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Sample records for activities creative ideas

  1. Creative Teaching Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Patricia H., Comp.; And Others

    This book contains 172 creative teaching ideas pertaining to various subject areas and aspects of business education. Most of the ideas included are intended for use in secondary and postsecondary classrooms; however, a few are applicable at all grade levels. The teaching ideas are organized according to the following subject areas/topics:…

  2. Creative Writing: Activity Ideas for Grades 7, 8, and 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Cheryl M.; Marler, Joyce

    This booklet is one of a series developed by the Northern Colorado Educational Board of Cooperative Services to make available to teachers ideas designed and tested by other teachers. Many of the ideas are from educational journals as well as from the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC). The booklet is divided into eight sections:…

  3. Creative constraints: Brain activity and network dynamics underlying semantic interference during idea production.

    PubMed

    Beaty, Roger E; Christensen, Alexander P; Benedek, Mathias; Silvia, Paul J; Schacter, Daniel L

    2017-03-01

    Functional neuroimaging research has recently revealed brain network interactions during performance on creative thinking tasks-particularly among regions of the default and executive control networks-but the cognitive mechanisms related to these interactions remain poorly understood. Here we test the hypothesis that the executive control network can interact with the default network to inhibit salient conceptual knowledge (i.e., pre-potent responses) elicited from memory during creative idea production. Participants studied common noun-verb pairs and were given a cued-recall test with corrective feedback to strengthen the paired association in memory. They then completed a verb generation task that presented either a previously studied noun (high-constraint) or an unstudied noun (low-constraint), and were asked to "think creatively" while searching for a novel verb to relate to the presented noun. Latent Semantic Analysis of verbal responses showed decreased semantic distance values in the high-constraint (i.e., interference) condition, which corresponded to increased neural activity within regions of the default (posterior cingulate cortex and bilateral angular gyri), salience (right anterior insula), and executive control (left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) networks. Independent component analysis of intrinsic functional connectivity networks extended this finding by revealing differential interactions among these large-scale networks across the task conditions. The results suggest that interactions between the default and executive control networks underlie response inhibition during constrained idea production, providing insight into specific neurocognitive mechanisms supporting creative cognition.

  4. Opening the Creative Mind of High Need for Cognitive Closure Individuals through Activation of Uncreative Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Lay See; Leung, Angela K.-Y.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on the integrative system theory of creativity combining the person, process, and press perspectives, this research offers the first evidence of how high-need-for-cognitive-closure (NFC) individuals' creative mind can be opened up, by making them become more cognizant of uncreative ideas as consensually invalid solutions to creative…

  5. Idea Generation Techniques for Sparking Creative Advertising Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marra, James L.

    In advertising, a creative idea can be defined as being right or on strategy in a unique way. For a copywriter, it is not easy to create an ad that has the "Big Idea" in it. Some helpful techniques that advertising students can use to generate creative ideas are (1) analogy, (2) forced relationships, (3) doing the opposite of what…

  6. Creative Sciencing. Ideas and Activities for Teachers and Children. Grades K-6. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Vito, Alfred; Krockover, Gerald H.

    This resource book includes 163 science activities for both preservice and in-service teachers. Activities have been field-tested and are cross-referenced according to the processes of science and the content area covered. Each activity has been written to evoke ideas from the reader, thus enabling each activity to serve a base for additional…

  7. Teaching Creativity Creatively: An Idea Journal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Robin

    Writing classes ought to be among the most creative environments imaginable, but sadly, some writing teachers seem to think that their own writing ability, in proximity, is enough to get students started. A good writing teacher must be a constant student of creativity, always searching for new ways to teach, new inspirations, new forms of…

  8. Pandora's Box: Creative Play Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Vicky E., Comp.

    Developed as part of a federally funded project for young handicapped and non handicapped children, the handbook contains suggestions for parents and teachers about creative use of materials found in the home. Provided are illustrations, lists of materials needed, explanations of purpose, and procedures for construction and use of 18 materials…

  9. Idea processing for creativity and management

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P E

    1988-01-01

    Tips and case histories on computer use for idea and outline processing: Productivity software to solve problems of idea hierarchy, transitions, and developments is matched to solutions for communicators. One case is text that ranges from methods and procedures to histories and legal definitions of classification for the US Department of Energy. Applications of value to writers, editors, and managers are for research; calendars; creativity; prioritization; idea discovery and manipulation; file and time management; and contents, indexes, and glossaries. 6 refs., 7 figs.

  10. FRONTOTEMPORAL AND DOPAMINERGIC CONTROL OF IDEA GENERATION AND CREATIVE DRIVE

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Alice W.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a three-factor anatomical model of human idea generation and creative drive, focusing on interactions between the temporal lobes, frontal lobes, and limbic system. Evidence is drawn from functional imaging, drug studies, and lesion analysis. Temporal lobe changes, as in hypergraphia, often increase idea generation, sometimes at the expense of quality. Frontal lobe deficits may decrease idea generation, in part because of rigid judgments about an idea's worth. These phenomena are clearest in verbal creativity, and roughly parallel the pressured communication of temporal lobe epilepsy, mania, and Wernicke's aphasia--compared to the sparse speech and cognitive inflexibility of depression, Broca's aphasia, and other frontal lobe lesions. The phenomena also shape non-linguistic creativity, as in that of frontotemporal dementia. The appropriate balance between frontal and temporal activity is mediated by mutually inhibitory corticocortical interactions. Mesolimbic dopamine influences novelty seeking and creative drive. Dopamine agonists and antagonists have opposite effects on goal-directed behavior and hallucinations. Creative drive is not identical to skill—the latter depends more on neocortical association areas. However, drive correlates better with successful creative output than skill does. Traditional neuroscientific models of creativity, such as the left brain – right brain hemispheric model, emphasize skills primarily, and stress art and musical skill at the expense of language and mathematics. The three-factor model proposed here predicts findings in a broad range of normal and pathological states, and can be tested in many experimental paradigms. PMID:16254989

  11. Creativity: The Role of Unconscious Processes in Idea Generation and Idea Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Simone M.; van Baaren, Rick B.; Dijksterhuis, Ap

    2012-01-01

    Today's world of continuous change thrives on creative individuals. Anecdotal reports suggest that creative performance benefits from unconscious processes. Empirical research on the role of the unconscious in creativity, though, is inconsistent and thus far has focused mainly on one aspect of the creative process--idea generation. This is the…

  12. Ideas Come from Everywhere: Generating Creativity for Your Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kesselman, Martin

    1994-01-01

    Describes tools and techniques that can be used to increase creativity in libraries. Highlights include idea files; brainstorming, in groups or as individuals; mind mapping; checklists; idea processing software; new age techniques such as brain integration and flotation tanks; and an annotated bibliography of six books on idea techniques. (LRW)

  13. Default and Executive Network Coupling Supports Creative Idea Production

    PubMed Central

    Beaty, Roger E.; Benedek, Mathias; Barry Kaufman, Scott; Silvia, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    The role of attention in creative cognition remains controversial. Neuroimaging studies have reported activation of brain regions linked to both cognitive control and spontaneous imaginative processes, raising questions about how these regions interact to support creative thought. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we explored this question by examining dynamic interactions between brain regions during a divergent thinking task. Multivariate pattern analysis revealed a distributed network associated with divergent thinking, including several core hubs of the default (posterior cingulate) and executive (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) networks. The resting-state network affiliation of these regions was confirmed using data from an independent sample of participants. Graph theory analysis assessed global efficiency of the divergent thinking network, and network efficiency was found to increase as a function of individual differences in divergent thinking ability. Moreover, temporal connectivity analysis revealed increased coupling between default and salience network regions (bilateral insula) at the beginning of the task, followed by increased coupling between default and executive network regions at later stages. Such dynamic coupling suggests that divergent thinking involves cooperation between brain networks linked to cognitive control and spontaneous thought, which may reflect focused internal attention and the top-down control of spontaneous cognition during creative idea production. PMID:26084037

  14. Default and Executive Network Coupling Supports Creative Idea Production.

    PubMed

    Beaty, Roger E; Benedek, Mathias; Kaufman, Scott Barry; Silvia, Paul J

    2015-06-17

    The role of attention in creative cognition remains controversial. Neuroimaging studies have reported activation of brain regions linked to both cognitive control and spontaneous imaginative processes, raising questions about how these regions interact to support creative thought. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we explored this question by examining dynamic interactions between brain regions during a divergent thinking task. Multivariate pattern analysis revealed a distributed network associated with divergent thinking, including several core hubs of the default (posterior cingulate) and executive (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) networks. The resting-state network affiliation of these regions was confirmed using data from an independent sample of participants. Graph theory analysis assessed global efficiency of the divergent thinking network, and network efficiency was found to increase as a function of individual differences in divergent thinking ability. Moreover, temporal connectivity analysis revealed increased coupling between default and salience network regions (bilateral insula) at the beginning of the task, followed by increased coupling between default and executive network regions at later stages. Such dynamic coupling suggests that divergent thinking involves cooperation between brain networks linked to cognitive control and spontaneous thought, which may reflect focused internal attention and the top-down control of spontaneous cognition during creative idea production.

  15. Nudging Students into Writing Creatively (Teaching Ideas).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perreault, George; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes ideas for writing prompts and assignments proposed by three different teachers: (1) writing poems inspired by smells of herbs and spices; (2) writing about past perceptions and feelings after looking at a photograph; and (3) writing a "self-portrait." (TB)

  16. Creative Media Ideas for the Gym

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Aaron; Reed, Julian

    2004-01-01

    This article offers readers ideas for using mass media to enhance their physical education program. Generally, media is the term used to define the way in communicating with a large number of people. Technically, media is divided into two categories: print and film (electronic). Print (journals, newspapers, books, etc.) is "put to paper" to create…

  17. More mind wandering, fewer original ideas: be not distracted during creative idea generation.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ning; Wu, Mengxia; Runco, Mark A; Pina, Jeremy

    2015-10-01

    Several studies suggest that mind wandering (MW) benefits creativity when the MW occurs in the incubation period of creative problem solving. The aim of present study was to examine the effects of MW that occurs in the course of creative idea generation. Participants received an Alternative Uses Task (AUT) and were asked to generate ideas for 20min. Their MW frequencies as time passed were measured by means of probe-caught MW. Comparisons of the AUT performances of high and low MW groups revealed that greater MW was associated with lower fluency and originality scores on the AUT. Furthermore, the high MW group showed greater MW as time passed, while the low MW group's MW was steady during the course of idea generation. Accordingly, the originality of idea generation decreased with time passing for the high MW group but was steady for the low MW group. The findings suggest that the MW during the course of creative idea generation is negatively related to creativity, perhaps because the control processes involved in idea generation are impaired by the mind wandering.

  18. Everyday Creativity: Spaces and Places for Ideas to Flourish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Paula Jorde; Hentschel, Ann

    2012-01-01

    In an era of early learning standards, packaged curriculums, and state quality rating systems, many directors lament that the accountability movement has sapped the creativity out of their programs. They say their teachers feel constricted, as though their own good ideas just don't matter anymore. Not true. In fact, it's more vital than ever to…

  19. Creative learning ideas from around the U.S.

    PubMed

    Pilcher, Jobeth

    Moving education away from a teacher-centered “sage on the stage” approach to learner-centered methodologies in which the instructor is more like a “guide on the side” enhances learning and retention of material. When preparing educational materials, nurse educators should focus on engaging learners, stimulating multiples senses, and taking steps to make learning fun. The innovative teaching strategies presented here have hopefully stimulated creative thinking among both educators and learners. Thank you to the nurses who were willing to share their creative ideas in this column.

  20. The Intermediate Impossible: A Prewriting Activity for Creative Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karloff, Kenneth

    1985-01-01

    Adapts Edward de Bono's "Intermediate Impossible" strategy--for considering ideas that normally would be discarded as stepping-stones to new ideas--for use as a prewriting activity to enhance creative problem solving. (HTH)

  1. Inhibitory Control as a Core Process of Creative Problem Solving and Idea Generation from Childhood to Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassotti, Mathieu; Agogué, Marine; Camarda, Anaëlle; Houdé, Olivier; Borst, Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Developmental cognitive neuroscience studies tend to show that the prefrontal brain regions (known to be involved in inhibitory control) are activated during the generation of creative ideas. In the present article, we discuss how a dual-process model of creativity--much like the ones proposed to account for decision making and reasoning--could…

  2. The neural coding of creative idea generation across adolescence and early adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Kleibeuker, Sietske W.; Koolschijn, P. Cédric M. P.; Jolles, Dietsje D.; De Dreu, Carsten K. W.; Crone, Eveline A.

    2013-01-01

    Creativity is considered key to human prosperity, yet the neurocognitive principles underlying creative performance, and their development, are still poorly understood. To fill this void, we examined the neural correlates of divergent thinking in adults (25–30 years) and adolescents (15–17 years). Participants generated alternative uses (AU) or ordinary characteristics (OC) for common objects while brain activity was assessed using fMRI. Adults outperformed adolescents on the number of solutions for AU and OC trials. Contrasting neural activity for AU with OC trials revealed increased recruitment of left angular gyrus, left supramarginal gyrus, and bilateral middle temporal gyrus in both adults and adolescents. When only trials with multiple AU were included in the analysis, participants showed additional left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG)/middle frontal gyrus (MFG) activation for AU compared to OC trials. Correspondingly, individual difference analyses showed a positive correlation between activations for AU relative to OC trials in left IFG/MFG and divergent thinking performance and activations were more pronounced in adults than in adolescents. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrated that creative idea generation involves recruitment of mainly left lateralized parietal and temporal brain regions. Generating multiple creative ideas, a hallmark of divergent thinking, shows additional lateral PFC activation that is not yet optimized in adolescence. PMID:24416008

  3. Give your ideas some legs: the positive effect of walking on creative thinking.

    PubMed

    Oppezzo, Marily; Schwartz, Daniel L

    2014-07-01

    Four experiments demonstrate that walking boosts creative ideation in real time and shortly after. In Experiment 1, while seated and then when walking on a treadmill, adults completed Guilford's alternate uses (GAU) test of creative divergent thinking and the compound remote associates (CRA) test of convergent thinking. Walking increased 81% of participants' creativity on the GAU, but only increased 23% of participants' scores for the CRA. In Experiment 2, participants completed the GAU when seated and then walking, when walking and then seated, or when seated twice. Again, walking led to higher GAU scores. Moreover, when seated after walking, participants exhibited a residual creative boost. Experiment 3 generalized the prior effects to outdoor walking. Experiment 4 tested the effect of walking on creative analogy generation. Participants sat inside, walked on a treadmill inside, walked outside, or were rolled outside in a wheelchair. Walking outside produced the most novel and highest quality analogies. The effects of outdoor stimulation and walking were separable. Walking opens up the free flow of ideas, and it is a simple and robust solution to the goals of increasing creativity and increasing physical activity.

  4. Effects of Problem Scope and Creativity Instructions on Idea Generation and Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rietzschel, Eric F.; Nijstad, Bernard A.; Stroebe, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The basic assumption of brainstorming is that increased quantity of ideas results in increased generation as well as selection of creative ideas. Although previous research suggests that idea quantity correlates strongly with the number of good ideas generated, quantity has been found to be unrelated to the quality of selected ideas. This article…

  5. Physical Activity Benefits Creativity: Squeezing a Ball for Enhancing Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, JongHan

    2015-01-01

    Studies in embodied cognition show that physical sensations, such as touch and movement, influence cognitive processes. Two studies were conducted to test whether squeezing a soft versus a hard ball facilitates different types of creativity. Squeezing a malleable ball would increase divergent creativity by catalyzing multiple or alternative ideas,…

  6. Does Generating Multiple Ideas Lead to Increased Creativity? A Comparison of Generating One Idea vs. Many

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiter-Palmon, Roni; Arreola, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings in creativity research suggest that how creativity is operationalized may have a profound influence on theories of creative production. In this study, two paradigms--divergent thinking and creative problem solving--were compared on several indices of creativity while keeping the problem constant. Participants were students from a…

  7. Creative Exercises for Cultivation of Creative Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoba, Toshio; An, Hiroshi; Ozasa, Toshihiro; Masutani, Yasuhiro; Mori, Koji; Yasutomi, Masanori; Yoshida, Haruyuki

    Creative Exercise” is one of the most important articles in the course of technology educations at the universities and the colleges. In this paper, some trials for the creative exercises developed in Osaka Electro-Communication University are introduced ; those are (1) exercises in “Creative Design Engineering”, (2) studies and educations on robots, (3) executive plan of rescue-robot contest, and (4) supporting system for application for the qualifying examinations. Their results and effectiveness are also discussed.

  8. Expertise in Musical Improvisation and Creativity: The Mediation of Idea Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Kleinmintz, Oded M.; Goldstein, Pavel; Mayseless, Naama; Abecasis, Donna; Shamay-Tsoory, Simone G.

    2014-01-01

    The current study explored the influence of musical expertise, and specifically training in improvisation on creativity, using the framework of the twofold model, according to which creativity involves a process of idea generation and idea evaluation. Based on the hypothesis that a strict evaluation phase may have an inhibiting effect over the generation phase, we predicted that training in improvisation may have a “releasing effect” on the evaluation system, leading to greater creativity. To examine this hypothesis, we compared performance among three groups - musicians trained in improvisation, musicians not trained in improvisation, and non-musicians - on divergent thinking tasks and on their evaluation of creativity. The improvisation group scored higher on fluency and originality compared to the other two groups. Among the musicians, evaluation of creativity mediated how experience in improvisation was related to originality and fluency scores. It is concluded that deliberate practice of improvisation may have a “releasing effect” on creativity. PMID:25010334

  9. Expertise in musical improvisation and creativity: the mediation of idea evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kleinmintz, Oded M; Goldstein, Pavel; Mayseless, Naama; Abecasis, Donna; Shamay-Tsoory, Simone G

    2014-01-01

    The current study explored the influence of musical expertise, and specifically training in improvisation on creativity, using the framework of the twofold model, according to which creativity involves a process of idea generation and idea evaluation. Based on the hypothesis that a strict evaluation phase may have an inhibiting effect over the generation phase, we predicted that training in improvisation may have a "releasing effect" on the evaluation system, leading to greater creativity. To examine this hypothesis, we compared performance among three groups--musicians trained in improvisation, musicians not trained in improvisation, and non-musicians--on divergent thinking tasks and on their evaluation of creativity. The improvisation group scored higher on fluency and originality compared to the other two groups. Among the musicians, evaluation of creativity mediated how experience in improvisation was related to originality and fluency scores. It is concluded that deliberate practice of improvisation may have a "releasing effect" on creativity.

  10. Does leader-affective presence influence communication of creative ideas within work teams?

    PubMed

    Madrid, Hector P; Totterdell, Peter; Niven, Karen

    2016-09-01

    Affective presence is a novel, emotion-related personality trait, supported in experimental studies, concerning the extent to which a person makes his or her interaction partners feel the same way (Eisenkraft & Elfenbein, 2010). Applying this concept to an applied teamwork context, we proposed that team-leader-affective presence would influence team members' communication of creative ideas. Multilevel modeling analysis of data from a survey study conducted with teams from a consultancy firm confirmed that team-leader-affective presence interacted with team-member creative idea generation to predict inhibition of voicing their ideas. Specifically, withholding of ideas was less likely when team members generated creative ideas and their team leader had higher positive affective presence or lower negative affective presence. These findings contribute to emotion research by showing affective presence as a trait with interpersonal meaning, which can shape how cognition is translated into social behavior in applied performance contexts, such as teamwork in organizations. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. Interaction effect of response medium and working memory capacity on creative idea generation

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ning; Yuan, Huan; Cheng, Rui; Wang, Qing; Runco, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the interaction effect of response medium (i.e., write down ideas and orally report ideas) and working memory capacity (WMC) on creative idea generation. Participants (N = 90) with higher or lower WMC were asked to solve Alternative Uses Task (AUT) problems in the condition of writing down or speaking out ideas. The results showed that fluency of AUT performance was higher in the writing than in the speaking condition. Additionally, participants with higher WMC performed better on AUT fluency than those with lower WMC in the writing condition, while they showed no difference in the speaking condition. Moreover, level of cognitive demand fully mediated the effect of response medium on AUT fluency. Theoretically, these findings indicated the importance of WMC in creative idea generation, which supported the controlled-attention theory of creativity. Practical implications and future directions were discussed. PMID:26528227

  12. A Creative Teacher's Innovative-Mind-Expanding Vertebrate Project Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Faye H.

    1981-01-01

    The article provides a collection of teaching ideas about vertebrate animals. Ideas include making a poem book about a group of animals, rhyming words with animal names, and finding animal names in a puzzle. (DB)

  13. Idea Bank: Assessing Your Curriculum with the Creative Rights Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thibeault, Matthew D.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a creative rights pyramid that was developed as part of the author's efforts to: (1) teach about copyright and intellectual property; and (2) increase students' awareness of their own intellectual property in and outside the music classroom. The pyramid is based on the U.S. Department of Agriculture's food pyramid to suggest…

  14. Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiely, Joyce

    1998-01-01

    Presents an interview with Allen Schoer, CEO of TAI Resources, regarding his definition of creativity, what stimulates individual creativity, what makes it grow, and how his experiences and ideas can be applied in any classroom for an effective learning experience. (VWC)

  15. Creative Reading Activities for the Middle Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quackenbush, Sylva

    The purpose of creative activities in the classroom and the part creativity should have in the reading program are discussed. Both the gifted and not-so-gifted child can be motivated, challenged, and provided with enriching experiences through creative activities planned and encouraged by a resourceful teacher. Suggestions given include the…

  16. High-School Students Believe School Physics Helps in Developing Logical but Not Creative Thinking: Active Learning Can Change This Idea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marušic, Mirko; Sliško, Josip

    2014-01-01

    This study is based on two exploratory questions with the aim of determining the relative effectiveness of two different student activities, called "Reading, Presenting and Questioning" (RPQ) and "Experimenting and Discussing" (ED), in changing students' perceptions and attitudes about the impact of physics learning on the…

  17. Cluster Concept Dynamics Leading to Creative Ideas Without Critical Slowing Down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldenberg, Y.; Solomon, S.; Mazursky, D.

    We present algorithmic procedures for generating systematically ideas and solutions to problems which are perceived as creative. Our method consists of identifying and characterizing the most creative ideas among a vast pool. We show that they fall within a few large classes (archetypes) which share the same conceptual structure (Macros). We prescribe well defined abstract algorithms which can act deterministically on arbitrary given objects. Each algorithm generates ideas with the same conceptual structure characteristic to one of the Macros. The resulting new ideas turn out to be perceived as highly creative. We support our claims by experiments in which senior advertising professionals graded advertisement ideas produced by our method according to their creativity. The marks (grade 4.6±0.2 on a 1-7 scale) obtained by laymen applying our algorithms (after being instructed for only two hours) were significantly better than the marks obtained by advertising professionals using standard methods (grade 3.6±0.2)). The method, which is currently taught in USA, Europe, and Israel and used by advertising agencies in Britain and Israel has received formal international recognition.

  18. The Effects of Domain Knowledge and Instructional Manipulation on Creative Idea Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hao, Ning

    2010-01-01

    The experiment was designed to explore the effects of domain knowledge, instructional manipulation, and the interaction between them on creative idea generation. Three groups of participants who respectively possessed the domain knowledge of biology, sports, or neither were asked to finish two tasks: imagining an extraterrestrial animal and…

  19. Repurposing "Lost," Discarded, or Forgotten Objects into a "Found" Treasure Trove of Creative Writing Instructional Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Through her years as an elementary teacher and now a university professor in teacher education, the author has developed many creative writing instructional ideas for use with all learners (i.e., elementary through graduate level). Resourcefulness and imaginative thinking proves invaluable to teaching artists' pedagogy in current economic…

  20. Emotional Creativity and Real-Life Involvement in Different Types of Creative Leisure Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trnka, Radek; Zahradnik, Martin; Kuška, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The role of emotional creativity in practicing creative leisure activities and in the preference of college majors remains unknown. This study aims to explore how emotional creativity measured by the Emotional Creativity Inventory (ECI; Averill, 1999) is interrelated with the real-life involvement in different types of specific creative leisure…

  1. [I.M. Sechenov's creative development of ideas in aviation and space medicine].

    PubMed

    Ushakov, I B; Bukhtiiarov, I V; Shishov, A A

    2011-07-01

    Research carried outby the great Russian scholar I. M. Sechenov has significantly contributed to development of aviation physiology, medicine and psychology. His fundamental works consisted of discovery of the constancy of alveolar air composition theory, study of interactions of analyzers systems in solving the problem of human spatial orientation under flight conditions, development of a nervous theory of fatigue. Creative development of ideas by I. M. Sechenov allowed enhancing the efficiency of performing and safety of aviation and space flights.

  2. Resource of Creative and Inventive Activities! First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Elizabeth, Comp.; Molotsky, Leonard, Comp.

    This guide encourages a learning environment that allows for creativity. Creative theory, assessment, and talent identification information is given. Student activities are presented to encourage creative problem solving, dispel myths and misunderstandings about creativity, provide exercises in brainstorming, creative thinking, and making cross…

  3. Exploring creative activity: a software environment for multimedia systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrett, Peter W.; Jardine, David A.

    1992-03-01

    This paper examines various issues related to the theory, design, and implementation of a system that supports creative activity for a multimedia environment. The system incorporates artificial intelligence notions to acquire concepts of the problem domain. This paper investigates this environment by considering a model that is a basis for a system, which supports a history of user interaction. A multimedia system that supports creative activity is problematic. It must function as a tool allowing users to experiment dynamically with their own creative reasoning process--a very nebulous task environment. It should also support the acquisition of domain knowledge so that empirical observation can be further evaluated. This paper aims to illustrate that via the reuse of domain-specific knowledge, closely related ideas can be quickly developed. This approach is useful in the following sense: Multimedia navigational systems hardcode referential links with respect to a web or network. Although users can access or control navigation in a nonlinear (static) manner, these referential links are 'frozen' and can not capture their creative actions, which are essential in tutoring or learning applications. This paper describes a multimedia assistant based on the notion of knowledge- links, which allows users to navigate through creative information in a nonlinear (dynamic) fashion. A selection of prototype code based on object-oriented techniques and logic programming partially demonstrates this.

  4. Physical activity: practice this idea

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Guilherme Veiga; Ciolac, Emmanuel Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Sedentary habits or insufficient activities to promote health benefits can influence the occurrence of chronic diseases. The cardiovascular risk factors arise, at least partially, from the individual-environment interaction during life, and worsen with aging and lack of physical exercise. Health promotion and prevention are among the greatest challenges of public health policies. However, physical activity turns out to be rarely recommended and, thus have a very poor adhesion. In spite of consensus about the benefits of physical activity in both primary and secondary prevention, only 32% of adults and 66% of children and adolescents, according to Healthy People 2010 guideline, practice leisure-time physical activity. Thus, the regular practice of physical activity and healthy habits require changes in basic concepts in government and social policies. The higher involvement of public and private sectors related to health and education, the more expressive would be the reduction in socioeconomic costs and the improvement in quality of life. PMID:24551484

  5. The role of (dis)inhibition in creativity: decreased inhibition improves idea generation.

    PubMed

    Radel, Rémi; Davranche, Karen; Fournier, Marion; Dietrich, Arne

    2015-01-01

    There is now a large body of evidence showing that many different conditions related to impaired fronto-executive functioning are associated with the enhancement of some types of creativity. In this paper, we pursue the possibility that the central mechanism associated with this effect might be a reduced capacity to exert inhibition. We tested this hypothesis by exhausting the inhibition efficiency through prolonged and intensive practice of either the Simon or the Eriksen Flanker task. Performance on another inhibition task indicated that only the cognitive resources for inhibition of participants facing high inhibition demands were impaired. Subsequent creativity tests revealed that exposure to high inhibition demands led to enhanced fluency in a divergent thinking task (Alternate Uses Task), but no such changes occurred in a convergent task (Remote Associate Task; studies 1a and 1b). The same manipulation also led to a hyper-priming effect for weakly related primes in a Lexical Decision Task (Study 2). Together, these findings suggest that inhibition selectively affects some types of creative processes and that, when resources for inhibition are lacking, the frequency and the originality of ideas was facilitated.

  6. Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazik, Edna F.; Tucker, Benny F.

    1983-01-01

    Two posters that involve digits and number activities designed to provide motivational activities for students are presented. It is thought the posters can be used to introduce some ideas from elementary number theory. Both primary objectives and possible instructional extensions are reviewed. (Author/MP)

  7. Where do bright ideas occur in our brain? Meta-analytic evidence from neuroimaging studies of domain-specific creativity

    PubMed Central

    Boccia, Maddalena; Piccardi, Laura; Palermo, Liana; Nori, Raffaella; Palmiero, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have assessed the neural underpinnings of creativity, failing to find a clear anatomical localization. We aimed to provide evidence for a multi-componential neural system for creativity. We applied a general activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis to 45 fMRI studies. Three individual ALE analyses were performed to assess creativity in different cognitive domains (Musical, Verbal, and Visuo-spatial). The general ALE revealed that creativity relies on clusters of activations in the bilateral occipital, parietal, frontal, and temporal lobes. The individual ALE revealed different maximal activation in different domains. Musical creativity yields activations in the bilateral medial frontal gyrus, in the left cingulate gyrus, middle frontal gyrus, and inferior parietal lobule and in the right postcentral and fusiform gyri. Verbal creativity yields activations mainly located in the left hemisphere, in the prefrontal cortex, middle and superior temporal gyri, inferior parietal lobule, postcentral and supramarginal gyri, middle occipital gyrus, and insula. The right inferior frontal gyrus and the lingual gyrus were also activated. Visuo-spatial creativity activates the right middle and inferior frontal gyri, the bilateral thalamus and the left precentral gyrus. This evidence suggests that creativity relies on multi-componential neural networks and that different creativity domains depend on different brain regions. PMID:26322002

  8. Mathematical Creative Activity and the Graphic Calculator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duda, Janina

    2011-01-01

    Teaching mathematics using graphic calculators has been an issue of didactic discussions for years. Finding ways in which graphic calculators can enrich the development process of creative activity in mathematically gifted students between the ages of 16-17 is the focus of this article. Research was conducted using graphic calculators with…

  9. Scaffolding for Creative Product Possibilities in a Design-Based STEM Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathcock, Stephanie J.; Dickerson, Daniel L.; Eckhoff, Angela; Katsioloudis, Petros

    2015-10-01

    Creativity can and should play a role in students' science experiences. Beghetto (Roeper Review 29(4):265-270, 2007) suggested a framework for teachers to assist students in transforming their creative ideas into creative products. This framework involves taking time to listen to students' ideas, helping them recognize the constraints of a task, and giving them multiple opportunities to think through and try their ideas. Ill-structured problems, such as those found in inquiry and engineering design activities, provide excellent opportunities for students to experience creative processing and express their creativity through product creation. These types of problems are typically challenging, but the use of appropriate questioning has been shown to assist students in solving problems. This multiple case study investigated the use of inquiry-based questioning as a means of supporting creativity within a design-based science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) activity. Findings suggest that groups facilitated by inquiry-based questioning strategies were better able to solve an ill-structured problem and achieved a more linear progression toward creative products than groups who were not facilitated by inquiry-based questions.

  10. Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fennell, Francis (Skip); And Others

    1982-01-01

    A variety of ideas for working with money are presented. Activities provide experience in counting nickels and dimes, counting money and making change, determining sale prices by computing the percentage off a base or regular price, and keeping a record of current balances in checking and savings accounts. (MP)

  11. Looking for Creativity: Where Do We Look When We Look for New Ideas?

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Carola; Bowden, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work using the eye movement monitoring technique has demonstrated that when people are engaged in thought they tend to disengage from the external world by blinking or fixating on an empty portion of the visual field, such as a blank wall, or out the window at the sky. This ‘looking at nothing’ behavior has been observed during thinking that does not explicitly involve visual imagery (mind wandering, insight in problem solving, memory encoding and search) and it is associated with reduced analysis of the external visual environment. Thus, it appears to indicate (and likely facilitate) a shift of attention from external to internal stimuli that benefits creativity and problem solving by reducing the cognitive load and enhancing attention to internally evolving activation. We briefly mention some possible reasons to collect eye movement data in future studies of creativity. PMID:26913018

  12. Teaching a Course on Creativity in Counseling: Ideas for Counselor Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Allison L.

    2011-01-01

    The benefits of creativity in counseling have been proclaimed by authors; however, training on creativity is sparse. Some literature exists on ways to implement a course on creativity in counseling, and certain counseling programs have incorporated classes and workshops on creativity in master's-level counseling programs. Still, there has been a…

  13. Student Technological Creativity Using Online Problem-Solving Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yu-Shan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of online (web-based) creative problem-solving (CPS) activities on student technological creativity and to examine the characteristics of student creativity in the context of online CPS. A pretest-posttest quasi-experiment was conducted with 107 fourth-grade students in Taiwan. The…

  14. Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, James C.; Sternberg, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Creativity is sometimes seen as irrelevant to educational practice. With an increased focus on standardized test scores, creative teachers and those who encourage creativity in the classroom often are accused of being idealists or missing the big picture. But the authors believe instead that creativity brings valuable benefits to the classroom. In…

  15. Use of creative activities in occupational therapy practice in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Müllersdorf, Maria; Ivarsson, Ann Britt

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of creative activities in occupational therapy in Sweden and how often Swedish occupational therapists use creative activities as a means of intervention. A web-mail survey was sent to 2975 Swedish occupational therapists working in health care at regional, county council or primary health care level, and those working in vocational rehabilitation. A total of 1867 (63%) answered the questionnaire and showed that 44% did use creative activities as a means of intervention and most often by practitioners working in psychiatric health care. The most commonly used form of creative activity was arts and crafts followed by gardening. This web-mail survey was based on a limited amount of items regarding creative activities. Further research should focus on in-depth inquiries about how occupational therapists and their patients perceive the use of creative activities as a means of treatment in occupational therapy.

  16. Activities and Accomplishments in Various Domains: Relationships with Creative Personality and Creative Motivation in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Eunsook; Peng, Yun; O'Neil, Harold F., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined relationships between five personal traits and adolescents' creative activities and accomplishments in five domains--music, visual arts, creative writing, science, and technology. Participants were 439 tenth graders (220 males and 219 females) in China. The relationships were examined using confirmatory factor analysis.…

  17. Give Your Ideas Some Legs: The Positive Effect of Walking on Creative Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppezzo, Marily; Schwartz, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Four experiments demonstrate that walking boosts creative ideation in real time and shortly after. In Experiment 1, while seated and then when walking on a treadmill, adults completed Guilford's alternate uses (GAU) test of creative divergent thinking and the compound remote associates (CRA) test of convergent thinking. Walking increased 81% of…

  18. Creative Disciplines Education: A Model for Assessing Ideas in Entrepreneurship Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Charlotte; Matlay, Harry

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to explore how creative disciplines education is taught, delivered, and assessed, and how this might inform the development of enterprise education UK. Design/methodology/approach: The paper makes use of empirical data from three main sources across creative disciplines: interviews with entrepreneurs; job adverts…

  19. Scaffolding for Creative Product Possibilities in a Design-Based STEM Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathcock, Stephanie J.; Dickerson, Daniel L.; Eckhoff, Angela; Katsioloudis, Petros

    2015-01-01

    Creativity can and should play a role in students' science experiences. Beghetto ("Roeper Review" 29(4):265-270, 2007) suggested a framework for teachers to assist students in transforming their creative ideas into creative products. This framework involves taking time to listen to students' ideas, helping them recognize the constraints…

  20. Piano Playing Reduces Stress More than Other Creative Art Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toyoshima, Kumiko; Fukui, Hajime; Kuda, Kiyoto

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have been conducted on the physiological effects of creative art activities. In this study, the effects of creative art activities on human stress were investigated, and their effects were compared in 57 healthy college students (27 males and 30 females). Subjects were divided into four groups, each of which participated in 30-minute…

  1. Creative Activity in Conception of Sustainable Development Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slahova, Aleksandra; Savvina, Jolanta; Cacka, Maris; Volonte, Ilze

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the stages in the development of creative activity considering the distinctive features of all stages and the modes of dynamics of the development of a creative person. Design/methodology/approach: The paper analyses scientific investigations and pedagogical experiences in order to develop the…

  2. Practice Led Research: Creative Activity, Academic Debate, and Intellectual Rigour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Josie

    2012-01-01

    By focussing on PhD supervision as well as creativity, this paper explores how the artefact and exegesis PhD offers an opportunity to bring creative activity together with academic debate and intellectual rigour. In this context, the latter does not justify the former nor interpret it in an academic and theoretical way. Rather, acting together,…

  3. From Rhetoric to Reality: Designing Activities to Foster Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cropley, David H.

    2014-01-01

    As teachers strive to make sense of and implement knowledge of creativity that is available from the research community, school librarians are called upon to help turn rhetoric into reality. Developing the creativity habit is far more meaningful and effective if the classroom activity is representative of the real-world problem-solving process.…

  4. Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prouty, Dick

    2000-01-01

    Creativity is valued increasingly in business and education. Humor, fun, and play take the brain from a cognitive, rule-bound state to a more fluid state where the whole body can work on a problem while the "thinking mind" is relaxed. Vignettes demonstrate how adventure education stimulates creativity through play, fun, humor, and…

  5. The Art of Scientific Ideas: Teaching and Learning Strategies that Promote Creative Problem Finding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaBanca, Frank; Ritchie, Krista C.

    2011-01-01

    Problem solving is a valuable skill in the science classroom. Students often use a variety of inquiry strategies to identify problems and their implications; develop action plans; locate relevant sources, information, and data; and formulate solutions. Problem solving is a logical, analytical, and sometimes creative process. The less tangible,…

  6. Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Immerzeel, George; Wiederanders, Don

    1974-01-01

    Four ideas are presented, each a variation of the tic-tac-toe game. Recognizing three addends is the goal of the primary level game; experiences with basic facts and fractions are objectives for upper levels. Each worksheet includes objectives, directions, and comments. (LS)

  7. Good Ideas: An Activity Book for Early Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Jamie, Comp.; And Others

    Presented are descriptions of 245 activities for use with young handicapped children. The activities, compiled by teachers in the Austin Early Childhood Special Education Program, are grouped according to the following 12 areas: pre-academic, language, science, perceptual, motor, games, music and creative expression, social-emotional, arts and…

  8. Creative motivation: creative achievement predicts cardiac autonomic markers of effort during divergent thinking.

    PubMed

    Silvia, Paul J; Beaty, Roger E; Nusbaum, Emily C; Eddington, Kari M; Kwapil, Thomas R

    2014-10-01

    Executive approaches to creativity emphasize that generating creative ideas can be hard and requires mental effort. Few studies, however, have examined effort-related physiological activity during creativity tasks. Using motivational intensity theory as a framework, we examined predictors of effort-related cardiac activity during a creative challenge. A sample of 111 adults completed a divergent thinking task. Sympathetic (PEP and RZ) and parasympathetic (RSA and RMSSD) outcomes were assessed using impedance cardiography. As predicted, people with high creative achievement (measured with the Creative Achievement Questionnaire) showed significantly greater increases in sympathetic activity from baseline to task, reflecting higher effort. People with more creative achievements generated ideas that were significantly more creative, and creative performance correlated marginally with PEP and RZ. The results support the view that creative thought can be a mental challenge.

  9. Designing Movement Activities to Develop Children's Creativity in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Rebecca Hun Ping

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the introduction of creative movement activity in three Hong Kong kindergartens to promote children's creativity. The purposes of the study were to examine the effectiveness of creative movement activity in promoting children's creativity and teachers' perceptions of the activities. The movement activities were designed…

  10. Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arithmetic Teacher, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Activities are presented that focus on attributes of numbers. The activities highlight such attributes as more than, equal to, greater than, less than, LCM, prime and factor. The activities provide practice in motivational game-oriented situations. (RH)

  11. Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Jean M.

    1993-01-01

    Focuses on connections between mathematics and environmental concerns. Activities were designed to make students aware of, and increase their knowledge of, the various materials people ordinarily use and discard and ways to use materials more conservatively. Each activity includes data gathering, graphing, and interpreting data. Activity sheets…

  12. Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Marcy

    1989-01-01

    Provided are four activities focusing on the application of mathematics to real-world situations: (1) Baby Weight; (2) High Temperature; (3) Skin Weight; and (4) Whale Weight. Each activity contains the objective, directions, extensions, and answers with worksheet. The activities required include the skills of making charts and graphs. (YP)

  13. IDEAS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Carne S.

    1991-01-01

    Four activities are described which focus on consumer awareness and judgment using data collection and judgment skills involving data from footwear. Worksheets for data collection and activities at home and at school are included. A set of ratings of sneakers from "Consumer Reports" magazine is provided. (CW)

  14. Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Martha H.; Gard, Diane M.

    1992-01-01

    Describes 4 activities for levels K-2, 3-5, 4-6, and 6-8 and a family activity that asks students to describe their community; use coordinates to represent the 4 voyages of Columbus; write a story based on a line graph of Lewis and Clark's expedition; determine serving sizes for astronauts in space; and investigate different modes of…

  15. Student Engagement in Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity (SERSCA) Program: Sharing a Program Model from Design and Development through Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Shawna; Uy, Ana; Bell, Joyce

    2017-01-01

    The Student Engagement in Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity (SERSCA) Program at California State University, Stanislaus provides support for student engagement in these areas from idea conception through dissemination. Through assistantships, mini-grants, the Student Research Competition, and travel grants, the Program is designed to…

  16. IDEAS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, George W.

    1977-01-01

    Four activities concerning addition and subtraction are described. They range in appropriate grade level from K-2 (crossing out objects) to 6-8 (solving decimal inequalities). Masters for worksheets are provided. (SD)

  17. IDEAS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Sharon L.

    1991-01-01

    Presented are activities that focus on gathering, using, and interpreting data about fingerprints as a basis for integrating mathematics and science. Patterns, classification, logical reasoning, and mathematical relationships are explored by making graphs, classifying fingerprints, and matching identical fingerprints. A parent-involvement activity…

  18. Enhancement of figural creativity by motor activation: effects of unilateral hand contractions on creativity are moderated by positive schizotypy.

    PubMed

    Rominger, Christian; Papousek, Ilona; Fink, Andreas; Weiss, Elisabeth M

    2014-01-01

    Creativity is an important trait necessary to achieve innovations in science, economy, arts and daily life. Therefore, the enhancement of creative performance is a significant field of investigation. A recent experiment showed enhanced verbal creativity after unilateral left-hand contractions, which was attributed to elevated activation of the right hemisphere. The present study aimed to extend these findings to the domain of figural creativity. Furthermore, as creativity and positive schizotypy may share some neurobiological underpinnings associated with the right hemisphere, we studied the potential moderating effect of positive schizotypy on the effects of the experimental modification of relative hemispheric activation on creativity. In a gender-balanced sample (20 men and 20 women), squeezing a hand gripper with the left hand enhanced figural creativity on the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking compared to squeezing the gripper with the right hand. However, this was only true when positive schizotypy was low. The moderating effect of schizotypy may be produced by relatively greater activity of certain parts of the right hemisphere being a shared neuronal correlate of creativity and positive schizotypy.

  19. Psychological and Pedagogic Conditions of Activating Creative Activity in Students for Successful Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abykanova, Bakytgul; Bilyalova, Zhupar; Makhatova, Valentina; Idrissov, Salamat; Nugumanov, Samal

    2016-01-01

    Creative activity of a pedagogic process subject depends on the pedagogue's position, on his faith in the abilities to learn successfully, on encouragement of achievements, stimulating the initiative and activity. Successful learning by activating creative activity is possible with the presence of respectful attitude towards the pedagogic process…

  20. Movement to Music: Ten Activities that Foster Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludowise, Kathleen Duck

    1985-01-01

    Describes 10 activities teachers can use to introduce music and movement which foster individual creative expression. The movement in each activity, ordered by level of difficulty, focuses elementary-age students' attention on one of three specific musical concepts: steady beat, tempo, and meter. (DST)

  1. Preservice Teachers' Personality Traits and Engagement in Creative Activities as Predictors of Their Support for Children's Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Il Rang; Kemple, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine relationships among preservice teachers' personality traits, their own engagement in creative activities, and their beliefs about the teaching practices that have been shown to support children's creativity. A total of 302 early childhood and elementary preservice teachers participated in this study. The…

  2. Supporting Creativity in School Libraries: Finding, Sharing, and Connecting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Techman, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Creativity is about openness and connection, it signals the chance to get ideas, share ideas, and try new things or put together old things in new ways. Libraries have always had the potential to source and support creative activities. Public library events and opportunities bring together people, ideas, and stuff (whether fabric, paint, wood,…

  3. [About creativity].

    PubMed

    Rubia Vila, Francisco José

    2006-01-01

    The term 'creativity', meaning to produce something out of nothing, is not accurate. A definition that included the establishment, the founding or the introduction of something anew for the first time would be rather appropiate. The most accurate interpretation of the creativity process is the one proposed by Alfred Rothenberg which establishes the hypothesis that creativity is due to what he calls a 'janusian thinking' characterized by conceiving simultaneously two or more opposed ideas, images or concepts. Two examples illustrate such way of thinking: one is Einstein's General Theory of Relativity and the other is Darwin's Theory of Natural Selection. The overcome of a dualistic thinking while keeping full consciousnees, that is, the utilization of both the primary and the secondary processes postulated by Freud, would be the key to creative thinking. From a neurophysiological point of view, it is very likely that the right hemisphere is rather connected to creativity, given that it is a mental state that requires non-focalized attention, greater right hemisphere activation, and low levels of prefrontal cortical activation allowing cognitive inhibition.

  4. Another Way to Develop Chinese Students' Creativity: Extracurricular Innovation Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao-jiang, Zhao; Xue-ting, Zhao

    2012-01-01

    In China, improving students' creativity is becoming an important goal of modern colleges and universities, especially in the domain of science and technology. The efforts made for this goal can be observed not only in classroom, but also in activities and competitions which were held out-of-school. This paper will firstly give a brief description…

  5. Creativity in the English Class: Activities to Promote EFL Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avila, Hernán A.

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces a pedagogical intervention that includes a set of creative activities designed to improve the oral and written production of students in the English classroom, especially those who have shown a lack of interest or attention. It was observed that participants initially seemed careless about studying the language. Eventually…

  6. Singaporean Teachers' Perception of Activities Useful for Fostering Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Ai-Girl

    2001-01-01

    This study asked 95 beginning and 116 experienced elementary teachers in Singapore to rate the usefulness of 33 learning activities for fostering creativity. Three clusters were identified. About two thirds of the experienced teachers' and one fifth of the beginning teachers' ratings indicated little differentiated preference among learning…

  7. Sand and Water Play: Simple, Creative Activities for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Sherrie; Cox, Amy

    Based on the view that creative play and hands-on experiences are essential to the development of well-balanced children and that their teachers have the responsibility to create an environment that can stimulate children's senses and curiosity, this book provides activities incorporating the use of sand and water tables into the classroom on a…

  8. Frontopolar activity and connectivity support dynamic conscious augmentation of creative state.

    PubMed

    Green, Adam E; Cohen, Michael S; Raab, Hillary A; Yedibalian, Christopher G; Gray, Jeremy R

    2015-03-01

    No ability is more valued in the modern innovation-fueled economy than thinking creatively on demand, and the "thinking cap" capacity to augment state creativity (i.e., to try and succeed at thinking more creatively) is of broad importance for education and a rich mental life. Although brain-based creativity research has focused on static individual differences in trait creativity, less is known about changes in creative state within an individual. How does the brain augment state creativity when creative thinking is required? Can augmented creative state be consciously engaged and disengaged dynamically across time? Using a novel "thin slice" creativity paradigm in 55 fMRI participants performing verb-generation, we successfully cued large, conscious, short-duration increases in state creativity, indexed quantitatively by a measure of semantic distance derived via latent semantic analysis. A region of left frontopolar cortex, previously associated with creative integration of semantic information, exhibited increased activity and functional connectivity to anterior cingulate gyrus and right frontopolar cortex during cued augmentation of state creativity. Individual differences in the extent of increased activity in this region predicted individual differences in the extent to which participants were able to successfully augment state creative performance after accounting for trait creativity and intelligence.

  9. Fun and Creative Unit Assessment Ideas for All Students in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fencl, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Although traditional methods of assessment--such as rubrics, checklists, skill tests, and quizzes--have long been viable methods of evaluation in physical education, they may at times seem boring or overwhelming. Yet, assessment can be as fun and interesting as the activities that are taught in physical education, and can help to increase…

  10. Teaching Ideas. Potpourri 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Marilyn, Ed.

    This publication contains a collection of teaching ideas and class activities for organization, journals, dictation, creative writing, outlines, poetry, vocabulary, film review word cards, paragraphing, career research and much more. Some of the materials, listed with their authors, include: (1) "Magazine Board" (Frieda Owen); (2)…

  11. Embodied metaphors and creative "acts".

    PubMed

    Leung, Angela K Y; Kim, Suntae; Polman, Evan; Ong, Lay See; Qiu, Lin; Goncalo, Jack A; Sanchez-Burks, Jeffrey

    2012-05-01

    Creativity is a highly sought-after skill. Prescriptive advice for inspiring creativity abounds in the form of metaphors: People are encouraged to "think outside the box", to consider a problem "on one hand, then on the other hand", and to "put two and two together" to achieve creative breakthroughs. These metaphors suggest a connection between concrete bodily experiences and creative cognition. Inspired by recent advances in the understanding of body-mind linkages in the research on embodied cognition, we explored whether enacting metaphors for creativity enhances creative problem solving. Our findings from five studies revealed that both physical and psychological embodiment of metaphors for creativity promoted convergent thinking and divergent thinking (i.e., fluency, flexibility, or originality) in problem solving. Going beyond prior research, which focused primarily on the kind of embodiment that primes preexisting knowledge, we provide the first evidence that embodiment can also activate cognitive processes that facilitate the generation of new ideas and connections.

  12. "Soka Kyoikugaku Taikei" versus "Education for Creative Living": How Makiguchi Tsunesaburo's Educational Ideas Are Presented in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inukai, Nozomi

    2013-01-01

    The only available English translation of Makiguchi Tsunesaburo's most characteristic work, "Soka Kyoikugaku Taikei" ("The System of Value-Creating Pedagogy"; 1930-1934), was published as "Education for Creative Living" in 1989 with Alfred Birnbaum as the translator and Dayle M. Bethel as the editor. "Education for Creative Living", not…

  13. Black History and Culture. Ideas and Activities for Studying.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanton, Roland; And Others

    This booklet contains information, ideas, and activities to help schools celebrate Black History Week. It is devoted to black achievements in the areas of music, politics, and business with the intention of developing respect for, awareness of, and a sense of the relationship between past and present events in the history of black Americans. There…

  14. Creativity and Creative Teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Hunter, Craig A.

    2001-01-01

    A review of the linkage between knowledge, creativity, and design is presented and related to the best practices of multidisciplinary design teams. The discussion related to design and design teams is presented in the context of both the complete aerodynamic design community and specifically the work environment at the NASA Langley Research Center. To explore ways to introduce knowledge and creativity into the research and design environment at NASA Langley Research Center a creative design activity was executed within the context of a national product development activity. The success of the creative design team activity gave rise to a need to communicate the experience in a straightforward and managed approach. As a result the concept of creative potential its formulated and assessed with a survey of a small portion of the aeronautics research staff at NASA Langley Research Center. The final section of the paper provides recommendations for future creative organizations and work environments.

  15. Model-Eliciting Activities as a Tool to Develop and Identify Creatively Gifted Mathematicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlin, Scott A.; Moon, Sidney M.

    2005-01-01

    This article addresses the use of Model-Eliciting Activities (MEAs) as a (curricular) tool to develop mathematical creativity and identify students who are creatively gifted in mathematics. The thesis of this article is that by using MEAs, gifted educators can: (a) provide students with opportunities to develop creative and applied mathematical…

  16. Fostering Students' Creativity through Van Hiele's 5 Phase-Based Tangram Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siew, Nyet Moi; Chong, Chin Lu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Van Hiele's 5 phase-based tangrams activities could help to foster creativity among Grade Three primary school students. Students' creativity was investigated in terms of Torrance's Figural Test of creative thinking: Fluency, Originality, Elaboration, Abstractness of title, and Resistance to a…

  17. Creative Activities for Teaching about the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Lawrence

    This unit contains activities dealing with wastes, the Greenhouse Effect, ozone depletion, energy, deforestation, and species extinction. Each section has a text to explain the issues and a crossword puzzle to reinforce the vocabulary. There are diagrams with questions that can be used as handouts or as transparency masters. (EH)

  18. Physical performance and creative activities of centenarians.

    PubMed

    Antonini, F M; Magnolfi, S U; Petruzzi, E; Pinzani, P; Malentacchi, F; Petruzzi, I; Masotti, G

    2008-01-01

    The human functional autonomy is reduced progressively with advancing age, although a considerable proportion of the centenarians maintain a good level of autosufficiency for the basic performance of the everyday life. Even if males have a lower probability to reach the centenarian age than females do, the male centenarians display generally better functional conditions than the females. Actually, there are no systemic studies on centenarian works or activities; nevertheless, the examples of several representative persons (artists, scientists, explorers, etc.) who remained active even after this age indicate that such a possibility is realistic, and that the maintenance of vital interest and passions, thus preserving competence and professional attitudes, is not in conflict with the reaching of extreme longevity.

  19. Creativity Education based on Participants' Reflective Thinking on their Creative Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Norio; Miwa, Kazuhisa

    Recently, some educational courses focusing on creativity, hereafter called ``creativity education'' has been conducted in engineering education. We believe that such creativity education is crucial not only in engineering education, but also in general education. In this study, we designed a learning environment that enables participants to experience some common creative activities, and evaluated its effectiveness in a university class. Our educational program consists of the following three phases: (1) introduction (the participants learned the basics of Mindstorms using the instructional manuscript, and subsequently constructed and modified a moving car with four wheels using Mindstorms), (2) creative activities (they produced creative playground equipment that can move using Mindstorms), and (3) self-reflective activities on the creative processes (they reflected on their creative processes and added the information to a diagram, and they discussed advantages and disadvantages while referring to the diagram). We evaluated the effectiveness of our educational program based on comparisons of the pre- and post-tests and the contents of the participants' discussions. In particular, we confirmed the following three learning activities: (1) the participants discussed their creative activities from various viewpoints, (2) they also discussed the viewpoints considered to be important for creative activities, and (3) they realized the importance of idea generation, idea embodiment, and collaboration in creative activities.

  20. The nursing research idea fair: fostering research interest and activity among nurses.

    PubMed

    Turjanica, Mary Ann; Turner, Barbra; Rodgers, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Educators need creative means to enhance nurses' understanding of the research process. The Nursing Research Idea Fair provides a multifaceted educational experience to stimulate interest in research, educate nurses about research, and engage nurses in the research process in a fun, nonintimidating way. Nurse-driven research studies have increased fourfold since implementing the fair.

  1. What, Why, How - Creative Activities in Occupational Therapy Practice in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Müllersdorf, Maria; Ivarsson, Ann-Britt

    2016-12-01

    Creative activities have historically been used in occupational therapy, and although their usage has declined in recent decades, they are still used in Swedish practice. The aim of this study was to better understand how occupational therapists use creative activities in practice. A web-based survey was sent to 520 occupational therapists, of which 304 (58.5%) responded. The main reason identified for using creative activities was to strengthen the client's occupational performance, well-being and self-esteem. The expected outcomes of applying creative activities were to support the client in self-expression and experiencing joy and desire. More than half of the occupational therapist respondents did not use creative activities to the extent they desired. Creative activities in occupational therapy are still used as a vital treatment to strengthen the clients' occupational performance abilities. The survey has looked at only a professional perspective on effectiveness of applying creative activities in occupational therapy. More research is needed to evaluate how occupational therapists internationally apply creative activities. There is also a need to gain information from the client's perspective on the therapeutic value of creative activities. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. The Contribution of Ideational Behavior to Creative Extracurricular Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paek, Sue Hyeon; Park, Hyeri; Runco, Mark A.; Choe, Ho-Seong

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of creative performance from ideation has shown promise, but questions remain. In this study, the relationship of ideational behavior and the creative performance of elementary school children (N = 255) was examined across 6 domains of creative performance: science, mathematics, technology, fine arts, music, and writing.…

  3. The Inventive Mind in Science: Creative Thinking Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebert, Christine; Ebert, Edward S., II

    Creative thinking and how to foster it is the focus of this resource book for teachers. Part One of this book emphasizes the theoretical background of the creative thinking concept and discusses the relationship between creative thinking, problem solving, science, and technology. Part Two focuses on three levels of inventing, each examining…

  4. Fostering a Collaborative and Creative Climate in a College Class through Idea-Centered Knowledge-Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Huang-Yao; Chang, Yu-Hui; Chai, Chin Sing

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the effects of student engagement in a knowledge-building (KB) environment on their collaborative learning process and the perceived creative climate of that environment. The participants were 30 college students who undertook a living technology course in which KB were employed. The main data sources include students'…

  5. The Use of Virtual Reality for Creating Unusual Environmental Stimulation to Motivate Students to Explore Creative Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Kung Wong; Lee, Pui Yuen

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the roles of simulation in creativity education and how to apply immersive virtual environments to enhance students' learning experiences in university, through the provision of interactive simulations. An empirical study of a simulated virtual reality was carried out in order to investigate the effectiveness of providing…

  6. Creativity meets neuroscience: experimental tasks for the neuroscientific study of creative thinking.

    PubMed

    Fink, Andreas; Benedek, Mathias; Grabner, Roland H; Staudt, Beate; Neubauer, Aljoscha C

    2007-05-01

    The psychometric assessment of different facets of creative abilities as well as the availability of experimental tasks for the neuroscientific study of creative thinking has replaced the view of creativity as an unsearchable trait. In this article we provide a brief overview of contemporary methodologies used for the operationalization of creative thinking in a neuroscientific context. Empirical studies are reported which measured brain activity (by means of EEG, fMRI, NIRS or PET) during the performance of different experimental tasks. These tasks, along with creative idea generation tasks used in our laboratory, constitute useful tools in uncovering possible brain correlates of creative thinking. Nevertheless, much more work is needed in order to establish reliable and valid measures of creative thinking, in particular measures of novelty or originality of creative insights.

  7. The Structural Challenge: A Simple Design-Based Science Activity to Foster Creativity among Kinaesthetic Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amir, Nazir; Subramaniam, R.

    2014-01-01

    A suitable way for teachers to present science content and foster creativity in less academically inclined students is by getting them to engage in design-based science activities and guiding them along the way. This study illustrates how a design-and-make activity was carried out with the aim of getting students to showcase their creativity while…

  8. The Effect of Play on the Creativity of Young Children during Subsequent Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard-Jones, Paul A.; Taylor, Jayne R.; Sutton, Lesley

    2002-01-01

    Investigated whether experiencing 25 minutes of unstructured play in a preceding task influenced the creativity of 6- and 7-year-olds in a subsequent activity. Found that there was a positive effect of a preceding salt-dough play activity upon the creativity and range of colors used in creating a collage with a controlled range of materials.…

  9. Shake Up Your Shakespeare: Creative Drama Activities for "Romeo and Juliet."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hett, Dorothy; Haring, Dana

    This paper presents creative drama activities based on Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" for use in ninth-grade English classrooms. The activities are divided into sections on improvisation, pantomime, image-making and creative drama, reader's theater, drama scenes, interior monologue, and producing plays. Each section of the paper…

  10. Orientation and Intentionality as Components of Creative Musical Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratus, John

    1991-01-01

    The view of musical creativity as spanning a continuum from the noises of the unschooled young child to the artistry of the trained professional fails to account for fundamental, developmental differences in the creators' perspectives. This paper seeks to distinguish two ways in which the creative functioning of the child or novice differ from…

  11. Beyond Right or Wrong: Challenges of Including Creative Design Activities in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we explore challenges encountered by K-12 educators in establishing classroom cultures that support creative learning activities with the Scratch programming language. Providing opportunities for students to understand and to build capacities for creative work was described by many of the teachers that we interviewed as a central…

  12. The Effectiveness of the Creative Writing Instruction Program Based on Speaking Activities (CWIPSA)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayat, Seher

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to develop a creative writing instruction program based on speaking activities and to investigate its effect on fourth-grade primary school students' creative writing achievements and writing attitudes. The experimental method based on the pre-test/post-test model was used in this research. The research was conducted with 42…

  13. The "Whistles" Stop Here: Encouraging Meaningful Creative Thinking in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meador, Karen

    2001-01-01

    This article provides 20 principles to enable educators to identify meaningful creative activities for gifted students and avoid the superfluous "whistles". Activities should: value creative thinking, make children more sensitive to environmental stimuli, encourage manipulation of objects and ideas, develop tolerance for new ideas, and teach how…

  14. Student Activity Ideas for the Technology Sequence Systems and Foundation Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    This publication provides single-page outlines of brief ideas for high school student activities in each of the System and Foundation Courses of the New York State technology sequence. The idea outlines are provided as a resource to assist teachers in the development of student learning activities. The six courses for which ideas are presented are…

  15. Beyond Idea Generation: The Power of Groups in Developing Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Kibby; Ruggeri, Azzurra; Kämmer, Juliane E.; Katsikopoulos, Konstantinos V.

    2016-01-01

    Brainstorming research has claimed that individuals are more creative than groups. However, these conclusions are largely based on measuring creativity by the number of ideas generated, and researchers have tended to neglect other important components of creativity, such as the quality of developed ideas. These studies aim to address this gap in…

  16. Spicing up Classrooms Using Creative Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubenstein, Lisa DaVia; Wilson, Hope E.

    2011-01-01

    Gifted programs have long relied upon creative challenges (activities in which students are asked to create a product or an idea in response to specific teacher directions) to spark ideas, collaboration, and exploration. These challenges, however, have often been devoid of context. Gifted students are pulled out of the classroom to build a bridge…

  17. Good morning creativity: task reactivation during sleep enhances beneficial effect of sleep on creative performance.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Simone M; Strick, Madelijn; Bos, Maarten W; van Baaren, Rick B; Dijksterhuis, Ap

    2012-12-01

    Both scientists and artists have suggested that sleep facilitates creativity, and this idea has received substantial empirical support. In the current study, we investigate whether one can actively enhance the beneficial effect of sleep on creativity by covertly reactivating the creativity task during sleep. Individuals' creative performance was compared after three different conditions: sleep-with-conditioned-odor; sleep-with-control-odor; or sleep-with-no-odor. In the evening prior to sleep, all participants were presented with a problem that required a creative solution. In the two odor conditions, a hidden scent-diffuser spread an odor while the problem was presented. In the sleep-with-conditioned-odor condition, task reactivation during sleep was induced by means of the odor that was also presented while participants were informed about the problem. In the sleep-with-control-odor condition, participants were exposed to a different odor during sleep than the one diffused during problem presentation. In the no odor condition, no odor was presented. After a night of sleep with the conditioned odor, participants were found to be: (i) more creative; and (ii) better able to select their most creative idea than participants who had been exposed to a control odor or no odor while sleeping. These findings suggest that we do not have to passively wait until we are hit by our creative muse while sleeping. Task reactivation during sleep can actively trigger creativity-related processes during sleep and thereby boost the beneficial effect of sleep on creativity.

  18. EEG alpha power and creative ideation.

    PubMed

    Fink, Andreas; Benedek, Mathias

    2014-07-01

    Neuroscientific studies revealed first insights into neural mechanisms underlying creativity, but existing findings are highly variegated and often inconsistent. Despite the disappointing picture on the neuroscience of creativity drawn in recent reviews, there appears to be robust evidence that EEG alpha power is particularly sensitive to various creativity-related demands involved in creative ideation. Alpha power varies as a function of creativity-related task demands and the originality of ideas, is positively related to an individuals' creativity level, and has been observed to increase as a result of creativity interventions. Alpha increases during creative ideation could reflect more internally oriented attention that is characterized by the absence of external bottom-up stimulation and, thus, a form of top-down activity. Moreover, they could indicate the involvement of specific memory processes such as the efficient (re-)combination of unrelated semantic information. We conclude that increased alpha power during creative ideation is among the most consistent findings in neuroscientific research on creativity and discuss possible future directions to better understand the manifold brain mechanisms involved in creativity.

  19. EEG alpha power and creative ideation☆

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Andreas; Benedek, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscientific studies revealed first insights into neural mechanisms underlying creativity, but existing findings are highly variegated and often inconsistent. Despite the disappointing picture on the neuroscience of creativity drawn in recent reviews, there appears to be robust evidence that EEG alpha power is particularly sensitive to various creativity-related demands involved in creative ideation. Alpha power varies as a function of creativity-related task demands and the originality of ideas, is positively related to an individuals’ creativity level, and has been observed to increase as a result of creativity interventions. Alpha increases during creative ideation could reflect more internally oriented attention that is characterized by the absence of external bottom-up stimulation and, thus, a form of top-down activity. Moreover, they could indicate the involvement of specific memory processes such as the efficient (re-)combination of unrelated semantic information. We conclude that increased alpha power during creative ideation is among the most consistent findings in neuroscientific research on creativity and discuss possible future directions to better understand the manifold brain mechanisms involved in creativity. PMID:23246442

  20. Neural correlates of creative thinking and schizotypy.

    PubMed

    Park, Haeme R P; Kirk, Ian J; Waldie, Karen E

    2015-07-01

    Empirical studies indicate a link between creativity and schizotypal personality traits, where individuals who score highly on schizotypy measures also display greater levels of creative behaviour. However, the exact nature of this relationship is not yet clear, with only a few studies examining this association using neuroimaging methods. In the present study, the neural substrates of creative thinking were assessed with a drawing task paradigm in healthy individuals using fMRI. These regions were then statistically correlated with the participants' level of schizotypy as measured by the Oxford-Liverpool Inventory of Feelings and Experiences (O-LIFE), which is a questionnaire consisting of four dimensions. Neural activations associated with the creativity task were observed in bilateral inferior temporal gyri, left insula, left parietal lobule, right angular gyrus, as well as regions in the prefrontal cortex. This widespread pattern of activation suggests that creative thinking utilises multiple neurocognitive networks, with creative production being the result of collaboration between these regions. Furthermore, the correlational analyses found the Unusual Experiences factor of the O-LIFE to be the most common dimension associated with these areas, followed by the Impulsive Nonconformity dimension. These correlations were negative, indicating that individuals who scored the highest in these factors displayed the least amount of activation when performing the creative task. This is in line with the idea that 'less is more' for creativity, where the deactivation of specific cortical areas may facilitate creativity. Thus, these findings contribute to the evidence of a common neural basis between creativity and schizotypy.

  1. Cultivating Creative Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughnn, Margery M.

    1973-01-01

    Creativity is largely an outgrowth of attitude rather than an activity, a set of predispositions rather than a production line. Author traces the concept of creative development and the role music plays in illustrating the creative process. (Author/RK)

  2. Engaging the Families of ELLs: Ideas, Resources, and Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Renee; Abrego, Michelle H.; Sutterby, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Learn how to involve the diverse families of English language learners with the effective, practical approaches in this book. This must-have resource for teachers and school leaders is packed with fresh ideas geared toward building a partnership between school communities and ELL families. The authors begin each chapter with realistic scenarios…

  3. Grade Level and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alacapinar, Füsun G.

    2013-01-01

    Problem Statement: Creativity has been addressed by many scientists and thinkers. Among them, Guilfort regards creativity as the ability to generate new ideas, and relates it to intelligence. According to Thurstone, creativity must develop and be implemented within a theoretical framework, and a solution must result. Torrance thinks of creativity…

  4. Creative activity and sex-role identity in elementary school children.

    PubMed

    Milgram, R M; Yitzhak, V; Milgram, N A

    1977-10-01

    The relationship of creative activity to sex-role identity was examined in boys (N = 80) and girls (N = 56), aged nine to twelve, of above average intelligence. Endorsement of personal characteristics that cut across sex stereotypes was associated with participation in a wide variety of creative activities. When analyzed by specific activity, the relationship with sex-role followed a consistent pattern for boys and girls combined: male activities such as sports with scores on the masculine scale, female activity such as dance or art with scores on the feminine scale, and sexually indeterminate activities such as drama or social leadership with scores on both scales.

  5. Teaching Ecosystems and Matter Cycles with Creative Drama Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cokadar, Hulusi; Yilmaz, Gulcin Cihan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of creative drama-based instruction on seventh graders' science achievements in the ecology and matter cycles unit and their attitudes toward science. The study is an experimental study carried out in one of the public elementary schools in Turkey during 2005-2006 schooling year. An ecological…

  6. Exploring Young Students Creativity: The Effect of Model Eliciting Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilat, Talya; Amit, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how engaging students in real-life mathematical situations can stimulate their mathematical creative thinking. We analyzed the mathematical modeling of two girls, aged 10 and 13 years, as they worked on an authentic task involving the selection of a track team. The girls displayed several modeling cycles that…

  7. Improved Creative Thinkers in a Class: A Model of Activity Based Tasks for Improving University Students' Creative Thinking Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oncu, Elif Celebi

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was improving university students' from different faculties creativity thinking through a creativity education process. The education process took twelve weeks' time. As pretest, Torrance test of creative thinking (TTCT) figural form was used. Participants were 24 university students from different faculties who…

  8. Why Teaching Creativity Requires More than Just Producing More "Creativity"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persaud, Raj

    2007-01-01

    Creativity is usually defined in terms of the production end of ideas or products, yet a neglected aspect of creativity, though no less vital, is the process by which creative products are critically evaluated, selected, altered or dismissed by the creator. Any attempt to promote creative thinking skills in schools needs to also address this…

  9. Individual Learning Styles and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitar, Aleša Saša; Cerne, Matej; Aleksic, Darija; Mihelic, Katarina Katja

    2016-01-01

    Business schools are in need of developing creative graduates. This article explores how creativity among business students can be stimulated. Because a considerable amount of knowledge is required for creative ideas to emerge, the learning process has a significant impact on creativity. This, in turn, indicates that learning style is important…

  10. Creative Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellano, Richard J.; Fleming, Mary Ann

    Educational goals and objectives, student activities, and visual aids are included in this guide to a three-dimensional design unit that combines creative art and industrial arts skills. Course goals include challenging students' creative skills, encouraging student interaction and successful group work, and providing an atmosphere of fun and…

  11. Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS), Grades 7-12: Language Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonis, Doris G.

    Presented is the Language Arts component of the Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS), a multidisciplinary energy education program designed for infusion into the curriculum of grades 7-12. Among the lessons included are an energy debate, puzzles, energy poetry, and energy life styles. Also contained in the IDEAS program are activity sets…

  12. Idea Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Presents three teaching ideas entitled (1) Rearview Mirrors; (2) Chills and Fevers; and (3) Science Activities and the Learner. The second idea presents a poem to help students with the relationship between Centigrade and Fahrenheit. The third idea presents activities on evaporation. (PR)

  13. The Idea Box.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for the Education of Young Children, Washington, DC.

    Five pamphlets offer helpful ideas and instructions on teacher planning, learning environments, teaching with nature, a creative curriculum, and ideas for administrators in "The Idea Box," compiled by members of the Austin Association for the Education of Young Children. Each pamphlet contains useful information for working with young children.…

  14. Bright Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Presents ideas for teaching techniques and learning activities in areas such as: New Year's resolutions, bird feeding, typing to spell, using thermometers, and activities utilizing old calendars. (JMB)

  15. Psycho-Pedagogical Conditions of Formation of Professional Creative Activity of Future Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askarovna, Uzakbayeva Sakypzhamal; Yertaevna, Abeltayeva Zhanel; Erhanovna, Sadykova Ayzhan; Rysbekova, R.

    2015-01-01

    Organizational, psychological and pedagogical conditions (the position of student in the educational process, the inclusion of students in active and independent activities, the creation of a positive creative environment and psychological climate, the active use of the forms, methods, technologies, adequate formation of professional creative…

  16. The Shoe Box Curriculum: Practical Ideas for Active Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molnar, Alex; Roy, Will

    This book contains 65 specific activities designed to help disadvantaged students learn to use language more skillfully and develop the ability to function well in the school environment. The descriptions of the activities are referred to as shoe box labs and generally include the title of the activity, instructions for performing the activity,…

  17. Steal These Ideas! Winning Activities from Real Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents several winning activities for students in the classroom. These activities include: (1) making Abraham Lincoln costumes; (2) creating frosty scenes from torn-paper collage for a grammar activity; (3) listening to Dr. Martin Luther King's "I have a Dream" speech; (4) hosting an architectural challenge for a kindergarten class;…

  18. RIF Book of Ideas: Activities to Motivate Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. National Reading is Fun-damental Program.

    Readily adaptable to classrooms, youth service organizations, and other groups that serve young people, the motivation activities in this book were set up for Reading is Fundamental projects and field tested by the organization's volunteers. Following an introduction to the characteristics of a good motivational activity and some guidelines for…

  19. School-Age Ideas and Activities for After School Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas-Foletta, Karen; Cogley, Michele

    This guide describes activities for school-age children in after-school day care programs. These activities may also be used in other settings. An introductory section discusses program philosophy, room arrangement, multicultural curriculum, program scheduling, summer programs and holiday care, field trips and special programs, age grouping,…

  20. Student Engagement with Artefacts and Scientific Ideas in a Laboratory and a Concept-Mapping Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamza, Karim Mikael; Wickman, Per-Olof

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to use a comparative approach to scrutinize the common assumption that certain school science activities are theoretical and therefore particularly suited for engaging students with scientific ideas, whereas others are practical and, thus, not equally conducive to engagement with scientific ideas. We compared two…

  1. [Characteristics of cortical activity in persons with high and low verbal creativity: analysis of alpha1,2 rhythms].

    PubMed

    Razumnikova, O M; Tarasova, I V; Vol'f, N V

    2009-01-01

    Creativity-related changes in alpha power in low-frequency (8-10 Hz) and high-frequency (10-13 Hz) bands were studied in university students having regard to generation of original ideas during performance of two verbal tasks. A high-creative group enrolled 16 subjects asked to generate original words--associates to the triads of verbal stimuli and 14 subjects who were asked to compose a sentence using triads of nouns from remote semantic categories. Low-creative groups included 22 and 13 individuals, respectively. In low-frequency band, highly creative subjects showed a higher level of alpha power than low creative individuals. In the high-frequency band, task-related alpha2 power desynchronization was different in these groups: high-creative individuals had higher power score than low-creative mostly in the anterior and parietal cortical areas. These data and a factor structure of alpha rhythm indices may be evidence of different strategies of information selection in highly and low creative persons.

  2. Idea Networking and Creative Sharing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Donovan R.

    2009-01-01

    When students engage with technology to produce media, impetus and inspiration often come from the work of others. In today's new media environment in which students blur the line between school-based technologies and personal devices and engagement, educators find themselves standing on a railroad track facing a speeding high-tech train. If…

  3. The Creative Pathways of Everyday Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanggaard, Lene

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents two studies of how the conduct of life in itself can be a creative act. Very often, creativity research is concerned with the study of what enables people to express themselves creatively or aesthetically or to produce creative ideas and products. Creativity as it arises in the mundane processes of everyday life is, however,…

  4. Creative Activities in Music – A Genome-Wide Linkage Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Oikkonen, Jaana; Kuusi, Tuire; Peltonen, Petri; Raijas, Pirre; Ukkola-Vuoti, Liisa; Karma, Kai; Onkamo, Päivi; Järvelä, Irma

    2016-01-01

    Creative activities in music represent a complex cognitive function of the human brain, whose biological basis is largely unknown. In order to elucidate the biological background of creative activities in music we performed genome-wide linkage and linkage disequilibrium (LD) scans in musically experienced individuals characterised for self-reported composing, arranging and non-music related creativity. The participants consisted of 474 individuals from 79 families, and 103 sporadic individuals. We found promising evidence for linkage at 16p12.1-q12.1 for arranging (LOD 2.75, 120 cases), 4q22.1 for composing (LOD 2.15, 103 cases) and Xp11.23 for non-music related creativity (LOD 2.50, 259 cases). Surprisingly, statistically significant evidence for linkage was found for the opposite phenotype of creative activity in music (neither composing nor arranging; NCNA) at 18q21 (LOD 3.09, 149 cases), which contains cadherin genes like CDH7 and CDH19. The locus at 4q22.1 overlaps the previously identified region of musical aptitude, music perception and performance giving further support for this region as a candidate region for broad range of music-related traits. The other regions at 18q21 and 16p12.1-q12.1 are also adjacent to the previously identified loci with musical aptitude. Pathway analysis of the genes suggestively associated with composing suggested an overrepresentation of the cerebellar long-term depression pathway (LTD), which is a cellular model for synaptic plasticity. The LTD also includes cadherins and AMPA receptors, whose component GSG1L was linked to arranging. These results suggest that molecular pathways linked to memory and learning via LTD affect music-related creative behaviour. Musical creativity is a complex phenotype where a common background with musicality and intelligence has been proposed. Here, we implicate genetic regions affecting music-related creative behaviour, which also include genes with neuropsychiatric associations. We also propose

  5. Creative Activities in Music--A Genome-Wide Linkage Analysis.

    PubMed

    Oikkonen, Jaana; Kuusi, Tuire; Peltonen, Petri; Raijas, Pirre; Ukkola-Vuoti, Liisa; Karma, Kai; Onkamo, Päivi; Järvelä, Irma

    2016-01-01

    Creative activities in music represent a complex cognitive function of the human brain, whose biological basis is largely unknown. In order to elucidate the biological background of creative activities in music we performed genome-wide linkage and linkage disequilibrium (LD) scans in musically experienced individuals characterised for self-reported composing, arranging and non-music related creativity. The participants consisted of 474 individuals from 79 families, and 103 sporadic individuals. We found promising evidence for linkage at 16p12.1-q12.1 for arranging (LOD 2.75, 120 cases), 4q22.1 for composing (LOD 2.15, 103 cases) and Xp11.23 for non-music related creativity (LOD 2.50, 259 cases). Surprisingly, statistically significant evidence for linkage was found for the opposite phenotype of creative activity in music (neither composing nor arranging; NCNA) at 18q21 (LOD 3.09, 149 cases), which contains cadherin genes like CDH7 and CDH19. The locus at 4q22.1 overlaps the previously identified region of musical aptitude, music perception and performance giving further support for this region as a candidate region for broad range of music-related traits. The other regions at 18q21 and 16p12.1-q12.1 are also adjacent to the previously identified loci with musical aptitude. Pathway analysis of the genes suggestively associated with composing suggested an overrepresentation of the cerebellar long-term depression pathway (LTD), which is a cellular model for synaptic plasticity. The LTD also includes cadherins and AMPA receptors, whose component GSG1L was linked to arranging. These results suggest that molecular pathways linked to memory and learning via LTD affect music-related creative behaviour. Musical creativity is a complex phenotype where a common background with musicality and intelligence has been proposed. Here, we implicate genetic regions affecting music-related creative behaviour, which also include genes with neuropsychiatric associations. We also propose

  6. Neuropsychiatry of creativity.

    PubMed

    Mula, Marco; Hermann, Bruce; Trimble, Michael R

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we review in brief the development of ideas that over time have tried to explain why some individuals are more creative than others and what may be the neurobiological links underlying artistic creativity. We note associations with another unique human idea, that of genius. In particular, we discuss frontotemporal dementia and bipolar, cyclothymic mood disorder as clinical conditions that are helping to unravel the underlying neuroanatomy and neurochemistry of human creativity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity".

  7. Using the Historical Environment: Practical Ideas and Activities for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This handbook provides eight detailed interdisciplinary lesson plans, with art, archaeological, and architectural heritage of historical British sites as the introductory focus. Historical background is combined with a variety of possible content area approaches, documentary sources, and photocopiable activity sheets for classroom and on-site…

  8. Junior Achievement Lesson Plans and Activity Ideas, 1997-98.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junior Achievemnt, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO.

    This packet contains economics lesson plans and activities for the high school student. Detailed lesson plans and worksheets address the following concepts: (1) stock market; (2) economics of water; (3) diaper economics; (4) quality; (5) scarcity; (6) steps to success; (7) effective marketing; (8) careers and success; (9) interviewing tips and…

  9. Novel Ideas for Young Readers! Projects and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuta, Katherine Wiesolek; Zernial, Susan

    This book offers 60 stimulating, classroom-tested activities to instill a love of literature and help young learners develop as readers, writers, and speakers. By using picture books, novels, or even nonfiction readings as starting points, the reproducible worksheets in the book can be implemented to strengthen students' entire spectrum of…

  10. 250+ Activities and Ideas for Developing Literacy Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jay, Hilda L.; Jay, M. Ellen

    Designed for use at school or at home, this book focuses on the development of seven types of literacy: linguistic, visual, mathematical, scientific, geographic, economic, and computer. The book's suggested activities are each introduced with a detailed discussion of the necessary prerequisite skills, the concepts to be mastered, the materials…

  11. Energizing Your Curricula--Ideas/Activities for Immediate Classroom Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, John; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Secondary-level activities include throwing dice to model exponential growth, measuring caloric values, and determining the efficiency of fluorescent and incandescent lighting. Students also measure the amount of heat absorbed in a closed car in the sun, and "spin" a good life web in order to visualize the entanglements of a high standard of…

  12. The Big Book of Therapeutic Activity Ideas for Children and Teens: Inspiring Arts-Based Activities and Character Education Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joiner, Lindsey

    2011-01-01

    For difficult or challenging children and teenagers in therapeutic or school settings, creative activities can be an excellent way of increasing enjoyment and boosting motivation, making the sessions more rewarding and successful for everyone involved. This resource provides over one hundred tried-and-tested fun and imaginative therapeutic…

  13. The Impact of Peer Review on Creative Self-Efficacy and Learning Performance in Web 2.0 Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chen-Chung; Lu, Kuan-Hsien; Wu, Leon Yufeng; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have pointed out the significant contrast between the creative nature of Web 2.0 learning activities and the structured learning in school. This study proposes an approach to leveraging Web 2.0 learning activities and classroom teaching to help students develop both specific knowledge and creativity based on Csikzentmihalyi's system…

  14. Reinventing Undergraduate Education: Engaging College Students in Research and Creative Activities. ASHE Higher Education Report, Volume 33, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Shouping, Ed.; Scheuch, Kathyrine, Ed.; Schwartz, Robert, Ed.; Gayles, Joy Gaston, Ed.; Li, Shaoqing, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to present both the empirical and conceptual evidence of the causes and effects of undergraduate student engagement in research and creative activities. Four questions guide this report: (1) What are the intellectual underpinnings of engaging undergraduate students in research and creative activities?; (2) What are…

  15. Creativity and health: an anti-humanist reflection.

    PubMed

    Fox, Nick J

    2013-09-01

    Many studies suggest that health benefits from engaging with the creative arts, but explanations of the association remain tenuous. This article explores both creativity and health from an anti-humanist perspective and develops a Deleuze-inspired analysis to supply the theoretical framework for creativity and health. In this view, creativity is an active, experimenting flow within a network or assemblage of bodies, things, ideas and institutions, while health is understood as the capacity of a body to affect and be affected by this assemblage. It is consequently unsurprising that there is a relationship between creative activity and health. This analysis is used to explore how creative production and reception can affect health, and to assess the implications for sociology and for arts in health-care practice.

  16. The Creative Brain: Corepresenting Schema Violations Enhances TPJ Activity and Boosts Cognitive Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Simone M.; Kühn, Simone; Müller, Barbara C. N.; van Baaren, Rick B.; Brass, Marcel; Dijksterhuis, Ap

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive flexibility is one of the essential mental abilities underlying creative thinking. Previous findings have shown that cognitive flexibility can be enhanced by schema violations, and it has been suggested that active involvement is needed for schema violations to facilitate cognitive flexibility. The possibility that identification with an…

  17. Investigation the Scientific Creativity of Gifted Students through Project-Based Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karademir, Ersin

    2016-01-01

    In this research, it is aimed to identify the scientific creativity of gifted students through project-based activities. In accordance with this purpose, a study has been carried out with 13 gifted students studying in third and fifth grade. In the study, students have been informed about the project development stages and they have been asked…

  18. Brain correlates underlying creative thinking: EEG alpha activity in professional vs. novice dancers.

    PubMed

    Fink, Andreas; Graif, Barbara; Neubauer, Aljoscha C

    2009-07-01

    Neuroscientific research on creativity has revealed valuable insights into possible brain correlates underlying this complex mental ability domain. However, most of the studies investigated brain activity during the performance of comparatively simple (verbal) type of tasks and the majority of studies focused on samples of the normal population. In this study we investigate EEG activity in professional dancers (n=15) who have attained a high level of expertise in this domain. This group was compared with a group of novices (n=17) who have only basic experience in dancing and completed no comprehensive training in this field. The EEG was recorded during performance of two different dancing imagery tasks which differed with respect to creative demands. In the first task participants were instructed to mentally perform a dance which should be as unique and original as possible (improvisation dance). In the waltz task they were asked to imagine dancing the waltz, a standard dance which involves a sequence of monotonous steps (lower creative demands). In addition, brain activity was also measured during performance of the Alternative Uses test. We observed evidence that during the generation of alternative uses professional dancers show stronger alpha synchronization in posterior parietal brain regions than novice dancers. During improvisation dance, professional dancers exhibited more right-hemispheric alpha synchronization than the group of novices did, while during imagining dancing the waltz no significant group differences emerged. The findings complement and extend existing findings on the relationship between EEG alpha activity and creative thinking.

  19. The Effect of Creative Writing Activities on the Story Writing Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temizkan, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine the effect of creative writing activities on the skill of university students in writing story genre text. Unequaled control group model which is half experimental is used in this research. 1/A section (experimental group) of standard class and 1/B section (control group) of evening class from Turkish…

  20. The Influences of Faculty on Undergraduate Student Participation in Research and Creative Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Shouping; Scheuch, Kathyrine; Gayles, Joy Gaston

    2009-01-01

    Using data collected from surveys of college juniors and seniors and faculty members in related academic departments, this study examined whether faculty teaching and research orientations, as well as faculty external funding, had any impact on undergraduate student participation in research and creative activities. The results of the study…

  1. Astute Activities: Increasing Cognitive and Creative Development in the Language Arts Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bay, Lois Marie Zinke

    Using Mark Twain's "Huckleberry Finn," John Knowles'"A Separate Peace," and Maya Angelou's "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings," a study examined the effects of Astute Activities--teaching techniques which increase students' cognitive ability and creativity--on student performance in two senior English classes in a small…

  2. Implementation of the Project "Including Disabled Senior Citizens in Creative Activities in 2013-2015"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploch, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    This paper made an attempt to indicate the findings of the author's research from the experiences of the implementation of the project "Including disabled senior citizens in creative activities in 2013-2015". The issues of disabled senior citizens have been an object of interest over the recent years though it still has not had a proper…

  3. Creative Thinking Development Program for Learning Activity Management of Secondary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pukdeewut, Sutinan; Chantarasombat, Chalard; Satapornwong, Pattananusorn

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this research were: to design a creative thinking development program for learning activity management of secondary school teachers, and to study the program's efficiency and effectiveness of usage. The results of the study were as follows: the program includes the vision, principles, objectives, content, program development…

  4. Student Engagement with Artefacts and Scientific Ideas in a Laboratory and a Concept-Mapping Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikael Hamza, Karim; Wickman, Per-Olof

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to use a comparative approach to scrutinize the common assumption that certain school science activities are theoretical and therefore particularly suited for engaging students with scientific ideas, whereas others are practical and, thus, not equally conducive to engagement with scientific ideas. We compared two school science activities, one (laboratory work) that is commonly regarded as focusing attention on artefacts that may distract students from central science concepts and the other (concept mapping) that is thought to make students focus directly on these concepts. We observed students in either a laboratory activity about real galvanic cells or a concept-mapping activity about idealized galvanic cells. We used a practical epistemology analysis to compare the two activities regarding students' actions towards scientific ideas and artefacts. The comparison revealed that the two activities, despite their alleged differences along the theory-practice scale, primarily resulted in similar student actions. For instance, in both activities, students interacted extensively with artefacts and, to a lesser extent, with scientific ideas. However, only occasionally did students establish any explicit continuity between artefacts and scientific ideas. The findings indicate that some of the problems commonly considered to be unique for school science practical work may indeed be a feature of school science activities more generally.

  5. Creative Experiences for Young Children. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenfeld, Mimi Brodsky

    Noting that a creative approach to early childhood education allows teachers to reinforce the foundation of achievement by encouraging and expanding upon children's play activities, this book provides teacher-developed ideas and strategies for creating learning communities in the early childhood classroom. The beginning chapter introduces creative…

  6. Epilepsy treatment and creativity.

    PubMed

    Zubkov, Sarah; Friedman, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Creativity can be defined as the ability to understand, develop, and express, in a systematic fashion, novel orderly relationships. It is sometimes difficult to separate cognitive skills requisite for the creative process from the drive that generates unique new ideas and associations. Epilepsy itself may affect the creative process. The treatment of epilepsy and its comorbidities, by altering or disrupting the same neural networks through antiseizure drugs (ASDs), treatment of epilepsy comorbidities, ablative surgery, or neurostimulation may also affect creativity. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms by which treatment can influence the creative process and review the literature on the consequences of therapy on different aspects of creativity in people with epilepsy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity".

  7. Creative Dance and Basketball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, David

    2004-01-01

    Physical education teachers enjoy the special privilege of guiding children to discover unique ways for expressing and communicating ideas, attitudes, thoughts, and emotions through movement. Creative dance lets children explore movement possibilities limited only by one's imagination. Individually and collectively, creative dance encourages…

  8. Nurturing Creative, Thinking Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goel, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes some ideas and experiences with training student engineers in creativity and critical thinking. In our survey, a large majority (82%) of respondents felt that as compared to all other kind of academic engagements, their projects had contributed most to develop their creativity. About 50% had also felt that their projects were…

  9. PS Corner: Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Donald R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the contents of a book entitled The Care and Feeding of Ideas: A Guide to Encouraging Creativity which considers the thinking process, why skills need to be developed, and how students use or should use these thinking skills. (RT)

  10. Professional training in creative writing is associated with enhanced fronto-striatal activity in a literary text continuation task.

    PubMed

    Erhard, K; Kessler, F; Neumann, N; Ortheil, H-J; Lotze, M

    2014-10-15

    The aim of the present study was to explore brain activities associated with creativity and expertise in literary writing. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we applied a real-life neuroscientific setting that consisted of different writing phases (brainstorming and creative writing; reading and copying as control conditions) to well-selected expert writers and to an inexperienced control group. During creative writing, experts showed cerebral activation in a predominantly left-hemispheric fronto-parieto-temporal network. When compared to inexperienced writers, experts showed increased left caudate nucleus and left dorsolateral and superior medial prefrontal cortex activation. In contrast, less experienced participants recruited increasingly bilateral visual areas. During creative writing activation in the right cuneus showed positive association with the creativity index in expert writers. High experience in creative writing seems to be associated with a network of prefrontal (mPFC and DLPFC) and basal ganglia (caudate) activation. In addition, our findings suggest that high verbal creativity specific to literary writing increases activation in the right cuneus associated with increased resources obtained for reading processes.

  11. Brain activity and connectivity during poetry composition: Toward a multidimensional model of the creative process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siyuan; Erkkinen, Michael G; Healey, Meghan L; Xu, Yisheng; Swett, Katherine E; Chow, Ho Ming; Braun, Allen R

    2015-09-01

    Creativity, a multifaceted construct, can be studied in various ways, for example, investigating phases of the creative process, quality of the creative product, or the impact of expertise. Previous neuroimaging studies have assessed these individually. Believing that each of these interacting features must be examined simultaneously to develop a comprehensive understanding of creative behavior, we examined poetry composition, assessing process, product, and expertise in a single experiment. Distinct activation patterns were associated with generation and revision, two major phases of the creative process. Medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) was active during both phases, yet responses in dorsolateral prefrontal and parietal executive systems (DLPFC/IPS) were phase-dependent, indicating that while motivation remains unchanged, cognitive control is attenuated during generation and re-engaged during revision. Experts showed significantly stronger deactivation of DLPFC/IPS during generation, suggesting that they may more effectively suspend cognitive control. Importantly however, similar overall patterns were observed in both groups, indicating the same cognitive resources are available to experts and novices alike. Quality of poetry, assessed by an independent panel, was associated with divergent connectivity patterns in experts and novices, centered upon MPFC (for technical facility) and DLPFC/IPS (for innovation), suggesting a mechanism by which experts produce higher quality poetry. Crucially, each of these three key features can be understood in the context of a single neurocognitive model characterized by dynamic interactions between medial prefrontal areas regulating motivation, dorsolateral prefrontal, and parietal areas regulating cognitive control and the association of these regions with language, sensorimotor, limbic, and subcortical areas distributed throughout the brain.

  12. Brain activity and connectivity during poetry composition: Toward a multidimensional model of the creative process

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Siyuan; Erkkinen, Michael G.; Healey, Meghan L.; Xu, Yisheng; Swett, Katherine E.; Chow, Ho Ming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Creativity, a multifaceted construct, can be studied in various ways, for example, investigating phases of the creative process, quality of the creative product, or the impact of expertise. Previous neuroimaging studies have assessed these individually. Believing that each of these interacting features must be examined simultaneously to develop a comprehensive understanding of creative behavior, we examined poetry composition, assessing process, product, and expertise in a single experiment. Distinct activation patterns were associated with generation and revision, two major phases of the creative process. Medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) was active during both phases, yet responses in dorsolateral prefrontal and parietal executive systems (DLPFC/IPS) were phase‐dependent, indicating that while motivation remains unchanged, cognitive control is attenuated during generation and re‐engaged during revision. Experts showed significantly stronger deactivation of DLPFC/IPS during generation, suggesting that they may more effectively suspend cognitive control. Importantly however, similar overall patterns were observed in both groups, indicating the same cognitive resources are available to experts and novices alike. Quality of poetry, assessed by an independent panel, was associated with divergent connectivity patterns in experts and novices, centered upon MPFC (for technical facility) and DLPFC/IPS (for innovation), suggesting a mechanism by which experts produce higher quality poetry. Crucially, each of these three key features can be understood in the context of a single neurocognitive model characterized by dynamic interactions between medial prefrontal areas regulating motivation, dorsolateral prefrontal, and parietal areas regulating cognitive control and the association of these regions with language, sensorimotor, limbic, and subcortical areas distributed throughout the brain. Hum Brain Mapp 36:3351–3372, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Human Brain

  13. Children's Creativity in Day Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reunamo, Jyrki; Lee, Hui-Chun; Wang, Li-Chen; Ruokonen, Inkeri; Nikkola, Teemu; Malmstrom, Sanna

    2014-01-01

    In this research, children's creativity in pretend play and the conditions for creativity during high involvement are studied from four points of view: as a zone for proximal development, as a skill, as a personal orientation and as a culturally shared environment creation. The theoretical model is influenced by Vygotsky's ideas of creativity as…

  14. Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS), Grades 7-12: Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonis, Doris G.

    Presented is the Science component of the Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS), a multidisciplinary energy education program designed for infusion into the curriculum of grades 7-12. Also contained in the program are activity sets for Home Economics (SE 034 678), Industrial Arts (SE 034 679), Language Arts (SE 034 680), Mathematics (SE…

  15. Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS), Grades 7-12: Home Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonis, Doris G.

    Presented is the Home Economics component of the Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS), a multidisciplinary energy education program designed for infusion into the curriculum of grades 7-12. Also included in the program are activity sets for Industrial Arts (SE 034 679), Language Arts (SE 034 680), Mathematics (SE 034 681), Science (SE…

  16. Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS), Grades 7-12: Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonis, Doris G.

    Presented is the Introduction for the Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS), a multidisciplinary energy education program designed for infusion into the curriculum of grades 7-12. Included in the program are activity sets for Home Economics (SE 034 678), Industrial Arts (SE 034 679), Language Arts (SE 034 680), Mathematics (SE 034 681),…

  17. Earth Child: Games, Stories, Activities, Experiments & Ideas about Living Lightly on Planet Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, Kathryn; Waidner, Mary

    This book is a collection of activities, stories, ideas, and games designed to help adults and young children develop a shared awareness of their environment. The material is presented in eight chapters. Activities and stories are interwoven throughout each chapter to provide a holistic view of the topic covered. The end of each chapter contains…

  18. Activation of Learning and Creative Activity of the Vocational Pedagogical University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krayukhina, Olga E.; Shmakova, Larisa E.; Smetanina, Veronica Yu.; Nikolaeva, Elizabeth A.; Tershukova, Marina B.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the problem under study is based on the society's demand for training students-- future professional training teachers ready to solve in a creative manner a wide range of professional and pedagogical tasks, as well as to develop professionally-oriented creative work in the process of training; it is also caused by the insufficient…

  19. Creative Environmental Education Activities for Children. Environmental Education Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Valley Authority (Land Between the Lakes), Golden Pond, KY.

    Twenty-seven activities have been compiled to assist teachers in incorporating environmental methods and techniques into their preschool curricula. These activities are designed to complement the classroom curriculum and heighten participant awareness and appreciation of environmental resources and relationships. Each activity includes: (1)…

  20. Creativity, Problem Solving and Innovative Science: Insights from History, Cognitive Psychology and Neuroscience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldous, Carol R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the intersection between creativity, problem solving, cognitive psychology and neuroscience in a discussion surrounding the genesis of new ideas and innovative science. Three creative activities are considered. These are (a) the interaction between visual-spatial and analytical or verbal reasoning, (b) attending to feeling in…

  1. Teaching for Creativity by Science Teachers in Grades 5-10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Abdali, Nasser S.; Al-Balushi, Sulaiman M.

    2016-01-01

    This classroom observation study explored how science teachers (N = 22) teach for creativity in grades 5-10 in Oman. We designed an observation form with 4 main categories that targeted the instructional practices related to teaching for creativity: questioning strategy, teacher's responses to students' ideas, classroom activities to support…

  2. Association of hair iron levels with creativity and psychological variables related to creativity

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos M.; Iizuka, Kunio; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Kunitoki, Keiko; Sassa, Yuko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2013-01-01

    Creativity generally involves the conception of original and valuable ideas. Previous studies have suggested an association between creativity and the dopaminergic system, and that physical activity facilitates creativity. Iron plays a key role in the dopaminergic system and physical activity. Here, we newly investigated the associations between hair iron levels and creativity, dopamine-related traits and states [novelty seeking, extraversion, and vigor (motivational state)], as well as the physical activity level. In the present study, we addressed this issue by performing a hair mineral analysis to determine iron levels and a behavioral creativity test of divergent thinking and related psychological measures among young adults (254 men, 88 women; mean age 20.79 ± 2.03 years). Iron levels did not show any significant association with creativity but displayed significant positive associations with novelty seeking, extraversion, and physical activity level. These results may be partly congruent with the notion that iron plays a key role in the dopaminergic system and imply that iron is important for traits and physical activity, which facilitate creativity. Future interventional or longitudinal studies are warranted to identify any causal effects. PMID:24385960

  3. Healthy and Creative Tap Dance: Teaching a Lifetime Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Barbara L. Michiels; Ozmun, Michelle; Keeton, Gladys

    2013-01-01

    As a result of competitive dance television shows, interest in tap dance seems to have increased in the past few years. Tap dance is a challenging and fun lifetime physical activity that is appropriate for people of all ages. It is an excellent activity for K-12 physical education programs, higher education, parks and recreation facilities,…

  4. A Neurocognitive Framework for Human Creative Thought

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Arne; Haider, Hilde

    2017-01-01

    We are an intensely creative species. Creativity is the fountainhead of our civilizations and a defining characteristic of what makes us human. But for all its prominence at the apex of human mental faculties, we know next to nothing about how brains generate creative ideas. With all previous attempts to tighten the screws on this vexed problem unsuccessful – right brains, divergent thinking, defocused attention, default mode network, alpha enhancement, prefrontal activation, etc. (Dietrich and Kanso, 2010) – the neuroscientific study of creativity finds itself in a theoretical arid zone that has perhaps no equal in psychology. We propose here a general framework for a fresh attack on the problem and set it out under 10 foundational concepts. Most of the ideas we favor are part and parcel of the standard conceptual toolbox of cognitive neuroscience but their combination and significance to creativity are original. By outlining, even in such broad strokes, the theoretical landscape of cognitive neuroscience as it relates to creative insights, we hope to bring into clear focus the key enabling factors that are likely to have a hand in computing ideational combinations in the brain. PMID:28119660

  5. A Neurocognitive Framework for Human Creative Thought.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Arne; Haider, Hilde

    2016-01-01

    We are an intensely creative species. Creativity is the fountainhead of our civilizations and a defining characteristic of what makes us human. But for all its prominence at the apex of human mental faculties, we know next to nothing about how brains generate creative ideas. With all previous attempts to tighten the screws on this vexed problem unsuccessful - right brains, divergent thinking, defocused attention, default mode network, alpha enhancement, prefrontal activation, etc. (Dietrich and Kanso, 2010) - the neuroscientific study of creativity finds itself in a theoretical arid zone that has perhaps no equal in psychology. We propose here a general framework for a fresh attack on the problem and set it out under 10 foundational concepts. Most of the ideas we favor are part and parcel of the standard conceptual toolbox of cognitive neuroscience but their combination and significance to creativity are original. By outlining, even in such broad strokes, the theoretical landscape of cognitive neuroscience as it relates to creative insights, we hope to bring into clear focus the key enabling factors that are likely to have a hand in computing ideational combinations in the brain.

  6. Counseling the Gifted, Creative, and Talented. An Arts Activities Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Adele

    1987-01-01

    The role of music and dance in counseling gifted students is discussed. Included are a rationale and description for both music and dance therapy as well as suggested activities and bibliographies. (DB)

  7. Enhancing verbal creativity: modulating creativity by altering the balance between right and left inferior frontal gyrus with tDCS.

    PubMed

    Mayseless, N; Shamay-Tsoory, S G

    2015-04-16

    Creativity is the production of novel ideas that have value. Previous research indicated that while regions in the right hemisphere are implicated in the production of new ideas, damage to the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) is associated with increased creativity, indicating that the left IFG damage may have a "releasing" effect on creativity. To examine this, in the present study we used transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to modulate activity of the right and the left IFG. In the first experiment we show that whereas anodal tDCS over the right IFG coupled with cathodal tDCS over the left IFG increases creativity as measured by a verbal divergent thinking task, the reverse stimulation does not affect creative production. To further confirm that only altering the balance between the two hemispheres is crucial in modulating creativity, in the second experiment we show that stimulation targeting separately the left IFG (cathodal stimulation) or the right IFG (anodal stimulation) did not result in changes in creativity as measured by verbal divergent thinking. These findings support the balance hypothesis, according to which verbal creativity requires a balance of activation between the right and the left frontal lobes, and more specifically, between the right and the left IFG.

  8. Creating connections to life during life-threatening illness: Creative activity experienced by elderly people and occupational therapists

    PubMed Central

    la Cour, Karen; Josephsson, Staffan; Luborsky, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to discover and characterize components of engagement in creative activity as occupational therapy for elderly people dealing with life-threatening illness, from the perspective of both clients and therapists. Despite a long tradition of use in clinical interventions, key questions remain little addressed concerning how and why people seek these activities and the kinds of benefits that may result. Method Qualitative interviews were conducted with 8 clients and 7 therapists participating in creative workshops using crafts at a nursing home in Sweden. Analysis of the interviews was conducted using a constant comparative method. Findings Engaging in creative activity served as a medium that enabled creation of connections to wider culture and daily life that counters consequences of terminal illness, such as isolation. Creating connections to life was depicted as the core category, carried out in reference to three subcategories: (1) a generous receptive environment identified as the foundation for engaging in creative activity; (2) unfolding creations—an evolving process; (3) reaching beyond for possible meaning horizons. Conclusion The findings suggest that the domain of creative activity can enable the creation of connections to daily life and enlarge the experience of self as an active person, in the face of uncertain life-threatening illness. Ultimately, the features that participants specify can be used to refine and substantiate the use of creative activities in intervention and general healthcare. PMID:16389735

  9. [Optimization of educational activity of departments of educational creativity in the Extension Course Institute for Medical Practitioners MUNKTs n. a. P.V.Mandryka].

    PubMed

    Balakhovskiĭ, A A; Koshelev, V P; Anufriev, A A; Vlasenko, T N

    2013-09-01

    Educational creativity is the key component of educational activity. The article is devoted to logical structure of educational creativity, difficulties and problems of formation and development of educational creativity in lecturers participating in educative process with participants of the Extension Course Institute for Medical Practitioners MUNKTs n. a. P.V. Mandryka. Heuristic activity and methods that are a huge part of educational creativity are emphasized. Specific features of heuristic activity are shown; classification of heuristic methods is presented. For the first time authors gave characteristic of qualitative levels of educational creativity.

  10. Idea Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herlocker, Helen; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Provides information on motivational activities, demonstrations, experiments, software, lessons, field trips, and a game as ideas for instructional use. Includes topics on digestion in paramecium, diffusion, cells, interactive displays, slime molds, and the construction of an underwater viewing device. (RT)

  11. Developing On-Campus Work-Integrated Learning Activities: The Value of Integrating Community and Industry Partners into the Creative Arts Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleischmann, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Work-integrated learning (WIL) is increasingly identified as essential to helping creative arts students' transition from university into the creative industries workplace. Off-campus activities, such as work placements, play a major role in educating work-ready graduates. At the same time, increasing enrolment numbers in creative arts education…

  12. Cultivating creativity in conservation science.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Clare E; Pinsky, Malin L; Ryan, Maureen E; Souther, Sara; Terrell, Kimberly A

    2014-04-01

    Conservation practitioners and scientists are often faced with seemingly intractable problems in which traditional approaches fail. While other sectors (e.g., business) frequently emphasize creative thinking to overcome complex challenges, creativity is rarely identified as an essential skill for conservationists. Yet more creative approaches are urgently needed in the effort to sustain Earth's biodiversity. We identified 4 strategies to develop skills in creative thinking and discuss underlying research and examples supporting each strategy. First, by breaking down barriers between disciplines and surrounding oneself with unfamiliar people, concepts, and perspectives, one can expand base knowledge and experiences and increase the potential for new combinations of ideas. Second, by meeting people where they are (both literally and figuratively), one exposes oneself to new environments and perspectives, which again broadens experiences and increases ability to communicate effectively with stakeholders. Third, by embracing risk responsibly, one is more likely to develop new, nontraditional solutions and be open to high-impact outcomes. Finally, by following a cycle of learning, struggle, and reflection, one can trigger neurophysiological changes that allow the brain to become more creative. Creativity is a learned trait, rather than an innate skill. It can be actively developed at both the individual and institutional levels, and learning to navigate the relevant social and practical barriers is key to the process. To maximize the success of conservation in the face of escalating challenges, one must take advantage of what has been learned from other disciplines and foster creativity as both a professional skill and an essential component of career training and individual development.

  13. Mind Sparklers. Fireworks for Igniting Creativity in Young Minds. Book 2 for Grades 4-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Robert E.

    The activities in this book were designed to encourage students to perceive what is going on around them, to be both receptive to and critical of the ideas of others, to analyze problems, to elaborate upon ideas, to explore possibilities, and to see relationships. The activities call for all 18 of E. Paul Torrance's creative thinking abilities.…

  14. Creative Drama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Council on the Arts, St. Louis.

    As one component of the Special Arts Project and designed to stimulate the use of creative drama in the classroom, this booklet describes 26 topics for classroom dramatic activities. Examples of topics are slow-motion techniques, simultaneous conversation, magic strings, making an object real, texture walk, word toss, tag freezes, and changing…

  15. The Assessment of Creativity: An Investment-Based Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I review ideas about creativity and its assessment. I open with some general remarks on the nature of creativity. Then I present the investment theory of creativity. Then I describe prompts my colleagues and I have used to measure creativity. Next I describe some of the assessments we have used to measure creativity. The ultimate…

  16. The Improvement of Children's Creativity through Korean Picture Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Boo-Kyung; Kim, Jeongjun

    1999-01-01

    Examines how one Korean kindergarten used picture books to facilitate children's creativity. Describes students' responses to literature-based science activities related to a picture book. Concludes that good picture books can unleash children's minds from conventional science activities and that the development of the children's ideas depended on…

  17. Managing for creativity.

    PubMed

    Florida, Richard; Goodnight, Jim

    2005-01-01

    A company's most important asset isn't raw materials, transportation systems, or political influence. It's creative capital--simply put, an arsenal of creative thinkers whose ideas can be turned into valuable products and services. Creative employees pioneer new technologies, birth new industries, and power economic growth. If you want your company to succeed, these are the people you entrust it to. But how do you accommodate the complex and chaotic nature of the creative process while increasing efficiency, improving quality, and raising productivity? Most businesses haven't figured this out. A notable exception is SAS Institute, the world's largest privately held software company. SAS makes Fortune's 100 Best Companies to Work For list every year. The company has enjoyed low employee turnover, high customer satisfaction, and 28 straight years of revenue growth. What's the secret to all this success? The authors, an academic and a CEO, approach this question differently, but they've come to the same conclusion: SAS has learned how to harness the creative energies of all its stakeholders, including its customers, software developers, managers, and support staff. Its framework for managing creativity rests on three guiding principles. First, help employees do their best work by keeping them intellectually engaged and by removing distractions. Second, make managers responsible for sparking creativity and eliminate arbitrary distinctions between "suits" and "creatives". And third, engage customers as creative partners so you can deliver superior products. Underlying all three principles is a mandate to foster interaction--not just to collect individuals' ideas. By nurturing relationships among developers, salespeople, and customers, SAS is investing in its future creative capital. Within a management framework like SAS's, creativity and productivity flourish, flexibility and profitability go hand in hand, and work/life balance and hard work aren't mutually exclusive.

  18. Creatives Teaching Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustina, Charles; Sweet, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Creativity is very much in the forefront of current international economic news. As developing countries successfully vie with established economies for manufacturing and less-skilled jobs, the pressure is on the developed world to move on to the next economic break-through. Innovation and the creativity that drive it are seen as crucial to this…

  19. Ideas for Directors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Information Exchange, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Presents child care center directors with a variety of relevant management ideas from business and the child care field. They include translating employee body language; leadership myths; on-the-job teacher training; undesirable bosses; wasting employee talent; voicing disagreement; employee anger; encouraging creativity; and coping with late…

  20. The therapeutic effectiveness of creative activities on mental well-being: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Leckey, J

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the literature to ascertain the effectiveness of creative activities on mental well-being within the mental health context. Creative activities have always been evident within the context of mental health and there is increasing recognition that the arts have an important role to play in improving the health and well-being of individuals. Medline, Cinahl and PsycINFO were searched utilizing the keywords art, therap, well-being and mental health. The arts council data base was accessed and the Department of Health review of Arts for Health Working Group. Eleven studies were appraised by one reviewer utilizing the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool. It was difficult to make comparisons of the papers accessed as a result of the majority of studies being evaluative in nature and untaken within local projects therefore lacking in generalization. The evidence suggests that creative activities can have a healing and protective effect on mental well-being. Their therapeutic effects promote relaxation, provide a means of self-expression, reduce blood pressure while boosting the immune system and reducing stress. However, the evidence to support these claims is weak and assumptions were made that lacked reliability and validity. Establishing the benefit of participating in creative arts is difficult because of a lack of consistency of a clear definition, but it is important to identify the potential of creative arts as a therapeutic and transformational tools and not an intervention for therapeutic diversion.

  1. A Journey into Chaos: Creativity and the Unconscious**

    PubMed Central

    Andreasen, Nancy C.

    2011-01-01

    The capacity to be creative, to produce new concepts, ideas, inventions, objects or art, is perhaps the most important attribute of the human brain. We know very little, however, about the nature of creativity or its neural basis. Some important questions include how should we define creativity? How is it related (or unrelated) to high intelligence? What psychological processes or environmental circumstance cause creative insights to occur? How is it related to conscious and unconscious processes? What is happening at the neural level during moments of creativity? How is it related to health or illness, and especially mental illness? This paper will review introspective accounts from highly creative individuals. These accounts suggest that unconscious processes play an important role in achieving creative insights. Neuroimaging studies of the brain during “REST” (random episodic silent thought, also referred to as the default state) suggest that the association cortices are the primary areas that are active during this state and that the brain is spontaneously reorganising and acting as a self-organising system. Neuroimaging studies also suggest that highly creative individuals have more intense activity in association cortices when performing tasks that challenge them to “make associations.” Studies of creative individuals also indicate that they have a higher rate of mental illness than a noncreative comparison group, as well as a higher rate of both creativity and mental illness in their first-degree relatives. This raises interesting questions about the relationship between the nature of the unconscious, the unconscious and the predisposition to both creativity and mental illness. PMID:21694961

  2. Idea Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides descriptions of activities and programs that have been successful with secondary science students. Includes ideas related to repairing radio-controlled cars, cooperative science-library center, observation exercises, recordkeeping skills and peer grading, DC power supply, chemistry of poison ivy, spore science, and a tic-tac-toe review…

  3. Teaching Ideas and Activities for Classroom: Integrating Technology into the Pedagogy of Integral Calculus and the Approximation of Definite Integrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caglayan, Gunhan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to offer teaching ideas in the treatment of the definite integral concept and the Riemann sums in a technology-supported environment. Specifically, the article offers teaching ideas and activities for classroom for the numerical methods of approximating a definite integral via left- and right-hand Riemann sums, along…

  4. Crafting Creative Nonfiction: From Close Reading to Close Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollins, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    A process writing project in a third-grade classroom explored the idea of using nonfiction mentor texts to assist students in writing their own creative informational texts about animals. By looking at author craft and structure during close reading activities with nonfiction Twin Texts, students were taught how to emulate these techniques in…

  5. Training of verbal creativity modulates brain activity in regions associated with language- and memory-related demands.

    PubMed

    Fink, Andreas; Benedek, Mathias; Koschutnig, Karl; Pirker, Eva; Berger, Elisabeth; Meister, Sabrina; Neubauer, Aljoscha C; Papousek, Ilona; Weiss, Elisabeth M

    2015-10-01

    This functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) study was designed to investigate changes in functional patterns of brain activity during creative ideation as a result of a computerized, 3-week verbal creativity training. The training was composed of various verbal divergent thinking exercises requiring participants to train approximately 20 min per day. Fifty-three participants were tested three times (psychometric tests and fMRI assessment) with an intertest-interval of 4 weeks each. Participants were randomly assigned to two different training groups, which received the training time-delayed: The first training group was trained between the first and the second test, while the second group accomplished the training between the second and the third test session. At the behavioral level, only one training group showed improvements in different facets of verbal creativity right after the training. Yet, functional patterns of brain activity during creative ideation were strikingly similar across both training groups. Whole-brain voxel-wise analyses (along with supplementary region of interest analyses) revealed that the training was associated with activity changes in well-known creativity-related brain regions such as the left inferior parietal cortex and the left middle temporal gyrus, which have been shown as being particularly sensitive to the originality facet of creativity in previous research. Taken together, this study demonstrates that continuous engagement in a specific complex cognitive task like divergent thinking is associated with reliable changes of activity patterns in relevant brain areas, suggesting more effective search, retrieval, and integration from internal memory representations as a result of the training.

  6. Creativity and the Quantum Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goswami, Amit

    1988-01-01

    The idea that creative acts are quantum jumps in the brain's mechanism is explored. Descriptions of the creative process that support the central role of sudden and discontinuous leaps of thought are cited from various philosophers and scientists. Distinctions between the functions of the brain and of computers are drawn. (VW)

  7. Creative Play in Language Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSelms, Carolann

    Creativity is the formulation and expression of an idea which is novel and useful to the creator. It is inherent in the foreign language classroom. Interpretation of experience, or creative play, is a normal part of first language use; with guidance it can be part of the second language learning experience. The effective teacher will consciously…

  8. Associative Algorithms for Computational Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varshney, Lav R.; Wang, Jun; Varshney, Kush R.

    2016-01-01

    Computational creativity, the generation of new, unimagined ideas or artifacts by a machine that are deemed creative by people, can be applied in the culinary domain to create novel and flavorful dishes. In fact, we have done so successfully using a combinatorial algorithm for recipe generation combined with statistical models for recipe ranking…

  9. Functional role of frontal alpha oscillations in creativity.

    PubMed

    Lustenberger, Caroline; Boyle, Michael R; Foulser, A Alban; Mellin, Juliann M; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-06-01

    Creativity, the ability to produce innovative ideas, is a key higher-order cognitive function that is poorly understood. At the level of macroscopic cortical network dynamics, recent electroencephalography (EEG) data suggests that cortical oscillations in the alpha frequency band (8-12 Hz) are correlated with creative thinking. However, whether alpha oscillations play a functional role in creativity has remained unknown. Here we show that creativity is increased by enhancing alpha power using 10 Hz transcranial alternating current stimulation (10 Hz-tACS) of the frontal cortex. In a study of 20 healthy participants with a randomized, balanced cross-over design, we found a significant improvement of 7.4% in the Creativity Index measured by the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT), a comprehensive and most frequently used assay of creative potential and strengths. In a second similar study with 20 subjects, 40 Hz-tACS was used instead of 10 Hz-tACS to rule out a general "electrical stimulation" effect. No significant change in the Creativity Index was found for such frontal 40 Hz stimulation. Our results suggest that alpha activity in frontal brain areas is selectively involved in creativity; this enhancement represents the first demonstration of specific neuronal dynamics that drive creativity and can be modulated by non-invasive brain stimulation. Our findings agree with the model that alpha recruitment increases with internal processing demands and is involved in inhibitory top-down control, which is an important requirement for creative ideation.

  10. Creative Natural Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2012-01-01

    In the authors' science classrooms, students respond favorably and with more enthusiasm when they engage them with doing activities and building their own connections, as opposed to simply listening to or reading about the important concepts. Creative activities are important in science classrooms because creativity is not only an integral…

  11. Creative Writing and Schiller's Aesthetic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howarth, Peter

    2007-01-01

    For academics committed to the idea of an all-round aesthetic education, one of the great successes of the last thirty years has been the tremendous expansion of creative writing classes. Despite the dramatic expansion of creative writing as an academic discipline, the methods, ideals, and values of creative writing workshops have very often been…

  12. Creativity and Insight in Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golnabi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes the thought process involved in problem solving and its categorization as creative thinking as defined by psychologist R. Weisberg (2006). Additionally, the notion of insight, sometimes present in unconscious creative thinking and often leading to creative ideas, is discussed in the context of geometry problem solving. In…

  13. Coherence, Complexity and Creativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arecchi, Fortunato Tito

    We review the ideas and experiments that established the onset of laser coherence beyond a suitable threshold. That threshold is the first of a chain of bifurcations in a non linear dynamics, leading eventually to deterministic chaos in lasers. In particular, the so called HC behavior has striking analogies with the electrical activity of neurons. Based on these considerations, we develop a dynamical model of neuron synchronization leading to coherent global perceptions. Synchronization implies a transitory control of neuron chaos. Depending on the time duration of this control, a cognitive agent has different amounts of awareness. Combining this with a stream of external inputs, one can point at an optimal use of internal resources, that is called cognitive creativity. While coherence is associated with long range correlations, complexity arises whenever an array of coupled dynamical systems displays multiple paths of coherence. What is the relation among the three concepts in the title? While coherence is associated with long range correlations, complexity arises whenever an array of coupled dynamical systems displays multiple paths of coherence. Creativity corresponds to a free selection of a coherence path within a complex nest. As sketched above, it seems dynamically related to chaos control.

  14. Grow Creativity!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shively, Candace Hackett

    2011-01-01

    Creativity matters. A shared vocabulary and lens for creativity helps teachers and students know what it means to "be creative" and where to start. J. P. Guilford's FFOE model of divergent thinking from the 1950s offers four dimensions to describe creativity: (1) Fluency; (2) Flexibility; (3) Originality; and (4) Elaboration. FFOE makes time spent…

  15. Positively Valenced Stimuli Facilitate Creative Novel Metaphoric Processes by Enhancing Medial Prefrontal Cortical Activation

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Karuna; Beeman, Mark; Faust, Miriam; Mashal, Nira

    2013-01-01

    A metaphor is a figure of speech in which a subject is symbolic of another unrelated object. In the present study, we examined neural patterns associated with both novel unfamiliar and conventional familiar metaphoric processing, and how these patterns are modulated by affective valence. Prior to fMRI scanning, participants received a list of word pairs (novel unfamiliar metaphors as well as conventional familiar metaphors) and were asked to denote the valence (positive, negative, or neutral) of each word pair. During scanning, participants had to decide whether the word pairs formed meaningful or meaningless expressions. Results indicate that participants were faster and more accurate at deciding that positively valenced metaphors were meaningful compared to neutral metaphors. These behavioral findings were accompanied by increased activation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and the right inferior parietal lobe (RIPL). Specifically, positively valenced novel unfamiliar metaphors elicited activation in these brain regions in addition to the left superior temporal gyrus when compared to neutral novel metaphors. We also found that the mPFC and PCC mediated the processing of positively valenced metaphors when compared to negatively valenced metaphors. Positively valenced conventional metaphors, however, elicited different neural signatures when contrasted with either neutral or negatively valenced conventional metaphors. Together, our results indicate that positively valenced stimuli facilitate creative metaphoric processes (specifically novel metaphoric processes) by mediating attention and cognitive control processes required for the access, integration, and selection of semantic associations via modulation of the mPFC. The present study is important for the development of neural accounts of emotion-cognition interactions required for creativity, language, and successful social functioning in general. PMID:23637686

  16. Development of Creative Activity of Students in the System of the Organizational Culture of the Modern University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khairullina, Nursafa; Bakhtizin, Ramil; Gaisina, Lyutsiya; Kosintseva, Tamara; Belonozhko, Lidia

    2016-01-01

    Student creativity today is indicative of the successful operation of the higher education institution in the training of specialists. Organizational culture, being a complex of common and shared by all subjects of teaching and educational activity such as values, norms, beliefs, acts as an important integration factor influencing the creative…

  17. Strategies for Improving Language across the Curriculum: Ideas and Activities for Every Classroom. Series of Caribbean Volunteer Publications, No. 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voluntary Services Overseas, Castries (St. Lucia).

    This book contains 50 hands-on activities representing most subjects taught at the secondary school level in the Caribbean. It lists the order of activities by chapter and name of each activity in the general table of contents. The first chapter, Investigating and Organizing Ideas, presents six activities and discusses semantic mapping, mind maps,…

  18. Innovation and creativity: A critical linkage

    SciTech Connect

    Hueter, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Creativity involves the associating of hitherto unrelated elements to form a new and useful combination. All have the ability but most seldom use it because of some false beliefs and failure to understand the creative process. Deterrents to creativity include fear of criticism, narrowness of education and training, habit, negative attitudes toward problems, lack of motivation, lack of self-confidence, lack of courage and discouragement by failures. The recognition and development of creative ideas requires mental effort, an open mind, searching seemingly unrelated fields and definition of the problem. Brainstorming is widely used to produce alternate ideas. Modifications of it are the Gordon Technique and Synectics. Morphological analysis and the examination of attributes are other aids to creativity. Recognition of a need, or of a new use of an old idea can be helpful. Management should encourage attempts at creativity. If the will exists, creativity can be developed by conscious effort instead of being left to chance.

  19. The Effect of Creative Drama Activities on Personal Development of Housewives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aykac, Murtaza

    2013-01-01

    This research was conducted with the purpose of determining the contribution of creative drama to the personal development of housewives. The study group consisted of 17 housewives who attended the Creative Drama Course in 2009 at the Contemporary Drama Association (Cagdas Drama Dernegi) in Cankaya, Ankara. The qualitative method was employed in…

  20. Caring for the Little Ones: Creative Activities for Infants and Toddlers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Karen

    1997-01-01

    Main section argues that developing aptitudes for creativity in infants and toddlers is an important goal. Suggests the foundations of creativity begin with feeling valued, learning to combine things, exploring space and direction (gross motor development), fine motor development, making things happen, making a mess, and exposure to variety.…

  1. Using Model-Eliciting Activities as a Tool to Identify and Develop Mathematically Creative Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coxbill, Emmy; Chamberlin, Scott A.; Weatherford, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Traditional classroom methods for identifying mathematically creative students have been inadequate. Identifying students who could potentially be mathematically creative is instrumental in the development of students and in meeting their affective and educational needs. One prospective identification tool is the use of model-eliciting activities…

  2. Creative Activity, Personality, Mental Illness, and Short-Term Mating Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaussart, Melanie L.; Kaufman, Scott Barry; Kaufman, James C.

    2012-01-01

    It has been argued that creativity evolved, at least in part, through sexual selection to attract mates. Recent research lends support to this view and has also demonstrated a link between certain dimensions of schizotypy, creativity, and short-term mating. The current study delves deeper into these relationships by focusing on engagement in…

  3. The Development of Creativity in Preschoolers' Drawings through Task-Oriented Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dulama, Maria Eliza; Iovu, Mihai-Bogdan; Vanea, Cornelia

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to plan working task for preschool children in order to deliver original and creative outputs. The theoretical background of the paper is set in defining creativity as "the capacity to create something new, original, and adequate to reality" (Roco, 2004; Jaoui, 1975; Rosca, 1981; Boden, 1992). The research…

  4. Educating for Environmental Sustainability and Educating for Creativity: Actively Compatible or Missed Opportunities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stables, Kay

    2009-01-01

    This paper identifies the importance of both creativity and environmental sustainability for developing individual learners and society as a whole. It suggests that sometimes these two concepts appear to be in tension and that, politically, each is often championed by different communities. The relationship between creativity and environmental…

  5. The Creative Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willings, David

    The paper examines variables involved in creativity and suggests ways in which gifted adolescents may be helped to isolate conditions under which they get their best ideas. Among variables considered are the hypnagogic state (physical and mental condition just before sleep), the hynopompic state (physiological and mental condition upon awakening),…

  6. Fostering Creative Expression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Elizabeth

    1968-01-01

    Teachers can encourage youngsters to express their ideas creatively by providing help in three areas--content, language, and process. In terms of content, children often have few resources for tapping their thoughts, and may need 'pump primers' such as being told the beginning and end of a story and speculating about a variety of middles. Once…

  7. Age-Related Changes in Creative Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roskos-Ewoldsen, Beverly; Black, Sheila R.; Mccown, Steven M.

    2008-01-01

    Age-related differences in cognitive processes were used to understand age-related declines in creativity. According to the Geneplore model (Finke, Ward, & Smith, 1992), there are two phases of creativity--generating an idea and exploring the implications of the idea--each with different underlying cognitive processes. These two phases are…

  8. Facilitative Effects of Practice upon Nonverbal Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roweton, William E.; Spencer, Herbert L., Jr.

    Numerous studies of verbal creativity indicate that idea originality increases progressively as more ideas are produced. The present study tested the effects of practice upon nonverbal creativity. Thirty-two fifth grade children were administered Form A and/or Form B of Torrance's picture completion task for 5 consecutive days. Figural originality…

  9. Origins of Genius: Darwinian Perspectives on Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonton, Dean Keith

    This study of creative genius argues that creativity can best be understood as a Darwinian process of variation and selection. The artist or scientist generates a wealth of ideas, and then subjects these ideas to aesthetic or scientific judgment, selecting only those that have the best chance to survive and reproduce. The book draws on the latest…

  10. Why Creativity Now? A Conversation with Sir Ken Robinson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azzam, Amy M.

    2009-01-01

    In this interview, creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson makes the case for creativity as the crucial 21st-century skill. Genuine creative processes involve critical thinking as well as imaginative insights and fresh ideas. Also, creativity is a process, not a single event, one that requires continual evaluation. It's about everyone, it's a function…

  11. Level of Student's Creative Thinking in Classroom Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siswono, Tatag Yuli Eko

    2011-01-01

    It is reasonable to assume that people are creative, but the degree of creativity is different. The Idea of the level of student's creative thinking has been expressed by experts, such as Gotoh (2004), and Krulik and Rudnick (1999). The perspective of the mathematics creative thinking refers to a combination of logical and divergent thinking which…

  12. Monster Magic: A Reading Activities Idea Book for Use with Children. A Fun with Reading Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Zinita

    Intended as a usable resource for librarians and teachers in planning and implementing a program for young library users and students, this book was developed to stimulate children to use the library. The introduction contains opening comments--including an explanation of how the theme of "monster magic" inspires creativity, specific goals, and a…

  13. Possible Brain Mechanisms of Creativity.

    PubMed

    Heilman, Kenneth M

    2016-06-01

    Creativity is the new discovery, understanding, development and expression of orderly and meaningful relationships. Creativity has three major stages: preparation, the development (nature and nurture) of critical knowledge and skills; innovation, the development of a creative solution; and creative production. Successful preparation requires a basic level of general intelligence and domain specific knowledge and skills and highly creative people may have anatomic alterations of specific neocortical regions. Innovation requires disengagement and divergent thinking primarily mediated by frontal networks. Creative people are often risk-takers and novelty seekers, behaviors that activate their ventral striatal reward system. Innovation also requires associative and convergent thinking, activities that are dependent on the integration of highly distributed networks. People are often most creative when they are in mental states associated with reduced levels of brain norepinephrine, which may enhance the communication between distributed networks. We, however, need to learn more about the brain mechanisms of creativity.

  14. From aggressiveness to creativity.

    PubMed

    Mrevlje, Gorazd V

    2004-02-01

    Psychology has a long tradition of considering human creativity as a distinct human characteristic and a special kind of human activity. After explaining the key motives for such an attitude, the author discusses those forms of healthy aggressiveness that stand out as necessary and constitutive elements of the creative process. Taking the well-known statement of C. G. Jung's 'The person who does not build (create), will demolish and destroy' as a starting point, the author compares the basic premises for understanding the process of human creativity, at the same time drawing on Freud's psychology of the individual and Jung's principle of the collective unconscious as well as his notion of 'complexes'. In doing so, the author somewhat boldly paraphrases Jung's dictum: 'In order to be creative, rather than just constructive, one must occasionally also destroy'. With reference to Wallas, Taylor and Neumann (Wallas 1926; Taylor 1959;;Neumann 2001), the author goes on to explore those concepts which help us to investigate the phenomenon of human creativity, drawing distinctions between emergent, expressive, productive, inventive and innovative creativity. The second part of the article discusses the importance of intelligence, originality, nonconformity, subversiveness and free-mindedness for the creative process of human beings. The author concludes with a further explanation of Erich Neumann's argument that human creativity cannot be understood solely as a result of sociogenetic factors, and argues that it is only by taking into consideration Jung's perception of creativity that a global ontological understanding of these processes can be achieved.

  15. Creative Concept Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David S.

    2002-01-01

    Recommends the use of concept mapping in science teaching and proposes that it be presented as a creative activity. Includes a sample lesson plan of a potato stamp concept mapping activity for astronomy. (DDR)

  16. A Creative Approach to Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macaranas, Natividad

    An innovative teaching method used in a theories of personality class at Eastern New Mexico University is described. The objectives of this method were to foster growth in creativity among students by involving them in creative activities or experiential sessions and to test for improvement in student creativity scores. The following procedure was…

  17. Creativity and the management team.

    PubMed

    Ross, A

    1984-01-01

    What is creativity? Is it an untempered gift found only in a few rare individuals? Or, is it a skill that can be developed in the people who make up your management team? As applied to medical group practice, creativity is a process through which the management team can originate ideas for responding to a complicated environment. To be effective, creativity must be fostered in individuals and in the organization. Drawing from lessons of successful corporations, the author examines the management styles which are conducive to creativity and innovation. Strong team management and proper orientation of new staff members are essential in building a foundation for creativity. To assist medical groups, key elements that are fundamental to fostering creativity in the organization are presented.

  18. The Point of Creative Frustration and the Creative Process: A New Look at an Old Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapp, D. David

    1992-01-01

    This paper offers an extension of Graham Wallas' model of the creative process. It identifies periods of problem solving, incubation, and growth with specific points of initial idea inception, creative frustration, and illumination. Responses to creative frustration are described including denial, rationalization, acceptance of stagnation, and new…

  19. Corporate Creativity Comes of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caudron, Shari

    1998-01-01

    Offers suggestions for fostering an idea-friendly culture: (1) allow employees to fail, (2) let them ask silly questions; (3) let them see their own kind of stimulus; (4) make awareness of creativity a top priority; (5) gain top management's support; (6) let people express opinions; and (7) encourage cross-fertilization of ideas. (JOW)

  20. Brain and Creativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliverio, A.

    Creativity can be considered from different points of view. Afirst possibility is to trace its natural history in mammals, mostly in non human primates. A second one is to consider mental processes, such as analogies, that may result in creative associations as evident in many fields, from arts to sciences. These two approaches lead to a better understanding of cognitive systems at the roots of creative behaviour. A third strategy relies on an analysis of primary and secondary states of mind characterizing flow and creativity. Flow, the mental state of operation in which a person is fully immersed in what he or she is doing, typical of intense problem solving activities, has been explained in terms of reduced prefrontal activity. While it is not difficult to carry out tests of problem solving activity, creativity is much more elusive and it is not easy to measure it. Thus, flow has often been simplistically assimilated to creativity and it has been assumed that also creati ve performance depends on low prefrontal activity. It is instead proposed that creativity involves two consecutive steps: 1. Generation of novelty, mostly in the ventral striatum. 2. Analysis of novelty by the prefrontal cortex that transforms it into creative behaviour. The emergence of creativity has been explained through a Darwinian process based upon the classic variation-selection procedure. Thus, basal ganglia, with their implicit strategies and memories, may be regarded as a mechanism that continuously generates novelty (variation) while the prefrontal cortex, possibly its dorsolateral areas, may be considered as the computational mechanism that transforms novelty (selection) into explicit creative behaviours.

  1. Unlocking Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonietti, Alessandro

    1997-01-01

    Debunks five misconceptions about improving creative thinking. To encourage students to think creatively, instructional techniques should reflect an integrated set of mental skills, use materials mimicking real-life situations, consider students' beliefs and tendencies toward creative thinking, show metacognitive sensibility, and foster a creative…

  2. Optimizing Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisk, Dorothy A.

    2014-01-01

    Transforming education or business starts with transforming one's mind, and that inner transformation starts with opening up to--indeed welcoming--the inevitable bursts of creativity available to everyone. Sidney J Parnes, one of the world's leading experts on creative problem-solving (CPSI), innovation and creativity, said, "I dream a dream,…

  3. Creative Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramwell, Gillian; Reilly, Rosemary C.; Lilly, Frank R.; Kronish, Neomi; Chennabathni, Revathi

    2011-01-01

    Good teaching is creative teaching, yet there is little research focusing on creative teachers themselves. In this article we report a synthesis of 13 qualitative case studies and 2 quantitative studies of teachers who demonstrated everyday or local creativity in their work. Themes and categories were identified through constant comparison and…

  4. The time-course of EEG alpha power changes in creative ideation

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Daniela; Benedek, Mathias; Papousek, Ilona; Weiss, Elisabeth M.; Fink, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Increases in EEG alpha power during creative ideation are among the most consistent findings in the neuroscientific study of creativity, but existing studies did not focus on time-related changes of EEG alpha activity patterns during the process of creative ideation so far. Since several cognitive processes are involved in the generation of creative ideas, different EEG correlates may result as a function of time. In this study we addressed this crucial point. Forty-five participants worked on the “Alternative Uses Task” while the EEG was recorded and changes in task-related power (relative to rest) in the upper-frequency band (10–12 Hz) for three isochronous time intervals of the idea generation period were determined. Alpha power changes during idea generation followed a characteristic time course: we found a general increase of alpha power at the beginning of idea generation that was followed by a decrease and finally by a re-increase of alpha prior to responding that was most pronounced at parietal and temporal sites of the right hemisphere. Additionally, the production of more original ideas was accompanied by increasing hemispheric asymmetry (more alpha in the right than left hemisphere) with increasing duration of the idea generation period. The observed time course of brain activity may reflect the progression of different but well-known stages in the idea generation process: that is the initial retrieval of common and old ideas followed by the actual generation of novel and more creative ideas by overcoming typical responses through processes of mental simulation and imagination. PMID:24860485

  5. The effects of duration of exposure to the REAPS model in developing students' general creativity and creative problem solving in science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhusaini, Abdulnasser Alashaal F.

    The Real Engagement in Active Problem Solving (REAPS) model was developed in 2004 by C. June Maker and colleagues as an intervention for gifted students to develop creative problem solving ability through the use of real-world problems. The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effects of the REAPS model on developing students' general creativity and creative problem solving in science with two durations as independent variables. The long duration of the REAPS model implementation lasted five academic quarters or approximately 10 months; the short duration lasted two quarters or approximately four months. The dependent variables were students' general creativity and creative problem solving in science. The second purpose of the study was to explore which aspects of creative problem solving (i.e., generating ideas, generating different types of ideas, generating original ideas, adding details to ideas, generating ideas with social impact, finding problems, generating and elaborating on solutions, and classifying elements) were most affected by the long duration of the intervention. The REAPS model in conjunction with Amabile's (1983; 1996) model of creative performance provided the theoretical framework for this study. The study was conducted using data from the Project of Differentiation for Diverse Learners in Regular Classrooms (i.e., the Australian Project) in which one public elementary school in the eastern region of Australia cooperated with the DISCOVER research team at the University of Arizona. All students in the school from first to sixth grade participated in the study. The total sample was 360 students, of which 115 were exposed to a long duration and 245 to a short duration of the REAPS model. The principal investigators used a quasi-experimental research design in which all students in the school received the treatment for different durations. Students in both groups completed pre- and posttests using the Test of Creative Thinking

  6. Client perceptions of the Tree Theme Method™: a structured intervention based on storytelling and creative activities.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, A Birgitta; Peterson, Kerstin; Leufstadius, Christel; Jansson, Jan-Ake; Eklund, Mona

    2010-09-01

    The Tree Theme Method (TTM) is an intervention based on sessions involving creative activities and life storytelling/story-making, in which the client paints trees representing various periods of his/her life. The aim of this study was to investigate clients' experiences of participating in a TTM intervention and their perceptions of the therapeutic relationship. Thematic interviews were undertaken. Twenty clients attending general outpatient mental healthcare units were recruited after having participated in the intervention. A qualitative content analysis resulted in six categories: “From feeling a pressure to perform to becoming focused and expressive”, “Expressing oneself and one's life situation led to awakening of memories and feelings”, “New perspectives of self-image, everyday life and relations to others”, “Story-making led to shaping and reconstructing one's life story”, “Interaction was of importance when reconstructing one's life story” and, finally, “The attitude of the occupational therapist was of importance for the development of the therapeutic relationship”. There seemed to be a close association between the intervention and the therapeutic relationship in starting a process of opening up new perspectives on everyday life, but there is a need for further studies including therapists' experience of using the TTM and their perception of the client–therapist relationship.

  7. Meta-Creativity: Being Creative about Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runco, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of meta-creativity is defined and explored, with examples drawn from the long and productive career of Arthur Cropley. "Meta-creativity" may sound like jargon, but then again, given how meta is used in the sciences (e.g., "meta-analysis," "meta-cognition"), it is a perfectly apt term. It is the best label…

  8. America's looming creativity crisis.

    PubMed

    Florida, Richard

    2004-10-01

    The strength of the American economy does not rest on its manufacturing prowess, its natural resources, or the size of its market. It turns on one factor--the country's openness to new ideas, which has allowed it to attract the brightest minds from around the world and harness their creative energies. But the United States is on the verge of losing that competitive edge. As the nation tightens its borders to students and scientists and subjects federal research funding to ideological and religious litmus tests, many other countries are stepping in to lure that creative capital away. Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Denmark, and others are spending more on research and development and shoring up their universities in an effort to attract the world's best--including Americans. If even a few of these nations draw away just a small percentage of the creative workers from the U.S., the effect on its economy will be enormous. In this article, the author introduces a quantitative measure of the migration of creative capital called the Global Creative-Class Index. It shows that, far from leading the world, the United States doesn't even rank in the top ten in the percentage of its workforce engaged in creative occupations. What's more, the baby boomers will soon retire. And data showing large drops in foreign student applications to U.S. universities and in the number of visas issued to knowledge workers, along with concomitant increases in immigration in other countries, suggest that the erosion of talent from the United States will only intensify. To defend the U.S. economy, the business community must take the lead in ensuring that global talent can move efficiently across borders, that education and research are funded at radically higher levels, and that we tap into the creative potential of more and more workers. Because wherever creativity goes, economic growth is sure to follow.

  9. Creativity under the gun.

    PubMed

    Amabile, Teresa M; Hadley, Constance N; Kramer, Steven J

    2002-08-01

    If you're like most managers, you've worked with people who swear they do their most creative work under tight deadlines. You may use pressure as a management technique, believing it will spur people on to great leaps of insight. You may even manage yourself this way. If so, are you right? Not necessarily, these researchers say. There are instances where ingenuity flourishes under extreme time pressure--for instance, a NASA team within hours comes up with a primitive but effective fix for the failing air filtration system aboard Apollo 13. But when creativity is under the gun, it usually ends up getting killed, the authors say. They recently took a close look at how people experience time pressure, collecting and analyzing more than 9,000 daily diary entries from individuals who were working on projects that required high levels of creativity and measuring their ability to innovate under varying levels of time pressure. The authors describe common characteristics of time pressure and outline four working environments under which creativity may or may not flourish. High-pressure days that still yield creativity are full of focus and meaningful urgency--people feel like they are on a mission. High-pressure days that yield no creativity lack such focus--people feel like they are on a treadmill, forced to switch gears often. On low-pressure days that yield creativity, people feel like they are on an expedition--exploring ideas rather than just identifying problems. And on low-pressure days that yield no creative thinking, people work on autopilot--doing their jobs without engaging too deeply. Managers should avoid extreme time pressure when possible; after all, complex cognitive processing takes time. For when they can't, the authors suggest ways to mollify its effects.

  10. Kacang Cerdik: A Conceptual Design of an Idea Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murah, Mohd Zamri; Abdullah, Zuraidah; Hassan, Rosilah; Bakar, Marini Abu; Mohamed, Ibrahim; Amin, Hazilah Mohd

    2013-01-01

    An idea management system is where ideas are stored and then can be evaluated and analyzed. It provides the structure and the platform for users to contribute ideas for innovation and creativity. Designing and developing an idea management system is a complex task because it involves many users and lot of ideas. Some of the critical features for…

  11. Creative and Communicative Homework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, April

    1988-01-01

    Suggests creative homework assignments to teach three Spanish grammatical structures (preterite and imperfect, future, and subjunctive) and theme oriented vocabulary (food, fashion, home furnishing, and nature). Suggested homework activities include poetry and letter writing, free association, and scavenger hunts. (LMO)

  12. Finding the Little 'c' in Physics: A Multiple Case Study Examining the Development of Creative Activities in the Physics Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Christopher

    This study focused on how physics teachers develop and implement activities that promote creative thinking strategies in the standards based physics classroom. A particular focus was placed on every day or little "c", creativity, which can be taught in the high school classroom. The study utilized a multiple case study design, which allows for in-depth study in a variety of settings. Four participants from various high schools were identified utilizing administrator recommendations. Data were then collected via interviews, observations, and documents. The data were coded and analyzed for emerging themes. The themes were then merged to determine findings to the stated research questions. The research demonstrated the importance of modifying activities for student interest and understanding through effective use of scientific inquiry. The past experiences and professional development of the participants served as a vital piece to the development of their educational pedagogy especially concerning inquiry and questioning strategies. It was also established that an unstructured, positive classroom environment is a vital aspect of teaching while supporting creative thinking skills.

  13. Gesture Facilitates Children's Creative Thinking.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Elizabeth; Lewis, Carine

    2017-02-01

    Gestures help people think and can help problem solvers generate new ideas. We conducted two experiments exploring the self-oriented function of gesture in a novel domain: creative thinking. In Experiment 1, we explored the relationship between children's spontaneous gesture production and their ability to generate novel uses for everyday items (alternative-uses task). There was a significant correlation between children's creative fluency and their gesture production, and the majority of children's gestures depicted an action on the target object. Restricting children from gesturing did not significantly reduce their fluency, however. In Experiment 2, we encouraged children to gesture, and this significantly boosted their generation of creative ideas. These findings demonstrate that gestures serve an important self-oriented function and can assist creative thinking.

  14. Ideas Exchange: Physical Education as a Dynamic Content Area Should Motivate Students to Be Physically Active. What New Ideas Can You Suggest to Kick Off the New School Year and Get Everyone "Moving" in the Right Direction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Melissa A.; Wright, James; Magnotta, John; Goldberg, Mark; Muller, Barbara; Reitz, Adam; Zavatto, Laura; Christenson, Bob; Winiecki, Tom; Beardsley, Rita; Connors, Shelly; Robelee, Margaret E.; Gosset, Michael; Mavrek, Srecko

    2010-01-01

    Physical education as a dynamic content area should motivate students to be physically active. In this article, readers suggest new ideas to kick off the new school year and get everyone "moving" in the right direction.

  15. Ideas Exchange: Should Students Be Granted a Waiver from Physical Education if They Are Involved in Other Activities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sipe, Roberta; Belka, David; Kamla, Jim; Christenson, Robert S.; Magnotta, John; Lorenzi, David G.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the opinions/ideas of professionals who were asked this question: "Should students be granted a waiver from physical education if they are involved in other activities?" These professionals share the pros and cons of the waiver question.

  16. Creativity and the surgeon.

    PubMed

    Gauderer, Michael W L

    2009-01-01

    This Robert E. Gross lecture is an analysis of the concept of creativity and how it relates to the practice of surgery. The questions-why surgery and creativity are closely associated; what influences creativity; why we should be concerned about it; and, finally, what rewards it brings-are discussed. In a personal note, the author describes his approach to creativity, with simplification as a central theme. He presents 6 examples of his work and the lessons learned from this activity. He stresses the importance of fostering creativity in all institutions in which physicians are trained and the need to focus on medical students, residents, and fellows. The critical importance of identifying, nurturing, and protecting innovators, as well as the role of the mentor, is emphasized. Because creativity has a place in many settings and discovery encompasses a wide spectrum, the author provides multiple suggestions aimed at encouraging the participation of those providing surgical care in the fulfilling experience of creative activity and innovation.

  17. Creativity and positive symptoms in schizophrenia revisited: Structural connectivity analysis with diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Son, Shuraku; Kubota, Manabu; Miyata, Jun; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Aso, Toshihiko; Urayama, Shin-ichi; Murai, Toshiya; Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2015-05-01

    Both creativity and schizotypy are suggested to be manifestations of the hyperactivation of unusual or remote concepts/words. However, the results of studies on creativity in schizophrenia are diverse, possibly due to the multifaceted aspects of creativity and difficulties of differentiating adaptive creativity from pathological schizotypy/positive symptoms. To date, there have been no detailed studies comprehensively investigating creativity, positive symptoms including delusions, and their neural bases in schizophrenia. In this study, we investigated 43 schizophrenia and 36 healthy participants using diffusion tensor imaging. We used idea, design, and verbal (semantic and phonological) fluency tests as creativity scores and Peters Delusions Inventory as delusion scores. Subsequently, we investigated group differences in every psychological score, correlations between fluency and delusions, and relationships between these scores and white matter integrity using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). In schizophrenia, idea and verbal fluency were significantly lower in general, and delusion score was higher than in healthy controls, whereas there were no group differences in design fluency. We also found positive correlation between phonological fluency and delusions in schizophrenia. By correlation analyses using TBSS, we found that the anterior part of corpus callosum was the substantially overlapped area, negatively correlated with both phonological fluency and delusion severity. Our results suggest that the anterior interhemispheric dysconnectivity might be associated with executive dysfunction, and disinhibited automatic spreading activation in the semantic network was manifested as uncontrollable phonological fluency or delusions. This dysconnectivity could be one possible neural basis that differentiates pathological positive symptoms from adaptive creativity.

  18. Creative Stories: A Storytelling Game Fostering Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koukourikos, Antonis; Karampiperis, Pythagoras; Panagopoulos, George

    2014-01-01

    The process of identifying techniques for fostering creativity, and applying these theoretical constructs in real-world educational activities, is, by nature, multifaceted and not straightforward, pertaining to several fields such as cognitive theory and psychology. Furthermore, the quantification of the impact of different activities on…

  19. The Road to Creative Achievement: A Latent Variable Model of Ability and Personality Predictors.

    PubMed

    Jauk, Emanuel; Benedek, Mathias; Neubauer, Aljoscha C

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the significance of different well-established psychometric indicators of creativity for real-life creative outcomes. Specifically, we tested the effects of creative potential, intelligence, and openness to experiences on everyday creative activities and actual creative achievement. Using a heterogeneous sample of 297 adults, we performed latent multiple regression analyses by means of structural equation modelling. We found openness to experiences and two independent indicators of creative potential, ideational originality and ideational fluency, to predict everyday creative activities. Creative activities, in turn, predicted actual creative achievement. Intelligence was found to predict creative achievement, but not creative activities. Moreover, intelligence moderated the effect of creative activities on creative achievement, suggesting that intelligence may play an important role in transforming creative activities into publically acknowledged creative achievements. This study supports the view of creativity as a multifaceted construct and provides an integrative model illustrating the potential interplay between its different facets.

  20. Creative Activity and Its Impact on Student Learning--Issues of Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allam, Claire

    2008-01-01

    The use of filmmaking as a creative learning tool within the academic curriculum has been pioneered at the University of Sheffield. Filmmaking has been found to promote a lively, exciting and challenging environment in the classroom. It produces highly motivated students and makes learning fun by giving them a sense of empowerment and achievement.…

  1. Creative, Kinesthetic Activities to Motivate Young Learners to Communicate: A Conversation with Paula Garrett-Rucks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devall, Kelly Davidson

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a question and answer session in which Paula Garrett-Rucks discusses how creativity and kinesthetics motivate young language learners, the type of characteristics she might consider for different age groups in planning lessons, her views on the goals of world language teachers of young learners, and what a typical lesson…

  2. Intrapreneurship: tapping employee creativity.

    PubMed

    Marszalek-Gaucher, E; Elsenhans, V D

    1988-12-01

    Seeking ways to produce new products, processes, and programs that would result in cost savings or increased revenue for nursing services and the institution, as well as attracting and retaining bright, creative nursing employees, the authors developed a pilot program to allow intrapreneurs to "run with" their ideas. The authors discuss the mechanics of their program development, implementation, and evaluation as well as examples of innovative projects under development by nursing employees.

  3. Activities Ideas Definition Strategies (AIDS). Learning Disabilities: A Book of Resources for the Classroom Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkin, Barbara; And Others

    Intended for regular classroom teachers with learning disabled children in their classes, the manual provides information and/or teaching ideas in 34 areas. Most sections are organized into three parts--examples of student behaviors, a discussion, and suggestions. Individual sections deal with the following areas: allergy, associative…

  4. Creativity in later life.

    PubMed

    Price, K A; Tinker, A M

    2014-08-01

    The ageing population presents significant challenges for the provision of social and health services. Strategies are needed to enable older people to cope within a society ill prepared for the impacts of these demographic changes. The ability to be creative may be one such strategy. This review outlines the relevant literature and examines current public health policy related to creativity in old age with the aim of highlighting some important issues. As well as looking at the benefits and negative aspects of creative activity in later life they are considered in the context of the theory of "successful ageing". Creative activity plays an important role in the lives of older people promoting social interaction, providing cognitive stimulation and giving a sense of self-worth. Furthermore, it is shown to be useful as a tool in the multi-disciplinary treatment of health problems common in later life such as depression and dementia. There are a number of initiatives to encourage older people to participate in creative activities such as arts-based projects which may range from visual arts to dance to music to intergenerational initiatives. However, participation shows geographical variation and often the responsibility of provision falls to voluntary organisations. Overall, the literature presented suggests that creative activity could be a useful tool for individuals and society. However, further research is needed to establish the key factors which contribute to patterns of improved health and well-being, as well as to explore ways to improve access to services.

  5. Some Ideas about Idea Processors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobrin, David N.

    Idea processors are computer programs that can aid the user in creating outlines by allowing the user to move, reorder, renumber, expand upon, or delete entries with a push of a button. The question is whether these programs are useful and should be offered to students. Theoretically, an idea processor prioritizes ideas by placing them in a…

  6. Polite Girls and Creative Boys? Students' Gender Moderates Accuracy of Teachers' Ratings of Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gralewski, Jacek; Karwowski, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether, and to what extent, teachers are able to recognize the creativity of their students. The study measured the creative abilities, creative attitude, creative activity, as well as intrinsic motivation, intelligence, and school functioning of 589 Polish high school students, while their teachers (N = 178)…

  7. Creative Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Roger, Ed.; Shermis, Michael, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This theme issue features 11 articles on the research interests of Indiana University faculty whose work on various campuses continues to advance knowledge about creative writing. Articles in this issue are "Creative Writing and the Future" (Roger Mitchell) which outlines the historical beginnings of the intellectual disciplines of…

  8. Creativity Repositioned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan-Rabideau, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Creativity is the cultural capital of the twenty-first century. This article presents an argument for the arts to lead a new wave of education reform that repositions creativity as the centerpiece of an education that prepares a generation of change agents for doing good.

  9. Changes in Brain Activation Associated with Spontaneous Improvization and Figural Creativity After Design-Thinking-Based Training: A Longitudinal fMRI Study.

    PubMed

    Saggar, Manish; Quintin, Eve-Marie; Bott, Nicholas T; Kienitz, Eliza; Chien, Yin-Hsuan; Hong, Daniel W-C; Liu, Ning; Royalty, Adam; Hawthorne, Grace; Reiss, Allan L

    2016-06-15

    Creativity is widely recognized as an essential skill for entrepreneurial success and adaptation to daily-life demands. However, we know little about the neural changes associated with creative capacity enhancement. For the first time, using a prospective, randomized control design, we examined longitudinal changes in brain activity associated with participating in a five-week design-thinking-based Creative Capacity Building Program (CCBP), when compared with Language Capacity Building Program (LCBP). Creativity, an elusive and multifaceted construct, is loosely defined as an ability to produce useful/appropriate and novel outcomes. Here, we focus on one of the facets of creative thinking-spontaneous improvization. Participants were assessed pre- and post-intervention for spontaneous improvization skills using a game-like figural Pictionary-based fMRI task. Whole-brain group-by-time interaction revealed reduced task-related activity in CCBP participants (compared with LCBP participants) after training in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior/paracingulate gyrus, supplementary motor area, and parietal regions. Further, greater cerebellar-cerebral connectivity was observed in CCBP participants at post-intervention when compared with LCBP participants. In sum, our results suggest that improvization-based creative capacity enhancement is associated with reduced engagement of executive functioning regions and increased involvement of spontaneous implicit processing.

  10. Creative partnerships: the profession's plan (Presidential Address).

    PubMed

    Gilfoyle, E M

    1987-12-01

    Through interprofessional collaboration on behalf of the populations we serve, and through the integration of science and art, we shall transform our present and direct our future. The crisis of the entrepreneurial idea in health care must not become the pathology of our service ideals. Rather, this crisis must be viewed as our opportunity to adopt marketing as an exchange relationship and engage in activities that market ourselves as a vital profession that places the good of those we serve above our own self-interest. Through our creative partnerships, we can achieve professional excellence. Professional excellence is the key to assuring occupational therapy's position in the marketplace.

  11. The "Creative Right Brain" Revisited: Individual Creativity and Associative Priming in the Right Hemisphere Relate to Hemispheric Asymmetries in Reward Brain Function.

    PubMed

    Aberg, Kristoffer Carl; Doell, Kimberly C; Schwartz, Sophie

    2016-09-20

    The idea that creativity resides in the right cerebral hemisphere is persistent in popular science, but has been widely frowned upon by the scientific community due to little empirical support. Yet, creativity is believed to rely on the ability to combine remote concepts into novel and useful ideas, an ability which would depend on associative processing in the right hemisphere. Moreover, associative processing is modulated by dopamine, and asymmetries in dopamine functionality between hemispheres may imbalance the expression of their implemented cognitive functions. Here, by uniting these largely disconnected concepts, we hypothesize that relatively less dopamine function in the right hemisphere boosts creativity by releasing constraining effects of dopamine on remote associations. Indeed, participants with reduced neural responses in the dopaminergic system of the right hemisphere (estimated by functional MRI in a reward task with positive and negative feedback), displayed higher creativity (estimated by convergent and divergent tasks), and increased associative processing in the right hemisphere (estimated by a lateralized lexical decision task). Our findings offer unprecedented empirical support for a crucial and specific contribution of the right hemisphere to creativity. More importantly our study provides a comprehensive view on potential determinants of human creativity, namely dopamine-related activity and associative processing.

  12. Creative Writing in America: Theory and Pedagogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moxley, Joseph M., Ed.

    Intended for high school and college teachers who are interested in how creative writing can be taught effectively, this book features the ideas of poets, novelists, editors, and playwrights on the fundamental aspects of their craft. The book contains the following chapters: (1) "Notes from a Cell: Creative Writing Programs in Isolation"…

  13. Viktor Lowenfeld Speaks on Art and Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brittain, W. Lambert, Ed.

    This retrospective compilation of speeches and ideas by Viktor Lowenfeld is representative of his work between the years 1946 to 1960 and reveals his concern with the importance of creativity in education. Nine chapters present Lowenfeld's thoughts: (1) "On the Significance of Individual Creative Expression"; (2) "On the Discrepancy…

  14. Intrinsic Motivation, Organizational Justice, and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannam, Kalli; Narayan, Anupama

    2015-01-01

    For employees to generate creative ideas that are not only original, but also useful to their company, they must interact with their workplace environment to determine organizational needs. Therefore, it is important to consider aspects of the individual as well as their environment when studying creativity. Intrinsic motivation, a predictor of…

  15. Exploring Collective Mathematical Creativity in Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenson, Esther

    2011-01-01

    This study combines theories related to collective learning and theories related to mathematical creativity to investigate the notion of collective mathematical creativity in elementary school classrooms. Collective learning takes place when mathematical ideas and actions, initially stemming from an individual, are built upon and reworked,…

  16. Imagining a Place for Creative Nonfiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesse, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Writing creative nonfiction means perceiving what details are worth telling, why they might matter, and how they might connect. Although no one much likes the term "creative nonfiction" (some are bothered by defining something by what it's not, others by a conviction that the idea is oxymoronic), it has emerged as the name of choice. In the past…

  17. Idea Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talesnick, Irwin, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Provides innovative ideas in biology, chemistry, and physics on the following topics: enzyme decomposition; chemical waste; time measurement; acid-base color magic; ball bouncing properties; heat; cell theory; and specimen boxes. Materials and procedures are listed when appropriate along with hints for expanding these ideas and investigations. (JM)

  18. Staffing Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Information Exchange, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Presents business organization and child care center managers with ideas on how to deal with various staffing situations. Ideas include suggestions for handling informal staff networks; getting insight into what is important to people; motivating people in difficult situations; developing temporary employee services for child caregivers; and…

  19. Leadership Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Information Exchange, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides day care center directors with relevant ideas for working with staff. Ideas include building "team spirit" among staff members; effective listening; gaining respect from staff members through effective decision-making skills; recognizing and correcting administrative errors; and effective group management techniques. (Author/BB)

  20. The Creative Potential of Metaphorical Writing in the Literacy Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    Creativity is difficult to define and a universal definition remains elusive. However, common words associated with creativity affirm that it concerns novelty and originality, hallmarks of many great and enduring texts. Students can also be encouraged to surface original ideas through constructing their own creative texts. This article outlines…

  1. The creative process in biomedical visualization: strategies and management.

    PubMed

    Anderson, P A

    1990-01-01

    The phases of the creative process (identification, preparation, incubation, insight, and elaboration/verification) are related to strategies for management of biomedical illustration projects. The idea that creativity is a mystery--and is unpredictable and uncontrollable--is not accepted. This article presents a practical way to encourage creative thinking in the biomedical visualization studio.

  2. Teaching for Creativity: Towards Sustainable and Replicable Pedagogical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliam, Erica; Dawson, Shane

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the pedagogical significance of recent shifts in scholarly attention away from first generation and towards second generation understandings of creativity. First generation or big "C" creativity locates the creative enterprise as a complex set of behaviours and ideas exhibited by an individual, while second generation or…

  3. Evolving Creativity: New Pedagogies for Young Children in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vong, Keang-Ieng

    2008-01-01

    This book challenges the assumption that creativity is culture-free. Fostering creativity in the young has gained unprecedented attention in China, one of the most vigorous world economies today. This book examines Chinese kindergarten teachers' interpretations of creativity in relation to their ideas of children's learning and cognition, using…

  4. [Esthetic training of the elderly--with special reference to the therapeutic effects of pictorial creative activities].

    PubMed

    Aissen-Crewett, M

    1987-01-01

    Hitherto programmes of artistic-creative activities with the elderly have meant to a large extent keeping such individuals busy and to aim at a "naive art" in the style of Grandma Moses, characterized by a conformity with stereotypes and practical utilizability. An aesthetic education of the elderly must, however, be guided by the recovery, extension and intensification of communicative fields and the strengthening and stabilization of identity and self-esteem. Emphasis, therefore, must not be placed on the production of a useful item corresponding to market rules but rather on the production process itself, which provides positive experience with material and techniques, strengthens self-confidence, reduces the demand for very good workmanship and enhances self-reliance and self-responsibility. Artistic-creative activities in this sense have a therapeutic effect; they stimulate the ability to communicate and enhance self-esteem. Experience made so far with art therapy with the elderly is discussed, in particular its effects on the treatment of the depressed elderly.

  5. The Creative Stereotype Effect.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Denis; Dunbar, Kevin N

    2016-01-01

    Because of its fundamental relevance to scientific innovation, artistic expression, and human ingenuity, creativity has long been the subject of systematic psychological investigation. Concomitantly, the far-reaching effects of stereotypes on various cognitive and social processes have been widely researched. Bridging these two literatures, we show in a series of two studies that stereotypes related to creativity can both enhance and diminish individuals' performance on a divergent thinking task. Specifically, Study 1 demonstrated that participants asked to take on a stereotypically uninhibited perspective performed significantly better on a divergent thinking task than those participants who took on a stereotypically inhibited perspective, and a control group. Relatedly, Study 2 showed that the same effect is found within-subjects, with divergent thinking significantly improving when participants invoke an uninhibited stereotype. Moreover, we demonstrate the efficacy of Latent Semantic Analysis as an objective measure of the originality of ideas, and discuss implications of our findings for the nature of creativity. Namely, that creativity may not be best described as a stable individual trait, but as a malleable product of context and perspective.

  6. The Creative Stereotype Effect

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Denis; Dunbar, Kevin N.

    2016-01-01

    Because of its fundamental relevance to scientific innovation, artistic expression, and human ingenuity, creativity has long been the subject of systematic psychological investigation. Concomitantly, the far-reaching effects of stereotypes on various cognitive and social processes have been widely researched. Bridging these two literatures, we show in a series of two studies that stereotypes related to creativity can both enhance and diminish individuals’ performance on a divergent thinking task. Specifically, Study 1 demonstrated that participants asked to take on a stereotypically uninhibited perspective performed significantly better on a divergent thinking task than those participants who took on a stereotypically inhibited perspective, and a control group. Relatedly, Study 2 showed that the same effect is found within-subjects, with divergent thinking significantly improving when participants invoke an uninhibited stereotype. Moreover, we demonstrate the efficacy of Latent Semantic Analysis as an objective measure of the originality of ideas, and discuss implications of our findings for the nature of creativity. Namely, that creativity may not be best described as a stable individual trait, but as a malleable product of context and perspective. PMID:26863143

  7. Emotional intelligence and emotional creativity.

    PubMed

    Ivcevic, Zorana; Brackett, Marc A; Mayer, John D

    2007-04-01

    Three studies examined the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and emotional creativity (EC) and whether each construct was predictive of creative behavior. It was hypothesized that the relationship between EI and EC corresponds to the relationship between cognitive intelligence and creative ability. Therefore, EI and EC were expected to be two distinct sets of abilities. Intercorrelations and confirmatory factor analyses supported the hypothesis. Furthermore, it was hypothesized that EC, but not EI, would correlate with behavioral creativity. Self-report measures of EC significantly correlated with laboratory and self-reported creativity measures in both studies, while ability measures of EC only correlated with self-reported artistic activity. EI was uncorrelated with creative behavior.

  8. EEG alpha oscillations during the performance of verbal creativity tasks: differential effects of sex and verbal intelligence.

    PubMed

    Fink, Andreas; Neubauer, Aljoscha C

    2006-10-01

    Task-related power changes in the EEG alpha band were analyzed in 31 participants (17 males and 14 females) during performance of two verbal creativity tasks. Participants were confronted with verbal problems that are in need of explanation (insight problems) and utopian situations that will actually never happen. In both tasks they were instructed to generate as many but also as unusual, unique or original ideas as possible. To assess brain responses that come along with highly original ideas, individual responses were divided into more and less original ideas (within each participant). Creative problem solving was generally accompanied by lower levels of cortical arousal (i.e., increases in alpha power from a pre-stimulus reference to an activation interval). Additionally, more original (vs. less original) responses were associated with a stronger task-related alpha synchronization in posterior (particularly centroparietal) cortices. Task-related alpha power changes during creative problem solving were also moderated by verbal IQ and sex.

  9. Ideas: Recycling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chessin, Debby A.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Presents classroom ideas focusing on connections among mathematics, concern for the environment, and conservation of natural resources, including decomposition, water conservation, packaging materials, use of manufactured cans, and recycling. Includes reproducible student worksheets. (MKR)

  10. Assessing Four Levels of Creative Mathematical Ability in Israeli Adolescents Utilizing Out-of-School Activities: A Circular Three-Stage Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livne, Nava L.; Milgram, Roberta M.

    2000-01-01

    A questionnaire of out-of-school activities was developed to assess mathematical creative ability at four levels using a three-stage circular technique. Israeli high school students (n=139) reported whether they had performed the activities. Resulting data provided evidence of the construct validity of a 12-item scale for assessing creative…

  11. Malevolent Creativity in Terrorist Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Paul; Horgan, John; Hunter, Samuel T.; Cushenbery, Lily D.

    2013-01-01

    Terrorist organizations are both imitative and innovative in character. While the drivers of imitation have been extensively modeled using concepts such as contagion and diffusion, creativity and innovation remain relatively underdeveloped ideas in the context of terrorist behavior. This article seeks to redress this deficiency by presenting a…

  12. Entrepreneurial Creativity through Motivational Synergy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amabile, Teresa M.

    1997-01-01

    Defines and describes entrepreneurial creativity, which is the generation and implementation of novel, appropriate ideas to establish a new venture. Discusses the need for motivational synergy, which results when strong levels of personal interest and involvement are combined with the promise of rewards that confirm competence. (Author/CR)

  13. The Creative Abilities of Children with Social and Emotional Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paget, Kathleen D.

    1982-01-01

    Responses of 78 emotionally disturbed children on the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking were compared to those from the standardization sample. Ss were close to the average in ability to arrive at different ideas, experienced difficulty in producing original ideas, and were substantially below average in the other areas of creativity. (Author/CL)

  14. Mathematical Thinking and Creativity through Mathematical Problem Posing and Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayllón, María F.; Gómez, Isabel A.; Ballesta-Claver, Julio

    2016-01-01

    This work shows the relationship between the development of mathematical thinking and creativity with mathematical problem posing and solving. Creativity and mathematics are disciplines that do not usually appear together. Both concepts constitute complex processes sharing elements, such as fluency (number of ideas), flexibility (range of ideas),…

  15. Active Learning Strategies in Face-to-Face Courses. IDEA Paper #53

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millis, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    As numerous research studies suggest, teachers who desire increased student learning should adopt active learning. This article explores the research, defines active learning, discusses its value, offers suggestions for implementing it, and provides six concrete examples of active learning approaches: Thinking-Aloud Pair Problem-Solving;…

  16. Brain structure links everyday creativity to creative achievement.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenfeng; Chen, Qunlin; Tang, Chaoying; Cao, Guikang; Hou, Yuling; Qiu, Jiang

    2016-03-01

    Although creativity is commonly considered to be a cornerstone of human progress and vital to all realms of our lives, its neural basis remains elusive, partly due to the different tasks and measurement methods applied in research. In particular, the neural correlates of everyday creativity that can be experienced by everyone, to some extent, are still unexplored. The present study was designed to investigate the brain structure underlying individual differences in everyday creativity, as measured by the Creative Behavioral Inventory (CBI) (N=163). The results revealed that more creative activities were significantly and positively associated with larger gray matter volume (GMV) in the regional premotor cortex (PMC), which is a motor planning area involved in the creation and selection of novel actions and inhibition. In addition, the gray volume of the PMC had a significant positive relationship with creative achievement and Art scores, which supports the notion that training and practice may induce changes in brain structures. These results indicate that everyday creativity is linked to the PMC and that PMC volume can predict creative achievement, supporting the view that motor planning may play a crucial role in creative behavior.

  17. [Frequency-spatial organization of brain electrical activity in creative verbal thinking: role of the gender factor].

    PubMed

    Razumnikova, O M; Bryzgalova, A O

    2005-01-01

    Gender differences in EEG patterns associated with verbal creativity were studied by EEG mapping. The EEGs of 18 males and 21 females (right-handed university students) were recorded during a performance of Remote Associates Task (RAT) compared with the letter-fluency and simple associate's tasks. Gender differences were found in a factor structure of the indices of verbal thinking and a score of generating words was greater in women than men. No significant gender differences in originality of associations were revealed, however, gender-related differences in the EEG-patterns were found at the final and initial stages of RAT. In men, the beta2-power was increased in both hemispheres at the beginning of test. To the end of testing, the power of oscillations in the beta2 band increased only in the central part of the cortex. In women, the beta2-power was increased to a greater extent in the right than in the left hemisphere at the initial stage of task performance, whereas the final stage was characterized by a relative decrease in beta-activity in parietotemporal cortical regions and increase in the left prefrontal region. It is suggested that the verbal creative thinking in men is based mostly on "insight" strategy whereas women additionally involve the "intellectual" strategy.

  18. Creative Ventures: Ancient Civilizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Rebecca

    The open-ended activities in this book are designed to extend the imagination and creativity of students and encourage students to examine their feelings and values about historic eras. Civilizations addressed include ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome, Mayan, Stonehenge, and Mesopotamia. The activities focus upon the cognitive and affective pupil…

  19. Sharing Teaching Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Teacher, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The first idea presented is an activity aimed at teaching students to reduce a fraction to lowest terms by looking for the greatest common factor (GCF) of the numerator and denominator. The second idea looks at ways to construct solution problems that are challenging but which do not bog pupils down. (MP)

  20. Is There Creativity in Design? From a Perspective of School Design and Technology in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Yi Lin; Siu, Kin Wai Michael

    2012-01-01

    As creativity is likely to become a crucial aspect of living in the future, it is important for educators to teach students to think creatively when solving constantly evolving and increasingly complex problems. Supported by the idea that creativity can be taught and learnt, elements of creativity are now embedded in secondary school education.…

  1. The Creative Use of Sentences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widdowson, H. G.

    Among the features characterizing human language is creativity, the ability to produce an infinite number of sentences with a finite number of rules. What is expected of creativity is non-conformity, violation of rules, and challenges to accepted convention. Words may be used to activate possible contexts. Most textbook sentence examples do not…

  2. Creativity and Collaborative Learning and Teaching Strategies in the Design Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, Morag; Littlejohn, Allison; Allan, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    Creativity can be described as the ability to generate new ideas and combine existing ideas in new ways to find novel solutions to problems. Creativity is enhanced by a free flow of knowledge and through social contact. On this basis, the authors argue that knowledge sharing is central to creativity in design and present preliminary evidence to…

  3. Creative Solutions and Their Evaluation: Comparing the Effects of Explanation and Argumentation Tasks on Student Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andiliou, Andria; Murphy, P. Karen

    2014-01-01

    Creative problem solving which results in novel and effective ideas or products is most advanced when learners can analyze, evaluate, and refine their ideas to improve creative solutions. The purpose of this investigation was to examine creative problem solving performance in undergraduate students and determine the tasks that support critical…

  4. Idea Organization and Idea Recall.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    Flower & Hayes). Subjects generated ideas relevant to a specific topic on Day 1. Then they organized their ideas and wrote a coherent text on the...change, after generation as a result of the qrganizational processes involved in writing. Flower and Hayes (1979) have developed an analysis of writing...arranging goals or particular aspects of the topic to be discussed. These goals have subgoals or subtopics and supporting arguments. Flower and Hayes

  5. Creativity and the role of the leader.

    PubMed

    Amabile, Teresa M; Khaire, Mukti

    2008-10-01

    In today's innovation-driven economy, understanding how to generate great ideas has become an urgent managerial priority. Suddenly, the spotlight has turned on the academics who've studied creativity for decades. How relevant is their research to the practical challenges leaders face? To connect theory and practice, Harvard Business School professors Amabile and Khaire convened a two-day colloquium of leading creativity scholars and executives from companies such as Google, IDEO, Novartis, Intuit, and E Ink. In this article, the authors present highlights of the research presented and the discussion of its implications. At the event, a new leadership agenda began to take shape, one rooted in the awareness that you can't manage creativity--you can only manage for creativity. A number of themes emerged: The leader's job is not to be the source of ideas but to encourage and champion ideas. Leaders must tap the imagination of employees at all ranks and ask inspiring questions. They also need to help their organizations incorporate diverse perspectives, which spur creative insights, and facilitate creative collaboration by, for instance, harnessing new technologies. The participants shared tactics for enabling discoveries, as well as thoughts on how to bring process to bear on creativity without straitjacketing it. They pointed out that process management isn't appropriate in all stages of creative work; leaders should apply it thoughtfully and manage the handoff from idea generators to commercializers deftly. The discussion also examined the need to clear paths through bureaucracy, weed out weak ideas, and maximize the organization's learning from failure. Though points of view varied, the theories and frameworks explored advance the understanding of creativity in business and offer executives a playbook for increasing innovation.

  6. South Korean and the US Secondary School Science Teachers' Conceptions of Creativity and Teaching for Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Miyoung; Kang, Nam-Hwa

    2010-01-01

    This study examined science teachers' conceptions of creativity in science education, pedagogical ideas, and contextual factors perceived as constraints on teaching for creativity and any differences in the conceptions of teachers from South Korea and the United States. Participants in the study consisted of 44 South Korean and 21 US secondary…

  7. Creative Cognition, Conceptual Combination, and the Creative Writing of Stephen R. Donaldson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Thomas B.

    2001-01-01

    Explores the use of conceptual combination in Stephen Donaldson's development of ideas for his fantasy books. Uses Donaldson's own account to illustrate the general principles of a creative cognition approach to understanding creativity and the role of the process of conceptual combination. Assesses links between Donaldson's and others' anecdotal…

  8. Homesteading: The Free Land Idea. An Activity Guide for Teachers Grades 4 through 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamberson, Wesley; Lange, L. S.; Sutter, Jason; Sutter, Gail

    This curriculum/activity guide is designed for use by teachers and other educators who live within trip distance of Homestead National Monument of America in Nebraska. However, some activities in the guide are designed for the classroom, and some are more effective if they are conducted outdoors; but many can be completed at school. The activity…

  9. Fostering and Assessing Creativity in Technology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buelin-Biesecker, Jennifer Katherine

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the creative outcomes in student work resulting from two pedagogical approaches to creative problem solving activities. A secondary goal was to validate the Consensual Assessment Technique (CAT) as a means of assessing creativity. Linear models for problem solving and design processes serve as the current paradigm in classroom…

  10. Breakthrough Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Describes innovative strategies that schools and universities are using to save money and reshape operations. Focuses on ideas in energy efficiency and facilities improvement, direct purchasing, energy management, retrofitting buildings, ceiling insulation upgrades, automation systems, electric demand programs, facilities programs, warranty…

  11. Dry idea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    A century before the federal government established a council for “sustainable development,” John Wesley Powell was touting the idea as way to tame the American West. Powell's quiver of intellectual tools included one that modern environmentalists swear by: integrated assessment.

  12. Bright Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Phil

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how to upgrade lighting technology in schools to reduce energy consumption and cut operating costs. Explores fixture efficiency using ballast and lamp upgrades and compact fluorescent lights. Other ideas include changing exit signs to ones that use less wattage, improving luminary efficiency through use of reflectors and shielding…

  13. Teaching Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Kathleen, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Ideas to aid the classroom teacher include integration of emphasis on reading into health education; definitions pertinent to contemporary health education; teaching students to read food labels; identification of implications of scientific advances such as test tube reproduction; and a card game to teach food groups to middle school children.…

  14. Idea Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Presents a series of science teaching ideas with the following titles: When Demonstrations Are Misleading, Lasers and Refraction, An Improved Stair-Step Model, Correcting Your Compass, Seeing Is Not Believing, Food Coloring: From the Kitchen to the Lab, Punny Business, Portfolios in Science, Feathers or Gold: A Case for Using the Metric System,…

  15. Creativity Awards: Great Expectations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgour, Mark; Sasser, Sheila; Koslow, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Given the creativity inherent in advertising, one useful measure of creativity may be the advertising creativity award. Although creativity awards have been used by academics, agencies, and clients as indicators of exemplary creative work, there is surprisingly little research as to what creative elements they actually represent. Senior agency…

  16. IBSE and Creativity Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trnova, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Creativity plays a very important role in education. Most of educational systems support creativity as relevant competence for the 21st century. According to the findings of experts, teachers' creativity is important for the development of students' creativity. We introduce a theoretical base of creativity and styles of creativity. Based on our…

  17. Designing Creative User Interactions for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Yi-Chun; Clinton, Gregory; Rieber, Lloyd P.

    2014-01-01

    Profitable creative ideas can emerge from within virtually any phase of the instructional design and development process. However, the design of user interactions is perhaps where learners can most directly experience the benefits of such ideas. In this article, the authors discuss principles of learner interaction as found in the instructional…

  18. Creativity and Introductory Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilaran, Ildefonso (Fonsie) J.

    2012-01-01

    When I was an undergraduate physics major, I would often stay up late with my physics major roommate as we would digest the physics content we were learning in our courses and explore our respective imaginations armed with our new knowledge. Such activity during my undergraduate years was confined to informal settings, and the first formal creativity assignment in my physics education did not come until well into my graduate years when my graduate advisor demanded that I write a prospectus for my dissertation. I have often lamented the fact that the first formal assignment in which I was required to be creative, take responsibility for my own learning and research objectives, and see them to completion during my physics education came so late, considering the degree to which creative attributes are celebrated in the personalities of great physicists. In this essay I will apply some of the basic concepts as defined by creativity-related psychology literature to physics pedagogy, relate these concepts to the exchanges in this journal concerning Michael Sobel's paper "Physics for the Non-Scientist: A Middle Way," and provide the framework for a low-overhead creativity assignment that can easily be implemented at all levels of physics education.

  19. Exploring Students' Intuitive Ideas of Randomness Using an iPod Shuffle Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Laura; Garfield, Joan

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an activity that engages students in considering characteristics of a random sequence, in this case, a randomly generated playlist of songs using the iPod shuffle feature. Students examine simulated sequences of randomly generated songs from a small music library in order to identify characteristics that are used to develop…

  20. New Ideas for Promoting Physical Activity among Middle Age and Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godbey, Geoffrey; Burnett-Wolle, Sarah; Chow, Hsueh-Wen

    2007-01-01

    Promoting physical activity among middle age and older adults to decrease the incidence of disease and premature death and to combat the health care costs associated with a sedentary lifestyle is more important now than ever. There is now a better understanding of what "successful aging" means and of what aspects of life have the greatest…

  1. Children's Caravan: A Reading Activities Idea Book for Use with Children. A Fun with Reading Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Judith A.

    Intended for elementary school teachers and librarians, this book was designed to help in the development of reading programs for young children. Five sections are included: (1) planning ahead, which includes getting organized, making decorations, collecting "junque" (craft materials and other items needed for craft activities); (2) conducting…

  2. The Complete Resource Book: An Early Childhood Curriculum. Over 2000 Activities and Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, Pam; Hastings, Kay

    This book is a collection of developmentally appropriate activities for 3- to 5-year-olds, designed to be easily integrated into the daily schedule of an early childhood program. The book's introduction describes the collection's theme units, delineates typical half- and full-day schedules, and discusses the arrangement and management of classroom…

  3. IDEA Fiscal Monitoring and Support Activities 2011-2012 Quick Reference Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Resource Center Program, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This Quick Reference Document is being distributed by the Regional Resource Center Program ARRA/Fiscal Priority Team to provide RRCP state liaisons and other (Technical Assistance) TA providers with a summary of critical fiscal monitoring and support activities they may be involved in during calendar years 2011 and 2012. Like other documents in…

  4. The Ideas of Geography Teachers about In-Service Geography Training Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koc, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the geography workshop (new approaches and new knowledge in geography), in view of the teachers, conducted within the in-service training activities for the geography teachers working in Sivas and Erzurum. The questionnaire, used as the data collection tool, was developed by the researcher. The questionnaire…

  5. Presenting Theoretical Ideas Prior to Inquiry Activities Fosters Theory-Level Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wecker, Christof; Rachel, Alexander; Heran-Dörr, Eva; Waltner, Christine; Wiesner, Hartmut; Fischer, Frank

    2013-01-01

    In the course of inquiry activities similar to those of real scientists, learners are supposed to develop knowledge both on the level of observable phenomena and on the level of explanatory theories. However, some theories involve theoretical entities (e.g., "Weiss domains") that cannot be observed directly and therefore may be hard to…

  6. Baby Days: Activities, Ideas, and Games for Enjoying Daily Life with a Child under Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowley, Barbara

    Noting the difficulty that many parents have finding activities to fit the busy life, budget, and energy levels of the average parent and the attention span and abilities of the typical infant and toddler, this book is designed as a reference book for parents and others looking for ways to entertain, educate, and enjoy a young child during the…

  7. People* Working . . . *Especially Women . . . A Book of Materials, Activities, and Ideas for the Classroom Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valiant, Sharon

    This bibliography lists publications and other media, historical facts, and suggestions for activities that show women as working and accomplishing people. Materials are from all grade levels (K-12) and many subject areas. Arrangement is in three sections. Part I deals with women who have worked but not for wages, the pioneer, the homemaker, and…

  8. [Influence of information over saturation on quality of creative activity and EEG spatial organization].

    PubMed

    Sviderskaia, N E

    2011-01-01

    In work the features of the biopotentials spatial organization are surveyed at successful and unsuccessful (abandoning or bad quality of a product) implementation of creative imagination in conditions of information over saturation. Two groups of the examinees have taken part in experiments: "professionals" (23 able-bodied examinees--students of faculty of an art graphics) and "nonprofessionals" (34 men, which specialty were not linked to systematic visual imagination). During experiment the examinees should mentally frame a visual object on the basis of two simple graphics units--right angle and diagonal, and after EEG registration to draw it on a paper and to give a title. The total number of units exceeded 7 +/- 2, i.e. the possibility of information processing at a realized level was unreal that reduced in necessity of connection of mechanisms of not realized information processes. Estimated quality of a framed product from the point of view successful and unsuccessful of implementation of the job and conforming to each of these variants of a feature of the EEG spatial organization, which shunted with the help of portable telemeter installation "SIT-EEG" from 24 items convexital surface of a head. Is shown, that at successful performance of the job in comparison with unsuccessful for "professionals" biopotentials spatial organization parameters--spatial synchronization (linear processes) and spatial disorder (the nonlinear processes) strengthen (in relation to a background) in frontal-temporal areas of the right hemisphere and parietal-occipital left ones. For "nonprofessionals" the value of these parameters was enlarged in an inverse direction: in frontal-temporal areas of the left hemisphere and in the right parietal-occipital. At unsuccessful performance of the jobs for "professionals" the body height ofbiopotentials spatial disorder almost in all cortical zones was marked, for "nonprofessionals" of change were weak. The between group differences in all

  9. A Creativity Taxonomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, George

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author describes his categorization of practical mathematical tasks using drama, body maths, and a host of outlandish props. He categorizes the lessons under three headings--demonstration, teamwork, and creative display--partly as a means of furthering the invention of more activities within each classification. His…

  10. Creative Ventures: The Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Rebecca

    This book, published in 1987, provides open-ended activities to extend the imagination and creativity of students and encourage them to examine their feelings and values. Williams' model of cognitive-intellective and affective-feeling domains are addressed. Nearly 60 pages of exercises focus on the future, asking students to predict future…

  11. Revisiting Mednick's Model on Creativity-Related Differences in Associative Hierarchies. Evidence for a Common Path to Uncommon Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benedek, Mathias; Neubauer, Aljoscha C.

    2013-01-01

    Fifty years ago, Mednick ["Psychological Review", 69 (1962) 220] proposed an elaborate model that aimed to explain how creative ideas are generated and why creative people are more likely to have creative ideas. The model assumes that creative people have flatter associative hierarchies and as a consequence can more fluently retrieve…

  12. Middle School Idea Book. A Compendium of Previously Published NABT Ideas and Activities Adapted and Reprinted for Middle School Teachers and Their Students (Grades 5-8).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcoxson, Catherine A., Ed.

    This manual specifically addresses teaching middle level students and offers teachers a variety of activities that were selected and edited to reflect middle level philosophy. It is divided into five chapters each with a different focus that contain hands-on activities designed to provide many exciting and fun experiences for adolescents. Every…

  13. Impact of Text on Idea Generation: An Electroencephalography Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Lingyun; Xiang, Wei; Chai, Chunlei; Wang, Changlu; Liu, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Sketching is widely used as a creative tool, playing a significant role in industrial design. Designers commonly use sketching to generate and evaluate ideas, leading to subsequent development of the most promising ideas. The current study examined the use of text in the idea generation sketching process among novices and experts. The…

  14. Pushing photonic ideas into innovation through crowdfunding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun

    2015-07-01

    It is known today that crowdfunding is a very popular approach that simultaneously assists in rapidly disseminating creative ideas, performing worldwide market survey, getting the fund, and eventually starting the business. Hence, this article highlights some of the photonics-related ideas that are explored through the promising crowdfunding approach. These include microlenses for mobile devices, specially designed lenses for helmets and solar cells, three-dimensional optical scanners, optical spectrometers, and surface plasmon resonance-based optical sensors. Most of them looks simple and yet are very creative backing up with interesting stories behind them to persuade the target customers to participate.

  15. Checklists, rules and creativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasmacher, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Universities have something that private industry wants - a unique culture of continuous learning, curiosity-driven research and international collaboration. According to an unending string of accounts in the business press, adopting this university culture is imperative for survival and success in the "technology-driven" 21st-century economy. The industry poster child for this idea is the IT giant Google. Its success undoubtedly buys the company increasing freedom to experiment with and nurture its own unique culture. But Google is routinely lauded for fostering academic-style debate in meetings, maintaining a fluid organization chart that allows employees to try other roles, and giving its engineers one day a week to pursue their own creative ideas for advancing the company's interests.

  16. An Idea for an Active Seismic Experiment on Mars in 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lognonne, Ph.; Banerdt, B.; Giardini, D.; Costard, F.

    2001-01-01

    The detection of liquid water is of prime interest and should have deep implications in the understanding of the Martian hydrological cycle and also in exobiology. In the frame of the 2007 joint CNES-NASA mission to Mars, a set of 4 NETLANDERS developed by an European consortium is expected to be launched in June 2007. We propose to use a second spacecraft going or landing to Mars to release near one of the Netlander a series of artificial metallic meteorites, in order to perform an active seismic experiment providing a seismic profile of the crust and subsurface.

  17. Investigating the Synergy of Critical Thinking and Creative Thinking in the Course of Integrated Activity in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yulin; Li, Bei-Di; Chen, Hsueh-Chih; Chiu, Fa-Chung

    2015-01-01

    The relationship lying between critical thinking and creative thinking is opposite or complementary, results of previous relevant researches have not yet concluded. However, most of researches put the effort to compare the respective effect of the thinking methods, either the teaching of creative thinking or that of critical thinking. Less of them…

  18. Creative Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianchi, Lynne

    2005-01-01

    Creative Partnerships in Education UK (CAPE), funded by the National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts (NESTA), worked with the Centre for Science Education at Sheffield Hallam University and The Centre for the Understanding of the Built Environment (CUBE) to devise and manage this project in 10 primary and secondary schools in Leeds…

  19. Creative Punishment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, John

    1988-01-01

    Punishment given in a caring, supportive environment can assist children to learn some tasks more quickly, when used in conjunction with programmed positive reinforcement. The manner in which a punishment is implemented impacts its effectiveness. Two experiments are presented in which teachers used creative punishment to produce classroom behavior…

  20. Design Creativity!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newbill, Phyllis; Baum, Liesl

    2013-01-01

    Technology is revolutionizing the way the world works, and there seems to be no end in sight. Information is everywhere and easy to find, so today's students will need to know what to do with it to be prepared for the overly stimulating, technology-driven, problem-riddled world they will soon face. That's why critical- and creative-thinking skills…

  1. Neural correlates of creative writing: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Shah, Carolin; Erhard, Katharina; Ortheil, Hanns-Josef; Kaza, Evangelia; Kessler, Christof; Lotze, Martin

    2013-05-01

    Cerebral activations involved in actual writing of a new story and the associated correlates with creative performance are still unexplored. To investigate the different aspects of the creative writing process, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging while 28 healthy participants performed a new paradigm related to creative writing: "brainstorming" (planning a story) and "creative writing" (writing a new and creative continuation of a given literary text), as well as an additional control paradigm of "reading" and "copying." Individual verbal creativity was assessed with a verbal creativity test and creative performance with a qualitative rating of the creative products. "brainstorming" engaged cognitive, linguistic, and creative brain functions mainly represented in a parieto-frontal-temporal network, as well as writing preparation, and visual and imaginative processing. "creative writing" activated motor and visual brain areas for handwriting and additionally, cognitive and linguistic areas. Episodic memory retrieval, free-associative and spontaneous cognition, and semantic integration were observed in a right lateralized activation pattern in bilateral hippocampi, bilateral temporal poles (BA 38), and bilateral posterior cingulate cortex in a "creative writing" minus "copying" comparison. A correlation analysis of "creative writing" minus "copying" with the creativity index revealed activation in the left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 45) and the left temporal pole (BA 38). Thus, verbal creativity during "creative writing" is associated with verbal and semantic memory as well as semantic integration.

  2. Applied Creativity: The Creative Marketing Breakthrough Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titus, Philip A.

    2007-01-01

    Despite the increasing importance of personal creativity in today's business environment, few conceptual creativity frameworks have been presented in the marketing education literature. The purpose of this article is to advance the integration of creativity instruction into marketing classrooms by presenting an applied creative marketing…

  3. Changing ideas about others' intentions: updating prior expectations tunes activity in the human motor system.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Pierre O; Roy, Alice C; Chambon, Valérian; Borghi, Anna M; Salemme, Roméo; Farnè, Alessandro; Reilly, Karen T

    2016-05-31

    Predicting intentions from observing another agent's behaviours is often thought to depend on motor resonance - i.e., the motor system's response to a perceived movement by the activation of its stored motor counterpart, but observers might also rely on prior expectations, especially when actions take place in perceptually uncertain situations. Here we assessed motor resonance during an action prediction task using transcranial magnetic stimulation to probe corticospinal excitability (CSE) and report that experimentally-induced updates in observers' prior expectations modulate CSE when predictions are made under situations of perceptual uncertainty. We show that prior expectations are updated on the basis of both biomechanical and probabilistic prior information and that the magnitude of the CSE modulation observed across participants is explained by the magnitude of change in their prior expectations. These findings provide the first evidence that when observers predict others' intentions, motor resonance mechanisms adapt to changes in their prior expectations. We propose that this adaptive adjustment might reflect a regulatory control mechanism that shares some similarities with that observed during action selection. Such a mechanism could help arbitrate the competition between biomechanical and probabilistic prior information when appropriate for prediction.

  4. Changing ideas about others’ intentions: updating prior expectations tunes activity in the human motor system

    PubMed Central

    Jacquet, Pierre O.; Roy, Alice C.; Chambon, Valérian; Borghi, Anna M.; Salemme, Roméo; Farnè, Alessandro; Reilly, Karen T.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting intentions from observing another agent’s behaviours is often thought to depend on motor resonance – i.e., the motor system’s response to a perceived movement by the activation of its stored motor counterpart, but observers might also rely on prior expectations, especially when actions take place in perceptually uncertain situations. Here we assessed motor resonance during an action prediction task using transcranial magnetic stimulation to probe corticospinal excitability (CSE) and report that experimentally-induced updates in observers’ prior expectations modulate CSE when predictions are made under situations of perceptual uncertainty. We show that prior expectations are updated on the basis of both biomechanical and probabilistic prior information and that the magnitude of the CSE modulation observed across participants is explained by the magnitude of change in their prior expectations. These findings provide the first evidence that when observers predict others’ intentions, motor resonance mechanisms adapt to changes in their prior expectations. We propose that this adaptive adjustment might reflect a regulatory control mechanism that shares some similarities with that observed during action selection. Such a mechanism could help arbitrate the competition between biomechanical and probabilistic prior information when appropriate for prediction. PMID:27243157

  5. Einstein: The Gourmet of Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Joel

    1979-01-01

    Reports a psychiatrist's analysis of Einstein's personal account of how he developed the theory of relativity. The psychiatrist cites Janusian thinking, actively conceiving two or more opposite concepts simultaneously, as a characteristic of much creative thought in general. (MA)

  6. The Creative Arts Process: What It Is and What It Is Not.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Linda C.; Nabors, Martha L.

    1993-01-01

    Describes several arts activities in early childhood classrooms, then explains why the activities are or are not creative. Discusses characteristics of creativity and ways for teachers and caregivers to encourage the creative process in children. (BB)

  7. The Dynamics of Creativity & the Courage to BE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Frederick David

    The following sections are included: * Preliminary Note * Definitions Of Creativity * American Heritage (Morris, 1969-78)55 * Howard Gardner (1993)33 * Stephen Nachmanovich (1990)58 * Dynamical Metaphor * Literary, Philosophic, and Religious Roots of Ideas of Creativity * Myth * Mysticism * Existentialism * Psychological Analysis of Creativity * Barman (& Freud), The Two Faces of Creativity (1989)18 * Stephen Nachmanovich, Free Play: Improvisation in Life and Art (1990)58 * Rollo May Man's Search for Himself, Chap 6, The Creative Conscience (1953)53. * Joy P. Guilford, The Psychometric Approach. (1950,1953)37,38 * Wolfgang Köhler, The Mentality of Apes (1925)46,47 * Csitszentmihalyi, Humanistic Attributional Approaches; Flow(1990)25; The Evolving Mind (1993)26 * Howard Gardner, Creating Minds (1993)33 * Summary of Dynamical Concepts Involved In Creativity * Self-Organizational Bifurcations are Creativity * Chaos and Instability Facilitate Creativity * Chaos at the Controls * Summary * Acknowledgement * References

  8. Creativity: Sense and Nonsense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholls, John G.

    1976-01-01

    The difference between pseudo-creativity--creativity as often defined by educators and society in general--and genuine creativity is examined. Personal qualities which seem to be essential for creative production and the place of creativity in education are discussed. (RW)

  9. How to pitch a brilliant idea.

    PubMed

    Elsbach, Kimberly D

    2003-09-01

    Coming up with creative ideas is easy; selling them to strangers is hard. Entrepreneurs, sales executives, and marketing managers often go to great lengths to demonstrate how their new concepts are practical and profitable--only to be rejected by corporate decision makers who don't seem to understand the value of the ideas. Why does this happen? Having studied Hollywood executives who assess screenplay pitches, the author says the person on the receiving end--the "catcher"--tends to gauge the pitcher's creativity as well as the proposal itself. An impression of the pitcher's ability to come up with workable ideas can quickly and permanently overshadow the catcher's feelings about an idea's worth. To determine whether these observations apply to business settings beyond Hollywood, the author attended product design, marketing, and venture-capital pitch sessions and conducted interviews with executives responsible for judging new ideas. The results in those environments were similar to her observations in Hollywood, she says. Catchers subconsciously categorize successful pitchers as showrunners (smooth and professional), artists (quirky and unpolished), or neophytes (inexperienced and naive). The research also reveals that catchers tend to respond well when they believe they are participating in an idea's development. As Oscar-winning writer, director, and producer Oliver Stone puts it, screen-writers pitching an idea should "pull back and project what he needs onto your idea in order to make the story whole for him." To become a successful pitcher, portray yourself as one of the three creative types and engage your catchers in the creative process. By finding ways to give your catchers a chance to shine, you sell yourself as a likable collaborator.

  10. What Teachers See as Creative Incidents in Elementary Science Lessons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Lynn D.; Newton, Douglas P.

    2010-10-01

    Teachers are often urged to nurture creativity but their conceptions of creativity in specific school subjects may have limitations which weaken their attempts to do so. Primary school teachers in England were asked to rate lesson activities according to the opportunity they offered children for creative thought in science. The teachers could, overall, distinguish between creative and reproductive activities but, as predicted, there was evidence of narrow conceptions of school science creativity, biased towards fact finding, practical activity, and technological design. Some teachers saw creativity in essentially reproductive activities and in what simply stimulated interest and on-task talk. Some implications and recommendations for teacher training and professional development are discussed.

  11. Sing Me a Story! Tell Me a Song! Creative Curriculum Activities for Teachers of Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Hilda L.

    This collection of developmentally appropriate early childhood education curriculum activities uses themes to integrate the curriculum for young children. The activities involve active exploration, problem-solving, and the acquisition of specific concepts or skills. The collection is divided into six broad sections, with individual themes…

  12. Creative Play Activities for Children with Disabilities: A Resource Book for Teachers and Parents. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Lisa Rappaport; Schulz, Linda

    This book provides 250 games and activities designed to help infants to 8-year-olds with all types of disabilities grow through play. Many activities come with special adaptations for children with physical, visual, hearing, emotional, and cognitive impairments. Each chapter focuses on a particular "world" or activity theme. Topics of individual…

  13. Hippocampal amnesia disrupts creative thinking.

    PubMed

    Duff, Melissa C; Kurczek, Jake; Rubin, Rachael; Cohen, Neal J; Tranel, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    Creativity requires the rapid combination and recombination of existing mental representations to create novel ideas and ways of thinking. The hippocampal system, through its interaction with neocortical storage sites, provides a relational database necessary for the creation, updating, maintenance, and juxtaposition of mental representations used in service of declarative memory. Given this functionality, we hypothesized that hippocampus would play a critical role in creative thinking. We examined creative thinking, as measured by verbal and figural forms of the torrance tests of creative thinking (TTCT), in a group of participants with hippocampal damage and severe declarative memory impairment as well as in a group of demographically matched healthy comparison participants. The patients with bilateral hippocampal damage performed significantly worse than comparison participants on both the verbal and figural portions of the TTCT. These findings suggest that hippocampus plays a role critical in creative thinking, adding to a growing body of work pointing to the diverse ways the hallmark processing features of hippocampus serve a variety of behaviors that require flexible cognition.

  14. 1994's 100 Great Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This article introduces a section with 100 innovative suggestions for creative activities that go across the curriculum and across grade levels and that are designed to hold students' enthusiasm. The activities are grouped by language arts, math, science, and social studies. (SM)

  15. A Handbook of Bright Ideas: Facilitating Giftedness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherry, Betty S., Ed.

    Presented is a manual developed by the Manatee, Florida, program for gifted students which includes articles by leading thinkers, information on J. Guilford's structure of the intellect model, the importance of cognitive and affective balance, creative development, checklists, games, and other ideas for teachers of gifted students. Articles…

  16. A Program for Training Creative Thinking: Inner City Evaluation. Report From the Task and Training Variables in Human Problem Solving and Creative Thinking Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Gary A.; And Others

    The effectiveness of a workbook for training creative thinking, "Thinking Creatively: A Guide to Training Imagination," was evaluated with a sample of 198 inner-city students. The materials seek to teach attitudes which predispose an individual to behave more creatively and techniques for producing new combinations of ideas. Two…

  17. Creativity and Cognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    1980-01-01

    The article focuses on research on improving creativity, including early efforts to enhance, operationalize, and define creativity. Studies dealing with behavioral management of creativity are discussed, as are those concerning the effects of self-statements and cognition. (CL)

  18. Computer Aided Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Tony

    1988-01-01

    Explores the conceptual components of a computer program designed to enhance creative thinking and reviews software that aims to stimulate creative thinking. Discusses BRAIN and ORACLE, programs intended to aid in creative problem solving. (JOW)

  19. Creativity, Personality and Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakefield, James A., Jr.; Goad, Nancy A.

    1981-01-01

    Creativity is discussed in terms of H. Eysenck's personality theory. Creative persons are characterized by introversion, neuroticism, psychoticism, and moderate to high intelligence. The literature is reviewed on similarities and differences between creativity and pathology. (Author/DB)

  20. Using a Concept Mapping Tool with a Photograph Association Technique (CoMPAT) to Elicit Children's Ideas about Microbial Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Jenny; Grace, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    Concept mapping is a technique used to provide a visual representation of an individual's ideas about a concept or set of related concepts. This paper describes a concept mapping tool using a photograph association technique (CoMPAT) that is considered to be a novel way of eliciting children's ideas. What children at 11 years of age know about…

  1. The Role of Domain Knowledge in Creative Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Thomas B.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that a predominant tendency in creative generation tasks is to base new ideas on well-known, specific instances of previous ideas (e.g., basing ideas for imaginary aliens on dogs, cats or bears). However, a substantial minority of individuals has been shown to adopt more abstract approaches to the task and to develop…

  2. Assuring both quality and creativity in basic research

    SciTech Connect

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1990-04-12

    How does one assure that both quality and creativity are obtained in basic research environments QA theoreticians have attempted to develop workable definitions of quality, but in more reflective moments, these definitions often fail to capture the deeper essence of the idea of quality.'' This paper asserts that creativity (as a product of the human mind) is a concrete interface between perfunctory definitions of quality (conformance to specifications) and more philosophical speculations about the nature of quality- related ultimates'' like elegance or beauty. In addition, we describe the distinction between creative ideas and creative acts and highlight one of the major inhibitors of creativity, fear. Finally we show that highly creative people often have an irreverent attitude toward boundaries and established authority, and discuss how one can allow for this when designing a QA program in a basic research environment.

  3. "He Hit Me Back First!" Creative Visualization Activities for Parenting and Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fugitt, Eva D.

    Activities for home and school designed to help children become aware of their own inner authority and ability to choose are offered in this book. Techniques and activities are based on the principles of psychosynthesis, a comprehensive educational approach to human growth and development pioneered in 1911 by Italian psychiatrist Robert Assagioli.…

  4. Students' Interest and Expectancy for Success while Engaged in Analysis- and Creative Design Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawanto, Oenardi; Stewardson, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Inasmuch as design is a central activity in K-12 engineering education, understanding the students' motivation during engaging in engineering design activities will help educators to develop and evaluate strategies for engineering design challenges, and improve curriculum. The objective of this study is to better understand the relationship…

  5. The Curious Naturalist: A Handbook of Crafts, Games, Activities, and Ideas for Teaching Children about the Magical World of Nature. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, John; And Others

    This handbook offers crafts, games, activities, and ideas for teaching the novice naturalist. Equally usable by both children and adults, the handbook can be used as a simple field guide to help identify and understand the night sky, woodland plants and wildflowers, birds, and animals. The guide categorizes activities and information by the…

  6. Flighty idea

    SciTech Connect

    Slocombe, W.B.

    1987-12-01

    One of the latest arms control initiatives being debated outside the government is a proposal for a complete ban on the testing of ballistic missiles. The ban is not a new idea, but recently it has been given greater visibility through the endorsement of the initiative by all but one of the Democratic presidential candidates. Its proponents assert that a flight test ban will prevent destabilizing modernizations of ballistic-missile technology, thereby decreasing the preemptive nuclear attack threat to US. ICBMs and strategic bomber forces, lessening incentives to launch a first strike, and adding overall to crisis and arms race stability. Closer analysis suggests, however, that although some flight-test restrictions could prove to be a useful component of a broader arms control regime, a total ban on ballistic-missile flight tests is unlikely to produce anything like the dramatic benefits claimed. It would block important programs needed to maintain stable deterrence, would present a number of verification problems, and would divert the superpowers from pursuing more fruitful and effective arms-control measures.

  7. Team Building for Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ely, Donald D.

    1975-01-01

    A system labeled FORCE (Formulation of Relevant Creative Environments) solved one large company's problems of developing potential creativity, cohesiveness, and increased work productivity within the organization. (MW)

  8. Ideas: Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sovchik, Robert; Meconi, L. J.

    1994-01-01

    Presents measurement activities for K-3, 4-6, 5-6, and 7-8 grade levels. Activities include a measurement scavenger hunt, using a clinometer to measure angles of elevation, estimating the age of trees, measuring the height of a tree, and measuring objects at a distance. Includes reproducible worksheets. (MDH)

  9. Pleasantness of Creative Tasks and Creative Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zenasni, Franck; Lubart, Todd

    2011-01-01

    To examine the impact of emotion on creative potential, experimental studies have typically focused on the impact of induced or spontaneous mood states on creative performance. In this report the relationship between the perceived pleasantness of tasks (using divergent thinking and story writing tasks) and creative performance was examined.…

  10. The 1960s &'70s: Creative Activities for Teaching American History. Teacher's Guide. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Lawrence

    The activities in this manual explore some of the issues of the 1960s and 1970s that reflected changes in U.S. patterns of thought: minorities sought their share of the American pie; young people challenged established authority; massive protests erupted against the Vietnam War; political corruption was found in high office and a marked change…

  11. Creative Multimodal Learning Environments and Blended Interaction for Problem-Based Activity in HCI Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ioannou, Andri; Vasiliou, Christina; Zaphiris, Panayiotis; Arh, Tanja; Klobucar, Tomaž; Pipan, Matija

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory case study aims to examine how students benefit from a multimodal learning environment while they engage in collaborative problem-based activity in a Human Computer Interaction (HCI) university course. For 12 weeks, 30 students, in groups of 5-7 each, participated in weekly face-to-face meetings and online interactions.…

  12. Changing Channels: Activities Promoting Media Smarts and Creative Problem Solving for Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Eric

    When children have healthy ways to process the news and information they see on television, they are better prepared to approach conflict peacefully and solve problems in their everyday lives. This guide presents activities for children to help them learn to think critically about what they see on television, to resolve conflicts productively, and…

  13. Exploring the Relationship between Adolescent Activities and Choice of Graduate School Discipline: Implications for Creativity Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartzell, Stephanie A.; Hong, Eunsook

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between adolescent extra-curricular activities and choice of graduate-education field was examined among students from three fields of study, science (n = 12), art (n = 12), and education (n = 14), using qualitative and quantitative methods. Results of profile analysis indicated that the different majors participated in…

  14. Exploring an Alternative Model of Human Reproductive Capability: A Creative Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherif, Abour H.; Jedlicka, Dianne M.

    2012-01-01

    Biological and social evolutionary processes, along with social and cultural developments, have allowed humans to separate procreation from pleasurable/recreational sexual activity. As a class learning project, an alternative, hypothetical reproductive scenario is presented: "What if humans were biologically ready to conceive only during one…

  15. No Cost/Low Cost: A Solution for Creative Physical Education Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messerole, Michael J.; Black, Bryan M.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how the use of Pringles cans and other tube containers can help physical education teachers gain a new perspective on incorporating a reusable, recyclable, durable product to create fun activities that support the development of fundamental skills in the physical education environment.

  16. Idea Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Robert E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes 11 hands-on activities involving genetics; principles of chemical luminescence; a nucleus model; dissection pins; science, technology, and society (STS) courseware; plant dyes; the scientific method; current events; a portable planetarium; solar energy; and burning tests. (YP)

  17. Idea Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Eight activities for use in the science classroom are presented. Included are insect collecting, laboratory procedures and safety, recycling, current events, variable manipulation, scientific method, electricity, and mechanics (Newton's Second Law of Motion). (KR)

  18. Idea Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisbee, Gregory D.; Fritz, Jane K.; Zurenda, Deb

    1997-01-01

    Presents three science activities: (1) Pizza Quadrants, a tool for estimating population size; (2) Ion Models, to assist students in understanding how to balance equations; and (3) Endangered Species Project, an interdisciplinary unit. (DDR)

  19. Fostering Creativity Through Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenberg, Betty K., Ed.; Troutman, Andria P., Ed.

    The 26 activities described in this volume deal with a wide variety of mathematical ideas. Most of the activities are appropriate for grades 6-9; many could be used with older or younger groups as well. All activities are described in detail; some descriptions include sample worksheets, and several provide suggestions for followup activities. The…

  20. Creativity and Critical Thinking in the Globalised University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clegg, Phil

    2008-01-01

    This paper outlines the dynamic life of the university in the era of neo-liberal globalisation, and within this context, discusses the nature of "creativity" as a life force or power, similar to the Ancient Greek idea of "Eros". This power is contrasted with functionalist and bureaucratic notions of creativity, and a disjuncture is identified…

  1. One-Year-Olds Think Creatively, Just Like Their Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoicka, Elena; Mowat, Rachael; Kirkwood, Joanne; Kerr, Tiffany; Carberry, Megan; Bijvoet-van den Berg, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Creativity is an essential human ability, allowing adaptation and survival. Twenty-nine 1-year-olds and their parents were tested on divergent thinking (DT), a measure of creative potential counting how many ideas one can generate. Toddlers' and parents' DT was moderately to highly correlated. Toddlers showed a wide range of DT scores, which were…

  2. Cognitive Profile in Low, Medium and High Creative Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Mercedes; Bermejo, Rosario; Sainz, Marta; Ferrandiz, Carmen; Prieto, Maria Dolores; Soto, Gloria

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the present work is to advance in the study of creativity-intelligence relationship looking into the students' cognitive profiles. It is hypothesized that, if creative ideas emerge as result of connecting distant concepts, and a balanced cognitive profile (without significant differences between ability levels) can…

  3. Creative Procedures for Adult Groups; Improving Teaching in the Church.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minor, Harold D., Ed.

    This guide to creative procedures for improving teaching adult church groups deals with the following: (1) steps in planning for instructional and learning experiences in adult groups; (2) techniques for admitting new ideas into a class; (3) using personal creativity through such means as role-playing, real-life experiences, brainstorming,…

  4. Effects of Concept Mapping on Creativity in Photo Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simper, Natalie; Reeve, Richard; Kirby, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    This research tested the use of concept map planning to support the development of creativity in photo stories, hypothesizing that skills taught to support organization would improve creativity. Concept maps are a type of graphic organizer, used to represent an ordering of ideas with nodes and linking words that form propositional statements. They…

  5. Classroom Idea-Sparkers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieff, Judith

    2007-01-01

    This article presents four Idea-Sparkers that were submitted by Jason McKinney, a graduate student at Southern Mississippi University and a 1st-grade teacher at Pisgah Elementary in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. First is entitled, "Raceway in the Classroom." This activity can help increase children's fluency and ability to identify numerous…

  6. Middle Grades Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Classroom Computer Learning, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Five ideas for computer-oriented classroom activities are presented. They include sending secret messages (while introducing the American Standard Code for Information Interchange- ASCII), conducting a computer survey, playing adventure games, showing why the END command is needed, and using control characters to protect a program. (JN)

  7. Upper Grades Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornburg, David; Beane, Pam

    1983-01-01

    Presents programming ideas using LOGO, activity for converting flowchart into a computer program, and a Pascal program for generating music using paddles. Includes the article "Helping Computers Adapt to Kids" by Philip Nothnagle; a program for estimating length of lines is included. (JN)

  8. Sharing Teaching Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippold, George C.

    1982-01-01

    Ideas are presented regarding: (1) unique learning activities for students who have difficulty with operations with signed numbers; (2) a mathematical inspection of a unique card trick that can be expressed as an equation; and (3) sketching of graphs of composite trigonometric functions. (MP)

  9. Middle Grades Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Classroom Computer Learning, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Activities for middle/junior high school students are presented, including use of string variables, science lesson ideas, computer scavenger hunt, and guidelines for interviewing people who own/use computers. Includes "I'll Write...Just Lead Me to My Computer" by Robert Engberg, discussing word processing instruction. (JN)

  10. Sharing Teaching Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Teacher, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Presents three teaching ideas involving (1) results of participation in the annual American Statistical Association's poster contest for students in grades K-12; (2) a variation on an annuity problem in which the contribution each year is increased by a given percentage; and (3) concrete activities to help students understand the meaning of radian…

  11. Early Grades Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Classroom Computer Learning, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presented are six practical teaching suggestions selected from commercially available materials and ideas submitted by readers. A personalized poster program, a hiking program, and activities in which students send the Logo turtle on an egg hunt and study pattern block programing are included. (JN)

  12. Hamilton Happening: A Creative Writing Scoop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lux, Katy; Nobel, Marcia

    A practical, low-cost plan that involves teacher workshops and noon-hour workshops for students to encourage creative activity in an elementary school program for kindergarten through grade five is described in this booklet. Included is a sample of a monthly newsletter that suggests activities for creative involvement that are seasonal, centered…

  13. Musical Creativity in Slovenian Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozman, Janja Crcinovic

    2009-01-01

    Background: The Slovenian music education curriculum for the first years of elementary school emphasises the following musical activities in the classroom: singing, playing instruments, listening to music, movement to music and musical creativity. In the field of musical creativity, there are two activities where students can be original and…

  14. Idea Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Describes four classroom activities that deal with a variety of scientific concepts. Discusses lessons on the cycles of matter in ecosystems, the calculation of the height of tall objects, bleaching techniques for bones, and the effects of force on sound when closing doors. (TW)

  15. Idea Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Cheryl A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Introduces 12 activities for teaching science. Includes one way to begin the school year, peristalsis demonstration, candy-coated metrics, 3-D constellations, 35-mm astrophotography, create an alien organism, jet propulsion, computer programs for pendulum calculations, plant versus animal, chocolate chip petroleum, paper rockets, and…

  16. Idea Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Describes classroom activities and models for migration, mutation, and isolation; a diffusion model; Bernoulli's principle; sound in a vacuum; time regression mystery of DNA; seating chart lesson plan; algae mystery laboratory; water as mass; science fair; flipped book; making a cloud; wet mount slide; timer adaptation; thread slide model; and…

  17. A Lighthouse in the Desert? Evaluating the Effects of Creativity Training on Employee Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdi, Kamal

    2007-01-01

    The contribution of three different creativity training programmes to employees' workplace idea generation and implementation was evaluated. The research was conducted within a government organization, where 191 employees (a mixture of participants and non-participants in creativity training) were surveyed. Analyses showed that creativity training…

  18. When Antecedents Diverge: Exploring Novelty and Value as Dimensions of Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruys, Melissa L.; Munshi, Natasha V.; Dewett, Todd C.

    2011-01-01

    Though an ongoing debate exists concerning how creativity should be defined and measured, it is generally agreed upon that creativity is the generation of ideas that are novel and of value (Amabile, 1996; Hennessey & Amabile, 2010). Yet most studies treat creativity as a black box in regards to the nature of the relationships between some commonly…

  19. The Role of Intuition in the Creative Process of Expert Chefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stierand, Marc; Dörfler, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Scholars studying intuition are frequently focusing on decision takers and to this day, they conceptualize intuition as a form of judgment. More recently, the notion of intuition in creativity has been challenged by the argument that although the creative process may contain intuitive judgments, any creative idea or solution is essentially the…

  20. The Importance of the Default Mode Network in Creativity--A Structural MRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kühn, Simone; Ritter, Simone M.; Müller, Barbara C. N.; van Baaren, Rick B.; Brass, Marcel; Dijksterhuis, Ap

    2014-01-01

    Anecdotal reports as well as behavioral studies have suggested that creative performance benefits from unconscious processes. So far, however, little is known about how creative ideas arise from the brain. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the neural correlates of creativity by means of structural MRI research. Given that unconscious…

  1. Democratizing Creativity: How Arts/Philosophy Can Contribute to the Question of Arts Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rocavert, Carla

    2016-01-01

    This article critically deconstructs the 21st-century economization and massification of creativity. It extends the discussion of arts bias and the associated ideas that artistic creativity is institutionalized, elitist, and an obstruction to more profitable applications of creativity. A tension is thus highlighted between the historically…

  2. Creativity for a Purpose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Hellen

    2011-01-01

    Creativity in primary science is even more important now than when it was first raised with the publication of the report "All our futures: creativity, culture and education." Creativity needs to involve both the teacher and the children. Exciting, creative and practical opportunities provided by the teacher will increase children's motivation and…

  3. Linguistics and Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Beaugrande, Robert

    Two main viewpoints have been consistently implied in linguistic research on creativity. The externalist sees creativity as outside the normal language, and the internalist views creativity as a basic process of language use. In this paper, creativity is regarded as the adaptation of the potential of systems to the demands of a particular act of…

  4. Utilizing Creative Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muirhead, Brent

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses creative teaching for public school teachers. It provides historical background on creativity research and highlights the barriers to creative teaching. The article emphasizes the relevant ways that teachers can encourage creativity in student work while supporting course objectives and standardized test preparation. The…

  5. Creativity: Concepts and Explorations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rookey, T. Jerome

    The lack of a universal definition of creativity has led to the assessment of creativity according to the definition favored by the evaluator. These assessments fall into four groups. The first centers around the concept of the creative product; it assesses a tangible event or relationship that results from the creative process, which is implied…

  6. Creativity and Mindfulness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batalo, Manuela Lynn

    2012-01-01

    In this study, I explored the personal attitudes toward creativity of students enrolled in digital photography classes at a Southern California community college, and attempted to discover if awareness brought to creativity and participating in a creative process affects these attitudes. Pink (2005) suggested that creativity is a desirable 21st…

  7. Creative Primary Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Liz

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how science can be integrated into the "creative curriculum". Creative approaches to curriculum design, cross-curricular studies and an increased focus on the creative arts are routes to promoting and teaching creativity. But when learning in science is based on a genuine enquiry-based approach with children…

  8. Gender Differences in Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, John; Kaufman, James C.

    2008-01-01

    Research on gender differences in creativity, including creativity test scores, creative achievements, and self-reported creativity is reviewed, as are theories that have been offered to explain such differences and available evidence that supports or refutes such theories. This is a difficult arena in which to conduct research, but there is a…

  9. Fluid Movement and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slepian, Michael L.; Ambady, Nalini

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive scientists describe creativity as fluid thought. Drawing from findings on gesture and embodied cognition, we hypothesized that the physical experience of fluidity, relative to nonfluidity, would lead to more fluid, creative thought. Across 3 experiments, fluid arm movement led to enhanced creativity in 3 domains: creative generation,…

  10. Creative Problem-Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grupas, Angela

    Educators can help themselves and others improve their creative thinking. Before the improvement can begin, there must be a common understanding of what creativity is. Edward Land described creativity as the sudden cessation of stupidity. Several barriers to creative thinking include boredom, lack of challenge, believing expertise in a particular…

  11. Teaching for Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Allison Antink

    2012-01-01

    Science teachers are often content to leave creativity to the arts and humanities classes. Fostering creativity in science, if attempted at all, is a challenge often relegated to the gifted classroom. But not just the privileged few have the capacity to be creative. Simply restructuring existing lessons can help promote creativity in all science…

  12. Can Senior Volunteers Deliver Reminiscence and Creative Activity Interventions? Results of the Legacy Intervention Family Enactment (LIFE) Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Rebecca S.; Harris, Grant M.; Burgio, Louis D.; Azuero, Casey B.; Miller, Leslie A.; Shin, Hae Jung; Eichorst, Morgan K.; Csikai, Ellen L.; DeCoster, Jamie; Dunn, Linda L.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Parmelee, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Context Palliative care patients and their family caregivers may have a foreshortened perspective of time left to live, or the expectation of the patient’s death in the near future. Patients and caregivers may report distress in physical, psychological, or existential/spiritual realms. Objectives To conduct a randomized controlled trial examining the effectiveness of retired senior volunteers (RSVs) in delivering a reminiscence and creative activity intervention aimed at alleviating palliative care patient and caregiver distress. Methods Of the 45 dyads that completed baseline, 28 completed post-intervention and 24 completed follow-up. The intervention group received three home visits by RSVs; control group families received three supportive telephone calls by research staff. Measures included symptom assessment and associated burden, depression, religiousness/spirituality, and meaning in life. Results Patients in the intervention group reported a significantly greater reduction in frequency of emotional symptoms (P = 0.02) and emotional symptom bother (P = 0.04) than the control group, as well as improved spiritual functioning. Family caregivers in the intervention group were more likely than control caregivers to endorse items on the Meaning in Life Scale (P = 0.02). Only improvement in intervention patients’ emotional symptom bother maintained at follow-up after discontinuing RSV contact (P = 0.024). Conclusion Delivery of the intervention by RSVs had a positive impact on palliative care patients’ emotional symptoms and burden and caregivers’ meaning in life. Meaningful prolonged engagement with palliative care patients and caregivers, possibly through alternative modes of treatment delivery such as continued RSV contact, may be necessary for maintenance of therapeutic effects. PMID:24667180

  13. Following Their Lead: Supporting Children's Ideas for Creating Dances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cone, Theresa Purcell

    2009-01-01

    When children create dances using their ideas, they are empowered to explore their thoughts, feelings, and perspectives. Through dance, they bring their inner self to the surface where they can express their dreams, fears, needs, and joys. Dance educators need to support children's ideas and trust the children's creative process, especially when…

  14. The "Power Play! Campaign's School Idea & Resource Kits" Improve Determinants of Fruit and Vegetable Intake and Physical Activity among Fourth- and Fifth-Grade Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keihner, Angie Jo; Meigs, Reba; Sugerman, Sharon; Backman, Desiree; Garbolino, Tanya; Mitchell, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Examine the effect of the "California Children's Power Play! Campaign's School Idea & Resource Kits" for fourth/fifth grades on the psychosocial determinants of fruit and vegetable (FV) intake and physical activity (PA). Methods: Randomized, controlled trial (n = 31 low-resource public schools; 1,154 children). Ten…

  15. Crucible of Creativity: Testing Public Outreach Activities at the Phoenix Comicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horodyskyj, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Phoenix Comicon (PCC) is a growing four-day pop culture event that features guests, costuming, exhibits, and discussion panels for popular sci-fi, fantasy, horror, and anime franchises. The 2014 and 2015 shows (which drew 75,000+ unique attendees each) featured a science programming track coordinated and organized by Horodyskyj. The track consisted of discussion panels, mixers, shows, interactive displays, and signature events (over 30 hours of programming each year). Topics ranged from planetary sciences to biotechnology to artificial intelligence and event staff were recruited from all levels of experience in academia, industry, and STEM outreach. The PCC science programming track for both 2014 and 2015 received very positive feedback from the audience, PCC management, and even scientists who participated in the event. Panelists and staff received frequent unsolicited praise about the content and events, and surveys showed requests for more science content in future years. Demand for good science programming, especially the kind that links the audience to local scientists, is high. The unique organizational structure of PCC, which draws heavily on the fan community rather than industry professionals, provides a rich test bed for public outreach activities generated by scientists themselves. In 2014, we tested science-based game shows, such as the bloody Exoplanet Survivor. In 2015, we ran a science interactivity booth and an interactive stage show about forensics based on the BBC series Sherlock. I will detail some of the successes and failures of these various events and what we're planning for 2016.

  16. Opinions of Class and Subject Matter Teachers and Candidate Teachers on the Effectiveness of Creative Drama in Teaching Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epcacan, Cevdet

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research is to establish the opinions of teachers and candidate teachers on the effect of creative drama. Descriptive research method is used in line with the objective of the research. Questionnaire is used for collecting data for the research. Questionnaire was prepared by the researcher. For the reliability of the…

  17. Brainstorm: occupational choice, bipolar illness and creativity.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Carol Horton; Grosskopf, Shawna; Yang, Ke

    2010-07-01

    Although economists have analyzed earnings, unemployment, and labor force participation for those with bipolar illness, occupational choice has yet to be explored. Psychological and medical studies often suggest an association between bipolar illness and creative achievement, but they tend to focus on eminent figures, case studies, or small samples. We seek to examine occupational creativity of non-eminent individuals with bipolar disorder. We use Epidemiologic Catchment Area data to estimate a multinomial logit model matched to an index of occupational creativity. Those with bipolar illness appear to be disproportionately concentrated in the most creative occupational category. Nonparametric kernel density estimates reveal that the densities of the occupational creativity variable for the bipolar and non-bipolar individuals significantly differ in the ECA data, and suggest that the probability of engaging in creative activities on the job is higher for bipolar than non-bipolar workers.

  18. Creativity and psychopathology: a shared vulnerability model.

    PubMed

    Carson, Shelley H

    2011-03-01

    Creativity is considered a positive personal trait. However, highly creative people have demonstrated elevated risk for certain forms of psychopathology, including mood disorders, schizophrenia spectrum disorders, and alcoholism. A model of shared vulnerability explains the relation between creativity and psychopathology. This model, supported by recent findings from neuroscience and molecular genetics, suggests that the biological determinants conferring risk for psychopathology interact with protective cognitive factors to enhance creative ideation. Elements of shared vulnerability include cognitive disinhibition (which allows more stimuli into conscious awareness), an attentional style driven by novelty salience, and neural hyperconnectivity that may increase associations among disparate stimuli. These vulnerabilities interact with superior meta-cognitive protective factors, such as high IQ, increased working memory capacity, and enhanced cognitive flexibility, to enlarge the range and depth of stimuli available in conscious awareness to be manipulated and combined to form novel and original ideas.

  19. World Cultures through Art Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Dindy

    The guide is intended to be a supplement to multicultural units in primary grades. The activities are freehand and students should be encouraged to use their imaginations and ideas to improve on a design. The approach is based on a whole language philosophy of learning with simple art activities that encourage creativity and critical thinking in…

  20. Creatively Expanding Minds through Interdisciplinary Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Don

    2010-01-01

    A long term, ever broadening search for ideas from multiple disciplines strengthens creative thinking for many gifted young people, especially if the search is guided by the evolving interests of the individual. Instead of asking students to delve deeply into a particular topic, encourage them to allow one point of study to suggest others, and…

  1. Leadership and Creativity in East Asian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shouse, Roger C.; Ma, Chenwei

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the concepts of educational creativity and leadership have attracted tremendous attention throughout East Asia. Driven in large part by isomorphic tendencies within a global organizational environment, the two ideas have also acquired the trappings of institutional myth. Often overlooked in the schools literature,…

  2. Twitter Fiction: A New Creative Literary Landscape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Sharaqi, Laila; Abbasi, Irum

    2016-01-01

    Twitter, synonymous with social networking, has become a successful social platform for the exchange of ideas, news, and information. It has also emerged as an experimental platform through which users explore creative realms of poetic and narrative content, albeit in 140 characters. The real-time tweets are fundamentally unique and increasingly…

  3. Thinking Creatively: A Guide to Training Imagination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Gary A.; Houtman, Susan E.

    The ideas in this workbook for stimulating children's creative thinking are presented as integral parts of ten stories about a boy named Dudley Bond (a distant relative of a very famous spy), his friend Max (a professional bear), and his cousin Maybelle. They find their imaginations stretched by a backyard scientist-inventor who knows dozens of…

  4. Factors That Influence Children's Free Choices of Topics for Creative Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobe, Ronald Albert

    The purpose of this study was to determine the scores of children's ideas for creative writing when given freedom of choice of topic, and to determine if those children who expressed ideas reportedly original to them were more or less creative than the others. The subjects, selected from grades 2, 4, and 6, were a stratified random sample…

  5. The influence of creative process engagement on employee creative performance and overall job performance: a curvilinear assessment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Bartol, Kathryn M

    2010-09-01

    Integrating theories addressing attention and activation with creativity literature, we found an inverted U-shaped relationship between creative process engagement and overall job performance among professionals in complex jobs in an information technology firm. Work experience moderated the curvilinear relationship, with low-experience employees generally exhibiting higher levels of overall job performance at low to moderate levels of creative process engagement and high-experience employees demonstrating higher overall performance at moderate to high levels of creative process engagement. Creative performance partially mediated the relationship between creative process engagement and job performance. These relationships were tested within a moderated mediation framework.

  6. Multicultural experience enhances creativity: the when and how.

    PubMed

    Leung, Angela Ka-Yee; Maddux, William W; Galinsky, Adam D; Chiu, Chi-yue

    2008-04-01

    Many practices aimed at cultivating multicultural competence in educational and organizational settings (e.g., exchange programs, diversity education in college, diversity management at work) assume that multicultural experience fosters creativity. In line with this assumption, the research reported in this article is the first to empirically demonstrate that exposure to multiple cultures in and of itself can enhance creativity. Overall, the authors found that extensiveness of multicultural experiences was positively related to both creative performance (insight learning, remote association, and idea generation) and creativity-supporting cognitive processes (retrieval of unconventional knowledge, recruitment of ideas from unfamiliar cultures for creative idea expansion). Furthermore, their studies showed that the serendipitous creative benefits resulting from multicultural experiences may depend on the extent to which individuals open themselves to foreign cultures, and that creativity is facilitated in contexts that deemphasize the need for firm answers or existential concerns. The authors discuss the implications of their findings for promoting creativity in increasingly global learning and work environments.

  7. Ideas Plus: A Collection of Practical Teaching Ideas. Book 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufmann, Felice, Comp.; Kent, Jeannette, Ed.

    Culled from ideas contributed by people attending conferences of the National Council of Teachers of English and by readers of "NOTES Plus" and "IDEAS Plus," the activities contained in this booklet are intended to promote the effective teaching of writing and literature. Teaching strategies offered in the first section of the…

  8. Creative Thinking of Practical Engineering Students During a Design Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waks, Shlomo; Merdler, Moti

    2003-01-01

    Creativity in engineering design had become an economic necessity and not merely the privilege of unique individuals. The search for new, innovative and effective ideas in engineering design stands in center of daily creative performance. This search requires sensitivity to gaps of knowledge and information, and the ability to evoke numerous, different and unique ideas about engineering problems. The source of such information or knowledge can be either extrinsic-such as provided by an instructor or expert or intrinsic, which might involve transformation from one field or context to another. Furthermore, interaction with an exterior source as well as developing an inherent drive, have an impact on the motivation to perform creatively. This article, which is based on a study conducted among Israeli practical engineering students, deals with the variations in creative thinking during various stages of a design project and the relation between creative thinking and motivation factors.

  9. TAG (Teaching Active Games) for the Holidays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erwin, Heather E.; Bachtel, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Holidays present the perfect opportunity for physical educators to utilize creative TAG (Teaching Active Games) games to offer maximum physical activity opportunities for their students. The TAG ideas in this article offer physical education teachers quick, instant activities that involve very little equipment, time management, or instruction. At…

  10. Creativity and sensory gating indexed by the P50: selective versus leaky sensory gating in divergent thinkers and creative achievers.

    PubMed

    Zabelina, Darya L; O'Leary, Daniel; Pornpattananangkul, Narun; Nusslock, Robin; Beeman, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Creativity has previously been linked with atypical attention, but it is not clear what aspects of attention, or what types of creativity are associated. Here we investigated specific neural markers of a very early form of attention, namely sensory gating, indexed by the P50 ERP, and how it relates to two measures of creativity: divergent thinking and real-world creative achievement. Data from 84 participants revealed that divergent thinking (assessed with the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking) was associated with selective sensory gating, whereas real-world creative achievement was associated with "leaky" sensory gating, both in zero-order correlations and when controlling for academic test scores in a regression. Thus both creativity measures related to sensory gating, but in opposite directions. Additionally, divergent thinking and real-world creative achievement did not interact in predicting P50 sensory gating, suggesting that these two creativity measures orthogonally relate to P50 sensory gating. Finally, the ERP effect was specific to the P50 - neither divergent thinking nor creative achievement were related to later components, such as the N100 and P200. Overall results suggest that leaky sensory gating may help people integrate ideas that are outside of focus of attention, leading to creativity in the real world; whereas divergent thinking, measured by divergent thinking tests which emphasize numerous responses within a limited time, may require selective sensory processing more than previously thought.

  11. When Lightning Strikes: Reexamining Creativity in Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, David K.; Becker, Kent W.

    2004-01-01

    Creativity is paramount to the therapeutic process. This article explored the role of creativity in counseling and psychotherapy through a critical analysis of several key articles in a special issue of The Journal of Clinical Activities, Assignments, & Handouts in Psychotherapy Practice (L. L. Hecker, 2002). Implications for counselors/therapists…

  12. From Creativity to Responsible Createlligence®

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban, Klaus K.

    2014-01-01

    A creative life is described with a dual perspective. Starting with the input of family and schools and crystallizing around the aspects of "spoken word" and "need of/for novelty," a scholarly career and research of new topics (in the country) developed on the one hand; on the other hand, creative activities and products in…

  13. Developing Creativity through Collaborative Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Lillie R.; Kim, Rina

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses an alternative approach for developing problem solving experiences for students. The major argument is that students can develop their creativity by engaging in collaborative problem solving activities in which they apply a variety of mathematical methods creatively to solve problems. The argument is supported by: considering…

  14. A Creative Climate for English Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livesay, Dorothy

    1968-01-01

    In contrast to the kind of leisurely climate that nurtured such creative artists of the past as the Brontes or Fanny Burney, today's adolescents exist in a frantic academic and social whirl in which their only leisure is often "a negative inertia against planned activity." To develop these students' potential as creative individuals and as social…

  15. Cycles of insanity and creativity within contemplative neural systems.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Stephen L

    2016-09-01

    Random connection weight disturbances within an assembly of artificial neural networks (ANN) drive a progression of activation patterns that are tantamount to the memories and ideas nucleating within the brain's cortex. The numerical evaluation of these pattern-based notions by another, more placid system of ANNs governs the magnitude of weight disturbances administered to the former assembly, that perturbative intensity in turn controlling the novelty of the resulting ideational stream as well as the retention of newly formed concepts. In search of solution patterns to posed problems, such collaborating neural systems autonomously cycle between two extremes in mean synaptic perturbation level. The higher limit, characterized by chaos and inattentiveness to exogenous input patterns, is the regime in which ideas first form and incubate. The lower bound, marked by relative synaptic tranquility, is favorable to the reactivation and reinforcement of concepts first seeded during heightened perturbation. When considering this synthetic neural architecture as a cognitive model, the proposed source of such synaptic fluctuations is volume neurotransmitter release within cortex where both ideational and critic nets are commingled. As a result of their overlap, not only are the generative cortical networks suffused with neurotransmitters, but also those functioning in a critic role, leading to altered 'opinions' about the perturbation-driven stream of consciousness that then govern the injection of neurotransmitters into cortex. The likely effect of such chemical feedback is that the brain constantly cycles between states of idea generating chaos and perception stabilizing tranquility in much the same way that creative artificial neural systems do. Postulating that ideas are potentially useful or interesting false memories born within such turmoil, creativity appears to take place through a cyclic process consisting of alternating phases of (1) cognitive incapacitation

  16. The integration of creative drama into science teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arieli, Bracha (Bari)

    This study explored the inclusion of creative drama into science teaching as an instructional strategy for enhancing elementary school students' understanding of scientific concepts. A treatment group of sixth grade students was taught a Full Option Science System (FOSS) science unit on Mixtures and Solutions with the addition of creative drama while a control group was taught using only the FOSS teaching protocol. Quantitative and qualitative data analyses demonstrated that students who studied science through creative drama exhibited a greater understanding of scientific content of the lessons and preferred learning science through creative drama. Treatment group students stated that they enjoyed participating in the activities with their friends and that the creative drama helped them to better understand abstract scientific concepts. Teachers involved with the creative drama activities were positively impressed and believed creative drama is a good tool for teaching science. Observations revealed that creative drama created a positive classroom environment, improved social interactions and self-esteem, that all students enjoyed creative drama, and that teachers' teaching style affected students' use of creative drama. The researcher concluded that the inclusion of creative drama with the FOSS unit enhanced students' scientific knowledge and understanding beyond that of the FOSS unit alone, that both teachers and students reacted positively to creative drama in science and that creative drama requires more time.

  17. Let's Meet Famous Artists. A Creative Art Activity Book. A Teacher's Guide Featuring 19 Famous Artists and Art Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinghorn, Harriet; And Others

    By studying the lives, important achievements, and works of famous artists, students may come to understand what those artists hoped to communicate to the world. By participating in art activities that are related to these artists' styles, students practice skills of observing, analyzing, and creating. This instructional guide provides…

  18. Training creative cognition: adolescence as a flexible period for improving creativity

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Claire E.; Kleibeuker, Sietske W.; de Dreu, Carsten K. W.; Crone, Eveline A.

    2014-01-01

    Creativity commonly refers to the ability to generate ideas, solutions, or insights that are novel yet feasible. The ability to generate creative ideas appears to develop and change from childhood to adulthood. Prior research, although inconsistent, generally indicates that adults perform better than adolescents on the alternative uses task (AUT), a commonly used index of creative ideation. The focus of this study was whether performance could be improved by practicing alternative uses generation. We examined the effectiveness of creative ideation training in adolescents (13–16 years, N = 71) and adults (23–30 years, N = 61). Participants followed one of three types of training, each comprising eight 20-min practice sessions within 2 week time: (1) alternative uses generation (experimental condition: creative ideation); (2) object characteristic generation (control condition: general ideation); (3) rule-switching (control condition: rule-switching). Progression in fluency, flexibility, originality of creative ideation was compared between age-groups and training conditions. Participants improved in creative ideation and cognitive flexibility, but not in general ideation. Participants in all three training conditions became better in fluency and originality on the AUT. With regard to originality, adolescents benefitted more from training than adults, although this was not specific for the creative ideation training condition. These results are interpreted in relation to (a) the different underlying processes targeted in the three conditions and (b) developmental differences in brain plasticity with increased sensitivity to training in adolescents. In sum, the results show that improvement can be made in creative ideation and supports the hypothesis that adolescence is a developmental stage of increased flexibility optimized for learning and explorative behavior. PMID:25400565

  19. Training creative cognition: adolescence as a flexible period for improving creativity.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Claire E; Kleibeuker, Sietske W; de Dreu, Carsten K W; Crone, Eveline A

    2014-01-01

    Creativity commonly refers to the ability to generate ideas, solutions, or insights that are novel yet feasible. The ability to generate creative ideas appears to develop and change from childhood to adulthood. Prior research, although inconsistent, generally indicates that adults perform better than adolescents on the alternative uses task (AUT), a commonly used index of creative ideation. The focus of this study was whether performance could be improved by practicing alternative uses generation. We examined the effectiveness of creative ideation training in adolescents (13-16 years, N = 71) and adults (23-30 years, N = 61). Participants followed one of three types of training, each comprising eight 20-min practice sessions within 2 week time: (1) alternative uses generation (experimental condition: creative ideation); (2) object characteristic generation (control condition: general ideation); (3) rule-switching (control condition: rule-switching). Progression in fluency, flexibility, originality of creative ideation was compared between age-groups and training conditions. Participants improved in creative ideation and cognitive flexibility, but not in general ideation. Participants in all three training conditions became better in fluency and originality on the AUT. With regard to originality, adolescents benefitted more from training than adults, although this was not specific for the creative ideation training condition. These results are interpreted in relation to (a) the different underlying processes targeted in the three conditions and (b) developmental differences in brain plasticity with increased sensitivity to training in adolescents. In sum, the results show that improvement can be made in creative ideation and supports the hypothesis that adolescence is a developmental stage of increased flexibility optimized for learning and explorative behavior.

  20. People underestimate the value of persistence for creative performance.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Brian J; Nordgren, Loran F

    2015-08-01

    Across 7 studies, we investigated the prediction that people underestimate the value of persistence for creative performance. Across a range of creative tasks, people consistently underestimated how productive they would be while persisting (Studies 1-3). Study 3 found that the subjectively experienced difficulty, or disfluency, of creative thought accounted for persistence undervaluation. Alternative explanations based on idea quality (Studies 1-2B) and goal setting (Study 4) were considered and ruled out and domain knowledge was explored as a boundary condition (Study 5). In Study 6, the disfluency of creative thought reduced people's willingness to invest in an opportunity to persist, resulting in lower financial performance. This research demonstrates that persistence is a critical determinant of creative performance and that people may undervalue and underutilize persistence in everyday creative problem solving.

  1. [Creativity and bipolar disorder].

    PubMed

    Maçkalı, Zeynep; Gülöksüz, Sinan; Oral, Timuçin

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between creativity and bipolar disorder has been an intriguing topic since ancient times. Early studies focused on describing characteristics of creative people. From the last quarter of the twentieth century, researchers began to focus on the relationship between mood disorders and creativity. Initially, the studies were based on biographical texts and the obtained results indicated a relationship between these two concepts. The limitations of the retrospective studies led the researchers to develop systematic investigations into this area. The systematic studies that have focused on artistic creativity have examined both the prevalence of mood disorders and the creative process. In addition, a group of researchers addressed the relationship in terms of affective temperaments. Through the end of the 90's, the scope of creativity was widened and the notion of everyday creativity was proposed. The emergence of this notion led researchers to investigate the associations of the creative process in ordinary (non-artist) individuals. In this review, the descriptions of creativity and creative process are mentioned. Also, the creative process is addressed with regards to bipolar disorder. Then, the relationship between creativity and bipolar disorder are evaluated in terms of aforementioned studies (biographical, systematic, psychobiographical, affective temperaments). In addition, a new model, the "Shared Vulnerability Model" which was developed to explain the relationship between creativity and psychopathology is introduced. Finally, the methodological limitations and the suggestions for resolving these limitations are included.

  2. Thinking Cap Plus Thinking Zap: tDCS of Frontopolar Cortex Improves Creative Analogical Reasoning and Facilitates Conscious Augmentation of State Creativity in Verb Generation.

    PubMed

    Green, Adam E; Spiegel, Katherine A; Giangrande, Evan J; Weinberger, Adam B; Gallagher, Natalie M; Turkeltaub, Peter E

    2016-04-13

    Recent neuroimaging evidence indicates neural mechanisms that support transient improvements in creative performance (augmented state creativity) in response to cognitive interventions (creativity cueing). Separately, neural interventions via tDCS show encouraging potential for modulating neuronal function during creative performance. If cognitive and neural interventions are separately effective, can they be combined? Does state creativity augmentation represent "real" creativity, or do interventions simply yield divergence by diminishing meaningfulness/appropriateness? Can augmenting state creativity bolster creative reasoning that supports innovation, particularly analogical reasoning? To address these questions, we combined tDCS with creativity cueing. Testing a regionally specific hypothesis from neuroimaging, high-definition tDCS-targeted frontopolar cortex activity recently shown to predict state creativity augmentation. In a novel analogy finding task, participants under tDCS formulated substantially more creative analogical connections in a large matrix search space (creativity indexed via latent semantic analysis). Critically, increased analogical creativity was not due to diminished accuracy in discerning valid analogies, indicating "real" creativity rather than inappropriate divergence. A simpler relational creativity paradigm (modified verb generation) revealed a tDCS-by-cue interaction; tDCS further enhanced creativity cue-related increases in semantic distance. Findings point to the potential of noninvasive neuromodulation to enhance creative relational cognition, including augmentation of the deliberate effort to formulate connections between distant concepts.

  3. Making ideas at scientific fabrication laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonda, Carlo; Canessa, Enrique

    2016-11-01

    Creativity, together with the making of ideas into fruition, is essential for progress. Today the evolution from an idea to its application can be facilitated by the implementation of Fabrication Laboratories, or FabLabs, having affordable digital tools for prototyping. FabLabs aiming at scientific research and invention are now starting to be established inside Universities, Research Centers and Schools. We review the setting up of the ICTP Scientific FabLab in Trieste, Italy, give concrete examples on the use in physics, and propose to replicate world-wide this class of multi-purpose workplaces within academia as a support for physics and math education and for community development.

  4. The evolutionary roots of creativity: mechanisms and motivations.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Geraint A; Tyack, Peter; Scharff, Constance; Rohrmeier, Martin

    2015-03-19

    We consider the evolution of cognition and the emergence of creative behaviour, in relation to vocal communication. We address two key questions: (i) what cognitive and/or social mechanisms have evolved that afford aspects of creativity?; (ii) has natural and/or sexual selection favoured human behaviours considered 'creative'? This entails analysis of 'creativity', an imprecise construct: comparable properties in non-humans differ in magnitude and teleology from generally agreed human creativity. We then address two apparent problems: (i) the difference between merely novel productions and 'creative' ones; (ii) the emergence of creative behaviour in spite of high cost: does it fit the idea that females choose a male who succeeds in spite of a handicap (costly ornament); or that creative males capable of producing a large and complex song repertoire grew up under favourable conditions; or a demonstration of generally beneficial heightened reasoning capacity; or an opportunity to continually reinforce social bonding through changing communication tropes; or something else? We illustrate and support our argument by reference to whale and bird song; these independently evolved biological signal mechanisms objectively share surface properties with human behaviours generally called 'creative'. Studying them may elucidate mechanisms underlying human creativity; we outline a research programme to do so.

  5. Creativity and Mobile Language Learning Using LingoBee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Sobah Abbas; Procter-Legg, Emma; Cacchione, Annamaria

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the authors explore the ideas of mobility and creativity through the use of LingoBee, a mobile app for situated language learning. LingoBee is based on ideas from crowd-sourcing and social networking to support language learners. Learners are able to create their own content and share it with other learners through a repository. The…

  6. Creative Writing and Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alber, Mark

    2001-04-01

    Students often view science as a mechanical endeavor that--unlike art, music, and literature--involves little imagination or creativity. This is partly due to the inability of scientists to communicate in accessible language the creative nature of scientific discovery and the tradition in science education of minimizing the role of the individual. This paper describes a project that helps students appreciate the creative side of science by using scientists and scientific theories as the basis for creative writing assignments.

  7. Mapping Creativity: Creativity Measurements Network Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinheiro, Igor Reszka; Cruz, Roberto Moraes

    2014-01-01

    This article borrowed network analysis tools to discover how the construct formed by the set of all measures of creativity configures itself. To this end, using a variant of the meta-analytical method, a database was compiled simulating 42,381 responses to 974 variables centered on 64 creativity measures. Results, although preliminary, indicate…

  8. Teaching Creativity--Creatively with Psychosynthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    du Pont de Bie, Alexis I.

    1985-01-01

    The author suggests that students can achieve an expansion of successful creative problem-solving through the use of psychosynthesis and allied techniques in transpersonal psychology. This paper discusses the philosophical rational of teaching creativity and examples of a practicum for use in the classroom or work place. (Author/CL)

  9. Creativity in art and science: are there two cultures?

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Nancy C; Ramchandran, Kanchna

    2012-03-01

    The study of creativity is characterized by a variety of key questions, such as the nature of the creative process, whether there are multiple types of creativity, the relationship between high levels of creativity ("Big C") and everyday creativity ("little c"), and the neural basis of creativity. Herein we examine the question of the relationship between creativity in the arts and the sciences, and use functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore the neural basis of creativity in a group of "Big C" individuals from both domains using a word association protocol. The findings give no support for the notion that the artists and scientists represent "two cultures. " Rather, they suggest that very gifted artists and scientists have association cortices that respond in similar ways. Both groups display a preponderance of activation in brain circuits involved in higher-order socioaffective processing and Random Episodic Silent Thought /the default mode.

  10. Unconventional Reservoirs: Ideas to Commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinker, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    There is no shortage of coal, oil, and natural gas in the world. What are sometimes in short supply are fresh ideas. Scientific innovation combined with continued advances in drilling and completion technology revitalized the natural gas industry in North America by making production from shale economic. Similar advances are now happening in shale oil. The convergence of ideas and technology has created a commercial environment in which unconventional reservoirs could supply natural gas to the North American consumer for 50 years or more. And, although not as far along in terms of resource development, oil from the Eagle Ford and Bakken Shales and the oil sands in Alberta could have a similar impact. Without advanced horizontal drilling, geosteering, staged hydraulic-fracture stimulation, synthetic and natural proppants, evolution of hydraulic fluid chemistry, and high-end monitoring and simulation, many of these plays would not exist. Yet drilling and completion technology cannot stand alone. Also required for success are creative thinking, favorable economics, and a tolerance for risk by operators. Current understanding and completion practices will leave upwards of 80% of oil and natural gas in the shale reservoirs. The opportunity to enhance recovery through advanced reservoir understanding and imaging, as well as through recompletions and infill drilling, is considerable. The path from ideas to commercialization will continue to provide economic results in unconventional reservoirs.

  11. Originality and Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Shaun

    This paper discusses the creative process of one author, a professional author/illustrator of picture books. The paper muses about the meaning of creativity and originality and states inspiration has to do with careful research and looking for a challenge. Creativity is about testing one proposition against another and seeing how things combine…

  12. Creativity and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knox, Alan

    2011-01-01

    This article explores personal, organisational and societal perspectives on creativity, arts, and adult education. Attention to creativity in the United States has increased during the past century. Fifty years ago, scholars and practitioners interested in the arts and sciences were focused on extraordinary creative achievements. Since then the…

  13. Creative Dramatics. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Julia; Sidlovskaya, Olga; Stotter, Ruth; Haugen, Kirsten; Leithold, Naomi

    2000-01-01

    Presents five articles on using creative dramatics in early childhood education: (1) "Drama: A Rehearsal for Life" (Julia Gabriel); (2) "Fairy Tales Enhance Imagination and Creative Thinking" (Olga Sidlovskaya); (3) "Starting with a Story" (Ruth Stotter); (4) "Using Creative Dramatics to Include All…

  14. Rethinking Creativity. Fastback 458.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Ronald R.; Ponticell, Judith A.; Gordon, Edward E.

    While intelligence plays an important role in understanding human behavior, it is through creativity that we can understand a human's ability to cope with challenging situations in novel and appropriate ways. This fastback explores theories and research on creativity. Its chapters are: (1) "Looking for Creativity," describing six multidisciplinary…

  15. Creativity in Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Robert A., Ed.

    A collection of 20 essays on creative problem solving in advertising and sales promotion considers the relationship between client and agency and the degree of creativity that is necessary or desirable for each side to bring to their collaboration. The different essays are fully illustrated and specifically focus on such areas as creativity in…

  16. Creativity and Intuition Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollinger, Stephen J.; Palaskonis, Dimitra G.; Pearson, Jodi L.

    2004-01-01

    This study used the recently revised Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and a variety of validated creativity measures to replicate a classic finding--that sensing-intuition predicts creativity--and to evaluate whether the other MBTI scales add to the prediction of creativity. 94 undergraduates completed the MBTI (form M self-scorable) and…

  17. Kaleidoscopic Thinking for Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrini, Catherine M., Ed.

    1991-01-01

    The most successful companies must be flexible and rapidly adaptable. This requires creative management and creative teamwork. Like a kaleidoscope, creative thinking is the ability to rearrange pieces to form a new reality, to see connections, and to think on a global scale. (SK)

  18. Heritability of Creative Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piffer, Davide; Hur, Yoon-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Although creative achievement is a subject of much attention to lay people, the origin of individual differences in creative accomplishments remain poorly understood. This study examined genetic and environmental influences on creative achievement in an adult sample of 338 twins (mean age = 26.3 years; SD = 6.6 years). Twins completed the Creative…

  19. Creativity: The Early Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shade, Rick; Shade, Patti Garrett

    2016-01-01

    There is a myth that some people are creative and others are not. However, all children are born creative. They love to explore, ask questions, and are incredibly imaginative. Parents are key in nurturing their child's creativity in the early years. This article offers resources and strategies parents can use at different ages and stages (newborn,…

  20. The Creativity Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Donovan R.

    2009-01-01

    Children are innately creative, and the youngest often are the most original because they have yet to be influenced by the creativity of others. One way to think of creative expression is as a continuum. At one end is originality, or the creation of something wholly new, "original." At the other end is replication, or the re-creation of something…

  1. The Creative Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Follos, Alison

    2004-01-01

    The underlying essence behind all creativity is the humanity that elevates art above manufactured product. Creativity takes courage to be nurtured and extracts personal sacrifices. Gifted with premonitions, obscured by insecurities, inflated by, ego, skewed by emotional highs and lows, wild and crazy, the lives of creative people are rarely dull.…

  2. Nurturing Creativity in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collard, Paul; Looney, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Across continents, creativity is a priority for education and is central to the discourse on 21st century learning. In this article, we explore how a greater focus on "everyday creativity" in schools changes the dynamics of teaching and learning. We look briefly at the main concepts in the literature on creativity in education. We then…

  3. Creativity in Language Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Jack C.

    2013-01-01

    One quality among the many that characterize effective teachers is the ability to bring a creative disposition to teaching. In second language teaching, creativity has also been linked to levels of attainment in language learning. Many of the language tasks favored by contemporary language teaching methods are believed to release creativity in…

  4. Creativity in Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimbell, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of the British Office of Standards in Education reports suggests that management and documentation are valued and rewarded over creativity in teaching. As in other policymaking bodies, preconditions to support creativity in schools are lacking, resulting in a mismatch between rhetoric about developing creative talents and the reality…

  5. The Creative Dancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrer, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the creative role of contemporary dancers within the choreographic process, and introduces the question of why their creative contribution is often overlooked? It highlights how different modes of creativity can be understood, and what impacts different choreographic processes have on the way dancers understand their creative…

  6. Organizational Outcomes of Creativity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    orientation of the focal person as evi- dence that they were creative. 14. Job/ Business Knowledge . Three responses focused on the fact that the creative...individual possessed good job or business knowledge . 15. Positive Effects Upon Others. Two respondents commented that their focal person was creative

  7. How to Kill Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amabile, Teresa M.

    1998-01-01

    Creativity is undermined unintentionally every day in work environments that were established to maximize business imperatives such as coordination, productivity, and control. Organizations must make a concerted effort to get rid of creativity killers and be truly innovative so that creativity not only survives but thrives. (Author/JOW)

  8. Characteristics of Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilford, J. P.

    One analysis of the creative process includes four steps: preparation; concentrated effort; withdrawal from the problem; insight or illumination; and verification, evaluation, and elaboration. The creative process is described elsewhere in four steps: openess, focusing, discipline, and closure. Research studies of highly creative adults have shown…

  9. The Creativity Crusade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shade, Rick; Shade, Patti Garrett

    2015-01-01

    Creativity has and always will be at the heart of American culture. It is evidenced in our daily lives thanks to the contributions of society's most revered icons. For decades, creativity has languished in the educational system. Creativity is not the norm in schools, and seems to only survive in classrooms or enrichment programs when highly…

  10. Creativity and innovation by empowering the customer: The case of Mulino Bianco. Part I: Organisational innovation context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujor, A.; Avasilcăi, S.

    2015-11-01

    The terms of creativity, co-creation, creative industries, innovation, and coinnovation are more and more used nowadays. While co-creation offers the possibility and encourages a more active involvement from the customers to create value rich experiences, innovation is responsible for the little improvements made for a better life, to grow a business, to improve products, services or company's productivity. Either customers, current and potential, or stakeholders’ involvement into innovation activities, through their creativity, represent an important way of value creation, of actions’ performance that increases the worth of goods, services, or business as a whole. More and more, different size businesses gather ideas for innovation from customers / stakeholders through their involvement into the early stages of the innovation process. Actually, it has been shown that their ideas sketch their needs and wishes, and have been described as “need information”. Customers and stakeholders, in general, also offer ideas that have been called “solution information”, which represents, not only need information, but also customer-based proposals that describe how ideas can be transformed into marketable products. The term of creative industries refers to those goods that can technically be reproduced, industrially produced, and commercially sold, this being one of the many definitions found in the literature. The classification of creative industries differs at the European Union level according to each country's development level and opening towards these industries’ perception as an engine for economic growth. To better explore and identify the importance of innovation and creativity for new products’ development or improvement a case study about Mulino Bianco was done. This methodology approach represents a part of a qualitative research approach within a broader research undertaken within the framework of the National Research Program PN II. Mulino Bianco

  11. Creative Ventures: Mysteries and UFO's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Rebecca

    This book published in 1987 provides open-ended activities to extend the imagination and creativity of students and encourage them to examine their feelings and values. Williams' model of cognitive-intellective and affective-feeling domains are addressed. Nearly 60 pages of exercises focus on the historical, the scientific, the mysterious, the…

  12. Creativity in Teaching Plant Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrakovic, Vehid; Bognar, Branko

    2009-01-01

    Using life-affirming values as a starting point, authors conducted action research to investigate ways of enabling pupils to experience freedom of choice, and to participate creatively in class activities, thus allowing them to begin to enjoy the subject of agriculture. The research problem was: How to encourage pupils to independently and freely…

  13. Creative Writing for Gifted Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chasteen, Betty

    The teacher of elementary level gifted students discusses successful creative writing activities. Among the reasons for students to learn writing early in the educational program are that written expression complements oral communication, heightens awareness of ordinary experiences, and helps students become more appreciative of language.…

  14. Creative Cognition and Brain Network Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Beaty, Roger E; Benedek, Mathias; Silvia, Paul J; Schacter, Daniel L

    2016-02-01

    Creative thinking is central to the arts, sciences, and everyday life. How does the brain produce creative thought? A series of recently published papers has begun to provide insight into this question, reporting a strikingly similar pattern of brain activity and connectivity across a range of creative tasks and domains, from divergent thinking to poetry composition to musical improvisation. This research suggests that creative thought involves dynamic interactions of large-scale brain systems, with the most compelling finding being that the default and executive control networks, which can show an antagonistic relation, tend to cooperate during creative cognition and artistic performance. These findings have implications for understanding how brain networks interact to support complex cognitive processes, particularly those involving goal-directed, self-generated thought.

  15. Creative Cognition and Brain Network Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Beaty, Roger E.; Benedek, Mathias; Silvia, Paul J.; Schacter, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    Creative thinking is central to the arts, sciences, and everyday life. How does the brain produce creative thought? A series of recently published papers has begun to provide insight into this question, reporting a strikingly similar pattern of brain activity and connectivity across a range of creative tasks and domains, from divergent thinking to poetry composition to musical improvisation. This research suggests that creative thought involves dynamic interactions of large-scale brain systems, with the most compelling finding being that the default and executive control networks, which can show an antagonistic relationship, actually cooperate during creative cognition and artistic performance. These findings have implications for understanding how brain networks interact to support complex cognitive processes, particularly those involving goal-directed, self-generated thought. PMID:26553223

  16. Creativity and innovation by empowering the customer: The case of Mulino Bianco. Part II: The digital customer value added

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujor, A.; Avasilcăi, S.

    2015-11-01

    The terms of creativity, co-creation, creative industries, innovation, and coinnovation are more and more used nowadays. While co-creation offers the possibility and encourages a more active involvement from the customers to create value rich experiences, innovation is responsible for the little improvements made for a better life, to grow a business, to improve products, services or company's productivity. Either customers, current and potential, or stakeholders’ involvement into innovation activities, through their creativity, represent an important way of value creation, of actions’ performance that increases the worth of goods, services, or business as a whole. More and more, different size businesses gather ideas for innovation from customers / stakeholders by involving them into the early stages of the innovation process. Actually, it has been shown that their ideas sketch their needs and wishes, and have been described as “need information”. Customers and stakeholders, in general, also offer ideas that have been called “solution information”, which represents, not only need information, but also customer-based proposals that describe how ideas can be transformed into marketable products. The term of creative industries refers to those goods that can technically be reproduced, industrially produced, and commercially sold, this being one of the many definitions found in the literature. Mulino Bianco was first launched in Italy, being one of the value brands of Barilla Group, which we can say, according to the Italian definition and classification, it belongs to creative industries: industry of food and taste. Even though Barilla Group's Research & Development department does its job very efficiently, developing and creating new products under different brands, lately a key strategy for the Group and for Mulino Bianco, by default, is customers’ pro-active involvement in products’ development or creation. One of the tools used for this is the

  17. Thinking outside the Clocks: The Effect of Layered-Task Time on the Creative Climate of Meetings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agypt, Brett; Rubin, Beth A.; Spivack, April J.

    2012-01-01

    The turbulence of the new economy puts demands on organizations to respond rapidly, flexibly and creatively to changing environments. Meetings are one of the organizational sites in which organizational actors "do" creativity; interaction in groups can be an important site for generating creative ideas and brainstorming. Additionally, Blount…

  18. Wanted: "Highly Motivated, Concept-Driven Stars"--Hiring Preferences of Top U.S. Creative Directors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broyles, Sheri J.; Kendrick, Alice

    A study surveyed creative directors of top United States advertising agencies to provide an idea of the expectations and hiring practices for both copywriters and art directors in creative departments of those agencies. Results revealed that two-thirds hire creative personnel "right out of school," but that little if any formal recruiting is…

  19. Designing EEG Neurofeedback Procedures to Enhance Open-Ended versus Closed-Ended Creative Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Wei-Lun; Shih, Yi-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Recent empirical evidence demonstrated that open-ended creativity (which refers to creativity measures that require various and numerous responses, such as divergent thinking) correlated with alpha brain wave activation, whereas closed-ended creativity (which refers to creativity measures that ask for one final correct answer, such as insight…

  20. Creativity in the Structure of Professionalism of a Higher School Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gladilina, Irina Petrovna

    2016-01-01

    In the science, due to the absence of strict and exact criteria for differentiating between creative and non-creative activities of a human, there is no rather full definition of "creativity" notion despite that this matter was addressed by many scholars. Multifactor field in the science on creativity allows interpreting the essence of…

  1. Linkographic Evidence for Concurrent Divergent and Convergent Thinking in Creative Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldschmidt, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, the creativity literature has stressed the role of divergent thinking in creative endeavor. More recently, it has been recognized that convergent thinking also has a role in creativity, and the design literature, which sees design as a creative activity a priori, has largely adopted this view: Divergent and convergent thinking are…

  2. Beyond the cliff of creativity: a novel key to Bipolar Disorder and creativity.

    PubMed

    Ricciardiello, Luciana; Fornaro, Pantaleo

    2013-05-01

    How brain processes translate into creativity is still an unsolved puzzle in science. Although a number of conceptual models of creativity has been proposed to date, the exact nature of the process is still unknown. Recent findings support the idea that creativity may reside upon a continuum with psychopathology. If creativity is meant as "the capability of generating novel and appropriate ideas to solve problems", the missing pieces of the puzzle might be nested in the link between creativity and Bipolar Disorder. The existence of such a link is widely accepted by the Scientific Community. What still remains unknown is the nature of this link. An unconventional perspective is adopted during the investigation. Starting from the observation that depression in Bipolar Disorder might possibly trace back to ancient survival strategies in extreme climatic conditions - i.e. hibernation - the paper analyses old and recent findings in different disciplines: paleo-anthropology, information technology, neurobiology. Hints from the related research fields are linked together. The unified framework that emerges, still as a set of hypotheses, is reported in the conclusions. A novel key of interpretation of both creativity and Bipolar Disorder is thus provided. The core result is that normal people, creative individuals and patients affected by Bipolar Disorder share the same mind mechanism for problem-solving. The mechanism consists of two specific components, which are described in detail in the paper. Dysfunctions in brain myelination, making signal interference possible, hold a big role. The conclusions of the paper are in agreement with reports by patients affected by Bipolar Disorder concerning their subjective experience during mania, which is traditionally described as prone to creativity. To make readers aware of such an experience, a synthesis was elaborated by the first author, in the unusual shape of a short story. The short story is the narrative version of a real

  3. Relation of Neurological Findings on Decoupling of Brain Activity from Limb Movement to Piagetian Ideas on the Origin of Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Joe

    2006-01-01

    Neurological research has demonstrated that brain activity in animals originally dedicated to the production and regulation of physical activity can be decoupled from that physical activity. Furthermore, animals can use the brain activity in this new condition to achieve particular results such as moving a cursor on a screen. These findings are…

  4. Collaborative Sketching in Crowdsourcing Design: A New Method for Idea Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Lingyun; Xiang, Wei; Chen, Shi; Yang, Zhiyuan

    2015-01-01

    Design integrates concepts and solves problems. Crowdsourcing design imports vast knowledge and produces creative ideas. It publishes design tasks, collects dozens of contributors' ideas and reward the best. Contributors in crowdsourcing design work individually when generating ideas. However, those who collaborate could make better use of crowd's…

  5. Creative Imagery--Useful But Not Necessary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbough, Jim R.

    1975-01-01

    It is important that the public relations aspect of agricultural education programs communicate the innovative activities, creativity, and individual approaches of effective programs in obtaining favorable public exposure. (EA)

  6. Creative Writing and the Water Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Rich; Virmani, Jyotika; Kusek, Kristen M.

    2001-01-01

    Uses the story "The Life of a Drop of Water" to initiate a creative writing activity and teach about the water cycle. Attempts to stimulate students' understanding of a scientific concept by using their imaginations. (YDS)

  7. Encountering the Creative Museum: Museographic Creativeness and the "Bricolage" of Time Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tlili, Anwar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to trace some lines of thinking towards a conceptualization of the uniqueness of the creative work of museums, the mode of creativeness that belongs exclusively to museums, or at least that museums are capable of by virtue of the types of materials and forms as well as activities unique to what will be referred to as…

  8. Creativity in the Later Life: Factors Associated with the Creativity of the Chinese Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Wei; Niu, Weihua

    2013-01-01

    This study examined a total of 140 elderly Chinese from China and the United States to investigate the relationship between attitude toward aging, daily activities, general health, education, and other demographics and rated creativity as measured by collage making and storytelling. The result of this study shows that creativity declines with age.…

  9. Ideas Identified and Distributed through Project IDEA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    This document contains ideas on a variety of subjects directed at the physical educator. The work was compiled by Project IDEA (Identify, Distribute, Exchange for Action). Topics include the following: (a) scheduling, (b) curriculum, (c) games, (d) specific courses, (e) life sports, (f) fitness, (g) adaptive Physical education, (h) course methods,…

  10. Creativity in older adults: a plethora of possibilities.

    PubMed

    Flood, Meredith; Phillips, Kenneth D

    2007-04-01

    Aging continues to be an important topic of study. For many older adults, the elder years can be a challenging, if not difficult, time. Creativity interventions have been shown to positively affect mental and physiological health indicators. The process of creating and one's attitude toward life may be more important than the actual product or tangible outcome. While many activities are those typically thought of as creative, such as painting, there are also a number of useful interventions that are not traditionally identified as creative ones, but that are, in fact, creative activities. This paper describes recent work with creativity in older adults, including research and clinical projects, and earlier works that could be refined as creative interventions. Recommendations for further investigation of creativity also are presented.

  11. Creative Work Careers: Pathways and Portfolios for the Creative Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the career opportunities, challenges and trajectories of creative work. As part of the Creative Trident approach to creative workforce measurements, the embedded mode draws attention to creative work as it is undertaken outside of the creative industries. This article further considers and conceptualises the complex careers…

  12. Wage Slavery or Creative Work?

    PubMed

    Mirowsky, John

    2011-07-01

    Western philosophical and scientific traditions often view human work as inherently onerous, wearisome, and degrading. Adam Smith, writing in the eighteenth century, saw work as the toil and trouble that is the real price humans pay for everything they need or want. Karl Marx, writing in the nineteenth century, considered wage labor alienating, but saw the possibility of self-expressive work. Dupré and Gagnier, a philosopher and a critic writing near the end of the twentieth century, agreed that work could be self-fulfilling, but only for an elite minority. This article summarizes the Western philosophical views of work from ancient to modern times. It reframes the philosophical positions as empirical questions and addresses them with statistics and models drawn from a 1995 U.S. survey. Observations suggest that work, in modern America, is not usually alienated. The great majority of Americans rate their paid work or other main daily activities (mostly unpaid work) as more autonomous and creative than not. Emotional well-being and the sense of control over one's own life increase with the degree of autonomy and creativity. The employed report less autonomous but more creative activity than do the nonemployed. Emotional well-being and perceived control correlate more strongly with creativity than with autonomy. The overall association thus favors employment, especially for the poorly educated, even though they give up more autonomy when employed. On the whole, work in modern America seems more self-fulfilling than onerous, alienating, or degrading.

  13. Wage Slavery or Creative Work?

    PubMed Central

    Mirowsky, John

    2013-01-01

    Western philosophical and scientific traditions often view human work as inherently onerous, wearisome, and degrading. Adam Smith, writing in the eighteenth century, saw work as the toil and trouble that is the real price humans pay for everything they need or want. Karl Marx, writing in the nineteenth century, considered wage labor alienating, but saw the possibility of self-expressive work. Dupré and Gagnier, a philosopher and a critic writing near the end of the twentieth century, agreed that work could be self-fulfilling, but only for an elite minority. This article summarizes the Western philosophical views of work from ancient to modern times. It reframes the philosophical positions as empirical questions and addresses them with statistics and models drawn from a 1995 U.S. survey. Observations suggest that work, in modern America, is not usually alienated. The great majority of Americans rate their paid work or other main daily activities (mostly unpaid work) as more autonomous and creative than not. Emotional well-being and the sense of control over one’s own life increase with the degree of autonomy and creativity. The employed report less autonomous but more creative activity than do the nonemployed. Emotional well-being and perceived control correlate more strongly with creativity than with autonomy. The overall association thus favors employment, especially for the poorly educated, even though they give up more autonomy when employed. On the whole, work in modern America seems more self-fulfilling than onerous, alienating, or degrading. PMID:24156083

  14. Politeness Pays. Creativity: New Ideas in Language Teaching, No. 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomes de Matos, F.

    Politeness is discussed as an integral part of human conversational interaction. Awareness of politeness is important to understanding proper language usage. Several sentences may perform the same function but vary in tone from a command to an extremely polite request. Foreign language instruction should expose learners to politeness and the…

  15. Creative Funding Ideas for Your Physical Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodie, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    Physical educators often find it difficult to secure funding for their programs in these tough economic times. However, there is funding out there, if one knows where to look and how to ask for it. This article describes how physical education teachers can make a funding action plan, who to contact, where to write to, and how to get equipment for…

  16. SPARKLING WORDS--TWO HUNDRED PRACTICAL AND CREATIVE WRITING IDEAS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CARLSON, RUTH KEARNEY

    THIS BOOK PROVIDES TEACHERS WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR STIMULATING YOUNG WRITERS TO CREATE IMAGINATIVE COMPOSITIONS CONTAINING VERSATILE VOCABULARY WORDS AND GRAPHIC DESCRIPTIONS. THE SUGGESTIONS ARE GROUPED INTO FIVE CHAPTERS--(1) "SPINNING IMAGINATIVE THOUGHTS" IS DESIGNED TO ASSIST TEACHERS IN FOSTERING PUPILS' FLEXIBLE THINKING PROCESSES TOWARD THE…

  17. A Picture’s Worth a Thousand Words: Engaging Youth in CBPR Using the Creative Arts

    PubMed Central

    Yonas, Michael A.; Burke, Jessica G.; Rak, Kimberly; Bennett, Antoine; Kelly, Vera; Gielen, Andrea C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Engaging youth and incorporating their unique expertise into the research process is important when addressing issues related to their health. Visual Voices is an arts-based participatory data collection method designed to work together with young people and communities to collaboratively elicit, examine, and celebrate the perspectives of youth. Objectives To present a process for using the creative arts with young people as a participatory data collection method and to give examples of their perspectives on safety and violence. Methods Using the creative arts, this study examined and illustrates the perspectives of how community factors influence safety and violence. Visual Voices was conducted with a total of 22 African-American youth in two urban neighborhoods. This method included creative arts-based writing, drawing, and painting activities designed to yield culturally relevant data generated and explored by youth. Qualitative data were captured through the creative content of writings, drawings, and paintings created by the youths as well as transcripts from audio recorded group discussion. Data was analyzed for thematic content and triangulated across traditional and nontraditional mediums. Findings were interpreted with participants and shared publicly for further reflection and utilization. Conclusion The youth participants identified a range of issues related to community factors, community safety, and violence. Such topics included the role of schools and social networks within the community as safe places and corner stores and abandoned houses as unsafe places. Visual Voices is a creative research method that provides a unique opportunity for youth to generate a range of ideas through access to the multiple creative methods provided. It is an innovative process that generates rich and valuable data about topics of interest and the lived experiences of young community members. PMID:20097996

  18. Evaluation of Computer Tools for Idea Generation and Team Formation in Project-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ardaiz-Villanueva, Oscar; Nicuesa-Chacon, Xabier; Brene-Artazcoz, Oscar; Sanz de Acedo Lizarraga, Maria Luisa; Sanz de Acedo Baquedano, Maria Teresa

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this research was to validate the effectiveness of Wikideas and Creativity Connector tools to stimulate the generation of ideas and originality by university students organized into groups according to their indexes of creativity and affinity. Another goal of the study was to evaluate the classroom climate created by these…

  19. The Role of Sketching States in the Stimulation of Idea Generation: An Eye Movement Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Lingyun; Xiang, Wei; Yang, Cheng; Yang, Zhiyuan; Lou, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Sketching is widely used in design to generate creative ideas. Design studies present stimuli during sketching to enhance creativity. This study examines the effect of stimuli presented during different sketching states, especially of those presented during the stuck period. It conducted a sketching experiment that enrolled 41 students with an…

  20. Creative Thinking and Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacy, Grace

    The booklet considers the nature of creativity in children and examines classroom implications. Among the topics addressed are the following: theories about creativity; research; developments in brain research; the creative process; creative problem solving; the Structure of Intellect Problem Solving (SIPS) model; a rationale for creativity in the…