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Sample records for activities daily living

  1. Teaching Activities of Daily Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormack, James E.

    Provided are strategies for teaching activities of daily living (ADL), which include dressing, eating, grooming, toileting, and basic homemakine, to severely retarded students. Reviewed are the steps necessary to teach ADL skills: ADL assessment, identification of appropriate strategies and tactics, and task analysis. Explained are four common…

  2. Vestibular Function and Activities of Daily Living

    PubMed Central

    Harun, Aisha; Semenov, Yevgeniy R.; Agrawal, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Vestibular dysfunction increases with age and is associated with mobility difficulties and fall risk in older individuals. We evaluated whether vestibular function influences the ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs). Method: We analyzed the 1999 to 2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey of adults aged older than 40 years (N = 5,017). Vestibular function was assessed with the Modified Romberg test. We evaluated the association between vestibular function and difficulty level in performing specific basic and instrumental ADLs, and total number of ADL impairments. Results: Vestibular dysfunction was associated with significantly higher odds of difficulty with nine ADLs, most strongly with difficulty managing finances (odds ratio [OR] = 2.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.18, 5.90]). In addition, vestibular dysfunction was associated with a significantly greater number of ADL impairments (β = .21, 95% CI = [0.09, 0.33]). This effect size was comparable with the influence of heavy smoking (β = .21, 95% CI = [0.06, 0.36]) and hypertension (β = .10, 95% CI = [0.02, 0.18]) on the number of ADL impairments. Conclusion: Vestibular dysfunction significantly influences ADL difficulty, most strongly with a cognitive rather than mobility-based task. These findings underscore the importance of vestibular inputs for both cognitive and physical daily activities. PMID:26753170

  3. Manual of Alternative Procedures: Activities of Daily Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormack, James E.; And Others

    Intended for teachers and others providing services for moderately and severely physically and/or mentally handicapped children and young adults, the manual presents strategies, procedures, and task analyses for training in daily living skills. Section I provides an overview of tactics for teaching activities of daily living (ADL) skills,…

  4. Neuropathologic correlates of activities of daily living in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Gad A; Fairbanks, Lynn A; Tekin, Sibel; Vinters, Harry V; Cummings, Jeffrey L

    2006-01-01

    Functional status, reflected by measures of activities of daily living (ADLs), deteriorates as Alzheimer disease (AD) progresses. Decline in activities of daily living may be mediated by executive and frontal lobe dysfunction. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between activities of daily living and pathologic burden in Alzheimer disease. Twenty two subjects with definite Alzheimer disease were selected from the UCLA ADRC neuropathology database. A total activities of daily living score was derived from the Retrospective Collateral Dementia Interview-Revised (RCDI-R) questionnaire, which was administered to caregivers of autopsied subjects included in the study. Neuritic plaque (NP) and neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) counts were performed for 8 brain regions. There was a significant positive correlation between total activities of daily living score (higher scores indicate more disability) and mean neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangle counts (r = 0.671, P = 0.001, and r = 0.542, P = 0.009, resp), as well as CA1 and prosubiculum neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangle counts, right and left orbital frontal neuritic plaques counts, and occipital neuritic plaques count. Total activities of daily living score did not correlate with age at death, age at symptom onset, dementia duration, gender, or education. Deteriorating activities of daily living in Alzheimer Disease subjects correlate with greater overall pathologic burden and possibly selectively with involvement of the medial temporal, occipital, and orbital frontal regions.

  5. Activities of Daily Living of Spanish-Speaking Immigrants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ailinger, Rita L.

    This anthropological study reports on some of the activities of daily living (ADL's) of 19 Spanish-speaking families living in a low income suburb of Washington, D.C. ADL's are defined as those functions which are performed on a usual day. Generically they include eating, sleeping, communicating, working, and recreating. In this paper, they…

  6. Fostering Activities of Daily Living by Intact Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Charles E.; Glaister, Judy; Brown, Alston; Phillips, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    We assessed effectiveness of four education programs in providing nursing assistants with ability to produce a therapeutic milieu supportive of intact residents' activities of daily living, positive self-esteem and mood: (1) a combination of Orem's Systems of Nursing Care and Skinner's Applied Behavioral Analysis, (2) Applied Behavioral Analysis,…

  7. Load along the femur shaft during activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    D'Angeli, V; Belvedere, C; Ortolani, M; Giannini, S; Leardini, A

    2013-08-09

    A comprehensive knowledge of the loads applied during activities of daily living to the femur shaft is necessary to the design of direct attachments of relevant prostheses. A motion analysis system was used together with an established protocol with skin markers to estimate the three components of the forces and moments acting on ten equidistant points along the full femur shaft. Twenty healthy young volunteers were analyzed while performing three repetitions of the following tasks: level walking at three different speeds, straight-line and with sudden changes of direction to the right and to the left, stairs ascending and descending, squat, rising from a chair and sitting down. Average load patterns, after normalisation for body weight and height, were calculated over subjects for each point, about the three anatomical axes, and for each motor task. These patterns were found consistent over subjects, but different among the anatomical axes and tasks. In general, the moments were observed limitedly influenced by the progression speed, and higher for more proximal points. The moments were also higher in abd/adduction (8.1% body weight*height on average), nearly three times larger than those in flex/extension (2.6) during stair descending. The largest value over all moments was 164.8 N m, abd/adduction in level walking at high speed. The present results should be of value also for a most suitable level for amputation in transfemoral amputation, for in-vitro mechanical tests and for finite element models of the femur.

  8. Load along the tibial shaft during activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    D'Angeli, V; Belvedere, C; Ortolani, M; Giannini, S; Leardini, A

    2014-03-21

    External load at the tibia during activities of daily living provides baseline measures for the improvement of the design of the bone-implant interface for relevant internal and external prostheses. A motion analysis system was used together with an established protocol with skin markers to estimate three-dimensional forces and moments acting on ten equidistant points along the tibial shaft. Twenty young and able-bodied volunteers were analysed while performing three repetitions of the following tasks: level walking at three different speeds, in a straight-line and with sudden changes of direction to the right and to the left, stair ascending and descending, squatting, rising from a chair and sitting down. Moment and force patterns were normalised to the percentage of body weight per height and body weight, respectively, and then averaged over all subjects for each point, about the three tibial anatomical axes, and for each task. Load patterns were found to be consistent over subjects, but different among the anatomical axes, tasks and points. Generally, moments were higher in the medio/lateral axis and influenced by walking speed. In all five walking tasks and in ascending stairs with alternating feet, the more proximal the point was the smaller the mean moment was. For the remaining tasks the opposite trend was observed. The overall largest value was observed in the medio/lateral direction at the ankle centre in level walking at high speed (9.1% body weight * height on average), nearly three times larger than that of the anterior/posterior axis (2.9) during level walking with a sidestep turn. The present results should be of value also for in-vitro mechanical tests and finite element models.

  9. Activity of daily living for Morquio A syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Eriko; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Shimada, Tsutomu; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Mackenzie, William G; Theroux, Mary C; Pizarro, Christian; Xie, Li; Miller, Freeman; Rahman, Tariq; Kecskemethy, Heidi H; Nagao, Kyoko; Morlet, Thierry; Shaffer, Thomas H; Chinen, Yasutsugu; Yabe, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Akemi; Shintaku, Haruo; Orii, Kenji E; Orii, Koji O; Mason, Robert W; Montaño, Adriana M; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Orii, Tadao; Tomatsu, Shunji

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of daily living (ADL) and surgical interventions in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA). The factor(s) that affect ADL are age, clinical phenotypes, surgical interventions, therapeutic effect, and body mass index. The ADL questionnaire comprises three domains: "Movement," "Movement with cognition," and "Cognition." Each domain has four subcategories rated on a 5-point scale based on the level of assistance. The questionnaire was collected from 145 healthy controls and 82 patients with MPS IVA. The patient cohort consisted of 63 severe and 17 attenuated phenotypes (2 were undefined); 4 patients treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), 33 patients treated with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for more than a year, and 45 untreated patients. MPS IVA patients show a decline in ADL scores after 10years of age. Patients with a severe phenotype have a lower ADL score than healthy control subjects, and lower scores than patients with an attenuated phenotype in domains of "Movement" and "Movement with cognition." Patients, who underwent HSCT and were followed up for over 10years, had higher ADL scores and fewer surgical interventions than untreated patients. ADL scores for ERT patients (2.5years follow-up on average) were similar with the-age-matched controls below 10years of age, but declined in older patients. Surgical frequency was higher for severe phenotypic patients than attenuated ones. Surgical frequency for patients treated with ERT was not decreased compared to untreated patients. In conclusion, we have shown the utility of the proposed ADL questionnaire and frequency of surgical interventions in patients with MPS IVA to evaluate the clinical severity and therapeutic efficacy compared with age-matched controls.

  10. Activity of daily living for Morquio A syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Eriko; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Shimada, Tsutomu; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Mackenzie, William G.; Theroux, Mary C.; Pizarro, Christian; Xie, Li; Miller, Freeman; Rahman, Tariq; Kecskemethy, Heidi H.; Nagao, Kyoko; Morlet, Thierry; Shaffer, Thomas H.; Chinen, Yasutsugu; Yabe, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Akemi; Shintaku, Haruo; Orii, Kenji E.; Orii, Koji O.; Mason, Robert W.; Montaño, Adriana M.; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Orii, Tadao; Tomatsu, Shunji

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of daily living (ADL) and surgical interventions in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA). The factor(s) that affect ADL are age, clinical phenotypes, surgical interventions, therapeutic effect, and body mass index. The ADL questionnaire comprises three domains: “Movement,” “Movement with cognition,” and “Cognition.” Each domain has four subcategories rated on a 5-point scale based on the level of assistance. The questionnaire was collected from 145 healthy controls and 82 patients with MPS IVA. The patient cohort consisted of 63 severe and 17 attenuated phenotypes (2 were undefined); 4 patients treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), 33 patients treated with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for more than a year, and 45 untreated patients. MPS IVA patients show a decline in ADL scores after 10 years of age. Patients with a severe phenotype have a lower ADL score than healthy control subjects, and lower scores than patients with an attenuated phenotype in domains of “Movement” and “Movement with cognition.” Patients, who underwent HSCT and were followed up for over 10 years, had higher ADL scores and fewer surgical interventions than untreated patients. ADL scores for ERT patients (2.5 years follow-up on average) were similar with the-age-matched controls below 10 years of age, but declined in older patients. Surgical frequency was higher for severe phenotypic patients than attenuated ones. Surgical frequency for patients treated with ERT was not decreased compared to untreated patients. In conclusion, we have shown the utility of the proposed ADL questionnaire and frequency of surgical interventions in patients with MPS IVA to evaluate the clinical severity and therapeutic efficacy compared with age-matched controls. PMID:27161890

  11. Activities of daily living in children with developmental coordination disorder: dressing, personal hygiene, and eating skills.

    PubMed

    Summers, Janet; Larkin, Dawne; Dewey, Deborah

    2008-04-01

    In order to understand how age, culture, and problems in motor coordination impact the performance of activities of daily living, we used focus groups and in-depth interviews with Australian and Canadian parents to examine activities of daily living of younger (5-7 years of age) and older (8-9 years of age) children with and without DCD. By comparison with their typically developing age group, children with DCD had more difficulty with dressing, personal hygiene, and eating skills. Difficulties with postural control and fine-motor skills were reported to contribute to poorer performance of activities of daily living. As expected, competence in the performance of activities of daily living improved in the older children with and without DCD and there were few differences in the performance of daily living tasks between typical children in Australia and Canada. Overall, the motor difficulties of children with DCD had a significant impact on performance of a wide range of daily activities.

  12. Measuring Disability: Application of the Rasch Model to Activities of Daily Living (ADL/IADL).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, T. Joseph; DeChello, Laurie M.; Garcia, Ramon; Fifield, Judith; Rothfield, Naomi; Reisine, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Performed a comparative analysis of Activities of Daily Living (ADL) items administered to 4,430 older adults and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living administered to 605 people with rheumatoid arthritis scoring both with Likert and Rasch measurement models. Findings show the superiority of the Rasch approach over the Likert method. (SLD)

  13. (Instrumental) Activities of Daily Living in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgenkamp, Thessa I. M.; van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Daily living skills are important to ageing adults with intellectual disabilities (ID). The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of these skills in older adults with ID and to investigate the influence of gender, age, level of ID and mobility on these skills. Daily living skills were measured with the Barthel Index (for Activities of…

  14. Activities of daily living and manual hand dexterity in persons with idiopathic parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoo-Im; Song, Chiang-Soon; Chun, Byung-Yoon

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between daily activities and manual dexterity in persons with Parkinson disease. [Subjects and Methods] The study participants were 25 patients with idiopathic Parkinson disease. This study used two clinical tools, the box-and-block test and Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living scale, to investigate the relationship between manual dexterity and Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living score. [Results] A positive correlation was observed between the Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living and the box-and-block test scores on the more and less affected sides. Moreover, the Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living score had a greater correlation with the box-and-block test score on the less affected side than that on the more affected side. [Conclusion] Manual dexterity and activities of daily living showed a positive correlation in individuals with Parkinson disease. The results of this study suggest that manual dexterity is an important factor for predicting physical performance in daily living in persons with Parkinson disease. PMID:28356630

  15. Activities of daily living and manual hand dexterity in persons with idiopathic parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoo-Im; Song, Chiang-Soon; Chun, Byung-Yoon

    2017-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between daily activities and manual dexterity in persons with Parkinson disease. [Subjects and Methods] The study participants were 25 patients with idiopathic Parkinson disease. This study used two clinical tools, the box-and-block test and Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living scale, to investigate the relationship between manual dexterity and Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living score. [Results] A positive correlation was observed between the Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living and the box-and-block test scores on the more and less affected sides. Moreover, the Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living score had a greater correlation with the box-and-block test score on the less affected side than that on the more affected side. [Conclusion] Manual dexterity and activities of daily living showed a positive correlation in individuals with Parkinson disease. The results of this study suggest that manual dexterity is an important factor for predicting physical performance in daily living in persons with Parkinson disease.

  16. Health smart home for elders - a tool for automatic recognition of activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Le, Xuan Hoa Binh; Di Mascolo, Maria; Gouin, Alexia; Noury, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Elders live preferently in their own home, but with aging comes the loss of autonomy and associated risks. In order to help them live longer in safe conditions, we need a tool to automatically detect their loss of autonomy by assessing the degree of performance of activities of daily living. This article presents an approach enabling the activities recognition of an elder living alone in a home equipped with noninvasive sensors.

  17. Activities of daily living and quality of life in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Opara, J A

    2012-06-12

    Alzheimer's disease is known for placing a significant burden on caregivers, which includes social, psychological, physical or economic aspects. The disease decreases patients' capacity for activities of daily living and quality of life. Information about functional status is useful in the interpretation of the quality of life assessment results. In this paper the most commonly used scales evaluating activities of daily living and quality of life in Alzheimer's disease, either generic or specific, is presented.

  18. Energy Expended by Adults with and without Intellectual Disabilities during Activities of Daily Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lante, Kerrie; Reece, John; Walkley, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to (1) determine the energy expenditure of adults with and without intellectual disabilities during common activities of daily living (ADL), (2) use these values to evaluate the accuracy of equivalent activity values reported in the Compendium of Physical Activities (CPA), and (3) identify ADL that may confer a health…

  19. Tips for Daily Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tips and Gadgets for Daily Activities Dressing Tips Shopping Tips Modifying the Bathroom Driving After Stroke Medication ... and resources. Find a group in your area . Online Support If there is not a support group ...

  20. Evaluation of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living in Greek Patients with Advanced Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mystakidou, Kyriaki; Parpa, Efi; Tsilika, Eleni; Panagiotoua, Irene; Roumeliotou, Anna; Symeonidi, Matina; Galanos, Antonis; Kouvaris, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Translation of the instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) was carried out and its psychometric properties were assessed in a Greek sample of patients with advanced cancer. The scale was translated with the forward-backward procedure into the Greek language. It was initially administered to 136 advanced cancer patients. To assess…

  1. Strategies of Daily Living Rehabilitative Activities for Post Stroke Patients at Minia University Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaky, Hend Elham Mohamed; EL-Lateef Mohammad, Zienab Abd; EL-Labban, Abdou Saad Taha; Ahmed, Gahen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stroke is a leading cause of disability. Rehabilitation aims to hasten and maximize recovery from stroke by treating the disabilities caused by the stroke. Therefore, the aim of this study determine the post stroke patients' knowledge and practices in relation to disease and activities of daily living before the implementation of…

  2. Need for Assistance in the Activities of Daily Living. Disability Statistics Abstract, Number 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Jae; LaPlante, Mitchell P.; Kaye, H. Stephen

    This abstract summarizes recent statistics on those needing assistance in Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), along with participation rates for various proposed benefit programs, based on an analysis of the 1990-91 Survey of Income and Program Participation. Analysis indicates: (1) an estimated 1.9 percent of the population has difficulty…

  3. Ambient Information Systems to Support the Elderly in Carrying Out Their Activities of Daily Living

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Vázquez, Juan Pablo; Rodríguez, Marcela D.

    As they age, older adult's present losses in their functional capabilities which cause them can't continue performing their activities of daily living (ADL) independently at home. We propose Ambient Information Systems (AIS) as appropriate pervasive devices to promote their independent living. Therefore our aim is to determine the utility and usability of AIS to support the independent life of older adults by helping them to perform their activities. In this paper we present preliminary results of a case study that we carried out for understanding the problems and needs that older adults face in doing some of their activities of daily living. In particular, we present results regarding the elderly problems to adhere to their medication prescription. Based on these results we propose AIS to support older adults to medicate. Finally, we present the design attributes incorporated into this AIS, which were identified from the design taxonomies of AIS reported in the literature.

  4. Disability in instrumental activities of daily living among older adults: gender differences

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Tiago da Silva; Corona, Ligiana Pires; Nunes, Daniella Pires; Santos, Jair Lício Ferreira; Duarte, Yeda Aparecida de Oliveira; Lebrão, Maria Lúcia

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze gender differences in the incidence and determinants of disability regarding instrumental activities of daily living among older adults. METHODS The data were extracted from the Saúde, Bem-Estar e Envelhecimento (SABE – Health, Wellbeing and Ageing) study. In 2000, 1,034 older adults without difficulty in regarding instrumental activities of daily living were selected. The following characteristics were evaluated at the baseline: sociodemographic and behavioral variables, health status, falls, fractures, hospitalizations, depressive symptoms, cognition, strength, mobility, balance and perception of vision and hearing. Instrumental activities of daily living such as shopping and managing own money and medication, using transportation and using the telephone were reassessed in 2006, with incident cases of disability considered as the outcome. RESULTS The incidence density of disability in instrumental activities of daily living was 44.7/1,000 person/years for women and 25.2/1,000 person/years for men. The incidence rate ratio between women and men was 1.77 (95%CI 1.75;1.80). After controlling for socioeconomic status and clinical conditions, the incidence rate ratio was 1.81 (95%CI 1.77;1.84), demonstrating that women with chronic disease and greater social vulnerability have a greater incidence density of disability in instrumental activities of daily living. The following were determinants of the incidence of disability: age ≥ 80 and worse perception of hearing in both genders; stroke in men; and being aged 70 to 79 in women. Better cognitive performance was a protective factor in both genders and better balance was a protective factor in women. CONCLUSIONS The higher incidence density of disability in older women remained even after controlling for adverse social and clinical conditions. In addition to age, poorer cognitive performance and conditions that adversely affect communication disable both genders. Acute events, such as a stroke

  5. Disability in instrumental activities of daily living among older adults: gender differences.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Tiago da Silva; Corona, Ligiana Pires; Nunes, Daniella Pires; Santos, Jair Lício Ferreira; Duarte, Yeda Aparecida de Oliveira; Lebrão, Maria Lúcia

    2014-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze gender differences in the incidence and determinants of disability regarding instrumental activities of daily living among older adults. METHODS The data were extracted from the Saúde, Bem-Estar e Envelhecimento (SABE - Health, Wellbeing and Ageing) study. In 2000, 1,034 older adults without difficulty in regarding instrumental activities of daily living were selected. The following characteristics were evaluated at the baseline: sociodemographic and behavioral variables, health status, falls, fractures, hospitalizations, depressive symptoms, cognition, strength, mobility, balance and perception of vision and hearing. Instrumental activities of daily living such as shopping and managing own money and medication, using transportation and using the telephone were reassessed in 2006, with incident cases of disability considered as the outcome. RESULTS The incidence density of disability in instrumental activities of daily living was 44.7/1,000 person/years for women and 25.2/1,000 person/years for men. The incidence rate ratio between women and men was 1.77 (95%CI 1.75;1.80). After controlling for socioeconomic status and clinical conditions, the incidence rate ratio was 1.81 (95%CI 1.77;1.84), demonstrating that women with chronic disease and greater social vulnerability have a greater incidence density of disability in instrumental activities of daily living. The following were determinants of the incidence of disability: age ≥ 80 and worse perception of hearing in both genders; stroke in men; and being aged 70 to 79 in women. Better cognitive performance was a protective factor in both genders and better balance was a protective factor in women. CONCLUSIONS The higher incidence density of disability in older women remained even after controlling for adverse social and clinical conditions. In addition to age, poorer cognitive performance and conditions that adversely affect communication disable both genders. Acute events, such as a stroke

  6. Dyspnoea with activities of daily living versus peak dyspnoea during exercise in male patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Oga, Toru; Nishimura, Koichi; Tsukino, Mitsuhiro; Hajiro, Takashi; Mishima, Michiaki

    2006-06-01

    Dyspnoea measurements in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can be broadly divided into two categories: those that assess breathlessness during exercise, and those that assess breathlessness during daily activities. We investigated the relationships between dyspnoea at the end of exercise and during daily activities with clinical measurements and mortality in COPD patients. We examined 143 male outpatients with moderate to very severe COPD. The peak Borg score at the end of progressive cycle ergometry was used for the assessment of peak dyspnoea rating during exercise, and the Baseline Dyspnea Index (BDI) score was used for dyspnoea with activities of daily living. Relationships between these dyspnoea ratings with other clinical measurements of pulmonary function, exercise indices, health status and psychological status were then investigated. In addition, their relationship with the 5-year mortality of COPD patients was also analyzed to examine their predictive ability. Although the BDI score was significantly correlated with airflow limitation, diffusing capacity, exercise indices, health status and psychological status, the Borg score at the end of exercise had non-existent or only weak correlations with them. The BDI score was strongly significantly correlated with mortality, whereas the Borg score was not. Dyspnoea during daily activities was more significantly correlated with objective and subjective measurements of COPD than dyspnoea at the end of exercise. In addition, the former was more predictive of mortality. Dyspnoea with activities of daily living is considered to be a better measurement for evaluating the disease severity of COPD than peak dyspnoea during exercise.

  7. Strength and ability to implement the activities of daily living in elderly resident in rural areas

    PubMed Central

    Souza dos Santos, Samara; Carneiro Vasconcelos, Lélia Renata; Alves dos Santos, Clarice

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association between muscle strength and the ability to perform basic and instrumental activities of daily living in elderly resident in rural areas of Jequie, Brazil. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional design study with a population of 104 individuals aged sixty or older, registered in the Family Health Unit of the district of Itajuru, Jequie-Brazil. Data collection was performed using a standardized instrument used as an interview, followed by the application of tests (bending arm with dumbbell and rising from a chair 30 sec). The basic and instrumental activities of daily living were investigated through the Katz and Lawton scales, respectively. The chi-square test with p ≤0.05 was used as a measure of statistical significance for bivariate analyzes between muscle strength and ability to perform daily activities. Results: The results showed a significant association between muscle strength and dynamic ability to perform activities of daily living. Conclusion: Reduced muscle strength is an important predictor of the functional ability of the elderly. Accordingly, it is recommended to observe muscle strength in actions directed at the elderly. PMID:27821897

  8. Supervised classification of Activities of Daily Living in Health Smart Homes using SVM.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Anthony; Noury, Norbert; Vacher, Michel

    2009-01-01

    By 2050, about a third of the French population will be over 65. To face this modification of the population, the current studies of our laboratory focus on the monitoring of elderly people at home. This aims at detect, as early as possible, a loss of autonomy by objectivizing criterions such as the international ADL or the French AGGIR scales implementing automatic classification of the different Activities of Daily Living. A Health Smart Home is used to achieve this goal. This flat includes different sensors. The data from the various sensors were used to classify each temporal frame into one of the activities of daily living that has been previously learnt (seven activities: hygiene, toilets, eating, resting, sleeping, communication and dressing/undressing). This is done using Support Vector Machines. We performed an experimentation with 13 young and healthy subjects to learn the model of activities and then we tested the classification algorithm (cross-validation) on real data.

  9. Executive function in daily life: Age-related influences of executive processes on instrumental activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Leslie; Giovanello, Kelly

    2010-06-01

    The present study of older adults used structural equation modeling (SEM) to examine the relationships between 3 executive processes underlying executive function (EF) (inhibition, task switching, updating in working memory), and 2 types of instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) (self-report, performance based). Experimental tasks of executive attention and self-report or performance-based IADL tests were administered to create latent constructs of EF and IADLs. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to examine the construct validity of EF and IADLs. This analysis indicated a 3-factor model of inhibition, updating, and task switching and a 2-factor model of self-report and performance-based IADLs. As predicted, when the latent variable relationships were analyzed, executive processes had a significant relationship with performance-based, but not self-report, IADLs. In addition, task switching had a strong and significant relationship with performance-based IADLs. The results of this study uniquely show a direct relationship between executive processes and performance-based IADLs, thus demonstrating the ecological utility of experimental measures of EF to predict daily function. Furthermore, these results point to areas of cognitive training that may strategically impact older adults' performance on daily life activities.

  10. Fatigue, anxiety and depression levels, activities of daily living of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Karakurt, Papatya; Ünsal, Ayla

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the fatigue, anxiety and depression levels, activities of daily living of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 255). It was found that there was significant difference between Visual Analogue Scale for Fatigue (VAS-F) point averages and gender, education levels, marital status and economical status of patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Among the participants in this study, 36.5% had an anxiety disorder whereas 69.0% exhibited depression. In the study, it was determined that 85.5% of those were independent in their Katz's Index of Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) and 49.4% of those were independent in their Lawton and Brody's Index of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs). This study has shown that VAS-F, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, ADL and IADL instruments that measure the various aspects of health-related quality of living can contribute considerably to a more diversified understanding of the patients' situation with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  11. A Study of Activities of Daily Living and Employment in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Ling-Yi; Yu, Shu-Ning; Yu, Ya-Tsu

    2012-01-01

    Research on daily living activities and employment levels of adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in Taiwan is limited. The aims of the study were to investigate outcomes related to functional independence and employment among people with ASD in Taiwan. We investigated the daily living activities and the employment status of 81 adults (age…

  12. Eccentric Viewing Training in the Home Environment: Can It Improve the Performance of Activities of Daily Living?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vukicevic, Meri; Fitzmaurice, Kerry

    2009-01-01

    Macular degeneration has a severe impact on a person's ability to perform activities of daily living. This study investigated the impact of in-home training in eccentric viewing on near acuity and performance of activities of daily living. The results suggest that eccentric viewing can ameliorate the impact of the loss of vision that is due to…

  13. Examining the Effects of Video Modeling and Prompts to Teach Activities of Daily Living Skills.

    PubMed

    Aldi, Catarina; Crigler, Alexandra; Kates-McElrath, Kelly; Long, Brian; Smith, Hillary; Rehak, Kim; Wilkinson, Lisa

    2016-12-01

    Video modeling has been shown to be effective in teaching a number of skills to learners diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In this study, we taught two young men diagnosed with ASD three different activities of daily living skills (ADLS) using point-of-view video modeling. Results indicated that both participants met criterion for all ADLS. Participants did not maintain mastery criterion at a 1-month follow-up, but did score above baseline at maintenance with and without video modeling. • Point-of-view video models may be an effective intervention to teach daily living skills. • Video modeling with handheld portable devices (Apple iPod or iPad) can be just as effective as video modeling with stationary viewing devices (television or computer). • The use of handheld portable devices (Apple iPod and iPad) makes video modeling accessible and possible in a wide variety of environments.

  14. Examination of Children's Recess Physical Activity Patterns Using the Activities for Daily Living-Playground Participation (ADL-PP) Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stellino, Megan Babkes; Sinclair, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Thorough assessment of children's physical activity is essential to efficacious interventions to reduce childhood obesity prevalence. The purpose of this study was to examine children's recess physical activity (RPA) patterns of behavior using the Activities of Daily Living-Playground Participation (ADL-PP: Watkinson et al., 2001) instrument.…

  15. Development and Psychometric Properties of the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living: Compensation Scale

    PubMed Central

    Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Parsey, Carolyn; Lamb, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The Instrumental Activities of Daily Living – Compensation (IADL-C) scale was developed to capture early functional difficulties and to quantify compensatory strategy use that may mitigate functional decline in the aging population. The IADL-C was validated in a sample of cognitively healthy older adults (N=184) and individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI; N=92) and dementia (N=24). Factor analysis and Rasch item analysis led to the 27-item IADL-C informant questionnaire with four functional domain subscales (money and self-management, home daily living, travel and event memory, and social skills). The subscales demonstrated good internal consistency (Rasch reliability 0.80 to 0.93) and test-retest reliability (Spearman coefficients 0.70 to 0.91). The IADL-C total score and subscales showed convergent validity with other IADL measures, discriminant validity with psychosocial measures, and the ability to discriminate between diagnostic groups. The money and self management subscale showed notable difficulties for individuals with MCI, whereas difficulties with home daily living became more prominent for dementia participants. Compensatory strategy use increased in the MCI group and decreased in the dementia group. PMID:25344901

  16. Development and psychometric properties of the instrumental activities of daily living: compensation scale.

    PubMed

    Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Parsey, Carolyn; Lamb, Richard

    2014-12-01

    The Instrumental Activities of Daily Living - Compensation (IADL-C) scale was developed to capture early functional difficulties and to quantify compensatory strategy use that may mitigate functional decline in the aging population. The IADL-C was validated in a sample of cognitively healthy older adults (N=184) and individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI; N=92) and dementia (N=24). Factor analysis and Rasch item analysis led to the 27-item IADL-C informant questionnaire with four functional domain subscales (money and self-management, home daily living, travel and event memory, and social skills). The subscales demonstrated good internal consistency (Rasch reliability 0.80 to 0.93) and test-retest reliability (Spearman coefficients 0.70 to 0.91). The IADL-C total score and subscales showed convergent validity with other IADL measures, discriminant validity with psychosocial measures, and the ability to discriminate between diagnostic groups. The money and self management subscale showed notable difficulties for individuals with MCI, whereas difficulties with home daily living became more prominent for dementia participants. Compensatory strategy use increased in the MCI group and decreased in the dementia group.

  17. Relationship between free-living daily physical activity and peripheral circulation in patients with intermittent claudication.

    PubMed

    Gardner, A W; Killewich, L A; Katzel, L I; Womack, C J; Montgomery, P S; Otis, R B; Fonong, T

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between free-living daily physical activity and peripheral circulation under resting, reactive hyperemia, and maximal exercise conditions in peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) patients with intermittent claudication. Sixty-one PAOD patients (age = 70 +/- 6 years, ankle/brachial index [ABI] = 0.57 +/- 0.24) were recruited from the Vascular Clinic at the Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center and from radio and newspaper advertisements. Free-living daily physical activity was measured as the energy expenditure of physical activity (EEPA), determined from doubly labeled water and indirect calorimetry. Patients also were characterized on ankle/brachial index, calf blood flow, calf transcutaneous oxygen tension (TcPO2), and calf transcutaneous heating power (TcHP). ABI and calf blood flow served as markers of the macrocirculation of the lower extremity, while TcPO2 and TcHP served as markers of the microcirculation. The claudication patients were sedentary, reflected by a mean EEPA value of 486 +/- 274 kcal/day. EEPA was related to calf TcHP at rest (282 +/- 24 mW; r = -0.413, p = 0.002), after postocclusion reactive hyperemia (275 +/- 22 mW; r = -0.381, p = 0.004), and after maximal exercise (276 +/- 20 mW; r = -0.461, p<0.001). ABI, calf blood flow, and calf TcPO2 were not related to EEPA under any condition. In conclusion, higher levels of free-living daily physical activity were associated with better microcirculation of the calf musculature in older PAOD patients with intermittent claudication.

  18. Probabilistic learning from incomplete data for recognition of activities of daily living in smart homes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; McClean, Sally I; Scotney, Bryan W

    2012-05-01

    Learning behavioral patterns for activities of daily living in a smart home environment can be challenged by the limited number of training data that may be available. This may be due to the infrequent repetition of routine activities (e.g., once daily), the expense of using observers to label activities, and the intrusion that would be caused by the presence of observers over long time periods. It is important, therefore, to make as much use of any labeled data that are collected, however, incomplete these data may be. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for learning behavioral patterns for multi-inhabitants living in a single smart home environment, by making full use of all limited labeled activities, including incomplete data resulting from unreliable low-level sensors in this environment. Through maximum-likelihood estimation, using Expectation-Maximization, we build a model that captures both environmental uncertainties from sensor readings and user uncertainties, including variations in how individuals carry out activities. Our algorithm outperforms models that cannot handle data incompleteness, with increasing performance gains as incompleteness increases. The approach also enables the impact of particular sensors to be assessed and can thus inform sensor maintenance and deployment.

  19. Amount and intensity of daily living activities in Charcot–Marie–Tooth 1A patients

    PubMed Central

    Menotti, Federica; Laudani, Luca; Damiani, Antonello; Macaluso, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background Charcot–Marie–Tooth 1A (CMT1A) patients show a reduction of spontaneous activities of daily living measured by means of questionnaires or pedometers, which are quite inaccurate compared to recent measurement techniques. Aim The study aimed at quantifying daily living activities in CMT1A patients by means of inertial sensors, which give information not only on the amount but also on the intensity of these activities. Materials and methods Time and count (amount), and velocity and power (intensity) of 24 h daily living activities were measured in eight patients (20–48 years; Barthel >90; Tinetti >20) and eight healthy individuals, matched for age and gender, by means of a wearable inertial sensor device. Results There were no differences between patients and controls in the 24-h distance covered and count of steps. However, count of step climbing and sit to stand were lower in patients than in controls (139.93 ± 141.66 vs. 341.06 ± 164.07 n and 58.23 ± 7.82 vs. 65.81 ± 4.75 n, respectively; P < 0.05) as well as mean daily step-climbing and walking velocities (1.07 ± 0.17 vs. 1.21 ± 0.10 m/sec and 1.16 ± 0.31 vs. 1.87 ± 0.50 m/sec, respectively; P < 0.05). In CMT1A patients there was a positive correlation between strength of the knee extensor muscles and both count of steps climbed (R = 0.80) and sit to stand (R = 0.79). Discussion and conclusion The reduced ability of CMT1A patients to carry out activities at high intensity, which was correlated with strength, suggests that strength training might be a rehabilitation tool for improving the 1 ability to carry out these activities. PMID:24653950

  20. Wear Testing of Moderate Activities of Daily Living Using In Vivo Measured Knee Joint Loading

    PubMed Central

    Reinders, Jörn; Sonntag, Robert; Vot, Leo; Gibney, Christian; Nowack, Moritz; Kretzer, Jan Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Resumption of daily living activities is a basic expectation for patients provided with total knee replacements. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the impact of different activities on the wear performance. In this study the wear performance under application of different daily activities has been analyzed. In vivo load data for walking, walking downstairs/upstairs, sitting down/standing up, and cycling (50 W & 120 W) has been standardized for wear testing. Wear testing of each activity was carried out on a knee wear simulator. Additionally, ISO walking was tested for reasons of comparison. Wear was assessed gravimetrically and wear particles were analyzed. In vivo walking produced the highest overall wear rates, which were determined to be three times higher than ISO walking. Moderate wear rates were determined for walking upstairs and downstairs. Low wear rates were determined for standing up/sitting down and cycling at power levels of 50 W and 120 W. The largest wear particles were observed for cycling. Walking based on in vivo data has been shown to be the most wear-relevant activity. Highly demanding activities (stair climbing) produced considerably less wear. Taking into account the expected number of loads, low-impact activities like cycling may have a greater impact on articular wear than highly demanding activities. PMID:25811996

  1. Biomechanical Characteristics of Hand Coordination in Grasping Activities of Daily Living

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Jin; Xiong, Cai-Hua; Xiong, Le; Huang, Xiao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Hand coordination can allow humans to have dexterous control with many degrees of freedom to perform various tasks in daily living. An important contributing factor to this important ability is the complex biomechanical architecture of the human hand. However, drawing a clear functional link between biomechanical architecture and hand coordination is challenging. It is not understood which biomechanical characteristics are responsible for hand coordination and what specific effect each biomechanical characteristic has. To explore this link, we first inspected the characteristics of hand coordination during daily tasks through a statistical analysis of the kinematic data, which were collected from thirty right-handed subjects during a multitude of grasping tasks. Then, the functional link between biomechanical architecture and hand coordination was drawn by establishing the clear corresponding causality between the tendinous connective characteristics of the human hand and the coordinated characteristics during daily grasping activities. The explicit functional link indicates that the biomechanical characteristic of tendinous connective architecture between muscles and articulations is the proper design by the Creator to perform a multitude of daily tasks in a comfortable way. The clear link between the structure and the function of the human hand also suggests that the design of a multifunctional robotic hand should be able to better imitate such basic architecture. PMID:26730579

  2. Biomechanical Characteristics of Hand Coordination in Grasping Activities of Daily Living.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Jin; Xiong, Cai-Hua; Xiong, Le; Huang, Xiao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Hand coordination can allow humans to have dexterous control with many degrees of freedom to perform various tasks in daily living. An important contributing factor to this important ability is the complex biomechanical architecture of the human hand. However, drawing a clear functional link between biomechanical architecture and hand coordination is challenging. It is not understood which biomechanical characteristics are responsible for hand coordination and what specific effect each biomechanical characteristic has. To explore this link, we first inspected the characteristics of hand coordination during daily tasks through a statistical analysis of the kinematic data, which were collected from thirty right-handed subjects during a multitude of grasping tasks. Then, the functional link between biomechanical architecture and hand coordination was drawn by establishing the clear corresponding causality between the tendinous connective characteristics of the human hand and the coordinated characteristics during daily grasping activities. The explicit functional link indicates that the biomechanical characteristic of tendinous connective architecture between muscles and articulations is the proper design by the Creator to perform a multitude of daily tasks in a comfortable way. The clear link between the structure and the function of the human hand also suggests that the design of a multifunctional robotic hand should be able to better imitate such basic architecture.

  3. Strategies for Daily Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... and FASD FASD and the Law – Criminal Justice Expectant Mothers Addiction Treatment Weekly Roundup Archive Speakers ... Now VIDEOS CONTACT DONATE Living with FASD National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome / Living with FASD Go ...

  4. A new clinical tool for assessing numerical abilities in neurological diseases: numerical activities of daily living

    PubMed Central

    Semenza, Carlo; Meneghello, Francesca; Arcara, Giorgio; Burgio, Francesca; Gnoato, Francesca; Facchini, Silvia; Benavides-Varela, Silvia; Clementi, Maurizio; Butterworth, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to build an instrument, the numerical activities of daily living (NADL), designed to identify the specific impairments in numerical functions that may cause problems in everyday life. These impairments go beyond what can be inferred from the available scales evaluating activities of daily living in general, and are not adequately captured by measures of the general deterioration of cognitive functions as assessed by standard clinical instruments like the MMSE and MoCA. We assessed a control group (n = 148) and a patient group affected by a wide variety of neurological conditions (n = 175), with NADL along with IADL, MMSE, and MoCA. The NADL battery was found to have satisfactory construct validity and reliability, across a wide age range. This enabled us to calculate appropriate criteria for impairment that took into account age and education. It was found that neurological patients tended to overestimate their abilities as compared to the judgment made by their caregivers, assessed with objective tests of numerical abilities. PMID:25126077

  5. Validation of Taiwan Performance-Based Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (TPIADL), a Performance- Based Measurement of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living for Patients with Vascular Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui-Mei; Lin, Hsiu-Fen; Huang, Mei-Feng; Chang, Chun-Wei; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Lo, Yi-Ching; Yen, Cheng-Fang; Chen, Cheng-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with cerebrovascular diseases often presented both cognitive and physical impairment. Disability in everyday functioning involving cognitive impairment among patients may be hard to completely rely on informants’ reports, as their reports may be confounded with physical impairment. The aim of this study was to validate a performance-based measure of functional assessment, the Taiwan Performance-Based Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (TPIADL), for vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) by examining its psychometric properties and diagnostic accuracy. Methods Ninety-seven patients with cerebrovascular diseases, including 30 with vascular dementia (VaD), 28 with mild cognitive impairment and 39 with no cognitive impairment, and 49 healthy control adults were recruited during study period. The TPIADL, as well as the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Lawton-IADL and Barthel Index (BI), were performed. The internal consistency, convergent and criteria validity of the TPIADL were examined. Results Cronbach’s alpha of the TPIADL test was 0.84. The TPIADL scores were significantly correlated with the Lawton IADL (r = –0.587, p <0.01). Notably, the TPIADL had a higher correlation coefficient with the cognitive domain of Lawton IADL (r = –0.663) than with physical domain of Lawton IADL (r = –0.541). The area under the relative operating characteristic curve was 0.888 (95% CI = 0.812–0.965) to differentiate VaD from other groups. The optimal cut-off point of the TPIADL for detecting VaD was 6/7, which gives a sensitivity of 73.3% and a specificity of 84.5%. Conclusion The TPIADL is a brief and sensitive tool for the detection of IADL impairment in patients with VaD. PMID:27851810

  6. Relationship of Having Hobbies and a Purpose in Life With Mortality, Activities of Daily Living, and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Among Community-Dwelling Elderly Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tomioka, Kimiko; Kurumatani, Norio; Hosoi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background This study’s aim was to clarify the relationship of having hobbies and a purpose in life (PIL; in Japanese, ikigai) with mortality and a decline in the activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental ADL (IADL) among the community-dwelling elderly. Methods Prospective observational data from residents aged ≥65 years who were at increased risk for death (n = 1853) and developing a decline in ADL (n = 1254) and IADL (n = 1162) were analyzed. Cox proportional hazard models were used for mortality analysis of data from February 2011 to November 2014. ADL and IADL were evaluated using the Barthel Index and the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology Index of Competence, respectively. ADL and IADL were assessed at baseline and follow-up and were evaluated using logistic regression models. Fully adjusted models included terms for age, gender, BMI, income, alcohol intake, smoking history, number of chronic diseases, cognitive function, and depression. Results During the follow-up of eligible participants, 248 had died, 119 saw a decline in ADL, and 178 saw a decline in IADL. In fully adjusted models, having neither hobbies nor PIL was significantly associated with an increased risk of mortality (hazard ratio 2.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.47–2.94), decline in ADL (odds ratio 2.74; 95% CI, 1.44–5.21), and decline in IADL (odds ratio 1.89; 95% CI, 1.01–3.55) compared to having both hobbies and PIL. Conclusions Although effect modifications by cognitive functioning and depression cannot be ruled out, our findings suggest that having hobbies and PIL may extend not only longevity, but also healthy life expectancy among community-dwelling older adults. PMID:26947954

  7. Using Rasch Analysis to Evaluate Accuracy of Individual Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) for Disability Measurement.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Bruce; Li, Yanen

    2015-01-01

    Our study objectives were to examine the accuracy of individual activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental ADLs (IADLs) for disability measurement, and determine whether dependence or difficulty is more useful for disability measurement. We analyzed data from 499 patients with 2+ ADLs or 3+ IADLs who participated in a home visiting nurse intervention study, and whose function had been assessed at study baseline and 22 months. Rasch analysis was used to evaluate accuracy of 24 individual ADL and IADL items. The individual items differed in the amount of information provided in measuring functional disability along the range of disability, providing much more information in (usually) one part of the range. While nearly all of the Item Information Curves (IICs) for the ADL dependence, IADL difficulty, and IADL dependence items were unimodal with one information peak each, the IICs for ADL difficulty exhibited a bimodal pattern with two peaks. Which of the individual items performed better in disability measurement varied by the extent of functional disability (i.e., by how disabled the patients were). The information peaks of most ADLs and many IADLs rise or drop steeply in a relatively short distance. Thus, whether dependence or difficulty is superior often changes very quickly along the disability continuum. There was considerable heterogeneity in which individual items provided the most and the least information at the three points of interest examined across the disability range (-2 SD units, mean, +2 SD units). While the disability region (low, medium, and high disability) for which each individual item provided the most information remained quite stable between baseline and 22 months for ADL difficulty, IADL difficulty, and IADL dependence, relatively large shifts occurred for ADL dependence items. At the disability mean dependence items offered more information for assessment than difficulty. While ADLs also provided more information at -2 and +2 SD

  8. The 'Technology - Activities of Daily Living Questionnaire': a version with a technology-related subscale

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Neira, Carlos; López, Oscar L.; Riveros, Rodrigo; Nuñez-Huasaf, Javier; Flores, Patricia; Slachevsky, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background Information and communication technology (ICT) has become an increasingly important part of daily life. The ability to use technology is becoming essential for autonomous functioning in society. Current functional scales for patients with cognitive impairment do not evaluate the use of technology. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a new version of the Activities of Daily Living Questionnaire (ADLQ) that incorporates an ICT subscale. Method A new technology-based subscale was incorporated into the Spanish Version of the ADLQ (SV-ADLQ), entitled The Technology Version of the ADLQ (T-ADLQ). The T-ADLQ was administered to 63 caregivers of dementia patients, 21 proxies of mild cognitive impairment patients and 44 proxies of normal elderly subjects (mean age of the sample ± SD: 73.5 ± 8.30). We analysed the convergent validity, internal consistency, reliability cut-off point, sensitivity and specificity of the T-ADLQ. The results of the T-ADLQ were compared to the SV-ADLQ. Results The T-ADLQ showed significant correlations with the Mini-mental Test (MMSE), the Frontal Assesment Battery (FAB) as well as other measures of functional impairment and dementia severity (MMSE: r = −0.70; FAB: r = −0.65; Functional Assessment Questionnaire: r = 0.77; Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale: r = −0.75; Clinical Dementia Rating Scale: r = 0.72; p<0.001). The T-ADLQ showed a good reliability with a relatively high Cronbach’s alpha coefficient (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.861). When considering a functional impairment cut-off point greater than 29.25%, the sensitivity and specificity of the T-ADLQ were 82% and 90%, respectively. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.937 for the T-ADLQ and 0.932 for the original version of the test. Conclusions The T-ADLQ revealed adequate indicators of validity and reliability for the functional assessment of activities of daily living in dementia patients. However, the inclusion of technology items in

  9. Evaluation of An Activities of Daily Living Scale for Adolescents and Adults with Developmental Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Maenner, Matthew J; Smith, Leann E; Hong, Jinkuk; Makuch, Renee; Greenberg, Jan S; Mailick, Marsha R

    2012-01-01

    Background Activity limitations are an important and useful dimension of disability, but there are few validated measures of activity limitations for adolescents and adults with developmental disabilities. Objective/Hypothesis To describe the development of the Waisman Activities of Daily Living (W-ADL) Scale for adolescents and adults with developmental disabilities, and systematically evaluate its measurement properties according to an established set of criteria. Methods The W-ADL was administered among four longitudinally-studied groups of adolescents and adults with developmental disabilities: 406 with autism; 147 with fragile-X syndrome; 169 with Down syndrome, and 292 with intellectual disability of other or unknown origin. The W-ADL contains 17 activities and each is rated on a 3-point scale (0=“does not do at all”, 1=“does with help”, 2=“independent”), and a standard set of criteria were used to evaluate its measurement properties. Results Across the disability groups, Cronbach’s alphas ranged from 0.88 to 0.94, and a single-factor structure was most parsimonious. The W-ADL was reliable over time, with weighted kappas between 0.92 and 0.93. Criterion and construct validity were supported through substantial associations with the Vineland Screener, need for respite services, caregiving burden, and competitive employment. No floor or ceiling effects were present. There were significant group differences in W-ADL scores by maternally-reported level of intellectual disability (mild, moderate, severe, profound). Conclusions The W-ADL exceeded the recommended threshold for each quality criterion the authors evaluated. This freely-available tool is an efficient measure of activities of daily living for surveys and epidemiological research concerning adolescents and adults with developmental disabilities. PMID:23260606

  10. Recognition of Activities of Daily Living with Egocentric Vision: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi-Hoa-Cuc; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Florez-Revuelta, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Video-based recognition of activities of daily living (ADLs) is being used in ambient assisted living systems in order to support the independent living of older people. However, current systems based on cameras located in the environment present a number of problems, such as occlusions and a limited field of view. Recently, wearable cameras have begun to be exploited. This paper presents a review of the state of the art of egocentric vision systems for the recognition of ADLs following a hierarchical structure: motion, action and activity levels, where each level provides higher semantic information and involves a longer time frame. The current egocentric vision literature suggests that ADLs recognition is mainly driven by the objects present in the scene, especially those associated with specific tasks. However, although object-based approaches have proven popular, object recognition remains a challenge due to the intra-class variations found in unconstrained scenarios. As a consequence, the performance of current systems is far from satisfactory. PMID:26751452

  11. Behavioral Intention to Use a Virtual Instrumental Activities of Daily Living System Among People With Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Richard; White, Marga; Diamond, Paul

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to investigate the behavioral intention to use (BIU) regarding a virtual system for practicing instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) among people with stroke. METHOD. Fourteen people who had sustained a stroke used a virtual world–based system over four sessions to participate in virtual occupations of preparing meals and putting away groceries. To investigate intention to use the technology, participants responded to a questionnaire based on the Technology Acceptance Model and were interviewed about the experience. RESULTS. Analysis of questionnaire responses revealed favorable attitudes toward the technology and statistically significant correlations between these attitudes and positive BIU. Analysis of qualitative data revealed four themes to support system use: Use of the affected arm increased, the virtual practice was enjoyable, the technology was user-friendly, and the system reflected real-life activities. CONCLUSION. This study shows that participants reported a positive BIU for the virtual system for practicing IADLs. PMID:25871604

  12. Impact of odor from industrial hog operations on daily living activities.

    PubMed

    Tajik, M; Muhammad, N; Lowman, A; Thu, K; Wing, S; Grant, G

    2008-01-01

    Intensive industrial animal production systems worldwide require confinement of large numbers of animals in small spaces and concentration of enormous quantities of waste. Industrial hog operations, in particular, have raised public concerns about their adverse impact on public health and sustainable development. Using a community-based participatory research approach and qualitative interviews, we explored people's perception of the impact of odor from these industries on daily living activities as they relate to the beneficial use of property and enjoyment of life. Our research indicates that hog odor limits several leisure time activities and social interactions which could have adverse public health consequences. The results of this study can assist the communities and other stakeholders in public policy development that addresses these concerns.

  13. Vision based assistive technology for people with dementia performing activities of daily living (ADLs): an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    As'ari, M. A.; Sheikh, U. U.

    2012-04-01

    The rapid development of intelligent assistive technology for replacing a human caregiver in assisting people with dementia performing activities of daily living (ADLs) promises in the reduction of care cost especially in training and hiring human caregiver. The main problem however, is the various kinds of sensing agents used in such system and is dependent on the intent (types of ADLs) and environment where the activity is performed. In this paper on overview of the potential of computer vision based sensing agent in assistive system and how it can be generalized and be invariant to various kind of ADLs and environment. We find that there exists a gap from the existing vision based human action recognition method in designing such system due to cognitive and physical impairment of people with dementia.

  14. Disabilities and Activities of Daily Living Among Veterans With Old Hip Disarticulation and Transpelvic Amputation

    PubMed Central

    Kachooei, Amir Reza; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohamad Hosein; Hallaj Moghadam, Mohamad; Fattahi, Asieh-sadat; Razi, Shiva; Salehi, Maryam; Azema, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Iran-Iraq imposed war lasted eight years and was one of the longest wars of the last century. Twenty-three years have passed since the war ended, but little has been discussed about the long-term results of war amputations in the literature. Objectives: In this long-term study, we have evaluated the activities of daily living among veterans with hip or hemipelvis amputations. Patients and Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on Iran-Iraq war veterans with hip or hemipelvis amputations in Iran. Eighty-four (96.5%) veterans out of 87 registered veterans with hip or hemipelvis amputations participated in the study. The degree of independence for activities of daily living (ADL) was assessed by the Barthel index. The degree of independence for instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) was assessed by the Lawton-Brody scale. Results: The average follow-up time was 26.6 ± 3.7 years. The average age of veterans was 44.1±7 years old. Of 84 amputees, 57 (67.85%) had limitations in at least one domain of the ADL. The most common single item that affected the patients was ascending and descending stairs seen in 45 (78.9%) veterans, followed by eating seen in 4 (7.01%) veterans. In addition, 70 (83.33%) had limitations in at least one domain of the IADL. The most common single item that affected the veterans was shopping seen in 56 (80%), followed by responsibility for own medications seen in 13 (18.57%) veterans. Spearman correlation coefficient of the sum scores of ADL and IADL showed an intermediate to strong correlation (r = 0.58). Conclusions: Increasing dependency in ADL is accompanied by increasing dependency in IADL. In the past, the duty of health care providers was saving the life of veterans due to injuries while at present, because these injuries occurred in young and healthy individuals, the need for increased function is being highlighted. PMID:25032170

  15. Loneliness in elderly individuals, level of dependence in activities of daily living (ADL) and influential factors.

    PubMed

    Hacihasanoğlu, Rabia; Yildirim, Arzu; Karakurt, Papatya

    2012-01-01

    This study has been carried out to investigate the level of loneliness, determine the level of dependence in the ADL and influential factors in the elderly people. This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 5 Family Healthcare Centers (FHC) located in central Erzincan, Turkey between March and June 2010. The data of the research was collected using a questionnaire that determined the descriptive and UCLA Loneliness Scale (UCLA-LS). Mean score of the UCLA-LS was determined as 51.59 ± 4.44. It was determined that 2% of the elderly ADL were completely dependent, 14.5% were semi-dependent. Factors such as being old, a widow/divorced, having a lower level of education and/or income, living alone, having a chronic disease, poor self-perceived health, lack of visits by relatives or acquaintances, dissatisfaction with the place of living, and being fully dependent while performing daily activities were determined as factors which increased the level of loneliness. Furthermore, factors such as being old, a female, a widow/divorced, living together with a daughter/son, having a chronic disease and poor self-perceived health were found to be influential in dependency. Elderly people who are alone and dependent in fulfilling their ADL should be monitored more closely.

  16. Activities of Daily Living in Mexican American Caregivers: The Key to Continuing Informal Care

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Bronwynne C.; Belyea, Michael J.; Coon, David W.; Ume, Ebere

    2013-01-01

    La familia drives elder care in Mexican–American (MA) families, but nursing home placement can result from day-to-day caregiving demands that increase caregiver difficulty with activities of daily living (ADLs). Using life course perspective, this article describes the initial data wave of 31 MA caregivers from a descriptive, longitudinal, mixed-methods study of 110 MA caregivers and care recipients over 15 months in their caregiving trajectories. Fifteen of 31 caregivers consistently indicated “no help needed” on the Katz ADL, whereas all but one reported “help needed” during semistructured interviews with cultural brokers. In addition to the discrepancy between results on the Katz ADL and interviews, findings include consideration of nursing home placement by moderately acculturated caregivers and minimization of their illnesses by caregivers. Additional methods of MA caregiver assessment may be needed due to the questionable accuracy of the Katz ADL; additional research should explore minimization and acculturation in MA caregivers. PMID:22740307

  17. Object Perception Impairments Predict Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Dependence in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    JEFFERSON, ANGELA L.; BARAKAT, LAMIA P.; GIOVANNETTI, TANIA; PAUL, ROBERT H.; GLOSSER, GUILA

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the contribution of object perception and spatial localization to functional dependence among Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Forty patients with probable AD completed measures assessing verbal recognition memory, working memory, object perception, spatial localization, semantic knowledge, and global cognition. Primary caregivers completed a measure of activities of daily living (ADLs) that included instrumental and basic self-care subscales (i.e., IADLs and BADLs, respectively). Stepwise multiple regressions revealed that global cognition accounted for significant portions of variance among the ADL total, IADL, and BADL scores. However, when global cognition was removed from the model, object perception was the only significant cognitive predictor of the ADL total and IADL subscale scores, accounting for 18.5% and 19.3% of the variance, respectively. When considering multiple cognitive components simultaneously, object perception and the integrity of the inferotemporal cortex is important in the completion of functional abilities in general and IADLs in particular among AD patients. PMID:16822730

  18. Attentional deficits affect activities of daily living in dementia‐associated with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bronnick, K; Ehrt, U; Emre, M; De Deyn, P P; Wesnes, K; Tekin, S; Aarsland, D

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of attentional deficits on activities of daily living (ADL) in patients with dementia associated with Parkinson's disease (PDD). Method 461 patients were assessed neuropsychologically. Factor analyses were used to differentiate attention from other cognitive functions and to differentiate different aspects of ADL functions. The effects of the attentional measure on ADL were examined using sequential multiple regression, controlling for age, sex, education, severity of motor symptoms and other cognitive functions. Results Three cognitive factors were identified, with one factor emerging as a measure of vigilance and focused attention. This factor predicted different aspects of ADL status even after controlling for motor functions and other cognitive factors. The attention factor was the single strongest cognitive predictor of ADL status, matching the strength of the effects of motor functions on ADL status. Conclusion Impaired attention is an important determinant of ADL functions in patients with PDD. PMID:16801351

  19. Relationship Between Grip and Pinch Strength and Activities of Daily Living in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jung Hyun; Seo, Kyung Mook; Kim, Don-Kyu; Shin, Hyun Iee; Shin, Hye Eun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between grip and pinch strength and independence in activities of daily living (ADL) in stroke patients. Methods Medical records of 577 stroke patients from January 2010 to February 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients' grip and pinch strength of both hemiplegic and non-hemiplegic hands and the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI) score were collected. These patients were divided into three groups: group A (onset duration: ≤3 months), group B (onset duration: >3 months and <2 years), and group C (onset duration: ≥2 years). The correlation between grip and pinch strength and the K-MBI score was analyzed. Results In group A (95 patients), the K-MBI score was significantly (p<0.05) correlated with the grip and pinch strength of both hands in patients with right hemiplegia. Significant (p<0.05) correlation between the K-MBI score and the grip and pinch strength of the hemiplegic hand was shown in patients with left hemiplegia. In group B (69 patients) and group C (73 patients), the K-MBI score was significantly (p<0.05) correlated with the grip and pinch strength of the hemiplegic hand. Conclusion Stroke patients in subacute stage mainly performed activities of daily living using their dominant hand. However, independence in ADL was associated with the strength of the affected dominant hand. For stroke patients in chronic and late chronic stages, their hand power of the affected hand was associated with independence in ADL regardless whether the dominant hand was affected. PMID:26605173

  20. Association Between Social Participation and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tomioka, Kimiko; Kurumatani, Norio; Hosoi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Population-based data examining the relationship between social participation (SP) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) are scarce. This study examined the cross-sectional relationship between SP and IADL in community-dwelling elderly persons. Methods Self-administered questionnaires were mailed to 23 710 residents aged ≥65 years in Nara, Japan (response rate: 74.2%). Data from 14 956 respondents (6935 males and 8021 females) without dependency in basic activities of daily living (ADL) were analyzed. The number, type, and frequency of participation in social groups (SGs) were used to measure SP. SGs included volunteer groups, sports groups, hobby groups, senior citizens’ clubs, neighborhood community associations, and cultural groups. IADL was evaluated using the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology Index of Competence. Logistic regression models stratified by gender were used. Results After adjustment for putative confounding factors, including demographics, health status, life-style habits, ADL, depression, cognitive function, social networks, social support, and social roles, participation in various SGs among both genders was inversely associated with poor IADL, showing a significant dose-response relationship between an increasing number of SGs and a lower proportion of those with poor IADL (P for trend <0.001). A significant inverse association between frequent participation and poor IADL was observed for all types of SGs among females, whereas the association was limited to sports groups and senior citizens’ clubs among males. Conclusions Our results show that participation in a variety of SGs is associated with independent IADL among the community-dwelling elderly, regardless of gender. However, the beneficial effects of frequent participation on IADL may be stronger for females than for males. PMID:27180933

  1. UPDRS activity of daily living score as a marker of Parkinson's disease progression.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Madaline B; Wylie, Scott A; Frysinger, Robert C; Patrie, James T; Huss, Diane S; Currie, Lillian J; Wooten, G Frederick

    2009-01-30

    The activities of daily living (ADL) subscore of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) captures the impact of Parkinson's disease (PD) on daily function and may be less affected than other subsections by variability associated with drug cycle and motor fluctuations. We examined UPDRS mentation, ADL and motor subscores in 888 patients with idiopathic PD. Multiple linear regression analyses determined the association between disease duration and UPDRS subscores as a function of medication status at examination and in a subset of patients with multiple examinations. Independent of medication status and across cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, ADL subscores showed a stronger and more stable association with disease duration than other UPDRS subscores after adjusting for age of disease onset. The association between disease duration and the motor subscore depended on medication status. The strong association between ADL subscore and disease duration in PD suggests that this measure may serve as a better marker of disease progression than signs and symptoms assessed in other UPDRS sections.

  2. A robotic system to train activities of daily living in a virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Guidali, Marco; Duschau-Wicke, Alexander; Broggi, Simon; Klamroth-Marganska, Verena; Nef, Tobias; Riener, Robert

    2011-10-01

    In the past decade, several arm rehabilitation robots have been developed to assist neurological patients during therapy. Early devices were limited in their number of degrees of freedom and range of motion, whereas newer robots such as the ARMin robot can support the entire arm. Often, these devices are combined with virtual environments to integrate motivating game-like scenarios. Several studies have shown a positive effect of game-playing on therapy outcome by increasing motivation. In addition, we assume that practicing highly functional movements can further enhance therapy outcome by facilitating the transfer of motor abilities acquired in therapy to daily life. Therefore, we present a rehabilitation system that enables the training of activities of daily living (ADL) with the support of an assistive robot. Important ADL tasks have been identified and implemented in a virtual environment. A patient-cooperative control strategy with adaptable freedom in timing and space was developed to assist the patient during the task. The technical feasibility and usability of the system was evaluated with seven healthy subjects and three chronic stroke patients.

  3. Linking Existing Instruments to Develop an Activity of Daily Living Item Bank.

    PubMed

    Li, Chih-Ying; Romero, Sergio; Bonilha, Heather S; Simpson, Kit N; Simpson, Annie N; Hong, Ickpyo; Velozo, Craig A

    2016-11-16

    This study examined dimensionality and item-level psychometric properties of an item bank measuring activities of daily living (ADL) across inpatient rehabilitation facilities and community living centers. Common person equating method was used in the retrospective veterans data set. This study examined dimensionality, model fit, local independence, and monotonicity using factor analyses and fit statistics, principal component analysis (PCA), and differential item functioning (DIF) using Rasch analysis. Following the elimination of invalid data, 371 veterans who completed both the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and minimum data set (MDS) within 6 days were retained. The FIM-MDS item bank demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach's α = .98) and met three rating scale diagnostic criteria and three of the four model fit statistics (comparative fit index/Tucker-Lewis index = 0.98, root mean square error of approximation = 0.14, and standardized root mean residual = 0.07). PCA of Rasch residuals showed the item bank explained 94.2% variance. The item bank covered the range of θ from -1.50 to 1.26 (item), -3.57 to 4.21 (person) with person strata of 6.3. The findings indicated the ADL physical function item bank constructed from FIM and MDS measured a single latent trait with overall acceptable item-level psychometric properties, suggesting that it is an appropriate source for developing efficient test forms such as short forms and computerized adaptive tests.

  4. [Behavioral competence among community dwelling older people with disability in basic activities of daily living].

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, T; Watanabe, S; Suzuki, T; Shibata, H; Yoshida, H; Yasumura, S; Niino, N

    2000-07-01

    This study observed the status of independence in behavioral competence among older people who have any disability in basic activities of daily living (BADL) living in a rural community in Japan. Study participants (N = 76) who were regarded as bedridden were surveyed by means of a questionnaire in July to August 1996. The independence variables were age, sex, BADL status, hearing impairment, visual impairment, history of stroke, and cognitive impairment. The dependent variable was each item of the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology (TMIG) Index of Competence, which is a multidimensional 13-item index of behavioral competence. Percentages of subjects who were independent in each item of the TMIG Index of Competence varied from 1% to 36%. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that BADL status was independently associated with independence in using a telephone, being interested in news stories or programs dealing with health, being called on for advice, and initiating conversations with young people, after adjustment for age, sex, hearing impairment, visual impairment, history of stroke, and cognitive impairment. These findings suggest that programs for preventing decline in behavioral competence of older people with BADL disability might be important as well as physical therapy for them.

  5. Factors associated with the recovery of activities of daily living after hospitalization for acute medical illness: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Ryohei; Watanabe, Hiroki; Tsutsumi, Madoka; Kanamori, Takeshige; Maeno, Tetsuhiro; Yanagi, Hisako

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the factors associated with the recovery rate of activities of daily living of elderly patients hospitalized for acute medical illness. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 238 elderly patients were enrolled in this study. The main outcome measure was the functional independence measure score which was used as an assessment of activities of daily living. The participants were divided into 2 groups based on their activities of daily living before onset: the independent group and the partially dependent group. The participants of each group were further divided into 2 subgroups based on recovery rates of activities of daily living: the high-recovery group (80%) and the low-recovery group (<80%). The factors associated with the recovery rate were examined using multivariate logistic regression analysis. [Results] The factors associated with the recovery rate were: days of inactivity and cognitive status at the start of rehabilitation for the independent group, and days of inactivity and nutritional status at the start of rehabilitation for the partially dependent group. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that the important factors for return to normal activities of daily living are: days of inactivity and cognitive status for the independent group; and days of inactivity and management of nutrition for the partially dependent group. PMID:27821931

  6. [A statistical analysis of factors influencing standing balance, activity of daily living and ambulation in hemiplegic patients].

    PubMed

    Nogaki, H

    1992-04-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate several factors influencing standing balance, activity of daily living and ambulation in hemiplegic patients after cerebro-vascular diseases. A statistical analysis of 121 hemiplegic patients with unilateral supratentorial lesions showed that age, severity of muscle weakness of involved or uninvolved extremities, unilateral spatial neglect and the sense of toe position had influence on standing balance, activity of daily living or ambulation. The patients were divided into five groups based on the degree of unilateral spatial neglect, evaluated by their copies of two daisies who omitted more than three quarters, three quarters, half, one quarter and none of the figures were defined as the USN-4, USN-3, USN-2, USN-1 and no involvement groups, respectively. Those who belonged to the USN-2 group had significantly lower scores for activity of daily living than those who belonged to the no involvement group. In the USN-2 group, 7 of the 8 patients could not keep standing for 50 seconds, while in the no involvement group, this was the case in only 1 of the 15 patients. Activity of daily living scores or sway area during standing showed no statistically significant differences between the USN-1 and no involvement groups. These results suggested that severe or moderate unilateral spatial neglect is one of the most important factors influencing standing balance and activity of daily living.

  7. Relations of morale and physical function to advanced activities of daily living in health promotion class participants

    PubMed Central

    Yajima, Masahide; Asakawa, Yasuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to clarify the relations of morale and physical function to the presence/absence of advanced activities of daily living. [Subjects] The subjects were 86 elderly community residents participating in health promotion classes. [Methods] A questionnaire survey on age, gender, presence/absence of advanced activities of daily living, and Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale score was conducted, in addition to assessment of fitness, consisting of measurement of height, body weight, grip and knee extensor muscle strength, functional reach, one-leg standing time, and Timed Up and Go test. Furthermore, multiple logistic regression analysis was performed with the presence/absence of advanced activities of daily living as a dependent variable. [Results] Grip strength and Timed Up and Go time were identified as variables influencing the presence/absence of advanced activities of daily living. [Conclusion] Physical function represented by grip strength and Timed Up and Go time was higher among subjects performing advanced activities of daily living. PMID:27065541

  8. Doing Well: A SEM Analysis of the Relationships between Various Activities of Daily Living and Geriatric Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katt, James A.; Speranza, Linda; Shore, Wendy; Saenz, Karen H.; Witta, E. Lea

    2009-01-01

    An existing large data set, the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) with the subsequent addition of the Consumption and Activities Mail Survey (CAMS) data, provides a rich data set for the examination of the activities of older adults. In this study HRS and CAMS data are used to examine relationships between various activities of daily living (ADLs)…

  9. A daily living activity remote monitoring system for solitary elderly people.

    PubMed

    Maki, Hiromichi; Ogawa, Hidekuni; Matsuoka, Shingo; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Caldwell, W Morton

    2011-01-01

    A daily living activity remote monitoring system has been developed for supporting solitary elderly people. The monitoring system consists of a tri-axis accelerometer, six low-power active filters, a low-power 8-bit microcontroller (MC), a 1GB SD memory card (SDMC) and a 2.4 GHz low transmitting power mobile phone (PHS). The tri-axis accelerometer attached to the subject's chest can simultaneously measure dynamic and static acceleration forces produced by heart sound, respiration, posture and behavior. The heart rate, respiration rate, activity, posture and behavior are detected from the dynamic and static acceleration forces. These data are stored in the SD. The MC sends the data to the server computer every hour. The server computer stores the data and makes a graphic chart from the data. When the caregiver calls from his/her mobile phone to the server computer, the server computer sends the graphical chart via the PHS. The caregiver's mobile phone displays the chart to the monitor graphically.

  10. Garment-based detection of falls and activities of daily living using 3-axis MEMS accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyan, M. N.; Tay, Francis E. H.; Manimaran, M.; Seah, K. H. W.

    2006-04-01

    This paper studied the detection of falls and activities of daily living (ADL) with two objectives: (1) minimum number of sensors for a broad range of activities and (2) maximize the comfort of the wearer for long term use. We used a garment to provide long term comfort for the wearer, with a 3-axis MEMS accelerometer on the shoulder position, as a wearable platform. ADL were detected in time-frequency domain and summation of absolute peak values of 3-D acceleration signals was used as feature in fall detection. 6 male and female subjects performed approximately five-hour long experiment. Sensitivity of 94.98% and specificity of 98.83% for altogether 1495 activities were achieved. Our garment-based detection system fulfilled the objective of providing the comfort of the wearer in long term monitoring of falls and ADL with high sensitivity. In fall detection, our device can summon medical assistances via SMS (Short Message Service). This detection system can raise fall alarm (fall SMS) automatically to individuals to get a shortened interval of the arrival of assistance.

  11. Breaking-up sedentary time is associated with impairment in activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Sardinha, Luis B; Ekelund, Ulf; dos Santos, Leandro; Cyrino, Edilson S; Silva, Analiza M; Santos, Diana A

    2015-12-01

    Identifying modifiable behaviors associated with prevention of activities of daily living (ADL) impairments is vital to implement preventive strategies for independent living in elderly. We aimed to examine the associations between objectively measured breaks in sedentary time with ADL impairments and physical independence. Cross-sectional assessments were carried out in 371 participants (131 male) aged 65-103 years from the Portuguese surveillance system of physical activity. Physical activity (PA) and sedentary time (ST) were assessed with accelerometry, and ADL impairments and physical independence with the self-reported 12-item composite physical function scale. Using ROC analyses a cut-off of 7 hourly breaks in sedentary time was identified which maximized the sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing physical dependence. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that, independently of moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), participants performing ≤ 7 hourly breaks in sedentary time had 2 to 7 fold increased odds for impairment in 10 of the 12 ADL. When stratifying ADL into basic, instrumental and advanced ADL we verified that less than 7 hourly breaks in sedentary time was associated with a 2 to 5 fold increased odds for impairments and physical dependence, independent of MVPA. No associations were observed between meeting PA guidelines and basic, instrumental, and advanced ADL impairment although time in MVPA was lower in participants showing impairments. In conclusion, the frequency of breaks in sedentary time in older ages is independently associated with lower risk for ADL impairments and physical dependence. Our findings support interventions to encourage older adults to increase overall PA by interrupting sedentary time.

  12. Multiplanar Knee Laxity and Perceived Function During Activities of Daily Living and Sport

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jeffrey B.; Wang, Hsin-Min; Schmitz, Randy J.; Rhea, Christopher K.; Ross, Scott E.; Shultz, Sandra J.

    2015-01-01

    Context Greater knee-joint laxity may lead to a higher risk of knee injury, yet it is unknown whether results of self-reported outcome measures are associated with distinct knee-laxity profiles. Objective To identify the extent to which multiplanar knee laxity is associated with patient-reported outcomes of knee function in healthy individuals during activities of daily living and sport. Design Descriptive laboratory study. Setting University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Forty healthy individuals (20 men, 20 women; age = 18–31 years). Main Outcome Measure(s) All participants were given the Knee Outcome Survey Activities of Daily Living Scale (KOS-ADL) and Sports Activities Scale (KOS-SAS) and subsequently measured for knee laxity in the sagittal, frontal, and transverse planes. Separate backward stepwise regression analyses were performed to determine the extent to which multiplanar knee-laxity values predicted KOS-ADL and KOS-SAS scores within each sex. Results Women had higher magnitudes of anterior, posterior (POSTLAX), varus (VARLAX), valgus (VALLAX), and internal-rotation laxity than men and trended toward greater external rotation (ERLAX) laxity. Greater POSTLAX, less VALLAX, and greater VARLAX was associated with lower KOS-ADL scores (KOS-ADL = −4.8 [POSTLAX], + 3.3 [VALLAX] − 2.2 [VARLAX] + 100.4, R2 = 0.74, P < .001) and greater POSTLAX and less VALLAX was associated with lower KOS-SAS scores (KOS-SAS = −8.2 [POSTLAX], + 3.6 [VALLAX] + 96.4, R2 = 0.67, P < .001) in women. In men, greater POSTLAX and less ERLAX was associated with lower KOS-SAS scores (KOS-ADL = −4.7 [POSTLAX], + 0.9 [ERLAX] + 96.4, R2 = 0.49, P < .001). Conclusions The combination of POSTLAX with less relative VALLAX (women) or less relative ERLAX (men) was a strong predictor of KOS scores, suggesting that a self-reported outcome measure may be beneficial as part of a preparticipation screening battery to identify those with perceived functional deficits

  13. Range of Motion Requirements for Upper-Limb Activities of Daily Living

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Lisa Smurr; Cowley, Jeffrey; Wilken, Jason M.; Resnik, Linda

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We quantified the range of motion (ROM) required for eight upper-extremity activities of daily living (ADLs) in healthy participants. METHOD. Fifteen right-handed participants completed several bimanual and unilateral basic ADLs while joint kinematics were monitored using a motion capture system. Peak motions of the pelvis, trunk, shoulder, elbow, and wrist were quantified for each task. RESULTS. To complete all activities tested, participants needed a minimum ROM of −65°/0°/105° for humeral plane angle (horizontal abduction–adduction), 0°–108° for humeral elevation, −55°/0°/79° for humeral rotation, 0°–121° for elbow flexion, −53°/0°/13° for forearm rotation, −40°/0°/38° for wrist flexion–extension, and −28°/0°/38° for wrist ulnar–radial deviation. Peak trunk ROM was 23° lean, 32° axial rotation, and 59° flexion–extension. CONCLUSION. Full upper-limb kinematics were calculated for several ADLs. This methodology can be used in future studies as a basis for developing normative databases of upper-extremity motions and evaluating pathology in populations. PMID:26709433

  14. Assessing Upper Extremity Motor Function in Practice of Virtual Activities of Daily Living

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Richard J.; Lichter, Matthew D.; Krepkovich, Eileen T.; Ellington, Allison; White, Marga; Diamond, Paul T.

    2015-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the criterion validity of measures of upper extremity (UE) motor function derived during practice of virtual activities of daily living (ADLs). Fourteen hemiparetic stroke patients employed a Virtual Occupational Therapy Assistant (VOTA), consisting of a high-fidelity virtual world and a Kinect™ sensor, in four sessions of approximately one hour in duration. An Unscented Kalman Filter-based human motion tracking algorithm estimated UE joint kinematics in real-time during performance of virtual ADL activities, enabling both animation of the user’s avatar and automated generation of metrics related to speed and smoothness of motion. These metrics, aggregated over discrete sub-task elements during performance of virtual ADLs, were compared to scores from an established assessment of UE motor performance, the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT). Spearman’s rank correlation analysis indicates a moderate correlation between VOTA-derived metrics and the time-based WMFT assessments, supporting the criterion validity of VOTA measures as a means of tracking patient progress during an UE rehabilitation program that includes practice of virtual ADLs. PMID:25265612

  15. Can activities of daily living contribute to EMG normalization for gait analysis?

    PubMed Central

    Ghazwan, Aseel; Forrest, Sarah M.; Holt, Cathy A.; Whatling, Gemma M.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to examine alternative methods of normalization that effectively reflect muscle activity as compared to Maximal Voluntary Contraction (MVC). EMG data recorded from knee flexion-extension muscles in 10 control subjects during the stance phase of the gait cycle were examined by adopting different approaches of normalization: MVC, Mean and Peak Dynamic during gait cycles, (MDM and PDM, respectively), Peak Dynamic during activities of daily living (ADLs), (*PDM), and a combination of ADLs and MVC(**PDM). Intra- and inter-individual variability were calculated to determine reliability and similarity to MCV. **PDM showed excellent reliability across subjects in comparison to MVC, where variance ratio ranged from 0.43–0.99 for **PDM and 0.79–1.08 for MVC. Coefficient of variability showed a similar trend to Variance Ratio, ranging from 0.60–1.25 for **PDM and 1.97–3.92 for MVC. Both MVC and **PDM, and to some extent *PDM, demonstrated good-to-excellent relative amplitude’s matching; i.e. root mean square difference and absolute difference were both around 0.08 for Vastus medialis to about 4 for Medial gastrocnemius. It was concluded that **PDM and *PDM were reliable, **PDM mirrored MVC and thus could be used as an alternative to MVC for subjects who are unable to provide the required effort for MVC testing. Where MVC testing is not possible, *PDM is the next preferred option. PMID:28369104

  16. Can activities of daily living contribute to EMG normalization for gait analysis?

    PubMed

    Ghazwan, Aseel; Forrest, Sarah M; Holt, Cathy A; Whatling, Gemma M

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to examine alternative methods of normalization that effectively reflect muscle activity as compared to Maximal Voluntary Contraction (MVC). EMG data recorded from knee flexion-extension muscles in 10 control subjects during the stance phase of the gait cycle were examined by adopting different approaches of normalization: MVC, Mean and Peak Dynamic during gait cycles, (MDM and PDM, respectively), Peak Dynamic during activities of daily living (ADLs), (*PDM), and a combination of ADLs and MVC(**PDM). Intra- and inter-individual variability were calculated to determine reliability and similarity to MCV. **PDM showed excellent reliability across subjects in comparison to MVC, where variance ratio ranged from 0.43-0.99 for **PDM and 0.79-1.08 for MVC. Coefficient of variability showed a similar trend to Variance Ratio, ranging from 0.60-1.25 for **PDM and 1.97-3.92 for MVC. Both MVC and **PDM, and to some extent *PDM, demonstrated good-to-excellent relative amplitude's matching; i.e. root mean square difference and absolute difference were both around 0.08 for Vastus medialis to about 4 for Medial gastrocnemius. It was concluded that **PDM and *PDM were reliable, **PDM mirrored MVC and thus could be used as an alternative to MVC for subjects who are unable to provide the required effort for MVC testing. Where MVC testing is not possible, *PDM is the next preferred option.

  17. Effects of community-based rehabilitation program on activities of daily living and cognition in elderly chronic stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Ju; Lee, Chun-Yeop

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of community-based rehabilitation program in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven subjects received community-based rehabilitation program ten times for ten months. The main outcome measures were the Modified Barthel Index score for activities of daily living and the Korean Mini-Mental State Examination score for cognition. [Results] The results of the study demonstrated that the community-based rehabilitation program improved activities of daily living performance and cognition significantly. [Conclusion] Based on the study results, the community-based rehabilitation program is an effective method for improving activities of daily living performance and cognitive function in elderly patients with chronic stroke. PMID:27942164

  18. Energy Expenditures for Activities of Daily Living in Korean Young Adults: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the energy expenditure (EE) of Korean young adults based on activities refined to a deskbound lifestyle. Methods Sixty-four healthy office workers aged between 25 and 46 years participated in this study. EE was expressed as metabolic equivalent of task (MET). Participants were evaluated in terms of their EE during physical activities of sleeping (n=22), typing (n=37), folding laundry (n=34), dishwashing (n=32), studying (n=18), mopping (n=35), walking (n=33), stair climbing (n=23), and running (n=29). Volume of oxygen consumption was measured by indirect calorimetry K4b2 (COSMED). The results were compared to the established Compendium MET. Results The MET of activities were: sleeping, 1.24±0.43; typing, 1.35±0.25; folding laundry, 1.58±0.51; dishwashing, 2.20±0.51; studying, 2.11±0.90; mopping, 2.72±0.69; walking at 4 km/hr, 3.48±0.65; stair climbing of five stories, 6.18±1.08; and running at 8 km/hr, 7.57±0.57. The values of typing and mopping were similar to those in the Compendium, whereas those of sleeping, folding laundry, dishwashing, studying, walking, stair climbing and running were different. Conclusion To our knowledge, this estimation of EE in MET during activities of daily living is the first data of young adults in Korea. These data could be used as a reference to modify the guidelines of physical activities for the age group examined in this study. PMID:27606280

  19. Activities of daily living, depression, and quality of life in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Blake J; Gasson, Natalie; Kane, Robert; Bucks, Romola S; Loftus, Andrea M

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether activities of daily living (ADL) mediate the relationship between depression and health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) in people with Parkinson's disease (PD). A cross-sectional, correlational research design examined data from 174 participants who completed the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15), Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39), and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-section 2 (UPDRS-section 2 [ADL]). Multiple Regression Analysis (MRA) was used to examine the mediator model. Depression and ADL significantly (p<.001) predicted HR-QOL, and depression significantly (p<.001) predicted ADL. Whilst ADL did not impact on the relationship between depression and HR-QOL, there was a significant (p<.001) indirect effect of depression on HR-QOL via ADL, suggesting both direct and indirect (via ADL) effects of depression on HR-QOL. The magnitude of this effect was moderate (R2 = .13). People with PD who report depression also experience greater difficulty completing ADL, which impacts upon their HR-QOL. It is recommended that clinicians adopt a multidisciplinary approach to care by combining pharmacological treatments with psycho/occupational therapy, thereby alleviating the heterogeneous impact of motor and non-motor symptoms on HR-QOL in people with PD.

  20. Bayer-activities of daily living scale in mild and moderate dementia of the Alzheimer type.

    PubMed

    Nagaratnam, Nages; Nagaratnam, Kujan; O'Mara, Deborah

    2013-12-01

    The main purpose of this study is to examine the reliability of the Bayer-Activities of Daily Living (B-ADL) scale when used as a cognitive screening instrument for mild and moderate dementia of the Alzheimer type. This is a retrospective study of 66 patients with dementia. The B-ADL scale was completed by the caregiver or the family member at the first encounter. The internal consistency was found to be 0.94 for the 27 patients that completed all 25 questions in the scale. Significant correlation and receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis were found for the B-ADL total score and subscale 1 (tasks requiring short- and long-term memory) for Clinical Dementia Rating scale. Severity of dementia by the B-ADL scale is statistically similar but not the same as Mini-Mental State Examination. Our findings confirm that B-ADL scale is a valid indicator of the cognitive status of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Standardized training tools for the UPDRS activities of daily living scale: newly available teaching program.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Christopher G; LeWitt, Peter A; Weidenman, Meredith

    2003-12-01

    The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) is the most widely used scale for evaluation of clinical impairment in PD. Whereas the motor section has been studied intensively for clinimetric properties and has an associated training tape, the Activities of Daily Living (ADL) section has been studied less rigorously. In preparation for a multicenter study that planned to use the UPDRS ADL score as an outcome, the authors reviewed the UPDRS ADL scale and designed a teaching program to provide a uniform technique for data acquisition without changing any wording of the primary scale. The teaching program is composed of four components: overall guidelines, clarifying points, recommended strategies, and a teaching videotape. The videotape shows examples of interviewers assessing each ADL item with patients of different disability levels and provides a complete ADL assessment of a single patient. Systematic training and utilization of this teaching program offer the potential for more uniformity in results of ADL assessments conducted in clinical practice and multicenter, international studies of PD. The written materials and videotape belong to the Movement Disorder Society and are available by contacting the MDS central office.

  2. Is surviving enough? Coping and impact on activities of daily living among melanoma patients with lymphoedema.

    PubMed

    Cromwell, K D; Chiang, Y J; Armer, J; Heppner, P P; Mungovan, K; Ross, M I; Gershenwald, J E; Lee, J E; Royal, R E; Lucci, A; Cormier, J N

    2015-09-01

    We assessed the impact of lymphoedema (defined as ≥ 10% limb volume change) on quality of life (QOL), ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) and coping in 277 melanoma patients. Limb volume was measured prospectively, pre-operatively and every 3-6 months for 18 months post-operatively using a perometer. Three questionnaires were administered to measure QOL, coping and impact on ADLs. Statistical analyses were conducted using longitudinal logistic regression models. At 18 months, the cumulative incidence of lymphoedema was 31% in patients with upper extremity nodal basin treatment and 40% in lower extremity nodal basin treatment patients. Patients with lower extremity lymphoedema reported lower QOL scores than those with upper extremity lymphoedema. Over 18 months, both groups with mild and moderate lymphoedema showed improvement in coping [odds ratio (OR): 6.67, 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.30-13.47] and performance of ADLs (OR: 7.46, CI: 3.38-16.47). Over the course of 18 months, men were found to have poorer coping scores than women (OR: 2.91, CI: 1.35-6.27). Lymphoedema was associated with improvement in coping over time (P = 0.08) and a higher reported interference with ADLs (OR: 2.53, CI: 1.29-4.97). Patient education about lymphoedema at the time of surgical consent may improve self-efficacy and coping ability. Effective management of lymphoedema may improve patient QOL and reduce interference with ADLs.

  3. Activities of daily living, depression, and social support among elderly Turkish people.

    PubMed

    Bozo, Ozlem; Toksabay, N Ece; Kürüm, Oya

    2009-03-01

    The authors examined the effects of activities of daily living (ADL) and perceived social support on the level of depression among elderly Turkish people. Participants were 102 adults older than the age of 60 years. The authors hypothesized that (a) lower levels of ADL would predict a higher level of depression, (b) a higher level of perceived social support would predict a lower level of depression, and (c) perceived social support would moderate the relation between ADL and depression. Although hierarchical multiple regression analysis did not yield a significant effect for an ADL-perceived social support interaction, ADL and perceived social support significantly predicted depression among elderly people. Thus, perceived social support did not moderate the relation between ADL and depression among elderly people; however, higher ADL functioning and higher perceived social support predicted lower depression. The nonsignificant effect of an ADL-perceived social support interaction on the level of depression among elderly people was incongruent with the stress-buffering model (S. Cohen & T. A. Willis, 1985). The authors discuss the strengths, limitations, and possible implications of the findings.

  4. Disaggregating Activities of Daily Living Limitations for Predicting Nursing Home Admission

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Joelle H; Mitchell, Olivia S; Koh, Benedict S K

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine whether disaggregated activities of daily living (ADL) limitations better predict the risk of nursing home admission compared to conventionally used ADL disability counts. Data Sources We used panel data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) for years 1998–2010. The HRS is a nationally representative survey of adults older than 50 years (n = 18,801). Study Design We fitted Cox regressions in a continuous time survival model with age at first nursing home admission as the outcome. Time-varying ADL disability types were the key explanatory variables. Principal Findings Of the six ADL limitations, bathing difficulty emerged as the strongest predictor of subsequent nursing home placement across cohorts. Eating and dressing limitations were also influential in driving admissions among more recent cohorts. Using simple ADL counts for analysis yielded similar adjusted R2s; however, the amount of explained variance doubled when we allowed the ADL disability measures to time-vary rather than remain static. Conclusions Looking beyond simple ADL counts can provide health professionals insights into which specific disability types trigger long-term nursing home use. Functional disabilities measured closer in time carry more prognostic power than static measures. PMID:25256014

  5. Prevalence of headache and its interference in the activities of daily living in female adolescent students

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Alaine Souza; de Araújo, Rodrigo Cappato; Gomes, Mayra Ruana de A.; de Almeida, Ludmila Remígio; de Souza, Gabriely Feitosa F.; Cunha, Samara Barreto; Pitangui, Ana Carolina R.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of headache and its interference in the activities of daily living (ADL) in female adolescent students. METHODS: This descriptive cross-sectional study enrolled 228 female adolescents from a public school in the city of Petrolina, Pernambuco, Northeast Brazil, aged ten to 19 years. A self-administered structured questionnaire about socio-demographic characteristics, occurrence of headache and its characteristics was employed. Headaches were classified according to the International Headache Society criteria. The chi-square test was used to verify possible associations, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: After the exclusion of 24 questionnaires that did not met the inclusion criteria, 204 questionnaires were analyzed. The mean age of the adolescents was 14.0±1.4 years. The prevalence of headache was 87.7%. Of the adolescents with headache, 0.5% presented migraine without pure menstrual aura; 6.7%, migraine without aura related to menstruation; 1.6%, non-menstrual migraine without aura; 11.7%, tension-type headache and 79.3%, other headaches. Significant associations were found between pain intensity and the following variables: absenteeism (p=0.001); interference in ADL (p<0.001); medication use (p<0.001); age (p=0.045) and seek for medical care (p<0.022). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of headache in female adolescents observed in this study was high, with a negative impact in ADL and school attendance. PMID:25119759

  6. Emotion, social functioning and activities of daily living in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Kipps, Christopher M; Mioshi, Eneida; Hodges, John R

    2009-06-01

    Social functioning in FTD is profoundly affected, and forms the basis for the clinical diagnosis of the behavioural variant of the disease (bv-FTD). In particular, there are deficits in emotional processing, but the inter-relationship of such deficits to other aspects of social functioning remains unclear. We studied patients with bv-FTD (n = 14) and AD (n = 14), and compared their performance on a test of emotion recognition with their scores on two carer-based assessments: the Disability Assessment for Dementia (DAD) of activities in daily living (ADL), and the Cambridge Behavioural Inventory (CBI). The bv-FTD group had significantly greater impairments in ADLs, and had higher scores on the CBI, compared to the AD group. Despite a deficit in emotion recognition, particularly involving negative emotions, in the FTD group relative to AD and controls, performance on this task did not correlate with ADL ratings which instead, correlated highly with carer-rated apathy levels on the CBI. The study highlights the multifactorial nature of social dysfunction in FTD which is important in the management of these patients and in designing effective behavioural and therapeutic interventions. The relationship of emotional processing to other aspects of social cognition in FTD is reviewed.

  7. Trunk angular kinematics during slip-induced backward falls and activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Lockhart, Thurmon E

    2014-10-01

    Prior to developing any specific fall detection algorithm, it is critical to distinguish the unique motion features associated with fall accidents. The current study aimed to investigate the upper trunk angular kinematics during slip-induced backward falls and activities of daily living (ADLs). Ten healthy older adults (age = 75 ± 6 yr (mean ± SD)) were involved in a laboratory study. Sagittal trunk angular kinematics were measured using optical motion analysis system during normal walking, slip-induced backward falls, lying down, bending over, and various types of sitting down (SN). Trunk angular phase-plane plots were generated to reveal the motion features of falls. It was found that backward falls were characterized by a simultaneous occurrence of a slight trunk extension and an extremely high trunk extension velocity (peak average = 139.7 deg/s), as compared to ADLs (peak average = 84.1 deg/s). It was concluded that the trunk extension angular kinematics of falls were clearly distinguishable from those of ADLs from the perspective of angular phase-plane plot. Such motion features can be utilized in future studies to develop a new prior-to-impact fall detection algorithm.

  8. An introductory study of common grasps used by adults during performance of activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Margarita; Sancho-Bru, J L; Gracia-Ibáñez, V; Pérez-González, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a descriptive survey on human grasps. Sixty-four videos were selected to represent tasks performed in the main areas of activities of daily living (ADL) (personal care, meal preparation, eating, housekeeping, etc.). All the participants were right-handed. Elementary grasps were identified for each hand, and the grasp type (from a 9-type classification), the hands involved, and the duration were registered for each case. The results show that the most commonly used grasps are: pinch, non-prehensile, cylindrical, lateral pinch and lumbrical. The presence of these grasps in the areas of ADL is, however, very different (e.g., pinch is widely used in food preparation and very little in driving). Some grasps were used more frequently with one hand or when both hands were used simultaneously (e.g., special pinch was hardly used by the left hand). Knowing the grasp types most frequently used in ADL is essential to be able to assess grasp rehabilitation processes or hand prostheses development.

  9. Social participation and independence in activities of daily living: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Encarnación; Lázaro, Angelina; Sánchez-Sánchez, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Background It is today widely accepted that participation in social activities contributes towards successful ageing whilst, at the same time, maintaining independence in the activities of daily living (ADLs) is the sine qua non for achieving that end. This study looks at people aged 65 and over living in an urban area in Spain who retain the ability to attend Social Centres providing recreational facilities. The aim of this paper is to quantify independence and identify the risk factors involved in its deterioration. Methods The sample size was calculated using the equation for proportions in finite populations based on a random proportional sample type, absolute error (e) = 0.05, α = 0.05, β = 0.1, p = q = 0.5. Two-stage sampling was used. In the first place, the population was stratified by residence and a Social Centre was randomly chosen for each district. In the second stage, individuals were selected in a simple random sample without replacement in proportion to the number of members at each social centre. A multivariate logistical regression analysis takes functional ADL capacity as the dependent variable. The choice of predictive variables was made using a bivariate correlation matrix. Among the estimators obtained, Nagelkerke's R2 coefficient, and the Odds ratio (CI 95%) were considered. Sensitivity and 1-specificity were adopted to present the results in graphic form. Results Out of this sample, 63.7% were fully capable of carrying out ADLs, while the main factors contributing to deterioration, identified on the basis of a logistic regression model, are in order of importance, poor physical health, poor mental health, age (above 75 years) and gender (female). The model employed has a predictive value of 88% and 92% (depending on the age range considered) with regard to the independence in ADLs. Conclusion A review of the few Spanish works using similar methodology shows that the percentage of non-institutionalised persons who are independent enough to

  10. The effect of mirror therapy on upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Young; Chang, Moonyoung; Kim, Kyeong-Mi; Kim, Hee-Jung

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of mirror therapy on upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen subjects were each assigned to a mirror therapy group and a sham therapy group. The Fugl-Meyer Motor Function Assessment and the Box and Block Test were performed to compare paretic upper-extremity function and hand coordination abilities. The functional independence measurement was conducted to compare abilities to perform activities of daily living. [Results] Paretic upper-extremity function and hand coordination abilities were significantly different between the mirror therapy and sham therapy groups. Intervention in the mirror therapy group was more effective than in the sham therapy group for improving the ability to perform activities of daily living. Self-care showed statistically significant differences between the two groups. [Conclusion] Mirror therapy is effective in improving paretic upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients. PMID:26180297

  11. Examining Success of Communication Strategies Used by Formal Caregivers Assisting Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease during an Activity of Daily Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Rozanne; Rochon, Elizabeth; Mihailidis, Alex; Leonard, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine how formal (i.e., employed) caregivers' use verbal and nonverbal communication strategies while assisting individuals with moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease (AD) during the successful completion of an activity of daily living (ADL). Based on the literature, the authors hypothesized that caregivers' use of 1 proposition,…

  12. Effects of mirror therapy combined with motor tasks on upper extremity function and activities daily living of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Lee, Sukmin; Kim, Donghoon; Lee, Kyoungbo; Kim, Youlim

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of mirror therapy combined with exercise tasks on the function of the upper limbs and activities of daily living. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five stroke patients who were receiving physical therapy at K Hospital in Gyeonggi-do, South Korea, were classified into a mirror therapy group (n=12) and a conventional therapy group (n=13). The therapies were applied for 30 minutes per day, five times per week, for a total of four weeks. Upper limb function was measured with the Action Research Arm test, the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, and the Box and Block test, and activities of daily living were measured with the Functional Independence Measure. A paired test was performed to compare the intragroup differences between before training and after four weeks of therapy, and an independent t-test was performed to compare the differences between the two groups before and after four weeks of therapy. [Results] In the intragroup comparison, both groups showed significant differences between measurements taken before and after four weeks of therapy. In the intergroup comparison, the mirror therapy group showed significant improvements compared with the conventional therapy group, both in upper limb function and activities of daily living. [Conclusion] The findings of this study demonstrated that mirror therapy is more effective than conventional therapy for the training of stroke patients to improve their upper limb function and activities of daily living. PMID:27065534

  13. Contribution of abdominal muscle strength to various activities of daily living of stroke patients with mild paralysis.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takaaki; Sato, Atsushi; Togashi, Yui; Kasahara, Ryuichi; Ohashi, Takuro; Yamamoto, Yuichi

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The trunk muscles frequently become weak after stroke, thus impacting overall activities of daily living. However, activities of daily living items closely related with trunk strength remain unclear. This study aimed to clarify the influence of trunk muscle weakness on activities of daily living items. [Subjects] The subjects were 24 stroke patients who fulfilled the following inclusion criteria: first stroke and the absence of severe paralysis, marked cognitive function deterioration, unilateral spatial neglect or apathy. [Methods] According to abdominal strength, the 24 patients were divided into a nonweakness group and a weakness group. For the assessment, we used the stroke impairment assessment set, the Berg balance scale, a simple test for evaluating hand function, grip strength, and functional independence measure scale scores and the results were compared between the groups. [Results] The Berg balance scale score and scores for dressing, toilet use, transfer to bed, and walk items of the functional independence measure were significantly lower in the weakness group than in the nonweakness group. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that weakness of the abdominal muscles adversely impacts the balance of patients with mild stroke as well as their ability to dress, use a toilet, transfer, and walk. Trunk training, including abdominal muscle exercises, can effectively improve the performance of these activities of daily living items.

  14. A Profile of Adults Needing Assistance with Activities of Daily Living, 1991-1992. Disability Statistics Report 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Jae; LaPlante, Mitchell P.

    This report uses data from the 1990 and 1991 samples of the Survey of Income and Program Participation to construct a profile of the U.S. noninstitutionalized adult population needing assistance with activities of daily living (ADL) and to estimate the size of the population eligible for federal personal assistance services (PAS) under different…

  15. Prediction of ground reaction forces and moments during various activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Fluit, R; Andersen, M S; Kolk, S; Verdonschot, N; Koopman, H F J M

    2014-07-18

    Inverse dynamics based simulations on musculoskeletal models is a commonly used method for the analysis of human movement. Due to inaccuracies in the kinematic and force plate data, and a mismatch between the model and the subject, the equations of motion are violated when solving the inverse dynamics problem. As a result, dynamic inconsistency will exist and lead to residual forces and moments. In this study, we present and evaluate a computational method to perform inverse dynamics-based simulations without force plates, which both improves the dynamic consistency as well as removes the model׳s dependency on measured external forces. Using the equations of motion and a scaled musculoskeletal model, the ground reaction forces and moments (GRF&Ms) are derived from three-dimensional full-body motion. The method entails a dynamic contact model and optimization techniques to solve the indeterminacy problem during a double contact phase and, in contrast to previously proposed techniques, does not require training or empirical data. The method was applied to nine healthy subjects performing several Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) and evaluated with simultaneously measured force plate data. Except for the transverse ground reaction moment, no significant differences (P>0.05) were found between the mean predicted and measured GRF&Ms for almost all ADLs. The mean residual forces and moments, however, were significantly reduced (P>0.05) in almost all ADLs using our method compared to conventional inverse dynamic simulations. Hence, the proposed method may be used instead of raw force plate data in human movement analysis using inverse dynamics.

  16. Validation of the Korean version of the Bayer activities of daily living scale.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seong Hye; Na, Duk L; Lee, Byung Hwa; Kang, Sue J; Ha, Choong-Kun; Han, Seol-Heui; Erzigkeit, Hellmut

    2003-08-01

    The Bayer-activities of daily living (B-ADL) is a brief and internationally applicable ADL instrument which has been validated in three European countries. The B-ADL has been developed to provide a tool for the assessment of functional deficits in performance of every day tasks as they are observed in mild to moderate stages of dementia. The B-ADL has been constructed for use in clinical trials as well as in clinical practice. From an international perspective the major application is the evaluation of treatment effects in clinical studies and the current study was to validate the Korean version of the B-ADL. The B-ADL was administered to a total of 129 subjects with varying degrees of cognitive decline. A substantial cross-sectional correlation between B-ADL and MMSE scores was found. The internal consistency of B-ADL was above 0.98. A factor analysis revealed that a one factor solution accounted for most of the total variance. The B-ADL global score significantly increased as the severity of dementia, assessed by global deterioration scale increased from stage 1 to 5. Test-retest reliabilities of B-ADL global score and each item were very high. All of these results were very similar to those from three European countries except for the proportion of 'non-applicability' in some ADL items. These findings provide evidence that the Korean version of B-ADL can be useful not only for clinical purposes but also for international multicentre studies.

  17. Predictive Factors of Dependency in Activities of Daily Living Following Limb Trauma in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Safa, Azade; Masoudi Alavi, Negin; Abedzadeh-Kalahroudi, Masoumeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Traumatic injuries in the elderly often lead to permanent disabilities and long-term treatments that can adversely influence their activities of daily of living (ADL). The effect on ADL is an important outcome in elderly trauma. Objectives The present study was designed to evaluate the predictive factors of dependency in ADL following limb trauma in elderly referred to Shahid Beheshti Hospital, Kashan, Iran, in 2013. Patients and Methods This descriptive study was conducted on 200 traumatic patients admitted to the trauma emergency ward of Shahid Beheshti hospital in 2013. The questionnaire used in this study had three parts: demographic data, information related to trauma, and an independence scale of ADL (ISADL). The ISADL was completed in the emergency ward to declare pre-traumatic status; it was also completed one and three months after trauma. Statistical analysis was conducted by the t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA). The repeated measure was used to study the trend of the ISADL and other demographic variables. The multiple regression analysis was also used to declare the predictive variables related to the ISADL. Results The study population consisted of 81 males (40.5%) and 119 females (59.5%). The participants’ average age was 70.57 ± 9.05 years. In total, 80.5% of the elderly were completely independent in ADL before trauma; this decreased to 13.5% one month after trauma. The repeated measure analysis showed a significant improvement in the ISADL three months after trauma. Gender, age, and education had significant interaction with the ISADL. The multiple regression analysis showed that type of trauma and location of injured organ had predictive values related to the ISADL, one and three months after trauma. The place and cause of trauma, and having surgery showed a significant relationship with the ISADL three months after trauma. Conclusions Many factors, such as gender, age, education, type of trauma, and location of injured organ

  18. Ecological Validity of Virtual Reality Daily Living Activities Screening for Early Dementia: Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Schlee, Winfried; Tsolaki, Magda; Müri, René; Mosimann, Urs; Nef, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    , and chair stands separately and while performing VR-DOTs in order to correlate performance in these measures with VR-DOTs because performance while navigating a virtual environment is a valid and reliable indicator of cognitive decline in elderly persons. Results The mild AD group was more impaired than the amnestic MCI group, and both were more impaired than healthy controls. The novel VR-DOT functional index correlated strongly with standard cognitive and functional measurements, such as mini-mental state examination (MMSE; rho=0.26, P=.01) and Bristol Activities of Daily Living (ADL) scale scores (rho=0.32, P=.001). Conclusions Functional impairment is a defining characteristic of predementia and is partly dependent on the degree of cognitive impairment. The novel virtual reality measures of functional ability seem more sensitive to functional impairment than qualitative measures in predementia, thus accurately differentiating from healthy controls. We conclude that VR-DOT is an effective tool for discriminating predementia and mild AD from controls by detecting differences in terms of errors, omissions, and perseverations while measuring ADL functional ability. PMID:25658491

  19. Effects of kinesiology taping on the upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in patients with hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eung-beom; Kim, Young-dong

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study determined the effects of kinesiology taping on the upper-extremity function and activities of daily living of patients with hemiplegia. [Subjects] The experimental group and control group comprised 15 hemiplegia patients each. [Methods] This study was performed from June 4 to December 22, 2012, involving 30 hemiplegia patients. The experimental and controls groups performed task practices for 30 minutes, 3 times per week for 28 weeks with and without taping, respectively. [Results] After treatment, there were significant differences in every outcome measures within each group except for the Brunnstrom recovery stage of the hand. However, there was a significant difference in functional independence movements between the groups. [Conclusion] Task practice has the same effectiveness regardless of the taping of the upper extremities. Nevertheless, taping is helpful for improving both the functions and activities of daily living in patients with hemiplegia. PMID:26157239

  20. The global deterioration scale: relationships to neuropsychological performance and activities of daily living in patients with vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Paul, Robert H; Cohen, Ronald A; Moser, David J; Zawacki, Tricia; Ott, Brian R; Gordon, Norman; Stone, William

    2002-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the relationships between ratings on the Global Deterioration Scale (GDS) and activities of daily living and cognitive function in 39 individuals with vascular dementia (VaD). The results of the study revealed significant correlations between GDS rating and performance on cognitive tests, including memory and overall cognitive ability. In addition, the GDS was significantly related to ratings of instrumental activities of daily living. Comparisons between patients with VaD with GDS scores between 4 and 6 (n = 21) and patients with scores between 2 and 3 (n = 18) revealed greater cognitive and functional deficits in the group with higher GDS scores. Further, the GDS score accurately classified 87% of the patients with VaD. These findings provide support for the validity of the GDS in general staging of dementia severity of VaD.

  1. Daily life in very old age: everyday activities as expression of successful living.

    PubMed

    Horgas, A L; Wilms, H U; Baltes, M M

    1998-10-01

    The goals of this article are (a) to describe the daily life of the very old in terms of frequency, duration, variety, and social and physical contexts of activities, and (b) to examine the effects of background variables (e.g., age, sex, residential and marital status, income, and education) on late life activity engagement. A representative sample of 516 adults aged 70-105 was interviewed about their activities using the Yesterday Interview. In contrast to most research on activity engagement, this measurement approach allows for assessment of both the type and context of activities engaged in during the day preceding the interview. The results indicated high frequencies of obligatory activities but also showed substantial time spent in discretionary activities, with television viewing occupying most of the participants' leisure time. Most activities were done alone and at home. In bivariate and multiple regression analyses, age and residential status had the strongest association with activity frequency, duration, and variety; the oldest-old and those residing in long-term care facilities had lower levels of activity engagement. Results are discussed in terms of their relevance for successful aging.

  2. Relationship of Cognitive Functions with Daily Living Activities, Depression, Anxiety and Clinical Variables in Hospitalized Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    DEMİR AKÇA, Ayşe Semra; SARAÇLI, Özge; EMRE, Ufuk; ATASOY, Nuray; GÜDÜL, Serdar; ÖZEN BARUT, Banu; ŞENORMANCI, Ömer; BÜYÜKUYSAL, M. Çağatay; ATİK, Levent; ATASOY, H. Tuğrul

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cognitive impairment in elderly patients, which may be a sign of dementia, depression, anxiety or medical diseases, has been determined as a risk factor for functional loss. In this study, we aimed to investigate the frequency of cognitive impairment and to investigate the relationship of cognitive status with sociodemographic variables, daily living activities, anxiety and depression in elderly inpatients. Method The sample of this cross-sectional and descriptive study consists of 243 patients aged 65 years and older who were hospitalized in Bülent Ecevit University Hospital. A sociodemographic questionnaire,, the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Activities of Daily Living Scale, Lawton-Brody Instrumental Daily Activities Scale, Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory were used for data collection. Results One hundred and six (43.6%) patients were female and 137 (56.4%) were male. The patients were divided into two groups according to the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) 23/24 cut-off score. The cognitive decline was statistically significantly more frequent in patients who were older, female, less educated, low socioeconomic status, and living in rural areas. There were more problems in the basic and instrumental activities of daily living and nutrition in patients with cognitive decline. Anxiety and depression scores were higher in this group. In our study, although the frequency of cognitive decline and depression according to GDS were 56% and 48%, respectively; we found that only 10.5% of patients applied to the psychiatrist, and 9.3% of patients received psychiatric treatment. Conclusion Cognitive decline may cause deterioration in the daily living activities, nutrition and capacity for independent functioning. Older age, female, low education, low socioeconomic status and living in rural area are important risk factors for cognitive impairment. Cognitive decline in older age may be associated with depression and

  3. Monitoring activities of daily living based on wearable wireless body sensor network.

    PubMed

    Kańtoch, E; Augustyniak, P; Markiewicz, M; Prusak, D

    2014-01-01

    With recent advances in microprocessor chip technology, wireless communication, and biomedical engineering it is possible to develop miniaturized ubiquitous health monitoring devices that are capable of recording physiological and movement signals during daily life activities. The aim of the research is to implement and test the prototype of health monitoring system. The system consists of the body central unit with Bluetooth module and wearable sensors: the custom-designed ECG sensor, the temperature sensor, the skin humidity sensor and accelerometers placed on the human body or integrated with clothes and a network gateway to forward data to a remote medical server. The system includes custom-designed transmission protocol and remote web-based graphical user interface for remote real time data analysis. Experimental results for a group of humans who performed various activities (eg. working, running, etc.) showed maximum 5% absolute error compared to certified medical devices. The results are promising and indicate that developed wireless wearable monitoring system faces challenges of multi-sensor human health monitoring during performing daily activities and opens new opportunities in developing novel healthcare services.

  4. Providing Daily Oral Infection Control to Persons Dependent on others for Activities of Daily Living: A Semi-Qualitative Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, R Constance; Dinsmore, Rebecca R; Meckstroth, Richard; Marshall, William

    2017-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to evaluate caregiver assessment of the ease of use of a specially designed toothbrush for providing daily oral infection control (toothbrushing) to persons dependent upon others for activities of daily living. Method Eighty-eight caregivers accepted surveys and multi-surface toothbrushes to provide daily oral infection control to the person to whom they assisted. They were asked to evaluate the ease of use of the multi-surface toothbrush, and provide comments about it. Results There were 30 surveys returned (34.1% response rate). In terms of the ease of use, 90.0% of the caregivers agreed (63.3% strongly agreed, and 26.7% agreed) that the multi-surface toothbrush was easier to use than their previous toothbrush. Comments about the toothbrush were predominantly positive. Conclusion It is difficult to provide daily oral infection control to another individual. Having an efficient oral health aid which makes it easier to do so is important to caregivers. With the overwhelming positive response to the multi-surface toothbrush, it is important to disseminate the information about its ease of use. PMID:28191548

  5. Transitions in activities of daily living in Mexico, 2001–2012

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Venegas, Carlos; De La Vega, Sergio; Wong, Rebeca

    2015-01-01

    Objective This paper describes the 2001–2012 progression of limitations in daily activities in the Mexican elderly population aged 60 or older and identifies how sociodemographic and health factors affect these progressions. Materials and methods Data come from the Mexican Health and Aging Study (MHAS), a national sample of adults born in 1951 or earlier, including a baseline survey in 2001 and follow-ups in 2003 and 2012. Results Difficulty in getting dressed is the activity that has the highest prevalence in all three waves for both genders. In the 11-year transition, 42.8% of the respondents with no limitations in 2001 reported no limitations in 2012. In contrast, 60.8% of those who reported three or more limitations in 2001 had died by 2012. Conclusions With the rapid aging of the Mexican population, the knowledge of patterns of deterioration of functional limitations will prove useful for future public health policies. PMID:26172235

  6. Monitoring daily living activities of elderly people in a nursing home using an infrared motion-detection system.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryoji; Otake, Sakuko; Izutsu, Takeshi; Yoshida, Masaki; Iwaya, Tsutomu

    2006-04-01

    We examined whether we could identify activity patterns of elderly people in a nursing home from sensor outputs of an infrared monitoring system. The subjects consisted of three elderly people. A single passive infrared sensor installed on the ceiling of each subject's usual dwelling room provided digital output whenever the subject moved. The subjects' actual daily activities were established from questionnaires with which patients documented their living patterns for each of 7 days. Activities were classed as sleeping, getting up/breakfast, indoor activities/going out, and dinner/going to bed. The mean +/- 2 standard deviations (SDs) of the sensor outputs on each day for each period of indoor activity was used to distinguish between normal and aberrant activities. Days on which sensor outputs exceeded the means +/- 2 SDs were regarded as atypical and were identified for each subject over a 28-day period. We were unable to determine the physical condition of the subjects on these atypical days. We were able to identify the pattern of daily indoor living activities and the duration of each class of activity using sensor outputs and a questionnaire. Days were assumed to be atypical when sensor outputs deviated from the normal pattern.

  7. Living with psoriasis: prevalence of shame, anger, worry, and problems in daily activities and social life.

    PubMed

    Sampogna, Francesca; Tabolli, Stefano; Abeni, Damiano

    2012-05-01

    Psychosocial problems are frequent among patients with psoriasis. The aim of this study was to analyse the prevalence of some specific psychosocial issues. These were evaluated in 936 patients using the emotions and functioning scales of the Skindex-29 questionnaire. The problems most frequently experienced were: shame, anger, worry, difficulties in daily activities and social life. All problems were associated with the severity of psoriasis and with depression or anxiety. Shame, worry and annoyance were more frequent in women than in men, and shame and anger were associated with a low level of education. Impairment in work/hobbies was significantly higher in patients with palmoplantar psoriasis and those with arthro-pathic psoriasis. In conclusion, clinicians could gain important insights about their patients by looking at the single items of a quality of life instrument, to identify patients with high levels of emotional and social problems, in order to improve quality of care.

  8. The Relationship between Activities of Daily Living and Life Satisfaction in the Elderly: Active Engagement as Compared to Passive Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannuzzelli, Jena; England, Eileen M.

    Daily activities and social contact were studied as influences on the life satisfaction of elderly people. It was considered that all activities might not be equal and that individuals who participate in more active activities and who have more active social contacts would score higher in life satisfaction than those who engage in inactive…

  9. Perception of difficulties with vision-related activities of daily living among patients undergoing unilateral posterior capsulotomy

    PubMed Central

    de Senne, Firmani M. B.; Temporini, Edméa R.; Arieta, Carlos E. L.; Pacheco, Karla D.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To assess the influence of Nd:YAG (neodymium: yttrium-aluminum- garnet) laser unilateral posterior capsulotomy on visual acuity and patients’ perception of difficulties with vision-related activities of daily life. METHODS We conducted an interventional survey that included 48 patients between 40 and 80 years of age with uni- or bilateral pseudophakia, posterior capsule opacification, and visual acuity ≤0.30 (logMAR) in one eye who were seen at a Brazilian university hospital. All patients underwent posterior capsulotomy using an Nd:YAG laser. Before and after the intervention, patients were asked to complete a questionnaire that was developed in an exploratory study. RESULTS Before posterior capsulotomy, the median visual acuity (logMAR) of the included patients was 0.52 (range 0.30–1.60). After posterior capsulotomy, the median visual acuity of the included patients improved to 0.10 (range 0.0–0.52). According to the subjects’ perceptions, their ability to perform most of their daily life activities improved after the intervention (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS After patients underwent posterior capsulotomy with an Nd:YAG laser, a significant improvement in the visual acuity of the treated eye was observed. Additionally, subjects felt that they experienced less difficulty performing most of their vision-dependent activities of daily living. PMID:20535363

  10. Assistive devices in activities of daily living used by persons with age-related macular degeneration: a population study of 85-year-olds living at home.

    PubMed

    Dahlin Ivanoff, S; Sonn, U

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the overall use of assistive devices among persons with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and how it is related to dependence in daily activities. This was a retrospective, descriptive, cross-sectional population study of 85-year-olds. The most common category of assistive devices was bathing devices followed by mobility devices. The overall use of assistive devices was 82%, and around 80% of the device users were independent in activities of daily living. They were multiple device users (57%) and used more mobility devices and personal assistance in mobility. In conclusion, the ARMD group comprises very frequent users of assistive devices and uses assistive devices to remain independent. This implies that health services should provide assistive devices at an early stage in the disablement process to avoid the development of dependence and should consider the likelihood of multiple health problems when assessing the needs of assistive devices among persons with ARMD.

  11. Patient Mood and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living in Alzheimer Disease: Relationship Between Patient and Caregiver Reports.

    PubMed

    Votruba, Kristen L; Persad, Carol; Giordani, Bruno

    2015-09-01

    This retrospective study investigated the relationship between self-reports and caregiver perceptions of patients' depressive symptoms and the respective ability of these reports to predict instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) beyond what is accounted for by cognitive abilities in 71 patients with mild Alzheimer disease. Patients completed the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form, and caregivers completed the Behavior Rating Scale for Dementia assessing their perception of patients' depressive symptoms. Caregivers also completed IADL items from the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study Activities of Daily Living Inventory. Cognitive measures included the Mini-Mental State Examination, Logical Memory from the Wechsler Memory Scale III, and Trail Making Test, Part B. The relationship between self-reported depressive symptoms and caregiver report of patients' depressive symptoms showed a trend toward significance (r = .22, P = .06). Measures of depressive symptoms significantly predicted 12.5% of the variance in IADLs performance, beyond that accounted for by patient demographics and cognitive functioning. Interestingly, patients' reports, rather than caregivers', were particularly useful in this prediction.

  12. The Effect of Reminiscence Therapy on Cognition, Depression, and Activities of Daily Living for Patients With Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Duru Aşiret, Güler; Kapucu, Sevgisun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was, conducted with experimental design, to investigate the effect of reminiscence therapy on cognition, depression, activities of daily living of institutionalized mild and moderate Alzheimer patients. The study was conducted with a total of 62 patients (31 intervention group and 31 control group) in four home care in Ankara, Turkey. Study was done between the July 1, 2013 and December 20, 2014. Reminiscence therapy sessions were held with groups consists of 4-5 patients, once a week with 30-35 minute duration for 12 weeks. Standardized Mini Mental Test was used in sample selection. Patients were listed through their mini mental test scores, and randomized as odd numbers to control group and even numbers to intervention group. Data were collected with forms developed by researcher 'Data Sheet' and 'Activities of Daily Living Follow-up Form' as well as scales 'Standardized Mini Mental Test' and 'Geriatric Depression Scale'. Chi-square, Mann Whitney-U test, variance analyses in repeated measures and Bonferroni tests were used for analysis. The increase in mean Standardized Mini Mental Test score and the decrease in mean Geriatric Depression Scale score of the individuals in the intervention group compared to the control group at the end of the reminiscence therapy was statistically significant (P < 0.05). At the end of reminiscence therapy sessions, increase in cognition and decrease in depression were found statistically significant in intervention group.

  13. [Practical experience on improving activities of daily living competence in Parkinson's patients treated with ropinirole. Results of a applied study].

    PubMed

    Reichmann, H; Angersbach, D; Buchwald, B

    2005-10-01

    Ropinirole is a non-ergot-selective D2 dopamine agonist. Its efficacy, tolerability, and safety have been extensively proven in controlled, double-blind trials. The present prospective, multicentre, postmarketing surveillance study tested whether the results of controlled clinical trials are also valid in routine clinical practice. For evaluation, international rating scales for tremor and activities of daily living were applied in a slightly modified manner. In 172 German centres, 453 parkinsonian patients (272 men, 174 women, average age 67 years) in advanced stages of the disease were treated with ropinirole alone or in combination with L-dopa. Activities of daily living and tremor significantly improved. This is the first prospective study which demonstrates beneficial effects of ropinirole on PD tremor. The dosage of L-dopa could be reduced in 31% of the patients. Side effects were reported in only 7.6%. The results of this postmarketing study corroborate the good clinical efficacy of ropinirole together with high safety under routine clinical conditions.

  14. A 3-year follow-up of stroke patients: relationships between activities of daily living and personality characteristics.

    PubMed

    Elmståhl, S; Sommer, M; Hagberg, B

    1996-01-01

    The importance of some personality characteristics for improvement of activities of daily life (ADL) was studied in sixty-six stroke patients, initially admitted to geriatric rehabilitation (n=37) or the department of medicine (n=29), 3 years after stroke. Outcome measurements were activities of daily life and motor and mental functions assessed using the Activity Index (AI) by Hamrin and Wohlin (1982). Neuroticism and extroversion were measured with the Eysenck Personality Inventory Scale. Preferred coping strategies were assessed from interviews on how the patients handle difficult events. Major improvements of ADL and motor functions were seen the first year after stroke. There was no major differences between patients admitted, either to geriatric rehabilitation or traditional medical wards regarding the outcome measurements except for better eating ability in the former group 3 years later. Subjects living alone showed deteriorated ADL functions after 3 years. Extrovert personality and active coping strategy predicted improved ADL functions. Multiple regression analyses with AI as the dependent variable proved active coping to predict functional outcome. In conclusion; increased knowledge about personality characteristics can improve possibilities for a more individual rehabilitation program.

  15. Activities of Daily Living Curriculum for Handicapped Adults. Materials Development Center Reprint #20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ. - Stout, Menomonie. Dept. of Rehabilitation and Manpower Services. Materials Development Center.

    Designed for use in group and shelter homes, this curriculum is intended to impart the necessary skills for independent living. It should also better prepare mentally and physically handicapped individuals with the training required to handle the responsibilities accompanying competitive employment. These fourteen courses are included: money…

  16. Level of asthma control and its impact on activities of daily living in asthma patients in Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Gazzotti, Mariana Rodrigues; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; Montealegre, Federico; Fish, James; Jardim, José Roberto

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of asthma on activities of daily living and on health status in patients with controlled, partially controlled, or uncontrolled asthma in Brazil. METHODS: We used data related to 400 patients in four Brazilian cities (São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Salvador, and Curitiba), obtained in a survey conducted throughout Latin America in 2011. All study subjects were > 12 years of age and completed a standardized questionnaire in face-to-face interviews. The questions addressed asthma control, hospitalizations, emergency room visits, and school/work absenteeism, as well as the impact of asthma on the quality of life, sleep, and leisure. The level of asthma control was determined in accordance with the Global Initiative for Asthma criteria. RESULTS: Among the 400 respondents, asthma was controlled in 37 (9.3%), partially controlled in 226 (56.5%), and uncontrolled in 137 (34.2%). The numbers of patients with uncontrolled or partially controlled asthma who visited the emergency room, who were hospitalized, and who missed school/work were higher than were those of patients with controlled asthma (p = 0.001, p = 0.05, and p = 0.01, respectively). Among those with uncontrolled asthma, the impact of the disease on activities of daily living, sleep, social activities, and normal physical exertion was greater than it was among those with controlled or partially controlled asthma (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In Brazil, asthma treatment should be monitored more closely in order to increase treatment adherence and, consequently, the level of asthma control, which can improve patient quality of life and minimize the negative impact of the disease. PMID:24310625

  17. Oral temperatures of the elderly in nursing homes in summer and winter in relation to activities of daily living

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Motohashi, Yutaka; Maeda, Akira

    This study was conducted to clarify the seasonal difference in body temperature in summer and winter, and to document the thermal environment of the elderly living in nursing homes. The subjects were 57 healthy elderly people aged >=63 years living in two nursing homes in Japan. One of the homes was characterized by subjects with low levels of activities of daily living (ADL). Oral temperatures were measured in the morning and afternoon, with simultaneous recording of ambient temperature and relative humidity. Oral temperatures in summer were higher than in winter, with statistically significant differences (P<0.05) of 0.25 (SD 0.61) °C in the morning and 0.24 (SD 0.50) °C in the afternoon. Differences between oral temperatures in summer and winter tended to be greater in subjects with low ADL scores, even when their room temperature was well-controlled. In conclusion, the oral temperatures of the elderly are lower in winter than summer, particularly in physically inactive people. It appears that those with low levels of ADL are more vulnerable to large changes in ambient temperature.

  18. Profile of subjective complaints and activities of daily living among current patients with Minamata disease after 3 decades

    SciTech Connect

    Kinjo, Yoshihide; Nakano, Atsuhiro; Sakamoto, Mineshi ); Higashi, Hirofumi ); Sakai, Ryoji )

    1993-11-01

    We surveyed 1144 current patients with Minamata disease (MD) aged 40 or over in the Minamata area and the same number of neighbor controls matched with age and sex by questionnarie interview with regard to subjective complaints and activities of daily living (ADL). From analysis of subjective complaints, it was found that MD patients had significantly higher rates of all complaints than controls (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that subjective complaints in controls were clearly separated into the following two categories: sensor disturbances and movement nerve disturbances, but all complaints in MD patients formed one cluster. Such variation seemed to be due to methylmercury exposure to the central nervous system. ADL analysis revealed that the difference in the ADL disability between MD patients and controls significantly increased with age (P < 0.05) and that ADL disability in MD patients was aggravated by aging. 25 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Techniques for Daily Living: Curriculum Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooldridge, Lillian; And Others

    Presented are specific guides concerning techniques for daily living which were developed by the child care staff at the Illinois Braille and Sight Saving School. The guides are designed for cottage parents of the children, who may have both visual and other handicaps, and show what daily living skills are necessary and appropriate for the…

  20. Specific cognitive functions and depressive symptoms as predictors of activities of daily living in older adults with heterogeneous cognitive backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Jonas J.; Diniz, Breno S.; Bicalho, Maria A.; Albuquerque, Maicon Rodrigues; Nicolato, Rodrigo; de Moraes, Edgar N.; Romano-Silva, Marco A.; Malloy-Diniz, Leandro F.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive functioning influences activities of daily living (ADL). However, studies reporting the association between ADL and neuropsychological performance show inconsistent results regarding what specific cognitive domains are related to each specific functional domains. Additionally, whether depressive symptoms are associated with a worse functional performance in older adults is still under explored. We investigated if specific cognitive domains and depressive symptoms would affect different aspects of ADL. Participants were 274 older adults (96 normal aging participants, 85 patients with mild cognitive impairment, and 93 patients probable with mild Alzheimer’s disease dementia) with low formal education (∼4 years). Measures of ADL included three complexity levels: Self-care, Instrumental-Domestic, and Instrumental-Complex. The specific cognitive functions were evaluated through a factorial strategy resulting in four cognitive domains: Executive Functions, Language/Semantic Memory, Episodic Memory, and Visuospatial Abilities. The Geriatric Depression Scale measured depressive symptoms. Multiple linear regression analysis showed executive functions and episodic memory as significant predictors of Instrumental-Domestic ADL, and executive functions, episodic memory and language/semantic memory as predictors of Instrumental-Complex ADL (22 and 28% of explained variance, respectively). Ordinal regression analysis showed the influence of specific cognitive functions and depressive symptoms on each one of the instrumental ADL. We observed a heterogeneous pattern of association with explained variance ranging from 22 to 38%. Different instrumental ADL had specific cognitive predictors and depressive symptoms were predictive of ADL involving social contact. Our results suggest a specific pattern of influence depending on the specific instrumental daily living activity. PMID:26257644

  1. Specific cognitive functions and depressive symptoms as predictors of activities of daily living in older adults with heterogeneous cognitive backgrounds.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Jonas J; Diniz, Breno S; Bicalho, Maria A; Albuquerque, Maicon Rodrigues; Nicolato, Rodrigo; de Moraes, Edgar N; Romano-Silva, Marco A; Malloy-Diniz, Leandro F

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive functioning influences activities of daily living (ADL). However, studies reporting the association between ADL and neuropsychological performance show inconsistent results regarding what specific cognitive domains are related to each specific functional domains. Additionally, whether depressive symptoms are associated with a worse functional performance in older adults is still under explored. We investigated if specific cognitive domains and depressive symptoms would affect different aspects of ADL. Participants were 274 older adults (96 normal aging participants, 85 patients with mild cognitive impairment, and 93 patients probable with mild Alzheimer's disease dementia) with low formal education (∼4 years). Measures of ADL included three complexity levels: Self-care, Instrumental-Domestic, and Instrumental-Complex. The specific cognitive functions were evaluated through a factorial strategy resulting in four cognitive domains: Executive Functions, Language/Semantic Memory, Episodic Memory, and Visuospatial Abilities. The Geriatric Depression Scale measured depressive symptoms. Multiple linear regression analysis showed executive functions and episodic memory as significant predictors of Instrumental-Domestic ADL, and executive functions, episodic memory and language/semantic memory as predictors of Instrumental-Complex ADL (22 and 28% of explained variance, respectively). Ordinal regression analysis showed the influence of specific cognitive functions and depressive symptoms on each one of the instrumental ADL. We observed a heterogeneous pattern of association with explained variance ranging from 22 to 38%. Different instrumental ADL had specific cognitive predictors and depressive symptoms were predictive of ADL involving social contact. Our results suggest a specific pattern of influence depending on the specific instrumental daily living activity.

  2. A Web-Based Non-Intrusive Ambient System to Measure and Classify Activities of Daily Living

    PubMed Central

    Urwyler, Prabitha; Rampa, Luca; Müri, René; Mosimann, Urs P

    2014-01-01

    Background The number of older adults in the global population is increasing. This demographic shift leads to an increasing prevalence of age-associated disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia. With the progression of the disease, the risk for institutional care increases, which contrasts with the desire of most patients to stay in their home environment. Despite doctors’ and caregivers’ awareness of the patient’s cognitive status, they are often uncertain about its consequences on activities of daily living (ADL). To provide effective care, they need to know how patients cope with ADL, in particular, the estimation of risks associated with the cognitive decline. The occurrence, performance, and duration of different ADL are important indicators of functional ability. The patient’s ability to cope with these activities is traditionally assessed with questionnaires, which has disadvantages (eg, lack of reliability and sensitivity). Several groups have proposed sensor-based systems to recognize and quantify these activities in the patient’s home. Combined with Web technology, these systems can inform caregivers about their patients in real-time (eg, via smartphone). Objective We hypothesize that a non-intrusive system, which does not use body-mounted sensors, video-based imaging, and microphone recordings would be better suited for use in dementia patients. Since it does not require patient’s attention and compliance, such a system might be well accepted by patients. We present a passive, Web-based, non-intrusive, assistive technology system that recognizes and classifies ADL. Methods The components of this novel assistive technology system were wireless sensors distributed in every room of the participant’s home and a central computer unit (CCU). The environmental data were acquired for 20 days (per participant) and then stored and processed on the CCU. In consultation with medical experts, eight ADL were classified

  3. The effects of hand strength on upper extremity function and activities of daily living in stroke patients, with a focus on right hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, DeokJu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hand strength on upper extremity function and activities of daily living in patients with right hemiplegia, as well as to provide important fundamental data for rehabilitation after stroke. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted from May 1 to December 30, 2013, at the Department of Rehabilitation of P Hospital in Seoul and included subjects hospitalized with a diagnosis of stroke. Patients with right hemiplegia were selected, and their hand strength, upper extremity function, and activities of daily living were evaluated. Hand strength was measured by grip, lateral pinch, and three-point pinch strength. [Results] The effects of hand strength on upper extremity function were evaluated. The results showed that all types of hand strength significantly influenced upper extremity function. However, only grip strength influenced activities of daily living. [Conclusion] In rehabilitation of stroke patients, it is necessary to first improve their general physical condition and basic activities of daily living, and then improve hand movement and hand muscle strength for instrumental activities of daily living training, which requires detailed hand movements. PMID:27799695

  4. SVM-based multimodal classification of activities of daily living in Health Smart Homes: sensors, algorithms, and first experimental results.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Anthony; Vacher, Michel; Noury, Norbert

    2010-03-01

    By 2050, about one third of the French population will be over 65. Our laboratory's current research focuses on the monitoring of elderly people at home, to detect a loss of autonomy as early as possible. Our aim is to quantify criteria such as the international activities of daily living (ADL) or the French Autonomie Gerontologie Groupes Iso-Ressources (AGGIR) scales, by automatically classifying the different ADL performed by the subject during the day. A Health Smart Home is used for this. Our Health Smart Home includes, in a real flat, infrared presence sensors (location), door contacts (to control the use of some facilities), temperature and hygrometry sensor in the bathroom, and microphones (sound classification and speech recognition). A wearable kinematic sensor also informs postural transitions (using pattern recognition) and walk periods (frequency analysis). This data collected from the various sensors are then used to classify each temporal frame into one of the ADL that was previously acquired (seven activities: hygiene, toilet use, eating, resting, sleeping, communication, and dressing/undressing). This is done using support vector machines. We performed a 1-h experimentation with 13 young and healthy subjects to determine the models of the different activities, and then we tested the classification algorithm (cross validation) with real data.

  5. Activities of Daily Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help make life better for people with Parkinson's General Gift Tribute Gift Moving Day ® Team Hope ... can help make life better for people with Parkinson's General Gift Tribute Gift Moving Day ® Team Hope ...

  6. The Relationship between Older Adults' Risk for a Future Fall and Difficulty Performing Activities of Daily Living.

    PubMed

    Mamikonian-Zarpas, Ani; Laganá, Luciana

    2015-12-01

    Functional status is often defined by cumulative scores across indices of independence in performing basic and instrumental activities of daily living (ADL/IADL), but little is known about the unique relationship of each daily activity item with the fall outcome. The purpose of this retrospective study was to examine the level of relative risk for a future fall associated with difficulty with performing various tasks of normal daily functioning among older adults who had fallen at least once in the past 12 months. The sample was comprised of community-dwelling individuals 70 years and older from the 1984-1990 Longitudinal Study of Aging by Kovar, Fitti, and Chyba (1992). Risk analysis was performed on individual items quantifying 6 ADLs and 7 IADLs, as well as 10 items related to mobility limitations. Within a subsample of 1,675 older adults with a history of at least one fall within the past year, the responses of individuals who reported multiple falls were compared to the responses of participants who had a single fall and reported 1) difficulty with walking and/or balance (FRAIL group, n = 413) vs. 2) no difficulty with walking or dizziness (NDW+ND group, n = 415). The items that had the strongest relationships and highest risk ratios for the FRAIL group (which had the highest probabilities for a future fall) included difficulty with: eating (73%); managing money (70%); biting or chewing food (66%); walking a quarter of a mile (65%); using fingers to grasp (65%); and dressing without help (65%). For the NDW+ND group, the most noteworthy items included difficulty with: bathing or showering (79%); managing money (77%); shopping for personal items (75%); walking up 10 steps without rest (72%); difficulty with walking a quarter of a mile (72%); and stooping/crouching/kneeling (70%). These findings suggest that individual items quantifying specific ADLs and IADLs have substantive relationships with the fall outcome among older adults who have difficulty with walking

  7. Cognitive and Physical Demands of Activities of Daily Living In Older Adults: Validation of Expert Panel Ratings

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Tamara G.; Gleason, Lauren J.; Wong, Bonnie; Habtemariam, Daniel; Jones, Richard N.; Schmitt, Eva M.; de Rooij, Sophia E.; Saczynski, Jane S.; Gross, Alden L.; Bean, Jonathan F.; Brown, Cynthia J.; Fick, Donna M.; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L.; O’Connor, Margaret; Tabloski, Patrica A.; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Inouye, Sharon K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Difficulties with performance of functional activities may result from cognitive and/or physical impairments. To date, there has not been a clear delineation of the physical and cognitive demands of activities of daily living. Objectives To quantify the relative physical and cognitive demands required to complete typical functional activities in older adults. Design Expert panel survey. Setting Web-based platform. Participants Eleven experts from eight academic medical centers and 300 community dwelling elderly adults age 70 and older scheduled for elective non-cardiac surgery from two academic medical centers. Methods Sum scores of expert ratings were calculated and then validated against objective data collected from a prospective longitudinal study. Main Outcome Measurements Correlation between expert ratings and objective neuropsychological tests (memory, language, complex attention) and physical measures (gait speed and grip strength) for performance-based tasks. Results Managing money, self-administering medications, using the telephone, and preparing meals were rated as requiring significantly more cognitive demand, while walking and transferring, moderately strenuous activities, and climbing stairs were assessed as more physically demanding. Largely cognitive activities correlated with objective neuropsychological performance (r=0.13–0.23, p<.05) and largely physical activities correlated with physical performance (r=0.15–0.46, p<.05). Conclusions Quantifying the degree of cognitive and/or physical demand for completing a specific task adds an additional dimension to standard measures of functional assessment. This additional information may significantly influence decisions about rehabilitation, post-acute care needs, treatment plans, and caregiver education. PMID:25661463

  8. Prediction of oxygen uptake dynamics by machine learning analysis of wearable sensors during activities of daily living

    PubMed Central

    Beltrame, T.; Amelard, R.; Wong, A.; Hughson, R. L.

    2017-01-01

    Currently, oxygen uptake () is the most precise means of investigating aerobic fitness and level of physical activity; however, can only be directly measured in supervised conditions. With the advancement of new wearable sensor technologies and data processing approaches, it is possible to accurately infer work rate and predict during activities of daily living (ADL). The main objective of this study was to develop and verify the methods required to predict and investigate the dynamics during ADL. The variables derived from the wearable sensors were used to create a predictor based on a random forest method. The temporal dynamics were assessed by the mean normalized gain amplitude (MNG) obtained from frequency domain analysis. The MNG provides a means to assess aerobic fitness. The predicted during ADL was strongly correlated (r = 0.87, P < 0.001) with the measured and the prediction bias was 0.2 ml·min−1·kg−1. The MNG calculated based on predicted was strongly correlated (r = 0.71, P < 0.001) with MNG calculated based on measured data. This new technology provides an important advance in ambulatory and continuous assessment of aerobic fitness with potential for future applications such as the early detection of deterioration of physical health. PMID:28378815

  9. Effects of therapeutic Tai chi on functional fitness and activities of daily living in patients with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hye-Jung

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the effects of therapeutic Tai chi (TTC) on the functional fitness status and activities of daily living (ADL) of patients with Parkinson disease (PD). The participants were clinically stable PDs in Hoehn and Yahr stage 1-2. These patients were randomly assigned to either the TTC group (n=11) or the control (CON) group (n=9). The TTC exercised at the clinic 2 times a week and performed home-based activity 1 time per week for 12 weeks. All the PDs were evaluated for functional fitness test and ADL screen before and after the 12-week trial. There was a significant Time × group interaction effect on the arm curl (P<0.01), functional reach (P<0.05), and stand on foot with eyes opened (P<0.05) of the functional fitness as compared to the CON. The results of the functional reach test in the CON worsened significantly during the 12-week intervention in comparison with those of the TTC (P<0.01). Also ADL showed significant changed in TCC (P<0.05). Tai chi training showed good effects on the functional fitness in PDs. This study suggests that further research into the based such as Tai chi intervention must be developed PD's quality of life in the future.

  10. Effects of therapeutic Tai chi on functional fitness and activities of daily living in patients with Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hye-Jung

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the effects of therapeutic Tai chi (TTC) on the functional fitness status and activities of daily living (ADL) of patients with Parkinson disease (PD). The participants were clinically stable PDs in Hoehn and Yahr stage 1–2. These patients were randomly assigned to either the TTC group (n=11) or the control (CON) group (n=9). The TTC exercised at the clinic 2 times a week and performed home-based activity 1 time per week for 12 weeks. All the PDs were evaluated for functional fitness test and ADL screen before and after the 12-week trial. There was a significant Time × group interaction effect on the arm curl (P<0.01), functional reach (P<0.05), and stand on foot with eyes opened (P<0.05) of the functional fitness as compared to the CON. The results of the functional reach test in the CON worsened significantly during the 12-week intervention in comparison with those of the TTC (P<0.01). Also ADL showed significant changed in TCC (P<0.05). Tai chi training showed good effects on the functional fitness in PDs. This study suggests that further research into the based such as Tai chi intervention must be developed PD’s quality of life in the future. PMID:27807532

  11. Prediction of oxygen uptake dynamics by machine learning analysis of wearable sensors during activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Beltrame, T; Amelard, R; Wong, A; Hughson, R L

    2017-04-05

    Currently, oxygen uptake () is the most precise means of investigating aerobic fitness and level of physical activity; however, can only be directly measured in supervised conditions. With the advancement of new wearable sensor technologies and data processing approaches, it is possible to accurately infer work rate and predict during activities of daily living (ADL). The main objective of this study was to develop and verify the methods required to predict and investigate the dynamics during ADL. The variables derived from the wearable sensors were used to create a predictor based on a random forest method. The temporal dynamics were assessed by the mean normalized gain amplitude (MNG) obtained from frequency domain analysis. The MNG provides a means to assess aerobic fitness. The predicted during ADL was strongly correlated (r = 0.87, P < 0.001) with the measured and the prediction bias was 0.2 ml·min(-1)·kg(-1). The MNG calculated based on predicted was strongly correlated (r = 0.71, P < 0.001) with MNG calculated based on measured data. This new technology provides an important advance in ambulatory and continuous assessment of aerobic fitness with potential for future applications such as the early detection of deterioration of physical health.

  12. Construct Validity of the Chinese Version of the Activities of Daily Living Rating Scale III in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, En-Chi; Lee, Yen; Lai, Kuan-Yu; Kuo, Chian-Jue; Lee, Shu-Chun; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background The Chinese version of the Activities of Daily Living Rating Scale III (ADLRS-III), which has 10 domains, is commonly used for assessing activities of daily living (ADL) in patients with schizophrenia. However, construct validity (i.e., unidimensionality) for each domain of the ADLRS-III is unknown, limiting the explanations of the test results. Purpose This main purpose of this study was to examine unidimensionality of each domain in the ADLRS-III. We also examined internal consistency and ceiling/floor effects in patients with schizophrenia. Methods From occupational therapy records, we obtained 304 self-report data of the ADLRS-III. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted to examine the 10 one-factor structures. If a domain showed an insufficient model fit, exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was performed to investigate the factor structure and choose one factor representing the original construct. Internal consistency was examined using Cronbach’s alpha (α). Ceiling and floor effects were determined by the percentage of patients with the maximum and minimum scores in each domain, respectively. Results CFA analyses showed that 4 domains (i.e., leisure, picture recognition, literacy ability, communication tools use) had sufficient model fits. These 4 domains had acceptable internal consistency (α = 0.79-0.87) and no ceiling/floor effects, except the leisure domain which had a ceiling effect. The other 6 domains showed insufficient model fits. The EFA results showed that these 6 domains were two-factor structures. Conclusion The results supported unidimensional constructs of the leisure, picture recognition, literacy ability, and communication tool uses domains. The sum scores of these 4 domains can be used to represent their respective domain-specific functions. Regarding the 6 domains with insufficient model fits, we have explained the two factors of each domain and chosen one factor to represent its original construct. Future users may

  13. Effects of visual perceptual intervention on visual-motor integration and activities of daily living performance of children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Cho, MiLim; Kim, DeokJu; Yang, Yeongae

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to find the effects of a visual perceptual intervention on visual-motor integration and activities of daily living performance of children with cerebral palsy as subjects. [Methods] This study was conducted with 56 children who were diagnosed as having cerebral palsy. The visual perceptual intervention was implemented for 8 weeks, 3 times a week, for 30 minutes per session, for a total of 24 sessions. All children were assessed using the VMI and WeeFIM to evaluate visual motor integration and activities of daily living skills, immediately before and after the 8-week intervention. [Results] The VMI and WeeFIM scores of all of the 56 children with CP who participated in the study improved, and the improvements were statistically significant. [Conclusion] Visual perceptual intervention had a positive influence on the visual-motor integration and activities of daily living performance of children with cerebral palsy.

  14. Effects of the Otago exercise program on fall efficacy, activities of daily living and quality of life in elderly stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Youngju; Chang, Moonyoung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the Otago exercise program on fall efficacy, activities of daily living, and quality of life in elderly stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Eight subjects performed the Otago exercise program three times per week, for 8 weeks. The outcome measures were the Fall Efficacy Scale score for fall efficacy, modified Barthel index for activities of daily living, and EQ-5D for quality of life. [Results] In our comparison of the results before and after the intervention, we found that the Otago exercise program improved fall efficacy significantly as well as the score for activities of daily living and quality of life, though not significantly. [Conclusion] We consider that the Otago exercise program is an effective method for improving fall efficacy in elderly stroke patients. PMID:26957755

  15. Long-term outcome and prediction models of activities of daily living in Alzheimer disease with cholinesterase inhibitor treatment.

    PubMed

    Wattmo, Carina; Wallin, Åsa K; Londos, Elisabet; Minthon, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    In untreated patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) the functional ability is gradually lost. What happens to the patients after continuous long-term cholinesterase inhibitor (ChEI) treatment is less investigated. The objective of this study was to describe the longitudinal functional outcome and analyze factors affecting the outcome in ChEI-treated patients. In an open, 3-year, nonrandomized, prospective, multicenter study in a routine clinical setting, 790 patients were treated with either donepezil, rivastigmine, or galantamine. At baseline and every 6 months, they were assessed with several rating scales including Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL), Physical Self-Maintenance Scale (PSMS), and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). A faster functional decline was associated with lower cognitive ability at baseline, older age, and the interaction of higher education and longer time in the study. The patients residing with a spouse or relative showed slower deterioration in IADL score. A higher mean dose of ChEI, regardless of drug agent, was also related to slower instrumental ADL decline. Prediction models for longitudinal functional outcome were provided. AD severity at baseline is a key factor in obtaining reliable clinical prognoses of the long-term ADL ability. The dosage of ChEI treatment could possibly lead to a different functional outcome.

  16. Relationships of Community and Individual Level Social Capital with Activities of Daily Living and Death by Gender

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Haruhiko; Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Michikawa, Takehiro; Takeda-Imai, Fujimi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Takebayashi, Toru; Nishiwaki, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    This study determined whether there is an association between social capital and a composite outcome of decline in Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and death by gender. A prospective 3.5 year cohort study was conducted in a rural town in Japan. The study participants were 984 individuals aged 65 years and older with not impaired on ADL at 2010 baseline survey. Social participation and generalized trust were measured as social capital. The individual level responses were dichotomized and aggregated into the community level (eight areas). Multilevel logistic regression adjusting for covariates revealed that social participation at the individual level was significantly associated with higher odds of composite outcome (OR of “not participate” = 1.97, 95% CI = 1.38–2.81). Regarding generalized trust, only in men, there was an inverse association at the community level (OR of “low” = 0.55, 95% CI = 0.32–0.96), and a positive association at the individual level (OR of “tend to be careful” = 2.22, 95% CI = 1.27–3.90). These results suggest that social capital were associated with a decline in ADL and death and that the association may differ by gender. PMID:27589773

  17. Self-rated health, activities of daily living, and mobility limitations among black and white stroke survivors.

    PubMed

    Boyington, Josephine E A; Howard, Daniel L; Holmes, DaJuanicia N

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To explore racial differences in self-rated health (SRH) and its relationship to activities of daily living (ADLs) and mobility limitations among stroke survivors. Method. Data from 580 Black and White participants of the North Carolina Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (EPESE) were used to assess relationships between SRH, ADLs, and mobility variables. Fisher's exact tests, t tests, and logistic regression with backward selection (p < .20) were used. Results. No racial difference in SRH was found. SRH was significant in predicting ADL status among Whites only (OR = 0.23; CI = 0.08-0.69; p < .01). Participants older than 75 years had a greater likelihood of being in the lowest functioning ADL categories (OR = 2.31; CI = 1.48-3.60; p < .01). Discussion. Though no racial differences in SRH were found, the relationship between SRH, ADLs, and mobility status was moderated by race. SRH was predictive of limitations in Whites only. Observed differences suggest SRH construct may differ by race.

  18. Effects of horse-riding exercise on balance, gait, and activities of daily living in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Nam; Lee, Dong-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effects of horse-riding exercise on balance, gait, and activities of daily living (ADLs) in stroke patients. [Subjects] Among 20 participants with stroke, 10 were randomly assigned to the experimental group, and 10 were randomly assigned to the control group. The experimental group participated in horse-riding exercise for 30 minutes per day, 5 days a week for 6 weeks. Balance was tested with the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Gait was measured using the 10-Meter Walk Test (10MWT). ADLs were tested with the Modified Barthel Index (MBI). Differences between pre- and post-experiment values within the two groups were compared using paired t-tests. Between-group differences were compared using independent t-tests. [Results] The experimental group showed significant improvements in balance, gait, and ADLs following horse-riding exercise. Additionally, the experimental group showed significant differences in balance, gait, and ADLs compared with in the control group. [Conclusion] These results support that horse-riding exercise enhances balance, gait, and ADLs in stroke patients. This study supports the need for further research on horse-riding exercise programs. PMID:25931690

  19. Older Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders with Activities of Daily Living (ADL) limitations: immigration and other factors associated with institutionalization.

    PubMed

    Fuller-Thomson, Esme; Chi, Monica

    2012-09-07

    This study determined the national prevalence and profile of Asian Americans with Activities of Daily Living (ADL) limitations and identified factors associated with institutionalization. Data were obtained from 2006 American Community Survey, which replaced the long-form of the US Census. The data are nationally representative of both institutionalized and community-dwelling older adults. Respondents were Vietnamese (n = 203), Korean (n = 131), Japanese (n = 193), Filipino (n = 309), Asian Indian (n = 169), Chinese (n = 404), Hawaiian/Pacific Islander (n = 54), and non-Hispanic whites (n = 55,040) aged 55 and over who all had ADL limitations. The prevalence of institutionalized among those with ADL limitations varies substantially from 4.7% of Asian Indians to 18.8% of Korean Americans with ADL limitations. Every AAPI group had a lower prevalence of institutionalization than disabled Non-Hispanic whites older adults (23.8%) (p < 0.001). After adjustment for socio-demographic characteristics, Asian Indians, Vietnamese, Japanese, Filipino, and Chinese had significantly lower odds of institutionalization than non-Hispanic whites (OR = 0.29, 0.31, 0.58, 0.51, 0.70, respectively). When the sample was restricted to AAPIs, the odds of institutionalization were higher among those who were older, unmarried, cognitively impaired and those who spoke English at home. This variation suggests that aggregating data across the AAPI groups obscures meaningful differences among these subpopulations and substantial inter-group differences may have important implications in the long-term care setting.

  20. Relationships among body mass index, activities of daily living and zinc nutritional status in disabled elderly patients in nursing facilities.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Kazue; Yamashita, Sachiko; Ando, Chinatsu; Endo, Yoriaki; Taniguchi, Keiko; Kikunaga, Shigeshi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the zinc nutritional status and the factors associated with serum zinc concentration in the elderly patients in two nursing facilities: body mass index (BMI), the level of care, the grade of bedriddenness, and the grade of cognitive function. The estimations of the hematological constituents, physical index, and dietary survey were made based on the examination carried out of the 26 disabled elderly patients (male 6, female 20, mean age 90±6 y). The results obtained from this study can be summarized as follows: 1) The low activities of daily living (ADL) group showed a low level of serum zinc concentration, although the uptake rate of zinc by subjects was shown to be high when compared to the Dietary Reference Intakes 2010. 2) The high ADL group showed a high level of serum zinc concentration. 3) The results of multiple regression analysis among the serum zinc concentration, the determined serum ingredients, and the physical characteristics showed the significant correlation of serum zinc concentration against the BMI, the level of care, height, Alb and iron values. 4) The BMI, the level of care, the grade of bedriddenness, and the grade of cognitive function of the subjects changed according to the zinc nutritional status. These results suggested that the actual requirements of zinc of the subjects were different according to the BMI, the level of care, the grade of bedriddenness, and the grade of cognitive function.

  1. Talk the talk and walk the walk. Evaluation of autonomy in aging and Alzheimer disease by simulating instrumental activities of daily living: the S-IADL

    PubMed Central

    Gounden, Yannick; Lacot, Emilie; Couvillers, Frédérique; Lions, Amandine; Hainselin, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Objective The autonomy of individuals is linked to the achievement of instrumental activities of daily living that require complex behavior. In the elderly, the assessment of autonomy is usually based on questionnaires that have strong subjective constraints. Considering this fact, we tested elderly healthy adults and Alzheimer disease patients using a new measure, the S-IADL (Simulation of Instrumental Activities for Daily Living), to assess the ability to perform effectively activities of daily living. Method The S-IADL shares many items with the well-known IADL questionnaire proposed by Lawton & Brody (1969). However, as opposed to the IADL, the assessment of autonomy is not based on the completion of a questionnaire but requires the realization or simulation of various activities of daily living. Eighty-three participants (69 healthy elderly, and 14 Alzheimer Disease patients) completed the IADL and performed the S-IADL assessment. Results Results revealed that, like the IADL, the S-IADL is able to identify AD patients who are likely to encounter difficulties in performing everyday activities, and no major differences were found between the IADL and the S-IADL. Conclusions We outlined some advantages for prefering, in certain situation, this new tool based on simulation of activities in functional evaluation. Finally, we discuss the main limits of the S-IADL that should be investigated prior to its utilization by clinicians. PMID:27672491

  2. Does the APACHE II score predict performance of activities of daily living in patients discharged from a weaning center?

    PubMed Central

    Rojek-Jarmuła, Anna; Hombach, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Data regarding the functional status of patients after prolonged mechanical ventilation are scarce, and little is known about its clinical predictors. Aim To investigate whether the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score on admission may predict performance in activities of daily living on discharge from a weaning center. Material and methods All consecutive patients admitted between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2013 were enrolled (n = 130). During this period, 15 subjects died, and 115 were successfully discharged (34 women; 81 men). APACHE II was calculated based on the worst values taken during the first 24 hours after admission. On discharge, the Barthel Index (BI) and its extended version, the Early Rehabilitation Barthel Index (ERBI), were assessed. Results Median BI was 20 points (IQR 5; 40), and ERBI was 20 points (–50; 40). There was no correlation between APACHE II and either BI (R = –0.07; p = 0.47) or ERBI (R = –0.07; p = 0.44). APACHE II predicted the need for assistance with bathing (AUROC = 0.833; p < 0.001), grooming (AUROC = 0.823; p < 0.001), toilet use (AUROC = 0.887; p < 0.001), and urination (AUROC = 0.658; p = 0.04). APACHE II had no impact on any ERBI items associated with ventilator weaning, including the need of further mechanical ventilation (AUROC = 0.534; p = 0.65) or tracheostomy (AUROC = 0.544; p = 0.42). Conclusions Although APACHE II cannot predict the overall functional status in patients discharged from a weaning center, it helps identify subjects who will need support with bathing, grooming, and toilet use. The APACHE II score is inadequate to predict performance in activities associated with further respiratory support. PMID:28096834

  3. Effect of virtual reality dance exercise on the balance, activities of daily living, and depressive disorder status of Parkinson’s disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nam-Yong; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Song, Hyun-Seung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] In this study, we examined the effects of virtual reality dance exercise on the balance, activities of daily living and depressive disorder status of Parkinson’s disease patients. [Subjects] Twenty patients were assigned either the experimental group (n = 10) or the control group (n = 10). All participants received 30 minutes of neurodevelopment treatment and 15 minutes of functional electrical stimulation 5 times per week for 6 weeks. The experimental group additionally performed 30 minutes of dance exercise. Balance, activities of daily living, and depressive disorder status were assessed before and after the 6-week treatment period using the Berg balance scale, the Modified Barthel Index, and the Beck Depression Inventory. The paired t-test was used to detect differences before and after treatment, and the independent t-test was used to detect differences between the treatment groups. [Results] The values for balance, activities of daily living, and depressive disorder status significantly differed between before and after treatment in the experimental group, and significantly differed between the experimental group and control group. [Conclusion] Virtual reality dance exercise has a positive effect on balance, activities of daily living, and depressive disorder status of Parkinson’s disease patients. PMID:25642060

  4. Effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on visual perception function and performance capability of activities of daily living in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ko-Un; Kim, Su-Han; An, Tae-Gyu

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on visual perception and performance of activities of daily living in patients with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty subjects were assigned equally to a tDCS plus traditional occupational therapy group (experimental group) and a traditional occupational therapy group (control group). The intervention was implemented five times per week, 30 minutes each, for six weeks. In order to assess visual perception function before and after the intervention, the motor-free visual perception test (MVPT) was conducted, and in order to compare the performance of activities of daily living, the Functional Independence Measure scale was employed. [Results] According to the results, both groups improved in visual perception function and in performance of activities of daily living. Although there was no significant difference between the two groups, the experimental group exhibited higher scores. [Conclusion] In conclusion, the application of tDCS for the rehabilitation of patients with stroke may positively affect their visual perception and ability to perform activities of daily living.

  5. Effect of virtual reality dance exercise on the balance, activities of daily living, and depressive disorder status of Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam-Yong; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Song, Hyun-Seung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] In this study, we examined the effects of virtual reality dance exercise on the balance, activities of daily living and depressive disorder status of Parkinson's disease patients. [Subjects] Twenty patients were assigned either the experimental group (n = 10) or the control group (n = 10). All participants received 30 minutes of neurodevelopment treatment and 15 minutes of functional electrical stimulation 5 times per week for 6 weeks. The experimental group additionally performed 30 minutes of dance exercise. Balance, activities of daily living, and depressive disorder status were assessed before and after the 6-week treatment period using the Berg balance scale, the Modified Barthel Index, and the Beck Depression Inventory. The paired t-test was used to detect differences before and after treatment, and the independent t-test was used to detect differences between the treatment groups. [Results] The values for balance, activities of daily living, and depressive disorder status significantly differed between before and after treatment in the experimental group, and significantly differed between the experimental group and control group. [Conclusion] Virtual reality dance exercise has a positive effect on balance, activities of daily living, and depressive disorder status of Parkinson's disease patients.

  6. Effect of Cognitive Rehabilitation on Improving Cognitive Function and Activities of Daily Living among Elderly Patients with Stroke at Assiut University Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abd-Elaziz, Saieda Abd-Elhameed; Khedr, Eman M.; Ahmed, Hanaa Abd Elhakiem; Ibrahim, Hoda Diab Fahmy

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is a frequent consequence of stroke. The study aimed to measure the effect of cognitive rehabilitation of elderly patients with stroke on their cognitive function and activities of daily living. Quasi experimental research design were used in this study. This study was conducted at neuropsychiatric, physical medicine and…

  7. Effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on visual perception function and performance capability of activities of daily living in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ko-Un; Kim, Soo-Han; An, Tae-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on visual perception and performance of activities of daily living in patients with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty subjects were assigned equally to a tDCS plus traditional occupational therapy group (experimental group) and a traditional occupational therapy group (control group). The intervention was implemented five times per week, 30 minutes each, for six weeks. In order to assess visual perception function before and after the intervention, the motor-free visual perception test (MVPT) was conducted, and in order to compare the performance of activities of daily living, the Functional Independence Measure scale was employed. [Results] According to the results, both groups improved in visual perception function and in performance of activities of daily living. Although there was no significant difference between the two groups, the experimental group exhibited higher scores. [Conclusion] In conclusion, the application of tDCS for the rehabilitation of patients with stroke may positively affect their visual perception and ability to perform activities of daily living. PMID:27799697

  8. Effects of training using video games on the muscle strength, muscle tone, and activities of daily living of chronic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyuchang

    2013-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of training using video games played on the Xbox Kinect on the muscle strength, muscle tone, and activities of daily living of post-stroke patients. [Subjects] Fourteen stroke patients were recruited. They were randomly allocated into two groups; the experimental group (n=7) and the control group (n=7). [Methods] The experimental group performed training using video games played on the Xbox Kinect together with conventional occupational therapy for 6 weeks (1 hour/day, 3 days/week), and the control group received conventional occupational therapy only for 6 weeks (30 min/day, 3 days/week). Before and after the intervention, the participants were measured for muscle strength, muscle tone, and performance of activities of daily living. [Results] There were significant differences pre- and post-test in muscle strength of the upper extremities, except the wrist, and performance of activities of daily living in the experimental group. There were no significant differences between the two groups at post-test. [Conclusion] The training using video games played on the Xbox Kinect had a positive effect on the motor function and performance of activities of daily living. This study showed that training using video games played on the Xbox Kinect may be an effective intervention for the rehabilitation of stroke patients.

  9. Caregivers' reported functional limitations in activities of daily living among middle-aged adults with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsia, Yi-Chen; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Loh, Ching-Hui; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2013-12-01

    This study was conducted to describe the functioning of Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and to examine socio-economic effects on ADL functioning among adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) aged 45 years and older (N=480) in Taiwan. The Barthel Index (BI) was used to determine a baseline level of ADL functioning in the study participants. There are five categories of functional impairment using the following cut-off values in Taiwan: total dependence (BI score 0-20), severe (BI score 21-60), moderate (BI score 61-90), mild (BI score 91-99), and total independence (BI score 100) (Taiwan Department of Health, 2012). The results revealed that 2.3% of adults with ID were in total dependence, 11.9% were in severe dependence, 27.9% were in moderate dependence, 8.1% had a mild dependence, and 49.8% were totally independent. In the multiple linear regression model of the ADL score, we determined that educational level, comorbid Down's syndrome, and disability level are the variables able to significantly predict ADL score (R(2)=0.190) after controlling for the factors of age, marital status, and other comorbidity conditions. Those ID adults with a lower education level (primary vs. literate, β=4.780, p=0.031; intermediate vs. literate, β=6.642, p=0.030), with comorbid Down's syndrome (β=-7.135, p=0.063), and with a more severe disability condition (severe vs. mild, β=-7.650, p=0.007; profound vs. mild, β=-19.169, p<0.001) had significantly lower ADL scores. The present study highlights the need to support mobility in older adults with ID as much as possible to optimize independence in this group.

  10. Cognitively-Related Basic Activities of Daily Living Impairment Greatly Increases the Risk of Death in Alzheimers Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Fu-Wen; Chan, Wenyaw; Chen, Ping-Jen; Zimmerman, Carissa; Waring, Stephen; Doody, Rachelle

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Some Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients die without ever developing cognitively impaired basic activities of daily living (basic ADL), which may reflect slower disease progression or better compensatory mechanisms. Although impaired basic ADL is related to disease severity, it may exert an independent risk for death. This study examined the association between impaired basic ADL and survival of AD patients, and proposed a multistate approach for modeling the time to death for patients who demonstrate different patterns of progression of AD that do or do not include basic ADL impairment. Methods 1029 patients with probable AD at the Baylor College of Medicine Alzheimer’s Disease and Memory Disorders Center met the criteria for this study. Two complementary definitions were used to define development of basic ADL impairment using the Physical Self-Maintenance Scale score. A weighted Cox regression model, including a time-dependent covariate (development of basic ADL impairment), and a multistate survival model were applied to examine the effect of basic ADL impairment on survival. Results As expected decreased ability to perform basic ADL at baseline, age at initial visit, years of education, and sex were all associated with significantly higher mortality risk. In those unimpaired at baseline, the development of basic ADL impairment was also associated with a much greater risk of death (hazard ratios 1.77–4.06) over and above the risk conferred by loss of MMSE points. A multi-state Cox model, controlling for those other variables quantified the substantive increase in hazard ratios for death conferred by the development of basic ADL impairment by two definitions and can be applied to calculate the short term risk of mortality in individual patients. Conclusions The current study demonstrates that the presence of basic ADL impairment or the development of such impairments are important predictors of death in AD patients, regardless of severity. PMID

  11. Performance-based assessment of activities of daily living (ADL) ability among women with chronic widespread pain.

    PubMed

    Waehrens, Eva Ejlersen; Amris, Kirstine; Fisher, Anne G

    2010-09-01

    Functional ability, including the ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL), is considered a core outcome domain in chronic pain clinical trials and is usually assessed through generic or disease-specific self-report questionnaires. Research, however, indicates that self-report and performance-based assessment of ADL offer distinct but complementary information about ability. The present study, therefore, investigated the applicability of a performance-based measure of ADL ability, the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS), among 50 women with chronic widespread pain. The investigated psychometric properties of the AMPS included discrimination between a sample of healthy women and those with chronic widespread pain, as well as stability when no intervention was provided and sensitivity to change following intervention. Data were obtained based on a repeated measures design performing AMPS evaluations twice pre- and twice post-rehabilitation. Results indicated that the ADL motor ability measures of the participants were significantly lower than those of healthy women of same age, the ADL motor and ADL process ability measures remained stable when no intervention was provided and the ADL motor ability measures were sensitive to change following a 2-week interdisciplinary rehabilitation program. A weak correlation (r(s)=-0.35) was found between self-reported ADL ability as measured by the physical function subscale of the Functional Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and performance-based ADL motor measures, and no correlation (r(s)=-0.02) was found between FIQ ADL measures and ADL process ability, supporting the need for both performance-based and self-reported assessment of ADL.

  12. Shallow Encoding and Forgetting Are Associated with Dependence in Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Among Older Adults Living with HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Pariya L.; Doyle, Katie L.; Scott, J. Cobb; Iudicello, Jennifer E.; Casaletto, Kaitlin B.; Weber, Erica; Moore, David J.; Morgan, Erin E.; Grant, Igor; Woods, Steven Paul; Hampton Atkinson, J.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Allen McCutchan, J.; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Marquie-Beck, Jennifer; Sherman, Melanie; Ellis, Ronald J.; Allen McCutchan, J.; Letendre, Scott; Capparelli, Edmund; Schrier, Rachel; Rosario, Debra; LeBlanc, Shannon; Heaton, Robert K.; Woods, Steven Paul; Cherner, Mariana; Moore, David J.; Morgan, Erin E.; Dawson, Matthew; Jernigan, Terry; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Archibald, Sarah L.; Hesselink, John; Annese, Jacopo; Taylor, Michael J.; Masliah, Eliezer; Achim, Cristian; Everall, Ian; Richman, Douglas; Smith, David M.; Allen McCutchan, J.; Achim, Cristian; Lipton, Stuart; Hampton Atkinson, J.; Gamst, Anthony C.; Cushman, Clint; Abramson, Ian; Vaida, Florin; Deutsch, Reena; Umlauf, Anya

    2014-01-01

    Aging and HIV are both risk factors for memory deficits and declines in real-world functioning. However, we know little about the profile of memory deficits driving instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) declines across the lifespan in HIV. This study examined 145 younger (<50 years) and 119 older (≥50 years) adults with HIV who completed the California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition (CVLT-II), the Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition Logical Memory subtest (WMS-III LM), and a modified Lawton and Brody ADL questionnaire. No memory predictors of IADL dependence emerged in the younger cohort. In the older group, IADL dependence was uniquely associated with worse performance on all primary CVLT-II variables, as well as elevated recency effects. Poorer immediate and delayed recall of the WMS-III LM was also associated with IADL dependence, although recognition was intact. Findings suggest older HIV-infected adults with shallow encoding and forgetting are at risk for IADL dependence. PMID:24695591

  13. Shallow encoding and forgetting are associated with dependence in instrumental activities of daily living among older adults living with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Fazeli, Pariya L; Doyle, Katie L; Scott, J Cobb; Iudicello, Jennifer E; Casaletto, Kaitlin B; Weber, Erica; Moore, David J; Morgan, Erin E; Grant, Igor; Woods, Steven Paul

    2014-05-01

    Aging and HIV are both risk factors for memory deficits and declines in real-world functioning. However, we know little about the profile of memory deficits driving instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) declines across the lifespan in HIV. This study examined 145 younger (<50 years) and 119 older (≥50 years) adults with HIV who completed the California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition (CVLT-II), the Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition Logical Memory subtest (WMS-III LM), and a modified Lawton and Brody ADL questionnaire. No memory predictors of IADL dependence emerged in the younger cohort. In the older group, IADL dependence was uniquely associated with worse performance on all primary CVLT-II variables, as well as elevated recency effects. Poorer immediate and delayed recall of the WMS-III LM was also associated with IADL dependence, although recognition was intact. Findings suggest older HIV-infected adults with shallow encoding and forgetting are at risk for IADL dependence.

  14. Effects of Stroke on Ipsilesional End-Effector Kinematics in a Multi-Step Activity of Daily Living

    PubMed Central

    Gulde, Philipp; Hughes, Charmayne Mary Lee; Hermsdörfer, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Background: Stroke frequently impairs activities of daily living (ADL) and deteriorates the function of the contra- as well as the ipsilesional limbs. In order to analyze alterations of higher motor control unaffected by paresis or sensory loss, the kinematics of ipsilesional upper limb movements in patients with stroke has previously been analyzed during prehensile movements and simple tool use actions. By contrast, motion recording of multi-step ADL is rare and patient-control comparisons for movement kinematics are largely lacking. Especially in clinical research, objective quantification of complex externally valid tasks can improve the assessment of neurological impairments. Methods: In this preliminary study we employed three-dimensional motion recording and applied kinematic analysis in a multi-step ADL (tea-making). The trials were examined with respect to errors and sub-action structure, durations, path lengths (PLs), peak velocities, relative activity (RA) and smoothness. In order to check for specific burdens the sub-actions of the task were extracted and compared. To examine the feasibility of the approach, we determined the behavioral and kinematic metrics of the (ipsilesional) unimanual performance of seven chronic stroke patients (64a ± 11a, 3 with right/4 with left brain damage (LBD), 2 with signs of apraxia, variable severity of paresis) and compared the results with data of 14 neurologically healthy age-matched control participants (70a ± 7a). Results: T-tests revealed that while the quantity and structure of sub-actions of the task were similar. The analysis of end-effector kinematics was able to detect clear group differences in the associated parameters. Specifically, trial duration (TD) was increased (Cohen’s d = 1.77); the RA (Cohen’s d = 1.72) and the parameters of peak velocities (Cohen’s d = 1.49/1.97) were decreased in the patient group. Analysis of the task’s sub-actions repeated measures analysis of variance (rmANOVA) revealed

  15. Intra-individual Neurocognitive Variability Confers Risk of Dependence in Activities of Daily Living among HIV-Seropositive Individuals without HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Erin E.; Woods, Steven Paul; Grant, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Although HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) are the strong predictors of everyday functioning difficulties, approximately half of all functionally impaired individuals are labeled “neurocognitively normal” according to the standard neuropsychological measures, suggesting that novel predictors of functional problems in this prevalent subgroup are needed. The present study hypothesized that increased neurocognitive intra-individual variability as indexed by dispersion would be associated with poor daily functioning among 82 persons with HIV infection who did not meet research criteria for HAND. An intra-individual standard deviation was calculated across the demographically adjusted T-scores of 13 standard neuropsychological tests to represent dispersion, and functional outcomes included self-reported declines in basic and instrumental activities of daily functioning (basic activity of daily living [BADL] and instrumental activity of daily living [IADL], respectively) and medication management. Dispersion was a significant predictor of medication adherence and dependence in both BADL and IADL, even when other known predictors of functional status (i.e., age, affective distress, and indices of disease severity) were included in the models. As a significant and unique predictor of a performance on the range of daily functioning activities, neurocognitive dispersion may be indicative of deficient cognitive control expressed as inefficient regulation of neurocognitive resources in the context of competing functional demands. As such, dispersion may have clinical utility in detecting risk for functional problems among HIV-infected individuals without HAND. PMID:22337933

  16. Intra-individual neurocognitive variability confers risk of dependence in activities of daily living among HIV-seropositive individuals without HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Erin E; Woods, Steven Paul; Grant, Igor

    2012-05-01

    Although HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) are the strong predictors of everyday functioning difficulties, approximately half of all functionally impaired individuals are labeled "neurocognitively normal" according to the standard neuropsychological measures, suggesting that novel predictors of functional problems in this prevalent subgroup are needed. The present study hypothesized that increased neurocognitive intra-individual variability as indexed by dispersion would be associated with poor daily functioning among 82 persons with HIV infection who did not meet research criteria for HAND. An intra-individual standard deviation was calculated across the demographically adjusted T-scores of 13 standard neuropsychological tests to represent dispersion, and functional outcomes included self-reported declines in basic and instrumental activities of daily functioning (basic activity of daily living [BADL] and instrumental activity of daily living [IADL], respectively) and medication management. Dispersion was a significant predictor of medication adherence and dependence in both BADL and IADL, even when other known predictors of functional status (i.e., age, affective distress, and indices of disease severity) were included in the models. As a significant and unique predictor of a performance on the range of daily functioning activities, neurocognitive dispersion may be indicative of deficient cognitive control expressed as inefficient regulation of neurocognitive resources in the context of competing functional demands. As such, dispersion may have clinical utility in detecting risk for functional problems among HIV-infected individuals without HAND.

  17. Products to Aid in Daily Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... for an update to this message. Product List Product/Services Topics Care Services Information and Referral Service (800) 782-4747 alsinfo@alsa-national.org For People with ALS and ... Videos Factsheets Products to Aid in Daily Living Informative Web Links ...

  18. Good Ideas for Teaching Daily Adult Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leigh, Robert K.

    Intended for practicing Adult Basic Education teachers, this handbook provides materials for teaching specific coping skills in the area of daily adult living. Three areas of study are explored: (1) community, which includes organizations, health, nutrition, safety, money management, and media; (2) government and law, which includes citizenship,…

  19. Limitation of activities of daily living accompanying reduced neck mobility after laminoplasty preserving or reattaching the semispinalis cervicis into axis.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Kazunari; Yokoyama, Toru; Ono, Atsushi; Numasawa, Takuya; Wada, Kanichiro; Itabashi, Taito; Toh, Satoshi

    2008-03-01

    Although difficulties with neck mobility often interfere with patients' activities of daily living (ADL) after cervical laminoplasty, there was no detailed study on the relation between the limitations of ADL accompanying postoperative reduced neck mobility and the cervical posterior approach. The aim of this study was to compare retrospectively the frequency of limitations of ADL accompanying neck mobility after laminoplasty preserving the semispinalis cervicis inserted into the C2 spinous process with that after laminoplasty reattaching the muscle to C2. Forty-nine patients after C4-C7 laminoplasty with C3 laminectomy preserving the semispinalis cervicis inserted into C2 (Group A) and 24 patients after C3-C7 laminoplasty reattaching the muscle (Group B) were evaluated. The frequency of postoperative limitations of ADL accompanying each of three neck movements of extension, flexion and rotation were investigated. The postoperative O-C7 angles at extension and flexion was measured on lateral extension and flexion radiographs of the cervical spine, respectively. The postoperative cervical range of motion in rotation was measured in the cranial view using a digital camera. Frequency of limitations of ADL accompanying extension was lower (P = 0.037) in Group A (2%) than in Group B (17%). Frequency of limitations of ADL accompanying flexion was similar in Group A (8%) and Group B (4%). Frequency of limitations of ADL accompanying rotation was lower (P = 0.031) in Group A (12%) than in Group B (33%). Average O-C7 angle at extension was significantly larger (P = 0.002) in Group A (147 degrees ) than in Group B (136 degrees ). Average O-C7 angle at flexion was similar in Group A (93 degrees ) and Group B (91 degrees ). Average range of motion in rotation was significantly larger (P = 0.004) in Group A (110 degrees ) than in Group B (91 degrees ). This retrospective study suggested that the frequency of limitations of ADL accompanying neck extension or rotation was lower

  20. Development of a novel questionnaire evaluating disability in activities of daily living in the upper extremities of patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Kutsuna, Toshiki; Matsunaga, Atsuhiko; Takagi, Yutaka; Motohashi, Sachiko; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Takuya; Ishii, Akira; Takahira, Naonobu; Yoshida, Atsushi; Masuda, Takashi

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a novel questionnaire evaluating disability in the activities of daily living in the upper extremities of hemodialysis (HD) patients (QDUE-HD). We recruited 83 patients (40 males and 43 females) aged 66 ± 8 years, and measured their muscle strength and range of motion in the upper extremities. Moreover, 14 patients performed a six-week exercise training regimen (the exercise group) and were compared with 15 patients not performing such training (the control group). In an initial questionnaire consisting of 37 items, 30 were taken from the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire and the Activities of Daily Living Test, and the remaining seven were selected from activities that HD patients perceived as impossible or extremely difficult to perform. The principal factor analysis focused on 11 items, as 26 showing floor and ceiling effects were excluded. These 11 items were divided into two categories consisting of six items termed "light work" and five termed "holding activities". The scores for light work and holding activities correlated significantly and positively with both muscle strength and range of motion in the upper extremities. These scores increased significantly after the six-week exercise training as compared with those before training in the exercise group. We conclude that the QDUE-HD is clinically useful for evaluating disability in activities of daily living in the upper extremities of HD patients because of its high reliability, validity and responsiveness.

  1. Day By Day in English: An ESL-SEDAC Daily Living Skills Resource Activities Guide. Final Edition and Resource Activities Packet, Final Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Special Education.

    The guide provides daily living experiences built around topics of interest to limited English speaking students in special education programs. Units are organized around eight themes: (1) at school; (2) living at home; (3) community, communication, and travel; (4) clothing and seasons; (5) shopping and food; (6) health, hygiene, and safety; (7)…

  2. Adding delayed recall to the ADAS-cog improves measurement precision in mild Alzheimer's disease: Implications for predicting instrumental activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Deborah A; Balsis, Steve; Benge, Jared F; Doody, Rachelle S

    2015-12-01

    As research increasingly focuses on preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), instruments must be retooled to identify early cognitive markers of AD. A supplemental delayed recall subtest for the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive (ADAS-cog; Mohs, Rosen, & Davis, 1983; Rosen, Mohs, & Davis, 1984) is commonly implemented, but it is not known precisely where along the spectrum of cognitive dysfunction this subtest yields incremental information beyond what is gained from the standard ADAS-cog, or whether it can improve prediction of functional outcomes. An item response theory approach can analyze this in a psychometrically rigorous way. Seven hundred eighty-eight patients with AD or amnestic complaints or impairment completed a battery including the ADAS-cog and 2 activities of daily living measures. The delayed recall subtest slightly improved the ADAS-cog's measurement precision in the mild range of cognitive dysfunction and increased prediction of instrumental activities of daily living for individuals with subjective memory impairment.

  3. Design and performance characterization of a hand orthosis prototype to aid activities of daily living in a post-stroke population.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Benjamin W; Goldfarb, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a hand orthosis prototype intended to assist persons with hand paresis, as a result of stroke, perform activities of daily living. Among its attributes, the orthosis is characterized by a low mass and small profile, while still offering the power assistance of a robotic exoskeleton. Experimental characterization of the orthosis is presented, including its mass, envelope dimensions, motion bandwidth, and joint torque characteristics.

  4. RESPONSIVENESS OF THE ACTIVITIES OF DAILY LIVING SCALE OF THE KNEE OUTCOME SURVEY AND NUMERIC PAIN RATING SCALE IN PATIENTS WITH PATELLOFEMORAL PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Piva, Sara R.; Gil, Alexandra B.; Moore, Charity G.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess internal and external responsiveness of the Activity of Daily Living Scale of the Knee Outcome Survey and Numeric Pain Rating Scale on patients with patellofemoral pain. Design One group pre-post design. Subjects A total of 60 individuals with patellofemoral pain (33 women; mean age 29.9 (standard deviation 9.6) years). Methods The Activity of Daily Living Scale and the Numeric Pain Rating Scale were assessed before and after 8 weeks of physical therapy program. Patients completed a global rating of change scale at the end of therapy. The standardized effect size, Guyatt responsiveness index, and the minimum clinical important difference were calculated. Results Standardized effect size of the Activity of Daily Living Scale was 0.63, Guyatt responsiveness index was 1.4, area under the curve was 0.83 (95% confidence interval: 0.72, 0.94), and the minimum clinical important difference corresponded to an increase of 7.1 percentile points. Standardized effect size of the Numeric Pain Rating Scale was 0.72, Guyatt responsiveness index was 2.2, area under the curve was 0.80 (95% confidence interval: 0.70, 0.92), and the minimum clinical important difference corresponded to a decrease of 1.16 points. Conclusion Information from this study may be helpful to therapists when evaluating the effectiveness of rehabilitation intervention on physical function and pain, and to power future clinical trials on patients with patellofemoral pain. PMID:19229444

  5. Comparison of Muscle Activation while Performing Tasks Similar to Activities of Daily Livings with and without a Cock-up Splint

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hye-Young; Jung, Nam-Hae; Chang, Moon-Young

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated changes in the activation of the main elbow muscle while performing tasks similar to activities of daily living (ADL) with and without a cock-up splint. [Methods] Sixteen participants performed a simulated feeding task and picked up light and heavy cans in the Jebsen-Taylor hand function test. The activation of the biceps brachii, the triceps brachii, and the brachioradialis with and without the cock-up splint was measured using a BTS FreeEMG 300 wireless electromyography system (BTS, Inc., Milan, Italy). [Results] The activation of the biceps brachii and the brachioradialis was significantly higher while performing the simulated feeding task with the cock-up splint than without the splint. While picking up the light and heavy cans, the activation of the brachioradialis was significantly decreased by wearing the cock-up splint. In the heavy cans task, the activation of the triceps brachii was significantly higher with the cock-up splint than without the splint. [Conclusion] This study showed that diverse muscles' activation was increased or decreased when wearing the cock-up splint while performing tasks similar to ADL. The results of this study can be used as an educational resource for therapists teaching patients about splint application and splint compliance in ADL. PMID:24259768

  6. Functional Status Assessment of COPD Based on Ability to Perform Daily Living Activities: A Systematic Review of Paper and Pencil Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Monjazebi, Fateme; Dalvandi, Asghar; Ebadi, Abbas; Khankeh, Hamid Reza; Rahgozar, Mahdi; Richter, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Context: Activity of daily living (ADL) is an important predictor of mortality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Increasing ADL is important in patients with COPD and assessment of ADL is one of the best ways to evaluate the status of COPD patients. Objectives: The objective of this systematic review was to provide an overview of the psychometric properties of paper and pencil instruments measuring ADL in patients with COPD. Data Sources: English papers published from 1980 to 2014 regarding ADL in patients with COPD were searched in Web of Science, MEDLINE, Google Scholar, Cochrane, PubMed, ProQuest, and CINAHL databases using the following keywords: “COPD”, “ADL”, “activities of daily living”, “daily activities”, “instrument”, “questionnaire”, “paper-and-pencil instruments”, and “measure”. Following the Internet search, manual search was also done to find article references. Study Selection: A total of 186 articles were found. Of those, 31 met the inclusion criteria. Full texts of articles meeting the inclusion criteria were studied. Consensus-based standards for the selection of health measurement instruments”(COSMIN) were used to assess the quality of the studies. Data Extraction: Data extraction form based on research aims developed by researchers and psychometric experts, with 17 questions was used. Results: In these articles, 14 pen and paper instruments were identified for examining ADL in patients with COPD; of which, 4 dealt directly with ADL while 9 assessed other criteria i.e. dyspnea as ADL indicator. The majority of instruments only dealt with two main dimensions of ADL: Basic Activities of Daily Living (BADL) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL), and did not consider Advanced Activities of Daily Living (AADL), which is influenced by cultural and motivational factors. Conclusion: Despite several ADL instruments identified, complete psychometric processes have only been done in

  7. Perceptions of participating in high-intensity functional exercise among older people dependent in activities of daily living (ADL).

    PubMed

    Lindelöf, N; Rosendahl, E; Gustafsson, S; Nygaard, J; Gustafson, Y; Nyberg, L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate how older people, dependent in ADL perceive their participation in a high-intensity, functional exercise program compared to the perceptions of those participating in a control activity. Forty-eight older people living in residential care facilities answered a questionnaire about their perceptions of participating in an activity for three months. They were aged 65-98, had a mean score of 24 on Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and 14 on Barthel ADL Index. The participants had been randomized to exercise (n=20) or control activity (n=28). Differences in responses between exercise and control activity were evaluated using logistic and ordinal regression analyses. The results show that a majority of the exercise group perceived positive changes in lower limb strength, balance, and in the ability to move more safely and securely compared to a minority of the control group (p<0.001). Significantly more respondents in the exercise activity answered that they felt less tired due to the activity (p=0.027) and that they prioritized this activity above other activities (p=0.010). More exercise participants reported that meeting for three months was too short, and fewer that it was too long compared to the control group (p=0.038). This study shows that older people living in residential care facilities, dependent in ADL, and with mild or no cognitive impairment had positive perceptions about participating in high-intensity functional exercise. The findings support the use of a high-intensity exercise program in this population of older people.

  8. From Data Acquisition to Data Fusion: A Comprehensive Review and a Roadmap for the Identification of Activities of Daily Living Using Mobile Devices.

    PubMed

    Pires, Ivan Miguel; Garcia, Nuno M; Pombo, Nuno; Flórez-Revuelta, Francisco

    2016-02-02

    This paper focuses on the research on the state of the art for sensor fusion techniques, applied to the sensors embedded in mobile devices, as a means to help identify the mobile device user's daily activities. Sensor data fusion techniques are used to consolidate the data collected from several sensors, increasing the reliability of the algorithms for the identification of the different activities. However, mobile devices have several constraints, e.g., low memory, low battery life and low processing power, and some data fusion techniques are not suited to this scenario. The main purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the state of the art to identify examples of sensor data fusion techniques that can be applied to the sensors available in mobile devices aiming to identify activities of daily living (ADLs).

  9. From Data Acquisition to Data Fusion: A Comprehensive Review and a Roadmap for the Identification of Activities of Daily Living Using Mobile Devices

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Ivan Miguel; Garcia, Nuno M.; Pombo, Nuno; Flórez-Revuelta, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the research on the state of the art for sensor fusion techniques, applied to the sensors embedded in mobile devices, as a means to help identify the mobile device user’s daily activities. Sensor data fusion techniques are used to consolidate the data collected from several sensors, increasing the reliability of the algorithms for the identification of the different activities. However, mobile devices have several constraints, e.g., low memory, low battery life and low processing power, and some data fusion techniques are not suited to this scenario. The main purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the state of the art to identify examples of sensor data fusion techniques that can be applied to the sensors available in mobile devices aiming to identify activities of daily living (ADLs). PMID:26848664

  10. The Impact of Leisure and Social Activities on Activities of Daily Living of Middle-Aged Adults: Evidence from a National Longitudinal Survey in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Monma, Takafumi; Takeda, Fumi; Noguchi, Haruko; Takahashi, Hideto; Tamiya, Nanako

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of leisure and social activities on the ability of middle-aged adults to maintain activities of daily living (ADL), and whether performing these activities alone or with others contributed to the ability to perform ADL. The study used nationally representative longitudinal data of 22,770 adults in Japan, aged 50–59 years, who did not have limitations in performing ADL at the beginning of the 5-year survey period. The study considered six activity categories: two leisure activities (“hobbies or cultural activities” and “exercise or sports”) and four social activities (“community events,” “support for children,” “support for elderly individuals,” and “other social activities”). Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine the relation between participation in these categories at baseline and difficulties in ADL at the 5-year follow-up. The association between the extent of social interaction during these activities (“by oneself,” “with others,” or “both”) and difficulties in ADL was also investigated. The analysis yielded significant negative correlations between “exercise or sports” and difficulties in ADL for both men and women, and between “hobbies or cultural activities” and difficulties in ADL for women. However, these significant relationships occurred only when activities were conducted “with others.” The present findings might help prevent deterioration in middle-aged adults’ performance of ADL in Japan. PMID:27788163

  11. Associations between Resting, Activity, and Daily Metabolic Rate in Free-Living Endotherms: No Universal Rule in Birds and Mammals.

    PubMed

    Portugal, Steven J; Green, Jonathan A; Halsey, Lewis G; Arnold, Walter; Careau, Vincent; Dann, Peter; Frappell, Peter B; Grémillet, David; Handrich, Yves; Martin, Graham R; Ruf, Thomas; Guillemette, Magella M; Butler, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Energy management models provide theories and predictions for how animals manage their energy budgets within their energetic constraints, in terms of their resting metabolic rate (RMR) and daily energy expenditure (DEE). Thus, uncovering what associations exist between DEE and RMR is key to testing these models. Accordingly, there is considerable interest in the relationship between DEE and RMR at both inter- and intraspecific levels. Interpretation of the evidence for particular energy management models is enhanced by also considering the energy spent specifically on costly activities (activity energy expenditure [AEE] = DEE - RMR). However, to date there have been few intraspecific studies investigating such patterns. Our aim was to determine whether there is a generality of intraspecific relationships among RMR, DEE, and AEE using long-term data sets for bird and mammal species. For mammals, we use minimum heart rate (fH), mean fH, and activity fH as qualitative proxies for RMR, DEE, and AEE, respectively. For the birds, we take advantage of calibration equations to convert fH into rate of oxygen consumption in order to provide quantitative proxies for RMR, DEE, and AEE. For all 11 species, the DEE proxy was significantly positively correlated with the RMR proxy. There was also evidence of a significant positive correlation between AEE and RMR in all four mammal species but only in some of the bird species. Our results indicate there is no universal rule for birds and mammals governing the relationships among RMR, AEE, and DEE. Furthermore, they suggest that birds tend to have a different strategy for managing their energy budgets from those of mammals and that there are also differences in strategy between bird species. Future work in laboratory settings or highly controlled field settings can tease out the environmental and physiological processes contributing to variation in energy management strategies exhibited by different species.

  12. Designing and testing lightweight shoulder prostheses with hybrid actuators for movements involved in typical activities of daily living and impact absorption.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Masashi; Kita, Kahori; Yu, Wenwei

    2015-01-01

    Unlike forearm amputees, transhumeral amputees have residual stumps that are too small to provide a sufficient range of operation for their prosthetic parts to perform usual activities of daily living. Furthermore, it is difficult for small residual stumps to provide sufficient impact absorption for safe manipulation in daily living, as intact arms do. Therefore, substitution of upper limb function in transhumeral amputees requires a sufficient range of motion and sufficient viscoelasticity for shoulder prostheses under critical weight and dimension constraints. We propose the use of two different types of actuators, ie, pneumatic elastic actuators (PEAs) and servo motors. PEAs offer high power-to-weight performance and have intrinsic viscoelasticity in comparison with motors or standard industrial pneumatic cylinder actuators. However, the usefulness of PEAs in large working spaces is limited because of their short strokes. Servo motors, in contrast, can be used to achieve large ranges of motion. In this study, the relationship between the force and stroke of PEAs was investigated. The impact absorption of both types of actuators was measured using a single degree-of-freedom prototype to evaluate actuator compliance for safety purposes. Based on the fundamental properties of the actuators identified, a four degree-of-freedom robotic arm is proposed for prosthetic use. The configuration of the actuators and functional parts was designed to achieve a specified range of motion and torque calculated from the results of a simulation of typical movements performed in usual activities of daily living. Our experimental results showed that the requirements for the shoulder prostheses could be satisfied.

  13. Designing and testing lightweight shoulder prostheses with hybrid actuators for movements involved in typical activities of daily living and impact absorption

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Masashi; Kita, Kahori; Yu, Wenwei

    2015-01-01

    Unlike forearm amputees, transhumeral amputees have residual stumps that are too small to provide a sufficient range of operation for their prosthetic parts to perform usual activities of daily living. Furthermore, it is difficult for small residual stumps to provide sufficient impact absorption for safe manipulation in daily living, as intact arms do. Therefore, substitution of upper limb function in transhumeral amputees requires a sufficient range of motion and sufficient viscoelasticity for shoulder prostheses under critical weight and dimension constraints. We propose the use of two different types of actuators, ie, pneumatic elastic actuators (PEAs) and servo motors. PEAs offer high power-to-weight performance and have intrinsic viscoelasticity in comparison with motors or standard industrial pneumatic cylinder actuators. However, the usefulness of PEAs in large working spaces is limited because of their short strokes. Servo motors, in contrast, can be used to achieve large ranges of motion. In this study, the relationship between the force and stroke of PEAs was investigated. The impact absorption of both types of actuators was measured using a single degree-of-freedom prototype to evaluate actuator compliance for safety purposes. Based on the fundamental properties of the actuators identified, a four degree-of-freedom robotic arm is proposed for prosthetic use. The configuration of the actuators and functional parts was designed to achieve a specified range of motion and torque calculated from the results of a simulation of typical movements performed in usual activities of daily living. Our experimental results showed that the requirements for the shoulder prostheses could be satisfied. PMID:26185472

  14. The Classic Measure of Disability in Activities of Daily Living Is Biased by Age but an Expanded IADL/ADL Measure Is Not

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate, by age, the performance of 2 disability measures based on needing help: one using 5 classic activities of daily living (ADL) and another using an expanded set of 14 activities including instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), walking, getting outside, and ADL (IADL/ADL). Methods. Guttman and item response theory (IRT) scaling methods are used with a large (N = 25,470) nationally representative household survey of individuals aged 18 years and older. Results. Guttman scalability of the ADL items increases steadily with age, reaching a high level at ages 75 years and older. That is reflected in an IRT model by age-related differential item functioning (DIF) resulting in age-biased measurement of ADL. Guttman scalability of the IADL/ADL items also increases with age but is lower than the ADL. Although age-related DIF also occurs with IADL/ADL items, DIF is lower in magnitude and balances out without causing age bias. Discussion. An IADL/ADL scale measuring need for help is hierarchical, unidimensional, and unbiased by age. It has greater content validity for measuring need for help in the community and shows greater sensitivity by age than the classic ADL measure. As demand for community services is increasing among adults of all ages, an expanded IADL/ADL measure is more useful than ADL. PMID:20100786

  15. Undermet needs for assistance in personal activities of daily living among community-dwelling oldest old in China from 2005 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Peng, Rong; Wu, Bei; Ling, Li

    2015-02-01

    Based on the 2005 and 2008 Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey, this study examined the prevalence of undermet needs for assistance in personal activities of daily living (ADL) and its associated risk factors among the oldest old aged 80+. Multilevel multinomial logistic modeling was used to analyze the risk factors and changes of undermet needs over time. The results show that the prevalence of slightly undermet needs decreased in urban China from 2005 to 2008. However, the prevalence of undermet needs remained high; 50% or more for both rural and urban residents. Compared to 2005, the likelihood of having slightly undermet needs in 2008 significantly decreased by 28% among rural residents and 22% among urban residents. The common risk factors of undermet needs among rural and urban residents included financial dependence, living alone, having unwilling caregivers, more ADL disabilities, and having poor self-rated health.

  16. Cognitive impairment categorized in community-dwelling older adults with and without dementia using in-home sensors that recognise activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Urwyler, Prabitha; Stucki, Reto; Rampa, Luca; Müri, René; Mosimann, Urs P; Nef, Tobias

    2017-02-08

    Cognitive impairment due to dementia decreases functionality in Activities of Daily Living (ADL). Its assessment is useful to identify care needs, risks and monitor disease progression. This study investigates differences in ADL pattern-performance between dementia patients and healthy controls using unobtrusive sensors. Around 9,600 person-hours of activity data were collected from the home of ten dementia patients and ten healthy controls using a wireless-unobtrusive sensors and analysed to detect ADL. Recognised ADL were visualized using activity maps, the heterogeneity and accuracy to discriminate patients from healthy were analysed. Activity maps of dementia patients reveal unorganised behaviour patterns and heterogeneity differed significantly between the healthy and diseased. The discriminating accuracy increases with observation duration (0.95 for 20 days). Unobtrusive sensors quantify ADL-relevant behaviour, useful to uncover the effect of cognitive impairment, to quantify ADL-relevant changes in the course of dementia and to measure outcomes of anti-dementia treatments.

  17. Cognitive impairment categorized in community-dwelling older adults with and without dementia using in-home sensors that recognise activities of daily living

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urwyler, Prabitha; Stucki, Reto; Rampa, Luca; Müri, René; Mosimann, Urs P.; Nef, Tobias

    2017-02-01

    Cognitive impairment due to dementia decreases functionality in Activities of Daily Living (ADL). Its assessment is useful to identify care needs, risks and monitor disease progression. This study investigates differences in ADL pattern-performance between dementia patients and healthy controls using unobtrusive sensors. Around 9,600 person-hours of activity data were collected from the home of ten dementia patients and ten healthy controls using a wireless-unobtrusive sensors and analysed to detect ADL. Recognised ADL were visualized using activity maps, the heterogeneity and accuracy to discriminate patients from healthy were analysed. Activity maps of dementia patients reveal unorganised behaviour patterns and heterogeneity differed significantly between the healthy and diseased. The discriminating accuracy increases with observation duration (0.95 for 20 days). Unobtrusive sensors quantify ADL-relevant behaviour, useful to uncover the effect of cognitive impairment, to quantify ADL-relevant changes in the course of dementia and to measure outcomes of anti-dementia treatments.

  18. The effects of prism glasses and intensive upper limb exercise on hemineglect, upper limb function, and activities of daily living in stroke patients: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se-Il; Kim, Jin-Kyung; Park, So-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of visual field with prism glasses, and intensive upper limb functional training on reduction of hemineglect and improvement in upper limb function and activities of daily living in three stroke patients with hemineglect. [Subjects] This study included three stroke patients hospitalized in a sanatorium. [Methods] Intervention treatment involving prism glass use for 12 hours and 30 minutes and paretic side upper limb training was conducted 5 days a week for 15 weeks. Three upper limb training tasks (hitting a balloon, passing through a ring, and reading a newspaper) were performed for 10 minutes each session, for a total of 30 minutes. Line by Section, Motor-Free Visual Perception Test-3 (MVPT-3), Manual Function Test (MFT), Box & Block Test (BBT), and Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) were conducted before and after intervention. [Results] Subjects’ hemineglect decreased and upper limb function on the paretic side improved after intervention, which enhanced activities of daily living. [Conclusion] Prism glass use and paretic upper limb functional training effectively ameliorated stroke patients’ hemineglect and improved upper limb function. Future research should focus on prism glasses that provide a wide visual field for use in patients with different conditions. PMID:26834386

  19. A study on the effect of self bedside exercise program on resilience and activities of daily living for patients with hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yang-Chool; Yi, Eun-Surk; Choi, Won-Ho; Lee, Byung-Mun; Cho, Sung-Bo; Kim, Ji-Youn

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design a repeatable universal rehabilitation program in which patients with hemiplegia can participate voluntarily, complementing physical and occupational therapies to increase voluntary exercise practice rate. Also, this study attempted to identify the relationship between psychological resilience due to the implementation of self-bedside exercise and functional recovery of activity of daily living (ADL). 12 patients with hemiplegia voluntarily participated in 8 weeks of self-bedside exercise 5 times a day and more than 5 days a week. Their program implementation, resilience, activities of daily living (MBI), upper limb motor functions (MFT), and balance ability (BBS) were analyzed and compared before and after the program. Compared to before implementing the program, significant increases were found in resilience, MBI, BBS, and MFT in the affected side after the implementation, and the resilience scores showed statistically positive correlation in MBI and MFT. Also, the change in resilience before and after the program implementation showed a statistically positive correlation. Therefore, it can be concluded that the self-bedside exercise developed in this study had a positive effect on voluntary participation in exercise as well as resilience and ADL. However, many studies which complement the psychological aspects of hemiparetic patients with stroke are still needed. PMID:25830141

  20. Ultrasound study of the motion of the residual femur within a trans-femoral socket during daily living activities other than gait.

    PubMed

    Convery, P; Murray, K D

    2001-12-01

    This study analyses the residual femur motion of a single amputee within a transfemoral socket during a series of daily living activities. Two simultaneously transmitting, socket mounted transducers were connected to two ultrasound scanners. Displacement measurements of the ultrasound image of the femur were video recorded and measured on "paused" playback. Abduction/adduction and flexion/extension of the residual femur within the socket at any instant during these activities were estimated, knowing the relative positions of the two transducers and the position of the residual femur on the ultrasound image. Consistent motion patterns of the residual femur within the trans-femoral socket were noted throughout each monitored daily living activity of the single amputee studied. Convery and Murray (2000) reported that during level walking, relative to the socket, the residual femur extends 6 degrees and abducts 9 degrees by mid-stance while flexing 6 degrees and adducting 2 degrees by toe-off. Uphill/downhill, turning to the right and stepping up/down altered this reported pattern of femoral motion by approximately 1 degree. During the standing activity from a seated position the femur initially flexed 4 degrees before moving to 7 degrees extension, while simultaneously adducting 6 degrees. During the sitting activity from a standing position the femur moved from 7 degrees extension and 6 degrees adduction to 3 degrees flexion and 1 degree abduction. The activity of single prosthetic support to double support introduced only minor femoral motion whereas during the activity of prosthetic suspension the femur flexed 8 degrees while simultaneously adducting 9 degrees. Additional studies of more amputees are required to validate the motion patterns presented in this investigation.

  1. Complementarity of the Mini-Nutritional Assessment and Activities of Daily Living for predicting follow-up mortality risk in elderly Taiwanese.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Alan C; Lee, Li-Chin; Wang, Jiun-Yi

    2013-02-28

    Physical functional ability and nutritional status are two major indicators for predicting the risk of mortality in older adults. The present study examined the complementarity of the Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and the Mini-Nutritional Assessment (MNA) for predicting follow-up 4-year all-cause mortality risk in elderly Taiwanese. We analysed data of the 'Survey of Health and Living Status of the Elderly in Taiwan', a population-based longitudinal cohort study which involved 2872 men and women of ≥ 65 years old at baseline (1999). We rated their functional dependency with the ADL scale and nutritional status with the MNA (both the long form, LF and the short form, SF) at baseline, and analysed the complementarity of the two scales in predicting follow-up 4-year all-cause mortality with Cox regression analysis and the net reclassification improvement (NRI) to quantify the improvement. The results showed that both ADL and MNA offered improvement in predicting follow-up mortality risk beyond that predicted by either one alone according to the Akaike information criterion and the NRI. The MNA-SF was nearly as effective as the MNA-LF in improving the predictive ability of the ADL. The present study suggests that the MNA (especially the SF because of its simplicity and time-saving feature) together with the ADL scale might be of value for predicting the mortality risk of frail elderly living in various settings.

  2. In the mood for love or vice versa? Exploring the relations among sexual activity, physical affection, affect, and stress in the daily lives of mid-aged women.

    PubMed

    Burleson, Mary H; Trevathan, Wenda R; Todd, Michael

    2007-06-01

    How do physical affection, sexual activity, mood, and stress influence one another in the daily lives of mid-aged women? Fifty-eight women (M age, 47.6 yrs) recorded physical affection, several different sexual behaviors, stressful events, and mood ratings every morning for 36 weeks. Using multilevel modeling, we determined that physical affection or sexual behavior with a partner on one day significantly predicted lower negative mood and stress and higher positive mood on the following day. The relation did not hold for orgasm without a partner. Additionally, positive mood on one day predicted more physical affection and sexual activity with a partner, but fewer solo orgasms the following day. Negative mood was mostly unrelated to next-day sexual activity or physical affection. Sexual orientation, living with a partner, and duration of relationship moderated some of these effects. Results support a bidirectional causal model in which dyadic sexual interaction and physical affection improve mood and reduce stress, with improved mood and reduced stress in turn increasing the likelihood of future sex and physical affection.

  3. The Effect of Active Support Interactive Training on the Daily Lives of Adults with an Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Totsika, Vasiliki; Toogood, Sandy; Hastings, Richard P.; McCarthy, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Background: Interactive training (IT) is one of the two staff training components of the active support (AS) model. The present study explores how effective IT is when offered to staff divorced in time from the AS workshops, the other training component. We explored the effects of IT on resident activity engagement, challenging behaviours and…

  4. Effectiveness of the back school program for the performance of activities of daily living in users of a basic health unit in Porto Alegre, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, Patrícia Thurow; Vieira, Adriane; Noll, Matias; Candotti, Cláudia Tarragô

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Primary care is considered the gateway to the Brazilian public health system and is responsible for managing the most prevalent problems in the population. In this study, the effects of Back School on pain, functionality, and the performance of activities of daily living (ADL) in users with chronic musculoskeletal pain were evaluated. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-four users (33 females and 11 males) participated in Back School, with five two-hour theoretical and practical meetings held once a week. The assessment instruments used were as follows: (a) a circuit evaluation of posture dynamics recorded on video, (b) an observational instrument of ADL using video, (c) anamnesis, (d) the visual analogue scale, and (e) the Oswestry Disability Index. [Results] The results showed decreased pain intensity, improved functionality, and the recovery of ADL. [Conclusion] The Back School program is an effective health education strategy for users with chronic musculoskeletal pain. PMID:27799699

  5. The effects of a rotator cuff tear on activities of daily living in older adults: A kinematic analysis.

    PubMed

    Vidt, Meghan E; Santago, Anthony C; Marsh, Anthony P; Hegedus, Eric J; Tuohy, Christopher J; Poehling, Gary G; Freehill, Michael T; Miller, Michael E; Saul, Katherine R

    2016-02-29

    Rotator cuff tears (RCT) in older individuals may compound age-associated physiological changes and impact their ability to perform daily functional tasks. Our objective was to quantify thoracohumeral kinematics for functional tasks in 18 older adults (mean age=63.3±2.2), and compare findings from nine with a RCT to nine matched controls. Motion capture was used to record kinematics for 7 tasks (axilla wash, forward reach, functional pull, hair comb, perineal care, upward reach to 90°, upward reach to 105°) spanning the upper limb workspace. Maximum and minimum joint angles and motion excursion for the three thoracohumeral degrees of freedom (elevation plane, elevation, axial rotation) were identified for each task and compared between groups. The RCT group used greater minimum elevation angles for axilla wash and functional pull (p≤0.0124) and a smaller motion excursion for functional pull (p=0.0032) compared to the control group. The RCT group also used a more internally rotated maximum axial rotation angle than controls for functional reach, functional pull, hair comb, and upward reach to 105° (p≤0.0494). The most differences between groups were observed for axial rotation, with the RCT group using greater internal rotation to complete functional tasks, and significant differences between groups were identified for all three thoracohumeral degrees of freedom for functional pull. We conclude that older adults with RCT used more internal rotation to perform functional tasks than controls. The kinematic differences identified in this study may have consequences for progression of shoulder damage and further functional impairment in older adults with RCT.

  6. The comparison of Neoprene palumbo and Genu direxa stable orthosis effects on pain and activity of daily living in patients with patellofemoral syndrome: a randomized blinded clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Mohammad Sadegh; Dehghan, Naser

    2015-01-01

    Background Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is one of the most common disorders of the knee. Conservative approaches, as well as surgery, can decrease pain and the syndrome’s progress effectively. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of neoprene palumbo orthosis (NPO) and Genu direxa stable orthosis (GDSO) on pain and the activities of daily living (ADL). Methods Thirty patients (males, ages 18 to 40) participated in this randomized blinded clinical trial. All of them were diagnosed with patella femoral pain syndrome. The participants were divided randomly into two groups of 15, with one group using neoprene palumbo (intervention group) and the other group using Genu direxa stable orthoses (control group). Using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), pain intensity and activities of daily living (ADL) and joint stiffness were analyzed before treatment and after three weeks of treatment. Data were analyzed using paired samples t-test and independent samples t-test. Results Both orthoses reduced the patients’ pain. Both group showed meaningful improvement in pain reduction and ADL increase after using orthosis in each group. In comparing the variables, no significant differences were found between pain severity and ADL (p = 0.592, p = 0.887). In both groups, the mean of pain severity was different before, during, and after using orthosis (p < 0.05). Conclusion The results of this study indicated that Neoprene palumbo and genudirexa stable orthoses improved the signs of patello femoral pain syndrome, including pain intensity and ADL. PMID:26516437

  7. Quantification of Daily Physical Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Robert; Breit, Greg; Quintana, Jason

    1994-01-01

    The influence of physical activity on the maintenance and adaptation of musculoskeletal tissue is difficult to assess. Cumulative musculoskeletal loading is hard to quantify and the attributes of the daily tissue loading history affecting bone metabolism have not been completely identified. By monitoring the vertical component of the daily ground reaction force (GRFz), we have an indirect measure of cumulative daily lower limb musculoskeletal loading to correlate with bone density and structure. The objective of this research is to develop instrumentation and methods of analysis to quantify activity level in terms of the daily history of ground reaction forces.

  8. Investigating the Efficacy of a Computerized Prompting Device to Assist Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder with Activities of Daily Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bimbrahw, Justin; Boger, Jennifer; Mihailidis, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Learning to perform self-care skills can pose a major challenge for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) as well as the parents and caregivers who support them. The computerized device described in this paper has been used by children with ASD and their carers to autonomously assist with self-care activities. The device uses computer…

  9. Effect of task-oriented training and high-variability practice on gross motor performance and activities of daily living in children with spastic diplegia

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hae-Yeon; Ahn, So-Yoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigates how a task-oriented training and high-variability practice program can affect the gross motor performance and activities of daily living for children with spastic diplegia and provides an effective and reliable clinical database for future improvement of motor performances skills. [Subjects and Methods] This study randomly assigned seven children with spastic diplegia to each intervention group including that of a control group, task-oriented training group, and a high-variability practice group. The control group only received neurodevelopmental treatment for 40 minutes, while the other two intervention groups additionally implemented a task-oriented training and high-variability practice program for 8 weeks (twice a week, 60 min per session). To compare intra and inter-relationships of the three intervention groups, this study measured gross motor performance measure (GMPM) and functional independence measure for children (WeeFIM) before and after 8 weeks of training. [Results] There were statistically significant differences in the amount of change before and after the training among the three intervention groups for the gross motor performance measure and functional independence measure. [Conclusion] Applying high-variability practice in a task-oriented training course may be considered an efficient intervention method to improve motor performance skills that can tune to movement necessary for daily livelihood through motor experience and learning of new skills as well as change of tasks learned in a complex environment or similar situations to high-variability practice. PMID:27821947

  10. Effects of a standard transfer exercise program on transfer quality and activities of daily living for transfer-dependent spinal cord injury patients

    PubMed Central

    You, Ji-Sung; Kim, You Lim; Lee, Suk Min

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of a standard transfer exercise program on the transfer quality and activities of daily living (ADL) in wheelchair-dependent spinal cord injury patients. [Subjects and Methods] We randomly divided 22 patients into 2 groups. During the intervention period, one group received treatment with both conventional physical therapy and a standard sitting pivot transfer exercise program (experimental group, n=12) and the other group was managed solely with conventional physical therapy (control group, n=10). The standard transfer exercise program comprised of an independent and a dependent program. Exercises were conducted 30 minutes daily, 3 times per week, over a period of 6 weeks. All subjects were tested using a transfer assessment instrument (TAI) and spinal cord independence measure (SCIM) before and after the intervention. [Results] Compared to the control group, the intervention group scored higher on both the transfer assessment instrument (TAI Part 1, Part 2, TAI total score) and spinal cord independence measure tests (SCIM mobility room and toilet score; SCIM total score). [Conclusion] In conclusion, the standard transfer exercise program is an effective tool which improves transfer quality and the ability of wheelchair-dependent spinal cord injury patients to carry out their ADLs. PMID:28356635

  11. Passive wireless sensor systems can recognize activites of daily living.

    PubMed

    Urwyler, Prabitha; Stucki, Reto; Muri, Rene; Mosimann, Urs P; Nef, Tobias

    2015-08-01

    The ability to determine what activity of daily living a person performs is of interest in many application domains. It is possible to determine the physical and cognitive capabilities of the elderly by inferring what activities they perform in their houses. Our primary aim was to establish a proof of concept that a wireless sensor system can monitor and record physical activity and these data can be modeled to predict activities of daily living. The secondary aim was to determine the optimal placement of the sensor boxes for detecting activities in a room. A wireless sensor system was set up in a laboratory kitchen. The ten healthy participants were requested to make tea following a defined sequence of tasks. Data were collected from the eight wireless sensor boxes placed in specific places in the test kitchen and analyzed to detect the sequences of tasks performed by the participants. These sequence of tasks were trained and tested using the Markov Model. Data analysis focused on the reliability of the system and the integrity of the collected data. The sequence of tasks were successfully recognized for all subjects and the averaged data pattern of tasks sequences between the subjects had a high correlation. Analysis of the data collected indicates that sensors placed in different locations are capable of recognizing activities, with the movement detection sensor contributing the most to detection of tasks. The central top of the room with no obstruction of view was considered to be the best location to record data for activity detection. Wireless sensor systems show much promise as easily deployable to monitor and recognize activities of daily living.

  12. Anemia and activities of daily living in the Korean urban elderly population: results from the Korean Longitudinal Study on Health and Aging (KLoSHA).

    PubMed

    Bang, Soo-Mee; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Kim, Yu Jung; Lee, Keun-Wook; Lim, Soo; Kim, Jee Hyun; Park, Young Joo; Chin, Ho Jun; Kim, Ki Woong; Jang, Hak-Chul; Lee, Jong Seok

    2013-01-01

    This study was planned to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of anemia and its impact on health-related quality of life and activities of daily living (ADL) in elderly Koreans. Of the 1,118 randomly sampled elderly Koreans aged 65 years or older living in Seongnam, Korea, on Aug. 1, 2005, we estimated the prevalence of anemia from 695 responders. We investigated the risk factors of anemia using a merged sample of this random sample and 270 volunteers enrolled from Seongnam residents aged 85 years or older. We diagnosed anemia according to the World Health Organization criteria. The estimated age- and gender-standardized prevalence of anemia was 8.33 % for the overall random sample (95 % confidence intervals (CI) 6.28-10.39), 10.58 % in men (95 % CI 7.09-14.07), and 6.85 % in women (95 % CI 4.37-9.34). The identified risk factors were age ≥80 years, male, iron deficiency, history of stroke, renal dysfunction, and metabolic syndrome. Anemia was associated with impairment in physical functioning (p = 0.031) and instrumental ADL (p < 0.001). This is the first report about anemia's prevalence in community-dwelling Korean elders, adjusted and standardized according to the city's and nation's population. Timely diagnosis of anemia and correction of its treatable cause may improve QOL and ADL in elderly individuals.

  13. Cognitive impairment categorized in community-dwelling older adults with and without dementia using in-home sensors that recognise activities of daily living

    PubMed Central

    Urwyler, Prabitha; Stucki, Reto; Rampa, Luca; Müri, René; Mosimann, Urs P; Nef, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive impairment due to dementia decreases functionality in Activities of Daily Living (ADL). Its assessment is useful to identify care needs, risks and monitor disease progression. This study investigates differences in ADL pattern-performance between dementia patients and healthy controls using unobtrusive sensors. Around 9,600 person-hours of activity data were collected from the home of ten dementia patients and ten healthy controls using a wireless-unobtrusive sensors and analysed to detect ADL. Recognised ADL were visualized using activity maps, the heterogeneity and accuracy to discriminate patients from healthy were analysed. Activity maps of dementia patients reveal unorganised behaviour patterns and heterogeneity differed significantly between the healthy and diseased. The discriminating accuracy increases with observation duration (0.95 for 20 days). Unobtrusive sensors quantify ADL-relevant behaviour, useful to uncover the effect of cognitive impairment, to quantify ADL-relevant changes in the course of dementia and to measure outcomes of anti-dementia treatments. PMID:28176828

  14. Relationship between level of independence in activities of daily living and estimated cardiovascular capacity in elderly women.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Brito, Letícia Vargas; Maranhao Neto, Geraldo Albuquerque; Moraes, Helena; Emerick, Raphael Fonseca e Silva; Deslandes, Andrea Camaz

    2014-01-01

    Elderly individuals undergo a progressive decline in functional capacity related to increased risk of dependency, loss of autonomy, and frailty. A lower cardiorespiratory fitness level is associated with cardiovascular disease events and mortality from all causes. The Veterans Specific Activity Questionnaire (VSAQ) was developed to facilitate prediction of the exercise capacity in older people with cardiovascular disease. However, few studies have investigated the relationship between the VSAQ and functional capacity in elderly women. This study investigated the relationship between functional capacity and the estimated cardiovascular capacity in elderly women, as assessed by the VSAQ. In this descriptive, observational, cross-sectional study, we evaluated 37 healthy elderly women (aged 70 ± 7 years). The assessment protocols used were the following: Anamnesis, VSAQ and nomogram (age adjusted), Senior Fitness Test (30-s chair stand, to assess lower-body strength; 8-foot up-and-go test, to assess agility-dynamic balance; and 2-min step test, to assess aerobic endurance). The Spearman test showed a significant correlation (p<0.001) between the functional tests and the VSAQ (8-foot up-and-go test rs=-0.715; 2-min step test rs=0.567; 30-s chair stand rs=0.582). Adjustment of the results by age improved the correlation (8-foot up-and-go test rs=-0.760; 2-min step test rs=0.627; 30-s chair stand rs=0.601). The VSAQ seems to be a simple way to estimate functional capacity, particularly in older women.

  15. The Glittre-ADL test reflects functional performance measured by physical activities of daily living in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Karloh, Manuela; Araujo, Cintia L. P.; Gulart, Aline A.; Reis, Cardine M.; Steidle, Leila J. M.; Mayer, Anamaria F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The Glittre-ADL test (TGlittre) is a valid and reliable test for the evaluation of functional capacity and involves multiple physical activities of daily living (PADL), which are known to be troublesome to patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). However, it is still unknown if this test is also able to reflect the functional performance of patients with COPD. Objective To investigate whether the TGlittre reflects the functional performance of COPD patients and whether the necessary time to complete the TGlittre and the PADL varies according to disease severity. Method Thirty-eight patients with COPD (age 65, SD=7 years; forced expiratory volume in the first second 41.3, SD=15.2% predicted) underwent anthropometric and lung function assessments and were submitted to the TGlittre and PADL measurement. Results TGlittre performance correlated significantly (p<0.05) with PADL variables, such as time sitting (r=0.50), walking (r=-0.46), number of steps taken (r=–0.53), walking movement intensity (r=–0.66), walking energy expenditure (r=-0.50), and total energy expenditure (r=–0.33). TGlittre performance was not significantly different in patients among the Global Initiative for COPD (GOLD) spirometric stages, but walking and sitting time were significantly lower and greater, respectively, in severe and very severe patients compared to those with moderate disease (p<0.05). Conclusion The performance on the TGlittre correlates with walking and sitting time and other real life PADL measurements. The severity of the disease is associated with the differences in the level of physical activity in daily life more than in functional capacity. PMID:27437713

  16. The Manchester Respiratory Activities of Daily Living questionnaire for use in COPD patients: translation into Portuguese and cross-cultural adaptation for use in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Junkes-Cunha, Maíra; Mayer, Anamaria Fleig; Reis, Cardine; Yohannes, Abebaw M.; Maurici, Rosemeri

    2016-01-01

    Objective : To translate The Manchester Respiratory Activities of Daily Living (MRADL) questionnaire into Portuguese and to create a version of the MRADL that is cross-culturally adapted for use in Brazil. Methods : The English-language version of the MRADL was translated into Portuguese by two health care researchers who were fluent in English. A consensus version was obtained by other two researchers and a pulmonologist. That version was back-translated into English by another translator who was a native speaker of English and fluent in Portuguese. The cognitive debriefing process consisted in having 10 COPD patients complete the translated questionnaire in order to test its understandability, clarity, and acceptability in the target population. On the basis of the results, the final Portuguese-language version of the MRADL was produced and approved by the committee and one of the authors of the original questionnaire. Results : The author of the MRADL questioned only a few items in the translated version, and some changes were made to the mobility and personal hygiene domains. Cultural differences regarding the domestic activities domain were found, in particular regarding the item "Do you have the ability to do a full clothes wash and hang them out to dry?", due to socioeconomic and climatic issues. The item "Do you take care of your garden?" was questioned by the participants who lived in apartments, being modified to "Do you take care of your garden or plants in your apartment?" Conclusions : The final Portuguese-language version of the MRADL adapted for use in Brazil was found to be easy to understand and easily applied. PMID:26982036

  17. Comparisons of social interaction and activities of daily living between long-term care facility and community-dwelling stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jeong-Ae; Park, Se-Gwan; Roh, Hyo-Lyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to compare the correlation between social interaction and activities of daily living (ADL) between community-dwelling and long-term care facility stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The Subjects were 65 chronic stroke patients (32 facility-residing, 33 community-dwelling). The Evaluation Social Interaction (ESI) tool was used to evaluate social interaction and the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) measure was used to evaluate ADL. [Results] Both social interaction and ADL were higher in community-dwelling than facility-residing stroke patients. There was a correlation between ESI and ADL for both motor and process skills among facility-residing patients, while only ADL process skills and ESI correlated among community-dwelling patients. In a partial correlation analysis using ADL motor and process skills as control variables, only process skills correlated with ESI. [Conclusion] For rehabilitation of stroke patients, an extended treatment process that combines ADL and social activities is likely to be required. Furthermore, treatment programs and institutional systems that can improve social interaction and promote health maintenance for community-dwelling and facility-residing chronic stroke patients are needed throughout the rehabilitation process. PMID:26644659

  18. Comparisons of social interaction and activities of daily living between long-term care facility and community-dwelling stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jeong-Ae; Park, Se-Gwan; Roh, Hyo-Lyun

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to compare the correlation between social interaction and activities of daily living (ADL) between community-dwelling and long-term care facility stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The Subjects were 65 chronic stroke patients (32 facility-residing, 33 community-dwelling). The Evaluation Social Interaction (ESI) tool was used to evaluate social interaction and the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) measure was used to evaluate ADL. [Results] Both social interaction and ADL were higher in community-dwelling than facility-residing stroke patients. There was a correlation between ESI and ADL for both motor and process skills among facility-residing patients, while only ADL process skills and ESI correlated among community-dwelling patients. In a partial correlation analysis using ADL motor and process skills as control variables, only process skills correlated with ESI. [Conclusion] For rehabilitation of stroke patients, an extended treatment process that combines ADL and social activities is likely to be required. Furthermore, treatment programs and institutional systems that can improve social interaction and promote health maintenance for community-dwelling and facility-residing chronic stroke patients are needed throughout the rehabilitation process.

  19. Interventions to reduce dependency in personal activities of daily living in community dwelling adults who use homecare services: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Phillip J; Worthington, Esme J; Parry, Ruth H; Walker, Marion F; Drummond, Avril ER

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To identify interventions that aim to reduce dependency in activities of daily living (ADL) in homecare service users. To determine: content; effectiveness in improving ability to perform ADL; and whether delivery by qualified occupational therapists influences effectiveness. Data sources: The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, PsycINFO, OTseeker, PEDro, Web of Science, CIRRIE, and ASSIA. Review methods: We included: randomised controlled trials, non-randomised controlled trials and controlled before and after studies. Two reviewers independently screened studies for inclusion, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. A narrative synthesis of the findings was conducted. Results: Thirteen studies were included, totalling 4975 participants. Ten (77%) were judged to have risk of bias. Interventions were categorised as those termed ‘re-ablement’ or ‘restorative homecare’ (n=5/13); and those involving separate components which were not described using this terminology (n=8/13). Content of the intervention and level of health professional input varied within and between studies. Effectiveness on ADL: eight studies included an ADL outcome, five favoured the intervention group, only two with statistical significance, both these were controlled before and after studies judged at high risk of bias. ADL outcome was reported using seven different measures. Occupational therapy: there was insufficient evidence to determine whether involvement of qualified occupational therapists influenced effectiveness. Conclusion: There is limited evidence that interventions targeted at personal ADL can reduce homecare service users’ dependency with activities, the content of evaluated interventions varies greatly. PMID:25587088

  20. The Relationship of White Matter Hyperintensities with Depressive Symptoms and Daily Living Activities in Early-Stage Alzheimer’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    BİLGİÇ, Başar; BAYRAM, Ali; HANAĞASI, Haşmet A.; TÜMAÇ, Ayfer; UYSAL, Pınar; ŞENTÜRK, Gülben; ALPSAN, Hale; LOHMANN, Ebba; GÜRVİT, Hakan; EMRE, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) detected on magnetic resonance imaging scans are frequently seen in both Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and depression patients and believed to play an important role in cognition and mood. Depressive symptoms and depression may accompany AD in all stages of the disease. The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship of regional WMHs with depressive symptoms, cognitive status, medial temporal lobe atrophy, and daily living activities in early-stage AD patients. Method Forty-five patients with very mild or mild AD were examined. All subjects underwent MRI and were assessed by the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination-Revised (ACE-R) for the evaluation of depressive symptom severity and cognitive status, respectively. The patients were divided into two groups based on the selected cut-off point in the GDS. CDR sum of the boxes (CDR-sb) scores were calculated as a measure of activities of daily living (ADLs). MRI T2-FLAIR slices were used to rate the white-matter lesions according to the Age-Related White Matter Changes Rating Scale, assessing the WMHs in frontal, parietooccipital, temporal, infratentorial and basal ganglia areas individually. Medial temporal lobe atrophy was assessed with high-resolution T1 images using visual rating scale. Results In the depressive group, frontal WMH scores were found to be higher than in the non-depressive group (p=0.006). ACE-r, CDR-sb and medial temporal lobe atrophy scores did not differ among the groups. CDR-sb scores showed a significant correlation with frontal WMH scores (left frontal WMH r=0.439, p=0.003, right frontal AMH r=0.459, p=0.001). Linear regression models revealed the effect of WMHs on depressive symptoms among the other factors including age, functionality and atrophy in the medial temporal areas. Discussion Our findings underscore the potential role of regional, particularly frontal AMHs in depressive symptoms

  1. Time trends in prevalence of activities of daily living (ADL) disability and survival: comparing two populations (aged 78+ years) living in a rural area in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Sjölund, Britt-Marie; Wimo, Anders; Qiu, Chengxuan; Engström, Maria; von Strauss, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to study time trends in prevalence of disability in ADL and survival among men and women 78 years and older comparing two cohorts. The study was a time trend study based on two population-based community cohorts, the Nordanstig Project (NP), collected 1995-1998 and the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care in Nordanstig (SNAC-N), collected 2001-2003. The participants were people aged 78 years and older from the NP cohort (N=303) and from the SNAC-N cohort (N=406). All were clinically examined by physicians and nurses using standardized protocols. Disability was defined as a need for assistance in one or more ADL activities. The prevalence of disability and survival were compared using logistic and Cox models. The prevalence of ADL disability was stable for men, while women became more disabled in ADL during the time period, OR 2.36 (1.12-4.94). There was no significant difference in survival time between the cohorts in either ADL disabled persons or non-disabled persons. There was a tendency for increased survival for non-disabled persons in SNAC-N compared with NP, although not significant; this was particularly true for women. In general, women survived longer than men did regardless of whether they were ADL disabled or not. The time trends for ADL disability found in the study show that ADL disability had increased in women but not in men. More studies are needed to identify risk factors for ADL disability with a view to preventing it in time.

  2. Ecological Assessment of Autonomy in Instrumental Activities of Daily Living in Dementia Patients by the Means of an Automatic Video Monitoring System

    PubMed Central

    König, Alexandra; Crispim-Junior, Carlos Fernando; Covella, Alvaro Gomez Uria; Bremond, Francois; Derreumaux, Alexandre; Bensadoun, Gregory; David, Renaud; Verhey, Frans; Aalten, Pauline; Robert, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the assessment of autonomy and functional ability involves clinical rating scales. However, scales are often limited in their ability to provide objective and sensitive information. By contrast, information and communication technologies may overcome these limitations by capturing more fully functional as well as cognitive disturbances associated with Alzheimer disease (AD). We investigated the quantitative assessment of autonomy in dementia patients based not only on gait analysis but also on the participant performance on instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) automatically recognized by a video event monitoring system (EMS). Three groups of participants (healthy controls, mild cognitive impairment, and AD patients) had to carry out a standardized scenario consisting of physical tasks (single and dual task) and several IADL such as preparing a pillbox or making a phone call while being recorded. After, video sensor data were processed by an EMS that automatically extracts kinematic parameters of the participants’ gait and recognizes their carried out activities. These parameters were then used for the assessment of the participants’ performance levels, here referred as autonomy. Autonomy assessment was approached as classification task using artificial intelligence methods that takes as input the parameters extracted by the EMS, here referred as behavioral profile. Activities were accurately recognized by the EMS with high precision. The most accurately recognized activities were “prepare medication” with 93% and “using phone” with 89% precision. The diagnostic group classifier obtained a precision of 73.46% when combining the analyses of physical tasks with IADL. In a further analysis, the created autonomy group classifier which obtained a precision of 83.67% when combining physical tasks and IADL. Results suggest that it is possible to quantitatively assess IADL functioning supported by an EMS and that even based on the extracted

  3. Ecological Assessment of Autonomy in Instrumental Activities of Daily Living in Dementia Patients by the Means of an Automatic Video Monitoring System.

    PubMed

    König, Alexandra; Crispim-Junior, Carlos Fernando; Covella, Alvaro Gomez Uria; Bremond, Francois; Derreumaux, Alexandre; Bensadoun, Gregory; David, Renaud; Verhey, Frans; Aalten, Pauline; Robert, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the assessment of autonomy and functional ability involves clinical rating scales. However, scales are often limited in their ability to provide objective and sensitive information. By contrast, information and communication technologies may overcome these limitations by capturing more fully functional as well as cognitive disturbances associated with Alzheimer disease (AD). We investigated the quantitative assessment of autonomy in dementia patients based not only on gait analysis but also on the participant performance on instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) automatically recognized by a video event monitoring system (EMS). Three groups of participants (healthy controls, mild cognitive impairment, and AD patients) had to carry out a standardized scenario consisting of physical tasks (single and dual task) and several IADL such as preparing a pillbox or making a phone call while being recorded. After, video sensor data were processed by an EMS that automatically extracts kinematic parameters of the participants' gait and recognizes their carried out activities. These parameters were then used for the assessment of the participants' performance levels, here referred as autonomy. Autonomy assessment was approached as classification task using artificial intelligence methods that takes as input the parameters extracted by the EMS, here referred as behavioral profile. Activities were accurately recognized by the EMS with high precision. The most accurately recognized activities were "prepare medication" with 93% and "using phone" with 89% precision. The diagnostic group classifier obtained a precision of 73.46% when combining the analyses of physical tasks with IADL. In a further analysis, the created autonomy group classifier which obtained a precision of 83.67% when combining physical tasks and IADL. Results suggest that it is possible to quantitatively assess IADL functioning supported by an EMS and that even based on the extracted data the

  4. Recognition of Daily Activity in Living Space based on Indoor Ambient Atmosphere and Acquiring Localized Information for Improvement of Recognition Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirasawa, Kazuki; Sawada, Shinya; Saitoh, Atsushi

    The system watching over elder's life is very important in a super-aged society Japan. In this paper, we describe a method to recognize resident's daily activities by means of using the information of indoor ambient atmosphere changes. The measuring targets of environmental changes are of gas and smell, temperature, humidity, and brightness. Those changes have much relation with resident's daily activities. The measurement system with 7 sensors (4 gas sensors, a thermistor, humidity sensor, and CdS light sensor) was developed for getting indoor ambient atmosphere changes. Some measurements were done in a one-room type residential space. 21 dimensional activity vectors were composed for each daily activity from acquired data. Those vectors were classified into 9 categories that were main activities by using Self-Organizing Map (SOM) method. From the result, it was found that the recognition of main daily activities based on information on indoor ambient atmosphere changes is possible. Moreover, we also describe the method for getting information of local gas and smell environmental changes. Gas and smell environmental changes are related with daily activities, especially very important action, eating and drinking. And, local information enables the relation of the place and the activity. For such a purpose, a gas sensing module with the operation function that synchronizes with human detection signal was developed and evaluated. From the result, the sensor module had the ability to acquire and to emphasize local gas environment changes caused by the person's activity.

  5. Greater Independence in Activities of Daily Living is Associated with Higher Health-Related Quality of Life Scores in Nursing Home Residents with Dementia.

    PubMed

    Chan, Charice S; Slaughter, Susan E; Jones, C Allyson; Wagg, Adrian S

    2015-06-30

    Health-related quality of life (HRQL) for nursing home residents is important, however, the concept of quality of life is broad, encompasses many domains and is difficult to assess in people with dementia. Basic activities of daily living (ADL) are measured routinely in nursing homes using the Resident Assessment Instrument-Minimum Data Set Version 2.0 (RAI-MDS) and Functional Independence Measure (FIM) instrument. We examined the relationship between HRQL and ADL to assess the future possibility of ADL dependency level serving as a surrogate measure of HRQL in residents with dementia. To assess ADL, measures derived from the RAI-MDS and FIM data were gathered for 111 residents at the beginning of our study and at 6-month follow-up. Higher scores for independence in ADL were correlated with higher scores for a disease-specific HRQL measure, the Quality of Life-Alzheimer's Disease Scale. Preliminary evidence suggests that FIM-assessed ADL is associated with HRQL for these residents. The associations of the dressing and toileting items with HRQL were particularly strong. This finding suggests the importance of ADL function in HRQL. The RAI-MDS ADL scales should be used with caution to evaluate HRQL.

  6. Non-Motor symptoms in Portuguese Parkinson’s Disease patients: correlation and impact on Quality of Life and Activities of Daily Living

    PubMed Central

    Bugalho, Paulo; Lampreia, Tânia; Miguel, Rita; Mendonça, Marcelo D.; Caetano, André; Barbosa, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of non-motor symptoms (NMS) in Parkinson’s Disease (PD) has varied between studies. Their interrelation isn’t totally understood. Also, the relative importance of each symptom, regarding its impact on activities of daily living (ADL) and health related quality of life (HRQL), remains debatable. We assessed all PD patients attending a Portuguese tertiary movement disorders center during one year (n = 134), with ADL, HRQL and other clinical scales approved for identifying the most relevant NMS in PD. All patients had at least one NMS. Sleep/fatigue, affect/cognition, attention/memory were the most frequent complaints, and their prevalence, above 80%, was higher than in most studies. There were significantly correlations between: sleepiness, psychosis and cognition; gastrointestinal, cardiovascular symptoms and pain; depression and apathy; anxiety and insomnia; olfaction, weight and hyperhidrosis. Depression/apathy exerted the strongest influence on HRQL and non-tremor motor dysfunction on ADL. Compared to studies in other countries, we found a higher prevalence of NMS, which could be specific of this population. The interrelation between NMS could be related to degeneration of different brain structures. NMS exert a stronger influence than MS in HRQL, which should be taken in account regarding treatment options. PMID:27573215

  7. Greater Independence in Activities of Daily Living is Associated with Higher Health-Related Quality of Life Scores in Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Charice S.; Slaughter, Susan E.; Jones, C. Allyson; Wagg, Adrian S.

    2015-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQL) for nursing home residents is important, however, the concept of quality of life is broad, encompasses many domains and is difficult to assess in people with dementia. Basic activities of daily living (ADL) are measured routinely in nursing homes using the Resident Assessment Instrument-Minimum Data Set Version 2.0 (RAI-MDS) and Functional Independence Measure (FIM) instrument. We examined the relationship between HRQL and ADL to assess the future possibility of ADL dependency level serving as a surrogate measure of HRQL in residents with dementia. To assess ADL, measures derived from the RAI-MDS and FIM data were gathered for 111 residents at the beginning of our study and at 6-month follow-up. Higher scores for independence in ADL were correlated with higher scores for a disease-specific HRQL measure, the Quality of Life—Alzheimer’s Disease Scale. Preliminary evidence suggests that FIM-assessed ADL is associated with HRQL for these residents. The associations of the dressing and toileting items with HRQL were particularly strong. This finding suggests the importance of ADL function in HRQL. The RAI-MDS ADL scales should be used with caution to evaluate HRQL. PMID:27417776

  8. Relationship between activity of daily living and asteatosis in the lower legs among elderly residents in long-term care institutions: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Gojiro; Kimura, Nao; Takehara, Kimie; Nakamura, Tetsuro; Kawashima, Makoto; Tsunemi, Yuichiro; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-10-01

    This cross-sectional observational study investigated the relationship between the level of activities of daily living (ADL) and asteatosis in the lower legs among elderly residents. We enrolled 173 residents from a long-term care health facility and two special nursing homes for elderly persons in the Tokyo metropolitan area and Oshima Island, Japan. The level of ADL was measured by the Barthel Index. The relationship between the Barthel Index total score and the presence of asteatosis in the lower legs diagnosed by a dermatologist was analysed by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Among the residents, 79·2% had asteatosis in their lower legs. An increase of 1 point in the Barthel Index total score was significantly associated with a decreased probability of lower leg asteatosis after adjusting for age, sex and the type of institution (adjusted odds ratio = 0·982; 95% confidence interval: 0·966-0·998). A higher level of ADL is associated with a lower probability of having asteatosis in the lower legs among residents in long-term care institutions. Nurses should pay specific attention to residents with limited ADL for initiating preventive care for asteatosis.

  9. Improved statistical power of Alzheimer clinical trials by item-response theory: proof of concept by application to the activities of daily living scale.

    PubMed

    Ard, M Colin; Galasko, Douglas R; Edland, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    Discovery of effective treatment for Alzheimer disease (AD) depends upon the availability of outcome measures that exhibit good sensitivity to rates of longitudinal decline on global functional performance. The Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Activities of Daily Living inventory (ADCS-ADL) is a frequently used functional endpoint in clinical trials for AD that assesses patient functional ability on the basis of informant ratings of patient performance on a variety of everyday tasks. Previous research has shown that the items comprising the ADCS-ADL are sensitive to characteristic longitudinal trajectories in AD. However, standard procedures for combining information from individual items into an overall test score may not make full use of the information provided by informant responses. The current study explored an application of item-response theory (IRT) techniques to the calculation of test scores on the ADCS-ADL. Using data from 2 ADCS clinical trials on mild-to-moderate AD patients we found that IRT based scoring increased sensitivity to change in functional ability and improved prospective statistical power of the ADCS-ADL as an outcome measure in clinical trials.

  10. Effects of neurofeedback and computer-assisted cognitive rehabilitation on relative brain wave ratios and activities of daily living of stroke patients: a randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hwi-Young; Kim, Ki-Tae; Jung, Jin-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of neurofeedback (NFB) and computer-assisted cognitive rehabilitation (CACR) on the relative brain wave ratios and activities of daily living (ADL) of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-four participants were randomly allocated to the NFB (n=14), CACR (n=14), or control (CON) (n=16) groups. Two expert therapists provided the NFB, CACR, and CON groups with traditional rehabilitation therapy in 30-minute sessions, 5 times a week, for 6 weeks. NFB training was provided only to the NFB group and CACR training was provided only to the CACR group. The CON group received traditional rehabilitation therapy only. Before and after 6 weeks of intervention, brain wave and ADL evaluations were performed, and the results were analyzed. [Results] The relative ratio of beta waves, only showed a significant increase in the frontal and parietal areas of the NFB group. Significant changes in ADL were shown by all three groups after the intervention. However, there were no significant differences between the NFB and CACR groups and the CON group. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that CACR and NFB are effective at improving cognitive function and ADL of stroke patients. PMID:27512287

  11. Predictors of general discomfort, limitations in activities of daily living and intention of a second donation in unrelated hematopoietic stem cell donation.

    PubMed

    Lee, M H; Jang, J H; Min, H J; Jang, H I; Nah, J H; Lyu, C J; Han, K-S; Won, J H; Lee, Y-H; Chong, S Y; Mun, Y C; Lee, W S; Kim, S J; Kim, I

    2017-02-01

    We performed a retrospective study of 1868 consecutive unrelated donors to predict the risk factors related to general discomfort, limitations in activities of daily living (ADLs) and intention of a second donation in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) donation. General discomfort and limitations in ADLs were assessed by numerical measurement (scores of 0-10) and donor's intention of a second donation by yes or no reply. The post-donation questionnaires were completed within 48 h after HSC collection and at 1 week, 4 weeks, and 4 months thereafter. Predictors of general discomfort included female sex (P<0.0001), bone marrow (BM) collection (P<0.0001) or PBSC collection through a central line (CL; P=0.0349), 2-day collection (P=0.0150) and negative or undetermined intention of a second donation on day 1 (P<0.0001). Predictors of limitations in ADLs included age group of 30-39 years (P=0.0046), female sex (P<0.0001), BM collection (P<0.0001) or PBSC collection through a CL (P<0.0001) and negative or undetermined intention of a second donation on day 1 (P<0.0001). The only predictor of positive intention of a second donation was male sex (P=0.0007). Age, sex and collection method and period should be considered risk factors when unrelated HSC donation is performed.

  12. Task-Oriented Exercise to Reduce Activities of Daily Living Disability in Vulnerable Older Adults: A Feasibility Study of the 3-Step Workout for Life.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chiung-Ju; Jones, Leah Y; Formyduval A, R M; Clark, Daniel O

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this feasibility study was to evaluate the 3-Step Workout for Life program, a 10-week exercise program that included moderate-intensity muscle strength training followed by task-oriented training. Fourteen participants completed the program (mean age = 73 years; SD = 6.83). The Box and Block test (Z = -2.24, p = .03) and the 30-s chair stand test (Z = -2.21, p = .03) indicate improved physical functioning of the upper and lower extremities. More importantly, results of the function component from the Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument (Z = -2.04, p = .04) and motor skills scale from the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (Z = -2.97, p = .003) indicate subjective and objective improvements on performing activities of daily living. Supplementing moderate-intensity muscle strength exercise with task-oriented training components is feasible. Preliminary data support the effectiveness of 3-Step Workout for Life in reducing late-life disability.

  13. The Association between Post-Stroke Depression and the Activities of Daily Living/Gait Balance in Patients with First-Onset Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Geun-Young; Im, Sun; Lee, Soo-Jung

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the association between post-stroke depression (PSD) and clinical outcomes, including activities of daily living (ADL) and gait balance, in patients with first-onset stroke. One hundred and eighty inpatients were recruited and followed-up for a 6-month. The depressive, cognitive, and stroke symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Global Deterioration Scale (GDS), the modified Rankin Scale (MRS), and the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). All patients were assessed at baseline and at the end of the observation (6-month). Among 180 patients, 127 (70.6%) were diagnosed with minimal-to-mild depression (MMD) while 53 (29.4%) were diagnosed with moderate-to-severe depression (MSD). The odd ratio (OR) for poor outcome in the MSD group was approximately 3.7 relative to the MMD group. The proportion of patients with better balance classified by the BBS score at 6-month was significantly higher in the MMD group than in the MSD group (OR=1.375). Our findings demonstrate the potential relationship between PSD and rehabilitation outcomes measured by different rating scales in Korean stroke patients. Our study suggests that clinicians should carefully evaluate depressive symptoms in patients with stroke during routine clinical practice. Adequately-powered and well-controlled further studies are necessary to confirm and fully characterize this relationship. PMID:27909458

  14. Effects of using consumer and expert ratings of an activities of daily living scale on predicting functional outcomes of postacute care.

    PubMed

    Chen, Q; Kane, R L

    2001-04-01

    To test the effects of using preference weights for activities of daily living (ADL) outcome measures derived from different sources, data from a large study of the outcomes of postacute care (PAC study) were analyzed using two different weightings for the ADL measures. Both were developed using the same magnitude estimation technique; one from a panel of long-term care experts (the expert rating system); the other from a group of elderly Medicare beneficiaries (the consumer rating system). Neither group was directly involved in the PAC study. Although ADL scores generated by both rating systems were highly correlated prior to hospitalization and at hospital discharge, the consumer and expert rating systems generated significantly different functional outcomes measured by the change of ADL scores with a few exceptions. Compared to the consumer rating system, the expert rating system generated a greater change in functional outcomes at each of three follow-up time points after hospital discharge. This study suggests that the choice of weights for ADL items is important.

  15. Evaluation of Three State-of-the-Art Classifiers for Recognition of Activities of Daily Living from Smart Home Ambient Data.

    PubMed

    Nef, Tobias; Urwyler, Prabitha; Büchler, Marcel; Tarnanas, Ioannis; Stucki, Reto; Cazzoli, Dario; Müri, René; Mosimann, Urs

    2015-05-21

    Smart homes for the aging population have recently started attracting the attention of the research community. The "health state" of smart homes is comprised of many different levels; starting with the physical health of citizens, it also includes longer-term health norms and outcomes, as well as the arena of positive behavior changes. One of the problems of interest is to monitor the activities of daily living (ADL) of the elderly, aiming at their protection and well-being. For this purpose, we installed passive infrared (PIR) sensors to detect motion in a specific area inside a smart apartment and used them to collect a set of ADL. In a novel approach, we describe a technology that allows the ground truth collected in one smart home to train activity recognition systems for other smart homes. We asked the users to label all instances of all ADL only once and subsequently applied data mining techniques to cluster in-home sensor firings. Each cluster would therefore represent the instances of the same activity. Once the clusters were associated to their corresponding activities, our system was able to recognize future activities. To improve the activity recognition accuracy, our system preprocessed raw sensor data by identifying overlapping activities. To evaluate the recognition performance from a 200-day dataset, we implemented three different active learning classification algorithms and compared their performance: naive Bayesian (NB), support vector machine (SVM) and random forest (RF). Based on our results, the RF classifier recognized activities with an average specificity of 96.53%, a sensitivity of 68.49%, a precision of 74.41% and an F-measure of 71.33%, outperforming both the NB and SVM classifiers. Further clustering markedly improved the results of the RF classifier. An activity recognition system based on PIR sensors in conjunction with a clustering classification approach was able to detect ADL from datasets collected from different homes. Thus, our

  16. Evaluation of Three State-of-the-Art Classifiers for Recognition of Activities of Daily Living from Smart Home Ambient Data

    PubMed Central

    Nef, Tobias; Urwyler, Prabitha; Büchler, Marcel; Tarnanas, Ioannis; Stucki, Reto; Cazzoli, Dario; Müri, René; Mosimann, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Smart homes for the aging population have recently started attracting the attention of the research community. The “health state” of smart homes is comprised of many different levels; starting with the physical health of citizens, it also includes longer-term health norms and outcomes, as well as the arena of positive behavior changes. One of the problems of interest is to monitor the activities of daily living (ADL) of the elderly, aiming at their protection and well-being. For this purpose, we installed passive infrared (PIR) sensors to detect motion in a specific area inside a smart apartment and used them to collect a set of ADL. In a novel approach, we describe a technology that allows the ground truth collected in one smart home to train activity recognition systems for other smart homes. We asked the users to label all instances of all ADL only once and subsequently applied data mining techniques to cluster in-home sensor firings. Each cluster would therefore represent the instances of the same activity. Once the clusters were associated to their corresponding activities, our system was able to recognize future activities. To improve the activity recognition accuracy, our system preprocessed raw sensor data by identifying overlapping activities. To evaluate the recognition performance from a 200-day dataset, we implemented three different active learning classification algorithms and compared their performance: naive Bayesian (NB), support vector machine (SVM) and random forest (RF). Based on our results, the RF classifier recognized activities with an average specificity of 96.53%, a sensitivity of 68.49%, a precision of 74.41% and an F-measure of 71.33%, outperforming both the NB and SVM classifiers. Further clustering markedly improved the results of the RF classifier. An activity recognition system based on PIR sensors in conjunction with a clustering classification approach was able to detect ADL from datasets collected from different homes. Thus

  17. Cardiac, ventilatory, and metabolic adjustments in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients during the performance of Glittre activities of daily living test.

    PubMed

    Tufanin, Andréa; Souza, Gerson Fonseca; Tisi, Guilherme Rocha; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Túlio; Nascimento, Oliver A; Jardim, José R

    2014-11-01

    Functional status and quality of life are measures of the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patient's health status and can demonstrate the impact of the disease on the patient's ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs). The Glittre-ADL test was developed to evaluate the functional status of COPD patients and their ability to perform activities of daily life. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cardiac, respiratory, and metabolic adjustments and reproducibility of the Glittre ADL test performed by COPD patients. Twenty-two mild to severe COPD patients (forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1): 56.6 ± 19.9% predicted; mean age: 66.3 ± 9.18 years old) were enrolled in this study. Metabolic (oxygen uptake (VO2), carbon dioxide production (VCO2), pulmonary ventilation (VE)/VCO2, and VE/VO2), ventilatory (tidal volume, respiratory rate, and VE), and cardiovascular (pulse oxygen saturation, VO2/heart rate (HR), and HR) variables, lower limbs fatigue, and dyspnea (Borg score) after each lap of two Glittre ADL test were analyzed. All metabolic, ventilatory, and cardiac variables increased their values up to the third lap and remained stable (plateau) until the end of the test (five laps; multivariate analysis); there was no difference among the time spent to complete each of the five laps in each test and between tests (total time of second test: 4 minutes and 3 seconds); the second test was 17.8 seconds (6.6%) shorter than the first one (NS). All variables were highly reproducible in the two tests (NS). At the end of the test, patients reached 87.7% of the VO2 max, 81% of VE peak, and 88.5% of the HR peak obtained from an incremental maximal test on a treadmill. The Glittre ADL test is easy for COPD patients to perform and is a highly reproducible test in COPD patients with mild to severe stages of the disease. In addition, our results suggest that it is possible to demonstrate the patient's functional capacity with a single test of

  18. Limitations in Activities of Daily Living in Community-Dwelling People Aged 75 and Over: A Systematic Literature Review of Risk and Protective Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zijlstra, G. A. Rixt; Witte, Nico De; Duppen, Daan; Stuck, Andreas E.; Kempen, Gertrudis I. J. M.; Schols, Jos M. G. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Most older people wish to age in place, for which functional status or being able to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) is an important precondition. However, along with the substantial growth of the (oldest) old, the number of people who develop limitations in ADLs or have functional decline dramatically increases in this part of the population. Therefore, it is important to gain insight into factors that can contribute to developing intervention strategies at older ages. As a first step, this systematic review was conducted to identify risk and protective factors as predictors for developing limitations in ADLs in community-dwelling people aged 75 and over. Methods Four electronic databases (CINAHL (EBSCO), EMBASE, PsycINFO and PubMed) were searched systematically for potentially relevant studies published between January 1998 and March 2016. Results After a careful selection process, 6,910 studies were identified and 25 were included. By far most factors were examined in one study only, and most were considered risk factors. Several factors do not seem to be able to predict the development of limitations in ADLs in people aged 75 years and over, and for some factors ambiguous associations were found. The following risk factors were found in at least two studies: higher age, female gender, diabetes, hypertension, and stroke. A high level of physical activity and being married were protective in multiple studies. Notwithstanding the fact that research in people aged 65 years and over is more extensive, risk and protective factors seem to differ between the ‘younger’ and ‘older’ olds. Conclusion Only a few risk and protective factors in community-dwelling people aged 75 years and over have been analysed in multiple studies. However, the identified factors could serve both detection and prevention purposes, and implications for future research are given as well. PMID:27760234

  19. Trends in activities of daily living disability in a large sample of community-dwelling Chinese older adults in Hong Kong: an age-period-cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ruby; Wong, Moses; Chang, Billy; Lai, Xin; Lum, C M; Auyeung, T W; Lee, Jenny; Tsoi, Kelvin; Lee, Ruby; Woo, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Background To examine the trends in activities of daily living (ADL) disability in older Chinese adults in Hong Kong between 2001 and 2012. Methods Using data from the Elderly Health Centres (EHCs) of the Department of Health comprising a total of 54 808 community-dwelling Chinese adults aged ≥65 years in 1 early cohort (1904–1917) and 10 3-year birth cohorts (1918–1920, 1921–1923, 1924–1926, 1927–1929, 1930–1932, 1933–1935, 1936–1938, 1939–1941, 1942–1944, 1945–1947), we examined trends in ADL disability by using age-period-cohort (APC) models. ADL disability was defined as being unable to perform at least 1 of 7 ADL activities (bathing, dressing, toileting, transferring, feeding, grooming, walking) independently. Cross-classified random-effects logistic regressions were performed for each of the APC trends with adjustment for age, period, cohort, sociodemographic, lifestyle, comorbidity and self-rated health. Results The mean age of the cohort was 70.9±4.7 (range 65–99) years. The prevalence rate of ADL disability was 1.6%. ADL disability increased with age (p<0.001) and the gradient of the increase was steeper in the older age groups. At the same age, women (1.7%) were more likely to report ADL disability than men (1.4%, p=0.001). For both genders, there was an increase in ADL disability between 2003 and 2012; adjustment for age, cohort and other covariates has diminished the trends observed among men. There was no cohort effect in ADL disability. Conclusions ADL disability in older adults has increased over the last decade. Further study is required to identify possible causes behind the disability trends. PMID:27979837

  20. Testing for neglect in right-hemispheric stroke patients using a new assessment battery based upon standardized activities of daily living (ADL).

    PubMed

    Eschenbeck, Philipp; Vossel, Simone; Weiss, Peter H; Saliger, Jochen; Karbe, Hans; Fink, Gereon R

    2010-10-01

    Spatial neglect is most frequently observed after right-hemispheric stroke and is characterized by a failure to report, to respond, or to orient to stimuli presented to the contralesional side. Although many neglect patients show difficulties in accomplishing activities of daily living (ADL), to date the clinical assessment of neglect is based upon neuropsychological paper-and-pencil tests. Thus, essential information about the patient's functional status may be missed out. Accordingly, we aimed at developing a new neglect test battery that incorporates standardized ADL. Six conventional paper-and-pencil neglect tests and eight standardized ADL with newly developed neglect-specific scoring criteria and cut-off scores were administered to 68 right-hemispheric stroke patients. According to the neuropsychological tests 22 patients showed symptoms suggesting neglect, whereas 17 patients showed symptoms suggesting neglect according to the newly developed neglect test based upon ADL. Neglect-specific impairments in the neuropsychological tests were significantly associated with those in the ADL-based tests, although dissociations were observed in seven patients. Neglect severity (as reflected in the percentage of positive subtests) was comparable for both test batteries and both test instruments showed high interrater reliability. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping revealed that the severity of neglect according to the neuropsychological and ADL-based tests was significantly associated with lesions within right fronto-parietal networks. We conclude that the newly developed ADL-based neglect battery provides an economic and ecologically valid tool for the assessment of neglect. The test can be used to assess and quantify neglect in everyday activities, and thus to monitor realistically rehabilitative needs of neglect patients.

  1. Effects of a High-Intensity Functional Exercise Program on Dependence in Activities of Daily Living and Balance in Older Adults with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Toots, Annika; Littbrand, Håkan; Lindelöf, Nina; Wiklund, Robert; Holmberg, Henrik; Nordström, Peter; Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor; Gustafson, Yngve; Rosendahl, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effects of a high-intensity functional exercise program on independence in activities of  daily living (ADLs) and balance in older people with dementia and whether exercise effects differed between dementia types. Design Cluster-randomized controlled trial: Umeå Dementia and Exercise (UMDEX) study. Setting Residential care facilities, Umeå, Sweden. Participants Individuals aged 65 and older with a dementia diagnosis, a Mini-Mental State Examination score of 10 or greater, and dependence in ADLs (N = 186). Intervention Ninety-three participants each were allocated to the high-intensity functional exercise program, comprising lower limb strength and balance exercises, and 93 to a seated control activity. Measurements Blinded assessors measured ADL independence using the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and Barthel Index (BI) and balance using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) at baseline and 4 (directly after intervention completion) and 7 months. Results Linear mixed models showed no between-group effect on ADL independence at 4 (FIM=1.3, 95% confidence interval (CI)=−1.6–4.3; BI=0.6, 95% CI=−0.2–1.4) or 7 (FIM=0.8, 95% CI=−2.2–3.8; BI=0.6, 95% CI=−0.3–1.4) months. A significant between-group effect on balance favoring exercise was observed at 4 months (BBS=4.2, 95% CI=1.8–6.6). In interaction analyses, exercise effects differed significantly between dementia types. Positive between-group exercise effects were found in participants with non-Alzheimer's dementia according to the FIM at 7 months and BI and BBS at 4 and 7 months. Conclusion In older people with mild to moderate dementia living in residential care facilities, a 4-month high-intensity functional exercise program appears to slow decline in ADL independence and improve balance, albeit only in participants with non-Alzheimer's dementia. PMID:26782852

  2. Fatigue as a long-term risk factor for limitations in instrumental activities of daily living and/or mobility performance in older adults after 10 years

    PubMed Central

    Mueller-Schotte, Sigrid; Bleijenberg, Nienke; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Schuurmans, Marieke J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Decline in the performance of instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and mobility may be preceded by symptoms the patient experiences, such as fatigue. The aim of this study is to investigate whether self-reported non-task-specific fatigue is a long-term risk factor for IADL-limitations and/or mobility performance in older adults after 10 years. Methods A prospective study from two previously conducted cross-sectional studies with 10-year follow-up was conducted among 285 males and 249 females aged 40–79 years at baseline. Fatigue was measured by asking “Did you feel tired within the past 4 weeks?” (males) and “Do you feel tired?” (females). Self-reported IADLs were assessed at baseline and follow-up. Mobility was assessed by the 6-minute walk test. Gender-specific associations between fatigue and IADL-limitations and mobility were estimated by multivariable logistic and linear regression models. Results A total of 18.6% of males and 28.1% of females were fatigued. After adjustment, the odds ratio for fatigued versus non-fatigued males affected by IADL-limitations was 3.3 (P=0.023). In females, the association was weaker and not statistically significant, with odds ratio being 1.7 (P=0.154). Fatigued males walked 39.1 m shorter distance than those non-fatigued (P=0.048). For fatigued females, the distance was 17.5 m shorter compared to those non-fatigued (P=0.479). Conclusion Our data suggest that self-reported fatigue may be a long-term risk factor for IADL-limitations and mobility performance in middle-aged and elderly males but possibly not in females. PMID:27877027

  3. Subtle problems in activities of daily living after a transient ischemic attack or an apparently fully recovered non-disabling stroke.

    PubMed

    Verbraak, Marieke E; Hoeksma, Agnes F; Lindeboom, Robert; Kwa, Vincent I H

    2012-02-01

    Little is known about the effects on the performance of activities of daily living (ADL) and quality of life (QoL) of transient ischemic attack (TIA) or a nondisabling stroke (NDS) with a full recovery in 72 hours. The present study evaluated ADL performance and QoL, as well as symptoms of anxiety and depression, in patients at 1 and 6 months after a TIA or an NDS. Consecutive hospitalized TIA/NDS patients not requiring rehabilitation were assessed at 1 and 6 months after discharge from a hospital or emergency department. ADL performance was evaluated using the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS), QoL was assessed with the Short Form 36 (SF-36), and depression and anxiety symptoms were assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). A total of 45 patients completed the follow-up. At 1 month after TIA/NDS, all patients were independent in ADL performance but had AMPS and SF-36 scores below the norm. In addition, 12 patients (27%) had anxiety symptoms, and 9 patients (20%) had symptoms of depression. Although initially considered fully recovered, 23 patients (51%) required rehabilitation after the first follow-up. After 6 months, their AMPS, SF-36, and HADS scores were lower than those of the patients who did not require rehabilitation after the first screening. Half of the patients with a TIA or an NDS who were initially considered fully recovered exhibited ADL limitations, decreased QoL, and symptoms of anxiety or depression after 6 months.

  4. A comparison of respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, activities of daily living and physical fitness in patients with cystic fibrosis and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Arikan, Hulya; Yatar, İlker; Calik-Kutukcu, Ebru; Aribas, Zeynep; Saglam, Melda; Vardar-Yagli, Naciye; Savci, Sema; Inal-Ince, Deniz; Ozcelik, Ugur; Kiper, Nural

    2015-01-01

    There are limited reports that compare muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, activities of daily living (ADL) and parameters of physical fitness of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with healthy peers in the literature. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, ADL and physical fitness in patients with CF and healthy subjects. Nineteen patients with CF (mean forced expiratory volume in one second-FEV1: 86.56±18.36%) and 20 healthy subjects were included in this study. Respiratory (maximal inspiratory pressure-MIP and maximal expiratory pressure-MEP) and peripheral muscle strength (quadriceps, shoulder abductors and hand grip strength) were evaluated. Functional exercise capacity was determined with 6min walk test (6MWT). ADL was assessed with Glittre ADL test and physical fitness was assessed with Munich fitness test (MFT). There were not any statistically significant difference in MIP, %MIP, MEP and %MEP values between two groups (p>0.05). %Peripheral muscle strength (% quadriceps and shoulder abductors strength), 6MWT distance and %6MWT distance were significantly lower in patients with CF than those of healthy subjects (p<0.05). Glittre ADL-test time was significantly longer in patients with CF than healthy subjects (p<0.05). According to Munich fitness test, the number of bouncing a ball, hanging score, distance of standing vertical jumping and standing vertical jumping score were significantly lower in patients with CF than those of healthy subjects (p<0.05). Peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, ADL performance and speed, coordination, endurance and power components of physical fitness are adversely affected in mild-severe patients with CF compared to healthy peers. Evaluations must be done in comprehensive manner in patients with CF with all stages.

  5. Impact of frontal white matter hyperintensity on instrumental activities of daily living in elderly women with Alzheimer disease and amnestic mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ogama, Noriko; Sakurai, Takashi; Nakai, Toshiharu; Niida, Shumpei; Saji, Naoki; Toba, Kenji; Umegaki, Hiroyuki; Kuzuya, Masafumi

    2017-01-01

    Background Instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) start to decline during the progression of amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) to Alzheimer disease (AD). Cognitive and physical decline are involved in the loss of functional independence. However, little is known about AD-related neural change that leads to IADL impairment. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effects of regional white matter hyperintensity (WMH) on IADL impairment in persons with AD and aMCI. Methods The participants were 347 female subjects aged 65–85 years diagnosed with AD (n = 227), aMCI (n = 44) or normal cognition (n = 76). IADL was assessed by the Lawton Index. Cognition, mood and mobility function were evaluated by comprehensive geriatric assessment batteries. WMH and brain atrophy were analyzed with brain magnetic resonance imaging, using an automatic segmentation program. Regional WMH was measured in the frontal, temporal, occipital and parietal lobes. Results Ability to carry out IADL of shopping, food preparation, mode of transportation, responsibility for own medication, and ability to handle finances was obviously impaired in the early stage of AD. Frontal WMH was specifically associated with disability to do shopping and food preparation even after adjusting for several confounders including brain atrophy. Conclusions IADL subcategories were differentially impaired along with cognitive status in persons with AD and aMCI. Frontal WMH was an important predictor of impaired ability to do shopping and food preparation. A preventive strategy for WMH might lead to suppression of IADL disability and slow the progression of AD. PMID:28253275

  6. Resistiveness to Care during Assistance with Activities of Daily Living in Non-institutionalized Persons with Dementia: Associations with Informal Caregivers’ Stress and Well-being

    PubMed Central

    Fauth, Elizabeth Braungart; Femia, Elia E.; Zarit, Steven H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Behavior problems that co-occur during assistance with Activities of Daily Living (Resistiveness to Care; RTC) are considered challenging, but are mostly studied in institutions with implications for patients and formal caregivers. RTC is related to, but independent from agitation, and detection of RTC may be left out of common assessments of persons with dementia in studies of informal caregiving (e.g. global assessments of dementia behavioral symptoms, standard assessments of ADL function). This study examines how RTC (frequency and caregivers’ stress appraisals of RTC) are related to caregivers’ well-being. Method 234 caregivers of people with dementia reported care receivers’ ADL impairment (eating, bathing, dressing), RTC frequency (of eating, bathing dressing), and their stress appraisals of these behaviors (RTC appraisals). Caregivers also self-reported their role overload, role captivity, and depressive symptoms. Hierarchical linear regression models included independent variables (demographics, ADL impairment, RTC frequency, RTC appraisals) with three separate dependent variables (overload, captivity, depressive symptoms). Results Two-thirds of informal caregivers reported RTC. Care recipients’ ADL impairment was associated with caregiver outcomes, but only before RTC was entered into the models. RTC frequency significantly predicted caregivers’ overload, captivity, and depression. RTC appraisals predicted overload and captivity. Conclusion RTC is common in persons with dementia residing at home, and RTC has more negative association with informal caregivers’ well-being than assistance with ADL. Adding RTC frequency and appraisal items to standard ADL measures may better estimate caregiver needs and risk, and identify modifiable environmental features by assessing behavioral symptoms in context. PMID:26066353

  7. A Residential Summer Camp--A Vehicle for Promoting Daily Living Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Sheldon; Hassler, Therese

    1979-01-01

    In an eight-week residential summer camp program for visually impaired children, activities of daily living (ADL) were offered as part of the regular program. Campers consistently indicated that this was a most worthwhile learning experience. (CL)

  8. Investigating the effect of education based on need to prevent falling during activities of daily living among the elderlies referring to health centers of Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Marziyeh; RezaeiDehaghani, Abdollah; Mehrabi, Tayebeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Falling has a great importance among the elderlies. Even if no physical injury occurs, it can cause fear of falling down again and, consequently, reduce older adults’ activities. With regard to the prevalence of falling among older adults, its prevention is essential. Therefore, the present study was aimed to define the effect of need-based education on prevention of older adults’ falling during their everyday life activities. Materials and Methods: This is a quasi-experimental study. Study population comprised all the older adults of age 60 years and over referring to health care centers in Isfahan. Through multiple random sampling, 15 older adults were selected from four health care centers. Data collection tool in the present study was Daily Activity Questionnaire. Results: Results showed a significant difference between the mean of daily activity scores in the intervention group before, immediately after, and 1 month after the intervention (12, 13.6, and 13.5, respectively; P = 0.01). Meanwhile, there was no significant deference between the scores immediately after and 1 month after the intervention. There was no significant difference observed between the three time points in the control group (mean = 12.3; P = 0.907). Conclusion: Implementation of education concerning prevention of older adults’ falling led to improvement of their daily activity in the intervention group. PMID:27563329

  9. Early diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment and mild dementia through basic and instrumental activities of daily living: Development of a new evaluation tool

    PubMed Central

    Gorus, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    Background Assessment of activities of daily living (ADL) is paramount to determine impairment in everyday functioning and to ensure accurate early diagnosis of neurocognitive disorders. Unfortunately, most common ADL tools are limited in their use in a diagnostic process. This study developed a new evaluation by adopting the items of the Katz Index (basic [b-] ADL) and Lawton Scale (instrumental [i-] ADL), defining them with the terminology of the International Classification of Human Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), adding the scoring system of the ICF, and adding the possibility to identify underlying causes of limitations in ADL. Methods and findings The construct validity, interrater reliability, and discriminative validity of this new evaluation were determined. From 2015 until 2016, older persons (65–93 y) with normal cognitive ageing (healthy comparison [HC]) (n = 79), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (n = 73), and Alzheimer disease (AD) (n = 71) underwent a diagnostic procedure for neurocognitive disorders at the geriatric day hospital of the Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (Brussels, Belgium). Additionally, the ICF-based evaluation for b- and i-ADL was carried out. A global disability index (DI), a cognitive DI (CDI), and a physical DI (PDI) were calculated. The i-ADL-CDI showed high accuracy and higher discriminative power than the Lawton Scale in differentiating HC and MCI (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.895, 95% CI .840–.950, p = .002), MCI and AD (AUC = 0.805, 95% CI .805–.734, p = .010), and HC and AD (AUC = 0.990, 95% CI .978–1.000, p < .001). The b-ADL-DI showed significantly better discriminative accuracy than the Katz Index in differentiating HC and AD (AUC = 0.828, 95% CI .759–.897, p = .039). This study was conducted in a clinically relevant sample. However, heterogeneity between HC, MCI, and AD and the use of different methods of reporting ADL might limit this study. Conclusions This evaluation of b- and i-ADL can contribute

  10. Effects of a home visiting nurse intervention versus care as usual on individual activities of daily living: a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Home visiting nurses (HVNs) have long been part of home and community-based care interventions designed to meet the needs of functionally declining older adults. However, only one of the studies including HVNs that have demonstrated successful impacts on Activities of Daily Living (ADL) has reported how those interventions affected individual ADLs such as bathing, instead reporting the effect on means of various ADL indices and scales. Reporting impacts on means is insufficient since the same mean can consist of many different combinations of individual ADL impairments. The purpose of our study was to identify which individual ADLs were affected by a specific HVN intervention. Methods This is a secondary analysis comparing two arms of a randomized controlled study that enrolled Medicare patients (mean age = 76.8 years; 70% female) with considerable ADL impairment. At baseline difficulty with individual ADLs ranged from a low of 16.0% with eating to a high of 78.0% with walking. Through monthly home visits, the HVN focused on empowering patients and using behavior change approaches to facilitate chronic disease self-management. Three categories of analyses were used to compare difficulty with and dependence in 6 individual ADLs between the HVN (n = 237) and care as usual (n = 262) groups (total N = 499) at 22 months after study entry: (1) unadjusted analyses that strictly depend on random assignment, (2) multinomial logistic regression analyses adjusting for baseline risk factors, and (3) multinomial regression analyses that include variables reporting post-randomization healthcare use as well as the baseline risk factors. Results Compared to care as usual, patients receiving the HVN intervention had less difficulty performing bathing at 22 months. However, there were no effects for difficulty performing the other 5 ADLs. While no effects were found for lower levels of dependence for any ADLs, impacts were detected for the most

  11. Association of early-onset dementia with activities of daily living (ADL) in middle-aged adults with intellectual disabilities: the caregiver's perspective.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Hsia, Yi-Chen; Wu, Chia-Ling; Chu, Cordia; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2014-03-01

    Few studies have investigated in detail which factors influence activities of daily living (ADL) in adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) comorbid with/without dementia conditions. The objective of the present study was to describe the relation between early onset dementia conditions and progressive loss of ADL capabilities and to examine the influence of dementia conditions and other possible factors toward ADL scores in adults with ID. This study was part of the "Healthy Aging Initiatives for Persons with an Intellectual Disability in Taiwan: A Social Ecological Approach" project. We analyzed data from 459 adults aged 45 years or older with an ID regarding their early onset symptoms of dementia and their ADL profile based on the perspective of the primary caregivers. Results show that a significant negative correlation was found between dementia score and ADL score in a Pearson's correlation test (r=-0.28, p<0.001). The multiple linear regression model reported that factors of male gender (β=4.187, p<0.05), marital status (β=4.79, p<0.05), education level (primary: β=5.544, p<0.05; junior high or more: β=8.147, p<0.01), Down's syndrome (β=-9.290, p<0.05), severe or profound disability level (β=-6.725, p<0.05; β=-15.773, p<0.001), comorbid condition (β=-4.853, p<0.05) and dementia conditions (β=-9.245, p<0.001) were variables that were able to significantly predict the ADL score (R(2)=0.241) after controlling for age. Disability level and comorbidity can explain 10% of the ADL score variation, whereas dementia conditions can only explain 3% of the ADL score variation in the study. The present study highlights that future studies should scrutinize in detail the reasons for the low explanatory power of dementia for ADL, particularly in examining the appropriateness of the measurement scales for dementia and ADL in aging adults with ID.

  12. Anatomical and psychometric relationships of behavioral neglect in daily living.

    PubMed

    Rousseaux, Marc; Allart, Etienne; Bernati, Thérèse; Saj, Arnaud

    2015-04-01

    Spatial neglect has been related to both cortical (predominantly at the temporal-parietal junction) and subcortical (predominantly of the superior longitudinal fasciculus) lesions. The objectives of this observational study were to specify the anatomical relationships of behavioral neglect in activities of daily living (N-ADLs), and the anatomical and psychometric relationships of N-ADLs on one hand and components of neglect (peripersonal neglect and personal neglect) and anosognosia on the other. Forty five patients were analyzed for behavioral difficulties in daily living (on the Catherine Bergego scale) and the main components of neglect (using conventional clinical assessments) during the first months post right hemisphere stroke. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping was used to identify brain areas within which lesions explained the severity of bias in each assessment (non-parametric permutation test; p<0.01, one tailed). N-ADLs was associated with lesions centered on the posterior part of the superior temporal gyrus and extending to the temporo-parietal junction, temporo-occipital junction and subcortical white matter (including the superior longitudinal fasciculus). Peripersonal neglect resulted from extended cortical lesions centered on the superior temporal gyrus and the inferior parietal gyrus, with subcortical extension. Personal neglect resulted predominantly from lesions centered on the somatosensory cortex and at a lesser degree on the superior temporal sulcus. Anosognosia resulted from lesions of the posterior inferior temporal gyrus and superior temporal gyrus. In anatomic terms, N-ADLs was strongly related to peripersonal neglect, and those relationships were also shown by the psychometric analysis. In conclusions, superior temporal gyrus and superior longitudinal fasciculus lesions have a pivotal role in N-ADLs. N-ADLs is principally related (anatomically and psychometrically) to peripersonal neglect, and at a lesser degree to anosognosia and

  13. Changes in activities of daily living, physical fitness, and depressive symptoms after six-month periodic well-rounded exercise programs for older adults living in nursing homes or special nursing facilities.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Pei; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Toyoshima, Hideaki; Otsuka, Rei; Wada, Keiko; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Ishikawa, Miyuki; Yuanying, Li; Hotta, Yo; Mitsuhashi, Hirotsugu; Muramatsu, Takashi; Kasuga, Norikatsu; Tamakoshi, Koji

    2009-09-01

    A 6-month, twice weekly, well-rounded exercise program (47 sessions in total) comprised of a combination of aerobic, resistance and flexibility training was provided for institutionalized older adults aged 60 to 93. We analyzed the data of 18 older adults who could stand and had attended more than 10% of the classes (mean participation rate: 54%) to examine changes in activities of daily living (ADL), physical fitness tests and depressive moods. The mean (+/- standard deviation, range) age of the participants was 71.3 (+/- 15.6, 60-93) in men and 85.9 (+/- 5.8, 72-93) in women. Significant improvement in ADL of the hand manipulation domain and borderline significant improvement in ADL of the mobility domain were observed (McNemar test p = 0.011 and 0.072, respectively). A 6-minute walk distance increased significantly from 151.6 m to 236.6 m (p = 0.01, paired t-test), and the result of the Soda Pop test, which tests hand-eye coordination, also improved significantly from 35.2 sec to 25.3 sec (p = 0.01, paired t-test). These findings suggest that such a program could be effective in improving the ADL and physical fitness of the elderly.

  14. Trainable Mentally Handicapped: Daily Living and Self Care Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped, Columbus, OH.

    Selected from the National Instructional Materials Information System (NIMIS)--a computer based on-line interactive retrieval system on special education materials--the bibliography covers 153 materials for teaching daily living and self care skills to trainable mentally handicapped students from early childhood to secondary level. Contained are…

  15. Daily Living Skills: A Manual for Educating Visually Impaired Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Gail, Ed.

    The manual contains rationales, general approaches, and specific procedures for educators and parents to use in teaching daily living skills to visually impaired students. Detailed suggestions are given with regard to learning objectives for blind or partially sighted children, age levels, and instructional adaptations for developing competency in…

  16. Exercise and sleep predict personal resources in employees' daily lives.

    PubMed

    Nägel, Inga J; Sonnentag, Sabine

    2013-11-01

    The present study investigates the interaction of exercise and sleep on state-like personal resources in employees' daily lives. Further, the study examines the association between state-like personal resources and emotional exhaustion. We conducted a diary study over five consecutive working days (total of 443 days) with 144 employees who answered daily online surveys after work and before bedtime. Multilevel modeling showed that exercise after work was positively related to the next day's personal resources when sleep duration during the night time was longer compared to other nights. Furthermore, personal resources positively related to lower emotional exhaustion after work on the next day. This study demonstrates that exercise and sleep may help to renew personal resources. Results stress the importance of balancing exercise and sleep in daily life.

  17. Daily Spousal Influence on Physical Activity in Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Martire, Lynn M.; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris; Mogle, Jacqueline; Schulz, Richard; Brach, Jennifer; Keefe, Francis J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Physical activity is critical for the management of knee osteoarthritis, and the spouse may play a role in encouraging or discouraging physical activity. Purpose To examine four types of spousal influence—spouses' daily activity, autonomy support, pressure, and persuasion--on the daily physical activity of adults living with knee osteoarthritis. Methods A total of 141 couples reported their daily experiences for 22 days using a handheld computer, and wore an accelerometer to measure moderate activity and steps. Results Spouses' autonomy support for patient physical activity, as well as their own level of activity, was concurrently associated with patients' greater daily moderate activity and steps. In addition, on days when male patients perceived that spouses exerted more pressure to be active, they spent less time in moderate activity. Conclusions Couple-oriented interventions for knee osteoarthritis should target physical activity in both partners and spousal strategies for helping patients stay active. PMID:23161472

  18. Factors favoring a degradation or an improvement in activities of daily living (ADL) performance among nursing home (NH) residents: a survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Bürge, Elisabeth; von Gunten, Armin; Berchtold, André

    2013-01-01

    Different factors influence ADL performance among nursing home (NH) residents in long term care. The aim was to investigate which factors were associated with a significant change of ADL performance in NH residents, and whether or not these factors were gender-specific. The design was a survival analysis. The 10,199 participants resided in ninety Swiss NHs. Their ADL performance had been assessed by the Resident Assessment Instrument Minimum Data Set (RAI-MDS) in the period from 1997 to 2007. Relevant change in ADL performance was defined as 2 levels of change on the ADL scale between two successive assessments. The occurrence of either an improvement or a degradation of the ADL status) was analyzed using the Cox proportional hazard model. The analysis included a total of 10,199 NH residents. Each resident received between 2 and 23 assessments. Poor balance, incontinence, impaired cognition, a low BMI, impaired vision, no daily contact with proxies, impaired hearing and the presence of depression were, by hierarchical order, significant risk factors for NH residents to experience a degradation of ADL performance. Residents, who were incontinent, cognitively impaired or had a high BMI were significantly less likely to improve their ADL abilities. Male residents with cancer were prone to see their ADL improve. The year of NH entry was significantly associated with either degradation or improvement of ADL performance. Measures aiming at improving balance and continence, promoting physical activity, providing appropriate nourishment and cognitive enhancement are important for ADL performance in NH residents.

  19. Daily Living Skills in Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder from 2 to 21?Years of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bal, Vanessa Hus; Kim, So-Hyun; Cheong, Daniel; Lord, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Daily living skills (DLS), such as personal hygiene, meal preparation, and money management, are important to independent living. Research suggests that many individuals with autism spectrum disorder exhibit impairments in daily living skills relative to their cognitive skills. This study examined predictors of daily living skills attainment and…

  20. Daily living pain assessment in children with autism: Exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Dubois, A; Michelon, C; Rattaz, C; Zabalia, M; Baghdadli, A

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to broaden knowledge about pain expression and assessment in daily life situations in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The goals are to provide a description of the responses of the GED-DI, the French version of the NCCPC, and to test the internal structure validity of this scale. Thirty five children with ASD were included in this study (mean age=58months; mean developmental age=32months). The French version of the NCCPC was filled in by parents. Descriptive analysis of responses shows that children with ASD express pain through varied and common behaviours, related to different expressive markers (vocal, facial, activity, etc.). Behaviours more specific to the symptomology and disturbances of ASD are also displayed. A four-factor solution (negative emotional reaction, idiosyncratic expression, hyper-vigilance reaction, pain expression) emerges from an exploratory factor analysis that explains 54.4% of the total variance. Correlation coefficients show good psychometric qualities in terms of internal consistency, factorial validity and discriminant validity. This study provides new data about pain expression in daily life situations and shows that the French version of NCCPC adjusted to ASD children is relevant to assess pain in daily life situations.

  1. Design and validation of low-cost assistive glove for hand assessment and therapy during activity of daily living-focused robotic stroke therapy.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Dominic E; Johnson, Michelle J; McGuire, John R

    2009-01-01

    Hand and arm impairment is common after stroke. Robotic stroke therapy will be more effective if hand and upper-arm training is integrated to help users practice reaching and grasping tasks. This article presents the design, development, and validation of a low-cost, functional electrical stimulation grasp-assistive glove for use with task-oriented robotic stroke therapy. Our glove measures grasp aperture while a user completes simple-to-complex real-life activities, and when combined with an integrated functional electrical stimulator, it assists in hand opening and closing. A key function is a new grasp-aperture prediction model, which uses the position of the end-effectors of two planar robots to define the distance between the thumb and index finger. We validated the accuracy and repeatability of the glove and its capability to assist in grasping. Results from five nondisabled subjects indicated that the glove is accurate and repeatable for both static hand-open and -closed tasks when compared with goniometric measures and for dynamic reach-to-grasp tasks when compared with motion analysis measures. Results from five subjects with stroke showed that with the glove, they could open their hands but without it could not. We present a glove that is a low-cost solution for in vivo grasp measurement and assistance.

  2. Robust and Soft Elastomeric Electronics Tolerant to Our Daily Lives.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Atsuko; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Saito, Takeshi; Kuwahara, Yuki; Sakurai, Shunsuke; Futaba, Don N; Yamada, Takeo; Hata, Kenji

    2015-09-09

    Clothes represent a unique textile, as they simultaneously provide robustness against our daily activities and comfort (i.e., softness). For electronic devices to be fully integrated into clothes, the devices themselves must be as robust and soft as the clothes themselves. However, to date, no electronic device has ever possessed these properties, because all contain components fabricated from brittle materials, such as metals. Here, we demonstrate robust and soft elastomeric devices where every component possesses elastomeric characteristics with two types of single-walled carbon nanotubes added to provide the necessary electronic properties. Our elastomeric field effect transistors could tolerate every punishment our clothes experience, such as being stretched (elasticity: ∼ 110%), bent, compressed (>4.0 MPa, by a car and heels), impacted (>6.26 kg m/s, by a hammer), and laundered. Our electronic device provides a novel design principle for electronics and wide range applications even in research fields where devices cannot be used.

  3. Is the patient able to watch TV or read the newspaper? A functional semi-structured scale to observe Hemineglect symptoms in Activities of Daily Living (H-ADL).

    PubMed

    Piccardi, L; Magnotti, L; Tanzilli, A; Aloisi, M; Guariglia, P

    2016-01-01

    We developed a functional semi-structured scale to observe Hemineglect symptoms in Activities of Daily Living (H-ADL). The scale could assist clinicians in assessing rehabilitation priorities aimed at correcting any persisting errors or omissions. In addition, the scale could also be used by caregivers to observe patients' progress and improve their participation. Two groups of right brain-damaged patients (25 with hemineglect; 27 without hemineglect) were tested twice: at admission and before discharge from hospital. A control group of healthy individuals matched to patients for age and education and patients' caregivers also participated. Two raters (A; B), experts in neuropsychology, observed patients and healthy individuals using the H-ADL. We found that the H-ADL final scores correlated with the standard hemineglect tests. The three groups differed in performance and differences also emerged between the first and the second assessment, suggesting an improvement due to the remission of hemineglect as a consequence of the treatment. Raters A and B did not differ in their observations, but there were some discrepancies with caregivers' observations. Therefore, although caregivers could help clinicians in detecting persistent hemineglect behaviour, the assessment should be performed by experts in neuropsychology.

  4. Rhythm of daily living and detection of atypical days for elderly people living alone as determined with a monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryoji; Ogawa, Mitsuhiro; Otake, Sakuko; Izutsu, Takeshi; Tobimatsu, Yoshiko; Iwaya, Tsutomu; Izumi, Shin-ichi

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a system for monitoring the health of elderly people living at home. Infrared and other sensor outputs are collected using a monitoring program installed on a personal computer (PC) in the home at a sampling rate of 1 Hz. Once each day, the data are transferred to a server through the Internet using a cable television (TV) connection. An elderly subject was monitored for a 12-day baseline period and completed a daily questionnaire about her activities. This enabled us to identify the rhythm of daily living (sleeping, 23:00-04:59; getting up/breakfast, 05:00-08:59; indoor activities/going out, 09:00-16:59; and dinner/going to bed, 17:00-22:59) and the average outputs from the sensors in the rooms. The subject was then monitored for a further six months. By identifying sensor output counts outside the limits of mean +/- 3SD, we were able to detect atypical days. During the six-month monitoring period, 29 atypical days were detected. We suggest that the monitoring system may be effective in tele-rehabilitation.

  5. [The daily life of men who lives with chronic venous ulcer: phenomenological study].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marcelo Henrique; de Jesus, Maria Cristina Pinto; Merighi, Miriam Aparecida Barbosa; de Oliveira, Deise Moura; Biscotto, Priscilla Ribeiro; Silva, Greyce Pollyne Santos

    2013-09-01

    The chronic venous leg ulcer is the major therapeutic problem of lower limb injuries, which can trigger changes in the daily life of the person affected by it. This study aimed to understand the daily life of men who lives with chronic venous ulcers. A phenomenological study was conducted with eight men, who were interviewed during June and July of 2001. The study asked questions related to: "Restrictions in social life" and "Recovering the skin integrity and restart the activities affected by the wound". The answers revealed that men with these ulcers have social implications in the areas of productivity and sexuality. This leads to restrictions in everyday life with loss in performance of socially established roles for men, leading to anxiety for his return at full performance of his social role. The findings suggest significant experiential aspects that may guide professionals in the planning and implementation of health actions aimed to treat these patients.

  6. Physical fitness is predictive for a decline in the ability to perform instrumental activities of daily living in older adults with intellectual disabilities: Results of the HA-ID study.

    PubMed

    Oppewal, Alyt; Hilgenkamp, Thessa I M; van Wijck, Ruud; Schoufour, Josje D; Evenhuis, Heleen M

    2015-01-01

    The ability to perform instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) is important for one's level of independence. A high incidence of limitations in IADL is seen in older adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), which is an important determinant for the amount of support one needs. The aim of this study was to assess the predictive value of physical fitness for the ability to perform IADL, over a 3-year follow-up period, in 601 older adults with ID. At baseline, an extensive physical fitness assessment was performed. In addition, professional caregivers completed the Lawton IADL scale, both at baseline and at follow-up. The average ability to perform IADL declined significantly over the 3-year follow-up period. A decline in the ability to perform IADL was seen in 44.3% of the participants. The percentage of participants being completely independent in IADL declined from 2.7% to 1.3%. Manual dexterity, balance, comfortable and fast gait speed, muscular endurance, and cardiorespiratory fitness were significant predictors for a decline in IADL after correcting for baseline IADL and personal characteristics (age, gender, level of ID, and Down syndrome). This can be interpreted as representing the predictive validity of the physical tests for a decline in IADL. This study shows that even though older adults with ID experience dependency on others due to cognitive limitations, physical fitness also is an important aspect for IADL, which stresses the importance of using physical fitness tests and physical fitness enhancing programs in the care for older adults with ID.

  7. Impact of Venous Thromboembolism, Venous Stasis Syndrome, Venous Outflow Obstruction and Venous Valvular Incompetence on Quality of Life and Activities of Daily Living: A Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ashrani, Aneel A.; Silverstein, Marc D.; Rooke, Thom W.; Lahr, Brian D.; Petterson, Tanya M.; Bailey, Kent R.; Melton, L. Joseph; Heit, John A.

    2010-01-01

    The role of venous stasis syndrome (VSS) mechanisms (i.e. venous outflow obstruction [VOO] and venous valvular incompetence [VVI]) on quality of life (QoL) and activities of daily living (ADL) is unknown. The objective of this study was to test the hypotheses that venous thromboembolism (VTE), VSS, VOO and VVI are associated with reduced QoL and ADL. This study is a follow-up of an incident VTE case–control study nested within a population-based inception cohort of incident residents from Olmsted County, MN, USA, between 1966 and 1990. The study comprised 232 Olmsted County residents with a first lifetime VTE and 133 residents without VTE. Methods included a questionnaire and physical examination for VSS; vascular laboratory testing for VOO and VVI; assessment of QoL by SF36 and of ADL by pertinent sections from the Older Americans Resources and Services (OARS) and Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales (AIMS2) questionnaires. Of the 365 study participants, 232 (64%), 161 (44%), 43 (12%) and 136 (37%) had VTE, VSS, VOO and VVI, respectively. Prior VTE was associated with reduced ADL and increased pain, VSS with reduced physical QoL and increased pain, and VOO with reduced physical QoL and ADL. VVI was not associated with QoL or ADL. In conclusion, VSS and VOO are associated with worse physical QoL and increased pain. VOO and VTE are associated with impaired ADL. We hypothesize that rapid clearance of venous outflow obstruction in individuals with acute VTE will improve their QoL and ADL. PMID:20926498

  8. A grid for a precise analysis of daily activities.

    PubMed

    Wojtasik, V; Olivier, C; Lekeu, F; Quittre, A; Adam, S; Salmon, E

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of daily living activities is essential in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Most current tools quantitatively assess overall ability but provide little qualitative information on individual difficulties. Only a few tools allow therapists to evaluate stereotyped activities and record different types of errors. We capitalised on the Kitchen Activity Assessment to design a widely applicable analysis grid that provides both qualitative and quantitative data on activity performance. A cooking activity was videotaped in 15 patients with dementia and assessed according to the different steps in the execution of the task. The evaluations obtained with our grid showed good correlations between raters, between versions of the grid and between sessions. Moreover, the degree of independence obtained with our analysis of the task correlated with the Kitchen Activity Assessment score and with a global score of cognitive functioning. We conclude that assessment of a daily living activity with this analysis grid is reproducible and relatively independent of the therapist, and thus provides quantitative and qualitative information useful for both evaluating and caring for demented patients.

  9. Daily foraging patterns in free-living birds: exploring the predation–starvation trade-off

    PubMed Central

    Bonter, David N.; Zuckerberg, Benjamin; Sedgwick, Carolyn W.; Hochachka, Wesley M.

    2013-01-01

    Daily patterns in the foraging behaviour of birds are assumed to balance the counteracting risks of predation and starvation. Predation risks are a function of the influence of weight on flight performance and foraging behaviours that may expose individuals to predators. Although recent research sheds light on daily patterns in weight gain, little data exist on daily foraging routines in free-living birds. In order to test the predictions of various hypotheses about daily patterns of foraging, we quantified the activity of four species of passerines in winter using radio-frequency identification receivers built into supplemental feeding stations. From records of 472 368 feeder visits by tagged birds, we found that birds generally started to feed before sunrise and continued to forage at a steady to increasing rate throughout the day. Foraging in most species terminated well before sunset, suggesting their required level of energy reserves was being reached before the end of the day. These results support the risk-spreading theorem over a long-standing hypothesis predicting bimodality in foraging behaviour purportedly driven by a trade-off between the risks of starvation and predation. Given the increased energetic demands experienced by birds during colder weather, our results suggest that birds' perceptions of risk are biased towards starvation avoidance in winter. PMID:23595267

  10. Social Networks and Daily Activities of Street Youth in Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campos, Regina; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Studied the social networks and daily activities of children and adolescents living or working on the streets of Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Found that youngsters who lived at home and worked on the street appeared to be experiencing orderly development despite their impoverished circumstances. Youngsters who lived on the streets, however, showed…

  11. Enhancing activities of daily living of chronic stroke patients in primary health care by modified constraint-induced movement therapy (HOMECIMT): study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stroke leads to constant rehabilitation needs even at the chronic stage. However, although many stroke patients receive physical or occupational therapy in primary health care, treatment prescriptions do not generally specify therapeutic goals; in particular, participation is not established as an explicit therapeutic goal in the ambulatory setting. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a therapy regimen for chronic stroke patients (modified ‘constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) at home’) with impaired hand or arm function with regard to the prerequisites of participation in everyday activities: a sufficient arm and hand function. ‘CIMT at home’ will be compared with conventional physical and occupational therapy (‘therapy as usual’). Methods/design The study is a parallel cluster randomized controlled trial with therapy practices as clusters (n = 48). After written consent from the patients (n = 144), the therapists will be randomly assigned to treat either the intervention or the control group. Blinded external assessors will evaluate the patients using standardized outcome measures before and after the intervention, and six months later. The two coprimary endpoint assessments of arm and hand function as prerequisites for participation (defined as equal involvement in activities of daily living) are the motor activity log (quality of arm and hand use) and the Wolf motor function test (arm and hand function). These assessments are made four weeks post-treatment and relativized to baseline performance. Changes in primary outcomes will be analyzed with mixed models, which consider the hierarchical structure of the data and will be adjusted to the baseline measurements and sex. The primary analysis will be the comparison of the two randomized groups, with respect to the adjusted averages for each of the two coprimary endpoints. To keep an overall significance level of 5%, the two endpoints will be tested at the

  12. Characteristics of daily arm activities in patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Kenneth; Annegarn, Janneke; Lima Passos, Valéria; Savelberg, Hans H; Schols, Annemie M; Wouters, Emiel F; Spruit, Martijn A

    2014-06-01

    Arm activities are required for maintenance of self-care and independent living. This study aimed to investigate whether and to what extent arm activities of daily living (ADL) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients differ compared to healthy controls and the extent to which they perform arm ADL at a relatively higher upper limb muscle effort. Daily arm and leg activities were assessed using accelerometers in the home environment (COPD: n=21, healthy: n=24; part 1). The relative efforts of the trapezius, deltoid and biceps muscles were studied using electromyography during domestic arm ADL in a laboratory setting (COPD: n=17, healthy: n=15; part 2). After correction for walking time, the time spent on arm ADL was similar between COPD patients and healthy control subjects (p=0.52), while the intensity of arm activities was lower in COPD patients (p=0.041). In the laboratory setting, arm ADL were performed at a lower intensity by COPD patients, while the trapezius muscle effort was significantly higher during several arm ADL compared to healthy control subjects (p<0.05). COPD patients have a similar duration of arm ADL compared to healthy subjects after correction for walking time, but perform arm activities at a lower intensity. Moreover, patients perform some arm ADL at a relatively higher muscle effort.

  13. Children of the "Sug": A Study of the Daily Lives of Street Children in Khartoum, Sudan, with Intervention Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kudrati, Mustafa; Plummer, Mary L.; Yousif, Nassrin Dafaalla El Hag

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The study examines street children's daily lives in Khartoum, Sudan to recommend ways to improve their conditions and to successfully assist them off the streets. Methods: In 2000-2001, eight researchers conducted participant observation for 7 weeks; 20 groups of children engaged in role-plays and drawing activities; over 500 children…

  14. Validation of dental impact on daily living questionnaire among tribal population of India

    PubMed Central

    Deepan Kumar, C. V.; Mohamed, Shamaz; Janakiram, Chandrashekar; Joseph, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oral conditions are known to affect various aspects of quality of life. Similarly, the social consequence of the quality of life in the day to day living is also equally important. Several studies have quantified the social consequences of diseases through activity limitations in people's daily living. The instruments which cover a broad spectrum of life are proposed to be compared with the clinical oral hygiene status of people from different social classes. Aim: To assess the validity of dental impact on daily living (DIDL) questionnaire measuring subjective dental problems and their impact in the day to day life among tribes of Wayanad. Study Design: Cross-sectional. Materials and Methods: DIDL questionnaire developed by Leao and Sheiham was used. We recorded the clinical oral health status using decayed, missing, filled, simplified oral hygiene index, and community periodontal index indices, to correlate the subjective findings of dental impact tribe to obtain construct validity of the questionnaire. Analysis: Descriptive statistics and Spearman's correlation using IBM SPSS software version 20. Results: In the study population of 250 participants, the majority of the participants were from the age group between 36 and 50 years (40%) and females were in the majority (64%). The clinical status of the participants was poor in the majority while their perceived impact in their day to day living was found to be relatively satisfied. The study results show the DIDL tool had weak validity in relation to the clinical status with relevance to the social status of Indian tribal population. Conclusion: The study result shows that there was insignificant and weak validity between the DIDL tool and the oral health status among these tribes who were from a low social class. This might be because their priority in life which is different from what a person from high social class. So the dental problem is ignored at the level of individual depending on his

  15. A System Design for Studying Geriatric Patients with Dementia and Hypertension Based on Daily Living Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weifeng; Betz, Willian R.; Frezza, Stephen T.; Liu, Yunkai

    2011-08-01

    Geriatric patients with dementia and hypertension (DAH) suffer both physically and financially. The needs of these patients mainly include improving the quality of daily living and reducing the cost of long-term care. Traditional treatment approaches are strained to meet these needs. The goal of the paper is to design an innovative system to provide cost-effective quality treatments for geriatric patients with DAH by collecting and analyzing the multi-dimensional personal information, such as observations in daily living (ODL) from a non-clinical environment. The proposed ODLs in paper include activities, cleanliness, blood pressure, medication compliance and mood changes. To complete the system design, an incremental user-centered strategy is exploited to assemble needs of patients, caregivers, and clinicians. A service-oriented architecture (SOA) is employed to make full use of existing devices, software systems, and platforms. This health-related knowledge can be interpreted and utilized to help patients with DAH remain in their homes safely and improve their life quality while reducing medical expenditures.

  16. Our Living Community: Community Studies through the Daily Newspaper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guenther, John E.

    This document presents a program designed to provide students with a comprehensive and interesting way to study their community. Although developed for secondary students, the program activities, with slight modification, should be equally successful with intermediate-level students. Using the community as the area to be studied, a major focus of…

  17. Using Video Prompting with Different Fading Procedures to Teach Daily Living Skills: A Preliminary Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Pei-Fang; Cannella-Malone, Helen I.; Wheaton, Joe E.; Tullis, Chris A.

    2016-01-01

    Two students with developmental disabilities were taught two daily living skills using video prompting with error correction presented on an iPod Touch, and two different fading procedures were implemented. In one fading procedure, individual video clips were merged into multiple larger clips following acquisition of the entire skill. In the…

  18. The Form and Function of Attachment Behavior in the Daily Lives of Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campa, Mary I.; Hazan, Cindy; Wolfe, Jared E.

    2009-01-01

    Central to attachment theory is the postulation of an inborn system to regulate attachment behavior. This system has been well studied in infancy and childhood, but much less is known about its functioning at later ages. The goal of this study was to explore the form and function of attachment behavior in the daily lives of young adults. Twenty…

  19. Relationships between Respiratory Muscle Strength and Daily Living Function in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hui-Yi; Chen, Chien-Chih; Hsiao, Shih-Fen

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a common childhood disorder characterized by motor disability. Children with CP are at risk of developing significant respiratory problems associated with insufficient respiratory muscle strength. It is crucial to identify important factors which are associated with the limitations in daily living function in such children.…

  20. Sensori-Motor and Daily Living Skills of Preschool Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jasmin, Emmanuelle; Couture, Melanie; McKinley, Patricia; Reid, Greg; Fombonne, Eric; Gisel, Erika

    2009-01-01

    Sensori-motor development and performance of daily living skills (DLS) remain little explored in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The objective of this study was to determine the impact of sensori-motor skills on the performance of DLS in preschool children with ASD. Thirty-five children, 3-4 years of age, were recruited and assessed…

  1. Social Media Use: An Exploratory Test of Effects on the Daily Lives of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Barbara; Cothern, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    This study covers the effects that social media use has on the daily lives of college students. More specifically, the current study focuses on college students' academic success, study habits, social interaction, and family interaction. Social media is a source of online tools that allow people from across the world to communicate with others.…

  2. Predictors and Course of Daily Living Skills Development in Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Shulamite A.; Carter, Alice S.

    2014-01-01

    Self-sufficiency is central to child and family well-being. This report focuses on predictors of adaptive daily living skills (DLS) development in young children with ASD and whether DLS gains predict decreases in parenting stress. Participants were 162 toddlers with ASD and their parents, assessed at 3 annual timepoints. Hierarchical Linear…

  3. Children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta and Their Daily Living. Handicap Research Group Report No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodin, Jane

    The study examined aspects of daily living of Swedish children with osteogenesis imperfecta, a mineral deficiency in the skeleton which results in stunted growth and frequent fractures. A questionnaire was administered to 24 families with children under the age of 18 and 3 families were interviewed. The study found the families in great need of…

  4. The Effectiveness of SpeechEasy during Situations of Daily Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Jennifer J.; Armson, Joy; Kiefte, Michael

    2008-01-01

    A multiple single-subject design was used to examine the effects of SpeechEasy on stuttering frequency in the laboratory and in longitudinal samples of speech produced in situations of daily living (SDL). Seven adults who stutter participated, all of whom had exhibited at least 30% reduction in stuttering frequency while using SpeechEasy during…

  5. Challenges Experienced in Teaching Daily Living Skills to Learners with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruteere, Rosallin Kananu; Mutia, Jacob Mpekethu; Mwoma, Teresa; Runo, Mary

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the challenges encountered when teaching daily living skills (DLS) to learners with mental retardation (MR). The study used purposive sampling to select the sub-county, special units, learners and teachers. The target population in this study was eighty four respondents. The sample for the study was the same…

  6. Understanding the gap between cognitive abilities and daily living skills in adolescents with autism spectrum disorders with average intelligence.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Amie W; Bishop, Somer L

    2015-01-01

    Daily living skills standard scores on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-2nd edition were examined in 417 adolescents from the Simons Simplex Collection. All participants had at least average intelligence and a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder. Descriptive statistics and binary logistic regressions were used to examine the prevalence and predictors of a "daily living skills deficit," defined as below average daily living skills in the context of average intelligence quotient. Approximately half of the adolescents were identified as having a daily living skills deficit. Autism symptomatology, intelligence quotient, maternal education, age, and sex accounted for only 10% of the variance in predicting a daily living skills deficit. Identifying factors associated with better or worse daily living skills may help shed light on the variability in adult outcome in individuals with autism spectrum disorder with average intelligence.

  7. Low-dose tertiary prophylactic therapy reduces total number of bleeds and improves the ability to perform activities of daily living in adults with severe haemophilia A: a single-centre experience from Beijing.

    PubMed

    Hua, Baolai; Lian, Xiaoyun; Li, Kuixing; Lee, Adrienne; Poon, Man-Chiu; Zhao, Yongqiang

    2016-03-01

    Full-dose prophylaxis treatment for persons with haemophilia is not affordable in China due to its economic constraints, particularly in adults requiring higher clotting factor (CFC) doses. Low-dose tertiary prophylaxis for adults with severe haemophilia A (SHA) in Beijing became feasible and implemented when government insurance covering 85% CFC cost in Beijing began in December 2009. The aim of this study was to evaluate the benefits of low-dose tertiary prophylaxis in SHA adults. Analysis of data on 33 patients on low-dose tertiary prophylaxis (5-10 IU/kg, two to three times per week) at the Haemophilia Treatment Center, Peking Union Medical College Hospital between December 2009 and December 2013. The 33 patients (age 18-60 years, mean 33.4) were on prophylaxis for 20.8 ± 9.9 months (compared with prior on-demand therapy for 20.0 ± 11.7 months). Prophylaxis resulted in significant decrease in annual bleeding rate (ABR, 11.8 ± 7.6 vs. 41.5 ± 20.7, 71.1% reduction, P < 0.0001), and significant improvement in Functional Independence Score in Haemophilia (FISH) measurement reflecting improvement in self-care and mobility. Radiologic (Pettersson) joint score was neither improved nor deteriorated. Ten of the 33 patients originally wheel chair and bed-bound began to walk and function independently in their daily lives. Low-dose tertiary prophylaxis for adults with SHA in China is feasible and beneficial. Although the average ABR remained high, a significant improvement in self-care and mobility measured by FISH was observed. These promising clinical experiences form the basis for further formal studies with more defined therapeutic protocol and outcome measures for affordable prophylaxis regimens in haemophilia adults in China.

  8. Daily ambulatory activity levels in idiopathic Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Skidmore, Frank M; Mackman, Chad A; Pav, Breckon; Shulman, Lisa M; Garvan, Cyndi; Macko, Richard F; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2008-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson disease (PD) may have decreased physical activity due to motor deficits. We recently validated the reliability of step activity monitors (SAMs) to accurately count steps in PD, and we wished to use them to evaluate the impact of disease severity on home activity levels in PD. Twenty-six subjects with PD (Hoehn and Yahr disease stage 2-4) were recruited to participate in a study of activity levels over 48 hours. Ability to achieve 95% device accuracy was an entry requirement. A Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) evaluation was performed on all subjects, subjects were monitored for 48 hours, and total number of steps per day and maximum steps taken per hour were calculated. Out of 26 subjects, 25 met entry requirements. We calculated the number of steps taken per day, as well as maximal activity levels, and correlated these with UPDRS total score, the activity of daily living subscale, and the UPDRS motor function subscale off and on medication (all p < 0.01). Transition from Hoehn and Yahr stage 2 to stage 3 was associated with a decline in functional mobility (p < 0.005). A microprocessor-linked SAM accurately counted steps in subjects with PD. The number of steps taken correlated highly with disease severity. SAMs may be useful outcome measures in PD.

  9. Daily living skills in individuals with autism spectrum disorder from 2 to 21 years of age.

    PubMed

    Bal, Vanessa Hus; Kim, So-Hyun; Cheong, Daniel; Lord, Catherine

    2015-10-01

    Daily living skills (DLS), such as personal hygiene, meal preparation, and money management, are important to independent living. Research suggests that many individuals with autism spectrum disorder exhibit impairments in daily living skills relative to their cognitive skills. This study examined predictors of daily living skills attainment and trajectories of daily living skills in a longitudinal sample referred for possible autism spectrum disorder and followed from 2 to 21 years of age. Consistent with previous studies, participants with autism spectrum disorder and nonspectrum diagnoses showed continual development of daily living skills throughout childhood and adolescence. Early childhood nonverbal mental age was the strongest predictor of daily living skills attainment for both diagnostic groups. Group-based modeling suggested two distinct trajectories of daily living skills development for participants with autism spectrum disorder. Skill levels for both groups of young adults with autism spectrum disorder remained considerably below age level expectations. Whereas the "High-DLS" group gained approximately 12 years in daily living skills from T2 to T21, the "Low-DLS" group's daily living skills improved 3-4 years over the 16- to 19-year study period. Nonverbal mental age, receptive language, and social-communication impairment at 2 years predicted High- versus Low-DLS group membership. Receiving greater than 20 h of parent-implemented intervention before age 3 was also associated with daily living skills trajectory. Results suggest that daily living skills should be a focus of treatment plans for individuals with autism spectrum disorder, particularly adolescents transitioning to young adulthood.

  10. Humor, laughter, and happiness in the daily lives of recently bereaved spouses.

    PubMed

    Lund, Dale A; Utz, Rebecca; Caserta, Michael S; De Vries, Brian

    The positive psychology movement has created more interest in examining the potential value of experiencing positive emotions (e.g., humor, laughter, and happiness) during the course of bereavement. This study of 292 recently widowed (5-24 weeks) men (39%) and women (61%) age 50 and over examined both the perceived importance of and actual experience of having positive emotions in their daily lives and how they might impact bereavement adjustments. We found that most of the bereaved spouses rated humor and happiness as being very important in their daily lives and that they were also experiencing these emotions at higher levels than expected. Experiencing humor, laughter, and happiness was strongly associated with favorable bereavement adjustments (lower grief and depression) regardless of the extent to which the bereaved person valued having these positive emotions.

  11. Bursts of Self-Conscious Emotions in the Daily Lives of Emerging Adults

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, David E.; Ram, Nilam; Pincus, Aaron L.; Rebar, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    Self-conscious emotions play a role in regulating daily achievement strivings, social behavior, and health, but little is known about the processes underlying their daily manifestation. Emerging adults (n = 182) completed daily diaries for eight days and multilevel models were estimated to evaluate whether, how much, and why their emotions varied from day-to-day. Within-person variation in authentic pride was normally-distributed across people and days whereas the other emotions were burst-like and characterized by zero-inflated, negative binomial distributions. Perceiving social interactions as generally communal increased the odds of hubristic pride activation and reduced the odds of guilt activation; daily communal behavior reduced guilt intensity. Results illuminated processes through which meaning about the self-in-relation-to-others is constructed during a critical period of development. PMID:25859164

  12. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily...

  13. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily...

  14. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily...

  15. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily...

  16. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily...

  17. Daily physical activity and type 2 diabetes: A review

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Hidetaka

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity improves glycemic control and reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Moderate to vigorous physical activity is recommended to manage T2D; however, patients with T2D can be physically weak, making it difficult to engage in the recommended levels of physical activity. Daily physical activity includes various activities performed during both occupational and leisure time such as walking, gardening, and housework that type 2 diabetic patients should be able to perform without considerable physical burden. This review focuses on the association between daily physical activity and T2D. Walking was the most common form of daily physical activity, with numerous studies demonstrating its beneficial effects on reducing the risk of T2D, CVD, and mortality. Walking for at least 30 min per day was shown to reduce the risk of T2D by approximately 50%. Additionally, walking was associated with a reduction in mortality. In contrast, evidence was extremely limited regarding other daily physical activities such as gardening and housework in patients with T2D. Recent studies have suggested daily physical activity, including non-exercise activity thermogenesis, to be favorably associated with metabolic risks and mortality. However, well-designed longitudinal studies are warranted to elucidate its effects on overall health. PMID:27350847

  18. Perceived health status and daily activity participation of older Malaysians.

    PubMed

    Ng, Sor Tho; Tengku-Aizan, Hamid; Tey, Nai Peng

    2011-07-01

    This article investigates the influence of perceived health status on the daily activity participation of older Malaysians. Data from the Survey on Perceptions of Needs and Problems of the Elderly, which was conducted in 1999, were used. The negative binomial regression results show that older persons with good perceived health status reported more varieties of daily activity participation, especially among the uneducated and those with below-average self-esteem. The multinomial logistic regression model suggests that older persons with good perceived health status tended to engage daily in paid work only or with leisure activities, whereas those perceived to have poor health were more likely to engage in leisure activities only or leisure and family role activities. Promotion of a healthy lifestyle at a younger age encourages every person to monitor and take responsibility for their own health, which is a necessary strategy to ensure active participation at an older age, and thus improve their well-being.

  19. Development and Initial Testing of the Penn Parkinson's Daily Activities Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Laura; Siderowf, Andrew; Rubright, Jonathan D.; Rick, Jacqueline; Dahodwala, Nabila; Duda, John E.; Hurtig, Howard; Stern, Matthew; Xie, Sharon X.; Rennert, Lior; Karlawish, Jason; Shea, Judy A.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Weintraub, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this work was to describe the development and psychometric analysis of the Penn Parkinson's Daily Activities Questionnaire. The questionnaire is an item response theory-based tool for rating cognitive instrumental activities of daily living in PD. Methods Candidate items for the Penn Parkinson's Daily Activities Questionnaire were developed through literature review and focus groups of patients and knowledgeable informants. Item selection and calibration of item-response theory parameters were performed using responses from a cohort of PD patients and knowledgeable informants (n = 388). In independent cohorts of PD patients and knowledgeable informants, assessments of test-retest reliability (n = 50), and construct validity (n = 68) of the questionnaire were subsequently performed. Construct validity was assessed by correlating questionnaire scores with measures of motor function, cognition, an existing activities of daily living measure, and directly observed daily function. Results Fifty items were retained in the final questionnaire item bank. Items were excluded owing to redundancy, difficult reading level, and when item-response theory parameters could not be calculated. Test-retest reliability was high (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.97; P < 0.001). The questionnaire correlated strongly with cognition (r = 0.68; P < 0.001) and directly observed daily function (r = 0.87; P < 0.001), but not with motor impairment (r = 0.08; P = 0.53). The questionnaire score accurately discriminated between PD patients with and without dementia (receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.91; 95% confidence interval: 0.85–0.97). Conclusions The Penn Parkinson's Daily Activities Questionnaire shows strong evidence of reliability and validity. Item response theory-based psychometric analysis suggests that this questionnaire can discriminate across a range of daily functions. PMID:26249849

  20. A daily process analysis of intentions and physical activity in college students.

    PubMed

    Conroy, David E; Elavsky, Steriani; Doerksen, Shawna E; Maher, Jaclyn P

    2013-10-01

    Social-cognitive theories, such as the theory of planned behavior, posit intentions as proximal influences on physical activity (PA). This paper extends those theories by examining within-person variation in intentions and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) as a function of the unfolding constraints in people's daily lives (e.g., perceived time availability, fatigue, soreness, weather, overeating). College students (N = 63) completed a 14-day diary study over the Internet that rated daily motivation, contextual constraints, and MVPA. Key findings from multilevel analyses were that (1) between-person differences represented 46% and 33% of the variability in daily MVPA intentions and behavior, respectively; (2) attitudes, injunctive norms, self-efficacy, perceptions of limited time availability, and weekend status predicted daily changes in intention strength; and (3) daily changes in intentions, perceptions of limited time availability, and weekend status predicted day-to-day changes in MVPA. Embedding future motivation and PA research in the context of people's daily lives will advance understanding of individual PA change processes.

  1. Validity and reliability of the Chinese version of the Daily Living Self-Efficacy Scale among stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Yan; Cheng, Hui-Lin; Fang, Liang; Bi, Rui-Xue; Fang, Xiao-Qun; Hu, Min

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the Daily Living Self-Efficacy Scale (DLSES) in stroke patients. In total, 172 participants were recruited from a local hospital in China. The internal consistent reliability and convergent validity of the total scale and activities of daily living (ADL) and psychosocial functioning subscales were examined and factor analysis was carried out. Cronbach's αs for the Chinese version of the DLSES, ADL subscale, and psychosocial subscale were 0.96, 0.90, and 0.95, respectively. In the factor analysis, two factors (ADL and psychosocial functioning) were extracted, explaining 84.4% of the total variance in self-efficacy (χ/d.f.=2.19, root mean square error of approximation=0.08, normed fit index=0.95, comparative fit index=0.98, incremental fit index=0.98). Convergent validity was confirmed by positive relationships between the Chinese version of the DLSES and the Modified Fall Efficacy Scale (r=0.87). The ADL subscale was associated positively with the Barthel Index (r=0.74) and the psychosocial functioning subscale was associated negatively with the Functional Activities Questionnaire (r=-0.73) and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (r=-0.44). The Chinese version of the DLSES was shown to be a reliable and valid measure of self-efficacy in stroke patients.

  2. Adolescents’ Daily Activities and the Restorative Niches that Support Them

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Jenny J.; Aspinall, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores wellbeing from the perspective of the psychological dynamics underlying adolescents’ relationship with place. It uses a dynamic model of wellbeing called personal project analysis (PPA) which captures the concept of ‘flourishing’, defined as functioning well in your activities, strivings and interactions with the world [1]. Using PPA methods we identified adolescents’ daily activities and the ‘restorative niches’ that best support them. A series of settings (including home, urban and natural outdoor places) were explored using PPA with 45 young people (aged 11–13) living in Edinburgh, Central Scotland. Participants were asked to think of eight projects of current importance to them, to say where the project took place and to rate each project against a series of core wellbeing dimensions measuring project meaning, manageability, support and affect (how much fun, stress etc.). Latent class analysis was carried out to explore clusters—or sub-groups—in the data and to identify the significant discriminators between clusters. A three-cluster model produced the best fit with project type, project place and wellbeing indicators (fun and stress) significantly discriminating between the three clusters. The three clusters were labeled by their dominant environmental context, ‘faraway’ (e.g., beach, national parks, hills), ‘everyday’ (e.g., home, school, local streets) and ‘citywide’ (e.g., sport settings, urban town context). ‘Faraway’ and ‘citywide’ clusters had a significantly higher wellbeing content, especially for fun and stress; the ‘everyday’ cluster indicated local environs remain a dominant project place for this age group, but are associated with greater stress. We compare findings with adults and suggest that outdoor settings further afield from home have greater significance within adolescent project systems, but that support is needed to facilitate access to these places. PMID:23202680

  3. Achieving recommended daily physical activity levels through commuting by public transportation: unpacking individual and contextual influences.

    PubMed

    Wasfi, Rania A; Ross, Nancy A; El-Geneidy, Ahmed M

    2013-09-01

    This paper estimates the amount of daily walking associated with using public transportation in a large metropolitan area and examines individual and contextual characteristics associated with walking distances. Total walking distance to and from transit was calculated from a travel diary survey for 6913 individuals. Multilevel regression modelling was used to examine the underlying factors associated with walking to public transportation. The physical activity benefits of public transportation varied along gender and socio-economic lines. Recommended minutes of daily physical activity can be achieved for public transportation users, especially train users living in affluent suburbs.

  4. The influence of chronotype in the daily lives of young children.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Laura K

    2016-01-01

    Research on chronotypic differences has been conducted for many years, however, until recently, little attention has been paid to young children. The current study examined the influence of morningness-eveningness in the daily lives of 2 to 4 year olds (291 females, 230 males, 8 gender not given) via an online survey completed by 529 mothers from across the United States. The results replicated previous findings on chronotypic differences in sleep-wake patterns and the development of morningness-eveningness in early childhood. The influence of chronotype on sleep habits, daily routines and schedules was also explored. At both bed and wake times, mothers of evening type (E-type) children were more likely to report challenges. For a while, morning type (M-type) children tended to fall asleep easily and wake themselves up in the morning, E-types were more likely to show bedtime resistance, wake in a negative mood and have conflicts with their parents. In the morning, mothers of M-type children often stuck to their normal routine on days when the child had to be somewhere at 7:00 am, whereas mothers of E-type children employed different strategies to get their child up and out the door. Bedtime routines and daily schedules also differed by chronotype. Individual differences in morningness-eveningness and their impact on sleep-wake patterns and social interactions are evident early on. A greater understanding of how they affect the lives of young children and their future development is needed.

  5. Promoting active living in healthy cities of Europe.

    PubMed

    Faskunger, Johan

    2013-10-01

    Local governments in Europe have a vital role in promoting physical activity in the daily life of citizens. However, explicit investment in active living has been limited. One of the four core themes for Phase IV (2003-2008) of the World Health Organization (WHO) European Healthy Cities Network (WHO-EHCN) was to encourage local governments and their partners to implement programs in favor of active living. This study analyzes the performance of network cities during this period. Responses to a general evaluation questionnaire are analyzed by content according to a checklist, and categorized into themes and dimensions. Most cities viewed "active living" as an important issue for urban planning; to improve visual appeal, enhance social cohesion, create a more sustainable transport system to promote walkability and cyclability and to reduce inequalities in public health. Almost all member cities reported on existing policies that support the promotion of active living. However, only eight (of the 59) responding cities mentioned an integrated framework specific for active living. Many efforts to promote active living are nested in programs to prevent obesity among adults or children. Future challenges include establishing integrated policies specifically for active living, introducing a larger range of actions, as well as increasing funding and capacity to make a difference at the population level.

  6. Longitudinal development of manual motor ability in autism spectrum disorder from childhood to mid-adulthood relates to adaptive daily living skills.

    PubMed

    Travers, Brittany G; Bigler, Erin D; Duffield, Tyler C; Prigge, Molly D B; Froehlich, Alyson L; Lange, Nicholas; Alexander, Andrew L; Lainhart, Janet E

    2016-04-07

    Many individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) exhibit motor difficulties, but it is unknown whether manual motor skills improve, plateau, or decline in ASD in the transition from childhood into adulthood. Atypical development of manual motor skills could impact the ability to learn and perform daily activities across the life span. This study examined longitudinal grip strength and finger tapping development in individuals with ASD (n = 90) compared to individuals with typical development (n = 56), ages 5 to 40 years old. We further examined manual motor performance as a possible correlate of current and future daily living skills. The group with ASD demonstrated atypical motor development, characterized by similar performance during childhood but increasingly poorer performance from adolescence into adulthood. Grip strength was correlated with current adaptive daily living skills, and Time 1 grip strength predicted daily living skills eight years into the future. These results suggest that individuals with ASD may experience increasingly more pronounced motor difficulties from adolescence into adulthood and that manual motor performance in ASD is related to adaptive daily living skills.

  7. Sensori-motor and daily living skills of preschool children with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Jasmin, Emmanuelle; Couture, Mélanie; McKinley, Patricia; Reid, Greg; Fombonne, Eric; Gisel, Erika

    2009-02-01

    Sensori-motor development and performance of daily living skills (DLS) remain little explored in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The objective of this study was to determine the impact of sensori-motor skills on the performance of DLS in preschool children with ASD. Thirty-five children, 3-4 years of age, were recruited and assessed with a battery of diagnostic and clinical tests. Children showed atypical sensory responses, very poor motor and DLS. Sensory avoiding, an excessive reaction to sensory stimuli, and fine motor skills were highly correlated with DLS, even when cognitive performance was taken into account. Sensori-motor deficits have an impact on the autonomy of children with ASD and interventions should aim at improving and supporting the development of sensori-motor skills.

  8. Cultural Orientations, Daily Activities, and Adjustment in Mexican American Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHale, Susan M.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Cansler, Emily

    2009-01-01

    The links between youth's daily activities and adjustment and the role of cultural practices and values in these links were studied in 469 youth from 237 Mexican American families. In home interviews, data on mothers', fathers', and two adolescent-age siblings' cultural practices (language use, social contacts) and values (for familism, for…

  9. Muscle activity and inactivity periods during normal daily life.

    PubMed

    Tikkanen, Olli; Haakana, Piia; Pesola, Arto J; Häkkinen, Keijo; Rantalainen, Timo; Havu, Marko; Pullinen, Teemu; Finni, Taija

    2013-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that not only the lack of physical activity, but also prolonged times of sedentary behaviour where major locomotor muscles are inactive, significantly increase the risk of chronic diseases. The purpose of this study was to provide details of quadriceps and hamstring muscle inactivity and activity during normal daily life of ordinary people. Eighty-four volunteers (44 females, 40 males, 44.1±17.3 years, 172.3±6.1 cm, 70.1±10.2 kg) were measured during normal daily life using shorts measuring muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity (recording time 11.3±2.0 hours). EMG was normalized to isometric MVC (EMG(MVC)) during knee flexion and extension, and inactivity threshold of each muscle group was defined as 90% of EMG activity during standing (2.5±1.7% of EMG(MVC)). During normal daily life the average EMG amplitude was 4.0±2.6% and average activity burst amplitude was 5.8±3.4% of EMG(MVC) (mean duration of 1.4±1.4 s) which is below the EMG level required for walking (5 km/h corresponding to EMG level of about 10% of EMG(MVC)). Using the proposed individual inactivity threshold, thigh muscles were inactive 67.5±11.9% of the total recording time and the longest inactivity periods lasted for 13.9±7.3 min (2.5-38.3 min). Women had more activity bursts and spent more time at intensities above 40% EMG(MVC) than men (p<0.05). In conclusion, during normal daily life the locomotor muscles are inactive about 7.5 hours, and only a small fraction of muscle's maximal voluntary activation capacity is used averaging only 4% of the maximal recruitment of the thigh muscles. Some daily non-exercise activities such as stair climbing produce much higher muscle activity levels than brisk walking, and replacing sitting by standing can considerably increase cumulative daily muscle activity.

  10. Home Accidents and Assistance in Daily Activities of Older Women in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erkal, Sibel; Sahin, Hande

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed the relation between incidents of at-home accidents and the assistance in daily activities of women age of 65+ living in the area of Dikmen Akpinar Health Care Unit in Ankara-Turkey. Of the women, 49.2% had experienced a home accident in the last 12 months. More than half of these accidents were caused by falling. Women over…

  11. Youth activity spaces and daily exposure to tobacco outlets.

    PubMed

    Lipperman-Kreda, Sharon; Morrison, Christopher; Grube, Joel W; Gaidus, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    We explored whether exposure to tobacco outlets in youths' broader activity spaces differs from that obtained using traditional geographic measures of exposure to tobacco outlet within buffers around homes and schools. Youths completed an initial survey, daily text-prompted surveys, and carried GPS-enabled phones for one week. GPS locations were geocoded and activity spaces were constructed by joining sequential points. We calculated the number of tobacco outlets around these polylines and around homes and schools. Results suggest that activity spaces provide a more accurate measure of tobacco outlet exposures than traditional measures. Assessing tobacco outlet exposure within activity spaces may yield significant information to advance the field.

  12. Activities of Daily Living and Controls from within

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelan, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Controls from within, more commonly referred to as self-control, are fundamental skills that children and youth need to display every day in innumerable interactions in order to function well in society. The children and youth who get referred to child and youth care (CYC) programs usually lack adequate self-control skills, creating difficulty for…

  13. Skeletal Adaptation to Daily Activity: A Biochemical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Robert T.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Musculoskeletal forces generated by normal daily activity on Earth maintain the functional and structural properties of muscle and bone throughout most of one's adult life. A reduction in the level of cumulative daily loading caused by space flight, bed rest or spinal cord injury induces rapid muscle atrophy, functional changes in muscle, and bone resorption in regions subjected to the reduced loading. Bone cells in culture and bone tissue reportedly respond to a wide variety of non-mechanical and mechanical stimuli ranging, from electromagnetic fields, and hormones to small amplitude, high frequency vibrations, fluid flow, strain rate, and stress/strain magnitude. However, neither the transduction mechanism that transforms the mechanical input into a muscle or bone metabolic response nor the characteristics, of the loading history that directly or indirectly stimulates the cell is known. Identifying the factors contributing to the input stimulus will have a major impact on the design of effective countermeasures for long duration space flight. This talk will present a brief overview of current theories of bone remodeling and functional adaptation to mechanical loading. Work from our lab will be presented from the perspective of daily cumulative loading on Earth and its relationship to bone density and structure. Our objective is to use the tibia and calcaneus as model bone sites of cortical and cancellous bone adaptation, loaded daily by musculoskeletal forces in equilibrium with the ground reaction force. All materials that will be discussed are in the open scientific literature.

  14. Rural Active Living: A Call to Action.

    PubMed

    Umstattd Meyer, M Renée; Moore, Justin B; Abildso, Christiaan; Edwards, Michael B; Gamble, Abigail; Baskin, Monica L

    2016-01-01

    Rural residents are less physically active than their urban counterparts and disproportionately affected by chronic diseases and conditions associated with insufficient activity. While the ecological model has been successful in promoting and translating active living research in urban settings, relatively little research has been conducted in rural settings. The resulting research gap prohibits a comprehensive understanding and application of solutions for active living in rural America. Therefore, the purpose of this article was to assess the evidence base for an ecological model of active living for rural populations and outline key scientific gaps that inhibit the development and application of solutions. Specifically, we reexamined the 4 domains conceptualized by the model and suggest that there is a dearth of research specific to rural communities across all areas of the framework. Considering the limited rural-specific efforts, we propose areas that need addressing to mobilize rural active living researchers and practitioners into action.

  15. Movement disorder society unified Parkinson disease rating scale experiences in daily living: longitudinal changes and correlation with other assessments.

    PubMed

    Lang, Anthony E; Eberly, Shirley; Goetz, Christopher G; Stebbins, Glenn; Oakes, David; Marek, Ken; Ravina, Bernard; Tanner, Caroline M; Shoulson, Ira

    2013-12-01

    The Movement Disorder Society (MDS) commissioned a revision of the UPDRS with the goals of improving instructions and definitions, more accurately evaluating milder features, and assessing patient-reported outcomes and nonmotor features. To date, no study has evaluated longitudinal changes in components of the MDS-UPDRS over time or correlated these with changes in other scales of various symptoms. We assessed Parts I and II of the MDS-UPDRS (non-Motor and Motor Experiences of Daily Living [nM-EDL, M-EDL]) as well as a number of other scales of motor, cognitive and behavioral function in a large population of patients (n = 383) with early- to mid-stage Parkinson's disease (PD) who had previously participated in a trial of a putative disease-modifying agent. Both parts of a MDS-UPDRS showed significant change over the 3-year follow-up period, with M-EDL scores declining to a greater extent than nM-EDL. Both the scores and their changes over time correlated relatively well with other rating scales of similar disease aspects. Modest correlations with the original version of the UPDRS supported the increased attention to nonmotor symptoms as well as milder levels of severity in the MDS-UPDRS. The M-EDL was much more sensitive to change over time in these early- to mid-stage patients than the original UPDRS Activities of Daily Living (ADL) scale. Finally, we showed no change over time in a small group of individuals with dopamine transporter single-photon emission computed tomography scans without evidence for dopamine deficiency. The nM-EDL and M-EDL components of the MDS-UPDRS provide an effective, relevant measure of change in the broad spectrum of symptoms of PD over the first decade of the disease.

  16. Daily update of motor predictions by physical activity.

    PubMed

    Gueugneau, Nicolas; Schweighofer, Nicolas; Papaxanthis, Charalambos

    2015-12-03

    Motor prediction, i.e., the ability to predict the sensory consequences of motor commands, is critical for adapted motor behavior. Like speed or force, the accuracy of motor prediction varies in a 24-hour basis. Although the prevailing view is that basic biological markers regulate this circadian modulation, behavioral factors such as physical activity, itself modulated by the alternation of night and day, can also regulate motor prediction. Here, we propose that physical activity updates motor prediction on a daily basis. We tested our hypothesis by up- and down-regulating physical activity via arm-immobilization and high-intensity training, respectively. Motor prediction was assessed by measuring the timing differences between actual and mental arm movements. Results show that although mental movement time was modulated during the day when the arm was unconstrained, it remained constant when the arm was immobilized. Additionally, increase of physical activity, via release from immobilization or intense bout of training, significantly reduced mental movement time. Finally, mental and actual times were similar in the afternoon in the unconstrained condition, indicating that predicted and actual movements match after sufficient amount of physical activity. Our study supports the view that physical activity calibrates motor predictions on a daily basis.

  17. Contribution of Structured Exercise Class Participation and Informal Walking for Exercise to Daily Physical Activity in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tudor-Locke, C.; Jones, G. R.; Myers, A. M.; Paterson, D. H.; Ecclestone, N. A.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the physical activity and exercise habits of independent-living older adults from a structured exercise program, noting the contribution of formal and informal exercise participation relative to total daily physical activity measured using pedometer and daily activity logs. Participation in structured exercise was an important contributor…

  18. Reciprocal Associations between Family and Peer Conflict in Adolescents' Daily Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Grace H.; Flook, Lisa; Fuligni, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Using a daily diary method, this study assessed daily episodes of family and peer conflict among 578 adolescents in the 9th grade to examine potential bidirectional associations between the family and peer domains. Adolescents completed a daily diary checklist at the end of each day over a 14-day period to report events of conflict and their…

  19. Daily Physical Activity and Life Satisfaction across Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Jaclyn P.; Pincus, Aaron L.; Ram, Nilam; Conroy, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity is considered a valuable tool for enhancing life satisfaction. However, the processes linking these constructs likely differ across the adult lifespan. In older adults the association between physical activity and life satisfaction appears to involve usual levels of physical activity (i.e., a between-person association driven by differences between more and less active people). In younger adults the association has consistently been based on day-to-day physical activity (i.e., a within-person association driven by differences between more and less active days). To resolve this inconsistency, a daily diary study was conducted with a lifespan sample of community-dwelling adults (age 18– 89 years; N = 150) over three 21-day measurement bursts. Usual physical activity was positively associated with life satisfaction in middle and older adulthood; however, this association was not present in young adulthood. When present, this between-person association was mediated by physical and mental health. A within-person association between physical activity and life satisfaction was also present (and did not differ across age). Generally, on days when people were more physically active then was typical for them, they experienced greater life satisfaction. Age differences in life satisfaction followed a cubic trajectory: lower during emerging adulthood, higher during midlife, and lower during older adulthood. This study adds to accumulating evidence that daily fluctuations in physical activity have important implications for well-being regardless of age, and clarifies developmental differences in life satisfaction dynamics that can inform strategies for enhancing life satisfaction. PMID:26280838

  20. Daily physical activity and life satisfaction across adulthood.

    PubMed

    Maher, Jaclyn P; Pincus, Aaron L; Ram, Nilam; Conroy, David E

    2015-10-01

    Physical activity is considered a valuable tool for enhancing life satisfaction. However, the processes linking these constructs likely differ across the adult life span. In older adults the association between physical activity and life satisfaction appears to involve usual levels of physical activity (i.e., a between-person association driven by differences between more and less active people). In younger adults the association has consistently been based on day-to-day physical activity (i.e., a within-person association driven by differences between more and less active days). To resolve this inconsistency, a daily diary study was conducted with a life span sample of community-dwelling adults (age 18-89 years; N = 150) over three 21-day measurement bursts. Usual physical activity was positively associated with life satisfaction in middle and older adulthood; however, this association was not present in young adulthood. When present, this between-person association was mediated by physical and mental health. A within-person association between physical activity and life satisfaction was also present (and did not differ across age). Generally, on days when people were more physically active then was typical for them, they experienced greater life satisfaction. Age differences in life satisfaction followed a cubic trajectory: lower during emerging adulthood, higher during midlife, and lower during older adulthood. This study adds to accumulating evidence that daily fluctuations in physical activity have important implications for well-being regardless of age, and clarifies developmental differences in life satisfaction dynamics that can inform strategies for enhancing life satisfaction.

  1. Active living and injury risk.

    PubMed

    Parkkari, J; Kannus, P; Natri, A; Lapinleimu, I; Palvanen, M; Heiskanen, M; Vuori, I; Järvinen, M

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to get reliable insight into injury risk in various commuting and lifestyle activities, as well as recreational and competitive sports. A cohort of 3 657 persons was randomly selected from the 15- to 74-year-old Finnish population. Ninety-two percent (n = 3 363) of the subjects accepted to participate the one-year follow-up, record all their physical activities that lasted 15 min or more, and register all acute and overuse injuries that occurred during these activities. To collect the information, the study subjects were interviewed by phone by the trained personnel of the Statistics Finland three times in four-month intervals. The individual injury risk per exposure time was relatively low, ranging from 0.19 to 1.5 per 1 000 hours of participation, in commuting and lifestyle activities including walking and cycling to work, gardening, home repair, hunting and fishing, and, in sports such as golf, dancing, swimming, walking, and rowing. The risk was clearly higher in squash, orienteering, and contact and team sports, such as judo, wrestling, karate, rinkball, floorball, basketball, soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, and Finnish baseball ranging from 6.6 to 18.3 per 1 000 hours of participation. However, the highest absolute number of injuries occurred in low-risk activities, such as gardening, walking, home-repair, and cycling, because they are performed so often. In conclusion, individual injury risk per exposure hours is relatively low in commuting and lifestyle activities compared to many recreational and competitive sports. However, at a population level, these low-to-moderate intensity activities are widely practised producing a rather high absolute number of injuries, and thus, preventive efforts are needed in these activities, too.

  2. Effects of Positive and Negative Reinforcement on Daily Living Skills in Chronic Psychiatric Patients in Community Residences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippman, Matthew R.; Motta, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    Examined contingent positive and negative reinforcement and adaptive behavior and mood among 36 chronic, psychiatric outpatients who received either contingent positive token reinforcement to improve daily living skills, negative reinforcement procedure based on removal of free-tokens, or no treatment. Found significant differences between control…

  3. Structural Equation Analyses of Clinical Subpopulation Differences and Comparative Treatment Outcomes: Characterizing the Daily Lives of Drug Addicts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiken, Leona S.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Used structural equation modeling for comparative treatment outcome research conducted with heterogeneous clinical subpopulations within large multimodality treatment settings. Evaluated effect of early period of treatment on daily lives of 486 clients in 2 drug abuse treatment modalities (methadone maintenance and outpatient counseling).…

  4. Understanding the Gap between Cognitive Abilities and Daily Living Skills in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders with Average Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Amie W.; Bishop, Somer L.

    2015-01-01

    Daily living skills standard scores on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-2nd edition were examined in 417 adolescents from the Simons Simplex Collection. All participants had at least average intelligence and a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder. Descriptive statistics and binary logistic regressions were used to examine the prevalence and…

  5. Social activities of older men who require daily support and the purpose of such activities.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Michiyo; Saeki, Kazuko; Ueda, Izumi; Honda, Hikaru; Mizuno, Yoshiko

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to analyze the social activities of older men who require daily support, and to clarify the purpose of such activities, in order to develop effective living support and preventive long-term care service, suitable for this population.Methods Individual, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 older men. Data were analyzed using inductive and qualitative methods.Results Four categories of social activities were identified, and four categories of purposes of these social activities were extracted. The following were the identified social activities: maintenance of "comfortable relationships with others," including family, relatives, friends, and neighbors; "participation and use of services and programs with clear objectives and relationships with others," such as long-term care insurance system services, clubs for the elderly, and hobby groups; maintenance of "relationships with former colleagues, depending on their experience of working with them," where some individuals actively participated in gatherings with former colleagues, while others did not keep in touch at all; and participation in "activities to enrich their feelings and quality of life within their living space," such as reading, watching TV, and doing household chores. The purposes of the observed social activities were to build "relationships with society through communication with other people" and to have a "sense of security by spending time with people of the same age and with those older than them." Hence, participants engaged in clubs for the elderly, as well as in hobby groups. In addition, participants made time for exercising regularly, which maintained their cognitive function and was intended for the "maintenance and activation of their physical functions by continuing to exercise," and "continuing to learn by thinking." Furthermore, participants engaged in the exercise or hobby groups that they were interested in, in order to

  6. Less-structured time in children's daily lives predicts self-directed executive functioning.

    PubMed

    Barker, Jane E; Semenov, Andrei D; Michaelson, Laura; Provan, Lindsay S; Snyder, Hannah R; Munakata, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    Executive functions (EFs) in childhood predict important life outcomes. Thus, there is great interest in attempts to improve EFs early in life. Many interventions are led by trained adults, including structured training activities in the lab, and less-structured activities implemented in schools. Such programs have yielded gains in children's externally-driven executive functioning, where they are instructed on what goal-directed actions to carry out and when. However, it is less clear how children's experiences relate to their development of self-directed executive functioning, where they must determine on their own what goal-directed actions to carry out and when. We hypothesized that time spent in less-structured activities would give children opportunities to practice self-directed executive functioning, and lead to benefits. To investigate this possibility, we collected information from parents about their 6-7 year-old children's daily, annual, and typical schedules. We categorized children's activities as "structured" or "less-structured" based on categorization schemes from prior studies on child leisure time use. We assessed children's self-directed executive functioning using a well-established verbal fluency task, in which children generate members of a category and can decide on their own when to switch from one subcategory to another. The more time that children spent in less-structured activities, the better their self-directed executive functioning. The opposite was true of structured activities, which predicted poorer self-directed executive functioning. These relationships were robust (holding across increasingly strict classifications of structured and less-structured time) and specific (time use did not predict externally-driven executive functioning). We discuss implications, caveats, and ways in which potential interpretations can be distinguished in future work, to advance an understanding of this fundamental aspect of growing up.

  7. Less-structured time in children's daily lives predicts self-directed executive functioning

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Jane E.; Semenov, Andrei D.; Michaelson, Laura; Provan, Lindsay S.; Snyder, Hannah R.; Munakata, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    Executive functions (EFs) in childhood predict important life outcomes. Thus, there is great interest in attempts to improve EFs early in life. Many interventions are led by trained adults, including structured training activities in the lab, and less-structured activities implemented in schools. Such programs have yielded gains in children's externally-driven executive functioning, where they are instructed on what goal-directed actions to carry out and when. However, it is less clear how children's experiences relate to their development of self-directed executive functioning, where they must determine on their own what goal-directed actions to carry out and when. We hypothesized that time spent in less-structured activities would give children opportunities to practice self-directed executive functioning, and lead to benefits. To investigate this possibility, we collected information from parents about their 6–7 year-old children's daily, annual, and typical schedules. We categorized children's activities as “structured” or “less-structured” based on categorization schemes from prior studies on child leisure time use. We assessed children's self-directed executive functioning using a well-established verbal fluency task, in which children generate members of a category and can decide on their own when to switch from one subcategory to another. The more time that children spent in less-structured activities, the better their self-directed executive functioning. The opposite was true of structured activities, which predicted poorer self-directed executive functioning. These relationships were robust (holding across increasingly strict classifications of structured and less-structured time) and specific (time use did not predict externally-driven executive functioning). We discuss implications, caveats, and ways in which potential interpretations can be distinguished in future work, to advance an understanding of this fundamental aspect of growing up

  8. Development of a smart garment to reduce kyphosis during daily living.

    PubMed

    Lou, Edmond; Lam, Gabrielle C; Hill, Douglas L; Wong, M S

    2012-11-01

    Many of the aches and pains of adults are the result of the long-term effects of bad posture or body misalignment. Postural kyphosis in adolescence, which is an excessive rounding of the upper spine, may be one of the effects of poor standing and sitting habits. A smart garment, consisting of a harness and two data-sensor loggers, was developed to monitor and provide vibration feedback to wearers to improve their posture during daily activities. Laboratory tests verified that the garment could provide an accuracy of 2 ± 2° during static measurement and 3 ± 2° during stable or slowly changing posture activities and 4 ± 4° during rapidly changing posture activities. Four volunteers wore the system for 3 h per day and for 4 consecutive days. The feedback was provided on the last 2 days and the kyphotic angle reduced by 8 ± 1° and 8 ± 2° on the last 2 days, respectively. Although the long-term effects of reminding the subjects' posture is still not clear, a short-term result shows promise that the smart garment may be able to improve the kyphosis.

  9. Predictive value of daily living score in acute respiratory failure of COPD patients requiring invasive mechanical ventilation pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation (MV) is imperative in many forms of acute respiratory failure (ARF) in COPD patients. Previous studies have shown the difficulty to identify parameters predicting the outcome of COPD patients treated by invasive MV. Our hypothesis was that a non specialized score as the activities daily living (ADL) score may help to predict the outcome of these patients. Methods We studied the outcome of 25 COPD patients admitted to the intensive care unit for ARF requiring invasive MV. The patients were divided into those weaning success (group A n = 17, 68%) or failure (group B n = 8, 32%). We investigated the correlation between the ADL score and the outcome and mortality. Results The ADL score was higher in group A (5.1 ±1.1 vs 3.7 ± 0.7 in group B, p < 0.01). Weaning was achieved in 76.5% of the cases with an ADL score ≥ 4 and in 23.5% of the cases with an ADL score < 4 (p < 0.05). Pulmonary function test, arterial blood gases collected during period of clinical stability and at admission and nutritional status were similar in both groups. The mortality, at six months, was 36%. The ADL score was a significant predictor of 6-month mortality (80 with an ADL score <4, 20 with an ADL score ≥4, p < 0.01). Conclusion Our pilot study demonstrates that the ADL score is predictive of weaning success and mortality at 6 months, suggesting that the assessment of daily activities should be an important component of ARF management in COPD patients. PMID:23078114

  10. Seasonal patterns of body temperature daily rhythms in group-living Cape ground squirrels Xerus inauris.

    PubMed

    Scantlebury, Michael; Danek-Gontard, Marine; Bateman, Philip W; Bennett, Nigel C; Manjerovic, Mary Beth; Manjerovic, Mary-Beth; Joubert, Kenneth E; Waterman, Jane M

    2012-01-01

    Organisms respond to cyclical environmental conditions by entraining their endogenous biological rhythms. Such physiological responses are expected to be substantial for species inhabiting arid environments which incur large variations in daily and seasonal ambient temperature (T(a)). We measured core body temperature (T(b)) daily rhythms of Cape ground squirrels Xerus inauris inhabiting an area of Kalahari grassland for six months from the Austral winter through to the summer. Squirrels inhabited two different areas: an exposed flood plain and a nearby wooded, shady area, and occurred in different social group sizes, defined by the number of individuals that shared a sleeping burrow. Of a suite of environmental variables measured, maximal daily T(a) provided the greatest explanatory power for mean T(b) whereas sunrise had greatest power for T(b) acrophase. There were significant changes in mean T(b) and T(b) acrophase over time with mean T(b) increasing and T(b) acrophase becoming earlier as the season progressed. Squirrels also emerged from their burrows earlier and returned to them later over the measurement period. Greater increases in T(b), sometimes in excess of 5°C, were noted during the first hour post emergence, after which T(b) remained relatively constant. This is consistent with observations that squirrels entered their burrows during the day to 'offload' heat. In addition, greater T(b) amplitude values were noted in individuals inhabiting the flood plain compared with the woodland suggesting that squirrels dealt with increased environmental variability by attempting to reduce their T(a)-T(b) gradient. Finally, there were significant effects of age and group size on T(b) with a lower and less variable T(b) in younger individuals and those from larger group sizes. These data indicate that Cape ground squirrels have a labile T(b) which is sensitive to a number of abiotic and biotic factors and which enables them to be active in a harsh and variable

  11. Psychosocial and Biological Markers of Daily Lives of Midlife Parents of Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Almeida, David M.; Greenberg, Jan S.; Savla, Jyoti; Stawski, Robert S.; Hong, Jinkuk; Taylor, Julie Lounds

    2009-01-01

    Using daily telephone interviews, 82 midlife parents (mean age = 57.4) of children with disabilities (mean age = 29.9) were compared with a closely matched sample of unaffected parents (N = 82) to elucidate the daily experience of non-normative parenting. In addition, salivary cortisol samples were obtained to examine whether parents of children…

  12. The daily life of elderly Germans: activity patterns, personal control, and functional health.

    PubMed

    Baltes, M M; Wahl, H W; Schmid-Furstoss, U

    1990-07-01

    Aging processes are often described as an interacting system of personal and environmental conditions. It is surprising, therefore, to find an almost complete lack of reliable data describing the everyday lives of the elderly in terms of external components such as type of activities, locations, and companionship. The present study is an attempt to remedy this lack of information and thereby provide a basis for a better understanding of aging processes. Forty-nine mobile and independently living elderly people (mean age = 72.7) recorded their daily activities over a period of 6 months. During a randomly selected week per month they kept a prestructured diary about what activities they engaged in, where, when, and with whom. In addition, functional health and personal control beliefs were assessed. The diaries were coded along 37 activity categories (inter-rater reliability estimated via Cohen's Kappa: M = .93), 5 categories for location and 6 categories for companionship. The major findings can be summarized as follows: The typical activity profile is characterized, in terms of highest frequency, by obligatory activities. In terms of time, however, they make up but little more than half of the day, predominantly the mornings. Afternoons and evenings, were mostly spent with leisure activities. The paths of daily lives of the elderly were marked by two geographic domains. The first and foremost is the home, followed by public places. With regard to the relationship between activities and personal control, we find a close relationship particularly when functional health is low.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Assessment of laboratory and daily energy expenditure estimates from consumer multi-sensor physical activity monitors

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Enhad A.; Western, Max J.; Nightingale, Thomas E.; Peacock, Oliver J.; Thompson, Dylan

    2017-01-01

    Wearable physical activity monitors are growing in popularity and provide the opportunity for large numbers of the public to self-monitor physical activity behaviours. The latest generation of these devices feature multiple sensors, ostensibly similar or even superior to advanced research instruments. However, little is known about the accuracy of their energy expenditure estimates. Here, we assessed their performance against criterion measurements in both controlled laboratory conditions (simulated activities of daily living and structured exercise) and over a 24 hour period in free-living conditions. Thirty men (n = 15) and women (n = 15) wore three multi-sensor consumer monitors (Microsoft Band, Apple Watch and Fitbit Charge HR), an accelerometry-only device as a comparison (Jawbone UP24) and validated research-grade multi-sensor devices (BodyMedia Core and individually calibrated Actiheart™). During discrete laboratory activities when compared against indirect calorimetry, the Apple Watch performed similarly to criterion measures. The Fitbit Charge HR was less consistent at measurement of discrete activities, but produced similar free-living estimates to the Apple Watch. Both these devices underestimated free-living energy expenditure (-394 kcal/d and -405 kcal/d, respectively; P<0.01). The multi-sensor Microsoft Band and accelerometry-only Jawbone UP24 devices underestimated most laboratory activities and substantially underestimated free-living expenditure (-1128 kcal/d and -998 kcal/d, respectively; P<0.01). None of the consumer devices were deemed equivalent to the reference method for daily energy expenditure. For all devices, there was a tendency for negative bias with greater daily energy expenditure. No consumer monitors performed as well as the research-grade devices although in some (but not all) cases, estimates were close to criterion measurements. Thus, whilst industry-led innovation has improved the accuracy of consumer monitors, these devices

  14. Assessment of laboratory and daily energy expenditure estimates from consumer multi-sensor physical activity monitors.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Enhad A; Western, Max J; Nightingale, Thomas E; Peacock, Oliver J; Thompson, Dylan

    2017-01-01

    Wearable physical activity monitors are growing in popularity and provide the opportunity for large numbers of the public to self-monitor physical activity behaviours. The latest generation of these devices feature multiple sensors, ostensibly similar or even superior to advanced research instruments. However, little is known about the accuracy of their energy expenditure estimates. Here, we assessed their performance against criterion measurements in both controlled laboratory conditions (simulated activities of daily living and structured exercise) and over a 24 hour period in free-living conditions. Thirty men (n = 15) and women (n = 15) wore three multi-sensor consumer monitors (Microsoft Band, Apple Watch and Fitbit Charge HR), an accelerometry-only device as a comparison (Jawbone UP24) and validated research-grade multi-sensor devices (BodyMedia Core and individually calibrated Actiheart™). During discrete laboratory activities when compared against indirect calorimetry, the Apple Watch performed similarly to criterion measures. The Fitbit Charge HR was less consistent at measurement of discrete activities, but produced similar free-living estimates to the Apple Watch. Both these devices underestimated free-living energy expenditure (-394 kcal/d and -405 kcal/d, respectively; P<0.01). The multi-sensor Microsoft Band and accelerometry-only Jawbone UP24 devices underestimated most laboratory activities and substantially underestimated free-living expenditure (-1128 kcal/d and -998 kcal/d, respectively; P<0.01). None of the consumer devices were deemed equivalent to the reference method for daily energy expenditure. For all devices, there was a tendency for negative bias with greater daily energy expenditure. No consumer monitors performed as well as the research-grade devices although in some (but not all) cases, estimates were close to criterion measurements. Thus, whilst industry-led innovation has improved the accuracy of consumer monitors, these devices

  15. The tool in the brain: apraxia in ADL. Behavioral and neurological correlates of apraxia in daily living.

    PubMed

    Bieńkiewicz, Marta M N; Brandi, Marie-Luise; Goldenberg, Georg; Hughes, Charmayne M L; Hermsdörfer, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Humans differ from other animals in the way they can skilfully and precisely operate or invent tools to facilitate their everyday life. Tools have dominated our home, travel and work environment, becoming an integral step for our motor skills development. What happens when the part of the brain responsible for tool use is damaged in our adult life due to a cerebrovascular accident? How does daily life change when we lose the previously mastered ability to make use of the objects around us? How do patients suffering from compromised tool use cope with food preparation, personal hygiene, grooming, housework, or use of home appliances? In this literature review we present a state of the art for single and multiple tool use research, with a focus on the impact that apraxia (impaired ability to perform tool-based actions) and action disorganization syndrome (ADS; impaired ability to carry out multi-step actions) have on activities of daily living (ADL). Firstly, we summarize the behavioral studies investigating the impact of apraxia and other comorbidity syndromes, such as neglect or visual extinction, on ADL. We discuss the hallmarks of the compromised tool use in terms of the sequencing of action steps, conceptual errors committed, spatial motor control, and temporal organization of the movement. In addition, we present an up-to-date overview of the neuroimaging and lesion analyses studies that provide an insight into neural correlates of tool use in the human brain and functional changes in the neural organization following a stroke, in the context of ADL. Finally we discuss the current practice in neurorehabilitation of ADL in apraxia and ADS aiming at increasing patients' independence.

  16. Understanding the Provision of Assistive Mobility and Daily Living Devices and Service Delivery to Veterans After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kairalla, John A.; Winkler, Sandra L.; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The objective of this study was to determine whether facility-level, structural factors affect the provision of assistive devices and services. DESIGN. A retrospective design was used. Activities of daily living and mobility-related devices were categorized into 11 types. Logistic regression models were performed for each type of device, controlling for patient-level and facility-level covariates. RESULTS. Non–veteran-level factors significantly affect the provision of assistive devices, even after covariate adjustment. Increased rehabilitation clinician staffing by 1 full-time equivalent position was associated with increased provision odds of 1%–5% for 5 of 11 types of devices. Lower facility complexity was significantly associated with increased provision odds of 35%–59% for 3 types of devices and with decreased provision odds of 16%–69% for 3 types of devices. CONCLUSION. System-level factors, in addition to patient need, significantly affect the provision of assistive devices. Provision guidelines could assist clinicians in making decisions about device provision. PMID:26709432

  17. An Evaluation of the Quality of Research on Evidence-Based Practices for Daily Living Skills for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Ee Rea; Ganz, Jennifer B.; Ninci, Jennifer; Neely, Leslie; Gilliland, Whitney; Boles, Margot

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a literature review of interventions for improving daily living skills of individuals with ASD. This review investigated the quality of the design and evidence of the literature base and determined the state of the evidence base related to interventions for improving daily living skills of individuals with ASD. Included studies…

  18. Comparison of accelerometry and oxymetry for measuring daily physical activity.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yumiko; Kawamura, Takashi; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Noda, Akiko; Hirai, Makoto; Saito, Hidehiko; Ohno, Yoshiyuki

    2002-08-01

    To assess the validity of accelerometry in measuring daily physical activity, the energy consumption calculated by accelerometry, with respiratory gas analysis as a reference, was evaluated in 45 non-athletes during various exercise tests. Subjects were required to (1) walk on a treadmill ergometer at various speeds, (2) walk on a treadmill ergometer at a fixed speed and with a stride of 20% more or 20% less than that when walking freely, (3) walk on a treadmill ergometer at a fixed speed wearing either sneakers or leather-soled shoes, and (4) cycle on a bicycle ergometer. There were strong linear relationships between the measurements during the progressively graded treadmill test, with an overall Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.97. The mean estimated difference ranged from -0.77 to 0.27 kcal/min and the coefficients of variation from 13.2% to 22.2%. However, the difference between the methods was not negligible for individual subjects. Accelerometry overestimated energy expenditure during short-step walking, and underestimated it during long-step walking. No significant difference in energy expenditure was found according to the type of shoes worn. Cycling activity was not recorded by accelerometry. Accelerometry is a reasonably accurate and feasible method for evaluating the physical activities of non-athletes, and could be a common tool for epidemiological research and health promotion despite its limitations.

  19. Live Scale Active Shooter Exercise: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ervin, Randy

    2008-01-01

    On October 23, 2007, the Lake Land College Public Safety Department conducted a full-scale live exercise that simulated an active shooter and barricaded hostage. In this article, the author will emphasize what they learned, and how they intend to benefit from it. He will list the law enforcement issues and general issues they encountered, and then…

  20. Mineral resources: out of the ground...into our daily lives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frank, Dave; Weathers, Judy; Galloway, John

    2001-01-01

    Minerals and mineral resources are a part of our everyday lives. This poster depicts a home and shows the different mineral(s) and mineral materials used to make the various products found in the average home.

  1. Association between sarcopenia and higher-level functional capacity in daily living in community-dwelling elderly subjects in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Yoshimi; Watanabe, Misuzu; Sun, Wei; Sugiura, Yumiko; Tsuda, Yuko; Kimura, Motoshi; Hayashida, Itsushi; Kusabiraki, Toshiyuki; Kono, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the association between sarcopenia, defined by muscle mass, muscle strength, and physical performance, and higher-level functional capacity in community-dwelling Japanese elderly people. Subjects were 1158 elderly, community-dwelling Japanese people aged 65 or older. We used bioelectrical impedance analysis to measure muscle mass, grip strength to measure muscle strength, and usual walking speed to measure physical performance. Sarcopenia was characterized by low muscle mass, plus low muscle strength or low physical performance. Subjects without low muscle mass, low muscle strength, and low physical performance were classified as "normal." Examination of higher-level functional capacity was performed using the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology Index of Competence (TMIG-IC). The TMIG-IC is a 13-item questionnaire completed by the subject; it contains five questions on self-maintenance and four questions each on intellectual activity and social role. Sarcopenia was identified in 11.3% and 10.7% of men and women, respectively. The percentage of disability for instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) was 39.0% in men with sarcopenia and 30.6% in women with sarcopenia. After adjustment for age, in men, sarcopenia was significantly associated with IADL disability compared with intermediate and normal subjects. In women, sarcopenia was significantly associated with every subscale of the TMIG-IC disability compared with intermediate and normal subjects. This study revealed that sarcopenia, defined by muscle mass, muscle strength, and physical performance, had a significant association with disability in higher-level functional capacity in elderly Japanese subjects. Interventions to prevent sarcopenia may prevent higher-level functional disability among elderly people.

  2. A Survey of Daily Trips of Persons Who Are Visually Impaired Living in Communities in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimizu, Michiko

    2009-01-01

    According to the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare of Japan (2006), there are 379,000 persons with visual impairments (both those who are blind and those with low vision) in Japan. Of these persons, 30% travel almost daily, 30% travel two to three days per week, 22% travel two to three days per month, and 11% travel several days a year; in…

  3. Gender and Age Differences in Hourly and Daily Patterns of Sedentary Time in Older Adults Living in Retirement Communities

    PubMed Central

    Bellettiere, John; Carlson, Jordan A.; Rosenberg, Dori; Singhania, Anant; Natarajan, Loki; Berardi, Vincent; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Sears, Dorothy D.; Moran, Kevin; Crist, Katie; Kerr, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Background Total sedentary time varies across population groups with important health consequences. Patterns of sedentary time accumulation may vary and have differential health risks. The purpose of this study is to describe sedentary patterns of older adults living in retirement communities and illustrate gender and age differences in those patterns. Methods Baseline accelerometer data from 307 men and women (mean age = 84±6 years) who wore ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers for ≥ 4 days as part of a physical activity intervention were classified into bouts of sedentary time (<100 counts per minute). Linear mixed models were used to account for intra-person and site-level clustering. Daily and hourly summaries were examined in mutually non-exclusive bouts of sedentary time that were 1+, 5+, 10+, 20+, 30+, 40+, 50+, 60+, 90+ and 120+ minutes in duration. Variations by time of day, age and gender were explored. Results Men accumulated more sedentary time than women in 1+, 5+, 10+, 20+, 30+, 40+, 50+ and 60+ minute bouts; the largest gender-differences were observed in 10+ and 20+ minute bouts. Age was positively associated with sedentary time, but only in bouts of 10+, 20+, 30+, and 40+ minutes. Women had more daily 1+ minute sedentary bouts than men (71.8 vs. 65.2), indicating they break up sedentary time more often. For men and women, a greater proportion of time was spent being sedentary during later hours of the day than earlier. Gender differences in intra-day sedentary time were observed during morning hours with women accumulating less sedentary time overall and having more 1+ minute bouts. Conclusions Patterns identified using bouts of sedentary time revealed gender and age differences in the way in which sedentary time was accumulated by older adults in retirement communities. Awareness of these patterns can help interventionists better target sedentary time and may aid in the identification of health risks associated with sedentary behavior. Future studies

  4. The Daily Activity Report (DAR) a Novel Measure of Functional Outcome for Serious Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Velligan, Dawn I.; Mintz, Jim; Sierra, Cynthia; Martin, Mona L.; Fredrick, Megan; Maglinte, Gregory A.; Corey-Lisle, Patricia K.

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of real-world functional outcomes in clinical trials for medications targeting negative symptoms and cognitive impairment is extremely important. We tested the psychometric properties of the Daily Activity Report (DAR), a novel assessment of productive daily activity. We administered the DAR and additional assessments of functional outcome, functional capacity, cognition and symptomatology to 50 individuals with schizophrenia at 2 time points, 1 month apart and to 25 healthy controls. The DAR records a person’s daily activity for 7 consecutive days based upon phone calls made 3 times a day. A total score and scores in 3 domains; instrumental activities (ie, independent living), social and work or school related activities are generated for the DAR. Inter-item consistency was high 0.89–0.94 for each domain and 0.88 overall. Test–retest reliability across 1 month for the total DAR score was 0.67, P < .0001. The total DAR score as well as scores for social activity and nondomestic work/school differed significantly between control and patient participants (P < .0001). DAR domain scores were associated with negative symptoms and functional outcomes, but the primary score related to these measures was the work/school dimension of the DAR. DAR scores were only weakly and nonsignificantly related to positive symptoms. This study provides preliminary support for the reliability and validity of the DAR using interviewer administration. The development of a patient reported version of the DAR using smart phone technology with automatic scoring is the next step. PMID:26712856

  5. "Active Living" Related to the Rural-Urban Continuum: A Time-Use Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millward, Hugh; Spinney, Jamie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper assesses the degree to which "active living" varies along the rural-urban continuum, within the county-sized regional municipality of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Methods: Time-diary data from the Halifax Space-Time Activity Research project were used to compute daily participation rates (PRs) and time durations, at various…

  6. Empathic accuracy for happiness in the daily lives of older couples: Fluid cognitive performance predicts pattern accuracy among men.

    PubMed

    Hülür, Gizem; Hoppmann, Christiane A; Rauers, Antje; Schade, Hannah; Ram, Nilam; Gerstorf, Denis

    2016-08-01

    Correctly identifying other's emotional states is a central cognitive component of empathy. We examined the role of fluid cognitive performance for empathic accuracy for happiness in the daily lives of 86 older couples (mean relationship length = 45 years; mean age = 75 years) on up to 42 occasions over 7 consecutive days. Men performing better on the Digit Symbol test were more accurate in identifying ups and downs of their partner's happiness. A similar association was not found for women. We discuss the potential role of fluid cognitive performance and other individual, partner, and situation characteristics for empathic accuracy. (PsycINFO Database Record

  7. Positive Technology for Healthy Living and Active Ageing.

    PubMed

    Riva, Giuseppe; Gaggioli, Andrea; Villani, Daniela; Cipresso, Pietro; Repetto, Claudia; Serino, Silvia; Triberti, Stefano; Brivio, Eleonora; Galimberti, Carlo; Graffigna, Guendalina

    2014-01-01

    Information and communication technologies are widely and rapidly spreading in people's daily lives. But what is the possible role of the mass proliferation of digital devices in supporting healthy living and active ageing? Are they useful in fostering personal growth and individual integration of the elderly, by promoting satisfaction, opportunities for action, and self-expression? Rather, do they enhance automation, impose constraints on personal initiative, and result in compulsive consumption of information? In this chapter, we suggest that possible answers to these questions will be offered by the "Positive Technology" approach, i.e., the scientific and applied approach to using technology so that it improves the quality of our personal experiences through its structuring, augmentation, and/or replacement. First, we suggest that it is possible to use technology to manipulate the quality of experience with the goal of increasing wellness and generating strengths and resilience in individuals, organizations, and society. Then, we classify positive technologies according to their effects on these three features of personal experience - Hedonic: technologies used to induce positive and pleasant experiences; Eudaimonic: technologies used to support individuals in reaching engaging and self-actualizing experiences; Social/Interpersonal: technologies used to support and improve the connectedness between individuals, groups, and organizations. Finally, we discuss the possible role of positive technologies for healthy living and active ageing by presenting different practical applications of this approach.

  8. Mind wandering in Chinese daily lives--an experience sampling study.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaolan; Wang, Xiao

    2012-01-01

    Mind wandering has recently received extensive research because it reveals an important characteristic of our consciousness: conscious experience can arise internally and involuntarily. As the first attempt to examine mind wandering in a non-western population, the present study used experience-sampling method to collect the daily momentary mind wandering episodes in a Chinese sample. The results showed that mind wandering was also a ubiquitous experience among the Chinese population, and, instead of emerging out of nowhere, it was often elicited by external or internal cues. Furthermore, most of the mind wandering episodes involved prospective thinking and were closely related to one's personal life. Finally, the frequency of mind wandering was influenced by some contextual factors. These results taken together suggest that mind wandering plays an important role in helping people to maintain a continuous feeling of "self" and to prepare them to cope with the upcoming events.

  9. "I'll Speak in Proper Slang": Language Ideologies in a Daily Editing Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godley, Amanda J.; Carpenter, Brian D.; Werner, Cynthia A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the language ideologies--the assumptions about the nature of language, language variation, and language learning--reflected in a widespread daily editing activity often known as Daily Oral Language or Daily Language Practice. Through a yearlong ethnographic study of grammar instruction in three urban,…

  10. Determining Connections between the Daily Lives of Zoo Elephants and Their Welfare: An Epidemiological Approach.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Cheryl L; Mench, Joy A; Carlstead, Kathy; Hogan, Jennifer N

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about animal welfare increasingly shape people's views about the acceptability of keeping animals for food production, biomedical research, and in zoos. The field of animal welfare science has developed over the past 50 years as a method of investigating these concerns via research that assesses how living in human-controlled environments influences the behavior, health and affective states of animals. Initially, animal welfare research focused on animals in agricultural settings, but the field has expanded to zoos because good animal welfare is essential to zoos' mission of promoting connections between animals and visitors and raising awareness of conservation issues. A particular challenge for zoos is ensuring good animal welfare for long-lived, highly social species like elephants. Our main goal in conducting an epidemiological study of African (Loxodonta africana) and Asian (Elephas maximus) elephant welfare in 68 accredited North American zoos was to understand the prevalence of welfare indicators in the population and determine the aspects of an elephant's zoo environment, social life and management that are most important to prevent and reduce a variety of welfare problems. In this overview, we provide a summary of the findings of the nine papers in the collection titled: Epidemiological Investigations of North American Zoo Elephant Welfare with a focus on the life history, social, housing, and management factors found to be associated with particular aspects of elephant welfare, including the performance of abnormal behavior, foot and joint problems, recumbence, walking rates, and reproductive health issues. Social and management factors were found to be important for multiple indicators of welfare, while exhibit space was found to be less influential than expected. This body of work results from the largest prospective zoo-based animal welfare study conducted to date and sets in motion the process of using science-based welfare benchmarks to

  11. Determining Connections between the Daily Lives of Zoo Elephants and Their Welfare: An Epidemiological Approach

    PubMed Central

    Meehan, Cheryl L.; Mench, Joy A.; Carlstead, Kathy; Hogan, Jennifer N.

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about animal welfare increasingly shape people’s views about the acceptability of keeping animals for food production, biomedical research, and in zoos. The field of animal welfare science has developed over the past 50 years as a method of investigating these concerns via research that assesses how living in human-controlled environments influences the behavior, health and affective states of animals. Initially, animal welfare research focused on animals in agricultural settings, but the field has expanded to zoos because good animal welfare is essential to zoos’ mission of promoting connections between animals and visitors and raising awareness of conservation issues. A particular challenge for zoos is ensuring good animal welfare for long-lived, highly social species like elephants. Our main goal in conducting an epidemiological study of African (Loxodonta africana) and Asian (Elephas maximus) elephant welfare in 68 accredited North American zoos was to understand the prevalence of welfare indicators in the population and determine the aspects of an elephant’s zoo environment, social life and management that are most important to prevent and reduce a variety of welfare problems. In this overview, we provide a summary of the findings of the nine papers in the collection titled: Epidemiological Investigations of North American Zoo Elephant Welfare with a focus on the life history, social, housing, and management factors found to be associated with particular aspects of elephant welfare, including the performance of abnormal behavior, foot and joint problems, recumbence, walking rates, and reproductive health issues. Social and management factors were found to be important for multiple indicators of welfare, while exhibit space was found to be less influential than expected. This body of work results from the largest prospective zoo-based animal welfare study conducted to date and sets in motion the process of using science-based welfare benchmarks

  12. Capturing Intrusive Re-experiencing in Trauma Survivors’ Daily Lives Using Ecological Momentary Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Intrusive memories are common following traumatic events and among the hallmark symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Most studies assess summarized accounts of intrusions retrospectively. We used an ecological momentary approach and index intrusive memories in trauma survivors with and without PTSD using electronic diaries. Forty-six trauma survivors completed daily diaries for 7 consecutive days recording a total of 294 intrusions. Participants with PTSD experienced only marginally more intrusions than those without PTSD, but experienced them with more “here and now quality,” and responded with more fear, helplessness, anger, and shame than those without PTSD. Most frequent intrusion triggers were stimuli that were perceptually similar to stimuli from the trauma. Individuals with PTSD experienced diary-prompted voluntary trauma memories with the same sense of nowness and vividness as involuntary intrusive trauma memories. The findings contribute to a better understanding of everyday experiences of intrusive reexperiencing in trauma survivors with PTSD and offer clinical treatment implications. PMID:24364602

  13. An Evidence-Based Adoption of Technology Model for Remote Monitoring of Elders’ Daily Activities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    What benefit will new technologies offer if they are inadequately or not used? This work presents a meta-synthesis of adoption of technology related findings from four innovative monitoring intervention research studies with older adults and their informal and/or formal caregivers. Each study employed mixed methods analyses that lead to an understanding of the key variables that influenced adoption of telephone and Internet based wireless remote monitoring technologies by elders and their caregivers. The studies were all conducted in “real world” homes ranging from solo residences to multi-story independent living residential buildings. Insights gained came from issues not found in controlled laboratory environments but in the complex interplay of family-elder-staff dynamics around balancing safety and independence. Findings resulted in an adoption of technology model for remote monitoring of elders’ daily activities derived from evidence based research to advance both practical and theoretical development in the field of gerontechnology. PMID:21423843

  14. Relations between Daily Activities and Adolescent Mood: The Role of Autonomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Sally M.; Mermelstein, Robin

    2007-01-01

    This study explored the combined influences of daily activities and autonomy in activity engagement on adolescent daily positive and negative moods. Ecological momentary assessments (EMA) were used to obtain information about 8th- and 10th-grade students' (N = 517) mood, activities, and situation throughout the day. Participants responded to…

  15. Circadian activity rhythm in pre-pubertal and pubertal marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) living in family groups.

    PubMed

    Melo, Paula R; Gonçalves, Bruno S B; Menezes, Alexandre A L; Azevedo, Carolina V M

    2016-03-01

    In marmosets, a phase advance was observed in activity onset in pubertal animals living in captivity under semi-natural conditions which had stronger correlation with the times of sunrise over the course of the year than the age of the animal. In order to evaluate the effect of puberty on the circadian activity rhythm in male and female marmosets living in family groups in controlled lighting conditions, the activity of 5 dyads of twins (4 ♀/♂ and 1 ♂/♂) and their respective parents was continuously monitored by actiwatches between the 4th and 12th months of age. The families were kept under LD 12:12 h with constant humidity and temperature. The onset of puberty was identified by monitoring fecal steroids. Juveniles showed higher totals of daily activity and differences in the daily distribution of activity in relation to parents, in which the bimodal profile was characterized by higher levels in evening activity in relation to morning activity. Regarding the phase, the activity onset and offset, occurred later in relation to parents. After entering puberty, the activity onset and offset occurred later and there was an increase in total daily activity. On the other hand, when assessing the effect of sex, only females showed a delay in the activity offset and an increase in total daily activity. Therefore, the circadian activity rhythm in marmosets has peculiar characteristics in the juvenile stage in relation to the total of daily activity, the onset and offset of the active phase, and the distribution of activity during this phase. Besides, the entering puberty was associated with a phase delay and increase on total daily activity, with differences between sexes, possibly due to hormonal influences and/or social modulation on rhythm.

  16. Bursts of Active Transport in Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Kuo, James; Granick, Steve

    2013-11-01

    We show, using a large new data set, that the temporally resolved speed of active cargo transport in living cells follows a scaling law over several decades of time and length. The statistical regularities display a time-averaged shape that we interpret to reflect stress buildup, followed by rapid release. The scaling power law agrees quantitatively with those reported in inanimate systems (jammed colloids and granular media, and magnetic Barkhausen noise), suggesting a common origin in pushing through a crowded environment in a weak force regime. The implied regulation of the speed of active cellular transport due to environmental obstruction results in bursts of speed and acceleration. These findings extend the classical notion of molecular crowding.

  17. Bursts of active transport in living cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Kuo, James; Granick, Steve

    2013-11-15

    We show, using a large new data set, that the temporally resolved speed of active cargo transport in living cells follows a scaling law over several decades of time and length. The statistical regularities display a time-averaged shape that we interpret to reflect stress buildup, followed by rapid release. The scaling power law agrees quantitatively with those reported in inanimate systems (jammed colloids and granular media, and magnetic Barkhausen noise), suggesting a common origin in pushing through a crowded environment in a weak force regime. The implied regulation of the speed of active cellular transport due to environmental obstruction results in bursts of speed and acceleration. These findings extend the classical notion of molecular crowding.

  18. Impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease on patients' daily lives: a European observational study in the primary care setting

    PubMed Central

    Gisbert, Javier P; Cooper, Alun; Karagiannis, Dimitrios; Hatlebakk, Jan; Agréus, Lars; Jablonowski, Helmut; Zapardiel, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Background The impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) on the daily lives of patients managed in primary care is not well known. We report the burden of GERD in a large population of patients managed in primary care, in terms of symptoms and impact on patients' daily lives. Methods RANGE (Retrospective ANalysis of GERD) was an observational study that was conducted at 134 primary care sites across six European countries. All adult subjects who had consulted their primary care physician (PCP) during a 4-month identification period were screened retrospectively and those consulting at least once for GERD-related reasons were identified. From this population, a random sample of patients was selected to enter the study and attended a follow-up appointment, during which the Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ), the GERD Impact Scale (GIS) and an extra-esophageal symptoms questionnaire were self-administered. Based on medical records, data were collected on demographics, history of GERD, its diagnostic work-up and therapy. Results Over the 4-month identification period, 373,610 subjects consulted their PCP and 12,815 (3.4%) did so for GERD-related reasons. From 2678 patients interviewed (approximately 75% of whom reported taking medication for GERD symptoms), symptom recurrence following a period of remission was the most common reason for consultation (35%). At the follow-up visit, with regard to RDQ items (score range 0–5, where high score = worse status), mean Heartburn dimension scores ranged from 0.8 (Sweden) to 1.2 (UK) and mean Regurgitation dimension scores ranged from 1.0 (Norway) to 1.4 (Germany). Mean overall GIS scores (range 1–4, where low score = worse status) ranged from 3.3 (Germany) to 3.5 (Spain). With regard to extra-esophageal symptoms, sleep disturbance was common in all countries in terms of both frequency and intensity. Conclusion In this large European observational study, GERD was associated with a substantial impact on the daily lives

  19. Daily variation of radon gas and its short-lived progeny concentration near ground level and estimation of aerosol residence time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Mohery; A, M. Abdallah; A, Ali; S, S. Baz

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of radon (222Rn) gas and its short-lived progenies 218Po, 214Pb, and 214Po were continuously monitored every four hours at the ground level in Jeddah city, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The measurements were performed three times every week, starting from November 2014 to October 2015. A method of electrostatic precipitation of positively charged 218Po and 214Po by a positive voltage was applied for determining 222Rn gas concentration. The short-lived 222Rn progeny concentration was determined by using a filter holder connected with the alpha-spectrometric technique. The meteorological parameters (relative air humidity, air temperature, and wind speed) were determined during the measurements of 222Rn and its progeny concentrations. 222Rn gas as well as its short-lived progeny concentration display a daily and seasonal variation with high values in the night and early morning hours as compared to low values at noon and in the afternoon. The observed monthly atmospheric concentrations showed a seasonal trend with the highest values in the autumn/winter season and the lowest values in the spring/summer season. Moreover, and in parallel with alpha-spectrometric measurements, a single filter-holder was used to collect air samples. The deposited activities of 214Pb and the long-lived 222Rn daughter 210Pb on the filter were measured with the gamma spectrometric technique. The measured activity concentrations of 214Pb by both techniques were found to be relatively equal largely. The highest mean seasonally activity concentrations of 210Pb were observed in the autumn/winter season while the lowest mean were observed in the spring/summer season. The mean residence time (MRT) of aerosol particles in the atmospheric air could be estimated from the activity ratios of 210Pb/214Pb. Project supported by the Deanship of Scientific Research (DSR), King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Grant No. 291/965/1434).

  20. Substituting activities mediates the effect of cognitive flexibility on physical activity: a daily diary study.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Scout M; Updegraff, John A

    2017-03-02

    Pursuit of physical activity goals often requires modifying plans, but research on these flexible processes is limited. Cognitive flexibility may heighten one's likelihood of using flexible self-regulatory strategies (e.g., substitution), thereby increasing physical activity. This study used daily diary methodology to test the indirect effect of cognitive flexibility on physical activity via activity substitution. A sample of 128 college students (73% female, mean age 19.9) completed baseline measures and cognitive flexibility assessments, then logged physical activity daily for 2 weeks. Activity substitution was defined as adopting an alternate activity on a day another planned activity was unfulfilled. Controlling for baseline activity, intentions, and time, a multilevel mediation model revealed a significant indirect effect of cognitive flexibility on physical activity via activity substitution (b = 81.36, p = .041). Our results indicate that people with greater cognitive flexibility are more likely to use flexible self-regulation, leading to greater physical activity.

  1. Living science: Science as an activity of living beings.

    PubMed

    MacLennan, Bruce J

    2015-12-01

    The philosophy of science should accommodate itself to the facts of human existence, using all aspects of human experience to adapt more effectively, as individuals, species, and global ecosystem. This has several implications: (1) Our nature as sentient beings interacting with other sentient beings requires the use of phenomenological methods to investigate consciousness. (2) Our embodied, situated, purposeful physical interactions with the world are the foundation of scientific understanding. (3) Aristotle's four causes are essential for understanding living systems and, in particular, the final cause aids understanding the role of humankind, and especially science, in the global ecosystem. (4) In order to fulfill this role well, scientists need to employ the full panoply of human faculties. These include the consciousness faculties (thinking, sensation, feeling, intuition), and therefore, as advocated by many famous scientists, we should cultivate our aesthetic sense, emotions, imagination, and intuition. Our unconscious faculties include archetypal structures common to all humans, which can guide scientific discovery. By striving to engage the whole of human nature, science will fulfill better its function for humans and the global ecosystem.

  2. Difficulty with daily activities involving the lower extremities in people with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Poole, Janet L; Brandenstein, Jane

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent of lower extremity impairments in motion and strength in people with systemic sclerosis and the relationships of the impairments to limitations in activities of daily living primarily involving the lower extremities. Participants were 69 persons with SSc who received evaluations of lower extremity joint motion (Keitel function test), strength (timed-stands test), and basic mobility (timed up and go test) and completed a demographic questionnaire regarding symptoms in the lower extremities. Activity limitations were measured by the Rheumatoid and Arthritis Outcome Score (RAOS) which examines functional ability, pain, and quality of life. The participants had difficulty with items requiring external rotation of the hips and lower extremity strength. There were moderate correlations between the impairment measures of joint motion, strength, mobility, and activity limitations. Fair correlations were found between the skin scores and the RAOS sections except for pain. The results of this study show that lower extremity involvement is present in persons with SSc. The findings, regarding strength, mobility, and joint motion are related to the ability to perform everyday activities involving the lower extremities, suggest that these areas should be targeted for intervention in persons with SSc.

  3. Daily Physical Activity and Life Satisfaction across Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Jaclyn P.; Pincus, Aaron L.; Ram, Nilam; Conroy, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity is considered a valuable tool for enhancing life satisfaction. However, the processes linking these constructs likely differ across the adult life span. In older adults the association between physical activity and life satisfaction appears to involve usual levels of physical activity (i.e., a between-person association driven by…

  4. Developing a model for understanding patient collection of observations of daily living: A qualitative meta-synthesis of the Project HealthDesign Program.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Deborah J; Keller, Sara R; Hayes, Gillian R; Dorr, David A; Ash, Joan S; Sittig, Dean F

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a meta-synthesis of five different studies that developed, tested, and implemented new technologies for the purpose of collecting Observations of Daily Living (ODL). From this synthesis, we developed a model to explain user motivation as it relates to ODL collection. We describe this model that includes six factors that motivate patients' collection of ODL data: usability, illness experience, relevance of ODLs, information technology infrastructure, degree of burden, and emotional activation. We show how these factors can act as barriers or facilitators to the collection of ODL data and how interacting with care professionals and sharing ODL data may also influence ODL collection, health-related awareness, and behavior change. The model we developed and used to explain ODL collection can be helpful to researchers and designers who study and develop new, personal health technologies to empower people to improve their health.

  5. Developing a model for understanding patient collection of observations of daily living: A qualitative meta-synthesis of the Project HealthDesign Program

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Deborah J.; Keller, Sara R.; Hayes, Gillian R.; Dorr, David A.; Ash, Joan S.; Sittig, Dean F.

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a meta-synthesis of five different studies that developed, tested, and implemented new technologies for the purpose of collecting Observations of Daily Living (ODL). From this synthesis, we developed a model to explain user motivation as it relates to ODL collection. We describe this model that includes six factors that motivate patients’ collection of ODL data: usability, illness experience, relevance of ODLs, information technology infrastructure, degree of burden, and emotional activation. We show how these factors can act as barriers or facilitators to the collection of ODL data and how interacting with care professionals and sharing ODL data may also influence ODL collection, health-related awareness, and behavior change. The model we developed and used to explain ODL collection can be helpful to researchers and designers who study and develop new, personal health technologies to empower people to improve their health. PMID:26949381

  6. The Daily Lives of People With HIV Infection: A Qualitative Study of the Control Group in an Expressive Writing Intervention.

    PubMed

    Metaweh, Maria; Ironson, Gail; Barroso, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Emotional disclosure is an expressive writing technique used in psychotherapy to process traumatic and stressful life experiences. While emotional disclosure interventions frequently use control groups, there are few qualitative analyses of these control groups. Our study's purpose was to analyze the control essays written by HIV-infected informants about their daily activities in an augmented written emotional disclosure intervention. Latent and manifest qualitative content analyses revealed prevalent contextual themes within the data. The emergent themes were socioeconomic status (SES), self-care, religiosity/spirituality, and social support. Emotional disclosure control subjects contributed substantial findings in terms of SES, self-care, resiliency, religiosity/spirituality, and social support and altruism.

  7. Weakly Supervised Recognition of Daily Life Activities with Wearable Sensors.

    PubMed

    Stikic, Maja; Larlus, Diane; Ebert, Sandra; Schiele, Bernt

    2011-12-01

    This paper considers scalable and unobtrusive activity recognition using on-body sensing for context awareness in wearable computing. Common methods for activity recognition rely on supervised learning requiring substantial amounts of labeled training data. Obtaining accurate and detailed annotations of activities is challenging, preventing the applicability of these approaches in real-world settings. This paper proposes new annotation strategies that substantially reduce the required amount of annotation. We explore two learning schemes for activity recognition that effectively leverage such sparsely labeled data together with more easily obtainable unlabeled data. Experimental results on two public data sets indicate that both approaches obtain results close to fully supervised techniques. The proposed methods are robust to the presence of erroneous labels occurring in real-world annotation data.

  8. Daily activity rhythms in the intertidal gastropod Hydrobia ulvae (Pennant)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, R. S. K.

    1986-03-01

    The intertidal gastropod Hydrobia ulvae was subjected experimentally in undisturbed core samples to different combinations of the presence or absence of light and of cover by seawater. As displayed in the field, a greater proportion of snails were active in the dark than in the light, and when covered by water as opposed to being provided only with a damp sediment surface. A slight, but significant, rhythmic change in activity levels, with a period averaging 24·5 h, was shownby animals maintained under conditions of constant darkness and of damp sediment surface. Peak activity in this rhythm, which is equivalent to only 1·3-1·6 times minimum levels, did not coincide with the peaks of activity displayed during the more marked rhythmic response of H. ulvae to natural fluctuations in light intensity and tidal water cover, however, and this presumed endogenous rhythm does not appear to contribute to such rhythmic activity in the field. Increased proportional activity in nature is suggested to be most likely a direct response to changes in ambient light intensity and to the presence or absence of water cover.

  9. Daily doses of biologically active UV radiation retrieved from commonly available parameters.

    PubMed

    de La Casinière, Alain; Touré, Mamadou Lamine; Masserot, Dominique; Cabot, Thierry; Pinedo Vega, Jose Luis

    2002-08-01

    A multiple linear correlation is done between atmospheric transmissivity for four biologically active radiation daily doses (UVB, erythemal, DNA and plant damage) T, and three parameters (daily sunshine fraction sigma, cosine of the daily minimum solar zenith angle mu min and daily total ozone column omega). T is defined as the ratio of a daily dose to its extra-atmospheric value. The data used are spectral UV measurements (390-400 nm at 0.5 nm step) recorded along year 2000 and over 8 months of year 2001 at Briançon Station (Alps, 1300 m above sea level) that forms part of the French UV network. The coefficients obtained from year 2000 correlation permit to retrieve daily doses for year 2001 with an average error running from 3 to 9% for monthly mean values and from 2 to 4.5% for 3-monthly mean values, depending on daily dose type. The retrieval of yearly mean value gives an error between 4 and 7.5%. Retrieving the daily dose of a given day, where sigma > or = 0.2, introduces error running from 16 to 32% depending on daily dose. An attempt to retrieve the yearly mean UVB daily dose for a northern France site, from the previous coefficients, gives encouraging results.

  10. Daily Variation in Adolescents' Sleep, Activities, and Psychological Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuligni, Andrew J.; Hardway, Christina

    2006-01-01

    The daily diary method was used to examine the daily dynamics of adolescent sleep time, activities, and psychological well-being among an ethnically diverse sample of over 750 adolescents approximately 14-15 years of age. Studying and stressful demands during the day were modestly but consistently associated with less sleep that evening. Receiving…

  11. Increases in Physical Activity Result in Diminishing Increments in Daily Energy Expenditure in Mice.

    PubMed

    O'Neal, Timothy J; Friend, Danielle M; Guo, Juen; Hall, Kevin D; Kravitz, Alexxai V

    2017-02-06

    Exercise is a common component of weight loss strategies, yet exercise programs are associated with surprisingly small changes in body weight [1-4]. This may be due in part to compensatory adaptations, in which calories expended during exercise are counteracted by decreases in other aspects of energy expenditure [1, 5-10]. Here we examined the relationship between a rodent model of voluntary exercise- wheel running- and total daily energy expenditure. Use of a running wheel for 3 to 7 days increased daily energy expenditure, resulting in a caloric deficit of ∼1 kcal/day; however, total daily energy expenditure remained stable after the first week of wheel access, despite further increases in wheel use. We hypothesized that compensatory mechanisms accounted for the lack of increase in daily energy expenditure after the first week. Supporting this idea, we observed a decrease in off-wheel ambulation when mice were using the wheels, indicating behavioral compensation. Finally, we asked whether individual variation in wheel use within a group of mice would be associated with different levels of daily energy expenditure. Despite a large variation in wheel running, we did not observe a significant relationship between the amount of daily wheel running and total daily energy expenditure or energy intake across mice. Together, our experiments support a model in which the transition from sedentary to light activity is associated with an increase in daily energy expenditure, but further increases in physical activity produce diminishingly small increments in daily energy expenditure.

  12. A survey of daily asthmatic activity patterns in Cincinnati

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    A survey was undertaken in Cincinnati to obtain information on the activity patterns of asthmatics. Because studies have demonstrated symptomatic responses to elevated levels of SO[sub 2] only during outdoor exercise, information on the behavioral patterns of asthmatics is vital for the accurate estimation of risk due to air pollution exposures. In particular, data detailing the actual likelihood of asthmatics being engaged in strenuous outdoor activity at any given time of day is essential for an accurate appraisal of response probability. This, in turn, is necessary for an accurate estimate of risk. In the absence of such activity data, those concerned with the setting of short-term SO[sub 2] regulations are required to use purely subjective judgment to estimate how many asthmatics are engaged in strenuous outdoor exercise when SO[sub 2] levels are high enough to affect them. The activity pattern data give an indication of how much such an assumption would overestimate the true response and thus the true risk associated with SO[sub 2]. Lack of information on the activity patterns of asthmatics has thus been a critical gap in the SO[sub 2] risk assessment process. The primary purpose of this survey was to fill that gap.

  13. Risk of violent crime victimization during major daily activities.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Andrew M; Felson, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to risk of violent crime is best understood after considering where people are, what they do, and for how long they do it. This article calculates Americans' exposure to violent attack per 10 million person-hours spent in different activities. Numerator data are from the National Crime Victimization Survey (2003-2008) estimates of violent incidents occurring during nine major everyday activities. Comparable denominator data are derived from the American Time Use Survey. The resulting time-based rates give a very different picture of violent crime victimization risk. Hour-for-hour, the greatest risk occurs during travel between activities. This general result holds for demographic subgroups and each type of violent crime victimization.

  14. Observational assessment of forceful exertion and the perceived force demands of daily activities.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Matthew M; Armstrong, Thomas J

    2004-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the accuracy and precision with which analysts observe and estimate the force produced as subjects performed exertions on a work simulator. Eight analysts observed 32 subjects and estimated force as a percent of subjects' maximum voluntary contraction (% MVC). Analysts exhibited bias toward the mean, as high force exertions (> 67% MVC) were underestimated (mean: 11.6% MVC) and low force exertions (<34% MVC) were overestimated (mean: 6.7% MVC). Average error for medium force exertions (34-67% MVC) was not statistically different from zero (2.1% MVC). For all force levels, precision of the estimate was very poor (standard deviation range: 16.2-20.7% MVC). Experience of the analyst in performing ergonomic analysis did not affect accuracy. A secondary objective of the study was to conduct a survey in which subjects identified activities of daily living they perceived as equivalent to controlled force levels. A total of 59 different activities ranging from minimal force required to near maximum were listed by at least 5% of the participants. This list may be used to assist health care practitioners and patients convey the force demands required of occupational tasks as well as for evaluating the diminished strength of the patient.

  15. Daily physical activity and its contribution to the health-related quality of life of ambulatory individuals with chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Participation in daily physical activity (PA) post-stroke has not previously been investigated as a possible explanatory variable of health-related quality of life (HRQL). The aims were 1) to determine the contribution of daily PA to the HRQL of individuals with chronic stroke and 2) to assess the relationship between the functional ability of these individuals to the amount of daily PA. Methods The amount of daily PA of forty adults with chronic stroke (mean age 66.5 ± 9.6 years) was monitored using two measures. Accelerometers (Actical) were worn on the hip for three consecutive days in conjunction with a self-report questionnaire [the PA Scale for Individuals with Physical Disabilities (PASIPD)]. The daily physical activity was measured as the mean total accelerometer activity counts/day and the PASIPD scores as the metabolic equivalent (MET) hr/day. HRQL was assessed by the Physical and Mental composite scores of the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36 (SF-36) in addition to the functional ability of the participants. Correlation and regression analyses were performed. Results After controlling for the severity of the motor impairment, the amount of daily PA, as assessed by the PASIPD and accelerometers, was found to independently contribute to 10-12% of the variance of the Physical Composite Score of the SF-36. No significant relationship was found between PA and the Mental Composite Score of the SF-36.The functional ability of the participants was found to be correlated to the amount of daily PA (r = 0.33 - 0.67, p < 0.01). Conclusion The results suggest that daily PA is associated with better HRQL (as assessed by the Physical composite score of the SF-36) for people living with stroke. Daily PA should be encouraged to potentially increase HRQL. Accelerometers in conjunction with a self-report questionnaire may provide important measures of PA which can be monitored and modified, and potentially influence HRQL. PMID:20682071

  16. Genetic Analysis of Daily Activity in Humans and Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    of the technical developments that have made such genetic dissections a productive force in the mouse , have, when combined with innovations in...and Mice AFOSR grant F49620-97-1-0321 Joseph S. Takahashi Dept. of Neurobiology & Physiology Northwestern University 2153 North Campus Dr. Evanston...Activity in Humans and Mice Unclassified 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Takahashi, Joseph S. ; 5f. WORK

  17. Impacts of a documentary on the daily lives of mothers and children with disabilities: an analysis of cine debates.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Fátima Gonçalves; Lau, Luciana Ferreira; Barbosa, Gabriella Ferrarese; Berlim, Daniela Lima Gomes; Menezes, Natasha Coelho; Braga, Daniela de Carvalho; Amorim, Annibal Coelho de; Amorim, Yuri Cavalcante

    2016-10-01

    The article analyzes the impact of a documentary on the daily lives of mothers and children with disabilities, exhibited at conferences, festivals, universities and schools in Brazil, Colombia and Japan. Produced by film and health professionals, social scientists and a women's network, the feature film "A special day" was awarded at Assim Vivemos VI International Disability Film Festival (2013-2014). The objective is to analyze the impact of the film and its diffusion among professionals and students from health and education areas. We adopted a methodology of cine debates that were recorded, transcribed and coded. The circuit toured 22 locations with one or more exhibitions for 3.370 people, of which nine presentations were analyzed. Our interpretations were guided by the notions as life account, biographical pact, imaginary and social representation. We analyzed gender issues, family and maternal care; reactions, adaptations and life after the diagnosis of disabilities; discrimination and prejudice; school and inclusion. The study showed that the communicative and expressive power of film becomes a powerful social technology to address gender, maternity and disability as an important and strategic issue for public health in the country.

  18. Daily energy expenditure, physical activity, and weight loss in Parkinson's disease patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) commonly exhibit weight loss (WL) which investigators attribute to various factors, including elevated energy expenditure. We tested the hypothesis that daily energy expenditure (DEE) and its components, resting energy expenditure (REE) and physical activity (P...

  19. Kinase Activity Studied in Living Cells Using an Immunoassay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bavec, Aljos?a

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise demonstrates the use of an immunoassay for studying kinase enzyme activity in living cells. The advantage over the classical method, in which students have to isolate the enzyme from cell material and measure its activity in vitro, is that enzyme activity is modulated and measured in living cells, providing a more…

  20. Does the Q − H index show a stronger relationship than the H:Q ratio in regard to knee pain during daily activities in patients with knee osteoarthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Remi; Matsui, Yasumoto; Harada, Atsushi; Takemura, Marie; Kondo, Izumi; Nemoto, Tetsuya; Sakai, Tadahiro; Hiraiwa, Hideki; Ota, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to elucidate the relationship between knee muscle strength and knee pain in activities of daily living, based on consideration of the difference between extension and flexion strength (Q − H) and the hamstring:quadriceps (H:Q) ratio in patients with knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were 78 females with knee osteoarthritis, and a total of 133 knees that had not been treated surgically were the targets of this research. The legs were divided according to dominance. Isometric knee extension and flexion muscle strength and knee pain during activities of daily living were measured. The H:Q ratio (flexion/extension muscle strength) and the difference between extension and flexion strength, (extension muscle strength/weight) minus (flexion muscle strength/weight), that is, Q − H, were calculated. The correlation between these indices and the knee pain score during activities of daily living was investigated. [Results] Greater knee pain during activities of daily living was related to lower knee extension muscle strength and Q − H in both the dominant and nondominant legs. Knee flexion muscle strength and the H:Q ratio were not significantly correlated with knee pain during any activities of daily living. [Conclusion] Knee extension muscle strength and Q − H were found to be significantly correlated with knee pain during activities of daily living, whereas the H:Q ratio was not. PMID:28174444

  1. Development and Evaluation of the Curriculum for BOLD (Bronx Oncology Living Daily) Healthy Living: A Diabetes Prevention and Control Program for Underserved Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, Beth A.; Kahan, Michelle; Martinez, Melissa; Isaac, Kathleen; Rossi, Amerigo; Skyhart, Rebecca; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Moadel, Alyson B.

    2014-01-01

    Underserved minority communities have few resources for addressing comorbidity risk reduction among long-term cancer survivors. To address this community need, we developed and piloted the Bronx Oncology Living Daily (BOLD) Healthy Living program, the first known diabetes prevention and control program to target cancer survivors and co-survivors in Bronx County, New York. The program aimed to facilitate lifestyle change and improve health-related quality of life (HRQoL) through weekly group nutrition education (60–90 minutes) and exercise (60 minutes) classes. We examined baseline characteristics of participants using simple descriptive statistics, and evaluated program implementation and impact using the RE-AIM framework. The curriculum, which drew from the social-ecological framework and motivational and cognitive behavioral strategies, consisted of twelve culturally- and medically-tailored modules with options for implementation as a 12-week or 4-week program. Seven programs (four 12-week and three 4-week in length, respectively) were implemented at 5 community site locations. Sixty-six cancer survivors and 17 cancer co-survivors (mean age 60.5 ± 10.2 years) enrolled in one of the programs. Most participants were female (95.2%) minority (55.4% black, 26.5% Hispanic/Latino) breast cancer survivors (75.7%). Median program attendance was 62.5% and did not significantly differ by program length; however, 67.3% of participants achieved ≥60% attendance among the 12-week programs, compared to 41.9% among the 4-week programs, and this difference was statistically significant (p=0.02). Overall, participants reported significant pre/post improvements in perceived health as good/excellent (66.0% to 75.5%; p=0.001), and borderline significant decreases in perceived pain as moderate/severe (45.5% to 38.2%; p=0.05). More than 90% of participants reported that the program helped them to achieve their-short term goals, motivated them to engage in healthier behaviors, and

  2. Development and Evaluation of the Curriculum for BOLD (Bronx Oncology Living Daily) Healthy Living: a Diabetes Prevention and Control Program for Underserved Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Beth A; Kahan, Michelle; Martinez, Melissa; Isaac, Kathleen; Rossi, Amerigo; Skyhart, Rebecca; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Moadel-Robblee, Alyson

    2015-09-01

    Underserved minority communities have few resources for addressing comorbidity risk reduction among long-term cancer survivors. To address this community need, we developed and piloted the Bronx Oncology Living Daily (BOLD) Healthy Living program, the first known diabetes prevention and control program to target cancer survivors and co-survivors in Bronx County, NY. The program aimed to facilitate lifestyle change and improve health-related quality of life (HRQoL) through weekly group nutrition education (60-90 min) and exercise (60 min) classes. We examined baseline characteristics of participants using simple descriptive statistics and evaluated program implementation and impact using the Reach, Efficacy, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework. The curriculum, which drew from the social-ecological framework and motivational and cognitive behavioral strategies, consisted of 12 culturally and medically tailored modules with options for implementation as a 12- or 4-week program. Seven programs (four 12 weeks and three 4 weeks in length, respectively) were implemented at five community site locations. Sixty-six cancer survivors and 17 cancer co-survivors (mean age 60.5 ± 10.2 years) enrolled in one of the programs. Most participants were female (95.2 %) minority (55.4 % black, 26.5 % Hispanic/Latino) breast cancer survivors (75.7 %). Median program attendance was 62.5 % and did not significantly differ by program length; however, 67.3 % of participants achieved ≥60 % attendance among the 12-week programs, compared to 41.9 % among the 4-week programs, and this difference was statistically significant (p = 0.02). Overall, participants reported significant pre/post improvements in perceived health as good/excellent (66.0 to 75.5 %; p = 0.001) and borderline significant decreases in perceived pain as moderate/severe (45.5 to 38.2 %; p = 0.05). More than 90 % of participants reported that the program helped them to achieve their

  3. Monitored daily ambulatory activity, inflammation, and oxidative stress in patients with claudication.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Andrew W; Parker, Donald E; Montgomery, Polly S; Blevins, Steve M; Teague, April M; Casanegra, Ana I

    2014-07-01

    We determined the association between daily ambulatory activity and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) and claudication. Patients with PAD (n = 134) limited by claudication were studied. Patients took 3275 ± 1743 daily strides for 273 ± 112 minutes each day, and their average daily cadence was 11.7 ± 2.7 strides/min. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein was significantly and negatively associated with the total number of daily strides (P < .001), total daily ambulatory time (P < .01), peak activity index (P < .01), daily average cadence (P < .05), and the maximum cadences for 60 minutes (P < .05), 30 minutes (P < .05), 20 minutes (P < .05), and 5 minutes (P < .01). Oxidized low-density lipoprotein and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 were not significantly associated with any of the ambulatory measures (P > .05). We conclude that higher levels of community-based, daily ambulatory activity are associated with lower levels of inflammation but are not associated with markers of oxidative stress.

  4. Functional capacity and assistance from the caregiver during daily activities in Brazilian children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cerebral Palsy (CP) presents changes in posture and movement as a core characteristic, which requires multiprofessional clinical treatments during children’s habilitation or rehabilitation. Besides clinical treatment, it is fundamental that professionals use evaluation systems to quantify the difficulties presented to the individual and their families in their daily lives. We aimed to investigate the functional capacity of individuals with CP and the amount of assistance required by the caregiver in day-to-day activities. Methods Twenty patients with CP, six-year-old on average, were evaluated. The Pediatric Evaluation Inventory of Incapacities was used (PEDI - Pediatric Evaluation Disability Inventory), a system adapted for Brazil that evaluates child's dysfunction in three 3 dimensions: self-care, mobility and social function. To compare the three areas, repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used. Results We found the following results regarding the functional capacity of children: self-care, 27.4%, ±17.5; mobility, 25.8%, ±33.3 and social function, 36.3%, ±27.7. The results of the demand of aid from the caregiver according to each dimension were: self-care, 9.7%, ±19.9; mobility, 14.1%, ± 20.9 and social function, 19.8%, ±26.1. Conclusion We indicated that there was no difference between the performance of the subjects in areas of self-care, mobility and social function considering the functional skills and assistance required by the caregiver. PMID:23302576

  5. The Relating Level of Teacher Candidates Based on Scientific Information with Their Daily Lives: A Case of Ataturk and Caucasian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurt, Murat

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine and compare candidate teachers' level of relating scientific information with their daily lives. The teachers were studying in the 1st and 4th classes in Atatürk and Caucasian Universities, Education Faculty, Elementary School Science Teaching Department during the 2012-2013 academic year. The research was…

  6. Effects of a Peer-Mediated Literacy Based Behavioral Intervention on the Acquisition and Maintenance of Daily Living Skills in Adolescents with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Michael P.; Honsberger, Christine; Cadette, Jessica; Honsberger, Toby

    2016-01-01

    Many adolescents with disabilities do not independently perform the daily living skills needed to be successful in typical community environments. Literacy Based Behavioral Interventions have been effective in promoting skill acquisition and maintenance in some learners, but have yet to be implemented to teach basic self-care skills. Also, LBBIs…

  7. Use of Video Modeling and Video Prompting Interventions for Teaching Daily Living Skills to Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Stephanie; Wolfe, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Identifying methods to increase the independent functioning of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is vital in enhancing their quality of life; teaching students with ASD daily living skills can foster independent functioning. This review examines interventions that implement video modeling and/or prompting to teach individuals with…

  8. Using a Hero as a Model in Video Instruction to Improve the Daily Living Skills of an Elementary-Aged Student with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohtake, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    The present pilot study investigated the impact of video hero modelling (VHM) on the daily living skills of an elementary-aged student with autism spectrum disorder. The VHM, in which a character much admired by the student exhibited a correct response, was shown to the participant immediately before the situation where he needed to exhibit the…

  9. Effects of daily schedules of forced activity on free-running rhythms in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mistlberger, R E

    1991-01-01

    Circadian rhythms of hamsters can be phase-shifted or entrained by single or daily sessions of induced wheel running. In contrast, observations of rats under restricted-feeding schedules suggest that their free-running rhythms are not readily entrainable by a daily bout of intense activity. A formal test of this idea was made by subjecting rats to daily 2-hr or 3-hr sessions of forced treadmill activity. None of 18 rats entrained to a daily treadmill schedule when tested in constant dim light, but 1 of 16 did entrain when tested after blinding, when the period of its free-running activity rhythm was very close to the period of the treadmill schedule and when the onset of its daily active phase overlapped with the treadmill sessions. These conditions were recreated in a final group of eight rats; the rats were trained in a light-dark cycle, blinded, and subjected to a treadmill schedule with a period of 23.91 hr that was initiated at the onset of the rats' active phase on day 1. Six of these rats entrained. The mechanism for entrainment by activity schedules clearly exists in rats, but the conditions under which this occurs are highly constrained, suggesting that activity is a very weak zeitgeber in this species. It is argued that the evolution of functionally separable food- and light-entrainable oscillators in the rat demands a very low sensitivity to feedback effects of activity.

  10. Music Is Key to Active, Happy Lives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Elizabeth

    1995-01-01

    Encapsulates a series of verbatim statements made by young musicians about the joy music has brought to their lives. The musicians, all students at Black Mountain Middle School in San Diego, California, exhibit a wide range of responses discussing their commitment, hard work, and sense of accomplishment. (MJP)

  11. Partnerships for progress in active living: from research to action

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The theme for the 2011 Active Living Research Annual Conference was "Partnerships for Progress in Active Living: From Research to Action." The rationale for this theme was simple: no person is an island. The theme recognizes that partnerships are essential to identify and implement solutions for co...

  12. Citizens' visions on active assisted living.

    PubMed

    Gudowsky, Niklas; Sotoudeh, Mahshid

    2015-01-01

    People aged 65 years and older are the fastest growing section of the population in many countries. Great hopes are projected on technology to support solutions for many of the challenges arising from this trend, thus making our lives more independent, more efficient and safer with a higher quality of life. But, as research and innovation ventures are often closely linked to the market, their focus may lead to biased planning in research and development as well as in policy-making with severe social and economic consequences. Thus the main research question concerned desirable settings of ageing in the future from different perspectives. The participatory foresight study CIVISTI-AAL cross-linked knowledge of lay persons, experts and stakeholders to include a wide variety of perspectives and values into productive long-term planning of research and development. Results include citizens' visions for autonomous living in 2050, implicitly and explicitly containing basic needs towards technological, social and organizational development as well as recommendations for implementation. Conclusions suggest that personalized health and living environments play an important part in the lay persons' view of aging in the future, but only if technologies support social and organizational innovations and yet do not neglect the importance of social affiliation and inclusion.

  13. Effect of computerized cognitive rehabilitation program on cognitive function and activities of living in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Chanuk; Yong, Mi-Hyun; Chung, Jaeyeop; Yang, Yeongae

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to examine the effect of cognitive rehabilitation using a computer on cognitive function and activities of daily living in stroke patients presenting impairment of cognitive function. [Subjects] Forty-six stroke patients were divided into two groups (a training group and control group) through random assignment. [Methods] The training group received rehabilitation therapy and an additional computerized cognitive rehabilitation program using The RehaCom software 30 minutes/day, 5 times/week for 5 weeks. The control group received only rehabilitation therapy including physical and occupational therapy. A comparative analysis on all subjects was conducted before and after the experiment using a cognitive test and activities of daily living test. [Results] After 5 weeks of therapy, the training group presented statistically significant improvement in cognitive function assessment items of digit span, visual span, visual learning, auditory continuous performance, visual continuous performance, and others compared with the control group but did not present statistically significant improvement in activities of daily living. [Conclusion] It was revealed through this study that computerized cognitive rehabilitation with the RehaCom program results in improvement in cognitive function and can be used as a treatment tool beneficial to stroke patients presenting cognitive impairment.

  14. Effect of computerized cognitive rehabilitation program on cognitive function and activities of living in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Chanuk; Yong, Mi-hyun; Chung, Jaeyeop; Yang, Yeongae

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to examine the effect of cognitive rehabilitation using a computer on cognitive function and activities of daily living in stroke patients presenting impairment of cognitive function. [Subjects] Forty-six stroke patients were divided into two groups (a training group and control group) through random assignment. [Methods] The training group received rehabilitation therapy and an additional computerized cognitive rehabilitation program using The RehaCom software 30 minutes/day, 5 times/week for 5 weeks. The control group received only rehabilitation therapy including physical and occupational therapy. A comparative analysis on all subjects was conducted before and after the experiment using a cognitive test and activities of daily living test. [Results] After 5 weeks of therapy, the training group presented statistically significant improvement in cognitive function assessment items of digit span, visual span, visual learning, auditory continuous performance, visual continuous performance, and others compared with the control group but did not present statistically significant improvement in activities of daily living. [Conclusion] It was revealed through this study that computerized cognitive rehabilitation with the RehaCom program results in improvement in cognitive function and can be used as a treatment tool beneficial to stroke patients presenting cognitive impairment. PMID:26355244

  15. Daily body temperature rhythms persist under the midnight sun but are absent during hibernation in free-living arctic ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Williams, Cory T; Barnes, Brian M; Buck, C Loren

    2012-02-23

    In indigenous arctic reindeer and ptarmigan, circadian rhythms are not expressed during the constant light of summer or constant dark of winter, and it has been hypothesized that a seasonal absence of circadian rhythms is common to all vertebrate residents of polar regions. Here, we show that, while free-living arctic ground squirrels do not express circadian rhythms during the heterothermic and pre-emergent euthermic intervals of hibernation, they display entrained daily rhythms of body temperature (T(b)) throughout their active season, which includes six weeks of constant sun. In winter, ground squirrels are arrhythmic and regulate core body temperatures to within ±0.2°C for up to 18 days during steady-state torpor. In spring, after the use of torpor ends, male but not female ground squirrels, resume euthermic levels of T(b) in their dark burrows but remain arrhythmic for up to 27 days. However, once activity on the surface begins, both sexes exhibit robust 24 h cycles of body temperature. We suggest that persistence of nycthemeral rhythms through the polar summer enables ground squirrels to minimize thermoregulatory costs. However, the environmental cues (zeitgebers) used to entrain rhythms during the constant light of the arctic summer in these semi-fossorial rodents are unknown.

  16. Daily Physical Activity: A Handbook for Grades 1-9 Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online Submission, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Alberta Education has prepared this school handbook to help teachers and administrators select age-appropriate activities that can be done almost anytime and anywhere. The Daily Physical Activity (DPA) school handbook is designed to provide information, ideas and inspiration for developing a successful DPA plan. The handbook is divided into four…

  17. Gender Differences in the Daily Physical Activities of Danish School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Glen; Pfister, Gertrud; Andersen, Lars Bo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the daily physical activities of Danish children with a focus on describing and explaining gender differences. Accelerometer measurements of physical activity in different contexts, as well as questionnaire data, were collected from more than 500 children at pre-school and later at third grade. The study…

  18. Daily Physical Activity for Children and Youth: A Review and Synthesis of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Heidi

    2006-01-01

    A Daily Physical Activity (DPA) Initiative was implemented in all schools in Alberta starting in September 2005. The expected outcome of the DPA Initiative is to increase the activity levels and healthy habits of students and, in part, address related issues such as chronic disease. As part of the first tier of the DPA Initiative evaluation study,…

  19. The Status of Daily Physical Activity in Northern Ontario's Elementary Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickwood, Greg

    2015-01-01

    The importance of daily physical activity (DPA) for children and youth is highlighted in Canada's Active Healthy Kids annual report on fitness. Since 2005, this report has revealed that elementary-aged students are spending most of their waking hours stationary, in front of screens (phones, televisions, computers). To counteract this trend, the…

  20. The effects of the Columbia shuttle disaster on the daily lives of older adults: findings from the VA Normative Aging Study.

    PubMed

    Neupert, S D; Almeida, D M; Mroczek, D K; Spiro, A

    2006-05-01

    During 2002-2003 the VA Normative Aging Study conducted an eight-day diary survey of stressors and well-being. A sub-sample of 19 men and 13 women (mean age = 71.78) completed daily questionnaires before and after the Columbia shuttle exploded on 1st February 2003, presenting a unique look into peoples' daily lives before and after a tragic event. Results indicated no significant changes in negative affect or physical symptoms, but people reported significant decreases in both positive affect and memory failures on days following the shuttle explosion. Implications of these findings and directions for future research are discussed.

  1. Low-intensity daily walking activity is associated with hippocampal volume in older adults.

    PubMed

    Varma, Vijay R; Chuang, Yi-Fang; Harris, Gregory C; Tan, Erwin J; Carlson, Michelle C

    2015-05-01

    Hippocampal atrophy is associated with memory impairment and dementia and serves as a key biomarker in the preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease. Physical activity, one of the most promising behavioral interventions to prevent or delay cognitive decline, has been shown to be associated with hippocampal volume; specifically increased aerobic activity and fitness may have a positive effect on the size of the hippocampus. The majority of older adults, however, are sedentary and have difficulty initiating and maintaining exercise programs. A modestly more active lifestyle may nonetheless be beneficial. This study explored whether greater objectively measured daily walking activity was associated with larger hippocampal volume. We additionally explored whether greater low-intensity walking activity, which may be related to leisure-time physical, functional, and social activities, was associated with larger hippocampal volume independent of exercise and higher-intensity walking activity. Segmentation of hippocampal volumes was performed using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain's Software Library (FSL), and daily walking activity was assessed using a step activity monitor on 92, nondemented, older adult participants. After controlling for age, education, body mass index, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and the Mini Mental State Exam, we found that a greater amount, duration, and frequency of total daily walking activity were each associated with larger hippocampal volume among older women, but not among men. These relationships were specific to hippocampal volume, compared with the thalamus, used as a control brain region, and remained significant for low-intensity walking activity, independent of moderate- to vigorous-intensity activity and self-reported exercise. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to explore the relationship between objectively measured daily walking activity and hippocampal volume in an older adult population. Findings

  2. [Long-term evacuation after the nuclear accident in Fukushima ~Different daily living under low-dose radioactive suffering~].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kazunobu

    2013-01-01

    One year has passed since the Great East Japan Earthquake and the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant accident. Even currently, more than 150,000 evacuees in Fukushima Prefecture are forced to leave their home and to move throughout Japan. Because of the limited space of temporary housing and the weakening of personal ties in local communities, many families need to move and have separate lives. As a consequence, Fukushima has a serious shortage of caregivers for the elderly. There have been more than 1,300 disaster-related deaths due to shock and stress after long-distance drifts from town to town. Most of the victims were the elderly, who collapsed, caught pneumonia, suffered stroke and heart attack. Concerns about the safety of low-dose radiation exposure deprived the elderly of important contact with playing outside with their grandchildren in Fukushima. Fear of invisible radioactive contamination inactivated outdoor activities such as farming, dairy, fishing, gardening, hiking and wild-vegetable/mushroom hunting, although most of these activities have been traditionally supported by the wisdom of the elderly. Several recent questionnaire investigations revealed that older evacuees wish to go home even if the environment has significant contamination. In contrast, more than half of younger generation with small children have a different attitude. Nuclear accident brought serious social pains although it did not acutely hurt our bodies.

  3. Pain mediates the association between physical activity and the impact of fibromyalgia on daily function.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Masataka; Corbin, Lisa W; Maluf, Katrina S

    2015-01-01

    This study quantified the association between recreational physical activity and daily function in women with fibromyalgia, and determined if this association is mediated by symptoms of pain, depression, or body mass. Twenty-three women diagnosed with fibromyalgia participated in an observational survey study. Recreational physical activity and the impact of fibromyalgia on daily function were assessed using the sport and leisure time physical activity subscales of the Baecke Physical Activity Questionnaire (BPAQ) and the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), respectively. Potential mediators of the association between physical activity and daily function were assessed using the Visual Analogue Scale for pain intensity (VAS-Pain), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and body mass index (BMI). BPAQ was inversely associated with FIQ (R (2) = 0.20) and VAS-Pain (R (2) = 0.39). VAS-Pain was positively associated with FIQ (R (2) = 0.23). The inverse association between BPAQ and FIQ was no longer significant after controlling for VAS-Pain. BDI was positively associated with FIQ (R (2) = 0.37), whereas BMI was not. BPAQ was not significantly associated with either BDI or BMI. These results indicate that the intensity of musculoskeletal pain, rather than depressive symptoms or body mass, mediates the association between physical activity and daily function among women with fibromyalgia.

  4. Daily and seasonal activity patterns of free range South-American rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus).

    PubMed

    Tozetti, Alexandro M; Martins, Marcio

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed at describing daily and seasonal variation in the activity of a population of South-American rattlesnakes (Crotalus durissus) in a savanna like habitat (Cerrado) in Southeastern Brazil. Seasonal and daily activities of snakes were evaluated by the number of captures of snakes during road surveys, accidental encounters, and relocations by radio-tracking. Our results show that climatic variables such as air temperature and rainfall have little influence on the activity pattern of rattlesnakes. Our findings indicate that rattlesnakes spend most of the day resting and most of the night in ambush posture. The South-American rattlesnake is active throughout the year with a discrete peak in activity of males during the matting season. The possibility of maintaining activity levels even during the coldest and driest season can facilitate the colonization of several habitats in South America. This possibility currently facilitates the colonization of deforested areas by rattlesnakes.

  5. Prevalence of functional disability in activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and associated factors, as predictors of morbidity and mortality.

    PubMed

    Millán-Calenti, José C; Tubío, Javier; Pita-Fernández, Salvador; González-Abraldes, Isabel; Lorenzo, Trinidad; Fernández-Arruty, Teresa; Maseda, Ana

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to establish the existing relationship among variables referred to the person, specifically age and gender, and the functional dependence in basic ADL and in IADL, as well as the possible relationship it has with the increase of morbidity and mortality in a random sample of 598 individuals older than 65 years. Of these individuals, 34.6% were categorized as dependent for at least one ADL, and 53.5% if we refer to IADL. Regarding the ADL, the risk of dependence increases (odds ratio=OR=1.089) per year of age, (OR=2.48) in women's case; while there is an IADL correlation between age and the score (r=-0.527; p<0.001). A relationship exists between dependence and the days of hospitalization (for ADL: r=-0.12, p=0.018 and IADL: r=-0.97, p=0.003), the number of visits to the doctor (ADL: r=-0.27, p<0.001; IADL: r=-0.25, p<0.001) or the presence of concomitant pathologies such as dementia (ADL: p<0.001; IADL: p<0.001). There is a significant association between age, gender and dependence, as well as between dependence and morbidity and mortality, so that dependence could be used as a predictor of both.

  6. How many and which items of activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) are necessary for screening.

    PubMed

    Roehrig, Bernd; Hoeffken, Klaus; Pientka, Ludger; Wedding, Ulrich

    2007-05-01

    Geriatric assessment (GA) in elderly cancer patients serves as screening instrument to identify patients who are vulnerable or frail. To reduce the diagnostic burden for patients and caregivers, we asked how many and which items of ADL and IADL questionnaires are necessary to identify those patients with limitations in the sum score of ADL or IADL. Data of 327 elderly patients (age>or=60 years), of whom 27.9% had limitations in ADL and 36.0% in IADL score, were entered in a forward selection model. Four out of ten items of ADL identified 95.3% of patients with limitations in ADL. Two out of eight items of IADL identified 97.4% of patients with limitations in IADL. The combined use of these items recognised 98.5% of patients with limitations in ADL or IADL score. If ADL and IADL scores are used for screening, we recommend an abbreviated version with 6 instead of 18 items.

  7. An Evaluation of the Quality of Research on Evidence-Based Practices for Daily Living Skills for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ee Rea; Ganz, Jennifer B; Ninci, Jennifer; Neely, Leslie; Gilliland, Whitney; Boles, Margot

    2015-09-01

    This study presents a literature review of interventions for improving daily living skills of individuals with ASD. This review investigated the quality of the design and evidence of the literature base and determined the state of the evidence base related to interventions for improving daily living skills of individuals with ASD. Included studies were evaluated to determine the overall quality of the evidence for each design within each article, based on the What Works Clearinghouse standards for single-case experimental design (Kratochwill et al. 2010), adapted by Maggin et al. (Remedial Spec Educ 34(1):44-58, 2013. doi: 10.1177/0741932511435176 ). As a result, video modeling was found to be an evidence-based practice. Limitations and implications for future research and for practitioners are discussed.

  8. Accelerometer-measured daily physical activity related to aerobic fitness in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Dencker, Magnus; Andersen, Lars B

    2011-06-01

    Maximum oxygen uptake (VO(2PEAK)) is generally considered to be the best single marker for aerobic fitness. While a positive relationship between daily physical activity and aerobic fitness has been established in adults, the relationship appears less clear in children and adolescents. The purpose of this paper is to summarise recently published data on the relationship between daily physical activity, as measured by accelerometers, and VO(2PEAK) in children and adolescents. A PubMed search was performed on 29 October 2010 to identify relevant articles. Studies were considered relevant if they included measurement of daily physical activity by accelerometry and related to a VO(2PEAK) either measured directly at a maximal exercise test or estimated from maximal power output. A total of nine studies were identified, with a total number of 6116 children and adolescents investigated. Most studies reported a low-to-moderate relationship (r = 0.10-0.45) between objectively measured daily physical activity and VO(2PEAK). No conclusive evidence exists that physical activity of higher intensities are more closely related to VO(2PEAK), than lower intensities.

  9. Routine daily physical activity and glucose variations are strongly coupled in adults with T1DM.

    PubMed

    Farabi, Sarah S; Carley, David W; Cinar, Ali; Quinn, Lauretta

    2015-12-01

    Type 1 Diabetes (T1DM) is characterized by altered glucose homeostasis resulting in wide glucose variations throughout a 24-h period. The relationship between routine daily physical activity and glucose variations has not been systematically investigated in adults with T1DM. The objectives of this study were to characterize and quantify the relationship between routine daily activity and glucose variations in a small group of adults with T1DM. Adults with T1DM treated with an insulin pump were recruited for the study. Over a 3-day period, glucose variations were monitored with a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) and routine daily physical activity was assessed using an accelerometer-based physical activity-monitoring band. Simultaneous glucose and physical activity data for one 24-h period were used for analysis. Cross-correlation function and wavelet coherence analyses were employed to quantify the coupling between physical activity and glucose. Twelve subjects were included in the analysis. Cross-correlation function analysis revealed strong coupling between activity and glucose. Wavelet Coherence demonstrated that slower oscillations (120-340 min) of glucose and physical activity exhibited significantly greater coherence (F = 12.6, P < 0.0001) than faster oscillations (10 and 120 min). Physical activity and glucose demonstrate strong time and frequency-dependent coupling throughout a 24-h time period in adults with T1DM.

  10. Central neural regulation by adrenergic nerves of the daily rhythm in hepatic tyrosine transaminase activity

    PubMed Central

    Black, Ira B.; Reis, Donald J.

    1971-01-01

    1. In adrenalectomized fasted rats transection of the spinal cord at C7-C8 or placement of bilateral electrolytic lesions in the lateral hypothalamus when performed in the morning interrupted the daily rhythm of hepatic tyrosine transaminase by elevating low (AM) enzyme activities to high (PM) levels; lesions placed in PM did not affect the late afternoon rise in enzyme activity. 2. Bilateral thalamic lesions had no affect on enzyme activity. 3. The activity of hepatic catechol-O-methyl transferase was unaffected by hypothalamic lesions. 4. The lesion-evoked rise of tyrosine transaminase activity was abolished by exogenously administered norepinephrine. 5. Cycloheximide blocked the rise of tyrosine transaminase activity caused by hypothalamic lesions. 6. The results suggest that rhythmic activity of sympathetic nerves governed by lateral hypothalamus contribute to regulation of the daily rhythm in tyrosine transaminase by regulating the release of norepinephrine peripherally; norepinephrine may block the daily rise of enzyme by interfering with protein synthesis, possibly of new enzyme, by competing with pyridoxal co-factor. 7. It is proposed that alternating activity of sympathetic-adrenergic and vagal-cholinergic nerves to liver, controlled by the C.N.S., contribute to rhythmic activity of hepatic tyrosine transaminase. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:4400586

  11. Daily physical activity in young children and their parents: A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Cantell, Marja; Crawford, Susan G; Dewey, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about physical activity (PA) in young children and about the relationship between their PA and that of their parents. OBJECTIVE: The main purpose of the present study (Y-Be-Active) was to examine the daily PA levels of young children and their parents, and to explore the relationship between children’s and parents’ PA. METHOD: Fifty-four children (mean age 4.3 years) and their parents (54 mothers, mean age 35.8 years; 50 fathers, mean age 38.2 years) wore accelerometers for three weekdays and two weekend days. Parents also completed questionnaires on family sociodemographics and PA habits. RESULTS: Children spent most of their time in light PA. Almost all children attained 30 min of daily moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), and most boys and girls attained 60 min of daily MVPA on weekdays. Only 60% of fathers and approximately one-half of mothers attained 30 min of daily MVPA on weekdays and weekend days. Children’s and fathers’ PA were correlated on weekends. Few parents (20% to 30%) participated regularly in organised PA with their child. Fathers’ involvement in PA with their children was associated with higher MVPA in children. CONCLUSIONS: Many young children and parents did not meet current Canadian recommendations for daily PA. Parental involvement in PA with their young children, particularly the involvement of fathers, appeared to promote higher levels of MVPA in young children. PMID:23450045

  12. Variation in the daily rhythm of body temperature of free-living Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx): does water limitation drive heterothermy?

    PubMed

    Hetem, Robyn Sheila; Strauss, Willem Maartin; Fick, Linda Gayle; Maloney, Shane Kevin; Meyer, Leith Carl Rodney; Shobrak, Mohammed; Fuller, Andrea; Mitchell, Duncan

    2010-10-01

    Heterothermy, a variability in body temperature beyond the limits of homeothermy, has been advanced as a key adaptation of Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx) to their arid-zone life. We measured body temperature using implanted data loggers, for a 1-year period, in five oryx free-living in the deserts of Saudi Arabia. As predicted for adaptive heterothermy, during hot months compared to cooler months, not only were maximum daily body temperatures higher (41.1 ± 0.3 vs. 39.7 ± 0.1°C, P = 0.0002) but minimum daily body temperatures also were lower (36.1 ± 0.3 vs. 36.8 ± 0.2°C, P = 0.04), resulting in a larger daily amplitude of the body temperature rhythm (5.0 ± 0.5 vs. 2.9 ± 0.2°C, P = 0.0007), while mean daily body temperature rose by only 0.4°C. The maximum daily amplitude of the body temperature rhythm reached 7.7°C for two of our oryx during the hot-dry period, the largest amplitude ever recorded for a large mammal. Body temperature variability was influenced not only by ambient temperature but also water availability, with oryx displaying larger daily amplitudes of the body temperature rhythm during warm-dry months compared to warm-wet months (3.6 ± 0.6 vs. 2.3 ± 0.3°C, P = 0.005), even though ambient temperatures were the same. Free-living Arabian oryx therefore employ heterothermy greater than that recorded in any other large mammal, but water limitation, rather than high ambient temperature, seems to be the primary driver of this heterothermy.

  13. Daily and seasonal variations in radon activity concentration in the soil air.

    PubMed

    Műllerová, Monika; Holý, Karol; Bulko, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Radon activity concentration in the soil air in the area of Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics (FMPI) in Bratislava, Slovak Republic, has been continuously monitored since 1994. Long-term measurements at a depth of 0.8 m and short-term measurements at a depth of 0.4 m show a high variability in radon activity concentrations in the soil. The analysis of the data confirms that regular daily changes in radon activity concentration in the soil air depend on the daily changes in atmospheric pressure. It was also found that the typical annual courses of the radon activity concentration in the soil air (with summer minima and winter maxima) were disturbed by mild winter and heavy summer precipitation. Influence of precipitation on the increase in the radon activity concentration in the soil air was observed at a depth of 0.4 m and subsequently at a depth of 0.8 m.

  14. Factors in Daily Physical Activity Related to Calcaneal Mineral Density in Men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchinson, Teresa M.; Whalen, Robert T.; Cleek, Tammy M.; Vogel, John M.; Arnaud, Sara B.

    1995-01-01

    To determine the factors in daily physical activity that influence the mineral density of the calcaneus, we recorded walking steps and the type and duration of exercise in 43 healthy 26-to 51-yr-old men. Areal (g/sq cm) calcaneal bone mineral density (CBMD) was measured by single energy x-ray densitometry. Subjects walked a mean (+/- SD) of 7902(+/-2534) steps per day or approximately 3.9(+/-1.2) miles daily. Eight subjects reported no exercise activities. The remaining 35 subjects spent 143(2-772) (median and range) min/wk exercising. Twenty-eight men engaged in exercise activities that generate single leg peak vertical ground reaction forces (GRF(sub z)) of 2 or more body weights (high loaders, HL), and 15 reported exercise or daily activities that typically generate GRF(sub z) less than 1.5 body weights (low loaders, LL). CBMD was 12% higher in HL than LL (0.668 +/- 0.074 g/sq cm vs 0.597 +/- 0.062 g/sq cm, P less than 0.004). In the HL group, CBMD correlated to reported minutes of high load exercise (r = 0.41, P less than 0.03). CBMD was not related to the number of daily walking steps (N = 43, r = 0.03, NS). The results of this study support the concept that the dominant factor in daily physical activity relating to bone mineral density is the participation in site specific high loading activities, i.e., for the calcaneus, high calcaneal loads.

  15. Who Will Present It during the Broadcast? A Case Study at a Daily Activity Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichenberg, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The present study is an investigation of a daily activity centre (DA). The overall aim was to build a grounded theory that could explain why this particular DA deviated from the norms of Swedish group homes and DAs described in previous studies. These studies have suggested that the staff stuck to old routines, such as letting the participants…

  16. Brief Daily Writing Activities and Performance on Major Multiple-Choice Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Haley C.; Bliss, Stacy L.; Hautau, Briana; Carroll, Erin; Jaspers, Kathryn E.; Williams, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    Although past research indicates that giving brief quizzes, administered either regularly or randomly, may lead to improvement in students' performance on major exams, negligible research has targeted daily writing activities that require the processing of course information at a deeper level than might result from simply reading course materials…

  17. Seasonal and Daily Variation in Physical Activity among Three-Year-Old Finnish Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soini, Anne; Tammelin, Tuija; Sääkslahti, Arja; Watt, Anthony; Villberg, Jari; Kettunen, Tarja; Mehtälä, Anette; Poskiparta, Marita

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess seasonal, daily, and gender variations in children's physical activity (PA). ActiGraph GT3X accelerometers were used to record the three-year-old children's PA levels for five consecutive days in autumn and winter. Complete data for both seasons were obtained for 47 children. Despite a significant…

  18. Hand function and performance of daily activities in systemic lupus erythematosus: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Malcus Johnsson, P; Sandqvist, G; Nilsson, J-Å; Bengtsson, A A; Sturfelt, G; Nived, O

    2015-07-01

    This clinical study was performed to investigate hand problems in individuals with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in comparison with healthy controls, and to explore problems in the performance of daily activities related to these hand problems, in order to objectify findings from a previous mail survey. We also investigated whether a simple hand test could detect hand problems in SLE. All individuals, 71 with SLE and 71 healthy controls, were examined for manifestations in body structures and body functions of the hands with a study-specific protocol. The simple hand test was performed by all the individuals and the arthritis impact measurement scale (AIMS 2) questionnaire was completed by the SLE individuals. In the SLE group, 58% had some kind of difficulty in the simple hand test, compared with 8% in the control group. Fifty percent of the SLE individuals experienced problems in performing daily activities due to hand deficits. Pain in the hands, reduced strength and dexterity, Raynaud's phenomenon and trigger finger were the most prominent body functions affecting the performance of daily activities. Deficits in hand function are common in SLE and affect the performance of daily activities. The simple hand test may be a useful tool in detecting hand problems.

  19. Different categories of living and non-living sound-sources activate distinct cortical networks.

    PubMed

    Engel, Lauren R; Frum, Chris; Puce, Aina; Walker, Nathan A; Lewis, James W

    2009-10-01

    With regard to hearing perception, it remains unclear as to whether, or the extent to which, different conceptual categories of real-world sounds and related categorical knowledge are differentially represented in the brain. Semantic knowledge representations are reported to include the major divisions of living versus non-living things, plus more specific categories including animals, tools, biological motion, faces, and places-categories typically defined by their characteristic visual features. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify brain regions showing preferential activity to four categories of action sounds, which included non-vocal human and animal actions (living), plus mechanical and environmental sound-producing actions (non-living). The results showed a striking antero-posterior division in cortical representations for sounds produced by living versus non-living sources. Additionally, there were several significant differences by category, depending on whether the task was category-specific (e.g. human or not) versus non-specific (detect end-of-sound). In general, (1) human-produced sounds yielded robust activation in the bilateral posterior superior temporal sulci independent of task. Task demands modulated activation of left lateralized fronto-parietal regions, bilateral insular cortices, and sub-cortical regions previously implicated in observation-execution matching, consistent with "embodied" and mirror-neuron network representations subserving recognition. (2) Animal action sounds preferentially activated the bilateral posterior insulae. (3) Mechanical sounds activated the anterior superior temporal gyri and parahippocampal cortices. (4) Environmental sounds preferentially activated dorsal occipital and medial parietal cortices. Overall, this multi-level dissociation of networks for preferentially representing distinct sound-source categories provides novel support for grounded cognition models that may underlie

  20. Different categories of living and non-living sound-sources activate distinct cortical networks

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Lauren R.; Frum, Chris; Puce, Aina; Walker, Nathan A.; Lewis, James W.

    2009-01-01

    With regard to hearing perception, it remains unclear as to whether, or the extent to which, different conceptual categories of real-world sounds and related categorical knowledge are differentially represented in the brain. Semantic knowledge representations are reported to include the major divisions of living versus non-living things, plus more specific categories including animals, tools, biological motion, faces, and places—categories typically defined by their characteristic visual features. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify brain regions showing preferential activity to four categories of action sounds, which included non-vocal human and animal actions (living), plus mechanical and environmental sound-producing actions (non-living). The results showed a striking antero-posterior division in cortical representations for sounds produced by living versus non-living sources. Additionally, there were several significant differences by category, depending on whether the task was category-specific (e.g. human or not) versus non-specific (detect end-of-sound). In general, (1) human-produced sounds yielded robust activation in the bilateral posterior superior temporal sulci independent of task. Task demands modulated activation of left-lateralized fronto-parietal regions, bilateral insular cortices, and subcortical regions previously implicated in observation-execution matching, consistent with “embodied” and mirror-neuron network representations subserving recognition. (2) Animal action sounds preferentially activated the bilateral posterior insulae. (3) Mechanical sounds activated the anterior superior temporal gyri and parahippocampal cortices. (4) Environmental sounds preferentially activated dorsal occipital and medial parietal cortices. Overall, this multi-level dissociation of networks for preferentially representing distinct sound-source categories provides novel support for grounded cognition models that may

  1. Method and Apparatus for Monitoring of Daily Activity in Terms of Ground Reaction Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Robert T. (Inventor); Breit, Gregory A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A device to record and analyze habitual daily activity in terms of the history of gait-related musculoskeletal loading is disclosed. The device consists of a pressure-sensing insole placed into the shoe or embedded in a shoe sole, which detects contact of the foot with the ground. The sensor is coupled to a portable battery-powered digital data logger clipped to the shoe or worn around the ankle or waist. During the course of normal daily activity, the system maintains a record of time-of-occurrence of all non-spurious foot-down and lift-off events. Off line, these data are filtered and converted to a history of foot-ground contact times, from which measures of cumulative musculoskeletal loading, average walking- and running-specific gait speed, total time spent walking and running, total number of walking steps and running steps, and total gait-related energy expenditure are estimated from empirical regressions of various gait parameters to the contact time reciprocal. Data are available as cumulative values or as daily averages by menu selection. The data provided by this device are useful for assessment of musculoskeletal and cardiovascular health and risk factors associated with habitual patterns of daily activity.

  2. Dual Sensory Loss and Depressive Symptoms: The Importance of Hearing, Daily Functioning, and Activity Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Kiely, Kim M.; Anstey, Kaarin J.; Luszcz, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The association between dual sensory loss (DSL) and mental health has been well established. However, most studies have relied on self-report data and lacked measures that would enable researchers to examine causal pathways between DSL and depression. This study seeks to extend this research by examining the effects of DSL on mental health, and identify factors that explain the longitudinal associations between sensory loss and depressive symptoms. Methods: Piecewise linear-mixed models were used to analyze 16-years of longitudinal data collected on up to five occasions from 1611 adults (51% men) aged between 65 and 103 years. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D). Vision loss (VL) was defined by corrected visual acuity >0.3 logMAR in the better eye, blindness, or glaucoma. Hearing loss (HL) was defined by pure-tone average (PTA) >25 dB in the better hearing ear. Analyses were adjusted for socio-demographics, medical conditions, lifestyle behaviors, activities of daily living (ADLs), cognitive function, and social engagement. Results: Unadjusted models indicated that higher levels of depressive symptoms were associated with HL (B = 1.16, SE = 0.33) and DSL (B = 2.15, SE = 0.39) but not VL. Greater rates of change in depressive symptoms were also evident after the onset of HL (B = 0.16, SE = 0.06, p < 0.01) and DSL (B = 0.30, SE = 0.09, p < 0.01). The associations between depressive symptoms and sensory loss were explained by difficulties with ADLs, and social engagement. Conclusion: Vision and HL are highly prevalent among older adults and their co-occurrence may compound their respective impacts on health, functioning, and activity engagement, thereby exerting strong effects on the mental health and wellbeing of those affected. There is therefore a need for rehabilitation programs to be sensitive to the combined effects of sensory loss on individuals

  3. Window to the Past: An Archaeological Dig Offers a Look at the Daily Lives of Prehistoric Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Mary Alice

    1999-01-01

    An Ohio University summer field school spent 10 weeks unearthing a 2,000-year-old Adena Indian village site. The project gave important insights into Adena daily life and gave students an opportunity to learn archeological thinking skills and techniques through actual experience. (TD)

  4. Daily Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Life Daily Plan Activities Communication Food & Eating Music & Art Personal Care Incontinence Bathing Dressing & Grooming Dental Care ... About Us | News | Events | Press | Careers | Privacy Policy | Copyrights & Reprints | Contact Us National Headquarters Alzheimer's Association National ...

  5. Quantification of Cyclic Ground Reaction Force Histories During Daily Activity in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breit, G. A.; Whalen, R. T.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical models and experimental studies of bone remodeling suggest that bone density and structure are influenced by local cyclic skeletal tissue stress and strain histories. Estimation of long-term loading histories in humans is usually achieved by assessment of physical activity level by questionnaires, logbooks, and pedometers, since the majority of lower limb cyclic loading occurs during walking and running. These methods provide some indication of the mechanical loading history, but fail to consider the true magnitude of the lower limb skeletal forces generated by various daily activities. These techniques cannot account for individual gait characteristics, gait speed, and unpredictable high loading events that may influence bone mass significantly. We have developed portable instrumentation to measure and record the vertical component of the ground reaction force (GRFz) during normal daily activity. This equipment allows long-term quantitative monitoring of musculoskeletal loads, which in conjunction with bone mineral density assessments, promises to elucidate the relationship between skeletal stresses and bone remodeling.

  6. Nicotine-induced perturbations on heart rate, body temperature and locomotor activity daily rhythms in rats.

    PubMed

    Pelissier, A L; Gantenbein, M; Bruguerolle, B

    1998-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of nicotine on the daily rhythms of heart rate, body temperature and locomotor activity in unrestrained rats by use of implanted radiotelemetry transmitters. The study was divided into three seven-day periods: a control period, a treatment period and a recovery period. The control period was used for baseline measurement of heart rate, body temperature and locomotor activity. During the treatment period three rats received nicotine (1 mg kg(-1), s.c.) at 0900 h. Three rats received saline under the same experimental conditions. Heart rate, body temperature and locomotor activity were continuously monitored and plotted every 10 min. During the three periods a power spectrum analysis was used to determine the dominant period of rhythmicity. If daily rhythms of heart rate, body temperature and locomotor activity were detected, the characteristics of these rhythms, i.e. the mesors, amplitudes and acrophases, were determined by cosinor analysis, expressed as means +/- s.e.m. and compared by analysis of variance. Nicotine did not suppress daily rhythmicity but induced decreases of amplitudes and phase-advances of acrophases for heart rate, body temperature and locomotor activity. These perturbations might result from the effects of nicotine on the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the hypothalamic clock that co-ordinates biological rhythms.

  7. Physical Activity among Older People Living Alone in Shanghai, China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yu; While, Alison E; Hicks, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate physical activity among older people living alone in Shanghai, People's Republic of China, and key factors contributing to their physical activity. Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was administered in nine communities in Shanghai, using a stratified random cluster sample: 521 community-dwelling older people…

  8. Online Peer-to-Peer Communities in the Daily Lives of People With Chronic Illness: A Qualitative Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Kingod, Natasja; Cleal, Bryan; Wahlberg, Ayo; Husted, Gitte R

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative systematic review investigated how individuals with chronic illness experience online peer-to-peer support and how their experiences influence daily life with illness. Selected studies were appraised by quality criteria focused upon research questions and study design, participant selection, methods of data collection, and methods of analysis. Four themes were identified: (a) illness-associated identity work, (b) social support and connectivity, (c) experiential knowledge sharing, and (d) collective voice and mobilization. Findings indicate that online peer-to-peer communities provide a supportive space for daily self-care related to chronic illness. Online communities provided a valued space to strengthen social ties and exchange knowledge that supported offline ties and patient-doctor relationships. Individuals used online communities to exchange experiential knowledge about everyday life with illness. This type of knowledge was perceived as extending far beyond medical care. Online communities were also used to mobilize and raise collective awareness about illness-specific concerns.

  9. Improving assessment of daily energy expenditure by identifying types of physical activity with a single accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, A G; Plasqui, G; Goris, A H C; Westerterp, K R

    2009-09-01

    Accelerometers are often used to quantify the acceleration of the body in arbitrary units (counts) to measure physical activity (PA) and to estimate energy expenditure. The present study investigated whether the identification of types of PA with one accelerometer could improve the estimation of energy expenditure compared with activity counts. Total energy expenditure (TEE) of 15 subjects was measured with the use of double-labeled water. The physical activity level (PAL) was derived by dividing TEE by sleeping metabolic rate. Simultaneously, PA was measured with one accelerometer. Accelerometer output was processed to calculate activity counts per day (AC(D)) and to determine the daily duration of six types of common activities identified with a classification tree model. A daily metabolic value (MET(D)) was calculated as mean of the MET compendium value of each activity type weighed by the daily duration. TEE was predicted by AC(D) and body weight and by AC(D) and fat-free mass, with a standard error of estimate (SEE) of 1.47 MJ/day, and 1.2 MJ/day, respectively. The replacement in these models of AC(D) with MET(D) increased the explained variation in TEE by 9%, decreasing SEE by 0.14 MJ/day and 0.18 MJ/day, respectively. The correlation between PAL and MET(D) (R(2) = 51%) was higher than that between PAL and AC(D) (R(2) = 46%). We conclude that identification of activity types combined with MET intensity values improves the assessment of energy expenditure compared with activity counts. Future studies could develop models to objectively assess activity type and intensity to further increase accuracy of the energy expenditure estimation.

  10. High average daily intake of PCDD/Fs and serum levels in residents living near a deserted factory producing pentachlorophenol (PCP) in Taiwan: influence of contaminated fish consumption.

    PubMed

    Lee, C C; Lin, W T; Liao, P C; Su, H J; Chen, H L

    2006-05-01

    An abandoned pentachlorophenol plant and nearby area in southern Taiwan was heavily contaminated by dioxins, impurities formed in the PCP production process. The investigation showed that the average serum PCDD/Fs of residents living nearby area (62.5 pg WHO-TEQ/g lipid) was higher than those living in the non-polluted area (22.5 and 18.2 pg WHO-TEQ/g lipid) (P<0.05). In biota samples, average PCDD/F of milkfish in sea reservoir (28.3 pg WHO-TEQ/g) was higher than those in the nearby fish farm (0.15 pg WHO-TEQ/g), and Tilapia and shrimp showed the similar trend. The average daily PCDD/Fs intake of 38% participants was higher than 4 pg WHO-TEQ/kg/day suggested by the world health organization. Serum PCDD/F was positively associated with average daily intake (ADI) after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, and smoking status. In addition, a prospective cohort study is suggested to determine the long-term health effects on the people living near factory.

  11. Teaching Students with Developmental Disabilities Daily Living Skills Using Point-of-View Modeling plus Video Prompting with Error Correction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Stephanie J.; Wolfe, Pamela S.

    2015-01-01

    A primary goal of instruction for students with developmental disabilities is to enhance their future quality of life by promoting skill acquisition, which will enable them to live, function, and participate in the community. One instructional method that can help students with developmental disabilities improve independence in performing daily…

  12. Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Patterns of Participation in Daily Physical and Play Activities

    PubMed Central

    Memari, Amir Hossein; Panahi, Nekoo; Ranjbar, Elaheh; Moshayedi, Pouria; Shafiei, Masih; Kordi, Ramin; Ziaee, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) indicates several neurodevelopmental impairments which may end in impairments in motor or physical activities. Daily physical activity involvement was investigated in a total of 83 children (52 boys and 31 girls) with ASD aged 6–15 years. Results indicated that only 10 (12%) of children with ASD were physically active. Children were predominantly engaged in solitary play rather than social play activities. Gender, family income, and household structure were found to be associated with activity scores. Financial burden and lack of opportunities were noted as the leading barriers to physical activities. In conclusion, findings indicated a low rate of physical activity participation in children with ASD that is closely associated with sociodemographic variables. PMID:26171247

  13. Daily Physical Activity Is Associated with Subcortical Brain Volume and Cognition in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Alosco, Michael L; Brickman, Adam M; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Sweet, Lawrence H; Josephson, Richard; Griffith, Erica Y; Narkhede, Atul; Hughes, Joel; Gunstad, John

    2015-11-01

    Cognitive impairment in heart failure (HF) is believed to in part stem from structural brain alterations, including shrinkage of subcortical regions. Fortunately, neurocognitive dysfunction in HF can be mitigated by physical activity (PA), though mechanisms for this phenomenon are unclear. PA is protective against age-related cognitive decline that may involve improved structural integrity to brain regions sensitive to aging (e.g., subcortical structures). Yet, no study has examined the benefits of PA on the brain in HF and we sought to do so and clarify related cognitive implications. Fifty older adults with HF completed a neuropsychological battery and wore an accelerometer for 7 days. All participants underwent brain MRI. This study targeted subcortical brain volume given subcortical alterations are often observed in HF and the sensitivity of PA to subcortical structures in other patient populations. Participants averaged 4348.49 (SD=2092.08) steps per day and greater daily steps predicted better attention/executive function, episodic memory, and language abilities, p's<.05. Medical and demographically adjusted regression analyses revealed higher daily steps per day predicted greater subcortical volume, with specific effects for the thalamus and ventral diencephalon, p's<.05. Greater subcortical volume was associated with better attention/executive function, p<.05. Higher daily PA was associated with increased subcortical brain volume and better cognition in older adults with HF. Longitudinal work is needed to clarify whether daily PA can attenuate brain atrophy in HF to reduce accelerated cognitive decline in this population.

  14. Living on Active Volcanoes - The Island of Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heliker, Christina; Stauffer, Peter H.; Hendley, James W.

    1997-01-01

    People on the Island of Hawai'i face many hazards that come with living on or near active volcanoes. These include lava flows, explosive eruptions, volcanic smog, damaging earthquakes, and tsunamis (giant seawaves). As the population of the island grows, the task of reducing the risk from volcano hazards becomes increasingly difficult. To help protect lives and property, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory closely monitor and study Hawai'i's volcanoes and issue timely warnings of hazardous activity.

  15. Health-care encounters create both discontinuity and continuity in daily life when living with chronic heart failure-A grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Östman, Malin; Ung, Eva Jakobsson; Falk, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Living with chronic heart failure (CHF) often involves lifelong contact with health care, more or less frequently, depending on fluctuating health-generating disruptions in everyday life. To reduce the influence on continuity in life, health-care professionals should preferably focus on supporting patients in managing their daily lives, based on their perspective. The aim of this study was to describe how the interaction in health-care encounters contributes to either continuity or discontinuity in the daily life for persons with CHF. Interviews with 18 participants were carried out, using the grounded theory method, through data collection and analysis. Two core concepts were constructed from data which reveal a model that illuminates the characteristics of the encounters, the actions of health-care professionals and the normative discourse. Patient-centred agenda consists of the categories: "Experiencing a subordinate approach," "Objectifying during the encounter" and "Expected to be compliant." This describes how health-care professionals enhance discontinuity in daily life by using a paternalistic approach in the encounter. Person-centred agenda consists of the categories: "Experiencing an empowering approach," "Person-centredness during the encounter" and "Expected to be capable." It describes how participants perceive that health-care professionals enable them to deal with everyday life which enhances continuity. The findings highlight the importance of health-care professionals' attitudes and communication in encounters with patients. Health care must be designed to support and promote patients' own strategic thinking by strengthening their self-image to enhance continuity in everyday life. The experience of discontinuity is based on the prevailing health-care culture which focuses on disease and medical treatment and regards it as superior to the illness experience in an everyday life context. We therefore strongly suggest a paradigm shift in the health

  16. Time-based prospective memory functioning in mild cognitive impairment associated with Parkinson’s disease: relationship with autonomous management of daily living commitments

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Alberto; Zabberoni, Silvia; Peppe, Antonella; Serafini, Francesca; Scalici, Francesco; Caltagirone, Carlo; Carlesimo, Giovanni Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Prospective memory (PM), that is, the ability to keep in memory and carry out intentions in the future, is reported to be impaired in individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD). PM failure may be also associated with reduced daily living functioning in these patients. Little is known, however, about the relationship between mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and time-based PM functioning in PD patients and the possible impact of PM deficits on patients’ autonomy in daily living. Here we aimed to investigate whether MCI associated with PD affects time-based PM. We also wished to determine whether PM impairment accounts for reduced autonomous management of medication in these patients. Method: The study included 48 PD patients with MCI, 33 PD patients without cognitive disorders (PDN) and 20 healthy controls. The time-based PM procedure required that subjects perform an action after a fixed time. The PM procedure was incorporated in the standard neuropsychological assessment. One score was computed for the ability to retrieve the intention (prospective component) and one for remembering the action to be executed (retrospective component). The Pill Questionnaire was administered to assess the ability to manage medication. Results: PD patients with MCI performed less accurately in the PM procedure than HC and tended to perform poorer than PDN. Moreover, in PD patients with MCI, accuracy on the prospective component of the PM task and performance on the Modified Card Sorting Test significantly predicted the ability to manage medication. Conclusions: Results document that reduced efficiency of time-based PM processes in PD is specifically related to the presence of MCI. The same data indicate that PM weakness may be associated with impaired daily living functioning and decreased autonomy. PMID:26106317

  17. [Interaction between neuropsychological deficit in execution/ performance and ability to carry out daily activities in Alzheimer type dementia].

    PubMed

    Perea, M V; Ladera, V

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to establish whether the results obtained in a sample of 54 patients with alzheimer-type dementia, while carrying out different executive-praxia tasks is related to or influences the daily life and habits of these people, as analyzed on the Blessed dementia scale. The diagnosis of Alzheimer-type dementia was established on the criteria developed by the NINCDS-ADRDA. Physical, neurological, neuropsychological, EEG and tomo-densitometric examinations were done in all cases. Executive-praxia function was analyzed on 5 sub-scales; non-symbolic praxias, bucco-facial praxias, purposeless reflex praxias, reflex praxias with objects/instruments and praxias of ideas. There were significant differences depending on the praxias used. The more difficult tasks were evaluated by execution praxias involving ideational, non-symbolic executive praxias. The changes found on the subscale of activities of daily living were partly due to poor non-symbolic, ideatorial praxic execution and to a lesser extent to the poor results of the purposeless reflexive symbolic praxic execution and bucco-facial praxia. On the sub-scale of changes in habits, the non-symbolic praxias and ideatorial praxias explain the small percentage variation found on this sub-scale.

  18. Persons with moderate Alzheimer's disease use simple technology aids to manage daily activities and leisure occupation.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Renna, Caterina; Pinto, Katia; De Vanna, Floriana; Caffò, Alessandro O; Stasolla, Fabrizio

    2014-09-01

    Two studies assessed technology-aided programs to support performance of daily activities and selection/activation of music items with patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease. In Study I, four patients were presented with activity-related pictorial instructions via a computer fitted with inexpensive, commercial software. In Study II, four patients were (a) presented with different music options and (b) allowed to select and activate the preferred option via a microswitch response. Study I showed that each patient learned to perform the two activities available with percentages of correct responses exceeding 85 by the end of the intervention. Study II showed that all patients learned to choose and activate music options. Psychology students, employed in a social validation check, scored the patients' behavior within the program better than their behavior in a control situation. The relevance and usability of simplified pictorial-instruction programs and music choice programs for patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease were discussed.

  19. The promise of mHealth: daily activity monitoring and outcome assessments by wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Dobkin, Bruce H; Dorsch, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Mobile health tools that enable clinicians and researchers to monitor the type, quantity, and quality of everyday activities of patients and trial participants have long been needed to improve daily care, design more clinically meaningful randomized trials of interventions, and establish cost-effective, evidence-based practices. Inexpensive, unobtrusive wireless sensors, including accelerometers, gyroscopes, and pressure-sensitive textiles, combined with Internet-based communications and machine-learning algorithms trained to recognize upper- and lower-extremity movements, have begun to fulfill this need. Continuous data from ankle triaxial accelerometers, for example, can be transmitted from the home and community via WiFi or a smartphone to a remote data analysis server. Reports can include the walking speed and duration of every bout of ambulation, spatiotemporal symmetries between the legs, and the type, duration, and energy used during exercise. For daily care, this readily accessible flow of real-world information allows clinicians to monitor the amount and quality of exercise for risk factor management and compliance in the practice of skills. Feedback may motivate better self-management as well as serve home-based rehabilitation efforts. Monitoring patients with chronic diseases and after hospitalization or the start of new medications for a decline in daily activity may help detect medical complications before rehospitalization becomes necessary. For clinical trials, repeated laboratory-quality assessments of key activities in the community, rather than by clinic testing, self-report, and ordinal scales, may reduce the cost and burden of travel, improve recruitment and retention, and capture more reliable, valid, and responsive ratio-scaled outcome measures that are not mere surrogates for changes in daily impairment, disability, and functioning.

  20. The Promise of mHealth: Daily Activity Monitoring and Outcome Assessments by Wearable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Bruce H.; Dorsch, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Mobile health tools that enable clinicians and researchers to monitor the type, quantity, and quality of everyday activities of patients and trial participants have long been needed to improve daily care, design more clinically meaningful randomized trials of interventions, and establish cost-effective, evidence-based practices. Inexpensive, unobtrusive wireless sensors, including accelerometers, gyroscopes, and pressure-sensitive textiles, combined with Internet-based communications and machine-learning algorithms trained to recognize upper- and lower-extremity movements, have begun to fulfill this need. Continuous data from ankle triaxial accelerometers, for example, can be transmitted from the home and community via WiFi or a smartphone to a remote data analysis server. Reports can include the walking speed and duration of every bout of ambulation, spatiotemporal symmetries between the legs, and the type, duration, and energy used during exercise. For daily care, this readily accessible flow of real-world information allows clinicians to monitor the amount and quality of exercise for risk factor management and compliance in the practice of skills. Feedback may motivate better self-management as well as serve home-based rehabilitation efforts. Monitoring patients with chronic diseases and after hospitalization or the start of new medications for a decline in daily activity may help detect medical complications before rehospitalization becomes necessary. For clinical trials, repeated laboratory-quality assessments of key activities in the community, rather than by clinic testing, self-report, and ordinal scales, may reduce the cost and burden of travel, improve recruitment and retention, and capture more reliable, valid, and responsive ratio-scaled outcome measures that are not mere surrogates for changes in daily impairment, disability, and functioning. PMID:21989632

  1. Profile of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease classified as physically active and inactive according to different thresholds of physical activity in daily life

    PubMed Central

    Furlanetto, Karina C.; Pinto, Isabela F. S.; Sant’Anna, Thais; Hernandes, Nidia A.; Pitta, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To compare the profiles of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) considered physically active or inactive according to different classifications of the level of physical activity in daily life (PADL). Method Pulmonary function, dyspnea, functional status, body composition, exercise capacity, respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, and presence of comorbidities were assessed in 104 patients with COPD. The level of PADL was quantified with a SenseWear Armband activity monitor. Three classifications were used to classify the patients as physically active or inactive: 30 minutes of activity/day with intensity >3.2 METs, if age ≥65 years, and >4 METs, if age <65 years; 30 minutes of activity/day with intensity >3.0 METs, regardless of patient age; and 80 minutes of activity/day with intensity >3.0 METs, regardless of patient age. Results In all classifications, when compared with the inactive group, the physically active group had better values of anthropometric variables (higher fat-free mass, lower body weight, body mass index and fat percentage), exercise capacity (6-minute walking distance), lung function (forced vital capacity) and functional status (personal care domain of the London Chest Activity of Daily Living). Furthermore, patients classified as physically active in two classifications also had better peripheral and expiratory muscle strength, airflow obstruction, functional status, and quality of life, as well as lower prevalence of heart disease and mortality risk. Conclusion In all classification methods, physically active patients with COPD have better exercise capacity, lung function, body composition, and functional status compared to physically inactive patients. PMID:27683835

  2. Flow experience in the daily lives of older adults: an analysis of the interaction between flow, individual differences, serious leisure, location, and social context.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jinmoo; Lee, Youngkhill; Pedersen, Paul M; McCormick, Bryan P

    2010-09-01

    This study examined how serious leisure, individual differences, social context, and location contribute to older adults' experiences of flow - an intense psychological state - in their daily lives. The Experience Sampling Method was used with 19 older adults in a Midwestern city in the United States. Experience of flow was the outcome measure, and the data were analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling. Results indicated that location and employment status influenced the subjects' flow experience. Furthermore, the findings revealed that retirement was negatively related to experiencing flow, and there was a significant association between home and the flow experience. The results of this study enhance the understanding of flow experiences in the everyday lives of older adults.

  3. Motivation and intention to integrate physical activity into daily school life: the JAM World Record event.

    PubMed

    Vazou, Spyridoula; Vlachopoulos, Symeon P

    2014-11-01

    Research on the motivation of stakeholders to integrate physical activity into daily school life is limited. The purpose was to examine the motivation of stakeholders to participate in a world record physical activity event and whether motivation was associated with future intention to use activity breaks during the daily school life and future participation in a similar event. After the 2012 JAM (Just-a-Minute) World Record event, 686 adults (591 women; 76.1% participated for children <10 years) completed measures of motivational regulations and future intention to (a) use the activity breaks and (b) participate in the event. High intrinsic motivation and low extrinsic motivation and amotivation for participation in the next event were reported. Hierarchical regression analysis, controlling for age, gender, and occupation, showed that intrinsic forms of motivation positively predicted, whereas amotivation negatively predicted, future intention to participate in the event and use the activity breaks. Multivariate analyses of variance revealed that school-related participants were more intrinsically motivated and intended to use the activity breaks and repeat the event more than those who were not affiliated with a school. Nonschool participants reported higher extrinsic motivation and amotivation than school-related participants.

  4. In-vivo three-dimensional knee kinematics during daily activities in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Stanley E; Jones, Stephen C; Lewis, Daniel D; Banks, Scott A; Conrad, Bryan P; Tremolada, Giovanni; Abbasi, Abdullah Z; Coggeshall, Jason D; Pozzi, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    The canine knee is morphologically similar to the human knee and thus dogs have been used in experimental models to study human knee pathology. To date, there is limited data of normal canine 3D knee kinematics during daily activities. The objective of this study was to characterize 3D in-vivo femorotibial kinematics in normal dogs during commonly performed daily activities. Using single-plane fluoroscopy, six normal dogs were imaged performing walk, trot, sit, and stair ascent activities. CT-generated bone models were used for kinematic measurement using a 3D-to-2D model registration technique. Increasing knee flexion angle was typically associated with increasing tibial internal rotation, abduction and anterior translation during all four activities. The precise relationship between flexion angle and these movements varied both within and between activities. Significant differences in axial rotation and coronal angulation were found at the same flexion angle during different phases of the walk and trot. This was also found with anterior tibial translation during the trot only. Normal canine knees accommodate motion in all planes; precise kinematics within this envelope of motion are activity dependent. This data establishes the characteristics of normal 3D femorotibial joint kinematics in dogs that can be used as a comparison for future studies.

  5. A nutritional intervention promoting a Mediterranean food pattern does not affect total daily dietary cost in North American women in free-living conditions.

    PubMed

    Goulet, Julie; Lamarche, Benoît; Lemieux, Simone

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of adopting a Mediterranean diet on dietary cost and energy density in free-living conditions. The 12-wk nutritional intervention consisted of 2 group courses and 7 individual sessions with a dietician in a sample of 73 healthy women. To evaluate the dietary response to the nutritional intervention, a registered dietician administered a FFQ at 0, 6, 12, and 24 wk. Total daily dietary cost was calculated using a price list including all items from the FFQ. Our findings indicated that daily energy cost evaluated at wk 12 vs. wk 0 [1046 +/- 217 vs. 967 +/- 192 kJ/Canadian dollars (CAN$), respectively, P = 0.18] and total daily dietary cost (8.61 +/- 2.13 vs. 8.75 +/- 2.50 CAN$/d per participant, respectively, P = 0.58) did not change. Total daily energy density at wk 12 decreased compared with wk 0 (2.56 +/- 0.76 vs. 2.20 +/- 0.67 kJ/g; P < 0.0001). Adherence to the Mediterranean diet led to increased cost related to vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts and seeds, canola/olive oil, whole grains, poultry, and fish (P < or = 0.01) and to reduced dietary cost for red meat, refined grains, desserts and sweets, and fast food (P < or = 0.008). In conclusion, these data suggest that adherence to a nutritional intervention program promoting the Mediterranean food pattern is not associated with increased daily dietary cost or energy cost but led to a reduction in energy density. Consequently, increased cost should not be considered a barrier to the promotion and adoption of a Mediterranean diet.

  6. Physical Activity in the Lives of Hong Kong Chinese Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ha, Amy S.; Macdonald, Doune; Pang, Bonnie O. H.

    2010-01-01

    To understand the physical activity culture in the lives of Hong Kong Chinese children and their parents, 48 young people between the ages 9 and 16 and their parents, with different socio-economic backgrounds and geographical locations, were interviewed for this study. By applying Confucianism and postcolonialism, this study aimed to investigate…

  7. Enhancing the Lives of Nursing Home Patients through Reading Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovelace, Terry

    This study investigated the use of reading activities in the enhancement of the lives of nursing-home patients. A special reading group was led by a reading specialist in weekly sessions. Patients voluntarily attended the one-hour sessions and read short selections supplied by the reading specialist. Patients ranged in age from 54 to 91. The…

  8. Effects of temperature and photoperiod on daily activity rhythms of Lutzomyia longipalpis (Diptera: Psychodidae)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Insect vectors have been established as models in Chronobiology for many decades, and recent studies have demonstrated a close relationship between the circadian clock machinery, daily rhythms of activity and vectorial capacity. Lutzomyia longipalpis, the primary vector of Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum in the New World, is reported to have crepuscular/nocturnal activity in the wild. However, most of these studies applied hourly CDC trap captures, which is a good indicative of L. longipalpis behaviour, but has limited accuracy due to the inability to record the daily activity of a single insect during consecutive days. In addition, very little is known about the activity pattern of L. longipalpis under seasonal variations of average temperature and day length in controlled laboratory conditions. Methods We recorded the locomotor activity of L. longipalpis males under different artificial regimes of temperature and photoperiod. First, in order to test the effects of temperature on the activity, sandflies were submitted to regimes of light/dark cycles similar to the equinox photoperiod (LD 12:12) combined with different constant temperatures (20°C, 25°C and 30°C). In addition, we recorded sandfly locomotor activity under a mild constant temperature (25°C with different day length regimes: 8 hours, 12 hours and 16 hours). Results L. longipalpis exhibited more activity at night, initiating dusk-related activity (onset time) at higher rather than lower temperatures. In parallel, changes of photoperiod affected anticipation as well as all the patterns of activity (onset, peak and offset time). However, under LD 16:08, sandflies presented the earliest values of maximum peak and offset times, contrary to other regimes. Conclusions Herein, we showed that light and temperature modulate L. longipalpis behaviour under controlled laboratory conditions, suggesting that sandflies might use environmental information to sustain their crepuscular

  9. Fluctuations in daily energy intake do not cause physiological stress in a Neotropical primate living in a seasonal forest.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Mota, Rodolfo; Righini, Nicoletta; Palme, Rupert

    2016-12-01

    Animals may face periods of nutritional stress due to short-term food shortage and/or low energy consumption associated with seasonal fluctuations in resource availability. We tested the hypothesis that periods of restricted macronutrient and energy intake result in energy deficits and physiological stress in wild black howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra) inhabiting seasonal tropical semi-deciduous forests. We conducted full-day follows of focal animals recording feeding rates, time spent feeding, and total amount of food ingested. We carried out nutritional analysis of foods collected from feeding trees and calculated the daily nutrient and energy intake of each focal individual. Fecal glucocorticoid metabolites (fGCM) of focal animals were used as an indicator of physiological stress. We found that fluctuations in daily energy intake across seasons did not have significant effects on fGCM of individuals. However, protein intake was negatively associated with fGCM, highlighting the interplay among macronutrients, metabolism, and the endocrine system. Fecal glucocorticoid metabolites were also positively related to fruit availability, but this relationship was most likely due to social stress associated with intergroup encounters and resource defense that occurred when preferred trees were fruiting. Behavioral strategies such as dietary shifts and nutrient mixing, and metabolic adaptations such as low energy expenditure allowed individuals to fulfill their minimum energy requirements even during periods of decreased resource availability and intake. The present study suggests that seasonal variations in food, macronutrient, and energy acquisition may have limited physiological costs for animals that exploit different types of plant resources such as howler monkeys.

  10. Oestradiol Exposure Early in Life Programs Daily and Circadian Activity Rhythms in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Royston, S E; Bunick, D; Mahoney, M M

    2016-01-01

    Hormone signalling during critical periods organises the adult circadian timekeeping system by altering adult hormone sensitivity and shaping fundamental properties of circadian rhythmicity. However, the timing of when developmental oestrogens modify the timekeeping system is poorly understood. To test the hypothesis that alterations in postnatal oestrogenic signalling organise adult daily activity rhythms, we utilised aromatase knockout mice (ArKO), which lack the enzyme required for oestradiol synthesis. ArKO and wild-type (WT) males and females were administered either oestradiol (E) or oil (OIL) daily for the first 5 postnatal days (p1-5E and p1-5OIL , respectively) because this time encompasses the emergence of clock gene rhythmicity and light responsiveness in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, a bilateral hypothalamic structure regarded as the 'master oscillator'. After sexual maturation, gonadectomy and exogenous oestradiol supplementation, locomotor parameters were assessed. We determined that altered oestrogenic signalling in early life exerts organisational control over the expression of daily and circadian activity rhythms in adult mice. Specifically, p1-5E reduced total wheel running activity in male and female ArKO and female WT mice but had no effect on WT male activity levels. In females, wheel running was consolidated by p1-5E to the early versus late evening, a phenomenon characteristic of male mice. The time of peak activity was advanced by p1-5E in WT and ArKO females but not males. P1-5E shortened the length of the active phase (alpha) in WT males but had no effect on ArKO males or females of either genotypes. Finally, p1-5E altered the magnitude of photic-induced shifts, suggesting that developmental oestrogenic signalling impacts adult circadian functions. In the present study, we further define both a critical period of development of the adult timekeeping system and the role that oestrogenic signalling plays in the expression of daily and

  11. Determinants of physical activity among Somali women living in Maine.

    PubMed

    Devlin, John T; Dhalac, Deqa; Suldan, Asha A; Jacobs, Ana; Guled, Khadija; Bankole, Kolawole A

    2012-04-01

    Somali women living in the US are at increased risk for chronic health conditions due to changes in lifestyle following immigration. Numerous barriers to physical activity have been reported in this population. Behavioral theory may inform the design of successful health interventions. We explored in focus groups the behavioral determinants of physical activity (theory of planned behavior, self-efficacy) among Somali women (N = 30). We found that most (two-thirds) subjects were sedentary, although women who had lived in the US for 10 years or longer were more likely to be active. Somali women recognize the health threat of physical inactivity, including high rates of obesity. Moral norms appear to be the major barrier to physical activity, due to prohibitions against exercising in public or in Western-style clothing. Taking moral norms into consideration should allow for the design of culturally-appropriate exercise programs that can address a major health threat in this vulnerable population.

  12. Exploring socioecological correlates of active living in retirement village residents.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Andrea; Wood, Lisa; Giles-Corti, Billie

    2014-01-01

    This study explored individual, social, and built environmental attributes in and outside of the retirement village setting and associations with various active living outcomes including objectively measured physical activity, specific walking behaviors, and social participation. Residents in Perth, Australia (N = 323), were surveyed on environmental perceptions of the village and surrounding neighborhood, self-reported physical activity, and demographic characteristics and wore accelerometers. Managers (N = 32) were surveyed on village characteristics, and objective neighborhood measures were generated in a Geographic Information System (GIS). Results indicated that built- and social-environmental attributes within and outside of retirement villages were associated with active living among residents; however, salient attributes varied depending on the specific outcome considered. Findings suggest that locating villages close to destinations is important for walking and that locating them close to previous and familiar neighborhoods is important for social participation. Further understanding and consideration into retirement village designs that promote both walking and social participation are needed.

  13. The Acute Relationships Between Affect, Physical Feeling States, and Physical Activity in Daily Life: A Review of Current Evidence.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yue; Shonkoff, Eleanor T; Dunton, Genevieve F

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, most studies investigating the acute relationships between affective and physical feeling states and physical activity were conducted in controlled laboratory settings, whose results might not translate well to everyday life. This review was among the first attempts to synthesize current evidence on the acute (e.g., within a few hours) relationships between affective and physical feeling states and physical activity from studies conducted in free-living, naturalistic settings in non-clinical populations. A systematic literature search yielded 14 eligible studies for review. Six studies tested the relationship between affective states and subsequent physical activity; findings from these studies suggest that positive affective states were positively associated with physical activity over the next few hours while negative affective states had no significant association. Twelve studies tested affective states after physical activity and yielded consistent evidence for physical activity predicting higher positive affect over the next few hours. Further, there was some evidence that physical activity was followed by a higher level of energetic feelings in the next few hours. The evidence for physical activity reducing negative affect in the next few hours was inconsistent and inconclusive. Future research in this area should consider recruiting more representative study participants, utilizing higher methodological standards for assessment (i.e., electronic devices combined with accelerometry), reporting patterns of missing data, and investigating pertinent moderators and mediators (e.g., social and physical context, intensity, psychological variables). Knowledge gained from this topic could offer valuable insights for promoting daily physical activity adoption and maintenance in non-clinical populations.

  14. The Acute Relationships Between Affect, Physical Feeling States, and Physical Activity in Daily Life: A Review of Current Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yue; Shonkoff, Eleanor T.; Dunton, Genevieve F.

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, most studies investigating the acute relationships between affective and physical feeling states and physical activity were conducted in controlled laboratory settings, whose results might not translate well to everyday life. This review was among the first attempts to synthesize current evidence on the acute (e.g., within a few hours) relationships between affective and physical feeling states and physical activity from studies conducted in free-living, naturalistic settings in non-clinical populations. A systematic literature search yielded 14 eligible studies for review. Six studies tested the relationship between affective states and subsequent physical activity; findings from these studies suggest that positive affective states were positively associated with physical activity over the next few hours while negative affective states had no significant association. Twelve studies tested affective states after physical activity and yielded consistent evidence for physical activity predicting higher positive affect over the next few hours. Further, there was some evidence that physical activity was followed by a higher level of energetic feelings in the next few hours. The evidence for physical activity reducing negative affect in the next few hours was inconsistent and inconclusive. Future research in this area should consider recruiting more representative study participants, utilizing higher methodological standards for assessment (i.e., electronic devices combined with accelerometry), reporting patterns of missing data, and investigating pertinent moderators and mediators (e.g., social and physical context, intensity, psychological variables). Knowledge gained from this topic could offer valuable insights for promoting daily physical activity adoption and maintenance in non-clinical populations. PMID:26779049

  15. Adults with X-linked agammaglobulinemia: impact of disease on daily lives, quality of life, educational and socioeconomic status, knowledge of inheritance, and reproductive attitudes.

    PubMed

    Winkelstein, Jerry A; Conley, Mary Ellen; James, Cynthia; Howard, Vanessa; Boyle, John

    2008-09-01

    Since many children with X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) can now be expected to reach adulthood, knowledge of the status of adults with XLA would be of importance to the patients, their families, and the physicians caring for these patients. We performed the current study in adults with XLA to examine the impact of XLA on their daily lives and quality of life, their educational and socioeconomic status, their knowledge of the inheritance of their disorder, and their reproductive attitudes. Physicians who had entered adult patients with XLA in a national registry were asked to pass on a survey instrument to their patients. The patients then filled out the survey instrument and returned it directly to the investigators. Adults with XLA were hospitalized more frequently and missed more work and/or school than did the general United States population. However, their quality of life was comparable to that of the general United States population. They achieved a higher level of education and had a higher income than did the general United States population. Their knowledge of the inheritance of their disease was excellent. Sixty percent of them would not exercise any reproductive planning options as a result of their disease. The results of the current study suggest that although the disease impacts the daily lives of adults with XLA, they still become productive members of society and excel in many areas.

  16. Comparison of impact on mood, health, and daily living experiences of primary caregivers of walking and non-walking children with cerebral palsy and provided community services support.

    PubMed

    Svedberg, Lena E; Englund, Erling; Malker, Hans; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet

    2010-05-01

    Many children with cerebral palsy (CP), especially non-walkers, were previously reported to have cold extremities, pain, sleeping disorders, constipation, and impaired well-being - besides accompanying impairments. Most children had had one or more of these symptoms for more than 1 year, and the symptoms were largely untreated. This study (1) describes mood, health, and daily life experiences of the children's parents; (2) explains impact that the child's impairments and symptoms have on the family; and (3) investigates community services support. Information in this study was gathered from parents of 106 children, ages 5-16, with CP, who lived in northern Sweden. Compared with parents of walkers, parents with non-walking children and several disorders were more frequently anxious for their children's physical and psychological health; often experienced restricted time for themselves; reported frequent daily living interferences; and stated that their health was affected due to the child's health. 10 percent of all families reported that their need of community services support was unmet. To improve health and to provide good community services support for the entire family, regular follow-up and evaluation of the child's treatment and family support are important.

  17. Variability and Stability in Daily Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity among 10 Year Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Sara; Gomes, Thayse Natacha; Borges, Alessandra; Santos, Daniel; Souza, Michele; dos Santos, Fernanda K.; Chaves, Raquel N.; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Maia, José A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Day-to-day variability and stability of children’s physical activity levels across days of the week are not well understood. Our aims were to examine the day-to-day variability of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), to determine factors influencing the day-to-day variability of MVPA and to estimate stability of MVPA in children. The sample comprises 686 Portuguese children (10 years of age). MVPA was assessed with an accelerometer, and BMI was computed from measured height and weight. Daily changes in MVPA and their correlates (gender, BMI, and maturity) were modeled with a multilevel approach, and tracking was calculated using Foulkes & Davies γ. A total of 51.3% of boys and 26.2% of girls achieved 60 min/day of MVPA on average. Daily MVPA was lower during the weekend (23.6% of boys and 13.6% of girls comply with the recommended 60 min/day of MVPA) compared to weekdays (60.8% and 35.4%, boys and girls, respectively). Normal weight children were more active than obese children and no effect was found for biological maturation. Tracking is low in both boys (γ = 0.59 ± 0.01) and girls (γ = 0.56 ± 0.01). Children’s MVPA levels during a week are highly unstable. In summary, boys are more active than girls, maturation does not affect their MVPA, and obese children are less likely to meet 60 min/day of MVPA. These results highlight the importance of providing opportunities for increasing children’s daily MVPA on all days of week, especially on the weekend. PMID:26262632

  18. Seasonal, daily activity, and habitat use by three sympatric pit vipers (Serpentes, Viperidae) from southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Marcelo C; Hartmann, Paulo A; Winck, Gisele R; Cechin, Sonia Z

    2014-04-25

    Viperid snakes are widely distributed in the South America and the greater distribution range of the family is found at the Crotalinae subfamily. Despite the abundance of this snakes along their geographic distribution, some ecological aspects remain unknown, principally at subtropical areas. In the present study, we evaluated the activity (daily and seasonal) and the use of the habitat by Bothrops diporus, B. jararaca and B. jararacussu, in an Atlantic Forest area at southern Brazil. We observed higher incidence of viperid snakes during the months with higher temperatures, while no snakes were found during the months with lower temperatures. The data suggest the minimum temperature as environmental variable with the greatest influence on the seasonal activity of this species. Considering the daily activity, we observed a tendency of snakes to avoid the warmest hours. Bothrops jararacussu tend to avoid open areas, being registered only inside and at the edges of the forest. We compared our results with previous studies realized at tropical areas and we suggest the observed seasonal activity as an evolutive response, despite the influence of the different environmental variables, according to the occurence region.

  19. Long-term effects of daily postprandial physical activity on blood glucose: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Håvard; Grindaker, Eirik; Rønnestad, Bent Ronny; Holmboe-Ottesen, Gerd; Høstmark, Arne Torbjørn

    2017-01-03

    Previous studies have shown that a bout of moderate or light postprandial physical activity effectively blunts the postprandial increase in blood glucose. The objective of this study was to test whether regular light postprandial physical activity can improve glycemia in persons with hyperglycemia or with a high risk of hyperglycemia. We randomized 56 participants to an intervention or a control group. They were diagnosed as hyperglycemic, not using antidiabetics, or were categorized as high-risk individuals for type 2 diabetes. The intervention group was instructed to undertake a minimum 30 min of daily light physical activity, starting a maximum of 30 min after a meal in addition to their usual physical activity for 12 weeks. The control group maintained their usual lifestyle. Blood samples were taken pre- and post-test. Forty participants completed the study and are included in the results. The self-reported increase in daily physical activity from before to within the study period was higher in the intervention group compared with control (41 ± 25 vs. 2 ± 16 min, p < 0.001). Activity diaries and accelerometer recordings supported this observation. The activity in the intervention group started earlier after the last meal compared with control (30 ± 13 vs. 100 ± 57 min, p = 0.001). There were no within- or between-group differences in any glycemic variable from pre- to post-test. In conclusion, the present study does not seem to support the notion that regular light postprandial physical activity improves blood glucose in the long term in persons with hyperglycemia or with high risk of hyperglycemia.

  20. Reliability and validity of daily physical activity measures during inpatient spinal cord injury rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Zbogar, Dominik; Eng, Janice J; Miller, William C; Krassioukov, Andrei V; Verrier, Mary C

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the test–retest reliability and convergent validity of daily physical activity measures during inpatient spinal cord injury rehabilitation. Design: Observational study. Setting: Two inpatient spinal cord injury rehabilitation centres. Subjects: Participants (n = 106) were recruited from consecutive admissions to rehabilitation. Methods: Physical activity during inpatient spinal cord injury rehabilitation stay was recorded on two days via (1) wrist accelerometer, (2) hip accelerometer if ambulatory, and (3) self-report (Physical Activity Recall Assessment for People with Spinal Cord Injury questionnaire). Spearman’s correlations and Bland–Altman plots were utilized for test–retest reliability. Correlations between physical activity measures and clinical measures (functional independence, hand function, and ambulation) were performed. Results: Correlations for physical activity measures between Day 1 and Day 2 were moderate to high (ρ = 0.53–0.89). Bland–Altman plots showed minimal bias and more within-subject differences in more active individuals and wide limits of agreement. None of these three physical activity measures correlated with one another. A moderate correlation was found between wrist accelerometry counts and grip strength (ρ = 0.58) and between step counts and measures of ambulation (ρ = 0.62). Functional independence was related to wrist accelerometry (ρ = 0.70) and step counts (ρ = 0.56), but not with self-report. Conclusion: The test–retest reliability and convergent validity of the instrumented measures suggest that wrist and hip accelerometers are appropriate tools for use in research studies of daily physical activity in the spinal cord injury rehabilitation setting but are too variable for individual use. PMID:27635252

  1. Develop a Prototype Personal Health Record Application (PHR-A) that Captures Information About Daily Living Important for Diabetes and Provides Decision Support with Actionable Advice for Diabetes Self Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Information About Daily Living Important for Diabetes and Provides Decision Support with Actionable Advice for Diabetes Self Care”. PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Develop a Prototype Personal Health Record Application (PHR-A) that Captures Information About Daily Living Important for Diabetes ...and Provides Decision Support with Actionable Advice for Diabetes Self Care 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-2-0196 5c. PROGRAM

  2. Drive for thinness, affect regulation and physical activity in eating disorders: a daily life study.

    PubMed

    Vansteelandt, Kristof; Rijmen, Frank; Pieters, Guido; Probst, Michel; Vanderlinden, Johan

    2007-08-01

    Using Ecological Momentary Assessment, the within patient associations between drive for thinness, emotional states, momentary urge to be physically active and physical activity were studied in 32 inpatients with an eating disorder. Participants received an electronic device and had to indicate at nine random times a day during 1 week their momentary drive for thinness, positive and negative emotional states and their urge to be physically active and physical activity. Multilevel analyses indicated that patients with higher mean levels for urge to be physically active were characterized by lower body mass index (BMI) and chronically negative affect whereas patients with higher mean levels for physical activity were characterized by lower BMI and higher dispositions for drive for thinness. In addition, within patient relations between drive for thinness and urge to be physically active were moderated by BMI and chronically negative affect whereas within patient relations between drive for thinness and physical activity were moderated by BMI. Finally, also positive emotional states were significantly associated with physical activity within patients. By using a daily process design, characteristics of physical activity were revealed that have not been identified with assessment methods that have a lower time resolution.

  3. Experience sampling and ecological momentary assessment for studying the daily lives of patients with anxiety disorders: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Walz, Laura C; Nauta, Maaike H; Aan Het Rot, Marije

    2014-12-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent. Symptoms may occur unpredictably (e.g., panic attacks) or predictably in specific situations (e.g., social phobia). Consequently, it may be difficult to assess anxiety and related constructs realistically in the laboratory or by traditional retrospective questionnaires. Experience sampling methods (ESM) and ecological momentary assessment (EMA) can deepen the understanding of the course of anxiety disorders by frequently assessing symptoms and other variables in the natural environment. We review 34 ESM/EMA studies on adult panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, post-traumatic stress disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder, as well as anxiety disorders in youth. Benefits of ESM/EMA for the study of anxiety disorders include generating insight into the temporal variability of symptoms and into the associations among daily affect, behaviors, and situational cues. Further, ESM/EMA has been successfully combined with ambulatory assessment of physiological variables and with treatment evaluations. We provide suggestions for future research, as well as for clinical applications.

  4. Social withdrawal of persons with vascular dementia associated with disturbance of basic daily activities, apathy, and impaired social judgment.

    PubMed

    Honda, Yukiko; Meguro, Kenichi; Meguro, Mitsue; Akanuma, Kyoko

    2013-01-01

    Patients with vascular dementia (VaD) are often isolated, withdrawn from society because of negative symptoms and functional disabilities. The aim of this study was to detect factors associated with social withdrawal in patients with VaD. The participants were 36 institutionalized patients with VaD. Social withdrawal was assessed with the social withdrawal of the Multidimensional Observation Scale for Elderly Subjects (MOSES). Possible explanatory variables were the MOSES items depression and self-care, Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument (CASI), apathy evaluation scale (AES), and Behavioral Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease Frequency-Weighted Severity Scale (BEHAVE-AD-FW). Multiple regression analyses were conducted for two groups: Analysis 1 was performed in all patients (N = 36) and Analysis 2 was performed in the patients with the ability to move by themselves (i.e., independent walking or independent movement with a cane or a wheelchair; n = 28). In Analysis 1, MOSES item social withdrawal was correlated with AES and MOSES item self-care. In Analysis 2, MOSES item social withdrawal was correlated with AES and CASI domain abstraction and judgment. Decreased social activities of VaD were not related to general cognitive function or depression. Disturbed activities of daily living (ADLs) for self-care may involve decreased frontal lobe function, indicating that comprehensive rehabilitation for both ADL and dementia are needed to improve the social activities of patients with VaD.

  5. Happier People Live More Active Lives: Using Smartphones to Link Happiness and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lathia, Neal; Sandstrom, Gillian M.; Mascolo, Cecilia; Rentfrow, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity, both exercise and non-exercise, has far-reaching benefits to physical health. Although exercise has also been linked to psychological health (e.g., happiness), little research has examined physical activity more broadly, taking into account non-exercise activity as well as exercise. We examined the relationship between physical activity (measured broadly) and happiness using a smartphone application. This app has collected self-reports of happiness and physical activity from over ten thousand participants, while passively gathering information about physical activity from the accelerometers on users' phones. The findings reveal that individuals who are more physically active are happier. Further, individuals are happier in the moments when they are more physically active. These results emerged when assessing activity subjectively, via self-report, or objectively, via participants' smartphone accelerometers. Overall, this research suggests that not only exercise but also non-exercise physical activity is related to happiness. This research further demonstrates how smartphones can be used to collect large-scale data to examine psychological, behavioral, and health-related phenomena as they naturally occur in everyday life. PMID:28052069

  6. A prospective, randomized, single-blinded trial on the effect of early rehabilitation on daily activities and motor function of patients with hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Bai, YuLong; Hu, YongShan; Wu, Yi; Zhu, Yulian; He, Qiang; Jiang, CongYu; Sun, LiMin; Fan, WenKe

    2012-10-01

    To investigate whether early rehabilitation has a positive impact on the recovery of the activities of daily living and motor function after intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke, 364 patients with hemorrhagic stroke were selected and randomly divided into a rehabilitation group and a control group. The rehabilitation group underwent a standardized, three-stage rehabilitation program. The control group was treated with standard hospital ward, internal medical intervention. The simplified Fugl-Myere assessment scale (FMA) and Modified Barthel Index (MBI) were administered at various time points. The magnitude of improvement was significantly higher in the rehabilitation group than in the control group for both the FMA (p<0.05) and MBI scores (p<0.05). The greatest improvement was observed in the first month post-stroke. Thus, our study shows that early rehabilitation can significantly improve the daily activities and motor functions of patients with stroke.

  7. Patterns of daily physical activity during school days in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mota, Jorge; Santos, Paula; Guerra, Sandra; Ribeiro, José C; Duarte, José A

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the weekday patterns of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in school children and adolescents and determine if there are periods of the day that are representative of their typical MVPA. The sample comprised 84 subjects (boys, n = 30; girls, n = 54), age 8-15 years old. Daily totals for the physical activity variables were calculated by summing the values from 13 hr of physical activity (PA) measurements (9:00-22:00), with 60-min time blocks comprising each day. The MVPA data values were categorized in four daily periods: morning (9:00-11:59), noon (12:00-14:59), late afternoon (15:00-17.59), and evening (18:00-21.59). Our data show that boys participated significantly more in MVPA than girls. Despite no clear patterns or differences among sex being found, girls showed higher percent of time engaged in MVPA during the morning and early afternoon periods (sum of two periods 51.0%), while boys' percent of time engaged in MVPA is higher at late afternoon and evening periods (sum of two periods 53.8%). The principal components analyses showed four distinct components that accounted for 67% of the variance, as follows: school hours (component 1); lunchtime and outside-school activities (component 2); morning time before school period (component 4); and period before bedtime (component 3) appear as distinct periods of the day. In conclusion, the present study shows that boys engaged more in MVPA than girls. Girls tend to be more active during school periods, while boys are more active after school.

  8. Activity Settings and Daily Routines in Preschool Classrooms: Diverse Experiences in Early Learning Settings for Low-Income Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuligni, Allison Sidle; Howes, Carollee; Huang, Yiching; Hong, Sandra Soliday; Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines activity settings and daily classroom routines experienced by 3- and 4-year-old low-income children in public center-based preschool programs, private center-based programs, and family child care homes. Two daily routine profiles were identified using a time-sampling coding procedure: a High Free-Choice pattern in which…

  9. The text telephone as an empowering technology in the daily lives of deaf people-A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Roos, Carin; Wengelin, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    Text-telephone technology (TTY) has been used for communication between deaf people since 1964. There is a gap in the scientific knowledge about the influence this may have had especially in relation to effective participation in society as well as the feeling of capability, confidence and collective meaningfulness. The aim of the present paper is, first, to disentangle the different aspects of TTY as an empowering artifact; and, second, to explore the role of TTY in their lives. To provide a framework for the empirical analysis, the paper draws on Empowerment Theory: personal control, a proactive approach to life, and a critical awareness of one's socio-political environment. Twenty-four people aged 16-64 with Swedish Sign Language (SSL) as their first language were interviewed. The findings indicate that the introduction of the TTY was of great importance for self-esteem, equality and independence. The findings show that feelings of empowerment are closely linked to language use and contextually driven, and it is in interaction between deaf and hearing that such feelings arise (or not). The results indicate the need for further research into Deaf people's use of other means of interacting, using modern technique for example in social digital media and interactive platforms.

  10. Relationship between physical activity and markers of oxidative stress in independent community-living elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Fraile-Bermúdez, A B; Kortajarena, M; Zarrazquin, I; Maquibar, A; Yanguas, J J; Sánchez-Fernández, C E; Gil, J; Irazusta, A; Ruiz-Litago, F

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between objective data of physical activity and markers of oxidative stress in older men and women. Participants were old adults, aged≥60years (61 women and 34 men) who were all capable of performing basic daily activities by themselves and lived on their own. To describe physical activity we used objective data measured by accelerometers which record active and sedentary periods during everyday life for five days. Determination of oxidative stress was conducted from three perspectives: determination plasma total antioxidant status (TAS), plasma antioxidant enzyme activities, i.e., glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and membrane lipid peroxidation (TBARS). In the group of women, those who met physical activity recommendations (WR) had lower level of TAS. In addition, the moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was negatively correlated with TAS. Simultaneously, MVPA was correlated with increase in the GPx antioxidant enzyme activity, and the counts per minute were positively correlated with CAT activity. In the group of men, the cpm and the MVPA were negatively correlated with lipid peroxidation while lifestyle physical activity was positively correlated with CAT activity. These findings suggest that MVPA in the elderly although it is related to a decrease in the TAS in women, induces adaptive increase in antioxidant enzyme activity and decreases lipid peroxidation in both women and men. These results suggest that at this time of life, it is not only the amount of physical activity performed that is important but also its intensity.

  11. Relation between sleep quality and daily physical activity in hemodialysis outpatients.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Shiori; Tsutou, Akimitsu; Shiotani, Hideyuki

    2014-03-28

    The purpose of this study was to examine the correlations among objective sleep variables, sleep-wake cycle parameters, and daily physical activity in hemodialysis patients and controls. Twenty-four hemodialysis patients (HD group) were compared with a control group consisting of 24 healthy participants matched for age, height, and weight. Sleep variables (total sleep time [TST], sleep efficiency [SE], sleep latency [SL], and waking after sleep onset [WASO]), sleep-wake cycle parameters (the sleep-wake cycle period and the peak of sleep-wake cycle variance), and daily physical activity (steps per day) for each participant were assessed by objective methods for two weeks. While there was no difference in TST between the two groups, the HD group showed a significantly increased SL (HD: 0:29±0:20 vs control: 0:16±0:13, p < 0.05) and WASO (HD: 2:21±1:00 vs control: 1:35±0:41, p<0.05) and decreased SE (HD: 67.1±13.6% vs control: 77.5±9.7%, p<0.01) compared to the control group. There was no significant difference in sleep-wake cycle period between the HD and control groups. However, the peak of sleep-wake cycle variance in the HD group (0.050±0.028) was significantly lower (t = 2.49, p<0.05) than in the control group (0.068±0.019). The number of daily steps taken in the HD group (4,774± 2,845 steps) was also significantly lower than in the control group (8,696± 3,047). The peak of sleep-wake cycle variance was significantly correlated with SE (r = 0.532, p<0.01), SL (r = -0.501, p<0.01), and WASO (r = -0.436, p<0.01), whereas the number of steps showed a weak correlation only with WASO (r = -0.308, p<0.05) among the objective sleep parameters. Our results suggest that sleep quality in HD patients may be more effectively improved by maintaining the regular 24-hour sleep-wake cycle rather than by increasing the amount of daily physical activity, indicating that intervention such as measures to prevent napping during hemodialysis sessions may prove effective in

  12. Health-care encounters create both discontinuity and continuity in daily life when living with chronic heart failure—A grounded theory study

    PubMed Central

    Östman, Malin; Ung, Eva Jakobsson; Falk, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Living with chronic heart failure (CHF) often involves lifelong contact with health care, more or less frequently, depending on fluctuating health-generating disruptions in everyday life. To reduce the influence on continuity in life, health-care professionals should preferably focus on supporting patients in managing their daily lives, based on their perspective. The aim of this study was to describe how the interaction in health-care encounters contributes to either continuity or discontinuity in the daily life for persons with CHF. Interviews with 18 participants were carried out, using the grounded theory method, through data collection and analysis. Two core concepts were constructed from data which reveal a model that illuminates the characteristics of the encounters, the actions of health-care professionals and the normative discourse. Patient-centred agenda consists of the categories: “Experiencing a subordinate approach,” “Objectifying during the encounter” and “Expected to be compliant.” This describes how health-care professionals enhance discontinuity in daily life by using a paternalistic approach in the encounter. Person-centred agenda consists of the categories: “Experiencing an empowering approach,” “Person-centredness during the encounter” and “Expected to be capable.” It describes how participants perceive that health-care professionals enable them to deal with everyday life which enhances continuity. The findings highlight the importance of health-care professionals’ attitudes and communication in encounters with patients. Health care must be designed to support and promote patients’ own strategic thinking by strengthening their self-image to enhance continuity in everyday life. The experience of discontinuity is based on the prevailing health-care culture which focuses on disease and medical treatment and regards it as superior to the illness experience in an everyday life context. We therefore strongly suggest a

  13. [Cognitive reserve in substance addicts in treatment: relation to cognitive performance and activities of daily living].

    PubMed

    Pedrero-Pérez, Eduardo J; Rojo-Mota, Gloria; Ruiz-Sánchez de León, José M; Fernández-Méndez, Laura M; Morales-Alonso, Sara; Prieto-Hidalgo, Ana

    2014-12-01

    Introduccion. El concepto de reserva cognitiva ha ido ganando interes en la medida en que se ha acumulado evidencia sobre su relacion con la resistencia del cerebro a declinar en su funcionamiento ante amenazas o alteraciones neurologicas. Aunque se ha estudiado en un gran numero de alteraciones (degenerativas, traumaticas, psicopatologicas), pocos trabajos relacionan la reserva cognitiva con la adiccion a sustancias, un proceso multidimensional con clara base neurologica. Objetivo. Explorar la reserva cognitiva de pacientes en tratamiento por adiccion a drogas, relacionandolo con su rendimiento cognitivo en pruebas neuropsicologicas y en actividades de la vida diaria. Pacientes y metodos. Muestra de 57 pacientes en tratamiento por adiccion a sustancias en un centro especifico. Se administraron el cuestionario de reserva cognitiva, la evaluacion cognitiva de Montreal y el inventario de sintomas prefrontales, y se recogieron variables relacionadas con la adiccion. Resultados. Se encontro una relacion positiva entre la reserva cognitiva y el tiempo de abstinencia, y negativa con la gravedad de la adiccion. Aparecieron diferencias significativas segun la reserva cognitiva en rendimiento neuropsicologico (especialmente en ciertos dominios cognitivos) y en actividades cotidianas. Conclusiones. La reserva cognitiva aparece como una variable relacionada con la adiccion y los deficits cognitivos que la acompañan; resulta ser una potencial diana de las actividades rehabilitadoras, vinculada al paradigma de enriquecimiento ambiental, como estrategia para potenciar la resistencia frente al deterioro cognitivo que favorece y mantiene la adiccion y para disminuir el potencial reforzador de la conducta de consumo.

  14. Dynamic Contact Mechanics on the Tibial Plateau of the Human Knee During Activities of Daily Living

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Susannah; Chen, Tony; Hutchinson, Ian D.; Choi, Dan; Voigt, Clifford; Warren, Russell F.; Maher, Suzanne A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant advances in scaffold design, manufacture, and development, it remains unclear what forces these scaffolds must withstand when implanted into the heavily loaded environment of the knee joint. The objective of this study was to fully quantify the dynamic contact mechanics across the tibial plateau of the human knee joint during gait and stair climbing. Our model consisted of a modified Stanmore knee simulator (to apply multi-directional dynamic forces), a two-camera motion capture system (to record joint kinematics), an electronic sensor (to record contact stresses on the tibial plateau), and a suite of post-processing algorithms. During gait, peak contact stresses on the medial plateau occurred in areas of cartilage-cartilage contact; while during stair climb, peak contact stresses were located in the posterior aspect of the plateau, under the meniscus. On the lateral plateau, during gait and in early stair-climb, peak contact stresses occurred under the meniscus, while in late stair-climb, peak contact stresses were experienced in the zone of cartilage-cartilage contact. At 45% of the gait cycle, and 20% and 48% of the stair-climb cycle, peak stresses were simultaneously experienced on both the medial and lateral compartment, suggesting that these phases of loading warrant particular consideration in any simulation intended to evaluate scaffold performance. Our study suggests that in order to design a scaffold capable of restoring ‘normal’ contact mechanics to the injured knees, the mechanics of the intended site of implantation should be taken into account in any pre-clinical testing regime. PMID:24296275

  15. Daily variation in the electrophysiological activity of mouse medial habenula neurones

    PubMed Central

    Sakhi, Kanwal; Belle, Mino D C; Gossan, Nicole; Delagrange, Philippe; Piggins, Hugh D

    2014-01-01

    AbstractIntrinsic daily or circadian rhythms arise through the outputs of the master circadian clock in the brain's suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) as well as circadian oscillators in other brain sites and peripheral tissues. SCN neurones contain an intracellular molecular clock that drives these neurones to exhibit pronounced day–night differences in their electrical properties. The epithalamic medial habenula (MHb) expresses clock genes, but little is known about the bioelectric properties of mouse MHb neurones and their potential circadian characteristics. Therefore, in this study we used a brain slice preparation containing the MHb to determine the basic electrical properties of mouse MHb neurones with whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology, and investigated whether these vary across the day–night cycle. MHb neurones (n = 230) showed heterogeneity in electrophysiological state, ranging from highly depolarised cells (∼ −25 to −30 mV) that are silent with no membrane activity or display depolarised low-amplitude membrane oscillations, to neurones that were moderately hyperpolarised (∼40 mV) and spontaneously discharging action potentials. These electrical states were largely intrinsically regulated and were influenced by the activation of small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels. When considered as one population, MHb neurones showed significant circadian variation in their spontaneous firing rate and resting membrane potential. However, in recordings of MHb neurones from mice lacking the core molecular circadian clock, these temporal differences in MHb activity were absent, indicating that circadian clock signals actively regulate the timing of MHb neuronal states. These observations add to the extracellularly recorded rhythms seen in other brain areas and establish that circadian mechanisms can influence the membrane properties of neurones in extra-SCN sites. Collectively, the results of this study indicate that the MHb may

  16. Seasonal and Daily Activity Patterns of Mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) Vectors of Pathogens in Northeastern Italy.

    PubMed

    Montarsi, Fabrizio; Mazzon, Luca; Cazzin, Stefania; Ciocchetta, Silvia; Capelli, Gioia

    2015-01-01

    The seasonal and daily activity of mosquito vectors of pathogens affecting animals and humans were studied in northeastern Italy at a site within the Po River Delta Park. A CDC-CO2 trap and a gravid trap were operated at 2-h intervals for 24 h every 15 d from May to October 2010. Overall, 5,788 mosquitoes comprising six species were collected, namely Culex pipiens L. (75.1% of total), Aedes caspius (Pallas) (15.2%), Aedes vexans (Meigen) (6.9%), Anopheles maculipennis s.l. Meigen (2.6%), Culiseta annulata (Schrank) (0.2%), and Culex modestus Ficalbi (<0.1%). The relative abundance of these species increased from May until the beginning of July and then decreased, disappearing at the beginning of October. The diel host-seeking patterns and oviposition site-seeking patterns were species specific and were differentially affected by the ecological variables recorded at the day and hour of mosquito collection or two weeks before collection. Knowledge of the seasonal and daily host-seeking patterns of mosquitoes highlights the time periods of the day and the seasons of potential exposure for animals and humans to mosquito-borne pathogens, therefore delineating the best time for the application of preventive measures. Furthermore, knowledge of the oviposition site-seeking activity of the mosquitoes optimizes the capture of gravid females, thereby enhancing the likelihood of detecting pathogens.

  17. AFS dynamics in a short-lived active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccarello, F.; Battiato, V.; Contarino, L.; Romano, P.; Spadaro, D.; Vlahos, L.

    2005-11-01

    In the framework of the study on active region emergence, we report the results obtained from the analysis of the short-lived (7 days) active region NOAA 10407. The data used were acquired during an observational campaign carried out with the THEMIS telescope in IPM mode in July 2003, coordinated with other ground- and space-based instruments (INAF-OACT, DOT, BBSO, MDI/SOHO, EIT/SOHO, TRACE). We determined the morphological and magnetic evolution of NOAA 10407, as well as the velocity fields associated with its magnetic structures. Within the limits imposed by the spatial and temporal resolution of the images analyzed, the first evidence of the active region formation is initially observed in the transition region and lower corona, and later on (i.e. after about 7 h) in the inner layers, as found in a previous analysis concerning a long-lived, recurrent active region. The results also indicate that the AFS formed in the active region shows typical upward motion at the AFS's tops and downward motion at the footpoints. The velocity values relevant to the upward motions decrease over the evolution of the region, similarly to the case of the recurrent active region, while we notice an increasing trend in the downflow velocity during the early phases of the time interval analyzed by THEMIS. On the other hand, the AFS preceding legs show a higher downflow than the following ones, a result in contrast with that found in the long-lived active region. The chromospheric area overhanging the sunspot umbra shows an upward motion of ˜ 2 km s-1, while that above the pores shows a downward motion of ~4 km s-1.

  18. Older Adults with Diabetes and Osteoarthritis and Their Spouses: Effects of Activity Limitations, Marital Happiness, and Social Contacts on Partners' Daily Mood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper, Susanne Olsen; Yorgason, Jeremy B.

    2009-01-01

    Using daily diary data from 28 later life couples where one spouse had diabetes and osteoarthritis, we examined crossover effects of target spouses' daily activity limitations and their partners' daily mood. On days when target spouses' daily activity limitations were higher than average, partners' positive mood decreased and negative mood…

  19. Gender Differences in Pain-Physical Activity Linkages among Older Adults: Lessons Learned from Daily Life Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Amy; Ashe, Maureen C.; DeLongis, Anita; Graf, Peter; Khan, Karim M.; Hoppmann, Christiane A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Many older adults know about the health benefits of an active lifestyle, but, frequently, pain prevents them from engaging in physical activity. The majority of older adults experience pain, a complex experience that can vary across time and is shaped by sociocultural factors like gender. Objectives. To describe the time-varying associations between daily pain and physical activity and to explore differences in these associations between women and men. Methods. One hundred and twenty-eight community-dwelling older adults aged 65 years and older were asked to report their pain levels three times daily over a 10-day period and wear an accelerometer to objectively capture their daily physical activity (step counts and minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity). Results. Increased daily step counts and minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity were associated with increased daily pain, especially among women. Confirming past literature and contrasting findings for daily pain reports, overall pain levels across the study period were negatively associated with minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity. Conclusions. Findings highlight that pain is significantly associated with physical activity in old age. The nature of this association depends on the time scale that is considered and differs between women and men. PMID:27445599

  20. Muscle metabolic function and free-living physical activity.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Gary R; Larson-Meyer, D Enette; Sirikul, Bovorn; Newcomer, Bradley R

    2006-11-01

    We have previously shown that muscle metabolic function measured during exercise is related to exercise performance and subsequent 1-yr weight gain. Because it is well established that physical activity is important in weight maintenance, we examined muscle function relationships with free-living energy expenditure and physical activity. Subjects were 71 premenopausal black and white women. Muscle metabolism was evaluated by (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during 90-s isometric plantar flexion contractions (45% maximum). Free-living energy expenditure (TEE) was measured using doubly labeled water, activity-related energy expenditure (AEE) was calculated as 0.9 x TEE - sleeping energy expenditure from room calorimetry, and free-living physical activity (ARTE) was calculated by dividing AEE by energy cost of standard physical activities. At the end of exercise, anaerobic glycolytic rate (ANGLY) and muscle concentration of phosphomonoesters (PME) were negatively related to TEE, AEE, and ARTE (P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis showed that both PME (partial r = -0.29, <0.02) and ANGLY (partial r = -0.24, P < 0.04) were independently related to ARTE. PME, primarily glucose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate, was significantly related to ratings of perceived exertion (r = 0.21, P < or = 0.05) during a maximal treadmill test. PME was not related to ARTE after inclusion of RPE in the multiple regression model, suggesting that PME may be obtaining its relationship with ARTE through an increased perception of effort during physical activity. In conclusion, physically inactive individuals tend to be more dependent on anaerobic glycolysis during exercise while relying on a glycolytic pathway that may not be functioning optimally.

  1. Daily physical activity and blood lactate indices of aerobic fitness in children.

    PubMed Central

    Welsman, J R; Armstrong, N

    1992-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between daily physical activity and aerobic fitness in 11-16-year-olds. Habitual physical activity was assessed in 28 boys (mean(s.d.) age 13.6(1.3) years) and 45 girls (mean(s.d) age 13.7(1.3) years) from minute-by-minute heart rate monitoring during 3 school days. Aerobic fitness was assessed by determining the percentage peak VO2 at blood lactate reference values of 2.5 and 4.0 mmol l-1 during incremental treadmill running. The 4.0 mmol l-1 level occurred at a mean(s.d.) value of 89(7)% peak VO2 in both boys and girls and mean(s.d.) values at the 2.5 mmol l-1 level were 82(9)% peak VO2 in girls. Mean(s.d.) percentage time with heart rates at or above 140 beats min-1 was 6(3)% in boys and 5(3)% in girls. Corresponding values for percentage time at or above 160 beats min-1 were 3(2) for boys and 2(1) for girls. The number of 10- and 20-min periods of activity with the heart rate sustained above the 140 and 160 beats min-1 thresholds were also totalled over the 3 days. No significant relationships were identified between percentage peak VO2 at the 2.5 or 4.0 mmol l-1 blood lactate reference levels and either percentage time or number of 10- or 20-min periods above 140 or 160 beats min-1 (P > 0.05). These results support the hypothesis that daily physical activity levels in 11-16-year-old children do not stress aerobic metabolism sufficiently to influence aerobic fitness. PMID:1490213

  2. Cardio-respiratory and daily activity monitor based on FMCW Doppler radar embedded in a wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Postolache, Octavian; Girão, Pedro Silva; Postolache, Gabriela; Gabriel, Joaquim

    2011-01-01

    Unobtrusive monitoring of the cardio-respiratory and daily activity for wheelchair users became nowadays an important challenge, considering population aging phenomena and the increasing of the elderly with chronic diseases that affect their motion capabilities. This work reports the utilization of FMCW (frequency modulated continuous wave) Doppler radar sensors embedded in a manual wheelchair to measure the cardiac and respiratory activities and the physical activity of the wheelchair user. Another radar sensor is included in the system in order to quantify the motor activity through the wheelchair traveled distance, when the user performs the manual operation of the wheelchair. A conditioning circuit including active filters and a microcontroller based primary processing module was designed and implemented to deliver the information through Bluetooth communication protocol to an Android OS tablet computer. The main capabilities of the software developed using Android SDK and Java were the signal processing of Doppler radar measurement channel signals, graphical user interface, data storage and Wi-Fi data synchronization with remote physiological and physical activity database.

  3. Higher daily physical activity is associated with higher osteocalcin levels in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Saydi E.; Frohnert, Brigitte I.; Thomas, William; Kelly, Aaron S.; Nathan, Brandon M.; Polgreen, Lynda E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exercise stimulates bone remodeling and improves insulin sensitivity (Si), even without associated weight loss. Osteocalcin (OCN), a bone-derived protein, is associated with improved Si. Purpose We examined how daily physical activity is associated with OCN and Si. Methods Physical activity was measured through questionnaires completed in Minneapolis from 2010 to 2012. A physical activity score (PAQsum) was calculated to quantify physical activity (range 1–5). OCN and bone specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP) were measured by ELISA. Si was measured by the insulin modified frequently sampled IV glucose tolerance test. Results The mean PAQsum value was 2.4 ± 0.8 in 47 participants (12–17.9 years old). PAQsum was positively associated with OCN (p = 0.006). Participants with PAQsum <  2 had significantly lower OCN levels compared to participants with PAQsum >  2 (p < 0.02). Obesity did not modify the association between PAQsum and OCN. There was no statistically significant association between PAQsum and Si or between OCN and Si, even after adjustment for percent body fat. Conclusions OCN is higher in more physically active individuals. More research is needed to clarify the relationship between OCN, physical activity and Si. PMID:26236583

  4. [The effect of daily exposure to low hardening temperature on plant vital activity].

    PubMed

    Markovskaia, E F; Sysoeva, M I; Sherudilo, E G

    2008-01-01

    Phenomenological responses of plants to daily short-term exposure to low hardening temperature was studied under chamber and field conditions. Experiments were carried out on cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), marigolds (Tagetes L.), and petunia (Petunia x hybrida) plants. The obtained data demonstrated a similar pattern of response in all studied plant species to different variants of exposure to low hardening temperature. The main features of plant response to daily short-term exposure to low hardening temperature include: a higher rate of increase in cold tolerance (cf. two- or threefold increase relative to constant low hardening temperature) that peaked on day 5 (cf. day 2 at constant low hardening temperature) and was maintained for 2 weeks (cf. 3-4 days at constant low hardening temperature); a simultaneous increase in heat tolerance (cf. twofold relative to constant low hardening temperature) maintained over a long period (cf. only in the beginning of the exposure to constant low hardening temperature); a sharp drop in the subsequent cold tolerance after plant incubation in the dark (cf. a very low decrease in cold tolerance following the exposure to constant low hardening temperature); a combination of high cold tolerance and high photochemical activity of the photosynthetic apparatus (cf. a low non-photochemical quenching at constant low hardening temperature); and the capacity to rapidly increase cold tolerance in response to repeated short-term exposures to low hardening temperature in plants grown outdoors (cf. a gradual increase after repeated exposure to constant low hardening temperature). Possible methods underlying the plant response to daily short-term exposure to low temperature are proposed.

  5. Active Cellular Mechanics and Information Processing in the Living Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M.

    2014-07-01

    I will present our recent work on the organization of signaling molecules on the surface of living cells. Using novel experimental and theoretical approaches we have found that many cell surface receptors are organized as dynamic clusters driven by active currents and stresses generated by the cortical cytoskeleton adjoining the cell surface. We have shown that this organization is optimal for both information processing and computation. In connecting active mechanics in the cell with information processing and computation, we bring together two of the seminal works of Alan Turing.

  6. Once daily versus three times daily mesalazine granules in active ulcerative colitis: a double-blind, double-dummy, randomised, non-inferiority trial

    PubMed Central

    Kruis, W; Kiudelis, G; Rácz, I; Gorelov, I A; Pokrotnieks, J; Horynski, M; Batovsky, M; Kykal, J; Boehm, S; Greinwald, R; Mueller, R

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the therapeutic equivalence and safety of once daily (OD) versus three times daily (TID) dosing of a total daily dose of 3 g Salofalk (mesalazine) granules in patients with active ulcerative colitis. Design: A randomised, double-blind, double-dummy, parallel group, multicentre, international, phase III non-inferiority study. Setting: 54 centres in 13 countries. Patients: 380 patients with confirmed diagnosis of established or first attack of ulcerative colitis (clinical activity index (CAI)>4 and endoscopic index ⩾4 at baseline) were randomised and treated. Interventions: 8-week treatment with either 3 g OD or 1 g TID mesalazine granules. Main outcome measures: Clinical remission (CAI⩽4) at study end. Results: 380 patients were evaluable for efficacy and safety by intention-to-treat (ITT); 345 for per protocol (PP) analysis. In the ITT population, 79.1% in the OD group (n = 191) and 75.7% in the TID group (n = 189) achieved clinical remission (p<0.0001 for non-inferiority). Significantly more patients with proctosigmoiditis achieved clinical remission in the OD group (86%; n = 97) versus the TID group (73%; n = 100; p = 0.0298). About 70% of patients in both treatment groups achieved endoscopic remission, and 35% in the OD group and 41% in the TID group achieved histological remission. About 80% of all patients preferred OD dosing. Similar numbers of adverse events occurred in 55 patients (28.8%) in the OD group and in 61 patients (32.3%) in the TID group, indicating that the two dosing regimens were equally safe and well tolerated. Conclusions: OD 3 g mesalazine granules are as effective and safe as a TID 1 g schedule. With respect to the best possible adherence of patients to the treatment, OD dosing of mesalazine should be the preferred application mode in active ulcerative colitis. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00449722 PMID:18832520

  7. The effect of low back pain on the daily activities of patients with lumbar disc herniation: a Turkish military hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Kose, Gulsah; Hatipoglu, Sevgi

    2012-04-01

    This study was performed to assess disability on daily living activities, which developed secondary to low back pain, in patients with lumbar disc herniation and treated either conservatively or surgically. The study was performed between November 2008 and June 2009. Visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to measure the intensity of pain, and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was used to assess the disability of the patients on daily living activities. Of the 112 patients, 55 were women and 57 were men. The mean age was 39.68 years for the conservative treatment group and 46.46 years the for surgical treatment group. In the pretreatment period, the patients who were selected for surgical treatment had higher VAS score and ODI than did the patients who were selected for conservative treatment. The disability areas that were reported in the pretreatment period were walking, sleeping, standing, and traveling for the surgical treatment group and self-care, sitting, and social life areas for the conservative treatment group. When the ODI and VAS score of the patients were statistically compared at the third month of posttreatment period, the scores were significantly low in the surgical treatment group. The disability areas that were reported at the third month of posttreatment period were weight lifting, self-care, and walking for the surgical treatment group and social life, sleeping, sitting, and standing for the conservative treatment group. This study found that patients with low back pain experience physical disabilities due to pain. Their daily living activities are affected by these disabilities and the intensity of pain affects the level of disability. Knowledge of the disability areas caused by low back pain plays an important role in the determination of nursing care and content of the education which will be offered to the patients. The use of scale on the patient's care is important to form a common language in nursing and to obtain evidence-based data

  8. Assessing Daily Physical Activity in Older Adults: Unraveling the Complexity of Monitors, Measures, and Methods.

    PubMed

    Schrack, Jennifer A; Cooper, Rachel; Koster, Annemarie; Shiroma, Eric J; Murabito, Joanne M; Rejeski, W Jack; Ferrucci, Luigi; Harris, Tamara B

    2016-08-01

    At the 67th Gerontological Society of America Annual Meeting, a preconference workshop was convened to discuss the challenges of accurately assessing physical activity in older populations. The advent of wearable technology (eg, accelerometers) to monitor physical activity has created unprecedented opportunities to observe, quantify, and define physical activity in the real-world setting. These devices enable researchers to better understand the associations of physical activity with aging, and subsequent health outcomes. However, a consensus on proper methodological use of these devices in older populations has not been established. To date, much of the validation research regarding device type, placement, and data interpretation has been performed in younger, healthier populations, and translation of these methods to older populations remains problematic. A better understanding of these devices, their measurement properties, and the data generated is imperative to furthering our understanding of daily physical activity, its effects on the aging process, and vice versa. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the highlights of the preconference workshop, including properties of the different types of accelerometers, the methodological challenges of employing accelerometers in older study populations, a brief summary of ongoing aging-related research projects that utilize different types of accelerometers, and recommendations for future research directions.

  9. Daily Activity and Nest Occupation Patterns of Fox Squirrels (Sciurus niger) throughout the Year

    PubMed Central

    Wassmer, Thomas; Refinetti, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The authors investigated the general activity and nest occupation patterns of fox squirrels in a natural setting using temperature-sensitive data loggers that measure activity as changes in the microenvironment of the animal. Data were obtained from 25 distinct preparations, upon 14 unique squirrels, totaling 1385 recording days. The animals were clearly diurnal, with a predominantly unimodal activity pattern, although individual squirrels occasionally exhibited bimodal patterns, particularly in the spring and summer. Even during the short days of winter (9 hours of light), the squirrels typically left the nest after dawn and returned before dusk, spending only about 7 hours out of the nest each day. Although the duration of the daily active phase did not change with the seasons, the squirrels exited the nest earlier in the day when the days became longer in the summer and exited the nest later in the day when the days became shorter in the winter, thus tracking dawn along the seasons. During the few hours spent outside the nest each day, fox squirrels seemed to spend most of the time sitting or lying. These findings suggest that fox squirrels may have adopted a slow life history strategy that involves long periods of rest on trees and short periods of ground activity each day. PMID:26963918

  10. Daily Activity Patterns of 2,316 Men and Women from Five Countries Differing in Socioeconomic Development

    PubMed Central

    Sani, Mamane; Refinetti, Roberto; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Pandi-Perumal, S. R.; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon A.; Dugas, Lara R.; Kafensztok, Ruth; Bovet, Pascal; Forrester, Terrence E.; Lambert, Estelle V.; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Luke, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Daily rhythmicity in the locomotor activity of laboratory animals has been studied in great detail for many decades, but the daily pattern of locomotor activity has not received as much attention in humans. We collected waist-worn accelerometer data from more than 2,000 individuals from five countries differing in socioeconomic development and conducted a detailed analysis of human locomotor activity. Body mass index was computed from height and weight. Individual activity records lasting 7 days were subjected to cosinor analysis to determine the parameters of the daily activity rhythm: mesor (mean level), amplitude (half the range of excursion), acrophase (time of the peak), and robustness (rhythm strength). The activity records of all individual participants exhibited statistically significant 24-hour rhythmicity, with activity increasing noticeably a few hours after sunrise and dropping off around the time of sunset, with a peak at 1:42 pm on average. The acrophase of the daily rhythm was comparable in men and women in each country but varied by as much as 3 h from country to country. Quantification of the socioeconomic stages of the five countries yielded suggestive evidence that more developed countries have more obese residents, who are less active, and who are active later in the day than residents from less developed countries. These results provide a detailed characterization of the daily activity pattern of individual human beings and reveal similarities and differences among people from five countries differing in socioeconomic development. PMID:26035482

  11. Functional characteristics of the rat jaw muscles: daily muscle activity and fiber type composition.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Nobuhiko; Sano, Ryota; Korfage, Joannes A M; Nakamura, Saika; Tanaka, Eiji; van Wessel, Tim; Langenbach, Geerling E J; Tanne, Kazuo

    2009-12-01

    Skeletal muscles have a heterogeneous fiber type composition, which reflects their functional demand. The daily muscle use and the percentage of slow-type fibers have been shown to be positively correlated in skeletal muscles of larger animals but for smaller animals there is no information. The examination of this relationship in adult rats was the purpose of this study. We hypothesized a positive relationship between the percentage of fatigue-resistant fibers in each muscle and its total duration of use per day. Fourteen Wistar strain male rats (410-450 g) were used. A radio-telemetric device was implanted to record muscle activity continuously from the superficial masseter, deep masseter, anterior belly of digastric and anterior temporalis muscles. The degree of daily muscle use was quantified by the total duration of muscle activity per day (duty time) exceeding specified levels of the peak activity (2, 5, 20 and 50%). The fiber type composition of the muscles was examined by the myosin heavy chain content of the fibers by means of immunohistochemical staining. At lower activity levels (exceeding 2 and 5% of the peak activity), the duty time of the anterior belly of digastric muscle was significantly (P < 0.01) longer than those of the other muscles. The anterior belly of digastric muscle also contained the highest percentage of slow-type fibers (type I fiber and hybrid fiber co-expressing myosin heavy chain I + IIA) (ca. 11%; P < 0.05). By regression analysis for all four muscles, an inter-muscular comparison showed a positive relationship between the duty time (exceeding 50% of the peak activity) and the percentage of type IIX fibers (P < 0.05), which demonstrate intermediate physiological properties relative to type IIA and IIB fibers. For the jaw muscles of adult male rats, the variations of fiber type composition and muscle use suggest that the muscle containing the largest amounts of slow-type fibers (the anterior belly of digastric muscle) is mainly

  12. The effect of total solar eclipse on the daily activities of Nasalis larvatus (Wurmb.) in Mangrove Center, Kariangau, East Kalimantan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sya Shanida, Sya; Hanik Lestari, Tiffany; Partasasmita, Ruhyat

    2016-11-01

    The total solar eclipse is an interesting phenomenon because the sun is covered by the moon. This phenomenon is like a night deception for animals, humans, and plants. One of the animals is Bekantan (Nasalis larvatus (Wurmb.)). Nasalis larvatus change its activity when this phenomenon occurs. The aims of the present study are (1) daily activity of Nasalis larvatus on total solar eclipse on March 9th, 2016 and (2) the effect of total solar eclipse on its activity in Mangrove Center, Kariangau, East Kalimantan. The adlibitum method was used in this study on Bekantan's adult female. The result shows that the total solar eclipse has considerable effect on the daily activity of Bekantan. During total solar eclipse, the activity of Bekantan significantly stopped. When the total solar eclipse finished, B