a protein that binds activin and inhibits its activity. This study examined the response of activin A and B in mice after renal IRI and the effect of exogenous FS in modulating the severity of renal injury. Methods Mice were treated with recombinant FS288 or vehicle before renal IRI surgery. Activin A, B, and FS levels in the serum and kidney, and renal injury parameters were measured at 3, 6, and 24 hours after reperfusion. Results Serum and kidney activin B levels were increased within 6 hours postrenal IRI, accompanied by renal injury—increased serum creatinine, messenger (m)RNA expression of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL); endothelial activation—increased E-selectin mRNA; and systemic inflammation—increased serum levels of IL-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and TNF-α. Further injury was potentiated by an upsurge in activin A by 24 hours, with further increases in serum creatinine, KIM-1 and NGAL mRNA expression. Follistatin treatment significantly reduced the level of serum activin B and subsequently blunted the increase in activin A. Renoprotection was evident with the attenuated rise in serum creatinine, KIM-1 and NGAL expression, tubular injury score, renal cell apoptosis, and serum IL-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 levels. Conclusions We propose that activin B initiates and activin A potentiates renal injury after IRI. Follistatin treatment, through binding and neutralizing the actions of activin B and subsequently activin A, reduced renal IRI by minimizing endothelial cell activation and dampening the systemic inflammatory response. These data support the potential clinical application of FS

  15. Structural basis for specificity of TGF[beta] family receptor small molecule inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Ogunjimi, Abiodun A.; Zeqiraj, Elton; Ceccarelli, Derek F.; Sicheri, Frank; Wrana, Jeffrey L.; David, Laurent

    2012-07-24

    Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF{beta}) receptor kinase inhibitors have a great therapeutic potential. SB431542 is one of the mainly used kinase inhibitors of the TGF{beta}/Activin pathway receptors, but needs improvement of its EC{sub 50} (EC{sub 50} = 1 {mu}M) to be translated to clinical use. A key feature of SB431542 is that it specifically targets receptors from the TGF{beta}/Activin pathway but not the closely related receptors from the bone morphogenic proteins (BMP) pathway. To understand the mechanisms of this selectivity, we solved the crystal structure of the TGF{beta} type I receptor (T{beta}RI) kinase domain in complex with SB431542. We mutated T{beta}RI residues coordinating SB431542 to their counterparts in activin-receptor like kinase 2 (ALK2), a BMP receptor kinase, and tested the kinase activity of mutated T{beta}RI. We discovered that a Ser280Thr mutation yielded a T{beta}RI variant that was resistant to SB431542 inhibition. Furthermore, the corresponding Thr283Ser mutation in ALK2 yielded a BMP receptor sensitive to SB431542. This demonstrated that Ser280 is the key determinant of selectivity for SB431542. This work provides a framework for optimising the SB431542 scaffold to more potent and selective inhibitors of the TGF{beta}/Activin pathway.

  16. Resolving two-dimensional kinetics of the integrin αIIbβ3-fibrinogen interactions using binding-unbinding correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Litvinov, Rustem I; Mekler, Andrey; Shuman, Henry; Bennett, Joel S; Barsegov, Valeri; Weisel, John W

    2012-10-12

    Using a combined experimental and theoretical approach named binding-unbinding correlation spectroscopy (BUCS), we describe the two-dimensional kinetics of interactions between fibrinogen and the integrin αIIbβ3, the ligand-receptor pair essential for platelet function during hemostasis and thrombosis. The methodology uses the optical trap to probe force-free association of individual surface-attached fibrinogen and αIIbβ3 molecules and forced dissociation of an αIIbβ3-fibrinogen complex. This novel approach combines force clamp measurements of bond lifetimes with the binding mode to quantify the dependence of the binding probability on the interaction time. We found that fibrinogen-reactive αIIbβ3 pre-exists in at least two states that differ in their zero force on-rates (k(on1) = 1.4 × 10(-4) and k(on2) = 2.3 × 10(-4) μm(2)/s), off-rates (k(off1) = 2.42 and k(off2) = 0.60 s(-1)), and dissociation constants (K(d)(1) = 1.7 × 10(4) and K(d)(2) = 2.6 × 10(3) μm(-2)). The integrin activator Mn(2+) changed the on-rates and affinities (K(d)(1) = 5 × 10(4) and K(d)(2) = 0.3 × 10(3) μm(-2)) but did not affect the off-rates. The strength of αIIbβ3-fibrinogen interactions was time-dependent due to a progressive increase in the fraction of the high affinity state of the αIIbβ3-fibrinogen complex characterized by a faster on-rate. Upon Mn(2+)-induced integrin activation, the force-dependent off-rates decrease while the complex undergoes a conformational transition from a lower to higher affinity state. The results obtained provide quantitative estimates of the two-dimensional kinetic rates for the low and high affinity αIIbβ3 and fibrinogen interactions at the single molecule level and offer direct evidence for the time- and force-dependent changes in αIIbβ3 conformation and ligand binding activity, underlying the dynamics of fibrinogen-mediated platelet adhesion and aggregation.

  17. MODULATION OF AMNIOTIC FLUID ACTIVIN-A AND INHIBIN-A IN WOMEN WITH PRETERM PREMATURE RUPTURE OF THE MEMBRANES AND INFECTION-INDUCED PRETERM BIRTH

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Victor A.; Buhimschi, Irina A.; Dulay, Antonette T.; Abdel-Razeq, Sonya S.; Oliver, Emily A.; Duzyj, Christina M.; Lipkind, Heather; Pettker, Christian M.; Buhimschi, Catalin S.

    2011-01-01

    PROBLEM Activins and inhibins are important modulators of inflammatory processes. We explored activation of amniotic fluid (AF) activin-A and inhibin-A system in women with intra-amniotic infection and preterm premature rupture of the membranes (PPROM). METHOD OF STUDY We analyzed 78 AF samples: “2nd trimester-control” (n=12), “3rd trimester-control” (n=14), preterm labor with intact membranes [positive-AF-cultures (n=13), negative-AF-cultures (n=13)] and PPROM [positive-AF-cultures (n=13), negative-AF-cultures (n=13)]. Activin-A levels were evaluated ex-vivo following incubation of amniochorion and placental villous explants with Gram-negative (LPS) or Gram-positive (Pam3Cys) bacterial mimics. Ability of recombinant activin-A and inhibin-A to modulate inflammatory reactions in fetal membranes was explored through explants’ IL-8 release. RESULTS Activin-A and inhibin-A were present in human AF and were gestational age-regulated. Activin-A was significantly upregulated by infection. Lower inhibin-A levels were seen in PPROM. LPS elicited release of activin-A from amniochorion, but not from villous explants. Recombinant activin-A stimulated IL-8 release from amniochorion, an effect that was not reversed by inhibin-A. CONCLUSION Human AF activin-A and inhibin-A are involved in biological processes linked to intra-amniotic infection/inflammation induced preterm birth. PMID:21992678

  18. IIA/IIB supergravity and ten-forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergshoeff, E. A.; Hartong, J.; Howe, P. S.; Ortín, T.; Riccioni, F.

    2010-05-01

    We perform a careful investigation of which p-form fields can be introduced consistently with the supersymmetry algebra of IIA and/or IIB ten-dimensional supergravity. In particular the ten-forms, also known as “top-forms”, require a careful analysis since in this case, as we will show, closure of the supersymmetry algebra at the linear level does not imply closure at the non-linear level. Consequently, some of the (IIA and IIB) ten-form potentials introduced in earlier work of some of us are discarded. At the same time we show that new ten-form potentials, consistent with the full non-linear supersymmetry algebra can be introduced. We give a superspace explanation of our work. All of our results are precisely in line with the predictions of the E 11 algebra.

  19. Supersymmetric AdS_6 solutions of type IIB supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyojoong; Kim, Nakwoo; Suh, Minwoo

    2015-10-01

    We study the general requirement for supersymmetric AdS_6 solutions in type IIB supergravity. We employ the Killing spinor technique and study the differential and algebraic relations among various Killing spinor bilinears to find the canonical form of the solutions. Our result agrees precisely with the work of Apruzzi et al. (JHEP 1411:099, 2014), which used the pure spinor technique. Hoping to identify the geometry of the problem, we also computed four-dimensional theory through the dimensional reduction of type IIB supergravity on AdS_6. This effective action is essentially a non-linear sigma model with five scalar fields parametrizing {SL}(3,{R})/{SO}(2,1), modified by a scalar potential and coupled to Einstein gravity in Euclidean signature. We argue that the scalar potential can be explained by a subgroup CSO(1,1,1) subset {SL}(3,{R}) in a way analogous to gauged supergravity.

  20. Lie-algebraic solutions of the type IIB matrix model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzistavrakidis, Athanasios

    2011-11-01

    A systematic search for Lie-algebra solutions of the type IIB matrix model is performed. Our survey is based on the classification of all Lie algebras for dimensions up to five and of all nilpotent Lie algebras of dimension six. It is shown that Lie-type solutions of the equations of motion of the type IIB matrix model exist and they correspond to certain nilpotent and solvable Lie algebras. Their representation in terms of Hermitian matrices is discussed in detail. These algebras give rise to certain noncommutative spaces for which the corresponding star products are provided. Finally the issue of constructing quantized compact nilmanifolds and solvmanifolds based on the above algebras is addressed.

  1. Deflection test results on D0 Run IIB stave

    SciTech Connect

    Lanfranco, Giobatta; /Fermilab

    2003-09-01

    The D0 RunIIb final design stave has been tested to verify its actual mechanical performance. The effectiveness of four G-11 (fiberglass/epoxy) braces to bridge the two channels has been investigated as well. All staves have met the goal stiffness for the silicon area. The stave mockups with braces have shown excellent stiffness in complete agreement with what theoretically calculated.

  2. Mechanical properties of D0 Run IIB silicon detector staves

    SciTech Connect

    Lanfranco, Giobatta; Fast, James; /Fermilab

    2001-06-01

    A proposed stave design for the D0 Run IIb silicon tracker outer layers featuring central cooling channels and a composite shell mechanical structure is evaluated for self-deflection and deflection due to external loads. This paper contains an introduction to the stave structure, a section devoted to composite lamina and laminate properties and finally a section discussing the beam deflections expected for assembled staves using these laminates.

  3. Spectropolarimetry of the Type IIb SN 2008aq*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevance, H. F.; Maund, J. R.; Baade, D.; Höflich, P.; Patat, F.; Spyromilio, J.; Wheeler, J. C.; Clocchiatti, A.; Wang, L.; Yang, Y.; Zelaya, P.

    2016-09-01

    We present optical spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry of the Type IIb SN 2008aq 16-d and 27-d post-explosion. The spectrum of SN 2008aq remained dominated by Hα P Cygni profile at both epochs, but showed a significant increase in the strength of the helium features, which is characteristic of the transition undergone by supernovae between Type IIb and Type Ib. Comparison of the spectra of SN 2008aq to other Type IIb SNe (SN 1993J, SN 2011dh, and SN 2008ax) at similar epochs revealed that the helium lines in SN 2008aq are much weaker, suggesting that its progenitor was stripped to a lesser degree. SN 2008aq also showed significant levels of continuum polarization at pcont = 0.70 (±0.22) per cent in the first epoch, increasing to pcont = 1.21 (±0.33) per cent by the second epoch. Moreover, the presence of loops in the q - u planes of Hα and He I in the second epoch suggests a departure from axial symmetry.

  4. CDF Run IIb Silicon Vertex Detector DAQ Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    S. Behari et al.

    2003-12-18

    The CDF particle detector operates in the beamline of the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab, Batavia, IL. The Tevatron is expected to undergo luminosity upgrades (Run IIb) in the future, resulting in a higher number of interactions per beam crossing. To operate in this dense radiation environment, an upgrade of CDF's silicon vertex detector (SVX) subsystem and a corresponding upgrade of its VME-based DAQ system has been explored. Prototypes of all the Run IIb SVX DAQ components have been constructed, assembled into a test stand and operated successfully using an adapted version of CDF's network-capable DAQ software. In addition, a PCI-based DAQ system has been developed as a fast and inexpensive tool for silicon detector and DAQ component testing in the production phase. In this paper they present an overview of the Run IIb silicon DAQ upgrade, emphasizing the new features and improvements incorporated into the constituent VME boards, and discuss a PCI-based DAQ system developed to facilitate production tests.

  5. Aspects of type IIB theory on asymptotically locally Euclidean spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Clifford V.; Myers, Robert C.

    1997-05-01

    D-brane technology and strong/weak coupling duality supplement traditional orbifold techniques by making certain background geometries more accessible. In this spirit, we consider some of the geometric properties of the type IIB theory on R6×M, where M is an ``asymptotically locally Euclidean'' (ALE) gravitational instanton. Given the self-duality of the theory, we can extract the geometry (both singular and resolved) seen by the weakly coupled IIB string by studying the physics of a D1-brane probe. The construction is both amusing and instructive, as the physics of the probe completely captures the mathematics of the construction of ALE instantons via ``hyper-Kähler quotients,'' as presented by Kronheimer. This relation has been noted by Douglas and Moore for the A series. We extend the explicit construction to the case of the D and E series-uncovering a quite beautiful structure-and highlight how all of the elements of the mathematical construction find their counterparts in the physics of the type IIB D-string. We discuss the explicit ALE metrics which may be obtained using these techniques, and comment on the role duality plays in relating gauged linear σ models to conformal field theories.

  6. On the progenitor of the Type IIb supernova 2016gkg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpatrick, Charles D.; Foley, Ryan J.; Abramson, Louis E.; Pan, Yen-Chen; Lu, Cicero-Xinyu; Williams, Peter; Treu, Tommaso; Siebert, Matthew R.; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Max, Claire E.

    2017-03-01

    We present a detection in pre-explosion Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of a point source consistent with being the progenitor star of the Type IIb supernova (SN IIb) 2016gkg. Post-explosion imaging from the Keck adaptive optics system was used to perform relative astrometry between the Keck and HST imaging. We identify a single point source in the HST images coincident with the SN position to 0.89σ. The HST photometry is consistent with the progenitor star being an A0 Ia star with T = 9500 K and log (L/L⊙) = 5.15. We find that the SN 2016gkg progenitor star appears more consistent with binary than single-star evolutionary models. In addition, early-time light-curve data from SN 2016gkg revealed a rapid rise in luminosity within ∼0.4 d of non-detection limits, consistent with models of the cooling phase after shock break-out. We use these data to determine an explosion date of 2016 September 20.15 and progenitor-star radius of log (R/R⊙) = 2.41, which agrees with photometry from the progenitor star. Our findings are also consistent with detections of other SNe IIb progenitor stars, although more luminous and bluer than most other examples.

  7. The Effects of Fibroblast Co-Culture and Activin A on in vitro Growth of Mouse Preantral Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Karimpour Malekshah, Abbasali; Heidari, Mahmoud; Parivar, Kazem; Azami, Nasrin Sadat

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to evaluate fibroblast co-culture and Activin A on in vitro maturation and fertilization of mouse preantral follicles. Methods: The ovaries from 12-14-day-old mice were dissected, and 120-150 μm preantral follicles were cultured individually in α-MEM as based medium for 12 days. A total number of 456 follicles were cultured in four conditions: (i) base medium as control group (n = 113), (ii) base medium supplemented with 30 ng/ml Activin A (n = 115), (iii) base medium co-cultured with mouse embryonic fibroblast (n = 113), and (iv) base medium supplemented with 30 ng/ml Activin A and co-cultured with fibroblast (n = 115). Rate of growth, survivability, antrum formation, ovulation, embryonic development and steroid production were evaluated. Analysis of Variance and Duncan test were applied for analyzing. Results: Both co-culture and co-culture + Activin A groups showed significant difference (P<0.05) in growth (on days 4, 6, and 8 of culture period) and survival rates. However, there was no significant difference in antrum formation, ovulation rate, and embryonic development of ovulated oocytes. There were significant differences (P<0.05) in the estradiol production on days 8, 10, and 12 between co-culture + Activin A and the control group. Progesterone production also was significant (P<0.05) in co-culture + Activin A group on days 6, 8, 10, and 12 compared to control group. Conclusion: Fibroblast co-culture and Activin A promoted growth and survivability of preantral follicles. However, simultaneous use of them was more efficient. PMID:24375163

  8. Role of Activin-A and Myostatin and Their Signaling Pathway in Human Myometrial and Leiomyoma Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md Soriful; Catherino, William H.; Protic, Olga; Janjusevic, Milijana; Gray, Peter Clarke; Giannubilo, Stefano Raffaele; Ciavattini, Andrea; Lamanna, Pasquale; Tranquilli, Andrea Luigi; Petraglia, Felice

    2014-01-01

    Context: Uterine leiomyomas are highly prevalent benign tumors of premenopausal women and the most common indication for hysterectomy. However, the exact etiology of this tumor is not fully understood. Objective: The objective of the study was to evaluate the role of activin-A and myostatin and their signaling pathways in human myometrial and leiomyoma cells. Design: This was a laboratory study. Setting: Myometrial and leiomyoma cells (primary and cell lines) were cultured in vitro. Patients: The study included premenopausal women who were admitted to the hospital for myomectomy or hysterectomy. Interventions: Primary myometrial and leiomyoma cells and/or cell lines were treated with activin-A (4 nM) and myostatin (4 nM) for different days of interval (to measure proliferation rate) or 30 minutes (to measure signaling molecules) or 48 hours to measure proliferating markers, extracellular matrix mRNA, and/or protein expression by real-time PCR, Western blot, and/or immunocytochemistry. Results: We found that activin-A and myostatin significantly reduce cell proliferation in primary myometrial cells but not in leiomyoma cells as measured by a CyQUANT cell proliferation assay kit. Reduced expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and Ki-67 were also observed in myometrial cells in response to activin-A and myostatin treatment. Activin-A also significantly increased mRNA expression of fibronectin, collagen1A1, and versican in primary leiomyoma cells. Finally, we found that activin-A and myostatin activate Smad-2/3 signaling but do not affect ERK or p38 signaling in both myometrial and leiomyoma cells. Conclusions: This study results suggest that activin-A and myostatin can exert antiproliferative and/or fibrotic effects on these cell types via Smad-2/3 signaling. PMID:24606069

  9. Activin-A and Myostatin Response and Steroid Regulation in Human Myometrium: Disruption of Their Signalling in Uterine Fibroid

    PubMed Central

    Bloise, Enrrico; Gray, Peter C.; Carrarelli, Patrizia; Islam, Md. Soriful; De Pascalis, Flavio; Severi, Filiberto Maria; Vale, Wylie; Castellucci, Mario; Petraglia, Felice

    2011-01-01

    Context: Investigation of activin-A (A) and myostatin (M) in human myometrium (HM) and leiomyoma (HL) will explain their involvement in human myometrial pathophysiology. Objective: We aimed to investigate A and M response and steroid regulation in HM. We also evaluated A and M expression and response in HL. Design: Tissues were analyzed and cultured. Patients: Patients included fertile (in proliferative phase) and menopausal women undergoing hysterectomy. Interventions: HM explant cultures were treated with A and M (for Smad-7 mRNA quantification) or estrogen and progesterone (for A and M mRNA quantification). A and M expression levels were also evaluated in menopausal (physiological absence of steroids) HM specimens. A and M and their receptors were evaluated in HL (n = 8, diameter 5–8 cm) compared with their matched HM. HL explants cultures were treated with A and M (for Smad7 mRNA quantification), and, to explain the absence of response, the levels of follistatin, follistatin-related gene (FLRG), and Cripto were evaluated. Results: A and M increased Smad7 expression in HM explants. A and M mRNAs were both reduced after estradiol treatment, unchanged after progesterone treatment, but were higher in menopausal than fertile (in proliferative phase) specimens. A, M, and FLRG were expressed at higher levels in HL compared with adjacent HM, whereas the receptors, follistatin, and Smad7 mRNAs resulted unchanged. Cripto mRNA was expressed only in HL. Conclusions: A and M act on human HM and are regulated by steroids. In HL there is an increase of A, M, FLRG, and Cripto expression. PMID:21177794

  10. Observation and interpretation of type IIb supernova explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Garoffolo, Antonia

    2016-03-01

    Core-collapse supernovae (CC-SNe) explosions represent the final demise of massive stars. Among the various types, there is a group of relatively infrequent CC-SNe termed type IIb, which appear to be hybrids between normal type II SNe (those characterised by H emission) and type Ib (those that lack H features in their spectra but exhibit prominent HeI lines). The nature of the stellar progenitors leading to type IIb SNe is currently unknown, although two channels are contemplated: single massive stars that have lost part of their outer envelope as a consequence of stellar winds, and massive stars that shed mass by Roche-Lobe overflow to a companion. The latter is in fact the favoured scenario for most of the objects observed up to now. In the majority of cases, when there are no direct progenitor detections, some hints about type IIb SN progenitors (e.g., initial mass) can be derived indirectly from the objects' light curves (LCs) and spectra. Motivated by the relatively few well-sampled observational datasets that exist up to date for type IIb SNe and the unknowns on their progenitors, we carried out extensive observations (mainly in the optical domain) for the young type IIb SNe 2011fu and 2013df. Both these SNe are particularly interesting because they show a first LC peak caused by shock breakout, followed by a secondary 56Ni-decay-powered maximum. The analysis of the data for SNe 2011fu and 2013df points to precursors that seem to have been stars with large radii (of the order of 100 RSun), with low mass hydrogen envelopes (tenths of MSun), and relatively low initial masses (12-18 MSun), which could have formed part of interacting binary systems. The nature of a third SN IIb candidate, OGLE-2013-SN-100, proved to be enigmatic. OGLE-2013-SN-100, shows a first peak in the LC, and other characteristics somewhat similar to those of type IIb SNe. However, after a deeper analysis, we conclude OGLE-2013-SN-100 is likely not a SN of type IIb. We provide an alternative

  11. An effect of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors on the kinetics of red blood cells aggregation.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Irina A; Muravyov, Alexei V; Khokhlova, Maria D; Rikova, Sofya Yu; Lyubin, Evgeny V; Gafarova, Marina A; Skryabina, Maria N; Fedyanin, Angrey A; Kryukova, Darya V; Shahnazarov, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    The reversible aggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) continues to be of the basic science and clinical interest. Recently it has been reported about a specific binding between fibrinogen and unknown erythrocyte glycoprotein receptors. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the red blood cell aggregation (RBCA) include the cell-cell interaction using the membrane receptors that bind such ligands as fibrinogen or fibronectin. To test this hypothesis the RBCs were incubated with monafram - the drug of the monoclonal antibodies against glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa, with the GPIIb-IIIa receptor antagonist tirofiban, epifibatide and with the fibrinogen inhibiting peptide. It has been found that the RBC incubation with monafram resulted in a marked RBCA decrease mainly in persons with high level of aggregation. Another research session has shown that RBC incubation with fibronectin was accompanied by a significant RBCA rise. The monafram addition to red cell incubation medium resulted in a significant RBCA lowering. The cell incubation with tirofiban and epifibatide issued in RBCA decrease. The similar results were obtained when RBCs were incubated with the fibrinogen inhibiting peptide. Although monafram, tirofiban, eptifibatide and the fibrinogen inhibiting peptide were related to fibrinogen function they didn't inhibit RBCA completely. Therefore, under moderate and low red blood cell aggregation the cell binding is probably related to nonspecific mode. It seems evident that the specific and nonspecific modes of red blood cell aggregate formation could co-exist. Additional theoretical and experimental investigations in this area are needed.

  12. Trastuzumab Emtansine in Treating Older Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-03

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  13. A method to find N = 1 AdS4 vacua in type IIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solard, Gautier

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we are looking for N = 1, AdS4 sourceless vacua in type IIB. While several examples exist in type IIA, there exists only one example of such vacua in type IIB. Thanks to the framework of generalized geometry we were able to devise a semi-algorithmical method to look for sourceless vacua. We present this method, which can easily be generalized to more complex cases, and give two new vacua in type IIB.

  14. Activin/Nodal signaling controls divergent transcriptional networks in human embryonic stem cells and in endoderm progenitors.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephanie; Teo, Adrian; Pauklin, Siim; Hannan, Nicholas; Cho, Candy H-H; Lim, Bing; Vardy, Leah; Dunn, N Ray; Trotter, Matthew; Pedersen, Roger; Vallier, Ludovic

    2011-08-01

    Activin/Nodal signaling is necessary to maintain pluripotency of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and to induce their differentiation toward endoderm. However, the mechanisms by which Activin/Nodal signaling achieves these opposite functions remain unclear. To unravel these mechanisms, we examined the transcriptional network controlled in hESCs by Smad2 and Smad3, which represent the direct effectors of Activin/Nodal signaling. These analyses reveal that Smad2/3 participate in the control of the core transcriptional network characterizing pluripotency, which includes Oct-4, Nanog, FoxD3, Dppa4, Tert, Myc, and UTF1. In addition, similar experiments performed on endoderm cells confirm that a broad part of the transcriptional network directing differentiation is downstream of Smad2/3. Therefore, Activin/Nodal signaling appears to control divergent transcriptional networks in hESCs and in endoderm. Importantly, we observed an overlap between the transcriptional network downstream of Nanog and Smad2/3 in hESCs; whereas, functional studies showed that both factors cooperate to control the expression of pluripotency genes. Therefore, the effect of Activin/Nodal signaling on pluripotency and differentiation could be dictated by tissue specific Smad2/3 partners such as Nanog, explaining the mechanisms by which signaling pathways can orchestrate divergent cell fate decisions.

  15. Seasonal changes in spermatogenesis and immunolocalization of inhibin/activin subunits in the wild male ground squirrel (Citellus dauricus Brandt).

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xia; Zhang, Haolin; Zhang, Wei; Song, Moshi; Zhang, Mengyuan; Li, Ben; Weng, Qiang; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the seasonal changes in spermatogenesis and the immunolocalization of the inhibin alpha and inhibin/activin (betaA and betaB) subunits during the breeding and non-breeding seasons in the wild male ground squirrel. The testicular weight and size and seminiferous tubule diameter were measured, and histological observations of testes were performed. The sections of the testes were immunostained by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method (ABC) using polyclonal antisera raised against porcine inhibin alpha, inhibin/activin betaA and inhibin/activin betaB during the breeding and non-breeding seasons. There were marked variations in testicular weight and size and seminiferous tubule diameter between the breeding and non-breeding seasons, and all types of spermatogenic cells, including spermatozoa, were found in the breeding season. In addition, immunoreactivity was also detected for the inhibin alpha, betaA and betaB subunits in Sertoli and Leydig cells during the breeding season, but immunostaining was only present for the inhibin alpha and inhibin/activin betaB subunits in Sertoli cells during the non-breeding season. These results suggest that seasonal changes in testicular weight and size and seminiferous tubule diameter of wild ground squirrels are correlated with changes in spermatogenesis, and the cellular localization of the inhibin/activin subunits showed season related changes in the breeding and non-breeding seasons.

  16. Closed headpiece of integrin [alpah]IIb[beta]3 and its complex with an [alpha]IIb[beta]3-specific antagonist that does not induce opening

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jieqing; Zhu, Jianghai; Negri, Ana; Provasi, Davide; Filizola, Marta; Coller, Barry S.; Springer, Timothy A.

    2011-08-24

    The platelet integrin {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} is essential for hemostasis and thrombosis through its binding of adhesive plasma proteins. We have determined crystal structures of the {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} headpiece in the absence of ligand and after soaking in RUC-1, a novel small molecule antagonist. In the absence of ligand, the {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} headpiece is in a closed conformation, distinct from the open conformation visualized in presence of Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) antagonists. In contrast to RGD antagonists, RUC-1 binds only to the {alpha}{sub IIb} subunit. Molecular dynamics revealed nearly identical binding. Two species-specific residues, {alpha}{sub IIb} Y190 and {alpha}{sub aIIb} D232, in the RUC-1 binding site were confirmed as important by mutagenesis. In sharp contrast to RGD-based antagonists, RUC-1 did not induce {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} to adopt an open conformation, as determined by gel filtration and dynamic light scattering. These studies provide insights into the factors that regulate integrin headpiece opening, and demonstrate the molecular basis for a novel mechanism of integrin antagonism.

  17. Changes in the reproductive function and developmental phenotypes in mice following intramuscular injection of an activin betaA-expressing plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Nyeu; Park, Moon Nyeo; Jung, Hoi Kyung; Cho, Chunghee; Mayo, Kelly E; Cho, Byung-Nam

    2008-01-01

    Background The TGF-beta family protein activin has numerous reported activities with some uncertainty in the reproductive axis and development. The precise roles of activin in in vivo system were investigated using a transient gain of function model. Methods To this end, an expression plasmid, pCMV-rAct, with the activin betaA cDNA fused to the cytomegalovirus promoter, was introduced into muscle of the female adult mice by direct injection. Results Activin betaA mRNA was detected in the muscle by RT-PCR and subsequent Southern blot analysis. Activin betaA was also detected, and western blot analysis revealed a relatively high level of serum activin with correspondingly increased FSH. In the pCMV-rAct-injected female mice, estrus stage within the estrous cycle was extended. Moreover, increased numbers of corpora lutea and a thickened granulosa cell layer with a small antrum in tertiary follicles within the ovary were observed. When injected female mice were mated with males of proven fertility, a subset of embryos died in utero, and most of those that survived exhibited increased body weight. Conclusion Taken together, our data reveal that activin betaA can directly influence the estrous cycle, an integral part of the reproduction in female mice and activin betaA can also influence the embryo development as an endocrine fashion. PMID:19077325

  18. SEARCH FOR PRECURSOR ERUPTIONS AMONG TYPE IIB SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Strotjohann, Nora L.; Ofek, Eran O.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Sullivan, Mark; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Cao, Yi; Shaviv, Nir J.; Fremling, Christoffer; Sollerman, Jesper; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Nugent, Peter E.; Arcavi, Iair; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason

    2015-10-01

    The progenitor stars of several Type IIb supernovae (SNe) show indications of extended hydrogen envelopes. These envelopes might be the outcome of luminous energetic pre-explosion events, so-called precursor eruptions. We use the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) pre-explosion observations of a sample of 27 nearby SNe IIb to look for such precursors during the final years prior to the SN explosion. No precursors are found when combining the observations in 15-day bins, and we calculate the absolute-magnitude-dependent upper limit on the precursor rate. At the 90% confidence level, SNe IIb have on average <0.86 precursors as bright as an absolute R-band magnitude of −14 in the final 3.5 years before the explosion and <0.56 events over the final year. In contrast, precursors among SNe IIn have a ≳5 times higher rate. The kinetic energy required to unbind a low-mass stellar envelope is comparable to the radiated energy of a few-weeks-long precursor that would be detectable for the closest SNe in our sample. Therefore, mass ejections, if they are common in such SNe, are radiatively inefficient or have durations longer than months. Indeed, when using 60-day bins, a faint precursor candidate is detected prior to SN 2012cs (∼2% false-alarm probability). We also report the detection of the progenitor of SN 2011dh that does not show detectable variability over the final two years before the explosion. The suggested progenitor of SN 2012P is still present, and hence is likely a compact star cluster or an unrelated object.

  19. Creep test results on D0 RunIIB stave

    SciTech Connect

    Lanfranco, Giobatta; /Fermilab

    2003-12-01

    The D0 RunIIb final design stave has been tested to verify its response to long term loading (creep). Two stave mockups have been investigated. Mechanical stave No.3 has been under continuous loading for 8 weeks. The maximum deflection was 3.6 {micro}m, with 80% of the total sag reached after the first two weeks. Mechanical stave No.2, despite the denomination, has been assembled successively with improved gluing assembly process and tested for six weeks. No creep mechanism has been observed in this surveyed mockup.

  20. AdS3 Solutions of IIB Supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Nakwoo

    2005-12-02

    We consider pure D3-brane configurations of IIB string theory which lead to supergravity solutions containing an AdS3 factor. They can provide new examples of AdS3/CFT2 examples on D3-branes whose worldvolume is partially compactified. When the internal 7 dimensional space is non-compact, they are related to fluctuations of higher dimensional AdS/CFT duality examples, thus dual to the BPS operators of D = 4 superconformal field theories. We find that supersymmetry requires the 7 dimensional space is warped Hopf-fibration of (real) 6 dimensional Kahler manifolds.

  1. Hematopoietic cell transplantation for mucopolysaccharidosis IIB (Hunter syndrome).

    PubMed

    Peters, C; Krivit, W

    2000-05-01

    Hunter syndrome is an X-linked metabolic storage disorder arising from deficiency of iduronate sulfatase enzyme activity. Despite the successful use of hematopoietic cell transplantation for a variety of lysosomal and peroxisomal storage diseases, limited benefit occurs following transplantation in either the severe or mild forms of Hunter syndrome. A brief ethical commentary is provided on the case of a boy with mucopolysaccharidosis IIB (ie the mild form) who received an unrelated umbilical cord blood transplant to improve his future quality of life. Bone Marrow Transplantation (2000).

  2. Vertex operators of ghost number three in Type IIB supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Andrei

    2016-06-01

    We study the cohomology of the massless BRST complex of the Type IIB pure spinor superstring in flat space. In particular, we find that the cohomology at the ghost number three is nontrivial and transforms in the same representation of the supersymmetry algebra as the solutions of the linearized classical supergravity equations. Modulo some finite dimensional spaces, the ghost number three cohomology is the same as the ghost number two cohomology. We also comment on the difference between the naive and semi-relative cohomology, and the role of b-ghost.

  3. Pharmacophore refinement of gpIIb/IIIa antagonists based on comparative studies of antiadhesive cyclic and acyclic RGD peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Gerhard; Gurrath, Marion; Kessler, Horst

    1994-12-01

    Structurally guided design approaches to low-molecular-weight platelet aggregation antagonists addressing the platelet-associated heterodimeric cell surface receptor gpIIb/IIIa rely on comparative studies of an ensemble of conformationally and biologically characterized compounds, since no high-resolution structure of the receptor system is available. We report a classical indirect and comparative pharmacophore refinement approach based on a series of small cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides as gpIIb/IIIa-fibrinogen interaction antagonists. These peptides have previously been investigated as potent and selective tumor cell adhesion inhibitors. The definition of geometrical descriptors classifying the RGD peptide conformations and their subsequent analysis over selected RGD- and RXD-containing protein structures allows for a correlation of distinct structural features for platelet aggregation inhibition. An almost parallel alignment of the Arg and Asp side chains was identified by a vector analysis as being present in all active cyclic hexa-and pentapeptides. This orientation is induced mainly by the constraint of backbone cyclization and is not of any covalent tripeptide-inherent origin, which was rationalized by a 500 ps high-energy MD simulation of a sequentially related linear model peptide. The incorporation of the recognition tripeptide Arg-Gly-Asp into the cyclic peptide templates acted as a filter mechanism, restricting the otherwise free torsional relation of both side chains to a parallel orientation. Based on the derived results, several detailed features of the receptor binding site could be deduced in terms of receptor complementarity. These findings should govern the design of next-generation compounds with enhanced activities. Furthermore, the complementary stereochemical characteristics of the substrate can be used as boundary conditions for pseudoreceptor modelling studies that are capable of reconstructing a hypothetical binding pocket

  4. The Platelet Integrin αIIbβ3 Differentially Interacts with Fibrin Versus Fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Litvinov, Rustem I; Farrell, David H; Weisel, John W; Bennett, Joel S

    2016-04-08

    Fibrinogen binding to the integrin αIIbβ3 mediates platelet aggregation and spreading on fibrinogen-coated surfaces. However,in vivoαIIbβ3 activation and fibrinogen conversion to fibrin occur simultaneously, although the relative contributions of fibrinogenversusfibrin to αIIbβ3-mediated platelet functions are unknown. Here, we compared the interaction of αIIbβ3 with fibrin and fibrinogen to explore their differential effects. A microscopic bead coated with fibrinogen or monomeric fibrin produced by treating the immobilized fibrinogen with thrombin was captured by a laser beam and repeatedly brought into contact with surface-attached purified αIIbβ3. When αIIbβ3-ligand complexes were detected, the rupture forces were measured and displayed as force histograms. Monomeric fibrin displayed a higher probability of interacting with αIIbβ3 and a greater binding strength. αIIbβ3-fibrin interactions were also less sensitive to inhibition by abciximab and eptifibatide. Both fibrinogen- and fibrin-αIIbβ3 interactions were partially inhibited by RGD peptides, suggesting the existence of common RGD-containing binding motifs. This assumption was supported using the fibrin variants αD97E or αD574E with mutated RGD motifs. Fibrin made from a fibrinogen γ'/γ' variant lacking the γC αIIbβ3-binding motif was more reactive with αIIbβ3 than the parent fibrinogen. These results demonstrate that fibrin is more reactive with αIIbβ3 than fibrinogen. Fibrin is also less sensitive to αIIbβ3 inhibitors, suggesting that fibrin and fibrinogen have distinct binding requirements. In particular, the maintenance of αIIbβ3 binding activity in the absence of the γC-dodecapeptide and the α-chain RGD sequences suggests that the αIIbβ3-binding sites in fibrin are not confined to its known γ-chain and RGD motifs.

  5. Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva-related Activated Activin-like Kinase Signaling Enhances Osteoclast Formation during Heterotopic Ossification in Muscle Tissues*

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Masato; Kawao, Naoyuki; Okumoto, Katsumi; Tamura, Yukinori; Okada, Kiyotaka; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva is characterized by extensive ossification within muscle tissues, and its molecular pathogenesis is responsible for the constitutively activating mutation (R206H) of the bone morphogenetic protein type 1 receptor, activin-like kinase 2 (ALK2). In this study, we investigated the effects of implanting ALK2 (R206H)-transfected myoblastic C2C12 cells into nude mice on osteoclast formation during heterotopic ossification in muscle and subcutaneous tissues. The implantation of ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells with BMP-2 in nude mice induced robust heterotopic ossification with an increase in the formation of osteoclasts in muscle tissues but not in subcutaneous tissues. The implantation of ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells in muscle induced heterotopic ossification more effectively than that of empty vector-transfected cells. A co-culture of ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells as well as the conditioned medium from ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells enhanced osteoclast formation in Raw264.7 cells more effectively than those with empty vector-transfected cells. The transfection of ALK2 (R206H) into C2C12 cells elevated the expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, whereas the inhibition of TGF-β signaling suppressed the enhanced formation of osteoclasts in the co-culture with ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells and their conditioned medium. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the causal mutation transfection of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva in myoblasts enhanced the formation of osteoclasts from its precursor through TGF-β in muscle tissues. PMID:24798338

  6. Multiwavelength observations of the Type IIb supernova 2009mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oates, S. R.; Bayless, A. J.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Prichard, T.; Prieto, J. L.; Immler, S.; Brown, P. J.; Breeveld, A. A.; De Pasquale, M.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Hamuy, M.; Holland, S. T.; Taddia, F.; Roming, P. W. A.

    2012-08-01

    We present Swift Ultra-Violet Optical Telescope and X-Ray Telescope (XRT) observations, and visual wavelength spectroscopy of the Type IIb supernova (SN) 2009mg, discovered in the Sb galaxy ESO 121-G26. The observational properties of SN 2009mg are compared to the prototype Type IIb SNe 1993J and 2008ax, with which we find many similarities. However, minor differences are discernible including SN 2009mg not exhibiting an initial fast decline or u-band upturn as observed in the comparison objects, and its rise to maximum is somewhat slower leading to slightly broader light curves. The late-time temporal index of SN 2009mg, determined from 40 d post-explosion, is consistent with the decay rate of SN 1993J, but inconsistent with the decay of 56Co. This suggests leakage of γ-rays out of the ejecta and a stellar mass on the small side of the mass distribution. Our XRT non-detection provides an upper limit on the mass-loss rate of the progenitor of ?. Modelling of the SN light curve indicates a kinetic energy of ?, an ejecta mass of ? and a 56Ni mass of 0.10 ± 0.01 M⊙. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5-m Magellan telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, and the Gemini Observatory, Cerro Pachon, Chile (Gemini Programmes GS-2009B-Q-9, GS-2009B-Q-40 and GS-2009B-Q-67).

  7. Type IIB flux vacua from G-theory I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candelas, Philip; Constantin, Andrei; Damian, Cesar; Larfors, Magdalena; Morales, Jose Francisco

    2015-02-01

    We construct non-perturbatively exact four-dimensional Minkowski vacua of type IIB string theory with non-trivial fluxes. These solutions are found by gluing together, consistently with U-duality, local solutions of type IIB supergravity on with the metric, dilaton and flux potentials varying along and the flux potentials oriented along T 4. We focus on solutions locally related via U-duality to non-compact Ricci-flat geometries. More general solutions and a complete analysis of the supersymmetry equations are presented in the companion paper [1]. We build a precise dictionary between fluxes in the global solutions and the geometry of an auxiliary K3 surface fibered over . In the spirit of F-theory, the flux potentials are expressed in terms of locally holomorphic functions that parametrize the complex structure moduli space of the K3 fiber in the auxiliary geometry. The brane content is inferred from the monodromy data around the degeneration points of the fiber.

  8. Dealing with unanticipated events in autonomous navigation. [HERMIES-IIB

    SciTech Connect

    Burks, B.L.; Barnett, D.L.; Killough, S.M.; Mann, R.C.; Pin, F.G.

    1987-09-01

    In this paper, we describe advances to our mobile robot series (currently HERMIES-IIB) to include 8 NCUBE processors onboard (computationally equivalent to 8 Vax 11/780's) operating in parallel, and augmentation of the sensor suite with cameras to facilitate on-board vision analysis and goal finding. The essential capabilities of the expert system described in our earlier paper have also been ported to the on-board HERMIES-IIB computers thereby eliminating off-board computation. We describe a successful experiment in which a robot is placed in an initial arbitrary location without prior specification of the room contents, successfully discovers and navigates around stationary and occasionally moving obstacles, picks up and moves small obstacles, searches for a control panel, and reads the meters found on the panel. The success of this experiment encourages more complex on-board vision analysis and expert system control in dynamic environments. The experiment will be expanded to include research in robot learning as the robot attempts to adjust the meter reading to a particular value without a priori knowledge of the control panel system dynamics. 18 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Arsenate transport by sodium/phosphate cotransporter type IIb

    SciTech Connect

    Villa-Bellosta, Ricardo; Sorribas, Victor

    2010-08-15

    Arsenic is a metalloid that causes the dysfunction of critical enzymes, oxidative stress, and malignancies. In recent years several transporters of As{sup III} have been identified, including aquaglyceroporins (AQP) and multidrug resistance proteins (MRP). As{sup V} transport, however, has not been sufficiently studied because it has been assumed that arsenate is taken up by mammalian cells through inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporters. In this paper we have analyzed the role of Pi transporters in the uptake of arsenate by directly using {sup 73}As{sup V} as a radiotracer in phosphate transporter-expressing Xenopus laevis oocytes. The affinities of Pi transporters for H{sub 3}AsO{sub 4} were lower than the affinities for Pi. NaPiIIa, NaPiIIc, Pit1, and Pit2 showed a K{sub m} for arsenate that was > 1 mM (i.e., at least ten times lower than the affinities for Pi). The NaPiIIb isoform showed the highest affinity for As{sup V} in mouse (57 {mu}M), rat (51 {mu}M), and human (9.7 {mu}M), which are very similar to the affinities for Pi. Therefore, NaPiIIb can have a prominent role in the toxicokinetics of arsenic following oral exposure to freshwater or food contaminated with As{sup V}.

  10. Docetaxel, Carboplatin, Trastuzumab, and Pertuzumab With or Without Estrogen Deprivation in Treating Patients With Hormone Receptor-Positive, HER2-Positive Operable or Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-12

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Positive; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  11. The Expression of Human Cytomegalovirus MicroRNA MiR-UL148D during Latent Infection in Primary Myeloid Cells Inhibits Activin A-triggered Secretion of IL-6

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Betty; Poole, Emma; Krishna, Benjamin; Sellart, Immaculada; Wills, Mark R.; Murphy, Eain; Sinclair, John

    2016-01-01

    The successful establishment and maintenance of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency is dependent on the expression of a subset of viral genes. Whilst the exact spectrum and functions of these genes are far from clear, inroads have been made for protein-coding genes. In contrast, little is known about the expression of non-coding RNAs. Here we show that HCMV encoded miRNAs are expressed de novo during latent infection of primary myeloid cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that miR-UL148D, one of the most highly expressed viral miRNAs during latent infection, directly targets the cellular receptor ACVR1B of the activin signalling axis. Consistent with this, we observed upregulation of ACVR1B expression during latent infection with a miR-UL148D deletion virus (ΔmiR-UL148D). Importantly, we observed that monocytes latently infected with ΔmiR-UL148D are more responsive to activin A stimulation, as demonstrated by their increased secretion of IL-6. Collectively, our data indicates miR-UL148D inhibits ACVR1B expression in latently infected cells to limit proinflammatory cytokine secretion, perhaps as an immune evasion strategy or to postpone cytokine-induced reactivation until conditions are more favourable. This is the first demonstration of an HCMV miRNA function during latency in primary myeloid cells, implicating that small RNA species may contribute significantly to latent infection. PMID:27491954

  12. (alpha)IIb Integrin, a novel marker for hemopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Corbel, Catherine; Vaigot, Pierre; Salaün, Josselyne

    2005-01-01

    Integrin (alpha)IIb(beta)3 (abbreviated as (alpha)IIb), also known as GPIIb-IIIa or CD41/CD61, is a cell adhesion molecule expressed on cells belonging to the megakaryocytic lineage. Aiming to identify new markers of hemopoietic progenitor cells (HPC), we undertook a developmental study of this molecule since it remains controversial if this integrin is expressed by various progenitors. We reported the expression pattern of two integrins, in both of which the beta3 chain is present, respectively associated with alphaV and alpha IIb in the chick embryo. While at E3.5, the earliest time at which these integrins can be detected, (alpha)V(beta)3 becomes expressed by endothelial cells in the aorta (and only in the aorta), (alpha)IIb(beta)3 becomes detected in the well-defined intra-aortic clusters made up of HPC. The latter were found to be multilineage progenitors when sorted for (alpha)IIb expression and analyzed by means of clonogenic assays. In mice also, (alpha)IIb is expressed in the intra-embryonic site of HPC generation, the intra-arterial clusters in the embryo proper, as well as in sites where HPC migrate. Finally we provided the first evidence in two species that multipotent HPC expressing (alpha)IIb are able to differentiate not only into cells of the erythroid and myeloid lineages but also into lymphocytes. These cell populations actually coexpress (alpha)IIb and c-Kit. These data establish (alpha)IIb as a novel marker for HPC, which appears at very early stages in the embryo. Capitalizing on this finding, other investigators confirmed it and suggested that (alpha)IIb plays a role in regulating hematopoietic development.

  13. An Activin/Furin Regulatory Loop Modulates the Processing and Secretion of Inhibin α- and βB-Subunit Dimers in Pituitary Gonadotrope Cells*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Antenos, Monica; Zhu, Jie; Jetly, Niti M.; Woodruff, Teresa K.

    2008-01-01

    Of all ligands of the transforming growth factor β superfamily, inhibins and activins are a physiologically relevant pair that are functional antagonists of each other. Activin stimulates whereas inhibin blocks follicle-stimulating hormone biosynthesis and secretion from pituitary gonadotrope cells, and together, inhibin and activin control the pituitary gonadal axis essential for normal reproductive function. Sharing a similar β-subunit, the secretion of inhibin heterodimers (α/β) or activin homodimers (β/β) as mature bioactive ligands depends, in part, on the proteolytic processing of precursor proteins. A short loop regulatory pathway controlling precursor processing and dimer secretion was discovered. Activin stimulates endogenous inhibin α- and βB-subunit mRNA, protein, and proteolytic processing. Simultaneously, activin stimulated the proconvertase furin through a Smad2/3-dependent process. The data provide a mechanism where the regulation of furin and inhibin subunits cooperates in an important positive short feedback loop. This regulatory loop augments the secretion of bioactive mature activin B, as well as inhibin B dimers, necessary for local follicle-stimulating hormone β regulation. PMID:18826955

  14. Activin B induces human endometrial cancer cell adhesion, migration and invasion by up-regulating integrin β3 via SMAD2/3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Siyuan; Klausen, Christian; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Zhu, Hua; Leung, Peter C K

    2015-10-13

    Endometrial cancer is the fourth most common female cancer and the most common gynecological malignancy. Although it comprises only ~10% of all endometrial cancers, the serous histological subtype accounts for ~40% of deaths due to its aggressive behavior and propensity to metastasize. Histopathological studies suggest that elevated expression of activin/inhibin βB subunit is associated with reduced survival in non-endometrioid endometrial cancers (type II, mostly serous). However, little is known about the specific roles and mechanisms of activin B (βB dimer) in serous endometrial cancer growth and progression. In the present study, we examined the biological functions of activin B in type II endometrial cancer cell lines, HEC-1B and KLE. Our results demonstrate that treatment with activin B increases cell migration, invasion and adhesion to vitronectin, but does not affect cell viability. Moreover, we show that activin B treatment increases integrin β3 mRNA and protein levels via SMAD2/3-SMAD4 signaling. Importantly, siRNA knockdown studies revealed that integrin β3 is required for basal and activin B-induced cell migration, invasion and adhesion. Our results suggest that activin B-SMAD2/3-integrin β3 signaling could contribute to poor patient survival by promoting the invasion and/or metastasis of type II endometrial cancers.

  15. Activin B Regulates Adipose-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Promote Skin Wound Healing via Activation of the MAPK Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Xu, Pengcheng; Wang, Xueer; Zhang, Min; Yan, Yuan; Chen, Yinghua; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Lin

    2017-04-07

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are multipotent stromal cells that can differentiate into a variety of cell types, including skin cells, and they can provide an abundant source of cells for skin tissue engineering and skin wound healing. The purpose of this study is to explore the therapeutic effects of activin B in combination with ADSCs and the possible signaling mechanism. In this study, we found that activin B was able to promote ADSC migration by inducing actin stress fiber formation in vitro. In vivo, activin B in combination with ADSCs was capable of enhancing α-SMA expression and wound closure. This combined treatment also promoted fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation and accelerated re-epithelialization and collagen deposition. Moreover, activin B in combination with ADSCs boosted angiogenesis in the wound area. Further study of the mechanism revealed that activation of JNK and ERK signaling, but not p38 signaling, were required for activin B-induced ADSC actin stress fiber formation and cell migration. These results showed that activin B was able to activate JNK and ERK signaling pathways to induce actin stress fiber formation and ADSC migration to promote wound healing. These results suggest that combined treatment with activin B and ADSCs is a promising therapeutic strategy for the management of serious skin wounds.

  16. Genomic clone encoding the. cap alpha. chain of the OKM1, LFA-1, and platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, L.J.; Sandrin, M.S.; Rajasekariah, P.; McKenzie, I.F.C.

    1986-02-01

    LFA-1, an antigen involved in cytolytic T lymphocyte-mediated killing, and Mac-1, the receptor for complement component C3bi, constitute a family of structurally and functionally related cell surface glycoproteins involved in cellular interactions. In both mouse and man, Mac-1 (OKM1) and LFA-1 share a common 95-kDa ..beta.. subunit but are distinguished by their ..cap alpha.. chains, which have different cellular distributions, apparent molecular masses (165 and 177 kDa, respectively), and peptide maps. The authors report the isolation of a genomic clone from a human genomic library that on transfection into mouse fibroblasts produced a molecule(s) reactive with monoclonal antibodies to OKM1, to LFA-1, and to platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa. This gene was cloned by several cycles of transfection of L cells with a human genomic library cloned in lambda phase Charon 4A and subsequent rescue of the lambda phage. Transfection with the purified recombinant lambda DNA yielded a transfectant that expressed the three human ..cap alpha.. chains of OKM1, LFA-1, and glycoprotein IIb-IIIa, presumably in association with the murine ..beta.. chain.

  17. The Cassiopeia A supernova was of type IIb.

    PubMed

    Krause, Oliver; Birkmann, Stephan M; Usuda, Tomonori; Hattori, Takashi; Goto, Miwa; Rieke, George H; Misselt, Karl A

    2008-05-30

    Cassiopeia A is the youngest supernova remnant known in the Milky Way and a unique laboratory for supernova physics. We present an optical spectrum of the Cassiopeia A supernova near maximum brightness, obtained from observations of a scattered light echo more than three centuries after the direct light of the explosion swept past Earth. The spectrum shows that Cassiopeia A was a type IIb supernova and originated from the collapse of the helium core of a red supergiant that had lost most of its hydrogen envelope before exploding. Our finding concludes a long-standing debate on the Cassiopeia A progenitor and provides new insight into supernova physics by linking the properties of the explosion to the wealth of knowledge about its remnant.

  18. CDF run IIb silicon detector: The innermost layer

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Busetto, G.; Hara, K.; Kim, S.; Manea, C.; Wang, Z.; Behari, S.; Maksimovic, P.; Benjamin, D.; Cabrera, S.; Kruse, M.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Canepa,A.; Fernandez, J.P.; Booth, P.; Cooke, P.; Cascella, M.; Cardoso, G.; Derylo, G.; Flaugher, B.; Hrycyk, M.; Kuznetsova, N.; Lukens, P.; Nelson,T.; Orlov, Y.; Wester, W.; Yun, J.C.; Chertok, M.; Holbrook, B.; Lander,R.; Landry, T.; Pellett, D.; Soha, A.; Yao, W.; Ciobanu, C.I.; Junk, T.; Feng, E.J.; Freeman, J.; Galtieri, L.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Haber, C.; Lujan, P.J.; Mandelli, E.; Weber, M.; Zetti, F.; Zimmermann, S.; Goldstein, J.; Harr, R.; Hill, C.; Himmel, A.; Incandela, J.; Stuart, D.; Kobayashi, K.; Nakano, I.; Tanaka, R.; Kong, D.J.; Yang, Y.C.; Lauhakangas, R.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Lu, R.-S.; Min, S.N.; Okusawa,T.; Yamamoto, K.; Tavi, M.; Zucchelli, S.; Hong, S.C.; Jeon, E.J.; Joo,K.K.; Lee, J.

    2003-10-24

    The innermost layer (L00) of the Run IIa silicon detector of CDF was planned to be replaced for the high luminosity Tevatron upgrade of Run IIb. This new silicon layer (L0) is designed to be a radiation tolerant replacement for the otherwise very similar L00 from Run IIa. The data are read out via long, fine-pitch, low-mass cables allowing the hybrids with the chips to sit at higher z(/spl sim/70 cm), outside of the tracking volume. The design and first results from the prototyping phase are presented. Special focus is placed on the amount and the structure of induced noise as well as signal-to-noise values.

  19. Affleck-Dine baryogenesis in type IIB string models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahverdi, Rouzbeh; Cicoli, Michele; Muia, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    We propose a possible string embedding of Affleck-Dine baryogenesis in type IIB sequestered models where the late-time decay of the lightest modulus reheats the universe to relatively low temperatures. We show that if inflation is driven by a blow-up Kähler modulus, the Affleck-Dine field can become tachyonic during inflation if the Kähler metric for matter fields has an appropriate inflaton-dependent contribution. We find that the Affleck-Dine mechanism can generate the observed baryon asymmetry for natural values of the underlying parameters which lead also to successful inflation and low-energy gaugino masses in a split supersymmetry scenario. The reheating temperature from the lightest modulus decay is high enough to allow thermal Higgsino-like dark matter.

  20. Activin Plays a Key Role in the Maintenance of Long-Term Memory and Late-LTP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ageta, Hiroshi; Ikegami, Shiro; Miura, Masami; Masuda, Masao; Migishima, Rika; Hino, Toshiaki; Takashima, Noriko; Murayama, Akiko; Sugino, Hiromu; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Kida, Satoshi; Yokoyama, Minesuke; Hasegawa, Yoshihisa; Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Aosaki, Toshihiko; Inokuchi, Kaoru

    2010-01-01

    A recent study has revealed that fear memory may be vulnerable following retrieval, and is then reconsolidated in a protein synthesis-dependent manner. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of these processes. Activin [beta]A, a member of the TGF-[beta] superfamily, is increased in activated neuronal circuits and regulates…

  1. Activin A Modulates CRIPTO-1/HNF4α+ Cells to Guide Cardiac Differentiation from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Duelen, Robin; Gilbert, Guillaume; Patel, Abdulsamie; de Schaetzen, Nathalie; De Waele, Liesbeth; Roderick, Llewelyn; Sipido, Karin R.; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Buyse, Gunnar M.

    2017-01-01

    The use of human pluripotent stem cells in basic and translational cardiac research requires efficient differentiation protocols towards cardiomyocytes. In vitro differentiation yields heterogeneous populations of ventricular-, atrial-, and nodal-like cells hindering their potential applications in regenerative therapies. We described the effect of the growth factor Activin A during early human embryonic stem cell fate determination in cardiac differentiation. Addition of high levels of Activin A during embryoid body cardiac differentiation augmented the generation of endoderm derivatives, which in turn promoted cardiomyocyte differentiation. Moreover, a dose-dependent increase in the coreceptor expression of the TGF-β superfamily member CRIPTO-1 was observed in response to Activin A. We hypothesized that interactions between cells derived from meso- and endodermal lineages in embryoid bodies contributed to improved cell maturation in early stages of cardiac differentiation, improving the beating frequency and the percentage of contracting embryoid bodies. Activin A did not seem to affect the properties of cardiomyocytes at later stages of differentiation, measuring action potentials, and intracellular Ca2+ dynamics. These findings are relevant for improving our understanding on human heart development, and the proposed protocol could be further explored to obtain cardiomyocytes with functional phenotypes, similar to those observed in adult cardiac myocytes. PMID:28163723

  2. Human platelet activation by Escherichia coli: roles for FcγRIIA and integrin αIIbβ3

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Callum N.; Kerrigan, Steven W.; Cox, Dermot; Henderson, Ian R.; Watson, Steve P.; Arman, Mònica

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gram-negative Escherichia coli cause diseases such as sepsis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in which thrombotic disorders can be found. Direct platelet–bacterium interactions might contribute to some of these conditions; however, mechanisms of human platelet activation by E. coli leading to thrombus formation are poorly understood. While the IgG receptor FcγRIIA has a key role in platelet response to various Gram-positive species, its role in activation to Gram-negative bacteria is poorly defined. This study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms of human platelet activation by E. coli, including the potential role of FcγRIIA. Using light-transmission aggregometry, measurements of ATP release and tyrosine-phosphorylation, we investigated the ability of two E. coli clinical isolates to activate platelets in plasma, in the presence or absence of specific receptors and signaling inhibitors. Aggregation assays with washed platelets supplemented with IgGs were performed to evaluate the requirement of this plasma component in activation. We found a critical role for the immune receptor FcγRIIA, αIIbβ3, and Src and Syk tyrosine kinases in platelet activation in response to E. coli. IgG and αIIbβ3 engagement was required for FcγRIIA activation. Moreover, feedback mediators adenosine 5’-diphosphate (ADP) and thromboxane A2 (TxA2) were essential for platelet aggregation. These findings suggest that human platelet responses to E. coli isolates are similar to those induced by Gram-positive organisms. Our observations support the existence of a central FcγRIIA-mediated pathway by which human platelets respond to both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:27025455

  3. Studies of tricyclic piperazine/piperidine furnished molecules as novel integrin αvβ3/αIIbβ3 dual antagonists using 3D-QSAR and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yulian; Li, Yan; Zhang, Shuwei; Ai, Chunzhi

    2011-02-01

    The development of injectable integrin α(v)β(3)/α(IIb)β(3) dual antagonists attracts much attention of research for treating of acute ischemic diseases in recent years. In this work, based on a dataset composed of 102 tricyclic piperazine/piperidine furnished dual α(v)β(3) and α(IIb)β(3) antagonists, a variety of in silico modeling approaches including the comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), comparative similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA), and molecular docking were applied to reveal the requisite 3D structural features impacting the biological activities. Our statistical results show that the ligand-based 3D-QSAR models for both the α(v)β(3) and α(IIb)β(3) studies exhibited satisfactory internal and external predictability, i.e., for the CoMFA models, results of Q(2)=0.48, R(ncv)(2)=0.87, R(pred)(2)=0.71 for α(v)β(3) and Q(2)=0.50, R(ncv)(2)=0.85, R(pred)(2)=0.72 for α(IIb)β(3) analysis were obtained, and for the CoMSIA ones, the outcomes of Q(2)=0.55, R(ncv)(2)=0.90, R(pred)(2)=0.72 for α(v)β(3) and Q(2)=0.52, R(ncv)(2)=0.88, R(pred)(2)=0.74 for α(IIb)β(3) were achieved respectively. In addition, through a comparison between 3D-QSAR contour maps and docking results, it is revealed that that the most crucial interactions occurring between the tricyclic piperazine/piperidine derivatives and α(v)β(3)/α(IIb)β(3) receptor ligand binding pocket are H-bonding, and the key amino acids impacting the interactions are Arg214, Asn215, Ser123, and Lys253 for α(v)β(3), but Arg214, Asn215, Ser123 and Tyr190 for α(IIb)β(3) receptors, respectively. Halogen-containing groups at position 15 and 16, benzene sulfonamide substituent at position 23, and the replacement of piperazine with 4-aminopiperidine of ring B may increase the α(v)β(3)/α(IIb)β(3) antagonistic activity. The potencies for antagonists to inhibit isolated α(v)β(3) and α(IIb)β(3) are linear correlated, indicating that similar interaction mechanisms may exist for the series

  4. Cell type specific targeted intracellular delivery into muscle of a monoclonal antibody that binds myosin IIb.

    PubMed

    Weisbart, Richard H; Yang, Fusheng; Chan, Grace; Wakelin, Rika; Ferreri, Kevin; Zack, Debra J; Harrison, Brooke; Leinwand, Leslie A; Cole, Greg M

    2003-03-01

    Methods for cell type specific targeted intracellular delivery of proteins in vivo remain limited. A murine monoclonal anti-dsDNA antibody, mAb 3E10, was selectively transported into skeletal muscle cells in vivo. The antibody bound a 200 kDa protein only found in lysates of skeletal muscle by Western blotting. The 200 kDa protein was purified from muscle lysate by antibody affinity chromatography and identified as the skeletal muscle specific heavy chain of myosin IIb by electrospray mass spectrometry. Antibody binding specificity for myosin IIb was demonstrated in Western blots by binding myosin in skeletal muscle lysates from mice null for myosin IId but not in mice null for myosin IIb. Myosin IIb is implicated in the specific targeting of mAb 3E10 to skeletal muscle.

  5. Combinatorial actions of Tgfβ and Activin ligands promote oligodendrocyte development and CNS myelination.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Dipankar J; Zameer, Andleeb; Mariani, John N; Zhang, Jingya; Asp, Linnea; Huynh, Jimmy; Mahase, Sean; Laitman, Benjamin M; Argaw, Azeb Tadesse; Mitiku, Nesanet; Urbanski, Mateusz; Melendez-Vasquez, Carmen V; Casaccia, Patrizia; Hayot, Fernand; Bottinger, Erwin P; Brown, Chester W; John, Gareth R

    2014-06-01

    In the embryonic CNS, development of myelin-forming oligodendrocytes is limited by bone morphogenetic proteins, which constitute one arm of the transforming growth factor-β (Tgfβ) family and signal canonically via Smads 1/5/8. Tgfβ ligands and Activins comprise the other arm and signal via Smads 2/3, but their roles in oligodendrocyte development are incompletely characterized. Here, we report that Tgfβ ligands and activin B (ActB) act in concert in the mammalian spinal cord to promote oligodendrocyte generation and myelination. In mouse neural tube, newly specified oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLPs) are first exposed to Tgfβ ligands in isolation, then later in combination with ActB during maturation. In primary OLP cultures, Tgfβ1 and ActB differentially activate canonical Smad3 and non-canonical MAP kinase signaling. Both ligands enhance viability, and Tgfβ1 promotes proliferation while ActB supports maturation. Importantly, co-treatment strongly activates both signaling pathways, producing an additive effect on viability and enhancing both proliferation and differentiation such that mature oligodendrocyte numbers are substantially increased. Co-treatment promotes myelination in OLP-neuron co-cultures, and maturing oligodendrocytes in spinal cord white matter display strong Smad3 and MAP kinase activation. In spinal cords of ActB-deficient Inhbb(-/-) embryos, apoptosis in the oligodendrocyte lineage is increased and OLP numbers transiently reduced, but numbers, maturation and myelination recover during the first postnatal week. Smad3(-/-) mice display a more severe phenotype, including diminished viability and proliferation, persistently reduced mature and immature cell numbers, and delayed myelination. Collectively, these findings suggest that, in mammalian spinal cord, Tgfβ ligands and ActB together support oligodendrocyte development and myelin formation.

  6. Characterization of follistatin-type domains and their contribution to myostatin and activin A antagonism.

    PubMed

    Cash, Jennifer N; Angerman, Elizabeth B; Keutmann, Henry T; Thompson, Thomas B

    2012-07-01

    Follistatin (FST)-type proteins are important antagonists of some members of the large TGF-β family of cytokines. These include myostatin, an important negative regulator of muscle growth, and the closely related activin A, which is involved in many physiological functions, including maintenance of a normal reproductive axis. FST-type proteins, including FST and FST-like 3 (FSTL3), differentially inhibit various TGF-β family ligands by binding each ligand with two FST-type molecules. In this study, we sought to examine features that are important for ligand antagonism by FST-type proteins. Previous work has shown that a modified construct consisting of the FST N-terminal domain (ND) followed by two repeating follistatin domains (FSD), herein called FST ND-FSD1-FSD1, exhibits strong specificity for myostatin over activin A. Using cell-based assays, we show that FST ND-FSD1-FSD1 is unique in its specificity for myostatin as compared with similar constructs containing domains from FSTL3 and that the ND is critical to its activity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that FSD3 of FST provides affinity to ligand inhibition and confers resistance to perturbations in the ND and FSD2, likely through the interaction of FSD3 of one FST molecule with the ND of the other FST molecule. Additionally, our data suggest that this contact provides cooperativity to ligand antagonism. Cross-linking studies show that this interaction also potentiates formation of 1:2 ligand-FST complexes, whereas lack of FSD3 allows formation of 1:1 complexes. Altogether, these studies support that domain differences generate FST-type molecules that are each uniquely suited ligand antagonists.

  7. Integrin αIIb-Mediated PI3K/Akt Activation in Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Haixia; Chen, Xue; Gruppo, Ralph A.; Li, Ding; Wang, Yanhua; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Kemin; Chai, Weiran; Sun, Yueping; Ding, Zhongren; Gartner, T. Kent; Liu, Junling

    2012-01-01

    Integrin αIIbβ3 mediated bidirectional signaling plays a critical role in thrombosis and haemostasis. Signaling mediated by the β3 subunit has been extensively studied, but αIIb mediated signaling has not been characterized. Previously, we reported that platelet granule secretion and TxA2 production induced by αIIb mediated outside-in signaling is negatively regulated by the β3 cytoplasmic domain residues R724KEFAKFEEER734. In this study, we identified part of the signaling pathway utilized by αIIb mediated outside-in signaling. Platelets from humans and gene deficient mice, and genetically modified CHO cells as well as a variety of kinase inhibitors were used for this work. We found that aggregation of TxA2 production and granule secretion by β3Δ724 human platelets initiated by αIIb mediated outside-in signaling was inhibited by the Src family kinase inhibitor PP2 and the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin, respectively, but not by the MAPK inhibitor U0126. Also, PP2 and wortmannin, and the palmitoylated β3 peptide R724KEFAKFEEER734, each inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt residue Ser473 and prevented TxA2 production and storage granule secretion. Similarly, Akt phosphorylation in mouse platelets stimulated by the PAR4 agonist peptide AYPGKF was αIIbβ3-dependent, and blocked by PP2, wortmannin and the palmitoylated peptide p-RKEFAKFEEER. Akt was also phosphorylated in response to mAb D3 plus Fg treatment of CHO cells in suspension expressing αIIbβ3-Δ724 or αIIbβ3E724AERKFERKFE734, but not in cells expressing wild type αIIbβ3. In summary, SFK(s) and PI3K/Akt signaling is utilized by αIIb-mediated outside-in signaling to activate platelets even in the absence of all but 8 membrane proximal residues of the β3 cytoplasmic domain. Our results provide new insight into the signaling pathway used by αIIb-mediated outside-in signaling in platelets. PMID:23082158

  8. Macrophages from the synovium of active rheumatoid arthritis exhibit an activin A-dependent pro-inflammatory profile.

    PubMed

    Soler Palacios, Blanca; Estrada-Capetillo, Lizbeth; Izquierdo, Elena; Criado, Gabriel; Nieto, Concha; Municio, Cristina; González-Alvaro, Isidoro; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Pablos, Jose Luis; Corbí, Angel L; Puig-Kröger, Amaya

    2015-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease whose pathogenesis and severity correlates with the presence of macrophage-derived pro-inflammatory cytokines within the inflamed synovium. Macrophage-derived cytokines fuel the pathological processes in RA and are targets of clinically successful therapies. However, although macrophage polarization determines cytokine production, the polarization state of macrophages in RA joints remains poorly defined. To dissect the molecular basis for the tissue-damaging effects of macrophages in RA joints, we undertook the phenotypic and transcriptomic characterization of ex vivo isolated CD14(+) RA synovial fluid (RA-SF) macrophages. Flow cytometry and gene profiling indicated that RA-SF macrophages express pro-inflammatory polarization markers (MMP12, EGLN3, CCR2), lack expression of markers associated with homeostatic and anti-inflammatory polarization (IGF1, HTR2B) and exhibit a transcriptomic profile that resembles the activin A-dependent gene signature of pro-inflammatory in vitro-generated macrophages. In fact, high levels of Smad-activating activin A were found in RA-SF and, accordingly, the Smad signalling pathway was activated in ex vivo-isolated RA-SF macrophages. In vitro experiments on monocytes and macrophages indicated that RA-SF promoted the acquisition of pro-inflammatory markers (INHBA, MMP12, EGLN3, CCR2) but led to a significant reduction in the expression of genes associated with homeostasis and inflammation resolution (FOLR2, SERPINB2, IGF1, CD36), thus confirming the pro-inflammatory polarization ability of RA-SF. Importantly, the macrophage-polarizing ability of RA-SF was inhibited by an anti-activin A-neutralizing antibody, thus demonstrating that activin A mediates the pro-inflammatory macrophage-polarizing ability of RA-SF. Moreover, and in line with these findings, multicolour immunofluorescence evidenced that macrophages within RA synovial membranes (RA-SM) also express pro

  9. CDF Run IIb silicon: Stave design and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Rong-Shyang Lu

    2003-11-07

    The CDF Silicon Vertex Detectors (SVX) have been shown to be excellent tools for heavy flavor physics, with the secondary vertex detection and good vertex resolution.The CDF RunIIb Silicon Vertex Detector (SVXIIb) was designed to be a radiation tolerant replacement for the current SVXII which was not anticipated to survive the projected Run II luminosity dose. The outer five layers use identical structural elements, called staves, to support six silicon sensors on each side. The stave is composed of carbon fiber skins on a foam core with a built-in cooling tube. Copper on Kapton bus cable carriers power and data/control signals underneath three silicon modules on each side of the stave. A Hybrid equipped with four new SVX4 chips are used to readout two silicon sensors on each module which can be readout and tested independently. This new design concept leads to a very compact mechanical and electrical detecting unit, allowing streamline production and ease of testing and installation. A description of the design and mechanical performance of the stave is given. They also present here results on the electrical performance obtained using prototype staves as well as results with the first pre-production parts.

  10. Nebular spectroscopy of the nearby Type IIb supernova 2011dh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivvers, Isaac; Mazzali, Paolo; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Botyánszki, János; Cenko, S. Bradley; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Kasen, Daniel; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Clubb, Kelsey I.

    2013-12-01

    We present nebular spectra of the nearby Type IIb supernova (SN) 2011dh taken between 201 and 678 d after core collapse. At these late times, SN 2011dh exhibits strong emission lines including a broad and persistent Hα feature. New models of the nebular spectra confirm that the progenitor of SN 2011dh was a low-mass giant (M ≈ 13-15 M⊙) that ejected ˜ 0.07 M⊙ of 56Ni and ˜ 0.27 M⊙ of oxygen at the time of explosion, consistent with the recent disappearance of a candidate yellow supergiant progenitor. We show that light from the SN location is dominated by the fading SN at very late times (˜ 2 yr) and not, for example, by a binary companion or a background source. We present evidence for interaction between the expanding SN blast wave and a circumstellar medium at late times and show that the SN is likely powered by positron deposition ≳1 yr after explosion. We also examine the geometry of the ejecta and show that the nebular line profiles of SN 2011dh indicate a roughly spherical explosion with aspherical components or clumps.

  11. Supersymmetry of AdS and flat IIB backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, S.; Gutowski, J.; Papadopoulos, G.

    2015-02-01

    We present a systematic description of all warped AdS n × w M 10- n and IIB backgrounds and identify the a priori number of supersymmetries N preserved by these solutions. In particular, we find that the AdS n backgrounds preserve for n ≤ 4 and for 4 < n ≤ 6 supersymmetries and for suitably restricted. In addition under some assumptions required for the applicability of the maximum principle, we demonstrate that the Killing spinors of AdS n backgrounds can be identified with the zero modes of Dirac-like operators on M 10- n establishing a new class of Lichnerowicz type theorems. Furthermore, we adapt some of these results to backgrounds with fluxes by taking the AdS radius to infinity. We find that these backgrounds preserve for 2 < n ≤ 4 and for 4 < n ≤ 7 supersymmetries. We also demonstrate that the Killing spinors of AdS n × w M 10- n do not factorize into Killing spinors on AdS n and Killing spinors on M 10- n .

  12. Precipitation of kidney myosin IIA and IIB by freezing.

    PubMed

    Dias, Decivaldo dos Santos; da Cruz, Grabriel Costa Nunes; de Sousa, Marcelo Valle; Coelho, Milton Vieira

    2011-03-01

    Actomyosin precipitation is a critical step in the purification of myosins. In this work, the objective was to precipitate rat kidney actomyosin and isolate myosin by freezing and thawing the soluble fraction. Kidney was homogenized in imidazole buffer, centrifuged at 45000 g for 30 min, and the supernatant was frozen at -20°C for 48 h. The supernatant was thawed at 4°C, centrifuged at 45000 g for 30 min and the precipitate washed twice with imidazole buffer pH 7.0 (with and without Triton X-100, respectively). The resulting precipitate presented a polypeptide profile in SDS/PAGE characteristic of actomyosin and expressed Mg- and K/EDTA-ATPase activity. The actomyosin complex was solubilized with ATP and Mg, and the main polypeptide, p200, was purified in a DEAE-Sepharose column. p200 was marked with anti-myosin II, co-sedimented with F-actin in the absence, but not in the presence, of ATP and was identified by MS/MS with a high Mascot score for myosin IIA. The analysis identified peptides exclusive of myosin IIB, but detected no peptides exclusive of myosin IIC.

  13. The influence of therapeutic blocking of Gp IIb/IIIa on platelet alpha-granular fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Harrison, P; Wilbourn, B; Cramer, E; Faint, R; Mackie, I J; Bhattacharya, S; Lahiri, A; Tenza, D; Machin, S J; Savidge, G F

    1992-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that platelet alpha-granule fibrinogen (fg) is derived from the plasma pool. Since platelets from patients with Type I Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (GT) are deficient in intracellular fibrinogen (fg) it was hypothesized that Gp IIb/IIIa could mediate the uptake of fg. To study the potential role of Gp IIb/IIIa in intracellular fg trafficking, the influence of therapeutic blocking of Gp IIb/IIIa on platelet fg was studied in 12 patients with stable ischaemic heart disease. Patients were either given a single intravenous dose of the monoclonal antibody 7E3 Fab (n = 4) or a combination of bolus and continuous infusion up to 24 (n = 3), 36 (n = 3) or 96 h (n = 2). All patients showed grossly prolonged bleeding times with a significant reduction of ex-vivo ADP induced aggregation. Although, surface Gp IIb/IIIa binding sites were consistently reduced in all patients, there was a variable but delayed decrease in platelet fg relative to vWf:Ag in only six out of the 12 patients studied. The reduction in fg appeared dependent upon both dosage and duration of Gp IIb/IIIa blockade. The study provides further evidence for the novel role of Gp IIb/IIIa in the intracellular trafficking of fg to platelet and megakaryocytic alpha-granules.

  14. Subcellular distribution of non-muscle myosin IIb is controlled by FILIP through Hsc70

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Hideshi; Takabayashi, Tetsuji; Xie, Min-Jue; Kuroda, Kazuki

    2017-01-01

    The neuronal spine is a small, actin-rich dendritic or somatic protrusion that serves as the postsynaptic compartment of the excitatory synapse. The morphology of the spine reflects the activity of the synapse and is regulated by the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton inside, which is controlled by actin binding proteins such as non-muscle myosin. Previously, we demonstrated that the subcellular localization and function of myosin IIb are regulated by its binding partner, filamin-A interacting protein (FILIP). However, how the subcellular distribution of myosin IIb is controlled by FILIP is not yet known. The objective of this study was to identify potential binding partners of FILIP that contribute to its regulation of non-muscle myosin IIb. Pull-down assays detected a 70-kDa protein that was identified by mass spectrometry to be the chaperone protein Hsc70. The binding of Hsc70 to FILIP was controlled by the adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity of Hsc70. Further, FILIP bound to Hsc70 via a domain that was not required for binding non-muscle myosin IIb. Inhibition of ATPase activity of Hsc70 impaired the effect of FILIP on the subcellular distribution of non-muscle myosin IIb. Further, in primary cultured neurons, an inhibitor of Hsc70 impeded the morphological change in spines induced by FILIP. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Hsc70 interacts with FILIP to mediate its effects on non-muscle myosin IIb and to regulate spine morphology. PMID:28234934

  15. Activin/Nodal Signaling Supports Retinal Progenitor Specification in a Narrow Time Window during Pluripotent Stem Cell Neuralization

    PubMed Central

    Bertacchi, Michele; Lupo, Giuseppe; Pandolfini, Luca; Casarosa, Simona; D’Onofrio, Mara; Pedersen, Roger A.; Harris, William A.; Cremisi, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Summary Retinal progenitors are initially found in the anterior neural plate region known as the eye field, whereas neighboring areas undertake telencephalic or hypothalamic development. Eye field cells become specified by switching on a network of eye field transcription factors, but the extracellular cues activating this network remain unclear. In this study, we used chemically defined media to induce in vitro differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) toward eye field fates. Inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling was sufficient to drive ESCs to telencephalic, but not retinal, fates. Instead, retinal progenitors could be generated from competent differentiating mouse ESCs by activation of Activin/Nodal signaling within a narrow temporal window corresponding to the emergence of primitive anterior neural progenitors. Activin also promoted eye field gene expression in differentiating human ESCs. Our results reveal insights into the mechanisms of eye field specification and open new avenues toward the generation of retinal progenitors for translational medicine. PMID:26388287

  16. Adipose stromal cells differentiation toward smooth muscle cell phenotype diminishes their vasculogenic activity due to induction of activin A secretion.

    PubMed

    Merfeld-Clauss, Stephanie; Lease, Benjamin R; Lu, Hongyan; March, Keith L; Traktuev, Dmitry O

    2016-09-16

    Adipose stromal cells (ASCs) support endothelial cell (EC) vasculogenesis through paracrine and cell-contact communications. In addition, ASCs differentiate towards the smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype under different stimuli, which prompted their use as a source of mural cells in fabricating small calibre vessels. How ASCs' SMC-lineage commitment affects their subsequent communication with ECs is unknown. The vasculogenic characteristics of human ASCs in progenitor stage and after differentiation towards SMC phenotype were analysed in the present study. Exposure to transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1 ) or activin A has induced expression of SMC markers in ASCs. Analysis performed after treatment withdrawal revealed that secretome of pre-differentiated ASCs had a reduced potency to support EC survival and these ASCs had diminished ability to support EC vasculogenesis in vitro. Vascularization of subcutaneous implants carrying a mixture of ECs and ASCs was 50% lower when, instead of control, pre-differentiated ASCs were used. Pre-differentiated ASCs had an inferior mitogenic response to EC-produced factors. Differentiation of ASCs was accompanied by upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor and a decrease in hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) production; however, addition of HGF to the co-culture incubation media did not improve vasculogenesis. In parallel, ASC treatment with TGFβ1 induced secretion of activin A. Augmenting co-culture incubation media with anti-activin A IgG restored the ability of pre-differentiated ASCs to support vasculogenesis to the same degree as control ASCs. The present study suggests that TGFβ1 or activin A-induced ASC commitment to SMC phenotype negatively affects the ability of ASCs to support EC vasculogenesis in applications based on EC and ASC co-injection into target tissues. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Distinct modes of SMAD2 chromatin binding and remodeling shape the transcriptional response to NODAL/Activin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Coda, Davide M; Gaarenstroom, Tessa; East, Philip; Patel, Harshil; Miller, Daniel S J; Lobley, Anna; Matthews, Nik; Stewart, Aengus; Hill, Caroline S

    2017-01-01

    NODAL/Activin signaling orchestrates key processes during embryonic development via SMAD2. How SMAD2 activates programs of gene expression that are modulated over time however, is not known. Here we delineate the sequence of events that occur from SMAD2 binding to transcriptional activation, and the mechanisms underlying them. NODAL/Activin signaling induces dramatic chromatin landscape changes, and a dynamic transcriptional network regulated by SMAD2, acting via multiple mechanisms. Crucially we have discovered two modes of SMAD2 binding. SMAD2 can bind pre-acetylated nucleosome-depleted sites. However, it also binds to unacetylated, closed chromatin, independently of pioneer factors, where it induces nucleosome displacement and histone acetylation. For a subset of genes, this requires SMARCA4. We find that long term modulation of the transcriptional responses requires continued NODAL/Activin signaling. Thus SMAD2 binding does not linearly equate with transcriptional kinetics, and our data suggest that SMAD2 recruits multiple co-factors during sustained signaling to shape the downstream transcriptional program. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22474.001 PMID:28191871

  18. Comparison of Diversity of Type IIb Supernovae with Asymmetry in Cassiopeia A Using Light Echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Kieran; Bianco, Federica B.; Modjaz, Maryam; Liu, Yu-Qian; Rest, Armin

    2016-10-01

    We compare the diversity of spectral line velocities in a large sample of type IIb supernovae (SNe IIb) with the expected asphericity in the explosion, as measured from the light echoes (LEs) of Cassiopeia A (Cas A), which was a historical galactic SN IIb. We revisit the results of Rest et al., who used LEs to observe Cas A from multiple lines of sight and hence determine its asphericity, as seen in the velocity of three spectral lines (He i λ5876, Hα, and the Ca ii near-infrared (NIR) triplet). We confirm and improve on this measurement by reproducing the effect of the LEs in the spectra of several extragalactic SNe IIb found in the literature as well as mean SN IIb spectra recently created by Liu et al. and comparing these to the observed light echo spectra of Cas A, including their associated uncertainties. In order to quantify the accuracy of this comparison, we smooth the light echo spectra of Cas A using Gaussian processes and use a Monte Carlo method to measure the absorption velocities of these three features in the spectra. We then test the hypothesis that the diversity of ejecta velocities seen in SNe IIb can be explained by asphericity. We do this by comparing the range of velocities seen in the different LEs, and hence different lines of sight, of Cas A to that seen in the population of SNe IIb. We conclude that these two ranges are of the same order and thus asphericity could be enough to explain the diversity in the expansion velocity alone.

  19. Activin A Inhibits MPTP and LPS-Induced Increases in Inflammatory Cell Populations and Loss of Dopamine Neurons in the Mouse Midbrain In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Stayte, Sandy; Rentsch, Peggy; Tröscher, Anna R.; Bamberger, Maximilian; Li, Kong M.; Vissel, Bryce

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disease characterized by a significant loss of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra pars compacta region and a subsequent loss of dopamine within the striatum. A promising avenue of research has been the administration of growth factors to promote the survival of remaining midbrain neurons, although the mechanism by which they provide neuroprotection is not understood. Activin A, a member of the transforming growth factor β superfamily, has been shown to be a potent anti-inflammatory following acute brain injury and has been demonstrated to play a role in the neuroprotection of midbrain neurons against MPP+-induced degeneration in vitro. We hypothesized that activin A may offer similar anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in in vivo mouse models of Parkinson’s disease. We found that activin A significantly attenuated the inflammatory response induced by both MPTP and intranigral administration of lipopolysaccharide in C57BL/6 mice. We found that administration of activin A promoted survival of dopaminergic and total neuron populations in the pars compacta region both 8 days and 8 weeks after MPTP-induced degeneration. Surprisingly, no corresponding protection of striatal dopamine levels was found. Furthermore, activin A failed to protect against loss of striatal dopamine transporter expression in the striatum, suggesting the neuroprotective action of activin A may be localized to the substantia nigra. Together, these results provide the first evidence that activin A exerts potent neuroprotection and anti-inflammatory effects in the MPTP and lipopolysaccharide mouse models of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:28121982

  20. Activation and shedding of platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa under non-physiological shear stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zengsheng; Mondal, Nandan K; Ding, Jun; Koenig, Steven C; Slaughter, Mark S; Griffith, Bartley P; Wu, Zhongjun J

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of non-physiological high shear stress on activation and shedding of platelet GP IIb/IIIa receptors. The healthy donor blood was exposed to three levels of high shear stresses (25, 75, 125 Pa) from the physiological to non-physiological status with three short exposure time (0.05, 0.5, 1.5 s), created by a specific blood shearing system. The activation and shedding of the platelet GPIIb/IIIa were analyzed using flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, platelet P-selectin expression of sheared blood, which is a marker for activated platelets, was also analyzed. The results from the present study showed that the number of activated platelets, as indicated by the surface GPIIb/IIIa activation and P-selectin expression, increased with increasing the shear stress level and exposure time. However, the mean fluorescence of GPIIb/IIIa on the platelet surface, decreased with increasing the shear stress level and exposure time. The reduction of GPIIb/IIIa on the platelet surface was further proved by the reduction of further activated platelet GPIIb/IIIa surface expression induced by ADP and the increase in GPIIb/IIIa concentration in microparticle-free plasma with increasing the applied shear stress and exposure time. It is clear that non-physiological shear stress induce a paradoxical phenomenon, in which both activation and shedding of the GPIIb/IIIa on the platelet surface occur simultaneously. This study may offer a new perspective to explain the reason of both increased thrombosis and bleeding events in patients implanted with high shear blood-contacting medical devices.

  1. Differential redistribution of platelet glycoproteins Ib and IIb-IIIa after plasmin stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cramer, E M; Lu, H; Caen, J P; Soria, C; Berndt, M C; Tenza, D

    1991-02-15

    The subcellular localization of the platelet membrane receptors glycoproteins (GP) Ib and IIb/IIIa [corrected] has been studied within resting platelets by a combination of biochemical and cytochemical techniques. While both GPIb and GPIIb/IIIa are localized within the plasma membrane and surface-connected canalicular system (SCCS) membranes, only GPIIb/IIIa is present within the internal face of alpha-granular membranes. Previous studies demonstrated that plasmin can induce platelet stimulation and also decrease ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation; it was suggested that this was because of GPIb degradation by plasmin. In this study, the respective localizations of both GPIb and GPIIb/IIIa were visualized during in vitro plasmin stimulation of platelets. Generally, plasmin induced shape change, pseudopod formation, organelle centralization either with or without alpha-granule release depending on the conditions of stimulation. Plasmin treatment of platelets at 37 degrees C resulted in the disappearance of GPIb from the cell surface and its subsequent redistribution into the channels and vesicles of the SCCS with no significant modification of GPIIb/IIIa remaining on the plasma membrane. Within degranulated platelets, GPIIb/IIIa was expressed on the plasma membrane and within membranes of large vacuoles containing the alpha-granule proteins. GPIb was virtually absent from these structures and mainly restricted to the SCCS. Addition of cytochalasin D inhibited the migration of GPIb to the SCCS. Biochemical measurements confirmed that no important hydrolysis of GPIb had occurred because only very little amounts of glycocalicin were generated during the reaction. In conclusion, in plasmin-treated platelets GPIIb/IIIa is externalized to the plasma membrane while GPIb is internalized into the SCCS. Although previous studies have suggested that plasmin degrades GPIb, the reduction in ristocetin-induced aggregation may be explained by its apparent redistribution within

  2. JAM-A protects from thrombosis by suppressing integrin αIIbβ3-dependent outside-in signaling in platelets.

    PubMed

    Naik, Meghna U; Stalker, Timothy J; Brass, Lawrence F; Naik, Ulhas P

    2012-04-05

    Mounting evidence suggests that agonist-initiated signaling in platelets is closely regulated to avoid excessive responses to injury. A variety of physiologic agonists induce a cascade of signaling events termed as inside-out signaling that culminate in exposure of high-affinity binding sites on integrin α(IIb)β(3). Once platelet activation has occurred, integrin α(IIb)β(3) stabilizes thrombus formation by providing agonist-independent "outside-in" signals mediated in part by contractile signaling. Junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A), a member of the cortical thymocyte marker of the Xenopus (CTX) family, was initially identified as a receptor for a platelet stimulatory mAb. Here we show that JAM-A in resting platelets functions as an endogenous inhibitor of platelet function. Genetic ablation of Jam-A in mice enhances thrombotic function of platelets in vivo. The absence of Jam-A results in increase in platelet aggregation ex vivo. This gain of function is not because of enhanced inside-out signaling because granular secretion, Thromboxane A2 (TxA2) generation, as well as fibrinogen receptor activation, are normal in the absence of Jam-A. Interestingly, integrin outside-in signaling such as platelet spreading and clot retraction is augmented in Jam-A-deficient platelets. We conclude that JAM-A normally limits platelet accumulation by inhibiting integrin outside-in signaling thus preventing premature platelet activation.

  3. Is There Still a Role for Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa Antagonists in Acute Coronary Syndromes?

    PubMed Central

    Iannetta, Loredana; Puddu, Paolo Emilio; Cuturello, Domenico; Saladini, Angela; Pellicano, Mariano; Schiariti, Michele

    2013-01-01

    The role played by glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa inhibitors has continuously evolved from the initial introduction in mid 90 s until the most recent guidelines for treating acute coronary syndromes, and competed with a wider use of ADP inhibitors and novel anticoagulant drugs, to the extent that they stepped down from class I to class II recommendation in the routine setting of acute coronary syndromes. As a consequence, GP IIb/IIIa use was greatly narrowed. The purpose of this review is to define the roles that GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors may still have in acute ischemic settings by explaining why in high risk patients they might be preferable and/or whether they might be added to ADP inhibitors also emphasizing the underlying mechanistic actions. It is concluded that there might be a more extensive use of GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors in patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes, strictly based on the definition for a high risk procedure: complexity, angiographic characteristics and patient’s risk profile, regardless whether STEMI or NSTEMI. The positive elements one should appreciate in GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors are: efficacy, rapid onset and reversibility of action, absence of pharmacogenomic variability, pharmacoeconomic considerations and the possibility of intracoronary administration.

  4. Analysis of Altered Micro RNA Expression Profiles in Focal Cortical Dysplasia IIB.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Liu, Chang-Qing; Li, Tian-Fu; Guan, Yu-Guang; Zhou, Jian; Qi, Xue-Ling; Yang, Yu-Tao; Deng, Jia-Hui; Xu, Zhi-Qing David; Luan, Guo-Ming

    2016-04-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia type IIB is a commonly encountered subtype of developmental malformation of the cerebral cortex and is often associated with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. In this study, to investigate the molecular etiology of focal cortical dysplasia type IIB, the authors performed micro ribonucleic acid (RNA) microarray on surgical specimens from 5 children (2 female and 3 male, mean age was 73.4 months, range 50-112 months) diagnosed of focal cortical dysplasia type IIB and matched normal tissue adjacent to the lesion. In all, 24 micro RNAs were differentially expressed in focal cortical dysplasia type IIB, and the microarray results were validated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Then the putative target genes of the differentially expressed micro RNAs were identified by bioinformatics analysis. Moreover, biological significance of the target genes was evaluated by investigating the pathways in which the genes were enriched, and the Hippo signaling pathway was proposed to be highly related with the pathogenesis of focal cortical dysplasia type IIB.

  5. Granulosa cell tumor mutant FOXL2C134W suppresses GDF-9 and activin A-induced follistatin transcription in primary granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    McTavish, Kirsten J.; Nonis, David; Hoang, Yvonne D.; Shimasaki, Shunichi

    2013-01-01

    A single somatic FOXL2 mutation (FOXL2C134W) was identified in almost all granulosa cell tumor (GCT) patients. In the pituitary, FOXL2 and Smad3 coordinately regulate activin stimulation of follistatin transcription. We explored whether a similar regulation occurs in the ovary, and whether FOXL2C134W has altered activity. We show that in primary granulosa cells, GDF-9 and activin increase Smad3-mediated follistatin transcription. In contrast to findings in the pituitary, FOXL2 negatively regulates GDF-9 and activin-stimulated follistatin transcription in the ovary. Knockdown of endogenous FOXL2 confirmed this inhibitory role. FOXL2C134W displayed enhanced inhibitory activity, completely ablating GDF-9 and activin-induced follistatin transcription. GDF-9 and activin activity was lost when either the smad binding element or the forkhead binding element were mutated, indicating that both sites are required for Smad3 actions. This study highlights that FOXL2 negatively regulates follistatin expression within the ovary, and that the pathogenesis of FOXL2C134W may involve an altered interaction with Smad3. PMID:23567549

  6. Effect of physical training on liver expression of activin A and follistatin in a nonalcoholic fatty liver disease model in rats

    PubMed Central

    Silva, R.N.; Bueno, P.G.; Avó, L.R.S.; Nonaka, K.O.; Selistre-Araújo, H.S.; Leal, A.M.O.

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by fat accumulation in the liver and is associated with obesity and insulin resistance. Activin A is a member of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF)-β superfamily and inhibits hepatocyte growth. Follistatin antagonizes the biological actions of activin. Exercise is an important therapeutic strategy to reduce the metabolic effects of obesity. We evaluated the pattern of activin A and follistatin liver expression in obese rats subjected to swimming exercise. Control rats (C) and high-fat (HF) diet-fed rats were randomly assigned to a swimming training group (C-Swim and HF-Swim) or a sedentary group (C-Sed and HF-Sed). Activin βA subunit mRNA expression was significantly higher in HF-Swim than in HF-Sed rats. Follistatin mRNA expression was significantly lower in C-Swim and HF-Swim than in either C-Sed or HF-Sed animals. There was no evidence of steatosis or inflammation in C rats. In contrast, in HF animals the severity of steatosis ranged from grade 1 to grade 3. The extent of liver parenchyma damage was less in HF-Swim animals, with the severity of steatosis ranging from grade 0 to grade 1. These data showed that exercise may reduce the deleterious effects of a high-fat diet on the liver, suggesting that the local expression of activin-follistatin may be involved. PMID:25075578

  7. [Inhibin, activin, follistatin, and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta): presence in the ovary and possible role in the regulation of folliculogenesis in primates].

    PubMed

    Gougeon, A

    1994-09-01

    The aim of this review is to provide recent data concerning the ovarian production of the inhibin-related peptides and their possible role in the regulation of ovarian folliculogenesis in primates. Activin is mainly produced by recruitable follicles, whereas inhibin, FSP and TGF-beta are mainly produced by preovulatory follicles. Activin could play a key role in the selection of the follicle destined to ovulate by enhancing the responsiveness of granulosa cells to FSH. Activin inhibits production of aromatizable androgens by theca interna cells but, by stimulating the FSH-induced aromatase at the level of granulosa cells, it prepares the early selected follicle to play its further endocrine function. The full endocrine function of the preovulatory follicle is triggered, among others, by inhibin which strongly stimulates the production of aromatizable androgens by theca interna cells, by TGF-beta which may favour cytodifferentiation of granulosa cells, and by FSP which, by binding activin, suppresses the negative actions of activin on preovulatory maturation.

  8. Effect of physical training on liver expression of activin A and follistatin in a nonalcoholic fatty liver disease model in rats.

    PubMed

    Silva, R N; Bueno, P G; Avó, L R S; Nonaka, K O; Selistre-Araújo, H S; Leal, A M O

    2014-09-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by fat accumulation in the liver and is associated with obesity and insulin resistance. Activin A is a member of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF)-β superfamily and inhibits hepatocyte growth. Follistatin antagonizes the biological actions of activin. Exercise is an important therapeutic strategy to reduce the metabolic effects of obesity. We evaluated the pattern of activin A and follistatin liver expression in obese rats subjected to swimming exercise. Control rats (C) and high-fat (HF) diet-fed rats were randomly assigned to a swimming training group (C-Swim and HF-Swim) or a sedentary group (C-Sed and HF-Sed). Activin βA subunit mRNA expression was significantly higher in HF-Swim than in HF-Sed rats. Follistatin mRNA expression was significantly lower in C-Swim and HF-Swim than in either C-Sed or HF-Sed animals. There was no evidence of steatosis or inflammation in C rats. In contrast, in HF animals the severity of steatosis ranged from grade 1 to grade 3. The extent of liver parenchyma damage was less in HF-Swim animals, with the severity of steatosis ranging from grade 0 to grade 1. These data showed that exercise may reduce the deleterious effects of a high-fat diet on the liver, suggesting that the local expression of activin-follistatin may be involved.

  9. High resolution structures of the bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor in two crystal forms: Implications for ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, Peter D.; Cutfield, John F.; Cutfield, Sue M. . E-mail: sue.cutfield@otago.ac.nz

    2006-12-29

    BMPRII is a type II TGF-{beta} serine threonine kinase receptor which is integral to the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling pathway. It is known to bind BMP and growth differentiation factor (GDF) ligands, and has overlapping ligand specificity with the activin type II receptor, ActRII. In contrast to activin and TGF-{beta} type ligands, BMPs bind to type II receptors with lower affinity than type I receptors. Crystals of the BMPRII ectodomain were grown in two different forms, both of which diffracted to high resolution. The tetragonal form exhibited some disorder, whereas the entire polypeptide was seen in the orthorhombic form. The two structures retain the basic three-finger toxin fold of other TGF-{beta} receptor ectodomains, and share the main hydrophobic patch used by ActRII to bind various ligands. However, they present different conformations of the A-loop at the periphery of the proposed ligand-binding interface, in conjunction with rearrangement of a disulfide bridge within the loop. This particular disulfide (Cys94-Cys117) is only present in BMPRII and activin receptors, suggesting that it is important for their likely shared mode of binding. Evidence is presented that the two crystal forms represent ligand-bound and free conformations of BMPRII. Comparison with the solved structure of ActRII bound to BMP2 suggests that His87, unique amongst TGF-{beta} receptors, may play a key role in ligand recognition.

  10. The Notch ligand Delta-like 1 integrates inputs from TGFbeta/Activin and Wnt pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Bordonaro, Michael Tewari, Shruti Atamna, Wafa Lazarova, Darina L.

    2011-06-10

    Unlike the well-characterized nuclear function of the Notch intracellular domain, it has been difficult to identify a nuclear role for the ligands of Notch. Here we provide evidence for the nuclear function of the Notch ligand Delta-like 1 in colon cancer (CC) cells exposed to butyrate. We demonstrate that the intracellular domain of Delta-like 1 (Dll1icd) augments the activity of Wnt signaling-dependent reporters and that of the promoter of the connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) gene. Data suggest that Dll1icd upregulates CTGF promoter activity through both direct and indirect mechanisms. The direct mechanism is supported by co-immunoprecipitation of endogenous Smad2/3 proteins and Dll1 and by chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses that revealed the occupancy of Dll1icd on CTGF promoter sequences containing a Smad binding element. The indirect upregulation of CTGF expression by Dll1 is likely due to the ability of Dll1icd to increase Wnt signaling, a pathway that targets CTGF. CTGF expression is induced in butyrate-treated CC cells and results from clonal growth assays support a role for CTGF in the cell growth-suppressive role of butyrate. In conclusion, integration of the Notch, Wnt, and TGFbeta/Activin signaling pathways is in part mediated by the interactions of Dll1 with Smad2/3 and Tcf4.

  11. Follistatin antagonizes activin signaling and acts with notum to direct planarian head regeneration.

    PubMed

    Roberts-Galbraith, Rachel H; Newmark, Phillip A

    2013-01-22

    Animals establish their body plans in embryogenesis, but only a few animals can recapitulate this signaling milieu for regeneration after injury. In planarians, a pluripotent stem cell population and perpetual signaling of polarity axes collaborate to direct a steady replacement of cells during homeostasis and to power robust regeneration after even severe injuries. Several studies have documented the roles of conserved signaling pathways in maintaining and resetting axial polarity in planarians, but it is unclear how planarians reestablish polarity signaling centers after injury and whether these centers serve to influence identity decisions of stem cell progeny during their differentiation. Here we find that a planarian Follistatin homolog directs regeneration of anterior identity by opposing an Activin/ActR-1/Smad2/3 signaling pathway. Follistatin and Notum, a Wnt inhibitor, are mutually required to reestablish an anterior signaling center that expresses both cues. Furthermore, we show that the direction of cells down particular differentiation paths requires regeneration of this anterior signaling center. Just as its amphibian counterpart in the organizer signals body plan and cell fate during embryogenesis, planarian Follistatin promotes reestablishment of anterior polarity during regeneration and influences specification of cell types in the head and beyond.

  12. Free differential algebras and pure spinor action in IIB superstring sigma models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Ichiro; Tonin, Mario

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we extend to the case of IIB superstring sigma models the method proposed in hep-th/10023500 to derive the pure spinor approach for type IIA sigma models. In particular, starting from the (Free) Differential Algebra and superspace parametrization of type IIB supergravity, extended to include the BRST differential and all the ghosts, we derive the BRST transformations of fields and ghosts as well as the standard pure spinor constraints for the ghosts λ related to supersymmetry. Moreover, using the method first proposed by us, we derive the pure spinor action for type IIB superstrings in curved supergravity backgrounds (on shell), in full agreement with the action first obtained by Berkovits and Howe.

  13. FLT PET in Measuring Treatment Response in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-02

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  14. Effects of escins Ia, Ib, IIa, and IIb from horse chestnuts on gastric emptying in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, H; Li, Y; Murakami, T; Yamahara, J; Yoshikawa, M

    1999-03-05

    Inhibitory effects of the saponin fraction and its principal constituents, escins Ia, Ib, IIa, and IIb, from horse chestnuts on gastric emptying were investigated in mice loaded with a non-nutrient or nutrient meal. The saponin fraction and escins Ia-IIb inhibited gastric emptying of a 1.5% carboxymethyl cellulose sodium salt (CMC-Na) meal by 11.1-54.2% (12.5-200 mg/kg). Escins Ia-IIb (50 mg/kg) also inhibited gastric emptying of a 40% glucose meal by 21.1-23.5% except for escin Ia, a milk meal by 18.4-33.1%, and a 30% ethanol meal by 13.5-15.9%. The effects of escins Ia-IIb on gastric emptying of the CMC-Na meal were attenuated by pretreatment with streptozotocin (100 mg/kg, i.v.), capsaicin (75 mg/kg in total, s.c.), or insulin (1 U/kg, s.c.). The effect of insulin was reduced by glucose (2 g/kg, i.v.) which can directly nourish the brain, but not by fructose (2 g/kg, i.v.) which cannot be utilized by the brain. The effects of escins Ia-IIb (50 mg/kg) were overridden in 60% ethanol-loaded mice, in which the central nervous system was suppressed by ethanol. These results suggest that capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves and central nervous system partly participate in the effects of escins Ia-IIb.

  15. New type IIB backgrounds and aspects of their field theory duals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caceres, Elena; Macpherson, Niall T.; Núñez, Carlos

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we study aspects of geometries in Type IIA and Type IIB String theory and elaborate on their field theory dual pairs. The backgrounds are associated with reductions to Type IIA of solutions with G 2 holonomy in eleven dimensions. We classify these backgrounds according to their G-structure, perform a non-Abelian T-duality on them and find new Type IIB configurations presenting dynamical SU(2)-structure. We study some aspects of the associated field theories defined by these new backgrounds. Various technical details are clearly spelled out.

  16. Role of nonmuscle myosin IIB and N-RAP in cell spreading and myofibril assembly in primary mouse cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shajia; Horowits, Robert

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the role of nonmuscle myosin heavy chain (NMHC) IIB in cultured embryonic mouse cardiomyocytes by specific knockdown using RNA interference. NMHC IIB protein levels decreased 90% compared with mock-transfected cells by 3 days post transfection. NMHC IIB knockdown resulted in a slow decrease in N-RAP protein levels over 6 days with no change in N-RAP transcript levels. N-RAP is a scaffold for alpha-actinin and actin assembly during myofibrillogenesis, and we quantitated myofibril accumulation by morphometric analysis of alpha-actinin organization. Between 3 and 6 days, NMHC IIB knockdown was accompanied by the abolishment of cardiomyocyte spreading. During this period the rate of myofibril accumulation steadily decreased, correlating with the slowly decreasing levels of N-RAP. Between 6 and 8 days NMHC IIB and N-RAP protein levels recovered, and cardiomyocyte spreading and myofibril accumulation resumed. Inhibition of proteasome function using MG132 led to accumulation of excess N-RAP, and the secondary decrease in N-RAP that otherwise accompanied NMHC IIB knockdown was abolished. The results show that NMHC IIB knockdown led to decreased N-RAP levels through proteasome-mediated degradation. Furthermore, these proteins have distinct functional roles, with NMHC IIB playing a role in cardiomyocyte spreading and N-RAP functioning in myofibril assembly.

  17. Activin Enhances α- to β-Cell Transdifferentiation as a Source For β-Cells In Male FSTL3 Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Brown, Melissa L; Andrzejewski, Danielle; Burnside, Amy; Schneyer, Alan L

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes results from inadequate β-cell number and/or function to control serum glucose concentrations so that replacement of lost β-cells could become a viable therapy for diabetes. In addition to embryonic stem cell sources for new β-cells, evidence for transdifferentiation/reprogramming of non-β-cells to functional β-cells is accumulating. In addition, de-differentiation of β-cells observed in diabetes and their subsequent conversion to α-cells raises the possibility that adult islet cell fate is malleable and controlled by local hormonal and/or environmental cues. We previously demonstrated that inactivation of the activin antagonist, follistatin-like 3 (FSTL3) resulted in β-cell expansion and improved glucose homeostasis in the absence of β-cell proliferation. We recently reported that activin directly suppressed expression of critical α-cell genes while increasing expression of β-cell genes, supporting the hypothesis that activin is one of the local hormones controlling islet cell fate and that increased activin signaling accelerates α- to β-cell transdifferentiation. We tested this hypothesis using Gluc-Cre/yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) α-cell lineage tracing technology combined with FSTL3 knockout (KO) mice to label α-cells with YFP. Flow cytometry was used to quantify unlabeled and labeled α- and β-cells. We found that Ins+/YFP+ cells were significantly increased in FSTL3 KO mice compared with wild type littermates. Labeled Ins+/YFP+ cells increased significantly with age in FSTL3 KO mice but not wild type littermates. Sorting results were substantiated by counting fluorescently labeled cells in pancreatic sections. Activin treatment of isolated islets significantly increased the number of YFP+/Ins+ cells. These results suggest that α- to β-cell transdifferentiation is influenced by activin signaling and may contribute substantially to β-cell mass.

  18. Method and making group IIB metal - telluride films and solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Basol, Bulent M.; Kapur, Vijay K.

    1990-08-21

    A technique is disclosed forming thin films (13) of group IIB metal-telluride, such as Cd.sub.x Zn.sub.1-x Te (0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1), on a substrate (10) which comprises depositing Te (18) and at least one of the elements (19) of Cd, Zn, and Hg onto a substrate and then heating the elements to form the telluride. A technique is also provided for doping this material by chemically forming a thin layer of a dopant on the surface of the unreacted elements and then heating the elements along with the layer of dopant. A method is disclosed of fabricating a thin film photovoltaic cell which comprises depositing Te and at least one of the elements of Cd, Zn, and Hg onto a substrate which contains on its surface a semiconductor film (12) and then heating the elements in the presence of a halide of the Group IIB metals, causing the formation of solar cell grade Group IIB metal-telluride film and also causing the formation of a rectifying junction, in situ, between the semiconductor film on the substrate and the Group IIB metal-telluride layer which has been formed.

  19. Mechanism of action and specificity of antimicrobial peptides designed based on buforin IIb.

    PubMed

    Jang, Su A; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Ju Young; Shin, Ju Ri; Kim, Da Jung; Cho, Ju Hyun; Kim, Sun Chang

    2012-04-01

    Buforin IIb-a synthetic analog of buforin II that contains a proline hinge between the two α-helices and a model α-helical sequence at the C-terminus (3× RLLR)-is a potent cell-penetrating antimicrobial peptide. To develop novel antimicrobial peptides with enhanced activities and specificity/therapeutic index, we designed several analogs (Buf III analogs) by substitutions of amino acids in the proline hinge region and two α-helices of buforin IIb, and examined their antimicrobial activity and mechanism of action. The substitution of hydrophobic residues ([F(6)] and [V(8)]) in the proline hinge region with other hydrophobic residues ([W(6)] and [I(8)]) did not affect antimicrobial activity, while the substitution of the first four amino acids RAGL with a model α-helical sequence increased the antimicrobial activity up to 2-fold. Like buforin IIb, Buf III analogs penetrated the bacterial cell membranes without significantly permeabilizing them and were accumulated inside Escherichia coli. Buf III analogs were shown to bind DNA in vitro and the DNA binding affinity of the peptides correlated linearly with their antimicrobial potency. Among the Buf III analogs, the therapeutic index of Buf IIIb and IIIc (RVVRQWPIG[RVVR](3) and KLLKQWPIG[KLLK](3), respectively) were improved 7-fold compared to that of buforin IIb. These results indicate that Buf III analogs appear to be promising candidates for future development as novel antimicrobial agents.

  20. Expression of the Nogo-A system in cortical lesions of pediatric patients with tuberous sclerosis complex and focal cortical dysplasia type IIb.

    PubMed

    Yu, Si-Xun; Li, Song; Shu, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Chun-Qing; Liu, Shi-Yong; Yang, Hui

    2012-07-01

    The reticulon protein Nogo-A is an important regulator of neurite growth, axonal plasticity, and cell migration in the central nervous system. Previous studies have shown markedly elevated levels of Nogo-A in human temporal lobe epilepsy. In the present study, we examined the expression pattern of the Nogo-A system in cortical lesions of pediatric patients with tuberous sclerosis complex and focal cortical dysplasia type IIb. These disorders are characterized by malformations of cortical development and are frequently associated with intractable epilepsy. We found that the messenger RNA and protein levels of the Nogo-A receptor (NgR) and the downstream targets of Nogo-A, LINGO-1, TROY, and RhoA but not P75 were upregulated in the cortices of patients compared with autopsy control samples. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated that Nogo-A and NgR were strongly expressed in misshapen cells, particularly dysmorphic neurons, balloon cells, and giant cells. TROY was diffusely expressed in the malformations of cortical development. Most of theNogo-A/NgR-positive misshapen cells were colabeled with neuronal rather than astrocytic markers. Taken together, our results suggestthat the activation of Nogo-A via the NgR/LINGO-1/TROY signal transduction pathways, but not NgR/LINGO-1/P75, may be involved in the development and/or seizure activity of cortical lesions in tuberous sclerosis complex and focal cortical dysplasia type IIb.

  1. Thrombopoietin enhances the alpha IIb beta 3-dependent adhesion of megakaryocytic cells to fibrinogen or fibronectin through PI 3 kinase.

    PubMed

    Zauli, G; Bassini, A; Vitale, M; Gibellini, D; Celeghini, C; Caramelli, E; Pierpaoli, S; Guidotti, L; Capitani, S

    1997-02-01

    The effect of thrombopoietin (TPO) on the functional activity of surface alpha IIb beta 3 (GPIIbIIIa) was investigated in both primary human megakaryocytic cells, derived from peripheral blood CD34+ cells, and HEL hematopoietic cell line. TPO (100 ng/mL) induced a sixfold to ninefold enhancement of adhesion of both primary megakaryocytic and HEL cells to plates coated with either fibrinogen or fibronectin and a parallel increase of immunoreactivity to the PAC1 monoclonal antibody (MoAb) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-fibrinogen, both of which recognize an activated state of alpha IIb beta 3. The enhanced adhesion to fibrinogen or fibronectin was mediated by the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) recognition sequence of alpha IIb beta 3, as it was abolished by pretreatment of cells with saturating concentrations of RGDS peptide. A MoAb specific for the alpha IIb beta subunit of alpha IIb beta 3 also inhibited cell attachment to fibrinogen or fibronectin, while MoAb to anti-alpha v beta 3 or anti-alpha 5 integrins were completely ineffective, clearly indicating that alpha IIb beta 3 participates in this association. A role for PI 3 kinase (PI 3-K) in the TPO-mediated increase in alpha IIb beta 3 function in megakaryocytic cells was suggested by the ability of the PI 3-K inhibitor wortmannin (100 nmol/L) and antisense oligonucleotides directed against the p85 regulatory subunit of PI 3-K to completely block the TPO-induced increase in alpha IIb beta 3 integrin activity upon TPO stimulation. The modulation of adhesiveness to extracellular matrix proteins containing the RGD motif mediated by TPO likely plays a physiologic role in megakaryocytopoiesis, as pretreatment of CD34+ cells with RGDS or anti-alpha IIb MoAb significantly reduced the number of megakaryocytic colonies obtained in a fibrinclot semisolid assay.

  2. Altered sex hormone concentrations and gonadal mRNA expression levels of activin signaling factors in hatchling alligators from a contaminated Florida lake.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brandon C; Kohno, Satomi; Cook, Robert W; Alvers, Ashley L; Hamlin, Heather J; Woodruff, Teresa K; Guillette, Louis J

    2010-04-01

    Activins and estrogens participate in regulating the breakdown of ovarian germ cell nests and follicle assembly in mammals. In 1994, our group reported elevated frequencies of abnormal, multioocytic ovarian follicles in 6 month old, environmental contaminant-exposed female alligators after gonadotropin challenge. Here, we investigated if maternal contribution of endocrine disrupting contaminants to the egg subsequently alters estrogen/inhibin/activin signaling in hatchling female offspring, putatively predisposing an increased frequency of multioocytic follicle formation. We quantified basal and exogenous gonadotropin-stimulated concentrations of circulating plasma steroid hormones and ovarian activin signaling factor mRNA abundance in hatchling alligators from the same contaminated (Lake Apopka) and reference (Lake Woodruff) Florida lakes, as examined in 1994. Basal circulating plasma estradiol and testosterone concentrations were greater in alligators from the contaminated environment, whereas activin/inhibin betaA subunit and follistatin mRNA abundances were lower than values measured in ovaries from reference lake animals. Challenged, contaminant-exposed animals showed a more robust increase in plasma estradiol concentration following an acute follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) challenge compared with reference site alligators. Aromatase and follistatin mRNA levels increased in response to an extended FSH challenge in the reference site animals, but not in the contaminant-exposed animals. In hatchling alligators, ovarian follicles have not yet formed; therefore, these endocrine differences are likely to affect subsequent ovarian development, including ovarian follicle assembly.

  3. FGF signaling via MAPK is required early and improves Activin A-induced definitive endoderm formation from human embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Lina; Mfopou, Josue K.; Geens, Mieke; Sermon, Karen; Bouwens, Luc

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deep study the FGF signaling role during DE specification in the context of hESCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DE differentiation from hESCs has an early dependence on FGF signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A serum-free DE protocol is developed based on the findings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The DE cells showed potential to differentiate into pancreatic progenitor cells. -- Abstract: Considering their unlimited proliferation and pluripotency properties, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) constitute a promising resource applicable for cell replacement therapy. To facilitate this clinical translation, it is critical to study and understand the early stage of hESCs differentiation wherein germ layers are defined. In this study, we examined the role of FGF signaling in Activin A-induced definitive endoderm (DE) differentiation in the absence of supplemented animal serum. We found that activated FGF/MAPK signaling is required at the early time point of Activin A-induced DE formation. In addition, FGF activation increased the number of DE cells compared to Activin A alone. These DE cells could further differentiate into PDX1 and NKX6.1 positive pancreatic progenitors in vitro. We conclude that Activin A combined with FGF/MAPK signaling efficiently induce DE cells in the absence of serum. These findings improve our understanding of human endoderm formation, and constitute a step forward in the generation of clinical grade hESCs progenies for cell therapy.

  4. Role of inhibin and activin in the modulation of gonadotropin- and steroid-induced oocyte maturation in the teleost Fundulus heteroclitus

    PubMed Central

    Petrino, Teresa R; Toussaint, Gesulla; Lin, Yu-Wai P

    2007-01-01

    Background Activin and inhibin are glycoproteins structurally related to the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily. These peptides were first described as factors that regulate the follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) at the pituitary level. The possible role of inhibin and activin, at the ovarian level, in mediating the stimulatory actions of a Fundulus pituitary extract (FPE) and 17alpha,20beta-dihydroprogesterone (DHP) on oocyte maturation was investigated in this study. Methods In vitro culture of ovarian follicles and induction of oocyte maturation were carried out in 75% Leibovitz L-15 medium. Follicles or denuded oocytes were exposed to FPE, inhibin, activin, ethanol vehicle (control group), or DHP. The competence of the follicles or denuded oocytes to respond to the hormones was assessed by scoring germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) used as an indication of the reinitiation of meiosis or oocyte maturation. DHP level was measured by radioimmunoassay. Results Addition of FPE promoted the synthesis of DHP by the granulose cells of fully grown ovarian follicles and thus stimulated GVBD in the oocyte. Presence of porcine inhibin did not hinder the synthesis of DHP stimulated by FPE, although it did inhibit the subsequent GVBD in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that the action of inhibin was at the oocyte level. Similarly to the findings with FPE, inhibin also blocked the DHP-induced GVBD in intact follicles, as well as the spontaneous and steroid-induced GVBD of denuded oocyte. Inhibin straightforwardly blocked the response to a low dose of DHP throughout the culture period, while higher doses of the steroid appeared to overcome the inhibitory effect especially at later times. In contrast to inhibin, recombinant human activin A significantly enhanced DHP-induced GVBD in a dose-dependent manner after 48 hr, although activin alone was not able to induce GVBD without the presence of the steroid. Conclusion Taking together with our previous studies that

  5. Inhibition of αIIbβ3 Ligand Binding by an αIIb Peptide that Clasps the Hybrid Domain to the βI Domain of β3

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen Hwa; Schaffner-Reckinger, Elisabeth; Tsoukatos, Demokritos C.; Aylward, Kelly; Moussis, Vassilios; Tsikaris, Vassilios; Trypou, Paraskevi; Egot, Marion; Baruch, Dominique; Kieffer, Nelly; Bachelot-Loza, Christilla

    2015-01-01

    Agonist-stimulated platelet activation triggers conformational changes of integrin αIIbβ3, allowing fibrinogen binding and platelet aggregation. We have previously shown that an octapeptide, p1YMESRADR8, corresponding to amino acids 313–320 of the β-ribbon extending from the β-propeller domain of αIIb, acts as a potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation. Here we have performed in silico modelling analysis of the interaction of this peptide with αIIbβ3 in its bent and closed (not swing-out) conformation and show that the peptide is able to act as a substitute for the β-ribbon by forming a clasp restraining the β3 hybrid and βI domains in a closed conformation. The involvement of species-specific residues of the β3 hybrid domain (E356 and K384) and the β1 domain (E297) as well as an intrapeptide bond (pE315-pR317) were confirmed as important for this interaction by mutagenesis studies of αIIbβ3 expressed in CHO cells and native or substituted peptide inhibitory studies on platelet functions. Furthermore, NMR data corroborate the above results. Our findings provide insight into the important functional role of the αIIb β-ribbon in preventing integrin αIIbβ3 head piece opening, and highlight a potential new therapeutic approach to prevent integrin ligand binding. PMID:26332040

  6. A demonstration of autonomous navigation and machine vision using the HERMIES-IIB robot

    SciTech Connect

    Burks, B.L.; Barnett, D.L.; Jones, J.P.; Killough, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, advances to our mobile robot series (currently HERMIES-IIB) to include 8 NCUBE processors on-board, (computationally equivalent to 8 Vax 11/780's) operating in parallel, and augmentation of the sensor suite with cameras to facilitate on-board vision analysis and goal finding are described. The essential capabilities of the expert system described in earlier papers have been ported to the on-board HERMIES-IIB computers thereby eliminating off-board computation. A successful experiment is described in which a robot is placed in an initial arbitrary location without prior specification of the room contents, successfully discovers and navigates around stationary and moving obstacles, picks up and moves small obstacles, searches for a control panel, and reads the meters found on the panel. 19 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Nonmuscle Myosin IIB Links Cytoskeleton to IRE1α Signaling during ER Stress

    PubMed Central

    He, Yin; Beatty, Alexander; Han, Xuemei; Ji, Yewei; Ma, Xuefei; Adelstein, Robert S.; Yates, John R.; Kemphues, Kenneth; Qi, Ling

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Here we identify and characterize a cytoskeletal myosin protein required for IRE1α oligomerization, activation, and signaling. Proteomic screening identified nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIB (NMHCIIB), a subunit of nonmuscle myosin IIB (NMIIB), as an ER stress-dependent interacting protein specific to IRE1α. Loss of NMIIB compromises XBP1s and UPR target gene expression with no effect on the PERK pathway. Mechanistically, NMIIB is required for IRE1α aggregation and foci formation under ER stress. The NMIIB-mediated effect on IRE1α signaling is in part dependent on the phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain and the actomyosin contractility of NMIIB. Biologically, the function of NMIIB in ER stress response is conserved as both mammalian cells and C. elegans lacking NMIIB exhibit hypersensitivity to ER stress. Thus, optimal IRE1α activation and signaling require concerted coordination between the ER and cytoskeleton. PMID:23237951

  8. Description of 1/4 BPS configurations in minimal type IIB supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Donos, Aristomenis

    2007-01-15

    In this paper we present an effort to extend the LLM construction of 1/2 BPS states in minimal IIB supergravity to configurations that preserve 1/4 of the total number of supersymmetries. Following the same techniques we reduce the problem to that of a single scalar which satisfies a nonlinear equation. In particular, the scalar is identified to be the Kahler potential with which a four dimensional base space is equipped.

  9. Description of 1/4 BPS configurations in minimal typeIIB supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donos, Aristomenis

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present an effort to extend the LLM construction of 1/2 BPS states in minimal IIB supergravity to configurations that preserve 1/4 of the total number of supersymmetries. Following the same techniques we reduce the problem to that of a single scalar which satisfies a nonlinear equation. In particular, the scalar is identified to be the Kahler potential with which a four dimensional base space is equipped.

  10. Di-J/Ψ Studies, Level 3 Tracking and the D0 Run IIb Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Vint, Philip John

    2010-02-01

    The D0 detector underwent an upgrade to its silicon vertex detector and triggering systems during the transition from Run IIa to Run IIb to maximize its ability to fully exploit Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron. This thesis describes improvements made to the tracking and vertexing algorithms used by the high level trigger in both Run IIa and Run IIb, as well as a search for resonant di-J/Ψ states using both Run IIa and Run IIb data. Improvements made to the tracking and vertexing algorithms during Run IIa included the optimization of the existing tracking software to reduce overall processing time and the certification and testing of a new software release. Upgrades made to the high level trigger for Run IIb included the development of a new tracking algorithm and the inclusion of the new Layer 0 silicon detector into the existing software. The integration of Layer 0 into the high level trigger has led to an improvement in the overall impact parameter resolution for tracks of ~50%. The development of a new parameterization method for finding the error associated to the impact parameter of tracks returned by the high level tracking algorithm, in association with the inclusion of Layer 0, has led to improvements in vertex resolution of ~4.5 μm. A previous search in the di-J/Ψ channel revealed a unpredicted resonance at ~13.7 GeV/c2. A confirmation analysis is presented using 2.8 fb-1 of data and two different approaches to cuts. No significant excess is seen in the di-J/Ψ mass spectrum.

  11. β-Subunit Binding Is Sufficient for Ligands to Open the Integrin αIIbβ3 Headpiece.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fu-Yang; Zhu, Jianghai; Eng, Edward T; Hudson, Nathan E; Springer, Timothy A

    2016-02-26

    The platelet integrin αIIbβ3 binds to a KQAGDV motif at the fibrinogen γ-chain C terminus and to RGD motifs present in loops in many extracellular matrix proteins. These ligands bind in a groove between the integrin α and β-subunits; the basic Lys or Arg side chain hydrogen bonds to the αIIb-subunit, and the acidic Asp side chain coordinates to a metal ion held by the β3-subunit. Ligand binding induces headpiece opening, with conformational change in the β-subunit. During this opening, RGD slides in the ligand-binding pocket toward αIIb, with movement of the βI-domain β1-α1 loop toward αIIb, enabling formation of direct, charged hydrogen bonds between the Arg side chain and αIIb. Here we test whether ligand interactions with β3 suffice for stable ligand binding and headpiece opening. We find that the AGDV tetrapeptide from KQAGDV binds to the αIIbβ3 headpiece with affinity comparable with the RGDSP peptide from fibronectin. AGDV induced complete headpiece opening in solution as shown by increase in hydrodynamic radius. Soaking of AGDV into closed αIIbβ3 headpiece crystals induced intermediate states similarly to RGDSP. AGDV has very little contact with the α-subunit. Furthermore, as measured by epitope exposure, AGDV, like the fibrinogen γ C-terminal peptide and RGD, caused integrin extension on the cell surface. Thus, pushing by the β3-subunit on Asp is sufficient for headpiece opening and ligand sliding, and no pulling by the αIIb subunit on Arg is required.

  12. The Progenitor and Early Evolution of the Type IIb SN 2016gkg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglia, L.; Fraser, M.; Sand, D. J.; Valenti, S.; Smartt, S. J.; McCully, C.; Anderson, J. P.; Arcavi, I.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Galbany, L.; Gal-Yam, A.; Haislip, J. B.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Howell, D. A.; Inserra, C.; Jha, S. W.; Kankare, E.; Lundqvist, P.; Maguire, K.; Mattila, S.; Reichart, D.; Smith, K. W.; Smith, M.; Stritzinger, M.; Sullivan, M.; Taddia, F.; Tomasella, L.

    2017-02-01

    We report initial observations and analysis on the Type IIb SN 2016gkg in the nearby galaxy NGC 613. SN 2016gkg exhibited a clear double-peaked light curve during its early evolution, as evidenced by our intensive photometric follow-up campaign. SN 2016gkg shows strong similarities with other Type IIb SNe, in particular, with respect to the He i emission features observed in both the optical and near-infrared. SN 2016gkg evolved faster than the prototypical Type IIb SN 1993J, with a decline similar to that of SN 2011dh after the first peak. The analysis of archival Hubble Space Telescope images indicate a pre-explosion source at SN 2016gkg’s position, suggesting a progenitor star with a ∼mid-F spectral type and initial mass 15{--}20 M {}ȯ , depending on the distance modulus adopted for NGC 613. Modeling the temperature evolution within 5 {days} of explosion, we obtain a progenitor radius of ∼ 48{--}124 R {}ȯ , smaller than that obtained from the analysis of the pre-explosion images (240{--}320 R {}ȯ ).

  13. Risk model in stage IB1-IIB cervical cancer with positive node after radical hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhilan; Huang, Kecheng; Lu, Zhiyong; Deng, Song; Xiong, Jiaqiang; Huang, Jia; Li, Xiong; Tang, Fangxu; Wang, Zhihao; Sun, Haiying; Wang, Lin; Zhou, Shasha; Wang, Xiaoli; Jia, Yao; Hu, Ting; Gui, Juan; Wan, Dongyi; Ma, Ding; Li, Shuang; Wang, Shixuan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors in patients with surgically treated node-positive IB1-IIB cervical cancer and to establish a risk model for disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). A total of 170 patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy as primary treatment for node-positive International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB1-IIB cervical cancer from January 2002 to December 2008 were retrospectively analyzed. Five published risk models were evaluated in this population. The variables, including common iliac lymph node metastasis and parametrial invasion, were independent predictors of outcome in a multivariate analysis using a Cox regression model. Three distinct prognostic groups (low, intermediate, and high risk) were defined using these variables. Five-year DFS rates for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 73.7%, 60.0%, and 25.0%, respectively (P<0.001), and 5-year OS rates were 81.9%, 42.8%, and 25.0%, respectively (P<0.001). The risk model derived in this study provides a novel means for assessing prognosis of patients with node-positive stage IB1-IIB cervical cancer. Future study will focus on external validation of the model and refinement of the risk scoring systems by adding new biologic markers.

  14. Two CRM protein subfamilies cooperate in the splicing of group IIB introns in chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Yukari; Bayraktar, Omer Ali; Barkan, Alice

    2008-11-01

    Chloroplast genomes in angiosperms encode approximately 20 group II introns, approximately half of which are classified as subgroup IIB. The splicing of all but one of the subgroup IIB introns requires a heterodimer containing the peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase homolog CRS2 and one of two closely related proteins, CAF1 or CAF2, that harbor a recently recognized RNA binding domain called the CRM domain. Two CRS2/CAF-dependent introns require, in addition, a CRM domain protein called CFM2 that is only distantly related to CAF1 and CAF2. Here, we show that CFM3, a close relative of CFM2, associates in vivo with those CRS2/CAF-dependent introns that are not CFM2 ligands. Mutant phenotypes in rice and Arabidopsis support a role for CFM3 in the splicing of most of the introns with which it associates. These results show that either CAF1 or CAF2 and either CFM2 or CFM3 simultaneously bind most chloroplast subgroup IIB introns in vivo, and that the CAF and CFM subunits play nonredundant roles in splicing. These results suggest that the expansion of the CRM protein family in plants resulted in two subfamilies that play different roles in group II intron splicing, with further diversification within a subfamily to accommodate multiple intron ligands.

  15. Multi-epitope Folate Receptor Alpha Peptide Vaccine, Sargramostim, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Bilateral Breast Carcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma; Unilateral Breast Carcinoma

  16. Transcriptional activation of mouse mast cell Protease-7 by activin and transforming growth factor-beta is inhibited by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Funaba, Masayuki; Ikeda, Teruo; Murakami, Masaru; Ogawa, Kenji; Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Sugino, Hiromu; Abe, Matanobu

    2003-12-26

    Previous studies have revealed that activin A and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) induced migration and morphological changes toward differentiation in bone marrow-derived cultured mast cell progenitors (BMCMCs). Here we show up-regulation of mouse mast cell protease-7 (mMCP-7), which is expressed in differentiated mast cells, by activin A and TGF-beta1 in BMCMCs, and the molecular mechanism of the gene induction of mmcp-7. Smad3, a signal mediator of the activin/TGF-beta pathway, transcriptionally activated mmcp-7. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), a tissue-specific transcription factor predominantly expressed in mast cells, melanocytes, and heart and skeletal muscle, inhibited Smad3-mediated mmcp-7 transcription. MITF associated with Smad3, and the C terminus of MITF and the MH1 and linker region of Smad3 were required for this association. Complex formation between Smad3 and MITF was neither necessary nor sufficient for the inhibition of Smad3 signaling by MITF. MITF inhibited the transcriptional activation induced by the MH2 domain of Smad3. In addition, MITF-truncated N-terminal amino acids could associate with Smad3 but did not inhibit Smad3-mediated transcription. The level of Smad3 was decreased by co-expression of MITF but not of dominant-negative MITF, which resulted from proteasomal protein degradation. The changes in the level of Smad3 protein were paralleled by those in Smad3-mediated signaling activity. These findings suggest that MITF negatively regulates Smad-dependent activin/TGF-beta signaling in a tissue-specific manner.

  17. Flow and transport at the Las Cruces trench site: Experiment IIb

    SciTech Connect

    Vinson, J.; Hills, R.G.; Wierenga, P.J.; Young, M.H.

    1997-07-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has been directed by Congress in the Low Level Waste Policy Act of 1980 to develop regulatory guidance and assist the individual states and compacts in siting and assessing future low level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities. Three water flow and solute transport experiments were performed as part of a comprehensive field trench study near Las Cruces, New Mexico to test deterministic and stochastic models of vadose zone flow and transport. This report presents partial results from the third experiment (experiment IIb). Experiments IIa and b were conducted on the North side of the trench, on a plot 1.22 m wide by 12 m long, perpendicular to the trench. The area was drip irrigated during two time periods with water containing a variety of tracers. The advance of the water front during the two irrigation episodes was measured with tensiometers and neutron probes. Solute front positions were determined from soil solution sampling through suction samplers and from disturbed sampling. The results from experiment IIb show predominantly downward water movement through the layered unsaturated soil, as evidenced from neutron probe data and gravimetric sampling. Tritium plumes were only half as deep and half as wide as the water plumes at 310 days after the beginning of experiment IIb. Chromium, applied as Cr(VI), moved a readily as, and similar to tritium, but there was a loss of mass due to reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Chloride and nitrate, initially present at high concentrations in the soil solution, were displaced by the low concentration irrigation water, resulting in chloride and nitrate concentration distributions that looked like negative images of the tritium distributions. The extensive data presented should serve well as a data base for model testing.

  18. Convergence and extension at gastrulation require a myosin IIB dependent cortical actin network

    PubMed Central

    Skoglund, Paul; Rolo, Ana; Chen, Xuejun; Gumbiner, Barry M.; Keller, Ray

    2009-01-01

    Summary Force-producing convergence (narrowing) and extension (lengthening) of tissues by active intercalation of cells along the axis of convergence play a major role in axial morphogenesis during development of both vertebrate and invertebrate embryos, and failure of these processes in human embryos leads to embryonic defects including spina bifida and anencephaly. Here we use Xenopus laevis, a system in which the polarized cell motility that drives this active cell intercalation has been related to development of forces that close the blastopore and elongate the body axis, to examine the role of myosin IIB in convergence and extension. We find that myosin IIB is localized in the cortex of intercalating cells, and that morpholino knockdown of this myosin isoform shows that it is essential for maintenance of a stereotypical, cortical actin cytoskeleton that we visualize with time-lapse fluorescent confocal microscopy. We show that this actin network consists of foci or nodes connected by cables and is polarized relative to the embryonic axis, preferentially cyclically shortening and lengthening parallel to the axis of cell polarization, elongation, and intercalation, and also parallel to the axis of convergence forces during gastrulation. MHC-B-depletion results in disruption of this polarized cytoskeleton, loss of the polarized protrusive activity characteristic of intercalating cells, eventual loss of cell-cell and cell matrix adhesion, and dose-dependent failure of blastopore closure, arguably because of failure to develop convergence forces parallel to the myosin IIB-dependent dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton. These findings bridge the gap between a molecular-scale motor protein and tissue-scale embryonic morphogenesis. PMID:18550716

  19. Radical hysterectomy with adjuvant radiotherapy versus radical radiotherapy for FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to compare treatment outcomes for Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IIB cervical carcinoma patients receiving radical surgery followed by adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy versus radical radiotherapy. Methods Medical records of FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer patients treated between July 2008 and December 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 148 patients underwent radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy (surgery-based group). These patients were compared with 290 patients that received radical radiotherapy alone (RT-based group). Recurrence rates, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), local control rates, and treatment-related complications were compared for these two groups. Results Similar rates of recurrence (16.89% vs. 12.41%, p = 0.200), PFS (log-rank, p = 0.211), OS (log-rank, p = 0.347), and local control rates (log-rank, p = 0.668) were observed for the surgery-based group and the RT-based group, respectively. Moreover, the incidence of acute grade 3–4 gastrointestinal reactions and late grade 3–4 lower limb lymphedema were significantly higher for the surgery-based group versus the RT-based group. Cox multivariate analyses found no significant difference in survival outcome between the two groups, and tumor diameter and histopathology were identified as significant prognostic factors for OS. Conclusions Radical radiotherapy was associated with fewer treatment-related complications and achieved comparable survival outcomes for patients with FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer compared to radical hysterectomy followed by postoperative radiotherapy. PMID:24495453

  20. Platelet Integrin αIIbβ3 Inhibitor Rescues Progression of Apoptosis in Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jie; Wang, Qinghang; Nie, Yumei; Yan, Rong; Dai, Kesheng; Zhou, Birong

    2016-01-01

    Background Apoptosis plays an important role in the physiology of platelet function. We aimed to detect the effect of the platelet integrin αIIbβ3 inhibitor, tirofiban, on apoptotic events, including mitochondrial inner-membrane potential (ΔΨm), phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure on platelet surface, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), when washed platelets were stimulated with thrombin. Material/Methods The study included washed platelets from healthy humans, divided into 4 groups: vehicle, and tirofiban (0.05 μg/ml, 0.25 μg/ml, and 0.5 μg/ml). Platelets were pretreated with vehicle or tirofiban and incubated at 37°C with agitation for 6 h and 24 h. Before thrombin addition, the vehicle group divided into 2 equal groups. Except one vehicle group, the other 4 groups were all stimulated with thrombin (1 U/ml) for 30 min at 37°C. Using flow cytometry, we studied the ΔΨm and PS exposure on platelet surfaces, and the generation of ROS in platelets. Results We observed that at the time of 6 h and 24 h, thrombin-stimulated vehicle platelets induced significant depolarization of ΔΨm, higher PS exposure, and increased ROS production compared with the vehicle group (P<0.01). However, the tirofiban group had significantly more recovery of ΔΨm, PS exposure, and ROS production compared with the thrombin group (P<0.01). Conclusions The platelet integrin αIIbβ3 inhibitor, tirofiban, inhibits the depolarization of ΔΨm, PS exposure on platelet surface, and ROS production when stimulated with thrombin. These results suggest that αIIbβ3 inhibitor inhibits the initiation of apoptosis in platelets, showing a potential clinical application of tirofiban as an apoptosis inhibitor. PMID:27827357

  1. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors and low-molecular-weight heparins: a combined role in coronary interventions?

    PubMed

    Fry, E T

    2001-03-01

    Management strategies for acute coronary syndromes (ACS) are making increasing use of both low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs) and glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa inhibitors. To date, however, relatively few studies have assessed the clinical potential of these two classes of agents in combination. There are theoretical grounds to expect LMWHs to be more effective than unfractionated heparin (UFH) in combination with GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors, since UFH, but not LMWH, activates platelets. The antiplatelet effects of GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors are therefore likely to be both more potent and more predictable when combined with LMWH. A recent study in more than 100 patients has demonstrated that a combination of dalteparin and the GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor abciximab provided effective anticoagulation in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), without causing significant bleeding or adverse events. Similar results were demonstrated in the National Investigators Collaborating on Enoxaparin (NICE-4) study using a combination of abciximab and enoxaparin in patients undergoing PCI. Of importance is the fact that there were no cases of severe thrombocytopenia in either LMWH study, although this is a recognized potential complication when UFH and abciximab are used in combination. Further studies are now warranted to confirm the efficacy of LMWH and GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors in combination, both for PCI and medical stabilization.

  2. Up-regulation of JAM-1 in AR42J cells treated with activin A and betacellulin and the diabetic regenerating islets.

    PubMed

    Yoshikumi, Yukako; Ohno, Hideki; Suzuki, Junko; Isshiki, Masashi; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Ohnishi, Hirohide; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Omata, Masao; Fujita, Toshiro; Mashima, Hirosato

    2008-08-01

    Pancreatic AR42J cells demonstrate the pluripotency in precursor cells of the gut endoderm and also provide an excellent model system to study the differentiation of the pancreas. Using the mRNA differential display technique, we identified junctional adhesion molecule-1 (JAM-1), a component of the tight junction, was highly up-regulated during the differentiation of AR42J cells, although junctions were not formed. The expression level of JAM-1 showed an up-regulation in the mRNA level after 3 hours and in the protein level after 24 hours in [activin A + betacellulin]-treated AR42J cells. The expressions of its signaling molecules, PAR-3 and atypical PKC lambda, also increased after the addition of activin A + betacellulin. When JAM-1 was over-expressed in [activin A + betacellulin]-treated AR42J cells, tagged-JAM-1 was observed in cytoplasm as vesicular structures and JAM-1 was colocalized with Rab3B and Rab13, members of the Rab family expressed at tight junctions. In streptozotocin-induced regenerating islets, the expression of JAM-1 was also up-regulated in the mRNA level and the protein level. JAM-1 might therefore play an important role in the differentiation of AR42J cells and the regeneration of pancreatic islets.

  3. Maximal R-symmetry violating amplitudes in type IIb superstring theory.

    PubMed

    Boels, Rutger H

    2012-08-24

    On-shell superspace techniques are used to quantify R-symmetry violation in type IIB superstring theory amplitudes in a flat background in 10 dimensions. This shows the existence of a particularly simple class of nonvanishing amplitudes in this theory, which violate R symmetry maximally. General properties of the class and some of its extensions are established that at string tree level are shown to determine the first three nontrivial effective field theory contributions to all multiplicity. This leads to a natural conjecture for the exact analytic part of the first two of these.

  4. [Complications of surgical stage of treatment in patients with cancer of cervix uteri stage IIB].

    PubMed

    Kryzhanivs'ka, A Ie

    2013-11-01

    The results of treatment of 127 patients, suffering cervix uteri cancer stage IIB in period of 1998 - 2012 yrs, were analyzed. Complications of surgical stage of the combined treatment have had occurred in 40.9% patients, including 40.5% patients, to whom neoadjuvant chemotherapy was conducted and in 41.5%--radiation therapy (RTH). The main postoperative complications--retroperitoneal lymphatic cysts--were revealed in 35.4% patients. The factors, raising the risk of postoperative complications occurrence, are following: the primary tumor spreading, metastatic affection of lymphatic nodes of pelvic cavity, preoperative conduction of RTH or chemotherapy.

  5. Coated platelets function in platelet-dependent fibrin formation via integrin αIIbβ3 and transglutaminase factor XIII.

    PubMed

    Mattheij, Nadine J A; Swieringa, Frauke; Mastenbroek, Tom G; Berny-Lang, Michelle A; May, Frauke; Baaten, Constance C F M J; van der Meijden, Paola E J; Henskens, Yvonne M C; Beckers, Erik A M; Suylen, Dennis P L; Nolte, Marc W; Hackeng, Tilman M; McCarty, Owen J T; Heemskerk, Johan W M; Cosemans, Judith M E M

    2016-04-01

    Coated platelets, formed by collagen and thrombin activation, have been characterized in different ways: i) by the formation of a protein coat of α-granular proteins; ii) by exposure of procoagulant phosphatidylserine; or iii) by high fibrinogen binding. Yet, their functional role has remained unclear. Here we used a novel transglutaminase probe, Rhod-A14, to identify a subpopulation of platelets with a cross-linked protein coat, and compared this with other platelet subpopulations using a panel of functional assays. Platelet stimulation with convulxin/thrombin resulted in initial integrin α(IIb)β3 activation, the appearance of a platelet population with high fibrinogen binding, (independently of active integrins, but dependent on the presence of thrombin) followed by phosphatidylserine exposure and binding of coagulation factors Va and Xa. A subpopulation of phosphatidylserine-exposing platelets bound Rhod-A14 both in suspension and in thrombi generated on a collagen surface. In suspension, high fibrinogen and Rhod-A14 binding were antagonized by combined inhibition of transglutaminase activity and integrin α(IIb)β3 Markedly, in thrombi from mice deficient in transglutaminase factor XIII, platelet-driven fibrin formation and Rhod-A14 binding were abolished by blockage of integrin α(IIb)β3. Vice versa, star-like fibrin formation from platelets of a patient with deficiency in α(IIb)β3(Glanzmann thrombasthenia) was abolished upon blockage of transglutaminase activity. We conclude that coated platelets, with initial α(IIb)β3 activation and high fibrinogen binding, form a subpopulation of phosphatidylserine-exposing platelets, and function in platelet-dependent star-like fibrin fiber formation via transglutaminase factor XIII and integrin α(IIb)β3.

  6. Coated platelets function in platelet-dependent fibrin formation via integrin αIIbβ3 and transglutaminase factor XIII

    PubMed Central

    Mattheij, Nadine J.A.; Swieringa, Frauke; Mastenbroek, Tom G.; Berny-Lang, Michelle A.; May, Frauke; Baaten, Constance C.F.M.J.; van der Meijden, Paola E.J.; Henskens, Yvonne M.C.; Beckers, Erik A.M.; Suylen, Dennis P.L.; Nolte, Marc W.; Hackeng, Tilman M.; McCarty, Owen J.T.; Heemskerk, Johan W.M.; Cosemans, Judith M.E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Coated platelets, formed by collagen and thrombin activation, have been characterized in different ways: i) by the formation of a protein coat of α-granular proteins; ii) by exposure of procoagulant phosphatidylserine; or iii) by high fibrinogen binding. Yet, their functional role has remained unclear. Here we used a novel transglutaminase probe, Rhod-A14, to identify a subpopulation of platelets with a cross-linked protein coat, and compared this with other platelet subpopulations using a panel of functional assays. Platelet stimulation with convulxin/thrombin resulted in initial integrin αIIbβ3 activation, the appearance of a platelet population with high fibrinogen binding, (independently of active integrins, but dependent on the presence of thrombin) followed by phosphatidylserine exposure and binding of coagulation factors Va and Xa. A subpopulation of phosphatidylserine-exposing platelets bound Rhod-A14 both in suspension and in thrombi generated on a collagen surface. In suspension, high fibrinogen and Rhod-A14 binding were antagonized by combined inhibition of transglutaminase activity and integrin αIIbβ3. Markedly, in thrombi from mice deficient in transglutaminase factor XIII, platelet-driven fibrin formation and Rhod-A14 binding were abolished by blockage of integrin αIIbβ3. Vice versa, star-like fibrin formation from platelets of a patient with deficiency in αIIbβ3 (Glanzmann thrombasthenia) was abolished upon blockage of transglutaminase activity. We conclude that coated platelets, with initial αIIbβ3 activation and high fibrinogen binding, form a subpopulation of phosphatidylserine-exposing platelets, and function in platelet-dependent star-like fibrin fiber formation via transglutaminase factor XIII and integrin αIIbβ3. PMID:26721892

  7. Early Duplication of a Single MHC IIB Locus Prior to the Passerine Radiations

    PubMed Central

    Eimes, John A.; Lee, Sang-im; Townsend, Andrea K.; Jablonski, Piotr; Nishiumi, Isao; Satta, Yoko

    2016-01-01

    A key characteristic of MHC genes is the persistence of allelic lineages over macroevolutionary periods, often through multiple speciation events. This phenomenon, known as trans-species polymorphism (TSP), is well documented in several major taxonomic groups, but has less frequently been observed in birds. The order Passeriformes is arguably the most successful terrestrial vertebrate order in terms of diversity of species and ecological range, but the reasons for this success remain unclear. Passerines exhibit the most highly duplicated MHC genes of any major vertebrate taxonomic group, which may generate increased immune response relative to other avian orders with fewer MHC loci. Here, we describe phylogenetic patterns of the MHC IIB in the passerine family Corvidae. Our results indicate wide-spread TSP within this family, with at least four supported MHC IIB allelic lineages that predate speciation by many millions of years. Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations indicate that divergence of these lineages occurred near the time of the divergence of the Passeriformes and other avian orders. We suggest that the current MHC diversity observed in passerines is due in part to the multiple duplication of a single MHC locus, DAB1, early in passerine evolution and that subsequent duplications of these paralogues have contributed to the enormous success of this order by increasing their ability to recognize and mount immune responses to novel pathogens. PMID:27658204

  8. Multi-Wavelength Observations of the Type IIb Supernova 2009mg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oates, S. R.; Bayless, A. J.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Prichard, T.; Prieto, J. L.; Immler, S.; Brown, P. J.; Breeveld, A. A.; DePasquale, M.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Hamuy, M.; Holland, S. T.; Taddia, F.; Roming, P. W. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present Swift UVOT and XRT observations, and visual wavelength spectroscopy of the Type IIb supernova (SN) 2009mg, discovered in the Sb galaxy ESO 121-G26. The observational properties of SN 2009mg are compared to the prototype Type IIb SNe 1993J and 2008ax, with which we find many similarities. However,minor differences are discernible including SN 2009mg not exhibiting an initial fast decline or micro-band upturn as observed in the comparison objects, and its rise to maximum is somewhat slower leading to slightly broader light curves. The late-time temporal index of SN 2009mg, determined from 40 days post-explosion, is consistent with the decay rate of SN 1993J, but inconsistent with the decay of Co-56. This suggests leakage of gamma-rays out of the ejecta and a stellar mass on the small side of the mass distribution. Our XRT nondetection provides an upper limit on the mass-loss rate of the progenitor of M less than 1.5 x 10(exp -5) solar mass yr(exp -1). Modelling of the SN light curve indicates a kinetic energy of 0.15 sup +0.02 sub -0.13 x 10(exp 51) erg, an ejecta mass of 0.56 sup+0.10 sub -.26 solar mass and a Ni-56 mass of 0.10 plus or minus 0.01 solar mass.

  9. A likely inverse-Compton emission from the Type IIb SN 2013df.

    PubMed

    Li, K L; Kong, A K H

    2016-08-02

    The inverse-Compton X-ray emission model for supernovae has been well established to explain the X-ray properties of many supernovae for over 30 years. However, no observational case has yet been found to connect the X-rays with the optical lights as they should be. Here, we report the discovery of a hard X-ray source that is associated with a Type II-b supernova. Simultaneous emission enhancements have been found in both the X-ray and optical light curves twenty days after the supernova explosion. While the enhanced X-rays are likely dominated by inverse-Compton scatterings of the supernova's lights from the Type II-b secondary peak, we propose a scenario of a high-speed supernova ejecta colliding with a low-density pre-supernova stellar wind that produces an optically thin and high-temperature electron gas for the Comptonization. The inferred stellar wind mass-loss rate is consistent with that of the supernova progenitor candidate as a yellow supergiant detected by the Hubble Space Telescope, providing an independent proof for the progenitor. This is also new evidence of the inverse-Compton emission during the early phase of a supernova.

  10. Generalized type IIB supergravity equations and non-Abelian classical r-matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Domenico; Reffert, Susanne; Sakamoto, Jun-ichi; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2016-11-01

    We study Yang-Baxter deformations of the {{AdS}}5× {S}5 superstring with non-Abelian classical r-matrices which satisfy the homogeneous classical Yang-Baxter equation. By performing a supercoset construction, we can get deformed {{AdS}}5× {S}5 backgrounds. While this is a new area of research, the current understanding is that Abelian classical r-matrices give rise to solutions of type IIB supergravity, while non-Abelian classical r-matrices lead to solutions of the generalized supergravity equations. We examine here some examples of non-Abelian classical r-matrices and derive the associated backgrounds explicitly. All of the resulting backgrounds satisfy the generalized equations. For some of them, we derive ‘T-dualized’ backgrounds by adding a linear coordinate dependence to the dilaton and show that these satisfy the usual type IIB supergravity equations. Remarkably, some of the ‘T-dualized’ backgrounds are locally identical to undeformed {{AdS}}5× {S}5 after an appropriate coordinate transformation, but this seems not to be generally the case.

  11. Topological charges in SL(2,R) covariant massive 11-dimensional and type IIB supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callister, Andrew K.; Smith, Douglas J.

    2009-12-01

    In this paper we construct closed expressions that correspond to the topological charges of the various 1/2-BPS states of the maximal 10- and 11-dimensional supergravity theories. These expressions are related to the structure of the supersymmetry algebras in curved spacetimes. We mainly focus on IIB supergravity and 11-dimensional supergravity in a double M9-brane background, with an emphasis on the SL(2,R) multiplet structure of the charges and how these map between theories. This includes the charges corresponding to the multiplets of 7- and 9-branes in IIB. We find that examining the possible multiplet structures of the charges provides another tool for exploring the spectrum of BPS states that appear in these theories. As a prerequisite to constructing the charges we determine the field equations and multiplet structure of the 11-dimensional gauge potentials, extending previous results on the subject. The massive gauge transformations of the fields are also discussed. We also demonstrate how these massive gauge transformations are compatible with the construction of an SL(2,R) covariant kinetic term in the 11-dimensional Kaluza-Klein monopole worldvolume action.

  12. A likely inverse-Compton emission from the Type IIb SN 2013df

    PubMed Central

    Li, K. L.; Kong, A. K. H.

    2016-01-01

    The inverse-Compton X-ray emission model for supernovae has been well established to explain the X-ray properties of many supernovae for over 30 years. However, no observational case has yet been found to connect the X-rays with the optical lights as they should be. Here, we report the discovery of a hard X-ray source that is associated with a Type II-b supernova. Simultaneous emission enhancements have been found in both the X-ray and optical light curves twenty days after the supernova explosion. While the enhanced X-rays are likely dominated by inverse-Compton scatterings of the supernova’s lights from the Type II-b secondary peak, we propose a scenario of a high-speed supernova ejecta colliding with a low-density pre-supernova stellar wind that produces an optically thin and high-temperature electron gas for the Comptonization. The inferred stellar wind mass-loss rate is consistent with that of the supernova progenitor candidate as a yellow supergiant detected by the Hubble Space Telescope, providing an independent proof for the progenitor. This is also new evidence of the inverse-Compton emission during the early phase of a supernova. PMID:27481538

  13. Identification of stepped changes of binding affinity during interactions between the disintegrin rhodostomin and integrin αIIbβ3 in living cells using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chia-Fen; Chang, Bo-Jui; Pai, Chyi-Huey; Chen, Hsuan-Yi; Chi, Sien; Hsu, Long; Tsai, Jin-Wu; Lin, Chi-Hung

    2004-10-01

    Integrin receptors serve as both mechanical links and signal transduction mediators between the cell and its environment. Experimental evidence demonstrates that conformational changes and lateral clustering of the integrin proteins may affect their binding to ligands and regulate downstream cellular responses; however, experimental links between the structural and functional correlations of the ligand-receptor interactions are not yet elucidated. In the present report, we utilized optical tweezers to measure the dynamic binding between the snake venom rhodostomin, coated on a microparticle and functioned as a ligand, and the membrane receptor integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3) expressed on a Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell. A progressive increase of total binding affinity was found between the bead and CHO cell in the first 300 sec following optical tweezers-guided contact. Further analysis of the cumulative data revealed the presence of "unit binding force" presumably exerted by a single rhodostomin-integrin pair. Interestingly, two such units were found. Among the measurements of less total binding forces, presumably taken at the early stage of ligand-receptor interactions, a unit of 4.15 pN per molecule pair was derived. This unit force dropped to 2.54 pN per molecule pair toward the later stage of interactions when the total binding forces were relatively large. This stepped change of single molecule pair binding affinity was not found when mutant rhodostomin proteins were used as ligands (a single unit of 1.81 pN per pair was found). These results were interpreted along with the current knowledge about the conformational changes of integrins during the "molecule activation" process.

  14. Impact of Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa Inhibitors Use on Outcomes After Lower Extremity Endovascular Interventions From Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2006-2011).

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Angela; Krajcer, Zvonimir

    2016-10-01

    Anticoagulant and antiplatelet medications are necessary in peripheral endovascular intervention, but a standardized approach has not yet been established. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor use in endovascular lower extremity interventions decreased overall amputation rates. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor use in endovascular lower extremity interventions increased postprocedural bleeding and complications requiring intervention.

  15. Activin A/BMP2 chimera AB235 drives efficient redifferentiation of long term cultured autologous chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, G.; López-Ruiz, E.; Kwiatkowski, W.; Montañez, E.; Arrebola, F.; Carrillo, E.; Gray, P. C.; Belmonte, J. C. Izpisua; Choe, S.; Perán, M.; Marchal, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) depends on the quality and quantity of implanted cells and is hindered by the fact that chondrocytes cultured for long periods of time undergo dedifferentiation. Here we have developed a reproducible and efficient chondrogenic protocol to redifferentiate chondrocytes isolated from osteoarthritis (OA) patients. We used morphological, histological and immunological analysis together with a RT-PCR detection of collagen I and collagen II gene expression to show that chondrocytes isolated from articular cartilage biopsies of patients and subjected to long-term culture undergo dedifferentiation and that these cells can be redifferentiated following treatment with the chimeric Activin A/BMP2 ligand AB235. Examination of AB235-treated cell pellets in both in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed that redifferentiated chondrocytes synthesized a cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM), primarily consisting of vertically-orientated collagen fibres and cartilage-specific proteoglycans. AB235-treated cell pellets also integrated into the surrounding subcutaneous tissue following transplantation in mice as demonstrated by their dramatic increase in size while non-treated control pellets disintegrated upon transplantation. Thus, our findings describe an effective protocol for the promotion of redifferentiation of autologous chondrocytes obtained from OA patients and the formation of a cartilage-like ECM that can integrate into the surrounding tissue in vivo. PMID:26563344

  16. Role of G protein signaling in the formation of the fibrin(ogen)-integrin αIIbβ3-actin cytoskeleton complex in platelets.

    PubMed

    Budnik, Ivan; Shenkman, Boris; Savion, Naphtali

    2016-09-01

    Effective platelet function requires formation of a physical link between fibrin(ogen), integrin αIIbβ3, and cytoplasmic actin filaments. We investigated the role of the Gαq, Gαi, and Gα12/13 families of heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (G proteins) in the assembly of a ligand-αIIbβ3-actin cytoskeleton complex. Selective and combined activation of the G proteins was achieved by using combinations of various platelet agonists and inhibitors. Formation and stability of fibrinogen-αIIbβ3 interaction were evaluated by the extent of platelet aggregation and the rate of eptifibatide-induced platelet disaggregation; association of αIIbβ3 with the cytoskeleton was analyzed by western blot. Formation of the fibrin-αIIbβ3-actin cytoskeleton complex was evaluated by rotational thromboelastometry assay in which clot formation was induced by the mixture of reptilase and factor XIIIa. We demonstrated that involvement of heterotrimeric G proteins in the formation of the ligand-αIIbβ3-cytoskeleton complex depends on whether fibrinogen or fibrin serves as the integrin ligand. Formation of the fibrinogen-αIIbβ3-cytoskeleton complex requires combined activation of at least two G protein pathways while the maximal αIIbβ3-cytoskeleton association and the strongest αIIbβ3-fibrinogen binding supporting irreversible platelet aggregation require combined activation of all three-Gαq, Gαi, and Gα12/13-G protein families. In contrast, formation of the fibrin-αIIbβ3-cytoskeleton complex mediating clot retraction is critically dependent on the activation of the Gαi family, especially on the activation of Gαz.

  17. Radiation therapy for stage IIA and IIB testicular seminoma: peripheral dose calculations and risk assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Berris, Theocharris; Lyraraki, Efrossyni; Damilakis, John

    2015-03-01

    This study was conducted to calculate the peripheral dose to critical structures and assess the radiation risks from modern radiotherapy for stage IIA/IIB testicular seminoma. A Monte Carlo code was used for treatment simulation on a computational phantom representing an average adult. The initial treatment phase involved anteroposterior and posteroanaterior modified dog-leg fields exposing para-aortic and ipsilateral iliac lymph nodes followed by a cone-down phase for nodal mass irradiation. Peripheral doses were calculated using different modified dog-leg field dimensions and an extended conventional dog-leg portal. The risk models of the BEIR-VII report and ICRP-103 were combined with dosimetric calculations to estimate the probability of developing stochastic effects. Radiotherapy for stage IIA seminoma with a target dose of 30 Gy resulted in a range of 23.0-603.7 mGy to non-targeted peripheral tissues and organs. The corresponding range for treatment of stage IIB disease to a cumulative dose of 36 Gy was 24.2-633.9 mGy. A dose variation of less than 13% was found by altering the field dimensions. Radiotherapy with the conventional instead of the modern modified dog-leg field increased the peripheral dose up to 8.2 times. The calculated heart doses of 589.0-632.9 mGy may increase the risk for developing cardiovascular diseases whereas the testicular dose of more than 231.9 mGy may lead to a temporary infertility. The probability of birth abnormalities in the offspring of cancer survivors was below 0.13% which is much lower than the spontaneous mutation rate. Abdominoplevic irradiation may increase the lifetime intrinsic risk for the induction of secondary malignancies by 0.6-3.9% depending upon the site of interest, patient’s age and tumor dose. Radiotherapy for stage IIA/IIB seminoma with restricted fields and low doses is associated with an increased morbidity. These data may allow the definition of a risk-adapted follow-up scheme for long

  18. SN 2011dh: DISCOVERY OF A TYPE IIb SUPERNOVA FROM A COMPACT PROGENITOR IN THE NEARBY GALAXY M51

    SciTech Connect

    Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Sternberg, Assaf; Rabinak, Itay; Waxman, Eli; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Quimby, Robert M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Li, Weidong; Bloom, Joshua S.; Nugent, Peter E.; Poznanski, Dovi; Sullivan, Mark; Gorbikov, Evgeny; and others

    2011-12-15

    On 2011 May 31 UT a supernova (SN) exploded in the nearby galaxy M51 (the Whirlpool Galaxy). We discovered this event using small telescopes equipped with CCD cameras and also detected it with the Palomar Transient Factory survey, rapidly confirming it to be a Type II SN. Here, we present multi-color ultraviolet through infrared photometry which is used to calculate the bolometric luminosity and a series of spectra. Our early-time observations indicate that SN 2011dh resulted from the explosion of a relatively compact progenitor star. Rapid shock-breakout cooling leads to relatively low temperatures in early-time spectra, compared to explosions of red supergiant stars, as well as a rapid early light curve decline. Optical spectra of SN 2011dh are dominated by H lines out to day 10 after explosion, after which He I lines develop. This SN is likely a member of the cIIb (compact IIb) class, with progenitor radius larger than that of SN 2008ax and smaller than the eIIb (extended IIb) SN 1993J progenitor. Our data imply that the object identified in pre-explosion Hubble Space Telescope images at the SN location is possibly a companion to the progenitor or a blended source, and not the progenitor star itself, as its radius ({approx}10{sup 13} cm) would be highly inconsistent with constraints from our post-explosion spectra.

  19. On WZ and RR couplings of BPS branes and their all order α‧ corrections in IIB, IIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatefi, Ehsan

    2017-03-01

    We compute all three and four point couplings of BPS Dp-branes for all different nonzero p-values on the entire world volume and transverse directions. We start finding out all four point function supersymmetric Wess-Zumino (WZ) actions of one closed string Ramond-Ramond (RR) field with two fermions, either with the same (IIB) or different chirality (IIA) as well as their all order α‧ corrections. The closed form of S-matrices of two closed string RR in both IIB, IIA, including their all order α‧ corrections have also been addressed. Our results confirm that, not only the structures of α‧ corrections but also their coefficients of IIB are quite different from their IIA ones. The S-matrix of an RR and two gauge (scalar) fields and their all order corrections in antisymmetric picture of RR have been carried out as well. Various remarks on the restricted Bianchi identities as well as all order α‧ corrections to all different supersymmetric WZ couplings in both type IIA and IIB superstring theory are also released. Lastly, different singularity structures as well as all order contact terms for all non-vanishing traces in type II have also been constructed.

  20. Chemoradiation Therapy and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Stages IB2-IIB or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-08

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Positive Para-Aortic Lymph Node; Positive Pelvic Lymph Node; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  1. The GLAS editing procedures for the FGGE level II-B data collected during SOP-1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W.; Edelmann, D.; Carus, H.

    1981-01-01

    The modifications made to the FGGE Level II-b data are discussed and the FORTRAN program developed to perform the modifications is described. It is suggested that the edited database is the most accurate one available for FGGE SOP-1 and 2.

  2. UNITED PRESBYTERIAN NATIONAL EDUCATION SURVEY, AN INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH PROJECT. VOLUMES IIA AND IIB, COMMUNICATIONS VARIABLES IN THE CHURCH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WHITMAN, LAURIS B.; AND OTHERS

    THE DEPARTMENT OF RESEARCH OF THE NATIONAL COUNCIL OF CHURCHES CONDUCTED A SURVEY FOR THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF ITS MEMBERSHIP AND RELIGIOUS BELIEFS. THE AIM WAS TO COMPARE VARIOUS POPULATIONS (CLERGY, COMMUNICANTS, CHURCH SCHOOL TEACHERS, AND YOUTH), CONCERNING THE EXTENT OF THEIR ORTHODOXY. VOLUMES IIA AND IIB OF THE REPORT RELATE TO THE…

  3. Effect of Cordycepin-Enriched WIB801C from Cordyceps militaris Suppressing Fibrinogen Binding to Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Ha; Kim, Hyun-Hong; Lim, Deok Hwi; Kim, Jong-Lae; Park, Hwa-Jin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of cordycepin-enriched (CE)-WIB801C, a n-butanol extract of Cordyceps militaris-hypha on collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation. CE-WIB801C dose dependently inhibited collagen-induced platelet aggregation, and had a synergistic effect together with cordycepin (W-cordycepin) from CE-WIB801C on the inhibition of collagen-induced platelet aggregation. CE-WIB801C and cordycepin stimulated the phosphorylation of VASP (Ser157) and the dephosphorylation of PI3K and Akt, and inhibited the binding of fibrinogen to glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (αIIb/β3) and the release of ATP and serotonin in collagen-induced platelet aggregation. A-kinase inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cAMPS reduced CE-WIB801C-, and cordycepin-increased VASP (Ser157) phosphorylation, and increased CE-WIB801C-, and cordycepin-inhibited the fibrinogen binding to αIIb/β3. Therefore, we demonstrate that CE-WIB801C-, and cordycepin-inhibited fibrinogen binding to αIIb/β3 are due to stimulation of cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of VASP (Ser157), and inhibition of PI3K/Akt phosphorylation. These results strongly indicate that CE-WIB801C and cordycepin may have preventive or therapeutic potential for platelet aggregation-mediated diseases, such as thrombosis, myocardial infarction, atherosclerosis, and ischemic cerebrovascular disease. PMID:25593645

  4. Remarks on non-BPS string amplitudes and their all order α' contact interactions in IIB, IIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatefi, Ehsan

    2017-03-01

    We explore the entire form of S-Matrix elements of a potential C n-1 Ramond-Ramond (RR) form field, a tachyon and two transverse scalar fields on both world volume and transverse directions of type IIB and IIA superstring theories. Apart from < {V}_{C^{-2}}{V}_{φ^0}{V}_{φ^0}{V}_{T^0}\\rangle the other scattering amplitude, namely < {V}_{C^{-1}}{V}_{φ^{-1}}{V}_{φ^0}{V}_{T^0}\\rangle is also revealed. We then start to compare all singularity structures of symmetric and asymmetric analysis, generating all infinite singularity structures as well as all order α' contact interactions on the whole directions. This leads to deriving various new contact terms and several new restricted Bianchi identities in both type IIB and IIA. It is also shown that just some of the new couplings of type IIB (IIA) string theory can be re-verified in an Effective Field Theory (EFT) by pull-back of branes. To construct the rest of S-matrix elements one needs to first derive restricted world volume (or bulk) Bianchi identities and then discover new EFT couplings in both type IIB and IIA. Finally the presence of commutator of scalar fields inside the exponential of Wess-Zumino action for non-BPS branes has been confirmed as well.

  5. Development of a label-free assay for sodium-dependent phosphate transporter NaPi-IIb.

    PubMed

    Wong, Soo-Hang; Gao, Alice; Ward, Sabrina; Henley, Charles; Lee, Paul H

    2012-07-01

    The most widely used assay format for characterizing plasma membrane transporter activity measures accumulation of radiolabeled substrates in tissues or cells expressing the transporters. This assay format had limitations and disadvantages; therefore, there was an unmet need for development of a homogeneous, nonradioactive assay for membrane transporter proteins. In this report, the authors describe the development of a label-free homogeneous assay for the sodium-dependent phosphate transporter NaPi-IIb using the Epic system. The addition of phosphate stimulated a dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) profile unique to cells expressing NaPi-IIb but not on parental cells. This DMR profile was phosphate specific because sulfate or buffer alone did not elicit the same response. Furthermore, the DMR response observed was phosphate and sodium dependent, with Km values in the micromolar and millimolar range, respectively. A known NaPi-IIb noncompetitive inhibitor was shown to completely inhibit the phosphate-stimulated DMR response, suggesting that this observed DMR response is an NaPi-IIb-mediated cellular event. The results demonstrate that a novel label-free assay was developed for studying transporter-mediated cellular activity, and this DMR assay platform could be applicable to other membrane transporter proteins.

  6. Preliminary Study for Manned Spacecraft with Escape System and H-IIB Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Takane; Ito, Michio; Takata, Shinichi

    HTV (H-II Transfer Vehicle) is the first Japanese un-manned service vehicle that will transport several pieces of equipments to ISS (International Space Station) and support human activities on orbit. HTV will be launched by the first H-IIB rocket in September 2009 and JAXA will have the capability to access LEO (Low Earth Orbit) bases with enough volume/weight as the human transport system. This paper is the preliminary study for developing a manned spacecraft from the HTV design and includes clarification of necessary development items. In addition, missing parts in the current HTV design are identified with some analysis, such as LES (Launch Escape System), which is mandatory for all human transport systems.

  7. Attractor Behaviour of Non-Supersymmetric Black Holes for type IIB Compactification

    SciTech Connect

    Kaura, Payal

    2007-10-03

    We look for possible non-supersymmetric black hole attractor solutions for type IIB compactified on (the mirror of) CY{sub 3}(2,128) expressed as a degree-12 hypersurface in WCP{sup 4}[1,1,2,2,6], for points away from the conifold locus, and for points near the conifold locus. We also discuss application of Kallosh's attractor equations (which are equivalent to the extremization of the effective black-hole potential) for nonsupersymmetric attractors and show that (a) for points away from the conifold locus, the attractor equations demand that the attractor solutions be independent of one of the two complex structure moduli, and (b) for points near the conifold locus, the attractor equations imply switching off of one of the six components of the fluxes. Both these features are more obvious using the atractor equations than the extremization of the black hole potential.

  8. Inhibition of class IIb histone deacetylase significantly improves cloning efficiency in mice.

    PubMed

    Ono, Tetsuo; Li, Chong; Mizutani, Eiji; Terashita, Yukari; Yamagata, Kazuo; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2010-12-01

    Since the first mouse clone was produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer, the success rate of cloning in mice has been extremely low. Some histone deacetylase inhibitors, such as trichostatin A and scriptaid, have improved the full-term development of mouse clones significantly, but the mechanisms allowing for this are unclear. Here, we found that two other specific inhibitors, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and oxamflatin, could also reduce the rate of apoptosis in blastocysts, improve the full-term development of cloned mice, and increase establishment of nuclear transfer-generated embryonic stem cell lines significantly without leading to obvious abnormalities. However, another inhibitor, valproic acid, could not improve cloning efficiency. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, oxamflatin, trichostatin A, and scriptaid are inhibitors for classes I and IIa/b histone deacetylase, whereas valproic acid is an inhibitor for classes I and IIa, suggesting that inhibiting class IIb histone deacetylase is an important step for reprogramming mouse cloning efficiency.

  9. Immunological monitoring in a controlled trial of immunotherapy in stage IIB malignant melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Embleton, M. J.; Ransom, J. H.; McIllmurray, M. B.; Reeves, W. G.

    1978-01-01

    Fifteen patients undergoing surgery for Stage IIb malignant melanoma were randomly allocated either to a group who received a vaccine of BCG mixed with irradiated autologous melanoma cells, or a control group who received no further treatment. All patients were monitored sequentially for immunological competence and tumour-directed immunity, using a wide range of techniques, and the results were compared retrospectively with their clinical course. Three months after surgery, there was a trend towards inhibition of PHA-induced lymphocyte transformation by autologous serum in patients who developed recurrent tumour within 12 months after treatment. Serum from patients who remained tumour-free for 12 months did not inhibit stimulation of autologous lymphocytes by PHA. Apart from this test, no other immunological parameters correlated either with clinical course or with the type of treatment received. PMID:565645

  10. Supersymmetric AdS5 solutions of type IIB supergravity without D3 branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couzens, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    We analyse the most general bosonic supersymmetric solutions of type IIB supergravity whose metrics are warped products of five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space (AdS5) with a five-dimensional Riemannian manifold M 5, where the five-form flux vanishes, while all remaining fluxes are allowed to be non-vanishing consistent with SO(4,2) symmetry. This completes the program of classifying all supersymmetric solutions of ten and eleven-dimensional supergravity with an AdS5 factor. We investigate the supersymmetry conditions in some special cases, and demonstrate how these are satisfied by a solution originally found in [13], utilising the method of non-Abelian T-duality.

  11. Displacements and stress distribution in D0 Run IIb stave due to CTE mismatches

    SciTech Connect

    Lanfranfo, Giobatta; Fast, James; /Fermilab

    2001-07-01

    A possible D0 Run IIb stave design currently under study is characterized by an outer carbon fiber stiffening shell with the silicon detectors mounted internally and a single central cooling line running between them; in this paper the stave will be analyzed for thermal compatibility since the different coefficient of thermal expansion in the materials may cause unpredictable stresses and strains in the structure. A simplified stave section has been modeled with finite elements for different materials configurations and the vertical and longitudinal displacements induced by the thermal gradient, together with the related stresses, have been computed. Finally, once selected the most suitable material combination, a more realistic model has been created in order to study the influence of the hybrid location along the ladders.

  12. Measurements on irradiated L1 sensor prototypes for the D0 Run IIb silicon detector project

    SciTech Connect

    Ahsan, M.; Bolton, T.; Carnes, K.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Gray, T.; Korjenevski, S.; Lehner, F.; Lipton, R.; Mao, H.S.; McCarthy, R.; /SUNY, Stony Brook /Kansas State U. /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    We report on irradiation studies of Hamamatsu prototype silicon microstrip detectors for layer 1 of the D0 upgrade project for Run IIb. The irradiation was carried out with 10 MeV protons up to proton fluence of 10{sup 14} p/cm{sup 2} at the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Manhatten, KS. The flux calibration was carefully checked using different dose normalization techniques. The results based on the obtained sensor leakage currents after irradiation show that the NIEL scaling hypothesis for low energy protons has to be applied with great care. We observe 30-40% less radiation damage in silicon for 10 MeV proton exposure than is expected from the predicted NIEL scaling.

  13. Most general spherically symmetric M2-branes and type-IIB strings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhaolong; Lue, H.

    2009-09-15

    We obtain the most general spherically symmetric M2-branes and type-IIB strings, with R{sup 1,2}xSO(8) and R{sup 1,1}xSO(8) isometries, respectively. We find that there are 12 different classes of M2-branes, and we study their curvature properties. In particular, we obtain new smooth M2-brane wormholes that connect two asymptotic regions: one is flat and the other can be either flat or AdS{sub 4}xS{sup 7}. We find that these wormholes are traversable with certain timelike trajectories. We also obtain the most general Ricci-flat solutions in five dimensions with R{sup 1,1}xSO(3) isometries.

  14. Analysis of late-time light curves of Type IIb, Ib and Ic supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, J. Craig; Johnson, V.; Clocchiatti, A.

    2015-06-01

    The shape of the light-curve peak of radioactive-powered core-collapse `stripped-envelope' supernovae constrains the ejecta mass, nickel mass and kinetic energy by the brightness and diffusion time for a given opacity and observed expansion velocity. Late-time light curves give constraints on the ejecta mass and energy, given the gamma-ray opacity. Previous work has shown that the principal light-curve peaks for SN IIb with small amounts of hydrogen and for hydrogen/helium-deficient SN Ib/c are often rather similar near maximum light, suggesting similar ejecta masses and kinetic energies, but that late-time light curves show a wide dispersion, suggesting a dispersion in ejecta masses and kinetic energies. It was also shown that SN IIb and SN Ib/c can have very similar late-time light curves, but different ejecta velocities demanding significantly different ejecta masses and kinetic energies. We revisit these topics by collecting and analysing well-sampled single-band and quasi-bolometric light curves from the literature. We find that the late-time light curves of stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae are heterogeneous. We also show that the observed properties, the photospheric velocity at peak, the rise time and the late decay time, can be used to determine the mean opacity appropriate to the peak. The opacity determined in this way is considerably smaller than common estimates. We discuss how the small effective opacity may result from recombination and asymmetries in the ejecta.

  15. Radiative-transfer models for supernovae IIb/Ib/Ic from binary-star progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Woosley, Stan; Livne, Eli; Waldman, Roni; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Langer, Norbert

    2015-10-01

    We present 1D non-local thermodynamic equilibrium time-dependent radiative-transfer simulations for supernovae (SNe) of Type IIb, Ib, and Ic that result from the terminal explosion of the mass donor in a close-binary system. Here, we select three ejecta with a total kinetic energy of ≈1.2 × 1051 erg, but characterized by different ejecta masses (2-5 M⊙), composition, and chemical mixing. The Type IIb/Ib models correspond to the progenitors that have retained their He-rich shell at the time of explosion. The Type Ic model arises from a progenitor that has lost its helium shell, but retains 0.32 M⊙ of helium in a CO-rich core of 5.11 M⊙. We discuss their photometric and spectroscopic properties during the first 2-3 months after explosion, and connect these to their progenitor and ejecta properties including chemical stratification. For these three models, Arnett's rule overestimates the 56Ni mass by ≈ 50 per cent while the procedure of Katz et al., based on an energy argument, yields a more reliable estimate. The presence of strong C I lines around 9000Å prior to maximum is an indicator that the pre-SN star was underabundant in helium. As noted by others, the 1.08μm feature is a complex blend of C I, Mg II, and He I lines, which makes the identification of He uncertain in SNe Ibc unless other He I lines can be identified. Our models show little scatter in (V - R) colour 10 d after R-band maximum. We also address a number of radiative transfer properties of SNe Ibc, including the notion of a photosphere, the inference of a representative ejecta expansion rate, spectrum formation, blackbody fits and `correction factors'.

  16. The type IIb supernova 2013df and its cool supergiant progenitor

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Foley, Ryan J.; Miller, Adam A.; Smith, Nathan; Lee, William H.; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2014-02-01

    We have obtained early-time photometry and spectroscopy of supernova (SN) 2013df in NGC 4414. The SN is clearly of Type IIb, with notable similarities to SN 1993J. From its luminosity at secondary maximum light, it appears that less {sup 56}Ni (≲ 0.06 M {sub ☉}) was synthesized in the SN 2013df explosion than was the case for the SNe IIb 1993J, 2008ax, and 2011dh. Based on a comparison of the light curves, the SN 2013df progenitor must have been more extended in radius prior to explosion than the progenitor of SN 1993J. The total extinction for SN 2013df is estimated to be A{sub V} = 0.30 mag. The metallicity at the SN location is likely to be solar. We have conducted Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Target of Opportunity observations of the SN with the Wide Field Camera 3, and from a precise comparison of these new observations to archival HST observations of the host galaxy obtained 14 yr prior to explosion, we have identified the progenitor of SN 2013df to be a yellow supergiant, somewhat hotter than a red supergiant progenitor for a normal Type II-Plateau SN. From its observed spectral energy distribution, assuming that the light is dominated by one star, the progenitor had effective temperature T {sub eff} = 4250 ± 100 K and a bolometric luminosity L {sub bol} = 10{sup 4.94±0.06} L {sub ☉}. This leads to an effective radius R {sub eff} = 545 ± 65 R {sub ☉}. The star likely had an initial mass in the range of 13-17 M {sub ☉}; however, if it was a member of an interacting binary system, detailed modeling of the system is required to estimate this mass more accurately. The progenitor star of SN 2013df appears to have been relatively similar to the progenitor of SN 1993J.

  17. Characterization of MHC class IIB for four endangered Australian freshwater fishes obtained from ecologically divergent populations.

    PubMed

    Bracamonte, Seraina E; Smith, Steve; Hammer, Michael; Pavey, Scott A; Sunnucks, Paul; Beheregaray, Luciano B

    2015-10-01

    Genetic diversity is an essential aspect of species viability, and assessments of neutral genetic diversity are regularly implemented in captive breeding and conservation programs. Despite their importance, information from adaptive markers is rarely included in such programs. A promising marker of significance in fitness and adaptive potential is the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), a key component of the adaptive immune system. Populations of Australian freshwater fishes are generally declining in numbers due to human impacts and the introduction of exotic species, a scenario of particular concern for members of the family Percichthyidae, several of which are listed as nationally vulnerable or endangered, and hence subject to management plans, captive breeding, and restoration plans. We used a next-generation sequencing approach to characterize the MHC IIB locus and provide a conservative description of its levels of diversity in four endangered percichthyids: Gadopsis marmoratus, Macquaria australasica, Nannoperca australis, and Nannoperca obscura. Evidence is presented for a duplicated MHC IIB locus, positively selected sites and recombination of MHC alleles. Relatively moderate levels of diversity were detected in the four species, as well as in different ecotypes within each species. Phylogenetic analyses revealed genus specific clustering of alleles and no allele sharing among species. There were also no shared alleles observed between two ecotypes within G. marmoratus and within M. australasica, which might be indicative of ecologically-driven divergence and/or long divergence times. This represents the first characterization and assessment of MHC diversity for Percichthyidae, and also for Australian freshwater fishes in general, providing key genetic resources for a vertebrate group of increasing conservation concern.

  18. ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPY OF TYPE IIB SUPERNOVAE: DIVERSITY AND THE IMPACT OF CIRCUMSTELLAR MATERIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Ami, Sagi; Hachinger, Stephan; Mazzali, Paolo A.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Horesh, Assaf; Yaron, Ofer; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Matheson, Thomas; Modjaz, Maryam; Sauer, Daniel N.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Smith, Nathan

    2015-04-10

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope (HST) multi-epoch ultraviolet (UV) spectra of the bright Type IIb SN 2013df, and undertake a comprehensive analysis of the set of four SNe IIb for which HST UV spectra are available (SN 1993J, SN 2001ig, SN 2011dh, and SN 2013df). We find strong diversity in both continuum levels and line features among these objects. We use radiative-transfer models that fit the optical part of the spectrum well, and find that in three of these four events we see a UV continuum flux excess, apparently unaffected by line absorption. We hypothesize that this emission originates above the photosphere, and is related to interaction with circumstellar material (CSM) located in close proximity to the SN progenitor. In contrast, the spectra of SN 2001ig are well fit by single-temperature models, display weak continuum and strong reverse-fluorescence features, and are similar to spectra of radioactive {sup 56}Ni-dominated SNe Ia. A comparison of the early shock-cooling components in the observed light curves with the UV continuum levels which we assume trace the strength of CSM interaction suggests that events with slower cooling have stronger CSM emission. The radio emission from events having a prominent UV excess is perhaps consistent with slower blast-wave velocities, as expected if the explosion shock was slowed down by the CSM that is also responsible for the strong UV, but this connection is currently speculative as it is based on only a few events.

  19. Reduction of type IIb myosin and IIB fibers in tibialis anterior muscle of mini-muscle mice from high-activity lines.

    PubMed

    Bilodeau, Geneviève M; Guderley, Helga; Joanisse, Denis R; Garland, Theodore

    2009-03-01

    Selective breeding of laboratory house mice (Mus domesticus) for high voluntary wheel running has generated four replicate lines that show an almost threefold increase in daily wheel-running distances as compared with four nonselected control lines. An unusual hindlimb "mini-muscle" phenotype (small muscles, increased mitochondrial enzyme levels, disorganized fiber distribution) has increased in frequency in two of the four replicate selected lines. The gene of major effect that accounts for this phenotype is an autosomal recessive that has been mapped to a 2.6335 Mb interval on MMU11, but not yet identified. This study examined the tibialis anterior muscle to determine whether changes in muscle fiber types could explain such modifications in muscle size and properties. Although selected and control lines did not exhibit systematic differences in the fiber types present in the tibialis anterior muscle, as assessed by electrophoresis of myosin heavy chains (MHC) and by histochemistry, mini-muscle mice lacked type IIB fibers and the corresponding MHCs. Mini-muscle tibialis show increased activities of hexokinase and citrate synthase compared with the normally sized muscles, likely the result of the modified fiber types in the muscle. The mini-muscle phenotype is the major means through which selective breeding for high wheel running has modified the functional capacities of the hindlimb muscles, as normally sized tibialis anterior muscles from control and selected lines did not show general differences in their enzymatic capacities, MHC profiles or fiber type composition, with the exception of an elevated hexokinase activity and a reduced GPa activity in the selected lines.

  20. Insulin Receptor Processing and Lipid Composition of Erythrocyte Membrane in Patients with Hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Masella, R.; Cantafora, A.; Maffì, D.; Volpe, R.; Ginnetti, M.G.; Ricci, G.; Mace, N.L.; Buxton, G.M.; Peterson, S.W.

    1995-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the common forms of dyslipidemia could affect either the lipid composition or insulin receptor processing (down-regulation) of erythrocytes. The study included 22 patients with type IIa hypercholesterolemia, 15 patients with type IV hypertriglyceridemia and 12 patients with type IIb hyperlipidemia. Ten normolipidemic subjects were used as controls. Their erythrocyte membranes were analyzed for lipid composition and insulin receptor down-regulation. The results show that all the hyperlipidemias investigated were characterized by significant increases in the cholesterol to phospholipid molar ratio (0.56 +/- 0.08 in controls and 1.11 +/- 0.13, 1.09 +/- 0.14, 1.04 +/- 0.15, p < 0.001, in types IIa, IIb and IV, respectively). Surface insulin receptors of type IIa and IIb patients did not appear to down-regulate when compared to normal subjects, but rather up-regulated (+65.2% in controls, -1.0% and -8.7%, p < 0.001, in type IIa and IIb patients, respectively). Patients with type IV hypertriglyceridemia showed a residual capacity for insulin receptor internalization (10.7% down-regulation). Membranes of all the patients contained a higher proportion of phosphatidylethanolamine; the molar ratio of sphingomyelin to phosphatidylcholine was significantly higher in types IIb than in controls (1.22 +/- 0.11 and 1.12 +/- 0.10, p < 0.05, respectively); all the patients showed a lower content of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the major glycerophospholipid classes. However, type IV hypertriglyceridemics showed less variations, especially in the phosphatidylserine fraction. These results indicate that the alterations in lipoprotein pattern may affect both the lipid membrane equilibria and the processing ability of surface insulin receptors. Copyright 1995 S. Karger AG, Basel

  1. Effects of gonadotrophins, growth hormone, and activin A on enzymatically isolated follicle growth, oocyte chromatin organization, and steroid secretion.

    PubMed

    Ola, Safiriyu Idowu; Ai, Jun-Shu; Liu, Jing-He; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Chen, Da-Yuan; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2008-01-01

    So far, standard follicle culture systems can produce blastocyst from less than 40% of the in vitro matured oocytes compared to over 70% in the in vivo counterpart. Because the capacity for embryonic development is strictly associated with the terminal stage of oocyte growth, the nuclear maturity status of the in vitro grown oocyte was the subject of this study. Mouse early preantral follicles (100-130 microm) and early antral follicles (170-200 microm) isolated enzymatically were cultured for 12 and 4 days, respectively, in a collagen-free dish. The serum-based media were supplemented with either 100 mIU/ml FSH (FSH only); 100 mIU/ml FSH + 10 mIU/ml LH (FSH-LH); 100 mIU/ml FSH + 1 mIU/ml GH (FSH-GH) or 100 mIU/ml FSH + 100 ng/ml activin A (FSH-AA). Follicle survival was highest in follicle stimulating hormone (FSH)-AA group in both cultured preantral (91.8%) and antral follicles (82.7%). Survival rates in the other groups ranged between 48% (FSH only, preantral follicle culture) and 78.7% (FSH only, antral follicle culture). Estradiol and progesterone were undetectable in medium lacking gonadotrophins while AA supplementation in synergy with FSH caused increased estradiol secretion and a simultaneously lowered progesterone secretion. Chromatin configuration of oocytes from surviving follicles at the end of culture revealed that there were twice more developmentally incompetent non-surrounded nucleolus (NSN) oocytes (>65%) than the competent surrounded nucleolus (SN) oocytes (<34%). We conclude that the present standard follicle culture system does not produce optimum proportion of developmentally competent oocytes.

  2. Postprandial lipemia enhances the capacity of large HDL2 particles to mediate free cholesterol efflux via SR-BI and ABCG1 pathways in type IIB hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Julia, Zélie; Duchene, Emilie; Fournier, Natalie; Bellanger, Natacha; Chapman, M John; Le Goff, Wilfried; Guerin, Maryse

    2010-11-01

    Lipid and cholesterol metabolism in the postprandial phase is associated with both quantitative and qualitative remodeling of HDL particle subspecies that may influence their anti-atherogenic functions in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway. We evaluated the capacity of whole plasma or isolated HDL particles to mediate cellular free cholesterol (FC) efflux, cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP)-mediated cholesteryl ester (CE) transfer, and selective hepatic CE uptake during the postprandial phase in subjects displaying type IIB hyperlipidemia (n = 16). Postprandial, large HDL2 displayed an enhanced capacity to mediate FC efflux via both scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-dependent (+12%; P < 0.02) and ATP binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1)-dependent (+31%; P < 0.008) pathways in in vitro cell systems. In addition, the capacity of whole postprandial plasma (4 h and 8 h postprandially) to mediate cellular FC efflux via the ABCA1-dependent pathway was significantly increased (+19%; P < 0.0003). Concomitantly, postprandial lipemia was associated with elevated endogenous CE transfer rates from HDL2 to apoB lipoproteins and with attenuated capacity (-17%; P < 0.02) of total HDL to deliver CE to hepatic cells. Postprandial lipemia enhanced SR-BI and ABCG1-dependent efflux to large HDL2 particles. However, postprandial lipemia is equally associated with deleterious features by enhancing formation of CE-enriched, triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles through the action of CETP and by reducing the direct return of HDL-CE to the liver.

  3. Cell surface receptors for CCN proteins.

    PubMed

    Lau, Lester F

    2016-06-01

    The CCN family (CYR61; CTGF; NOV; CCN1-6; WISP1-3) of matricellular proteins in mammals is comprised of six homologous members that play important roles in development, inflammation, tissue repair, and a broad range of pathological processes including fibrosis and cancer. Despite considerable effort to search for a high affinity CCN-specific receptor akin to growth factor receptors, no such receptor has been found. Rather, CCNs bind several groups of multi-ligand receptors as characteristic of other matricellular proteins. The most extensively documented among CCN-binding receptors are integrins, including αvβ3, αvβ5, α5β1, α6β1, αIIbβ3, αMβ2, and αDβ2, which mediate diverse CCN functions in various cell types. CCNs also bind cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), low density liproprotein receptor-related proteins (LRPs), and the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) receptor, which are endocytic receptors that may also serve as co-receptors in cooperation with other cell surface receptors. CCNs have also been reported to bind FGFR-2, Notch, RANK, and TrkA, potentially altering the affinities of these receptors for their ligands. The ability of CCNs to bind a multitude of receptors in various cell types may account for the remarkable versatility of their functions, and underscore the diverse signaling pathways that mediate their activities.

  4. Perioperative Severe Hypotension in a Patient with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type IIb and Bilateral Adrenalectomies: Time to Review the Evidence for Stress Dose Steroids

    PubMed Central

    Zavala, Acsa; Hagan, Katherine B.; Van Meter, Antoinette; Williams, Uduak Ursula; Zhang, Wei; Owusu-Agyemang, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type IIb (MEN IIb) is an endocrine disorder which can manifest with tumors such as pheochromocytomas and neuromas. We present the case of a patient with MEN IIb, after bilateral adrenalectomies, on maintenance steroid replacement, who underwent a neuroma resection and developed severe hypotension. There is persistent controversy regarding the general administration of perioperative “stress dose” steroids for patients with adrenal insufficiency. While the most recent literature suggests that stress dose steroids are unnecessary for secondary adrenal insufficiency, the rarer form of primary adrenal insufficiency always requires supplemental steroids, specifically hydrocortisone, when undergoing surgical procedures. PMID:27900224

  5. Angiomodulin is required for cardiogenesis of embryonic stem cells and is maintained by a feedback loop network of p63 and Activin-A.

    PubMed

    Wolchinsky, Zohar; Shivtiel, Shoham; Kouwenhoven, Evelyn Nathalie; Putin, Daria; Sprecher, Eli; Zhou, Huiqing; Rouleau, Matthieu; Aberdam, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor p63, member of the p53 gene family, encodes for two main isoforms, TAp63 and ΔNp63 with distinct functions on epithelial homeostasis and cancer. Recently, we discovered that TAp63 is essential for in vitro cardiogenesis and heart development in vivo. TAp63 is expressed by embryonic endoderm and acts on cardiac progenitors by a cell-non-autonomous manner. In the present study, we search for cardiogenic secreted factors that could be regulated by TAp63 and, by ChIP-seq analysis, identified Angiomodulin (AGM), also named IGFBP7 or IGFBP-rP1. We demonstrate that AGM is necessary for cardiac commitment of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and its regulation depends on TAp63 isoform. TAp63 directly activates both AGM and Activin-A during ESC cardiogenesis while these secreted factors modulate TAp63 gene expression by a feedback loop mechanism. The molecular circuitry controlled by TAp63 on AGM/Activin-A signaling pathway and thus on cardiogenesis emphasizes the importance of p63 during early cardiac development.

  6. The maturation-inducing hormone 17a-20b-dihydroxy-4pregnen-3-one regulates gene expression of inhibin A and bambi (bone morphogenetic protein and activin membrane bound inhibitor) in the rainbow trout ovary

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGFb) superfamily members are important paracrine and autocrine regulators of ovarian development and steroidogenesis in mammals and birds, but their reproductive roles in fish are not well understood. The activin system, Tgfb, and bone morphogenetic protein 15 (Bmp...

  7. Identification and characterization of major histocompatibility complex class IIB alleles from three species of European ranid frogs

    PubMed Central

    A. Marosi, Béla; M. Kiemnec-Tyburczy, Karen; V. Ghira, Ioan; Sos, Tibor; Popescu, Octavian

    2014-01-01

    Immune genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are among the most polymorphic genes in the vertebrate genome. Due to their polymorphic nature, they are often used to assess the adaptive genetic variability of natural populations. This study describes the first molecular characterization of 13 partial MHC class IIB sequences from three European ranid frogs. The utility of previously published primers was expanded by using them to successfully amplify eight exon 2 alleles from Rana arvalis.We also designed a novel primer set that successfully amplified exon 2 from Pelophylax kurtmuelleri. Pelophylax lessonae was also designed as part of this study. Results indicate the presence of one or two class IIB loci in these three species. In R. arvalis, significant evidence of positive selection acting on MHC antigen binding sites was found. Many European ranid populations are experiencing disease-related declines; the newly developed primers can, therefore, be used for further population analyses of native frogs. PMID:27843985

  8. SALT spectroscopic classification of PS15cjr (=LSQ15bgf) as a type-IIb supernova near maximum light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, S. W.; Pan, Y.-C.; Foley, R. J.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.; Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Kniazev, A.

    2015-10-01

    We obtained SALT (+RSS) spectroscopy of PS15cjr (=LSQ15bgf) on 2015 Oct 16.9 UT, covering the wavelength range 350-950 nm. Cross-correlation of the spectrum with a template library using SNID (Blondin & Tonry 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024) shows PS15cjr is likely a type-IIb a few days past maximum light, with a good match to the spectrum of SN 1993J at +4 days.

  9. Genomic Porosity between Invasive Chondrostoma nasus and Endangered Endemic Parachondrostoma toxostoma (Cyprinidae): The Evolution of MHC IIB Genes

    PubMed Central

    Šimková, Andrea; Civáňová, Kristína; Gettová, Lenka; Gilles, André

    2013-01-01

    Two cyprinid species, Parachondrostoma toxostoma, an endemic threatened species, and Chondrostoma nasus, an invasive species, live in sympatry in southern France and form two sympatric zones where the presence of intergeneric hybrids is reported. To estimate the potential threat to endemic species linked to the introduction of invasive species, we focused on the DAB genes (functional MHC IIB genes) because of their adaptive significance and role in parasite resistance. More specifically, we investigated (1) the variability of MHC IIB genes, (2) the selection pattern shaping MHC polymorphism, and (3) the extent to which trans-species evolution and intergeneric hybridization affect MHC polymorphism. In sympatric areas, the native species has more diversified MHC IIB genes when compared to the invasive species, probably resulting from the different origins and dispersal of both species. A similar level of MHC polymorphism was found at population level in both species, suggesting similar mechanisms generating MHC diversity. In contrast, a higher number of DAB-like alleles per specimen were found in invasive species. Invasive species tended to express the alleles of two DAB lineages, whilst native species tended to express the alleles of only the DAB3 lineage. Hybrids have a pattern of MHC expression intermediate between both species. Whilst positive selection acting on peptide binding sites (PBS) was demonstrated in both species, a slightly higher number of positively selected sites were identified in C. nasus, which could result from parasite-mediated selection. Bayesian clustering analysis revealed a similar pattern of structuring for the genetic variation when using microsatellites or the MHC approach. We confirmed the importance of trans-species evolution for MHC polymorphism. In addition, we demonstrated bidirectional gene flow for MHC IIB genes in sympatric areas. The positive significant correlation between MHC and microsatellites suggests that demographic

  10. CDX-1401 and Poly-ICLC Vaccine Therapy With or Without CDX-301in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IV Melanoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Origin; Iris Melanoma; Medium/Large Size Posterior Uveal Melanoma; Mucosal Melanoma; Ocular Melanoma With Extraocular Extension; Small Size Posterior Uveal Melanoma; Stage IIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIB Uveal Melanoma; Stage IIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Uveal Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Uveal Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Uveal Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Uveal Melanoma

  11. 30 CFR 57.22235 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-C, II-A, II-B, and IV mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-C, II-A, II-B... AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22235 Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-C, II-A, II-B, and IV mines). (a) If methane reaches 1.0 percent in...

  12. 30 CFR 57.22238 - Actions at 2.0 percent methane (I-B, II-B, V-B, and VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Actions at 2.0 percent methane (I-B, II-B, V-B... AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22238 Actions at 2.0 percent methane (I-B, II-B, V-B, and VI mines). If methane reaches 2.0 percent in the...

  13. 30 CFR 57.22231 - Actions at 0.25 percent methane (I-B, II-B, V-B, and VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Actions at 0.25 percent methane (I-B, II-B, V-B... AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22231 Actions at 0.25 percent methane (I-B, II-B, V-B, and VI mines). If methane reaches 0.25 percent in...

  14. Overexpression and Initial Characterization of the Chromosomal Aminoglycoside 3′-O-Phosphotransferase APH(3′)-IIb from Pseudomonas aeruginosa▿†

    PubMed Central

    Hainrichson, Mariana; Yaniv, Orit; Cherniavsky, Marina; Nudelman, Igor; Shallom-Shezifi, Dalia; Yaron, Sima; Baasov, Timor

    2007-01-01

    The chromosomal gene aph(3′)-IIb, encoding an aminoglycoside 3′-phosphotransferase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The APH(3′)-IIb enzyme was purified as a monomer in a two-step procedure and was shown to phosphorylate its substrates at the C-3′-OH position, with kcat/Km values of 0.4 × 104 to 36 × 104 M−1 s−1. PMID:17088479

  15. 30 CFR 57.22235 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-C, II-A, II-B, and IV mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-C, II-A, II-B... AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22235 Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-C, II-A, II-B, and IV mines). (a) If methane reaches 1.0 percent in...

  16. 30 CFR 57.22231 - Actions at 0.25 percent methane (I-B, II-B, V-B, and VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions at 0.25 percent methane (I-B, II-B, V-B... AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22231 Actions at 0.25 percent methane (I-B, II-B, V-B, and VI mines). If methane reaches 0.25 percent in...

  17. 30 CFR 57.22238 - Actions at 2.0 percent methane (I-B, II-B, V-B, and VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions at 2.0 percent methane (I-B, II-B, V-B... AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22238 Actions at 2.0 percent methane (I-B, II-B, V-B, and VI mines). If methane reaches 2.0 percent in the...

  18. Clinical benefit of low molecular weight heparin for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention with glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung Sun; Her, Sung-Ho; Baek, Ju Yeal; Park, Mahn-Won; Kim, Hyoung Doo; Jeong, Myung Ho; Ahn, Young keun; Chae, Shung Chull; Hur, Seung Ho; Hong, Taek Jong; Kim, Young Jo; Seong, In Whan; Chae, Jei Keon; Rhew, Jay Young; Chae, In Ho; Cho, Myeong Chan; Bae, Jang Ho; Rha, Seung Woon; Kim, Chong Jim; Choi, Donghoon; Jang, Yang Soo; Yoon, Junghan; Chung, Wook Sung; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Seung, Ki Bae; Park, Seung Jung

    2010-11-01

    The efficacy of low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) with low dose unfractionated heparin (UFH) during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with or without glycoprotein (Gp) IIb/IIIa inhibitor compared to UFH with or without Gp IIb/IIIa inhibitor has not been elucidated. Between October 2005 and July 2007, 2,535 patients with ST elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing PCI in the Korean Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR) were assigned to either of two groups: a group with Gp IIb/IIIa inhibitor (n=476) or a group without Gp IIb/IIIa inhibitor (n=2,059). These groups were further subdivided according to the use of LMWH with low dose UFH (n=219) or UFH alone (n=257). The primary end points were cardiac death or myocardial infarction during the 30 days after the registration. The primary end point occurred in 4.1% (9/219) of patients managed with LMWH during PCI and Gp IIb/IIIa inhibitor and 10.8% (28/257) of patients managed with UFH and Gp IIb/IIIa inhibitor (odds ratio [OR], 0.290; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.132-0.634; P=0.006). Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) with major bleeding was observed in LMHW and UFH with Gp IIb/IIIa inhibitor (1/219 [0.5%] vs 1/257 [0.4%], P=1.00). For patients with STEMI managed with a primary PCI and Gp IIb/IIIa inhibitor, LMWH is more beneficial than UFH.

  19. The daf-4 gene encodes a bone morphogenetic protein receptor controlling C. elegans dauer larva development.

    PubMed

    Estevez, M; Attisano, L; Wrana, J L; Albert, P S; Massagué, J; Riddle, D L

    1993-10-14

    The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family is a conserved group of signalling molecules within the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily. This group, including the Drosophila decapentaplegic (dpp) protein and the mammalian BMPs, mediates cellular interactions and tissue differentiation during development. Here we show that a homologue of human BMPs controls a developmental switch in the life cycle of the free-living soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Starvation and overcrowding induce C. elegans to form a developmentally arrested, third-stage dauer larva. The daf-4 gene, which acts to inhibit dauer larva formation and promote growth, encodes a receptor protein kinase similar to the daf-1, activin and TGF-beta receptor serine/threonine kinases. When expressed in monkey COS cells, the daf-4 receptor binds human BMP-2 and BMP-4. The daf-4 receptor is the first to be identified for any growth factor in the BMP family.

  20. Metallicity dependence of Type Ib/c and IIb supernova progenitors in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sung-Chul

    Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe Ib/c) are characterized by the lack of prominent hydrogen lines in thespectra, implying that their progenitors have lost most of their hydrogen envelopes by the time of the iron corecollapse. Binary interactions provide an important evolutionary chanel for SNe Ib/c, and recent observations indicatethat the inferred ejecta masses of SNe Ibc are more consistent with the prediction of the binary scenario than that ofthe single star scenario that invokes mass loss as the key evolutionary factor for SNe Ib/c progenitors. So far,theoretical predictions on the detailed properties of SNe Ib/c progenitors in binary systems have been made mostlywith models using solar metallicity. However, unlike the single star scenario, where SNe Ib/c are expected only forsufficiently high metallicity, hydrogen-deficent SN progenitors can be produced via binary interactions at anymetallicity. In this talk, I will discuss theoretical predictions on the metallicity dependence of the SNe Ib/c progenitorstructure, based on evolutionary models of massive binary stars. Sepefically, I will address how the ejecta masses ofSNe Ib and Ic and the ratio of SN Ib/c to SN IIb as well as SN Ib to SN Ic would systematically change as a function ofmetallicity, and which new types of SNe are expected in binary systems at low metallicity.

  1. Metallicity dependence of Type Ib/c and IIb supernova progenitors in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sung-CHul

    2015-08-01

    Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe Ib/c) are characterized by the lack of prominent hydrogen lines in the spectra, implying that their progenitors have lost most of their hydrogen envelopes by the time of the iron core collapse. Binary interactions provide an important evolutionary chanel for SNe Ib/c, and recent observations indicate that the inferred ejecta masses of SNe Ibc are more consistent with the prediction of the binary scenario than that of the single star scenario that invokes mass loss as the key evolutionary factor for SNe Ib/c progenitors. So far, theoretical predictions on the detailed properties of SNe Ib/c progenitors in binary systems have been made mostly with models using solar metallicity. However, unlike the single star scenario, where SNe Ib/c are expected only for sufficiently high metallicity, hydrogen-deficent SN progenitors can be produced via binary interactions at any metallicity. In this talk, I will discuss theoretical predictions on the metallicity dependence of the SNe Ib/c progenitor structure, based on evolutionary models of massive binary stars. Sepefically, I will address how the ejecta masses of SNe Ib and Ic and the ratio of SN Ib/c to SN IIb as well as SN Ib to SN Ic would systematically change as a function of metallicity, and which new types of SNe are expected in binary systems at low metallicity.

  2. Dynamical supersymmetry analysis of conformal invariance for superstrings in type IIB RR plane-wave background

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha

    2009-12-15

    In a previous work (arXiv:0902.3750 [hep-th]) we studied the world-sheet conformal invariance for superstrings in the type IIB R-R plane-wave in semi-light-cone gauge. Here we give further justification to the results found in that work through alternative arguments using dynamical supersymmetries. We show that by using the supersymmetry algebra the same quantum definition of the energy-momentum (EM) tensor can be derived. Furthermore, using certain Jacobi identities we indirectly compute the Virasoro anomaly terms by calculating the second-order supersymmetry variation of the EM tensor. Certain integrated forms of all such terms are shown to vanish. In order to deal with various divergences that appear in such computations we take a point-split definition of the same EM tensor. The final results are shown not to suffer from the ordering ambiguity as noticed in the previous work provided the coincidence limit is taken before sending the regularization parameter to zero at the end of the computation.

  3. Maintenance of MHC Class IIB diversity in a recently established songbird population

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, Danielle J.; Dapper, Amy L.; Peterson, Mark P.; Atwell, Jonathan W.; Ketterson, Ellen D.

    2012-01-01

    We examined variation at MHC Class IIB genes in a recently established population of dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis) in a coastal urban environment in southern California, USA relative to an ancestral-range population from a nearby species-typical montane environment. The founding population is estimated to have been quite small, but we predicted that variation at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) among the founders would nevertheless be preserved owing to the high functional significance of MHC. Previous studies of MHC in songbirds have had varying degrees of success in isolating loci, as passerines show extensive MHC gene duplication. In order to compare diversity in the two populations, we employed two published approaches to sequencing MHC Class II exon 2: direct sequencing with exon-based primers, and traditional cloning and sequencing with intron-based primers. Results from both methods show that the colonist population has maintained high levels of variation. Our results also indicate varying numbers of alleles across individuals, corroborating evidence for gene duplication in songbird MHC. While future studies in songbirds may need to take a genomic approach to fully understand the structure of MHC in this lineage, our results show that it is possible to use traditional methods to reveal functional variation across populations. PMID:22685370

  4. Mirage models confront the LHC. II. Flux-stabilized type IIB string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Bryan L.; Nelson, Brent D.

    2014-04-01

    We continue the study of a class of string-motivated effective supergravity theories in light of current data from the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In this installment we consider type IIB string theory compactified on a Calabi-Yau orientifold in the presence of fluxes, in the manner originally formulated by Kachru et al. We allow for a variety of potential uplift mechanisms and embeddings of the Standard Model field content into D3-and D7-brane configurations. We find that an uplift sector independent of the Kähler moduli, as is the case with anti-D3-branes, is inconsistent with data unless the matter and Higgs sectors are localized on D7 branes exclusively, or are confined to twisted sectors between D3-and D7-branes. We identify regions of parameter space for all possible D-brane configurations that remain consistent with Planck observations on the dark matter relic density and measurements of the CP-even Higgs mass at the LHC. Constraints arising from LHC searches at √s =8 TeV and the LUX dark matter detection experiment are discussed. The discovery prospects for the remaining parameter space at dark matter direct-detection experiments are described, and signatures for detection of superpartners at the LHC with √s =14 TeV are analyzed.

  5. Warped AdS 6 × S 2 in Type IIB supergravity I: local solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hoker, Eric; Gutperle, Michael; Karch, Andreas; Uhlemann, Christoph F.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the existence of solutions with 16 residual supersymmetries to Type IIB supergravity on a space-time of the formc AdS 6× S 2 warped over a two-dimensional Riemann surface Σ. The SO(2 , 5) × SO(3) isometry extends to invariance under the exceptional Lie superalgebra F (4). In the present paper, we construct the general Ansatz compatible with these symmetries, derive the corresponding reduced BPS equations, and obtain their complete local solution in terms of two locally holomorphic functions {A}_{± } on Σ, subject to certain positivity and regularity conditions. Globally, ( {A}+ , {A}- ) are allowed to be multiple-valued on Σ and be holomorphic sections of a holomorphic bundle over Σ with structure group contained in SU(1,1)× C . Globally regular solutions are expected to provide the near-horizon geometry of ( p, q) 5-brane and 7-brane webs which are holographic duals to five-dimensional conformal field theories. A preliminary analysis of the positivity and regularity conditions will be presented here, leaving the construction of globally regular solutions to a subsequent paper.

  6. Structure of the C-terminal Domain of Transcription Facto IIB from Trypanosoma brucei

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, B.; Kanneganti, N; Rieckhof, G; Das, A; Laurents, D; Palenchar, J; Bellofatto, V; Wah, D

    2009-01-01

    In trypanosomes, the production of mRNA relies on the synthesis of the spliced leader (SL) RNA. Expression of the SL RNA is initiated at the only known RNA polymerase II promoter in these parasites. In the pathogenic trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, transcription factor IIB (tTFIIB) is essential for SL RNA gene transcription and cell viability, but has a highly divergent primary sequence in comparison to TFIIB in well-studied eukaryotes. Here we describe the 2.3 A resolution structure of the C-terminal domain of tTFIIB (tTFIIBC). The tTFIIBC structure consists of 2 closely packed helical modules followed by a C-terminal extension of 32 aa. Using the structure as a guide, alanine substitutions of basic residues in regions analogous to functionally important regions of the well-studied eukaryotic TFIIB support conservation of a general mechanism of TFIIB function in eukaryotes. Strikingly, tTFIIBC contains additional loops and helices, and, in contrast to the highly basic DNA binding surface of human TFIIB, contains a neutral surface in the corresponding region. These attributes probably mediate trypanosome-specific interactions and have implications for the apparent bidirectional transcription by RNA polymerase II in protein-encoding gene expression in these organisms.

  7. Structural basis for distinctive recognition of fibrinogen [gamma]C peptide by the platelet integrin [alpha][subscript IIb][beta]3

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, Timothy A.; Zhu, Jianghai; Xiao, Tsan

    2009-01-12

    Hemostasis and thrombosis (blood clotting) involve fibrinogen binding to integrin {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} on platelets, resulting in platelet aggregation. {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} binding fibrinogen via an Arg-Asp-Gly (RGD) motif in fibrinogen's {alpha} subunit. {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} also binds to fibrinogen; however, it does so via an unstructured RGD-lacking C-terminal region of the {gamma} subunit ({gamma}C peptide). These distinct modes of fibrinogen binding enable {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} and {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} to function cooperatively in hemostasis. In this study, crystal structures reveal the integrin {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3}-{gamma}C peptide interface, and, for comparison, integrin {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} bound to a lamprey {gamma}C primordial RGD motif. Compared with RGD, the GAKQAGDV motif in {gamma}C adopts a different backbone configuration and binds over a more extended region. The integrin metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) Mg{sup 2+} ion binds the {gamma}C Asp side chain. The adjacent to MIDAS (ADMIDAS) Ca{sup 2+} ion binds the {gamma}C C terminus, revealing a contribution for ADMIDAS in ligand binding. Structural data from this natively disordered {gamma}C peptide enhances our understanding of the involvement of {gamma}C peptide and integrin {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} in hemostasis and thrombosis.

  8. Geology and mineral deposits of an area in the Departments of Antioquia and Caldas (Subzone IIB), Colombia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feininger, Tomas; Barrero L., Dario; Castro, Nestor; Hall, R.B.

    1973-01-01

    The Inventario Minero National (IMN), a four-year cooperative geologic mapping and mineral resources appraisal project, was accomplished under an agreement between the Republic of Colombia and the U. S. Agency for International Development from 1964 through 1969. Subzone IIB, consisting essentially of the east half of Zone comprises nearly 20,000 km2 principally in the Department of Antioquia but including also small parts of the Departments of Caldas and Tolima. The rocks in IIB range from Precambrian to Holocene. Precambrian feldspar-quartz gneiss occupies a mosaic of fault-bounded blocks intruded by igneous rocks between the Oto fault and the Rio Magdalena. Paleozoic rocks are extensive, and include lightly metamorphosed graptolite-bearing Ordovician shale at Cristalina, and a major suite of graphitic quartz-mica schist, feldspathic and aluminous gneiss, quartzite, marble, amphibolite, and other rocks. Syntectonic intrusive gneiss included many of the older rocks during a late Paleozoic(?) orogeny, which was accompanied by Abukuma-type metamorphosing from lowermost greenschist to upper amphibolite facies. A Jurassic diorite pluton bounded by faults cuts volcanic rocks of unknown age east of the Otu fault. Cretaceous rocks are major units. Middle Cretaceous carbonaceous shale, sandstone, graywacke, conglomerate, and volcanic rocks are locally prominent. The Antioquian batholith (quartz diorite) of Late Cretaceous age cuts the middle Cretaceous and older rocks. A belt of Tertiary nonmarine clastic sedimentary rocks crops out along the Magdalena Valley. Patches of Tertiary alluvium are locally preserved in the mountains. Quaternary alluvium, much of it auriferous, is widespread in modern stream valleys. Structurally IIB constitutes part of a vast complex synclinorium intruded concordantly by syntectonic catazonal or mesozonal felsic plutons, and by the later epizonal post-tectonic Antioquian batholith. Previously unrecognized major wrench faults are outstanding

  9. The warm circumstellar envelope and wind of the G9 IIb star HR 6902

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsch, T.; Baade, R.; Reimers, D.

    2001-12-01

    IUE observations of the eclipsing binary system HR 6902 obtained at various epochs spread over four years indicate the presence of warm circumstellar material enveloping the G9 IIb primary. The spectra show Si Iv and C Iv absorption up to a distance of 3.3 giant radii (Rg). Line ratio diagnostics yields an electron temperature of ~ 78 000 K which appears to be constant over the observed height range. Applying a least square fit absorption line analysis we derive column densities as a function of height. We find that the inner envelope (< 3;Rg) of the bright giant is consistent with a hydrostatic density distribution. The derived line broadening velocity of ~ 70 km s-1 is sufficient to provide turbulent pressure support for the required scale height. However, an improved agreement with observations over the whole height regime including the emission line region is obtained with an outflow model. We demonstrate that the common β power-law as well as a P ∝ ρ wind yield appropriate fit models. Adopting a continuous mass outflow we obtain a mass-loss rate of M⊙=0.8 - 3.4 × 10-11 Msolar yr-1 depending on the particular wind model. The emission lines observed during total eclipse are attributed mostly to resonance scattering of B star photons in the extended envelope of the giant. By means of a multi-dimensional line formation study we show that the global envelope properties are consistent with the wind models derived from the absorption line analysis. We argue that future high resolution UV spectroscopy will resolve the large-scale velocity structure of the circumstellar shell. As an illustration we present theoretical Si Iv and C Iv emission profiles showing model-dependent line shifts and asymmetries.

  10. The continuing story of SN IIb 2013df: new optical and IR observations and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalai, Tamás; Vinkó, József; Nagy, Andrea P.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Wheeler, J. Craig; Dhungana, Govinda; Marion, G. Howie; Kehoe, Robert; Fox, Ori D.; Sárneczky, Krisztián; Marschalkó, Gábor; Bíró, Barna I.; Borkovits, Tamás; Hegedüs, Tibor; Szakáts, Róbert; Ferrante, Farley V.; Bányai, Evelin; Hodosán, Gabriella; Kelemen, János; Pál, András

    2016-08-01

    SN 2013df is a nearby Type IIb supernova that seems to be the spectroscopic twin of the well-known SN 1993J. Previous studies revealed many, but not all interesting properties of this event. Our goal was to add new understanding of both the early- and late-time phases of SN 2013df. Our spectral analysis is based on six optical spectra obtained with the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope during the first month after explosion, complemented by a near-infrared spectrum. We applied the SYNAPPS spectral synthesis code to constrain the chemical composition and physical properties of the ejecta. A principal result is the identification of `high-velocity' He I lines in the early spectra of SN 2013df, manifest as the blue component of the double-troughed profile at ˜5650 Å. This finding, together with the lack of clear separation of H and He lines in velocity space, indicates that both H and He features form at the outer envelope during the early phases. We also obtained ground-based BVRI and g'r 'i'z' photometric data up to +45 d and unfiltered measurements with the ROTSE-IIIb telescope up to +168 d. From the modelling of the early-time quasi-bolometric light curve, we find Mej ˜ 3.2-4.6 M⊙ and Ekin ˜ 2.6-2.8 × 1051 erg for the initial ejecta mass and the initial kinetic energy, respectively, which agree well with the values derived from the separate modelling of the light-curve tail. Late-time mid-infrared excess indicates circumstellar interaction starting ˜1 yr after explosion, in accordance with previously published optical, X-ray, and radio data.

  11. Ciprofloxacin DPI: a randomised, placebo-controlled, phase IIb efficacy and safety study on cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Dorkin, Henry L; Staab, Doris; Operschall, Elisabeth; Alder, Jeff; Criollo, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment of infective bronchitis involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a cornerstone of care in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This phase IIb, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study assessed the efficacy and safety of ciprofloxacin dry powder for inhalation (DPI) in this population. Methods Patients with CF, ≥12 years of age (N=286), were randomised to ciprofloxacin DPI (32.5 mg (n=93) or 48.75 mg (n=93)), or corresponding placebo (32.5 mg, n=65; 48.75 mg, n=35) twice daily for 28 days. The primary objective was the change in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) from baseline (day 0) to end of treatment (day 29) in the intent-to-treat population for ciprofloxacin DPI compared with the corresponding placebo group. Results The primary effectiveness objective was not met; there were no significant differences in change in FEV1 between ciprofloxacin DPI and the corresponding placebo group for either dose (p=0.154). However, in pooled analyses, FEV1 decline from baseline to treatment end was significantly lower with ciprofloxacin DPI than with placebo (pooled data; p=0.02). Ciprofloxacin DPI showed positive effects on sputum bacterial load and quality of life, but these effects were not maintained at the 4-week follow-up. Ciprofloxacin DPI was well tolerated and there were no significant differences in type/incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events by treatment group (p=0.115). Conclusions Further investigations are needed to determine the full scope of the beneficial effects of ciprofloxacin DPI for patients with CF. Trial registration number Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00645788; EudraCT 2008-008314-40. PMID:26688732

  12. The Two-Peptide (Class-IIb) Bacteriocins: Genetics, Biosynthesis, Structure, and Mode of Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen-Meyer, Jon; Oppegård, Camilla; Rogne, Per; Haugen, Helen Sophie; Kristiansen, Per Eugen

    The two-peptide (class-IIb) bacteriocins consist of two different peptides, both of which are required to obtain high antimicrobial activity. These bacteriocins kill target-cells by inducing membrane-leakage and they seem to display some specificity with respect to the molecules they transfer across membranes. The genes encoding the two peptides of two-peptide bacteriocins are next to each other on the same operon. In the same or a nearby operon are genes encoding (i) the immunity protein that protects the bacteriocin-producer from its own bacteriocin, (ii) a dedicated ABC-transporter that exports the bacteriocin from cells and cleaves off the N-terminal bacteriocin leader sequence, and (iii) an accessory protein whose exact function has not been fully clarified. Some two-peptide bacteriocins appear to be produced constitutively, whereas the production of other two-peptide bacteriocins is regulated through a three-component regulatory system that consists of a peptide pheromone, a membrane-associated histidine protein kinase, and response regulators. It has recently been proposed that the two peptides of (some) two-peptide bacteriocins may form a membrane-penetrating helix-helix structure involving helix-helix interacting GxxxG-motifs present in all currently characterized two-peptide bacteriocins. It has also been suggested that the helix-helix structure interacts with an integrated membrane (transport) protein, thus inducing a conformational change in the protein, which in turn causes membrane-leakage. This proposed mode-of-action is similar to that of the pediocin-like (class-IIa) bacteriocins and lactococcin A, which bind to a part of the mannose phosphotransferase permease that is embedded in the cell membrane, thereby altering the conformation of the ­permease in a manner that causes membrane-leakage and cell death.

  13. Structural basis for quinine-dependent antibody binding to platelet integrin αIIbβ3

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianghai; Zhu, Jieqing; Bougie, Daniel W.; Aster, Richard H.

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia (DITP) is caused by antibodies that react with specific platelet-membrane glycoproteins when the provoking drug is present. More than 100 drugs have been implicated as triggers for this condition, quinine being one of the most common. The cause of DITP in most cases appears to be a drug-induced antibody that binds to a platelet membrane glycoprotein only when the drug is present. How a soluble drug promotes binding of an otherwise nonreactive immunoglobulin to its target, leading to platelet destruction, is uncertain, in part because of the difficulties of working with polyclonal human antibodies usually available only in small quantities. Recently, quinine-dependent murine monoclonal antibodies were developed that recognize a defined epitope on the β-propeller domain of the platelet integrin αIIb subunit (GPIIb) only when the drug is present and closely mimic the behavior of antibodies found in human patients with quinine-induced thrombocytopenia in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrate specific, high-affinity binding of quinine to the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of these antibodies and define in crystal structures the changes induced in the CDR by this interaction. Because no detectable binding of quinine to the target integrin could be demonstrated in previous studies, the findings indicate that a hybrid paratope consisting of quinine and reconfigured antibody CDR plays a critical role in recognition of its target epitope by an antibody and suggest that, in this type of drug-induced immunologic injury, the primary reaction involves binding of the drug to antibody CDRs, causing it to acquire specificity for a site on a platelet integrin. PMID:26282540

  14. Nonmuscle myosin IIB as a therapeutic target for the prevention of relapse to methamphetamine use.

    PubMed

    Young, E J; Blouin, A M; Briggs, S B; Sillivan, S E; Lin, L; Cameron, M D; Rumbaugh, G; Miller, C A

    2016-05-01

    Memories associated with drug use increase vulnerability to relapse in substance use disorder (SUD), and there are no pharmacotherapies for the prevention of relapse. Previously, we reported a promising finding that storage of memories associated with methamphetamine (METH), but not memories for fear or food reward, is vulnerable to disruption by actin depolymerization in the basolateral amygdala complex (BLC). However, actin is not a viable therapeutic target because of its numerous functions throughout the body. Here we report the discovery of a viable therapeutic target, nonmuscle myosin IIB (NMIIB), a molecular motor that supports memory by directly driving synaptic actin polymerization. A single intra-BLC treatment with Blebbistatin (Blebb), a small-molecule inhibitor of class II myosin isoforms, including NMIIB, produced a long-lasting disruption of context-induced drug seeking (at least 30 days). Further, postconsolidation genetic knockdown of Myh10, the heavy chain of the most highly expressed NMII in the BLC, was sufficient to produce METH-associated memory loss. Blebb was found to be highly brain penetrant. A single systemic injection of the compound selectively disrupted the storage of METH-associated memory and reversed the accompanying increase in BLC spine density. This effect was specific to METH-associated memory, as it had no effect on an auditory fear memory. The effect was also independent of retrieval, as METH-associated memory was disrupted 24 h after a single systemic injection of Blebb delivered in the home cage. Together, these results argue for the further development of small-molecule inhibitors of NMII as potential therapeutics for the prevention of SUD relapse triggered by drug associations.

  15. Input-specific regulation of hippocampal circuit maturation by non-muscle Myosin IIB

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Emin D.; Aceti, Massimiliano; Creson, Thomas K.; Rojas, Camilo S.; Hubbs, Cristopher; McGuire, Megan N.; Kakad, Priyanka P.; Miller, Courtney A.; Rumbaugh, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Myh9 and Myh10, which encode two major isoforms of non-muscle myosin II expressed in the brain, have emerged as risk factors for developmental brain disorders. Myosin II motors regulate neuronal cytoskeletal dynamics leading to optimization of synaptic plasticity and memory formation. However, the role of these motor complexes in brain development remains poorly understood. Here, we disrupted the in vivo expression of Myh9 and/or Myh10 in developing hippocampal neurons to determine how these motors contribute to circuit maturation in this brain area important for cognition. We found that Myh10 ablation in early postnatal, but not mature, CA1 pyramidal neurons reduced excitatory synaptic function in the Schaffer collateral pathway, while more distal inputs to CA1 neurons were relatively unaffected. Myh10 ablation in young neurons also selectively impaired the elongation of oblique dendrites that receive Schaffer collateral inputs, while the structure of distal dendrites was normal. We observed normal spine density and spontaneous excitatory currents in these neurons, indicating that Myh10 KO impaired proximal pathway synaptic maturation through disruptions to dendritic development rather than postsynaptic strength or spine morphogenesis. To address possible redundancy and/or compensation by other Myosin II motors expressed in neurons, we performed similar experiments in Myh9 null neurons. In contrast to findings in Myh10 mutants, evoked synaptic function in young Myh9 KO hippocampal neurons was normal. Data obtained from double Myh9/Myh10 KO neurons largely resembled the MyH10 KO synaptic phenotype. These data indicate that Myosin IIB is a key molecular factor that guides input-specific circuit maturation in the developing hippocampus. PMID:25931194

  16. Plantar measurements to determine success of surgical correction of Stage IIb adult acquired flatfoot deformity.

    PubMed

    Matheis, Erika A; Spratley, E Meade; Hayes, Curtis W; Adelaar, Robert S; Wayne, Jennifer S

    2014-01-01

    Adult acquired flatfoot deformity is a degenerative disease causing medial arch dysfunction. Surgical correction has typically involved tendon reconstruction with calcaneal osteotomy; however, the postoperative changes have not been fully characterized. The present study assessed the success of surgical correction of Stage IIb adult acquired flatfoot deformity through changes in plantar pressures and patient-generated outcome scores. With Institutional Review Board approval, 6 participants were evaluated before and after surgery using pedobarography, the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score, and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short-form questionnaire. The plantar pressures were recorded using a TekScan HRMat(®) during walking and in a 1- and 2-foot stance. The resulting contour maps were segmented into 9 regions, with the peak pressure, normalized force, and arch index calculated. Surgical effects were analyzed using paired t tests. Postoperatively, the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score and Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short-form questionnaire scores increased significantly from 180 ± 78 to 360 ± 136 (p < .03) and 47 ± 18 to 71 ± 19 (p = .06), respectively. During the 2-foot stance, the normalized force had increased significantly in the lateral midfoot (p < .03), although no significant differences were found in peak pressures. No significant differences were observed in the 1-foot stance. During walking, the normalized force increased significantly in the lateral mid- and forefoot (p < .05). The peak pressure increased significantly in the lateral forefoot (p < .01). The arch index values demonstrated no significant changes. The increased questionnaire scores indicated that surgical correction improved the self-perceived health of the participants. Lateral shifts in the peak pressure and normalized force suggest that forefoot and midfoot loading is altered postoperatively, consistent with the goal of offloading the dysfunctional arch. Thus, the present study has

  17. External cobalt 60 irradiation alone for stage IIB carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Z.Z.; He, F.Z.

    1989-02-01

    From 1964 to 1980, 97 patients with Stage IIb carcinoma of cervix uteri were treated by external 60Co irradiation alone. Of these 97 patients, 94 (96.9%) had squamous cell carcinoma. The parametrial extension of the lesion almost reached the pelvic wall in 73.2% and vaginal extension reached to the upper half of vaginal in 24.7% of the patients. A tumor dose of 60 Gy was given to the whole pelvis by a four field technic (opposing parallel AP and lateral portals) in 6-8 weeks. A booster dose of 10 Gy was delivered to the cervix by a pair of reduced opposing parallel AP portals or a perineal portal in a week. The doses delivered were equivalent to the Time-Dose-Fractionation (TDF) value of 110-130 at the center of pelvis and 90-110 in the whole pelvis. The 5-year survival rate for all 97 patients was 56.7%. It was 59.8% when those who died of other diseases were excluded. The prognosis of patients without residual tumor on the cervix and/or vagina was better than that with residual tumor (p less than 0.01). Thirty-seven patients died of cancer (23 died of recurrence, 8 of distant metastases, 2 of both, and 4 were lost before the fifth year). Of these 37 patients, 97.3% died within 3 years after initial treatment. During the radiation treatment, reactions were moderate. Late complications included 19 (19.6%) with mild cystitis and 16 (16.5%) with mild proctitis, 2 (2.7%) developed recto-vaginal fistula. These results were slightly poorer than those using intracavitary and external irradiation or the combination of preoperative irradiation plus surgery. Yet, for patients with extensions nearing the pelvic wall or with contra-indications to surgery or intracavitary radiotherapy, external irradiation alone is still of value.

  18. Abnormal cytoplasmic extensions associated with active αIIbβ3 are probably the cause for macrothrombocytopenia in Glanzmann thrombasthenia-like syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hauschner, Hagit; Mor-Cohen, Ronit; Messineo, Stefania; Mansour, Wissam; Seligsohn, Uri; Savoia, Anna; Rosenberg, Nurit

    2015-04-01

    Mutations in the ITGA2B or ITGB3 genes that encode for the αIIbβ3 platelet integrin usually cause Glanzmann thrombasthenia, a severe autosomal recessive bleeding disorder characterized by absence of platelet aggregation, but normal platelet number and size. Several rare mutations cause a Glanzmann-like syndrome which manifests macrothrombocytopenia and usually displays autosomal dominant inheritance. The exact mechanism causing Glanzmann-like syndrome is unknown. One typical example of Glanzmann-like mutations causes deletion of 40 amino acids (p.647-686) in the β3 β-tail domain (βTD_del) that was found in the heterozygous state in Italian and Japanese families. A second example is a missense mutation, C560R, located in the epidermal growth factor-like domain, found in the homozygous state in a French patient. Both mutations cause constitutive activation of αIIbβ3, but differ in their surface expression. In the current study, we generated cultured cells expressing β3-βTD_del or β3-C560R mutations along with wild-type αIIb, and examined the cells' ability to create tubulin-dependent protrusions compared to cells expressing wild-type αIIbβ3. Unlike cells expressing wild-type αIIbβ3, cells harboring each of the mutations exhibited abnormal cytoplasmic extensions on immobilized fibrinogen or Von Willebrand factor, which resembled extensions formed in megakaryocyte leading to proplatelets. Moreover, we showed that formation of abnormal extensions occurred also in wild-type αIIbβ3 cells when activated by activating antibody. These results suggest that the active conformation of αIIbβ3 can induce cytoskeletal rearrangements that lead to impaired proplatelet formation.

  19. Benefits of pharmacological facilitation with glycoprotein IIb-IIIa inhibitors in diabetic patients undergoing primary angioplasty for STEMI. A subanalysis of the EGYPT cooperation.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Giuseppe; Michael Gibson, C; Bellandi, Francesco; Murphy, Sabina; Maioli, Mauro; Noc, Marko; Zeymer, Uwe; Dudek, Dariusz; Arntz, Hans-Richard; Zorman, Simona; Gabriel, H Mesquita; Emre, Ayse; Cutlip, Donald; Rakowski, Tomasz; Gyongyosi, Mariann; Huber, Kurt; Van't Hof, Arnoud W J

    2009-10-01

    The Early Glycoprotein IIb-IIIa inhibitors in Primary angioplasty (EGYPT) cooperation aimed at evaluating, by pooling individual patient's data of randomized trials, the benefits of pharmacological facilitation with Gp IIb-IIIa inhibitors among STEMI patients undergoing primary angioplasty. In the current study we analyze the benefits of early Gp IIb-IIIa inhibitors in diabetic patients. The literature was scanned by formal searches of electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE) from January 1990 to October 2007. We examined all randomized trials on facilitation by early administration of Gp IIb-IIIa inhibitors in STEMI. No language restrictions were enforced. Individual patients' data were obtained from 11 out of 13 trials, including 1,662 patients. Diabetes was present in 281 (16.9%). Early Gp IIb-IIIa inhibitors were associated with improved preprocedural TIMI 3 flow (26.0% vs. 13.1%, P = 0.006), postprocedural TIMI 3 flow (90.1% vs. 75.0%, P = 0.18), MBG 3 (40.8% vs. 30.4%, P = 0.004), and less distal embolization (11.6% vs. 20.8%, P = 0.05). However, early Gp IIb-IIIa inhibitors did not significantly reduce mortality (8.3% vs. 9.5%, P = 0.64). This meta-analysis shows that pharmacological facilitation with early administration of Gp IIb-IIIa inhibitors in STEMI patients with diabetes undergoing primary angioplasty, is associated with significant benefits in terms of preprocedural and postprocedural TIMI flow, improved myocardial perfusion, without significant benefits in mortality.

  20. Roles of thrombin and platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb/IIIa in platelet-subendothelial deposition after angioplasty in an ex vivo whole artery model

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, A.V.; Leung, L.L.; Leung, W.H.; Grant, G.W.; McDougall, I.R.; Fischell, T.A. )

    1991-09-01

    Platelet deposition at the site of injury caused by balloon angioplasty is associated with acute closure and restenosis. In a new ex vivo whole artery angioplasty model, the authors examined the roles of thrombin inhibition with D-Phe-Pro-ArgCH2Cl (PPACK) and inhibition of the platelet membrane fibrinogen receptor glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GPIIb/IIIa) with monoclonal antibody 7E3 on platelet deposition at the site of balloon injury. Fresh rabbit aortas were mounted in a perfusion chamber. One half of the mounted arterial segment was dilated with a standard angioplasty balloon catheter and the uninjured half served as the control segment. The vessels were perfused with human blood at physiological pressure and shear rates of 180-250 second-1 for 30 minutes. Platelet deposition was measured using 111In-labeled platelets and scanning electron microscopy. With heparin (2 units/ml) anticoagulation, 8.2 {plus minus} 2.2 {times} 10(6) platelets/cm2 were deposited at the site of balloon injury compared with 0.7 {plus minus} 0.2 {times} 10(6) platelets/cm2 on uninjured segments (p less than 0.02, n = 7). PPACK was tested at a concentration (10 microM) that totally inhibited platelet aggregation in response to thrombin. 7E3 was tested at a concentration (10 micrograms/ml) that totally inhibited platelet aggregation. Platelet deposition at the site of balloon injury was reduced 47% by PPACK and 70% by 7E3 compared with heparin. At shear rates seen in nonstenotic coronary arteries, PPACK and 7E3 are more effective than heparin in reducing platelet deposition at the site of balloon injury. The significant inhibition of platelet deposition by PPACK demonstrates the importance of heparin-resistant thrombin in platelet thrombus formation.

  1. Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing intracoronary and intravenous administration of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongshi; Wu, Boting; Shu, Xianhong

    2012-04-15

    Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor inhibitors (GPIs) have been widely adopted as an adjuvant regimen during primary percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, but whether intracoronary administration of these potent antiplatelet agents conveys better efficacy and safety over the intravenous route has not been well addressed. A meta-analysis was performed by a systematic search of the published research for randomized controlled trials comparing intracoronary versus intravenous administration of GPIs in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Eight studies involving 686 patients in the intracoronary arm and 660 in the intravenous arm met the inclusion criteria. Postprocedural Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) grade 3 flow (odds ratio [OR] 1.46, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08 to 1.98, p <0.05) and myocardial reperfusion grade 2 or 3 (OR 1.78, 95% CI 1.29 to 2.46, p <0.001) were markedly more often achieved in patients who received intracoronary boluses of GPIs than those receiving the intravenous strategy. Intracoronary administration resulted in a reduced incidence of mortality (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.92, p <0.05), target vessel revascularization (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.99, p <0.05), and the composite end point of major adverse cardiac events (OR 0.48, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.76, p <0.005) at 30-day follow-up. No significant difference was found in terms of major or minor bleeding (OR 1.14, p = 0.71, and OR 0.86, p = 0.47 respectively). In conclusion, intracoronary administration of GPIs yielded favorable outcomes in postprocedural blood flow restoration and 30-day clinical prognosis in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. The intracoronary use of GPIs can be recommended as a preferred regimen during primary percutaneous coronary intervention.

  2. Actions of activin A, connective tissue growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor and teratocarcinoma-derived growth factor 1 on the development of the bovine preimplantation embryo.

    PubMed

    Kannampuzha-Francis, Jasmine; Tribulo, Paula; Hansen, Peter J

    2016-05-17

    The reproductive tract secretes bioactive molecules collectively known as embryokines that can regulate embryonic growth and development. In the present study we tested four growth factors expressed in the endometrium for their ability to modify the development of the bovine embryo to the blastocyst stage and alter the expression of genes found to be upregulated (bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) and keratin 8, type II (KRT8)) or downregulated (NADH dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) and S100 calcium binding protein A10 (S100A10)) in embryos competent to develop to term. Zygotes were treated at Day 5 with 0.01, 0.1 or 1.0 nM growth factor. The highest concentration of activin A increased the percentage of putative zygotes that developed to the blastocyst stage. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) increased the number of cells in the inner cell mass (ICM), decreased the trophectoderm : ICM ratio and increased blastocyst expression of KRT8 and ND1. The lowest concentration of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) reduced the percentage of putative zygotes becoming blastocysts. Teratocarcinoma-derived growth factor 1 increased total cell number at 0.01 nM and expression of S100A10 at 1.0 nM, but otherwise had no effects. Results confirm the prodevelopmental actions of activin A and indicate that CTGF may also function as an embryokine by regulating the number of ICM cells in the blastocyst and altering gene expression. Low concentrations of HGF were inhibitory to development.

  3. Hormonal and photoperiodic modulation of testicular mRNAs coding for inhibin/activin subunits and follistatin in Clethrionomys glareolus, Schreber.

    PubMed

    Tähkä, K M; Kaipia, A; Toppari, J; Tähkä, S; Tuuri, T; Tuohimaa, P

    1998-07-01

    Photoperiodic and hormonal modulation of mRNAs for testicular inhibin/activin subunits and follistatin were studied in a seasonally breeding rodent, the bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus). Photoperiod-induced testicular regression had no effect on the relatively low steady-state levels of follistatin mRNA. Inhibin alpha (I alpha) and beta B (I beta B) mRNA levels were significantly higher in regressed than in active gonads, but inhibin beta A was undetectable. The effect of gonadotropin administration on testicular weight and mRNA concentrations differed between the sexually active and quiescent voles. Neither FSH (1.2 U/kg; s.c. for 5 days) nor hCG (600 IU/kg; s.c. for 5 days) affected testicular weight in sexually active voles, whereas both gonadotropins significantly increased testicular weight in photo-regressed individuals. FSH had no effect on I alpha or I beta B mRNA concentrations in the active testes, whereas excessive hCG challenge induced a decrease in the steady-state levels of these mRNAs. FSH induced an increase in I alpha mRNA concentrations in the regressed gonad, whereas both gonadotropins concomitantly down-regulated I beta B mRNA levels. In conclusion, the high expression of I alpha and I beta B mRNA in the regressed testis imply autocrine and paracrine roles for inhibin/activin in the quiescent gonad of seasonal breeders. Inhibin alpha-subunit expression is at least partly under the control of FSH in the bank vole testis.

  4. Leptin treatment reduces body fat but does not affect lean body mass or the myostatin-follistatin-activin axis in lean hypoleptinemic women.

    PubMed

    Brinkoetter, Mary; Magkos, Faidon; Vamvini, Maria; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2011-07-01

    Animal studies in vivo indicate that leptin treatment in extremely leptin-sensitive ob/ob mice reduces body weight exclusively by reducing fat mass and that it increases muscle mass by downregulating myostatin expression. Data from human trials are limited. Therefore, we aimed at characterizing the effects of leptin administration on fat mass, lean body mass, and circulating regulators of muscle growth in hypoleptinemic and presumably leptin-sensitive human subjects. In an open-label, single-arm trial, seven lean, strenuously exercising, amenorrheic women with low leptin concentrations (≤5 ng/ml) were given recombinant methionyl human leptin (metreleptin; 0.08 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) for 10 wk. In a separate randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, seven women were given metreleptin (initial dose: 0.08 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) for 3 mo, increased thereafter to 0.12 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) if menstruation did not occur), and six were given placebo for 9 mo. Metreleptin significantly reduced total body fat by an average of 18.6% after 10 wk (P < 0.001) in the single-arm trial and by 19.5% after 9 mo (placebo subtracted; P for interaction = 0.025, P for metreleptin = 0.004) in the placebo-controlled trial. There were no significant changes in lean body mass (P ≥ 0.33) or in serum concentrations of myostatin (P ≥ 0.35), follistatin (P ≥ 0.30), and activin A (P ≥ 0.20) whether in the 10-wk trial or the 9-mo trial. We conclude that metreleptin administration in lean hypoleptinemic women reduces fat mass exclusively and does not affect lean body mass or the myostatin-follistatin-activin axis.

  5. HAD superfamily phosphotransferase substrate diversification: structure and function analysis of HAD subclass IIB sugar phosphatase BT4131.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhibing; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Allen, Karen N

    2005-06-21

    The BT4131 gene from the bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron VPI-5482 has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The protein, a member of the haloalkanoate dehalogenase superfamily (subfamily IIB), was purified to homogeneity, and its X-ray crystal structure was determined to1.9 A resolution using the molecular replacement phasing method. BT4131 was shown by an extensive substrate screen to be a broad-range sugar phosphate phosphatase. On the basis of substrate specificity and gene context, the physiological function of BT4131 in chitin metabolism has been tentatively assigned. Comparison of the BT4131 structure alpha/beta cap domain structure with those of other type IIB enzymes (phosphoglycolate phosphatase, trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase, and proteins of unknown function known as PDB entries , , and ) identified two conserved loops (BT4131 residues 172-182 and 118-130) in the alphabetabeta(alphabetaalphabeta)alphabetabeta type caps and one conserved loop in the alphabetabetaalphabetabeta type caps, which contribute residues for contact with the substrate leaving group. In BT4131, the two loops contribute one polar and two nonpolar residues to encase the displaced sugar. This finding is consistent with the lax specificity BT4131 has for the ring size and stereochemistry of the sugar phosphate. In contrast, substrate docking showed that the high-specificity phosphoglycolate phosphatase (PDB entry ) uses a single substrate specificity loop to position three polar residues for interaction with the glycolate leaving group. We show how active site "solvent cages" derived from analysis of the structures of the type IIB HAD phosphatases could be used in conjunction with the identity of the residues stationed along the cap domain substrate specificity loops, as a means of substrate identification.

  6. Differential cumene hydroperoxide sensitivity of cytochrome P-450 enzymes IA1 and IIB1 determined by their way of membrane incorporation.

    PubMed

    Balvers, W G; Boersma, M G; Veeger, C; Rietjens, I M

    1992-09-15

    The cytochrome P-450-dependent O-dealkylation of alkoxyresorufins was used to study the effect of cumene hydroperoxide on cytochrome P-450 IIB1 and IA1 in microsomal and reconstituted systems. In liver microsomal systems from respectively phenobarbital and 3-methylcholanthrene pretreated male Wistar rats, cytochrome P-450 IIB1-dependent pentoxyresorufin-O-dealkylation appeared to be more sensitive to cumene hydroperoxide treatment than cytochrome P-450 IA1-dependent ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylation. This phenomenon was also observed when the cumene hydroperoxide sensitivity of P-450 IIB1 and IA1 was studied in an isosafrole pretreated rat liver microsomal system. The decrease in alkoxy-O-dealkylating activities appeared to proceed by destruction of the cytochrome P-450 component of the enzyme system. Purification and reconstitution of the enzyme system components in a system in which the isolated proteins were not incorporated into a membrane resulted in the disappearance of the difference in sensitivity between the two P-450 enzymes. However, in a reconstituted system with membrane incorporated proteins, again cytochrome P-450 IIB1 expressed a higher sensitivity towards cumene hydroperoxide than cytochrome P-450 IA1. From this it was concluded that the differential cumene hydroperoxide sensitivity of cytochrome P-450 IIB1 and IA1 is not caused by an intrinsic difference in their sensitivity but by a differential effect of membrane incorporation on their cumene hydroperoxide sensitivity.

  7. Integrin-dependent Control of Translation: Engagement of Integrin αIIbβ3 Regulates Synthesis of Proteins in Activated Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Pabla, Ravinder; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Dixon, Dan A.; Bray, Paul F.; McIntyre, Thomas M.; Prescott, Stephen M.; Zimmerman, Guy A.

    1999-01-01

    Integrins are widely expressed plasma membrane adhesion molecules that tether cells to matrix proteins and to one another in cell–cell interactions. Integrins also transmit outside-in signals that regulate functional responses of cells, and are known to influence gene expression by regulating transcription. In previous studies we found that platelets, which are naturally occurring anucleate cytoplasts, translate preformed mRNA transcripts when they are activated by outside-in signals. Using strategies that interrupt engagement of integrin αIIbβ3 by fibrinogen and platelets deficient in this integrin, we found that αIIbβ3 regulates the synthesis of B cell lymphoma 3 (Bcl-3) when platelet aggregation is induced by thrombin. We also found that synthesis of Bcl-3, which occurs via a specialized translation control pathway regulated by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), is induced when platelets adhere to immobilized fibrinogen in the absence of thrombin and when integrin αIIbβ3 is engaged by a conformation-altering antibody against integrin αIIbβ3. Thus, outside-in signals delivered by integrin αIIbβ3 are required for translation of Bcl-3 in thrombin-stimulated aggregated platelets and are sufficient to induce translation of this marker protein in the absence of thrombin. Engagement of integrin α2β1 by collagen also triggered synthesis of Bcl-3. Thus, control of translation may be a general mechanism by which surface adhesion molecules regulate gene expression. PMID:9885253

  8. A point mutation in the EGF-4 domain of β(3) integrin is responsible for the formation of the Sec(a) platelet alloantigen and affects receptor function.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Ulrich J; Bakchoul, Tamam; Eva, Olga; Giptner, Astrid; Bein, Gregor; Aster, Richard H; Gitter, Maria; Peterson, Julie; Santoso, Sentot

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT) is caused by fetomaternal platelet incompatibility with maternal antibodies crossing the placenta and destroying fetal platelets. Antibodies against human platelet antigen-1a (HPA-1a) and HPA-5b are responsible for the majority of NAIT cases. We observed a suspected NAIT in a newborn with a platelet count of 25 G/l and petechial haemorrhages. Serological analysis of maternal serum revealed an immunisation against αIIbβ3 on paternal platelets only, indicating the presence of an antibody against a new rare alloantigen (Sec(a)) residing on αIIbβ3. The location of Sec(a) on αIIbβ3 was confirmed by immunoprecipitation. Nucleotide sequence analysis of paternal β3 revealed a single nucleotide exchange (G(1818)T) in exon 11 of the β3 gene (ITGB3), changing Lys(580) (wild-type) to Asn(580) (Sec(a)). Two additional members of the family Sec were typed Sec(a) positive, but none of 300 blood donors. Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing Asn(580), but not Lys(580) αIIbβ3, bound anti-Sec(a), which was corroborated by immunoprecipitation. Adhesion of transfected cells onto immobilised fibrinogen showed reduced binding of the Asn(580) variant compared to wild-type αIIbβ3. Analysis of transfected cells with anti-LIBS and PAC-1 antibody showed reduced binding when compared to the wild-type. No such effects were observed with Sec(a) positive platelets, which, however, are heterozygous for the Lys(580)Asn mutation. In this study, we describe a NAIT case caused by maternal alloimmunisation against a new antigen on αIIbβ3. Analysis with mutant transfected cells showed that the Lys(580)Asn mutation responsible for the formation of the Sec(a) antigenic determinant affects αIIbβ3 receptor function.

  9. Dysfunctional platelet membrane receptors: from humans to mice.

    PubMed

    Ware, Jerry

    2004-09-01

    Insights into hemostasis and thrombosis have historically benefited from the astute diagnosis of human bleeding and thrombotic disorders followed by decades of careful biochemical characterization. This work has set the stage for the development of a number of mouse models of hemostasis and thrombosis generated by gene targeting strategies in the mouse genome. The utility of these models is the in depth analysis that can be performed on the precise molecular interactions that support hemostasis and thrombosis along with efficacy testing of various therapeutic strategies. Already the mouse has proven to be an excellent model of the processes that support hemostasis and thrombosis in the human vasculature. A brief summary of the salient phenotypes from knockout mice missing key platelet receptors is presented, including the glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX-V and GP IIb/IIIa (alphaIIb/beta3) receptors; the collagen receptors, GP VI and alpha2/beta1; the protease activated receptors (PARs); and the purinergic receptors, P2Y(1) and P2Y(12). A few differences exist between mouse and human platelets and where appropriate those will be highlighted in this review. Concluding remarks focus on the importance of understanding the power and limitations of various in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo models currently being used and the impact of the mouse strain on the described platelet phenotype.

  10. Role of Gas6 receptors in platelet signaling during thrombus stabilization and implications for antithrombotic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne; Burnier, Laurent; Flores, Nathalie; Savi, Pierre; DeMol, Maria; Schaeffer, Paul; Herbert, Jean-Marc; Lemke, Greg; Goff, Stephen P.; Matsushima, Glenn K.; Earp, H. Shelton; Vesin, Christian; Hoylaerts, Marc F.; Plaisance, Stéphane; Collen, Désiré; Conway, Edward M.; Wehrle-Haller, Bernhard; Carmeliet, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Mechanisms regulating thrombus stabilization remain largely unknown. Here, we report that loss of any 1 of the Gas6 receptors (Gas6-Rs), i.e., Tyro3, Axl, or Mer, or delivery of a soluble extracellular domain of Axl that traps Gas6 protects mice against life-threatening thrombosis. Loss of a Gas6-R does not prevent initial platelet aggregation but impairs subsequent stabilization of platelet aggregates, at least in part by reducing “outside-in” signaling and platelet granule secretion. Gas6, through its receptors, activates PI3K and Akt and stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation of the β3 integrin, thereby amplifying outside-in signaling via αIIbβ3. Blocking the Gas6-R–αIIbβ3 integrin cross-talk might be a novel approach to the reduction of thrombosis. PMID:15650770

  11. Supernova 2010as: the lowest-velocity member of a family of flat-velocity type IIb supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Folatelli, Gastón; Bersten, Melina C.; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo; Hamuy, Mario; Olivares Estay, Felipe; Pignata, Giuliano; Anderson, Joseph P.; Holmbo, Simon; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Maeda, Keiichi; Morrell, Nidia; Contreras, Carlos; Phillips, Mark M.; Förster, Francisco; Prieto, José Luis; Valenti, Stefano; Afonso, Paulo; Altenmüller, Konrad; Elliott, Jonny; and others

    2014-09-01

    We present extensive optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations of the stripped-envelope supernova SN 2010as. Spectroscopic peculiarities such as initially weak helium features and low expansion velocities with a nearly flat evolution place this object in the small family of events previously identified as transitional Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe). There is ubiquitous evidence of hydrogen, albeit weak, in this family of SNe, indicating that they are in fact a peculiar kind of Type IIb SNe that we name 'flat-velocity' Type IIb. The flat-velocity evolution—which occurs at different levels between 6000 and 8000 km s{sup –1} for different SNe—suggests the presence of a dense shell in the ejecta. Despite the spectroscopic similarities, these objects show surprisingly diverse luminosities. We discuss the possible physical or geometrical unification picture for such diversity. Using archival Hubble Space Telescope images, we associate SN 2010as with a massive cluster and derive a progenitor age of ≈6 Myr, assuming a single star-formation burst, which is compatible with a Wolf-Rayet progenitor. Our hydrodynamical modeling, on the contrary, indicates that the pre-explosion mass was relatively low, ≈4 M {sub ☉}. The seeming contradiction between a young age and low pre-SN mass may be solved by a massive interacting binary progenitor.

  12. Formation and Evolution of Dust in Type IIb Supernovae with Application to the Cassiopeia A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Takaya; Kozasa, Takashi; Tominaga, Nozomu; Maeda, Keiichi; Umeda, Hideyuki; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Krause, Oliver

    2010-04-01

    The amount and size of dust formed in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) and injected into the interstellar medium (ISM) depend on the type of CCSNe through the varying thicknesses of their outer envelopes. Recently Cas A was identified as a Type IIb SN (SN IIb) that is characterized by a small-mass hydrogen envelope. In order to clarify how the amount of dust formed in the ejecta and supplied into the ISM depends on the type of CCSNe, we investigate the formation of dust grains in the ejecta of an SN IIb and their evolution in the shocked gas in the SN remnant (SNR) by considering two sets of density structures (uniform and power-law profiles) for the circumstellar medium (CSM). Based on these calculations, we also simulate the time evolution of thermal emission from the shock-heated dust in the SNR and compare the results with the observations of Cas A SNR. We find that the total mass of dust formed in the ejecta of an SN IIb is as large as 0.167 M sun but the average radius of dust is smaller than 0.01 μm and is significantly different from those in SNe II-P with massive hydrogen envelopes; in the explosion with the small-mass hydrogen envelope, the expanding He core undergoes little deceleration, so that the gas density in the He core is too low for large-sized grains to form. In addition, the low-mass hydrogen envelope of the SN IIb leads to the early arrival of the reverse shock at the dust-forming region. If the CSM is more or less spherical, then the newly formed small grains would be completely destroyed in the relatively dense shocked gas for the CSM hydrogen density of n H>0.1 cm-3 without being injected into the ISM. However, the actual CSM is likely to be non-spherical, so a portion of the dust grains could be ejected into the ISM without being shocked. We demonstrate that the temporal evolution of the spectral energy distribution (SED) by thermal emission from dust is sensitive to the ambient gas density and structure that affects the

  13. Type IIb supernova SN 2011dh: Spectra and photometry from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, G. H.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Foley, Ryan J.; Berlind, Perry; Bieryla, Allyson; Calkins, Michael L.; Challis, Peter; Chornock, Ryan; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Falco, Emilio E.; Friedman, Andrew S.; Vinko, Jozsef; Bloom, Joshua S.; Chevalier, Roger A.; Culliton, Chris; Curtis, Jason L.; Everett, Mark E.; France, Kevin; Fransson, Claes; Garnavich, Peter; and others

    2014-02-01

    We report spectroscopic and photometric observations of the Type IIb SN 2011dh obtained between 4 and 34 days after the estimated date of explosion (May 31.5 UT). The data cover a wide wavelength range from 2000 Å in the ultraviolet (UV) to 2.4 μm in the near-infrared (NIR). Optical spectra provide line profiles and velocity measurements of H I, He I, Ca II, and Fe II that trace the composition and kinematics of the supernova (SN). NIR spectra show that helium is present in the atmosphere as early as 11 days after the explosion. A UV spectrum obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph reveals that the UV flux for SN 2011dh is low compared to other SN IIb. Modeling the spectrum with SYNOW suggests that the UV deficit is due to line blanketing from Ti II and Co II. The H I and He I velocities in SN 2011dh are separated by about 4000 km s{sup –1} at all phases. A velocity gap is consistent with models for a preexplosion structure in which a hydrogen-rich shell surrounds the progenitor. We estimate that the H shell of SN 2011dh is ≈8 times less massive than the shell of SN 1993J and ≈3 times more massive than the shell of SN 2008ax. Light curves (LCs) for 12 passbands are presented: UVW2, UVM2, UVW1, U, u', B, V, r', i', J, H, and K{sub s} . In the B band, SN 2011dh reached peak brightness of 13.17 mag at 20.0 ± 0.5 after the explosion. The maximum bolometric luminosity of 1.8 ± 0.2 × 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1} occurred ≈22 days after the explosion. NIR emission provides more than 30% of the total bolometric flux at the beginning of our observations, and the NIR contribution increases to nearly 50% of the total by day 34. The UV produces 16% of the total flux on day 4, 5% on day 9, and 1% on day 34. We compare the bolometric LCs of SN 2011dh, SN 2008ax, and SN 1993J. The LC are very different for the first 12 days after the explosions, but all three SN IIb display similar peak luminosities, times of peak, decline rates, and colors after maximum

  14. Translational regulation: identification of the site on bacteriophage T4 rIIB mRNA recognized by the regA gene function.

    PubMed Central

    Karam, J; Gold, L; Singer, B S; Dawson, M

    1981-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4 gene regA encodes a protein that diminishes the expression of many unlinked early T4 genes. Previous work demonstrated that regA-mediated repression occurs after transcription. We report here on the identification of the target site on one regA-sensitive mRNA, the message encoding the phage T4 rIIB protein. The target for regA-mediated action overlaps the translational initiation domain of the rIIB messenger. The regA protein may be a repressor that operates translationally on a significant and interesting set of early phage T4 mRNAs. Images PMID:7029523

  15. Novel mutations of integrin αIIb and β3 genes in Turkish children with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia.

    PubMed

    Tokgoz, Huseyin; Torun Ozkan, Didem; Caliskan, Umran; Akar, Nejat

    2015-01-01

    Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (GT) is an inherited disorder of platelet aggregation, characterized by qualitative and quantitative defect on platelet αIIbβ3 integrin (GpIIb/IIIa), resulting in lifelong bleeding tendency due to defective platelet plug formation. The αIIb gene (ITGA2B) and β3 gene (ITGB3) are closely located at chromosome 17q21.31-32. ITGA2B consist of 30 exons and encoding α chain, whereas ITGB3 has 15 exons and encoding β chain. Until now, according to the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD), 138 mutations at ITGA2B gene and 101 mutations at ITGB3 gene have been identified. We aimed to determine whether there was any mutation in the ITGA2B and ITGB3 genes, and a correlation between clinical phenotype and genotype in Turkish GT patients. We examined 20 patients with GT followed at the Department of Pediatric Hematology, Meram Faculty of Medicine, for Clinical and Laboratory Findings and Molecular Genetic Analysis. Peripheral blood was collected from patients, and a written informed consent for genetic analysis was obtained from parents. DNA was isolated from by proteinase K and phenol/chloroform extraction. ITGA2B and ITGB3 genes were screened by polymerase chain reaction. There were 12 females and 8 males with a median age of 15.25 years. Major clinical presentations of these patients were mucocutaneous bleedings. The most common bleeding type was epistaxis (85%). Life-threatening bleedings were seen in five patients. Seven (35%) patients showed various mutations in the ITGA2B or ITGB3 genes. We detected four novel mutations in three different regions and two mutations defined previously within the ITGA2B gene. These changes are at exon 4; c.570 T > G alteration, at exon 13 c.1277 T > A, c.1291 T > G alterations, at exon 19 c.1921A > G alterations. And from the start point of exon 14, behind 107 bases, we detected a heterozygous alteration at Thymine to Guanine. According to PolyPhen Database Program and NCBI Multiple Alignment Tool Database

  16. A Naphthalenic Derivative ND-1 Inhibits Thrombus Formation by Interfering the Binding of Fibrinogen to Integrin αIIbβ3

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xue; Liu, Tong-dan; Xie, Zhou-ling; Zhao, Qi; Cao, Yuan; Liu, Xiao-dong; Wang, Cai-hui; Gamariel, Rwibasira Rudinga

    2016-01-01

    Integrin αIIbβ3 plays a crucial role in the process of platelet aggregation. Three integrin αIIbβ3 antagonists (abciximab, eptifibatide, and tirofiban) have been approved by FDA for clinical use. Unfortunately, they all showed severe side effects such as thrombocytopenia and bleeding risk. Thus, researches on the development of more effective and safer antiplatelet agents are needed. In this manuscript we reported a novel naphthalenic derivative compound ND-1 with potent antithrombotic effect and lower bleeding risk. ND-1 inhibited ADP-, collagen-, thrombin-, and U46619-induced platelet aggregation with IC50 values of 1.29, 14.46, 12.84, and 40.24 μM, respectively. Mechanism studies indicated that ND-1 inhibited the binding of fibrinogen to integrin αIIbβ3 in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 3.12 μM. ND-1 inhibited P-selectin expression induced by ADP, collagen, thrombin, and U46619 on the surface of platelets. Additionally, this compound reduced platelets spreading to the immobilized fibrinogen. In vivo, ND-1 potently decreased thrombus formation in an arteriovenous shunt thrombosis model in rats and slightly prolonged bleeding time in a tail cutting model in mice. Taken together, our results reveal that ND-1 is a novel antagonist of αIIbβ3 with strong antithrombotic effect and lower bleeding risk. PMID:28097150

  17. Evaluation of heat-labile enterotoxins type IIa and type IIb in the pathogenicity of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli for neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Type II heat-labile enterotoxins (LT-II) have been reported in Escherichia coli isolates from humans, animals, food and water samples. The roles of the antigenically distinguishable LT-IIa and LT-IIb subtypes in pathogenesis and virulence of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) have not been previously re...

  18. Levels and interactions of selenium with group IIB metals in mussels from Swansea Bay, South Wales, U. K

    SciTech Connect

    Micallef, S.; Tyler, P.A.

    1989-03-01

    Swansea Bay is an inlet located on the northern coastline of the Bristol Channel, U.K. Past and present urban and industrialized development has led to the direct or indirect input to the bay, the latter from rivers, of various industrial and domestic waste discharge containing appreciable amounts of metal effluents. This area also supports a small commercial fishery. In an aquatic dynamic system such as this, the fate of a single chemical is complicated by possible interaction with other elements. In this study the results of a survey of the Group IIB metals, zinc, cadmium and mercury in the mussel, Mytilus edulis, from the Swansea bay area are presented. In addition, selenium concentrations are reported since it has been reported that this micronutrient can exert an antagonistic effect on these metals. Correlations between the different elements are included.

  19. Randomised trial of coronary intervention with antibody against platelet IIb/IIIa integrin for reduction of clinical restenosis: results at six months. The EPIC Investigators.

    PubMed

    Topol, E J; Califf, R M; Weisman, H F; Ellis, S G; Tcheng, J E; Worley, S; Ivanhoe, R; George, B S; Fintel, D; Weston, M

    1994-04-09

    Restenosis after coronary angioplasty occurs in at least 30% of patients in the first six months and, as yet, there is no known treatment to decrease this event. We tested a monoclonal antibody Fab fragment (c7E3) directed against the platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa integrin, the receptor mediating the final common pathway of platelet aggregation, to see whether it reduced the frequency of clinical restenosis. Patients who had unstable angina, recent or evolving myocardial infarction, or high-risk angiographic morphology, were randomised to receive c7E3 bolus and a 12 hour infusion of c7E3 (708 patients), c7E3 bolus and placebo infusion (695 patients), or placebo bolus and placebo infusion (696 patients). With maintenance of the double-blind state, patients were followed-up for at least 6 months to determine the need for repeat angioplasty or surgical coronary revascularisation and the occurrence of ischaemic events. By 30 days, 12.8% of placebo bolus/placebo infusion patients had had a major ischaemic event (death, myocardial infarction, urgent revascularisation), compared with 8.3% of c7E3 bolus/c7E3 infusion patients, yielding a 4.5% difference (35% reduction, p = 0.008). At 6 months, the absolute difference in patients with major ischaemic event or elective revascularisation was 8.1% between placebo bolus/placebo infusion and c7E3 bolus/c7E3 infusion patients (35.1% vs 27.0%; 23% reduction p = 0.001). The favourable long-term effect was mainly due to less need for bypass surgery or repeat angioplasty in patients with an initial successful procedure, since need for repeat target vessel revascularisation was 26% less for c7E3 bolus/c7E3 infusion than for placebo treatment (16.5% vs 22.3%; p = 0.007). The c7E3 bolus/placebo infusion group had an intermediate outcome which was not significantly better than that of the placebo bolus/placebo infusion group. These results extend the benefit of c7E3 bolus/c7E3 infusion from reducing abrupt closure and acute

  20. In vivo amelioration of endogenous antitumor autoantibodies via low-dose P4N through the LTA4H/activin A/BAFF pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Ling; Tsai, Nu-Man; Hsieh, Cheng-Hao; Ho, Shu-Yi; Chang, Jung; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Hsu, Ming-Hua; Chang, Chia-Ching; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Jackson, Tiffany L. B.; Mold, David E.; Huang, Ru Chih C.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer progression is associated with the development of antitumor autoantibodies in patients’ sera. Although passive treatment with antitumor antibodies has exhibited remarkable therapeutic efficacy, inhibitory effects on tumor progression by endogenous antitumor autoantibodies (EAAs) have been limited. In this study, we show that P4N, a derivative of the plant lignan nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), enhanced the production of EAAs and inhibited tumor growth at low noncytotoxic concentrations via its immunoregulatory activity. Intratumoral injection of P4N improved the quantity and quality of EAAs, and passive transfer of P4N-induced EAAs dramatically suppressed lung metastasis formation and prolonged the survival of mice inoculated with metastatic CT26 tumor cells. P4N-induced EAAs specifically recognized two surface antigens, 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and F1F0 ATP synthase, on the plasma membrane of cancer cells. Additionally, P4N treatment led to B-cell proliferation, differentiation to plasma cells, and high titers of autoantibody production. By serial induction of autocrine and paracrine signals in monocytes, P4N increased B-cell proliferation and antibody production via the leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H)/activin A/B-cell activating factor (BAFF) pathway. This mechanism provides a useful platform for studying and seeking a novel immunomodulator that can be applied in targeting therapy by improving the quantity and quality of the EAAs. PMID:27856749

  1. In vivo amelioration of endogenous antitumor autoantibodies via low-dose P4N through the LTA4H/activin A/BAFF pathway.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Ling; Tsai, Nu-Man; Hsieh, Cheng-Hao; Ho, Shu-Yi; Chang, Jung; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Hsu, Ming-Hua; Chang, Chia-Ching; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Jackson, Tiffany L B; Mold, David E; Huang, Ru Chih C

    2016-11-29

    Cancer progression is associated with the development of antitumor autoantibodies in patients' sera. Although passive treatment with antitumor antibodies has exhibited remarkable therapeutic efficacy, inhibitory effects on tumor progression by endogenous antitumor autoantibodies (EAAs) have been limited. In this study, we show that P4N, a derivative of the plant lignan nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), enhanced the production of EAAs and inhibited tumor growth at low noncytotoxic concentrations via its immunoregulatory activity. Intratumoral injection of P4N improved the quantity and quality of EAAs, and passive transfer of P4N-induced EAAs dramatically suppressed lung metastasis formation and prolonged the survival of mice inoculated with metastatic CT26 tumor cells. P4N-induced EAAs specifically recognized two surface antigens, 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and F1F0 ATP synthase, on the plasma membrane of cancer cells. Additionally, P4N treatment led to B-cell proliferation, differentiation to plasma cells, and high titers of autoantibody production. By serial induction of autocrine and paracrine signals in monocytes, P4N increased B-cell proliferation and antibody production via the leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H)/activin A/B-cell activating factor (BAFF) pathway. This mechanism provides a useful platform for studying and seeking a novel immunomodulator that can be applied in targeting therapy by improving the quantity and quality of the EAAs.

  2. Macrophage uptake and accumulation of folates are polarization-dependent in vitro and in vivo and are regulated by activin A.

    PubMed

    Samaniego, Rafael; Palacios, Blanca Soler; Domiguez-Soto, Ángeles; Vidal, Carlos; Salas, Azucena; Matsuyama, Takami; Sánchez-Torres, Carmen; de la Torre, Inmaculada; Miranda-Carús, Maria Eugenia; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Puig-Kröger, Amaya

    2014-05-01

    Vitamin B9, commonly known as folate, is an essential cofactor for one-carbon metabolism that enters cells through three major specialized transporter molecules (RFC, FR, and PCFT), which differ in expression pattern, affinity for substrate, and ligand-binding pH dependency. We now report that the expression of the folate transporters differs between macrophage subtypes and explains the higher accumulation of 5-MTHF-the major folate form found in serum-in M2 macrophages in vitro and in vivo. M1 macrophages display a higher expression of RFC, whereas FRβ and PCFT are preferentially expressed by anti-inflammatory and homeostatic M2 macrophages. These differences are also seen in macrophages from normal tissues involved in folate transit (placenta, liver, colon) and inflamed tissues (ulcerative colitis, RA), as M2-like macrophages from normal tissues express FRβ and PCFT, whereas TNF-α-expressing M1 macrophages from inflamed tissues are RFC+. Besides, we provide evidences that activin A is a critical factor controlling the set of folate transporters in macrophages, as it down-regulates FRβ, up-regulates RFC expression, and modulates 5-MTHF uptake. All of these experiments support the notion that folate handling is dependent on the stage of macrophage polarization.

  3. Effects of c-Jun N-terminal kinase on Activin A/Smads signaling in PC12 cell suffered from oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Wang, J Q; Xu, Z H; Liang, W Z; He, J T; Cui, Y; Liu, H Y; Xue, L X; Shi, W; Shao, Y K; Mang, J; Xu, Z X

    2016-02-29

    Activin A (Act A), a member of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily, is an early gene in response to cerebral ischemia. Growing evidences confirm the neuroprotective effect of Act A in ischemic injury through Act A/Smads signal activation. In this process, regulation networks are involved in modulating the outcomes of Smads signaling. Among these regulators, crosstalk between c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Smads signaling has been found in the TGF-β induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition. However, in neural ischemia, the speculative regulation between JNK and Act A/Smads signaling pathways has not been clarified. To explore this issue, an Oxygen Glucose Deprivation (OGD) model was introduced to nerve-like PC12 cells. We found that JNK signal activation occurred at the early time of OGD injury (1 h). Act A administration suppressed JNK phosphorylation. In addition, JNK inhibition could elevate the strength of Smads signaling and attenuate neural apoptosis after OGD injury. Our results indicated a negative regulation effect of JNK on Smads signaling in ischemic injury. Taken together, JNK, as a critical site for neural apoptosis and negative regulator for Act A/Smads signaling, was presumed to be a molecular therapeutic target for ischemia.

  4. Structural and Functional Characterization of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus’s Class IIb Fructose 1,6-Bisphosphate Aldolase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common nosocomial sources of soft-tissue and skin infections and has more recently become prevalent in the community setting as well. Since the use of penicillins to combat S. aureus infections in the 1940s, the bacterium has been notorious for developing resistances to antibiotics, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). With the persistence of MRSA as well as many other drug resistant bacteria and parasites, there is a growing need to focus on new pharmacological targets. Recently, class II fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases (FBAs) have garnered attention to fill this role. Regrettably, scarce biochemical data and no structural data are currently available for the class II FBA found in MRSA (SaFBA). With the recent finding of a flexible active site zinc-binding loop (Z-Loop) in class IIa FBAs and its potential for broad spectrum class II FBA inhibition, the lack of information regarding this feature of class IIb FBAs, such as SaFBA, has been limiting for further Z-loop inhibitor development. Therefore, we elucidated the crystal structure of SaFBA to 2.1 Å allowing for a more direct structural analysis of SaFBA. Furthermore, we determined the KM for one of SaFBA’s substrates, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, as well as performed mode of inhibition studies for an inhibitor that takes advantage of the Z-loop’s flexibility. Together the data offers insight into a class IIb FBA from a pervasively drug resistant bacterium and a comparison of Z-loops and other features between the different subtypes of class II FBAs. PMID:25390935

  5. Combining molecular evolution and environmental genomics to unravel adaptive processes of MHC class IIB diversity in European minnows (Phoxinus phoxinus)

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Helene; Burri, Reto; Comtesse, Fabien; Fumagalli, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Host–pathogen interactions are a major evolutionary force promoting local adaptation. Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) represent unique candidates to investigate evolutionary processes driving local adaptation to parasite communities. The present study aimed at identifying the relative roles of neutral and adaptive processes driving the evolution of MHC class IIB (MHCIIB) genes in natural populations of European minnows (Phoxinus phoxinus). To this end, we isolated and genotyped exon 2 of two MHCIIB gene duplicates (DAB1 and DAB3) and 1′665 amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers in nine populations, and characterized local bacterial communities by 16S rDNA barcoding using 454 amplicon sequencing. Both MHCIIB loci exhibited signs of historical balancing selection. Whereas genetic differentiation exceeded that of neutral markers at both loci, the populations' genetic diversities were positively correlated with local pathogen diversities only at DAB3. Overall, our results suggest pathogen-mediated local adaptation in European minnows at both MHCIIB loci. While at DAB1 selection appears to favor different alleles among populations, this is only partially the case in DAB3, which appears to be locally adapted to pathogen communities in terms of genetic diversity. These results provide new insights into the importance of host–pathogen interactions in driving local adaptation in the European minnow, and highlight that the importance of adaptive processes driving MHCIIB gene evolution may differ among duplicates within species, presumably as a consequence of alternative selective regimes or different genomic context. Using next-generation sequencing, the present manuscript identifies the relative roles of neutral and adaptive processes driving the evolution of MHC class IIB (MHCIIB) genes in natural populations of a cyprinid fish: the European minnow (Phoxinus phoxinus). We highlight that the relative importance of neutral

  6. Inferring supernova IIb/Ib/Ic ejecta properties from light curves and spectra: correlations from radiative-transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Woosley, Stan; Livne, Eli; Waldman, Roni; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Langer, Norbert

    2016-05-01

    We present 1D non-local thermodynamic equilibrium time-dependent radiative-transfer simulations for a large grid of supernovae (SNe) IIb/Ib/Ic that result from the terminal explosion of the mass donor in a close-binary system. Our sample covers ejecta masses Me of 1.7-5.2 M⊙, kinetic energies Ekin of 0.6-5.0 × 1051 erg, and 56Ni masses of 0.05-0.30 M⊙. We find a strong correlation between the 56Ni mass and the photometric properties at maximum, and between the rise time to bolometric maximum and the post-maximum decline rate. We confirm the small scatter in (V - R) at 10 d past R-band maximum. The quantity V_m ≡ √{2E_kin/M_e} is comparable to the Doppler velocity measured from He I 5875 Å at maximum in SNe IIb/Ib, although some scatter arises from the uncertain level of chemical mixing. The O I 7772 Å line may be used for SNe Ic, but the correspondence deteriorates with higher ejecta mass/energy. We identify a temporal reversal of the Doppler velocity at maximum absorption in the ˜1.05 μm feature in all models. The reversal is due to He I alone and could serve as a test for the presence of helium in SNe Ic. Because of variations in composition and ionization, the ejecta opacity shows substantial variations with both velocity and time. This is in part the origin of the offset between our model light curves and the predictions from the Arnett model.

  7. Trigramin: Primary structure and its inhibition of von Willebrand factor binding to glycoprotein IIb/IIIa complex on human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Turfu; Holt, J.C.; Kirby, E.P.; Niewiarowski, S.

    1989-01-24

    Trigramin, a naturally occurring peptide purified from Trimeresurus gramineus snake venom, inhibits platelet aggregation and the binding of {sup 125}I-fibrinogen to ADP-stimulated platelets without affecting the platelet-release reaction. {sup 125}I-trigramin binds to ADP-stimulated and to chymotrypsin-treated normal platelets but not to thrombasthenic platelets. {sup 125}I-trigramin binding to platelets is blocked by monoclonal antibodies directed against the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa complex and by Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS). The authors determined the primary structure of trigramin, which is composed of a single polypeptide chain of 72 amino acid residues and six disulfide bridges. The molecular weight of trigramin calculated on the basis of amino acid sequence was 7500, and the average pI was 5.61. An RGD sequence appeared in the carboxy-terminal domain of trigramin. An amino-terminal fragment (7-33) of trigramin showed 39% homology with a region (1555-1581) of von Willebrand factor (vWF). Trigramin also showed 36% identity in a 42 amino acid overlap and 53% identity in a 15 amino acid overlap when compared with two adhesive proteins, collagen {alpha}{sub 1} (I) and laminin B{sub 1}, respectively. Trigramin blocked binding of human vWF to the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa complex in thrombin-activated platelets in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, the data suggest that the biological activity of trigramin may depend upon the presence of an RGD sequence, the secondary structure of the molecule, and perhaps some other sequences that it shares with adhesive proteins.

  8. Structural and functional characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus's class IIb fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase.

    PubMed

    Capodagli, Glenn C; Lee, Stephen A; Boehm, Kyle J; Brady, Kristin M; Pegan, Scott D

    2014-12-09

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common nosocomial sources of soft-tissue and skin infections and has more recently become prevalent in the community setting as well. Since the use of penicillins to combat S. aureus infections in the 1940s, the bacterium has been notorious for developing resistances to antibiotics, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). With the persistence of MRSA as well as many other drug resistant bacteria and parasites, there is a growing need to focus on new pharmacological targets. Recently, class II fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases (FBAs) have garnered attention to fill this role. Regrettably, scarce biochemical data and no structural data are currently available for the class II FBA found in MRSA (SaFBA). With the recent finding of a flexible active site zinc-binding loop (Z-Loop) in class IIa FBAs and its potential for broad spectrum class II FBA inhibition, the lack of information regarding this feature of class IIb FBAs, such as SaFBA, has been limiting for further Z-loop inhibitor development. Therefore, we elucidated the crystal structure of SaFBA to 2.1 Å allowing for a more direct structural analysis of SaFBA. Furthermore, we determined the KM for one of SaFBA's substrates, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, as well as performed mode of inhibition studies for an inhibitor that takes advantage of the Z-loop's flexibility. Together the data offers insight into a class IIb FBA from a pervasively drug resistant bacterium and a comparison of Z-loops and other features between the different subtypes of class II FBAs.

  9. Integrin-Alpha IIb Identifies Murine Lymph Node Lymphatic Endothelial Cells Responsive to RANKL

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Olga G.; Chypre, Mélanie; Brouard, Nathalie; Rauber, Simon; Alloush, Farouk; Romera-Hernandez, Monica; Bénézech, Cécile; Li, Zhi; Eckly, Anita; Coles, Mark C.; Rot, Antal; Yagita, Hideo; Léon, Catherine; Ludewig, Burkhard; Cupedo, Tom; Lanza, François; Mueller, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    Microenvironment and activation signals likely imprint heterogeneity in the lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) population. Particularly LECs of secondary lymphoid organs are exposed to different cell types and immune stimuli. However, our understanding of the nature of LEC activation signals and their cell source within the secondary lymphoid organ in the steady state remains incomplete. Here we show that integrin alpha 2b (ITGA2b), known to be carried by platelets, megakaryocytes and hematopoietic progenitors, is expressed by a lymph node subset of LECs, residing in medullary, cortical and subcapsular sinuses. In the subcapsular sinus, the floor but not the ceiling layer expresses the integrin, being excluded from ACKR4+ LECs but overlapping with MAdCAM-1 expression. ITGA2b expression increases in response to immunization, raising the possibility that heterogeneous ITGA2b levels reflect variation in exposure to activation signals. We show that alterations of the level of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), by overexpression, neutralization or deletion from stromal marginal reticular cells, affected the proportion of ITGA2b+ LECs. Lymph node LECs but not peripheral LECs express RANK. In addition, we found that lymphotoxin-β receptor signaling likewise regulated the proportion of ITGA2b+ LECs. These findings demonstrate that stromal reticular cells activate LECs via RANKL and support the action of hematopoietic cell-derived lymphotoxin. PMID:27010197

  10. A TaqMan-Based Multiplex qPCR Assay and DNA Extraction Method for Phylotype IIB Sequevars 1&2 (Select Agent) Strains of Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Stulberg, Michael J; Huang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB, sequevars 1 and 2 (IIB-1&2) cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates, and are quarantined pathogens in Canada and Europe. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of their potential risk to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated geraniums are also a host and have the potential to spread the pathogen through trade, and its extracts strongly inhibits DNA-based detection methods. We designed four primer and probe sets for an improved qPCR method that targets stable regions of DNA. RsSA1 and RsSA2 recognize IIB-1&2 strains, RsII recognizes the current phylotype II (the newly proposed R. solanacearum species) strains (and a non-plant associated R. mannitolilytica), and Cox1 recognizes eight plant species including major hosts of R. solanacearum such as potato, tomato and cultivated geranium as an internal plant control. We multiplexed the RsSA2 with the RsII and Cox1 sets to provide two layers of detection of a positive IIB-1&2 sample, and to validate plant extracts and qPCR reactions. The TaqMan-based uniplex and multiplex qPCR assays correctly identified 34 IIB-1&2 and 52 phylotype II strains out of 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains. Additionally, the multiplex qPCR assay was validated successfully using 169 artificially inoculated symptomatic and asymptomatic plant samples from multiple plant hosts including geranium. Furthermore, we developed an extraction buffer that allowed for a quick and easy DNA extraction from infected plants including geranium for detection of R. solanacearum by qPCR. Our multiplex qPCR assay, especially when coupled with the quick extraction buffer method, allows for quick, easy and reliable detection and differentiation of the IIB-1&2 strains of R. solanacearum.

  11. A TaqMan-Based Multiplex qPCR Assay and DNA Extraction Method for Phylotype IIB Sequevars 1&2 (Select Agent) Strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Stulberg, Michael J.; Huang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB, sequevars 1 and 2 (IIB-1&2) cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates, and are quarantined pathogens in Canada and Europe. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of their potential risk to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated geraniums are also a host and have the potential to spread the pathogen through trade, and its extracts strongly inhibits DNA-based detection methods. We designed four primer and probe sets for an improved qPCR method that targets stable regions of DNA. RsSA1 and RsSA2 recognize IIB-1&2 strains, RsII recognizes the current phylotype II (the newly proposed R. solanacearum species) strains (and a non-plant associated R. mannitolilytica), and Cox1 recognizes eight plant species including major hosts of R. solanacearum such as potato, tomato and cultivated geranium as an internal plant control. We multiplexed the RsSA2 with the RsII and Cox1 sets to provide two layers of detection of a positive IIB-1&2 sample, and to validate plant extracts and qPCR reactions. The TaqMan-based uniplex and multiplex qPCR assays correctly identified 34 IIB-1&2 and 52 phylotype II strains out of 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains. Additionally, the multiplex qPCR assay was validated successfully using 169 artificially inoculated symptomatic and asymptomatic plant samples from multiple plant hosts including geranium. Furthermore, we developed an extraction buffer that allowed for a quick and easy DNA extraction from infected plants including geranium for detection of R. solanacearum by qPCR. Our multiplex qPCR assay, especially when coupled with the quick extraction buffer method, allows for quick, easy and reliable detection and differentiation of the IIB-1&2 strains of R. solanacearum. PMID:26426354

  12. A TaqMan-based multiplex qPCR assay and DNA extraction method for phylotype IIB sequevars 1&2 (select agent) strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    DOE PAGES

    Stulberg, Michael J.; Huang, Qi

    2015-10-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB, sequevars 1 and 2 (IIB-1&2) cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates, and are quarantined pathogens in Canada and Europe. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of their potential risk to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated geraniums are also a host and have the potential to spread the pathogen through trade, and its extracts strongly inhibits DNA-based detection methods. We designed four primer and probe sets for an improved qPCR method that targets stable regionsmore » of DNA. RsSA1 and RsSA2 recognize IIB-1&2 strains, RsII recognizes the current phylotype II (the newly proposed R. solanacearum species) strains (and a non-plant associated R. mannitolilytica), and Cox1 recognizes eight plant species including major hosts of R. solanacearum such as potato, tomato and cultivated geranium as an internal plant control. We multiplexed the RsSA2 with the RsII and Cox1 sets to provide two layers of detection of a positive IIB-1&2 sample, and to validate plant extracts and qPCR reactions. The TaqMan-based uniplex and multiplex qPCR assays correctly identified 34 IIB-1&2 and 52 phylotype II strains out of 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains. Additionally, the multiplex qPCR assay was validated successfully using 169 artificially inoculated symptomatic and asymptomatic plant samples from multiple plant hosts including geranium. Moreover, we developed an extraction buffer that allowed for a quick and easy DNA extraction from infected plants including geranium for detection of R. solanacearum by qPCR. Our multiplex qPCR assay, especially when coupled with the quick extraction buffer method, allows for quick, easy and reliable detection and differentiation of the IIB-1&2 strains of R. solanacearum.« less

  13. Statistical mechanics of cracks. Dualities in supersymmetric field theories. Orientifolds of Type IIB strings with discrete B flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchel, Alexander Sergeevich

    . In the third part of this thesis we discuss orientifolds of Type IIB strings with quantized B-flux. First, we consider anomaly cancelations in Type IIB orientifolds on T4/ZN , N = 2, 4, with quantized NS-NS sector background B-flux. We identify the twisted sector R-R scalars and tensor multiplets with Green-Schwarz interactions responsible for this cancelation. We present an explicit construction of the models and argue that consistence with 2b/2 multiplicity of 59-sector states requires a modification of the relation between the 1-loop channel and a tree channel modulus for the 59-cylinder amplitudes. We then extend analysis to the four dimensional Type IIB orientifolds on T6/Z6 with NS-NS sector background B-flux. We provide an explicit construction of these four dimensional vacua and show that all gauge anomalies cancel. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  14. The effects of a single intravenous injection of novel activin A/BMP-2 (AB204) on toxicity and the respiratory and central nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Byung-Hak; Lee, Jae Hyup; Na, Kyuheum; Ahn, Chihoon; Cho, Jongho; Ahn, Hyun Chan; Choi, Jungyoun; Oh, Hyosun; Kim, Byong Moon; Choe, Senyon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a single intravenous injection of a novel osteoinductive material, activin A/BMP-2 (AB204), to rodents on toxicity and their respiratory functions and central nervous system (CNS). A single intravenous injection of AB204 was given to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats in doses of 0, 0.625, 2.5 and 10 mg/kg to observe the mortality rate, the general symptoms for 14 days. The experimental groups were also given 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg of AB204, respectively, and the respiration rate, the tidal volume and the minute volume were measured for 240 min. The experimental groups of imprinting control region (ICR) mice were given a single intravenous injection of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg of AB204, respectively. Their body temperature was taken and general behaviors were observed to evaluate the effect of AB204 on the CNS for 240 min. The study on toxicity of a single intravenous injection found no death or abnormal symptoms, abnormal findings from autopsy, or abnormal body weight gain or loss in all the experimental groups. No abnormal variation associated with the test substance was observed in the respiration rate, the tidal volume, the minute volume, body temperature or the general behaviors. On the basis of these results, the approximate lethal dose of AB204 for a single intravenous injection exceeds 10 mg/kg for SD rats and a single intravenous injection of ≤0.8 mg/kg AB204 has no effect on their respiratory system for SD rat and no effect on their CNS for ICR mice.

  15. Characterization and cloning of a receptor for BMP-2 and BMP-4 from NIH 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, B B; Cook, J S; Wolsing, D H; Ting, J; Tiesman, J P; Correa, P E; Olson, C A; Pecquet, A L; Ventura, F; Grant, R A

    1994-01-01

    The bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are a group of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta)-related factors whose only receptor identified to date is the product of the daf-4 gene from Caenorhabditis elegans. Mouse embryonic NIH 3T3 fibroblasts display high-affinity 125I-BMP-4 binding sites. Binding assays are not possible with the isoform 125I-BMP-2 unless the positively charged N-terminal sequence is removed to create a modified BMP-2, 125I-DR-BMP-2. Cross-competition experiments reveal that BMP-2 and BMP-4 interact with the same binding sites. Affinity cross-linking assays show that both BMPs interact with cell surface proteins corresponding in size to the type I (57- to 62-kDa) and type II (75- to 82-kDa) receptor components for TGF-beta and activin. Using a PCR approach, we have cloned a cDNA from NIH 3T3 cells which encodes a novel member of the transmembrane serine/threonine kinase family most closely resembling the cloned type I receptors for TGF-beta and activin. Transient expression of this receptor in COS-7 cells leads to an increase in specific 125I-BMP-4 binding and the appearance of a major affinity-labeled product of approximately 64 kDa that can be labeled by either tracer. This receptor has been named BRK-1 in recognition of its ability to bind BMP-2 and BMP-4 and its receptor kinase structure. Although BRK-1 does not require cotransfection of a type II receptor in order to bind ligand in COS cells, complex formation between BRK-1 and the BMP type II receptor DAF-4 can be demonstrated when the two receptors are coexpressed, affinity labeled, and immunoprecipitated with antibodies to either receptor subunit. We conclude that BRK-1 is a putative BMP type I receptor capable of interacting with a known type II receptor for BMPs. Images PMID:8065329

  16. 30 CFR 57.22232 - Actions at 0.5 percent methane (I-B, II-A, II-B, IV, V-B, and VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Actions at 0.5 percent methane (I-B, II-A, II-B...-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22232 Actions at 0.5 percent methane (I-B, II-A, II-B, IV, V-B, and VI mines). If methane reaches...

  17. 30 CFR 57.22232 - Actions at 0.5 percent methane (I-B, II-A, II-B, IV, V-B, and VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions at 0.5 percent methane (I-B, II-A, II-B...-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22232 Actions at 0.5 percent methane (I-B, II-A, II-B, IV, V-B, and VI mines). If methane reaches...

  18. 30 CFR 57.22201 - Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). 57.22201 Section 57.22201 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH....22201 Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). All......

  19. 30 CFR 57.22201 - Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). 57.22201 Section 57.22201 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH....22201 Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). All mines...

  20. 30 CFR 57.22201 - Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). 57.22201 Section 57.22201 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH....22201 Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). All mines...

  1. 30 CFR 57.22201 - Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). 57.22201 Section 57.22201 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH....22201 Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). All mines...

  2. Stable expression of rat cytochrome P-450IIB1 cDNA in Chinese hamster cells (V79) and metabolic activation of aflatoxin B sub 1

    SciTech Connect

    Doehmer, J.; Dogra, S.; Friedberg, T.; Monier, S.; Adesnik, M.; Glatt, H.; Oesch, F. )

    1988-08-01

    V79 Chinese hamster fibroblasts are widely used for mutagenicity testing but have the serious limitation that they do not express cytochromes P-450, which are needed for the activation of many promutagens to mutagenic metabolites. A full-length cDNA clone encoding the monooxygenase cytochrome P-450IIB1 under control of the simian virus 40 early promoter was constructed and cointroduced with the selection marker neomycin phosphotransferase (conferring resistance to G418) into V79 Chinese hamster cells. G418-resistant cells were selected, established as cell lines, and tested for cytochrome P-450IIB1 expression and enzymatic activity. Two cell lines (SD1 and SD3) were found that stably produce cytochrome P-450IIB1. Although purified cytochromes P-450 possess monooxygenase activity only after reconstitution with cytochrome P-450 reductase and phospholipid, the gene product of the construct exhibited this activity. This implies that the gene product is intracellularly localized in a way that allows access to the required components. If compared with V79 cells, the mutation rate for the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltranferase (HPRT) locus in SD1 cells is markedly increased when exposed to aflatoxin B{sub 1}, which is activated by this enzyme.

  3. Calcium-dependent properties of CIB binding to the integrin alphaIIb cytoplasmic domain and translocation to the platelet cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Shock, D D; Naik, U P; Brittain, J E; Alahari, S K; Sondek, J; Parise, L V

    1999-01-01

    The alphaIIbbeta3 integrin receives signals in agonist-activated platelets, resulting in its conversion to an active conformation that binds fibrinogen, thereby mediating platelet aggregation. Fibrinogen binding to alphaIIbbeta3 subsequently induces a cascade of intracellular signalling events. The molecular mechanisms of this bi-directional alphaIIbbeta3-mediated signalling are unknown but may involve the binding of proteins to the integrin cytoplasmic domains. We reported previously the sequence of a novel 22-kDa, EF-hand-containing, protein termed CIB (calcium- and integrin-binding protein) that interacts specifically with the alphaIIb cytoplasmic domain in the yeast two-hybrid system. Further analysis of numerous tissues and cell lines indicated that CIB mRNA and protein are widely expressed. In addition, isothermal titration calorimetry indicated that CIB binds to an alphaIIb cytoplasmic-domain peptide in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, with moderate affinity (K(d), 700 nM) and 1:1 stoichiometry. In aggregated platelets, endogenous CIB and alphaIIbbeta3 translocate to the Triton X-100-insoluble cytoskeleton in a parallel manner, demonstrating that the cellular localization of CIB is regulated, potentially by alphaIIbbeta3. Thus CIB may contribute to integrin-related functions by mechanisms involving Ca(2+)-modulated binding to the alphaIIb cytoplasmic domain and changes in intracellular distribution. PMID:10477286

  4. Cognitive behavioural therapy for depression in multiple endocrine neoplasia type IIB: a 1-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Mejía-Castrejón, Jessica; Landa-Ramírez, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes a 24-year-old man diagnosed with multiple endocrine neoplasia type IIB and major depression. Because cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) has proven effective in the treatment of major depression in the general population and patients with cancer, we decided to adapt and use this therapy and evaluate its impact on major depression and the patient’s quality of life. The therapy was conducted individually in 15 sessions that were given over a span of 25 weeks. The data show that therapy was a useful treatment that reduced depression according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV criteria and self-report instruments. CBT also helped improve the patient’s quality of life, and it was considered to be an acceptable intervention for the patient, with ongoing positive results 1 year after the last psychotherapy session. CBT is a potential option for treating depression in this population but further research is needed. PMID:24898996

  5. Identification of a two-component Class IIb bacteriocin in Streptococcus pyogenes by recombinase-based in vivo expression technology

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Brent D.; Herfst, Christine A.; Tonial, Nicholas C.; Wakabayashi, Adrienne T.; Zeppa, Joseph J.; McCormick, John K.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a globally prominent bacterial pathogen that exhibits strict tropism for the human host, yet bacterial factors responsible for the ability of S. pyogenes to compete within this limited biological niche are not well understood. Using an engineered recombinase-based in vivo expression technology (RIVET) system, we identified an in vivo-induced promoter region upstream of a predicted Class IIb bacteriocin system in the M18 serotype S. pyogenes strain MGAS8232. This promoter element was not active under in vitro laboratory conditions, but was highly induced within the mouse nasopharynx. Recombinant expression of the predicted mature S. pyogenes bacteriocin peptides (designated SpbM and SpbN) revealed that both peptides were required for antimicrobial activity. Using a gain of function experiment in Lactococcus lactis, we further demonstrated S. pyogenes immunity function is encoded downstream of spbN. These data highlight the importance of bacterial gene regulation within appropriate environments to help understand mechanisms of niche adaptation by bacterial pathogens. PMID:27808235

  6. Copy number variation and genetic diversity of MHC Class IIb alleles in an alien population of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Mable, Barbara K; Kilbride, Elizabeth; Viney, Mark E; Tinsley, Richard C

    2015-10-01

    Xenopus laevis (the African clawed frog), which originated through hybridisation and whole genome duplication, has been used as a model for genetics and development for many years, but surprisingly little is known about immune gene variation in natural populations. The purpose of this study was to use an isolated population of X. laevis that was introduced to Wales, UK in the past 50 years to investigate how variation at the MHC compares to that at other loci, following a severe population bottleneck. Among 18 individuals, we found nine alleles based on exon 2 sequences of the Class IIb region (which includes the peptide binding region). Individuals carried from one to three of the loci identified from previous laboratory studies. Genetic variation was an order of magnitude higher at the MHC compared with three single-copy nuclear genes, but all loci showed high levels of heterozygosity and nucleotide diversity and there was not an excess of homozygosity or decrease in diversity over time that would suggest extensive inbreeding in the introduced population. Tajima's D was positive for all loci, which is consistent with a bottleneck. Moreover, comparison with published sequences identified the source of the introduced population as the Western Cape region of South Africa, where most commercial suppliers have obtained their stocks. These factors suggest that despite founding by potentially already inbred individuals, the alien population in Wales has maintained substantial genetic variation at both adaptively important and neutral genes.

  7. Does the parasite-mediated selection drive the MHC class IIB diversity in wild populations of European chub (Squalius cephalus)?

    PubMed

    Seifertová, Mária; Jarkovský, Jiří; Šimková, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    The genes of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) provide an excellent opportunity to study host-parasite relationships because they are expected to evolve in response to parasites and variation in parasite communities. In this study, we investigated the potential role of parasite-mediated selection acting on MHC class IIB (DAB) genes in European chub (Squalius cephalus) natural populations. We found significant differences between populations in metazoan parasites, neutral and adaptive genetic diversities. The analyses based on pairwise data revealed that populations with dissimilar MHC allelic profiles were geographically distant populations with significantly different diversity in microsatellites and a dissimilar composition of parasite communities. The results from the generalized estimating equations method (GEE) on the level of individuals revealed that metazoan parasite load in European chub was influenced by the diversity of DAB alleles as well as by the diversity of neutral genetic markers and host traits reflecting condition and immunocompetence. The multivariate co-inertia analysis showed specific associations between DAB alleles and parasite species. DAB1-like alleles were more involved in associations with ectoparasites, while DAB3-like alleles were positively associated with endoparasites which could suggest potential differences between DAB genes caused by different selection pressure. Our study revealed that parasite-mediated selection is not the only variable affecting MHC diversity in European chub; however, we strongly support the role of neutral processes as the main driver of DAB diversity across populations. In addition, our study contributes to the understanding of the evolution of MHC genes in wild living fish.

  8. Discriminative Features in Three Autosomal Recessive Cutis Laxa Syndromes: Cutis Laxa IIA, Cutis Laxa IIB, and Geroderma Osteoplastica

    PubMed Central

    Kariminejad, Ariana; Afroozan, Fariba; Bozorgmehr, Bita; Ghanadan, Alireza; Akbaroghli, Susan; Khorram Khorshid, Hamid Reza; Mojahedi, Faezeh; Setoodeh, Aria; Loh, Abigail; Tan, Yu Xuan; Escande-Beillard, Nathalie; Malfait, Fransiska; Reversade, Bruno; Gardeitchik, Thatjana; Morava, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Cutis laxa is a heterogeneous condition characterized by redundant, sagging, inelastic, and wrinkled skin. The inherited forms of this disease are rare and can have autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked inheritance. Three of the autosomal recessive cutis laxa syndromes, namely cutis laxa IIA (ARCL2A), cutis laxa IIB (ARCL2B), and geroderma osteodysplastica (GO), have very similar clinical features, complicating accurate diagnosis. Individuals with these conditions often present with cutis laxa, progeroid features, and hyperextensible joints. These conditions also share additional features, such as short stature, hypotonia, and congenital hip dislocation, but the severity and frequency of these findings are variable in each of these cutis laxa syndromes. The characteristic features for ARCL2A are abnormal isoelectric focusing and facial features, including downslanting palpebral fissures and a long philtrum. Rather, the clinical phenotype of ARCL2B includes severe wrinkling of the dorsum of the hands and feet, wormian bones, athetoid movements, lipodystrophy, cataract and corneal clouding, a thin triangular face, and a pinched nose. Normal cognition and osteopenia leading to pathological fractures, maxillary hypoplasia, and oblique furrowing from the outer canthus to the lateral border of the supraorbital ridge are discriminative features for GO. Here we present 10 Iranian patients who were initially diagnosed clinically using the respective features of each cutis laxa syndrome. Each patient’s clinical diagnosis was then confirmed with molecular investigation of the responsible gene. Review of the clinical features from the cases reported from the literature also supports our conclusions. PMID:28294978

  9. Structural abnormalities develop in the brain after ablation of the gene encoding nonmuscle myosin II-B heavy chain.

    PubMed

    Tullio, A N; Bridgman, P C; Tresser, N J; Chan, C C; Conti, M A; Adelstein, R S; Hara, Y

    2001-04-23

    Ablation of nonmuscle myosin heavy chain II-B (NMHC-B) in mice results in severe hydrocephalus with enlargement of the lateral and third ventricles. All B(-)/B(-) mice died either during embryonic development or on the day of birth (PO). Neurons cultured from superior cervical ganglia of B(-)/B(-) mice between embryonic day (E) 18 and P0 showed decreased rates of neurite outgrowth, and their growth cones had a distinctive narrow morphology compared with those from normal mice. Serial sections of E12.5, E13.5, and E15 mouse brains identified developmental defects in the ventricular neuroepithelium. On E12.5, disruption of the coherent ventricular surface and disordered cell migration of neuroepithelial and differentiated cells were seen at various points in the ventricular walls. These abnormalities resulted in the formation of rosettes in various regions of the brain and spinal cord. On E13.5 and E15, disruption of the ventricular surface and aberrant protrusions of neural cells into the ventricles became more prominent. By E18.5 and P0, the defects in cells lining the ventricular wall resulted in an obstructive hydrocephalus due to stenosis or occlusion of the third ventricle and cerebral aqueduct. These defects may be caused by abnormalities in the cell adhesive properties of neuroepithelial cells and suggest that NMHC-B is essential for both early and late developmental processes in the mammalian brain.

  10. Multiple roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein, fibroblast growth factor and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in the anterior neural patterning of adherent human embryonic stem cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Giuseppe; Novorol, Claire; Smith, Joseph R.; Vallier, Ludovic; Miranda, Elena; Alexander, Morgan; Biagioni, Stefano; Pedersen, Roger A.; Harris, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have successfully produced a variety of neural cell types from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but there has been limited systematic analysis of how different regional identities are established using well-defined differentiation conditions. We have used adherent, chemically defined cultures to analyse the roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in neural induction, anteroposterior patterning and eye field specification in hESCs. We show that either BMP inhibition or activation of FGF signalling is required for effective neural induction, but these two pathways have distinct outcomes on rostrocaudal patterning. While BMP inhibition leads to specification of forebrain/midbrain positional identities, FGF-dependent neural induction is associated with strong posteriorization towards hindbrain/spinal cord fates. We also demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signalling is activated during neural induction and promotes acquisition of neural fates posterior to forebrain. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is needed for efficient forebrain specification. Finally, we provide evidence that the levels of Activin/Nodal and BMP signalling have a marked influence on further forebrain patterning and that constitutive inhibition of these pathways represses expression of eye field genes. These results show that the key mechanisms controlling neural patterning in model vertebrate species are preserved in adherent, chemically defined hESC cultures and reveal new insights into the signals regulating eye field specification. PMID:23576785

  11. Total saponin from Korean Red Ginseng inhibits binding of adhesive proteins to glycoprotein IIb/IIIa via phosphorylation of VASP (Ser157) and dephosphorylation of PI3K and Akt

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyuk-Woo; Shin, Jung-Hae; Cho, Hyun-Jeong; Rhee, Man Hee; Park, Hwa-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background Binding of adhesive proteins (i.e., fibrinogen, fibronectin, vitronectin) to platelet integrin glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (αIIb/β3) by various agonists (thrombin, collagen, adenosine diphosphate) involve in strength of thrombus. This study was carried out to evaluate the antiplatelet effect of total saponin from Korean Red Ginseng (KRG-TS) by investigating whether KRG-TS inhibits thrombin-induced binding of fibrinogen and fibronectin to αIIb/β3. Methods We investigated the effect of KRG-TS on phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and dephosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt, affecting binding of fibrinogen and fibronectin to αIIb/β3, and clot retraction. Results KRG-TS had an antiplatelet effect by inhibiting the binding of fibrinogen and fibronectin to αIIb/β3 via phosphorylation of VASP (Ser157), and dephosphorylation of PI3K and Akt on thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. Moreover, A-kinase inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cyclic adenosine monophosphates (cAMPs) reduced KRG-TS-increased VASP (Ser157) phosphorylation, and increased KRG-TS-inhibited fibrinogen-, and fibronectin-binding to αIIb/β3. These findings indicate that KRG-TS interferes with the binding of fibrinogen and fibronectin to αIIb/β3 via cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of VASP (Ser157). In addition, KRG-TS decreased the rate of clot retraction, reflecting inhibition of αIIb/β3 activation. In this study, we clarified ginsenoside Ro (G-Ro) in KRG-TS inhibited thrombin-induced platelet aggregation via both inhibition of [Ca2+]i mobilization and increase of cAMP production. Conclusion These results strongly indicate that KRG-TS is a beneficial herbal substance inhibiting fibrinogen-, and fibronectin-binding to αIIb/β3, and clot retraction, and may prevent platelet αIIb/β3-mediated thrombotic disease. In addition, we demonstrate that G-Ro is a novel compound with antiplatelet characteristics of KRG-TS. PMID:26843825

  12. The crucial role of Activin A on the formation of primordial germ cell-like cells from skin-derived stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui; Sun, Yuan-Chao; Ge, Wei; Tan, Hui; Cheng, Shun-Feng; Yin, Shen; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Li, Lan; Dyce, Paul; Li, Julang; Yang, Xiao; Shi, Qing-Hua; Shen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are founder cells of the germ cell lineage, and can be differentiated from stem cells in an induced system in vitro. However, the induction conditions need to be optimized in order to improve the differentiation efficiency. Activin A (ActA) is a member of the TGF-β super family and plays an important role in oogenesis and folliculogenesis. In the present study, we found that ActA promoted PGC-like cells (PGCLCs) formation from mouse skin-derived stem cells (SDSCs) in both embryoid body-like structure (EBLS) differentiation and the co-culture stage in a dose dependent manner. ActA treatment (100 ng/ml) during EBLS differentiation stage and further co-cultured for 6 days without ActA significantly increased PGCLCs from 53.2% to 82.8%, and as well as EBLS differentiation without ActA followed by co-cultured with 100 ng/ml ActA for 4 to 12 days with the percentage of PGCLCs increasing markedly in vitro. Moreover, mice treated with ActA at 100 ng/kg body weight from embryonic day (E) 5.5-12.5 led to more PGCs formation. However, the stimulating effects of ActA were interrupted by Smad3 RNAi, and in an in vitro cultured Smad3(-/-) mouse skin cells scenario. SMAD3 is thus likely a key effecter molecule in the ActA signaling pathway. In addition, we found that the expression of some epiblast cell markers, Fgf5, Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b and Wnt3, was increased in EBLSs cultured for 4 days or PGCLCs co-cultured for 12 days with ActA treatment. Interestingly, at 16 days of differentiation, the percentage of PGCLCs was decreased in the presence of ActA, but the expression of meiosis-relative genes, such as Stra8, Dmc1, Sycp3 and Sycp1, was increased. In conclusion, our data here demonstrated that ActA can promote PGCLC formation from SDSCs in vitro, at early stages of differentiation, and affect meiotic initiation of PGCLCs in later stages.

  13. Minimal promoter systems reveal the importance of conserved residues in the B-finger of human transcription factor IIB.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Nancy E; Glaser, Bryan T; Foley, Katherine M; Burton, Zachary F; Burgess, Richard R

    2009-09-11

    The "B-finger" of transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) is highly conserved and believed to play a role in the initiation process. We performed alanine substitutions across the B-finger of human TFIIB, made change-of-charge mutations in selected residues, and substituted the B-finger sequence from other organisms. Mutant proteins were examined in two minimal promoter systems (containing only RNA polymerase II, TATA-binding protein, and TFIIB) and in a complex system, using TFIIB-immunodepleted HeLa cell nuclear extract (NE). Mutations in conserved residues located on the sides of the B-finger had the greatest effect on activity in both minimal promoter systems, with mutations in residues Glu-51 and Arg-66 eliminating activity. The double change-of-charge mutant (E51R:R66E) did not show activity in either minimal promoter system. Mutations in the nonconserved residues at the tip of the B-finger did not significantly affect activity. However, all of the mutations in the B-finger showed at least 25% activity in the HeLa cell NE. Chimeric proteins, containing B-finger sequences from species with conserved residues on the side of the B-finger, showed wild-type activity in a minimal promoter system and in the HeLa cell NE. However, chimeric proteins whose sequence showed divergence on the sides of the B-finger had reduced activity. Transcription factor IIF (TFIIF) partially restored activity of the inactive mutants in the minimal promoter system, suggesting that TFIIF in HeLa cell NE helps to rescue the inactive mutations by interacting with either the B-finger or another component of the initiation complex that is influenced by the B-finger.

  14. Effects of escins Ia, Ib, IIa, and IIb from horse chestnuts on gastrointestinal transit and ileus in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, H; Li, Y; Yoshikawa, M

    1999-08-01

    The effects of saponin fraction and its principal constituents escins Ia (1), Ib (2), IIa (3), and IIb (4) from horse chestnuts on gastrointestinal transit (GIT) and ileus were investigated in mice. Ileus was induced by acetic acid peritoneal irritation or by laparotomy with manipulation. One hour after the oral administration, the saponin fraction (12.5-100 mg/kg) and 14 (12.5-50 mg/ kg, except for 3 at 12.5 mg/kg) dose-dependently accelerated GIT. The optimal effects of the saponin fraction (25 mg/kg) occurred 5-240 min (applied intervals between the fraction and the charcoal meal) after the oral administration. The fraction (12.5-100 mg/ kg) and 1-4 (12.5-50 mg/kg, except for 1 and 2 at 12.5 mg/kg) dose-dependently prevented the inhibition of GIT induced by the acetic acid peritoneal irritation. They (12.5-100mg/kg) also dose-dependently prevented the inhibition of GIT induced by the laparotomy with manipulation. Desacylescins I (5) and II (6) (50 mg/kg) showed no such effects. These results demonstrated that the saponin fraction and 1-4 accelerated GIT and prevented the experimental ileus, and indicate that the 21, 22-acyl groups are essential for the accelerative effects of 1-4. The accelerations of GIT by 1-4 were completely abolished by the pretreatment with streptozotocin (100 mg/kg, iv), but not by the pretreatment with capsaicin (75 mg/kg in total, sc) or atropine (10 mg/kg, sc). These results imply that the sympathetic nervous system may be, but neither capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves nor the cholinergic mechanism, involved in the accelerations of GIT by escins 1-4.

  15. Seasonal expressions of follicle-stimulating hormone receptor and luteinizing hormone receptor in the scented gland of the male muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haolin; Zhang, Fengwei; Zhu, Manyu; Wang, Junjie; Sheng, Xia; Yuan, Zhengrong; Han, Yingying; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi; Weng, Qiang

    2017-04-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) may influence the functions of nongonadal tissues in addition to their classic target gonads. Our previous studies revealed that the scented glands of male muskrats expressed prolactin receptor, steroidogenic enzymes, and inhibin/activin subunits. To further seek the evidence of the activities of pituitary gonadotropins in scented glands, we investigated the seasonal expression patterns of FSH receptor (FSHR) and LH/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHCGR). The weight and size of scented glands during the breeding season were significantly higher than those during the nonbreeding season. Immunohistochemical studies showed that FSHR was present in the serous cells of scented glands, whereas LHCGR was present in the interstitial cells. The protein and mRNA expression levels of FSHR and LHCGR were significantly higher in the scented glands during the breeding season than those during the nonbreeding season. Importantly, the levels of circulating FSH and LH were remarkably higher during the breeding season. Taken together, these results suggested that gonadotropins may affect the function of muskrat scented gland via the locally expressed receptors in a season-dependent manner.

  16. Cangrelor: a novel P2Y12 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Norgard, Nicholas B

    2009-08-01

    Antiplatelet therapy is critical in the prevention of thrombotic complications of acute coronary syndrome and percutaneous coronary interventions. Current antiplatelet agents (aspirin, clopidogrel and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists) have demonstrated the capacity to reduce major adverse cardiac events. However, these agents have limitations that compromise their clinical utility. The platelet P2Y12 receptor plays a central role in platelet function and is a focus in the development of antiplatelet therapies. Cangrelor is a potent, competitive inhibitor of the P2Y12 receptor that is administered by intravenous infusion and rapidly achieves near complete inhibition of ADP-induced platelet aggregation. This investigational drug has been studied for use during coronary procedures and the management of patients experiencing acute coronary syndrome and is undergoing evaluation for use in the prevention of perioperative stent thrombosis.

  17. Prevention of thrombosis and rethrombosis and enhancement of the thrombolytic actions of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator in the canine heart by DMP728, a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonist.

    PubMed Central

    Lucchessi, B R; Rote, W E; Driscoll, E M; Mu, D X

    1994-01-01

    1. We studied DMP728, a non-peptide glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa receptor antagonist, for prevention of coronary artery thrombosis or rethrombosis in a chronic canine model subjected to arterial injury. 2. In protocol I, DMP728 (1.0 mg kg-1, i.v., n = 8) or saline (n = 8) was administered and a 150 microA anodal current was applied to the intimal surface of the left circumflex coronary artery (LCX). Dogs were monitored for 6 h and again on each of 5 subsequent days. 3. Ex vivo platelet aggregation was inhibited but returned to baseline 1 day after drug administration. Thrombus weight was reduced (saline, 20.7 +/- 5.0 mg; DMP728 1.7 +/- 0.4 mg; P < 0.05), as was infarct size [saline, 27.5 +/- 4.3; DMP728, 1.6 +/- 0.7 (per cent left ventricle); P < 0.05]. All control animals died by day 3, while all but one of the treated dogs survived the entire protocol (P < 0.05). 4. In protocol II, an LCX thrombus was induced and thrombolytic therapy was initiated 30 min later. DMP728 (1.0 mg kg-1, i.v., n = 8) or saline (n = 8) was administered 5 min after recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator infusion had begun. The incidence of reocclusion was reduced by DMP728 (saline, 4/8; DMP728, 1/8). One day after thrombolysis, 7/8 DMP728-treated animals were alive compared with 1/8 in the control group (P = 0.01). 5. DMP728 inhibited ex vivo platelet aggregation, prevented primary and secondary occlusive thrombus formation, reduced thrombus weight and infarct size and increased survival in a chronic canine model of coronary artery thrombus formation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7889289

  18. Expression of human factor VIII under control of the platelet-specific alphaIIb promoter in megakaryocytic cell line as well as storage together with VWF.

    PubMed

    Shi, Q; Wilcox, D A; Fahs, S A; Kroner, P A; Montgomery, R R

    2003-05-01

    Hemophilia A, which results in defective or deficient factor VIII (FVIII) protein, is one of the genetic diseases that has been addressed through gene therapy trials. FVIII synthesis does not occur in normal megakaryocytes. In hemophilia patients who have inhibitors to FVIII activity, megakaryocytes could be a protected site of FVIII synthesis and subsequent release. Since von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a carrier protein for FVIII, we hypothesize that by directing FVIII synthesis to megakaryocytes, it would traffick together with VWF to storage in megakaryocyte alpha-granules and the platelets derived from these cells. Such synthesis would establish a protected, releasable alpha-granule pool of FVIII together with VWF. When platelets are activated in a region of local vascular damage, FVIII and VWF could potentially be released together to provide improved local hemostatic effectiveness. To direct FVIII expression to the megakaryocyte lineage, we designed a FVIII expression cassette where the human B-domain deleted FVIII cDNA was placed under the control of the megakaryocytic/platelet-specific glycoprotein IIb (alphaIIb) promoter. We demonstrated by means of a functional FVIII activity assay that the biosynthesis of FVIII occurred normally in Dami cells transfected with FVIII. FVIII production was higher when driven by the alphaIIb promoter compared to the CMV promoter, and was increased about 8-fold following PMA treatment of the transfected Dami cells. Immunofluorescence staining of the transfected cells showed that FVIII stored together with VWF in the granules. The data indicate that the megakaryocytic compartment of hematopoietic cells may represent a potential target of gene therapy for hemophilia A-especially in those patients who have developed inhibitors to plasma FVIII.

  19. Vascular closure devices and the risk of vascular complications after percutaneous coronary intervention in patients receiving glycoprotein IIb-IIIa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Resnic, F S; Blake, G J; Ohno-Machado, L; Selwyn, A P; Popma, J J; Rogers, C

    2001-09-01

    Vascular closure devices offer advantages over traditional means of obtaining hemostasis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in terms of patient comfort and time to ambulation. We investigate whether such devices also reduce the risk of vascular complications in selected patient populations. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all patients who underwent PCI at our institution between January 1998 and December 1999. Of 3,151 consecutive patients, 3,027 were eligible to receive vascular closure devices. Of these, 1,485 received a closure device and 1,409 received glycoprotein IIb-IIIa antagonists. The overall vascular complication rate, as defined by the need for surgical repair or transfusion, or the development of arteriovenous fistula, pseudoaneurysm, or large hematoma, was 4.20%. By univariate analysis, the use of closure devices was associated with a lower vascular complication rate (3.03% vs 5.52%; p = 0.002) and a shorter length of hospital stay (2.77 vs 3.97 days, p <0.001). Multivariate analysis showed a significant reduction in vascular complications with closure devices (odds ratio 0.59, p = 0.007). For the subgroup of patients receiving glycoprotein IIb-IIIa antagonists, the use of closure devices was associated with an even more pronounced reduction in the risk of vascular complications (odds ratio 0.45, p <0.008). Thus, the use of closure devices in selected patients undergoing PCI is associated with a low rate of vascular complications and decreased length of stay. This benefit was most marked for patients receiving glycoprotein IIb-IIIa antagonists.

  20. Myosin IIB and F-actin control apical vacuolar morphology and histamine-induced trafficking of H-K-ATPase-containing tubulovesicles in gastric parietal cells.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Paramasivam; Crothers, James M; Rosen, Jared E; Nakada, Stephanie L; Rakholia, Milap; Okamoto, Curtis T; Forte, John G; Machen, Terry E

    2014-04-15

    Selective inhibitors of myosin or actin function and confocal microscopy were used to test the role of an actomyosin complex in controlling morphology, trafficking, and fusion of tubulovesicles (TV) containing H-K-ATPase with the apical secretory canaliculus (ASC) of primary-cultured rabbit gastric parietal cells. In resting cells, myosin IIB and IIC, ezrin, and F-actin were associated with ASC, whereas H-K-ATPase localized to intracellular TV. Histamine caused fusion of TV with ASC and subsequent expansion resulting from HCl and water secretion; F-actin and ezrin remained associated with ASC whereas myosin IIB and IIC appeared to dissociate from ASC and relocalize to the cytoplasm. ML-7 (inhibits myosin light chain kinase) caused ASC of resting cells to collapse and most myosin IIB, F-actin, and ezrin to dissociate from ASC. TV were unaffected by ML-7. Jasplakinolide (stabilizes F-actin) caused ASC to develop large blebs to which actin, myosin II, and ezrin, as well as tubulin, were prominently localized. When added prior to stimulation, ML-7 and jasplakinolide prevented normal histamine-stimulated transformations of ASC/TV and the cytoskeleton, but they did not affect cells that had been previously stimulated with histamine. These results indicate that dynamic pools of actomyosin are required for maintenance of ASC structure in resting cells and for trafficking of TV to ASC during histamine stimulation. However, the dynamic pools of actomyosin are not required once the histamine-stimulated transformation of TV/ASC and cytoskeleton has occurred. These results also show that vesicle trafficking in parietal cells shares mechanisms with similar processes in renal collecting duct cells, neuronal synapses, and skeletal muscle.

  1. Long-lasting X-ray emission from type IIb supernova 2011dh and mass-loss history of the yellow supergiant progenitor

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Keiichi; Katsuda, Satoru; Bamba, Aya; Terada, Yukikatsu; Fukazawa, Yasushi

    2014-04-20

    Type IIb supernova (SN) 2011dh, with conclusive detection of an unprecedented yellow supergiant (YSG) progenitor, provides an excellent opportunity to deepen our understanding on the massive star evolution in the final centuries toward the SN explosion. In this paper, we report on detection and analyses of thermal X-ray emission from SN IIb 2011dh at ∼500 days after the explosion on Chandra archival data, providing a solidly derived mass-loss rate of a YSG progenitor for the first time. We find that the circumstellar media should be dense, more than that expected from a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star by one order of magnitude. The emission is powered by a reverse shock penetrating into an outer envelope, fully consistent with the YSG progenitor but not with a W-R progenitor. The density distribution at the outermost ejecta is much steeper than that expected from a compact W-R star, and this finding must be taken into account in modeling the early UV/optical emission from SNe IIb. The derived mass-loss rate is ∼3 × 10{sup –6} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for the mass-loss velocity of ∼20 km s{sup –1} in the final ∼1300 yr before the explosion. The derived mass-loss properties are largely consistent with the standard wind mass-loss expected for a giant star. This is not sufficient to be a main driver to expel nearly all the hydrogen envelope. Therefore, the binary interaction, with a huge mass transfer having taken place at ≳ 1300 yr before the explosion, is a likely scenario to produce the YSG progenitor.

  2. Specificity of RSG-1.2 peptide binding to RRE-IIB RNA element of HIV-1 over Rev peptide is mainly enthalpic in origin.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Bose, Debojit; Suryawanshi, Hemant; Sabharwal, Harshana; Mapa, Koyeli; Maiti, Souvik

    2011-01-01

    Rev is an essential HIV-1 regulatory protein which binds to the Rev responsive element (RRE) present within the env gene of HIV-1 RNA genome. This binding facilitates the transport of the RNA to the cytoplasm, which in turn triggers the switch between viral latency and active viral replication. Essential components of this complex have been localized to a minimal arginine rich Rev peptide and stem IIB region of RRE. A synthetic peptide known as RSG-1.2 binds with high binding affinity and specificity to the RRE-IIB than the Rev peptide, however the thermodynamic basis of this specificity has not yet been addressed. The present study aims to probe the thermodynamic origin of this specificity of RSG-1.2 over Rev Peptide for RRE-IIB. The temperature dependent melting studies show that RSG-1.2 binding stabilizes the RRE structure significantly (ΔT(m) = 4.3°C), in contrast to Rev binding. Interestingly the thermodynamic signatures of the binding have also been found to be different for both the peptides. At pH 7.5, RSG-1.2 binds RRE-IIB with a K(a) = 16.2±0.6×10(7) M(-1) where enthalpic change ΔH = -13.9±0.1 kcal/mol is the main driving force with limited unfavorable contribution from entropic change TΔS = -2.8±0.1 kcal/mol. A large part of ΔH may be due to specific stacking between U72 and Arg15. In contrast binding of Rev (K(a) = 3.1±0.4×10(7) M(-1)) is driven mainly by entropy (ΔH = 0 kcal/mol and TΔS = 10.2±0.2 kcal/mol) which arises from major conformational changes in the RNA upon binding.

  3. A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Phase IIb Trial of A3309, A Bile Acid Transporter Inhibitor, for Chronic Idiopathic Constipation

    PubMed Central

    Chey, William D; Camilleri, Michael; Chang, Lin; Rikner, Leif; Graffner, Hans

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A3309 is a minimally absorbed ileal bile acid (BA) transporter (IBAT) inhibitor. We conducted an 8-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group, phase IIb study, which evaluated A3309 in patients with chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC). METHODS: Patients with CIC (modified Rome III criteria and <3 complete (CSBM) spontaneous bowel movements (SBMs)/week during the 2-week baseline) were randomized to 5, 10, or 15 mg A3309 or placebo once daily. The primary end point was change in SBM number during week 1 compared with baseline. Other bowel and abdominal symptoms were assessed as secondary end points. Serum 7αC4 and lipids were evaluated as biomarkers of BA synthesis/loss. RESULTS: In all, 190 patients (mean 48 years, 90% female) were randomized. Mean increase (95% confidence interval) in SBM for week 1 were 1.7 (0.7–2.8) for placebo vs. 2.5 (1.5–3.5), 4.0 (2.9–5.0), and 5.4 (4.4–6.4) for 5 mg, 10 mg (P<0.002), and 15 mg (P<0.001) A3309, respectively. Increased stool frequency was maintained over 8 weeks. Time to first SBM and CSBM were significantly reduced in the 10- and 15-mg A3309 groups compared with placebo. Straining and bloating decreased with A3309 compared with placebo (P<0.05). Increased 7αC4 and reduced low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with A3309 suggested increased BA synthesis and BA loss. The most common adverse events (AEs) were abdominal pain and diarrhea, which occurred most commonly in the 15-mg A3309 group. No drug-related serious AEs were observed. CONCLUSIONS: A3309 increased stool frequency and improved constipation-related symptoms in CIC; effects were maintained over 8 weeks of treatment. PMID:21606974

  4. Taking Personalized Medicine Seriously: Biomarker Approaches in Phase IIb/III Studies in Major Depression and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Laughren, Thomas; Lamers, Femke; Picard, Rosalind; Walther, Sebastian; Goff, Donald; Sainati, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    and integration of such markers into clinical research is both required and feasible in order to meet the benefit of personalized medicine. This article is based on proceedings from the “Taking Personalized Medicine Seriously—Biomarker Approaches in Phase IIb/III Studies in Major Depression and Schizophrenia” session, which was held during the 10th Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society for Clinical Trials Meeting (ISCTM) in Washington, DC, February 18 to 20, 2014. PMID:25977838

  5. Ovarian follicle development in the laying hen is accompanied by divergent changes in inhibin A, inhibin B, activin A and follistatin production in granulosa and theca layers.

    PubMed

    Lovell, T M; Gladwell, R T; Groome, N P; Knight, P G

    2003-04-01

    To study the potential involvement of inhibin A (inhA), inhibin B (inhB), activin A (actA) and follistatin (FS) in the recruitment of follicles into the preovulatory hierarchy, growing follicles (ranging from 1 mm to the largest designated F1) and the three most recent postovulatory follicles (POFs) were recovered from laying hens (n=11). With the exception of <4 mm follicles and POFs, follicle walls were dissected into separate granulosa (G) and theca (T) layers before extraction. Contents of inhA, inhB, actA and FS in tissue extracts were assayed using specific two-site ELISAs and results are expressed per mg DNA. InhB content of both G and T followed a similar developmental pattern, although the content was >4-fold higher in G than in T at all stages. InhB content was very low in follicles <4 mm but increased ~50-fold (P<0.0001) to peak in 7-9 mm follicles, before falling steadily as follicles entered and moved up the follicular hierarchy (40-fold; 8 mm vs F2). In stark contrast, inhA remained very low in prehierarchical follicles (< or =9 mm) but then increased progressively as follicles moved up the preovulatory hierarchy to peak in F1 (approximately 100-fold increase; P<0.0001); In F1 >97% of inhA was confined to the G layer whereas in 5-9 mm follicles inhA was only detected in the T layer. Both inhA and inhB contents of POFs were significantly reduced compared with F1. Follicular actA was mainly confined to the T layer although detectable levels were present in G from 9 mm; actA was low between 1 and 9 mm but increased sharply as follicles entered the preovulatory hierarchy (approximately 6-fold higher in F4; P<0.0001); levels then fell approximately 2-fold as the follicle progressed to F1. Like actA, FS predominated in the T although significant amounts were also present in the G of prehierarchical follicles (4-9 mm), in contrast to actA, which was absent from the G. The FS content of T rose approximately 3-fold from 6 mm to a plateau which was sustained

  6. Phase II Evaluation of Dalantercept, a Soluble Recombinant Activin Receptor-Like Kinase 1 (ALK1) Receptor Fusion Protein, for the Treatment of Recurrent or Persistent Endometrial Cancer: An NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group Study 0229N

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Vicky; Filiaci, Virginia L.; Chen, Lee-may; Darus, Christopher J.; Kendrick, James E.; Sutton, Gregory; Moxley, Katherine; Aghajanian, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Objective This two-stage phase II study assessed activity of single agent dalantercept in patients with recurrent/persistent endometrial carcinoma (EMC). Methods Eligible patients had persistent/recurrent EMC after 1–2 prior cytotoxic regimens, measurable disease (RECIST 1.1), and GOG performance ≤ 2. Dalantercept 1.2 mg/kg subcutaneous was administered once every 3 weeks until disease progression (PD)/development of prohibitory toxicity. Primary objectives were to estimate the proportion of patients with persistent/recurrent EMC, who survive progression-free without receiving non-protocol therapy (TPFS) for at least 6 months and to estimate the proportion having objective tumor response. Results All 28 enrolled patients were eligible and evaluable. Median age: 62 years. Most common histologies: 32% Grade 1/2 endometrioid and 54% serous tumors. Prior treatment: 1 or 2 regimens in 82% and 18% of patients, respectively. Eighteen patients received prior radiation therapy. Patients received 1–12 cycles of dalantercept, and 46% of patients received ≤2 cycles. The most common adverse events (AE) were fatigue, anemia, constipation and peripheral edema. Grade 3/4 AEs occurred in 39% and 4% of patients. One grade 5 gastric hemorrhage in a patient with a history of radiation fibrosis/small bowel obstruction was deemed possibly dalantercept-related. All patients are off study: 86% for PD. No ORs were observed; 57% had stable disease and 11% had TPFS ≥ 6 mos. Median progression-free and overall survival: 2.1 months (90% CI: 1.4–3.2) and 14.5 months (90% CI: 7.0–17.5), respectively. Conclusions Dalantercept has insufficient single agent activity in recurrent EMC to warrant further investigation at this dose level and schedule. PMID:25888978

  7. Successful use of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor, heparin, and IABP during PCI in a post-neurosurgical patient with STEMI and cardiogenic shock due to very late bare-metal stent thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Akkus, Nuri I; Rajpal, Saurabh; Agnani, Sujata

    2012-02-01

    Stent thrombosis is not unusual in a post-operative setting. Use of heparin, aspirin, clopidogrel, and glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa inhibitors in this setting needs to be balanced because of the increased risk of perioperative bleeding. This is of special concern in neurosurgery, where postoperative mass effect from bleeding in a closed space is a serious risk. We describe a unique case of inferior and anterior ST-elevation myocardial infarction in cardiogenic shock during spinal surgery with acute, very late bare-metal stent (BMS) thrombosis in the left anterior descending coronary artery and simultaneous acute thrombotic occlusion of the right coronary artery, treated by primary percutaneous intervention, intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) support and use of GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor in addition to clopidogrel, aspirin, and heparin with good surgical and cardiac outcome. This case report describes first time use of GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor and IABP with heparin, in a patient just after spinal surgery.

  8. The Phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5)P3) Binder Rasa3 Regulates Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent Integrin αIIbβ3 Outside-in Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Battram, Anthony M.; Durrant, Tom N.; Agbani, Ejaife O.; Heesom, Kate J.; Paul, David S.; Piatt, Raymond; Poole, Alastair W.; Cullen, Peter J.; Bergmeier, Wolfgang; Moore, Samantha F.; Hers, Ingeborg

    2017-01-01

    The class I PI3K family of lipid kinases plays an important role in integrin αIIbβ3 function, thereby supporting thrombus growth and consolidation. Here, we identify Ras/Rap1GAP Rasa3 (GAP1IP4BP) as a major phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate-binding protein in human platelets and a key regulator of integrin αIIbβ3 outside-in signaling. We demonstrate that cytosolic Rasa3 translocates to the plasma membrane in a PI3K-dependent manner upon activation of human platelets. Expression of wild-type Rasa3 in integrin αIIbβ3-expressing CHO cells blocked Rap1 activity and integrin αIIbβ3-mediated spreading on fibrinogen. In contrast, Rap1GAP-deficient (P489V) and Ras/Rap1GAP-deficient (R371Q) Rasa3 had no effect. We furthermore show that two Rasa3 mutants (H794L and G125V), which are expressed in different mouse models of thrombocytopenia, lack both Ras and Rap1GAP activity and do not affect integrin αIIbβ3-mediated spreading of CHO cells on fibrinogen. Platelets from thrombocytopenic mice expressing GAP-deficient Rasa3 (H794L) show increased spreading on fibrinogen, which in contrast to wild-type platelets is insensitive to PI3K inhibitors. Together, these results support an important role for Rasa3 in PI3K-dependent integrin αIIbβ3-mediated outside-in signaling and cell spreading. PMID:27903653

  9. Effect of simultaneous inhibition of starch branching enzymes I and IIb on the crystalline structure of rice starches with different amylose contents.

    PubMed

    Man, Jianmin; Yang, Yang; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Changquan; Chen, Yifang; Wang, Youping; Gu, Minghong; Liu, Qiaoquan; Wei, Cunxu

    2013-10-16

    Mutating or inhibiting genes encoding starch branching enzymes (SBEs) can increase the amylose content (AC) of cereals. We analyzed endosperm starches from three rice cultivars with different ACs and from transgenic lines derived from them. The transgenic lines had simultaneously inhibited SBE I and IIb genes. Compared with the starch from their wild-type parents, the starch from transgenic lines showed significantly increased apparent ACs and lamella size and decreased relative crystallinity, double helix content, and lamellar peak scattering intensity, and altered short-range ordered structure in the external region. These changes were more prominent in the line derived from the high-AC cultivar than in those derived from waxy and low-AC cultivars. Inhibiting both SBE I and IIb changed the crystalline structure of starch from A-type to CA-type in lines derived from waxy and low-AC cultivars, and from A-type to C-type in that derived from the high-AC cultivar.

  10. 30 CFR 57.22501 - Personal electric lamps (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Personal electric lamps (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). 57.22501 Section 57.22501 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND... Illumination § 57.22501 Personal electric lamps (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B......

  11. 30 CFR 57.22501 - Personal electric lamps (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Personal electric lamps (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). 57.22501 Section 57.22501 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND... Illumination § 57.22501 Personal electric lamps (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B......

  12. A comparison of the fibrinogen receptor distribution on adherent platelets using both soluble fibrinogen and fibrinogen immobilized on gold beads.

    PubMed

    Estry, D W; Mattson, J C; Mahoney, G J; Oesterle, J R

    1991-04-01

    The distribution of fibrinogen receptors was determined on the surface of adherent platelets using both direct labeling with the ligand fibrinogen which was immobilized on gold particles (Fg-Au) and indirect immunogold (Ig-Au) labeling of bound soluble fibrinogen identified with a rabbit polyclonal anti-fibrinogen antibody. Two distinctly different patterns of labeling were obtained and appeared to depend on whether solid phase fibrinogen (Fg-Au) or soluble phase released fibrinogen were bound to the membrane receptor. The membrane-bound Fg-Au reorganized in patterns that closely mimicked the organization of the underlying cytoskeleton. In approximately 18% of the adherent platelets, Fg-Au was seen in channels or vesicle-like structures lying deep to the platelet surface suggesting internalization into the open canalicular system and/or endocytosis. The labeling pattern obtained when identifying the location of membrane-bound soluble released fibrinogen by Ig-Au was diffuse and lacked the organizational patterns characteristic of Fg-Au. Unlike the Fg-Au probe, early dendritic platelets were heavily labeled by the soluble phase fibrinogen using the Ig-Au technique. Although the label covered the entire exposed platelet membrane in fully spread platelets, labeling over the peripheral web was more dense than that over the intermediate or granulomere zone. The diffuse organization and heavier peripheral distributional pattern of the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa (GP IIb-IIIa) receptor in fixed, adherent platelets, was also seen with the GP IIb-IIIa receptor-specific antibody AP-2. The binding of both the Fg-Au and Ig-Au were inhibited using the tetrapeptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS) (93% and 98% inhibition, respectively), AP-2 (98% and 97%, respectively) and platelets from patients with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (GT) (99% and 98%, respectively). The data presented provides the first report that receptor reorganization, following binding of fibrinogen, appears to be related to

  13. Systemic blockade of ACVR2B ligands prevents chemotherapy-induced muscle wasting by restoring muscle protein synthesis without affecting oxidative capacity or atrogenes

    PubMed Central

    Nissinen, T. A.; Degerman, J.; Räsänen, M.; Poikonen, A. R.; Koskinen, S.; Mervaala, E.; Pasternack, A.; Ritvos, O.; Kivelä, R.; Hulmi, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin is a widely used and effective chemotherapy drug. However, cardiac and skeletal muscle toxicity of doxorubicin limits its use. Inhibiting myostatin/activin signalling can prevent muscle atrophy, but its effects in chemotherapy-induced muscle wasting are unknown. In the present study we investigated the effects of doxorubicin administration alone or combined with activin receptor ligand pathway blockade by soluble activin receptor IIB (sACVR2B-Fc). Doxorubicin administration decreased body mass, muscle size and bone mineral density/content in mice. However, these effects were prevented by sACVR2B-Fc administration. Unlike in many other wasting situations, doxorubicin induced muscle atrophy without markedly increasing typical atrogenes or protein degradation pathways. Instead, doxorubicin decreased muscle protein synthesis which was completely restored by sACVR2B-Fc. Doxorubicin administration also resulted in impaired running performance without effects on skeletal muscle mitochondrial capacity/function or capillary density. Running performance and mitochondrial function were unaltered by sACVR2B-Fc administration. Tumour experiment using Lewis lung carcinoma cells demonstrated that sACVR2B-Fc decreased the cachectic effects of chemotherapy without affecting tumour growth. These results demonstrate that blocking ACVR2B signalling may be a promising strategy to counteract chemotherapy-induced muscle wasting without damage to skeletal muscle oxidative capacity or cancer treatment. PMID:27666826

  14. The impact of supersaturation level for oral absorption of BCS class IIb drugs, dipyridamole and ketoconazole, using in vivo predictive dissolution system: Gastrointestinal Simulator (GIS).

    PubMed

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Matsui, Kazuki; Searls, Amanda L; Takeuchi, Susumu; Amidon, Gregory E; Sun, Duxin; Amidon, Gordon L

    2017-03-03

    The development of formulations and the assessment of oral drug absorption for Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) class IIb drugs is often a difficult issue due to the potential for supersaturation and precipitation in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The physiological environment in the GI tract largely influences in vivo drug dissolution rates of those drugs. Thus, those physiological factors should be incorporated into the in vitro system to better assess in vivo performance of BCS class IIb drugs. In order to predict oral bioperformance, an in vitro dissolution system with multiple compartments incorporating physiologically relevant factors would be expected to more accurately predict in vivo phenomena than a one-compartment dissolution system like USP Apparatus 2 because, for example, the pH change occurring in the human GI tract can be better replicated in a multi-compartmental platform. The Gastrointestinal Simulator (GIS) consists of three compartments, the gastric, duodenal and jejunal chambers, and is a practical in vitro dissolution apparatus to predict in vivo dissolution for oral dosage forms. This system can demonstrate supersaturation and precipitation and, therefore, has the potential to predict in vivo bioperformance of oral dosage forms where this phenomenon may occur. In this report, in vitro studies were performed with dipyridamole and ketoconazole to evaluate the precipitation rates and the relationship between the supersaturation levels and oral absorption of BCS class II weak base drugs. To evaluate the impact of observed supersaturation levels on oral absorption, a study utilizing the GIS in combination with mouse intestinal infusion was conducted. Supersaturation levels observed in the GIS enhanced dipyridamole and ketoconazole absorption in mouse, and a good correlation between their supersaturation levels and their concentration in plasma was observed. The GIS, therefore, appears to represent in vivo dissolution phenomena and

  15. 30 CFR 57.22227 - Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Ventilation § 57.22227 Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). (a) Methane monitoring devices and portable, battery-powered, self-contained devices used for...

  16. 30 CFR 57.22227 - Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Ventilation § 57.22227 Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). (a) Methane monitoring devices and portable, battery-powered, self-contained devices used for...

  17. 30 CFR 57.22227 - Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Ventilation § 57.22227 Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). (a) Methane monitoring devices and portable, battery-powered, self-contained devices used for...

  18. Ultrastructural and biochemical analysis of fibrinogen receptors on activated thrombocytes

    SciTech Connect

    O'Toole, E.T.

    1989-01-01

    The present studies have been concerned with the role of fibrinogen and its receptor, GP IIb/IIIa, during the activation and early aggregation of pigeon thrombocytes. Thrombocytes were surface labeled with {sup 125}I then separated on SDS-PAGE. Analysis by gel autoradiography revealed major bands at MW 145 kd and 98 kd, which corresponded to human GPIIb and GPIIIa. Immunologic similarity of the pigeon and human receptor components was established by dot blot analysis using polyclonal antibodies directed against human GPIIb and GPIIIa. Pigeon fibrinogen, isolated by plasma precipitation with PEG-1000 and purified over Sepharose 4B, was used to study receptor-ligand interaction. Separation of pigeon fibrinogen on SDS-PAGE resulted in three peptides having apparent MW of 62kd, 55kd, and 47kd which are comparable to human fibrinogen. Further similarity of human and pigeon fibrinogen was verified by immonodiffusion against an antibody specific for the human protein. The role of fibrinogen and its receptor in thrombocyte function was established by turbidimetric aggregation using thrombin as an agonist under conditions requiring Ca++ and fibrinogen.

  19. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF SUPERNOVA 2011ei: TIME-DEPENDENT CLASSIFICATION OF TYPE IIb AND Ib SUPERNOVAE AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THEIR PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Milisavljevic, Dan; Margutti, Raffaella; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Chomiuk, Laura; Sanders, Nathan E.; Pignata, Giuliano; Bufano, Filomena; Fesen, Robert A.; Parrent, Jerod T.; Parker, Stuart; Mazzali, Paolo; Pian, Elena; Pickering, Timothy; Buckley, David A. H.; Crawford, Steven M.; Gulbis, Amanda A. S.; Hettlage, Christian; Hooper, Eric; Nordsieck, Kenneth H.; O'Donoghue, Darragh; and others

    2013-04-10

    We present X-ray, UV/optical, and radio observations of the stripped-envelope, core-collapse supernova (SN) 2011ei, one of the least luminous SNe IIb or Ib observed to date. Our observations begin with a discovery within {approx}1 day of explosion and span several months afterward. Early optical spectra exhibit broad, Type II-like hydrogen Balmer profiles that subside rapidly and are replaced by Type Ib-like He-rich features on a timescale of one week. High-cadence monitoring of this transition suggests absorption attributable to a high-velocity ({approx}> 12, 000 km s{sup -1}) H-rich shell, which is likely present in many Type Ib events. Radio observations imply a shock velocity of v Almost-Equal-To 0.13 c and a progenitor star average mass-loss rate of M-dot {approx}1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} (assuming wind velocity v{sub w} = 10{sup 3} km s{sup -1}). This is consistent with independent constraints from deep X-ray observations with Swift-XRT and Chandra. Overall, the multi-wavelength properties of SN 2011ei are consistent with the explosion of a lower-mass (3-4 M{sub Sun }), compact (R{sub *} {approx}< 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm), He-core star. The star retained a thin hydrogen envelope at the time of explosion, and was embedded in an inhomogeneous circumstellar wind suggestive of modest episodic mass loss. We conclude that SN 2011ei's rapid spectral metamorphosis is indicative of time-dependent classifications that bias estimates of the relative explosion rates for Type IIb and Ib objects, and that important information about a progenitor star's evolutionary state and mass loss immediately prior to SN explosion can be inferred from timely multi-wavelength observations.

  20. Californium versus cobalt brachytherapy combined with external-beam radiotherapy for IIB stage cervical cancer: long-term experience of a single institute

    PubMed Central

    Janulionis, Ernestas; Valuckas, Konstantinas Povilas; Samerdokiene, Vitalija; Atkocius, Vydmantas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper was to observe and compare long-term curative effects and complications of FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer patients (n = 232) treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) californium (252Cf) neutron or cobalt (60Co) photon intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) combined with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Material and methods The EBRT dose to the small pelvis was 50 Gy in both groups. The brachytherapy component of 252Cf or 60Co was added in the 3rd week of EBRT, 5 fractions were performed once per week resulting in a total ICBT dose of 40 Gy/Gyeq (point A). Results Overall survival (OS) at 5, 10 and 15 years was 63.6%, 50.4% and 38.8% in the 252Cf group and 62.2%, 50.5%, 39.9%, in the 60Co group, respectively (p = 0.74). The percentage of tumour recurrence was statistically significantly lower in the 252Cf group with 7.4% versus 17.1% in the 60Co group (p = 0.02). Second primary cancers have developed similarly 9.1% and 8.1% cases for 252Cf and 60Co groups, respectively. Conclusions Our long-term retrospective study comparing 252Cf and 60Co isotopes with brachytherapy in combined treatment of FIGO IIB stage cervix carcinoma patients shows, that overall survival in the both groups are similar. However, the recurrence of tumour was significantly lower in the 252Cf group. The incidence of second primary cancers was similar in both groups. PMID:26622239

  1. Differential effect of the inhibition of Grb2-SH3 interactions in platelet activation induced by thrombin and by Fc receptor engagement.

    PubMed Central

    Saci, Abdelhafid; Liu, Wang-Qing; Vidal, Michel; Garbay, Christiane; Rendu, Francine; Bachelot-Loza, Christilla

    2002-01-01

    The adaptor protein Grb2 (growth factor receptor-bound protein 2) is involved in cell proliferation via the Ras signalling pathway. In order to study the role of Grb2 in blood platelet responses, we used a peptide containing two proline-rich sequences derived from Sos (peptidimer), which binds to Grb2-Src homology 3 domain (SH3) with a high affinity, and hence inhibits Grb2-SH3-mediated protein interactions. Platelet aggregation and 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) release measured in the presence of the peptidimer were: (i) significantly decreased when induced by thrombin; and (ii) potentiated when induced by the engagement of the Fc receptor. In thrombin-activated platelets, the Grb2-SH2 domain formed an association with the beta3 subunit of the alphaIIb-beta3 integrin (GPIIb-IIIa), Shc, Syk, Src and SHP1 (SH2-containing phosphotyrosine phosphatase 1), whereas these associations did not occur after the engagement of the receptor for the Fc domain of IgG (FcgammaRIIa) or in resting platelets. Grb2-SH3 domains formed an association with the proline-rich sequences of Sos and Cbl in both resting and activated platelets, since the peptidimer abolished these associations. Inhibition of both fibrinogen binding and platelet aggregation by the peptide RGDS (Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser) had no effect on thrombin-induced Grb2-SH2 domain association with the aforementioned signalling molecules, indicating that these associations occurred during thrombin-induced 'inside-out' signalling. Platelet aggregation induced by direct activation via alphaIIb-beta3 ('outside-in' signalling) was potentiated by the peptidimer. The results show that inhibition of Grb2-SH3 interactions with signal-transduction proteins down-regulates thrombin-induced platelet activation, but also potentiates Fc receptor- and alphaIIb-beta3-mediated platelet activation. PMID:11964172

  2. Common pathways regulate Type III TGFβ receptor-dependent cell invasion in epicardial and endocardial cells.

    PubMed

    Clark, Cynthia R; Robinson, Jamille Y; Sanchez, Nora S; Townsend, Todd A; Arrieta, Julian A; Merryman, W David; Trykall, David Z; Olivey, Harold E; Hong, Charles C; Barnett, Joey V

    2016-06-01

    Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transformation (EMT) and the subsequent invasion of epicardial and endocardial cells during cardiac development is critical to the development of the coronary vessels and heart valves. The transformed cells give rise to cardiac fibroblasts and vascular smooth muscle cells or valvular interstitial cells, respectively. The Type III Transforming Growth Factor β (TGFβR3) receptor regulates EMT and cell invasion in both cell types, but the signaling mechanisms downstream of TGFβR3 are not well understood. Here we use epicardial and endocardial cells in in vitro cell invasion assays to identify common mechanisms downstream of TGFβR3 that regulate cell invasion. Inhibition of NF-κB activity blocked cell invasion in epicardial and endocardial cells. NF-κB signaling was found to be dysregulated in Tgfbr3(-/-) epicardial cells which also show impaired cell invasion in response to ligand. TGFβR3-dependent cell invasion is also dependent upon Activin Receptor-Like Kinase (ALK) 2, ALK3, and ALK5 activity. A TGFβR3 mutant that contains a threonine to alanine substitution at residue 841 (TGFβR3-T841A) induces ligand-independent cell invasion in both epicardial and endocardial cells in vitro. These findings reveal a role for NF-κB signaling in the regulation of epicardial and endocardial cell invasion and identify a mutation in TGFβR3 which stimulates ligand-independent signaling.

  3. Rapid Activation of Bone Morphogenic Protein 9 by Receptor-mediated Displacement of Pro-domains*

    PubMed Central

    Kienast, Yvonne; Jucknischke, Ute; Scheiblich, Stefan; Thier, Martina; de Wouters, Mariana; Haas, Alexander; Lehmann, Christian; Brand, Verena; Bernicke, Dirk; Honold, Konrad; Lorenz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    By non-covalent association after proteolytic cleavage, the pro-domains modulate the activities of the mature growth factor domains across the transforming growth factor-β family. In the case of bone morphogenic protein 9 (BMP9), however, the pro-domains do not inhibit the bioactivity of the growth factor, and the BMP9·pro-domain complexes have equivalent biological activities as the BMP9 mature ligand dimers. By using real-time surface plasmon resonance, we could demonstrate that either binding of pro-domain-complexed BMP9 to type I receptor activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1), type II receptors, co-receptor endoglin, or to mature BMP9 domain targeting antibodies leads to immediate and complete displacement of the pro-domains from the complex. Vice versa, pro-domain binding by an anti-pro-domain antibody results in release of the mature BMP9 growth factor. Based on these findings, we adjusted ELISA assays to measure the protein levels of different BMP9 variants. Although mature BMP9 and inactive precursor BMP9 protein were directly detectable by ELISA, BMP9·pro-domain complex could only be measured indirectly as dissociated fragments due to displacement of mature growth factor and pro-domains after antibody binding. Our studies provide a model in which BMP9 can be readily activated upon getting into contact with its receptors. This increases the understanding of the underlying biology of BMP9 activation and also provides guidance for ELISA development for the detection of circulating BMP9 variants. PMID:26677222

  4. A TaqMan-based multiplex qPCR assay and DNA extraction method for phylotype IIB sequevars 1&2 (select agent) strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    SciTech Connect

    Stulberg, Michael J.; Huang, Qi

    2015-10-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB, sequevars 1 and 2 (IIB-1&2) cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates, and are quarantined pathogens in Canada and Europe. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of their potential risk to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated geraniums are also a host and have the potential to spread the pathogen through trade, and its extracts strongly inhibits DNA-based detection methods. We designed four primer and probe sets for an improved qPCR method that targets stable regions of DNA. RsSA1 and RsSA2 recognize IIB-1&2 strains, RsII recognizes the current phylotype II (the newly proposed R. solanacearum species) strains (and a non-plant associated R. mannitolilytica), and Cox1 recognizes eight plant species including major hosts of R. solanacearum such as potato, tomato and cultivated geranium as an internal plant control. We multiplexed the RsSA2 with the RsII and Cox1 sets to provide two layers of detection of a positive IIB-1&2 sample, and to validate plant extracts and qPCR reactions. The TaqMan-based uniplex and multiplex qPCR assays correctly identified 34 IIB-1&2 and 52 phylotype II strains out of 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains. Additionally, the multiplex qPCR assay was validated successfully using 169 artificially inoculated symptomatic and asymptomatic plant samples from multiple plant hosts including geranium. Moreover, we developed an extraction buffer that allowed for a quick and easy DNA extraction from infected plants including geranium for detection of R. solanacearum by qPCR. Our multiplex qPCR assay, especially when coupled with the quick extraction buffer method, allows for quick, easy and reliable detection and differentiation of the IIB-1&2 strains of R. solanacearum.

  5. Synthetic anabolic agents: steroids and nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    The central role of testosterone in the development of male characteristics, as well as its beneficial effects on physical performance and muscle growth, has led to the search for synthetic alternatives with improved pharmacological profiles. Hundreds of steroidal analogs have been prepared with a superior oral bioavailability, which should also possess reduced undesirable effects. However, only a few entered the pharmaceutical market due to severe toxicological incidences that were mainly attributed to the lack of tissue selectivity. Prominent representatives of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are for instance methyltestosterone, metandienone and stanozolol, which are discussed as model compounds with regard to general pharmacological aspects of synthetic AAS. Recently, nonsteroidal alternatives to AAS have been developed that selectively activate the androgen receptor in either muscle tissue or bones. These so-called selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are currently undergoing late clinical trials (IIb) and will be prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency from January 2008. Their entirely synthetic structures are barely related to steroids, but particular functional groups allow for the tissue-selective activation or inhibition of androgen receptors and, thus, the stimulation of muscle growth without the risk of severe undesirable effects commonly observed in steroid replacement therapies. Hence, these compounds possess a high potential for misuse in sports and will be the subject of future doping control assays.

  6. 30 CFR 57.22201 - Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II...-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22201 Mechanical ventilation (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). All mines...

  7. 30 CFR 57.22227 - Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A... Ventilation § 57.22227 Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). (a... be used in Subcategory I-C mines. (c)(1) If electrically......

  8. 30 CFR 57.22227 - Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A... Ventilation § 57.22227 Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). (a... be used in Subcategory I-C mines. (c)(1) If electrically......

  9. A novel family of RGD-containing disintegrin (Tablysin-15) from the salivary gland of the horsefly Tabanus yao targets integrins αIIbβ3 and αVβ3 and inhibits platelet aggregation and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dongying; Xu, Xueqing; An, Su; Liu, Huan; Yang, Xuening; Andersen, John F.; Wang, Yipeng; Tokumasu, Fuyuki; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Francischetti, Ivo M. B.; Lai, Ren

    2012-01-01

    A novel family of RGD-containing molecule (Tablysin-15) has been molecularly characterized from the salivary gland of the hematophagous horsefly Tabanus yao. Tablysin-15 does not share primary sequence homology to any disintegrin discovered so far, and displays an RGD motif in the N-terminus of the molecule. It is also distinct from disintegrins from Viperidae since its mature form is not released from a metalloproteinase precursor. Tablysin-15 exhibits high affinity for platelet αIIbβ3 and endothelial cell αvβ3 integrins, but not for α5β1 or α2β1. Accordingly, it blocks endothelial cell adhesion to vitronectin (IC50 ~ 1 nM) and marginally to fibronectin (IC50 ~ 1 µM), but not to collagen. It also inhibits FGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation, and attenuates tube formation in vitro. In platelets, Tablysin-15 inhibits aggregation induced by collagen, ADP and convulxin, and prevents static platelet adhesion to immobilized fibrinogen. In addition, solid-phase assays and flow cytometry demonstrates that αIIbβ3 binds to Tablysin-15. Moreover, immobilized Tablysin-15 supports platelet adhesion by a mechanism which was blocked by anti-integrin αIIbβ3 monoclonal antibody (e.g. abciximab) or by EDTA. Furthermore, Tablysin-15 dose-dependently attenuates thrombus formation to collagen under flow, without affecting platelet adhesion to collagen fibrils. Consistent with these findings, Tablysin-15 displays antithrombotic properties in vivo suggesting that it is a useful tool to block αIIbβ3, or as a prototype to develop antithrombotics. The RGD motif in the unique sequence of Tablysin-15 represents a novel template for studying the structure-function relationship of the disintegrin family of inhibitors. PMID:21475772

  10. Loss of function of 1-FEH IIb has more impact on post-harvest inulin degradation in Cichorium intybus than copy number variation of its close paralog 1-FEH IIa.

    PubMed

    Dauchot, Nicolas; Raulier, Pierre; Maudoux, Olivier; Notté, Christine; Draye, Xavier; Van Cutsem, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Key Message: The loss of mini-exon 2 in the 1-FEH IIb glycosyl-hydrolase results in a putative non-functional allele. This loss of function has a strong impact on the susceptibility to post-harvest inulin depolymerization. Significant variation of copy number was identified in its close paralog 1-FEH IIa, but no quantitative effect of copy number on carbohydrates-related phenotypes was detected. Inulin polyfructan is the second most abundant storage carbohydrate in flowering plants. After harvest, it is depolymerized by fructan exohydrolases (FEHs) as an adaptive response to end-season cold temperatures. In chicory, the intensity of this depolymerization differs between cultivars but also between individuals within a cultivar. Regarding this phenotypic variability, we recently identified statistically significant associations between inulin degradation and genetic polymorphisms located in three FEHs. We present here new results of a systematic analysis of copy number variation (CNV) in five key members of the chicory (Cichorium intybus) GH32 multigenic family, including three FEH genes and the two inulin biosynthesis genes: 1-SST and 1-FFT. qPCR analysis identified a significant variability of relative copy number only in the 1-FEH IIa gene. However, this CNV had no quantitative effect. Instead, cloning of the full length gDNA of a close paralogous sequence (1-FEH IIb) identified a 1028 bp deletion in lines less susceptible to post-harvest inulin depolymerization. This region comprises a 9 bp mini-exon containing one of the three conserved residues of the active site. This results in a putative non-functional 1-FEH IIb allele and an observed lower inulin depolymerization. Extensive genotyping confirmed that the loss of mini-exon 2 in 1-FEH IIb and the previously identified 47 bp duplication located in the 3'UTR of 1-FEH IIa belong to a single haplotype, both being statistically associated with reduced susceptibility to post-harvest inulin depolymerization

  11. Prospective testing for drug-dependent antibodies reduces the incidence of thrombocytopenia observed with the small molecule glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonist roxifiban: implications for the etiology of thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Seiffert, Dietmar; Stern, Andrew M; Ebling, William; Rossi, Richard J; Barrett, Yu Chen; Wynn, Richard; Hollis, Gregory F; He, Bokang; Kieras, Cathy J; Pedicord, Donna L; Cromley, Debra A; Hua, Tsushung A; Stein, Robert B; Daly, Robert N; Sferruzza, Anthony; Pieniaszek, Henry J; Billheimer, Jeffrey T

    2003-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a relatively common side effect observed during glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa antagonist therapy. With the oral antagonist roxifiban, we observed thrombocytopenia, defined as 50% reduction of platelets over predose values or below 90 000/microL (9 x 10(10)/L), with a frequency of 2% (8 of 386). Thrombocytopenia occurred either early (days 2 to 4) or delayed (days 11 to 16). No additional cases were observed with up to 6 months of treatment. Retrospective analysis provided evidence for drug-dependent antibodies (DDABs) to GP IIb/IIIa in 5 of 6 subjects, suggestive of an immune etiology of thrombocytopenia. The hypothesis that excluding patients based on positive DDAB reaction would reduce the frequency of thrombocytopenia was tested. Patients were screened for DDABs during the study qualification period and, overall, 3.9% of the patients were excluded based on pre-existing DDAB concentrations above a statistically defined medical decision limit. An additional 2.6% were excluded based on therapy-related antibody production during the first 2 weeks. With antibody testing, 0.2% of patients (2 of 1044) developed immune-mediated thrombocytopenia. One case developed a rapidly increasing antibody concentration and presented with thrombocytopenia despite discontinuation of roxifiban therapy. The second case was related to a false-negative test result. The frequency of thrombocytopenia was statistically significantly reduced from 2% to 0.2% (P =.0007) comparing nonscreened and screened patients. Testing for DDABs can reduce the frequency of thrombocytopenia in patients treated with roxifiban and, by analogy, other GP IIb/IIIa antagonists. Thus, DDAB testing may be employed to increase the safety of GP IIb/IIIa antagonists.

  12. Opioid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Stein, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are the oldest and most potent drugs for the treatment of severe pain. Their clinical application is undisputed in acute (e.g., postoperative) and cancer pain, but their long-term use in chronic pain has met increasing scrutiny. This article reviews mechanisms underlying opioid analgesia and other opioid actions. It discusses the structure, function, and plasticity of opioid receptors; the central and peripheral sites of analgesic actions and side effects; endogenous and exogenous opioid receptor ligands; and conventional and novel opioid compounds. Challenging clinical situations, such as the tension between chronic pain and addiction, are also illustrated.

  13. Daily Pomegranate Intake Has No Impact on PSA Levels in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer - Results of a Phase IIb Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stenner-Liewen, Frank; Liewen, Heike; Cathomas, Richard; Renner, Christoph; Petrausch, Ulf; Sulser, Tullio; Spanaus, Katharina; Seifert, Hans Helge; Strebel, Räto Thomas; Knuth, Alexander; Samaras, Panagiotis; Müntener, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Pomegranate has been shown to prolong PSA doubling time in early prostate cancer, but no data from a placebo controlled trial has been published yet. The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the impact of pomegranate juice in patients with prostate cancer. We conducted a phase IIb, double blinded, randomized placebo controlled trial in patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer. Only patients with a PSA value ≥ 5ng/ml were included. The subjects consumed 500 ml of pomegranate juice or 500 ml of placebo beverage every day for a 4 week period. Thereafter, all patients received 250 ml of the pomegranate juice daily for another 4 weeks. PSA values were taken at baseline, day 14, 28 and on day 56. The primary endpoint was the detection of a significant difference in PSA serum levels between the groups after one month of treatment. Pain scores and adherence to intervention were recorded using patient diaries. 102 patients were enrolled. The majority of patients had castration resistant prostate cancer (68%). 98 received either pomegranate juice or placebo between October 2008 and May 2011. Adherence to protocol was good, with 94 patients (96%) completing the first period and 87 patients (89%) completing both periods. No grade 3 or higher toxicities occurred within the study. No differences were detected between the two groups with regard to PSA kinetics and pain scores. Consumption of pomegranate juice as an adjunct intervention in men with advanced prostate cancer does not result in significant PSA declines compared to placebo. PMID:24069070

  14. Daily Pomegranate Intake Has No Impact on PSA Levels in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer - Results of a Phase IIb Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Stenner-Liewen, Frank; Liewen, Heike; Cathomas, Richard; Renner, Christoph; Petrausch, Ulf; Sulser, Tullio; Spanaus, Katharina; Seifert, Hans Helge; Strebel, Räto Thomas; Knuth, Alexander; Samaras, Panagiotis; Müntener, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Pomegranate has been shown to prolong PSA doubling time in early prostate cancer, but no data from a placebo controlled trial has been published yet. The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the impact of pomegranate juice in patients with prostate cancer. We conducted a phase IIb, double blinded, randomized placebo controlled trial in patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer. Only patients with a PSA value ≥ 5ng/ml were included. The subjects consumed 500 ml of pomegranate juice or 500 ml of placebo beverage every day for a 4 week period. Thereafter, all patients received 250 ml of the pomegranate juice daily for another 4 weeks. PSA values were taken at baseline, day 14, 28 and on day 56. The primary endpoint was the detection of a significant difference in PSA serum levels between the groups after one month of treatment. Pain scores and adherence to intervention were recorded using patient diaries. 102 patients were enrolled. The majority of patients had castration resistant prostate cancer (68%). 98 received either pomegranate juice or placebo between October 2008 and May 2011. Adherence to protocol was good, with 94 patients (96%) completing the first period and 87 patients (89%) completing both periods. No grade 3 or higher toxicities occurred within the study. No differences were detected between the two groups with regard to PSA kinetics and pain scores. Consumption of pomegranate juice as an adjunct intervention in men with advanced prostate cancer does not result in significant PSA declines compared to placebo.

  15. Optimal pathological response indicated better long-term outcome among patients with stage IB2 to IIB cervical cancer submitted to neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kecheng; Sun, Haiying; Chen, Zhilan; Li, Xiong; Wang, ShaoShuai; Zhao, Xiaolin; Tang, Fangxu; Jia, Yao; Hu, Ting; Du, Xiaofang; Wang, Haoran; Lu, Zhiyong; Huang, Jia; Gui, Juan; Wang, Xiaoli; Zhou, Shasha; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Jincheng; Guo, Lili; Yang, Ru; Shen, Jian; Zhang, Qinghua; Li, Shuang; Wang, Shixuan

    2016-01-01

    The role of pathological response in long-term outcome is still unclear in cervical cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in China. This study aimed to investigate the effect of optimal pathologic response (OPR) on survival in the patients treated with NACT and radical hysterectomy. First, 853 patients with stage IB2-IIB cervical cancer were included in a retrospective analysis; a Cox proportional hazards model was used to investigate the relationship between pathological response and disease-free survival (DFS). In the retrospective database, 64 (7.5%) patients were found to have achieved an OPR (residual disease <3 mm stromal invasion); in the multivariate Cox model, the risk of death was much greater in the non-OPR group than in the OPR group (HR, 2.61; 95%CI, 1.06 to 6.45; P = 0.037). Next, the role of OPR was also evaluated in a prospective cohort of 603 patients with cervical cancer. In the prospective cohort, 56 (9.3%) patients were found to have achieved an OPR; the log-rank tests showed that the risk of recurrence was higher in the non-OPR patients than in the OPR group (P = 0.05). After combined analysis, OPR in cervical cancer was found to be an independent prognostic factor for DFS. PMID:27325186

  16. Prolonged C2 spinal hemisection-induced inactivity reduces diaphragm muscle specific force with modest, selective atrophy of type IIx and/or IIb fibers.

    PubMed

    Mantilla, Carlos B; Greising, Sarah M; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Seven, Yasin B; Sieck, Gary C

    2013-02-01

    The diaphragm muscle (DIAm) is critically responsible for sustaining ventilation. Previously we showed in a commonly used model of spinal cord injury, unilateral spinal cord hemisection at C(2) (SH), that there are minimal changes to muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) and fiber type distribution following 14 days of SH-induced ipsilateral DIAm inactivity. In the present study, effects of long-term SH-induced inactivity on DIAm fiber size and force were examined. We hypothesized that prolonged inactivity would not result in substantial DIAm atrophy or force loss. Adult rats were randomized to control or SH groups (n = 34 total). Chronic bilateral DIAm electromyographic (EMG) activity was monitored during resting breathing. Minimal levels of spontaneous recovery of ipsilateral DIAm EMG activity were evident in 42% of SH rats (<25% of preinjury root mean square amplitude). Following 42 days of SH, DIAm specific force was reduced 39%. There was no difference in CSA for type I or IIa DIAm fibers in SH rats compared with age, weight-matched controls (classification based on myosin heavy chain isoform expression). Type IIx and/or IIb DIAm fibers displayed a modest 20% reduction in CSA (P < 0.05). Overall, there were no differences in the distribution of fiber types or the contribution of each fiber type to the total DIAm CSA. These data indicate that reduced specific force following prolonged inactivity of the DIAm is associated with modest, fiber type selective adaptations in muscle fiber size and fiber type distribution.

  17. Are We Appropriately Selecting Therapy For Patients With Cervical Cancer? Longitudinal Patterns-of-Care Analysis for Stage IB-IIB Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Julie A.; Rusthoven, Chad; DeWitt, Peter E.; Davidson, Susan A.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: We performed a patterns-of-care analysis evaluating the effects of newer technology and recent research findings on treatment decisions over 26 years to determine whether patients with cervical cancer are being appropriately selected for treatment to optimize the therapeutic ratio. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was conducted using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program from 1983 to 2009. We identified 10,933 women with stage IB-IIB cervical carcinoma. Results: Of the 10,933 subjects identified, 40.1% received surgery, 26.8% received radiation (RT), and 33.1% received surgery plus RT. RT use increased after 2000 compared to prior to 2000, with a corresponding decrease in surgery and surgery plus RT. Among patients with risk factors including tumor size >4 cm, positive parametria, and positive lymph nodes, declining use of surgery plus RT was observed. However, 23% of patients with tumors >4 cm, 20% of patients with positive parametria, and 55% of node-positive patients continued to receive surgery plus RT as of 2009. Factors associated with increased use of surgery plus RT included patient age <50 and node-positive status. Conclusions: In this largest patterns-of-care analysis to date for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, we found a substantial proportion of patients continue to undergo surgery followed by radiation, despite randomized data supporting the use of definitive radiation therapy, with lower morbidity than surgery and radiation.

  18. Involvement of integrins alpha(3)beta(1) and alpha(5)beta(1) and glycoprotein IIb in megakaryocyte-induced osteoblast proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Justin M; Horowitz, Mark C; Kacena, Melissa A

    2010-04-01

    As the prevalence of osteoporosis is expected to increase over the next few decades, the development of novel therapeutic strategies to combat this disorder becomes clinically imperative. These efforts draw extensively from an expanding body of knowledge pertaining to the physiologic mechanisms of skeletal homeostasis. To this body of knowledge, we contribute that cells of hematopoietic lineage may play a crucial role in balancing osteoblastic bone formation against osteoclastic resorption. Specifically, our laboratory has previously demonstrated that megakaryocytes (MKs) can induce osteoblast (OB) proliferation in vitro, but do so only when direct cell-to-cell contact is permitted. To further investigate the nature of this interaction, we have effectively neutralized several adhesion molecules known to function in the analogous interaction of MKs with another cell type of mesenchymal origin-the fibroblast (FB). Our findings implicate the involvement of fibronectin/RGD-binding integrins including alpha3beta1 (VLA-3) and alpha5beta1 (VLA-5) as well as glycoprotein (gp) IIb (CD41), all of which are known to be expressed on MK membranes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that interleukin (IL)-3 can enhance MK-induced OB activation in vitro, as demonstrated in the MK-FB model system. Taken together, these results suggest that although their physiologic and clinical implications are very different, these two models of hematopoietic-mesenchymal cell activation are mechanistically analogous in several ways.

  19. The platelet fibrinogen receptor: an immunogold-surface replica study of agonist-induced ligand binding and receptor clustering

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Platelet aggregation requires the binding of fibrinogen to its receptor, a heterodimer consisting of the plasma-membrane glycoproteins (GP) IIb and IIIa. Although the GPIIb-IIIa complex is present on the surface of unstimulated platelets, it binds fibrinogen only after platelet activation. We have used an immunogold-surface replica technique to study the distribution of GPIIb-IIIa and bound fibrinogen over broad areas of surface membranes in unstimulated, as well as thrombin-activated and ADP-activated human platelets. We found that the immunogold-labeled GPIIb-IIIa was monodispersed over the surface of unstimulated platelets, although the cell surface lacked immunoreactive fibrinogen. On thrombin-stimulated platelets, approximately 65% of the GPIIb-IIIa molecules were in clusters within the plane of the membrane. Fibrinogen, which had been released from the alpha-granules of these cells, bound to GPIIb-IIIa on the cell surface and was similarly clustered. To determine whether the receptors clustered before ligand binding, or as a consequence thereof, we studied the surface distribution of GPIIb-IIIa after stimulation with ADP, which causes activation of the fibrinogen receptor function of GPIIb-IIIa without inducing the release of fibrinogen. In the absence of added fibrinogen, the unoccupied, yet binding-competent receptors on ADP-stimulated platelets were monodispersed. The addition of fibrinogen caused the GPIIb-IIIa molecules to cluster on the cell surface. Clustering was also induced by the addition of the GPIIb-IIIa-binding domains of fibrinogen, namely the tetrapeptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser on the alpha-chain or the gamma-chain decapeptide gamma 402-411. These results show that receptor occupancy causes clustering of GPIIb-IIIa in activated platelets. PMID:3584243

  20. Roundabout receptors.

    PubMed

    Ypsilanti, Athéna R; Chedotal, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Roundabout receptors (Robo) and their Slit ligands were discovered in the 1990s and found to be key players in axon guidance. Slit was initially described s an extracellular matrix protein that was expressed by midline glia in Drosophila. A few years later, it was shown that, in vertebrates and invertebrates, Slits acted as chemorepellents for axons crossing the midline. Robo proteins were originally discovered in Drosophila in a mutant screen for genes involved in the regulation of midline crossing. This ligand-receptor pair has since been implicated in a variety of other neuronal and non-neuronal processes ranging from cell migration to angiogenesis, tumourigenesis and even organogenesis of tissues such as kidneys, lungs and breasts.