Science.gov

Sample records for activities case studies

  1. Gang Activity on Campus: A Crisis Response Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Mahauganee; Meaney, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This case study challenges readers to consider a contemporary issue for campus threat assessment and emergency preparedness: gang presence on college campuses. A body of research examining the presence of gangs and gang activity on college campuses has developed, revealing that gangs pose a viable threat for institutions of higher education. The…

  2. Active Ageing and Active Citizenship in Liguria: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palumbo, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Liguria has the oldest age structure in Europe because of a low birth rate and long lifespans and therefore is a very interesting laboratory region in which to experiment with active ageing policies. The generations that are now approaching retirement hold a high level of personal and professional resources; so the "new" elderly people…

  3. Web-Enhanced Case-Based Activity in Teacher Education: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hyeonjin; Hannafin, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent work in case-based reasoning (CBR) reinforces the importance of situated learning, expert cases, and authentic tasks and activities for novice learners. As novices engage CBR environments, they apprentice in the experts' practices while developing the understanding, knowledge and skill of a given community. This study examined how…

  4. Models Role within Active Learning in Biology. A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pop-Pacurar, Irina; Tirla, Felicia-Doina

    2009-01-01

    In order to integrate ideas and information creatively, to motivate students and activate their thinking, we have used in Biology classes a series of active methods, among which the methods of critical thinking, which had very good results. Still, in the case of some intuitive, abstract, more difficult topics, such as the cell structure,…

  5. Incorporating Active Learning with Videos: A Case Study from Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kester J.; Sharma, Manjula D.

    2008-01-01

    Watching a video often results in passive learning and does not actively engage students. In this study, a class of 20 HSC Physics students were introduced to a teaching model that incorporated active learning principles with the watching of a video that explored the Meissner Effect and superconductors. Students would watch short sections of the…

  6. GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION AND INFRARED REACTIVATION: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study evaluated the effectiveness and cost of removing trace organic contaminants and surrogates from drinking water by granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption. The effect of multiple reactivations of spent GAC was also evaluated. Results indicated that reactivated GAC eff...

  7. Promoting Physical Activity in Girls: A Case Study of One School's Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felton, Gwen; Saunders, Ruth P.; Ward, Dianne S.; Dishman, Rod K.; Dowda, Marsha; Pate, Russell R.

    2005-01-01

    This case study profiles one of 24 high schools that participated in a school-based, NIH-funded study to increase physical activity among high school girls. The case study school was one of 12 randomly assigned to the intervention group. The study intervention was based on the premise that a successful intervention is developed and tailored by…

  8. Case study of a complex active-region filament eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X. L.; Qu, Z. Q.; Kong, D. F.; Deng, L. H.; Xue, Z. K.

    2013-09-01

    Context. We investigated a solar active-region filament eruption associated with a C6.6 class flare and a coronal mass ejection (CME) in NOAA active region 08858 on 2000 February 9. Aims: We aim to better understand the relationship between filament eruptions and the associated flares and CMEs. Methods: Using BBSO, SOHO/EIT, and TRACE observational data, we analyzed the process of the active-region filament eruption in the chromosphere and the corona. Using the SOHO/MDI magnetograms, we investigated the change of the magnetic fields in the photosphere. Using the GOES soft X-ray flux and the SOHO/LASCO images, we identified the flare and CME, which were associated with this active-region filament eruption. Results: The brightenings in the chromosphere are a precursor of the filament expansion. The eruption itself can be divided into four phases: In the initial phase, the intertwined bright and dark strands of the filament expand. Then, the bright strands are divided into three parts with different expansion velocity. Next, the erupting filament-carrying flux rope expands rapidly and combines with the lower part of the expanding bright strands. Finally, the filament erupts accompanied by other dark strands overlying the filament.The overlying magnetic loops and the expansion of the filament strands can change the direction of the eruption. Conclusions: The time delay between the velocity peaks of the filament and that of the two parts of the bright strands clearly demonstrates that the breakup of the bright loops tying on the filament into individual strands is important for its eruption. The eruption is a collection of multiple processes that are physically coupled rather than a single process.

  9. A Case Study of a Girls' Exergaming Physical Activity Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Yoonsin

    2012-01-01

    Girls 6 to 19 years old have the highest rates of obesity with about thirty percent being obese in the US (Ogden et al., 2006). Researchers studying the prevention of childhood obesity are examining exergames because playing video games is popular among youth (Rideout, Foehr, & Roberts, 2010). Recent research has mainly focused on energy…

  10. Parental Involvement in Active Transport to School Initiatives: A Multi-Site Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyler, Amy; Baldwin, Julie; Carnoske, Cheryl; Nickelson, Jan; Troped, Philip; Steinman, Lesley; Pluto, Delores; Litt, Jill; Evenson, Kelly; Terpstra, Jennifer; Brownson, Ross; Schmid, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Background: Increasing physical activity in youth is a recommended approach to curbing the childhood obesity epidemic. One way to help increase children's daily activity is to promote active transportation to and from school (ATS). Purpose: The purpose of this case study was to explore parental perception of, and participation in, ATS initiatives.…

  11. A Tale of 2 Teachers: A Preschool Physical Activity Intervention Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howie, Erin K.; Brewer, Alisa E.; Dowda, Marsha; McIver, Kerry L.; Saunders, Ruth P.; Pate, Russell R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Preschool settings vary greatly, and research has shown that interventions are more successful when they can be adapted to individual settings. This is a descriptive case study of how 2 teachers successfully adapted and implemented a preschool physical activity intervention. Methods: The Study of Health and Activity in Preschool…

  12. Towards Active Learning: A Case Study on Active Learning in a Small Rural School in Finland. Research [Report].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimonen, Eija; Nevalainen, Raimo

    As part of an international comparative study of active learning in seven countries, a case study examined active learning practices of students and teachers in a small rural school in Finland. Small schools have traditionally existed in the sparsely populated Finnish countryside, and 60 percent of Finnish elementary schools have 1-3 teachers.…

  13. An Evaluation of a Constructivist Online Collaborative Learning Activity: A Case Study on Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choo, Koo Ah; Eshaq, Ahmad Rafi Mohamed; Samsudin, Khairul Anuar; Guru, Balachandher Krishnan

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports a case study which involved 32 secondary school students participating in an online collaborative learning (OCL) activity known as Diary of Discovering Geometry. This activity aimed to explore the real contents in the learners' surrounding for discovering the spatial concepts and the applications of geometry. The purpose of the…

  14. Case Study of an Institutionalized Urban Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Sarah A.; Rukavina, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    This single case study (Yin, 2009) compares an established urban physical education/ sport/physical activity program with two models: Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program/CSPAP (AAHPERD, 2013; CDC, 2013); and Lawson's propositions (2005) for sport, exercise and physical education for empowerment and community development to…

  15. Physical Activity Promotion in General Practices of Barcelona: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puig Ribera, Anna; McKenna, Jim; Riddoch, Chris

    2006-01-01

    This case study aimed to generate explanations for the lack of integration of physical activity (PA) promotion in general practices of Barcelona, the capital of Catalonia. This explanatory study adopted a qualitative approach, based on three techniques; focus groups (n = 3), semi-structured (n = 25) and short individual interviews (n = 5). These…

  16. Purposeful activity for people with enduring mental health problems: reflections from a case study.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, D

    1998-10-01

    The desire to work is deeply rooted in the human psyche and involves both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. If this is indeed the case, then this form of human activity should be considered to be an important element of our lives and therefore worthy of intervention when circumstances restrict an individual's engagement with it. To investigate the therapeutic nature of work for people with enduring mental health problems, the author conducted a pilot case study of a work rehabilitation scheme in the United Kingdom. The main theme to emerge from the study was that of purposeful activity. PMID:9793215

  17. Answering the Call for Accountability: An Activity and Cost Analysis Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carducci, Rozana; Kisker, Carrie B.; Chang, June; Schirmer, James

    2007-01-01

    This article summarizes the findings of a case study on the creation and application of an activity-based cost accounting model that links community college salary expenditures to mission-critical practices within academic divisions of a southern California community college. Although initially applied as a financial management tool in private…

  18. University Student Agency, Representation, and Activism: A Case Study of Students Studying English at Universite Cheikh Anta Diop (Dakar, Senegal)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stafford, Casey

    2012-01-01

    This study explores and interrogates dominant representations of African university students by examining how students conceptualize and act upon their own agency. Using a qualitative case-study approach, the author examines how students actively confront the ideological and material conditions presented by schooling. [The dissertation citations…

  19. Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Lois A., Ed.; Sue, Valerie M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents two case studies using online surveys for evaluation. The authors begin with an example of a needs assessment survey designed to measure the amount of help new students at a university require in their first year. They then discuss the follow-up survey conducted by the same university to measure the effectiveness of the…

  20. Active Bodies, Active Minds: A Case Study on Physical Activity and Academic Success in Lawrence, Massachusetts. Understanding Boston

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacheck, Jennifer; Wright, Catherine; Chomitz, Virginia; Chui, Kenneth; Economos, Christina; Schultz, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    This case study addresses two major priorities of the Boston Foundation--health and education. Since the 2007 publication of the "Understanding Boston" report "The Boston Paradox: Lots of Health Care, Not Enough Health," the Boston Foundation has worked to draw attention to the epidemic of preventable chronic disease that not…

  1. Exploratory qualitative case study of lab-type activity interactions in an online graduate geoscience course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciavarella, Veronica C.

    This exploratory qualitative case study investigated the use of lab-type activities in an online graduate geoscience course. Constructivism is the theoretical framework used to explain how learning happens in lab-type activity, and provided the goals to which successful learning in lab-type activity is compared. This study focused on the learner-instructor, learner-learner, and perceptions of the learner-content interactions that occurred related to lab-type activities in an online graduate geoscience course to determine: if the instructor appeared as a facilitator of the learning process in the interactions over the activities; if students engaged in discussion and reflection about the activities; if students perceived the activities as meaningful and authentic; and if students perceived using higher order thinking and prior knowledge while interacting with the content. Ten graduate students from three offerings of the course participated in this study, as well as the instructor and designer of the course content and lab-type activities. Data were collected through interviews, and observation and analysis of the lab-type activities, instructor feedback to students in their graded activities, and discussion that occurred between the instructor and students and among students about the lab-type activities in discussion forums. The nature of the instructor's interactions in discussion forums, in feedback to students on graded activities, and reported by students' in interviews supported that, in the learner-instructor interactions, the instructor of this course was a facilitator who guided and scaffolded the students towards successfully completing the activities. Students engaged in discussion and reflected on the activities, but most learner-learner interactions in discussion forums about the lab-type activities appeared to occur for the purpose of comparison of results, support, and empathy. Students' success at higher order thinking type questions in lab

  2. Participation in play activities: a single-case study focusing on a child with obesity experiences.

    PubMed

    Skär, Lisa; Prellwitz, Maria

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how a child with obesity perceived participation in play activities. A single-case study design was chosen to optimize the understanding of the complexities of the research question. A 9-year-old boy diagnosed with obesity was studied. This is a typical case and is studied mainly to provide understanding to the issue. The data were collected from interviews with the boy, his mother and his teacher. Data were also collected through observations and a self-report assessment instrument called Kid Play Profile. The results showed that the boy was ridiculed by his peers and that at times he felt excluded from them, which prevented him from participating in play activities. The boy's experience came from different perceived problems such as lack of friends to play with, his inability to know how to perform in different play activities, and lack of proper support and encouragement from adults. Supporting children to overcome social skills deficits could prevent them from being teased and may have a positive effect on health. To optimize children's participation in play activities, it is important for adults to give them proper support and encouragement. The results were discussed with regard to earlier research, and topics for further research are suggested. PMID:18489691

  3. Fine Motor Activities Program to Promote Fine Motor Skills in a Case Study of Down's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lersilp, Suchitporn; Putthinoi, Supawadee; Panyo, Kewalin

    2016-01-01

    Children with Down's syndrome have developmental delays, particularly regarding cognitive and motor development. Fine motor skill problems are related to motor development. They have impact on occupational performances in school-age children with Down's syndrome because they relate to participation in school activities, such as grasping, writing, and carrying out self-care duties. This study aimed to develop a fine motor activities program and to examine the efficiency of the program that promoted fine motor skills in a case study of Down's syndrome. The case study subject was an 8 -year-old male called Kai, who had Down's syndrome. He was a first grader in a regular school that provided classrooms for students with special needs. This study used the fine motor activities program with assessment tools, which included 3 subtests of the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, second edition (BOT-2) that applied to Upper-limb coordination, Fine motor precision and Manual dexterity; as well as the In-hand Manipulation Checklist, and Jamar Hand Dynamometer Grip Test. The fine motor activities program was implemented separately and consisted of 3 sessions of 45 activities per week for 5 weeks, with each session taking 45 minutes. The results showed obvious improvement of fine motor skills, including bilateral hand coordination, hand prehension, manual dexterity, in-hand manipulation, and hand muscle strength. This positive result was an example of a fine motor intervention program designed and developed for therapists and related service providers in choosing activities that enhance fine motor skills in children with Down's syndrome. PMID:27357876

  4. High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Studies of Active Faults: a Case Study from Washington State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberty, L. M.; Pratt, T. L.

    2007-12-01

    In the past five years, new high-resolution seismic surveys have filled in gaps in our understanding of active structures beneath the Puget Lowland region of Washington State. The extensive forests have made recognition of active faults difficult, but new Light Distance and Ranging (LIDAR) detailed topographic data have made a major breakthrough in mapping active faults. Extensive regional and high-resolution marine seismic surveys have been fundamental to understanding the tectonic framework of the area. These marine profiles, however, lack coverage beneath water bodies that large ships cannot navigate and beneath city streets underlain by late Pleistocene glacial deposits that are missing from the waterways. Recent land surveys and profiles in restricted waterways can therefore bridge the gap between paleoseismic and marine geophysical studies, and test elements of models proposed by regional-scale geophysical studies. We have also been venturing into more congested areas to seismically image faults in key urban locations. Results from recent surveys have: 1) documented new faults that had long been suspected in the Olympia area; 2) clarified the relationship between the LIDAR scarps and observed structures across the Tacoma fault zone; 3) provided a window into structures beneath the north and eastern portions of the western Tacoma fault zone; 4) documented deformation along the Seattle fault near a paleoseismic trench; 5) mapped the eastern part the Seattle fault zone beyond its previously mapped limits; and 6) documented multiple fault strands in the Seattle fault zone in the cities of Bellevue and Seattle. The results better constrain interpretations of paleoseismic data collected on these faults, and provide targets for future paleoseismic studies.

  5. Neural Changes following Behavioral Activation for a Depressed Breast Cancer Patient: A Functional MRI Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Gawrysiak, Michael J.; Carvalho, John P.; Rogers, Baxter P.; Nicholas, Christopher R. N.; Dougherty, John H.; Hopko, Derek R.

    2012-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging is an innovative but at this stage underutilized method to assess the efficacy of psychotherapy for depression. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used in this case study to examine changes in brain activity in a depressed breast cancer patient receiving an 8-session Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD), based on the work of Hopko and Lejuez (2007). A music listening paradigm was used during fMRI brain scans to assess reward responsiveness at pre- and posttreatment. Following treatment, the patient exhibited attenuated depression and changes in blood oxygenation level dependence (BOLD) response in regions of the prefrontal cortex and the subgenual cingulate cortex. These preliminary findings outline a novel means to assess psychotherapy efficacy and suggest that BATD elicits functional brain changes in areas implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. Further research is necessary to explore neurobiological mechanisms of change in BATD, particularly the potential mediating effects of reward responsiveness and associated brain functioning. PMID:22953146

  6. Teaching with the Case Study Method to Promote Active Learning in a Small Molecule Crystallography Course for Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Michael G.; Powers, Tamara M.; Zheng, Shao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Implementing the case study method in a practical X-ray crystallography course designed for graduate or upper-level undergraduate chemistry students is described. Compared with a traditional lecture format, assigning small groups of students to examine literature case studies encourages more active engagement with the course material and…

  7. Policies related to active transport to and from school: a multisite case study.

    PubMed

    Eyler, Amy A; Brownson, Ross C; Doescher, Mark P; Evenson, Kelly R; Fesperman, Carrie E; Litt, Jill S; Pluto, Delores; Steinman, Lesley E; Terpstra, Jennifer L; Troped, Philip J; Schmid, Thomas L

    2008-12-01

    Active transportation to and from school (ATS) is a viable strategy to help increase physical activity among youth. ATS can be challenging because initiatives require transdisciplinary collaboration, are influenced by the built environment and are affected by numerous policies. The purpose of this study is to identify policies and factors that influence ATS initiatives. Nine elementary schools in seven states participated in this case study. Sixty-nine stakeholders were interviewed. The interviews were transcribed, coded and analyzed using a master thematic codebook. This study identified two distinct aspects of policies: 'influential factors' which are factors that might impact policies related to ATS and 'policy actions' which are policies reported by people involved in ATS initiatives that directly affected their success. Influential factors included sidewalks, crosswalks/crossing guards, funding, personal safety concerns, advocacy group involvement and others. Policy actions included policies on school speed zone, drop-off, no-transport zones, school siting, school start/dismissal time and school choice. Despite the diversity of the schools studied, similarities included influence of built environment, safety concerns, funding and transdisciplinary collaboration. Stakeholders need to work together to stimulate action and ensure successful initiatives. Influential factors appear to be important to this process. PMID:17956883

  8. Conducting an Introductory Biology Course in an Active Learning Classroom: A Case Study of an Experienced Faculty Member

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langley, David; Guzey, S. Selcen

    2014-01-01

    A case study is described that examines the beliefs and practices of a university instructor who teaches regularly in an active learning classroom. His perspective provides insights into the pedagogical practices that drive his success in these learning spaces.

  9. Erosional flux from tectonically active landscapes: Case studies from Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roda-Boluda, Duna; D'Arcy, Mitch; Whittaker, Alex; Allen, Philip; Gheorghiu, Delia; Rodes, Angel

    2016-04-01

    Erosion and sediment supply are fundamentally important controls on landscape evolution, governing the denudation of relief, the stratigraphy deposited in basins, and the ultimate destruction of orogens. However, quantifying the rates, timescales, and predominant processes of erosion remains a major challenge in many tectonically active areas. Here, we use Southern Italy as a case study to demonstrate how these challenges can be overcome. We present 15 new 10Be catchment-averaged erosion rates, for systems distributed along 5 active normal faults for which we have excellent constraints on throw rates along strike and uplift history. These footwall catchments have a total relief of up to 1800 m and throw rates up to 1.4 mm/yr. We show that sediment supply estimates based on the 10Be erosion rates agree well with sediment supply predictions based on the fault throw profiles. Our results suggest that about 80% of the material uplifted by the faults is being eroded at a similar magnitude to the fault throw rates, offering new insights into the topographic balance of uplift and erosion in this area. These findings imply that active normal faulting is the primary control on sediment supply in Southern Italy. Our field observations suggest that landslides are an important source of sediment in our study area, and are largely driven by incision in response to fault activity. Using a field-calibrated landslide inventory, we estimate landslide-derived sediment flux for our sampled catchments. These estimates correlate well with total sediment flux estimates, demonstrating quantitatively that landslides must be a major source of sediment. Their erosional signal is adequately captured by the 10Be analyses most likely because of the high frequency of small landslides and their high spatial density in these catchments (typically >10% of the total area), which ensures sufficient sediment mixing. Finally, we use our results to calibrate the BQART model of sediment supply, enabling

  10. Analyzing the Roles, Activities, and Skills of Learning Technologists: A Case Study from City University London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Olivia; Sumner, Neal

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a case study carried out at City University London into the role of learning technologists. The article examines how the role developed by providing points of comparison with a report on the career development of learning technology staff in UK universities in 2001. This case study identified that learning technologists…

  11. Case Study: Testing with Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2015-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue discusses using case studies to test for knowledge or lessons learned.

  12. Risk assessment of oil and gas well drilling activities in Iran - a case study: human factors.

    PubMed

    Amir-Heidari, Payam; Farahani, Hadi; Ebrahemzadih, Mehrzad

    2015-01-01

    Oil and gas well drilling activities are associated with numerous hazards which have the potential to cause injury or harm for people, property and the environment. These hazards are also a threat for the reputation of drilling companies. To prevent accidents and undesired events in drilling operations it is essential to identify, evaluate, assess and control the attendant risks. In this work, a structured methodology is proposed for risk assessment of drilling activities. A case study is performed to identify, analyze and assess the risks arising from human factors in one of the on shore drilling sites in southern Iran. A total of 17 major hazards were identified and analyzed using the proposed methodology. The results showed that the residual risks of 100% of these hazards were in the acceptable or transitional zone, and their levels were expected to be lowered further by proper controls. This structured methodology may also be used in other drilling sites and companies for assessing the risks. PMID:26333832

  13. Using Photographs as Case Studies to Promote Active Learning in Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krauss, David A.; Salame, Issa I.; Goodwyn, Lauren N.

    2010-01-01

    If a picture is worth a thousand words, think about how long it takes your students to read a thousand words. Case studies are effective and stimulating ways to teach a variety of subjects, including the biological sciences. In learning the details of a particular case, students develop skills in both deductive and inductive reasoning, hypothesis…

  14. Using Disability Studies Theory to Change Disability Services: A Case Study in Student Activism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cory, Rebecca C.; White, Julia M.; Stuckey, Zosha

    2010-01-01

    In 2001, a group of student activists at Syracuse University started an organization called the Beyond Compliance Coordinating Committee (BCCC). The BCCC activists used disability studies theory to engage the campus in conversations about disability and inform significant change in the way Syracuse administration think about disability. This paper…

  15. Trajectory Hunting: A Case Study of Rapid Chlorine Activation in December 1992 as Seen by UARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, M. Y.; Santee, M. L.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Mergenthaler, J. M.; Kumer, J. B.; Tabazadeh, A.; Livesey, N. J.

    2000-01-01

    Trajectory hunting (i.e., a technique to find air parcels sampled at least twice over the course of a few days) is applied to analyze Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) measurements in conjunction with the Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) photochemical box model. As a case study, we investigate rapid chlorine activation in the Arctic lower stratosphere on December 29, 1992 associated with a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) event. Eleven air parcels that have been sampled several times along five-day trajectories at the 465 K (approx. 46 hPa), 520 K (approx. 31 hPa), and 585 K (approx. 22 hPa) levels were investigated. For the first time, the latest versions of the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES, version 9) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS, version 5) data sets are analyzed, and their consistency is assessed. A detailed sensitivity study with the AER photochemical box model along these trajectories leads to the conclusion that for the December 24-29, 1992 episode: (1) the individual CLAES ClONO2 and MLS ClO measurements are self-consistent within their uncertainties; and (2) most of the time, UARS measurements of ClO, ClONO2, HNO3, and aerosol extinction at 780 cm(exp -1) agree within the range of their uncertainties with the model calculations. It appears that the HNO3 and aerosol extinction measurements for four parcels at 520 K look more supportive for the nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) scheme, However, the uncertainties in the individual UARS measurements and UK Meteorological Office temperature do not allow a definite discrimination between the NAT and supercooled ternary solution (STS) PSC schemes for this chlorine activation episode in December 1992.

  16. Trajectory Hunting: A Case Study of Rapid Chlorine Activation in December 1992 as Seen by UARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, M. Y.; Santee, M. L.; Rodriquez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Mergenthaler, J. M.; Kumer, J. B.; Tabazadeh, A.; Livesey

    2000-01-01

    Trajectory hunting (i.e., a technique to find air parcels sampled at least twice over the course of a few days) is applied to analyze Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) measurements in conjunction with the Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) photochemical box model. As a case study, we investigate rapid chlorine activation in the Arctic lower stratosphere on December 29, 1992 associated with a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) event. Eleven air parcels that have been sampled several times along 5-day trajectories at the 465 K (approx. 46 hPa), 520 K (approx. 31 hPa), and 585 K (approx. 22 hPa) levels were investigated. For the first time, the latest versions of the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES, version 9) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS, version 5) data sets are analyzed, and their consistency is assessed. A detailed sensitivity study with the AER photochemical box model along these trajectories leads to the conclusion that for the December 24-29, 1992 episode (1) the individual CLAES version 9 ClONO2 and MLS version 5 ClO measurements are self-consistent within their uncertainties; and (2) most of the time, UARS measurements of ClO, ClONO2, HNO3, and aerosol extinction at 780 cm (exp -1) agree within the range of their uncertainties with the model calculations. It appears that the HNO3 and aerosol extinction measurements for four parcels at 520 K look more supportive for the nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) scheme. However, the uncertainties in the individual UARS measurements and U.K. Meteorological Office temperature do not allow a definite discrimination between the NAT and supercooled ternary solution (STS) PSC schemes for this chlorine activation episode in December 1992.

  17. Validation of MODIS and SEVIRI Active Fire Monitoring products over Western Romania. Case study: Arad County

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oanea, Lavinia; Alina Ristea, Mihaela

    2014-05-01

    At the national level, the issue of wildfire monitoring represents a long debated topic. However, in the present situation, fire management requires various improvements in terms of detection, monitoring and post-fire analysis. The objectives of this study are to validate the data provided by MODIS (Terra and Aqua) Active Fire Monitoring and SEVIRI (MSG) FIR (Active Fire Monitoring) satellite products, with wildfires field data from The Romanian General Inspectorate for Emergency Situations (IGSU) (1), to chart the efficiency of satellite products in locating fires and study their strengths and weaknesses using a SWOT analysis (2). This is the initial step of a larger project that aims to implement an online Geographic Information System for fire management that will ease wildfire data manipulation and facilitate the decision making process. In order to do so, the current study objectives must be achieved. Our general strategy is to determine the consistency of direct (field measurements) and indirect (satellite data) observations. Depending on the amount of field information, the fire characteristics (location, frequency, extension area, moment of occurrence, type of fire, and others) will be studied through a statistical analysis. The products show some peculiar restrictiveness like spatial and temporal resolution. Specifically, we will process and interpret satellite products to identify wildfires according to the data from IGSU using specialized software. The case study for the application of these procedures is a set of fire events from Arad county - Romania, that occurred between 2007 and 2013. In order to do so, it is important to compare results from different sensors with field information through various methods and to use only consistent results. The results will play an important role in achieving the above mentioned informational system, which will integrate field information, satellite data and values of parameters that influence the evolution of

  18. Analogue experiments applied to active tectonics studies: the case of seismogenic normal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seno, S.; Bonini, L.; Toscani, G.

    2010-12-01

    Lithosphere can be divided into three main zones as a function of increasing depth: an aseismic updip zone, the seismogenic zone and a deep aseismic zone. Identifying the location of these zones is a key goal to understand how a specific seismogenic fault works. The evaluation of the seismogenic structures potential in tectonically active regions needs an accurate knowledge of the geometries and kinematic of the faults. In many cases, large seismogenic faults are not clearly and unambiguously expressed at the surface, whereas in other regions with higher deformation rates a clear geological surface evidence is often associated with large earthquakes. Therefore, the characterization of the seismogenic faults and of their mutual interactions it is not always straightforward; in this case, analogue modeling can provide an independent and useful tool for the interpretation of the surface geological data. Analogue modeling applied to earthquake geology is a quite innovative technique: when combined with other datasets (e.g.: seismic tomography, seismic profiles, well-logging data, field geology, morphotectonic and palaeo-seismological data) it can provide significant insights on the long term (i.e. Quaternary) evolution of a seismogenic fault. We carried out a set of analogue models at 1 : 100,000 scale that reproduce in 2D a normal fault with a relatively low dip angle (45°-50°). In our experimental approach different materials have been used to simulate the three main zones in which the lithosphere is separated. Dry sand and wet clay simulate different mechanical behaviour of rocks during seismic cycle. The dry sand, with its negligible cohesion and ductility, represents brittle rocks that deformed by localized faulting during earthquakes. Wet clay, with its slightly greater cohesion and ductility, mimics aseismic updip zone. Glass microbeads simulate aseismic plastic zone. Preliminary results are highlighting a mutual control among the three analogue materials

  19. Analysis of Satellite Retreived Active-Passive Merged Soil Moisture Distribution: A Case Study Over India.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravorty, A.; Chahar, B. R.; Sharma, O. P.; Dhanya, C. T.

    2014-12-01

    Soil moisture is the source of water for evapotranspiration over the continents and it participates in both energy and water balance of the earth. Soil moisture participates in the energy cycle by managing the partitioning of the energy budget into latent and sensible heat, there by influencing the hydrological cycle. But to better understand the influence of soil moisture on the hydrological cycle, large scale monitoring is required. The objective of this study is to qualitatively analyze the active-passive merged soil moisture distribution, prepared under the ESA_CCI programme, against two AMSR-E soil moisture distributions, AMSR-E/NSIDC (National Snow and Ice Data Center) and AMSR-E/VUA(Virje Universiet Amstradam) and GLDAS_NOAH model simulations. The ESA_CCI soil moisture distribution is also compared with the GPCC monthly precipitation distribution to observe the representativeness of the precipitation seasonality in the satellite retrieved soil moisture. India has been selected as the study area, esp. the Central Indian region, as it has shown to be a soil moisture hot-spot for land-surface atmosphere interaction. The preliminary study show that both ESA_CCI and AMSR-E/VUA soil moisture distributions capture similar seasonal patterns in addition to processes like rainfall events and inter-annual variations. In addition to this it was also observed that the soil moisture distribution of ESA_CCI and AMSR-E/VUA are linearly related to each other for more than 50% of the land points. In case of ESA_CCI and AMSR-E/NSIDC, the soil moisture distributions are able to capture similar seasonal patterns but not the random events and they also do not show a strong linear relationship. We also analyze the effect of topography and vegetation distribution on the error charactristics of the satellite retrieved soil moisture distributions.

  20. Making a difference: Ten case studies of DSM/IRP interactive efforts and related advocacy group activities

    SciTech Connect

    English, M.; Schexnayder, S.; Altman, J.; Schweitzer, M.

    1994-03-01

    This report discusses the activities of organizations that seek to promote integrated resource planning and aggressive, cost-effective demand-side management by utilities. The activities of such groups -- here called energy efficiency advocacy groups (EEAGs) -- are examined in ten detailed am studies. Nine of the cases involve some form of interactive effort between investor-owned electric utilities and non-utility to develop policies, plans, or programs cooperatively. Many but not all of the interactive efforts examined are formal collaboratives. In addition, all ten cases include discussion of other EEAG activities, such as coalition-building, research, participation in statewide energy planning, and intervention in regulatory proceedings.

  1. Sport activity in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: A case study of a Paralympic swimmer.

    PubMed

    Vita, Giuseppe; La Foresta, Stefania; Russo, Massimo; Vita, Gian Luca; Messina, Sonia; Lunetta, Christian; Mazzeo, Anna

    2016-09-01

    This study reports the positive physical, emotional and psychosocial changes induced by sport activity in a Paralympic swimmer with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) type 4A. When we compared evaluations before initiating sport activity with those after five years of competitive activity, we found: i) increased proximal muscles strength of upper limbs; ii) augmented ability to propel wheelchair independently; iii) improved quality of life; iv) reduced trait anxiety and striking improvement of depression; v) enhanced self-esteem. Longitudinal studies in large cohorts to evaluate the positive effects of sport activity are needed to support provision of evidence-based advice to patients and families. PMID:27460291

  2. Sustaining Comprehensive Physical Activity Practice in Elementary School: A Case Study Applying Mixed Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjomsland, Hege Eikland

    2010-01-01

    This study examines an elementary school which during enrollment in the European Network of Health Promoting Schools, 1993-2003, and the Norwegian Physical Activity and Healthy Meals Project, 2004-2006, selected physical activity (PA) as a prioritized area. Survey data, school documents, and focus group data were collected and analyzed through a…

  3. EVALUATION OF AIRBORNE ASBESTOS CONCENTRATIONS BEFORE AND DURING AND O&M ACTIVITY: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current lack of information regarding the impact of O&M activities on the potential for asbestos exposure to building staff and occupants prompted this study. This report presents a statistical evaluation of airborne asbestos data collected before and during an O&M activity i...

  4. Perception of Physical Activity Participation of Chinese Female Graduate Students: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Zi; Cardinal, Bradley J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Chinese female international students (CFIS) have been identified as one of the least physically active groups in the United States. In an effort to better understand this situation, this study's purpose was to examine CFIS in American higher education in terms of the meaning they assigned to physical activity and facilitators and…

  5. Capacity Building as a Tool for Assessing Training and Development Activity: An Indian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnaveni, R.; Sripirabaa, B.

    2008-01-01

    In recognition of its increasing importance, many organizations make periodic assessments of their training and development activity. The objective of the present study was to extend the concept of capacity building to the assessment of training and development activity in an automobile component manufacturing organization, using a developed and…

  6. Decision-Making Styles of Active-Duty Police Officers: A Multiple-Case Occupational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Patrick Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the decision-making styles of active-duty police officers or what the consequences of not understanding those decision-making styles may be. The purpose of the study was to describe the demographics and decision-making profiles of active-duty police officers, as well as any relationships that may exist among these variables,…

  7. Policies Related to Active Transport to and from School: A Multisite Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyler, Amy A.; Brownson, Ross C.; Doescher, Mark P.; Evenson, Kelly R.; Fesperman, Carrie E.; Litt, Jill S.; Pluto, Delores; Steinman, Lesley E.; Terpstra, Jennifer L.; Troped, Philip J.; Schmid, Thomas L.

    2008-01-01

    Active transportation to and from school (ATS) is a viable strategy to help increase physical activity among youth. ATS can be challenging because initiatives require transdisciplinary collaboration, are influenced by the built environment and are affected by numerous policies. The purpose of this study is to identify policies and factors that…

  8. Who Will Present It during the Broadcast? A Case Study at a Daily Activity Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichenberg, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The present study is an investigation of a daily activity centre (DA). The overall aim was to build a grounded theory that could explain why this particular DA deviated from the norms of Swedish group homes and DAs described in previous studies. These studies have suggested that the staff stuck to old routines, such as letting the participants…

  9. A Case Study of Using Groupware To Support Collaborative Activities in a Distance Learning Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luetkehans, Lara M.

    This case study examined the ways a groupware tool, TWISTER (Talking - Writing - Information access - Solving problems with Technology for Education and Research), was used to create a learner-centered distance learning environment in a telecommunications in education class. Data were collected using learner participant surveys, observation field…

  10. A Voice-Activated, Interactive Videodisc Case Study for Use in the Medical School Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harless, William G.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The Technological Innovations in Medical Education (TIME) Project of the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications is exploring the use of interactive videodisc, microcomputer, and voice recognition technology to create interactive case studies of simulated patients to train second-year medical students in the introduction to…

  11. Older Workers in the 21st Century: Active and Educated, a Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besl, John R.; Kale, Balkrishna D.

    1996-01-01

    A case study of the Wisconsin labor market suggests that in future older adults will have higher educational attainment and labor force participation rates than today's older cohorts. Changes in retirement programs and greater growth in white-collar occupations and women's employment are some of the causal factors. (SK)

  12. Active Travel by Built Environment and Lifecycle Stage: Case Study of Osaka Metropolitan Area

    PubMed Central

    Waygood, E. Owen D.; Sun, Yilin; Letarte, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Active travel can contribute to physical activity achieved over a day. Previous studies have examined active travel associated with trips in various western countries, but few studies have examined this question for the Asian context. Japan has high levels of cycling, walking and public transport, similar to The Netherlands. Most studies have focused either on children or on adults separately, however, having children in a household will change the travel needs and wants of that household. Thus, here a household lifecycle stage approach is applied. Further, unlike many previous studies, the active travel related to public transport is included. Lastly, further to examining whether the built environment has an influence on the accumulation of active travel minutes, a binary logistic regression examines the built environment’s influence on the World Health Organization’s recommendations of physical activity. The findings suggest that there is a clear distinction between the urbanized centers and the surrounding towns and unurbanized areas. Further, active travel related to public transport trips is larger than pure walking trips. Females and children are more likely to achieve the WHO recommendations. Finally, car ownership is a strong negative influence. PMID:26694429

  13. Active Travel by Built Environment and Lifecycle Stage: Case Study of Osaka Metropolitan Area.

    PubMed

    Waygood, E Owen D; Sun, Yilin; Letarte, Laurence

    2015-12-01

    Active travel can contribute to physical activity achieved over a day. Previous studies have examined active travel associated with trips in various western countries, but few studies have examined this question for the Asian context. Japan has high levels of cycling, walking and public transport, similar to The Netherlands. Most studies have focused either on children or on adults separately, however, having children in a household will change the travel needs and wants of that household. Thus, here a household lifecycle stage approach is applied. Further, unlike many previous studies, the active travel related to public transport is included. Lastly, further to examining whether the built environment has an influence on the accumulation of active travel minutes, a binary logistic regression examines the built environment's influence on the World Health Organization's recommendations of physical activity. The findings suggest that there is a clear distinction between the urbanized centers and the surrounding towns and unurbanized areas. Further, active travel related to public transport trips is larger than pure walking trips. Females and children are more likely to achieve the WHO recommendations. Finally, car ownership is a strong negative influence. PMID:26694429

  14. Case Study: Writing a Journal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prud'homme-Genereux, Annie

    2016-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue describes incorporating a journal article into the classroom by first converting it into a case study.

  15. Promotion and support of physical activity in elderly patients on hemodialysis: a case study.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Kotomi; Hashimoto, Toshihiko

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to ascertain the optimum strategy for implementing a physical activity intervention in patients on hemodialysis by investigating the physical characteristics of elderly patients on hemodialysis, and their attitude to physical activity and level of daily activity. [Subjects] The Subject were 10 elderly patients on hemodialysis. [Methods] They wore a physical activity monitor for 1 week. Data obtained were analyzed for hemodialysis and non- hemodialysis days, and two-way analysis of variance was used to compare the number of steps and activity levels. A questionnaire was administered to investigate the stage of psychological preparedness for exercise and attitudes toward/awareness of exercise. [Results] There was no significant difference in the number of steps or exercise levels on hemodialysis and non- hemodialysis days. However, on both types of days, subjects spent long periods not engaged in any activity. Most of their activity was either inactivity or sedentary behavior. [Conclusion] Patients on hemodialysis with low physical activity levels are considered to have poor physical function and exercise tolerance. To maintain and improve the physical function of patients on hemodialysis, it will be necessary to reduce their time spent in inactive, and comprehensive care that covers psychosocial aspects should be provided to promote the proactive improvement of physical activity and their attitudes to exercise. PMID:27190487

  16. Promotion and support of physical activity in elderly patients on hemodialysis: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Shiota, Kotomi; Hashimoto, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to ascertain the optimum strategy for implementing a physical activity intervention in patients on hemodialysis by investigating the physical characteristics of elderly patients on hemodialysis, and their attitude to physical activity and level of daily activity. [Subjects] The Subject were 10 elderly patients on hemodialysis. [Methods] They wore a physical activity monitor for 1 week. Data obtained were analyzed for hemodialysis and non- hemodialysis days, and two-way analysis of variance was used to compare the number of steps and activity levels. A questionnaire was administered to investigate the stage of psychological preparedness for exercise and attitudes toward/awareness of exercise. [Results] There was no significant difference in the number of steps or exercise levels on hemodialysis and non- hemodialysis days. However, on both types of days, subjects spent long periods not engaged in any activity. Most of their activity was either inactivity or sedentary behavior. [Conclusion] Patients on hemodialysis with low physical activity levels are considered to have poor physical function and exercise tolerance. To maintain and improve the physical function of patients on hemodialysis, it will be necessary to reduce their time spent in inactive, and comprehensive care that covers psychosocial aspects should be provided to promote the proactive improvement of physical activity and their attitudes to exercise. PMID:27190487

  17. Case Studies in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeakes, Samuel J.

    1989-01-01

    A case study writing exercise used in a course on parasitology was found to be a powerful learning experience for students because it involved discipline-based technical writing and terminology, brought the students in as evaluators, applied current learning, caused interaction among all students, and simulated real professional activities. (MSE)

  18. Social Interaction and the Formation of Entrepreneurial Characteristics: A Case Study in Authentic Enterprise Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Christina W. M.; Man, Thomas W. Y.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper is an empirical study which aims to investigate the development of social interaction and their impacts on developing learners' entrepreneurial characteristics throughout their participation in an authentic enterprise activity. Design/methodology/approach: The sample of this study was drawn from the participants of an…

  19. Descriptive Analysis of Title VII-Funded State Education Agency Activities. Volume II: Nine Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nava, Hector; And Others

    Results of a national study of the use of funds provided by the 1974 amendments to Title VII of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act by the state education agencies (SEAs) are presented. The study was undertaken to (1) describe and analyze SEA policies and activities regarding bilingual education, (2) describe and analyze the SEA-level…

  20. Understanding EFL Students' Participation in Group Peer Feedback of L2 Writing: A Case Study from an Activity Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Shulin; Lee, Icy

    2015-01-01

    While the last three decades have witnessed a growing body of research on peer feedback in first language (L1) and second language (L2) writing, research about students' motives for participating in group peer feedback has remained underexplored. In order to fill this important gap, this case study, guided by the constructs of activity and motive…

  1. Factors Associated with Adolescent Physical Activity during Middle School Physical Education: A One-Year Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senne, Terry; Rowe, David; Boswell, Boni; Decker, James; Douglas, Shaun

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive component of a larger, exploratory case study was to examine associations among lesson contexts, teacher behaviors, and adolescent physical activity over a year of physical education (PE) at one school. Middle school students (n = 206) and their PE teachers (n = 4) were observed twice-weekly across one academic…

  2. Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing for Inter-Library Services: A Case Study in a University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pernot, Eli; Roodhooft, Filip; Van den Abbeele, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    Although the true costs of inter-library loans (ILL) are unknown, universities increasingly rely on them to provide better library services at lower costs. Through a case study, we show how to perform a time-driven activity-based costing analysis of ILL and provide evidence of the benefits of such an analysis.

  3. Leisure time activities related to carcinogen exposure and lung cancer risk in never smokers. A case-control study

    SciTech Connect

    Ruano-Ravina, Alberto; García-Lavandeira, José Antonio; Torres-Durán, María; Prini-Guadalupe, Luciana; Parente-Lamelas, Isaura; Leiro-Fernández, Virginia; Montero-Martínez, Carmen; González-Barcala, Francisco Javier; Golpe-Gómez, Antonio; Martínez, Cristina; Castro-Añón, Olalla; Mejuto-Martí, María José; and others

    2014-07-15

    We aim to assess the relationship between leisure time activities related to exposure to carcinogenic substances and lung cancer risk in a hospital-based case-control study performed in never smokers. We included never smoking cases with anatomopathologically confirmed lung cancer and never smoking controls undergoing trivial surgery, at 8 Spanish hospitals. The study was conducted between January 2011 and June 2013. Participants were older than 30 and had no previous neoplasms. All were personally interviewed focusing on lifestyle, environmental tobacco smoke exposure, occupational history and leisure time activities (including duration of such activities). Results were analyzed through logistic regression and adjusted also by residential radon and education level. We included 513 never smokers, 191 cases and 322 controls. The OR for those performing the studied leisure time activities was 1.43 (95%CI 0.78–2.61). When we restricted the analysis to those performing do-it-yourself activities for more than 10 years the OR was 2.21 (95%CI 0.93–5.27). Environmental tobacco smoke exposure did not modify this association. The effect for the different lung cancer histological types was very close to significance for adenocarcinoma but only when these activities were performed for more than 10 years. We encourage health professionals to recommend protective measures for those individuals while performing these hobbies to reduce the risk of lung cancer. - Highlights: • Some leisure time activities are associated with the exposure to carcinogenic substances. • These activities are model-making, painting (artistic or not), furniture refinishing or wood working. • Few studies have assessed lung cancer risk due to these hobbies and none in never-smokers. • Leisure activities related to exposure to carcinogenic substances present higher lung cancer risk. • The risk is higher when these activities are performed for more than 10 years.

  4. Leisure time activities related to carcinogen exposure and lung cancer risk in never smokers. A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ruano-Ravina, Alberto; García-Lavandeira, José Antonio; Torres-Durán, María; Prini-Guadalupe, Luciana; Parente-Lamelas, Isaura; Leiro-Fernández, Virginia; Montero-Martínez, Carmen; González-Barcala, Francisco Javier; Golpe-Gómez, Antonio; Martínez, Cristina; Castro-Añón, Olalla; Mejuto-Martí, María José; Barros-Dios, Juan Miguel

    2014-07-01

    We aim to assess the relationship between leisure time activities related to exposure to carcinogenic substances and lung cancer risk in a hospital-based case-control study performed in never smokers. We included never smoking cases with anatomopathologically confirmed lung cancer and never smoking controls undergoing trivial surgery, at 8 Spanish hospitals. The study was conducted between January 2011 and June 2013. Participants were older than 30 and had no previous neoplasms. All were personally interviewed focusing on lifestyle, environmental tobacco smoke exposure, occupational history and leisure time activities (including duration of such activities). Results were analyzed through logistic regression and adjusted also by residential radon and education level. We included 513 never smokers, 191 cases and 322 controls. The OR for those performing the studied leisure time activities was 1.43 (95%CI 0.78-2.61). When we restricted the analysis to those performing do-it-yourself activities for more than 10 years the OR was 2.21 (95%CI 0.93-5.27). Environmental tobacco smoke exposure did not modify this association. The effect for the different lung cancer histological types was very close to significance for adenocarcinoma but only when these activities were performed for more than 10 years. We encourage health professionals to recommend protective measures for those individuals while performing these hobbies to reduce the risk of lung cancer. PMID:24742725

  5. Socio-Cultural Context for Online Learning: A Case Study Viewed from Activity Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiaojing

    2004-01-01

    The complexities of digital age pose challenge to existing instruction technology theory as it applies to a distance learning environment. Through the lens of Activity Theory, this study takes a broad picture of an online course and examines the socio-cultural factors affecting the success of a distance course as well as their complex…

  6. Preferences for Deep-Surface Learning: A Vocational Education Case Study Using a Multimedia Assessment Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamm, Simon; Robertson, Ian

    2010-01-01

    This research tests the proposition that the integration of a multimedia assessment activity into a Diploma of Events Management program promotes a deep learning approach. Firstly, learners' preferences for deep or surface learning were evaluated using the revised two-factor Study Process Questionnaire. Secondly, after completion of an assessment…

  7. Transformational Processes and Learner Outcomes for Online Learning: An Activity Theory Case Study of Spanish Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terantino, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine the actions of online language learners from an activity theoretical perspective. It also attempted to explain how the students' learning outcomes evolved from their online learning experiences. This explanation placed an emphasis on the learners' previous experiences, defining their activity…

  8. The Responses of Preschoolers with Cochlear Implants to Musical Activities: A Multiple Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schraer-Joiner, Lyn E.; Chen-Hafteck, Lily

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the musical experiences of preschool cochlear implant users. Research objectives were to examine: (1) musical, social and emotional responses to activities; and (2) whether length of experience with the implant influenced responses. Participants were three prelingually deafened children, age 4,…

  9. A Case Study Objectively Assessing Female Physical Activity Levels within the National Curriculum for Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Matthew; Daly-Smith, Andrew; Morley, David; McKenna, James

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the National Curriculum for Physical Education (NCPE) lesson themes and contexts on the profile of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Fifteen, Year 9 Physical Education (PE) lessons were assessed within the lesson themes of Outwitting Opponents (OO) (delivered through field hockey…

  10. Identifying induced seismicity in active tectonic regions: A case study of the San Joaquin Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminzadeh, F.; Göbel, T.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the connection between petroleum-industry activities, and seismic event occurrences is essential to monitor, quantify, and mitigate seismic risk. While many studies identified anthropogenically-induced seismicity in intraplate regions where background seismicity rates are generally low, little is known about how to distinguish naturally occurring from induced seismicity in active tectonic regions. Further, it is not clear how different oil and gas operational parameters impact the frequency and magnitude of the induced seismic events. Here, we examine variations in frequency-size and spatial distributions of seismicity within the Southern Joaquin basin, an area of both active petroleum production and active fault systems. We analyze a newly available, high-quality, relocated earthquake catalog (Hauksson et al. 2012). This catalog includes many seismic events with magnitudes up to M = 4.5 within the study area. We start by analyzing the overall quality and consistence of the seismic catalog, focusing on temporal variations in seismicity rates and catalog completeness which could indicate variations in network sensitivity. This catalog provides relatively homogeneous earthquake recordings after 1981, enabling us to compare seismicity rates before and after the beginning of more pervasive petroleum-industry activities, for example, hydraulic-fracturing and waste-water disposals. We conduct a limited study of waste-water disposal wells to establish a correlation between seismicity statistics (i.e. rate changes, fractal dimension, b-value) within specific regions and anthropogenic influences. We then perform a regional study, to investigate spatial variations in seismicity statistics which are then correlated to oil field locations and well densities. In order to distinguish, predominantly natural seismicity from induced seismicity, we perform a spatial mapping of b-values and fractal dimensions of earthquake hypocenters. Seismic events in the proximity to

  11. Designing medical devices for conformance with harmonized standards: a case study of non-active implants.

    PubMed

    Gogins, J A

    1995-01-01

    The European Community's Medical Devices Directives represent an ambitious effort to streamline the regulation of medical devices within the European Economic Area, an area comprising more than 380 million people. In this, the second of two special reports, Jean A. Goggins uses a case study format to demonstrate the process that would be used to gain European approval for a hypothetical medical device. In the first report, appearing on page 284, Richard C. Fries and Mark D. Graber describe the Medical Devices Directives and their effect on the product-development process. PMID:7550496

  12. Crystallization kinetics and molecular mobility of an amorphous active pharmaceutical ingredient: A case study with Biclotymol.

    PubMed

    Schammé, Benjamin; Couvrat, Nicolas; Malpeli, Pascal; Delbreilh, Laurent; Dupray, Valérie; Dargent, Éric; Coquerel, Gérard

    2015-07-25

    The present case study focuses on the crystallization kinetics and molecular mobility of an amorphous mouth and throat drug namely Biclotymol, through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), temperature resolved X-ray powder diffraction (TR-XRPD) and hot stage microscopy (HSM). Kinetics of crystallization above the glass transition through isothermal and non-isothermal cold crystallization were considered. Avrami model was used for isothermal crystallization process. Non-isothermal cold crystallization was investigated through Augis and Bennett model. Differences between crystallization processes have been ascribed to a site-saturated nucleation mechanism of the metastable form, confirmed by optical microscopy images. Regarding molecular mobility, a feature of molecular dynamics in glass-forming liquids as thermodynamic fragility index m was determined through calorimetric measurements. It turned out to be around m=100, describing Biclotymol as a fragile glass-former for Angell's classification. Relatively long-term stability of amorphous Biclotymol above Tg was analyzed indirectly by calorimetric monitoring to evaluate thermodynamic parameters and crystallization behavior of glassy Biclotymol. Within eight months of storage above Tg (T=Tg+2°C), amorphous Biclotymol does not show a strong inclination to crystallize and forms a relatively stable glass. This case study, involving a multidisciplinary approach, points out the importance of continuing looking for stability predictors. PMID:26003417

  13. Case Study Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes the history of case study teaching, types of cases, and experimental data supporting their effectiveness. It also describes a model for comparing the efficacy of the various case study methods. (Contains 1 figure.)

  14. Imaging the complexity of an active normal fault system: The 1997 Colfiorito (central Italy) case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiaraluce, L.; Ellsworth, W.L.; Chiarabba, C.; Cocco, M.

    2003-01-01

    Six moderate magnitude earthquakes (5 < Mw < 6) ruptured normal fault segments of the southern sector of the North Apennine belt (central Italy) in the 1997 Colfiorito earthquake sequence. We study the progressive activation of adjacent and nearby parallel faults of this complex normal fault system using ???1650 earthquake locations obtained by applying a double-difference location method, using travel time picks and waveform cross-correlation measurements. The lateral extent of the fault segments range from 5 to 10 km and make up a broad, ???45 km long, NW trending fault system. The geometry of each segment is quite simple and consists of planar faults gently dipping toward SW with an average dip of 40??-45??. The fault planes are not listric but maintain a constant dip through the entire seismogenic volume, down to 8 km depth. We observe the activation of faults on the hanging wall and the absence of seismicity in the footwall of the structure. The observed fault segmentation appears to be due to the lateral heterogeneity of the upper crust: preexisting thrusts inherited from Neogene's compressional tectonic intersect the active normal faults and control their maximum length. The stress tensor obtained by inverting the six main shock focal mechanisms of the sequence is in agreement with the tectonic stress active in the inner chain of the Apennine, revealing a clear NE trending extension direction. Aftershock focal mechanisms show a consistent extensional kinematics, 70% of which are mechanically consistent with the main shock stress field.

  15. Time Use Patterns between Maintenance, Subsistence and Leisure Activities: A Case Study in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hui-fen, Zhou; Zhen-shan, Li; Dong-qian, Xue; Yang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    The Chinese government conducted its first time use survey of the activities of Chinese individuals in 2008. Activities were classified into three broad types, maintenance activities, subsistence activities and leisure activities. Time use patterns were defined by an individuals' time spent on maintenance, subsistence and leisure activities each…

  16. A learning activity to introduce undergraduate students to bioethics in human clinical research: a case study.

    PubMed

    Segarra, Ignacio; Gomez, Manuel

    2014-12-01

    We developed a pharmacology practicum assignment to introduce students to the research ethics and steps involved in a clinical trial. The assignment included literature review, critical analysis of bioethical situations, writing a study protocol and presenting it before a simulated ethics committee, a practice interview with a faculty member to obtain informed consent, and a student reflective assessment and self-evaluation. Students were assessed at various steps in the practicum; the learning efficiency of the activity was evaluated using an independent survey as well as students' reflective feedback. Most of the domains of Bloom's and Fink's taxonomies of learning were itemized and covered in the practicum. Students highly valued the translatability of theoretical concepts into practice as well as the approach to mimic professional practice. This activity was within a pharmacy program, but may be easily transferable to other medical or health sciences courses. PMID:25747690

  17. Carbonate aquifers with hydraulically non-active matrix: A case study from Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzonca, Bartłomiej

    2008-06-01

    SummaryThe Devonian carbonate (karst) rocks of the Holy Cross Mountains (Góry Świętokrzyskie) in Poland, which constitute a major water supply for the region, are the subject of the presented study. Using standard laboratory methods, the matrix hydrogeological properties (open porosity, permeability and specific yield) of the limestones and dolomites were determined. The test results showed very low open porosities of the samples, as well as an extremely low permeability. The specific yield in all the cases was zero. There was a very slight correlation between the permeability (represented by the hydraulic conductivity) and the open porosity for limestones - and no correlation for dolomites. The measured parameters do not depend on the structure of the rock matrix (classified as pelite, sparite or crystalline) nor does the occurrence of fractures. Differences in open porosity (but not in hydraulic conductivity) were observed between the samples from different structural units.

  18. Proliferative activity (ki-67 expression) and outcome in high grade osteosarcoma: a study of 27 cases.

    PubMed

    Jong, R; Davis, A M; Mendes, M G; Wunder, J S; Bell, R S; Kandel, R

    2000-01-01

    Purpose. Although pre-operative chemotherapy has improved the prognosis for individuals with osteosarcoma, approximately 40% of patients will die of their disease.The aim of this study was to quantitate proliferative activity in high grade osteosarcomas and to determine whether proliferation is a prognostic factor.Patients. The study consisted of 27 patients with high grade non-metastatic osteosarcoma at various sites for whom pre-operative biopsies and resection specimens were available for review. All patients were treated similarly and had at least 24 months' follow-up from the date of diagnosis.Methods. Proliferative activity (Ki-67 expression) was examined in the diagnostic biopsies immunohistochemically using the MIB-1 antibody. Proliferation was quantitated in two ways; (1) the number of immunopositive cells was counted manually using an ocular grid; or (2) the percentage of immunopositive nuclear area was assessed using morphometric image analysis. Proliferative index was evaluated in relation to patient outcome.Results. Proliferative activity was seen in all biopsies.The median proliferative index as determined by counting cells was 24% (mean of 27%, range of 7-61%) and by image analysis was 2% (mean 3%, range 0.32-8.4).The correlation between MIB-1 proliferation indices determined either by image analysis methodology or manual cell counting was high (Spearman's rho=0.79). Proliferative index did not appear to predict either disease-free or overall survival.Discussion. Tumor proliferation does not appear to be prognostic for high grade osteosarcomas.Whether assessment of this feature in conjunction with other tumor characteristics might be prognostic requires further study. PMID:18521434

  19. The active site architecture in peroxiredoxins: a case study on Mycobacterium tuberculosis AhpE.

    PubMed

    Pedre, Brandán; van Bergen, Laura A H; Palló, Anna; Rosado, Leonardo A; Dufe, Veronica Tamu; Molle, Inge Van; Wahni, Khadija; Erdogan, Huriye; Alonso, Mercedes; Proft, Frank De; Messens, Joris

    2016-08-11

    Peroxiredoxins catalyze the reduction of peroxides, a process of vital importance to survive oxidative stress. A nucleophilic cysteine, also known as the peroxidatic cysteine, is responsible for this catalytic process. We used the Mycobacterium tuberculosis alkyl hydroperoxide reductase E (MtAhpE) as a model to investigate the effect of the chemical environment on the specificity of the reaction. Using an integrative structural (R116A - PDB ; F37H - PDB ), kinetic and computational approach, we explain the mutational effects of key residues in its environment. This study shows that the active site residues are specifically oriented to create an environment which selectively favours a reaction with peroxides. PMID:27471753

  20. Summary of Case Studies of Exemplary Shared Programs. Rural Education Component, Activity 1.2: Rural Clusters Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mid-Continent Regional Educational Lab., Aurora, CO.

    Four case studies conducted by the Mid-continent Regional Educational Laboratory (McREL) Rural Education Project examined four clusters of rural schools and their efforts to improve schooling by collaborating and sharing resources. The Mid-Missouri Small School Consortium involved five rural school districts in efforts to incorporate…

  1. Case study: Minimization of corrosion using activated sodium bromide in a medium-size cooling tower

    SciTech Connect

    Nalepa, C.J.; Moore, R.M.; Golson, G.L.; Wolfe, T.W.; Puckorius, P.R.

    1996-10-01

    The process loop cooling tower at the Albemarle Process Development Center in Baton Rouge, LA has historically used chlorine as the biocide together with industry accepted phosphorus-based corrosion/scale inhibitors. Although this regimen provided biocontrol, sludge and iron build-up was a recurring problem, especially in low-velocity, small cross-sectional areas of piping. A general clean-up of the system was performed in April, 1995. This clean-up was followed with a switch to a two-component corrosion inhibitor/dispersant package. It was decided to study alternate biocides as well at this time. Activated sodium bromide was found to be particularly effective in this tower, which operates at pH {approximately}8.4. Relative to chlorine, the use of activated sodium bromide led to a decrease in general and pitting corrosion on mild steel while maintaining prior performance on admiralty brass. The reduced corrosion appears to be due to a combination of both chemical (less attack on passivated metal surfaces) and biological factors (better control of heterotrophic and sessile bacteria). These conclusions are supported by chemical analyses, corrosion meter and coupon data, dip slides, BART (biological activity reaction test) tests, and visual observations of the tower sump and heat exchanger surfaces.

  2. Non-verbal Full Body Emotional and Social Interaction: A Case Study on Multimedia Systems for Active Music Listening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camurri, Antonio

    Research on HCI and multimedia systems for art and entertainment based on non-verbal, full-body, emotional and social interaction is the main topic of this paper. A short review of previous research projects in this area at our centre are presented, to introduce the main issues discussed in the paper. In particular, a case study based on novel paradigms of social active music listening is presented. Active music listening experience enables users to dynamically mould expressive performance of music and of audiovisual content. This research is partially supported by the 7FP EU-ICT Project SAME (Sound and Music for Everyone, Everyday, Everywhere, Every Way, www.sameproject.eu).

  3. Mass movements in fjords caused by seismic activity? A case study from Balsfjord, northern Norway.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forwick, M.; Vorren, T. O.

    2003-04-01

    Fjords can provide excellent opportunities for investigating sedimentary processes related to slope failures. Balsfjord is a 46 km long and maximum 5 km wide fjord in northern Norway, about 10 km south of Tromsø. An end moraine divides the fjord into an Inner and Outer Basin. High-resolution seismic data (3.5 kHz penetration echo sounder), as well as two piston cores, one from each basin, were analysed. The objective of this study was to find submarine deposits that could be used to study the regionality and chronology of postglacial mass-movement activity in northern Norway. Various types of gravity flows were identified, i.e. slumps, debris flows and turbidites. Maximum thickness of one debris flow is c. 15 m. Two marked turbidites have a lateral extent of about 10 km. The origins of some slumps and debris flows include slope failure of the end moraine crossing the fjord, as well as in front of a river mouth. The origin of the turbidites will be studied using grain-size distribution. Three mass-movement events in both basins are correlated using radiocarbon dates. Since these events can be identified in both basins, they are suggested to indicate regional avalanche activity. The three events were bracketed between 9400 radiocarbon years BP and 9100 radiocarbon years BP. This time span fits into the period of most rapid postglacial isostatic uplift in areas adjacent to Balsfjord (Corner and Haugane, 1993). A close correlation between a steep uplift gradient and earthquake frequency/magnitude is suggested by several authors (e.g. Bøe et al., 2001). Thus, seismic activity can be regarded as a potential trigger mechanism for mass-movement activity in Balsfjord. References: Bøe, R., Hovland, M., Instanes, A., Rise, L. and Vasshus, S., 2000. Submarine slide scars and mass movements in Karmsundet and Skudenesfjorden, southwestern Norway: morphology and evolution. Marine Geology, 167(1-2): 147-165. Corner, G.D. and Haugane, E., 1993. Marine-lacustrine stratigraphy of

  4. Nicotinamide polymeric nanoemulsified systems: a quality-by-design case study for a sustained antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Zidan, Ahmed S; Ahmed, Osama Aa; Aljaeid, Bader M

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinamide, the amide form of vitamin B3, was demonstrated to combat some of the antibiotic-resistant infections that are increasingly common around the world. The objective of this study was to thoroughly understand the formulation and process variabilities affecting the preparation of nicotinamide-loaded polymeric nanoemulsified particles. The quality target product profile and critical quality attributes of the proposed product were presented. Plackett-Burman screening design was employed to screen eight variables for their influences on the formulation's critical characteristics. The formulations were prepared by an oil-in-water emulsification followed by solvent replacement. The prepared systems were characterized by entrapment capacity (EC), entrapment efficiency (EE), particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, in vitro drug release, and their antibacterial activity against bacterial scrums. EC, EE, particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, and percentage release in 24 hours were found to be in the range of 33.5%-68.8%, 53.1%-67.1%, 43.3-243.3 nm, 0.08-0.28, 9.5-53.3 mV, and 5.8%-22.4%, respectively. One-way analysis of variance and Pareto charts revealed that the experimental loadings of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and Eudragit(®) S100 were the most significant for their effects on nicotinamide EC and EE. Moreover, the polymeric nanoemulsified particles demonstrated a sustained release profile for nicotinamide. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray diffraction demonstrated a significant interaction between the drug and 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin that might modulate the sustained release behavior. Furthermore, the formulations provided a sustained antibacterial activity that depended on nicotinamide-loading concentration, release rate, and

  5. The active management of surgical waiting lists: a urological surgery case study.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Russell J; Smith, Katrina M; Dejager, Ebony M; Callahan, John T; Abernethy, Jennifer A; Dunn, Eddie J; Hunter-Smith, David J

    2011-11-01

    Elective surgery waiting list management is a major public healthcare issue. This case study describes an integrated multifaceted approach to waiting list management at Peninsula Health, a public health service in Victoria, Australia. At the commencement of this study it was recognised that several issues associated with the urological surgical service constituted potential clinical risk. These included: recall mechanisms for multiple surveillance procedures; significant resource deficits; and long surgery waiting times. Responding to these issues a multifaceted approach to wait list management was implemented including: audit; direct lines of communication between clinical and administrative staff; urgent caseload management; utilisation of the Elective Surgery Access Scheme; financial and resource analysis justifying the appointment of a full-time urologist, and the establishment of a urology service from a satellite campus; implementation of a recall database; development of an outpatient service; and commencement of a day surgery initiative. This approach yielded results that included a 67% reduction in the number of 'ready for care' patients and a 78% reduction in the number of patients classified as 'overdue for surgery'. Average wait time for semi-urgent and non-urgent patients reduced from 248 days to 180 days in the 10-month period. PMID:22126940

  6. Variation of ecosystem services and human activities: A case study in the Yanhe Watershed of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chang-hong; Fu, Bo-Jie; He, Chan-Sheng; Lü, Yi-He

    2012-10-01

    The concept of 'ecosystem service' provides cohesive views on mechanisms by which nature contributes to human well-being. Fast social and economic development calls for research on interactions between human and natural systems. We took the Yanhe Watershed as our study area, and valued the variation of ecosystem services and human activities of 2000 and 2008. Five ecosystem services were selected i.e. net primary production (NPP), carbon sequestration and oxygen production (CSOP), water conservation, soil conservation, and grain production. Human activity was represented by a composite human activity index (HAI) that integrates human population density, farmland ratio, influence of residential sites and road network. Analysis results of the five ecosystem services and human activity (HAI) are as follows: (i) NPP, CSOP, water conservation, and soil conservation increased from 2000 to 2008, while grain production declined. HAI decreased from 2000 to 2008. Spatially, NPP, CSOP, and water conservation in 2000 and 2008 roughly demonstrated a pattern of decline from south to north, while grain production shows an endocentric increasing spatial pattern. Soil conservation showed a spatial pattern of high in the south and low in the north in 2000 and a different pattern of high in the west and low in the east in 2008 respectively. HAI is proportional to the administrative level and economic development. Variation of NPP/CSOP between 2000 and 2008 show an increasing spatial pattern from northwest to southeast. In contrast, the variation of soil conservation shows an increasing pattern from southeast to northwest. Variation of water conservation shows a fanning out decreasing pattern. Variation of grain production doesn't show conspicuous spatial pattern. (ii) Variation of water conservation and of soil conservation is significantly positively correlated at 0.01 level. Both variations of water conservation and soil conservation are negatively correlated with variation of HAI

  7. Midtail plasma flows and the relationship to near-Earth substorm activity: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, R. E.; Goodrich, C. C.; Reeves, G. D.; Belian, R. D.; Taktakishvili, A.

    1994-01-01

    Recent simulations of magnetotail reconnection have pointed to a link between plasma flows, dipolarization, and the substorm current wedge. In particular, Hesse and Birn (1991) have proposed that earthward jetting of plasma from the reconnection region transports flux into the near-Earth region. At the inner edge of the plasma sheet this flux piles up, producing a dipolarization of the magnetic field. The vorticity produced by the east-west deflection of the flow at the inner edge of the plasma sheet gives rise to field-aligned currents that have region 1 polarity. Thus in this scenario the earthward flow from the reconnection region produces the dipolarization ad the current wedge in a self-consistent fashion. In this study we examine observations made on April 8, 1985 by the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE)/Ion Release Module (IRM), the geosynchronous satellites 1979-053, 1983-019, and 1984-037, and Syowa station, as well as AE. This event is unique because IRM was located near the neutral sheet in the midnight sector for am extended period of time. Ground data show that there was ongoing activity in the IRM local time sector for several hours, beginning at 1800 UT and reaching a crescendo at 2300 UT. This activity was also accompanied by energetic particle variations, including injections, at geosynchronous orbit in the nighttime sector. Significantly, there were no fast flows at the neutral sheet until the great intensification of activity at 2300 UT. At that time, IRM recorded fast eartheard flow simultaneous with a dipolatization of the magetic field. We conclude that while the aforementioned scenario for the creation of the current wedge encounters serious problems explaining the earlier activity, the observations at 2300 UT are consistent with the scenario of Hesse and Birn (1191). On that basis it is argued that the physics of substorms is not exclusively rooted in the development of a global tearing mode. Processes at the inner edge

  8. A Case Study Analysis of a Constructionist Knowledge Building Community with Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ang, Chee S.; Zaphiris, Panayiotis; Wilson, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates how activity theory can help research a constructionist community. We present a constructionist activity model called CONstructionism Through ACtivity Theory (CONTACT) model and explain how it can be used to analyse the constructionist activity in knowledge building communities. We then illustrate the model through its…

  9. Isotopic Evidence for Microbial Activity in Crystalline Bedrock Fractures - a Case Study from Olkiluoto, SW Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahlstedt, E. K.; Karhu, J.; Pitkänen, P.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in the geochemical environment in crystalline bedrock fractures were investigated using the stable isotopes of C, O and S in fracture filling minerals as tracers. Of special interest were the possible changes which may occur in the subsurface at low temperatures. Especially, the influence of microbial activity was recognized as a catalyst for inducing changes in the geochemical environment. The study site is the Olkiluoto island located on the western coast of Finland, planned to host a geological repository for nuclear waste. Fracture surfaces were investigated to recognize the latest mineralizations at the site. These fillings were comprised of thin plates or small euhedral crystals of calcite and pyrite. The carbon and sulfur isotope compositions of calcite and pyrite were measured from bulk material by conventional IRMS, and in situ by secondary ion mass spectrometry. A notable feature of the late-stage fillings was high variabilities in the δ13C values of calcite and the δ34S values of pyrite, which ranged from -53.8 ‰ to +31.6 ‰ and from -50.4 ‰ to +77.7 ‰, respectively. Based on the isotopic compositions of the fillings, several features in the past hydrogeochemical environment could be recognized. The isotopic composition of the fracture fillings indicate an environment which was stratified with respect to depth. Characteristic features include bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) occurring at depths <111 m (bsl), and a methanogenetic environment at depths >50 m. It appears that methanic conditions were replaced by sulfate reduction at depths >50 m likely due to infiltration of SO42--rich brackish waters. Sulfate reducing bacteria used mainly surface derived organic carbon as electron donors. Some indication of minor methanotrophic activity was recognized in anomalously low δ13C values of calcite, down to -53.8 ‰, at the depth range of 34-54 m. This methanotrophic activity may have been related to bacteria using CH4 as an electron donor in

  10. Active deformation and seismicity in the Southern Alps (Italy): The Montello hill as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danesi, Stefania; Pondrelli, Silvia; Salimbeni, Simone; Cavaliere, Adriano; Serpelloni, Enrico; Danecek, Peter; Lovati, Sara; Massa, Marco

    2015-06-01

    The Montello anticline is a morphotectonic feature of the east pede-mountain of the South Alpine Chain in northern Italy, which lies ca. 40 km northwest of Venice, Italy. The purpose of this study is to characterize the present-day crustal deformation and seismotectonics of the Montello area through multi-parametric geophysical observations. We used new data obtained from the installation of a temporary network of 12 seismic stations and 6 GPS sites. The GPS observations indicate that there is ~ 1 mm/yr shortening across the Montello thrust. Sites located north of the Montello thrust front deviate from the ~ NNW-ward Adria-Eurasia convergence direction, as they are constrained by a relative rotation pole in northwestern Italy that has a NNE-ward motion trend. Over 18 months, seismographic recordings allowed us to locate 142 local seismic events with Ml 0.5-3.5 with good reliability (rms < 0.5). After cross-correlation analysis, we classified 42 of these events into six clusters, with cross-correlation thresholds > 0.80. The source focal solutions indicate that: (i) there is thrusting seismic activity on the basal, sub-horizontal, portion of the Montello structure; and (ii) strike-slip source kinematics prevail on the western edge of the Montello hill. Our observations on the source mechanisms and the measured crustal deformation confirm that the Montello thrust is tectonically active.

  11. Investigating the relationship of lightning activity and rainfall: A case study for Crete Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordanidou, V.; Koutroulis, A. G.; Tsanis, I. K.

    2016-05-01

    The relationship of lightning activity and rainfall is investigated for rain events of variable intensity. Rain data from 22 gauging stations over the island of Crete and lightning activity from the Global Lightning Network including both cloud-to-ground and some cloud flashes are analyzed for the period September 2012 to June 2014. Local thunderstorms' characteristics are investigated both individually as well as in groups according to the results of k-means clustering algorithm in 3 dimensions (space (x, y) and time (t)) in which the number of clusters is decided by G-means algorithm. Correlation of non-zero pairs of rain intensity and number of flashes is examined at various time intervals, time lags and effective radii. Also, correlation of flash count within 50 km radius around the stations is examined for the rain events of maximum hourly intensity for each gauging station. The highest coincidence of lightning clusters with intense rain events reaches 60% when gauges are 25-30 km from the cluster center. Maximum correlation within non-zero pairs of rain intensity and flashes number is obtained for more intense rain (99th percentile) and for increased flash count within the searching area (more than 10 flashes). Also, correlation is stronger for shorter time windows. The findings of this study improve the understanding of thunderstorm events and could provide staple information for the improvement of forecasting extreme events.

  12. ANDRILL educational activities in Italy: progettosmilla.it, a case-study of an interactive project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattadori, M.

    2008-12-01

    In January 2006, the Italian ANDRILL (Antartic Geological Drilling) team selected the project progettosmilla.it and its instructor Matteo Cattadori, a high school teacher and collaborator of Museo Tridentino di Scienze Naturali (TN - Italy) to represent Italy in the ANDRILL-ARISE team. The ARISE (Andrill Research Immersion for Science Educators) comprised a group of teachers from 4 nations (US, New Zealand, Germany and Italy) and is part of the initiative Public and Educational Outreach component of the ANDRILL project. The selected teachers are sent to Antarctica and are actively involved in all stages of the scientific investigation, with the main aim of establishing a bridge between research and the schools in the participating countries. Progettosmilla.it was selected to take part in the first edition of ANDRILL-ARISE held at the American Antarctic base of Mc Murdo during the 2006-2007 austral summer.The project makes use of different tools, techniques and forms of communication-education to stimulate the interest and motivation of students, teachers and organizers/trainers in ANDRILL research and polar sciences in general. Activities are organized and scheduled according to a fixed timetable that cover 2/3 of an academic year and are centered on the site www.progettosmilla.it. This site feature daily reports, as well as online activities and various services for users in Italian schools. Among the online materials, more conventional ones are: - summaries of the ANDRILL research and the Antarctic environment; including multimedia (1200 photos, 10 video and audio); resource folders for teachers on 10 different subjects of study; course work for the participating school students. - ITC-oriented materials such as: videoconferencing and chat sessions with Antarctica or between classes, blogs, web-quest, animations and interactive teaching. -Many services are implemented in collaboration with other teachers and allow the ARISE team to perform distant collaborative

  13. LCA of waste prevention activities: a case study for drinking water in Italy.

    PubMed

    Nessi, Simone; Rigamonti, Lucia; Grosso, Mario

    2012-10-15

    The strategic relevance of waste prevention has considerably increased worldwide during recent years, such that the current European legislation requires the preparation of national waste prevention programmes in which reduction objectives and measures are identified. In such a context, it is possible to recognise how, in order to correctly evaluate the environmental consequences of a prevention activity, a life cycle perspective should be employed. This allows us to go beyond the simple reduction of the generated waste which, alone, does not automatically imply achieving better overall environmental performance, especially when this reduction is not pursued through the simple reduction of consumption. In this study, the energetic and environmental performance of two waste prevention activities considered particularly meaningful for the Italian context were evaluated using life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. The two activities were the utilisation of public network water (two scenarios) and of refillable bottled water (two scenarios) for drinking purposes, instead of one-way bottled water (three scenarios). The energy demand and specific potential impacts of the four waste prevention scenarios and of the three baseline scenarios were compared with the aim of evaluating whether, and under what conditions, the analysed prevention activities are actually associated with overall energetic and environmental benefits. In typical conditions, the use of public network water directly from the tap results in the best scenario, while if water is withdrawn from public fountains, its further transportation by private car can involve significant impacts. The use of refillable PET bottled water seems the preferable scenario for packaged water consumption, if refillable bottles are transported to local distributors along the same (or a lower) distance as one-way bottles to retailers. The use of refillable glass bottled water is preferable to one-way bottled water only if a

  14. Case Study of Severe Lightning Activity Prior to and During the Outbreak of the June 1st Greenbelt Tornado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, B. H.; Badesha, S.; Shishineh, A.; Adams, N. H.

    2012-12-01

    Surges in lightning activity have been known to be associated with the outbreak of tornado activity. We present a case study of a tornado that touched down near Greenbelt Maryland during the evening of June 1st 2012. Preceding the tornado touchdown, two single point lightning detection systems, a Boltek LD-250 and Vaisala SA20, recorded very high lightning activity rates. An electric field mill (EFM) was also making measurements and recorded large, rapid amplitude oscillations in the vertical electric fields. These electric field oscillations quickly subsided after the initial tornado touchdown. The lightning activity also generated significant RF interference in the S-band dish antenna operated at the Applied Physics Laboratory. It was somewhat surprising that the lightning activity produced enough radiation at these frequencies to cause measured levels of interference which could potentially impair satellite communications. Our interpretation of the EFM data is that intensive vertical forcing and rotation in the thunderstorm during the tornado formation caused the observed rapid electric field oscillations. At the same time, the vertical mixing in the storm caused a surge in lightning activity rates recorded by the Boltek and Vaisala sensors. Following the tornado touchdown, there was a rapid decrease in the lightning rates from the sensors. The EFM oscillations also abruptly ceased and went to a more normal slow-varying pattern typically observed during other thunderstorms without associated tornado activity. It is suggested that a network of field mills could provide realtime warning of imminent tornado activity.

  15. Nicotinamide polymeric nanoemulsified systems: a quality-by-design case study for a sustained antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    Zidan, Ahmed S; Ahmed, Osama AA; Aljaeid, Bader M

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinamide, the amide form of vitamin B3, was demonstrated to combat some of the antibiotic-resistant infections that are increasingly common around the world. The objective of this study was to thoroughly understand the formulation and process variabilities affecting the preparation of nicotinamide-loaded polymeric nanoemulsified particles. The quality target product profile and critical quality attributes of the proposed product were presented. Plackett–Burman screening design was employed to screen eight variables for their influences on the formulation’s critical characteristics. The formulations were prepared by an oil-in-water emulsification followed by solvent replacement. The prepared systems were characterized by entrapment capacity (EC), entrapment efficiency (EE), particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, in vitro drug release, and their antibacterial activity against bacterial scrums. EC, EE, particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, and percentage release in 24 hours were found to be in the range of 33.5%–68.8%, 53.1%–67.1%, 43.3–243.3 nm, 0.08–0.28, 9.5–53.3 mV, and 5.8%–22.4%, respectively. One-way analysis of variance and Pareto charts revealed that the experimental loadings of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and Eudragit® S100 were the most significant for their effects on nicotinamide EC and EE. Moreover, the polymeric nanoemulsified particles demonstrated a sustained release profile for nicotinamide. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray diffraction demonstrated a significant interaction between the drug and 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin that might modulate the sustained release behavior. Furthermore, the formulations provided a sustained antibacterial activity that depended on nicotinamide-loading concentration

  16. Effects of therapeutic climbing activities wearing a weighted vest on a child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Sun; Song, Chiang-Soon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of therapeutic climbing activities on the brain waves and attention of a child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. [Subject and Methods] The subject of this case study was a 7 year 6-month old child diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. This study was based on evidence gathered at 3 distinct stages: a pre-intervention period, 10 intervention periods (2 weeks), and one post-intervention period. The intervention involved therapeutic climbing activities wearing a weighted vest over the course of 4 weeks. The clinical outcome measures were electroencephalography and the Star Cancellation Test. [Results] The mean activation of alpha waves was improved by the therapeutic intervention. During the intervention, the mean activation of alpha waves was the highest at the F3 cortical locus and the lowest at the T4 cortical locus. The average Star Cancellation Test scores were 43 at pre-intervention, 50 during the therapeutic intervention, and 52 at post-intervention. The performance time of the Star Cancellation Test was 240.1 seconds at pre-intervention, 90.2 seconds during the therapeutic intervention, and 60.0 seconds at post-intervention. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that therapeutic climbing activities performed wearing a weighted vest had positive effects on the brain waves and the attention span of a child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. PMID:26644705

  17. Subsidence activity maps derived from DInSAR data: Orihuela case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanabria, M. P.; Guardiola-Albert, C.; Tomás, R.; Herrera, G.; Prieto, A.; Sánchez, H.; Tessitore, S.

    2014-05-01

    A new methodology is proposed to produce subsidence activity maps based on the geostatistical analysis of persistent scatterer interferometry (PSI) data. PSI displacement measurements are interpolated based on conditional Sequential Gaussian Simulation (SGS) to calculate multiple equiprobable realizations of subsidence. The result from this process is a series of interpolated subsidence values, with an estimation of the spatial variability and a confidence level on the interpolation. These maps complement the PSI displacement map, improving the identification of wide subsiding areas at a regional scale. At a local scale, they can be used to identify buildings susceptible to suffer subsidence related damages. In order to do so, it is necessary to calculate the maximum differential settlement and the maximum angular distortion for each building of the study area. Based on PSI-derived parameters those buildings in which the serviceability limit state has been exceeded, and where in situ forensic analysis should be made, can be automatically identified. This methodology has been tested in the city of Orihuela (SE Spain) for the study of historical buildings damaged during the last two decades by subsidence due to aquifer overexploitation. The qualitative evaluation of the results from the methodology carried out in buildings where damages have been reported shows a success rate of 100%.

  18. Validation of Self-Report Measures of Physical Activity: A Case Study Using the New Zealand Physical Activity Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackay, Lisa M.; Schofield, Grant M.; Schluter, Philip J.

    2007-01-01

    Accurate measurement of physical activity is fundamentally important in epidemiological research of physical activity behavior. A widely used telephone-based physical activity questionnaire was compared with other methods of administration and objective measures (pedometers and accelerometers) among 80 adults (43 women). The telephone…

  19. Fugitive greenhouse gas emissions from shale gas activities - a case study of Dish, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, A.; Roscoe, B.; Lary, D.; Schaefer, D.; Tao, L.; Sun, K.; Brian, A.; DiGangi, J.; Miller, D. J.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    We evaluate new findings on aerial (horizontal and vertical) mapping of methane emissions in the atmospheric boundary layer region to help study fugitive methane emissions from extraction, transmission, and storage of natural gas and oil in Dish, Texas. Dish is located in the Barnett Shale which has seen explosive development of hydraulic fracking activities in recent years. The aerial measurements were performed with a new laser-based methane sensor developed specifically for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) methane sensor, with a mass of 2.5 kg and a precision of < 20 ppbv methane at 1 Hz, was flown on the UT-Dallas ARC Payload Master electronic aircraft at two sites in Texas: one representative of urban emissions of the Dallas-Fort Worth area in Richardson, Texas and another in Dish, Texas, closer to gas and oil activities. Methane mixing ratios at Dish were ubiquitously in the 3.5 - 4 ppmv range which was 1.5 - 2 ppmv higher than methane levels immediately downwind of Dallas. During the flight measurements at Dish, narrow methane plumes exceeding 20 ppmv were frequently observed at altitudes from the surface to 130 m above the ground. Based on the wind speed at the sampling location, the horizontal widths of large methane plumes were of the order of 100 m. The locations of the large methane plumes were variable in space and time over a ~ 1 km2 area sampled from the UAV. Spatial mapping over larger scales (10 km) by ground-based measurements showed similar methane levels as the UAV measurements. To corroborate our measurements, alkane and other hydrocarbon mixing ratios from an on-site TCEQ environmental monitoring station were analyzed and correlated with methane measurements to fingerprint the methane source. We show that fugitive methane emissions at Dish are a significant cause of the large and ubiquitous methane levels on the 1-10 km scale.

  20. H-reflex suppression and autonomic activation during lucid REM sleep: a case study.

    PubMed

    Brylowski, A; Levitan, L; LaBerge, S

    1989-08-01

    A single subject, a proficient lucid dreamer experienced with signaling the onset of lucidity (reflective consciousness of dreaming) by means of voluntary eye movements, spent 4 nonconsecutive nights in the sleep laboratory. The subject reported becoming lucid and signaling in 8 of the 18 rapid-eye movement (REM) periods recorded. Ten lucid dream reports were verified by polygraphic examination of signals, providing a total of 12.5 min of signal-verified lucid REM. H-Reflex amplitude was recorded every 5 s, along with continuous recording of electroencephalogram, electrooculogram, electromyogram, electrocardiogram, finger pulse, and respiration. Significant findings included greater mean H-reflex suppression during lucid REM sleep than during nonlucid REM and correlations of H-reflex suppression with increased eye movement density, heart rate, and respiration rate. These results support previous studies reporting that lucid REM is not, as might be supposed, a state closer to awakening than ordinary, or nonlucid, REM; rather, lucid dreaming occurs during unequivocal REM sleep and is characteristically associated with phasic REM activation. PMID:2762692

  1. Health activism and the logic of connective action. A case study of rare disease patient organisations

    PubMed Central

    Vicari, Stefania; Cappai, Franco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This exploratory work investigates the role of digital media in expanding health discourse practices in a way to transform traditional structures of agency in public health. By focusing on a sample of rare disease patient organisations as representative of contemporary health activism, this study investigates the role of digital communication in the development of (1) bottom-up sharing and co-production of health knowledge, (2) health public engagement dynamics and (3) health information pathways. Findings show that digital media affordances for patient organisations go beyond the provision of social support for patient communities; they ease one-way, two-way and crowdsourced processes of health knowledge sharing, exchange and co-production, provide personalised routes to health public engagement and bolster the emergence of varied pathways to health information where experiential knowledge and medical authority are equally valued. These forms of organisationally enabled connective action can help the surfacing of personal narratives that strengthen patient communities, the bottom-up production of health knowledge relevant to a wider public and the development of an informational and eventually cultural context that eases patients’ political action. PMID:27499676

  2. Voice-Activated Lightweight Reacher to Assist with Upper Extremity Movement Limitations: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Umer; Conti, Gerry E; Erlandson, Robert F; Ellis, Richard D; Brown, Vince; Pandya, Abhilash K

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this research was to design a functional and user-friendly reacher for people with spinal cord injuries (SCIs). Engineering advancements have taken assistive robotics to new dimensions. Technologies such as wheelchair robotics and myo-electronically controlled systems have opened up a wide range of new applications to assist people with physical disabilities. Similarly, exo-skeletal limbs and body suits have provided new foundations from which technologies can aid function. Unfortunately, these devices have issues of usability, weight, and discomfort with donning. The Smart Assistive Reacher Arm (SARA) system, developed in this research, is a voice-activated, lightweight, mobile device that can be used when needed. SARA was built to help overcome daily reach challenges faced by individuals with limited arm and hand movement capability, such as people with cervical level 5-6 (C5-6) SCI. This article shows that a functional reacher arm with voice control can be beneficial for this population. Comparison study with healthy participants and an SCI participant shows that, when using SARA, a person with SCI can perform simple reach and grasp tasks independently, without someone else's help. This suggests that the interface is intuitive and can be easily used to a high level of proficiency by a SCI individual. PMID:26132355

  3. Administrators in Action--Managing Public Monies and Processing Emotion in School Activities: A Teaching Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenuto, Penny L.; Gardiner, Mary E.; Yamamoto, Julie K.

    2015-01-01

    This teaching case describes school administrators in action performing day-to-day leadership tasks, managing public funds in school activities, and interacting with others appropriately. The case focuses on administrative challenges in handling and managing school activity funds. A method for processing emotion is discussed to assist…

  4. The altitude effect on the climatic factors controlling debris flows activation: the Marderello Torrent case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palladino, Michela; Turconi, Laura; Savio, Gabriele; Tropeano, Domenico

    2015-04-01

    The left Cenischia valley includes some of the best known alpine basins prone to debris flow in Northwestern Italian Alps. In particular, in the Marderello catchment (6,6 km²), a left tributary of the Cenischia river, 31 important debris flood/flow events occurred during the last one hundred years. According to the chronicles of the last three centuries, events with significant volumes are on the average liable to take place every 3-4 years, whereas minor events may occur even twice per year. Due to the high frequency of activations, the site is of relevant interest for monitoring purposes. Since the early nineties, the CNR IRPI equipped the Marderello basin with meteorological monitoring devices. The rainfall monitoring network consists of four rain gauges, placed at different elevations, between 800 m a.s.l. and 2854 m a.s.l. Other meteorological data (air moisture and temperature, atmospheric pressure, wind speed and direction) are provided by three stations located at 3150, 2150 and 830 m a.s.l. The main objective of the monitoring is the investigation of the triggering conditions for debris flows initiation. In the scientific literature the prediction of debris flows is often tackled by the use of empirical methods, based on the analysis of past activation and related rainfall triggering conditions. The effectiveness of these methods strictly depends on the representativeness of the meteorological monitoring stations used to collect the data. In complex orography sites, as the Alpine catchments are, the remarkable elevation gaps between the source areas of debris flows and the rain gauges position make it difficult to identify the triggering rainfall. To attain more reliable results, the elevation effect must be considered. In fact, elevation influences the precipitation in terms of cumulative values and, as a result of the temperature gradient, it controls the nature of the precipitation (rain/snow). In the present study we use the rainfall and temperature

  5. Extension joints: a tool to infer the active stress field orientation (case study from southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Guidi, Giorgio; Caputo, Riccardo; Scudero, Salvatore; Perdicaro, Vincenzo

    2013-04-01

    An intense tectonic activity in eastern Sicily and southern Calabria is well documented by the differential uplift of Late Quaternary coastlines and by the record of the strong historical earthquakes. The extensional belt that crosses this area is dominated by a well established WNW-ESE-oriented extensional direction. However, this area is largely lacking of any structural analysis able to define the tectonics at a more local scale. In the attempt to fill this gap of knowledge, we carried out a systematic analysis of extension joint sets. In fact, the systematic field collection of these extensional features, coupled with an appropriate inversion technique, allows to determine the characteristic of the causative tectonic stress field. Joints are defined as outcrop-scale mechanical discontinuities showing no evidence of shear motion and being originated as purely extensional fractures. Such tectonic features are one of the most common deformational structures in every tectonic environment and particularly abundant in the study area. A particular arrangement of joints, called "fracture grid-lock system", and defined as an orthogonal joint system where mutual abutting and crosscutting relationships characterize two geologically coeval joint sets, allow to infer the direction and the magnitude of the tectonic stress field. We performed the analyses of joints only on Pleistocene deposits of Eastern Sicily and Southern Calabria. Moreover we investigated only calcarenite sediments and cemented deposits, avoiding claysh and loose matrix-supported clastic sediments where the deformation is generally accomodated in a distributed way through the relative motion between the single particles. In the selection of the sites, we also took into account the possibility to clearly observe the geometric relationships among the joints. For this reason we chose curvilinear road cuts or cliffs, wide coastal erosional surfaces and quarries. The numerical inversions show a similar stress

  6. Groundwater fluoride enrichment in an active rift setting: Central Kenya Rift case study.

    PubMed

    Olaka, Lydia A; Wilke, Franziska D H; Olago, Daniel O; Odada, Eric O; Mulch, Andreas; Musolff, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Groundwater is used extensively in the Central Kenya Rift for domestic and agricultural demands. In these active rift settings groundwater can exhibit high fluoride levels. In order to address water security and reduce human exposure to high fluoride in drinking water, knowledge of the source and geochemical processes of enrichment are required. A study was therefore carried out within the Naivasha catchment (Kenya) to understand the genesis, enrichment and seasonal variations of fluoride in the groundwater. Rocks, rain, surface and groundwater sources were sampled for hydrogeochemical and isotopic investigations, the data was statistically and geospatially analyzed. Water sources have variable fluoride concentrations between 0.02-75 mg/L. 73% exceed the health limit (1.5mg/L) in both dry and wet seasons. F(-) concentrations in rivers are lower (0.2-9.2mg/L) than groundwater (0.09 to 43.6 mg/L) while saline lake waters have the highest concentrations (0.27-75 mg/L). The higher values are confined to elevations below 2000 masl. Oxygen (δ(18)O) and hydrogen (δD) isotopic values range from -6.2 to +5.8‰ and -31.3 to +33.3‰, respectively, they are also highly variable in the rift floor where they attain maximum values. Fluoride base levels in the precursor vitreous volcanic rocks are higher (between 3750-6000 ppm) in minerals such as cordierite and muscovite while secondary minerals like illite and kaolinite have lower remnant fluoride (<1000 ppm). Thus, geochemical F(-) enrichment in regional groundwater is mainly due to a) rock alteration, i.e. through long residence times and natural discharge and/or enhanced leakages of deep seated geothermal water reservoirs, b) secondary concentration fortification of natural reservoirs through evaporation, through reduced recharge and/or enhanced abstraction and c) through additional enrichment of fluoride after volcanic emissions. The findings are useful to help improve water management in Naivasha as well as similar

  7. Meeting the Challenges of Active Learning in Web-Based Case Studies for Sustainable Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchings, Maggie; Hadfield, Mark; Howarth, George; Lewarne, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Teaching staff, designing conventional courses in higher education, must make decisions about selecting content and activities to engage students in learning. When the Internet is chosen as the principal delivery vehicle it presents particular challenges for the design of active learning. Further challenges are added when working with a complex,…

  8. Child Poverty and Child Rights Meet Active Citizenship: A New Zealand and Sweden Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Michael; Salonen, Tapio

    2011-01-01

    Children's rights and active citizenship have been significant policy emphases and developments in recent years but the relationship between the two has not been actively explored in relation to the implications for child poverty. Recent policy developments in New Zealand and Sweden are drawn on here to explore this relationship. The article…

  9. NITRIFICATION AND ARSENIC REMOVAL IN BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE FILTERS: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonia in source waters can cause water treatment and distribution system problems, many of which are associated with biological nitrification. Therefore, in some cases, the removal of ammonia from water is desirable. Biological oxidation of ammonia to nitrate and nitrate (nitr...

  10. NITRIFICATION AND IRON AND ARSENIC REMOVAL IN BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE FILTERS: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonia in source waters can cause water treatment and distribution system problems, many of which are associated with biological nitrification. Therefore, in some cases, the removal of ammonia from water is desirable. Biological oxidation of ammonia to nitrate and nitrate (nitr...

  11. Extraction, Quantification and Characterization of Uterine Magnetomyographic Activity - A Proof of Concept Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Eswaran, Hari; Govindan, Rathinaswamy B.; Furdea, Adrian; Murphy, Pam; Lowery, Curtis L.; Preissl, Hubert T

    2009-01-01

    Objective The objective was to extract, quantify and characterize the uterine magnetomyographic (MMG) signals that correspond to the electrophysiological activity of the uterus. Methods Transabdominal MMG recordings with high spatial-temporal resolution were performed with the use of the 151 non-invasive magnetic sensors system. The extraction, quantification and characterization procedures were developed and applied to representative MMG signals that were recorded from a pregnant woman at regular intervals starting at 37 weeks of gestation until the subject reached active labor. Results Multiple MMG recordings were successfully performed on the subject before she went into active labor. The extracted MMG burst activity showed a statistically significant correlation (r=0.2;p<0.001) with the contractile events perceived by mothers. The time frequency analysis of the burst activity showed a power shift towards higher frequency at 48 hours before the subject went into active labor as compared to earlier recordings. Further there was a gradual increase in the synchrony in the higher frequency band as the subject reached close to active labor. Conclusions The non-invasive recording of the magnetic signals of pregnant uterus with high spatial-temporal resolution can provide an insight into the preparatory phase of labor and has the potential of predicting term and preterm labor. PMID:19303190

  12. Case Studies Behavior Modification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wark, David M.

    The case histories of five students enrolled in a university course in how to study are reported. The students ranged in age from 18 to 35, included two males and three females, and varied in school experience from no college in one case and some college in two cases to college degrees in two cases. Students were initially taught to chart their…

  13. Occupational and Environmental Health Risks Associated with Informal Sector Activities-Selected Case Studies from West Africa.

    PubMed

    Basu, Niladri; Ayelo, Paul Ahoumènou; Djogbénou, Luc S; Kedoté, Marius; Lawin, Herve; Tohon, Honesty; Oloruntoba, Elizabeth O; Adebisi, Nurudeen A; Cazabon, Danielle; Fobil, Julius; Robins, Thomas; Fayomi, Benjamin

    2016-08-01

    Most in the Economic Community of West African States region are employed in the informal sector. While the informal sector plays a significant role in the region's economy, policymakers and the scientific community have long neglected it. To better understand informal-sector work conditions, the goal here is to bring together researchers to exchange findings and catalyze dialogue. The article showcases research studies on several economic systems, namely agriculture, resource extraction, transportation, and trade/commerce. Site-specific cases are provided concerning occupational health risks within artisanal and small-scale gold mining, aggregate mining, gasoline trade, farming and pesticide applications, and electronic waste recycling. These cases emphasize the vastness of the informal sector and that the majority of work activities across the region remain poorly documented, and thus no data or knowledge is available to help improve conditions and formulate policies and programs to promote and ensure decent work conditions. PMID:27231011

  14. Shallow water submarine hydrothermal activity - A case study in the assessment of ocean acidification and fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Yoshida, K.; Hagiwara, T.; Nagao, K.; Kusakabe, M.; Wang, B.; Chen, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Most natural Shallow Water submarine Hydrothermal activates (SWH) along coastlines are related to hydrothermal eruptions involving heating of groundwater with the volcanic gas. These SWHs supply nutrients such as phosphorus and micro nutrients like iron to the euphotic zone, contributing to the overall natural fertility and primary productivity of coastal waters. However, SWHs also have a negative effect, dispersing toxic materials such as mercury and arsenic, and affecting the acidification of the surrounding waters. In this study, we evaluate the impact of "iron supply" and "ocean acidification" on the primary production in a coastal marine environment, at a SWH area discovered off Gueshandao Island, northeast Taiwan. In the past three years, expeditions were conducted and observations made around this SWH site. Divers, small boats and a research vessel (R/V OR1, Ocean University National Taiwan) were used to survey successively larger areas around the site. Some of the results obtained are as follows. Hydrothermal vents are located in a hilly terrain rich with hot spring water with gas erupting intermittently. There are two types of vents, roughly divided by color, yellow hot spring water with higher temperature >110 degC ejected from sulfur chimneys of various sizes, and colorless water with lower temperature ~80 degC ejected directly from the crevices of the andesitic bedrock. Natural sulfur solidifying in the mouth of a small chimney was captured by a video camera, and explosions were also observed at intervals of a few minutes. Sediment, sand and particles of sulfur were deposited on the sides to a radius of about 50 m condensing around the chimney. The bottom type changes from sand/particles to outcrop/rock away from the vents. Moreover, gas samples were collected from the vents; the ratios of gas concentrations (N2/Ar) and isotopic composition of noble gas (3He/4He) suggest that these volcanic gases are mantle-derived. Hydrothermal fluid with high p

  15. Late Holocene fluvial activity and correlations with dendrochronology of subfossil trunks: Case studies of northeastern Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rădoane, Maria; Nechita, Constantin; Chiriloaei, Francisca; Rădoane, Nicolae; Popa, Ionel; Roibu, Cătălin; Robu, Delia

    2015-06-01

    The main objective of this paper is to describe the late Holocene behaviour of rivers using an interdisciplinary approach combining fluvial geomorphology and subfossil trunk dendrochronology. The subfossil wood material collected along the rivers was investigated for dendrometric and dendrochronologic parameters. The research methods in these fields helped us to understand the effect of the fluvial environment on riparian trees and their records and helped in reconstructing the riparian palaeoenvironment. The study area consists of two rivers with different typologies but comparable sizes: the Moldova River, which features a braided to wandering channel in its lower reach, and the Siret River, which features a sinuous-meandering channel. Along the 100-km-long floodplain of the former and the 144-km-long floodplain of the latter, we found and sampled 77 subfossil trunks, of which 26 were subjected to 14C dating. The resulting data consist of floodplain facies mapping data, electric resistivity measurements, absolute dates, and dendrometric and dendrochronologic data. The results indicate that during a 100-year period, the two rivers were sensitive to climate change and anthropogenic effects, particularly a narrowing of the active channel by 76% in the braided channel and 38% in the sinuous-meandering channel. During the past 3300-3000 YBP, the Moldova River maintained its braided style, whereas the sinuous-meandering style has been characteristic of the Siret River for the previous 6800-4600 YBP. The two distinct fluvial environments are recorded in the dendrometric structure of the trunks buried in the channel-fill sediments. The braided fluvial environment was more effective in uprooting riparian trees and incorporating them in the floodplain deposits, whereas the sinuous-meandering style of stream effectively buried tree trunks in lateral accretion lobes. Absolute and dendrochronologic dating allowed for the reconstruction of timelines of the felling of the trees

  16. Using ToxCast to Explore Chemical Activities and Hazard Traits: A Case Study With Ortho-Phthalates.

    PubMed

    Pham, Nathalie; Iyer, Shoba; Hackett, Edward; Lock, Bennett H; Sandy, Martha; Zeise, Lauren; Solomon, Gina; Marty, Melanie

    2016-06-01

    US EPA's Toxicity Forecaster (ToxCastTM) is a tool with potential use in evaluating safer consumer products, conducting chemical alternatives analyses, prioritizing chemicals for exposure monitoring, and ultimately performing screening-level risk assessments. As a case study exploring a potential use of ToxCast, we evaluated ToxCast results for ortho-phthalates focused on the well-established toxicological endpoints of some members of this class. We compared molecular perturbations measured in ToxCast assays with the known apical toxicity endpoints of o-phthalates reported in the open literature to broadly reflect on the predictive capability of the high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. We grouped the ToxCast assays into defined sets to examine o-phthalate activity and potency. This study revealed several links between key molecular events assayed in vitro and chemical-specific hazard traits. In general, parent o-phthalates are more active than their monoester metabolites. The medium-chain length o-phthalate group is also more active than other o-phthalate groups, as supported by Toxicological Priority Index ranking and statistical methods. Some HTS assay results correlated with in vivo findings, but others did not. For example, there was a notable lack of assay activity to explain the known male reproductive toxicity of these compounds. Ultimately, HTS data resources such as ToxCast may inform us of sensitive upstream toxicity endpoints and may assist in the rapid identification of environmental chemical hazards for screening and prioritization. However, this case study shows that the absence of positive results in ToxCast in vitro assays cannot be interpreted as absence of related in vivo toxicity, and limited biological coverage by the assays remains a concern. PMID:26969370

  17. Exploration and monitoring geothermal activity using Landsat ETM + images. A case study at Aso volcanic area in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mia, Md. Bodruddoza; Nishijima, Jun; Fujimitsu, Yasuhiro

    2014-04-01

    Thermal activity monitoring in and around active volcanic areas using remote sensing is an essential part of volcanology nowadays. Three identical approaches were used for thermal activity exploration at Aso volcanic area in Japan using Landsat ETM + images. First, the conventional methods for hydrothermal alteration mapping were applied to find the most active thermal region after exploring geothermal indicator minerals. Second, we found some thermally highly anomalous regions around Nakadake crater using land surface temperature estimation. Then, the Stefan-Boltzmann equation was used for estimating and also monitoring radiative heat flux (RHF) from the most active region of about 8 km2 in and around Nakadake crater in the central part of the Aso volcano. To fulfill the required parameter in the Stefan-Boltzmann equation for radiative heat flux, the NDVI (Normalized differential vegetation index) method was used for spectral emissivity, and the mono-window algorithm was used for land surface temperature of this study area. The NDVI value was used to divide land-cover in the study area into four types: water, bare ground, mixed and vegetated land. The bare land was found within the most active region. Vegetation coverage area showed an inverse relationship with total RHF in this study as health of thermally stressed vegetation supports this relationship. The spatial distribution of spectral emissivity ranged from 0.94 to 0.99 in our study. Land surface temperature was estimated using a mono-window algorithm and was highest LST in 2008 and lowest in 2011. The results of RHF showed that the highest pixel RHF was found to be about 296 W/m2 in 2008. Total RHF was obtained of about 607 MW in 2002 and the lowest was about 354 MW in 2008. The RHF anomaly area was found the highest in 2002 and was lowest in 2011. The highest total heat discharge rate (HDR) obtained about 3918 MW in 2002 and lowest total HDR about 2289 MW in 2008 from this study area. But in the case of

  18. Anti-quorum sensing activity of selected sponge extracts: a case study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pejin, Boris; Talevska, Aleksandra; Ciric, Ana; Glamoclija, Jasmina; Nikolic, Milos; Talevski, Trajce; Sokovic, Marina

    2014-01-01

    The anti-quorum sensing activities towards the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01 (pyocyanin production, biofilm formation and twitching and flagella motility) of two crude extracts (methanol and acetone) of the freshwater sponge Ochridaspongia rotunda (Arndt, 1937) were evaluated in vitro for the first time. Both extracts demonstrated P. aeruginosa pyocyanin inhibitory activity, reducing its production for 49.90% and 42.44%, respectively. In addition, they both showed higher anti-biofilm activity (48.29% and 53.99%, respectively) than ampicillin (30.84%). Finally, O. rotunda extracts effectively reduced twitching and flagella motility of P. aeruginosa. Taken all together, these results suggest that endemic sponge species from the oldest lake in Europe may offer novel bioactive natural products with promising medicinal potential towards P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:25039944

  19. Expressive Morality in a Collaborative Learning Activity: A Case Study in the Creation of Moral Meaning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Bill; Buzzelli, Cary A.

    2002-01-01

    Considers the way moral meanings are created, Expressed, and negotiated in the actions and words of participants as they engage in a collaborative science activity. Offers an analysis of two excerpts from a video recording of a third grade classroom in which two students work with each other and with a visiting teacher on an experiment that…

  20. Delivering Sustainable Practice? A Case Study of the Scottish Active Schools Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Gavin

    2009-01-01

    Since 1999, concerns about Scotland's future health and economic performance have profoundly impacted on the new Scottish Executive. Research highlighting an obesity crisis facing young Scots has, together with the work of Scotland's Physical Activity Task Force and Physical Education Review Group, encouraged the education of all young Scots to be…

  1. Case study: Comparison of biological active compounds in milk from organic and conventional dairy herds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conflicting reports of the quantities of biologically active compounds present in milk from organic grass-fed and conventional herds show that more research is required, especially as these compounds are linked to human health benefits and can improve the health value consumers place on dairy produc...

  2. Expanding "Within Context" to "Across Contexts" Learning: A Case Study of Informal and Formal Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Mi Song; Hung, Wei Loong David; Jamaludin, Azilawati Bte; Lim, Seo Hong

    2014-01-01

    Learning happens not only in schools, but also in every context that affords new experiences and opportunities for metacognition. We aim to maximize the different activity-milieux in which learners are engaged in developing their life-long learning dispositions to learn within and across contexts. This paper is a follow up of an earlier published…

  3. Motivating Nursing Faculty to Use Active Learning Strategies: A Qualitative Multiple Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardell, Traci Lee

    2011-01-01

    The nursing shortage remains of great concern to the nursing profession and to nursing educators. With the projected need for Registered Nurses high and the attrition rate in nursing programs remaining high, a focus on retention of qualified nursing students may be needed. One way to contribute to enhanced retention is using active learning…

  4. A Case Study of an Induction Year Teacher's Problem-Solving Using the LIBRE Model Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerra, Norma S.; Flores, Belinda Bustos; Claeys, Lorena

    2009-01-01

    Background: A federally-funded program at the University of Texas at San Antonio adopted a holistic problem solving mentoring approach for novice teachers participating in an accelerated teacher certification program. Aims/focus of discussion: To investigate a novice teacher's problem-solving activity through self-expression of challenges and…

  5. A Case Study on Using Prediction Markets as a Rich Environment for Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Patrick; Garvey, John; McGrath, Fergal

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, prediction markets are presented as an innovative pedagogical tool which can be used to create a Rich Environment for Active Learning (REAL). Prediction markets are designed to make forecasts about specific future events by using a market mechanism to aggregate the information held by a large group of traders about that event into a…

  6. Advancing the M-Learning Research Agenda for Active, Experiential Learning: Four Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyson, Laurel Evelyn; Litchfield, Andrew; Lawrence, Elaine; Raban, Ryszard; Leijdekkers, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on an m-learning research agenda instituted at our university in order to explore how mobile technology can enhance active, experiential learning. Details of the implementation and results of four areas of m-learning are presented: mobile supported fieldwork, fostering interactivity in large lectures with mobile technology,…

  7. Assessing active faulting by hydrogeological modeling and superconducting gravimetry: A case study for Hsinchu Fault, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Tzuyi; Cheng, Ching-Chung; Hwang, Cheinway; Crossley, David

    2014-09-01

    We develop a new hydrology and gravimetry-based method to assess whether or not a local fault may be active. We take advantage of an existing superconducting gravimeter (SG) station and a comprehensive groundwater network in Hsinchu to apply the method to the Hsinchu Fault (HF) across the Hsinchu Science Park, whose industrial output accounts for 10% of Taiwan's gross domestic product. The HF is suspected to pose seismic hazards to the park, but its existence and structure are not clear. The a priori geometry of the HF is translated into boundary conditions imposed in the hydrodynamic model. By varying the fault's location, depth, and including a secondary wrench fault, we construct five hydrodynamic models to estimate groundwater variations, which are evaluated by comparing groundwater levels and SG observations. The results reveal that the HF contains a low hydraulic conductivity core and significantly impacts groundwater flows in the aquifers. Imposing the fault boundary conditions leads to about 63-77% reduction in the differences between modeled and observed values (both water level and gravity). The test with fault depth shows that the HF's most recent slip occurred in the beginning of Holocene, supplying a necessary (but not sufficient) condition that the HF is currently active. A portable SG can act as a virtual borehole well for model assessment at critical locations of a suspected active fault.

  8. A Case Study of Two Teachers Attempting to Create Active Mathematics Discourse Communities with Latinos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Craig Joseph

    2013-01-01

    This is a qualitative study of two English-dominant mathematics teachers, who I refer to as "monolingual" because they speak only English and do not speak competently or extensively the cultural language of their students. This study explores how these teachers plan, implement, and reflect upon lessons with respect to their bilingual,…

  9. A Case Study of URM Retention through IBP's Professional Development and Mentoring Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Ricciardi, L.; Detrick, L.; Siegfried, D.; Fauver, A.; Ithier-Guzman, W.; Thomas, S. H.; Valaitis, S.

    2012-12-01

    , focuses on increasing the retention rate of URM students receiving advanced degrees in Earth system science. Through a three-phase structure of activities, the program addresses major barriers to retention in ESS including isolation, lack of preparation and professional development, and lack of mentoring. Program activities center on peer-to-peer community building, professional development exercises, networking experiences, one-on-one mentoring, and a facilitated virtual community. MS PHD'S participants report a reduced sense of isolation, an increased sense of community, and a higher level of confidence about their ability to succeed in their chosen field. As of August 2012, 189 students have participated in the program. 60 of those students are currently enrolled in a PhD. program. Another 35 have completed their PhD and are actively engaged in the ESS workforce.

  10. Activity Diagrams for DEVS Models: A Case Study Modeling Health Care Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Ozmen, Ozgur; Nutaro, James J

    2015-01-01

    Discrete Event Systems Specification (DEVS) is a widely used formalism for modeling and simulation of discrete and continuous systems. While DEVS provides a sound mathematical representation of discrete systems, its practical use can suffer when models become complex. Five main functions, which construct the core of atomic modules in DEVS, can realize the behaviors that modelers want to represent. The integration of these functions is handled by the simulation routine, however modelers can implement each function in various ways. Therefore, there is a need for graphical representations of complex models to simplify their implementation and facilitate their reproduction. In this work, we illustrate the use of activity diagrams for this purpose in the context of a health care behavior model, which is developed with an agent-based modeling paradigm.

  11. Application of Activated Sludge Model No. 1 to biological treatment of pure winery effluents: case studies.

    PubMed

    Stricker, A E; Racault, Y

    2005-01-01

    The practical applicability of computer simulation of aerobic biological treatment systems for winery effluents was investigated to enhance traditional on-site evaluation of new processes. As there is no existing modelling tool for pure winery effluent, a model widely used for municipal activated sludge (ASM1) was used. The calibration and validation steps were performed on extended on-site data. The global soluble COD, DO and OUR were properly reproduced. Possible causes for the remaining discrepancies between measured and simulated data were identified and suggestions for improvement directions were made to adapt ASM1 to winery effluents. The calibrated model was then used to simulate scenarios to evaluate the plant behaviour for different operation or design. In combination with on-site observations, it allowed us to establish useful and justified improvement suggestions for aeration tank and aeration device design as well as feed, draw and aeration operation. PMID:15771107

  12. Optimization of active distribution networks: Design and analysis of significative case studies for enabling control actions of real infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moneta, Diana; Mora, Paolo; Viganò, Giacomo; Alimonti, Gianluca

    2014-12-01

    The diffusion of Distributed Generation (DG) based on Renewable Energy Sources (RES) requires new strategies to ensure reliable and economic operation of the distribution networks and to support the diffusion of DG itself. An advanced algorithm (DISCoVER - DIStribution Company VoltagE Regulator) is being developed to optimize the operation of active network by means of an advanced voltage control based on several regulations. Starting from forecasted load and generation, real on-field measurements, technical constraints and costs for each resource, the algorithm generates for each time period a set of commands for controllable resources that guarantees achievement of technical goals minimizing the overall cost. Before integrating the controller into the telecontrol system of the real networks, and in order to validate the proper behaviour of the algorithm and to identify possible critical conditions, a complete simulation phase has started. The first step is concerning the definition of a wide range of "case studies", that are the combination of network topology, technical constraints and targets, load and generation profiles and "costs" of resources that define a valid context to test the algorithm, with particular focus on battery and RES management. First results achieved from simulation activity on test networks (based on real MV grids) and actual battery characteristics are given, together with prospective performance on real case applications.

  13. The case study approach

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The case study approach allows in-depth, multi-faceted explorations of complex issues in their real-life settings. The value of the case study approach is well recognised in the fields of business, law and policy, but somewhat less so in health services research. Based on our experiences of conducting several health-related case studies, we reflect on the different types of case study design, the specific research questions this approach can help answer, the data sources that tend to be used, and the particular advantages and disadvantages of employing this methodological approach. The paper concludes with key pointers to aid those designing and appraising proposals for conducting case study research, and a checklist to help readers assess the quality of case study reports. PMID:21707982

  14. Antiepileptic drugs with histone deacetylase inhibition activity and prostate cancer risk: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Jukka K; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Auvinen, Anssi; Murtola, Teemu J

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies suggest that antiepileptic drugs with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor properties may have prostate cancer preventive effects. We evaluated the association between antiepileptic drug use and prostate cancer risk in a population-based case-control study. The study included all new prostate cancer cases diagnosed in Finland in 1995-2002 and matched controls (24,657 case-control pairs) identified from the Finnish Cancer Registry and the Population Register Center, respectively. Information on antiepileptic drug purchases was obtained from the national prescription reimbursement database. Odds ratios and their 95 % confidence intervals were estimated using age-adjusted and multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression analysis. Compared to never-users of antiepileptic drugs, the overall prostate cancer risk was decreased among users of phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and valproic acid (multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.47, 95 % CI 0.24-0.92; OR 0.82, 95 % CI 0.71-0.94, and OR 0.62, 95 % CI 0.42-0.92, respectively), but not among users of other antiepileptic drugs. Overall prostate cancer risk decreased in a dose-dependent manner by cumulative amount, duration and yearly dosage (intensity) of HDAC inhibitors valproic acid and carbamazepine. The risk of advanced prostate cancer was decreased only among carbamazepine users (OR 0.65, 95 % CI 0.44-0.96). Our results support possible prostate cancer preventive effects of HDAC inhibitors. However, also phenobarbital use was associated with decreased prostate cancer risk, despite not having HDAC inhibiting activity. The mechanism of action for antiepileptic drugs in prostate cancer deserves further study. PMID:27038166

  15. Energy, Economics and the Environment: Case Studies and Teaching Activities for Elementary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Dept. of Education, Indianapolis. Center for School Improvement and Performance.

    This curriculum guide for middle school environmental education focuses on energy, economics, and the environment (EEE), and the interrelatedness of these three areas of study. The booklet is designed to provide teachers and students with a conceptual framework for analyzing complicated issues that involve the economic implications of energy and…

  16. Active Supervision, Precorrection, and Explicit Timing: A High School Case Study on Classroom Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haydon, Todd; Kroeger, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    One proactive approach to increasing student engagement in schools is implementing Positive Behavior Intervention and Support (PBIS) strategies. PBIS focuses on prevention and concentrates on quality-of-life issues that include improved academic achievement, enhanced social competence, and safe learning and teaching environments. This study is a…

  17. Mashing-Up Wikis and Forums: A Case Study of Collaborative Problem-Based Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ioannou, Andri; Stylianou-Georgiou, Agni

    2012-01-01

    A lot of studies have investigated the isolated use of threaded discussion and wiki technologies to facilitate collaboration in online learning settings. Nevertheless, the integration of both technologies into a potentially superior collaborative learning tool has not been explicitly investigated. This manuscript reports on an effort to undertake…

  18. Active Learning through Student Film: A Case Study of Cultural Geography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Jon

    2013-01-01

    This study contributes to the debate over the potential of film as a pedagogical aid. It argues that integrating film production into the assessment of undergraduate modules secures advantages for student learning: students connect their ideas more explicitly to "real world" examples; new voices and understandings are introduced to…

  19. The Environment, Attitudes and Activities of Rural Women: A Case Study of Jhok Sayal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Seemin Anwar

    Conducted in the Punjab in Jhok Sayal, a predominantly Muslim village, this narrative study described: the environment and living conditions of women in this rural village (comprised mainly of tenants and landless labourers); the attitudes of the women toward education, marriage, family planning, and skills; and the woman's daily and annual…

  20. Can phylogeny predict chemical diversity and potential medicinal activity of plants? A case study of amaryllidaceae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background During evolution, plants and other organisms have developed a diversity of chemical defences, leading to the evolution of various groups of specialized metabolites selected for their endogenous biological function. A correlation between phylogeny and biosynthetic pathways could offer a predictive approach enabling more efficient selection of plants for the development of traditional medicine and lead discovery. However, this relationship has rarely been rigorously tested and the potential predictive power is consequently unknown. Results We produced a phylogenetic hypothesis for the medicinally important plant subfamily Amaryllidoideae (Amaryllidaceae) based on parsimony and Bayesian analysis of nuclear, plastid, and mitochondrial DNA sequences of over 100 species. We tested if alkaloid diversity and activity in bioassays related to the central nervous system are significantly correlated with phylogeny and found evidence for a significant phylogenetic signal in these traits, although the effect is not strong. Conclusions Several genera are non-monophyletic emphasizing the importance of using phylogeny for interpretation of character distribution. Alkaloid diversity and in vitro inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and binding to the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) are significantly correlated with phylogeny. This has implications for the use of phylogenies to interpret chemical evolution and biosynthetic pathways, to select candidate taxa for lead discovery, and to make recommendations for policies regarding traditional use and conservation priorities. PMID:22978363

  1. Finding the Little 'c' in Physics: A Multiple Case Study Examining the Development of Creative Activities in the Physics Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Christopher

    This study focused on how physics teachers develop and implement activities that promote creative thinking strategies in the standards based physics classroom. A particular focus was placed on every day or little "c", creativity, which can be taught in the high school classroom. The study utilized a multiple case study design, which allows for in-depth study in a variety of settings. Four participants from various high schools were identified utilizing administrator recommendations. Data were then collected via interviews, observations, and documents. The data were coded and analyzed for emerging themes. The themes were then merged to determine findings to the stated research questions. The research demonstrated the importance of modifying activities for student interest and understanding through effective use of scientific inquiry. The past experiences and professional development of the participants served as a vital piece to the development of their educational pedagogy especially concerning inquiry and questioning strategies. It was also established that an unstructured, positive classroom environment is a vital aspect of teaching while supporting creative thinking skills.

  2. Case study of an approved corrective action integrating active remediation with intrinsic remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Teets, D.B.; Guest, P.R.; Blicker, B.R.

    1996-12-01

    Parsons Engineering Science, Inc., performed UST removals and/or site assessments at UST system locations at a former US Air Force Base (AFB) in Denver, Colorado. Four UST systems, incorporating 17 USTs, were located within the petroleum, oils, and lubricants bulk storage yard (POL Yard) of the former AFB. During the tank removals and subsequent site investigations, petroleum hydrocarbon contamination was found in soils at each site. Significant releases from two of the UST systems resulted in a dissolved benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) plume in the groundwater, and smear-zone contamination of soils beneath the majority of the POL Yard. Because of the close proximity of the UST systems, and the presence of the groundwater plume beneath the POL Yard, a corrective action plan (CAP) was prepared that encompassed all four UST systems. An innovative, risk-based CAP integrated active remediation of petroleum-contaminated soils with intrinsic remediation of groundwater. A natural attenuation evaluation for the dissolved BTEX was performed to demonstrate that natural attenuation processes are providing adequate remediation of groundwater and to predict the fate of the groundwater plume. BTEX concentrations versus distance were regressed to obtain attenuation rates, which were then used to calculate BTEX degradation rates using a one-dimensional, steady-state analytical solution. Additionally, electron acceptor concentrations in groundwater were compared to BTEX concentrations to provide evidence that natural attenuation of BTEX compounds was occurring. The natural attenuation evaluation was used in the CAP to support the intrinsic remediation with long-term monitoring alternative for groundwater, thereby avoiding the installation of an expensive groundwater remediation system.

  3. Human migration activities drive the fluctuation of ARGs: Case study of landfills in Nanjing, eastern China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingming; Ye, Mao; Schwab, Arthur P; Li, Xu; Wan, Jinzhong; Wei, Zhong; Wu, Jun; Friman, Ville-Petri; Liu, Kuan; Tian, Da; Liu, Manqiang; Li, Huixin; Hu, Feng; Jiang, Xin

    2016-09-01

    Landfills are perfect sites to study the effect of human migration on fluctuation of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) as they are the final destination of municipal waste. For example, large-scale human migration during the holidays is often accompanied by changes in waste dumping having potential effects on ARG abundance. Three landfills were selected to examine fluctuation in the abundance of fifteen ARGs and Intl1 genes for 14 months in Nanjing, eastern China. Mass human migration, the amount of dumped waste and temperature exerted the most significant effects on bimonthly fluctuations of ARG levels in landfill sites. As a middle-sized cosmopolitan city in China, millions of college students and workers migrate during holidays, contributing to the dramatic increases in waste production and fluctuation in ARG abundances. In line with this, mass migration explained most of the variation in waste dumping. The waste dumping also affected the bioaccessibility of mixed-compound pollutants that further positively impacted the level of ARGs. The influence of various bioaccessible compounds on ARG abundance followed the order: antibiotics>nutrients>metals>organic pollutants. Concentrations of bioaccessible compounds were more strongly correlated with ARG levels compared to total compound concentrations. Improved waste classification and management strategies could thus help to decrease the amount of bioaccessible pollutants leading to more effective control for urban ARG dissemination. PMID:27179703

  4. Multilayer stress from gravity and its tectonic implications in urban active fault zone: A case study in Shenzhen, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chuang; Wang, Hai-hong; Luo, Zhi-cai; Ning, Jin-sheng; Liu, Hua-liang

    2015-03-01

    It is significant to identify urban active faults for human life and social sustainable development. The ordinary methods to detect active faults, such as geological survey, artificial seismic exploration, and electromagnetic exploration, are not convenient to be carried out in urban area with dense buildings. It is also difficult to supply information about vertical extension of the deeper faults by these methods. Gravity, reflecting the mass distribution of the Earth's interior, provides an alternative way to detect faults, which is more efficient and convenient for urban active fault detection than the aforementioned techniques. Based on the multi-scale decomposition of gravity anomalies, a novel method to invert multilayer horizontal tectonic stresses is proposed. The inverted multilayer stress fields are further used to infer the distribution and stability of the main faults. In order to validate our method, the multilayer stress fields in the Shenzhen fault zone are calculated as a case study. The calculated stress fields show that their distribution is controlled significantly by the strike of the main faults and can be used to derive depths of the faults. The main faults in Shenzhen may range from 4 km to 20 km in the depth. Each layer of the crust is nearly equipressure since the horizontal tectonic stress has small amplitude. It indicates that the main faults in Shenzhen are relatively stable and have no serious impact on planning and construction of the city.

  5. Birds of a feather stay active together: a case study of an all-male older adult exercise program.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, William L; Beauchamp, Mark R

    2013-04-01

    In this article, the authors report the results of a case study examining a group-based exercise program for older adult men. The purpose of the investigation was to identify the elements of this program responsible for its appeal. Interviews, conducted with a purposely sampled subset of program members, were subject to content-analytic procedures. Participants identified social connectedness (reflected by themes of demographic homogeneity, support and care, customs and traditions, and interpersonal comparisons) and supportive leadership behaviors (constituted by communication, the provision of choice, and individualized attention) as major attractions in the program. A few participants also noted the challenge that exists when a program is seen by some as being a social program that provides opportunities for exercise and by others as an exercise program that provides opportunities for socializing. Findings are discussed in relation to contextual factors associated with older adult men's involvement in physical activity programs. PMID:22899819

  6. [Qualitative case study].

    PubMed

    Debout, Christophe

    2016-06-01

    The qualitative case study is a research method which enables a complex phenomenon to be explored through the identification of different factors interacting with each other. The case observed is a real situation. In the field of nursing science, it may be a clinical decision-making process. The study thereby enables the patient or health professional experience to be conceptualised. PMID:27338694

  7. SETDA Case Studies 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Educational Technology Directors Association, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The State Educational Technology Directors Association (SETDA) published a series of case studies from 28 states to showcase examples of how ARRA EETT ("American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Enhancing Education Through Technology") grant funds have impacted teaching and learning. SETDA collected data for the case studies through a variety…

  8. A Case Study: Analyzing City Vitality with Four Pillars of Activity-Live, Work, Shop, and Play.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Matt; Nordstrom, Blake W; Scholes, Jon; Joncas, Kate; Gordon, Patrick; Krivenko, Elliott; Haynes, Winston; Higdon, Roger; Stewart, Elizabeth; Kolker, Natali; Montague, Elizabeth; Kolker, Eugene

    2016-03-01

    This case study evaluates and tracks vitality of a city (Seattle), based on a data-driven approach, using strategic, robust, and sustainable metrics. This case study was collaboratively conducted by the Downtown Seattle Association (DSA) and CDO Analytics teams. The DSA is a nonprofit organization focused on making the city of Seattle and its Downtown a healthy and vibrant place to Live, Work, Shop, and Play. DSA primarily operates through public policy advocacy, community and business development, and marketing. In 2010, the organization turned to CDO Analytics ( cdoanalytics.org ) to develop a process that can guide and strategically focus DSA efforts and resources for maximal benefit to the city of Seattle and its Downtown. CDO Analytics was asked to develop clear, easily understood, and robust metrics for a baseline evaluation of the health of the city, as well as for ongoing monitoring and comparisons of the vitality, sustainability, and growth. The DSA and CDO Analytics teams strategized on how to effectively assess and track the vitality of Seattle and its Downtown. The two teams filtered a variety of data sources, and evaluated the veracity of multiple diverse metrics. This iterative process resulted in the development of a small number of strategic, simple, reliable, and sustainable metrics across four pillars of activity: Live, Work, Shop, and Play. Data during the 5 years before 2010 were used for the development of the metrics and model and its training, and data during the 5 years from 2010 and on were used for testing and validation. This work enabled DSA to routinely track these strategic metrics, use them to monitor the vitality of Downtown Seattle, prioritize improvements, and identify new value-added programs. As a result, the four-pillar approach became an integral part of the data-driven decision-making and execution of the Seattle community's improvement activities. The approach described in this case study is actionable, robust, inexpensive

  9. Recombinant human activated protein C resets thrombin generation in patients with severe sepsis – a case control study

    PubMed Central

    de Pont, Anne-Cornélie JM; Bakhtiari, Kamran; Hutten, Barbara A; de Jonge, Evert; Vroom, Margreeth B; Meijers, Joost CM; Büller, Harry R; Levi, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC) is the first drug for which a reduction of mortality in severe sepsis has been demonstrated. However, the mechanism by which this reduction in mortality is achieved is still not clearly defined. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the dynamics of the anticoagulant, anti-inflammatory and pro-fibrinolytic action of rhAPC in patients with severe sepsis, by comparing rhAPC-treated patients with case controls. Methods In this prospectively designed multicenter case control study, 12 patients who were participating in the ENHANCE study, an open-label study of rhAPC in severe sepsis, were treated intravenously with rhAPC at a constant rate of 24 μg/kg/h for a total of 96 h. Twelve controls with severe sepsis matching the inclusion criteria received standard therapy. The treatment was started within 48 h after the onset of organ failure. Blood samples were taken before the start of the infusion and at 4, 8, 24, 48, 96 and 168 h, for determination of parameters of coagulation and inflammation. Results Sepsis-induced thrombin generation as measured by thrombin-antithrombin complexes and prothrombin fragment F1+2, was reset by rhAPC within the first 8 h of infusion. The administration of rhAPC did not influence parameters of fibrinolysis and inflammation. There was no difference in outcome or occurrence of serious adverse events between the treatment group and the control group. Conclusion Sepsis-induced thrombin generation in severely septic patients is reset by rhAPC within the first 8 h of infusion without influencing parameters of fibrinolysis and inflammation. PMID:16277710

  10. Active faulting Vs other surface displacing complex geomorphic phenomena. Case studies from a tectonically active area, Abruzzi Region, central Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Sardo, Lorenzo; Gori, Stefano; Falcucci, Emanuela; Saroli, Michele; Moro, Marco; Galadini, Fabrizio; Lancia, Michele; Fubelli, Giandomenico; Pezzo, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    How can be univocally inferred the genesis of a linear surface scarp as the result of an active and capable fault (FAC) in tectonically active regions? Or, conversely, how it is possible to exclude that a scarp is the result of a capable fault activation? Trying to unravel this open questions, we show two ambiguous case studies about the problem of the identification of active and capable faults in a tectonically active area just based on the presence of supposed fault scarps at surface. The selected cases are located in the area comprised between the Middle Aterno Valley Fault (MAVF) and the Campo Imperatore Plain (Abruzzi Region, central Apennines), nearby the epicentral area of the April 6th, 2009 L'Aquila earthquake. In particular, the two case studies analysed are located in a region characterized by a widespread Quaternary faults and by several linear scarps: the case studies of (i) Prata D'Ansidonia area and (ii) Santo Stefano di Sessanio area. To assess the origin and the state of activity of the investigated geomorphic features, we applied a classical geological and geomorphological approach, based on the analysis of the available literature, the interpretation of the aerial photographs, field surveying and classical paleoseismological approach, the latter consisting in digging excavations across the analysed scarps. These analysis were then integrated by morphometrical analyses. As for case (i), we focused on determining the geomorphic "meaning" of linear scarps carved onto fluvial-deltaic conglomerates (dated to the Early Pleistocene; Bertini and Bosi, 1993), up to 3 meters high and up to 1,5 km long, that border a narrow, elongated and flat-bottom depressions, filled by colluvial deposits. These features groove the paleo-landsurface of Valle Daria (Bosi and Bertini, 1970), wide landsurface located between Barisciano and Prata D'Ansidonia. Entwining paleoseismological trenching with geophysical analyses (GPR, ERT and microgravimetrical prospections), it

  11. MULTIPLE CONTAMINANTS CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information taken from the arsenic demonstration program projects that have treatment systems removing multiply contaminants from drinking water. The case studies sited in the presentation consist of projects that have arsenic along with either nitrate, ...

  12. Laos case study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Peuan Mit is a Lao organization working to address the needs of children and youth living and working on the streets. This case study outlines how a trusted and strong relationship with local police provides mutual benefit. PMID:22769869

  13. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  14. Mapping Research Activities and Technologies for Sustainability and Environmental Studies--A Case Study at University Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hara, Keishiro; Uwasu, Michinori; Kurimoto, Shuji; Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Umeda, Yasushi; Shimoda, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    Systemic understanding of potential research activities and available technology seeds at university level is an essential condition to promote interdisciplinary and vision-driven collaboration in an attempt to cope with complex sustainability and environmental problems. Nonetheless, any such practices have been hardly conducted at universities…

  15. Dissent by Design: Fostering Student Activism in Higher Education through a Case Study of Student Affairs in a Public University in the Philippines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernardo, Maria Aurora Correa; Baranovich, Diana-Lea

    2016-01-01

    Student activism is a ubiquitous component in most democratic societies. Despite its disconcerting implications to the university's operations, it remains an important agenda to student development in higher education. This study presents the case of a university in the Philippines where student activism is a predominant ethos. The findings expose…

  16. Active faulting Vs other surface displacing complex geomorphic phenomena. Case studies from a tectonically active area, Abruzzi Region, central Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Sardo, Lorenzo; Gori, Stefano; Falcucci, Emanuela; Saroli, Michele; Moro, Marco; Galadini, Fabrizio; Lancia, Michele; Fubelli, Giandomenico; Pezzo, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    How can be univocally inferred the genesis of a linear surface scarp as the result of an active and capable fault (FAC) in tectonically active regions? Or, conversely, how it is possible to exclude that a scarp is the result of a capable fault activation? Trying to unravel this open questions, we show two ambiguous case studies about the problem of the identification of active and capable faults in a tectonically active area just based on the presence of supposed fault scarps at surface. The selected cases are located in the area comprised between the Middle Aterno Valley Fault (MAVF) and the Campo Imperatore Plain (Abruzzi Region, central Apennines), nearby the epicentral area of the April 6th, 2009 L'Aquila earthquake. In particular, the two case studies analysed are located in a region characterized by a widespread Quaternary faults and by several linear scarps: the case studies of (i) Prata D'Ansidonia area and (ii) Santo Stefano di Sessanio area. To assess the origin and the state of activity of the investigated geomorphic features, we applied a classical geological and geomorphological approach, based on the analysis of the available literature, the interpretation of the aerial photographs, field surveying and classical paleoseismological approach, the latter consisting in digging excavations across the analysed scarps. These analysis were then integrated by morphometrical analyses. As for case (i), we focused on determining the geomorphic "meaning" of linear scarps carved onto fluvial-deltaic conglomerates (dated to the Early Pleistocene; Bertini and Bosi, 1993), up to 3 meters high and up to 1,5 km long, that border a narrow, elongated and flat-bottom depressions, filled by colluvial deposits. These features groove the paleo-landsurface of Valle Daria (Bosi and Bertini, 1970), wide landsurface located between Barisciano and Prata D'Ansidonia. Entwining paleoseismological trenching with geophysical analyses (GPR, ERT and microgravimetrical prospections), it

  17. Using group consciousness theories to understand political activism: case studies of Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, and Ingo Hasselbach.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Lauren E

    2010-12-01

    I describe and integrate several theories of group consciousness and collective action, along with 3 case studies of political activists. I have 2 goals: (1) to use the theories to help us understand something puzzling about each life and (2) to use the cases to complicate and expand the theories. Barack Obama's case raises the question of how someone with a politicized Black identity evolved into a politician working for all oppressed people and complicates racial identity development theory. Hillary Clinton's case raises the question of how a middle-class White girl raised in a conservative family became a prominent Democratic Party politician and complicates group consciousness theories by demonstrating the importance of generation and personality. Ingo Hasselbach's (a former German neo-Nazi leader) case illustrates relative deprivation theory and raises the question of whether theories developed to explain subordinate group consciousness can be applied to movements of dominant group consciousness. PMID:21039526

  18. Teaching astronomy with case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Timothy F.

    2015-11-01

    Breaking the students into small, collaborative learning groups to solve a meaningful task together is one of the most successful and fully evaluated teaching techniques implemented over the last century. Although there are many ways to accomplish small group learning, a long-standing and consistently successful collaborative class activity is to use the case study teaching strategy. The use of case studies is common in medical schools and law schools, but not so common in the teaching of astronomy. Case studies create meaningful conversations among students and with the professor by focusing on life-like dilemmas to be solved. Case study tasks ask audience members to synthesize several ideas or evaluate scenarios that have not been explicitly presented to them in the lecture or in available readings.

  19. The decision, implementation and assessment of a credit-bearing activity class by faculty in residence: A case study.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Janet; Harrison, Geoff; Humphrey, Michael; Sielaff, Cala; Wintrow, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    This case study reports on a programmatic decision to require a credit-bearing course that was made by Faculty in Residence (FIR), including its implementation and results over a two-year period from 2010-2012. The focus is on FIR and on the impact of their decision upon the students enrolled in their Living Learning Communities (LLCs). The credit-bearing course was a Kinesiology Activities class taken by all seven LLCs at Boise State University. Anonymous feedback from students was obtained via end of semester surveys; results were used to improve the course. Survey feedback was analyzed to assess the value students perceived to have gained from the course. The majority of students reported gaining value from the class. Students noted that it positively affected their time management/personal accountability, that it decreased their stress level and that it increased their awareness of the Recreational Center offerings. Some students were critical of the course, reporting little to no value or even resentment about the course requirement. The decision, implementation and improvements of the course required faculty leadership and full participation of all LLCs; perceptions of the FIR in terms of the effects of adding the required course on their LLC are reported. PMID:26519021

  20. The development of BCB-sealed galvanic cells. Case study: aluminum-platinum cells activated with sodium hypochlorite electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlutowski, J.; Biver, C. J.; Wang, W.; Knighton, S.; Bumgarner, J.; Langebrake, L.; Moreno, W.; Cardenas-Valencia, A. M.

    2007-08-01

    Energy on demand is an important concept in remote sensor development. The fabrication process for silicon-wafer-based, totally enclosed galvanic cells is presented herein. Benzocyclyobutene (BCB), a photo-patternable material, is used as the adhesive layer between the silicon wafers on which metal electrodes are patterned to form the cells' electrolyte cavity. As a case study, and since aluminum is an anode material with thermodynamic high energy density, this metal is evaporated onto a wafer and used as an anode. A sputtered platinum film collects the charge and provides a catalytic surface in the cell cathode. The metal film patterning process and wafer-to-wafer bonding with BCB is detailed. The difficulties encountered, and design modifications to overcome these, are presented. Cells of the mentioned design were activated with sodium hypochlorite solution electrolyte. Typical potential outputs for the cells, as a function of operational time, are also presented. With a 5 kΩ load, a potential of 1.4 V was maintained for over 240 min, until depletion of the electrolyte occurred. Average cell energy outputs under electrical loads between 100 Ω and 5 kΩ were in the range of 4-10 J with columbic densities ranging from 45 to 83 Ah L-1.

  1. Social media activism and Egyptians' use of social media to combat sexual violence: an HiAP case study.

    PubMed

    Peuchaud, Sheila

    2014-06-01

    This paper represents a case study of how social media activists have harnessed the power of Facebook, Twitter and mobile phone networks to address sexual harassment in Egypt. HarassMap plots reports of sexual harassment on a Google Map and informs victims of support services. Tahrir Bodyguard and Operation Anti-Sexual Harassment (OpAntiSH) protect female protestors who have been vulnerable to sexual aggression at the hands of unruly mobs and by agents of the state. Activists have access to an Android app called 'I'm Getting Arrested' or 'Byt2ebed 3alia' in Egyptian Arabic. The app sends the time and GPS coordinates of an arrest to family, fellow activists, legal counsel and social media outlets. The hope is the initiatives described in this paper could inspire public health ministries and activist NGOs to incorporate crowdsourcing social media applications in the spirit of health in all policies (HiAP). To that end, this paper will begin by defining social media activism from the perspective of the communications discipline. This paper will then demonstrate the significance of sexual harassment as a public health issue, and describe several social media efforts to document incidents and protect victims. The paper will conclude with discussion regarding how these innovations could be integrated into the HiAP approach. PMID:25217347

  2. The Impact of Institutional Culture on Student Activism: A Multi-Case Study in Christian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    This study contributes to the description and meaning of student activism within the context of Christian college environments and cultures, and is interpreted through the sociological concept of symbolic interactionism. The purpose of this study is to help fill the void in the literature on student activism at Christian colleges and universities,…

  3. EFL Learning through Language Activities outside the Classroom: A Case Study of English Education Students in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chusanachoti, Ruedeerath

    2009-01-01

    This study explored how Thai learners of English as a foreign language, engaged in English activities outside of classrooms to learn and practice the English language. Three research questions of this study include: (a) How do the participants perceive access and availability of out of class English activities in local environments?, (b) How do…

  4. The Implications of Null Patterns and Output Unit Activation Functions on Simulation Studies of Learning: A Case Study of Patterning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaremchuk, V.; Willson, L.R.; Spetch, M.L.; Dawson, M.R.W.

    2005-01-01

    Animal learning researchers have argued that one example of a linearly nonseparable problem is negative patterning, and therefore they have used more complicated multilayer networks to study this kind of discriminant learning. However, it is shown in this paper that previous attempts to define negative patterning problems to artificial neural…

  5. Essential activities and knowledge domains of case management: new insights from the CCMC role and functions study.

    PubMed

    Tahan, Hussein

    2006-01-01

    The Commission for Case Manager Certification (CCMC) defines case management (CM) as "a collaborative process that assesses, plans, implements, coordinates, monitors, and evaluates the options and services required to meet an individual's health needs. [Case management] uses communication and available resources to promote quality, cost-effective outcomes." The practice of CM spans the entire health-care spectrum, including pre-acute, acute, and post-acute settings, and the involvement of varied care providers, such as nurses, social workers, rehabilitation counselors, physicians, and other allied health professionals. So what does it mean to practice as a case manager? What roles and job functions are performed and what knowledge is required of a professional in the field for effective practice? These highly relevant questions reflect the thinking of the CCMC commissioners when the latest Case Manager Role and Functions study was undertaken. The primary purpose of this research, which is conducted every 5 years by the CCMC, is to capture the current state of CM practice. This type of in-depth research is required to support an evidence-based certification examination such as the one offered by CCMC-the certified case manager (CCM) credential. Moreover, as the first and largest nationally accredited organization to certify US case managers, the CCMC recognizes its responsibility to undertake and promote scientifically conducted research in the field of CM. PMID:16720258

  6. Exploring the Relevance of the Personal and Social Responsibility Model in Adapted Physical Activity: A Collective Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Paul M.; White, Katherine; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the application of the Personal and Social Responsibility Model (PSRM) in an adapted physical activity program. Although the PSRM was developed for use with underserved youth, scholars in the field of adapted physical activity have noted its potential relevance for children with disabilities. Using a…

  7. Intranodular clusters of activated cells with T follicular helper phenotype in nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma: a pilot study of 32 cases from Finland.

    PubMed

    Nathwani, Bharat N; Vornanen, Martine; Winkelmann, Ria; Kansal, Rina; Doering, Claudia; Hartmann, Sylvia; Hansmann, Martin L

    2013-09-01

    In nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL), little is known about the presence of intranodular clusters of cytologically activated lymphoid cells producing a moth-eaten pattern histologically. This pilot study of 32 NLPHL cases from Finland ascertained (1) the frequency of the intranodular clusters of activated lymphoid cells, (2) the immunophenotype of the activated cells, (3) the size and immunophenotype of the rosetting cells, and (4) the clinical significance of the activated cells. Histologically, intranodular clusters of activated cells produced a moth-eaten pattern in 100% (32 cases; subtle in 62.5%, overt in 37.5%). In immunostains, activated cells in subtle clusters (20 cases) were very difficult to identify. Twelve cases had overt clusters of activated cells, which were positive with CD3, CD4, PD1, CXCL13 (T follicular helper [T(FH)] phenotype), but rarely with Ki-67 and BCL2. Most activated rosetting cells had the same immunophenotype as the nonrosetting cells, except for CXCL13. Clinical presentation for all 32 Finnish patients was distinctive: 97% men, 97% with peripheral lymphadenopathy and 35.5% with stage III/IV disease. Only 22% relapsed; 97% were in remission. There was no significant clinical difference between cases with overt and subtle clusters. Intranodular activated TFH cells in NLPHL appeared to be nonproliferating and not long-living, and they were not associated with any adverse clinical outcome. Although most activated cells were TFH cells, it seemed that they were unable to increase the number of malignant cells. The pathogenetic role of the intranodular activated TFH and the small T cells in NLPHL needs further investigation. PMID:23684509

  8. Geothermal Case Studies

    DOE Data Explorer

    Young, Katherine

    2014-09-30

    database.) In fiscal year 2015, NREL is working with universities to populate additional case studies on OpenEI. The goal is to provide a large enough dataset to start conducting analyses of exploration programs to identify correlations between successful exploration plans for areas with similar geologic occurrence models.

  9. Using Muon Radiography to map the Bedrock Geometry underneath an active Glacier: A Case Study in the Central Swiss Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechmann, Alessandro; Mair, David; Nishiyama, Ryuichi; Ariga, Akitaka; Ariga, Tomoko; Ereditato, Antonio; Scampoli, Paola; Vladymyrov, Mykhailo; Schlunegger, Fritz

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, muon radiography has been successfully applied to tackle geological issues and has enjoyed an increasing interest, mainly because this methodology enriches the geophysical arsenal by another shallow subsurface imaging tool that may give independent constraints on material density. Muons that originate from the collision of cosmic particles with Earth's atmosphere are able to penetrate the material in question and can finally be recorded by a detector. The irradiation intensity can then be inverted to the density of the traversed material. Various successful two-dimensional attempts have already been made to image e.g. magma chambers inside volcanoes (Lesparre et al., 2012; Nishiyama et al., 2014; Tanaka et al., 2005), but this method has yet to be applied for mapping the base of glaciers, where the density contrasts between ice and underlying bedrock are even greater than those between magma and host rock. While a high Alpine setup limits the possibilities to deploy traditional geophysical methods for surveying the base of glaciers (because of inaccessible terrain, poor infrastructure or the presence of water in the ice), muon radiography might prove to be a promising alternative. The muon intensity data from stereo observation can be related to the three-dimensional geometry of the interface between the glacier and its bedrock. Given a suitable input model, this relation can be solved within the framework of geophysical inverse problems. The final model then gives geologists invaluable information on erosional mechanisms underneath active glaciers, as this has not yet been observed. We test this methodology for a site within the Jungfrau region, situated in the central Swiss Alps. Our first goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of the method through a case study at the Eiger glacier, starting from a toy model in a first phase and continuing with real data in a second phase. For this purpose, we installed cosmic-ray detectors at two sites inside

  10. Forecasting landslide activations by means of GA-SAKe. An example of application to three case studies in Calabria (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iovine, Giulio G. R.; De Rango, Alessio; Gariano, Stefano L.; Terranova, Oreste G.

    2016-04-01

    GA-SAKe - the Genetic-Algorithm based release of the hydrological model SAKe (Self Adaptive Kernel) - allows to forecast the timing of activation of landslides [1, 2], based on dates of landslide activations and rainfall series. The model can be applied to either single or set of similar landslides in a homogeneous context. Calibration of the model is performed through Genetic-Algorithm, and provides families of optimal, discretized solutions (kernels) that maximize the fitness function. The mobility functions are obtained through convolution of the optimal kernels with rain series. The shape of the kernel, including its base time, is related to magnitude of the landslide and hydro-geological complexity of the slope. Once validated, the model can be applied to estimate the timing of future landslide activations in the same study area, by employing measured or forecasted rainfall. GA-SAKe is here employed to analyse the historical activations of three rock slides in Calabria (Southern Italy), threatening villages and main infrastructures. In particular: 1) the Acri-Serra di Buda case, developed within a Sackung, involving weathered crystalline and metamorphic rocks; for this case study, 6 dates of activation are available; 2) the San Fili-Uncino case, developed in clay and conglomerate overlaying gneiss and biotitic schist; for this case study, 7 dates of activation are available [2]; 3) the San Benedetto Ullano-San Rocco case, developed in weathered metamorphic rocks; for this case study, 3 dates of activation are available [1, 3, 4, 5]. The obtained results are quite promising, given the high performance of the model against slope movements characterized by numerous historical activations. Obtained results, in terms of shape and base time of the kernels, are compared by taking into account types and sizes of the considered case studies, and involved rock types. References [1] Terranova O.G., Iaquinta P., Gariano S.L., Greco R. & Iovine G. (2013) In: Landslide

  11. Atrial fibrillation case study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sarah; Wilson, Tracey

    2016-03-01

    This article discusses the irregular heart rhythm caused by atrial fibrillation (AF). A brief overview of the pathophysiology will be provided. A case study is discussed to highlight the treatment and management of AF. The care provision describes common signs and symptoms and also the treatment and management of AF within the maternity care setting. The importance of maintaining the mother-baby dyad is highlighted. For the purpose of maintaining confidentiality the woman will be referred to as Shama. PMID:27044188

  12. Association Between Polymorphisms of ADRBK1 Gene and Plasma Renin Activity in Hypertensive Patients: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu; Li, Nanfang; Yao, Xiaoguang; Heizati, Mulalibieke; Zhang, Delian; Zhu, Qing; Chang, Guijuan; Zhang, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    Background Renin is the first step of the RAS cascade, which is a major regulator of salt-volume homeostasis. Adrenergic beta receptor kinase 1 (ADRBK1) plays important roles in regulating blood pressure via the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC), which plays an important role in Na+ reabsorption in the renal collecting duct. The present case-control study was designed to investigate the potential relationship between polymorphisms of ADRBK1 and plasma renin activity (PRA) in hypertension. Material/Methods We recruited 1831 hypertensive and 422 normotensive Han Chinese subjects. Sitting PRA (ng/mL/h) was measured using radioimmunoassay method. Hypertensive patients were classified into 4 renin categories via PRA quartile. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the ADRBK1 gene (rs1894111, rs4930416, rs7127431, rs12286664, and rs3730147) were identified via TaqMan polymerase chain reaction. Results Comparison of the hypertensive group and the control group showed significant differences in distribution of genotypes and alleles of rs1894111 (P<0.05). Moreover, distribution of the dominant model (CC vs. CT+TT) in rs1894111 was lower in the hypertensive group than in the control group (P<0.05). Subjects were classified into 4 subgroups based on PRA quartile; the dominant model (CC vs. CT+TT) of rs1894111 was significantly lower in the quartile 1 group (the group with the lowest PRA) than in the control group (P<0.05). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the dominant model (CC vs. CT+TT) of rs1894111 was significantly different in the hypertensive group (OR=1.590, 95%CI=1.022–2.474, P<0.05), particularly in the quartile 1 group (OR=1.845, 95%CI=1.119–3.042, P<0.05), but not in the quartile 4 group. Conclusions The dominant model (CC vs. CT+TT) of rs1894111 polymorphism in the ADRBK1 gene might be associated with low-renin hypertension in Han Chinese. PMID:27555048

  13. Human activity under high pressure: A case study on fluctuation scaling of air traffic controller's communication behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanjun; Zhang, Qiqian; Zhu, Chenping; Hu, Minghua; Duong, Vu

    2016-01-01

    Recent human dynamics research has unmasked astonishing statistical characteristics such as scaling behaviors in human daily activities. However, less is known about the general mechanism that governs the task-specific activities. In particular, whether scaling law exists in human activities under high pressure remains an open question. In air traffic management system, safety is the most important factor to be concerned by air traffic controllers who always work under high pressure, which provides a unique platform to study human activity. Here we extend fluctuation scaling method to study air traffic controller's communication activity by investigating two empirical communication datasets. Taken the number of controlled flights as the size-like parameter, we show that the relationships between the average communication activity and its standard deviation in both datasets can be well described by Taylor's power law, with scaling exponent α ≈ 0.77 ± 0.01 for the real operational data and α ≈ 0.54 ± 0.01 for the real-time training data. The difference between the exponents suggests that human dynamics under pressure is more likely dominated by the exogenous force. Our findings may lead to further understanding of human behavior.

  14. Why do patients with stroke not receive the recommended amount of active therapy (ReAcT)? Study protocol for a multisite case study investigation

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, David J; Tyson, Sarah; Rodgers, Helen; Drummond, Avril; Palmer, Rebecca; Prescott, Matthew; Tyrrell, Pippa; Burton, Louisa; Grenfell, Katie; Brkic, Lianne; Forster, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Increased frequency and intensity of inpatient therapy contributes to improved outcomes for stroke survivors. Differences exist in the amount of therapy provided internationally. In England, Wales and Northern Ireland it is recommended that a minimum of 45 min of each active therapy should be provided at least 5 days a week provided the therapy is appropriate and that the patient can tolerate this. Sentinel Stroke National Audit Programme (2014) data demonstrate this standard is not being achieved for most patients. No research been undertaken to explore how therapists in England manage their practice to meet time-specific therapy recommendations. The ReAcT study aims to develop an in-depth understanding of stroke therapy provision, including how the guideline of 45 min a day of each relevant therapy, is interpreted and implemented by therapists, and how it is experienced by stroke-survivors and their families. Methods and analysis A multisite ethnographic case study design in a minimum of six stroke units will include modified process mapping, observations of service organisation, therapy delivery and documentary analysis. Semistructured interviews with therapists and service managers (n=90), and with patients and informal carers (n=60 pairs) will be conducted. Data will be analysed using the Framework approach. Ethics and dissemination The study received a favourable ethical opinion via the National Research Ethics Service (reference number: 14/NW/0266). Participants will provide written informed consent or, where stroke-survivors lack capacity, a consultee declaration will be sought. ReAcT is designed to generate insights into the organisational, professional, social, practical and patient-related factors acting as facilitators or barriers to providing the recommended amount of therapy. Provisional recommendations will be debated in consensus meetings with stakeholders who have not participated in ReAcT case studies or interviews. Final

  15. Active-learning strategies: the use of a game to reinforce learning in nursing education. A case study.

    PubMed

    Boctor, Lisa

    2013-03-01

    The majority of nursing students are kinesthetic learners, preferring a hands-on, active approach to education. Research shows that active-learning strategies can increase student learning and satisfaction. This study looks at the use of one active-learning strategy, a Jeopardy-style game, 'Nursopardy', to reinforce Fundamentals of Nursing material, aiding in students' preparation for a standardized final exam. The game was created keeping students varied learning styles and the NCLEX blueprint in mind. The blueprint was used to create 5 categories, with 26 total questions. Student survey results, using a five-point Likert scale showed that they did find this learning method enjoyable and beneficial to learning. More research is recommended regarding learning outcomes, when using active-learning strategies, such as games. PMID:22910398

  16. Diagnostic and prognostic value of serum creatine-kinase activity in ill cats: a retrospective study of 601 cases.

    PubMed

    Aroch, Itamar; Keidar, Ido; Himelstein, Anat; Schechter, Miri; Shamir, Merav Hagar; Segev, Gilad

    2010-06-01

    In veterinary medicine, serum creatine-kinase (CK) activity is mostly used to assess skeletal muscle damage. This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of increased CK activity in a large, ill-cat population and to characterise associated diseases, clinical and laboratory findings and its prognostic value. Cats with a complete serum biochemistry analysis were consecutively enrolled, divided into two CK activity-based groups (within and above reference interval) and compared. The study included 601 cats. Median serum CK was 402 U/l (range 16-506870). Increased CK (>250 U/l) was observed in 364 (60%) cats, and>30-fold its upper reference limit in 43 (7%). Cats with increased CK had greater (P < or = 0.05) body weight, and were more likely to have a history of collapse, dyspnoea, abnormal lung sounds, cyanosis, shock and paraplegia, higher median serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase activities and total bilirubin and triglyceride concentrations, but lower, median total protein, albumin, globulin and cholesterol concentrations and proportion of anorexia than cats with normal CK. Cardiac diseases, trauma, bite wounds, systemic bacterial infections, prior anaesthesia and intramuscular injections were more common (P < or = 0.05) in cats with increased compared to normal CK activity. The hospitalisation period was longer (P=0.007) and treatment cost and mortality were higher (P<0.005) in cats with increased CK activity. However, CK activity was an inaccurate outcome predictor (area under the receiver operator characteristics curve 0.58). Increased CK activity is very common in ill cats. PMID:20236849

  17. Economic impact of stimulated technological activity. Part 3: Case study, knowledge additions and earth links from space crew systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A case study of knowledge contributions from the crew life support aspect of the manned space program is reported. The new information needed to be learned, the solutions developed, and the relation of new knowledge gained to earthly problems were investigated. Illustrations are given in the following categories: supplying atmosphere for spacecraft; providing carbon dioxide removal and recycling; providing contaminant control and removal; maintaining the body's thermal balance; protecting against the space hazards of decompression, radiation, and meteorites; minimizing fire and blast hazards; providing adequate light and conditions for adequate visual performance; providing mobility and work physiology; and providing adequate habitability.

  18. Solar activity as a possible cause of large forest fires--a case study: analysis of the Portuguese forest fires.

    PubMed

    Gomes, J F P; Radovanovic, M

    2008-05-01

    Fires of large dimension destroy forests, harvests and housing objects. Apart from that combustion products and burned surfaces become large ecological problems. Very often fires emerge simultaneously on different locations of a region so a question could be asked if they always have been a consequence of negligence, pyromania, high temperatures or maybe there has been some other cause. This paper is an attempt of establishing the possible connection between forest fires that numerous satellites registered and activities happening on the Sun immediately before fires ignite. Fires emerged on relatively large areas from Portugal and Spain on August 2005, as well as on other regions of Europe. The cases that have been analyzed show that, in every concrete situation, an emission of strong electromagnetic and thermal corpuscular energy from highly energetic regions that were in geo-effective position had preceded the fires. Such emissions have, usually, very high energy and high speeds of particles and come from coronary holes that also have been either in the very structure or in the immediate closeness of the geo-effective position. It should also be noted that the solar wind directed towards the Earth becomes weaker with deeper penetration towards the topographic surface. However, the results presented in this paper suggest that, there is a strong causality relationship between solar activity and the ignition of these forest fires taking place in South-western Europe. PMID:18291443

  19. Conformational entropic maps of functional coupling domains in GPCR activation: A case study with beta2 adrenergic receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fan; Abrol, Ravinder; Goddard, William, III; Dougherty, Dennis

    2014-03-01

    Entropic effect in GPCR activation is poorly understood. Based on the recent solved structures, researchers in the GPCR structural biology field have proposed several ``local activating switches'' that consisted of a few number of conserved residues, but have long ignored the collective dynamical effect (conformational entropy) of a domain comprised of an ensemble of residues. A new paradigm has been proposed recently that a GPCR can be viewed as a composition of several functional coupling domains, each of which undergoes order-to-disorder or disorder-to-order transitions upon activation. Here we identified and studied these functional coupling domains by comparing the local entropy changes of each residue between the inactive and active states of the β2 adrenergic receptor from computational simulation. We found that agonist and G-protein binding increases the heterogeneity of the entropy distribution in the receptor. This new activation paradigm and computational entropy analysis scheme provides novel ways to design functionally modified mutant and identify new allosteric sites for GPCRs. The authors thank NIH and Sanofi for funding this project.

  20. Conducting and Reporting Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtman, Merilyn; Taylor, Satomi Izumi

    Issues and elements of case study research are explored and illustrated with the example of a case study of a kindergarten in a suburb of Tokyo (Japan). Case study research is a type of qualitative research that concentrates on a single unit or entity, with boundaries established by the researcher. The case is an example drawn from a larger class,…

  1. Colorectal adenomas and energy intake, body size and physical activity: a case-control study of subjects participating in the Nottingham faecal occult blood screening programme.

    PubMed Central

    Little, J.; Logan, R. F.; Hawtin, P. G.; Hardcastle, J. D.; Turner, I. D.

    1993-01-01

    Most case-control studies of colorectal cancer have shown a positive association with energy intake. In contrast studies which have considered physical activity have found the most active to have a lower risk of colonic cancer and obesity appears to be no more than weakly related to colorectal cancer. We therefore compared energy intake determined by a diet history interview, self-reported height and weight, together with measures of lifetime job activity levels and leisure activity in the year prior to interview in 147 cases with colorectal adenomas and two control groups (a) 153 age-sex matched FOB-negative subjects (b) 176 FOB-positive subjects in whom no adenoma or carcinoma was found. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals () adjusted for age, sex and social class. No association with weight or body mass index was found. The only association with physical activity found with both control groups was an inverse association with running or cycling for half an hour continuously at least once a week RR 0.46 (0.2-1.3) compared with control group (a), and RR = 0.32 (0.1-0.8) compared with (b), but few subjects engaged in such activity. There was an inverse association with energy intake (trend chi 2 = 5.3, P < 0.025) in the comparison with control group (a) only, a finding which is consistent with those of two previous studies of asymptomatic adenoma. PMID:8427777

  2. The Case for the Application of Worldwide Marine Radioactivity Studies In the Search for Undeclared Facilities and Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Schanfein

    2013-06-01

    Undeclared nuclear facilities unequivocally remain the most difficult safeguards challenge facing the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Recent cases of undeclared facilities revealed in Iran and Syria, which are NPT signatory States, show both the difficulty and the seriousness of this threat to nonproliferation. In the case of undeclared nuclear facilities, the most effective deterrent against proliferation is the application of Wide-Area Environmental Sampling (WAES); however, WAES is currently cost-prohibitive. As with any threat, the most effective countering strategy is a multifaceted approach. Some of the approaches applied by the IAEA include: open source analysis, satellite imagery, on-site environmental sampling, complementary access under the Additional Protocol (where in force), traditional safeguards inspections, and information provided by member States. These approaches, naturally, are focused on specific States. Are there other opportunities not currently within the IAEA purview to assess States that may provide another opportunity to detect clandestine facilities? In this paper, the author will make the case that the IAEA Department of Safeguards should explore the area of worldwide marine radioactivity studies as one possible opportunity. One such study was released by the IAEA Marine Environment Laboratory in January 2005. This technical document focused on 90Sr, 137Cs, and 239/240Pu. It is clearly a challenging area because of the many sources of anthropogenic radionuclides in the world’s oceans and seas including: nuclear weapons testing, reprocessing, accidents, waste dumping, and industrial and medical radioisotopes, whose distributions change based on oceanographic, geochemical, and biological processes, and their sources. It is additionally challenging where multiple States share oceans, seas, and rivers. But with the application of modern science, historical sampling to establish baselines, and a focus on the most relevant

  3. Effects of stratified active layers on high-altitude permafrost warming: a case study on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xicai; Li, Yanping; Yu, Qihao; Shi, Xiaogang; Yang, Daqing; Roth, Kurt

    2016-07-01

    Seasonally variable thermal conductivity in active layers is one important factor that controls the thermal state of permafrost. The common assumption is that this conductivity is considerably lower in the thawed than in the frozen state, λt/λf < 1. Using a 9-year dataset from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) in conjunction with the GEOtop model, we demonstrate that the ratio λt/λf may approach or even exceed 1. This can happen in thick (> 1.5 m) active layers with strong seasonal total water content changes in the regions with summer-monsoon-dominated precipitation pattern. The conductivity ratio can be further increased by typical soil architectures that may lead to a dry interlayer. The unique pattern of soil hydraulic and thermal dynamics in the active layer can be one important contributor for the rapid permafrost warming at the study site. These findings suggest that, given the increase in air temperature and precipitation, soil hydraulic properties, particularly soil architecture in those thick active layers must be properly taken into account in permafrost models.

  4. Vertebral Angiosarcoma. Case Study.

    PubMed

    Guzik, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Bone angiosarcomas, especially vertebral angiosarcomas, are very rare. There are no studies based on large clinical samples in the literature, and only a few single case reports can be found. The symptoms of the disease are not specific. It is usually detected incidentally or at a late stage when pathological vertebral fractures or neurological complications occur. Diagnostic imaging and history help to recognize the tumour behind the symptoms, but do not allow accurate clinical diagnosis. The basis for a diagnosis is the histopathological examination supported by immunohistochemistry (IHC) assays. The case of a 26-year-old woman with an angiosarcoma involving the eighth thoracic vertebra we report reflects diagnostic problems adversely affecting the efficacy and accuracy of treatment offered to patients. The patient underwent three surgeries of the spine, including two biopsies. A needle biopsy did not provide sufficient information for the diagnosis. An open excisional biopsy, which at the same time temporarily reduced neurological deficits in the patient, was the only chance to obtain an accurate diagnosis. The third surgery was posterior decompression of the spinal cord due to the rapidly escalating paraparesis. It was not until 8 weeks later that the final diagnosis was established. At that time, the patient could not be qualified for any supplementary treatment. The patient died in hospital 6 months after the onset of disease. PMID:26468177

  5. PREDICT : A CASE STUDY.

    SciTech Connect

    Kerscher, W. J. III; Booker, J. M.; Meyer, Mary A.

    2001-01-01

    Delphi Automotive Systems and the Los Alamos National Laboratory worked together to develop PREDICT, a new methodology to characterize the reliability of a new product during its development program. Rather than conducting testing after hardware has been built, and developing statistical confidence bands around the results, this updating approach starts with an early reliability estimate characterized by large uncertainty, and then proceeds to reduce the uncertainty by folding in fresh information in a Bayesian framework. A considerable amount of knowledge is available at the beginning of a program in the form of expert judgment which helps to provide the initial estimate. This estimate is then continually updated as substantial and varied information becomes available during the course of the development program. This paper presents a case study of the application of PREDICT, with the objective of further describing the methodology. PREDICT has been honored with an R&D 100 Award presented by R&D Magazine.

  6. Activated matrix metalloproteinase-8 in saliva as diagnostic test for periodontal disease? A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Izadi Borujeni, Susan; Mayer, Matthias; Eickholz, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Untreated periodontal disease may influence general health. However, how may a physician, who is not trained in periodontal probing, detect untreated periodontitis? Activated matrix metalloproteinase-8 (aMMP-8) in saliva correlates with periodontal probing parameters. Thus, sensitivity and specificity of a chair-side test for aMMP-8 to detect periodontitis were evaluated. Thirty cases [untreated chronic periodontitis (ChP); 15 generalized moderate and 15 generalized severe] and 30 controls [probing depths (PD) ≤3 mm, vertical probing attachment level (PAL-V) ≤2 mm at <30 % of sites) were examined periodontally (PD, PAL-V, bleeding on probing). Subsequently, the aMMP-8 test was performed. The test kit becomes positive with ≥25 ng/ml aMMP-8 in the sample. The aMMP-8 test was positive in 87 % of ChP and in 40 % of controls. That corresponds to a sensitivity of 87 % and a specificity of 60 %. The sensitivity to detect generalized severe ChP was 93 % (60 % specificity). Backward stepwise logistic regression analysis to explain positive aMMP-8 tests identified exclusively ChP with an odds ratio of 9.8 (p < 0.001). Positive results of the aMMP-8 test significantly correlate with generalized ChP. The aMMP-8 test may be used by physicians to detect periodontitis in their patients. PMID:25841875

  7. Multiparametric approach to unravel the mechanism of Strombolian activity at a multivent system: Mt. Etna case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannata, Andrea; Del Bello, Elisabetta; Kueppers, Ulrich; Privitera, Eugenio; Ricci, Tullio; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Sciotto, Mariangela; Spina, Laura; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Pena Fernandez, Juan Jose; Sesterhenn, Joern

    2016-04-01

    On 5th July 2014 an eruptive fissure (hereafter referred to as EF) opened at the base of North-East Crater (NEC) of Mt. Etna. EF produced both Strombolian explosions and lava effusion. Thanks to the multiparametric experiment planned in the framework of MEDSUV project, we had the chance to acquire geophysical and volcanological data, in order to investigate the ongoing volcanic activity at EF. Temporary instruments (2 broadband seismometers, 2 microphones, 3-microphone arrays, a high-speed video camera and a thermal-camera) were deployed near the active vents during 15-16 July 2014 and were integrated with the data recorded by the permanent networks. Several kinds of studies are currently in progress, such as: frequency analysis by Fourier Transform and Short Time Fourier Transform to evaluate the spectral content of both seismic and acoustic signals; partitioning of seismic and acoustic energies, whose time variations could reflect changes in the volcanic dynamics; investigation on the intertimes between explosions to investigate their recurrence behaviour; classification of the waveforms of infrasound events. Furthermore, joint analysis of video signals and seismic-acoustic wavefields outlined relationships between pyroclasts ejection velocity, total erupted mass, peak explosion pressure, and air-ground motion coupling. This multiparametric approach allowed distinguishing and characterizing individually the behavior of the two vents active along the eruptive fissure via their thermal, visible and infrasonic signatures and shed light in the eruptive dynamics.

  8. Contribution of high resolution PLEIADES imagery to active faults analysis. Case study of the Longriba Fault System, eastern Tibet.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansberque, Claire; Bellier, Olivier; Godard, Vincent; Lasserre, Cécile; Wang, Mingming; Xu, Xiwei; Tan, Xibin

    2015-04-01

    High resolution imagery has largely developed during those two last decades allowing the possibility to observe and quantify geological and geomorphological features ranging from meter to few centimeters. Active tectonic and geomorphological studies have greatly benefited from the systematic use of such data. For that reason, we tested the contribution of PLEAIDES images to the analysis of an active strike-slip fault system in eastern Tibet. We used 50 cm resolution panchromatic PLEIADES images in order to map active fault segmentation, localize offsets of geomorphic markers and quantify vertical and horizontal displacements. We propose a preliminary study using PLEIADES images along the Longriba Fault System (LFS). The LFS, located at the eastern Tibetan Plateau margin, is constituted of two NW-SE dextral strike-slip and parallel fault zones: Longriqu and Maoergai, 80 and 120 km-long, respectively. It accommodates ~4 mm/yr dextral slip and very few vertical motion. We used stereo-pairs to build relative Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) (without ground control points) with a horizontal resolution ranging from 2 to 5 m, in order to understand the geometry of the system. We measured fault segments with lengths ranging from a hundred meters to several kilometers which are relatively close from each others, and several offsets of geomorphic markers (alluvial fans, ridges, rivers) ranging from a few meters to ~40 m. According to the segmentation deduced from those results we suggest that the fault has a high seismic potential (>Mw7.0) and that probably many surface rupturing earthquakes occurred along the LFS over the Holocene.

  9. A Case Study Research of the Support Actions and Activities of External School Consultants to New Basic School Innovative Schools. (School Support Study).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Vilsteren, Cees A.

    In the Netherlands, the immediate support and coaching of primary schools and kindergartens is institutionalized in a nationwide network of local and regional school support agencies. This research study sought information about the role and characteristics of external consultants and their relationship to the school. Explorative case studies were…

  10. Cell-free extracellular enzymatic activity is linked to seasonal temperature changes: a case study in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltar, Federico; Legrand, Catherine; Pinhassi, Jarone

    2016-05-01

    Extracellular enzymatic activities (EEAs) are a crucial step in the degradation of organic matter. Dissolved (cell-free) extracellular enzymes in seawater can make up a significant contribution of the bulk EEA. However, the factors controlling the proportion of dissolved EEA in the marine environment remain unknown. Here we studied the seasonal changes in the proportion of dissolved relative to total EEA (of alkaline phosphatase (APase), β-glucosidase (BGase), and leucine aminopeptidase (LAPase)), in the Baltic Sea for 18 months. The proportion of dissolved EEA ranged between 37 and 100, 0 and 100, and 34 and 100 % for APase, BGase, and LAPase, respectively. A consistent seasonal pattern in the proportion of dissolved EEA was found among all the studied enzymes, with values up to 100 % during winter and < 40 % during summer. A significant negative relation was found between the proportion of dissolved EEA and temperature, indicating that temperature might be a critical factor controlling the proportion of dissolved relative to total EEA in marine environments. Our results suggest a strong decoupling of hydrolysis rates from microbial dynamics in cold waters. This implies that under cold conditions, cell-free enzymes can contribute to substrate availability at large distances from the producing cell, increasing the dissociation between the hydrolysis of organic compounds and the actual microbes producing the enzymes. This might also suggest a potential effect of global warming on the hydrolysis of organic matter via a reduction of the contribution of cell-free enzymes to the bulk hydrolytic activity.

  11. The Nature of Activated Non-classical Hydrogen Bonds: A Case Study on Acetylcholinesterase-Ligand Complexes.

    PubMed

    Berg, Lotta; Mishra, Brijesh Kumar; Andersson, C David; Ekström, Fredrik; Linusson, Anna

    2016-02-18

    Molecular recognition events in biological systems are driven by non-covalent interactions between interacting species. Here, we have studied hydrogen bonds of the CH⋅⋅⋅Y type involving electron-deficient CH donors using dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT) calculations applied to acetylcholinesterase-ligand complexes. The strengths of CH⋅⋅⋅Y interactions activated by a proximal cation were considerably strong; comparable to or greater than those of classical hydrogen bonds. Significant differences in the energetic components compared to classical hydrogen bonds and non-activated CH⋅⋅⋅Y interactions were observed. Comparison between DFT and molecular mechanics calculations showed that common force fields could not reproduce the interaction energy values of the studied hydrogen bonds. The presented results highlight the importance of considering CH⋅⋅⋅Y interactions when analysing protein-ligand complexes, call for a review of current force fields, and opens up possibilities for the development of improved design tools for drug discovery. PMID:26751405

  12. Real-world in-use activity, fuel use, and emissions for nonroad construction vehicles: a case study for excavators.

    PubMed

    Abolhasani, Saeed; Frey, H Christopher; Kim, Kangwook; Rasdorf, William; Lewis, Phil; Pang, Shih-Hao

    2008-08-01

    A study design was developed and demonstrated for deployment of a portable emission measurement system (PEMS) for excavators. Excavators are among the most commonly used vehicles in construction activities. The PEMS measured nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide, and opacity-based particulate matter. Data collection, screening, processing, and analysis protocols were developed to assure data quality and to quantify variability in vehicle fuel consumption and emissions rates. The development of data collection procedures was based on securing the PEMS while avoiding disruption to normal vehicle operations. As a result of quality assurance, approximately 90% of the attempted measurements resulted in valid data. On the basis of field data collected for three excavators, an average of 50% of the total nitric oxide emissions was associated with 29% of the time of operation, during which the average engine speed and manifold absolute pressure were significantly higher than corresponding averages for all data. Mass per time emission rates during non-idle modes (i.e., moving and using bucket) were on average 7 times greater than for the idle mode. Differences in normalized average rates were influenced more by intercycle differences than intervehicle differences. This study demonstrates the importance of accounting for intercycle variability in real-world in-use emissions to develop more accurate emission inventories. The data collection and analysis methodology demonstrated here is recommended for application to more vehicles to better characterize real-world vehicle activity, fuel use, and emissions for nonroad construction equipment. PMID:18720653

  13. The effect of involuntary motor activity on myoelectric pattern recognition: a case study with chronic stroke patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Li, Yun; Chen, Xiang; Li, Guanglin; Zev Rymer, William; Zhou, Ping

    2013-08-01

    Objective. This study investigates the effect of the involuntary motor activity of paretic-spastic muscles on the classification of surface electromyography (EMG) signals. Approach. Two data collection sessions were designed for 8 stroke subjects to voluntarily perform 11 functional movements using their affected forearm and hand at relatively slow and fast speeds. For each stroke subject, the degree of involuntary motor activity present in the voluntary surface EMG recordings was qualitatively described from such slow and fast experimental protocols. Myoelectric pattern recognition analysis was performed using different combinations of voluntary surface EMG data recorded from the slow and fast sessions. Main results. Across all tested stroke subjects, our results revealed that when involuntary surface EMG is absent or present in both the training and testing datasets, high accuracies (>96%, >98%, respectively, averaged over all the subjects) can be achieved in the classification of different movements using surface EMG signals from paretic muscles. When involuntary surface EMG was solely involved in either the training or testing datasets, the classification accuracies were dramatically reduced (<89%, <85%, respectively). However, if both the training and testing datasets contained EMG signals with the presence and absence of involuntary EMG interference, high accuracies were still achieved (>97%). Significance. The findings of this study can be used to guide the appropriate design and implementation of myoelectric pattern recognition based systems or devices toward promoting robot-aided therapy for stroke rehabilitation.

  14. Teaching science to 8th graders by engaging them in a design and technology activity: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidawi, Mai M.

    This study described how students can apply science concepts to a Design and Technology task. It also examined whether the students could transfer their scientific knowledge to their design of technology. The study was conducted at an urban school in Philadelphia where a sample of 36 eighth grade students were taught a science unit, Energy, Machines, and Motion, and engaged in a technology design task that was chosen based on the scientific content of the unit. Two approaches of relating teaching science to technological design were observed and described. Through the first approach, the students were given technology lessons in addition to their science lessons. This was to provide them with the technological knowledge that they needed in designing technology such as learning about the design process, selection of appropriate materials, and selection of appropriate tools and how to use them. Also, the students were taught the social skills that will enable them to develop an effective collaborative relationship with their peers such as conflict-management and brainstorming. Through the second approach, the students were taught the science unit and then at the end of the unit the students were given the design task as an assessment of their scientific knowledge. The students' experience of designing technology for each approach was described. The study was conducted using multiple tools and instruments such as observation, videotaping, interviews, and testing. The students were also given the survey PATT-USA to measure their attitude toward technology. The study showed that the students' learning of science was impacted by their weak prerequisite knowledge in science, their poor verbal and written communication skills and their style as dependent learners. Also, the study showed the great impact of the school and classroom cultures on the participation of the students in a Design and Technology activity. The students in this study showed great resistant to

  15. The Lililwan Project: study protocol for a population-based active case ascertainment study of the prevalence of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) in remote Australian Aboriginal communities

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Elizabeth J; Latimer, Jane; Carter, Maureen; Oscar, June; Ferreira, Manuela; Olson, Heather Carmichael; Lucas, Barbara; Doney, Robyn; Salter, Claire; Peadon, Elizabeth; Hawkes, Genevieve; Hand, Marmingee

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Anecdotal reports suggest that high-risk drinking in pregnancy is common in some remote Australian communities. Alcohol is teratogenic and may cause a range of lifelong conditions termed ‘fetal alcohol spectrum disorders’ (FASD). Australia has few diagnostic services for FASD, and prevalence of these neurodevelopmental disorders remains unknown. In 2009, Aboriginal leaders in the remote Fitzroy Valley in North Western Australia identified FASD as a community priority and initiated the Lililwani Project in partnership with leading research organisations. This project will establish the prevalence of FASD and other health and developmental problems in school-aged children residing in the Fitzroy Valley, providing data to inform FASD prevention and management. Methods and analysis This is a population-based active case ascertainment study of all children born in 2002 and 2003 and residing in the Fitzroy Valley. Participants will be identified from the Fitzroy Valley Population Project and Communicare databases. Parents/carers will be interviewed using a standardised diagnostic questionnaire modified for local language and cultural requirements to determine the demographics, antenatal exposures, birth outcomes, education and psychosocial status of each child. A comprehensive interdisciplinary health and neurodevelopmental assessment will be performed using tests and operational definitions adapted for the local context. Internationally recognised diagnostic criteria will be applied to determine FASD prevalence. Relationships between pregnancy exposures and early life trauma, neurodevelopmental, health and education outcomes will be evaluated using regression analysis. Results will be reported according to STROBE guidelines for observational studies. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval has been granted by the University of Sydney Human Research Ethics Committee, the Western Australian Aboriginal Health Information and Ethics Committee, the Western

  16. Natural Learning Case Study Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Natural Learning Case Study Archives (NLCSA) is a research facility for those interested in using case study analysis to deepen their understanding of common sense knowledge and natural learning (how the mind interacts with everyday experiences to develop common sense knowledge). The database comprises three case study corpora based on experiences…

  17. Annoyance and activity disturbance induced by high-speed railway and conventional railway noise: a contrastive case study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High-speed railway (HR, Electrified railway with service speed above 200 km/h.) noise and conventional railway (CR, Electrified railway with service speed under 200 km/h.) noise are different in both time and frequency domain. There is an urgent need to study the influence of HR noise and consequently, develop appropriate noise evaluation index and limits for the total railway noise including HR and CR noise. Methods Based on binaural recording of HR and CR noises in a approximate semi-free field, noise annoyance and activity disturbance induced by maximal train pass-by events in China were investigated through laboratory subjective evaluation. 80 students within recruited 102 students, 40 males and 40 females, 23.9 ± 2.1 years old, were finally selected as the subjects. After receiving noise stimulus via headphone of a binaural audio playback system, subjects were asked to express the annoyance or activity disturbance due to railway noise at a 0-100 numerical scale. Results The results show that with the same annoyance rating (A) or activity disturbance rating (D), the A-weighted equivalent sound pressure level (LAeq) of CR noise is approximately 7 dB higher than that of HR noise. Linear regression analysis between some acoustical parameters and A (or D) suggests that the coefficient of determination (R2) is higher with the instantaneous fast A-weighted sound pressure level (LAFmax) than that with LAeq. A combined acoustical parameter, LHC = 1.74LAFmax + 0.008LAFmax(Lp-LAeq), where Lp is the sound pressure level, was derived consequently, which could better evaluate the total railway noise, including HR and CR noise. More importantly, with a given LHC, the noise annoyance of HR and CR noise is the same. Conclusions Among various acoustical parameters including LHC and LAeq, A and D have the highest correlation with LHC. LHC has been proved to be an appropriate index to evaluate the total railway noise, including both HR and CR. However

  18. Case Studies in Wilderness Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Melissa; Tarter, Shana Lee

    Five case studies explore issues in wilderness medicine, with emphasis on evacuation decision making. The cases describe medical problems encountered during wilderness trips involving college or high school students. In each case, the situation and facts of the case are outlined, including the patient's medical history and vital signs, and at…

  19. Termination: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Ahron L

    2015-12-01

    In this article I posit and examine certain criteria and qualities for ending an analysis. The case study describes the end phase of a four-year psychoanalysis in which the patient's decision to move to another area forced the end of his analysis. We continued to explore and work through his core neurotic conflicts that included issues of competitive rivalry, dominance and submission, control, and anxiety about birth and death. A shift in the transference from me as a negative father to me as a supportive but competitive older brother was also examined in the context of ending treatment as well as other aspects of the transference. In addition, we analyzed the meaning of his ending treatment based on an extra-analytic circumstance. In discussing this phase of treatment, the definition and history of the term "termination" and its connotations are reviewed. Various criteria for completing an analysis are examined, and technical observations about this phase of treatment are investigated. It was found that while a significant shift in the transference occurred in this phase of the patient's analysis, conflicts related to the transference were not "resolved" in the classical sense. Terminating treatment was considered as a practical matter in which the patient's autonomy and sense of choice were respected and analyzed. PMID:26583444

  20. Improved workflow modelling using role activity diagram-based modelling with application to a radiology service case study.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Nagesh; Keast, John E; Ceglarek, Darek

    2014-10-01

    The modelling of complex workflows is an important problem-solving technique within healthcare settings. However, currently most of the workflow models use a simplified flow chart of patient flow obtained using on-site observations, group-based debates and brainstorming sessions, together with historic patient data. This paper presents a systematic and semi-automatic methodology for knowledge acquisition with detailed process representation using sequential interviews of people in the key roles involved in the service delivery process. The proposed methodology allows the modelling of roles, interactions, actions, and decisions involved in the service delivery process. This approach is based on protocol generation and analysis techniques such as: (i) initial protocol generation based on qualitative interviews of radiology staff, (ii) extraction of key features of the service delivery process, (iii) discovering the relationships among the key features extracted, and, (iv) a graphical representation of the final structured model of the service delivery process. The methodology is demonstrated through a case study of a magnetic resonance (MR) scanning service-delivery process in the radiology department of a large hospital. A set of guidelines is also presented in this paper to visually analyze the resulting process model for identifying process vulnerabilities. A comparative analysis of different workflow models is also conducted. PMID:24962645

  1. Optimization of electrostatics as a strategy for cold-adaptation: a case study of cold- and warm-active elastases.

    PubMed

    Papaleo, Elena; Olufsen, Magne; De Gioia, Luca; Brandsdal, Bjørn O

    2007-07-01

    Adaptation to both high and low temperatures requires proteins with special properties. While organisms living at or close to the boiling point of water need to have proteins with increased stability, other properties are required at temperatures close to the freezing point of water. Indeed, it has been shown that enzymes adapted to cold environments are less resistant to heat with a concomitant increased activity as compared to their warm-active counter-parts. Several recent studies have pointed in the direction that electrostatic interactions play a central role in temperature adaptation, and in this study we investigate the role such interactions have in adaptation of elastase from Atlantic salmon and pig. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to generate structural ensembles at 283 and 310 K of the psychrophilic and mesophilic elastase, and a total of eight 12 ns simulations have been carried out. Even though the two homologues have a highly similar three-dimensional structure, the location and number of charged amino acids are very different. Based on the simulated structures we find that very few salt-bridges are stable throughout the simulations, and provide little stabilization/destabilization of the proteins as judged by continuum electrostatic calculations. However, the mesophilic elastase is characterized by a greater number of salt-bridges as well as a putative salt-bridge network close to the catalytic site, indicating a higher rigidity of the components involved in the catalytic cycle. In addition, subtle differences are also found in the electrostatic potentials in the vicinity of the catalytic residues, which may explain the increased catalytic efficiency of the cold-adapted elastase. PMID:17084098

  2. Public involvement in the priority setting activities of a wait time management initiative: a qualitative case study

    PubMed Central

    Bruni, Rebecca A; Laupacis, Andreas; Levinson, Wendy; Martin, Douglas K

    2007-01-01

    Background As no health system can afford to provide all possible services and treatments for the people it serves, each system must set priorities. Priority setting decision makers are increasingly involving the public in policy making. This study focuses on public engagement in a key priority setting context that plagues every health system around the world: wait list management. The purpose of this study is to describe and evaluate priority setting for the Ontario Wait Time Strategy, with special attention to public engagement. Methods This study was conducted at the Ontario Wait Time Strategy in Ontario, Canada which is part of a Federal-Territorial-Provincial initiative to improve access and reduce wait times in five areas: cancer, cardiac, sight restoration, joint replacements, and diagnostic imaging. There were two sources of data: (1) over 25 documents (e.g. strategic planning reports, public updates), and (2) 28 one-on-one interviews with informants (e.g. OWTS participants, MOHLTC representatives, clinicians, patient advocates). Analysis used a modified thematic technique in three phases: open coding, axial coding, and evaluation. Results The Ontario Wait Time Strategy partially meets the four conditions of 'accountability for reasonableness'. The public was not directly involved in the priority setting activities of the Ontario Wait Time Strategy. Study participants identified both benefits (supporting the initiative, experts of the lived experience, a publicly funded system and sustainability of the healthcare system) and concerns (personal biases, lack of interest to be involved, time constraints, and level of technicality) for public involvement in the Ontario Wait Time Strategy. Additionally, the participants identified concern for the consequences (sustainability, cannibalism, and a class system) resulting from the Ontario Wait Times Strategy. Conclusion We described and evaluated a wait time management initiative (the Ontario Wait Time Strategy

  3. The active tropical cyclone season of 2005 2006 over Northwest Australia: Operational model performance and high resolution case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, B. W.; Leslie, L. M.; Leplastrier, M.; Qi, L.

    2007-08-01

    There are three main aims of this study. First, the main features of the active 2005 2006 Australian region tropical cyclone (TC) season are summarized, with particular emphasis on the northwest Australian region. Second, an assessment is made of the skill of the available operational global and regional numerical weather prediction (NWP) models for three of the most significant TCs (TCs Clare, Glenda and Hubert), each of which made landfall on the northwest coast of Australia. Third, high-resolution numerical modelling simulations of these same three TCs are described in detail. The numerical weather prediction (NWP) model used here was developed at the University of Oklahoma, and in this study it utilises initial and boundary conditions obtained from archived analyses and forecasts provided by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, as well as a 4D-Var data assimilation scheme to ingest all available satellite data. The high-resolution numerical model is multiply two-way nested, with the innermost domain having a resolution of 5 km. It was found that unlike the operational models, which were restricted by relatively low resolution and less data, the high resolution model was able to capture most of the major features of all three TC lifecycles including development from initial tropical depressions, intensification, and their tracks, landfall, and associated rainfall and wind fields.

  4. The Boston Schoolyard Initiative: A Study of Its Schoolyard Renovations--Disseminating Lessons Learned from a Case Study Analysis of a Successful Active Space Redevelopment Program. Program Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakashian, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Researchers in the Boston University Department of Environmental Health conducted a case study of the Boston Schoolyard Initiative, a project that provides funds and technical support to community groups dedicated to renovating schoolyards in Boston. Researchers described the process by which the Boston Schoolyard Initiative came into being and…

  5. Microbial bio-mineralization processes in hydrothermal travertine: the case study of two active travertine systems (Tuscany, Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barilaro, Federica; Bontognali, Tomaso R. R.; Mc Kenzie, Judith A.; Vasconcelos, Crisogono

    2015-04-01

    Modern hydrothermal travertine deposits, occurring today at Bagni San Filippo (Radicofani Basin) and at Bagni di Saturnia (Albegna Valley) in Tuscany, Central Italy, have been investigated with the main purpose to improve the understanding of the processes that control calcium carbonate precipitation in hydrothermal-spring settings. Present-day thermal activity at Bagni di Saturnia is characterized by a 37.5°C thermal spring with a rate of about 800 l/s, with a pH of ca. 6.4. Thermal water discharges at Bagni San Filippo reach a rate of 20 litres per second at a maximum temperature of 50°C and a pH of ca. 7. The springs expel water enriched in H2S-CO2-SO42- and HCO3- and divalent cations (Ca and Mg). In the studied areas, travertine precipitation occurs in association with living microbial mats and biofilms, composed of a heterogeneous community of green algae, filamentous cyanobacteria and other types of prokaryotes, anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria and heterotrophic heat-tolerant bacteria, with a variable amount of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Nine categories of fabric types, dominantly calcite and aragonite in composition, showing a wide range of macro- and micro-porosity, have been identified. High magnification analysis of dendritic and laminated boundstone, crystalline crust cementstone, raft boundstone, coated bubble boundstone, micrite mudstone and coated reed boundstone fabric types, suggests that precipitation occurs in association with organic matter. Diatoms, cyanobacteria filaments and other bacteria are then associated with the EPS and often appear totally or partially entombed (passively or actively) in it. Organic extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and often the external surface of cyanobacterial sheaths are the location where the calcite minerals nucleate and grow. Precipitation begins with organomineral nano-globules consisting of nanometre-size, from sub-spherical to globular-like, raised structures (5 to 80 nm diameter

  6. Underground electromagnetic activity in two regions with contrasting seismicity: a case study from the Eastern Alps and Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroň, Ivo; Koktavý, Pavel; Stemberk, Josef; Macků, Robert; Trčka, Tomáš; Škarvada, Pavel; Lenhardt, Wolfgang; Meurers, Bruno; Rowberry, Mattew; Marti, Xavi; Plan, Lukas; Grasemann, Berhnard; Mitrovic, Ivanka

    2016-04-01

    Electromagnetic emissions (EME) occur during the fracturing of solid materials under laboratory conditions and may represent potential earthquake precursors. We recorded EME from May 2015 to October 2015 in two caves situated in contrasting seismotectonic settings. Zbrašov Aragonite Caves are located close to the seismically quiescent contact between the Bohemian Massif and the Outer Western Carpathians while Obir Caves are located near the seismically active Periadriatic Fault on the southern margin of the Eastern Alps. The specific monitoring points are located at depths of tens of metres below the ground surface as such places are assumed to represent favourably shielded environments. The EME signals were continuously monitored by two custom-made Emission Data Loggers (EDLOG), comprising both analogue and digital parts. The crucial analogue component within the EDLOG is a wideband shielded magnetic loop antenna. To be able to observe EME related rock deformation and microfracturing we recorded signals between 10 and 200 kHz with a sampling frequency of 500 kHz. An ultralow noise preamplifier placed close to the antenna increases the signal-to-noise ratio. Further signal processing consisted of filtering, such as antialiasing and interference rejection, and additional amplification to fit the signal to the full scale range of the AD convertor. The digital part of the EDLOG comprises a range of PC components such as high-capacity replaceable data storage and unbuffered RAM, high-speed multichannel DAQ cards, and custom made control software in the programming environment LabVIEW. During our EME monitoring all the raw data were stored. This has allowed us to perform advanced data processing and detailed analysis. During the study period some artificial EME signals were observed in Zbrašov Aragonite Caves. This artificial noise may have overprinted any natural signals and is most likely to relate to the pumping of CO2. In contrast, markedly different signals were

  7. On the origin of rhythmic contractile activity of the esophagus in early achalasia, a clinical case study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji-Hong; Wang, Xuan-Yu; Liu, Louis W. C.; Yu, Wenzhen; Yu, Yuanjie; Zhao, Liang; Huizinga, Jan D.

    2013-01-01

    A patient with early achalasia presented spontaneous strong rhythmic non-propulsive contractions at ~7/min, independent of swallows. Our aim was to evaluate characteristics of the rhythmic contractions, provide data on the structure of pacemaker cells in the esophagus and discuss a potential role for interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in the origin of rhythmicity. We hypothesize that intramuscular ICC (ICC-IM) are the primary pacemaker cells. The frequency but not the amplitude of the rhythmic contractions was inhibited by the phosphodiesterase inhibitor drotaverine consistent with cAMP inhibiting pacemaker currents in ICC-IM. The frequency increased by wet swallows but not dry swallows, consistent with stretch causing increase in slow wave frequency in ICC-IM. New studies on archival material showed that ICC-IM were present throughout the human esophageal musculature and were not diminished in early achalasia. Although ICC-IM exhibited a low density, they were connected to PDGFRα-positive fibroblast-like cells with whom they formed a dense gap junction coupled network. Nitrergic innervation of ICC was strongly diminished in early achalasia because of the loss of nitrergic nerves. It therefore appears possibly that ICC-IM function as pacemaker cells in the esophagus and that the network of ICC and PDGFRα-positive cells allows for coupling and propagation of the pacemaker activity. Loss of nitrergic innervation to ICC in achalasia may render them more excitable such that its pacemaker activity is more easily expressed. Loss of propagation in achalasia may be due to loss of contraction-induced aboral nitrergic inhibition. PMID:23734090

  8. An Automated Approach to Transform Use Cases into Activity Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Tao; Briand, Lionel C.; Labiche, Yvan

    Use cases are commonly used to structure and document requirements while UML activity diagrams are often used to visualize and formalize use cases, for example to support automated test case generation. Therefore the automated support for the transition from use cases to activity diagrams would provide significant, practical help. Additionally, traceability could be established through automated transformation, which could then be used for instance to relate requirements to design decisions and test cases. In this paper, we propose an approach to automatically generate activity diagrams from use cases while establishing traceability links. Data flow information can also be generated and added to these activity diagrams. Our approach is implemented in a tool, which we used to perform five case studies. The results show that high quality activity diagrams can be generated. Our analysis also shows that our approach outperforms existing academic approaches and commercial tools.

  9. Calciphylaxis: a case study.

    PubMed

    Kauric-Klein, Zorica

    2012-01-01

    Caring for J.D. was a stressful experience. The extent of her wounds, pain, and limited options for treatment was very frustrating for the nursing staff. Although she did not survive, patient outcomes were met to some degree. Her pain was controlled to a greater extent, and there was less infection present in her wounds. The nurses worked with J.D. closely to improve her pain control and facilitate less painful dressing changes. They were vigilant in assessing the progress of her wound healing and communicating any increased signs of infections from her wounds. They sang with her to help distract her from the pain she was experiencing and to help her cope with her lengthy 8-month hospitalization. Providing care for J.D. was also a very important learning experience for nurses in terms of appropriate pain management for patients with CUA, wound care, and the need to sustain adequate nutrition to promote wound healing. CUA is a rare but potentially fatal disease that occurs in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). Early diagnosis and treatment are essential to prevent the devastating effects of this disease. Nephrology nurses need to reinforce the importance of keeping calcium, phosphorous, and parathyroid levels within normal ranges for their patients on dialysis. They also need to be vigilant in monitoring for potential CUA skin lesions to prevent and treat it early. To date, treatment options are mostly based on findings from case reports. Treatment requires a multidisciplinary approach with input from nephrologists, nurses, pain specialists, infectious disease specialists, and surgeons. The major goals of treatment are controlling risk factors, controlling pain, and preventing wound infection and possible sepsis. More studies need to be conducted to test interventions that may help treat CUA. PMID:23094342

  10. Estimation of active faulting in a slow deformation area: Culoz fault as a case study (Jura-Western Alps junction).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Taille, Camille; Jouanne, Francois; Crouzet, Christian; Jomard, Hervé; Beck, Christian; de Rycker, Koen; van Daele, Maarten; Lebourg, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The north-western Alps foreland is considered as still experiencing distal effects of Alpine collision, resulting in both horizontal and vertical relative displacements. Based on seismological and geodetic surveys, detailed patterns of active faulting (including subsurface décollements, blind ramps and deeper crustal thrusts have been proposed (Thouvenot et al., 1998), underlining the importance of NW-SE left-lateral strike-slip offsets as along the Vuache and Culoz faults (cf. the 1996 Epagny event: M=5.4; Thouvenot et al., 1998 and the 1822 Culoz event I=VII-VIII; Vogt, 1979). In parallel to this tectonic evolution, the last glaciation-deglaciation cycles contributed to develop large and over-deepened lacustrine basins, such as Lake Le Bourget (Perrier, 1980). The fine grain, post LGM (ie post 18 ky), sedimentary infill gives a good opportunity to evidence late quaternary tectonic deformations. This study focuses on the Culoz fault, extending from the Jura to the West, to the Chautagne swamp and through the Lake Le Bourget to the East. Historical earthquakes are known nearby this fault as ie the 1822 Culoz event. The precise location and geometry of the main fault is illustrated but its Eastern termination still needs to be determined. High resolution seismic sections and side-scan sonar images performed in the 90's (Chapron et al., 1996) showed that the Col du Chat and Culoz faults have locally deformed the quaternary sedimentary infill of the lake. These studies, mainly devoted to paleo-climate analysis were not able to determine neither the geometry of the fault, or to quantify the observed deformations. A new campaign devoted to highlight the fault geometry and associated deformation, has been performed in October 2013. Very tight profiles were performed during this high resolution seismic survey using seistec boomer and sparker sources. In several places the rupture reaches the most recent seismic reflectors underlying that these faults were active during

  11. Pathway modeling of microarray data: A case study of pathway activity changes in the testis following in utero exposure to dibutyl phthalate (DBP)

    SciTech Connect

    Ovacik, Meric A.; Sen, Banalata; Euling, Susan Y.; Gaido, Kevin W.; Ierapetritou, Marianthi G.; Androulakis, Ioannis P.

    2013-09-15

    Pathway activity level analysis, the approach pursued in this study, focuses on all genes that are known to be members of metabolic and signaling pathways as defined by the KEGG database. The pathway activity level analysis entails singular value decomposition (SVD) of the expression data of the genes constituting a given pathway. We explore an extension of the pathway activity methodology for application to time-course microarray data. We show that pathway analysis enhances our ability to detect biologically relevant changes in pathway activity using synthetic data. As a case study, we apply the pathway activity level formulation coupled with significance analysis to microarray data from two different rat testes exposed in utero to Dibutyl Phthalate (DBP). In utero DBP exposure in the rat results in developmental toxicity of a number of male reproductive organs, including the testes. One well-characterized mode of action for DBP and the male reproductive developmental effects is the repression of expression of genes involved in cholesterol transport, steroid biosynthesis and testosterone synthesis that lead to a decreased fetal testicular testosterone. Previous analyses of DBP testes microarray data focused on either individual gene expression changes or changes in the expression of specific genes that are hypothesized, or known, to be important in testicular development and testosterone synthesis. However, a pathway analysis may inform whether there are additional affected pathways that could inform additional modes of action linked to DBP developmental toxicity. We show that Pathway activity analysis may be considered for a more comprehensive analysis of microarray data.

  12. Teaching Pharmacology by Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Sue

    1997-01-01

    Using pharmacology case studies with nursing students encourages theory-practice links and infuses real-life content. Cases provide rich qualitative data for evaluating curriculum. However, they are not a substitute for evidence-based practice. (SK)

  13. A Novel Approach based on GPS/GNSS Surveying to Monitor Excessive Active Landslide: A Case Study of Intepe Landslide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güngördü, Deniz; Cuneyt Erenoǧlu, R.; Akcay, Özgün; Erenoǧlu, Oya

    2016-04-01

    Landslide is the down-slope of soil, rock and organic material under the influence of gravity and they leave deep scars in the topography and occur quite fast in a short time, are one of the most dangerous types of natural disasters. Geology, geotechnics and geodesy sciences had implemented many kind of technique which is many usefully and early warning systems with increasing of technologically events for monitoring. In last decades, the Global Positioning System (GPS/GNSS) technology has shown that it is capable to monitor sub-centimeter landslide deformations. In this study, it is imposed to represent the area under investigation by a number of GPS/GNSS sites in order to monitor the landslide phenomena. After the landslide occured in February 2015 in Intepe, Canakkale (NW Turkey), some sites are used to define a stable reference frame and remaining stations are the monitoring points situated in the deformation area. In this way, these sites were surveyed for 6 days using rapid-static GPS/GNSS technique. Then, a series of deformation analysis was performed between consecutive days. Finally, the determination of the significant movement of these sites was done relatively to the reference ones, e.g. the movement was 3.5 cm per a day averagely. This paper therefore highlights an investigation of landslide motions to discover the characteristics of mass movement for the excessive active landslide. Keywords: GPS/GNSS, landslide, deformation monitoring, Intepe, Turkey

  14. Long-term characterization, lagoon treatment and migration potential of landfill leachate: a case study in an active Italian landfill.

    PubMed

    Frascari, D; Bronzini, F; Giordano, G; Tedioli, G; Nocentini, M

    2004-01-01

    The elaboration of 10 years of monitoring of leachate quality and quantity, leachate treatment and degree of contamination of soil and surface waters at the Tre Monti site--an active, 4-million-m(3) landfill in Northern Italy--is presented in this study. A hydrological model of leachate production is applied, with a good match of the experimental data. The concentrations of all leachate components except sulfate are characterized by fluctuations over a constant or increasing value. Different ways of interpreting leachate quality data are discussed; the elaboration indicates that the pollutant load on the leachate treatment facility will remain basically constant as long as waste will be added to the landfill. The analysis of the data relative to 10 years of leachate pre-treatment in the adjoining, non-aerated lagoon system indicates that a significant removal is achieved for most leachate components; the operational conditions of the plant are described, and the removal mechanisms are discussed. Finally, the potential for contamination of soil and surface waters is examined by analyzing long-term quality trends of the sub-superficial waters sampled near the lagoons and by means of an analytical campaign conducted on clay cores sampled near and underneath the treatment ponds. The experimental values indicate that the clay layer located under the entire site offers an effective barrier to the migration of leachate contaminants. PMID:14575746

  15. Feasibility, Yield, and Cost of Active Tuberculosis Case Finding Linked to a Mobile HIV Service in Cape Town, South Africa: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kranzer, Katharina; Lawn, Stephen D.; Meyer-Rath, Gesine; Vassall, Anna; Raditlhalo, Eudoxia; Govindasamy, Darshini; van Schaik, Nienke; Wood, Robin; Bekker, Linda-Gail

    2012-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization is currently developing guidelines on screening for tuberculosis disease to inform national screening strategies. This process is complicated by significant gaps in knowledge regarding mass screening. This study aimed to assess feasibility, uptake, yield, treatment outcomes, and costs of adding an active tuberculosis case-finding program to an existing mobile HIV testing service. Methods and Findings The study was conducted at a mobile HIV testing service operating in deprived communities in Cape Town, South Africa. All HIV-negative individuals with symptoms suggestive of tuberculosis, and all HIV-positive individuals regardless of symptoms were eligible for participation and referred for sputum induction. Samples were examined by microscopy and culture. Active tuberculosis case finding was conducted on 181 days at 58 different sites. Of the 6,309 adults who accessed the mobile clinic, 1,385 were eligible and 1,130 (81.6%) were enrolled. The prevalence of smear-positive tuberculosis was 2.2% (95% CI 1.1–4.0), 3.3% (95% CI 1.4–6.4), and 0.4% (95% CI 1.4 015–6.4) in HIV-negative individuals, individuals newly diagnosed with HIV, and known HIV, respectively. The corresponding prevalence of culture-positive tuberculosis was 5.3% (95% CI 3.5–7.7), 7.4% (95% CI 4.5–11.5), 4.3% (95% CI 2.3–7.4), respectively. Of the 56 new tuberculosis cases detected, 42 started tuberculosis treatment and 34 (81.0%) completed treatment. The cost of the intervention was US$1,117 per tuberculosis case detected and US$2,458 per tuberculosis case cured. The generalisability of the study is limited to similar settings with comparable levels of deprivation and TB and HIV prevalence. Conclusions Mobile active tuberculosis case finding in deprived populations with a high burden of HIV and tuberculosis is feasible, has a high uptake, yield, and treatment success. Further work is now required to examine cost-effectiveness and affordability and

  16. Assessment of Diet and Physical Activity in Paediatric Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Patients: A United Kingdom Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Philippa S.; Lang, Sarah; Gilbert, Marianne; Kamat, Deepa; Bansal, Sanjay; Ford-Adams, Martha E.; Desai, Ashish P.; Dhawan, Anil; Fitzpatrick, Emer; Moore, J. Bernadette; Hart, Kathryn H.

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children, with prevalence rising alongside childhood obesity rates. This study aimed to characterise the habitual diet and activity behaviours of children with NAFLD compared to obese children without liver disease in the United Kingdom (UK). Twenty-four biopsy-proven paediatric NAFLD cases and eight obese controls without biochemical or radiological evidence of NAFLD completed a 24-h dietary recall, a Physical Activity Questionnaire (PAQ), a Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ) and a 7-day food and activity diary (FAD), in conjunction with wearing a pedometer. Groups were well matched for age and gender. Obese children had higher BMI z-scores (p = 0.006) and BMI centiles (p = 0.002) than participants with NAFLD. After adjusting for multiple hypotheses testing and controlling for differences in BMI, no differences in macro- or micronutrient intake were observed as assessed using either 24-h recall or 7-day FAD (p > 0.001). Under-reporting was prevalent (NAFLD 75%, Obese Control 87%: p = 0.15). Restrained eating behaviours were significantly higher in the NAFLD group (p = 0.005), who also recorded more steps per day than the obese controls (p = 0.01). In conclusion, this is the first study to assess dietary and activity patterns in a UK paediatric NAFLD population. Only a minority of cases and controls were meeting current dietary and physical activity recommendations. Our findings do not support development of specific dietary/ physical activity guidelines for children with NAFLD; promoting adherence with current general paediatric recommendations for health should remain the focus of clinical management. PMID:26703719

  17. Assessment of Diet and Physical Activity in Paediatric Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Patients: A United Kingdom Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Philippa S; Lang, Sarah; Gilbert, Marianne; Kamat, Deepa; Bansal, Sanjay; Ford-Adams, Martha E; Desai, Ashish P; Dhawan, Anil; Fitzpatrick, Emer; Moore, J Bernadette; Hart, Kathryn H

    2015-12-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children, with prevalence rising alongside childhood obesity rates. This study aimed to characterise the habitual diet and activity behaviours of children with NAFLD compared to obese children without liver disease in the United Kingdom (UK). Twenty-four biopsy-proven paediatric NAFLD cases and eight obese controls without biochemical or radiological evidence of NAFLD completed a 24-h dietary recall, a Physical Activity Questionnaire (PAQ), a Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ) and a 7-day food and activity diary (FAD), in conjunction with wearing a pedometer. Groups were well matched for age and gender. Obese children had higher BMI z-scores (p = 0.006) and BMI centiles (p = 0.002) than participants with NAFLD. After adjusting for multiple hypotheses testing and controlling for differences in BMI, no differences in macro- or micronutrient intake were observed as assessed using either 24-h recall or 7-day FAD (p > 0.001). Under-reporting was prevalent (NAFLD 75%, Obese Control 87%: p = 0.15). Restrained eating behaviours were significantly higher in the NAFLD group (p = 0.005), who also recorded more steps per day than the obese controls (p = 0.01). In conclusion, this is the first study to assess dietary and activity patterns in a UK paediatric NAFLD population. Only a minority of cases and controls were meeting current dietary and physical activity recommendations. Our findings do not support development of specific dietary/ physical activity guidelines for children with NAFLD; promoting adherence with current general paediatric recommendations for health should remain the focus of clinical management. PMID:26703719

  18. Exploring Students' Emotional Responses and Participation in an Online Peer Assessment Activity: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Kun-Hung; Hou, Huei-Tse; Wu, Sheng-Yi

    2014-01-01

    In the social interactions among individuals of learning communities, including those individuals engaged in peer assessment activities, emotion may be a key factor in learning. However, research regarding the emotional response of learners in online peer assessment activities is relatively scarce. Detecting learners' emotion when they make…

  19. Gaining Proficiency through Task-Based Activities in the Portuguese Classroom (Beginning and Intermediate Year Case Studies)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones-Kellogg, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a task-based activity used at the United States Military Academy, in their first- through third-semester Portuguese language sequence "Proficiencies" (Proficiências). The stand-alone task-based activity can be an effective tool in gaining foreign-language proficiency at even the lowest levels of classroom instruction…

  20. The utilization of Malaysian Active GPS System data for geodynamic applications: a case study in East and West Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Bakar, Rabieahtul; Azahari Razak, Khamarrul

    2010-05-01

    Geodynamic studies of Malaysia have been ventured upon in the South-East Asia region since the first GeodySEA project in 1996. Both East and West Malaysia lies on the Eurasian Plate, and assumed to have no linear distortion between any two joined points relative to one another. However, Malaysia lies at the southern tip of the plate encroached by two frequently ruptured boundaries, the Indian-Australian plate and the Philippines plate, and it is also within the buffer of the Ring of fire. Hence, this paper is essential to determine the relative movement of Malaysia, and with the possibilities to identify the presences of slip-fault formation which might be of threat to the stable platform that we have taken for granted. Availability of uninterrupted GPS observations over the Malaysian Active GPS System known as MASS stations situated across the country established by the Department of Survey and Mapping (DSMM) evidently help provides the data for this study. There are currently eighteen MASS stations mounted with Trimble 4000 dual frequency antenna and data recorded at fine second interval made accessible in hourly files. Satellite data collected continuously over a long period of time are processed by Bernese GPS processing software. Fifteen International GNSS Service (IGS) stations were selected within similar period of observations were gathered, processed, later act as tie points to the MASS stations. Apparently with this Malaysia will form a network to the globe. In this research the author will output the relative MASS stations coordinates and velocity estimates in International terrestrial reference frame (ITRF) 2000 since GPS data used are before the derivation of ITRF2005. At present the measures of quality for GPS derived coordinates given by commercial software packages tend to be unrealistic because unmodelled errors remain unaccounted for. The commercial software packages are either over-optimistic or conversely, therefore, have low fidelity. Thus

  1. Are winter-active species vulnerable to climate warming? A case study with the wintergreen terrestrial orchid, Tipularia discolor.

    PubMed

    Marchin, Renée M; Dunn, Robert R; Hoffmann, William A

    2014-12-01

    In the eastern United States, winter temperature has been increasing nearly twice as fast as summer temperature, but studies of warming effects on plants have focused on species that are photosynthetically active in summer. The terrestrial orchid Tipularia discolor is leafless in summer and acquires C primarily in winter. The optimum temperature for photosynthesis in T. discolor is higher than the maximum temperature throughout most of its growing season, and therefore growth can be expected to increase with warming. Contrary to this hypothesis, experimental warming negatively affected reproductive fitness (number of flowering stalks, flowers, fruits) and growth (change in leaf area from 2010 to 2012) in T. discolor. Temperature in June-July was critical for flowering, and mean July temperature greater than 29 °C (i.e., 2.5 °C above ambient) eliminated reproduction. Warming of 1.2 °C delayed flowering by an average of 10 days and fruiting by an average of 5 days. Warming of 4.4 °C reduced relative growth rates by about 60%, which may have been partially caused by the direct effects of temperature on photosynthesis and respiration. Warming indirectly increased vapor pressure deficit (VPD) by 0.2-0.5 kPa, and leaf-to-air VPD over 1.3 kPa restricted stomatal conductance of T. discolor to 10-40% of maximum conductance. These results highlight the need to account for changes in VPD when estimating temperature responses of plant species under future warming scenarios. Increasing temperature in the future will likely be an important limiting factor to the distribution of T. discolor, especially along the southern edge of its range. PMID:25255853

  2. Active seismic and passive microtremor HVSR for assessing site effects in Jammu city, NW Himalaya, India—A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, A. K.; Mundepi, A. K.; Chauhan, Neetu; Jasrotia, A. S.; Rai, Nitesh; Gachhayat, Tapas Kumar

    2012-02-01

    1-D shear wave velocity structure is important for site effect studies and geotechnical engineering, but it is quite difficult and expensive to derive from the conventional geophysical techniques. Active (MASW) and passive (microtremors, HVSR) methods were conducted at 30 sites in the frontal part of the Himalaya which is characterized by soft sediments and strong seismological effects. Shear wave velocity ( Vs) in the range of ~ 238 m/s to ~ 450 m/s has been obtained from 30 m thick layer of quaternary sediments overlying Lower Miocene bed rock (Upper Siwalik Conglomerate) in Jammu city, NW Himalaya. The shear wave velocity ( Vs) along with seismic input motion of Chamoli earthquake (mb 6.8) has been used to obtain site response spectrum. The response spectrum suggests five to seven times increase in peak ground acceleration for single or two storey buildings and by eight to twelve times increase in amplification ratio with respect to input ground motion. The amplification spectrum shows peak amplification of ~ 2 Hz-~ 3 Hz in the central part and ~ 1.75 Hz-2 Hz in the northern, southwestern and southeastern parts of the city. The advantage of microtremor HVSR is that it yields direct estimate of the fundamental frequency which is found to vary from ~ 1 Hz to ~ 3 Hz for same sites. Further, the 1-D velocity models obtained from ModelHVSR Matlab routine have been compared with the soil models prepared by derived using MASW. The comparison shows correlation between soil models for sites having high shallow impedance contrast between the overlying sediments and very stiff material (bedrock) underneath as than sites having less impedance contrast.

  3. Methane transport from the active layer to lakes in the Arctic using Toolik Lake, Alaska, as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Paytan, Adina; Lecher, Alanna L.; Dimova, Natasha; Sparrow, Katy J.; Kodovska, Fenix Garcia-Tigreros; Murray, Joseph; Tulaczyk, Slawomir; Kessler, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Methane emissions in the Arctic are important, and may be contributing to global warming. While methane emission rates from Arctic lakes are well documented, methods are needed to quantify the relative contribution of active layer groundwater to the overall lake methane budget. Here we report measurements of natural tracers of soil/groundwater, radon, and radium, along with methane concentration in Toolik Lake, Alaska, to evaluate the role active layer water plays as an exogenous source for lake methane. Average concentrations of methane, radium, and radon were all elevated in the active layer compared with lake water (1.6 × 104 nM, 61.6 dpm⋅m−3, and 4.5 × 105 dpm⋅m−3 compared with 1.3 × 102 nM, 5.7 dpm⋅m−3, and 4.4 × 103 dpm⋅m−3, respectively). Methane transport from the active layer to Toolik Lake based on the geochemical tracer radon (up to 2.9 g⋅m−2⋅y−1) can account for a large fraction of methane emissions from this lake. Strong but spatially and temporally variable correlations between radon activity and methane concentrations (r2 > 0.69) in lake water suggest that the parameters that control methane discharge from the active layer also vary. Warming in the Arctic may expand the active layer and increase the discharge, thereby increasing the methane flux to lakes and from lakes to the atmosphere, exacerbating global warming. More work is needed to quantify and elucidate the processes that control methane fluxes from the active layer to predict how this flux might change in the future and to evaluate the regional and global contribution of active layer water associated methane inputs. PMID:25775530

  4. A Native Chemical Ligation Handle that Enables the Synthesis of Advanced Activity-Based Probes: Diubiquitin as a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Monique P C; El Oualid, Farid; ter Beek, Jarno; Ovaa, Huib

    2014-01-01

    We present the development of a native chemical ligation handle that also functions as a masked electrophile that can be liberated during synthesis when required. This handle can thus be used for the synthesis of complex activity-based probes. We describe the use of this handle in the generation of linkage-specific activity-based deubiquitylating enzyme probes that contain substrate context and closely mimic the native ubiquitin isopeptide linkage. We have generated activity-based probes based on all seven isopeptide-linked diubiquitin topoisomers and demonstrated their structural integrity and ability to label DUBs in a linkage-specific manner. PMID:24623714

  5. Advocating for active living on the rural-urban fringe: a case study of planning in the Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Adler, Sy; Dobson, Noelle; Fox, Karen Perl; Weigand, Lynn

    2008-06-01

    This case study is about the politics of incorporating active-living elements into a concept plan for a new community of about 68,000 people on the edge of the Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area. Development on the rural-urban fringe is ongoing in metropolitan areas around the United States. In this article, we evaluate the product of the concept-planning process from the standpoint of the extent to which environmental elements conducive to active living were included. We also analyze four issues in which challenges to the incorporation of active-living features surfaced: choices related to transportation facilities, the design and location of retail stores, the location of schools and parks, and the location of a new town center. Overall, the Damascus/Boring Concept Plan positions the area well to promote active living. Analyses of the challenges that emerged yielded lessons for advocates regarding ways to deal with conflicts between facilitating active living and local economic development and related tax-base concerns and between active-living elements and school-district planning autonomy as well as the need for advocates to have the capacity to present alternatives to the usual financial and design approaches taken by private- and public-sector investors. PMID:18469172

  6. Emotion, Engagement, and Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Terry, David R.; Lemons, Paula; Armstrong, Norris; Brickman, Peggy; Ribbens, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Three college faculty taught large general biology classes using case studies and personal response systems (clickers). Each instructor taught the same eight cases in two different sections, except the questions within the cases differed. In one section the questions were lower order (LO) factual inquiries, and in the other they were largely…

  7. Case Study: Case Studies and the Flipped Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Schiller, Nancy A.

    2013-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue discusses the positive and negative aspects of the "flipped classroom." In the flipped classroom model, what is normally done in class and what is normally done as…

  8. Syncope: Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Kleyman, Inna; Weimer, Louis H

    2016-08-01

    Syncope, or the sudden loss of consciousness, is a common presenting symptom for evaluation by neurologists. It is not a unique diagnosis but rather a common manifestation of disorders with diverse mechanisms. Loss of consciousness is typically preceded by a prodrome of symptoms and sometimes there is a clear trigger. This article discusses several cases that illustrate the various causes of syncope. Reflex syncope is the most common type and includes neurally mediated, vasovagal, situational, carotid sinus hypersensitivity, and atypical forms. Acute and chronic autonomic neuropathies and neurodegenerative disorders can also present with syncope. PMID:27445240

  9. Supporting Teachers in Designing CSCL Activities: A Case Study of Principle-Based Pedagogical Patterns in Networked Second Language Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wen, Yun; Looi, Chee-Kit; Chen, Wenli

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes the identification and use of principle-based pedagogical patterns to help teachers to translate design principles into actionable teaching activities, and to scaffold student learning with sufficient flexibility and creativity. A set of pedagogical patterns for networked Second language (L2) learning, categorized and…

  10. Preadolescence Female Development through Sport and Physical Activity: A Case Study of an Urban After-School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruening, Jennifer E.; Dover, Kydani M.; Clark, Brianna S.

    2009-01-01

    Youth development research has found that children become more engaged and benefit more from being incorporated as decision makers. Thus participation helps promote development and encourages engagement. Based in theories of engagement and free-choice learning, the current research focused on a program combining sport/physical activity, life…

  11. Policymaking as a Multi-Layered Activity. A Case Study from the Higher Education Sector in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ljosland, Ragnhild

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with policymaking in the higher education sector as an activity which happens on many levels, with many and varying interests involved. As the present thematic issue highlights, language is present in higher education policymaking, whether explicitly or implicitly. This special issue's initial claim is that "Policy is what…

  12. Can an active aging index (AAI) provide insight into reducing elder abuse? A case study in Rajshahi District, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Tareque, Md Ismail; Ahmed, Md Munsur; Tiedt, Andrew D; Hoque, Nazrul

    2014-01-01

    We use data from respondents aged 60 years and above, collected during April 2009 in the Rajshahi district of Bangladesh, to examine whether high activeness, as captured by an AAI or in sub-domains, can help reduce the risk of elder abuse. The findings suggest that more than half of rural elderly and 14 percent of urban elderly were at some point abused. High activeness in health and security dimensions lowers the risk of being abused while those who are low active in community participation have the lowest risk of being abused in both rural and urban areas. Being literate (elderly with primary/secondary education) is revealed to be a significant factor that lowers the risk of abuse in both rural and urban areas. These results imply a need for educational programs that bolster positive and proper community interaction, in turn promoting a secure later life for elders, and reducing burden for families and society. High activeness in health and security dimensions should also be promoted to keep the elderly healthy and protect from abusive behavior. PMID:24331549

  13. Effect of Active Learning Techniques on Students' Choice of Approach to Learning in Dentistry: A South African Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to report on empirical work, related to a techniques module, undertaken with the dental students of the University of the Western Cape, South Africa. I will relate how a range of different active learning techniques (tutorials; question papers and mock tests) assisted students to adopt a deep approach to learning in…

  14. Executive University Managers' Experiences of Strike and Protest Activity: A Qualitative Case Study of a South African University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominguez-Whitehead, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Strike and protest activity at South African universities continues to be prevalent nearly two decades after the dismantling of apartheid, although there has been a shift away from directing strikes and protests against the government (during the apartheid era), to directing them against higher education institutions and management (since the…

  15. Bringing "Invisible" Side Activities to Light. A Case Study of Rural Female Entrepreneurs in the Veenkolonien, the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markantoni, Marianna; van Hoven, Bettina

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, rural areas in Western societies have transformed from a production to a consumption space. Much research on rural diversification and revitalization has focused on farmers and their wives. However, it is useful to examine side activities run by non-farm women which have slowly emerged in the last few years. In view of…

  16. The Effect of Early Thyroidectomy on the Course of Active Graves' Orbitopathy (GO): A Retrospective Case Study.

    PubMed

    Meyer Zu Horste, M; Pateronis, K; Walz, M K; Alesina, P; Mann, K; Schott, M; Esser, J; Eckstein, A K

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the work was to investigate the effect of early thyroidectomy on the course of active Graves' orbitopathy (GO) in patients with low probability of remission [high TSH receptor antibody (TRAb) serum levels, severe GO] compared to that of continued therapy with antithyroid drugs. Two cohorts were evaluated retrospectively (total n=92 patients with active GO, CAS≥4). Forty-six patients underwent early thyroidectomy (Tx-group) 6±2 months after initiation of antithyroid drug (ATD) therapy, while ATD was continued for another 6±2 months in the ATD-group (n=46). These controls were consecutively chosen from a database and matched to the Tx-group. GO was evaluated (activity, severity, TRAb) at baseline and at 6 month follow-up. At baseline, both cohorts were virtually identical as to disease severity, activity and duration, as well as prior anti-inflammatory treatment, age, gender, and smoking behavior. At 6 month follow-up, NOSPECS severity score was significantly decreased within each group, but did not differ between both groups. However, significantly more patients of the Tx-group presented with inactive GO (89.1 vs. 67.4%, * p=0.02), and mean CAS score was significantly lower in Tx-group (2.1) than in ADT-group (2.8; * p=0.02) at the end of follow-up. TRAb levels declined in both groups (Tx-group: from 18.6 to 5.2 vs. ATD-group: 12.8-3.2 IU/l, p0=0.07, p6months=0.32). Residual GO activity was lower in Tx-group, associated with a higher rate of inactivation of GO. This allows an earlier initiation of ophthalmosurgical rehabilitation in patients with severe GO, which may positively influence quality of life of the patients. PMID:27351809

  17. Exploring lay views on physical activity and their implications for public health policy. A case study from East Belfast.

    PubMed

    Prior, L; Scott, D; Hunter, R; Donnelly, M; Tully, M A; Cupples, M E; Kee, F

    2014-08-01

    It is now recognised that inactive lifestyles underpin much of the disease burden evident in the richer nations of the world. Indeed, the WHO has identified physical inactivity as a 'global public health problem' and has established minimum physical activity (PA) targets for people at different stages of the life-course. Yet, according to WHO, just under 1/3 of working age adults across the globe meet those targets and it is not at all clear how the disjunction between the recommendations of policy makers and the behaviour of ordinary people might be surmounted. Using an opportunity to examine the impact of an urban regeneration project on community residents in East Belfast (Northern Ireland) this paper examines the views of some 113 people on how to increase rates of PA in an area of multiple deprivation. The results of the analysis suggest that lay people rarely consider PA as a discrete issue, or one that centres on individuals and their motivation, but rather as one component in a complex web of concerns, processes and events that include such things as the actions of neighbours and relatives, material and political environments, vandalism, violence, and the weather. We explore and unravel the nature of those concerns using novel methods of content analysis that generate 'issue webs'. Particular attention is paid to the ways in which lay people conceptualize 'activity' and to the manner in which they point to ways of encouraging activity that are rooted in everyday life rather than in the corpocentric, agent-centred and often sport dominated strategies favoured by local policy makers. Our results support those who argue that interventions to increase rates of PA need to move beyond behavioural approaches that focus on individuals and consider the social, political and material contexts in which 'activity' occurs. PMID:24911510

  18. A National Case-Control Study Identifies Human Socio-Economic Status and Activities as Risk Factors for Tick-Borne Encephalitis in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Stefanoff, Pawel; Rosinska, Magdalena; Samuels, Steven; White, Dennis J.; Morse, Dale L.; Randolph, Sarah E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is endemic to Europe and medically highly significant. This study, focused on Poland, investigated individual risk factors for TBE symptomatic infection. Methods and Findings In a nation-wide population-based case-control study, of the 351 TBE cases reported to local health departments in Poland in 2009, 178 were included in the analysis. For controls, of 2704 subjects (matched to cases by age, sex, district of residence) selected at random from the national population register, two were interviewed for each case and a total of 327 were suitable for the analysis. Questionnaires yielded information on potential exposure to ticks during the six weeks (maximum incubation period) preceding disease onset in each case. Independent associations between disease and socio-economic factors and occupational or recreational exposure were assessed by conditional logistic regression, stratified according to residence in known endemic and non-endemic areas. Adjusted population attributable fractions (PAF) were computed for significant variables. In endemic areas, highest TBE risk was associated with spending ≥10 hours/week in mixed forests and harvesting forest foods (adjusted odds ratio 19.19 [95% CI: 1.72–214.32]; PAF 0.127 [0.064–0.193]), being unemployed (11.51 [2.84–46.59]; 0.109 [0.046–0.174]), or employed as a forester (8.96 [1.58–50.77]; 0.053 [0.011–0.100]) or non-specialized worker (5.39 [2.21–13.16]; 0.202 [0.090–0.282]). Other activities (swimming, camping and travel to non-endemic regions) reduced risk. Outside TBE endemic areas, risk was greater for those who spent ≥10 hours/week on recreation in mixed forests (7.18 [1.90–27.08]; 0.191 [0.065–0.304]) and visited known TBE endemic areas (4.65 [0.59–36.50]; 0.058 [−0.007–0.144]), while travel to other non-endemic areas reduced risk. Conclusions These socio-economic factors and associated human activities identified as risk factors for symptomatic

  19. Three Community College Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojtysiak, Joseph; Sutton, William J., II; Wright, Tommy; Brantley, Linda

    2011-01-01

    This article presents three case studies that focus on specific projects that are underway or have been completed. In the first case study, Joseph Wojtysiak and William J. Sutton, II discuss the Green Center of Central Pennsylvania, which is designed to serve as the state's preeminent source for education, training and public information about…

  20. The Big Read: Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Endowment for the Arts, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Big Read evaluation included a series of 35 case studies designed to gather more in-depth information on the program's implementation and impact. The case studies gave readers a valuable first-hand look at The Big Read in context. Both formal and informal interviews, focus groups, attendance at a wide range of events--all showed how…

  1. Instructional Computing: Ten Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargan, Carol; Hunter, Beverly

    These case studies are written for educational institutions that wish to plan, extend, or improve their use of computers for learning and teaching. Each case study includes a brief description of each of the following: profile of the institution, history of the development of instructional computing, organization and management, student access to…

  2. Impact of wind erosion on detecting active tectonics from geomorphic indexes in extremely arid areas: a case study from the Hero Range, Qaidam Basin, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lei; Xiao, Ancheng; Yang, Shufeng

    2014-11-01

    Geomorphologic analysis has been used widely to detect active tectonics in regions where fluvial incision is the major erosional process. In this paper, however, we assess the feasibility of utilizing these frequently-used geomorphic indexes (e.g., hypsometric curves, longitudinal channel profiles, normalized stream length-gradient (SLK) index) to determine active tectonics in extremely arid areas where wind erosion also plays an important role. The case study is developed on the Hero Range in the western Qaidam Basin, one of the driest regions on Earth with severe wind erosion since late Pliocene. The result shows that in the west and south sectors, as well as the western part of the east sector, of the Hero Range where fluvial incision prevails, these geomorphic indexes are good indicators of active faulting and consistent with the geological result based on study of fault traces, scarps, faulted Holocene fans and historical seismicity within the past four decades. In contrast, along the northeastern margin (the NE and the SE parts of the east sector) of the range where wind erosion is also important, the results from the geomorphic indexes show quite active tectonics, contrary with the geological evidence favoring weakly active tectonics. Moreover, the positive SLK anomaly lies oblique to the fault trace and the anticline axis but parallel to the wind direction. To reconcile the contradiction, we propose that wind erosion caused by northwestern winds has a tendency to make geomorphic indexes exhibit anomalous values that indicate higher activities, by way of (1) lowering the base-level to generate knickpoints on the longitudinal channel profiles and therefore positive SLK anomalies, and (2) lateral erosion of the mountain front making the hypsometric curves and even the longitudinal channel profiles more convex, and producing obvious slope breaks.

  3. Pathway modeling of microarray data: a case study of pathway activity changes in the testis following in utero exposure to dibutyl phthalate (DBP).

    PubMed

    Ovacik, Meric A; Sen, Banalata; Euling, Susan Y; Gaido, Kevin W; Ierapetritou, Marianthi G; Androulakis, Ioannis P

    2013-09-15

    Pathway activity level analysis, the approach pursued in this study, focuses on all genes that are known to be members of metabolic and signaling pathways as defined by the KEGG database. The pathway activity level analysis entails singular value decomposition (SVD) of the expression data of the genes constituting a given pathway. We explore an extension of the pathway activity methodology for application to time-course microarray data. We show that pathway analysis enhances our ability to detect biologically relevant changes in pathway activity using synthetic data. As a case study, we apply the pathway activity level formulation coupled with significance analysis to microarray data from two different rat testes exposed in utero to Dibutyl Phthalate (DBP). In utero DBP exposure in the rat results in developmental toxicity of a number of male reproductive organs, including the testes. One well-characterized mode of action for DBP and the male reproductive developmental effects is the repression of expression of genes involved in cholesterol transport, steroid biosynthesis and testosterone synthesis that lead to a decreased fetal testicular testosterone. Previous analyses of DBP testes microarray data focused on either individual gene expression changes or changes in the expression of specific genes that are hypothesized, or known, to be important in testicular development and testosterone synthesis. However, a pathway analysis may inform whether there are additional affected pathways that could inform additional modes of action linked to DBP developmental toxicity. We show that Pathway activity analysis may be considered for a more comprehensive analysis of microarray data. PMID:20850466

  4. Case Studies and Activities in Adult Education and Human Resource Development. Adult Education Special Topics: Theory, Research and Practice in LifeLong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Steven W.

    2010-01-01

    Case studies have become a widely-used instructional tool in many educational environments. The use of case studies began in the 1950s at Harvard Business School. Today, they may be used as part of a course of study, or as the main focus of a course, to which other material is added. While the use of case studies is prevalent in schools of…

  5. Agency over a phantom limb and electromyographic activity on the stump depend on visuomotor synchrony: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Imaizumi, Shu; Asai, Tomohisa; Kanayama, Noriaki; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Koyama, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    Most patients, post-amputation, report the experience of a phantom limb. Some even sense voluntary movements when viewing a mirror image of the intact limb superimposed onto the phantom limb. While delayed visual feedback of an action is known to reduce a sense of agency, the effect of delayed visual feedback on phantom motor sensation (i.e., sense of controlling a phantom limb) has not been examined. Using a video-projection system, we examined the effect of delayed visual feedback on phantom motor sensation in an upper-limb amputee (male; left upper-limb amputation). He was instructed to view mirrored video images of his intact hand clasping and unclasping during a phantom limb movement. He then rated the intensity of the phantom motor sensation. Three types of hand movement images were presented as follows: synchronous, asynchronous with a 250-ms delay, and asynchronous with a 500-ms delay. Results showed that phantom motor sensation decreased when the image was delayed by 250 and 500 ms. However, when we instructed the patient to adjust the phase of phantom limb movement to that of the image with a 500-ms delay, phantom motor sensation increased. There was also a positive correlation between intensity of phantom motor sensation and electromyographic (EMG) activity on deltoids at the patient’s stump. These results suggest that phantom motor sensation and EMG activity on the stump depend on visuomotor synchrony and top-down effects. PMID:25120449

  6. Agency over a phantom limb and electromyographic activity on the stump depend on visuomotor synchrony: a case study.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Shu; Asai, Tomohisa; Kanayama, Noriaki; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Koyama, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    Most patients, post-amputation, report the experience of a phantom limb. Some even sense voluntary movements when viewing a mirror image of the intact limb superimposed onto the phantom limb. While delayed visual feedback of an action is known to reduce a sense of agency, the effect of delayed visual feedback on phantom motor sensation (i.e., sense of controlling a phantom limb) has not been examined. Using a video-projection system, we examined the effect of delayed visual feedback on phantom motor sensation in an upper-limb amputee (male; left upper-limb amputation). He was instructed to view mirrored video images of his intact hand clasping and unclasping during a phantom limb movement. He then rated the intensity of the phantom motor sensation. Three types of hand movement images were presented as follows: synchronous, asynchronous with a 250-ms delay, and asynchronous with a 500-ms delay. Results showed that phantom motor sensation decreased when the image was delayed by 250 and 500 ms. However, when we instructed the patient to adjust the phase of phantom limb movement to that of the image with a 500-ms delay, phantom motor sensation increased. There was also a positive correlation between intensity of phantom motor sensation and electromyographic (EMG) activity on deltoids at the patient's stump. These results suggest that phantom motor sensation and EMG activity on the stump depend on visuomotor synchrony and top-down effects. PMID:25120449

  7. The distant future of solar activity: A case study of Beta Hydri. III - Transition region, corona, and stellar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dravins, D.; Linde, P.; Ayres, T. R.; Linsky, J. L.; Monsignori-Fossi, B.; Simon, T.; Wallinder, F.

    1993-01-01

    The paper investigates the secular decay of solar-type activity through a detailed comparison of the present sun with the very old solar-type star, Beta Hyi, taken as a proxy of the future sun. Analyses of successive atmospheric layers are presented, with emphasis of the outermost parts. The FUV emission lines for the transition zone are among the faintest so far seen in any solar-type star. The coronal soft X-ray spectrum was measured through different filters on EXOSAT and compared to simulated X-ray observations of the sun seen as a star. The flux from Beta Hyi is weaker than that from the solar corona and has a different spectrum. It is inferred that a thermally driven stellar wind can no longer be supported, which removes the mechanism from further rotational braking of the star through a magnetic stellar wind.

  8. Characterization of active fault scarps from medium to high resolution DEM: case studies from Central and Southern Apennines (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunori, C.; Cinti, F. R.; Ventura, G.

    2013-12-01

    We identify geo-morphometric features of active fault scarps in Italy through a semiautomatic processing using GIS. Medium to high resolution DEM was used to characterize the geometry, structural, and erosive elements of two seismogenic normal faults in Central and Southern Apennines. The Pettino fault in L'Aquila area was detected using a 1 m pixel DEM derived from airborne LiDAR survey (Friuli Venezia Giulia Civil Protection). For the Castrovillari fault in northern Calabria region was used a 4 m pixel DEM (Regional Cartography Office of Regione Calabria). Scarp segments are region of planar discontinuities identified by selected values of DEM-derived Terrain Ruggedness Index (TRI) and Vector Ruggedness Measure (VRM). These planar discontinuities corresponds to landscape features such as, river terraces, roads scarps, and other natural or human features. The discrimination between these features have been accomplished overlaying extracted features on aerial photograph, geological and geomorphologic maps and in situ survey. After that, we perform the quantitative and statistical analysis of these areas identified as "fault scarps". The identification of elements relative to the scarps (e.g. base, crest, slope) is then obtained to derive the estimate of parameters describing the fault: altitude, height of the scarp, length, slope and aspect, Terrain Ruggedness Index (TRI) and Vector Ruggedness Measure (VRM). The spatial distribution of the extracted values was obtained through their statistical analysis. We analyze scarp parameters variations along the whole scarp extent, such as strike value from aspect variations, slope and profile curvature differences as indicators of tectonic and/or erosion activity. The combined analysis of the DEM-derived parameters allows us to (a) define aspects of three-dimensional scarp geometry, (b) decipher its geomorphological significance, and (c) estimate the long-term slip rate.

  9. Building on a YMCA's health and physical activity promotion capacities: A case study of a researcher-organization partnership to optimize adolescent programming_.

    PubMed

    Bush, Paula Louise; García Bengoechea, Enrique

    2016-08-01

    School-based physical activity programs are only effective for increasing adolescents' school-based physical activity. To increase out-of-school-time physical activity, complementary community programs are warranted. Partnerships between universities and community organizations may help build the capacity of these organizations to provide sustainable programs. To understand capacity building processes and outcomes, we partnered with a YMCA to build on their adolescent physical activity promotion capacity. Together, we designed and implemented means to evaluate the YMCA teen program to inform program planning. For this qualitative case study, emails and interviews and meetings transcripts were collected over 2.5 years and analyzed using inductive and deductive thematic analysis. Findings illustrate that the YMCA's workforce and organizational development capacities (e.g., evaluation and health promotion capacity and competence) were increased through our partnership, resource allocation, and leadership. We responded to YMCA partners' perceived needs, yet guided them beyond those needs, successfully combining our complementary objectives, knowledge, and skills to generate an integrated program vision, rationale, and evaluation results. This provided YMCA partners with validation, reminders, and awareness. In turn, this contributed to programming and evaluation practice changes. In light of extant capacity building literature, we discuss how our partnership increased the YMCA's capacity to promote healthy adolescent programs. PMID:27161649

  10. Optimal design activated sludge process by means of multi-objective optimization: case study in Benchmark Simulation Model 1 (BSM1).

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenliang; Yao, Chonghua; Lu, Xiwu

    2014-01-01

    Optimal design of activated sludge process (ASP) using multi-objective optimization was studied, and a benchmark process in Benchmark Simulation Model 1 (BSM1) was taken as a target process. The objectives of the study were to achieve four indexes of percentage of effluent violation (PEV), overall cost index (OCI), total volume and total suspended solids, making up four cases for comparative analysis. Models were solved by the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm in MATLAB. Results show that: ineffective solutions can be rejected by adding constraints, and newly added objectives can affect the relationship between the existing objectives; taking Pareto solutions as process parameters, the performance indexes of PEV and OCI can be improved more than with the default process parameters of BSM1, especially for N removal and resistance against dynamic NH4(+)-N in influent. The results indicate that multi-objective optimization is a useful method for optimal design ASP. PMID:24845320

  11. A case control study investigating the effects of levels of physical activity at work as a risk factor for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A potential risk factor for prostate cancer is occupational physical activity. The occupational aetiology of prostate cancer remains unclear. The purpose of this research was to examine associations between the level of exposure to various measures of physical activity at work and the risk of Prostate Cancer. Methods Using the Finnish Job Exposure Matrix and the occupational history of 1,436 cases and 1,349 matched controls from an Australian case control study; we investigated five related exposure variables considered to be risk factors by comparing odds ratios. Results Modestly increasing odds ratios were detected with increasing levels of workload but there was no difference in this trend between moderate and high grade tumours. In regard to occupational physical workload no statistically significant association was observed overall but an increasing trend with level of exposure was observed for high grade compared with moderate grade tumours. Conclusion Both workload and physical workload merit further investigation, particularly for the latter in relation to grade of tumour. PMID:25103150

  12. Improving the active involvement of stakeholders and the public in flood risk management - tools of an involvement strategy and case study results from Austria, Germany and Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischhauer, M.; Greiving, S.; Flex, F.; Scheibel, M.; Stickler, T.; Sereinig, N.; Koboltschnig, G.; Malvati, P.; Vitale, V.; Grifoni, P.; Firus, K.

    2012-09-01

    The EU Flood Risk Management Directive 2007/60/EC aims at an active involvement of interested parties in the setting up of flood risk management plans and thus calls for more governance-related decision-making. This requirement has two perspectives. On the one hand, there is (1) the question of how decision-makers can improve the quality of their governance process. On the other hand, there is (2) the question of how the public shall be appropriately informed and involved. These questions were the centre of the ERA-Net CRUE-funded project IMRA (integrative flood risk governance approach for improvement of risk awareness) that aimed at an optimisation of the flood risk management process by increasing procedural efficiency with an explicit involvement strategy. To reach this goal, the IMRA project partners developed two new approaches that were implemented in three case study areas for the first time in flood risk management: 1. risk governance assessment tool: An indicator-based benchmarking and monitoring tool was used to evaluate the performance of a flood risk management system in regard to ideal risk governance principles; 2. social milieu approach: The concept of social milieus was used to gain a picture of the people living in the case study regions to learn more about their lifestyles, attitudes and values and to use this knowledge to plan custom-made information and participation activities for the broad public. This paper presents basic elements and the application of two innovative approaches as a part of an "involvement strategy" that aims at the active involvement of all interested parties (stakeholders) for assessing, reviewing and updating flood risk management plans, as formulated in the EU Flood Risk Management Directive 2007/60/EC.

  13. In situ microscopy as a tool for the monitoring of filamentous bacteria: a case study in an industrial activated sludge system dominated by M. parvicella.

    PubMed

    Dunkel, Thiemo; Dias, Philipe Ambrozio; de León Gallegos, Erika Lizette; Tacke, Viola; Schielke, Andreas; Hesse, Tobias; Fajado, Diego Andrés Sierra; Suhr, Hajo; Wiedemann, Philipp; Denecke, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the application of in situ microscopy for monitoring the growth of filamentous bacteria which can induce disturbances in an industrial activated sludge process. An in situ microscope (ISM) is immersed directly into samples of activated sludge with Microthrix parvicella as dominating species. Without needing further preparatory steps, the automatic evaluation of the ISM-images generates two signals: the number of individual filaments per image (ISM-filament counting) and the total extended filament length (TEFL) per image (ISM-online TEFL). In this first version of the image-processing algorithm, closely spaced crossing filament-segments or filaments within bulk material are not detected. The signals show highly linear correlation both with the standard filament index and the TEFL. Correlations were further substantiated by comparison with real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) measurements of M. parvicella and of the diluted sludge volume index. In this case study, in situ microscopy proved to be a suitable tool for straightforward online-monitoring of filamentous bacteria in activated sludge systems. With future adaptation of the system to different filament morphologies, including cross-linking filaments, bundles, and attached growth, the system will be applicable to other wastewater treatment plants. PMID:27003073

  14. "Play to Learn": A Case-Study of Parent/Carer and Child Engagement with a Physical Activity Website Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Helen; Fleming, Scott

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, Sport Wales produced guidance for practitioners delivering the new Foundation Phase curriculum for children aged three to seven years. A focus was on physical development and in 2009 a resource entitled "Play to Learn" was developed supported by a website launched in 2011. The present study addresses (non-)engagement with the…

  15. A Case Study of After-School Activities in One School That Is Making Progress in Closing the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shugerman, Susan Robin

    2013-01-01

    Closing the achievement gap has been a national conversation for several decades and a priority for educators and researchers. By looking closely at one school which is showing exceptional success with closing the achievement gap for low income students and English language learners, this study seeks to understand how school personnel and parents…

  16. Identification of activity regimes by unsupervised pattern classification of volcanic tremor data. Case studies from Mt. Etna.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, H.; Behncke, B.; Falsaperla, S.; Messina, A.; Spampinato, S.

    2009-04-01

    The monitoring of the seismic background signal - commonly referred to as volcanic tremor - has become a key tool for volcanic surveillance, particularly when field surveys are unsafe and/or visual observations are hampered by bad weather conditions. Indeed, it could be demonstrated that changes in the state of activity of the volcano show up in the volcanic tremor signature, such as amplitude and frequency content. Hence, the analysis of the characteristics of volcanic tremor leads us to pass from a mere monoparametric vision of the data to a multivariate one, which can be tackled with modern concepts of multivariate statistics. For this aim we present a recently developed software package which combines various concepts of unsupervised classification, in particular cluster analysis and Kohonen maps. Unsupervised classification is based on a suitable definition of similarity between patterns rather than on a-priori knowledge of their class membership. It aims at the identification of heterogeneities within a multivariate data set, thus permitting to focalize critical periods where significant changes in signal characteristics are encountered. The application of the software is demonstrated on sample sets derived from Mt. Etna during eruptions in 2001, 2006 and 2007-8.

  17. In vitro antibiofilm activity of the freshwater bryozoan Hyalinella punctata: a case study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Pejin, Boris; Ciric, Ana; Karaman, Ivo; Horvatovic, Mladen; Glamoclija, Jasmina; Nikolic, Milos; Sokovic, Marina

    2016-08-01

    The antibiofilm and possible antiquorum sensing effects against the strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 of five crude extracts of the freshwater bryozoan Hyalinella punctata (Hancock, 1850) were evaluated in vitro for the first time. H. punctata ethyl acetate extract (HpEtAc) exhibited the highest antibiofilm activity reducing the biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1 in the range of 80.63-88.13%. While all tested extracts reduced the twitching motility of the aforementioned bacterial strain, HpEtAc showed to be the most effective. Finally, at a concentration of 0.5 MIC, the same extract mostly inhibited the production of pyocyanin by P. aeruginosa PAO1 (71.53%). In comparison both with the positive controls used (streptomycin and ampicillin, 67.13 and 69.77%, respectively), HpEtAc was found to inhibit pyocyanin in a higher extent. An extensive chemical characterisation of this particular extract may result in isolation and identification of novel lead compounds targeting P. aeruginosa, an opportunistic human pathogen. PMID:26264659

  18. Exploring the benefits of growing bioenergy crops to activate lead-contaminated agricultural land: a case study on sweet potatoes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shu-Fen; Huang, Chin-Yuan; Chen, Kuo-Lin; Lin, Sheng-Chien; Lin, Yung-Cheng

    2015-03-01

    Phytoremediation is the most environmentally friendly remediation technology for heavy metal contaminated soil. However, the phytoremediation approach requires a long time to yield results, and the plants used must be economically profitable to maintain the sustainability of the process. Because high levels of bioethanol can be produced from sweet potatoes, an experiment was conducted by planting sweet potatoes in a lead-contaminated site to observe their growth and lead-uptake capacity, thereby enabling the evaluation of the phytoremediation efficiency of sweet potatoes. The lead content in the soil was approximately 6000 mg kg(-1), and the phytoavailable Pb content was 1766 mg kg(-1). Three starch-rich sweet potato varieties, Tainung No. 10 (TNG-10), Tainung No. 31 (TNG-31), and Tainung No. 57 (TNG-57), were used in the experiment. The results indicated that TNG-10, TNG-31, and TNG-57 had fresh root tuber yields of 94.5, 133.0, and 47.5 ton ha(-1) year(-1), produced 9450, 13,297, and 4748 L ha(-1) year(-1) of bioethanol, and removed 2.68, 7.73, and 3.22 kg ha(-1) year(-1) of lead, respectively. TNG-31 yielded the highest bioethanol production and the highest lead removal in the lead-contaminated site. Therefore, implementing phytoremediation by planting TNG-31 would decrease lead content and generate income, thereby rendering the sustainable and applicable activation of contaminated soil possible. PMID:25716522

  19. Industrial cogeneration case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, D. R.; Isser, S.; Hinkle, B.; Friedman, N. R.

    1980-09-01

    Studies were performed on a number of operating cogeneration systems to determine application, economics, and attitudes of industrial and utility executives toward cogeneration. A literature survey was conducted and an identification of candidate cogeneration sites was carried out. This was followed by a screening of these sites down to 20 to 30 candidate sites. The screening was carried out on the basis of cogeneration capacity, geographical diversity, generation type, and industrial diversity. The remaining sites were contacted as to their willingness to work with EPRI, and an industrial questionnaire was developed on technical, economic, and institutional cogeneration issues. Each of the seventeen sites was visited during this task. A utility questionnaire was developed and utilities with cogeneration systems studied in this survey were contacted as to their attitudes toward cogeneration. In addition, a compilation of a list of operating cogeneration systems was performed.

  20. An active footwall shortcut thrust revealed by seismic reflection profiling: a case study of the Futaba fault, northern Honshu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Kato, Naoko; Higashinaka, Motonori; Kurashimo, Eiji; Iwasaki, Takaya; Abe, Susumu

    2013-04-01

    The Futaba fault is located along the Pacific cast of southern part of Northern Honshu and continues at least 100 km. Based on tectonic morphological research, its central part show the active tectonic features. Due to the effect of M9 Tohoku Oki earthquake 2011, the evaluation of Coulomb stress changes on the fault surface is concerned for the assess of seismic hazards. To investigate the deep geometry of seismogenic source fault and basic crustal structure, we performed deep seismic reflection profiling along the 58-km-long seismic line across the Futaba fault. The seismic data were obtained using four vibroseis trucks and 1164 channel recorders. The seismic section portrays the half graben filled by 1000-m-thick lower Miocene fluvial sediments, suggesting that the Futaba fault reactivated as a west dipping normal fault during the early Miocene associated with opening of the Sea of Japan. On the hanging wall of the Miocene normal fault, Mesozoic metamorphic rocks are cropping out forming a narrow range parallel to the fault. On the footwall of this range, footwall shortcut thrust is clearly identified by the deformation of Plio-Pleistocene sediments on the seismic section. The deeper extension of the Futaba fault can be traced down to 4.5 seconds (TWT) and sub-horizontal reflectors are developed around 6-7 seconds (TWT). The dip angle of the Futaba fault in the seismogenic zone is about 45 degrees. The footwall shortcut thrust was formed at the shallow high-angle part of the Futaba fault as a low-angle (30 degrees) reverse fault. The formation of half graben is limited along the northern part of this fault system. The footwall shortcut thrust was developed along a 40-km-long segment only accompanied with the Miocene half graben. The southern segment of the surface trace of the Futaba fault suggests a straight geometry may represent a change in dip angle.

  1. Case Studies in Science Ethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Karen

    2010-03-01

    Everyone in science should have ethics education training. I have seen graduate students taken advantage of by their mentors. Many of us have seen misconduct...but what should we do about it? Young scientists are often unaware of the rules in science and make mistakes because of their ignorance of the rules in that particular field of study. Then there are an increasing number of cases in the news of overt cases of misrepresentation in science. All are welcome to attend this discussion of case studies. A case study on topics such as: how to treat data properly, how our values in science affect our work, who gets authorship on scientific papers, who is first author on a paper, what you should do if you uncover misconduct or plagiarism in your university, and we will discuss the scientist's role in society. This will be a painless, non-confrontational small group, then large group discussion of each case

  2. Drought prediction using co-active neuro-fuzzy inference system, validation, and uncertainty analysis (case study: Birjand, Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memarian, Hadi; Pourreza Bilondi, Mohsen; Rezaei, Majid

    2015-06-01

    This work aims to assess the capability of co-active neuro-fuzzy inference system (CANFIS) for drought forecasting of Birjand, Iran through the combination of global climatic signals with rainfall and lagged values of Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) index. Using stepwise regression and correlation analyses, the signals NINO 1 + 2, NINO 3, Multivariate Enso Index, Tropical Southern Atlantic index, Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation index, and NINO 3.4 were recognized as the effective signals on the drought event in Birjand. Based on the results from stepwise regression analysis and regarding the processor limitations, eight models were extracted for further processing by CANFIS. The metrics P-factor and D-factor were utilized for uncertainty analysis, based on the sequential uncertainty fitting algorithm. Sensitivity analysis showed that for all models, NINO indices and rainfall variable had the largest impact on network performance. In model 4 (as the model with the lowest error during training and testing processes), NINO 1 + 2(t-5) with an average sensitivity of 0.7 showed the highest impact on network performance. Next, the variables rainfall, NINO 1 + 2(t), and NINO 3(t-6) with the average sensitivity of 0.59, 0.28, and 0.28, respectively, could have the highest effect on network performance. The findings based on network performance metrics indicated that the global indices with a time lag represented a better correlation with El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Uncertainty analysis of the model 4 demonstrated that 68 % of the observed data were bracketed by the 95PPU and D-Factor value (0.79) was also within a reasonable range. Therefore, the fourth model with a combination of the input variables NINO 1 + 2 (with 5 months of lag and without any lag), monthly rainfall, and NINO 3 (with 6 months of lag) and correlation coefficient of 0.903 (between observed and simulated SPI) was selected as the most accurate model for drought forecasting using CANFIS

  3. Managing the Risk of Triggered Seismicity: Can We Identify (and Avoid) Potentially Active Faults? - A Practical Case Study in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoback, M. D.; Alt, R. C., II; Walsh, F. R.; Walters, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    It is well known that throughout the central and eastern U.S. there has been a marked increase in seismicity since 2009, at least some of which appears to increased wastewater injection. No area has seen a greater increase in seismicity than Oklahoma. In this paper, we utilize newly available information on in situ stress orientation and relative magnitudes, the distribution of high volume injection wells and knowledge of the intervals used for waste water disposal to identify the factors potentially contributing to the occurrence of triggered seismicity. While there are a number of sites where in situ stress data has been successfully used to identify potentially active faults, we are investigating whether this methodology can be implemented throughout a state utilizing the types of information frequently available in areas of oil and gas development. As an initial test of this concept, we have been compiling stress orientation data from wells throughout Oklahoma provided by private industry. Over fifty new high quality data points, principally drilling-induced tensile fractures observed in image logs, result in a greatly improved understanding of the stress field in much of the state. A relatively uniform ENE direction of maximum compressive stress is observed, although stress orientations (and possibly relative stress magnitudes) differ in the southern and southwestern parts of the state. The proposed methodology can be tested in the area of the NE-trending fault that produced the M 5+ earthquakes in the Prague, OK sequence in 2011, and the Meers fault in southwestern OK, that produced a M~7 reverse faulting earthquake about 1100 years ago. This methodology can also be used to essentially rule out slip on other major faults in the area, such as the ~N-S trending Nemaha fault system. Additional factors leading to the occurrence of relatively large triggered earthquakes in Oklahoma are 1) the overall increase in injection volumes throughout the state in recent

  4. Drought prediction using co-active neuro-fuzzy inference system, validation, and uncertainty analysis (case study: Birjand, Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memarian, Hadi; Pourreza Bilondi, Mohsen; Rezaei, Majid

    2016-08-01

    This work aims to assess the capability of co-active neuro-fuzzy inference system (CANFIS) for drought forecasting of Birjand, Iran through the combination of global climatic signals with rainfall and lagged values of Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) index. Using stepwise regression and correlation analyses, the signals NINO 1 + 2, NINO 3, Multivariate Enso Index, Tropical Southern Atlantic index, Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation index, and NINO 3.4 were recognized as the effective signals on the drought event in Birjand. Based on the results from stepwise regression analysis and regarding the processor limitations, eight models were extracted for further processing by CANFIS. The metrics P-factor and D-factor were utilized for uncertainty analysis, based on the sequential uncertainty fitting algorithm. Sensitivity analysis showed that for all models, NINO indices and rainfall variable had the largest impact on network performance. In model 4 (as the model with the lowest error during training and testing processes), NINO 1 + 2(t-5) with an average sensitivity of 0.7 showed the highest impact on network performance. Next, the variables rainfall, NINO 1 + 2(t), and NINO 3(t-6) with the average sensitivity of 0.59, 0.28, and 0.28, respectively, could have the highest effect on network performance. The findings based on network performance metrics indicated that the global indices with a time lag represented a better correlation with El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Uncertainty analysis of the model 4 demonstrated that 68 % of the observed data were bracketed by the 95PPU and D-Factor value (0.79) was also within a reasonable range. Therefore, the fourth model with a combination of the input variables NINO 1 + 2 (with 5 months of lag and without any lag), monthly rainfall, and NINO 3 (with 6 months of lag) and correlation coefficient of 0.903 (between observed and simulated SPI) was selected as the most accurate model for drought forecasting using CANFIS

  5. An investigation into the crystallization tendency/kinetics of amorphous active pharmaceutical ingredients: A case study with dipyridamole and cinnarizine.

    PubMed

    Baghel, Shrawan; Cathcart, Helen; Redington, Wynette; O'Reilly, Niall J

    2016-07-01

    Amorphous drug formulations have great potential to enhance solubility and thus bioavailability of BCS class II drugs. However, the higher free energy and molecular mobility of the amorphous form drive them towards the crystalline state which makes them unstable. Accurate determination of the crystallization tendency/kinetics is the key to the successful design and development of such systems. In this study, dipyridamole (DPM) and cinnarizine (CNZ) have been selected as model compounds. Thermodynamic fragility (mT) was measured from the heat capacity change at the glass transition temperature (Tg) whereas dynamic fragility (mD) was evaluated using methods based on extrapolation of configurational entropy to zero [Formula: see text] , and heating rate dependence of Tg [Formula: see text] . The mean relaxation time of amorphous drugs was calculated from the Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher (VTF) equation. Furthermore, the correlation between fragility and glass forming ability (GFA) of the model drugs has been established and the relevance of these parameters to crystallization of amorphous drugs is also assessed. Moreover, the crystallization kinetics of model drugs under isothermal conditions has been studied using Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) approach to determine the Avrami constant 'n' which provides an insight into the mechanism of crystallization. To further probe into the crystallization mechanism, the non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of model systems were also analysed by statistically fitting the crystallization data to 15 different kinetic models and the relevance of model-free kinetic approach has been established. The crystallization mechanism for DPM and CNZ at each extent of transformation has been predicted. The calculated fragility, glass forming ability (GFA) and crystallization kinetics are found to be in good correlation with the stability prediction of amorphous solid dispersions. Thus, this research work involves a multidisciplinary approach to

  6. Reconstructing the geological and structural history of an active geothermal field: A case study from New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milicich, S. D.; Wilson, C. J. N.; Bignall, G.; Pezaro, B.; Bardsley, C.

    2013-07-01

    The utilisation of geothermal systems benefits from an understanding of the host-rock geology, locations and controls of permeability pathways, and the nature and timing of magmatic sources providing thermal energy. Kawerau Geothermal Field in the central Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) of New Zealand is currently developed for electricity generation and direct uses of high-temperature steam to ~ 200 MW electrical output. The Kawerau geothermal system is hosted in a sequence of volcanic lithologies (tuffs, lavas and intrusive bodies) and sediments that overlie faulted Mesozoic metasedimentary (greywacke) basement. Identification of lithologies in the volcanic/sedimentary sequence is challenging due to the levels of hydrothermal alteration and lithological similarities. A combination of detailed petrological investigations, consideration of the emplacement processes and greater certainty of crystallisation or eruption ages through U-Pb age determinations on zircons is used to reconstruct the depositional and faulting evolution of the rocks hosting the currently active hydrothermal system. The oldest event inferred is faulting of the greywacke along northwest-southeast orientated, dominantly strike-slip structures to generate half-grabens that were filled with sediments, incorporating two dated ignimbrites (2.38 ± 0.05 and 2.17 ± 0.05 Ma). A 1.46 ± 0.01 Ma ignimbrite was deposited relatively evenly across the field, implying that any topographic relief was subdued at that time. Subsequent deposition of ignimbrites occurred in episodes around 1.0, 0.55-0.6, and 0.32 Ma, interspersed with thin sedimentary sequences that accumulated at average rates of 0.06 mm yr- 1. Andesite lavas from a buried composite cone occur as a conformable package between units dated at 1.0 and 0.6 Ma. Bodies of coherent rhyolite occur at multiple stratigraphic levels: two magma types with associated tuffs were emplaced as domes and sills at 0.36 ± 0.03 Ma, and a third type at 0.138 ± 0.007 Ma

  7. Blood Transcriptional Biomarkers for Active Tuberculosis among Patients in the United States: a Case-Control Study with Systematic Cross-Classifier Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mikaela A.; Vasquez, Joshua; Weiner, Marc; Chapman, Adam; Engle, Melissa; Higgins, Michael; Quinones, Amy M.; Rosselli, Vanessa; Canono, Elizabeth; Yoon, Christina; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Davis, J. Lucian; Phang, Tzu; Stearman, Robert S.; Datta, Gargi; Garcia, Benjamin J.; Daley, Charles L.; Strong, Michael; Kechris, Katerina; Fingerlin, Tasha E.; Reves, Randall; Geraci, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Blood transcriptional signatures are promising for tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis but have not been evaluated among U.S. patients. To be used clinically, transcriptional classifiers need reproducible accuracy in diverse populations that vary in genetic composition, disease spectrum and severity, and comorbidities. In a prospective case-control study, we identified novel transcriptional classifiers for active TB among U.S. patients and systematically compared their accuracy to classifiers from published studies. Blood samples from HIV-uninfected U.S. adults with active TB, pneumonia, or latent TB infection underwent whole-transcriptome microarray. We used support vector machines to classify disease state based on transcriptional patterns. We externally validated our classifiers using data from sub-Saharan African cohorts and evaluated previously published transcriptional classifiers in our population. Our classifier distinguishing active TB from pneumonia had an area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of 96.5% (95.4% to 97.6%) among U.S. patients, but the AUC was lower (90.6% [89.6% to 91.7%]) in HIV-uninfected Sub-Saharan Africans. Previously published comparable classifiers had AUC values of 90.0% (87.7% to 92.3%) and 82.9% (80.8% to 85.1%) when tested in U.S. patients. Our classifier distinguishing active TB from latent TB had AUC values of 95.9% (95.2% to 96.6%) among U.S. patients and 95.3% (94.7% to 96.0%) among Sub-Saharan Africans. Previously published comparable classifiers had AUC values of 98.0% (97.4% to 98.7%) and 94.8% (92.9% to 96.8%) when tested in U.S. patients. Blood transcriptional classifiers accurately detected active TB among U.S. adults. The accuracy of classifiers for active TB versus that of other diseases decreased when tested in new populations with different disease controls, suggesting additional studies are required to enhance generalizability. Classifiers that distinguish active TB from latent TB are accurate and generalizable

  8. Theoretical pluralism in psychoanalytic case studies

    PubMed Central

    Willemsen, Jochem; Cornelis, Shana; Geerardyn, Filip M.; Desmet, Mattias; Meganck, Reitske; Inslegers, Ruth; Cauwe, Joachim M. B. D.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide an overview of the scientific activity of different psychoanalytic schools of thought in terms of the content and production of case studies published on ISI Web of Knowledge. Between March 2013 and November 2013, we contacted all case study authors included in the online archive of psychoanalytic and psychodynamic case studies (www.singlecasearchive.com) to inquire about their psychoanalytic orientation during their work with the patient. The response rate for this study was 45%. It appears that the two oldest psychoanalytic schools, Object-relations psychoanalysis and Ego psychology or “Classical psychoanalysis” dominate the literature of published case studies. However, most authors stated that they feel attached to two or more psychoanalytic schools of thought. This confirms that the theoretical pluralism in psychoanalysis stretches to the field of single case studies. The single case studies of each psychoanalytic school are described separately in terms of methodology, patient, therapist, or treatment features. We conclude that published case studies features are fairly similar across different psychoanalytic schools. The results of this study are not representative of all psychoanalytic schools, as some do not publish their work in ISI ranked journals. PMID:26483725

  9. ISEE 3 observations during the CDAW 8 intervals - Case studies of the distant geomagnetic tail covering a wide range of geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Slavin, J. A.; Owen, C. J.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Galvin, A. B.; Sanderson, T. R.; Scholer, M.

    1989-01-01

    Observations made by the ISEE 3 spacecraft in the distant geomagnetic tail during the eight CDAW 8 intervals are discussed, along with their relation to concurrent geomagnetic activity. This extensive multiinstrument case study of distant tail data covers a wide range of geomagnetic conditions from extended intervals of magnetic quiet with isolated substorms to prolonged periods of intense disturbance. Plasmoids are observed in the distant tail following disturbance enhancements, the time of their appearance being generally consistent with disconnection from the near-earth region at the time of the enhancement. Their structure is entirely consistent with the neutral line model. However, not all enhancements in geomagnetic activity result in the observation of plasmoids. In particular, the CDAW 8 data suggest that, during extended intervals of strong activity, a continuous neutral line may reside in the near-earth tail and some disturbance enhancements may then relate to an increase in the reconnection rate at a preexisting neutral line, rather than to new neutral line and plasmoid formation.

  10. Work Teams: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, M. Scott

    1981-01-01

    An important aspect of work environment is job content and structure. As this case study illustrates, increased productivity, enhanced job satisfaction, substantial cost reduction, and a reduction in turnover are some of the benefits of task reorganization. (CT)

  11. Case Study: del Amo Bioventing

    EPA Science Inventory

    The attached presentation discusses the fundamentals of bioventing in the vadose zone. The basics of bioventing are presented. The experience to date with the del Amo Superfund Site is presented as a case study.

  12. Hydrogeologic Case Studies (Seattle, WA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  13. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (CHICAGO, IL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  14. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (DENVER PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  15. Nasopharyngeal Case-Control Study

    Cancer.gov

    A case-control study conducted in Taiwan between 1991-1994 among approximately 1,000 individuals to examine the role of viral, environmental, and genetic factors associated with the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

  16. A Preliminary Case Study of SCALE Activities at the California State University, Northridge: Factors Influencing Change Initiatives in STEM Undergraduate Education, Teacher Training, and Partnerships with K-12 Districts. WCER Working Paper No. 2007-7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hora, Matthew T.; Millar, Susan B.

    2007-01-01

    This report of the National Science Foundation-funded SCALE Institutions of Higher Education (IHE) Case Studies line of work provides preliminary findings about SCALE activities at the California State University, Northridge (CSUN). This interview-based study (N = 19) includes a descriptive analysis of SCALE activities and an exploratory analysis…

  17. The evolution of sandy soils under the influence of vegetation succession and anthropogenic activities - case study from Błędów Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus, Magdalena; Drewnik, Marek

    2016-04-01

    Sandy areas are an important source of research about early stages of the soils formation process and their further development. The rate of succession is reflecting the influence of vegetation on chemical and physical properties of soils which as the time goes undergo the evolution process caused by other environmental factors. The Błędów Desert (Poland, Central Europe) is an example of this kind of area, where sandy soils evolved into Podzols, but as a result of human activities conducted since Middle Ages soil cover has been destroyed to bedrock. Currently progressing vegetation succession occurred in two ways: primary, which took place in areas covered by loose sand and secondary, in the areas with fossil soils. Presently the Błędów Desert is a suitable example to study soil changes in both cases mentioned above. The main aim of the study was to present diversity and characteristics of soils in The Błędów Desert in relation to their development stages and vegetation succession. During field studies soil profiles were described and selected for the detailed studies and soils samples were taken for laboratory analysis, including a determination of basic physical and chemical analysis as well as for micromorphological analysis (selected profiles). Podzols located near the boundary of the study area was selected as a reference soils. The results proved the complexity of the soil process formation, which strongly depends on the vegetation succession and human activities including human-induced aeolian processes. Results confirmed the presence of buried soils, which together with the contemporary soils formed a soil sequence. Moreover, research shows that the dominant soil-forming processes at the Błędów Desert are humus accumulation and podzolization. To summarize, The Błędów Desert is a dynamic environment undergoing rapid changes of soil cover under the influence of the interaction of vegetation, anthropopression and aeolian processes.

  18. Are fish and standardized FETAX assays protective enough for amphibians? A case study on Xenopus laevis larvae assay with biologically active substances present in livestock wastes.

    PubMed

    Martini, Federica; Tarazona, José V; Pablos, M Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Biologically active substances could reach the aquatic compartment when livestock wastes are considered for recycling. Recently, the standardized FETAX assay has been questioned, and some researchers have considered that the risk assessment performed on fish could not be protective enough to cover amphibians. In the present study a Xenopus laevis acute assay was developed in order to compare the sensitivity of larvae relative to fish or FETAX assays; veterinary medicines (ivermectin, oxytetracycline, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim) and essential metals (zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium) that may be found in livestock wastes were used for the larvae exposure. Lethal (LC(50)) and sublethal effects were estimated. Available data in both, fish and FETAX studies, were in general more protective than values found out in the current study, but not in all cases. Moreover, the presence of nonlethal effects, caused by ivermectin, zinc, and copper, suggested that several physiological mechanisms could be affected. Thus, this kind of effects should be deeply investigated. The results obtained in the present study could expand the information about micropollutants from livestock wastes on amphibians. PMID:22629159

  19. Are Fish and Standardized FETAX Assays Protective Enough for Amphibians? A Case Study on Xenopus laevis Larvae Assay with Biologically Active Substances Present in Livestock Wastes

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Federica; Tarazona, José V.; Pablos, M. Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Biologically active substances could reach the aquatic compartment when livestock wastes are considered for recycling. Recently, the standardized FETAX assay has been questioned, and some researchers have considered that the risk assessment performed on fish could not be protective enough to cover amphibians. In the present study a Xenopus laevis acute assay was developed in order to compare the sensitivity of larvae relative to fish or FETAX assays; veterinary medicines (ivermectin, oxytetracycline, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim) and essential metals (zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium) that may be found in livestock wastes were used for the larvae exposure. Lethal (LC50) and sublethal effects were estimated. Available data in both, fish and FETAX studies, were in general more protective than values found out in the current study, but not in all cases. Moreover, the presence of nonlethal effects, caused by ivermectin, zinc, and copper, suggested that several physiological mechanisms could be affected. Thus, this kind of effects should be deeply investigated. The results obtained in the present study could expand the information about micropollutants from livestock wastes on amphibians. PMID:22629159

  20. Challenges from Tuberculosis Diagnosis to Care in Community-Based Active Case Finding among the Urban Poor in Cambodia: A Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Shelly; Koeut, Pichenda; Thai, Sopheak; Khun, Kim Eam; Colebunders, Robert; Lynen, Lut

    2015-01-01

    Background While community-based active case finding (ACF) for tuberculosis (TB) holds promise for increasing early case detection among hard-to-reach populations, limited data exist on the acceptability of active screening. We aimed to identify barriers and explore facilitators on the pathway from diagnosis to care among TB patients and health providers. Methods Mixed-methods study. We administered a survey questionnaire to, and performed in-depth interviews with, TB patients identified through ACF from poor urban settlements in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Additionally, we conducted focus group discussions and in-depth interviews with community and public health providers involved in ACF, respectively. Results Acceptance of home TB screening was strong among key stakeholders due to perceived reductions in access barriers and in direct and indirect patient costs. Privacy and stigma were not an issue. To build trust and facilitate communication, the participation of community representatives alongside health workers was preferred. Most health providers saw ACF as complementary to existing TB services; however, additional workload as a result of ACF was perceived as straining operating capacity at public sector sites. Proximity to a health facility and disease severity were the strongest determinants of prompt care-seeking. The main reasons reported for delays in treatment-seeking were non-acceptance of diagnosis, high indirect costs related to lost income/productivity and transportation expenses, and anticipated side-effects from TB drugs. Conclusions TB patients and health providers considered home-based ACF complementary to facility-based TB screening. Strong engagement with community representatives was believed critical in gaining access to high risk communities. The main barriers to prompt treatment uptake in ACF were refusal of diagnosis, high indirect costs, and anticipated treatment side-effects. A patient-centred approach and community involvement were essential

  1. Nanosensors: towards morphological control of gas sensing activity. SnO2, In2O3, ZnO and WO3 case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurlo, Aleksander

    2011-01-01

    Anisotropy is a basic property of single crystals. Dissimilar facets/surfaces have different geometric and electronic structure that results in dissimilar functional properties. Several case studies unambiguously demonstrated that the gas sensing activity of metal oxides is determined by the nature of surfaces exposed to ambient gas. Accordingly, a control over crystal morphology, i.e. over the angular relationships, size and shape of faces in a crystal, is required for the development of better sensors with increased selectivity and sensitivity in the chemical determination of gases. The first step toward this nanomorphological control of the gas sensing properties is the design and synthesis of well-defined nanocrystals which are uniform in size, shape and surface structure. These materials possess the planes of the symmetrical set {hkl} and must therefore behave identically in chemical reactions and adsorption processes. Because of these characteristics, the form-controlled nanocrystals are ideal candidates for fundamental studies of mechanisms of gas sensing which should involve (i) gas sensing measurements on specific surfaces, (ii) their atomistic/quantum chemical modelling and (ii) spectroscopic information obtained on same surfaces under operation conditions of sensors.Anisotropy is a basic property of single crystals. Dissimilar facets/surfaces have different geometric and electronic structure that results in dissimilar functional properties. Several case studies unambiguously demonstrated that the gas sensing activity of metal oxides is determined by the nature of surfaces exposed to ambient gas. Accordingly, a control over crystal morphology, i.e. over the angular relationships, size and shape of faces in a crystal, is required for the development of better sensors with increased selectivity and sensitivity in the chemical determination of gases. The first step toward this nanomorphological control of the gas sensing properties is the design and

  2. A Case Study of Online Instructional Collaborative Discussion Activities for Problem-Solving Using Situated Scenarios: An Examination of Content and Behavior Cluster Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hou, Huei-Tse

    2011-01-01

    In some higher education courses that focus on case studies, teachers can provide situated scenarios (such as business bottlenecks and medical cases) and problem-solving discussion tasks for students to promote their cognitive skills. There is limited research on the content, performance, and behavioral patterns of teaching using online…

  3. The effects of water rock interaction and the human activities on the occurrence of hexavalent chromium in waters. The case study of the Psachna basin, Central Euboea, Greece.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasileiou, Eleni; Perraki, Maria; Stamatis, George; Gartzos, Efthimios

    2014-05-01

    High concentrations of heavy metals, particularly of the toxic hexavalent chromium, are recorded in surface and ground waters in many areas, and constitute one of the most severe environmental problems nowadays. The natural genesis of chromium is associated with the geological environment (peridotites and serpentintites). Chromium is structured in many minerals, mainly in spinel (e.g. chromite), in silicate minerals such as phyllosilicate serpentine minerals, chlorite, talc and chain-silicate minerals of pyroxene and amphibole group. Chromium is found in two forms in soils, waters and rocks, the hexavalent and the trivalent one. The relation between Cr(III) and Cr(VI) strongly depends on pH and oxidative properties of the area; however, in most cases, Cr(III) is the dominating variant. The natural oxidation of trivalent to hexavalent chromium can be achieved by manganese oxides, H2O2, O2 gas and oxy-hydroxides of trivalent iron. Anthropogenic factors may also cause the process of chromium's oxidation. In the Psachna basin, Central Euboea, Greece, high concentrations of hexavalent chromium were recently measured in spring- and drill- waters. In this work, we study the effect of the geological environment and of the anthropogenic activities on the water quality with emphasis on chromium. A detailed geochemical, petrological and mineralogical study of rocks and soils was carried out by means of optical microscopy, XRF, XRD and SEM/EDS. Ground and surface water samples were physically characterized and hydrochemically studied by means of ICP and AAF. Combined result evaluation indicates a natural source for the trivalent chromium in waters, attributed to the alteration of Cr-bearing minerals of the ultramafic rocks. However the oxidation of trivalent to hexavalent chromium results from anthropogenic activities, mainly from intensive agricultural activities and the extensive use of fertilizers and pesticides causing nitrate pollution in groundwater. It has been shown

  4. Experiencing Online Pedagogy: A Canadian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Heather E.; Barnett, John

    2010-01-01

    This case study explored the educational experiences of Canadian preservice teachers in a course designed to teach about online teaching. Students gained experience in course design and delivery, and safe and ethical behavior related to technology. Findings indicated that projects in which students actively applied their knowledge were more…

  5. Value for Money Case Studies. Mendip Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kedney, Bob, Ed.

    In response to a shift from the management of curriculum to the management of scarce resources to deliver a changing curriculum, this paper brings together three "value for money" case studies in college administration. The papers identify three levels of activity, ranging from the one-time opportunity for good housekeeping through tactical…

  6. Physics Courses--Some Suggested Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swetman, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    To communicate the relevance and excitement of science activity to students, the use of more imaginative, and even openly speculative, case studies in physics courses is suggested. Some useful examples are Magnetic Monopoles, Constants, Black Holes, Antimatter, Zero Mass Particles, Tachyons, and the Bootstrap Hypothesis. (DF)

  7. Case Studies: Windows onto Clinical Supervision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Jim; And Others

    1993-01-01

    By examining the structures and activities common to six case studies of clinical teacher supervision, this article identifies five conditions that facilitate changes in teacher thinking and behavior: development of a supportive, collegial relationship; teacher control over supervision products; continuity over time; focused, descriptive records…

  8. Ground Motion Simulation for a Large Active Fault System using Empirical Green's Function Method and the Strong Motion Prediction Recipe - a Case Study of the Noubi Fault Zone -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuriyama, M.; Kumamoto, T.; Fujita, M.

    2005-12-01

    The 1995 Hyogo-ken Nambu Earthquake (1995) near Kobe, Japan, spurred research on strong motion prediction. To mitigate damage caused by large earthquakes, a highly precise method of predicting future strong motion waveforms is required. In this study, we applied empirical Green's function method to forward modeling in order to simulate strong ground motion in the Noubi Fault zone and examine issues related to strong motion prediction for large faults. Source models for the scenario earthquakes were constructed using the recipe of strong motion prediction (Irikura and Miyake, 2001; Irikura et al., 2003). To calculate the asperity area ratio of a large fault zone, the results of a scaling model, a scaling model with 22% asperity by area, and a cascade model were compared, and several rupture points and segmentation parameters were examined for certain cases. A small earthquake (Mw: 4.6) that occurred in northern Fukui Prefecture in 2004 were examined as empirical Green's function, and the source spectrum of this small event was found to agree with the omega-square scaling law. The Nukumi, Neodani, and Umehara segments of the 1891 Noubi Earthquake were targeted in the present study. The positions of the asperity area and rupture starting points were based on the horizontal displacement distributions reported by Matsuda (1974) and the fault branching pattern and rupture direction model proposed by Nakata and Goto (1998). Asymmetry in the damage maps for the Noubi Earthquake was then examined. We compared the maximum horizontal velocities for each case that had a different rupture starting point. In the case, rupture started at the center of the Nukumi Fault, while in another case, rupture started on the southeastern edge of the Umehara Fault; the scaling model showed an approximately 2.1-fold difference between these cases at observation point FKI005 of K-Net. This difference is considered to relate to the directivity effect associated with the direction of rupture

  9. Monitoring and analyses of volcanic activity using remote sensing data at the Alaska Volcano Observatory: Case study for Kamchatka, Russia, December 1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D. J.; Dean, K., G.; Dehn, J.; Miller, T., P.; Kirianov, V. Yu.

    There are about 100 potentially active volcanoes in the North Pacific Ocean region that includes Alaska, the Kamchatka Peninsula, and the Kurile Islands, but fewer than 25% are monitored seismically. The region averages about five volcanic eruptions per year, and more than 20,000 passengers and millions of dollars of cargo fly the air routes in this region each day. One of the primary public safety objectives of the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) is to mitigate the hazard posed by volcanic ash clouds drifting into these busy air traffic routes. The AVO uses real-time remote sensing data (AVHRR, GOES, and GMS) in conjunction with other methods (primarily seismic) to monitor and analyze volcanic activity in the region. Remote sensing data can be used to detect volcanic thermal anomalies and to provide unique information on the location, movement, and composition of volcanic eruption clouds. Satellite images are routinely analyzed twice each day at AVO and many times per day during crisis situations. As part of its formal working relationship with the Kamchatka Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), the AVO provides satellite observations of volcanic activity in Kamchatka and distributes notices of volcanic eruptions from KVERT to non-Russian users in the international aviation community. This paper outlines the current remote sensing capabilities and operations of the AVO and describes the responsibilities and procedures of federal agencies and international aviation organizations for volcanic eruptions in the North Pacific region. A case study of the December 4, 1997, eruption of Bezymianny volcano, Russia, is used to illustrate how real-time remote sensing and hazard communication are used to mitigate the threat of volcanic ash to aircraft.

  10. Physical Activity Pattern and Personal-Social Factors of Mothers During Pregnancy And Infant Birth Weight Based On MET Scale: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoodi, Zohreh; Karimlou, Masoud; Sajjadi, Homeira; Dejman, Masoumeh; Vameghi, Meroe; Dolatian, Mahrokh; Baradarn Eftekhari, Monir

    2013-01-01

    Background Low birth weight is one of the most important public health issues in developing and developed countries and identifying its etiology is important for prevention. Objectives Considering the unknown impact of physical activity on low birth weight, this research was conducted to investigate the relationship between physical activity and low birth weight. Patients and Methods This research was conducted using a case-control design. The control group was made of 500 women with normal birth weight infants and the case group included 250 women with low birth weight infants from the selected hospitals in city of Tehran. The information was gathered using a researcher-made questionnaire which was prepared for determining the relationship between mothers’ lifestyle during pregnancy and infants' low birth weight using social determinants of health approach. In this questionnaire, scope of physical activity was investigated in three groups of athletic activities, activities at home and leisure activities. Activity intensity was determined using MET scale and the data were analyzed in SPSS software using independent t-test, Chi-square and logistic regression. Results In the present research, based on the results of multiple logistic regression test, an increase in the time spent on sport activities (OR = 2.20) and home activities (OR =1.44) (P = 0.003) was accompanied by increased chance of giving birth to low birth weight infants; in contrast, one hour increase of leisure activities decreased the probability of low birth weight infants by 0.32 (P = 0.008). Conclusions An increase in the time spent on sport and home activities, even after considering other influential factors, was related to low birth weight. PMID:24396576

  11. Teaching Case: Enterprise Architecture Specification Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steenkamp, Annette Lerine; Alawdah, Amal; Almasri, Osama; Gai, Keke; Khattab, Nidal; Swaby, Carval; Abaas, Ramy

    2013-01-01

    A graduate course in enterprise architecture had a team project component in which a real-world business case, provided by an industry sponsor, formed the basis of the project charter and the architecture statement of work. The paper aims to share the team project experience on developing the architecture specifications based on the business case…

  12. Association between bone stiffness and nutritional biomarkers combined with weight-bearing exercise, physical activity, and sedentary time in preadolescent children. A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Diana; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Gianfagna, Francesco; Konstabel, Kenn; Lissner, Lauren; Mårild, Staffan; Molnar, Dénes; Moreno, Luis A; Siani, Alfonso; Sioen, Isabelle; Veidebaum, Toomas; Ahrens, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    Physical activity (PA) and micronutrients such as calcium (Ca), vitamin D (25OHD), and phosphate (PO) are important determinants of skeletal development. This case-control study examined the association of these nutritional biomarkers and different PA behaviours, such as habitual PA, weight-bearing exercise (WBE) and sedentary time (SED) with bone stiffness (SI) in 1819 2-9-year-old children from the IDEFICS study (2007-2008). SI was measured on the calcaneus using quantitative ultrasound. Serum and urine Ca and PO and serum 25OHD were determined. Children's sports activities were reported by parents using a standardised questionnaire. A subsample of 1089 children had accelerometer-based PA data (counts per minute, cpm). Moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) and SED were estimated. Children with poor SI (below the 15th age-/sex-/height-specific percentile) were defined as cases (N=603). Randomly selected controls (N=1216) were matched by age, sex, and country. Odds ratios (OR) for poor SI were calculated by conditional logistic regression for all biomarkers and PA behaviour variables separately and combined (expressed as tertiles and dichotomised variables, respectively). ORs were adjusted for fat-free mass, dairy product consumption, and daylight duration. We observed increased ORs for no sports (OR=1.39, p<0.05), PA levels below 524 cpm (OR=1.85, p<0.05) and MVPA below 4.2% a day (OR=1.69, p<0.05) compared to WBE, high PA levels (<688 cpm) and high MVPA (6.7%), respectively. SED was not associated with SI. ORs were moderately elevated for low serum Ca and 25OHD. However, biomarkers were not statistically significantly associated with SI and did not modify the association between PA behaviours and SI. Although nutritional biomarkers appear to play a minor role compared to the osteogenic effect of PA and WBE, it is noteworthy that the highest risk for poor SI was observed for no sports or low MVPA combined with lower serum Ca (<2.5 mmol/l) or lower 25OHD (<43.0 nmol

  13. Forecasting the timing of activation of rainfall-induced landslides. An application of GA-SAKe to the Acri case study (Calabria, Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariano, Stefano Luigi; Terranova, Oreste; Greco, Roberto; Iaquinta, Pasquale; Iovine, Giulio

    2013-04-01

    In Calabria (Southern Italy), rainfall-induced landslides often cause significant economic loss and victims. The timing of activation of rainfall-induced landslides can be predicted by means of either empirical ("hydrological") or physically-based ("complete") approaches. In this study, by adopting the Genetic-Algorithm based release of the hydrological model SAKe (Self Adaptive Kernel), the relationships between the rainfall series and the dates of historical activations of the Acri slope movement, a large rock slide located in the Sila Massif (Northern Calabria), have been investigated. SAKe is a self-adaptive hydrological model, based on a black-box approach and on the assumption of a linear and steady slope-stability response to rainfall. The model can be employed to predict the timing of occurrence of rainfall-induced landslides. With the model, either the mobilizations of a single phenomenon, or those of a homogeneous set of landslides in a given study area can be analysed. By properly tuning the model parameters against past occurrences, the mobility function and the threshold value can be identified. The ranges of the parameters depend on the characteristics of the slope and of the considered landslide, besides hydrological characteristics of the triggering events. SAKe requires as input: i) the series of rains, and ii) the set of known dates of landslide activation. The output of the model is represented by the mobilization function, Z(t): it is defined by means of the convolution between the rains and a filter function (i.e. the Kernel). The triggering conditions occur when the value of Z(t) gets greater than a given threshold, Zcr. In particular, the specific release of the model here employed (GA-SAKe) employs an automated tool, based on elitist Genetic Algorithms. As a result, a family of optimal, discretized kernels has been obtained from initial standard analytical functions. Such kernels maximize the fitness function of the model: they have been

  14. In Case You Teach English: Case Studies in the English Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johannessen, Larry R.

    Case studies can be a powerful strategy to use for helping students learn critical thinking processes that are key to interpreting and responding to literature and writing. Some of the major benefits of applying case methods are: cases provide an environment for active learning; they encourage the creation of a community of learners; cases help…

  15. Case Studies in Broadcast Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Howard W.

    This collection of case studies, based on factual situations which have challenged broadcast managers in recent years, is designed to stimulate thinking about and solving of "real world" problems in commercial radio and television operations. Topics of a serious, long-run nature include enlarging the radio audience; station revenue and economy;…

  16. Case Studies in Sports Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Nancy

    1988-01-01

    This article presents case studies of two athletes who wanted to affect a change in their body weight in order to enhance athletic performance. Each athlete's problem and the nutrition approach used to solve it are discussed. Caloric values of fast foods are listed. (JL)

  17. Principal Succession: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jeffery C.; Webber, Charles F.

    Principal succession is misunderstood and underutilized as a means of affecting dynamic renewal in school communities. Previously, the replacement of a principal was examined solely through the experiences of principals and teachers. This paper reports on a case study that added the previously neglected perspectives of students, support staff, and…

  18. The Language Dilemma: Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teboul, J. C. Bruno

    2002-01-01

    Presents the case study involving a fictitious company's English-only policy and threats of legal action based on that policy. Includes the following responses: "Legal Issues Posed in the Language Dilemma" (Gregory S. Walden); "English Only: A Workplace Dilemma" (Alan Pakiela); "Problems with English-Only Policies" (Barbara Lynn Speicher); and…

  19. INNOVATIVE CLEAN TECHNOLOGIES CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Innovative Clean Technologies case studies contained herein are the products of the "Pollution Prevention by and for Small Business" Program (P2SB). he P2SB was an outreach program directed to small businesses that had developed innovative concepts for pollution prevention in...

  20. Due Process Hearing Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bateman, David F.; Jones, Marni Gail

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a due process hearing case study of a mother who contended that his son, D.J., has been denied of a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) of his School District after being suspended from school. D.J., an elementary student, had been described as hyperactive, inattentive, defiant, and often volatile. He was identified…

  1. Case Study: Planning as Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peter A. C.

    2007-01-01

    Proposes that the objectives of strategic planning may be attained more effectively if implemented via a learning paradigm. In support of this claim, describes a case study detailing implementation of such an initiative plus post-implementation interviews. (Contains 5 figures.)

  2. State Planning System. Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherin, Ellen, Ed.

    The State Planning System (SPS) is a policy-oriented management tool intended to help analyze the interrelated effects of alternative policies and their relationships to state goals. Two pilot-test case studies are described--the SPS tuition policy evaluation conducted in Colorado, and New York's SPS evaluation of the applicability of large scale…

  3. Case Studies in Applied Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematical Association of America, Washington, DC.

    This collection of nine case studies in applied mathematics was written primarily for the use of the instructor by a Conference sponsored by the Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics (CUPM). Each chapter contains exercises of varying degrees of difficulty and several include student projects. The materials were used on a trial…

  4. Increased Case Notification through Active Case Finding of Tuberculosis among Household and Neighbourhood Contacts in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Fukushi; Eang, Mao Tan; Nishikiori, Nobuyuki; Yadav, Rajendra-Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Background Globally, there has been growing evidence that suggests the effectiveness of active case finding (ACF) for tuberculosis (TB) in high-risk populations. However, the evidence is still insufficient as to whether ACF increases case notification beyond what is reported in the routine passive case finding (PCF). In Cambodia, National TB Control Programme has conducted nationwide ACF with Xpert MTB/RIF that retrospectively targeted household and neighbourhood contacts alongside routine PCF. This study aims to investigate the impact of ACF on case notifications during and after the intervention period. Methods Using a quasi-experimental cluster randomized design with intervention and control arms, we compared TB case notification during the one-year intervention period with historical baseline cases and trend-adjusted expected cases, and estimated additional cases notified during the intervention period (separately for Year 1 and Year 2 implementation). The proportion of change in case notification was compared between intervention and control districts for Year 1. The quarterly case notification data from all intervention districts were consolidated, aligning different implementation quarters, and separately analysed to explore the additionality. The effect of the intervention on the subsequent case notification during the post-intervention period was also assessed. Results In Year 1, as compared to expected cases, 1467 cases of all forms (18.5%) and 330 bacteriologically-confirmed cases (9.6%) were additionally notified in intervention districts, whereas case notification in control districts decreased by 2.4% and 2.3%, respectively. In Year 2, 2737 cases of all forms (44.3%) and 793 bacteriologically-confirmed cases (38%) were additionally notified as compared to expected cases. The proportions of increase in case notifications from baseline cases and expected cases to intervention period cases were consistently higher in intervention group than in control

  5. Association of disease activity with acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease during tocilizumab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a retrospective, case-control study.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Mitsuhiro; Kaneko, Yuko; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Kondo, Harumi; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the study was to identify risk factors for acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease (ILD) during tocilizumab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This is a retrospective, case-control study. We reviewed 395 consecutive RA patients who received tocilizumab. First, we divided the patients according to the presence (RA-ILD) or absence of ILD (non-ILD) assessed by chest X-ray or high-resolution computed tomography, and compared them for characteristics relevant to RA-ILD. Subsequently, focusing on the patients with RA-ILD, we assessed their baseline characteristics and clinical courses comparing patients with acute exacerbation to those without. Comparing 78 with ILD and 317 without ILD, the following were identified as factors related to RA-ILD on multivariate analysis: age 60 years or older (OR 4.5, 95 % CI 2.2-9.4, P < 0.0001), smoking habit (OR 2.9, 95 % CI 1.5-5.5, P = 0.002), and high rheumatoid factor levels (OR 2.8, 95 % CI 1.4-5.5, P = 0.002). Of 78 RA-ILD patients, six developed acute exacerbation during tocilizumab treatment. The median duration between the initiation of tocilizumab treatment and the acute exacerbation occurrence was 48 weeks. While baseline characteristics did not differ between acute exacerbation and non-acute exacerbation groups, patients experiencing acute exacerbation had significantly higher Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) at 24 weeks (20.8 vs. 6.2, P = 0.019). Univariate analysis showed that CDAI > 10 at 24 weeks was a risk factor for acute exacerbation (OR 4.7, 95 % CI 2.1-10.4, P = 0.02). Uncontrolled arthritis activity during tocilizumab treatment may be associated with acute exacerbation of RA-ILD, suggesting post-treatment monitoring of disease activity is important not only with respect to RA itself but also for RA-ILD. PMID:27072347

  6. Active strike-slip faulting history inferred from offsets of topographic features and basement rocks: a case study of the Arima Takatsuki Tectonic Line, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Tadashi; Lin, Aiming

    2002-01-01

    Geological, geomorphological and geophysical data have been used to determine the total displacement, slip rates and age of formation of the Arima-Takatsuki Tectonic Line (ATTL) in southwest Japan. The ATTL is an ENE-WSW-trending dextral strike-slip fault zone that extends for about 60 km from northwest of the Rokko Mountains to southwest of the Kyoto Basin. The ATTL marks a distinct topographic boundary between mountainous regions and basin regions. Tectonic landforms typically associated with active strike-slip faults, such as systematically-deflected stream channels, offset ridges and fault scarps, are recognized along the ATTL. The Quaternary drainage system shows progressive displacement along the fault traces: the greater the magnitude of stream channel, the larger the amount of offset. The maximum dextral deflection of stream channels is 600-700 m. The field data and detailed topographic analyses, however, show that pre-Neogene basement rocks on both sides of the ATTL are displaced by about 16-18 km dextrally and pre-Mio-Pliocene elevated peneplains are also offset 16-17 km in dextral along the ATTL. This suggests that the ATTL formed in the period between the development of the pre-Mio-Pliocene peneplains and deflection of the Quaternary stream channels. The geological, geomorphological and geophysical evidence presented in this study indicates that (1) the ATTL formed after the mid-Miocene, (2) the ATTL has moved as a dextral strike-slip fault with minor vertical component since its formation to late Holocene and (3) the ATTL is presently active with dextral slip rates of 1-3 mm/year and a vertical component of >0.3 mm/year. The formation of the ATTL was probably related to the opening of the Japan Sea, which is the dominant tectonic event around Japan since mid-Miocene. The case study of the ATTL provides insight into understanding the tectonic history and relationship between tectonic landforms and structures in active strike-slip faults.

  7. The Development of Topography in Ancient and Active Orogens: Case Studies of Landscape Evolution in the Southern Appalachians, USA and Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallen, Sean Francis

    Understanding the development of topography is fundamental to the geosciences. Topography represents the sum of all tectonic and geodynamic processes that force the earth's surface upward paired with those that act to bring it down. Spatial and temporal changes in topographic relief can modulate the various feedbacks between atmospheric, earth surface and rock exhumation processes, sediment flux, and the magnitude and style of gravity driven natural hazards. Plate tectonics provides the first-order framework necessary to understand how topography is built through the interaction of lithospheric plates. However, density contrasts in the mantle can also influence the elevation of the earth's surface through dynamic topography, while poorly understood nuances of mountain building at convergent margins complicate drawing direct connections between tectonics and topography. Such linkages are further confounded by non-linearity between rock uplift and erosion, variations in rates of deformation, changes in climate and the properties of bedrock. Great advances in our understanding of the evolution of topography have been achieved, yet numerous questions remain regarding the evolution of topography in ancient and active orogens. This research addresses knowledge gaps in the development of topography through case-studies of landscape evolution in the southern Appalachians Mountains, USA and the forearc overlying the Hellenic subduction zone. Chapter 1 explores the origins of modern topographic relief in the southern Appalachians, where tectonic activity ceased prior to 200 Ma. Conventional theories invoked to explain modern relief in the region are challenged. Quantitative analyses of digital elevation models and numerical modeling are coupled to provide the magnitudes and timing of changes in topographic relief. The results suggest that the southern Appalachians experienced a phase of topographic rejuvenation during the Miocene that increased the distance between the

  8. "You Know I Hate It when People Half Ass Things": A Case Study of a High School Science Student and the Role of Pre-Instructional Activities, Goal Orientation, and Self-Efficacy in Learning with Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Samuel Arthur

    2010-01-01

    This single subject case study followed a high school student and his use of a simulation of marine ecosystems. The study examined his metaworld, motivation, and learning before, during and after using the simulation. A briefing was conceptualized based on the literature on pre-instructional activities, advance organizers, and performance…

  9. A Preliminary Case Study of SCALE Activities at the University of Wisconsin-Madison: Factors Influencing Change Initiatives in STEM Undergraduate Education, Teacher Training, and Partnerships with K-12 Districts. WCER Working Paper No. 2007-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hora, Matthew T.; Millar, Susan B.

    2007-01-01

    This report on the SCALE Institutions of Higher Education (IHE) Case Studies line of work provides preliminary findings about SCALE activities at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison). This study focuses on the structural and behavioral dynamics influencing the implementation of the four core SCALE strategies for effecting change in…

  10. River sinuosity changes as indicators of the possible neotectonic activity - a case study on the Danube River between Paks (Hungary) and Beograd (Serbia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovszki, Judit

    2010-05-01

    . However, another possible explanation is based on the significant sediment load of the tributary, that is naturally decreases the river sinuosity. Horváth, F., Bada, G., Windhoffer, G., Csontos, L., Dombrádi, E., Dövényi, P., Fodor, L., Grenerczy, Gy., Síkhegyi, F., Szafián, P., Székely, B., Timár, G., Tóth, L., Tóth, T. (2006): A Pannon-medence jelenkori geodinamikájának atlasza: Euro-konform térképsorozat és magyarázó. Magyar Geofizika 47(4), 133-137. Ouchi, S. (1985): Response of alluvial rivers to slow active tectonic movement. Geol. Soc. Am. Bull. 96, 504-515. Timár, G. (2003): Controls on channel sinuosity changes: a case study of the Tisza River, the Great Hungarian Plain. Quaternary Sci. Rev. 22, 2199-2207. Timár, G., Molnár, G., Székely, B., Biszak, S., Varga, J., Jankó, A. (2006): Digitized maps of the Habsburg Empire - The map sheets of the second military survey and their georeferenced version. Arcanum, Budapest, 59 p. van Balen, R. T., Kasse, C., Moor, J. (2008): Impact of groundwater flow on meandering; example from the Geul river, the Netherlands. Earth Surf. Process. and Landf. 33(13), 2010-2028. Zámolyi, A., Székely, B., Draganits, E., Timár, G. (2010): Neotectonic control on river sinuosity at the western margin of the Little Hungarian Plain. Geomorph., in press, DOI: 10.1016/j.geomorph.2009.06.028

  11. [Research progress on case-control study].

    PubMed

    Zhang, F F; Liu, Z D; Zhang, C X; Jiang, B F

    2016-04-10

    Several new varients related to the case-control designs have been developed in the recent decades, and this article briefly summarized four new designs: two-stage design, case-specular study, exposure-crossover study and case-case-time-control study. This paper involved principles of study design, requisites for application, advantages and disadvantages on all the studies. PMID:27087230

  12. Culturally Responsive Active Citizenship Education for Newcomer Students: A Cross-State Case Study of Two Teachers in Arizona and New York

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, Pablo; Jaffee, Ashley Taylor

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines how two social studies teachers in New York and Arizona engage newcomer youth in active citizenship education. Using a framework of culturally responsive active citizenship education, this article sheds light on how two teachers, in two different social, political, and educational contexts, enact critical citizenship practices…

  13. Donors contribute more than acceptors to increase the two-photon activity--a case study with cyclopenta[b]naphthalene based molecules.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Mehboob

    2014-12-21

    In the present work, we address the question -"which among the electron donors and the electron acceptors contribute more to the two-photon (TP) activity of a donor-π-acceptor type of molecule?" For this purpose we have performed ab initio calculations to calculate the TP transition probability (δTP) of a recently synthesized (Benedetti et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2012, 134(30), 12418-12421) cyclopenta[b]naphthalene based chemo-sensor and its derivatives containing different electron donor and acceptor groups. Our study revealed that both under vacuum and in solvent phases, an increase in electron donor strength (-OMe, -NH2, -NMe2) increases the δTP value up to five times, whereas, an increase in the acceptor group strength (-COCH3, -NO2, -CN) increases it by a factor of two only. The highest δTP value is obtained for the molecule having the strongest donor-acceptor pair (-CN, -NMe2) considered in this work. We have also noted that, the removal of the cyclopentane ring from the original system increases the δTP value by ∼20% and the replacement of the naphthyl group by the benzene ring decreases it by ∼70%. All these results are explained by inspecting different TP tensor elements and different transition moment vectors involved in a two-state model approach. A close scrutiny of different parameters in 2SM clearly reveals that upon increasing the strength of either the donor or the acceptor group the parameters change in favour of increasing the overall δTP values but in the case of donors this effect is much larger. PMID:25367708

  14. Research in Accrediting Efforts (Project REA). An Assessment on the Awarding of Academic Credit for CETA Activities in Illinois. Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoyanoff, Karen, Comp.; Klehm, Jeanette, Comp.

    Summaries are presented of 15 case studies conducted at Illinois Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) regions to determine the kind of credentialing mechanisms that exist for awarding academic credit or some other record of achievement to those eligible participants who complete CETA training programs. Introductory material describes…

  15. Union-Active School Librarians and School Library Advocacy: A Modified Case Study of the British Columbia Teacher-Librarians' Association and the British Columbia Teachers' Federation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewbank, Ann Dutton

    2015-01-01

    This modified case study examines how the members of the British Columbia Teacher-Librarians' Association (BCTLA), a Provincial Specialist Association (PSA) of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation (BCTF), work together to advocate for strong school library programs headed by a credentialed school librarian. Since 2002, despite nullification…

  16. Designing case-control studies.

    PubMed Central

    Yanagawa, T

    1979-01-01

    Identification of confounding factors, evaluation of their influence on cause-effect associations, and the introduction of appropriate ways to account for these factors are important considerations in designing case-control studies. This paper presents designs useful for these purposes, after first providing a statistical definition of a confounding factor. Differences in the ability to identify and evaluate confounding factors and estimate disease risk between designs employing stratification (matching) and designs randomly sampling cases and controls are noted. Linear logistic models for the analysis of data from such designs are described and are shown to liberalize design requirements and to increase relative risk estimation efficiency. The methods are applied to data from a multiple factor investigation of lung cancer patients and controls. PMID:540588

  17. Towards widespread exploitation of high resolution multi-temporal interferometry for monitoring landslide activity: a case-study of Southern Gansu, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasowski, Janusz; Bovenga, Fabio; Dijkstra, Tom; Meng, Xingmin; Nutricato, Raffaele; Chiaradia, Maria Teresa

    2014-05-01

    Although Multi-Temporal Interferometry (MTI) techniques are considered to have already reached the operational level, it is apparent that, in both research and practice, we are only just beginning to benefit from the high resolution imagery that is currently acquired by the new generation of radar satellites. MTI techniques are not applicable in any environment, but, nonetheless, we foresee a strong possibility that in the future these techniques will see widespread exploitation in support of slope hazard assessments. MTI applications will become increasingly important in cases where little or no conventional monitoring is feasible (e.g. remote locations and limited funds). The tremendous potential of MTI is illustrated using selected examples of applications ranging from local to catchment scales. A particular focus is on the use of MTI for the investigation of slope instability in the remote high mountain region of Zhouqu, Southern Gansu, known to be affected by large magnitude (M7-8) earthquakes and catastrophic mass movements. The MTI processing of high resolution (~3 m) COSMO/SkyMed (CSK) satellite images produced spatially dense information (more than 1000 radar targets/km2) on ground surface displacements. A substantial portion of the radar targets showed significant displacements (from few to over 100 mm/yr), denoting widespread slope instability. In particular, the MTI results provided valuable information on the activity of some very large, apparently slow moving landslides that represent a persistent hazard to the local population and infrastructure, particularly as these landslides are known to undergo periods of increased activity resulting in river damming and disastrous flooding. Given the general lack of field monitoring data on slope instability in Southern Gansu, the MTI-derived displacements offer a unique form of remote displacement monitoring that provides valuable information to experts tasked with formulating strategies for hazard management

  18. Physical activity completed when young has residual bone benefits at 94 years of age: a within-subject controlled case study

    PubMed Central

    Warden, Stuart J.; Mantila Roosa, Sara M.

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity is recommended for skeletal health because bones adapt to mechanical loading. The young skeleton shows greatest plasticity to physical activity-related mechanical loads, but bones are most at risk of failure later in life. The discrepancy raises the question of whether the skeletal benefits of physical activity completed when young persist with aging. Here we present a unique case wherein the cortical bone benefit of physical activity completed over five decades earlier could be established within an individual aged in their tenth decade of life. Specifically, we compared bone properties at the midshaft humerus between the throwing and nonthrowing arms of a 94-year-old former Major League Baseball player who ceased throwing 55 years earlier. By performing analyses within-subject, the long-term skeletal benefit of physical activity completed when young could be assessed independent of inherited and systemic traits. Also, as the subject threw left-handed during his throwing career, but was right-hand dominant in all other activities throughout life, any lasting skeletal benefits in favor of the throwing arm could not be attributable to simple arm dominance. Analyses indicated that any cortical bone mass, area and thickness benefits of throwing-related physical activity completed when young were lost with aging, possibly due to accelerated intracortical remodeling. In contrast, the subject’s throwing (nondominant) arm had greater total cross-sectional area and estimated strength (polar moment of inertia) than in his dominant arm, despite muscle indices favoring the latter. These data indicate that physical activity completed when young can have lasting benefits on bone size and strength, independent of the maintenance of bone mass benefits. PMID:24879028

  19. A case for case studies: exploring the use of case study design in community nursing research.

    PubMed

    Bergen, A; While, A

    2000-04-01

    The case study has become an accepted vehicle for conducting research in a variety of disciplines. However, the meaning behind the term is not always made explicit by researchers and this has given rise to a number of assumptions which are open to challenge, and to questions about the robustness of the method. This paper explores some of the issues arising from one particular definition of case study research, used in a study by Yin which examined the practice of case management in community nursing. Four main areas are discussed. First, defining 'case' is seen to pose questions about the relationship of the phenomenon to its context, the degree of researcher control over case definition, the limits to what may constitute a 'case' and what is meant by the term 'unit of analysis'. Second, the relevance of external validity to case study research is supported through the use of a number of tactics, in particular Yin's concept of replication logic, which involves generalizing to theory, rather than to empirical data. Third, the use of method triangulation (multiple methods of data collection) is advanced as a means of enhancing construct validity in research where data converge around a particular theory. Finally, the relationship of the case study to theory construction, through the prior development of 'propositions' is discussed. Each of these issues is applied to the design and conduct of a research study based closely on Yin's multiple case study framework. Thirteen 'cases' were selected of case management practice and data were collected through interviews and examination of literature and documentation, to explore the suitability of community nurses for the role. It is concluded that, given the appropriate subject matter, context and research aims, the case study method may be seen as a credible option in nursing research. PMID:10759989

  20. Identifying an active case of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Williams, G; Alarcon, E; Jittimanee, S; Walusimbi, M; Sebek, M; Berga, E; Villa, T S

    2008-04-01

    The best practice standards set out in chapter 2 of the Best Practice guide focus on the various aspects of identifying an active case of TB and aim to address some of the challenges associated with case detection. The importance of developing a good relationship with the patient from the start, when he or she is often most vulnerable, is emphasised. The first standard focuses on the assessment of someone who might have TB and the second gives detailed guidance about the collection of sputum for diagnosis. The standards are aimed at the health care worker, who assesses the patient when he or she presents at a health care facility and therefore needs to be familiar with the signs, symptoms and risk factors associated with TB. Having suspected TB, the health care worker then needs to ensure that the correct tests are ordered and procedures are followed so that the best quality samples possible are sent to the laboratory and all documentation is filled out clearly and correctly. The successful implementation of these standards can be measured by the accurate and prompt reporting of results, the registration of every case detected and the continued attendance of every patient who needs treatment. PMID:18371262

  1. Trapezius activity of fibromyalgia patients is enhanced in stressful situations, but is similar to healthy controls in a quiet naturalistic setting: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Muscle activity and pain development of fibromyalgia (FM) patients in response to mental stress show inconsistent results, when compared to healthy controls (HCs). A possible reason for the inconsistent results is the large variation in stress exposures in different studies. This study compares muscle responses of FM patients and HCs for different modes and levels of imposed stress, to elucidate features in stress exposures that distinguish stress responses of FM patients from HCs. Methods Upper trapezius (clavicular and acromial fibers), deltoid, and biceps surface electromyographic (sEMG) activity was recorded in FM patients (n=26) and HCs (n=25). Heart rate (HR) was recorded and used as indicator of autonomic activation. Tests included inspiratory breath holding (sympathetic activation procedure), mental stress tests (color-word test and backward counting; 28 min), instructed rest prior to stress test (30 min TV watching), and controlled arm movement. sEMG and HR was also recorded during an unrestrained evening stay at a patient hotel. The 5-min period with lowest trapezius muscle activity was determined. Pain (shoulder/neck, low back pain) and perceived tension were scored on VAS scales at the start and the end of the stress test and at bedtime. Results Trapezius sEMG responses of FM patients were significantly higher than HCs during sympathetic activation, mental stress, and instructed rest, but similar during arm movement and unrestrained evening activity. HR of FM patients and HCs was similar during mental stress and in the evening, including the 5-min period with lowest trapezius activity. Muscle activity of FM patients during the stress test (with shoulder/neck pain development) and the evening stay (no pain development) was similar. Conclusions FM patients show elevated muscle activity (in particular trapezius activity) in situations with imposed stress, including sympathetic activation, and putative anticipatory stress. Muscle activity and

  2. What Factors Contribute to the Achievement Gap: A Case Study of Multicultural/Disadvantaged Student Participation in Co Curricular Activities at a Large Urban High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Carlton D.

    2009-01-01

    This quantitative research study used logistical regression and ordinary least squares to examine factors that contribute to the narrowing of the achievement gap at an urban high school in the Midwest. The study analyzed the relationship between five independent variables related to participation in co curricular activities, demographic…

  3. Dynamic flood risk: case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Baldassarre, Giuliano

    2013-04-01

    While many progresses have been made in the static assessment of (current) flood risk, additional transdisciplinary research is required for the development of new methods for the dynamic assessment of (future) flood risk, which is very much needed in a rapidly changing environment. To this end, it is essential to understand why flood risk has changed in the past. This presentation shows the scientific outcomes of diverse case studies (the Po river in Italy and a number of African rivers), whereby data and models are utilized to analyse and interpret the dynamics of flood risk. In particular, a number of hypotheses were tested by considering different agents of change, such as climate and/or land-use, flood prevention measures, human population dynamics. These case studies show that one of the main challenges in assessing (dynamic) flood risk is the deep interconnection not only between the different agents of change, but also between the components of risk (i.e. hazard, exposure, vulnerability or resilience). For instance, changes in flood hazard often trigger changes in exposure and vulnerability to flooding, and vice versa. These complex interactions seem to make predictions of future flood risk over long time scales rather difficult, if not impossible.

  4. The Image of the 1967 War in Israeli History Textbooks as Test Case: Studying an Active Past in a Protracted Regional Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yogev, Esther

    2012-01-01

    This article seeks to shed light on the dilemma facing history education in regions beset by a protracted, and as yet unresolved ethno-political conflict. The article will examine this issue by means of a unique test case that observes a dramatic war event in Israeli textbooks. The event in question is the Six-Day War of 1967 and the study of its…

  5. Case Study: A Picture Worth a Thousand Words? Making a Case for Video Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pai, Aditi

    2014-01-01

    A picture, they say, is worth a thousand words. If a mere picture is worth a thousand words, how much more are "moving pictures" or videos worth? The author poses this not merely as a rhetorical question, but because she wishes to make a case for using videos in the traditional case study method. She recommends four main approaches of…

  6. The CZSaw notes case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eric; Gupta, Ankit; Darvill, David; Dill, John; Shaw, Chris D.; Woodbury, Robert

    2013-12-01

    Analysts need to keep track of their analytic findings, observations, ideas, and hypotheses throughout the analysis process. While some visual analytics tools support such note-taking needs, these notes are often represented as objects separate from the data and in a workspace separate from the data visualizations. Representing notes the same way as the data and integrating them with data visualizations can enable analysts to build a more cohesive picture of the analytical process. We created a note-taking functionality called CZNotes within the visual analytics tool CZSaw for analyzing unstructured text documents. CZNotes are designed to use the same model as the data and can thus be visualized in CZSaw's existing data views. We conducted a preliminary case study to observe the use of CZNotes and observed that CZNotes has the potential to support progressive analysis, to act as a shortcut to the data, and supports creation of new data relationships.

  7. STS Case Study Development Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosa de Jesus, Dan A.; Johnson, Grace K.

    2013-01-01

    The Shuttle Case Study Collection (SCSC) has been developed using lessons learned documented by NASA engineers, analysts, and contractors. The SCSC provides educators with a new tool to teach real-world engineering processes with the goal of providing unique educational materials that enhance critical thinking, decision-making and problem-solving skills. During this third phase of the project, responsibilities included: the revision of the Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML) source code to ensure all pages follow World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) standards, and the addition and edition of website content, including text, documents, and images. Basic HTML knowledge was required, as was basic knowledge of photo editing software, and training to learn how to use NASA's Content Management System for website design. The outcome of this project was its release to the public.

  8. Physical Activity, Lesson Context and Teacher Behaviours within the Revised English National Curriculum for Physical Education: A Case Study of One School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mersh, Rachel; Fairclough, Stuart J.

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed student activity levels, lesson contexts, and teacher behaviours within the revised English National Curriculum for Physical Education (NCPE). Fifteen Year 7 (age 11-12 years) PE lessons were systematically observed for each gender using SOFIT (System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time). Boys engaged in moderate-to-vigorous…

  9. Marketing and clinical trials: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Francis, David; Roberts, Ian; Elbourne, Diana R; Shakur, Haleema; Knight, Rosemary C; Garcia, Jo; Snowdon, Claire; Entwistle, Vikki A; McDonald, Alison M; Grant, Adrian M; Campbell, Marion K

    2007-01-01

    Background Publicly funded clinical trials require a substantial commitment of time and money. To ensure that sufficient numbers of patients are recruited it is essential that they address important questions in a rigorous manner and are managed well, adopting effective marketing strategies. Methods Using methods of analysis drawn from management studies, this paper presents a structured assessment framework or reference model, derived from a case analysis of the MRC's CRASH trial, of 12 factors that may affect the success of the marketing and sales activities associated with clinical trials. Results The case study demonstrates that trials need various categories of people to buy in – hence, to be successful, trialists must embrace marketing strategies to some extent. Conclusion The performance of future clinical trials could be enhanced if trialists routinely considered these factors. PMID:18028537

  10. Brick handling: a case study.

    PubMed

    Webb, R D; Handyside, J

    1982-09-01

    A small change in brick dimensions resulted in an increase in the perceived work-load of men loading and unloading pallets of bricks by hand. A laboratory study indicated that the change in brick dimensions required changes in grip pattern in order to unload bricks at the same rate, moving the same number at a time. These changed grip patterns resulted in increased upper body movement, increased chest-muscle activity and higher heart rates. These differences were reflected in higher subjective ratings of fatigue. PMID:15676442

  11. Combinative dyebath treatment with activated carbon and UV/H2O2: a case study on Everzol Black-GSP.

    PubMed

    Ince, N H; Hasan, D A; Ustün, B; Tezcanli, G

    2002-01-01

    Treatability of textile dyebath effluents by two simultaneously operated processes comprising adsorption and advanced oxidation was investigated using a reactive dyestuff, Everzol Black-GSP (EBG). The method was comprised of contacting aqueous solutions of the dye with hydrogen peroxide and granules of activated carbon (GAC) during irradiation of the reactor with ultraviolet light (UV). Control experiments were run separately with each individual process (advanced oxidation with UV/H2O2 and adsorption on GAC) to select the operating parameters on the basis of maximum color removal. The effectiveness of the combined scheme was tested by monitoring the rate of decolorization and the degree of carbon mineralization in effluent samples. It was found that in a combined medium of advanced oxidation and adsorption, color was principally removed by oxidative degradation, while adsorption contributed to the longer process of dye mineralization. Economic evaluation of the system based on total color removal and 50% mineralization showed that in the case of Everzol Black-GSP, which adsorbs relatively poorly on GAC, the proposed combination provides 25% and 35% reduction in hydrogen peroxide and energy consumption relative to the UV/H2O2 system. Higher cost reductions are expected in cases with well adsorbing dyes and/or with less costly adsorbents. PMID:12361048

  12. Exploring Behavioral Markers of Long-term Physical Activity Maintenance: A Case Study of System Identification Modeling within a Behavioral Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Hekler, Eric B.; Buman, Matthew P.; Poothakandiyil, Nikhil; Rivera, Daniel E.; Dzierzewski, Joseph M.; Morgan, Adrienne Aiken; McCrae, Christina S.; Roberts, Beverly L.; Marsiske, Michael; Giacobbi, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    Efficacious interventions to promote long-term maintenance of physical activity are not well understood. Engineers have developed methods to create dynamical system models for modeling idiographic (i.e., within-person) relationships within systems. In behavioral research, dynamical systems modeling may assist in decomposing intervention effects and identifying key behavioral patterns that may foster behavioral maintenance. The Active Adult Mentoring Program (AAMP) was a 16-week randomized controlled trial of a group-based, peer-delivered physical activity intervention targeting older adults. Time intensive (i.e., daily) physical activity reports were collected throughout the intervention. We explored differential patterns of behavior among participants who received the active intervention (N=34; 88% women, 64.1±8.3 years of age) and either maintained 150 minutes/week of moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA; n=10) or did not (n=24) at 18 months following the intervention period. We used dynamical systems modeling to explore whether key intervention components (i.e., self-monitoring, access to an exercise facility, behavioral initiation training, behavioral maintenance training) and theoretically plausible behavioral covariates (i.e., indoor vs. outdoor activity) predicted differential patterns of behavior among maintainers and non-maintainers. We found that maintainers took longer to reach a steady-state of MVPA. At week 10 of the intervention, non-maintainers began to drop whereas maintainers increased MVPA. Self-monitoring, behavioral initiation training, % outdoor activity, and behavioral maintenance training, but not access to an exercise facility, were key variables that explained patterns of change among maintainers. Future studies should be conducted to systematically explore these concepts within a priori idiographic (i.e., N-of-1) experimental designs. PMID:24084400

  13. Exploring behavioral markers of long-term physical activity maintenance: a case study of system identification modeling within a behavioral intervention.

    PubMed

    Hekler, Eric B; Buman, Matthew P; Poothakandiyil, Nikhil; Rivera, Daniel E; Dzierzewski, Joseph M; Morgan, Adrienne Aiken; McCrae, Christina S; Roberts, Beverly L; Marsiske, Michael; Giacobbi, Peter R

    2013-10-01

    Efficacious interventions to promote long-term maintenance of physical activity are not well understood. Engineers have developed methods to create dynamical system models for modeling idiographic (i.e., within-person) relationships within systems. In behavioral research, dynamical systems modeling may assist in decomposing intervention effects and identifying key behavioral patterns that may foster behavioral maintenance. The Active Adult Mentoring Program was a 16-week randomized controlled trial of a group-based, peer-delivered physical activity intervention targeting older adults. Time-intensive (i.e., daily) physical activity reports were collected throughout the intervention. We explored differential patterns of behavior among participants who received the active intervention (N = 34; 88% women, 64.1 ± 8.3 years of age) and either maintained 150 minutes/week of moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA; n = 10) or did not (n = 24) at 18 months following the intervention period. We used dynamical systems modeling to explore whether key intervention components (i.e., self-monitoring, access to an exercise facility, behavioral initiation training, behavioral maintenance training) and theoretically plausible behavioral covariates (i.e., indoor vs. outdoor activity) predicted differential patterns of behavior among maintainers and nonmaintainers. We found that maintainers took longer to reach a steady-state of MVPA. At week 10 of the intervention, nonmaintainers began to drop whereas maintainers increased MVPA. Self-monitoring, behavioral initiation training, percentage of outdoor activity, and behavioral maintenance training, but not access to an exercise facility, were key variables that explained patterns of change among maintainers. Future studies should be conducted to systematically explore these concepts within a priori idiographic (i.e., N-of-1) experimental designs. PMID:24084400

  14. Using Case Studies To Teach Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabel, Connie

    Using case studies in science instruction develops problem solving and enhances listening and cooperative learning skills. Unlike other disciplines such as law and medicine, the case study method is rarely used in science education to enrich the curriculum. This study investigates the use of content-based case studies as a means of developing…

  15. The costs of preventive activities for exotic contagious diseases-A Danish case study of foot and mouth disease and swine fever.

    PubMed

    Denver, Sigrid; Alban, Lis; Boklund, Anette; Houe, Hans; Mortensen, Sten; Rattenborg, Erik; Tamstorf, Trine Vig; Zobbe, Henrik; Christensen, Tove

    2016-09-01

    The present paper provides an overview of the costs of preventive activities, currently undertaken in Denmark, related to foot and mouth disease (FMD) and classical and African swine fever (SF). Only costs held between outbreaks were included. Costs were divided into public costs and costs paid by the pig and cattle industries, respectively. Data were retrieved from multiple sources such as databases, legal documents, official statistics, yearly reports and expert opinions. As no previous studies have assessed such costs, data collection and estimation procedures were discussed and decided upon in a group of experts from universities, industry, and public authorities. The costs of each preventive activity were related to the type of activity, the number of times the activity was carried out and the share of costs that could be associated with FMD or SF. Uncertainty about parameters was incorporated in the analysis by assuming that the FMD/SF shares of costs as well as total costs for each activity could take on a most likely as well as a minimum and maximum value. A high degree of transparency was prioritized in the cost analysis, which enables reproducibility and easy access to conducting sensitivity analyses. A total of 27 FMD/SF preventive activities were identified. The estimated median (minimum-maximum) of total costs amounted to €32 (18-50) million in 2013. The single most costly FMD/SF related activity, amounting to €8 (5-13) million or 26% of total costs, was a national legal requirement to clean lorries immediately after transportation of live animals. The distribution of costs between stakeholders was estimated to be as follows: pig industry 63%, cattle industry 27%, and the public authorities 10%. Most of the activities focused on reducing the probability of spreading FMD/SF, while only a few activities were directed mainly towards reducing the probability of introduction. Legally required FMD/SF activities (mainly based on EU legislation) accounted

  16. Mode of action framework analysis for receptor-mediated toxicity: The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) as a case study.

    PubMed

    Corton, J Christopher; Cunningham, Michael L; Hummer, B Timothy; Lau, Christopher; Meek, Bette; Peters, Jeffrey M; Popp, James A; Rhomberg, Lorenz; Seed, Jennifer; Klaunig, James E

    2014-01-01

    Several therapeutic agents and industrial chemicals induce liver tumors in rodents through the activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). The cellular and molecular events by which PPARα activators induce rodent hepatocarcinogenesis has been extensively studied and elucidated. This review summarizes the weight of evidence relevant to the hypothesized mode of action (MOA) for PPARα activator-induced rodent hepatocarcinogenesis and identifies gaps in our knowledge of this MOA. Chemical-specific and mechanistic data support concordance of temporal and dose-response relationships for the key events associated with many PPARα activators including a phthalate ester plasticizer di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and the drug gemfibrozil. While biologically plausible in humans, the hypothesized key events in the rodent MOA, for PPARα activators, are unlikely to induce liver tumors in humans because of toxicodynamic and biological differences in responses. This conclusion is based on minimal or no effects observed on growth pathways, hepatocellular proliferation and liver tumors in humans and/or species (including hamsters, guinea pigs and cynomolgous monkeys) that are more appropriate human surrogates than mice and rats at overlapping dose levels. Overall, the panel concluded that significant quantitative differences in PPARα activator-induced effects related to liver cancer formation exist between rodents and humans. On the basis of these quantitative differences, most of the workgroup felt that the rodent MOA is "not relevant to humans" with the remaining members concluding that the MOA is "unlikely to be relevant to humans". The two groups differed in their level of confidence based on perceived limitations of the quantitative and mechanistic knowledge of the species differences, which for some panel members strongly supports but cannot preclude the absence of effects under unlikely exposure scenarios. PMID:24180432

  17. Contributions from the activity analysis to the products development project: case study based on a project of innovation and comfort in aircraft's cabins.

    PubMed

    Greghi, F M; Rossi, N T; Souza, G B J; Menegon, L N

    2012-01-01

    Comfort is an issue that has gained relevance within the aeronautical industry due to the necessity of manufacturers and airline companies of differentiating themselves in a market that has become more and more competitive each day. This study's aim is to analyze the comfort/discomfort of passengers, based on the analysis of the activities performed in the aircrafts' cabin during real flights, in order to create ergonomics requirements and a methodology of comfort analysis. The study has been performed during domestic commercial flights, and the adopted data collection techniques have been: the application of 219 questionnaires to passengers, 44 registrations of postures and actions through filmings and 12 semistructured interviews. The method has made possible the reconstruction of the user's action course in performing activities in real flight situations, and the calculation of the area occupied by the passenger during his or her actions. The integrated analysis of the results corroborates data from previous studies in which both the space made available to each passenger and the activity performed interfere in their perception of comfort. From this study it has been concluded that the method constitutes itself as an innovative tool within the process of aircrafts' cabins project enabling the calculation of the action space based on the reconstructed course. PMID:22316700

  18. Allographic agraphia: A case study

    PubMed Central

    Menichelli, Alina; Rapp, Brenda; Semenza, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of patient MN, diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia, who exhibited a severe impairment in writing letters and words in upper-case print in the face of accurate production of the same stimuli in lower-case cursive. In contrast to her written production difficulties, MN was unimpaired in recognizing visually presented letters and words in upper-case print. We find a modest benefit of visual form cueing in the written production of upper-case letters, despite an inability to describe or report visual features of letters in any case or font. This case increases our understanding of the allographic level of letter-shape representation in written language production. It provides strong support for previous reports indicating the neural independence of different types of case and font-specific letter-shape information; it provides evidence that letter-shape production does not require explicit access to information about the visual attributes of letter shapes and, finally, it reveals the possibility of interaction between processes involved in letter-shape production and perception. PMID:18489965

  19. Case Study: The Chemistry of Cocaine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewprashad, Brahmadeo

    2011-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's case study focuses on the chemistry of cocaine to teach a number of core concepts in organic chemistry. It also requires that students read and analyze an original research paper on…

  20. Case Studies for Inclusive Schools. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Peggy L.

    2005-01-01

    Case Studies for "Inclusive Schools, Second Edition" presents a sampling of case studies that contain realistic problems concerning inclusion issues for teacher education students to solve. This format was chosen because the case study approach to learning is gaining in popularity as it provides students with an opportunity to apply information…

  1. Business and Consumer Education Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delta Pi Epsilon, Minneapolis, Minn. Phi Chapter.

    This publication contains 58 case studies for classroom use in teaching various business and consumer education subjects at the high school level. A supplement to a previous Phi Chapter publication, "Office Education Case Studies" (1973), the case studies are intended to create class discussions and help students acquire the ability to analyze…

  2. Case Study Evaluations: A Decade of Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.

    1997-01-01

    In the last 10 years, there has been increased use of case study methodology, with accompanying refinement and improvement of the methods. Case studies have become legitimate research methods in evaluation, but it is too soon to say whether improvements in methodology are really resulting in improvements in the case studies conducted. (SLD)

  3. Case study: Bioremediation in the Aleutian Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, K.J.; Laford, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    This case study describes the design, construction, and operation of a bioremediation pile on Adak Island, which is located in the Aleutian Island chain. Approximately 1,900 m{sup 3} of petroleum-contaminated soil were placed in the bioremediation pile. The natural bioremediation process was enhanced by an oxygen and nutrient addition system to stimulate microbial activity. Despite the harsh weather on the island, after the first 6 months of operation, laboratory analyses of soil samples indicated a significant (80%) reduction in diesel concentrations.

  4. Detecting young, slow-slipping active faults by geologic and multidisciplinary high-resolution geophysical investigations: A case study from the Apennine seismic belt, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Improta, L.; Ferranti, L.; de Martini, P. M.; Piscitelli, S.; Bruno, P. P.; Burrato, P.; Civico, R.; Giocoli, A.; Iorio, M.; D'Addezio, G.; Maschio, L.

    2010-11-01

    The Southern Apennines range of Italy presents significant challenges for active fault detection due to the complex structural setting inherited from previous contractional tectonics, coupled to very recent (Middle Pleistocene) onset and slow slip rates of active normal faults. As shown by the Irpinia Fault, source of a M6.9 earthquake in 1980, major faults might have small cumulative deformation and subtle geomorphic expression. A multidisciplinary study including morphological-tectonic, paleoseismological, and geophysical investigations has been carried out across the extensional Monte Aquila Fault, a poorly known structure that, similarly to the Irpinia Fault, runs across a ridge and is weakly expressed at the surface by small scarps/warps. The joint application of shallow reflection profiling, seismic and electrical resistivity tomography, and physical logging of cored sediments has proved crucial for proper fault detection because performance of each technique was markedly different and very dependent on local geologic conditions. Geophysical data clearly (1) image a fault zone beneath suspected warps, (2) constrain the cumulative vertical slip to only 25-30 m, (3) delineate colluvial packages suggesting coseismic surface faulting episodes. Paleoseismological investigations document at least three deformation events during the very Late Pleistocene (<20 ka) and Holocene. The clue to surface-rupturing episodes, together with the fault dimension inferred by geological mapping and microseismicity distribution, suggest a seismogenic potential of M6.3. Our study provides the second documentation of a major active fault in southern Italy that, as the Irpinia Fault, does not bound a large intermontane basin, but it is nested within the mountain range, weakly modifying the landscape. This demonstrates that standard geomorphological approaches are insufficient to define a proper framework of active faults in this region. More in general, our applications have wide

  5. [Long-term effect of a cognitive intervention on learning and participation in a significant leisure activity in early dementia of Alzheimer type: a case study].

    PubMed

    Provencher, Véronique; Bier, Nathalie; Audet, Thérèse; Gagnon, Lise

    2009-06-01

    Decreased ability to accomplish significant leisure activities often occurs in early stages of dementia of Alzheimer type (DAT). As a long term effect, it may eventually affect the quality of life of the patient as well as that of the caregiver's. In a previous study, a woman with early DAT (77 years old, MMSE: 24/30) improved her participation in 2 leisure activities (listening to music and praying in a group) following the learning of a few tasks (e.g. using a radio cassette, remembering the significance of an pre-programmed ring) as a result of a cognitive intervention. The present study presents the long term effect of this intervention on the retention of the learned tasks and on spontaneous participation in both leisure activities of her daily living. Measures of tasks' learning and spontaneous participation in activities have been obtained through direct observation (ex: ability to use the tasks learned without assistance) and telephone conversations with the caregiver. The measures were taken 9 to 15 months post-intervention. Nine months after the end of the intervention, the participant could no longer use the radio cassette, but was able to remember the significance of the pre-programmed ring. Similarly, she stopped listening to music, but still attended her prayer group. The intervention appears to maintain participation in a leisure activity for several months in a patient with early DAT, in spite of expected functional decline. This functional impact can be achieved through retention of specific learned tasks as well as by strong external cues (daily pre-programmed ring), and can increase the quality of life for patients with DAT. PMID:19473956

  6. Concentrated photovoltaics, a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonini, Piergiorgio; Centro, Sandro; Golfetto, Stelvio; Saccà, Alessandro

    2014-12-01

    Concentrated Photovoltaics (CPV), once a niche technology, has now reached the maturity and reliability for large scale power generation. Especially in regions where temperatures are very high, the use of high efficiency triple junction solar cells with concentrating optics allows stable energy yield. Thus CPV can be seen as complementary and not in concurrence with silicon photovoltaics. The state of the art, the advantages and limitations of this technology will be shown. Among the main advantages of CPV is the possibility of a much higher energy supply, when compared to silicon photovoltaics, both comparing CPV and silicon with same area or the same installed power. The use of recycled and recyclable materials allows a more environmentally friendly production. The possibility to couple CPV with desalination facilities, energy storage will be analysed. As an example a case study of a CPV installation in Northern Italy is discussed. Here the use of mature technologies, derived from automotive and lighting sectors resulted in a simple and efficient module.

  7. Improving temporal profiles of anthropogenic emissions influenced by human activities and meteorological drivers for atmospheric dispersion modelling - a case study for the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieno, M.; Reis, S.; Ambelas Skjøth, C.; Lang, M.; Geels, C.

    2010-12-01

    Emissions of trace gases originating from anthropogenic activities are vital input data for chemical transport models (CTMs). Other key input datasets such as meteorological drivers, and biogeochemical and physical processes have been subject to detailed investigation and research in the recent past, while the representation of emission data in CTMs has been somewhat neglected. Arguably, this has less impact on the regional to hemispheric or global scale, where the grid sizes of currently applied CTMs represent well mixed average concentrations or deposition values. Evaluating model output against ground-based observations or remote sensing results on these spatial levels appears not to be overly sensitive to the temporal (and spatial) profiles of emission input data. With increasing level of detail and spatiotemporal resolution, CTMs applied to determine national or local scale air quality are likely prone to be more sensitive to the spatial and temporal patterns of anthropogenic emissions. This paper discusses results of the application of the EMEP4UK CTM on a 5 km x 5 km resolution for the whole of the United Kingdom. In a first instance, detailed temporal profiles for emissions from road transport, power generation and other stationary sources have been developed. Depending on typical sectoral activities, hourly to seasonal variations have been quantified and (sub-)sectoral time curves generated. Here, we will discuss how these improved time curves influence modelled concentrations of NO2, Ozone and PM10 for selected episodes in the year 2007. In a second application, both anthropogenic activities (e.g. manure spreading and fertilizer application) and meteorological factors (e.g. temperature and seasonality) have been investigated regarding their influence on the spatiotemporal distribution of NH3 emissions (Skjøth et al., 2004; see as well Pinder et al., 2004; Gilliland et al., 2006). The discussion of results in this case will focus on the impact on the

  8. Cancer Advocacy in Africa: case studies of innovative practices

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present six case studies describing innovative cancer advocacy programs in Africa. For each case study, an example of an advocacy activity, list of factors contributing to the success of the organization, and an example of an obstacle addressed by the organization are described. PMID:23902662

  9. Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This draft document presents two case studies of nanoscale titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) used (1) to remove arsenic from drinking water and (2) as an active ingredient in topical sunscreen. The draft case studies are organized around a comprehensive environmental asses...

  10. Personal Development Plans: Case Studies of Practice. Report 280.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamkin, P.; And Others

    The use and effectiveness of personal development plans (PDPs) in planning career and skill development activities for individuals within employing organizations in the United Kingdom was examined through case studies of seven firms and telephone interviews with representatives of seven other firms. The case studies/interviews focused on the…

  11. Utilization of human nuclear receptors as an early counter screen for off-target activity: a case study with a compendium of 615 known drugs.

    PubMed

    Fan, Fan; Hu, Rong; Munzli, Anke; Chen, Yuan; Dunn, Robert T; Weikl, Kerstin; Strauch, Simone; Schwandner, Ralf; Afshari, Cynthia A; Hamadeh, Hisham; Nioi, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Off-target effects of drugs on nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) may result in adverse effects in multiple organs/physiological processes. Reliable assessments of the NHR activities for drug candidates are therefore crucial for drug development. However, the highly permissive structures of NHRs for vastly different ligands make it challenging to predict interactions by examining the chemical structures of the ligands. Here, we report a detailed investigation on the agonistic and antagonistic activities of 615 known drugs or drug candidates against a panel of 6 NHRs: androgen, progesterone, estrogen α/β, and thyroid hormone α/β receptors. Our study revealed that 4.7 and 12.4% compounds have agonistic and antagonistic activities, respectively, against this panel of NHRs. Nonetheless, potent, unintended NHR hits are relatively rare among the known drugs, indicating that such interactions are perhaps not tolerated during drug development. However, we uncovered examples of compounds that unintentionally agonize or antagonize NHRs. In addition, a number of compounds showed multi-NHR activities, suggesting that the cross-talk between multiple NHRs co-operate to elicit in vivo effects. These data highlight the merits of counter screening drug candidate against NHRs during drug discovery/development. PMID:25752796

  12. Balance between herbicidal activity and toxicity effect: a case study of the joint effects of triazine and phenylurea herbicides on Selenastrum capricornutum and Photobacterium phosphoreum.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hongming; Lin, Zhifen; Yao, Zhifeng; Gao, Ya; Cong, Yongping; Yu, Hongxia

    2014-05-01

    The use of herbicide mixtures has become a cost-effective strategy against the evolution of herbicide resistance to protect global food production. Much research has focused on investigating either the herbicidal activities or the toxicity effects of herbicides; however, few of them have investigated both factors. This study investigates the balance between herbicidal activity for Selenastrum capricornutum and toxicity effect toward Photobacterium phosphoreum by determining the joint effects of triazine (simetryn, atrazine, prometon and prometryn) and phenylurea (fenuron, monuron, monolinuron and diuron) herbicides. The results showed that among the four triazines, only simetryn exhibited a unique effect (formation of a pi-sigma bond with the D1 microalga protein and an H-bond with the Luc photobacterial protein); and among 16 triazine-phenylurea binary mixtures, only the mixtures containing simetryn resulted in TU1 values (herbicidal activities of mixtures on S. capricornutum) >TU2 values (toxicity effects of mixtures on P. phosphoreum). However, the other 12 mixtures, which did not contain simetryn, showed the opposite result (TU1activity and toxicity effect, which will encourage thoughtful efforts for how to best combine herbicides in a sustainable way. PMID:24681700

  13. Real-Time Web-Based Assessment of Total Population Risk of Future Emergency Department Utilization: Statewide Prospective Active Case Finding Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chunqing; Zhao, Yifan; Hao, Shiying; Zheng, Le; Fu, Changlin; Wen, Qiaojun; Ji, Jun; Li, Zhen; Wang, Yong; Zheng, Xiaolin; Dai, Dorothy; Culver, Devore S; Alfreds, Shaun T; Rogow, Todd; Stearns, Frank; Sylvester, Karl G; Widen, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background An easily accessible real-time Web-based utility to assess patient risks of future emergency department (ED) visits can help the health care provider guide the allocation of resources to better manage higher-risk patient populations and thereby reduce unnecessary use of EDs. Objective Our main objective was to develop a Health Information Exchange-based, next 6-month ED risk surveillance system in the state of Maine. Methods Data on electronic medical record (EMR) encounters integrated by HealthInfoNet (HIN), Maine’s Health Information Exchange, were used to develop the Web-based surveillance system for a population ED future 6-month risk prediction. To model, a retrospective cohort of 829,641 patients with comprehensive clinical histories from January 1 to December 31, 2012 was used for training and then tested with a prospective cohort of 875,979 patients from July 1, 2012, to June 30, 2013. Results The multivariate statistical analysis identified 101 variables predictive of future defined 6-month risk of ED visit: 4 age groups, history of 8 different encounter types, history of 17 primary and 8 secondary diagnoses, 8 specific chronic diseases, 28 laboratory test results, history of 3 radiographic tests, and history of 25 outpatient prescription medications. The c-statistics for the retrospective and prospective cohorts were 0.739 and 0.732 respectively. Integration of our method into the HIN secure statewide data system in real time prospectively validated its performance. Cluster analysis in both the retrospective and prospective analyses revealed discrete subpopulations of high-risk patients, grouped around multiple “anchoring” demographics and chronic conditions. With the Web-based population risk-monitoring enterprise dashboards, the effectiveness of the active case finding algorithm has been validated by clinicians and caregivers in Maine. Conclusions The active case finding model and associated real-time Web-based app were designed to

  14. [Effect of hydrochemistry characteristics under impact of human activity: a case study in the upper reaches of the Xijiang River basin].

    PubMed

    Yu, Shil; Sun, Ping-an; Du, Wen-yue; He, Shi-yi; Li, Rui

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, observation and sampling were taken three times a month in a hydrological year for three typical sections of the middle and upper reaches of the Xijiang River basin, based on the data of hydrochemistry and flow, the article mainly discusses the evolution process of hydrochemistry in river under natural process and impact of human activity. Hydrochemical characteristics of 116. samples were analyzed in the study area. The hydrochemistry type in the middle and upper reaches of the Xijiang River basin belonged to HCO3- -Ca2+ type, and the chemical weathering type mainly came from carbonate rock weathering. Ca2+ and HCO3- were the main cations and anions, which reflected that hydrochemical characteristics of river in karst area mainly affected by the dissolution of carbonate rock. Na, Mg2, Ca2+ and Cl- mainly affected by natural conditions, the impact of human activity was little. K+, NO3-, SO4(2-) and HCO3- were affected by human activity in different degrees, and it showed different influence ways. This study had an important significance for the change of river hydrochemistry, water quality characteristics, and the effect on substance transported fluxes in the downstream of Pearl River and water quality protection in South China Monsoon Area. PMID:25898649

  15. Risk Transmission Indicator of Schistosomiasis Japonicum Considering Human Activities in Lake and Marshland Regions- A Case Study of Poyang Lake, Jiangxi Province, P.R. China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marie, Tiphanie; Yesou, Herve; Huber, Claire; De Fraipont, Paul; Uribe, Carlos; Lacaux, Jean-Pierre; Lafaye, Murielle; Lai, Xijun; Desnos, Yves-Louis

    2013-01-01

    This paper present the method used to determine the areas where schistosomiasis transmission is the higher. A primary work was necessary to this study: identification of potential presence of schistosomiasis japonicum’s vector in Poyang lakeshore area (Jiangxi Province, P.R. China). Results obtained from its first work were crossing with the most risky human activities and with villages to elaborate a level of transmission risk. The first parameter determined concern fishing, which was identified like the most risky activity for schistosomiasis transmission, and fish traps were digitalized using a very high resolution ALOS data. The second parameter is about the risky areas for buffalo grazing, and vector potential presence areas were crossed with village proximity to determine the most risky areas for human transmission. The third parameter built is a level of risk for each village digitalized around Poyang Lake, taking into account the proximity and level of potential presence of vector’s areas.

  16. [Variations in hemostasis and fibrinolysis during the treatment of acute myocardial infarct (AMI) with tissue-type plasminogen activator (TTPA). A study of 17 cases].

    PubMed

    Izaguirre Avila, R; Ruiz de Chávez Cervantes, A; Villavicencio, R; Gómez Trigos, A; Mar Chavira, R; Spíndola, M del C; Casanova, J M

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this trial was to estimate changes in the coagulation and fibrinolysis systems during the thrombolytic treatment with recombinant human tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in patients with acute myocardial infarction and correlate with hemorrhagic complications. We studied 17 patients with a 3 hours-continuous systemic infusion of 100 mg of rt-PA. Prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, fibrinogen splits products, plasminogen, alfa-2-antiplasmin (a-2AP) and antithrombin III (AT-III) were performed before, during and after infusion. Most patients showed lengthening coagulation times. Fibrinogen and plasminogen were decreased and PDF was increased. No variations in alpha-2AP or AT-III were observed. The recuperation of fibrinogen levels occurred in 3 hours and there was hyperfibrinogenemia after day 3. No hemorrhagic complication was observed in patients with abnormalities in these coagulation or fibrinolytic tests. PMID:8347053

  17. Demystifying Instructional Innovation: The Case of Teaching with Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantar, Lina D.

    2013-01-01

    Issues emerging from instructional innovation are inevitable, yet basing any curriculum shift on a theoretical framework is paramount. This paper grounds the case-based pedagogy in three learning theories: behaviorism, cognitivism, and constructivism. The three theories are described and situated in relation to the case study method. An…

  18. Quaternary migration of active extension revealed by a syn-tectonic alluvial fan shift. A case study in the Northern Apennines of Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabella, Francesco; Bucci, Francesco; Cardinali, Mauro; Santangelo, Michele; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2016-04-01

    In areas characterized by the progressive migration of active extension through time, shifts in the position of the active depocenter occur. Such shifts through time produces peculiar geomorphological settings that are often characterized by wind gaps, abandoned valleys, streams captures and drainage inversions. These features provide the opportunity to investigate active areas by studying the recent-most geological history of the related nearby basins. We investigate this topic in a tectonically active area in the Northern Apennines of Italy, as indicated by both instrumental and historical seismicity (maximum epicentral intensity I0=VIII) and extension rates in the order of 2.5-2.7 mm/yr. In particular, we study the Montefalco ridge drainage inversion. Here, fluvial sands and imbricated conglomerates deposited in a lower Pleistocene depocenter constituted by an extensional subsiding basin, are presently uplifted more than 200 m above the present day alluvial plain. The Montefalco ridge drainage inversion, at about 400 m a.s.l., separates two valleys, the Gualdo Cattaneo - Bastardo valley to the West (300 m a.s.l.) and the Foligno present-day alluvial plain to the East (200 m a.s.l.). Seismic reflection data show that the maximum thickness of the continental sequence in the Foligno valley is in the order of 500 m. This valley is presently occupied by a 37 km2 alluvial fan produced by the Topino river flowing from NE to SW. To unravel the Quaternary tectonic evolution of the area, we integrate different data sets collected by field mapping, detailed photo-geological data, sediments provenance information, and subsurface data. We interpret the Montefalco ridge as a paleo-Foligno-like alluvial fan representing the evidence of the recent migration of the active extension to the East of around 7 km. Considering an age of deformation of 2.5 My, an extension rate of about 2.8 mm/yr is derived, which corresponds to the present-day geodetic rates. We stress the importance

  19. Peace Corps Water/Sanitation Case Studies and Analyses. Appropriate Technologies for Development. Case Study CS-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbert, Diana E., Comp.

    This document provides an overview of Peace Corps water and sanitation activities, five case studies (Thailand, Yemen, Paraguay, Sierra Leone, and Togo), programming guidelines, and training information. Each case study includes: (1) background information on the country's geography, population, and economics; (2) information on the country's…

  20. Case Studies for Effective Business Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlister-Kizzier, Donna

    This book is designed as a resource for educators who teach business content in a variety of instructional settings. It contains case studies representing all functional areas of business, including corporate training, for grades 7 through graduate education. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the case study method. The history of the case method,…

  1. Influence of different forest system management practices on leaf litter decomposition rates, nutrient dynamics and the activity of ligninolytic enzymes: a case study from central European forests.

    PubMed

    Purahong, Witoon; Kapturska, Danuta; Pecyna, Marek J; Schulz, Elke; Schloter, Michael; Buscot, François; Hofrichter, Martin; Krüger, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Leaf litter decomposition is the key ecological process that determines the sustainability of managed forest ecosystems, however very few studies hitherto have investigated this process with respect to silvicultural management practices. The aims of the present study were to investigate the effects of forest management practices on leaf litter decomposition rates, nutrient dynamics (C, N, Mg, K, Ca, P) and the activity of ligninolytic enzymes. We approached these questions using a 473 day long litterbag experiment. We found that age-class beech and spruce forests (high forest management intensity) had significantly higher decomposition rates and nutrient release (most nutrients) than unmanaged deciduous forest reserves (P<0.05). The site with near-to-nature forest management (low forest management intensity) exhibited no significant differences in litter decomposition rate, C release, lignin decomposition, and C/N, lignin/N and ligninolytic enzyme patterns compared to the unmanaged deciduous forest reserves, but most nutrient dynamics examined in this study were significantly faster under such near-to-nature forest management practices. Analyzing the activities of ligninolytic enzymes provided evidence that different forest system management practices affect litter decomposition by changing microbial enzyme activities, at least over the investigated time frame of 473 days (laccase, P<0.0001; manganese peroxidase (MnP), P = 0.0260). Our results also indicate that lignin decomposition is the rate limiting step in leaf litter decomposition and that MnP is one of the key oxidative enzymes of litter degradation. We demonstrate here that forest system management practices can significantly affect important ecological processes and services such as decomposition and nutrient cycling. PMID:24699676

  2. Effect of recycling activities on the heating value of solid waste: case study of the Greater Vancouver Regional District (Metro Vancouver).

    PubMed

    Abedini, Ali R; Atwater, James W; Fu, George Yuzhu

    2012-08-01

    Two main goals of the integrated solid waste management system (ISWMS) of Metro Vancouver (MV) include further recycling of waste and energy recovery via incineration of waste. These two very common goals, however, are not always compatible enough to fit in an ISWMS depending on waste characteristics and details of recycling programs. This study showed that recent recycling activities in MV have negatively affected the net heating value (NHV) of municipal solid waste (MSW) in this regional district. Results show that meeting MV's goal for additional recycling of MSW by 2015 will further reduce the NHV of waste, if additional recycling activities are solely focused on more extensive recycling of packaging materials (e.g. paper and plastic). It is concluded that 50% additional recycling of paper and plastic in MV will increase the overall recycling rate to 70% (as targeted by the MV for 2015) and result in more than 8% reduction in NHV of MSW. This reduction translates to up to 2.3 million Canadian dollar (CAD$) less revenue at a potential waste-to-energy (WTE) plant with 500 000 tonnes year(-1) capacity. Properly designed recycling programmes, however, can make this functional element of ISWMS compatible with green goals of energy recovery from waste. Herein an explanation of how communities can increase their recycling activities without affecting the feasibility of potential WTE projects is presented. PMID:22700857

  3. Estrogenic activity measured in a sewage treatment works treating industrial inputs containing high concentrations of alkylphenolic compounds--a case study.

    PubMed

    Sheahan, David A; Brighty, Geoff C; Daniel, Mic; Kirby, Sonia J; Hurst, Mark R; Kennedy, Joe; Morris, Steven; Routledge, Edwin J; Sumpter, John P; Waldock, Michael J

    2002-03-01

    Chemical analyses were combined with a biological assay to investigate the main estrogenic chemicals as they passed through a sewage treatment works (STW) and entered a river. The STW studied was unusual in that it received wastewater from the textile trade. This wastewater was shown to contain high concentrations of alkylphenol polyethoxylates and their degradation products, such as nonylphenol. High-performance liquid chromatography fractionation, combined with biological assay, showed that the majority of the estrogenic activity was contributed by the alkylphenolic chemicals and the natural estrogens 17beta-estradiol and estrone. Despite removal of a high proportion of the alkylphenolic chemicals by the various treatment processes within the STW, concentrations in the final effluent were still high compared to most other STW effluents in the United Kingdom. The effluent was very estrogenic to caged fish, as was the river water 2 and 5 km downstream of the STW, even though less so. Using various approaches, attempts were made to determine which group of chemicals contributed most to the estrogenic activity of the effluent. The analysis suggested that, in this unusual situation, the alkylphenolic chemicals may contribute the majority of the estrogenic activity of the effluent. However, this conclusion was based on a number of uncertainties that are presently unresolved and hence can be considered only tentative. PMID:11878463

  4. Mode of action and human relevance analysis for nuclear receptor-mediated liver toxicity: A case study with phenobarbital as a model constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activator

    PubMed Central

    Elcombe, Clifford R.; Peffer, Richard C.; Wolf, Douglas C.; Bailey, Jason; Bars, Remi; Bell, David; Cattley, Russell C.; Ferguson, Stephen S.; Geter, David; Goetz, Amber; Goodman, Jay I.; Hester, Susan; Jacobs, Abigail; Omiecinski, Curtis J.; Schoeny, Rita; Xie, Wen; Lake, Brian G.

    2014-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are important nuclear receptors involved in the regulation of cellular responses from exposure to many xenobiotics and various physiological processes. Phenobarbital (PB) is a non-genotoxic indirect CAR activator, which induces cytochrome P450 (CYP) and other xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and is known to produce liver foci/tumors in mice and rats. From literature data, a mode of action (MOA) for PB-induced rodent liver tumor formation was developed. A MOA for PXR activators was not established owing to a lack of suitable data. The key events in the PB-induced liver tumor MOA comprise activation of CAR followed by altered gene expression specific to CAR activation, increased cell proliferation, formation of altered hepatic foci and ultimately the development of liver tumors. Associative events in the MOA include altered epigenetic changes, induction of hepatic CYP2B enzymes, liver hypertrophy and decreased apoptosis; with inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication being an associative event or modulating factor. The MOA was evaluated using the modified Bradford Hill criteria for causality and other possible MOAs were excluded. While PB produces liver tumors in rodents, important species differences were identified including a lack of cell proliferation in cultured human hepatocytes. The MOA for PB-induced rodent liver tumor formation was considered to be qualitatively not plausible for humans. This conclusion is supported by data from a number of epidemiological studies conducted in human populations chronically exposed to PB in which there is no clear evidence for increased liver tumor risk. PMID:24180433

  5. Mode of action and human relevance analysis for nuclear receptor-mediated liver toxicity: A case study with phenobarbital as a model constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activator.

    PubMed

    Elcombe, Clifford R; Peffer, Richard C; Wolf, Douglas C; Bailey, Jason; Bars, Remi; Bell, David; Cattley, Russell C; Ferguson, Stephen S; Geter, David; Goetz, Amber; Goodman, Jay I; Hester, Susan; Jacobs, Abigail; Omiecinski, Curtis J; Schoeny, Rita; Xie, Wen; Lake, Brian G

    2014-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are important nuclear receptors involved in the regulation of cellular responses from exposure to many xenobiotics and various physiological processes. Phenobarbital (PB) is a non-genotoxic indirect CAR activator, which induces cytochrome P450 (CYP) and other xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and is known to produce liver foci/tumors in mice and rats. From literature data, a mode of action (MOA) for PB-induced rodent liver tumor formation was developed. A MOA for PXR activators was not established owing to a lack of suitable data. The key events in the PB-induced liver tumor MOA comprise activation of CAR followed by altered gene expression specific to CAR activation, increased cell proliferation, formation of altered hepatic foci and ultimately the development of liver tumors. Associative events in the MOA include altered epigenetic changes, induction of hepatic CYP2B enzymes, liver hypertrophy and decreased apoptosis; with inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication being an associative event or modulating factor. The MOA was evaluated using the modified Bradford Hill criteria for causality and other possible MOAs were excluded. While PB produces liver tumors in rodents, important species differences were identified including a lack of cell proliferation in cultured human hepatocytes. The MOA for PB-induced rodent liver tumor formation was considered to be qualitatively not plausible for humans. This conclusion is supported by data from a number of epidemiological studies conducted in human populations chronically exposed to PB in which there is no clear evidence for increased liver tumor risk. PMID:24180433

  6. Factors affecting healthy eating and physical activity behaviors among multiethnic blue- and white-collar workers: a case study of one healthcare institution.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Jodi H; Braun, Kathryn L; Novotny, Rachel; Mokuau, Noreen

    2013-09-01

    Worksite health promotion programs can reduce prevalence of chronic disease among employees, but little research has been done to discern whether they meet the needs and incorporate the preferences of workers of different occupational types. The objective of this study is to examine differences in influences to healthy eating and physical activity and preferences for programs among multiethnic blue- and white-collar workers in Hawai'i. A total of 57 employees from a major health care corporation in Hawai'i participated. A mixed-methods approach was employed, in which findings from focus groups with white-collar workers (WCW) (n=18) were used to inform development of a questionnaire with closed and open-ended items for use with blue-collar workers (BCW) (n=39), whose jobs did not provide adequate time to participate in focus groups. Focus groups with WCW revealed that onsite availability of healthy food and fitness opportunities provided the most support for healthy eating and physical activity at work; work demands, easy access to unhealthy foods, and lack of onsite fitness opportunities were barriers; and lifestyle management was a topic of substantial interest. BCW cited the ability to bring home lunch and their (physically active) jobs as being supportive of healthy behaviors; not having enough time to eat and personal illness/injury were barriers; and chronic disease topics were of greatest interest. Knowing differences in influences to healthy eating and physical activity, as well as preferences for worksite wellness programming, among BCW and WCW, is important when planning and implementing worksite health promotion programs. PMID:24069570

  7. Antimicrobial activity and agricultural properties of bitter melon (Momordica charantia L.) grown in northern parts of Turkey: a case study for adaptation.

    PubMed

    Yaldız, Gülsüm; Sekeroglu, Nazım; Kulak, Muhittin; Demirkol, Gürkan

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the adaptation capability of bitter melon (Momordica charantia L.), which is widely grown in tropical and subtropical climates, in northern parts of Turkey. In this study, plant height, number of fruits, fruit length, fruit width, number of seeds and fruit weight of bitter melon grown in field conditions were determined. The antimicrobial effect of the ethanol extract of fruit and seeds against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans microorganisms was tested in vitro by the disc diffusion method. In conclusion, plant height (260 cm), number of fruits (16 per  plant), number of seeds (30.2  per fruit), fruit width (3.8 cm), fruit length (10.6 cm) and fruit weight (117.28 g fruit(- 1)) were determined; fruits were found to have antimicrobial activity against A. niger; oil and seeds were found to have antimicrobial activity against A. niger and E. coli. PMID:25141891

  8. Neurology Case Studies: Cerebrovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad U; Gorelick, Philip B

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses interesting vascular neurology cases including the management of intracranial stenosis, migraine headache and stroke risk, retinal artery occlusions associated with impaired hearing, intracranial occlusive disease, a heritable cause of stroke and vascular cognitive impairment, and an interesting clinico-neuroradiologic disorder associated with eclampsia. PMID:27445238

  9. The Use of Student Consulting Projects as an Active Learning Pedagogy: A Case Study in a Production/Operations Management Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heriot, Kirk C.; Cook, Ron; Jones, Rita C.; Simpson, Leo

    2008-01-01

    Active learning has attracted considerable attention in higher education in response to concerns about how and what students are learning. There are many different forms of active learning, yet most of them are classroom based. We propose an alternative to active learning in the classroom through active learning outside of the classroom in the…

  10. The Undergraduate Case Research Study Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vega, Gina

    2010-01-01

    Student-written cases are powerful pedagogical tools that can lead to improved understanding of business situations, more informed analysis, emphasis on reflection, and clearer expository writing, all of which are critical skills for business students. Cases provide an opportunity for students to enjoy an active learning experience and derive the…

  11. Possible helio-geomagnetic activity influence on cardiological cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsavrias, Christos

    Eruptive solar events as flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) occur during solar activ-ity periods. Energetic particles, fast solar wind plasma and electromagnetic radiation pass through interplanetary space, arrive on Earth's ionosphere-magnetosphere and produce various disturbances. It is well known the negative influence of geomagnetic substorms on the human technological applications on geospace. During the last 25 years, many studies concerning the possible influence on the human health are published. Increase of the Acute Coronary Syn-dromes and disorders of the Cardiac Rhythm, increase of accidents as well as neurological and psychological disorders (e.g. increase of suicides) during or near to the geomagnetic storms time interval are reported. In this study, we research the problem in Greece, focusing on patients with Acute Myocardial Infraction, hospitalized in the 2nd Cardiological Department of the General Hospital of Nikaea (Piraeus City), for the time interval 1997-2007 (23rd solar cycle) and also to the arrival of emergency cardiological cases to Emergency Department of two greek hospitals, the General Hospital of Lamia City and the General Hospital of Veria City during the selected months, with or without helio-geomagnetic activity, of the 23rd solar cycle. Increase of cases is recorded during the periods with increase helio-geomagnetic activity. The necessity of continuing the research for a longer period and with a bigger sample is high; so as to exact more secure conclusions.

  12. Microgravity isolation system design: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, R. D.; Knospe, C. R.; Allaire, P. E.; Grodsinsky, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    Many acceleration-sensitive, microgravity science experiments will require active vibration isolation from manned orbiters on which they will be mounted. The isolation problem, especially in the case of a tethered payload, is a complex three-dimensional one that is best suited to modern-control design methods. In this paper, extended H(sub 2) synthesis is used to design an active isolator (i.e., controller) for a realistic single-input-multiple-output (SIMO) microgravity vibration isolation problem. Complex mu-analysis methods are used to analyze the isolation system with respect to sensor, actuator, and umbilical uncertainties. The paper fully discusses the design process employed and the insights gained. This design case study provides a practical approach for isolation problems of greater complexity. Issues addressed include a physically intuitive state-space description of the system, disturbance and noise filters, filters for frequency weighting, and uncertainty models. The controlled system satisfies all the performance specifications and is robust with respect to model uncertainties.

  13. Developing, Implementing and Evaluating Case Studies in Materials Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Claire; Wilcock, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    The use of case studies to teach materials science undergraduates is an exciting and interesting educational approach. As well as helping learners to connect theory and practice, the case method is also useful for creating an active learning environment, developing key skills and catering for a range of different learning styles. This paper…

  14. Identification of some factors affecting pharmaceutical active compounds (PhACs) removal in real wastewater. Case study of fungal treatment of reverse osmosis concentrate.

    PubMed

    Badia-Fabregat, Marina; Lucas, Daniel; Gros, Meritxell; Rodríguez-Mozaz, Sara; Barceló, Damià; Caminal, Glòria; Vicent, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Many technologies are being developed for the efficient removal of micropollutants from wastewater and, among them, fungal degradation is one of the possible alternative biological treatments. In this article, some factors that might affect pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) removal in a fungal treatment of real wastewater were identified in batch bioreactor treating reverse osmosis concentrate (ROC) from urban wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). We found that degradation of PhACs by Trametes versicolor was enhanced by addition of external nutrients (global removal of 44%). Moreover, our results point out that high aeration might be involved in the increase in the concentration of some PhACs. In fact, conjugation and deconjugation processes (among others) affect the removal assessment of emerging contaminants when working with real concentrations in comparison to experiments with spiked samples. Moreover, factors that could affect the quantification of micropollutants at lab-scale experiments were studied. PMID:25464308

  15. Using relational developmental systems theory to link program goals, activities, and outcomes: the sample case of the 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Richard M; Wang, Jun; Chase, Paul A; Gutierrez, Akira S; Harris, Elise M; Rubin, Rachel O; Yalin, Ceren

    2014-12-01

    In contemporary developmental science, relational development systems models have been used to frame the positive youth development (PYD) perspective, which posits that youth will thrive when there is alignment between their strengths and ecological resources in their context. Evidence from the 4-H Study of PYD indicates that out-of-school-time youth development programs are key ecological resources enhancing youth thriving. This chapter discusses the particular facets of youth development programs (the "Big Three"-positive and sustained adult-youth relationships, skill-building activities, and youth leadership opportunities) involved in promoting youth thriving. The importance of using theory to design and implement programs is also discussed, and challenges of reaching the diversity of American youth with effective programs are noted. PMID:25537347

  16. Case Studies for Management Development in Bangladesh.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Gary N.

    Eight case studies appropriate for use in a course in management development were prepared and are provided in this document. The typical case describes a real business situation in which a real manager had to reach a decision. The case gives quantitative and qualitative information that is, or may be, relevant to that decision. Questions for…

  17. Study on Case Teaching of Financial Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Che, Zhenghong; Che, Zhengmei

    2011-01-01

    Case teaching is an efficient teaching method of management. It plays an important role to enhance the students' ability to practice the theory. However, case teaching of financial management has not achieved the expected results. The paper aims to study the importance, characteristics and corresponding methods of case teaching method of financial…

  18. The case study of biomaterials and biominerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen

    2013-04-01

    The teaching of biomaterials as case study by on-line platform , susceptible to develop both individually and in groups, got different objectives proposed by the European Higher Education System, among which include: participate actively in the teaching-learning process by students, interpreting situations, adapt processes and solutions. It also improves oral and written communication, analytical skills and synthesis and also the ability to think critically. Biomaterials have their origin in biominerals. These are solid inorganic compounds of defined structure, consisting of molecular control mechanisms that operate in biological systems. Its main functions are: structural support, a reservoir of essential elements, sensors, mechanical protection and storage of toxic elements. Following the demand of materials compatible with certain functional systems of our body, developed biomaterials. Always meet the condition of biocompatibility. Should be tolerated by the body and do not provoke rejection. This involves a comprehensive study of physiological conditions and the anatomy of the body where a biomaterial has to be implemented. The possibility of generating new materials from biominerals has a major impact in medicine and other fields could reach as geology, construction, crystallography, etc. While the study of these issues is in its infancy today, can be viewed as an impact on the art and future technology. Planning case study that students would prepare its report for discussion in subgroups. Occurs then the pooling of individual analysis, joint case discussion and adoption by the subgroup of a consensual solution to the problem. The teacher as facilitator and coordinator of the final case analysis, sharing leads to group-wide class and said the unanimous decision reached by the students and gives his opinion on the resolution of the case. REFERENCES D.P. Ausubel. Psicología Educativa. Un punto de vista cognoscitivo. Trillas. Ed. 1983. E.W. Eisner. Procesos

  19. Utilizing high-throughput bioassays associated with US EPA ToxCast Program to assess biological activity of environmental contaminants: A case study of chemical mixtures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects-based monitoring and surveillance is increasingly being utilized in conjunction with chemical monitoring to determine potential biological activity associated with environmental contaminants. Supervised approaches targeting specific chemical activity or molecular pathways...

  20. Mode of action framework analysis for receptor-mediated toxicity: the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor alpha (PPARα) as a case study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Therapeutic hypolipidemic agents and industrial chemicals that cause peroxisome proliferation and induce liver tumors in rodents activate the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). Research has elucidated the cellular and molecular events by w...

  1. Academic Planning: Four Institutional Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieft, Raymond N.

    As part of a project studying intrainstitutional planning, management, and evaluation, four case studies were undertaken in 1976 of academic planning at Villa Maria College, Kansas City Metropolitan Community College District, West Virginia University, and Western Washington University. The case studies were part of an ongoing project, the…

  2. Microbial activity and carbonate isotope signatures as a tool for identification of spatial differences in methane advection: a case study at the Pacific Costa Rican margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, S.; Steeb, P.; Hensen, C.; Liebetrau, V.; Dale, A. W.; Nuzzo, M.; Treude, T.

    2014-01-01

    The forearc of the convergent margin offshore Costa Rica is a region characterized by strong advection of methane-charged fluids causing the formation of ubiquitous cold seeps (mounds). Presented here are the first measurements of microbial anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and sulfate reduction (SR) rates in sediments from two mounds (11 and 12), applying radiotracer techniques in combination with numerical modelling. In addition, analysis of microbial, methane-dependent carbonate δ18O, δ13C, and 87Sr / 86Sr signatures constrained the origin of the carbonate-precipitating fluid. Average rates of microbial activities differed by a factor of ~5 to 6 between Mound 11 (AOM 140.71 (±40.84 SD) mmol m-2 d-1, SR 117.25 (±82.06 SD) mmol m-2 d-1) and Mound 12 (AOM 22.37 (±0.85 SD) mmol m-2 d-1, SR 23.99 (±5.79 SD) mmol m-2 d-1). Modelling results yielded upward fluid advection velocities of 200 cm yr-1 at Mound 11 and 15 cm yr-1 at Mound 12. Analysis of oxygen and carbon isotope variations of authigenic carbonates from the two locations revealed more enriched values for Mound 11 (δ18O : 3.18 to 6.15‰; δ13C: -14.14 to -29.56‰) compared to Mound 12 (δ18O : 3.09 to 4.48‰; δ13C : -39.53 to -48.98‰). The variation of carbonate 87Sr / 86Sr indicated considerable admixture of deep-source fluid at Mound 11, while seawater 87Sr / 86Sr characteristics prevailed at Mound 12 during precipitation. The present study is in accordance with previous work supporting considerable differences of methane flux between the two mounds. It also strengthens the hypothesis of a dominant deep fluid source with thermogenic methane at Mound 11 versus a shallow source of biogenic methane at Mound 12. The results demonstrate that measurements of methane-driven microbial activity in combination with numerical modelling are a valid tool for constraining recent methane fluxes in the study area. In addition, the analysis of methane-derived authigenic carbonates provides an independent

  3. Case Studies in Neurocritical Care.

    PubMed

    Sakusic, Amra; Rabinstein, Alejandro A

    2016-08-01

    The practice of neurocritical care encompasses multiple acute neurologic and neurosurgical diseases and requires detailed knowledge of neurology and critical care. This article presents 5 cases that illustrate just some of the conditions encountered in the daily practice of neurocritical care and exemplify some of the common diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic challenges facing the neurointensivist. Life-threatening medical complications after severe acute ischemic stroke, seizures and extreme agitation from autoimmune encephalitis, refractory seizures after subdural hemorrhage, neurologic and systemic complications related to aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, and status epilepticus after cardiac arrest are discussed in this article. PMID:27445248

  4. Composites in manufacturing - Case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Strong, A.B. )

    1991-01-01

    The papers presented in this volume focus on 19 cases of applied technology in composites design and manufacturing, all of them dealing with specific products. Topics covered include design using composite in aerospace, innovative materials and processing, tooling, fasteners and adhesives, finishing, repair, specialty applications of composites, and applications in the automotive industry. Papers are presented on the filament winding of isogrid fuselage structures; design and use of aramid fiber in aircraft structures; resin transfer molding of a complex composite aircraft structure; and field repair of an advanced helicopter vertical fin structure.

  5. 7 CFR 275.12 - Review of active cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Review of active cases. 275.12 Section 275.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD STAMP AND FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM PERFORMANCE REPORTING SYSTEM Quality Control (QC) Reviews § 275.12 Review of active cases....

  6. A qualitative approach to measure the effectiveness of active avian influenza virus surveillance with respect to its cost: a case study from Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Häsler, B; Howe, K S; Hauser, R; Stärk, K D C

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the project was to apply cost-effectiveness analysis to the economic appraisal of avian influenza virus (AIV) surveillance, using the implemented surveillance programme in Switzerland as a case study. First a qualitative risk assessment approach was used to assess the expected impact of surveillance on the transmission and spread of AIV. The effectiveness of surveillance was expressed as the difference in defined probabilities between a scenario with surveillance and a scenario without surveillance. The following probabilities were modelled (i) transmission of highly pathogenic AIV (HPAIV) from wild birds to poultry, (ii) mutation from low pathogenic AIV (LPAIV) into HPAIV in poultry, and (iii) transmission of HPAIV to other poultry holdings given a primary outbreak. The cost-effectiveness ratio was defined conventionally as the difference in surveillance costs (ΔC) divided by the change in probability (ΔP), the technical objective, on the presumption that surveillance diminishes the respective probabilities. However, results indicated that surveillance in both wild birds and poultry was not expected to change the probabilities of primary and secondary AIV outbreaks in Switzerland. The overall surveillance costs incurred were estimated at 31,000 €/year, which, to be a rational investment of resources, must still reflect the value policy makers attribute to other benefits from having surveillance (e.g. peace of mind). The advantage of the approach adopted is that it is practical, transparent, and thus able to clarify for policy makers the key variables to be taken into account when evaluating the economic efficiency of resources invested in surveillance, prevention and intervention to exclude AIV. PMID:22296733

  7. Formal Methods Case Studies for DO-333

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofer, Darren; Miller, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    RTCA DO-333, Formal Methods Supplement to DO-178C and DO-278A provides guidance for software developers wishing to use formal methods in the certification of airborne systems and air traffic management systems. The supplement identifies the modifications and additions to DO-178C and DO-278A objectives, activities, and software life cycle data that should be addressed when formal methods are used as part of the software development process. This report presents three case studies describing the use of different classes of formal methods to satisfy certification objectives for a common avionics example - a dual-channel Flight Guidance System. The three case studies illustrate the use of theorem proving, model checking, and abstract interpretation. The material presented is not intended to represent a complete certification effort. Rather, the purpose is to illustrate how formal methods can be used in a realistic avionics software development project, with a focus on the evidence produced that could be used to satisfy the verification objectives found in Section 6 of DO-178C.

  8. Active Media Studies for PASER

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, Sergey P.; Kanareykin, Alexei; Schoessow, Paul; Schaechter, Levi

    2009-01-22

    The Particle Acceleration by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (PASER) is a concept that is based on the direct transfer of energy from active medium to a charged particle beam. The PASER was originally formulated and demonstrated for optical (laser) media; we are pursuing a PASER demonstration experiment based on an optically pumped paramagnetic medium active in the X-band. The activity in this case is produced via Zeeman Effect. We report on the development of an active medium based on fullerene (C{sub 60}). Various aspects like temperature dependence, concentration effects and the role of the host media are presented. Application of the technology to accelerators and microwave components will be discussed.

  9. Case studies in conservation science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisulca, Christina

    The research presented in this dissertation covers three separate topics of conservation as defined by the National Science Foundation: 1) Materials Stabilization, Strengthening, Monitoring, and Repair; 2. Understanding Material Degradation and Aging; and 3) Materials and Structural Characterization of Cultural Heritage Objects (the 'technical study'). The first topic is addressed through a study to assess the consolidant tetraethoxysilane for the stabilization of alum treated wood. Falling under materials degradation studies is a study published in American Museum Novitates to understand how environmental conditions affect the aging of fossil resins from five different deposits. Two separate studies are included in technical study of cultural heritage objects which comprises the third research area of materials characterization. The first is a survey of red dyes used in Chinese paintings from the Ming Dynasty to the Early Republic (1364-1911). The second is a study of the pigments, dyes and binders used in Hawaiian barkcloth (kapa) from the 19th century.

  10. Self-potential and passive seismic monitoring of hydrothermal activity: A case study at Iodine Pool, Waimangu geothermal valley, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legaz, A.; Revil, A.; Roux, P.; Vandemeulebrouck, J.; Gouédard, P.; Hurst, T.; Bolève, A.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine geyser, located in the Waimangu Geothermal Valley (New Zealand), has been studied by both passive electrical and seismic methods. The activity of the geyser was monitored at various distances from the vent using self-potential method. The self-potential signals display cyclic negative variations with respect to a baseline drawn when the geyser is quiet. The minimum in the self-potential signals coincides with the maximum overflow. We provide a numerical model able to explain both the polarity and magnitude of the observed signal. This model is based on the fluctuations of the hydraulic head in the conduit of the geyser; the divergence of the streaming current density is created at the interface between the pipe and the surrounding rock. Passive seismic experiments were used to localize ambient noise sources. These signals have been processed with the so-called Matched-Field Processing technique (MFP); a dominant source emerged from this processing, that we characterized in range and depth with a good accuracy.

  11. Redesigning a Curriculum for Inquiry: An Ecology Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spronken-Smith, R. A.; Walker, R.; Dickinson, K. J. M.; Closs, G. P.; Lord, J. M.; Harland, T.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on an interdisciplinary ecology degree that was redesigned to provide more research activity for undergraduates. A case study approach explored how the teaching team constructed a curriculum that used inquiry activities. The development of an inquiry curriculum was enabled by a University audit focusing on the links between…

  12. The Case Study Method in the STEM Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2006-01-01

    "Active learning" where students are required to do something in the classroom rather than simply listen to a lecture has been repeatedly shown to be superior to the lecture method in advancing student learning. The use of case studies in the classroom is one of the most successful active learning methods of teaching science, technology,…

  13. Changes in mid-late Holocene hurricane activity influence coastal dynamics in northeastern Gulf of Mexico - A case study in the Choctawhatchee Bay, Destin FL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranasinghage, P. N.; Donnelly, J. P.; Evans, R. L.; Ashton, A. D.; Condon, K.; Sullivan, R.; Beltzer, A.; Coastal Systems Group

    2011-12-01

    Hurricanes greatly influence coastal changes in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Sedimentological, geochemical, and productivity indicators show that Choctawhatchee Bay, Destin, FL underwent a series of hydrological changes during the mid-late Holocene period. Sedimentological evidence suggests that these changes were, at least in part, driven by variations in the frequency of intense hurricane landfalls in the area. Based on CHIRP seismic reflectance images, a total of 12 sediment cores, ranging in length from 2-5 m, were extracted from Choctawhatchee Bay. Stratigraphy of these cores was studied using X radiograph and elemental composition was measured at 1mm resolution using an XRF core scanner. Grain size and color reflectance were measured at 0.5-1 cm resolution. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on the first derivatives of the combined visible - nIR color reflectance data base to derive compositional data. Environmental proxies (Ca/Ti, Sr/Ti and grain size) indicate that Choctawhatchee Bay was a high energy environment with marine influence between ~6000 yrs BP and ~ 3200 yrs BP and also between ~ 2500 - ~1000 yrs BP. Decreases in gain size, Ca/Ti, and Sr/Ti ratios and an increase in blue-green and eukaryotic algae, as shown by the PCA, indicate gradual isolation and greater freshwater influence in the bay between ~3200 - ~2500 yrs BP. Since sea level has been relatively stable during the mid-late Holocene in the Gulf of Mexico, these changes are most likely related to changes in barrier morphology across the mouth of the bay. During periods of higher hurricane activity, frequent barrier breaching opens the bay, whereas barrier growth during quiescent periods isolates the bay from direct marine influence. The high energy environment between ~2500 - ~ 1000 yrs BP begins with a coarse storm sand layer, This period is also marked by an unconformity, formed by the erosion of a possible strong storm event occurred ~1000 yrs BP . The presence of a number

  14. Determining K/Ar age of fault activity through analysis of clay mineralogy: A case study of "El Doctor Fault", México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garduño, D. E.; Pi, T.; Sole, J.; Martini, M.; Alcala, J. R.

    2013-05-01

    The upper continental crust of Mexico is cut by several major faults, some of which were interpreted as terrane boundaries. Although the age of such faults is key to reconstructing the tectonic evolution of Mexico, geochronologic studies focused on the absolute dating of a fault are scattered. The Doctor fault zone is a decakilometric NNW-SSE structure that produced the overriding of the Lower Cretaceus El Doctor carbonate platform onto foreland calcareous turbidites of Upper Cretaceous Soyatal Formation. In the fault zone, turbidites of the Soyatal Formation display a pervasive foliation at the submillimeter-scale. In calcareous layers, this foliation is defined by seams of opaque minerals concentrated along stilolitic surfaces, whereas in lutitic layers it is defined by iso-oriented fine-grained illite. We collected 17 samples from a traverse across the Doctor fault zone, in order to (1) defining and quantifying fault-related changes in clay mineralogy, (2) studying fabrics in clay-rich fault rocks and protolith, and (3) dating the fault activity by illite K/Ar with laser. Texture was studied with petrographic microscope on polished thin sections. Three size fractions (from 2 μm to 0.05 μm) were extracted using centrifugation. Clay mineralogy was determined using XRD in clay oriented samples and the illite crystallinity (IC) has been determined by the Kübler method (Kisch, 1990). The amount of 2M1 illite was quantified using XRD patterns from a randomly oriented sample, achieved using WILDFIRE (Reynolds, 1994, Haines and Van der Pluijm, 2008) and RIETVELD methods and the timing of fault main activity is determined using K/Ar dating. The mineralogy of the samples consists of quartz, calcite, plagioclase, hematite and clays. The clay mineralogy contain illite (zone 1, zone 2 and zone 3), smectite (zone 2), chlorite (zone 3), kaolinite (zone 1 and zone3), and vermiculite (zone 3). The range of IC (0.24 to 0.4) is attributed to heterogeneous origins of illite

  15. Case-Control Study of Writer's Cramp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roze, E.; Soumare, A.; Pironneau, I.; Sangla, S.; de Cock, V. Cochen; Teixeira, A.; Astorquiza, A.; Bonnet, C.; Bleton, J. P.; Vidailhet, M.; Elbaz, A.

    2009-01-01

    Task-specific focal dystonias are thought to be due to a combination of individual vulnerability and environmental factors. There are no case-control studies of risk factors for writer's cramp. We undertook a case-control study of 104 consecutive patients and matched controls to identify risk factors for the condition. We collected detailed data…

  16. A Constructive Controversy Approach to "Case Studies"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Sharon R.; Erickson, Karla A.

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of analysis of student responses to a case study titled "Drinks and Dinner," the authors evaluate the pedagogical potential of using constructive controversy case studies to teach about inequality. "Drinks and Dinner" is designed to capture the complexity of social interactions that defy simple solutions to engage students in…

  17. Self-Employment Training Programs: Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Melissa, Ed.; And Others

    This self-employment training program case study booklet has been developed for general use in exploring the feasibility of this kind of development tool. The case studies describe a number of comprehensive, self-employment training and assistance programs, from the local to the national level. Chapter II includes information on the training plan,…

  18. Chemical Case Studies: Science-Society "Bonding."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstein, Avi; Nae, Nehemia

    1981-01-01

    Describes a unit designed to illustrate the "science-society-technology connection," in which three case studies of the chemical industry in Israel are presented to high school chemistry students. Chosen for the unit are case studies on copper production in Timna, on plastics, and on life from the Dead Sea. (CS)

  19. Twenty Techniques for Teaching with Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sudzina, Mary R.

    2005-01-01

    Problem-based learning and teaching with case studies are instructional approaches that are increasingly being applied in a variety of disciplines, such as business, law, medicine, and education. Instructors who have experienced traditional, teacher-centered instruction are often looking for ways to successfully integrate case studies, a…

  20. Using Case Studies: An International Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClam, Tricia; Woodside, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    Case studies as an instructional strategy have been used in many disciplines, including law, teacher education, science, medicine, and business. Among the benefits of this method of instruction are involving students in learning, developing their critical thinking skills, promoting communication, and engaging in critical analysis. Case studies are…

  1. Library Media Center Problems: Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coburn, Louis

    Problems which arise in school library media centers are considered, using the case study method. The 30 case studies cover: problems in child management; the librarian's role in reading instruction and guidance, and in teaching library skills; conflicting opinions on the management and objectives of the media center; the librarian's role and job…

  2. Collaboration in Distance Education. International Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Louise, Ed.; Mugridge, Ian, Ed.

    This book contains nine case studies of collaboration in distance education. The case studies focus on such aspects of collaboration in distance education as the following: roles of individual institutional partners; importance of personal relationships; benefits of collaboration to individual partners; conflicts between collaboration and…

  3. Teaching Case Studies: A Collaborative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buffington, James R.; Harper, Jeffrey S.

    Many of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accredited schools require undergraduate Management Information Systems (MIS) majors to take a course in the management of information technology. Over half of these schools utilize case studies in the teaching of this course. The authors emphasize that case studies are an…

  4. A Case Study of "Empathetic Teaching Artistry"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risner, Doug

    2014-01-01

    This case study is one of twenty cases derived from Anderson and Risner's international study of teaching artists in dance, and theatre, which investigated participants' (n=172) artistic and academic preparation in dance, and theatre, initial entry into the teaching artist field, rewards, challenges, and obstacles in participants'…

  5. Case Studies for Teaching Students with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macnamara, Gael R.

    2004-01-01

    This easy-to-use book of case studies helps you recognize the signs of dyslexia and prescribe effective teaching strategies for students with dyslexia. It includes a Case Study Analysis Sheet so you can work through important aspects of a student's personal, academic, and social life. You can then compare what you've compiled to the author's…

  6. Is Pain Suffering? A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Helen K.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the case study of an elderly woman shows how bodily pain and suffering meld in her narrative, not as the subjective and objective sides of the same event, but as distinct experiences in which both constructs emerge separately or come together based on the meaning she imputes to the event. The case study shows the clear…

  7. Iowa College Student Aid Commission Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leigh, Rachel A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive case study was to trace the policy production process of a state agency, the Iowa College Student Aid Commission (Commission), to its function today. This case study relied on a review of federal and state statutes, a news article search, biennium reports of the Commission, and information obtained from the…

  8. Tactile Astronomy - a Portuguese case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canas, L.; Alves, F.; Correia, A.

    2012-09-01

    Although astronomy plays an important role in the most various outreach initiatives, as well as school science curricula, due to its strong visual component in knowledge acquisition, astronomy subjects are not entirely well addressed and accessed by visually impaired students and/or general public. This stresses the need of more tactile material production, still very scarce in an educational context whether formal or informal. This is a case study activity developed based on different schematic tactile images of several objects present in our solar system. These images in relief, highlight, through touch, several relevant features present in the different astronomical objects studied. The scientific knowledge is apprehended through the use of a tactile key, complemented with additional information. Through proper hands-on activities implementation and careful analysis of the outcome, the adapted images associated with an explanatory key prove to be a valuable resource in tactile astronomy domain. Here we describe the process of implementing such initiative near visually impaired students. The struggles and challenges perceived by all involved and the enrichment experience of engaging astronomy with visually impaired audiences, broadening horizons in an overall experience accessible to all.

  9. A case study of embarrassment.

    PubMed

    Dann, O T

    1977-01-01

    The psychoanalytic references to embarrassment are reviewed. Embarrassment, in the literature, is seen largely as an affect involving exhibitionistic and scopophilic conflicts and defenses against these. A case in which embarrassment was prominent is discussed. Embarrassment in the patient was an ego response which implied an external object for its manifestation. It involved exhibitionistic and scopophilic conflicts and projective defenses, but also operated in ego-gratifying and adaptive ways. Her embarrassment was understood through the analysis of an initial embarrassing dream of nakedness and other dreams and associated material as the defensive out-grouth of repeated exposures to the primal scene. Embarrassment was a resistance to remembering in the analysis, and the primal-scene experiences were partially reconstructed. The analytic situation was, in many ways, a symbolic re-creation of the primal scene, including the patient's response of embarrassment. The development of embarrassment in the patient's childhood was furthered and confirmed by its being an identification with the attitudes of both parents. Finally, some reflections on embarrassment and shame in its various forms are set forth. PMID:560404

  10. Modern midwifery: two case studies.

    PubMed

    Anderson, S

    1985-01-01

    To gain more understanding of the practices of modern midwives, 2 births occurring in a Botswanan District Hospital Maternity Ward were observed by a research assistant. Naturalistic observation was considered more reliable than interviews with either patients or modern midwives to assess the biosocial aspects of birth in the modern sector. At admission to the labor room, these 2 midwives checked the patient's blood pressure, performed a vaginal examination, checked the fetal heart, palpated the uterus, shaved the public hair, and administered an enema. Both midwives did not communicate with their patients during these procedures or offer information on the results. The patients were told not to push; 1 midwife commented, "In the hospital, nobody delivers by herself." Rather, patients were instructed to do their "breathing exercises," a term with which they were not familiar and was not explained. In the 1st case, an episiotomy was performed. Both births were uneventful in terms of complications, but marked by a lack of attention to the psychological needs of the patient or sufficient explanations as to the progress of the delivery. Overall, all communications between the modern midwives observed and their patients were impersonal, with an emphasis on technical procedures. PMID:12282440

  11. Five case studies of multifamily weatherization programs

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, L; Wilson, T.; Lewis, G.; MacDonald, M.

    1997-12-31

    The multifamily case studies that are the subject of this report were conducted to provide a better understanding of the approach taken by program operators in weatherizing large buildings. Because of significant variations in building construction and energy systems across the country, five states were selected based on their high level of multifamily weatherization. This report summarizes findings from case studies conducted by multifamily weatherization operations in five cities. The case studies were conducted between January and November 1994. Each of the case studies involved extensive interviews with the staff of weatherization subgrantees conducting multifamily weatherization, the inspection of 4 to 12 buildings weatherized between 1991 and 1993, and the analysis of savings and costs. The case studies focused on innovative techniques which appear to work well.

  12. Case-control study on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma polymorphism and interaction with HDL on essential hypertension in Chinese Han

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Xu, Ping; Feng, Wei; Jiang, Xianyan; Zhang, Tao; Li, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma (PPARG) with essential hypertension (EH) and additional role of gene– high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) interaction. Materials and Methods: A total of 1640 patients with EH (806 males, 834 females), with a mean age of 52.5±12.6 years, were selected, including 816 EH patients and 824 controls, who were enrolled from the community. Three SNPs were selected for genotyping in the case–control study: rs10865710, rs709158, rs1805192. Logistic regression model was used to examine the interaction between SNP and HDL on EH, odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were also calculated. Results: All genotypes were distributed according to Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium in controls. Logistic regression analysis showed an association between genotypes of variants in rs1805192 and decreased EH risk, EH risk was significantly lower in carriers of Ala allele of the rs1805192 polymorphism than those with Pro/Pro (Pro/Ala+ Ala/Ala versus Pro/Pro, adjusted OR (95% CI) =0.65 (0.53–0.83), after covariate adjustment. In addition, the Ala allele of the rs1805192 polymorphism was also associated with diastolic blood pressure (DBP), but not systolic blood pressure (SBP), we also found, by interaction analysis, combined effect of rs1805192 and HDL on EH risk after covariate adjustment. Conclusion: Our results support an important association between rs1805192 minor allele (Ala allele) of PPARG and lower EH risk, the interaction analysis showed a combined effect of Ala- HDL on lower EH risk. PMID:26877853

  13. Outage management: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, S.B.; Barriere, M.T. ); Roberts, K.H. . Walter A. Haas School of Business)

    1992-01-01

    Outage management issues identified from a field study conducted at a two-unit commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR), when one unit was in a refueling outage and the other unit was at full power operation, are the focus of this paper. The study was conduced as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) organizational factors research program, and therefore the issues to be addressed are from an organizational perspective. Topics discussed refer to areas identified by the NRC as critical for safety during shutdown operations, including outage planning and control, personnel stress, and improvements in training and procedures. Specifically, issues in communication, management attention, involvement and oversight, administrative processes, organizational culture, and human resources relevant to each of the areas are highlighted by example from field data collection. Insights regarding future guidance in these areas are presented based upon additional data collection subsequent to the original study.

  14. Outage management: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, S.B.; Barriere, M.T.; Roberts, K.H.

    1992-09-01

    Outage management issues identified from a field study conducted at a two-unit commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR), when one unit was in a refueling outage and the other unit was at full power operation, are the focus of this paper. The study was conduced as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) organizational factors research program, and therefore the issues to be addressed are from an organizational perspective. Topics discussed refer to areas identified by the NRC as critical for safety during shutdown operations, including outage planning and control, personnel stress, and improvements in training and procedures. Specifically, issues in communication, management attention, involvement and oversight, administrative processes, organizational culture, and human resources relevant to each of the areas are highlighted by example from field data collection. Insights regarding future guidance in these areas are presented based upon additional data collection subsequent to the original study.

  15. Risks to children from exposure to lead in air during remedial or removal activities at Superfund sites: a case study of the RSR lead smelter Superfund site.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Ghassan A; Diamond, Gary L

    2003-01-01

    Superfund sites that are contaminated with lead and undergoing remedial action generate lead-enriched dust that can be released into the air. Activities that can emit lead-enriched dust include demolition of lead smelter buildings, stacks, and baghouses; on-site traffic of heavy construction vehicles; and excavation of soil. Typically, air monitoring stations are placed around the perimeter of a site of an ongoing remediation to monitor air lead concentrations that might result from site emissions. The National Ambient Air Quality (NAAQ) standard, established in 1978 to be a quarterly average of 1.5 microg/m(3), is often used as a trigger level for corrective action to reduce emissions. This study explored modeling approaches for assessing potential risks to children from air lead emissions from the RSR Superfund site in West Dallas, TX, during demolition and removal of a smelter facility. The EPA Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic (IEUBK) model and the International Commission of Radiologic Protection (ICRP) lead model were used to simulate blood lead concentrations in children, based on monitored air lead concentrations. Although air lead concentrations at monitoring stations located in the downwind community intermittently exceeded the NAAQ standard, both models indicated that exposures to children in the community areas did not pose a significant long-term or acute risk. Long-term risk was defined as greater than 5% probability of a child having a long-term blood lead concentration that exceeded 10 microg/dl, which is the CDC and the EPA blood lead concern level. Short-term or acute risk was defined as greater than 5% probability of a child having a blood lead concentration on any given day that exceeded 20 microg/dl, which is the CDC trigger level for medical evaluation (this is not intended to imply that 20 microg/dl is a threshold for health effects in children exposed acutely to airborne lead). The estimated potential long-term and short-term exposures

  16. 3D image of Brittle/Ductile transition in active volcanic area and its implication on seismicity: The Campi Flegrei caldera case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaldo, Raffaele; Luca, D'auria; Susi, Pepe; Giuseppe, Solaro; Pietro, Tizzani

    2015-04-01

    The thermo-rheology of the rocks is a crucial aspect to understand the mechanical behavior of the crust in young and tectonically active area. As a consequence, several studies have been performed since last decades in order to understand the role of thermic state in the evolution of volcanic environments. In this context, we analyze the upper crust rheology of the Campi Flegrei active caldera (Southern Italy). Our target is the evaluation of the 3D geometry of the Brittle-Ductile transition beneath the resurgent caldera, by integrating the available geological, geochemical, and geophysical data. We first performed a numerical thermal model by using the a priori geological and geophysical information; than we employ the retrieved isothermal distribution to image the rheological stratification of the shallow crust beneath caldera. In particular, considering both the thermal proprieties and the mechanical heterogeneities of the upper crust, we performed, in a Finite Element environment, a 3D conductive time dependent thermal model through an numerical of solution of the Fourier equation. The dataset consist in temperature measurements recorded in several deep wells. More specifically, the geothermal gradients were measured in seven deep geothermal boreholes, located in three main distinct areas: Mofete, Licola, and San Vito. In addition, we take into account also the heat flow density map at the caldera surface calculated by considering the thermal measurements carried out in 30 shallow water wells. We estimate the isothermal distribution of the crust calibrating two model parameters: the heat production [W], associated to the magma injection episodes in the last 60 kyears within the magma chamber and the heat flow coefficient [W/m2*K] at the external surface. In particular, the optimization procedure has been performed using an exhaustive grid search, to minimize the differences between model and experimental measurements. The achieved results allowed us to

  17. Case Studies in Literacy Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purvis, Don

    The report details results of a research project to monitor and map the literacy development of three learners of English as a Second Language (ESL) studying in an Australian English program for adult migrants. The objective was to gain a longitudinal picture of their reading and writing development over a period of nine months. Five additional…

  18. Active, Collaborative and Case-Based Learning with Computer-Based Case Scenarios.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Discusses ideas and observations about the development, use, and pedagogy of computer-based case scenarios. Outlines two large computer-based case scenarios written to help students develop their skills and knowledge in business information systems. Considers factors in the design of computer-based case scenarios and related activities that might…

  19. Pull remanufacturing: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, L.O.

    1992-09-01

    This paper describes how pull production methods have been applied to a manual transmission remanufacturing line at Tooele Army Depot in Utah. The paper emphasizes techniques for linking the control of disassembly and cleaning operations to the repair and assembly portions of the production system (PP C). The primary objective is to show that production planning and control can be simplified when pull mechanisms are combined with shop floor improvements. One approach to applying MRP II to remanufacturing is to use a separate production schedule for the disassembly and assembly portions of the operation. This approach is primarily needed when managing the delivery and inventory of cores is critical to the successful operation of a remanufacturing organization. Because Army depots frequently have an adequate inventory of cores on hand (somewhere on-site), this requirement is usually less significant. Therefore, it is possible to eliminate the use of a master production schedule for disassembly and rely on pull linkages from the repair and assembly operations to control the activity of the disassembly and cleaning operations. In remanufacturing environments having multiple products and adequate buffers of core inventory, effective coordination of disassembly and cleaning functions with assembly production requirements becomes a key production control issue.

  20. Pull remanufacturing: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, L.O.

    1992-09-01

    This paper describes how pull production methods have been applied to a manual transmission remanufacturing line at Tooele Army Depot in Utah. The paper emphasizes techniques for linking the control of disassembly and cleaning operations to the repair and assembly portions of the production system (PP&C). The primary objective is to show that production planning and control can be simplified when pull mechanisms are combined with shop floor improvements. One approach to applying MRP II to remanufacturing is to use a separate production schedule for the disassembly and assembly portions of the operation. This approach is primarily needed when managing the delivery and inventory of cores is critical to the successful operation of a remanufacturing organization. Because Army depots frequently have an adequate inventory of cores on hand (somewhere on-site), this requirement is usually less significant. Therefore, it is possible to eliminate the use of a master production schedule for disassembly and rely on pull linkages from the repair and assembly operations to control the activity of the disassembly and cleaning operations. In remanufacturing environments having multiple products and adequate buffers of core inventory, effective coordination of disassembly and cleaning functions with assembly production requirements becomes a key production control issue.

  1. A Case Study of Engineering Ethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kazuo

    In Engineering Ethics Class at Shizuoka University, the Code of Ethics and Cases for Electrical Engineers by IEEJ Ethics committee is used to promote for high education effect to correspond large number of students (140students). In this paper, a case study in the class, and survey results for ethics value of students are presented. In addition, some comments for role playing act on the case of virtual experiences by students are described.

  2. A Disability Studies Framework for Policy Activism in Postsecondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabel, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    This article uses disability studies and the social model of disability as theoretical foundations for policy activism in postsecondary education. The social model is discussed and a model for policy activism is described. A case study of how disability studies and policy activism can be applied is provided utilizing the "3C Project to Provide…

  3. Studies in geophysics: Active tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Active tectonics is defined within the study as tectonic movements that are expected to occur within a future time span of concern to society. Such movements and their associated hazards include earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and land subsidence and emergence. The entire range of geology, geophysics, and geodesy is, to some extent, pertinent to this topic. The needs for useful forecasts of tectonic activity, so that actions may be taken to mitigate hazards, call for special attention to ongoing tectonic activity. Further progress in understanding active tectonics depends on continued research. Particularly important is improvement in the accuracy of dating techniques for recent geologic materials.

  4. Labyrinthine sequestrum: four case studies.

    PubMed

    Lao, Zheng; Sha, Yan; Chen, Bing; Dai, Chun-Fu; Huang, Wen-Hu; Cheng, Yu-Shu

    2012-09-01

    Labyrinthine sequestrum, a rare form of labyrinthitis, is highly distinct from the more commonly encountered labyrinthitis ossificans based on its unique clinical, radiologic, and histologic characteristics. The study included 4 such patients who had undergone clinical and laboratory investigations, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessments followed by surgical procedures and pathological evaluation. Their major symptoms were otorrhea, otalgia, tinnitus, and profound hearing loss. Imaging studies showed an osteolytic soft mass with calcified debris in the inner ear, and the bony labyrinth was eroded partly or completely by granulation mass, with loss of bony morphology. Further pathological examination was coincident with inflammatory granulation tissue with some calcification or osseous tissue. The disease process is attributed to chronic osteomyelitis due to the presence of osteonecrosis. Prompt CT and MRI examinations and optimal therapeutic management facilitate definitive diagnosis and protect against fatal complications. PMID:22467283

  5. Case Studies on Educational Administration. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Theodore J.

    This book contains 24 case studies selected to demonstrate the different types of challenges in contemporary educational leadership. It is intended to help prospective administrators develop decision-making skills. The cases are quite complex with multiple viewpoints and aspects. They represent a range of problems encountered by practitioners in…

  6. Case Studies of Environmental Risks to Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Lynn R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents case studies on children's exposure to pesticides, including risks through the use of the insecticide aldicarb on bananas, the home use of diazinon, and the use of interior house paint containing mercury. These cases illustrate how regulatory agencies, parents, health-care providers, and others who come into contact with children have…

  7. Case Studies in Elementary and Secondary Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boboc, Marius; Nordgren, R. D.

    2010-01-01

    Practical and engaging, this book contains 21 case studies that help students apply curriculum theory to classroom reality. Each case is authored by an in-service teacher, reflecting on ways to improve instruction by making changes to various aspects of the curriculum. These real-life examples investigate up-to-date curricular issues ranging from…

  8. Abbreviated Case Studies in Organizational Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanguri, Deloris McGee

    2005-01-01

    The cases contained within organizational communication texts are generally two to three pages, often followed by questions. These case studies are certainly useful. They generally describe events in the present, provide some type of organizational context, include first-hand data, include a record of what people say and think, develop a…

  9. Case Study Report #8. Lisa Williams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Douglas D.; And Others

    This document presents one in a series of twenty-three case studies derived from in-depth interviews using a sampling of former participants in the Mountain-Plains program, a residential, family-based education program developed to improve the economic potential and lifestyle of selected student families in a six-state area. Each case study…

  10. Analyzing the Social Knowledge Construction Behavioral Patterns of an Online Synchronous Collaborative Discussion Instructional Activity Using an Instant Messaging Tool: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hou, Huei-Tse; Wu, Sheng-Yi

    2011-01-01

    Online discussions have been widely utilized as an educational activity, and much research has been conducted on the process and behaviors involved in asynchronous discussions. However, research on behavioral patterns in learners' synchronous discussions, including the process of social knowledge construction and project coordination is limited.…

  11. Modes of Governmentality in an Online Space: A Case Study of Blog Activities in an Advanced Level Japanese-as-a-Foreign-Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doerr, Neriko M.; Sato, Shinji

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the validity of the incorporation of online communication in language education classes as a practice free of power politics. By examining blog activities in an advanced-level Japanese-as-a-Foreign-Language classroom at a university in the USA, we show that the blog's postings and readers' comments evoke certain modes of…

  12. Implementing Change to Arrest the Decline in Moderate to Vigorous Physical Activity (MVPA) for Adolescent Girls in Two Rural and Regional High Schools: A Case Study Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Judith; Puglisi, Lauren; Perry, Janine

    2012-01-01

    Inactivity has been linked to a range of lifestyle conditions such as hypertension, type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease (World Health Organisation, 2009). Engagement in physical activity and in sport has been consistently reported to decline as the general population ages (Telama et al., 2005). In particular, the age of adolescence has…

  13. Exploring Behavioral Markers of Long-Term Physical Activity Maintenance: A Case Study of System Identification Modeling within a Behavioral Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hekler, Eric B.; Buman, Matthew P.; Poothakandiyil, Nikhil; Rivera, Daniel E.; Dzierzewski, Joseph M.; Aiken Morgan, Adrienne; McCrae, Christina S.; Roberts, Beverly L.; Marsiske, Michael; Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Efficacious interventions to promote long-term maintenance of physical activity are not well understood. Engineers have developed methods to create dynamical system models for modeling idiographic (i.e., within-person) relationships within systems. In behavioral research, dynamical systems modeling may assist in decomposing intervention effects…

  14. A Case Study for Comparing the Effectiveness of a Computer Simulation and a Hands-on Activity on Learning Electric Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekmekci, Adem; Gulacar, Ozcan

    2015-01-01

    Science education reform emphasizes innovative and constructivist views of science teaching and learning that promotes active learning environments, dynamic instructions, and authentic science experiments. Technology-based and hands-on instructional designs are among innovative science teaching and learning methods. Research shows that these two…

  15. Curriculum Case Studies Are of Questionable Quality but Helped Precollege Curriculum Activities, National Science Foundation. Report of the Comptroller General of the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    This publication resulted from an investigation by the Government Accounting Office (GAO) into alleged inaccuracies in a National Science Foundation (NSF) report "Pre-college Science Curriculum Activities of the National Science Foundation." Five NSF supported curriculum improvement projects were investigated. Generally, inaccurate and unsupported…

  16. Transient expansion of activated CD8+ T cells characterizes tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in patients with HIV: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background CD4+ T cell activation indicators have been reported to be a common phenomenon underlying diverse manifestations of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). However, we have found that a high frequency of circulating CD8+ T cells is a specific risk factor for mycobacterial IRIS. Therefore, we investigated whether CD8+ T cells from patients who develop TB IRIS were specifically activated. Methods We obtained PBMCs from HIV+ patients prior to and 4, 8, 12, 24, 52 and 104 weeks after initiating antiretroviral therapy. CD38 and HLADR expression on naive, central memory and effector memory CD8+ and CD4+ T cells were determined by flow cytometry. Absolute counts and frequencies of CD8+ T cell subsets were compared between patients who developed TB IRIS, who developed other IRIS forms and who remained IRIS-free. Results TB IRIS patients showed significantly higher counts of naive CD8+ T cells than the other groups at most time points, with a contraction of the effector memory subpopulation occurring later in the follow-up period. Activated (CD38+ HLADR+) CD8+ T cells from all groups decreased with treatment but transiently peaked in TB IRIS patients. This increase was due to an increase in activated naive CD8+ T cell counts during IRIS. Additionally, the CD8+ T cell subpopulations of TB IRIS patients expressed HLADR without CD38 more frequently and expressed CD38 without HLADR less frequently than cells from other groups. Conclusions CD8+ T cell activation is specifically relevant to TB IRIS. Different IRIS forms may involve different alterations in T cell subsets, suggesting different underlying inflammatory processes. PMID:23688318

  17. Multiwavelength Study of Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Veeresh

    2010-08-01

    framework of the unification scheme. In other words, it is ensured that the two subtypes being compared are not selected from entirely different parts of the evolution function (redshift, luminosity, bulge magnitude, stellar luminosity of the host galaxy and Hubble type of the host galaxy). To study the X-ray spectral properties of two Seyfert subtypes I use the XMM-Newton pn data. The 0.5 - 10 keV X-ray spectra of Seyfert galaxies are generally best fitted with a model consists of: an absorbed power law with exponential cut-off which contains cold absorption from the Galactic hydrogen column density together with absorption from neutral gas at the redshift of the source; a narrow Gaussian line fitted to the Fe K_alpha line at 6.4 keV; a soft excess component characterized by either a steep power law and/or a thermal plasma model with temperature kT and in some cases, reflection component characterized by the reflection from an isotropically illuminated cold slab, (model `pexrav' in XSPEC) is required. Partial covering of the primary AGN power law component is also required for the best fit in some sources. There are several type 2 sources in our sample in which the hard (2.0 - 10.0 keV) part of the X-ray spectrum is best fitted with a reflection component alone (`pexrav' model). The statistical comparisons of the X-ray spectral properties show that in compared to Seyfert type 1s, the type 2s exhibit lower X-ray luminosities in soft (0.5 - 2.0 keV) and hard (2.0 - 10.0) X-ray bands, higher X-ray absorbing column densities, higher equivalent widths of Fe K line, and lower flux ratios of hard X-ray (2.0 - 10.0 keV) to [OIII]. In both the Seyfert subtypes, the X-ray luminosity is moderately correlated with the pc-scale, kpc-scale radio luminosities and [OIII] line luminosity, in a similar fashion. A large fraction ~ 60 - 70% of type 2 Seyferts of our sample are likely to be Compton-thick and as a case study of a Compton-thick AGN, we studied the broad-band 0.5 - 50 keV X

  18. A Singapore Case of Lesson Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Lu Pien; Yee, Lee Peng

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we present a case study of six Singaporean elementary school teachers working in a Lesson Study team that prepared them for problem solving instruction. The Lesson Study process included preparing, observing, and critiquing mathematics lessons in the context of solving fractions tasks. By conducting Lesson Study, we anticipated…

  19. Constraining fault activity by investigating tectonically-deformed Quaternary palaeoshorelines using a synchronous correlation method: the Capo D'Orlando Fault as a case study (NE Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschis, Marco; Roberts, Gerald P.; Robertson, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Long-term curstal extension rates, accommodated by active normal faults, can be constrained by investigating Late Quaternary vertical movements. Sequences of marine terraces tectonically deformed by active faults mark the interaction between tectonic activity, sea-level changes and active faulting throughout the Quaternary (e.g. Armijo et al., 1996, Giunta et al, 2011, Roberts et al., 2013). Crustal deformation can be calculated over multiple seismic cycles by mapping Quaternary tectonically-deformed palaeoshorelines, both in the hangingwall and footwall of active normal faults (Roberts et al., 2013). Here we use a synchronous correlation method between palaeoshorelines elevations and the ages of sea-level highstands (see Roberts et al., 2013 for further details) which takes advantage of the facts that (i) sea-level highstands are not evenly-spaced in time, yet must correlate with palaeoshorelines that are commonly not evenly-spaced in elevation, and (ii) that older terraces may be destroyed and/or overprinted by younger highstands, so that the next higher or lower paleoshoreline does not necessarily correlate with the next older or younger sea-level highstand. We investigated a flight of Late Quaternary marine terraces deformed by normal faulting as a result of the Capo D'Orlando Fault in NE Sicily (e.g. Giunta et al., 2011). This fault lies within the Calabrian Arc which has experienced damaging seismic events such as the 1908 Messina Straits earthquake ~ Mw 7. Our mapping and previous mapping (Giunta et al. (2011) demonstrate that the elevations of marine terraces inner edges change along the strike the NE - SW oriented normal fault. This confirms active deformation on the Capo D'Orlando Fault, strongly suggesting that it should be added into the Database of Individual Seismogenic Sources (DISS, Basili et al., 2008). Giunta et al. (2011) suggested that uplift rates and hence faults lip-rates vary through time for this examples. We update the ages assigned to

  20. Towards creating a superstimulus to normalise glucose metabolism in the prediabetic: a case-study in the feast-famine and activity-rest cycle

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Louis; Caulfield, Brian

    2012-01-01

    We live in a time of plenty. During evolution, periods of hunger and simultaneously high activity levels would combine giving a stimulus which is absent from modern lifestyles. This is potentially connected with abnormal glucose metabolism. It was hypothesised that simultaneous fasting and aggressive aerobic neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) exercise, until metabolic exhaustion, may be an acceptable modern equivalent. A healthy subject fasted for 44 h (water allowed) during which he undertook three aerobic NMES sessions at >50%VO2max; heart rate >160 bpm. Metabolic gas analysis of a comparable session in the non-fasting state showed 100% carbohydrate substrate utilisation. With fasting the NMES exercise consumed mostly fat–up to 100% fat utilisation at 42 h. This clear shift away from using carbohydrate as a substrate and hypoglycaemia may indicate that carbohydrate stores are nearly depleted. The authors postulate that this may constitute a metabolic super stimulus mimicking the famine-activity periods of our ancestors. PMID:22605804

  1. Integrating Educational Technologies into Teacher Education: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawlins, Peter; Kehrwald, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    This article is a case study of an integrated, experiential approach to improving pre-service teachers' understanding and use of educational technologies in one New Zealand teacher education programme. The study examines the context, design and implementation of a learning activity which integrated student-centred approaches, experiential…

  2. Children and Professionals Rights to Participation: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesquita-Pires, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the process of praxiological transformation developed in an early childhood education institution, in Portugal, within four activity rooms. It is a single case study using action research, context-based staff development and participatory childhood pedagogy as means to change educational practices. It undertakes thorough…

  3. Performance Measures of Academic Faculty--A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidovitch, Nitza; Soen, Dan; Sinuani-Stern, Zila

    2011-01-01

    This case study is the first to track the method used by an Israeli institution of higher education to assess and reward faculty members using a set of performance measures ("Excellence criteria"). The study profiles faculty members who received financial rewards for excellence during 2005-2007, based on the previous year's activities, as measured…

  4. BTS Case Study: The Galloway Family Home

    SciTech Connect

    Brandegee Group

    1999-03-08

    Case study of an energy-efficient Habitat for Humanity house that uses 30% less energy than conventional residential construction. The project was part of the Jimmy Carter Work Project in rural Appalachia in 1997.

  5. Object-oriented classification of a high-spatial resolution SPOT5 image for mapping geology and landforms of active volcanoes: Semeru case study, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassouk, Zeineb; Thouret, Jean-Claude; Gupta, Avijit; Solikhin, Akhmad; Liew, Soo Chin

    2014-09-01

    The present work explores the object-oriented classification (OOC) of high-spatial resolution (HSR) satellite panchromatic imagery for mapping the geology of the persistently active Semeru volcano and its ring plain, east Java, Indonesia. A panchromatic SPOT5 image and a digital elevation model (DEM) have been used to identify geologic units, structures, landforms and deposits. The panchromatic image was georeferenced and enhanced using histogram equalization. The enhanced image was segmented into polygons using the EnviFx (©Exelis) Software. The polygons were delineated and classified on the basis of spectral (panchromatic hues and textures), topographic (slope, elevation) information and geologic/geomorphic processes. The validity of classification was evaluated by interpreting Google Earth images, aerial photographs and limited field observations. The classification consists of three hierarchical levels across the volcanic area of about 745 km2. The first operational spatial level includes seven large volcano domains based on the spectral content of the volcanic, tectonic and lithological structures, and principal catchments. The second operational level, based on contextual relationships (topography, drainage network, vegetation cover type, stratigraphy and slope dynamics), encompasses 20 geological units that range between 30 and 80 km2 in area. Among the units, the third operational level distinguishes as many as 47 geomorphological sub-units (0.25-25 km2) according to slope gradient, deposit type, mass-wasting process and weathering. The resulting map provides a detailed pattern of geologic and geomorphic features unlike previous geologic maps that identified only 11 stratigraphic units. We show that the high-spatial resolution panchromatic SPOT5 scene can help to safely map the geology and landforms of persistently active volcanoes such as Semeru. We have applied the OOC technique on one HSR GeoEye panchromatic image to map another active volcano, Merapi

  6. Active emergent thrust associated with a detachment fold: A case study of the eastern boundary fault of Takada plain, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, N.; Ishiyama, T.; Sato, H.; Saito, H.; Kurashimo, E.; Abe, S.

    2012-04-01

    To estimate seismic hazards, understanding the relationship between active fault and seismic source fault is crucial. Along the Japan Sea coast of Northern Honshu, Japan, thick sediments, deposited in the Miocene rift-grabens, formed fold-and-thrust belt, due to the shortening deformation since the Pliocene time. Most of the thrusts are active and show clear geomorphological evidences. Some of the thrusts are secondary faults, produced by the folding of competent layers. To elucidate the relationship between an emergent thrust and deep-sited seismogenic source fault, we performed shallow high-resolution seismic reflection profiling across the eastern boundary fault of the Takada plain, central Japan. Based on the moropho-tectonic data, the vertical slip rate of the Eastern boundary fault of the Takada plain is 0.9 mm/y and has potential to produce M7.2 earthquake (AIST, 2006). For shallow structure, we obtained CMP-seismic reflection data from a 7-km-long seismic line, using 541 channels of off-line recorders. Seismic source was an Envirovibe (IVI). Receiver and shot intervals are 12.5 m and seismic signals were recorded by fixed channels. Shallow seismic data were acquired as a piggy-bag project of 70 km-long onshore-offshore deep seismic profiling. High-resolution seismic section portrays the emergent thrust, dipping to the east at about 30 degrees. The hanging wall consist Pliocene interbedded mudstone and sandstone and deeper extension of the thrust can be traced down to the Miocene mudstone of the Teradoamri Formation as a low-angle fault. In the Niigata basin, the lower part of the Teradomari Formation is known as over pressured mudstone and shallow detachments are commonly developed in this unit. Based on the deep seismic section, including velocity profile obtained by refraction tomography, deep sited fault does not connect to the shallow active fault directly.

  7. Case studies of selected Project "Flash" events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaides, K. A.; Michaelides, S. C.; Savvidou, K.; Orphanou, A.; Constantinides, P.; Charalambous, M.; Michaelides, M.

    2009-03-01

    Flooding is a consequence of the prevailing meteorological situation, the intensity and duration of precipitation, geomorphology, human activities over a geographical region and other factors. Floods result in damage and destruction of infrastructure and private property and, in some cases, in fatalities. Flash floods are sudden and quite localized in extend, characterized by excessive amounts of rainfall within a short period of time and are distinguished from other floods by their degree of severity. The broader knowledge concerning flash floods is useful for the better understanding of the underlying thermodynamic and dynamic mechanisms, as well as the associated physical processes. The wider understanding of flashfloods can form part of an integrated system for short and very short forecasting of these events. In the present study, the synoptic, dynamic and thermodynamic conditions during the development of a baroclinic depression which affected the area of Cyprus on 6 November 2005 are studied. The depression was associated with extreme weather phenomena, such as thunderstorms, a water spout and high precipitation accumulations. The results indicate the importance of the dynamic parameters in the system's development and the thermodynamic analysis has shown the convective potential of the atmosphere.

  8. The charge excitation in the Raman process as correlated from a classical theory for Raman optical activity: the case study of (+)-(R)-methyloxirane.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yan; Wu, Guozhen; Wang, Peijie

    2012-03-01

    We developed a classical algorithm to calculate the spectral signs in the Raman optical activity (ROA) spectrum. In this algorithm, the charge re-distributions among the bonds, which are associated to the bond polarizabilities, are included. For (+)-(R)-methyloxirane, we found that if these bond polarizabilities are attributed to the atoms and are properly scaled in order to be combined with the Mulliken charges on the atoms in the ground state, then the experimental ROA spectral signs can be well reproduced. Furthermore, in this process, we are able to determine that around 20% of the electrons in the molecule are excited in the Raman process. PMID:22226895

  9. Landslide Economics: Concepts and Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Martin; Damm, Bodo

    2015-04-01

    Landslide economics is vital for fundamental understanding of landslide risk as dealing with two important topics: (i) impact assessment, either as damage statistics or cost modeling, and (ii) vulnerability assessment, i.e., the study of exposure, sensitivity, and resilience to landslide damage, ideally from both sociotechnical and financial perspective (e.g., Crovelli and Coe, 2009; Wills et al., 2014). Many aspects addressed in landslide economics have direct influence on landslide risk, including: (i) human activity is often a major causative factor of landslides, not only by predisposing or triggering them, but also as a result of inadequate (low-cost) landslide mitigation; (ii) the level of tolerable or acceptable risk, a measure driving a large part of landslide costs in industrialized countries, is highly variable, differing between individuals, public or private organizations, and societies, with its nature being to change over time; and (iii) decision makers are faced with finding the right balance in landslide mitigation, thus need to weight diverse geological and socioeconomic factors that control its effectiveness in both technical and financial terms (e.g., Klose et al., 2014a). A large part of the complexity in assessing landslide risk as measured by economic costs is due to unique problems in understanding of (i) what types of landslide damage affect human activity and infrastructure in which way, (ii) how society contributes and responds to various kinds of damage, and (iii) how landslide damage is valued in monetary terms. Landslide economics shows the potential to take account of these sociocultural factors to the benefit of risk analysis (e.g., Klose et al., 2014b). The present contribution introduces local and regional case studies in which different economic issues of landslide risk are highlighted using the example of public infrastructures in NW Germany. A special focus is on the following topics: (i) risk culture and created risk, (ii

  10. The Influence of Liberal Studies on Students' Participation in Socio-Political Activities: The Case of the Umbrella Movement in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fung, Dennis; Su, Angie

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports an investigation into how secondary student participants in Hong Kong's Umbrella Movement related this particular political experience to their learning of Liberal Studies. Questionnaire-based surveys and interviews were conducted to probe their interpretations of Liberal Studies' impact on their political involvement and their…

  11. Responses of surface runoff to climate change and human activities in the arid region of central Asia: a case study in the Tarim River basin, China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changchun; Chen, Yaning; Chen, Yapeng; Zhao, Ruifeng; Ding, Hui

    2013-04-01

    Based on hydrological and climatic data and land use/cover change data covering the period from 1957 to 2009, this paper investigates the hydrological responses to climate change and to human activities in the arid Tarim River basin (TRB). The results show that the surface runoff of three headstreams (Aksu River, Yarkant River and Hotan River) of the Tarim River exhibited a significant increasing trend since 1960s and entered an even higher-runoff stage in 1994. In the contrary, the surface runoff of Tarim mainstream displayed a persistent decreasing trend since 1960s. The increasing trend of surface runoff in the headstreams can be attributed to the combined effects of both temperature and precipitation changes during the past five decades. But, the decreasing trend of surface runoff in the mainstream and the observed alterations of the temporal and spatial distribution patterns were mainly due to the adverse impacts of human activities. Specifically, increasingly intensified water consumption for irrigation and the associated massive constructions of water conservancy projects were responsible for the decreasing trend of runoff in the mainstream. And, the decreasing trend has been severely jeopardizing the ecological security in the lower reaches. It is now unequivocally clear that water-use conflicts among different sectors and water-use competitions between upper and lower reaches are approaching to dangerous levels in TRB that is thus crying for implementing an integrated river basin management scheme. PMID:23377191

  12. Impacts of Human Activities on Groundwater Quality of an Alluvial Aquifer: A Case Study of the Eskişehir Plain, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaçaroğlu, Fikret; Günay, Gültekin

    1997-04-01

    Hydrochemical and water-quality (except biological) data obtained through a two-year sampling and analysis program indicate that the highest concentrations of groundwater pollution occur in the central and eastern parts of Eskişehir city. Groundwater quality degradation outside the urban area results from agricultural activities. The most serious pollution of groundwater in the Eskişehir plain is from nitrogen compounds (ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate). The concentrations of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate of the 51 surveyed water wells range from 0.01-1.65 mg/L, 0.01-1.80 mg/L, and 1.1-257.0 mg/L, respectively. Orthophosphate concentrations in groundwater range from 0.01-1.25 mg/L. Considerable seasonal fluctuation in the groundwater quality was observed. In general, the groundwater quality in wet seasons was better than the quality in dry seasons.

  13. A Case Study about Communication Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Grace Hui Chin

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this case study was to identify what were Taiwanese University English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners' perceptions about learning communication strategies. This study collected qualitative data about students' beliefs and attitudes as they learned communication strategies. The research question guiding the study was:…

  14. Education and Work Councils: Four Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prager, Audrey; And Others

    This collection of four case studies represents the conclusion of a two-phase study of a federal program to sponsor education and work councils. Following an outline of the history and concept of education and work councils as well as the findings of a study of such councils, the importance of council collaboration with selected sectors is…

  15. Predicting Students Drop Out: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dekker, Gerben W.; Pechenizkiy, Mykola; Vleeshouwers, Jan M.

    2009-01-01

    The monitoring and support of university freshmen is considered very important at many educational institutions. In this paper we describe the results of the educational data mining case study aimed at predicting the Electrical Engineering (EE) students drop out after the first semester of their studies or even before they enter the study program…

  16. Using Relational Developmental Systems Theory to Link Program Goals, Activities, and Outcomes: The Sample Case of the 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Richard M.; Wang, Jun; Chase, Paul A.; Gutierrez, Akira S.; Harris, Elise M.; Rubin, Rachel O.; Yalin, Ceren

    2014-01-01

    In contemporary developmental science, relational development systems models have been used to frame the positive youth development (PYD) perspective, which posits that youth will thrive when there is alignment between their strengths and ecological resources in their context. Evidence from the 4-H Study of PYD indicates that out-of-school-time…

  17. Rethinking Trends in Instructional Objectives: Exploring the Alignment of Objectives with Activities and Assessment in Higher Education--A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamanaka, Akio; Wu, Leon Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    This study explored higher education level syllabi to identify trends in educational objectives. Bloom's Taxonomy and various strategic models were used to classify 714 objectives from 114 sections of courses administered through a Midwest teacher education institution in the United States. 1229 verbs and verb phrases were classified through the…

  18. Multimedia Activities in L2 Course Websites--A Case Study of a Site Dedicated to Cultural Topics of Portuguese-Speaking Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasconcelos, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    This study examines student preferences and behavior when navigating online multimedia modules dedicated to teaching cultural aspects associated with an L2, and the contribution of the online multimedia format of the modules to raising interest in these cultural topics. It focuses on student options regarding reading texts on the modules' main…

  19. The Role of the Black Church in Socializing African American Students for School Success: A Collective Case Study into the Nature of Prophetic Activism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Diedria Howell

    2012-01-01

    Little attention has been given to the potential role of faith-based institutions in fostering academic achievement through socialization; the purpose of this study is to reveal that link. For many African American students, the public education system has not successfully prepared them for citizenry in today's global community. An urgent…

  20. RISKS TO CHILDREN FROM EXPPOSURE TO LEAD IN AIR DURING REMEDIAL OR REMOVAL ACTIVITIES AT SUPERFUND SITES: A CASE STUDY OF THE RSR LEAD SMELTER SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study explored modeling approaches for assessing potential risks to children from air lead emisions from the RSR Superfund site in Dallas, TX. The EPA Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic model and the International Radiologic Protection lead model were used to simulate blo...

  1. Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP): a case study for highly conserved chordata-specific genes shaping the brain and mutated in cancer.

    PubMed

    Gozes, Illana; Yeheskel, Adva; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada

    2015-01-01

    The recent finding of activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) as a protein decreased in serum of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to controls, alongside with the discovery of ADNP mutations in autism and coupled with the original description of cancer mutations, ignited an interest for a comparative analysis of ADNP with other AD/autism/cancer-associated genes. We strive toward a better understanding of the molecular structure of key players in psychiatric/neurodegenerative diseases including autism, schizophrenia, and AD. This article includes data mining and bioinformatics analysis on the ADNP gene and protein, in addition to other related genes, with emphasis on recent literature. ADNP is discovered here as unique to chordata with specific autism mutations different from cancer-associated mutation. Furthermore, ADNP exhibits similarities to other cancer/autism-associated genes. We suggest that key genes, which shape and maintain our brain and are prone to mutations, are by in large unique to chordata. Furthermore, these brain-controlling genes, like ADNP, are linked to cell growth and differentiation, and under different stress conditions may mutate or exhibit expression changes leading to cancer propagation. Better understanding of these genes could lead to better therapeutics. PMID:25428252

  2. Lead isotopes in soils and groundwaters as tracers of the impact of human activities on the surface environment: The Domizio-Flegreo Littoral (Italy) case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grezzi, G.; Ayuso, R.A.; de Vivo, B.; Lima, A.; Albanese, S.

    2011-01-01

    The isotopic signature of geogenic and anthropogenic materials, in combination with concentration data for pollutants, can help trace the origin and the extent of contamination in the environment. This approach is particularly effective if naturally occurring and anthropogenically introduced metals have different isotopic ratios. Lead isotope analysis on soils from 7 profiles (1. m depth) and on groundwaters from 8 wells have been used to determine the impact of human activities on the surface environment of Domizio-Flegreo Littoral. Result obtained show that in sub-rural areas the isotopic composition of the samples collected along the soil profiles of Domizio-Flegreo Littoral is likely mostly controlled by the nature of the parent geologic material (natural) while in more urbanized areas (Giugliano) Pb isotopic composition in superficial soils is mostly influenced by anthropic sources such as motor vehicles. Lead isotopic ratios in groundwaters also show that the use of pesticides and, probably, the influence of aerosols and the presence of illegal waste disposal can influence water quality. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Dependence of the high-latitude plasma irregularities on the auroral activity indices: a case study of 17 March 2015 geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Iurii; Zakharenkova, Irina

    2015-09-01

    The magnetosphere substorm plays a crucial role in the solar wind energy dissipation into the ionosphere. We report on the intensity of the high-latitude ionospheric irregularities during one of the largest storms of the current solar cycle—the St. Patrick's Day storm of 17 March 2015. The database of more than 2500 ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers was used to estimate the irregularities occurrence and dynamics over the auroral region of the Northern Hemisphere. We analyze the dependence of the GPS-detected ionospheric irregularities on the auroral activity. The development and intensity of the high-latitude irregularities during this geomagnetic storm reveal a high correlation with the auroral hemispheric power and auroral electrojet indices (0.84 and 0.79, respectively). Besides the ionospheric irregularities caused by particle precipitation inside the polar cap region, evidences of other irregularities related to the storm enhanced density (SED), formed at mid-latitudes and its further transportation in the form of tongue of ionization (TOI) towards and across the polar cap, are presented. We highlight the importance accounting contribution of ionospheric irregularities not directly related with particle precipitation in overall irregularities distribution and intensity.

  4. Gigantic Suprapubic Lymphedema: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanhaeivash, Roozbeh; Franiel, Tobias; Grimm, Marc-Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We present the first case study of idiopathic gigantic suprapubic lymphedema and buried penis treated with puboscrotal reconstruction in a patient with initial extreme obesity after an extensive weight reduction (120 kg). Massive localized lymphedema of the suprapubic region should be differentiated from the scrotal type. Severe lymphedema could not resolve on its own and weight reduction does not seem to be helpful in such cases. PMID:27574599

  5. Gigantic Suprapubic Lymphedema: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Tanhaeivash, Roozbeh; Franiel, Tobias; Grimm, Marc-Oliver; Horstmann, Marcus

    2016-08-01

    We present the first case study of idiopathic gigantic suprapubic lymphedema and buried penis treated with puboscrotal reconstruction in a patient with initial extreme obesity after an extensive weight reduction (120 kg). Massive localized lymphedema of the suprapubic region should be differentiated from the scrotal type. Severe lymphedema could not resolve on its own and weight reduction does not seem to be helpful in such cases. PMID:27574599

  6. Nuclear forensic investigations: two case studies.

    PubMed

    Wallenius, M; Mayer, K; Ray, I

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology and analytical methods used in nuclear forensic investigations. Two case studies are taken as examples to illustrate this. These examples represent typical cases that have been analysed at the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) since last 10 years, i.e. the beginning of the illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. Results of the various analytical techniques are shown, which, together with other type of information, reveal the origin of the material. PMID:16410154

  7. Active case finding of tuberculosis: historical perspective and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Golub, J. E.; Mohan, C. I.; Comstock, G. W.; Chaisson, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite a history of remarkable scientific achievements in microbiology and therapeutics, tuberculosis (TB) continues to pose an extraordinary threat to human health. Case finding and treatment of TB disease are the principal means of controlling transmission and reducing incidence. This review presents a historical perspective of active case finding (ACF) of TB, detailing case detection strategies that have been used over the last century. This review is divided into the following sections: mass radiography, house-to-house surveys, out-patient case detection, enhanced case finding, high-risk populations and cost-effectiveness. The report concludes with a discussion and recommendations for future case finding strategies. Understanding the strengths and weaknesses of these methods will help inform and shape ACF as a TB control policy in the twenty-first century. PMID:16333924

  8. Backpocket: Activities for Nature Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendry, Ian; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Leading naturalist-teachers share outdoor learning activities and techniques, including using binoculars as magnifiers, scavenger hunts, games such as "what's it called" and "I spy," insect study, guessing the age of trees by examining the bark, leading bird walks, exploring nature in the community, and enhancing nature hikes with props. (LP)

  9. 2D and 3D Shear-Wave Velocity Structure to >1 Km Depth from Ambient and Active Surface Waves: Three "Deep Remi" Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, J. N.; Pancha, A.; Pullammanappallil, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Refraction microtermor routinely assesses 1D and 2D velocity-depth profiles to shallow depths of approximately 100 m primarily for engineering applications. Estimation of both shallow and deep (>100 m) shear-velocity structure are key elements in the assessment of urban areas for potential earthquake ground shaking, damage, and the calibration of recorded ground motions. Three independent studies investigated the ability of the refraction microtremor technology to image deep velocity structure, to depths exceeding 1 km (Deep ReMi). In the first study, we were able to delineate basin thicknesses of up to 900 m and the deep-basin velocity structure beneath the Reno-area basin. Constraints on lateral velocity changes in 3D as well as on velocity profiles extended down to 1500 m, and show a possible fault offset. This deployment used 30 stand-alone wireless instruments mated to 4.5 Hz geophones, along each of five arrays 2.9 to 5.8 km long. Rayleigh-wave dispersion was clear at frequencies as low as 0.5 Hz using 120 sec ambient urban noise records. The results allowed construction of a 3D velocity model, vetted by agreement with gravity studies. In a second test, a 5.8 km array delimited the southern edge of the Tahoe Basin, with constraints from gravity. There, bedrock depth increased by 250 m in thickness over a distance of 1600 m, with definition of the velocity of the deeper basin sediments. The third study delineated the collapse region of an underground nuclear explosion within a thick sequence of volcanic extrusives, using a shear-wave minivibe in a radial direction, and horizontal geophones. Analysis showed the cavity extends to 620 m depth, with a width of 180 m and a height of 220 m. Our results demonstrate that deep velocity structure can be recovered using ambient noise. This technique offers the ability to define 2D and 3D structural representations essential for seismic hazard evaluation.

  10. Active Interior Noise Control Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Veeramani, S.; Sampath, A.; Balachandran, B.; Wereley, N.

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations into the control of noise in the interior of a three-dimensional enclosure with a flexible boundary are presented. The rigid boundaries are constructed from acrylic material, and in the different cases considered the flexible boundary is constructed from either aluminum or composite material. Noise generated by an external speaker is transmitted into the enclosure through the flexible boundary and active control is realized by using Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) piezoelectric actuators bonded to the flexible boundary. Condenser microphones are used for noise measurements inside and outside the enclosure. Minimization schemes for global and local noise control in the presence of a harmonic disturbance are developed and discussed. In the experiments, analog feedforward control is implemented by using the harmonic disturbance as a reference signal.

  11. 76 FR 42129 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Case Submission Form, Case Assistance Form

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... FY2010. We are requesting a two year approval for the form anticipating Government Paperwork Elimination... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Agency Information Collection Activities: Case Submission Form, Case Assistance Form (Form...

  12. Social Studies Project Evaluation: Case Study and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, John

    1982-01-01

    Describes the development and application of a model for social studies program evaluations. A case study showing how the model's three-step process was used to evaluate the Improving Citizenship Education Project in Fulton County, Georgia is included. (AM)

  13. Technologies in Literacy Learning: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloonan, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This article draws on outcomes of a study which explored changes in teachers' literacy pedagogies as a result of their participation in a collaborative teacher professional learning project. The educational usability of schemas drawn from multiliteracies and Learning by Design theory is illustrated through a case study of a teacher's work on…

  14. Collaborative Assessment: Middle School Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkison, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing a participant observer research model, a case study of the efficacy of a collaborative assessment methodology within a middle school social studies class was conducted. A review of existing research revealed that students' perceptions of assessment, evaluation, and accountability influence their intrinsic motivation to learn. A…

  15. Case Studies of the Migrant Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Ellen L.

    Intended for federal policymakers, this study examined four aspects of the Chapter 1 migrant education program: program administration, program services, students served, and program expenditures. Case studies were conducted in California, Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts, Oregon, and Texas between November 1986 and March 1987. State agencies and…

  16. Case Studies in Australian Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Ralph J., Ed.; Rooth, S. John, Ed.

    This publication contains the following 24 case studies of adult education in Australia: "NSW Department of Agriculture Home Study Programme" (O'Neill); "Self-Help Adult Education: The University of the Third Age at the Brisbane CAE" (Swindell); "Marriage Enrichment Programme" (D. Kerr, C. Kerr); "Carringbush Library: A Place to Be" (Letcher);…

  17. A Multiple Case Study of Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Wei; Khoury, Anne E.

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to explore how leadership and contextual factors influence innovation in R&D teams in national laboratories, using the approach of multiple case studies. This paper provides some preliminary findings from two highly innovative teams residing in two national laboratories in the US. The preliminary results suggested several common…

  18. Connecting Reading and Writing: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Zhanfang

    2015-01-01

    Connecting reading and writing, proposed by many scholars, is realized in this case study. The 30 participants in this study are the English majors of the third year in one School of Foreign Languages in Beijing. They are encouraged to write journals every week, based on the source text materials in their Intensive Reading class, with the final…

  19. Anthropology and Popular Culture: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estes, Jack

    The study of popular culture in the United States is an appropriate anthropological endeavor, as evidenced in a case study of the volcanic eruption of Mt. St. Helens in Oregon. By examining its popular arts, anthropologists gain understanding of the culture and its people. For example, an analysis of reactions to the Mt. St. Helens eruption…

  20. CASE STUDY: DIELDRIN ATTACK IN DALYAN LAGOON

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the first two weeks of December 2005, NATO sponsored an Advanced Study Institute (ASI) in Istanbul, Turkey. Part of this ASI involved a case study of a terrorist attack, where a chemical was assumed to be dumped into Sulunger Lake in Turkey. This chapter documents the re...

  1. Case Studies of Three Interorganizational Arrangements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.; And Others

    As part of their study of interorganizational collaboration, researchers present three detailed case studies of how regional education agencies (REAs) supply knowledge utilization services to the school districts they serve. The three REAs are the Wayne County (Michigan) Intermediate School District (with 36 districts), the Educational Improvement…

  2. Impact of agricultural activity and geologic controls on groundwater quality of the alluvial aquifer of the Guadalquivir River (province of Jaén, Spain): a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorite-Herrera, Miguel; Jiménez-Espinosa, Rosario

    2008-06-01

    The alluvial aquifer of the Alto Guadalquivir River is one of the most important shallow aquifers in Jaén, Spain. It is located in the central-eastern part of the province, and its groundwater resources are used mainly for crop irrigation in an agriculture-dominated area. Hydrochemical and water-quality data obtained through a 2-year sampling (2004-2006) and analysis program indicate that nitrate pollution is a serious problem affecting groundwater due to the use of nitrogen (N)-fertilizers in agriculture. During the study, 231 water samples were collected from wells and springs to determine water chemistry and the extent of nitrate pollution. The concentration of nitrate in groundwater ranged from 1.25 to 320.88 mg/l. Considerable seasonal fluctuations in groundwater quality were observed as a consequence of agricultural practices and other factors such as annual rainfall distribution and the Guadalquivir River flow regime. The chemical composition of the water is not only influenced by agricultural practices, but also by interaction with the alluvial sediments. The dissolution of evaporites accounts for part of the Na+, K+, Cl-, SO4 2-, Mg2+, and Ca2+, but other processes, such as calcite precipitation and dedolomitization, also contribute to groundwater chemistry.

  3. Space-borne Observations of Atmospheric Pre-Earthquake Signals in Seismically Active Areas: Case Study for Greece 2008-2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouzounov, D. P.; Pulinets, S. A.; Davidenko, D. A.; Kafatos, M.; Taylor, P. T.

    2013-01-01

    We are conducting theoretical studies and practical validation of atm osphere/ionosphere phenomena preceding major earthquakes. Our approach is based on monitoring of two physical parameters from space: outgoi ng long-wavelength radiation (OLR) on the top of the atmosphere and e lectron and electron density variations in the ionosphere via GPS Tot al Electron Content (GPS/TEC). We retrospectively analyzed the temporal and spatial variations of OLR an GPS/TEC parameters characterizing the state of the atmosphere and ionosphere several days before four m ajor earthquakes (M>6) in Greece for 2008-2009: M6.9 of 02.12.08, M6. 2 02.20.08; M6.4 of 06.08.08 and M6.4 of 07.01.09.We found anomalous behavior before all of these events (over land and sea) over regions o f maximum stress. We expect that our analysis reveal the underlying p hysics of pre-earthquake signals associated with some of the largest earthquakes in Greece.

  4. Numerical simulation of tornadoes' meteorological conditions over Greece: A case study of tornadic activity over NW Peloponnese on March 25, 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsangouras, Ioannis T.; Nastos, Panagiotis T.; Pytharoulis, Ioannis

    2014-05-01

    Recent research revealed that NW Peloponnese, Greece is an area that favours pre-frontal tornadic incidence. This study presents the results of the synoptic analysis of the meteorological conditions during a tornado event over NW Peloponnese on March 25, 2009. Further, the role of topography in tornado genesis is examined. The tornado was formed approximately at 10:30 UTC, south-west of Vardas village, crossed the Nea Manolada and faded away at Lappas village, causing several damage. The length of its track was approximately 9-10 km and this tornado was characterized as F2 (Fujita scale) or T4-T5 in TORRO intensity scale. Synoptic analysis was based on ECMWF datasets, as well as on daily composite mean and anomaly of the geopotential heights at the middle and lower troposphere from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. In addition, numerous datasets derived from weather observations and remote sensing were used in order to interpret better the examined extreme event. Finally, a numerical simulation was performed using the non-hydrostatic Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF), initialized with ECMWF gridded analyses, with telescoping nested grids that allow the representation of atmospheric circulations ranging from the synoptic scale down to the meso-scale. In the numerical simulations the topography of the inner grid was modified by: a) 0% (actual topography) and b) -100% (without topography).

  5. I/S and C/S mixed layers, some indicators of recent physical-chemical changes in active geothermal systems: The case study of Chipilapa (El Salvador)

    SciTech Connect

    Beaufort, D.; Papapanagiotou, P.; patrier, P.; Fouillac, A.M.; Traineau, H.

    1996-01-24

    I/S and C/S mixed layers from the geothermal field of Chipilapa (El Salvador) have been studied in details in order to reevaluate their potential use as indicator of the thermodynamic conditions in which they were formed. It is funded that overprinting of clay bearing alteration stages is common. For a given alteration stage, the spatial variation of I/S and C/S mixed layer ininerals is controlled by kinetics of mixed layer transformation and not only by temperature. Clay geo-thermometers cannot give reliable results because the present crystal-chemical states of the I/S and C/S mixed layers is not their initial state, it was aquired during the overall hydrothermal history which post dated the nucleation of smectitic clay material at high temperature. Occurrences of smectites or smectite-rich mixed layers at high temperature in reservoirs is a promising guide for reconstruct the zones in which boiling or mixing of non isotherinal fluids occurred very recently or still presently.

  6. Promoting Autonomous Listening to Podcasts: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on an exploratory case study of a Japanese learner of English as a foreign language (EFL) who was introduced to metatextual skills and activities for metacognitive instruction as a route towards promoting her autonomous use of the BBC's online "From Our Own Correspondent" podcasts outside of the classroom to…

  7. A methodology of healthcare quality measurement: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecoraro, F.; Luzi, D.; Cesarelli, M.; Clemente, F.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we present a comprehensive model for quality assessment taking into account structure, process and outcome dimensions introduced in the Donabedian framework. To test our hypothesis a case study based on the Italian healthcare services is reported focusing on the analysis of the hospital bed management and on the phenomenon of both active and passive patient mobility.

  8. The Learning Organization Ten Years On: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peter A. C.

    1999-01-01

    A learning organization is viable when the learning climate successfully changes managers' mindsets. A case study of a financial services enterprise illustrates ways to keep mind sets from hardening and shows how changing learning activities and tools can change habits of thinking and learning. (Contains 30 references.) (SK)

  9. Longevity of a Woman with Down Syndrome: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicoine, Brian; McGuire, Dennis

    1997-01-01

    This case study of an 83-year-old woman with Down syndrome suggests she is the longest surviving person with the condition. Also noted is the lack of decline in mental function and performance of activities of daily living despite the apparently universal presence of the neuropathologic changes of Alzheimer's disease in persons with Down syndrome…

  10. Enhancing Personal and Family Finance Courses Using Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gudmunson, Clinton G.; Zuiker, Virginia Solis; Katras, Mary Jo; Sabri, Mohamad Fazli

    2015-01-01

    Growing financial concerns among college students and on college campuses suggests urgency in teaching personal finance more effectively. Active learning approaches to teaching, including the use of case studies, problem-based learning, group work, in-class writing, demonstrations, and so forth, may be more appropriate and useful when used to…

  11. Three Strategies for Teaching Research Methods: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeffer, Carla A.; Rogalin, Christabel L.

    2012-01-01

    The authors provide a brief case study of a three-strategy approach for teaching undergraduate research methods that (1) incorporates active learning assignments and discussion-based learning, (2) integrates a cross-discipline and cross-method faculty guest discussion facilitators series, and (3) focuses on the challenges and rewards of conducting…

  12. Evaluation of the Start Programme: Case-Study Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLeod, Shona; Sharp, Caroline; Weaving, Harriet; Smith, Robert; Wheater, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    This report presents five case studies of long-term partnerships (over three years) between arts organisations and schools. The Start programme enables arts venues and schools to work together to offer disadvantaged young people opportunities to engage in creative activities that inspire them and enhance their experience of the arts. It is…

  13. Rural Action: A Collection of Community Work Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Paul, Ed.; Francis, David, Ed.

    This book contains 10 case studies of rural community development in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, and Catalonia, as seen from the perspective of community-work practitioners. Development projects encompassed such activities as promotion of tourism, establishment of community centers, vocational training for school dropouts, adult community…

  14. "Real-Time" Case Studies in Organizational Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Shawn D.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an activity that integrates theory and application by examining the multiple communication events affecting a single organization in "real time" over the course of an academic term. The "real-time" case study (RTCS) avails students of the opportunity to examine organizational communication events as they are occurring in…

  15. Multiscale seismic imaging of active fault zones for hazard assessment: A case study of the Santa Monica fault zone, Los Angeles, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, T.L.; Dolan, J.F.; Odum, J.K.; Stephenson, W.J.; Williams, R.A.; Templeton, M.E.

    1998-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflection profiles at two different scales were acquired across the transpressional Santa Monica Fault of north Los Angeles as part of an integrated hazard assessment of the fault. The seismic data confirm the location of the fault and related shallow faulting seen in a trench to deeper structures known from regional studies. The trench shows a series of near-vertical strike-slip faults beneath a topographic scarp inferred to be caused by thrusting on the Santa Monica fault. Analysis of the disruption of soil horizons in the trench indicates multiple earthquakes have occurred on these strike-slip faults within the past 50 000 years, with the latest being 1000 to 3000 years ago. A 3.8-km-long, high-resolution seismic reflection profile shows reflector truncations that constrain the shallow portion of the Santa Monica Fault (upper 300 m) to dip northward between 30?? and 55??, most likely 30?? to 35??, in contrast to the 60?? to 70?? dip interpreted for the deeper portion of the fault. Prominent, nearly continuous reflectors on the profile are interpreted to be the erosional unconformity between the 1.2 Ma and older Pico Formation and the base of alluvial fan deposits. The unconformity lies at depths of 30-60 m north of the fault and 110-130 m south of the fault, with about 100 m of vertical displacement (180 m of dip-slip motion on a 30??-35?? dipping fault) across the fault since deposition of the upper Pico Formation. The continuity of the unconformity on the seismic profile constrains the fault to lie in a relatively narrow (50 m) zone, and to project to the surface beneath Ohio Avenue immediately south of the trench. A very high-resolution seismic profile adjacent to the trench images reflectors in the 15 to 60 m depth range that are arched slightly by folding just north of the fault. A disrupted zone on the profile beneath the south end of the trench is interpreted as being caused by the deeper portions of the trenched strike

  16. Case studies: Soil mapping using multiple methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Hauke; Wunderlich, Tina; Hagrey, Said A. Al; Rabbel, Wolfgang; Stümpel, Harald

    2010-05-01

    Soil is a non-renewable resource with fundamental functions like filtering (e.g. water), storing (e.g. carbon), transforming (e.g. nutrients) and buffering (e.g. contamination). Degradation of soils is meanwhile not only to scientists a well known fact, also decision makers in politics have accepted this as a serious problem for several environmental aspects. National and international authorities have already worked out preservation and restoration strategies for soil degradation, though it is still work of active research how to put these strategies into real practice. But common to all strategies the description of soil state and dynamics is required as a base step. This includes collecting information from soils with methods ranging from direct soil sampling to remote applications. In an intermediate scale mobile geophysical methods are applied with the advantage of fast working progress but disadvantage of site specific calibration and interpretation issues. In the framework of the iSOIL project we present here some case studies for soil mapping performed using multiple geophysical methods. We will present examples of combined field measurements with EMI-, GPR-, magnetic and gammaspectrometric techniques carried out with the mobile multi-sensor-system of Kiel University (GER). Depending on soil type and actual environmental conditions, different methods show a different quality of information. With application of diverse methods we want to figure out, which methods or combination of methods will give the most reliable information concerning soil state and properties. To investigate the influence of varying material we performed mapping campaigns on field sites with sandy, loamy and loessy soils. Classification of measured or derived attributes show not only the lateral variability but also gives hints to a variation in the vertical distribution of soil material. For all soils of course soil water content can be a critical factor concerning a succesful

  17. Integrating ethics into case study assignments.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Pamela A

    2014-12-01

    I teach an upper-level writing course, Genes, Race, Gender, and Society, designed for Life Science majors, in which I utilize a case study to expose students to ethical ways of thinking. Students first work through the topical case study and then are challenged to rethink their responses through the lenses of ethics, taking into account different ethical frameworks. Students then develop their own case study, integrating ethical components. I want to expose my students to this way of thinking because I see technology being driven by the Jurassic Park phenomenon, "Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn't stop to think if they should," and want future physicians grounded in a sense of how their actions relate to the greater good. PMID:25574287

  18. Shuttle Case Study Collection Website Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, Khadijah S.; Johnson, Grace K.

    2012-01-01

    As a continuation from summer 2012, the Shuttle Case Study Collection has been developed using lessons learned documented by NASA engineers, analysts, and contractors. Decades of information related to processing and launching the Space Shuttle is gathered into a single database to provide educators with an alternative means to teach real-world engineering processes. The goal is to provide additional engineering materials that enhance critical thinking, decision making, and problem solving skills. During this second phase of the project, the Shuttle Case Study Collection website was developed. Extensive HTML coding to link downloadable documents, videos, and images was required, as was training to learn NASA's Content Management System (CMS) for website design. As the final stage of the collection development, the website is designed to allow for distribution of information to the public as well as for case study report submissions from other educators online.

  19. Ada software productivity prototypes: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hihn, Jairus M.; Habib-Agahi, Hamid; Malhotra, Shan

    1988-01-01

    A case study of the impact of Ada on a Command and Control project completed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is given. The data for this study was collected as part of a general survey of software costs and productivity at JPL and other NASA sites. The task analyzed is a successful example of the use of rapid prototyping as applied to command and control for the U.S. Air Force and provides the U.S. Air Force Military Airlift Command with the ability to track aircraft, air crews and payloads worldwide. The task consists of a replicated database at several globally distributed sites. The local databases at each site can be updated within seconds after changes are entered at any one site. The system must be able to handle up to 400,000 activities per day. There are currently seven sites, each with a local area network of computers and a variety of user displays; the local area networks are tied together into a single wide area network. Using data obtained for eight modules, totaling approximately 500,000 source lines of code, researchers analyze the differences in productivities between subtasks. Factors considered are percentage of Ada used in coding, years of programmer experience, and the use of Ada tools and modern programming practices. The principle findings are the following. Productivity is very sensitive to programmer experience. The use of Ada software tools and the use of modern programming practices are important; without such use Ada is just a large complex language which can cause productivity to decrease. The impact of Ada on development effort phases is consistent with earlier reports at the project level but not at the module level.

  20. The Science Manager's Guide to Case Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, Kristi M.; Peffers, Melissa S.; Ruegg, Rosalie T.; Vallario, Robert W.

    2001-09-24

    This guide takes the science manager through the steps of planning, implementing, validating, communicating, and using case studies. It outlines the major methods of analysis, describing their relative merits and applicability while providing relevant examples and sources of additional information. Well-designed case studies can provide a combination of rich qualitative and quantitative information, offering valuable insights into the nature, outputs, and longer-term impacts of the research. An objective, systematic, and credible approach to the evaluation of U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science programs adds value to the research process and is the subject of this guide.